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Sample records for ulcer healing rates

  1. Molecular mechanisms of ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, A

    2000-04-01

    An ulcer in the gastrointestinal tract is a deep necrotic lesion penetrating the entire mucosal thickness and muscularis mucosae. Ulcer healing is an active process of filling the mucosal defect with proliferating and migrating epithelial and connective tissue cells. At the ulcer margin, epithelial cells proliferate and migrate onto the granulation tissue to cover (reepithelialize) the ulcer and also invade granulation tissue to reconstruct glandular structures within the ulcer scar. The reepithelialization and reconstruction of glandular structures is controlled by growth factors: trefoil peptides, EGF, HGF, bFGF and PDGF; and locally produced cytokines by regenerating cells in an orderly fashion and integrated manner to ensure the quality of mucosal restoration. These growth factors, most notably EGF, trigger cell proliferation via signal transduction pathways involving EGF-R, adapter proteins (Grb2, Shc and Sos), Ras, Raf1 and MAP (Erk1/Erk2) kinases, which, after translocation to nuclei, activate transcription factors and cell proliferation. Cell migration requires cytoskeletal rearrangements and is controlled by growth factors via Rho/Rac and signaling pathways involving PLC-gamma, PI-3 K and phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins. Granulation tissue develops at the ulcer base. It consists of connective tissue cells: fibroblasts, macrophages and proliferating endothelial cells forming microvessels under the control of angiogenic growth factors: bFGF, VEGF and angiopoietins, which all promote angiogenesiscapillary vessel formation, essential for the restoration of microvascular network in the mucosa and thus crucial for oxygen and nutrient supply. The major mechanism of activation of angiogenic growth factors and their receptor expression appears to be hypoxia, which activates hypoxia-inducible factor, which binds to VEGF promoter.

  2. Maintenance therapy with sucralfate in duodenal ulcer: genuine prevention or accelerated healing of ulcer recurrence?

    PubMed

    Bynum, T E; Koch, G G

    1991-08-08

    We sought to compare the efficacy of sucralfate to placebo for the prevention of duodenal ulcer recurrence and to determine that the efficacy of sucralfate was due to a true reduction in ulcer prevalence and not due to secondary effects such as analgesic activity or accelerated healing. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel groups, multicenter clinical study with 254 patients. All patients had a past history of at least two duodenal ulcers with at least one ulcer diagnosed by endoscopic examination 3 months or less before the start of the study. Complete ulcer healing without erosions was required to enter the study. Sucralfate or placebo were dosed as a 1-g tablet twice a day for 4 months, or until ulcer recurrence. Endoscopic examinations once a month and when symptoms developed determined the presence or absence of duodenal ulcers. If a patient developed an ulcer between monthly scheduled visits, the patient was dosed with a 1-g sucralfate tablet twice a day until the next scheduled visit. Statistical analyses of the results determined the efficacy of sucralfate compared with placebo for preventing duodenal ulcer recurrence. Comparisons of therapeutic agents for preventing duodenal ulcers have usually been made by testing for statistical differences in the cumulative rates for all ulcers developed during a follow-up period, regardless of the time of detection. Statistical experts at the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and on the FDA Advisory Panel expressed doubts about clinical study results based on this type of analysis. They suggested three possible mechanisms for reducing the number of observed ulcers: (a) analgesic effects, (b) accelerated healing, and (c) true ulcer prevention. Traditional ulcer analysis could miss recurring ulcers due to an analgesic effect or accelerated healing. Point-prevalence analysis could miss recurring ulcers due to accelerated healing between endoscopic examinations. Maximum ulcer

  3. Comparison of healing rate in diabetes-related foot ulcers with low frequency ultrasonic debridement versus non-surgical sharps debridement: a randomised trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Foot ulceration has been reported as the leading cause of hospital admission and amputation in individuals with diabetes. Diabetes-related foot ulcers require multidisciplinary management and best practice care, including debridement, offloading, dressings, management of infection, modified footwear and management of extrinsic factors. Ulcer debridement is a commonly applied management approach involving removal of non-viable tissue from the ulcer bed. Different methods of debridement have been reported in the literature including autolytic debridement via moist wound healing, mechanical debridement utilising wet to dry dressings, theatre based sharps debridement, biological debridement, non-surgical sharps debridement and newer technology such as low frequency ultrasonic debridement. Methods People with diabetes and a foot ulcer, referred to and treated by the Podiatry Department at Monash Health and who meet the inclusion criteria will be invited to participate in this randomised controlled trial. Participants will be randomly and equally allocated to either the non-surgical sharps debridement (control) or low frequency ultrasonic debridement (intervention) group (n = 322 ulcers/n = 108 participants). Where participants have more than one ulcer, only the participant will be randomised, not the ulcer. An investigator not involved in participant recruitment or assessment will be responsible for preparing the random allocation sequence and envelopes. Each participant will receive weekly treatment for six months including best practice podiatric management. Each ulcer will be measured on a weekly basis by calculating total area in centimetres squared. Measurement will be undertaken by a trained research assistant to ensure outcomes are blinded from the treating podiatrist. Another member of the research team will assess the final primary outcome. Discussion The primary aim of this study is to compare healing rates for diabetes-related foot ulcers

  4. [Laser's biostimulation in healing or crural ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Król, P; Franek, A; Huńka-Zurawińska, W; Bil, J; Swist, D; Polak, A; Bendkowski, W

    2001-11-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate effect of laser's biostimulation on the process of healing of crural ulcerations. Three comparative groups of patients, A, B and C, were made at random from the patients with venous crural ulcerations. The group A consisted of 17, the group B 15, the group C 17 patients. The patients in all comparative groups were treated pharmacologically and got compress therapy. Ulcerations at patients in group A were additionally irradiated by light of biostimulation's laser (810 nm) in this way that every time ulcerations got dose of energy 4 J/cm2. The patient's in-group B additionally got blind trial (with placebo in the form of quasi-laserotherapy). The evaluated factors were to estimate how laser's biostimulation causes any changes of the size of the ulcers and of the volume of tissue defect. The speed of changes of size and volume of tissue defect per week was calculated. After the treatment there was statistically significant decrease of size of ulcers in all comparative groups while there was no statistically significant difference between the groups observed. After the treatment there was statistically significant decrease of volume of ulcers only in groups A and C but there was no statistically significant difference between the groups observed.

  5. Increased healing in diabetic toe ulcers in a multidisciplinary foot clinic-An observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Almdal, T; Nielsen, A Anker; Nielsen, K E; Jørgensen, M E; Rasmussen, A; Hangaard, S; Siersma, V; Holstein, P E

    2015-12-01

    To study toe ulcer healing in patients with diabetic foot ulcers attending a multidisciplinary foot clinic over a 10 years period. The study was retrospective, consecutive and observational during 2001 through 2011. The patients were treated according to the International Consensus on the Diabetic Foot. During the period the chiropodist staffing in the foot clinic was doubled; new offloading material and orthopedic foot corrections for recalcitrant ulcers were introduced. Healing was investigated in toe ulcers in Cox regression models. 2634 patients developed foot ulcers, of which 1461 developed toe ulcers; in 790 patients these were neuropathic, in 551 they were neuro-ischemic and in 120 they were critically ischemic. One-year healing rates increased in the period 2001-2011 from 75% to 91% for neuropathic toe ulcers and from 72% to 80% for neuro-ischemic toe ulcers, while no changes was observed for ischemic toe ulcers. Adjusted for changes in the patient population, the overall rate of healing for neuropathic and neuro-ischemic toe ulcers almost doubled (HR=1.95 [95% CI: 1.36-2.80]). The results show that the healing of toe ulcers improved. This outcome could not be explained by changes in the patient characteristics, but coincided with a number of improvements in organization and therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pressure ulcer healing promoted by adequate protein intake in rats

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhanfen; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Yanan; Tian, Yiqing; Sun, Sujuan; Li, Xian

    2018-01-01

    The effect of protein intake on rat pressure ulcer healing was evaluated. One hundred rats were numbered according to body weight and then they were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=25) using the random number table. After rat models of stage II pressure ulcer were established, they were fed with feed containing different protein levels (10, 15, 20 and 25%). Healing time, pressure ulcer area, body weight, albumin (ALB) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels among groups were compared. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was also performed to observe pressure ulcer tissue structure. In the healing process of pressure ulcer, rats with 20% protein intake had the shortest healing time and the smallest pressure ulcer area. Body weight, ALB and Hb levels were much closer to the normal level. H&E staining result also suggested that the pressure ulcer healing degree of rats with 20% protein intake was much better than the others. Adequate protein intake is therefore conducive to pressure ulcer healing, while excessive or insufficient protein intake has negative impact on healing. PMID:29731816

  7. Pressure ulcer healing promoted by adequate protein intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhanfen; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Yanan; Tian, Yiqing; Sun, Sujuan; Li, Xian

    2018-05-01

    The effect of protein intake on rat pressure ulcer healing was evaluated. One hundred rats were numbered according to body weight and then they were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=25) using the random number table. After rat models of stage II pressure ulcer were established, they were fed with feed containing different protein levels (10, 15, 20 and 25%). Healing time, pressure ulcer area, body weight, albumin (ALB) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels among groups were compared. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was also performed to observe pressure ulcer tissue structure. In the healing process of pressure ulcer, rats with 20% protein intake had the shortest healing time and the smallest pressure ulcer area. Body weight, ALB and Hb levels were much closer to the normal level. H&E staining result also suggested that the pressure ulcer healing degree of rats with 20% protein intake was much better than the others. Adequate protein intake is therefore conducive to pressure ulcer healing, while excessive or insufficient protein intake has negative impact on healing.

  8. Healing Rates in a Multicenter Assessment of a Sterile, Room Temperature, Acellular Dermal Matrix Versus Conventional Care Wound Management and an Active Comparator in the Treatment of Full-Thickness Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Walters, Jodi; Cazzell, Shawn; Pham, Hau; Vayser, Dean; Reyzelman, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this 16-week, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial was to assess the healed ulcer rate of a human acellular dermal matrix, DermACELL, compared with conventional care and a second acellular dermal matrix, Graftjacket, in the treatment of full-thickness diabetic foot ulcers. One hundred sixty-eight patients were randomized into DermACELL, conventional care, and Graftjacket treatment arms in a 2:2:1 ratio. Patients in the acellular dermal matrix groups received either 1 or 2 applications of the graft at the discretion of the investigator. Weekly follow-up visits were conducted until the ulcer healed or the endpoint was reached. At 16 weeks, the DermACELL arm had a significantly higher proportion of completely healed ulcers than the conventional care arm (67.9% vs 48.1%; P = .0385) and a nonsignificantly higher proportion than the Graftjacket arm (67.9% vs 47.8%; P = .1149). The DermACELL arm also exhibited a greater average percent reduction in wound area than the conventional care arm (91.4% vs 80.3%; P = .0791) and the Graftjacket arm (91.4% vs 73.5%; P = .0762). The proportion of severe adverse events and the proportion of overall early withdrawals were similar among the 3 groups based on relative population size (P ≥ .05). The results presented here indicate that DermACELL is an appropriate clinical option in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers, with significant increases in healing rates and rate of percentage wound closure as compared with conventional care options.

  9. Healed corneal ulcer with keloid formation.

    PubMed

    Alkatan, Hind M; Al-Arfaj, Khalid M; Hantera, Mohammed; Al-Kharashi, Soliman

    2012-04-01

    We are reporting a 34-year-old Arabic white female patient who presented with a white mass covering her left cornea following multiple ocular surgeries and healed corneal ulcer. The lesion obscured further view of the iris, pupil and lens. The patient underwent penetrating keratoplasty and the histopathologic study of the left corneal button showed epithelial hyperplasia, absent Bowman's layer and subepithelial fibrovascular proliferation. The histopathologic appearance was suggestive of a corneal keloid which was supported by further ultrastructural study. The corneal graft remained clear 6 months after surgery and the patient was satisfied with the visual outcome. Penetrating keratoplasty may be an effective surgical option for corneal keloids in young adult patients.

  10. Stress, Illness Perceptions, Behaviors, and Healing in Venous Leg Ulcers: Findings From a Prospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Walburn, Jessica; Weinman, John; Norton, Sam; Hankins, Matthew; Dawe, Karen; Banjoko, Bolatito; Vedhara, Kavita

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of stress, illness perceptions, and behaviors on healing of venous leg ulcers. A prospective observational study of 63 individuals for 24 weeks investigated possible psychosocial predictors of healing. There were two indices of healing: rate of change in ulcer area and number of weeks to heal. Psychological variables were assessed at baseline using self-report measures (Perceived Stress Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire, adapted Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities, Adherence Questionnaire, and Short-Form Health Survey). Controlling for sociodemographic and clinical variables, for the 24 weeks, a slower rate of change in ulcer area was predicted by greater stress (standardized β = -0.61, p = .008), depression (standardized β = -0.51, p = .039), and holding negative perceptions or beliefs about the ulcer (standardized β = -1.4, p = .045). By 24 weeks, 69% of ulcers had closed. A more negative emotional response to the ulcer at baseline (i.e., emotional representation of the ulcer) was associated with a greater number of weeks to heal (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.41-0.95, p = .028). Higher educational attainment (HR = 3.22, 95% CI = 1.37-7.55, p = .007) and better adherence to compression bandaging (HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.06-1.88, p = .019) were associated with fewer weeks to heal. No other psychosocial variable (stress, perceptions about the ulcer, health behaviors) predicted weeks to heal. Alongside ulcer-related predictors, psychological and sociodemographic factors were associated with healing. Future research should explore mediating mechanisms underlying these associations and develop interventions to target these variables.

  11. Stress, Illness Perceptions, Behaviors, and Healing in Venous Leg Ulcers: Findings From a Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Walburn, Jessica; Weinman, John; Norton, Sam; Hankins, Matthew; Dawe, Karen; Banjoko, Bolatito; Vedhara, Kavita

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of stress, illness perceptions, and behaviors on healing of venous leg ulcers. Methods A prospective observational study of 63 individuals for 24 weeks investigated possible psychosocial predictors of healing. There were two indices of healing: rate of change in ulcer area and number of weeks to heal. Psychological variables were assessed at baseline using self-report measures (Perceived Stress Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire, adapted Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities, Adherence Questionnaire, and Short-Form Health Survey). Results Controlling for sociodemographic and clinical variables, for the 24 weeks, a slower rate of change in ulcer area was predicted by greater stress (standardized β = −0.61, p = .008), depression (standardized β = −0.51, p = .039), and holding negative perceptions or beliefs about the ulcer (standardized β = −1.4, p = .045). By 24 weeks, 69% of ulcers had closed. A more negative emotional response to the ulcer at baseline (i.e., emotional representation of the ulcer) was associated with a greater number of weeks to heal (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.41-0.95, p = .028). Higher educational attainment (HR = 3.22, 95% CI = 1.37–7.55, p = .007) and better adherence to compression bandaging (HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.06–1.88, p = .019) were associated with fewer weeks to heal. No other psychosocial variable (stress, perceptions about the ulcer, health behaviors) predicted weeks to heal. Conclusions Alongside ulcer-related predictors, psychological and sociodemographic factors were associated with healing. Future research should explore mediating mechanisms underlying these associations and develop interventions to target these variables. PMID:27941577

  12. Anti-ulcer and ulcer healing potentials of Musa sapientum peel extract in the laboratory rodents.

    PubMed

    Onasanwo, Samuel Adetunji; Emikpe, Benjamin Obukowho; Ajah, Austin Azubuike; Elufioye, Taiwo Olayemi

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated the anti-ulcer and ulcer healing potentials of the methanol extract of Musa sapientum peel in the laboratory rats. Methanol extract of the peels on Musa sapientum (MEMS) was evaluated for its anti-ulcer using alcohol-induced, aspirin-induced, and pyloric ligation-induced models, and for its ulcer healing employing acetic acid-induced ulcer models in rats. The findings from this experiment showed that MEMS (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, b.w.) anti-ulcer and ulcer healing activity (P ≤ 0.05) is dose-dependent. Also, MEMS exhibited healing of the ulcer base in all the treated groups when compared with the control group. The outcomes of this experiment revealed that the anti-ulcer effect of MEMS may be due to its anti-secretory and cyto-protective activity. The healing of the ulcer base might not be unconnected with basic fibroblast growth factors responsible for epithelial regeneration.

  13. Anti-ulcer and ulcer healing potentials of Musa sapientum peel extract in the laboratory rodents

    PubMed Central

    Onasanwo, Samuel Adetunji; Emikpe, Benjamin Obukowho; Ajah, Austin Azubuike; Elufioye, Taiwo Olayemi

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the anti-ulcer and ulcer healing potentials of the methanol extract of Musa sapientum peel in the laboratory rats. Materials and Methods: Methanol extract of the peels on Musa sapientum (MEMS) was evaluated for its anti-ulcer using alcohol-induced, aspirin-induced, and pyloric ligation-induced models, and for its ulcer healing employing acetic acid-induced ulcer models in rats. Results: The findings from this experiment showed that MEMS (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, b.w.) anti-ulcer and ulcer healing activity (P ≤ 0.05) is dose-dependent. Also, MEMS exhibited healing of the ulcer base in all the treated groups when compared with the control group. Conclusion: The outcomes of this experiment revealed that the anti-ulcer effect of MEMS may be due to its anti-secretory and cyto-protective activity. The healing of the ulcer base might not be unconnected with basic fibroblast growth factors responsible for epithelial regeneration. PMID:23900937

  14. Healing and Antisecretory Effects of Aqueous Extract of Eremomastax speciosa (Acanthaceae) on Unhealed Gastric Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Amang, A P; Mezui, C; Siwe, G T; Emakoua, J; Mbah, G; Nkwengoua, E Z; Enow-Orock, G E; Tan, P V

    2017-01-01

    This work investigated the healing and antisecretory effects of the aqueous extract of Eremomastax speciosa on "unhealed gastric ulcers" associated with gastric acid hypersecretion. "Unhealed gastric ulcers" were induced using indomethacin following the establishment of acetic-acid-induced chronic gastric ulcers. The extract (200 and 400 mg/kg, per os) was administered concomitantly with indomethacin (1 mg/kg, subcutaneously). The effects of the extract on both basal and histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion were determined. Mucus secretion and oxidative stress parameters were measured, and histological assessment of ulcer healing was carried out. The extract significantly promoted the healing process in rats subjected to "unhealed gastric ulcers" (82.4-88.5% healing rates). Treatment with the extract significantly reduced the basal (25.95-49.51% reduction rates) and histamine-stimulated (24.25-47.41%) acid secretions. The healing effect of the extract was associated with a significant ( p < 0.05) increase of mucus secretion and concentrations of antioxidant enzymes compared with the controls. The extract at the highest dose showed normalization of the mucosa, without glandular destruction and with the disappearance of fibrosis and lymphocyte infiltration. The abilities of the extract to increase mucus secretion, to reinforce antioxidant status, and to inhibit acid secretion would be some of the mechanisms by which this extract would accelerate the healing process in "unhealed gastric ulcers."

  15. High probability of healing without amputation of plantar forefoot ulcers in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Örneholm, Hedvig; Apelqvist, Jan; Larsson, Jan; Eneroth, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is an important entity which in many cases is the first serious complication in diabetes. Although a plantar forefoot location is common, there are few studies on larger cohorts and in such studies there is often a combination of various types of ulcer and ulcer locations. The purpose of this study is to discern the outcome of plantar forefoot ulcers and their specific characteristics in a large cohort. All patients (n = 770), presenting with a plantar forefoot ulcer at a multidisciplinary diabetes foot clinic from January 1, 1983 to December 31, 2012 were considered for the study. Seven hundred one patients (median age 67 [22-95]) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were followed according to a preset protocol until final outcome (healing or death). Severe peripheral vascular disease was present in 26% of the patients and 14% had evidence of deep infection upon arrival at the foot clinic. Fifty-five percent (385/701) of the patients healed without foot surgery, 25% (173/701) healed after major debridement, 9% (60/701) healed after minor or major amputation and 12% (83/701) died unhealed. Median healing time was 17 weeks. An ulcer classified as Wagner grade 1 or 2 at inclusion and independent living were factors associated with a higher healing rate. Seventy-nine percent of 701 patients with diabetes and a plantar forefoot ulcer treated at a multidisciplinary diabetes foot clinic healed without amputation. For one third some form of foot surgery was needed to achieve healing. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  16. The influence of polymorbidity, revascularization, and wound therapy on the healing of arterial ulceration.

    PubMed

    Tautenhahn, Joerg; Lobmann, Ralf; Koenig, Brigitte; Halloul, Zuhir; Lippert, Hans; Buerger, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    An ulcer categorized as Fontaine's stage IV represents a chronic wound, risk factor of arteriosclerosis, and co-morbidities which disturb wound healing. Our objective was to analyze wound healing and to assess potential factors affecting the healing process. 199 patients were included in this 5-year study. The significance levels were determined by chi-squared and log-rank tests. The calculation of patency rate followed the Kaplan-Meier method. Mean age and co-morbidities did not differ from those in current epidemiological studies. Of the patients with ulcer latency of more than 13 weeks (up to one year), 40% required vascular surgery. Vascular surgery was not possible for 53 patients and they were treated conservatively. The amputation rate in the conservatively treated group was 37%, whereas in the revascularizated group it was only 16%. Ulcers in patients with revascularization healed in 92% of cases after 24 weeks. In contrast, we found a healing rate of only 40% in the conservatively treated group (p<0.001). Revascularization appeared more often in diabetic patients (n=110; p<0.01) and the wound size and number of infections were elevated (p=0.03). Among those treated conservatively, wound healing was decelerated (p=0.01/0.02; chi(2) test). The success of revascularization, presence of diabetes mellitus, and wound treatment proved to be prognostic factors for wound healing in arterial ulcers.

  17. Endomicroscopy for assessing mucosal healing in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Gheorghe, Cristian; Cotruta, Bogdan; Iacob, Razvan; Becheanu, Gabriel; Dumbrava, Mona; Gheorghe, Liana

    2011-12-01

    The assessment of tissue healing has emerged as an important treatment goal in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), mucosal healing may represent the ultimate therapeutic goal due to the fact that the inflammation is limited to the mucosal layer. Mucosal and histological healing may indicate a subset of UC patients in long-term clinical, endoscopic and histological remission in whom immunomodulators, biologics, and even aminosalicylates may be withdrawn. Confocal laser endomicroscopy allows the assessment of residual cellular inflammation, crypt and vessel architecture distortion during ongoing endoscopy, and therefore permits a real-time evaluation of histological healing in patients with ulcerative proctitis. Images of conventional optical microscopy and confocal laser endomicroscopy in patients with ulcerative proctitis in remission are presented.

  18. Proper muscle layer damage affects ulcer healing after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Yohei; Mimori, Nobuya; Mizutamari, Hiroya; Kato, Yuhei; Shimazu, Kazuhiro; Sawaguchi, Masayuki; Tawaraya, Shin; Igarashi, Kimihiro; Okubo, Syunji

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is the established therapy for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, management of the artificial ulcers associated with ESD has become important and the relationship between ulcer healing factors and treatment is still unclear. We aimed to evaluate ESD-related artificial ulcer reduction ratio at 4 weeks to assess factors associating with ulcer healing after ESD that may lead to optimal treatment. Between January 2009 and December 2013, a total of 375 lesions fulfilled the expanded criteria for ESD. We defined ulcer reduction rate <90% as (A) poor-healing group; and rate ≥90% as (B) well-healing group. After exclusion, 328 lesions were divided into two groups and analyzed. These two groups were compared based on clinicopathological/endoscopic features, concomitant drugs, and treatment. Ulcer reduction rate was significantly correlated with factors related to the ESD procedure (i.e. procedure time, submucosal fibrosis, and injury of the proper muscle layer, in univariate analysis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that submucosal fibrosis (F2) (P = 0.03; OR, 16.46; 95% CI, 1.31-206.73) and injury of the proper muscle layer (P = 0.01; OR, 4.27; 95% CI, 2.04-8.92) were statistically significant predictors of delayed healing. This single-center retrospective study indicated that ESD-induced artificial ulcer healing was affected by submucosal fibrosis and injury of the proper muscle layer, which induced damage to the muscle layer. Therefore, the preferable pharmacotherapy can be determined on completion of the ESD procedure. © 2015 The Authors Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  19. Topical propolis improves wound healing in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Afkhamizadeh, Mozhgan; Aboutorabi, Robab; Ravari, Hassan; Fathi Najafi, Mohsen; Ataei Azimi, Sajad; Javadian Langaroodi, Adineh; Yaghoubi, Mohammad Ali; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-08-22

    In this randomized controlled trial, diabetic patients with foot ulcers (Wagner grades 1 and 2) were randomly assigned to conventional therapies for diabetic foot ulcer plus topical propolis ointment (5%; twice daily) or conventional therapies alone. The process of ulcer healing was observed during 4 weeks and compared between the two groups regarding the size, erythema, exudates, white blood cell (WBC) count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). The process of ulcer size reduction during the four-week period of study was significantly different between the groups. However, this difference was not significant between the third and fourth weeks. There was no significant difference between two groups regarding erythema and exudate reduction as well as WBC count and ESR. Administration of topical propolis ointment in addition to the conventional treatments of diabetic foot ulcer could reduce the size of ulcers with Wagner grades 1 and 2.

  20. Sustained compression and healing of chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, S. D.; Wright, D. D.; Backhouse, C. M.; Riddle, E.; McCollum, C. N.

    1988-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--Comparison of four layer bandage system with traditional adhesive plaster bandaging in terms of (a) compression achieved and (b) healing of venous ulcers. DESIGN--Part of larger randomised trial of five different dressings. SETTING--Outpatient venous ulcer clinic in university hospital. PATIENTS--(a) Pressure exerted by both bandage systems was measured in the same 20 patients. (b) Healing with the four layer bandage was assessed in 148 legs in 126 consecutive patients (mean age 71 (SE 2); range 30-96) with chronic venous ulcers that had resisted treatment with traditional bandaging for a mean of 27.2 (SE 8) months. INTERVENTIONS--(a) Four layer bandage system or traditional adhesive plaster bandaging for pressure studies; (b) four layer bandaging applied weekly for studies of healing. END POINTS--(a) Comparison of pressures achieved at the ankle for up to one week; (b) complete healing within 12 weeks. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--(a) Four layer bandage produced higher initial pressures at the ankle of 42.5 (SE 1) mm Hg compared with 29.8 (1.8) for the adhesive plaster (p less than 0.001; 95% confidence interval 18.5 to 6.9). Pressure was maintained for one week with the four layer bandage but fell to 10.4 (3.5) mm Hg at 24 hours with adhesive plaster bandaging. (b) After weekly bandaging with the four layer bandage 110 of 48 venous ulcers had healed completely within 12 (mean 6.3 (0.4)) weeks. CONCLUSION--Sustained compression of over 40 mm Hg achieved with a multilayer bandage results in rapid healing of chronic venous ulcers that have failed to heal in many months of compression at lower pressures with more conventional bandages. PMID:3144330

  1. Autoradiographic study on healing process of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer in rat. Possible importance of Brunner's glands in ulcer healing

    SciTech Connect

    Fuse, Y.; Tsuchihashi, Y.; Sugihara, H.

    1988-09-01

    The healing process of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer was studied by (/sup 3/H)thymidine autoradiography. After the development of ulcer in the duodenum, cell proliferation was markedly activated not only in the crypts but also in the Brunner's glands near the ulcer. In the initial stages of ulcer healing, they both contributed to form the surface covering regenerating epithelium. Granulation tissue also proliferated at the base of the ulcer. In later stages of ulcer healing, new crypts were formed in the floor of the ulcer. New villi regenerated from these crypts and Brunner's glands regenerated by proliferation in situ. The ulcer basemore » then was completely covered with new villi and granulation tissue was replaced by dense fibrous connective tissue. The present study suggested that the Brunner's glands, together with the crypts of Lieberkuehn, play an important role in the healing process of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer.« less

  2. Severity and duration of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) before seeking care as predictors of healing time: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Marjolein M.; Igland, Jannicke; Østbye, Truls; Graue, Marit; Skeie, Svein; Wu, Bei; Rokne, Berit

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether A) duration of ulcer before start of treatment in specialist health care, and B) severity of ulcer according to University of Texas classification system (UT) at start of treatment (baseline), are independent predictors of healing time. Methods This retrospective cohort study, based on electronic medical record data, included 105 patients from two outpatient clinics in Western Norway with a new diabetic foot ulcer during 2009–2011. The associations of duration of ulcer and ulcer severity with healing time were assessed using cumulative incidence curves and subdistribution hazard ratio estimated using competing risk regression with adjustment for potential confounders. Results Of the 105 participants, 45.7% achieved ulcer healing, 36.2% underwent amputations, 9.5% died before ulcer healing and 8.5% were lost to follow-up. Patients who were referred to specialist health care by a general practitioner ≥ 52 days after ulcer onset had a 58% (SHR 0.42, CI 0.18–0.98) decreased healing rate compared to patients who were referred earlier, in the adjusted model. High severity (grade 2/3, stage C/D) according to the UT classification system was associated with a decreased healing rate compared to low severity (grade1, stage A/B or grade 2, stage A) with SHR (95% CI) equal to 0.14 (0.05–0.43) after adjustment for referral time and other potential confounders. Conclusion Early detection and referral by both the patient and general practitioner are crucial for optimal foot ulcer healing. Ulcer grade and severity are also important predictors for healing time, and early screening to assess the severity and initiation of prompt treatment is important. PMID:28498862

  3. A retrospective study using the pressure ulcer scale for healing (PUSH) tool to examine factors affecting stage II pressure ulcer healing in a Korean acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Hee

    2014-09-01

    Stage II pressure ulcers (PUs) should be managed promptly and appropriately in order to prevent complications. To identify the factors affecting Stage II PU healing and optimize care, the electronic medical records of patients with a Stage II PU in an acute care hospital were examined. Patient and ulcer characteristics as well as nutritional assessment variables were retrieved, and ulcer variables were used to calculate Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) scores. The effect of all variables on healing status (healed versus nonhealed) and change in PUSH score for healing rate were compared. Records of 309 Stage II PUs from 155 patients (mean age 61.2 ± 15.2 [range 5-89] years, 182 [58.9%] male) were retrieved and analyzed. Of those, 221 healed and 88 were documented as not healed at the end of the study. The variables that were significantly different between patients with PUs that did and did not heal were: major diagnosis (P = 0.001), peripheral arterial disease (P = 0.007), smoking (P = 0.048), serum albumin ( <2.5 g/dL) (P = 0.002), antidepressant use (P = 0.035), vitamin use (P = 0.006), history of surgery (P <0.001), PU size (P = 0.003), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) score (P = 0.020), Braden scale score (P = 0.003), and mean arterial pressure (MAP, mm Hg) (P = 0.026). The Cox proportional hazard model showed a significant positive difference in PUSH score change -indicative of healing - when pressure-redistribution surfaces were used (P <0.001, HR = 2.317), PU size was small (≤3.0 cm2, P = 0.006, HR = 1.670), MAP (within a range of 52-112 mm Hg) was higher P = 0.010, HR = 1.016), and patients were provided multivitamins (P = 0.037, HR=1.431). The results of this study suggest strategies for healing Stage II PUs in the acute care setting should include early recognition of lower-stage PUs, the provision of static pressure-redistribution surfaces and multivitamins, and maintaining higher MAP may facilitate healing and prevent deterioration

  4. Treatment of chronic non-healing ulcers using autologous platelet rich plasma: a case series.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Manish; Gupta, Saniya; Bukhari, Suhail; Ponemone, Venkatesh

    2017-02-27

    Non-healing ulcers are a major health problem worldwide and have great impact at personal, professional and social levels, with high cost in terms of human and material resources. Recalcitrant non-healing ulcers are inevitable and detrimental to the lower limb and are a major cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputations. Application of autologous Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) has been a major breakthrough for the treatment of non-healing and diabetic foot ulcers, as it is an easy and cost-effective method, and provides the necessary growth factors that enhance tissue healing. PRP is a conglomeration of thrombocytes, cytokines and various growth factors which are secreted by α-granules of platelets that augment the rate of natural healing process with decrease in time. The purpose of this case series was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of autologous platelet rich plasma for the treatment of chronic non-healing ulcers on the lower extremity. Autologous PRP was prepared from whole blood utilizing a rapid, intraoperative point-of-care system that works on the principle of density gradient centrifugation. Twenty Four (24) patients with non-healing ulcers of different etiologies, who met the inclusion criteria, were treated with single dose of subcutaneous PRP injections along with topical application of PRP gel under compassionate use. The mean age of the treated patients was 62.5 ± 13.53 years and they were followed-up for a period of 24 weeks. All the patients showed signs of wound healing with reduction in wound size, and the mean time duration to ulcer healing was 8.2 weeks. Also, an average five fold increase in the platelet concentrate was observed in the final PRP product obtained using the rapid point-of-care device, and the average platelet dose administered to the patients was 70.10 × 10 8 . This case series has demonstrated the potential safety and efficacy of autologous platelet rich plasma for the treatment of chronic non-healing ulcers. NCT

  5. Inhibition of nocturnal acidity is important but not essential for duodenal ulcer healing.

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi Porro, G; Parente, F; Sangaletti, O

    1990-01-01

    We have determined the relative importance of day and night time gastric acid inhibition for duodenal ulcer healing by comparing the anti-ulcer efficacy of a single morning with that of a single bedtime dose of ranitidine. One hundred and thirty patients with active duodenal ulcer were randomly assigned to a double-blind therapy with ranitidine 300 mg at 8 am or the same dose at 10 pm for up to eight weeks. The antisecretory effects of these regimens were also assessed by 24 h intragastric pH monitoring in 18 of these patients. At four weeks ulcers had healed in 41/61 (67%) of patients taking the morning dose and in 47/63 (75%) of those receiving the nocturnal dose (95% CI for the difference -0.09 +0.25; p ns). At eight weeks, the corresponding healing rates were 82% and 85.5%, respectively (95% CI for the difference -0.11 +0.17; p ns). Both treatments were significantly superior to placebo in raising 24 h intragastric pH, although the effects of the morning dose were of shorter duration than those of the nocturnal dose. These findings suggest that suppression of nocturnal acidity is important but not essential to promote healing of duodenal ulcers; a prolonged period of acid inhibition during the day (as obtained with a single large morning dose of H2-blockers) may be equally effective. PMID:2186980

  6. Comparison of characteristics and healing course of diabetic foot ulcers by etiological classification: neuropathic, ischemic, and neuro-ischemic type.

    PubMed

    Yotsu, Rie Roselyne; Pham, Ngoc Minh; Oe, Makoto; Nagase, Takeshi; Sanada, Hiromi; Hara, Hisao; Fukuda, Shoji; Fujitani, Junko; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Tamaki, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    To identify differences in the characteristics of patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) according to their etiological classification and to compare their healing time. Over a 4.5-year period, 73 patients with DFUs were recruited. DFUs were etiologically classified as being of neuropathic, ischemic, or neuro-ischemic origin. Descriptive analyses were performed to characterize study subjects, foot-related factors, and healing outcome and time. Duration of healing was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Healing time among the three types was compared using the log rank test. The number of patients manifesting neuropathic, ischemic, and neuro-ischemic ulcers was 30, 20, and 14, respectively. Differences were identified for age, diabetes duration, body mass index, hypertension, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Patients with neuro-ischemic ulcers had better ankle-brachial index, skin perfusion pressure (SPP), and transcutaneous oxygen pressure values compared to those with ischemic ulcers. The average time in which 50% of patients had healed wounds was 70, 113, and 233 days for neuropathic, neuro-ischemic, and ischemic ulcers, respectively. Main factors associated with healing were age and SPP values. Based on the etiological ulcer type, DFU healing course and several patient factors differed. Failure to consider the differences in DFU etiology may have led to heterogeneity of results in previous studies on DFUs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. High mucosal healing rates in 5-ASA-treated ulcerative colitis patients: results of a meta-analysis of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Römkens, Tessa E H; Kampschreur, Milou T; Drenth, Joost P H; van Oijen, Martijn G H; de Jong, Dirk J

    2012-11-01

    Recently, mucosal healing (MH) is regarded as an important treatment goal in ulcerative colitis (UC). 5-Aminosalicylates (5-ASA) are the standard treatment in mild-to-moderate UC, but the effect on MH is less known. The aim of this study was to systematically review the medical literature in order to compare different preparations of 5-ASA for the effect on MH. We conducted a structured search of PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to identify randomized controlled clinical trials with 5-ASA in UC providing data about MH. We calculated the sample size-weighted pooled proportion of patients with MH, and performed meta-analysis of head-to-head comparisons. Out of 645 hits, we included 90 treatment arms, involving 3977 patients using oral 5-ASA (granulate and tablets) and 2513 patients using rectal 5-ASA (suppositories, enema, and foam). Overall, 43,7% of 5-ASA treated patients achieved MH (oral 36,9%; rectal 50,3%). In oral studies, 49% of patients using granulate (7 treatment-arms) achieved MH compared to 34,9% using tablets (43 treatment-arms). In rectal studies the proportion of MH was 62% for suppositories (eight treatment arms), 51% for foam (nine treatment arms), and 46% for enema (23 treatment arms), respectively. 5-ASA preparations achieved MH in nearly 50% of UC patients. There were no significant differences in MH between the various 5-ASA agents, either in the oral or the rectal treatment groups. Copyright © 2012 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  8. Anti-ulcer and wound healing activities of Sida corymbosa in rats.

    PubMed

    John-Africa, Lucy Binda; Yahaya, Tijani Adeniyi; Isimi, Christianah Yetunde

    2014-01-01

    There are strong beliefs in the efficacy of traditional medical systems worldwide. Many herbs have been acclaimed to possess antiulcer effects and could be unexplored sources of new lead compounds. Sida corymbosa R. E. Fries (Malvaceae) is used in Northern Nigeria to treat ulcers and wounds. This work aimed to investigate the usefulness of Sida corymbosa in treatments of stomach ulcers and wounds in traditional medicine. Effect of the aqueous extract was determined on gastric ulceration, rate of wound healing and inflammation using ethanol-induced and diclofenac-induced ulceration, wound excision model and albumin-induced inflammation respectively in rats. The study demonstrated the anti-ulcer activity of Sida corymbosa as the extract (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) showed a dose-dependent, significant (P<0.05) reduction of ulcer indices against gastric ulcers induced by both ethanol and diclofenac. Topical application of a formulation prepared with the extract of Sida corymbosa on surgically created incisions produced an increase in the rate of healing of the wounds. The extract of Sida corymbosa exhibited a significant (P < 0.05), dose-related decrease in inflammation induced by fresh egg albumin. This study showed that Sida corymbosa has constituents with the ability to reduce the severity of haemorrhagic gastric lesions, promote wound healing and reduce inflammation. These actions may be attributed to any one of the active constituents or as a result of synergistic effects of these phytoconstituents. This study validates the use of the plant in traditional medicine for the treatment of stomach ulcers and wounds.

  9. Non-healing foot ulcers in diabetic patients: general and local interfering conditions and management options with advanced wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Uccioli, Luigi; Izzo, Valentina; Meloni, Marco; Vainieri, Erika; Ruotolo, Valeria; Giurato, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Medical knowledge about wound management has improved as recent studies have investigated the healing process and its biochemical background. Despite this, foot ulcers remain an important clinical problem, often resulting in costly, prolonged treatment. A non-healing ulcer is also a strong risk factor for major amputation. Many factors can interfere with wound healing, including the patient's general health status (i.e., nutritional condition indicated by albumin levels) or drugs such as steroids that can interfere with normal healing. Diabetic complications (i.e., renal insufficiency) may delay healing and account for higher amputation rates observed in diabetic patients under dialysis treatment. Wound environment (e.g., presence of neuropathy, ischaemia, and infection) may significantly influence healing by interfering with the physiological healing cascade and adding local release of factors that may worsen the wound. The timely and well-orchestrated release of factors regulating the healing process, observed in acute wounds, is impaired in non-healing wounds that are blocked in a chronic inflammatory phase without progressing to healing. This chronic phase is characterised by elevated protease activity (EPA) of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and serine proteases (e.g., human neutrophil elastase) that interfere with collagen synthesis, as well as growth factor release and action. EPA (mainly MMP 9, MMP-8 and elastase) and inflammatory factors present in the wound bed (such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNFa) account for the catabolic state of non-healing ulcers. The availability of wound dressings that modulate EPA has added new therapeutic options for treating non-healing ulcers. The literature confirms advantages obtained by reducing protease activity in the wound bed, with better outcomes achieved by using these dressings compared with traditional ones. New technologies also allow a physician to know the status of the wound bed environment, particularly EPA, in a clinical

  10. Effect of FRG-8813, a new-type histamine H(2)-receptor antagonist, on the recurrence of gastric ulcer after healing by drug treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Ajioka, H; Miyake, H; Matsuura, N

    2000-08-01

    We investigated the recurrence of ulcers in rats after treatment with FRG-8813, (+/-)-2-(furfurylsulfinyl)-N-[4- [4-(piperidinomethyl)-2-pyridyl] oxy-(Z)-2-butenyl] acetamide, a novel histamine H(2)-receptor antagonist. Chronic gastric ulcers were induced by serosa-searing with a hot metal bar, and the ulcer healing and recurrence after treatment with FRG-8813 or famotidine were evaluated by endoscopy for 160 days. At the dose of 30 mg/kg p. o., once daily, the treatment with FRG-8813 or famotidine for 60 days, which was stopped earlier if the ulcer had healed, accelerated the ulcer healing significantly. A subsequent follow-up study on the healed rats showed that the cumulative recurrence rate of rats healed by FRG-8813 was lower than that of naturally healed rats or rats healed by famotidine. In many cases of rats healed by FRG-8813, the regenerated mucosa was normal in contrast with the control of famotidine-healed animals. The mucosal regeneration index of the gastric ulcer after 10 days' administration of FRG-8813 was significantly higher than that obtained with famotidine. After cessation of the treatment with famotidine for 7 days, rebound hyperacidity was induced; but such rebound did not occur with FRG-8813. Considering the low recurrence rate of ulcers after FRG-8813 treatment, we suggest that FRG-8813 treatment may provide additional benefits in peptic ulcer therapy. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Cost consequences due to reduced ulcer healing times - analyses based on the Swedish Registry of Ulcer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Öien, Rut F; Forssell, Henrik; Ragnarson Tennvall, Gunnel

    2016-10-01

    Resource use and costs for topical treatment of hard-to-heal ulcers based on data from the Swedish Registry of Ulcer Treatment (RUT) were analysed in patients recorded in RUT as having healed between 2009 and 2012, in order to estimate potential cost savings from reductions in frequency of dressing changes and healing times. RUT is used to capture areas of improvement in ulcer care and to enable structured wound management by registering patients with hard-to-heal leg, foot and pressure ulcers. Patients included in the registry are treated in primary care, community care, private care, and inpatient hospital care. Cost calculations were based on resource use data on healing time and frequency of dressing changes in Swedish patients with hard-to-heal ulcers who healed between 2009 and 2012. Per-patient treatment costs decreased from SEK38 223 in 2009 to SEK20 496 in 2012, mainly because of shorter healing times. Frequency of dressing changes was essentially the same during these years, varying from 1·4 to 1·6 per week. The total healing time was reduced by 38%. Treatment costs for the management of hard-to-heal ulcers can be reduced with well-developed treatment strategies resulting in shortened healing times as shown in RUT. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Candida albicans infection delays duodenal ulcer healing in cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Longxue; Yoshida, Masashi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Hideki; Wakabayashi, Go; Tanabe, Minoru; Kawachi, Shigeyuki; Shinoda, Masahiro; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Wada, Norihito; Kameyama, Kaori; Kumai, Koichiro; Kubota, Tetsuro; Sano, Katsuko; Nagao, Keisuke; Amagai, Masayuki; Kitagawa, Yuko; Kitajima, Masaki

    2008-11-01

    A low curability of ulcers infected with Candida has been reported in the literature. The aim of the study reported here was to investigate experimentally whether Candida infection affects the healing of ulcers. Candida albicans (the Candida group) or saline (the control group) was administered intragastrically into rats with a cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer. The duodenal lesions, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were assessed. On Day 7 post-administration, 70.4% rats of the Candida group had a duodenal ulcer compared with 33.3% in the control group (P < 0.05). The duodenal ulcer in the Candida group was significantly larger and deeper than that in the control group. The number of VEGF-A- and PCNA-positive cells was smaller and the area of VEGF-A expression was lower in the Candida group. Using a rat model, we have demonstrated that Candida infection can delay the wound healing process of duodenal ulcers by means of a low expression of VEGF-A and PCNA.

  13. Comparison of the efficacy of rabeprazole 10 mg and omeprazole 20 mg for the healing rapidity of peptic ulcer diseases.

    PubMed

    Ji, Sangwon; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jae Woo; Jee, Myeong Kwan; Park, Kwang Wha; Uh, Young; Lee, Dong Ki; Song, Jae Suk; Baik, Soon Koo; Kwon, Sang Ok

    2006-09-01

    Rabeprazole has been known to inhibit H(+)/K(+)-ATPase more rapidly than omeprazole, the prototype proton pump inhibitor (PPI). The aim of this study was to demonstrate equivalence between low-dose rabeprazole 10 mg and omeprazole 20 mg for the healing rapidity of active peptic ulcer and for improvement of symptoms. Also, the effect of CYP2C19 genotypes on ulcer healing rapidity was investigated. A total of 112 patients with active peptic ulcer were randomized to receive either rabeprazole 10 mg q.d. or omeprazole 20 mg q.d. for 6 weeks. The remaining ratios (%) and complete healing of the ulcer were determined by endoscopy at 1 week and 6 weeks of treatment. The severity of ulcer pain was also investigated during treatment. CYP2C19 genotype was determined by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. The remaining ratio of peptic ulcers after 1 week and the complete healing rate after 6 weeks in the rabeprazole versus omeprazole group were 45.5% versus 50.3% (P = 0.475) and 80.6% versus 87.0% (P = 0.423), respectively. CYP2C19 genotypes had no effect on the remaining ratio of peptic ulcers after 1 week and the healing rate of peptic ulcers after 6 weeks in both groups. The proportions of patients with symptom improvement or resolution were comparable between the two groups. Low-dose rabeprazole 10 mg has a similar efficacy for the healing rapidity of active peptic ulcer disease and symptom improvement compared with standard-dose omeprazole 20 mg.

  14. Wound healing effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors: An emerging concept in management of diabetic foot ulcer-A review.

    PubMed

    Saboo, Apoorva; Rathnayake, Ayeshmanthe; Vangaveti, Venkat N; Malabu, Usman H

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have a well-known effect on glycaemic control in patients with diabetes but little is known on their wound healing role in this group of population. This paper reviews the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors on wound healing of diabetic foot ulcers. Published data on effects and mechanism of DDP-4 inhibitors on wound healing were derived from Medline, PubMed and Google Scholar search of English language literature from 1994 to 2014 using the key words such as "DPP-4 inhibitors", "endothelial healing" "diabetes" and "chronic ulcers". DPP-4 inhibitors show a potential benefit in processes of wound healing in diabetic chronic foot ulcers. The enzyme inhibitors promote recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells and allow the final scaffolding of wounds. Furthermore DPP-4 inhibitors augment angiogenesis and have widespread effects on optimising the immune response to persistent hypoxia in chronic diabetes wounds. DPP-4 inhibitors show promise in the local wound healing of diabetic foot ulcers in addition to its already established glycaemic control. In the light of high rate of amputations due to non-healing ulcers with profound psychological and economical liability, more investigations on the usefulness of DPP-4 inhibitors in the high risk diabetes population are needed. Copyright © 2015 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rebamipide promotes healing of colonic ulceration through enhanced epithelial restitution.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Tomohisa; Naito, Yuji; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Okuda, Toshimitsu; Mizushima, Katsura; Suzuki, Takahiro; Handa, Osamu; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-09-07

    To investigate the efficacy of rebamipide in a rat model of colitis and restitution of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Acute colitis was induced with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in male Wistar rats. Rats received intrarectal rebamipide treatment daily starting on day 7 and were sacrificed on day 14 after TNBS administration. The distal colon was removed to evaluate the various parameters of inflammation. Moreover, wound healing assays were used to determine the enhanced restitution of rat intestinal epithelial (RIE) cells treated with rebamipide. Intracolonic administration of rebamipide accelerated TNBS-induced ulcer healing. Increases in the wet weight of the colon after TNBS administration were significantly inhibited by rebamipide. The wound assay revealed that rebamipide enhanced the migration of RIE cells through phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and activation of Rho kinase. Rebamipide enema healed intestinal injury by enhancing restitution of RIE cells, via ERK activation. Rebamipide might be a novel therapeutic approach for inflammatory bowel disease.

  16. Healing process of venous ulcers: the role of microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Ambrózy, Ewald; Waczulíková, Iveta; Willfort, Andrea; Böhler, Kornelia; Cauza, Karla; Ehringer, Herbert; Heinz, Gottfried; Koppensteiner, Renate; Marić, Snezana; Gschwandtner, Michael E

    2013-02-01

    In order to describe adequately the process of healing in the intermediate degrees, we investigated microcirculatory changes in the venous ulcers at well-defined stages of wound repair. We investigated dynamic changes in microcirculation during the healing process of venous ulcers. Ten venous ulcers were investigated in three consecutive clinical stages of wound healing: non granulation tissue (NGTA), GTA and scar. Subpapillary microcirculation was measured by laser Doppler perfusion (LDP) imaging and expressed using LDP values in arbitrary units. Nutritive perfusion by capillary microscopy and expressed as capillary density (CD) - the number of capillaries per square millimetre. Before the development of GTA the LDP was low (median 1·35; lower-upper quartiles 0·71-1·83) accompanied with zero CD in all but one patient who had a density of 1. With the first appearance of GTA in the same area, the LDP was improved (2·22; 1·12-2·33; P = 0·0024) when compared with NGTA, in combination with a significant increase in CD (1·75; 0-3; P = 0·0054). In scar, the LDP was similar to that in the NGTA (1·03; 0·77-1·83; P = 0·278), combined with the highest CD (5·75; 4·5-8) in comparison with the previous stages of the area (for both pairs, P < 0·0001). Venous ulcers are caused by poor nutritive and subpapillary perfusion. Subpapillary perfusion plays a major role in the formation of GTA. In a scar, the increased nutritive perfusion is sufficient to cover the blood supply and keep skin viable while subpapillary perfusion is low. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  17. Publicly Reported Wound Healing Rates: The Fantasy and the Reality

    PubMed Central

    Fife, Caroline E.; Eckert, Kristen A.; Carter, Marissa J.

    2018-01-01

    Significance: We compare real-world data from the U.S. Wound Registry (USWR) with randomized controlled trials and publicly reported wound outcomes and develop criteria for honest reporting of wound outcomes, a requirement of the new Quality Payment Program (QPP). Recent Advances: Because no method has existed by which wounds could be stratified according to their likelihood of healing among real-world patients, practitioners have reported fantastically high healing rates. The USWR has developed several risk-stratified wound healing quality measures for diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and venous leg ulcers (VLUs) as part of its Qualified Clinical Data Registry (QCDR). This allows practitioners to report DFU and VLU healing rates in comparison to the likelihood of whether the wound would have healed. Critical Issues: Under the new QPP, practitioners must report at least one practice-relevant outcome measure, and it must be risk adjusted so that clinicians caring for the sickest patients do not appear to have worse outcomes than their peers. The Wound Healing Index is a validated risk-stratification method that can predict whether a DFU or VLU will heal, leveling the playing field for outcome reporting and removing the need to artificially inflate healing rates. Wound care practitioners can report the USWR DFU and VLU risk-stratified outcome measure to satisfy the quality reporting requirements of the QPP. Future Directions: Per the requirements of the QPP, the USWR will begin publicly reporting of risk-stratified healing rates once quality measure data have met the reporting standards of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Some basic rules for data censoring are proposed for public reporting of healing rates, and others are needed, which should be decided by consensus among the wound care community. PMID:29644145

  18. Healing and Antisecretory Effects of Aqueous Extract of Eremomastax speciosa (Acanthaceae) on Unhealed Gastric Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Amang, A. P.; Mezui, C.; Siwe, G. T.; Emakoua, J.; Mbah, G.; Nkwengoua, E. Z.; Enow-Orock, G. E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This work investigated the healing and antisecretory effects of the aqueous extract of Eremomastax speciosa on “unhealed gastric ulcers” associated with gastric acid hypersecretion. Materials and Methods “Unhealed gastric ulcers” were induced using indomethacin following the establishment of acetic-acid-induced chronic gastric ulcers. The extract (200 and 400 mg/kg, per os) was administered concomitantly with indomethacin (1 mg/kg, subcutaneously). The effects of the extract on both basal and histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion were determined. Mucus secretion and oxidative stress parameters were measured, and histological assessment of ulcer healing was carried out. Results The extract significantly promoted the healing process in rats subjected to “unhealed gastric ulcers” (82.4–88.5% healing rates). Treatment with the extract significantly reduced the basal (25.95–49.51% reduction rates) and histamine-stimulated (24.25–47.41%) acid secretions. The healing effect of the extract was associated with a significant (p < 0.05) increase of mucus secretion and concentrations of antioxidant enzymes compared with the controls. The extract at the highest dose showed normalization of the mucosa, without glandular destruction and with the disappearance of fibrosis and lymphocyte infiltration. Conclusion The abilities of the extract to increase mucus secretion, to reinforce antioxidant status, and to inhibit acid secretion would be some of the mechanisms by which this extract would accelerate the healing process in “unhealed gastric ulcers.” PMID:29234676

  19. The use of low output laser therapy to accelerate healing of diabetic foot ulcers: a randomized prospective controlled trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, S. V. L. G.; Subapriya, S.; Yeoh, C. N.; Soosai, S.; Shalini, V.; Harwant, S.

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of low output laser therapy as an adjuvant treatment in grade 1 diabetic foot ulcers. Methods: Sixteen patients were randomly divided equally into two groups. Group A had daily dressing only, while group B had low output laser therapy instituted five days a week in addition to daily dressing. Serial measurement of the ulcer was done weekly using digital photography and analyzed. Results: The rate of healing in group A was 10.42 mm2/week, and in group B was 66.14mm2/week. The difference in the rate of healing was statistically significant, p<0.05. Conclusion: Laser therapy as an adjuvant treatment accelerates diabetic ulcer healing by six times in a six week period.

  20. Topically applied connective tissue growth factor/CCN2 improves diabetic preclinical cutaneous wound healing: potential role for CTGF in human diabetic foot ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Henshaw, F R; Boughton, P; Lo, L; McLennan, S V; Twigg, S M

    2015-01-01

    Topical application of CTGF/CCN2 to rodent diabetic and control wounds was examined. In parallel research, correlation of CTGF wound fluid levels with healing rate in human diabetic foot ulcers was undertaken. Full thickness cutaneous wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic control rats were treated topically with 1 μg rhCTGF or vehicle alone, on 2 consecutive days. Wound healing rate was observed on day 14 and wound sites were examined for breaking strength and granulation tissue. In the human study across 32 subjects, serial CTGF regulation was analyzed longitudinally in postdebridement diabetic wound fluid. CTGF treated diabetic wounds had an accelerated closure rate compared with vehicle treated diabetic wounds. Healed skin withstood more strain before breaking in CTGF treated rat wounds. Granulation tissue from CTGF treatment in diabetic wounds showed collagen IV accumulation compared with nondiabetic animals. Wound α-smooth muscle actin was increased in CTGF treated diabetic wounds compared with untreated diabetic wounds, as was macrophage infiltration. Endogenous wound fluid CTGF protein rate of increase in human diabetic foot ulcers correlated positively with foot ulcer healing rate (r = 0.406; P < 0.001). These data collectively increasingly substantiate a functional role for CTGF in human diabetic foot ulcers.

  1. Racial and ethnic disparities in the healing of pressure ulcers present at nursing home admission.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Donna Z; Gurvich, Olga; Savik, Kay; Eberly, Lynn E; Harms, Susan; Mueller, Christine; Garrard, Judith; Cunanan, Kristen; Wiltzen, Kjerstie

    2017-09-01

    Pressure ulcers increase the risk of costly hospitalization and mortality of nursing home residents, so timely healing is important. Disparities in healthcare have been identified in the nursing home population but little is known about disparities in the healing of pressure ulcers. To assess racial and ethnic disparities in the healing of pressure ulcers present at nursing home admission. Multi-levels predictors, at the individual resident, nursing home, and community/Census tract level, were examined in three large data sets. Minimum Data Set records of older individuals admitted to one of 439 nursing homes of a national, for-profit chain over three years with a stages 2-4 pressure ulcer (n=10,861) were searched to the 90-day assessment for the first record showing pressure ulcer healing. Predictors of pressure ulcer healing were analyzed for White admissions first using logistic regression. The Peters-Belson method was used to assess racial or ethnic disparities among minority group admissions. A significantly smaller proportion of Black nursing home admissions had their pressure ulcer heal than expected had they been part of the White group. There were no disparities in pressure ulcer healing disadvantaging other minority groups. Significant predictors of a nonhealing of pressure ulcer were greater deficits in activities of daily living and pressure ulcer severity. Reducing disparities in pressure ulcer healing is needed for Blacks admitted to nursing homes. Knowledge of disparities in pressure ulcer healing can direct interventions aiming to achieve equity in healthcare for a growing number of minority nursing home admissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk factors of delayed ulcer healing after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joo Hyun; Kim, Sang Gyun; Choi, Jeongmin; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2015-12-01

    Although post-endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) iatrogenic ulcer is known to heal faster than peptic ulcer, some iatrogenic ulcers show delayed healing. The aim of this study was to clarify risk factors of delayed ulcer healing after gastric ESD. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of all patients who had ESD for gastric neoplasms (866 adenomas and 814 early gastric cancers) between January 2005 and February 2011. Of 1680 subjects, 95 had delayed ulcer healing in 3-month follow-up. Multivariate analysis showed that diabetes (OR 1.743; 95% CI 1.017-2.989, p = 0.043), coagulation abnormality (OR 3.195; 95% CI 1.535-6.650, p = 0.002), specimen size greater than 4 cm (OR 2.999; 95% CI 1.603-5.611, p = 0.001), and electrocoagulation (OR 7.149; 95% CI 1.738-29.411, p = 0.006) were revealed to be independent risk factors of delayed ulcer healing. Meanwhile, persistent Helicobacter pylori infection was not related to the delayed ulcer healing. Large iatrogenic ulcer by ESD with massive hemostasis, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus or coagulation abnormalities, tends to take more than 3 months to heal. For such cases, initial dosage increment of PPI or addition of other anti-ulcer agents after ESD may be beneficial.

  3. Effect of antisecretory agents and vagotomy on healing of chronic cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, S.S.; Raaberg, L.; Therkelsen, K.

    1986-07-01

    Penetrated cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers in rats have a very prolonged course of healing. In this study, it was investigated how much the healing of these ulcers is accelerated by some treatments. The treatments included omeprazole, cimetidine, and truncal vagotomy. In addition, the effect of omeprazole and cimetidine on gastric acid secretion was investigated in chronic gastric fistula rats. After 25 days of treatment, significantly more rats in the treated groups had healed ulcers than in the control group. There was little further improvement up to 100 days of treatment, and the difference between treated and untreated groups decreased. The morphologymore » of healing ulcers in treated and untreated rats was also compared. In controls, there was a simultaneous regeneration of mucosa and the submucosal Brunner's glands from the edges of the ulcer, the slow proliferation rate of the latter probably being decisive for the prolonged healing. In the treated rats, the mucosa first regenerated with formation of crypts and low villi and subsequently, the Brunner's glands were formed by proliferation from the bottom of the crypts.« less

  4. Local blockage of EMMPRIN impedes pressure ulcers healing in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi-Lan; Luo, Xiao; Wang, Ze-Xin; Yang, Guo-Li; Liu, Ji-Zhong; Liu, Ya-Qiong; Li, Ming; Chen, Min; Xia, Yong-Mei; Liu, Jun-Jie; Qiu, Shu-Ping; Gong, Xiao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Excessive extracellular matrix degradation caused by the hyperfunction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) has been implicated in the failure of pressure ulcers healing. EMMPRIN, as a widely expressed protein, has emerged as an important regulator of MMP activity. We hypothesize that EMMPRIN affects the process of pressure ulcer healing by modulating MMP activity. In the rat pressure ulcer model, the expression of EMMPRIN in ulcers detected by Western blot was elevated compared with that observed in normal tissue. To investigate the role of EMMPRIN in regulating ulcer healing, specific antibodies against EMMPRIN were used via direct administration on the pressure ulcer. Local blockage of EMMPRIN resulted in a poor ulcer healing process compared with control ulcers, which was the opposite of our expectation. Furthermore, inhibiting EMMPRIN minimally impacted MMP activity. However, the collagen content in the pressure ulcer was reduced in the EMMPRIN treated group. Angiogenesis and the expression of angiogenic factors in pressure ulcers were also reduced by EMMPRIN local blockage. The results in the present study indicate a novel effect of EMMPRIN in the regulation of pressure ulcer healing by controlling the collagen contents and angiogenesis rather than MMPs activity.

  5. Quality of healing of gastric ulcers: Natural products beyond acid suppression

    PubMed Central

    Kangwan, Napapan; Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2014-01-01

    Gastric ulcer is a chronic disease featured with unexpected complications, including bleeding, stenosis and perforation, as well as a high incidence of recurrence. Clinical treatments for gastric ulcer have allowed the rapid development of potent anti-ulcer drugs during the last several decades. Gastric ulcer healing is successful with conventional treatments including H2-receptor antagonists, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been essential for ulcer healing and prevention of complications. Additionally, Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is effective in reducing ulcer recurrence and leads to physiological changes in the gastric mucosa which affect the ulcer healing process. However, in spite of these advancements, some patients have suffered from recurrence or intractability in spite of continuous anti-ulcer therapy. A new concept of the quality of ulcer healing (QOUH) was initiated that considers the reconstruction of the mucosal structure and its function for preventing ulcer recurrence. Although several gastroprotection provided these achievements of the QOUH, which PPI or other acid suppressants did not accomplish, we found that gastroprotection that originated from natural products, such as a newer formulation from either Artemisia or S-allyl cysteine from garlic, were very effective in the QOUH, as well as improving clinical symptoms with fewer side effects. In this review, we will introduce the importance of the QOUH in ulcer healing and the achievements from natural products. PMID:24891974

  6. Quality of healing of gastric ulcers: Natural products beyond acid suppression.

    PubMed

    Kangwan, Napapan; Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2014-02-15

    Gastric ulcer is a chronic disease featured with unexpected complications, including bleeding, stenosis and perforation, as well as a high incidence of recurrence. Clinical treatments for gastric ulcer have allowed the rapid development of potent anti-ulcer drugs during the last several decades. Gastric ulcer healing is successful with conventional treatments including H2-receptor antagonists, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been essential for ulcer healing and prevention of complications. Additionally, Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is effective in reducing ulcer recurrence and leads to physiological changes in the gastric mucosa which affect the ulcer healing process. However, in spite of these advancements, some patients have suffered from recurrence or intractability in spite of continuous anti-ulcer therapy. A new concept of the quality of ulcer healing (QOUH) was initiated that considers the reconstruction of the mucosal structure and its function for preventing ulcer recurrence. Although several gastroprotection provided these achievements of the QOUH, which PPI or other acid suppressants did not accomplish, we found that gastroprotection that originated from natural products, such as a newer formulation from either Artemisia or S-allyl cysteine from garlic, were very effective in the QOUH, as well as improving clinical symptoms with fewer side effects. In this review, we will introduce the importance of the QOUH in ulcer healing and the achievements from natural products.

  7. Healing pressure ulcers with collagen or hydrocolloid: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Graumlich, James F; Blough, Linda S; McLaughlin, Richard G; Milbrandt, Joseph C; Calderon, Cesar L; Agha, Syed Abbas; Scheibel, L William

    2003-02-01

    To compare the effects of topical collagen and hydrocolloid on pressure ulcer healing. Randomized (allocation concealed), single-blind (outcome assessors), controlled trial with 8-week follow-up. Eleven nursing homes in central Illinois. Sixty-five patient-residents with Stage II or III pressure ulcers: median age 83.1, median Braden score 12, 63% female, 80% Stage II ulcers, and 20% Stage III ulcers. Exclusion criteria included cellulitis and osteomyelitis. Thirty-five patients were allocated to topical collagen daily, 30 to topical hydrocolloid twice weekly. The primary outcome was complete healing within 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes were time to heal, ulcer area healed per day, linear healing of wound edge, and cost of therapy. Analysis by intention to treat revealed similar complete ulcer healing within 8 weeks in collagen (51%) and hydrocolloid (50%) recipients (difference 1%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 26-29%). Mean healing time was similar: collagen healed in 5 weeks (95% CI = 4-6), hydrocolloid healed in 6 weeks (95% CI = 5-7). Mean area healed per day was 6 mm(2)/d in both treatment groups. Mean linear healing of the wound edge was 3 mm in both groups. In multivariate analysis, baseline ulcer depth was the only independent predictor of complete ulcer healing within 8 weeks (odds ratio = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.38-0.81). Cost analysis favored hydrocolloid. There were no significant differences in healing outcome between collagen and hydrocolloid. Collagen was more expensive and offered no major benefits to patients otherwise eligible for hydrocolloid treatment.

  8. Expected outcomes from topical haemoglobin spray in non-healing and worsening venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Arenberger, P; Elg, F; Petyt, J; Cutting, K

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of topical haemoglobin spray on treatment response and wound-closure rates in patients with chronic venous leg ulcers. A linear regression model was used to forecast healing outcomes over a 12-month period. Simulated data were taken from normal distributions based on post-hoc analysis of a 72-patient study in non-healing and worsening wounds (36 patients receiving standard care and 36 receiving standard care plus topical haemoglobin spray). Using a simulated 25,000 'patients' from each group, the proportion of wound closure over time was projected. Simulation results predicted a 55% wound closure rate at six months in the haemoglobin group, compared with 4% in the standard care group. Over a 12-month simulation period, a 43% overall reduction in wound burden was predicted. With the haemoglobin spray, 85% of wounds were expected to heal in 12 months, compared with 13% in the standard care group. Topical haemoglobin spray promises a more effective treatment for chronic venous leg ulcers than standard care alone in wounds that are non-healing or worsening. Further research is required to validate these predictions and to identify achievable outcomes in other chronic wound types.

  9. Topical oxygen therapy results in complete wound healing in diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Janelle; Lu, Suzanne; McLaren, Ann-Marie; Perry, Julie A; Cross, Karen M

    2016-11-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a significant problem in an aging population. Fifteen percent of diabetics develop a DFU over their lifetime, which can lead to potential amputation. The 5-year survival rate after amputation is 31%, which is greater than the lifetime risk of mortality from cancer. Topical oxygen is a promising technique for the adjunctive therapy of chronic wounds including DFUs, but few controlled studies exist to support its clinical adoption. The aim of this study was to compare a portable topical oxygen delivery system in patients with nonhealing DFUs to standard best practice. Twenty patients were randomized into a topical oxygen group (n = 10), and a nonplacebo control group with regular dressings and standard care (n = 10), and attended the diabetic foot clinic once weekly for 8 weeks. Ulcer surface area over time was analyzed using standardized digital imaging software. DFUs were present without healing for a mean duration of 76 weeks prior to the study. They found a significant difference in healing rate between patients receiving topical oxygen and those receiving standard care. Topical oxygen, therefore, represents a potentially exciting new technology to shorten healing time in patients with nonhealing DFUs. More prospective randomized and powered studies are needed to determine the benefits of topical oxygen, but our current results are very promising. © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society.

  10. Is ranitidine therapy sufficient for healing peptic ulcers associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use?

    PubMed Central

    YEOMANS, N D; SVEDBERG, L-E; NAESDAL, J

    2006-01-01

    Long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increases the risk of serious gastroduodenal events. To minimise these risks, patients often require concomitant acid-suppressive therapy. We conducted a literature review of clinical trials examining use of ranitidine 150 mg twice daily to heal gastroduodenal ulcers (GU) in NSAID recipients. Seven studies were identified. After 8 weeks’ treatment with ranitidine, GU healing rates ranged from 50% to 74% and rates of duodenal ulcer (DU) healing ranged from 81% to 84%. Ranitidine was more effective when NSAIDs were discontinued (healing rates reaching 95% and 100%, respectively). The ulcer healing rate with sucralfate was similar to that of ranitidine. However, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was associated with significantly greater rates of both GU and DU healing than ranitidine; 8-week GU rates were 92% and 88% with esomeprazole 40 mg and 20 mg, respectively (vs. 74% with ranitidine, p < 0.01). For omeprazole, 8-week healing rates were 87% with omeprazole 40 mg and 84% with omeprazole 20 mg (vs. 64% for ranitidine, p < 0.001), and for lansoprazole the corresponding values were 73–74% and 66–69% for the 30 mg and 15 mg doses, respectively (vs. 50–53% for ranitidine, p < 0.05). In the PPI study reporting DU healing the values were 92% for omeprazole 20 mg (vs. 81% for ranitidine, p < 0.05) and 88% for omeprazole 40 mg (p = 0.17 vs. ranitidine). NSAID-associated GU are more likely to heal when patients receive concomitant treatment with a PPI rather than ranitidine. PMID:17073837

  11. Rebamipide promotes healing of colonic ulceration through enhanced epithelial restitution

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Tomohisa; Naito, Yuji; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Okuda, Toshimitsu; Mizushima, Katsura; Suzuki, Takahiro; Handa, Osamu; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of rebamipide in a rat model of colitis and restitution of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. METHODS: Acute colitis was induced with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in male Wistar rats. Rats received intrarectal rebamipide treatment daily starting on day 7 and were sacrificed on day 14 after TNBS administration. The distal colon was removed to evaluate the various parameters of inflammation. Moreover, wound healing assays were used to determine the enhanced restitution of rat intestinal epithelial (RIE) cells treated with rebamipide. RESULTS: Intracolonic administration of rebamipide accelerated TNBS-induced ulcer healing. Increases in the wet weight of the colon after TNBS administration were significantly inhibited by rebamipide. The wound assay revealed that rebamipide enhanced the migration of RIE cells through phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and activation of Rho kinase. CONCLUSION: Rebamipide enema healed intestinal injury by enhancing restitution of RIE cells, via ERK activation. Rebamipide might be a novel therapeutic approach for inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:21987622

  12. Coping style and depression influence the healing of diabetic foot ulcers: observational and mechanistic evidence.

    PubMed

    Vedhara, K; Miles, J N V; Wetherell, M A; Dawe, K; Searle, A; Tallon, D; Cullum, N; Day, A; Dayan, C; Drake, N; Price, P; Tarlton, J; Weinman, J; Campbell, R

    2010-08-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that the healing of diabetic foot ulcers is affected by psychosocial factors such as distress. We examined this proposal in a prospective study, in which we considered the role of psychological distress and coping style in the healing of diabetic foot ulcers over a 24 week period. We also explored the role of salivary cortisol and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as potential mechanisms. For this prospective observational study we recruited 93 (68 men; mean age 60 years) patients with neuropathic or neuroischaemic diabetic foot ulcers from specialist podiatry clinics in secondary care. Clinical and demographic determinants of healing, psychological distress, coping, salivary cortisol and both MMP2 and MMP9 were assessed at baseline. Ulcers were assessed at baseline and at 6, 12 and 24 weeks post-baseline. The primary outcome was ulcer status at 24 weeks, i.e. healed vs not healed. After controlling for clinical and demographic determinants of healing, ulcer healing at 24 weeks was predicted by confrontation coping, but not by depression or anxiety. Patients with unhealed ulcers exhibited greater confrontation coping (model including depression: OR 0.809, 95% CI 0.704-0.929, p = 0.003; model including anxiety: OR 0.810, 95% CI 0.704-0.930, p = 0.003). However, change in ulcer size over the observation period was associated with depression only (p = 0.04, d = 0.31). Healed ulcers by 24 weeks were also associated with lower evening cortisol, higher precursor MMP2 and a greater cortisol awakening response. Confrontation coping and depression predict ulcer healing. Our preliminary enquiry into biological mechanisms suggests that cortisol and precursor MMP2 may underlie these relationships.

  13. Effectivity of artrihpi irrigation for diabetic ulcer healing: A randomized controlled trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayatri, Dewi; Asmorohadi, Aries; Dahlia, Debie

    2018-02-01

    The healing process of diabetic ulcer is often impeded by inflammation, infection, and decreased immune state. High pressure irrigation (10-15 psi) may be used to control the infection level. This research was designed to identify the effectiveness of artrihpi irrigation device towards diabetic ulcers in public hospitals in the Central Java. This research is a randomized control trial with cross over design. Sixty four subjects were selected using block randomization technique, and were divided into control and intervention group. The intervention was given in 6 days along with wound healing evaluation in every 3 days. The results demonstrated that there was a significant difference decrease scoring healing after treatment, even though the difference scoring healing between both groups was not statistically significant. However, it means difference was found that in the intervention artrihpi the wound healing was better than the spuit. These results illustrates the artrihpi may be solution of using high pressure irrigation to help healing process diabetic ulcers.

  14. Divergent effects of new cyclooxygenase inhibitors on gastric ulcer healing: Shifting the angiogenic balance

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; del Soldato, Piero; Wallace, John L.

    2002-01-01

    Delayed gastric ulcer healing is a well recognized problem associated with the use of cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors. In contrast, NO-releasing COX inhibitors do not interfere with ulcer healing. These divergent effects may in part be due to differences in their effects on platelets, which are known to influence ulcer healing. Therefore, we compared the effects of a nonselective COX inhibitor (flurbiprofen), a nitric oxide-releasing COX inhibitor (HCT-1026), and a selective COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) on gastric ulcer healing, angiogenesis, and platelet/serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endostatin. Gastric ulcers were induced in rats by serosal application of acetic acid. Daily treatment with the test drugs was started 3 days later and continued for 1 week. Celecoxib and flurbiprofen impaired angiogenesis and delayed ulcer healing, as well as increasing serum endostatin levels relative to those of VEGF. HCT-1026 did not delay ulcer healing nor impair angiogenesis, and also did not change the ratio of serum endostatin to VEGF. Incubation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with serum from celecoxib- or flurbiprofen-treated rats resulted in suppressed proliferation and increased apoptosis, effects that were reversed by an antiendostatin antibody. These results demonstrate a previously unrecognized mechanism through which nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs can delay ulcer healing, namely, through altering the balance of anti- and proangiogenic factors in the serum. The absence of a delaying effect of HCT-1026 on ulcer healing may be related to the maintenance of a more favorable balance in serum levels of pro- and antiangiogenic growth factors. PMID:12232050

  15. Topical Administration of Pirfenidone Increases Healing of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Randomized Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Janka-Zires, Marcela; Uribe-Wiechers, Ana Cecilia; Juárez-Comboni, Sonia Citlali; López-Gutiérrez, Joel; Escobar-Jiménez, Jarod Jazek; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Only 30 percent of chronic diabetic foot ulcers heal after 20 weeks of standard treatment. Pirfenidone is a drug with biological, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical pirfenidone added to conventional treatment in noninfected chronic diabetic foot ulcers. This was a randomized crossover study. Group 1 received topical pirfenidone plus conventional treatment for 8 weeks; after this period, they were switched to receive conventional treatment only for 8 more weeks. In group 2, the order of the treatments was the opposite. The end points were complete ulcer healing and size reduction. Final data were obtained from 35 ulcers in 24 patients. Fifty-two percent of ulcers treated with pirfenidone healed before 8 weeks versus 14.3% treated with conventional treatment only (P = 0.025). Between 8 and 16 weeks, 30.8% ulcers that received pirfenidone healed versus 0% with conventional treatment (P = 0.081). By week 8, the reduction in ulcer size was 100% [73–100] with pirfenidone versus 57.5% with conventional treatment [28.9–74] (P = 0.011). By week 16, the reduction was 93% [42.7–100] with pirfenidone and 21.8% [8–77.5] with conventional treatment (P = 0.050). The addition of topical pirfenidone to conventional treatment significantly improves the healing of chronic diabetic noninfected foot ulcers. PMID:27478849

  16. Topical Administration of Pirfenidone Increases Healing of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Randomized Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Janka-Zires, Marcela; Almeda-Valdes, Paloma; Uribe-Wiechers, Ana Cecilia; Juárez-Comboni, Sonia Citlali; López-Gutiérrez, Joel; Escobar-Jiménez, Jarod Jazek; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Only 30 percent of chronic diabetic foot ulcers heal after 20 weeks of standard treatment. Pirfenidone is a drug with biological, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical pirfenidone added to conventional treatment in noninfected chronic diabetic foot ulcers. This was a randomized crossover study. Group 1 received topical pirfenidone plus conventional treatment for 8 weeks; after this period, they were switched to receive conventional treatment only for 8 more weeks. In group 2, the order of the treatments was the opposite. The end points were complete ulcer healing and size reduction. Final data were obtained from 35 ulcers in 24 patients. Fifty-two percent of ulcers treated with pirfenidone healed before 8 weeks versus 14.3% treated with conventional treatment only (P = 0.025). Between 8 and 16 weeks, 30.8% ulcers that received pirfenidone healed versus 0% with conventional treatment (P = 0.081). By week 8, the reduction in ulcer size was 100% [73-100] with pirfenidone versus 57.5% with conventional treatment [28.9-74] (P = 0.011). By week 16, the reduction was 93% [42.7-100] with pirfenidone and 21.8% [8-77.5] with conventional treatment (P = 0.050). The addition of topical pirfenidone to conventional treatment significantly improves the healing of chronic diabetic noninfected foot ulcers.

  17. Gastroprotective and ulcer healing effects of Piptadeniastrum Africanum on experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Ateufack, Gilbert; Domgnim Mokam, Elisabeth Carol; Mbiantcha, Marius; Dongmo Feudjio, Rostand Breuil; David, Nana; Kamanyi, Albert

    2015-07-08

    Gastric peptic ulcer is one of the common disorders of gastrointestinal tract, which occur due to an imbalance between the offensive and defensive factors. It is an illness that affects a considerable number of people worldwide. This study was conducted to evaluate the antiulcerogenic and antiulcer effects and recognize the basic mechanism of action of Piptadeniastrum africanum stem bark extracts. The aqueous and methanol extracts of Piptadeniastrum africanum were administered at the doses 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg to evaluate their effects on gastric ulcer induced by the HCl/ethanol mixture, indomethacin and acetic acid in Wistar strain male adult rats, aged between 12 and 16 weeks and weighing between 180 and 220 g. Ranitidine, Maalox and Misoprostol were used as standard drugs. Histopathological examination and nitric oxide level were performed to evaluate the basic mechanism of action of Piptadeniastrum africanum. Phytochemical screening was carried out to identify known phytochemicals present in these extracts. The aqueous and methanol extracts of stem bark of Piptadeniastrum africanum significantly inhibited (p < 0.01) gastric ulceration induced by HCl/ethanol to the percentages of inhibition of 81.38; 98.75 and 100 % for the aqueous extract and then 75.83, 89.76 and 96.52 % for the methanol extract, and with the Indomethacin-induced ulcers, aqueous and methanol extracts of bark of Piptadeniastrum africanum reduce significantly (p < 0.01) induced gastric lesions in rats, with percentage of cure 35.75; 52.33 and 98.58 % for the aqueous extract, and 33.7; 51.97; and 65.93 to the methanol extract. The results revealed a significant reduction of ulcerated surface in both extracts and increase of nitric oxide (NO) level with methanol extract. When compared to methanol extract, aqueous extract showed more pronounced effects, corresponding to percentages of healing of 59. 92; 84.12 and 59.65 % for the aqueous extract; and 70.43; 55.49 and 57.59 % for the

  18. Effectiveness of Removable Walker Cast Versus Nonremovable Fiberglass Off-Bearing Cast in the Healing of Diabetic Plantar Foot Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Faglia, Ezio; Caravaggi, Carlo; Clerici, Giacomo; Sganzaroli, Adriana; Curci, Vincenzo; Vailati, Wanda; Simonetti, Daniele; Sommalvico, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the efficacy of a removable cast walker compared with that of a nonremovable fiberglass off-bearing cast in the treatment of diabetic plantar foot ulcer. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Forty-five adult diabetic patients with nonischemic, noninfected neuropathic plantar ulcer were randomly assigned for treatment with a nonremovable fiberglass off-bearing cast (total contact cast [TCC] group) or walker cast (Stabil-D group). Treatment duration was 90 days. Percent reduction in ulcer surface area and total healing rates were evaluated after treatment. RESULTS A total of 48 patients were screened; however, 2 patients in the TCC group and 1 patient in the Stabil-D group did not complete the study and were considered dropouts. There were no significant differences in demographic and clinic characteristics of the 45 patients completing the study. Ulcer surface decreased from 1.41 to 0.21 cm2 (P < 0.001) in the TCC group and from 2.18 to 0.45 cm2 (P < 0.001) in the Stabil-D group, with no significant differences between groups (P = 0.722). Seventeen patients (73.9%) in the TCC group and 16 patients (72.7%) in the Stabil-D group achieved healing (P = 0.794). Average healing time was 35.3 ± 3.1 and 39.7 ± 4.2 days in the TCC and Stabil-D group, respectively (P = 0.708). CONCLUSIONS The Stabil-D cast walker, although removable, was equivalent in efficacy to the TCC in terms of ulcer size reduction and total healing rate. The easier use of Stabil-D may help increase the use of off-loading devices in the management of plantar neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:20357377

  19. Combination Growth Factor Therapy via Electrostatically Assembled Wound Dressings Improves Diabetic Ulcer Healing In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Almquist, Benjamin D; Castleberry, Steven A; Sun, Julia B; Lu, Alice Y; Hammond, Paula T

    2015-10-01

    Chronic skin ulcerations are a common complication of diabetes mellitus, affecting up to one in four diabetic individuals. Despite the prevalence of these wounds, current pharmacologic options for treating them remain limited. Growth factor-based therapies have displayed a mixed ability to drive successful healing, which may be due to nonoptimal delivery strategies. Here, a method for coating commercially available nylon dressings using the layer-by-layer process is described to enable both sustained release and independent control over the release kinetics of vascular endothelial growth factor 165 and platelet-derived growth factor BB. It is shown that the use of strategically spaced diffusion barriers formed spontaneously by disulfide bonds enables independent control over the release rates of incorporated growth factors, and that in vivo these dressings improve several aspects of wound healing in db/db mice. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The effect of nitric oxide releasing cream on healing pressure ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Saidkhani, Vahid; Asadizaker, Marziyeh; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Latifi, Sayed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pressure ulcer is one of the main concerns of nurses in medical centers around the world, which, if untreated, causes irreparable problems for patients. In recent years, nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed as an effective method for wound healing. This study was conducted to determine the effect of nitric oxide on pressure ulcer healing. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 58 patients with pressure ulcer at hospitals affiliated to Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences were homogenized and later divided randomly into two groups of treatment (nitric oxide cream; n = 29) and control (placebo cream; n = 29). In this research, the data collection tool was the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH). At the outset of the study (before using the cream), the patients' ulcers were examined weekly in terms of size, amount of exudates, and tissue type using the PUSH tool for 3 weeks. By integrating these three factors, wound healing was determined. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Results: Although no significant difference was found in terms of the mean of score size, the amount of exudates, and the tissue type between the two groups, the mean of total score (healing) between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Nitric oxide cream seems to accelerate wound healing. Therefore, considering its easy availability and cost-effectiveness, it can be used for treating pressure ulcers in the future. PMID:27186212

  1. Effect of Infrared Radiation on the Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Ashrafalsadat; Sadeghi Moghadam, Ali; Shariati, Abdalali; karimi, Hamid; Haghighizadeh, Mohamad Hossien

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot ulcer is a worldwide health care concern affecting tens of thousands of patients. If these ulcers left untreated, they can create severe complications. Objectives This study was designed to examine the effect of infrared radiation on the healing of diabetic foot ulcer. Patients and Methods This clinical trial was performed on 50 patients referred to Dr. Ganjavian hospital in Dezful city, Iran, with diabetic foot ulcer degree 1 and 2 (based on Wegener Scale). Sample size was determined based on relevant studies of the recent decade. Patients were classified into the intervention and control groups (n = 25 in each group) in terms of age, gender, degree of ulcer, ulcer site and body mass index. In this study, work progress was evaluated according to the checklist of diabetic foot ulcer healing evaluation. Results The results of the current study showed that there was a statistically significant difference in healing ulcers (P < 0.05) and mean healing time (P < 0.05) between the two groups. Conclusions Using the infrared plus routine dressing is more effective than using merely routine dressing. PMID:27942260

  2. Quality of ulcer healing in gastrointestinal tract: Its pathophysiology and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Toshio; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Morimoto, Ken’ichi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we review the concept of quality of ulcer healing (QOUH) in the gastrointestinal tract and its role in the ulcer recurrence. In the past, peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has been a chronic disease with a cycle of repeated healing/remission and recurrence. The main etiological factor of PUD is Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which is also the cause of ulcer recurrence. However, H. pylori-negative ulcers are present in 12%-20% of patients; they also recur and are on occasion intractable. QOUH focuses on the fact that mucosal and submucosal structures within ulcer scars are incompletely regenerated. Within the scars of healed ulcers, regenerated tissue is immature and with distorted architecture, suggesting poor QOUH. The abnormalities in mucosal regeneration can be the basis for ulcer recurrence. Our studies have shown that persistence of macrophages in the regenerated area plays a key role in ulcer recurrence. Our studies in a rat model of ulcer recurrence have indicated that proinflammatory cytokines trigger activation of macrophages, which in turn produce increased amounts of cytokines and chemokines, which attract neutrophils to the regenerated area. Neutrophils release proteolytic enzymes that destroy the tissue, resulting in ulcer recurrence. Another important factor in poor QOUH can be deficiency of endogenous prostaglandins and a deficiency and/or an imbalance of endogenous growth factors. Topically active mucosal protective and antiulcer drugs promote high QOUH and reduce inflammatory cell infiltration in the ulcer scar. In addition to PUD, the concept of QOUH is likely applicable to inflammatory bowel diseases including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. PMID:23002355

  3. [Research progress of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors on healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yunyi; Liang, Yujie; Ran, Xingwu

    2018-05-01

    To review the effect of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors on the wound healing and its mechanisms in chronic diabetic foot ulcers. The latest literature concerning DPP-4 inhibitors for chronic diabetic foot ulcers was extensively reviewed, as well as the potential benefit and mechanism of DPP-4 inhibitors on wound healing of diabetic foot ulcers was analyzed thoroughly. DPP-4 inhibitors can accelerated the ulcer healing. The mechanisms probably include inhibiting the expression of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and restoring the balance of the wound MMP and the tissue inhibitors of MMP; promoting recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells and augmenting angiogenesis; optimizing extracellular matrix construction and the immune response to persistent hypoxia in chronic diabetes wounds, and so on. At present, clinical researches show that DPP-4 inhibitors may be considered as an adjuvant treatment for chronic diabetic foot ulcers. DPP-4 inhibitors show promise in the local wound healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers. However, more strictly designed, adequately powered, long-term follow-up, and high-quality randomized control trials are needed to further verify their efficacy and safety for chronic diabetic foot ulcers.

  4. The Probiotic Mixture VSL#3 Accelerates Gastric Ulcer Healing by Stimulating Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Dharmani, Poonam; De Simone, Claudio; Chadee, Kris

    2013-01-01

    Studies assessing the effect and mechanism of probiotics on diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GI) including gastric ulcers are limited despite extensive work and promising results of this therapeutic option for other GI diseases. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which the probiotic mixture VSL#3 (a mixture of eight probiotic bacteria including Lactobacilli, Bifidobacteria and Streptococcus species) heals acetic acid induced gastric ulcer in rats. VSL#3 was administered orally at low (6×109 bacteria) or high (1.2×1010 bacteria) dosages from day 3 after ulcer induction for 14 consecutive days. VSL#3 treatments significantly enhanced gastric ulcer healing in a dose-dependent manner. To assess the mechanism(s) whereby VSL#3 exerted its protective effects, we quantified the gene expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, protein and expression of stomach mucin-Muc5ac, regulatory cytokine-IL-10, COX-2 and various growth factors. Of all the components examined, only expression and protein production of VEGF was increased 332-fold on day 7 in the ulcerated tissues of animals treated with VSL#3. Predictably, animals treated with VEGF neutralizing antibody significantly delayed gastric ulcer healing in VSL#3 treated animals. This is the first report to demonstrate high efficacy of the probiotic mixture VSL#3 in enhancing gastric ulcer healing. Probiotic efficacy was effective at higher concentrations of VSL#3 by specifically increasing the expression and production of angiogenesis promoting growth factors, primarily VEGF. PMID:23484048

  5. Factors affecting the healing of pressure ulcers in a Korean acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Sung, Young Hee; Park, Kyung Hee

    2011-01-01

    We sought to determine the factors affecting pressure ulcer (PU) healing in an acute care facility in Korea. Data were collected between October 1, 2006, and September 30, 2007, regarding PU status and factors hypothesized to influence wound healing. We developed a form that queried factors thought to affect PU healing based on literature review. We also administered the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) tool to assess healing of PUs and calculated change in PUSH scale as the outcome variable reflecting the magnitude of the healing of PU. One hundred fifty eight patients with a total of 326 PUs in an acute care hospital located in Seoul, Korea, comprised the sample. The variables found to significantly affect PU healing included mean arterial pressure (MAP), serum albumin level, urinary incontinence, consultation with nutritionist, Braden Scale scale, wound size, and exudate amount. Pressure ulcer healing was improved when the MAP was higher (B = 0.034) and the serum albumin level was more than 2.8 g/dL (20.8 grams/liter) (B = 1.107). When managing patients in an acute care setting, PU healing may be improved by maintaining MAP and providing protein supplements to keep serum albumin level greater than 2.8 g/dL (20.8 grams/liter).

  6. Factors Affecting Wound Healing in Individuals With Pressure Ulcers: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Azize; AAbbasoğlu, Aysel; Işık, Sevcan Avcı; Çevik, Banu; Saltan, Çiğdem; Elbaş, Nalan Özhan; Yalılı, Ayşe

    2018-02-01

    Owing to the number and severity of concomitant factors, pressure ulcers remain a significant problem. A retrospective study of data from adult patients with a pressure ulcer was conducted to identify factors that may affect their healing. Data from patients who were hospitalized between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2015, in a private Turkish university hospital who had a Stage 2, Stage 3, Stage 4, or unstageable pressure ulcer that was assessed using the Bates-Jensen Wound Assessment Tool (BWAT) were abstracted. The following variables were examined: demographic characteristics (gender, age, hospital unit, duration of hospitalization), health status and disease data (vital signs, mobility, nutrition, diagnosis, chronic diseases, medication), laboratory values (albumin, hemoglobin, blood glucose), and pressure ulcer characteristics (stage, location, healing status, duration) and pressure ulcer risk status as determined by patient Braden Scale score. Seventy-eight (78) patient records were identified. Patient mean age was 70.8 ± 13.47 years, and length of hospitalization was on average 32.52 ± 27.2 days. Most ulcers (62; 79.5%) were Stage 2 and located in the sacral area (59; 75.6%). Thirty-four (34) patients (43.6%) were discharged and 44 (56.4%) died. At the time of discharge or death, 65.4% of the ulcers had not healed. Patients whose wounds were healed were significantly more likely to have higher hemoglobin and mean arterial pressure, better mobility, received oral nutrition, and discharged from the hospital than patients whose ulcers did not heal. The results suggest that these variables, including Braden Scale and BWAT scores, might be considered when developing a treatment plan of care. Additional studies examining risk factors for nonhealing pressure ulcers, including studies with large samples to facilitate multivariate analyses, are needed.

  7. Impact of optimal anticoagulation therapy on chronic venous ulcer healing in thrombophilic patients with post-thrombotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa, C A; Olivares-Cruz, S; Laparra-Escareno, H; Sanchez-Castro, S; Tamayo-Garcia, B; Anaya-Ayala, J E

    2016-12-02

    four healed the ulcers with an mean of 72 months (range: 2-204) (p=0.94). There seems to be an association between an optimal anticoagulation therapy with Warfarin monitored by INR and wound healing rates in thrombophilic patients with chronic venous ulcers. Further research is warranted. The authors have no conflict of interest.

  8. Evaluating the effect of the new incentive system for high-risk pressure ulcer patients on wound healing and cost-effectiveness: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Hiromi; Nakagami, Gojiro; Mizokami, Yuko; Minami, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Aya; Oe, Makoto; Kaitani, Toshiko; Iizaka, Shinji

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of new incentive system for pressure ulcer management, which focused on skilled nurse staffing in terms of rate of healing and medical costs. A prospective cohort study included two types of groups: 39 institutions, which introduced the new incentive system, and 20 non-introduced groups (control). Sixty-seven patients suffering from severe pressure ulcers in the introduced group and 38 patients in the non-introduced group were included. Wound healing and medical costs were monitored weekly for three weeks by their skilled nurses in charge. Healing status and related medical costs. The introduced group showed significantly higher rate of healing compared with the control group at each weekly assessment. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the introduction of the new incentive system was independently associated with the faster healing rate (beta=3.44, P<.001). The budget impact analysis demonstrated that introducing this system could reduce cost of treating severe pressure ulcers by 1.776 billion yen per year. The new incentive system for the management of pressure ulcers, which focused on staffing with skilled nurses can improve healing rate with reduced medical cost. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of nutritional intervention on healing of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Hisashige, Akinori; Ohura, Takehiko

    2012-12-01

    Pressure ulcers not only affect quality of life among the elderly, but also bring a large economic burden. There is limited evidence available for the effectiveness of nutritional interventions for treatment of pressure ulcers. In Japan, recently, a 60-patient randomized controlled trial of nutritional intervention on pressure ulcers demonstrated improvement in healing of pressure ulcers, compared with conventional management. To evaluate value for money of nutritional intervention on healing of pressure ulcers, cost-effective analysis was carried out using these trial results. The analysis was carried out from a societal perspective. As effectiveness measures, pressure ulcer days (PUDs) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated. Prevalence of pressure ulcers was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Utility score for pressure ulcers is derived from a cross-sectional survey among health professionals related to pressure ulcers. Costs (e.g., nutritional interventions and management of pressure ulcers) were estimated from trial data during observation and follow-up. Stochastic and qualitative sensitivity analyses were performed to examine the robustness of results. For observation (12 weeks) and follow-up (12-week observation plus 4-week follow-up), nutritional intervention reduced PUDs by 9.6 and 16.2 per person, and gained 0.226 × 10(-2) QALYs and 0.382 × 10(-2) QALYs per person, respectively. In addition, costs were reduced by $542 and $881 per person, respectively. This means nutritional intervention is dominant (cost savings and greater effectiveness). The sensitivity analyses showed the robustness of these results. Economic evaluation of nutritional intervention on healing pressure ulcers from a small randomized controlled trial showed that this intervention is cost saving with health improvement. Further studies are required to determine whether this is a cost-effective intervention for widespread use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and

  10. Clopidogrel inhibits angiogenesis of gastric ulcer healing via downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Peng, Yen-Ling; Chen, Tseng-Shing; Huo, Teh-Ia; Hou, Ming-Chih; Huang, Hui-Chun; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh

    2016-09-01

    Although clopidogrel does not cause gastric mucosal injury, it does not prevent peptic ulcer recurrence in high-risk patients. We explored whether clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing via inhibiting angiogenesis and to elucidate the possible mechanisms. Gastric ulcers were induced in Sprague Dawley rats, and ulcer healing and angiogenesis of ulcer margin were compared between clopidogrel-treated rats and controls. The expressions of the proangiogenic growth factors and their receptors including basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), bFGF receptor (FGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGFR1, VEGFR2, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)A, PDGFB, PDGFR A, PDGFR B, and phosphorylated form of mitogenic activated protein kinase pathways over the ulcer margin were compared via western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In vitro, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to elucidate how clopidogrel inhibited growth factors-stimulated HUVEC proliferation. The ulcer sizes were significantly larger and the angiogenesis of ulcer margin was significantly diminished in the clopidogrel (2 and 10 mg/kg/d) treated groups. Ulcer induction markedly increased the expression of phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK), FGFR2, VEGF, VEGFR2, and PDGFRA when compared with those of normal mucosa. Clopidogrel treatment significantly decreased pERK, FGFR2, VEGF, VEGFR2, and PDGFRA expression at the ulcer margin when compared with those of the respective control group. In vitro, clopidogrel (10(-6)M) inhibited VEGF-stimulated (20 ng/mL) HUVEC proliferation, at least, via downregulation of VEGFR2 and pERK. Clopidogrel inhibits the angiogenesis of gastric ulcer healing at least partially by the inhibition of the VEGF-VEGFR2-ERK signal transduction pathway. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. The Role of Pressure Offloading on Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing and Prevention of Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A

    2016-09-01

    An increased plantar pressure is a causative factor in the development of plantar foot ulcers in people with diabetes mellitus, and ulcers are a precursor of lower extremity amputation. In this article, the evidence is reviewed that relieving areas of increased plantar pressure (ie, offloading) can heal plantar foot ulcers and prevent their recurrence. Noninfected, nonischemic neuropathic plantar forefoot ulcers should heal in 6 to 8 weeks with adequate offloading. Recent meta-analyses and systematic reviews show that nonremovable knee-high devices are most effective. This is probably because they eliminate the problem of nonadherence with the use of a removable device. Studies show a large discrepancy between evidence-based recommendations on offloading and what is used in clinical practice. Many clinics continue to use methods that are less effective or have not been proven to be effective, while ignoring evidence-based methods. Strategies are proposed to address this issue, notably the adoption and implementation of recent international guidelines by professional societies and a stronger focus of clinicians on expedited healing. For the prevention of plantar foot ulcer recurrence in high-risk patients, 2 recent trials have shown that the incidence of recurrence can be significantly reduced with custom-made footwear that has a demonstrated pressure-relieving effect through guidance by plantar pressure measurements, under the condition that the footwear is worn. This review helps to inform clinicians about effective offloading treatment for healing plantar foot ulcers and preventing their recurrence.

  12. Effects of Purified Saccharomyces cerevisiae (1→3)-β-Glucan on Venous Ulcer Healing

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Sarah Dantas Viana; Cordeiro, Sara Lima; Cavalcanti, Jéssica Escorel Chaves; Melchuna, Karina Mendes; Lima, Aleida Maria da Silva; Filho, Irami Araújo; Medeiros, Aldo Cunha; Rocha, Keyla Borges Ferreira; Oliveira, Elizabeth Maia; Faria, Eduardo Dantas Baptista; Sassaki, Guilherme Lanzi; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira; Sales, Valéria Soraya Farias

    2012-01-01

    Water-insoluble glucan was isolated from the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The yeast cells were treated with alkali and the residue then with acid. Chemical and NMR (1D and 2D) analyses showed that a linear (1→3)-β-glucan was purified that was not contaminated with other carbohydrates, proteins or phenolic compounds. The effects of the glucan on wound healing were assessed in human venous ulcers by histopathological analysis after 30 days of topical treatment. (1→3)-β-glucan enhanced ulcer healing and increased epithelial hyperplasia, as well as increased inflammatory cells, angiogenesis and fibroblast proliferation. In one patient who had an ulcer that would not heal for over 15 years, glucan treatment caused a 67.8% decrease in the area of the ulcer. This is the first study to investigate the effects of (1→3)-β-glucan on venous ulcer healing in humans; our findings suggest that this glucan is a potential natural biological response modifier in wound healing. PMID:22942695

  13. Increased ratio of serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 against TIMP-1 predicts poor wound healing in diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhihong; Guo, Shuqin; Yao, Fang; Zhang, Yunliang; Li, Tingting

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about serum concentrations of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 in diabetic patients with foot ulcers. This study demonstrates their relationship with wound healing. Ninety-four patients with diabetic foot ulcers were recruited in the study. Serum MMP-9, MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were measured at the first clinic visit and the end of 4-week treatment and followed up till 12 weeks. According to the decreasing rate of ulcer healing area at the fourth week, we divided those cases into good and poor healers. Through analyses, we explore the possible relationship among those factors and degree of wound healing. The median level of serum MMP-9 in good healers was lower than poor healers at first visit (124.2 μg/L vs 374.6 μg/L, p<0.05), and after 4-week therapy it decreased 5-fold approximately. In contrast, the change in MMP-9 concentration did not reach statistical significance in poor healers. MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 varied slightly in both good healers and poor healers. The MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio better reflected the healing than MMP-9 alone before therapy and after 4 week treatment (r = -0.6475 vs -0.3251, r = -0.7096 vs -0.1231, respectively). Receiver Operator Curve (ROC) showed that the cutoff for MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio at <0.395 best predicted a reduction in wound area of 82% at the end of 4-week treatment with a sensitivity of 63.6% and a specificity of 58.6% (area under the curve 0.658, p < 0.001). Detecting serum MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio on admission might be a predictor of healing and might provide a novel target for the future therapy in diabetic foot ulcers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A controlled, randomized, comparative study of a radiant heat bandage on the healing of stage 3-4 pressure ulcers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David R; Diebold, Marilyn R; Eggemeyer, Linda M

    2005-01-01

    Pressure ulcers, like other chronic wounds, fail to proceed through an orderly and timely process to produce anatomical or functional integrity. Treatment of pressure ulcers is directed to improving host factors and providing an optimum wound environment. In addition to providing a moist wound environment, it has been theorized that preventing hypothermia in a wound and maintaining a normothermic state might improve wound healing. Forty-one subjects with a stage 3 or stage 4 truncal pressure ulcer >1.0 cm(2) were recruited from outpatient clinics, long-term care nursing homes, and a rehabilitation center. The experimental group was randomized to a radiant-heat dressing device and the control group was randomized to a hydrocolloid dressing, with or without a calcium alginate filler. Subjects were followed until healed or for 12 weeks. Eight subjects (57%) in the experimental group had complete healing of their pressure ulcer compared with 7 subjects (44%) with complete healing in the control group (P = .46). Although a 13% difference in healing rate between the two arms of the study was found, this difference was not statistically significant. At almost all points along the healing curve, the proportion not healed was higher in the control arm.

  15. A Bioengineered Living Cell Construct Activates an Acute Wound Healing Response in Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Rivka C.; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Rosa, Ashley M.; Ramirez, Horacio A.; Badiavas, Evangelos; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2017-01-01

    Chronic non-healing venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are widespread and debilitating, with high morbidity and associated costs; approximately $15 billion is spent annually on the care of VLUs in the US. Despite this, there is a paucity of treatments for VLUs, due to the lack of pathophysiologic insight into ulcer development as well as the lack of knowledge regarding biologic actions of existing VLU-targeted therapies. The bioengineered bilayered living cellular construct (BLCC) skin substitute is an FDA-approved biologic treatment for healing VLUs. To elucidate the mechanisms through which the BLCC promotes healing of chronic VLUs, we conducted a clinical trial (NCT01327937) in which patients with non-healing VLUs were treated with either standard care (compression therapy) or the BLCC together with standard care. Tissue was collected from the VLU edge before and 1 week after treatment, and samples underwent comprehensive microarray, mRNA, and protein analyses. Ulcers treated with the BLCC skin substitute displayed three distinct transcriptomic patterns, suggesting that BLCC induced a shift from a non-healing to a healing tissue response involving modulation of inflammatory and growth factor signaling, keratinocyte activation, and attenuation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. In these ways, BLCC application orchestrated a shift from the chronic non-healing ulcer microenvironment to a distinctive healing milieu resembling that of an acute, healing wound. Our findings provide in vivo evidence in patient VLU biopsies of pathways that can be targeted in the design of new therapies to promote healing of chronic VLUs. PMID:28053158

  16. Rebamipide May Be Comparable to H2 Receptor Antagonist in Healing Iatrogenic Gastric Ulcers Created by Endoscopic Mucosal Resection: A Prospective Randomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Jin; Lee, Sang Kil; Kim, Jie Hyun; Lee, Yong Chan

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) results in the formation of iatrogenic gastric ulcers and the optimal treatments for such ulcers are still unclear. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of rebamipide in the management of EMR-induced ulcers by comparing it with an H2 receptor antagonist. After EMR, patients were randomly assigned into either rebamipide or famotidine groups. All patients received a one-week lansoprazole 30 mg q.d. therapy followed by three-week famotidine (20 mg b.i.d.) or rebamipide (100 mg t.i.d.) therapy. Four weeks after the treatments, ulcer sizes, stages, bleeding rates, and ulcer-related symptoms were compared using endoscopy and a questionnaire. A total of 63 patients were enrolled in this study. Finally, 51 patients were analyzed, 26 in rebamipide and 25 in famotidine group. Baseline characteristics were not significantly different between the two groups. Four weeks after EMR, the two groups were comparable in terms of ulcer reduction ratio (P=0.297), and ulcer stage (P=1.000). Moreover, no difference was observed with regard to ulcer-related symptoms, drug compliance, adverse drug event rates, and bleeding rates. Our data suggest that rebamipide is not inferior to famotidine in healing iatrogenic gastric ulcers, and could be a therapeutic option in the treatment of such ulcers. PMID:20358002

  17. Combined application of alginate dressing and human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor promotes healing in refractory chronic skin ulcers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guobao; Sun, Tangqing; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Qiuhe; Zhang, Keyan; Tian, Qingfen; Huo, Ran

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical therapeutic effect of the combined application of alginate and recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) on the healing of refractory chronic skin ulcers. A single center, three arm, randomized study was performed at Jinan Central Hospital (Jinan, Shandong, China). A total of 60 patients with refractory chronic skin ulcers, which persisted for >1 month, were enrolled and randomly assigned into one of the following three groups: alginate dressing/rhGM-CSF group (group A), rhGM-CSF only group (group B) and conventional (vaseline dressing) group (group C). The wound area rate was measured, granulation and color were observed and pain was evaluated. The data were summarized and statistical analysis was performed. The results demonstrated that group A exhibited a significantly faster wound healing rate and lower pain score compared with the other groups (P<0.01). In conclusion, the combined application of alginate dressing and rhGM-CSF for the treatment of refractory chronic skin ulcers demonstrated significant advantages. It promoted the growth of granulation tissue, accelerated re-epithelialization and also effectively reduced wound pain, and thus improved the quality of life for the patient. This suggests that the combined application of alginate and rhGM-CSF may be an effective therapeutic strategy for the clinical treatment of refractory chronic skin ulcers.

  18. Effects of artemisinin, with or without lumefantrine and amodiaquine on gastric ulcer healing in rat.

    PubMed

    Ajeigbe, Kazeem O; Emikpe, Benjamin O; Olaleye, Samuel Babafemi

    2018-04-27

    Antimalarial drugs have been shown to predispose the stomach to ulceration in rats. However, their role in the modulation of gastric ulcer healing is not known. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of artemisinin-based combination therapies on ulcer healing. Gastric kissing ulcers were induced in 40 male albino rats (150-180 g) using 0.2 mL 50% acetic acid. One day after the ulcer induction, experimental rats were divided into four groups and treated once daily orally for 3 days as follows: (1) normal saline, (2) artemether-lumefantrine (2/12 mg/kg), (3) artesunate-amodiaquine (4/10 mg/kg), and (4) artesunate (2 mg/kg) only. A fifth group of 10 rats served as overall control with no ulcer induced and no treatment given. Ulcer healing was determined on days 4 and 7 post induction using ulcer score and planimetry. Artesunate decreased ulcer severity by 12.5% and 52.0% on days 4 and 7, respectively. Significant increases in severity were observed in rats treated with artemether-lumefantrine (25.0% and 40.0%) and artesunate-amodiaquine (50.0% and 95.0%). Lipid peroxidation was decreased by artesunate by day 7 (27%; p<0.05) but increased in artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine administered rats (63.6% and 55%; p<0.05). The activity of superoxide dismutase was reduced by artesunate-amodiaquine on day 7 (22%; p<0.05) but no effect in the artemether-lumefantrine treatment. Neutrophil infiltration, total leukocyte count, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, and C-reactive protein values were significantly increased in the artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine treated groups when compared with the untreated ulcer control group (p<0.05). These variables were all reduced by artesunate (p<0.05). This study revealed that although artesunate may be beneficial in gastric ulcer healing, its combination with either lumefantrine or amodiaquine may delay healing of gastric mucosal injury.

  19. Nerve growth factor injected into the gastric ulcer base incorporates into endothelial, neuronal, glial and epithelial cells: implications for angiogenesis, mucosal regeneration and ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, T; Ahluwalia, A; Watanabe, T; Arakawa, T; Tarnawski, A S

    2015-08-01

    A previous study has demonstrated that locally administered growth factors such as epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor can accelerate healing of experimental gastric ulcers in rats. That study indicates that locally administered growth factors can exert potent biological effects resulting in enhanced gastric ulcers healing. However, the fate of injected growth factors, their retention and localization to specific cellular compartments have not been examined. In our preliminary study, we demonstrated that local injection of nerve growth factor to the base of experimental gastric ulcers dramatically accelerates ulcer healing, increases angiogenesis - new blood vessel formation, and improves the quality of vascular and epithelial regeneration. Before embarking on larger, definitive and time sequence studies, we wished to determine whether locally injected nerve growth factor is retained in gastric ulcer's tissues and taken up by specific cells during gastric ulcer healing. Gastric ulcers were induced in anesthetized rats by local application of acetic acid using standard methods; and, 60 min later fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled nerve growth factor was injected locally to the ulcer base. Rats were euthanized 2, 5 and 10 days later. Gastric specimens were obtained and processed for histology. Unstained paraffin sections were examined under a fluorescence microscope, and the incorporation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled nerve growth factor into various gastric tissue cells was determined and quantified. In addition, we performed immunostaining for S100β protein that is expressed in neural components. Five and ten days after ulcer induction labeled nerve growth factor (injected to the gastric ulcer base) was incorporated into endothelial cells of blood vessels, neuronal, glial and epithelial cells, myofibroblasts and muscle cells. This study demonstrates for the first time that during gastric ulcer healing

  20. Autologous circulating angiogenic cells treated with osteopontin and delivered via a collagen scaffold enhance wound healing in the alloxan-induced diabetic rabbit ear ulcer model.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, Aonghus; Kulkarni, Mangesh; Vaughan, Erin E; Creane, Michael; Liew, Aaron; Dockery, Peter; Pandit, Abhay; O'Brien, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is the leading cause of amputation in people with diabetes mellitus. Peripheral vascular disease is present in the majority of patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Despite standard treatments there exists a high amputation rate. Circulating angiogenic cells previously known as early endothelial progenitor cells are derived from peripheral blood and support angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, providing a potential topical treatment for non-healing diabetic foot ulcers. A scaffold fabricated from Type 1 collagen facilitates topical cell delivery to a diabetic wound. Osteopontin is a matricellular protein involved in wound healing and increases the angiogenic potential of circulating angiogenic cells. A collagen scaffold seeded with circulating angiogenic cells was developed. Subsequently the effect of autologous circulating angiogenic cells that were seeded in a collagen scaffold and topically delivered to a hyperglycemic cutaneous wound was assessed. The alloxan-induced diabetic rabbit ear ulcer model was used to determine healing in response to the following treatments: collagen seeded with autologous circulating angiogenic cells exposed to osteopontin, collagen seeded with autologous circulating angiogenic cells, collagen alone and untreated wound. Stereology was used to assess angiogenesis in wounds. The cells exposed to osteopontin and seeded on collagen increased percentage wound closure as compared to other groups. Increased angiogenesis was observed with the treatment of collagen and collagen seeded with circulating angiogenic cells. These results demonstrate that topical treatment of full thickness cutaneous ulcers with autologous circulating angiogenic cells increases wound healing. Cells exposed to the matricellular protein osteopontin result in superior wound healing. The wound healing benefit is associated with a more efficient vascular network. This topical therapy provides a potential novel therapy for the treatment of non-healing

  1. The LeucoPatch® system in the management of hard-to-heal diabetic foot ulcers: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Game, Frances; Jeffcoate, William; Tarnow, Lise; Day, Florence; Fitzsimmons, Deborah; Jacobsen, Judith

    2017-10-10

    Diabetic foot ulcers are a common and severe complication of diabetes mellitus. Standard treatment includes debridement, offloading, management of infection and revascularisation where appropriate, although healing times may be long. The LeucoPatch® device is used to generate an autologous platelet-rich fibrin and leucocyte wound dressing produced from the patient's own venous blood by centrifugation, but without the addition of any reagents. The final product comprises a thin, circular patch composed predominantly of fibrin together with living platelets and leucocytes. Promising results have been obtained in non-controlled studies this system, but this now needs to be tested in a randomised controlled trial (RCT). If confirmed, the LeucoPatch® may become an important new tool in the armamentarium in the management of diabetic foot ulcers which are hard-to-heal. People with diabetes and hard-to-heal ulcers of the foot will receive either pre-specified good standard care or good standard care supplemented by the application of the LeucoPatch® device. The primary outcome will be the percentage of ulcers healed within 20 weeks. Healing will be defined as complete epithelialisation without discharge that is maintained for 4 weeks and is confirmed by an observer blind to randomisation group. Ulcers of the foot are a major source of morbidity to patients with diabetes and costs to health care economies. The study population is designed to be as inclusive as possible with the aim of maximising the external validity of any findings. The primary outcome measure is healing within 20 weeks of randomisation and the trial also includes a number of secondary outcome measures. Among these are rate of change in ulcer area as a predictor of the likelihood of eventual healing, minor and major amputation of the target limb, the incidence of infection and quality of life. International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, ISRCTN27665670 . Registered on 5 July 2013.

  2. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue accelerates healing of chronic gastric ulcer in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Cheng; Ho, Ching-Chun; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Xiu-Zhu; Cheng, Tzu-Ting

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for impaired healing of peptic ulcers, and there are currently no supplementary therapeutics other than the standard antipeptic medicine to improve the ulcer healing in diabetes. This study examined the potential pleiotropic effect of a glucagon-like peptide (Glp)-1 analogue exendin (Ex)-4 on the regeneration of gastric ulcer in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Methods and results Chronic ulcer was created in rat stomach by submucosal injection of acetic acid and peri-ulcer tissues were analyzed 7 days after operation. Ulcer wound healing was impaired in diabetic rats with suppressed tissue expression of eNOS and enhanced levels of pro-inflammatory reactions. Treatment with intraperitoneal injection of Ex4 (0.5 μg/kg/d) significantly reduced the area of gastric ulcer without changing blood glucose level. Ex-4 restored the expression of pro-angiogenic factors, and attenuated the generation of regional inflammation and superoxide anions. The improvement of ulcer healing was associated with increased expression of MMP-2 and formation of granulation tissue in the peri-ulcer area. Conclusion Administration of Ex4 may induce pro-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative reactions in the peri-ulcer tissue of diabetic rats that eventually enhances tissue granulation and closure of ulcerative wounds. Our results support the potential clinical application of Glp-1 analogues as supplementary hypoglycemic agents in the antipeptic ulcer medication in diabetes. PMID:29095895

  3. Piper umbellatum L.: A medicinal plant with gastric-ulcer protective and ulcer healing effects in experimental rodent models.

    PubMed

    da Silva Junior, Iberê Ferreira; Balogun, Sikiru Olaitan; de Oliveira, Ruberlei Godinho; Damazo, Amílcar Sabino; Martins, Domingos Tabajara de Oliveira

    2016-11-04

    Piper umbellatum L. (Piperaceae) is a shrub found in the Amazon, Savannah and Atlantic Forest region of Brazil. It is widely used in folk medicine in many countries primarily for the treatment of gastric disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gastroprotective and anti-ulcer effects of hydroethanolic extract of P. umbellatum (HEPu) leaves in experimental rodents. In addition, the anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of the extract was assessed. The leaves of P. umbellatum were macerated in 75% (1:3w/v) hydroethanolic solution to obtain HEPu. The gastroprotective and ulcer healing activities of HEPu were evaluated using acidified ethanol (acute) and acetic acid (chronic) gastric ulcer models in rodents. The anti-H. pylori activity was evaluated by in vitro broth microdilution assay using H. pylori cagA + and vacA + strain. The probable mechanism of action of HEPu was evaluated by determining gastric secretory parameters, antioxidant enzyme (catalase), non-protein sulfhydryl (glutathione) and malondialdehyde levels in gastric tissue, including pro-inflammatory (IL-1β, TNF-a, IL -17, RANTES, IFN-γ and MIP-2) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines. HEPu demonstrated potent gastroprotection against acute ulcer induced by acidified ethanol and excellent healing effect of the chronic ulcer induced by acetic acid. The gastroprotective activity in acidified ethanol is partly attributed to the antioxidant mechanisms, while anti-secretory, anti-inflammatory and regeneration of the gastric mucosa are evoked as part of its antiulcer mechanism of action. The gastric ulcer healing of HEPu also involves restoration of the altered cytokines levels to near normal. However, it has no in vitro anti-H. pylori activity. The results of this study showed that HEPu possesses preventive and curative effects in experimental models of gastric ulcers in animals. These effects are partially dependent on antioxidant, antisecretory, anti-inflammatory and mucosa regeneration. It is

  4. Increasing gastric juice pH level prior to anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy may be beneficial to the healing of duodenal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hong-Yun; Wang, Juan; Yan, Guo-Chao; Huo, Xiao-Hui; Mu, Li-Juan; Chu, Jian-Kun; Niu, Wei-Wei; Duan, Zhi-Ying; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Wang, Jing; Wang, Zhi-Yu

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the efficacy of clarithromycin-based triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori (Hp)-infected duodenal ulcer when combined with different pH levels of gastric juices. A total of 160 patients with Hp-infected duodenal ulcers were randomly allocated into two groups. Patients in the treatment group (n=80) were administered a 20-mg dose of omeprazole twice daily for 1 week and then the treatment and control groups (n=80) received therapy for Hp infection and duodenal ulcers. We observed the ulcer healing stage, the content of anti-Hp IgA in gastric juice and the Hp eradication rate before and after proton pump inhibitor therapy in the two groups. Results revealed that the Hp eradication rate in the treatment group was 93% compared with 81% in the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The ulcer healing rate in the treatment group was 93%, compared with 70% in the control group (P<0.05). A positive linear correlation was observed between gastric pH and the content of anti-Hp IgA in gastric juice (P<0.05). Increasing gastric pH prior to anti-Hp therapy may be beneficial to the eradication of Hp and for promoting the healing of duodenal ulcers.

  5. Topical oxygen therapy promotes the healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hayes, P D; Alzuhir, N; Curran, G; Loftus, I M

    2017-11-02

    Interventions that can heal or reduce diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) size may reduce the incidence of infection and amputation, and reduce associated social and economic costs. Many chronic wounds exhibit a degree of hypoxia and this leads to a reduction in healing processes including cell division and differentiation, angiogenesis, infection prevention, and collagen production. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the effects of a device supplying continuous oxygen ambulatory therapy on healing in chronic DFUs. Patients with chronic DFUs from two tertiary referral hospitals in the UK received treatment with the device. Data were prospectively obtained on wound size using standardised digital images measured by a clinician blinded to the study. Data on device satisfaction and pain were also obtained. We recruited 10 patients, with a mean ulcer duration of 43 weeks (median: 43 weeks) before treatment. By week eight, mean ulcer size had decreased by 51% (median: 53%). Seven of the 10 ulcers were in a healing trajectory, one ulcer present for 56 weeks healed completely, a two-year old ulcer was reduced by more than 50%, and a third, present for 88 weeks, was down to 10% of its original size by the end of the eight-week study. There was also a non-significant trend towards reduction in pain and the device was extremely well tolerated. The ambulatory topical oxygen delivery device showed a significant beneficial effect on wound size. This poses practical advantages over currently existing oxygen-based wound therapies such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy due to its continuous oxygen delivery, ease of use, safety and lower cost. The results of this study warrant further review of the device in comparison to standard wound therapies.

  6. [Effectiveness of a micronized purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF) in the healing process of lower limb ulcers. An open multicentre study, controlled and randomized].

    PubMed

    Glinski, W; Chodynicka, B; Roszkiewicz, J; Bogdanowski, T; Lecewicz-Torun, B; Kaszuba, A; Bowszyc, J; Nowak, A; Wnorowski, J; Wasik, F; Glinska-Ferenz, M; Blaszczyk, M; Strzyga, P; Pachocki, R

    2001-04-01

    To determine the increase in healing rate of venous ulcer in patients receiving a micronised purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF) as supplementation to standard local care. A randomised, open, controlled, multicentre study. Departments of Dermatology and University Outpatients Clinics. One hundred and forty patients with chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers. PATIENTS received standard compressive therapy plus external treatment alone or 2 tablets of MPFF daily in addition to the above treatment for 24 weeks. Healing of ulcers and their reduction in size after 24 weeks of treatment. The percentage of patients whose ulcers healed completely was found to be markedly higher in those receiving MPFF in addition to standard external and compressive treatment than in those treated with conventional therapy alone (46.5% vs 27.5%; p<0.05. OR=2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.6). Ulcers with diameters <3 cm were cured in 71% of patients in the MPFF group and in 50% of patients in the control group, whereas ulcers between 3 and 6 cm in diameter were cured in 60% and 32% of patients (p<0.05), respectively. The mean reduction in ulcer size was also found to be greater in patients treated with MPFF (80%) than in the control group (65%) (p<0.05). The cost-effectiveness ratio (cost per healed ulcer) in the MPFF group was 1026.2 compared with 1871.8 in the control group. These results indicate that MPFF significantly improves the cure rate in patients with chronic venous insufficiency.

  7. The Effectiveness of Hypochlorous Acid Solution on Healing of Infected Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragab, Islam I.; Kamal, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Wound cleansing remains a corner stone in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. Hydrogen Peroxide (H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2]) and Povidone Iodine are topical antimicrobial agents but known to be toxic to cells involved in the wound healing cascade. The biggest challenge for the physicians and nurses is searching for a safe, noncytotoxic and…

  8. Topical 5% potassium permanganate solution accelerates the healing process in chronic diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Madrigal-Perez, Violeta M; Lara-Esqueda, Agustin; Diaz-Sanchez, Martha G; Guzman-Esquivel, Jose; Rosas-Vizcaino, Luis E; Virgen-Jimenez, Oscar O; Kleiman-Trujillo, Juleny; Lagarda-Canales, Maria R; Ceja-Espiritu, Gabriel; Rangel-Salgado, Viridiana; Lopez-Lemus, Uriel A; Delgado-Enciso, Josuel; Lara-Basulto, Agustin D; Soriano Hernández, Alejandro D

    2018-02-01

    Potassium permanganate has been reported to be an effective treatment for certain types of wounds. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of potassium permanganate in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. A single-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus that presented with a foot ulcer persisting for >3 months. The control group (n=10) was treated with the current standard treatment, which comprises of measures for reducing pressure in the ulcerated area, daily cleansing of the ulcer with potable water and antiseptic wash solution, and the application of a disinfectant solution on the entire surface area of the ulcer; while the intervention group (n=15) received the standard treatment plus 5% topical potassium permanganate solution applied once a day for 21 days. In the intervention group, 1 patient did not tolerate the treatment and was eliminated from the study on the first day. The remaining patients tolerated the interventions well. At the end of the treatment period, ulcers in the control group had decreased by 38% whereas those in the intervention group decreased by 73% (P<0.009). The degree of decrease was also investigated; the ulcer size was ≥50% decreased in 40% of patients in the control group and in 86% of patients in the intervention group (P=0.02). In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that topical potassium permanganate is well tolerated and significantly accelerates the healing process of diabetic foot ulcers.

  9. Topical 5% potassium permanganate solution accelerates the healing process in chronic diabetic foot ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Madrigal-Perez, Violeta M.; Lara-Esqueda, Agustin; Diaz-Sanchez, Martha G.; Guzman-Esquivel, Jose; Rosas-Vizcaino, Luis E.; Virgen-Jimenez, Oscar O.; Kleiman-Trujillo, Juleny; Lagarda-Canales, Maria R.; Ceja-Espiritu, Gabriel; Rangel-Salgado, Viridiana; Lopez-Lemus, Uriel A.; Delgado-Enciso, Josuel; Lara-Basulto, Agustin D.; Soriano Hernández, Alejandro D.

    2018-01-01

    Potassium permanganate has been reported to be an effective treatment for certain types of wounds. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of potassium permanganate in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. A single-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus that presented with a foot ulcer persisting for >3 months. The control group (n=10) was treated with the current standard treatment, which comprises of measures for reducing pressure in the ulcerated area, daily cleansing of the ulcer with potable water and antiseptic wash solution, and the application of a disinfectant solution on the entire surface area of the ulcer; while the intervention group (n=15) received the standard treatment plus 5% topical potassium permanganate solution applied once a day for 21 days. In the intervention group, 1 patient did not tolerate the treatment and was eliminated from the study on the first day. The remaining patients tolerated the interventions well. At the end of the treatment period, ulcers in the control group had decreased by 38% whereas those in the intervention group decreased by 73% (P<0.009). The degree of decrease was also investigated; the ulcer size was ≥50% decreased in 40% of patients in the control group and in 86% of patients in the intervention group (P=0.02). In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that topical potassium permanganate is well tolerated and significantly accelerates the healing process of diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:29435274

  10. Rhamnogalacturonan from Acmella oleracea (L.) R.K. Jansen: gastroprotective and ulcer healing properties in rats.

    PubMed

    Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; da Silva, Luisa Mota; Mendes, Daniel Augusto Gasparin Bueno; Cabrini, Daniela de Almeida; Nascimento, Adamara Machado; Iacomini, Marcello; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko

    2014-01-01

    A rhamnogalacturonan (RGal) isolated from Acmella oleracea (L.) R.K. Jansen administered by oral route showed gastroprotective activity against acute lesions induced by ethanol. In this study, we investigated the gastric ulcer healing effect of RGal and its mechanisms of action. Intraperitoneal treatment of animals with RGal protected the gastric mucosa against acute lesions induced by ethanol, with participation of gastric mucus. Furthermore, in the chronic ulcer model, oral administration of RGal accelerates the gastric ulcer healing, accompanied by increasing of cellular proliferation and gastric mucus content, reducing inflammatory parameters and oxidative stress. In addition, the repeated 7 days-treatment of animals with RGal did not show alterations of clinical and behavioral symptoms, body and organs weights or plasmatic biochemical parameters. Collectively, these results showed that RGal has an interesting antiulcerogenic activity and could constitute an attractive molecule of interest for the development of new antiulcer agents.

  11. Therapeutic effectiveness of a Calendula officinalis extract in venous leg ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M; de Freitas, F; de Barros Winter, M

    2016-12-02

    Non-healing venous leg ulcers (VLUs) have a significant effect on patients' quality of life and substantially increase expenditures in health-care systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of the Calendula officinalis extract, Plenusdermax, in the treatment of VLUs. Patients treated with Calendula officinalis extract (n=38) and control patients (n=19) were evaluated every two weeks for 30 weeks or until their ulcers healed. Assessments included determination of the wound area by planimetry, infection control, and evaluation of the clinical aspects of the wounds. The percentage of healing velocity per week (%HVw), taking the initial area at baseline into account, was also determined. The proportion of the treatment patients achieving complete epithelialisation was 72 % and 32 % in the treatment and control groups, respectively. The average healing time was approximately 12 weeks in the treatment group and 25 % in control patients. Patients with ulcers treated with Calendula officinalis extract had a significant 4-fold increase in percentage healing velocity per week, 7.4 %, compared with 1.7 % in the control group. No adverse events were observed during the Calendula officinalis extract treatment. Our findings indicate that Calendula officinalis extract is an effective treatment for VLUs. The authors have no conflict of interest.

  12. Honey for wound healing, ulcers, and burns; data supporting its use in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Al-Waili, Noori; Salom, Khelod; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad A

    2011-04-05

    The widespread existence of unhealed wounds, ulcers, and burns has a great impact on public health and economy. Many interventions, including new medications and technologies, are being used to help achieve significant wound healing and to eliminate infections. Therefore, to find an intervention that has both therapeutic effect on the healing process and the ability to kill microbes is of great value. Honey is a natural product that has been recently introduced in modern medical practice. Honey's antibacterial properties and its effects on wound healing have been thoroughly investigated. Laboratory studies and clinical trials have shown that honey is an effective broad-spectrum antibacterial agent. This paper reviews data that support the effectiveness of natural honey in wound healing and its ability to sterilize infected wounds. Studies on the therapeutic effects of honey collected in different geographical areas on skin wounds, skin and gastric ulcers, and burns are reviewed and mechanisms of action are discussed. (Ulcers and burns are included as an example of challenging wounds.) The data show that the wound healing properties of honey include stimulation of tissue growth, enhanced epithelialization, and minimized scar formation. These effects are ascribed to honey's acidity, hydrogen peroxide content, osmotic effect, nutritional and antioxidant contents, stimulation of immunity, and to unidentified compounds. Prostaglandins and nitric oxide play a major role in inflammation, microbial killing, and the healing process. Honey was found to lower prostaglandin levels and elevate nitric oxide end products. These properties might help to explain some biological and therapeutic properties of honey, particularly as an antibacterial agent or wound healer. The data presented here demonstrate that honeys from different geographical areas have considerable therapeutic effects on chronic wounds, ulcers, and burns. The results encourage the use of honey in clinical

  13. Evaluation of a muscle pump-activating device for non-healing venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Harris, Connie; Duong, Rochelle; Vanderheyden, Gwen; Byrnes, Beth; Cattryse, Renee; Orr, Ava; Keast, David

    2017-12-01

    This evaluation involves an innovative muscle pump-activating device (geko™) as an adjunctive therapy with best practices for non-healing venous leg ulcers (VLUs). Stimulating the common peroneal nerve (at the fibular head), the geko™ device creates a response that acts as foot and calf muscle pumps, increasing venous, arterial and microcirculatory flow. The aim was to evaluate and determine if the geko™ is effective in this population and if it should be added to the medical supply formulary. In all, 12 patients with 18 recalcitrant VLUs (defined as less than 30% reduction in wound size in 30 days with best practices) in two community settings in Ontario consented to the evaluation and were treated with the geko™ for up to 20 weeks. A total of 44% of wounds healed, and 39% decreased in size. One patient non-adherent with the geko™ and best practices had deterioration in his or her wounds. With the patients as their own control, the mean weekly healing rate with the geko™ was 9·35% (±SD 0·10) compared to 0·06% (±SD 0·10) prior to baseline, which was statistically significant (P < 0·01). Three patients not in optimal therapy increased compression due to decreased pain, further enabling healing. This study was not a randomised investigation, although the patients acted as their own controls. A pragmatic evaluation reflects the reality of the community sector; in spite of best practices or evidence-based care, therapy is not uniformly applied, with some participants unable to tolerate or indeed comply with optimal compression therapy. Rash occurred under the devices in 7 of 12 (58%) patients. One patient stopped the device due to rash, while another had to take breaks from using the device. Subsequently, the manufacturer (FirstKind Ltd) has developed a new device and protocol specific to the requirements of wound therapy to minimise this response. This small case series demonstrated the highly significant effectiveness of the geko™ device in these

  14. An exploratory study on differences in cumulative plantar tissue stress between healing and non-healing plantar neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    van Netten, Jaap J; van Baal, Jeff G; Bril, Adriaan; Wissink, Marieke; Bus, Sicco A

    2018-03-01

    Mechanical stress is important in causing and healing plantar diabetic foot ulcers, but almost always studied as peak pressure only. Measuring cumulative plantar tissue stress combines plantar pressure and ambulatory activity, and better defines the load on ulcers. Our aim was to explore differences in cumulative plantar tissue stress between people with healing and non-healing plantar diabetic foot ulcers. We analyzed a subgroup of 31 patients from a randomized clinical trial, treated with a removable offloading device for their plantar diabetic forefoot ulcer. We measured in-device dynamic plantar pressure and daily stride count to calculate cumulative plantar tissue stress at the ulcer location and associated this with ulcer healing and ulcer surface area reduction at four weeks (Student's t and chi-square test for significance, Cohen's d for effect size). In 12 weeks, 68% (n = 21) of the ulcers healed and 32% (n = 10) did not. No statistically significant differences were found for cumulative plantar tissue stress, plantar pressure or ambulatory activity between people with healed and not-healed ulcers. Cumulative plantar tissue stress was 25% lower for people with healed ulcers (155 vs. 207 MPa·s/day; P = 0.71; Effect size: d = 0.29). Post-hoc analyses in the 27 patients who self-reported to be adherent to wearing the device showed that cumulative plantar tissue stress was 49% lower for those who reached ≥75% ulcer surface area reduction at four weeks (140 vs. 275 MPa·s/day; P = 0.09; d = 0.76); smaller differences and effect sizes were found for peak pressure (24%), peak pressure-time integral (30%) and ambulatory activity (26%); (P-value range: 0.14-0.97; Cohen's d range: 0.14-0.70). Measuring cumulative plantar tissue stress may provide insight beyond that obtained from plantar pressure or ambulatory activity alone, with regard to diabetic foot ulcer healing using removable offloading devices. These explorative findings

  15. Healing, Antioxidant and Cytoprotective Properties of Indigofera truxillensis in Different Models of Gastric Ulcer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Luiz-Ferreira, Anderson; Cola, Maira; Barbastefano, Victor; de-Faria, Felipe Meira; de Almeida, Ana Beatriz A.; Farias-Silva, Elisângela; Calvo, Tamara Regina; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia A.; Vilegas, Wagner; Souza-Brito, Alba Regina M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the antiulcerogenic activity and mechanisms of the aqueous (AqF 100 mg/kg) and ethyl acetate (AcF 50 mg/kg) fractions from Indigofera truxillensis leaves. This dose was selected to assess its activity on ulcer healing and its action on gastric acid and mucus secretion, prostaglandin production and antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione reductase (GSH-Rd)). Gastric ulcer was induced by absolute ethanol. Antisecretory action, mucus and prostaglandin production, healing and antioxidant enzyme activities were evaluated for both fractions. AqF and AcF significantly inhibited the gastric mucosal damage caused by ethanol. This effect was statistically significant at 100 and 50 mg/kg compared with the vehicle. Neither fraction interfered with gastric secretion. AcF increased the PGE2 production, and both fractions increased mucus production. l-NAME did not alter the gastroprotection exerted by the fractions, but N-ethylmaleimide attenuated only AcF. In the ischemia/reperfusion model both fractions inhibited the mucosal damage. AcF increased SOD, GSH-Px and GSH-Rd activity, but AqF increased only SOD and GSH-Px. In the acetic acid-induced ulcer model AcF only accelerated ulcer healing. These results showed that Indigofera truxillensis acted as a gastroprotective agent, stimulating protective factors and antioxidants enzymes. PMID:23203107

  16. The efficacy and safety of natural honey on the healing of foot ulcers: a case series.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Hashim; Salma, Mansour Abu; Al Lenjawi, Badriya; Abdi, Seham; Gouda, Zaghloul; Barakat, Nour; Elmahdi, Hisham; Abraham, Sisy; Hamza, Abdul Hakeem; Al Khozaei, Dhyiaa; Al Majid, Shawqia; Al Majid, Hanaa; Abdini, Johina; Al Jaber, Maryam; Al Masseh, Fareeda; Al Ali, Amal Abdulla

    2015-04-01

    This clinical observation investigated the efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and acceptability of natural honey on the healing of a variety of chronic foot ulcers at the primary care level. A total of 12 patients with foot ulcers utilizing natural honey as an effective alternative to more expensive, advanced wound products were followed. Cases were referred to Umgwailinah Primary Health Care Center, Doha, Qatar from different health centers and from Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar. There were also self-referred cases. After rinsing the site with normal saline, natural honey was applied and the wound was covered by glycerin-impregnated gauze (Adaptic Non-Adhering Dressing, Systagenix, San Antonio, TX) to prevent the absorption of honey into the cotton gauze and away from the wound site. Patients were followed on a daily basis for an average of 4 weeks. All ulcers healed with no contractures or scars with a mean healing time of 3 weeks. There was a 75% reduction in the dressing budget of the health center and a high level of satisfaction among both health professionals and patients. Patients' pain levels were reduced significantly after using natural honey, as evidenced by the use of the Visual Analog Scale. The use of natural honey in the management of chronic foot ulcers proved to be efficacious, cost-effective, and acceptable by both clinicians and patients.

  17. Effects of hydrotalcite combined with esomeprazole on gastric ulcer healing quality: A clinical observation study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui-Qi; Mao, Hua; Huang, Li-Yun; Su, Pei-Zhu; Lu, Min

    2017-02-21

    To evaluate the effects of hydrotalcite combined with esomeprazole on gastric ulcer healing quality. Forty-eight patients diagnosed with gastric ulcer between June 2014 and February 2016 were randomly allocated to the combination therapy group or monotherapy group. The former received hydrotalcite combined with esomeprazole, and the latter received esomeprazole alone, for 8 wk. Twenty-four healthy volunteers were recruited and acted as the healthy control group. Endoscopic ulcer healing was observed using white light endoscopy and narrow band imaging magnifying endoscopy. The composition of collagen fibers, amount of collagen deposition, expression of factor VIII and TGF-β1, and hydroxyproline content were analyzed by Masson staining, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescent imaging and ELISA. Following treatment, changes in the gastric microvascular network were statistically different between the combination therapy group and the monotherapy group ( P < 0.05). There were significant differences ( P < 0.05) in collagen deposition, expression level of Factor VIII and TGF-β1, and hydroxyproline content in the two treatment groups compared with the healthy control group. These parameters in the combination therapy group were significantly higher than in the monotherapy group ( P < 0.05). The ratio of collagen I to collagen III was statistically different among the three groups, and was significantly higher in the combination therapy group than in the monotherapy group ( P < 0.05). Hydrotalcite combined with esomeprazole is superior to esomeprazole alone in improving gastric ulcer healing quality in terms of improving microvascular morphology, degree of structure maturity and function of regenerated mucosa.

  18. Increased Number of Langerhans Cells in the Epidermis of Diabetic Foot Ulcers Correlates with Healing Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie; Lehmann, Janin; Pastar, Irena; Kirsner, Robert S.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are a specialized subset of epidermal dendritic cells. They represent one of the first cells of immunological barrier and play an important role during the inflammatory phase of acute wound healing. Despite considerable progress in our understanding of the immunopathology of diabetes mellitus and its associated co-morbidities such as diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), considerable gaps in our knowledge exist. In this study, we utilized the human ex vivo wound model and confirmed the increased epidermal LCs at wound edges during early phases of wound healing. Next, we aimed to determine differences in quantity of LCs between normal human and diabetic foot skin and to learn if the presence of LCs correlates with the healing outcome in DFUs. We utilized immunofluorescence to detect CD207+ LCs in specimens from normal and diabetic foot skin and DFU wound edges. Specimens from DFUs were collected at the initial visit and 4 weeks at the time when the healing outcome was determined. DFUs that decreased in size by >50% were considered to be healing, while DFUs with a size reduction of <50% were considered non-healing. Quantitative assessment of LCs showed a higher number of LCs in healing when compared to non–healing DFU’s. Our findings provide evidence that LCs are present in higher number in diabetic feet than normal foot skin. Healing DFUs show a higher number of LCs compared to non-healing DFUs. These findings indicate that the epidermal immune barrier plays an important role in the DFU healing outcome and may offer new therapeutic avenues targeting LC in non-healing DFUs. PMID:24277309

  19. Retrospective comparison of diabetic foot ulcer and venous stasis ulcer healing outcome between a dermal repair scaffold (PriMatrix) and a bilayered living cell therapy (Apligraf).

    PubMed

    Karr, Jeffrey C

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this study was to review clinical experience in treating diabetic and venous stasis wounds with Apligraf or PriMatrix. A total of 40 diabetic foot ulcers and 28 venous stasis ulcers were treated with either PriMatrix or Apligraf for number of days open and for number of days for complete healing between the 2 treatments. Although both treatments were highly effective, the study results of 68 ulcers in 48 patients demonstrated that patients treated with PriMatrix healed faster than patients treated with Apligraf despite larger wound sizes.

  20. Prediction of Wound Healing in Diabetic Foot Ulcers: an Observational Study in Tertiary Hospital in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Soewondo, Pradana; Suyono, Slamet; Sastrosuwignyo, Mpu Kanoko; Harahap, Alida R; Sutrisna, Bambang; Makmun, Lukman H

    2017-01-01

    to evaluate the role of clinical characteristics, functional markers of vasodilation, inflammatory response, and atherosclerosis in predicting wound healing in diabetic foot ulcer. a cohort study (February - October 2010) was conducted from 40 subjects with acute diabetic foot ulcer at clinical ward of Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National Central General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Each subject underwent at least two variable measurements, i.e. during inflammatory phase and proliferation phase. The studied variables were clinical characteristics, complete peripheral blood count (CBC) and differential count, levels of HbA1c, ureum, creatinine, lipid profile, fasting blood glucose (FBG), marker of endothelial dysfunction (asymmetric dimethylarginine/ADMA, endothelin-1/ET-1, and flow-mediated dilation/FMD of brachial artery), and marker of vascular calcification (osteoprotegerin/OPG). median of time achieving 50% granulation tissue in our study was 21 days. There were nine factors that contribute in the development of 50% granulation tissue, i.e. family history of diabetes mellitus (DM), previous history of wound, wound area, duration of existing wound, captopril and simvastatin medications, levels of ADMA, ET-1, and OPG. There were three out of the nine factors that significantly correlated with wound healing, i.e. wound area, OPG levels, and simvastatin medications. in acute diabetic foot ulcers, wound area and OPG levels had positive correlation with wound healing, whereas simvastatin medications had negative correlation with wound healing.

  1. Ulcer healing activity of Mumijo aqueous extract against acetic acid induced gastric ulcer in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokhi, Nader; Keshavarzi, Zakieh; Khaksari, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Gastric ulcer is an important clinical problem, chiefly due to extensive use of some drugs. The aim was to assess the activity of Mumijo extract (which is used in traditional medicine) against acetic acid induced gastric ulcer in rats. Materials and Methods: The aqueous extract of Mumijo was prepared. Animals were randomly (n = 10) divided into four groups: Control, sham-operated group (received 0.2 ml of acetic acid to induce gastric ulcer), Mumijo (100 mg/kg/daily) were given for 4 days postacetic acid administration, and ranitidine group (20 mg/kg). The assessed parameters were pH and pepsin levels (by Anson method) of gastric contents and gastric histopathology. Ranitidine was used as reference anti-ulcer drug. Results: The extract (100 mg/kg/daily, p.o.) inhibited acid acetic-induced gastric ulceration by elevating its pH versus sham group (P < 0.01) and decreasing the pepsin levels compared to standard drug, ranitidine (P < 0.05). The histopathology data showed that the treatment with Mumijo extract had a significant protection against all mucosal damages. Conclusion: Mumijo extract has potent antiulcer activity. Its anti-ulcer property probably acts via a reduction in gastric acid secretion and pepsin levels. The obtained results support the use of this herbal material in folk medicine. PMID:25709338

  2. A prospective study evaluating the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH Tool) to assess stage II, stage III, and stage IV pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Günes, Ulkü Yapucu

    2009-05-01

    Many valid and reliable tools and techniques are available for wound measurement. However, few prospective clinical studies assessing these instruments have been conducted. A prospective, methodological study was conducted between September 2006 and November 2007 to evaluate use of the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) version 3 in patients with one or more pressure ulcer. A convenience sample of 72 persons (mean age 66.9 +/- 12.8 years) with 86 pressure ulcers (49% Stage II, 47% Stage III, and 4% Stage IV) was recruited and assessed weekly until healing, transfer, patient death, or end of study for a maximum of 8 weeks. Most ulcers (77%) were in the sacral area and 56% had been present for 1 month or longer. Repeated measures analysis revealed that PUSH total scores decreased significantly (P < 0.001) over the 8-week study, with significant differences in PUSH total scores between healed and unhealed ulcers each week, starting on week 1. The total PUSH score as well as the length x width item in the tool accurately differentiated between healed and nonhealed ulcers. Although the PUSH tool is practical, easy-to-use, and generally sensitive to change, some modifications would improve its value--ie, a wound size/depth subscale. Additional studies to help clinicians more accurately evaluate the effectiveness of their interventions, including studies to determine whether wound measurements alone may suffice to monitor healing, are needed.

  3. Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is not associated with wound healing in diabetic foot ulcer patients treated in a multidisciplinary setting.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Sherman, Ronald L; Hines, Kathryn; Lippincott, Christopher; Black, James H; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2018-04-01

    Socioeconomic deprivation is associated with poor glycemic control and higher hospital admission rates in patients with diabetes. We sought to quantify the effects of neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation on wound healing among a cohort of patients with diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. Socioeconomic disadvantage was calculated for all patients using the area deprivation index (ADI) stratified by quartile (from ADI-0: least through ADI-3: most). Predictors of wound healing were assessed using Cox proportional hazards models accounting for patient demographics, wound characteristics, and ADI category. Six hundred twenty-one wounds were evaluated, including 59% ADI-0, 7% ADI-1, 12% ADI-2, and 22% ADI-3. After accounting for patient demographics and wound characteristics, the likelihood of wound healing was similar between groups (ADI-3 versus ADI-0: hazards ratio [HR] 1.03 [95% confidence interval 0.76-1.41]). Independent predictors of poor wound healing included peripheral arterial disease (HR 0.75), worse wound stage (stage 4: HR 0.48), larger wound area (HR 0.99), and partially dependent functional status (HR 0.45) (all, P < 0.05). In a multidisciplinary setting, wound healing was largely dependent on wound characteristics and vascular status rather than patient demographics or neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage. Use of a multidisciplinary approach to the management of DFU may overcome the negative effects of socioeconomic disadvantage frequently described in the diabetic population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The influence of different sub-bandage pressure values on venous leg ulcers healing when treated with compression therapy.

    PubMed

    Milic, Dragan J; Zivic, Sasa S; Bogdanovic, Dragan C; Jovanovic, Milan M; Jankovic, Radmilo J; Milosevic, Zoran D; Stamenkovic, Dragan M; Trenkic, Marija S

    2010-03-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLU) have a huge social and economic impact. An estimated 1.5% of European adults will suffer a venous ulcer at some point in their lives. Despite the widespread use of bandaging with high pressure in the treatment of this condition, recurrence rates range between 25% to 70%. Numerous studies have suggested that the compression system should provide sub-bandage pressure values in the range from 35 mm Hg to 45 mm Hg in order to achieve the best possible healing results. An open, randomized, prospective, single-center study was performed in order to determine the healing rates of VLU when treated with different compression systems and different sub-bandage pressure values. One hundred thirty-one patients (72 women, 59 men; mean age, 59-years-old) with VLU (ulcer surface >3 cm(2); duration >3 months) were randomized into three groups: group A - 42 patients who were treated using an open-toed, elastic, class III compression device knitted in tubular form (Tubulcus, Laboratoires Innothera, Arcueil, France); group B - 46 patients treated with the multi-component bandaging system comprised of Tubulcus and one elastic bandage (15 cm wide and 5 cm long with 200% stretch, Niva, Novi Sad, Serbia); and group C - forty-three patients treated with the multi-component bandaging system comprised of Tubulcus and two elastic bandages. Pressure measurements were taken with the Kikuhime device (TT MediTrade, Soro, Denmark) at the B1 measuring point in the supine, sitting, and standing positions under the three different compression systems. The median resting values in the supine and standing positions in examined study groups were as follows: group A - 36.2 mm Hg and 43.9 mm Hg; group B - 53.9 mm Hg and 68.2 mm Hg; group C - 74.0 mm Hg and 87.4 mm Hg. The healing rate during the 26-week treatment period was 25% (13/42) in group A, 67.4% (31/46) in group B, and 74.4% (32/43) in group C. The success of compression treatment in group A was strongly associated with the

  5. Duodenocutaneous fistula in rats as a model for "wound healing-therapy" in ulcer healing: the effect of pentadecapeptide BPC 157, L-nitro-arginine methyl ester and L-arginine.

    PubMed

    Skorjanec, S; Kokot, A; Drmic, D; Radic, B; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Kolenc, D; Zenko, A; Lovric Bencic, M; Belosic Halle, Z; Situm, A; Zivanovic Posilovic, G; Masnec, S; Suran, J; Aralica, G; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2015-08-01

    While very rarely reported, duodenocutanenous fistula research might alter the duodenal ulcer disease background and therapy. Our research focused on rat duodenocutaneous fistulas, therapy, stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157, an anti-ulcer peptide that healed other fistulas, nitric oxide synthase-substrate L-arginine, and nitric oxide synthase-inhibitor L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). The hypothesis was, duodenal ulcer-healing, like the skin ulcer, using the successful BPC 157, with nitric oxide-system involvement, the "wound healing-therapy", to heal the duodenal ulcer, the fistula-model that recently highlighted gastric and skin ulcer healing. Pressure in the lower esophageal and pyloric sphincters was simultaneously assessed. Duodenocutaneous fistula-rats received BPC 157 (10 μg/kg or 10 ng/kg, intraperitoneally or perorally (in drinking water)), L-NAME (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally), L-arginine (100 mg/kg intraperitoneally) alone and/or together, throughout 21 days. Duodenocutaneous fistula-rats maintained persistent defects, continuous fistula leakage, sphincter failure, mortality rate at 40% until the 4(th) day, all fully counteracted in all BPC 157-rats. The BPC 157-rats experienced rapidly improved complete presentation (maximal volume instilled already at 7(th) day). L-NAME further aggravated the duodenocutaneous fistula-course (mortality at 70% until the 4(th) day); L-arginine was beneficial (no mortality; however, maximal volume instilled not before 21(st) day). L-NAME-worsening was counteracted to the control level with the L-arginine effect, and vice versa, while BPC 157 annulled the L-NAME effects (L-NAME + L-arginine; L-NAME + BPC 157; L-NAME + L-arginine + BPC 157 brought below the level of the control). It is likely that duodenocutaneous fistulas, duodenal/skin defect simultaneous healing, reinstated sphincter function, are a new nitric oxide-system related phenomenon. In conclusion, resolving the duodenocutanenous fistulashealing

  6. [Influence of honey, royal jelly and propolis on accelerating acetate healing of experimental gastric ulcers in rats].

    PubMed

    Belostotskiĭ, N I; Kas'ianenko, V I; Dubtsova, E A; Lazebnik, L B

    2009-01-01

    This study examines gastric acetic ulcer healing in the rat after administration of honey, royal jelly and propolis into the stomach. Chronic gastric ulcers were induced in male Wistar rats by the application of 100% acetic acid to the serosal surface of the stomach on 60 sec. Bee-keeping products were administrated into the stomach from 2nd to 7th day after acetic ulcer induction. On 7th day animals were killed, and ulcer area was measured in mm2. In gastric juice pH and activity of pepsin were measured. The healing of acetic ulcers is accelerated with the administration of honey, royal jelly or propolis during six days. The largest healing effect was demonstrated with propolis and royal jelly, smaller one with the honey. It was revealed decrease of stomach acid secretion in the rats, which have received bee-keeping products versus the rats of control group.

  7. High-Frequency Generator in Wound Healing of Marjolin's Ulcer After Carcinoma Resection.

    PubMed

    Tacani, Pascale Mutti; Tacani, Rogério Eduardo; Machado, Aline Fernanda Perez; Montezello, Débora; Góes, João Carlos Guedes Sampaio; Marx, Angela Gonçalves; Liebano, Richard Eloin

    2018-05-01

    Marjolin's ulcers (MU) are skin malignancies that form over burn injuries. These very aggressive ulcers can result in functional and wound healing impairment, and require a well thought out treatment plan. Physiotherapy offers resources to help promote recovery of these patients, as described in this case report, in which the patient with a history of burn in the lower limbs evolved to malignancy 32 years later. This patient underwent tumor resection of the left foot, with recurrence and lymphadenectomy . Physical therapy included the application of high-frequency generator (HFG) for wound healing and exercises for functional recovery. The treatment lasted for many months and resulted in the improvement of the surgical wound areas, pain, swelling, sensitivity, strength muscle, and gait. It was observed that the use of HFG can be a tool in the tissue repair of surgical wound after the resection of MU; however, further studies need to be carried out to suit parameters and ensure safety of cancer patients.

  8. Analyzing the influence of gastric intestinal metaplasia on gastric ulcer healing in Helicobacter pylori-infected patients without atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Wei; Chang, Liang-Che; Hua, Chung-Ching; Hsieh, Bor-Jen; Chen, Shuo-Wei; Chien, Rong-Nan

    2017-01-03

    Gastric epithelial hyper-proliferation was reported in patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-infected gastric mucosa with intestinal metaplasia (IM) changes. In patients with gastric ulcer (GU) and IM, the GU may have a different healing rate in comparison to patients without IM. This study aimed to compare the difference in GU healing between H. pylori-infected patients with IM and those without IM. We retrospectively analyzed patients at the Keelung Chung Gung Memorial Hospital during the period from March 2005 to January 2011. The inclusion criteria were: 1) endoscopic findings of GU and biopsy histological examination plus rapid urease test indicating H. pylori infection; 2) gastric IM adjacent to a GU but with no atrophic gastritis changes; 3) patients receiving H. pylori eradication triple therapy and 8 weeks of maintenance therapy with a proton pump inhibitor; and 4) patients receiving follow-up endoscopy within the 3 rd and the 4 th months after treatment. In total, 327 patients with GU and H. pylori infection (136 with IM and 191 without IM) were included. Patients with IM had a higher GU healing rate than those without IM (91.9% vs. 84.3%, P = 0.040). Multivariate logistical regression analysis revealed that failure of H. pylori eradication (Odds = 4.013, 95% CI: 1.840-8.951, P < 0.001) and gastric IM (Odds = 0.369, 95% CI: 0.168-0.812, P = 0.013) were the predictors of non-healing GU following treatment. Patient with gastric IM change may have a higher GU healing rate than those without gastric IM. However, successful H. pylori eradication is a more important factor for GU healing than gastric IM.

  9. Disrupted lives: investigating coping strategies for non-healing leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Alison

    The aim of this study was to explore the lived experience of people who have non-healing venous ulcers using hermeneutic phenomenology. Unstructured interviews were carried out with five people who also completed a diary. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was utilized to identify themes and patterns. The core themes identified through analysis were biographical disruption, ways of coping, social implications and therapeutic relationships. The emergent themes reveal the impact of chronicity in participants' experience of chronic leg ulcers, their various emotional and problem-focused coping strategies and the positive role the district nurse plays in their lives. This study places leg ulceration within the body of literature on chronicity, linking nursing theory with the insights offered from health psychology.

  10. [Endoscopic nasobiliary and nasopancreatic drainage contributing to healing of duodenal ulcer perforation: a case report].

    PubMed

    Enokida, Kohei; Kikuyama, Masataka; Kurokami, Takafumi; Shirane, Naofumi; Aoyama, Haruna; Aoyama, Hiroyuki; Sato, Tatsunori; Taki, Yusuke

    2015-10-01

    A 75-year-old man with vomiting and right abdominal pain was admitted to the Department of Surgery in our hospital. With a diagnosis of perforated duodenal ulcer, he was treated conservatively. On the day 8 of hospitalization, his general condition worsened and he underwent surgery. During operation, the perforated duodenal ulcer and paraduodenal fluid collection was observed, and percutaneous drainage was accordingly established. After this procedure, renal dysfunction was exacerbated and he was transferred to our department for endoscopic treatment. On day 28 of hospitalization, nasobiliary and nasopancreatic drainage was administered. Renal dysfunction gradually improved, and healing of the perforated duodenal ulcer was recognized on day 93. On day 112, the patient was discharged.

  11. Vedolizumab Induces Long-term Mucosal Healing in Patients With Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Noman, Maja; Ferrante, Marc; Bisschops, Raf; De Hertogh, Gert; Van den Broeck, Karolien; Rans, Karen; Rutgeerts, Paul; Vermeire, Séverine; Van Assche, Gert

    2017-09-01

    Vedolizumab has proven efficacy in inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], but long-term mucosal healing in Crohn's disease [CD], as well as the incidence of colorectal neoplasia in IBD, among patients treated with vedolizumab have not been studied. We aimed to document mucosal healing and to explore the risk of colorectal neoplasia with vedolizumab maintenance therapy. Surveillance colonoscopy was prospectively scheduled for patients with longstanding ulcerative coltis [UC] or CD at a tertiary referral centre, in the open-label extension phase (vedolizumab 300 mg intravenously [IV] every 4 weeks) of the Gemini studies [GEMINI LTS, study number NCT00790933]. Mayo score ≤ 1 or ulcer disappearance [in CD] was defined as mucosal healing. Targeted biopsies were graded for inflammation and dysplasia. Of 68 patients [29 CD/39 UC] treated for ≥ 1 year [median 3.2 years, range 1.1-6.1], 58 [24 CD/34 UC] were endoscopically monitored. Durable endoscopic healing corrected by non-responder imputation was found in 7/24, 29% [CD] and 17/34, 50% [UC]. Combined histological and mucosal healing was observed in 5/24 [CD] and 11/34 [UC] of those with endoscopic healing. Low-grade dysplasia was detected in 10% of patients and high-grade dysplasia in the resection specimen of one patient with biopsy-proven low-grade dysplasia. Long-term endoscopic and histological healing was observed in a proportion of patients treated with vedolizumab long-term. The dysplasia risk with vedolizumab deserves further study. Copyright © 2017 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. The Effect of Combined Ultrasound and Electric Field Stimulation on Wound Healing in Chronic Ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Avrahami, Ram; Rosenblum, Jonathan; Gazes, Michael; Rosenblum, Sean; Litman, Leib

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound and electric stimulation are known therapies for the treatment of chronic ulcerations. Combined modulated ultrasound and electric field stimulation (CUSEFS) have never been studied as a single modality. The authors evaluate the results of CUSEFS (BRH Medical Ltd, Jerusalem, Israel) on a variety of wound types in a number of clinics. This retrospective analysis looked at ulcers treated with CUSEFS in 4 clinics. Wounds were evaluated by an independent assessor and data was evaluated by an independent statistician. Of the 300 wounds treated with the CUSEFS device, only those classified as diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) or venous leg ulcers (VLUs) were evaluated. A treatment was deemed successful if the wound was 50% closed within 4 weeks. Subjects were then followed to see if their wounds completely closed within 16 weeks. Of the 27 DFUs treated, 59.3% (16) achieved 50% closure within 4 weeks. Of the 38 VLUs treated, 71.1% (27) achieved 50% closure within 4 weeks. It was found that variables such as gender, size of the wound at presentation, and longevity of the wound had no bearing on the outcome. The age of the patient had an effect on the outcome of the VLUs. The wound healing trajectory was supported in that there was a significant difference in the achievement of total closure between those subjects who had a successful trial and those who did not. Combined modulated ultrasound and electric field stimulation has a place as adjunct therapy that aids wound healing and provides an effective noninvasive treatment option.

  13. Evidence of gastric ulcer healing activity of Maytenus robusta Reissek: In vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luisa Mota; Boeing, Thaise; Somensi, Lincon Bordignon; Cury, Benhur Judah; Steimbach, Viviane Miranda Bispo; Silveria, Alessandro Conrado de Oliveira; Niero, Rivaldo; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Santin, José Roberto; de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni

    2015-12-04

    Maytenus robusta Reissek (Celastraceae) is traditionally used in Brazilian folk medicine to treat gastric ulcer, as a substitute for M. ilicifolia, which is almost extinct. The gastroprotective properties of M. robusta were demonstrated previously using only preventive approaches, such as acute gastric ulcer models. However, the healing effect of M. robusta in gastric ulcers remains unclear. The current study was carried out to investigate the healing effectiveness of M. robusta hydroalcoholic extract (HEMR) from aerial parts in the acetic acid-induced chronic ulcer model and to determine its effect on cell proliferation, scavenging free radicals, and inflammatory and oxidative damage. To evaluate the healing properties of HEMR in vivo, chronic gastric ulcer was induced in rats by 80% acid acetic. Next, different groups of animals (n=6) were treated orally with vehicle (water plus 1% tween, 1 ml/kg), omeprazole (20mg/kg), or HEMR (1-10mg/kg), twice daily for 7 days. At the end of the treatment, the total ulcer area (mm(2)) was measured and a sample of gastric tissue was taken for histological and histochemical analysis. Evaluation of GSH and LOOH levels, GST, SOD, CAT and MPO activity was also performed at the site of the lesion. In parallel, radical scavenging activity, cytoprotective effect, and cell proliferation activity in fibroblasts (L929 cells) were determined by in vitro trials. The antisecretory properties were evaluated using the pylorus ligature model in rats, and the anti-Helicobacter pylori activity was determined in vitro. Acute toxicity was evaluated by relative organ weight and biochemical parameters in serum. The prokinetic properties were also evaluated in mice. Oral administration of HEMR (10mg/kg) reduced the gastric ulcer area by 53%, compared to the vehicle group (120.0 ± 8.3mm(2)), the regeneration of gastric mucosa was evidenced in histological analysis. Moreover, HEMR treatment increased gastric mucin content and reduced oxidative stress

  14. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurement in diabetic foot ulcers: mean values and cut-point for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuan; Weng, Huan; Chen, Lihong; Yang, Haiyun; Luo, Guangming; Mai, Lifang; Jin, Guoshu; Yan, Li

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate mean values and cut-point of transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO2) measurement in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Prospective, descriptive study. Sixty-one patients with diabetes mellitus and foot ulcers comprised the sample. The research setting was Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital of SunYat-sen University, Guangzhou, China. Participants underwent transcutaneous oxygen (TcPO2) measurement at the dorsum of foot. Patients were classified into 3 groups according to clinical outcomes: (1) ulcers healed with intact skin group, (2) ulcer improved, and (3) ulcer failed to improve. TcPO2 was assessed and cut-points for predicting diabetic foot ulcer healing were calculated. Thirty-six patients healed with intact skin, 8 experienced improvement, and 17 showed no improvement. Mean TcPO2 levels were significantly higher (P< .001) in healed ulcers with intact skin (32 ± 10 mmHg) when compared to the improvement group (30 ± 7 mmHg) and the nonhealing group (15 ± 12 mmHg). All patients with TcPO2≤ 10 mmHg failed to heal or experienced deterioration in their foot ulcers. In contrast, all patients with TcPO2≥ 40 mmHg achieved wound closure. Measurement of TcPO2 in the supine position revealed a cut-point value of 25 mmHg as the best threshold for predicting diabetic foot ulcer healing; the area under the curve using this cut-point was 0.838 (95% confidence interval = 0.700-0.976). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for TxPO2 were 88.6%, 82.4%, 90.7%, and 72.2%, respectively. TcPO2≥ 40 mmHg was associated with diabetic foot ulcer healing, but a TcPO2≤ 10 mmHg was associated with failure of wound healing. We found that a cut-point of 25 mmHg was most predictive of diabetic foot ulcer healing.

  15. Non-healing gastro-duodenal ulcer: A rare presentation of primary abdominal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Merali, Nabeel; Chandak, Pankaj; Doddi, Sudeendra; Sinha, Prakash

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We present a case of primary gastrointestinal tuberculosis that has culminated in ulcer formation, in the absence of pulmonary involvement in an immunocompetent patient. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 28-year-old Asian male presented to casualty with a 1-week history of epigastric cramping abdominal pain and several episodes of non-bilious vomiting. The patient deteriorated clinically, becoming more cachectic and given his unexplained weight loss, an oesophageal-gastro-duodenal endoscopic imaging confirmed a duodenal ulcer. The biopsy of the non-healing ulcer was the hallmark of the disease, revealing evidence of granulomatous inflammation consistent with tuberculosis bacilli. DISCUSSION Gastrointestinal tuberculosis with ulceration is rare with respect to the oesophagus, stomach and duodenum. This case proves to be unique, as our patient had experienced primary isolated gastric tuberculosis in the absence of pulmonary tuberculosis in a healthy individual. Immunohistochemical staining, histopathology and radiological investigations have demonstrated their importance in confirming abdominal tuberculosis and the extent of bowel involvement. CONCLUSION This case has illustrated the difficulties associated with a prompt diagnosis of an unusual case of primary duodenal tuberculosis from chronic peptic ulcer disease in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:25506841

  16. Non-healing gastro-duodenal ulcer: A rare presentation of primary abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Merali, Nabeel; Chandak, Pankaj; Doddi, Sudeendra; Sinha, Prakash

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of primary gastrointestinal tuberculosis that has culminated in ulcer formation, in the absence of pulmonary involvement in an immunocompetent patient. A 28-year-old Asian male presented to casualty with a 1-week history of epigastric cramping abdominal pain and several episodes of non-bilious vomiting. The patient deteriorated clinically, becoming more cachectic and given his unexplained weight loss, an oesophageal-gastro-duodenal endoscopic imaging confirmed a duodenal ulcer. The biopsy of the non-healing ulcer was the hallmark of the disease, revealing evidence of granulomatous inflammation consistent with tuberculosis bacilli. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis with ulceration is rare with respect to the oesophagus, stomach and duodenum. This case proves to be unique, as our patient had experienced primary isolated gastric tuberculosis in the absence of pulmonary tuberculosis in a healthy individual. Immunohistochemical staining, histopathology and radiological investigations have demonstrated their importance in confirming abdominal tuberculosis and the extent of bowel involvement. This case has illustrated the difficulties associated with a prompt diagnosis of an unusual case of primary duodenal tuberculosis from chronic peptic ulcer disease in an immunocompetent patient. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Jianweiyuyang granule on gastric ulcer recurrence and expression of VEGF mRNA in the healing process of gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xing-Ping; Li, Jia-Bang; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Ding, Xiang; Huang, Cheng-Hui; Zhou, Bing

    2005-09-21

    To investigate the effect of Jianweiyuyang (JWYY) granule on gastric ulcer recurrence and its mechanism in the treatment of gastric ulcer in rats. Gastric ulcer in rats was induced according to Okeba's method with minor modification and the recurrence model was induced by IL-1beta. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA (VEGF mRNA) was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in gastric ulcer and microvessel density (MVD) adjacent to the ulcer margin was examined by immunohistochemistry. MVD was higher in the JWYY treatment group (14.0+/-2.62) compared with the normal, model and ranitidine treatment groups (2.2+/-0.84, 8.8+/-0.97, 10.4+/-0.97) in rats (P<0.01). The expression level of VEGF mRNA in gastric tissues during the healing process of JWYY treatment group rats significantly increased compared with other groups (normal group: 0.190+/-0.019, model group: 0.642+/-0.034, ranitidine group: 0.790+/-0.037, P<0.01). JWYY granules can stimulate angiogenesis and enhance the expression of VEGF mRNA in gastric ulcer rats. This might be the mechanism for JWYY accelerating the ulcer healing, and preventing the recurrence of gastric ulcer.

  18. A comparison of healing rates on two pressure-relieving systems.

    PubMed

    Russell, L; Reynolds, T; Carr, J; Evans, A; Holmes, M

    The authors have previously reported the preliminary results of a randomized-controlled trial comparing the relative efficacy of two pressure-relieving systems: Huntleigh Nimbus 3 and Aura Cushion, and Pegasus Cairwave Therapy System and ProActive Seating Cushion (Russell et al, 2000). Although both the mattresses and cushions were effective treatments for pressure ulcers, the Huntleigh equipment was demonstrated to be statistically more effective for heel ulcers, but no differences were demonstrated for sacral ulcers. This article gives a more detailed analysis of the 141 patients assessed using computerized-image analysis of the digital images of sacral ulcers captured during the trial and specifically discusses the healing rates and other patient characteristics. Ninety-eight per cent of ulcers examined were deemed superficial (Torrance grade 2a, 2b, 3). Precision of image analysis assessed by within- and between-batch coefficients of variation was excellent: calibration CV 0.93-1.84%; area CV 4.61-5.72%. The healing rates on the two mattresses were not shown to be statistically different from each other.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of becaplermin gel on wound healing of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, Adrienne M; Waycaster, Curtis R; Motley, Travis A

    2015-01-01

    We sought to determine the long-term cost effectiveness (payer's perspective) of becaplermin gel plus good wound care (BGWC) vs. good wound care (GWC) alone in terms of wound healing and risk of amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). Outcomes data were derived from a propensity score-matched cohort from the Curative Health Services database between 1998 and 2004, which was followed for 20 weeks. A four-state Markov model was used to predict costs and outcomes of wound healing and risk of amputation for BGWC vs. GWC alone over 1 year in patients with DFU. The primary outcome was closed-wound weeks. Transition probabilities for healing and amputation were derived from the aforementioned propensity score-matched cohorts. Ulcer recurrence was estimated from the medical literature. Utilization for becaplermin was calculated using the dosing algorithm in the product labeling. Of 24,898 eligible patients, 9.6% received BGWC. Based on the model, patients treated with BGWC had substantially more closed-wound weeks compared with GWC (16.1 vs. 12.5 weeks, respectively). More patients receiving BGWC had healed wounds at 1 year compared with those receiving GWC (48.1% vs. 38.3%). Risk of amputation was lower in the BGWC cohort (6.8% vs. 9.8%). Expected annual direct costs for DFU were $21,920 for BGWC and $24,640 for GWC. BGWC was economically dominant over GWC, providing better outcomes at a lower cost in patients with DFU. Compared with GWC alone, BGWC is more effective in healing wounds and lowering amputation risk, thereby decreasing long-term costs for DFU. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  20. Effects of hydrotalcite combined with esomeprazole on gastric ulcer healing quality: A clinical observation study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui-Qi; Mao, Hua; Huang, Li-Yun; Su, Pei-Zhu; Lu, Min

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effects of hydrotalcite combined with esomeprazole on gastric ulcer healing quality. METHODS Forty-eight patients diagnosed with gastric ulcer between June 2014 and February 2016 were randomly allocated to the combination therapy group or monotherapy group. The former received hydrotalcite combined with esomeprazole, and the latter received esomeprazole alone, for 8 wk. Twenty-four healthy volunteers were recruited and acted as the healthy control group. Endoscopic ulcer healing was observed using white light endoscopy and narrow band imaging magnifying endoscopy. The composition of collagen fibers, amount of collagen deposition, expression of factor VIII and TGF-β1, and hydroxyproline content were analyzed by Masson staining, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescent imaging and ELISA. RESULTS Following treatment, changes in the gastric microvascular network were statistically different between the combination therapy group and the monotherapy group (P < 0.05). There were significant differences (P < 0.05) in collagen deposition, expression level of Factor VIII and TGF-β1, and hydroxyproline content in the two treatment groups compared with the healthy control group. These parameters in the combination therapy group were significantly higher than in the monotherapy group (P < 0.05). The ratio of collagen I to collagen III was statistically different among the three groups, and was significantly higher in the combination therapy group than in the monotherapy group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Hydrotalcite combined with esomeprazole is superior to esomeprazole alone in improving gastric ulcer healing quality in terms of improving microvascular morphology, degree of structure maturity and function of regenerated mucosa. PMID:28275307

  1. Association of Hemoglobin A1c and Wound Healing in Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Fesseha, Betiel K; Abularrage, Christopher J; Hines, Kathryn F; Sherman, Ronald; Frost, Priscilla; Langan, Susan; Canner, Joseph; Likes, Kendall C; Hosseini, Sayed M; Jack, Gwendolyne; Hicks, Caitlin W; Yalamanchi, Swaytha; Mathioudakis, Nestoras

    2018-04-16

    This study evaluated the association between hemoglobin A 1c (A1C) and wound outcomes in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). We conducted a retrospective analysis of an ongoing prospective, clinic-based study of patients with DFUs treated at an academic institution during a 4.7-year period. Data from 270 participants and 584 wounds were included in the analysis. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess the incidence of wound healing at any follow-up time in relation to categories of baseline A1C and the incidence of long-term (≥90 days) wound healing in relation to tertiles of nadir A1C change and mean A1C change from baseline, adjusted for potential confounders. Baseline A1C was not associated with wound healing in univariate or fully adjusted models. Compared with a nadir A1C change from baseline of -0.29 to 0.0 (tertile 2), a nadir A1C change of 0.09 to 2.4 (tertile 3) was positively associated with long-term wound healing in the subset of participants with baseline A1C <7.5% (hazard ratio [HR], 2.07; 95% CI, 1.08-4.00), but no association with wound healing was seen with the mean A1C change from baseline in this group. Neither nadir A1C change nor mean A1C change were associated with long-term wound healing in participants with baseline A1C ≥7.5%. There does not appear to be a clinically meaningful association between baseline or prospective A1C and wound healing in patients with DFUs. The paradoxical finding of accelerated wound healing and increase in A1C in participants with better baseline glycemic control requires confirmation in further studies. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  2. Role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-dependent macrophages in gastric ulcer healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Y; Nakase, Y; Isomoto, Y; Matsuda, N; Amagase, K; Kato, S; Takeuchi, K

    2011-08-01

    We examined the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-dependent macrophages in the healing of gastric ulcers in mice. Male M-CSF-deficient (op/op) and M-CSF-expressing heterozygote (+/?) mice were used. Gastric ulcers were induced by thermal cauterization under ether anesthesia, and healing was observed for 14 days after ulceration. The numbers of macrophages and microvessels in the gastric mucosa were determined immunohistochemically with anti-CD68 and anti-CD31 antibodies, respectively. Expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA was determined via real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the mucosal content of prostaglandin (PG) E(2) was determined via enzyme immunoassay on day 10 after ulceration. The healing of gastric ulcers was significantly delayed in op/op mice compared with +/? mice. Further, significantly fewer macrophages were observed in the normal gastric mucosa of op/op mice than in +/? mice. Ulcer induction caused a marked accumulation of macrophages around the ulcer base in +/? mice, but this response was attenuated in op/op mice. The mucosal PGE(2) content as well as the expression of COX-2, VEGF, and TNF-α mRNA were all upregulated in the ulcerated area of +/? mice but significantly suppressed in op/op mice. The degree of vascularization in the ulcerated area was significantly lower in op/op mice than in +/? mice. Taken together, these results suggest that M-CSF-dependent macrophages play an important role in the healing of gastric ulcers, and that this action may be associated with angiogenesis promoted by upregulation of COX-2/PGE(2) production.

  3. Therapeutic effect of exogenous ghrelin in the healing of gingival ulcers is mediated by the release of endogenous growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1.

    PubMed

    Cieszkowski, J; Warzecha, Z; Ceranowicz, P; Ceranowicz, D; Kusnierz-Cabala, B; Pedziwiatr, M; Dembinski, M; Ambrozy, T; Kaczmarzyk, T; Pihut, M; Wieckiewicz, M; Olszanecki, R; Dembinski, A

    2017-08-01

    Ghrelin, an acylated 28-amino acid polypeptide, was primary isolated from the stomach, and the stomach is a main source of circulating ghrelin. Ghrelin strongly and dose-dependently stimulates release of growth hormone from the anterior pituitary, as well as increases food intake and fat deposition. Previous studies showed that ghrelin exhibits protective and therapeutic effect in different parts of the gastrointestinal system, including the oral cavity. The aim of present study was to examine the role of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in the healing of gingival ulcers. Studies were performed on rats with the intact pituitary gland and hypophysectomized rats. In anesthetized rats, chronic ulcers of the gum were induced by acetic acid. Rats were treated intraperitoneally twice a day with saline or ghrelin (4, 8 or 16 nmol/kg/dose) for six days. In pituitary-intact rats, administration of ghrelin significantly increased serum concentration of growth hormone and IGF-1 and this effect was associated with a significant increase in the healing rate of gingival ulcers. Moreover, treatment with ghrelin increased mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis in the gum, while a local inflammation was decreased what was observed as a reduction in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β. Hypophysectomy decreased serum level of growth hormone below a detection limit; whereas serum concentration of IGF-1 was reduced by 90%. On the other hand, removal of the pituitary gland was without any significant effect on the healing rate of gingival ulcers or on the ulcer-induced increase in DNA synthesis and concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β in gingival mucosa. Administration of ghrelin failed to affect serum level of growth hormone and IGF-1 in hypophysectomized rats, and was without any effect on the healing rate of gingival ulcers, mucosal blood flow, DNA synthesis or concentration of interleukin-1β in gingival mucosa. Neither

  4. Arginine glutamate improves healing of radiation-induced skin ulcers in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Khalin, Igor; Kocherga, Ganna

    2013-12-01

    The increase in the incidence of the radiation-induced skin injury cases and the absence of standard treatments escalate the interest in finding new and effective drugs for these lesions. We studied the effect of a 40% solution of arginine glutamate on the healing of radiation-induced skin ulcers in guinea pigs. Radiation skin injury was produced on the thigh of guinea pigs by 60 Gy local X-ray irradiation. Treatment was started 6 weeks after the irradiation when ulcers had been formed. Arginine glutamate was administered by subcutaneous injections around the wound edge. Methyluracil was chosen as the comparison drug. The animals were sacrificed on day 21 after the start of treatment and the irradiated skin tissues were subjected to histological evaluation, cytokines analysis, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes analysis. We have shown that arginine glutamate significantly (p < 0.05) decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the wound, restored the balance between lipid peroxidation formation and antioxidant enzymes activity and promoted cell proliferation as well as collagen synthesis. These results demonstrate that arginine glutamate successfully improves the healing of radiation-induced skin ulcers. In all probability, the curative effect is associated with the interaction of arginine with nitric oxide synthase II and arginase I, but further investigations are needed to validate this.

  5. Performance of prognostic markers in the prediction of wound healing or amputation among patients with foot ulcers in diabetes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Brownrigg, J R W; Hinchliffe, R J; Apelqvist, J; Boyko, E J; Fitridge, R; Mills, J L; Reekers, J; Shearman, C P; Zierler, R E; Schaper, N C

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of wound healing and major amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulceration is clinically important to stratify risk and target interventions for limb salvage. No consensus exists as to which measure of peripheral artery disease (PAD) can best predict outcomes. To evaluate the prognostic utility of index PAD measures for the prediction of healing and/or major amputation among patients with active diabetic foot ulceration, two reviewers independently screened potential studies for inclusion. Two further reviewers independently extracted study data and performed an assessment of methodological quality using the Quality in Prognostic Studies instrument. Of 9476 citations reviewed, 11 studies reporting on 9 markers of PAD met the inclusion criteria. Annualized healing rates varied from 18% to 61%; corresponding major amputation rates varied from 3% to 19%. Among 10 studies, skin perfusion pressure ≥ 40 mmHg, toe pressure ≥ 30 mmHg (and ≥ 45 mmHg) and transcutaneous pressure of oxygen (TcPO2 ) ≥ 25 mmHg were associated with at least a 25% higher chance of healing. Four studies evaluated PAD measures for predicting major amputation. Ankle pressure < 70 mmHg and fluorescein toe slope < 18 units each increased the likelihood of major amputation by around 25%. The combined test of ankle pressure < 50 mmHg or an ankle brachial index (ABI) < 0.5 increased the likelihood of major amputation by approximately 40%. Among patients with diabetic foot ulceration, the measurement of skin perfusion pressures, toe pressures and TcPO2 appear to be more useful in predicting ulcer healing than ankle pressures or the ABI. Conversely, an ankle pressure of < 50 mmHg or an ABI < 0.5 is associated with a significant increase in the incidence of major amputation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Adjunctive Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Healing of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Yu; Wu, Re-Wen; Hsu, Mei-Chi; Hsieh, Ching-Jung; Chou, Man-Chun

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of standard wound care with adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) to standard wound care alone on wound healing, markers of inflammation, glycemic control, amputation rate, survival rate of tissue, and health-related quality of life in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). Prospective, randomized, open-label, controlled study. The sample comprised 38 patients with nonhealing DFUs who were deemed poor candidates for vascular surgery. Subjects were randomly allocated to an experimental group (standard care plus HBOT, n = 20) or a control group (standard care alone, n = 18). The study setting was a medical center in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was administered in a hyperbaric chamber under 2.5 absolute atmospheric pressure for 120 minutes; subjects were treated 5 days a week for 4 consecutive weeks. Both groups received standard wound care including debridement of necrotic tissue, topical therapy for Wagner grade 2 DFUs, dietary control and pharmacotherapy to maintain optimal blood glucose levels. Wound physiological indices were measured and blood tests (eg, markers of inflammation) were undertaken. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form. Complete DFU closure was achieved in 5 patients (25%) in the HBOT group (n = 20) versus 1 participant (5.5%) in the routine care group (n = 18) (P = .001). The amputation rate was 5% for the HBOT group and 11% for the routine care group (χ = 15.204, P = .010). The HBOT group showed statistically significant improvements in inflammation index, blood flow, and health-related quality of life from pretreatment to 2 weeks after the last therapy ended (P < .05). Hemoglobin A1c was significantly lower in the HBOT group following treatment (P < .05) but not in the routine care group. Adjunctive HBOT improved wound healing in persons with DFU. Therapy also reduced the risk of amputation of the

  7. Pathophysiology of wound healing and alterations in venous leg ulcers-review.

    PubMed

    Raffetto, Joseph D

    2016-03-01

    Venous leg ulcer (VLU) is one of the most common lower extremity ulcerated wound, and is a significant healthcare problem with implications that affect social, economic, and the well-being of a patient. VLU can have debilitating related problems which require weekly medical care and may take months to years to heal. The pathophysiology of VLU is complex, and healing is delayed in many patients due to a persistent inflammatory condition. Patient genetic and environmental factors predispose individuals to chronic venous diseases including VLU. Changes in shear stress affecting the glycocalyx are likely initiating events, leading to activation of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells, and leukocyte activation with attachment and migration into vein wall, microcirculation, and in the interstitial space. Multiple chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, proteases and matrix metalloproteinases are produced. The pathology of VLU involves an imbalance of inflammation, inflammatory modulators, oxidative stress, and proteinase activity. Understanding the cellular and biochemical events that lead to the progression of VLU is critical. With further understanding of inflammatory pathways and potential mechanisms, certain biomarkers could be revealed and studied as both involvement in the pathophysiology of VLU but also as therapeutic targets for VLU healing. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Chemical structure of bismuth compounds determines their gastric ulcer healing efficacy and anti-Helicobacter pylori activity.

    PubMed

    Sandha, G S; LeBlanc, R; Van Zanten, S J; Sitland, T D; Agocs, L; Burford, N; Best, L; Mahoney, D; Hoffman, P; Leddin, D J

    1998-12-01

    The recognition of the role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease has led to renewed interest in bismuth pharmacology since bismuth compounds have both anti-Helicobacter pylori and ulcer healing properties. The precise chemical structure of current bismuth compounds is not known. This has hindered the development of new and potentially more efficacious formulations. We have created two new compounds, 2-chloro-1,3-dithia-2-bismolane (CDTB) and 1,2-[bis(1,3-dithia-2-bismolane)thio]ethane (BTBT), with known structure. In a rat model of gastric ulceration, BTBT was comparable to, and CDTB was significantly less effective than colloidal bismuth subcitrate in healing cryoprobe-induced ulcers. However, both BTBT and CDTB inhibited H. pylori growth in vitro at concentrations <1/10 that of colloidal bismuth subcitrate. The effects on ulcer healing are not mediated by suppression of acid secretion, pepsin inhibition, or prostaglandin production. Since all treated animals received the same amount of elemental bismuth, it appears that the efficacy of bismuth compounds varies with compound structure and is not simply dependent on the delivery of bismuth ion. Because the structure of the novel compounds is known, our understanding of the relationship of bismuth compound structure and to biologic activity will increase. In the future it may be possible to design other novel bismuth compounds with more potent anti-H. pylori and ulcer healing effects.

  9. Topical application of quercetin improves wound healing in pressure ulcer lesions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guimei; Wang, Zhijing; Wang, Zhaoxia; Wang, Xirui

    2018-05-07

    The ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) induced skin lesion has been identified as primary cause of pressure ulcers. To date, attempts to prevent pressure ulcers have not produced a significant improvement. Quercetin, one of the most widely distributed flavonoids in fruits and vegetables, exhibits its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties against many diseases, including ischemic heart disease, atherosclerosis, and renal injury. In vitro wound scratch assay was first used to assess the function of quercetin in wounding cell model. Next, animal pressure ulcers model was established with two cycles of I/R. The impact of quercetin in the wound recovery, immune cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokines production was investigated in this model. Mechanistic regulation of quercetin at the wound site was also studied. Quercetin accelerated wound closure in cell scratch assay. Dose response study suggested 1 μM quercetin for in vivo study. In I/R injury model, quercetin treatment significantly accelerated wound closure, reduced immune cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokines production. Signaling study showed quercetin treatment inhibited MAPK but not NFĸB activation. Quercetin treatment improved the wound healing process in I/R lesions by suppressing MAPK pathway. Our results supported that quercetin could be a potential therapeutic agent for pressure ulcers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. An Automatic Assessment System of Diabetic Foot Ulcers Based on Wound Area Determination, Color Segmentation, and Healing Score Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Pedersen, Peder C; Strong, Diane M; Tulu, Bengisu; Agu, Emmanuel; Ignotz, Ron; He, Qian

    2015-08-07

    For individuals with type 2 diabetes, foot ulcers represent a significant health issue. The aim of this study is to design and evaluate a wound assessment system to help wound clinics assess patients with foot ulcers in a way that complements their current visual examination and manual measurements of their foot ulcers. The physical components of the system consist of an image capture box, a smartphone for wound image capture and a laptop for analyzing the wound image. The wound image assessment algorithms calculate the overall wound area, color segmented wound areas, and a healing score, to provide a quantitative assessment of the wound healing status both for a single wound image and comparisons of subsequent images to an initial wound image. The system was evaluated by assessing foot ulcers for 12 patients in the Wound Clinic at University of Massachusetts Medical School. As performance measures, the Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) value for the wound area determination algorithm tested on 32 foot ulcer images was .68. The clinical validity of our healing score algorithm relative to the experienced clinicians was measured by Krippendorff's alpha coefficient (KAC) and ranged from .42 to .81. Our system provides a promising real-time method for wound assessment based on image analysis. Clinical comparisons indicate that the optimized mean-shift-based algorithm is well suited for wound area determination. Clinical evaluation of our healing score algorithm shows its potential to provide clinicians with a quantitative method for evaluating wound healing status. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  11. Gallic Acid Enriched Fraction of Phyllanthus emblica Potentiates Indomethacin-Induced Gastric Ulcer Healing via e-NOS-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Ananya; Chatterjee, Sirshendu; Biswas, Angshuman; Bhattacharya, Sayanti; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Bandyopadhyay, Sandip K.

    2012-01-01

    The healing activity of gallic acid enriched ethanolic extract (GAE) of Phyllanthus emblica fruits (amla) against the indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration in mice was investigated. The activity was correlated with the ability of GAE to alter the cyclooxygenase- (COX-) dependent healing pathways. Histology of the stomach tissues revealed maximum ulceration on the 3rd day after indomethacin (18 mg/kg, single dose) administration that was associated with significant increase in inflammatory factors, namely, mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS) expression. Proangiogenic parameters such as the levels of prostaglandin (PG) E2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), von Willebrand Factor VIII, and endothelial NOS (e-NOS) were downregulated by indomethacin. Treatment with GAE (5 mg/kg/day) and omeprazole (3 mg/kg/day) for 3 days led to effective healing of the acute ulceration, while GAE could reverse the indomethacin-induced proinflammatory changes of the designated biochemical parameters. The ulcer healing activity of GAE was, however, compromised by coadministration of the nonspecific NOS inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), but not the i-NOS-specific inhibitor, L-N6-(1-iminoethyl) lysine hydrochloride (L-NIL). Taken together, these results suggested that the GAE treatment accelerates ulcer healing by inducing PGE2 synthesis and augmenting e-NOS/i-NOS ratio. PMID:22966242

  12. Enhancement of Wound Healing by the Traditional Chinese Medicine Herbal Mixture Sophora flavescens in a Rat Model of Perianal Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    XU, XIAOPING; LI, XIAOHUA; ZHANG, LEI; LIU, ZHAOHUI; PAN, YUAN; CHEN, DONG; BIN, DONGHUA; DENG, QUN; SUN, YU; HOFFMAN, M. ROBERT; YANG, ZHIJIAN; YUAN, HONG

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim: Hemorrhoidectomy is often associated with significant postoperative complications that may result in slow wound healing. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) compound Sophora flavescens (CSF) has shown efficacy on many inflammatory disorders. The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of CSF on wound healing in a rat model of perianal ulceration. Materials and Methods: A rat model of perianal ulceration was induced by subcutaneous injection of 75% glacial acetic acid. The animals with induced perianal ulcer received topical treatment of low, medium, and high doses of CFS twice daily. Potassium permanganate (PP); 0.02%) was given to the animals for comparison. Macroscopic and histological assessments of the ulcerated area were performed after treatment. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) was detected by immunohistochemical analysis. Results: Topical administration of medium- and high-dose CSF significantly enhanced perianal ulcer healing as compared to the untreated control (p<0.05). The macroscopic ulceration score was significantly reduced only in the high-dose CSF-treated group as compared to the control (p<0.01). All doses of CSF and PP ameliorated histological damages in the rats with induced perianal ulceration. High-dose CSF or PP significantly reduced the expression of PGE2 and IL-8 as compared to the control (p<0.01). No treatment-related toxicity was found in either the CSF- or the PP-treated mice. Conclusion: CSF enhances wound healing in a rat model of perianal ulceration. The inhibitory effect of CSF on pro-inflammatory cytokines PGE2 and IL-8 may be involved in the mechanism of enhanced wound-healing. PMID:28652418

  13. Enhancement of Wound Healing by the Traditional Chinese Medicine Herbal Mixture Sophora flavescens in a Rat Model of Perianal Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoping; Li, Xiaohua; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Zhaohui; Pan, Yuan; Chen, Dong; Bin, Donghua; Deng, Qun; Sun, Y U; Hoffman, Robert M; Yang, Zhijian; Yuan, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Hemorrhoidectomy is often associated with significant postoperative complications that may result in slow wound healing. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) compound Sophora flavescens (CSF) has shown efficacy on many inflammatory disorders. The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of CSF on wound healing in a rat model of perianal ulceration. A rat model of perianal ulceration was induced by subcutaneous injection of 75% glacial acetic acid. The animals with induced perianal ulcer received topical treatment of low, medium, and high doses of CFS twice daily. Potassium permanganate (PP); 0.02%) was given to the animals for comparison. Macroscopic and histological assessments of the ulcerated area were performed after treatment. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) was detected by immunohistochemical analysis. Topical administration of medium- and high-dose CSF significantly enhanced perianal ulcer healing as compared to the untreated control (p<0.05). The macroscopic ulceration score was significantly reduced only in the high-dose CSF-treated group as compared to the control (p<0.01). All doses of CSF and PP ameliorated histological damages in the rats with induced perianal ulceration. High-dose CSF or PP significantly reduced the expression of PGE 2 and IL-8 as compared to the control (p<0.01). No treatment-related toxicity was found in either the CSF- or the PP-treated mice. CSF enhances wound healing in a rat model of perianal ulceration. The inhibitory effect of CSF on pro-inflammatory cytokines PGE 2 and IL-8 may be involved in the mechanism of enhanced wound-healing. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. Wound-Healing Peptides for Treatment of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Other Infected Skin Injuries.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana; Teixeira, Cátia; Ferraz, Ricardo; Prudêncio, Cristina; Gomes, Paula

    2017-10-18

    As the incidence of diabetes continues to increase in the western world, the prevalence of chronic wounds related to this condition continues to be a major focus of wound care research. Additionally, over 50% of chronic wounds exhibit signs and symptoms that are consistent with localized bacterial biofilms underlying severe infections that contribute to tissue destruction, delayed wound-healing and other serious complications. Most current biomedical approaches for advanced wound care aim at providing antimicrobial protection to the open wound together with a matrix scaffold (often collagen-based) to boost reestablishment of the skin tissue. Therefore, the present review is focused on the efforts that have been made over the past years to find peptides possessing wound-healing properties, towards the development of new and effective wound care treatments for diabetic foot ulcers and other skin and soft tissue infections.

  15. ECAMulticapa: Effectiveness of double-layered compression therapy for healing venous ulcers in primary care: a Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Folguera-Álvarez, Carmen; Garrido-Elustondo, Sofia; Verdú-Soriano, José; García-García-Alcalá, Diana; Sánchez-Hernández, Mónica; Torres-de Castro, Oscar German; Barceló-Fidalgo, Maria Luisa; Martínez-González, Olga; Ardiaca-Burgués, Lidia; Solano-Villarrubia, Carmen; Lebracón-Cortés, Pilar Raquel; Molins-Santos, Carmen; Fresno-Flores, Mar; Cánovas-Lago, Maria Carmen; Benito-Herranz, Luisa Fernanda; García-Sánchez, Maria Teresa; Castillo-Pla, Olga; Morcillo-San Juan, María Sol; Ayuso-de la Torre, Maria Begoña; Burgos-Quintana, Pilar; López-Torres-Escudero, Ana; Ballesteros-García, Gema; García-Cabeza, Piedad; de Francisco-Casado, Maria Ángeles; Rico-Blázquez, Milagros

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency, in its final stage can cause venous ulcers. Venous ulcers have a prevalence of 0.5 % to 0.8 % in the general population, and increases starting at 60 years of age. This condition often causes increased dependency in affected individuals, as well as a perceived reduced quality of life and family overload. Local Treating chronic venous ulcers has 2 components: topically healing the ulcer and controlling the venous insufficiency. There is evidence that compressive therapy favours the healing process of venous ulcers. The studies we have found suggest that the use of multilayer bandage systems is more effective than the use of bandages with a single component, these are mostly using in Spain. Multilayer compression bandages with 2 layers are equally effective in the healing process of chronic venous ulcers as 4-layer bandages and are better tolerated and preferenced by patients. More studies are needed to specifically compare the 2-layer bandages systems in the settings where these patients are usually treated. Randomised, controlled, parallel, multicentre clinical trial, with 12 weeks of follow-up and blind evaluation of the response variable. The objective is to assess the efficacy of multilayer compression bandages (2 layers) compared with crepe bandages, based on the incidence of healed venous ulcers in individuals treated in primary care nursing consultations, at 12 weeks of follow-up. The study will include 216 individuals (108 per branch) with venous ulcers treated in primary care nursing consultations. The primary endpoint is complete healing at 12 weeks of follow-up. The secondary endpoints are the degree of healing (Resvech.2), quality of life (CCVUQ-e), adverse reactions related to the healing process. Prognosis and demographic variables are also recorder. Effectiveness analysis using Kaplan-Meier curves, a log-rank test and a Cox regression analysis. The analysis was performed by intention to treat. The study results can

  16. Efficacy of sildenafil on ischaemic digital ulcer healing in systemic sclerosis: the placebo-controlled SEDUCE study

    PubMed Central

    Hachulla, Eric; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Carpentier, Patrick; Agard, Christian; Chatelus, Emmanuel; Jego, Patrick; Mouthon, Luc; Queyrel, Viviane; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Michon-Pasturel, Ulrique; Jaussaud, Roland; Mathian, Alexis; Granel, Brigitte; Diot, Elisabeth; Farge-Bancel, Dominique; Mekinian, Arsène; Avouac, Jérôme; Desmurs-Clavel, Hélène; Clerson, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, on digital ulcer (DU) healing in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods Randomised, placebo-controlled study in patients with SSc to assess the effect of sildenafil 20 mg or placebo, three times daily for 12 weeks, on ischaemic DU healing. The primary end point was the time to healing for each DU. Time to healing was compared between groups using Cox models for clustered data (two-sided tests, p=0.05). Results Intention-to-treat analysis involved 83 patients with a total of 192 DUs (89 in the sildenafil group and 103 in the placebo group). The HR for DU healing was 1.33 (0.88 to 2.00) (p=0.18) and 1.27 (0.85 to 1.89) (p=0.25) when adjusted for the number of DUs at entry, in favour of sildenafil. In the per protocol population, the HRs were 1.49 (0.98 to 2.28) (p=0.06) and 1.43 (0.93 to 2.19) p=0.10. The mean number of DUs per patient was lower in the sildenafil group compared with the placebo group at week (W) 8 (1.23±1.61 vs 1.79±2.40 p=0.04) and W12 (0.86±1.62 vs 1.51±2.68, p=0.01) resulting from a greater healing rate (p=0.01 at W8 and p=0.03 at W12). Conclusions The primary end point was not reached in intention-to-treat, partly because of an unexpectedly high healing rate in the placebo group. We found a significant decrease in the number of DUs in favour of sildenafil compared with placebo at W8 and W12, confirming a sildenafil benefit. Trial registration number NCT01295736. PMID:25995322

  17. Effects of insulin on the skin: possible healing benefits for diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Emanuelli, T; Burgeiro, A; Carvalho, E

    2016-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers affect 15-20 % of all diabetic patients and remain an important challenge since the available therapies have limited efficacy and some of the novel therapeutic approaches, which include growth factors and stem cells, are highly expensive and their safety remains to be evaluated. Despite its low cost and safety, the interest for topical insulin as a healing agent has increased only in the last 20 years. The molecular mechanisms of insulin signaling and its metabolic effects have been well studied in its classical target tissues. However, little is known about the specific effects of insulin in healthy or even diabetic skin. In addition, the mechanisms involved in the effects of insulin on wound healing have been virtually unknown until about 10 years ago. This paper will review the most recent advances in the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the beneficial effects of insulin on skin wound healing in diabetes. Emerging evidence that links dysfunction of key cellular organelles, namely the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria, to changes in the autophagy response, as well as the impaired wound healing in diabetic patients will also be discussed along with the putative mechanisms whereby insulin could regulate/modulate these alterations.

  18. Atypical Diabetic Foot Ulcer Keratinocyte Protein Signaling Correlates with Impaired Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Glenn D; Ramos, Corrine; Hoke, Nicholas N; Crossland, Mary C; Shawler, Lisa G; Boykin, Joseph V

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and wound infections often resulting in lower extremity amputations. The protein signaling architecture of the mechanisms responsible for impaired DFU healing has not been characterized. In this preliminary clinical study, the intracellular levels of proteins involved in signal transduction networks relevant to wound healing were non-biasedly measured using reverse-phase protein arrays (RPPA) in keratinocytes isolated from DFU wound biopsies. RPPA allows for the simultaneous documentation and assessment of the signaling pathways active in each DFU. Thus, RPPA provides for the accurate mapping of wound healing pathways associated with apoptosis, proliferation, senescence, survival, and angiogenesis. From the study data, we have identified potential diagnostic, or predictive, biomarkers for DFU wound healing derived from the ratios of quantified signaling protein expressions within interconnected pathways. These biomarkers may allow physicians to personalize therapeutic strategies for DFU management on an individual basis based upon the signaling architecture present in each wound. Additionally, we have identified altered, interconnected signaling pathways within DFU keratinocytes that may help guide the development of therapeutics to modulate these dysregulated pathways, many of which parallel the therapeutic targets which are the hallmarks of molecular therapies for treating cancer.

  19. Atypical Diabetic Foot Ulcer Keratinocyte Protein Signaling Correlates with Impaired Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Hoke, Glenn D.; Ramos, Corrine; Hoke, Nicholas N.; Crossland, Mary C.; Shawler, Lisa G.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and wound infections often resulting in lower extremity amputations. The protein signaling architecture of the mechanisms responsible for impaired DFU healing has not been characterized. In this preliminary clinical study, the intracellular levels of proteins involved in signal transduction networks relevant to wound healing were non-biasedly measured using reverse-phase protein arrays (RPPA) in keratinocytes isolated from DFU wound biopsies. RPPA allows for the simultaneous documentation and assessment of the signaling pathways active in each DFU. Thus, RPPA provides for the accurate mapping of wound healing pathways associated with apoptosis, proliferation, senescence, survival, and angiogenesis. From the study data, we have identified potential diagnostic, or predictive, biomarkers for DFU wound healing derived from the ratios of quantified signaling protein expressions within interconnected pathways. These biomarkers may allow physicians to personalize therapeutic strategies for DFU management on an individual basis based upon the signaling architecture present in each wound. Additionally, we have identified altered, interconnected signaling pathways within DFU keratinocytes that may help guide the development of therapeutics to modulate these dysregulated pathways, many of which parallel the therapeutic targets which are the hallmarks of molecular therapies for treating cancer. PMID:27840833

  20. Relationship between maceration and wound healing on diabetic foot ulcers in Indonesia: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Haryanto, Haryanto; Arisandi, Defa; Suriadi, Suriadi; Imran, Imran; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Sanada, Hiromi; Okuwa, Mayumi; Sugama, Junko

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between maceration and wound healing. A prospective longitudinal design was used in this study. The wound condition determined the type of dressings used and the dressing change frequency. A total of 62 participants with diabetic foot ulcers (70 wounds) were divided into two groups: non-macerated (n = 52) and macerated wounds (n = 18). Each group was evaluated weekly using the Bates-Jensen Wound Assessment Tool, with follow-ups until week 4. The Mann-Whitney U test showed that the changes in the wound area in week 1 were faster in the non-macerated group than the macerated group (P = 0·02). The Pearson correlation analysis showed a moderate correlation between maceration and wound healing from enrolment until week 4 (P = 0·002). After week 4, the Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the non-macerated wounds healed significantly faster than the macerated wounds (log-rank test = 19·378, P = 0·000). The Cox regression analysis confirmed that maceration was a significant and independent predictor of wound healing in this study (adjusted hazard ratio, 0·324; 95% CI, 0·131-0·799; P = 0·014). The results of this study demonstrated that there is a relationship between maceration and wound healing. Changes in the wound area can help predict the healing of wounds with maceration in clinical settings. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Healing Effect of Low-Temperature Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma in Pressure Ulcer: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chuangsuwanich, Apirag; Assadamongkol, Tananchai; Boonyawan, Dheerawan

    2016-12-01

    Pressure ulcers are difficult to treat. Recent reports of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma (LTAPP) indicated its safe and effectiveness in chronic wound care management. It has been shown both in vitro and vivo studies that LTAPP not only helps facilitate wound healing but also has antimicrobial efficacy due to its composition of ion and electron, free radicals, and ultraviolet ray. We studied the beneficial effect of LTAPP specifically on pressure ulcers. In a prospective randomized study, 50 patients with pressure ulcers were divided into 2 groups: Control group received standard wound care and the study group was treated with LTAPP once every week for 8 consecutive weeks in addition to standard wound care. We found that the group treated with LTAPP had significantly better PUSH (Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing) scores and exudate amount after 1 week of treatment. There was also a reduction in bacterial load after 1 treatment regardless of the species of bacteria identified.

  2. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the gastroprotective and ulcer healing actions of colloidal bismuth subcitrate (De-Nol) in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, S J; Dembinski, A; Warzecha, Z; Bielanski, W; Brzozowski, T; Drozdowicz, D

    1988-01-01

    Colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS; De-Nol) exhibits gastroprotective properties in experimental animals and enhances the healing of chronic gastroduodenal ulcers, but the mechanisms of these actions have not been entirely elucidated. The present study was designed to determine whether epidermal growth factor (EGF), which also has gastroprotective and ulcer healing properties, contributes to the action of De-Nol on the stomach in rats. It was found that De-Nol protects the gastric mucosa against ethanol damage and that this is accompanied by increased mucosal generation of prostaglandins (PG). Removal of the endogenous source of EGF (sialoadenectomy) did not significantly decrease the protective and PG stimulating effects of De-Nol. Pretreatment with exogenous EGF partially protected the stomach against ethanol injury, but did not influence the protective action of De-Nol in sialoadenectomised animals. De-Nol, like EGF given orally, enhanced the healing of chronic gastric and duodenal ulcers induced by serosal acetic acid. De-Nol was found to bind EGF in a pH-dependent manner and to accumulate it in ulcer area. Thus the peptide is available locally in high concentrations to accelerate the re-epithelialisation and tissue repair of the ulcerated mucosa. These ulcer healing effects of De-Nol were reduced by sialoadenectomy and restored in part by oral administration of EGF. We conclude that salivary glands in rats are not essential for the gastroprotection induced by De-Nol, but seem to play an important role in the ulcer healing action of this drug possibly via an EGF mediated mechanism. PMID:3260885

  3. The n-Hexane, ethylacetate, and butanol fractions from Hydnocarpi Semen enhanced wound healing in a mice ulcer model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geum Seon; Yim, Dongsool; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Kang, Tae Jin

    2012-12-01

    Our previous report showed that Hydnocarpi Semen (HS) extract has wound repair activity at ulcer lesion in diabetic mice. In this study, fractions of n-Hexane, ethylacetate (EtOAc), and butanol (BuOH) from HS crude extract were evaluated for their wound healing activity by using in vivo diabetic ulcer models and in vitro acute inflammation model. Although n-Hexane and EtOAc fractions promote wound healing in mice with ulcer, the BuOH fraction exhibited the most potent wound healing activity and the wound area score significantly decreased after treatment of BuOH fraction even at dose of 2 mg/kg. BuOH fraction stimulated macrophages to increase the production of nitric oxide (NO) and TNF-α. The BuOH fraction also enhanced the production of TGF-β and VEGF, which were involved in fibroblast activation and angiogenesis. The mRNA expression and activation of MMP-9 were increased by three fractions and the activity was higher in BuOH fraction-treated group compared to the other groups. The mechanism that the HS helps to promote healing of diabetic ulcer is possibly associated with the production of TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, as well as the secretion of VEGF, TGF-β, and MMP-9, which were involved in proliferation of capillaries and fibroblasts. These results suggest that HS can be a new candidate material for the treatment of wound in skin ulcer.

  4. Therapy for unhealed gastrocutaneous fistulas in rats as a model for analogous healing of persistent skin wounds and persistent gastric ulcers: stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157, atropine, ranitidine, and omeprazole.

    PubMed

    Skorjanec, Sandra; Dolovski, Zdravko; Kocman, Ivan; Brcic, Luka; Blagaic Boban, Alenka; Batelja, Lovorka; Coric, Marjana; Sever, Marko; Klicek, Robert; Berkopic, Lidija; Radic, Bozo; Drmic, Domagoj; Kolenc, Danijela; Ilic, Spomenko; Cesarec, Vedran; Tonkic, Ante; Zoricic, Ivan; Mise, Stjepan; Staresinic, Mario; Ivica, Mihovil; Lovric Bencic, Martina; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2009-01-01

    This study focused on unhealed gastrocutaneous fistulas to resolve whether standard drugs that promote healing of gastric ulcers may simultaneously have the same effect on cutaneous wounds, and corticosteroid aggravation, and to demonstrate why peptides such as BPC 157 exhibit a greater healing effect. Therefore, with the fistulas therapy, we challenge the wound/growth factors theory of the analogous nonhealing of wounds and persistent gastric ulcers. The healing rate of gastrocutaneous fistula in rat (2-mm-diameter stomach defect, 3-mm-diameter skin defect) validates macro/microscopically and biomechanically a direct skin wound/stomach ulcer relation, and identifies a potential therapy consisting of: (i) stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 [in drinking water (10 microg/kg) (12 ml/rat/day) or intraperitoneally (10 microg/kg, 10 ng/kg, 10 pg/kg)], (ii) atropine (10 mg/kg), ranitidine (50 mg/kg), and omeprazole (50 mg/kg), (iii) 6-alpha-methylprednisolone (1 mg/kg) [intraperitoneally, once daily, first application at 30 min following surgery; last 24 h before sacrifice (at postoperative days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, and 21)]. Greater anti-ulcer potential and efficiency in wound healing compared with standard agents favor BPC 157, efficient in inflammatory bowel disease (PL-14736, Pliva), given in drinking water or intraperitoneally. Even after 6-alpha-methylprednisolone aggravation, BPC 157 promptly improves both skin and stomach mucosa healing, and closure of fistulas, with no leakage after up to 20 ml water intragastrically. Standard anti-ulcer agents, after a delay, improve firstly skin healing and then stomach mucosal healing, but not fistula leaking and bursting strength (except for atropine). We conclude that BPC 157 may resolve analogous nonhealing of wounds and persistent gastric ulcers better than standard agents.

  5. The Effect of a Connexin43-Based Peptide on the Healing of Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers: A Multicenter, Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghatnekar, Gautam S; Grek, Christina L; Armstrong, David G; Desai, Sanjay C; Gourdie, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    The gap junction protein, connexin43 (Cx43), has critical roles in the inflammatory, edematous, and fibrotic processes following dermal injury and during wound healing, and is abnormally upregulated at the epidermal wound margins of venous leg ulcers (VLUs). Targeting Cx43 with ACT1, a peptide mimetic of the carboxyl-terminus of Cx43, accelerates fibroblast migration and proliferation, and wound reepithelialization. In a prospective, multicenter clinical trial conducted in India, adults with chronic VLUs were randomized to treatment with an ACT1 gel formulation plus conventional standard-of-care (SOC) protocols, involving maintaining wound moisture and four-layer compression bandage therapy, or SOC protocols alone. The primary end point was mean percent ulcer reepithelialization from baseline to 12 weeks. A significantly greater reduction in mean percent ulcer area from baseline to 12 weeks was associated with the incorporation of ACT1 therapy (79% (SD 50.4)) as compared with compression bandage therapy alone (36% (SD 179.8); P=0.02). Evaluation of secondary efficacy end points indicated a reduced median time to 50 and 100% ulcer reepithelialization for ACT1-treated ulcers. Incorporation of ACT1 in SOC protocols may represent a well-tolerated, highly effective therapeutic strategy that expedites chronic venous ulcer healing by treating the underlying ulcer pathophysiology through Cx43-mediated pathways. PMID:25072595

  6. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Inhibits Gastric Ulcer Healing through Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Nadatani, Yuji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Ohkawa, Fumikazu; Takeda, Shogo; Higashimori, Akira; Sogawa, Mitsue; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Koji; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was initially discovered as a nuclear protein that interacts with DNA as a chromatin-associated non-histone protein to stabilize nucleosomes and to regulate the transcription of many genes in the nucleus. Once leaked or actively secreted into the extracellular environment, HMGB1 activates inflammatory pathways by stimulating multiple receptors, including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), leading to tissue injury. Although HMGB1’s ability to induce inflammation has been well documented, no studies have examined the role of HMGB1 in wound healing in the gastrointestinal field. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of HMGB1 and its receptors in the healing of gastric ulcers. We also investigated which receptor among TLR2, TLR4, or RAGE mediates HMGB1’s effects on ulcer healing. Gastric ulcers were induced by serosal application of acetic acid in mice, and gastric tissues were processed for further evaluation. The induction of ulcer increased the immunohistochemical staining of cytoplasmic HMGB1 and elevated serum HMGB1 levels. Ulcer size, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and the expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) mRNA peaked on day 4. Intraperitoneal administration of HMGB1 delayed ulcer healing and elevated MPO activity and TNFα expression. In contrast, administration of anti-HMGB1 antibody promoted ulcer healing and reduced MPO activity and TNFα expression. TLR4 and RAGE deficiency enhanced ulcer healing and reduced the level of TNFα, whereas ulcer healing in TLR2 knockout (KO) mice was similar to that in wild-type mice. In TLR4 KO and RAGE KO mice, exogenous HMGB1 did not affect ulcer healing and TNFα expression. Thus, we showed that HMGB1 is a complicating factor in the gastric ulcer healing process, which acts through TLR4 and RAGE to induce excessive inflammatory responses. PMID:24244627

  7. High-mobility group box 1 inhibits gastric ulcer healing through Toll-like receptor 4 and receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Nadatani, Yuji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Ohkawa, Fumikazu; Takeda, Shogo; Higashimori, Akira; Sogawa, Mitsue; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Koji; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was initially discovered as a nuclear protein that interacts with DNA as a chromatin-associated non-histone protein to stabilize nucleosomes and to regulate the transcription of many genes in the nucleus. Once leaked or actively secreted into the extracellular environment, HMGB1 activates inflammatory pathways by stimulating multiple receptors, including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), leading to tissue injury. Although HMGB1's ability to induce inflammation has been well documented, no studies have examined the role of HMGB1 in wound healing in the gastrointestinal field. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of HMGB1 and its receptors in the healing of gastric ulcers. We also investigated which receptor among TLR2, TLR4, or RAGE mediates HMGB1's effects on ulcer healing. Gastric ulcers were induced by serosal application of acetic acid in mice, and gastric tissues were processed for further evaluation. The induction of ulcer increased the immunohistochemical staining of cytoplasmic HMGB1 and elevated serum HMGB1 levels. Ulcer size, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and the expression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) mRNA peaked on day 4. Intraperitoneal administration of HMGB1 delayed ulcer healing and elevated MPO activity and TNFα expression. In contrast, administration of anti-HMGB1 antibody promoted ulcer healing and reduced MPO activity and TNFα expression. TLR4 and RAGE deficiency enhanced ulcer healing and reduced the level of TNFα, whereas ulcer healing in TLR2 knockout (KO) mice was similar to that in wild-type mice. In TLR4 KO and RAGE KO mice, exogenous HMGB1 did not affect ulcer healing and TNFα expression. Thus, we showed that HMGB1 is a complicating factor in the gastric ulcer healing process, which acts through TLR4 and RAGE to induce excessive inflammatory responses.

  8. Specific nutritional support accelerates pressure ulcer healing and reduces wound care intensity in non-malnourished patients.

    PubMed

    van Anholt, R D; Sobotka, L; Meijer, E P; Heyman, H; Groen, H W; Topinková, E; van Leen, M; Schols, J M G A

    2010-09-01

    We investigated the potential of a high-protein, arginine- and micronutrient-enriched oral nutritional supplement (ONS) to improve healing of pressure ulcers in non-malnourished patients who would usually not be considered for extra nutritional support. Forty-three non-malnourished subjects with stage III or IV pressure ulcers were included in a multicountry, randomized, controlled, double-blind, parallel group trial. They were offered 200 mL of the specific ONS or a non-caloric control product three times per day, in addition to their regular diet and standard wound care, for a maximum of 8 wk. Results were compared with repeated-measures mixed models (RMMM), analysis of variance, or Fisher's exact tests for categorical parameters. Supplementation with the specific ONS accelerated pressure ulcer healing, indicated by a significantly different decrease in ulcer size compared with the control, over the period of 8 wk (P Ulcer Scale for Healing) in the supplemented group differed significantly (P healing of pressure ulcers and decreased wound care intensity in non-malnourished patients, which is likely to decrease overall costs of pressure ulcer treatment. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Venous leg ulcer healing with electric stimulation therapy: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Miller, C; McGuiness, W; Wilson, S; Cooper, K; Swanson, T; Rooney, D; Piller, N; Woodward, M

    2017-03-02

    Compression therapy is a gold standard treatment to promote venous leg ulcer (VLU) healing. Concordance with compression therapy is, however, often sub-optimal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of electric stimulation therapy (EST) to facilitate healing of VLUs among people who do not use moderate-to-high levels of compression (>25 mmHg). A pilot multicentre, single-blinded randomised controlled trial was conducted. Participants were randomised (2:1) to the intervention group or a control group where EST or a sham device was used 4 times daily for 20 minutes per session. Participants were monitored fortnightly for eight weeks. The primary outcome measure was percentage of area (wound size) change. In the 23 patients recruited, an average redution in wound size of 23.15% (standard deviation [SD]: 61.23) was observed for the control group compared with 32.67 % (SD: 42.54) for the intervention. A moderate effect size favouring the intervention group was detected from univariate [F(1,18)=1.588, p=0.224, partial eta squared=0.081] and multivariate repeated measures [F(1,18)=2.053, p=0.169, partial eta squared=0.102] analyses. The pilot study was not powered to detect statistical significance, however, the difference in healing outcomes are encouraging. EST may be an effective adjunct treatment among patients who have experienced difficulty adhering to moderate-to-high levels of compression therapy.

  10. Successful Endoscopic Management of Non-Healing Perforated Duodenal Ulcer with Polyglycolic Acid Sheet and Fibrin Glue.

    PubMed

    Mishiro, Tsuyoshi; Shibagaki, Kotaro; Matsuda, Kayo; Fukuyama, Chika; Okada, Mayumi; Mikami, Hironobu; Izumi, Daisuke; Yamashita, Noritsugu; Okimoto, Eiko; Fukuda, Naoki; Aimi, Masahito; Fukuba, Nobuhiko; Oshima, Naoki; Takanashi, Toshihiro; Matsubara, Takeshi; Ishimura, Norihisa; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, treatment techniques in which polyglycolic acid sheets are applied to various situations with fibrin glue have exhibited great clinical potential, and previous studies have reported safety and efficacy. We describe closure of a non-healing perforated duodenal ulcer with the use of a polyglycolic acid sheet and fibrin glue in an elderly patient who was not a candidate for surgery.

  11. Enhancement of Gastric Ulcer Healing and Angiogenesis by Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene Mediated by Attenuated Salmonella in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ha, Xiaoqin; Peng, Junhua; Zhao, Hongbin; Deng, Zhiyun; Dong, Juzi; Fan, Hongyan; Zhao, Yong; Li, Bing; Feng, Qiangsheng; Yang, Zhihua

    2017-02-01

    The present study developed an oral hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene therapy strategy for gastric ulcers treatment. An attenuated Salmonella typhimurium that stably expressed high HGF (named as TPH) was constructed, and the antiulcerogenic effect of TPH was evaluated in a rat model of gastric ulcers that created by acetic acid subserosal injection. From day 5 after injection, TPH (1 × 10⁹ cfu), vehicle (TP, 1 × 10⁹ cfu), or sodium bicarbonate (model control) was administered orally every alternate day for three times. Then ulcer size was measured at day 21 after ulcer induction. The ulcer area in TPH-treated group was 10.56 ± 3.30 mm², which was smaller when compared with those in the TP-treated and model control groups (43.47 ± 4.18 and 56.25 ± 6.38 mm², respectively). A higher level of reepithelialization was found in TPH-treated group and the crawling length of gastric epithelial cells was significantly longer than in the other two groups (P < 0.05). The microvessel density in the ulcer granulation tissues of the TPH-treated rats was 39.9 vessels/mm², which was greater than in the TP-treated and model control rats, with a significant statistical difference. These results suggest that TPH treatment significantly accelerates the healing of gastric ulcers via stimulating proliferation of gastric epithelial cells and enhancing angiogenesis on gastric ulcer site.

  12. Enhancement of Gastric Ulcer Healing and Angiogenesis by Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene Mediated by Attenuated Salmonella in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The present study developed an oral hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene therapy strategy for gastric ulcers treatment. An attenuated Salmonella typhimurium that stably expressed high HGF (named as TPH) was constructed, and the antiulcerogenic effect of TPH was evaluated in a rat model of gastric ulcers that created by acetic acid subserosal injection. From day 5 after injection, TPH (1 × 109 cfu), vehicle (TP, 1 × 109 cfu), or sodium bicarbonate (model control) was administered orally every alternate day for three times. Then ulcer size was measured at day 21 after ulcer induction. The ulcer area in TPH-treated group was 10.56 ± 3.30 mm2, which was smaller when compared with those in the TP-treated and model control groups (43.47 ± 4.18 and 56.25 ± 6.38 mm2, respectively). A higher level of reepithelialization was found in TPH-treated group and the crawling length of gastric epithelial cells was significantly longer than in the other two groups (P < 0.05). The microvessel density in the ulcer granulation tissues of the TPH-treated rats was 39.9 vessels/mm2, which was greater than in the TP-treated and model control rats, with a significant statistical difference. These results suggest that TPH treatment significantly accelerates the healing of gastric ulcers via stimulating proliferation of gastric epithelial cells and enhancing angiogenesis on gastric ulcer site. PMID:28049228

  13. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... produce chemicals that help the ulcer heal. Taking Pressure off Your Foot Ulcer Foot ulcers are partly caused by too much ... ulcer has healed. These devices will take the pressure off of the ulcer area. This will help speed healing. Be sure ...

  14. Preliminary investigation of topical nitroglycerin formulations containing natural wound healing agent in diabetes-induced foot ulcer.

    PubMed

    Hotkar, Mukesh S; Avachat, Amelia M; Bhosale, Sagar S; Oswal, Yogesh M

    2015-04-01

    Nitroglycerin (NTG) is an organic nitrate rapidly denitrated by enzymes to release free radical nitric oxide and shows improved wound healing and tissue protection from oxidative damage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether topical application of NTG in the form of gel/ointment along with a natural wound healing agent, aloe vera, would bring about wound healing by using diabetes-induced foot ulcer model and rat excision wound model. All these formulations were evaluated for pH, viscosity, drug content and ex vivo diffusion studies using rat skin. Based on ex vivo permeation studies, the formulation consisting of carbopol 974p as a gelling agent and aloe vera was found to be suitable. The in vivo study used streptozotocin-induced diabetic foot ulcer and rat excision wound models to analyse wound healing activity. The wound size in animals of all treated groups was significantly reduced compared with that of the diabetic control and marketed treated animals. This study showed that the gel formed with carbopol 974p (1%) and aloe vera promotes significant wound healing and closure in diabetic rats compared with the commercial product and provides a promising product to be used in diabetes-induced foot ulcer. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effect of oral nutritional supplementation on wound healing in diabetic foot ulcers: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, D G; Hanft, J R; Driver, V R; Smith, A P S; Lazaro-Martinez, J L; Reyzelman, A M; Furst, G J; Vayser, D J; Cervantes, H L; Snyder, R J; Moore, M F; May, P E; Nelson, J L; Baggs, G E; Voss, A C

    2014-09-01

    Among people with diabetes, 10-25% will experience a foot ulcer. Research has shown that supplementation with arginine, glutamine and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate may improve wound repair. This study tested whether such supplementation would improve healing of foot ulcers in persons with diabetes. Along with standard of care, 270 subjects received, in a double-blinded fashion, (twice per day) either arginine, glutamine and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate or a control drink for 16 weeks. The proportion of subjects with total wound closure and time to complete healing was assessed. In a post-hoc analysis, the interaction of serum albumin or limb perfusion, as measured by ankle-brachial index, and supplementation on healing was investigated. Overall, there were no group differences in wound closure or time to wound healing at week 16. However, in subjects with an albumin level of ≤ 40 g/l and/or an ankle-brachial index of < 1.0, a significantly greater proportion of subjects in the arginine, glutamine and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate group healed at week 16 compared with control subjects (P = 0.03 and 0.008, respectively). Those with low albumin or decreased limb perfusion in the supplementation group were 1.70 (95% CI 1.04-2.79) and 1.66 (95% CI 1.15-2.38) times more likely to heal. While no differences in healing were identified with supplementation in non-ischaemic patients or those with normal albumin, addition of arginine, glutamine and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate as an adjunct to standard of care may improve healing of diabetic foot ulcers in patients with risk of poor limb perfusion and/or low albumin levels. Further investigation involving arginine, glutamine and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate in these high-risk subgroups might prove clinically valuable. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  16. Modelling the cost-effectiveness of electric stimulation therapy in non-healing venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R R; Sladkevicius, E; Guest, J F

    2011-10-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of using electric stimulation (ES) therapy (Accel-Heal) plus dressings and compression bandaging compared with dressings and compression bandaging alone in treating chronic, non-healing venous leg ulcers (VLUs) of >6 months' duration from the perspective of the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK. A 5-month Markov model was constructed, depicting the management of a chronic, non-healing VLU of >6 months' duration. The model considers the decision by a clinician to continue with a patient's previous care plan (comprising dressings and compression bandaging) or treating with ES therapy plus dressings and compression bandaging. The model was used to estimate the relative cost-effectiveness of ES therapy at 2008-2009 prices. According to the model, 38% of VLUs are expected to heal within 5 months after starting ES therapy, with a further 57% expected to improve. This improvement in clinical outcome is expected to lead to a 6% health gain of 0.017 QALYs (from 0.299 to 0.316 QALYs) over 5 months. The model also showed that using ES therapy instead of continuing with a patient's previous care plan is expected to reduce the NHS cost of managing them by 15%, from £880 to £749, due in part to a 27% reduction in the requirement for nurse visits (from mean 49.0 to 35.9 visits per patient) over the first 5 months after the start of treatment. Hence, use of ES therapy was found to be a dominant treatment (improved outcome for less cost). Within the model's limitations, use of ES therapy potentially affords the NHS a cost-effective treatment, compared with patients remaining on their previous care plan in managing chronic, non-healing VLUs of >6 months' duration. However, this is dependant on the number of ES therapy units per treatment, the unit cost of the device, and the number of nurse visits required to manage patients in clinical practice. This study was sponsored by Synapse Microcurrent Ltd., manufacturers of Accel-Heal. The authors

  17. Micronutrients and Natural Compounds Status and Their Effects on Wound Healing in the Diabetic Foot Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kulprachakarn, Kanokwan; Ounjaijean, Sakaewan; Wungrath, Jukkrit; Mani, Raj; Rerkasem, Kittipan

    2017-12-01

    The diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is an invariably common complication of diabetes mellitus, it is also a significant cause of amputation as well as extended hospitalization. As most patients with DFU suffer from malnutrition, which has been related to improper metabolic micronutrients status, alterations can affect impaired wound healing process. Micronutrients and herbal remedies applications present a wide range of health advantages to patients with DFU. The purpose of this review is to provide current evidence on the potential effect of dietary supplementations such as vitamins A, C, D, E, magnesium, zinc, copper, iron, boron, and such naturally occurring compounds as Aloe vera, Naringin, and Radix Astragali (RA) and Radix Rehmanniae (RR) in the administration of lower extremity wounds, especially in DFU, and to present some insights for applications in the treatment of DFU patients in the future.

  18. Healing property of the Piper betel phenol, allylpyrocatechol against indomethacin-induced stomach ulceration and mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, S; Banerjee, D; Bauri, AK; Chattopadhyay, S; Bandyopadhyay, SK

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the protective activity of allylpyrocatechol (APC), the major antioxidant constituent of Piper betel, against the indomethacin-induced stomach ulceration in the rat model and correlates with its antioxidative and mucin protecting properties. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups. Normal control rats (group I) were given the vehicle oral dose of gum acacia in distilled water (1 mL per rat); ulcerated control and treated rats (groups II-V) were given a single dose of indomethacin (30 mg/kg body wt.); group II rats were sacrificed 4 h after indomethacin administration; groups III-V rats were given the vehicle (1 mL per rat) or APC (2 mg/kg body wt.) or misoprostol (1.43 μg/kg body wt.) once daily by oral intubation for 7 d starting from 4 h after the indomethacin administration. After 7 d, the stomach tissues were excised for histological examination and biochemical analysis. RESULTS: Treatment with APC (2 mg/kg body wt per day) and misoprostol (1.43 μg/kg body wt per day) for 7 d could effectively heal the stomach ulceration as revealed from the ulcer index and histopathological studies. Compared to the zero day ulcerated group, treatment with APC and misoprostol reduced the ulcer index by 93.4% and 85.4% respectively (P < 0.05). Both APC and misoprostol accelerated ulcer healing observed in natural recovery (P < 0.05), their respective healing capacities not being significantly different. The healing capacities of APC and misoprostol could be attributed to their antioxidant activity as well as the ability to enhance the mucin content of the gastric tissues. Compared to the ulcerated untreated rats, those treated with APC and misoprostol showed near normal MDA levels, while the protein levels were 86% and 78% of the normal value respectively (P < 0.05). Likewise, both APC and misoprostol increased the SOD, catalase, and mucin levels significantly (P < 0.05), the effect of APC being better. CONCLUSION: APC can protect

  19. Healing property of the Piper betel phenol, allylpyrocatechol against indomethacin-induced stomach ulceration and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, S; Banerjee, D; Bauri, A-K; Chattopadhyay, S; Bandyopadhyay, S-K

    2007-07-21

    To evaluate the protective activity of allylpyrocatechol (APC), the major antioxidant constituent of Piper betel, against the indomethacin-induced stomach ulceration in the rat model and correlates with its antioxidative and mucin protecting properties. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups. Normal control rats (group I) were given the vehicle oral dose of gum acacia in distilled water (1 mL per rat); ulcerated control and treated rats (groups II-V) were given a single dose of indomethacin (30 mg/kg body wt.); group II rats were sacrificed 4 h after indomethacin administration; groups III-V rats were given the vehicle (1 mL per rat) or APC (2 mg/kg body wt.) or misoprostol (1.43 mug/kg body wt.) once daily by oral intubation for 7 d starting from 4 h after the indomethacin administration. After 7 d, the stomach tissues were excised for histological examination and biochemical analysis. Treatment with APC (2 mg/kg body wt per day) and misoprostol (1.43 mug/kg body wt per day) for 7 d could effectively heal the stomach ulceration as revealed from the ulcer index and histopathological studies. Compared to the zero day ulcerated group, treatment with APC and misoprostol reduced the ulcer index by 93.4% and 85.4% respectively (P < 0.05). Both APC and misoprostol accelerated ulcer healing observed in natural recovery (P < 0.05), their respective healing capacities not being significantly different. The healing capacities of APC and misoprostol could be attributed to their antioxidant activity as well as the ability to enhance the mucin content of the gastric tissues. Compared to the ulcerated untreated rats, those treated with APC and misoprostol showed near normal MDA levels, while the protein levels were 86% and 78% of the normal value respectively (P < 0.05). Likewise, both APC and misoprostol increased the SOD, catalase, and mucin levels significantly (P < 0.05), the effect of APC being better. APC can protect indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration

  20. Venous ulcer review

    PubMed Central

    Bevis, Paul; Earnshaw, Jonothan

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What is the best treatment for venous ulcers? Results: Compression aids ulcer healing. Pentoxifylline can aid ulcer healing. Artificial skin grafts are more effective than other skin grafts in helping ulcer healing. Correction of underlying venous incompetence reduces ulcer recurrence. Implementation: Potential pitfalls to avoid are: Failure to exclude underlying arterial disease before application of compression.Unusual-looking ulcers or those slow to heal should be biopsied to exclude malignant transformation. PMID:21673869

  1. Débridement and Autologous Lipotransfer for Chronic Ulceration of the Diabetic Foot and Lower Limb Improves Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Stasch, Tilman; Hoehne, Julius; Huynh, Tuan; De Baerdemaeker, Randy; Grandel, Siegfried; Herold, Christian

    2015-12-01

    The application of autologous lipotransfer (fat grafting, lipofilling) in reconstructive surgery is steadily becoming more popular as evidence of the regenerative and reparative effects of fat becomes better known. The authors investigated the use of autologous lipotransfer for treatment of chronic diabetic and other foot and lower limb ulcers. Twenty-six patients with nonhealing wounds were treated with surgical débridement and autologous lipotransfer (using the débridement and autologous lipotransfer method). The mean age of the wounds before intervention was 16.7 months. Wound size after débridement averaged 5.1 ± 2.6 cm2. On average, 7.1 ± 3.3 cc of lipoaspirate was transferred into the wound area. Twenty-two of 25 wounds (88 percent) healed completely within a mean of 68.0 ± 33.0 days. A reduction of wound size by 50 percent was achieved after an average of 4 weeks. In one patient with an ulcer within particularly scarred tissues on the lower limb, a repeated session of lipotransfer led to complete wound healing after another 4 weeks. The authors describe a simple and useful technique to improve wound healing in diabetic feet and chronic lower limb ulcers with a background of peripheral vascular disease, where other interventional options to achieve wound healing have failed.

  2. Role of activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in gastric ulcer healing in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Baraka, Azza M; Deif, Maha M

    2011-01-01

    The potential utility of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-activating agents, such as metformin, in inducing angiogenesis, could be a promising approach to promote healing of gastric ulcers complicated by diabetes mellitus. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of a drug that activates AMPK, namely metformin, in gastric ulcer healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Forty male Wistar albino rats were made diabetic by intraperitoneal (i.p.) streptozotocin injection and 10 rats were injected i.p. by a single dose of physiological saline. Six weeks following streptozotocin or saline injection, gastric ulcers were induced by serosal application of acetic acid. Three days after acetic acid application, rats were divided into group 1 (nondiabetic control), group 2 (streptozotocin-injected rats), groups 3-5 (streptozotocin-injected rats treated with metformin or metformin and an inhibitor of AMPK, namely compound C or pioglitazone) for 7 days following acetic acid application. Administration of metformin, but not pioglitazone, resulted in a significant decrease in the gastric ulcer area, a significant increase in epithelial regeneration assessed histologically, a significant increase in the number of microvessels in the ulcer margin, a significant increase in gastric vascular endothelial growth factor concentration and gastric von Willebrand factor as well as a significant increase in gastric phospho-AMPK. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMPK, blocked metformin-induced changes in assessed parameters suggesting that the effect of metformin was mediated mainly through activation of AMPK. Our results suggest the feasibility of a novel treatment strategy, namely drugs activating AMPK, for patients in whom impairment of ulcer healing constitutes a secondary complication of diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Evaluation of wound healing in diabetic foot ulcer using platelet-rich plasma gel: A single-arm clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Molavi, Behnam; Mohammadi, Saeed; Nikbakht, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Ashraf Malek; Mostafaei, Shayan; Norooznezhad, Amir Hossein; Ghorbani Abdegah, Ali; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) gel for treatment of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) during the first 4 weeks of the treatment. In this longitudinal and single-arm trial, 100 patients were randomly selected after meeting certain inclusion and exclusion criteria; of these 100 patients, 70 (70%) were enrolled in the trial. After the primary care actions such as wound debridement, the area of each wound was calculated and recorded. The PRP therapy (2mL/cm 2 of ulcers) was performed weekly until the healing time for each patient. We used one sample T-test for healing wounds and Bootstrap resampling approach for reporting confidence interval with 1000 Bootstrap samples. The p-value<0.05 were considered statistically significant. The mean (SD) of DFU duration was 19.71 weeks (4.94) for units sampling. The ratio of subjects who withdrew from the study was calculated to be 2 (2.8%). Average area of 71 ulcers in the mentioned number of cases was calculated to be 6.11cm 2 (SD: 4.37). Also, the mean, median (SD) of healing time was 8.7, 8 weeks (SD: 3.93) except for 2 mentioned cases. According to one sample T-test, wound area (cm 2 ), on average, significantly decreased to 51.9% (CI: 46.7-57.1) through the first four weeks of therapy. Furthermore, significant correlation (0.22) was not found between area of ulcers and healing duration (p-value>0.5). According to the results, PRP could be considered as a candidate treatment for non-healing DFUs as it may prevent future complications such as amputation or death in this pathological phenomenon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Opened Proton Pump Inhibitor Capsules Reduce Time to Healing Compared With Intact Capsules for Marginal Ulceration Following Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Allison R; Chan, Walter W; Devery, Aiofe; Ryan, Michele B; Thompson, Christopher C

    2017-04-01

    Marginal ulceration, or ulceration at the gastrojejunal anastomosis, is a common complication of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Acidity likely contributes to the pathophysiology, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) frequently are prescribed for treatment. However, patients with gastric bypass only have a small gastric pouch and rapid small-bowel transit, which limits the opportunity for capsule breakdown and PPI absorption. Soluble PPIs (open capsules [OCs]) might be absorbed more easily than intact capsules (ICs). We compared time to ulcer healing, number of endoscopic procedures, and use of health care for patients with marginal ulceration who received PPIs in OC vs IC form. We performed a retrospective study of 164 patients diagnosed with marginal ulceration who underwent RYGB at the Brigham and Women's Hospital from 2000 through 2015. Patients received high-dose PPIs and underwent repeat endoscopy every 3 months until ulcer healing was confirmed. We used time-to-event analysis with a Cox proportional hazards model to evaluate the association between mode of PPI administration and time to ulcer healing, in addition to Cox multivariate regression analysis. Total charge (procedural and maintenance) was determined by comparison of categorized charges incurred from time of ulcer diagnosis to resolution. The primary outcome was time to healing of marginal ulceration in RYGB patients receiving high-dose PPIs in OC vs IC form. A total of 162 patients were included (115 received OC and 49 received IC). All patients were followed up until ulcer healing was confirmed. The median time to ulcer healing was 91.0 days for the OC group vs 342.0 days for the IC group (P < .001). OC was the only independent predictor of time to ulcer healing (P < .001) when we controlled for known risk factors. The number of endoscopic procedures (P = .02) and overall health care utilization (P = .05) were lower in the OC than the IC group. Patients with marginal ulceration after RYGB who

  5. Twice-daily Budesonide 2-mg Foam Induces Complete Mucosal Healing in Patients with Distal Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Makoto; Aoyama, Nobuo; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nishino, Haruo; Kobayashi, Kiyonori; Hirai, Fumihito; Watanabe, Kenji; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2016-07-01

    Mucosal healing is an important therapeutic goal for ulcerative colitis. Once-daily administration of budesonide 2-mg foam is widely used for inducing clinical remission. No study has assessed the usefulness of twice-daily budesonide 2mg foam on mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis patients. We explored the efficacy for mucosal healing of once- or twice-daily budesonide foam in distal ulcerative colitis patients. This study was a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. In all, 165 patients with active, mild to moderate distal ulcerative colitis were randomised to three groups: once- or twice-daily budesonide 2mg/25ml foam, or placebo foam, for 6 weeks. Complete mucosal healing [endoscopic subscore = 0] and the safety profile were assessed at Week 6. Prespecified and post hoc analyses were used. The percentages of complete mucosal healing in the twice-daily budesonide foam group were 46.4% compared with 23.6% in the once-daily group [p = 0.0097], or 5.6% in the placebo group [p < 0.0001]. The percentages of clinical remission and the percentages of endoscopic subscore ≤ 1 in the twice-daily budesonide foam group were 48.2% and 76.8%, compared with 50.9% and 69.1% in the once-daily group [no difference], or 20.4% and 46.3% in the placebo group [p = 0.0029 and p = 0.0007], respectively. In the subgroup of patients with previous use of a 5-aminosalicylic acid suppository or enema, there was a greater percentage of complete mucosal healing in the twice-daily budesonide foam group [32.0%] compared with that in the once-daily [8.7%, p = 0.0774] or placebo groups [4.8%, p = 0.0763], though there was no significant difference. No serious adverse event occurred. A significantly greater percentage of patients receiving twice-daily administration of budesonide foam compared with once-daily administration/placebo achieved complete mucosal healing. This is the first study to evaluate the endoscopic efficacy of twice-daily administration of 6-week

  6. Twice-daily Budesonide 2-mg Foam Induces Complete Mucosal Healing in Patients with Distal Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, Nobuo; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nishino, Haruo; Kobayashi, Kiyonori; Hirai, Fumihito; Watanabe, Kenji; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Mucosal healing is an important therapeutic goal for ulcerative colitis. Once-daily administration of budesonide 2-mg foam is widely used for inducing clinical remission. No study has assessed the usefulness of twice-daily budesonide 2mg foam on mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis patients. We explored the efficacy for mucosal healing of once- or twice-daily budesonide foam in distal ulcerative colitis patients. Methods: This study was a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. In all, 165 patients with active, mild to moderate distal ulcerative colitis were randomised to three groups: once- or twice-daily budesonide 2mg/25ml foam, or placebo foam, for 6 weeks. Complete mucosal healing [endoscopic subscore = 0] and the safety profile were assessed at Week 6. Prespecified and post hoc analyses were used. Results: The percentages of complete mucosal healing in the twice-daily budesonide foam group were 46.4% compared with 23.6% in the once-daily group [p = 0.0097], or 5.6% in the placebo group [p < 0.0001]. The percentages of clinical remission and the percentages of endoscopic subscore ≤ 1 in the twice-daily budesonide foam group were 48.2% and 76.8%, compared with 50.9% and 69.1% in the once-daily group [no difference], or 20.4% and 46.3% in the placebo group [p = 0.0029 and p = 0.0007], respectively. In the subgroup of patients with previous use of a 5-aminosalicylic acid suppository or enema, there was a greater percentage of complete mucosal healing in the twice-daily budesonide foam group [32.0%] compared with that in the once-daily [8.7%, p = 0.0774] or placebo groups [4.8%, p = 0.0763], though there was no significant difference. No serious adverse event occurred. Conclusions: A significantly greater percentage of patients receiving twice-daily administration of budesonide foam compared with once-daily administration/placebo achieved complete mucosal healing. This is the first study to evaluate the endoscopic

  7. Olive oil-induced reduction of oxidative damage and inflammation promotes wound healing of pressure ulcers in mice.

    PubMed

    Donato-Trancoso, Aline; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Romana-Souza, Bruna

    2016-07-01

    The overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and exacerbated inflammatory response are the main events that impair healing of pressure ulcers. Therefore, olive oil may be a good alternative to improve the healing of these chronic lesions due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. This study investigated the effect of olive oil administration on wound healing of pressure ulcers in mice. Male Swiss mice were daily treated with olive oil or water until euthanasia. One day after the beginning of treatment, two cycles of ischemia-reperfusion by external application of two magnetic plates were performed in skin to induced pressure ulcer formation. The olive oil administration accelerated ROS and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and reduced oxidative damage in proteins and lipids when compared to water group. The inflammatory cell infiltration, gene tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression and protein neutrophil elastase expression were reduced by olive oil administration when compared to water group. The re-epithelialization and blood vessel number were higher in the olive oil group than in the water group. The olive oil administration accelerated protein expression of TNF-α, active transforming growth factor-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor-A when compared to water group. The collagen deposition, myofibroblastic differentiation and wound contraction were accelerated by olive oil administration when compared to water group. Olive oil administration improves cutaneous wound healing of pressure ulcers in mice through the acceleration of the ROS and NO synthesis, which reduces oxidative damage and inflammation and promotes dermal reconstruction and wound closure. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of a disease-specific oral nutritional support for pressure ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Emanuele; Klersy, Catherine; Andreola, Manuela; Pisati, Roberto; Schols, Jos M G A; Caccialanza, Riccardo; D'Andrea, Federico

    2017-02-01

    The Oligo Element Sore Trial has shown that supplementation with a disease-specific nutritional formula enriched with arginine, zinc, and antioxidants improves pressure ulcer (PU) healing in malnourished patients compared to an isocaloric-isonitrogenous support. However, the use of such a nutritional formula needs to be supported also by a cost-effectiveness evaluation. This economic evaluation - from a local healthcare system perspective - was conducted alongside a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial following a piggy-back approach. The primary efficacy endpoint was the percentage of change in PU area at 8 weeks. The cost analysis focused on: the difference in direct medical costs of local PU care between groups and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of nutritional therapy related to significant study endpoints (percentage of change in PU area and ≥40% reduction in PU area at 8 weeks). Although the experimental formula was more expensive (mean difference: 39.4 Euros; P < 0.001), its use resulted in money saving with respect to both non-nutritional PU care activities (difference, -113.7 Euros; P = 0.001) and costs of local PU care (difference, -74.3 Euros; P = 0.013). Therefore, given its efficacy it proved to be a cost-effective intervention. The robustness of these results was confirmed by the sensitivity analyses. The use of a disease-specific oral nutritional formula not only results in better healing of PUs, but also reduces the costs of local PU care from a local healthcare system perspective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  9. Thyroid hormones increase stomach goblet cell numbers and mucin expression during indomethacin induced ulcer healing in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Namulema, Jackline; Nansunga, Miriam; Kato, Charles Drago; Kalange, Muhammudu; Olaleye, Samuel Babafemi

    2018-01-01

    Gastric ulcers are mucosal discontinuities that may extend into the mucosa, submucosa or even deeper. They result from an imbalance between mucosal aggressors and protective mechanisms that include the mucus bicarbonate layer. Thyroid hormones have been shown to accelerate gastric ulcer healing in part by increasing the adherent mucus levels. However, the effects of thyroid hormones on goblet cell numbers and expression of neutral and acidic mucins during ulcer healing have not been investigated. Thirty six adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups each with six animals. Group 1 (normal control) and group 2 (negative control) were given normal saline for eight weeks. Groups 3 and 4 were given 100 μg/kg per day per os of thyroxine so as to induce hyperthyroidism. Groups 5 and 6 received 0.01% ( w / v ) Propylthiouracil (PTU) for 8 weeks so as to induce hypothyroidism. After thyroid hormonal levels were confirmed using radioimmunoassay and immunoradiometric assays, ulcer induction was done using 40 mg/kg intragastric single dose of Indomethacin in groups 2, 3 and 5. Stomachs were extracted after day 3 and 7 of ulcer induction for histological examination. Histochemistry was carried out using Periodic Acid Shiff and Alcian Blue. The number of acidic and neutral goblet cells were determined by counting numbers per field. Mucin expression (%) was determined using Quick Photo Industrial software version 3.1. The numbers of neutral goblet cells (cells/field) increased significantly ( P  < 0.05) in the ulcer+thyroxine (14.67 ± 0.33), thyroxine (17.04 ± 1.71) and ulcer+PTU (12.89 ± 1.06) groups compared to the normal control (10.78 ± 1.07) at day 3. For the acidic goblet cells, differences between treatment groups were more pronounced at day 7 between the ulcer+thyroxine (22.56 ± 1.26) and thyroxine (22.89 ± 0.80). We further showed that percentage expression of both neutral and acidic mucins was significantly higher

  10. Carbon monoxide released from its pharmacological donor, tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer, accelerates the healing of pre-existing gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Magierowski, Marcin; Magierowska, Katarzyna; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Sliwowski, Zbigniew; Ginter, Grzegorz; Pajdo, Robert; Chmura, Anna; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a gaseous mediator produced by haem oxygenases (HOs), has been shown to prevent stress-, ethanol-, aspirin- and alendronate-induced gastric damage; however, its role in gastric ulcer healing has not been fully elucidated. We investigated whether CO released from tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2) can affect gastric ulcer healing and determined the mechanisms involved in this healing action. Gastric ulcers were induced in Wistar rats by serosal application of acetic acid. Animals received 9 days of treatment with RuCl 3 [2.5 mg·kg -1 intragastrically (i.g.)], haemin (5 mg·kg -1 i.g.), CORM-2 (0.1-10 mg·kg -1 i.g.) administered alone or with zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP, 10 mg·kg -1 i.g.), 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 5 mg·kg -1 i.g.), N G -nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA, 15 mg·kg -1 i.g.), indomethacin (5 mg·kg -1 i.g.) or glibenclamide (10 mg·kg -1 i.g.). Gastric ulcer area and gastric blood flow (GBF) were assessed planimetrically, microscopically and by laser flowmeter respectively. Gastric mRNA/protein expressions of EGF, EGF receptors, VEGFA, HOs, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), COX-2, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and pro-inflammatory iNOS, IL-1β and TNF-α were determined by real-time PCR or Western blots. CORM-2 and haemin but not RuCl 3 or ZnPP decreased ulcer size while increasing GBF. These effects were reduced by ODQ, indomethacin, l-NNA and glibenclamide. CORM-2 significantly decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory markers, Nrf2/HO1 and HIF-1α, and up-regulated EGF. CO released from CORM-2 or endogenously produced by the HO1/Nrf2 pathway accelerates gastric ulcer healing via an increase in GBF, an up-regulation in EGF expression and down-regulation of the inflammatory response. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Rebamipide solution: a novel submucosal injection material to promote healing speed and healing quality of ulcers induced by endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Ai; Uraoka, Toshio; Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Shimoda, Masayuki; Goto, Osamu; Ochiai, Yasutoshi; Maehata, Tadateru; Akimoto, Teppei; Mitsunaga, Yutaka; Sasaki, Motoki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Yahagi, Naohisa

    2018-04-01

    Rebamipide is administered perorally to protect the gastric mucosa. We assessed the efficacy and safety of a novel rebamipide solution as a submucosal injection material for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) using an in vivo porcine model. An endoscopist blinded to the test agents performed ESDs of hypothetical 30 mm lesions using a 2% rebamipide solution at 2 sites (rebamipide group) and a saline solution at 2 other sites (control group) in the stomachs of 8 pigs. The technical outcomes were compared between the 2 groups. The gastric ulcer stages were evaluated by endoscopy once weekly for 4 weeks after the ESD to determine the healing score (1-6). The pigs were killed at 1 week (n = 2), 2 weeks (n = 2), and 4 weeks (n = 4) after the ESD for pathologic evaluation of ESD-induced ulcers and scarring. There were no significant differences in any of the technical outcomes between the 2 groups, and no adverse events related to the ESD in any of the animals. The healing score was significantly higher in the rebamipide group than in the control group at 2 weeks (P = .027), 3 weeks (P = .034), and 4 weeks (P = .012). In the histopathologic assessment, fibrosis was significantly less extensive in the rebamipide group than in the control group at 2 weeks (P = .02) and 4 weeks (P = .04). The rebamipide solution appeared to promote both the speed and quality of healing of ESD-induced ulcers by suppressing fibrosis. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative healing property of kombucha tea and black tea against indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration in mice: possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Debashish; Hassarajani, Sham A; Maity, Biswanath; Narayan, Geetha; Bandyopadhyay, Sandip K; Chattopadhyay, Subrata

    2010-12-01

    The healing activity of black tea (BT) and BT fermented with Candida parapsilosis and kombucha culture, designated as CT and KT respectively against the indomethacin-induced stomach ulceration has been studied in a mouse model. The KT sample (KT4) produced by fermenting BT for four days, showed the best DPPH radical scavenging capacity and phenolics contents. Hence the ulcer-healing activity of KT4 was compared with those of CT4 and BT. All the tea extracts (15 mg kg(-1)) could effectively heal the gastric ulceration as revealed from the histopathological and biochemical studies, with relative efficacy as KT4 > CT4 ∼ BT. The healing capacities of the tea extracts could be attributed to their antioxidant activity as well as the ability to protect the mucin content of the gastric tissues. In addition, the ability of KT4 to reduce gastric acid secretion might also contribute to its ulcer-healing activity. The tea preparation KT4 (15 mg kg(-1)) was as effective as the positive control, omeprazole (3 mg kg(-1)) in ulcer healing.

  13. The Proteolytic Fraction from Latex of Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis (P1G10) Enhances Wound Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Double-Blind Randomized Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Tonaco, Luís A B; Gomes, Flavia L; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo; Lopes, Miriam T P; Salas, Carlos E

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of the proteolytic fraction from Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis, designated as P1G10, on the healing of chronic foot ulcers in neuropathic patients with diabetes 2. Fifty patients were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, double-blind trial, to verify the efficacy and safety of a topical dressing formulated with 0.1% P1G10, intended for wound healing, versus a hydrogel (control) protocol. Upon completion of the intervention, the outcome evaluated the number of patients attaining full epithelization (100%), or at least 80% healing. Statistical analysis compared the data on each group for the significance of the differences. Collection of data was finished in week 16, and the results were analyzed by intention to treat. The results showed that, in the control group, 5 patients attained 100% ulcer healing, 3 patients ≥ 80% healing and 11 experienced ulcer changes ≤ 80%, and the remainder showed no changes or their wounds became worse. Meanwhile, in the P1G10 group, 11 patients experienced full healing, 4 had healing ≥ 80% and 5 had ulcer changes ≤ lower than 80%, and the remainder showed no changes or their wounds became worse. The healing incidence for the first endpoint (100% healing) showed that the P1G10 group was 2.95-fold more efficacious than the control group (CI 95%) and 2.52-fold (CI, 95%) higher than its control for the second endpoint (80% healing). These data support the hypothesis that topical application of the proteolytic fraction identified as P1G10 significantly enhances foot ulcer healing compared to hydrogel treatment.

  14. Promote pressure ulcer healing in individuals with spinal cord injury using an individualized cyclic pressure-relief protocol.

    PubMed

    Makhsous, Mohsen; Lin, Fang; Knaus, Evan; Zeigler, Mary; Rowles, Diane M; Gittler, Michelle; Bankard, James; Chen, David

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate whether an individualized cyclic pressure-relief protocol accelerates wound healing in wheelchair users with established pressure ulcers (PrUs). Randomized controlled study. Spinal cord injury clinics. Forty-four subjects, aged 18-79 years, with a Stage II or Stage III PrU, were randomly assigned to the control (n = 22) or treatment (n = 22) groups. Subjects in the treatment group used wheelchairs equipped with an individually adjusted automated seat that provided cyclic pressure relief, and those in the control group used a standard wheelchair. All subjects sat in wheelchairs for a minimum of 4 hours per day for 30 days during their PrU treatment. Wound characteristics were assessed using the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) tool and wound dimensions recorded with digital photographs twice a week. Median healing time for a 30% healing relative to initial measurements, the percentage reduction in wound area, and the percentage improvement in PUSH score achieved at the end of the trial were compared between groups. At the end of 30 days, both groups demonstrated a general trend of healing. However, the treatment group was found to take significantly less time to achieve 30% healing for the wound measurement compared with the control group. The percentage improvement of the wound area and PUSH scores were greater in using cyclic seating (45.0 +/- 21.0, P < .003; 29.9 +/- 24. 6, P < .003) compared with standard seating (10.2 +/- 34.9, 5.8 +/- 9.2). The authors' findings show that cyclically relieving pressure in the area of a wound for seated individuals can greatly aid wound healing. The current study provides evidence that the individualized cyclic pressure-relief protocol helps promote pressure wound healing in a clinical setting. The authors concluded that the individualized cyclic pressure relief may have substantial benefits in accelerating the healing process in wheelchair users with existing PrUs, while maintaining the mobility of

  15. Wound healing outcomes in a diabetic foot ulcer outpatient clinic at an acute care hospital: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lu, S H; McLaren, A-M

    2017-10-01

    Patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) have an increased risk of lower extremity amputation. A retrospective chart review of patients with DFUs attending the Foot Treatment and Assessment chiropodist-led outpatient clinic at an inner-city academic hospital was conducted to determine wound healing outcomes and characteristics contributing to outcomes. We reviewed the complete clinical history of 279 patients with 332 DFUs spanning over a five-year period. The mean age of patients was 61.5±12.5 years and most patients (83.5%) had one DFU. The majority of wounds (82.5%) were in the forefoot. Overall, 267/332 (80.5%) wounds healed. A greater proportion of wounds healed in the forefoot (82.5%) and midfoot (87.1%) than hindfoot (51.9%; p<0.001). Using a logistic regression model, palpable pedal pulse and use of a total contact cast were associated with better wound healing. Our findings are the first to demonstrate the benefits of chiropodists leading an acute care outpatient clinic in the management of DFUs in Canada and delivers wound healing outcomes equivalent to or exceeding those previously published.

  16. Roles of pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors as well as matrix metalloproteinases in healing of NSAID-induced small intestinal ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Gyenge, Melinda; Amagase, Kikuko; Kunimi, Shino; Matsuoka, Rie; Takeuchi, Koji

    2013-10-06

    We examined changes in the expression of a pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and an anti-angiogenic factor, endostatin, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in the rat small intestine after administration of indomethacin and investigated the roles of these factors in the healing of indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulcers. Male SD rats were given indomethacin (10mg/kg) p.o. and euthanized at various time points (3-24h and 2-7days) after the administration. To impair the healing of these lesions, low-dose of indomethacin (2mg/kg) was given p.o. once daily for 6days starting 1day after ulceration. Levels of VEGF, endostatin, MMP-2 and MMP-9 were determined by Western blotting. The expression of both VEGF and endostatin was upregulated after the ulceration. Repeated administration of low-dose indomethacin impaired the ulcer healing with a decrease of VEGF expression and a further increase of endostatin expression, resulting in a marked decrease in the ratio of VEGF/endostatin expression. The levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were both significantly increased after the ulceration, but these responses were suppressed by the repeated indomethacin treatment. The healing of these ulcers was significantly delayed by the repeated administration of MMP inhibitors such as ARP-101 and SB-3CT. The results confirm the importance of the balance between pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic activities in the healing of indomethacin-induced small intestinal damage and further suggest that the increased expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 is another important factor for ulcer healing in the small intestine. © 2013.

  17. Iliac Vein Interrogation Augments Venous Ulcer Healing in Patients Who Have Failed Standard Compression Therapy along with Pathological Venous Closure.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Albeir Y; Broce, Mike; Yacoub, Michael; AbuRahma, Ali F

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of venous ulcers is demanding for patients, as well as clinicians, and the investigation of underlying venous hypertension is the cornerstone of therapy. We propose that occult iliac vein stenosis should be ruled out by iliac vein interrogation (IVI) in patients with advanced venous stasis. We conducted a systematic retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of patients who presented with CEAP (clinical, etiological, anatomical, and pathophysiological) 6 venous disease. All patients had great saphenous vein ablation, compressive treatment, wound care (including Unna boot compression), and perforator closure using ablation therapy. Iliac vein stenosis was defined as ≥50% stenosis in cross-sectional surface area on intravascular ultrasound. Primary outcomes include time of venous ulcer healing and/or measurable change in the Venous Clinical Severity Score. Twenty-two patients with CEAP 6 venous disease met the inclusion criteria (active ulcers >1.5 cm in diameter). The average age and body mass index were 62.2 ± 9.2 years and 41.7 ± 16.7, respectively. The majority were female (72.7%) with common comorbidities, such as hyperlipidemia (54.5%), hypertension (36.4%), and diabetes mellitus (27.3%). Twenty-nine ulcers with an average diameter of 3.4 ± 1.9 cm and a depth of 2.2 ± 0.5 mm were treated. The majority of the ulcers occurred on the left limb (n = 17, 58.6%). Average perforator venous reflux was 3.6 ± 0.8 sec, while common femoral reflux was 1.8 ± 1.6. The majority (n = 19, 64.5%) of the perforator veins were located at the base of the ulcer, while the remainder (n = 10, 34.5%) were within 2 cm from the base. Of the 13 patients who underwent IVI, 8 patients (61.5%) had stenosis >50% that was corrected with iliac vein angioplasty and stenting (IVAS). There was a strong trend toward shorter healing time in the IVI group (7.9 ± 9.5 weeks) than for patients in the no iliac vein interrogation (NIVI) group (20.2 ± 15

  18. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... These include both regular and decaffeinated coffee, tea, chocolate, meat extracts, alcohol, black pepper, chili powder, mustard ... Disease, peptic ulcers, proton pump inhibitor, sucralfate, triple therapy January 1, 1996 Copyright © American Academy of Family ...

  19. The Effect of Electrical Stimulation Combined with Foam Dressing on Ulcer Healing in Rats with Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ki-Pi; Yoo, Seol Bong; Yang, Seok Jeong; Yoon, Yong-Soon

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of electrical stimulation (ES) combined with foam dressing on wound healing in rats with spinal cord injury. Complete spinal cord injury was induced in 49 male Sprague-Dawley rats at the T11-L1 level, after which a pressure ulcer was induced on the left thigh. The newly invented surface electrode, which was fitted with foam inside, was applied to the ulcers. Rats were divided into 2 groups as follows: the ES group, which received foam dressings and ES (2 Hz and 200-microsecond duration, 15 mA) for 4 times a day, 30 minutes each, for 3 weeks; and the control group, which received the foam dressings without ES. The ulcer area was measured by taking a photograph daily from day 0 to day 21. Histopathologic and immune-histochemical evaluations were performed on day 1 and days 7, 14, and 21. The area of the ulcers of the ES group was smaller than that of the control group after day 14 (P < .05). In the ES group, the vascularity was significantly greater on day 14 and more decreased on day 21 compared with day 7 than that in the control group (P < .05). In the ES group, the area of positive reaction to anti-α-SMA antibody was increased compared with the control group on days 7 and 14 and decreased on day 21 (P > .05). Electrical stimulation combined with foam dressing by means of newly invented surface electrodes facilitates and accelerates the wound-healing process.

  20. Efficacy of mummy on healing of pressure ulcers: A randomized controlled clinical trial on hospitalized patients in intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Moghadari, Masoud; Rezvanipour, Mozafar; Mehrabani, Mitra; Ahmadinejad, Mehdi; Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem

    2018-01-01

    Background Mummy is a mineral substance which according to Persian medicine texts, may be useful in treatment of chronic ulcers. Objective The present study was performed with the aim of determining the effect of mummy on healing of pressure in male patients who had been hospitalized due to cerebrospinal injury in the Intensive Care Unit. Methods This randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed on 75 patients who had pressure ulcer at Shahid Bahonar Hospital in Kerman, Iran, from September 2016 to March 2017. The control group received normal saline and routine wound dressing, while the intervention group received mummy water solution 20% in addition to normal saline and routine wound dressing on a daily basis. Data was recorded based on the PUSH method. In both groups, ulcers were evaluated on days 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 for the variables of ulcer surface area, the amount of exudate and type of tissue. Data analysis was done through SPSS 21 and using t-test, Repeated Measure Analysis, Cox Regression and Chi-square. Results Both groups showed reduction in the average ulcer surface area (3.26 to 0.53 in the intervention group and 5.1 to 3.46 in the control group), the average exudate amount (1.26 to 0.26 in the intervention group and 1.83 to 1.06 in the control group) and the average tissue score (1.36 to 0.23 in the intervention group and 2.13 to 1.26 in the control group). Over the entire study period, the intervention group showed more acceptable signs of healing compared to the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion The healing process was more prominent in the intervention group than the control group. Clinical trial registration The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials with registered NO. (IRCT2014042917494N1) (29/04/2014). Funding No financial support for the research. PMID:29588812

  1. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester promotes wound healing of mice pressure ulcers affecting NF-κB and NOS2 and NRF2 expression.

    PubMed

    Romana-Souza, Bruna; Dos Santos, Jeanine Salles; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2018-06-01

    In pressure ulcers, the synthesis of reactive oxygen species induced by ischemia and reperfusion leads to chronic inflammation and tissue damage, which impair the closure of these lesions. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), found in propolis, promotes cutaneous wound healing of acute lesions and severe burns. However, the effects of CAPE on wound healing of pressure ulcers have not been investigated. This study investigated the effects of CAPE administration in a murine model of pressure ulcers. To induce pressure ulcers, two cycles of ischemia and reperfusion by external application of two magnetic plates were performed in the skin dorsum of mice. After the last cycle, animals were treated daily with CAPE or vehicle until they were euthanized. The nitric oxide synthesis, lipid peroxidation, macrophage migration, protein nuclear factor kappa B and nitric-oxide synthase-2 expression were increased 3 days after ulceration but decreased 7 days later, in pressure ulcers of the CAPE group compared to that of the control group. CAPE reduced the protein expression of nuclear factor-erythroid2-related factor 2 in pressure ulcers 3 days after ulceration, but increased 7 days later. Myofibroblast density was increased in the CAPE group 7 days after ulceration, but reduced 12 days later when compared to control group. In addition, CAPE promoted collagen deposition, re-epithelialization and wound closure of mice pressure ulcers 12 days after ulceration. CAPE brings forward inflammatory response and oxidative damage involved in injury by ischemia and reperfusion, promoting dermal reconstruction and closure of pressure ulcers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Success Rate of Split-Thickness Skin Grafting of Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers Depends on the Presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Høgsberg, Trine; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Thomsen, Jens Schiersing; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The last years of research have proposed that bacteria might be involved in and contribute to the lack of healing of chronic wounds. Especially it seems that Pseudomonas aeruginosa play a crucial role in the healing. At Copenhagen Wound Healing Centre it was for many years clinical suspected that once chronic venous leg ulcers were colonized (weeks or months preoperatively) by P. aeruginosa, the success rate of skin grafting deteriorated despite aggressive treatment. To investigate this, a retrospective study was performed on the clinical outcome of 82 consecutive patients with chronic venous leg ulcers on 91 extremities, from the 1st of March 2005 until the 31st of August 2006. This was achieved by analysing the microbiology, demographic data, smoking and drinking habits, diabetes, renal impairment, co-morbidities, approximated size and age of the wounds, immunosuppressive treatment and complicating factors on the clinical outcome of each patient. The results were evaluated using a Student T-test for continuous parameters, chi-square test for categorical parameters and a logistic regression analysis to predict healing after 12 weeks. The analysis revealed that only 33,3% of ulcers with P. aeruginosa, isolated at least once from 12 weeks prior, to or during surgery, were healed (98% or more) by week 12 follow-up, while 73,1% of ulcers without P. aeruginosa were so by the same time (p = 0,001). Smoking also significantly suppressed the outcome at the 12-week follow-up. Subsequently, a logistic regression analysis was carried out leaving P. aeruginosa as the only predictor left in the model (p = 0,001). This study supports our hypothesis that P. aeruginosa in chronic venous leg ulcers, despite treatment, has considerable impact on partial take or rejection of split-thickness skin grafts. PMID:21655269

  3. Success rate of split-thickness skin grafting of chronic venous leg ulcers depends on the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Høgsberg, Trine; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Thomsen, Jens Schiersing; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The last years of research have proposed that bacteria might be involved in and contribute to the lack of healing of chronic wounds. Especially it seems that Pseudomonas aeruginosa play a crucial role in the healing. At Copenhagen Wound Healing Centre it was for many years clinical suspected that once chronic venous leg ulcers were colonized (weeks or months preoperatively) by P. aeruginosa, the success rate of skin grafting deteriorated despite aggressive treatment. To investigate this, a retrospective study was performed on the clinical outcome of 82 consecutive patients with chronic venous leg ulcers on 91 extremities, from the 1(st) of March 2005 until the 31(st) of August 2006. This was achieved by analysing the microbiology, demographic data, smoking and drinking habits, diabetes, renal impairment, co-morbidities, approximated size and age of the wounds, immunosuppressive treatment and complicating factors on the clinical outcome of each patient. The results were evaluated using a Student T-test for continuous parameters, chi-square test for categorical parameters and a logistic regression analysis to predict healing after 12 weeks. The analysis revealed that only 33,3% of ulcers with P. aeruginosa, isolated at least once from 12 weeks prior, to or during surgery, were healed (98% or more) by week 12 follow-up, while 73,1% of ulcers without P. aeruginosa were so by the same time (p = 0.001). Smoking also significantly suppressed the outcome at the 12-week follow-up. Subsequently, a logistic regression analysis was carried out leaving P. aeruginosa as the only predictor left in the model (p = 0.001). This study supports our hypothesis that P. aeruginosa in chronic venous leg ulcers, despite treatment, has considerable impact on partial take or rejection of split-thickness skin grafts.

  4. The Individual Health Discount Rate in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Waljee, Akbar K.; Morris, Arden M.; Waljee, Jennifer F.; Higgins, Peter D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background In cost-effectiveness analysis, discount rates are used in calculating the value of future costs and benefits. However, standard discount rates may not accurately describe the decision-making of patients with Ulcerative Colitis (UC). These patients often choose the long-term risks of immunosuppressive therapy over the short-term risks of colectomy, demonstrating very high discount rates for future health. In this study, we aimed to measure the discount rate in UC patients and identify variables associated with the discount rate. Methods We surveyed patients with UC and patients who were post-colectomy for UC to measure their valuations of UC and colectomy health states. We used Standard Gamble(SG) and Time-Trade-Off(TTO) methods to assess current and future health state valuations, and calculated the discount rate. Results Participants included 150 subjects with UC and 150 subjects who were post-colectomy for UC. Discount rates varied widely (20.6%–100%) with an overall median rate of 55.0%, which was significantly higher than the standard rate of 5%. Older age and male gender and predicted high discount rates (aversion to immediate risk in favor of distant future risk). For each additional decade of age, patients’ expected discount rate increased by 0.77%. Female gender was the only predictor of very low discount rates. Female patients’ discount rates averaged 8.1% less than age-matched males. Conclusions The accepted discount rate of 5% grossly underestimates UC patients’ preference for long-term over short-term risk. This might explain UC patients’ frequent choice of the long-term risks of immunosuppressive medical therapy over the short-term risks of colectomy. PMID:21560195

  5. Footwear and offloading interventions to prevent and heal foot ulcers and reduce plantar pressure in patients with diabetes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bus, S A; van Deursen, R W; Armstrong, D G; Lewis, J E A; Caravaggi, C F; Cavanagh, P R

    2016-01-01

    Footwear and offloading techniques are commonly used in clinical practice for preventing and healing of foot ulcers in persons with diabetes. The goal of this systematic review is to assess the medical scientific literature on this topic to better inform clinical practice about effective treatment. We searched the medical scientific literature indexed in PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane database for original research studies published since 1 May 2006 related to four groups of interventions: (1) casting; (2) footwear; (3) surgical offloading; and (4) other offloading interventions. Primary outcomes were ulcer prevention, ulcer healing, and pressure reduction. We reviewed both controlled and non-controlled studies. Controlled studies were assessed for methodological quality, and extracted key data was presented in evidence and risk of bias tables. Uncontrolled studies were assessed and summarized on a narrative basis. Outcomes are presented and discussed in conjunction with data from our previous systematic review covering the literature from before 1 May 2006. We included two systematic reviews and meta-analyses, 32 randomized controlled trials, 15 other controlled studies, and another 127 non-controlled studies. Several randomized controlled trials with low risk of bias show the efficacy of therapeutic footwear that demonstrates to relief plantar pressure and is worn by the patient, in the prevention of plantar foot ulcer recurrence. Two meta-analyses show non-removable offloading to be more effective than removable offloading for healing plantar neuropathic forefoot ulcers. Due to the limited number of controlled studies, clear evidence on the efficacy of surgical offloading and felted foam is not yet available. Interestingly, surgical offloading seems more effective in preventing than in healing ulcers. A number of controlled and uncontrolled studies show that plantar pressure can be reduced by several conservative and surgical approaches. Sufficient

  6. Individual health discount rate in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Waljee, Akbar K; Morris, Arden M; Waljee, Jennifer F; Higgins, Peter D R

    2011-06-01

    In cost-effectiveness analysis, discount rates are used in calculating the value of future costs and benefits. However, standard discount rates may not accurately describe the decision-making of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). These patients often choose the long-term risks of immunosuppressive therapy over the short-term risks of colectomy, demonstrating very high discount rates for future health. In this study we aimed to measure the discount rate in UC patients and identify variables associated with the discount rate. We surveyed patients with UC and patients who were postcolectomy for UC to measure their valuations of UC and colectomy health states. We used Standard Gamble (SG) and Time-Trade-Off (TTO) methods to assess current and future health state valuations and calculated the discount rate. Participants included 150 subjects with UC and 150 subjects who were postcolectomy for UC. Adjusted discount rates varied widely (0%-100%), with an overall median rate of 55.0% (interquartile range [IQR] 20.6-100), which was significantly higher than the standard rate of 5%. Within the normal range of discount rates, patients' expected discount rate increased by 0.80% for each additional year of age, and female patients had discount rates that averaged ≈ 8% less than their age-matched counterparts and approached statistical significance. The accepted discount rate of 5% grossly underestimates UC patients' preference for long-term over short-term risk. This might explain UC patients' frequent choice of the long-term risks of immunosuppressive medical therapy over the short-term risks of colectomy. Copyright © 2010 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  7. Verification of echo amplitude envelope analysis method in skin tissues for quantitative follow-up of healing ulcers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omura, Masaaki; Yoshida, Kenji; Akita, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Tadashi

    2018-07-01

    We aim to develop an ultrasonic tissue characterization method for the follow-up of healing ulcers by diagnosing collagen fibers properties. In this paper, we demonstrated a computer simulation with simulation phantoms reflecting irregularly distributed collagen fibers to evaluate the relationship between physical properties, such as number density and periodicity, and the estimated characteristics of the echo amplitude envelope using the homodyned-K distribution. Moreover, the consistency between echo signal characteristics and the structures of ex vivo human tissues was verified from the measured data of normal skin and nonhealed ulcers. In the simulation study, speckle or coherent signal characteristics are identified as periodically or uniformly distributed collagen fibers with high number density and high periodicity. This result shows the effectiveness of the analysis using the homodyned-K distribution for tissues with complicated structures. Normal skin analysis results are characterized as including speckle or low-coherence signal components, and a nonhealed ulcer is different from normal skin with respect to the physical properties of collagen fibers.

  8. Laser photobiomodulation in pressure ulcer healing of human diabetic patients: gene expression analysis of inflammatory biochemical markers.

    PubMed

    Ruh, Anelice Calixto; Frigo, Lúcio; Cavalcanti, Marcos Fernando Xisto Braga; Svidnicki, Paulo; Vicari, Viviane Nogaroto; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão; Leal Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; De Isla, Natalia; Diomede, Francesca; Trubiani, Oriana; Favero, Giovani Marino

    2018-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PU) are wounds located mainly on bone surfaces where the tissue under pressure suffers ischemia leading to cellular lesion and necrosis , its causes and the healing process depend on several factors. The aim of this study was evaluating the gene expression of inflammatory/reparative factors: IL6, TNF, VEGF, and TGF, which take part in the tissue healing process under effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT). In order to perform lesion area analysis, PUs were photographed and computer analyzed. Biochemical analysis was performed sa.mpling ulcer border tissue obtained through biopsy before and after laser therapy and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. The study comprised eight individuals, mean age sixty-two years old, and sacroiliac and calcaneous PU, classified as degree III and IV according to the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP). PUs were irradiated with low-level laser (InGaAIP, 100 mW, 660 nm), energy density 2 J/cm 2 , once a day, with intervals of 24 h, totaling 12 applications. The lesion area analysis revealed averaged improvement of the granulation tissue size up to 50% from pre- to post-treatment. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that IL6 values were not significantly different before and after treatment, TNF gene expression was reduced, and VEFG and TGF-β gene expression increased after treatment. After LLLT, wounds presented improvement in gross appearance, with increase in factors VEFG and TGF-β, and reduction of TNF; despite our promising results, they have to be analyzed carefully as this study did not have a control group.

  9. Effectiveness of acupuncture, special dressings and simple, low-adherence dressings for healing venous leg ulcers in primary healthcare: study protocol for a cluster-randomized open-labeled trial

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Jorge; Modesto, Manuela; Mendez, Camila; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Aguilar, Inmaculada; Carrasco-Lozano, Jesus Manuel; Faus, Vicente; Martos, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Background Venous leg ulcers constitute a chronic recurring complaint that affects 1.0–1.3% of the adult population at some time in life, and which corresponds to approximately 75% of all chronic ulcers of the leg. Multilayer compression bandaging is, at present, the only treatment that has been proved to be effective in treating this type of ulcer. There is no consensus, however, about the dressings that may be applied, beneath the compression, to promote the healing of this type of ulcer, as there does not seem to be any added benefit from using special dressings rather than simple, low-adherence ones. As well as analgesia, acupuncture provokes peripheral vasodilation, in skin and muscles – which has been demonstrated both experimentally and in clinical practice – probably due to the axon reflex, among other mechanisms. The aim of the present study is to measure the effectiveness and cost of compression treatment for venous leg ulcers combined with special dressings, in comparison with low-adherence ones and acupuncture. Methods/design Cluster-randomized open-labeled trial, at 15 primary healthcare clinics in the Sevilla-Sur Healthcare District, with a control group treated with compression bandaging and low-adherence dressings; the experiment will consist, on the one hand, of the compression treatment applied in combination with special dressings (Treatment 1), and on the other, the compression treatment applied in association with low-adherence dressings, together with acupuncture (Treatment 2). Discussion The results will be measured and recorded in terms of the median time elapsed until complete healing of the ulcer, and the rate of complete healing at 3 months after beginning the treatment. An economic analysis will also be made. This study, carried out in the context of real clinical practice, will provide information for decision-taking concerning the effectiveness of special dressings. Moreover, for the first time a high-quality study will evaluate

  10. The use of PriMatrix, a fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix, in healing chronic diabetic foot ulcers: a prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Kavros, Steven J; Dutra, Timothy; Gonzalez-Cruz, Renier; Liden, Brock; Marcus, Belinda; McGuire, James; Nazario-Guirau, Luis

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this multicenter study was to prospectively evaluate the healing outcomes of chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated with PriMatrix (TEI Biosciences, Boston, Massachusetts), a fetal bovine acellular dermal matrix. Inclusion criteria required the subjects to have a chronic DFU that ranged in area from 1 to 20 cm² and failed to heal more than 30% during a 2-week screening period when treated with moist wound therapy. For qualifying subjects, PriMatrix was secured into a clean, sharply debrided wound; dressings were applied to maintain a moist wound environment, and the DFU was pressure off-loaded. Wound area measurements were taken weekly for up to 12 weeks, and PriMatrix was reapplied at the discretion of the treating physician. A total of 55 subjects were enrolled at 9 US centers with 46 subjects progressing to study completion. Ulcers had been in existence for an average of 286 days, and initial mean ulcer area was 4.34 cm². Of the subjects completing the study, 76% healed by 12 weeks with a mean time to healing of 53.1 ± 21.9 days. The mean number of applications for these healed wounds was 2.0 ± 1.4, with 59.1% healing with a single application of PriMatrix and 22.9% healing with 2 applications. For subjects not healed by 12 weeks, the average wound area reduction was 71.4%. The results of this multicenter prospective study demonstrate that the use of PriMatrix integrated with standard-of-care therapy is a successful treatment regimen to heal DFUs.

  11. [Impact of interventions in the pressure ulcer rate].

    PubMed

    Araya Farías, I; Febré, N

    To evaluate the impact of a risk management program for prevention of pressure ulcers (PUs) in an adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU). A quantitative, prospective study performed with a «before and after» evaluation, and designed in three stages: 1) PU incidence study; 2) Intervention by implementing a risk management program, and 3) Assessment of the impact. Adherence to the preventive measures showed a significant increase (11.7%) between the first month of the program and the final month (58.5%) of the assessment. Initial PU rate was 20.9, with a decrease in the rate to 14.0 per 1000 bed occupancy days (P<.05) after the risk management program. The data show that the risk management program, using prevention measures, was effective in reducing the rate of PU in the period under study by more than 33%. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of the internal and external responsiveness of the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) tool for assessing acute and chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Choi, Edmond P H; Chin, Weng Yee; Wan, Eric Y F; Lam, Cindy L K

    2016-05-01

    To examine the internal and external responsiveness of the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) tool for assessing the healing progress in acute and chronic wounds. It is important to establish the responsiveness of instruments used in conducting wound care assessments to ensure that they are able to capture changes in wound healing accurately over time. Prospective longitudinal observational study. The key study instrument was the PUSH tool. Internal responsiveness was assessed using paired t-testing and effect size statistics. External responsiveness was assessed using multiple linear regression. All new patients with at least one eligible acute or chronic wound, enrolled in the Nurse and Allied Health Clinic-Wound Care programme between 1 December 2012 - 31 March 2013 were included for analysis (N = 541). Overall, the PUSH tool was able to detect statistically significant changes in wound healing between baseline and discharge. The effect size statistics were large. The internal responsiveness of the PUSH tool was confirmed in patients with a variety of different wound types including venous ulcers, pressure ulcers, neuropathic ulcers, burns and scalds, skin tears, surgical wounds and traumatic wounds. After controlling for age, gender and wound type, subjects in the 'wound improved but not healed' group had a smaller change in PUSH scores than those in the 'wound healed' group. Subjects in the 'wound static or worsened' group had the smallest change in PUSH scores. The external responsiveness was confirmed. The internal and external responsiveness of the PUSH tool confirmed that it can be used to track the healing progress of both acute and chronic wounds. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The Effect of Foot Exercises on Wound Healing in Type 2 Diabetic Patients With a Foot Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Eraydin, Şahizer; Avşar, Gülçin

    2017-12-19

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of foot exercises on wound healing in type 2 diabetic patients with a diabetic foot ulcer. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Sixty-five patients from an outpatient clinic with grade 1 or 2 ulcers (Wagner classification) who met study criteria agreed to participate; 60 patients completed the study and were included in the final analysis. Subjects were followed up between February 2014 and June 2015. Subjects were recruited by the researchers in the clinics where they received treatment. Subjects were randomly allocated to either the control or intervention group. Data were collected using investigator-developed forms: patient information form and the diabetic foot exercises log. Patients in the intervention group received standard wound care and performed daily foot exercises for 12 weeks; the control group received standard wound care but no exercises. The ulcers of the patients in both the intervention and control groups were examined and measured at the 4th, 8th, and 12th weeks. The groups were compared in terms of the ulcer size and depth. To analyze and compare the data, frequency distribution, mean (standard deviation), variance analysis, and the independent samples t test and the χ test were used. The mean ulcer areas were 12.63 (14.43), 6.91 (5.44), 4.30 (3.70), and 3.29 (3.80) cm (P < .05) in the study intervention group, and 24.67 (20.70), 24.75 (20.84), 20.33 (20.79), and 18.52 (21.49) cm in the control group in the 4th, 8th, and 12th weeks, respectively. Significant differences were found between diabetic foot ulcer sizes in the study intervention group in the 4th and 12th weeks compared to beginning baseline (P ≤ .05). However, only the 12th week was different from the beginning in the control group (P = .000). The mean depths of the ulcers were 0.56 (0.85), 0.42 (0.68), 0.36 (0.50), and 0.28 (0.38) cm in the study intervention group (P < .05) and 0.61 (0.84), 0.82 (1.07), 0.83 (1

  14. Novel mechanisms and signaling pathways of esophageal ulcer healing: the role of prostaglandin EP2 receptors, cAMP, and pCREB

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Amrita; Baatar, Dolgor; Jones, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate that prostaglandins of E class (PGEs) may promote healing of tissue injury e.g., gastroduodenal and dermal ulcers. However, the precise roles of PGEs, their E-prostanoid (EP) receptors, signaling pathways including cAMP and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and their relation to VEGF and angiogenesis in the tissue injury healing process remain unknown, forming the rationale for this study. Using an esophageal ulcer model in rats, we demonstrated that esophageal mucosa expresses predominantly EP2 receptors and that esophageal ulceration triggers an increase in expression of the EP2 receptor, activation of CREB (the downstream target of the cAMP signaling), and enhanced VEGF gene expression. Treatment of rats with misoprostol, a PGE1 analog capable of activating EP receptors, enhanced phosphorylation of CREB, stimulated VEGF expression and angiogenesis, and accelerated esophageal ulcer healing. In cultured human esophageal epithelial (HET-1A) cells, misoprostol increased intracellular cAMP levels (by 163-fold), induced phosphorylation of CREB, and stimulated VEGF expression. A cAMP analog (Sp-cAMP) mimicked, whereas an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (Rp-cAMP) blocked, these effects of misoprostol. These results indicate that the EP2/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway mediates the stimulatory effect of PGEs on angiogenesis essential for tissue injury healing via the induction of CREB activity and VEGF expression. PMID:25059824

  15. Structured health care for subjects with diabetic foot ulcers results in a reduction of major amputation rates.

    PubMed

    Weck, Matthias; Slesaczeck, Torsten; Paetzold, Hartmut; Muench, Dirk; Nanning, Thomas; von Gagern, Georg; Brechow, Andrej; Dietrich, Ulf; Holfert, Mandy; Bornstein, Stefan; Barthel, Andreas; Thomas, Antje; Koehler, Carsta; Hanefeld, Markolf

    2013-03-13

    We tested the effects of structured health care for the diabetic foot in one region in Germany aiming to reduce the number of major amputations. In a prospective study we investigated patients with diabetic foot in a structured system of outpatient, in-patient and rehabilitative treatment. Subjects were recruited between January 1st, 2000 and December 31, 2007. All participants underwent a two-year follow-up. The modified University of Texas Wound Classification System (UT) was the basis for documentation and data analysis. We evaluated numbers of major amputations, rates of ulcer healing and mortality. In order to compare the effect of the structured health care program with usual care in patients with diabetic foot we evaluated the same parameters at another regional hospital without interdisciplinary care of diabetic foot (controls). 684 patients with diabetic foot and 508 controls were investigated. At discharge from hospital 28.3% (structured health care program, SHC) vs. 23.0% (controls) of all ulcers had healed completely. 51.5% (SHC) vs. 49.8% (controls) were in UT grade 1.Major amputations were performed in 32 subjects of the structured health care program group (4.7%) vs. 110 (21.7%) in controls (p<0.0001). Mortality during hospitalization was 2.5% (SHC) vs. 9.4% in controls (p<0.001). With the structured health care program we achieved a significant reduction of major amputation rates by more than 75% as compared to standard care.

  16. Healing mechanisms of the hydroalcoholic extract and ethyl acetate fraction of green tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze) on chronic gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Borato, Débora Gasparin; Scoparo, Camila Toledo; Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; da Silva, Luísa Mota; de Souza, Lauro Mera; Iacomini, Marcello; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko

    2016-03-01

    Green tea is an infusion of unfermented leaves of Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze (Theaceae), traditionally used for the treatment of obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and gastric complaints. This study evaluated the mechanisms involved in the gastric ulcer healing of the hydroalcoholic extract from green tea (GEt), its ethyl acetate fraction, (GEAc) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) using the model of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcer in rats. The chronic gastric ulcer was induced by application of 80 % acetic acid on serosal mucosa of rats. After 7 days of oral treatment with GEt and GEAc, the ulcer area, mucin content, inflammatory parameters (MPO and NAG), and antioxidant system (GSH and LOOH levels, SOD and GST activities) were evaluated. In vitro, the scavenging activity of GEt and GEAc were also measured. The antisecretory action was studied on the pylorus ligature method in rats. Oral treatment with GEt and GEAc reduced significantly the gastric ulcer area induced by acetic acid. The gastric ulcer healing was accompanied by increasing of mucin content, restoration of GSH levels and SOD activity, and reduction of MPO and LOOH levels. In addition, GEt and GEAc reduced the DPPH free radicals in vitro. Furthermore, the oral treatment of animals with GEt and GEAc did not alter the gastric acid secretion or cause signs of toxicity. Collectively, these results showed that GEt had a pronounced antiulcer effect, possibly through maintenance of mucin content and reduction of inflammation and oxidative stress. In addition, the compounds present in its ethyl acetate fraction could be responsible for the extract activity.

  17. Increased growth factors play a role in wound healing promoted by noninvasive oxygen-ozone therapy in diabetic patients with foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Guan, Meiping; Xie, Cuihua; Luo, Xiangrong; Zhang, Qian; Xue, Yaoming

    2014-01-01

    Management of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is a great challenge for clinicians. Although the oxygen-ozone treatment improves the diabetic outcome, there are few clinical trials to verify the efficacy and illuminate the underlying mechanisms of oxygen-ozone treatment on DFUs. In the present study, a total of 50 type 2 diabetic patients complicated with DFUs, Wagner stage 2~4, were randomized into control group treated by standard therapy only and ozone group treated by standard therapy plus oxygen-ozone treatment. The therapeutic effects were graded into 4 levels from grade 0 (no change) to grade 3 (wound healing). The wound sizes were measured at baseline and day 20, respectively. Tissue biopsies were performed at baseline and day 11. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) proteins in the pathologic specimens were determined by immunohistochemical examinations. The effective rate of ozone group was significantly higher than that of control group (92% versus 64%, P < 0.05). The wound size reduction was significantly more in ozone group than in control group (P < 0.001). After treatment, the expressions of VEGF, TGF-β, and PDGF proteins at day 11 were significantly higher in ozone group than in control group. Ozone therapy promotes the wound healing of DFUs via potential induction of VEGF, TGF-β, and PDGF at early stage of the treatment. (Clinical trial registry number is ChiCTR-TRC-14004415).

  18. Comparative Clinical Study of the Wound Healing Effects of a Novel Micropore Particle Technology: Effects on Wounds, Venous Leg Ulcers, and Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed

    Bilyayeva, Olga O; Neshta, Viacheslav V; Golub, Alexander A; Sams-Dodd, Frank

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the wound healing effects of Acapsil, a white, odorless powder based on micropore particle technology (MPPT) (Willingsford Ltd, Southampton, UK) by comparing it to Gentaxane (Gentaksan, Borshchagovsky CCP, Kyiv, Ukraine) (polydimethylsiloxane powder with gentamicin antibiotic) and Ioddicerin (Farmak, Kyiv, Ukraine) (iodine with dimethyl sulfoxide [DMSO]). The study included 266 patients with primarily trophic ulcers caused by pancreatic diabetes and venous insufficiency of the lower extremities, carbuncles, phlegmons, infected third- or fourth-degree heat burns, and infiltrations of postoperative wounds. The products were applied once daily to the wound until it was clean (ie, free from necrosis, pus, and fibrinogenous thickenings). The number of days (mean ± standard deviation) to a clean wound was 3.0 ± 0.9 for MPPT (n = 88) compared with 7.0 ± 1.2 and 8.0 ± 1.1 for Gentaxane (n = 90) and iodine/DMSO (n = 88), respectively. Thus, MPPT reduced the time to reach a clean wound by 57% and 62%, respectively. Products were used once daily until a clean wound was reached, which also reflects the number of applications. Days to onset of granulation for MPPT, Gentaxane, and iodine/DMSO were 4.5 ± 0.8, 9.2 ± 1.4, and 10.3 ± 1.5 days, respectively; and days to onset of epithelialization were 7.8 ± 1.1, 14.1 ± 1.9, and 16.4 ± 2.7 days, respectively. Subgroup analysis of patients with diabetic foot and venous leg ulcers found that each of these demonstrated the same pattern of healing as the overall study. The number of hospitalization days was 14.6 ± 5.6 for MPPT, 21.0 ± 10.7 for Gentaxane, and 24.0 ± 7.9 for iodine/DMSO. Compared with Gentaxane, patients receiving MPPT had a 31% reduction in hospitalization duration and a 39% reduction compared with iodine/DMSO. These findings demonstrate that MPPT represents a valuable new approach to wound care.

  19. Suppression of LRRC19 promotes cutaneous wound healing in pressure ulcers in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Wang, Zhijing; Wang, Xirui

    2018-02-20

    The ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) induced skin lesion has been identified as primary cause of pressure ulcer. Better understanding of the mechanism is required for new therapy development. Leucine rich repeat containing protein 19 (LRRC19) is a recently discovered transmembrane protein containing leucine-rich repeats and plays a role in immune response. To investigate the role of LRRC19 in pressure ulcers, mouse ulcer model was established with two cycles of I/R. The expression of LRRC19 was assessed during injury. siRNA mediated LRRC19 downregulation was applied to investigate the disease severity, immune cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokines production. The primary skin fibroblasts were stimulated with IL-1β to dissect the molecular mechanism. LRRC19 was readily induced in I/R induced lesion site in a pattern mimicking the disease progress as measured by wound area. Knockdown of LRRC19 by siRNA significantly alleviated the disease severity and attenuated immune cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokines production. In primary skin fibroblast model, siRNA knockdown of LRRC19 suppressed IL-1β mediated NFκB activation and its downstream cytokines production. LRRC19 was a novel factor for I/R-induced tissue damage by promoting NFκB dependent pro-inflammatory response. Our results supported that LRRC19 could be a potential therapeutic target for pressure ulcers.

  20. Using image J to document healing in ulcers of the foot in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jeffcoate, William J; Musgrove, Alison J; Lincoln, Nadina B

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the reliability of measuring the cross-sectional area of diabetic foot ulcers using Image J software. The inter- and intra-rater reliability of ulcer area measures were assessed using digital images of acetate tracings of ulcers of the foot affecting 31 participants in an off-loading randomised trial. Observations were made independently by five specialist podiatrists, one of whom was experienced in the use of Image J software and educated the other four in a single session. The mean (±SD) of the mean cross-sectional areas of the 31 ulcers determined independently by the five observers was 1386·7 (±22·7) mm 2 . The correlation between all pairs of observers was >0·99 (P < 0·001). There was no significant difference overall between the five observers (ANOVA F1.538; P = 0·165) and no difference between any two (paired samples test t = -0·787-1·396; P ≥ 0·088). The correlation between the areas determined by two observers on two occasions separated by not less than 1 week was very high (0·997 and 0·999; P < 0·001 and <0·001, respectively). The inter- and intra-reliability of the Image J software is very high, with no evidence of a difference either between or within observers. This technique should be considered for both research and clinical use in order to document changes in ulcer area. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Cross-talk between hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide in the mechanism of experimental gastric ulcers healing, regulation of gastric blood flow and accompanying inflammation.

    PubMed

    Magierowski, Marcin; Magierowska, Katarzyna; Hubalewska-Mazgaj, Magdalena; Surmiak, Marcin; Sliwowski, Zbigniew; Wierdak, Mateusz; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Chmura, Anna; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2018-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and carbon monoxide (CO) exert gastroprotection against acute gastric lesions. We determined the cross-talk between H 2 S and CO in gastric ulcer healing process and regulation of gastric blood flow (GBF) at ulcer margin. Male Wistar rats with acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers were treated i.g. throughout 9 days with vehicle (control), NaHS (0.1-10 mg/kg) +/- zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP, 10 mg/kg), d,l-propargylglycine (PAG, 30 mg/kg), CO-releasing CORM-2 (2.5 mg/kg) +/- PAG. GBF was assessed by laser flowmetry, ulcer area was determined by planimetry/histology. Gastric mucosal H 2 S production was analysed spectrophotometrically. Protein and/or mRNA expression at ulcer margin for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)A, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr), cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST), heme oxygenases (HOs), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf-2), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), IL-1β, TNF-α and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α were determined by real-time PCR or western blot. IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, GM-CSF plasma concentration was assessed using Luminex platform. NaHS dose-dependently decreased ulcer area and increased GBF but ZnPP attenuated these effects. PAG decreased H 2 S production but failed to affect CORM-2-mediated ulcer healing and vasodilation. NaHS increased Nrf-2, EGFr, VEGFA and decreased pro-inflammatory markers expression and IL-1β, IL-2, IL-13, TNF-α, GM-CSF plasma concentration. CORM-2 decreased IL-1β and GM-CSF plasma levels. We conclude that NaHS accelerates gastric ulcer healing increasing microcirculation and Nrf-2, EGFr, VEGFA expression. H 2 S-mediated ulcer healing involves endogenous CO activity while CO does not require H 2 S. NaHS decreases systemic inflammation more effectively than CORM-2. Copyright © 2017

  2. Efficacy and safety evaluation of systemic extremely low frequency magnetic fields used in the healing of diabetic foot ulcers--phase II data.

    PubMed

    Cañedo-Dorantes, Luis; Soenksen, Luis R; García-Sánchez, Clara; Trejo-Núñez, Daphny; Pérez-Chávez, Fernando; Guerrero, Arturo; Cardona-Vicario, Melisa; García-Lara, Carlos; Collí-Magaña, Dianelly; Serrano-Luna, Gregorio; Angeles Chimal, José S; Cabrera, Guillermo

    2015-08-01

    Cellular and animal models investigating extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) have reported promotion of leukocyte-endothelial interactions, angiogenesis, myofibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation, improvement of peripheral neuropathy and diabetic wound healing. In humans, it has also been reported that systemic exposure to ELF-MF stimulates peripheral blood mononuclear cells, promoting angiogenesis and healing of chronic leg ulcers. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of exposing different blood volumes to specific ELF-MFs (120 Hz sinusoidal waves of 0.4-0.9 mT RMS) to induce healing of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). Twenty six diabetic patients with non-responsive DFUs were divided into two exposure groups to receive treatment and record healing time. The forearm group, exposed to ELF-MF 2 h/day, twice weekly (3.6 l of blood/session); and the thorax group, exposed 25 min/day, 2 times/week (162.5 l of blood/session). Treatment period was 100 days or upon complete healing. Ulcer recurrences and adverse effects were investigated during short-term (<1 year) and long-term (3.4-7.8 years) follow-up. Mean healing time was 61.48 ± 33.08 days in the forearm group and 62.56 ± 29.33 days for the thorax group. No adverse effects or ulcer recurrences in the original ulcer site were reported during treatment, the short-term follow-up period or the long-term follow-up period in both groups. Healing time was independent of the amount of blood exposed to ELF-MF used in this trial. ELF-MFs are effective and safe and could be applied to non-healing DFUs in conjunction with other preventive interventions to reduce DFUs complications. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Predictive validity of granulation tissue color measured by digital image analysis for deep pressure ulcer healing: a multicenter prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Iizaka, Shinji; Kaitani, Toshiko; Sugama, Junko; Nakagami, Gojiro; Naito, Ayumi; Koyanagi, Hiroe; Konya, Chizuko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    This multicenter prospective cohort study examined the predictive validity of granulation tissue color evaluated by digital image analysis for deep pressure ulcer healing. Ninety-one patients with deep pressure ulcers were followed for 3 weeks. From a wound photograph taken at baseline, an image representing the granulation red index (GRI) was processed in which a redder color represented higher values. We calculated the average GRI over granulation tissue and the proportion of pixels exceeding the threshold intensity of 80 for the granulation tissue surface (%GRI80) and wound surface (%wound red index 80). In the receiver operating characteristics curve analysis, most GRI parameters had adequate discriminative values for both improvement of the DESIGN-R total score and wound closure. Ulcers were categorized by the obtained cutoff points of the average GRI (≤80, >80), %GRI80 (≤55, >55-80, >80%), and %wound red index 80 (≤25, >25-50, >50%). In the linear mixed model, higher classes for all GRI parameters showed significantly greater relative improvement in overall wound severity during the 3 weeks after adjustment for patient characteristics and wound locations. Assessment of granulation tissue color by digital image analysis will be useful as an objective monitoring tool for granulation tissue quality or surrogate outcomes of pressure ulcer healing. © 2012 by the Wound Healing Society.

  4. Role and Determinants of Adherence to Off-loading in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing: A Prospective Investigation.

    PubMed

    Crews, Ryan T; Shen, Biing-Jiun; Campbell, Laura; Lamont, Peter J; Boulton, Andrew J M; Peyrot, Mark; Kirsner, Robert S; Vileikyte, Loretta

    2016-08-01

    Studies indicate that off-loading adherence is low in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), which may subsequently delay healing. However, there is little empirical evidence for this relationship or the factors that influence adherence. This prospective, multicenter, international study of 79 (46 from the U.K. and 33 the U.S.) persons with type 2 diabetes and plantar DFUs assessed the association between off-loading adherence and DFU healing over a 6-week period. Additionally, potential demographic, disease, and psychological determinants of adherence were examined. DFUs were off-loaded with a removable device (77% a removable cast walker). Off-loading adherence was assessed objectively by activity monitors. Patient-reported measures included Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Neuropathy and Foot Ulcer Quality of Life (NeuroQoL) instrument, and Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R). Off-loading adherence was monitored for 35 ± 10 days, and devices were used during 59 ± 22% of subjects' activity. In multivariate analyses, smaller baseline DFU size, U.K. study site, and better off-loading adherence predicted smaller DFU size at 6 weeks (P < 0.05). Better off-loading adherence was, in turn, predicted by larger and more severe baseline DFUs, more severe neuropathy, and NeuroQoL foot pain (P < 0.05). In contrast, greater NeuroQoL postural instability predicted worse off-loading adherence (P < 0.001). HADS and IPQ-R measures were not significantly associated with off-loading adherence. Off-loading adherence is associated with the amount of DFU healing that occurs, while postural instability is a powerful predictor of nonadherence. Clinicians should take this neuropathic symptom into consideration when selecting an off-loading device, as off-loading-induced postural instability may further contribute to nonadherence. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is

  5. Improvement of wound healing by water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) in patients with chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs including evaluation using infrared thermography

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, James B.; Nielsen, Stig Pors; Hoffmann, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    clear reduction of pain and pain medication consumption (e.g. from 15 to 0 pain tablets per day), and a normalization of the thermographic image (before the beginning of the therapy typically hyperthermic rim of the ulcer with relative hypothermic ulcer base, up to 4.5°C temperature difference). In one patient the therapy of an ulcer of one leg was performed with the fully active radiator (wIRA(+VIS)), while the therapy of an ulcer of the other leg was made with a control group radiator (only VIS without wIRA), showing a clear difference in favour of the wIRA treatment. All mentioned VAS ratings improved remarkably during the period of irradiation treatment, representing an increased quality of life. Failures of complete or nearly complete wound healing were seen only in patients with arterial insufficiency, in smokers or in patients who did not have venous compression garment therapy. Discussion and conclusions: wIRA can alleviate pain considerably (with an impressive decrease of the consumption of analgesics) and accelerate wound healing or improve a stagnating wound healing process and diminish an elevated wound exudation and inflammation both in acute and in chronic wounds (in this study shown in chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs) and in problem wounds including infected wounds. In chronic recalcitrant wounds complete healing is achieved, which was not reached before. Other studies have shown that even without a disturbance of wound healing an acute wound healing process can be improved (e.g. reduced pain) by wIRA. wIRA is a contact-free, easily used and pleasantly felt procedure without consumption of material with a good penetration effect, which is similar to solar heat radiation on the surface of the earth in moderate climatic zones. Wound healing and infection defence (e.g. granulocyte function including antibacterial oxygen radical formation of the granulocytes) are critically dependent on a sufficient energy supply (and on sufficient oxygen

  6. Improvement of wound healing by water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) in patients with chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs including evaluation using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Mercer, James B; Nielsen, Stig Pors; Hoffmann, Gerd

    2008-10-21

    consumption (e.g. from 15 to 0 pain tablets per day), and a normalization of the thermographic image (before the beginning of the therapy typically hyperthermic rim of the ulcer with relative hypothermic ulcer base, up to 4.5 degrees C temperature difference). In one patient the therapy of an ulcer of one leg was performed with the fully active radiator (wIRA(+VIS)), while the therapy of an ulcer of the other leg was made with a control group radiator (only VIS without wIRA), showing a clear difference in favour of the wIRA treatment. All mentioned VAS ratings improved remarkably during the period of irradiation treatment, representing an increased quality of life. Failures of complete or nearly complete wound healing were seen only in patients with arterial insufficiency, in smokers or in patients who did not have venous compression garment therapy. wIRA can alleviate pain considerably (with an impressive decrease of the consumption of analgesics) and accelerate wound healing or improve a stagnating wound healing process and diminish an elevated wound exudation and inflammation both in acute and in chronic wounds (in this study shown in chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs) and in problem wounds including infected wounds. In chronic recalcitrant wounds complete healing is achieved, which was not reached before. Other studies have shown that even without a disturbance of wound healing an acute wound healing process can be improved (e.g. reduced pain) by wIRA. wIRA is a contact-free, easily used and pleasantly felt procedure without consumption of material with a good penetration effect, which is similar to solar heat radiation on the surface of the earth in moderate climatic zones. Wound healing and infection defence (e.g. granulocyte function including antibacterial oxygen radical formation of the granulocytes) are critically dependent on a sufficient energy supply (and on sufficient oxygen). The good clinical effect of wIRA on wounds and also on problem wounds and

  7. Low level laser therapy (GaAlInP 660 nm) in healing of a chronic venous ulcer: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botaro, C. A.; Faria, L. A.; Oliveira, R. G.; Bruno, R. X.; Rocha, C. A. Q. C.; Paiva-Oliveira, E. L.

    2015-07-01

    The venous ulcer represents approximately 70% to 90% of inferior member ulcers, and the most common etiological factor is venous insufficiency, triggered by venous hypertension. Currently in Brazil there are several types of lasers used in physiotherapy, which benefit biological potential, emitting low power radiation, with anti-inflammatory, analgesic, healing and circulatory effects. This study aimed at the analysis of low level laser therapy effects (LLLT) on the process of tissue repair in chronic venous ulcers. We conducted a case study of a patient with a venous ulcer in the lateral region of the right inferior member. The patient underwent LLLT, which used a GaAlInP diode laser, with a wavelength of 660 nm and energy density of 4 J cm-2 applied punctually at the edges of the wound, with an average distance of 1 cm between the points with a pen-laser perpendicular wrapped in paper and a plastic wrap, keeping contact with the tissue. After four months of therapy and a total of 21 sessions, an improvement was noticeable in the gross appearance of the wound, but after a month and a half without therapy, the dimensions of the wound increased in length and width. Analyzing the results of this case study allows us to conclude that the LLLT GaAlInP (660 nm) with an energy density of 4 J cm-2, was not successful in the healing of venous ulcers.

  8. Comparison of marginal ulcer rates between antecolic and retrocolic laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Parenti, Lara; Arapis, Konstantinos; Chosidow, Denis; Marmuse, Jean-Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Marginal ulcer can be a serious complication after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. The aim of this study was to compare the rates of marginal ulcer between the antecolic and the retrocolic technique, in a large cohort of patients. Over a near 10-year period, 1,142 patients underwent laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. The antecolic and the retrocolic technique were used in respectively 572 and 570 consecutive patients. All procedures were performed using a circular stapled gastrojejunostomy. Patients were followed for 18 to 99 months (mean 48.8 months). During follow-up, 46 patients developed a marginal ulcer (4 %), 32 in the antecolic group (5.6 %) and 14 in the retrocolic group (2.5 %). Nineteen patients (3.3 %) in the antecolic group and eight patients in the retrocolic group (1.4 %) developed early marginal ulcer (i.e., within 3 months after surgery). The mean time to onset of anastomotic ulcer symptoms after surgery was 11 months (range 0.25-72). Forty-four patients were submitted to medical treatment, and 35 patients (79.5 %) had complete resolution of their symptoms. Patients with an antecolic Roux limb develop significantly more marginal ulcers (p = 0.007) and early marginal ulcer (p = 0.033) than the patients with a retrocolic Roux limb. The antecolic technique seems to be a risk factor for appearance of marginal ulcer.

  9. Clinic-epidemiological evaluation of ulcers in patients with leprosy sequelae and the effect of low level laser therapy on wound healing: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium leprae is the only pathogenic bacteria able to infect peripheral nerves. Neural impairment results in a set of sensitive, motor and autonomic disturbances, with ulcers originating primarily on the hands and feet. The study objectives were to analyze the clinic-epidemiological characteristics of patients attended at one specialized dressing service from a leprosy-endemic region of the Brazilian Amazon and to evaluate the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on wound healing of these patients. Methods Clinic-epidemiological evaluation of patients with leprosy sequelae was performed at the reference unit in sanitary dermatology of the state of Pará in Brazil. We conducted anamnesis, identification of the regions affected by the lesions and measurement of ulcer depth and surface area. After that, we performed a randomized clinical trial. Fifty-one patients with ulcers related to leprosy were evaluated, twenty-five of them were randomly assigned to a low level laser therapy group or a control group. Patients were treated 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Outcome measures were ulcer surface area, ulcer depth and the pressure ulcer scale for healing score (PUSH). Results Ninety-seven ulcers were identified, with a mean (SD) duration of 97.6 (111.7) months, surface area of 7.3 (11.5) cm2, and depth of 6.0 (6.2) mm. Statistical analysis of the data determined that there were no significant differences in the variables analyzed before and after treatment with low level laser therapy. Conclusions Ulcers in patients with leprosy remain a major source of economic and social losses, even many years after they have been cured of M. leprae infection. Our results indicate that it is necessary to develop new and more effective therapeutic tools, as low level laser therapy did not demonstrate any additional benefits to ulcer healing with the parameters used in this study. Trial Registration The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00860717. PMID

  10. Systematic review with meta-analysis: comparative efficacy of biologics for induction and maintenance of mucosal healing in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Cholapranee, A; Hazlewood, G S; Kaplan, G G; Peyrin-Biroulet, L; Ananthakrishnan, A N

    2017-05-01

    Mucosal healing is an important therapeutic endpoint in the management of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Limited data exist regarding the comparative efficacy of various therapies in achieving this outcome. To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of biologics for induction and maintenance of mucosal healing in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCT) examining mucosal healing as an endpoint of immunosuppressives, anti-tumour necrosis factor α (anti-TNF) or anti-integrin monoclonal antibody therapy for moderate-to-severe CD or UC. Pooled effect sizes for induction and maintenance of mucosal healing were calculated and pairwise treatment comparisons evaluated using a Bayesian network meta-analysis. A total of 12 RCTs were included in the meta-analysis (CD - 2 induction, 4 maintenance; UC - 8 induction, 5 maintenance). Duration of follow-up was 6-12 weeks for induction and 32-54 weeks for maintenance trials. In CD, anti-TNFs were more effective than placebo for maintaining mucosal healing [28% vs. 1%, Odds ratio (OR) 19.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.51-110.84]. In UC, anti-TNFs and anti-integrins were more effective than placebo for inducing (45% vs. 30%) and maintaining mucosal healing (33% vs. 18%). In network analysis, adalimumab therapy was inferior to infliximab [OR 0.45, 95% credible interval (CrI) 0.25-0.82] and combination infliximab-azathioprine (OR 0.32, 95% CrI 0.12-0.84) for inducing mucosal healing in UC. There was no statistically significant pairwise difference between vedolizumab and anti-TNF agents in UC. Anti-TNF and anti-integrin biological agents are effective in inducing mucosal healing in UC, with adalimumab being inferior to infliximab or combination therapy. Infliximab and adalimumab were similar in CD. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A cost and clinical effectiveness analysis among moist wound healing dressings versus traditional methods in home care patients with pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Souliotis, Kyriakos; Kalemikerakis, Ioannis; Saridi, Maria; Papageorgiou, Manto; Kalokerinou, Athena

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was a cost and clinical effectiveness analysis between moist wound healing dressings and gauze in a homecare set up for the treatment of stage III and IV pressure ulcers up to complete healing. In addition, we assessed the overall economic burden on the Healthcare System. Treatment method for each patient was chosen randomly by using sealed opaque envelopes. The authors monitored the healing progress and recorded treatment costs without interfering with the treatment process. The healing progress was estimated by using surface measurement transparent films. To estimate treatment costs, the authors took into account labor costs, cost of dressings, as well the cost of other materials such as cleansing gauzes, normal saline, syringes, examination gloves, antiseptics and adhesive tape. The patient group under treatment with moist wound healing dressings consisted of 27 men and 20 women aged 75.1 ± 8,6 and had an average ulcer surface of 43.5 ± 30.70 cm(2) ; the patient group under treatment with gauze comprised 25 men and 23 women aged 77.02 ± 8.02 and had an average ulcer surface 41.52 ± 29.41 cm(2) (p = 0.25, 95% CI, Student's t test). The average healing time for the moist wound healing dressings group' was 85.56 ± 52.09 days, while 121.4 ± 52.21 days for the "gauze group" (p = 0.0001, 95% CI, Student's t test). The dressing change frequency per patient was reduced in the "moist wound healing dressings group," 49.5 ± 29.61, compared with a dressing change frequency per patient of 222.6 ± 101.86 for the "gauze group" (p = 0.0001, 95% CI, Student's t test). The use of moist wound healing dressings had a lower total treatment cost of 1,351 € per patient compared with, the use of gauzes (3,888 €). © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society.

  12. Treatment for Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... NSAID-induced peptic ulcer when you have an H. pylori infection? If you have an H. pylori ... ulcers are healing. How do doctors treat an H.pylori -induced peptic ulcer? Doctors may prescribe triple ...

  13. Carboxymethyl Cellulose, Trichloroacetic Acid, and Unna Boot for Healing Venous Ulcers: A Comparative Study of Their Efficacy and Socioeconomic Impact.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Sueli; Januário, Virginia; Oliveira, Maria Leide W; de Oliveira Teixeira, Maria Luiza; Maciel, Solange; Macedo, João Carlos; Ramos-E-Silva, Marcia

    2017-01-01

    Chronic ulcers are defined as a breakdown of the long-term cutaneous barrier or frequent recurrence of breakdowns. Dressings are a form of treatment and, in view of the variety and high cost of the products on the market, three agents were selected for this investigation, regarding their efficacy and cost/benefit ratio. The objective of the investigation was to evaluate and compare the efficacy, costs, and benefits of carboxymethylcellulose in paste at 20% (CMC 20%), trichloroacetic acid at 90% (TCA 90%), and Unna boot for treatment of chronic venous ulcers. Three groups of 30 patients each were chosen randomly for ambulatory treatment with TCA 90% (G1), CMC 20% (G2), and Unna boot (G3). The evolution of the cicatricial process of each group separately and between groups was analyzed with measurement of the lesion areas in square centimeters (cm2) and observation of the amount of exudate from observation of the photographic record, until their healing, in the maximum period of 20 weeks. A significant reduction of lesion areas in all groups was observed ( P =.0001), with a median reduction of 7.6 cm 2 (38.1%) for G1, 3.9 cm 2 (38.8%) for G2, and 16.2 cm 2 (77.8%) for G3. There was a significant difference in the absolute delta of the lesion areas ( P =.0001) of the groups. The three types of treatments promoted effective improvement, with acquisition and utilization of all three products in the public health services being recommended.

  14. Roles of calcitonin gene-related peptide in maintenance of gastric mucosal integrity and in enhancement of ulcer healing and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Takashi; Hattori, Youichiro; Komine, Rie; Ae, Takako; Mizuguchi, Sumito; Arai, Katsuharu; Saeki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tatsunori; Hosono, Kanako; Hayashi, Izumi; Oh-Hashi, Yoshio; Kurihara, Yukiko; Kurihara, Hiroki; Amagase, Kikuko; Okabe, Susumu; Saigenji, Katsunori; Majima, Masataka

    2008-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is known to be rich in neural systems, among which afferent neurons are reported to exhibit protective actions. We tested whether an endogenous neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), can prevent gastric mucosal injury elicited by ethanol and enhance healing of acetic acid-induced ulcer using CGRP knockout mice (CGRP(-/-)). The stomach was perfused with 1.6 mmol/L capsaicin or 1 mol/L NaCl, and gastric mucosal injury elicited by 50% ethanol was estimated. Levels of CGRP in the perfusate were determined by enzyme immunoassay. Gastric ulcers were induced by serosal application of absolute acetic acid. Capsaicin inhibited injured area dose-dependently. Fifty percent ethanol containing capsaicin immediately increased intragastric levels of CGRP in wild-type (WT) mice, although 50% ethanol alone did not. The protective action of capsaicin against ethanol was completely abolished in CGRP(-/-). Preperfusion with 1 mol/L NaCl increased CGRP release and reduced mucosal damage during ethanol perfusion. However, 1 mol/L NaCl was not effective in CGRP(-/-). Healing of ulcer elicited by acetic acid in CGRP(-/-) mice was markedly delayed, compared with that in WT. In WT, granulation tissues were formed at the base of ulcers, and substantial neovascularization was induced, whereas those were poor in CGRP(-/-). Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor was more markedly reduced in CGRP(-/-) than in WT. CGRP has a preventive action on gastric mucosal injury and a proangiogenic activity to enhance ulcer healing. These results indicate that the CGRP-dependent pathway is a good target for regulating gastric mucosal protection and maintaining gastric mucosal integrity.

  15. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.; Heading, R.C.; Taylor, T.V.

    1986-07-01

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison ofmore » emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease.« less

  16. Increasing pressure ulcer rates and changes in delivery of care: a retrospective analysis at a University Clinic.

    PubMed

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Lehmann, Nils; Kröger, Knut; Maier, Irene; Schneider, Helmut; Niebel, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the relation between pressure ulcers and delivery of care. No decrease of pressure ulcer rates could be recognised in acute hospital care, despite intensive efforts in prevention. Furthermore, reports show increasing rates. Retrospective analysis of hospital data. The study included all inpatients from year 1 (2003/2004) and 4 (2006/2007) of the interdisciplinary decubitus project. Information on ulcers was recorded at admission, discharge and in case of new events. We analysed the effect of age, length of stay, operation and intensive care episode. In logistic regression, we used the existence of ulcers and the appearance of new ulcers as dependent variables. Parallel to a decrease in the number of inpatients, age, length of stay and operation frequency rose between 2003 and 2007. Higher age, longer length of stay, operation, intensive care episode and year 4 raise the odds for ulcers in univariate and with exception of operation in multivariate analyses. With exception of operation and year 4, the same variables raise the odds for new ulcers, too. The increase of pressure ulcer frequency could be related to changes in delivery of care. The adverse event pressure ulcer will become more important in hospital care. There is no decrease in pressure ulcer rates, albeit enormous efforts in prevention. Hospital care has been facing changes in case mix. Age, length of stay and intensive care episodes are related to increasing ulcer rates at a University Clinic. Nursing management has to be aware of additional workload for pressure ulcer management in the future.

  17. Rating long-term care facilities on pressure ulcer development: importance of case-mix adjustment.

    PubMed

    Berlowitz, D R; Ash, A S; Brandeis, G H; Brand, H K; Halpern, J L; Moskowitz, M A

    1996-03-15

    To determine the importance of case-mix adjustment in interpreting differences in rates of pressure ulcer development in Department of Veterans Affairs long- term care facilities. A sample assembled from the Patient Assessment File, a Veterans Affairs administrative database, was used to derive predictors of pressure ulcer development; the resulting model was validated in a separate sample. Facility-level rates of pressure ulcer development, both unadjusted and adjusted for case mix using the predictive model, were compared. Department of Veterans Affairs long-term care facilities. The derivation sample consisted of 31 150 intermediate medicine and nursing home residents who were initially free of pressure ulcers and were institutionalized between October 1991 and April 1993. The validation sample consisted of 17 946 residents institutionalized from April 1993 to October 1993. Development of a stage 2 or greater pressure ulcer. 11 factors predicted pressure ulcer development. Validated performance properties of the resulting model were good. Model-predicted rates of pressure ulcer development at individual long-term care facilities varied from 1.9% to 6.3%, and observed rates ranged from 0% to 10.9%. Case-mix-adjusted rates and ranks of facilities differed considerably from unadjusted ratings. For example, among five facilities that were identified as high outliers on the basis of unadjusted rates, two remained as outliers after adjustment for case mix. Long-term care facilities differ in case mix. Adjustments for case mix result in different judgments about facility performance and should be used when facility incidence rates are compared.

  18. The Wound Healing Effects of Herbal Cream Containing Oliveria Decumbens and Pelargonium Graveolens Essential Oils in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Model

    PubMed Central

    Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Khamechian, Tahereh; Tamtaji, Omid Reza; Mokhtari, Rasoul; Talaei, Sayyed Alireza

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND The number of diabetic patients in adult population is increasing. All this population are at risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) that are associated with unwanted ailments and high mortality. In spite of current therapies for DFUs, further therapies are needed to help the patients. METHODS The efficacy of herbal cream containing Pelargonium graveolens and Oliveria decombens essential oils was evaluated topically for treatment of DFUs in rat animal model in comparison with two other herbal formulas containing each essential oil alone, placebo (the basic formula without active ingredients) and normal saline as control groups. After anesthesia of diabetic rats (n=75) induced by streptozotocin (STZ), diabetic wounds were visible on the hind dorsal surface of the foot. The treatments were initiated on Day 1 and repeated 3 times a day for thirteen consecutive days. On day 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13, the wound sizes were determined and assessed histologically. RESULTS Three herbal formulations reduced the size of wounds in rats with DFUs, while the cream containing combined herbals of O. decumbens and P. graveolens essential oils had the highest tissue repair in DFU rat models. CONCLUSION Due to better wound healing effects of combined herbal cream containing O. decumbens and P. graveolens essential oils, it can be recommended in treatment of DFUs. PMID:29651391

  19. The Wound Healing Effects of Herbal Cream Containing Oliveria Decumbens and Pelargonium Graveolens Essential Oils in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Model.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Khamechian, Tahereh; Tamtaji, Omid Reza; Mokhtari, Rasoul; Talaei, Sayyed Alireza

    2018-01-01

    The number of diabetic patients in adult population is increasing. All this population are at risk of developing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) that are associated with unwanted ailments and high mortality. In spite of current therapies for DFUs, further therapies are needed to help the patients. The efficacy of herbal cream containing Pelargonium graveolens and Oliveria decombens essential oils was evaluated topically for treatment of DFUs in rat animal model in comparison with two other herbal formulas containing each essential oil alone, placebo (the basic formula without active ingredients) and normal saline as control groups. After anesthesia of diabetic rats (n=75) induced by streptozotocin (STZ), diabetic wounds were visible on the hind dorsal surface of the foot . The treatments were initiated on Day 1 and repeated 3 times a day for thirteen consecutive days. On day 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13, the wound sizes were determined and assessed histologically. Three herbal formulations reduced the size of wounds in rats with DFUs, while the cream containing combined herbals of O. decumbens and P. graveolens essential oils had the highest tissue repair in DFU rat models. Due to better wound healing effects of combined herbal cream containing O. decumbens and P. graveolens essential oils, it can be recommended in treatment of DFUs.

  20. Structured health care for subjects with diabetic foot ulcers results in a reduction of major amputation rates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective We tested the effects of structured health care for the diabetic foot in one region in Germany aiming to reduce the number of major amputations. Research design and methods In a prospective study we investigated patients with diabetic foot in a structured system of outpatient, in-patient and rehabilitative treatment. Subjects were recruited between January 1st, 2000 and December 31, 2007. All participants underwent a two-year follow-up. The modified University of Texas Wound Classification System (UT) was the basis for documentation and data analysis. We evaluated numbers of major amputations, rates of ulcer healing and mortality. In order to compare the effect of the structured health care program with usual care in patients with diabetic foot we evaluated the same parameters at another regional hospital without interdisciplinary care of diabetic foot (controls). Results 684 patients with diabetic foot and 508 controls were investigated. At discharge from hospital 28.3% (structured health care program, SHC) vs. 23.0% (controls) of all ulcers had healed completely. 51.5% (SHC) vs. 49.8% (controls) were in UT grade 1. Major amputations were performed in 32 subjects of the structured health care program group (4.7%) vs. 110 (21.7%) in controls (p<0.0001). Mortality during hospitalization was 2.5% (SHC) vs. 9.4% in controls (p<0.001). Conclusions With the structured health care program we achieved a significant reduction of major amputation rates by more than 75% as compared to standard care. PMID:23497152

  1. The impact of glycaemic variability on wound healing in the diabetic foot - A retrospective study of new ulcers presenting to a specialist multidisciplinary foot clinic.

    PubMed

    Dhatariya, Ketan K; Li Ping Wah-Pun Sin, Edwin; Cheng, Joyce Oi Suet; Li, Francesca Yan Nok; Yue, Anson Wei Yue; Gooday, Catherine; Nunney, Ian

    2018-01-01

    Glycaemic variability - the visit-to-visit variation in HbA1c - plays a possible role in the development of micro and macrovascular disease in patients with diabetes. Whether HbA1c variability is a factor determining wound healing in diabetic foot ulcers remains unknown. We aimed to determine whether HbA1c variability is associated with foot ulcer healing time. A retrospective analysis of patients presenting to our specialist multidisciplinary foot clinic between July 2013 and March 2015, with at least three HbA1c measurements within five years of presentation and more than two follow-up reviews. HbA1c variation was measured by magnitude of standard deviation. 629 new referrals were seen between July 2013 and March 2015. Of these, 172 patients had their number of days to healing recorded and sufficient numbers of HbA1c values to determine variability. The overall geometric mean days to heal was 91.1 days (SD 80.8-102.7). In the low HbA1c variability group the geometric mean days to heal was 78.0 days (60.2-101.2) vs 126.9 days (102.0-158.0) in the high Hb1Ac variability group (p = .032). Those with low HbA1c (<58 mmol/mol) and low variability healed faster than those with high HbA1c and high variability (73.5 days [59.5-90.8] vs 111.0 days [92.0-134.0], p = .007). Additionally, our results show that time to healing is more dependent on the mean HbA1c than the variability in HbA1c (p = .007). Our data suggest that there was a significant association between HbA1c variability and healing time in diabetic foot ulcers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Autologous cultured keratinocytes on porcine gelatin microbeads effectively heal chronic venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin Yu; Hafner, Jürg; Dragieva, Galya; Seifert, Burkhardt; Burg, Günter

    2004-01-01

    We have established a specific bioreactor microcarrier cell culture system using porcine gelatin microbeads as carriers to produce autologous keratinocytes on a large scale. Moreover, we have shown that autologous keratinocytes can be cultured on porcine collagen pads, thereby forming a single cell layer. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy and safety of autologous cultured keratinocytes on microbeads and collagen pads in the treatment of chronic wounds. Fifteen patients with recalcitrant venous leg ulcers were assigned to three groups in a single-center, prospective, uncontrolled study: five underwent a single treatment with keratinocyte monolayers on collagen pads (group 1); another five received a single grafting with keratinocyte-microbeads (group 2); and the last five received multiple, consecutive applications of keratinocyte-microbeads 3 days apart (group 3). All patients were followed for up to 12 weeks. By 12 weeks, there was a mean reduction in the initial wound area of 50, 83, and 97 percent in the three groups, respectively. The changes in wound size were statistically significant between the first and third groups (p= 0.0003). Keratinocyte-microbeads proved to be more effective than keratinocyte monolayers on collagen pads when the former were applied every 3 days. Rapid availability within 10-13 days after skin biopsy and easy handling represent particular advantages.

  3. Healing Rate of Swim Bladders in Rainbow Trout

    SciTech Connect

    Bellgraph, Brian J.; Brown, Richard S.; Stephenson, John R.

    2008-12-01

    The swimbladders of juvenile rainbow trout Onchorhynchus mykiss were ruptured and subsequently observed for 28 days to identify healing patterns of swimbladder wounds and the effects of swimbladder rupture on direct mortality. Healing began within seven days, wounds were completely closed after 14 days, and no mortalities occurred. The healing process followed a pattern in which tissue first thickened around the opening (7 to 14 days), followed by scarring of the ruptured area, and disappearance of any evidence of the wound (21 to 28 days). The healing observed in juvenile rainbow trout swimbladders suggests that swimbladder rupture does not resultmore » in direct mortality as was hypothesized; however, the indirect effects of swimbladder injury (e.g., a decreased ability to swim efficiently) may lead to mortality by predation or other natural phenomena that were not observable in this study.« less

  4. A single-arm trial indirect comparison investigation: a proof-of-concept method to predict venous leg ulcer healing time for a new acellular synthetic matrix matched to standard care control.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Ronald; Nelson, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    To compare data on time to healing from two separate cohorts: one treated with a new acellular synthetic matrix plus standard care (SC) and one matched from four large UK pragmatic, randomised controlled trials [venous leg ulcer (VLU) evidence network]. We introduce a new proof-of-concept strategy to a VLU clinical evidence network, propensity score matching and sensitivity analysis to predict the feasibility of the new acellular synthetic matrix plus SC for success in future randomised, controlled clinical trials. Prospective data on chronic VLUs from a safety and effectiveness study on an acellular synthetic matrix conducted in one wound centre in the UK (17 patients) and three wound centres in Australia (36 patients) were compared retrospectively to propensity score-matched data from patients with comparable leg ulcer disease aetiology, age, baseline ulcer area, ulcer duration, multi-layer compression bandaging and majority of care completed in specialist wound centres (average of 1 visit per week), with the outcome measures at comparable follow-up periods from patients enrolled in four prospective, multicentre, pragmatic, randomised studies of venous ulcers in the UK (the comparison group; VLU evidence network). Analysis using Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed a mean healing time of 73·1 days for ASM plus SC (ASM) treated ulcers in comparison with 83·5 days for comparison group ulcers treated with SC alone (Log rank test, χ 2 5·779, P = 0·016) within 12 weeks. Sensitivity analysis indicates that an unobserved covariate would have to change the odds of healing for SC by a factor of 1·1 to impact the baseline results. Results from this study predict a significant effect on healing time when using a new ASM as an adjunct to SC in the treatment of non-healing venous ulcers in the UK, but results are sensitive to unobserved covariates that may be important in healing time comparison. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Effects of new biomimetic regenerating agents on corneal wound healing in an experimental model of post-surgical corneal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, I; Íñigo-Portugués, A; Carreño, N; Riestra, A C; Merayo-Lloves, J M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of the topical application of cacicol regenerating agent (RGTA) in an experimental model of corneal ulcer after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in mice. Mice were subjected to PRK surgery with a 2.0mm ablation zone on the central cornea and 45mm of depth on a VISX Star S2 excimer laser. Corneas were treated topically with cacicol drops 1hour and 48hours after injury. Control groups received balanced salt solution (BSS) in the same dosage. Clinical and histopathological events were evaluated at 1, 2, 3 and 7 days after surgery. Sections obtained through the central region of the corneas were used to analyze the histopathological events of injured and healed corneas. αSMA (myofibroblast transformation), E cadherin (assembly of epithelial cells) and neuronal class III β-tubulin (innervation) were performed. Corneas treated topically with cacicol for 7 days showed a greater degree of transparency compared to controls. cacicol treated corneas showed improved epithelial cytoarchitecture. Analysis of αSMA profiles in the stroma showed that cacicol reduced or delayed the presence of myofibroblasts in the stroma compared to BSS (P<0.001). Finally, a putative neuroregenerative effect of cacicol was found in corneas subjected to an experimental PRK lesion. In some cases some interindividual variability could be observed due to the design of the experimental model. This is a limitation to consider, despite the statistical significance of the data. In a model of laser induced surgical lesions in the cornea, topical application of an RGTA (i.e. cacicol) could be involved in avoiding myofibroblast scarring formation and promoting nerve regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Fecal immunochemical test for predicting mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Cong; Jiang, Min; Sun, Ming-Jun; Cao, Qin

    2018-05-01

    Fecal immunochemical test (FIT) is a promising marker for assessment of inflammatory bowel disease activity. However, the utility of FIT for predicting mucosal healing (MH) of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients has yet to be clearly demonstrated. The objective of our study was to perform a diagnostic test accuracy test meta-analysis evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of FIT in predicting MH of UC patients. We systematically searched the databases from inception to November 2017 that evaluated MH in UC. The methodological quality of each study was assessed according to the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies checklist. The extracted data were pooled using a summary receiver operating characteristic curve model. Random-effects model was used to summarize the diagnostic odds ratio, sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio. Six studies comprising 625 UC patients were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity values for predicting MH in UC were 0.77 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-0.81) and 0.81 (95% CI, 0.76-0.85), respectively. The FIT level had a high rule-in value (positive likelihood ratio, 3.79; 95% CI, 2.85-5.03) and a moderate rule-out value (negative likelihood ratio, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.16-0.43) for predicting MH in UC. The results of the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis (area under the curve, 0.88; standard error of the mean, 0.02) and diagnostic odds ratio (18.08; 95% CI, 9.57-34.13) also revealed improved discrimination for identifying MH in UC with FIT concentration. Our meta-analysis has found that FIT is a simple, reliable non-invasive marker for predicting MH in UC patients. © 2018 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Pressure ulcer prevention and healing using alternating pressure mattress at home: the PARESTRY project.

    PubMed

    Meaume, S; Marty, M

    2015-08-01

    Specialised pressure-relieving supports reduce or relieve the interface pressure between the skin and the support surface. The comparative effectiveness of dynamic support surfaces is debated. The aim of this study is to examine the impact of using an alternating pressure air mattress (APAM) on pressure ulcer (PU) incidence in patients receiving home-based care. A second aim was to determine the level of patient/family satisfaction with comfort and gain the views of the care team that used the APAM. The PARESTRY study was a prospective observational study conducted in patients with a high risk of PUs (Braden score <15), discharged to hospital-care at home. The primary prevention groups consisted of patients with no PU at baseline who were in bed for at least 20 hours a day. Patients at baseline with a category 3 or 4 PU or a category 1 or 2 PU in association with poor general health or end-of-life status were included in the secondary prevention group. All patients were laid on an APAM. The primary end point was the % of patients with a worsening skin condition in the pressure area (heel, sacrum, ischium) at day 90 or at the end of the study. The primary analysis was done on the full analysis set (patients included with at least a second assessment), using the last observation carried forward technique to handle missing data, at day 90. A 95% confidence interval was calculated. Analysis was performed on 92 patients (30 in primary prevention and 62 in secondary prevention). The average time spent in bed was 22.7 (SD 2.7) hours a day and 22.6 (SD 2.2) hours in the primary and secondary prevention groups, respectively. At baseline, in the secondary group, 77% of patients had a sacral PU, 63% a heel PU, 8% an ischial tuberosity PU and 45% a PU in another area, a number of patients having multiple PUs. In the primary prevention group, 63% (19/30) of patients dropped out of the study (5 were hospitalised, 9 died, 5 other causes). In the secondary prevention group, 61

  8. Healing effects of Musa sapientum var. paradisiaca in diabetic rats with co-occurring gastric ulcer: cytokines and growth factor by PCR amplification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study evaluates the effects of extract of Musa sapientum fruit (MSE) on ulcer index, blood glucose level and gastric mucosal cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β and growth factor, TGF-α (affected in diabetes and chronic ulcer) in acetic acid (AA)-induced gastric ulcer (GU) in diabetic (DR) rat. Methods MSE (100 mg/kg, oral), omeprazole (OMZ, 2.0 mg/kg, oral), insulin (INS, 4 U/kg, sc) or pentoxyphylline (PTX, 10 mg/kg, oral) were given once daily for 10 days in 14 days post-streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneal)-induced diabetic rats while, the normal/diabetic rats received CMC for the same period after induction of GU with AA. Ulcer index was calculated based upon the product of length and width (mm2/rat) of ulcers while, TNF-α, IL-1β and TGF-α were estimated in the gastric mucosal homogenate from the intact/ulcer region. Phytochemical screening and HPTLC analysis of MSE was done following standard procedures. Results An increase in ulcer index, TNF-α and IL-1β were observed in normal (NR)-AA rat compared to NR-normal saline rat, which were further increased in DR-AA rat while, treatments of DR-AA rat with MSE, OMZ, INS and PTX reversed them, more so with MSE and PTX. Significant increase in TGF-α was found in NR-AA rat which did not increase further in DR-AA rat. MSE and PTX tended to increase while, OMZ and INS showed little or no effect on TGF-α in AA-DR rat. Phytochemical screening of MSE showed the presence of saponins, flavonoids, glycosides, steroids and alkaloids and HPTLC analysis indicated the presence of eight active compounds. Conclusion MSE showed antidiabetic and better ulcer healing effects compared with OMZ (antiulcer) or INS (antidiabetic) in diabetic rat and could be more effective in diabetes with concurrent gastric ulcer. PMID:24192345

  9. Healing effects of Musa sapientum var. paradisiaca in diabetic rats with co-occurring gastric ulcer: cytokines and growth factor by PCR amplification.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mohan; Gautam, Manish Kumar; Singh, Amit; Goel, Raj Kumar

    2013-11-05

    The present study evaluates the effects of extract of Musa sapientum fruit (MSE) on ulcer index, blood glucose level and gastric mucosal cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β and growth factor, TGF-α (affected in diabetes and chronic ulcer) in acetic acid (AA)-induced gastric ulcer (GU) in diabetic (DR) rat. MSE (100 mg/kg, oral), omeprazole (OMZ, 2.0 mg/kg, oral), insulin (INS, 4 U/kg, sc) or pentoxyphylline (PTX, 10 mg/kg, oral) were given once daily for 10 days in 14 days post-streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneal)-induced diabetic rats while, the normal/diabetic rats received CMC for the same period after induction of GU with AA. Ulcer index was calculated based upon the product of length and width (mm2/rat) of ulcers while, TNF-α, IL-1β and TGF-α were estimated in the gastric mucosal homogenate from the intact/ulcer region. Phytochemical screening and HPTLC analysis of MSE was done following standard procedures. An increase in ulcer index, TNF-α and IL-1β were observed in normal (NR)-AA rat compared to NR-normal saline rat, which were further increased in DR-AA rat while, treatments of DR-AA rat with MSE, OMZ, INS and PTX reversed them, more so with MSE and PTX. Significant increase in TGF-α was found in NR-AA rat which did not increase further in DR-AA rat. MSE and PTX tended to increase while, OMZ and INS showed little or no effect on TGF-α in AA-DR rat. Phytochemical screening of MSE showed the presence of saponins, flavonoids, glycosides, steroids and alkaloids and HPTLC analysis indicated the presence of eight active compounds. MSE showed antidiabetic and better ulcer healing effects compared with OMZ (antiulcer) or INS (antidiabetic) in diabetic rat and could be more effective in diabetes with concurrent gastric ulcer.

  10. Systematic review with meta-analysis: Comparative efficacy of biologics for induction and maintenance of mucosal healing in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Cholapranee, Aurada; Hazlewood, Glen S; Kaplan, Gilaad G.; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2017-01-01

    Background Mucosal healing is an important therapeutic endpoint in the management of Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Limited data exists regarding the comparative efficacy of various therapies in achieving this outcome. Methods We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT) examining mucosal healing as an endpoint of immunosuppressives, anti-tumor necrosis factor α (anti-TNF) or anti-integrin monoclonal antibody therapy for moderate-to-severe CD or UC. Pooled effect sizes for induction and maintenance of mucosal healing were calculated and pair-wise treatment comparisons evaluated using a Bayesian network meta-analysis. Results A total of 12 RCTs were included in the meta-analysis (CD – 2 induction, 4 maintenance; UC – 8 induction, 5 maintenance). Duration of follow-up was 6–12 weeks for induction and 32–54 weeks for maintenance trials. In CD, anti-TNFs were more effective than placebo for maintaining mucosal healing (28% vs. 1%, Odds ratio (OR) 19.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.51 – 110.84). In UC, anti-TNFs and anti-integrins were more effective than placebo for inducing (45% vs. 30%) and maintaining mucosal healing (33% vs. 18%). In network analysis, adalimumab therapy was inferior to infliximab (OR 0.45, 95% credible interval (CrI) 0.25 – 0.82) and combination infliximab-azathioprine (OR 0.32, 95% CrI 0.12 – 0.84) for inducing mucosal healing in UC. There was no statistically significant pairwise difference between vedolizumab and anti-TNF agents in UC. Conclusion Anti-TNF and anti-integrin biologic agents are effective in inducing mucosal healing in UC with adalimumab being inferior to infliximab or combination therapy. Infliximab and adalimumab were similar in CD. PMID:28326566

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy stimulates colonic stem cells and induces mucosal healing in patients with refractory ulcerative colitis: a prospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Bekheit, Mohamed; Baddour, Nahed; Katri, Khaled; Taher, Yousry; El Tobgy, Khaled; Mousa, Essam

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is used as part of treatment in a variety of clinical conditions. Its use in the treatment of ulcerative colitis has been reported in few clinical reports. Objective We report the effect of HBO on refractory ulcerative colitis exploring one potential mechanism of action. Design A review of records of patients with refractory ulcerative colitis who received HBO was conducted. Clinical and histopathological scoring was utilised to evaluate the response to HBO therapy (HBOT). Results All patients manifested clinical improvement by the 40th cycle of HBOT. The median number of stool frequency dropped from seven motions/day (range=3–20) to 1/day (range=0.5–3), which was significant (z=−4.6, p<0.001). None of the patients manifested persistent blood passage after HBOT (z=−3.2, p=0.002). The severity index significantly improved after HBOT (z=−4.97, p<0.001). Histologically, a significant reduction of the scores of activity was recorded accompanied by a significant increase in the proliferating cell nuclear antigen labelling index of the CD44 cells of the colonic mucosa (p=0.001). Conclusions HBOT is effective in the setting of refractory ulcerative colitis. The described protocol is necessary for successful treatment. HBOT stimulates colonic stem cells to promote healing. PMID:27195128

  12. Effects of esomeprazole on healing of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastric ulcers in the presence of a continued NSAID treatment: Characterization of molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fornai, Matteo; Colucci, Rocchina; Antonioli, Luca; Awwad, Oriana; Ugolini, Clara; Tuccori, Marco; Fulceri, Federica; Natale, Gianfranco; Basolo, Fulvio; Blandizzi, Corrado

    2011-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors promote ulcer repair in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-treated patients with ongoing NSAID-induced gastric toxicity, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We examined the healing mechanisms of esomeprazole on NSAID-induced gastric ulcerations in the presence of a continued NSAID treatment. Ulcerations were induced in rats by oral indomethacin (6μmol/kg/day) for 14 days. Indomethacin administration was continued, alone or combined with equivalent acid inhibitory doses of esomeprazole (5μmol/kg/day), lansoprazole (15μmol/kg/day) or famotidine (20μmol/kg/day), for additional 7 days. Stomachs were then processed for: histomorphometric analysis of mucosal injury; mucosal levels of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and malondialdehyde (MDA); expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), caspase-3, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) (Western blot); expression of Ki-67 (immunohistochemistry). Indomethacin for 14 days elicited mucosal damage, reduced PGE(2) levels and increased MDA. After additional 7 days, indomethacin induced the following effects: further enhancement of mucosal damage and MDA content; decrease in PGE(2) levels; increase in COX-2 and activated caspase-3 expression; decrease in VEGF, PCNA and Ki-67 expression. In the presence of indomethacin, esomeprazole and lansoprazole were more effective than famotidine in promoting resolution of mucosal damage. Concomitantly, esomeprazole and lansoprazole, but not famotidine, restored PCNA and Ki-67 expression, and normalized MDA levels. Moreover, esomeprazole, lansoprazole and famotidine partly counteracted caspase-3 activation, without affecting VEGF expression. The healing activity of esomeprazole on indomethacin-induced gastric ulcerations can be ascribed to two mechanisms: (1) acid-dependent reduction of pro-apoptotic signalling; (2) acid-independent restoration of proliferating/repairing pathways. Copyright © 2010

  13. The effects of vitamin D supplementation on wound healing and metabolic status in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, Reza; Pourbagheri, Hamideh; Momen-Heravi, Mansooreh; Bahmani, Fereshteh; Shadi, Jafar; Soleimani, Zahra; Asemi, Zatollah

    2017-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of vitamin D supplementation on wound healing and metabolic status in patients with diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed among 60 patients with grade 3 DFU according to "Wagner-Meggitt's" criteria. Participants were randomly divided into two groups (each 30 participants) and received either 50,000IU vitamin D supplements every 2weeks for 12weeks (group A) or placebo (group B). Fasting blood samples were taken at study baseline and after 12-week intervention to determine related markers. After 12weeks of intervention, compared with the placebo, vitamin D supplementation resulted in a significant reduction in ulcer length (-2.1±1.1 vs. -1.1±1.1cm, P=0.001), width (-2.0±1.2 vs. -1.1±1.0cm, P=0.02) and depth (-1.0±0.5 vs. -0.5±0.5cm, P<0.001), and erythema rate (100% vs. 80%, P=0.01). In addition, in supplemented patients changes in serum insulin concentration (-3.4±9.2 vs. +2.8±9.3 μIU/mL, P=0.01), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated insulin resistance (-1.5±4.1 vs. +1.7±5.1, P=0.01), the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (+0.006±0.02 vs. -0.006±0.02, P=0.03) and HbA1c (-0.6±0.6 vs. -0.1±0.5%, P=0.004) were significantly different from those of patients in the placebo group. Additionally, following supplementation with vitamin D, significant reductions in serum total- (-15.8±18.9 vs. +5.3±31.8mg/dL, P=0.003), LDL- (-17.2±19.8 vs. +2.2±28.6mg/dL, P=0.003), total-/HDL-cholesterol ratio (-1.1±0.8 vs. -0.2±1.1, P=0.001), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (-0.4±2.5 vs. +1.9±4.2μg/mL, P=0.01), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (-34.7±32.4 vs. -18.0±26.6mm/h, P=0.03) and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations (-0.7±0.9 vs. -0.2±0.5μmol/L, P=0.008) were seen compared with the placebo. Overall, vitamin D supplementation for 12weeks among patients with DFU had beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis

  14. A prospective randomised trial of four-layer versus short stretch compression bandages for the treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Scriven, J. M.; Taylor, L. E.; Wood, A. J.; Bell, P. R.; Naylor, A. R.; London, N. J.

    1998-01-01

    This trial was undertaken to examine the safety and efficacy of four-layer compared with short stretch compression bandages for the treatment of venous leg ulcers within the confines of a prospective, randomised, ethically approved trial. Fifty-three patients were recruited from a dedicated venous ulcer assessment clinic and their individual ulcerated limbs were randomised to receive either a four-layer bandage (FLB)(n = 32) or a short stretch bandage (SSB)(n = 32). The endpoint was a completely healed ulcer. However, if after 12 weeks of compression therapy no healing had been achieved, that limb was withdrawn from the study and deemed to have failed to heal with the prescribed bandage. Leg volume was measured using the multiple disc model at the first bandaging visit, 4 weeks later, and on ulcer healing. Complications arising during the study were recorded. Data from all limbs were analysed on an intention to treat basis; thus the three limbs not completing the protocol were included in the analysis. Of the 53 patients, 50 completed the protocol. At 1 year the healing rate was FLB 55% and SSB 57% (chi 2 = 0.0, df = 1, P = 1.0). Limbs in the FLB arm of the study sustained one minor complication, whereas SSB limbs sustained four significant complications. Leg volumes reduced significantly after 4 weeks of compression, but subsequent volume changes were insignificant. Ulcer healing rates were not influenced by the presence of deep venous reflux, post-thrombotic deep vein changes nor by ulcer duration. Although larger ulcers took longer to heal, the overall healing rates for large (> 10 cm2) and small (10 cm2 or less) ulcers were comparable. Four-layer and short stretch bandages were equally efficacious in healing venous ulcers independent of pattern of venous reflux, ulcer area or duration. FLB limbs sustained fewer complications than SSB. PMID:9682649

  15. Mucosal Healing Is Associated With Improved Long-term Outcomes of Patients With Ulcerative Colitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shailja C; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Sands, Bruce E; Narula, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    The paradigm for treatment for ulcerative colitis (UC) is shifting from resolving symptoms toward objective measures such as mucosal healing (MH). However, it is unclear whether MH is associated with improved long-term outcomes. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify and analyze studies comparing long-term outcomes of patients with MH with those without MH. We performed a systematic search of 3 large databases to identify prospective studies of patients with active UC that included outcomes of patients found to have MH at the first endoscopic evaluation after initiation of UC therapy (MH1) compared with those without MH1. The primary outcome was clinical remission after at least 52 weeks. Secondary outcomes included proportions of patients who were free of colectomy or corticosteroids and rate of MH after at least 52 weeks. We analyzed 13 studies comprising 2073 patients with active UC. Patients with MH1 had pooled odds ratio of 4.50 for achieving long-term (after at least 52 weeks) clinical remission (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.12-9.52), 4.15 for remaining free of colectomy (95% CI, 2.53-6.81), 8.40 for achieving long-term MH (95% CI, 3.13-22.53), and 9.70 for achieving long-term corticosteroid-free clinical remission (95% CI, 0.94-99.67), compared with patients without MH1. We found no difference in outcomes if patients achieved MH1 while receiving biologic versus non-biologic therapy. In a meta-analysis, we associated MH with long-term clinical remission, avoidance of colectomy, and corticosteroid-free clinical remission. MH is therefore appropriate goal of UC therapy. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Use of Bovine Collagen-glycosaminoglycan Matrix for Atypical Lower Extremity Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Garwood, Caitlin S; Kim, Paul J; Matai, Vinay; Steinberg, John S; Evans, Karen K; Mitnick, Carol Deane B; Attinger, Christopher E

    2016-09-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of bovine collagen-glycosaminoglycan matrix on atypical lower extremity ulcers. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent application of bovine collagen matrix to a lower extremity ulcer with an atypical etiology including autoimmune disease, sickle cell anemia, radiation therapy, connective tissue disease, vasculitis, or coagulopathy from January 2009 to October 2014. The following outcomes were evaluated: rate of ulcer healing and closure, number of ulcers that received a split-thickness skin graft, improvement in pain, and complications related to the ulcer. Thirty-eight patients with 71 lower extremity ulcers were analyzed. The most common ulcer etiolo- gies included rheumatoid arthritis, sickle cell anemia, and coagulopa- thy. After application of the bovine collagen matrix, 30 (42.3%) ulcers healed at a mean of 220.9 days. Of the 71 ulcers, 26 (36.6%) re- ceived a split-thickness skin graft after application of the matrix and 17 (65.4%) of those went on to complete healing. Ten patients had a local infection noted during follow-up, and 5 patients had dehiscence or dissociation of the matrix. Atypical lower extremity ulcers, such as those caused by autoimmune diseases and sickle cell anemia, proved difficult to heal. This case series shows that bovine collagen matrix can be a successful adjunctive therapy for the treatment of these challenging ulcers.

  17. Frequency and prognostic role of mucosal healing in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis after one-year of biological therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Klaudia; Lakatos, Péter László; Szűcs, Mónika; Pallagi-Kunstár, Éva; Bálint, Anita; Nagy, Ferenc; Szepes, Zoltán; Vass, Noémi; Kiss, Lajos S; Wittmann, Tibor; Molnár, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the endoscopic activity before and after a one-year period of biological therapy and to evaluate the frequency of relapses and need for retreatment after stopping the biologicals in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: The data from 41 patients with CD and 22 patients with UC were assessed. Twenty-four CD patients received infliximab, and 17 received adalimumab. The endoscopic severity of CD was quantified with the simplified endoscopic activity score for Crohn’s disease in CD and with the Mayo endoscopic subscore in UC. RESULTS: Mucosal healing was achieved in 23 CD and 7 UC patients. Biological therapy had to be restarted in 78% of patients achieving complete mucosal healing with CD and in 100% of patients with UC. Neither clinical remission nor mucosal healing was associated with the time to restarting the biological therapy in either CD or UC. CONCLUSION: Mucosal healing did not predict sustained clinical remission in patients in whom the biological therapies had been stopped. PMID:24659890

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate impaired wound healing through enhancing keratinocyte functions in diabetic foot ulcerations on the plantar skin of rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Jiro; Kamiya, Hideki; Himeno, Tatsuhito; Shibata, Taiga; Kondo, Masaki; Okawa, Tetsuji; Fujiya, Atsushi; Fukami, Ayako; Uenishi, Eita; Seino, Yusuke; Tsunekawa, Shin; Hamada, Yoji; Naruse, Keiko; Oiso, Yutaka; Nakamura, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Although the initial healing stage involves a re-epithelialization in humans, diabetic foot ulceration (DFU) has been investigated using rodent models with wounds on the thigh skin, in which a wound contraction is initiated. In this study, we established a rodent model of DFU on the plantar skin and evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) in this model. The wounds made on the hind paws or thighs of streptozotocin induced diabetic or control rats were treated with BM-MSCs. Expression levels of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (pFAK), matrix metaroprotease (MMP)-2, EGF, and IGF-1, were evaluated in human keratinocytes, which were cultured in conditioned media of BM-MSCs (MSC-CM) with high glucose levels. Re-epithelialization initiated the healing process on the plantar, but not on the thigh, skin. The therapy utilizing BM-MSCs ameliorated the delayed healing in diabetic rats. In the keratinocytes cultured with MSC-CM, the decreased pFAK levels in the high glucose condition were restored, and the MMP2, EGF, and IGF-1 levels increased. Our study established a novel rat DFU model. The impaired healing process in diabetic rats was ameliorated by transplantation of BM-MSCs. This amelioration might be accounted for by the modification of keratinocyte functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of the Risk of Relapse in Ulcerative Colitis According to the Degree of Mucosal Healing (Mayo 0 vs 1): A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; Vallejo, Nicolau; de la Iglesia, Daniel; Uribarri, Laura; Bastón, Iria; Ferreiro-Iglesias, Rocío; Lorenzo, Aurelio; Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis (UC) has become a common endpoint in most clinical trials and a relevant therapeutic goal in clinical practice. Despite important differences between endoscopic Mayo scores 0 and 1, both scores are considered as mucosal healing in most important trials. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the risk of relapse in UC patients according to the degree of mucosal healing (endoscopic Mayo scores of 0 and 1). A prospective longitudinal cohort study was designed. All UC patients who presented with mucosal healing at colonoscopy were consecutively included. Mucosal healing was defined as an endoscopic Mayo score of 0 or 1. Clinical relapse was defined as the need for therapy to induce remission, any treatment escalation, hospitalization or colectomy. All clinical relapses were evaluated at months 6 and 12 after study entry. Results were subjected to unconditional stepwise logistic and Kaplan-Meier regression analysis. One hundred and eighty-seven consecutive UC patients (126 [67.3%] with Mayo score 0 and 61 [32.7%] with Mayo score 1) were included. Of patients with Mayo scores 0 and 1, 9.4 and 36.6% respectively presented a relapse during the first 6 months of follow-up (p < 0.001). The only factor independently associated with UC relapses in the multivariate analysis was an endoscopic Mayo score of 1 (odds ratio 6.27, 95% confidence interval 2.73-14.40, p < 0.001). Patients with an endoscopic Mayo score of 1 have a higher risk of relapse than those with a score of 0. The concept of mucosal healing should be limited to patients with an endoscopic Mayo score of 0. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Increasing age and tear size reduce rotator cuff repair healing rate at 1 year

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Mustafa S; Cooper, Cushla; Cook, Jonathan; Cooper, David; Dakin, Stephanie G; Snelling, Sarah; Carr, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — There is a need to understand the reasons why a high proportion of rotator cuff repairs fail to heal. Using data from a large randomized clinical trial, we evaluated age and tear size as risk factors for failure of rotator cuff repair. Patients and methods — Between 2007 and 2014, 65 surgeons from 47 hospitals in the National Health Service (NHS) recruited 447 patients with atraumatic rotator cuff tendon tears to the United Kingdom Rotator Cuff Trial (UKUFF) and 256 underwent rotator cuff repair. Cuff integrity was assessed by imaging in 217 patients, at 12 months post-operation. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the influence of age and intra-operative tear size on healing. Hand dominance, sex, and previous steroid injections were controlled for. Results — The overall healing rate was 122/217 (56%) at 12 months. Healing rate decreased with increasing tear size (small tears 66%, medium tears 68%, large tears 47%, and massive tears 27% healed). The mean age of patients with a healed repair was 61 years compared with 64 years for those with a non-healed repair. Mean age increased with larger tear sizes (small tears 59 years, medium tears 62 years, large tears 64 years, and massive tears 66 years). Increasing age was an independent factor that negatively influenced healing, even after controlling for tear size. Only massive tears were an independent predictor of non-healing, after controlling for age. Interpretation — Although increasing age and larger tear size are both risks for failure of rotator cuff repair healing, age is the dominant risk factor. PMID:28880113

  1. Increasing age and tear size reduce rotator cuff repair healing rate at 1 year.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mustafa S; Cooper, Cushla; Cook, Jonathan; Cooper, David; Dakin, Stephanie G; Snelling, Sarah; Carr, Andrew J

    2017-12-01

    Background and purpose - There is a need to understand the reasons why a high proportion of rotator cuff repairs fail to heal. Using data from a large randomized clinical trial, we evaluated age and tear size as risk factors for failure of rotator cuff repair. Patients and methods - Between 2007 and 2014, 65 surgeons from 47 hospitals in the National Health Service (NHS) recruited 447 patients with atraumatic rotator cuff tendon tears to the United Kingdom Rotator Cuff Trial (UKUFF) and 256 underwent rotator cuff repair. Cuff integrity was assessed by imaging in 217 patients, at 12 months post-operation. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the influence of age and intra-operative tear size on healing. Hand dominance, sex, and previous steroid injections were controlled for. Results - The overall healing rate was 122/217 (56%) at 12 months. Healing rate decreased with increasing tear size (small tears 66%, medium tears 68%, large tears 47%, and massive tears 27% healed). The mean age of patients with a healed repair was 61 years compared with 64 years for those with a non-healed repair. Mean age increased with larger tear sizes (small tears 59 years, medium tears 62 years, large tears 64 years, and massive tears 66 years). Increasing age was an independent factor that negatively influenced healing, even after controlling for tear size. Only massive tears were an independent predictor of non-healing, after controlling for age. Interpretation - Although increasing age and larger tear size are both risks for failure of rotator cuff repair healing, age is the dominant risk factor.

  2. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  3. Comparison Between a New, Two-component Compression System With Zinc Paste Bandages for Leg Ulcer Healing: A Prospective, Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Trial Monitoring Sub-bandage Pressures.

    PubMed

    Mosti, Giovanni; Crespi, Aldo; Mattaliano, Vincenzo

    2011-05-01

    Compression therapy is standard treatment for venous leg ulcers. The authors prefer multi-layer, multi-component, stiff, high-pressure bandages to treat venous leg ulcers. The Unna boot (UB) is an example of this type of bandage. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and tolerability of UB to a new, two-component bandage. One hundred (100) patients with venous ulcers were randomized into two groups: group A (n = 50) received UB and group B (n = 50) 3M™ Coban™ 2 Layer Compression System (C2L). All patients were followed weekly for 3 months and then monthly until complete healing was achieved. The primary outcomes were: ulcer healing or surface reduction; pain; and exudate control. The secondary outcomes were: ease of application and removal of the bandage, pressure exerted in the supine and standing position after application and before removal, and bandage comfort. C2L was associated with 100% ulcer healing; 47 out of 50 cases healed within the first 3 months after application of the bandage. Compared with the UB, there was no statistically significant difference. In both groups the effect of compression on pain and overall well being was excellent; pain decreased by 50% within 1-2 weeks and remained low throughout the duration of treatment and overall well being improved significantly. There was no significant difference between the two systems concerning level of comfort. C2L proved to be effective in treating venous ulcers due to its stiffness and pressure. Its effectiveness was similar to UB, which is often considered the gold-standard compression device for venous ulcers. This fact, in combination with high tolerability and ease of application and removal, make this new bandage particularly suitable for the treatment of venous leg ulcers. .

  4. Factors affecting healing rates after arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Tashjian, Robert Z; Hollins, Anthony M; Kim, Hyun-Min; Teefey, Sharlene A; Middleton, William D; Steger-May, Karen; Galatz, Leesa M; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2010-12-01

    Double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs were developed to improve initial biomechanical strength of repairs to improve healing rates. Despite biomechanical improvements, failure of healing remains a clinical problem. To evaluate the anatomical results after double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with ultrasound to determine postoperative repair integrity and the effect of various factors on tendon healing. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Forty-eight patients (49 shoulders) who had a complete arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (double-row technique) were evaluated with ultrasound at a minimum of 6 months after surgery. Outcome was evaluated at a minimum of 1-year follow-up with standardized history and physical examination, visual analog scale for pain, active forward elevation, and preoperative and postoperative shoulder scores according to the system of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons and the Simple Shoulder Test. Quantitative strength was measured postoperatively. Ultrasound and physical examinations were performed at a minimum of 6 months after surgery (mean, 16 months; range, 6 to 36 months) and outcome questionnaire evaluations at a minimum of 12 months after surgery (mean, 29 months; range, 12 to 55 months). Of 49 repairs, 25 (51%) were healed. Healing rates were 67% in single-tendon tears (16 of 24 shoulders) and 36% in multitendon tears (9 of 25 shoulders). Older age and longer duration of follow-up were correlated with poorer tendon healing (P < .03). Visual analog scale for pain, active forward elevation, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores, and Simple Shoulder Test scores all had significant improvement from baseline after repair (P < .0001). Increased age and longer duration of follow-up were associated with lower healing rates after double-row rotator cuff repair. The biological limitation at the repair site, as reflected by the effects of age on healing, appears to be the most important factor influencing tendon healing

  5. Complete mucosal healing of distal lesions induced by twice-daily budesonide 2-mg foam promoted clinical remission of mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis with distal active inflammation: double-blind, randomized study.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Makoto; Aoyama, Nobuo; Tada, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Kiyonori; Hirai, Fumihito; Watanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Mamoru; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2018-04-01

    Budesonide foam is used for the topical treatment of distal ulcerative colitis. This phase III study was performed to confirm mucosal healing and other therapeutic effects of twice-daily budesonide 2-mg foam in patients with mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis including left-sided colitis and pancolitis. This was a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. A total of 126 patients with mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis with active inflammation in the distal colon were randomized to two groups receiving twice-daily budesonide 2 mg/25 ml foam or placebo foam. The primary endpoint was the percentage of complete mucosal healing of distal lesions (endoscopic subscore of 0) at week 6. Some patients continued the treatment through week 12. Drug efficacy and safety were evaluated. The percentages of both complete mucosal healing of distal lesions and clinical remission were significantly improved in the budesonide as compared with the placebo group (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.0035). Subgroup analysis showed similar efficacy of budesonide foam for complete mucosal healing of distal lesions and clinical remission regardless of disease type. The clinical remission percentage tended to be higher in patients achieving complete mucosal healing of distal lesions than in other patients. There were no safety concerns with budesonide foam. This study confirmed for the first time complete mucosal healing with twice-daily budesonide 2-mg foam in mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis with distal active inflammation. The results also indicated that complete mucosal healing of distal lesions by budesonide foam promotes clinical remission of ulcerative colitis. Clinical trial registration no.: Japic CTI-142704.

  6. Assessment of decisions in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori-related duodenal ulcer: a cost-effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Chen, S Y; Wang, J Y; Chen, J; Zhang, X D; Zhang, S S

    1999-10-01

    Many treatment trials for Helicobacter pylori have been reported but few have evaluated treatment in terms of both cost and effectiveness. It is important to find a therapy with a high eradication rate and low cost, especially in China. The aim of the study is to assess the efficiency of therapy for duodenal ulcers, including ulcer healing, H. pylori eradication and ulcer recurrence. Ninety-six consecutive patients with duodenal ulcers and H. pylori infection were randomly allocated into two groups: AMT group (amoxycillin + metronidazole + tagamet); OA group (omeprazole + amoxycillin). Side-effects were recorded during the treatment period. Endoscopic examinations were repeated at the 7th or 8th week to assess ulcer healing. Patients were followed up for 6 months and repeat endoscopy was performed. Ulcer healing rate, H. pylori eradication rate and ulcer recurrence rate were compared. All costs were recorded and a cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted. In the AMT and OA groups, the ulcer healing rate was 83.7 and 93.5%, respectively (P = 0.27). The eradication rate of H. pylori was 65.1 and 69.6%, respectively and was significantly higher in patients with an ulcer diameter < or = 1 cm compared with those with an ulcer diameter > 1 cm, irrespective of treatment group. There was no difference in recurrence rate, duration of pain or the time lost because of the disease. Moderate or severe side-effects were found in 8.9% in AMT group and 6.5% in OA group. The cost of treatment for ulcer healing, H. pylori eradication and reduction in ulcer recurrence were all lower in the AMT group than in the OA group. Sensitivity analysis supported the result that AMT was more cost effective than OA. The AMT therapy was more effective and less costly than the OA therapy, especially in patients with H. pylori-related duodenal ulcers < 1 cm diameter.

  7. Technical and clinical outcome of topical wound oxygen in comparison to conventional compression dressings in the management of refractory nonhealing venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Tawfick, Wael A; Sultan, Sherif

    2013-01-01

    Topical wound oxygen (TWO(2)) proposes an option in the management of refractory nonhealing venous ulcers (RVUs). End points are proportion of ulcers healed at 12 weeks, recurrence rates, reduction in ulcer size, and time to full healing. A total of 67 patients with RVU were managed using TWO(2) and 65 patients with conventional compression dressings (CCDs) for 12 weeks or till full healing. Mean reduction in ulcer surface area at 12 weeks was 96% in patients managed with TWO(2) and 61% in patients managed with CCD. At 12 weeks, 76% of the TWO(2)-managed ulcers had completely healed, compared to 46% of the CCD-managed ulcers (P < .0001). Median time to full healing was 57 days in patients managed with TWO(2) and 107 days in patients managed with CCD (P< .0001). After 36 months follow-up, 14 of the 30 healed CCD ulcers showed recurrence compared to 3 of the 51 TWO(2)-healed ulcers. The TWO(2) is effective and valuable in managing RVU. The TWO(2) slashes the time required for RVU healing and radically decreases the recurrence rates.

  8. Use of 16S rRNA sequencing and quantitative PCR to correlate venous leg ulcer bacterial bioburden dynamics with wound expansion, antibiotic therapy, and healing

    PubMed Central

    Sprockett, Daniel D.; Ammons, Christine G.; Tuttle, Marie S.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of infection in chronic wounds is currently limited to subjective clinical signs and culture-based methods that underestimate the complexity of wound microbial bioburden as revealed by DNA-based microbial identification methods. Here, we use 16S rRNA next generation sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to characterize weekly changes in bacterial load, community structure, and diversity associated with a chronic venous leg ulcer over the 15-week course of treatment and healing. Our DNA-based methods and detailed sampling scheme reveal that the bacterial bioburden of the wound is unexpectedly dynamic, including changes in the bacterial load and community structure that correlate with wound expansion, antibiotic therapy, and healing. We demonstrate that these multidimensional changes in bacterial bioburden can be summarized using swabs taken prior to debridement, and therefore, can be more easily collected serially than debridement or biopsy samples. Overall, this case illustrates the importance of detailed clinical indicators and longitudinal sampling to determine the pathogenic significance of chronic wound microbial dynamics and guide best use of antimicrobials for improvement of healing outcomes. PMID:25902876

  9. [Prevention of pressure ulcer (bedsore)].

    PubMed

    Sedmak, Dijana; Vrhovec, Marina; Huljev, Dubravko

    2013-10-01

    Although progress in many fields of science, medicine and technology is evident, we are still witnessing the appearance of bedsores and its consequences. However, in the last fifty years there has been considerable progress in the understanding of its causes, prevention and treatment. Prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers are complicated by the many misconceptions. However, with due knowledge of the process of healing of acute and chronic wounds and of the pathophysiological processes, in many cases chronic wounds, like pressure ulcers, can now be prevented and cured, and thus reduce the cost of treatment, as well as the mortality rate.

  10. Metformin Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Reduced Proliferation, Wound Healing Impairment In Vivo and Is Associated to Clinical Outcomes in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Patients.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Gonzalez, Fatima; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto R; Fernandez-Ruiz, Julio C; Nava-Ramirez, Hilda S; Hernandez-Correa, Adriana C; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E

    2016-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies in diabetic patients have demonstrated a protective effect of metformin to the development of several types of cancer. The underlying mechanisms of such phenomenon is related to the effect of metformin on cell proliferation among which, mTOR, AMPK and other targets have been identified. However, little is known about the role that metformin treatment have on other cell types such as keratinocytes and whether exposure to metformin of these cells might have serious repercussions in wound healing delay and in the development of complications in diabetic patients with foot ulcers or in their exacerbation. HaCaT Cells were exposed to various concentrations of metformin and cell viability was evaluated by a Resazurin assay; Proliferation was also evaluated with a colony formation assay and with CFSE dilution assay by flow cytometry. Cell cycle was also evaluated by flow cytometry by PI staining. An animal model of wound healing was used to evaluate the effect of metformin in wound closure. Also, an analysis of patients receiving metformin treatment was performed to determine the effect of metformin treatment on the outcome and wound area. Statistical analysis was performed on SPSS v. 18 and GraphPad software v.5. Metformin treatment significantly reduces cell proliferation; colony formation and alterations of the cell cycle are observed also in the metformin treated cells, particularly in the S phase. There is a significant increase in the area of the wound of the metformin treated animals at different time points (P<0.05). There is also a significant increase in the size and wound area of the patients with diabetic foot ulcers at the time of hospitalization. A protective effect of metformin was observed for amputation, probably associated with the anti inflammatory effects reported of metformin. Metformin treatment reduces cell proliferation and reduces wound healing in an animal model and affects clinical outcomes in diabetic foot ulcer

  11. The Effect of Foot Exercises on Wound Healing in Type 2 Diabetic Patients With a Foot Ulcer: A Randomized Control Study.

    PubMed

    Eraydin, Şahizer; Avşar, Gülçin

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of foot exercises on wound healing in type 2 diabetic patients with a diabetic foot ulcer. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Sixty-five patients from an outpatient clinic with grade 1 or 2 ulcers (Wagner classification) who met study criteria agreed to participate; 60 patients completed the study and were included in the final analysis. Subjects were followed up between February 2014 and June 2015. Subjects were recruited by the researchers in the clinics where they received treatment. Subjects were randomly allocated to either the control or intervention group. Data were collected using investigator-developed forms: patient information form and the diabetic foot exercises log. Patients in the intervention group received standard wound care and performed daily foot exercises for 12 weeks; the control group received standard wound care but no exercises. The ulcers of the patients in both the intervention and control groups were examined and measured at the 4th, 8th, and 12th weeks. The groups were compared in terms of the ulcer size and depth. To analyze and compare the data, frequency distribution, mean (standard deviation), variance analysis, and the independent samples t test and the χ test were used. The mean ulcer areas were 12.63 (14.43), 6.91 (5.44), 4.30 (3.70), and 3.29 (3.80) cm (P < .05) in the study intervention group, and 24.67 (20.70), 24.75 (20.84), 20.33 (20.79), and 18.52 (21.49) cm in the control group in the 4th, 8th, and 12th weeks, respectively. Significant differences were found between diabetic foot ulcer sizes in the study intervention group in the 4th and 12th weeks compared to beginning baseline (P ≤ .05). However, only the 12th week was different from the beginning in the control group (P = .000). The mean depths of the ulcers were 0.56 (0.85), 0.42 (0.68), 0.36 (0.50), and 0.28 (0.38) cm in the study intervention group (P < .05) and 0.61 (0.84), 0.82 (1.07), 0.83 (1

  12. The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification independently predicts wound healing in diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Sherman, Ronald; Malas, Mahmoud B; Black, James H; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2018-04-02

    Previous studies have reported correlation between the Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system and wound healing time on unadjusted analyses. However, in the only multivariable analysis to date, WIfI stage was not predictive of wound healing. Our aim was to examine the association between WIfI classification and wound healing after risk adjustment in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary DFU clinic from June 2012 to July 2017 were enrolled in a prospective database. A Cox proportional hazards model accounting for patients' sociodemographics, comorbidities, medication profiles, and wound characteristics was used to assess the association between WIfI classification and likelihood of wound healing at 1 year. There were 310 DFU patients enrolled (mean age, 59.0 ± 0.7 years; 60.3% male; 60.0% black) with 709 wounds, including 32.4% WIfI stage 1, 19.9% stage 2, 25.2% stage 3, and 22.4% stage 4. Mean wound healing time increased with increasing WIfI stage (stage 1, 96.9 ± 8.3 days; stage 4, 195.1 ± 10.6 days; P < .001). Likelihood of wound healing at 1 year was 94.1% ± 2.0% for stage 1 wounds vs 67.4% ± 4.4% for stage 4 (P < .001). After risk adjustment, increasing WIfI stage was independently associated with poor wound healing (stage 4 vs stage 1: hazard ratio, [HR] 0.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.59). Peripheral artery disease (HR, 0.73), increasing wound area (HR, 0.99 per square centimeter), and longer time from wound onset to first assessment (HR, 0.97 per month) also decreased the likelihood of wound healing, whereas use of clopidogrel was protective (HR, 1.39; all, P ≤ .04). The top three predictors of poor wound healing were WIfI stage 4 (z score, -5.40), increasing wound area (z score, -3.14), and WIfI stage 3 (z score, -3.11), respectively. Among patients with DFU, the WIfI classification system predicts wound

  13. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Induces LL-37 and HBD-2 Production in Keratinocytes from Diabetic Foot Ulcers Promoting Wound Healing: An In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Curiel, Irma; Trujillo, Valentin; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; Rincon, Kublai; Rivas-Calderon, Bruno; deHaro-Acosta, Jeny; Marin-Luevano, Paulina; Lozano-Lopez, Daniel; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A.; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) are one of the most common diabetes-related cause of hospitalization and often lead to severe infections and poor healing. It has been recently reported that patients with DFU have lower levels of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) at the lesion area, which contributes with the impairment of wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25 (OH)2 D3) and L-isoleucine induced HBD-2 and LL-37 in primary cultures from DFU. We developed primary cell cultures from skin biopsies from 15 patients with DFU and 15 from healthy donors. Cultures were treated with 1,25 (OH)2D3 or L-isoleucine for 18 h. Keratinocytes phenotype was identified by western blot and flow cytometry. Real time qPCR for DEFB4, CAMP and VDR gene expression was performed as well as an ELISA to measure HBD-2 and LL-37 in supernatant. Antimicrobial activity, in vitro, wound healing and proliferation assays were performed with conditioned supernatant. The results show that primary culture from DFU treated with 1,25(OH)2D3, increased DEFB4 and CAMP gene expression and increased the production of HBD-2 and LL-37 in the culture supernatant. These supernatants had antimicrobial activity over E. coli and induced remarkable keratinocyte migration. In conclusion the 1,25(OH)2D3 restored the production of AMPs in primary cell from DFU which were capable to improve the in vitro wound healing assays, suggesting their potential therapeutic use on the treatment of DFU. PMID:25337708

  14. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 induces LL-37 and HBD-2 production in keratinocytes from diabetic foot ulcers promoting wound healing: an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Curiel, Irma; Trujillo, Valentin; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; Rincon, Kublai; Rivas-Calderon, Bruno; deHaro-Acosta, Jeny; Marin-Luevano, Paulina; Lozano-Lopez, Daniel; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) are one of the most common diabetes-related cause of hospitalization and often lead to severe infections and poor healing. It has been recently reported that patients with DFU have lower levels of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) at the lesion area, which contributes with the impairment of wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25 (OH)2 D3) and L-isoleucine induced HBD-2 and LL-37 in primary cultures from DFU. We developed primary cell cultures from skin biopsies from 15 patients with DFU and 15 from healthy donors. Cultures were treated with 1,25 (OH)2D3 or L-isoleucine for 18 h. Keratinocytes phenotype was identified by western blot and flow cytometry. Real time qPCR for DEFB4, CAMP and VDR gene expression was performed as well as an ELISA to measure HBD-2 and LL-37 in supernatant. Antimicrobial activity, in vitro, wound healing and proliferation assays were performed with conditioned supernatant. The results show that primary culture from DFU treated with 1,25(OH)2D3, increased DEFB4 and CAMP gene expression and increased the production of HBD-2 and LL-37 in the culture supernatant. These supernatants had antimicrobial activity over E. coli and induced remarkable keratinocyte migration. In conclusion the 1,25(OH)2D3 restored the production of AMPs in primary cell from DFU which were capable to improve the in vitro wound healing assays, suggesting their potential therapeutic use on the treatment of DFU.

  15. Effect of systemic insulin treatment on diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Vatankhah, Nasibeh; Jahangiri, Younes; Landry, Gregory J; Moneta, Gregory L; Azarbal, Amir F

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates if different diabetic treatment regimens affect diabetic foot ulcer healing. From January 2013 to December 2014, 107 diabetic foot ulcers in 85 patients were followed until wound healing, amputation or development of a nonhealing ulcer at the last follow-up visit. Demographic data, diabetic treatment regimens, presence of peripheral vascular disease, wound characteristics, and outcome were collected. Nonhealing wound was defined as major or minor amputation or those who did not have complete healing until the last observation. Median age was 60.0 years (range: 31.1-90.1 years) and 58 cases (68.2%) were males. Twenty-four cases reached a complete healing (healing rate: 22.4%). The median follow-up period in subjects with classified as having chronic wounds was 6.0 months (range: 0.7-21.8 months). Insulin treatment was a part of diabetes management in 52 (61.2%) cases. Insulin therapy significantly increased the wound healing rate (30.3% [20/66 ulcers] vs. 9.8% [4/41 ulcers]) (p = 0.013). In multivariate random-effect logistic regression model, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, type of diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, peripheral arterial disease, oral hypoglycemic use, wound infection, involved side, presence of Charcot's deformity, gangrene, osteomyelitis on x-ray, and serum hemoglobin A1C levels, insulin treatment was associated with a higher chance of complete healing (beta ± SE: 15.2 ± 6.1, p = 0.013). Systemic insulin treatment can improve wound healing in diabetic ulcers after adjusting for multiple confounding covariates. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  16. Clinical validity of the estimated energy requirement and the average protein requirement for nutritional status change and wound healing in older patients with pressure ulcers: A multicenter prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Iizaka, Shinji; Kaitani, Toshiko; Nakagami, Gojiro; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-11-01

    Adequate nutritional intake is essential for pressure ulcer healing. Recently, the estimated energy requirement (30 kcal/kg) and the average protein requirement (0.95 g/kg) necessary to maintain metabolic balance have been reported. The purpose was to evaluate the clinical validity of these requirements in older hospitalized patients with pressure ulcers by assessing nutritional status and wound healing. This multicenter prospective study carried out as a secondary analysis of a clinical trial included 194 patients with pressure ulcers aged ≥65 years from 29 institutions. Nutritional status including anthropometry and biochemical tests, and wound status by a structured severity tool, were evaluated over 3 weeks. Energy and protein intake were determined from medical records on a typical day and dichotomized by meeting the estimated average requirement. Longitudinal data were analyzed with a multivariate mixed-effects model. Meeting the energy requirement was associated with changes in weight (P < 0.001), arm muscle circumference (P = 0.003) and serum albumin level (P = 0.016). Meeting the protein requirement was associated with changes in weight (P < 0.001) and serum albumin level (P = 0.043). These markers decreased in patients who did not meet the requirement, but were stable or increased in those who did. Energy and protein intake were associated with wound healing for deep ulcers (P = 0.013 for both), improving exudates and necrotic tissue, but not for superficial ulcers. Estimated energy requirement and average protein requirement were clinically validated for prevention of nutritional decline and of impaired healing of deep pressure ulcers. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  17. Off-loading total contact cast in combination with hydrogel and foam dressing for management of diabetic plantar ulcer of the foot.

    PubMed

    Vaseenon, Tanawat; Thitiboonsuwan, Songwut; Cheewawattanachai, Chaiyarit; Pimchoo, Punngam; Phanphaisarn, Areerak

    2014-12-01

    The total contact cast is considered to be an effective method of off-loading a diabetic non-infected pressure ulcer. However complications have been reported in 1 to 15% of cases, e.g. prolonged healing of the ulcer. Debridement with modern dressings has been reported to be effective in promoting wound healing; however there have been few reported studies of the combination of modern dressings with the cast. To evaluate the effectiveness of a combination of treatments on healing rates in diabetic non-infected plantar ulcer of the foot. This retrospective study with prospective data collection was conducted between September 2010 and August 2012. Twenty diabetic patients with plantar neuropathic ulcer were treated using a combination of a contact cast plus hydrogel andfoam dressings. The size and location of the ulcer, ulcer healing, foot deformities and complications were evaluated. Of 21 ulcers, 20 (95.2%) healed completely in a mean time of 30.1 days (range 14 to 70 days). Healing times for forefoot and midfoot ulcers were 22.6 and 26.8 days, respectively, which is significantly shorter than the 51.7 days for heel ulcers. One patient who had an unhealed ulcer developed a severe infection two months after treatment, which necessitated below the knee amputation. There were three cases of recurrence of the ulcers after casting. Off-loading casting combined with modern dressings had a high rate of healing in short-term treatment of diabetic non-infected pressure ulcers. Recurrence of ulcers and new site abrasions were common complications; those complications may have been caused by association with bone deformity or improper footwear.

  18. Effects of administration of a proton pump inhibitor before endoscopic submucosal dissection for differentiated early gastric cancer with ulcer.

    PubMed

    Myung, Yu Sik; Hong, Su Jin; Han, Jae Pil; Park, Kyung Woo; Ko, Bong Min; Lee, Moon Sung

    2017-01-01

    In ulcerative early gastric cancer, improvement and exacerbation of ulceration repeat as a malignant cycle. Moreover, early gastric cancer combined with ulcer is associated with a low curative resection rate and high risk of adverse events. The aim of this study was to investigate the ulcer healing rate and clinical outcomes with the administration of a proton pump inhibitor before endoscopic submucosal dissection for differentiated early gastric cancer with ulcer. A total of 136 patients with differentiated early gastric cancer with ulcer who met the expanded indications for endoscopic submucosal dissection were reviewed between June 2005 and June 2014. Eighty-one patients were given PPI before endoscopic submucosal dissection and 55 patients were not given PPI. The complete ulcer healing rate was significantly different between the two groups (59.3 % vs. 23.6 %, P < 0.001). The procedure time was 38.1 ± 35.7 and 50.8 ± 50.2 min (P = 0.047). However, no significant differences were detected in the en bloc resection rate, complete resection rate, and adverse events including bleeding and perforation. Multivariate analysis showed that administration of PPI (OR = 10.83, P < 0.001) and mucosal invasion (OR = 24.43, P < 0.001) were independent factors that predicted complete healing of ulceration. The calculated accuracy for whether complete healing of the ulcer after PPI administration can differentiate mucosal from submucosal invasion was 75.3 %. Administration of PPI before ESD in differentiated EGC meeting the expanded criteria is effective to heal the ulcer lesion and reduce the mean procedure time. Complete healing of the ulcer after PPI administration suggests mucosal cancer.

  19. Hydroethanolic extract of Baccharis trimera promotes gastroprotection and healing of acute and chronic gastric ulcers induced by ethanol and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida; da Silva, Luisa Mota; Ferreira, Daniele Maria; Galuppo, Larissa Favaretto; Borato, Debora Gasparin; Prando, Thiago Bruno Lima; Lourenço, Emerson Luiz Botelho; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Stefanello, Maria Élida Alves; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula; Acco, Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol is a psychoactive substance highly consumed around the world whose health problems include gastric lesions. Baccharis trimera is used in folk medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. However, few studies have evaluated its biological and toxic effects. To validate the popular use of B. trimera and elucidate its possible antiulcerogenic and cytotoxic mechanisms, a hydroethanolic extract of B. trimera (HEBT) was evaluated in models of gastric lesions. Rats and mice were used to evaluate the protective and antiulcerogenic effects of HEBT on gastric lesions induced by ethanol, acetic acid, and chronic ethanol consumption. The effects of HEBT were also evaluated in a pylorus ligature model and on gastrointestinal motility. The LD50 of HEBT in mice was additionally estimated. HEBT was analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance, and a high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprint analysis was performed. Oral HEBT administration significantly reduced the lesion area and the oxidative stress induced by acute and chronic ethanol consumption. However, HEBT did not protect against gastric wall mucus depletion and did not alter gastric secretory volume, pH, or total acidity in the pylorus ligature model. Histologically, HEBT accelerated the healing of chronic gastric ulcers in rats, reflected by contractions of the ulcer base. Flavonoids and caffeoylquinic acids were detected in HEBT, which likely contributed to the therapeutic efficacy of HEBT, preventing or reversing ethanol- and acetic acid-induced ulcers, respectively. HEBT antiulcerogenic activity may be partially attributable to the inhibition of free radical generation and subsequent prevention of lipid peroxidation. Our results indicate that HEBT has both gastroprotective and curative activity in animal models, with no toxicity.

  20. A pressure ulcer and fall rate quality composite index for acute care units: A measure development study.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Diane K; Jayawardhana, Ananda; Burman, Mary E; Dunton, Nancy E; Staggs, Vincent S; Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra; Gajewski, Byron J

    2016-11-01

    Composite indices are single measures that combine the strengths of two or more individual measures and provide broader, easy-to-use measures for evaluation of provider performance and comparisons across units and hospitals to support quality improvement. The study objective was to develop a unit-level inpatient composite nursing care quality performance index-the Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index. Two-phase measure development study. 5144 patient care units in 857 United States hospitals participating in the National Database of Nursing Quality Indictors ® during the year 2013. The Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index was developed in two phases. In Phase 1 the formula was generated using a utility function and generalized penalty analysis. Experts with experience in healthcare quality measurement provided the point of indicator equivalence. In Phase 2 initial validity evidence was gathered based on hypothesized relationships between the Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index and other variables using two-level (unit, hospital) hierarchical linear mixed modeling. The Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index=100-PUR-FR, where PUR is pressure ulcer rate and FR is total fall rate. Higher scores indicate better quality. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated agreement between pairs of experts and provided evidence for inter-rater reliability of the formula. The validation process demonstrated that higher registered nurse skill mix, higher percent of registered nurses with a baccalaureate in nursing or higher degree, higher percent of registered nurses with national specialty certification, and lower percent of hours supplied by agency staff were significantly associated with higher Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index scores. Higher percentages of unit patients at risk for a hospital-acquired pressure ulcer and higher unit rates of physical restraint use were not associated with higher Pressure

  1. A PRESSURE ULCER AND FALL RATE QUALITY COMPOSITE INDEX FOR ACUTE CARE UNITS: A MEASURE DEVELOPMENT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardhana, Ananda; Burman, Mary E.; Dunton, Nancy E.; Staggs, Vincent S.; Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra; Gajewski, Byron J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Composite indices are single measures that combine the strengths of two or more individual measures and provide broader, easy-to-use measures for evaluation of provider performance and comparisons across units and hospitals to support quality improvement. Objective The study objective was to develop a unit-level inpatient composite nursing care quality performance index – the Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index. Design Two-phase measure development study. Settings 5,144 patient care units in 857 United States hospitals participating in the National Database of Nursing Quality Indictors® during the year 2013. Methods The Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index was developed in two phases. In Phase 1 the formula was generated using a utility function and generalized penalty analysis. Experts with experience in healthcare quality measurement provided the point of indicator equivalence. In Phase 2 initial validity evidence was gathered based on hypothesized relationships between the Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index and other variables using two-level (unit, hospital) hierarchical linear mixed modeling. Results The Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index = 100 − PUR − FR, where PUR is pressure ulcer rate and FR is total fall rate. Higher scores indicate better quality. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated agreement between pairs of experts and provided evidence for inter-rater reliability of the formula. The validation process demonstrated that higher registered nurse skill mix, higher percent of registered nurses with a baccalaureate in nursing or higher degree, higher percent of registered nurses with national specialty certification, and lower percent of hours supplied by agency staff were significantly associated with higher Pressure Ulcer and Fall Rate Quality Composite Index scores. Higher percentages of unit patients at risk for a hospital-acquired pressure ulcer and higher unit rates of

  2. Dressings and topical agents for arterial leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Forster, Rachel; Pagnamenta, Fania

    2015-06-29

    It is estimated that people in industrialised countries have a 1% chance of suffering from a leg ulcer at some time in their life. The majority of leg ulcers are associated with circulation problems; poor blood return in the veins causes venous ulcers (around 70% of ulcers) and poor blood supply to the legs causes arterial ulcers (around 22% of ulcers). Treatment of arterial leg ulcers is directed towards correcting the poor arterial blood supply, for example by correcting arterial blockages (either surgically or pharmaceutically). If the blood supply has been restored, these arterial ulcers can heal following principles of good wound care. Dressings and topical agents make up a part of good wound care for arterial ulcers but there are many products available and it is unclear what impact these have on ulcer healing. This is an update of a review first published in 2003. To determine whether topical agents and wound dressings affect healing in arterial ulcers. To compare healing rates, patient-centred outcomes and costs between wound dressings and topical agents. For this update the Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Specialised Register (last searched November 2014) and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library) (2014, Issue 10). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), or controlled clinical trials (CCTs) evaluating dressings and topical agents in the treatment of arterial leg ulcers were eligible for inclusion. The participants had to have ulcers that were described as arterial, and the time to healing, proportion completely healed, or rate of reduction in ulcer area had to be reported. All wound dressings and topical agents were eligible for inclusion in this review. The two review authors independently extracted information on the participants' characteristics, the interventions, and outcomes using a standardised data extraction form. Disagreements between the review authors

  3. Mortality and recurrence rate after pressure ulcer operation for elderly long-term bedridden patients.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Masamitsu; Tada, Hideyuki; Mashiba, Kumi; Yurugi, Satoshi; Iioka, Hiroshi; Niitsuma, Katsunori; Yasuda, Yukiko

    2005-06-01

    We operated on 16 sacral pressure ulcers in elderly and long-term residential patients who were immobile as a result of cerebral vascular disease. The mean age of patients was 76 years. Eight ulcers were treated with local fascial flaps and 8 by simple closure. The follow-up period was from 1 to 4 years. Recurrence and mortality rates were examined retrospectively. In the 16 patients, recurrence occurred in 37.5%, and 43.8% died without recurrence. The recurrence rate was 37.5% for local fascial flaps and 37.5% for simple closure. Overall mortality was 68.8% in the follow-up period. Because postoperative death was common, we should not only focus on reducing local pressure but also pay attention to any underlying disease. Because of this high mortality rate, the least invasive procedure possible should be used. Because the recurrence rate of simple closure was the same as for local fascial flaps, simple closure should be considered as a reconstructive method.

  4. Effects of the Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in the process of healing diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, Maura Cristina Porto; Carvalho, Ana Flávia Machado de; Feitosa, Valrian Campos; Coelho, Isabely Madalena; Oliveira, Rauirys Alencar de; Arisawa, Emília Ângela Loschiavo

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of the low-level laser therapy applying Laser on the tissue repair in ulcer carriers due to diabetes. Sixteen type II diabetic patients, ulcer carriers in the lower limbs, participated in the research from which eight were in the control group and eight were submitted to the low-level laser therapy with a pulsed wave form, visible ray, wave length of 632.8 nm, 30 mW peak power, (Laser - HTM). The application time was of 80 (4J/cm2) seconds. The application was punctual without contact (approximately 1mm of distance), the pen being held in a perpendicular position related to the wound, in equidistant points. There were 12 appointments, of which three were done weekly in alternated days. Photograph records and an application of the brief inventory of pain were done before and after 30 days of follow-up. There was a significant decrease in the size of the wound when compared to the control group (p<0.05). The pain was also reported as having an intense improvement in the treated group. The low-level laser treatment seems to be an efficient method, viable, painless and of low costs concerning the tissue repair ulcers in a diabetic foot.

  5. Ulcerative Dermatitis in C57BL/6 Mice Exhibits an Oxidative Stress Response Consistent with Normal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lisa K; Csaki, Lauren S; Cantor, Rita M; Reue, Karen; Lawson, Greg W

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative dermatitis (UD) is a common syndrome of unknown etiology that results in profound morbidity in C57BL/6 mice and lines on a C57BL/6 background. The lesions are due to severe pruritus-induced self-trauma, progressing from superficial excoriations to deep ulcerations. UD may be behavioral in origin, with ulcerative lesions resulting from self-mutilating behavior in response to unresolved inflammation or compulsion. Alternatively, abnormal oxidative damage may be a mechanism underlying UD. To evaluate whether UD behaves similarly to normal wounds, consistent with a secondary self-inflicted lesion, or is a distinct disorder with abnormal wound response, we evaluated expression levels of genes representing various arms of the oxidative stress response pathway UD-affected and unwounded C57BL/6J mice. No evidence indicated that UD wounds have a defect in the oxidative stress response. Our findings are consistent with an understanding of C57BL/6 UD lesions as typical rather than atypical wounds. PMID:22776048

  6. Comment on "Topically Applied Connective Tissue Growth Factor/CCN2 Improves Diabetic Preclinical Cutaneous Wound Healing: Potential Role for CTGF in Human Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing".

    PubMed

    Li, Hongling; Cao, Cong; Huang, Ai; Man, Yi

    2015-01-01

    A recent paper in this journal, presented a novel method by topical application of growth factors in stimulating diabetic cutaneous wound healing that caught our attention. We believe that the experimental method in the article is efficient and creative, but it also has some controversies and shortcomings to be discussed. We noted that the authors used "Tegaderm" as a semiocclusive dressing film and stated that it exerted a "splinting effect" on the wound margins and controlled contraction. Indeed, the "Tegaderm" itself can serve as a dressing film to isolate the wound bed with outside environments while the "splinting effect" is mainly achieved by adding silicone splints around the wound. Considering the unique properties of silicone splints and "Tegaderm," our experimental group propose an alternative method named "combined-suturing" technique that is not only suturing the silicone splints but also securing the "Tegaderm" around the wound. The specific reasons and operative procedures are explained in detail in this letter.

  7. Oral Delivery of Nanoparticles Loaded With Ginger Active Compound, 6-Shogaol, Attenuates Ulcerative Colitis and Promotes Wound Healing in a Murine Model of Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Xu, Changlong; Liu, Dandan; Han, Moon Kwon; Wang, Lixin; Merlin, Didier

    2018-01-24

    Oral drug delivery is the most attractive pathway for ulcerative colitis [UC] therapy, since it has many advantages. However, this strategy has encountered many challenges, including the instability of drugs in the gastrointestinal tract [GT], low targeting of disease tissues, and severe adverse effects. Nanoparticles capable of colitis tissue-targeted delivery and site-specific drug release may offer a unique and therapeutically effective system that addresses these formidable challenges. We used a versatile single-step surface-functionalising technique to prepare PLGA/PLA-PEG-FA nanoparticles loaded with the ginger active compound, 6-shogaol [NPs-PEG-FA/6-shogaol]. The therapeutic efficacy of NPs-PEG-FA/6-shogaol was evaluated in the well-established mouse model of dextran sulphate sodium [DSS]-induced colitis. NPs-PEG-FA exhibited very good biocompatibility both in vitro and in vivo. Subsequent cellular uptake experiments demonstrated that NPs-PEG-FA could undergo efficient receptor-mediated uptake by colon-26 cells and activated Raw 264.7 macrophage cells. In vivo, oral administration of NPs-PEG-FA/6-shogaol encapsulated in a hydrogel system [chitosan/alginate] significantly alleviated colitis symptoms and accelerated colitis wound repair in DSS-treated mice by regulating the expression levels of pro-inflammatory [TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and iNOS] and anti-inflammatory [Nrf-2 and HO-1] factors. Our study demonstrates a convenient, orally administered 6-shogaol drug delivery system that effectively targets colitis tissue, alleviates colitis symptoms, and accelerates colitis wound repair. This system may represent a promising therapeutic approach for treating inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]. Copyright © 2017 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. The Difference Between the Healing and the Nonhealing Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Review of the Role of the Microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Danielle; Saeed, Mujahid; Narendran, Parth; Tiwari, Alok

    2017-09-01

    Diabetic foot disease carries a high morbidity and is a leading cause of lower limb amputation. This may in part be due to the effect diabetes mellitus (DM) has on the microcirculation including in the skin. We conducted a review of studies that have examined the relationship between microcirculatory function and wound healing in patients with DM. A search of the Medline, Embase, and Web of Science databases was performed coupled with a review of references for the period 1946 to March 2015. Nineteen studies of diverse methodology and cohort selection were identified. Poor function of the microcirculation was related to poor outcome. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO 2 ) was the most commonly used method to measure the microcirculation and thresholds for poor outcome proposed ranged from 10 mmHg to <34 mmHg. Two studies reexamined microcirculatory function following revascularization. Both found an increase in TcPO 2 , however only 1 reached statistical significance. No significant difference in the results of microcirculation tests was found between diabetic and nondiabetic patients. While it is not possible to draw firm conclusions from the evidence currently available there are clear areas that warrant research. Good microcirculation unsurprisingly appears to associate with better wound healing. The influence of DM is not clear, and neither is the degree of improvement required to achieve healing. Studies that examine a clearly defined cohort both with and without DM are urgently required. Accurate quantitative assessment of microcirculation will aid prediction of wound healing identifying those at greatest risk of amputation.

  9. The Study of Influence of Different Methods of Local Treatment on Wound Healing in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Zaitseva, E L; Tokmakova, A Y; Shestakova, M V; Galstyan, G R; Doronina, L P

    To evaluate the influence of different methods of local treatment on tissue repair in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. We evaluated such clinical characteristics as wound size and local perfusion after using negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), local collagen, and standard care in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. We observed 63 patients with neuropathic and neuroischemic forms of diabetic foot (without critical ischemia) after surgical debridement. After that 21 patients received NPWT, 21 local collagen treatment and 21 ― standard care. After using NPWT wound area and depth decreased in 19,8% and 42,8% (p<0.05), in group of collagen dressings in 26,4 and 30,4% (p<0.05). In control group those parameters were 17,0 и 16.6% respectively (p<0.05). There was found the significant increase of local perfusion according to oxygen monitoring in group of NPWT (p<0.05). The received data showed that the intensity of lower limb tissue repair processes increases more significant after using NPWT and collagen dressings in comparison to standard care which is found according to wound size and tissue perfusion alterations.

  10. Topical phenytoin for treating pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiang Yong; Li, Hong Ling; Su, He; Cai, Hui; Guo, Tian Kang; Liu, Ruifeng; Jiang, Lei; Shen, Yan Fei

    2017-02-22

    Pressure ulcers are common in clinical practice and pose a significant health problem worldwide. Apart from causing suffering to patients, they also result in longer hospital stays and increase the cost of health care. A variety of methods are used for treating pressure ulcers, including pressure relief, patient repositioning, biophysical strategies, nutritional supplementation, debridement, topical negative pressure, and local treatments including dressings, ointments and creams such as bacitracin, silver sulphadiazine, neomycin, and phenytoin. Phenytoin is a drug more commonly used in the treatment of epilepsy, but may play an important role in accelerating ulcer healing. To assess the effects of topical phenytoin on the rate of healing of pressure ulcers of any grade, in any care setting. In September 2016, we searched the following electronic databases to identify relevant randomized clinical trials: the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; the Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase; and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We handsearched conference proceedings from the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Wound Management Association and the Tissue Viability Society for all available years. We searched the references of the retrieved trials to identify further relevant trials. We also searched clinical trials registries to identify ongoing and unpublished studies. There were no restrictions with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. We included all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) addressing the effects (both benefits and harms) of topical phenytoin on the healing of pressure ulcers of any grade compared with placebo or alternative treatments or no therapy, irrespective of blinding, language, and publication status. Two review authors independently selected studies, extracted information on participants, interventions, methods and results and assessed risk of bias using

  11. RECURRENCE RATE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN PATIENTS WITH PEPTIC ULCER FIVE YEARS OR MORE AFTER SUCCESSFUL ERADICATION.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Yuri Costa Farago; Bonatto, Gabriel da Rocha; Bonatto, Mauro Willeman

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is highly prevalent worldwide, especially in developing countries. Its presence in the gastroduodenal mucosa is related with development of peptic ulcer and other illnesses. The eradication of H. pylori improves mucosal histology in patients with peptic ulcers. This study was aimed to verify if H. pylori recurrence occurs five years or more after confirmed eradication in patients with peptic ulcer. Moreover, we sought to determine the recurrence rate. Retrospective and longitudinal, this study was based on a sample of 201 patients from western Paraná, Brazil. The patients were diagnosed with peptic ulcer disease, in the period of 1990-2000, and followed for five years or more after successful H. pylori eradication. Patients with early recurrence - prior to five years after eradication - were excluded from the sample. During an average follow-up of 8 years, 180 patients (89.55%) remained negative, and 21 (10.45%) became positive for H. pylori infection. New ulcers appeared in two-thirds of the patients with H. pylori recurrence. The recurrence of H. pylori in patients with peptic ulcer can occur in the long-term - even if the infection had been successfully eradicated and the patients had remained free of recurrence in the first years of follow-up.

  12. The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system predicts wound healing but not major amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers treated in a multidisciplinary setting.

    PubMed

    Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Sherman, Ronald L; Hines, Kathryn F; Lum, Ying W; Perler, Bruce A; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2017-06-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) threatened limb classification has been shown to correlate well with risk of major amputation and time to wound healing in heterogeneous diabetic and nondiabetic populations. Major amputation continues to plague the most severe stage 4 WIfI patients, with 1-year amputation rates of 20% to 64%. Our aim was to determine the association between WIfI stage and wound healing and major amputation among patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary DFU clinic from July 2012 to December 2015 were enrolled in a prospective database. Wound healing and major amputation were compared for patients stratified by WIfI classification. There were 217 DFU patients with 439 wounds (mean age, 58.3 ± 0.8 years; 58% male, 63% black) enrolled, including 28% WIfI stage 1, 11% stage 2, 33% stage 3, and 28% stage 4. Peripheral arterial disease and dialysis were more common in patients with advanced (stage 3 or 4) wounds (P ≤ .05). Demographics of the patients, socioeconomic status, and comorbidities were otherwise similar between groups. There was a significant increase in the number of active wounds per limb at presentation with increasing WIfI stage (stage 1, 1.1 ± 0.1; stage 4, 1.4 ± 0.1; P = .03). Mean wound area (stage 1, 2.6 ± 0.6 cm 2 ; stage 4, 15.3 ± 2.8 cm 2 ) and depth (stage 1, 0.2 ± 0.0 cm; stage 4, 0.8 ± 0.1 cm) also increased progressively with increasing wound stage (P < .001). Minor amputations (stage 1, 18%; stage 4, 56%) and revascularizations (stage 1, 6%; stage 4, 55%) were more common with increasing WIfI stage (P < .001). On Kaplan-Meier analysis, WIfI classification was predictive of wound healing (P < .001) but not of major amputation (P = .99). For stage 4 wounds, the mean wound healing time was 190 ± 17 days, and risk of major amputation at 1 year was 5.7% ± 3.2%. Among

  13. Efficacy of treatment with rebamipide for endoscopic submucosal dissection-induced ulcers.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Masaki; Matsui, Shigenaga; Kawasaki, Masanori; Asakuma, Yutaka; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Kashida, Hiroshi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2013-09-14

    To prospectively compare the healing rates of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD)-induced ulcers treated with either a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) or rebamipide. We examined 90 patients with early gastric cancer who had undergone ESD. All patients were administered an intravenous infusion of the PPI lansoprazole (20 mg) every 12 h for 2 d, followed by oral administration of lansoprazole (30 mg/d, 5 d). After 7-d treatment, the patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups and received either lansoprazole (30 mg/d orally, n = 45; PPI group) or rebamipide (300 mg orally, three times a day; n = 45; rebamipide group). At 4 and 8 wk after ESD, the ulcer outcomes in the 2 groups were compared. No significant differences were noted in patient age, underlying disease, tumor location, Helicobacter pylori infection rate, or ESD-induced ulcer size between the 2 groups. At both 4 and 8 wk, the healing rates of ESD-induced ulcers were similar in the PPI-treated and the rebamipide-treated patients (4 wk: PPI, 27.2%; rebamipide, 33.3%; P = 0.5341; 8 wk: PPI, 90.9%; rebamipide, 93.3%; P = 0.6710). At 8 wk, the rates of granulation lesions following ulcer healing were significantly higher in the PPI-treated group (13.6%) than in the rebamipide-treated group (0.0%; P = 0.0103). Ulcer-related symptoms were similar in the 2 treatment groups at 8 wk. The medication cost of 8-wk treatment with the PPI was 10945 yen vs 4889 yen for rebamipide. No ulcer bleeding or complications due to the drugs were observed in either treatment group. The healing rate of ESD-induced ulcers was similar with rebamipide or PPI treatment; however, rebamipide treatment is more cost-effective and prevents granulation lesions following ulcer healing.

  14. Efficacy of treatment with rebamipide for endoscopic submucosal dissection-induced ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Masaki; Matsui, Shigenaga; Kawasaki, Masanori; Asakuma, Yutaka; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Kashida, Hiroshi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively compare the healing rates of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD)-induced ulcers treated with either a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) or rebamipide. METHODS: We examined 90 patients with early gastric cancer who had undergone ESD. All patients were administered an intravenous infusion of the PPI lansoprazole (20 mg) every 12 h for 2 d, followed by oral administration of lansoprazole (30 mg/d, 5 d). After 7-d treatment, the patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups and received either lansoprazole (30 mg/d orally, n = 45; PPI group) or rebamipide (300 mg orally, three times a day; n = 45; rebamipide group). At 4 and 8 wk after ESD, the ulcer outcomes in the 2 groups were compared. RESULTS: No significant differences were noted in patient age, underlying disease, tumor location, Helicobacter pylori infection rate, or ESD-induced ulcer size between the 2 groups. At both 4 and 8 wk, the healing rates of ESD-induced ulcers were similar in the PPI-treated and the rebamipide-treated patients (4 wk: PPI, 27.2%; rebamipide, 33.3%; P = 0.5341; 8 wk: PPI, 90.9%; rebamipide, 93.3%; P = 0.6710). At 8 wk, the rates of granulation lesions following ulcer healing were significantly higher in the PPI-treated group (13.6%) than in the rebamipide-treated group (0.0%; P = 0.0103). Ulcer-related symptoms were similar in the 2 treatment groups at 8 wk. The medication cost of 8-wk treatment with the PPI was 10945 yen vs 4889 yen for rebamipide. No ulcer bleeding or complications due to the drugs were observed in either treatment group. CONCLUSION: The healing rate of ESD-induced ulcers was similar with rebamipide or PPI treatment; however, rebamipide treatment is more cost-effective and prevents granulation lesions following ulcer healing. PMID:24039365

  15. The beneficial effects of probiotic administration on wound healing and metabolic status in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Sima; Bayani, Masomeh; Bahmani, Fereshteh; Tajabadi-Ebrahimi, Maryam; Bayani, Mohammad Ali; Jafari, Parvaneh; Asemi, Zatollah

    2018-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of probiotic supplementation on wound healing and metabolic status in subjects with diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted among 60 subjects (aged 40-85 years old) with grade 3 diabetic foot ulcer. Individuals were randomly divided into 2 groups (30 subjects each group) to receive either probiotic or placebo daily for 12 weeks. After the 12-week intervention, compared with the placebo, probiotic supplementation led to significant reductions in ulcer length (-1.3 ± 0.9 vs. -0.8 ± 0.7 cm, P = .01), width (-1.1 ± 0.7 vs. -0.7 ± 0.7 cm, P = .02), and depth (-0.5 ± 0.3 vs. -0.3 ± 0.3 cm, P = .02). Furthermore, significant reductions in fasting plasma glucose (-29.6 ± 30.3 vs. -5.8 ± 39.8 mg/dL, P = .01), serum insulin concentrations (-4.3 ± 7.9 vs. +0.4 ± 8.5 μIU/mL, P = .03), and haemoglobin A1c (-0.6 ± 0.5 vs. -0.2 ± 0.4%, P = .003) and a significant rise in the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (+0.01 ± 0.01 vs. -0.01 ± 0.02, P = .003) were seen following supplementation of probiotic compared with the placebo. Additionally, compared with the placebo, probiotic supplementation resulted in significant decreases in serum total cholesterol (-4.8 ± 16.1 vs. +7.0 ± 27.1 mg/dL, P = .04), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (-9.0 ± 14.7 vs. -1.7 ± 8.6 mg/L, P = .02), plasma malondialdehyde (-0.8 ± 0.8 vs. -0.2 ± 0.8 μmol/L, P = .001), and significant increases in plasma nitric oxide (+6.2 ± 8.2 vs. +0.8 ± 8.0 μmol/L, P = .01) and total antioxidant capacity concentrations (+179.3 ± 97.2 vs. -85.1 ± 203.4 mmol/L, P < .001). Overall, probiotic supplementation for 12 weeks among subjects with diabetic foot ulcer had beneficial effects on ulcer size, glycaemic control, total cholesterol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, plasma nitric oxide, total

  16. [Comparison of Helicobacter pylori eradication rate in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia and peptic ulcer diseases according to proton pump inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Hong, Eun Jung; Park, Dong Il; Oh, Suk Joong; Song, Min Jun; Choi, Woo Hyuk; Hong, Cheul Ho; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Shon, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik

    2008-08-01

    Conflicting results have been reported whether patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) respond differently to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication treatment compared with patients with peptic ulcer diseases (PUD). The aim of this study was to evaluate any difference in H. pylori eradication rates between patients with NUD and PUD according to each proton pump inhibitor (PPI). From September, 2004 to April, 2007, we retrospectively reviewed 2,297 patients with NUD (1,050 patients) or PUD (1,247 patients) infected with H. pylori. All patients received a standard 1 week triple therapy comprising of one of the five PPIs (pantoprazole, esomeprazole, omeprazole, lansoprazole, rabeprazole), clarithromycin and amoxicillin. The follow-up H. pylori test was performed 4 weeks after the completion of therapy. There was no significant difference in the eradication rates between the two groups. In comparison of eradication rates according to PPI, omeprazole- based triple therapy group showed higher eradication rate than other groups in patients with NUD, but not in patients with PUD. This study failed to show any difference in H. pylori eradication rate between patients with NUD and PUD. There is no convincing evidence that the eradication rate may be affected by different PPI.

  17. Malignant melanoma misdiagnosed as diabetic foot ulcer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Dawei; Ran, Xingwu

    2017-07-01

    Acral lentiginous melanoma (AML) does not exhibit the classic signs of malignant melanoma. ALM is frequently misdiagnosed because of its unusual sites and atypical clinical morphologies, which lead to poor prognosis. A female patient aged 78 years was presented to our center with two ulcers on her right foot. Diabetic foot ulcer was considered as the primary diagnosis. The ulcers failed to improve after 2 weeks' therapy. An incisional biopsy of the lesion revealed malignant melanoma. The patient received wide excision, skin grafting as well as biotherapy. The lesion was healed and no other metastasis has been founded until now. Clinicians must maintain a high level of suspicion in distinguishing malignant melanoma from other more benign skin lesions of the foot. The need for early biopsy of ulcer, even when clinical suspicion is low, can not be overemphasized. Only in this way can we reduce misdiagnosis rate and improve survival rate in patients with foot ulcer.

  18. Effect of low-level laser therapy on the healing process of donor site in patients with grade 3 burn ulcer after skin graft surgery (a randomized clinical trial).

    PubMed

    Vaghardoost, Reza; Momeni, Mahnoush; Kazemikhoo, Nooshafarin; Mokmeli, Soheila; Dahmardehei, Mostafa; Ansari, Fereshteh; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Sabr Joo, Parisa; Mey Abadi, Sara; Naderi Gharagheshlagh, Soheila; Sassani, Saeed

    2018-04-01

    Skin graft is a standard therapeutic technique in patients with deep ulcers, but managing donor site after grafting is very important. Although several modern dressings are available to enhance the comfort of donor site, using techniques that accelerate wound healing may enhance patient satisfaction. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used in several medical fields, including healing of diabetic, surgical, and pressure ulcers, but there is not any report of using this method for healing of donor site in burn patients. The protocols and informed consent were reviewed according to Medical Ethics Board of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (IR.SBMU.REC.1394.363) and Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRCT2016020226069N2). Eighteen donor sites in 11 patients with grade 3 burn ulcer were selected. Donor areas were divided into 2 parts, for laser irradiation and control randomly. Laser area was irradiated by a red, 655-nm laser light, 150 mW, 2 J/cm 2 , on days 0 (immediately after surgery), 3, 5, and 7. Dressing and other therapeutic care for both sites were the same. The patients and the person who analyzed the results were blinded. The size of donor site reduced in both groups during the 7-day study period (P < 0.01) and this reduction was significantly greater in the laser group (P = 0.01). In the present study, for the first time, we evaluate the effects of LLLT on the healing process of donor site in burn patients. The results showed that local irradiation of red laser accelerates wound healing process significantly.

  19. Ethanolic extract of roots from Arctium lappa L. accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcer in rats: Involvement of the antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luisa Mota; Allemand, Alexandra; Mendes, Daniel Augusto G B; Dos Santos, Ana Cristina; André, Eunice; de Souza, Lauro Mera; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; Dartora, Nessana; Marques, Maria Consuelo Andrade; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; Werner, Maria Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the curative efficacy of the ethanolic extract (EET) of roots from Arctium lappa (bardana) in healing of chronic gastric ulcers induced by 80% acetic acid in rats and additionally studies the possible mechanisms underlying this action. Oral administration of EET (1, 3, 10 and 30mg/kg) reduced the gastric lesion area in 29.2%, 41.4%, 59.3% and 38.5%, respectively, and at 10mg/kg promoted significant regeneration of the gastric mucosa, which was confirmed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry. EET (10mg/kg) treatment did not increase the gastric mucus content but restored the superoxide dismutase activity, prevented the reduction of glutathione levels, reduced lipid hydroperoxides levels, inhibited the myeloperoxidase activity and reduced the microvascular permeability. In addition, EET reduced the free radical generation and increased scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals in vitro. Furthermore, intraduodenal EET (10 and 30mg/kg) decreased volume and acidity of gastric secretion. Total phenolic compounds were high in EET (Folin-Ciocalteau assay) and the analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that the main compounds present in EET were a serie of hydroxycinnamoylquinic acid isomers. In conclusion, these data reveal that EET promotes regeneration of damaged gastric mucosa, probably through its antisecretory and antioxidative mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Oral aspirin for treating venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Carvalho, Paulo Eduardo; Magolbo, Natiara G; De Aquino, Rebeca F; Weller, Carolina D

    2016-02-18

    published or ongoing trials. There were no language or publication date restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared oral aspirin with placebo or no drug intervention (in the presence or absence of compression therapy) for treating people with venous leg ulcers. Our main outcomes were time to complete ulcer healing, rate of change in the area of the ulcer, proportion of ulcers healed in the trial period, major bleeding, pain, mortality, adverse events and ulcer recurrence (time for recurrence and proportion of recurrence). Two review authors independently selected studies for inclusion, extracted data, assessed the risk of bias of each included trial and assessed overall quality of evidence for the main outcomes in the 'Summary of findings' table. The electronic search located 62 studies. We included two RCTs of oral aspirin (300 mg/daily) given in addition to compression compared with compression and placebo, or compression alone. To date, the impact of aspirin on VLUs has been examined by only two randomised clinical trials, both with a small number of participants. The first RCT was conducted in the United Kingdom (n=20) and reported that daily administration of aspirin (300mg) in addition to compression bandages increased both the rate of healing, and the number of participants healed when compared to placebo in addition to compression bandaging over a four month period. Thirty-eight per cent of the participants given aspirin reported complete healing compared with 0% in the placebo group . Improvement (assessed by reduction in wound size) occurred in 52% of the participants taking aspirin compared with 26% in those taking placebo). The study identified potential benefits of taking aspirin as an adjunct to compression but the sample size was small, and neither the mechanism by which aspirin improved healing nor its effects on recurrence were investigated.In 2012 an RCT in Spain (n=51) compared daily administration of aspirin (300mg) in

  1. Compressed air massage hastens healing of the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Mars, M; Desai, Y; Gregory, M A

    2008-02-01

    The management of diabetic foot ulcers remains a problem. A treatment modality that uses compressed air massage has been developed as a supplement to standard surgical and medical treatment. Compressed air massage is thought to improve local tissue oxygenation around ulcers. The aim of this study was to determine whether the addition of compressed air massage influences the rate of healing of diabetic ulcers. Sixty consecutive patients with diabetes, admitted to one hospital for urgent surgical management of diabetic foot ulcers, were randomized into two groups. Both groups received standard medical and surgical management of their diabetes and ulcer. In addition, one group received 15-20 min of compressed air massage, at 1 bar pressure, daily, for 5 days a week, to the foot and the tissue around the ulcer. Healing time was calculated as the time from admission to the time of re-epithelialization. Fifty-seven patients completed the trial; 28 received compressed air massage. There was no difference in the mean age, Wagner score, ulcer size, pulse status, or peripheral sensation in the two groups. The time to healing in the compressed air massage group was significantly reduced: 58.1 +/- 22.3 days (95% confidence interval: 49.5-66.6) versus 82.7 +/- 30.7 days (95% confidence interval: 70.0-94.3) (P = 0.001). No adverse effects in response to compressed air massage were noted. The addition of compressed air massage to standard medical and surgical management of diabetic ulcers appears to enhance ulcer healing. Further studies with this new treatment modality are warranted.

  2. Gastroprotective and ulcer healing effects of hydroethanolic extract of leaves of Caryocar coriaceum: Mechanisms involved in the gastroprotective activity.

    PubMed

    de Lacerda Neto, Luis Jardelino; Ramos, Andreza Guedes Barbosa; Santos Sales, Valterlucio; de Souza, Severino Denicio Gonçalves; Dos Santos, Antonia Thassya Lucas; de Oliveira, Larissa Rolim; Kerntopf, Marta Regina; de Albuquerque, Thais Rodrigues; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo Jose; Wanderley, Almir Gonçalves; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar

    2017-01-05

    This work aimed to determine the chemical fingerprint of hydroethanolic extract of leaves of Caryocar coriaceum (HELCC) and the gastroprotective activity. The chemical fingerprint of HELCC was analyzed by HPLC-DAD, to quantify total phenols and flavonoids were carried out by Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and aluminum chloride assay, while in vitro antioxidant activity was evaluated by the DPPH method. The methods used to determine pharmacological activity were: gastroprotective screening test in classical models of induced acute and chronic gastric lesions and physical barrier test. Further assays were performed to demonstrate the involvement of NO, prostaglandins, ATP-dependent potassium channels, TRPV, noradrenergic α2 receptors, histamines, and opioids. The DPPH method demonstrated the antioxidant activity of the extract, in vitro, explained by the presence of polyphenols and flavonoids. Oral administration of the extract, previously dissolved in deionized water, at a dose of 100 mg/kg decreased the lesions induced by indomethacin, acidified ethanol, ethanol and acetic acid by 75.0, 72.8, 69.4 and 86.2% respectively. It was demonstrated that opioid receptors, α 2 -adrenergic receptors and primary afferent neurons sensitive to capsaicin were involved in the mechanism of gastric protection, in addition to the contribution of NO and prostaglandins. The results show that extract is a promising candidate for the treatment of gastric ulcers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of mechanical rock properties and fracture healing rate on crustal fluid flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel; de Riese, Tamara

    2016-04-01

    Fluid flow in the Earth's crust is very slow over extended periods of time, during which it occurs within the connected pore space of rocks. If the fluid production rate exceeds a certain threshold, matrix permeability alone is insufficient to drain the fluid volume and fluid pressure builds up, thereby reducing the effective stress supported by the rock matrix. Hydraulic fractures form once the effective pressure exceeds the tensile strength of the rock matrix and act subsequently as highly effective fluid conduits. Once local fluid pressure is sufficiently low again, flow ceases and fractures begin to heal. Since fluid flow is controlled by the alternation of fracture permeability and matrix permeability, the flow rate in the system is strongly discontinuous and occurs in intermittent pulses. Resulting hydraulic fracture networks are largely self-organized: opening and subsequent healing of hydraulic fractures depends on the local fluid pressure and on the time-span between fluid pulses. We simulate this process with a computer model and describe the resulting dynamics statistically. Special interest is given to a) the spatially and temporally discontinuous formation and closure of fractures and fracture networks and b) the total flow rate over time. The computer model consists of a crustal-scale dual-porosity setup. Control parameters are the pressure- and time-dependent fracture healing rate, and the strength and the permeability of the intact rock. Statistical analysis involves determination of the multifractal properties and of the power spectral density of the temporal development of the total drainage rate and hydraulic fractures. References Bons, P. D. (2001). The formation of large quartz veins by rapid ascent of fluids in mobile hydrofractures. Tectonophysics, 336, 1-17. Miller, S. a., & Nur, A. (2000). Permeability as a toggle switch in fluid-controlled crustal processes. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 183(1-2), 133-146. Sachau, T., Bons, P. D

  4. Systematic Review and Meta-analysis: Placebo Rates in Induction and Maintenance Trials of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Guangyong; Parker, Claire E.; Macdonald, John K.; Mosli, Mahmoud H.; Khanna, Reena; Shackelton, Lisa M.; Vandervoort, Margaret K.; AlAmeel, Turki; Al Beshir, Mohammad; AlMadi, Majid; Al-Taweel, Talal; Atkinson, Nathan S. S.; Biswas, Sujata; Chapman, Thomas P.; Dulai, Parambir S.; Glaire, Mark A.; Hoekman, Daniel; Koutsoumpas, Andreas; Minas, Elizabeth; Samaan, Mark A.; Travis, Simon; D’Haens, Geert; Levesque, Barrett G.; Sandborn, William J.; Feagan, Brian G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Minimisation of the placebo responses in randomised controlled trials [RCTs] is essential for efficient evaluation of new interventions. Placebo rates have been high in ulcerative colitis [UC] clinical trials, and factors influencing this are poorly understood. We quantify placebo response and remission rates in UC RCTs and identify trial design factors influencing them. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched from inception through April 2014 for placebo-controlled trials in adult patients with UC of a biological agent, corticosteroid, immunosuppressant, or aminosalicylate. Data were independently doubly extracted. Quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Results: In all, 51 trials [48 induction and 10 maintenance phases] were identified. Placebo response and remission rates were pooled according to random-effects models, and mixed-effects meta-regression models were used to evaluate effects of study-level characteristics on these rates. Pooled estimates of placebo remission and response rates for induction trials were 10% (95% confidence interval [CI] 7-13%) and 33% [95% CI 29-37%], respectively. Corresponding values for maintenance trials were 19% [95% CI 11-30%] and 22% [95% CI 17-28%]. Trials enrolling patients with more active disease confirmed by endoscopy [endoscopy subscore ≥ 2] were associated with lower placebo rates. Conversely, placebo rates increased with increasing trial duration and number of study visits. Conclusions: Objective assessment of greater disease activity at trial entry by endoscopy lowered placebo rates, whereas increasing trial duration and more interactions with healthcare providers increased placebo rates. These findings have important implications for design and conduct of clinical trials. PMID:26746169

  5. Systematic Review and Meta-analysis: Placebo Rates in Induction and Maintenance Trials of Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Jairath, Vipul; Zou, Guangyong; Parker, Claire E; Macdonald, John K; Mosli, Mahmoud H; Khanna, Reena; Shackelton, Lisa M; Vandervoort, Margaret K; AlAmeel, Turki; Al Beshir, Mohammad; AlMadi, Majid; Al-Taweel, Talal; Atkinson, Nathan S S; Biswas, Sujata; Chapman, Thomas P; Dulai, Parambir S; Glaire, Mark A; Hoekman, Daniel; Koutsoumpas, Andreas; Minas, Elizabeth; Samaan, Mark A; Travis, Simon; D'Haens, Geert; Levesque, Barrett G; Sandborn, William J; Feagan, Brian G

    2016-05-01

    Minimisation of the placebo responses in randomised controlled trials [RCTs] is essential for efficient evaluation of new interventions. Placebo rates have been high in ulcerative colitis [UC] clinical trials, and factors influencing this are poorly understood. We quantify placebo response and remission rates in UC RCTs and identify trial design factors influencing them. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched from inception through April 2014 for placebo-controlled trials in adult patients with UC of a biological agent, corticosteroid, immunosuppressant, or aminosalicylate. Data were independently doubly extracted. Quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. In all, 51 trials [48 induction and 10 maintenance phases] were identified. Placebo response and remission rates were pooled according to random-effects models, and mixed-effects meta-regression models were used to evaluate effects of study-level characteristics on these rates. Pooled estimates of placebo remission and response rates for induction trials were 10% (95% confidence interval [CI] 7-13%) and 33% [95% CI 29-37%], respectively. Corresponding values for maintenance trials were 19% [95% CI 11-30%] and 22% [95% CI 17-28%]. Trials enrolling patients with more active disease confirmed by endoscopy [endoscopy subscore ≥ 2] were associated with lower placebo rates. Conversely, placebo rates increased with increasing trial duration and number of study visits. Objective assessment of greater disease activity at trial entry by endoscopy lowered placebo rates, whereas increasing trial duration and more interactions with healthcare providers increased placebo rates. These findings have important implications for design and conduct of clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Appropriateness and long-term discontinuation rate of biological therapies in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Michel H; Bortolotti, Murielle; Vader, John-Paul; Mottet, Christian; Schoepfer, Alain; Gonvers, Jean-Jacques; Burnand, Bernard; Froehlich, Florian; Michetti, Pierre; Pittet, Valérie

    2014-08-01

    Anti-TNFα agents are commonly used for ulcerative colitis (UC) therapy in the event of non-response to conventional strategies or as colon-salvaging therapy. The objectives were to assess the appropriateness of biological therapies for UC patients and to study treatment discontinuation over time, according to appropriateness of treatment, as a measure of outcome. We selected adult ulcerative colitis patients from the Swiss IBD cohort who had been treated with anti-TNFα agents. Appropriateness of the first-line anti-TNFα treatment was assessed using detailed criteria developed during the European Panel on the Appropriateness of Therapy for UC. Treatment discontinuation as an outcome was assessed for categories of appropriateness. Appropriateness of the first-line biological treatment was determined in 186 UC patients. For 64% of them, this treatment was considered appropriate. During follow-up, 37% of all patients discontinued biological treatment, 17% specifically because of failure. Time-to-failure of treatment was significantly different among patients on an appropriate biological treatment compared to those for whom the treatment was considered not appropriate (p=0.0007). Discontinuation rate after 2years was 26% compared to 54% between those two groups. Patients on inappropriate biological treatment were more likely to have severe disease, concomitant steroids and/or immunomodulators. They were also consistently more likely to suffer a failure of efficacy and to stop therapy during follow-up. Appropriateness of first-line anti-TNFα therapy results in a greater likelihood of continuing with the therapy. In situations where biological treatment is uncertain or inappropriate, physicians should consider other options instead of prescribing anti-TNFα agents. Copyright © 2014 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cost-effective non-surgical treatment of chronic pressure ulcers in the community.

    PubMed

    Dale, Megan; Cox-Martin, Bill; Shaw, Paula; Carolan-Rees, Grace

    2014-03-01

    The Salisbury Pressure Ulcer Outreach Service successfully treats patients with chronic pressure ulcers that have not healed during routine community treatment. These patients have grade 4 pressure ulcers, involving extensive destruction, or damage to muscle and bone. A combination of scientific, seating and tissue viability expertise with a holistic approach results in non-surgical healing for 70% of patients. For those who still require surgery, outcomes are more successful with this approach, resulting in low recurrence rates. Prior to creation of the outreach service, patients were referred directly for surgical closure, resulting in high recurrence levels and long waiting lists. The authors compared costs of the Pressure Ulcer Outreach Service with the previous system of surgical closure. The model base case found that the Pressure Ulcer Outreach Service saved £8588 per patient, and that cost savings could be even greater if the outreach service was extended into preventative work.

  8. Influence of aspirin therapy in the ulcer associated with chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    del Río Solá, Ma Lourdes; Antonio, Jose; Fajardo, González; Vaquero Puerta, Carlos

    2012-07-01

    To determine the effect of aspirin on ulcer healing rate in patients with chronic venous insufficiency, and to establish prognostic factors that influence ulcer evolution. Between 2001 and 2005, 78 patients with ulcerated lesions of diameter >2 cm and associated with chronic venous insufficiency were evaluated in our hospital. Of these, 51 patients (22 men, 29 women) with mean age of 60 years (range: 36-86) were included in a prospective randomized trial with a parallel control group. The treatment group received 300 mg of aspirin and the control group received no drug treatment; in both groups, healing was associated with standard compression therapy. During follow-up, held weekly in a blinded fashion, there was ulcer healing as well as cases of recurrence. Results were analyzed by intention-to-treat approach. Cure rate was estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and the influence of prognostic factors was analyzed by applying the Cox proportional hazards model. In the presence of gradual compression therapy, healing occurred more rapidly in patients receiving aspirin versus the control subjects (12 weeks in the treated group vs. 22 weeks in the control group), with a 46% reduction in healing time. The main prognostic factor was estimated initial area of injury (P = 0.032). Age, sex, systemic therapy, and infection showed little relevance to evolution. The administration of aspirin daily dose of 300 mg shortens the healing time of ulcerated lesions in the chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). The main prognostic factor for healing of venous ulcerated lesions is the initial surface area of the ulcer. Copyright © 2012 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  10. Selective plantar fascia release for nonhealing diabetic plantar ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Young; Hwang, Seungkeun; Lee, Yoonjung

    2012-07-18

    Achilles tendon lengthening can decrease plantar pressures, leading to resolution of forefoot ulceration in patients with diabetes mellitus. However, this procedure has been reported to have a complication rate of 10% to 30% and can require a long period of postoperative immobilization. We have developed a new technique, selective plantar fascia release, as an alternative to Achilles tendon lengthening for managing these forefoot ulcers. We evaluated sixty patients with diabetes for a mean of 23.5 months after selective plantar fascia release for the treatment of nonhealing diabetic neuropathic ulcers in the forefoot. Preoperative and postoperative dorsiflexion range of motion of the affected metatarsophalangeal joint and wound-healing data were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the procedure and to determine the relationship between plantar fascia release and ulcer healing. Complications were recorded. Thirty-six (56%) of the ulcers healed within six weeks, including twenty-nine (60%) of the plantar toe ulcers and seven (44%) of the metatarsophalangeal joint ulcers. The mean range of motion of the affected metatarsophalangeal joint increased from 15.3° ± 7.8° to 30.6° ± 14.1° postoperatively (p < 0.05). All patients in whom the preoperative dorsiflexion of the affected metatarsophalangeal joint was between 5° and 30° and in whom the range of motion of that joint increased by ≥13° after the procedure experienced healing of the ulcer. No ulcer recurrence in the original location was identified during follow-up. No patients experienced any complications associated with the selective plantar fascia release. Our results suggest that selective plantar fascia release can lead to healing of neuropathic plantar forefoot ulcers in diabetic patients. Ulcers in patients in whom the preoperative dorsiflexion angle of the affected metatarsophalangeal joint is between 5° and 30° and in whom the increase in range of motion is ≥13° postoperatively have the

  11. Magnesium Supplementation and the Effects on Wound Healing and Metabolic Status in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcer: a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, Reza; Pidar, Farangis; Momen-Heravi, Mansooreh; Bahmani, Fereshteh; Akbari, Hossein; Asemi, Zatollah

    2018-02-01

    Hypomagnesemia is associated with the development of neuropathy and abnormal platelet activity, both of which are risk factors for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of magnesium administration on wound healing and metabolic status in subjects with DFU. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed among 70 subjects with grade 3 DFU. Subjects were randomly divided into two groups (35 subjects each group) to receive either 250 mg magnesium oxide supplements or placebo daily for 12 weeks. Pre- and post-intervention wound depth and appearance were scored in accordance with the "Wagner-Meggitt's" wound assessment tool. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after the 12-week intervention to assess related markers. After the 12-week treatment, compared with the placebo, magnesium supplementation resulted in a significant increase in serum magnesium (+0.3 ± 0.3 vs. -0.1 ± 0.2 mg/dL, P < 0.001) and significant reductions in ulcer length (-1.8 ± 2.0 vs. -0.9 ± 1.1 cm, P = 0.01), width (-1.6 ± 2.0 vs. -0.8 ± 0.9 cm, P = 0.02), and depth (-0.8 ± 0.8 vs. -0.3 ± 0.5 cm, P = 0.003). In addition, significant reductions in fasting plasma glucose (-45.4 ± 82.6 vs. -10.6 ± 53.7 mg/dL, P = 0.04), serum insulin values (-2.4 ± 5.6 vs. +1.5 ± 9.6 μIU/mL, P = 0.04), and HbA1c (-0.7 ± 1.5 vs. -0.1 ± 0.4%, P = 0.03) and a significant rise in the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (+0.01 ± 0.01 vs. -0.004 ± 0.02, P = 0.01) were seen following supplementation of magnesium compared with the placebo. Additionally, compared with the placebo, taking magnesium resulted in significant decrease in serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (-19.6 ± 32.5 vs. -4.8 ± 11.2 mg/L, P = 0.01) and significant increase in plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC) concentrations (+6.4 ± 65.2 vs. -129.9 ± 208.3 mmol/L, P < 0

  12. A Case-Control Study of Esomeprazole Plus Rebamipide vs. Omeprazole Plus Rebamipide on Post-ESD Gastric Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Bunno, Maki; Gouda, Kyosuke; Yamahara, Kunihiro; Kawaguchi, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is useful for treating gastric tumors. Several trials have shown the efficacy of 4 or 8 weeks of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) administration for post-ESD ulcers. However, if the size of the post-ESD ulcer is larger than predicted, PPI administration alone might not be sufficient for the ulcer to heal within 4 weeks. There is no report about the efficacy of post-ESD gastric ulcers by esomeprazole. We examined retrospectively the efficacy of a combination therapy of esomeprazole plus rebamipide, a mucosal-protective antiulcer drug, on the acceleration of post-ESD ulcer healing comparing with omeprazole plus rebamipide. We reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent ESD for gastric neoplasia. We conducted a case-control study to compare the healing rates within 4 weeks effected by esomeprazole plus rebamipide (group E) and omeprazole plus rebamipide (group O). The sizes of the artificial ulcers were divided into normal-sized or large-sized. The baseline characteristics did not differ significantly between the two groups except age and sex. Stage S1 disease was observed in 27.6% and 38.7% of patients after 4 weeks of treatment in the group E and O, respectively. In large-sized artificial ulcers, the healing rate of stage S1 in group E is significantly higher than that in group O in 4 weeks.(25% VS 0%:P = 0.02). The safety and efficacy profiles of esomeprazole plus rebamipide and omeprazole and rebamipide are similar for the treatment of ESD-induced ulcers. In large-sized ulcers, esomeprazole plus rebamipide promotes ulcer healing.

  13. Pentoxifylline for treating venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Jull, A; Arroll, B; Parag, V; Waters, J

    2007-07-18

    absence of compression appears to be more effective than placebo or no treatment (RR 2.25, 95% CI 1.49 to 3.39). A comparison between pentoxifylline and defibrotide found no statistically significant difference in healing rates. More adverse effects were reported in people receiving pentoxifylline (RR 1.56, 95% CI 1.10 to 2.22). Nearly three-quarters (72%) of the reported adverse effects were gastrointestinal. Pentoxifylline is an effective adjunct to compression bandaging for treating venous ulcers and may be effective in the absence of compression. The majority of adverse effects were gastrointestinal disturbances.

  14. Effects of Topic Simvastatin for the Treatment of Chronic Vascular Cutaneous Ulcers: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Raposio, Edoardo; Libondi, Guido; Bertozzi, Nicolò; Grignaffini, Eugenio; Grieco, Michele P

    2015-12-01

    Recent research suggests that statins might be useful in the process of wound healing, playing a positive immune-modulatory role, improving microvascular function and reducing oxidative stress. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy of topic application of Simvastatin-based cream in the treatment of chronic vascular cutaneous ulcers, comparing this type of treatment to a collagen-based dressing, proven to be effective for ulcer treatment. A total of 20 ulcers were studied in 2 Groups of randomly-chosen patients for a period of one month. In the first Group a 0.5% Simvastatin-based cream was topically administered, while the second Group (control) was treated with an absorbable type I bovine collagen-based medication. Each week, wound healing progress was observed in both Groups, and the ulcers photographed. Wound healing rate was calculated by considering the absolute change in area and by the formula "healing ratio (%) = [(Area 0 - Area t4 )/Area 0 ] × 100," both sets of data being related to the days comprised in the study in order to calculate healing rate per day. Statistical analysis was performed by Student t test. Study endpoint equaling the time-course changes of ulcer areas. At the end of the study, when considering absolute change in area, the experimental Group appeared to heal better and faster than the control Group although differences between the Groups were not statistically significant. Conversely, rates of wound healing in the experimental and control Groups were 46.88% and 64% respectively, revealing statistically significant differences. ( P < 0.05). In conclusion, topic application of a simvastatin-based cream proved to be well- tolerated but not effective in the management of vascular leg ulcers in a 4 week-period.

  15. Low colectomy rates in ulcerative colitis in an unselected European cohort followed for 10 years.

    PubMed

    Hoie, Ole; Wolters, Frank L; Riis, Lene; Bernklev, Tomm; Aamodt, Geir; Clofent, Juan; Tsianos, Epaminondas; Beltrami, Marina; Odes, Selwyn; Munkholm, Pia; Vatn, Morten; Stockbrügger, Reinhold W; Moum, Bjorn

    2007-02-01

    The colectomy rate in ulcerative colitis (UC) is related to morbidity and to treatment decisions made during disease course. The aims of this study were to determine the colectomy risk in UC in the first decade after diagnosis and to identify factors that may influence the choice of surgical treatment. In 1991-1993, 781 UC patients from 9 centers located in 7 countries in northern and southern Europe and in Israel were included in a prospective inception cohort study. After 10 years of follow-up, 617 patients had complete medical records, 73 had died, and 91 had been lost to follow-up. There were no significant differences in age, sex, or disease extent at diagnosis between patients followed for 10 years and those lost to follow-up. The 10-year cumulative risk of colectomy was 8.7%: 10.4% in the northern and 3.9% in the southern European centers (P < .001). Colectomy was more likely in extensive colitis than in proctitis, with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 4.1 (95% CI: 2.0-8.4). Compared with the southern centers, the adjusted HR was 2.7 (95% CI: 1.3-5.6) for The Netherlands and Norway together and 8.2 (95% CI: 3.6-18.6) for Denmark. Age at diagnosis, sex, and smoking status at diagnosis had no statistically significant influence on colectomy rates. The colectomy rate was found to be lower than that in previous publications, but there was a difference between northern and southern Europe. Colectomy was associated with extensive colitis, but the geographic variations could not be explained.

  16. Evaluation of the Present-on-Admission Indicator among Hospitalized Fee-for-Service Medicare Patients with a Pressure Ulcer Diagnosis: Coding Patterns and Impact on Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcer Rates.

    PubMed

    Squitieri, Lee; Waxman, Daniel A; Mangione, Carol M; Saliba, Debra; Ko, Clifford Y; Needleman, Jack; Ganz, David A

    2018-01-25

    To evaluate national present-on-admission (POA) reporting for hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) and examine the impact of quality measure exclusion criteria on HAPU rates. Medicare inpatient, outpatient, and nursing facility data as well as independent provider claims (2010-2011). Retrospective cross-sectional study. We evaluated acute inpatient hospital admissions among Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries in 2011. Admissions were categorized as follows: (1) no pressure ulcer diagnosis, (2) new pressure ulcer diagnosis, and (3) previously documented pressure ulcer diagnosis. HAPU rates were calculated by varying patient exclusion criteria. Among admissions with a pressure ulcer diagnosis, we observed a large discrepancy in the proportion of admissions with a HAPU based on hospital-reported POA data (5.2 percent) and the proportion with a new pressure ulcer diagnosis based on patient history in billing claims (49.7 percent). Applying quality measure exclusion criteria resulted in removal of 91.2 percent of admissions with a pressure injury diagnosis from HAPU rate calculations. As payers and health care organizations expand the use of quality measures, it is important to consider how the measures are implemented, coding revisions to improve measure validity, and the impact of patient exclusion criteria on provider performance evaluation. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. Gastroduodenal ulceration in foals.

    PubMed

    Becht, J L; Byars, T D

    1986-07-01

    Gastroduodenal ulceration is becoming recognised as an important disease in foals during the first few months of life. Aetiopathogenesis is presumed to be similar to peptic disease in humans associated with back diffusion of hydrogen ions into the mucosa. Many factors have been incriminated as predisposing foals to ulceration but few have been proven. To date, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents has been the only documented cause of gastroduodenal ulceration in foals. The clustering of affected foals on certain farms suggests an infectious aetiology but attempts to identify a causative organism have been unsuccessful. Four clinical syndromes defined for foals with gastroduodenal ulceration include: silent ulcers, which occur most often in the non-glandular stomach along the margo plicatus and are identified as incidental findings at necropsy; active ulcers which are often manifested by abdominal pain, excessive salivation and bruxism; perforating ulcers which usually result in a severe, diffuse peritonitis; and pyloric or duodenal obstruction from a healing ulcer. General approaches to therapy of a foal with active ulceration consist of reduction of gastric acidity and enhancement of mucosal protection. Antacids and type 2 histamine receptor antagonists are used most often to neutralise or decrease acid secretion, respectively. Sucralfate, a locally active sulphated sucrose preparation, is commonly used as a cytoprotective agent. The efficacy and safety of many products used have not been evaluated adequately in foals. Perforating ulcers are usually associated with death or humane destruction of the foal because of fulminating peritonitis. Surgical intervention and bypass procedures are indicated in foals that develop pyloric or duodenal obstructions from healing ulcers.

  18. Evaluation of removable and irremovable cast walkers in the healing of diabetic foot wounds: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David G; Lavery, Lawrence A; Wu, Stephanie; Boulton, Andrew J M

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a removable cast walker (RCW) and an "instant" total contact cast (iTCC) in healing neuropathic diabetic foot ulcerations. We randomly assigned 50 patients with University of Texas grade 1A diabetic foot ulcerations into one of two off-loading treatment groups: an RCW or the same RCW wrapped with a cohesive bandage (iTCC) so patients could not easily remove the device. Subjects were evaluated weekly for 12 weeks or until wound healing. An intent-to-treat analysis showed that a higher proportion of patients had ulcers that were healed at 12 weeks in the iTCC group than in the RCW group (82.6 vs. 51.9%, P = 0.02, odds ratio 1.8 [95% CI 1.1-2.9]). Of the patients with ulcers that healed, those treated with an iTCC healed significantly sooner (41.6 +/- 18.7 vs. 58.0 +/- 15.2 days, P = 0.02). Modification of a standard RCW to increase patient adherence to pressure off-loading may increase both the proportion of ulcers that heal and the rate of healing of diabetic neuropathic wounds.

  19. Comparison of low-strength compression stockings with bandages for the treatment of recalcitrant venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Brizzio, Eugenio; Amsler, Felix; Lun, Bertrand; Blättler, Werner

    2010-02-01

    To compare the proportion and rate of healing, pain, and quality of life of low-strength medical compression stockings (MCS) with traditional bandages applied for the treatment of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers. A single-center, randomized, open-label study was performed with consecutive patients. Sigvaris prototype MCS providing 15 mm Hg-25 mm Hg at the ankle were compared with multi-layer short-stretch bandages. In both groups, pads were placed above incompetent perforating veins in the ulcer area. The initial static pressure between the dressing-covered ulcer and the pad was 29 mm Hg and 49 mm Hg with MCS and bandages, respectively. Dynamic pressure measurements showed no difference. Compression was maintained day and night and changed every week. The primary endpoint was healing within 90 days. Secondary endpoints were healing within 180 days, time to healing, pain (weekly Likert scales), and monthly quality of life (ChronIc Venous Insufficiency Quality of Life [CIVIQ] questionnaire). Of 74 patients screened, 60 fulfilled the selection criteria and 55 completed the study; 28 in the MCS and 27 in the bandage group. Ulcers were recurrent (48%), long lasting (mean, 27 months), and large (mean, 13 cm2). All but one patient had deep venous reflux and/or incompetent perforating veins in addition to trunk varices. Characteristics of patients and ulcers were evenly distributed (exception: more edema in the MCS group; P = .019). Healing within 90 days was observed in 36% with MCS and in 48% with bandages (P = .350). Healing within 180 days was documented in 50% with MCS and in 67% with bandages (P = .210). Time to healing was identical. Pain scored 44 and 46 initially (on a scale in which 100 referred to maximum and 0 to no pain) and decreased within the first week to 20 and 28 in the MCS and bandage groups, respectively (P < .001 vs .010). Quality of life showed no difference between the treatment groups. In both groups, pain at 90 days had decreased by half

  20. Wound healing outcomes: Using big data and a modified intent-to-treat method as a metric for reporting healing rates.

    PubMed

    Ennis, William J; Hoffman, Rachel A; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Kirsner, Robert S; Gordon, Hanna M

    2017-08-01

    Chronic wounds are increasing in prevalence and are a costly problem for the US healthcare system and throughout the world. Typically outcomes studies in the field of wound care have been limited to small clinical trials, comparative effectiveness cohorts and attempts to extrapolate results from claims databases. As a result, outcomes in real world clinical settings may differ from these published studies. This study presents a modified intent-to-treat framework for measuring wound outcomes and measures the consistency of population based outcomes across two distinct settings. In this retrospective observational analysis, we describe the largest to date, cohort of patient wound outcomes derived from 626 hospital based clinics and one academic tertiary care clinic. We present the results of a modified intent-to-treat analysis of wound outcomes as well as demographic and descriptive data. After applying the exclusion criteria, the final analytic sample includes the outcomes from 667,291 wounds in the national sample and 1,788 wounds in the academic sample. We found a consistent modified intent to treat healing rate of 74.6% from the 626 clinics and 77.6% in the academic center. We recommend that a standard modified intent to treat healing rate be used to report wound outcomes to allow for consistency and comparability in measurement across providers, payers and healthcare systems. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  1. Grafting with Cryopreserved Amniotic Membrane versus Conservative Wound Care in Treatment of Pressure Ulcers: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Mehdi; Azarpira, Negar; Mohammad Karimi, Vahid; Mossayebi, Hamid; Esfandiari, Elaheh

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the healing process of pressure ulcers treated with cryopreserved human amniotic membrane allograft and routine pressure ulcer care in our hospital. Methods: From January 2012 to December 2013, in a prospective randomized clinical trial (IRCT201612041335N2), 24 patients with second and third stage of pressure ulcers were enrolled in this study. All patients needed split-thickness skin grafts for pressure ulcer-wound coverage. Selected patients had symmetric ulcers on both upper and lower extremities. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: amnion and control. In the amnion group, the ulcer was covered with cryopreserved amniotic membrane and in the control group it was treated with local Dilantin powder application. The duration and success rate of complete healing was compared between the two groups. Results: The study group was composed of 24 pressure ulcers in 24 patients (19 males and 5 females) with a mean age of 44±12.70 years. The demographic characteristics, ulcer area, and underlying diseases were similar in both groups. The early sign of response, such as decrease in wound discharge, was detected 12-14 days after biological dressing. Complete pressure ulcer healing occurred only in the amnion group (p< 0.001). Partial healing was significantly higher in the amnion group (p< 0.03). Healing time in this group was faster than that the control group (20 days versus 54 days). No major complication was recorded with amniotic membrane dressing Conclusion: Cryopreserved amniotic membrane is an effective biologic dressing that promotes re-epithelialization in pressure ulcers PMID:29177171

  2. Ulcer dressings and management.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Geoff

    2014-09-01

    Chronic leg ulcers caused by venous disease, arterial disease or a combination of both need to be clearly identified before treatment can be commenced. Their management will depend on the diagnosis, combining direct management of the ulcer as well as management of patient factors. Other chronic wounds commonly observed in practice include pressure wounds, skin tears, atypical leg ulcers. This paper will outline a simple way to manage people with chronic ulcers. Conclusion The prevalence of chronic wounds is expected to rise given that people are living longer and that the incidence of diabetes is increasing. There is a need is to clearly identify the underlying cause of any wound, including factors that may delay healing, and to treat appropriately. Treatment should address the wound environment, tissue base, presence of bacteria and the level of slough. If there is no improvement in wound healing after 4 weeks then seek help from a wound specialist. The prevalence of chronic ulcers in Australia has been estimated at 2-5%. Comprehensive assessment of the ulcer, the region and the whole person is an important first step in treatment. The aim of management is to promote healing and minimise the impact on the patient.

  3. The molecular biology in wound healing & non-healing wound.

    PubMed

    Qing, Chun

    2017-08-01

    The development of molecular biology and other new biotechnologies helps us to recognize the wound healing and non-healing wound of skin in the past 30 years. This review mainly focuses on the molecular biology of many cytokines (including growth factors) and other molecular factors such as extracellular matrix (ECM) on wound healing. The molecular biology in cell movement such as epidermal cells in wound healing was also discussed. Moreover many common chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers, leg ulcers, diabetic foot wounds, venous stasis ulcers, etc. usually deteriorate into non-healing wounds. Therefore the molecular biology such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and other molecular factors in diabetes non-healing wounds were also reviewed. Copyright © 2017 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Does topical wound oxygen (TWO2) offer an improved outcome over conventional compression dressings (CCD) in the management of refractory venous ulcers (RVU)? A parallel observational comparative study.

    PubMed

    Tawfick, W; Sultan, S

    2009-07-01

    Topical wound oxygen (TWO(2)) may help wound healing in the management of refractory venous ulcers (RVU). The aim of this study was to measure the effect of TWO(2) on wound healing using the primary end-point of the proportion of ulcers healed at 12 weeks. Secondary end-points were time to full healing, percentage of reduction in ulcer size, pain reduction, recurrence rates and Quality-Adjusted Time Spent Without Symptoms of disease and Toxicity of Treatment (Q-TWiST). A parallel observational comparative study. Patients with CEAP C(6,s) RVU, assessed by duplex ultrasonography, were managed with either TWO(2) (n=46) or conventional compression dressings (CCD) (n=37) for 12 weeks or till full healing. Patients were followed up at 3 monthly intervals. At 12 weeks, 80% of TWO(2) managed ulcers were completely healed, compared to 35% of CCD ulcers (p<0.0001). Median time to full healing was 45 days in TWO(2) patients and 182 days in CCD patients (p<0.0001). The pain score threshold in TWO(2) managed patients improved from 8 to 3 by 13 days. After 12-month follow-up, 5 of the 13 healed CCD ulcers showed signs of recurrence compared to none of the 37 TWO(2) healed ulcers. TWO(2) patients experienced a significantly improved Q-TWiST. TWO(2) reduces recurrence rates, alleviates pain and improves the Q-TWiST. We believe it is a valuable tool in the armamentarium of management of RVU.

  5. Synergistic action of protease-modulating matrix and autologous growth factors in healing of diabetic foot ulcers. A prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Kakagia, Despoina D; Kazakos, Konstantinos J; Xarchas, Konstantinos C; Karanikas, Michael; Georgiadis, George S; Tripsiannis, Gregory; Manolas, Constantinos

    2007-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that addition of a protease-modulating matrix enhances the efficacy of autologous growth factors in diabetic ulcers. Fifty-one patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers were managed as outpatients at the Democritus University Hospital of Alexandroupolis and followed up for 8 weeks. All target ulcers were > or = 2.5 cm in any one dimension and had been previously treated only with moist gauze. Patients were randomly allocated in three groups of 17 patients each: Group A was treated only with the oxidized regenerated cellulose/collagen biomaterial (Promogran, Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ), Group B was treated only with autologous growth factors delivered by Gravitational Platelet Separation System (GPS, Biomet), and Group C was managed by a combination of both. All ulcers were digitally photographed at initiation of the study and then at change of dressings once weekly. Computerized planimetry (Texas Health Science Center ImageTool, Version 3.0) was used to assess ulcer dimensions that were analyzed for homogeneity and significance using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences, Version 13.0. Post hoc analysis revealed that there was significantly greater reduction of all three dimensions of the ulcers in Group C compared to Groups A and B (all P<.001). Although reduction of ulcer dimensions was greater in Group A than in Group B, these differences did not reach statistical significance. It is concluded that protease-modulating dressings act synergistically with autologous growth factors and enhance their efficacy in diabetic foot ulcers.

  6. Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ulcerative colitis care at Mayo Clinic Symptoms Ulcerative colitis symptoms can vary, depending on the severity of inflammation ... children, failure to grow Most people with ulcerative colitis have mild to moderate symptoms. The course of ulcerative colitis may vary, with ...

  7. Leg ulcer treatment outcomes with new ovine collagen extracellular matrix dressing: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Gregory A; Gass, Kimberly

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the rate of closure observed in venous leg ulcers during treatment with ovine collagen extracellular matrix dressings and compression. Fourteen patients with 23 wounds were retrospectively evaluated with respect to healing rates, time to closure, and weekly facility charge fees.

  8. Nurse clinic versus home delivery of evidence-based community leg ulcer care: A randomized health services trial

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Margaret B; Graham, Ian D; Lorimer, Karen; VandenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Buchanan, Maureen; Wells, Phil S; Brandys, Tim; Pierscianowski, Tadeusz

    2008-01-01

    Background International studies report that nurse clinics improve healing rates for the leg ulcer population. However, these studies did not necessarily deliver similar standards of care based on evidence in the treatment venues (home and clinic). A rigorous evaluation of home versus clinic care is required to determine healing rates with equivalent care and establish the acceptability of clinic-delivered care. Methods Health Services RCT was conducted where mobile individuals were allocated to either home or nurse clinic for leg ulcer management. In both arms, care was delivered by specially trained nurses, following an evidence protocol. Primary outcome: 3-month healing rates. Secondary outcomes: durability of healing (recurrence), time free of ulcers, HRQL, satisfaction, resource use. Data were collected at base-line, every 3 months until healing occurred, with 1 year follow-up. Analysis was by intention to treat. Results 126 participants, 65 randomized to receive care in their homes, 61 to nurse-run clinics. No differences found between groups at baseline on socio-demographic, HRQL or clinical characteristics. mean age 69 years, 68% females, 84% English-speaking, half with previous episode of ulceration, 60% ulcers at inclusion < 5 cm2 for < 6 months. No differences in 3-month healing rates: clinic 58.3% compared to home care at 56.7% (p = 0.5) or in secondary outcomes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that organization of care not the setting where care is delivered influences healing rates. Key factors are a system that supports delivery of evidence-based recommendations with care being provided by a trained nursing team resulting in equivalent healing rates, HRQL whether care is delivered in the home or in a community nurse-led clinic. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol Registration System: NCT00656383 PMID:19036149

  9. Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers.Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series.PRESSURE ULCER PREVENTION: an evidence based analysisThe cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation)MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC PRESSURE ULCERS: an evidence-based analysis The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions?Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by as much as 400%, to increase the frequency

  10. A novel dimeric thymosin beta 4 with enhanced activities accelerates the rate of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tian-Jiao; Wang, Qi; Ma, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Xiao-Chang; Zhang, Cun; Hao, Qiang; Li, Wei-Na; Zhang, Ying-Qi; Li, Meng

    2013-01-01

    Objective Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) is a peptide with 43 amino acids that is critical for repair and remodeling tissues on the skin, eye, heart, and neural system following injury. To fully realize its utility as a treatment for disease caused by injury, the authors constructed a cost-effective novel Tβ4 dimer and demonstrated that it was better able to accelerate tissue repair than native Tβ4. Methods A prokaryotic vector harboring two complete Tβ4 genes with a short linker was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. A pilot-scale fermentation (10 L) was performed to produce engineered bacteria and the Tβ4 dimer was purified by one-step hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The activities of the Tβ4 dimer to promote endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and sprouting were assessed by tetramethylbenzidine (methylthiazol tetrazolium), trans-well, scratch, and tube formation assays. The ability to accelerate dermal healing was assessed on rats. Results After fermentation, the Tβ4 dimer accounted for about 30% of all the bacteria proteins. The purity of the Tβ4 dimer reached 98% after hydrophobic interaction chromatography purification. An average of 562.4 mg/L Tβ4 dimer was acquired using a 10 L fermenter. In each assay, the dimeric Tβ4 exhibited enhanced activities compared with native Tβ4. Notably, the ability of the dimeric Tβ4 to promote cell migration was almost two times higher than that of Tβ4. The rate of dermal healing in the dimeric Tβ4-treated rats was approximately 1 day faster than with native Tβ4-treated rats. Conclusion The dimeric Tβ4 exhibited enhanced activity on wound healing than native Tβ4, and the purification process was simple and cost-effective. This data could be of significant benefit for the high pain and morbidity associated with chronic wounds disease. A better strategy to develop Tβ4 as a treatment for other diseases caused by injuries such as heart attack, neurotrophic keratitis, and multiple sclerosis was

  11. Nicorandil, Gastrointestinal Adverse Drug Reactions and Ulcerations: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Umberto; Deosaran, Jordanna; Leslie, Stephen J; Rushworth, Gordon F; Stewart, Derek; Ford, Ian; Watson, Angus J M

    2016-03-01

    Nicorandil is a popular anti-anginal drug in Europe and Japan. Apart from some common adverse drug reactions (ADR), its safety is satisfactory. Several reports have suggested a link between nicorandil, gastrointestinal (GI) ulceration and fistulas. The review aims to critically appraise, synthesize and present the available evidence of all known GI ADR per anatomical location. The study complied with the PRISMA statement. Literature and pharmacovigilance databases were used to provide rate and/or calculate parameters (median age, median dose, history of symptoms, length of therapy and healing time after withdrawal of the drug). Differences in distribution of quantitative variables were analyzed via Mann-Whitney test. Correlation between quantitative variables was assessed with a Spearman's correlation coefficient. A p value <0.05 was significant. Oral ulcerations occur in 0.2% of the subjects, anal ulcerations are present between 0.07% and 0.37% of patients. Oral and distal GI involvements are the most common ADR (28-29% and 27-31% of all GI ADR, respectively). The hepatobiliary system, the pancreas and salivary glands are not affected by nicorandil exposure. The time to develop oral ulcerations is 74 weeks among people on <30 mg/day compared to only 7.5 weeks in individuals on higher regimens (p = 0.47). There is a significant correlation between dose and ulcer healing time (Spearman's 0.525, p < 0.001). Ulcerative disease is a very commonly reported GI ADR. A delayed ulcerative tendency supports the hypothesis of an ulcerogenic metabolite. Nicorandil seems to act as a cause of the ulcerations, but appears to also work in synergy with other promoting factors. Whether the action of the metabolites relies on a specific mechanism or a simple chemical ulceration is still to be established.

  12. A Comparative Clinical Study on Five Types of Compression Therapy in Patients with Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Dolibog, Pawel; Franek, Andrzej; Taradaj, Jakub; Dolibog, Patrycja; Blaszczak, Edward; Polak, Anna; Brzezinska-Wcislo, Ligia; Hrycek, Antoni; Urbanek, Tomasz; Ziaja, Jacek; Kolanko, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare five types of compression therapy in venous leg ulcers (intermittent pneumatic vs. stockings vs. multi layer vs. two layer short stretch bandages vs. Unna boots). Primary study endpoints were analysis of changes of the total ulcer surface area, volume and linear dimensions inside observed groups. The secondary end points were comparisons between all groups the number of completely healed wounds (ulcer healing rates), Gilman index and percentage change of ulcer surface area. In total, 147 patients with unilateral venous leg ulcers were included to this study. Participants were randomly allocated to the groups: A, B, C, D and E. After two months the healing rate was the highest in group A (intermittent pneumatic compression) - 57.14%, 16/28 patients, B (ulcer stocking system) - 56.66%, 17/30 patients and C (multi layer short stretch bandage) - 58.62%, 17/29 patients. Significantly much worse rate found in group D (two layer short stretch bandages) - only 16.66%, 5/30 patients and E (Unna boots) - 20%, 6/30 patients. The analysis of changes of the percentage of Gilman index and wound total surface area confirmed that intermittent pneumatic compression, stockings and multi layer bandages are the most efficient. The two layer short - stretch bandages and Unna boots appeared again much less effective. PMID:24396284

  13. Eradication therapy for peptic ulcer disease in Helicobacter pylori-positive people.

    PubMed

    Ford, Alexander C; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Delaney, Brendan; Forman, David; Moayyedi, Paul

    2016-04-19

    Peptic ulcer disease is the cause of dyspepsia in about 10% of people. Ninety-five percent of duodenal and 70% of gastric ulcers are associated with Helicobacter pylori. Eradication of H. pylori reduces the relapse rate of ulcers but the magnitude of this effect is uncertain. This is an update of Ford AC, Delaney B, Forman D, Moayyedi P. Eradication therapy for peptic ulcer disease in Helicobacter pylori-positive patients. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2006, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD003840. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003840.pub4. To assess the proportion of peptic ulcers healed and the proportion of participants who remained free from relapse with eradication therapy against placebo or other pharmacological therapies in H. pylori-positive people.To assess the proportion of participants that achieved complete relief of symptoms and improvement in quality of life scores.To compare the incidence of adverse effects/drop-outs (total number for each drug) associated with the different treatments.To assess the proportion of participants in whom successful eradication was achieved. In this update, we identified trials by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to March 2016) and Ovid EMBASE (1980 to March 2016). To identify further relevant trials, we handsearched reference lists from trials selected by electronic searching, and published abstracts from conference proceedings from the United European Gastroenterology Week (published in Gut) and Digestive Disease Week (published in Gastroenterology). The search was last updated in March 2016. We contacted members of Cochrane Upper GI and Pancreatic Diseases, and experts in the field and asked them to provide details of outstanding clinical trials and any relevant unpublished materials. We analysed randomised controlled trials of short- and long-term treatment of peptic ulcer disease in H. pylori-positive adults. Participants received at least one week of H. pylori

  14. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal-Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S; Cramer, Emily

    2016-08-01

    Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal-noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, and medical-surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta-binomial models, we estimated between-unit variability (signal) and within-unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal-noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between-unit variability to the total of between- and within-unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal-noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal-noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal‐Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital‐acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal‐noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step‐down, medical, surgical, and medical‐surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta‐binomial models, we estimated between‐unit variability (signal) and within‐unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal‐noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between‐unit variability to the total of between‐ and within‐unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal‐noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal‐noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27223598

  16. Self-Care-Based Treatment Using Ordinary Elastic Bandages for Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Suehiro, Kotaro; Morikage, Noriyasu; Harada, Takasuke; Samura, Makoto; Takeuchi, Yuriko; Mizoguchi, Takahiro; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to study venous leg ulcer (VLU) healing and recurrence rates of VLU using a self-care-based treatment strategy. Methods: The study included 36 patients (43 legs) who visited our clinic between April 2009 and June 2015 because of non-healing VLUs and who had been treated by us for more than a year (until June 2016). Patients or their caregivers were first provided instructions for performing the “no-intentional-stretch” bandaging technique using ordinary elastic bandages. Wounds were cleansed with tepid water daily, and bandages were re-applied by patients or their caregivers; this was continued until VLUs were healed. Compression was discontinued after healing, but was restarted if persistent swelling and/or dermatitis was noticed on their legs. Results: The median ulcer size was 6.5 cm2 (range, 1–105 cm2). The median number of clinic visits until healing was six (range, 3–35). The 6- and 12-month healing rates were 67% and 86%, respectively. Twenty (44%) legs required compression therapy after VLU healing. The cumulative recurrence-free rate at 60 months was 86%. Conclusion: Reasonable healing and recurrence rates were achieved by applying a self-care-based VLU treatment strategy. PMID:29147163

  17. Inhibiting renin angiotensin system in rate limiting step by aliskiren as a new approach for preventing indomethacin induced gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Halici, Zekai; Polat, Beyzagul; Cadirci, Elif; Topcu, Atilla; Karakus, Emre; Kose, Duygu; Albayrak, Abdulmecit; Bayir, Yasin

    2016-10-25

    Previously blocking the renin angiotensin system (RAAS) has been effective in the prevention of gastric damage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aliskiren, and thus, direct renin blockage, in indomethacin-induced gastric damage model. Effects of aliskiren were evaluated in indomethacin-induced gastric damage model on Albino Wistar rats. Effects of famotidine has been investigated as standard antiulcer agent. Stereological analyses for ulcer area determination, biochemical analyses for oxidative status determination and molecular analyses for tissue cytokine and cyclooxygenase determination were performed on stomach tissues. In addition, to clarify antiulcer effect mechanism of aliskiren pylorus ligation-induced gastric acid secretion model was applied on rats. Aliskiren was able to inhibit indomethacin-induced ulcer formation. It also inhibited renin, and thus, decreased over-produced Angiotensin-II during ulcer formation. Aliskiren improved the oxidative status and cytokine profile of the stomach, which was most probably impaired by increased Angiotensin II concentration. Aliskiren also increased gastroprotective prostaglandin E2 concentration. Finally, aliskiren did not change the gastric acidity in pylorus ligation model. Aliskiren exerted its protective effects on stomach tissue by decreasing inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress as a result of inhibiting the RAAS, at a rate-limiting step, as well as its end product, angiotensin II. Aliskiren also significantly increased protective factors such as PGE2, but not affect aggressive factors such as gastric acidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Short-term stress, but not mucosal healing nor depression was predictive for the risk of relapse in patients with ulcerative colitis: a prospective 12-month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Langhorst, Jost; Hofstetter, Anna; Wolfe, Fred; Häuser, Winfried

    2013-10-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory bowel disease. Psychological factors such as depression and stress are under debate to contribute to the risk of relapse. The impact of mucosal healing to reduce the risk of relapse had not been studied prospectively. The aim of this study was to identify whether depression and stress increase and mucosal healing reduces the risk of clinical relapse in patients with UC in clinical remission. Patients in clinical remission were followed prospectively for 1 year, or less if they relapsed. Endoscopy and histology score and long-term perceived stress (Perceived Stress Questionnaire) were measured at baseline. Mucosal healing was defined by a Mayo Endoscopy score of 0-1. Depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and acute perceived stress (Cohen Perceived Stress Scale) were measured at baseline and after 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. A time-dependent multivariate Cox regression model determined the predictors of time to relapse. Seventy-five patients were included into final analysis, of which 28 (37.3%) relapsed. Short-term stress at the last visit before relapse (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.10) and male gender (HR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.01-5.61), but not baseline mucosal healing (HR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.35-2.11), baseline long-term stress (HR = 0.20, 95% CI = 0.01-3.31), and depression at the last visit before relapse (HR = 1.08, 95% CI = 0.95-1.22) were predictive for a relapse. Short-term stress but not depression nor mucosal healing was predictive for the risk of relapse in patients with UC in clinical remission. Larger multicentre studies are necessary to confirm our findings.

  19. A prospective, randomised, controlled, multi-centre comparative effectiveness study of healing using dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft, bioengineered skin substitute or standard of care for treatment of chronic lower extremity diabetic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Zelen, Charles M; Gould, Lisa; Serena, Thomas E; Carter, Marissa J; Keller, Jennifer; Li, William W

    2015-12-01

    A prospective, randomised, controlled, parallel group, multi-centre clinical trial was conducted at three sites to compare the healing effectiveness of treatment of chronic lower extremity diabetic ulcers with either weekly applications of Apligraf(®) (Organogenesis, Inc., Canton, MA), EpiFix(®) (MiMedx Group, Inc., Marietta, GA), or standard wound care with collagen-alginate dressing. The primary study outcome was the percent change in complete wound healing after 4 and 6 weeks of treatment. Secondary outcomes included percent change in wound area per week, velocity of wound closure and a calculation of the amount and cost of Apligraf or EpiFix used. A total of 65 subjects entered the 2-week run-in period and 60 were randomised (20 per group). The proportion of patients in the EpiFix group achieving complete wound closure within 4 and 6 weeks was 85% and 95%, significantly higher (all adjusted P-values ≤ 0·003) than for patients receiving Apligraf (35% and 45%), or standard care (30% and 35%). After 1 week, wounds treated with EpiFix had reduced in area by 83·5% compared with 53·1% for wounds treated with Apligraf. Median time to healing was significantly faster (all adjusted P-values ≤0·001) with EpiFix (13 days) compared to Apligraf (49 days) or standard care (49 days). The mean number of grafts used and the graft cost per patient were lower in the EpiFix group campared to the Apligraf group, at 2·15 grafts at a cost of $1669 versus 6·2 grafts at a cost of $9216, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate the clinical and resource utilisation superiority of EpiFix compared to Apligraf or standard of care, for the treatment of diabetic ulcers of the lower extremities. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal published by Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A Prospective, Postmarket, Compassionate Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Acellular Fish-skin Graft Which Contains Omega-3 Fatty Acids for the Closure of Hard-to-heal Lower Extremity Chronic Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun K; Polanco, Thais O; Lantis, John C

    2016-04-01

    A novel piscine acellular fish-skin graft product has 510k clearance on the US market. This product (Omega3, Kerecis, Isafjordur, Iceland) is to be used similarly to extracellular matrices (ECMs) on the market (eg, bovine and porcine) except that it contains fats, including omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids that have been associated with anti-inflammatory properties in many studies. While many current ECMs are effective on open wounds, studies have largely excluded application to hard-to-heal ulcers. To test this product in a real-world environment, the authors chose to look specifically at hard-to-heal ulcers based on previously defined wound and patient factors. The primary objective was to assess the percentage of wound closure area from baseline after 5 weekly fish-skin graft applications in 18 patients with at least 1 "hard-to-heal" criteria. Patients underwent application of the fish skin for 5 sequential weeks, followed by 3 weeks of standard of care. Wound area, skin assessments, and pain were assessed weekly. A 40% decrease in wound surface area (P < 0.05) and a 48% decrease in wound depth was seen with 5 weekly applications of the fish-skin graft and secondary dressing (P < 0.05). Complete closure was seen in 3 of 18 patients by the end of the study phase. This fish-skin product appears to provide promise as an effective wound closing adjunctive ECM. This is true when used in this compassionate setting, where many other products fail. This study lacks a control arm and an aggressive application schedule, but the investigators believe it represents real-world practice.

  1. Healing rates for challenging rotator cuff tears utilizing an acellular human dermal reinforcement graft

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study presents a retrospective case series of the clinical and structural outcomes (1.5 T MRI) of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with acellular human dermal graft reinforcement performed by a single surgeon in patients with large, massive, and previously repaired rotator cuff tears. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients with mean anterior to posterior tear size 3.87 ± 0.99 cm (median 4 cm, range 2.5–6 cm) were enrolled in the study and were evaluated for structural integrity using a high-field (1.5 T) MRI at an average of 16.8 months after surgery. The Constant-Murley scores, the Flexilevel Scale of Shoulder Function (Flex SF), scapular plane abduction, and strength were analyzed. Results: MRI results showed that the rotator cuff repair was intact in 85.7% (12/14) of the patients studied. Two patients had a Sugaya Type IV recurrent tear (2 of 14; 14.3%), which were both less than 1 cm. The Constant score increased from a preoperative mean of 49.72 (range 13–74) to a postoperative mean of 81.07 (range 45–92) (P value = 0.009). Flexilevel Scale of Shoulder Function (Flex SF) Score normalized to a 100-point scale improved from a preoperative mean of 53.69 to a postoperative mean of 79.71 (P value = 0.003). The Pain Score improved from a preoperative mean of 7.73 to a postoperative mean of 13.57 (P value = 0.008). Scapular plane abduction improved from a preoperative mean of 113.64° to a postoperative mean of 166.43° (P value = 0.010). The strength subset score improved from a preoperative mean of 1.73 kg to a postoperative mean of 7.52 kg (P value = 0.006). Conclusions: This study presents a safe and effective technique that may help improve the healing rates of large, massive, and revision rotator cuff tears with the use of an acellular human dermal allograft. This technique demonstrated favorable structural healing rates and statistically improved functional outcomes in the near term. Level of Evidence: 4. Retrospective case series. PMID

  2. The effect of nurse manager turnover on patient fall and pressure ulcer rates.

    PubMed

    Warshawsky, Nora; Rayens, Mary Kay; Stefaniak, Karen; Rahman, Rana

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of nurse manager turnover on the occurrence of adverse events. Nurse managers create professional nurse practice environments to support the provision of quality patient outcomes. Inconsistent findings were reported in the literature testing the relationship between nurse managers and patient outcomes. All prior studies assumed stable nursing management. A longitudinal quasi-experimental study of 23 nursing units in two hospitals was used to determine whether unit characteristics, including nurse manager turnover, have an effect on patient falls or pressure ulcers. Statistical analyses included repeated measures and hierarchical modelling. Patients in medical/surgical units experienced more falls than in intensive care units (F1,11 = 15.9, P = 0.002). Patients in units with a nurse manager turnover [odds ratio: 3.16; 95% confidence interval: 1.49-6.70] and intensive care units (odds ratio: 2.70; 95% confidence interval: 1.33-5.49) were more likely to develop pressure ulcers. Nurse manager turnover and intensive care unit status were associated with more pressure ulcers. Medical/surgical unit status was associated with more falls. The study was limited by a small sample size. Nurse manager turnover may negatively impact patient outcomes. Stable nursing management, strategic interim management and long-term succession planning may reduce adverse patient events. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. 1995 William J. Stickel Gold Award. High strain rate tissue deformation. A theory on the mechanical etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations.

    PubMed

    Landsman, A S; Meaney, D F; Cargill, R S; Macarak, E J; Thibault, L E

    1995-10-01

    Foot ulcerations are one of the most common and dangerous complications associated with chronic diabetes mellitus. Many studies have focused on neuropathy, in conjunction with elevated ground reactive forces, as the principal cause of these ulcerations. The authors discuss the mechanical cause of diabetic ulcerations at the cellular level. It is hypothesized that increased rate of tissue deformation associated with foot slap secondary to progressive motor neuropathy is the actual culprit, and not the magnitude of local pressure applied. The authors present a cellular model that shows that high rates of tissue deformation may result in elevated intracellular calcium concentrations, which may lead to cellular death, while comparable loads gradually applied do not. Furthermore, there is no significant difference in the response observed at 5 psi and 10 psi. Based on these findings, it is hypothesized that techniques such as ankle foot orthoses, which control the velocity of foot strike, may be useful in treating diabetic foot ulcerations.

  4. Prediction of venous wound healing with laser speckle imaging.

    PubMed

    van Vuuren, Timme Maj; Van Zandvoort, Carina; Doganci, Suat; Zwiers, Ineke; tenCate-Hoek, Arina J; Kurstjens, Ralph Lm; Wittens, Cees Ha

    2017-12-01

    Introduction Laser speckle imaging is used for noninvasive assessment of blood flow of cutaneous wounds. The aim of this study was to assess if laser speckle imaging can be used as a predictor of venous ulcer healing. Methods After generating the flux speckle images, three regions of interest (ROI) were identified to measure the flow. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value for ulcer healing were calculated. Results In total, 17 limbs were included. A sensitivity of 92.3%, specificity of 75.0%, PPV of 80.0%, and NPV 75.0% were found in predicting wound healing based on laser speckle images. Mean flux values were lowest in the center (ROI I) and showed an increase at the wound edge (ROI II, p = 0.03). Conclusion Laser speckle imaging shows acceptable sensitivity and specificity rates in predicting venous ulcer healing. The wound edge proved to be the best probability for the prediction of wound healing.

  5. NeutroPhase® in chronic non-healing wounds

    PubMed Central

    Crew, John; Varilla, Randell; Rocas, Thomas Allandale; Debabov, Dmitri; Wang, Lu; Najafi, Azar; Rani, Suriani Abdul; Najafi, Ramin (Ron); Anderson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds, such as venous stasis ulcers, diabetic ulcers, and pressure ulcers are serious unmet medical needs that affect a patient’s morbidity and mortality. Common pathogens observed in chronic non-healing wounds are Staphylococcus including MRSA, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Stenotrophomonas, and Serratia spp. Topical and systemically administered antibiotics do not adequately decrease the level of bacteria or the associated biofilm in chronic granulating wounds and the use of sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics can lead to resistant phenotypes. Furthermore, topical antiseptics may not be fully effective and can actually impede wound healing. We show 5 representative examples from our more than 30 clinical case studies using NeutroPhase® as an irrigation solution with chronic non-healing wounds with and without the technique of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). NeutroPhase® is pure 0.01% hypochlorous acid (i.e. >97% relative molar distribution of active chlorine species as HOCl) in a 0.9% saline solution at pH 4-5 and is stored in glass containers. NovaBay has three FDA cleared 510(k)s. Patients showed a profound improvement and marked accelerated rates of wound healing using NeutroPhase® with and without NPWT. NeutroPhase® was non-toxic to living tissues. PMID:23272294

  6. Pressure ulcer assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, C R; Rodeheaver, G T

    1999-01-01

    A pressure ulcer is an area of localized tissue destruction directly related to prolonged pressure. The loss of skin integrity produces significant consequences not only for the individual, but also for the community, with reported costs of $8.5 billion for pressure-ulcer care. Because of these costs, health care providers should be seeking prevention programs that identify high-risk individuals and implement preventive measures before the ulcer begins. Once the individual develops an ulcer, assessment of healing is critical to determine the appropriate treatment. Successful treatment depends on the principles of debridement, cleansing, bacterial control, wound dressing, and occasionally, surgical intervention.

  7. Manuka Honey Exerts Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities That Promote Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Almasaudi, Saad B.; Al-Hindi, Rashad R.; Abdel-dayem, Umama A.; Ali, Soad S.; Saleh, Rasha M.; Al Jaouni, Soad K.

    2017-01-01

    Gastric ulcers are a major problem worldwide with no effective treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of manuka honey in the treatment of acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcers in rats. Different groups of rats were treated with three different concentrations of honey. Stomachs were checked macroscopically for ulcerative lesions in the glandular mucosa and microscopically for histopathological alterations. Treatment with manuka honey significantly reduced the ulcer index and maintained the glycoprotein content. It also reduced the mucosal myeloperoxidase activity, lipid peroxidation (MDA), and the inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) as compared to untreated control group. In addition, honey-treated groups showed significant increase in enzymatic (GPx and SOD) and nonenzymatic (GSH) antioxidants besides levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Flow cytometry studies showed that treatment of animals with manuka honey has normalized cell cycle distribution and significantly lowered apoptosis in gastric mucosa. In conclusion, the results indicated that manuka honey is effective in the treatment of chronic ulcer and preservation of mucosal glycoproteins. Its effects are due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that resulted in a significant reduction of the gastric mucosal MDA, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and caused an elevation in IL-10 levels. PMID:28250794

  8. A systematic review of maggot debridement therapy for chronically infected wounds and ulcers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xinjuan; Jiang, Kechun; Chen, Jingan; Wu, Liang; Lu, Hui; Wang, Aiping; Wang, Jianming

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to systematically evaluate maggot debridement therapy (MDT) in the treatment of chronically infected wounds and ulcers. We performed a meta-analysis referring to the PRISMA statement (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses). We searched for published articles in the following databases: PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, Wanfang (Chinese), and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). The latest search was updated on March 14, 2014. For dichotomous outcomes, the effects of MDT were expressed as the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). For continuous outcomes with different measurement scales, we calculated the standardized mean difference (SMD). The pooled effects were estimated using a fixed effect model or random effect model based on the heterogeneity test. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the types of wounds or ulcers. MDT had a significantly increased positive effect on wound healing compared with conventional therapies, with a pooled RR of 1.80 (95% CI 1.24-2.60). The subgroup analysis revealed that the combined RRs were 1.79 (95% CI 0.95-3.38) for patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) and 1.70 (95% CI 1.28-2.27) for patients with other types of ulcers. The time to healing of the ulcers was significantly shorter among patients treated with MDT, with a pooled SMD of -0.95 (95% CI -1.24, -0.65). For patients with DFU, the SMD was -0.79 (95% CI -1.18, -0.41), and for patients with other types of ulcers, the SMD was -1.16 (95% CI -1.63, -0.69). MDT not only shortened the healing time but also improved the healing rate of chronic ulcers. Therefore, MDT may be a feasible alternative in the treatment of chronic ulcers. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Retrospective analysis of pulsed radiofrequency energy therapy use in the treatment of chronic pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Conner-Kerr, Teresa; Isenberg, Richard A

    2012-06-01

    : The purpose of the study was to evaluate the benefit of using pulsed radiofrequency energy (PRFE) therapy in the treatment of chronic pressure ulcers. : A retrospective analysis was performed using case series data from the Provant Wound Registry, which consists of demographic characteristics and wound healing outcomes for patients treated with the Provant Therapy System. : The analysis subset consisted of data from 39 distinct centers, including both residential and ambulatory care facilities. : The analysis included data from 89 patients. The majority of patients (89%) were cared for in residential facilities, whereas 11% of patients were cared for in ambulatory care facilities. : Specific outcomes that assessed wound healing between the initial time point and at the 4-week follow-up were as follows: percent wound surface area reduction (PWAR), proportion of wounds achieving 50% reduction or greater in wound surface area (50% PWAR), and the rate of wound healing (wound healing trajectory in centimeters squared per day). : Overall, there was a 51% median reduction in wound surface area (PWAR) after 4 weeks of PRFE therapy for wounds in the study, with 51% of wounds (56/110) achieving 50% reduction or greater in wound surface area (50% PWAR). Rate of healing measurements for the overall study group showed a median wound healing trajectory of 0.13 cm/d at 4 weeks. : Compared with historical controls and other studies using similar surrogate wound healing markers, these results suggest PRFE therapy is a beneficial adjuvant treatment option for healing chronic pressure ulcers.

  10. Usefulness of Transcriptional Blood Biomarkers as a Non-invasive Surrogate Marker of Mucosal Healing and Endoscopic Response in Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Planell, Núria; Masamunt, M Carme; Leal, Raquel Franco; Rodríguez, Lorena; Esteller, Miriam; Lozano, Juan J; Ramírez, Anna; Ayrizono, Maria de Lourdes Setsuko; Coy, Claudio Saddy Rodrigues; Alfaro, Ignacio; Ordás, Ingrid; Visvanathan, Sudha; Ricart, Elena; Guardiola, Jordi; Panés, Julián; Salas, Azucena

    2017-10-27

    Ulcerative colitis [UC] is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon. Colonoscopy remains the gold standard for evaluating disease activity, as clinical symptoms are not sufficiently accurate. The aim of this study is to identify new accurate non-invasive biomarkers based on whole-blood transcriptomics that can predict mucosal lesions and response to treatment in UC patients. Whole-blood samples were collected for a total of 152 UC patients at endoscopy. Blood RNA from 25 UC individuals and 20 controls was analysed using microarrays. Genes that correlated with endoscopic activity were validated using real-time polymerase chain reaction in an independent group of 111 UC patients, and a prediction model for mucosal lesions was evaluated. Responsiveness to treatment was assessed in a longitudinal cohort of 16 UC patients who started anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] therapy and were followed up for 14 weeks. Microarray analysis identified 122 genes significantly altered in the blood of endoscopically active UC patients. A significant correlation with the degree of endoscopic activity was observed in several genes, including HP, CD177, GPR84, and S100A12. Using HP as a predictor of endoscopic disease activity, an accuracy of 67.3% was observed, compared with 52.4%, 45.2%, and 30.3% for C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and platelet count, respectively. Finally, at 14 weeks of treatment, response to anti-TNF therapy induced alterations in blood HP, CD177, GPR84, and S100A12 transcripts that correlated with changes in endoscopic activity. Transcriptional changes in UC patients are sensitive to endoscopic improvement and appear to be an effective tool to monitor patients over time. © European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) 2017.

  11. Usefulness of Transcriptional Blood Biomarkers as a Non-invasive Surrogate Marker of Mucosal Healing and Endoscopic Response in Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Planell, Núria; Masamunt, M Carme; Leal, Raquel Franco; Rodríguez, Lorena; Esteller, Miriam; Lozano, Juan J; Ramírez, Anna; Ayrizono, Maria de Lourdes Setsuko; Coy, Claudio Saddy Rodrigues; Alfaro, Ignacio; Ordás, Ingrid; Visvanathan, Sudha; Ricart, Elena; Guardiola, Jordi; Panés, Julián; Salas, Azucena

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims Ulcerative colitis [UC] is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon. Colonoscopy remains the gold standard for evaluating disease activity, as clinical symptoms are not sufficiently accurate. The aim of this study is to identify new accurate non-invasive biomarkers based on whole-blood transcriptomics that can predict mucosal lesions and response to treatment in UC patients. Methods Whole-blood samples were collected for a total of 152 UC patients at endoscopy. Blood RNA from 25 UC individuals and 20 controls was analysed using microarrays. Genes that correlated with endoscopic activity were validated using real-time polymerase chain reaction in an independent group of 111 UC patients, and a prediction model for mucosal lesions was evaluated. Responsiveness to treatment was assessed in a longitudinal cohort of 16 UC patients who started anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] therapy and were followed up for 14 weeks. Results Microarray analysis identified 122 genes significantly altered in the blood of endoscopically active UC patients. A significant correlation with the degree of endoscopic activity was observed in several genes, including HP, CD177, GPR84, and S100A12. Using HP as a predictor of endoscopic disease activity, an accuracy of 67.3% was observed, compared with 52.4%, 45.2%, and 30.3% for C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and platelet count, respectively. Finally, at 14 weeks of treatment, response to anti-TNF therapy induced alterations in blood HP, CD177, GPR84, and S100A12 transcripts that correlated with changes in endoscopic activity. Conclusions Transcriptional changes in UC patients are sensitive to endoscopic improvement and appear to be an effective tool to monitor patients over time. PMID:28981629

  12. [Financial rating optimization in pressure ulcers management: yes, but at what price?].

    PubMed

    Crouzet, C; Chaput, B; Grolleau, J-L

    2013-06-01

    The surgical management of pressure ulcers remains very expensive even if preventive measures and improved care pathways allowed to reduce spending in this domain in recent years. Since 2004, the funding of French hospitals by "fee-for-service" and the needs of saving health spending necessarily compels us to interest ourselves in these purely economic considerations and sometimes modify our requirements for hospital stay to optimize a "patient' valorisation group". In the future, this may lead the surgeon to bias the real needs of the patient for the benefit of hospital establishment. Through a medico-economic analysis of our practices conducted in the plastic surgery department of the University hospital of Toulouse, we tried to identify how to optimize the surgical management of pressure ulcers in terms of valorisation of hospital stay. The aim is still to remain critical about the aberrations that this could introduce in the future for our clinical activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Ugh! Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... people talk about ulcers, though, they usually mean peptic ulcers . These form in the stomach or the upper ... pain go away. Kids don't usually get peptic ulcers, but they're common in adults. Doctors say ...

  14. Connective tissue ulcers.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren's syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Disease Course and Colectomy Rate of Ulcerative Colitis: A Follow-up Cohort Study of a Referral Center in Tuscany.

    PubMed

    Manetti, Natalia; Bagnoli, Siro; Rogai, Francesca; Bonanomi, Andrea G; Vannozzi, Giancarlo; Giannotta, Martina; Annese, Vito

    2016-08-01

    The disease course and colectomy rate of ulcerative colitis (UC) vary largely in population-based and referral center cohorts. We retrospectively evaluated our cohort to determine the disease course and risk factors for colectomy. A cohort of 1723 ulcerative colitis patients (986 males; mean age, 34.8 ± 15.4 yrs) were identified and followed since 1960s for a mean of 11 ± 9 years (range, 1-49 yrs). The disease extension was classified as E1, E2, and E3 on diagnosis at 19.7%, 54.2%, and 26.1% of patients, respectively. At the final follow-up, the disease extension increased in 20% of the cases. Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) were reported by 11% of the patients, whereas systemic corticosteroids (CS), IM or anti-TNFα agents were used by 68.6%, 20.4%, and 6.4% of patients, respectively. The crude colectomy rate was 7% (120 pts), with a 1.2% rate (n = 21) at 1 year from diagnosis (95% CI, 0.7-1.7) and a Kaplan-Meyer estimation of up to 18.2% after 30 years of follow-up. The 1-year colectomy rate showed no significant difference through the decades, whereas the 5-year and 10-year absolute value of colectomy was halved in the last 2 decades compared with the period from 1960 to 1990 (P = 0.01), with a general trend of a reduced colectomy rate at survival curves (P = 0.056). The colectomy rate was low in our cohort and further reduced in the last 2 decades. However, despite the availability of anti-TNFα agents, no further significant reduction of colectomies was observed in the last decade.

  16. High revision rate but good healing capacity of atypical femoral fractures. A comparison with common shaft fractures.

    PubMed

    Schilcher, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Healing of complete, atypical femoral fractures is thought to be impaired, but the evidence is weak and appears to be based on the delayed healing observed in patients with incomplete atypical fractures. Time until fracture healing is difficult to assess, therefore we compared the reoperation rates between women with complete atypical femoral fractures and common femoral shaft fractures. We searched the orthopaedic surgical registry in Östergötland County for patients with subtrochanteric and femoral shaft fractures (ICD-10 diagnosis codes S72.2, S72.3 and M84.3F) between January 1st 2007 and December 31st 2013. Out of 895 patients with surgically treated femoral shaft fractures, 511 were women 50 years of age or older. Among these we identified 24 women with atypical femoral shaft fractures, and 71 with common shaft fractures. Reoperations were performed in 6 and 5 patients, respectively, odds ratio 4.4 (95% CI 1.2 to 16.1). However, 5 reoperations in the atypical fracture group could not be ascribed to poor healing. In 3 patients the reoperation was due to a new fracture proximal to a standard intramedullary nail. In 2 patients the distal locking screws were removed due to callus formation that was deemed incomplete 5 months post-operatively. The one patient with poor healing showed faint callus formation at 5 months when the fracture was dynamised and callus remained sparse at 11 months. Among patients with common shaft fractures, 2 reoperations were performed to remove loose screws, 2 because of peri-implant fractures and 1 reoperation due to infection. Reoperation rates in patients with complete atypical femoral fractures are higher than in patients with common shaft fractures. The main reason for failure was peri-implant fragility fractures which might be prevented with the use of cephalomedullary nails at the index surgery. Fracture healing however, seems generally good. A watchful waiting approach is advocated in patients with fractures that appear to

  17. Antacids and peptic ulcer--a reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, T; Rhodes, J

    1979-01-01

    Antacids can reduce gastroduodenal acidity for long periods if taken in substantial quantities after food. Their healing effect on gastric ulcer is minimal, if present at all, and easily overwhelmed by the benefit obtained from admission to hospital. Intensive antacid therapy appears effective in healing duodenal ulcer and preventing haemorrhage from stress ulcer, and is comparable in these respects with cimetidine but with a higher incidence of side-effects. Clinical impression strongly suggests that antacids relieve pain in peptic ulcer but objective confirmation is lacking. PMID:38192

  18. Fabrication of Waterproof, Breathable Composite Liquid Dressing and Its Application in Diabetic Skin Ulcer Repair.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dong-Lin; Chen, Yan-Pei; Wang, Yu-Fei; Li, Xiao-Dong; Bao, Ning; He, Hong; Gu, Hai-Ying

    2016-11-01

    Diabetic patients are at increased risk of severe skin infections. Covering the wound as early as possible can prevent infection and shorten the course of treatment. In this study, the authors fabricated a waterproof and breathable composite liquid dressing (CLD) that formed a barrier to bacteria and shortened healing time of diabetic rat skin ulcers. The CLD was prepared in a formulation that, on evaporation of the liquid carrier, acts as a waterproof, breathable coating on injured skin. The coating was analyzed for water resistance, moisture vapor transmission rate (MVTR), bacterial barrier properties, sustained-release function, and biosafety. A chemically induced rat model of diabetic foot ulcers was used to examine the wound healing effect of CLD and CLD that contained Dermlin (Yensen Biotech Co, Jiangyin, Jiangsu, China). The wound healing rate, histologic changes, and epidermal growth factor expression were also evaluated. The CLD functioned as an effective barrier against infection, was waterproof, had a suitable MVTR, and had effective biosafety. The synergistic effects of CLD and Dermlin had a rapid wound closure rate. Histologic analysis and measurement of epidermal growth factor expression through an in vivo test revealed that the possible mechanism of the CLD effects included the reduction of inflammation and promotion of cell proliferation. Early treatment with the CLD can prevent infection. In combination with Dermlin, the CLD may promote better wound closure in diabetic skin ulcers. The authors' study suggests a novel strategy for ulcer healing.

  19. Increased Wound-Healing Rate In Pig Skin Treated By Helium-Neon Laser.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abergel, R. Patrick; Glassberg, Edward; Uitto, Jouni

    1988-06-01

    We have demonstrated that 11cNc, laws stimulate collagen synthesis both in human stun fibroblast cultures and hairless mice in vivo. Subscqucnt studies on pig skin have also idcntificd the mechanism of the collagen stimulation. Both type 1 and typc 111 procolagcn mRNA, levels were markcdly elevated at day 17 and 26 in wounds treated by laser. Furthermore, typo ill procollagen was cicvatcd in carly stages of wound healing, at day 10, confirming the notion that typc 111 collagen accumulation precedes that of typc 1 in wound healing processes. (for summary,please see table and references below)

  20. Marjolin's Ulcer Complicating a Pressure Sore: The Clock is Ticking.

    PubMed

    Khan, Kamran; Giannone, Anna Lucia; Mehrabi, Erfan; Khan, Ayda; Giannone, Roberto E

    2016-02-22

    Malignant degeneration in any chronic wound is termed a Marjolin's ulcer (MU). The overall metastatic rate of MU is approximately 27.5%. However, the prognosis of MU specific to pressure sores is poor, with a reported metastatic rate of 61%. This is due to insidious, asymptomatic malignant degeneration, a lack of healthcare provider awareness, and, ultimately, delayed management. An 85-year-old white male was noted by his wound-care nurse to have a rapidly developing growth on his lower back over a period of 4 months. There was history of a non-healing, progressive pressure ulcer of the lower back for the past 10 years. On examination, there was a 4 × 4 cm pressure ulcer of the lower back, with a superimposed 1.5 × 2 cm growth in the superior region. There was an absence of palpable regional lymphadenopathy. Punch biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma consistent with Marjolin's ulcer. The ulcer underwent excision with wide margins, and a skin graft was placed. Due to the prompt recognition of an abnormality by the patient's wound-care nurse, metastasis was not evident on imaging. There are no signs of recurrence at 1-year follow-up. Marjolin's ulcer has a rapid progression from local disease to widespread metastasis. Therefore, it is essential that wound-care providers are aware of the clinical signs and symptoms of malignant degeneration in chronic wounds.

  1. Geographic and temporal variations in the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, A

    1985-01-01

    The epidemiology of peptic ulcer is characterised by marked geographic and temporal variations. Gastric ulcer occurs about 5-10 times more often than duodenal ulcer in Japan. In most European countries and the USA, duodenal ulcer is about twice as frequent as gastric ulcer. The variation among different European countries does not show any clear-cut relationship to European geography. The reported differences in healing rate, relapse rate after discontinuation of treatment with histamine2 (H2)-blockers, and harmful effects of smoking are probably related to the varying fraction of bad healers recruited for controlled clinical trials in different countries. In male migrant workers who emigrated from Southern to Central Europe, duodenal ulcer occurs twice as frequent as in the native population. A similar phenomenon has been reported from South Africa. Peptic ulcer used to be a rare disease before the 19th century. In the beginning of the 19th century acute perforations of gastric ulcers were first reported in young girls. With progress of the 19th century peptic ulcer became more frequent also in men. By the end of the century the incidence of duodenal ulcer had surpassed that of gastric ulcer. Studies from the USA and England reported that the number of hospital admissions, surgical operations, and deaths due to duodenal or gastric ulcer had declined during the last 20 years. A cohort analysis demonstrates that the temporal changes of peptic ulcer in all European countries, in Japan, and in the USA occur in a fashion characteristic of those due to changes in birth-cohort risks. Generations born in the last 30 years of the 19th century manifested the highest risk of developing peptic ulcer and carried it throughout their lives. The birth-cohorts with a high risk for duodenal ulcer lagged 10-30 years behind those with a high risk for gastric ulcer. The cohort phenomenon starts at an age below 5 years for both gastric and duodenal ulcer. The cohort phenomenon implies

  2. Efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) plus rebamipide for endoscopic submucosal dissection-induced ulcers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Guo, Xufeng; Ye, Chuncui; Yu, Shijie; Zhang, Jixiang; Song, Jia; Cao, Zhuo; Wang, Jing; Liu, Min; Dong, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with rebamipide versus PPIs alone for the treatment of ulcers after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). PubMed, Web of Science, Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and China Naitonal Knowledge Infrastructure were searched up to the end of October 2013 in order to identify all randomized controlled trials reporting the effects of PPIs plus rebamipide on healing ulcers after ESD. The outcome measurement was complete ulcer healing. A total of six studies involving 724 patients were included. The pooled data suggested a significantly higher rate of ulcer healing after endoscopic therapy among patients treated with PPIs plus rebamipide than among those treated with PPIs alone [odds ratio (OR)=2.40, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.68-3.44]. The subgroup analysis showed PPI plus rebamipide therapy to be more effective in healing ESD-induced ulcers than treatment with PPIs alone after both four (OR=2.22, 95%CI: 1.53-3.24) and eight weeks of treatment (OR=3.19, 95%CI: 1.22-8.31). In addition, the combination therapy was found to be significantly more effective than the use of PPIs alone for all ESD ulcers greater than 20 mm in size (OR=4.77, 95%CI: 2.22-10.26). There were no significant differences between the treatment groups with regard to ulcer location (low, middle or upper stomach) or the presence of absence of H. pylori infection. No serious adverse events were observed in either group. The results of this meta-analysis suggest that treatment with PPIs plus rebamipide is superior to PPI monotherapy for healing ESD-induced ulcers over four weeks, particularly large ulcers. However, more well-designed trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  3. Topical lavender oil for the treatment of recurrent aphthous ulceration.

    PubMed

    Altaei, D Tagreed

    2012-02-01

    To determine the laboratory and clinical efficacy of lavender oil in the treatment of recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU). This was a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study performed firstly to treat the induced ulcers by different methods in experimental animals (rabbits) treated with lavender oil or placebo. Clinical and histological healing was established by measuring the area of the ulcer and inflammation levels in each test group. Secondly, safety/toxicity; the median lethal dose (LD50) was studied in albino mice, and dermal irritation test was performed by primary irritation to the skin and measured by a patch-test technique on the intact skin of the albino rabbit. Thirdly, antibacterial effect; lavender oil was screened against bacteria obtained from swab specimen of human subjects' RAU using disc diffusion method. Fourthly, clinical study; 115 subjects (mean age 38 years, mean weight 75 kg) were divided into two groups of subjects topically treated with lavender oil or placebo. The clinical efficacy was assessed by inflammation level, erythema, edema, ulcer duration, ulcer size, mean area under the curve of ulcer area, healing time, and associated pain intensity and reduction. Animals treated with lavender oil showed a significant ulcer size reduction, increased rate of mucosal repair, and healing within 3 days of treatment compared to baseline and placebo groups [2-3 days (90%), 4 days (10%)] (P=0.001). The intraperitoneal LD50 value in mice was 6.5 gm/kg; clinical dermal irritation test showed no sign of irritation in the tested products. Lavender oil showed a broad antibacterial activity against all tested strains; it exhibited significant inhibition on tested bacteria where the value of zone of inhibition ranged from 14.5-24 mm vs Streptomycin (25 microg/disc) 12-22 +/- 0.5 mm; MIC was > 6.4-36 mg/ml. RAU patients treated with lavender oil showed a significant reduction in inflammation level, ulcer size, healing time, from 2-4 days [2 days

  4. Acellular Flowable Matrix in the Treatment of Tunneled or Cavity Ulcers in Diabetic Feet: A Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Campitiello, Ferdinando; Mancone, Manfredi; Della Corte, Angela; Guerniero, Raffaella; Canonico, Silvestro

    2018-06-01

    The authors aimed to explore the feasibility and safety of an advanced, acellular, flowable wound matrix (FWM) in patients with diabetes-related cavity or tunnel lesions involving deep structures. Patients with diabetic foot ulcers were hospitalized at the General and Geriatric Surgery Unit of the University of Campania in Naples, Italy, between March 2015 and December 2015. Twenty-three patients with tunneled or cavity ulcers were treated. The lesions were filled with the FWM. Surgical wound edges were either approximated with stitches or left to heal by secondary intention. After 6 weeks, 78.26% of patients completely healed after a single application of the FWM. The healing time for all healed wounds was 30.85 ± 12.62 days, or 26.11 ± 5.43 days in patients for whom wound edges were approximated by stitches, and 57.66 ± 3.05 days in the patients who healed by secondary intention (P = .01). Permanent tissue regeneration was observed in a high percentage of patients, and shorter healing time was achieved. Study authors observed a low rate of complications such as major amputation and increased hospitalization. The FWM seems ideal for tunneled and cavity ulcers with irregular geometry. This new porous matrix allows closure of the lesion while reducing healing time and demolition surgery.

  5. Autologous platelet-rich gel for treatment of diabetic chronic refractory cutaneous ulcers: A prospective, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan; Chen, Dawei; Wang, Chun; Yuan, Nanbing; Wang, Yan; He, Liping; Yang, Yanzhi; Chen, Lihong; Liu, Guanjian; Li, Xiujun; Ran, Xingwu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine the safety and effectiveness of topical autologous platelet-rich gel (APG) application on facilitating the healing of diabetic chronic refractory cutaneous ulcers. The study was designed as a prospective, randomized controlled trial between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2011. Eligible inpatients at the Diabetic Foot Care Center of West China Hospital, Sichuan University (China) were randomly prescribed with a 12-week standard treatment of ulcers (the control group) or standard treatment plus topical application APG (the APG group). The wound healing grades (primary endpoint), time to complete healing, and healing velocity within 12 weeks were monitored as short-term effectiveness measurements, while side effects were documented safety endpoints. The rates of survival and recurrence within the follow up were recorded as long-term effectiveness endpoints. Analysis on total diabetic ulcers (DUs) (n = 117) and subgroup analysis on diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) (n = 103) were both conducted. Standard treatment plus APG treatment was statistically more effective than standard treatment (p < 0.05 in both total DUs and subgroup of DFUs). The subjects defined as healing grade 1 were 50/59 (84.8%) in total DUs and 41/48 (85.4%) in DFUs in the APG group compared with 40/58 (69.0%) and 37/55 (67.3%) in the control group from intent to treat population. The Kaplan-Meier time-to-healing were significantly different between the two groups (p < 0.05 in both total DUs and subgroup of DFUs). No side effects were identified after topical APG application. The long-term survival and recurrence rates were comparative between groups (p > 0.05). This study shows that topical APG application plus standard treatment is safe and quite effective on diabetic chronic refractory cutaneous ulcers, compared with standard treatment. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  6. Healing rate and autoimmune safety of full-thickness wounds treated with fish skin acellular dermal matrix versus porcine small-intestine submucosa: a noninferiority study.

    PubMed

    Baldursson, Baldur Tumi; Kjartansson, Hilmar; Konrádsdóttir, Fífa; Gudnason, Palmar; Sigurjonsson, Gudmundur F; Lund, Sigrún Helga

    2015-03-01

    A novel product, the fish skin acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has recently been introduced into the family of biological materials for the treatment of wounds. Hitherto, these products have been produced from the organs of livestock. A noninferiority test was used to compare the effect of fish skin ADM against porcine small-intestine submucosa extracellular matrix in the healing of 162 full-thickness 4-mm wounds on the forearm of 81 volunteers. The fish skin product was noninferior at the primary end point, healing at 28 days. Furthermore, the wounds treated with fish skin acellular matrix healed significantly faster. These results might give the fish skin ADM an advantage because of its environmental neutrality when compared with livestock-derived products. The study results on these acute full-thickness wounds might apply for diabetic foot ulcers and other chronic full-thickness wounds, and the shorter healing time for the fish skin-treated group could influence treatment decisions. To test the autoimmune reactivity of the fish skin, the participants were tested with the following ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) tests: RF, ANA, ENA, anti ds-DNA, ANCA, anti-CCP, and anticollagen I and II. These showed no reactivity. The results demonstrate the claims of safety and efficacy of fish skin ADM for wound care. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Multisystemic Sarcoidosis Presenting as Pretibial Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Baunacke, Anja; Hansel, Gesina

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Up to 30% of patients develop cutaneous manifestations, either specific or nonspecific. Ulcerating sarcoidosis leading to leg ulcers is a rare observation that may lead to confusions with other, more common types of chronic leg ulcers. We report the case of a 45-year-old female patient with chronic multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with pretibial leg ulcers. Other etiology could be excluded. Histology revealed nonspecific findings. Therefore, the diagnosis of nonspecific leg ulcers in sarcoidosis was confirmed. Treatment consisted of oral prednisolone and good ulcer care. Complete healing was achieved within 6 months. Sarcoidosis is a rare cause of leg ulcers and usually sarcoid granulomas can be found. Our patient illustrates that even in the absence of sarcoid granulomas, leg ulcers can be due to sarcoidosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. The value of debridement and Vacuum-Assisted Closure (V.A.C.) Therapy in diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Eneroth, Magnus; van Houtum, William H

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of diabetic foot ulcers includes a number of different regimes such as glycaemic control, re-vascularization, surgical, local wound treatment, offloading and other non-surgical treatments. Although considered the standard of care, the scientific evidence behind the various debridements used is scarce. This presentation will focus on debridement and V.A.C. Therapy, two treatments widely used in patients with diabetes and foot ulcers. A review of existing literature on these treatments in diabetic foot ulcers, with focus on description of the various types of debridements used, the principles behind negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) using the V.A.C. Therapy system and level of evidence. Five randomized controlled trials (RCT) of debridement were identified; three assessed the effectiveness of a hydrogel as a debridement method, one evaluated surgical debridement and one evaluated larval therapy. Pooling the three hydrogel RCTs suggested that hydrogels are significantly more effective than gauze or standard care in healing diabetic foot ulcers. Surgical debridement and larval therapy showed no significant benefit. Other debridement methods such as enzyme preparations or polysaccharide beads have not been evaluated in RCTs of people with diabetes. More than 300 articles have been published on negative pressure wound therapy, including several small RCTs and a larger multi-centre RCT of diabetic foot ulcers. Negative pressure wound therapy seems to be a safe and effective treatment for complex diabetic foot wounds, and could lead to a higher proportion of healed wounds, faster healing rates, and potentially fewer re-amputations than standard care. Although debridement of the ulcer is considered a prerequisite for healing of diabetic foot ulcers, the grade of evidence is quite low. This may be due to a lack of studies rather than lack of effect. Negative pressure wound therapy seems to be safe and effective in the treatment of some diabetic foot ulcers

  9. [Having trouble with pressure ulcers care?].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Masako; Noda, Yasuhiro; Nohara, Yoko; Fujii, Keiko; Sato, Noriko; Renda, Akiyoshi; Yuasa, Takashi; Muramatsu, Shuichi; Furuta, Katsunori

    2004-12-01

    Since 1997, we, the community pharmacists, have established this society, Aichi Prefecture Society for the Study of Pressure Ulcers Care, in order to furnish drug information about pressure ulcers care. Moist atmosphere is required for the healing of pressure ulcers. The moist environment that could be regulated depends on the physicochemical property of ointment bases. Therefore, ointment should reasonably be chosen to adjust the moisture. Since 2000, we have been committed to providing pharmacists, who work on home care, with a booklet to instruct how to choose ointments for pressure ulcers treatment. In 2002, when the Aichi pharmaceutical association held a training conference held at various hospitals using the booklet as a teaching material, hospital pharmacists cooperated by making a field study trip to observe pressure ulcers treatments. Nowadays researchers at pharmaceutical colleges have also cooperated in studying the efficacy and economical effect of the method of blending different ointments to improve the healing process of pressure ulcers.

  10. Use of ultraportable vacuum therapy systems in the treatment of venous leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Roberto; Nisi, Giuseppe; Grimaldi, Luca; Brandi, Cesare; D'Aniello, Carlo

    2017-10-23

    The high incidence of venous leg ulcers and the difficult to give a complete healing involves in an increase of costs for National Health System. Main therapies to obtain a fast healing are compressive bandages, treatment of abnormal venous flow and in-situ-strategies of wound care. Negative pressure therapy does not conventionally used, because these systems not allow the use of compression bandages. Recently the development of ultraportable devices has improved the compliance and the results. Ten patients with venous chronic ulcer on the lower extremities were recruited for this study: all patients had venous leg ulcers from at least one year. We treated the patients with autologous partial thickness skin graft and subsequently we applied NANOVA device included in compressive bandage. We used NANOVA for fourteen days and after we made traditional medications. We submitted a questionnaire to evaluate the impact of dressing and NANOVA device in the quality of life of patients. The device contributed to the formation of granulation tissue and increased the success rate of autologous skin graft without limiting mobility of patient. In addition to this, we have been able to perform compression bandages thanks to small size of this device. Eight ulcers healed within 90 days of medication. We believe that ultraportable negative pressure systems are useful devices for treatment of venous leg ulcers because them allows to realize a compressive bandage without mobility limitations.

  11. Adaptive compression therapy for venous leg ulcers: a clinically effective, patient-centred approach.

    PubMed

    Harding, Keith G; Vanscheidt, Wolfgang; Partsch, Hugo; Caprini, Joseph A; Comerota, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    A prospective, randomised, 12-week study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of two compression methods for venous leg ulcers (VLUs); a new adaptive compression therapy (ACT) system, combining intermittent and sustained pneumatic compression (n = 38) and a conventional four-layer bandage system (n = 52). Primary outcomes were ulcer healing and safety. Secondary outcomes were comfort, compliance, ulcer pain, patient-perceived product performance and quality of life. Ulcer healing rate was similar (31·6% versus 42·3%, respectively, P = 0·30) between the treatments. Adverse events and patient-rated comfort were also similar. Average daily usage for the dual system was 10·5 and 1·8 hours in the sustained and intermittent modes, respectively, representing its use during 71% of waking hours. Predicted final ulcer pain was also similar (P = 0·68). Performance was subjectively better for adaptive compression and significantly higher for exudate management (P = 0·04), skin protection (P < 0·001), removal ease (P = 0·0007), bathing (P < 0·0001) and sleep comfort (P = 0·0405). The adjusted final quality-of-life score was 0·1025 higher for adaptive compression (P = 0·0375). Subjects with healed ulcers attained higher final scores than unhealed subjects (P = 0·0004). This study provides evidence that ACT is comparably efficacious to successfully heal VLUs compared with four-layer bandage management but is better accepted and achieves higher patient-reported quality-of-life scores in these challenging patients. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Providing cost-effective treatment of hard-to-heal wounds in the community through use of NPWT.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Jane

    2015-06-01

    The treatment of non-healing wounds accounts for a high proportion of wound care costs. Advanced technology treatments, such as negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), could be cost-effective if they result in faster healing. The objective of this study is to assess the effect on healing and the cost-effectiveness of a single-use NPWT (i.e PICO by Smith & Nephew) when used on hard-to-heal wounds in a community setting. This was a cohort case study in which wounds were treated with NWPT for 2 weeks. Wounds were assessed every 2-4 weeks to a healed state. The weekly cost of treatment prior to intervention, that is, the products used and nurse time, were compared with treatment costs associated with NWPT and after a return to standard treatment. The study included 9 patients with leg ulcers or pressure ulcers that had been slow healing or non-healing for at least 6 weeks. While treated with NPWT, the average weekly reduction in wound size was 21%. The wound size achieved with NPWT was reached on average 10 weeks earlier than predicted. The increased healing rate continued after PICO stopped and 5 wounds healed on average 8 weeks later. Frequency of dressing changes fell from 4 times weekly at baseline to 2 times a week with NPWT and to 1.8 after NPWT stopped. Weekly cost of treatment with NPWT was, on average, 1.6 times higher than the baseline, but fell to 3 times less when NPWT stopped owing to the reduction in dressing changes. The amount of change in healing rate was considerably higher than the increase in costs associated with NPWT. NWPT is a cost-effective treatment for hard-to-heal wounds. Wounds decreased in size and healed more quickly under NWPT treatment than under standard treatment. Additional NPWT costs can be quickly offset by faster healing and a shortened treatment period.

  13. Estimating incision healing rate for surgically implanted acoustic transmitters from recaptured fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoonyan, Abby; Kraus, Richard T.; Faust, Matthew D.; Vandergoot, Christopher; Cooke, Steven J.; Cook, H. Andrew; Hayden, Todd A.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags has become a common method in fishery research, but rarely are fish examined by scientists after release to understand the extent that surgical incisions have healed. Walleye (Sander vitreus) are a valuable, highly exploited fishery resource in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Here, fishery capture of walleye with internal acoustic transmitters combined with a high reward program provided multiple opportunities to examine photographs and quantify the status of surgical incisions. Walleye (n = 926) from reef and river spawning populations in Lake Erie and Lake Huron were implanted with acoustic transmitters during spring spawning events from 2011 to 2016. Incisions were closed with polydioxanone monofilament using two to three interrupted sutures. Out of 276 recaptured fish, 60 incision sites were clearly visible in photographs, and these were scored by two independent readers for incision closure, inflammation, and the presence of sutures.Results While incision sites were completely closed by 61 days post-release (95% CI 44–94), sutures remained for up to 866 days. Sutures were expelled serially during a protracted period, and the probability of observing at least one suture in a recaptured fish declined below 50% after 673 days (95% CI 442–1016). Inflammation at the incision increased during the first 71 days and then declined monotonically, remaining detectable at low levels.Conclusion Our results emphasized that sutures remained in free-ranging fish past the time when they were beneficial for incision healing. Most dissolvable sutures have been designed for use in endotherms where the body temperature and internal milieu differ dramatically from the conditions experienced by fishes in temperate climates. Identification of new suture materials for fish that facilitate healing while absorbing or dissolving in a reasonable period (e.g., a few weeks to three months) in colder temperatures (e.g., <12 °C) would

  14. Takayasu arteritis and ulcerative colitis: high rate of co-occurrence and genetic overlap.

    PubMed

    Terao, Chikashi; Matsumura, Takayoshi; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Kirino, Yohei; Maejima, Yasuhiro; Nakaoka, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Meiko; Amiya, Eisuke; Tamura, Natsuko; Nakajima, Toshiki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Horita, Tetsuya; Matsukura, Mitsuru; Kochi, Yuta; Ogimoto, Akiyoshi; Yamamoto, Motohisa; Takahashi, Hiroki; Nakayamada, Shingo; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Wada, Yoko; Narita, Ichiei; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Ohmura, Koichiro; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Tanemoto, Kazuo; Miyata, Tetsuro; Kuwana, Masataka; Komuro, Issei; Tabara, Yasuharu; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2015-05-01

    Takayasu arteritis (TAK) is a systemic vasculitis affecting large arteries and large branches of the aorta. Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a prevalent autoimmune colitis. Since TAK and UC share HLA-B*52:01 and IL12B as genetic determinants, and since there are case reports of the co-occurrence of these diseases, we hypothesized that UC is a common complication of TAK. We undertook this study to perform a large-scale analysis of TAK, both to evaluate the prevalence of concurrent cases of TAK and UC and to identify and estimate susceptibility genes shared between the 2 diseases. We analyzed a total of 470 consecutive patients with TAK from 14 institutions. We characterized patients with TAK and UC by analyzing clinical manifestations and genetic components. Genetic overlapping of TAK and UC was evaluated with the use of UC susceptibility single-nucleotide polymorphisms by comparing risk directions and effect sizes between susceptibility to the 2 diseases. Thirty of 470 patients with TAK had UC (6.4% [95% confidence interval 4.3-9.0]). This percentage was strikingly higher than that expected from the prevalence of UC in Japan. Patients with TAK complicated with UC developed TAK at an earlier stage of life (P = 0.0070) and showed significant enrichment of HLA-B*52:01 compared to TAK patients without UC (P = 1.0 × 10(-5) ) (odds ratio 12.14 [95% confidence interval 2.96-107.23]). The 110 non-HLA markers of susceptibility to UC significantly displayed common risk directions with susceptibility to TAK (P = 0.0054) and showed significant departure of permutation P values from expected P values (P < 1.0 × 10(-10) ). UC is a major complication of TAK. These 2 diseases share a significant proportion of their genetic background, and HLA-B*52:01 may play a central role in their co-occurrence. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  15. The impact of Clostridum difficile on surgical rate among ulcerative colitis patients: A systemic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiang-Chen; Shen, Jun; Zhu, Qi; Ran, Zhi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the impact of Clostridum difficile infection (CDI) on patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Clostridium difficile infection causes greater morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of C. difficile on surgical risk among ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ACP Journal Club, DARE, CMR, and HTA. Studies were included if fulfilled the following criteria: (1) Cohort or case-control studies, which involved a comparison group that lacked CDI, (2) Patients were given a primary diagnosis of UC, (3) Comorbidity of CDI was evaluated by enzyme immunoassay of stool for C. difficile toxin A and B or C. difficile stool culture, (4) Studies evaluated surgical rate, and (5) Studies reported an estimate of odds ratio, accompanied by a corresponding measure of uncertainty. Five studies with 2380 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Overall, meta-analysis showed that UC with CDI patients had a significant higher surgical rate than patients with UC alone. (OR=1.76, 95% CI=1.36-2.28). C. difficile infection increased the surgical rate in UC patients. However, results should be interpreted with caution, given the limitations of this stud.

  16. Deformity of duodenal bulb, gastric metaplasia of duodenal regenerating mucosa and recurrence of duodenal ulcer: A correlated study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Chao; Pan, Shiann; Lien, Gi-Shih; Liao, Cheng-Hsiung; Chen, Sheng-Hsuan; Cheng, Yeong-Shan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation among the presence and degree of gastric metaplasia of duodenal regenerating mucosa, the deformity of bulb and the recurrence of duodenal ulcer. METHODS: A total of 99 patients with duodenal ulcer were treated with H2-antagonist with or without antimicrobial therapy. All patients received follow-up endoscopic examinations 6 wk after treatment. When the ulcer(s) were noted to be healed, two biopsies were taken from the ulcer scar for histological study of gastric metaplasia, and 4 biopsies were taken from antrum for Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) study. Out of these cases, 44 received further follow-up endoscopic examinations after 3, 6 and 12 mo respectively for studying the recurrence rate of duodenal ulcers. The correlation among ulcer recurrence, degree of gastric metaplasia of regenerating mucosa, bulbar deformity, and colonization of H pylori in the stomach was then studied. RESULTS: The results showed that there was a strong correlation between the deformity of duodenal bulb and the degree of gastric metaplasia of regenerating duodenal mucosa. The recurrence rate of duodenal ulcer had a significant difference between patients with and without H pylori colonization in the stomach (P<0.001). The greater the degree of gastric metaplasia of duodenal regenerating mucosa, the higher the recurrence rate of duodenal ulcer (P = 0.021). The more deformed the duodenal bulb, the higher the incidence of recurrence of duodenal ulcer (P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: There is a correlation among deformity of duodenal bulb, gastric metaplasia of duodenal regenerating mucosa and recurrence of duodenal ulcer. A more severely deformed duodenal bulb is closely related to a greater extent of gastric metaplasia. Both factors contribute to the recurrence of duodenal ulcer. PMID:15793868

  17. Prevention of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-associated gastrointestinal symptoms and ulcer complications.

    PubMed

    Peura, David A

    2004-09-06

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) produce symptoms of dyspepsia and peptic ulcer disease in up to 50% and up to 20%, respectively, of individuals taking them. Risk factors for NSAID-related gastric injury include age >70 years, history of ulcer disease, use of multiple agents (e.g., > or =2 NSAIDs, or an NSAID plus aspirin--even at cardioprotective doses), high doses of an NSAID, and concurrent use of corticosteroids or anticoagulants. In NSAID users, infection with Helicobacter pylori can produce additive or synergistic gastric mucosal injury. Several clinical strategies can decrease the risk for dyspepsia, ulceration, and the more serious complications in NSAID users. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) co-therapy has been shown to lower the incidence of dyspepsia in those taking NSAIDs. In those with an active ulcer, PPI therapy produces ulcer healing even in "tough-to-treat" individuals who require ongoing NSAID therapy. Maintenance of ulcer healing is significantly greater in those who receive ongoing PPI treatment compared with placebo, and adverse events and treatment withdrawals are fewer compared with their occurrence in persons treated with misoprostol. In those not receiving aspirin therapy, the use of an NSAID that is a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 may result in fewer gastrointestinal symptoms compared with a traditional agent; however, studies have failed to show any decrease in healthcare resource utilization (including outpatient or emergency room visits, hospitalization rate, or use of any resource) with COX-2-selective therapy.

  18. A Comprehensive Program to Reduce Rates of Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers in a System of Community Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Englebright, Jane; Westcott, Ruth; McManus, Kathryn; Kleja, Kacie; Helm, Colleen; Korwek, Kimberly M; Perlin, Jonathan B

    2018-03-01

    The prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (PrUs) has significant consequences for patient outcomes and the cost of care. Providers are challenged with evaluating available evidence and best practices, then implementing programs and motivating change in various facility environments. In a large system of community hospitals, the Reducing Hospital Acquired-PrUs Program was developed to provide a toolkit of best practices, timely and appropriate data for focusing efforts, and continuous implementation support. Baseline data on PrU rates helped focus efforts on the most vulnerable patients and care situations. Facilities were empowered to use and adapt available resources to meet local needs and to share best practices for implementation across the system. Outcomes were measured by the rate of hospital-acquired PrUs, as gathered from patient discharge records. The rate of hospital-acquired stage III and IV PrUs decreased 66.3% between 2011 and 2013. Of the 149 participating facilities, 40 (27%) had zero hospital-acquired stage III and IV PrUs and 77 (52%) had a reduction in their PrU rate. Rates of all PrUs documented as present on admission did not change during this period. A comparison of different strategies used by the most successful facilities illustrated the necessity of facility-level flexibility and recognition of local workflows and patient demographics. Driven by the combination of a repository of evidence-based tools and best practices, readily available data on PrU rates, and local flexibility with processes, the Reducing Hospital Acquired-PrUs Program represents the successful operationalization of improvement in a wide variety of facilities.

  19. Acellular fetal bovine dermal matrix for treatment of chronic ulcerations of the midfoot associated with Charcot neuroarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Kavros, Steven J

    2012-08-01

    Gross deformity of the foot in Charcot neuroarthropathy can lead to collapse and subsequent ulceration, infection, amputation, or premature death. This study evaluated healing of midfoot ulcerations of Charcot neuroarthropathy using PriMatrix, a novel acellular fetal bovine dermal matrix. In this retrospective analysis, 20 patients with ulcerations of the midfoot associated with Charcot neuroarthropathy were treated with either PriMatrix in addition to standard wound care (PriMatrix group,n = 12) or standard wound care alone (control group, n = 8). All patients had chronic, nonhealing foot ulcerations of at least 2250 mm(3) for a minimum of 30 days duration. All foot ulcerations were full thickness with subcutaneous involvement. Ankle brachial index ≥0.90 and/or transcutaneous oximetry (TcPo(2)) ≥40 mm Hg at the periulcer site was necessary for inclusion. Patients were excluded if they had acute or chronic osteomyelitis of the foot. Demography, risk factors, baseline severity of Charcot neuroarthropathy, and wound volume (control 4078 mm(3), PriMatrix 3737.5 mm(3), P = nonsignificant) were similar between treatment groups. Mean time to healing in the PriMatrix group (116 days, 95% CI = 109-123) was significantly shorter than in the control group (180 days, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 171-188); P < .0001. A significantly faster rate of healing was observed with PriMatrix (87.9 mm(3)/wk, 95% CI = 115.2% to 60.6%) compared with control (59.0 mm(3)/wk, 95% CI = 72.8% to 45.3%); P < .0001). The significantly faster rate of healing and steeper slope of volume reduction in the PriMatrix group warrants further investigation into its effects on healing of neuropathic ulcerations and potential limb salvage.

  20. Long-term outcome study of growth factor-treated pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Payne, W G; Ochs, D E; Meltzer, D D; Hill, D P; Mannari, R J; Robson, L E; Robson, M C

    2001-01-01

    Exogenous application of growth factors have been reported in an attempt to accelerate healing of chronic wounds. Most of the trials were of brief duration with short to no follow-up periods. Long-term outcome studies are sparse for pressure ulcer therapies with success rates around 30% for both operative and nonoperative treatments. Follow-up evaluations were performed serially up to 12 months for patients completing a 35 day blinded, placebo-controlled cytokine clinical trial of pressure ulcers. Fifty-four of 61 patients completed the follow-up period with 68.5% of the patients (37 of 54) being healed after 1 year. Of patients healing > or =85% during the active treatment phase, 84.6% were healed after 1 year compared with 61% of those that healed <85% during treatment (P <0.05). Long-term outcome was better in this growth factor trial than with surgical or standard nonoperative treatment of pressure ulcers. Since only patients receiving exogenously applied cytokines achieved >85% closure during the treatment phase of the trial, the excellent long-term outcome appears attributable to the cytokine therapy.

  1. Peptic Ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your ... Comes and goes for several days or weeks Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest ...

  2. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... ulcers: Drinking too much alcohol Regular use of aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( ... pylori infection. Your ulcer is caused by taking aspirin or NSAIDs. Your doctor may also prescribe this ...

  3. Intervention with Formulated Collagen Gel for Chronic Heel Pressure Ulcers in Older Adults with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Agosti, Jennifer K; Chandler, Lois A

    2015-11-01

    Chronic pressure ulcers (PrUs), ulcers that fail to progress through the expected phases of wound healing in a timely fashion, are not only a concern for the patients afflicted with them, but are also a significant burden for the long-term-care facilities in which patients reside. The heel is the second most common location for PrUs. Morbidity and mortality rates for heel PrUs, particularly in the diabetic population, are alarming. Therefore, a consistently effective, cost-conscious, and user-friendly topical treatment for heel ulcers would be welcomed by patients and clinicians. This article describes a marked and rapid improvement in wound granulation in 3 older adult patients following weekly treatment for 8 weeks of chronic (≥1-year duration) heel ulcers with an easy-to-use, cost-effective, topical, formulated collagen gel.

  4. Effect of Custom-Made Footwear on Foot Ulcer Recurrence in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bus, Sicco A.; Waaijman, Roelof; Arts, Mark; de Haart, Mirjam; Busch-Westbroek, Tessa; van Baal, Jeff; Nollet, Frans

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Custom-made footwear is the treatment of choice to prevent foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes. This footwear primarily aims to offload plantar regions at high ulcer risk. However, ulcer recurrence rates are high. We assessed the effect of offloading-improved custom-made footwear and the role of footwear adherence on plantar foot ulcer recurrence. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We randomly assigned 171 neuropathic diabetic patients with a recently healed plantar foot ulcer to custom-made footwear with improved and subsequently preserved offloading (∼20% peak pressure relief by modifying the footwear) or to usual care (i.e., nonimproved custom-made footwear). Primary outcome was plantar foot ulcer recurrence in 18 months. Secondary outcome was ulcer recurrence in patients with an objectively measured adherence of ≥80% of steps taken. RESULTS On the basis of intention-to-treat, 33 of 85 patients (38.8%) with improved footwear and 38 of 86 patients (44.2%) with usual care had a recurrent ulcer (relative risk −11%, odds ratio 0.80 [95% CI 0.44–1.47], P = 0.48). Ulcer-free survival curves were not significantly different between groups (P = 0.40). In the 79 patients (46% of total group) with high adherence, 9 of 35 (25.7%) with improved footwear and 21 of 44 (47.8%) with usual care had a recurrent ulcer (relative risk −46%, odds ratio 0.38 [0.15–0.99], P = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS Offloading-improved custom-made footwear does not significantly reduce the incidence of plantar foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes compared with custom-made footwear that does not undergo such improvement, unless it is worn as recommended. PMID:24130357

  5. Clinical and cost-effectiveness of compression hosiery versus compression bandages in treatment of venous leg ulcers (Venous leg Ulcer Study IV, VenUS IV): a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Rebecca L; Gabe, Rhian; Ali, Shehzad; Adderley, Una; Bland, J Martin; Cullum, Nicky A; Dumville, Jo C; Iglesias, Cynthia P; Kang'ombe, Arthur R; Soares, Marta O; Stubbs, Nikki C; Torgerson, David J

    2014-03-08

    0% bandage; p=0·02). 300 participants had 895 adverse events, of which 85 (9·5%) were classed as serious but unrelated to trial treatment. Two-layer compression hosiery is a viable alternative to the four-layer bandage-it is equally as effective at healing venous leg ulcers. However, a higher rate of treatment changes in participants in the hosiery group than in the bandage group suggests that hosiery might not be suitable for all patients. NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme (07/60/26). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Compression stockings for treating venous leg ulcers: measurement of interface pressure under a new ulcer kit.

    PubMed

    Partsch, B; Partsch, H

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the interface pressure of a newly designed two-layer compression stocking (Mediven ulcer kit Medi QMBH, Bayreuth, Germany) in different body positions and to compare the values with those obtained with another two-layer product. Interface pressure was measured on the distal medial leg in 16 legs of volunteers, with the basic layer alone and with the whole stocking kit in the supine, sitting and standing position for both stocking systems. The literature concerning ulcer-healing rates is reviewed. Mediven ulcerkit produced statistically significant higher pressure values than the ulcer stocking with a median resting value of 35.5 mmHg in the supine and 42.5 mmHg in the standing position. The pressure while standing comes close to values exerted by bandages. The basic layer alone applies a pressure of 20.5 mmHg. Especially designed compression stockings exerting sufficient interface pressure may be indicated in patients with small ulcers of short duration.

  7. Supervised exercise training as an adjunct therapy for venous leg ulcers: a randomized controlled feasibility trial.

    PubMed

    Klonizakis, M; Tew, G A; Gumber, A; Crank, H; King, B; Middleton, G; Michaels, J A

    2018-05-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are typically painful and heal slowly. Compression therapy offers high healing rates; however, improvements are not usually sustained. Exercise is a low-cost, low-risk and effective strategy for improving physical and mental health. Little is known about the feasibility and efficacy of supervised exercise training used in combination with compression therapy patients with VLUs. To assess the feasibility of a 12-week supervised exercise programme as an adjunct therapy to compression in patients with VLUs. This was a two-centre, two-arm, parallel-group, randomized feasibility trial. Thirty-nine patients with venous ulcers were recruited and randomized 1 : 1 either to exercise (three sessions weekly) plus compression therapy or compression only. Progress/success criteria included exercise attendance rate, loss to follow-up and patient preference. Baseline assessments were repeated at 12 weeks, 6 months and 1 year, with healing rate and time, ulcer recurrence and infection incidents documented. Intervention and healthcare utilization costs were calculated. Qualitative data were collected to assess participants' experiences. Seventy-two per cent of the exercise group participants attended all scheduled exercise sessions. No serious adverse events and only two exercise-related adverse events (both increased ulcer discharge) were reported. Loss to follow-up was 5%. At 12 months, median ulcer healing time was lower in the exercise group (13 vs. 34·7 weeks). Mean National Health Service costs were £813·27 for the exercise and £2298·57 for the control group. The feasibility and acceptability of both the supervised exercise programme in conjunction with compression therapy and the study procedures is supported. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists.

  8. SCI Survey to Determine Pressure Ulcer Vulnerability in the Outpatient Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    ULCER HX # DAYS TO 1ST PU SINCE INJURY # PUs SINCE INJURY AVG. LENGTH TO HEAL PU SURGERY NEEDED FOR PUs SURGERY TYPE TROCHANTER SACRUMISCHIUM HEELS OTHER PRESSURE ULCER LOCATIO OTHER MENTAL STATUS EDUC LEVEL: HGB HBA1C 8

  9. Which Clip? A Prospective Comparative Study of Retention Rates of Endoscopic Clips on Normal Mucosa and Ulcers in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Payal; Ji-Shin, Eun; Haito-Chavez, Yamile; Valeshabad, Ali K.; Akshintala, Venkata; Aguila, Gerard; Kumbhari, Vivek; Ruben, Dawn S.; Lennon, Anne-Marie; Singh, Vikesh; Canto, Marcia; Kalloo, Anthony; Khashab, Mouen A.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim: There are currently no data on the relative retention rates of the Instinct clip, Resolution clip, and QuickClip2Long. Also, it is unknown whether retention rate differs when clips are applied to ulcerated rather than normal mucosa. The aim of this study is to compare the retention rates of three commonly used endoscopic clips. Materials and Methods: Six pigs underwent upper endoscopy with placement of one of each of the three types of clips on normal mucosa in the gastric body. Three mucosal resections were also performed to create “ulcers”. Each ulcer was closed with placement of one of the three different clips. Repeat endoscopy was performed weekly for up to 4 weeks. Results: Only the Instinct and Resolution clips remained attached for the duration of the study (4 weeks). At each time point, a greater proportion of Instinct clips were retained on normal mucosa, followed by Resolution clips. QuickClip2Long had the lowest retention rate on normal mucosa. Similar retention rates of Instinct clips and Resolution clips were seen on simulated ulcers, although both were superior to QuickClip2Long. However, the difference did not reach statistical significance. All QuickClip2Long clips were dislodged at 4 weeks in both the groups. Conclusions: The Resolution and Instinct clips have comparable retention rates and both appeared to be better than the QuickClip2Long on normal mucosa-simulated ulcers; however this did not reach statistical significance. Both the Resolution clip and the Instinct clip may be preferred in clinical situations when long-term clip attachment is required, including marking of tumors for radiotherapy and anchoring feeding tubes or stents. Either of the currently available clips may be suitable for closure of iatrogenic mucosal defects without features of chronicity. PMID:25434317

  10. Impaired fracture healing with high non-union rates remains irreversible after traumatic brain injury in leptin-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Graef, F.; Seemann, R.; Garbe, A.; Schmidt-Bleek, K.; Schaser, K-D.; Keller, J.; Duda, G.; Tsitsilonis, S.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and long-bone fractures can show increased callus formation. This effect has already been reproduced in wild-type (wt) mice. However, the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Leptin is significantly increased following TBI, while its role in bone healing remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate fracture healing in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and to measure any possible impact of TBI on callus formation. 138 female, 12 weeks old, ob/ob mice were divided into four groups: Control, fracture, TBI and combined trauma. Osteotomies were stabilized with an external fixator; TBI was induced with Controlled Cortical Impact Injury. Callus bridging was weekly evaluated with in vivo micro-CT. Biomechanical testing was performed ex vivo. Micro-CT showed high non-union rates after three and four weeks in the fracture and combined trauma group. No differences were observed in callus volume, density and biomechanical properties at any time point. This study shows that bony bridging is impaired in the present leptin-deficient trauma model. Furthermore, the phenomenon of increased callus formation after TBI could not be reproduced in ob/ob mice, as in wt mice. Our findings suggest that the increased callus formation after TBI may be dependent on leptin signaling. PMID:28574414

  11. Self-healing of cracks formed in Silicon-Aluminum anodes electrochemically cycled at high lithiation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sandeep; Alpas, Ahmet T.

    2016-10-01

    Lithiation-induced volume changes in Si result in fracture and fragmentation of Si anodes in Li-ion batteries. This paper reports the self-healing behaviour of cracks observed in micron-sized Si particles dispersed in a ductile Al matrix of a Si-Al electrode electrochemically cycled vs. Li/Li+ using a high lithiation rate of 15.6 C. Cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed that an amorphous layer with a depth up to ∼100 nm was formed at the surface of Si particles. In-situ optical microscopy performed during electrochemical experiments revealed development of cracks in Si particles as the voltage decreased to 0.02 V during lithiation. Self-healing of cracks in Si particles occurred in two steps: i) arresting of the crack growth at the Si/Al interface as the surrounding Al matrix had a higher fracture toughness and thus acted as a barrier to crack propagation, and ii) closure of cracks due to compressive stresses applied to the crack faces by the amorphous zones formed on each side of the crack paths.

  12. Nizatidine versus placebo in active benign gastric ulcer disease: an eight-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind comparison. The Nizatidine Benign Gastric Ulcer Disease Study Group.

    PubMed

    Cloud, M L; Enas, N; Offen, W W

    1992-09-01

    To determine if 150 mg nizatidine twice daily or 300 mg nizatidine at bedtime are similarly effective and to compare each dose with placebo in healing benign gastric ulcers and relieving peptic ulcer symptoms. This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel comparison. The study was conducted at 74 gastroenterology and internal medicine clinics in the United States and Canada. Four hundred fifty-six patients with active benign gastric ulcer documented by endoscopy participated in the study. On the basis of a computer-generated randomization list, patients were assigned sequentially to receive either 150 mg nizatidine twice daily (n = 151), 300 mg nizatidine once daily at bedtime and identically appearing placebo capsules in the morning (n = 153), or placebo capsules twice daily (n = 152). Treatment lasted for 8 weeks unless healing was documented by endoscopy after 4 weeks. Antacid tablets (aluminum hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide, simethicone combination) were supplied for relief of symptoms. Both doses of nizatidine significantly improved healing rates at 8 weeks compared with placebo. Daytime and nighttime symptom severity was improved by both nizatidine regimens at end point (p less than 0.015 versus placebo, two-tailed test). Antacid use was similar for all groups in the end point analysis. Patient well-being was significantly better in patients treated with nizatidine than in patients in the placebo group ((p less than 0.04, two-tailed test). No clinically significant differences in the incidence of adverse clinical or laboratory events were noted. Nizatidine, 300 mg at bedtime and 150 mg twice daily, resulted in greater healing of benign gastric ulcers than placebo treatment after 8 weeks. Relief of the symptoms of gastric ulcer was significantly better in the patients receiving nizatidine treatment versus placebo treatment.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of wound management in France: pressure ulcers and venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Meaume, S; Gemmen, E

    2002-06-01

    This study set out to define realistic protocols of care for the treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers and pressure ulcers in France and, by developing cost-effectiveness models, to compare the different protocols of care for the two ulcer groups, enabling a calculation of direct medical costs per ulcer healed in a typical French health insurance plan. Clinical outcomes and some treatment patterns were obtained from published literature. Validations of different treatment patterns were developed using an expert consensus panel similar to the Delphi approach. Costs were calculated based on national averages and estimates from the UK and Germany. The models were used to measure costs per healed ulcer over a 12-week period. For both the pressure ulcer and venous leg ulcer models, three protocols of care were identified. For pressure ulcers and venous leg ulcers, the hydrocolloid DuoDERM (ConvaTec, also known as Granuflex in the UK and Varihesive in Germany) was most cost-effective in France. The combination of published data and expert consensus opinion is a valid technique, and in this case suggests that treating pressure ulcers and venous leg ulcers with hydrocolloid dressings is more cost-effective than treating them with saline gauze, in spite of the lower unit cost of the latter.

  14. Low dose aspirin as adjuvant treatment for venous leg ulceration: pragmatic, randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial (Aspirin4VLU).

    PubMed

    Jull, Andrew; Wadham, Angela; Bullen, Chris; Parag, Varsha; Kerse, Ngaire; Waters, Jill

    2017-11-24

    Objective  To determine the effect of low dose aspirin on ulcer healing in patients with venous leg ulcers. Design  Pragmatic, community based, parallel group, double blind, randomised controlled trial. Setting  Five community nursing centres in New Zealand. Participants  251 adults with venous leg ulcers who could safely be treated with aspirin or placebo: 125 were randomised to aspirin and 126 to placebo. Interventions  150 mg oral aspirin daily or matching placebo for up to 24 weeks treatment, with compression therapy as standard background treatment. Main outcome measures  The primary outcome was time to complete healing of the reference ulcer (largest ulcer if more than one ulcer was present). Secondary outcomes included proportion of participants healed, change in ulcer area, change in health related quality of life, and adverse events. Analysis was by intention to treat. Results  The median number of days to healing of the reference ulcer was 77 in the aspirin group and 69 in the placebo group (hazard ratio 0.85, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 1.13, P=0.25). The number of participants healed at the endpoint was 88 (70%) in the aspirin group and 101 (80%) in the placebo group (risk difference -9.8%, 95% confidence interval -20.4% to 0.9%, P=0.07). Estimated change in ulcer area was 4.1 cm 2 in the aspirin group and 4.8 cm 2 in the placebo group (mean difference -0.7 cm 2 , 95% confidence interval -1.9 to 0.5 cm 2 , P=0.25). 40 adverse events occurred among 29 participants in the aspirin group and 37 adverse events among 27 participants in the placebo group (incidence rate ratio 1.1, 95% confidence interval 0.7 to 1.7, P=0.71). Conclusion  Our findings do not support the use of low dose aspirin as adjuvant treatment for venous leg ulcers. Trial registration  ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02158806. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Treatment of pressure ulcers with autologous bone marrow nuclear cells in patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sarasúa, J González; López, S Pérez; Viejo, M Álvarez; Basterrechea, M Pérez; Rodríguez, A Fernández; Gutiérrez, A Ferrero; Gala, J García; Menéndez, Y Menéndez; Augusto, D Escudero; Arias, A Pérez; Hernández, J Otero

    2011-01-01

    Context Pressure ulcers are especially difficult to treat in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and recurrence rates are high. Prompted by encouraging results obtained using bone marrow stem cells to treat several diseases including chronic wounds, this study examines the use of autologous stem cells from bone marrow to promote the healing of pressure ulcers in patients with SCI. Objective To obtain preliminary data on the use of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) to treat pressure ulcers in terms of clinical outcome, procedure safety, and treatment time. Participants Twenty-two patients with SCI (19 men, 3 women; mean age 56.41 years) with single type IV pressure ulcers of more than 4 months duration. Interventions By minimally invasive surgery, the ulcers were debrided and treated with BM-MNCs obtained by Ficoll density gradient separation of autologous bone marrow aspirates drawn from the iliac crest. Results In 19 patients (86.36%), the pressure ulcers treated with BM-MNCs had fully healed after a mean time of 21 days. The number of MNCs isolated was patient dependent, although similar clinical outcomes were observed in each case. Compared to conventional surgical treatment, mean intra-hospital stay was reduced from 85.16 to 43.06 days. Following treatment, 5 minutes of daily wound care was required per patient compared to 20 minutes for conventional surgery. During a mean follow-up of 19 months, none of the resolved ulcers recurred. Conclusions Our data indicate that cell therapy using autologous BM-MNCs could be an option to treat type IV pressure ulcers in patients with SCI, avoiding major surgical intervention. PMID:21756569

  16. [Vacuum-assisted therapy for various wound types including diabetic foot ulcer].

    PubMed

    Farah, Raymond; Gantus, Maher; Kogan, Leonid

    2011-03-01

    Vacuum is a noninvasive system that creates a localized controlled negative pressure environment. In this study, vacuum was provided by the V.A.C. Therapy system, which promotes wound healing by delayed primary or secondary intention through creating a moist wound environment, preparing the wound bed for closure, reducing edema, and promoting formation and perfusion of granulation tissue. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy is indicated for use in all care settings and for a variety of wound types including diabetic foot ulcers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate safety and clinical efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) compared with advanced moist wound therapy and standard treatment to treat foot ulcers in diabetic patients. This trial enrolled 43 patients; most of them were diabetic patients at any age with various skin ulcers and diabetic foot. These patients were divided into two groups, 17 patients were treated with vacuum and the 26 patients in the control group were treated with standard therapy including debridement. A greater proportion of foot and skin ulcers achieved complete ulcer closure with vacuum-assisted therapy p<0.001 compared with the standard therapy. Vacuum therapy significantly decreased the duration and frequency of admission p=0.032 and decreased the rate of amputation p<0.001. Results of our trial support other studies and demonstrate that vacuum is as safe as and more efficacious than standard therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. A significantly greater number of patients achieved complete ulcer closure and granulation tissue formation with this therapy. The study group showed a significant reduction in the median time needed to heal ulcers, reduction of the number of admissions and amputation frequency.

  17. A systematic approach for the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic peptic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chen-Shuan; Chiang, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Yi-Chia

    2015-01-01

    An idiopathic peptic ulcer is defined as an ulcer with unknown cause or an ulcer that appears to arise spontaneously. The first step in treatment is to exclude common possible causes, including Helicobacter pylori infection, infection with other pathogens, ulcerogenic drugs, and uncommon diseases with upper gastrointestinal manifestations. When all known causes are excluded, a diagnosis of idiopathic peptic ulcer can be made. A patient whose peptic ulcer is idiopathic may have a higher risk for complicated ulcer disease, a poorer response to gastric acid suppressants, and a higher recurrence rate after treatment. Risk factors associated with this disease may include genetic predisposition, older age, chronic mesenteric ischemia, smoking, concomitant diseases, a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists score, and higher stress. Therefore, the diagnosis and management of emerging disease should systematically explore all known causes and treat underlying disease, while including regular endoscopic surveillance to confirm ulcer healing and the use of proton-pump inhibitors on a case-by-case basis. PMID:26354049

  18. Wound Blush Obtainment Is the Most Important Angiographic Endpoint for Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Makoto; Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Iida, Osamu; Yamauchi, Yasutaka; Kawasaki, Daizo; Yokoi, Yoshiaki; Soga, Yoshimistu; Ohura, Norihiko; Nakamura, Masato

    2017-01-23

    This study aimed to assess the optimal angiographic endpoint of endovascular therapy (EVT) for wound healing. Several reports have demonstrated acceptable patency and limb salvage rates following infrapopliteal interventions for the treatment of critical limb ischemia (CLI). However, the optimal angiographic endpoint of EVT remains unclear. We conducted a subanalysis of the prospective multicenter OLIVE (Endovascular Treatment for Infrainguinal Vessels in Patients with Critical Limb Ischemia) registry investigation assessing patients who received infrainguinal EVT for CLI. We analyzed data from 185 limbs with ischemic ulcerations classified as Rutherford class 5 or 6, managed with EVT alone (i.e., not undergoing bypass surgery). The wound healing rate after EVT was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The association between final angiographic data and wound healing was assessed employing a Cox proportional hazards model. The overall wound healing rate was 73.5%. The probabilities of wound healing in patients with wound blush obtainment was significantly higher than that of those without wound blush (79.6% vs. 46.5%; p = 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, wound blush obtainment was an independent predictor of wound healing. The presence of wound blush after EVT is significantly associated with wound healing. Wound blush as an angiographic endpoint for EVT may serve as a novel predictor of wound healing in patients with CLI. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Maggots as a wound debridement agent for chronic venous leg ulcers under graduated compression bandages: A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Davies, C E; Woolfrey, G; Hogg, N; Dyer, J; Cooper, A; Waldron, J; Bulbulia, R; Whyman, M R; Poskitt, K R

    2015-12-01

    Slough in chronic venous leg ulcers may be associated with delayed healing. The purpose of this study was to assess larval debridement in chronic venous leg ulcers and to assess subsequent effect on healing. All patients with chronic leg ulcers presenting to the leg ulcer service were evaluated for the study. Exclusion criteria were: ankle brachial pressure indices <0.85 or >1.25, no venous reflux on duplex and <20% of ulcer surface covered with slough. Participants were randomly allocated to either 4-layer compression bandaging alone or 4-layer compression bandaging + larvae. Surface areas of ulcer and slough were assessed on day 4; 4-layer compression bandaging was then continued and ulcer size was measured every 2 weeks for up to 12 weeks. A total of 601 patients with chronic leg ulcers were screened between November 2008 and July 2012. Of these, 20 were randomised to 4-layer compression bandaging and 20 to 4-layer compression bandaging + larvae. Median (range) ulcer size was 10.8 (3-21.3) cm(2) and 8.1 (4.3-13.5) cm(2) in the 4-layer compression bandaging and 4-layer compression bandaging + larvae groups, respectively (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.184). On day 4, median reduction in slough area was 3.7 cm(2) in the 4-layer compression bandaging group (P < 0.05) and 4.2 cm(2) (P < 0.001) in the 4-layer compression bandaging + larvae group. Median percentage area reduction of slough was 50% in the 4-layer compression bandaging group and 84% in the 4-layer compression bandaging + larvae group (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.05). The 12-week healing rate was 73% and 68% in the 4-layer compression bandaging and 4-layer compression bandaging + larvae groups, respectively (Kaplan-Meier analysis, P = 0.664). Larval debridement therapy improves wound debridement in chronic venous leg ulcers treated with multilayer compression bandages. However, no subsequent improvement in ulcer healing was demonstrated. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Use of Antibiotic Impregnated Resorbable Beads Reduces Pressure Ulcer Recurrence: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Khansa, Ibrahim; Barker, Jenny C; Ghatak, Piya Das; Sen, Chandan K; Gordillo, Gayle M

    2018-05-17

    Recurrence of pressure ulcers remains common. We have employed resorbable antibiotic beads as a therapeutic strategy to deliver high local antibiotic concentrations to the debridement site. Our objective was to determine whether the use of resorbable antibiotic- beads would reduce pressure ulcer recurrence. We reviewed all stage IV pressure ulcers treated with excision, partial ostectomy and flap coverage over 16 years. Baseline patient factors (location of ulcer, presence of osteomyelitis, preoperative prealbumin), surgical factors (type of flap, use of antibiotic beads, bone culture results) and postoperative outcomes (ulcer recurrence at 1 year, dehiscence, seroma, cellulitis) were collected. Outcomes of patients who received antibiotic-impregnated beads were compared to those who did not. 86 patients with 120 stage IV pressure ulcers underwent excision and flap coverage. This included 16 ulcers where antibiotic beads were used, and 104 where they were not. The overall ulcer recurrence rate at 12 months was 35.8%. The recurrence rate in the group treated with antibiotic beads was significantly lower than the group without beads (12.5% vs. 39.4%, p=0.03). Overall, complication rates between the two groups were similar (43.8% vs. 51.9%, p=0.54). No systemic or local toxicity from antibiotic beads occurred. Scanning electron microscopy images of sacral bone from one case showed bacterial biofilm even after debridement. Pressure ulcer recurrence at 1 year after excision and flap coverage decreased significantly with the use of resorbable antibiotic beads. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the Wound Healing Society.

  1. Long-term outcomes of extracorporeal shockwave therapy for chronic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Ta; Yang, Ya-Ju; Liu, Rue-Tsuan; Kuo, Yur-Ren

    2014-06-15

    Recent studies showed that extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) is effective in the treatment of chronic foot ulcers in short term. However, the long-term effects of ESWT in chronic foot ulcers are unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of ESWT in chronic foot ulcers with 5-y follow-up. The study cohort consisted of 67 patients with 72 ulcers including 38 patients with 40 ulcers in the diabetes mellitus (DM) group and 29 patients with 32 ulcers in the non-diabetes mellitus (non-DM) group. Each patient received ESWT to the affected foot twice per week for 3 wk for a total of six treatments. The evaluations included clinical assessment for the ulcer status, local blood flow perfusion, and analysis of mortality and morbidity. The results showed completely healed ulcers in 55.6% and 57.4% of total series, 48% and 43% of DM group, and 66% and 71% of non-DM group at 1 and 5 y (P = 0.022 and P = 0.027), respectively. The mortality rate was 15% in total series, 24% in DM group, and 3% in non-DM group (P = 0.035). The rate of amputation was 11% in total series, 17% in DM group, and 3.6% in non-DM group (P = 0.194). The blood flow perfusion rate significantly increased after ESWT for up to 1 yr but decreased from 1-5 y in both groups. However, the non-DM group showed significantly better blood flow perfusion than the DM group at 5 y (P = 0.04). ESWT appears effective in chronic diabetic and nondiabetic foot ulcers. However, the effects decreased from 1-5 y after treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ketorolac Administered in the Recovery Room for Acute Pain Management Does Not Affect Healing Rates of Femoral and Tibial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Donohue, David; Sanders, Drew; Serrano-Riera, Rafa; Jordan, Charles; Gaskins, Roger; Sanders, Roy; Sagi, H Claude

    2016-09-01

    To determine whether ketorolac administered in the immediate perioperative period affects the rate of nonunion in femoral and tibial shaft fractures. Retrospective comparative study. Single Institution, Academic Level 1 Trauma Center. Three hundred and thirteen skeletally mature patients with 137 femoral shaft (OTA 32) and 191 tibial shaft (OTA 42) fractures treated with intramedullary rod fixation. Eighty patients with 33 femoral shaft and 52 tibial shaft fractures were administered ketorolac within the first 24 hours after surgery (group 1-study group). Two-hundred thirty-three patients with 104 femoral shaft and 139 tibial shaft fractures were not (group 2-control group). Rate of reoperation for repair of a nonunion and time to union. Average time to union of the femur was 147 days for group 1 and 159 days for group 2 (P = 0.57). Average time to union of the tibia was 175 days for group 1 and 175 days for group 2 (P = 0.57). There were 3 femoral nonunions (9%) in group 1 and eleven femoral nonunions (11.6%) in group 2 (P = 1.00). There were 3 tibial nonunions (5.8%) in group 1 and 17 tibial nonunions (12.2%) in group 2 (P = 0.29). The average dose of ketorolac for patients who healed their fracture was 85 mg, whereas it was 50 mg for those who did not (P = 0.27). All patients with a nonunion in the study group were current smokers. Ketorolac administered in the first 24 hours after fracture repair for acute pain management does not seem to have a negative impact on time to healing or incidence of nonunion for femoral or tibial shaft fractures. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  3. The pathophysiology of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Brooks, F P

    1985-11-01

    Heterogeneity is the most important consideration in the pathophysiology of peptic ulcer disease. Acute ulcers and erosions present clinically with gastrointestinal bleeding or perforation. If they heal there is no predictable recurrence. Factors concerned with mucosal defense are relatively more important than aggressive factors such as acid and pepsin. Local ischemia is the earliest recognizable gross lesion. The gastric mucosa is at least as vulnerable as the duodenal mucosa and probably more so. Most drug-induced ulcers occur in the stomach. Chronic or recurrent true peptic ulcers (penetrating the muscularis mucosae) usually present with abdominal pain. Many duodenal ulcer patients report that the pain occurs when the stomach is empty or is relieved by food, and follows a pattern of relatively long periods of freedom from symptoms between recurrences. Approximately 50% of patients experience a recurrence within a year if anti-ulcer medication is stopped. In most western countries recurrent duodenal ulcer is more common than gastric ulcer. Peptic ulcer disease is also more common in men. Recent evidence indicates genetic and familial factors in duodenal ulcer and increased acid-pepsin secretion in response to a variety of stimuli. However, it is also becoming clear that of all the abnormal functions noted, few are present in all subjects and many are clustered in subgroups. In chronic gastric ulcer of the corpus, defective defense mechanisms, such as duodenogastric reflux and atrophic gastritis, seem to be more important than aggressive factors. Nevertheless, antisecretory medications accelerate the healing of such ulcers. It remains to be seen whether prostaglandins, mucus secretion, or gastric mucosal blood flow are impaired in chronic ulcer disease.

  4. Double-blind randomised clinical trial of a pepsin-inhibitory pentapeptide (pepstatin) in the treatment of duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnevie, O; Svendsen, L B; Holst-Christensen, J; Johansen, T S; Søltoft, J; Christiansen, P M

    1979-01-01

    In a double-blind randomised clinical trial a specific inhibition of peptic activity with a pentapeptide, pepstatin, had no significant advantage over placebo in the ulcer healing and symptomatology of duodenal ulcer. Thus, the inhibition of pepsin in human gastric juice does not appear to have a major influence on the healing of duodenal ulcer. PMID:385457

  5. An Essential Role of NRF2 in Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Long, Min; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Wen, Qing; Bharara, Manish; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Shiwen; Wong, Pak K.

    2016-01-01

    The high mortality and disability of diabetic nonhealing skin ulcers create an urgent need for the development of more efficacious strategies targeting diabetic wound healing. In the current study, using human clinical specimens, we show that perilesional skin tissues from patients with diabetes are under more severe oxidative stress and display higher activation of the nuclear factor-E2–related factor 2 (NRF2)–mediated antioxidant response than perilesional skin tissues from normoglycemic patients. In a streptozotocin-induced diabetes mouse model, Nrf2−/− mice have delayed wound closure rates compared with Nrf2+/+ mice, which is, at least partially, due to greater oxidative DNA damage, low transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and high matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) expression, and increased apoptosis. More importantly, pharmacological activation of the NRF2 pathway significantly improves diabetic wound healing. In vitro experiments in human immortalized keratinocyte cells confirm that NRF2 contributes to wound healing by alleviating oxidative stress, increasing proliferation and migration, decreasing apoptosis, and increasing the expression of TGF-β1 and lowering MMP9 under high-glucose conditions. This study indicates an essential role for NRF2 in diabetic wound healing and the therapeutic benefits of activating NRF2 in this disease, laying the foundation for future clinical trials using NRF2 activators in treating diabetic skin ulcers. PMID:26718502

  6. Body mass index is not associated with reoperation rates in patients with a surgically treated perforated peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Duch, Patricia; Møller, Morten Hylander

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present nationwide Danish cohort study was to examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and reoperation in patients who are sur-gically treated for perforated peptic ulcer (PPU). This was a nationwide cohort study of all Danish patients who were surgically treated for benign gastric or duodenal PPU between 2011 and 2013. reoperation within 30 days of the primary surgical procedure and 90-day survival. The association between BMI and reoperation are presented as crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 726 patients were included. The median age was 69.5 years (range: 18.2-101.7 years), 51.4% were women (n = 373), 78.4% (n = 569) of the patients had at least one co-existing disease, and 47.5% (n = 345) were categorised as American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class ≥ 3. Re-operative surgery was done in 124 patients (17.1%). No statistically significant adjusted association between underweight, overweight or obesity and re-operation was found (adjusted OR (95% CI): 0.456 (0.181-1.148), 1.468 (0.857-2.517), and 1.314 (0.663-2.601), respectively). Patients undergoing reoperative surgery had a statistically significantly lower crude 90-day survival than patients without need of reperative surgery; 63.9% (83/124) versus 75.9% (457/602), p = 0.037. In the present nationwide cohort study of PPU patients, no statistically significantly adjusted correlation between BMI and re-operation rates was found. Patients undergoing reoperative surgery had a decreased 90-day survival. not relevant. not relevant.

  7. Ulcerative colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge Living with your ileostomy Low-fiber diet Total colectomy or proctocolectomy - ... Clinical practice guidelines for the medical management of nonhospitalized ulcerative colitis: the Toronto consensus. Gastroenterology . ...

  8. Deficiency of liver-derived insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) does not interfere with the skin wound healing rate

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Sampath; Grünler, Jacob; Sunkari, Vivekananda Gupta; Calissendorff, Freja S.; Ansurudeen, Ishrath; Illies, Christopher; Svensson, Johan; Jansson, John-Olov; Ohlsson, Claes; Brismar, Kerstin; Catrina, Sergiu-Bogdan

    2018-01-01

    Objective IGF-I is a growth factor, which is expressed in virtually all tissues. The circulating IGF-I is however derived mainly from the liver. IGF-I promotes wound healing and its levels are decreased in wounds with low regenerative potential such as diabetic wounds. However, the contribution of circulating IGF-I to wound healing is unknown. Here we investigated the role of systemic IGF-I on wound healing rate in mice with deficiency of liver-derived IGF-I (LI-IGF-I-/- mice) during normal (normoglycemic) and impaired wound healing (diabetes). Methods LI-IGF-I-/- mice with complete inactivation of the IGF-I gene in the hepatocytes were generated using the Cre/loxP recombination system. This resulted in a 75% reduction of circulating IGF-I. Diabetes was induced with streptozocin in both LI-IGF-I-/- and control mice. Wounds were made on the dorsum of the mice, and the wound healing rate and histology were evaluated. Serum IGF-I and GH were measured by RIA and ELISA respectively. The expression of IGF-I, IGF-II and the IGF-I receptor in the skin were evaluated by qRT-PCR. The local IGF-I protein expression in different cell types of the wounds during wound healing process was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Results The wound healing rate was similar in LI-IGF-I-/- mice to that in controls. Diabetes significantly delayed the wound healing rate in both LI-IGF-I-/- and control mice. However, no significant difference was observed between diabetic animals with normal or reduced hepatic IGF-I production. The gene expression of IGF-I, IGF-II and IGF-I receptor in skin was not different between any group of animals tested. Local IGF-I levels in the wounds were similar between of LI-IGF-I-/- and WT mice although a transient reduction of IGF-I expression in leukocytes in the wounds of LI-IGF-I-/- was observed seven days post wounding. Conclusion Deficiency in the liver-derived IGF-I does not affect wound healing in mice, neither in normoglycemic conditions nor in

  9. Deficiency of liver-derived insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) does not interfere with the skin wound healing rate.

    PubMed

    Botusan, Ileana Ruxandra; Zheng, Xiaowei; Narayanan, Sampath; Grünler, Jacob; Sunkari, Vivekananda Gupta; Calissendorff, Freja S; Ansurudeen, Ishrath; Illies, Christopher; Svensson, Johan; Jansson, John-Olov; Ohlsson, Claes; Brismar, Kerstin; Catrina, Sergiu-Bogdan

    2018-01-01

    IGF-I is a growth factor, which is expressed in virtually all tissues. The circulating IGF-I is however derived mainly from the liver. IGF-I promotes wound healing and its levels are decreased in wounds with low regenerative potential such as diabetic wounds. However, the contribution of circulating IGF-I to wound healing is unknown. Here we investigated the role of systemic IGF-I on wound healing rate in mice with deficiency of liver-derived IGF-I (LI-IGF-I-/- mice) during normal (normoglycemic) and impaired wound healing (diabetes). LI-IGF-I-/- mice with complete inactivation of the IGF-I gene in the hepatocytes were generated using the Cre/loxP recombination system. This resulted in a 75% reduction of circulating IGF-I. Diabetes was induced with streptozocin in both LI-IGF-I-/- and control mice. Wounds were made on the dorsum of the mice, and the wound healing rate and histology were evaluated. Serum IGF-I and GH were measured by RIA and ELISA respectively. The expression of IGF-I, IGF-II and the IGF-I receptor in the skin were evaluated by qRT-PCR. The local IGF-I protein expression in different cell types of the wounds during wound healing process was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The wound healing rate was similar in LI-IGF-I-/- mice to that in controls. Diabetes significantly delayed the wound healing rate in both LI-IGF-I-/- and control mice. However, no significant difference was observed between diabetic animals with normal or reduced hepatic IGF-I production. The gene expression of IGF-I, IGF-II and IGF-I receptor in skin was not different between any group of animals tested. Local IGF-I levels in the wounds were similar between of LI-IGF-I-/- and WT mice although a transient reduction of IGF-I expression in leukocytes in the wounds of LI-IGF-I-/- was observed seven days post wounding. Deficiency in the liver-derived IGF-I does not affect wound healing in mice, neither in normoglycemic conditions nor in diabetes.

  10. Efficacy of Cellular Therapy for Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Deng, Hong; Tang, Zhouping

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a widely spread chronic disease with growing incidence worldwide, and diabetic foot ulcer is one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Cellular therapy has shown promise in the management of diabetic foot ulcer in many preclinical experiments and clinical researches. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cellular therapy in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. We systematically searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases from inception to May 2017 for randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of cellular therapy in diabetic foot ulcer, and a meta-analysis was conducted. A total of 6 randomized controlled clinical trials involving 241 individuals were included in this meta-analysis. The results suggested that cellular therapy could help accelerating the healing of diabetic foot ulcer, presented as higher ankle-brachial index (mean difference = 0.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11 to 0.23), higher transcutaneous oxygen pressure (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 1.43; 95% CI, 1.09- to 1.78), higher ulcer healing rate (relative risk [RR] = 1.78; 95% CI, 1.41 to 2.25), higher amputation-free survival (RR = 1.25; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.40), and lower scale of pain (SMD = -1.69; 95% CI, -2.05 to -1.33). Furthermore, cellular therapy seemed to be safe, with no serious complications and low risk of short-term slight complications. Cellular therapy could accelerate the rate of diabetic foot ulcer healing and may be more efficient than standard therapy for diabetic foot treatment.

  11. Role of honey in wound dressing in diabetic foot ulcer.

    PubMed

    Surahio, Abdul Rashid; Khan, Ashar Ahmad; Farooq, MainUsman; Fatima, Iffat

    2014-01-01

    Honey has antibacterial and antimicrobial properties. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and role of honey as local wound dressing agent in the management of diabetic foot and its effect on rate of amputation. This prospective observational study was done in the general surgery department, Al- Noor Specialist hospital, Holly Makkah, KSA from 1st March, 2007 to 31st May, 2008 (15 months). This study includes 172 patients of either gender, above 18 years of age, belonging to different nationalities admitted to A1- Noor specialist hospital, Holly Makkah, KSA. A total of 172 patients with male to female ratio 1.54:1 were admitted from 1st March, 2007 to 31st May, 2008 with complicated and non-healing diabetic foot ulcers. Out of these 172 patients, 135 (78.48%) were Saudi and 37 (21.52%) were non Saudi residents with ratio of 3.6:1. After admission and resuscitation, all the patients under went early surgical debridement and dressing with the thick layer of honey locally available. Wounds became healthy within 7-35 days. Three patients (1.75%) underwent big toe amputation and 2 (1.16%) patients under.went below knee amputations. Twenty (11.6%) patients under went split skin grafting to cover the wound while in other patients wound healed by secondary intention. Use of honey significantly reduced rate of amputation and improve wound healing when used for wound dressing in chronic diabetic foot ulcers.

  12. Noninvasive assessment of diabetic foot ulcers with diffuse photon density wave methodology: pilot human study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazoglou, Elisabeth S.; Neidrauer, Michael; Zubkov, Leonid; Weingarten, Michael S.; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2009-11-01

    A pilot human study is conducted to evaluate the potential of using diffuse photon density wave (DPDW) methodology at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths (685 to 830 nm) to monitor changes in tissue hemoglobin concentration in diabetic foot ulcers. Hemoglobin concentration is measured by DPDW in 12 human wounds for a period ranging from 10 to 61 weeks. In all wounds that healed completely, gradual decreases in optical absorption coefficient, oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, and total hemoglobin concentration are observed between the first and last measurements. In nonhealing wounds, the rates of change of these properties are nearly zero or slightly positive, and a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) is observed in the rates of change between healing and nonhealing wounds. Differences in the variability of DPDW measurements over time are observed between healing and nonhealing wounds, and this variance may also be a useful indicator of nonhealing wounds. Our results demonstrate that DPDW methodology with a frequency domain NIR device can differentiate healing from nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers, and indicate that it may have clinical utility in the evaluation of wound healing potential.

  13. Effect of custom-made footwear on foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes: a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A; Waaijman, Roelof; Arts, Mark; de Haart, Mirjam; Busch-Westbroek, Tessa; van Baal, Jeff; Nollet, Frans

    2013-12-01

    Custom-made footwear is the treatment of choice to prevent foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes. This footwear primarily aims to offload plantar regions at high ulcer risk. However, ulcer recurrence rates are high. We assessed the effect of offloading-improved custom-made footwear and the role of footwear adherence on plantar foot ulcer recurrence. We randomly assigned 171 neuropathic diabetic patients with a recently healed plantar foot ulcer to custom-made footwear with improved and subsequently preserved offloading (∼20% peak pressure relief by modifying the footwear) or to usual care (i.e., nonimproved custom-made footwear). Primary outcome was plantar foot ulcer recurrence in 18 months. Secondary outcome was ulcer recurrence in patients with an objectively measured adherence of ≥80% of steps taken. On the basis of intention-to-treat, 33 of 85 patients (38.8%) with improved footwear and 38 of 86 patients (44.2%) with usual care had a recurrent ulcer (relative risk -11%, odds ratio 0.80 [95% CI 0.44-1.47], P = 0.48). Ulcer-free survival curves were not significantly different between groups (P = 0.40). In the 79 patients (46% of total group) with high adherence, 9 of 35 (25.7%) with improved footwear and 21 of 44 (47.8%) with usual care had a recurrent ulcer (relative risk -46%, odds ratio 0.38 [0.15-0.99], P = 0.045). Offloading-improved custom-made footwear does not significantly reduce the incidence of plantar foot ulcer recurrence in diabetes compared with custom-made footwear that does not undergo such improvement, unless it is worn as recommended.

  14. BATS RECOVERING FROM WHITE-NOSE SYNDROME ELEVATE METABOLIC RATE DURING WING HEALING IN SPRING.

    PubMed

    Meierhofer, Melissa B; Johnson, Joseph S; Field, Kenneth A; Lumadue, Shayne S; Kurta, Allen; Kath, Joseph A; Reeder, DeeAnn M

    2018-04-04

      Host responses to infection with novel pathogens are costly and require trade-offs among physiologic systems. One such pathogen is the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS) and has led to mass mortality of hibernating bats in eastern North America. Although infection with Pd does not always result in death, we hypothesized that bats that survive infection suffer significant consequences that negatively impact the ability of females to reproduce. To understand the physiologic consequences of surviving infection with Pd, we assessed differences in wing damage, mass-specific resting metabolic rate, and reproductive rate between little brown myotis ( Myotis lucifugus) that survived a winter in captivity after inoculation with Pd (WNS survivors) and comparable, uninfected bats. Survivors of WNS had significantly more damaged wing tissue and displayed elevated mass-specific metabolic rates compared with Pd-uninfected bats after emergence from hibernation. The WNS survivors and Pd-uninfected bats did not significantly differ in their reproductive capacity, at least in captivity. However, our metabolic data demonstrated greater energetic costs during spring in WNS survivors compared with uninfected bats, which may have led to other consequences for postpartum fitness. We suggest that, after surviving the energetic constraints of winter, temperate hibernating bats infected with Pd faced a second energetic bottleneck after emerging from hibernation.

  15. Reducing Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection Rates in the Context of a Caring-Healing Environment: A Patient Safety Program Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Daphne

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) prove to be detrimental to both the patient and the hospital. The present study was a quality improvement training project to affect CLABSI rates in the cardiac intensive care unit in the context of a caring-healing environment, and contributed to a culture of patient safety to empower staff to speak up if they see a breach in protocol at any time. A caring-healing environment encouraged staff to take the extra time and precautions to prevent infections for their patients and created a better quality of care for the patients.

  16. VenUS I: a randomised controlled trial of two types of bandage for treating venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, C; Nelson, E A; Cullum, N A; Torgerson, D J

    2004-07-01

    To compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of two different compression bandages for the healing of venous leg ulcers. A pragmatic, randomised controlled trial with an economic evaluation. Community, district nurse-led services; community leg ulcer clinics; hospital leg ulcer clinics with community outreach. A range of urban and rural settings in England and Scotland. Patients with a venous leg ulcer of at least 1-week's duration, at least 1 cm in length or width and an ankle:brachial pressure index of at least 0.8. The four-layer bandage (4LB) (which is multilayer elastic compression) compared with the short-stretch bandage (SSB) (multilayer, inelastic compression). The primary end-point was complete healing of all the ulcers on the trial leg. Secondary outcomes were the proportion of patients healed at 12 and 24 weeks, rate of recurrence, costs of leg ulcer treatment and quality of life. Between April 1999 and December 2000 the trial recruited 387 people aged from 23 to 97 years at trial entry. The majority of patients in this trial (82%; 316/387) had a reference ulcer of area healing of individuals in the two trial groups was compared using the log-rank test. The difference in the distribution of cumulative healing times between the individuals in the two groups was not statistically significant at the 5% level. Adjusting for the effects of variables which may influence healing (centre, baseline ulcer area, duration, episodes, ankle mobility, weight) in a Cox proportional hazards model, a statistically significant treatment effect in favour of the 4LB was identified. At any point in time, the probability of healing for individuals in the SSB treatment arm is significantly lower than that for people treated with the 4LB. Our base case economic analysis showed that the 4LB is the dominant strategy, that is, it is

  17. Does Physiological Stress Slow Down Wound Healing in Patients With Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Razjouyan, Javad; Grewal, Gurtej Singh; Talal, Talal K.; Armstrong, David G.; Mills, Joseph L.; Najafi, Bijan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Poor healing is an important contributing factor to amputation among patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). Physiological stress may slow wound healing and increase susceptibility to infection. Objectives: The objective was to examine the association between heart rate variability (HRV) as an indicator of physiological stress response and healing speed (HealSpeed) among outpatients with active DFUs. Design and Methods: Ambulatory patients with diabetes with DFUs (n = 25, age: 59.3 ± 8.3 years) were recruited. HRV during pre–wound dressing was measured using a wearable sensor attached to participants’ chest. HRVs were quantified in both time and frequency domains to assess physiological stress response and vagal tone (relaxation). Change in wound size between two consecutive visits was used to estimate HealSpeed. Participants were then categorized into slow healing and fast healing groups. Between the two groups, comparisons were performed for demographic, clinical, and HRV derived parameters. Associations between different descriptors of HRV and HealSpeed were also assessed. Results: HealSpeed was significantly correlated with both vagal tone (r = –.705, P = .001) and stress response (r = .713, P = .001) extracted from frequency domain. No between-group differences were observed except those from HRV-derived parameters. Models based on HRVs were the highest predictors of slow/fast HealSpeed (AUC > 0.90), while models based on demographic and clinical information had poor classification performance (AUC = 0.44). Conclusion: This study confirms an association between stress/vagal tone and wound healing in patients with DFUs. In particular, it highlights the importance of vagal tone (relaxation) in expediting wound healing. It also demonstrates the feasibility of assessing physiological stress responses using wearable technology in outpatient clinic during routine clinic visits. PMID:28436270

  18. Does Physiological Stress Slow Down Wound Healing in Patients With Diabetes?

    PubMed

    Razjouyan, Javad; Grewal, Gurtej Singh; Talal, Talal K; Armstrong, David G; Mills, Joseph L; Najafi, Bijan

    2017-07-01

    Poor healing is an important contributing factor to amputation among patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). Physiological stress may slow wound healing and increase susceptibility to infection. The objective was to examine the association between heart rate variability (HRV) as an indicator of physiological stress response and healing speed (Heal Speed ) among outpatients with active DFUs. Ambulatory patients with diabetes with DFUs (n = 25, age: 59.3 ± 8.3 years) were recruited. HRV during pre-wound dressing was measured using a wearable sensor attached to participants' chest. HRVs were quantified in both time and frequency domains to assess physiological stress response and vagal tone (relaxation). Change in wound size between two consecutive v