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Sample records for ultrasound tissue typing

  1. Tissue identification by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecroissette, D. H.; Heyser, R. C.; Gammell, P. M.; Wilson, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The ultrasonic properties of animal and human soft tissue were measured over the frequency range of 1.5 to 10.0 MHz. The method employed a swept-frequency, coherent technique known as time delay spectrometry. Measurements of attenuation versus frequency on liver, backfat, kidney, pancreas, spleen, breast, and other tissue were made. Considerable attention was paid to tissue handling and in determining the effects of fixing on the attenuation of ultrasound in the tissue.

  2. Tissue types (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports other tissues and binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). ...

  3. Stimulation of Tissue Healing by Ultrasound: Physical Mechanisms of Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, O.; Chong, J.; Monreal, R.

    2004-09-01

    Even though the use of ultrasound in medicine is better known by its results in diagnostic procedures, the employ of this type of mechanical energy with therapeutic purposes is been used in new and impressive applications. To obtain or to improve tissue healing in many ailments it is used a lot of approaches, from the employ of antibiotics when it is considered by the presence of an infection in the wound, to several types of physical stimulation. One of them is ultrasound. This paper consider some of the most important mechanisms of action of ultrasound in tissue that can be related whit the repair processes and specifies levels of activation of many paths of action. Especial emphasis has received the stimulation of bone repair by ultrasound.

  4. Tissue temperatures during ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty.

    PubMed

    Ablaza, V J; Gingrass, M K; Perry, L C; Fisher, J; Maxwell, G P

    1998-08-01

    Removing excess subcutaneous fat with the assistance of ultrasonic energy has recently become a technique of interest in the United States after nearly a decade of use in Europe. There are a number of reported advantages of ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty over traditional liposuction, and there are also some theoretical concerns. Ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty involves the conversion of electrical energy to mechanical energy and transfer to the tissues through acoustic pressure waves, with the formation of heat as a by-product. Heat generated in this process dissipates through the body's own cooling mechanisms and conduction to the surrounding tissues, and it does not contribute to the clinical treatment of the adipose tissue. Reports of "burns" and ischemic skin injuries in the literature, and concerns for potential heat-related problems, prompted us to investigate whether significant temperature elevations occur in the clinical setting. Subcutaneous tissue temperature determinations during ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty were begun in February of 1996, and data were collected from 55 patients who had the procedure performed during a 6-month period. Intraoperatively, temperature measurements were made with a data-logging instrument and a needle microprobe inserted into the subcutaneous tissues. Temperatures were taken in the area of liposuction before the infusion of tumescent fluid, after tumescent fluid infusion, and at 5-minute intervals until the end of the procedure. The patient's core body temperature remained stable during the procedure within a narrow range (35.7 degrees C to 36.3 degrees C). There was a gradual increase in the temperature of the subcutaneous tissues over time during the application of ultrasonic energy; however, average subcutaneous temperatures remained below the core temperature (p < 0.05) at all time intervals. Room-temperature tumescent fluid further enhanced the thermal safety zone without lowering core body temperature. There were no

  5. Quantitative Ultrasound for Nondestructive Characterization of Engineered Tissues and Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Dalecki, Diane; Mercado, Karla P; Hocking, Denise C

    2016-03-01

    Non-invasive, non-destructive technologies for imaging and quantitatively monitoring the development of artificial tissues are critical for the advancement of tissue engineering. Current standard techniques for evaluating engineered tissues, including histology, biochemical assays and mechanical testing, are destructive approaches. Ultrasound is emerging as a valuable tool for imaging and quantitatively monitoring the properties of engineered tissues and biomaterials longitudinally during fabrication and post-implantation. Ultrasound techniques are rapid, non-invasive, non-destructive and can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation. This review provides an overview of ultrasound imaging, quantitative ultrasound techniques, and elastography, with representative examples of applications of these ultrasound-based techniques to the field of tissue engineering.

  6. Objective breast tissue image classification using Quantitative Transmission ultrasound tomography

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Bilal; Klock, John; Wiskin, James; Lenox, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound (QT) is a powerful and emerging imaging paradigm which has the potential to perform true three-dimensional image reconstruction of biological tissue. Breast imaging is an important application of QT and allows non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging of whole breasts in vivo. Here, we report the first demonstration of breast tissue image classification in QT imaging. We systematically assess the ability of the QT images’ features to differentiate between normal breast tissue types. The three QT features were used in Support Vector Machines (SVM) classifiers, and classification of breast tissue as either skin, fat, glands, ducts or connective tissue was demonstrated with an overall accuracy of greater than 90%. Finally, the classifier was validated on whole breast image volumes to provide a color-coded breast tissue volume. This study serves as a first step towards a computer-aided detection/diagnosis platform for QT. PMID:27934955

  7. Objective breast tissue image classification using Quantitative Transmission ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Bilal; Klock, John; Wiskin, James; Lenox, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound (QT) is a powerful and emerging imaging paradigm which has the potential to perform true three-dimensional image reconstruction of biological tissue. Breast imaging is an important application of QT and allows non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging of whole breasts in vivo. Here, we report the first demonstration of breast tissue image classification in QT imaging. We systematically assess the ability of the QT images’ features to differentiate between normal breast tissue types. The three QT features were used in Support Vector Machines (SVM) classifiers, and classification of breast tissue as either skin, fat, glands, ducts or connective tissue was demonstrated with an overall accuracy of greater than 90%. Finally, the classifier was validated on whole breast image volumes to provide a color-coded breast tissue volume. This study serves as a first step towards a computer-aided detection/diagnosis platform for QT.

  8. Tissue harmonic synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Rasmussen, Joachim Hee; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) and tissue harmonic imaging (THI) are combined to improve the image quality of medical ultrasound imaging. The technique is evaluated in a comparative study against dynamic receive focusing (DRF). The objective is to investigate if SASB combined with THI improves the image quality compared to DRF-THI. The major benefit of SASB is a reduced bandwidth between the probe and processing unit. A BK Medical 2202 Ultraview ultrasound scanner was used to acquire beamformed RF data for offline evaluation. The acquisition was made interleaved between methods, and data were recorded with and without pulse inversion for tissue harmonic imaging. Data were acquired using a Sound Technology 192 element convex array transducer from both a wire phantom and a tissue mimicking phantom to investigate spatial resolution and penetration. In vivo scans were also performed for a visual comparison. The spatial resolution for SASB-THI is on average 19% better than DRI-THI, and the investigation of penetration showed equally good signal-to-noise ratio. In vivo B-mode scans were made and compared. The comparison showed that SASB-THI reduces the artifact and noise interference and improves image contrast and spatial resolution.

  9. Clinical use of ultrasound tissue harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Tranquart, F; Grenier, N; Eder, V; Pourcelot, L

    1999-07-01

    The recent introduction of tissue harmonic imaging could resolve the problems related to ultrasound in technically difficult patients by providing a marked improvement in image quality. Tissue harmonics are generated during the transmit phase of the pulse-echo cycle, that is, while the transmitted pulse propagates through tissue. Tissue harmonic images are formed by utilizing the harmonic signals that are generated by tissue and by filtering out the fundamental echo signals that are generated by the transmitted acoustic energy. To achieve this, two processes could be used; one by using filters for fundamental and harmonic imaging and the second using two simultaneous pulses with a 180 degrees difference in phase. The introduction of harmonics allows increased penetration without a loss of detail, by obtaining a clearer image at depth with significantly less compromise to the image quality caused by the use of lower frequencies. This imaging mode could be used in different organs with a heightening of low-contrast lesions through artefact reduction, as well as by the induced greater intrinsic contrast sensitivity of the harmonic imaging mode.

  10. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  11. Guiding tissue regeneration with ultrasound in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalecki, Diane; Comeau, Eric S.; Raeman, Carol H.; Child, Sally Z.; Hobbs, Laura; Hocking, Denise C.

    2015-05-01

    Developing new technologies that enable the repair or replacement of injured or diseased tissues is a major focus of regenerative medicine. This paper will discuss three ultrasound technologies under development in our laboratories to guide tissue regeneration both in vitro and in vivo. A critical obstacle in tissue engineering is the need for rapid and effective tissue vascularization strategies. To address this challenge, we are developing acoustic patterning techniques for microvascular tissue engineering. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields provide a rapid, non-invasive approach to spatially pattern cells in three dimensions without affecting cell viability. Acoustic patterning of endothelial cells leads to the rapid formation of microvascular networks throughout the volumes of three-dimensional hydrogels, and the morphology of the resultant microvessel networks can be controlled by design of the ultrasound field. A second technology under development uses ultrasound to noninvasively control the microstructure of collagen fibers within engineered tissues. The microstructure of extracellular matrix proteins provides signals that direct cell functions critical to tissue regeneration. Thus, controlling collagen microfiber structure with ultrasound provides a noninvasive approach to regulate the mechanical properties of biomaterials and control cellular responses. The third technology employs therapeutic ultrasound to enhance the healing of chronic wounds. Recent studies demonstrate increased granulation tissue thickness and collagen deposition in murine dermal wounds exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In summary, ultrasound technologies offer noninvasive approaches to control cell behaviors and extracellular matrix organization and thus hold great promise to advance tissue regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Multimodal classification of prostate tissue: a feasibility study on combining multiparametric MRI and ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashab, Hussam Al-Deen; Haq, Nandinee Fariah; Nir, Guy; Kozlowski, Piotr; Black, Peter; Jones, Edward C.; Goldenberg, S. Larry; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Moradi, Mehdi

    2015-03-01

    The common practice for biopsy guidance is through transrectal ultrasound, with the fusion of ultrasound and MRI-based targets when available. However, ultrasound is only used as a guidance modality in MR-targeted ultrasound-guided biopsy, even though previous work has shown the potential utility of ultrasound, particularly ultrasound vibro-elastography, as a tissue typing approach. We argue that multiparametric ultrasound, which includes B-mode and vibro-elastography images, could contain information that is not captured using multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) and therefore play a role in refining the biopsy and treatment strategies. In this work, we combine mpMRI with multiparametric ultrasound features from registered tissue areas to examine the potential improvement in cancer detection. All the images were acquired prior to radical prostatectomy and cancer detection was validated based on 36 whole mount histology slides. We calculated a set of 24 texture features from vibro-elastography and B-mode images, and five features from mpMRI. Then we used recursive feature elimination (RFE) and sparse regression through LASSO to find an optimal set of features to be used for tissue classification. We show that the set of these selected features increases the area under ROC curve from 0.87 with mpMRI alone to 0.94 with the selected mpMRI and multiparametric ultrasound features, when used with support vector machine classification on features extracted from peripheral zone. For features extracted from the whole-gland, the area under the curve was 0.75 and 0.82 for mpMRI and mpMRI along with ultrasound, respectively. These preliminary results provide evidence that ultrasound and ultrasound vibro-elastography could be used as modalities for improved cancer detection in combination with MRI.

  13. Classification of kidney and liver tissue using ultrasound backscatter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Rivaz, Hassan; Cerrolaza, Juan J.; Jago, James; Safdar, Nabile; Boctor, Emad M.; Linguraru, Marius G.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) tissue characterization provides valuable information for the initialization of automatic segmentation algorithms, and can further provide complementary information for diagnosis of pathologies. US tissue characterization is challenging due to the presence of various types of image artifacts and dependence on the sonographer's skills. One way of overcoming this challenge is by characterizing images based on the distribution of the backscatter data derived from the interaction between US waves and tissue. The goal of this work is to classify liver versus kidney tissue in 3D volumetric US data using the distribution of backscatter US data recovered from end-user displayed Bmode image available in clinical systems. To this end, we first propose the computation of a large set of features based on the homodyned-K distribution of the speckle as well as the correlation coefficients between small patches in 3D images. We then utilize the random forests framework to select the most important features for classification. Experiments on in-vivo 3D US data from nine pediatric patients with hydronephrosis showed an average accuracy of 94% for the classification of liver and kidney tissues showing a good potential of this work to assist in the classification and segmentation of abdominal soft tissue.

  14. Tissue Bioeffects during Ultrasound-mediated Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Jonathan

    Ultrasound has been developed as both a valuable diagnostic tool and a potent promoter of beneficial tissue bioeffects for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Vascular effects can be mediated by mechanical oscillations of circulating microbubbles, or ultrasound contrast agents, which may also encapsulate and shield a therapeutic agent in the bloodstream. Oscillating microbubbles can create stresses directly on nearby tissue or induce fluid effects that effect drug penetration into vascular tissue, lyse thrombi, or direct drugs to optimal locations for delivery. These investigations have spurred continued research into alternative therapeutic applications, such as bioactive gas delivery. This dissertation addresses a fundamental hypothesis in biomedical ultrasound: ultrasound-mediated drug delivery is capable of increasing the penetration of drugs across different physiologic barriers within the cardiovascular system, such as the vascular endothelium, blood clots, and smooth muscle cells.

  15. Drug Delivery to Extravascular Tissue by Ultrasound-activated Microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooiman, Klazina; Harteveld, Miranda; de Jong, Nico; van Wamel, Annemieke

    2007-05-01

    Drugs will be delivered to tissue more efficiently if the vascular endothelial permeability is increased. Although recent studies have established that the permeability of single-cell membranes is increased by ultrasound in combination with contrast agents, it is not known whether this combination can also increase the permeability of an endothelial layer. To investigate endothelial layer permeability, we treated monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with ultrasound and the contrast agent BR14. Endothelial layer permeability was assessed by measuring the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the transendothelial transport of fluorescein. Ultrasound in combination with BR14 significantly decreased TEER to 68.0 ± 3.1% of initial values and temporally increased endothelial permeability for fluorescein by 38.1 ± 16.4 %. After treatment, no cell loss or damage was observed. In conclusion, ultrasound in combination with BR14 increased the endothelial layer permeability. This feature may be used for future ultrasound-guided drug delivery systems.

  16. Human Tissue-Temperature Rise During Ultrasound Treatments With the Aquaflex Gel Pad.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Sunnee; Draper, David O.; Knight, Kenneth L.; Brent Feland, J; Eggett, Dennis

    2004-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure tissue-temperature rise in the lateral aspect of the ankle during 10-minute ultrasound treatments with ultrasound gel (gel), a gel pad with a thin layer of ultrasound gel on the top (gel/pad), and a gel pad with a thin layer of ultrasound gel on the top and the bottom coated with ultrasound gel (gel/pad/gel). DESIGN AND SETTING: We used a 1 x 3 repeated-measures, crossover design. The dependent variables were tissue-temperature change and time to peak temperature. The independent variable was the type of ultrasound coupling medium. Treatment orders were randomly assigned, and all possible orders were assigned 3 times. A thermocouple was inserted through a 32-mm catheter at a depth of 1 cm into the target-tissue space, the posterior lateral aspect of the left ankle, halfway between the lateral malleolus and the Achilles tendon. Each treatment consisted of ultrasound delivered topically at 1 W/cm(2), 3 MHz, in the continuous mode for 10 minutes. SUBJECTS: Eighteen healthy, college-aged student volunteers (13 women, 5 men), with no history of ankle injury in the previous 6 months. MEASUREMENTS: Intratissue temperature, measured every 30 seconds for 10 minutes. RESULTS: Intratissue temperature increases during the 10-minute treatments were significantly greater for the ultrasound gel (7.72 degrees C +/- 0.52 degrees C) and the gel/pad/gel (6.68 degrees C +/- 0.52 degrees C) than for the gel/pad (4.98 degrees C +/- 0.52 degrees C). CONCLUSIONS: When ultrasound is applied over bony prominences, a gel pad should be covered with ultrasound gel on both sides to ensure optimal heating.

  17. A Temporal View of Soft Tissue Quantitative Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, William D.

    The objective of soft tissue quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is to improve diagnostic ultrasound imaging capabilities via quantitative outcomes. Over the past three or so decades, there have been an increasing number of QUS successes. A temporal view moves us back in history almost six decades when techniques and theoretical developments were in their earliest stages that impacted modern QUS successes. The earliest theoretical developments and techniques some six decades ago can be attributed to Lev Chernov, Philip Morse, Herman Feshbach, Uno Ingard, John Wild and Jack Reid. Later, Floyd Dunn developed important views as to how connective tissue affected the interaction between ultrasound and soft tissue. Then, as the theory of wave propagation in soft tissues with random inhomogeneities was extended and applied by Fred Lizzi, Jim Zagzebski and Mike Insana (and their colleagues), contemporary QUS successes started to emerge.

  18. Ultrasound strain imaging for quantification of tissue function: cardiovascular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Korte, Chris L.; Lopata, Richard G. P.; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.

    2013-03-01

    With ultrasound imaging, the motion and deformation of tissue can be measured. Tissue can be deformed by applying a force on it and the resulting deformation is a function of its mechanical properties. Quantification of this resulting tissue deformation to assess the mechanical properties of tissue is called elastography. If the tissue under interrogation is actively deforming, the deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as `strain imaging'. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaques characterization, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. We developed radio frequency (RF) based ultrasound methods to assess the deformation at higher resolution and with higher accuracy than commercial methods using conventional image data (Tissue Doppler Imaging and 2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so 1D. We further extended this method to multiple directions and further improved precision by using compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. In arteries, the presence of vulnerable plaques may lead to acute events like stroke and myocardial infarction. Consequently, timely detection of these plaques is of great diagnostic value. Non-invasive ultrasound strain compounding is currently being evaluated as a diagnostic tool to identify the vulnerability of plaques. In the heart, we determined the strain locally and at high resolution resulting in a local assessment in contrary to conventional global functional parameters like cardiac output or shortening fraction.

  19. Noninvasive tissue temperature estimation using nonlinear ultrasound harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraghechi, Borna; Kolios, Michael C.; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2017-03-01

    Non-invasive tissue temperature estimation is important in thermal therapies for having an efficient treatment. A noninvasive ultrasonic technique for monitoring tissue temperature changes is proposed based on the changes in the harmonics of ultrasound backscatter as a function of temperature. The backscattered pressure amplitudes of the fundamental frequency (p1), the second (p2) and the third (p3) harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound propagation and the ratios of the second and the third harmonics over the fundamental frequency (p2/p1 and p3/p1) were investigated as a function of temperature. The acoustic harmonics were generated and detected with a commercial high frequency ultrasound imaging system in pulse-echo mode. The experiments were performed on tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and ex vivo bovine muscle tissues. The temperature was increased from 26°C to 46°C in increments of 2°C. The average values of p1, p2, p3, p2/p1, p3/p1 increased by 14%, 50%, 117%, 37% and 92% for the gel phantoms, and for the tissue samples increased by 29%, 50%, 170%, 10% and 109%, respectively. The results indicate that the harmonic amplitudes and their ratios are highly sensitive to propagation medium's temperature and could potentially be used for noninvasive ultrasound thermometry.

  20. The thresholds and mechanisms of tissue injury by focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Julianna

    Therapeutic ultrasound is used in clinics around the world to treat ailments such as uterine fibroids, kidney stones, and plantar fasciitis. While many of the therapeutic effects of ultrasound are elicited by hyperthermia, bubbles can also interact with tissue to produce beneficial effects. For example, bubbles are used in boiling histotripsy to de-bulk tissue and are used in shock wave lithotripsy to break kidney stones. However, the same bubbles that break the kidney stones also damage the kidney, which is why bubble damage is a concern in every ultrasound application including fetal imaging. Whether the aim is to emulsify a tumor or image a fetus, understanding the thresholds and mechanisms of tissue injury by bubbles in an ultrasound field is important for all ultrasound applications and was the goal of this dissertation. One specific application of therapeutic ultrasound, known as boiling histotripsy, uses shock wave heating to explosively expand a millimeter-size boiling bubble at the transducer focus and fractionate bulk tissue. Yet it was unclear how the millimeter-size boiling or vapor bubble broke down the tissue into its submicron components. In this dissertation, we experimentally tested the hypothesis that ultrasonic atomization, or the emission of fine droplets from an acoustically excited liquid film, is the mechanism by which the millimeter-size boiling bubble in boiling histotripsy fractionates tissue into its submicron components. Using high speed photography, we showed that tissue can behave as a liquid such that a miniature acoustic fountain forms and atomization occurs within a millimeter-size cavity that approximates the boiling or vapor bubble produced by boiling histotripsy. The end result of tissue atomization was a hole in the tissue surface. After showing that tissue can be eroded by atomization, a series of experiments were conducted to determine the tissue properties that influence atomization. The results indicated that highly

  1. Tissue Characterization on Ultrasound Harmonic Signals using Nakagami Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fanglue; Cristea, Anca; Cachard, Christian; Basset, Olivier

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) imaging provides a way to characterize biological tissue. The QUS estimates can be obtained from the envelope statistics. Previous studies are mainly based on the whole backscattered signals analysis. However, the ultrasound propagation is a nonlinear process and the harmonic signals can therefore reveal the nonlinear nature of a biological medium. The present study investigates the statistics of harmonic signal envelopes to relate the distribution parameters to the nonlinear coefficients. The main results demonstrate that the distributions exhibit a different behavior for fundamental and harmonic signals and that media with different nonlinearities can be distinguished, when using Nakagami statistics on the harmonic signal envelopes.

  2. Opto-ultrasound imaging in vivo in deep tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Ke; YanXu; Zheng, Yao; Zhu, Xinpei; Gong, Wei

    2016-02-01

    It is of keen importance of deep tissue imaging with high resolution in vivo. Here we present an opto-ultrasound imaging method which utilizes an ultrasound to confine the laser pulse in a very tiny spot as a guide star. The results show that the imaging depth is 2mm with a resolution of 10um. Meanwhile, the excitation power we used is less than 2mW, which indicates that our methods can be applied in vivo without optical toxicity and optical bleaching due to the excitation power.

  3. Use of stationary focused ultrasound fields for characterization of tissue and localized tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, Brian Andrew

    Ultrasound-induced blood stasis has been observed for more than 30 years. The physical understanding of the phenomenon has not been fully explored. Analytical descriptions of the acoustic interaction with spheres in suspension have been derived but the physical implications and limitations have not been demonstrated. The analytical expressions will be tested against physical observations using numerical simulations. The simulations will begin with stationary spheres and continue with the inclusion of moving spheres and a moving suspending fluid. To date, experimental observations of acoustically induced blood stasis have been either in vitro or invasive. We demonstrate ultrasound-induced blood stasis in murine normal leg muscle versus tumor-bearing legs, observed through noninvasive measurements of optical spectroscopy, and discuss possible diagnostic uses for this effect of ultrasound. We derive the optimal optical wavelengths for measuring the effects of the ultrasound at small source detector separations. Using optical oximetry performed at the optimal wavelengths, we demonstrate that effects of ultrasound can be used to differentiate tumor from normal leg muscle tissue in mice. To provide a statistical analysis of the experiments, we propose a novel diagnostic algorithm that quantitatively differentiates tumor from nontumor with maximum specificity 0.83, maximum sensitivity 0.79, and area under receiver-operating-characteristics curve 0.90. Ultrasound has long been known to cause tissue heating when applied in high intensities. More recently, interest has arisen in the area of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for localized tissue heating effects, specifically thermal ablation. All present techniques employ focused traveling high intensity acoustic waves to create a region of elevated temperature. Such high intensity traveling waves can be damaging to normal tissue in the vicinity of the focal region, and have demonstrated surface burns and caused

  4. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion.

  5. Incorporating tissue absorption and scattering in rapid ultrasound beam modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Douglas; Almquist, Scott

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a new approach for modeling the propagation of an ultrasound beam in inhomogeneous tissues such as encountered with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for treatment of various diseases. This method, called the hybrid angular spectrum (HAS) approach, alternates propagation steps between the space and the spatial frequency domains throughout the inhomogeneous regions of the body; the use of spatial Fourier transforms makes this technique considerably faster than other modeling approaches (about 10 sec for a 141 x 141 x 121 model). In HIFU thermal treatments, the acoustic absorption property of the tissues is of prime importance since it leads to temperature rise and the achievement of desired thermal dose at the treatment site. We have recently added to the HAS method the capability of independently modeling tissue absorption and scattering, the two components of acoustic attenuation. These additions improve the predictive value of the beam modeling and more accurately describes the thermal conditions expected during a therapeutic ultrasound exposure. Two approaches to explicitly model scattering were developed: one for scattering sizes smaller than a voxel, and one when the scattering scale is several voxels wide. Some anatomically realistic examples that demonstrate the importance of independently modeling absorption and scattering are given, including propagation through the human skull for noninvasive brain therapy and in the human breast for treatment of breast lesions.

  6. Temperature rise in tissue ablation using multi-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sijia Guo; Yun Jing; Xiaoning Jiang

    2013-08-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming an increasingly important noninvasive surgical tool, despite the challenges in temperature rise control and unwanted heating problems. In this study, experiments and simulations on tissue ablation effectiveness were performed using multi-frequency HIFU with frequency differences of more than 500 kHz (center frequencies are 950 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3.3 MHz). In the experiments, the temperature was recorded as chicken breast tissue was heated by single-frequency, dual-frequency, and tri-frequency HIFU configurations at controlled acoustic power and exposure time. 5% to 10% temperature rise differences were observed between single- and multi-frequency modes, indicating that multi-frequency HIFU is more effective at producing faster temperature rises. Cavitation detection tests were conducted to compare the cavitation pressure fields between single- and multi-frequency ultrasound. Moreover, simulations on single-frequency and multi-frequency acoustic fields as well as bio-heating-induced temperature fields were performed. With the comparison between experimental and simulation results, we believe that the more effective tissue ablation using multi-frequency ultrasound is likely attributed to the enhanced cavitation, a promising result for HIFU applications.

  7. Ultrasound therapy applicators for controlled thermal modification of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdette, E. Clif; Lichtenstiger, Carol; Rund, Laurie; Keralapura, Mallika; Gossett, Chad; Stahlhut, Randy; Neubauer, Paul; Komadina, Bruce; Williams, Emery; Alix, Chris; Jensen, Tor; Schook, Lawrence; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-03-01

    Heat therapy has long been used for treatments in dermatology and sports medicine. The use of laser, RF, microwave, and more recently, ultrasound treatment, for psoriasis, collagen reformation, and skin tightening has gained considerable interest over the past several years. Numerous studies and commercial devices have demonstrated the efficacy of these methods for treatment of skin disorders. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot effectively treat effectively because there is little or no control of the size, shape, and depth of the target zone. These limitations make it extremely difficult to obtain consistent treatment results. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility for using acoustic energy for controlled dose delivery sufficient to produce collagen modification for the treatment of skin tissue in the dermal and sub-dermal layers. We designed and evaluated a curvilinear focused ultrasound device for treating skin disorders such as psoriasis, stimulation of wound healing, tightening of skin through shrinkage of existing collagen and stimulation of new collagen formation, and skin cancer. Design parameters were examined using acoustic pattern simulations and thermal modeling. Acute studies were performed in 201 freshly-excised samples of young porcine underbelly skin tissue and 56 in-vivo treatment areas in 60- 80 kg pigs. These were treated with ultrasound (9-11MHz) focused in the deep dermis. Dose distribution was analyzed and gross pathology assessed. Tissue shrinkage was measured based on fiducial markers and video image registration and analyzed using NIH Image-J software. Comparisons were made between RF and focused ultrasound for five energy ranges. In each experimental series, therapeutic dose levels (60degC) were attained at 2-5mm depth. Localized collagen changes ranged from 1-3% for RF versus 8-15% for focused ultrasound. Therapeutic ultrasound applied at high

  8. Ultrasonic atomization of tissue and its role in tissue fractionation by high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2012-12-01

    Atomization and fountain formation is a well-known phenomenon that occurs when a focused ultrasound wave in liquid encounters an air interface. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to fractionate a tissue into submicron-sized fragments in a process termed boiling histotripsy, wherein the focused ultrasound wave superheats the tissue at the focus, producing a millimetre-sized boiling or vapour bubble in several milliseconds. Yet the question of how this millimetre-sized boiling bubble creates submicron-sized tissue fragments remains. The hypothesis of this work is that the tissue can behave as a liquid such that it atomizes and forms a fountain within the vapour bubble produced in boiling histotripsy. We describe an experiment, in which a 2 MHz HIFU transducer (maximum in situ intensity of 24 000 W cm-2) was aligned with an air-tissue interface meant to simulate the boiling bubble. Atomization and fountain formation was observed with high-speed photography and resulted in tissue erosion. Histological examination of the atomized tissue showed whole and fragmented cells and nuclei. Air-liquid interfaces were also filmed. Our conclusion was that HIFU can fountain and atomize tissue. Although this process does not entirely mimic what was observed in liquids, it does explain many aspects of tissue fractionation in boiling histotripsy.

  9. Ultrasonic atomization of tissue and its role in tissue fractionation by high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Simon, Julianna C; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Khokhlova, Vera A; Wang, Yak-Nam; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R

    2012-12-07

    Atomization and fountain formation is a well-known phenomenon that occurs when a focused ultrasound wave in liquid encounters an air interface. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to fractionate a tissue into submicron-sized fragments in a process termed boiling histotripsy, wherein the focused ultrasound wave superheats the tissue at the focus, producing a millimetre-sized boiling or vapour bubble in several milliseconds. Yet the question of how this millimetre-sized boiling bubble creates submicron-sized tissue fragments remains. The hypothesis of this work is that the tissue can behave as a liquid such that it atomizes and forms a fountain within the vapour bubble produced in boiling histotripsy. We describe an experiment, in which a 2 MHz HIFU transducer (maximum in situ intensity of 24 000 W cm(-2)) was aligned with an air-tissue interface meant to simulate the boiling bubble. Atomization and fountain formation was observed with high-speed photography and resulted in tissue erosion. Histological examination of the atomized tissue showed whole and fragmented cells and nuclei. Air-liquid interfaces were also filmed. Our conclusion was that HIFU can fountain and atomize tissue. Although this process does not entirely mimic what was observed in liquids, it does explain many aspects of tissue fractionation in boiling histotripsy.

  10. Ultrasonic atomization of tissue and its role in tissue fractionation by high intensity focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Atomization and fountain formation is a well-known phenomenon that occurs when a focused ultrasound wave in liquid encounters an air interface. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to fractionate tissue into submicron-size fragments in a process termed boiling histotripsy, wherein the focused ultrasound wave superheats the tissue at the focus, producing a millimetre-size boiling or vapour bubble in several milliseconds. Yet the question of how this millimetre-size boiling bubble creates submicron-size tissue fragments remains. The hypothesis of this work is that tissue can behave as a liquid such that it forms a fountain and atomization within the vapour bubble produced in boiling histotripsy. We describe an experiment, in which a 2-MHz HIFU transducer (maximum in situ intensity of 24,000 W/cm2) was aligned with an air-tissue interface meant to simulate the boiling bubble. Atomization and fountain formation were observed with high-speed photography and resulted in tissue erosion. Histological examination of the atomized tissue showed whole and fragmented cells and nuclei. Air-liquid interfaces were also filmed. Our conclusion was that HIFU can fountain and atomize tissue. Although this process does not entirely mimic what was observed in liquids, it does explain many aspects of tissue fractionation in boiling histotripsy. PMID:23159812

  11. Ultrasound of soft tissue masses of the hand

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Most soft tissue mass lesions of the hand are benign. Ganglia are the commonest lesions encountered, followed by giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath. Malignant tumors are rare. Often a specific diagnosis can be achieved on imaging by considering the location and anatomical relations of the lesion within the hand or wrist, and assessing its morphology. Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent modality for evaluating soft tissue tumors with its multiplanar capability and ability to characterize tissue. Ultrasound plays a complementary role to MRI. It is often the initial modality used for assessing masses as it is cheap and available, and allows reliable differentiation of cystic from solid lesions, along with a real time assessment of vascularity. This review describes the US appearances of the most frequently encountered soft tissue masses of the wrist and hand, correlating the findings with MRI where appropriate. PMID:26673615

  12. Characterizing Tissue with Acoustic Parameters Derived from Ultrasound Data

    SciTech Connect

    Littrup, P; Duric, N; Leach, R R; Azevedo, S G; Candy, J V; Moore, T; Chambers, D H; Mast, J E; Johnson, S A; Holsapple, E

    2002-01-23

    In contrast to standard reflection ultrasound (US), transmission US holds the promise of more thorough tissue characterization by generating quantitative acoustic parameters. We compare results from a conventional US scanner with data acquired using an experimental circular scanner operating at frequencies of 0.3 - 1.5 MHz. Data were obtained on phantoms and a normal, formalin-fixed, excised breast. Both reflection and transmission-based algorithms were used to generate images of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation.. Images of the phantoms demonstrate the ability to detect sub-mm features and quantify acoustic properties such as sound speed and attenuation. The human breast specimen showed full field evaluation, improved penetration and tissue definition. Comparison with conventional US indicates the potential for better margin definition and acoustic characterization of masses, particularly in the complex scattering environments of human breast tissue. The use of morphology, in the context of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation, for characterizing tissue, is discussed.

  13. Diffraction tomography applied to simulated ultrasound through breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, David H.

    2002-11-01

    Diffraction tomography is used to obtain images of sound speed and attenuation of a slice of breast tissue obtained from the Visible Woman data set. Simulated ultrasound data was generated using an acoustic propagation code run on the ASCI Blue Pacific computer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Data was generated for a slice of healthy tissue, and a slice with simulated lesions to determine the ability of the imaging method to detect various abnormalities in the breast. In addition, the time reversal operator for the slice was constructed from the data and the eigenfunctions backpropagated into the slice as first suggested by Mast [Mast, Nachman, and Waag, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102(2)] to identify structures associated with each time reversal mode for both the healthy tissue and tissue with lesions.

  14. Ultrasound induced bubble clusters and tunnels in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahed, Pooya; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D.; Bailey, Michael R.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2016-11-01

    Soft tissue fractionation induced by acoustic cavitation is desired for non-invasive tissue removal in histotripsy, while being a potential injury mechanism in other therapeutic ultrasound treatments such as lithotripsy. In this work, we investigate the formation of bubble clusters and tunnels in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms by focused ultrasound bursts to inform a class of damage models. Agar phantoms of different stiffness were subjected to a series of multi-cycle ultrasound bursts, using a burst wave lithotripsy (BWL) protocol, and simultaneously imaged at 200 frames per second (1 image per ultrasound burst). Some bubbles become visible in images ( 200 microns) due to the negative pressure ( 7.5 MPa) in the initial bursts, and the number of visible bubbles increases continuously during the subsequent bursts. A Rayleigh-Plesset-type bubble dynamics model, which accounts for viscoelastic confinement of agar gels, is developed. Material fatigue leading to eventual irreversible fracture-like failure in this model is proposed to explain the key observations. In addition to isolated, approximately spherical bubbles, long tunnel-like features are observed, which are seemingly lines of joined bubbles along a possible fracture or defect. The geometry of these tunnel-like features is quantified, and a physical explanation for tunnel formation is proposed in terms of bubble expansion and unstable collapse. This work was supported by NIH NIDDK Grant P01-DK043881.

  15. Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Soft Tissue with Ultrasound Vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenadich, I.; Bernal, M.; Greenleaf, J. F.

    The cardiovascular diseases atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, hypertension and heart failure have been related to stiffening of vessels and myocardium. Noninvasive measurements of mechanical properties of cardiovascular tissue would facilitate detection and treatment of disease in early stages, thus reducing mortality and possibly reducing cost of treatment. While techniques capable of measuring tissue elasticity have been reported, the knowledge of both elasticity and viscosity is necessary to fully characterize mechanical properties of soft tissues. In this article, we summarize the Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) method developed by our group and report on advances made in characterizing stiffness of large vessels and myocardium. The method uses radiation forceFadiation force to excite shear waves in soft tissue and pulse echo ultrasound to measure the motion. The speed of propagation of shear waves at different frequencies is used to generate dispersions curves for excised porcine left-ventricular free-wall myocardium and carotid arteries. An antisymmetric Lamb wave model was fitted to the LV myocardium dispersion curves to obtain elasticity and viscosity moduli. The results suggest that the speed of shear wave propagation in four orthogonal directions on the surface of the excised myocardium is similar. These studies show that the SDUV method has potential for clinical application in noninvasive quantification of elasticity and viscosity of vessels and myocardium.

  16. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in dentofacial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiji; Kuroda, Shingo; Horiuchi, Shinya; Tabata, Akira; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2015-04-01

    Oral and maxillofacial diseases affect millions of people worldwide and hence tissue engineering can be considered an interesting and clinically relevant approach to regenerate orofacial tissues after being affected by different diseases. Among several innovations for tissue regeneration, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been used extensively in medicine as a therapeutic, operative, and diagnostic tool. LIPUS is accepted to promote bone fracture repair and regeneration. Furthermore, the effect of LIPUS on soft tissues regeneration has been paid much attention, and many studies have performed to evaluate the potential use of LIPUS to tissue engineering soft tissues. The present article provides an overview about the status of LIPUS stimulation as a tool to be used to enhance regeneration/tissue engineering. This review consists of five parts. Part 1 is a brief introduction of the acoustic description of LIPUS and mechanical action. In Part 2, biological problems in dentofacial tissue engineering are proposed. Part 3 explores biologic mechanisms of LIPUS to cells and tissues in living body. In Part 4, the effectiveness of LIPUS on cell metabolism and tissue regeneration in dentistry are summarized. Finally, Part 5 relates the possibility of clinical application of LIPUS in orthodontics. The present review brings out better understanding of the bioeffect of LIPUS therapy on orofacial tissues which is essential to the successful integration of management remedies for tissue regeneration/engineering. To develop an evidence-based approach to clinical management and treatment of orofacial degenerative diseases using LIPUS, we would like to be in full pursuit of LIPUS biotherapy. Still, there are many challenges for this relatively new strategy, but the up to date achievements using it promises to go far beyond the present possibilities.

  17. Pulsed-ultrasound tagging of light in living tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Aner; Rubanov, E.; Pomerantz, Ami; Sfez, Bruno G.

    2004-07-01

    Ultrasound can be used in order to locally modulate, or tag, light in a turbid medium. This tagging process is made possible due to the extreme sensitivity of laser speckle distribution to minute changes within the medium. This hybrid technique presents several advantages compared to all-optical tomographic techniques, in that the image resolution is fixed by the ultrasound focus diameter. To our best knowledge, only in vitro experiments have been performed, either on tissue-like phantoms or meat. However a strong difference exists between these sample and living tissues. In living tissues, different kind of liquids flow through the capillaries, strongly reducing the sspeckle autocorrelation time. We have performed experiments on both mice and humans, showing that the autocorrelation time is much shorter than what was previously thought. We show however that it is possible to obtain signal with acceptable signal to noise ratio down to a few cm depth. We will also discuss the origin and characteristics of the speckle noise.

  18. Three-dimensional ultrasound does not improve diagnosis of retained placental tissue compared to two-dimensional ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Belachew, Johanna; Axelsson, Ove; Eurenius, Karin; Mulic-Lutvica, Ajlana

    2015-01-01

    The study objective was to improve ultrasonic diagnosis of retained placental tissue by measuring the volume of the uterine body and cavity using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound. Twenty-five women who were to undergo surgical curettage due to suspected retained placental tissue were included. The volume of the uterine body and cavity was measured using the VOCAL imaging program. Twenty-one women had retained placental tissue histologically verified. Three of these had uterine volumes exceeding the largest volume observed in the normal puerperium. Seventeen of the 21 women had a uterine cavity volume exceeding the largest volume observed in the normal puerperium. In all 14 cases examined 28 days or more after delivery the cavity volume exceeded the largest volume observed in the normal puerperium. A large cavity volume estimated with 3D ultrasound is indicative of retained placental tissue. However, 3D ultrasound adds little or no diagnostic power compared to 2D ultrasound.

  19. Ultrasound-guided tissue fractionation by high intensity focused ultrasound in an in vivo porcine liver model

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Simon, Julianna C.; Cunitz, Bryan W.; Starr, Frank; Paun, Marla; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy for noninvasive tissue ablation has been recently gaining momentum. In HIFU, ultrasound energy from an extracorporeal source is focused within the body to ablate tissue at the focus while leaving the surrounding organs and tissues unaffected. Most HIFU therapies are designed to use heating effects resulting from the absorption of ultrasound by tissue to create a thermally coagulated treatment volume. Although this approach is often successful, it has its limitations, such as the heat sink effect caused by the presence of a large blood vessel near the treatment area or heating of the ribs in the transcostal applications. HIFU-induced bubbles provide an alternative means to destroy the target tissue by mechanical disruption or, at its extreme, local fractionation of tissue within the focal region. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a recently developed approach to HIFU-induced ultrasound-guided tissue fractionation in an in vivo pig model. In this approach, termed boiling histotripsy, a millimeter-sized boiling bubble is generated by ultrasound and further interacts with the ultrasound field to fractionate porcine liver tissue into subcellular debris without inducing further thermal effects. Tissue selectivity, demonstrated by boiling histotripsy, allows for the treatment of tissue immediately adjacent to major blood vessels and other connective tissue structures. Furthermore, boiling histotripsy would benefit the clinical applications, in which it is important to accelerate resorption or passage of the ablated tissue volume, diminish pressure on the surrounding organs that causes discomfort, or insert openings between tissues. PMID:24843132

  20. DUAL-FOCUS THERAPEUTIC ULTRASOUND TRANSDUCER FOR PRODUCTION OF BROAD TISSUE LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong Seob; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    In noninvasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, formation of a large tissue lesion per sonication is desirable for reducing the overall treatment time. The goal of this study is to show the feasibility of enlarging tissue lesion size with a dual-focus therapeutic ultrasound transducer (DFTUT) by increasing the depth-of-focus (DOF). The proposed transducer consists of a disc- and an annular-type element of different radii of curvatures to produce two focal zones. To increase focal depth and to maintain uniform beamwidth of the elongated DOF, each element transmits ultrasound of a different center frequency: the inner element at a higher frequency for near field focusing and the outer element at a lower frequency for far field focusing. By activating two elements at the same time with a single transmitter capable of generating a dual-frequency mixed signal, the overall DOF of the proposed transducer may be extended considerably. A prototype transducer composed of a 4.1 MHz inner element and a 2.7 MHz outer element was fabricated to obtain preliminary experimental results. The feasibility the proposed technique was demonstrated through sound field, temperature and thermal dose simulations. The performance of the prototype transducer was verified by hydrophone measurements and tissue ablation experiments on a beef liver specimen. When several factors affecting the length and the uniformity of elongated DOF of the DFTUT are optimized, the proposed therapeutic ultrasound transducer design may increase the size of ablated tissues in the axial direction and, thus, decreasing the treatment time for a large volume of malignant tissues especially deep-seated targets. PMID:20870346

  1. Characterization of various tissue mimicking materials for medical ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouvenot, Audrey; Poepping, Tamie; Peters, Terry M.; Chen, Elvis C. S.

    2016-04-01

    Tissue mimicking materials are physical constructs exhibiting certain desired properties, which are used in machine calibration, medical imaging research, surgical planning, training, and simulation. For medical ultrasound, those specific properties include acoustic propagation speed and attenuation coefficient over the diagnostic frequency range. We investigated the acoustic characteristics of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastisol, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and isopropanol using a time-of-light technique, where a pulse was passed through a sample of known thickness contained in a water bath. The propagation speed in PVC is approximately 1400ms-1 depending on the exact chemical composition, with the attenuation coefficient ranging from 0:35 dB cm-1 at 1MHz to 10:57 dB cm-1 at 9 MHz. The propagation speed in PDMS is in the range of 1100ms-1, with an attenuation coefficient of 1:28 dB cm-1 at 1MHz to 21:22 dB cm-1 at 9 MHz. At room temperature (22 °C), a mixture of water-isopropanol (7:25% isopropanol by volume) exhibits a propagation speed of 1540ms-1, making it an excellent and inexpensive tissue-mimicking liquid for medical ultrasound imaging.

  2. Optimal conditions for tissue perforation using high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Takashi; Kihara, Taizo; Ogawa, Kouji; Tanabe, Ryoko; Yosizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Kakimoto, Takashi; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Chiba, Toshio

    2012-10-01

    To perforate tissue lying deep part in body, a large size transducer was assembled by combining four spherical-shaped transducers, and the optimal conditions for tissue perforation have studied using ventricle muscle of chicken as a target. The ex vivo experiments showed that ventricle muscle was successfully perforated both when it was exposed to High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) directly and when it was exposed to HIFU through atrial muscle layer. Moreover, it was shown that calculated acoustic power distributions are well similar to the perforation patterns, and that the acoustic energy distributes very complexly near the focus. Lastly, perforation on the living rabbit bladder wall was demonstrated as a preliminary in vivo experiment.

  3. Characterization of tissue scaffolds using optics and ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, N. T.; Parker, N. G.; He, D.; Ruan, H.; Hayes-Gill, B. R.; Mather, M. L.; Crowe, J. A.; Rose, F. R. A. J.; Povey, M. J. W.; Morgan, S. P.

    2011-03-01

    Tissue scaffolds are an integral part of the tissue engineering process, assisting in the culturing of cells in three dimensions. It is important to understand both the properties of the scaffold and the growth of cells within the scaffold. This paper describes a system to characterise scaffolds using acoustic techniques alone and the development of an ultrasound modulated optical tomography system to study the growth of cells within the scaffolds. Our interest is in characterising the properties of gel-based and polymer foam-based scaffolds. Results from a purely acoustic system have been used to investigate the properties of foam scaffolds manufactured from synthetic polyesters poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) via a supercritical fluid process. As these are porous materials, they are particularly challenging acoustically as the pores scatter sound significantly. However, it is demonstrated that acoustic signals are detectable through a 6mm thick scaffold. Although acoustics alone can be used to characterize many properties of the scaffolds, useful information can also be obtained from optical techniques e.g. monitoring the growth of cells within the scaffold via optical absorption or fluorescence techniques. Light scattering is of course a significant problem for relatively thick engineered tissue (~5mm). The acoustic approach has been extended to include laser illumination and detection of the ultrasound modulated optical pulse. Images of optically-absorbing materials embedded in gel-based tissue phantoms will be presented demonstrating that a lateral resolution of 250μm and an axial resolution of ~90μm can be achieved in scattering samples.

  4. Medical ultrasound: imaging of soft tissue strain and elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Peter N. T.; Liang, Hai-Dong

    2011-01-01

    After X-radiography, ultrasound is now the most common of all the medical imaging technologies. For millennia, manual palpation has been used to assist in diagnosis, but it is subjective and restricted to larger and more superficial structures. Following an introduction to the subject of elasticity, the elasticity of biological soft tissues is discussed and published data are presented. The basic physical principles of pulse-echo and Doppler ultrasonic techniques are explained. The history of ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue strain and elasticity is summarized, together with a brief critique of previously published reviews. The relevant techniques—low-frequency vibration, step, freehand and physiological displacement, and radiation force (displacement, impulse, shear wave and acoustic emission)—are described. Tissue-mimicking materials are indispensible for the assessment of these techniques and their characteristics are reported. Emerging clinical applications in breast disease, cardiology, dermatology, gastroenterology, gynaecology, minimally invasive surgery, musculoskeletal studies, radiotherapy, tissue engineering, urology and vascular disease are critically discussed. It is concluded that ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue strain and elasticity is now sufficiently well developed to have clinical utility. The potential for further research is examined and it is anticipated that the technology will become a powerful mainstream investigative tool. PMID:21680780

  5. Medical ultrasound: imaging of soft tissue strain and elasticity.

    PubMed

    Wells, Peter N T; Liang, Hai-Dong

    2011-11-07

    After X-radiography, ultrasound is now the most common of all the medical imaging technologies. For millennia, manual palpation has been used to assist in diagnosis, but it is subjective and restricted to larger and more superficial structures. Following an introduction to the subject of elasticity, the elasticity of biological soft tissues is discussed and published data are presented. The basic physical principles of pulse-echo and Doppler ultrasonic techniques are explained. The history of ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue strain and elasticity is summarized, together with a brief critique of previously published reviews. The relevant techniques-low-frequency vibration, step, freehand and physiological displacement, and radiation force (displacement, impulse, shear wave and acoustic emission)-are described. Tissue-mimicking materials are indispensible for the assessment of these techniques and their characteristics are reported. Emerging clinical applications in breast disease, cardiology, dermatology, gastroenterology, gynaecology, minimally invasive surgery, musculoskeletal studies, radiotherapy, tissue engineering, urology and vascular disease are critically discussed. It is concluded that ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue strain and elasticity is now sufficiently well developed to have clinical utility. The potential for further research is examined and it is anticipated that the technology will become a powerful mainstream investigative tool.

  6. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Cain, Charles A; Hall, Timothy L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, two-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (P(cav)) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p(-)) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching one when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as P(cav) = 0.5) was between p(-) = 26 and 30 MPa in all samples with high water content but varied between p(-) = 13.7 and >36 MPa in other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p(-) = 28.2 megapascals was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at various pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue.

  7. A real-time measure of cavitation induced tissue disruption by ultrasound imaging backscatter reduction.

    PubMed

    Hall, Timothy L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2007-03-01

    A feedback method for obtaining real-time information on the mechanical disruption of tissue through ultrasound cavitation is presented. This method is based on a substantial reduction in ultrasound imaging backscatter from the target volume as the tissue structure is broken down. Ex-vivo samples of porcine liver were exposed to successive high-intensity ultrasound pulses at a low duty cycle to induce mechanical disruption of tissue parenchyma through cavitation (referred to as histotripsy). At the conclusion of treatment, B-scan imaging backscatter was observed to have decreased by 22.4 +/- 2.3 dB in the target location. Treated samples of tissue were found to contain disrupted tissue corresponding to the imaged hypoechoic volume with no remaining discernable structure and a sharp boundary. The observed, substantial backscatter reduction may be an effective feedback mechanism for assessing treatment efficacy in ultrasound surgery using pulsed ultrasound to create cavitation.

  8. Viscoelastic Property Measurement in Thin Tissue Constructs Using Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a dual-element concave ultrasound transducer system for generating and tracking of localized tissue displacements in thin tissue constructs on rigid substrates. The system is comprised of a highly focused PZT-4 5-MHz acoustic radiation force (ARF) transducer and a confocal 25-MHz polyvinylidene fluoride imaging transducer. This allows for the generation of measurable displacements in tissue samples on rigid substrates with thickness values down to 500 µm. Impulse-like and longer duration sine-modulated ARF pulses are possible with intermittent M-mode data acquisition for displacement tracking. The operations of the ARF and imaging transducers are strictly synchronized using an integrated system for arbitrary waveform generation and data capture with a shared timebase. This allows for virtually jitter-free pulse-echo data well suited for correlation-based speckle tracking. With this technique we could faithfully capture the entire dynamics of the tissue axial deformation at pulse-repetition frequency values up to 10 kHz. Spatio-temporal maps of tissue displacements in response to a variety of modulated ARF beams were produced in tissue-mimicking elastography phantoms on rigid substrates. The frequency response was measured for phantoms with different modulus and thickness values. The frequency response exhibited resonant behavior with the resonance frequency being inversely proportional to the sample thickness. This resonant behavior can be used in obtaining high-contrast imaging using magnitude and phase response to sinusoidally modulated ARF beams. Furthermore, a second order forced harmonic oscillator (FHO) model was shown to capture this resonant behavior. Based on the FHO model, we used the extended Kalman filter (EKF) for tracking the apparent modulus and viscosity of samples subjected to dc and sinusoidally modulated ARF. The results show that the stiffness (apparent modulus) term in the FHO is largely time-invariant and can be estimated robustly

  9. Window-modulated compounding Nakagami imaging for ultrasound tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ma, Hsiang-Yang; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Ho, Ming-Chih; Lee, Yu-Hsin

    2014-08-01

    Ultrasound Nakagami parametric imaging is a useful tool for tissue characterization. Previous literature has suggested using a square with side lengths corresponding to 3 times the transducer pulse length as the minimum window for constructing the Nakagami image. This criterion does not produce sufficiently smooth images for the Nakagami image to characterize homogeneous tissues. To improve image smoothness, we proposed window-modulated compounding (WMC) Nakagami imaging based on summing and averaging the Nakagami images formed using sliding windows with varying window side lengths from 1 to N times the transducer pulse length in 1 pulse length step. Simulations (the number densities of scatterers: 2-16 scatterers/mm(2)) and experiments on fully developed speckle phantoms (the scatterer diameters: 20-106 μm) were conducted to suggest an appropriate number of frames N and to evaluate the image smoothness and resolution by analyzing the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the parameter distribution and the widths of the image autocorrelation function (ACF), respectively. In vivo ultrasound measurements on rat livers without and with cirrhosis were performed to validate the practical performance of the WMC Nakagami image in tissue characterization. The simulation results showed that using a range of N from 7 to 10 as the number of frames for image compounding reduces the estimation error to less than 5%. Based on this criterion, the Nakagami parameter obtained from the WMC Nakagami image increased from 0.45 to 0.95 after increasing the number densities of scatterers from 2 to 16 scatterers/mm(2). The FWHM of the parameter distribution (bins=40) was 13.5±1.4 for the Nakagami image and 9.1±1.43 for the WMC Nakagami image, respectively (p-value<.05). The widths of the ACF for the Nakagami and WMC Nakagami images were 454±5.36 and 458±4.33, respectively (p-value>.05). In the phantom experiments, we also found that the FWHM of the parameter distribution for the WMC

  10. Intense focused ultrasound preferentially stimulates subcutaneous and focal neuropathic tissue: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    McClintic, Abbi M.; Dickey, Trevor C.; Gofeld, Michael; Kliot, Michel; Loeser, John D.; Richebe, Philippe; Mourad, Pierre D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Potential peripheral sources of pain from subcutaneous tissue can require invasive evocative tests for their localization and assessment. Here we describe studies whose ultimate goal is development of a non-invasive evocative test for subcutaneous, painful tissue. Design We used a rat model of a focal and subcutaneous neuroma to test the hypothesis that intense focused ultrasound can differentiate focal and subcutaneous neuropathic tissue from control tissue. To do so we first applied intense focused ultrasound (2 MHz, with individual pulses of 0.1 seconds in duration) to the rat’s neuroma while the rat was under light anesthesia. We started with low values of intensity which we increased until intense focused ultrasound stimulation caused the rat to reliably flick its paw. We then applied that same intense focused ultrasound protocol to control tissue away from the neuroma and assayed for the rat’s response to that stimulation. Results Intense focused ultrasound of sufficient strength (I_sata of 600 +/− 160 W/cm^2) applied to the neuroma caused the rat to flick its paw, while the same intense focused ultrasound applied millimeters to a centimeter away failed to induce a paw flick. Conclusion Successful stimulation of the neuroma by intense focused ultrasound required co-localization of the neuroma and intense focused ultrasound, supporting our hypothesis. PMID:23137045

  11. AUGMENTATION OF LIMB PERFUSION AND REVERSAL OF TISSUE ISCHEMIA PRODUCED BY ULTRASOUND-MEDIATED MICROBUBBLE CAVITATION

    PubMed Central

    Belcik, J. Todd; Mott, Brian H.; Xie, Aris; Zhao, Yan; Kim, Sajeevani; Lindner, Nathan J.; Ammi, Azzdine; Linden, Joel M.; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultrasound can increase tissue blood flow in part through the intravascular shear produced by oscillatory pressure fluctuations. We hypothesized that ultrasound-mediated increases in perfusion can be augmented by microbubble contrast agents that undergo ultrasound-mediated cavitation, and sought to characterize the biologic mediators. Methods and Results Contrast ultrasound perfusion imaging of hindlimb skeletal muscle and femoral artery diameter measurement were performed in non-ischemic mice after unilateral 10 min exposure to intermittent ultrasound alone (mechanical index [MI] 0.6 or 1.3) or ultrasound with lipid microbubbles (2×108 I.V.). Studies were also performed after inhibiting shear- or pressure-dependent vasodilator pathways, and in mice with hindlimb ischemia. Ultrasound alone produced a 2-fold increase (p<0.05) in muscle perfusion regardless of ultrasound power. Ultrasound-mediated augmentation in flow was greater with microbubbles (3-fold and 10-fold higher than control for MI 0.6 and 1.3, respectively; p<0.05), as was femoral artery dilation. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) attenuated flow augmentation produced by ultrasound and microbubbles by 70% (p<0.01), whereas inhibition of adenosine-A2a receptors and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids had minimal effect. Limb nitric oxide (NO) production and muscle phospho-eNOS increased in a stepwise fashion by ultrasound and ultrasound with microbubbles. In mice with unilateral hindlimb ischemia (40–50% reduction in flow), ultrasound (MI 1.3) with microbubbles increased perfusion by 2-fold to a degree that was greater than the control non-ischemic limb. Conclusions Increases in muscle blood flow during high-power ultrasound are markedly amplified by the intravascular presence of microbubbles and can reverse tissue ischemia. These effects are most likely mediated by cavitation-related increases in shear and activation of eNOS. PMID:25834183

  12. Broadband miniature optical ultrasound probe for high resolution vascular tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Colchester, Richard J.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Mosse, Charles A.; Beard, Paul C.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-01-01

    An all-optical ultrasound probe for vascular tissue imaging was developed. Ultrasound was generated by pulsed laser illumination of a functionalized carbon nanotube composite coating on the end face of an optical fiber. Ultrasound was detected with a Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity on the end face of an adjacent optical fiber. The probe diameter was < 0.84 mm and had an ultrasound bandwidth of ~20 MHz. The probe was translated across the tissue sample to create a virtual linear array of ultrasound transmit/receive elements. At a depth of 3.5 mm, the axial resolution was 64 µm and the lateral resolution was 88 µm, as measured with a carbon fiber target. Vascular tissues from swine were imaged ex vivo and good correspondence to histology was observed. PMID:25909031

  13. Ultrasound Imaging Techniques for Spatiotemporal Characterization of Composition, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties in Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Deng, Cheri X; Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound techniques are increasingly being used to quantitatively characterize both native and engineered tissues. This review provides an overview and selected examples of the main techniques used in these applications. Grayscale imaging has been used to characterize extracellular matrix deposition, and quantitative ultrasound imaging based on the integrated backscatter coefficient has been applied to estimating cell concentrations and matrix morphology in tissue engineering. Spectral analysis has been employed to characterize the concentration and spatial distribution of mineral particles in a construct, as well as to monitor mineral deposition by cells over time. Ultrasound techniques have also been used to measure the mechanical properties of native and engineered tissues. Conventional ultrasound elasticity imaging and acoustic radiation force imaging have been applied to detect regions of altered stiffness within tissues. Sonorheometry and monitoring of steady-state excitation and recovery have been used to characterize viscoelastic properties of tissue using a single transducer to both deform and image the sample. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography uses separate ultrasound transducers to produce a more potent deformation force to microscale characterization of viscoelasticity of hydrogel constructs. These ultrasound-based techniques have high potential to impact the field of tissue engineering as they are further developed and their range of applications expands.

  14. Developing High-Frequency Quantitative Ultrasound Techniques to Characterize Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Karla Patricia E.

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for the repair or replacement of native tissues and organs. Further advancements in the fabrication of functional engineered tissues are partly dependent on developing new and improved technologies to monitor the properties of engineered tissues volumetrically, quantitatively, noninvasively, and nondestructively over time. Currently, engineered tissues are evaluated during fabrication using histology, biochemical assays, and direct mechanical tests. However, these techniques destroy tissue samples and, therefore, lack the capability for real-time, longitudinal monitoring. The research reported in this thesis developed nondestructive, noninvasive approaches to characterize the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of 3-D engineered tissues using high-frequency quantitative ultrasound and elastography technologies. A quantitative ultrasound technique, using a system-independent parameter known as the integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC), was employed to visualize and quantify structural properties of engineered tissues. Specifically, the IBC was demonstrated to estimate cell concentration and quantitatively detect differences in the microstructure of 3-D collagen hydrogels. Additionally, the feasibility of an ultrasound elastography technique called Single Tracking Location Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (STL-ARFI) imaging was demonstrated for estimating the shear moduli of 3-D engineered tissues. High-frequency ultrasound techniques can be easily integrated into sterile environments necessary for tissue engineering. Furthermore, these high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques can enable noninvasive, volumetric characterization of the structural, biological, and mechanical properties of engineered tissues during fabrication and post-implantation.

  15. Novel Applications of Ultrasound Technology to Visualize and Characterize Myofascial Trigger Points and Surrounding Soft Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Siddhartha; Shah, Jay P.; Gebreab, Tadesse; Yen, Ru-Huey; Gilliams, Elizabeth; Danoff, Jerome; Gerber, Lynn H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Apply ultrasound (US) imaging techniques to better describe the characteristics of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) and the immediately adjacent soft tissue. Design Descriptive (exploratory) study. Setting Biomedical research center. Participants 9 subjects meeting Travell and Simons’s criteria for MTrPs in a taut band in the upper trapezius. Interventions (None) Main Outcome Measures MTrPs were evaluated by 1) physical examination, 2) pressure algometry, and 3) three types of ultrasound imaging including grayscale (2D US), vibration sonoelastography (VSE), and Doppler. Methods Four sites in each patient were labeled based on physical examination as either active MTrP (spontaneously-painful, A-MTrP), latent MTrP (non-painful, L-MTrP), or normal myofascial tissue. US examination was performed on each subject by a team blinded to the physical findings. A 12-5 MHz US transducer was used. VSE was performed by color Doppler variance imaging while simultaneously inducing vibrations (~92Hz) with a handheld massage vibrator. Each site was assigned a tissue imaging score (TIS) as follows: 0 = uniform echogenicity and stiffness; 1 = focal hypoechoic region with stiff nodule; 2 = multiple hypoechoic regions with stiff nodules. Blood flow in the neighborhood of MTrPs was assessed using Doppler imaging. Each site was assigned a blood flow waveform score (BFS) as follows: 0 = normal arterial flow in muscle; 1 = elevated diastolic flow; 2 = high-resistance flow waveform with retrograde diastolic flow. Results MTrPs appeared as focal, hypoechoic regions on 2D US, indicating local changes in tissue echogenicity, and as focal regions of reduced vibration amplitude on VSE, indicating a localized stiff nodule. MTrPs were elliptical in shape, with a size of 0.16 ± 0.11 cm2. There were no significant differences in size between A-MTrPs and L-MTrPs. Sites containing MTrPs were more likely to have higher TIS compared to normal myofascial tissue (p<0.002). Small arteries (or

  16. Interaction of ultrasound with vortices in type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sonin, E.B.

    1996-04-01

    The theory of ultrasound in the mixed state of type-II superconductors is suggested which takes into account the Magnus force on vortices, the anti-Magnus force on ions, and diamagnetism of the mixed state. The acoustic Faraday effect (rotation of polarization of the transverse ultrasonic wave propagating along vortices) is linear in the Magnus force in any regime of the flux flow for wavelengths now used in the ultrasound experiments. Therefore, in contrast to previous predictions, the Faraday effect should be looked for only in clean superconductors with a strong Magnus force. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of cancellous bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lifeng; Lashkari, Bahman; Tan, Joel W Y; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    We used ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging modalities to characterize cattle trabecular bones. The PA signals were generated with an 805-nm continuous wave laser used for optimally deep optical penetration depth. The detector for both modalities was a 2.25-MHz US transducer with a lateral resolution of ~1 mm at its focal point. Using a lateral pixel size much larger than the size of the trabeculae, raster scanning generated PA images related to the averaged values of the optical and thermoelastic properties, as well as density measurements in the focal volume. US backscatter yielded images related to mechanical properties and density in the focal volume. The depth of interest was selected by time-gating the signals for both modalities. The raster scanned PA and US images were compared with microcomputed tomography (μCT) images averaged over the same volume to generate similar spatial resolution as US and PA. The comparison revealed correlations between PA and US modalities with the mineral volume fraction of the bone tissue. Various features and properties of these modalities such as detectable depth, resolution, and sensitivity are discussed.

  18. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of cancellous bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lifeng; Lashkari, Bahman; Tan, Joel W. Y.; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    We used ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging modalities to characterize cattle trabecular bones. The PA signals were generated with an 805-nm continuous wave laser used for optimally deep optical penetration depth. The detector for both modalities was a 2.25-MHz US transducer with a lateral resolution of ˜1 mm at its focal point. Using a lateral pixel size much larger than the size of the trabeculae, raster scanning generated PA images related to the averaged values of the optical and thermoelastic properties, as well as density measurements in the focal volume. US backscatter yielded images related to mechanical properties and density in the focal volume. The depth of interest was selected by time-gating the signals for both modalities. The raster scanned PA and US images were compared with microcomputed tomography (μCT) images averaged over the same volume to generate similar spatial resolution as US and PA. The comparison revealed correlations between PA and US modalities with the mineral volume fraction of the bone tissue. Various features and properties of these modalities such as detectable depth, resolution, and sensitivity are discussed.

  19. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... your test will be done. Alternative Names Sonogram Images Abdominal ultrasound Ultrasound in pregnancy 17 week ultrasound ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  20. Investigation of Post-mortem Tissue Effects Using Long-time Decorrelation Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csány, Gergely; Balogh, Lajos; Gyöngy, Miklós

    Decorrelation ultrasound is being increasingly used to investigate long-term biological phenomena. In the current work, ultrasound image sequences of mice who did not survive anesthesia (in a separate investigation) were analyzed and post-mortem tissue effects were observed via decorrelation calculation. A method was developed to obtain a quantitative parameter characterizing the rate of decorrelation. The results show that ultrasound decorrelation imaging is an effective method of observing post-mortem tissue effects and point to further studies elucidating the mechanism behind these effects.

  1. Modeling Transversely Isotropic, Viscoelastic, Incompressible Tissue-like Materials with Application in Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions. PMID:25591921

  2. Pulmonary ultrasound elastography: a feasibility study with phantoms and ex-vivo tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Man Minh; Xie, Hua; Paluch, Kamila; Stanton, Douglas; Ramachandran, Bharat

    2013-03-01

    Elastography has become widely used for minimally invasive diagnosis in many tumors as seen with breast, liver and prostate. Among different modalities, ultrasound-based elastography stands out due to its advantages including being safe, real-time, and relatively low-cost. While lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality among both men and women, the use of ultrasound elastography for lung cancer diagnosis has hardly been investigated due to the limitations of ultrasound in air. In this work, we investigate the use of static-compression based endobronchial ultrasound elastography by a 3D trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) transducer for lung cancer diagnosis. A water-filled balloon was designed to 1) improve the visualization of endobronchial ultrasound and 2) to induce compression via pumping motion inside the trachea and bronchiole. In a phantom study, we have successfully generated strain images indicating the stiffness difference between the gelatin background and agar inclusion. A similar strain ratio was confirmed with Philips ultrasound strain-based elastography product. For ex-vivo porcine lung study, different tissue ablation methods including chemical injection, Radio Frequency (RF) ablation, and direct heating were implemented to achieve tumor-mimicking tissue. Stiff ablated lung tissues were obtained and detected with our proposed method. These results suggest the feasibility of pulmonary elastography to differentiate stiff tumor tissue from normal tissue.

  3. Development of a Mechanical Scanning-type Intravascular Ultrasound System Using a Miniature Ultrasound Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Masayuki; Xie, Shangping; Tagawa, Norio; Moriya, Tadashi; Furukawa, Yuji

    2007-07-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) plays an important role for the detection of arteriosclerosis, which causes the ischemic heart disease. In mechanical scanning-type IVUS, it is necessary to rotate a transducer or a reflecting mirror. A method that involves rotating the transducer using a torque wire causes image distortion (NURD: non uniform rotation distortion). For a method that involves placing an electromagnetic motor on the tip of an IVUS probe is difficult to miniaturize the probe. Our objectives are to miniaturize the probe (1 mm in diameter, 5 mm in length) and to remove NURD. Therefore, we conducted a study to assess the feasibility of attaining these objectives by constructing a prototype IVUS system, in which an ultrasound motor using a stator in the form of a helical coil (abbreviated as CS-USM: coiled stator-ultrasonic motor) is incorporated, and to clarify problems that need to be solved in constructing the probe.

  4. Quantitative Assessment of First Annular Pulley and Adjacent Tissues Using High-Frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hsun; Yang, Tai-Hua; Wang, Shyh-Hau; Su, Fong-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Due to a lack of appropriate image resolution, most ultrasound scanners are unable to sensitively discern the pulley tissues. To extensively investigate the properties of the A1 pulley system and the surrounding tissues for assessing trigger finger, a 30 MHz ultrasound system was implemented to perform in vitro experiments using the hypodermis, A1 pulley, and superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) dissected from cadavers. Ultrasound signals were acquired from both the transverse and sagittal planes of each tissue sample. The quantitative ultrasonic parameters, including sound speed, attenuation coefficient, integrated backscatter (IB) and Nakagami parameter (m), were subsequently estimated to characterize the tissue properties. The results demonstrated that the acquired ultrasound images have high resolution and are able to sufficiently differentiate the variations of tissue textures. Moreover, the attenuation slope of the hypodermis is larger than those of the A1 pulley and SDFT. The IB of A1 pulley is about the same as that of the hypodermis, and is very different from SDFT. The m parameter of the A1 pulley is also very different from those of hypodermis and SDFT. This study demonstrated that high-frequency ultrasound images in conjunction with ultrasonic parameters are capable of characterizing the A1 pulley system and surrounding tissues. PMID:28067854

  5. Temperature elevation of biological tissue model exposed by focused ultrasound with acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Naotaka; Kudo, Nobuki; Akiyama, Iwaki

    2012-09-01

    Focused ultrasound with acoustic radiation force (ARF) is beginning to be used for imaging and measuring tissue elasticity. On the other hand, it was suggested that the temperature elevation near bone at focus may be significant within the limits of acoustic output regulation in diagnostic ultrasound devices (Herman; 2002). In this study, with the aim of obtaining the relationships between temperature elevations and parameters of ultrasound exposure with ARF, temperature elevations in two kinds of tissue models with or without bone were numerically evaluated. The results showed that the temperature elevation at focus on the surface of bone may exceed an allowable temperature elevation which WFUMB guideline recommends, even though the acoustic intensity is within the limits of acoustic output regulation in diagnostic ultrasound devices.

  6. Observation of the inception and evolution of a cavitation cloud in tissue with ultrafast ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieur, Fabrice; Zorgani, Ali; Catheline, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    The local application of ultrasound is known to improve drug intake by tumors. Cavitating bubbles are one of the contributing effects. A setup where two ultrasound transducers are placed confocally is used to generate cavitation in ex vivo tissue. As the transducers emit a series of short bursts, the creation and evolution of the cavitation activity is monitored using an ultrafast ultrasound imaging system. This system capable of frame rates up to 10000 frames per second provides several tens of images between consecutive bursts. A cross-correlation between consecutive images used for speckle tracking shows a decorrelation of the imaging signal due to changes induced by the cavitation cloud. This post-processed sequence of images reveals that once bubbles have been created in the tissue, they remain for a short time even when no ultrasound is applied. The evolution of the size and place of the cavitation cloud between bursts show a repeatable pattern through a burst sequence.

  7. Registration of 3D ultrasound computer tomography and MRI for evaluation of tissue correspondences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, T.; Dapp, R.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Gemmeke, H.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a new imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis. In the current state of development it is essential to correlate USCT with a known imaging modality like MRI to evaluate how different tissue types are depicted. Due to different imaging conditions, e.g. with the breast subject to buoyancy in USCT, a direct correlation is demanding. We present a 3D image registration method to reduce positioning differences and allow direct side-by-side comparison of USCT and MRI volumes. It is based on a two-step approach including a buoyancy simulation with a biomechanical model and free form deformations using cubic B-Splines for a surface refinement. Simulation parameters are optimized patient-specifically in a simulated annealing scheme. The method was evaluated with in-vivo datasets resulting in an average registration error below 5mm. Correlating tissue structures can thereby be located in the same or nearby slices in both modalities and three-dimensional non-linear deformations due to the buoyancy are reduced. Image fusion of MRI volumes and USCT sound speed volumes was performed for intuitive display. By applying the registration to data of our first in-vivo study with the KIT 3D USCT, we could correlate several tissue structures in MRI and USCT images and learn how connective tissue, carcinomas and breast implants observed in the MRI are depicted in the USCT imaging modes.

  8. Acoustically accessible window determination for ultrasound mediated treatment of glycogen storage disease type Ia patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shutao; Raju, Balasundar I.; Leyvi, Evgeniy; Weinstein, David A.; Seip, Ralf

    2012-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is caused by an inherited single-gene defect resulting in an impaired glycogen to glucose conversion pathway. Targeted ultrasound mediated delivery (USMD) of plasmid DNA (pDNA) to liver in conjunction with microbubbles may provide a potential treatment for GSDIa patients. As the success of USMD treatments is largely dependent on the accessibility of the targeted tissue by the focused ultrasound beam, this study presents a quantitative approach to determine the acoustically accessible liver volume in GSDIa patients. Models of focused ultrasound beam profiles for transducers of varying aperture and focal lengths were applied to abdomen models reconstructed from suitable CT and MRI images. Transducer manipulations (simulating USMD treatment procedures) were implemented via transducer translations and rotations with the intent of targeting and exposing the entire liver to ultrasound. Results indicate that acoustically accessible liver volumes can be as large as 50% of the entire liver volume for GSDIa patients and on average 3 times larger compared to a healthy adult group due to GSDIa patients' increased liver size. Detailed descriptions of the evaluation algorithm, transducer-and abdomen models are presented, together with implications for USMD treatments of GSDIa patients and transducer designs for USMD applications.

  9. Dynamic morphometric characterization of local connective tissue network structure in humans using ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Helene M; Rizzo, Donna M; Fox, James R; Badger, Gary J; Wu, Junru; Konofagou, Elisa E; Stevens-Tuttle, Debbie; Bouffard, Nicole A; Krag, Martin H

    2007-01-01

    Background In humans, connective tissue forms a complex, interconnected network throughout the body that may have mechanosensory, regulatory and signaling functions. Understanding these potentially important phenomena requires non-invasive measurements of collagen network structure that can be performed in live animals or humans. The goal of this study was to show that ultrasound can be used to quantify dynamic changes in local connective tissue structure in vivo. We first performed combined ultrasound and histology examinations of the same tissue in two subjects undergoing surgery: in one subject, we examined the relationship of ultrasound to histological images in three dimensions; in the other, we examined the effect of a localized tissue perturbation using a previously developed robotic acupuncture needling technique. In ten additional non-surgical subjects, we quantified changes in tissue spatial organization over time during needle rotation vs. no rotation using ultrasound and semi-variogram analyses. Results 3-D renditions of ultrasound images showed longitudinal echogenic sheets that matched with collagenous sheets seen in histological preparations. Rank correlations between serial 2-D ultrasound and corresponding histology images resulted in high positive correlations for semi-variogram ranges computed parallel (r = 0.79, p < 0.001) and perpendicular (r = 0.63, p < 0.001) to the surface of the skin, indicating concordance in spatial structure between the two data sets. Needle rotation caused tissue displacement in the area surrounding the needle that was mapped spatially with ultrasound elastography and corresponded to collagen bundles winding around the needle on histological sections. In semi-variograms computed for each ultrasound frame, there was a greater change in the area under the semi-variogram curve across successive frames during needle rotation compared with no rotation. The direction of this change was heterogeneous across subjects. The frame

  10. Multi-Push (MP) Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) Ultrasound for Assessing Tissue Viscoelasticity, In Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Scola, Mallory R.; Baggesen, Leslie M.; Gallippi, Caterina M.

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) ultrasound is a method of elastographic imaging in which micron-scale tissue displacements, induced and tracked by ultrasound, reflect clinically relevant tissue mechanical properties. Our laboratory has recently shown that tissue viscoelasticity is assessed using the novel Multi-Push (MP) ARF method. MP ARF applies the Voigt model for viscoelastic materials and compares the displacements achieved by successive ARF excitations to qualitatively or quantitatively represent the relaxation time for constant stress, which is a direct descriptor of the viscoelastic response of the tissue. We have demonstrated MP ARF in custom viscoelastic tissue mimicking materials and implemented the method in vivo in canine muscle and human renal allografts, with strong spatial correlation between MP ARF findings and histochemical features and previously reported mechanical changes with renal disease. These data support that noninvasive MP ARF is capable of clinically relevant assessment of tissue viscoelastic properties. PMID:23366389

  11. The role of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound in the diagnosis of childhood febrile urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    İlarslan, Nisa Eda Çullas; Fitöz, Ömer Suat; Öztuna, Derya Gökmen; Küçük, Nuriye Özlem; Yalçınkaya, Fatma Fatoş

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study assessed the ability of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound in the detection of childhood febrile urinary tract infections in comparison with the gold standard reference method: Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinicacid renal cortical scintigraphy. Material and Methods: This prospective study included 60 patients who were hospitalized with a first episode of febrile urinary tract infections. All children were examined with dimercaptosuccinicacid scan and tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound within the first 3 days of admission. Results: Signs indicative of acute infection were observed in 29 patients according to the results of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound while dimercaptosuccinicacid scan revealed abnormal findings in 33 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tissue harmonic imaging combined with power Doppler ultrasound using dimercaptosuccinicacid scintigraphy as the reference method in patients diagnosed with first episode febrile urinary tract infections were calculated as 57.58% (95% confidence interval: 40.81%–72.76%); 62.96% (95% confidence interval: 44.23%–78.47%); 65.52% (95% confidence interval: 52.04%–77%); 54.84% (95% confidence interval: 41.54%–67.52%); respectively. Conclusions: Although current results exhibit inadequate success of power Doppler ultrasound, this practical and radiation-free method may soon be comprise a part of the routine ultrasonographic evaluation of febrile urinary tract infections of childhood if patients are evaluated early and under appropriate sedation. PMID:26265892

  12. Cavitation-induced damage in soft tissue phantoms by focused ultrasound bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahed, Pooya; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D.; Bailey, Michael R.; Hutchens, Shelby B.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2015-11-01

    Cavitation in soft tissues, similar to that in purely hydrodynamic configurations, is thought to cause tissue injury in therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Our goal is to generalize bubble dynamics models to represent this phenomenon, which we pursue experimentally with observations in tissue-mimicking polyacrylamide and agarose phantoms and semi-analytic generalization of Rayleigh-Plesset-type bubble dynamics models. The phantoms were imaged with high-speed cameras while subjected to a series of multiple pressure wave bursts, of the kind being considered specifically for burst-wave lithotripsy (BWL). The experimental observations show bubble activation at multiple sites during the initial pulses. After multiple pulses, a further onset of cavitation is observed at some new locations suggesting material failure due to fatigue under cyclic loading. A nonlinear strain-energy with strain hardening is used to represent the elasticity of the surrounding medium. Griffith's fracture criterion is then applied in order to determine the onset of material damage. The damaged material is then represented as a Newtonian fluid. By assuming that such a decrease in the fracture toughness occurs under cyclic loading, the fatigue behavior observed in the experiments can be reproduced by our model. This work was supported by NIH grant NIDDK PO1-DK043881.

  13. A tissue phantom for visualization and measurement of ultrasound-induced cavitation damage.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alexander P; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2010-12-01

    Many ultrasound studies involve the use of tissue-mimicking materials to research phenomena in vitro and predict in vivo bioeffects. We have developed a tissue phantom to study cavitation-induced damage to tissue. The phantom consists of red blood cells suspended in an agarose hydrogel. The acoustic and mechanical properties of the gel phantom were found to be similar to soft tissue properties. The phantom's response to cavitation was evaluated using histotripsy. Histotripsy causes breakdown of tissue structures by the generation of controlled cavitation using short, focused, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. Histotripsy lesions were generated in the phantom and kidney tissue using a spherically focused 1-MHz transducer generating 15 cycle pulses, at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz with a peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Damage appeared clearly as increased optical transparency of the phantom due to rupture of individual red blood cells. The morphology of lesions generated in the phantom was very similar to that generated in kidney tissue at both macroscopic and cellular levels. Additionally, lesions in the phantom could be visualized as hypoechoic regions on a B-mode ultrasound image, similar to histotripsy lesions in tissue. High-speed imaging of the optically transparent phantom was used to show that damage coincides with the presence of cavitation. These results indicate that the phantom can accurately mimic the response of soft tissue to cavitation and provide a useful tool for studying damage induced by acoustic cavitation.

  14. Structural Quality Control of Swiss-Type Cheese with Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskelinen, J.; Alavuotunki, A.; Hæggström, E.; Alatossava, T.

    2007-03-01

    A study on structural quality control of Swiss-type cheese with ultrasound is presented. We used a longitudinal mode pulse-echo setup using 1-2MHz ultrasonic frequencies to detect cheese-eyes and ripening induced cracks. Results show that the ultrasonic method posses good potential to monitor the cheese structure during the ripening process. Preliminary results indicate that maturation stage could be monitored with ultrasonic velocity measurements. Further studies to verify the method's on-line potential to detect low-structural-quality cheeses are planned.

  15. PE-CMOS based C-scan ultrasound for foreign object detection in soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chu-Chuan; Lo, Shih-Chung Ben; Freedman, Matthew T; Lasser, Marvin E; Kula, John; Sarcone, Anita; Wang, Yue

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a C-scan ultrasound prototype and three imaging modalities for the detection of foreign objects inserted in porcine soft tissue. The object materials include bamboo, plastics, glass and aluminum alloys. The images of foreign objects were acquired using the C-scan ultrasound, a portable B-scan ultrasound, film-based radiography, and computerized radiography. The C-scan ultrasound consists of a plane wave transducer, a compound acoustic lens system, and a newly developed ultrasound sensor array based on the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor coated with piezoelectric material (PE-CMOS). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the images were analyzed to quantitatively evaluate the detectability using different imaging modalities. The experimental results indicate that the C-scan prototype has better CNR values in 4 out of 7 objects than other modalities. Specifically, the C-scan prototype provides more detail information of the soft tissues without the speckle artifacts that are commonly seen with conventional B-scan ultrasound, and has the same orientation as the standard radiographs but without ionizing radiation.

  16. Heating simulations of pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound in the presence of heterogeneous tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao; Zheng, Yinfei; Duan, Huilong

    2017-03-01

    A numerical model for evaluating the distribution of the acoustic pressure and temperature beneath the abdominal wall or the chest wall under nonablative high-intensity ultrasound treatments is proposed. The nonlinear propagation of the ultrasound wave was simulated using a k-space pseudo-spectral method. The abdominal wall (heterogeneous medium) was presented by the digital tissue cross sections. The heating process was modeled by solving the bioheat equation using a finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. As indicated in the simulation, the presents of the heterogeneous tissue can influence the distribution of the acoustic intensity. The intensity beneath the abdominal wall was decreased by 2.2 dB on the focal point compared with homogeneous tissue and the temperature of the focused region in the tissue is reduced as a result. Furthermore, compared with conventional 2-order FDTD methods, the proposed model is still stable when the high dissipative tissue (e.g., bone) presents.

  17. Quantitative ultrasound tissue characterization in shoulder and thigh muscles – a new approach

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Pernille Kofoed; Jensen, Bente R; Darvann, Tron; Jørgensen, Kurt; Bakke, Merete

    2006-01-01

    Background The echogenicity patterns of ultrasound scans contain information of tissue composition in muscles. The aim was: (1) to develop a quantitative ultrasound image analysis to characterize tissue composition in terms of intensity and structure of the ultrasound images, and (2) to use the method for characterization of ultrasound images of the supraspinatus muscle, and the vastus lateralis muscle. Methods Computerized texture analyses employing first-order and higher-order grey-scale statistics were developed to objectively characterize ultrasound images of m. supraspinatus and m. vastus lateralis from 9 healthy participants. Results The mean grey-scale intensity was higher in the vastus lateralis muscle (p < 0.05) than in the supraspinatus muscle (average value of middle measuring site 51.4 compared to 35.0). Furthermore, the number of spatially connected and homogeneous regions (blobs) was higher in the vastus lateralis (p < 0.05) than in the supraspinatus (average for m. vastus lateralis: 0.092 mm-2 and for m. supraspinatus: 0.016 mm-2). Conclusion The higher intensity and the higher number of blobs in the vastus lateralis muscle indicates that the thigh muscle contained more non-contractile components than the supraspinatus muscle, and that the muscle was coarser. The image analyses supplemented each other and gave a more complete description of the tissue composition in the muscle than the mean grey-scale value alone. PMID:16420695

  18. Model-based correction of tissue compression for tracked ultrasound in soft tissue image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Pheiffer, Thomas S; Thompson, Reid C; Rucker, Daniel C; Simpson, Amber L; Miga, Michael I

    2014-04-01

    Acquisition of ultrasound data negatively affects image registration accuracy during image-guided therapy because of tissue compression by the probe. We present a novel compression correction method that models sub-surface tissue displacement resulting from application of a tracked probe to the tissue surface. Patient landmarks are first used to register the probe pose to pre-operative imaging. The ultrasound probe geometry is used to provide boundary conditions to a biomechanical model of the tissue. The deformation field solution of the model is inverted to non-rigidly transform the ultrasound images to an estimation of the tissue geometry before compression. Experimental results with gel phantoms indicated that the proposed method reduced the tumor margin modified Hausdorff distance (MHD) from 5.0 ± 1.6 to 1.9 ± 0.6 mm, and reduced tumor centroid alignment error from 7.6 ± 2.6 to 2.0 ± 0.9 mm. The method was applied to a clinical case and reduced the tumor margin MHD error from 5.4 ± 0.1 to 2.6 ± 0.1 mm and the centroid alignment error from 7.2 ± 0.2 to 3.5 ± 0.4 mm.

  19. A review on ultrasound-based thyroid cancer tissue characterization and automated classification.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U R; Swapna, G; Sree, S V; Molinari, F; Gupta, S; Bardales, R H; Witkowska, A; Suri, J S

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we review the different studies that developed Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) for automated classification of thyroid cancer into benign and malignant types. Specifically, we discuss the different types of features that are used to study and analyze the differences between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. These features can be broadly categorized into (a) the sonographic features from the ultrasound images, and (b) the non-clinical features extracted from the ultrasound images using statistical and data mining techniques. We also present a brief description of the commonly used classifiers in ultrasound based CAD systems. We then review the studies that used features based on the ultrasound images for thyroid nodule classification and highlight the limitations of such studies. We also discuss and review the techniques used in studies that used the non-clinical features for thyroid nodule classification and report the classification accuracies obtained in these studies.

  20. Ultrasound Technologies for the Spatial Patterning of Cells and Extracellular Matrix Proteins and the Vascularization of Engineered Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvin, Kelley A.

    Technological advancements in the field of tissue engineering could save the lives of thousands of organ transplant patients who die each year while waiting for donor organs. Currently, two of the primary challenges preventing tissue engineers from developing functional replacement tissues and organs are the need to recreate complex cell and extracellular microenvironments and to vascularize the tissue to maintain cell viability and function. Ultrasound is a form of mechanical energy that can noninvasively and nondestructively interact with tissues at the cell and protein level. In this thesis, novel ultrasound-based technologies were developed for the spatial patterning of cells and extracellular matrix proteins and the vascularization of three-dimensional engineered tissue constructs. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields were utilized to noninvasively control the spatial organization of cells and cell-bound extracellular matrix proteins within collagen-based engineered tissue. Additionally, ultrasound induced thermal mechanisms were exploited to site-specifically pattern various extracellular matrix collagen microstructures within a single engineered tissue construct. Finally, ultrasound standing wave field technology was used to promote the rapid and extensive vascularization of three-dimensional tissue constructs. As such, the ultrasound technologies developed in these studies have the potential to provide the field of tissue engineering with novel strategies to spatially pattern cells and extracellular matrix components and to vascularize engineered tissue, and thus, could advance the fabrication of functional replacement tissues and organs in the field of tissue engineering.

  1. Quasi-static elastography and its application in investigation of focused ultrasound induced tissue lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Ling, Tao; Shen, Yong; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Hairong; Li, Faqi

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring of Focused Ultrasound (FUS) therapy has always been a key factor for a successful therapy. Although B-mode ultrasound has long been used for monitoring FUS therapy, the gray scale changes can not precisely reflect the lesion formation inside the tissue, while MR thermometry is considered to be too expensive. In this study, elastography had been performed using a commercial ultrasound system to investigate lesions produced by FUS irradiation in vitro. Several motion detection algorithms had been performed to improve the motion detection accuracy in the elastography. The effects of different algorithms on the motion detection accuracy were compared. Experimental results on the FUS induced lesion in swine muscle were introduced. The results indicated that lesions induced by small dosage of FUS inside the tissue can be successfully detected, which has a profound clinical meaning for the monitoring of FUS therapy.

  2. Radio Frequency Ultrasound Time Series Signal Analysis to Evaluate High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Lesion Formation Status in Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mobasheri, Saeedeh; Behnam, Hamid; Rangraz, Parisa; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a novel treatment modality used by scientists and clinicians in the recent decades. This modality has had a great and significant success as a noninvasive surgery technique applicable in tissue ablation therapy and cancer treatment. In this study, radio frequency (RF) ultrasound signals were acquired and registered in three stages of before, during, and after HIFU exposures. Different features of RF time series signals including the sum of amplitude spectrum in the four quarters of the frequency range, the slope, and intercept of the best-fit line to the entire power spectrum and the Shannon entropy were utilized to distinguish between the HIFU-induced thermal lesion and the normal tissue. We also examined the RF data, frame by frame to identify exposure effects on the formation and characteristics of a HIFU thermal lesion at different time steps throughout the treatment. The results obtained showed that the spectrum frequency quarters and the slope and intercept of the best fit line to the entire power spectrum both increased two times during the HIFU exposures. The Shannon entropy, however, decreased after the exposures. In conclusion, different characteristics of RF time series signal possess promising features that can be used to characterize ablated and nonablated tissues and to distinguish them from each other in a quasi-quantitative fashion. PMID:27186536

  3. High resolution ultrasound elastomicroscopy imaging of soft tissues: system development and feasibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y. P.; Bridal, S. L.; Shi, J.; Saied, A.; Lu, M. H.; Jaffre, B.; Mak, A. F. T.; Laugier, P.

    2004-09-01

    Research in elasticity imaging typically relies on 1-10 MHz ultrasound. Elasticity imaging at these frequencies can provide strain maps with a resolution in the order of millimetres, but this is not sufficient for applications to skin, articular cartilage or other fine structures. We developed a prototype high resolution elastomicroscopy system consisting of a 50 MHz ultrasound backscatter microscope system and a calibrated compression device using a load cell to measure the pressure applied to the specimen, which was installed between a rigidly fixed face-plate and a specimen platform. Radiofrequency data were acquired in a B-scan format (10 mm wide × 3 mm deep) in specimens of mouse skin and bovine patellar cartilage. The scanning resolution along the B-scan plane direction was 50 µm, and the ultrasound signals were digitized at 500 MHz to achieve a sensitivity better than 1 µm for the axial displacement measurement. Because of elevated attenuation of ultrasound at high frequencies, special consideration was necessary to design a face-plate permitting efficient ultrasound transmission into the specimen and relative uniformity of the compression. Best results were obtained using a thin plastic film to cover a specially shaped slit in the face-plate. Local tissue strain maps were constructed by applying a cross-correlation tracking method to signals obtained at the same site at different compression levels. The speed of sound in the tissue specimen (1589.8 ± 7.8 m s-1 for cartilage and 1532.4 ± 4.4 m s-1 for skin) was simultaneously measured during the compression test. Preliminary results demonstrated that this ultrasound elastomicroscopy technique was able to map deformations of the skin and articular cartilage specimens to high resolution, in the order of 50 µm. This system can also be potentially used for the assessment of other biological tissues, bioengineered tissues or biomaterials with fine structures.

  4. High resolution ultrasound elastomicroscopy imaging of soft tissues: system development and feasibility.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y P; Bridal, S L; Shi, J; Saied, A; Lu, M H; Jaffre, B; Mak, A F T; Laugier, P

    2004-09-07

    Research in elasticity imaging typically relies on 1-10 MHz ultrasound. Elasticity imaging at these frequencies can provide strain maps with a resolution in the order of millimetres, but this is not sufficient for applications to skin, articular cartilage or other fine structures. We developed a prototype high resolution elastomicroscopy system consisting of a 50 MHz ultrasound backscatter microscope system and a calibrated compression device using a load cell to measure the pressure applied to the specimen, which was installed between a rigidly fixed face-plate and a specimen platform. Radiofrequency data were acquired in a B-scan format (10 mm wide x 3 mm deep) in specimens of mouse skin and bovine patellar cartilage. The scanning resolution along the B-scan plane direction was 50 microm, and the ultrasound signals were digitized at 500 MHz to achieve a sensitivity better than 1 microm for the axial displacement measurement. Because of elevated attenuation of ultrasound at high frequencies, special consideration was necessary to design a face-plate permitting efficient ultrasound transmission into the specimen and relative uniformity of the compression. Best results were obtained using a thin plastic film to cover a specially shaped slit in the face-plate. Local tissue strain maps were constructed by applying a cross-correlation tracking method to signals obtained at the same site at different compression levels. The speed of sound in the tissue specimen (1589.8+/-7.8 m s(-1) for cartilage and 1532.4+/-4.4 m s(-1) for skin) was simultaneously measured during the compression test. Preliminary results demonstrated that this ultrasound elastomicroscopy technique was able to map deformations of the skin and articular cartilage specimens to high resolution, in the order of 50 microm. This system can also be potentially used for the assessment of other biological tissues, bioengineered tissues or biomaterials with fine structures.

  5. Precision Medicine Starts With Preanalytics: Real-Time Assessment of Tissue Fixation Quality by Ultrasound Time-of-Flight Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Melissa L; Bauer, Daniel R; Chafin, David; Theiss, Abbey; Otter, Michael; Baird, Geoffrey S

    2017-03-01

    Personalized medicine promises diagnosis and treatment of disease at the individual level and relies heavily on clinical specimen integrity and diagnostic assay quality. Preanalytics, the collection and handling steps of a clinical specimen before immunohistochemistry or other clinical assay, are critically important to enable the correct diagnosis of disease. However, the effects of preanalytics are often overlooked due to a lack of standardization and limited assessment tools to quantify their variation. Here, we report a novel real-time ultrasound time-of-flight instrument that is capable of monitoring and imaging the critical step in formalin fixation, diffusion of the fixative into tissue, which provides a quantifiable quality metric for tissue fixation in the clinical laboratory ensuring consistent downstream molecular assay results. We analyzed hundreds of tissue specimens from 34 distinct human tissue types and 12 clinically relevant diseased tissues for diffusion and fixation metrics. Our measurements can be converted into tissue diffusivity constants that correlate with the apparent diffusion constant calculated using magnetic resonance imaging (R=0.83), despite the differences in the approaches, indicating that our approach is biophysically plausible. Using data collected from time-of-flight analysis of many tissues, we have therefore developed a novel rapid fixation program that could ensure high-quality downstream assay results for a broad range of human tissue types.

  6. Precision Medicine Starts With Preanalytics: Real-Time Assessment of Tissue Fixation Quality by Ultrasound Time-of-Flight Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Melissa L.; Bauer, Daniel R.; Chafin, David; Theiss, Abbey; Otter, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Personalized medicine promises diagnosis and treatment of disease at the individual level and relies heavily on clinical specimen integrity and diagnostic assay quality. Preanalytics, the collection and handling steps of a clinical specimen before immunohistochemistry or other clinical assay, are critically important to enable the correct diagnosis of disease. However, the effects of preanalytics are often overlooked due to a lack of standardization and limited assessment tools to quantify their variation. Here, we report a novel real-time ultrasound time-of-flight instrument that is capable of monitoring and imaging the critical step in formalin fixation, diffusion of the fixative into tissue, which provides a quantifiable quality metric for tissue fixation in the clinical laboratory ensuring consistent downstream molecular assay results. We analyzed hundreds of tissue specimens from 34 distinct human tissue types and 12 clinically relevant diseased tissues for diffusion and fixation metrics. Our measurements can be converted into tissue diffusivity constants that correlate with the apparent diffusion constant calculated using magnetic resonance imaging (R2=0.83), despite the differences in the approaches, indicating that our approach is biophysically plausible. Using data collected from time-of-flight analysis of many tissues, we have therefore developed a novel rapid fixation program that could ensure high-quality downstream assay results for a broad range of human tissue types. PMID:28027117

  7. Non-invasive tissue parameter estimation with dual-mode ultrasound arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonova, Alyona; Wilken-Resman, Elias; Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad

    2017-03-01

    Objective of this study was to noninvasively extract quantitative estimates of heart tissue absorption before and after lesion formation. To extract tissue absorption, ultrasound temperature maps were reconstructed from single transmit focus (STF) images acquired with a 3.5MHz Dual-Mode Ultrasound Array (DMUA). Initial heating rate is estimated before and after therapeutic lesion formation through a delivery of a subtherapeutic intensity shot in ex vivo bovine heart tissue. Changes in heating rate are documented for a subset of five subtherapeutic shot intensities. Additionally, repeatability is demonstrated for before and after measurement of the initial heating rate. Careful gross examination of tissue was performed for every location where an absorption measurement was made.

  8. Ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging to monitor vascular growth in tissue engineered constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Seung Yun; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Zhang, Ge; Suggs, Laura J.; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2009-02-01

    Quantitative and qualitative monitoring of neovascular growth is required in many vascular tissue engineering applications. For example, the contribution of progenitor cells in growing microvasculature has been demonstrated; however, the process of vascularization from progenitor cells is not well understood. Therefore, there is a need for an imaging technique that is consistent, easy to use, and can quantitatively assess the dynamics of vascular growth or regression in a three-dimensional environment. In this study, we evaluate the ability of combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging to assess the dynamics of vascular growth. The experiments were performed using hydrogels that spontaneously promote tube formation from implanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Specifically, PEGylated fibrin gels, supporting the development of capillary growth were implanted in a Lewis rat. After one week, the rat was euthanized and the gel implants were excised and positioned in water cuvettes for imaging. Simultaneous ultrasound and photoacoustic images were obtained using single-element, focused ultrasound transducers interfaced with a nanosecond pulsed laser source. To image samples, ultrasound transducers operating at either 25 MHz or 48 MHz and interfaced with laser sources operating at either 532 nm or within 680-800 nm wavelengths were used. The 3-D ultrasound and photoacoustic images were acquired by mechanically scanning the transducer over the region of interest and capturing spatially co-registered and temporally consecutive photoacoustic transients and ultrasound pulse-echo signals. The ultrasound and photoacoustic images agree well with the overall anatomy and vascular structure in the gel samples. The results suggest that the photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging could be used to sequentially monitor the growth of neovasculature in-vivo.

  9. Damage mechanisms for ultrasound-induced cavitation in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnez, M.; Vlaisavljevich, E.; Xu, Z.; Johnsen, E.

    2017-03-01

    In a variety of biomedical applications, cavitation occurs in soft tissue. Although significant amounts of research have been performed on cavitation in water, bubble dynamics, and related bioeffects remain poorly understood. We use numerical simulations of spherical bubble dynamics in soft tissue to assess the extent to which viscoelasticity affects "known" and introduces "new" damage mechanisms. We find that deviatoric stresses - although not an important damage mechanism in water - are significantly enhanced and could be an important bioeffect mechanism in tissue. Both the viscoelastic properties and the nonlinear, large-collapse radius contribute to stress amplification in the surroundings. In addition, temperatures in the surrounding medium increase more in the Zener tissue than in water, due to viscous heating.

  10. Controlled tissue emulsification produced by high intensity focused ultrasound shock waves and millisecond boiling.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Canney, Michael S; Khokhlova, Vera A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R

    2011-11-01

    In high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications, tissue may be thermally necrosed by heating, emulsified by cavitation, or, as was recently discovered, emulsified using repetitive millisecond boiling caused by shock wave heating. Here, this last approach was further investigated. Experiments were performed in transparent gels and ex vivo bovine heart tissue using 1, 2, and 3 MHz focused transducers and different pulsing schemes in which the pressure, duty factor, and pulse duration were varied. A previously developed derating procedure to determine in situ shock amplitudes and the time-to-boil was refined. Treatments were monitored using B-mode ultrasound. Both inertial cavitation and boiling were observed during exposures, but emulsification occurred only when shocks and boiling were present. Emulsified lesions without thermal denaturation were produced with shock amplitudes sufficient to induce boiling in less than 20 ms, duty factors of less than 0.02, and pulse lengths shorter than 30 ms. Higher duty factors or longer pulses produced varying degrees of thermal denaturation combined with mechanical emulsification. Larger lesions were obtained using lower ultrasound frequencies. The results show that shock wave heating and millisecond boiling is an effective and reliable way to emulsify tissue while monitoring the treatment with ultrasound.

  11. Localized Ablation of Thyroid Tissue by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: an Alternative to Surgery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esnault, Olivier; Franc, Brigitte; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lacoste, Francois

    2006-05-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device to obtain a localised destruction of the thyroid with no damage to adjacent tissues. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The ewe model was used because its thyroid gland is easily accessible with ultrasound. The animals were anaesthetised with 10 mg / kg IV injection of Penthothal. The HIFU pulses were generated by a 3-MHz spherical transducer under ultrasound guidance. Macroscopic and microscopic tissue lesions were identified after formalin fixation of the anterior part of the ewe's neck. RESULTS: After determining the optimal instrument settings to obtain localized thyroid ablation, the repeatability of the method was evaluated using a HIFU prototype designed specifically for human use: in 13 ewes (26 treated lobes), an average of 20 (range: 14-27) ultrasound pulses (pulse duration: 3 s) per lobe covering a mean volume of 0.5 cm3 (range: 0.3-0.7 cm3) were delivered. The ewes were sacrificed 2-5 weeks after treatment delivery. No damage to the nerves, trachea, esophagus or muscle was observed. Only 3 ewes suffered superficial skin burns. The desired thyroid lesions were obtained in 25/26 treated lobes, as demonstrated by fibrotic tissues, which replaced necrotic areas. CONCLUSION: These results obtained in the ewe model show that thyroid lesions of defined volume can be induced safely and suggest that the HIFU device is now ready for human trials.

  12. Dependence of ultrasound echo decorrelation on local tissue temperature during ex vivo radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Swetha; Schmidt, Daniel T; Rao, Marepalli B; Mast, T Douglas

    2016-03-21

    This study investigates echo decorrelation imaging, an ultrasound method for thermal ablation monitoring. The effect of tissue temperature on the mapped echo decorrelation parameter was assessed in radiofrequency ablation experiments performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. Echo decorrelation maps were compared with corresponding tissue temperatures simulated using the finite element method. For both echo decorrelation imaging and integrated backscatter imaging, the mapped tissue parameters correlated significantly but weakly with local tissue temperature. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to assess the ability of echo decorrelation and integrated backscatter to predict tissue temperature greater than 40, 60, and 80 °C. Significantly higher area under the ROC curve (AUROC) values were obtained for prediction of tissue temperatures greater than 40, 60, and 80 °C using echo decorrelation imaging (AUROC = 0.871, 0.948 and 0.966) compared to integrated backscatter imaging (AUROC = 0.865, 0.877 and 0.832).

  13. Mechanical Model Analysis for Quantitative Evaluation of Liver Fibrosis Based on Ultrasound Tissue Elasticity Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Maki, Tomonori; Yamakawa, Makoto; Mitake, Tsuyoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Fujimoto, Kenji

    2012-07-01

    Precise evaluation of the stage of chronic hepatitis C with respect to fibrosis has become an important issue to prevent the occurrence of cirrhosis and to initiate appropriate therapeutic intervention such as viral eradication using interferon. Ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging, i.e., elastography can visualize tissue hardness/softness, and its clinical usefulness has been studied to detect and evaluate tumors. We have recently reported that the texture of elasticity image changes as fibrosis progresses. To evaluate fibrosis progression quantitatively on the basis of ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging, we introduced a mechanical model of fibrosis progression and simulated the process by which hepatic fibrosis affects elasticity images and compared the results with those clinical data analysis. As a result, it was confirmed that even in diffuse diseases like chronic hepatitis, the patterns of elasticity images are related to fibrous structural changes caused by hepatic disease and can be used to derive features for quantitative evaluation of fibrosis stage.

  14. Mathematical modeling of ultrasound in tissue engineering: From bioreactors to the cellular scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louw, Tobias M.

    Tissue engineering seeks to provide a means to treat injuries that are beyond the body's natural ability to repair without the issues associated with allografts. Autologous cells are cultured in a bioreactor which controls the cellular environment (including mechanical stimulation) for optimal tissue growth. We investigate ultrasound as an effective means of mechanical stimulation by predicting the ultrasonic field in a bioreactor, as well as ultrasonic bioeffects at the cellular level. The Transfer Matrix Angular Spectrum Approach was found to be the most accurate and computationally efficient bioreactor model. Three critical factors influence experimental results: (1) the diameter of the tissue engineering scaffold greatly affects the ultrasonic field; (2) the position of the ultrasonic transducer and liquid level in the tissue culture well determines the maximum pressure amplitude in the bioreactor, but the pressure can be controlled by measuring the transducer input electrical impedance and manipulating the applied voltage; and (3) the position of pressure nodes are influenced by ultrasonic frequency and liquid level; this will affect the response of cells to applied ultrasound. On the cellular level, it was shown that chondrocytes respond to ultrasound with frequency dependence. A predicted resonance frequency near 5MHz matched experimental results showing maximum expression of load inducible genes at 5MHz. Mechanical stresses are concentrated near the nucleus at resonance, alluding to the possibility that the nucleus may directly sense ultrasonic stimulation. We postulate that ultrasound influences the transport of p-ERK to the nucleus or causes minor chromatin reorganization, leading to the observed frequency dependent gene expression. We linked in vitro ultrasonic stimulation to in vivo mechanical stimulation generated by natural movement. The chondrocyte's response to impact is under-damped, and the cell oscillates with a frequency close to the model

  15. The effects of ultrasound and alternating current on the laser penetration in the tissue.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Munqith Saleem

    2016-07-01

    The visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) lasers are now widely used in therapeutic and other medical applications. Some of these applications require to deliver the laser energy deep toward the desired tissue target or organ. The aim of this in vitro study is to investigate practically whether the modulation of laser energy by employing the therapeutic ultrasound or electrical energies can increase the penetration depth of the laser light inside the tissue. Such modulation was implemented in this study by coupling the (c.w.) diode and Nd:YAG laser energies with the ultrasound or AC current simultaneously as they pass through preprepared ex vivo bovine muscular tissue strips. Two wavelengths of diode lasers were used, 637 and 808 nm beside the 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser. The results showed a noticeable decrease of these laser attenuation factors as they pass through the tissue strips in the presence of the ultrasound or AC energies. By using this coupling modulation, the capability of increasing the laser penetration depths inside the tissue was confirmed without having to increase their applied power.

  16. Observation of a cavitation cloud in tissue using correlation between ultrafast ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Fabrice; Zorgani, Ali; Catheline, Stefan; Souchon, Rémi; Mestas, Jean-Louis; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril

    2015-07-01

    The local application of ultrasound is known to improve drug intake by tumors. Cavitating bubbles are one of the contributing effects. A setup in which two ultrasound transducers are placed confocally is used to generate cavitation in ex vivo tissue. As the transducers emit a series of short excitation bursts, the evolution of the cavitation activity is monitored using an ultrafast ultrasound imaging system. The frame rate of the system is several thousands of images per second, which provides several tens of images between consecutive excitation bursts. Using the correlation between consecutive images for speckle tracking, a decorrelation of the imaging signal appears due to the creation, fast movement, and dissolution of the bubbles in the cavitation cloud. By analyzing this area of decorrelation, the cavitation cloud can be localized and the spatial extent of the cavitation activity characterized.

  17. Tracking the deformation of a tissue phantom induced by ultrasound-driven bubble oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinguely, M.; Matar, O. K.; Garbin, V.

    2015-12-01

    Microbubbles are used as contrast agents in ultrasound medical imaging. Once the microbubbles are injected into the body, they flow through the vascular system, confined by viscoelastic boundaries. The proximity of the boundaries affects the dynamics of the bubbles in ultrasound, in a manner that depends on the boundary's viscoelastic properties. Experiments on violently collapsing bubbles have revealed the dynamics of deformation of blood vessel walls. However, the deformation field induced by a bubble undergoing small-amplitude oscillations, relevant for ultrasound imaging, is difficult to access in experiment, and has not been reported yet. We present an experimental method to measure the deformation field induced by a bubble oscillating inside a microchannel within a tissue phantom. We use high-speed video microscopy to track the displacement of tracer particles embedded in the phantom, along with the dynamics of the bubble.

  18. A tissue checkpoint regulates type 2 immunity

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyken, Steven J.; Nussbaum, Jesse C.; Lee, Jinwoo; Molofsky, Ari B.; Liang, Hong-Erh; Pollack, Joshua L.; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Marson, Alexander; Erle, David J.; Locksley, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) and CD4+ T helper type 2 (Th2) cells are defined by their similar effector cytokines, which together mediate the features of allergic immunity. Here, we show that tissue ILC2s and Th2 cells differentiate independently but share overlapping effector function programs mediated by exposure to the tissue-derived cytokines interleukin (IL)-25, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Loss of these three tissue signals does not affect lymph node priming but abrogates terminal differentiation of effector Th2 cells and adaptive lung inflammation in a T cell-intrinsic manner. Our findings suggest how diverse perturbations activate type 2 immunity, uncovering a shared local tissue-elicited checkpoint that can be exploited to control both innate and adaptive allergic inflammation. PMID:27749840

  19. Ultrasound elastography assessment of bone/soft tissue interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Biren J.; Yang, Xu; Chaudhry, Anuj; Shafeeq Shajudeen, Peer; Nair, Sanjay P.; Weiner, Bradley K.; Tasciotti, Ennio; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Righetti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of elastographic imaging techniques to assess the bone/soft tissue interface, a region that has not been previously investigated but may provide important information about fracture and bone healing. The performance of axial strain elastograms and axial shear strain elastograms at the bone/soft tissue interface was studied ex vivo on intact and fractured canine and ovine tibias. Selected ex vivo results were corroborated on intact sheep tibias in vivo. The elastography results were statistically analyzed using elastographic image quality tools. The results of this study demonstrate distinct patterns in the distribution of the normalized local axial strains and axial shear strains at the bone/soft tissue interface with respect to the background soft tissue. They also show that the relative strength and distribution of the elastographic parameters change in the presence of a fracture and depend on the degree of misalignment between the fracture fragments. Thus, elastographic imaging modalities might be used in the future to obtain information regarding the integrity of bones and to assess the severity of fractures, alignment of bone fragments as well as to follow bone healing.

  20. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... called multiples) To screen for birth defects, like spina bifida or heart defects . Screening means seeing if your ... example, if the ultrasound shows your baby has spina bifida, she may be treated in the womb before ...

  1. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's uterus. The sound waves bounce off solid structures in the body ...

  2. Noninvasive surgery of prostate tissue by high-intensity focused ultrasound: an updated report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghvi, Narendra T.; Syrus, J.; Foster, Richard S.; Bihrle, Richard; Casey, Richard W.; Uchida, Toyoak

    2000-05-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and it is experimentally applied for the treatment of localized prostate caner (PC). Recent advances in the transducer material and technology have permitted to combine the ultrasound visualization capability and HIFU on the same ceramic crystal. Also, the transducer efficiency has increased to a level that a smaller size intracavity probe can be made to produce sufficient acoustic power required for the focused ultrasound surgery of the prostate. Using this technology, 4 MHz mechanically scanning transrectal ultrasound probes has been designed. The transrectal probes are used with Sonablate (SB-200, manufactured by Focus Surgery, Inc., Indianapolis, IN) device. The SB-200 produces both transverse and longitudinal images of the prostate. The transverse and longitudinal images are used for selection of tissue volume, treatment planning and monitoring of tissue during the HIFU treatment cycle. The paper reviews the present operation of the device and recent clinical protocol that has improved efficiency, efficacy and safety of the device. The two years follow-up clinical results from the multi-site US Pilot Study (USPS) and The Male Health Centre are compared with the Kitasato-study (Kitasato School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Japan).

  3. Limited damage of tissue mimic caused by a collapsing bubble under low-frequency ultrasound exposure.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenji; Obata, Kazuya; Tsukamoto, Akira; Ushida, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the bubble induced serious damage to tissue mimic exposed to 27-kHz ultrasound. The initial bubble radius ranged from 80 to 100 μm, which corresponded approximately to the experimentally-evaluated resonant radius of the given ultrasound frequency. The tissue mimic consisted of 10 wt% gelatine gel covered with cultured canine kidney epithelial cells. The collapsing bubble behaviour during the ultrasound exposure with negative peak pressures of several hundred kPa was captured by a high-speed camera system. After ultrasound exposure, a cell viability test was conducted based on microscopic bright-field images and fluorescence images for living and dead cells. In the viability test, cells played a role in indicating the damaged area. The bubble oscillations killed the cells, and on occasion detached layers of cultured cells from the gel. The damaged area was comparable or slightly larger than the initial bubble size, and smaller than the maximum bubble size. We concluded that only a small area in close proximity to the bubble could be damaged even above transient cavitation threshold.

  4. ROC analysis of ultrasound tissue characterization classifiers for breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gefen, Smadar; Tretiak, Oleh J; Piccoli, Catherine W; Donohue, Kevin D; Petropulu, Athina P; Shankar, P Mohana; Dumane, Vishruta A; Huang, Lexun; Kutay, M Alper; Genis, Vladimir; Forsberg, Flemming; Reid, John M; Goldberg, Barry B

    2003-02-01

    Breast cancer diagnosis through ultrasound tissue characterization was studied using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of combinations of acoustic features, patient age, and radiological findings. A feature fusion method was devised that operates even if only partial diagnostic data are available. The ROC methodology uses ordinal dominance theory and bootstrap resampling to evaluate A(z) and confidence intervals in simple as well as paired data analyses. The combined diagnostic feature had an A(z) of 0.96 with a confidence interval of at a significance level of 0.05. The combined features show statistically significant improvement over prebiopsy radiological findings. These results indicate that ultrasound tissue characterization, in combination with patient record and clinical findings, may greatly reduce the need to perform biopsies of benign breast lesions.

  5. Limited Accuracy of Colour Doppler Ultrasound Dynamic Tissue Perfusion Measurement in Diabetic Adults

    PubMed Central

    Stoperka, Felix; Karger, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic tissue perfusion measurement (DTPM) is a pre-described and available method in pediatric ultrasound to quantify tissue perfusion in renal Doppler ultrasound by particular video analysis software. This study evaluates DTPM during single and between repeated visits after 6 months, calibrates repeated DTPM within different region of interest (ROI) and compares DTPM with kidney function markers in adult patients with early diabetic nephropathy (n = 17). During repeated measurements, no association of readings at the same patients in the same (n = 3 readings) as well as repeated visit (n = 2 visits) could be retrieved. No association between DTPM, MDRD-GFR, albuminuria, age and duration of diabetes was observed. These negative results are presumably related to inconsistency of DTPM due to non-fixed ROI position as could be shown in calibrating series. Further development of the method should be performed to enable reproducible DTPM readings in adults. PMID:28033403

  6. Tissue motion and strain in the human brain assessed by intraoperative ultrasound in glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Selbekk, Tormod; Brekken, Reidar; Solheim, Ole; Lydersen, Stian; Hernes, Toril A N; Unsgaard, Geirmund

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate tissue motion and strain imposed by cardiovascular pulsation in pathologic and normal brain parenchyma, as quantified from in vivo ultrasound data. Ultrasound acquired during surgery of 16 patients with glial tumors was retrospectively processed and analyzed. The tissue velocity was quantified at depths of 1cm, 2cm and 3cm from brain cortex to investigate spatial dependency with depth. Comparison of strain and velocity in tumor and adjacent normal parenchyma was performed by selecting two regions-of-interest in the hyperechoic tumor and two regions in the low-echogenic areas interpreted as mainly normal tissue with some degree of tumor cell infiltration. The absolute maximum tissue velocity is seen to increase with increasing depths in 14 of 16 cases (87.5%). The maximum tissue velocities in the four regions close to the ultrasound visible tumor border are not statistically different (p=0.163 to p=0.975). The strain magnitudes are significantly higher in the regions with expected normal brain parenchyma than in regions with expected glial tumor tissue, both for the two regions being closest to the tumor border (p=0.0004) and for the two regions further away from the tumor border (p=0.0009). We conclude that the velocity of the brain parenchyma imposed by arterial pulsation during a cardiac cycle is generally increasing with increasing depth from cortex. The maximum velocity appears to be similar in regions with expected normal brain and tumor tissue, thus, does not seem to be affected by pathology. Strain magnitude is, however, a suitable parameter for discrimination of glial tumor and normal brain parenchyma. (E-mail: Tormod.Selbekk@sintef.no).

  7. Effects of ultrasound frequency and tissue stiffness on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold for cavitation.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Maxwell, Adam; Warnez, Matthew T; Mancia, Lauren; Singh, Rahul; Putnam, Andrew J; Fowlkes, Brian; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-06-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation of a cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. Previous work has indicated that a cavitation cloud can be formed by a single pulse with one high-amplitude negative cycle, when the negative pressure amplitude directly exceeds a pressure threshold intrinsic to the medium. We hypothesize that the intrinsic threshold in water-based tissues is determined by the properties of the water inside the tissue, and changes in tissue stiffness or ultrasound frequency will have a minimal impact on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold. To test this hypothesis, the histotripsy intrinsic threshold was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The probability of cavitation was measured by subjecting tissue phantoms with adjustable mechanical properties and ex vivo tissues to a histotripsy pulse of 1-2 cycles produced by 345-kHz, 500-kHz, 1.5-MHz and 3-MHz histotripsy transducers. Cavitation was detected and characterized by passive cavitation detection and high-speed photography, from which the probability of cavitation was measured versus pressure amplitude. The results revealed that the intrinsic threshold (the negative pressure at which probability = 0.5) is independent of stiffness for Young's moduli (E) <1 MPa, with only a small increase (∼2-3 MPa) in the intrinsic threshold for tendon (E = 380 MPa). Additionally, results for all samples revealed only a small increase of ∼2-3 MPa when the frequency was increased from 345 kHz to 3 MHz. The intrinsic threshold was measured to be between 24.7 and 30.6 MPa for all samples and frequencies tested in this study. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the intrinsic threshold to initiate a histotripsy bubble cloud is not significantly affected by tissue stiffness or ultrasound frequency in the hundreds of kilohertz to megahertz range.

  8. Effects of tissue stiffness, ultrasound frequency, and pressure on histotripsy-induced cavitation bubble behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew T.; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 µm. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness cause a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest.

  9. Is Duplex-Ultrasound a useful tool in defining rejection episodes in composite tissue allograft transplants?

    PubMed

    Loizides, Alexander; Kronberger, Irmgard-Elisabeth; Plaikner, Michaela; Gruber, Hannes

    2015-12-01

    Immunologic reactions in transplanted organs are in more or less all allograft patients detectable: clear parameters exist as e.g. in renal transplants where the clearance power reduces by rejection. On the contrary, in composite tissue allografts clear and objective indicators stating a rejection episode lack. We present the case of a hand-transplanted subject with signs of acute transplant rejection diagnosed by means of Duplex Ultrasound and confirmed by biopsy.

  10. Nonlinearity parameter B/A of biological tissue ultrasound imaging in echo mode

    SciTech Connect

    Toulemonde, M. Varray, F.; Bernard, A.; Basset, O.; Cachard, C.

    2015-10-28

    The nonlinearity B/A parameter influences the distortion of ultrasound waves during their propagation in tissue. Normal and pathological media have different B/A values and this parameter may be used to characterize them. In this paper the multitaper coherent plane wave compounding (MCPWC) is combined with the extended comparative method (ECM) to estimate the B/A parameter in simulation and acquisition. Using plane wave transmission and orthogonal apodization during beam forming improves the B/A estimation and delineation.

  11. Extraction of mechanical properties of foot plantar tissues using ultrasound indentation associated with genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ling, Hang-Yin; Choi, Pong-Chi; Zheng, Yong-ping; Lau, Kin-Tak

    2007-08-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of ultrasound indentation technique for estimating the mechanical properties of foot plantar tissues in virtue of the reconstruction of the force response using genetic algorithm (GA) from an indentation test based on a quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) model. The indentation test on the plantar tissues covering the right first metatarsal head of a normal subject was carried out to verify the feasibility of the GA for the extraction of the tissue properties. The QLV properties of the plantar tissues were determined by the GA with a fixed Poisson's ratio. Such results were then compared with those obtained using a classical optimization method. Moreover, the GA was further employed to simultaneously determine the QLV properties as well as the Poisson's ratio of the plantar tissues. The correlations between the QLV properties and the Poisson's ratio are discussed.

  12. Why Are Short Pulses More Efficient in Tissue Erosion Using Pulsed Cavitational Ultrasound Therapy (Histotripsy)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2010-03-01

    Histotripsy produces mechanical tissue fractionation through controlled cavitation. The histotripsy induced tissue erosion is more efficient with shorter (i.e., 3-6 cycles) rather than longer (i.e. 24 cycles) pulses. In this study, we investigated the reasons behind this observation by studying dynamics of the cavitating bubble clouds and individual bubbles during and after a therapy pulse. Bubble clouds were generated at a gel-water interface using 5 to 30-cycle 1 MHz pulses at P-/P+>19/125-MPa pressure and 1-kHz pulse repetition frequency. The evolution of the overall bubble cloud and individual bubbles were studied using high speed photography. Results show that: 1) within the first 10-15 cycles, the overall cloud grew to its maximum size; the individual bubbles underwent violent expansion and collapse, and grew in size with each cycle of ultrasound; 2) between the 15th cycle and the end of the pulse, the overall cloud size did not change even if further cycles of ultrasound were delivered; the individual bubbles no longer underwent violent collapse; 3) after the pulse, the overall cloud gradually dissolved; the individual bubbles may coalesce into larger bubbles for 0-40 μs, and then gradually dissolved. These observations suggest that violent growth and collapse of individual bubbles occur within the first few cycles of ultrasound pulse most often. This may explain why extremely short pulses are more energy efficient in histotripsy-induced tissue erosion.

  13. Experimental Evaluation of Ultrasound-Guided 3D Needle Steering in Biological Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Abayazid, Momen; Vrooijink, Gustaaf J.; Patil, Sachin; Alterovitz, Ron; Misra, Sarthak

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this paper, we present a system capable of automatically steering bevel-tip flexible needles under ultrasound guidance towards stationary and moving targets in gelatin phantoms and biological tissue while avoiding stationary and moving obstacles. We use three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound to track the needle tip during the procedure. Methods Our system uses a fast sampling-based path planner to compute and periodically update a feasible path to the target that avoids obstacles. We then use a novel control algorithm to steer the needle along the path in a manner that reduces the number of needle rotations, thus reducing tissue damage. We present experimental results for needle insertion procedures for both stationary and moving targets and obstacles for up to 90 mm of needle insertion. Results We obtained a mean targeting error of 0.32 ± 0.10 mm and 0.38 ± 0.19 mm in gelatin-based phantom and biological tissue, respectively. Conclusions The achieved submillimeter accuracy suggests that our approach is sufficient to target the smallest lesions (ϕ2 mm) that can be detected using state-of-the-art ultrasound imaging systems. PMID:24562744

  14. Methods for using 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking in biaxial mechanical testing of biological tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Park, Dae Woo; Dutta, Debaditya; Simon, Marc; Kim, Kang

    2015-04-01

    Being multilayered and anisotropic, biological tissues such as cardiac and arterial walls are structurally complex, making the full assessment and understanding of their mechanical behavior challenging. Current standard mechanical testing uses surface markers to track tissue deformations and does not provide deformation data below the surface. In the study described here, we found that combining mechanical testing with 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking could overcome this limitation. Rat myocardium was tested with a biaxial tester and was concurrently scanned with high-frequency ultrasound in three dimensions. The strain energy function was computed from stresses and strains using an iterative non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Because the strain energy function consists of terms for the base matrix and for embedded fibers, spatially varying fiber orientation was also computed by curve fitting. Using finite-element simulations, we first validated the accuracy of the non-linear curve-fitting algorithm. Next, we compared experimentally measured rat myocardium strain energy function values with those in the literature and found a matching order of magnitude. Finally, we retained samples after the experiments for fiber orientation quantification using histology and found that the results satisfactorily matched those computed in the experiments. We conclude that 3-D ultrasound speckle tracking can be a useful addition to traditional mechanical testing of biological tissues and may provide the benefit of enabling fiber orientation computation.

  15. Combined chirp coded tissue harmonic and fundamental ultrasound imaging for intravascular ultrasound: 20–60 MHz phantom and ex vivo results

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinhyoung; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2013-01-01

    The application of chirp coded excitation to pulse inversion tissue harmonic imaging can increase signal to noise ratio. On the other hand, the elevation of range side lobe level, caused by leakages of the fundamental signal, has been problematic in mechanical scanners which are still the most prevalent in high frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. Fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging can achieve range side lobe levels lower than –60 dB with Hanning window, but it yields higher side lobes level than pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic imaging (PI-CTHI). Therefore, in this paper a combined pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic and fundamental imaging mode (CPI-CTHI) is proposed to retain the advantages of both chirp coded harmonic and fundamental imaging modes by demonstrating 20–60 MHz phantom and ex vivo results. A simulation study shows that the range side lobe level of CPI-CTHI is 16 dB lower than PI-CTHI, assuming that the transducer translates incident positions by 50 μm when two beamlines of pulse inversion pair are acquired. CPI-CTHI is implemented for a proto-typed intravascular ultrasound scanner capable of combined data acquisition in real-time. A wire phantom study shows that CPI-CTHI has a 12 dB lower range side lobe level and a 7 dB higher echo signal to noise ratio than PI-CTHI, while the lateral resolution and side lobe level are 50 μm finer and –3 dB less than fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging respectively. Ex vivo scanning of a rabbit trachea demonstrates that CPI-CTHI is capable of visualizing blood vessels as small as 200 μm in diameter with 6 dB better tissue contrast than either PI-CTHI or fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging. These results clearly indicate that CPI-CTHI may enhance tissue contrast with less range side lobe level than PI-CTHI. PMID:22871273

  16. Combined chirp coded tissue harmonic and fundamental ultrasound imaging for intravascular ultrasound: 20-60 MHz phantom and ex vivo results.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinhyoung; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2013-02-01

    The application of chirp coded excitation to pulse inversion tissue harmonic imaging can increase signal to noise ratio. On the other hand, the elevation of range side lobe level, caused by leakages of the fundamental signal, has been problematic in mechanical scanners which are still the most prevalent in high frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. Fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging can achieve range side lobe levels lower than -60dB with Hanning window, but it yields higher side lobes level than pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic imaging (PI-CTHI). Therefore, in this paper a combined pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic and fundamental imaging mode (CPI-CTHI) is proposed to retain the advantages of both chirp coded harmonic and fundamental imaging modes by demonstrating 20-60MHz phantom and ex vivo results. A simulation study shows that the range side lobe level of CPI-CTHI is 16dB lower than PI-CTHI, assuming that the transducer translates incident positions by 50μm when two beamlines of pulse inversion pair are acquired. CPI-CTHI is implemented for a proto-typed intravascular ultrasound scanner capable of combined data acquisition in real-time. A wire phantom study shows that CPI-CTHI has a 12dB lower range side lobe level and a 7dB higher echo signal to noise ratio than PI-CTHI, while the lateral resolution and side lobe level are 50μm finer and -3dB less than fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging respectively. Ex vivo scanning of a rabbit trachea demonstrates that CPI-CTHI is capable of visualizing blood vessels as small as 200μm in diameter with 6dB better tissue contrast than either PI-CTHI or fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging. These results clearly indicate that CPI-CTHI may enhance tissue contrast with less range side lobe level than PI-CTHI.

  17. Development of a High-Throughput Ultrasound Technique for the Analysis of Tissue Engineering Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Stukel, Jessica; Goss, Monika; Zhou, Haoyan; Zhou, Wenda; Willits, Rebecca; Exner, Agata A.

    2015-01-01

    Development of hydrogel-based tissue engineering constructs is growing at a rapid rate, yet translation to patient use has been sluggish. Years of costly preclinical tests are required to predict clinical performance and safety of these devices. The tests are invasive, destructive to the samples and, in many cases, are not representative of the ultimate in vivo scenario. Biomedical imaging has the potential to facilitate biomaterial development by enabling longitudinal noninvasive device characterization directly in situ. Among the various available imaging modalities, ultrasound stands out as an excellent candidate due to low cost, wide availability, and a favorable safety profile. The overall goal of this work was to demonstrate the utility of clinical ultrasound in longitudinal characterization of 3D hydrogel matrices supporting cell growth. Specifically, we developed a quantitative technique using clinical B-mode ultrasound to differentiate collagen content and fibroblast density within poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels and validated it in an in vitro phantom environment. By manipulating the hydrogel gelation, differences in ultrasound signal intensity were found between gels with collagen fibers and those with non-fiber forming collagen, indicating that the technique was sensitive to the configuration of the protein. At a collagen density of 2.5 mg/mL collagen, fiber forming collagen had a significantly increased signal intensity of 14.90± 2.58*10−5 a.u. compared to non-fiber forming intensity at 2.74± 0.36*10−5 a.u. Additionally, differences in intensity were found between living and fixed fibroblasts, with an increased signal intensity detected in living cells (5 ± 0.8*10−5 a.u. in 1 day live cells compared to 2.26 ± 0.39*10−5 a.u. in fixed cells at a concentration of 1*106 cells/mL in gels containing collagen). Overall, there was a linear correlation >0.90 for ultrasound intensity with increasing cell density. Results demonstrate the

  18. Investigation of optimal method for inducing harmonic motion in tissue using a linear ultrasound phased array--a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Janne; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-04-01

    Many noninvasive ultrasound techniques have been developed to explore mechanical properties of soft tissues. One of these methods, Localized Harmonic Motion Imaging (LHMI), has been proposed to be used for ultrasound surgery monitoring. In LHMI, dynamic ultrasound radiation-force stimulation induces displacements in a target that can be measured using pulse-echo imaging and used to estimate the elastic properties of the target. In this initial, simulation study, the use of a one-dimensional phased array is explored for the induction of the tissue motion. The study compares three different dual-frequency and amplitude-modulated single-frequency methods for the inducing tissue motion. Simulations were computed in a homogeneous soft-tissue volume. The Rayleigh integral was used in the simulations of the ultrasound fields and the tissue displacements were computed using a finite-element method (FEM). The simulations showed that amplitude-modulated sonication using a single frequency produced the largest vibration amplitude of the target tissue. These simulations demonstrate that the properties of the tissue motion are highly dependent on the sonication method and that it is important to consider the full three-dimensional distribution of the ultrasound field for controlling the induction of tissue motion.

  19. Tomographic reconstruction of tissue properties and temperature increase for high-intensity focused ultrasound applications.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lu; Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Kumon, Ronald E; Deng, Cheri X; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-10-01

    The acoustic and thermal properties as well as the temperature change within a tissue volume during high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation are critically important for treatment planning and monitoring. Described in this article is a tomographic reconstruction method used to determine the tissue properties and increase in temperature in a 3-D volume. On the basis of the iterative finite-element solution to the bioheat equation coupled with Tikhonov regularization techniques, our reconstruction algorithm solves the inverse problem of bioheat transfer and uses the time-dependent temperature measured on a tissue surface to obtain the acoustic absorption coefficient, thermal diffusivity and temperature increase within the subsurface volume. Numerical simulations were performed to validate the reconstruction algorithm. The method was initially conducted in ex vivo experiments in which time-dependent temperature on a tissue surface was measured using high-resolution, non-invasive infrared thermography.

  20. TOMOGRAPHIC RECONSTRUCTION OF TISSUE PROPERTIES AND TEMPERATURE INCREASE FOR HIGH-INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND APPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Lu; Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Kumon, Ronald E.; Deng, Cheri X.; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    The acoustic and thermal properties as well as the temperature change within a tissue volume during high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation are critically important for treatment planning and monitoring. Described in this article is a tomographic reconstruction method used to determine the tissue properties and increase in temperature in a 3-D volume. On the basis of the iterative finite-element solution to the bioheat equation coupled with Tikhonov regularization techniques, our reconstruction algorithm solves the inverse problem of bioheat transfer and uses the time-dependent temperature measured on a tissue surface to obtain the acoustic absorption coefficient, thermal diffusivity and temperature increase within the subsurface volume. Numerical simulations were performed to validate the reconstruction algorithm. The method was initially conducted in ex vivo experiments in which time-dependent temperature on a tissue surface was measured using high-resolution, non-invasive infrared thermography. PMID:23849388

  1. Ultrasound-guided three-dimensional needle steering in biological tissue with curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Abayazid, Momen; Moreira, Pedro; Shahriari, Navid; Patil, Sachin; Alterovitz, Ron; Misra, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a system capable of automatically steering a bevel-tipped flexible needle under ultrasound guidance toward a physical target while avoiding a physical obstacle embedded in gelatin phantoms and biological tissue with curved surfaces. An ultrasound pre-operative scan is performed for three-dimensional (3D) target localization and shape reconstruction. A controller based on implicit force control is developed to align the transducer with curved surfaces to assure the maximum contact area, and thus obtain an image of sufficient quality. We experimentally investigate the effect of needle insertion system parameters such as insertion speed, needle diameter and bevel angle on target motion to adjust the parameters that minimize the target motion during insertion. A fast sampling-based path planner is used to compute and periodically update a feasible path to the target that avoids obstacles. We present experimental results for target reconstruction and needle insertion procedures in gelatin-based phantoms and biological tissue. Mean targeting errors of 1.46±0.37 mm, 1.29±0.29 mm and 1.82±0.58 mm are obtained for phantoms with inclined, curved and combined (inclined and curved) surfaces, respectively, for insertion distance of 86-103 mm. The achieved targeting errors suggest that our approach is sufficient for targeting lesions of 3mm radius that can be detected using clinical ultrasound imaging systems.

  2. Ultrasound-guided three-dimensional needle steering in biological tissue with curved surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Abayazid, Momen; Moreira, Pedro; Shahriari, Navid; Patil, Sachin; Alterovitz, Ron; Misra, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a system capable of automatically steering a bevel-tipped flexible needle under ultrasound guidance toward a physical target while avoiding a physical obstacle embedded in gelatin phantoms and biological tissue with curved surfaces. An ultrasound pre-operative scan is performed for three-dimensional (3D) target localization and shape reconstruction. A controller based on implicit force control is developed to align the transducer with curved surfaces to assure the maximum contact area, and thus obtain an image of sufficient quality. We experimentally investigate the effect of needle insertion system parameters such as insertion speed, needle diameter and bevel angle on target motion to adjust the parameters that minimize the target motion during insertion. A fast sampling-based path planner is used to compute and periodically update a feasible path to the target that avoids obstacles. We present experimental results for target reconstruction and needle insertion procedures in gelatin-based phantoms and biological tissue. Mean targeting errors of 1.46 ± 0.37 mm, 1.29 ± 0.29 mm and 1.82 ± 0.58 mm are obtained for phantoms with inclined, curved and combined (inclined and curved) surfaces, respectively, for insertion distance of 86–103 mm. The achieved targeting errors suggest that our approach is sufficient for targeting lesions of 3 mm radius that can be detected using clinical ultrasound imaging systems. PMID:25455165

  3. Coregistered three-dimensional ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system for ovarian tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Andres; Guo, Puyun; Gamelin, John; Yan, Shikui; Sanders, Mary M.; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2009-09-01

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of all gynecologic cancers, with a five-year survival rate of only 30% or less. Current imaging techniques are limited in sensitivity and specificity in detecting early stage ovarian cancer prior to its widespread metastasis. New imaging techniques that can provide functional and molecular contrasts are needed to reduce the high mortality of this disease. One such promising technique is photoacoustic imaging. We develop a 1280-element coregistered 3-D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system based on a 1.75-D acoustic array. Volumetric images over a scan range of 80 deg in azimuth and 20 deg in elevation can be achieved in minutes. The system has been used to image normal porcine ovarian tissue. This is an important step toward better understanding of ovarian cancer optical properties obtained with photoacoustic techniques. To the best of our knowledge, such data are not available in the literature. We present characterization measurements of the system and compare coregistered ultrasound and photoacoustic images of ovarian tissue to histological images. The results show excellent coregistration of ultrasound and photoacoustic images. Strong optical absorption from vasculature, especially highly vascularized corpora lutea and low absorption from follicles, is demonstrated.

  4. Quantitative assessment of photoacoustic tomography systems integrating clinical ultrasound transducers using novel tissue-simulating phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Pfefer, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT) systems based on commercial ultrasound instruments have the benefit of dualmodality imaging, which increases their appeal from a clinical standpoint. However, factors that influence PAT system performance have not been thoroughly investigated and standardized test methods have not been established for image quality evaluation. To address these issues we have adapted phantom-based approaches from ultrasound imaging standards and implemented them to assess a PAT system developed for vascular imaging. Our system comprises a tunable near-infrared pulsed laser and a commercial ultrasound imaging system, including four interchangeable linear array clinical ultrasound transducers with varying center frequencies, acoustic bandwidths and geometries. Phantoms consisted of a customized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastisol gel that simulates both optical and acoustic properties of breast tissue. One phantom incorporates a sub-resolution filament array suitable for bimodal ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging, while another contains an array of hemoglobin-filled cylindrical inclusions at various depths. Key performance characteristics were evaluated, including spatial resolution, signal uniformity, contrast, and penetration depth. These characteristics were evaluated at 750 nm at radiant exposures below ANSI safety limits. Effects of transducer properties on imaging performance were evaluated. Axial and lateral resolution ranged from 0.27-0.83 mm and 0.28-1.8 mm, respectively, and penetration depths from 1.9-4.2 cm were achieved. These results demonstrate variation in PAT system performance based on clinical transducer selection, as well as the utility of realistic phantom-based test methods in performing benchtop evaluations of system performance.

  5. Trans-urethral ultrasound (TUUS) imaging for visualization and analysis of the prostate and associated tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David R., III; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-04-01

    Accurate assessment of pathological conditions in the prostate is difficult. Screening methods include palpation if the prostate gland, blood chemical testing, and diagnostic imaging. Trans-rectal Ultrasound (TRUS) is commonly used for the assessment of pathological conditions, however, TRUS is severely constrained by the relative distal location of the imaging probe. Trans-urethral Ultrasound (TUUS) may overcome some limitations of TRUS. A TUUS catheter was used to image the prostate, rectum, bladder, ureter, neuro-vascular bundles, arteries, and surrounding tissue. In addition, 360 degrees rotational scans were recorded for reconstruction into 3D volumes. Segmentation was challenging, however, new techniques such as active contour methods show potential. 3D visualizations, including both volume and surface rendering, were provided to clinicians off-line. On-line 3D visualization techniques are currently being developed. Potential applications of TUUS include: prostate cancer diagnosis and staging as well as image guided biopsy and therapy.

  6. Control of the necrosed tissue volume during noninvasive ultrasound surgery using a 16-element phased array.

    PubMed

    Fan, X; Hynynen, K

    1995-03-01

    Focused high-power ultrasound beams are well suited for noninvasive local destruction of deep target volumes. In order to avoid cavitation and to utilize only thermal tissue damage, high frequencies (1-5 MHz) are used in ultrasonic surgery. However, the focal spots generated by sharply focused transducers become so small that only small tumors can be treated in a reasonable time. Phased array ultrasound transducers can be employed to electronically scan a focal spot or to produce multiple foci in the desired region to increase the treated volume. In this article, theoretical and experimental studies of spherically curved square-element phased arrays for use in ultrasonic surgery were performed. The simulation results were compared with experimental results from a 16-element array. It was shown that the phased array could control the necrosed tissue volume by using closely spaced multiple foci. The phased array can also be used to enlarge a necrosed tissue volume in only one direction at a time, i.e., lateral or longitudinal. The spherically curved 16 square-element phased array can produce useful results by varying the phase and amplitude setting. Four focal points can be easily generated with a distance of two or four wavelengths between the two closest peaks. The maximum necrosed tissue volume generated by the array can be up to sixteen times the volume induced by a similar spherical transducer. Therefore the treatment time could be reduced compared with single transducer treatment.

  7. Towards the Development of a Thyroid Ultrasound Biometric Scheme Based on Tissue Echo-morphological Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabra, Josè C. R.; Fred, Ana L. N.

    This paper proposes a biometric system based on features extracted from the thyroid tissue accessed through 2D ultrasound. Tissue echo-morphology, which accounts for the intensity (echogenicity), texture and structure has started to be used as a relevant parameter in a clinical setting. In this paper, features related to texture, morphology and tissue reflectivity are extracted from the ultrasound images and the most discriminant ones are selected as an input for a prototype biometric identification system. Several classifiers were tested, with the best results being achieved by a combination of classifiers (k-Nearest Neighbors, MAP and entropy distance). Using leave-one-out cross-validation method the identification rate was up to 94%. Features related to texture and echogenicity were tested individually with high identification rates up to 78% and 70%, respectively. This suggests that the acoustic impedance (reflectivity or echogenicity) of the tissue as well as texture are feasible parameters to discriminate between distinct subjects. This paper shows the effectiveness of the proposed classification, which can be used not only as a new biometric modality but also as a diagnostic tool.

  8. The effect of electronically steering a phased array ultrasound transducer on near-field tissue heating

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Allison; Vyas, Urvi; Todd, Nick; Bever, Joshua de; Christensen, Douglas A.; Parker, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study presents the results obtained from both simulation and experimental techniques that show the effect of mechanically or electronically steering a phased array transducer on proximal tissue heating. Methods: The thermal response of a nine-position raster and a 16-mm diameter circle scanning trajectory executed through both electronic and mechanical scanning was evaluated in computer simulations and experimentally in a homogeneous tissue-mimicking phantom. Simulations were performed using power deposition maps obtained from the hybrid angular spectrum (HAS) method and applying a finite-difference approximation of the Pennes’ bioheat transfer equation for the experimentally used transducer and also for a fully sampled transducer to demonstrate the effect of acoustic window, ultrasound beam overlap and grating lobe clutter on near-field heating. Results: Both simulation and experimental results show that electronically steering the ultrasound beam for the two trajectories using the 256-element phased array significantly increases the thermal dose deposited in the near-field tissues when compared with the same treatment executed through mechanical steering only. In addition, the individual contributions of both beam overlap and grating lobe clutter to the near-field thermal effects were determined through comparing the simulated ultrasound beam patterns and resulting temperature fields from mechanically and electronically steered trajectories using the 256-randomized element phased array transducer to an electronically steered trajectory using a fully sampled transducer with 40 401 phase-adjusted sample points. Conclusions: Three distinctly different three distinctly different transducers were simulated to analyze the tradeoffs of selected transducer design parameters on near-field heating. Careful consideration of design tradeoffs and accurate patient treatment planning combined with thorough monitoring of the near-field tissue temperature will

  9. In Vivo Noninvasive Characterization of Brown Adipose Tissue Blood Flow by Contrast Ultrasound in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Baron, David M.; Clerte, Maeva; Brouckaert, Peter; Raher, Michael J.; Flynn, Aidan W.; Zhang, Haihua; Carter, Edward A.; Picard, Michael H.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle

    2012-01-01

    Background Interventions to increase brown adipose tissue (BAT) volume and activation are being extensively investigated as therapies to decrease the body weight in obese subjects. Noninvasive methods to monitor these therapies in animal models and humans are rare. We investigated whether contrast ultrasound (CU) performed in mice could detect BAT and measure its activation by monitoring BAT blood flow. After validation, CU was used to study the role of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and nitric oxide synthases in the acute regulation of BAT blood flow. Methods and Results Blood flow of interscapular BAT was assessed in mice (n=64) with CU by measuring the signal intensity of continuously infused contrast microbubbles. Blood flow of BAT estimated by CU was 0.5±0.1 (mean±SEM) dB/s at baseline and increased 15-fold during BAT stimulation by norepinephrine (NE, 1 μg·kg−1·min−1). Assessment of BAT blood flow using CU was correlated to that performed with fluorescent microspheres (R2=0.86, p<0.001). To evaluate whether intact BAT activation is required to increase BAT blood flow, CU was performed in UCP1-deficient (UCP1−/−) mice with impaired BAT activation. Norepinephrine infusion induced a smaller increase in BAT blood flow in UCP1−/− mice than in wild-type mice. Finally, we investigated whether NOS played a role in acute NE-induced changes of BAT blood flow. Genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of NOS3 attenuated the NE-induced increase in BAT blood flow. Conclusions These results indicate that CU can detect BAT in mice, and estimate BAT blood flow in mice with functional differences in BAT. PMID:22776888

  10. High-intensity-focused-ultrasound (HIFU) induced homeostasis and tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Sunita; Michel, M. S.; Alken, Peter; Kohrmann, K. U.; Haecker, Axel

    2003-06-01

    At high intensity levels, ultrasound energy focused into remote tissue targets in human body has shown to produce thermal necrosis in circumscribed regions with sub-millimeter accuracy. The non-invasive modality known as HIFU has enormous potential for thermal ablation of cancers/tumors of the human body without any adverse effects in the surrounding normal tissue. In this paper, empirical results for parametric assessment and interdependence of several exposure variables are presented for producing thermal necrosis as well as hemostasis. Multiple HIFU transducers in selective spatial configuration have been deployed using a suitably designed experiemntal harness, with and without motorized jig scanning. The pre-planning and on-line procedure for treatment and specified instrumentation is described. Custom designed 25mm aperture HIFU probes resonating at 2 MHz focused at 64 and 80 mm are used. Results have been obtained in ex-vivo animal tissue and in vitro biological phantoms for hemostasis.

  11. Deep-tissue focal fluorescence imaging with digitally time-reversed ultrasound-encoded light

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying Min; Judkewitz, Benjamin; DiMarzio, Charles A.; Yang, Changhuei

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is one of the most important research tools in biomedical sciences. However, scattering of light severely impedes imaging of thick biological samples beyond the ballistic regime. Here we directly show focusing and high-resolution fluorescence imaging deep inside biological tissues by digitally time-reversing ultrasound-tagged light with high optical gain (~5×105). We confirm the presence of a time-reversed optical focus along with a diffuse background—a corollary of partial phase conjugation—and develop an approach for dynamic background cancellation. To illustrate the potential of our method, we image complex fluorescent objects and tumour microtissues at an unprecedented depth of 2.5 mm in biological tissues at a lateral resolution of 36 μm×52 μm and an axial resolution of 657 μm. Our results set the stage for a range of deep-tissue imaging applications in biomedical research and medical diagnostics. PMID:22735456

  12. The role of ultrasound-guided needle biopsy in the diagnosis of soft-tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, M; Pollastri, P; Ferraro, A; Betoni, F; Bacci, G; Galletti, S

    2007-06-01

    Soft-tissue tumors are not very common, but their diagnosis can be very difficult. In the final analysis, their diagnosis requires a biopsy, which must furnish a sufficient amount of material to allow a reliable histological diagnosis. The authors evaluated the diagnostic efficacy of ultrasound-guided needle biopsy in the diagnosis of soft-tissue tumors of the musculoskeletal system. The aim of the study was to optimize the biopsy procedure, with particular emphasis on the choice of the biopsy needle (large-gauge manual versus semiautomatic) based on the characteristics of the neoplastic mass (consistency, depth, size, location). The results of the study showed that appropriate needle selection significantly reduced the frequency of biopsies that were insufficient for histological diagnosis. The method proved to be highly reliable for diagnosis of soft-tissue tumors but strongly related to the proper selection of the needle to be used.

  13. Analysis of Cardiovascular Tissue Components for the Diagnosis of Coronary Vulnerable Plaque from Intravascular Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yoo Na; Kim, Ga Young; Shin, Eun Seok

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize cardiovascular tissue components and analyze the different tissue properties for predicting coronary vulnerable plaque from intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images. For this purpose, sequential IVUS image frames were obtained from human coronary arteries using 20 MHz catheters. The plaque regions between the intima and media-adventitial borders were manually segmented in all IVUS images. Tissue components of the plaque regions were classified into having fibrous tissue (FT), fibrofatty tissue (FFT), necrotic core (NC), or dense calcium (DC). The media area and lumen diameter were also estimated simultaneously. In addition, the external elastic membrane (EEM) was computed to predict the vulnerable plaque after the tissue characterization. The reliability of manual segmentation was validated in terms of inter- and intraobserver agreements. The quantitative results found that the FT and the media as well as the NC would be good indicators for predicting vulnerable plaques in IVUS images. In addition, the lumen was not suitable for early diagnosis of vulnerable plaque because of the low significance compared to the other vessel parameters. To predict vulnerable plaque rupture, future study should have additional experiments using various tissue components, such as the EEM, FT, NC, and media.

  14. Ultrasound Elastography for Estimation of Regional Strain of Multilayered Hydrogels and Tissue-Engineered Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chen-Yuan; Heebner, Joseph; Baskaran, Harihara; Welter, Jean F.; Mansour, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage constructs tend to develop inhomogeneously, thus, to predict the mechanical performance of the tissue, conventional biomechanical testing, which yields average material properties, is of limited value. Rather, techniques for evaluating regional and depth-dependent properties of TE cartilage, preferably non-destructively, are required. The purpose of this study was to build upon our previous results and to investigate the feasibility of using ultrasound elastography to non-destructively assess the depth-dependent biomechanical characteristics of TE cartilage while in a sterile bioreactor. As a proof-of-concept, and to standardize an assessment protocol, a well-characterized three-layered hydrogel construct was used as a surrogate for TE cartilage, and was studied under controlled incremental compressions. The strain field of the construct predicted by elastography was then validated by comparison with a poroelastic finite-element analysis (FEA). On average, the differences between the strains predicted by elastography and the FEA were within 10%. Subsequently engineered cartilage tissue was evaluated in the same test fixture. Results from these examinations showed internal regions where the local strain was 1–2 orders of magnitude greater than that near the surface. These studies document the feasibility of using ultrasound to evaluate the mechanical behaviors of maturing TE constructs in a sterile environment. PMID:26077987

  15. Experimental high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion formation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert; Kalisz, Andrew; Lee, Paul; Lizzi, Frederic; Fujikura, Kana; Otsuka, Ryo; Homma, Shunichi

    2004-05-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) (4.5-7.5 MHz) was used to form lesions in cardiac tissue, with an ultimate objective of treating conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and ventricular tachycardia. Ultrasound attenuation coefficients were experimentally determined in vitro for calf myocardial tissue, both muscle and pericardial fat. These coefficients were employed in computational models of linear beam propagation, tissue heating profiles and thermal lesion formation for a variety of focused transducers. Modeling was performed for continuous and pulsed exposures. These models suggested initial power levels and exposure durations for in vitro experiments on calf ventricles and septa and ex vivo experiments on canine whole hearts. Repeatability of lesion size and placement was studied as power and exposure parameters varied around the initial values. With these experimental results, power and exposure parameters were selected to create lesions in vivo in canine ventricles and septa in open-chest, anesthetized dogs. Pulsed exposures were synchronized to cardiac and respiration cycles to ensure accurate placement of the lesions. These initial in vivo experiments showed that HIFU treatments in the beating heart are feasible; they also identified refinements that are now being implemented for better control of lesion size and placement. [Work supported by NCI and NHLBI Grant 5R01 CA84588.

  16. Ultrasound Elastography for Estimation of Regional Strain of Multilayered Hydrogels and Tissue-Engineered Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Yuan; Heebner, Joseph; Baskaran, Harihara; Welter, Jean F; Mansour, Joseph M

    2015-12-01

    Tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage constructs tend to develop inhomogeneously, thus, to predict the mechanical performance of the tissue, conventional biomechanical testing, which yields average material properties, is of limited value. Rather, techniques for evaluating regional and depth-dependent properties of TE cartilage, preferably non-destructively, are required. The purpose of this study was to build upon our previous results and to investigate the feasibility of using ultrasound elastography to non-destructively assess the depth-dependent biomechanical characteristics of TE cartilage while in a sterile bioreactor. As a proof-of-concept, and to standardize an assessment protocol, a well-characterized three-layered hydrogel construct was used as a surrogate for TE cartilage, and was studied under controlled incremental compressions. The strain field of the construct predicted by elastography was then validated by comparison with a poroelastic finite-element analysis (FEA). On average, the differences between the strains predicted by elastography and the FEA were within 10%. Subsequently engineered cartilage tissue was evaluated in the same test fixture. Results from these examinations showed internal regions where the local strain was 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than that near the surface. These studies document the feasibility of using ultrasound to evaluate the mechanical behaviors of maturing TE constructs in a sterile environment.

  17. Eigenspace based minimum variance beamforming applied to ultrasound imaging of acoustically hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Saeed; Austeng, Andreas; Johansen, Tonni F; Holm, Sverre

    2012-10-01

    Minimum variance (MV) based beamforming techniques have been successfully applied to medical ultrasound imaging. These adaptive methods offer higher lateral resolution, lower sidelobes, and better definition of edges compared to delay and sum beamforming (DAS). In standard medical ultrasound, the bone surface is often visualized poorly, and the boundaries region appears unclear. This may happen due to fundamental limitations of the DAS beamformer, and different artifacts due to, e.g., specular reflection, and shadowing. The latter can degrade the robustness of the MV beamformers as the statistics across the imaging aperture is violated because of the obstruction of the imaging beams. In this study, we employ forward/backward averaging to improve the robustness of the MV beamforming techniques. Further, we use an eigen-spaced minimum variance technique (ESMV) to enhance the edge detection of hard tissues. In simulation, in vitro, and in vivo studies, we show that performance of the ESMV beamformer depends on estimation of the signal subspace rank. The lower ranks of the signal subspace can enhance edges and reduce noise in ultrasound images but the speckle pattern can be distorted.

  18. Correlation of pre-operative MRI and intra-operative 3D ultrasound to measure brain tissue shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, David G.; Comeau, Roch M.; Lee, Belinda K. H.; Peters, Terence M.

    2000-04-01

    The usefulness of stereotactic neurosurgery performed via a craniotomy is limited because the craniotomy leads to a brain tissue shift of 10 mm on average. We have recently completed an examination of 2D intra-operative ultrasound as a means of visualization and measurement of brain shift. A commercial 3D tracking system was used for real-time registration of the ultrasound video to pre-operative MR images, and annotation of the images was used to measure the shift. More than 15 surgical cases have been performed thus far with the 2D system. We are now undertaking phantom studies with tracked 3D ultrasound, and have developed sophisticated tools for real- time overlay of ultrasound and MRI volumes. These tools include a virtual-reality view of the ultrasound probe with live ultrasound video superimposed over a 3D -rendered MRI of the brain, as well as 3D ultrasound/MRI transparency overlay views. Algorithms to automatically extract landmarks from MRI and 3D ultrasound images are under development. We aim to use these landmarks to automatically generate nonlinear warp transformations to correct the pre-operative MRI as well as surgical target coordinates for brain shift. Portions of the C++ code developed for this project have been contributed to the open-source Visualization Toolkit (VTK).

  19. The effect of adjunctive noncontact low frequency ultrasound on deep tissue pressure injury.

    PubMed

    Honaker, Jeremy S; Forston, Michael R; Davis, Emily A; Weisner, Michelle M; Morgan, Jennifer A; Sacca, Emily

    2016-11-01

    The optimal treatment for deep tissue pressure injuries has not been determined. Deep tissue pressure injuries represent a more ominous early stage pressure injury that may evolve into full thickness ulceration despite implementing the standard of care for pressure injury. A longitudinal prospective historical case control study design was used to determine the effectiveness of noncontact low frequency ultrasound plus standard of care (treatment group) in comparison to standard of care (control group) in reducing deep tissue pressure injury severity, total surface area, and final pressure injury stage. The Honaker Suspected Deep Tissue Injury Severity Scale (range 3-18[more severe]) was used to determine deep tissue pressure injury severity at enrollment (Time 1) and discharge (Time 2). A total of 60 subjects (Treatment = 30; Control= 30) were enrolled in the study. In comparison to the control group mean deep tissue pressure injury total surface area change at Time 2 (0.3 cm(2) ), the treatment group had a greater decrease (8.8 cm(2) ) that was significant (t = 2.41, p = 0.014, r(2)  = 0.10). In regards to the Honaker Suspected Deep Tissue Injury Severity Scale scores, the treatment group had a significantly lower score (7.6) in comparison to the control group (11.9) at time 2, with a mean difference of 4.6 (t = 6.146, p = 0.0001, r(2)  = 0.39). When considering the final pressure ulcer stage at Time 2, the control group were mostly composed of unstageable pressure ulcer (57%) and deep tissue pressure injury severity (27%). In contrast, the treatment group final pressure ulcer stages were less severe and were mostly composed of stage 2 pressure injury (50%) and deep tissue pressure injury severity (23%) were the most common at time 2. The results of this study have shown that deep tissue pressure injury severity treated with noncontact low frequency ultrasound within 5 days of onset and in conjunction with standard of care may improve

  20. A Feed-forward Neural Network Algorithm to Detect Thermal Lesions Induced by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound in Tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Shakhssalim, Naser; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2012-10-01

    Non-invasive ultrasound surgeries such as high intensity focused ultrasound have been developed to treat tumors or to stop bleeding. In this technique, incorporation of a suitable imaging modality to monitor and control the treatments is essential so several imaging methods such as X-ray, Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging have been proposed to monitor the induced thermal lesions. Currently, the only ultrasound imaging technique that is clinically used for monitoring this treatment is standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging. This paper describes a novel method for detecting high intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions using a feed forward neural-network. This study was carried on in vitro animal tissue samples. Backscattered radio frequency signals were acquired in real-time during treatment in order to detect induced thermal lesions. Changes in various tissue properties including tissue's attenuation coefficient, integrated backscatter, scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution, frequency dependent scatterer amplitudes and tissue vibration derived from the backscattered radio frequency data acquired 10 minutes after treatment regarding to before treatment were used in this study. These estimated parameters were used as features of the neural network. Estimated parameters of two sample tissues including two thermal lesions and their segmented B-mode images were used along with the pathological results as training data for the neural network. The results of the study shows that the trained feed forward neural network could effectively detect thermal lesions in vitro. Comparing the estimated size of the thermal lesion (9.6 mm × 8.5 mm) using neural network with the actual size of that from physical examination (10.1 mm × 9 mm) shows that we could detect high intensity focused ultrasound thermal lesions with the difference of 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm.

  1. [Study on the spectrophotometric determination of hydroxyl free radical from low power trench-type ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan-ping; Yuan, Ying-mao; Zhu, Yu-chen

    2012-05-01

    Under the condition of different pH (7-11) and different ethanol volume fraction (45% to 85%), the ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra of malachite green were studied in neutral and alkaline ethanol solution, the maximum absorption wavelength at 620 nm was found, and the matching degree of standard curve was better established. In low power trench-type ultrasound apparatus, the absorption of the malachite green solution was measured under ultrasound and non-ultrasound, respectively. the difference values of the ultraviolet absorption of the malachite green solution under low power trench-type ultrasound were measured results of the hydroxyl free radical oxidation degrading malachite green, therefore hydroxyl free radical from low power trench-type ultrasound was determined indirectly. Then the contents of hydroxyl free radical in four conditions were measured. The detection limit of the method of 8.4 x 10(-6) mmol x L(-1) and the relative standard deviation of the method of 9.4 x 10(-5) - 3.7 x 10(-4) mmol x L(-1) were determined, a higher testing precision and good reproducibility were confirmed. It can be applied for fast detection of neutral and alkaline ethanol solution system in the case of very low concentration of hydroxyl free radicals. Since malachite green is heat sensitive, so compared to measuring temperature, the method possessed better functions for thermal effects of ultrasound.

  2. Small-window parametric imaging based on information entropy for ultrasound tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Chen, Chin-Kuo; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Chang, King-Jen; Fang, Jui; Ma, Hsiang-Yang; Chou, Dean

    2017-01-01

    Constructing ultrasound statistical parametric images by using a sliding window is a widely adopted strategy for characterizing tissues. Deficiency in spatial resolution, the appearance of boundary artifacts, and the prerequisite data distribution limit the practicability of statistical parametric imaging. In this study, small-window entropy parametric imaging was proposed to overcome the above problems. Simulations and measurements of phantoms were executed to acquire backscattered radiofrequency (RF) signals, which were processed to explore the feasibility of small-window entropy imaging in detecting scatterer properties. To validate the ability of entropy imaging in tissue characterization, measurements of benign and malignant breast tumors were conducted (n = 63) to compare performances of conventional statistical parametric (based on Nakagami distribution) and entropy imaging by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The simulation and phantom results revealed that entropy images constructed using a small sliding window (side length = 1 pulse length) adequately describe changes in scatterer properties. The area under the ROC for using small-window entropy imaging to classify tumors was 0.89, which was higher than 0.79 obtained using statistical parametric imaging. In particular, boundary artifacts were largely suppressed in the proposed imaging technique. Entropy enables using a small window for implementing ultrasound parametric imaging.

  3. Small-window parametric imaging based on information entropy for ultrasound tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Chen, Chin-Kuo; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Chang, King-Jen; Fang, Jui; Ma, Hsiang-Yang; Chou, Dean

    2017-01-01

    Constructing ultrasound statistical parametric images by using a sliding window is a widely adopted strategy for characterizing tissues. Deficiency in spatial resolution, the appearance of boundary artifacts, and the prerequisite data distribution limit the practicability of statistical parametric imaging. In this study, small-window entropy parametric imaging was proposed to overcome the above problems. Simulations and measurements of phantoms were executed to acquire backscattered radiofrequency (RF) signals, which were processed to explore the feasibility of small-window entropy imaging in detecting scatterer properties. To validate the ability of entropy imaging in tissue characterization, measurements of benign and malignant breast tumors were conducted (n = 63) to compare performances of conventional statistical parametric (based on Nakagami distribution) and entropy imaging by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The simulation and phantom results revealed that entropy images constructed using a small sliding window (side length = 1 pulse length) adequately describe changes in scatterer properties. The area under the ROC for using small-window entropy imaging to classify tumors was 0.89, which was higher than 0.79 obtained using statistical parametric imaging. In particular, boundary artifacts were largely suppressed in the proposed imaging technique. Entropy enables using a small window for implementing ultrasound parametric imaging. PMID:28106118

  4. Temperature dependence of the shear modulus of soft tissues assessed by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sapin-de Brosses, E; Gennisson, J-L; Pernot, M; Fink, M; Tanter, M

    2010-03-21

    Soft tissue stiffness was shown to significantly change after thermal ablation. To better understand this phenomenon, the study aims (1) to quantify and explain the temperature dependence of soft tissue stiffness for different organs, (2) to investigate the potential relationship between stiffness changes and thermal dose and (3) to study the reversibility or irreversibility of stiffness changes. Ex vivo bovine liver and muscle samples (N = 3 and N = 20, respectively) were slowly heated and cooled down into a thermally controlled saline bath. Temperatures were assessed by thermocouples. Sample stiffness (shear modulus) was provided by the quantitative supersonic shear imaging technique. Changes in liver stiffness are observed only after 45 degrees C. In contrast, between 25 degrees C and 65 degrees C, muscle stiffness varies in four successive steps that are consistent with the thermally induced proteins denaturation reported in the literature. After a 6 h long heating and cooling process, the final muscle stiffness can be either smaller or bigger than the initial one, depending on the stiffness at the end of the heating. Another important result is that stiffness changes are linked to thermal dose. Given the high sensitivity of ultrasound to protein denaturation, this study gives promising prospects for the development of ultrasound-guided HIFU systems.

  5. Optical measurement of adipose tissue thickness and comparison with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imging, and callipers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraskin, Dmitri; Boeth, Heide; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2009-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy is used to quantify the subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness (ATT) over five muscle groups (vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius, ventral forearm and biceps brachii muscle) of healthy volunteers (n=20). The optical lipid signal (OLS) was obtained from the second derivative of broad band attenuation spectra and the lipid absorption peak (λ=930 nm). Ultrasound and MR imaging as well as mechanical calliper readings were taken as reference methods. The data show that the OLS is a good predictor for ATT (<16 mm) with absolute and relative errors of <0.8 mm and <24%, respectively. The optical method compares favourably with calliper reading. The finding of a non-linear relationship of optical signal vs. ultrasound is explained by a theoretical two-layer model based on the diffusion approximation for the transport of photons. The crosstalk between the OLS and tissue hemoglobin concentration changes during an incremental cycling exercise was found to be small, indicating the robustness of OLS. Furthermore, the effect of ATT on spatially-resolved spectroscopy measurements is shown to decrease the calculated muscle hemoglobin concentration and to increase oxygen saturation.

  6. Considering Angle Selection When Using Ultrasound Electrode Displacement Elastography to Evaluate Radiofrequency Ablation of Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Chen, Pin-Yu; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Liu, Hao-Li; Teng, Jianfu

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive treatment to thermally destroy tumors. Ultrasound-based electrode-displacement elastography is an emerging technique for evaluating the region of RFA-induced lesions. The angle between the imaging probe and the RFA electrode can influence electrode-displacement elastography when visualizing the ablation zone. We explored the angle effect on electrode-displacement elastography to measure the ablation zone. Phantoms embedded with meatballs were fabricated and then ablated using an RFA system to simulate RFA-induced lesions. For each phantom, a commercial ultrasound scanner with a 7.5 MHz linear probe was used to acquire raw image data at different angles, ranging from 30° to 90° at increments of 10°, to construct electrode-displacement images and facilitate comparisons with tissue section images. The results revealed that the ablation regions detected using electrode-displacement elastography were highly correlated with those from tissue section images when the angle was between 30° and 60°. However, the boundaries of lesions were difficult to distinguish, when the angle was larger than 60°. The experimental findings suggest that angle selection should be considered to achieve reliable electrode-displacement elastography to describe ablation zones. PMID:24971347

  7. Interlaced photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system with real-time coregistration for ovarian tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2014-07-01

    Coregistered ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic imaging are emerging techniques for mapping the echogenic anatomical structure of tissue and its corresponding optical absorption. We report a 128-channel imaging system with real-time coregistration of the two modalities, which provides up to 15 coregistered frames per second limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. In addition, the system integrates a compact transvaginal imaging probe with a custom-designed fiber optic assembly for in vivo detection and characterization of human ovarian tissue. We present the coregistered US and photoacoustic imaging system structure, the optimal design of the PC interfacing software, and the reconfigurable field programmable gate array operation and optimization. Phantom experiments of system lateral resolution and axial sensitivity evaluation, examples of the real-time scanning of a tumor-bearing mouse, and ex vivo human ovaries studies are demonstrated.

  8. Comparative histomorphometric study of bone tissue synthesized after electric and ultrasound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Coman, Mălina; Hîncu, Mihaela; Surlin, Petra; Mateescu, Garofiţa; Nechita, A; Banu, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The clinical use of the alternative therapies in traumatology is conditioned by the knowledge and understanding of their actions on the bone tissue. The hereby study aims at the comparative assessment of the effectiveness of the direct current and ultrasounds in treating the fractures. Thus, we have proceeded to a comparative histological study of the bone tissue in the fractured area and the biomechanical description and the three-dimensional model of the stimulated bone's behavior by using micro-CT X-rays and the finite element analysis. The findings clearly show that the bone, which has been stimulated during a period of two weeks, has regained its functions, that is 85% of the compression one and 95% of the shearing one. These values prove that 90% of the bone structure has healed.

  9. Interlaced photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system with real-time coregistration for ovarian tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Coregistered ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic imaging are emerging techniques for mapping the echogenic anatomical structure of tissue and its corresponding optical absorption. We report a 128-channel imaging system with real-time coregistration of the two modalities, which provides up to 15 coregistered frames per second limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. In addition, the system integrates a compact transvaginal imaging probe with a custom-designed fiber optic assembly for in vivo detection and characterization of human ovarian tissue. We present the coregistered US and photoacoustic imaging system structure, the optimal design of the PC interfacing software, and the reconfigurable field programmable gate array operation and optimization. Phantom experiments of system lateral resolution and axial sensitivity evaluation, examples of the real-time scanning of a tumor-bearing mouse, and ex vivo human ovaries studies are demonstrated. PMID:25069009

  10. Changes in backscatter of liver tissue due to thermal coagulation induced by focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Shishitani, Takashi; Matsuzawa, Ryo; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasonic imaging has advantages in its self-consistency in guiding and monitoring ultrasonic treatment such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. Changes in ultrasonic backscatter of tissues due to HIFU treatment have been observed, but their mechanism is still under discussion. In this paper, ultrasonic backscatter of excised and degassed porcine liver tissue was observed before and after HIFU exposure using a diagnostic scanner, and its acoustic impedance was mapped using an ultrasonic microscope. The histology of its pathological specimen was also observed using an optical microscope. The observed decrease in backscatter intensity due to HIFU exposure was consistent with a spatial Fourier analysis of the histology, which also showed changes due to the exposure. The observed increase in acoustic impedance due to the exposure was also consistent with the histological change assuming that the increase was primarily caused by the increase in the concentration of hepatic cells.

  11. Interlaced photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system with real-time coregistration for ovarian tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2014-01-01

    Coregistered ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic imaging are emerging techniques for mapping the echogenic anatomical structure of tissue and its corresponding optical absorption. We report a 128-channel imaging system with real-time coregistration of the two modalities, which provides up to 15 coregistered frames per second limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. In addition, the system integrates a compact transvaginal imaging probe with a custom-designed fiber optic assembly for in vivo detection and characterization of human ovarian tissue. We present the coregistered US and photoacoustic imaging system structure, the optimal design of the PC interfacing software, and the reconfigurable field programmable gate array operation and optimization. Phantom experiments of system lateral resolution and axial sensitivity evaluation, examples of the real-time scanning of a tumor-bearing mouse, and ex vivo human ovaries studies are demonstrated.

  12. Non-invasive and non-destructive characterization of tissue engineered constructs using ultrasound imaging technologies: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang; Wagner, William R.

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid expansion of biomaterial development and coupled efforts to translate such advances toward the clinic, non-invasive and non-destructive imaging tools to evaluate implants in situ in a timely manner are critically needed. The required multilevel information is comprehensive, including structural, mechanical, and biological changes such as scaffold degradation, mechanical strength, cell infiltration, extracellular matrix formation and vascularization to name a few. With its inherent advantages of non-invasiveness and non-destructiveness, ultrasound imaging can be an ideal tool for both preclinical and clinical uses. In this review, currently available ultrasound imaging technologies that have been applied in vitro and in vivo for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are discussed and some new emerging ultrasound technologies and multi-modality approaches utilizing ultrasound are introduced. PMID:26518412

  13. Non-invasive and Non-destructive Characterization of Tissue Engineered Constructs Using Ultrasound Imaging Technologies: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang; Wagner, William R

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid expansion of biomaterial development and coupled efforts to translate such advances toward the clinic, non-invasive and non-destructive imaging tools to evaluate implants in situ in a timely manner are critically needed. The required multi-level information is comprehensive, including structural, mechanical, and biological changes such as scaffold degradation, mechanical strength, cell infiltration, extracellular matrix formation and vascularization to name a few. With its inherent advantages of non-invasiveness and non-destructiveness, ultrasound imaging can be an ideal tool for both preclinical and clinical uses. In this review, currently available ultrasound imaging technologies that have been applied in vitro and in vivo for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are discussed and some new emerging ultrasound technologies and multi-modality approaches utilizing ultrasound are introduced.

  14. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Modeling of Nonlinear Propagation in Multi-layer Biological Tissues for Strong Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ting-Bo; Liu, Zhen-Bo; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Dong; Gong, Xiu-Fen

    2009-08-01

    A theoretical model of the nonlinear propagation in multi-layered tissues for strong focused ultrasound is proposed. In this model, the spheroidal beam equation (SBE) is utilized to describe the nonlinear sound propagation in each layer tissue, and generalized oblique incidence theory is used to deal with the sound transmission between two layer tissues. Computer simulation is performed on a fat-muscle-liver tissue model under the irradiation of a 1 MHz focused transducer with a large aperture angle of 35°. The results demonstrate that the tissue layer would change the amplitude of sound pressure at the focal region and cause the increase of side petals.

  15. Ultrasound backscatter measurements of intact human proximal femurs--relationships of ultrasound parameters with tissue structure and mineral density.

    PubMed

    Malo, M K H; Töyräs, J; Karjalainen, J P; Isaksson, H; Riekkinen, O; Jurvelin, J S

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound reflection and backscatter parameters are related to the mechanical and structural properties of bone in vitro. However, the potential of ultrasound reflection and backscatter measurements has not been tested with intact human proximal femurs ex vivo. We hypothesize that ultrasound backscatter can be measured from intact femurs and that the measured backscattered signal is associated with cadaver age, bone mineral density (BMD) and trabecular bone microstructure. In this study, human femoral bones of 16 male cadavers (47.0±16.1 years, range: 21-77 years) were investigated using pulse-echo ultrasound measurements at the femoral neck in the antero-posterior direction and at the trochanter major in the anteroposterior and lateromedial directions. Recently introduced ultrasound backscatter parameters, independent of cortical thickness, e.g., time slope of apparent integrated backscatter (TSAB) and mean of the backscatter difference technique (MBD) were obtained and compared with the structural properties of trabecular bone samples, extracted from the locations of ultrasound measurements. Moreover, more conventional backscatter parameters, e.g., apparent integrated backscatter (AIB) and frequency slope of apparent integrated backscatter (FSAB) were analyzed. Bone mineral density of the intact femurs was evaluated using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). AIB and MDB measured from the femoral neck correlated significantly (p<0.01) with the neck BMD (R2=0.44 and 0.45), cadaver age (R2=0.61 and 0.41) and several structural parameters, e.g., bone volume fraction (R2=0.33 and 0.39, p<0.05 and p<0.01), respectively. To conclude, ultrasound backscatter parameters, measured from intact proximal femurs, are significantly related (p<0.05) to structural properties and mineral density of trabecular bone.

  16. Adipose tissue lymphocytes: types and roles.

    PubMed

    Caspar-Bauguil, S; Cousin, B; Bour, S; Casteilla, L; Castiella, L; Penicaud, L; Carpéné, C

    2009-12-01

    Besides adipocytes, specialized in lipid handling and involved in energy balance regulation, white adipose tissue (WAT) is mainly composed of other cell types among which lymphocytes represent a non-negligible proportion. Different types of lymphocytes (B, alphabetaT, gammadeltaT, NK and NKT) have been detected in WAT of rodents or humans, and vary in their relative proportion according to the fat pad anatomical location. The lymphocytes found in intra-abdominal, visceral fat pads seem representative of innate immunity, while those present in subcutaneous fat depots are part of adaptive immunity, at least in mice. Both the number and the activity of the different lymphocyte classes, except B lymphocytes, are modified in obesity. Several of these modifications in the relative proportions of the lymphocyte classes depend on the degree of obesity, or on leptin concentration, or even fat depot anatomical location. Recent studies suggest that alterations of lymphocyte number and composition precede the macrophage increase and the enhanced inflammatory state of WAT found in obesity. Lymphocytes express receptors to adipokines while several proinflammatory chemokines are produced in WAT, rendering intricate crosstalk between fat and immune cells. However, the evidences and controversies available so far are in favour of an involvement of lymphocytes in the control of the number of other cells in WAT, either adipocytes or immune cells and of their secretory and metabolic activities. Therefore, immunotherapy deserves to be considered as a promising approach to treat the endocrino-metabolic disorders associated to excessive fat mass development.

  17. Comprehensive approach to breast cancer detection using light: photon localization by ultrasound modulation and tissue characterization by spectral discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Fay A.; Tomlinson, Harold W.; Brooksby, Glen W.

    1993-09-01

    A new technique called Ultrasound Tagging of Light (UTL) for imaging breast tissue is described. In this approach, photon localization in turbid tissue is achieved by cross- modulating a laser beam with focussed, pulsed ultrasound. Light which passes through the ultrasound focal spot is `tagged' with the frequency of the ultrasound pulse. The experimental system uses an Argon-Ion laser, a single PIN photodetector, and a 1 MHz fixed-focus pulsed ultrasound transducer. The utility of UTL as a photon localization technique in scattering media is examined using tissue phantoms consisting of gelatin and intralipid. In a separate study, in vivo optical reflectance spectrophotometry was performed on human breast tumors implanted intramuscularly and subcutaneously in nineteen nude mice. The validity of applying a quadruple wavelength breast cancer discrimination metric (developed using breast biopsy specimens) to the in vivo condition was tested. A scatter diagram for the in vivo model tumors based on this metric is presented using as the `normal' controls the hands and fingers of volunteers. Tumors at different growth stages were studied; these tumors ranged in size from a few millimeters to two centimeters. It is expected that when coupled with a suitable photon localization technique like UTL, spectral discrimination methods like this one will prove useful in the detection of breast cancer by non-ionizing means.

  18. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound increases the mechanical properties of the healing tissues at bone-tendon junction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min-Hua; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Huang, Qing-Hua; Lu, Hong-Bin; Qin, Ling

    2009-01-01

    The re-establishment of bone-tendon junction (BTJ) tissues is involved in many trauma and reconstructive surgeries. A direct BTJ repair requires a long period of immobilization which may be associated with a postoperative weak knee. In this study, we investigated if low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment increases the material properties of healing tissues at bone-tendon junction (BTJ) after partial patellectomy using rabbit models. Standard partial patellectomy was conducted on one knee of twenty four rabbits which were randomly divided into an ultrasound group and a control group. The bony changes of BTJ complexes around the BTJ healing interface were measured by anteroposterior x-ray radiographs; then the volumetric bone-mineral density (BMD) of the new bone was assessed using a peripheral computed tomography scanner (pQCT). The stiffness of patellar cartilage, fibrocartilage at the healing interface and the tendon were measured in situ using a novel noncontact ultrasound water jet indentation system. Not only significantly more newly formed bone at the BTJ healing interface but also increased stiffness of the junction tissues were found in the ultrasound group compared with the controls at week 18. In addition, the ultrasound group also showed significantly 44% higher BMD at week 6 than controls.

  19. Effect of hydrodynamic cavitation in the tissue erosion by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2016-09-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as an effective therapeutic modality in clinics. Besides the thermal ablation, tissue disintegration is also possible because of the interaction between the distorted HIFU bursts and either bubble cloud or boiling bubble. Hydrodynamic cavitation is another type of cavitation and has been employed widely in industry, but its role in mechanical erosion to tissue is not clearly known. In this study, the bubble dynamics immediately after the termination of HIFU exposure in the transparent gel phantom was captured by high-speed photography, from which the bubble displacement towards the transducer and the changes of bubble size was quantitatively determined. The characteristics of hydrodynamic cavitation due to the release of the acoustic radiation force and relaxation of compressed surrounding medium were found to associate with the number of pulses delivered and HIFU parameters (i.e. pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency). Because of the initial big bubble (~1 mm), large bubble expansion (up to 1.76 folds), and quick bubble motion (up to ~1 m s-1) hydrodynamic cavitation is significant after HIFU exposure and may lead to mechanical erosion. The shielding effect of residual tiny bubbles would reduce the acoustic energy delivered to the pre-existing bubble at the focus and, subsequently, the hydrodynamic cavitation effect. Tadpole shape of mechanical erosion in ex vivo porcine kidney samples was similar to the contour of bubble dynamics in the gel. Liquefied tissue was observed to emit towards the transducer through the punctured tissue after HIFU exposure in the sonography. In summary, the release of HIFU exposure-induced hydrodynamic cavitation produces significant bubble expansion and motion, which may be another important mechanism of tissue erosion. Understanding its mechanism and optimizing the outcome would broaden and enhance HIFU applications.

  20. Effect of hydrodynamic cavitation in the tissue erosion by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2016-09-21

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as an effective therapeutic modality in clinics. Besides the thermal ablation, tissue disintegration is also possible because of the interaction between the distorted HIFU bursts and either bubble cloud or boiling bubble. Hydrodynamic cavitation is another type of cavitation and has been employed widely in industry, but its role in mechanical erosion to tissue is not clearly known. In this study, the bubble dynamics immediately after the termination of HIFU exposure in the transparent gel phantom was captured by high-speed photography, from which the bubble displacement towards the transducer and the changes of bubble size was quantitatively determined. The characteristics of hydrodynamic cavitation due to the release of the acoustic radiation force and relaxation of compressed surrounding medium were found to associate with the number of pulses delivered and HIFU parameters (i.e. pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency). Because of the initial big bubble (~1 mm), large bubble expansion (up to 1.76 folds), and quick bubble motion (up to ~1 m s(-1)) hydrodynamic cavitation is significant after HIFU exposure and may lead to mechanical erosion. The shielding effect of residual tiny bubbles would reduce the acoustic energy delivered to the pre-existing bubble at the focus and, subsequently, the hydrodynamic cavitation effect. Tadpole shape of mechanical erosion in ex vivo porcine kidney samples was similar to the contour of bubble dynamics in the gel. Liquefied tissue was observed to emit towards the transducer through the punctured tissue after HIFU exposure in the sonography. In summary, the release of HIFU exposure-induced hydrodynamic cavitation produces significant bubble expansion and motion, which may be another important mechanism of tissue erosion. Understanding its mechanism and optimizing the outcome would broaden and enhance HIFU applications.

  1. Visualizing the stress distribution within vascular tissues using intravascular ultrasound elastography: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Richards, Michael S; Perucchio, Renato; Doyley, Marvin M

    2015-06-01

    A methodology for computing the stress distribution of vascular tissue using finite element-based, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) reconstruction elastography is described. This information could help cardiologists detect life-threatening atherosclerotic plaques and predict their propensity to rupture. The calculation of vessel stresses requires the measurement of strain from the ultrasound images, a calibrating pressure measurement and additional model assumptions. In this work, we conducted simulation studies to investigate the effect of varying the model assumptions, specifically Poisson's ratio and the outer boundary conditions, on the resulting stress fields. In both simulation and phantom studies, we created vessel geometries with two fibrous cap thicknesses to determine if we could detect a difference in peak stress (spatially) between the two. The results revealed that (i) Poisson's ratios had negligible impact on the accuracy of stress elastograms, (ii) the outer boundary condition assumption had the greatest effect on the resulting modulus and stress distributions and (iii) in simulation and in phantom experiments, our stress imaging technique was able to detect an increased peak stress for the vessel geometry with the smaller cap thickness. This work is a first step toward understanding and creating a robust stress measurement technique for evaluating atherosclerotic plaques using IVUS elastography.

  2. Interrogating the viscoelastic properties of tissue using viscoelastic response (VISR) ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzo, Mallory Renee

    Affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 newborn males, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic disorders in humans. Boys with DMD suffer progressive loss of muscle strength and function, leading to wheelchair dependence, cardiac and respiratory compromise, and death during young adulthood. There are currently no treatments that can halt or reverse the disease progression, and translating prospective treatments into clinical trials has been delayed by inadequate outcome measures. Current outcome measures, such as functional and muscle strength assessments, lack sensitivity to individual muscles, require subjective effort of the child, and are impacted by normal childhood growth and development. The goal of this research is to develop Viscoelastic Response (VisR) ultrasound which can be used to delineate compositional changes in muscle associated with DMD. In VisR, acoustic radiation force (ARF) is used to produce small, localized displacements within the muscle. Using conventional ultrasound to track the motion, the displacement response of the tissue can be evaluated against a mechanical model. In order to develop signal processing techniques and assess mechanical models, finite element method simulations are used to model the response of a viscoelastic material to ARF excitations. Results are then presented demonstrating VisR differentiation of viscoelastic changes with progressive dystrophic degeneration in a dog model of DMD. Finally, clinical feasibility of VisR imaging is demonstrated in two boys with DMD.

  3. Paraffin-gel tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound-guided needle biopsy phantom.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Sílvio L; Pavan, Theo Z; Junior, Jorge E; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2013-12-01

    Paraffin-gel waxes have been investigated as new soft tissue-mimicking materials for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy training. Breast phantoms were produced with a broad range of acoustical properties. The speed of sound for the phantoms ranged from 1425.4 ± 0.6 to 1480.3 ± 1.7 m/s at room temperature. The attenuation coefficients were easily controlled between 0.32 ± 0.27 dB/cm and 2.04 ± 0.65 dB/cm at 7.5 MHz, depending on the amount of carnauba wax added to the base material. The materials do not suffer dehydration and provide adequate needle penetration, with a Young's storage modulus varying between 14.7 ± 0.2 kPa and 34.9 ± 0.3 kPa. The phantom background material possesses long-term stability and can be employed in a supine position without changes in geometry. These results indicate that paraffin-gel waxes may be promising materials for training radiologists in ultrasound biopsy procedures.

  4. Imaging monitored loosening of dense fibrous tissues using high-intensity pulsed ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Lun; Li, Pai-Chi; Shih, Wen-Pin; Huang, Pei-Shin; Kuo, Po-Ling

    2013-10-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is proposed as a new alternative treatment for contracture of dense fibrous tissue. It is hypothesized that the pulsed-HIFU can release the contracted tissues by attenuating tensile stiffness along the fiber axis, and that the stiffness reduction can be quantitatively monitored by change of B-mode images. Fresh porcine tendons and ligaments were adapted to an ex vivo model and insonated with pulsed-HIFU for durations ranging from 5 to 30 min. The pulse length was 91 µs with a repetition frequency of 500 Hz, and the peak rarefactional pressure was 6.36 MPa. The corresponding average intensities were kept around 1606 W cm-2 for ISPPA and 72.3 W cm-2 for ISPTA. B-mode images of the tissues were acquired before and after pulsed-HIFU exposure, and the changes in speckle intensity and organization were analyzed. The tensile stiffness of the HIFU-exposed tissues along the longitudinal axis was examined using a stretching machine. Histology examinations were performed by optical and transmission electron microscopy. Pulsed-HIFU exposure significantly decreased the tensile stiffness of the ligaments and tendons. The intensity and organization of tissue speckles in the exposed region were also decreased. The speckle changes correlated well with the degree of stiffness alteration. Histology examinations revealed that pulsed-HIFU exposure probably damages tissues via a cavitation-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that pulsed-HIFU with a low duty factor is a promising tool for developing new treatment strategies for orthopedic disorders.

  5. Hybrid optoacoustic and ultrasound biomicroscopy monitors’ laser-induced tissue modifications and magnetite nanoparticle impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Héctor; Sobol, Emil; Baum, Olga; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Tissue modification under laser radiation is emerging as one of the advanced applications of lasers in medicine, with treatments ranging from reshaping and regeneration of cartilage to normalization of the intraocular pressure. Laser-induced structural alterations can be studied using conventional microscopic techniques applied to thin specimen. Yet, development of non-invasive imaging methods for deep tissue monitoring of structural alterations under laser radiation is of great importance, especially for attaining efficient feedback during the procedures. We developed a fast scanning biomicroscopy system that can simultaneously deliver both optoacoustic and pulse-echo ultrasound contrast from intact tissues and show that both modalities allow manifesting the laser-induced changes in cartilage and sclera. Furthermore, images of the sclera samples reveal a crater developing around the center of the laser-irradiated spot as well as a certain degree of thickening within the treated zone, presumably due to pore formation. Finally, we were able to observe selective impregnation of magnetite nanoparticles into the cartilage, thus demonstrating a possible contrast enhancement approach for studying specific treatment effects. Overall, the new imaging approach holds promise for development of noninvasive feedback control systems that could guarantee efficacy and safety of laser-based medical procedures.

  6. Microultrasound characterisation of ex vivo porcine tissue for ultrasound capsule endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, H. S.; Cox, B. F.; Sunoqrot, M.; Démoré, C. E. M.; Näthke, I.; Gomez, T.; Cochran, S.

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disease development and progression is often characterised by cellular and tissue architectural changes within the mucosa and sub-mucosa layers. Current clinical capsule endoscopy and other approaches are heavily reliant on optical techniques which cannot detect disease progression below the surface layer of the tissue. To enhance the ability of clinicians to detect cellular changes earlier and more confidently, both quantitative and qualitative microultrasound (μUS) techniques are investigated in healthy ex vivo porcine GI tissue. This work is based on the use of single-element, focussed μUS transducers made with micromoulded piezocomposite operating at around 48 MHz. To explore the possibility that μUS can detect Crohn’s disease and other inflammatory bowel diseases, ex vivo porcine small bowel tissue samples were cannulised and perfused with phosphate-buffered saline followed by various dilutions of polystyrene microspheres. Comparison with fluorescent imaging showed that the microspheres had infiltrated the microvasculature of the samples and that μUS was able to successfully detect this as a mimic of inflammation. Samples without microspheres were analysed using quantitative ultrasound to assess mechanical properties. Attenuation coefficients of 1.78 ± 0.66 dB/mm and 1.92 ± 0.77 dB/mm were obtained from reference samples which were surgically separated from the muscle layer. Six intact samples were segmented using a software algorithm and the acoustic impedance, Z, for varying tissue thicknesses, and backscattering coefficient, BSC, were calculated using the reference attenuation values and tabulated.

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007646.htm Endoscopic ultrasound To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is ...

  8. Ultra-sound imaging for precision implantation of a multi sensor temperature probe in skeletal muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Glen P; Reardon, Frank D; Ducharme, Michel B; Reardon, Mark L; Zaleski, Wytek

    2002-10-01

    A technique for implanting multi sensor temperature probes in muscle tissue was developed to optimize the accuracy of the tissue temperature measurements and the internal localization of the probe. Real time ultra-sound imaging was used to (a) determine the best perpendicular insertion tract, (b) guide the insertion of the probe in order to avoid major blood vessels, and (c) verify the insertion point relative to discernable anatomic reference structures such as arteries and bone.

  9. Diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis in ultrasound using tissue characterization and pixel classification.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U R; Vinitha Sree, S; Mookiah, M R K; Yantri, R; Molinari, F; Zieleźnik, W; Małyszek-Tumidajewicz, J; Stępień, B; Bardales, R H; Witkowska, A; Suri, J S

    2013-07-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is the most common type of inflammation of the thyroid gland, and accurate diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis would be helpful to better manage the disease process and predict thyroid failure. Most of the published computer-based techniques that use ultrasound thyroid images for Hashimoto's thyroiditis diagnosis are limited by lack of procedure standardization because individual investigators use various initial ultrasound settings. This article presents a computer-aided diagnostic technique that uses grayscale features and classifiers to provide a more objective and reproducible classification of normal and Hashimoto's thyroiditis-affected cases. In this paradigm, we extracted grayscale features based on entropy, Gabor wavelet, moments, image texture, and higher order spectra from the 100 normal and 100 Hashimoto's thyroiditis-affected ultrasound thyroid images. Significant features were selected using t-test. The resulting feature vectors were used to build the following three classifiers using tenfold stratified cross validation technique: support vector machine, k-nearest neighbor, and radial basis probabilistic neural network. Our results show that a combination of 12 features coupled with support vector machine classifier with the polynomial kernel of order 1 and linear kernel gives the highest accuracy of 80%, sensitivity of 76%, specificity of 84%, and positive predictive value of 83.3% for the detection of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The proposed computer-aided diagnostic system uses novel features that have not yet been explored for Hashimoto's thyroiditis diagnosis. Even though the accuracy is only 80%, the presented preliminary results are encouraging to warrant analysis of more such powerful features on larger databases.

  10. Non-invasive assessment of negative pressure wound therapy using high frequency diagnostic ultrasound: oedema reduction and new tissue accumulation.

    PubMed

    Young, Stephen R; Hampton, Sylvie; Martin, Robin

    2013-08-01

    Tissue oedema plays an important role in the pathology of chronic and traumatic wounds. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is thought to contribute to active oedema reduction, yet few studies have showed this effect. In this study, high frequency diagnostic ultrasound at 20 MHz with an axial resolution of 60 µm was used to assess the effect of NPWT at - 80 mmHg on pressure ulcers and the surrounding tissue. Wounds were monitored in four patients over a 3-month period during which changes in oedema and wound bed thickness (granulation tissue) were measured non-invasively. The results showed a rapid reduction of periwound tissue oedema in all patients with levels falling by a mean of 43% after 4 days of therapy. A 20% increase in the thickness of the wound bed was observed after 7 days due to new granulation tissue formation. Ultrasound scans through the in situ gauze NPWT filler also revealed the existence of macrodeformation in the tissue produced by the negative pressure. These preliminary studies suggest that non-invasive assessment using high frequency diagnostic ultrasound could be a valuable tool in clinical studies of NPWT.

  11. Determining temperature distribution in tissue in the focal plane of the high (>100 W/cm(2)) intensity focused ultrasound beam using phase shift of ultrasound echoes.

    PubMed

    Karwat, Piotr; Kujawska, Tamara; Lewin, Peter A; Secomski, Wojciech; Gambin, Barbara; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    In therapeutic applications of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) the guidance of the HIFU beam and especially its focal plane is of crucial importance. This guidance is needed to appropriately target the focal plane and hence the whole focal volume inside the tumor tissue prior to thermo-ablative treatment and beginning of tissue necrosis. This is currently done using Magnetic Resonance Imaging that is relatively expensive. In this study an ultrasound method, which calculates the variations of speed of sound in the locally heated tissue volume by analyzing the phase shifts of echo-signals received by an ultrasound scanner from this very volume is presented. To improve spatial resolution of B-mode imaging and minimize the uncertainty of temperature estimation the acoustic signals were transmitted and received by 8 MHz linear phased array employing Synthetic Transmit Aperture (STA) technique. Initially, the validity of the algorithm developed was verified experimentally in a tissue-mimicking phantom heated from 20.6 to 48.6 °C. Subsequently, the method was tested using a pork loin sample heated locally by a 2 MHz pulsed HIFU beam with focal intensity ISATA of 129 W/cm(2). The temperature calibration of 2D maps of changes in the sound velocity induced by heating was performed by comparison of the algorithm-determined changes in the sound velocity with the temperatures measured by thermocouples located in the heated tissue volume. The method developed enabled ultrasound temperature imaging of the heated tissue volume from the very inception of heating with the contrast-to-noise ratio of 3.5-12 dB in the temperature range 21-56 °C. Concurrently performed, conventional B-mode imaging revealed CNR close to zero dB until the temperature reached 50 °C causing necrosis. The data presented suggest that the proposed method could offer an alternative to MRI-guided temperature imaging for prediction of the location and extent of the thermal lesion prior to applying the

  12. Achondrogenesis type 2 diagnosed by transvaginal ultrasound at 12 weeks' gestation.

    PubMed

    Soothill, P W; Vuthiwong, C; Rees, H

    1993-06-01

    Ultrasound examination at 12 weeks' gestation revealed severe generalised subcutaneous oedema in a pregnancy at risk for achondrogenesis type II. Transvaginal scanning confirmed the oedema and suggested abnormal limb development. The prenatal diagnosis was confirmed by X-ray examination after transvaginal termination.

  13. Prostate tissue ablation with MRI guided transurethral therapeutic ultrasound and intraoperative assessment of the integrity of the neurovascular bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammet, Steffen; Partanen, Ari; Yousuf, Ambereen; Wardrip, Craig; Niekrasz, Marek; Antic, Tatjana; Razmaria, Aria; Sokka, Sham; Karczmar, Gregory; Oto, Aytekin

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of the precision of prostate tissue ablation with MRI guided therapeuticultrasound by intraoperative objective assessment of the neurovascular bundle in canines in-vivo. METHODS: In this ongoing IACUC approved study, eight male canines were scanned in a clinical 3T Achieva MRI scanner (Philips) before, during, and after ultrasound therapy with a prototype MR-guided ultrasound therapy system (Philips). The system includes a therapy console to plan treatment, to calculate real-time temperature maps, and to control ultrasound exposures with temperature feedback. Atransurethral ultrasound applicator with eight transducer elements was used to ablate canine prostate tissue in-vivo. Ablated prostate tissue volumes were compared to the prescribed target volumes to evaluate technical effectiveness. The ablated volumes determined by MRI (T1, T2, diffusion, dynamic contrast enhanced and 240 CEM43 thermal dose maps) were compared to H&E stained histological slides afterprostatectomy. Potential nerve damage of the neurovascular bundle was objectively assessed intraoperativelyduring prostatectomy with a CaverMap Surgical Aid nerve stimulator (Blue Torch Medical Technologies). RESULTS: Transurethral MRI -guided ultrasound therapy can effectively ablate canine prostate tissue invivo. Coronal MR-imaging confirmed the correct placement of the HIFU transducer. MRI temperature maps were acquired during HIFU treatment, and subsequently used for calculating thermal dose. Prescribed target volumes corresponded to the 240 CEM43 thermal dose maps during HIFU treatment in all canines. Ablated volumes on high resolution anatomical, diffusion weighted, and contrast enhanced MR images matched corresponding histological slides after prostatectomy. MRI guidance with realtime temperature monitoring showed no damage to surrounding tissues, especially to the neurovascular bundle (assessed intra-operatively with a nerve stimulator) or to the rectum wall. CONCLUSIONS: Our study

  14. Noninvasive temperature estimation in tissue via ultrasound echo-shifts. Part II. In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Maass-Moreno, R; Damianou, C A; Sanghvi, N T

    1996-10-01

    Time shifts in echo signals returning from a heated volume of tissue correlate well with the temperature changes. In this study the relationship between these time shifts (or delays) and the tissue temperature was investigated in excised muscle tissue (turkey breast) as a possible dosimetric method. Heat was induced by the repeated activation of a sharply focused high-intensity ultrasound beam. Pulse echoes were sent and received with a confocal diagnostic transducer during the brief periods when the high-intensity ultrasonic beam was inactive. The change in transit time between echoes collected at different temperatures was estimated using cross-correlation techniques. With spatial-peak temporal-peak intensities (ISPTP) of less than 950W/cm2, the delay versus temperature relationship was fit to a linear equation with highly reproducible coefficients. The results confirmed that for spatial-peak temperature increases of approximately 10 degrees C, temperature-dependent changes in velocity were the single most important factor determining the observed delay, and a linear approximation could produce accurate temperature estimations. Nonlinear phenomena that occurred during the high-intensity irradiation had no significant effect on the measured delay. At ISPTP of 1115-2698 W/cm2, the delay-temperature relationship showed a similar monotonically decreasing pattern, but as the temperature peaked its slope gradually increased. This may reflect the curvilinear nature of the velocity-temperature relationship, but it may also be related to irreversible tissue modifications and to the use of the spatial-peak temperature to experimentally characterize the temperature changes. Overall, the results were consistent with theoretical predictions and encourage further experimental work to validate other aspects of the technique.

  15. Detection of tissue harmonic motion induced by ultrasonic radiation force using pulse-echo ultrasound and Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Chen, Shigao; Tan, Wei; Kinnick, Randall; Greenleaf, James F

    2007-02-01

    A method using pulse echo ultrasound and the Kalman filter is developed for detecting submicron harmonic motion induced by ultrasonic radiation force. The method estimates the amplitude and phase of the motion at desired locations within a tissue region with high sensitivity. The harmonic motion generated by the ultrasound radiation force is expressed as extremely small oscillatory Doppler frequency shifts in the fast time (A-line) of ultrasound echoes, which are difficult to estimate. In slow time (repetitive ultrasound echoes) of the echoes, the motion also is presented as oscillatory phase shifts, from which the amplitude and phase of the harmonic motion can be estimated with the least mean squared error by Kalman filter. This technique can be used to estimate the traveling speed of a harmonic shear wave by tracking its phase changes during propagation. The shear wave propagation speed can be used to solve for the elasticity and viscosity of tissue as reported in our earlier study. Validation and in vitro experiments indicate that the method provides excellent estimations for very small (submicron) harmonic vibrations and has potential for noninvasive and quantitative stiffness measurements of tissues such as artery.

  16. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Tissue Inflammation Using an Animal Model of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Warram, Jason M.; Wang, Dezhi; Ratnayaka, Sithira; Traylor, Amie; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of molecular ultrasound (US) imaging for monitoring the early inflammatory effects following acute kidney injury. Procedures A population of rats underwent 30 min of renal ischemia (acute kidney injury, N=6) or sham injury (N=4) using established surgical methods. Animals were divided and molecular US imaging was performed during the bolus injection of a targeted microbubble (MB) contrast agent to either P-selectin or vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). Imaging was performed before surgery and 4 and 24 h thereafter. After manual segmentation of renal tissue space, the molecular US signal was calculated as the difference between time-intensity curve data before MB injection and after reaching steady-state US image enhancement. All animals were terminated after the 24 h imaging time point and kidneys excised for immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. Results Renal inflammation was analyzed using molecular US imaging. While results using the P-selectin and VCAM-1 targeted MBs were comparable, it appears that the former was more sensitive to biomarker expression. All molecular US imaging measures had a positive correlation with IHC findings. Conclusions Acute kidney injury is a serious disease in need of improved noninvasive methods to help diagnose the extent of injury and monitor the tissue throughout disease progression. Molecular US imaging appears well suited to address this challenge and more research is warranted. PMID:25905474

  17. High-frequency ultrasound M-mode monitoring of HIFU ablation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumon, R. E.; Gudur, M. S. R.; Zhou, Y.; Deng, C. X.

    2012-10-01

    Effective real-time HIFU lesion detection is important for expanded use of HIFU in interventional electrophysiology (e.g., epicardial ablation of cardiac arrhythmia). The goal of this study was to investigate rapid, high-frequency M-mode ultrasound imaging for monitoring spatiotemporal changes in tissue during HIFU application. The HIFU application (4.33 MHz, 1000 Hz PRF, 50% duty cycle, 1 s exposure, 6100 W/cm2) was perpendicularly applied to porcine cardiac tissue with a high-frequency imaging system (Visualsonics Vevo 770, 55 MHz, 4.5 mm focal distance) confocally aligned. Radiofrequency (RF) M-mode data (1 kHz PRF, 4 s × 7 mm) was acquired before, during, and after HIFU treatment. Gross lesions were compared with M-mode data to correlate lesion and cavity formation. Integrated backscatter, echo-decorrelation parameters, and their cumulative extrema over time were analyzed for automatically identifying lesion width and bubble formation. Cumulative maximum integrated backscatter showed the best results for identifying the final lesion width, and a criterion based on line-to-line decorrelation was proposed for identification of transient bubble activity.

  18. Real-time 2D Imaging of Thermal and Mechanical Tissue Response to Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2010-03-01

    An integrated system capable of performing high frame-rate two-dimensional (2D) temperature imaging in realtime is has been developed. The system consists of a SonixRP ultrasound scanner and a custom built data processing unit connected with Gigabit Ethernet (GbE). The SonixRP scanner which serves as the frontend of the integrated system allows us to have flexibilities of controlling the beam sequence and accessing the radio frequency (RF) data in realtime through its research interface. The RF data is then streamlined to the backend of the system through GbE, where the data is processed using a 2D temperature estimation algorithm running in a general purpose graphics processing unit (GPU). Using this system, we have developed a 2D high frame-rate imaging mode, M2D, for imaging the mechanical and thermal tissue response to subtherapeutic HIFU beams. In this paper, we present results from imaging subtherapetic HIFU beams in vitro porcine heart before and after lesion formation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of tissue parameter changes due to HIFU-induced lesions.

  19. Trans-urethral ultrasound (TUUS) imaging for visualization and analysis of the prostate and associated tissues.

    PubMed

    Holmes, D R; Robb, R

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of prostate disease is high. However, accurate assessment of pathological conditions is still difficult. Although CT, MRI, and TRUS imaging methods provide useful information, each has specific drawbacks. Our work examines the potential and utility of 3D trans-urethral ultrasound (TUUS) for improved imaging of the prostate. Four normal canines were examined with TUUS. The catheter was placed in the urethra and used to image the prostate, rectum, bladder, ureter, neuro-vascular bundles, arteries, and surrounding tissue. 2D and 3D datasets were acquired and digitized. The 2D data provides useful visualization of the tissue. The clinician was also able to watch urine enter the bladder and perform a digital rectal exam in real-time. 3D data visualization required torodial reconstruction. The algorithm was optimized to provide very fast 3D reconstructions of the prostate. Segmentation of the data proved challenging, but 3D visualization, including volume rendered data and surface rendered data, were well accepted by clinicians. Clinicians and researchers determined a number of potential applications of these new techniques, including: prostate cancer diagnosis and staging, assessment of Benign Nodular Enlargement, assessment of physiologic function of the bladder, evaluation of morphologic properties of the prostate, and image guided biopsy and therapy.

  20. Feasibility of coded vibration in a vibro-ultrasound system for tissue elasticity measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinxin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua; Li, Tianjie; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2016-07-01

    The ability of various methods for elasticity measurement and imaging is hampered by the vibration amplitude on biological tissues. Based on the inference that coded excitation will improve the performance of the cross-correlation function of the tissue displacement waves, the idea of exerting encoded external vibration on tested samples for measuring its elasticity is proposed. It was implemented by integrating a programmable vibration generation function into a customized vibro-ultrasound system to generate Barker coded vibration for elasticity measurement. Experiments were conducted on silicone phantoms and porcine muscles. The results showed that coded excitation of the vibration enhanced the accuracy and robustness of the elasticity measurement especially in low signal-to-noise ratio scenarios. In the phantom study, the measured shear modulus values with coded vibration had an R(2 )= 0.993 linear correlation to that of referenced indentation, while for single-cycle pulse the R(2) decreased to 0.987. In porcine muscle study, the coded vibration also obtained a shear modulus value which is more accurate than the single-cycle pulse by 0.16 kPa and 0.33 kPa at two different depths. These results demonstrated the feasibility and potentiality of the coded vibration for enhancing the quality of elasticity measurement and imaging.

  1. Spectroscopic measurement of adipose tissue thickness and comparison with ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraskin, Dmitri; Boeth, Heide; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2007-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is widely applied for applications monitoring skeletal muscle oxygenation. However, this method is obstructed by the subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness (ATT) which might vary between < 1 mm to more than 12 mm. Though diffuse optical imaging can be applied to measure ATT, the objective here is to get this measure from spectroscopic data of a single source-detector distance. For the measurement of the optical lipid signal we used a broad band spatially resolved system (SRS), which is based on measurements of the wavelength dependence of the attenuation A for source detector distances ρ between 29 mm and 39 mm. Ultrasound images served as an anatomical reference of the lipid layer. The measurements were taken on 5 different muscle groups of 20 healthy volunteers, each for left and right limbs, e.g. vastus medialis, vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius muscle on the leg and ventral forearm muscles and biceps brachii muscle on the arm. Different analysis strategies were tested for the best calculation of ATT. There is a good non-linear correlation between optical lipid signal and ultrasound data, with an overall error in ATT prediction of about 0.5 mm. This finding is supported experimentally by additional MRI measurements as well as a multi-layer Monte Carlo (MC) model. Based on this data of the ATT thickness, a newly developed algorithm which exploits the wavelength dependence of the slope in attenuation with respect to source-detector distance and MC simulation for these parameters as a function of absorption and scattering coefficients delivers a considerably better fit of reflectance spectra when fitting haemoglobin concentrations. Implications for the monitoring of muscle oxygen saturation are discussed.

  2. Synchronous heating of two local regions of a biological tissue phantom using automated targeting of phase conjugate ultrasound beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutyansky, L. M.; Brysev, A. P.; Klopotov, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous heating of two local regions of an absorbing medium by phase conjugate ultrasound beams focused on them has been experimentally demonstrated. A polymeric biological tissue phantom with two small air cavities scattering sound has been used as the medium irradiated by a 5-MHz "probe" ultrasound beam. The scattered field is incident on a parametric device for ultrasonic wave phase conjugation. The conjugate and amplified field is self-adaptive focused on scatterers and heats the medium owing to the absorption of the ultrasonic energy. In this case, these regions are heated by about 5°C in 70 s. Only an insignificant increase in the temperature owing to the heat conduction effect is observed in the remaining volume of the phantom. The implemented effect can be used in medical applications of phase conjugate ultrasound beams.

  3. Breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ueno, E

    1996-03-01

    In ultrasound, ultrasonic images are formed by means of echoes among tissues with different acoustic impedance. Acoustic impedance is the product of sound speed and bulk modulus. The bulk modulus expresses the elasticity of an object, and in the human body, the value is increased by conditions such as fibrosis and calcification. The sound speed is usually high in elastic tissues and low in water. In the body, it is lowest in the fatty tissue. Ultrasound echoes are strong on the surface of bones which are hard and have a high sound speed. In organs filled with air such as the lungs, the bulk modulus is low and the sound speed is extremely low at 340 m/s, which produce strong echoes (the sound speed in solid tissues is 1,530 m/s). Human tissue is constructed of units smaller than the ultrasonic beam, and it is necessary to understand back-scattering in order to understand the ultrasonic images of these tissues. When ultrasound passes through tissue, it is absorbed as thermal energy and attenuated. Fiber is a tissue with a high absorption and attenuation rate. When the rate increases, the posterior echoes are attenuated. However, in masses with a high water content such as cysts, the posterior echoes are accentuated. This phenomenon is an important, basic finding for determining the properties of tumors. Breast cancer can be classified into two types: stellate carcinoma and circumscribed carcinoma. Since stellate carcinoma is rich in fiber, the posterior echoes are attenuated or lacking. However, circumscribed carcinoma has a high cellularity and the posterior echoes are accentuated. The same tendency is also seen in benign tumors. In immature fibroadenomas, posterior echoes are accentuated, while in fibroadenomas with hyalinosis, the posterior echoes are attenuated. Therefore, if the fundamentals of this tissue characterization and the histological features are understood, reading of ultrasound becomes easy. Color Doppler has also been developed and has contributed

  4. Ultrasound -Assisted Gene Transfer to Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem/Progenitor Cells (ASCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Ueno, Hitomi; Hokari, Rei; Yuan, Wenji; Kuno, Shuichi; Kakimoto, Takashi; Enosawa, Shin; Negishi, Yoichi; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Chiba, Toshio; Hayashi, Shuji

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, multilineage adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) have become increasingly attractive as a promising source for cell transplantation and regenerative medicine. Particular interest has been expressed in the potential to make tissue stem cells, such as ASCs and marrow stromal cells (MSCs), differentiate by gene transfection. Gene transfection using highly efficient viral vectors such as adeno- and sendai viruses have been developed for this purpose. Sonoporation, or ultrasound (US)-assisted gene transfer, is an alternative gene manipulation technique which employs the creation of a jet stream by ultrasonic microbubble cavitation. Sonoporation using non-viral vectors is expected to be a much safer, although less efficient, tool for prospective clinical gene therapy. In this report, we assessed the efficacy of the sonoporation technique for gene transfer to ASCs. We isolated and cultured adipocyets from mouse adipose tissue. ASCs that have the potential to differentiate with transformation into adipocytes or osteoblasts were obtained. Using the US-assisted system, plasmid DNA containing beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes were transferred to the ASCs. For this purpose, a Sonopore 4000 (NEPAGENE Co.) and a Sonazoid (Daiichi Sankyo Co.) instrument were used in combination. ASCs were subjected to US (3.1 MHz, 50% duty cycle, burst rate 2.0 Hz, intensity 1.2 W/cm2, exposure time 30 sec). We observed that the gene was more efficiently transferred with increased concentrations of plasmid DNA (5-150 μg/mL). However, further optimization of the US parameters is required, as the gene transfer efficiency was still relatively low. In conclusion, we herein demonstrate that a gene can be transferred to ASCs using our US-assisted system. In regenerative medicine, this system might resolve the current issues surrounding the use of viral vectors for gene transfer.

  5. Heating of tissues in vivo by pulsed focused ultrasound to stimulate enhanced HSP expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wójcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2011-09-01

    The main aim of this work was numerical modeling of temperature fields induced in soft tissues in vivo by pulsed focused ultrasound during neurodegenerative disease treatment and experimental verification of the proposed model for a rat liver. The new therapeutic approach to neurodegenerative diseases consists of stimulation of enhanced expression of the Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) which are responsible for immunity of cells to stress. During therapy the temperature rise in tissues in vivo should not exceed 6 °C above level of the thermal norm (37 °C). First, the 3D acoustic pressure field, and the rate of heat production per unit volume due to that field, were calculated using our 3D numerical solver capable of predicting nonlinear propagation of pulsed high intensity waves generated from circular focused acoustic sources in multilayer configuration of attenuating media. The two-layer configuration of media (water—rat liver) assumed in calculations fairly well approximated both the real anatomic dimensions of rat liver and the geometric scheme of our experimental set-up. A numerical solution of the Pennes bio-heat transfer equation which accounted for the effects of heat diffusion, blood perfusion and metabolism rates, was employed to calculate the temperature fields induced in the rat liver by the ultrasonic beam. The numerical simulation results were verified experimentally using a thermocouple inserted in the liver of a rat under anesthesia at the beam focus. The quantitative analysis of the obtained results enabled estimation of the effects of several acoustic and thermal parameters of the rat liver in vivo on the temperature rise, as well as determination of exposure time for ultrasonic beams with varied acoustic power generated by a 2-MHz circular transducer of 15-mm diameter and 25-mm focal length, in order to avoid the tissue overheating that leads to cells necrosis, which would be unacceptable in neurodegenerative disease treatment.

  6. 3-D visualization and non-linear tissue classification of breast tumors using ultrasound elastography in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Ahmed; Layne, Ginger; Abraham, Jame; Mukdadi, Osama M

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the study described here was to introduce new methods for the classification and visualization of human breast tumors using 3-D ultrasound elastography. A tumor's type, shape and size are key features that can help the physician to decide the sort and extent of necessary treatment. In this work, tumor type, being either benign or malignant, was classified non-invasively for nine volunteer patients. The classification was based on estimating four parameters that reflect the tumor's non-linear biomechanical behavior, under multi-compression levels. Tumor prognosis using non-linear elastography was confirmed with biopsy as a gold standard. Three tissue classification parameters were found to be statistically significant with a p-value < 0.05, whereas the fourth non-linear parameter was highly significant, having a p-value < 0.001. Furthermore, each breast tumor's shape and size were estimated in vivo using 3-D elastography, and were enhanced using interactive segmentation. Segmentation with level sets was used to isolate the stiff tumor from the surrounding soft tissue. Segmentation also provided a reliable means to estimate tumors volumes. Four volumetric strains were investigated: the traditional normal axial strain, the first principal strain, von Mises strain and maximum shear strain. It was noted that these strains can provide varying degrees of boundary enhancement to the stiff tumor in the constructed elastograms. The enhanced boundary improved the performance of the segmentation process. In summary, the proposed methods can be employed as a 3-D non-invasive tool for characterization of breast tumors, and may provide early prognosis with minimal pain, as well as diminish the risk of late-stage breast cancer.

  7. Nonlinear ultrasound propagation through layered liquid and tissue-equivalent media: computational and experimental results at high frequency.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ross; Cherin, Emmanuel; Lam, Toby Y J; Tavakkoli, Jahangir; Zemp, Roger J; Foster, F Stuart

    2006-11-21

    Nonlinear propagation has been demonstrated to have a significant impact on ultrasound imaging. An efficient computational algorithm is presented to simulate nonlinear ultrasound propagation through layered liquid and tissue-equivalent media. Results are compared with hydrophone measurements. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of nonlinear propagation in high frequency ultrasound micro-imaging. The acoustic field of a focused transducer (20 MHz centre frequency, f-number 2.5) was simulated for layered media consisting of water and tissue-mimicking phantom, for several wide-bandwidth source pulses. The simulation model accounted for the effects of diffraction, attenuation and nonlinearity, with transmission and refraction at layer boundaries. The parameter of nonlinearity, B/A, of the water and tissue-mimicking phantom were assumed to be 5.2 and 7.4, respectively. The experimentally measured phantom B/A value found using a finite-amplitude insert-substitution method was shown to be 7.4 +/- 0.6. Relative amounts of measured second and third harmonic pressures as a function of the fundamental pressures at the focus were in good agreement with simulations. Agreement within 3% was found between measurements and simulations of the beam widths of the fundamental and second harmonic signals following propagation through the tissue phantom. The results demonstrate significant nonlinear propagation effects for high frequency imaging beams.

  8. Ultrasound-mediated gene transfer (sonoporation) in fibrin-based matrices: potential for use in tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nomikou, Nikolitsa; Feichtinger, Georg A; Redl, Heinz; McHale, Anthony P

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that gene transfer into donor cells is an efficient and practical means of locally supplying requisite growth factors for applications in tissue regeneration. Here we describe, for the first time, an ultrasound-mediated system that can non-invasively facilitate gene transfer into cells entrapped within fibrin-based matrices. Since ultrasound-mediated gene transfer is enhanced using microbubbles, we compared the efficacy of neutral and cationic forms of these reagents on the ultrasound-stimulated gene transfer process in gel matrices. In doing so we demonstrated the beneficial effects associated with the use of cationic microbubble preparations that interact directly with cells and nucleic acid within matrices. In some cases, gene expression was increased two-fold in gel matrices when cationic microbubbles were compared with neutral microbubbles. In addition, incorporating collagen into fibrin gels yielded a 25-fold increase in gene expression after application of ultrasound to microbubble-containing matrices. We suggest that this novel system may facilitate non-invasive temporal and spatial control of gene transfer in gel-based matrices for the purposes of tissue regeneration.

  9. Microscopic observation of glass bead movement in soft tissue-mimicking phantom under ultrasound PW mode scanning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Funamoto, Kenichi; Tanabe, Masayuki; Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that stones and calcification in soft tissue show special enhancement in response to color flow (CF) or pulse Doppler (PW) mode ultrasound scan. This phenomenon is known as the "twinkling sign (TS)". The authors conducted an in vitro experiment to investigate the mechanism of TS occurrence by observing a glass bead in a transparent PVA-H soft tissue-mimicking phantom. The TS in PW mode showed a low-power and slow-velocity spectrum. At the same time, analysis of images by high-speed camera showed that the glass bead in the phantom oscillated following the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the PW mode ultrasound scan. The harmonic oscillations were confirmed, as well. The ultrasound radiation force-driven micro-oscillation possibly affects the ultrasound propagation around the scatterer and triggers random signals in the received echo signals. The results indicate that TS is a phenomenon based on complicated acoustic-mechanical interaction of multiple mechanisms. Further investigation is required for gaining a full understanding of the mechanism of TS occurrence and its clinical application.

  10. Power modulation contrast enhanced ultrasound for postoperative perfusion monitoring following free tissue transfer in head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Anand, R; Hickman, M; Senior, R; Walji, S; Ramchandani, P L; Culliford, D; Ilankovan, V; Greaves, K

    2010-12-01

    This feasibility study evaluated whether contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEU) was able to assess free flap perfusion following free tissue transfer in the head and neck region. Thirty-six patients underwent standard clinical monitoring (SCM) and CEU postoperatively. The time taken for each technique to detect flap failure was recorded. Qualitative CEU analysis by visual assessment predicted survival in 30/30 (100%) and failure in 5/6 (83%) flaps with sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values of 100, 86, 97 and 100%, respectively. Quantitative CEU measurement of blood volume (α) values within healthy perfused flaps was over 60 times higher than in failing flaps (8.25±2.82dB vs. 0.12±0.17dB, respectively, P<0.0001). If a cut-off α value of <1.5dB was used to predict future flap failure, the accuracy of the test was 100% (sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV). If a cut-off α value of >1.9dB indicated flap success, the PPV and NPV are 100%. Following surgery, SCM took 76 (±15) h to detect flap failure compared with 18 (±38) h with CEU (P<0.05). CEU is highly accurate in its ability to distinguish between perfused and failing flaps. The technique is quick (<10min) and capable of imaging all flap types.

  11. Classification algorithm of ovarian tissue based on co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Alqasemi, Umar; Zhu, Quing

    2014-03-01

    Human ovarian tissue features extracted from photoacoustic spectra data, beam envelopes and co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic images are used to characterize cancerous vs. normal processes using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The centers of suspicious tumor areas are estimated from the Gaussian fitting of the mean Radon transforms of the photoacoustic image along 0 and 90 degrees. Normalized power spectra are calculated using the Fourier transform of the photoacoustic beamformed data across these suspicious areas, where the spectral slope and 0-MHz intercepts are extracted. Image statistics, envelope histogram fitting and maximum output of 6 composite filters of cancerous or normal patterns along with other previously used features are calculated to compose a total of 17 features. These features are extracted from 169 datasets of 19 ex vivo ovaries. Half of the cancerous and normal datasets are randomly chosen to train a SVM classifier with polynomial kernel and the remainder is used for testing. With 50 times data resampling, the SVM classifier, for the training group, gives 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. For the testing group, it gives 89.68+/- 6.37% sensitivity and 93.16+/- 3.70% specificity. These results are superior to those obtained earlier by our group using features extracted from photoacoustic raw data or image statistics only.

  12. Experiences Using a Special Purpose Robot for Focal Ultrasound Based Tissue Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, S.; Li, J. R.; Mishral, R.; Lim, W. K.; Hacker, A.; Michel, M. S.; Alken, P.; Köhrmann, K. U.

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes implementation, empirical set-up and ex vivo trial results of a non-invasive robotic surgery system, called FUSBOT-BS, to treat tumours/cancers by the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The desired surgical effects of ultrasonic irradiation are decided by a pre-planned delivered dosage and the temporal aspects of wave propagation. The temperature rise in the target site depends upon the exposure conditions. A multiple transducer approach is adopted in this research. Surgical planning and deployment of the probes in a given location and specified trajectory is accomplished using robotic techniques. The test results for ablation were conducted in biological phantoms and in various animal tissues, in vitro, such as fat, muscle, and kidney from lamb, beef and pork. The representative results obtained in these empirical studies are presented, which help to understand dependence of crucial HIFU parameters to decide the treatment planning and surgical protocols. The robotic system achieved an end-point accuracy of ±0.5mm. It is possible to precisely position target lesions and ablate remote target sites of varying shapes and sizes with flexible protocols.

  13. Ultrasound pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; ...

  14. Transvaginal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uterine bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Menstrual bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Infertility - transvaginal ultrasound; Ovarian - transvaginal ultrasound; Abscess - transvaginal ultrasound

  15. Quantitative muscle ultrasound measures rapid declines over time in children with SMA type 1.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kay W; Connolly, Anne M; Zaidman, Craig M

    2015-11-15

    Muscles are small in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). It is not known if muscle size changes over time in SMA type 1. We quantified changes over time in muscle size and echointensity during two repeated ultrasound examinations of unilateral proximal (biceps brachii/brachialis and quadriceps) and distal (anterior forearm flexors and tibialis anterior) muscles in three children with SMA type 1. We compared muscle thickness (MT) to body weight-dependent normal reference values. Children were 1, 6, and 11months old at baseline and had 2, 2 and 4 months between ultrasound examinations, respectively. At baseline, MT was normal for weight in all muscles except an atrophic quadriceps in the oldest child. MT decreased and echointensity increased (worsened) over time. At follow up, MT was below normal for weight in the quadriceps in all three children, in the biceps/brachioradialis in two, and in the anterior forearm in one. Tibialis anterior MT remained normal for weight in all three children. Muscle echointensity increased over time in all muscles and, on average, more than doubled in two children. In children with SMA type 1, muscle atrophies and becomes hyperechoic over time. Quantitative muscle ultrasound measures disease progression in SMA type 1 that warrants additional study in more children.

  16. Ultrasound dynamic micro-elastography applied to the viscoelastic characterization of soft tissues and arterial walls.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Cédric; Hadj Henni, Anis; Cloutier, Guy

    2010-09-01

    Quantitative noninvasive methods that provide in vivo assessment of mechanical characterization of living tissues, organs and artery walls are of interest because information on their viscoelastic properties in the presence of disease can affect diagnosis and treatment options. This article proposes the dynamic micro-elastography (DME) method to characterize viscoelasticity of small homogeneous soft tissues, as well as the adaptation of the method for vascular applications [vascular dynamic micro-elastography (VDME)]. The technique is based on the generation of relatively high-frequency (240-1100 Hz) monochromatic or transient plane shear waves within the medium and the tracking of these waves from radio-frequency (RF) echoes acquired at 25 MHz with an ultrasound biomicroscope (Vevo 770, Visualsonics). By employing a dedicated shear wave gated strategy during signal acquisition, postprocessed RF sequences could achieve a very high frame rate (16,000 images per s). The proposed technique successfully reconstructed shear wave displacement maps at very high axial (60 mum) and lateral (250 mum) spatial resolutions for motions as low as a few mum. An inverse problem formulated as a least-square minimization, involving analytical simulations (for homogenous and vascular geometries) and experimental measurements were performed to retrieve storage (G') and loss (G'') moduli as a function of the shearing frequency. Viscoelasticity measurements of agar-gelatin materials and of a small rat liver were proven feasible. Results on a very thin wall (3 mm thickness) mimicking artery enabled to validate the feasibility and the reliability of the vascular inverse problem formulation. Subsequently, the G' and G'' of a porcine aorta showed that both parameters are strongly dependent on frequency, suggesting that the vascular wall is mechanically governed by complex viscoelastic laws.

  17. Investigation of foreign objects in soft-tissue using a PE-CMOS ultrasound system: a preliminary comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chu-Chuan; Lo, Shih-Chung Ben; Freedman, Matthew T.; Lasser, Marvin E.; Lasser, Bob; Kula, John; Wang, Yue Joseph; Hsieh, Tsung-I.; Sarcone, Anita

    2006-03-01

    In this study, we have tested the ability of four imaging modalities to investigate foreign objects in soft tissue. We inserted wood, plastic, glass, and aluminum objects into a pork sample to simulate traumatized soft tissue. Each object was inserted into the skin, then passed through the fat tissue layer and penetrated into the muscle layer. We then took images of the pork sample using four different modalities: (1) a C-Scan imaging prototype which consists of an unfocused transducer, a compound acoustic lens, and a 2D ultrasound sensor array based on the piezoelectric sensing complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (PE-CMOS) technology; (2) a portable B-Scan ultrasound system; (3) a conventional X-ray system; (4) and a computed radiography (CR) X-ray system. We found that the aluminum and glass objects were clearly visible in both conventional X-ray and CR X-ray images with good contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR); however, the wood and plastic objects could not be clearly seen using these modalities. However, we found that the wood, plastic, and glass objects, as well as the thicker aluminum object, were clearly visible in the C-Scan ultrasound images. Furthermore, the fold fibro structures of the fat and muscle tissues in the pork were observable using this modality. The C-Scan prototype images produce neither speckle nor geometry distortion. Both of these issues are commonly seen in B-Scan ultrasound. The results of this study also indicate that the C-Scan images have better CNRs for most foreign objects when compared to other imaging modalities.

  18. Ex vivo viscoelastic characterization of head and neck tissue abnormalities using ultrasound-stimulated vibro-acoustography (USVA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccabi, Ashkan; Garritano, James; Arshi, Armin; Saddik, George; Tajudeen, Bobby A.; St. John, Maie; Grundfest, Warren S.; Taylor, Zachary D.

    2014-03-01

    In the absence of an imaging technique that offers a highly dynamic range detection of malignant tissue intra-operatively, surgeons are often forced to excise excess healthy tissue to ensure clear margins of resection. Techniques that are currently used in the detection of tumor regions include palpation, optical coherence tomography (OCT) elastography, dye injections, and conventional ultrasound to pinpoint the affected area. However, these methods suffer from limitations such as minimal specificity, low contrast, and limited depth of penetration. Lack of specificity and low contrast result in the production of vague disease margins and fail to provide a reliable guidance tool for surgeons. The proposed work presents an alternative diagnostic technique, ultrasound-stimulated vibro-acoustography (USVA), which may potentially provide surgeons with detailed intra-operative imagery characterized by enhanced structural boundaries and well-defined borders based on the viscoelastic properties of tissues. We demonstrate selective imaging using ex vivo tissue samples of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with the presence of both malignant and normal areas. Spatially resolved maps of varying acoustic properties were generated and show good contrast between the areas of interest. While the results are promising, determining the precision and sensitivity of the USVA imaging system in identifying boundary regions as well as intensities of ex vivo tissue targets may provide additional information to non-invasively assess confined regions of diseased tissues from healthy areas.

  19. Theoretical study in applications of doublet mechanics to detect tissue pathological changes in elastic properties using high frequency ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layman, Christopher; Wu, Junru

    2004-08-01

    The mathematical framework of a new elastic theory-doublet mechanics (DM)-was reviewed. The fundamental difference between DM and classical continuum mechanics (CCM) is that the former has taken the discrete nature of tissue on the cellular level into account and the latter assumes tissue is uniform and continuous. Theoretical calculations based on DM were performed for reflection coefficients of a substrate-tissue layer-substrate assembly. Results of computer simulations have shown that ultrasound reflection coefficients in the range of 15-30 MHz are sensitive to changes in cell size and elastic moduli of tissue according to DM but not to CCM. Potential experimental applications of this technique to tissue characterization are discussed.

  20. Comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE): a novel method for two-dimensional shear elasticity imaging of soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Manduca, Armando; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F; Chen, Shigao

    2012-09-01

    Fast and accurate tissue elasticity imaging is essential in studying dynamic tissue mechanical properties. Various ultrasound shear elasticity imaging techniques have been developed in the last two decades. However, to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2-D shear elasticity map, multiple data acquisitions are typically required. In this paper, a novel shear elasticity imaging technique, comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE), is introduced in which only one rapid data acquisition (less than 35 ms) is needed to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2-D shear wave speed map (40 × 38 mm). Multiple unfocused ultrasound beams arranged in a comb pattern (comb-push) are used to generate shear waves. A directional filter is then applied upon the shear wave field to extract the left-to-right (LR) and right-to-left (RL) propagating shear waves. Local shear wave speed is recovered using a time-of-flight method based on both LR and RL waves. Finally, a 2-D shear wave speed map is reconstructed by combining the LR and RL speed maps. Smooth and accurate shear wave speed maps are reconstructed using the proposed CUSE method in two calibrated homogeneous phantoms with different moduli. Inclusion phantom experiments demonstrate that CUSE is capable of providing good contrast (contrast-to-noise ratio ≥ 25 dB) between the inclusion and background without artifacts and is insensitive to inclusion positions. Safety measurements demonstrate that all regulated parameters of the ultrasound output level used in CUSE sequence are well below the FDA limits for diagnostic ultrasound.

  1. Comparison of tissue heating between manual and hands-free ultrasound techniques.

    PubMed

    Gulick, Dawn T

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this single-factor repeated-measures design was to examine the effectiveness of tissue heating with a hands-free ultrasound (US) technique compared to a hand-held US transducer using the Rich-Mar AutoSound unit. US is a therapeutic modality often used to provide deep tissue heating. Recently, a "hands-free" US unit was introduced by Rich-Mar Incorporated. This unit allows the clinician to choose the mode of US delivery, using either a handheld (manual) transducer or a hands-free device that pulses the US beam through the transducer. However, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services has deemed delivery of US via a hands-free unit to be investigational. Forty volunteers over 18 years of age participated. Treatment was provided at a 3-MHz US frequency. Muscle temperature was measured with 26-gauge, 4-cm Physiotemp thermistors placed in the triceps surae muscle. The depth of thermistor placement was at 1 - and 2-cm deep. One calf was treated with a manual transducer (5-cm(2) US head at three times the effective radiating area [ERA]), and one calf was treated with the hands-free transducer (14-cm(2) [ERA]). Both methods used a 1.5 W/cm(2) intensity for 10 minutes. The manual technique used an overlapping circular method at 4 cm/sec, and the hands-free method used a sequential pulsing at 4 cm/sec. Tissue temperatures were recorded at baseline and every 30 seconds. The hands-free technique resulted in a tissue temperature increase from 33.68 to 38.7 degrees C and an increase from 33.45 to 40.1 degrees C using the manual technique at 1-cm depth. The tissue temperature increase at the 2-cm depth was from 34.95 to 35.44 degrees C for the hands-free device and 34.44 to 38.42 degrees C for the manual device. Thus, there was a significant difference between the hands-free and the manual mode of US delivery for the 3-MHz frequency (5.02 degrees C vs. 6.65 degrees C at 1 cm and 1.49 degrees C vs. 3.98 degrees C at 2 cm). In this study, the "hands

  2. Practical Guidelines for Ultrasound-Guided Core Needle Biopsy of Soft-Tissue Lesions: Transformation from Beginner to Specialist

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Yoon; Oh, Tack Sun; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (US-CNB) is an important step in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions. To maximize efficacy and minimize the complications of US-CNB, it is critical to collaborate with a multidisciplinary team and to understand the particular considerations of US-CNB for these lesions. The purpose of this article is to provide a systematic review and step-by-step tips for using US-CNB to diagnose musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions. PMID:28246516

  3. Partial shrinkage of venous tissues near valves using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Curiel, Laura; Milleret, René; Pichot, Olivier; Lacoste, François; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2005-03-01

    The cross-section of a vein can be reduced by exposing the collagen of the vein wall to high temperature (85° C) for a few seconds. Partial shrinkage of the vein is appropriate for correcting deformations of valvular tissues that can cause the abnormal blood reflux which is the main cause of varicose veins and Superficial Venous Insufficiency. Due to its suitability for inducing localized heating, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) is a good method for correcting valvular tissue. In the present study, the feasibility of using HIFU for inducing partial shrinkage of the saphenous vein wall is demonstrated. The position and size of valvular deformations are well suited to being heated and, consequently, reduced with HIFU. The resulting shrinkage of deformations should restore normal function of the valve. An experimental protocol was used in which several in vitro segments of human saphenous vein were exposed with a monochromatic signal produced by a real-time imaging HIFU probe. The probe has a focal length of 45 mm, a diameter of 52.5 mm and operates at 3 MHz. Ultrasonic imaging, obtained with an 8-MHz 128-element linear array placed at the centre of the HIFU probe, was used to target the vein. The segment was inserted in a porcine muscle sample, and both were placed into a PVC cylinder. Individual sonications of the vein wall were performed for acoustic power values ranging between 8.75 and 35 W at a constant sonication duration of 5 s. Different durations ranging between 3 and 7 s at constant power were also tested. Finally, a long duration of 18 s was tested while the focal point was displaced along the vein wall at a speed of 0.5 mm/s. Results showed that shrinkage of the vein wall was observed using echographic and macroscopic analysis. In particular, the vein diameter was reduced by 15% for a sonication-duration of 18 s with continuous displacement of the focal point. Results showed that HIFU is suitable for partial shrinkage of the saphenous vein and

  4. A pilot study using Tissue Velocity Ultrasound Imaging (TVI) to assess muscle activity pattern in patients with chronic trapezius myalgia

    PubMed Central

    Peolsson, Michael; Larsson, Britt; Brodin, Lars-Åke; Gerdle, Björn

    2008-01-01

    Background Different research techniques indicate alterations in muscle tissue and in neuromuscular control of aching muscles in patients with chronic localized pain. Ultrasound can be used for analysis of muscle tissue dynamics in clinical practice. Aim This study introduces a new muscle tissue sensitive ultrasound technique in order to provide a new methodology for providing a description of local muscle changes. This method is applied to investigate trapezius muscle tissue response – especially with respect to specific regional deformation and deformation rates – during concentric shoulder elevation in patients with chronic trapezius myalgia and healthy controls before and after pain provocation. Methods Patients with trapezius myalgia and healthy controls were analyzed using an ultrasound system equipped with tissue velocity imaging (TVI). The patients performed a standardized 3-cm concentric shoulder elevation before and after pain provocation/exercise at a standardized elevation tempo (30 bpm). A standardized region of interest (ROI), an ellipsis with a size that captures the upper and lower fascia of the trapezius muscle (4 cm width) at rest, was placed in the first frame of the loop registration of the elevation. The ROI was re-anchored frame by frame following the same anatomical landmark in the basal fascia during all frames of the concentric phase. In cardiac measurement, tissue velocities are measured in the axial projection towards and against the probe where red colour represents shortening and red lengthening. In the case of measuring the trapezius muscle, tissue deformation measurements are made orthogonally, thus, indirectly. Based on the assumption of muscle volume incompressibility, blue represents tissue contraction and red relaxation. Within the ROI, two variables were calculated as a function of time: deformation and deformation rate. Hereafter, max, mean, and quadratic mean values (RMS) of each variable were calculated and compared before

  5. The design and characterization of an ultrasound phased array suitable for deep tissue hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Aitkenhead, Adam H; Mills, John A; Wilson, Adrian J

    2008-11-01

    In this paper we describe the design and evaluation of a planar phased-array ultrasound transducer suitable for producing localized hyperthermia in solid tumors deep within the body. Simulation using a customized version of Ultrasim has been used to determine the relationship between the size and position of the focus and parameters of the array. These parameters include the overall size of the array and the size, shape and distribution of the individual elements. A 15-element prototype array has been constructed using the results of the simulation. Beam profile measurements on this transducer made in an acoustic tank were compared with the beam profile predicted by simulation. The results showed good agreement in the shape of the focal region, but with the focus closer to the surface of the physical transducer when compared with the simulation and with small high-intensity areas between the surface of the transducer and the focus in the measured profile. A sensitivity analysis using a simulated factorial experiment indicated that the presence of a secondary vibrational mode within the elements of the array was the principal cause for both the shift in the position of the focus and for the unwanted maxima close to the surface of the array. The results also showed that the array was tolerant of a large variation in output intensity of the individual elements in the array in producing a focal region. Extrapolation of the results obtained in this study indicate that an array of 60 elements, based on the design described, driven by 550 V peak-to-peak pulses would be capable of producing a peak focal intensity of 50 Wcm(-2) at a depth of 60 mm in tissue, which would be appropriate for hyperthermia used as an adjunct to radiotherapy or chemotherapy.

  6. The effect of the shape and size of gold seeds irradiated with ultrasound on the bio-heat transfer in tissue.

    PubMed

    Gkigkitzis, Ioannis; Austerlitz, Carlos; Haranas, Ioannis; Campos, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this report is to propose a new methodology to treat prostate cancer with macro-rod-shaped gold seeds irradiated with ultrasound and develop a new computational method for temperature and thermal dose control of hyperthermia therapy induced by the proposed procedure. A computer code representation, based on the bio-heat diffusion equation, was developed to calculate the heat deposition and temperature elevation patterns in a gold rod and in the tissue surrounding it as a result of different therapy durations and ultrasound power simulations. The numerical results computed provide quantitative information on the interaction between high-energy ultrasound, gold seeds and biological tissues and can replicate the pattern observed in experimental studies. The effect of differences in shapes and sizes of gold rod targets irradiated with ultrasound is calculated and the heat enhancement and the bio-heat transfer in tissue are analyzed.

  7. A Tissue-Mimicking Ultrasound Test Object Using Droplet Vaporization to Create Point Targets

    PubMed Central

    Carneal, Catherine M.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Krücker, Jochen; Carson, Paul L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound test objects containing reference point targets could be useful for evaluating ultrasound systems and phase aberration correction methods. Polyacrylamide gels containing albumin-stabilized droplets (3.6 µm mean diameter) of dodecafluoropentane (DDFP) are being developed for this purpose. Perturbation by ultrasound causes spontaneous vaporization of the superheated droplets to form gas bubbles, a process termed acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). The resulting bubbles (20 to 160 µm diameter) are small compared with acoustic wavelengths in diagnostic ultrasound and are theoretically suitable for use as point targets (phase errors <20° for typical f-numbers). Bubbles distributed throughout the material are convenient for determining the point spread function in an imaging plane or volume. Cooling the gel causes condensation of the DDFP droplets, which may be useful for storage. Studying ADV in such viscoelastic media could provide insight into potential bioeffects from rapid bubble formation. PMID:21937339

  8. Achondrogenesis type IB (Fraccaro): study of collagen in the tissue and in chondrocytes cultured in agarose.

    PubMed

    Freisinger, P; Stanescu, V; Jacob, B; Cohen-Solal, L; Maroteaux, P; Bonaventure, J

    1994-02-15

    A lethal chondrodysplasia characterized by extreme micromelia was diagnosed by ultrasound examination in two sibs whose nonconsanguineous parents were healthy. Radiographic and histopathologic data indicated that the two foetuses (18 and 21 weeks old) had achondrogenesis type IB (Fraccaro). Quantitation of total collagen extractable from dried cartilage samples demonstrated a 50% decrease when compared to an age-related control. This decrease was essentially related to type II collagen. Nevertheless, the alpha chains and the CB peptides of type II collagen had a normal electrophoretic mobility. A significant amount of collagen type I was also detected. The electrophoretic pattern of collagens type IX and XI did not differ significantly from control sample. The extracellular matrix elaborated by patient chondrocytes cultured in agarose for 10-12 days, contained less collagen type II than normal cells. Labelling with 14C-proline of cultured cells showed the presence of procollagen and type II collagen chains with a normal electrophoretic mobility, but an alpha 2(I) chain was detectable in the patient material, indicating the presence of collagen type I which supported the tissue findings. The significance of the type II collagen reduction in the patient's cartilage is unclear but it is unlikely to be the primary defect in achondrogenesis type I.

  9. Correlation of preoperative MRI and intraoperative 3D ultrasound to measure brain tissue shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, David G.; Lee, Belinda K. H.; Peters, Terence M.

    2001-05-01

    B-Mode ultrasound is often used during neurosurgery to provide intra-operative images of the brain though a craniotomy, but the use of 3D ultrasound during surgery is still in its infancy. We have developed a system that provides real-time freehand 3D ultrasound reconstruction at a reduced resolution. The reconstruction proceeds incrementally and the 3D image is overlayed, via a computer, on a pre-operative 3D MRI scan. This provides the operator with the necessary feedback to maintain a constant freehand sweep-rate, and also ensures that the sweep covers the desired anatomical volume. All of the ultrasound video frames are buffered, and a full-resolution, compounded reconstruction proceeds once the manual sweep is complete. We have also developed tools for manual tagging of homologous landmarks in the 3D MRI and 3D ultrasound volumes that use a piecewise cubic approximation of thin-plate spline interpolation to achieve interactive nonlinear registration and warping of the MRI volume to the ultrasound volume: Each time a homologous point-pair is identified by the use, the image of the warped MRI is updated on the computer screen after less than 0.5 s.

  10. Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU): a fully integrated technique for sonication and monitoring of thermal ablation in tissues.

    PubMed

    Maleke, C; Konofagou, E E

    2008-03-21

    FUS (focused ultrasound), or HIFU (high-intensity-focused ultrasound) therapy, a minimally or non-invasive procedure that uses ultrasound to generate thermal necrosis, has been proven successful in several clinical applications. This paper discusses a method for monitoring thermal treatment at different sonication durations (10 s, 20 s and 30 s) using the amplitude-modulated (AM) harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) technique in bovine liver samples in vitro. The feasibility of HMI for characterizing mechanical tissue properties has previously been demonstrated. Here, a confocal transducer, combining a 4.68 MHz therapy (FUS) and a 7.5 MHz diagnostic (pulse-echo) transducer, was used. The therapy transducer was driven by a low-frequency AM continuous signal at 25 Hz, producing a stable harmonic radiation force oscillating at the modulation frequency. A pulser/receiver was used to drive the pulse-echo transducer at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 5.4 kHz. Radio-frequency (RF) signals were acquired using a standard pulse-echo technique. The temperature near the ablation region was simultaneously monitored. Both RF signals and temperature measurements were obtained before, during and after sonication. The resulting axial tissue displacement was estimated using one-dimensional cross correlation. When temperature at the focal zone was above 48 degrees C during heating, the coagulation necrosis occurred and tissue damage was irreversible. The HMI displacement profiles in relation to the temperature and sonication durations were analyzed. At the beginning of heating, the temperature at the focus increased sharply, while the tissue stiffness decreased resulting in higher HMI displacements. This was confirmed by an increase of 0.8 microm degrees C(-1)(r=0.93, p<.005). After sustained heating, the tissue became irreversibly stiffer, followed by an associated decrease in the HMI displacement (-0.79 microm degrees C(-1), r=-0.92, p<0.001). Repeated

  11. Estimation and imaging of breast lesions using a two-layer tissue structure by ultrasound-guided optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Quing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A new two-step estimation and imaging method is developed for a two-layer breast tissue structure consisting of a breast tissue layer and a chest wall underneath. First, a smaller probe with shorter distance source-detector pairs was used to collect the reflected light mainly from the breast tissue layer. Then, a larger probe with 9×14 source-detector pairs and a centrally located ultrasound transducer was used to collect reflected light from the two-layer tissue structure. The data collected from the smaller probe were used to estimate breast tissue optical properties. With more accurate estimation of the average breast tissue properties, the second layer properties can be assessed from data obtained from the larger probe. Using this approach, the unknown variables have been reduced from four to two and the estimated bulk tissue optical properties are more accurate and robust. In addition, a two-step reconstruction using a genetic algorithm and conjugate gradient method is implemented to simultaneously reconstruct the absorption and reduced scattering maps of targets inside a two-layer tissue structure. Simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to validate the new reconstruction method, and a clinical example is given to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. PMID:26046722

  12. Quantitative imaging of young's modulus of soft tissues from ultrasound water jet indentation: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min-Hua; Mao, Rui; Lu, Yin; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Tian-Fu; Chen, Si-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Indentation testing is a widely used approach to evaluate mechanical characteristics of soft tissues quantitatively. Young's modulus of soft tissue can be calculated from the force-deformation data with known tissue thickness and Poisson's ratio using Hayes' equation. Our group previously developed a noncontact indentation system using a water jet as a soft indenter as well as the coupling medium for the propagation of high-frequency ultrasound. The novel system has shown its ability to detect the early degeneration of articular cartilage. However, there is still lack of a quantitative method to extract the intrinsic mechanical properties of soft tissue from water jet indentation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between the loading-unloading curves and the mechanical properties of soft tissues to provide an imaging technique of tissue mechanical properties. A 3D finite element model of water jet indentation was developed with consideration of finite deformation effect. An improved Hayes' equation has been derived by introducing a new scaling factor which is dependent on Poisson's ratios v, aspect ratio a/h (the radius of the indenter/the thickness of the test tissue), and deformation ratio d/h. With this model, the Young's modulus of soft tissue can be quantitatively evaluated and imaged with the error no more than 2%.

  13. Research of Ultrasound-Mediated Transdermal Drug Delivery System Using Cymbal-Type Piezoelectric Composite Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Huiting; Gao, Chunming; Liu, Lixian; Sun, Qiming; Zhao, Binxing; Yan, Laijun

    2015-06-01

    Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) implemented by especially low-frequency ultrasound is generally known as sonophoresis or phonophoresis which has drawn considerable wide attention. However, TDD has not yet achieved its full potential as an alternative to conventional drug delivery methods due to its bulky instruments. In this paper, a cymbal-type piezoelectric composite transducer (CPCT) which has advantages over a traditional ultrasound generator in weight, flexibility, and power consumption, is used as a substitute ultrasonicator to realize TDD. First, theoretical research on a CPCT based on the finite element analysis was carried out according to which a series of applicable CPCTs with bandwidths of 20 kHz to 100 kHz were elaborated. Second, a TDD experimental setup was built with previously fabricated CPCTs aimed at the administration of glucose. Finally, the TDD performance of glucose molecule transport in porcine skin was measured in vitro by quantifying the concentration of glucose, and the time variation curves were subsequently obtained. During the experiment, the driving wave form, frequency, and power consumption of the transducers were selected as the main elements which determined the efficacy of glucose delivery. The results indicate that the effectiveness of the CPCT-based delivery is constrained more by the frequency and intensity of ultrasound rather than the driving waveform. The light-weight, flexibility, and low-power consumption of a CPCT can potentially achieve effective TDD.

  14. Ultrasound and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril

    This paper begins with an overview and a description of the interactions between ultrasound and biological tissues encountered during treatment protocols. In a second part of this seminar, two clinical applications of therapeutic ultrasound will be described in details: -Kidney stone destruction by ultrasound (lithotripsy) and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for treating prostate cancer (HIFU).

  15. Lives to save lives--the ethics of tissue typing.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    Should we allow tissue typing of in vitro embryos in order to implant those which could provide potentially life-saving cells to an existing serious ill sibling with that tissue type? A case is made that such tissue matching does not involve unacceptable instrumentality towards or commodification of children. The key distinction is that the parents' request for tissue typing is reactive in the face of serious medical need rather than being proactive in the sense of seeking the means to specify a child with chosen desirable characteristics. Nevertheless, as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a relatively new technique, both long-term safety issues concerning effects on child development following embryo biopsy and the risks of misdiagnosis must be given due weight as must the avoidance of exploitation of couples desperate to save a sick child. The HFEA originally made a distinction, recently revoked, between allowing tissue typing after PGD to select against affected embryos and denying it when PGD is not required because the embryos are not at risk of inheriting the disease suffered by the existing sibling. If tissue typing is not inherently unethical and misdiagnosis poses a greater risk than biopsy damage, then this distinction is not ethically tenable.

  16. Integrated photoacoustic, ultrasound and fluorescence platform for diagnostic medical imaging-proof of concept study with a tissue mimicking phantom

    PubMed Central

    James, Joseph; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham; Woh, Lye Sun

    2014-01-01

    The structural and molecular heterogeneities of biological tissues demand the interrogation of the samples with multiple energy sources and provide visualization capabilities at varying spatial resolution and depth scales for obtaining complementary diagnostic information. A novel multi-modal imaging approach that uses optical and acoustic energies to perform photoacoustic, ultrasound and fluorescence imaging at multiple resolution scales from the tissue surface and depth is proposed in this paper. The system comprises of two distinct forms of hardware level integration so as to have an integrated imaging system under a single instrumentation set-up. The experimental studies show that the system is capable of mapping high resolution fluorescence signatures from the surface, optical absorption and acoustic heterogeneities along the depth (>2cm) of the tissue at multi-scale resolution (<1µm to <0.5mm). PMID:25071954

  17. Murine ultrasound-guided transabdominal para-aortic injections of self-assembling type I collagen oligomers.

    PubMed

    Yrineo, Alexa A; Adelsperger, Amelia R; Durkes, Abigail C; Distasi, Matthew R; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Murphy, Michael P; Goergen, Craig J

    2017-03-10

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) represent a potentially life-threatening condition that predominantly affects the infrarenal aorta. Several preclinical murine models that mimic the human condition have been developed and are now widely used to investigate AAA pathogenesis. Cell- or pharmaceutical-based therapeutics designed to prevent AAA expansion are currently being evaluated with these animal models, but more minimally invasive strategies for delivery could improve their clinical translation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of self-assembling type I collagen oligomers as an injectable therapeutic delivery vehicle in mice. Here we show the success and reliability of a para-aortic, ultrasound-guided technique for injecting quickly-polymerizing collagen oligomer solutions into mice to form a collagen-fibril matrix at body temperature. A commonly used infrarenal mouse AAA model was used to determine the target location of these collagen injections. Ultrasound-guided, closed-abdominal injections supported consistent delivery of collagen to the area surrounding the infrarenal abdominal aorta halfway between the right renal artery and aortic trifurcation into the iliac and tail arteries. This minimally invasive approach yielded outcomes similar to open-abdominal injections into the same region. Histological analysis on tissue removed on day 14 post-operatively showed minimal in vivo degradation of the self-assembled fibrillar collagen and the majority of implants experienced minimal inflammation and cell invasion, further confirming this material's potential as a method for delivering therapeutics. Finally, we showed that the typical length and position of this infrarenal AAA model was statistically similar to the length and targeted location of the injected collagen, increasing its feasibility as a localized therapeutic delivery vehicle. Future preclinical and clinical studies are needed to determine if specific therapeutics incorporated into

  18. Development of a Tissue-Mimicking Phantom for Evaluating the Focusing Performance of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Zongyu; Li Faqi; Zou Jiangzhong; Wang Zhibiao

    2006-05-08

    Objectives: To develop a tissue mimicking phantom which can be used to evaluate the focusing performance of the HIFU transducer, and the phantom should has the same acoustic characteristic and thermotics characteristic as the biological tissue. Materials and methods: The tissue mimicking phantom was made from water, gelatin, fresh biologic tissue Its ultrasonic parameters (attenuation coefficient) of the phantom was measured by the method of radiation pressure, and thermotics parameters of the phantom, including thermal conductivity, specific heat/fusion point et al were tested under the Measurement meter. The HIFU biological effect of the phantom was evaluated under the Model JC focused ultrasound tumor therapeutic system, developed and produced by Chongqing HIFU Technology Co. Ltd (working frequency: 0.7MHz; acoustic power: 200W; focal distance: 135mm; Acoustic focal region: 3x3x25 cubic mm). Results: The self-made phantom is sable, has smooth and glossy appearance, well-distributed construction, and good elasticity. We measured the followed values for acoustic and thermal properties: density 1049{+-}2 kg/m3; attenuation 0.532{+-}0.017 dB/cm (0.8 MHz), 0.612{+-}0.021 dB/cm (1.0 MHz); thermal conductivity 0.76{+-}0.08 W/m/- deg. C; specific heat 3653{+-}143 J/kg- deg. C; fusion point154{+-}8 deg. C. The BFR induced in the phantom after HIFU exposure was stable in its size and appearance. Conclusion: We produced and improved one tissue mimicking phantom successfully which had semblable ultrasound and thermphysical properties like the soft tissue, and can replace the bovine liver to investigate the HIFU biological effect and to detect the focusing performance of the HIFU energy transducer. The research was supported by Chongqing University of Medical Science (CX200320)

  19. Non-contact, ultrasound-based indentation method for measuring elastic properties of biological tissues using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    PubMed

    Vappou, Jonathan; Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Grondin, Julien; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-04-07

    Noninvasive measurement of mechanical properties of biological tissues in vivo could play a significant role in improving the current understanding of tissue biomechanics. In this study, we propose a method for measuring elastic properties non-invasively by using internal indentation as generated by harmonic motion imaging (HMI). In HMI, an oscillating acoustic radiation force is produced by a focused ultrasound transducer at the focal region, and the resulting displacements are estimated by tracking radiofrequency signals acquired by an imaging transducer. In this study, the focal spot region was modeled as a rigid cylindrical piston that exerts an oscillatory, uniform internal force to the underlying tissue. The HMI elastic modulus EHMI was defined as the ratio of the applied force to the axial strain measured by 1D ultrasound imaging. The accuracy and the precision of the EHMI estimate were assessed both numerically and experimentally in polyacrylamide tissue-mimicking phantoms. Initial feasibility of this method in soft tissues was also shown in canine liver specimens in vitro. Very good correlation and agreement was found between the measured Young's modulus and the HMI modulus in the numerical study (r(2) > 0.99, relative error <10%) and on polyacrylamide gels (r(2) = 0.95, relative error <24%). The average HMI modulus on five liver samples was found to EHMI = 2.62  ±  0.41 kPa, compared to EMechTesting = 4.2  ±  2.58 kPa measured by rheometry. This study has demonstrated for the first time the initial feasibility of a non-invasive, model-independent method to estimate local elastic properties of biological tissues at a submillimeter scale using an internal indentation-like approach. Ongoing studies include in vitro experiments in a larger number of samples and feasibility testing in in vivo models as well as pathological human specimens.

  20. Development of a Tissue-Mimicking Phantom for Evaluating the Focusing Performance of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zongyu, Jing; Faqi, Li; Jiangzhong, Zou; Zhibiao, Wang

    2006-05-01

    Objectives: To develop a tissue mimicking phantom which can be used to evaluate the focusing performance of the HIFU transducer, and the phantom should has the same acoustic characteristic and thermotics characteristic as the biological tissue. Materials and methods: The tissue mimicking phantom was made from water, gelatin, fresh biologic tissue Its ultrasonic parameters (attenuation coefficient) of the phantom was measured by the method of radiation pressure, and thermotics parameters of the phantom, including thermal conductivity, specific heat/fusion point et al were tested under the Measurement meter. The HIFU biological effect of the phantom was evaluated under the Model JC focused ultrasound tumor therapeutic system, developed and produced by Chongqing HIFU Technology Co. Ltd (working frequency: 0.7MHz; acoustic power: 200W; focal distance: 135mm; Acoustic focal region: 3×3×25 cubic mm). Results: The self-made phantom is sable, has smooth and glossy appearance, well-distributed construction, and good elasticity. We measured the followed values for acoustic and thermal properties: density 1049±2 kg/m3; attenuation 0.532±0.017 dB/cm (0.8 MHz), 0.612±0.021 dB/cm (1.0 MHz); thermal conductivity 0.76±0.08 W/m/-°C; specific heat 3653±143 J/kg-°C; fusion point154±8°C. The BFR induced in the phantom after HIFU exposure was stable in its size and appearance. Conclusion: We produced and improved one tissue mimicking phantom successfully which had semblable ultrasound and thermphysical properties like the soft tissue, and can replace the bovine liver to investigate the HIFU biological effect and to detect the focusing performance of the HIFU energy transducer. The research was supported by Chongqing University of Medical Science (CX200320).

  1. Imaging high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced tissue denaturation by multispectral photoacoustic method: an ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yao; O'Neill, Brian

    2013-03-10

    We present an ex vivo study for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in multispectral photoacoustic imaging (PAI) of tissue denaturation induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in this paper. Tissue of bovine muscle was thermally treated in a heated water bath and by HIFU, and then was imaged using a multispectral photoacoustic approach. Light at multiple optical wavelengths between 700 and 900 nm was delivered to the treated bovine muscle tissue to excite the photoacoustic signal. Apparent tissue denaturation has been observed in multispectral photoacoustic images after being treated in a water bath and by HIFU. It is interesting that the denaturation is more striking at shorter optical wavelength photoacoustic images than at longer optical wavelength photoacoustic images. Multispectral photoacoustic images of the tissue denaturation were further analyzed and the photoacoustic spectrums of the denaturized tissue were calculated in this paper. This study suggests that a multispectral PAI approach might be a promising tool to evaluate tissue denaturation induced by HIFU treatment.

  2. Ultrasound tissue characterization does not differentiate genotype, but indexes ejection fraction deterioration in becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Giglio, Vincenzo; Puddu, Paolo Emilio; Holland, Mark R; Camastra, Giovanni; Ansalone, Gerardo; Ricci, Enzo; Mela, Julia; Sciarra, Federico; Di Gennaro, Marco

    2014-12-01

    The aims of the study were, first, to assess whether myocardial ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC) in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) can be used to differentiate between patients with deletions and those without deletions; and second, to determine whether UTC is helpful in diagnosing the evolution of left ventricular dysfunction, a precursor of dilated cardiomyopathy. Both cyclic variation of integrated backscatter and calibrated integrated backscatter (cIBS) were assessed in 87 patients with BMD and 70 controls. The average follow-up in BMD patients was 48 ± 12 mo. UTC analysis was repeated only in a subgroup of 40 BMD patients randomly selected from the larger overall group (15 with and 25 without left ventricular dysfunction). Discrimination between BMD patients with and without dystrophin gene deletion was not possible on the basis of UTC data: average cvIBS was 5.2 ± 1.2 and 5.5 ± 1.4 dB, and average cIBS was 29.9 ± 4.7 and 29.6 ± 5.8, respectively, significantly different (p < 0.001) only from controls (8.6 ± 0.5 and 24.6 ± 1.2 dB). In patients developing left ventricular dysfunction during follow-up, cIBS increased to 31.3 ± 5.4 dB, but not significantly (p = 0.08). The highest cIBS values (34.6 ± 5.3 dB, p < 0.09 vs. baseline, p < 0.01 vs BMD patients without left ventricular dysfunction) were seen in the presence of severe left ventricular dysfunction. Multivariate statistics indicated that an absolute change of 6 dB in cIBS is associated with a high probability of left ventricular dysfunction. UTC analysis does not differentiate BMD patients with or without dystrophin gene deletion, but may be useful in indexing left ventricular dysfunction during follow-up.

  3. Comparison of Ultrasound Attenuation and Backscatter Estimates in Layered Tissue-Mimicking Phantoms among Three Clinical Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kibo; Rosado-Mendez, Ivan M.; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A.; Ghoshal, Goutam; Pawlicki, Alexander D.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Lavarello, Roberto J.; Oelze, Michael L.; Zagzebski, James A.; O’Brien, William D.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Backscatter and attenuation coefficient estimates are needed in many quantitative ultrasound strategies. In clinical applications, these parameters may not be easily obtained because of variations in scattering by tissues overlying a region of interest (ROI). The goal of this study is to assess the accuracy of backscatter and attenuation estimates for regions distal to nonuniform layers of tissue-mimicking materials. In addition, this work compares results of these estimates for “layered” phantoms scanned using different clinical ultrasound machines. Two tissue-mimicking phantoms were constructed, each exhibiting depth-dependent variations in attenuation or backscatter. The phantoms were scanned with three ultrasound imaging systems, acquiring radio frequency echo data for offline analysis. The attenuation coefficient and the backscatter coefficient (BSC) for sections of the phantoms were estimated using the reference phantom method. Properties of each layer were also measured with laboratory techniques on test samples manufactured during the construction of the phantom. Estimates of the attenuation coefficient versus frequency slope, α0, using backscatter data from the different systems agreed to within 0.24 dB/cm-MHz. Bias in the α0 estimates varied with the location of the ROI. BSC estimates for phantom sections whose locations ranged from 0 to 7 cm from the transducer agreed among the different systems and with theoretical predictions, with a mean bias error of 1.01 dB over the used bandwidths. This study demonstrates that attenuation and BSCs can be accurately estimated in layered inhomogeneous media using pulse-echo data from clinical imaging systems. PMID:23160474

  4. Detecting tissue optical and mechanical properties with an ultrasound modulated optical imaging system in reflection detection geometry

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi; Li, Sinan; Eckersley, Robert J.; Elson, Daniel S.; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Tissue optical and mechanical properties are correlated to tissue pathologic changes. This manuscript describes a dual-mode ultrasound modulated optical imaging system capable of sensing local optical and mechanical properties in reflection geometry. The optical characterisation was achieved by the acoustic radiation force assisted ultrasound modulated optical tomography (ARF-UOT) with laser speckle contrast detection. Shear waves generated by the ARF were also tracked optically by the same system and the shear wave speed was used for the elasticity measurement. Tissue mimicking phantoms with multiple inclusions buried at 11 mm depth were experimentally scanned with the dual-mode system. The inclusions, with higher optical absorption and/or higher stiffness than background, were identified based on the dual results and their stiffnesses were quantified. The system characterises both optical and mechanical properties of the inclusions compared with the ARF-UOT or the elasticity measurement alone. Moreover, by detecting the backward scattered light in reflection detection geometry, the system is more suitable for clinical applications compared with transmission geometry. PMID:25657875

  5. Phase one clinical trial of the use of focused ultrasound surgery for the treatment of soft-tissue tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ter Haar, Gail R.; Rivens, Ian H.; Moskovic, Eleanor; Huddart, Robert; Visioli, Andrew G.

    1998-04-01

    A prototype extra-corporeal focused ultrasound surgery device has been built and tested extensively in model systems both in vivo and ex vivo. A phase 1, normal tissue toxicity trial is now underway. Patients with soft tissue tumors lying 4 - 12 cm below the skin surface are being treated using a dose escalation technique. An in situ `ablative intensity' (AI) has been established from preclinical studies. This was found to be 1500 Wcm-2 for up to 3 seconds at 1.7 MHz. Groups of three patients are being treated at doses rising from 25% AI through 50%, 63%, 80%, 100% to 125% AI for 1 second. Finally, 2 and 3 second exposure will be used for the two highest doses. Patients receive no sedation or anaesthetic. Target sites include all soft tissue tumors, especially those of the prostate, kidney and liver. Patients are examined for skin erythema, and are asked to complete pain and symptom questionnaires prior to treatment, immediately after treatment, one week and one month later. Patients receive a diagnostic ultrasound scan before and immediately after exposure, and after 1 week. Those at the highest dose levels are also offered a magnetic resonance scan.

  6. Noninvasive assessment of the activity of the shoulder girdle muscles using ultrasound real-time tissue elastography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Muraki, Takayuki; Sekiguchi, Yusuke; Ishijima, Takahiro; Morise, Shuhei; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Itoi, Eiji; Izumi, Shin-Ichi

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether the activity of the shoulder girdle muscles could be estimated by measuring the elasticity of these muscles under several levels of muscle contraction through ultrasound real-time tissue elastography (RTE). Ten healthy men performed submaximal voluntary contractions (MVC) in each manual muscle testing position for the middle deltoid, upper trapezius, supraspinatus, levator scapulae, and rhomboid major. The elasticity of these muscles was measured using ultrasound RTE during the task. The strain ratio of the muscle to an acoustic coupler was calculated as an assessment index of the muscle elasticity. Higher strain ratio values imply lower elasticity. In addition, the electromyographic activity was recorded from surface electrodes attached only to the middle deltoid and upper trapezius. The strain ratios were negatively correlated with the normalized root mean square values for the middle deltoid (r=-0.659, p<0.001) and upper trapezius (r=-0.554, p<0.001). The strain ratios of all the muscles decreased with an increase from 10% MVC force to 30% MVC force. Ultrasound RTE may be useful for noninvasively assessing the activity of the shoulder girdle muscles at certain shoulder positions with low levels of muscle contraction.

  7. Microbubble type and distribution dependence of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shutao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Olumolade, Oluyemi; Feshitan, Jameel A; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-01-01

    Focused ultrasound, in the presence of microbubbles, has been used non-invasively to induce reversible blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening in both rodents and non-human primates. This study was aimed at identifying the dependence of BBB opening properties on polydisperse microbubble (all clinically approved microbubbles are polydisperse) type and distribution by using a clinically approved ultrasound contrast agent (Definity microbubbles) and in-house prepared polydisperse (IHP) microbubbles in mice. A total of 18 C57 BL/6 mice (n = 3) were used in this study, and each mouse was injected with either Definity or IHP microbubbles via the tail vein. The concentration and size distribution of activated Definity and IHP microbubbles were measured, and the microbubbles were diluted to 6 × 10(8)/mL before injection. Immediately after microbubble administration, mice were subjected to focused ultrasound with the following parameters: frequency = 1.5 MHz, pulse repetition frequency = 10 Hz, 1000 cycles, in situ peak rarefactional acoustic pressures = 0.3, 0.45 and 0.6 MPa for a sonication duration of 60 s. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was used to confirm BBB opening and allowed for image-based analysis. Permeability of the treated region and volume of BBB opening did not significantly differ between the two types of microbubbles (p > 0.05) at peak rarefractional acoustic pressures of 0.45 and 0.6 MPa, whereas IHP microbubbles had significantly higher permeability and opening volume (p < 0.05) at the relatively lower pressure of 0.3 MPa. The results from this study indicate that microbubble type and distribution could have significant effects on focused ultrasound-induced BBB opening at lower pressures, but less important effects at higher pressures, possibly because of the stable cavitation that governs the former. This difference may have become less significant at higher pressures, where inertial cavitation typically occurs.

  8. Design and implementation of therapeutic ultrasound generating circuit for dental tissue formation and tooth-root healing.

    PubMed

    Woon Tiong Ang; Scurtescu, C; Wing Hoy; El-Bialy, T; Ying Yin Tsui; Jie Chen

    2010-02-01

    Biological tissue healing has recently attracted a great deal of research interest in various medical fields. Trauma to teeth, deep and root caries, and orthodontic treatment can all lead to various degrees of root resorption. In our previous study, we showed that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) enhances the growth of lower incisor apices and accelerates their rate of eruption in rabbits by inducing dental tissue growth. We also performed clinical studies and demonstrated that LIPUS facilitates the healing of orthodontically induced teeth-root resorption in humans. However, the available LIPUS devices are too large to be used comfortably inside the mouth. In this paper, the design and implementation of a low-power LIPUS generator is presented. The generator is the core of the final intraoral device for preventing tooth root loss and enhancing tooth root tissue healing. The generator consists of a power-supply subsystem, an ultrasonic transducer, an impedance-matching circuit, and an integrated circuit composed of a digital controller circuitry and the associated driver circuit. Most of our efforts focus on the design of the impedance-matching circuit and the integrated system-on-chip circuit. The chip was designed and fabricated using 0.8- ¿m high-voltage technology from Dalsa Semiconductor, Inc. The power supply subsystem and its impedance-matching network are implemented using discrete components. The LIPUS generator was tested and verified to function as designed and is capable of producing ultrasound power up to 100 mW in the vicinity of the transducer's resonance frequency at 1.5 MHz. The power efficiency of the circuitry, excluding the power supply subsystem, is estimated at 70%. The final products will be tailored to the exact size of teeth or biological tissue, which is needed to be used for stimulating dental tissue (dentine and cementum) healing.

  9. Real-Time Assessment of Tissue Hypoxia In Vivo with Combined Photoacoustics and High-Frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gerling, Marco; Zhao, Ying; Nania, Salvatore; Norberg, K. Jessica; Verbeke, Caroline S.; Englert, Benjamin; Kuiper, Raoul V.; Bergström, Åsa; Hassan, Moustapha; Neesse, Albrecht; Löhr, J. Matthias; Heuchel, Rainer L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In preclinical cancer studies, non-invasive functional imaging has become an important tool to assess tumor development and therapeutic effects. Tumor hypoxia is closely associated with tumor aggressiveness and is therefore a key parameter to be monitored. Recently, photoacoustic (PA) imaging with inherently co-registered high-frequency ultrasound (US) has reached preclinical applicability, allowing parallel collection of anatomical and functional information. Dual-wavelength PA imaging can be used to quantify tissue oxygen saturation based on the absorbance spectrum differences between hemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental Design: A new bi-modal PA/US system for small animal imaging was employed to test feasibility and reliability of dual-wavelength PA for measuring relative tissue oxygenation. Murine models of pancreatic and colon cancer were imaged, and differences in tissue oxygenation were compared to immunohistochemistry for hypoxia in the corresponding tissue regions. Results: Functional studies proved feasibility and reliability of oxygenation detection in murine tissue in vivo. Tumor models exhibited different levels of hypoxia in localized regions, which positively correlated with immunohistochemical staining for hypoxia. Contrast-enhanced imaging yielded complementary information on tissue perfusion using the same system. Conclusion: Bimodal PA/US imaging can be utilized to reliably detect hypoxic tumor regions in murine tumor models, thus providing the possibility to collect anatomical and functional information on tumor growth and treatment response live in longitudinal preclinical studies. PMID:24723982

  10. Use of shock-wave heating for faster and safer ablation of tissue volumes in high intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, V.; Yuldashev, P.; Sinilshchikov, I.; Partanen, A.; Khokhlova, T.; Farr, N.; Kreider, W.; Maxwell, A.; Sapozhnikov, O.

    2015-10-01

    Simulation of enhanced heating of clinically relevant tissue volumes using nonlinear ultrasound waves generated by a multi-element HIFU phased array were conducted based on the combined Westervelt and bio-heat equations. A spatial spectral approach using the fast Fourier transform algorithm and a corresponding analytic solution to the bioheat equation were used to optimize temperature modeling in tissue. Localized shock-wave heating within a much larger treated tissue volume and short, single HIFU pulses within a much longer overall exposure time were accounted for in the algorithm. Separation of processes with different time and spatial scales made the calculations faster and more accurate. With the proposed method it was shown that for the same time-average power, the use of high peak power pulsing schemes that produce high-amplitude shocks at the focus result in faster tissue heating compared to harmonic, continuous-wave sonications. Nonlinear effects can significantly accelerate volumetric heating while also permitting greater spatial control to reduce the impact on surrounding tissues. Such studies can be further used to test and optimize various steering trajectories of shock-wave sonications for faster and more controlled treatment of tissue volumes.

  11. Ultrasound for In Vitro, Noninvasive Real-Time Monitoring and Evaluation of Tissue-Engineered Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Aguilar, Luis G; Mulderrig, Shane; Moreira, Ricardo; Hatam, Nima; Spillner, Jan; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Mela, Petra

    2016-10-01

    Tissue-engineered heart valves are developed in bioreactors where biochemical and mechanical stimuli are provided for extracellular matrix formation. During this phase, the monitoring possibilities are limited by the need to maintain the sterility and integrity of the valve. Therefore, noninvasive and nondestructive techniques are required. As such, optical imaging is commonly used to verify valve's functionality in vitro. It provides important information (i.e., leaflet symmetry, geometric orifice area, and closing and opening times), which is, however, usually limited to a singular view along the central axis from the outflow side. In this study, we propose ultrasound as a monitoring method that, in contrast to established optical imaging, can assess the valve from different planes, scanning the whole three-dimensional geometry. We show the potential benefits associated with the application of ultrasound to bioreactors, in advancing heart valve tissue engineering from design to fabrication and in vitro maturation. Specifically, we demonstrate that additional information, otherwise unavailable, can be gained to evaluate the valve's functionality (e.g., coaptation length, and effective cusp height and shape). Furthermore, we show that Doppler techniques provide qualitative visualization and quantitative evaluation of the flow through the valve, in real time and throughout the whole in vitro fabrication phase.

  12. Photoacoustic detection and optical spectroscopy of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in biologic tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Alhamami, Mosa; Kolios, Michael C.; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: (a) to investigate the capability of photoacoustic (PA) method in detecting high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments in muscle tissuesin vitro; and (b) to determine the optical properties of HIFU-treated and native tissues in order to assist in the interpretation of the observed contrast in PA detection of HIFU treatments. Methods: A single-element, spherically concaved HIFU transducer with a centre frequency of 1 MHz was utilized to create thermal lesions in chicken breast tissuesin vitro. To investigate the detectability of HIFU treatments photoacoustically, PA detection was performed at 720 and 845 nm on seven HIFU-treated tissue samples. Within each tissue sample, PA signals were acquired from 22 locations equally divided between two regions of interest within two volumes in tissue – a HIFU-treated volume and an untreated volume. Optical spectroscopy was then carried out on 10 HIFU-treated chicken breast specimens in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm, in 1-nm increments, using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The authors’ optical spectroscopy raw data (total transmittance and diffuse reflectance) were used to obtain the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of HIFU-induced thermal lesions and native tissues by employing the inverse adding-doubling method. The aforementioned interaction coefficients were subsequently used to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient and light penetration depth of HIFU-treated and native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. Results: HIFU-treated tissues produced greater PA signals than native tissues at 720 and 845 nm. At 720 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.68 ± 0.25 (mean ± standard error of the mean). At 845 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.75

  13. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ultrasound; Peripheral vascular ultrasound ... A duplex ultrasound combines: Traditional ultrasound: This uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create pictures. Doppler ultrasound: This ...

  14. Treatment of in-vivo bladder tissue with electronically scanned high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuillu, Benoit; Lacoste, Francois; Schlosser, Jacques; Vallancien, Guy

    1998-04-01

    Introduction: The efficacy of extracorporeal High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) on bladder wall has been demonstrated. However, the treatment is still slow, needing about 15 min to treat 1 cm2. Objectives: Demonstrate the feasibility of HIFU with electronic scanning and reduce the during of HIFU treatments. Conclusions: Necrotic lesions on bladder posterior wall can be obtained with HIFU treatments using electronic scanning of the focal point. Average treatment duration with electronic scanning is reduced to 3 min 30 sec/cm2.

  15. SOUND-SPEED AND ATTENUATION IMAGING OF BREAST TISSUE USING WAVEFORM TOMOGRAPHY OF TRANSMISSION ULTRASOUND DATA

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, LIANJIE; PRATT, R. GERHARD; DURIC, NEB; LITTRUP, PETER

    2007-01-25

    Waveform tomography results are presented from 800 kHz ultrasound transmission scans of a breast phantom, and from an in vivo ultrasound breast scan: significant improvements are demonstrated in resolution over time-of-flight reconstructions. Quantitative reconstructions of both sound-speed and inelastic attenuation are recovered. The data were acquired in the Computed Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system, comprising a 20 cm diameter solid-state ultrasound ring array with 256 active, non-beamforming transducers. Waveform tomography is capable of resolving variations in acoustic properties at sub-wavelength scales. This was verified through comparison of the breast phantom reconstructions with x-ray CT results: the final images resolve variations in sound speed with a spatial resolution close to 2 mm. Waveform tomography overcomes the resolution limit of time-of-flight methods caused by finite frequency (diffraction) effects. The method is a combination of time-of-flight tomography, and 2-D acoustic waveform inversion of the transmission arrivals in ultrasonic data. For selected frequency components of the waveforms, a finite-difference simulation of the visco-acoustic wave equation is used to compute synthetic data in the current model, and the data residuals are formed by subtraction. The residuals are used in an iterative, gradient-based scheme to update the sound-speed and attenuation model to produce a reduced misfit to the data. Computational efficiency is achieved through the use of time-reversal of the data residuals to construct the model updates. Lower frequencies are used first, to establish the long wavelength components of the image, and higher frequencies are introduced later to provide increased resolution.

  16. Sound-speed and attenuation imaging of breast tissue using waveform tomography of transmission ultrasound data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, R. Gerhard; Huang, Lianjie; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter

    2007-03-01

    Waveform tomography results are presented from 800 kHz ultrasound transmission scans of a breast phantom, and from an in vivo ultrasound breast scan: significant improvements are demonstrated in resolution over time-of-flight reconstructions. Quantitative reconstructions of both sound-speed and inelastic attenuation are recovered. The data were acquired in the Computed Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system, comprising a 20 cm diameter solid-state ultrasound ring array with 256 active, non-beamforming transducers. Waveform tomography is capable of resolving variations in acoustic properties at sub-wavelength scales. This was verified through comparison of the breast phantom reconstructions with x-ray CT results: the final images resolve variations in sound speed with a spatial resolution close to 2 mm. Waveform tomography overcomes the resolution limit of time-of-flight methods caused by finite frequency (diffraction) effects. The method is a combination of time-of-flight tomography, and 2-D acoustic waveform inversion of the transmission arrivals in ultrasonic data. For selected frequency components of the waveforms, a finite-difference simulation of the visco-acoustic wave equation is used to compute synthetic data in the current model, and the data residuals are formed by subtraction. The residuals are used in an iterative, gradient-based scheme to update the sound-speed and attenuation model to produce a reduced misfit to the data. Computational efficiency is achieved through the use of time-reversal of the data residuals to construct the model updates. Lower frequencies are used first, to establish the long wavelength components of the image, and higher frequencies are introduced later to provide increased resolution.

  17. Two types of brown adipose tissue in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lidell, Martin E; Betz, Matthias J; Enerbäck, Sven

    2014-01-01

    During the last years the existence of metabolically active brown adipose tissue in adult humans has been widely accepted by the research community. Its unique ability to dissipate chemical energy stored in triglycerides as heat makes it an attractive target for new drugs against obesity and its related diseases. Hence the tissue is now subject to intense research, the hypothesis being that an expansion and/or activation of the tissue is associated with a healthy metabolic phenotype. Animal studies provide evidence for the existence of at least two types of brown adipocytes. Apart from the classical brown adipocyte that is found primarily in the interscapular region where it constitutes a thermogenic organ, a second type of brown adipocyte, the so-called beige adipocyte, can appear within white adipose tissue depots. The fact that the two cell types develop from different precursors suggests that they might be recruited and stimulated by different cues and therefore represent two distinct targets for therapeutic intervention. The aim of this commentary is to discuss recent work addressing the question whether also humans possess two types of brown adipocytes and to highlight some issues when looking for molecular markers for such cells. PMID:24575372

  18. High-frequency ultrasound for monitoring changes in liver tissue during preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, Roxana M.; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Giles, Anoja; Sherar, Michael D.; Hunt, John W.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    Currently the only method to assess liver preservation injury is based on liver appearance and donor medical history. Previous work has shown that high-frequency ultrasound could detect ischemic cell death due to changes in cell morphology. In this study, we use high-frequency ultrasound integrated backscatter to assess liver damage in experimental models of liver ischemia. Ultimately, our goal is to predict organ suitability for transplantation using high-frequency imaging and spectral analysis techniques. To examine the effects of liver ischemia at different temperatures, livers from Wistar rats were surgically excised, immersed in phosphate buffer saline and stored at 4 and 20 °C for 24 h. To mimic organ preservation, livers were excised, flushed with University of Wisconsin (UW) solution and stored at 4 °C for 24 h. Preservation injury was simulated by either not flushing livers with UW solution or, before scanning, allowing livers to reach room temperature. Ultrasound images and corresponding radiofrequency data were collected over the ischemic period. No significant increase in integrated backscatter (~2.5 dBr) was measured for the livers prepared using standard preservation conditions. For all other ischemia models, the integrated backscatter increased by 4-9 dBr demonstrating kinetics dependent on storage conditions. The results provide a possible framework for using high-frequency imaging to non-invasively assess liver preservation injury.

  19. Interaction of vortices with ultrasound and the acoustic Faraday effect in type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, D.; Bulaevskii, L.; Ivlev, B. |; Maley, M.; Bishop, A.R.

    1996-03-01

    We study the interaction of sound waves with vortices in type-II superconductors, taking into account pinning and electrodynamic forces between vortices and crystal displacements. We propose ultrasound techniques as a method for obtaining information about vortex dynamics. This is particularly appropiate at low temperatures where transport measurements are ineffective. The changes in sound velocity and attenuation due to vortices, can provide information on the elastic constants of the vortex system and on vortex dissipation, respectively. At low temperatures the Magnus force acting on vortices leads to the {ital acoustic} {ital Faraday} {ital effect}: there is a rotation of the polarization plane of tranverse sound waves propagating along the magnetic field. This effect is linear in the Magnus force and magnetic field in crystals with equivalent {ital a} and {ital b} axes for a field parallel to the {ital c} axis. We discuss how this effect can be measured by means of either pulse-echo techniques or standing sound waves. Also, we show that an ac electromagnetic field acting on the vortex system can generate ultrasound. We calculate the amplitude of the generated sound waves in the linear regime and compare with recent experiments. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Ultrasound Transducer and System for Real-Time Simultaneous Therapy and Diagnosis for Noninvasive Surgery of Prostate Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong Seob; Chang, Jin Ho; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    For noninvasive treatment of prostate tissue using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), this paper proposes a design of an integrated multi-functional confocal phased array (IMCPA) and a strategy to perform both imaging and therapy simultaneously with this array. IMCPA is composed of triple-row phased arrays: a 6 MHz array in the center row for imaging and two 4 MHz arrays in the outer rows for therapy. Different types of piezoelectric materials and stack configurations may be employed to maximize their respective functionalities, i.e., therapy and imaging. Fabrication complexity of IMCPA may be reduced by assembling already constructed arrays. In IMCPA, reflected therapeutic signals may corrupt the quality of imaging signals received by the center row array. This problem can be overcome by implementing a coded excitation approach and/or a notch filter when B-mode images are formed during therapy. The 13-bit Barker code, which is a binary code with unique autocorrelation properties, is preferred for implementing coded excitation, although other codes may also be used. From both Field II simulation and experimental results, whether these remedial approaches would make it feasible to simultaneously carry out imaging and therapy by IMCPA was verifeid. The results showed that the 13-bit Barker code with 3 cycles per bit provided acceptable performances. The measured −6 dB and −20 dB range mainlobe widths were 0.52 mm and 0.91 mm, respectively, and a range sidelobe level was measured to be −48 dB regardless of whether a notch filter was used. The 13-bit Barker code with 2 cycles per bit yielded −6dB and −20dB range mainlobe widths of 0.39 mm and 0.67 mm. Its range sidelobe level was found to be −40 dB after notch filtering. These results indicate the feasibility of the proposed transducer design and system for real-time imaging during therapy. PMID:19811994

  1. Method of and Apparatus for Histological Human Tissue Characterization Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); Taler, George A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining important histological characteristics of tissue, including a determination of the tissue's health is discussed. Electrical pulses are converted into meaningful numerical representations through the use of Fourier Transforms. These numerical representations are then used to determine important histological characteristics of tissue. This novel invention does not require rectification and thus provides for detailed information from the ultrasonic scan.

  2. Method of and Apparatus for Histological Human Tissue Characterization Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); TalEr, George A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining important histological characteristics of tissue, including a determination of the tissue's health. Electrical pulses are converted into meaningful numerical representations through the use of Fourier Transforms. These numerical representations are then used to determine important histological characteristics of tissue. This novel invention does not require rectification and thus provides for detailed information from the ultrasonic scan.

  3. Effect of substrate choice and tissue type on tissue preparation for spectral histopathology by Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fullwood, Leanne M; Griffiths, Dave; Ashton, Katherine; Dawson, Timothy; Lea, Robert W; Davis, Charles; Bonnier, Franck; Byrne, Hugh J; Baker, Matthew J

    2014-01-21

    Raman spectroscopy is a non-destructive, non-invasive, rapid and economical technique which has the potential to be an excellent method for the diagnosis of cancer and understanding disease progression through retrospective studies of archived tissue samples. Historically, biobanks are generally comprised of formalin fixed paraffin preserved tissue and as a result these specimens are often used in spectroscopic research. Tissue in this state has to be dewaxed prior to Raman analysis to reduce paraffin contributions in the spectra. However, although the procedures are derived from histopathological clinical practice, the efficacy of the dewaxing procedures that are currently employed is questionable. Ineffective removal of paraffin results in corruption of the spectra and previous experiments have shown that the efficacy can depend on the dewaxing medium and processing time. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of commonly used spectroscopic substrates (CaF2, Spectrosil quartz and low-E slides) and the influence of different histological tissue types (normal, cancerous and metastatic) on tissue preparation and to assess their use for spectral histopathology. Results show that CaF2 followed by Spectrosil contribute the least to the spectral background. However, both substrates retain paraffin after dewaxing. Low-E substrates, which exhibit the most intense spectral background, do not retain wax and resulting spectra are not affected by paraffin peaks. We also show a disparity in paraffin retention depending upon the histological identity of the tissue with abnormal tissue retaining more paraffin than normal.

  4. Optimization of Contrast-to-Tissue Ratio by Adaptation of Transmitted Ternary Signal in Ultrasound Pulse Inversion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Girault, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast imaging has provided more accurate medical diagnoses thanks to the development of innovating modalities like the pulse inversion imaging. However, this latter modality that improves the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) is not optimal, since the frequency is manually chosen jointly with the probe. However, an optimal choice of this command is possible, but it requires precise information about the transducer and the medium which can be experimentally difficult to obtain, even inaccessible. It turns out that the optimization can become more complex by taking into account the kind of generators, since the generators of electrical signals in a conventional ultrasound scanner can be unipolar, bipolar, or tripolar. Our aim was to seek the ternary command which maximized the CTR. By combining a genetic algorithm and a closed loop, the system automatically proposed the optimal ternary command. In simulation, the gain compared with the usual ternary signal could reach about 3.9 dB. Another interesting finding was that, in contrast to what is generally accepted, the optimal command was not a fixed-frequency signal but had harmonic components. PMID:23573167

  5. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-09-06

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application.

  6. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J.; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm2 intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  7. Controlling the spatial organization of cells and extracellular matrix proteins in engineered tissues using ultrasound standing wave fields

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Kelley A.; Hocking, Denise C.; Dalecki, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds great potential for saving the lives of thousands of organ transplant patients who die each year while waiting for donor organs. However, to successfully fabricate tissues and organs in vitro, methodologies that recreate appropriate extracellular microenvironments to promote tissue regeneration are needed. In this study, we have developed an application of ultrasound standing wave field (USWF) technology to the field of tissue engineering. Acoustic radiation forces associated with USWF were used to non-invasively control the spatial distribution of mammalian cells and cell-bound extracellular matrix proteins within three-dimensional collagen-based engineered tissues. Cells were suspended in unpolymerized collagen solutions and were exposed to a continuous wave USWF, generated using a 1 MHz source, for 15 min at room temperature. Collagen polymerization occurred during USWF exposure resulting in the formation of three-dimensional collagen gels with distinct bands of aggregated cells. The density of cell bands was dependent on both the initial cell concentration and the pressure amplitude of the USWF. Importantly, USWF exposure did not decrease cell viability, but rather enhanced cell function. Alignment of cells into loosely clustered, planar cell bands significantly increased levels of cell-mediated collagen gel contraction and collagen fiber reorganization as compared to sham-exposed samples with a homogeneous cell distribution. Additionally, the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin, was localized to cell banded areas by binding the protein to the cell surface prior to USWF exposure. By controlling cell and extracellular organization, this application of USWF technology is a promising approach for engineering tissues in vitro. PMID:20870341

  8. High-Resolution Ultrasound-Switchable Fluorescence Imaging in Centimeter-Deep Tissue Phantoms with High Signal-To-Noise Ratio and High Sensitivity via Novel Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bingbing; Bandi, Venugopal; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Pei, Yanbo; D’Souza, Francis; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    For many years, investigators have sought after high-resolution fluorescence imaging in centimeter-deep tissue because many interesting in vivo phenomena—such as the presence of immune system cells, tumor angiogenesis, and metastasis—may be located deep in tissue. Previously, we developed a new imaging technique to achieve high spatial resolution in sub-centimeter deep tissue phantoms named continuous-wave ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (CW-USF). The principle is to use a focused ultrasound wave to externally and locally switch on and off the fluorophore emission from a small volume (close to ultrasound focal volume). By making improvements in three aspects of this technique: excellent near-infrared USF contrast agents, a sensitive frequency-domain USF imaging system, and an effective signal processing algorithm, for the first time this study has achieved high spatial resolution (~ 900 μm) in 3-centimeter-deep tissue phantoms with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high sensitivity (3.4 picomoles of fluorophore in a volume of 68 nanoliters can be detected). We have achieved these results in both tissue-mimic phantoms and porcine muscle tissues. We have also demonstrated multi-color USF to image and distinguish two fluorophores with different wavelengths, which might be very useful for simultaneously imaging of multiple targets and observing their interactions in the future. This work has opened the door for future studies of high-resolution centimeter-deep tissue fluorescence imaging. PMID:27829050

  9. Listening to speech recruits specific tongue motor synergies as revealed by transcranial magnetic stimulation and tissue-Doppler ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    D'Ausilio, A; Maffongelli, L; Bartoli, E; Campanella, M; Ferrari, E; Berry, J; Fadiga, L

    2014-01-01

    The activation of listener's motor system during speech processing was first demonstrated by the enhancement of electromyographic tongue potentials as evoked by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over tongue motor cortex. This technique is, however, technically challenging and enables only a rather coarse measurement of this motor mirroring. Here, we applied TMS to listeners' tongue motor area in association with ultrasound tissue Doppler imaging to describe fine-grained tongue kinematic synergies evoked by passive listening to speech. Subjects listened to syllables requiring different patterns of dorso-ventral and antero-posterior movements (/ki/, /ko/, /ti/, /to/). Results show that passive listening to speech sounds evokes a pattern of motor synergies mirroring those occurring during speech production. Moreover, mirror motor synergies were more evident in those subjects showing good performances in discriminating speech in noise demonstrating a role of the speech-related mirror system in feed-forward processing the speaker's ongoing motor plan.

  10. INVESTIGATION INTO THE MECHANISMS OF TISSUE ATOMIZATION BY HIGH INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Julianna C.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic atomization, or the emission of a fog of droplets, was recently proposed to explain tissue fractionation in boiling histotripsy. However, even though liquid atomization has been studied extensively, the mechanisms of tissue atomization remain unclear. In this paper, high-speed photography and overpressure were used to evaluate the role of bubbles in tissue atomization. As the static pressure increased, the degree of fractionation decreased, and the ex vivo tissue became thermally denatured. The effect of surface wetness on atomization was also evaluated in vivo and in tissue-mimicking gels where surface wetness was found to enhance atomization by forming surface instabilities that augment cavitation. In addition, experimental results indicated that wetting collagenous tissues, such as the liver capsule, allowed atomization to breach such barriers. These results highlight the importance of bubbles and surface instabilities in atomization and could be used to enhance boiling histotripsy for transition to clinical use. PMID:25662182

  11. Investigation into the mechanisms of tissue atomization by high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Simon, Julianna C; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Wang, Yak-Nam; Khokhlova, Vera A; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasonic atomization, or the emission of a fog of droplets, was recently proposed to explain tissue fractionation in boiling histotripsy. However, even though liquid atomization has been studied extensively, the mechanisms underlying tissue atomization remain unclear. In the work described here, high-speed photography and overpressure were used to evaluate the role of bubbles in tissue atomization. As static pressure increased, the degree of fractionation decreased, and the ex vivo tissue became thermally denatured. The effect of surface wetness on atomization was also evaluated in vivo and in tissue-mimicking gels, where surface wetness was found to enhance atomization by forming surface instabilities that augment cavitation. In addition, experimental results indicated that wetting collagenous tissues, such as the liver capsule, allowed atomization to breach such barriers. These results highlight the importance of bubbles and surface instabilities in atomization and could be used to enhance boiling histotripsy for transition to clinical use.

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nef quasispecies in pathological tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, B M; Epstein, L G; Saito, Y; Chen, D; Sharer, L R; Anand, R

    1992-01-01

    The role of the nef gene in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is poorly understood. To provide a basis for studies on the role of nef in AIDS, we used targeted polymerase chain reaction amplification and DNA sequencing to determine the structure of nef genes in pathologic tissue from HIV-1-infected children and adults. We find that the nef reading frame is open in 92% of clones derived from both brain and lymphocytic tissue of children, suggesting that nef is expressed in these tissues. One HIV-1 clone, BRVA, obtained by coculture from the brain of an adult AIDS patient with progressive dementia, was previously shown to contain a duplicated region in nef. We show here that similar duplications are widespread in both adults and children with AIDS. However, coculture strongly selects against the broad spectrum of nef quasispecies found in tissue. These findings suggest functional selection for nef quasispecies in pathologic tissues during HIV-1 infection of the human host. Images PMID:1501274

  13. Acute Effects of Lateral Thigh Foam Rolling on Arterial Tissue Perfusion Determined by Spectral Doppler and Power Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hotfiel, Thilo; Swoboda, Bernd; Krinner, Sebastian; Grim, Casper; Engelhardt, Martin; Uder, Michael; Heiss, Rafael U

    2017-04-01

    Hotfiel, T, Swoboda, B, Krinner, S, Grim, C, Engelhardt, M, Uder, M, and Heiss, R. Acute effects of lateral thigh foam rolling on arterial tissue perfusion determined by spectral Doppler and power Doppler ultrasound. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 893-900, 2017-Foam rolling has been developed as a popular intervention in training and rehabilitation. However, evidence on its effects on the cellular and physiological level is lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of foam rolling on arterial blood flow of the lateral thigh. Twenty-one healthy participants (age, 25 ± 2 years; height, 177 ± 9 cm; body weight, 74 ± 9 kg) were recruited from the medical and sports faculty. Arterial tissue perfusion was determined by spectral Doppler and power Doppler ultrasound, represented as peak flow (Vmax), time average velocity maximum (TAMx), time average velocity mean (TAMn), and resistive index (RI), and with semiquantitative grading that was assessed by 4 blindfolded investigators. Measurement values were assessed under resting conditions and twice after foam rolling exercises of the lateral thigh (0 and 30 minutes after intervention). The trochanteric region, mid portion, and distal tibial insertion of the lateral thigh were representative for data analysis. Arterial blood flow of the lateral thigh increased significantly after foam rolling exercises compared with baseline (p ≤ 0.05). We detected a relative increase in Vmax of 73.6% (0 minutes) and 52.7% (30 minutes) (p < 0.001), in TAMx of 53.2% (p < 0.001) and 38.3% (p = 0.002), and in TAMn of 84.4% (p < 0.001) and 68.2% (p < 0.001). Semiquantitative power Doppler scores at all portions revealed increased average grading of 1.96 after intervention and 2.04 after 30 minutes compared with 0.75 at baseline. Our results may contribute to the understanding of local physiological reactions to self-myofascial release.

  14. Spatial-temporal ultrasound imaging of residual cavitation bubbles around a fluid-tissue interface in histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong; Xu, Shanshan; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Runna; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation is considered as the primary mechanism of soft tissue fragmentation (histotripsy) by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound. The residual cavitation bubbles have a dual influence on the histotripsy pulses: these serve as nuclei for easy generation of new cavitation, and act as strong scatterers causing energy "shadowing." To monitor the residual cavitation bubbles in histotripsy, an ultrafast active cavitation imaging method with relatively high signal-to-noise ratio and good spatial-temporal resolution was proposed in this paper, which combined plane wave transmission, minimum variance beamforming, and coherence factor weighting. The spatial-temporal evolutions of residual cavitation bubbles around a fluid-tissue interface in histotripsy under pulse duration (PD) of 10-40 μs and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.67-2 kHz were monitored by this method. The integrated bubble area curves inside the tissue interface were acquired from the bubble image sequence, and the formation process of histotripsy damage was estimated. It was observed that the histotripsy efficiency decreased with both longer PDs and higher PRFs. A direct relationship with a coefficient of 1.0365 between histotripsy lesion area and inner residual bubble area was found. These results can assist in monitoring and optimization of the histotripsy treatment further.

  15. Wavelet-transform-based active imaging of cavitation bubbles in tissues induced by high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Xu, Shanshan; Hu, Hong; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-08-01

    Cavitation detection and imaging are essential for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapies. In this paper, an active cavitation imaging method based on wavelet transform is proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The Yang-Church model, which is a combination of the Keller-Miksis equation with the Kelvin-Voigt equation for the pulsations of gas bubbles in simple linear viscoelastic solids, is utilized to construct the bubble wavelet. Experiments with porcine muscles demonstrate that image quality is associated with the initial radius of the bubble wavelet and the scale. Moreover, the Yang-Church model achieves a somewhat better performance compared with the Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model. Furthermore, the pulse inversion (PI) technique is combined with bubble wavelet transform to achieve further improvement. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio (CTR) of the best tissue bubble wavelet transform (TBWT) mode image is improved by 5.1 dB compared with that of the B-mode image, while the CTR of the best PI-based TBWT mode image is improved by 7.9 dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image. This work will be useful for better monitoring of cavitation in HIFU-induced therapies.

  16. Feasibility of optoacoustic visualization of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in live tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2010-03-01

    A 3-D optoacoustic imaging system was used to visualize thermal lesions produced in vivo using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). A 7.5-MHz, surgical, focused transducer with a radius of curvature of 35 mm and an aperture diameter of 23 mm was used to generate HIFU. A pulsed laser, which could operate at 755 nm and 1064 nm, was used to illuminate excised tissue and mice using a bifurcated fiber bundle resulting in two wide beams of light. Tomographic images were obtained while the specimens were rotated within a sphere outlined by a concave arc-shaped array of 64 piezo-composite transducers. These images were then combined to reconstruct 3-D volume images (voxel resolution 0.5 mm), which were acquired before and after HIFU exposure. In vivo optoacoustic images acquired at 1064 nm provided visualization of HIFU lesions. The lesion was indicated by a negative optoacoustic contrast. The molecular nature of such contrast may possibly be associated with reduction of the optical absorption due to reduced concentration of blood, tissue dehydration, denaturation of proteins and porphyrins, and reduction of thermoacoustic efficiency in the thermally treated tissue. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential of optoacoustic imaging to assess and monitor the progress of HIFU therapy.

  17. Feasibility and effect of ultrasound microbubble-mediated wild-type p53 gene transfection of HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, WEN-JUAN; XIONG, ZHENG-AI; TANG, YAN; DONG, PEI-TING; LI, PAN; WANG, ZHI-GANG

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of diseases. The key problem of gene therapy is the choice of an effective vector. Ultrasound-mediated microbubble technique (UMMT) has already shown promising applications in numerous types of tumors apart from cervical carcinoma. In the present study, according to the results of an MTT assay, we initially chose an ultrasound intensity of 0.5 W/cm2, an ultrasound exposure time of 30 sec and a microbubble concentration of 10% as the optimum experimental condition for wtp53 plasmid transfection into HeLa cells. To further investigate the transfection efficiency of ultrasound combined with microbubbles, RT-PCR analysis was used to examine the mRNA level of p53. The transfection efficiency in the plasmid plus microbubbles and ultrasound group was significantly higher than that of the other groups. Following transfection of the wtp53 gene, flow cytometric analysis showed that the cell cycle of HeLa cells was arrested in the G1 phase. The results of the present study suggest that UMMT, a new gene delivery system, increases the transfection efficiency of the wtp53 gene. Moreover, the growth of HeLa cells was arrested by introducing wtp53. This study may afford a new trend for the gene therapy of cervical carcinoma. PMID:22970006

  18. The role of acoustic nonlinearity in tissue heating behind the rib cage using high intensity focused ultrasound phased array

    PubMed Central

    Yuldashev, Petr V.; Shmeleva, Svetlana M.; Ilyin, Sergey A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Gavrilov, Leonid R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate theoretically the effects of nonlinear propagation in a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field produced by a therapeutic phased array and the resultant heating of tissue behind a rib cage. Three configurations of focusing were simulated: in water, in water with ribs in the beam path, and in water with ribs backed by a layer of soft tissue. The Westervelt equation was used to model the nonlinear HIFU field and a 1 MHz phased array consisting of 254 circular elements was used as a boundary condition to the model. The temperature rise in tissue was modelled using the bioheat equation, and thermally necrosed volumes were calculated using the thermal dose formulation. The shapes of lesions predicted by the modelling were compared with those previously obtained in in vitro experiments at low power sonications. Intensity levels at the face of the array elements that corresponded to formation of high amplitude shock fronts in the focal region were determined as 10 W·cm−2 in the free field in water and 40 W·cm−2 in the presence of ribs. It was shown that exposures with shocks provided a substantial increase in tissue heating, and its better spatial localization in the main focal region only. The relative effects of overheating ribs and splitting of the focus due to the periodic structure of the ribs were therefore reduced. These results suggest that utilizing nonlinear propagation and shock formation effects can be beneficial for inducing confined HIFU lesions when irradiating through obstructions such as ribs. Design of compact therapeutic arrays to provide maximum power outputs with lower intensity levels at the elements is necessary to achieve shock wave regimes for clinically relevant sonication depths in tissue. PMID:23528338

  19. Early evaluation of renal hemodynamic alterations in type I diabetes mellitus with duplex ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Saif, Aasem; Soliman, Neveen A; Abdel-Hameed, Alaa

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the role of renal duplex ultrasonography in the detection of early alteration of renal blood flow in type I diabetic patients, we studied with duplex ultrasound 32 patients with type I diabetes mellitus (19 males, 13 females, age range 8-19 years) and 35 age and sex-matched controls. The resistivity indices (RIs) and pulsatility indices (PIs) of the main renal as well as intra-renal arteries were calculated. Compared with the healthy control subjects, diabetic patients had significantly higher resistivity indices (RIs) in the intrarenal (segmental, arcuate and interlobar) arteries (P= 0.001). The study, also revealed a significantly positive correlation between the RIs in the intrarenal arteries in diabetics and the albumin/creatinine ratio (r= 0.54, 0.52 and 0.51 respectively), glycated hemoglobin (r= 0.61, 0.59 and 0.63 respectively), as well as the estimated GFR (e-GFR) (r= 0.53, 0.51 and 0.57 respectively). We conclude that the current study documented early intra-renal hemodynamic alterations in the form of pathologically elevated intrarenal RIs. This denotes the potential usefulness of duplex evaluation of the intrarenal arteries, as a noninvasive procedure, for monitoring type 1 diabetic patients to predict those at risk of diabetic nephropathy.

  20. [Microalbuminuria and ultrasound characteristics of kidneys in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1].

    PubMed

    Hasanović, Evlijana; Tulumović, Denijal; Imamović, Goran; Trnacević, Senaid

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare ultrasound findings of kidneys in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1 (DMT1), establish the association with microalbuminuria, blood pressure values and metabolic control of the disease, and creatinine clearance. In 80 children and adolescents with DMT1, in whom illness occurred in period between 2 and 16 years of age, morphometry measurements with ultrasound were performed. Nephelometric method of three consecutive samples of urine determined microalbuminuria. In patients with microalbuminuria, creatinine clearance was also measured. Demographic data were obtained from the parents and from the patients medical records. In relation to the duration of the disease, all patients were divided into two groups: the first group of patients with illness lasting for less than 10 years, and the second were those whose illness had lasted more than 10 years. In patients with duration of DMT1 of more than 10 years, the frequency of pathological findings of the longitudinal diameter and volume of both kidneys in relation to age and anthropometric standards was statistically significantly greater. Also, the finding of microalbuminuria was more frequent. In the group of patients with DMT1 lasting for more than 10 years, the mean value of HBA1c was statistically significantly higher In patients with microalbuminuria the total mean value of creatinine clearance was within the bounds of the reference values and was statistically significantly higher in patients in whom the illness had lasted less than three years, which indicates hyperfiltration of the kidneys. Alongside microalbuminuria, monitoring of the dimension and volume of the kidneys may indicate the existence of the early phases of diabetic nephropathy and result in its prevention and prevention of illness progression.

  1. Evaluation of an algorithm for semiautomated segmentation of thin tissue layers in high-frequency ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Qiang; Dunmore-Buyze, Joy; Boughner, Derek R; Lacefield, James C

    2006-02-01

    An algorithm consisting of speckle reduction by median filtering, contrast enhancement using top- and bottom-hat morphological filters, and segmentation with a discrete dynamic contour (DDC) model was implemented for nondestructive measurements of soft tissue layer thickness. Algorithm performance was evaluated by segmenting simulated images of three-layer phantoms and high-frequency (40 MHz) ultrasound images of porcine aortic valve cusps in vitro. The simulations demonstrated the necessity of the median and morphological filtering steps and enabled testing of user-specified parameters of the morphological filters and DDC model. In the experiments, six cusps were imaged in coronary perfusion solution (CPS) then in distilled water to test the algorithm's sensitivity to changes in the dimensions of thin tissue layers. Significant increases in the thickness of the fibrosa, spongiosa, and ventricularis layers, by 53.5% (p < 0.001), 88.5% (p < 0.001), and 35.1% (p = 0.033), respectively, were observed when the specimens were submerged in water. The intraobserver coefficient of variation of repeated thickness estimates ranged from 0.044 for the fibrosa in water to 0.164 for the spongiosa in CPS. Segmentation accuracy and variability depended on the thickness and contrast of the layers, but the modest variability provides confidence in the thickness measurements.

  2. Effects of tissue mechanical and acoustic anisotropies on the performance of a cross-correlation-based ultrasound strain imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Lee, Wei-Ning

    2017-02-01

    The anisotropic mechanical properties (mechanical anisotropy) and view-dependent ultrasonic backscattering (acoustic anisotropy) of striated muscle due to the underlying myofiber arrangement have been well documented, but whether they impact on ultrasound strain imaging (USI) techniques remains unclear. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the performance of a cross-correlation-based two-dimensional (2D) USI method in anisotropic media under controlled quasi-static compression in silico and in vitro. First, synthetic pre- and post-deformed 2D radiofrequency images of anisotropic phantoms were simulated in two scenarios to examine the individual effect of the mechanical and acoustic anisotropies on strain estimation. In the first scenario, the phantom was defined to be transversely isotropic with the scatterer amplitudes following a zero-mean Gaussian distribution, while in the second scenario, the phantom was defined to be mechanically isotropic with Gaussian distributed scatterer amplitudes correlated along the principal directions of pre-defined fibers. These two anisotropies were then jointly incorporated into the ultrasound image simulation model with additional depth-dependent attenuation. Three imaging planes—the fiber plane with the fiber direction perpendicular to the ultrasound beam (TISperp_fb), the fiber plane with the fiber direction parallel to the beam (TISpara), and the transverse fiber plane (TISperp_cfb)—were studied. The absolute relative error (ARE) of the lateral strain estimates in TISperp_fb (20.99  ±  15.65%) was much higher than that in TISperp_cfb (4.14  ±  3.17%). The ARE in TISpara was unavailable owing to the large spatial extent of false peaks. The effect of tissue anisotropy on the performance of the 2D USI was further confirmed in an in vitro porcine skeletal muscle phantom. The best in-plane strain quality was again shown in TISperp_cfb (elastographic signal-to-noise ratio, or SNRe:  >25 d

  3. Effects of tissue mechanical and acoustic anisotropies on the performance of a cross-correlation-based ultrasound strain imaging method.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Lee, Wei-Ning

    2017-02-21

    The anisotropic mechanical properties (mechanical anisotropy) and view-dependent ultrasonic backscattering (acoustic anisotropy) of striated muscle due to the underlying myofiber arrangement have been well documented, but whether they impact on ultrasound strain imaging (USI) techniques remains unclear. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the performance of a cross-correlation-based two-dimensional (2D) USI method in anisotropic media under controlled quasi-static compression in silico and in vitro. First, synthetic pre- and post-deformed 2D radiofrequency images of anisotropic phantoms were simulated in two scenarios to examine the individual effect of the mechanical and acoustic anisotropies on strain estimation. In the first scenario, the phantom was defined to be transversely isotropic with the scatterer amplitudes following a zero-mean Gaussian distribution, while in the second scenario, the phantom was defined to be mechanically isotropic with Gaussian distributed scatterer amplitudes correlated along the principal directions of pre-defined fibers. These two anisotropies were then jointly incorporated into the ultrasound image simulation model with additional depth-dependent attenuation. Three imaging planes-the fiber plane with the fiber direction perpendicular to the ultrasound beam (TISperp_fb), the fiber plane with the fiber direction parallel to the beam (TISpara), and the transverse fiber plane (TISperp_cfb)-were studied. The absolute relative error (ARE) of the lateral strain estimates in TISperp_fb (20.99  ±  15.65%) was much higher than that in TISperp_cfb (4.14  ±  3.17%). The ARE in TISpara was unavailable owing to the large spatial extent of false peaks. The effect of tissue anisotropy on the performance of the 2D USI was further confirmed in an in vitro porcine skeletal muscle phantom. The best in-plane strain quality was again shown in TISperp_cfb (elastographic signal-to-noise ratio, or SNRe:  >25 d

  4. 3D ultrasound biomicroscopy for assessment of cartilage repair tissue: volumetric characterisation and correlation to established classification systems.

    PubMed

    Schöne, M; Männicke, N; Somerson, J S; Marquaß, B; Henkelmann, R; Mochida, J; Aigner, T; Raum, K; Schulz, R M

    2016-02-08

    Objective and sensitive assessment of cartilage repair outcomes lacks suitable methods. This study investigated the feasibility of 3D ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) to quantify cartilage repair outcomes volumetrically and their correlation with established classification systems. 32 sheep underwent bilateral treatment of a focal cartilage defect. One or two years post-operatively the repair outcomes were assessed and scored macroscopically (Outerbridge, ICRS-CRA), by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, MOCART), and histopathology (O'Driscoll, ICRS-I and ICRS-II). The UBM data were acquired after MRI and used to reconstruct the shape of the initial cartilage layer, enabling the estimation of the initial cartilage thickness and defect volume as well as volumetric parameters for defect filling, repair tissue, bone loss and bone overgrowth. The quantification of the repair outcomes revealed high variations in the initial thickness of the cartilage layer, indicating the need for cartilage thickness estimation before creating a defect. Furthermore, highly significant correlations were found for the defect filling estimated from UBM to the established classification systems. 3D visualisation of the repair regions showed highly variable morphology within single samples. This raises the question as to whether macroscopic, MRI and histopathological scoring provide sufficient reliability. The biases of the individual methods will be discussed within this context. UBM was shown to be a feasible tool to evaluate cartilage repair outcomes, whereby the most important objective parameter is the defect filling. Translation of UBM into arthroscopic or transcutaneous ultrasound examinations would allow non-destructive and objective follow-up of individual patients and better comparison between the results of clinical trials.

  5. Ultrasound Thermometry for Optimizing heat Supply During a Hyperthermia Therapy of Cancer Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Mario; Rath, Katharina; Ruiz, Andrés Eduardo Ramos; Kühnicke, Elfgard

    Monitoring the temperature during a hyperthermia therapy allows optimizing the heat supply to destroy the cancer whereby the damage in the surrounding tissue is minimized. This contribution presents the fundamental research and current work to realize a locally resolved, noninvasive and intra-surgically applicable temperature measurement in tissue. This is realized by measuring the sound velocity locally resolved by an annular array, which allows noninvasive measurements although the observed tissue is not accessible from all directions. The method had been already qualified for fluids and analyses the echoes of moving scattering particles to obtain the time of flight to the focus of the transducer. As the parameters of the transducer are known the focus position (and thus the time of flight) can be calculated as a function of the sound velocity distribution of the propagation medium. Hence the measured time of flight allows determining the focus position and mean sound velocity simultaneously by means of this function. Varying the time lags of the signals for each element allows moving the focus and so measuring locally resolved. This contribution presents first ex-vivo measurements in tissue and thus proves the adaptability of this technique for tissue.

  6. Characterization of tissue-simulating phantom materials for ultrasound-guided needle procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Susan; Moore, John; Lammers, Deanna; Baxter, John; Peters, Terry

    2012-02-01

    Needle biopsies are standard protocols that are commonly performed under ultrasound (US) guidance or computed tomography (CT)1. Vascular access such as central line insertions, and many spinal needle therapies also rely on US guidance. Phantoms for these procedures are crucial as both training tools for clinicians and research tools for developing new guidance systems. Realistic imaging properties and material longevity are critical qualities for needle guidance phantoms. However, current commercially available phantoms for use with US guidance have many limitations, the most detrimental of which include harsh needle tracks obfuscating US images and a membrane comparable to human skin that does not allow seepage of inner media. To overcome these difficulties, we tested a variety of readily available media and membranes to evaluate optimal materials to fit our current needs. It was concluded that liquid hand soap was the best medium, as it instantly left no needle tracks, had an acceptable depth of US penetration and portrayed realistic imaging conditions, while because of its low leakage, low cost, acceptable durability and transparency, the optimal membrane was 10 gauge vinyl.

  7. Assessment of the effects of ultrasound-mediated glucose on permeability of normal, benign, and cancerous human lung tissues with the Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Huajiang; Wu, Guoyong; Guo, Zhouyi; Yang, Hongqin; He, Yonghong; Xie, Shusen; Guo, Xiao

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of ultrasound-mediated analyte diffusion on permeability of normal, benign, and cancerous human lung tissue in vitro and to find more effective sonophoretic (SP) delivery in combination with the optical clearing agents (OCAs) method to distinguish normal and diseased lung tissues. The permeability coefficients of SP in combination with OCAs diffusion in lung tissue were measured with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). 30% glucose and SP with a frequency of 1 MHz and an intensity of 0.80 W/cm2 over a 3 cm probe was simultaneously applied for 15 min. Experimental results show that the mean permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP were found to be (2.01±0.21)×10-5 cm/s from normal lung (NL) tissue, (2.75±0.28)×10-5 cm/s from lung benign granulomatosis (LBG) tissue, (4.53±0.49)×10-5 cm/s from lung adenocarcinoma tumor (LAT) tissue, and (5.81±0.62)×10-5 cm/s from lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) tissue, respectively. The permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP increase approximately 36.8%, 125.4%, and 189.1% for the LBG, LAT, and LSCC tissue compared with that for the NL tissue, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP between LBG and NL tissue (p<0.05), between LAT and NL tissue (p<0.05), and between LSCC and NL tissue (p<0.05). The results suggest that the OCT functional imaging technique to combine an ultrasound-OCAs combination method could become a powerful tool in early diagnosis and monitoring of changed microstructure of pathologic human lung tissue.

  8. Insulin action in adipose tissue in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta-Blanco, Francisco; Botella-Carretero, Jose Ignacio; Iglesias, Pedro; Balsa, José Antonio; Zamarrón, Isabel; De la Puerta, Cristina; Arrieta, Juan José; Ramos, Francisco; Vázquez, Clotilde; Rovira, Adela

    2011-01-01

    Background: Insulin action has been reported to be normal in type 1 diabetic patients. However, some studies have reported an insulin resistance state in these patients. The aim of this study was to investigate insulin resistance in a group of type 1 diabetic patients. We studied the insulin action in adipose tissue and analyzed the effects of duration of disease, body mass index (BMI), and glycosylated hemoglobin on insulin action at the receptor and postreceptor levels in adipocytes. Methods: Nine female type 1 diabetic patients with different durations of disease and eight nondiabetic female patients of comparable age and BMI were studied. 125I-insulin binding and U-[14C]-D-glucose transport was measured in a sample of subcutaneous gluteus adipose tissue obtained by open surgical biopsy from each subject. Results: The duration of disease was negatively correlated with both 125I-insulin binding capacity (r = −0.70, P < 0.05) and basal and maximum insulin-stimulated glucose transport (r = −0.87, P < 0.01, and r = −0.88, P < 0.01, respectively). Maximum specific 125I-insulin binding to the receptors in adipocytes was higher in the group of patients with a shorter duration of disease (P < 0.01). Basal and maximum insulin-stimulated glucose transport was significantly higher in the group with less than 5 years of disease (P < 0.01). No correlation was found between BMI and insulin action. Conclusion: Female type 1 diabetic patients have normal insulin action. There is a high glucose uptake in the early phase of the disease, although a longer duration of disease appears to be a contributing factor to a decrease in insulin action in these patients, and involving both receptor and postreceptor mechanisms. PMID:21475629

  9. Ultrasound Estimates of Visceral and Subcutaneous-Abdominal Adipose Tissues in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    De Lucia Rolfe, Emanuella; Modi, Neena; Uthaya, Sabita; Hughes, Ieuan A.; Dunger, David B.; Acerini, Carlo; Stolk, Ronald P.; Ong, Ken K.

    2013-01-01

    Other imaging techniques to quantify internal-abdominal adiposity (IA-AT) and subcutaneous-abdominal adiposity (SCA-AT) are frequently impractical in infants. The aim of this study was twofold: (a) to validate ultrasound (US) visceral and subcutaneous-abdominal depths in assessing IA-AT and SCA-AT from MRI as the reference method in infants and (b) to analyze the association between US abdominal adiposity and anthropometric measures at ages 3 months and 12 months. Twenty-two infants underwent MRI and US measures of abdominal adiposity. Abdominal US parameters and anthropometric variables were assessed in the Cambridge Baby Growth Study (CBGS), n = 487 infants (23 girls) at age 3 months and n = 495 infants (237 girls) at 12 months. US visceral and subcutaneous-abdominal depths correlated with MRI quantified IA-AT (r = 0.48, P < 0.05) and SCA-AT (r = 0.71, P < 0.001) volumes, respectively. In CBGS, mean US-visceral depths increased by ~20 % between ages 3 and 12 months (P < 0.0001) and at both ages were lower in infants breast-fed at 3 months than in other infants. US-visceral depths at both 3 and 12 months were inversely related to skinfold thickness at birth (P = 0.03 and P = 0.009 at 3 and 12 months, resp.; adjusted for current skinfold thickness). In contrast, US-subcutaneous-abdominal depth at 3 months was positively related to skinfold thickness at birth (P = 0.004). US measures can rank infants with higher or lower IA-AT and SCA-AT. Contrasting patterns of association with visceral and subcutaneous-abdominal adiposities indicate that they may be differentially regulated in infancy. PMID:23710350

  10. [The ultrasound characteristics of kidneys in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1].

    PubMed

    Hasanović, Evlijana; Tulumović, Denijal; Imamović, Goran; Trnacević, Senaid

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare ultrasound findings of morphometric measurements and registration of Doppler signs of kidneys between children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1 (DMT1) with microalbuminuria, and metabolic control with duration of the disease. Retrospective-prospective study included 80 patients, who got DMT1 in the age from 2 to 16 years. In relation to the duration of the disease, all patients were divided into two groups: the first was whose illness had lasted less than 10 years, the second group was with duration of DMT1 more than 10 years. In patients with duration of DMT1 more than 10 years, the frequency of microalbuminuria, pathological findings of the volume of right kidney, and higher HbA1C were significantly greater. The significant difference was found in the frequency of pathological findings of the resistance index (RI) in the interlobar arteries in both kidneys. Alongside microalbuminuria, monitoring the dimension and volume of the kidneys may indicate the existence of the early phases of diabetic nephropathy.

  11. Ultrasound monitoring of the influence of different accelerating admixtures and cement types for shotcrete on setting and hardening behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Belie, N. de . E-mail: nele.debelie@ugent.be; Grosse, C.U.; Kurz, J.; Reinhardt, H.-W.

    2005-11-15

    The possible use of ultrasound measurements for monitoring setting and hardening of mortar containing different accelerating admixtures for shotcrete was investigated. The sensitivity to accelerator type (alkaline aluminate or alkali-free) and dosage, and accelerator-cement compatibility were evaluated. Furthermore, a new automatic onset picking algorithm for ultrasound signals was tested. A stepwise increase of the accelerator dosage resulted in increasing values for the ultrasound pulse velocity at early ages. In the accelerated mortar no dormant period could be noticed before the pulse velocity started to increase sharply, indicating a quick change in solid phase connectivity. The alkaline accelerator had a larger effect than the alkali-free accelerator, especially at ages below 90 min. The effect of the alkali-free accelerator was at very early age more pronounced on mortar containing CEM I in comparison with CEM II, while the alkaline accelerator had a larger influence on mortar containing CEM II. The increase of ultrasound energy could be related to the setting phenomenon and the maximum energy was reached when the end of workability was approached. Only the alkaline accelerator caused a significant reduction in compressive strength and this for all the dosages tested.

  12. Influence of temperature-dependent thermal parameters on temperature elevation of tissue exposed to high-intensity focused ultrasound: numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Guntur, Sitaramanjaneya Reddy; Choi, Min Joo

    2015-03-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used successfully as a non-invasive modality in treating solid tumors. The temperature rise HIFU irradiation causes in a tissue depends on the thermal properties of the tissue. This study was motivated by our observation that the thermal properties of a tissue vary significantly with temperature (Guntur SR, Lee KI, Paeng DG, Coleman AJ, Choi MJ. Ultrasound Med Biol 2013;39:1771-1784). This research investigated how significantly the alteration of tissue thermal parameters, in the ranges of values measured at 25°C-90°C, affects prediction of the temperature elevation of tissue under the same HIFU exposure. The numerical simulation was performed by coupling a non-linear Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov equation with a bio-heat transfer function. In the conventional method of prediction, the thermal parameters were set as constants measured at room temperature (25°C). This study compared the conventional prediction with those predicted with different thermal parameters measured at the various temperatures up to 90°C. The results indicated that the conventional method significantly overestimated the rise in focal temperature in the liver tissue exposed to a clinical HIFU field, compared with the prediction made using thermal parameters measured at temperatures that cause thermal denaturation. This finding suggests that temperature-dependent thermal parameters should be considered in predicting the temperature rise in a tissue to avoid use of an insufficient thermal dose in treatment planning for HIFU surgery.

  13. [Treatment of a solitary adenoma of the parathyroid gland with ultrasound-guided percutaneous Radio-Frequency-Tissue-Ablation (RFTA)].

    PubMed

    Hänsler, J; Harsch, I A; Strobel, D; Hahn, E G; Becker, D

    2002-06-01

    Radio-Frequency-Tissue-Ablation (RFTA) for the treatment of primary and secondary tumours of the liver has been used for several years, but this minimally invasive treatment is not limited to the liver. A patient suffering from symptomatic postmenopausal osteoporosis, additionally having primary hyperparathyroidism since 1995, refused a surgical resection of the adenoma of the parathyroid gland. Sonographically a 16 mm hypoechoic tumour dorsal of the right upper pole of the thyroid gland was detected. Osteodensitometry: severe osteoporosis of the lumbar spine (88 % of the norm for this age group). Blood check: Elevation of serum calcium level (3.1mmol/l) and serum parathormone level 274 pg/dl (N: 10-50). A percutaneous ultrasound guided RFTA of the adenoma of the thyroid gland was carried out. After RFTA the serum parathormone levels and the serum calcium levels dropped back to normal. The patient was followed-up for one year. For the first time a sufficient therapy for osteoporosis comprising calcium, etidronate and cholecalciferol could be carried out. The osteodensitometry carried out one year after treatment showed an increase in bone density. For the treatment of symptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism RFTA can be a therapeutic alternative for patients with contraindications for surgery.

  14. Use of nakagami statistics and empirical mode decomposition for ultrasound tissue characterization by a nonfocused transducer.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Ho, Ming-Chih; Lee, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Yung-Sheng; Chang, Chien-Chung; Huang, Norden E; Wu, Zhao-Hua; Chang, King-Jen

    2009-12-01

    The Nakagami parameter associated with the Nakagami distribution estimated from ultrasonic backscattered signals reflects the scatterer concentration in a tissue. A nonfocused transducer does not allow tissue characterization based on the Nakagami parameter. This paper proposes a new method called the noise-assisted Nakagami parameter based on empirical mode decomposition of noisy backscattered echoes to allow quantification of the scatterer concentration based on data obtained using a nonfocused transducer. To explore the practical feasibility of the proposed method, the current study performed experiments on phantoms and measurements on rat livers in vitro with and without fibrosis induction. The results show that using a nonfocused transducer makes it possible to use the noise-assisted Nakagami parameter to classify phantoms with different scatterer concentrations and different stages of liver fibrosis in rats more accurately than when using techniques based on the echo intensity and the conventional Nakagami parameter. However, the conventional Nakagami parameter and the noise-assisted Nakagami parameter have different meanings: the former represents the statistics of signals backscattered from unresolvable scatterers, whereas the latter is associated with stronger resolvable scatterers or local inhomogeneity caused by scatterer aggregation.

  15. CONTRAST-ENHANCED ULTRASOUND ASSESSMENT OF IMPAIRED ADIPOSE TISSUE AND MUSCLE PERFUSION IN INSULIN-RESISTANT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Belcik, J. Todd; Davidson, Brian P.; Foster, Ted; Qi, Yue; Zhao, Yan; Peters, Dawn; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background In diabetes mellitus reduced perfusion and capillary surface area in skeletal muscle, which is a major glucose storage site, contributes to abnormal glucose homeostasis. Using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) we investigated whether abdominal adipose tissue perfusion is abnormal in insulin resistance (IR) and correlates with glycemic control. Methods and Results Abdominal adipose tissue and skeletal muscle CEU perfusion imaging was performed in obese IR (db/db) mice at 11-12 or 14-16 weeks of age, and in control lean mice. Time-intensity data were analyzed to quantify microvascular blood flow (MBF) and capillary blood volume (CBV). Blood glucose response over one hour was measured after insulin challenge (1 u/Kg, I.P.). Compared to control mice, db/db mice at 11-12 and 14-16 weeks had a higher glucose concentration area-under-the-curve after insulin (11.8±2.8, 20.6±4.3, and 28.4±5.9 mg·min/dL [×1000], respectively, p=0.0002), and also had lower adipose MBF (0.094±0.038, 0.035±0.010, and 0.023±0.01 mL/min/g, p=0.0002) and CBV (1.6±0.6, 1.0±0.3, and 0.5±0.1 mL/100 g, p=0.0017). The glucose area-under-the-curve correlated in a non-linear fashion with both adipose and skeletal muscle MBF and CBV. There were significant linear correlations between adipose and muscle MBF (r=0.81) and CBV (r=0.66). Adipocyte cell volume on histology was 25-fold higher in 14-16 week db/db versus control mice. Conclusions Abnormal adipose MBF and CBV in IR can be detected by CEU and correlates with the degree of impairment in glucose storage. Abnormalities in adipose tissue and muscle appear to be coupled. Impaired adipose tissue perfusion is in part explained by an increase in adipocyte size without proportional vascular response. PMID:25855669

  16. Characterizing tissue microstructure using an ultrasound system-independent spatial autocorrelation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Fang

    1999-09-01

    The research described in this dissertation is related to characterization of tissue microstructure using a system- independent spatial autocorrelation function (SAF). The function was determined using a reference phantom method, which employed a well-defined ``point- scatterer'' reference phantom to account for instrumental factors. The SAF's were estimated for several tissue-mimicking (TM) phantoms and fresh dog livers. Both phantom tests and in vitro dog liver measurements showed that the reference phantom method is relatively simple and fairly accurate, providing the bandwidth of the measurement system is sufficient for the size of the scatterer being involved in the scattering process. Implementation of this method in clinical scanner requires that distortions from patient's body wall be properly accounted for. The SAF's were estimated for two phantoms with body-wall-like distortions. The experimental results demonstrated that body wall distortions have little effect if echo data are acquired from a large scattering volume. One interesting application of the SAF is to form a ``scatterer size image''. The scatterer size image may help providing diagnostic tools for those diseases in which the tissue microstructure is different from the normal. Another method, the BSC method, utilizes information contained in the frequency dependence of the backscatter coefficient to estimate the scatterer size. The SAF technique produced accurate scatterer size images of homogeneous TM phantoms and the BSC method was capable of generating accurate size images for heterogeneous phantoms. In the scatterer size image of dog kidneys, the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) between renal cortex and medulla was improved dramatically compared to the gray- scale image. The effect of nonlinear propagation was investigated by using a custom-designed phantom with overlaying TM fat layer. The results showed that the correlation length decreased when the transmitting power increased. The

  17. Study on the refractive index matching effect of ultrasound on optical clearing of bio-tissues based on the derivative total reflection method

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Huanhuan; Wang, Jin; Ye, Qing; Deng, Zhichao; Mei, Jianchun; Zhou, Wenyuan; Zhang, Chunping; Tian, Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the tissue optical clearing (OC) technique in the biomedicine field has drawn lots of attention. Various physical and chemical methods have been introduced to improve the efficacy of OC. In this study, the effect of the combination of glycerol and ultrasound treatment on OC of in vitro porcine muscle tissues has been investigated. The refractive index (RI) matching mechanism of OC was directly observed based on the derivative total reflection method. A theoretical model was used to simulate the proportion of tissue fluid in the illuminated area. Moreover, the total transmittance spectra have been obtained by a spectrometer over the range from 450 nm to 700 nm. The administration of glycerol and ultrasound has led to an increase of the RI of background medium and a more RI matching environment was achieved. The experimental results support the validity of the ultrasound treatment for OC. The RI matching mechanism has been firstly quantitatively analyzed based on the derivative total reflection method. PMID:25360366

  18. TU-F-12A-09: GLCM Texture Analysis for Normal-Tissue Toxicity: A Prospective Ultrasound Study of Acute Toxicity in Breast-Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Yang, X; Curran, W; Torres, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the morphologic and structural integrity of the breast glands using sonographic textural analysis, and identify potential early imaging signatures for radiation toxicity following breast-cancer radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Thirty-eight patients receiving breast RT participated in a prospective ultrasound imaging study. Each participant received 3 ultrasound scans: 1 week before RT (baseline), and at 6-week and 3-month follow-ups. Patients were imaged with a 10-MHz ultrasound on the four quadrant of the breast. A second order statistical method of texture analysis, called gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), was employed to assess RT-induced breast-tissue toxicity. The region of interest (ROI) was 28 mm × 10 mm in size at a 10 mm depth under the skin. Twenty GLCM sonographic features, ratios of the irradiated breast and the contralateral breast, were used to quantify breast-tissue toxicity. Clinical assessment of acute toxicity was conducted using the RTOG toxicity scheme. Results: Ninety-seven ultrasound studies (776 images) were analyzed; and 5 out of 20 sonographic features showed significant differences (p < 0.05) among the baseline scans, the acute toxicity grade 1 and 2 groups. These sonographic features quantified the degree of tissue damage through homogeneity, heterogeneity, randomness, and symmetry. Energy ratio value decreased from 108±0.05 (normal) to 0.99±0.05 (Grade 1) and 0.84±0.04 (Grade 2); Entropy ratio value increased from 1.01±0.01 to 1.02±0.01 and 1.04±0.01; Contrast ratio value increased from 1.03±0.03 to 1.07±0.06 and 1.21±0.09; Variance ratio value increased from 1.06±0.03 to 1.20±0.04 and 1.42±0.10; Cluster Prominence ratio value increased from 0.98±0.02 to 1.01±0.04 and 1.25±0.07. Conclusion: This work has demonstrated that the sonographic features may serve as imaging signatures to assess radiation-induced normal tissue damage. While these findings need to be validated in a larger cohort, they suggest

  19. Noninvasive pulsed focused ultrasound allows spatiotemporal control of targeted homing for multiple stem cell types in murine skeletal muscle and the magnitude of cell homing can be increased through repeated applications

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Scott R.; Ziadloo, Ali; Kim, Saejeong J.; Nguyen, Ben A.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are promising therapeutics for cardiovascular diseases and intravenous injection is the most desirable route of administration clinically. Subsequent homing of exogenous stem cells to pathological loci is frequently required for therapeutic efficacy and is mediated by chemo attractants (cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, and growth factors). Homing processes are inefficient and depend on short-lived pathological inflammation that limits the window of opportunity for cell injections. Noninvasive pulsed focused ultrasound (plus), which emphasizes mechanical ultrasound-tissue interactions, can be precisely targeted in the body and is a promising approach to target and maximize stem cell delivery by stimulating chemo attractant expression in plus-treated tissue prior to cell infusions. We demonstrate that plus is nondestructive to marine skeletal muscle tissue (no necrosis, hemorrhage, or muscle stem cell activation) and initiates a largely M2-type macrophage response. We also demonstrate local up regulation of chemo attractants in plus-treated skeletal muscle leads to enhance homing, permeability, and retention of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and human endothelial precursor cells (EPC). Furthermore, the magnitude of MSC or EPC homing was increased when plus treatments and cell infusions were repeated daily. This study demonstrates that plus defines transient “molecular zip codes” of elevated chemo attractants in targeted muscle tissue, which effectively provides spatiotemporal control and tenability of the homing process for multiple stem cell types. plus is a clinically-translatable modality that may ultimately improve homing efficiency and flexibility of cell therapies for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23922277

  20. Doppler Ultrasound Detection of Preclinical Changes in Foot Arteries in Early Stage of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leoniuk, Jolanta; Łukasiewicz, Adam; Szorc, Małgorzata; Sackiewicz, Izabela; Janica, Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background There are few reports regarding the changes within the vessels in the initial stage of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to estimate the hemodynamic and morphological parameters in foot arteries in type 2 diabetes subjects and to compare these parameters to those obtained in a control group of healthy volunteers. Material/Methods Ultrasound B-mode, color Doppler and pulse wave Doppler imaging of foot arteries was conducted in 37 diabetic patients and 36 non-diabetic subjects to determine their morphological (total vascular diameter and flow lumen diameter) and functional parameters (spectral analysis). Results In diabetic patients, the overall vascular diameter and wall thickness were statistically significantly larger when compared to the control group in the right dorsalis pedis artery (P=0.01; P=0.001), left dorsalis pedis artery (P=0.007; P=0.006), right posterior tibial artery (P=0.005; P=0.0005), and left posterior tibial artery (P=0.007; P=0.0002). No significant differences were observed in both groups in flow lumen diameters and blood flow parameters (PSV, EDV, PI, RI). In the diabetic group, the level of HbA1c positively correlated with flow resistance index in the right dorsalis pedis artery (r=0.38; P=0.02), right posterior tibial artery (r=0.38; P=0.02) and left posterior tibial artery (r=0.42; P=0.009). The pulsatility index within the dorsalis pedis artery decreased with increased trophic skin changes (r=–0.431, P=0.009). Conclusions In the diabetic group, overall artery diameters larger than and flow lumina comparable to the control group suggest vessel wall thickening occurring in the early stage of diabetes. Doppler flow parameters are comparable in both groups. In the diabetic group, the level of HbA1c positively correlated with flow resistance index and negative correlation was observed between the intensity of trophic skin changes and the pulsatility index. PMID:25202434

  1. Chirp-encoded excitation for dual-frequency ultrasound tissue harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Shen, Che-Chou; Lin, Chin-Hsiang

    2012-11-01

    Dual-frequency (DF) transmit waveforms comprise signals at two different frequencies. With a DF transmit waveform operating at both fundamental frequency (f(0)) and second-harmonic frequency (2f(0)), tissue harmonic imaging can be simultaneously performed using not only the conventional 2f(0) second-harmonic signal but also using the f(0 )frequency-difference harmonic signal. Nonetheless, when chirp excitation is incorporated into the DF transmit waveform for harmonic SNR improvement, a particular waveform design is required to maintain the bandwidth of the f(0) harmonic signal. In this study, two different DF chirp waveforms are proposed to produce equal harmonic bandwidth at both the f(0) and 2f(0) frequencies to achieve speckle reduction by harmonic spectral compounding and to increase harmonic SNR for enhanced penetration and sensitivity. The UU13 waveform comprises an up-sweeping f(0) chirp and an up-sweeping 2f(0) chirp with triple bandwidth, whereas the UD11 waveform includes an up-sweeping f(0) chirp and a down-sweeping 2f(0) chirp with equal bandwidth. Experimental results indicate that the UU13 tends to suffer from a high range side lobe level resulting from 3f(0) interference. Consequently, the 2f(0) harmonic envelopes of the UD11 and the UU13 waveforms have compression qualities of 87% and 77%, respectively, when the signal bandwidth is 30%. When the bandwidth increases to 50%, the compression quality of the 2f(0) harmonic envelope degrades to 78% and 54%, respectively, for the UD11 and the UU13 waveforms. The compression quality value of the f0 harmonic envelope remains similar between the two DF transmit waveforms for all signal bandwidths. B-mode harmonic images also show that the UD11 is less contaminated by range side lobe artifacts than is the UU13. Compared with a short pulse with equal bandwidth, the UD11 waveform not only preserves the same spatial resolution after compression but also improves the image SNR by about 10 dB. Moreover, the image

  2. Metrological Validation of a Measurement Procedure for the Characterization of a Biological Ultrasound Tissue-Mimicking Material.

    PubMed

    Santos, Taynara Q; Alvarenga, André V; Oliveira, Débora P; Costa-Felix, Rodrigo P B

    2017-01-01

    The speed of sound and attenuation are important properties for characterizing reference materials such as biological phantoms used in ultrasound applications. There are many publications on the manufacture of ultrasonic phantoms and the characterization of their properties. However, few studies have applied the principles of metrology, such as the expression of the uncertainty of measurement. The objective of this study is to validate a method for characterizing the speed of sound and the attenuation coefficient of tissue-mimicking material (TMM) based on the expression of the measurement of uncertainty. Six 60-mm-diameter TMMs were fabricated, three 10 mm thick and three 20 mm thick. The experimental setup comprised two ultrasonic transducers, acting as transmitter or receiver depending on the stage of the measurement protocol, both with a nominal center frequency of 5 MHz and an element diameter of 12.7 mm. A sine burst of 20 cycles and 20-V peak-to-peak amplitude at 5 MHz excited the transmitter transducer, producing a maximum pressure of 0.06 MPa. The measurement method was based on the through-transmission substitution immersion technique. The speed of sound measurement system was validated using a calibrated stainless-steel cylinder as reference material, and normalized errors were <0.8. The attenuation coefficient measurement method was validated using replicated measurements under repeatability conditions. The normalized error between the two measurement sets was <1. The proposed uncertainty models for the measurements of the speed of sound and the attenuation coefficient can help other laboratories develop their own uncertainty models. These validated measurement methods can be used to certify a TMM as a reference material for biotechnological applications.

  3. The speed of sound and attenuation of an IEC agar-based tissue-mimicking material for high frequency ultrasound applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Pye, Stephen D; Browne, Jacinta E; Janeczko, Anna; Ellis, Bill; Butler, Mairead B; Sboros, Vassilis; Thomson, Adrian J W; Brewin, Mark P; Earnshaw, Charles H; Moran, Carmel M

    2012-07-01

    This study characterized the acoustic properties of an International Electromechanical Commission (IEC) agar-based tissue mimicking material (TMM) at ultrasound frequencies in the range 10-47 MHz. A broadband reflection substitution technique was employed using two independent systems at 21°C ± 1°C. Using a commercially available preclinical ultrasound scanner and a scanning acoustic macroscope, the measured speeds of sound were 1547.4 ± 1.4 m∙s(-1) and 1548.0 ± 6.1 m∙s(-1), respectively, and were approximately constant over the frequency range. The measured attenuation (dB∙cm(-1)) was found to vary with frequency f (MHz) as 0.40f + 0.0076f(2). Using this polynomial equation and extrapolating to lower frequencies give values comparable to those published at lower frequencies and can estimate the attenuation of this TMM in the frequency range up to 47 MHz. This characterisation enhances understanding in the use of this TMM as a tissue equivalent material for high frequency ultrasound applications.

  4. Backward-mode multiwavelength photoacoustic scanner using a planar Fabry-Perot polymer film ultrasound sensor for high-resolution three-dimensional imaging of biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Edward; Laufer, Jan; Beard, Paul

    2008-02-01

    A multiwavelength backward-mode planar photoacoustic scanner for 3D imaging of soft tissues to depths of several millimeters with a spatial resolution in the tens to hundreds of micrometers range is described. The system comprises a tunable optical parametric oscillator laser system that provides nanosecond laser pulses between 600 and 1200 nm for generating the photoacoustic signals and an optical ultrasound mapping system based upon a Fabry-Perot polymer film sensor for detecting them. The system enables photoacoustic signals to be mapped in 2D over a 50 mm diameter aperture in steps of 10 microm with an optically defined element size of 64 microm. Two sensors were used, one with a 22 microm thick polymer film spacer and the other with a 38 mum thick spacer providing -3 dB acoustic bandwidths of 39 and 22 MHz, respectively. The measured noise equivalent pressure of the 38 microm sensor was 0.21 kPa over a 20 MHz measurement bandwidth. The instrument line-spread function (LSF) was measured as a function of position and the minimum lateral and vertical LSFs found to be 38 and 15 microm, respectively. To demonstrate the ability of the system to provide high-resolution 3D images, a range of absorbing objects were imaged. Among these was a blood vessel phantom that comprised a network of blood filled tubes of diameters ranging from 62 to 300 microm immersed in an optically scattering liquid. In addition, to demonstrate the applicability of the system to spectroscopic imaging, a phantom comprising tubes filled with dyes of different spectral characteristics was imaged at a range of wavelengths. It is considered that this type of instrument may provide a practicable alternative to piezoelectric-based photoacoustic systems for high-resolution structural and functional imaging of the skin microvasculature and other superficial structures.

  5. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Ultrasound imaging of the abdomen uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures within ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  6. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Hip Ultrasound Hip ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of muscles, tendons, ligaments, ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  7. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Obstetric Ultrasound Obstetric ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of a baby (embryo ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirate-derived preclinical pancreatic cancer models reveal panitumumab sensitivity in KRAS wild-type tumors.

    PubMed

    Berry, William; Algar, Elizabeth; Kumar, Beena; Desmond, Christopher; Swan, Michael; Jenkins, Brendan J; Croagh, Daniel

    2017-05-15

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is largely refractory to existing therapies used in unselected patient trials, thus emphasizing the pressing need for new approaches for patient selection in personalized medicine. KRAS mutations occur in 90% of PC patients and confer resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors (e.g., panitumumab), suggesting that KRAS wild-type PC patients may benefit from targeted panitumumab therapy. Here, we use tumor tissue procured by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirate (EUS-FNA) to compare the in vivo sensitivity in patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) of KRAS wild-type and mutant PC tumors to panitumumab, and to profile the molecular signature of these tumors in patients with metastatic or localized disease. Specifically, RNASeq of EUS-FNA-derived tumor RNA from localized (n = 20) and metastatic (n = 20) PC cases revealed a comparable transcriptome profile. Screening the KRAS mutation status of tumor genomic DNA obtained from EUS-FNAs stratified PC patients into either KRAS wild-type or mutant cohorts, and the engraftment of representative KRAS wild-type and mutant EUS-FNA tumor samples into NOD/SCID mice revealed that the growth of KRAS wild-type, but not mutant, PDXs was selectively suppressed with panitumumab. Furthermore, in silico transcriptome interrogation of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)-derived KRAS wild-type (n = 38) and mutant (n = 132) PC tumors revealed 391 differentially expressed genes. Taken together, our study validates EUS-FNA for the application of a novel translational pipeline comprising KRAS mutation screening and PDXs, applicable to all PC patients, to evaluate personalized anti-EGFR therapy in patients with KRAS wild-type tumors.

  9. Opto-acoustic diagnostics of the thermal action of high-intensity focused ultrasound on biological tissues: the possibility of its applications and model experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhlova, Tanya D; Pelivanov, Ivan M; Solomatin, Vladimir S; Karabutov, Aleksander A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A

    2006-12-31

    The possibility of using the opto-acoustic (OA) method for monitoring high-intensity ultrasonic therapy is studied. The optical properties of raw and boiled liver samples used as the undamaged model tissue and tissue destroyed by ultrasound, respectively, are measured. Experiments are performed with samples consisting of several alternating layers of raw and boiled liver of different thickness. The position and transverse size of the thermal lesion were determined from the temporal shape of the OA signals. The results of measurements are compared with the real size and position of the thermal lesion determined from the subsequent cuts of the sample. It is shown that the OA method permits the diagnostics of variations in biological tissues upon ultrasonic therapy. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  10. Tissue type characterization using photoacoustic power spectrum, a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Goldstein, Seth D.; Kang, Jin U.; Choti, Michaal; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    The development of technologies capable of non-invasive characterization of tissue has the potential to significantly improve diagnostic and therapeutic medical interventions. In this study we investigated the feasibility of a noninvasive photoacoustic (PA) approach for characterizing biological tissues. The measurement was performed in the transmission mode with a wideband hydrophone while a tunable Q-switched Nd:YAG pulsed laser was used for illumination. The power spectrum of photoacoustic signal induced by a pulsed laser light from tissue was analyzed and features were extracted to study their correlation with tissue biomechanical properties. For a controlled study, tissue mimicking gelatin phantoms with different densities and equivalent optical absorptions were used as targets. The correlation between gelatin concentration of such phantoms and their mechanical properties were validated independently with a dynamic mechanical analyzer capable of calculating complex loss and storage moduli between two compression plates. It was shown that PA spectrums were shifted towards higher frequencies by increasing gelatin concentration. In order to quantify this effect, signal energy in two intervals of low and high frequency ranges were calculated. Gelatin concentration was correlated with PA energy in high frequency range with R2=0.94. Subsequently, PA signals generated from freshly resected human thyroid specimens were measured and analyzed in a similar fashion. We found that in aggregate, malignant thyroid tissue contains approximately 1.6 times lower energy in the high frequency range in comparison to normal thyroid tissue (p<0.01). This ratio increased with increasing illumination wavelength from 700 nm to 900nm. In summary, this study demonstrated the feasibility of using photoacoustic technique for characterizing tissue on the basis of viscoelastic properties of the tissue.

  11. Accumulation of L-type Bovine Prions in Peripheral Nerve Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Morikazu; Matsuura, Yuichi; Masujin, Kentaro; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Shu, Yujing; Kurachi, Megumi; Kasai, Kazuo; Murayama, Yuichi; Fukuda, Shigeo; Onoe, Sadao; Hagiwara, Ken’ichi; Yamakawa, Yoshio; Sata, Tetsutaro; Mohri, Shirou; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported the intraspecies transmission of L-type atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). To clarify the peripheral pathogenesis of L-type BSE, we studied prion distribution in nerve and lymphoid tissues obtained from experimentally challenged cattle. As with classical BSE prions, L-type BSE prions accumulated in central and peripheral nerve tissues. PMID:20587193

  12. Quantitative Ultrasound in Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Feleppa, Ernest J.; Mamou, Jonathan; Porter, Christopher R.; Machi, Junji

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound is a relatively inexpensive, portable, and versatile imaging modality that has a broad range of clinical uses. It incorporates many imaging modes, such as conventional gray-scale “B-mode” imaging to display echo amplitude in a scanned plane; M-mode imaging to track motion at a given fixed location over time; duplex, color, and power Doppler imaging to display motion in a scanned plane; harmonic imaging to display non-linear responses to incident ultrasound; elastographic imaging to display relative tissue stiffness; and contrast-agent imaging with simple contrast agents to display blood-filled spaces or with targeted agents to display specific agent-binding tissue types. These imaging modes have been well described in the scientific, engineering, and clinical literature. A less well-known ultrasonic imaging technology is based on quantitative ultrasound or (QUS), which analyzes the distribution of power as a function of frequency in the original received echo signals from tissue and exploits the resulting spectral parameters to characterize and distinguish among tissues. This article discusses the attributes of QUS-based methods for imaging cancers and providing improved means of detecting and assessing tumors. The discussion will include applications to imaging primary prostate cancer and metastatic cancer in lymph nodes to illustrate the methods. PMID:21362522

  13. Quantification of petroleum-type hydrocarbons in avian tissue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gay, M.L.; Belisle, A.A.; Patton, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    Summary: Methods were developed for the analysis of 16 hydrocarbons in avian tissue. Mechanical extraction with pentane was followed by clean-up on Florisil and Silicar. Residues were determined by gas--liquid chromatography and gas-liquid, chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method was applied to the analysis of liver, kidney, fat, and brain tissue of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) fed a mixture of hydrocarbons. Measurable concentrations of all compounds analyzed were present in all tissues except brain. Highest concentrations were in fat.

  14. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation for assistant diagnosis of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxin; Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2016-04-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer.

  15. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation to aid breast cancer image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L

    2016-02-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer.

  16. Automated 3D Ultrasound Image Segmentation to Aid Breast Cancer Image Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer. PMID:26547117

  17. A method to expedite data acquisition for multiple spatial-temporal analyses of tissue perfusion by contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Christian; Hüttebräuker, Nils; Wilkening, Wilko; Ermert, Helmut

    2009-03-01

    For semiquantitative analyses of tissue perfusion using contrast-enhanced ultrasound the acquisition and processing of time intensity curves (TIC) is required. These TICs can be computed for each pixel of an image plane, yielding parametric images of classification numbers like "blood volume" and "flow rate." The expenditure of time for data acquisition and analysis typically limits semiquantitative perfusion imaging to a single image plane in 2-D. 3-D techniques, however, provide a higher diagnostic value since more information (e.g., of an entire lesion) is obtained. Moreover, spatial compounding, being a 2-D-technique where an object is imaged from different viewing angles, is known to improve image quality by reducing artifacts and speckle noise. Both techniques, 3-D and compounding, call for optimized acquisition and processing of TICs in several image planes (3-D) or in several (overlapping) sections of the same image plane (compounding) to decrease the time needed for data acquisition. Here, an approach of interleaved imaging is presented which is applicable, among others, to contrast perfusion imaging using the replenishment method. The total acquisition time is decreased by sequentially scanning image planes twice for short time spans - first, immediately after microbubble destruction to record the initial rise of the TICs, and second, a sufficient time thereafter to assess final values of the TIC. Data from both periods are combined to fit a model function from which parameters are extracted such as perfusion rate and blood volume. This approach was evaluated by in vitro measurements on a perfusion-mimicking phantom for both, individual images such as would be used for volume reconstruction in 3-D and compound images obtained from full angle spatial compounding (FASC, 360 degrees ). An error analysis is conducted to derive the deviation of the extracted parameters of the proposed method compared with the conventional one. These deviations are entailed by

  18. Influence of different sized nanoparticles combined with ultrasound on the optical properties of in vitro normal and cancerous human lung tissue studied with OCT and diffuse reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. P.; Wu, G. Y.; Wei, H. J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, H. Q.; He, Y. H.; Xie, S. S.; Liu, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The present study is concerned with the in vitro study of different sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles’ (NPs) penetration and accumulation in human normal lung (NL) tissue and lung adenocarcinoma tumor (LAT) tissue by the methods of continuous optical coherence tomography (OCT) monitoring and diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra measurement, and their evaluating the effects of TiO2 NPs in two sizes (60 nm and 100 nm) and their combination with ultrasound (US) on the optical properties of human NL and LAT tissue. Spectral measurements indicate that TiO2 NPs penetrate and accumulate into the tissues and thus induce enhancement of DR. The averaged and normalized OCT signal intensity suggests that light penetration depth is significantly enlarged by ultrasound. The average attenuation coefficient of NL tissue changes from 5.10  ±  0.26 mm-1 to 3.12  ±  0.43 mm-1 and 2.15  ±  0.54 mm-1 at 120 min for 60 nm TiO2 NPs and 60 nm TiO2NPs/US treatment, respectively, and from 5.54  ±  0.46 mm-1 to 3.24  ±  0.73 mm-1 and 2.69  ±  0.34 mm-1 at 150 min for 100 nm TiO2 NPs and 100 nm TiO2NPs/US, respectively. The average attenuation coefficient of LAT tissue changes from 9.12  ±  0.54 mm-1 to 4.54  ±  0.39 mm-1 and 3.61  ±  0.38 mm-1 at 120 min for 60 nm TiO2 NPs and 60 nm TiO2NPs/US treatment, respectively, and from 9.79  ±  0.32 mm-1 to 5.12  ±  0.47 mm-1 and 4.89  ±  0.59 mm-1 at 150 min for 100 nm TiO2 NPs and 100 nm TiO2NPs/US, respectively. The results suggest that the optical properties of NL and LAT tissues are greatly influenced by TiO2 NPs and their combination with ultrasound.

  19. Semiquantitative Evaluation of Extrasynovial Soft Tissue Inflammation in the Shoulders of Patients with Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Elderly-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis by Power Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryochi; Okamoto, Akiko; Seri, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a scoring system for evaluating the extrasynovial soft tissue inflammation of the shoulders in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and elderly-onset rheumatoid arthritis with PMR-like onset (pm-EORA) using ultrasound. Methods. We analyzed stored power Doppler (PD) images obtained by the pretreatment examination of 15 PMR patients and 15 pm-EORA patients. A semiquantitative scoring system for evaluating the severity of PD signals adjacent to the anterior aspect of the subscapularis tendon was designed. Results. A four-point scale scoring for the hyperemia on the subscapularis tendon was proposed as follows in brief: 0 = absent or minimal flow, 1 = single vessel dots or short linear-shape signals, 2 = long linear-shape signals or short zone-shape signals, or 3 = long zone-shape signals. This scoring system showed good intra- and interobserver reliability and good correlation to quantitative pixel-counting evaluation. By using it, we demonstrated that inflammation in PMR is dominantly localized in extrasynovial soft tissue as compared with pm-EORA. Conclusions. We proposed a reliable semiquantitative scoring system using ultrasound for the evaluation of extrasynovial soft tissue inflammation of the shoulders in patients with both PMR and pm-EORA. This system is simple to use and can be utilized in future investigations.

  20. Semiquantitative Evaluation of Extrasynovial Soft Tissue Inflammation in the Shoulders of Patients with Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Elderly-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis by Power Doppler Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Ryochi; Okamoto, Akiko; Seri, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a scoring system for evaluating the extrasynovial soft tissue inflammation of the shoulders in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and elderly-onset rheumatoid arthritis with PMR-like onset (pm-EORA) using ultrasound. Methods. We analyzed stored power Doppler (PD) images obtained by the pretreatment examination of 15 PMR patients and 15 pm-EORA patients. A semiquantitative scoring system for evaluating the severity of PD signals adjacent to the anterior aspect of the subscapularis tendon was designed. Results. A four-point scale scoring for the hyperemia on the subscapularis tendon was proposed as follows in brief: 0 = absent or minimal flow, 1 = single vessel dots or short linear-shape signals, 2 = long linear-shape signals or short zone-shape signals, or 3 = long zone-shape signals. This scoring system showed good intra- and interobserver reliability and good correlation to quantitative pixel-counting evaluation. By using it, we demonstrated that inflammation in PMR is dominantly localized in extrasynovial soft tissue as compared with pm-EORA. Conclusions. We proposed a reliable semiquantitative scoring system using ultrasound for the evaluation of extrasynovial soft tissue inflammation of the shoulders in patients with both PMR and pm-EORA. This system is simple to use and can be utilized in future investigations. PMID:28293635

  1. Is tissue harmonic ultrasound imaging (THI) of the prostatic urethra and rectum superior to brightness (B) mode imaging? An observer study.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gurpreet K; Angyalfi, Steve; Dunscombe, Peter B; Khan, Rao F

    2014-09-01

    Quality ultrasound images are an essential part of prostate brachytherapy procedure. The authors have previously reported that tissue harmonic ultrasound images (THI) are superior to brightness (B) mode for the prostate. The objective of the current study was to compare both imaging modes for visualization of the prostatic urethra and rectum. B and THI mode transrectal ultrasound images were acquired for ten patients. The prostatic urethra and rectal wall were contoured by a radiation oncologist (RO) and five observers on randomly presented images. The contours on one patient were repeated four additional times by four observers. All the images were qualitatively scored using a five-level Likert scale. The values of the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients showed that the observers were in close agreement with the RO. Two sample paired student t-test showed that the rectum volumes with THI were significantly smaller than B-mode, but no significant difference for urethra. Two-factor analysis of variances showed significant observer variability in defining the rectum and urethra in both imaging modes. Observer consistency of the rectum volumes, estimated by standard deviations as percentages of means was significantly improved for THI. The Likert scale based qualitative assessment supported quantitative observations. The significant improvement in image quality of the prostate (reported previously) and rectum with THI may offer better-quality treatment plans for prostate brachytherapy and potential improvement in local control.

  2. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and ethanol induced tissue ablation: Thermal lesion volume and temperature ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Nguyen Hai

    HIFU is the upcoming technology for noninvasive or minimally invasive tumor ablation via the localized acoustic energy deposition at the focal region within the tumor target. The presence of cavitation bubbles had been shown to improve the therapeutic effect of HIFU. In this study, we have investigated the effect of HIFU on temperature rise and cavitation bubble activity in ethanol-treated porcine liver and kidney tissues. We have also explored changes in the viability and proliferation rate of HepG2, SW1376, and FB1 cancer cells with their exposure to ethanol and HIFU. Tissues were submerged in 95% ethanol for five hours and then exposed to HIFU generated by a 1.1 MHz transducer or injected into focal spot before HIFU exposure. Cavitation events were measured by a passive cavitation detection technique for a range of acoustic power from 1.17 W to 20.52 W. The temperature around the focal zone was measured by type K or type E thermocouples embedded in the samples. In experiments with cancer cells, 2.7 millions cells were treated with concentration of ethanol at concentration 2%, 4%, 10%, 25%, and 50% and the cell were exposed to HIFU with power of 2.73 W, 8.72 W, and 12.0 W for 30 seconds. Our data show that the treatment of tissues with ethanol reduces the threshold power for inertial cavitation and increases the temperature rise. The exposure of cancer cells to various HIFU power only showed a higher number of viable cells 24 to 72 hours after HIFU exposure. On the other hand, both the viability and proliferation rate were significantly decreased in cells treated with ethanol and then HIFU at 8.7 W and 12.0 W even at ethanol concentration of 2 and 4 percent. In conclusion, the results of our study indicate that percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) and HIFU have a synergistic effect on cancer cells ablation.

  3. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Gan, Qi; Ye, Jian; Yue, Jian; Wang, Benzhong; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Yilmaz, Alper; Tweedle, Michael F.; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG)—fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting. PMID:27367051

  4. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zeshu; Pei, Jing; Wang, Dong; Gan, Qi; Ye, Jian; Yue, Jian; Wang, Benzhong; Povoski, Stephen P; Martin, Edward W; Hitchcock, Charles L; Yilmaz, Alper; Tweedle, Michael F; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG)-fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting.

  5. The cavitation threshold of human tissue exposed to 0.2-MHz pulsed ultrasound: preliminary measurements based on a study of clinical lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A J; Kodama, T; Choi, M J; Adams, T; Saunders, J E

    1995-01-01

    Evidence of acoustic cavitation was identified in the form of transient echoes in ultrasound B-scan images of patients receiving extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy treatment on a Storz Modulith SL20. This lithotripter generates 10-microseconds duration pulses with a centre frequency of 0.2 MHz at a pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The visual appearance of B-scan images was examined in a total of 30 patients and a quantitative analysis of echogenicity changes was carried out in six cases involving lithotripsy treatment of stones in the renal pelvis. In these patients new echoes were identified in images unaffected by movement artefacts and were found to occur in perinephric fat and adjacent muscle and kidney tissue at positions close to the axis of the shock-wave field between 1 and 2 cm in advance of the indicated beam focus of the lithotripter. The echogenicity within each region increased significantly above the background level when the output of the lithotripter was increased above a threshold value. The acoustic pressures corresponding to this threshold were measured in water using a calibrated PVDF membrane hydrophone. After correction for attenuation in tissue the cavitation thresholds, in terms of the temporal peak negative pressure, are found to lie between 1.5 MPa and 3.5 MPa in all six cases. Interpretation of the measured values in terms of the likely threshold at the higher frequencies used in diagnostic ultrasound is considered using a theoretical model.

  6. Liposome-mediated transfection of wild-type P53 DNA into human prostate cancer cells is improved by low-frequency ultrasound combined with microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    BAI, WEN-KUN; ZHANG, WEI; HU, BING; YING, TAO

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common type of cancer in elderly men. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of ultrasound exposure in combination with SonoVue microbubbles on liposome-mediated transfection of wild-type P53 genes into human prostate cancer cells. PC-3 human prostate cancer cells were exposed to ultrasound; duty cycle was controlled at 20% (2 sec on, 8 sec off) for 5 min with and without SonoVue microbubble echo-contrast agent using a digital sonifier (frequency, 21 kHz; intensity, 46 mW/cm2). The cells were divided into eight groups, as follows: Group A (SonoVue + wild-type P53), group B (ultrasound + wild-type P53), group C (SonoVue + ultrasound + wild-type P53), group D (liposome + wild-type P53), group E (liposome + SonoVue + wild-type P53), group F (liposome + wild-type P53 + ultrasound), group G (liposome + wild-type P53 + ultrasound + SonoVue) and the control group (wild-type P53). Following treatment, a hemocytometer was used to measure cell lysis, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were performed to detect P53 gene transfection efficiency, Cell Counting Kit-8 was employed to reveal cell proliferation and Annexin V/propidium iodide staining was used to determine cell apoptosis. Cell lysis was minimal in each group. Wild-type P53 gene and protein expression were significantly increased in the PC-3 cells in group G compared with the control and all other groups (P<0.01). Cell proliferation was significantly suppressed in group G compared with the control group and all other groups (P<0.01). Cell apoptosis levels in group G were significantly improved compared with the control group and all other groups (P<0.01). Thus, the results of the present study indicate that the use of low-frequency and low-energy ultrasound in combination with SonoVue microbubbles may be a potent physical method for increasing liposome gene delivery efficiency. PMID:27313702

  7. Topographical Control of Ocular Cell Types for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Kevin J.; Saint-Geniez, Magali; Tao, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Visual impairment affects over 285 million people worldwide and has a major impact on an individual’s quality of life. Tissue engineering has the potential to increase quality of life for many of these patients by preventing vision loss or restoring vision using cell-based therapies. However, these strategies will require an understanding of the microenvironmental factors that influence cell behavior. The eye is a well-organized organ whose structural complexity is essential for proper function. Interactions between ocular cells and their highly ordered extracellular matrix are necessary for maintaining key tissue properties including corneal transparency and retinal lamination. Therefore, it is not surprising that culturing these cells in vitro on traditional flat substrates result in irregular morphology. Instead, topographically patterned biomaterials better mimic native extracellular matrix and have been shown to elicit in vivo-like morphology and gene expression which is essential for tissue engineering. Herein we review multiple methods for producing well-controlled topography and discuss optimal biomaterial scaffold design for cells of the cornea, retina, and lens. PMID:23744715

  8. The analysis of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase gene in different type liver tissues

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guo-Qing; Qin, Cheng-Yong; Shu, Rong-Hua

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To probe the value of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) messenger RNA in monitoring canceration of liver cells and for early diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), by researching the types of GGT messenger RNA (GGTmRNA) in liver tissues and peripheral blood of different hepatopathy. METHODS: The three types of GGTmRNA (A, B, C) in liver tissues and peripheral blood from the patients with HCC, noncancerous hepatopathy, hepatic benign tumor, secondary carcinoma of liver, and healthy persons were detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: (1) In normal liver tissues, type A was predominantly found (100.00%), type B was not found, type C was found occasionally (25.00%); (2) The distribution of types of GGTmRNA in liver tissues with acute hepatitis, chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, alcoholic hepatopathy was similar as in normal liver tissues (P > 0.05), but type B was found in 3 of 18 patients with chronic hepatitis (16.67%), and also in 3 of 11 patients with cirrhosis (27.27%); (3) There was no significant difference of types of GGTmRNA between liver tissues with hepatic benign tumor, secondary carcinoma of liver and normal liver tissues (P > 0.05); (4) Type B was predominant in cancerous tissues with HCC (87.5%), the prevalence of type B in cancerous tissues was significantly higher than that in normal liver tissues (0/12) (P < 0.05), but the prevalence of type A in cancerous tissues (46.88%) was significantly lower than that in normal liver tissues (100.00%) (P < 0.05), and the prevalence of type C (6.25%) in cancerous was the same as that in normal liver tissues (25.00%) (P > 0.05). In noncancerous tissues of livers with HCC, the main types were type A and type B, the prevalence of type A (85.71%, 90.48%) and type C (14.29%, 9.52%) in noncancerous tissues of liver with HCC was similar as that in normal liver tissues (A: 100.00%; C: 25.00%) (P > 0.05), but the prevalence of type B (80.95%, 76.19%) in noncancerous tissues of

  9. Nonlinear ultrasound imaging of nanoscale acoustic biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Maresca, David; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Melis, Johan M; Ni, Yu-Li; Bourdeau, Raymond W; Kochmann, Dennis M; Shapiro, Mikhail G

    2017-02-13

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used to probe the mechanical structure of tissues and visualize blood flow. However, the ability of ultrasound to observe specific molecular and cellular signals is limited. Recently, a unique class of gas-filled protein nanostructures called gas vesicles (GVs) was introduced as nanoscale (∼250 nm) contrast agents for ultrasound, accompanied by the possibilities of genetic engineering, imaging of targets outside the vasculature and monitoring of cellular signals such as gene expression. These possibilities would be aided by methods to discriminate GV-generated ultrasound signals from anatomical background. Here, we show that the nonlinear response of engineered GVs to acoustic pressure enables selective imaging of these nanostructures using a tailored amplitude modulation strategy. Finite element modeling predicted a strongly nonlinear mechanical deformation and acoustic response to ultrasound in engineered GVs. This response was confirmed with ultrasound measurements in the range of 10 to 25 MHz. An amplitude modulation pulse sequence based on this nonlinear response allows engineered GVs to be distinguished from linear scatterers and other GV types with a contrast ratio greater than 11.5 dB. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this nonlinear imaging strategy in vitro, in cellulo, and in vivo.

  10. Nonlinear ultrasound imaging of nanoscale acoustic biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maresca, David; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Melis, Johan M.; Ni, Yu-Li; Bourdeau, Raymond W.; Kochmann, Dennis M.; Shapiro, Mikhail G.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used to probe the mechanical structure of tissues and visualize blood flow. However, the ability of ultrasound to observe specific molecular and cellular signals is limited. Recently, a unique class of gas-filled protein nanostructures called gas vesicles (GVs) was introduced as nanoscale (˜250 nm) contrast agents for ultrasound, accompanied by the possibilities of genetic engineering, imaging of targets outside the vasculature and monitoring of cellular signals such as gene expression. These possibilities would be aided by methods to discriminate GV-generated ultrasound signals from anatomical background. Here, we show that the nonlinear response of engineered GVs to acoustic pressure enables selective imaging of these nanostructures using a tailored amplitude modulation strategy. Finite element modeling predicted a strongly nonlinear mechanical deformation and acoustic response to ultrasound in engineered GVs. This response was confirmed with ultrasound measurements in the range of 10 to 25 MHz. An amplitude modulation pulse sequence based on this nonlinear response allows engineered GVs to be distinguished from linear scatterers and other GV types with a contrast ratio greater than 11.5 dB. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this nonlinear imaging strategy in vitro, in cellulo, and in vivo.

  11. Type of MRI contrast, tissue gadolinium, and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Do, Catherine; Barnes, Jeffrey L; Tan, Chunyan; Wagner, Brent

    2014-10-01

    It has been presupposed that the thermodynamic stability constant (K(therm)) of gadolinium-based MRI chelates relate to the risk of precipitating nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The present study compared low-K(therm) gadodiamide with high-K(therm) gadoteridol in cultured fibroblasts and rats with uninephrectomies. Gadolinium content was assessed using scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in paraffin-embedded tissues. In vitro, fibroblasts demonstrated dose-dependent fibronectin generation, transforming growth factor-β production, and expression of activated myofibroblast stress fiber protein α-smooth muscle actin. There were negligible differences with respect to toxicity or proliferation between the two contrast agents. In the rodent model, gadodiamide treatment led to greater skin fibrosis and dermal cellularity than gadoteridol. In the kidney, both contrast agents led to proximal tubule vacuolization and increased fibronectin accumulation. Despite large detectable gadolinium signals in the spleen, skin, muscle, and liver from the gadodiamide-treated group, contrast-induced fibrosis appeared to be limited to the skin and kidney. These findings support the hypothesis that low-K(therm) chelates have a greater propensity to elicit nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and demonstrate that certain tissues are resistant to these effects.

  12. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  13. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  16. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  17. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  18. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  19. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  20. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  1. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... the examination. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of a console ... ultrasound that require biopsy are not cancers. Many facilities do not offer ultrasound screening, and the procedure ...

  2. Investigation of synthetic aperture methods in ultrasound surface imaging using elementary surface types.

    PubMed

    Kerr, W; Pierce, S G; Rowe, P

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic aperture imaging methods have been employed widely in recent research in non-destructive testing (NDT), but uptake has been more limited in medical ultrasound imaging. Typically offering superior focussing power over more traditional phased array methods, these techniques have been employed in NDT applications to locate and characterise small defects within large samples, but have rarely been used to image surfaces. A desire to ultimately employ ultrasonic surface imaging for bone surface geometry measurement prior to surgical intervention motivates this research, and results are presented for initial laboratory trials of a surface reconstruction technique based on global thresholding of ultrasonic 3D point cloud data. In this study, representative geometry artefacts were imaged in the laboratory using two synthetic aperture techniques; the Total Focusing Method (TFM) and the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) employing full and narrow synthetic apertures, respectively. Three high precision metallic samples of known geometries (cuboid, sphere and cylinder) which featured a range of elementary surface primitives were imaged using a 5MHz, 128 element 1D phased array employing both SAFT and TFM approaches. The array was manipulated around the samples using a precision robotic positioning system, allowing for repeatable ultrasound derived 3D surface point clouds to be created. A global thresholding technique was then developed that allowed the extraction of the surface profiles, and these were compared with the known geometry samples to provide a quantitative measure of error of 3D surface reconstruction. The mean errors achieved with optimised SAFT imaging for the cuboidal, spherical and cylindrical samples were 1.3mm, 2.9mm and 2.0mm respectively, while those for TFM imaging were 3.7mm, 3.0mm and 3.1mm, respectively. These results were contrary to expectations given the higher information content associated with the TFM images. However, it was

  3. Meselect – A Rapid and Effective Method for the Separation of the Main Leaf Tissue Types

    PubMed Central

    Svozil, Julia; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baerenfaller, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Individual tissues of complex eukaryotic organisms have specific gene expression programs that control their functions. Therefore, tissue-specific molecular information is required to increase our understanding of tissue-specific processes. Established methods in plants to obtain specific tissues or cell types from their organ or tissue context typically require the enzymatic degradation of cell walls followed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) using plants engineered for localized expression of green fluorescent protein. This has facilitated the acquisition of valuable data, mainly on root cell type-specific transcript and protein expression. However, FACS of different leaf cell types is difficult because of chlorophyll autofluorescence that interferes with the sorting process. Furthermore, the cell wall composition is different in each cell type. This results in long incubation times for refractory cell types, and cell sorting itself can take several hours. To overcome these limitations, we developed Meselect (mechanical separation of leaf compound tissues), a rapid and effective method for the separation of leaf epidermal, vascular and mesophyll tissues. Meselect is a novel combination of mechanical separation and rapid protoplasting, which benefits from the unique cell wall composition of the different tissue types. Meselect has several advantages over cell sorting: it does not require expensive equipment such as a cell sorter and does not depend on specific fluorescent reporter lines, the use of blenders as well as the inherent mixing of different cell types and of intact and damaged cells can be avoided, and the time between wounding of the leaf and freezing of the sample is short. The efficacy and specificity of the method to enrich the different leaf tissue types has been confirmed using Arabidopsis leaves, but it has also been successfully used for leaves of other plants such as tomato or cassava. The method is therefore useful for plant

  4. Meselect - A Rapid and Effective Method for the Separation of the Main Leaf Tissue Types.

    PubMed

    Svozil, Julia; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baerenfaller, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Individual tissues of complex eukaryotic organisms have specific gene expression programs that control their functions. Therefore, tissue-specific molecular information is required to increase our understanding of tissue-specific processes. Established methods in plants to obtain specific tissues or cell types from their organ or tissue context typically require the enzymatic degradation of cell walls followed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) using plants engineered for localized expression of green fluorescent protein. This has facilitated the acquisition of valuable data, mainly on root cell type-specific transcript and protein expression. However, FACS of different leaf cell types is difficult because of chlorophyll autofluorescence that interferes with the sorting process. Furthermore, the cell wall composition is different in each cell type. This results in long incubation times for refractory cell types, and cell sorting itself can take several hours. To overcome these limitations, we developed Meselect (mechanical separation of leaf compound tissues), a rapid and effective method for the separation of leaf epidermal, vascular and mesophyll tissues. Meselect is a novel combination of mechanical separation and rapid protoplasting, which benefits from the unique cell wall composition of the different tissue types. Meselect has several advantages over cell sorting: it does not require expensive equipment such as a cell sorter and does not depend on specific fluorescent reporter lines, the use of blenders as well as the inherent mixing of different cell types and of intact and damaged cells can be avoided, and the time between wounding of the leaf and freezing of the sample is short. The efficacy and specificity of the method to enrich the different leaf tissue types has been confirmed using Arabidopsis leaves, but it has also been successfully used for leaves of other plants such as tomato or cassava. The method is therefore useful for plant

  5. Tissue type determination by impedance measurement: A bipolar and monopolar comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Jack; Bouazza-Marouf, Kaddour; Noronha, Dorita; Gaur, Atul

    2017-01-01

    Background: In certain medical applications, it is necessary to be able to determine the position of a needle inside the body, specifically with regards to identifying certain tissue types. By measuring the electrical impedance of specific tissue types, it is possible to determine the type of tissue the tip of the needle (or probe) is at. Materials and Methods: Two methods have been investigated for electric impedance detection; bipolar and monopolar. Commercially available needle electrodes are of a monopolar type. Although many patents exist on the bipolar setups, these have not as yet been commercialized. This paper reports a comparison of monopolar and bipolar setups for tissue type determination. In vitro experiments were carried out on pork to compare this investigation with other investigations in this field. Results: The results show that both monopolar and bipolar setups are capable of determining tissue type. However, the bipolar setup showed slightly better results; the difference between the different soft tissue type impedances was greater compared to the monopolar method. Conclusion: Both monopolar and bipolar electrical impedance setups work very similarly in inhomogeneous volumes such as biological tissue. There is a clear potential for clinical applications with impedance-based needle guidance, with both the monopolar and bipolar setups. It is, however, worth noting that the bipolar setup is more versatile. PMID:28217047

  6. Fourier transform infrared imaging and infrared fiber optic probe spectroscopy identify collagen type in connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Hanifi, Arash; McCarthy, Helen; Roberts, Sally; Pleshko, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage and mechanically inferior fibrocartilage consisting of mixed collagen types are frequently found together in repairing articular cartilage. The present study seeks to develop methodology to identify collagen type and other tissue components using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral evaluation of matrix composition in combination with multivariate analyses. FTIR spectra of the primary molecular components of repair cartilage, types I and II collagen, and aggrecan, were used to develop multivariate spectral models for discrimination of the matrix components of the tissues of interest. Infrared imaging data were collected from bovine bone, tendon, normal cartilage, meniscus and human repair cartilage tissues, and composition predicted using partial least squares analyses. Histology and immunohistochemistry results were used as standards for validation. Infrared fiber optic probe spectral data were also obtained from meniscus (a tissue with mixed collagen types) to evaluate the potential of this method for identification of collagen type in a minimally-invasive clinical application. Concentration profiles of the tissue components obtained from multivariate analysis were in excellent agreement with histology and immunohistochemistry results. Bone and tendon showed a uniform distribution of predominantly type I collagen through the tissue. Normal cartilage showed a distribution of type II collagen and proteoglycan similar to the known composition, while in repair cartilage, the spectral distribution of both types I and II collagen were similar to that observed via immunohistochemistry. Using the probe, the outer and inner regions of the meniscus were shown to be primarily composed of type I and II collagen, respectively, in accordance with immunohistochemistry data. In summary, multivariate analysis of infrared spectra can indeed be used to differentiate collagen type I and type II, even in the presence of proteoglycan, in connective tissues

  7. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  8. Combination of high-intensity focused ultrasound irradiation and hydroxyapatite nanoparticle injection to injure normal goat liver tissue in vivo without costal bone incision.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Xiao, Z; Xiao, Y; Wang, Z; Li, F; Li, M; Peng, X

    2014-10-20

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the in vivo safety of intravenous nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HA), to explore how nano-HA might influence the effects of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on normal liver tissue, and to investigate whether intravenous nano-HA could enhance HIFU for hepatocellular carcinoma ablation in a goat model. The present study, for the first time, indicated that the delivery of abundant nano-HA into the body over short periods of time could be assembled by the hepatic reticuloendothelial system, subsequently leading to a rapid rise of ultrasound-induced overheating, and ultimately resulting in enlargement of the coagulation necrotic area for ablated hepatocellular carcinoma in goats both in vivo and ex vivo. On the other hand, therapeutic doses of nano-HA were much lower than the lethal dose, and consequently presented transient and mild abnormalities of hepatic enzymes and renal function during the first 24 h after nano-HA injection. These results suggested that the combined application of nano-HA and HIFU is potentially a more effective alternative option compared to surgery for hepatocellular carcinoma local ablation in a safe and feasible manner.

  9. [Radiology Update Ultrasound Elastography – Quintessence for the Primary Care Physician].

    PubMed

    Franckenberg, Sabine; Gubler, Christoph; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Rominger, Marga

    2016-02-03

    Ultrasound elastography visualizes and measures elasticity of tissue. Depending on the methods there are four types of elastography: strain elastography (SE), transient elastography (TE), acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) and shear wave elastography (SWE). Due to the fact that pathological changes in the tissue in most of the cases mean a lower elasticity, ultrasound elastography is able to diagnose diseases such as liver fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, to help in the diagnosis of suspicious lesions in mamma, prostate and thyroid gland. So far, ultrasound elastography is not yet able to replace other standardized diagnostic tools but can add valuable diagnostic information.

  10. Experimental and simulation studies on focused ultrasound triggered drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen; Choi, Yongjin; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2017-01-01

    To improve drug delivery efficiency in cancer therapy, many researchers have recently concentrated on drug delivery systems that use anticancer drug loaded micro- or nanoparticles. In addition, induction methods, such as ultrasound, magnetic field, and infrared light, have been considered as active induction methods for drug delivery. Among these, focused ultrasound has been regarded as a promising candidate for the active induction method of drug delivery system because it can penetrate a deep site in soft tissue, and its energy can be focused on the targeted lesion. In this research, we employed focused ultrasound as an active induction method. For an anticancer drug loaded microparticles, we fabricated poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid docetaxel (PLGA-DTX) nanoparticle encapsulated alginate microbeads using the single-emulsion technique and the aeration method. To select the appropriate operating parameter for the focused ultrasound, we measured the pressure and temperature induced by the focused ultrasound at the focal area using a needle-type hydrophone and a digital thermal detector, respectively. Additionally, we conducted a simulation of focused ultrasound using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3a. The experimental measurement results were compared with the simulation results. In addition, the drug release rates of the PLGA-DTX-encapsulated alginate microbeads induced by the focused ultrasound were tested. Through these experiments, we determined that the appropriate focused ultrasound parameter was peak pressure of 1 MPa, 10 cycle/burst, and burst period of 20 μSec. Finally, we performed the cell cytotoxicity and drug uptake test with focused ultrasound induction and found that the antitumor effect and drug uptake efficiency were significantly enhanced by the focused ultrasound induction. Thus, we confirmed that focused ultrasound can be an effective induction method for an anticancer drug delivery system.

  11. Computational study on the propagation of strongly focused nonlinear ultrasound in tissue with rib-like structures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiexing; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen; Ping, Zihong; Wu, Junru

    2013-08-01

    The presence of a rib cage is a significant hindrance to the potential applications of focused ultrasound as a noninvasive extracorporeal surgery modality for various internal organs. Here the influence of ribs on the propagation of strongly focused high-intensity nonlinear ultrasound beam inside the body is studied. Based on the spheroidal beam equation, a three-dimensional numerical algorithm is developed to solve the nonlinear acoustic field generated by a focused ultrasonic transducer with a large aperture angle. Idealized ribs, of rectangular cross sectional, with high absorption and impedance, and various dimensions, are used to simulate human anatomical configurations. The changes in the spatial distribution of acoustic intensity and the reduction of the acoustic pressure amplitude and heat deposition rate due to the presence of "ribs" are investigated. It is somewhat surprising that in some cases, the axial peak positions shift less than 2 mm and more than 80% of the sound energy can propagate through the space of the rib cage in the strongly focused sound field. This study also includes quantitative analyses of the effects of different rib configurations and transducers of various f-numbers. The results can be used as reference information for further study and clinical applications.

  12. A new formalism for the quantification of tissue perfusion by the destruction-replenishment method in contrast ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Arditi, Marcel; Frinking, Peter J A; Zhou, Xiang; Rognin, Nicolas G

    2006-06-01

    A new formalism is presented for the destruction-replenishment perfusion quantification approach at low mechanical index. On the basis of physical considerations, best-fit methods should be applied using perfusion functions with S-shape characteristics. These functions are first described for the case of a geometry with a single flow velocity, then extended to the case of vascular beds with blood vessels having multiple flow velocity values and directions. The principles guiding the analysis are, on one hand, a linearization of video echo signals to overcome the log-compression of the imaging instrument, and, on the other hand, the spatial distribution of the transmit-receive ultrasound beam in the elevation direction. An in vitro model also is described; it was used to confirm experimentally the validity of the approach using a commercial contrast agent. The approach was implemented in the form of a computer program, taking as input a sequence of contrast-specific images, as well as parameters related to the ultrasound imaging equipment used. The generated output is either flow-parameter values computed in regions-of-interest, or parametric flow-images (e.g., mean velocity, mean transit time, mean flow, flow variance, or skewness). This approach thus establishes a base for extracting information about the morphology of vascular beds in vivo, and could allow absolute quantification provided that appropriate instrument calibration is implemented.

  13. Application of Focused Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction for the Quantification of Persistent Organic Pollutions in Liver Tissue of Giant Toad (Rhinella marina).

    PubMed

    Flores-Ramírez, R; Espinosa-Reyes, G; Cilia-López, V G; González-Mille, D J; Rodríguez-Aguilar, M; Díaz de León-Martínez, L; Díaz-Barriga, F

    2017-02-01

    A simple and rapid focused ultrasound extraction method was developed for the determination of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in liver tissue obtained of giant toad (Rhinella marina) using a gas chromatography coupled to a mass detector with electron impact ionization. The performed method for POPs, was validated in fortified matrix, showing linearity from the LOQ up to 100 ng/mL; LODs and LOQs for each compound were between 1.7 and 4.8 and 3.5-7.5 ng/mL, respectively. Recovery rates were among 79%-116% for POPs determined. Finally, the method was applied in liver samples of giant toads found in a malarial area in Mexico. The sensitivity of the proposed method was good enough to ensure reliable determination of target analytes at concentration levels commonly found in this kind of samples.

  14. Ultrasound Phantoms to Protect Patients from Novices

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    With the growing use of ultrasound for pain management, we are interested in how to teach and practice ultrasound-guided procedures. Ethically, we should not insert a needle in a patient until after much practice on a phantom. Several types of phantoms have been introduced for ultrasound training, including water, agar/gelatin, elastomeric rubber, and meat phantoms and cadavers. The ideal phantom is similar to human tissue, is readily available and inexpensive, can be used repeatedly, provides tactile feedback, will hold a needle in place, does not generate needle tracks, and is not a health hazard. Several studies have shown the effectiveness of phantoms for improving the proficiency of novices. We hope that the application of phantoms in education leads to improved proficiency and increased patient safety. PMID:27103961

  15. The influence of gluten free diet on quantitative ultrasound of proximal phalanxes in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Giuliana; Spadaro, Raffaella; Iafusco, Dario; Lombardi, Francesca; Del Puente, Antonio; Esposito, Antonella; De Terlizzi, Francesca; Prisco, Francesco; Troncone, Riccardo; Franzese, Adriana

    2008-08-01

    A reduced bone mineral density has been reported in patients with untreated celiac disease (CD) as well as in patients with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone mineral status by phalangeal quantitative ultrasound in 52 children and adolescents with both diseases (mean age 13.3+/-4.9 years). As a control group 50 patients with T1DM and no CD (age 12.2+/-4.0 years) were studied. The following bone parameters, amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS) and bone transmission time (BTT) were considered and expressed as z score. Compliance to gluten free diet and long term glycemic control (mean of four determinations of HbA1c in the last year) were also assessed. The lowest mean AD-SoS z score values were found in patients with T1DM and CD, who reported transgressions to gluten free diet and exhibited positivity for serum anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG) and/or endomysial antibodies (EmA), compared with patients with occasional transgressions but negative for anti-tTG and/or -EmA, patients strictly adherent to the diet, and patients who suffered only from diabetes (ANOVA p=0.021). No difference was found between patients with diabetes alone and patients with both diseases strictly adherent to gluten free diet. Prevalence of osteopenia (z AD-SoS values <-2 SD) was higher in patients with T1DM and CD and poor compliance to the diet (45.5%) compared with patients with T1DM (8%) or patients with both diseases strictly compliant to diet (12.9%) (p=0.015). A negative correlation between Ad-SoS z score and HbA1c (r -0.236, p=0.036) was found when patients with T1DM and patients with T1DM and CD, who strictly adhere to the diet, were pooled. In conclusion the quality of bone as assessed by phalangeal ultrasound in patients with T1DM and CD, who strictly adhere to gluten free diet, is similar to that found in T1DM patients. A higher prevalence of osteopenia is present in patients with both diseases who

  16. Towards enabling ultrasound guidance in cervical cancer high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Adrian; Sojoudia, Samira; Gaudet, Marc; Yap, Wan Wan; Chang, Silvia D.; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Moradi, Mehdi

    2014-03-01

    MRI and Computed Tomography (CT) are used in image-based solutions for guiding High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment of cervical cancer. MRI is costly and CT exposes the patients to ionizing radiation. Ultrasound, on the other hand, is affordable and safe. The long-term goal of our work is to enable the use of multiparametric ultrasound imaging in image-guided HDR for cervical cancer. In this paper, we report the development of enabling technology for ultrasound guidance and tissue typing. We report a system to obtain the 3D freehand transabdominal ultrasound RF signals and B-mode images of the uterus, and a method for registration of ultrasound to MRI. MRI and 3D ultrasound images of the female pelvis were registered by contouring the uterus in the two modalities, creating a surface model, followed by rigid and B-spline deformable registration. The resulting transformation was used to map the location of the tumor from the T2-weighted MRI to ultrasound images and to determine cancerous and normal areas in ultrasound. B-mode images show a contrast for cancer vs. normal tissue. Our study shows the potential and the challenges of ultrasound imaging in guiding cervical cancer treatments.

  17. The role of acoustic nonlinearity in tissue heating behind a rib cage using a high-intensity focused ultrasound phased array.

    PubMed

    Yuldashev, Petr V; Shmeleva, Svetlana M; Ilyin, Sergey A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Gavrilov, Leonid R; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2013-04-21

    The goal of this study was to investigate theoretically the effects of nonlinear propagation in a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field produced by a therapeutic phased array and the resultant heating of tissue behind a rib cage. Three configurations of focusing were simulated: in water, in water with ribs in the beam path and in water with ribs backed by a layer of soft tissue. The Westervelt equation was used to model the nonlinear HIFU field, and a 1 MHz phased array consisting of 254 circular elements was used as a boundary condition to the model. The temperature rise in tissue was modelled using the bioheat equation, and thermally necrosed volumes were calculated using the thermal dose formulation. The shapes of lesions predicted by the modelling were compared with those previously obtained in in vitro experiments at low-power sonications. Intensity levels at the face of the array elements that corresponded to the formation of high-amplitude shock fronts in the focal region were determined as 10 W cm(-2) in the free field in water and 40 W cm(-2) in the presence of ribs. It was shown that exposures with shocks provided a substantial increase in tissue heating, and its better spatial localization in the main focal region only. The relative effects of overheating ribs and splitting of the focus due to the periodic structure of the ribs were therefore reduced. These results suggest that utilizing nonlinear propagation and shock formation effects can be beneficial for inducing confined HIFU lesions when irradiating through obstructions such as ribs. Design of compact therapeutic arrays to provide maximum power outputs with lower intensity levels at the elements is necessary to achieve shock wave regimes for clinically relevant sonication depths in tissue.

  18. Cell-Type-Specific Genome-wide Expression Profiling after Laser Capture Microdissection of Living Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Manohar, C F

    2005-02-09

    The purpose of this technical feasibility study was to develop and evaluate robust microgenomic tools for investigations of genome-wide expression of very small numbers of cells isolated from whole tissue sections. Tissues contain large numbers of cell-types that play varied roles in organ function and responses to endogenous and exogenous toxicants whether bacterial, viral, chemical or radiation. Expression studies of whole tissue biopsy are severely limited because heterogeneous cell-types result in an averaging of molecular signals masking subtle but important changes in gene expression in any one cell type(s) or group of cells. Accurate gene expression analysis requires the study of specific cell types in their tissue environment but without contamination from surrounding cells. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a new technology to isolate morphologically distinct cells from tissue sections. Alternative methods are available for isolating single cells but not yet for their reliable genome-wide expression analyses. The tasks of this feasibility project were to: (1) Develop efficient protocols for laser capture microdissection of cells from tissues identified by antibody label, or morphological stain. (2) Develop reproducible gene-transcript analyses techniques for single cell-types and determine the numbers of cells needed for reliable genome-wide analyses. (3) Validate the technology for epithelial and endothelial cells isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of mice.

  19. Recent advances in medical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound has become one of the most widely used imaging modalities in medicine; yet, before ultrasound-imaging systems became available, high intensity ultrasound was used as early as the 1950s to ablate regions in the brains of human patients. Recently, a variety of novel applications of ultrasound have been developed that include site-specific and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, histotripsy, tissue regeneration, and bloodless surgery, among many others. This lecture will review several new applications of therapeutic ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors.

  20. Amplification of Herpes simplex type 1 and Human Herpes type 5 viral DNA from formalin-fixed Alzheimer brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, John D; Royall, Donald; Daum, Luke T; Kagan-Hallet, Kathleen; Chambers, James P

    2005-12-16

    It is known that nucleic acids from formalin-fixed tissues are not nearly as good templates for DNA amplification as those extracted from fresh tissues. However, specimens stored in most pathologic archives are initially fixed in formalin. The possibility of an infectious etiology of several diseases including Alzheimer's underscores the usefulness of archived tissue in assessing the association of infectious agents with specific pathology. In this report, we describe in detail a method resulting in robust amplification of HSV1 and Human Herpes type (HHV) 5 viral DNA targets using formalin-fixed Alzheimer brain frontal and temporal tissue as source of amplification template. Herpes simplex type 2 viral DNA was not detected in the limited samples examined in this study. Amplicons were verified by sequence analysis. Brain tissue stored in formalin longer than 1 year prior to post-formalin-fixation analysis gave rise to significantly shorter amplicons consistent with the observation that template DNA integrity decreases significantly with increasing time of storage in formalin. Thus, this report should be useful in PCR-based investigations assessing the regional presence of viral DNAs in formalin-fixed brain tissue.

  1. Therapeutic ultrasound reverses peripheral ischemia in type 2 diabetic mice through PI3K-Akt-eNOS pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhao-Yang; Li, Rui-Lin; Zhou, Hong-Sheng; Huang, Jing-Juan; Su, Zhi-Xiao; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Lan; Li, Yue; Shi, Yi-Qin; Hao, Chang-Ning; Duan, Jun-Li

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound (TUS) has been demonstrated to improve endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, which played a crucial role in the regulation of angiogenesis. Diabetes Mellitus (DM) impairs eNOS activity. We tested the hypothesis that DM may retard unilateral hindlimb ischemia-induced angiogenesis by inhibiting eNOS in high-fat diet (HFD)/streptozocin (STZ) induced diabetic mice, and that TUS may reverse DM-related impairment of angiogenesis. C57BL/6 mice were allocated to four groups: (A) mice were fed standard diet (control); (B) mice were fed standard diet and treated with TUS (control+TUS); (C) type-2 DM mice were induced by HFD/STZ (diabetic); and (D) type-2 DM mice and treated with TUS (dabetic+TUS). All mice were surgically induced unilateral limb ischemia. The ischemic skeletal muscles in groups B and D were irradiated with extracorporeal TUS for 9 minutes/day (frequency of 1 MHz, intensity of 0.3 W/cm2) for 14 consecutive days. The result showed that TUS augmented the blood perfusion, increased capillary density accompanied by an upregulation of angiogenic factors and a downregulation of apoptotic proteins in group D relative to group C. In vitro, TUS inhibited the apoptosis, promoted tubule formation, proliferation and migration capacities, increased angiogenic factors expression and reduced apoptotic protein levels in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Furthermore, TUS can robust reverse the inhibiting effect induced by high glucose (HG) on HUVECs, and these benefits could be blocked by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002) or eNOS inhibitor (L-NAME). Together, TUS restored type-2 DM-mediated inhibition of ischemia-induced angiogenesis, partially via PI3K-Akt-eNOS signal pathway. PMID:27725849

  2. Ultrasound mediated delivery of drugs and genes to solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Victor

    2008-06-30

    It has long been shown that therapeutic ultrasound can be used effectively to ablate solid tumors, and a variety of cancers are presently being treated in the clinic using these types of ultrasound exposures. There is, however, an ever-increasing body of preclinical literature that demonstrates how ultrasound energy can also be used non-destructively for increasing the efficacy of drugs and genes for improving cancer treatment. In this review, a summary of the most important ultrasound mechanisms will be given with a detailed description of how each one can be employed for a variety of applications. This includes the manner by which acoustic energy deposition can be used to create changes in tissue permeability for enhancing the delivery of conventional agents, as well as for deploying and activating drugs and genes via specially tailored vehicles and formulations.

  3. Ultrasound mediated delivery of drugs and genes to solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Victor

    2008-01-01

    It has long been shown that therapeutic ultrasound can be used effectively to ablate solid tumors, and a variety of cancers are presently being treated in the clinic using these types of ultrasound exposures. There is, however, an ever-increasing body of preclinical literature that demonstrates how ultrasound energy can also be used non-destructively for increasing the efficacy of drugs and genes for improving cancer treatment. In this review, a summary of the most important ultrasound mechanisms will be given with a detailed description of how each one can be employed for a variety of applications. This includes the manner by which acoustic energy deposition can be used to create changes in tissue permeability for enhancing the delivery of conventional agents, as well as for deploying and activating drugs and genes via specially tailored vehicles and formulations. PMID:18474406

  4. Expression of tissue type and urokinase type plasminogen activators as well as plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 and type-2 in human and rhesus monkey placenta

    PubMed Central

    HU, ZHAO-YUAN; LIU, YI-XUN; LIU, KUI; BYRNE, SIMON; NY, TOR; FENG, QIANG; OCKLEFORD, COLIN D.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of mRNAs and antigens of tissue type (t) and urokinase type (u) plasminogen activators (PA) plus their corresponding inhibitors, type-1 (PAI-1) and type-2 (PAI-2) were studied in human and rhesus monkey placentae by in situ hybridisation and immunocytochemistry. Specific monkey cRNA and antibodies against human tPA, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 were used as probes. The following results were obtained. (1) All the molecules tPA, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 and their mRNAs were identified in the majority of the extravillous cytotrophoblast cells of the decidual layer between Rohr's and Nitabuch's striae and in cytotrophoblast cells of the chorionic plate, basal plate, intercotyledonary septae and cytotrophoblast cells of the chorionic villous tree. (2) Expression of uPA and PAI-2 was noted in villous trophoblast whereas tPA and PAI-1 were mainly concentrated where detachment from maternal tissue occurs. (3) No expression of tPA, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 was observed in the basal plate endometrial stromal cells, chorionic plate connective tissue cells, septal endometrial stromal cells or villous core mesenchyme. (4) The distribution of probes observed following in situ hybridisation is generally consistent with the immunofluorescence pattern of the corresponding antigens and no significant interspecies differences were noted. It is possible that both decidual and extravillous trophoblast cells of placentae of human and rhesus monkey are capable of producing tPA, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 to differing extents. Coordinated expression of these genes in the tissue may play an essential role in the maintenance of normal placentation and parturition. The differences in distribution we observed are consistent with the suggestion that coordinated expression of tPA and its inhibitor PAI-1 may play a key role in fibrinolytic activity in the early stages of placentation and separation of placenta from maternal tissue at term. On the other hand, uPA with its inhibitor PAI-2 appears

  5. Contrast-enhanced, real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging of tissue perfusion: preliminary results in a rabbit model of testicular torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltiel, H. J.; Padua, H. M.; Gargollo, P. C.; Cannon, G. M., Jr.; Alomari, A. I.; Yu, R.; Clement, G. T.

    2011-04-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the clinical investigation of a wide variety of perfusion disorders. Quantitative analysis of perfusion is not widely performed, and is limited by the fact that data are acquired from a single tissue plane, a situation that is unlikely to accurately reflect global perfusion. Real-time perfusion information from a tissue volume in an experimental rabbit model of testicular torsion was obtained with a two-dimensional matrix phased array US transducer. Contrast-enhanced imaging was performed in 20 rabbits during intravenous infusion of the microbubble contrast agent Definity® before and after unilateral testicular torsion and contralateral orchiopexy. The degree of torsion was 0° in 4 (sham surgery), 180° in 4, 360° in 4, 540° in 4, and 720° in 4. An automated technique was developed to analyze the time history of US image intensity in experimental and control testes. Comparison of mean US intensity rate of change and of ratios between mean US intensity rate of change in experimental and control testes demonstrated good correlation with testicular perfusion and mean perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabeled microspheres, an accepted 'gold standard'. This method is of potential utility in the clinical evaluation of testicular and other organ perfusion.

  6. Adaptive Thermal Therapy using Planar Ultrasound Transducers with Real-time MR Temperature Feedback: Demonstration in Gel Phantoms and Ex-vivo Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kee; Choy, Vanessa; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2007-05-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy offers a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. The main goal of this study was to evaluate active temperature feedback on a clinical 1.5T MR imager to control conformal thermal therapy. MR thermometry was performed during heating in both thermal gel phantoms and ex-vivo tissue with a single-element transurethral heating applicator. The applicator rotation rate and power were controlled based on MRI-temperature measurements. The influence of a cooling gradient (to simulate cooling of the rectum or urethra) was also investigated in gel phantoms. The 55°C isotherm generated during heating closely matched the targeted prostate shape, with an average distance error of 0.9 mm ± 0.4 mm in turkey breasts, 1.3 mm ± 0.5 mm in gel phantoms without rectal cooling and 1.4 mm ± 0.6 mm in gel phantoms with rectal cooling. Accurate, MRI-guided, active feedback has been successfully demonstrated experimentally and has the capability to adjust for unpredictable and varying tissue properties during the treatment.

  7. Contrast-enhanced, real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging of tissue perfusion: preliminary results in a rabbit model of testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Paltiel, H J; Padua, H M; Gargollo, P C; Cannon, G M; Alomari, A I; Yu, R; Clement, G T

    2011-04-07

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the clinical investigation of a wide variety of perfusion disorders. Quantitative analysis of perfusion is not widely performed, and is limited by the fact that data are acquired from a single tissue plane, a situation that is unlikely to accurately reflect global perfusion. Real-time perfusion information from a tissue volume in an experimental rabbit model of testicular torsion was obtained with a two-dimensional matrix phased array US transducer. Contrast-enhanced imaging was performed in 20 rabbits during intravenous infusion of the microbubble contrast agent Definity® before and after unilateral testicular torsion and contralateral orchiopexy. The degree of torsion was 0° in 4 (sham surgery), 180° in 4, 360° in 4, 540° in 4, and 720° in 4. An automated technique was developed to analyze the time history of US image intensity in experimental and control testes. Comparison of mean US intensity rate of change and of ratios between mean US intensity rate of change in experimental and control testes demonstrated good correlation with testicular perfusion and mean perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabeled microspheres, an accepted 'gold standard'. This method is of potential utility in the clinical evaluation of testicular and other organ perfusion.

  8. Assessment of parabens and ultraviolet filters in human placenta tissue by ultrasound-assisted extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vela-Soria, F; Gallardo-Torres, M E; Ballesteros, O; Díaz, C; Pérez, J; Navalón, A; Fernández, M F; Olea, N

    2017-03-03

    Increasing concerns have been raised over recent decades about human exposure to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs), especially about their possible effects on embryo, foetus, newborn, and child. Parabens (PBs) and ultraviolet filters (UV-filters) are prevalent EDCs widely used as additives in cosmetics and personal care products (PCPs). The objective of this study was to determine the presence of four PBs and ten UV-filters in placental tissue samples using a novel analytical method based on ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Multivariate optimization strategies were used to accurately optimize extraction and clean-up parameters. Limits of quantification ranged from 0.15 to 0.5μgkg(-1), and inter-day variability (evaluated as relative standard deviation) ranged from 3.6% to 14%. The method was validated using matrix-matched standard calibration followed by a recovery assay with spiked samples. Recovery percents ranged from 94.5% to 112%. The method was satisfactorily applied for the determination of the target compounds in human placental tissue samples collected at delivery from 15 randomly selected women. This new analytical procedure can provide information on foetal exposure to compounds, which has been little studied.

  9. Atherosclerotic plaque tissue characterization in 2D ultrasound longitudinal carotid scans for automated classification: a paradigm for stroke risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Vinitha Sree, S; Afonso, David; Sanches, Joao; Shafique, Shoaib; Nicolaides, Andrew; Pedro, L M; Fernandes E Fernandes, J; Suri, Jasjit S

    2013-05-01

    In the case of carotid atherosclerosis, to avoid unnecessary surgeries in asymptomatic patients, it is necessary to develop a technique to effectively differentiate symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. In this paper, we have presented a data mining framework that characterizes the textural differences in these two classes using several grayscale features based on a novel combination of trace transform and fuzzy texture. The features extracted from the delineated plaque regions in B-mode ultrasound images were used to train several classifiers in order to prepare them for classification of new test plaques. Our CAD system was evaluated using two different databases consisting of 146 (44 symptomatic to 102 asymptomatic) and 346 (196 symptomatic and 150 asymptomatic) images. Both these databases differ in the way the ground truth was determined. We obtained classification accuracies of 93.1 and 85.3 %, respectively. The techniques are low cost, easily implementable, objective, and non-invasive. For more objective analysis, we have also developed novel integrated indices using a combination of significant features.

  10. Precise anatomy localization in CT data by an improved probabilistic tissue type atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Astrid; Schadewaldt, Nicole; Schulz, Heinrich; Vik, Torbjørn; Bergtholdt, Martin; Bystrov, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Automated interpretation of CT scans is an important, clinically relevant area as the number of such scans is increasing rapidly and the interpretation is time consuming. Anatomy localization is an important prerequisite for any such interpretation task. This can be done by image-to-atlas registration, where the atlas serves as a reference space for annotations such as organ probability maps. Tissue type based atlases allow fast and robust processing of arbitrary CT scans. Here we present two methods which significantly improve organ localization based on tissue types. A first problem is the definition of tissue types, which until now is done heuristically based on experience. We present a method to determine suitable tissue types from sample images automatically. A second problem is the restriction of the transformation space: all prior approaches use global affine maps. We present a hierarchical strategy to refine this global affine map. For each organ or region of interest a localized tissue type atlas is computed and used for a subsequent local affine registration step. A three-fold cross validation on 311 CT images with different fields-of-view demonstrates a reduction of the organ localization error by 33%.

  11. Comparative analysis of codeword representation by clustering methods for the classification of histological tissue types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygili, Ahmet; Uysal, Gunalp; Bilgin, Gokhan

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the classification of several histological tissue types, i.e., muscles, nerves, connective and epithelial tissue cells, is studied in high resolutional histological images. In the feature extraction step, bag of features method is utilized to reveal distinguishing features of each tissue cell types. Local small blocks of sub-images/patches are extracted to find discriminative patterns for followed strategy. For detecting points of interest in local patches, Harris corner detection method is applied. Afterwards, discriminative features are extracted using the scale invariant feature transform method using these points of interests. Several code word representations are obtained by clustering approach (using k-means fuzzy c-means, expectation maximization method, Gaussian mixture models) and evaluated in comparative manner. In the last step, the classification of the tissue cells data are performed using k-nearest neighbor and support vector machines methods.

  12. Ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of synovium is an increasingly performed procedure with a high diagnostic yield. In this review, we discuss the normal synovium, as well as the indications, technique, tissue handling and clinical applications of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. PMID:26581578

  13. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses. PMID:26973405

  14. Ultrasound elastographic techniques in focal liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Conti, Clara Benedetta; Cavalcoli, Federica; Fraquelli, Mirella; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    2016-03-07

    Elastographic techniques are new ultrasound-based imaging techniques developed to estimate tissue deformability/stiffness. Several ultrasound elastographic approaches have been developed, such as static elastography, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force imaging methods, which include point shear wave and shear wave imaging elastography. The application of these methods in clinical practice aims at estimating the mechanical tissues properties. One of the main settings for the application of these tools has been liver stiffness assessment in chronic liver disease, which has been studied mainly using transient elastography. Another field of application for these techniques is the assessment of focal lesions, detected by ultrasound in organs such as pancreas, prostate, breast, thyroid, lymph nodes. Considering the frequency and importance of the detection of focal liver lesions through routine ultrasound, some studies have also aimed to assess the role that elestography can play in studying the stiffness of different types of liver lesions, in order to predict their nature and thus offer valuable non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of liver masses.

  15. Point-of-care musculoskeletal ultrasound is critical for the diagnosis of hemarthroses, inflammation and soft tissue abnormalities in adult patients with painful haemophilic arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Kidder, W; Nguyen, S; Larios, J; Bergstrom, J; Ceponis, A; von Drygalski, A

    2015-07-01

    We previously demonstrated in adult patients with haemophilia (PWH) that hemarthrosis is present in only ~1/3rd of acutely painful joints by using point-of-care-musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS). Therefore, other unrecognized tissue abnormalities must contribute to pain. Using high resolution MSKUS, employing grey scale and power Doppler, we sought to retrospectively (i) investigate soft tissue abnormalities in painful haemophilic joints and (ii) to determine to what extent MSKUS findings, functional or radiographic joint scores correlate with biomarkers of inflammation in PWH. Findings were correlated with Hemophilia Joint Health Scores (HJHS), Pettersson scores, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and von Willebrand factor activity and antigen levels. A total of 65 MSKUS examinations for acute and chronic joint pains were performed for 34 adult haemophilia patients, mostly for chronic joint pains (72.3%). The most prominent findings (66.5%) pertained to inflammatory soft tissue changes including synovitis, tendinitis, enthesitis, bursitis and fat pad inflammation. Effusions were present in 55.5% and 46.8% of MSKUS performed for acute and chronic pain, respectively. Of those, 90.0% were bloody during acute and 47.6% during persistent pains. While inflammatory biomarkers correlated well with overall HJHS and total Pettersson scores (P < 0.05), they did not differ between those patients with synovitis and those without. MSKUS is emerging as an important modality to diagnose treatable musculoskeletal abnormalities contributing to pain in haemophilic arthropathy, and therefore seems critical for a personalized approach to haemophilia care. The role of biomarkers in this setting remains less clear and requires further investigation.

  16. Type-1 pericytes participate in fibrous tissue deposition in aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2013-12-01

    In older adults, changes in skeletal muscle composition are associated with increased fibrosis, loss of mass, and decreased force, which can lead to dependency, morbidity, and mortality. Understanding the biological mechanisms responsible is essential to sustaining and improving their quality of life. Compared with young mice, aged mice take longer to recover from muscle injury; their tissue fibrosis is more extensive, and regenerated myofibers are smaller. Strong evidence indicates that cells called pericytes, embedded in the basement membrane of capillaries, contribute to the satellite-cell pool and muscle growth. In addition to their role in skeletal muscle repair, after tissue damage, they detach from capillaries and migrate to the interstitial space to participate in fibrosis formation. Here we distinguish two bona fide pericyte subtypes in the skeletal muscle interstitium, type-1 (Nestin-GFP(-)/NG2-DsRed(+)) and type-2 (Nestin-GFP(+)/NG2-DsRed(+)), and characterize their heretofore unknown specific roles in the aging environment. Our in vitro results show that type-1 and type-2 pericytes are either fibrogenic or myogenic, respectively. Transplantation studies in young animals indicate that type-2 pericytes are myogenic, while type-1 pericytes remain in the interstitial space. In older mice, however, the muscular regenerative capacity of type-2 pericytes is limited, and type-1 pericytes produce collagen, contributing to fibrous tissue deposition. We conclude that in injured muscles from aging mice, the pericytes involved in skeletal muscle repair differ from those associated with scar formation.

  17. Type-1 pericytes participate in fibrous tissue deposition in aged skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Mintz, Akiva

    2013-01-01

    In older adults, changes in skeletal muscle composition are associated with increased fibrosis, loss of mass, and decreased force, which can lead to dependency, morbidity, and mortality. Understanding the biological mechanisms responsible is essential to sustaining and improving their quality of life. Compared with young mice, aged mice take longer to recover from muscle injury; their tissue fibrosis is more extensive, and regenerated myofibers are smaller. Strong evidence indicates that cells called pericytes, embedded in the basement membrane of capillaries, contribute to the satellite-cell pool and muscle growth. In addition to their role in skeletal muscle repair, after tissue damage, they detach from capillaries and migrate to the interstitial space to participate in fibrosis formation. Here we distinguish two bona fide pericyte subtypes in the skeletal muscle interstitium, type-1 (Nestin-GFP−/NG2-DsRed+) and type-2 (Nestin-GFP+/NG2-DsRed+), and characterize their heretofore unknown specific roles in the aging environment. Our in vitro results show that type-1 and type-2 pericytes are either fibrogenic or myogenic, respectively. Transplantation studies in young animals indicate that type-2 pericytes are myogenic, while type-1 pericytes remain in the interstitial space. In older mice, however, the muscular regenerative capacity of type-2 pericytes is limited, and type-1 pericytes produce collagen, contributing to fibrous tissue deposition. We conclude that in injured muscles from aging mice, the pericytes involved in skeletal muscle repair differ from those associated with scar formation. PMID:24067916

  18. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney - blood and urine flow Abdominal ultrasound References Chen L. Abdominal ultrasound imaging. In: Sahani DV, Samir ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  19. Ultrasound Techniques for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasound has proven to be a safe non-invasive technique for imaging organs and measuring cardiovascular function. It has unique advantages for application to problems with man in space including evaluation of cardiovascular function both in serial studies and during critical operations. In addition, specialized instrumentation may be capable of detecting the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. A spatial location and three-dimensional reconstruction system is being developed to improve the accuracy and reproducibility for serial comparative ultrasound studies of cardiovascular function. The three-dimensional method permits the acquisition of ultrasonic images from many views that can be recombined into a single reconstruction of the heart or vasculature. In addition to conventional imaging and monitoring systems, it is sometimes necessary or desirable to develop instrumentation for special purposes. One example of this type of development is the design of a pulsed-Doppler system to monitor cerebral blood flow during critical operations such as re-entry. A second example is the design of a swept-frequency ultrasound system for the detection of bubbles in the circulatory system and/or soft tissues as an early indication of the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. This system exploits the resonant properties of bubbles and can detect both fundamental and second harmonic emissions from the insonified region.

  20. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  1. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  2. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  3. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  4. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  5. 21 CFR 1271.85 - What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of cells and tissues? 1271.85 Section 1271.85 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.85 What donor testing is required for different types of cells and tissues? (a) All...

  6. Conformal thermal therapy using planar ultrasound transducers and adaptive closed-loop MR temperature control: demonstration in gel phantoms and ex vivo tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, K.; Choy, V.; Chopra, R.; Bronskill, M. J.

    2007-05-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy offers a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Integrating a multi-element planar transducer with active MR temperature feedback can enable three-dimensional conformal thermal therapy of a target region within the prostate gland while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Continuous measurement of the temperature distribution in tissue enables dynamic compensation for unknown changes in blood flow and tissue properties during treatment. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using active temperature feedback on a clinical 1.5 T MR imager for conformal thermal therapy. MR thermometry was performed during heating in both gel phantoms and excised tissue with a transurethral heating applicator, and the rotation rate and power were varied based on the thermal measurements. The capability to produce a region of thermal damage that matched a target boundary was evaluated. The influence of a cooling gradient (to simulate cooling of the rectum or urethra) on the desired pattern of thermal damage was also investigated in gel phantoms. Results showed high correlation between the desired target boundary and the 55 °C isotherm generated during heating with an average distance error of 0.9 mm ± 0.4 mm (n = 6) in turkey breasts, 1.4 mm ± 0.6 mm (n = 4) in gel phantoms without rectal cooling and 1.4 mm ± 0.6 mm (n = 3) in gel phantoms with rectal cooling. The results were obtained using a temporal update rate of 5 s, a spatial resolution of 3 × 3 × 10 mm for the control point, and a temperature uncertainty of approximately 1 °C. The performance of the control algorithm under these conditions was comparable to that of simulations conducted previously by our group. Overall, the feasibility of generating targeted regions of thermal damage with a transurethral heating applicator and active MR temperature feedback has been demonstrated experimentally. This method of treatment

  7. Conformal thermal therapy using planar ultrasound transducers and adaptive closed-loop MR temperature control: demonstration in gel phantoms and ex vivo tissues.

    PubMed

    Tang, K; Choy, V; Chopra, R; Bronskill, M J

    2007-05-21

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy offers a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Integrating a multi-element planar transducer with active MR temperature feedback can enable three-dimensional conformal thermal therapy of a target region within the prostate gland while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Continuous measurement of the temperature distribution in tissue enables dynamic compensation for unknown changes in blood flow and tissue properties during treatment. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using active temperature feedback on a clinical 1.5 T MR imager for conformal thermal therapy. MR thermometry was performed during heating in both gel phantoms and excised tissue with a transurethral heating applicator, and the rotation rate and power were varied based on the thermal measurements. The capability to produce a region of thermal damage that matched a target boundary was evaluated. The influence of a cooling gradient (to simulate cooling of the rectum or urethra) on the desired pattern of thermal damage was also investigated in gel phantoms. Results showed high correlation between the desired target boundary and the 55 degrees C isotherm generated during heating with an average distance error of 0.9 mm +/- 0.4 mm (n = 6) in turkey breasts, 1.4 mm +/- 0.6 mm (n = 4) in gel phantoms without rectal cooling and 1.4 mm +/- 0.6 mm (n = 3) in gel phantoms with rectal cooling. The results were obtained using a temporal update rate of 5 s, a spatial resolution of 3 x 3 x 10 mm for the control point, and a temperature uncertainty of approximately 1 degrees C. The performance of the control algorithm under these conditions was comparable to that of simulations conducted previously by our group. Overall, the feasibility of generating targeted regions of thermal damage with a transurethral heating applicator and active MR temperature feedback has been demonstrated experimentally. This method

  8. Quo vadis medical ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Lewin, Peter A

    2004-04-01

    The last three decades of development in diagnostic ultrasound imaging and technology are briefly reviewed and the impact of the crucial link between the two apparently independent research efforts, which eventually facilitated implementation of harmonic imaging modality is explored. These two efforts included the experiments with piezoelectric PVDF polymer material and studies of the interaction between ultrasound energy and biological tissue. Harmonic imaging and its subsequent improvements revolutionized the diagnostic power of clinical ultrasound and brought along images of unparalleled resolution, close to that of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality. The nonlinear propagation effects and their implications for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications of ultrasound are also briefly addressed. In diagnostic applications, the impact of these effects on image resolution and tissue characterization is reviewed; in therapeutic applications, the influence of nonlinear propagation effects on highly localized tissue ablation and cauterization is examined. Next, the most likely developments and future trends in clinical ultrasound technology, including 3D and 4D imaging, distant palpation, image enhancement using contrast agents, monitoring, and merger of diagnostic and therapeutic applications by e.g. introducing ultrasonically controlled targeted drug delivery are reviewed. Finally, a possible competition from other imaging modalities is discussed.

  9. Carotid Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Carotid Ultrasound Also known as carotid duplex. Carotid ultrasound is a painless imaging test that uses high- ... of your carotid arteries. This test uses an ultrasound machine, which includes a computer, a screen, and ...

  10. Tissue-specific expression of the human type II collagen gene in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lovell-Badge, R.H.; Bygrave, A.; Bradley, A.; Robertson, E.; Tilly, R.; Cheah, K.S.E.

    1987-05-01

    Type II collagen is crucial to the development of form in vertebrates as it is the major protein of cartilage. To study the factors regulating its expression the authors introduced a cosmid containing the human type II collagen gene, including 4.5 kilobases of 5' and 2.2 kilobases of 3' flanking DNA, into embryonic stem cells in vitro. The transformed cells contribute to all tissues in chimeric mice allowing the expression of the exogenous gene to be studied in vivo. Human type II collagen mRNA is restricted to tissues showing transcription from the endogenous gene and human type II collagen is found in extracellular matrix surrounding chondrocytes in cartilage. The results indicate that the cis-acting requirements for correct temporal and spatial regulation of the gene are contained with the introduced DNA.

  11. Angular Error in Ultrasound Doppler Tissue Velocities and Its Influence on the Derived Variable Peak Systolic Strain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Both two- and four-chamber apical images have been recorded on a sample of 18 normal individuals. The study of tissue velocities in the myocard ...is the speed at which the myocard is deforming. The strain rate (dε/dt) is estimated by [9]: L vLrv −+= )(�ε (2) where v is the...increase back to zero. This is because the strain rate is negative when the myocard is contracting, as it is during systole, and positive during

  12. Assessment of ultrasound-assisted extraction as sample pre-treatment for the measurement of lead isotope ratios in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costas-Rodríguez, M.; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-06-01

    In this work, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) was evaluated as a sample preparation procedure for lead isotope ratio measurements in marine biological tissues by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. 20 mg of marine biological tissue and 1 mL of acid extractant were sonicated for 3 min at 60% ultrasound amplitude. Matrix separation was performed in the supernatant using a chromatographic exchange resin (Sr-Spec™). Total elimination of organic matter was achieved during the separation step. Microwave-assisted digestion and dry-ashing were used for comparative purposes. No significant differences were found in lead isotope ratios at 95% of confidence level. UAE emerges as an advantageous alternative to classical methods for sample preparation owing to its simplicity and rapidity ( i.e. operation steps were reduced), low reagent consumption and low contamination risks.

  13. Hybrid use of combined and sequential delivery of growth factors and ultrasound stimulation in porous multilayer composite scaffolds to promote both vascularization and bone formation in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haoran; Liu, Xia; Zhu, Minghua; Luo, Guilin; Sun, Tao; Peng, Qiang; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Taijun; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Keliang; Feng, Bo; Weng, Jie; Wang, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a multilayer coating technology would be adopted to prepare a porous composite scaffold and the growth factor release and ultrasound techniques were introduced into bone tissue engineering to finally solve the problems of vascularization and bone formation in the scaffold whilst the designed multilayer composite with gradient degradation characteristics in the space was used to match the new bone growth process better. The results of animal experiments showed that the use of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) combined with growth factors demonstrated excellent capabilities and advantages in both vascularization and new bone formation in bone tissue engineering. The degradation of the used scaffold materials could match new bone formation very well. The results also showed that only RGD-promoted cell adhesion was insufficient to satisfy the needs of new bone formation while growth factors and LIPUS stimulation were the key factors in new bone formation.

  14. Ultrasound-assisted extraction followed by disposable pipette purification for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in small-size biological tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Pena-Abaurrea, M; García de la Torre, V S; Ramos, L

    2013-11-22

    The use of solid-phase extraction pipette tip (also called disposable pipette extraction, DPX) has been evaluated for the purification of environmentally relevant polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in fatty extracts obtained by ultrasound-assisted extraction with a sonication probe from small-size biological tissues. Complete sample treatment involved only 50 mg of sample and was completed in ca. 15 min with minimal sample manipulation and reagents consumption (i.e., 1.5 mL of n-hexane and 0.8 g of acidic silica). The performance of the proposed methodology for the intended determination was firstly evaluated by determination of the endogenous PCB levels in a naturally contaminated internal reference material. The determined concentrations showed a good agreement with those obtained using a more conventional sample preparation procedure previously validated in our laboratory (recoveries, as compared to levels determined using the latter method, were in the 85-123% range for a large majority of the studied congeners, and the relative standard deviations were in general lower than 14%). Results obtained for the analysis of reference food samples and certified reference materials NIST 1945 and 1947 demonstrated that, when combined with gas chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry working in the tandem mode, GC-ITD(MS/MS), the proposed methodology allowed accurate determination of most of the investigated PCBs and that 50 mg of sample sufficed for the screening of less abundant toxic congeners.

  15. Comparative study of the topical application of Aloe vera gel, therapeutic ultrasound and phonophoresis on the tissue repair in collagenase-induced rat tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Maia Filho, Antonio Luiz Martins; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; Munin, Egberto; Aimbire, Flávio; Albertini, Regiane

    2010-10-01

    The aim of our study was to compare topical use of Aloe vera gel, pulsed mode ultrasound (US) and Aloe vera phonophoresis on rat paw with collagenase-induced tendinitis. Edema size, tensile tendon strength, tendon elasticity, number of inflammatory cells and tissue histology were studied at 7 and 14 days after tendinitis induction. Pulse mode US parameters were: 1 MHz frequency, 100 Hz repetition rate, 10% duty cycle, and 0.5 W/cm(2) intensity, applied for 2 min each session. A 0.5 mL of Aloe vera gel at 2% concentration was applied for 2 min per session, topically and by phonophoresis. Topical application of Aloe vera gel did not show any statistically significant improvement in the inflammatory process, whereas phonophoresis enhanced the gel action reducing edema and number of inflammatory cells, promoting the rearrangement of collagen fibers and promoting also the recovery of the tensile strength and elasticity of the inflamed tendon to recover their normal pre-injury status. Results seem to indicate that Aloe vera phonophoresis is a promising technique for tendinitis treatment, without the adverse effect provoked by systemic anti-inflammatory drugs.

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided tissue sampling of small subepithelial tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle

    PubMed Central

    Schlag, Christoph; Menzel, Christoph; Götzberger, Manuela; Nennstiel, Simon; Klare, Peter; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Schmid, Roland M.; Weirich, Gregor; von Delius, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims The optimal approach to small subepithelial tumors (SETs) of the upper gastrointestinal tract remains inconclusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) for less invasive tissue sampling of small SETs of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Patients and methods In this prospective observational study patients with small ( ≤ 3 cm) SETs of the upper gastrointestinal tract were eligible and underwent EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle. The main outcome measure was the diagnostic yield. The number of obtained core biopsies was also assessed. Results Twenty patients were included. The mean SET size was 16 mm (range 10 – 27 mm). EUS-FNB was technically feasible in all cases and no complications were observed. The diagnostic yield was 75 %. Core biopsy specimens were obtained in only 25 % of cases. Conclusion EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle of small SETs can achieve a definite diagnosis in the majority of cases. However, because core samples cannot regularly be obtained, EUS-FNB seems not to be convincingly superior to standard EUS-FNA in this setting PMID:28299351

  17. X-ray scattering for classifying tissue types associated with breast disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, Sabeena; Siu, Karen K. W.; Falzon, Gregory; Nazaretian, Simon; Hart, Stewart A.; Fox, Jane G.; Susil, Beatrice J.; Lewis, Robert A.

    2008-10-15

    Collagen types I and III can be characterized at the molecular level (at the tens to hundreds of nanometers scale) using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Although collagen fibril structural parameters at this length scale have shown differences between diseased and nondiseased breast tissues, a comprehensive analysis involving a multitude of features with a large (>50) patient cohort has not previously been investigated. Breast tissue samples were excised from 80 patients presenting with either a breast lump or reduction mammoplasty. From these, invasive carcinoma, benign tissue, and normal parenchyma were analyzed. Parameters related to collagen structure, including longitudinal (axial) and lateral (equatorial) features, polar angle features, total scattering intensity, and tissue heterogeneity effects, were extracted from the SAXS patterns and examined. The amplitude of the third-order axial peak and the total scattering intensity (amorphous scatter) showed the most separation between tissue groups and a classification model using these two parameters demonstrated an accuracy of over 95% between invasive carcinoma and mammoplasty patients. Normal tissue taken from disease-free patients (mammoplasty) and normal tissue taken from patients with presence of disease showed significant differences, suggesting that SAXS may provide different diagnostic information from that of conventional histopathology.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Disease Stratified Human Pancreas Tissue Indicates Unique Signature of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Burch, Tanya C; Morris, Margaret A; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Pugliese, Alberto; Nadler, Jerry L; Nyalwidhe, Julius O

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are associated with functional beta cell loss due to ongoing inflammation. Despite shared similarities, T1D is an autoimmune disease with evidence of autoantibody production, as well as a role for exocrine pancreas involvement. Our hypothesis is that differential protein expression occurs in disease stratified pancreas tissues and regulated proteins from endocrine and exocrine tissues are potential markers of disease and potential therapeutic targets. The study objective was to identify novel proteins that distinguish the pancreas from donors with T1D from the pancreas from patients with T2D, or autoantibody positive non-diabetic donors. Detailed quantitative comprehensive proteomic analysis was applied to snap frozen human pancreatic tissue lysates from organ donors without diabetes, with T1D-associated autoantibodies in the absence of diabetes, with T1D, or with T2D. These disease-stratified human pancreas tissues contain exocrine and endocrine tissues (with dysfunctional islets) in the same microenvironment. The expression profiles of several of the proteins were further verified by western blot. We identified protein panels that are significantly and uniquely upregulated in the three disease-stratified pancreas tissues compared to non-disease control tissues. These proteins are involved in inflammation, metabolic regulation, and autoimmunity, all of which are pathways linked to, and likely involved in, T1 and T2 diabetes pathogenesis. Several new proteins were differentially upregulated in prediabetic, T1D, and T2D pancreas. The results identify proteins that could serve as novel prognostic, diagnostic, and therapeutic tools to preserve functional islet mass in Type 1 Diabetes.

  19. Dermal microvasculature and tissue selective thinning techniques (ultrasound and water-jet) of short-time expanded skin in dogs.

    PubMed

    Siegert, R; Danter, J; Jurk, V; Eggers, R; Krüger, S

    1998-01-01

    Certain reconstructive procedures, like auricular reconstructions, require thin and well-vascularized skin. The aims of this study were to analyze if the increased survival of expanded skin flaps was due to morphologic changes of the dermis, if thinning of short-time expanded skin was possible without harm to the microcirculation and if tissue selective cutting methods could be used to resect subcutaneous fat without damaging its vessels. Eighty-two 200-ml expanders were implanted into the trunk regions of 26 beagles and filled immediately with sterile saline. In the first series of experiments, the expansion was terminated after intervals of 0.5-5 weeks and dermal vessels were analyzed morphometrically. In the second series the expanded flaps were raised after 2 weeks and thinned solely surgically or with the additional use of an ultrasonic knife or with cutting by water jet. In contrast to sham flaps, the expanded skin showed only very few areas of necrosis and these were located superficially in most cases. The relative volume of the dermal vessels and their quantity showed a significant increase after the expansion. Additionally, the subcutaneous tissue could be thinned down to 0.4 mm with the water-jet-cutter. Findings demonstrated that the method used could create a well-vascularized skin flap of minimal thickness that could be very helpful for special reconstructive procedures.

  20. Effects of low-power LED and therapeutic ultrasound in the tissue healing and inflammation in a tendinitis experimental model in rats.

    PubMed

    Moura Júnior, Manoel de Jesus; Arisawa, Emilia Ângela Loschiavo; Martin, Airton Abrahão; de Carvalho, Janderson Pereira; da Silva, José Mário Nunes; Silva, José Figueiredo; Silveira, Landulfo

    2014-01-01

    This work evaluated the anti-inflammatory response of low-power light-emitting diode (LED) and ultrasound (US) therapies and the quality and rapidness of tendon repair in an experimental model of tendinitis, employing histomorphometry and Raman spectroscopy. Tendinitis was induced by collagenase into the right tendon of 35 male Wistar rats with an average weight of 230 g. The animals were randomly separated into seven groups of five animals each: tendinitis without treatment-control (TD7 and TD14, where 1 and 2 indicated sacrifice on the 7th and 14th day, respectively), tendinitis submitted to US therapy (US7 and US14) and tendinitis submitted to LED therapy (LED7 and LED14). Contralateral tendons of the TD group at the 14th day were used as the healthy group (H). US treatment was applied in pulsed mode at 10 %, 1 MHz frequency, 0.5 W/cm(2), 120 s. LED therapy parameters were 4 J/cm(2), 120 s, daily dose at the same time and same point. Sacrifice was performed on the 7th or 14th day. Histomorphometric analysis showed lower number of fibroblasts on the 14th day of therapy for the US-treated group, compared to the TD and LED, indicating lower tissue inflammation. Raman showed that the LED group had an increase in the amount of collagen I and III from the 7th to the 14th day, which would indicate more organized fibers and a better quality of the healing, and US showed lower collagen I synthesis in the 14th day compared to H, indicating a lower tissue reorganization.

  1. Metabolic factors, adipose tissue, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels in Type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) production by adipose tissue is increased in obesity, and its circulating levels are high in type 2 diabetes. PAI-1 increases cardiovascular risk by favoring clot stability, interfering with vascular remodeling, or both. We investigated in obese diabetic per...

  2. JSUM ultrasound elastography practice guidelines: pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Yoshiki; Kuwahara, Takamichi; Irisawa, Atsushi; Itokawa, Fumihide; Uchida, Hiroki; Sasahira, Naoki; Kawada, Natsuko; Itoh, Yuya; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a relatively new diagnostic technique for measuring the elasticity (hardness) of tissue. Eleven years have passed since the debut of elastography. Various elastography devices are currently being marketed by manufacturers under different names. Pancreatic elastography can be used not only with transabdominal ultrasonography but also with endoscopic ultrasonography, but some types of elastography are difficult to perform for the pancreas. These guidelines aim to classify the various types of elastography into two major categories depending on the differences in the physical quantity (strain, shear wave), and to present the evidence for pancreatic elastography and how to use pancreatic elastography in the present day. But the number of reports on ultrasound elastography for the pancreas is still small, and there are no reports on some elastography devices for the pancreas. Therefore, these guidelines do not recommend methods of imaging and analysis by elastography device.

  3. Controlling collagen fiber microstructure in three-dimensional hydrogels using ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Kelley A.; VanderBurgh, Jacob; Hocking, Denise C.; Dalecki, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Type I collagen is the primary fibrillar component of the extracellular matrix, and functional properties of collagen arise from variations in fiber structure. This study investigated the ability of ultrasound to control collagen microstructure during hydrogel fabrication. Under appropriate conditions, ultrasound exposure of type I collagen during polymerization altered fiber microstructure. Scanning electron microscopy and second-harmonic generation microscopy revealed decreased collagen fiber diameters in response to ultrasound compared to sham-exposed samples. Results of mechanistic investigations were consistent with a thermal mechanism for the effects of ultrasound on collagen fiber structure. To control collagen microstructure site-specifically, a high frequency, 8.3-MHz, ultrasound beam was directed within the center of a large collagen sample producing dense networks of short, thin collagen fibrils within the central core of the gel and longer, thicker fibers outside the beam area. Fibroblasts seeded onto these gels migrated rapidly into small, circularly arranged aggregates only within the beam area, and clustered fibroblasts remodeled the central, ultrasound-exposed collagen fibrils into dense sheets. These investigations demonstrate the capability of ultrasound to spatially pattern various collagen microstructures within an engineered tissue noninvasively, thus enhancing the level of complexity of extracellular matrix microenvironments and cellular functions achievable within three-dimensional engineered tissues. PMID:23927189

  4. Effects of nonlinear propagation in ultrasound contrast agent imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Meng-Xing; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Eckersley, Robert J

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates two types of nonlinear propagation and their effects on image intensity and contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in contrast ultrasound images. Previous studies have shown that nonlinear propagation can occur when ultrasound travels through tissue and microbubble clouds, making tissue farther down the acoustic path appear brighter in pulse inversion (PI) images, thus reducing CTR. In this study, the effect of nonlinear propagation through tissue or microbubbles on PI image intensity and CTR are compared at low mechanical index. A combination of simulation and experiment with SonoVue microbubbles were performed using a microbubble dynamics model, a laboratory ultrasound system and a clinical prototype scanner. The results show that, close to the bubble resonance frequency, nonlinear propagation through a bubble cloud of a few centimeter thickness with a modest concentration (1:10000 dilution of SonoVue microbubbles) is much more significant than through tissue-mimicking material. Consequently, CTR in regions distal to the imaging probe is greatly reduced for nonlinear propagation through the bubble cloud, with as much as a 12-dB reduction compared with nonlinear propagation through tissue-mimicking material. Both types of nonlinear propagation cause only a small change in bubble PI signals at the bubble resonance frequency. When the driving frequency increases beyond bubble resonance, nonlinear propagation through bubbles is greatly reduced in absolute values. However because of a greater reduction in nonlinear scattering from bubbles at higher frequencies, the corresponding CTR is much lower than that at bubble resonance frequency.

  5. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; Livingstone, Margaret S; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-07-21

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation--the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood-brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood-brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that will

  6. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-07-01

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood-brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood-brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that will

  7. Agouti expression in human adipose tissue: functional consequences and increased expression in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven R; Gawronska-Kozak, Barbara; Janderová, Lenka; Nguyen, Taylor; Murrell, Angela; Stephens, Jacqueline M; Mynatt, Randall L

    2003-12-01

    It is well recognized that the agouti/melanocortin system is an important regulator of body weight homeostasis. Given that agouti is expressed in human adipose tissue and that the ectopic expression of agouti in adipose tissue results in moderately obese mice, the link between agouti expression in human adipose tissue and obesity/type 2 diabetes was investigated. Although there was no apparent relationship between agouti mRNA levels and BMI, agouti mRNA levels were significantly elevated in subjects with type 2 diabetes. The regulation of agouti in cultured human adipocytes revealed that insulin did not regulate agouti mRNA, whereas dexamethasone treatment potently increased the levels of agouti mRNA. Experiments with cultured human preadipocytes and with cells obtained from transgenic mice that overexpress agouti demonstrated that melanocortin receptor (MCR) signaling in adipose tissue can regulate both preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. Taken together, these results reveal that agouti can regulate adipogenesis at several levels and suggest that there are functional consequences of elevated agouti levels in human adipose tissue. The influence of MCR signaling on adipogenesis combined with the well-established role of MCR signaling in the hypothalamus suggest that adipogenesis is coordinately regulated with food intake and energy expenditure.

  8. Rules of tissue packing involving different cell types: human muscle organization

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Daniel; Sáez, Aurora; Gómez-Gálvez, Pedro; Paradas, Carmen; Escudero, Luis M.

    2017-01-01

    Natural packed tissues are assembled as tessellations of polygonal cells. These include skeletal muscles and epithelial sheets. Skeletal muscles appear as a mosaic composed of two different types of cells: the “slow” and “fast” fibres. Their relative distribution is important for the muscle function but little is known about how the fibre arrangement is established and maintained. In this work we capture the organizational pattern in two different healthy muscles: biceps brachii and quadriceps. Here we show that the biceps brachii muscle presents a particular arrangement, based on the different sizes of slow and fast fibres. By contrast, in the quadriceps muscle an unbiased distribution exists. Our results indicate that the relative size of each cellular type imposes an intrinsic organization into natural tessellations. These findings establish a new framework for the analysis of any packed tissue where two or more cell types exist. PMID:28071729

  9. Rules of tissue packing involving different cell types: human muscle organization.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Daniel; Sáez, Aurora; Gómez-Gálvez, Pedro; Paradas, Carmen; Escudero, Luis M

    2017-01-10

    Natural packed tissues are assembled as tessellations of polygonal cells. These include skeletal muscles and epithelial sheets. Skeletal muscles appear as a mosaic composed of two different types of cells: the "slow" and "fast" fibres. Their relative distribution is important for the muscle function but little is known about how the fibre arrangement is established and maintained. In this work we capture the organizational pattern in two different healthy muscles: biceps brachii and quadriceps. Here we show that the biceps brachii muscle presents a particular arrangement, based on the different sizes of slow and fast fibres. By contrast, in the quadriceps muscle an unbiased distribution exists. Our results indicate that the relative size of each cellular type imposes an intrinsic organization into natural tessellations. These findings establish a new framework for the analysis of any packed tissue where two or more cell types exist.

  10. Role of bone-type tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase and PHOSPO1 in vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N; Sobenin, Igor; Chistiakov, Dimitry A

    2014-01-01

    Matrix vesicle (MV)-mediated mineralization is important for bone ossification. However, under certain circumstances such as atherosclerosis, mineralization may occur in the arterial wall. Bone-type tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) hydrolyzes inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) and generates inorganic phosphate (Pi), which is essential for MV-mediated hydroxyapatite formation. MVs contain another phosphatase, PHOSPHO1, that serves as an additional supplier of Pi. Activation of bone-type tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) in vascular smooth muscle cells precedes vascular calcification. By degrading PPi, TNAP plays a procalcific role changing the Pi/PPi ratio toward mineralization. A pathologic role of bone-type TNAP and PHOSPHO1 make them to be attractive targets for cardiovascular therapy.

  11. Medical ultrasound systems.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jeff; Kremkau, Frederick

    2011-08-06

    Medical ultrasound imaging has advanced dramatically since its introduction only a few decades ago. This paper provides a short historical background, and then briefly describes many of the system features and concepts required in a modern commercial ultrasound system. The topics addressed include array beam formation, steering and focusing; array and matrix transducers; echo image formation; tissue harmonic imaging; speckle reduction through frequency and spatial compounding, and image processing; tissue aberration; Doppler flow detection; and system architectures. It then describes some of the more practical aspects of ultrasound system design necessary to be taken into account for today's marketplace. It finally discusses the recent explosion of portable and handheld devices and their potential to expand the clinical footprint of ultrasound into regions of the world where medical care is practically non-existent. Throughout the article reference is made to ways in which ultrasound imaging has benefited from advances in the commercial electronics industry. It is meant to be an overview of the field as an introduction to other more detailed papers in this special issue.

  12. Tracking of adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells using two magnetic nanoparticle types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, Annika; Siegmund, Birte J.; Grüttner, Cordula; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Frerich, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to be considered as an emerging detection technique for cell tracking experiments to evaluate the fate of transplanted progenitor cells and develop successful cell therapies for tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering using adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells has been advocated for the cure of soft tissue defects or for persistent soft tissue augmentation. Adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells were differentiated into the adipogenic lineage and labeled with two different types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in varying concentrations which resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of gene expression of adipogenic differentiation markers, adiponectin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), whereas the metabolic activity was not altered. As a result, only low nanoparticle concentrations for labeling were used for in vivo experiments. Cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and subcutaneously implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. At 24 h as well as 28 days after implantation, MRI analyses were performed visualizing nanoparticle-labeled cells using T2-weighted sequences. The quantification of absolute volume of the scaffolds revealed a decrease of volume over time in all experimental groups. The distribution of nanoparticle-labeled cells within the scaffolds varied likewise over time.

  13. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells maintain intestinal epithelial stem cells after tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Aparicio-Domingo, Patricia; Romera-Hernandez, Monica; Karrich, Julien J; Cornelissen, Ferry; Papazian, Natalie; Lindenbergh-Kortleve, Dicky J; Butler, James A; Boon, Louis; Coles, Mark C; Samsom, Janneke N; Cupedo, Tom

    2015-10-19

    Disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier allows bacterial translocation and predisposes to destructive inflammation. To ensure proper barrier composition, crypt-residing stem cells continuously proliferate and replenish all intestinal epithelial cells within days. As a consequence of this high mitotic activity, mucosal surfaces are frequently targeted by anticancer therapies, leading to dose-limiting side effects. The cellular mechanisms that control tissue protection and mucosal healing in response to intestinal damage remain poorly understood. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) are regulators of homeostasis and tissue responses to infection at mucosal surfaces. We now demonstrate that ILC3s are required for epithelial activation and proliferation in response to small intestinal tissue damage induced by the chemotherapeutic agent methotrexate. Multiple subsets of ILC3s are activated after intestinal tissue damage, and in the absence of ILC3s, epithelial activation is lost, correlating with increased pathology and severe damage to the intestinal crypts. Using ILC3-deficient Lgr5 reporter mice, we show that maintenance of intestinal stem cells after damage is severely impaired in the absence of ILC3s or the ILC3 signature cytokine IL-22. These data unveil a novel function of ILC3s in limiting tissue damage by preserving tissue-specific stem cells.

  14. Multiplatform analysis of 12 cancer types reveals molecular classification within and across tissues of origin.

    PubMed

    Hoadley, Katherine A; Yau, Christina; Wolf, Denise M; Cherniack, Andrew D; Tamborero, David; Ng, Sam; Leiserson, Max D M; Niu, Beifang; McLellan, Michael D; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Zhang, Jiashan; Kandoth, Cyriac; Akbani, Rehan; Shen, Hui; Omberg, Larsson; Chu, Andy; Margolin, Adam A; Van't Veer, Laura J; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Laird, Peter W; Raphael, Benjamin J; Ding, Li; Robertson, A Gordon; Byers, Lauren A; Mills, Gordon B; Weinstein, John N; Van Waes, Carter; Chen, Zhong; Collisson, Eric A; Benz, Christopher C; Perou, Charles M; Stuart, Joshua M

    2014-08-14

    Recent genomic analyses of pathologically defined tumor types identify "within-a-tissue" disease subtypes. However, the extent to which genomic signatures are shared across tissues is still unclear. We performed an integrative analysis using five genome-wide platforms and one proteomic platform on 3,527 specimens from 12 cancer types, revealing a unified classification into 11 major subtypes. Five subtypes were nearly identical to their tissue-of-origin counterparts, but several distinct cancer types were found to converge into common subtypes. Lung squamous, head and neck, and a subset of bladder cancers coalesced into one subtype typified by TP53 alterations, TP63 amplifications, and high expression of immune and proliferation pathway genes. Of note, bladder cancers split into three pan-cancer subtypes. The multiplatform classification, while correlated with tissue-of-origin, provides independent information for predicting clinical outcomes. All data sets are available for data-mining from a unified resource to support further biological discoveries and insights into novel therapeutic strategies.

  15. Using Data Fusion to Characterize Breast Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Littrup, P; Duric, N; Leach, R R; Azevedo, S G; Candy, J V; Moore, T; Chambers, D H; Mast, J E; Johnson, S A; Holsapple, E

    2002-01-23

    New ultrasound data, obtained with a circular experimental scanner, are compared with data obtained with standard X-ray CT. Ultrasound data obtained by scanning fixed breast tissue were used to generate images of sound speed and reflectivity. The ultrasound images exhibit approximately 1 mm resolution and about 20 dB of dynamic range. All data were obtained in a circular geometry. X-ray CT scans were used to generate X-ray images corresponding to the same 'slices' obtained with the ultrasound scanner. The good match of sensitivity, resolution and angular coverage between the ultrasound and X-ray data makes possible a direct comparison of the three types of images. We present the results of such a comparison for an excised breast fixed in formalin. The results are presented visually using various types of data fusion. A general correspondence between the sound speed, reflectivity and X-ray morphologies is found. The degree to which data fusion can help characterize tissue is assessed by examining the quantitative correlations between the ultrasound and X-ray images.

  16. Soft tissue reconstruction for type IV-D duplicated thumb: a new surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yin-Chun; Chih, Tsai-Tung; Wang, Tai-Lung; Fu, Yin-Chih; Chen, Jian-Chih

    2007-06-01

    Type IV-D duplicated thumb has the most complex anomalies and difficulties for treatment among polydatyly. Double osteotomy is usually recommended to gain the best cosmetic and functional outcome. However, 4 cases of type IV-D duplicated thumb were treated only by soft tissue procedure in this study. At operation, a conjoined A2 pulley was routinely identified, and the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) was found bifurcated distal to the conjoined pulley in every of these cases. Instead of double osteotomy, a soft tissue procedure that included centralization of FPL and A2 pulley reconstruction was pursued to correct these special anomalies. The overall clinical results were evaluated by a modification of the Tada scoring system based on the range of motion, joint stability, alignment of the remaining thumb, and subjective opinion regarding the reconstructed thumb after an average follow-up of 3.3 years (range, 2.5-4.7 years). According to the scoring system, the results were rated as good in 3 cases and fair in 1 case. From the results, the A2 pulley reconstruction and FPL centralization could prove to be an effective method for the treatment of type IV-D duplicated thumb and could efficiently avoid the residual angular deformities. Therefore, we recommend this soft tissue procedure as an alternative surgical technique to the double-osteotomy procedure for treating a type IV-D duplicated thumb in a very young child, whose bone is still not mature enough for holding the fixing pins.

  17. Cell type-specific properties and environment shape tissue specificity of cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Martin H.; Serrano, Luis

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest mysteries in cancer research remains why mutations in certain genes cause cancer only at specific sites in the human body. The poor correlation between the expression level of a cancer gene and the tissues in which it causes malignant transformations raises the question of which factors determine the tissue-specific effects of a mutation. Here, we explore why some cancer genes are associated only with few different cancer types (i.e., are specific), while others are found mutated in a large number of different types of cancer (i.e., are general). We do so by contrasting cellular functions of specific-cancer genes with those of general ones to identify properties that determine where in the body a gene mutation is causing malignant transformations. We identified different groups of cancer genes that did not behave as expected (i.e., DNA repair genes being tissue specific, immune response genes showing a bimodal specificity function or strong association of generally expressed genes to particular cancers). Analysis of these three groups demonstrates the importance of environmental impact for understanding why certain cancer genes are only involved in the development of some cancer types but are rarely found mutated in other types of cancer. PMID:26856619

  18. Metformin Ameliorates Podocyte Damage by Restoring Renal Tissue Podocalyxin Expression in Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Limin; Gu, Junfei; Yang, Di; Wang, Wei; Ye, Shandong

    2015-01-01

    Podocalyxin (PCX) is a signature molecule of the glomerular podocyte and of maintaining integrity of filtration function of glomerulus. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of different doses of metformin on renal tissue PCX expression in type 2 diabetic rats and clarify its protection on glomerular podocytes. Type 2 diabetic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats in which diabetes was induced by high-fat diet/streptozotocin (HFD-STZ) were treated with different doses of metformin (150, 300, and 500 mg/kg per day, resp.) for 8 weeks. Various biochemical parameters, kidney histopathology, and renal tissue PCX expression levels were examined. In type 2 diabetic rats, severe hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia were developed. Urinary albumin and PCX were markedly increased. Diabetes induced significant alterations in renal glomerular structure. In addition, protein and mRNA expression of renal tissue PCX were highly decreased. However, treatment of rats with different doses of metformin restored all these changes to a varying degree. These results suggested that metformin can ameliorate glomerular podocyte damage in type 2 diabetic rats, which may be partly associated with its role in restoring PCX expression and inhibiting urinary excretion of PCX with dose dependence. PMID:26075281

  19. Ultrasound physics.

    PubMed

    Shriki, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Bedside ultrasound has become an important modality for obtaining critical information in the acute care of patients. It is important to understand the physics of ultrasound in order to perform and interpret images at the bedside. The physics of both continuous wave and pulsed wave sound underlies diagnostic ultrasound. The instrumentation, including transducers and image processing, is important in the acquisition of appropriate sonographic images. Understanding how these concepts interplay with each other enables practitioners to obtain the best possible images.

  20. Determination of clenbuterol in porcine tissues using solid-phase extraction combined with ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and HPLC-UV detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baomi; Yan, Hongyuan; Qiao, Fengxia; Geng, Yuru

    2011-01-01

    A new pretreatment method, solid-phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextration (SPE-DLLME), was proposed in first time for the determination of clenbuterol (CLB) in porcine tissue samples. The tissue samples were firstly extracted by SPE, then its eluents were used as dispersant of the followed DLLME for further purification and enrichment of CLB. Various parameters (such as the type of SPE sorbent, the type and volume of elution solvent, the type and volume of extractant and dispersant, etc.) that affected the efficiency of the two steps were optimized. Good linearity of CLB was ranged from 0.19 μg/kg to 192 μg/kg with correlation coefficient (r²) of 0.9995. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.07 μg/kg (S/N=3) and the recoveries at three spiked levels were ranged from 87.9% to 103.6% with the relative standard deviation (RSD) less than 3.9% (n=3). Under the optimized conditions, the enrichment factor (EF) for CLB could up to 62 folds. The presented method that combined the advantages of SPE and DLLME, had higher selectivity than SPE method and was successfully applied to the determination of CLB in tissue samples.

  1. Prospective Study for Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Tissue Acquisition Using 25- and 22-Gauge Core Biopsy Needles in Solid Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Jeong Yup; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Kim, Hoguen; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although thicker needles theoretically allow more tissue to be collected, their decreased flexibility can cause mechanical damage to the endoscope, technical failure, and sample blood contamination. The effects of needle gauge on diagnostic outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) of pancreatic mass lesions remain unknown. This study compared procurement rates of histologic cores obtained from EUS-FNB of pancreatic masses using 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Patients and Methods From March 2014 to July 2014, 66 patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent EUS-FNB with both 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Among them, 10 patients were excluded and thus 56 patients were eligible for the analyses. Needle sequences were randomly assigned, and two passes were made with each needle, consisting of 10 uniform to-and-fro movements on each pass with 10 mL syringe suction. A pathologist blinded to needle sequence evaluated specimens for the presence of histologic core. Results The mean patient age was 65.8 ± 9.5 years (range, 44–89 years); 35 patients (62.5%) were men. The mean pancreatic mass size was 35.3 ± 17.1 mm (range 14–122.3 mm). Twenty-eight patients (50%) had tumors at the pancreas head or uncinate process. There were no significant differences in procurement rates of histologic cores between 25-gauge (49/56, 87.5%) and 22-gauge (46/56, 82.1%, P = 0.581) needles or diagnostic accuracy using only histologic cores (98% and 95%). There were no technical failures or procedure-related adverse events. Conclusions The 25-gauge core biopsy needle could offer acceptable and comparable outcomes regarding diagnostic performance including histologic core procurement rates compared to the 22-gauge core biopsy needle, although the differences were not statistically significant. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01795066 PMID:27149404

  2. Interactions of human blood and tissue cell types with 95-nm-high nanotopography.

    PubMed

    Dalby, Matthew J; Marshall, George E; Johnstone, Heather J H; Affrossman, Stanley; Riehle, Mathis O

    2002-03-01

    Two of the major concerns for tissue engineering materials are inflammatory responses from blood cells and fibrous encapsulation by the body in order to shield the implant from blood reaction. A further hurdle is that of vascularization. In order to develop new tissues, or to repair parts of the vascular system, nutrients need to be carried to the basal cell layers. If a material promotes tissue formation, but not vascularization, necrosis will be observed as multilayered cells develop. In this paper, polymer demixed island topography with a 95-nm Z axis was tested using human mononuclear blood cells, platelets, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. The results showed no difference in blood response between the islands and the flat controls, suggesting that in vivo there would be negligible immunological difference. Fibroblasts reacted by changing morphology into a rounded shape with thick processes and poorly developed cytoskeleton. Retardation of fibroblast growth may be an advantageous, as it is this cell type that forms the fibrous capsule, preventing growth of the required tissue type. Finally, endothelial cells were seen to form arcuate, or curved, morphologies in response to the islands. This is the normal, in vivo, morphology for vascular endothelium. This result suggests that the nano-features are promoting a more phenotypically correct morphology.

  3. Healthy and tumoral tissue resistivity in wild-type and sparc-/- animal models.

    PubMed

    Meroni, D; Mauri, G; Bovio, D; Bianchi, A M; Chiodoni, C; Colombo, M P; Meroni, E; Aliverti, A

    2016-12-01

    Despite the technological improvement of radiologic, endoscopic and nuclear imaging, the accuracy of diagnostic procedures for tumors can be limited whenever a mass-forming lesion is identified. This is true also because bioptical sampling cannot be properly guided into the lesions so as to puncture neoplastic tissue and to avoid necrotic areas. Under these circumstances, invasive and expensive procedures are still required to obtain diagnosis which is mandatory to plan the most appropriate therapeutic strategy. In order to test if electrical impedance spectroscopy may be helpful in providing further evidence for cancer detection, resistivity measurements were taken on 22 mice, 11 wild-type and 11 sparc-/- (knock out for the protein SPARC: secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine), bearing mammary carcinomas, by placing a needle-probe into tumor, peritumoral and contralateral healthy fat areas. Tumor resistivity was significantly lower than both peritumoral fat and contralateral fat tissues. Resistivity in sparc-/- mice was lower than wild-type animals. A significant frequency dependence of resistivity was present in tissues analyzed. We conclude that accurate measurements of resistivity may allow to discriminate between tissues with different pathological and/or structural characteristics. Therefore, resistivity measurements could be considered for in vivo detection and differential diagnosis of tumor masses.

  4. 11-Beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 expression in white adipose tissue is strongly correlated with adiposity.

    PubMed

    Milagro, Fermin I; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2007-04-01

    Glucocorticoid action within the cells is regulated by the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression and two enzymes, 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11betaHSD1), which converts inactive to active glucocorticoids, and 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11betaHSD2), which regulates the access of active glucocorticoids to the receptor by converting cortisol/corticosterone to the glucocorticoid-inactive form cortisone/dehydrocorticosterone. Male Wistar rats developed obesity by being fed a high-fat diet for 56 days, and GR, 11betaHSD1 and 11betaHSD2 gene expression were compared with control-diet fed animals. Gene expression analysis of 11betaHSD1, 11betaHSD2 and GR were performed by RT-PCR in subcutaneous and retroperitoneal adipose tissue. High-fat fed animals overexpressed 11betaHSD2 in subcutaneous but not in retroperitoneal fat. Interestingly, mRNA levels strongly correlated in both tissues with different parameters related to obesity, such as body weight, adiposity and insulin resistance, suggesting that this gene is a reliable marker of adiposity in this rat model of obesity. Thus, 11betaHSD2 is expressed in adipose tissue by both adipocytes and stromal-vascular cells, which suggests that this enzyme may play an important role in preventing fat accumulation in adipose tissue.

  5. Identification of organ tissue types and skin from forensic samples by microRNA expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Eva; Extra, Antje; Cachée, Philipp; Courts, Cornelius

    2017-05-01

    The identification of organ tissues in traces recovered from scenes and objects with regard to violent crimes involving serious injuries can be of considerable relevance in forensic investigations. Molecular genetic approaches are provably superior to histological and immunological assays in characterizing organ tissues, and micro-RNAs (miRNAs), due to their cell type specific expression patterns and stability against degradation, emerged as a promising molecular species for forensic analyses, with a range of tried and tested indicative markers. Thus, herein we present the first miRNA based approach for the forensic identification of organ tissues. Using quantitative PCR employing an empirically derived strategy for data normalization and unbiased statistical decision making, we assessed the differential expression of 15 preselected miRNAs in tissues of brain, kidney, lung, liver, heart muscle, skeletal muscle and skin. We show that not only can miRNA expression profiling be used to reliably differentiate between organ tissues but also that this method, which is compatible with and complementary to forensic DNA analysis, is applicable to realistic forensic samples e.g. mixtures, aged and degraded material as well as traces generated by mock stabbings and experimental shootings at ballistic models.

  6. Tissue resident macrophages: Key players in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and its complications.

    PubMed

    Meshkani, Reza; Vakili, Sanaz

    2016-11-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that chronic inflammation is an important pathogenic mediator of the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). It is now generally accepted that tissue-resident macrophages play a major role in regulation of tissue inflammation. T2D-associated inflammation is characterized by an increased abundance of macrophages in different tissues along with production of inflammatory cytokines. The complexity of macrophage phenotypes has been reported from different human tissues. Macrophages exhibit a phenotypic range that is intermediate between two extremes, M1 (pro-inflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory). Cytokines and chemokines produced by macrophages generate local and systemic inflammation and this condition leads to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance in liver, adipose and skeletal muscle tissues. Data from human and animal studies also suggest that macrophages contribute to T2D complications such as nephropathy, neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases through cell-cell interactions and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and proteases to induce inflammatory cell recruitment, cell apoptosis, angiogenesis, and matrix protein remodeling. In this review we focus on the functions of macrophages and the importance of these cells in the pathogenesis of T2D. In addition, the contribution of macrophages to diabetes complications such as nephropathy, neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases is discussed.

  7. Reversal of type 1 diabetes in mice by brown adipose tissue transplant.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Subhadra C; Piston, David W

    2012-03-01

    Current therapies for type 1 diabetes (T1D) involve insulin replacement or transplantation of insulin-secreting tissue, both of which suffer from numerous limitations and complications. Here, we show that subcutaneous transplants of embryonic brown adipose tissue (BAT) can correct T1D in streptozotocin-treated mice (both immune competent and immune deficient) with severely impaired glucose tolerance and significant loss of adipose tissue. BAT transplants result in euglycemia, normalized glucose tolerance, reduced tissue inflammation, and reversal of clinical diabetes markers such as polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia. These effects are independent of insulin but correlate with recovery of the animals' white adipose tissue. BAT transplants lead to significant increases in adiponectin and leptin, but with levels that are static and not responsive to glucose. Pharmacological blockade of the insulin receptor in BAT transplant mice leads to impaired glucose tolerance, similar to what is seen in nondiabetic animals, indicating that insulin receptor activity plays a role in the reversal of diabetes. One possible candidate for activating the insulin receptor is IGF-1, whose levels are also significantly elevated in BAT transplant mice. Thus, we propose that the combined action of multiple adipokines establishes a new equilibrium in the animal that allows for chronic glycemic control without insulin.

  8. Biochemical analysis of callus tissue in osteogenesis imperfecta type IV. Evidence for transient overmodification in collagen types I and III.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, R E; Vetter, U; Nerlich, A; Wörsdorfer, O; Teller, W M; Müller, P K

    1989-01-01

    We analyzed tissue and cells from a stationary and a rapidly growing hyperplastic callus from a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type IV and compared the results with those of compact bone and skin fibroblasts of an age-matched control. Collagen and protein contents per cell were low in the callus tissues and collagen I and III were overmodified as evidenced by an elevated level of hydroxylysine. The degree of lysyl hydroxylation was highest in those regions that appeared most immature by histological examination. Lysyl hydroxylation approached normal levels in collagen from the stationary callus and from the center of the growing callus. Overmodification of collagen was not seen in compact bone or cell cultures (neither skin fibroblasts nor callus cells) from the patient. Elevation of hydroxylysine in collagen from OI patients is generally attributed to mutations that delay triple helix formation. Our observations suggest that the varying degree of collagen modifications may occur in consequence of regulatory mechanisms during bone development and tissue repair. These mechanisms may be defective in some patients with OI as seen in this case with hyperplastic callus formation. Images PMID:2760218

  9. Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound - A Novel Non-Invasive Non-Ionizing Method for the Detection of Brown Adipose Tissue in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, A.; Li, Q.; Panagia, M.; Abdelbaky, A.; MacNabb, M.; Samir, A.; Cypess, AM.; Weyman, AE.; Tawakol, A.; Scherrer-Crosbie, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Brown adipose tissue (BAT) consumes glucose when it is activated by cold exposure, allowing its detection in humans by 18-F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography (18F-FDG PET-CT). We recently described a novel non-invasive and non-ionizing imaging method to assess BAT in mice using contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS). Here, we report the application of this method in healthy humans. Methods Thirteen healthy volunteers were recruited. CEUS was performed before and after cold exposure in all subjects using a continuous intravenous infusion of perflutren gas filled lipid microbubbles and triggered imaging of the supraclavicular space. The first 5 subjects received microbubbles at a lower infusion rate than the subsequent 8 subjects, and are analyzed as a separate group. Blood flow was estimated by the product of the plateau (A) and the slope (β) of microbubble replenishment curves. All underwent 18F-FDG PET-CT after cold exposure. Results An increase in the acoustic signal was noted in the supraclavicular adipose tissue area with increasing triggering intervals in all subjects, demonstrating the presence of blood flow. The area imaged by CEUS co-localized with BAT, as detected by 18F-FDG PET-CT. In a cohort of 8 subjects with an optimized CEUS protocol, CEUS-derived BAT blood flow increased with cold exposure compared to basal BAT blood flow in warm conditions (Aβ 3.3 [0.5–5.7] AU/s vs. 1.25 [0.5–2.6] AU/s; p=0.02). Of these 8 subjects, 5 had a >2-fold increase in their blood flow after cold exposure; these responders had higher BAT activity measured by 18F-FDG PET-CT (SUVmax 2.25 [1.53–4.57] vs. 0.51 [0.47–0.73]; p=0.02). Conclusions The present study demonstrates the feasibility of using CEUS as a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging modality in estimating BAT blood flow in young, healthy humans. CEUS may be a useful and scalable tool in the assessment of BAT and BAT-targeted therapies. PMID:26255029

  10. Assessment of three types of spaceflight hardware for tissue culture studies: Comparison of skeletal tissue growth and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Klement, B.J.; Spooner, B.S.

    1997-01-01

    Three different types of spaceflight hardware, the BioProcessing Module (BPM), the Materials Dispersion Apparatus (MDA), and the Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA), were assessed for their ability to support pre-metatarsal growth and differentiation in experiments conducted on five space shuttle flights. BPM-cultured pre-metatarsal tissue showed no difference in flight and ground control lengths. Flight and ground controls cultured in the MDA grew 135 {mu}m and 141 {mu}m, respectively, in an 11 day experiment. Only five control rods and three flight rods mineralized. In another MDA experiment, pre-metatarsals were cultured at 4{degree}C (277K) or 20{degree}C (293K) for the 16 day mission, then cultured an additional 16 days in laboratory dishes at 37{degree}C (310K). The 20{degree}C (293K) cultures died post-flight. The 4{degree}C (277K) flight pre-metatarsals grew 417 {mu}m more than the 4{degree}C (277K) ground controls post-flight. In 5 and 6 day experiments done in FPAs, flight rods grew longer than ground control rods. In a 14 day experiment, ground control and flight rods also expanded in length, but there was no difference between them. The pre-metatarsals cultured in the FPAs did not mineralize, or terminally differentiate. These experiments demonstrate, that while supporting pre-metatarsal growth in length, the three types of hardware are not suitable to support routine differentiation. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Tissue Transglutaminase Regulates Chondrogenesis in Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Collagen Type XI Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugasundaram, Shobana; Logan-Mauney, Sheila; Burgos, Kaitlin

    2011-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is a multifunctional enzyme with a plethora of potential applications in regenerative medicine and tissue bioengineering. In this study, we examined the role of tTG as a regulator of chondrogenesis in human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) using nanofibrous scaffolds coated with collagen type XI. Transient treatment of collagen type XI films and 3D scaffolds with tTG results in enhanced attachment of MSC and supports rounded cell morphology compared to the untreated matrices or those incubated in the continuous presence of tTG. Accordingly, enhanced cell aggregation and augmented chondrogenic differentiation have been observed on the collagen type XI-coated poly (L-lactide) - nanofibrous scaffolds treated with tTG prior to cell seeding. Exogenous tTG increases resistance to collagenolysis in collagen type XI matrices by catalyzing intermolecular cross-linking, detected by a shift in the denaturation temperature. In addition, tTG auto-crosslinks to collagen type XI as detected by western blot and immunofluorescent analysis. This study identifies tTG as a novel regulator of MSC chondrogenesis further contributing to the expanding use of these cells in cartilage bioengineering. PMID:21830118

  12. Glucose transporter Glut-1 is detectable in peri-necrotic regions in many human tumor types but not normal tissues: Study using tissue microarrays.

    PubMed

    Airley, Rachel; Evans, Andrew; Mobasheri, Ali; Hewitt, Stephen M

    2010-05-20

    The hypoxic tumor microenvironment is associated with malignant progression and poor treatment response. The glucose transporter Glut-1 is a prognostic factor and putative hypoxia marker. So far, studies of Glut-1 in cancer have utilized conventional immunohistochemical analysis in a series of individual biopsy or surgical specimens. Tissue microarrays, however, provide a rapid, inexpensive means of profiling biomarker expression. To evaluate hypoxia markers, tissue cores must show the architectural features of hypoxia; i.e. viable tissue surrounding necrotic regions. Glut-1 may be a useful biomarker to validate tissue microarrays for use in studies of hypoxia-regulated genes in cancer. In this study, we carried out immunohistochemical detection of Glut-1 protein in many tumor and normal tissue types in a range of tissue microarrays. Glut-1 was frequently found in peri-necrotic regions, occurring in 9/34 lymphomas, 6/12 melanomas, and 5/16 glioblastomas; and in 43/54 lung, 22/84 colon, and 23/60 ovarian tumors. Expression was rare in breast (6/40) and prostate (1/57) tumors, and in normal tissue, was restricted to spleen, tongue, and CNS endothelium. In conclusion, tissue microarrays enable the observation of Glut-1 expression in peri-necrotic regions, which may be linked to hypoxia, and reflect previous studies showing differential Glut-1 expression across tumor types and non-malignant tissue.

  13. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery of targeted echogenic liposomes in a novel ex vivo mouse aorta model.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Kathryn E; Caudell, Danielle N; Sutton, Jonathan T; Klegerman, Melvin E; Vela, Deborah; Pyne-Geithman, Gail J; Abruzzo, Todd; Cyr, Peppar E P; Geng, Yong-Jian; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2010-06-15

    The goal of this study was to determine whether targeted, Rhodamine-labeled echogenic liposomes (Rh-ELIP) containing nanobubbles could be delivered to the arterial wall, and whether 1-MHz continuous wave ultrasound would enhance this delivery profile. Aortae excised from apolipoprotein-E-deficient (n=8) and wild-type (n=8) mice were mounted in a pulsatile flow system through which Rh-ELIP were delivered in a stream of bovine serum albumin. Half the aortae from each group were treated with 1-MHz continuous wave ultrasound at 0.49 MPa peak-to-peak pressure, and half underwent sham exposure. Ultrasound parameters were chosen to promote stable cavitation and avoid inertial cavitation. A broadband hydrophone was used to monitor cavitation activity. After treatment, aortic sections were prepared for histology and analyzed by an individual blinded to treatment conditions. Delivery of Rh-ELIP to the vascular endothelium was observed, and sub-endothelial penetration of Rh-ELIP was present in five of five ultrasound-treated aortae and was absent in those not exposed to ultrasound. However, the degree of penetration in the ultrasound-exposed aortae was variable. There was no evidence of ultrasound-mediated tissue damage in any specimen. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery within the arterial wall was demonstrated in this novel model, which allows quantitative evaluation of therapeutic delivery.

  14. Validation of four-dimensional ultrasound for targeting in minimally-invasive beating-heart surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Danielle F.; Wiles, Andrew D.; Moore, John; Wedlake, Chris; Gobbi, David G.; Peters, Terry M.

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasound is garnering significant interest as an imaging modality for surgical guidance, due to its affordability, real-time temporal resolution and ease of integration into the operating room. Minimally-invasive intracardiac surgery performed on the beating-heart prevents direct vision of the surgical target, and procedures such as mitral valve replacement and atrial septal defect closure would benefit from intraoperative ultrasound imaging. We propose that placing 4D ultrasound within an augmented reality environment, along with a patient-specific cardiac model and virtual representations of tracked surgical tools, will create a visually intuitive platform with sufficient image information to safely and accurately repair tissue within the beating heart. However, the quality of the imaging parameters, spatial calibration, temporal calibration and ECG-gating must be well characterized before any 4D ultrasound system can be used clinically to guide the treatment of moving structures. In this paper, we describe a comprehensive accuracy assessment framework that can be used to evaluate the performance of 4D ultrasound systems while imaging moving targets. We image a dynamic phantom that is comprised of a simple robot and a tracked phantom to which point-source, distance and spherical objects of known construction can be attached. We also follow our protocol to evaluate 4D ultrasound images generated in real-time by reconstructing ECG-gated 2D ultrasound images acquired from a tracked multiplanar transesophageal probe. Likewise, our evaluation framework allows any type of 4D ultrasound to be quantitatively assessed.

  15. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery of targeted echogenic liposomes in a novel ex vivo mouse aorta model

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Kathryn E.; Caudell, Danielle N.; Sutton, Jonathan T.; Klegerman, Melvin E.; Vela, Deborah; Pyne-Geithman, Gail J.; Abruzzo, Todd; Cyr, Peppar E. P.; Geng, Yong-Jian; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether targeted, Rhodamine-labeled echogenic liposomes (Rh-ELIP) containing nanobubbles could be delivered to the arterial wall, and whether 1 MHz continuous wave ultrasound would enhance this delivery profile. Aortae excised from apolipoprotein-E-deficient (n = 8) and wild-type (n = 8) mice were mounted in a pulsatile flow system through which Rh-ELIP were delivered in a stream of bovine serum albumin. Half the aortae from each group were treated with 1-MHz continuous wave ultrasound at 0.49 MPa peak-to-peak pressure, and half underwent sham exposure. Ultrasound parameters were chosen to promote stable cavitation and avoid inertial cavitation. A broadband hydrophone was used to monitor cavitation activity. After treatment, aortic sections were prepared for histology and analyzed by an individual blinded to treatment conditions. Delivery of Rh-ELIP to the vascular endothelium was observed, and subendothelial penetration of Rh-ELIP was present in five of five ultrasound-treated aortae and was absent in those not exposed to ultrasound. However, the degree of penetration in the ultrasound-exposed aortae was variable. There was no evidence of ultrasound-mediated tissue damage in any specimen. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery within the arterial wall was demonstrated in this novel model, which allows quantitative evaluation of therapeutic delivery. PMID:20202474

  16. Dysmorphic choroid plexuses and hydrocephalus associated with increased nuchal translucency: early ultrasound markers of de novo thanatophoric dysplasia type II with cloverleaf skull (Kleeblattschaedel).

    PubMed

    Tonni, Gabriele; Palmisano, Marcella; Ginocchi, Vladimiro; Ventura, Alessandro; Baldi, Maurizia; Baffico, Ave Maria

    2014-11-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) type II presenting in the first trimester with increased nuchal translucency (NT) and cloverleaf skull (Kleeblattschaedel) have been scantly reported in the medical record. Abnormal choroid plexus has been seen in association with fetal anomalies. Here we described a case of increased NT associated with indented choroid plexuses, early onset hydrocephalus and cloverleaf skull in a fetus subsequently diagnosed at early second trimester to carry a de novo mutation encoding for TD type II. The findings of dysmorphic choroid plexus, early onset hydrocephalus and cloverleaf skull at first trimester scan may be early, useful ultrasound markers of TD type II. Molecular analysis to control for possible overlapping syndromes were performed and resulted negative. Postmortem X-ray and 3D-CT scan confirmed the cloverleaf skull, narrow thorax, straight femur with rhizomelic shortening of the limbs and the presence of a communicating hydrocephalus.

  17. Relationships of mercury concentrations across tissue types, muscle regions and fins for two shark species.

    PubMed

    O'Bryhim, Jason R; Adams, Douglas H; Spaet, Julia L Y; Mills, Gary; Lance, Stacey L

    2017-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) exposure poses a threat to both fish and human health. Sharks are known to bioaccumulate Hg, however, little is known regarding how Hg is distributed between different tissue groups (e.g. muscle regions, organs). Here we evaluated total mercury (THg) concentrations from eight muscle regions, four fins (first dorsal, left and right pectorals, caudal-from both the inner core and trailing margin of each fin), and five internal organs (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, epigonal organ) from two different shark species, bonnethead (Sphyrna tiburo) and silky shark (Carcharhinus falciformis) to determine the relationships of THg concentrations between and within tissue groups. Total Hg concentrations were highest in the eight muscle regions with no significant differences in THg concentrations between the different muscle regions and muscle types (red and white). Results from tissue collected from any muscle region would be representative of all muscle sample locations. Total Hg concentrations were lowest in samples taken from the fin inner core of the first dorsal, pectoral, and caudal (lower lobe) fins. Mercury concentrations for samples taken from the trailing margin of the dorsal, pectoral, and caudal fins (upper and lower lobe) were also not significantly different from each other for both species. Significant relationships were found between THg concentrations in dorsal axial muscle tissue and the fin inner core, liver, kidney, spleen and heart for both species as well as the THg concentrations between the dorsal fin trailing margin and the heart for the silky shark and all other sampled tissue types for the bonnethead shark. Our results suggest that biopsy sampling of dorsal muscle can provide data that can effectively estimate THg concentrations in specific organs without using more invasive, or lethal methods.

  18. Phased-array ultrasound technology enhances accuracy of dual frequency ultrasound measurements - towards improved ultrasound bone diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Linder, Hans; Malo, Markus K H; Liukkonen, Jukka; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Overlying soft tissues attenuate ultrasound backscattered from bone, complicating diagnostics of osteoporosis at the most important fracture sites. Dual-frequency ultrasound technique (DFUS) has been proposed to solve this problem through determination of thickness and composition of overlying soft tissue. This study applies DFUS technique for the first time with a phased-array transducer to investigate if the thickness of two interfering layers (oil and water) can be accurately determined in a variety of configurations. Results indicate that DFUS may be used with phased-array ultrasound systems, making them a suitable combination to consider in future development of clinical in vivo ultrasound methodologies.

  19. Characterization of Human Papillomavirus Type 154 and Tissue Tropism of Gammapapillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ure, Agustín Enrique; Forslund, Ola

    2014-01-01

    The novel human papillomavirus type 154 (HPV154) was characterized from a wart on the crena ani of a three-year-old boy. It was previously designated as the putative HPV type FADI3 by sequencing of a subgenomic FAP amplicon. We obtained the complete genome by combined methods including rolling circle amplification (RCA), genome walking through an adapted method for detection of integrated papillomavirus sequences by ligation-mediated PCR (DIPS-PCR), long-range PCR, and finally by cloning of four overlapping amplicons. Phylogenetically, the HPV154 genome clustered together with members of the proposed species Gammapapillomavirus 11, and demonstrated the highest identity in L1 to HPV136 (68.6%). The HPV154 was detected in 3% (2/62) of forehead skin swabs from healthy children. In addition, the different detection sites of 62 gammapapillomaviruses were summarized in order to analyze their tissue tropism. Several of these HPV types have been detected from multiple sources such as skin, oral, nasal, and genital sites, suggesting that the gammapapillomaviruses are generalists with a broader tissue tropism than previously appreciated. The study expands current knowledge concerning genetic diversity and tropism among HPV types in the rapidly growing gammapapillomavirus genus. PMID:24551244

  20. Programmable Real-time Clinical Photoacoustic and Ultrasound Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeesu; Park, Sara; Jung, Yuhan; Chang, Sunyeob; Park, Jinyong; Zhang, Yumiao; Lovell, Jonathan F; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-10-12

    Photoacoustic imaging has attracted interest for its capacity to capture functional spectral information with high spatial and temporal resolution in biological tissues. Several photoacoustic imaging systems have been commercialized recently, but they are variously limited by non-clinically relevant designs, immobility, single anatomical utility (e.g., breast only), or non-programmable interfaces. Here, we present a real-time clinical photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system which consists of an FDA-approved clinical ultrasound system integrated with a portable laser. The system is completely programmable, has an intuitive user interface, and can be adapted for different applications by switching handheld imaging probes with various transducer types. The customizable photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system is intended to meet the diverse needs of medical researchers performing both clinical and preclinical photoacoustic studies.

  1. Programmable Real-time Clinical Photoacoustic and Ultrasound Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeesu; Park, Sara; Jung, Yuhan; Chang, Sunyeob; Park, Jinyong; Zhang, Yumiao; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has attracted interest for its capacity to capture functional spectral information with high spatial and temporal resolution in biological tissues. Several photoacoustic imaging systems have been commercialized recently, but they are variously limited by non-clinically relevant designs, immobility, single anatomical utility (e.g., breast only), or non-programmable interfaces. Here, we present a real-time clinical photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system which consists of an FDA-approved clinical ultrasound system integrated with a portable laser. The system is completely programmable, has an intuitive user interface, and can be adapted for different applications by switching handheld imaging probes with various transducer types. The customizable photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system is intended to meet the diverse needs of medical researchers performing both clinical and preclinical photoacoustic studies. PMID:27731357

  2. Comparison of three types of chondrocytes in collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Spector, Myron

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the chondrogenesis in type I and II collagen scaffolds seeded with chondrocytes from three types of cartilage, after four weeks of culture: auricular (AU), articular (AR) and meniscal (ME). Related aims were to investigate the expression of a contractile muscle actin isoform, alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA), in the cells in the scaffold and to determine the presence of a lubricating glycoprotein, lubricin, in the constructs. Adult goat AU, AR and ME chondrocytes were seeded into two types of collagen scaffolds: type II collagen and type I/III collagen. After four weeks of culture, the constructs were prepared for histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of the distribution of glycosaminoglycan (GAG), types I and II collagen, elastin, SM and lubricin. AU constructs contained substantially more tissue than the AR and ME samples. The AU constructs exhibited neocartilage, but no elastin. There were no notable differences between the type I and II collagen scaffolds. Novel findings were the expression of SMA by the AU cells in the scaffolds and the presence of lubricin in the AR and AU constructs. AU cells have the capability to produce cartilage in collagen scaffolds under conditions in which there is little histogenesis by AR and ME cells.

  3. A Tactile Sensor for Ultrasound Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yiyan; Shkel, Yuri M; Hall, Timothy J

    2016-02-15

    Medical ultrasound systems are capable of monitoring a variety of health conditions while avoiding invasive procedures. However this function is complicated by ultrasound contrast of the tissue varying with contact pressure exerted by the probe. The knowledge of the contact pressure is beneficial for a variety of screening and diagnostic procedures involving ultrasound. This paper introduces a solid-state sensor array which measures the contact pressure distribution between the probe and the tissue marginally affecting the ultrasound imaging capabilities. The probe design utilizes the dielectrostriction mechanism which relates the change in dielectric properties of the sensing layer to deformation. The concept, structure, fabrication, and performance of this sensor array are discussed. The prototype device is highly tolerant to overloads (>1 MPa tested) and provides stress measurements in the range of 0.14 to 10 kPa. Its loss of ultrasound transmissivity is less 3dB at 9 MHz ultrasound frequency. This performance is satisfactory for clinical and biomedical research in ultrasound image formation and interpretation, however for commercial product, a higher ultrasound transmissivity is desired. Directions for improving the sensor ultrasound transparency and electrical performance are discussed. The sensor array described in this paper has been developed specifically for ultrasound diagnosis during breast cancer screening. However, the same sensing mechanism, similar configuration and sensor array structure can be applied to other applications involving ultrasound tools for medical diagnostics.

  4. A Tactile Sensor for Ultrasound Imaging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yiyan; Shkel, Yuri M.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical ultrasound systems are capable of monitoring a variety of health conditions while avoiding invasive procedures. However this function is complicated by ultrasound contrast of the tissue varying with contact pressure exerted by the probe. The knowledge of the contact pressure is beneficial for a variety of screening and diagnostic procedures involving ultrasound. This paper introduces a solid-state sensor array which measures the contact pressure distribution between the probe and the tissue marginally affecting the ultrasound imaging capabilities. The probe design utilizes the dielectrostriction mechanism which relates the change in dielectric properties of the sensing layer to deformation. The concept, structure, fabrication, and performance of this sensor array are discussed. The prototype device is highly tolerant to overloads (>1 MPa tested) and provides stress measurements in the range of 0.14 to 10 kPa. Its loss of ultrasound transmissivity is less 3dB at 9 MHz ultrasound frequency. This performance is satisfactory for clinical and biomedical research in ultrasound image formation and interpretation, however for commercial product, a higher ultrasound transmissivity is desired. Directions for improving the sensor ultrasound transparency and electrical performance are discussed. The sensor array described in this paper has been developed specifically for ultrasound diagnosis during breast cancer screening. However, the same sensing mechanism, similar configuration and sensor array structure can be applied to other applications involving ultrasound tools for medical diagnostics. PMID:26880870

  5. Temporal Healing in Rat Achilles Tendon: Ultrasound Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Connie S.; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E.; Okotie, Gregory; Brounts, Sabrina H.; Baer, Geoffrey S.; Vanderby, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether a new ultrasound-based technique correlates with mechanical and biological metrics that describe the tendon healing. Achilles tendons in 32 rats were unilaterally transected and allowed to heal without repair. At 7, 9, 14, or 29 days post-injury, tendons were collected and examined for healing via ultrasound image analysis, mechanical testing, and immunohistochemistry. Consistent with previous studies, we observe that the healing tendons are mechanically inferior (ultimate stress, ultimate load, and normalized stiffness) and biologically altered (cellular and ECM factors) compared to contralateral controls with an incomplete recovery over healing time. Unique to this study, we report: 1) Echo intensity (defined by gray-scale brightness in the ultrasound image) in the healing tissue is related to stress and normalized stiffness. 2) Elongation to failure is relatively constant so that tissue normalized stiffness is linearly correlated with ultimate stress. Together, 1 and 2 suggest a method to quantify mechanical compromise in healing tendons. 3) The amount and type of collagen in healing tendons associates with their strength and normalized stiffness as well as their ultrasound echo intensity. 4) A significant increase of periostin in the healing tissues suggests an important but unexplored role for this ECM protein in tendon healing. PMID:23149902

  6. Intravascular ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, A F; de Korte, C L; Céspedes, E I

    1998-10-01

    Intravascular Ultrasound Blastography. The response of a tissue to mechanical excitation is a function of its mechanical properties. Excitation can be dynamic or quasistatic in nature. The response (e.g. displacement, velocity, compression) can be measured via ultrasound. This is the main principle underlying ultrasound elasticity imaging, sonoelasticity imaging, or ultrasound elastography. It is of great interest to know the local hardness of vessel wall and plaques. Intravascular elastography yields information unavailable or inconclusive if obtained from IVUS alone and thus contributes to more correct diagnosis. Potentially it can be used for therapy guidance. During the last decade several working groups used elastography in intravascular applications with varying success. In this paper we discuss the various approaches by different working groups. Focus will be on the approach of the Rotterdam group. Using a 30 MHz IVUS catheter, RF data are acquired from vessels in vitro at different intraluminal pressures. Local tissue displacement estimation by cross-correlation is followed by computation of the local strain. The resulting image supplies local information on the elastic properties of the vessel and plaque with high spatial resolution. Feasibility and usefulness are shown by means of phantom measurements. Furthermore, initial in vitro results of femoral arteries and correlation with histology are discussed. Phantom data show that the elastograms reveal information not presented by the echogram. In vitro artery data prove that in principle elastography is capable of identifying plaque composition where echography fails.

  7. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... sickle cell disease. It is also used to measure conditions affecting blood flow to and within the brain, such as: Stenosis : ... saved. Doppler ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures ... represent the flow of blood through the blood vessels. top of ...

  8. Sonophoresis Using Ultrasound Contrast Agents: Dependence on Concentration.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghee; Song, Gillsoo; Jo, Yongjun; Won, Jongho; Son, Taeyoon; Cha, Ohrum; Kim, Jinho; Jung, Byungjo; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Chul-Woo; Seo, Jongbum

    2016-01-01

    Sonophoresis can increase skin permeability to various drugs in transdermal drug delivery. Cavitation is recognized as the predominant mechanism of sonophoresis. Recently, a new logical approach to enhance the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery was tried. It is to utilize the engineered microbubble and its resonant frequency for increase of cavitation activity. Actively-induced cavitation with low-intensity ultrasound (less than ~1 MPa) causes disordering of the lipid bilayers and the formation of aqueous channels by stable cavitation which indicates a continuous oscillation of bubbles. Furthermore, the mutual interactions of microbubble determined by concentration of added bubble are also thought to be an important factor for activity of stable cavitation, even in different characteristics of drug. In the present study, we addressed the dependence of ultrasound contrast agent concentration using two types of drug on the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery. Two types of experiment were designed to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery according to ultrasound contrast agent concentration. First, an experiment of optical clearing using a tissue optical clearing agent was designed to assess the efficiency of sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. Second, a Franz diffusion cell with ferulic acid was used to quantitatively determine the amount of drug delivered to the skin sample by sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. The maximum enhancement ratio of sonophoresis with a concentration of 1:1,000 was approximately 3.1 times greater than that in the ultrasound group without ultrasound contrast agent and approximately 7.5 times greater than that in the control group. These results support our hypothesis that sonophoresis becomes more effective in transdermal drug delivery due to the presence of engineered bubbles, and that the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery using sonophoresis with microbubbles depends on the

  9. Sonophoresis Using Ultrasound Contrast Agents: Dependence on Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Donghee; Song, Gillsoo; Jo, Yongjun; Won, Jongho; Son, Taeyoon; Cha, Ohrum; Kim, Jinho; Jung, Byungjo; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Chul-Woo; Seo, Jongbum

    2016-01-01

    Sonophoresis can increase skin permeability to various drugs in transdermal drug delivery. Cavitation is recognized as the predominant mechanism of sonophoresis. Recently, a new logical approach to enhance the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery was tried. It is to utilize the engineered microbubble and its resonant frequency for increase of cavitation activity. Actively-induced cavitation with low-intensity ultrasound (less than ~1 MPa) causes disordering of the lipid bilayers and the formation of aqueous channels by stable cavitation which indicates a continuous oscillation of bubbles. Furthermore, the mutual interactions of microbubble determined by concentration of added bubble are also thought to be an important factor for activity of stable cavitation, even in different characteristics of drug. In the present study, we addressed the dependence of ultrasound contrast agent concentration using two types of drug on the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery. Two types of experiment were designed to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery according to ultrasound contrast agent concentration. First, an experiment of optical clearing using a tissue optical clearing agent was designed to assess the efficiency of sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. Second, a Franz diffusion cell with ferulic acid was used to quantitatively determine the amount of drug delivered to the skin sample by sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. The maximum enhancement ratio of sonophoresis with a concentration of 1:1,000 was approximately 3.1 times greater than that in the ultrasound group without ultrasound contrast agent and approximately 7.5 times greater than that in the control group. These results support our hypothesis that sonophoresis becomes more effective in transdermal drug delivery due to the presence of engineered bubbles, and that the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery using sonophoresis with microbubbles depends on the

  10. Biochemical characterization of the medaka (Oryzias latipes) orthologue for mammalian tissue-type transglutaminase (TG2).

    PubMed

    Takada, Yuki; Watanabe, Yuko; Okuya, Kazuho; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Hitomi, Kiyotaka

    2017-03-01

    Transglutaminase is an enzyme family responsible for post-translational modification such as protein cross-linking and the attachment of primary amine and/or deamidation of glutamine-residue in proteins. Medaka (Oryzias latipes), a recently established model fish, has similar functional proteins to those characterized in mammals. Previously, we found the apparent orthologues that correspond to human transglutaminases in medaka. In this study, regarding the medaka orthologue of human tissue-type transglutaminase (OlTGT), recombinant protein was expressed in an active form in bacteria cultured at low temperature. Using the recombinant protein, we biochemically characterized the enzymatic activity and also obtained a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognized OlTGT. Immunochemical analysis revealed that OlTGT was not expressed ubiquitously, unlike its mammalian orthologue, but in primarily limited tissues such as the eye, brain, spinal cord, and gas gland.

  11. Characterization of feline TRIM genes: molecular cloning, expression in tissues, and response to type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Koba, Ryota; Kokaji, Chika; Fujisaki, Gentoku; Oguma, Keisuke; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2013-05-15

    Members of the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein family in mammals are responsible for various cellular processes. Previous studies have revealed that several TRIM proteins were induced by interferons (IFN) and that these proteins were involved in innate immune response against retroviral infection. Although retroviral infection is prevalent in domestic cats, the expression profiles and roles of feline TRIM genes against these viral infections are not well understood. In the present study, we examined tissue expression and IFN inducibility of nine feline TRIM genes. In addition, the complete coding sequences of six cloned TRIM genes were determined, and their structures were analyzed. Nine TRIM genes were expressed in feline tissues and five were up-regulated by type I IFN. The predicted amino acid sequence of six feline TRIM proteins showed high sequence similarities to other mammalian TRIM proteins, and suggest that feline TRIM genes are potentially involved in antiviral reactivity in IFN-mediated immune response.

  12. Altered pattern of cannabinoid type 1 receptor expression in adipose tissue of dysmetabolic and overweight patients.

    PubMed

    Sarzani, Riccardo; Bordicchia, Marica; Marcucci, Pierfrancesco; Bedetta, Samuele; Santini, Silvia; Giovagnoli, Andrea; Scappini, Lorena; Minardi, Daniele; Muzzonigro, Giovanni; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Rappelli, Alessandro

    2009-03-01

    In overweight patients (OW), the increased peripheral activity of the endocannabinoid system in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) may be mediated by cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor expression. We determined whether CB1 receptor splice variants and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in perirenal and subcutaneous adipose tissues are associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Gene expression with multiple-primers real-time polymerase chain reaction (TaqMan; Applied Biosystem, Weiterstadt, Germany) was performed to study VAT and paired subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) mRNA from 36 consecutive patients undergoing nephrectomy. Cannabinoid type 1A and CB1E mRNAs variants with the longer version of exon 4 were expressed. The CB1 expression in perirenal VAT significantly correlated with body mass index (BMI). Paired subcutaneous/perirenal samples from normal-weight patients (BMI < 25 kg/m(2)) showed higher CB1 expression in SAT (P = .002), whereas in OW (BMI > or = 25 kg/m(2)), the higher CB1 expression was in VAT (P = .038). In unpaired samples, SAT of normal-weight patients had significantly higher CB1 mRNA levels compared with SAT of OW, whereas higher CB1 expression (P = .009) was found in VAT of OW (n = 25). Overweight patients with increased visceral CB1 expression had higher waist circumference (P < .01), insulin (P < .01), and homeostasis model assessment index (P < .01). In addition, patients with the MetS (n = 22) showed higher CB1 expression in perirenal adipose tissues (P = .007). Visceral adipose CB1 expression correlated with BMI. Overweight patients and those with MetS showed a CB1 expression pattern supporting a CB1-mediated overactivity of the endocannabinoid system in human VAT.

  13. Cardiac arrhythmias produced by ultrasound and contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, Claudio

    Ultrasound is used widely in medicine for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Ultrasound contrast agents are suspensions of gas-filled microbubbles used to enhance diagnostic imaging. Microbubble contrast agents can increase the likelihood of bioeffects of ultrasound associated with acoustic cavitation. Under certain exposure conditions, the interaction of ultrasound with cardiac tissues can produce cardiac arrhythmias. The general objective of this thesis was to develop a greater understanding of ultrasound-induced premature cardiac beats. The hypothesis guiding this work was that acoustic cavitation is the physical mechanism for the production of arrhythmias with ultrasound. This hypothesis was tested through a series of experiments with mice in vivo and theoretical investigations. Results of this research supported the acoustic cavitation hypothesis. The acoustic pressure threshold for premature beats was significantly lower with microbubble contrast agents present in the blood than without. With microbubbles, the threshold for premature beats was below the current output limits of diagnostic devices. The threshold was not significantly dependent upon contrast agent type and was not influenced by contrast agent dose over three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the dependence of the threshold on acoustic frequency was consistent with the frequency dependence of acoustic cavitation. Experimentally determined thresholds for premature beats in vivo were in excellent agreement with theoretically estimated thresholds for inertial cavitation. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to measure the acoustic emissions produced by cavitating microbubbles in vivo. A direct correlation between the amplitude of the PCD and the percentage of ultrasound pulses producing a premature beat was consistent with cavitation as a mechanism for this bioeffect. Although this thesis focused on the mechanistic understanding of ultrasound-induced arrhythmias, more persistent

  14. Real-time target tracking of soft tissues in 3D ultrasound images based on robust visual information and mechanical simulation.

    PubMed

    Royer, Lucas; Krupa, Alexandre; Dardenne, Guillaume; Le Bras, Anthony; Marchand, Eric; Marchal, Maud

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a real-time approach that allows tracking deformable structures in 3D ultrasound sequences. Our method consists in obtaining the target displacements by combining robust dense motion estimation and mechanical model simulation. We perform evaluation of our method through simulated data, phantom data, and real-data. Results demonstrate that this novel approach has the advantage of providing correct motion estimation regarding different ultrasound shortcomings including speckle noise, large shadows and ultrasound gain variation. Furthermore, we show the good performance of our method with respect to state-of-the-art techniques by testing on the 3D databases provided by MICCAI CLUST'14 and CLUST'15 challenges.

  15. Hot topics in biomedical ultrasound: ultrasound therapy and its integration with ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everbach, E. Carr

    2005-09-01

    Since the development of biomedical ultrasound imaging from sonar after WWII, there has been a clear divide between ultrasonic imaging and ultrasound therapy. While imaging techniques are designed to cause as little change as possible in the tissues through which ultrasound propagates, ultrasound therapy typically relies upon heating or acoustic cavitation to produce a desirable therapeutic effect. Concerns over the increasingly high acoustic outputs of diagnostic ultrasound scanners prompted the adoption of the Mechanical Index (MI) and Thermal Index (TI) in the early 1990s. Therapeutic applications of ultrasound, meanwhile, have evolved from deep tissue heating in sports medicine to include targeted drug delivery, tumor and plaque ablation, cauterization via high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and accelerated dissolution of blood clots. The integration of ultrasonic imaging and therapy in one device is just beginning, but the promise of improved patient outcomes is balanced by regulatory and practical impediments.

  16. Fusion of Ultrasound Tissue-Typing Images with Multiparametric MRI for Image-guided Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    pathological changes in small- and medium-sized arteries, which decrease vascular inflow. These arterial changes resemble chronic, progressive atherosclerosis ...and may be due to a combination of intimal fibrosis, direct damage to the arterial wall, and acceleration of naturally occurring atherosclerosis [16... atherosclerosis par- ticularly if the patient has one or more VCs. This model is consistent with the findings of the present study, namely that post-XRT

  17. Scanning Ultrasound (SUS) Causes No Changes to Neuronal Excitability and Prevents Age-Related Reductions in Hippocampal CA1 Dendritic Structure in Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Robert John; Leinenga, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Scanning ultrasound (SUS) is a noninvasive approach that has recently been shown to ameliorate histopathological changes and restore memory functions in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Although no overt neuronal damage was reported, the short- and long-term effects of SUS on neuronal excitability and dendritic tree morphology had not been investigated. To address this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in wild-type mice 2 and 24 hours after a single SUS treatment, and one week and 3 months after six weekly SUS treatments, including sham treatments as controls. In both treatment regimes, no changes in CA1 neuronal excitability were observed in SUS-treated neurons when compared to sham-treated neurons at any time-point. For the multiple treatment groups, we also determined the dendritic morphology and spine densities of the neurons from which we had recorded. The apical trees of sham-treated neurons were reduced at the 3 month time-point when compared to one week; however, surprisingly, no longitudinal change was detected in the apical dendritic trees of SUS-treated neurons. In contrast, the length and complexity of the basal dendritic trees were not affected by SUS treatment at either time-point. The apical dendritic spine densities were reduced, independent of the treatment group, at 3 months compared to one week. Collectively, these data suggest that ultrasound can be employed to prevent an age-associated loss of dendritic structure without impairing neuronal excitability. PMID:27727310

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Injection of Botulinum Toxin Type A for Piriformis Muscle Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Valeno, Giovanni; Beatrice, Raffaele; Cinone, Nicoletta; Baricich, Alessio; Picelli, Alessandro; Panza, Francesco; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2015-08-10

    Piriformis muscle syndrome (PMS) is caused by prolonged or excessive contraction of the piriformis muscle associated with pain in the buttocks, hips, and lower limbs because of the close proximity to the sciatic nerve. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) reduces muscle hypertonia as well as muscle contracture and pain inhibiting substance P release and other inflammatory factors. BoNT-A injection technique is important considering the difficult access of the needle for deep location, the small size of the muscle, and the proximity to neurovascular structures. Ultrasound guidance is easy to use and painless and several studies describe its use during BoNT-A administration in PMS. In the present review article, we briefly updated current knowledge regarding the BoNT therapy of PMS, describing also a case report in which this syndrome was treated with an ultrasound-guided injection of incobotulinumtoxin A. Pain reduction with an increase of hip articular range of motion in this patient with PMS confirmed the effectiveness of BoNT-A injection for the management of this syndrome.

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Injection of Botulinum Toxin Type A for Piriformis Muscle Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Valeno, Giovanni; Beatrice, Raffaele; Cinone, Nicoletta; Baricich, Alessio; Picelli, Alessandro; Panza, Francesco; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Piriformis muscle syndrome (PMS) is caused by prolonged or excessive contraction of the piriformis muscle associated with pain in the buttocks, hips, and lower limbs because of the close proximity to the sciatic nerve. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) reduces muscle hypertonia as well as muscle contracture and pain inhibiting substance P release and other inflammatory factors. BoNT-A injection technique is important considering the difficult access of the needle for deep location, the small size of the muscle, and the proximity to neurovascular structures. Ultrasound guidance is easy to use and painless and several studies describe its use during BoNT-A administration in PMS. In the present review article, we briefly updated current knowledge regarding the BoNT therapy of PMS, describing also a case report in which this syndrome was treated with an ultrasound-guided injection of incobotulinumtoxin A. Pain reduction with an increase of hip articular range of motion in this patient with PMS confirmed the effectiveness of BoNT-A injection for the management of this syndrome. PMID:26266421

  20. Cancer abolishes the tissue type-specific differences in the phenotype of energetic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Acebo, Paloma; Giner, Daniel; Calvo, Piedad; Blanco-Rivero, Amaya; Ortega, Alvaro D; Fernández, Pedro L; Roncador, Giovanna; Fernández-Malavé, Edgar; Chamorro, Margarita; Cuezva, José M

    2009-08-18

    Nowadays, cellular bioenergetics has become a central issue of investigation in cancer biology. Recently, the metabolic activity of the cancer cell has been shown to correlate with a proteomic index that informs of the relative mitochondrial activity of the cell. Within this new field of investigation, we report herein the production and characterization of high-affinity monoclonal antibodies against proteins of the "bioenergetic signature" of the cell. The use of recombinant proteins and antibodies against the mitochondrial beta-F1-ATPase and Hsp60 proteins and the enzymes of the glycolytic pathway glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase M2 in quantitative assays provide, for the first time, the actual amount of these proteins in normal and tumor surgical specimens of breast, lung, and esophagus. The application of this methodology affords a straightforward proteomic signature that quantifies the variable energetic demand of human tissues. Furthermore, the results show an unanticipated finding: tumors from different tissues and/or histological types have the same proteomic signature of energetic metabolism. Therefore, the results indicate that cancer abolishes the tissue-specific differences in the bioenergetic phenotype of mitochondria. Overall, the results support that energetic metabolism represents an additional hallmark of the phenotype of the cancer cell and a promising target for the treatment of diverse neoplasias.

  1. Three-dimensional coupled-object segmentation using symmetry and tissue type information.

    PubMed

    Bijari, Payam B; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents an automatic method for segmentation of brain structures using their symmetry and tissue type information. The proposed method generates segmented structures that have homogenous tissues. It benefits from general symmetry of the brain structures in the two hemispheres. It also benefits from the tissue regions generated by fuzzy c-means clustering. All in all, the proposed method can be described as a dynamic knowledge-based method that eliminates the need for statistical shape models of the structures while generating accurate segmentation results. The proposed approach is implemented in MATLAB and tested on the Internet Brain Segmentation Repository (IBSR) datasets. To this end, it is applied to the segmentation of caudate and ventricles three-dimensionally in magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the brain. Impacts of each of the steps of the proposed approach are demonstrated through experiments. It is shown that the proposed method generates accurate segmentation results that are insensitive to initialization and parameter selection. The proposed method is compared to four previous methods illustrating advantages and limitations of each method.

  2. A method to obtain reference images for evaluation of ultrasonic tissue characterization techniques.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M S; Wilhjelm, J E; Sahl, B; Brandt, T; Martinsen, K; Jespersen, S K; Falk, E

    2002-05-01

    A general problem when evaluating ultrasonic methods for tissue characterization is that "a golden standard" is seldom known. This paper describes a manual method to obtain a reference image, with the same geometry as the ultrasound image, indicating spatial location of the different tissue types present in the biological tissue scanned in vitro. A 30 x 10 x 2 mm3 piece of formalin fixed porcine tissue was molded into an agar block, which on the top surface, contained a set of fiducial markers, spaced 2.5 mm. The block was submerged into 20 degrees C water and a set of parallel 7.5 MHz spatial compound ultrasound images of tissue and fiducial markers were recorded each 0.5 mm. Guided by the fiducial markers, the agar block was subsequently cut into slices 2.5 mm thick, photographed and finally analyzed histologically identifying these tissues: collagen rich, collagen poor, micro vessels and muscle fibres. Due to: (1) the cutting procedure, (2) the finite size of the ultrasound beam and (3) the spatial variation in propagation velocity, the macroscopic photographs did not align completely with the ultrasound images. Likewise, the histological image is a geometrically distorted version of the macroscopic photograph, due to the histological preparation process. The histological information was "mapped back" into the format of the ultrasound images the following way: On the macroscopic images, outlines were drawn manually which defined the border of the tissue. These outlines were superimposed on the corresponding ultrasound images (identified via the fiducial markers) and modified to encompass what appeared to be tissue regions on the ultrasound images and subsequently re-applied to the macroscopic image. This modified macroscopic outline was used as guideline when drawing outlines identifying regions of the various tissue types. Specifically, the macroscopic image revealed the borders between the different tissues, while the histological image identified the four

  3. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... plan for their effective treatment. detect blood clots (deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the major veins of ... What are the limitations of Vascular Ultrasound? Vessels deep in the body are harder to see than ...

  4. Adipose tissue expansion and the development of obesity: influence of dietary fat type.

    PubMed

    Hausman, D B; Loh, M Y; Flatt, W P; Martin, R J

    1997-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that the prevalence of obesity in adults has increased by 30% or more in the past decade, with increases in both genders and in all ethnic and racial populations and age groups. Obesity is associated with many chronic diseases and alterations in physiologic function including cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, gallbladder disease and certain types of cancer. Much attention regarding dietary influences on obesity development or prevention has focused on high fat diets. Many studies have confirmed that high fat feeding leads to an expansion of adipose tissue mass through an increase in fat cell size and/or number and to the subsequent development of obesity. However, there is little definitive information on the effect of type of dietary fat, especially palm oil, on adipose tissue cellularity and the development of obesity. These studies were designed to determine whether dietary fat of different sources vary in their ability to produce obesity and to begin to elucidate the mechanism by which such divergence occurs. Male Osborne-Mendel rats were fed either a low fat (15% calories) or one of three high fat diets (65% calories) for 12 weeks. The predominant fat source in the high fat diets was either soybean oil, tallow, or palm-olein (a fraction of palm oil). Final body weight was not influenced by fat level or type; however, percent carcass lipid and fat pad weight were higher in soybean oil and tallow fed rats than in low fat and palm-olein fed rats. Fat pad specific increases in cell size and cell number were observed for tallow and soybean oil fed compared to low fat and palm-olein fed rats. Serum triglycerides were higher in the tallow and palm-olein fed rats compared to low fat fed rats; no significant effects of dietary fat type on serum cholesterol were observed. These results indicate that palm-olein, unlike tallow and soybean oil, were comparable to a low fat diet concerning fat pad weight, body composition and

  5. [Ultrasound for peripheral neural block].

    PubMed

    Kefalianakis, F

    2005-03-01

    Ultrasound is well established in medicine. Unfortunately, ultrasound is still rarely used in the area of anesthesia. The purpose of the article is to illustrate the possibilities and limitations of ultrasound in regional anesthesia. The basic principles of ultrasound are the piezoelectric effect and the behaviour of acoustic waveforms in human tissue. Ultrasound imaging in medicine uses high frequency pulses of sound waves (2.5-10 MHz). The following images are built up from the reflected sounds. The ultrasound devices used in regional anesthesia (commonly by 10 MHz) deliver a two-dimensional view. The main step for a successful regional anaesthesia is to identify the exact position of the nerve. In addition, specific surface landmarks and the use of peripheral nerve stimulator help to detect the correct position of the needle. Nerves are demonstrated as an composition of hyperechogenic (white) and hypoechogenic (black) areas. The surrounding hyperechogenic parts are epi- and perineurium, the dark hypoechogenic part is the neural tissue. The composition of peripheral nerves are always similar, but the quantities of each part, of surrounding perineurium and nerval structures, differ. Further the imaging of nerves is significantly influenced by the angle of beam to the nerve and the surrounding anatomic structures. Only experience and correct interpretation make the ultrasound a valid method in clinical practice. Correct interpretation has to be learned by standardized education. Three examples of peripheral nerve blocks are described. The detection of nerves and the visualization of the correct spread of local anesthetics to the nerves are the main principles of effective ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, whereas closest proximity of the needle to the target nerve is not necessary. The described examples of ultrasound guidance for nerval block illustrates the specific procedures with reduced probability of nerval irritation, high success and low rate of

  6. Porosity, Mineralization, Tissue Type and Morphology Interactions at the Human Tibial Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampson, Naomi A.

    Prior research has shown a relationship between tibia robustness (ratio of cross-sectional area to bone length) and stress fracture risk, with less robust bones having a higher risk, which may indicate a compensatory increase in elastic modulus to increase bending strength. Previous studies of human tibiae have shown higher ash content in slender bones. In this study, the relationships between variations in volumetric porosity, ash content, tissue mineral density, secondary bone tissue, and cross sectional geometry, were investigated in order to better understand the tissue level adaptations that may occur in the establishment of cross-sectional properties. In this research, significant differences were found between porosity, ash content, and tissue type around the cortex between robust and slender bones, suggesting that there was a level of co-adaption occurring. Variation in porosity correlated with robustness, and explained large parts of the variation in tissue mineral density. The nonlinear relationship between porosity and ash content may support that slender bones compensate for poor geometry by increasing ash content through reduced remodeling, while robust individuals increase porosity to decrease mass, but only to a point. These results suggest that tissue level organization plays a compensatory role in the establishment of adult bone mass, and may contribute to differences in bone aging between different bone phenotypes. The results suggest that slender individuals have significantly less remodeled bone, however the proportion of remodeled bone was not uniform around the tibia. In the complex results of the study of 38% vs. 66% sites the distal site was subject to higher strains than the 66% site, indicating both local and global regulators may be affecting overall remodeling rates and need to be teased apart in future studies. This research has broad clinical implications on the diagnosis and treatment of fragility fractures. The relationships that

  7. Tissue distribution and clonal diversity of the T and B cell repertoire in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Seay, Howard R.; Yusko, Erik; Rothweiler, Stephanie J.; Zhang, Lin; Posgai, Amanda L.; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Emerson, Ryan O.; Kaddis, John S.; Ko, Dave; Nakayama, Maki; Smith, Mia J.; Cambier, John C.; Pugliese, Alberto; Atkinson, Mark A.; Robins, Harlan S.; Brusko, Todd M.

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive immune repertoire plays a critical role in type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. However, efforts to characterize B cell and T cell receptor (TCR) profiles in T1D subjects have been largely limited to peripheral blood sampling and restricted to known antigens. To address this, we collected pancreatic draining lymph nodes (pLN), “irrelevant” nonpancreatic draining lymph nodes, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and splenocytes from T1D subjects (n = 18) and control donors (n = 9) as well as pancreatic islets from 1 T1D patient; from these tissues, we collected purified CD4+ conventional T cells (Tconv), CD4+ Treg, CD8+ T cells, and B cells. By conducting high-throughput immunosequencing of the TCR β chain (TRB) and B cell receptor (BCR) immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) on these samples, we sought to analyze the molecular signature of the lymphocyte populations within these tissues and of T1D. Ultimately, we observed a highly tissue-restricted CD4+ repertoire, while up to 24% of CD8+ clones were shared among tissues. We surveyed our data set for previously described proinsulin- and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65–reactive (GAD65-reactive) receptors, and interestingly, we observed a TRB with homology to a known GAD65-reactive TCR (clone GAD4.13) present in 7 T1D donors (38.9%), representing >25% of all productive TRB within Tconv isolated from the pLN of 1 T1D subject. These data demonstrate diverse receptor signatures at the nucleotide level and enriched autoreactive clones at the amino acid level, supporting the utility of coupling immunosequencing data with knowledge of characterized autoreactive receptors. PMID:27942583

  8. Tissue distribution and clonal diversity of the T and B cell repertoire in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Seay, Howard R; Yusko, Erik; Rothweiler, Stephanie J; Zhang, Lin; Posgai, Amanda L; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Vignali, Marissa; Emerson, Ryan O; Kaddis, John S; Ko, Dave; Nakayama, Maki; Smith, Mia J; Cambier, John C; Pugliese, Alberto; Atkinson, Mark A; Robins, Harlan S; Brusko, Todd M

    2016-12-08

    The adaptive immune repertoire plays a critical role in type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. However, efforts to characterize B cell and T cell receptor (TCR) profiles in T1D subjects have been largely limited to peripheral blood sampling and restricted to known antigens. To address this, we collected pancreatic draining lymph nodes (pLN), "irrelevant" nonpancreatic draining lymph nodes, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and splenocytes from T1D subjects (n = 18) and control donors (n = 9) as well as pancreatic islets from 1 T1D patient; from these tissues, we collected purified CD4(+) conventional T cells (Tconv), CD4(+) Treg, CD8(+) T cells, and B cells. By conducting high-throughput immunosequencing of the TCR β chain (TRB) and B cell receptor (BCR) immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) on these samples, we sought to analyze the molecular signature of the lymphocyte populations within these tissues and of T1D. Ultimately, we observed a highly tissue-restricted CD4(+) repertoire, while up to 24% of CD8(+) clones were shared among tissues. We surveyed our data set for previously described proinsulin- and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65-reactive (GAD65-reactive) receptors, and interestingly, we observed a TRB with homology to a known GAD65-reactive TCR (clone GAD4.13) present in 7 T1D donors (38.9%), representing >25% of all productive TRB within Tconv isolated from the pLN of 1 T1D subject. These data demonstrate diverse receptor signatures at the nucleotide level and enriched autoreactive clones at the amino acid level, supporting the utility of coupling immunosequencing data with knowledge of characterized autoreactive receptors.

  9. Blunted response of pituitary type 1 and brown adipose tissue type 2 deiodinases to swimming training in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, D L; Fortunato, R S; Neto, R A L; da Silva Silvestre, D H; Nigro, M; Frankenfeld, T G P; Werneck-de-Castro, J P S; Carvalho, D P

    2012-10-01

    Ovariectomy leads to significant increase in body weight, but the possible peripheral mechanisms involved in weight gain are still unknown. Since exercise and thyroid hormones modulate energy balance, we aimed to study the effect of swimming training on body weight gain and brown adipose tissue (BAT) type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase responses in ovariectomized (Ox) or sham-operated (Sh) rats. Rats were submitted to a period of 8-week training, 5 days per week with progressive higher duration of exercise protocol. Swimming training program did not totally prevent the higher body mass gain that follows ovariectomy in rats (16.5% decrease in body mass gain in Ox trained rats compared to 22% decrease in sham operated trained animals, in relation to the respective sedentary groups), but training of Ox animals impaired the accumulation of subcutaneous fat pads. Interestingly, swimming training upregulates pituitary type 1 (p<0.001 vs. all groups) and BAT type 2 iodothyronine deiodinases (p<0.05 vs. ShS and OxS) in sham operated but not in Ox rats, indicating an impaired pituitary and peripheral response to exercise in Ox rats. However, BAT mitochondrial O2 consumption significantly increased by swimming training in both sham and Ox groups, indicating that Ox BAT mitochondria responds normally to exercise stimulus, but does not result in a significant reduction of body weight. In conclusion, increased body mass gain produced by Ox is not completely impaired by 8 weeks of high intensity physical training, showing that these animals sustain higher rate of body mass gain independent of being submitted to higher energy expenditure.

  10. Identification of cell types, tissues and pathways affected by risk loci in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Zhao, Pan; Shen, Changbing; Shen, Songke; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zuo, Xianbo; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun; Yin, Xianyong

    2016-04-01

    Many common variants have been found associated with the risk of psoriasis, but the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown, mostly owing to the difficulty in dissecting the mechanism of each variant using representative cell type and tissue in biological experiments. We applied an integrative method SNPsea which has been developed by investigators in Broad, to identify the most relevant cell types, tissues, and pathways to psoriasis by assessing the condition specificity affected by psoriasis genome-wide association studies-implicated genes. We employed this software on 89 single-nucleotide polymorphisms with genome-wide significance in Han Chinese and Caucasian populations. We found significant evidence for peripheral blood CD56 + NK cells (P = 1.30 × 10(-7)), Langerhans cells (P = 4.96 × 10(-6)) and CD14+ monocytes (P < 4.80 × 10(-5)) in psoriasis. We suggested that the DNase I hypersensitivity sites in CD14+ cells were active in psoriasis (P = 2.20 × 10(-16)). In addition, we discovered that biotic stimulus response, cytokine production and NF-κB pathways were significantly activated in psoriasis (P < 1.00 × 10(-5)). In conclusion, we found several innate immune cells and immune pathways in psoriasis that will help guide biological experiments for psoriasis risk variants in future.

  11. Trauma Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Prachanukool, Thidathit; Sricharoen, Pungkava; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of acute trauma patients through the use of multi-site scanning encompassing abdominal, cardiothoracic, vascular and skeletal scans. In a high-speed polytrauma setting, because exsanguinations are the primary cause of trauma morbidity and mortality, ultrasound is used for quick and accurate detection of hemorrhages in the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities during the primary Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) survey. Volume status can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC), which is a useful tool in the initial phase and follow-up evaluations. Pneumothorax can also be quickly detected with ultrasound. During the secondary survey and in patients sustaining low-speed or localized trauma, ultrasound can be used to help detect abdominal organ injuries. This is particularly helpful in patients in whom hemoperitoneum is not identified on an initial scan because findings of organ injuries will expedite the next test, often computed tomography (CT). Moreover, ultrasound can assist in detection of fractures easily obscured on radiography, such as rib and sternal fractures.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of the effect of ultrasound on the fibrinolysis of clots

    PubMed Central

    Chernysh, Irina N.; Everbach, E. Carr; Purohit, Prashant K.; Weisel, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Ultrasound accelerates tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA)-induced fibrinolysis of clots in vitro and in vivo. Objective To identify mechanisms for the enhancement of t-PA-induced fibrinolysis of clots. Methods Turbidity is an accurate and convenient method, not previously used, to follow the effects of ultrasound. Deconvolution microscopy was used to determine changes in structure, while fluorescence recovery after photobleaching was used to characterize the kinetics of binding/unbinding and transport. Results The ultrasound pulse repetition frequency affected clot lysis times, but there were no thermal effects. Ultrasound in the absence of t-PA produced a slight but consistent decrease in turbidity, suggesting a decrease in fibrin diameter due solely to the action of the ultrasound, likely caused by an increase in protofibril tension because of vibration from ultrasound. Changes in fibrin network structure during lysis with ultrasound were visualized in real time by deconvolution microscopy, revealing that the network becomes unstable when 30–40% of the protein in the network was digested, whereas without ultrasound, the fibrin network was digested gradually and retained structural integrity. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching during lysis revealed that the off-rate of oligomers from digesting fibers was not much affected but the number of binding/unbinding sites was increased. Conclusions Ultrasound causes a decrease in the diameter of the fibers due to tension as a result of vibration, leading to increased binding sites for plasmin(ogen)/t-PA. The positive feedback of this structural change together with increased mixing/transport of t-PA/plasmin(ogen) is likely to account for the observed enhancement of fibrinolysis by ultrasound. PMID:25619618

  13. Ultrasound in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Priego Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasound is a type of energy which can help analytical chemists in almost all their laboratory tasks, from cleaning to detection. A generic view of the different steps which can be assisted by ultrasound is given here. These steps include preliminary operations usually not considered in most analytical methods (e.g. cleaning, degassing, and atomization), sample preparation being the main area of application. In sample preparation ultrasound is used to assist solid-sample treatment (e.g. digestion, leaching, slurry formation) and liquid-sample preparation (e.g. liquid-liquid extraction, emulsification, homogenization) or to promote heterogeneous sample treatment (e.g. filtration, aggregation, dissolution of solids, crystallization, precipitation, defoaming, degassing). Detection techniques based on use of ultrasonic radiation, the principles on which they are based, responses, and the quantities measured are also discussed.

  14. The effects of twisting and type of aspiration needle on the efficiency of transvaginal ultrasound-guided ovum pick-up in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Yoshihiko; Sakaguchi, Minoru; Katagiri, Seiji; Yamada, Yutaka; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    2003-10-01

    The effects of twisting and type (single- or double-lumen) of aspiration needle on the efficiency of transvaginal ultrasound-guided ovum pick-up (US-guided OPU) were investigated in cattle. The first study using slaughterhouse ovaries revealed that twisting of the needle during follicle aspiration improved the oocyte recovery rate without deleterious effects on the attachment of cumulus layers. Vacuum pressure affected the oocyte recovery and cumulus attachment, regardless of the needle type. The needle type did not affect the oocyte recovery or cumulus attachment with an optimized vacuum pressure. In the second study, US-guided OPU was performed in live cows using two types of needles with a vacuum pressure of 75 mmHg. The needle type did not affect the oocyte recovery or cumulus attachment of the recovered oocytes. The results revealed that twisting of the needle is effective in follicle aspiration, and suggested that a single-lumen needle is as useful as a double-lumen needle for US-guided OPU in cattle.

  15. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound - Carotid Carotid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the carotid arteries ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  16. An atlas of active enhancers across human cell types and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Robin; Gebhard, Claudia; Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Hoof, Ilka; Bornholdt, Jette; Boyd, Mette; Chen, Yun; Zhao, Xiaobei; Schmidl, Christian; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ntini, Evgenia; Arner, Erik; Valen, Eivind; Li, Kang; Schwarzfischer, Lucia; Glatz, Dagmar; Raithel, Johanna; Lilje, Berit; Rapin, Nicolas; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jørgensen, Mette; Andersen, Peter Refsing; Bertin, Nicolas; Rackham, Owen; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Ishizu, Yuri; Shimizu, Yuri; Furuhata, Erina; Maeda, Shiori; Negishi, Yutaka; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Lassmann, Timo; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Kondo, Naoto; Kawai, Jun; Lennartsson, Andreas; Daub, Carsten O.; Heutink, Peter; Hume, David A.; Jensen, Torben Heick; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Müller, Ferenc; Consortium, The Fantom; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Carninci, Piero; Rehli, Michael; Sandelin, Albin

    2014-03-01

    Enhancers control the correct temporal and cell-type-specific activation of gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes. Knowing their properties, regulatory activity and targets is crucial to understand the regulation of differentiation and homeostasis. Here we use the FANTOM5 panel of samples, covering the majority of human tissues and cell types, to produce an atlas of active, in vivo-transcribed enhancers. We show that enhancers share properties with CpG-poor messenger RNA promoters but produce bidirectional, exosome-sensitive, relatively short unspliced RNAs, the generation of which is strongly related to enhancer activity. The atlas is used to compare regulatory programs between different cells at unprecedented depth, to identify disease-associated regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms, and to classify cell-type-specific and ubiquitous enhancers. We further explore the utility of enhancer redundancy, which explains gene expression strength rather than expression patterns. The online FANTOM5 enhancer atlas represents a unique resource for studies on cell-type-specific enhancers and gene regulation.

  17. An atlas of active enhancers across human cell types and tissues

    PubMed Central