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Sample records for ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecysto-cholangiography

  1. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff.

  2. Ultrasound-guided, percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation: technical note.

    PubMed

    Chan, Isaac; Brown, Anthony R; Park, Kenneth; Winfree, Christopher J

    2010-09-01

    Peripheral nerve stimulation is a form of neuromodulation that applies electric current to peripheral nerves to induce stimulation paresthesias within the painful areas. To report a method of ultrasound-guided, percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation. This technique utilizes real-time imaging to avoid injury to adjacent vascular structures during minimally invasive placement of peripheral nerve stimulator electrodes. We describe a patient that presented with chronic, bilateral foot pain following multiple foot surgeries, for whom a comprehensive, pain management treatment strategy had failed. We utilized ultrasound-guided, percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation at a thigh level to provide durable pain relief on the right side, and open peripheral nerve stimulation on the left. The patient experienced appropriate stimulation paresthesias and excellent pain relief on the plantar aspect of the right foot with the percutaneous electrode. On the left side, we were unable to direct the stimulation paresthesias to the sole of the foot, despite multiple electrode repositionings. A subsequent, open placement of a left tibial nerve stimulator was performed. This revealed that the correct electrode position against the tibial nerve was immediately adjacent to the popliteal artery, and was thus not appropriate for percutaneous placement. We describe a method of ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve stimulation that avoids the invasiveness of electrode placement via an open procedure while providing excellent pain relief. We further describe limitations of the percutaneous approach when navigating close to large blood vessels, a situation more appropriately managed with open peripheral nerve stimulator placement. Ultrasound-guided placement may be considered for patients receiving peripheral nerve stimulators placed within the deep tissues, and not easily placed in a blind fashion.

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Renal Access for Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Description of Three Novel Ultrasound-Guided Needle Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Carissa; Masic, Selma; Usawachintachit, Manint; Hu, Weiguo; Yang, Wenzeng; Stoller, Marshall; Li, Jianxing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ultrasound-guided renal access for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is a safe, effective, and low-cost procedure commonly performed worldwide, but a technique underutilized by urologists in the United States. The purpose of this article is to familiarize the practicing urologist with methods for ultrasound guidance for percutaneous renal access. We discuss two alternative techniques for gaining renal access for PCNL under ultrasound guidance. We also describe a novel technique of using the puncture needle to reposition residual stone fragments to avoid additional tract dilation. With appropriate training, ultrasound-guided renal access for PCNL can lead to reduced radiation exposure, accurate renal access, and excellent stone-free success rates and clinical outcomes. PMID:26414304

  4. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous tracheostomy in critically ill obese patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous tracheostomy (PCT) and the incidence of complications in critically ill, obese patients. Methods Fifty consecutive patients were included in a prospective study in two surgical and critical care medicine departments. Obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at least 30 kg/m2. The feasibility of PCT and the incidence of complications were compared in obese patients (n = 26) and non-obese patients (n = 24). Results are expressed as the median (25th-75th percentile) or number (percentage). Results The median BMIs were 34 kg/m2 (32-38) in the obese patient group and 25 kg/m2 (24-28) in the non-obese group (p < 0.001). The median times for tracheostomy were 10 min (8-14) in non-obese patients and 9 min (5-10) in obese-patients (p = 0.1). The overall complication rate was similar in obese and non-obese patient groups (35% vs. 33%, p = 0.92). Most complications were minor (hypotension, desaturation, tracheal cuff puncture and minor bleeding), with no differences between obese and non-obese groups. Bronchoscopic inspection revealed two cases of granuloma (8%) in obese patients. One non-obese patient developed a peristomal skin infection, which was treated with intravenous antibiotics. Ultrasound-guided PCT was possible in all enrolled patients and there were no surgical conversions or deaths. Conclusions This study demonstrated that US-guided PCT is feasible in obese patients with a low complication rate. Obesity may not constitute a contra-indication for US-guided PCT. A US examination provides information on cervical anatomy and hence modifies and guides choice of the PCT puncture site. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01502657. PMID:22390815

  5. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous tracheostomy in critically ill obese patients.

    PubMed

    Guinot, Pierre-Grégoire; Zogheib, Elie; Petiot, Sandra; Marienne, Jean-Pierre; Guerin, Anne-Marie; Monet, Pauline; Zaatar, Rody; Dupont, Hervé

    2012-12-12

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous tracheostomy (PCT) and the incidence of complications in critically ill, obese patients. Fifty consecutive patients were included in a prospective study in two surgical and critical care medicine departments. Obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at least 30 kg/m². The feasibility of PCT and the incidence of complications were compared in obese patients (n = 26) and non-obese patients (n = 24). Results are expressed as the median (25th-75th percentile) or number (percentage). The median BMIs were 34 kg/m² (32-38) in the obese patient group and 25 kg/m² (24-28) in the non-obese group (p < 0.001). The median times for tracheostomy were 10 min (8-14) in non-obese patients and 9 min (5-10) in obese-patients (p = 0.1). The overall complication rate was similar in obese and non-obese patient groups (35% vs. 33%, p = 0.92). Most complications were minor (hypotension, desaturation, tracheal cuff puncture and minor bleeding), with no differences between obese and non-obese groups. Bronchoscopic inspection revealed two cases of granuloma (8%) in obese patients. One non-obese patient developed a peristomal skin infection, which was treated with intravenous antibiotics. Ultrasound-guided PCT was possible in all enrolled patients and there were no surgical conversions or deaths. This study demonstrated that US-guided PCT is feasible in obese patients with a low complication rate. Obesity may not constitute a contra-indication for US-guided PCT. A US examination provides information on cervical anatomy and hence modifies and guides choice of the PCT puncture site. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01502657.

  6. Ethnicity influences pain after ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Mahfudz, Anis S; Vijayananthan, Anushya

    2015-12-01

    The influence of ethnicity on pain complicating ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy (US-guided PLB) and its clinical impact has not been reported to date. Consecutive adults from a multiethnic background, undergoing an US-guided PLB, were independently assessed for pain up to 6 h after the procedure. Clinical and demographic parameters were analysed to determine independent predictors of significant pain after PLB. Willingness to undergo a repeat procedure was assessed 1 week after PLB. Data from 203 patients (median age 50 years; 43.9% female; ethnicity: Malay 41.5%, Chinese 40%, Indian 18%; median BMI 27.7 kg/m; median waist circumference 92.0 cm) were analysed. Pain after US-guided PLB was experienced in 133 (61.1%) patients, with severity grades as follows: none, n=81 (39.9%); mild, n=56 (27.6%); moderate, n=51 (25.1%); and severe, n=15 (7.4%). Analgesia requirements correlated well with severity of pain. Independent predictors of significant pain after PLB (moderate and severe categories) in patients included age less than 50 years [odds ratio (OR) 3.0], female sex (OR 3.7), Indian ethnicity (OR 2.9) and Malay ethnicity (OR 2.7), but not number of needle passes, BMI and educational levels. Patients who experienced moderate/severe pain were less willing to undergo a repeat PLB compared with those who experienced mild/no pain (60.9 vs. 82.8%, P=0.001). Ethnicity has an important role in the development of pain after US-guided PLB. This has a significant impact on willingness to repeat the procedure.

  7. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided renal biopsy: A Libyan experience

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, A.; Tarsin, R.; ElHabbash, B.; Zagan, N.; Markus, R.; Drebeka, S.; AbdElmola, K.; Shawish, T.; Shebani, A.; AbdElmola, T.; ElUsta, A.; Ehtuish, E. F.

    2010-01-01

    This study was done to assess the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB), to ascertain the risk factors for complications and determine the optimal period of observation. The radiologist (A.M.) at the National Organ Transplant Centre, Central Hospital, Tripoli, Libya, performed 86 PRBs between February 1, 2006, and January 31, 2008, using an automated biopsy gun with 16-gauge needle. Coagulation profile was done in all the patients. All patients were kept on strict bed rest for six hours post-procedure. Eighty six renal biopsies were performed on 78 patients referred from rheumatology department and eight post-kidney transplant recipients; 23 were males with age range 15 – 56 years and 63 females with age range 16 – 66 years. A mean of 17.5 glomeruli were present in each specimen. A glomerular yield of less than five glomeruli was seen in four biopsies. Class I lupus nephritis (LN) was seen in 1 patient, class II lupus nephritis in 7 patients, class III LN in 13 patients and class IV LN in 29 patients. All the eight renal allografts were diagnosed as acute tubular necrosis or acute interstitial rejection. The risk of post-biopsy bleeding was higher in women, older patients and higher PTT. The overall complication rate was 5.8%. Three complications were observed within six hours of biopsy. No late complication was seen. PRB under real-time ultrasound-guidance is a safe and efficacious procedure to establish the histological diagnosis and should be done as out-patient procedure. Observation time of six hours post-biopsy is optimal. PMID:20835320

  8. Septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Randelli, Filippo; Sdao, Silvana; Sardanelli, Francesco; Randelli, Pietro

    2014-08-01

    Calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff is a common condition. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration is one of several options to treat this condition. The main advantages of this procedure are short duration, good outcome, and low cost. Furthermore, only minor complications have been reported in the literature, namely, vagal reactions during the procedure and mild postprocedural pain. We report the first case of septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of calcific tendinopathy. Although this is generally considered a very safe procedure, a risk of infection should be taken into account. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Drainage of Neonatal Pyometrocolpos Under Local Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Algin, Oktay, E-mail: droktayalgin@gmail.com; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Kilic, Nizamettin

    2011-02-15

    Hydrometrocolpos is an uncommon congenital disorder with cystic dilatation of the vagina and uterus that occurs as a result of accumulated secretions from the reproductive tract due to distal genital tract obstruction. Secondary infection may also occur, resulting in pyometrocolpos, a potentially lethal disease. Immediate drainage of the cystic mass in patients determined to have pyometrocolpos is required to prevent or treat uropathy and septicemia until definitive corrective surgery can be performed. We report an unusual cause of obstructive uropathy in three infants: pyometrocolpos due to lower genital tract atresia. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage of the pyometrocolpos resulted in dramatically improvedmore » clinical and laboratory findings in these patients. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage under local anesthesia is a simple, minimally invasive, safe, and effective procedure that facilitates later successful corrective surgery and avoids the need for more complex drainage procedures.« less

  10. X-ray–free Ultrasound-guided Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: How to Select the Right Patient?

    PubMed Central

    Usawachintachit, Manint; Tzou, David T.; Hu, Weiguo; Li, Jianxing; Chi, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify factors associated with successful ultrasound guidance for each surgical step of ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). PATIENTS AND METHODS Consecutive patients undergoing PCNL between March 2015 and June 2016 were prospectively enrolled. An attempt was made to use ultrasound guidance in renal access, tract dilation, and nephrostomy tube placement for each patient. For steps during which ultrasound guidance was unsuccessful, fluoroscopic screening was applied. Regression analysis identified patient characteristics associated with successful use of ultrasound guidance. RESULTS A total of 96 patients composed this cohort, with a mean body mass index of 28.7 kg/m2. Mean stone size was 33.1 ± 18.9 mm, and no hydronephrosis was found in 63.5% of cases. Fluoroscopic screening was required for renal access in 27 cases (28.1%), tract dilation in 38 (39.6%), and nephrostomy tube placement in 80 (83.3%). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that successful ultrasound guidance was significantly associated with the presence of hydronephrosis for renal access and the absence of staghorn calculi for tract dilation. Ultrasound-guided nephrostomy tube placement appeared linked to surgeon experience. CONCLUSION To achieve completely x-ray–free ultrasound-guided PCNL, the ideal patient should have a hydronephrotic collecting system with no staghorn stone present. For practitioners looking to adopt ultrasound guidance into their PCNL practice, these represent the most appropriate patients to safely initiate a surgical experience. PMID:27720776

  11. Realtime ultrasound guided percutaneous tracheostomy in emergency setting: the glass ceiling has been broken.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Parli Raghavan; Vijai, M N; Shouche, Sachin

    2017-01-01

    In recent years ultrasound guided percutaneous tracheostomy (USPCT) has become a routine practice in critical care units. Its safety and superiority over conventional percutaneous tracheostomy and bronchoscopic guided PCT is proven to be non-inferior in elective cases. However its role in emergency percutaneous tracheostomy has never been studied, since percutaneous tracheostomy itself remains an enigma in accessing emergency airway. There is no report of use of ultrasound guided percutaneous tracheostomy in emergency setting so far in the literature. We report our early experience with USPCT in emergency setting. Sixteen adult patients who required access to an emergency surgical airway after failure to accomplish emergency oro-tracheal intubation were the study population. Their airway was accessed by USPCT. Recorded data included clinical and demographic data including time taken to perform the procedure and complications. Short term and long term follow ups for a period of 2 years were done for the survivors. Twelve male and four female patients underwent the procedure and the average time of the procedure was 3.6 min with no failures nor conversions to surgical tracheostomy and no complications. The average oxygen saturation was 86% and average Glasgow coma scale was 8.4. This time period included the oxygen insufflation time. 10 patients were decannulated while six patients died due to the pathology of the disease itself. There were no complications in either short term or long term follow up. USPCT has a definitive role in emergency both in trauma and non-trauma setting. It is safe, feasible and faster in experienced hands. Use of USPCT in emergency setting has further narrowed the list of contraindications of percutaneous tracheostomy.

  12. Ultrasound-guided, minimally invasive, percutaneous needle puncture treatment for tennis elbow.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiaan; Hu, Bing; Xing, Chunyan; Li, Jia

    2008-10-01

    This report evaluates the efficacy of percutaneous needle puncture under sonographic guidance in treating lateral epicondylitis (tennis-elbow). Ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle puncture was performed on 76 patients who presented with persistent elbow pain. Under a local anesthetic and sonographic guidance, a needle was advanced into the calcification foci and the calcifications were mechanically fragmented. This was followed by a local injection of 25 mg prednisone acetate and 1% lidocaine. If no calcification was found then multiple punctures were performed followed by local injection of 25 mg prednisone acetate and 1% lidocaine. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the degree of pain pre-and posttreatment at 1 week to 24 weeks. Elbow function improvement and degree of self-satisfaction were also evaluated. Of the 76 patients, 55% were rated with excellent treatment outcome, 32% good, 11% average, and 3% poor. From 3 weeks posttreatment, VAS scores were significantly reduced compared with the pretreatment score (P<0.05) and continued to gradually decline up to 24 weeks posttreatment. Sonography demonstrated that the calcified lesions disappeared completely in 13% of the patients, were reduced in 61% of the patients, and did not change in 26% of the patients. Color Doppler flow signal used to assess hemodynamic changes showed a significant improvement after treatment in most patients. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle puncture is an effective and minimally invasive treatment for tennis elbow. Sonography can be used to accurately identify the puncture location and monitor changes.

  13. Treatment efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency ablation for benign thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-long; Lu, Feng; Yue, Wen-wen; Sun, Li-ping; Bo, Xiao-wan; Guo, Le-hang; Xu, Jun-mei; Liu, Bo-ji; Li, Dan-dan; Qu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency ablation (BRFA) of benign thyroid nodules by comparison with a matched untreated control group. Methods: The therapeutic efficacy and safety in 35 patients who were subjected to a single session of ultrasound-guided percutaneous BRFA (Group A) for benign thyroid nodules were compared with those in 35 untreated patients (Group B) with benign nodules. The benign nature of all the nodules was confirmed by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB), and all the patients had normal thyroid functions. BRFA was performed with a bipolar electrode (CelonProSurge 150–T20) with an output power of 20 W. Nodule volume, thyroid function and clinical symptoms of all the patients were compared before treatment and during follow-up. Results: In Group A, the BRFA procedures were completed with a mean time of 10.02 ± 3.30 min (range, 5.47–16.03 min) and with a mean total energy deposition of 10.747 ± 3704 J (range, 5510–17.770 J). The procedures were tolerated well in all the patients without causing any major complications. At the 6-month follow-up, all of the nodule volume decreased significantly (from 8.81 ± 8.66 to 1.59 ± 1.55 ml, p < 0.001) in Group A, whereas the nodule volume increased from 6.90 ± 3.77 to 7.87 ± 3.95 ml in Group B (p < 0.001). All (100%) the 35 nodules in Group A had volume reduction ratios (VRRs) of >50%, among which 3 (8.57%) had VRRs >90%. In Group A, the clinical symptoms of the patients who had symptoms before BRFA disappeared, whereas in Group B, the patients had no resolution of clinical symptoms at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided percutaneous BRFA seems to be an effective and safe method for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. It may gain a wide use in clinical practice. Advances in knowledge: Based on the comparable efficacy and clinical

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Tenotomy of Biceps Tendon: Technical Feasibility on Cadavers.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Mauri, Giovanni; Messina, Carmelo; Aliprandi, Alberto; Secchi, Francesco; Sardanelli, Francesco; Randelli, Pietro Simone

    2016-10-01

    We tested the technical feasibility of ultrasound-guided percutaneous tenotomy of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) in cadavers. Both shoulders of two fresh cadavers were scanned anteriorly to evaluate the extra-articular portion of the LHBT. Under ultrasound monitoring, a scalpel was advanced obliquely up to touch the superficial medial side of the LHBT, cutting it until the tendon was not visible anymore. Ultrasound evaluation was repeated after the procedure, and anatomic dissection was performed. The procedure was 100% feasible: four cuts were made to completely sever the tendon; the duration was less than 1 min. Skin incision measured 5 mm in two cases and 6 mm in two cases. Anatomic dissection confirmed complete tendon cut in all cases with proximal and distal tendon stumps very close to each other. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous LHBT tenotomy was 100% technically feasible in cadavers with a quick procedure and minimal cutaneous incision. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Release: Study Upon Clinical Efficacy and Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Petrover, David, E-mail: dpetrover@yahoo.fr; Silvera, Jonathan, E-mail: silvera.jonathan@gmail.com; Baere, Thierry De, E-mail: Debaere@igr.fr

    ObjectivesTo evaluate the feasibility and 6 months clinical result of sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) and median nerve decompression after ultra-minimally invasive, ultrasound-guided percutaneous carpal tunnel release (PCTR) surgery.MethodsConsecutive patients with carpal tunnel syndrome were enrolled in this descriptive, open-label study. The procedure was performed in the interventional radiology room. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at baseline and 1 month. The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire was administered at baseline, 1, and 6 months.Results129 patients were enrolled. Significant decreases in mean symptom severity scores (3.3 ± 0.7 at baseline, 1.7 ± 0.4 at Month 1, 1.3 ± 0.3 at Month 6) and mean functional status scores (2.6 ± 1.1 atmore » baseline, 1.6 ± 0.4 at Month 1, 1.3 ± 0.5 at Month 6) were noted. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a complete section of all TCL and nerve decompression in 100% of patients. No complications were identified.ConclusionsUltrasound-guided PCTR was used successfully to section the TCL, decompress the median nerve, and reduce self-reported symptoms.« less

  16. Computer tomography urography assisted real-time ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy on renal calculus.

    PubMed

    Fang, You-Qiang; Wu, Jie-Ying; Li, Teng-Cheng; Zheng, Hao-Feng; Liang, Guan-Can; Chen, Yan-Xiong; Hong, Xiao-Bin; Cai, Wei-Zhong; Zang, Zhi-Jun; Di, Jin-Ming

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of pre-designed route on computer tomography urography (CTU) in the ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for renal calculus.From August 2013 to May 2016, a total of 100 patients diagnosed with complex renal calculus in our hospital were randomly divided into CTU group and control group (without CTU assistance). CTU was used to design a rational route for puncturing in CTU group. Ultrasound was used in both groups to establish a working trace in the operation areas. Patients' perioperative parameters and postoperative complications were recorded.All operations were successfully performed, without transferring to open surgery. Time of channel establishment in CTU group (6.5 ± 4.3 minutes) was shorter than the control group (10.0 ± 6.7 minutes) (P = .002). In addition, there was shorter operation time, lower rates of blood transfusion, secondary operation, and less establishing channels. The incidence of postoperative complications including residual stones, sepsis, severe hemorrhage, and perirenal hematoma was lower in CTU group than in control group.Pre-designing puncture route on CTU images would improve the puncturing accuracy, lessen establishing channels as well as improve the security in the ultrasound-guided PCNL for complex renal calculus, but at the cost of increased radiation exposure.

  17. 'X-ray'-free balloon dilation for totally ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tie; Chen, Guanghua; Gao, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Chuanliang; Li, Lei; Sun, Yinghao

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of balloon dilation for 'X-ray'-free ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). From January 2012 to December 2012, patients underwent 'X-ray'-free ultrasound-guided PCNL with Amplatz dilator (Group A). From January 2013 to April 2014, patients underwent 'X-ray'-free ultrasound-guided PCNL with balloon dilator (Group B). For balloon dilation, a 10 F fascial dilator was used to dilate the tract. Subsequently, the 6 F nephrostomy balloon (8 mm in diameter) was indwelled along the guidewire with a marked length equal to the dilation depth. Under the monitoring of ultrasound, the location of balloon was secured and disappearance of balloon waist was confirmed when the balloon was inflated at a pressure of 20 atm. A total of 163 patients were involved in this study. Of 81 procedures in Group A, 45 procedures were performed by a senior urologist while 36 procedures by a resident. Of 82 patients in Group B, 47 procedures were performed by the same senior urologist while 35 procedures by another resident. For the senior urologist, there was no statistically significant difference between two groups in calyx of entry, stone-free rate, decline of hemoglobin and hematocrit, operation time and hospitalization. But for the residents, there was less decline of hemoglobin and hematocrit, tract development time and hospitalization in Group B compared to Group A (0.6 vs. 1.7 g/dl, p = 0.001; 2.3% vs. 5.5%, p = 0.003; 10.1 vs. 11.0 min, p = 0.027; 7.8 vs. 13.9 days, p < 0.001). Balloon dilation method introduced in this study is compensable for tract development when 'X-ray'-free ultrasound-guided PCNL is performed. Modified techniques make totally ultrasound guidance for PCNL feasible, easy and safe. In addition, such a procedure is preferable for initial operators because of less hemorrhage complication.

  18. Accuracy and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle core biopsy of renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianding; Lv, Yuanhang; Xu, Zilin; Aniu, Muguo; Qiu, Yang; Wei, Bing; Li, Xiaohong; Wei, Qiang; Dong, Qiang; Lin, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Our aim is to determine the sufficiency, accuracy, and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle core biopsy of renal masses in Chinese patients. Patients who had undergone ultrasound-guided needle core renal mass biopsy from June 2012 to June 2016 at West China Hospital, China were retrospectively reviewed. The information obtained included demographics, mass-related parameters, biopsy indications, technique, complications, pathologic results, and follow-up. Concordance of surgical resection pathology and follow-up data were assessed. Renal mass biopsies were performed in 106 patients. Thirty-nine (36.8%) were asymptomatic. The male/female ratio was 60/46, with a median age of 49.5 years. Median mass size was 8.1 cm (range 1.8–20). Biopsy was performed through a 16-gauge needle, with median cores of 2 taken (range 1–5). Only one significant biopsy-related complication (hemorrhage requiring transfusion) was encountered. An adequate tissue sample was obtained in 97.2% (103/106) of biopsies. Eighty-seven biopsies (82.1%) showed malignant neoplasms, 16 (15.1%) yielded benignity, and 3 (2.8%) were nondiagnostic. After biopsy, 46 patients (43.4%) underwent surgery. Compared with the subsequent mass resection pathology, the biopsy diagnoses were identical in 43 cases. The accuracy rate of biopsy distinguishing malignant from benign lesions was 99.1%, and the rate for determining tumor histological type (excluding the nondiagnostic biopsies) was 95.1%. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting malignancy were 98.9% and 100%, respectively. In several situations, there is still a role for biopsy before intervention. Percutaneous needle core biopsy under ultrasonography guidance is highly accurate and safe, and can determine the proper management of undefinable masses. PMID:29595650

  19. Ultrasound guided percutaneous cholecystostomy in high-risk patients for surgical intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bakkaloglu, Huseyin; Yanar, Hakan; Guloglu, Recep; Taviloglu, Korhan; Tunca, Fatih; Aksoy, Murat; Ertekin, Cemalettin; Poyanli, Arzu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of ultrasound guided percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC) in the treatment of acute cholecystitis in a well-defined high risk patients under general anesthesia. METHODS: The data of 27 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous transhepatic cholecystostomy for the management of acute cholecystitis from January 1999 to June 2003 was retrospectively evaluated. All of the patients had both clinical and sonographic signs of acute cholecystitis and had comorbid diseases. RESULTS: Ultrasound revealed gallbladder stones in 25 patients and acalculous cholecystitis in two patients. Cholecystostomy catheters were removed 14-32 d (mean 23 d) after the procedure in cases where complete regression of all symptoms was achieved. There were statistically significant reductions in leukocytosis, (13.7 × 103 ± 1.3 × 103 μg/L vs 13 × 103 ± 1 × 103 μg/L, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 13.7 × 103 ± 1.3 × 103 μg/L vs 8.3 × 103 ± 1.2 × 103 μg/L, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC), C -reactive protein (51.2 ± 18.5 mg/L vs 27.3 ± 10.4 mg/L, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 51.2 ± 18.5 mg/L vs 5.4 ± 1.5 mg/L, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC), and fever (38 ± 0.35°C vs 37.3 ± 0.32°C, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 38 ± 0.35°C vs 36.9 ± 0.15°C, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC). Sphincterotomy and stone extraction was performed successfully with endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) in three patients. After cholecystostomy, 5 (18%) patients underwent delayed cholecystectomy without any complications. Three out of 22 patients were admitted with recurrent acute cholecystitis during the follow-up and recovered with medical treatment. Catheter dislodgement occurred in three patients spontaneously, and two of them were managed by reinsertion of the catheter. CONCLUSION: As an alternative to surgery, percutan-eous cholecystostomy seems to be a safe method in critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis and can be performed with low

  20. First Experience of Ultrasound-guided Percutaneous Ablation for Recurrent Hepatoblastoma after Liver Resection in Children

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoxian; Zhou, Luyao; Huang, Guangliang; Zhong, Zhihai; Jiang, Chunlin; Shan, Quanyuan; Xu, Ming; Kuang, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to summarize the first experience with ultrasound-guided percutaneous ablation treatment (PAT) for recurrent hepatoblastoma (HB) after liver resection in children. From August 2013 to October 2014, PAT was used to treat 5 children with a total of 8 recurrent HB (mean size, 1.4 ± 0.8 cm; size range, 0.7–3.1 cm), including 4 patients with 7 tumors in the liver and 1 patient with 1 tumor in the lung. Technical success was achieved in all patients (5/5, 100%). The complete ablation rate after the first ablation session was 80% (4/5) on a patient-by-patient basis and 87.5% (7/8) on a tumor-by-tumor basis. Only 1 patient developed a fever with temperature >39 °C; it lasted 4 days after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and was resolved by conservative therapy. During the follow-up period, new intrahepatic recurrences after PAT were detected in two patients. One died due to tumor progression 4 months after ablation. The median overall survival time after PAT was 13.8 months. PAT is a safe and promising therapy for children with recurrent HB after liver resection, and further investigation in large-scale randomized clinical trials is required to determine its role in the treatment of this disease. PMID:26578035

  1. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration versus Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration in Diagnosis of Focal Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Naga, Mazen Ibrahim; Esmat, Serag; Naguib, Mohamed; Hassanein, Mohamed; Hassani, Mohamed; El-Kassas, Mohamed; Mahdy, Reem Ezzat; El-Gemeie, Emad; Farag, Ali Hassan; Foda, Ayman Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the leading cancer morbidity and mortality world-wide. Controversy has arisen about whether the percutaneous approach with computed tomography/ultrasonography-guidance fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) or endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred method to obtain diagnostic tissue. Our purpose of this study is to compare between the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA and percutaneous US-FNA in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 197 patients with pancreatic masses were included in the study, 125 patients underwent US-FNA (Group 1) and 72 patients underwent EUS-FNA (Group 2). Results: EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy (88.9%) as US-FNA (87.2%) in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for EUS-FNA was 84%, 100%, 100%, 73.3% respectively. It was 85.5%, 90.4%, 94.7%, 76% respectively for US-FNA. EUS-FNA had a lower complication rate (1.38%) than US-FNA (5.6%). Conclusion: EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy as US-FNA of pancreatic masses with a lower complication rate. PMID:24949394

  2. [Percutaneous ultrasound-guided drainage in the surgical treatment of acute severe pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Delattre, J-F; Levy Chazal, N; Lubrano, D; Flament, J-B

    2004-11-01

    To report results of percutaneous ultrasound-guided drainage, performed by a surgeon, in the treatment of complications of acute pancreatitis (AP), and to determine the role of this technique in the therapeutic armamentarium of severe AP. From 1986 to 2001, 59 patients were included in this retrospective study. All patients initially had severe necrotizing AP (mean Ranson score = 4.1 ; range : 2-7). Anatomical lesions included pancreatic abscess in 6 patients and necrosis in 53 (17 stage D and 36 stage E according to Balthazar's classification). Necrosis was infected in 42 and sterile in 11 respectively. Drainage was performed under ultrasound guidance and local anaesthesia using small-diameter drains (7-14 French). Drainage was performed on average 23 days after onset of AP. Infection was proven by fine-needle aspiration in 47 (80 %) patients (41 infected necrosis and 6 localized abscess). In one patient, culture of aspirated fluid was negative but necrosis was infected (one false negative). Culture of aspirated fluid was negative and necrosis was sterile in 11 patients. Nineteen (32%) patients healed without subsequent surgery: 7 (16%) in the infected necrosis group, 6(55%) in the sterile necrosis group, and 6 (100%) in the abscess group. Forty (68%) patients had subsequent necrosectomy including 8 (14%) who died. Twenty (34 %) digestive fistulas healed spontaneously, except one treated by diversion stomia. Of the 16 (27 %) pancreatic fistulas, 6 needed subsequent interventional treatment. In selected patients, percutaneous drainage can represent an alternative to surgery with a 14% mortality rate. The high rate of subsequent necrosectomy suggests that drains with larger diameter, possibly associated with continuous irrigation, should be used.

  3. Ultrasound guided percutaneous cholecystostomy in high-risk patients for surgical intervention.

    PubMed

    Bakkaloglu, Huseyin; Yanar, Hakan; Guloglu, Recep; Taviloglu, Korhan; Tunca, Fatih; Aksoy, Murat; Ertekin, Cemalettin; Poyanli, Arzu

    2006-11-28

    To assess the efficacy and safety of ultrasound guided percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC) in the treatment of acute cholecystitis in a well-defined high risk patients under general anesthesia. The data of 27 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous transhepatic cholecystostomy for the management of acute cholecystitis from January 1999 to June 2003 was retrospectively evaluated. All of the patients had both clinical and sonographic signs of acute cholecystitis and had comorbid diseases. Ultrasound revealed gallbladder stones in 25 patients and acalculous cholecystitis in two patients. Cholecystostomy catheters were removed 14-32 d (mean 23 d) after the procedure in cases where complete regression of all symptoms was achieved. There were statistically significant reductions in leukocytosis, (13.7 x 10(3)+/-1.3 x 10(3) microg/L vs 13 x 10(3)+/-1 x 10(3) microg/L, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 13.7 x 10(3)+/-1.3 x 10(3) microg/L vs 8.3 x 10(3)+/-1.2 x 10(3) microg/L, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC), C -reactive protein (51.2+/-18.5 mg/L vs 27.3+/-10.4 mg/L, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 51.2+/-18.5 mg/L vs 5.4+/-1.5 mg/L, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC), and fever (38+/-0.35 centigrade vs 37.3+/-0.32 centigrade, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 38+/-0.35 centigrade vs 36.9+/-0.15 centigrade, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC). Sphincterotomy and stone extraction was performed successfully with endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) in three patients. After cholecystostomy, 5 (18%) patients underwent delayed cholecystectomy without any complications. Three out of 22 patients were admitted with recurrent acute cholecystitis during the follow-up and recovered with medical treatment. Catheter dislodgement occurred in three patients spontaneously, and two of them were managed by reinsertion of the catheter. As an alternative to surgery, percutaneous cholecystostomy seems to be a safe method in critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis and can be performed with

  4. Ultrasonographic percutaneous anatomy of the atlanto-occipital region and indirect ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture in the dog and the cat.

    PubMed

    Etienne, A-L; Audigié, F; Peeters, D; Gabriel, A; Busoni, V

    2015-04-01

    Cisternal puncture in dogs and cats is commonly carried out. This article describes the percutaneous ultrasound anatomy of the cisternal region in the dog and the cat and an indirect technique for ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture. Ultrasound images obtained ex vivo and in vivo were compared with anatomic sections and used to identify the landmarks for ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture. The ultrasound-guided procedure was established in cadavers and then applied in vivo in seven dogs and two cats. The anatomic landmarks for the ultrasound-guided puncture are the cisterna magna, the spinal cord, the two occipital condyles on transverse images, the external occipital crest and the dorsal arch of the first cervical vertebra on longitudinal images. Using these ultrasound anatomic landmarks, an indirect ultrasound-guided technique for cisternal puncture is applicable in the dog and the cat. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Acute Calcific Bursitis After Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Barbotage of Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bo-Sung; Lee, Seung Hak; Cho, Yung; Chung, Sun Gun

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous barbotage is an effective treatment for rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, providing rapid and substantial pain relief. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with aggravated pain early after ultrasound-guided barbotage of a large calcific deposit in the supraspinatus tendon. Subsequent examination revealed a thick calcification spreading along the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa space, suggesting acute calcific bursitis complicated by barbotage. Additional barbotage alleviated her pain completely. Therefore, a high index of suspicion for acute calcific bursitis is required in patients with unresolved or aggravated pain after barbotage. Repeated barbotage could be effective for this condition. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Usefulness of rehabilitation in patients with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment.

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Schiavone, Cosima; Salini, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a specific rehabilitation program for patients in whom ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment (UGPT) was performed for rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy (RCCT). In this prospective observational study, 86 patients (22 males and 64 females) with shoulder calcific tendinopathy treated with UGPT were enrolled. At the end of the procedure, a corticosteroid injection into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa was performed. The patients were then asked to follow a specific rehabilitation protocol (2 times/week for 5 weeks) that focused on mobility, strength and function. At baseline and after 6 weeks, clinical parameters, visual analog scale (VAS) and Constant-Murley scale (CMS) scores and ultrasound (US) features were collected. The mean age of the patients was 48.9 ± 8.4 years and their mean BMI was 22.7 ± 2.1. Considering the whole cohort, the treatment was effective, with a significant decrease in the VAS score and an improvement in the CMS score. Thereafter, on the basis of the compliance to the rehabilitation program (by self-report), 53 and 33 patients were included in the rehabilitation group (Rehab group; performed exercises ≥2 times/week) and the No Rehab group (performed exercises <2 times/week), respectively. The comparison between the groups showed that the subjects who performed the exercises regularly had better results in terms of pain and functional recovery, and less associated diseases (e.g. adhesive bursitis and tenosynovitis of the long head of the biceps) than those who were less compliant with the program. UGPT, followed by a specific postprocedure rehabilitation program, was an effective treatment for RCCT. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided vs. intraoperative rectus sheath block for pediatric umbilical hernia repair: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Litz, Cristen N; Farach, Sandra M; Fernandez, Allison M; Elliott, Richard; Dolan, Jenny; Patel, Nikhil; Zamora, Lillian; Colombani, Paul M; Walford, Nebbie E; Amankwah, Ernest K; Snyder, Christopher W; Danielson, Paul D; Chandler, Nicole M

    2017-06-01

    Regional anesthesia is commonly used in children. Our hypothesis was that percutaneous ultrasound-guided (PERC) rectus sheath blocks would result in lower postoperative pain scores compared to intraoperative (IO) rectus sheath blocks following umbilical hernia repair. A single-institution randomized blinded trial was conducted in pediatric patients undergoing elective umbilical hernia repair. The primary outcome was mean postoperative Wong-Baker pain score. Secondary outcomes included narcotic requirements and length of postoperative stay. Fifty-eight patients were included: 28 PERC and 30 IO. Operating room time was significantly longer in the PERC group (41 vs. 35min, p<0.01). Mean postoperative pain scores (PERC-2.6 vs. IO-3.3, p=0.11), morphine equivalents intraoperatively (PERC-0 vs. IO-0.04mg/kg, p=0.29) and postoperatively (PERC-0.04 vs. IO-0.09mg/kg, p=0.17), time to first postoperative narcotic dose (PERC-30 vs. IO-22min, p=0.33, log-rank test), and postoperative length of stay (PERC-76 vs. IO-80min, p=0.44) were similar. Following umbilical hernia repair in children, percutaneous ultrasound-guided and intraoperative rectus sheath blocks resulted in similar mean postoperative pain scores. There were no differences in secondary outcomes such as time to first narcotic, narcotic requirements, and length of stay. The additional resources required to complete a percutaneous ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block may not be warranted. Randomized controlled trial. Level I. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Breast cancer: determining the genetic profile from ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy specimens obtained during the diagnostic workups.

    PubMed

    López Ruiz, J A; Zabalza Estévez, I; Mieza Arana, J A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the possibility of determining the genetic profile of primary malignant tumors of the breast from specimens obtained by ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsies during the diagnostic imaging workup. This is a retrospective study in 13 consecutive patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer by B-mode ultrasound-guided 12 G core needle biopsy. After clinical indication, the pathologist decided whether the paraffin block specimens seemed suitable (on the basis of tumor size, validity of the sample, and percentage of tumor cells) before sending them for genetic analysis with the MammaPrint® platform. The size of the tumors on ultrasound ranged from 0.6cm to 5cm. In 11 patients the preserved specimen was considered valid and suitable for use in determining the genetic profile. In 1 patient (with a 1cm tumor) the pathologist decided that it was necessary to repeat the core biopsy to obtain additional samples. In 1 patient (with a 5cm tumor) the specimen was not considered valid by the genetic laboratory. The percentage of tumor cells in the samples ranged from 60% to 70%. In 11/13 cases (84.62%) it was possible to do the genetic analysis on the previously diagnosed samples. In most cases, regardless of tumor size, it is possible to obtain the genetic profile from tissue specimens obtained with ultrasound-guided 12 G core biopsy preserved in paraffin blocks. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle treatment of calcific tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, K Nithin; McDowall, Adam; Simunovic, Nicole; Bhandari, Mohit; Choudur, Hema N

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the efficacy of ultrasound-guided needle lavage in treating calcific tendinitis. Two independent assessors searched medical databases and screened studies for eligibility. Eleven articles were included. Heterogeneity among included studies precluded meta-analysis. Results of randomized controlled trials suggested no difference in pain relief between needle lavage and other interventions, but the studies were of low quality. Additional high-quality evidence is required to determine the relative efficacy of ultrasound-guided needle lavage in the management of calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

  10. Ultrasound-guided Interdigital Neuroma Injections: Short-term Clinical Outcomes after a Single Percutaneous Injection—Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Ronald S.; Ciavarra, Gina A.; Pavlov, Helene

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To describe the procedure of ultrasound-guided Morton’s neuroma and recurrent stump neuroma injections and early clinical outcomes after a single injection. Materials and Methods Retrospective review of 44 percutaneous ultrasound-guided neuroma injections in 24 patients who had completed clinical outcomes questionnaires. A 10-point pain scale [scale of 1 (no pain) to 10 (severe pain)] in a 7-day pain log format was distributed to patients at the time percutaneous neuroma injection was performed. Results Neuromas were clearly visualized with sonography as hypoechoic nodules and were distinguishable from other causes of forefoot pain, such as metatarsophalangeal joint synovitis and intermetatarsal bursae. The sizes of the neuromas injected ranged between 4 and 19 mm. Postinjection, all neuromas displayed increased echogenicity and/or the appearance of fluid surrounding it, confirming localization of the therapeutic mixture. We arbitrarily subdivided the pain ratings into symptomatic (greater than 4) and asymptomatic (less than or equal to 4) for statistical analysis. Average pain level pre injection was 5.2 and average pain level was 3.7 at 7 days post single injection, with 62% of the initially symptomatic patients asymptomatic on day 7 (p < 0.000001). Overall, 76% of the total number of neuromas injected once were asymptomatic on day 7. Conclusion Ultrasound can be used to accurately target Morton’s neuromas and, therefore, appropriately direct therapeutic interventions, with good short-term clinical results. PMID:18751769

  11. Doppler ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy with two-step tract dilation for management of complex renal stones.

    PubMed

    Xu, Youming; Wu, Zhonghua; Yu, Jianhua; Wang, Shulong; Li, Fang; Chen, Jiushun; Liu, Jin; Chen, Kan

    2012-06-01

    To report our experience and assess the safety and efficacy of Doppler ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) with 2-step tract dilation for complex renal stones. From March 2009 to February 2011, 262 patients underwent PCNL. Eighty-three patients had a complete and 105 had partial staghorn calculus, and 74 had a renal pelvic stone of >2 cm in diameter. Thirty-five patients had renal surgical history. Doppler ultrasound-guided PCNL with 2-step tract dilation were performed. Stones were fragmented and cleared using a combination of ultrasonic and pneumatic lithotripters. All PCNL procedures were successful. Successful access to the collecting system was 100%. Although most of the cases (231/262) were managed satisfactorily by a single tract, a second tract was used in 31 cases. Mean operation time was 56 minutes (range 25-145). The primary stone-free rate of PCNL was 80.9%. There were 39 auxiliary procedures (13 second PCNL and 26 extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy). One month after treatment, the overall stone-free rate was 92.7%. Five patients (1.9%) received blood transfusion. Eight patients (3.1%) with a postoperative fever of ≥38.5°C were cured by intravenous antibiotics. No other severe complications occurred. The mean postoperative stay was 3.8 days (range 2-12). Doppler ultrasound-guided PCNL with 2-step tract dilation for complex renal stones is safe, effective, and worthy of wider use in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of methylene blue to identify nerve pathology and guide surgery.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Joseph A; Breshears, Jonathan D; Arnaout, Omar; Simon, Neil G; Hastings-Robinson, Ashley M; Aleshi, Pedram; Kliot, Michel

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to provide a technique that could be used in the preoperative period to facilitate the surgical exploration of peripheral nerve pathology. METHODS The authors describe a technique in which 1) ultrasonography is used in the immediate preoperative period to identify target peripheral nerves, 2) an ultrasound-guided needle electrode is used to stimulate peripheral nerves to confirm their position, and then 3) a methylene blue (MB) injection is performed to mark the peripheral nerve pathology to facilitate surgical exploration. RESULTS A cohort of 13 patients with varying indications for peripheral nerve surgery is presented in which ultrasound guidance, stimulation, and MB were used to localize and create a road map for surgeries. CONCLUSIONS Preoperative ultrasound-guided MB administration is a promising technique that peripheral nerve surgeons could use to plan and execute surgery.

  13. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous fine-needle aspiration of 545 focal pancreatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Giulia A; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Idili, Antonio; Malagò, Roberto; Iozzia, Roberta; Manfrin, Erminia; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy and short-term complication rate of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytologic sampling of focal pancreatic lesions. We reviewed 545 consecutive ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytologic sampling procedures for focal pancreatic lesions from January 2004 through June 2008. The procedures were performed with a 20- or 21-gauge needle. The onsite cytopathologist evaluated the appropriateness of the sample and made a diagnosis. We reviewed the final diagnosis and the radiologic and medical records of all patients for onset of complications during or within 7 days of the procedure. The study sample included 262 women and 283 men (mean age, 62 years; range, 25-86 years). The head or uncinate process of the pancreas was the location of 63.0% of the lesions, and 35.2% of the lesions were located in the body or tail of the pancreas. The site of 10 lesions (1.8%) was not specified. Sampling was diagnostic in 509 of the 545 cases (93.4%). Excluding the 36 nondiagnostic samples, ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytologic sampling had 99.4% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 99.4% accuracy. In 537 of the 545 cases (98.5%), the procedure was uneventful. In two cases, abdominal fluid was found after the procedure that was not present before the procedure. Six patients experienced postprocedural pain without abnormal findings at subsequent imaging. No major complications occurred. Ultrasound-guided cytologic sampling is safe and accurate for the diagnosis and planning of management of focal pancreatic lesions. With a cytologist on site, the rate of acquisition of samples adequate for diagnosis is high, reducing the need for patient recall.

  14. Value of Artisanal Simulators to Teach Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Biopsy Using a Tru-Cut Needle for Veterinary and Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Araújo Setin, Raíza; Fortes Cirimbelli, Carolina; Mazeto Ercolin, Anna Carolina; Pires, Sâmara Turbay; Disselli, Tamiris; Ferrarini Nunes Soares Hage, Maria Cristina

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the applicability of artisanal simulators to teach veterinary and medical students the ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy using a tru-cut needle. The artisanal simulators consisted of bovine liver between two layers of commercially available grape gelatin. Students were paired, with one doing the biopsy and…

  15. Ultrasound-guided placement of a permanent percutaneous femoral nerve stimulator leads for the treatment of intractable femoral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Narouze, Samer N; Zakari, Adel; Vydyanathan, Amaresh

    2009-01-01

    Femoral nerve injury is a rare complication of cardiac catheterization and is usually caused by direct trauma during femoral artery access, compression from a hematoma, or prolonged digital pressure for post-procedural hemostasis. Peripheral nerve stimulation has been used to treat different pain syndromes in the upper and lower extremities with variable success and it typically requires direct vision with open surgical approach. Since the femoral nerve can be readily seen with ultrasonography, an ultrasound-guided lead placement seemed practical. A 61-year-old morbidly obese male who sustained femoral nerve injury during cardiac catheterization continued to complain of intractable femoral neuropathy 18 months afterwords. He failed multiple treatment modalities and continued to complain of severe neuropathic pains that markedly interfere with his daily activities. Two percutaneous leads were placed under real-time ultrasonography and the placement was confirmed with fluoroscopy. One lead was placed along the longitudinal axis of the nerve and the patient had good coverage over the anterior thigh but not below the knee. So another lead was placed horizontally across the femoral nerve in order to stimulate all the branches and the patient reported good coverage along the saphenous nerve distribution down to the foot. The patient continues to be pain free 20 months after the implant. Here we described a novel non-invasive percutaneous approach for femoral nerve stimulation with ultrasound guidance which allowed precise placement of the stimulating lead very close to the femoral nerve without the need for surgical exploration.

  16. Comparison of the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block and local anesthetic infiltration for laparoscopic percutaneous extraperitoneal closure in children.

    PubMed

    Uchinami, Yuka; Sakuraya, Fumika; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Hoshino, Koji; Mikami, Eri; Ishikawa, Taro; Fujii, Hitomi; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Morimoto, Yuji

    2017-05-01

    Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block and local anesthetic infiltration are the standard options to improve postoperative pain for children undergoing surgery with a midline incision. However, there is no study comparing the effect of ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block with local anesthetic infiltration for children undergoing laparoscopic surgery. The aim of this trial was to compare the onset of ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block with that of local anesthetic infiltration for laparoscopic percutaneous extraperitoneal closure in children. We performed an observer-blinded, randomized, prospective trial. Enrolled patients were assigned to either an ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block group or a local anesthetic infiltration group. The ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block group (n = 17) received ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block with 0.2 ml·kg -1 of 0.375% ropivacaine per side in the posterior rectus sheath compartment. The local anesthetic infiltration group (n = 17) received local anesthetic infiltration with 0.2 ml·kg -1 of 0.75% ropivacaine. The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability (FLACC) pain scores were recorded at 0, 30, 60 min after arrival at the postanesthesia care unit. Of the 37 patients enrolled in this study, 34 completed the study protocol. A significant difference in the pain scale between the ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block group and local anesthetic infiltration group was found at 0 min (median: 0, interquartile range [IQR]: 0-1.5, vs median: 1, IQR 0-5, confidence interval of median [95% CI]: 0-3, P = 0.048), but no significant difference was found at 30 min (median: 1, IQR: 0-4 vs median: 6, IQR: 0-7, 95% CI: 0-5, P = 0.061), or 60 min (median: 0, IQR: 0-2 vs median: 1, IQR: 0-3, 95% CI: -1 to 1, P = 0.310). No significant difference was found in anesthesia time between the ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block and local anesthetic infiltration groups. No procedure-related complications were observed in either group

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Buría, José L.; Truyols-Domínguez, Sebastián; Valero-Alcaide, Raquel; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Atín-Arratibel, María A.; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US-) guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n = 17) group or exercise (n = 19) group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous electrolysis group also received the application of galvanic current through acupuncture needle on each session once a week (total 4 sessions). Shoulder pain (NPRS) and disability (DASH) were assessed at baseline, after 2 sessions, and 1 week after the last session. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant Group∗Time interactions for shoulder pain and disability (all, P < 0.01): individuals receiving US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with the eccentric exercises experienced greater improvement than those receiving eccentric exercise alone. Conclusions. US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with eccentric exercises resulted in small better outcomes at short term compared to when only eccentric exercises were applied in subacromial pain syndrome. The effect was statistically and clinically significant for shoulder pain but below minimal clinical difference for function. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects and potential placebo effect of this intervention. PMID:26649058

  18. Treatment of proximal hamstring tendinopathy-related sciatic nerve entrapment: presentation of an ultrasound-guided "Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis" application.

    PubMed

    Mattiussi, Gabriele; Moreno, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy-related Sciatic Nerve Entrapment (PHTrSNE) is a neuropathy caused by fibrosis interposed between the semimembranosus tendon and the sciatic nerve, at the level of the ischial tuberosity. Ultrasound-guided Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (US-guided EPI) involves galvanic current transfer within the treatment target tissue (fibrosis) via a needle 0.30 to 0.33 mm in diameter. The galvanic current in a saline solution instantly develops the chemical process of electrolysis, which in turn induces electrochemical ablation of fibrosis. In this article, the interventional procedure is presented in detail, and both the strengths and limits of the technique are discussed. US-guided EPI eliminates the fibrotic accumulation that causes PHTrSNE, without the semimembranosus tendon or the sciatic nerve being directly involved during the procedure. The technique is however of limited use in cases of compression neuropathy. US-guided EPI is a technique that is quick to perform, minimally invasive and does not force the patient to suspend their activities (work or sports) to make the treatment effective. This, coupled to the fact that the technique is generally well-tolerated by patients, supports use of US-guided EPI in the treatment of PHTrSNE.

  19. Extracorporeal shockwaves versus ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage for the treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo-González, Federico; Ramos-Alvarez, Juan J; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo; González-Pérez, José; Jiménez-Herranz, Elena; Varela, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave treatment (ESWT) and ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage (UGPL) are two effective ways of treating rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy (RCCT). The aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of these techniques in the treatment of RCCT. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Patients treated in our sports medicine and rehabilitation center (Centro Médico Deyre, Madrid. Spain) between January 2007 and December 2013. This randomized study compares the results achieved with these techniques over one year following their use to treat the above condition. Eighty patients received ESWT and 121 received UGPL. A visual analogue scale was used to measure pain, and ultrasound to determine the extent of calcification, at 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Pain and the amount of calcification were significantly reduced by both techniques at 3, 6 and 12 months (P<0.001 for each), but significantly more so by UGPL (P<0.001). Both techniques are valid for the treatment of RCCT, although UGPL is associated with a greater reduction of calcification and greater reduction in pain. The results obtained applying UGPL, the low cost and the lack of complications should therefore make the treatment of choice in centers that are appropriately equipped and staffed.

  20. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous bone drilling for the treatment of lateral epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang Ho; Cha, Jang Gyu; Lee, Bo Ra

    2018-01-01

    To determine the clinical efficacy of sonographically-guided percutaneous bone drilling of the lateral epicondyle (LE) for the treatment of patients with LE. We included 24 patients with LE who reported pain in this study. All patients underwent sonographically-guided percutaneous bone drilling of the lateral epicondyle. Follow-up sonography and physical examinations were performed 1, 3 and 6 months after the procedure. The outcome measures included sonographic findings, visual analogue scale (VAS) score, maximum voluntary grip strength (MVGS) and patient-related tennis elbow evaluation (PRTEE) score. None of the patients had immediate complications during the procedure. The area of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) tears decreased significantly at 1 month and declined gradually over the remaining 5 months of the study (p < 0.001). The mean pain VAS score was significantly lower at 6 months than preoperatively (respectively; p < 0.001). The mean MVGS increased significantly between pretreatment and 6 months post-treatment (p < 0.001), whereas the PRTEE score decreased significantly during the same period (p < 0.001). Sonographically-guided percutaneous drilling is a quick and safe treatment option for LE that can be performed in an outpatient setting. • Percutaneous drilling of the lateral condyle is effective for the treatment of LE. • The area of ECRB tears can be measured by US-guided saline injection. • US-guided percutaneous drilling is a quick and safe treatment option for LE.

  1. Emergency ultrasound-guided percutaneous embolization of post-traumatic bleeding hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Sameer; Ahuja, Chirag Kamal; Yadav, Thakur Deen; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2012-09-01

    Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm (HAP) is an uncommon but serious complication of blunt trauma abdomen which can be managed by non-surgical interventional methods. We describe the case of a young boy with blunt trauma abdomen having a large hepatic laceration associated with two pseudoaneurysms of the hepatic artery branches. Both these HAPs were successfully managed by percutaneous injection of cyanoacrylate glue under sonographic guidance. A major surgery was thus averted. A brief review of the etiology, diagnosis and management of HAP including the present case is discussed.

  2. Autonomic Responses to Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Needle Electrolysis: Effect of Needle Puncture or Electrical Current?

    PubMed

    García Bermejo, Paula; De La Cruz Torres, Blanca; Naranjo Orellana, José; Albornoz Cabello, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish if the changes in sympathetic and parasympathetic activity (analyzed through heart-rate variability [HRV]) during ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis (PNE) is due to the effect of needle puncture only or of the PNE technique per se where the puncture and galvanic current are combined. This was an experimental, case-control study that took place at the University of Seville. Subjects were 36 male footballers who were randomly allocated to three groups: a control group (CG; 12 players), for whom HRV was recorded for 10 min, both at rest and during an exhaustive US examination of the patellar tendon and adjacent structures; a first experimental group (PNE group; 12 players), for whom HRV was recorded for 10 min, both at rest and during application of US-guided PNE in the patellar tendon; and a second experimental group (needle group; 12 players), for whom HRV was recorded for 10 min, both at rest and during application of US-guided PNE without electrical current in the patellar tendon. The outcome measures were the diameters of the Poincaré plot (SD1, SD2), stress score, and sympathetic/parasympathetic ratio. There were no differences between groups in any baseline measurements, nor were there any significant differences between CG measurements (baseline vs. intervention). The PNE group exhibited statistically significant increases in SD1 (p = 0.01) and SD2 (p = 0.004) and statistically significant decreases in SS and S/PS ratio (p = 0.03), indicating increased parasympathetic and decreased sympathetic activity, respectively. The needle group exhibited statistically significant increases in SD2 (p = 0.02) and statistically significant decreases in SS (p = 0.02), indicating decreased sympathetic activity. The application of the US-guided PNE technique caused a measurable increase in parasympathetic activity (detected by HRV), which was due to the combination of needle puncture and

  3. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided TOPAZ Radiofrequency Coblation: A Novel Coaxial Technique for the Treatment of Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis-Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit; Best, Alistair J; Rennie, Winston J

    2016-06-01

    Various therapeutic options are available for treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Studies using TOPAZ coblation (ArthroCare, Sunnyvale, CA) have had good early results. The current coblation technique involves a surgical incision or breach of the highly specialized plantar fat pad, which can be associated with risks. We describe a novel technique of ultrasound-guided percutaneous coblation with a lateral heel approach. Advantages include precise targeting of the plantar fascia by direct dynamic visualization of the coblation tip, a true percutaneous approach with a needle skin puncture (<5 mm), and preservation of the plantar fat pad by using a lateral heel approach. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  4. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage of calcific bursitis of the medial collateral ligament of the knee: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo-González, Federico; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; González-Pérez, José; Jiménez-Herranz, Elena; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    Calcification of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the knee is rare. The literature reports no positive outcomes when conservative treatment has been followed. This paper reports a case of such calcification and its treatment using ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage (UGPL). A 66-year-old patient presented with medial knee pain. X-ray, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance (MR) examinations revealed calcific bursitis of the MCL, which was treated by UGPL. One month after treatment the patient was asymptomatic. X-ray, ultrasound, and MR examinations confirmed the almost complete disappearance of the calcification; only very tiny fragments remained. Calcific bursitis of the MCL of the knee is very uncommon, but should be taken into account in differential diagnoses for medial knee pain. UGPL is proposed as a treatment for this condition.

  5. Yield and complications in percutaneous renal biopsy. A comparison between ultrasound-guided gun-biopsy and manual techniques in native and transplant kidneys.

    PubMed

    Nyman, R S; Cappelen-Smith, J; al Suhaibani, H; Alfurayh, O; Shakweer, W; Akhtar, M

    1997-05-01

    To compare the yield and complications of ultrasound-guided gun-biopsy and manual Tru-Cut techniques in percutaneous renal biopsy. A total of 448 biopsies were reviewed. They comprised 124 manual and 131 gun-biopsies in native kidneys, and 111 manual and 82 gun-biopsies in transplant kidneys. The gun-biopsies were performed under real-time ultrasound (US) guidance. The manual technique used US mainly for marking the position of the kidney. There was a significantly higher diagnostic yield and fewer complications in the gun-biopsy group. A total of 8 major complications were found, all in the manual group. Provided that the operator is experienced in US scanning, a switch from the manual technique to real-time US-guided gun-biopsy will result in the improvement of diagnostic accuracy together with a reduced risk of complications.

  6. Therapeutic results after ultrasound-guided intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI®) in the treatment of rectus abdominis-related groin pain in professional footballers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Carlos; Mattiussi, Gabriele; Núñez, Francisco J

    2016-10-01

    Rectus abdominis-related groin pain (RAGP) is one of the possible clinical patterns that determine pubalgia. RAGP is one of the typical patterns in footballers and is due to the degeneration and tendinopathy of the distal tendon, at the level of the two pubic tubercles. Intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI) is a novel technique used in the treatment of tendinopathies. The aim of this study was to examine the therapeutic benefits of EPI by contrasting the two basic components that characterize RAGP: painful symptoms and resultant functional deficits. Eight professional footballers at Udinese Calcio Spa Football Club underwent ultrasound-guided EPI intervention. No other type of treatment was combined with EPI. Pain was monitored with the Verbal Rating Scale, while functional deficit was monitored using the Patient Specific Functional Scale. The scales implementation took place before treatment, then 24 hours, 1 week, 1 month and 6 months after the end of treatment. Treatment with EPI produced a complete reduction of pain symptoms in one month and enabled excellent functional recovery for walking and jogging in one week; for getting out of bed, running, jumping and kicking within one month from the end of the treatment. Treatment with ultrasound-guided EPI has shown encouraging clinical results for RAGP. Data are preliminary: considering the limitations of this study more complex design studies are necessary to test the efficacy of the technique. This study introduces the EPI technique for the first time in the treatment of professional footballers suffering from RAGP. Its future use is proposed as a treatment solution, including complementary to conservative treatment.

  7. Treatment of proximal hamstring tendinopathy-related sciatic nerve entrapment: presentation of an ultrasound-guided “Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis” application

    PubMed Central

    Mattiussi, Gabriele; Moreno, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy-related Sciatic Nerve Entrapment (PHTrSNE) is a neuropathy caused by fibrosis interposed between the semimembranosus tendon and the sciatic nerve, at the level of the ischial tuberosity. Methods Ultrasound-guided Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (US-guided EPI) involves galvanic current transfer within the treatment target tissue (fibrosis) via a needle 0.30 to 0.33 mm in diameter. The galvanic current in a saline solution instantly develops the chemical process of electrolysis, which in turn induces electrochemical ablation of fibrosis. In this article, the interventional procedure is presented in detail, and both the strengths and limits of the technique are discussed. Results US-guided EPI eliminates the fibrotic accumulation that causes PHTrSNE, without the semimembranosus tendon or the sciatic nerve being directly involved during the procedure. The technique is however of limited use in cases of compression neuropathy. Conclusion US-guided EPI is a technique that is quick to perform, minimally invasive and does not force the patient to suspend their activities (work or sports) to make the treatment effective. This, coupled to the fact that the technique is generally well-tolerated by patients, supports use of US-guided EPI in the treatment of PHTrSNE. PMID:27900300

  8. Two Cases of Lethal Complications Following Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Fine-Needle Biopsy of the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Drinkovic, Ivan; Brkljacic, Boris

    1996-09-15

    Two cases with lethal complications are reported among 1750 ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous fine-needle liver biopsies performed in our department. The first patient had angiosarcoma of the liver which was not suspected after computed tomography (CT) and US studies had been performed. The other patient had hepatocellular carcinoma in advanced hepatic cirrhosis. Death was due to bleeding in both cases. Pre-procedure laboratory tests did not reveal the existence of major bleeding disorders in either case. Normal liver tissue was interposed in the needle track between the liver capsule and the lesions which were targeted.

  9. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous irrigation in rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy: what is the evidence? A systematic review with proposals for future reporting.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Ezio; Banfi, Giuseppe; Serafini, Giovanni; Lacelli, Francesca; Orlandi, Davide; Bandirali, Michele; Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2015-07-01

    We performed a systematic review of current evidence regarding ultrasound-guided percutaneous irrigation of calcific tendinopathy (US-PICT) in the shoulder aimed to: assess different published techniques; evaluate clinical outcome in a large combined cohort; and propose suggestions for homogeneous future reporting. Cochrane Collaboration for Systematic Reviews of Interventions Guidelines were followed. We searched MEDLINE/MEDLINE In-Process/EMBASE/Cochrane databases from 1992-2013 using the keywords 'ultrasound, shoulder, needling, calcification, lavage, rotator cuff' combined in appropriate algorithms. References of resulting papers were also screened. Risk of bias was assessed with a modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Of 284 papers found, 15 were included, treating 1,450 shoulders in 1,403 patients (females, n = 838; mean age interval 40-63 years). There was no exclusion due to risk of bias. US-PICT of rotator cuff is a safe and effective procedure, with an estimated average 55% pain improvement at an average of 11 months, with a 10% minor complication rate. No evidence exists in favour of using a specific size/number of needles. Imaging follow-up should not be used routinely. Future studies should aim at structural uniformity, including the use of the Constant Score to assess outcomes and 1-year minimum follow-up. Alternatives to steroid injections should also be explored. • US-PICT of rotator cuff is a safe and effective procedure. • On average 55% pain improvement with 10% minor complication rate. • No evidence exists in favour of using a specific size/number of needles. • Future need to assess outcome using Constant Score with 1-year minimum follow-up.

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Nephrostomy Performed on Neonates and Infants Using a "14-4" (Trocar and Cannula) Technique.

    PubMed

    Bas, Ahmet; Gülşen, Fatih; Emre, Senol; Samanci, Cesur; Uzunlu, Osman; Cantasdemir, Murat; Emir, Haluk; Numan, Furuzan

    2015-12-01

    Percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) catheters are placed under combined ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance in the interventional radiology suite and present unique challenges in neonates and infants. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate feasibility of PCN using a "14-4" (trocar and cannula) technique on neonates and infants. Between September 2009 and June 2014, data for 27 kidneys from consecutive 22 neonates or infants who underwent PCN catheter placement using the "14-4" technique were retrospectively analyzed. The median age at the time of placement of the PCN catheters was 11 days (range 5-300 days). There were 18 males and 4 females. All procedures were performed in the interventional radiology suite but without using fluoroscopy. Unilateral PCN was performed on 17 out of 22 patients, while bilateral drainage was performed on five patients. The technical success rate was 100%. The median duration of PCN catheter was 75 days (range 10-138 days). Minor macroscopic hematuria not requiring blood transfusion was present in two of the patients in which the hematuria lasted in 2 days. Placement of PCN catheters using a "14-4" technique with ultrasound as the sole imaging modality is a technically feasible and desirable option for neonates or infants. The technique obviates the need for ionizing radiation and potentially could be performed in the ultrasound room or even at the bedside.

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Polidocanol Sclerotherapy in Benign Cystic Thyroid Nodules: Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaohua; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Fang; Wu, Wenjun; Chen, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous polidocanol injection (PPI) in treating cystic thyroid nodules. A total of 158 cystic or predominantly cystic thyroid nodules (>80% cystic component) in 143 patients were evaluated. 114 patients with compressive symptoms or aesthetic complaints were offered PPI. 44 individuals without compressive symptoms and aesthetic complaints who were only followed up clinically were used as the control group. The efficacy and safety of PPI were evaluated for 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months of follow-up. In the PPI group, the mean baseline volume of 15.6 ± 18.9 cm 3 reduced at the 1-month follow-up to 5.1 ± 5.6 cm 3 ( p < 0.001) and 0.6 ± 0.9 ( p < 0.001), and nodules shrunk according to the time after PPI ( p < 0.001). A complete response (if ≥70% decrease) to PPI at the 12-month follow-up occurred in 100% of the cystic or predominant cystic nodules. None of the nodules recurred at the 12-month follow-up after PPI. The side effects were mild. Twenty patients (17.5%) developed mild localized pain, and fourteen cases (12.3%) experienced mild or moderate fever after PPI. PPI is a safe and effective alternative to treat benign cystic or predominant cystic thyroid nodules.

  12. Efficacy of Ultrasound-Guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block for Analgesia During Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty for Dialysis Access

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Emiko, E-mail: chibaemi23@comet.ocn.ne.jp; Hamamoto, Kohei, E-mail: hkouhei917@gmail.com; Nagashima, Michio, E-mail: nagamic00@gmail.com

    PurposeTo evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided axillary brachial plexus block (ABPB) for analgesia during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for dialysis access.Subjects and MethodsTwenty-one patients who underwent PTA for stenotic dialysis access shunts and who had previous experience of PTA without sedation, analgesia, and anesthesia were included. The access type in all patients was native arteriovenous fistulae in the forearm. Two radiologists performed US-guided ABPB for the radial and musculocutaneous nerves before PTA. The patients’ pain scores were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) after PTA, and these were compared with previous sessions without US-guided ABPB. Themore » patient’s motor/sensory paralysis after PTA was also examined.ResultsThe mean time required to achieve US-guided ABPB was 8 min. The success rate of this procedure was 100 %, and there were no significant complications. All 21 patients reported lower VAS with US-guided ABPB as compared to without the block (p < 0.01). All patients expressed the desire for an ABPB for future PTA sessions, if required. Transient motor paralysis occurred in 8 patients, but resolved in all after 60 min.ConclusionUS-guided ABPB is feasible and effective for analgesia in patients undergoing PTA for stenotic dialysis access sites.Level of EvidenceLevel 4 (case series).« less

  13. Outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention in intermediate coronary artery disease: fractional flow reserve-guided versus intravascular ultrasound-guided.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chang-Wook; Yoon, Hyuck-Jun; Cho, Yun-Kyeong; Park, Hyoung-Seob; Kim, Hyungseop; Hur, Seung-Ho; Kim, Yoon-Nyun; Chung, In-Sung; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Tahk, Seung-Jae; Fearon, William F; Kim, Kwon-Bae

    2010-08-01

    This study sought to evaluate the long-term clinical outcomes of a fractional flow reserve (FFR)-guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) strategy compared with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided PCI for intermediate coronary lesions. Both FFR- and IVUS-guided PCI strategies have been reported to be safe and effective in intermediate coronary lesions. The study included 167 consecutive patients, with intermediate coronary lesions evaluated by FFR or IVUS (FFR-guided, 83 lesions vs. IVUS-guided, 94 lesions). Cutoff value of FFR in FFR-guided PCI was 0.80, whereas that for minimal lumen cross sectional area in IVUS-guided PCI was 4.0 mm(2). The primary outcome was defined as a composite of major adverse cardiac events including death, myocardial infarction, and ischemia-driven target vessel revascularization at 1 year after the index procedure. Baseline percent diameter stenosis and lesion length were similar in both groups (51 +/- 8% and 24 +/- 12 mm in the FFR group vs. 52 +/- 8% and 24 +/- 13 mm in the IVUS group, respectively). However, the IVUS-guided group underwent revascularization therapy significantly more often (91.5% vs. 33.7%, p < 0.001). No significant difference was found in major adverse cardiac event rates between the 2 groups (3.6% in FFR-guided PCI vs. 3.2% in IVUS-guided PCI). Independent predictors for performing intervention were guiding device: FFR versus IVUS (relative risk [RR]: 0.02); left anterior descending coronary artery versus non-left anterior descending coronary artery disease (RR: 5.60); and multi- versus single-vessel disease (RR: 3.28). Both FFR- and IVUS-guided PCI strategy for intermediate coronary artery disease were associated with favorable outcomes. The FFR-guided PCI reduces the need for revascularization of many of these lesions. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Autonomic responses to ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis of the patellar tendon in healthy male footballers.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz Torres, Blanca; Albornoz Cabello, Manuel; García Bermejo, Paula; Naranjo Orellana, José

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis (PNE) is a novel minimally invasive approach, which involves the application of a galvanic current via an acupuncture needle. As in any procedure involving needling, vagal reactions have been reported during PNE. To examine for changes in autonomic activity during the US-guided PNE technique on healthy patellar tendons by measurement and analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). Twenty-two male footballers were randomly allocated to: a control group (11 players), for whom HRV was recorded for 10 min, both at rest and during an exhaustive US examination of the patellar tendon and adjacent structures; and an experimental group (11 players), for whom HRV was recorded for 10 min, both at rest and during application of US-guided PNE on the patellar tendon. The following HRV parameters were assessed: mean NN interval, mean heart rate, time domain parameters (SDNN, rMSSD, pNN50), diameters of the Poincaré plot (SD1, SD2), stress score, and sympathetic/parasympathetic ratio. There were no differences between groups in any baseline measurements, nor were there any significant differences between control group measurements (baseline vs intervention). The experimental group exhibited statistically significant increases in SDNN/SD1 (p=0.02/p=0.03) and SD2 (p=0.03), indicating increased parasympathetic and decreased sympathetic activity, respectively. US-guided PNE was associated with an autonomic imbalance characterised by greater parasympathetic activity, which could potentially result in a vasovagal reaction. Care should be taken to monitor for adverse reactions during US-guided PNE and simple HRV indicators may have a role in early detection. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis in chronic lateral epicondylitis: short-term and long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Valera-Garrido, Fermín; Minaya-Muñoz, Francisco; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Background Ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis (PNE) is a novel minimally invasive approach which consists of the application of a galvanic current through an acupuncture needle. Objective To evaluate the clinical and ultrasonographic effectiveness of a multimodal programme (PNE, eccentric exercise (EccEx) and stretching) in the short term for patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, and to determine whether the clinical outcomes achieved decline over time. Methods A one-way repeated measures study was performed in a clinical setting in 36 patients presenting with lateral epicondylitis. The patients received one session of US-guided PNE per week over 4–6 weeks, associated with a home programme of EccEx and stretching. The main outcome measures were severity of pain, disability (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire), structural tendon changes (US), hypervascularity and patients’ perceptions of overall outcome. Measurements at 6, 26 and 52 weeks follow-up included recurrence rates (increase in severity of pain or disability compared with discharge), perception of overall outcome and success rates. Results All outcome measures registered significant improvements between pre-intervention and discharge. Most patients (n=30, 83.3%) rated the overall outcome as ‘successful’ at 6 weeks. The ultrasonographic findings showed that the hypoechoic regions and hypervascularity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis changed significantly. At 26 and 52 weeks, all participants (n=32) perceived a ‘successful’ outcome. Recurrence rates were null after discharge and at follow-up at 6, 26 and 52 weeks. Conclusions Symptoms and degenerative structural changes of chronic lateral epicondylitis are reduced after US-guided PNE associated with EccEx and stretching, with encouragingly low recurrences in the mid to long term. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02085928. PMID:25122629

  16. Treatment of the calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff by ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle lavage. Two years prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-González, Federico Del; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo; González-Pérez, José; Calderón-Montero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: to evaluate the short and long term effectiveness of ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous needle lavage in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. To study the evolution of the size of calcifications and pain in the two years after treatment. Methods: study design: A 2 year longitudinal prospective study is carried out after applying the UGPL technique on a number of patients diagnosed with calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. Clinical, ultrasound and radiology follow-up controls were performed, 3 months, 6 months, one year and two years after the treatment. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to assess the pain. The degree and point of pain is selected on a 10 cm line, arranged horizontally or vertically. The “0” represents no pain and “10” represents worst pain. The population studied was made up of 121 patients that required our service as a result of suffering from a painful shoulder. Results: the pain (VAS) and the size of the calcification significantly decreased with the application of the technique (p< 0,001 in both cases) and regardless of the sex (p: 0.384 for pain and p: 0.578 for the size of the calcification). This occurred from the first check-up (3 months) and was maintained for two year. Conclusions: we consider this technique to be a valid alternative as a first-choice treatment of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. The intervention is simple, cost-effective, does not require hospitalization, involves no complications, rehabilitation treatment is not required and it shows very few side effects without sequelae, significantly reducing the size of the calcification and pain in the majority of patients. PMID:25332939

  17. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis in chronic lateral epicondylitis: short-term and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Valera-Garrido, Fermín; Minaya-Muñoz, Francisco; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis (PNE) is a novel minimally invasive approach which consists of the application of a galvanic current through an acupuncture needle. To evaluate the clinical and ultrasonographic effectiveness of a multimodal programme (PNE, eccentric exercise (EccEx) and stretching) in the short term for patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, and to determine whether the clinical outcomes achieved decline over time. A one-way repeated measures study was performed in a clinical setting in 36 patients presenting with lateral epicondylitis. The patients received one session of US-guided PNE per week over 4-6 weeks, associated with a home programme of EccEx and stretching. The main outcome measures were severity of pain, disability (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire), structural tendon changes (US), hypervascularity and patients' perceptions of overall outcome. Measurements at 6, 26 and 52 weeks follow-up included recurrence rates (increase in severity of pain or disability compared with discharge), perception of overall outcome and success rates. All outcome measures registered significant improvements between pre-intervention and discharge. Most patients (n=30, 83.3%) rated the overall outcome as 'successful' at 6 weeks. The ultrasonographic findings showed that the hypoechoic regions and hypervascularity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis changed significantly. At 26 and 52 weeks, all participants (n=32) perceived a 'successful' outcome. Recurrence rates were null after discharge and at follow-up at 6, 26 and 52 weeks. Symptoms and degenerative structural changes of chronic lateral epicondylitis are reduced after US-guided PNE associated with EccEx and stretching, with encouragingly low recurrences in the mid to long term. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02085928. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  18. Treatment of the calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff by ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle lavage. Two years prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Del Castillo-González, Federico; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo; González-Pérez, José; Calderón-Montero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Purpose: to evaluate the short and long term effectiveness of ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous needle lavage in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. To study the evolution of the size of calcifications and pain in the two years after treatment. Methods: a 2 year longitudinal prospective study is carried out after applying the UGPL technique on a number of patients diagnosed with calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. Clinical, ultrasound and radiology follow-up controls were performed, 3 months, 6 months, one year and two years after the treatment. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to assess the pain. The degree and point of pain is selected on a 10cm line, arranged horizontally or vertically. The “0” represents no pain and “10” represents worst pain. The population studied was made up of 121 patients that required our service as a result of suffering from a painful shoulder. Results: the pain (VAS) and the size of the calcification significantly decreased with the application of the technique (p< 0,001 in both cases) and regardless of the sex (p: 0.384 for pain and p: 0.578 for the size of the calcification). This occurred from the first check-up (3 months) and was maintained for two year. Conclusion: we consider this technique to be a valid alternative as a first-choice treatment of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. The intervention is simple, cost-effective, does not require hospitalization, involves no complications, rehabilitation treatment is not required and it shows very few side effects without sequelae, significantly reducing the size of the calcification and pain in the majority of patients. PMID:25767776

  19. Efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous polidocanol sclerotherapy in benign predominantly cystic thyroid nodules: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaohua; Zhou, Qi; Chen, Shuoping; Wang, Fang; Wu, Wenjun; Chen, Xiaojun

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous polidocanol injection (PPI) in treatment of predominantly cystic thyroid nodules. This prospective study included 111 patients with 122 benign predominantly cystic thyroid nodules inducing pressure symptoms or cosmetic problems. The nodules were randomized to a single aspiration with (n = 61) or without (n = 61) subsequent PPI and followed up after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Ten patients (12 nodules) declined to follow up after aspiration in group 2. Nodule volumes, symptoms scores, and cosmetic scores were evaluated before and after treatment. The therapeutic success rate and safety of PPI for treatment of predominantly cystic thyroid nodules were also evaluated. In the PPI group, the nodule volumes were reduced from 13.67 ± 9.90 to 2.60 ± 2.66 (p < .001). Therapeutic success rate (nodule volume reduction >50%) was obtained in 57 of 61 (93.44%) nodules in the PPI group, compared to seven of 49 (14.29%) in the aspiration group (p < .001). In the aspiration group, the nodule volume was not significantly reduced. The reduction in symptom scores was significantly higher in the PPI group (from 3.60 ± 1.65 to 1.60 ± 1.19) than in the aspiration group (from 3.62 ± 1.89 to 3.30 ± 1.06) (p < .001, between groups). The reduction in cosmetic scores showed a significant difference between groups (p < .001). In total, 4.92% of patients (3/61) in the PPI group and 85.71% (42/49) in the aspiration group showed recurrence during the follow-up period. There was a significant difference in the recurrence rate between groups (p < .001). No major side-effects occurred. US-guided PPI of benign recurrent predominantly cystic thyroid nodules is effective and safe. PPI is an important alternative to benign recurrent predominantly cystic thyroid nodules.

  20. Clinical results after ultrasound-guided intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI®) and eccentric exercise in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Abat, F; Gelber, P E; Polidori, F; Monllau, J C; Sanchez-Ibañez, J M

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the outcome of ultrasound (US)-guided intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI(®)) and eccentric exercise in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy during a long-term follow-up. Forty patients with patellar tendinopathy were prospectively evaluated over a 10-year follow-up period. Pain and function were evaluated before treatment, at 3 months and at 2, 5 and 10 years using the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Patella (VISA-P) score, the Tegner score and Blazina's classification. According to VISA-P score at baseline, patients were also dichotomized into Group 1 (<50 points) and Group 2 (≥50 points). There were 21 patients in Group 1 and 19 in Group 2. Patient satisfaction was measured according to the Roles and Maudsley score. The VISA-P score improved globally by 41.2 points (p < 0.01) after a mean 4.1 procedures. In Group 1, VISA-P score improved from 33.1 ± 13 to 78.9 ± 14.4 at 3-month and to 88.8 ± 10.1 at 10-year follow-up (p < 0.001). In Group 2, VISA-P score improved from 69.3 ± 10.5 to 84.9 ± 9 at 3-month and to 96.0 ± 4.3 at 10-year follow-up (p < 0.001). After 10 years, 91.2 % of the patients had a VISA-P score >80 points. The same level (80 % of patients) or the Tegner score at no more than one level lower (20 % of patients) was restored, and 97.5 % of the patients were satisfied with the procedure. Treatment with the US-guided EPI(®) technique and eccentric exercises in patellar tendinopathy resulted in a great improvement in knee function and a rapid return to the previous level of activity after few sessions. The procedure has proved to be safe with no recurrences on a long-term basis. Therapeutic study, Level IV.

  1. Long-term outcome of ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation of selected "recurrent" neck nodal metastases in 25 patients with TNM stages III or IVA papillary thyroid carcinoma previously treated by surgery and 131I therapy.

    PubMed

    Hay, Ian D; Lee, Robert A; Davidge-Pitts, Caroline; Reading, Carl C; Charboneau, J William

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation (UPEA) of neck nodal metastases (NNM) has rarely been reported in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) patients with advanced localized disease. We ablated 25 PTC patients with stage III or IVA disease (mean age 58 years) who had "recurrent" NNM after surgery and 131I therapy. Diagnosis of 37 selected NNM was proven by ultrasound-guided biopsy. UPEA was usually performed in 2 outpatient sessions. After UPEA, 35 of 37 NNM (95%) decreased in size. None had significant Doppler flow. Seventeen (46%) disappeared on rescanning. Serum thyroglobulin fell in 19 of 22 (86%) without thyroglobulin autoantibodies. None of the UPEA-treated NNM, followed on average for 5.4 years, required further intervention. Six patients (24%) subsequently developed 18 "new" recurrences. Of the 18, 15 (83%) were managed successfully by UPEA rather than operation. None of the 25 patients developed permanent hoarseness or have died from PTC. At our institution, where patients undergoing nodal dissections are charged $35-45,000, each outpatient UPEA procedure saves health providers approximately $38,400. Our 25 ablated patients, by avoiding 40 further neck reexplorations, on average, saved $61,440 in charges. UPEA for NNM in advanced localized PTC has proved safe and effective. It is also considerably less expensive than the conventional operative alternative of nodal dissection. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrasound guided V3 segment vertebral artery direct percutaneous puncture for basilar artery mechanical thrombectomy in acute stroke: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jamsheed A; Almekhlafi, Mohammed A; Hill, Michael D; Goyal, Mayank; Eesa, Muneer

    2014-04-01

    A middle aged patient presented with acute ischemic stroke due to basilar artery occlusion. The patient clinically deteriorated despite intravenous thrombolysis and was referred for mechanical thrombectomy. The right vertebral artery was occluded and could not be accessed despite attempting various shaped catheters, even when a radial artery access was used. The left vertebral artery ended in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Eventually, ultrasound guided V3 segment vertebral artery direct puncture was successfully done and the procedure was completed. No access related complications were encountered. Direct cervical arterial puncture can be safely used by experienced operators as a last resort in acute stroke cases with difficult access.

  3. Assistive technology for ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Ikhsan, Mohammad; Tan, Kok Kiong; Putra, Andi Sudjana

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the existing technology used to improve the safety and ease of ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. Electronic database searches were conducted in Scopus, IEEE, Google Patents, and relevant conference databases (SPIE, MICCAI, and IEEE conferences) for related articles on assistive technology for ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. A total of 89 articles were examined and pointed to several fields that are currently the focus of improvements to ultrasound-guided procedures. These include improving needle visualization, needle guides and localization technology, image processing algorithms to enhance and segment important features within the ultrasound image, robotic assistance using probe-mounted manipulators, and improving procedure ergonomics through in situ projections of important information. Probe-mounted robotic manipulators provide a promising avenue for assistive technology developed for freehand ultrasound-guided percutaneous procedures. However, there is currently a lack of clinical trials to validate the effectiveness of these devices.

  4. Ultrasound-guided chest biopsies.

    PubMed

    Middleton, William D; Teefey, Sharlene A; Dahiya, Nirvikar

    2006-12-01

    Pulmonary nodules that are surrounded by aerated lung cannot be visualized with sonography. Therefore, percutaneous biopsy must be guided with computed tomography or fluoroscopy. Although this restriction only applies to central lung nodules, it has permeated referral patterns for other thoracic lesions and has retarded the growth of ultrasound-guided interventions. Nevertheless, sonography is an extremely flexible modality that can expeditiously guide many biopsy procedures in the thorax. Peripheral pulmonary nodules can be successfully biopsied with success rates exceeding 90% and complications rates of less than 5%. Orienting the probe parallel to the intercostal space facilitates biopsies of peripheral pulmonary nodules. Anterior mediastinal masses that extend to the parasternal region are often easily approachable provided the internal mammary vessels, costal cartilage, and deep great vessels are identified and avoided. Superior mediastinal masses can be sampled from a suprasternal or supraclavicular approach. Phased array probes or tightly curved arrays may provide improved access for biopsies in this location. Posterior mediastinal masses are more difficult to biopsy with ultrasound guidance because of the overlying paraspinal muscles. However, when posterior mediastinal masses extend into the posterior medial pleural region, they can be biopsied with ultrasound guidance. Because many lung cancers metastasize to the supraclavicular nodes, it is important to evaluate the supraclavicular region when determining the best approach to obtain a tissue diagnosis. When abnormal supraclavicular nodes are present, they often are the easiest and safest lesions to biopsy.

  5. Ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of synovium is an increasingly performed procedure with a high diagnostic yield. In this review, we discuss the normal synovium, as well as the indications, technique, tissue handling and clinical applications of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. PMID:26581578

  6. Lower Extremity Injury Patterns in Elite Ballet Dancers: Ultrasound/MRI Imaging Features and an Institutional Overview of Therapeutic Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Interventions.

    PubMed

    Rehmani, Razia; Endo, Yoshimi; Bauman, Phillip; Hamilton, William; Potter, Hollis; Adler, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    Altered biomechanics from repetitive microtrauma, such as long practice hours in en pointe (tip of the toes) or demi pointe (balls of the feet) predispose ballet dancers to a multitude of musculoskeletal pathologies particularly in the lower extremities. Both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are radiation-sparing modalities which can be used to confidently evaluate these injuries, with ultrasound (US) offering the added utility of therapeutic intervention at the same time in experienced hands. The purposes of this paper were: (1) to illustrate the US and MRI features of lower extremity injury patterns in ballet dancers, focusing on pathologies commonly encountered at a single orthopedic hospital; (2) to present complementary roles of both ultrasound and MRI in the evaluation of these injuries whenever possible; (3) to review and present our institutional approach towards therapeutic ultrasound-guided interventions by presenting explicit cases. Online searches were performed using the search criteria of "ballet biomechanics" and "ballet injuries." The results were then further narrowed down by limiting articles published in the past 15 years, modality (US and MRI), anatomical region (foot and ankle, hip and knee) and to major radiology, orthopedics, and sports medicine journals. Performing ballet poses major stress to lower extremities and predisposes dancer to several musculoskeletal injuries. These can be adequately evaluated by both US and MRI. US is useful for evaluating superficial structures such as soft tissues, tendons, and ligaments, particularly in the foot and ankle. MRI provides superior resolution of deeper structures such as joints, bone marrow, and cartilage. In addition, US can be used as a therapeutic tool for providing quick symptomatic improvement in these athletes for who "time is money". Performing ballet may cause major stress to the lower extremities, predominantly affecting the foot and ankle, followed by the knee and hip. US

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Application of Percutaneous Electrolysis as an Adjunct to Exercise and Manual Therapy for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    de-Miguel-Valtierra, Lorena; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Arias-Buría, José L

    2018-05-16

    This randomized clinical trial compared the effects of adding US-guided percutaneous electrolysis into a program consisting of manual therapy and exercise on pain, related-disability, function and pressure sensitivity in subacromial pain syndrome. Fifty patients with subacromial pain syndrome were randomized into manual therapy and exercise or percutaneous electrolysis group. All patients received the same manual therapy and exercise program, one session per week for 5 consecutive weeks. Patients assigned to the electrolysis group also received the application of percutaneous electrolysis at each session. The primary outcome was Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH). Secondary outcomes included pain, function (Shoulder Pain and Disability Index-SPADI) pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) and Global Rating of Change (GROC). They were assessed at baseline, post-treatment, and 3, and 6 months after treatment. Both groups showed similar improvements in the primary outcome (DASH) at all follow-ups (P=0.051). Subjects receiving manual therapy, exercise, and percutaneous electrolysis showed significantly greater changes in shoulder pain (P<0.001) and SPADI (P<0.001) than those receiving manual therapy and exercise alone at all follow-ups. Effect sizes were large (SMD>0.91) for shoulder pain and function at 3 and 6 months in favour of the percutaneous electrolysis group. No between-groups differences in PPT were found. The current clinical trial found that the inclusion of US-guided percutaneous electrolysis in combination with manual therapy and exercise resulted in no significant differences for related-disability (DASH) than the application of manual therapy and exercise alone in patients with subacromial pain syndrome. Nevertheless, differences were reported for some secondary outcomes such as shoulder pain and function (SPADI). Whether or not these effects are reliable should be addressed in future studies Perspective This study found that the inclusion of US

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Creation in Budd-Chiari Syndrome: Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Direct Simultaneous Puncture of the Portal Vein and Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Boyvat, Fatih, E-mail: boyvatf@yahoo.com; Aytekin, Cueneyt; Harman, Ali

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is an uncommon disorder that can be life-threatening, depending on the degree of hepatic venous outflow obstruction. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) provides decompression of the congested liver but the hepatic vein obstruction makes the procedure more difficult. We describe a modified method that involved a single percutaneous puncture of the portal vein and inferior vena cava simultaneously for TIPS creation in a patient with BCS.

  9. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided renal biopsy in supine antero-lateral position: a new approach for obese and non-obese patients.

    PubMed

    Gesualdo, Loreto; Cormio, Luigi; Stallone, Giovanni; Infante, Barbara; Di Palma, Anna Maria; Delli Carri, Paolo; Cignarelli, Mauro; Lamacchia, Olga; Iannaccone, Salvatore; Di Paolo, Salvatore; Morrone, Luigi; Aucella, Filippo; Carrieri, Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    Percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided renal biopsy is the gold standard in the evaluation of renal diseases, but some patients, such as the obese, may not be eligible for this procedure. Aim of this study was to determine the feasibility, efficacy and safety of US-guided percutaneous renal biopsy in supine antero-lateral position (SALP) in high-risk patients (BMI > 30 and/or respiratory difficulty), as well as to compare the overall outcome of SALP with that of traditional prone position (PP) in low-risk patients (BMI < or = 30/no respiratory difficulty). One hundred and ten consecutive patients scheduled for native kidney biopsy were recruited. Ninety low-risk patients were randomized following a permuted block randomization list to receive either US-guided renal biopsy in PP (Group 1) or SALP (Group 2), whereas 20 high-risk patients received US-guided renal biopsy in SALP (Group 3) and were our observational cohort study. Comfort compliance and breathing difficulty in each group were evaluated by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Bleeding complications were evaluated through US renal scanning. Mean operating time was 7 min. Comfort compliance and breathing difficulty were significantly better for SALP in both low- and high-risk patients; there were no significant differences in pain after biopsy among the three groups. Bleeding complications were slightly higher in Group 1. Diagnostic yield was similar in all groups. SALP is reliable, minimally invasive, easy, highly successful, timesaving and almost free from severe side-effects. A better VAS score for breathing difficulty and comfort compliance characterizes this procedure, making it particularly suitable for obese patients.

  10. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma by radiofrequency hyperthermia with a 'cooled-tip needle'. A preliminary clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Francica, G; Marone, G

    1999-05-01

    three recorded deaths, two were due to intrahepatic tumor diffusion. In our experience radiofrequency hyperthermia with the cooled-tip needle afforded an effective and safe percutaneous ablative method for HCC in cirrhosis and shortened treatment time.

  11. Transvaginal Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy of Deep Pelvic Masses: How We Do It.

    PubMed

    Plett, Sara K; Poder, Liina; Brooks, Rebecca A; Morgan, Tara A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the rationale and indications for transvaginal ultrasound-guided biopsy. Transvaginal ultrasound-guided biopsy can be a helpful tool for diagnosis and treatment planning in the evaluation of pelvic masses, particularly when the anatomy precludes a transabdominal or posterior transgluteal percutaneous biopsy approach. A step-by-step summary of the technique with preprocedure and postprocedure considerations is included. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral catheterization].

    PubMed

    Salleras-Duran, Laia; Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral catheterization is a technique that can be difficult in some patients. Some studies have recently described the use of ultrasound to guide the venous catheterization. To describe the success rate, time required, complications of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization. and patients and professionals satisfaction The search was performed in databases (Medline-PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Cuiden Plus) for studies published about ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization performed on patients that provided results on the success of the technique, complications, time used, patient satisfaction and the type of professional who performed the technique. A total of 21 studies were included. Most of them get a higher success rate 80% in the catheterization ecoguide and time it is not higher than the traditional technique. The Technical complications analyzed were arterial puncture rates and lower nerve 10%. In all studies measuring and comparing patient satisfaction in the art ecoguide is greater. Various professional groups perform the technique. The use of ultrasound for peripheral pipes has a high success rate, complications are rare and the time used is similar to that of the traditional technique. The technique of inserting catheters through ultrasound may be learned by any professional group performing venipuncture. Finally, it gets underscores the high patient satisfaction with the use of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrasound-guided venous access for pacemakers and defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Seto, Arnold H; Jolly, Aaron; Salcedo, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    Ultrasound guidance is widely recommended to reduce the risk of complications during central venous catheter placement. However, ultrasound guidance is not commonly utilized for implanting leads for cardiac rhythm management devices. We describe our technique of ultrasound-guided pacemaker implantation, including a novel pull-through technique that allows percutaneous guidewire insertion prior to the first incision. We review the literature and recent advances in ultrasound imaging technology that may facilitate the adoption of ultrasound guidance. Ultrasound guidance provides a safe and rapid technique for extrathoracic subclavian or axillary venous lead placement. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Ultrasound-guided vs endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for pancreatic cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Masato; Ishii, Hiroshi; Kuraoka, Kensuke; Yukisawa, Seigo; Kasuga, Akiyoshi; Ozaka, Masato; Suzuki, Sho; Takano, Kouichi; Sugiyama, Yuko; Itoi, Takao

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the effectiveness and safety of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: Patients who were diagnosed with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic PC between February 2006 and September 2011 were selected for this retrospective study. FNA biopsy for pancreatic tumors had been performed percutaneously under extracorporeal ultrasound guidance until October 2009; then, beginning in November 2009, EUS-FNA has been performed. We reviewed the complete medical records of all patients who met the selection criteria for the following data: sex, age, location and size of the targeted tumor, histological and/or cytological findings, details of puncture procedures, time from day of puncture until day of definitive diagnosis, and details of severe adverse events. RESULTS: Of the 121 patients who met the selection criteria, 46 had a percutaneous biopsy (Group A) and 75 had an EUS-FNA biopsy (Group B). Adequate cytological specimens were obtained in 42 Group A patients (91.3%) and all 75 Group B patients (P = 0.0192), and histological specimens were obtained in 41 Group A patients (89.1%) and 65 Group B patients (86.7%). Diagnosis of malignancy by cytology was positive in 33 Group A patients (78.6%) and 72 Group B patients (94.6%) (P = 0.0079). Malignancy by both cytology and pathology was found in 43 Group A (93.5%) and 73 Group B (97.3%) patients. The mean period from the puncture until the cytological diagnosis in Group B was 1.7 d, which was significantly shorter than that in Group A (4.1 d) (P < 0.0001). Severe adverse events were experienced in two Group A patients (4.3%) and in one Group B patient (1.3%). CONCLUSION: EUS-FNA, as well as percutaneous needle aspiration, is an effective modality to obtain cytopathological confirmation in patients with advanced PC. PMID:23613631

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural drainage of postoperative pancreatic collections.

    PubMed

    Tilara, Amy; Gerdes, Hans; Allen, Peter; Jarnagin, William; Kingham, Peter; Fong, Yuman; DeMatteo, Ronald; D'Angelica, Michael; Schattner, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic leak is a major cause of morbidity after pancreatectomy. Traditionally, peripancreatic fluid collections have been managed by percutaneous or operative drainage. Data for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage of postoperative fluid collections are limited. Here we report on the safety, efficacy, and timing of EUS-guided drainage of postoperative peripancreatic collections. This is a retrospective review of 31 patients who underwent EUS-guided drainage of fluid collections after pancreatic resection. Technical success was defined as successful transgastric deployment of at least one double pigtail plastic stent. Clinical success was defined as resolution of the fluid collection on follow-up CT scan and resolution of symptoms. Early drainage was defined as initial transmural stent placement within 30 days after surgery. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage was performed effectively with a technical success rate of 100%. Clinical success was achieved in 29 of 31 patients (93%). Nineteen of the 29 patients (65%) had complete resolution of their symptoms and collection with the first endoscopic procedure. Repeat drainage procedures, including some with necrosectomy, were required in the remaining 10 patients, with eventual resolution of collection and symptoms. Two patients who did not achieve durable clinical success required percutaneous drainage by interventional radiology. Seventeen (55%) of 31 patients had successful early drainage completed within 30 days of their operation. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of fluid collections after pancreatic resection is safe and effective. Early drainage (<30 days) of postoperative pancreatic fluid collections was not associated with increased complications in this series. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid ... Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? What is Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? ...

  17. Outcomes of ultrasound guided renal mass biopsies.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Edward L; Choromanska, Agnieszka; Al-Katib, Sayf; Coffey, Mary

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate of nondiagnostic ultrasound-guided renal mass biopsies (RMBs) at our institution and to determine what patient, procedural, and focal renal mass (FRM) factors were associated with nondiagnostic ultrasound-guided RMBs. Eighty-two ultrasound-guided renal mass biopsies performed between January 2014 and October 2016 were included in our study. Biopsy outcomes (diagnostic vs. nondiagnostic) and patient, procedural, and FRM characteristics were retrospectively reviewed and recorded. Univariate statistical analyses were performed to identify biopsy characteristics that were indicative of nondiagnostic biopsy. Ultrasound-guided RMBs were diagnostic in 70 out of 82 cases (85%) and non-diagnostic in 12 cases (15%). Among the diagnostic biopsies, 54 (77%) were malignant cases, 94% of which were renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Of the 12 nondiagnostic cases, the final diagnosis was RCC in 4 cases and angiomyolipoma in one case; seven of the nondiagnostic cases were lost to follow-up. A weak association (p = 0.04) was found between the number of needle passes and the biopsy outcome. None of the remaining collected RMB characteristics showed a significant correlation with a diagnostic or nondiagnostic RMB. Six patients (7%) experienced complications. Ultrasound-guided renal mass biopsy is a safe and effective method for the diagnosis of renal masses with a low rate of nondiagnostic outcomes. A nondiagnostic biopsy should not be treated as a surrogate for a diagnosis since a significant number of patients with nondiagnostic biopsies have subsequently been shown to have renal malignancies. Repeat biopsy should be considered in such cases.

  18. Simulators for training in ultrasound guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Farjad Sultan, Syed; Shorten, George; Iohom, Gabrielle

    2013-06-01

    The four major categories of skill sets associated with proficiency in ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia are 1) understanding device operations, 2) image optimization, 3) image interpretation and 4) visualization of needle insertion and injection of the local anesthetic solution. Of these, visualization of needle insertion and injection of local anaesthetic solution can be practiced using simulators and phantoms. This survey of existing simulators summarizes advantages and disadvantages of each. Current deficits pertain to the validation process.

  19. Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade.

    PubMed

    Chin, Ki Jinn; Chan, Vincent

    2008-10-01

    The use of ultrasound for peripheral nerve blockade is becoming popular. Although the feasibility of ultrasound-guided nerve blockade is now clear, it is uncertain at this time whether it represents the new standard for regional anesthesia in terms of efficacy and safety. The ability to visualize nerve location, needle advancement, needle-nerve interaction, and local anesthetic spread makes ultrasound-guided nerve block an attractive option. Study results indicate that these advantages can improve the ease of block performance, block success rates, and complications. At the same time there is evidence that ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia is a unique skill in its own right, and that proficiency in it requires training and experience. Ultrasound is a valuable tool that is now available to the regional anesthesiologist, and it is fast becoming a standard part of practice. It promises to be of especial value to the less experienced practitioner. Ultrasound does not in itself, however, guarantee the efficacy and safety of peripheral nerve blockade. Proper training in its use is required and we can expect to see the development of formal standards and guidelines in this regard.

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy after a failed or impossible ERCP.

    PubMed

    Mora Soler, Ana María; Álvarez Delgado, Alberto; Piñero Pérez, María Concepción; Velasco-Guardado, Antonio; Marcos Prieto, Héctor; Rodríguez Pérez, Antonio

    2018-05-01

    endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) is an alternative to percutaneous trans-hepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) in cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). this is a retrospective description of six cases of endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage via choledochoduodenostomy (EUCD), as well as the clinical characteristics, endoscopic procedure, complications and monitoring. all cases had malignant distal biliary obstruction. The procedure was concluded with good drainage in four out of six patients. Two late complications were recorded that were caused by stent migration and there were no deaths related with the procedure. The average monitoring period was six months. EUCD can be considered as a valid therapeutic choice in some selected cases and when performed by a team of expert endoscopists in cases of failed ERCP drainage or as an alternative to PTBD. However, the procedure has some associated complications.

  1. Focused ultrasound guided relocation of kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Abrol, Nitin; Kekre, Nitin S

    2015-01-01

    Complete removal of all fragments is the goal of any intervention for urinary stones. This is more important in lower pole stones where gravity and spatial orientation of lower pole infundibulum may hinder spontaneous passage of fragments. Various adjuvant therapies (inversion, diuresis, percussion, oral citrate, etc.) are described to enhance stone-free rate but are not widely accepted. Focused ultrasound-guided relocation of fragments is a recently described technique aimed at improving results of intervention for stone disease. Purpose of this review is to discuss development of this technology and its potential clinical applications. Pubmed search was made using key words "Focused ultrasound" and "kidney stone". All English language articles were reviewed by title. Relevant studies describing development and application of focused ultrasound in renal stones were selected for review. Focused ultrasound has proven its efficacy in successfully relocating up to 8 mm stone fragments in vitro and in pigs. Relocation is independent of stone composition. The latest model allows imaging and therapy with a single handheld probe facilitating its use by single operator. The acoustic energy delivered by the new prototype is even less than that used for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Therapeutic exposure has not caused thermal injury in pig kidneys. Focused ultrasound-guided relocation of stones is feasible. Though it is safe in application in pigs, technology is awaiting approval for clinical testing in human beings. This technology has many potential clinical applications in the management of stone disease.

  2. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of thyroid: Report of two cases and systematic review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Karan; Mittal, Saurabh; Hadda, Vijay; Jain, Deepali; Mohan, Anant; Guleria, Randeep

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive and safe technique for a sampling of mediastinal lesions. Indications for EBUS-TBNA have gradually expanded since its introduction. The usual approach to cytological sampling of the thyroid gland is percutaneous ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) performed under local anesthesia. US-FNA may be risky or not feasible in intrathoracic/substernal thyroid location. Feasibility of aspirating thyroid lesions with EBUS-TBNA has been occasionally reported. We report two patients wherein EBUS-TBNA was utilized for thyroid lesion aspiration and definitive diagnosis. We highlight the utility and safety of EBUS-TBNA in the evaluation of intrathoracic thyroid lesions wherein image-guided percutaneous aspiration may be risky/sometimes impossible to perform. A systematic review of literature has also been performed summarizing and discussing the issues pertaining to EBUS-TBNA of the thyroid gland. PMID:27891005

  3. Outcomes of Ultrasound-Guided Thrombin Injection of Nongroin Arterial Pseudoaneurysms.

    PubMed

    Valesano, Johnathan C; Schmitz, John J; Kurup, A Nicholas; Schmit, Grant D; Moynagh, Michael R; Atwell, Thomas D; Lewis, Bradley D; Lee, Robert A; Callstrom, Matthew R

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate success and complication rates of percutaneous ultrasound-guided thrombin injection of nongroin pseudoaneurysms (PSAs). Retrospective review of a prospectively maintained institutional database yielded 39 cases of arterial PSAs occurring at nongroin sites that were treated with percutaneous ultrasound-guided thrombin injection between 2000 and 2016 (average patient age 69.2 y ± 14.0). Of PSAs, 74.4% (29/39) arose in the upper extremities, and 92.3% (36/39) were iatrogenic. The brachial artery was the most commonly affected vessel (51.3% [20/39]), and arterial access was the most common cause (56.4% [22/39]). Average overall PSA size was 2.4 cm (range, 0.5-7.2 cm); average amount of thrombin injected was 320 IU (range, 50-2,000 IU). Technical success was defined as absence of flow within the PSA immediately after thrombin injection. Treatment success was defined as sustained thrombosis on follow-up imaging obtained at 1-3 days after treatment. Technical and treatment success rates of thrombin injections were 100% (39/39) and 84.8% (28/33), respectively. Longer term follow-up imaging (average 71 d; range, 12-201 d) was available for 7 of the treatment successes with 100% (7/7) showing sustained thrombosis. Comparing treatment successes and failures, there was no significant difference in average PSA size (2.3 cm vs 2.0 cm, P = .51) or average amount of thrombin injected (360 IU vs 180 IU, P = .14). There were no complications. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection is a safe, efficacious treatment option for PSAs arising in nongroin locations. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultrasound-guided interventional PDT of liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chaoying; Yang, Dong; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Huijuan; Huang, Muyin; Chen, Ji; Lu, Guorong

    1996-09-01

    Thirty patients with advanced liver cancer were treated by interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT). These included 28 hepatocellular carcinoma and two adenocarcinoma, 19 primary tumors and 11 recurred follow other treatments. The diameter of tumors were 7-10cm in 13 cases and 10-16cm in 17 cases. In this study, an argon laser pumped dye laser system was used to give a CW laser beam at 630 nm which was split and coupled into there optical fibers. The patients were injected intravenously with photosensitizer hematoporphyrin derivative at a dose of 5mg/kg body weight 48 hours before PDT. Then the fibers were inserted into tumor by ultrasound- guided percutaneous puncture. The inserted irradiation points were spaced in entire tumor with the light release power 300mW and the irradiation time 12 minutes per point. Total 52 treatments were performed in 30 patients. Among them, 14 cases were treated only one time and 16 cases via 2-3 times. The follow-up was carried out in 25 cases for 12- 24 months. The results show that significant remission was 22 percent in those patients by only one treatment and 62 percent in those via 2 to 3 treatments. The shrink rate of tumor size was over 90 percent in five of six cases after treatment 3. The survival time has been over one year in 12 cases. No obvious change to be found for all patients in liver function test, renal function test and blood routine examination. The level of AFP indicated a descending trend after PDT. This work indicate that PDT is effective and safe for the treatment of large liver cancers including those recurred follow hepatic resection and those failed in hepatic artery infusion embolic chemotherapy.

  5. Does ultrasound-guided lidocaine injection improve local anaesthesia before femoral artery catheterization?

    PubMed

    Spiliopoulos, S; Katsanos, K; Diamantopoulos, A; Karnabatidis, D; Siablis, D

    2011-05-01

    To present the results of a prospective, randomized, single-centre study investigating local anaesthesia before percutaneous common femoral artery (CFA) puncture and catheterization with the use of ultrasound-guided injection of lidocaine versus standard infiltration by manual palpation. Patients scheduled to undergo diagnostic or therapeutic transfemoral catheter-based procedures gave informed consent and were randomized in two groups. In the first arm local anaesthesia with lidocaine hydrochloride 1% was performed under ultrasound guidance (group U/S), while in the second arm the standard method of manual artery palpation was applied (group M). In both groups, subsequent CFA catheterization was achieved under ultrasound guidance. The primary study endpoint was peri-procedural pain level evaluated with a visual-analogue scale (VAS score 0-10). Between January 2009 and 2010, 200 patients (161 men, mean age 63±12 years) were equally assigned to each group without any significant differences in baseline demographics. Patients in group U/S experienced significantly less pain during CFA catheterization in comparison with group M with a difference of three points in mean VAS score reported (1.6±1.6 versus 4.6±1.9, p<0.0001). In addition, significantly less volume of lidocaine was used in group U/S compared to group M (16±2.7 versus 19±0.8ml, p<0.001).Total vascular access time was similar in both groups (4.4±1.3 versus 4.5±1.3min). Overall complications included two small groin haematomas in each group. Ultrasound-guided local anaesthesia of the CFA prior to percutaneous transcatheter procedures is safe and achieves superior levels of analgesia with minimal patient pain and discomfort compared to the standard method of manual palpation. Copyright © 2011 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Transurethral ultrasound-guided laser-induced prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayan, Richard K.; Roth, Robert A.

    1991-07-01

    A transurethral ultrasound-guided Nd:YAG laser delivery system has been developed for use as an alternative approach to the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The TULIP system has been extensively tested in canine models and is currently undergoing FDA trials in humans.

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage

    PubMed Central

    Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya; Draganov, Peter V

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biliary drainage has emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to percutaneous and surgical interventions for patients with biliary obstruction who had failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). EUS-guided biliary drainage has become feasible due to the development of large channel curvilinear therapeutic echo-endoscopes and the use of real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopy imaging in addition to standard ERCP devices and techniques. EUS-guided biliary drainage is an attractive option because of its minimally invasive, single step procedure which provides internal biliary decompression. Multiple investigators have reported high success and low complication rates. Unfortunately, high quality prospective data are still lacking. We provide detailed review of the use of EUS for biliary drainage from the perspective of practicing endoscopists with specific focus on the technical aspects of the procedure. PMID:22363114

  8. ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASOUND-GUIDED FINE-NEEDLE ASPIRATION IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF ADRENAL METASTASIS IN A HIGH-RISK POPULATION.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Catherine D; Erickson, Dana; Levy, Michael J; Gleeson, Ferga C; Salomao, Diva R; Delivanis, Danae A; Bancos, Irina

    2017-12-01

    While the left adrenal gland is readily accessible via endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), data regarding the utility of EUS-FNA in the diagnosis of adrenal lesions remain limited. We aimed to ( 1) describe the clinical context, adverse event rate, and diagnostic performance of EUS-FNA, and ( 2) compare the safety profile and diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA with percutaneous adrenal biopsy. Single-center, retrospective cohort study. Medical records of patients who underwent adrenal EUS-FNA from 2005-2016 were reviewed. Biopsy outcomes were evaluated using a predefined reference standard. Results were compared to patients who underwent percutaneous biopsy (n = 419; 1994-2014) at the same institution. A total of 121 patients underwent EUS-FNA of 122 adrenal lesions (left [n = 121]; right [n = 1]; mean lesion size, 1.8 cm). Cytology was positive for malignancy in 35 (29%), suspicious for malignancy in 1 (1%), atypical in 1 (1%), negative for malignancy in 81 (66%), and nondiagnostic in 4 (3%). No adverse events were reported. EUS-FNA diagnosed metastasis with a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 97.4%, positive predictive value of 91.7%, and negative predictive value of 100%. When compared to percutaneous biopsy, lesion size (1.8 cm vs. 3.7 cm; P<.001) and biopsy site (99% vs. 62% left adrenal; P<.001) were significantly different. EUS-FNA adverse event rate was lower than percutaneous biopsy (0% vs. 4%; P = .024), but nondiagnostic rates were similar (3.3% vs. 4.8%; P = .48). EUS-FNA is a sensitive technique to sample adrenal lesions in patients at high risk for adrenal metastasis with fewer adverse events compared to percutaneous biopsy. CI = confidence interval CT = computed tomography EUS-FNA = endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration NPV = negative predictive value PPV = positive predictive value TUS = transabdominal ultra-sound.

  9. Ultrasound-guided cable-free 13-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy of non-mass breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jiwoon; Jang, Mijung; Yun, Bo La; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Kang, Eunyoung; Park, So Yeon; Moon, Woo Kyung; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Bohyoung

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the outcomes of ultrasound-guided core biopsy for non-mass breast lesions by the novel 13-gauge cable-free vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) and by the conventional 14-gauge semi-automated core needle biopsy (CCNB). Materials and methods Our institutional review board approved this prospective study, and all patients provided written informed consent. Among 1840 ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsies performed from August 2013 to December 2014, 145 non-mass breast lesions with suspicious microcalcifications on mammography or corresponding magnetic resonance imaging finding were subjected to 13-gauge VAB or 14-gauge CCNB. We evaluated the technical success rates, average specimen numbers, and tissue sampling time. We also compared the results of percutaneous biopsy and final surgical pathologic diagnosis to analyze the rates of diagnostic upgrade or downgrade. Results Ultrasound-guided VAB successfully targeted and sampled all lesions, whereas CCNB failed to demonstrate calcification in four (10.3%) breast lesions with microcalcification on specimen mammography. The mean sampling time were 238.6 and 170.6 seconds for VAB and CCNB, respectively. No major complications were observed with either method. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) lesions were more frequently upgraded after CCNB (8/23 and 3/5, respectively) than after VAB (2/26 and 0/4, respectively P = 0.028). Conclusion Non-mass breast lesions were successfully and accurately biopsied using cable-free VAB. The underestimation rate of ultrasound-detected non-mass lesion was significantly lower with VAB than with CCNB. Trial registration CRiS KCT0002267. PMID:28628656

  10. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block: outcome of 510 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Perlas, Anahi; Lobo, Giovanni; Lo, Nick; Brull, Richard; Chan, Vincent W S; Karkhanis, Reena

    2009-01-01

    Supraclavicular brachial plexus block provides consistently effective anesthesia to the upper extremity. However, traditional nerve localization techniques may be associated with a high risk of pneumothorax. In the present study, we report block success and clinical outcome data from 510 consecutive patients who received an ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block for upper extremity surgery. After institutional review board approval, the outcome of 510 consecutive patients who received an ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block for upper extremity surgery was reviewed. Real-time ultrasound guidance was used with a high-frequency linear probe. The neurovascular structures were imaged on short axis, and the needle was inserted using an in-plane technique with either a medial-to-lateral or lateral-to-medial orientation. Five hundred ten ultrasound-guided supraclavicular blocks were performed (50 inpatients, 460 outpatients) by 47 different operators at different levels of training over a 24-month period. Successful surgical anesthesia was achieved in 94.6% of patients after a single attempt; 2.8% required local anesthetic supplementation of a single peripheral nerve territory; and 2.6% received an unplanned general anesthetic. No cases of clinically symptomatic pneumothorax developed. Complications included symptomatic hemidiaphragmatic paresis (1%), Horner syndrome (1%), unintended vascular punctures (0.4%), and transient sensory deficits (0.4%). Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block is associated with a high rate of successful surgical anesthesia and a low rate of complications and thus may be a safe alternative for both inpatients and outpatients. Severe underlying respiratory disease and coagulopathy should remain a contraindication for this brachial plexus approach.

  11. Analysis of "dry" mesothelioma with ultrasound guided biopsies.

    PubMed

    Stigt, Jos A; Boers, James E; Groen, Harry J M

    2012-12-01

    Image-guided sampling of the thickened pleura is a sensitive approach in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma with pleural effusion. Malignant pleural mesothelioma presenting without effusion however is more of a diagnostic challenge. In this study we report the diagnostic yield and complications of ultrasound-guided cutting needle biopsies in this particular category of patients. A retrospective database analysis from September 2007 until January 2012 was performed in 56 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Clinical characteristics and results of diagnostic evaluations were analysed. Of the 56 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma, 20 patients presented without pleural effusion of with locular effusion. Ultrasound-guided cutting needle biopsy was performed in 14/20 patients with a diagnostic accuracy of 80%. Only 1 patient had mild haemoptysis immediately following biopsies. Diagnosing patients with pleural thickenings suspect for malignant mesothelioma without pleural effusion or with loculated pleural effusion is effective and safe with ultrasound-guided cutting needle biopsies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Retrospective Analysis of Ultrasound-guided Flexible Ureteroscopy in the Management of Calyceal Diverticular Calculi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Qing; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Nian-Zeng

    2016-09-05

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is the most widely recommended treatment for calyceal diverticular calculi, providing excellent stone-free results. However, its invasiveness is not negligible considering its major complication rates. Flexible ureteroscopy (FURS) is currently used to treat calyceal diverticula. However, the greatest drawback of FURS is locating the diverticulum since its neck is narrow and concealed. In such a case, the FURS procedure must be converted to PCNL. The aim of this study was to evaluate ultrasound-guided flexible ureteroscopy (UFURS) identifying diverticulum and the management of calyceal diverticular calculi. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 24 patients who had calyceal diverticular calculi. In all 12 patients in the UFURS group, direct FURS failed to find evidence of calyceal diverticula but were confirmed with imaging. The other 12 patients in the PCNL group received PCNL plus fulguration of the diverticular walls. Puncture of calyceal diverticulum was successful in all 12 UFURS patients. Two patients in this group had postoperative residual calculi and two patients developed fever. In the PCNL group, percutaneous renal access and lithotomy were successful in all 12 patients. One patient in this group had residual calculi, one had perirenal hematoma, and two patients developed fever. No significant difference was found in the operating time (UFURS vs. PCNL, 91.8 ± 24.2 vs. 86.3 ± 18.7 min), stone-free rate (UFURS vs. PCNL, 9/12 vs. 10/12), and rate of successful lithotripsy (UFURS vs. PCNL, 10/12 vs. 11/12) between the two groups (all P> 0.05). Postoperative pain scores in the FURS group were significantly lower than that in the PCNL group (2.7 ± 1.2 vs. 6.2 ± 1.5, P< 0.05). Hospital stay in the UFURS group was significantly shorter than that in the PCNL group (3.4 ± 0.8 vs. 5.4 ± 1.0 days, P< 0.05). All patients were symptom-free following surgery (UFURS vs. PCNL, 10/10 vs. 12/12). Ultrasound-guided puncture

  13. Clinical Utility and Pitfalls of Ultrasound Guided Foreign Body Removal in War Fighters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    1 AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-08-2-0162 TITLE: Clinical Utility and Pitfalls of Ultrasound Guided Foreign Body Removal in War...Clinical Utility and Pitfalls of Ultrasound Guided Foreign Body Removal in War Fighters 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER: W81XWH-08-2-0162 5c...Purpose: To demonstrate that 1) ultrasound guided foreign body removal (USFBR) is superior to conventional surgery in the cadaver model, 2) USFBR can be

  14. Ultrasound-guided central venous access using Google Glass.

    PubMed

    Wu, Teresa S; Dameff, Christian J; Tully, Jeffrey L

    2014-12-01

    The use of ultrasound during invasive bedside procedures is quickly becoming the standard of care. Ultrasound machine placement during procedures often requires the practitioner to turn their head during the procedure to view the screen. Such turning has been implicated in unintentional hand movements in novices. Google Glass is a head-mounted computer with a specialized screen capable of projecting images and video into the view of the wearer. Such technology may help decrease unintentional hand movements. Our aim was to evaluate whether or not medical practitioners at various levels of training could use Google Glass to perform an ultrasound-guided procedure, and to explore potential advantages of this technology. Forty participants of varying training levels were randomized into two groups. One group used Google Glass to perform an ultrasound-guided central line. The other group used traditional ultrasound during the procedure. Video recordings of eye and hand movements were analyzed. All participants from both groups were able to complete the procedure without difficulty. Google Glass wearers took longer to perform the procedure at all training levels (medical student year 1 [MS1]: 193 s vs. 77 s, p > 0.5; MS4: 197s vs. 91s, p ≤ 0.05; postgraduate year 1 [PGY1]: 288s vs. 125 s, p > 0.5; PGY3: 151 s vs. 52 s, p ≤ 0.05), and required more needle redirections (MS1: 4.4 vs. 2.0, p > 0.5; MS4: 4.8 vs. 2.8, p > 0.5; PGY1: 4.4 vs. 2.8, p > 0.5; PGY3: 2.0 vs. 1.0, p > 0.5). In this study, it was possible to perform ultrasound-guided procedures with Google Glass. Google Glass wearers, on average, took longer to gain access, and had more needle redirections, but less head movements were noted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia Simulation Training: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao Xu; Trivedi, Vatsal; AlSaflan, AbdulHadi A; Todd, Suzanne Clare; Tricco, Andrea C; McCartney, Colin J L; Boet, Sylvain

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) has become the criterion standard of regional anesthesia practice. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia teaching programs often use simulation, and guidelines have been published to help guide URGA education. This systematic review aimed to examine the effectiveness of simulation-based education for the acquisition and maintenance of competence in UGRA. Studies identified in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ERIC were included if they assessed simulation-based UGRA teaching with outcomes measured at Kirkpatrick level 2 (knowledge and skills), 3 (transfer of learning to the workplace), or 4 (patient outcomes). Two authors independently reviewed all identified references for eligibility, abstracted data, and appraised quality. After screening 176 citations and 45 full-text articles, 12 studies were included. Simulation-enhanced training improved knowledge acquisition (Kirkpatrick level 2) when compared with nonsimulation training. Seven studies measuring skill acquisition (Kirkpatrick level 2) found that simulation-enhanced UGRA training was significantly more effective than alternative teaching methods or no intervention. One study measuring transfer of learning into the clinical setting (Kirkpatrick level 3) found no difference between simulation-enhanced UGRA training and non-simulation-based training. However, this study was discontinued early because of technical challenges. Two studies examined patient outcomes (Kirkpatrick level 4), and one of these found that simulation-based UGRA training improved patient outcomes compared with didactic teaching. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia knowledge and skills significantly improved with simulation training. The acquired UGRA skills may be transferred to the clinical setting; however, further studies are required to confirm these changes translate to improved patient outcomes.

  16. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection of genicular artery pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Rachakonda, Aditya; Qato, Khalil; Khaddash, Tamim; Carroccio, Alfio; Pamoukian, Vicken; Giangola, Gary

    2015-07-01

    Pseudoaneurysm is a rare complication after arthroscopic procedures involving the knee. A 38-year-old man presented 1 month after right-knee arthroscopy with a 2-cm pulsating mass on the medial side of the right knee. Duplex ultrasound evaluation revealed 2.5 × 2.1-cm pseudoaneurysm just distal to the patella with arterialized flow communicating with the inferior medial genicular artery. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection was performed in an office setting, and the resolution of active flow within the pseudoaneurysm was confirmed with duplex ultrasonography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Pathology.

    PubMed

    Dettori, Nathan; Choudur, Hema; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2018-07-01

    High-resolution ultrasound serves as a fast, accessible, reliable, and radiation-free tool for anatomical and dynamic evaluation of various peripheral nerves. It can be used not only to identify and diagnose peripheral nerve and perineural pathology accurately but also to guide various nerve and perineural interventions. We describe the normal and pathologic appearances of peripheral nerves, the pathologies commonly affecting the individual peripheral nerves, and the current ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve interventions and techniques. Future directions are also highlighted. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Liver Biopsy With Gelatin Sponge Pledget Tract Embolization in Infants Weighing Less Than 10 kg.

    PubMed

    Lungren, Matthew P; Lindquester, Will S; Seidel, Frank Glen; Kothary, Nishita; Monroe, Eric J; Shivaram, Giri; Gill, Anne E; Hawkins, Matthew C

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to describe and assess the technical success and safety of ultrasound-guided liver biopsy with gelatin sponge pledget tract embolization technique in infants <10 kg across 3 tertiary pediatric hospitals. There were 67 pediatric patients weighing <10 kg (36 boys; 31 girls; average age 202 days; average weight 6 kg, range 1.5-9.9 kg) referred for liver biopsy performed with ultrasound guidance and gelatin sponge pledget tract embolization during a 2-year period. Patient history, procedural records, and clinical follow-up documents were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 67 procedures were included. There was 100% technical success rate and all samples obtained provided adequate tissue for histological assessment. Average number of 18 G biopsy passes was 3 (range 1-6). There were no procedure-related deaths. There was 1 complication (1%) in a 5-kg infant who was readmitted 36 hours after biopsy with a fever and fully recovered after antibiotics were administered. Biliary atresia was the most common underlying diagnosis (20%), whereas others included acute rejection (16%) and biliary obstruction (7%). Ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy with gelatin sponge pledget tract embolization technique in children weighing <10 kg is safe, effective, and use of this technique may lead to a reduction in rates of adverse events reported in other pediatric series.

  19. Ultrasound-guided interventional therapy for recurrent ovarian chocolate cysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Lu; Dong, Xiao-Qiu; Shao, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Si-Ming

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided interventional therapy in the treatment of postoperative recurrent chocolate cysts. The 198 patients enrolled in this study were divided into three groups. In group 1, the saline washing group, the cavity of the cyst was washed thoroughly with warm saline. In group 2, the ethanol short-time retention group, after washing with saline, the cyst was injected with 95% ethanol with a volume of half of the fluid aspirated from the cyst. Ten minutes later, the rest of the ethanol was aspirated. In group 3, the ethanol retention group, the procedures were the same as with the ethanol short-time retention group, except that 95% of the ethanol was retained in the cyst. An ultrasound examination was performed in the third, sixth and 12th months after therapy. The chocolate cyst cure rate was significantly higher in the ethanol retention group (96%, 66/69) than in the ethanol short-time retention group (82%, 56/68) and no case was cured in the first group (saline washing). We conclude that ultrasound-guided injection and 95% ethanol retention are an effective therapy for the treatment of postoperative recurrent chocolate cysts. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rapid diagnosis of liver cancer by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy.

    PubMed

    Huber, K; Heuhold, N

    1987-01-01

    Because of the relatively favorable prognosis to the patient with early detected hepatocarcinoma followed by surgical treatment if resection is possible, it is important to differentiate quickly between primary and secondary liver cancer. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNAB) was used as a first diagnostic measure in patients with sonographic evidence of liver tumors. Biopsies were done under sonographic control and antiseptic conditions from the center and the border zone of solid tumors of the liver, and the aspirated cell material was air dried on glass slides and Giemsa stained. The cytologic diagnosis was proved by clinical course and in most cases by surgical or autoptic histology. Cytologic evaluation lead in 15 cases to the diagnosis of definitive or suspicious malignant liver disease; the sensitivity was 93% and the specificity was 87%. One case classified as suspicious for malignancy by cytologic examination could be identified as cirrhotic nodule by further investigations. In none of the patients did we find complications from the biopsy procedure. From these data it is concluded that US-FNAB can serve as a rapid, inexpensive, safe, and highly accurate first diagnostic step in patients with solid lesions of the liver.

  1. [Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block for upper abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Osaka, Yoshimune; Kashiwagi, Masanori; Nagatsuka, Yukio; Oosaku, Masayoshi; Hirose, Chikako

    2010-08-01

    Upper abdominal surgery leads to severe postoperative pain. Insufficient postoperative analgesia accompanies a high incidence of complications. Therefore, postoperative analgesia is very important. The epidural analgesia has many advantages. However it has a high risk of epidural hematoma in anticoagulated patients. Rectus sheath block provided safer and more reliable analgesia in recent years, by the development of ultrasound tools. We experienced two cases of the rectus sheath block in upper abdominal surgery under ultrasound guidance. Ultrasound guided rectus sheath block can reduce the risk of peritoneal puncture, bleeding, and other complications. Rectus sheath block is very effective to reduce postoperative pain in upper abdominal surgery as an alternative method to epidural anesthesia in anticoagulated patients.

  2. Ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of pelvic collections.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Anuj; Sundareyan, Ramaniwas; Kumar, Sheo; Arora, Divya

    2015-01-01

    The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain intra-abdominal collections not reached by the transabdominal approach. We discuss 6 patients with such pelvic collections treated with transrectal drainage using catheter placement via Seldinger technique. Transrectal drainage helped achieve clinical and radiological resolution of pelvic collections in 6 and 5 of 6 cases, respectively. It simultaneously helped avoid injury to intervening bowel loops and neurovascular structures using real-time visualization of armamentarium used for drainage. Radiation exposure from fluoroscopic/CT guidance was avoided. Morbidity and costs incurred in surgical exploration were reduced using this much less invasive ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of deep-seated pelvic collections.

  3. Ultrasound-guided piriformis muscle injection. A new approach.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua Alén, E; Diz Villar, A; Curt Nuño, F; Illodo Miramontes, G; Refojos Arencibia, F J; López González, J M

    2016-12-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an uncommon cause of buttock and leg pain. Some treatment options include the injection of piriformis muscle with local anesthetic and steroids. Various techniques for piriformis muscle injection have been described. Ultrasound allows direct visualization and real time injection of the piriformis muscle. We describe 5 consecutive patients, diagnosed of piriformis syndrome with no improvement after pharmacological treatment. Piriformis muscle injection with local anesthetics and steroids was performed using an ultrasound technique based on a standard technique. All 5 patients have improved their pain measured by numeric verbal scale. One patient had a sciatic after injection that improved in 10 days spontaneously. We describe an ultrasound-guided piriformis muscle injection that has the advantages of being effective, simple, and safe. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. An ultrasound-guided fluorescence tomography system: design and specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Alisha V.; Flynn, Brendan P.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Torosean, Sason; Davis, Scott C.; Maytin, Edward V.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    An ultrasound-guided fluorescence molecular tomography system is under development for in vivo quantification of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) during Aminolevulinic Acid - Photodynamic Therapy (ALA-PDT) of Basal Cell Carcinoma. The system is designed to combine fiber-based spectral sampling of PPIX fluorescence emission with co-registered ultrasound images to quantify local fluorophore concentration. A single white light source is used to provide an estimate of the bulk optical properties of tissue. Optical data is obtained by sequential illumination of a 633nm laser source at 4 linear locations with parallel detection at 5 locations interspersed between the sources. Tissue regions from segmented ultrasound images, optical boundary data, white light-informed optical properties and diffusion theory are used to estimate the fluorophore concentration in these regions. Our system and methods allow interrogation of both superficial and deep tissue locations up to PpIX concentrations of 0.025ug/ml.

  5. Transurethral ultrasound-guided laser prostatectomy: initial Luebeck experince

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Stephen; Spitzenpfeil, Elisabeth; Knipper, Ansgar; Jocham, Dieter

    1994-02-01

    Transurethral ultrasound guided laser prostatectomy is one of the most promising alternative invasive treatment modalities for benign prostatic hyperplasia. The principle feature is an on- line 3-D controlling of Nd:YAG laser denaturation of the periurethral tissue. Necrotic tissue is not removed, but sloughs away with the urinary stream within weeks. The bleeding hazard during and after the operation is minimal. By leaving the bladder neck untouched, sexual function is not endangered. Thirty-one patients with symptomatic BPH were treated with the TULIP system and followed up for at least 12 weeks. Suprapubic bladder drainage had to be maintained for a mean time of 37 days. Conventional TURP was performed in four patients due to chronic infection, recurrent bleeding, and poor results. Our initial experience with the TULIP system shows it to be very efficient and safe. A longer follow up of a larger patient population is necessary to compare the therapeutic efficiency to conventional transurethral resection.

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Cryoanalgesia of Peripheral Nerve Lesions.

    PubMed

    Djebbar, Sahlya; Rossi, Ignacio M; Adler, Ronald S

    2016-11-01

    The real-time nature of ultrasound makes it ideally suited to provide guidance for a variety of musculoskeletal interventional procedures involving peripheral nerves. Continuous observation of the needle ensures proper placement and allows continuous monitoring when performing localized ablative therapy and therefore more accurate positioning of a cryoprobe, use of smaller needles, as well as access to small structures. We describe our experience performing cryoablative procedures. Patients undergoing cryoneurolysis have largely reported varying degrees of long-term pain relief and improvement in function; no serious complications have yet been identified. Ultrasound-guided cryoneurolysis can provide a useful, safe alternative to other ablative techniques to achieve long-term analgesia from painful peripheral nerve lesions. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Laparoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Uterine Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Milic, Andrea; Asch, Murray R.; Hawrylyshyn, Peter A.

    Four patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids measuring less than 6 cm underwent laparoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using multiprobe-array electrodes. Follow-up of the treated fibroids was performed with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and patients' symptoms were assessed by telephone interviews. The procedure was initially technically successful in 3 of the 4 patients and MRI studies at 1 month demonstrated complete fibroid ablation. Symptom improvement, including a decrease in menstrual bleeding and pain, was achieved in 2 patients at 3 months. At 7 months, 1 of these 2 patients experienced symptom worsening which correlated with recurrent fibroid on MRI. Themore » third, initially technically successfully treated patient did not experience any symptom relief after the procedure and was ultimately diagnosed with adenomyosis. Our preliminary results suggest that RFA is a technically feasible treatment for symptomatic uterine fibroids in appropriately selected patients.« less

  8. Inexpensive homemade models for ultrasound-guided vein cannulation training.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Stefano; Santori, Gregorio; Porcile, Elisa; Licausi, Martina; Centanaro, Monica; Valente, Umberto

    2007-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that low-cost homemade models may be used to acquire the basic skills for ultrasound-guided central vein puncture. Training study. University transplantation department. Training was performed using three different homemade models (A, B, and C). Segments of a common rubber tourniquet (V1) and Silastic tube (V2) were used to simulate vessels within agar-based models. Overall cost for each model was less than 5 euro (US$7). For each test (test I, A-V1; II, A-V2; III, B-V1; IV, C-V2), the number of punctures and attempts needed to locate the needle inside the lumen were recorded. Each test was considered completed when participants punctured the vessels at the first attempt for three consecutive times. In test I, the mean number of punctures and attempts were 3.85 +/- 1.26 and 4.95 +/- 3.05; in test II, 4.60 +/- 1.14 and 6.30 +/- 2.51; in test III, 4.80 +/- 1.06 and 4.65 +/- 2.21; and in test IV, 4.45 +/- 1.23 and 6.05 +/- 2.92, respectively. For each test, no statistical difference was found by comparison of number of punctures and attempts for anesthesiologists versus nonanesthesiologists, men versus women, or previous experience versus no experience with central vein cannulation (CVC). Video game users obtained better results than did nonusers in test I (punctures, P = 0.033; attempts, P = 0.038), test II (punctures, P = 0.052; attempts, P = 0.011), and test IV (punctures, P = 0.001; attempts, P = 0.003). A posttraining questionnaire showed favorable opinions about the clarity of the instructions, aptness of the models, and adequacy of the training. In our operative unit, the use of ultrasound guidance for CVC increased from 2% to 23% in the first month after training. Low-cost homemade models are useful in acquiring basic coordination skills for ultrasound-guided CVC.

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided transluminal drainage for peripancreatic fluid collections: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hiroshi; Itoi, Takao; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2014-07-01

    Endoscopic drainage for pancreatic and peripancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) has been increasingly used as a minimally invasive alternative to surgical or percutaneous drainage. Recently, endoscopic ultrasound-guided transluminal drainage (EUS-TD) has become the standard of care and a safe procedure for nonsurgical PFC treatment. EUS-TD ensures a safe puncture, avoiding intervening blood vessels. Single or multiple plastic stents (combined with a nasocystic catheter) were used for the treatment of PFCs for EUS-TD. More recently, the use of covered self-expandable metallic stents (CSEMSs) has provided a safer and more efficient approach route for internal drainage. We focused our review on the best approach and stent to use in endoscopic drainage for PFCs. We reviewed studies of EUS-TD for PFCs based on the original Atlanta Classification, including case reports, case series, and previous review articles. Data on clinical outcomes and adverse events were collected retrospectively. A total of 93 patients underwent EUS-TD of pancreatic pseudocysts using CSEMSs. The treatment success and adverse event rates were 94.6% and 21.1%, respectively. The majority of complications were of mild severity and resolved with conservative therapy. A total of 56 patients underwent EUS-TD using CSEMSs for pancreatic abscesses or infected walled-off necroses. The treatment success and adverse event rates were 87.8% and 9.5%, respectively. EUS-TD can be performed safely and efficiently for PFC treatment. Larger diameter CSEMSs without additional fistula tract dilation for the passage of a standard scope are needed to access and drain for PFCs with solid debris.

  10. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage for pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weitian; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Ningming; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The factors influencing the efficacy of ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage were investigated in the present study. A retrospective analysis of clinical data from 435 patients who presented with a pleural effusion was performed. Patients were divided into a control group and an intervention group. Thirty-seven patients in the control group were given standard care using pleural puncture to draw the excess fluid. The 398 patients in the intervention group were treated using ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage. The rate of successful drainage of a pleural effusion was significantly higher (P<0.05), while the rate of complication was lower, in the ultrasound-guided thoracentesis cases compared to standard care treatment. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage is an efficient, safe and minimally invasive procedure to alleviate pleural effusion. The efficacy of the procedure is related to the separation of pleural effusion, drainage tube type and tube diameter. PMID:28105155

  11. The advent of ultrasound-guided ablation techniques in nodular thyroid disease: towards a patient-tailored approach.

    PubMed

    Papini, Enrico; Pacella, Claudio M; Misischi, Irene; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Døssing, Helle; Hegedus, Laszlo

    2014-08-01

    Surgery is the long-established therapeutic option for benign thyroid nodules, which steadily grow and become symptomatic. The cost of thyroid surgery, the risk of temporary or permanent complications, and the effect on quality of life, however, remain relevant concerns. Therefore, various minimally invasive treatments, directed towards office-based management of symptomatic nodules, without requiring general anaesthesia, and with negligible damage to the skin and cervical tissues, have been proposed during the past two decades. Today, ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol injection and thermal ablation with laser or radiofrequency have been thoroughly evaluated, and are accessible procedures in specialized centres. In clinical practice, relapsing thyroid cysts are effectively managed with percutaneous ethanol injection treatment, which should be considered therapy of choice. In solid non-functioning thyroid nodules that grow or become symptomatic, trained operators may safely induce, with a single session of laser ablation treatment or radiofrequency ablation, a 50% volume decrease and, in parallel, improve local symptoms. In contrast, hyperfunctioning nodules remain best treated with radioactive iodine, which results in a better control of hyperthyroidism, also in the long-term, and fewer side-effects. Currently, minimally invasive treatment is also investigated for achieving local control of small size neck recurrences of papillary thyroid carcinoma in patients who are poor candidates for repeat cervical lymph node dissection. This particular use should still be considered experimental. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Technical tips to perform safe and effective ultrasound guided steroid joint injections in children.

    PubMed

    Parra, Dimitri A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the technique used to perform ultrasound guided steroid joint injections in children in a group of joints that can be injected using ultrasound as the only image guidance modality. The technique is described and didactic figures are provided to illustrate key technical concepts. It is very important to be familiar with the sonographic appearance of the pediatric joints and the developing bone when performing ultrasound-guided joint injections in children.

  13. A novel ultrasound-guided shoulder arthroscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyryshkin, K.; Mousavi, P.; Beek, M.; Chen, T.; Pichora, D.; Abolmaesumi, P.

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a novel ultrasound-guided computer system for arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder joint. Intraoperatively, the system tracks and displays the surgical instruments, such as arthroscope and arthroscopic burrs, relative to the anatomy of the patient. The purpose of this system is to improve the surgeon's perception of the three-dimensional space within the anatomy of the patient in which the instruments are manipulated and to provide guidance towards the targeted anatomy. Pre-operatively, computed tomography images of the patient are acquired to construct virtual threedimensional surface models of the shoulder bone structure. Intra-operatively, live ultrasound images of pre-selected regions of the shoulder are captured using an ultrasound probe whose three-dimensional position is tracked by an optical camera. These images are used to register the surface model to the anatomy of the patient in the operating room. An initial alignment is obtained by matching at least three points manually selected on the model to their corresponding points identified on the ultrasound images. The registration is then improved with an iterative closest point or a sequential least squares estimation technique. In the present study the registration results of these techniques are compared. After the registration, surgical instruments are displayed relative to the surface model of the patient on a graphical screen visible to the surgeon. Results of laboratory experiments on a shoulder phantom indicate acceptable registration results and sufficiently fast overall system performance to be applicable in the operating room.

  14. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Silvestri, Enzo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an established modality for shoulder evaluation, being accurate, low cost and radiation free. Different pathological conditions can be diagnosed using ultrasound and can be treated using ultrasound guidance, such as degenerative, traumatic or inflammatory diseases. Subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis is the most common finding on ultrasound evaluation for painful shoulder. Therapeutic injections of corticosteroids are helpful to reduce inflammation and pain. Calcific tendinopathy of rotator cuff affects up to 20% of painful shoulders. Ultrasound-guided treatment may be performed with both single- and double-needle approach. Calcific enthesopathy, a peculiar form of degenerative tendinopathy, is a common and mostly asymptomatic ultrasound finding; dry needling has been proposed in symptomatic patients. An alternative is represented by autologous platelet-rich plasma injections. Intra-articular injections of the shoulder can be performed in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory and degenerative diseases with corticosteroids or hyaluronic acid respectively. Steroid injections around the long head of the biceps brachii tendon are indicated in patients with biceps tendinopathy, reducing pain and humeral tenderness. The most common indication for acromion-clavicular joint injection is degenerative osteoarthritis, with ultrasound representing a useful tool in localizing the joint space and properly injecting various types of drugs (steroids, lidocaine or hyaluronic acid). Suprascapular nerve block is an approved treatment for chronic shoulder pain non-responsive to conventional treatments as well as candidate patients for shoulder arthroscopy. This review provides an overview of these different ultrasonography-guided procedures that can be performed around the shoulder.

  15. Models to teach lung sonopathology and ultrasound-guided thoracentesis.

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, Jacek A

    2014-12-01

    Lung sonography allows rapid diagnosis of lung emergencies such as pulmonary edema, hemothorax or pneumothorax. The ability to timely diagnose an intraoperative pneumothorax is an important skill for the anesthesiologist. However, lung ultrasound exams require an interpretation of not only real images but also complex acoustic artifacts such as A-lines and B-lines. Therefore, appropriate training to gain proficiency is important. Simulated environment using ultrasound phantom models allows controlled, supervised learning. We have developed hybrid models that combine dry or wet polyurethane foams, porcine rib cages and human hand simulating a rib cage. These models simulate fairly accurately pulmonary sonopathology and allow supervised teaching of lung sonography with the immediate feedback. In-vitro models can also facilitate learning of procedural skills, improving transducer and needle positioning and movement, rapid recognition of thoracic anatomy and hand - eye coordination skills. We described a new model to teach an ultrasound guided thoracentesis. This model consists of the experimenter's hand placed on top of the water-filled container with a wet foam. Metacarpal bones of the human hand simulate a rib cage and a wet foam simulates a diseased lung immersed in the pleural fluid. Positive fluid flow offers users feedback when a simulated pleural effusion is accurately assessed.

  16. Practice guidelines for endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis.

    PubMed

    Wyse, Jonathan M; Battat, Robert; Sun, Siyu; Saftoiu, Adrian; Siddiqui, Ali A; Leong, Ang Tiing; Arturo Arias, Brenda Lucia; Fabbri, Carlo; Adler, Douglas G; Santo, Erwin; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos; Artifon, Everson; Mishra, Girish; Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Poley, Jan Werner; Guo, Jintao; Vila, Juan J; Lee, Linda S; Sharma, Malay; Bhutani, Manoop S; Giovannini, Marc; Kitano, Masayuki; Eloubeidi, Mohamad Ali; Khashab, Mouen A; Nguyen, Nam Q; Saxena, Payal; Vilmann, Peter; Fusaroli, Pietro; Garg, Pramod Kumar; Ho, Sammy; Mukai, Shuntaro; Carrara, Silvia; Sridhar, Subbaramiah; Lakhtakia, Sundeep; Rana, Surinder S; Dhir, Vinay; Sahai, Anand V

    2017-01-01

    The objective of guideline was to provide clear and relevant consensus statements to form a practical guideline for clinicians on the indications, optimal technique, safety and efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN). Six important clinical questions were determined regarding EUS-CPN. Following a detailed literature review, 6 statements were proposed attempting to answer those questions. A group of expert endosonographers convened in Chicago, United States (May 2016), where the statements were presented and feedback provided. Subsequently a consensus group of 35 expert endosonographers voted based on their individual level of agreement. A strong recommendation required 80% voter agreement. The modified GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) criteria were used to rate the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Eighty percent agreement was reached on 5 of 6 consensus statements, 79.4% agreement was reached on the remaining one. EUS-CPN is efficacious, should be integrated into the management of pancreas cancer pain, and can be considered early at the time of diagnosis of inoperable disease. Techniques may still vary based on operator experience. Serious complications exist, but are rare.

  17. Penthrox inhaler analgesia in transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chanyang; Woo, Henry H

    2015-06-01

    Periprostatic injection of local anaesthetic (PILA) has been shown to significantly reduce pain in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUSPB). However, this method does not address pain that is associated with ultrasound probe insertion, and the injection of local anaesthetic itself causes pain. The aim of this study was to explore the efficacy of methoxyflurane delivered by a Penthrox inhaler as a novel method of pain relief during TRUSPB. From July 2012 to July 2013, 64 patients were scheduled at a single centre to undergo TRUSPB while receiving analgesia via Penthrox inhaler. Fifteen minutes after the biopsy procedure, these patients were asked to complete a pain score survey using a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS) to separately report the degree of pain experienced during digital rectal examination (DRE), ultrasound probe insertion and core biopsy. The median pain scores on a 10-cm VAS were 2.0, 2.4 and 3.0 during DRE, probe insertion and needle biopsy, respectively, while using the Penthrox inhaler. Of the 64 patients, 11 had undergone TRUSPB previously receiving PILA. In these patients, PILA was significantly better than the Penthrox inhaler for pain relief during needle biopsy (median pain score 2.0 versus 4.0; P = 0.012). The Penthrox inhaler appears to be a safe and effective method of analgesia for TRUSPB. Patients who had experienced both PILA and Penthrox reported pain scores that significantly favoured PILA over the Penthrox inhaler. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. A technical report on ultrasound-guided scapulocostal syndrome injection.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, C; Harmon, D

    2016-08-01

    We describe a case report and technique for using an ultrasound scanner and a linear transducer to guide serratus posterior superior (SPS) muscle injection. A 43-year-old female presented with chronic pain centered under the right upper portion of her scapula impacting her activities of daily living. For the ultrasound-guided SPS muscle injection, the patient was placed in the prone position. The transducer was oriented in a transverse orientation at the level of the C6-T1 vertebrae. Here the SPS muscle attaches to the lower portion of the ligament nuchae and the intervening interspinous ligaments. The muscle fibers run inferiorly and laterally to attach to the 2nd-5th ribs which were identified along with the lateral portion of the serratus posterior superior muscle which is covered by the scapula. Real-time imaging was used to direct a spinal needle into the trigger points of the SPS muscle, where solution was injected under direct vision. The patient's pain symptoms improved significantly. Serratus posterior superior injection can confirm a diagnosis of scapulocostal syndrome and be therapeutically beneficial.

  19. Urinary morbidity following ultrasound-guided transperineal prostate seed implantation.

    PubMed

    Gelblum, D Y; Potters, L; Ashley, R; Waldbaum, R; Wang, X H; Leibel, S

    1999-08-01

    To assess the urinary morbidity experienced by patients undergoing ultrasound-guided, permanent transperineal seed implantation for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Between September 1992 and September 1997, 693 consecutive patients presented with a diagnosis of clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate, and were treated with ultrasound-guided transperineal interstitial permanent brachytherapy (TPIPB). Ninety-three patients are excluded from this review, having received neoadjuvant antiandrogen therapy. TPIPB was performed with 125I in 165 patients and with 103Pd in 435 patients. Patients treated with implant alone received 160 Gy with 125I (pre TG43) or 120 Gy with 103Pd. One hundred two patients received preimplant, pelvic external beam radiation (XRT) to a dose of either 41.4 or 45 Gy because of high-risk features including PSA > or = 10 and/or Gleason score > or = 7. Combined modality patients received 120 Gy and 90 Gy, respectively for 125I or 103Pd. All patients underwent postimplant cystoscopy and placement of an indwelling Foley catheter for 24-48 h. Follow-up was at 5 weeks after implant, every 3 months for the first 2 years, and then every 6 months for subsequent years. Patients completed AUA urinary symptom scoring questionnaires at initial consultation and at each follow-up visit. Urinary toxicity was classified by the RTOG toxicity scale with the following adaptations; grade 1 urinary toxicity was symptomatic nocturia or frequency requiring none or minimal medical intervention such as phenazopyridine; grade 2 urinary toxicity was early obstructive symptomatology requiring alpha-blocker therapy; and grade 3 toxicity was considered that requiring indwelling catheters or posttreatment transurethral resection of the prostate for symptom relief. Log-rank analysis and Chi-square testing was performed to assess AUA score, prostate size, isotope selection, and the addition of XRT as possible prognosticators of postimplant urinary toxicity. The

  20. Evaluation of ultrasound-guided vascular access in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, Scott C; Sullivan, Lauren A; Morley, Paul S; Boscan, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    To describe the technique and determine the feasibility, success rate, perceived difficulty, and time to vascular access using ultrasound guidance for jugular vein catheterization in a cardiac arrest dog model. Prospective descriptive study. University teaching hospital. Nine Walker hounds. A total of 27 jugular catheterizations were performed postcardiac arrest using ultrasound guidance. Catheterizations were recorded based on the order in which they were performed and presence/absence of a hematoma around the vein. Time (minutes) until successful vascular access and perceived difficulty in achieving vascular access (scale of 1 = easy to 10 = difficult) were recorded for each catheterization. Mean time to vascular access was 1.9 minutes (95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.4 min) for catheterizations without hematoma, versus 4.3 minutes (1.8-10.1 min) for catheterizations with hematoma (P = 0.1). Median perceived difficulty was 2 of 10 (range 1-7) for catheterizations without hematoma, versus 2 of 10 (range 1-8) for catheterizations with hematoma (P = 0.3). A learning curve was evaluated by comparing mean time to vascular access and perceived difficulty in initial versus subsequent catheterizations. Mean time to vascular access was 2.5 minutes (1.0-6.4 min) in the initial 13 catheterizations versus 3.3 minutes (1.5-7.5 min) in the subsequent 14 catheterizations (P = 0.6). Median perceived difficulty in the first 13 catheterizations (3, range 1-8) was significantly greater (P = 0.049) than median perceived difficulty in the subsequent 14 catheterizations (2, range 1-6). Ultrasound-guided jugular catheterization is associated with a learning curve but is successful in obtaining rapid vascular access in dogs. Further prospective studies are warranted to confirm the utility of this technique in a clinical setting. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  1. The Ultrasound-Guided Retroclavicular Block: A Prospective Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Jasmin; Fréchette, Yannick; Sansoucy, Yanick; Echave, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this feasibility study was to determine the success rate (sensory and surgical) of the novel retroclavicular block and to thoroughly describe the technique. In addition, needle tip and shaft visibility, needling time, procedural discomfort, motor block success rate, patient satisfaction at 48-hour follow-up, and complications were also recorded. Fifty patients scheduled for distal upper limb surgery received an in-plane, single-shot, ultrasound-guided retroclavicular block with 40 mL of mepivacaine 1.5% with epinephrine 2.5 μg/mL. Block success was defined as a sensory score of 10/10 for the 5 nerves supplying the distal upper limb at 30 minutes. Surgical success, needle visibility, needling time, axillary artery depth, motor block rate, patient discomfort with technique, satisfaction at 48 hours, and complications were also recorded. All blocks were video-recorded and timed for further independent assessment. A chest x-ray was obtained before discharge. Forty-five patients had a total sensory score of 10/10 at 30 minutes (90% success rate). Surgical success rate was 96%. Mean needling time was 3.77 minutes (25th-75th percentiles, 2.90-6.53 minutes) with a mean axillary artery depth of 3.1 ± 0.7 cm. Procedure-related discomfort (mean visual analog scale, 1.9 ± 1.2) was low. Mean 48-hour patient satisfaction rate (9.2 ± 1.1), mean needle tip (Likert scale, 3.0 ± 0.9), and shaft visibility (3.9 ± 0.9) were high. One vascular puncture and two transient paresthesias were recorded. No pneumothorax was revealed by chest x-ray. In this study, the novel retroclavicular block offered a quick, safe, and reliable alternative for distal arm block. Further studies, comparing this approach with the classic infraclavicular block, are required to validate its efficacy, safety, and reliability.

  2. New platform for evaluating ultrasound-guided interventional technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle tracking systems are frequently used in surgical procedures. Various needle tracking technologies have been developed using ultrasound, electromagnetic sensors, and optical sensors. To evaluate these new needle tracking technologies, 3D volume information is often acquired to compute the actual distance from the needle tip to the target object. The image-guidance conditions for comparison are often inconsistent due to the ultrasound beam-thickness. Since 3D volumes are necessary, there is often some time delay between the surgical procedure and the evaluation. These evaluation methods will generally only measure the final needle location because they interrupt the surgical procedure. The main contribution of this work is a new platform for evaluating needle tracking systems in real-time, resolving the problems stated above. We developed new tools to evaluate the precise distance between the needle tip and the target object. A PZT element transmitting unit is designed as needle introducer shape so that it can be inserted in the needle. We have collected time of flight and amplitude information in real-time. We propose two systems to collect ultrasound signals. We demonstrate this platform on an ultrasound DAQ system and a cost-effective FPGA board. The results of a chicken breast experiment show the feasibility of tracking a time series of needle tip distances. We performed validation experiments with a plastisol phantom and have shown that the preliminary data fits a linear regression model with a RMSE of less than 0.6mm. Our platform can be applied to more general needle tracking methods using other forms of guidance.

  3. Objective assessment of operator performance during ultrasound-guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Tabriz, David M; Street, Mandie; Pilgram, Thomas K; Duncan, James R

    2011-09-01

    ultrasound-guided needle placement. The performance indices were closely related to operator experience.

  4. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration versus core needle biopsy: comparison of post-biopsy hematoma rates and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Chae, In Hye; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Park, Vivian Y; Kwak, Jin Young

    2017-07-01

    To compare post-biopsy hematoma rates between ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy, and to investigate risk factors for post-biopsy hematoma. A total of 5304 thyroid nodules which underwent ultrasound guided biopsy were included in this retrospective study. We compared clinical and US features between patients with and without post-biopsy hematoma. Associations between these features and post-biopsy hematoma were analyzed. Post-biopsy hematoma rate was 0.8% (43/5121) for ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and 4.9% (9/183) for ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy (P < 0.001). For ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration, gender, age, size, presence of vascularity, and suspicious US features were not associated with post-biopsy hematoma according to experience level. Post-biopsy hematoma occurred significantly more with ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy (9/179, 5.0%) than with ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration (9/1138, 0.8%) (P < 0.001) in experienced performers and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy was the only significant risk factor for post-biopsy hematoma (adjusted Odds Ratio, 6.458, P < 0.001). Post-biopsy hematoma occurred significantly more in ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy than in ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy was the only independent factor of post-biopsy hematoma in thyroid nodules.

  5. Transvaginal ultrasound-guided embryo transfer in IVF.

    PubMed

    Larue, L; Keromnes, G; Massari, A; Roche, C; Moulin, J; Gronier, H; Bouret, D; Cassuto, N G; Ayel, J P

    2017-05-01

    To determine whether transvaginal ultrasound-guided embryo transfer is a technique that can be used routinely, whether it improves IVF outcomes and whether it makes difficult transfers easier and more successful. Non-randomized retrospective study conducted between 2012 and 2016 in the fertility center of the Diaconesses-Croix St-Simon hospital group. The outcomes of 3910 transfers, performed by 5 senior operators, under transabdominal ultrasound guidance are compared with those of 800 transfers, performed by 1 senior operator under transvaginal ultrasound guidance. The criteria studied are the feasibility of the technique and the percentage of pregnancies per transfer in the two populations described, as well as in the difficult and very difficult transfer populations. All the transfers were feasible under transvaginal ultrasound guidance without the use of forceps or additional instruments. The percentage of pregnancies per transfer is significantly increased, when the transfer is performed under transvaginal ultrasound guidance compared with that performed under transabdominal ultrasound guidance, in the general population (38%, n=800 vs 30%, n=3910; P 0.0004) and in the reference population characterized by age <38 years and >6 oocytes collected per puncture (45%, n=490 vs 36%, n=1968; P 0.002). The percentage of pregnancies per transfer (P/T) is not significantly different in the populations of easy transfers (n 695, 38% P/T), difficult transfers (n 58, 46% P/T; P=ns) and very difficult transfers (n 47, 34% P/T; P=ns). Embryo transfer is a key stage in IVF, in which the quality of performance determines the outcome. In this study, transvaginal ultrasound guidance of the transfer, which is the reference procedure in gynaecological imaging, significantly increases the percentage of pregnancies per transfer, both in the general population and in the reference population, compared with transfers performed under transabdominal ultrasound guidance. Transvaginal

  6. Diagnostic Yield of Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background: New transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) technologies have been developed, but their clinical effectiveness and determinants of diagnostic yield have not been quantified. Prospective data are needed to determine risk-adjusted diagnostic yield. Methods: We prospectively enrolled patients undergoing TBNA of mediastinal lymph nodes in the American College of Chest Physicians Quality Improvement Registry, Evaluation, and Education (AQuIRE) multicenter database and recorded clinical, procedural, and provider information. All clinical decisions, including type of TBNA used (conventional vs endobronchial ultrasound-guided), were made by the attending bronchoscopist. The primary outcome was obtaining a specific diagnosis. Results: We enrolled 891 patients at six hospitals. Most procedures (95%) were performed with ultrasound guidance. A specific diagnosis was made in 447 cases. Unadjusted diagnostic yields were 37% to 54% for different hospitals, with significant between-hospital heterogeneity (P = .0001). Diagnostic yield was associated with annual hospital TBNA volume (OR, 1.003; 95% CI, 1.000-1.006; P = .037), smoking (OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.02-2.34; P = .042), biopsy of more than two sites (OR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.38-0.85; P = .015), lymph node size (reference > 1-2 cm, ≤ 1 cm: OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.34-0.77; P = .003; > 2-3 cm: OR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.61-3.85; P < .001; and > 3 cm: OR, 3.61; 95% CI, 2.17-6.00; P < .001), and positive PET scan (OR, 3.12; 95% CI, 1.39-7.01; P = .018). Biopsy was performed on more and smaller nodes at high-volume hospitals (P < .0001). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first bronchoscopy study of risk-adjusted diagnostic yields on a hospital-level basis. High-volume hospitals were associated with high diagnostic yields. This study also demonstrates the value of procedural registries as a quality improvement tool. A larger number and variety of participating hospitals is needed to verify these results and to further

  7. Ultrasound guided therapeutic injections of the cervical spine and brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Cormick, Wes

    2014-02-01

    Introduction : Recent applications in ultrasound imaging include ultrasound assessment and ultrasound guided therapeutic injections of the spine and brachial plexus. Discussion : Ultrasound is an ideal modality for these regions as it allows accurate safe and quick injection of single or multiple sites. It has the added advantages of lack of ionising radiation, and can be done without requiring large expensive radiology equipment. Conclusion : Brachial plexus pathology may be present in patients presenting for shoulder symptoms where very little is found at imaging the shoulder. It is important to understand the anatomy and normal variants that may exist to be able to recognise when pathology is present. When pathology is demonstrated it is easy to do a trial of therapy with ultrasound guided injection of steroid around the nerve lesion. This review will outline the normal anatomy and variants and common pathology, which can be amenable to ultrasound guided injection of steroid.

  8. Comparison of Ultrasound-Guided and Fluoroscopy-Assisted Antegrade Common Femoral Artery Puncture Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Michael M.; Goh, Gerard S.; Power, Sarah

    PurposeTo prospectively compare the procedural time and complication rates of ultrasound-guided and fluoroscopy-assisted antegrade common femoral artery (CFA) puncture techniques.Materials and MethodsHundred consecutive patients, undergoing a vascular procedure for which an antegrade approach was deemed necessary/desirable, were randomly assigned to undergo either ultrasound-guided or fluoroscopy-assisted CFA puncture. Time taken from administration of local anaesthetic to vascular sheath insertion in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), patients’ age, body mass index (BMI), fluoroscopy radiation dose, haemostasis method and immediate complications were recorded. Mean and median values were calculated and statistically analysed with unpaired t tests.ResultsSixty-nine male and 31 female patients underwent antegrademore » puncture (mean age 66.7 years). The mean BMI was 25.7 for the ultrasound-guided (n = 53) and 25.3 for the fluoroscopy-assisted (n = 47) groups. The mean time taken for the ultrasound-guided puncture was 7 min 46 s and for the fluoroscopy-assisted technique was 9 min 41 s (p = 0.021). Mean fluoroscopy dose area product in the fluoroscopy group was 199 cGy cm{sup 2}. Complications included two groin haematomas in the ultrasound-guided group and two retroperitoneal haematomas and one direct SFA puncture in the fluoroscopy-assisted group.ConclusionUltrasound-guided technique is faster and safer for antegrade CFA puncture when compared to the fluoroscopic-assisted technique alone.« less

  9. [Feasibility of device closure for multiple atrial septal defects using 3D printing and ultrasound-guided intervention technique].

    PubMed

    Qiu, X; Lü, B; Xu, N; Yan, C W; Ouyang, W B; Liu, Y; Zhang, F W; Yue, Z Q; Pang, K J; Pan, X B

    2017-04-25

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of trans-catheter closure of multiple atrial septal defects (ASD) monitored by trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) under the guidance of 3D printing heart model. Methods: Between April and August 2016, a total of 21 patients (8 male and 13 female) with multiple ASD in Fuwai Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences underwent CT scan and 3-dimensional echocardiography for heart disease model produced by 3D printing technique. The best occlusion program was determined through the simulation test on the model. Percutaneous device closure of multiple ASD was performed follow the predetermined program guided by TTE. Clinical follow-up including electrocardiogram and TTE was arranged at 1 month after the procedure. Results: The trans-catheter procedure was successful in all 21 patients using a single atrial septal occluder. Mild residual shunt was found in 5 patient in the immediate postoperative period, 3 of them were disappeared during postoperative follow-up. There was no death, vascular damage, arrhythmia, device migration, thromboembolism, valvular dysfunction during the follow-up period. Conclusion: The use of 3D printing heart model provides a useful reference for transcatheter device closure of multiple ASD achieving through ultrasound-guided intervention technique, which appears to be safe and feasible with good outcomes of short-term follow-up.

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Single-Injection Infraclavicular Block Versus Ultrasound-Guided Double-Injection Axillary Block: A Noninferiority Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Ariane; Nadeau, Marie-Josée; Dion, Nicolas; Lévesque, Simon; Nicole, Pierre C; Turgeon, Alexis F

    2016-01-01

    Single-injection ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block is a simple, reliable, and effective technique. A simplified double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block technique with a high success rate recently has been described. It has the advantage of being performed in a superficial and compressible location, with a potentially improved safety profile. However, its effectiveness in comparison with single-injection infraclavicular block has not been established. We hypothesized that the double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block would show rates of complete sensory block at 30 minutes noninferior to the single-injection ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block. After approval by our research ethics committee and written informed consent, adults undergoing distal upper arm surgery were randomized to either group I, ultrasound-guided single-injection infraclavicular block, or group A, ultrasound-guided double-injection axillary block. In group I, 30 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine was injected posterior to the axillary artery. In group A, 25 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine was injected posteromedial to the axillary artery, after which 5 mL was injected around the musculocutaneous nerve. Primary outcome was the rate of complete sensory block at 30 minutes. Secondary outcomes were the onset of sensory and motor blocks, surgical success rates, performance times, and incidence of complications. All outcomes were assessed by a blinded investigator. The noninferiority of the double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block was considered if the limits of the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) were within a 10% margin of the rate of complete sensory block of the infraclavicular block. At 30 minutes, the rate of complete sensory block was 79% in group A (90% CI, 71%-85%) compared with 91% in group I (90% CI, 85%-95%); the upper limit of CI of group A is thus included in the established noninferiority margin of 10%. The rate of complete sensory block was lower in group A (proportion

  11. Anaesthetics, steroids and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal procedures

    PubMed Central

    La Marra, Alice; Arrigoni, Francesco; Mariani, Silvia; Zugaro, Luigi; Splendiani, Alessandra; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Reginelli, Alfonso; Zappia, Marcello; Brunese, Luca; Duka, Ejona; Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    This review aims to evaluate the role of anaesthetics, steroids and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) employed with ultrasound-guided injection in the management of musculoskeletal pathology of the extremities. Ultrasound-guided injection represents an interesting and minimally invasive solution for the treatment of tendon and joint inflammatory or degenerative diseases. The availability of a variety of new drugs such as hyaluronic acid and PRP provides expansion of the indications and therapeutic possibilities. The clinical results obtained in terms of pain reduction and functional recovery suggest that the use of infiltrative procedures can be a good therapeutic alternative in degenerative and inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:27302491

  12. Targeted Ultrasound-Guided Perineural Hydrodissection of the Sciatic Nerve for the Treatment of Piriformis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burke, Christopher J; Walter, William R; Adler, Ronald S

    2018-05-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a common cause of lumbar, gluteal, and thigh pain, frequently associated with sciatic nerve symptoms. Potential etiologies include muscle injury or chronic muscle stretching associated with gait disturbances. There is a common pathological end pathway involving hypertrophy, spasm, contracture, inflammation, and scarring of the piriformis muscle, leading to impingement of the sciatic nerve. Ultrasound-guided piriformis injections are frequently used in the treatment of these pain syndromes, with most of the published literature describing injection of the muscle. We describe a safe, effective ultrasound-guided injection technique for the treatment of piriformis syndrome using targeted sciatic perineural hydrodissection followed by therapeutic corticosteroid injection.

  13. Ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation for treating uterine arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Yan, X; Zhao, C; Tian, C; Wen, S; He, X; Zhou, Y

    2017-08-01

    To explore HIFU treatment for uterine arteriovenous malformation. A case report. Gynaecological department in a university teaching hospital of China. A patient with uterine arteriovenous malformation. The diagnosis of uterine arteriovenous malformation was made through MRI. Ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU) ablation was performed. HIFU is effective in treating uterine arteriovenous malformation. The patient had reduction of the lesion volume and obvious symptom relief, without significant adverse effects. HIFU can be used as a new treatment option for uterine arteriovenous malformation. Ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation is effective in treating uterine arteriovenous malformation. © 2017 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  14. Anaesthetics, steroids and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal procedures.

    PubMed

    Barile, Antonio; La Marra, Alice; Arrigoni, Francesco; Mariani, Silvia; Zugaro, Luigi; Splendiani, Alessandra; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Reginelli, Alfonso; Zappia, Marcello; Brunese, Luca; Duka, Ejona; Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    This review aims to evaluate the role of anaesthetics, steroids and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) employed with ultrasound-guided injection in the management of musculoskeletal pathology of the extremities. Ultrasound-guided injection represents an interesting and minimally invasive solution for the treatment of tendon and joint inflammatory or degenerative diseases. The availability of a variety of new drugs such as hyaluronic acid and PRP provides expansion of the indications and therapeutic possibilities. The clinical results obtained in terms of pain reduction and functional recovery suggest that the use of infiltrative procedures can be a good therapeutic alternative in degenerative and inflammatory joint diseases.

  15. Real-time computed tomography dosimetry during ultrasound-guided brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Irving D; Meskell, Paul; Oldenburg, Nicklas E; Saltzman, Brian; Kearney, Gary P; Holupka, Edward J

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided implantation of permanent radioactive seeds is a treatment option for localized prostate cancer. Several techniques have been described for the optimal placement of the seeds in the prostate during this procedure. Postimplantation dosimetric calculations are performed after the implant. Areas of underdosing can only be corrected with either an external beam boost or by performing a second implant. We demonstrate the feasibility of performing computed tomography (CT)-based postplanning during the ultrasound-guided implant and subsequently correcting for underdosed areas. Ultrasound-guided brachytherapy is performed on a modified CT table with general anesthesia. The postplanning CT scan is performed after the implant, while the patient is still under anesthesia. Additional seeds are implanted into "cold spots," and the resultant dosimetry confirmed with CT. Intraoperative postplanning was successfully performed. Dose-volume histograms demonstrated adequate dose coverage during the initial implant, but on detailed analysis, for some patients, areas of underdosing were observed either at the apex or the peripheral zone. Additional seeds were implanted to bring these areas to prescription dose. Intraoperative postplanning is feasible during ultrasound-guided brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Although the postimplant dose-volume histograms for all patients, before the implantation of additional seeds, were adequate according to the American Brachytherapy Society criteria, specific critical areas can be underdosed. Additional seeds can then be implanted to optimize the dosimetry and reduce the risk of underdosing areas of cancer.

  16. Ultrasound-guided suprascapular nerve block: a correlation with fluoroscopic and cadaveric findings.

    PubMed

    Peng, Philip W H; Wiley, Michael J; Liang, James; Bellingham, Geoff A

    2010-02-01

    Previous work on the ultrasound-guided injection technique and the sonoanatomy of the suprascapular region relevant to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) block suggested that the ultrasound scan showed the presence of the suprascapular notch and transverse ligament. The intended target of the ultrasound-guided injection was the notch. The objective of this case report and the subsequent cadaver dissection findings is to reassess the interpretation of the ultrasound images when locating structures for SSN block. A 45-yr-old man with chronic shoulder pain received an ultrasound-guided SSN block using the suprascapular notch as the intended target. The position of the needle was verified by fluoroscopy, which showed the tip of the needle well outside the suprascapular notch. Similar ultrasound-guided SSN blocks were performed in two cadavers. Dissections were performed which showed that the needle tips were not at the suprascapular notch but, more accurately, were close to the SSN but at the floor of the suprascapular fossa between the suprascapular and spinoglenoid notch. Our fluoroscopic and cadaver dissection findings both suggest that the ultrasound image of the SSN block shown by the well-described technique is actually targeting the nerve on the floor of the suprascapular spine between the suprascapular and spinoglenoid notches rather than the suprascapular notch itself. The structure previously identified as the transverse ligament is actually the fascia layer of the supraspinatus muscle.

  17. PLUS: open-source toolkit for ultrasound-guided intervention systems.

    PubMed

    Lasso, Andras; Heffter, Tamas; Rankin, Adam; Pinter, Csaba; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2014-10-01

    A variety of advanced image analysis methods have been under the development for ultrasound-guided interventions. Unfortunately, the transition from an image analysis algorithm to clinical feasibility trials as part of an intervention system requires integration of many components, such as imaging and tracking devices, data processing algorithms, and visualization software. The objective of our paper is to provide a freely available open-source software platform-PLUS: Public software Library for Ultrasound-to facilitate rapid prototyping of ultrasound-guided intervention systems for translational clinical research. PLUS provides a variety of methods for interventional tool pose and ultrasound image acquisition from a wide range of tracking and imaging devices, spatial and temporal calibration, volume reconstruction, simulated image generation, and recording and live streaming of the acquired data. This paper introduces PLUS, explains its functionality and architecture, and presents typical uses and performance in ultrasound-guided intervention systems. PLUS fulfills the essential requirements for the development of ultrasound-guided intervention systems and it aspires to become a widely used translational research prototyping platform. PLUS is freely available as open source software under BSD license and can be downloaded from http://www.plustoolkit.org.

  18. Perioperative ultrasound-guided wire marking of calcific deposits in calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Sigg, Andreas; Draws, Detlev; Stamm, Axel; Pfeiffer, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The identification of a calcific deposit in the rotator cuff can often cause difficulties. A new technique is described to identify the calcific deposit perioperatively with a ultrasound-guided wire. The technique allows a safe direct marking of calcific deposits making the procedure faster especially in difficult cases.

  19. Value of Artisanal Simulators to Train Veterinary Students in Performing Invasive Ultrasound-Guided Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hage, Maria Cristina F. N. S.; Massaferro, Ana Beatriz; Lopes, Érika Rondon; Beraldo, Carolina Mariano; Daniel, Jéssika

    2016-01-01

    Pericardial effusion can lead to cardiac tamponade, which endangers an animal's life. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis is used to remove abnormal liquid; however, it requires technical expertise. In veterinary medical education, the opportunity to teach this procedure to save lives during emergencies is rare; therefore, simulators are…

  20. Ultrasound-guided microwave ablation in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules in 435 patients

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Lin-Xue; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Jun-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of ultrasound-guided microwave ablation in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. A total of 474 benign thyroid nodules in 435 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided microwave ablation from September 2012 to August 2015 were included. Nodule volume and thyroid function were measured before treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and subsequently after every 6 months. The nodule volume reduction rate and changes of thyroid function were evaluated. The volume of all thyroid nodules significantly decreased after ultrasound-guided microwave ablation. The average volume was 13.07 ± 0.95 ml before treatment, and 1.14 ± 0.26 ml at 12-months follow-up. The mean volume reduction rate was 90% and the final volume reduction rate was 94%. The volume reduction rate of mainly cystic nodules was significantly higher than that of simple solid and mainly solid nodules (all P < 0.05). The pretreatment volume of nodules was positively correlated with the final volume reduction rate at final follow-up (P = 0.004). No serious complications were observed after treatment. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided microwave ablation is an effective and safe technique for treatment of benign thyroid nodules, and has the potential for clinical applications. Impact statement Ultrasound-guided MWA is an effective and safe technique for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. It can significantly reduce the nodule volume, improve the patients’ clinical symptoms, has less complication, guarantees quick recovery, meets patients' aesthetic needs, and shows less interference on the physiological and psychological aspects of the body. MWA should be a good complement to traditional open surgery and has potentials in clinical applications. PMID:28847173

  1. Comparison of Stereotactic and Ultrasound-guided Biopsy of Solid Supratentorial Tumor: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Chandra, P. Sarat; Sharma, Bhawani S.; Mehta, V. S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The computed tomography (CT) guided stereotactic biopsy (STB) is considered as method of choice for biopsy of intracranial mass lesions. However, it's disadvantages are frame fixation, time requirement for transportation between CT scan suit to the operation theater with added much higher equipment cost in the relatively resource scarred developing country. Ultrasound-guided biopsy (USGB) is relatively simpler, economical, less time consuming, and real-time procedure. Clinical Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven consecutively admitted patients with supratentorial brain tumors, who underwent biopsy of the lesion using CT compatible stereotactic and ultrasound-guided (USGB) procedure formed cohort of the study. Based on location and size of the lesions, the cases were divided into two groups, superficial and deep. Twenty-two patients underwent ultrasound-guided biopsy and 15 with STB. Results: The diagnostic yield of STB was 93% and 91% for ultrasound-guided biopsy. The mean operation time of STB group was 149.00 min and 94 min for USGB, which was statistically significant. Two cases in each group developed hematoma; however, one case in USGB group needed surgical evacuation. The real-time monitoring detected two hematoma intraoperatively, which were further also confirmed on postoperative CT scan head. Conclusions: The ultrasound-guided biopsy procedure (USGB) was simple, relatively shorter time-consuming procedure and equally efficacious and utilizing economical equipment and can act as a safer alternative to CT STB process for biopsy of the intracranial mass lesion. Furthermore, USGB also provided intra-operative real-time monitoring, which provided clue for close monitoring in the postoperative period after completion of biopsy to look for development of fresh hematoma development not only at the biopsy site but also along the biopsy track and adjoining area. Perhaps, a longer period of ultrasonic monitoring following the procedure would be of

  2. Ultrasound-guided synovial Tru-cut biopsy: indications, technique, and outcome in 111 cases.

    PubMed

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Griffith, James F; Lai, Fernand M; Hui, Mamie; Chiu, K H; Lee, Ryan K L; Ng, Alex W H; Leung, Jason

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. Clinical notes, pathology and microbiology reports, ultrasound and other imaging studies of 100 patients who underwent 111 ultrasound-guided synovial biopsies were reviewed. Biopsies were compared with the final clinical diagnosis established after synovectomy (n = 43) or clinical/imaging follow-up (n = 57) (mean 30 months). Other than a single vasovagal episode, no complication of synovial biopsy was encountered. One hundred and seven (96 %) of the 111 biopsies yielded synovium histologically. Pathology ± microbiology findings for these 107 conclusive biopsies comprised synovial tumour (n = 30, 28 %), synovial infection (n = 18, 17 %), synovial inflammation (n = 45, 42 %), including gouty arthritis (n = 3), and no abnormality (n = 14, 13 %). The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of synovial biopsy was 99 %, 97 %, and 100 % for synovial tumour; 100 %, 100 %, and 100 % for native joint infection; and 78 %, 45 %, and 100 % for prosthetic joint infection. False-negative synovial biopsy did not seem to be related to antibiotic therapy. Ultrasound-guided Tru-cut synovial biopsy is a safe and reliable technique with a high diagnostic yield for diagnosing synovial tumour and also, most likely, for joint infection. Regarding joint infection, synovial biopsy of native joints seems to have a higher diagnostic yield than that for infected prosthetic joints. • Ultrasound-guided Tru-cut synovial biopsy has high accuracy (99 %) for diagnosing synovial tumour. • It has good accuracy, sensitivity, and high specificity for diagnosis of joint infection. • Synovial biopsy of native joints works better than biopsy of prosthetic joints. • A negative synovial biopsy culture from a native joint largely excludes septic arthritis. • Ultrasound-guided Tru-cut synovial biopsy is a safe and well-tolerated procedure.

  3. Ultrasound-guided microwave ablation in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules in 435 patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Jiang; Qian, Lin-Xue; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Jun-Feng

    2017-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of ultrasound-guided microwave ablation in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. A total of 474 benign thyroid nodules in 435 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided microwave ablation from September 2012 to August 2015 were included. Nodule volume and thyroid function were measured before treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and subsequently after every 6 months. The nodule volume reduction rate and changes of thyroid function were evaluated. The volume of all thyroid nodules significantly decreased after ultrasound-guided microwave ablation. The average volume was 13.07 ± 0.95 ml before treatment, and 1.14 ± 0.26 ml at 12-months follow-up. The mean volume reduction rate was 90% and the final volume reduction rate was 94%. The volume reduction rate of mainly cystic nodules was significantly higher than that of simple solid and mainly solid nodules (all P < 0.05). The pretreatment volume of nodules was positively correlated with the final volume reduction rate at final follow-up ( P = 0.004). No serious complications were observed after treatment. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided microwave ablation is an effective and safe technique for treatment of benign thyroid nodules, and has the potential for clinical applications. Impact statement Ultrasound-guided MWA is an effective and safe technique for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. It can significantly reduce the nodule volume, improve the patients' clinical symptoms, has less complication, guarantees quick recovery, meets patients' aesthetic needs, and shows less interference on the physiological and psychological aspects of the body. MWA should be a good complement to traditional open surgery and has potentials in clinical applications.

  4. Ultrasound guided double injection of blood into cisterna magna: a rabbit model for treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongchao; Zhu, Youzhi; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Zixuan; Lian, Juan; Luo, Fucheng; Deng, Xuefei; Wong, Kelvin K L

    2016-02-06

    Double injection of blood into cisterna magna using a rabbit model results in cerebral vasospasm. An unacceptably high mortality rate tends to limit the application of model. Ultrasound guided puncture can provide real-time imaging guidance for operation. The aim of this paper is to establish a safe and effective rabbit model of cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage with the assistance of ultrasound medical imaging. A total of 160 New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into four groups of 40 each: (1) manual control group, (2) manual model group, (3) ultrasound guided control group, and (4) ultrasound guided model group. The subarachnoid hemorrhage was intentionally caused by double injection of blood into their cisterna magna. Then, basilar artery diameters were measured using magnetic resonance angiography before modeling and 5 days after modeling. The depth of needle entering into cisterna magna was determined during the process of ultrasound guided puncture. The mortality rates in manual control group and model group were 15 and 23 %, respectively. No rabbits were sacrificed in those two ultrasound guided groups. We found that the mortality rate in ultrasound guided groups decreased significantly compared to manual groups. Compared with diameters before modeling, the basilar artery diameters after modeling were significantly lower in manual and ultrasound guided model groups. The vasospasm aggravated and the proportion of severe vasospasms was greater in ultrasound guided model group than that of manual group. In manual model group, no vasospasm was found in 8 % of rabbits. The ultrasound guided double injection of blood into cisterna magna is a safe and effective rabbit model for treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

  5. Ultrasound-Guided 50% Ethyl Alcohol Injection for Patients With Malleolar and Olecranon Bursitis: A Prospective Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji Seong; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and effect of ultrasound-guided ethyl alcohol injection on malleolar and olecranon synovial proliferative bursitis. Methods Twenty-four patients received ultrasound-guided 50% diluted ethyl alcohol injection at the site of synovial proliferative bursitis after aspiration of the free fluid. Results Swelling and symptoms significantly decreased in 13 of the 24 patients without any complications. Eleven patients had partial improvement in swelling and symptoms. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided alcohol injection could be an alternative therapeutic option before surgery in patients with chronic intractable malleolar and olecranon synovial proliferative bursitis. PMID:27152282

  6. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Bilio-pancreatic Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Giovannini, Marc; Bories, Erwan; Téllez-Ávila, Félix I.

    2012-01-01

    The echoendoscopic biliary drainage is an option to treat obstructive jaundices when endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) drainage fails. These procedures compose alternative methods to the side of surgery and percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, and it was only possible by the continuous development and improvement of echoendoscopes and accessories. The development of linear sectorial array echoendoscopes in early 1990 brought a new approach to diagnostic and therapeutic dimension on echoendoscopy capabilities, opening the possibility to perform punction over direct ultrasonografic view. Despite of the high success rate and low morbidity of biliary drainage obtained by ERCP, difficulty could be found at the presence of stent tumor ingrown, tumor gut compression, periampullary diverticula and anatomic variation. The echoendoscopic technique starts performing punction and contrast of the left biliary tree. When performed from gastric wall, the access is made through hepatic segment III. From duodenum, direct common bile duct punction. Diathermic dilatation of the puncturing tract is required using a 6-Fr cystostome and a plastic or metal stent is introducted. The techincal success of hepaticogastrostomy is near 98%, and complications are present in 20%: pneumoperitoneum, choleperitoneum, infection and stent disfunction. To prevent bile leakage, we have used the 2-stent techniques. The first stent introduced was a long uncovered metal stent (8 or 10 cm) and inside this first stent a second fully covered stent of 6 cm was delivered to bridge the bile duct and the stomach. Choledochoduodenostomy overall success rate is 92%, and described complications include, in frequency order, pneumoperitoneum and focal bile peritonitis, present in 14%. By the last 10 years, the technique was especially performed in reference centers, by ERCP experienced groups, and this seems to be a general guideline to safer procedure execution. The ideal approach for

  7. Value of cytopathologist-performed ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration as a screening test for ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy in nonpalpable breast masses.

    PubMed

    Lieu, David

    2009-04-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of breast masses in the United States has been on the decline for the last decade and has been largely replaced by ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy (UG-CNB). Some studies show core-needle biopsy (CNB) is superior to FNA in terms of absolute sensitivity, specificity, and inadequate rate. However, the importance of a skilled aspirator, experienced cytopathologist, and immediate cytological evaluation (ICE) in FNA is often not considered. CNB is more expensive, invasive, risky, and painful than FNA. This prospective study examines the value of cytopathologist-performed ultrasound-guided FNA (UG-FNA) with ICE as a screening test for cytopathologist-performed UG-CNB on nonpalpable or difficult-to-palpate solid breast masses visible on ultrasound. One hundred twenty consecutive nonpalpable or difficult-to-palpate presumably solid breast masses in 109 female patients from January2, 2008 to June 30, 2008 underwent cytopathologist-performed UG-FNA with ICE. Twenty cases were converted to cytopathologist-performed UG-CNB because ICE was inadequate, hypocellular, atypical, suspicious, or malignant. Patients with clearly benign cytology did not undergo UG-CNB. UG-FNA with ICE reduced the percentage of patients undergoing UG-CNB by 87%. A new role for cytopathologist-performed UG-FNA of nonpalpable breast masses has been identified.

  8. Treatment of great auricular neuralgia with real-time ultrasound-guided great auricular nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Younghoon; Kim, Saeyoung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: The great auricular nerve can be damaged by the neck surgery, tumor, and long-time pressure on the neck. But, great auricular neuralgia is very rare condition. It was managed by several medication and landmark-based great auricular nerve block with poor prognosis. Patient concerns: A 25-year-old man presented with a pain in the left lateral neck and auricle. Diagnosis: He was diagnosed with great auricular neuralgia. Interventions: His pain was not reduced by medication. Therefore, the great auricular nerve block with local anesthetics and steroid was performed under ultrasound guidance. Outcomes: Ultrasound guided great auricular nerve block alleviated great auricular neuralgia. Lessons: This medication-resistant great auricular neuralgia was treated by the ultrasound guided great auricular nerve block with local anesthetic agent and steroid. Therefore, great auricular nerve block can be a good treatment option of medication resistant great auricular neuralgia. PMID:28328811

  9. A pitfall during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial forceps biopsy of the mediastinal lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Krenke, Rafal; Korczynski, Piotr; Gorska, Katarzyna; Chazan, Ryszarda

    2014-03-01

    The high diagnostic yield and favorable safety profile of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial forceps biopsy of the mediastinal lymph nodes have been recently demonstrated. We report an unusual technical problem during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial forceps biopsy that could be a prerequisite for severe complications. A rupture of the steering band precluded closure of the forceps jaws opened in the subcarinal lymph node. A solution to the problem is presented, together with other procedure-related complications reported in the literature. The report emphasizes that a dysfunction of the forceps steering band can result in severe complications when it occurs during transbronchial sampling of mediastinal lesions. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Drainage of Supralevator Hematoma in a Hemodynamically Stable Patient.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Debjani; Jennings, Paul E; Banerjee, Mamta; Gada, Ruta

    2015-12-01

    Paravaginal hematomas can be life-threatening. In patients with intact vaginal walls and perineum, they may pose a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Supralevator hematomas are much less common than infralevator hematomas. We present a case of puerperal hemorrhagic shock after a normal vaginal delivery in a low-risk parous woman resulting from an occult supralevator hematoma. Because the woman was hemodynamically unstable initially, she underwent a vaginal surgical drainage. A week later, the supravaginal hematoma reformed. At this time the patient was hemodynamically stable, and ultrasound-guided drainage was performed, which resulted in complete resolution of the hematoma within 10 days. In a clinically stable puerperal patient, ultrasound-guided drainage of a supralevator hematoma resulted in rapid and complete resolution of symptoms.

  11. Minimally Invasive Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Release: Preliminary Clinical Results.

    PubMed

    Henning, P Troy; Yang, Lynda; Awan, Tariq; Lueders, Daniel; Pourcho, Adam M

    2018-04-02

    Ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release was performed on 14 patients (18 wrists) using dynamic expansion of the transverse safe zone. Our patient population included able-bodied patients and those with impairments. The first 8 cases (12 wrists) underwent the procedure in an operating room, the remainder in an outpatient setting. No complications occurred, and all patients were able to immediately resume use of their hands without therapy. Improvements in the Quick Form of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand Index and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire at 3 months were comparable to results reported with mini-open and endoscopic release. Our results show that ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release can be safely and effectively performed in an outpatient setting. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Ultrasound guided electrochemotherapy for the treatment of a clear cell thymoma in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Menicagli, Francesco; Pettorali, Michela; Baldi, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    A twelve-year-old male castrated domestic shorthair cat was presented for rapidly progressing respiratory distress. The cat was depressed, tachypneic and moderately responsive. Ultrasonography showed a mediastinal mass associated with a significant pleural effusion that needed tapping every five to seven days. Ultrasound guided biopsy yielded a diagnosis of clear cell thymoma upon histopathology. After complete staging procedures, the owner elected to treat the cat with electrochemotherapy (ECT) using systemic bleomycin. Two sessions of ultrasound guided ECT were performed at two week intervals with trains of biphasic electric pulses applied using needle electrodes until complete coverage of the area was achieved. The treatment was well tolerated and resulted in partial remission (PR). Additional sessions were performed on a monthly basis. The cat is still in PR after fourteen months. ECT resulted in improved local control and should be considered among the available adjuvant treatments in pets carrying visceral tumors. PMID:28331834

  13. High-flow vascular malformation treatment using ultrasound-guided laser combined with polidocanol sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Ping; Li, Lan; Li, Jia-le

    2015-07-01

    The current treatment for vascular malformations includes surgery, sclerotherapy, and embolization. However, each method has its limitations, such as recurrence, complications, scarring, and radiation exposure. Therefore, identifying an effective, minimally invasive treatment that reduces lesion recurrence is particularly important. We describe in detail a patient who received treatment with ultrasound-guided laser interruption of feeding vessels combined with polidocanol sclerotherapy after the recurrence of forearm high-flow vascular malformation.

  14. Accuracy of ultrasound-guided nerve blocks of the cervical zygapophysial joints.

    PubMed

    Siegenthaler, Andreas; Mlekusch, Sabine; Trelle, Sven; Schliessbach, Juerg; Curatolo, Michele; Eichenberger, Urs

    2012-08-01

    Cervical zygapophysial joint nerve blocks typically are performed with fluoroscopic needle guidance. Descriptions of ultrasound-guided block of these nerves are available, but only one small study compared ultrasound with fluoroscopy, and only for the third occipital nerve. To evaluate the potential usefulness of ultrasound-guidance in clinical practice, studies that determine the accuracy of this technique using a validated control are essential. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of ultrasound-guided nerve blocks of the cervical zygapophysial joints using fluoroscopy as control. Sixty volunteers were studied. Ultrasound-imaging was used to place the needle to the bony target of cervical zygapophysial joint nerve blocks. The levels of needle placement were determined randomly (three levels per volunteer). After ultrasound-guided needle placement and application of 0.2 ml contrast dye, fluoroscopic imaging was performed for later evaluation by a blinded pain physician and considered as gold standard. Raw agreement, chance-corrected agreement κ, and chance-independent agreement Φ between the ultrasound-guided placement and the assessment using fluoroscopy were calculated to quantify accuracy. One hundred eighty needles were placed in 60 volunteers. Raw agreement was 87% (95% CI 81-91%), κ was 0.74 (0.64-0.83), and Φ 0.99 (0.99-0.99). Accuracy varied significantly between the different cervical nerves: it was low for the C7 medial branch, whereas all other levels showed very good accuracy. Ultrasound-imaging is an accurate technique for performing cervical zygapophysial joint nerve blocks in volunteers, except for the medial branch blocks of C7.

  15. Safety of Ultrasound-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injections for Sialorrhea as Performed by Pediatric Otolaryngologists.

    PubMed

    Shariat-Madar, Bahbak; Chun, Robert H; Sulman, Cecille G; Conley, Stephen F

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate incidence of complications and hospital readmission as a result of ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injections to manage sialorrhea. Case series with chart review. Children's Hospital of Wisconsin. A case series with chart review was performed of all cases of ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin by pediatric otolaryngologists from March 5, 2010, to September 26, 2014,. Primary outcomes included complications such as dysphagia, aspiration pneumonia, and motor paralysis. Secondary outcomes included hospitalization, intubation, and nasogastric tube placement. There were 48 patients, 111 interventions, and 306 intraglandular injections identified. Botulinum toxin type A and type B were utilized in 4 and 107 operative interventions, respectively. Type A was injected into 4 parotid and 4 submandibular glands, utilizing doses of 20 U per parotid and 30 U per submandibular gland. Type B was injected into 98 parotid and 200 submandibular glands, with average dosing of 923 U per parotid and 1170 U per submandibular gland, respectively. There were 2 instances of subjectively worsening of baseline dysphagia that self-resolved. No cases were complicated by aspiration pneumonia or motor paralysis. No patients required hospital readmission, intubation, or nasogastric tube placement. Prior published data indicated 16% complication incidence with ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin. Our study found a low complication rate (0.6%) with ultrasound-guided injections of botulinum toxin to manage sialorrhea, without cases of aspiration pneumonia or motor paralysis. Of 306 intraglandular injections, there were 2 cases of worsening baseline subjective dysphagia that self-resolved. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  16. Neurologic Outcomes After Low-Volume, Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Block and Ambulatory Shoulder Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rajpal, Gaurav; Winger, Daniel G; Cortazzo, Megan; Kentor, Michael L; Orebaugh, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative neurologic symptoms after interscalene block and shoulder surgery have been reported to be relatively frequent. Reports of such symptoms after ultrasound-guided block have been variable. We evaluated 300 patients for neurologic symptoms after low-volume, ultrasound-guided interscalene block and arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients underwent ultrasound-guided interscalene block with 16 to 20 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine or a mix of 0.2% bupivacaine/1.2% mepivacaine solution, followed by propofol/ketamine sedation for ambulatory arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients were called at 10 days for evaluation of neurologic symptoms, and those with persistent symptoms were called again at 30 days, at which point neurologic evaluation was initiated. Details of patient demographics and block characteristics were collected to assess any association with persistent neurologic symptoms. Six of 300 patients reported symptoms at 10 days (2%), with one of these patients having persistent symptoms at 30 days (0.3%). This was significantly lower than rates of neurologic symptoms reported in preultrasound investigations with focused neurologic follow-up and similar to other studies performed in the ultrasound era. There was a modest correlation between the number of needle redirections during the block procedure and the presence of postoperative neurologic symptoms. Ultrasound guidance of interscalene block with 16- to 20-mL volumes of local anesthetic solution results in a lower frequency of postoperative neurologic symptoms at 10 and 30 days as compared with investigations in the preultrasound period.

  17. Treatment of Partial Rotator Cuff Tear with Ultrasound-guided Platelet-rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Sengodan, Vetrivel Chezian; Kurian, Sajith; Ramasamy, Raghupathy

    2017-01-01

    Background: The treatment of symptomatic partial rotator cuff tear has presented substantial challenge to orthopaedic surgeons as it can vary from conservative to surgical repair. Researches have established the influence of platelet rich plasma in healing damaged tissue. Currently very few data are available regarding the evidence of clinical and radiological outcome of partial rotator cuff tear treated with ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection in English literature. Materials and Methods: 20 patients with symptomatic partial rotator cuff tears were treated with ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection. Before and after the injection of platelet rich plasma scoring was done with visual analogue score, Constant shoulder score, and UCLA shoulder score at 8 weeks and third month. A review ultrasound was performed 8 weeks after platelet rich plasma injection to assess the rotator cuff status. Results: Our study showed statistically significant improvements in 17 patients in VAS pain score, constant shoulder score and UCLA shoulder score. No significant changes in ROM were noted when matched to the contra-lateral side (P < 0.001) at the 3 month follow-up. The study also showed good healing on radiological evaluation with ultrasonogram 8 weeks after platelet rich plasma injection. Conclusion: Ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection for partial rotator cuff tears is an effective procedure that leads to significant decrease in pain, improvement in shoulder functions, much cost-effective and less problematic compared to a surgical treatment. PMID:28900553

  18. Treatment of Partial Rotator Cuff Tear with Ultrasound-guided Platelet-rich Plasma.

    PubMed

    Sengodan, Vetrivel Chezian; Kurian, Sajith; Ramasamy, Raghupathy

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of symptomatic partial rotator cuff tear has presented substantial challenge to orthopaedic surgeons as it can vary from conservative to surgical repair. Researches have established the influence of platelet rich plasma in healing damaged tissue. Currently very few data are available regarding the evidence of clinical and radiological outcome of partial rotator cuff tear treated with ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection in English literature. 20 patients with symptomatic partial rotator cuff tears were treated with ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection. Before and after the injection of platelet rich plasma scoring was done with visual analogue score, Constant shoulder score, and UCLA shoulder score at 8 weeks and third month. A review ultrasound was performed 8 weeks after platelet rich plasma injection to assess the rotator cuff status. Our study showed statistically significant improvements in 17 patients in VAS pain score, constant shoulder score and UCLA shoulder score. No significant changes in ROM were noted when matched to the contra-lateral side ( P < 0.001) at the 3 month follow-up. The study also showed good healing on radiological evaluation with ultrasonogram 8 weeks after platelet rich plasma injection. Ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection for partial rotator cuff tears is an effective procedure that leads to significant decrease in pain, improvement in shoulder functions, much cost-effective and less problematic compared to a surgical treatment.

  19. Value of artisanal simulators to train veterinary students in performing invasive ultrasound-guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Hage, Maria Cristina F N S; Massaferro, Ana Beatriz; Lopes, Érika Rondon; Beraldo, Carolina Mariano; Daniel, Jéssika

    2016-03-01

    Pericardial effusion can lead to cardiac tamponade, which endangers an animal's life. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis is used to remove abnormal liquid; however, it requires technical expertise. In veterinary medical education, the opportunity to teach this procedure to save lives during emergencies is rare; therefore, simulators are recommended for this practice. The present study aimed to create a model that can be made "at home" at low cost for ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis training and to gather feedback about this model through questionnaires given to the participants. Eighteen professionals and thirty-six students were introduced to the simulator in pairs. After the simulation training session, participants filled out the questionnaire. Participants considered the model strong in the following areas: visualization of the pericardium, the heart, fluid in the pericardium, and fluid decrease during fictitious pericardiocentesis and its realism. They considered the model weak or moderate in the following areas: visualization of the surrounding tissues, difficulty of pericardial puncture, and visualization of the catheter. The professionals classified the realism of the experimental heart as moderate, whereas the undergraduate students classified it as strong. All participants believed that the experimental model could be useful in preparing for a future real situation. This model fulfills the need for a practical, realistic, and cost-effective model for ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis training. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  20. Comparison of two ultrasound-guided injection techniques targeting the sacroiliac joint region in equine cadavers.

    PubMed

    Stack, John David; Bergamino, Chiara; Sanders, Ruth; Fogarty, Ursula; Puggioni, Antonella; Kearney, Clodagh; David, Florent

    2016-09-20

    To compare the accuracy and distribution of injectate for cranial (CR) and caudomedial (CM) ultrasound-guided injections of equine sacroiliac joints. Both sacroiliac joints from 10 lumbosacropelvic specimens were injected using cranial parasagittal (CR; curved 18 gauge, 25 cm spinal needles) and caudomedial (CM; straight 18 gauge, 15 cm spinal needles) ultrasound-guided approaches. Injectate consisted of 4 ml iodinated contrast and 2 ml methylene blue. Computed tomographical (CT) scans were performed before and after injections. Time for needle guidance and repositioning attempts were recorded. The CT sequences were analysed for accuracy and distribution of contrast. Intra-articular contrast was detected in sacroiliac joints following 15/40 injections. The CR and CM approaches deposited injectate ≤2 cm from sacroiliac joint margins following 17/20 and 20/20 injections, respectively. Median distance of closest contrast to the sacroiliac joint was 0.4 cm (interquartile range [IQR]: 1.5 cm) for CR approaches and 0.6 cm (IQR: 0.95 cm) for CM approaches. Cranial injections resulted in injectate contacting lumbosacral intertransverse joints 15/20 times. Caudomedial injections were perivascular 16/20 times. Safety and efficacy could not be established. Cranial and CM ultrasound-guided injections targeting sacroiliac joints were very accurate for periarticular injection, but accuracy was poor for intra-articular injection. Injectate was frequently found in contact with interosseous sacroiliac ligaments, as well as neurovascular and synovial structures in close vicinity of sacroiliac joints.

  1. Pregnancies following ultrasound-guided drainage of tubo-ovarian abscess.

    PubMed

    Gjelland, Knut; Granberg, Seth; Kiserud, Torvid; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Ekerhovd, Erling

    2012-07-01

    To study fertility among women treated by means of ultrasound-guided drainage and antibiotics for tubo-ovarian abscess (TOA). Retrospective cohort study. A tertiary referral center. One hundred women of reproductive age treated for TOA between June 1986 and July 2003. Transvaginal ultrasound-guided drainage of TOA was performed in all patients. The procedure was repeated if a substantial amount of pus was seen using ultrasonography 2-5 days after the initial aspiration, and repeated later if necessary. Frequency of naturally conceived pregnancies. Twenty of 38 (52.6%; 95% CI 36.5-68.9%) women who intended to have a child achieved pregnancy naturally and became mothers. In addition, 7 (50%) of 14 women who were not on birth control on a regular basis became pregnant. No ectopic pregnancies were registered. Ultrasound-guided drainage of TOA in combination with antibiotics seems to preserve fertility in approximately half of the patients. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in diagnosis of abdominal and pelvic neoplasm in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailing; Li, Fangxuan; Liu, Juntian; Zhang, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of abdominal and pelvic masses in adults has gained tremendous popularity. However, the application of the same treatment in children is not as popular because of apprehensions regarding inadequate tissues for the biopsy and accidental puncture of vital organs. Data of the application of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in 105 pediatric patients with clinically or ultrasound-diagnosed abdominopelvic masses were reviewed. Diagnostic procedures were conducted in our institution from May 2011 to May 2013. The biopsies were conducted on 86 malignant lesions and 19 benign lesions. 86 malignant tumors comprised neuroblastomas (30 cases), hepatoblastomas (15 cases), nephroblastomas (11 cases), and primitive neuroectodermal tumors/malignant small round cells (6 cases). Among malignant tumor cases, only a pelvic primitive neuroectodermal tumor did not receive a pathological diagnosis. Therefore, the biopsy accuracy was 98.8 % in malignant tumor. However, the biopsies for one neuroblastomas and one malignant small round cell tumor were inadequate for cytogenetic analysis. Therefore, 96.5 % of the malignant tumor patients received complete diagnosis via biopsy. 19 benign tumors comprised mature teratoma (10 cases), hemangioendothelioma (3 cases), paraganglioma (2 cases), and infection (2 cases). The diagnostic accuracy for benign neoplasm was 100 %. Five patients experienced postoperative complications, including pain (2 patients), bleeding from the biopsy site (2 patients), and wound infection (1 patient). Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy is an efficient, minimally invasive, accurate, and safe diagnostic method that can be applied in the management of abdominal or pelvic mass of pediatric patients.

  3. [An easy, safe and affective method for the treatment of intussusception: ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction].

    PubMed

    Ülger, Fatma Esra Bahadır; Ülger, Aykut; Karakaya, Ali Erdal; Tüten, Fatih; Katı, Ömer; Çolak, Mustafa

    2014-03-01

    Intussusception is one of the important causes of intestinal obstruction in children. Hydrostatic reduction under ultrasound guidance is a popular treatment method for intussusception. In the present study, we aimed to explain the demographic characteristics of and treatment approaches in patients diagnosed with intussusception by ultrasound. Forty-one patients diagnosed with intussusception by ultrasound between August 2011 and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-four of these patients who had no contraindications had been treated with ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction. Twenty-four of the patients were male and 17 were female, a 1.4/1 male-to-female ratio. The majority of the patients were between the ages of 6-24 months and 2-5 years. The mean age was 31.12±26.32 months (range 3-125). Patients were more frequently diagnosed in April and May. Seventeen patients who had clinical contraindications enrolled directly for surgery. In 20 of the 24 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction, reduction was achieved. Three experienced recurrence. In two of these patients, successful reduction was achieved with the second attempt. The remaining patient was enrolled for surgery. Hydrostatic reduction was performed 26 times on these 24 patients, and in 22, success was achieved (84.6%). No procedure-related complications occurred in the patients. Ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction, with its high success rates and lack of radiation risk, should be the first choice therapeutic approach for children diagnosed with intussusception.

  4. Comparison of ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block according to the various volumes of local anesthetic

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok Kon; Kang, Bong Jin; Kwon, Min A; Song, Jae Gyok; Jeon, Soo Mi

    2013-01-01

    Background The ultrasound guidance in regional nerve blocks has recently been introduced and gaining popularity. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block has many advantages including the higher success rate, faster onset time, and fewer complications. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical data according to the varied volume of local anesthetics in the ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block. Methods One hundred twenty patients were randomized into four groups, according to the local anesthetic volume used: Group 35 (n = 30), Group 30 (n = 30), Group 25 (n = 30), and Group 20 (n = 30). Supraclavicular blocks were performed with 1% mepivacaine 35 ml, 30 ml, 25 ml, and 20 ml, respectively. The success rate, onset time, and complications were checked and evaluated. Results The success rate (66.7%) was lower in Group 20 than that of Group 35 (96.7%) (P < 0.05). The average onset times of Group 35, Group 30, Group 25, and Group 20 were 14.3 ± 6.9 min, 13.6 ± 4.5 min, 16.7 ± 4.6 min, and 16.5 ± 3.7 min, respectively. There were no significant differences. Horner's syndrome was higher in Group 35 (P < 0.05). Conclusions In conclusion, we achieved 90% success rate with 30 ml of 1% mepivacaine. Therefore, we suggest 30 ml of local anesthetic volume for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block. PMID:23814648

  5. Ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of iliopsoas spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sconfienza, L.M.; Perrone, N.; Lacelli, F.; Lentino, C.; Serafini, G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) is a common treatment for iliopsoas muscle spasticity, but it is not easy to position the needle in this muscle without guidance. In this paper we describe an ultrasound-guided technique for the intramuscular injection of BTX-A to treat spasticity of the iliopsoas muscle. Its effectiveness was assessed in 10 patients. Method and materials The ultrasound-guided technique for BTX-A injection was used on 10 patients. The needle was inserted into the muscle belly at an angle of 45° along the longitudinal axis of the muscle when allowed by patient's condition. Results In all cases, the iliopsoas muscle was easily identified and both the iliac and psoas components were assessed. Introduction of the needle and drug injection were entirely carried out under ultrasonographic guidance. The procedure was successful in all patients, even in those with a high-grade spasticity, and general anesthesia was not required. Conclusions This ultrasound-guided technique allows accurate guidance for the injection of BTX-A, and it can be considered as an alternate supportive therapy in patients with spasticity and dystonia. PMID:23396653

  6. Real-time visualization of ultrasound-guided retrobulbar blockade: an imaging study.

    PubMed

    Luyet, C; Eichenberger, U; Moriggl, B; Remonda, L; Greif, R

    2008-12-01

    Retrobulbar anaesthesia allows eye surgery in awake patients. Severe complications of the blind techniques are reported. Ultrasound-guided needle introduction and direct visualization of the spread of local anaesthetic may improve quality and safety of retrobulbar anaesthesia. Therefore, we developed a new ultrasound-guided technique using human cadavers. In total, 20 blocks on both sides in 10 embalmed human cadavers were performed. Using a small curved array transducer and a long-axis approach, a 22 G short bevel needle was introduced under ultrasound guidance lateral and caudal of the eyeball until the needle tip was seen 2 mm away from the optic nerve. At this point, 2 ml of contrast dye as a substitute for local anaesthetic was injected. Immediately after the injection, the spread of the contrast dye was documented by means of CT scans performed in each cadaver. The CT scans showed the distribution of the contrast dye in the muscle cone and behind the posterior sclera in all but one case. No contrast dye was found inside the optic nerve or inside the eyeball. In one case, there could be an additional trace of contrast dye behind the orbita. Our new ultrasound-guided technique has the potential to improve safety and efficacy of the procedure by direct visualization of the needle placement and the distribution of the injected fluid. Furthermore, the precise injection near the optic nerve could lead to a reduction of the amount of the local anaesthetic needed with fewer related complications.

  7. Ultrasound guided transarterial coil placement in the internal and external carotid artery in horses.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Juan; Iglesias, Manuel; Chao, Eduardo Lloret; Bussy, Christian

    2015-04-01

    To assess ultrasound guided transarterial coil placement (UGTACP) for occlusion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and external carotid artery (ECA) in horses. Cadaveric and in vivo study. Cadaveric horses (n = 10), healthy horses (3), and 1 clinical case. Cadaveric and in vivo (healthy horses): UGTACP was performed in the caudal part of the ICA and ECA. Coil placement in the rostral part of the ICA was performed blindly and controlled by conventional radiography. No coils were placed in the rostral part of the ECA. UGTACP of the ICA was in a horse with guttural pouch mycosis of the left guttural pouch. Accurate ultrasound-guided catheterization of the ICA and ECA was performed in all specimens. Ultrasound-guided coil placement was successfully performed in all cases except 1. No complications occurred in the in vivo study. The clinical case fully recovered and returned to its intended use. Based on our study, UGTACP of the ICA and ECA caudal part is a feasible alternative to fluoroscopy. An advantage of this technique is the accuracy with which you can catheterize both ICA and ECA and the ability to identify unusual branching at the origin of the ICA. Regarding the rostral part of the ICA, angiographic catheter guidance in this region is probably more precise using fluoroscopy as it is performed blindly. In a clinical situation, combination of US and fluoroscopy guidance can result in reduction of radiation exposure time. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  8. Ultrasound-guided injection of triamcinolone and bupivacaine in the management of De Quervain's disease.

    PubMed

    Jeyapalan, Kanagaratnam; Choudhary, Surabhi

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the technique and usefulness of ultrasound-guided intrasynovial injection of triamcinolone and bupivacaine in treatment of de Quervain's disease. A total of 17 patients with symptomatic De Quervain's disease were included in this study. The procedure involved confirmation of diagnosis with ultrasound followed by guided injection of a mixture of 20 mg of triamcinolone (40 mg/ml) and 1 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. Ultrasound guidance with a high resolution 15-Mhz footprint probe was used for injection into the first dorsal extensor compartment tendon sheath (E1). The response to ultrasound-guided injection was ascertained at the post procedure outpatient clinic appointment according to the follow-up clinic notes. There were 14 female and 3 male patients aged 29 to 74 years. Mean duration of symptoms was 8.9 months. One patient had an atypical septum in the first extensor compartment and the extensor pollicis brevis alone was involved. The mean post-injection follow-up was at 6.75 weeks. One patient was lost to follow-up. Fifteen out of 16 patients had significant symptomatic relief (93.75%). There were no immediate or delayed complications. Recurrence of symptoms was seen in 3 (20%) patients. Ultrasound-guided injection of triamcinolone and bupivacaine is safe and useful in controlling symptoms of De Quervain's disease. Correct needle placement with ultrasound guidance avoids intratendinous injection as well as local complications like fat atrophy and depigmentation.

  9. [Pancreatic tail pseudoaneurysm: percutaneous treatment by thrombin injection].

    PubMed

    Pacheco Jiménez, M; Moreno Sánchez, T; Moreno Rodríguez, F; Guillén Rico, M

    2014-01-01

    Visceral artery pseudoaneurysms secondary to acute and/or chronic pancreatitis are a relatively common and potentially serious complication. Endovascular techniques are the most currently accepted techniques, given the higher morbidity-mortality of surgery. The thrombosis of the pseudoaneurysm using an ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection is emerging as a useful option in those cases in which endovascular embolisation is not possible. We present the case of a patient with a pseudoaneurysm of the transverse pancreatic artery secondary to chronic pancreatitis, and successfully treated by administering percutaneous thrombin. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Safety of pediatric percutaneous liver biopsy performed by interventional radiologists.

    PubMed

    Potter, Carol; Hogan, Mark J; Henry-Kendjorsky, Katherine; Balint, Jane; Barnard, John A

    2011-08-01

    National data suggest that pediatric percutaneous liver biopsy is increasingly being performed by interventional radiologists rather than pediatric gastroenterologists. The objective of the present report is to describe the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous liver biopsy performed by interventional radiologists in a large cohort of children and to compare the results with the existing literature on biopsies performed by pediatric gastroenterologists. The medical records of 249 children undergoing ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy by interventional radiologists were reviewed for adverse events and success of obtaining tissue. Two hundred ninety-four biopsies were reviewed. There were no deaths. There were 2 instances of a 2-g or greater drop in hemoglobin following biopsy, neither of which was associated with clinical signs of hemorrhage. A small, asymptomatic pneumothorax quickly resolved without treatment. One patient developed Klebsiella sepsis 48  hours after biopsy. In all but 1 case, an adequate sample size was obtained. This low incidence of adverse events compares favorably with existing published reports of morbidity and mortality following percutaneous liver biopsy performed by pediatric gastroenterologists. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy performed by experienced pediatric interventional radiologists in a children's hospital setting is as safe and effective as biopsy performed by pediatric gastroenterologists.

  11. The sensitivity of motor response to needle nerve stimulation during ultrasound guided interscalene catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Neurostimulation during single shot interscalene block has a significant false negative motor response rate. Compared with tangential needle approaches for single shot block, interscalene catheter (ISC) placement commonly involves Tuohy needles inserted longitudinally to the brachial plexus. This study aimed to determine the sensitivity of neurostimulation during ultrasound-guided ISC needle placement, and the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided ISC needle endpoint. One hundred fifty-five consecutive nonstimulating ISCs were placed with the needle tip position confirmed by the sonographic spread of 5 mL dextrose 5%. Catheter advancement was then blind 2 to 3 cm past the needle tip. A 0.8 mA electrical stimulus at 2 Hz was applied throughout. When a satisfactory image was obtained, neurostimulation was ignored and the minimum motor response amplitude noted. If imaging was equivocal, a brief appropriate motor response at 0.8 mA was sought. A sustained response at <0.5 mA was only sought if imaging was suboptimal. Prior to surgery conducted under general anesthesia, 30 mL ropivacaine 0.5% was administered through the ISC. Catheter success was defined as a recovery room numerical rating pain score of ultrasound guided ISC needle endpoint is a feasible alternative to a neurostimulation endpoint.

  12. Ultrasound-guided thoracenthesis: the V-point as a site for optimal drainage positioning.

    PubMed

    Zanforlin, A; Gavelli, G; Oboldi, D; Galletti, S

    2013-01-01

    In the latest years the use of lung ultrasound is increasing in the evaluation of pleural effusions, because it makes follow-up easier and drainage more efficient by providing guidance on the most appropriate sampling site. However, no standardized approach for ultrasound-guided thoracenthesis is actually available. To evaluate our usual ultrasonographic landmark as a possible standard site to perform thoracenthesis by assessing its value in terms of safety and efficiency (success at first attempt, drainage as complete as possible). Hospitalized patients with non organized pleural effusion underwent thoracenthesis after ultrasound evaluation. The point showing on ultrasound the maximum thickness of the effusion ("V-point") was chosen for drainage. 45 ultrasound guided thoracenthesis were performed in 12 months. In 22 cases there were no complications; 16 cases of cough, 2 cases of mild dyspnea without desaturation, 4 cases of mild pain; 2 cases of complications requiring medical intervention occurred. No case of pneumothorax related to the procedure was detected. In all cases drainage was successful on the first attempt. The collected values of maximum thickness at V-point (min 3.4 cm - max 15.3 cm) and drained fluid volume (min 70 ml - max 2000 ml) showed a significative correlation (p < 0.0001). When the thickness was greater or equal to 9.9 cm, drained volume was always more than 1000 ml. The measure of the maximum thickness at V-point provides high efficiency to ultrasound guided thoracentesis and allows to estimate the amount of fluid in the pleural cavity. It is also an easy parameter that makes the proposed method quick to learn and apply.  

  13. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided epidural access at the lumbo-sacral space in dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa; Busoni, Valeria; Carrozzo, Maria Valentina; Sandersen, Charlotte; Gabriel, Annick; Bolen, Géraldine

    2015-01-01

    Epidural injections are commonly performed blindly in veterinary medicine. The aims of this study were to describe the lumbosacral ultrasonographic anatomy and to assess the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique in dogs. A cross sectional anatomic atlas of the lumbosacral region and ex vivo ultrasound images were obtained in two cadavers to describe the ultrasound anatomy and to identify the landmarks. Sixteen normal weight canine cadavers were used to establish two variations of the technique for direct ultrasound-guided injection, using spinal needles or epidural catheters. The technique was finally performed in two normal weight cadavers, in two overweight cadavers and in five live dogs with radiographic abnormalities resulting of the lumbosacral spine. Contrast medium was injected and CT was used to assess the success of the injection. The anatomic landmarks to carry out the procedure were the seventh lumbar vertebra, the iliac wings, and the first sacral vertebra. The target for directing the needle was the trapezoid-shaped echogenic zone between the contiguous articular facets of the lumbosacral vertebral canal visualized in a parasagittal plane. The spinal needle or epidural catheter was inserted in a 45° craniodorsal-caudoventral direction through the subcutaneous tissue and the interarcuate ligament until reaching the epidural space. CT examination confirmed the presence of contrast medium in the epidural space in 25/25 dogs, although a variable contamination of the subarachnoid space was also noted. Findings indicated that this ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique is feasible for normal weight and overweight dogs, with and without radiographic abnormalities of the spine. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  14. Evaluation of a Standardized Program for Training Practicing Anesthesiologists in Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia Skills.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Edward R; Harrison, T Kyle; Kim, T Edward; Kan, Jack; Shum, Cynthia; Gaba, David M; Ganaway, Toni; Kou, Alex; Udani, Ankeet D; Howard, Steven K

    2015-10-01

    Practicing anesthesiologists have generally not received formal training in ultrasound-guided perineural catheter insertion. We designed this study to determine the efficacy of a standardized teaching program in this population. Anesthesiologists in practice for 10 years or more were recruited and enrolled to participate in a 1-day program: lectures and live-model ultrasound scanning (morning) and faculty-led iterative practice and mannequin-based simulation (afternoon). Participants were assessed and recorded while performing ultrasound-guided perineural catheter insertion at baseline, at midday (interval), and after the program (final). Videos were scored by 2 blinded reviewers using a composite tool and global rating scale. Participants were surveyed every 3 months for 1 year to report the number of procedures, efficacy of teaching methods, and implementation obstacles. Thirty-two participants were enrolled and completed the program; 31 of 32 (97%) completed the 1-year follow-up. Final scores [median (10th-90th percentiles)] were 21.5 (14.5-28.0) of 30 points compared to 14.0 (9.0-20.0) at interval (P < .001 versus final) and 12.0 (8.5-17.5) at baseline (P < .001 versus final), with no difference between interval and baseline. The global rating scale showed an identical pattern. Twelve of 26 participants without previous experience performed at least 1 perineural catheter insertion after training (P < .001). However, there were no differences in the monthly average number of procedures or complications after the course when compared to baseline. Practicing anesthesiologists without previous training in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia can acquire perineural catheter insertion skills after a 1-day standardized course, but changing clinical practice remains a challenge. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. A successful model to learn and implement ultrasound-guided venous catheterization in apheresis.

    PubMed

    Gopalasingam, Nigopan; Thomsen, Anna-Marie Eller; Folkersen, Lars; Juhl-Olsen, Peter; Sloth, Erik

    2017-12-01

    Apheresis treatments can be performed with peripheral venous catheters (PVC), although central venous catheters (CVC) are inserted when PVCs fail or patient with history of difficult vascular access prior to the apheresis. Ultrasound guidance for PVC has shown promising results in other settings. To investigate if ultrasound guidance for PVC could be implemented among apheresis nurses. Second, how implementation of ultrasound guidance affected the number of CVCs used for apheresis per patient. Apheresis nurses completed a systematic training program for ultrasound-guided vascular access. All independent catheterizations were registered during the implementation stage. The number of CVCs in the pre- and postimplementation stages of the ultrasound guidance was compared. Six nurses completed the training program within a median of 48 days (range 38-83 days). In 77 patients, 485 independent ultrasound-guided PVC placements were performed during the implementation stage. All apheresis treatments (485/485) were accomplished using PVCs without requiring CVC as rescue. During the preimplementation stage, 125 of 273 (45.8%) procedures required a CVC for completion of apheresis procedures; during the postimplementation stage only 30 of 227 (13.2%) procedures required a CVC (p < 0.001). In the postimplementation stage, no CVCs were placed as rescue caused by failed PVCs but were only placed for patients where the ultrasound machine was unavailable. It indicates an effective success rate of 100% for ultrasound-guided PVC use. This study showed that ultrasound guidance could be implemented among apheresis nurses as a routine tool eliminating the need of CVC as a rescue. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Rectus Sheath Block in Gynaecological Surgery with Pfannenstiel Incision

    PubMed Central

    Cüneyitoğlu, Şule; Türktan, Mediha; Biricik, Ebru; Özcengiz, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the effects of ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block in gynaecological surgery with Pfannenstiel incision. Methods After the approval of the ethics committee and the patients’ consent, 75 ASA I–II patients who were aged between 20 and 70 years and scheduled for a gynaecological surgery with Pfannenstiel incision were included in this study. After induction of general anaesthesia, patients were randomly divided into three groups. In Group UR patients (n=25), ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block with 0.25% levobupivacaine (0.2 mL kg−1) was performed. In Group SR patients (n=25), surgical rectus sheath block with 0.25% levobupivacaine (0.2 mL kg−1) was applied. In Group T (n=25) patients, tramadol (2 mg kg−1) was intravenously administered 30 min before the end of surgery. Patient-controlled analgesia device was established for postoperative pain relief in all groups. Haemodynamic data and inspired sevoflurane concentration were recorded during the operation. Pain scores, total tramadol consumption, supplemental analgesic requirement and side effects were postoperatively evaluated. Results Demographic characteristics, duration of surgery and haemodynamic parameters were similar between the groups. Inspired sevoflurane concentration (%) and VAS scores were significantly lower in Group UR than those in Groups SR and T. Total tramadol consumption was significantly lower in Groups UR and SR than that in Group T. There was no significant difference in the incidence of side effects. Conclusion This study demonstrates that ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block helps to provide the effective analgesia without any side effects compared with surgical rectus sheath block and intravenous tramadol for gynaecological surgery with Pfannenstiel incision. PMID:27366521

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Rectus Sheath Block in Gynaecological Surgery with Pfannenstiel Incision.

    PubMed

    Cüneyitoğlu, Şule; Türktan, Mediha; Biricik, Ebru; Özcengiz, Dilek

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block in gynaecological surgery with Pfannenstiel incision. After the approval of the ethics committee and the patients' consent, 75 ASA I-II patients who were aged between 20 and 70 years and scheduled for a gynaecological surgery with Pfannenstiel incision were included in this study. After induction of general anaesthesia, patients were randomly divided into three groups. In Group UR patients (n=25), ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block with 0.25% levobupivacaine (0.2 mL kg(-1)) was performed. In Group SR patients (n=25), surgical rectus sheath block with 0.25% levobupivacaine (0.2 mL kg(-1)) was applied. In Group T (n=25) patients, tramadol (2 mg kg(-1)) was intravenously administered 30 min before the end of surgery. Patient-controlled analgesia device was established for postoperative pain relief in all groups. Haemodynamic data and inspired sevoflurane concentration were recorded during the operation. Pain scores, total tramadol consumption, supplemental analgesic requirement and side effects were postoperatively evaluated. Demographic characteristics, duration of surgery and haemodynamic parameters were similar between the groups. Inspired sevoflurane concentration (%) and VAS scores were significantly lower in Group UR than those in Groups SR and T. Total tramadol consumption was significantly lower in Groups UR and SR than that in Group T. There was no significant difference in the incidence of side effects. This study demonstrates that ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block helps to provide the effective analgesia without any side effects compared with surgical rectus sheath block and intravenous tramadol for gynaecological surgery with Pfannenstiel incision.

  18. Randomized comparison of three transducer orientation approaches for ultrasound guided internal jugular venous cannulation.

    PubMed

    Batllori, M; Urra, M; Uriarte, E; Romero, C; Pueyo, J; López-Olaondo, L; Cambra, K; Ibáñez, B

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided internal jugular venous access increases the rate of successful cannulation and reduces the incidence of complications, compared with the landmark technique. Three transducer orientation approaches have been proposed for this procedure: short-axis (SAX), long-axis (LAX) and oblique-axis (OAX). Our goal was to assess and compare the performance of these approaches. A prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted in one teaching hospital. Patients aged 18 yr or above, who were undergoing ultrasound-guided internal jugular cannulation, were randomly assigned to one of three intervention groups: SAX, LAX and OAX group. The main outcome measure was successful cannulation on first needle pass. Incidence of mechanical complications was also registered. Restricted randomization was computer-generated. In total, 220 patients were analysed (SAX n=73, LAX n=75, OAX n=72). Cannulation was successful on first needle pass in 51 (69.9%) SAX patients, 39 (52%) LAX patients and 53 (73.6%) OAX patients. First needle pass failure was higher in the LAX group than in the OAX group (adjusted OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.71-8.0, P=0.002). A higher mechanical complication rate was observed in the SAX group (15.1%) than in the OAX (6.9%) and LAX (4%) groups (P=0.047). As OAX showed a higher first needle pass success rate than LAX and a lower mechanical complications rate than SAX, we recommend it as the standard approach when performing ultrasound-guided internal jugular venous access. Further clinical studies are needed to confirm this conclusion. NCT 01966354. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration needles: which one and in what situation?

    PubMed

    Karadsheh, Zeid; Al-Haddad, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is increasingly used as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool for pancreatic and other gastrointestinal disorders. Several factors affect the outcome of EUS-FNA, one of which is needle size. The decision to use a specific needle depends on factors including location, consistency, and type of the lesion; presence of onsite cytopathologist; and need for additional tissue procurement for histology. This review provides a balanced perspective on the use of different needle sizes available, highlighting the differences among them and potential niche applications of each to maximize diagnostic yield of EUS-FNA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Preliminary study of ergonomic behavior during simulated ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia using a head-mounted display.

    PubMed

    Udani, Ankeet D; Harrison, T Kyle; Howard, Steven K; Kim, T Edward; Brock-Utne, John G; Gaba, David M; Mariano, Edward R

    2012-08-01

    A head-mounted display provides continuous real-time imaging within the practitioner's visual field. We evaluated the feasibility of using head-mounted display technology to improve ergonomics in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia in a simulated environment. Two anesthesiologists performed an equal number of ultrasound-guided popliteal-sciatic nerve blocks using the head-mounted display on a porcine hindquarter, and an independent observer assessed each practitioner's ergonomics (eg, head turning, arching, eye movements, and needle manipulation) and the overall block quality based on the injectate spread around the target nerve for each procedure. Both practitioners performed their procedures without directly viewing the ultrasound monitor, and neither practitioner showed poor ergonomic behavior. Head-mounted display technology may offer potential advantages during ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

  1. Ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma injection for distal biceps tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Barker, Scott L; Bell, Simon N; Connell, David; Coghlan, Jennifer A

    2015-04-01

    Distal biceps tendinopathy is an uncommon cause of elbow pain. The optimum treatment for cases refractory to conservative treatment is unclear. Platelet-rich plasma has been used successfully for other tendinopathies around the elbow. Six patients with clinical and radiological evidence of distal biceps tendinopathy underwent ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. Clinical examination findings, visual analogue score (VAS) for pain and Mayo Elbow Performance scores were recorded. The Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 68.3 (range 65 to 85) (fair function) to 95 (range 85 to 100) (excellent function). The VAS at rest improved from a mean of 2.25 (range 2 to 5) pre-injection to 0. The VAS with movement improved from a mean of 7.25 (range 5 to 8) pre-injection to 1.3 (range 0 to 2). No complications were noted. Ultrasound-guided PRP injection appears to be a safe and effective treatment for recalcitrant cases of distal biceps tendinopathy. Further investigation with a randomized controlled trial is needed to fully assess its efficacy.

  2. Backscattering analysis of high frequency ultrasonic imaging for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Thomas; Akiyama, Takahiro; Lee, Changyang; Martin, Sue E.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2017-03-01

    A new ultrasound-guided breast biopsy technique is proposed. The technique utilizes conventional ultrasound guidance coupled with a high frequency embedded ultrasound array located within the biopsy needle to improve the accuracy in breast cancer diagnosis.1 The array within the needle is intended to be used to detect micro- calcifications indicative of early breast cancers such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Backscattering analysis has the potential to characterize tissues to improve localization of lesions. This paper describes initial results of the application of backscattering analysis of breast biopsy tissue specimens and shows the usefulness of high frequency ultrasound for the new biopsy related technique. Ultrasound echoes of ex-vivo breast biopsy tissue specimens were acquired by using a single-element transducer with a bandwidth from 41 MHz to 88 MHz utilizing a UBM methodology, and the backscattering coefficients were calculated. These values as well as B-mode image data were mapped in 2D and matched with each pathology image for the identification of tissue type for the comparison to the pathology images corresponding to each plane. Microcalcifications were significantly distinguished from normal tissue. Adenocarcinoma was also successfully differentiated from adipose tissue. These results indicate that backscattering analysis is able to quantitatively distinguish tissues into normal and abnormal, which should help radiologists locate abnormal areas during the proposed ultrasound-guided breast biopsy with high frequency ultrasound.

  3. Training and certification in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Konge, Lars; Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Clementsen, Paul Frost

    2017-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) plays a key role in the staging of lung cancer, which is crucial for allocation to surgical treatment. EBUS-TBNA is a complicated procedure and simulation-based training is helpful in the first part of the long learning curve prior to performing the procedure on actual patients. New trainees should follow a structured training programme consisting of training on simulators to proficiency as assessed with a validated test followed by supervised practice on patients. The simulation-based training is superior to the traditional apprenticeship model and is recommended in the newest guidelines. EBUS-TBNA and oesophageal ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA or EUS-B-FNA) are complementary to each other and the combined techniques are superior to either technique alone. It is logical to learn and to perform the two techniques in combination, however, for lung cancer staging solely EBUS-TBNA simulators exist, but hopefully in the future simulation-based training in EUS will be possible. PMID:28840013

  4. Ultrasound guided electrical impedance tomography for 2D free-interface reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guanghui; Ren, Shangjie; Dong, Feng

    2017-07-01

    The free-interface detection problem is normally seen in industrial or biological processes. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive technique with advantages of high-speed and low cost, and is a promising solution for free-interface detection problems. However, due to the ill-posed and nonlinear characteristics, the spatial resolution of EIT is low. To deal with the issue, an ultrasound guided EIT is proposed to directly reconstruct the geometric configuration of the target free-interface. In the method, the position of the central point of the target interface is measured by a pair of ultrasound transducers mounted at the opposite side of the objective domain, and then the position measurement is used as the prior information for guiding the EIT-based free-interface reconstruction. During the process, a constrained least squares framework is used to fuse the information from different measurement modalities, and the Lagrange multiplier-based Levenberg-Marquardt method is adopted to provide the iterative solution of the constraint optimization problem. The numerical results show that the proposed ultrasound guided EIT method for the free-interface reconstruction is more accurate than the single modality method, especially when the number of valid electrodes is limited.

  5. In-Plane Ultrasound-Guided Knee Injection Through a Lateral Suprapatellar Approach: A Safe Technique.

    PubMed

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco A; Taneja, Atul K; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to describe a technique for in-plane ultrasound-guided knee arthrography through a lateral suprapatellar approach, reporting its accuracy and related complications. A retrospective search was performed for computed tomography and magnetic resonance reports from June 2013 through June 2015. Imaging studies, puncture descriptions, and guided-procedure images were reviewed along with clinical and surgical history. A fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist performed all procedures under sterile technique and ultrasound guidance with the probe in oblique position on the lateral suprapatellar recess after local anesthesia with the patient on dorsal decubitus, hip in neutral rotation, and 30 to 45 degrees of knee flexion. A total of 86 consecutive subjects were evaluated (mean, 55 years). All subjects underwent intra-articular injection of contrast, which was successfully reached in the first attempt in 94.2% of the procedures (81/86), and in the second attempt in 5.8% (5/86) after needle repositioning without a second puncture. There were no postprocedural reports of regional complications at the puncture site, such as significant pain, bleeding, or vascular lesions. Our study demonstrates that in-plane ultrasound-guided injection of the knee in semiflexion approaching the lateral suprapatellar recess is a safe and useful technique to administer intra-articular contrast solution, as an alternative method without radiation exposure.

  6. Ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma injection for distal biceps tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Simon N; Connell, David; Coghlan, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Background Distal biceps tendinopathy is an uncommon cause of elbow pain. The optimum treatment for cases refractory to conservative treatment is unclear. Platelet-rich plasma has been used successfully for other tendinopathies around the elbow. Methods Six patients with clinical and radiological evidence of distal biceps tendinopathy underwent ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. Clinical examination findings, visual analogue score (VAS) for pain and Mayo Elbow Performance scores were recorded. Results The Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 68.3 (range 65 to 85) (fair function) to 95 (range 85 to 100) (excellent function). The VAS at rest improved from a mean of 2.25 (range 2 to 5) pre-injection to 0. The VAS with movement improved from a mean of 7.25 (range 5 to 8) pre-injection to 1.3 (range 0 to 2). No complications were noted. Discussion Ultrasound-guided PRP injection appears to be a safe and effective treatment for recalcitrant cases of distal biceps tendinopathy. Further investigation with a randomized controlled trial is needed to fully assess its efficacy. PMID:27582965

  7. A review of the benefits and pitfalls of phantoms in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hocking, Graham; Hebard, Simon; Mitchell, Christopher H

    2011-01-01

    With the growth of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, so has the requirement for training tools to practice needle guidance skills and evaluate echogenic needles. Ethically, skills in ultrasound-guided needle placement should be gained in a phantom before performance of nerve blocks on patients in clinical practice. However, phantom technology is varied, and critical evaluation of the images is needed to understand their application to clinical use. Needle visibility depends on the echogenicity of the needle relative to the echogenicity of the tissue adjacent the needle. We demonstrate this point using images of echogenic and nonechogenic needles in 5 different phantoms at both shallow angles (20 degrees) and steep angles (45 degrees). The echogenicity of phantoms varies enormously, and this impacts on how needles are visualized. Water is anechoic, making all needles highly visible, but does not fix the needle to allow practice placement. Gelatin phantoms and Blue Phantoms provide tactile feedback but have very low background echogenicity, which greatly exaggerates needle visibility. This makes skill acquisition easier but can lead to false confidence in regard to clinical ability. Fresh-frozen cadavers retain much of the textural feel of live human tissue and are nearly as echogenic. Similar to clinical practice, this makes needles inserted at steep angles practically invisible, unless they are highly echogenic. This review describes the uses and pitfalls of phantoms that have been described or commercially produced. Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

  8. Ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction of intussusception with saline: Safe and effective.

    PubMed

    Karadağ, Çetin Ali; Abbasoğlu, Latif; Sever, Nihat; Kalyoncu, Meltem Kaba; Yıldız, Abdullah; Akın, Melih; Candan, Mustafa; Dokucu, Ali İhsan

    2015-09-01

    The study was undertaken to assess the efficacy of ultrasound-guided saline enema in reducing intussusception and to determine the role of age and duration of symptoms on this event. The case records of patients who were treated for intussusception at our institutions over the past 10 years were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 419 patients were treated for intussusception and 375 of them were included into the study. Patients were excluded if they had symptoms and signs of acute abdominal disease and required surgery as an initial treatment. Hydrostatic reduction was successful in 313 of the 375 patients (83.46%). The procedure-related complication rate was nil. There were 29 episodes of recurrences in 23 patients, and recurrence rates did not differ between patients who responded to hydrostatic reduction and those who required surgery. Younger age [median (range); 11 months (3-108 months) vs. 20 months (1-180 months); p<0.05], rectal bleeding (p<0.01) and long duration of symptoms [mean (range); 1.95 days (1-7 days) vs. 1.44 days (1-10 days); p<0.01] were significantly associated with failed hydrostatic reduction. Ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction is an easy, safe and effective method for the treatment of intussusception in the absence of acute abdominal findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Minimum effective volume of mepivacaine for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae Gyok; Kang, Bong Jin; Park, Kee Keun

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to estimate the minimum effective volume (MEV) of 1.5% mepivacaine for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block by placing the needle near the lower trunk of brachial plexus and multiple injections. Methods Thirty patients undergoing forearm and hand surgery received ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block with 1.5% mepivacaine. The initial volume of local anesthetic injected was 24 ml, and local anesthetic volume for the next patient was determined by the response of the previous patient. The next patient received a 3 ml higher volume in the case of the failure of the previous case. If the previous block was successful, the next volume was 3 ml lower. MEV was estimated by the Dixon and Massey up and down method. MEV in 95, 90, and 50% of patients (MEV95, MEV90, and MEV50) were calculated using probit transformation and logistic regression. Results MEV95 of 1.5% mepivacaine was 17 ml (95% confidence interval [CI], 13-42 ml), MEV90 was 15 ml (95% CI, 12-34 ml), and MEV50 was 9 ml (95% CI, 4-12 ml). Twelve patients had a failed block. Three patients received general anesthesia. Nine patients could undergo surgery with sedation only. Only one patient showed hemi-diaphragmatic paresis. Conclusions MEV95 was 17 ml, MEV90 was 15 ml, and MEV50 was 9 ml. However, needle location near the lower trunk of brachial plexus and multiple injections should be performed. PMID:23904937

  10. Percutaneous treatment of calculi in reconstructed bladder.

    PubMed

    Paez, Edgar; Reay, Emma; Murthy, L N S; Pickard, Robert S; Thomas, David J

    2007-03-01

    To report our results with percutaneous removal of calculi from reconstructed bladders. Twelve patients with reconstructed bladders who underwent endoscopic cystolithotomy were identified from our departmental database, and retrospective review of case notes and imaging was performed. Access was gained via an ultrasound-guided new tract in 9 patients (75%). An old suprapubic tract site was used in two patients, and the Mitrofanoff stoma was the route of access in one patient. The procedure was successful, with stone clearance achieved in all 12 cases. No major complications were observed. At a median follow up of 24 months, stone recurrence was observed in 5 patients (42%), 4 of whom underwent repeat procedures. Follow-up showed no change in continence in the patient with a Mitroffanoff stoma. Percutaneous cystolithotomy is a safe and effective minimally invasive option for removal of stones in a reconstructed bladder. We recommend endoscopic removal as the treatment of choice in these patients.

  11. Delphi Method Validation of a Procedural Performance Checklist for Insertion of an Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Central Line.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Nicholas; Wittler, Mary; Askew, Kim; Manthey, David

    2016-01-01

    Placement of ultrasound-guided central lines is a critical skill for physicians in several specialties. Improving the quality of care delivered surrounding this procedure demands rigorous measurement of competency, and validated tools to assess performance are essential. Using the iterative, modified Delphi technique and experts in multiple disciplines across the United States, the study team created a 30-item checklist designed to assess competency in the placement of ultrasound-guided internal jugular central lines. Cronbach α was .94, indicating an excellent degree of internal consistency. Further validation of this checklist will require its implementation in simulated and clinical environments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Vascular Access Simulator for Medical Training: Proposal of a Simple, Economic and Effective Model.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Rafael Vilhena de Carvalho; Polimanti, Afonso César; Galego, Sidnei José; Bicudo, Maria Claudia; Montagna, Erik; Corrêa, João Antônio

    2017-03-01

    To present a simple and affordable model able to properly simulate an ultrasound-guided venous access. The simulation was made using a latex balloon tube filled with water and dye solution implanted in a thawed chicken breast with bones. The presented model allows the simulation of all implant stages of a central catheter. The obtained echogenicity is similar to that observed in human tissue, and the ultrasound identification of the tissues, balloon, needle, wire guide and catheter is feasible and reproducible. The proposed model is simple, economical, easy to manufacture and capable of realistically and effectively simulating an ultrasound-guided venous access.

  13. [Clinical application of ultrasound guided Fogarty balloon catheter in arterial crisis].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodong; Wang, Pei; Yu, Changyu; Yan, Xiaowei; Yin, Jing

    2017-10-01

    To explore the effectiveness of arterial crisis after replantation of limb treated by ultrasound guided Fogarty balloon catheter. Between January 2012 and July 2016, 27 patients suffered from arterial crisis after replantation of limb were treated with ultrasound guided Fogarty balloon catheter combined with thrombolytic anticoagulant. There were 18 males and 9 females with the age of 19-51 years (mean, 32 years). The limb mutilation position was at knee joint in 3 cases, lower limb in 9 cases, ankle joint in 6 cases, elbow joint in 2 cases, forearm in 4 cases, and wrist joint in 3 cases. The arterial crisis happened at 2.5-18 hours (mean, 7.5 hours) after limb replantation surgery. Color doppler ultrasonography was used to diagnose the arterial thrombosis, finally the anastomotic thrombosis were found in 16 cases, non-anastomotic thrombosis in 7 cases, and combined thrombosis in 4 cases. All the thrombosis were deteced in the arteries with the length of 0.8-3.9 cm. No complication such as vascular perforation, rupture, air embolism, thromboembolism, wound infection, or sepsis happened after operation. Arterial crisis occurred again in 3 cases at 1.5-13.5 hours after limb replantation and treated by arterial exploration, 1 case was treated successfully; 2 cases had arterial occlusion and partial necrosis of limb, and got amputation treatment at last. The rest 24 cases survived with the incision healing by first stage. In the 24 cases, 1 case suffered from acute myonephropathic metabolic syndrome and corrected after hemodialysis; 1 case suffered from acute liver functional damage and corrected by comprehensive treatment of internal medicine. The 24 patients were followed up 7-38 months (mean, 11 months). At last follow-up, blood supply of the limb was good with normal skin temperature and improved sense of feeling, activity, and swelling. According to Chinese Medical Association of hand surgery to the upper extremity function assessment standard, the results were

  14. Medial approach of ultrasound-guided costoclavicular plexus block and its effects on regional perfussion.

    PubMed

    Nieuwveld, D; Mojica, V; Herrera, A E; Pomés, J; Prats, A; Sala-Blanch, X

    2017-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block in the costoclavicular space located between the clavicle and the first rib, reaches the secondary trunks when they are clustered together and lateral to the axillary artery. This block is most often performed through a lateral approach, the difficulty being finding the coracoid process an obstacle and guiding the needle towards the vessels and pleura. A medial approach, meaning from inside to outside, will avoid these structures. Traditionally the assessment of a successful block is through motor or sensitive responses but a sympathetic fibre block can also be evaluated measuring the changes in humeral artery blood flow, skin temperature and/or perfusion index. To describe the medial approach of the ultrasound-guided costoclavicular block evaluating its development by motor and sensitive response and measurement of sympathetic changes. Description of the technique and administration of 20ml of contrast in a fresh cadaver model, evaluating the distribution with CT-scan and sagittal sections of the anatomic piece. Subsequently in a clinical phase, including 11 patients, we evaluated the establishment of motor, sensitive and sympathetic blocks. We evaluated the sympathetic changes reflected by humeral artery blood flow, skin temperature and distal perfusion index. In the anatomical model the block was conducted without difficulties, showing an adequate periclavicular distribution of the contrast in the CT-scan and in sagittal sections, reaching the interscalenic space as far as the secondary trunks. Successful blocks were observed in 91% of patients after 25minutes. All the parameters reflecting sympathetic block increased significantly. The humeral artery blood flow showed an increase from 108 ± 86 to 188±141ml/min (P=.05), skin temperature from 32.1±2 to 32.8±9°C (P=.03) and perfusion index from 4±3 to 9±5 (P=.003). The medial approach of the ultrasound-guided costoclavicular block is anatomically feasible, with high

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Intermediate Site Greater Occipital Nerve Infiltration: A Technical Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Jonathan; Kastler, Adrian; Tatu, Laurent; Behr, Julien; Kechidi, Rachid; Kastler, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Two studies recently reported that computed tomography (CT) guided infiltration of the greater occipital nerve at its intermediate site allows a high efficacy rate with long-lasting pain relief following procedure in occipital neuralgia and in various craniofacial pain syndromes. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the technical feasibility and safety of ultrasound-guided intermediate site greater occipital nerve infiltration. Retrospective study. This study was conducted at the imaging department of a 1,409 bed university hospital. Local institutional review board approval was obtained and written consent was waived. In this retrospective study, 12 patients suffering from refractory occipital neuralgia or craniofacial pain syndromes were included between April and October 2014. They underwent a total of 21 ultrasound-guided infiltrations. Infiltration of the greater occipital nerve was performed at the intermediate site of the greater occipital nerve, at its first bend between obliqus capitis inferior and semispinalis capitis muscles with local anestetics and cortivazol. Technical success was defined as satisfactory diffusion of added iodinated contrast media in the fatty space between these muscles depicted on control CT scan. We also reported first data of immediate block test efficacy and initial clinical efficacy at 7 days, one month, and 3 months, defined by a decrease of at least 50% of visual analog scale (VAS) scores. Technical success rate was 95.24%. Patients suffered from right unilateral occipital neuralgia in 3 cases, left unilateral occipital neuralgia in 2 cases, bilateral occipital neuralgia in 2 cases, migraine in one case, cervicogenic headache in one case, tension-type headache in 2 cases, and cluster headache in one case. Block test efficacy was found in 93.3% (14/15) cases. Clinical efficacy was found in 80% of cases at 7 days, in 66.7% of cases at one month and in 60% of cases at 3 months. No major complications were noted. Some of the

  16. Palpation- and ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Anderson F; Strain, George M; Rademacher, Nathalie; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Tully, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    To compare palpation-guided with ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Prospective randomized experimental trial. Eighteen adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) weighing 252-295 g. After induction of anesthesia with isoflurane, parrots received an injection of lidocaine (2 mg kg(-1)) in a total volume of 0.3 mL at the axillary region. The birds were randomly assigned to equal groups using either palpation or ultrasound as a guide for the brachial plexus block. Nerve evoked muscle potentials (NEMP) were used to monitor effectiveness of brachial plexus block. The palpation-guided group received the local anesthetic at the space between the pectoral muscle, triceps, and supracoracoideus aticimus muscle, at the insertion of the tendons of the caudal coracobrachial muscle, and the caudal scapulohumeral muscle. For the ultrasound-guided group, the brachial plexus and the adjacent vessels were located with B-mode ultrasonography using a 7-15 MHz linear probe. After location, an 8-5 MHz convex transducer was used to guide injections. General anesthesia was discontinued 20 minutes after lidocaine injection and the birds recovered in a padded cage. Both techniques decreased the amplitude of NEMP. Statistically significant differences in NEMP amplitudes, were observed within the ultrasound-guided group at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection and within the palpation-guided group at 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. No effect on motor function, muscle relaxation or wing droop was observed after brachial plexus block. The onset of the brachial plexus block tended to be faster when ultrasonography was used. Brachial plexus injection can be performed in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and nerve evoked muscle potentials were useful to monitor the effects on nerve conduction in this avian species. Neither technique produced an effective block at the

  17. [Prognostic analysis of plantar fasciitis treated by pneumatic ballistic extracorporeal shock wave versus ultrasound guided intervention].

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiu-Lin; Wang, Ke-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Yang, Yi-Tian; Cao, Fu-Yang; Yang, Jing; Yuan, Wei-Xiu; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2018-02-20

    To compare the medium- and long-term effect of pneumatic ballistic extracorporeal shock wave versus ultrasound-guided hormone injection in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. The clinical data were collected from patients with plantar fasciitis admitted to PLA General Hospital pain department from September, 2015 to February, 2017. The patients were randomly divided into ultrasound-guided drug injection group and shock wave group. The therapeutic parameters including the numerical rating scale (NRS) scores in the first step pain in the morning, American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle Hindfoot Scale, and thickness of the plantar fascia were monitored before and at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after the treatment. The recurrence rate, effectiveness, and patient satisfaction were compared between the two groups at 6 months after the treatment. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled in shock wave group and 38 patients in ultrasound group. The NRS scores in the first step pain in the morning were lowered after treatment in both groups (P<0.05), and the scores were significantly lower in ultrasound group than in shock wave group at 1 week and 1 month (P<0.01), but significantly higher in ultrasound group than in shock wave group at 3 and 6 months after treatment (P<0.05). The AOFAS functional scores were increased in both groups (P<0.05) at 6 months after treatment, was significantly lower in ultrasound group than in shock wave group than group B (90.44∓13.27 vs 75.76∓21.40; P<0.05). The effective rates in shock wave group and ultrasound group were 92.31% and 76.32%, respectively (P<0.05). Recurrence was found in 1 patient (2.56%) in shock wave group and in 8 (21.05%) in ultrasound group (P<0.05). The patient satisfaction scores were significantly higher in shock wave group than in ultrasound group (8.13∓2.67 vs 6.63∓3.75, P=0.048). Pneumatic ballistic extracorporeal shock achieves better medium- and long-term outcomes than ultrasound-guided

  18. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration in the diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors in 4 dogs

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Ronaldo C.; Parent, Joane M.; Dobson, Howard; Ruotsalo, Kristiina; Holmberg, David; Duque, M. Carolina; Poma, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration was used in establishing the diagnosis in 4 cases of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Sonographic and cytologic characteristics are discussed. Because of its availability and ease of use, axillary ultrasonography with fine needle aspiration can be an initial diagnostic step for suspected brachial plexus tumors. PMID:18320983

  19. Gestrinone combined with ultrasound-guided aspiration and ethanol injection for treatment of chocolate cyst of ovary.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyun; Xu, Yun

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine clinical performance of gestrinone combined with ultrasound-guided aspiration and ethanol injection in treating chocolate cyst of ovary. Sixty-eight patients enrolled in this study were randomly divided into two groups: control group and combination treatment group. In the control group, 34 patients were treated with ultrasound-guided aspiration and ethanol injection. In the combination treatment group, 34 patients received gestrinone p.o. following ultrasound-guided aspiration and ethanol injection. The recurrence rate of chocolate cyst was 10-fold lower in the combination treatment group (2.94%, 1/34) than in the control group (29.4%, 10/34) at 12 months. The effective rate for reduction of chocolate cyst was significantly higher in the combination treatment group (94.12%, 32/34) than in the control group (64.71%, 22/34) (P = 0.009). Gestrinone combined with ultrasound-guided aspiration and ethanol injection therapy is an effective treatment for ovarian chocolate cyst with low recurrence rate. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  20. A novel graphical user interface for ultrasound-guided shoulder arthroscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyryshkin, K.; Mousavi, P.; Beek, M.; Pichora, D.; Abolmaesumi, P.

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel graphical user interface developed for a navigation system for ultrasound-guided computer-assisted shoulder arthroscopic surgery. The envisioned purpose of the interface is to assist the surgeon in determining the position and orientation of the arthroscopic camera and other surgical tools within the anatomy of the patient. The user interface features real time position tracking of the arthroscopic instruments with an optical tracking system, and visualization of their graphical representations relative to a three-dimensional shoulder surface model of the patient, created from computed tomography images. In addition, the developed graphical interface facilitates fast and user-friendly intra-operative calibration of the arthroscope and the arthroscopic burr, capture and segmentation of ultrasound images, and intra-operative registration. A pilot study simulating the computer-aided shoulder arthroscopic procedure on a shoulder phantom demonstrated the speed, efficiency and ease-of-use of the system.

  1. Derivation of a Performance Checklist for Ultrasound-Guided Arthrocentesis Using the Modified Delphi Method.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Derek; Pariyadath, Manoj; Wittler, Mary; Askew, Kim; Manthey, David; Hartman, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    Arthrocentesis is an important skill for physicians in multiple specialties. Recent studies indicate a superior safety and performance profile for this procedure using ultrasound guidance for needle placement, and improving quality of care requires a valid measurement of competency using this modality. We endeavored to create a validated tool to assess the performance of this procedure using the modified Delphi technique and experts in multiple disciplines across the United States. We derived a 22-item checklist designed to assess competency for the completion of ultrasound-guided arthrocentesis, which demonstrated a Cronbach's alpha of 0.89, indicating an excellent degree of internal consistency. Although we were able to demonstrate content validity for this tool, further validity evidence should be acquired after the tool is used and studied in clinical and simulated contexts. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  2. Successful Treatment of Abdominal Cutaneous Entrapment Syndrome Using Ultrasound Guided Injection

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Myong Joo; Seo, Dong Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    There are various origins for chronic abdominal pain. About 10-30% of patients with chronic abdominal pain have abdominal wall pain. Unfortunately, abdominal wall pain is not thought to be the first origin of chronic abdominal pain; therefore, patients usually undergo extensive examinations, including diagnostic laparoscopic surgery. Entrapment of abdominal cutaneous nerves at the muscular foramen of the rectus abdominis is a rare cause of abdominal wall pain. If abdominal wall pain is considered in earlier stage of chronic abdominal pain, unnecessary invasive procedures are not required and patients will reach symptom free condition as soon as the diagnosis is made. Here, we report a case of successful treatment of a patient with abdominal cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome by ultrasound guided injection therapy. PMID:23862004

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Angioplasty of Dysfunctional Vascular Access for Haemodialysis. The Pros and Cons

    SciTech Connect

    García-Medina, J., E-mail: josegmedina57@gmail.com; García-Alfonso, J. J., E-mail: juanjozarandieta@gmail.com

    PurposeTo describe the benefits and the disadvantages of angioplasty in dialysis fistulas using only ultrasound guidance.Materials and MethodsThis is a prospective study in 132 failing or non-maturing arteriovenous accesses that underwent 189 ultrasound-guided balloon angioplasties. The technical success was defined as non-use of X-ray fluoroscopy during the procedure.Results127 procedures (67%) were successfully completed without fluoroscopy. Most failures were due to difficulty to traverse aneurismal segments, as well as anastomotic stenoses. Including initial failures, the primary patency rates at 6, 12 months and 2 years were 75 ± 3, 41 ± 3 and 14 ± 2%, respectively.ConclusionEndovascular repair of the dysfunctional vascular access for haemodialysis under ultrasound guidance ismore » feasible and safe in roughly two-thirds of cases.« less

  4. A reliable technique for ultrasound-guided perineural injection in ulnar neuropathy at the elbow.

    PubMed

    Hamscha, Ulrike M; Tinhofer, Ines; Heber, Stefan; Grisold, Wolfgang; Weninger, Wolfgang J; Meng, Stefan

    2017-08-01

    Ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE) is a common peripheral compression neuropathy and, in most cases, occurs at 2 sites, the retroepicondylar groove or the cubital tunnel. With regard to a potential therapeutic approach with perineural corticosteroid injection, the aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of injection fluid applied at a standard site. We performed ultrasound-guided (US-guided) perineural injections to the ulnar nerve halfway between the olecranon and the medial epicondyle in 21 upper limbs from 11 non-embalmed cadavers. In anatomic dissection we investigated the spread of injected ink. Ink was successfully injected into the perineural sheath of the ulnar nerve in all 21 cases (cubital tunnel: 21 of 21; retroepicondylar groove: 19 of 21). US-guided injection between the olecranon and the medial epicondyle is a feasible and safe method to reach the most common sites of ulnar nerve entrapment. Muscle Nerve 56: 237-241, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided techniques for diagnosing pancreatic mass lesions: Can we do better?

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Andrew C; Lee, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic approach to a possible pancreatic mass lesion relies first upon various non-invasive imaging modalities, including computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Once a suspect lesion has been identified, tissue acquisition for characterization of the lesion is often paramount in developing an individualized therapeutic approach. Given the high prevalence and mortality associated with pancreatic cancer, an ideal approach to diagnosing pancreatic mass lesions would be safe, highly sensitive, and reproducible across various practice settings. Tools, in addition to radiologic imaging, currently employed in the initial evaluation of a patient with a pancreatic mass lesion include serum tumor markers, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). EUS-FNA has grown to become the gold standard in tissue diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. PMID:27818584

  6. Isolated splenic tuberculosis diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Nasa, Mukesh; Choudhary, Narendra S; Guleria, Mridula; Puri, Rajesh

    2017-04-01

    Our patient was a 48-year-old female, who presented with history of persistent low-grade fever and weight loss. The CT scan of the abdomen revealed multiple hypodense lesions in spleen. No primary focus of infection was detected in any other organs. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of splenic lesion revealed granulomatous inflammation. The patient was started on anti-tuberculous therapy. There is a diagnostic possibility of splenic tuberculosis even in immunocompetent individuals and we chose a combination anti-tuberculous therapy as the first line treatment with consideration of splenectomy depending on the response. Copyright © 2016 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasound guided transplantation of enriched and cryopreserved spermatogonial cell suspension in goats.

    PubMed

    Kaul, G; Kaur, J; Rafeeqi, T A

    2010-12-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells transplantation provides a unique approach for studying spermatogenesis. Initially developed in mice, this technique has now been extended in farm animals and provides an alternative means to preserve valuable male germ line and to produce transgenic animals. The aim of this study was to enrich type A spermatogonial cells amongst the isolated cells from goat testis, to cryopreserve these enriched populations of cells and their subsequent transplantation in unrelated recipient goats under ultrasound guidance. The cells were isolated enzymatically and enriched by differential plating and separation on discontinuous percoll gradient. Ultrasound guided injection of trypan blue dye into rete testis resulted in 20-30% filling of the seminiferous tubules. Prior to transplantation, the cells were labelled with a fluorescent dye to trace donor cells in recipient seminiferous tubules after transplantation. The fluorescent-labelled cells were observed up to 12 weeks after transplantation. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. [Ultrasound-guided cutaneous intercostal branches nerves block: A good analgesic alternative for gallbladder open surgery].

    PubMed

    Fernández Martín, M T; López Álvarez, S; Mozo Herrera, G; Platero Burgos, J J

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become the standard treatment for gallbladder diseases. However, there are still some patients for whom conversion to open surgery is required. This surgery can produce significant post-operative pain. Opioids drugs have traditionally been used to treat this pain, but side effects have led to seeking alternatives (plexus, nerve or fascia blocks or wound). The cases are presented of 4 patients subjected to ultrasound-guided intercostal branches blocks in the mid-axillary line from T6 to T12 with levobupivacaine as an analgesic alternative in open surgery of gallbladder, with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrasound-Guided Intervention for Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia: An Updated Review of Anatomy and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Abdallah El-Sayed; Khalil, Adham Aboul Fotouh; Eltawab, Basma Aly; Wu, Wei-Ting

    2018-01-01

    Orofacial myofascial pain is prevalent and most often results from entrapment of branches of the trigeminal nerves. It is challenging to inject branches of the trigeminal nerve, a large portion of which are shielded by the facial bones. Bony landmarks of the cranium serve as important guides for palpation-guided injections and can be delineated using ultrasound. Ultrasound also provides real-time images of the adjacent muscles and accompanying arteries and can be used to guide the needle to the target region. Most importantly, ultrasound guidance significantly reduces the risk of collateral injury to vital neurovascular structures. In this review, we aimed to summarize the regional anatomy and ultrasound-guided injection techniques for the trigeminal nerve and its branches, including the supraorbital, infraorbital, mental, auriculotemporal, maxillary, and mandibular nerves. PMID:29808105

  10. Evaluation of the eZono 4000 with eZGuide for ultrasound-guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Gadsden, Jeff; Latmore, Malikah; Levine, Daniel M

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasound-guided procedures are increasingly common in a variety of acute care settings, such as the operating room, critical care unit and emergency room. However, accurate judgment of needle tip position using traditional ultrasound technology is frequently difficult, and serious injury can result from inadvertently advancing beyond or through the target. Needle navigation is a recent innovation that allows the clinician to visualize the needle position and trajectory in real time as it approaches the target. A novel ultrasound machine has recently been introduced that is portable and designed for procedural guidance. The eZono 4000™ features an innovative needle navigation technology that is simple to use and permits the use of a wide range of commercially available needles, avoiding the inconvenience and cost of proprietary equipment. This article discusses this new ultrasound machine in the context of other currently available ultrasound machines featuring needle navigation.

  11. Learning Ultrasound-Guided Needle Insertion Skills through an Edutainment Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wing-Yin; Ni, Dong; Pang, Wai-Man; Qin, Jing; Chui, Yim-Pan; Yu, Simon Chun-Ho; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    Ultrasound-guided needle insertion is essential in many of minimally invasive surgeries or procedures, such as biopsy, drug delivery, spinal anaesthesia, etc. Accurate and safe needle insertion is a difficult task due to the high requirement of hand-eye coordination skills. Many proposed virtual reality (VR) based training systems put their emphasis on realistic simulation instead of pedagogical efficiency. The lack of schematic training scenario leads to boredom of repetitive operations. To solve this, we present our novel training system with the integration of game elements in order to retain the trainees' enthusiasm. Task-oriented scenarios, time attack scenarios and performance evaluation are introduced. Besides, some state-of-art technologies are also presented, including ultrasound simulation, needle haptic rendering as well as a mass-spring-based needle-tissue interaction simulation. These works are shown to be effective to keep the trainees up with learning.

  12. Mediastinal abscess after endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Leong, Steven C; Marshall, Henry M; Bint, Michael; Yang, Ian A; Bowman, Rayleen V; Fong, Kwun M

    2013-10-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive technique that allows lung cancer nodal staging and biopsy of parabronchial and paratracheal tissue. Its simplicity, high diagnostic yield, ability to diagnose both benign and malignant conditions, and exceedingly low complication rate has resulted in rapid widespread adoption by surgeons and physicians. EBUS-TBNA-related complications, however, do occur and need to be considered when assessing the risk-benefit profile of performing the procedure, and if the patient represents with unexpected symptoms after the procedure. We describe a 64-year-old woman who presented with a mediastinal abscess 5 days after EBUS-TBNA. This case demonstrates the importance of considering EBUS-TBNA-related complications to guide relevant imaging decisions and antibiotic choices. We review the published literature regarding infective complications of EBUS-TBNA and propose possible pathophysiologies. These complications are likely to increase in frequency as the technique is more widely adopted.

  13. Ultrasound-guided approach for axillary brachial plexus, femoral nerve, and sciatic nerve blocks in dogs.

    PubMed

    Campoy, Luis; Bezuidenhout, Abraham J; Gleed, Robin D; Martin-Flores, Manuel; Raw, Robert M; Santare, Carrie L; Jay, Ariane R; Wang, Annie L

    2010-03-01

    To describe an ultrasound-guided technique and the anatomical basis for three clinically useful nerve blocks in dogs. Prospective experimental trial. Four hound-cross dogs aged 2 +/- 0 years (mean +/- SD) weighing 30 +/- 5 kg and four Beagles aged 2 +/- 0 years and weighing 8.5 +/- 0.5 kg. Axillary brachial plexus, femoral, and sciatic combined ultrasound/electrolocation-guided nerve blocks were performed sequentially and bilaterally using a lidocaine solution mixed with methylene blue. Sciatic nerve blocks were not performed in the hounds. After the blocks, the dogs were euthanatized and each relevant site dissected. Axillary brachial plexus block Landmark blood vessels and the roots of the brachial plexus were identified by ultrasound in all eight dogs. Anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the four ventral nerve roots (C6, C7, C8, and T1) and the axillary vessels. Three roots (C7, C8, and T1) were adequately stained bilaterally in all dogs. Femoral nerve block Landmark blood vessels (femoral artery and femoral vein), the femoral and saphenous nerves and the medial portion of the rectus femoris muscle were identified by ultrasound in all dogs. Anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the femoral vessels, femoral nerve, and the rectus femoris muscle. The femoral nerves were adequately stained bilaterally in all dogs. Sciatic nerve block. Ultrasound landmarks (semimembranosus muscle, the fascia of the biceps femoris muscle and the sciatic nerve) could be identified in all of the dogs. In the four Beagles, anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the biceps femoris muscle, the semimembranosus muscle, and the sciatic nerve. In the Beagles, all but one of the sciatic nerves were stained adequately. Ultrasound-guided needle insertion is an accurate method for depositing local anesthetic for axillary brachial plexus, femoral, and sciatic nerve blocks.

  14. Development of an ultrasound-guided technique for pudendal nerve block in cat cadavers.

    PubMed

    Adami, Chiara; Angeli, Giovanni; Haenssgen, Kati; Stoffel, Michael H; Spadavecchia, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this prospective experimental cadaveric study was to develop an ultrasound-guided technique to perform an anaesthetic pudendal nerve block in male cats. Fifteen fresh cadavers were used for this trial. A detailed anatomical dissection was performed on one cat in order to scrutinise the pudendal nerve and its ramifications. In a second step, the cadavers of six cats were used to test three different ultrasonographic approaches to the pudendal nerve: the deep dorso-lateral, the superficial dorso-lateral and the median transperineal. Although none of the approaches allowed direct ultrasonographical identification of the pudendal nerve branches, the deep dorso-lateral was found to be the most advantageous one in terms of practicability and ability to identify useful and reliable landmarks. Based on these findings, the deep dorso-lateral approach was selected as technique of choice for tracer injections (0.1 ml 1% methylene blue injected bilaterally) in six cat cadavers distinct from those used for the ultrasonographical study. Anatomical dissection revealed a homogeneous spread of the tracer around the pudendal nerve sensory branches in all six cadavers. Finally, computed tomography was performed in two additional cadavers after injection of 0.3 ml/kg (0.15 ml/kg per each injection sites, left and right) contrast medium through the deep dorso-lateral approach in order to obtain a model of volume distribution applicable to local anaesthetics. Our findings in cat cadavers indicate that ultrasound-guided pudendal nerve block is feasible and could be proposed to provide peri-operative analgesia in clinical patients undergoing perineal urethrostomy.

  15. Ultrasound guided needle localization and microsurgical exploration for incidental nonpalpable testicular tumors.

    PubMed

    Hopps, Carin V; Goldstein, Marc

    2002-09-01

    We describe a technique by which incidental, nonpalpable intratesticular tumors are excised using intraoperative ultrasonography and the operating microscope. Men with impalpable intratesticular tumors incidentally detected by ultrasonography underwent intraoperative ultrasound guided needle localization and microsurgical exploration of the mass. The testis was delivered through an inguinal incision and placed on ice to minimize warm ischemia. Two rubber shod vascular clamps were placed across the spermatic cord. The tumor was identified by ultrasound and localized with a 30 gauge needle, which was placed adjacent to the tumor. An operating microscope providing 6x to 25x magnification was used to excise the lesion with a 2 to 5 mm. margin. Tissue diagnosis was obtained by frozen section. Multiple random biopsies of the remaining parenchyma were done to confirm absent malignancy. Ultrasound showed incidental, nonpalpable testis tumors in 4 of the 65 men who underwent infertility evaluation and were entered into the microsurgical testis biopsy database between January 1995 and December 2001. All lesions were hypoechoic. Frozen section analysis of the lesions revealed 2 Leydig cell tumors, 1 mass with an inconclusive pathological diagnosis and 1 inflammatory mass. On permanent section the latter 2 lesions were seminoma. The seminomas were 1.6 and 0.9 cm. in the greatest diameter, and the Leydig cell tumors were 0.35 and 0.2 cm., respectively. Random biopsies were positive for seminoma and intratubular germ cell neoplasia in both testes with seminoma. These 2 patients subsequently opted to undergo radical orchiectomy. No residual tumor was detected in either radical orchiectomy specimen. Intraoperative ultrasound guided needle localization with microsurgical exploration is a safe and effective approach to even small impalpable testicular masses. This technique provides the opportunity to identify and remove benign and malignant lesions, and preserve the testis when the

  16. Ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection therapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis: 12-year care experience.

    PubMed

    Young, Cody M; Shiels, William E; Coley, Brian D; Hogan, Mark J; Murakami, James W; Jones, Karla; Higgins, Gloria C; Rennebohm, Robert M

    2012-12-01

    Intra-articular corticosteroid injections are a safe and effective treatment for patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The potential scope of care in ultrasound-guided corticosteroid therapy in children and a joint-based corticosteroid dose protocol designed to optimize interdisciplinary care are not found in the current literature. The purpose of this study was to report the spectrum of care, technique and safety of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection therapy in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and to propose an age-weight-joint-based corticosteroid dose protocol. A retrospective analysis was performed of 198 patients (ages 21 months to 28 years) referred for treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis with corticosteroid therapy. Symptomatic joints and tendon sheaths were treated as prescribed by the referring rheumatologist. An age-weight-joint-based dose protocol was developed and utilized for corticosteroid dose prescription. A total of 1,444 corticosteroid injections (1,340 joints, 104 tendon sheaths) were performed under US guidance. Injection sites included small, medium and large appendicular skeletal joints (upper extremity 497, lower extremity 837) and six temporomandibular joints. For patients with recurrent symptoms, 414 repeat injections were performed, with an average time interval of 17.7 months (range, 0.5-101.5 months) between injections. Complications occurred in 2.6% of injections and included subcutaneous tissue atrophy, skin hypopigmentation, erythema and pruritis. US-guided corticosteroid injection therapy provides dynamic, precise and safe treatment of a broad spectrum of joints and tendon sheaths throughout the entire pediatric musculoskeletal system. An age-weight-joint-based corticosteroid dose protocol is effective and integral to interdisciplinary care of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  17. Virtual reality, ultrasound-guided liver biopsy simulator: development and performance discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, S J; Hunt, C M; Woolnough, H M; Crawshaw, M; Kilkenny, C; Gould, D A; England, A; Sinha, A; Villard, P F

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this article was to identify and prospectively investigate simulated ultrasound-guided targeted liver biopsy performance metrics as differentiators between levels of expertise in interventional radiology. Methods Task analysis produced detailed procedural step documentation allowing identification of critical procedure steps and performance metrics for use in a virtual reality ultrasound-guided targeted liver biopsy procedure. Consultant (n=14; male=11, female=3) and trainee (n=26; male=19, female=7) scores on the performance metrics were compared. Ethical approval was granted by the Liverpool Research Ethics Committee (UK). Independent t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA) investigated differences between groups. Results Independent t-tests revealed significant differences between trainees and consultants on three performance metrics: targeting, p=0.018, t=−2.487 (−2.040 to −0.207); probe usage time, p = 0.040, t=2.132 (11.064 to 427.983); mean needle length in beam, p=0.029, t=−2.272 (−0.028 to −0.002). ANOVA reported significant differences across years of experience (0–1, 1–2, 3+ years) on seven performance metrics: no-go area touched, p=0.012; targeting, p=0.025; length of session, p=0.024; probe usage time, p=0.025; total needle distance moved, p=0.038; number of skin contacts, p<0.001; total time in no-go area, p=0.008. More experienced participants consistently received better performance scores on all 19 performance metrics. Conclusion It is possible to measure and monitor performance using simulation, with performance metrics providing feedback on skill level and differentiating levels of expertise. However, a transfer of training study is required. PMID:21304005

  18. Ultrasound-guided near-infrared spectroscopy for brain functional study: feasibility analysis and preliminary work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ronald; Qiang, Bo; Liu, Jun

    2005-04-01

    Recent advances in diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy (DOIS) allow the noninvasive measurement of local changes in cerebral oxygenation and hemodynamics. Available DOIS devices fall into three categories: time domain (TD), frequency domain (FD) and continuous wave (CW). The TD and FD devices have potential for high spatial resolution, high temporal resolution and high accuracy measurement, but the instrument cost and the hardware size prevent their wide clinical application. Furthermore, the presence of the low scattering cerebrospinal fluid layer (CSF) and its thickness variation during motion challenges quantitative, continuous monitoring of the cortex layer oxygenation and blood content. MRI has been used to provide a priori knowledge of the head anatomy that helps the NIR image reconstruction. However, the technology is expensive and lacks portability. This paper proposes a method that combines the accuracy of a TD/FD system and the portability of a CW device. With the optical baseline measured by a TD or FD device and the layer thickness characterized by an ultrasound transducer, a conventional CW system may be able to quantify the cortex layer optical absorption with high accuracy. In this paper, the feasibility of using ultrasound guided CW spectroscopy to monitor brain activities was studied on a multi layer head model using Monte Carlo simulation and order of magnitude analysis. A forward algorithm based on diffuse approximation and 2D Fourier Transform was used to optimize the source detector separation. Both analytical and neuron network approaches were developed for inverse calculation of the cortex layer absorption in real time. An ultrasound transducer was used to monitor the thickness of different layers surrounding the cerebral cortex. The concept of ultrasound guided CW spectroscopy was demonstrated by numerical simulation on a 2 layer head model and the use of the ultrasound transducer for layer thickness characterization was verified by

  19. Virtual reality, ultrasound-guided liver biopsy simulator: development and performance discrimination.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S J; Hunt, C M; Woolnough, H M; Crawshaw, M; Kilkenny, C; Gould, D A; England, A; Sinha, A; Villard, P F

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this article was to identify and prospectively investigate simulated ultrasound-guided targeted liver biopsy performance metrics as differentiators between levels of expertise in interventional radiology. Task analysis produced detailed procedural step documentation allowing identification of critical procedure steps and performance metrics for use in a virtual reality ultrasound-guided targeted liver biopsy procedure. Consultant (n=14; male=11, female=3) and trainee (n=26; male=19, female=7) scores on the performance metrics were compared. Ethical approval was granted by the Liverpool Research Ethics Committee (UK). Independent t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA) investigated differences between groups. Independent t-tests revealed significant differences between trainees and consultants on three performance metrics: targeting, p=0.018, t=-2.487 (-2.040 to -0.207); probe usage time, p = 0.040, t=2.132 (11.064 to 427.983); mean needle length in beam, p=0.029, t=-2.272 (-0.028 to -0.002). ANOVA reported significant differences across years of experience (0-1, 1-2, 3+ years) on seven performance metrics: no-go area touched, p=0.012; targeting, p=0.025; length of session, p=0.024; probe usage time, p=0.025; total needle distance moved, p=0.038; number of skin contacts, p<0.001; total time in no-go area, p=0.008. More experienced participants consistently received better performance scores on all 19 performance metrics. It is possible to measure and monitor performance using simulation, with performance metrics providing feedback on skill level and differentiating levels of expertise. However, a transfer of training study is required.

  20. An inexpensive, easily constructed, reusable task trainer for simulating ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis.

    PubMed

    Zerth, Herb; Harwood, Robert; Tommaso, Laura; Girzadas, Daniel V

    2012-12-01

    Pericardiocentesis is a low-frequency, high-risk procedure integral to the practice of emergency medicine. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis is the preferred technique for providing this critical intervention. Traditionally, emergency physicians learned pericardiocentesis in real time, at the bedside, on critically ill patients. Medical education is moving toward simulation for training and assessment of procedures such as pericardiocentesis because it allows learners to practice time-sensitive skills without risk to patient or learner. The retail market for models for pericardiocentesis practice is limited and expensive. We have developed an ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis task trainer that allows the physician to insert a needle under ultrasound guidance, pierce the "pericardial sac" and aspirate "blood." Our model can be simply constructed in a home kitchen, and the overall preparation time is 1 h. Our model costs $20.00 (US, 2008). Materials needed for the construction include 16 ounces of plain gelatin, one large balloon, one golf ball, food coloring, non-stick cooking spray, one wooden cooking skewer, surgical iodine solution, and a 4-quart sized plastic food storage container. Refrigeration and a heat source for cooking are also required. Once prepared, the model is usable for 2 weeks at room temperature and may be preserved an additional week if refrigerated. When the model shows signs of wear, it can be easily remade, by simply recycling the existing materials. The self-made model was well liked by training staff due to accessibility of a simulation model, and by learners of the technique as they felt more at ease performing pericardiocentesis on a live patient. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block in children with umbilical hernia: Case series.

    PubMed

    Alsaeed, Abdul Hamid; Thallaj, Ahmed; Khalil, Nancy; Almutaq, Nada; Aljazaeri, Ayman

    2013-10-01

    Umbilical hernia repair, a common day-case surgery procedure in children, is associated with a significant postoperative pain. The most popular peripheral nerve blocks used in umbilical hernia repair are rectus sheath infiltration and caudal block. The rectus sheath block may offer improved pain relief following umbilical hernia repair with no undesired effects such as lower limb motor weakness or urinary retention seen with caudal block which might delay discharge from the hospital. Ultrasound guidance of peripheral nerve blocks has reduced the number of complications and improved the quality of blocks. The aim of this case series is to assess the post rectus sheath block pain relief in pediatric patients coming for umbilical surgery. Twenty two (22) children (age range: 1.5-8 years) scheduled for umbilical hernia repair were included in the study. Following the induction of general anesthesia, the ultrasonographic anatomy of the umbilical region was studied with a 5-16 MHz 50 mm linear probe. An ultrasound-guided posterior rectus sheath block of both rectus abdominis muscles (RMs) was performed (total of 44 punctures). An in-plain technique using Stimuplex A insulated facet tip needle 22G 50mm. Surgical conditions, intraoperative hemodynamic parameters, and postoperative analgesia by means of the modified CHEOPS scale were evaluated. ultrasonograghic visualization of the posterior sheath was possible in all patients. The ultrasound guided rectus sheath blockade provided sufficient analgesia in all children with no need for additional analgesia except for one patient who postoperatively required morphine 0.1 mg/kg intravenously. There were no complications. Ultrasound guidance enables performances of an effective rectus sheath block for umbilical hernia. Use of the Stimuplex A insulated facet tip needle 22G 50mm provides easy, less traumatic skin and rectus muscle penetration and satisfactory needle visualiza.

  2. Ultrasound-guided plantar fascia release technique: a retrospective study of 46 feet.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Praveen K; Japour, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided plantar fascia release offers the surgeon clear visualization of anatomy at the surgical site. This technique uses small arthroscopic dissecting instruments through a 0.5-cm incision, allowing the surgeon to avoid the larger and more tissue-disruptive incision that is traditionally used for plantar heel spur resection and plantar fascia releases. Forty-one patients (46 feet) were selected for the study. The mean patient age was 47 years. Twenty-nine were considered obese with a body mass index greater than 30 kg/m(2). Patients were functionally and subjectively evaluated 4 weeks after surgery using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle and Hindfoot Rating Scale. Results from the study show a significant improvement (P = .05 confidence level) 4 weeks postoperatively for the 41 patients (46 feet), compared to their preoperative condition. The mean pretest score was 33.6 (range 10-52); this score improved to 88.0 (range 50-100), 4 weeks postoperatively. There were no postoperative infections or complications. The ultrasound-guided plantar fascia release technique is a practical surgical procedure for the relief of chronic plantar fascia pain because the surgeon is able to clearly visualize the plantar fascia by ultrasound. In addition, there is minimal disruption to surrounding tissue because small instruments are passed through a small 0.5-cm incision. The traditional open method of heel spur surgery, in contrast, uses a larger skin incision of 3 to 5 cm, followed by larger instruments to dissect to the plantar fascia.

  3. Point-of-Care Ultrasonography Findings and Care Use Among Patients Undergoing Ultrasound-Guided Shoulder Injections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se Won; Tiu, Timothy; Roberts, Jeremy; Lee, Brian; Bartels, Matthew N; Oh-Park, Mooyeon

    2018-01-01

    The aims of the study were to assess the overall reduction of pain in patients undergoing ultrasound-guided shoulder injections and to characterize the preinjection point-of-care ultrasound findings and use of clinical services postinjection including the use of magnetic resonance imaging and surgeries. Data of 172 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided subacromial subdeltoid injection or glenohumeral joint injection were reviewed for preinjection point-of-care ultrasound findings, change in pain intensity at 2 mos from baseline, and use of care at 6 mos' postinjection. Pain intensity was measured by the numeric rating scale and a dichotomous report of global impression of significant improvement in pain. Responders were defined as those with 50% or more reduction in numeric rating scale or those with global impression of 50% or more improvement. There were 141 responders among the 172 patients analyzed. Full-thickness rotator cuff tears were higher in the ultrasound-guided subacromial subdeltoid injection group when compared with the glenohumeral joint injection group (P = 0.038) and abnormal bicipital tendon findings higher in the glenohumeral joint injection group (P = 0.016). There were no significant differences in specific abnormal U findings between responders versus nonresponders. Twelve patients had a shoulder magnetic resonance imaging and four patients underwent operative interventions after the injection. Overall pain reduction after ultrasound-guided shoulder injections was favorable in the short term. There was no specific preinjection point-of-care ultrasound findings associated with clinical pain reduction after injection. Additional imaging and operative intervention after ultrasound-guided shoulder injections seemed to be relatively low.

  4. A review of randomised controlled trials comparing ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy with endothermal ablation for the treatment of great saphenous varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Davies, Huw Ob; Popplewell, Matthew; Darvall, Katy; Bate, Gareth; Bradbury, Andrew W

    2016-05-01

    The last 10 years have seen the introduction into everyday clinical practice of a wide range of novel non-surgical treatments for varicose veins. In July 2013, the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommended the following treatment hierarchy for varicose veins: endothermal ablation, ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy, surgery and compression hosiery. The aim of this paper is to review the randomised controlled trials that have compared endothermal ablation and ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy to determine if the level 1 evidence base still supports an "endothermal ablation first" strategy for the treatment of varicose veins. A PubMed and OVID literature search (until 31 January 2015) was performed and randomised controlled trials comparing endothermal ablation and ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy were obtained. Although anatomical success appeared higher with endothermal ablation than ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy, clinical success and patient-reported outcomes measures were similar. Morbidity and complication rates were very low and not significantly different between endothermal ablation and ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy. Ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy was consistently less expensive that endothermal ablation. All endovenous modalities appear to be successful and have a role in modern day practice. Although further work is required to optimise ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy technique to maximise anatomical success and minimise retreatment, the present level 1 evidence base shows there is no significant difference in clinical important outcomes between ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy and endothermal ablation. As ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy is less expensive, it is likely to be a more cost-effective option in most patients in most healthcare settings. Strict adherence to the treatment hierarchy recommended by National Institute for Health and Care Excellence seems unjustified. © The Author

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Catheter Drainage of Large Breast Abscesses in Lactating Women: How to Preserve Breastfeeding Safely.

    PubMed

    Falco, Giuseppe; Foroni, Monica; Castagnetti, Fabio; Marano, Luigi; Bordoni, Daniele; Rocco, Nicola; Marchesi, Vanessa; Iotti, Valentina; Vacondio, Rita; Ferrari, Guglielmo

    2016-12-01

    Management of breast abscess in lactating women remains controversial. During pregnancy, women may develop different kinds of benign breast lesions that could require a surgical incision performed under general anesthesia with consequent breastfeeding interruption. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the management of large breast abscesses with ultrasound-assisted drainage aiming at breastfeeding preservation. 34 lactating women with a diagnosis of unilateral breast abscess have been treated with an ultrasound (US)-assisted drainage of the abscess. A pigtail catheter was inserted into the fluid collection using the Seldinger technique under US guide and connected to a three stop way to allow drainage and irrigation of the cavity until its resolution. All procedures have been found safe and well tolerated. No recurrence was observed and breastfeeding was never interrupted. The described technique allows to avoid surgery and to preserve breastfeeding in well-selected patients with a safe, well-tolerated and cost-effective procedure.

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Thyroid Nodule Core Biopsy: Clinical Utility in Patients with Prior Nondiagnostic Fine-Needle Aspirate

    PubMed Central

    Vij, Abhinav; Seale, Melanie K.; Desai, Gaurav; Halpern, Elkan; Faquin, William C.; Parangi, Sareh; Hahn, Peter F.; Daniels, Gilbert H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Five percent to 20% of thyroid nodule fine-needle aspiration (FNA) samples are nondiagnostic. The objective of this study was to determine whether a combination of FNA and core biopsy (CFNACB) would yield a higher proportion of diagnostic readings compared with FNA alone in patients with a history of one or more prior nondiagnostic FNA readings. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 90 core biopsies (CBs) performed in 82 subjects (55 women and 27 men) between 2006 and 2008 in an outpatient clinic. Results CFNACB yielded a diagnostic reading in 87%. The diagnostic reading yield of the CB component of CFNACB was significantly superior to the concurrent FNA component, with CB yielding a diagnosis in 77% of cases and FNA yielding a diagnosis in 47% (p<0.0001). The combination of CB and FNA had a higher diagnostic reading yield than either alone. In 69 nodules that had only one prior nondiagnostic FNA, CB was diagnostic in 74%, FNA was diagnostic in 52%, CFNACB was diagnostic in 87%, and CB performed significantly better than FNA (p=0.0135). In 21 nodules with two or more prior nondiagnostic FNAs, CFNACB and CB were diagnostic in 86%, FNA was diagnostic in 29%, and CB was significantly better than FNA (p=0.0005). Clinical, ultrasound, or histopathologic follow-up was available for 81% (73/90) of the CFNACB procedures. No subject with a benign CFNACB reading was diagnosed with thyroid malignancy in the follow-up period (range 4–37 months, mean 18 months), although one subject had minimal increase in nodule size and was awaiting repeat sonography at study conclusion. Conclusion Thyroid nodule CFNACB is safe and clinically useful in selected patients when a prior FNA reading is nondiagnostic. CFNACB is superior to either CB or FNA alone. CFNACB should be strongly considered as an alternative to surgery in individuals with two prior nondiagnostic FNAs. PMID:22304390

  7. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided drainage of an abdominal fluid collection following Whipple’s resection

    PubMed Central

    Jah, Asif; Jamieson, Neville; Huguet, Emmanuel; Griffiths, William; Carroll, Nicholas; Praseedom, Raaj

    2008-01-01

    Percutaneous aspiration and drainage of post-operative abdominal fluid collections is a well established standard technique. However, some fluid collections are not amenable to percutaneous drainage either due to location or the presence of surrounding visceral structures. Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) has been widely used for the drainage of pancreatitis-related abdominal fluid collections. However, there are no reports on the use of this technique in the post-operative setting. We report a case where the EUS-guided technique was used to drain a percutaneously inaccessible post-operative collection which had developed after Whipple’s resection. PMID:19058316

  8. Conventional Landmark-Guided Midline Versus Preprocedure Ultrasound-Guided Paramedian Techniques in Spinal Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kallidaikurichi Srinivasan, Karthikeyan; Iohom, Gabriella; Loughnane, Frank; Lee, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    Multiple passes and attempts while administering spinal anesthesia are associated with a greater incidence of postdural puncture headache, paraesthesia, and spinal hematoma. We hypothesized that the routine use of a preprocedural ultrasound-guided paramedian technique for spinal anesthesia would reduce the number of passes required to achieve entry into the subarachnoid space when compared with the conventional landmark-guided midline approach. One hundred consenting patients scheduled for elective total joint replacements (hip and knee) were randomized into group C (conventional) and group P (preprocedural ultrasound-guided paramedian technique) with 50 in each group. The patients were blinded to the study group. All spinal anesthetics were administered by a consultant anesthesiologist. In group C, spinal anesthetic was done via the midline approach using clinically palpated landmarks. In group P, a preprocedural ultrasound scan was used to mark the paramedian insertion site, and spinal anesthetic was performed via the paramedian approach. The average number of passes (defined as the number of forward advancements of the spinal needle in a given interspinous space, i.e., withdrawal and redirection of spinal needle without exiting the skin) in group P was approximately 0.34 times that in group C, a difference that was statistically significant (P = 0.01). Similarly, the average number of attempts (defined as the number of times the spinal needle was withdrawn from the skin and reinserted) in group P was approximately 0.25 times that of group C (P = 0.0021). In group P, on an average, it took 81.5 (99% confidence interval, 68.4-97 seconds) seconds longer to identify the landmarks than in group C (P = 0.0002). All other parameters, including grading of palpated landmarks, time taken for spinal anesthetic injection, periprocedural pain scores, periprocedural patient discomfort visual analog scale score, conversion to general anesthetic, paresthesia, and radicular pain

  9. Modelling and characterisation of a ultrasound-actuated needle for improved visibility in ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia and tissue biopsy.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Y; Hilgers, A; Sadiq, M; Cochran, S; Corner, G; Huang, Z

    2016-07-01

    Clear needle visualisation is recognised as an unmet need for ultrasound guided percutaneous needle procedures including regional anaesthesia and tissue biopsy. With inadequate needle visibility, these procedures may result in serious complications or a failed operation. This paper reports analysis of the modal behaviour of a previously proposed ultrasound-actuated needle configuration, which may overcome this problem by improving needle visibility in colour Doppler imaging. It uses a piezoelectric transducer to actuate longitudinal resonant modes in needles (outer diameter 0.8-1.2mm, length>65mm). The factors that affect the needle's vibration mode are identified, including the needle length, the transducer's resonance frequency and the gripping position. Their effects are investigated using finite element modelling, with the conclusions validated experimentally. The actuated needle was inserted into porcine tissue up to 30mm depth and its visibility was observed under colour Doppler imaging. The piezoelectric transducer is able to generate longitudinal vibration with peak-to-peak amplitude up to 4μm at the needle tip with an actuating voltage of 20Vpp. Actuated in longitudinal vibration modes (distal mode at 27.6kHz and transducer mode at 42.2kHz) with a drive amplitude of 12-14Vpp, a 120mm needle is delineated as a coloured line in colour Doppler images, with both needle tip and shaft visualised. The improved needle visibility is maintained while the needle is advanced into the tissue, thus allowing tracking of the needle position in real time. Moreover, the needle tip is highlighted by strong coloured artefacts around the actuated needle generated by its flexural vibration. A limitation of the technique is that the transducer mode requires needles of specific lengths so that the needle's resonance frequency matches the transducer. This may restrict the choice of needle lengths in clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Forearm Nerve Blocks: A Novel Application for Pain Control in Adult Patients with Digit Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Patricia Javedani, Parisa; Amini, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Phalanx fractures and interphalangeal joint dislocations commonly present to the emergency department. Although these orthopedic injuries are not complex, the four-point digital block used for anesthesia during the reduction can be painful. Additionally, cases requiring prolonged manipulation or consultation for adequate reduction may require repeat blockade. This case series reports four patients presenting after mechanical injuries resulting in phalanx fracture or interphalangeal joint dislocations. These patients received an ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block of the forearm with successful subsequent reduction. To our knowledge, use of ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks of the forearm for anesthesia in reduction of upper extremity digit injuries in adult patients in the emergency department setting has not been described before. PMID:27555971

  11. Case report: ultrasound-guided continuous thoracic paravertebral block for outpatient acute pain management of multilevel unilateral rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hiroaki; Salviz, Emine Aysu; Chen, Stephanie; Vandepitte, Catherine; Hadzic, Admir

    2013-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with multiple unilateral rib fractures (T3-T8) gained the ability to breathe deeply and to ambulate after ultrasound-guided continuous thoracic paravertebral block and was discharged home after being observed for 15 hours after the block. The ultrasound guidance was helpful in determining the site of rib fractures and the optimal level for catheter placement. This report also discusses the management of analgesia using continuous paravertebral block in an outpatient with trauma.

  12. Real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia using the SonixGPS® needle tracking system: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wong, Simon W; Niazi, Ahtsham U; Chin, Ki J; Chan, Vincent W

    2013-01-01

    The SonixGPS® is an electromagnetic needle tracking system for ultrasound-guided needle intervention. Both current and predicted needle tip position are displayed on the ultrasound screen in real-time, facilitating needle-beam alignment and guidance to the target. This case report illustrates the use of the SonixGPS system for successful performance of real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia in a patient with difficult spinal anatomy. A 67-yr-old male was admitted to our hospital to undergo revision of total right hip arthroplasty. His four previous arthroplasties for hip revision were performed under general anesthesia because he had undergone L3-L5 instrumentation for spinal stenosis. The L4-L5 interspace was viewed with the patient in the left lateral decubitus position. A 19G 80-mm proprietary needle (Ultrasonix Medical Corp, Richmond, BC, Canada) was inserted and directed through the paraspinal muscles to the ligamentum flavum in plane to the ultrasound beam. A 120-mm 25G Whitacre spinal needle was then inserted through the introducer needle in a conventional fashion. Successful dural puncture was achieved on the second attempt, as indicated by a flow of clear cerebrospinal fluid. The patient tolerated the procedure well, and the spinal anesthetic was adequate for the duration of the surgery. The SonixGPS is a novel technology that can reduce the technical difficulty of real-time ultrasound-guided neuraxial blockade. It may also have applications in other advanced ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia techniques where needle-beam alignment is critical.

  13. Effectiveness of ultrasound-guided injections combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis.

    PubMed

    Gasparre, Giuseppe; Fusaro, Isabella; Galletti, Stefano; Volini, Silvia; Benedetti, Maria Grazia

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the association of exercises for the shoulder with ultrasound-guided injection into the bursa significantly improves the treatment outcome in adhesive bursitis. Two groups of 35 patients, one treated with ultrasound-guided injection (UGI) and the other one with ultrasound-guided injection and home exercise program (UGI-exercise) for 1 month, were assessed for pain and shoulder function before treatment, 1 and 3 months post-treatment. Fourteen patients in UGI group and 23 patients in the UGI-exercises group were completely free of pain after 1 month (p = 0.031). At 3 months' follow-up, patients in the UGI-exercise group showed a significant improvement with respect to the other group (p = 0.005). No differences were found in function assessment. The UGI combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis is effective to ensure a more frequent complete pain relief in the medium term.

  14. [Ultrasound-guided microwave ablation with artificial pleural effusion for liver tumor adjacent to 
diaphragmatic dome].

    PubMed

    Tang, Tian; Gu, Shanzhi; Li, Guowen; Huang, Manping; Huang, Bin; Xiong, Zhengping

    2017-02-28

    To explore the value of ultrasound-guided microwave ablation with artificial pleural effusion for liver tumor adjacent to diaphragmatic dome.
 Methods: A total of 34 patients with liver tumors located at diaphragmatic dome in Hunan Provincial Tumor Hospital were recruited from January 2014 to October 2015. The number of lesions ≤3 or lesion diameter ≤5 cm was in line with the microwave ablation indications. B ultrasound-guided microwave ablation for the liver tumors was undertaken after the artificial pleural effusion being established. 3-4 weeks later after the microwave ablation, all patients were imaged with enhance CT or MRI. The effect of ablation and the complications were evaluated.
 Results: There were 49 lesions in 34 patients, including 30 cases (88.2%) of complete ablation (CA), 3 cases (8.8%) of partial ablation (PA) and one case with new lesions after ablation (2.9%). Thirty-four patients had (1 580±230.7) mL of pleural effusion volume, while one case had bloody pleural effusion. One case had a diaphragmatic thermal injury, and one case had a biliary tumor infection. All of them showed remission after symptomatic treatment. 
 Conclusion: Combination of ultrasound-guided microwave ablation with artificial pleural effusion is a safe and effective therapy for liver tumor adjacent to diaphragmatic dome.

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Stimulation of Posterior Tibial Nerve: A Potential Novel Intervention for Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yung-Tsan; Chang, Chih-Ya; Chou, Yu-Ching; Yeh, Chun-Chang; Li, Tsung-Ying; Chu, Heng-Yi; Chen, Liang-Cheng

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic benefit of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) stimulation at the posterior tibial nerve (PTN) in patients with recalcitrant plantar fasciitis (PF). A prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial (12-wk follow-up). Outpatient local medical center settings. Patients (N=36) with recalcitrant PF underwent randomization, and all were included in the final data analysis. Patients in the PRF group were treated with 1 dose of ultrasound-guided PRF stimulation at the PTN, and those in the control group received 1 dose of 2% lidocaine, 0.5mL, injected at the PTN under ultrasound guidance. The visual analog scale (first-step and overall pain), American Orthopedic Foot-Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale, and ultrasonographic thickness of the plantar fascia were evaluated at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. Thirty-six patients (20 feet per group) completed the study. The PRF group had a significantly larger improvement in first-step pain, overall pain, and AOFAS score (all P<.001), as well as plantar fascia thickness (P<.05), compared with those of the control group at all observed time points. This study shows that ultrasound-guided PRF stimulation at the PTN is effective for treating recalcitrant PF. This simple, reproducible method could be a novel strategy for managing recalcitrant PF. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia in a Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD)-Deficient Geriatric Trauma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Födinger, Agnes M.; Kammerlander, Christian; Luger, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic enzymatic disorder causing hemolytic anemia. Exposure to drugs is considered to be the most common cause of acute hemolysis in patients with G6PD deficiency. Experience with regional anesthesia, in particular peripheral nerve blocks, is rarely described in patients with G6PD deficiency, but is of great clinical interest. For this reason, we now report on the successful management of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block in a patient with geriatric G6PD deficiency. Case report: A female, 75-year-old geriatric trauma patient with G6PD deficiency and a fracture of the left forearm, was scheduled for osteosynthesis of the left forearm. For surgery regional anesthesia with ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block with 30 mL bupivacaine 0.5% was established. Surgical operation und postoperative course were uneventful and with no signs of hemolysis. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block with bupivacaine was a safe and effective technique in this patient with G6PD deficiency. Peripheral nerve block is a major analgesic approach and of great value for anesthesiologists and surgeons, especially in our aging and multimorbid society. PMID:23569708

  17. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle injection for local control of recurrent non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Farrah; Anker, Christopher J; Garrison, Garth; Kinsey, C Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is an established technique for the diagnosis of thoracic malignancies. Non-ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle injection has been used previously to deliver chemotherapeutic agents. To use endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle injection (EBUS-TBNI) to achieve local control of recurrent early-stage lung cancer. A 63-year-old man presented with recurrent early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma after chemotherapy and external beam radiation. We used EBUS-TBNI to deliver cisplatin into the tumor located outside the airway. This procedure was performed on three separate occasions without complication. EBUS-TBNI resulted in resolution of fluorodeoxyglucose avidity, measured by positron emission tomography-computed tomography, in the region at 4 weeks. However, at 5 months, there was evidence of distal recurrence. This is the first description of EBUS-TBNI to treat local recurrence of lung cancer and one of the first reports of the use of EBUS for intratumoral therapy. Additional research is warranted to determine the clinical usefulness and safety of this therapeutic approach.

  18. Management of hypertrophic pylorus stenosis with ultrasound guided single shot epidural anaesthesia--a retrospective analysis of 20 cases.

    PubMed

    Willschke, Harald; Machata, Anette-Marie; Rebhandl, Winfried; Benkoe, Thomas; Kettner, Stephan C; Brenner, Lydia; Marhofer, Peter

    2011-02-01

    To retrospectively describe the performance of ultrasound guided thoracic epidural anaesthesia under sedation for anaesthesia management of open pyloromyotomy. Anaesthesia management for hypertrophic pylorus stenosis (HPS) is usually performed under general anaesthesia with tracheal intubation. Only a few publications describe avoidance of tracheal intubation in infants by using spinal or caudal anaesthesia. The present retrospective analysis describes the performance of ultrasound guided thoracic epidural anaesthesia under sedation for anaesthetic management of open pyloromyotomy. Twenty consecutive infants scheduled for pyloromyotomy according to the Weber-Ramstedt technique were retrospectively analysed. After sedation with nalbuphine and propofol, an ultrasound guided single shot thoracic epidural anaesthesia was performed with 0.75 ml·kg(-1) ropivacaine 0.475%. Insufficient blockade was defined as increase of HR > 15% from initial value and/or any movements at skin incision. In those cases we were prepared for rapid sequence intubation according to the departmental standard. All pyloromyotomies could be performed under single shot thoracic epidural anaesthesia and sedation. One case of moderate oxygen desaturation was treated with intermittent ventilation via face mask. Thoracic epidural anaesthesia under sedation for pyloromyotomy has been a useful technique in this retrospective series of infants suffering from HPS. In 1/20 infants short term assisted ventilation via face mask was required. Undisturbed surgery was possible in all cases. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Paraffin-gel tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound-guided needle biopsy phantom.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Sílvio L; Pavan, Theo Z; Junior, Jorge E; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2013-12-01

    Paraffin-gel waxes have been investigated as new soft tissue-mimicking materials for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy training. Breast phantoms were produced with a broad range of acoustical properties. The speed of sound for the phantoms ranged from 1425.4 ± 0.6 to 1480.3 ± 1.7 m/s at room temperature. The attenuation coefficients were easily controlled between 0.32 ± 0.27 dB/cm and 2.04 ± 0.65 dB/cm at 7.5 MHz, depending on the amount of carnauba wax added to the base material. The materials do not suffer dehydration and provide adequate needle penetration, with a Young's storage modulus varying between 14.7 ± 0.2 kPa and 34.9 ± 0.3 kPa. The phantom background material possesses long-term stability and can be employed in a supine position without changes in geometry. These results indicate that paraffin-gel waxes may be promising materials for training radiologists in ultrasound biopsy procedures. Copyright © 2013 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. White light-informed optical properties improve ultrasound-guided fluorescence tomography of photoactive protoporphyrin IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Brendan P.; DSouza, Alisha V.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-04-01

    Subsurface fluorescence imaging is desirable for medical applications, including protoporphyrin-IX (PpIX)-based skin tumor diagnosis, surgical guidance, and dosimetry in photodynamic therapy. While tissue optical properties and heterogeneities make true subsurface fluorescence mapping an ill-posed problem, ultrasound-guided fluorescence-tomography (USFT) provides regional fluorescence mapping. Here USFT is implemented with spectroscopic decoupling of fluorescence signals (auto-fluorescence, PpIX, photoproducts), and white light spectroscopy-determined bulk optical properties. Segmented US images provide a priori spatial information for fluorescence reconstruction using region-based, diffuse FT. The method was tested in simulations, tissue homogeneous and inclusion phantoms, and an injected-inclusion animal model. Reconstructed fluorescence yield was linear with PpIX concentration, including the lowest concentration used, 0.025 μg/ml. White light spectroscopy informed optical properties, which improved fluorescence reconstruction accuracy compared to the use of fixed, literature-based optical properties, reduced reconstruction error and reconstructed fluorescence standard deviation by factors of 8.9 and 2.0, respectively. Recovered contrast-to-background error was 25% and 74% for inclusion phantoms without and with a 2-mm skin-like layer, respectively. Preliminary mouse-model imaging demonstrated system feasibility for subsurface fluorescence measurement in vivo. These data suggest that this implementation of USFT is capable of regional PpIX mapping in human skin tumors during photodynamic therapy, to be used in dosimetric evaluations.

  1. Ultrasound-guided medical thoracoscopy in the absence of pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Giampietro; Valsecchi, Alberto; Indellicati, Davide; Arondi, Sabrina; Trigiani, Marco; Pinelli, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    Medical thoracoscopy (MT) is a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure that permits the study of the pleural space. The presence of pleural adhesions is the most important contraindication to performing MT. Lesions of the pleura in absence of pleural effusion are usually studied in video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) with preoperative ultrasound evaluation. No data are available about ultrasound-guided MT in the absence of pleural effusion. From January 2007 to June 2013, 622 consecutive MTs were performed under ultrasound guidance without inducing a pneumothorax. A retrospective cohort of 29 patients affected by pleural diseases without fluid was reviewed. The fifth or sixth intercostal spaces along the midaxillary line with a good echographic "sliding sign" and normal appearance of the pleural line were chosen as the entry site. The pleural cavity was explored, and biopsies were performed. The mean age of the patient cohort was 62.8 years; there were 20 male patients and nine female patients. Pleural adherences were avoided, and adequate number of pleural biopsies were performed. No parenchymal lung injuries, bleeding, or hematoma occurred. Seventeen patients had a completely free pleural cavity, four patients had a single pleural adhesion, and eight had multiple pleural adhesions; in all cases, however, endoscopic exploration was possible and biopsy specimens were adequate. The most frequent histopathologic diagnosis was malignant pleural mesothelioma. We have shown that thoracic ultrasound accurately identifies intrathoracic adhesions and, in experienced hands, can guide MT access, replacing the VATS approach, even in the complete absence of pleural effusion.

  2. Ergonomic task analysis of ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ajmal, Muhammad; Power, Susan; Smith, Tim; Shorten, George D

    2011-02-01

    To apply ergonomic task analysis to the performance of ultrasound-guided (US-guided) femoral nerve block (FNB) in an acute hospital setting. Pilot prospective observational study. Orthopedic operating room of a regional trauma hospital. 15 anesthesiologists of various levels of experience in US-guided FNB (estimated minimum experience < 10 procedures; maximum about 50 procedures, and from basic trainees to consultants); and 15 patients (5 men and 10 women), aged 77 ± 15 (mean ± SD yrs) years. MEASUREMENTS/OBSERVATIONS: A data capture "tool", which was modified from one previously developed for ergonomic study of spinal anesthesia, was studied. Patient, operator, and heterogeneous environmental factors related to ergonomic performance of US-guided FNB were identified. The observation period started immediately before commencement of positioning the patient and ended on completion of perineural injection. Data were acquired using direct observations, photography, and application of a questionnaire. The quality of ergonomic performance was generally suboptimal and varied greatly among operators. Eight (experience < 10 procedures) of 15 operators excessively rotated their head, neck, and/or back to visualize the image on the ultrasound machine. Eight operators (experience < 10 procedures) performed the procedure with excessive thoracolumbar flexion. Performance of US-guided FNB presents ergonomic challenges and was suboptimal during most of the procedures observed. Formal training in US-guided peripheral nerve blockade should include reference to ergonomic factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A cMUT probe for ultrasound-guided focused ultrasound targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Gross, Dominique; Coutier, Caroline; Legros, Mathieu; Bouakaz, Ayache; Certon, Dominique

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound-mediated targeted therapy represents a promising strategy in the arsenal of modern therapy. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) technology could overcome some difficulties encountered by traditional piezoelectric transducers. In this study, we report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of an ultrasound-guided focused ultrasound (USgFUS) cMUT probe dedicated to preclinical evaluation of targeted therapy (hyperthermia, thermosensitive liposomes activation, and sonoporation) at low frequency (1 MHz) with simultaneous ultrasonic imaging and guidance (15 to 20 MHz). The probe embeds two types of cMUT arrays to perform the modalities of targeted therapy and imaging respectively. The wafer-bonding process flow employed for the manufacturing of the cMUTs is reported. One of its main features is the possibility of implementing two different gap heights on the same wafer. All the design and characterization steps of the devices are described and discussed, starting from the array design up to the first in vitro measurements: optical (microscopy) and electrical (impedance) measurements, arrays' electroacoustic responses, focused pressure field mapping (maximum peak-to-peak pressure = 2.5 MPa), and the first B-scan image of a wire-target phantom.

  4. Risks and benefits in treatment of mediastinal abscess by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lei; Krimsky, William S; Wu, Qingchen; Sun, Jiayuan

    2017-07-01

    Mediastinal abscess is a fatal condition, treatment of mediastinal abscess is with antibiotics and sometimes surgery for debridement and drainage. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a safe assessment and candidate treatment method of mediastinal lesions. This study aimed to HYPERLINK "javascript:void(0);" discuss risks and benefits in treatment of mediastinal abscess by EBUS-TBNA. We noticed a 56-year-old man with developed bilateral pneumonia and sepsis after puncture of mediastinal abscess by EBUS-TBNA. The patient was successfully treated with a combination of systemic anti-infection treatment and intracavitary administration of antibiotics, antifungal and repeated drainage and lavage via EBUS-TBNA, in 1 year follow-up without recurrence. This study indicated infection spread risk of mediastinal abscess after EBUS-TBNA, and mediastinal abscess was successfully cured by combination of systemic anti-infection and local intervention through EBUS-TBNA. EBUS-TBNA is a potential effective minimally invasive treatment for mediastinal abscess, and it is necessary to be aware of clinical complications after puncture of mediastinal infectious lesions by EBUS-TBNA. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Diagnostic yield of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for mediastinal staging in lung cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Bussy, Sebastián; Labarca, Gonzalo; Canals, Sofia; Caviedes, Iván; Folch, Erik; Majid, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive diagnostic test with a high diagnostic yield for suspicious central pulmonary lesions and for mediastinal lymph node staging. The main objective of this study was to describe the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal lymph node staging in patients with suspected lung cancer. METHODS: Prospective study of patients undergoing EBUS-TBNA for diagnosis. Patients ≥ 18 years of age were recruited between July of 2010 and August of 2013. We recorded demographic variables, radiological characteristics provided by axial CT of the chest, location of the lesion in the mediastinum as per the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer classification, and definitive diagnostic result (EBUS with a diagnostic biopsy or a definitive diagnostic method). RESULTS: Our analysis included 354 biopsies, from 145 patients. Of those 145 patients, 54.48% were male. The mean age was 63.75 years. The mean lymph node size was 15.03 mm, and 90 lymph nodes were smaller than 10.0 mm. The EBUS-TBNA method showed a sensitivity of 91.17%, a specificity of 100.0%, and a negative predictive value of 92.9%. The most common histological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: EBUS-TBNA is a diagnostic tool that yields satisfactory results in the staging of neoplastic mediastinal lesions. PMID:26176519

  6. Chronic abdominal wall pain and ultrasound-guided abdominal cutaneous nerve infiltration: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kanakarajan, Saravanakumar; High, Kristina; Nagaraja, Ravi

    2011-03-01

    Chronic abdominal wall pain occurs in about 10-30% of patients presenting with chronic abdominal pain. Entrapment of abdominal cutaneous nerves at the lateral border of the rectus abdominis muscle has been attributed as a cause of abdominal wall pain. We report our experience of treating such patients using ultrasound-guided abdominal cutaneous nerve infiltration. We conducted a retrospective audit of abdominal cutaneous nerve infiltration performed in the period between September 2008 to August 2009 in our center. All patients had received local anesthetic and steroid injection under ultrasound guidance. The response to the infiltration was evaluated in the post-procedure telephone review as well as in the follow-up clinic. Brief pain inventory (BPI) and numerical rating scale pain scores were collated from two points: the initial outpatient clinic and the follow up clinic up to 5 months following the injection. Nine patients had abdominal cutaneous nerve injections under ultrasound guidance in the period under review. Six patients reported 50% pain relief or more (responders) while three patients did not. Pain and BPI scores showed a decreasing trend in responders. The median duration of follow-up was 12 weeks. Ultrasound can reliably be used for infiltration of the abdominal cutaneous nerves. This will improve the safety as well as diagnostic utility of the procedure. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Ultrasound-guided hydrodissection decreases gliding resistance of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Evers, Stefanie; Thoreson, Andrew R; Smith, Jay; Zhao, Chunfeng; Geske, Jennifer R; Amadio, Peter C

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess alterations in median nerve (MN) biomechanics within the carpal tunnel resulting from ultrasound-guided hydrodissection in a cadaveric model. Twelve fresh frozen human cadaver hands were used. MN gliding resistance was measured at baseline and posthydrodissection, by pulling the nerve proximally and then returning it to the origin. Six specimens were treated with hydrodissection, and 6 were used as controls. In the hydrodissection group there was a significant reduction in mean peak gliding resistance of 92.9 ± 34.8 mN between baseline and immediately posthydrodissection (21.4% ± 10.5%; P = 0.001). No significant reduction between baseline and the second cycle occurred in the control group: 9.6 ± 29.8 mN (0.4% ± 5.3%; P = 0.467). Hydrodissection can decrease the gliding resistance of the MN within the carpal tunnel, at least in wrists unaffected by carpal tunnel syndrome. A clinical trial of hydrodissection seems justified. Muscle Nerve 57: 25-32, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for staging of lung cancer: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Fahad

    2012-09-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) offers a minimally invasive alternative to mediastinoscopy with additional access to the hilar nodes, a better safety profile, and it removes the costs and hazards of theatre time and general anesthesia with comparable sensitivity, although the negative predictive value of mediastinoscopy (and sample size) is greater. EBUS- TBNA also obtains larger samples than conventional TBNA, has superior performance and theoretically is safer, allowing real-time sampling under direct vision. It can also have predictive value both in sonographic appearance of the nodes and histological characteristics. EBUS-TBNA is therefore indicated for NSCLC staging, diagnosis of lung cancer when there is no endobronchial lesion, and diagnosis of both benign (especially tuberculosis and sarcoidosis) and malignant mediastinal lesions. The procedure is different than for flexible bronchoscopy, takes longer, and requires more training. EBUS-TBNA is more expensive than conventional TBNA but can save costs by reducing the number of more costly mediastinoscopies. In the future, endobronchial ultrasound may have applications in airways disease and pulmonary vascular disease.

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound guided brush/fine-needle aspiration cytology: A 15-month study.

    PubMed

    Tummidi, Santosh; Kothari, Kanchan; Sathe, Pragati; Agnihotri, Mona; Fernandes, Gwendolyn; Naik, Leena; Jain, Aleena; Chaturvedi, Rachana

    2018-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become increasingly popular for the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal diseases and peri-gastrointestinal lesions. The application of FNA/Brush has dramatically expanded the clinical utility of EUS. To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy, study the spectrum of lesions encountered in EUS-FNAC/brush cytology of gastrointestinal and peri-gastrointestinal lesions. Total of 124 patients during the period from August 2015 to November 2016 was included in the study. Routine staining was done. A total of 124 cases were studied with 86% (107 cases) being satisfactory for evaluation. M:F ratio was 1:1.03, mean age of 50.5 years. The most common site was common bile duct (CBD) (37%) followed by lymph node (21%), pancreas (17.7%), esophagus (17%), stomach (3.5%), liver (1.8%), gallbladder (1%), and spleen (1%). In total, 53.4% lesions were benign, in 6.5% atypical cells were seen, 12.1% were suspicious for malignancy, and 28% cases were positive for malignancy. Follow-up was available in 102 cases with cyto-histopathological concordance rate of 90%. EUS-FNA/Brush is a reliable, sensitive, specific and minimally invasive way to establish a diagnosis. It can be utilized as a pre-operative procedure for the management of many intra-abdominal lesions and prevent unnecessary invasive procedures. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The effects of hypnotherapy during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy for pain and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hızlı, Fatih; Özcan, Osman; Selvi, İsmail; Eraslan, Pınar; Köşüş, Aydın; Baş, Okan; Yıkılmaz, Taha Numan; Güven, Oğuz; Başar, Halil

    2015-11-01

    Several studies evaluating the tolerance of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided needle biopsies showed that moderate-to-severe pain was associated with the procedure. Additionally, prebiopsy anxiety or rebiopsy as a result of a prior biopsy procedure is mentioned as factors predisposing to higher pain intensity. Thus, in this study, we investigated the effects of hypnotherapy during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy for pain and anxiety. Sixty-four patients presenting for TRUS-guided prostate needle biopsy were randomly assigned to receive either 10-min presurgery hypnosis session (n = 32, mean age 63.5 ± 6.1, p = 0.289) or a presurgery control session (n = 32, mean age 61.8 ± 6.8, p = 0.289). The hypnosis session involved suggestions for increased relaxation and decreased anxiety. Presurgery pain and anxiety were measured using visual analog scales (VAS), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS), respectively. In our statistics, p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Postintervention, and before surgery, patients in the hypnosis group had significantly lower mean values for presurgery VAS [mean 1 (0-8); p = 0.011], BAI (6.0 vs 2.0; p < 0.001), and HAS (11.0 vs 6.0; p < 0.001). The study results indicate that a brief presurgery hypnosis intervention can be an effective means of controlling presurgical anxiety, and therefore pain, in patients awaiting diagnostic prostate cancer surgery.

  11. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for lung cancer staging: early experience in Brazil*,**

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Viviane Rossi; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Jacomelli, Márcia; Demarzo, Sérgio Eduardo; Palomino, Addy Lidvina Mejia; Rodrigues, Ascédio José; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Pego-Fernandes, Paulo Manoel; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive, safe and accurate method for collecting samples from mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. This study focused on the initial results obtained with EBUS-TBNA for lung cancer and lymph node staging at three teaching hospitals in Brazil. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with lung cancer and submitted to EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal lymph node staging. The EBUS-TBNA procedures, which involved the use of an EBUS scope, an ultrasound processor, and a compatible, disposable 22 G needle, were performed while the patients were under general anesthesia. Results: Between January of 2011 and January of 2014, 149 patients underwent EBUS-TBNA for lymph node staging. The mean age was 66 ± 12 years, and 58% were male. A total of 407 lymph nodes were sampled by EBUS-TBNA. The most common types of lung neoplasm were adenocarcinoma (in 67%) and squamous cell carcinoma (in 24%). For lung cancer staging, EBUS-TBNA was found to have a sensitivity of 96%, a specificity of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 85%. Conclusions: We found EBUS-TBNA to be a safe and accurate method for lymph node staging in lung cancer patients. PMID:25750671

  12. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for lung cancer staging: early experience in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Viviane Rossi; Cardoso, Paulo Francisco Guerreiro; Jacomelli, Márcia; Demarzo, Sérgio Eduardo; Palomino, Addy Lidvina Mejia; Rodrigues, Ascédio José; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Pego-Fernandes, Paulo Manoel; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive, safe and accurate method for collecting samples from mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. This study focused on the initial results obtained with EBUS-TBNA for lung cancer and lymph node staging at three teaching hospitals in Brazil. This was a retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with lung cancer and submitted to EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal lymph node staging. The EBUS-TBNA procedures, which involved the use of an EBUS scope, an ultrasound processor, and a compatible, disposable 22 G needle, were performed while the patients were under general anesthesia. Between January of 2011 and January of 2014, 149 patients underwent EBUS-TBNA for lymph node staging. The mean age was 66 ± 12 years, and 58% were male. A total of 407 lymph nodes were sampled by EBUS-TBNA. The most common types of lung neoplasm were adenocarcinoma (in 67%) and squamous cell carcinoma (in 24%). For lung cancer staging, EBUS-TBNA was found to have a sensitivity of 96%, a specificity of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 85%. We found EBUS-TBNA to be a safe and accurate method for lymph node staging in lung cancer patients.

  13. Cognitive task analysis for instruction in single-injection ultrasound guided-regional anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucev, Gligor V.

    Cognitive task analysis (CTA) is methodology for eliciting knowledge from subject matter experts. CTA has been used to capture the cognitive processes, decision-making, and judgments that underlie expert behaviors. A review of the literature revealed that CTA has not yet been used to capture the knowledge required to perform ultrasound guided regional anesthesia (UGRA). The purpose of this study was to utilize CTA to extract knowledge from UGRA experts and to determine whether instruction based on CTA of UGRA will produce results superior to the results of traditional training. This study adds to the knowledge base of CTA in being the first one to effectively capture the expert knowledge of UGRA. The derived protocol was used in a randomized, double blinded experiment involving UGRA instruction to 39 novice learners. The results of this study strongly support the hypothesis that CTA-based instruction in UGRA is more effective than conventional clinical instruction, as measured by conceptual pre- and post-tests, performance of a simulated UGRA procedure, and time necessary for the task performance. This study adds to the number of studies that have proven the superiority of CTA-informed instruction. Finally, it produced several validated instruments that can be used in instructing and evaluating UGRA.

  14. Ultrasound-guided minimally invasive surgery for achilles tendon rupture: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen-Chie; Chen, Pei-Yu; Wang, Ting-Ming; Wang, Chung-Li

    2012-07-01

    Many surgeons prefer surgical repair for Achilles tendon ruptures in an attempt to reduce the risk of rerupture. To minimize wound complications, the use of minimally invasive surgery has become more popular recently. In line with this, the use of ultrasound to guide Achilles tendon repair is reported in this study. From March 2005 to January 2008, 23 patients with Achilles tendon rupture were repaired by the same surgeon. The ages of the patients ranged from 19 to 67 years old, with an average of 43 years old. The repair of the Achilles tendon was achieved through a stab wound under the guidance of ultrasonography. A control group consisted of 25 patients who received traditional open Achilles tendon repair. The average operation time was 52 minutes, and the average wound size was 1.1 cm. The short leg cast was removed 4 weeks after the surgery, and serial casting was used for another 3 to 4 weeks. The postoperative AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scores were 98.7 in the experimental group, 96.5 in the control group with no significant difference. The rates of local infection, stiffness of the ankle, pain of the scar and sural nerve injury were better in the experimental group than in the control group with significant difference. Ultrasound-guided surgery was a good choice due to its availability and real-time soft tissue visualization. It can further minimize the size of the surgical wound. Our method has the potential to achieve reliable results.

  15. Novel ultrasound-guided inter-semispinal plane block: a comparative pilot study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ohgoshi, Yuichi; Nishizakura, Ryo; Takahashi, Yuki; Takeda, Keisuke; Nakayama, Hirosuke; Kawamata, Mariko; Kurahashi, Kiyoyasu

    2018-02-01

    We previously reported that a novel multifidus cervicis plane (MCP) block could anesthetize the dorsal rami of the cervical spinal nerves. While MCP sonoanatomy is easily detectable in most patients, it is sometimes difficult to recognize the MCP injection plane, especially in elderly patients. Thus, we proposed the inter-semispinal plane (ISP) block as an alternative for the MCP block. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of the ISP block by evaluating the area and duration of anesthesia, compared with that of the MCP block in eight healthy volunteers. Each participant underwent unilateral ultrasound-guided MCP block and ISP block. For each block, 20 ml of ropivacaine 0.2% was injected, and the area of anesthesia was determined using the pinprick test. The anesthetic area ranged from C4 to T2 (3/8; 37.5%), T3 (2/8; 25%), or T4 (3/8; 37.5%) in the MCP block, and from C4 to T1 (1/8; 12.5%), T2 (3/8; 37.5%), T3 (2/8; 25%), or T4 (1/8; 12.5%) in the ISP block. The mean (standard deviation) duration of sensory loss following MCP and ISP blocks was 329 (77) min and 349 (70) min, respectively. Thus, the ISP block may be a reliable alternative to the MCP block.

  16. Teaching medical students ultrasound-guided vascular access - which learning method is best?

    PubMed

    Lian, Alwin; Rippey, James C R; Carr, Peter J

    2017-05-15

    Ultrasound is recommended to guide insertion of peripheral intravenous vascular cannulae (PIVC) where difficulty is experienced. Ultrasound machines are now common-place and junior doctors are often expected to be able to use them. The educational standards for this skill are highly varied, ranging from no education, to self-guided internet-based education, to formal, face-to-face traditional education. In an attempt to decide which educational technique our institution should introduce, a small pilot trial comparing educational techniques was designed. Thirty medical students were enrolled and allocated to one of three groups. PIVC placing ability was then observed, tested and graded on vascular access phantoms. The formal, face-to-face traditional education was rated best by the students, and had the highest success rate in PIVC placement, the improvement statistically significant compared to no education (p = 0.01) and trending towards significance when compared to self-directed internet-based education (p<0.06). The group receiving traditional face-to-face teaching on ultrasound-guided vascular access, performed significantly better than those not receiving education. As the number of ultrasound machines in clinical areas increases, it is important that education programs to support their safe and appropriate use are developed.

  17. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided lymph node biopsy with transbronchial needle forceps: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Herth, F J F; Schuler, H; Gompelmann, D; Kahn, N; Gasparini, S; Ernst, A; Schuhmann, M; Eberhardt, R

    2012-02-01

    One limitation of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is the size of the available needles, frequently yielding only cells for cytological examination. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of newly developed needle forceps to obtain tissue for the histological diagnosis of enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. Patients with enlarged, positron emission tomography (PET)-positive lymph nodes were included. The transbronchial needle forceps (TBNF), a sampling instrument combining the characteristics of a needle (bevelled tip for penetrating through the bronchial wall) with forceps (two serrated jaws for grasping tissue) was used through the working channel of the EBUS-TBNA scope. Efficacy and safety was assessed. 50 patients (36 males and 14 females; mean age 51 yrs) with enlarged or PET-positive lymph nodes were included in this pilot study. In 48 (96%) patients penetration of the bronchial wall was possible and in 45 patients tissue for histological diagnosis was obtained. In three patients TBNF provided inadequate material. For patients in whom the material was adequate for a histological examination, a specific diagnosis was established in 43 (86%) out of 50 patients (nonsmall cell lung cancer: n=24; small cell lung cancer: n=7; sarcoidosis: n=4; Hodgkin's lymphoma: n=4; tuberculosis: n=2; and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: n=2).No clinically significant procedure-related complications were encountered. This study demonstrated that EBUS-TBNF is a safe procedure and provides diagnostic histological specimens of mediastinal lymph nodes.

  18. Ultrasound-guided shoulder MR arthrography: comparison of rotator interval and posterior approach.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Ozgokce, Mesut; Tuncer, Kutsi; Yuce, Ihsan; Yalcin, Ahmet; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Sagsoz, Erdem; Kantarci, Mecit

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the two different ultrasound-guided injection techniques for magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography of the shoulder. This study included 100 patients [50 rotator interval group (n=50) vs. 50 posterior approach group (n=50)]. All procedures were performed by the same radiologist. The two injection techniques were compared. The discomfort during and after arthrography was evaluated. Extraarticular contrast media extravasation was graded according to the MRI findings. The number of injection attempts, effect of contrast media extravasation rate on diagnostic quality and procedure times were recorded. There were no significant difference between the posterior and rotator interval puncture groups with regard to pain (P=.915), procedure times (P=.401) or attempt scores (P=.182). There were significantly more contrast media extravasations with rotator interval approach than posterior approach (P<.05). Both techniques were successful and well tolerated by patients. Posterior injection technique provided a more effective route with decreased extravasation rate and easier approach compared to the rotator interval approach. © 2014.

  19. Ultrasound-guided Subclavian Vein Cannulation Using a Micro-Convex Ultrasound Probe

    PubMed Central

    Fair, James; Hirshberg, Eliotte L.; Grissom, Colin K.; Brown, Samuel M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The subclavian vein is the preferred site for central venous catheter placement due to infection risk and patient comfort. Ultrasound guidance is useful in cannulation of other veins, but for the subclavian vein, current ultrasound-guided techniques using high-frequency linear array probes are generally limited to axillary vein cannulation. Methods: We report a series of patients who underwent clinically indicated subclavian venous catheter placement using a micro-convex pediatric probe for real-time guidance in the vein’s longitudinal axis. We identified rates of successful placement and complications by chart review. Results: Twenty-four catheters were placed using the micro-convex pediatric probe with confirmation of placement of the needle medial to the lateral border of the first rib. Sixteen of the catheters were placed by trainee physicians. In 23 patients, the catheter was placed without complication (hematoma, pneumothorax, infection). In one patient, the vein could not be safely cannulated without risk of arterial puncture, so an alternative site was selected. Conclusions: Infraclavicular subclavian vein cannulation using real-time ultrasound with a micro-convex pediatric probe appears to be a safe and effective method of placing subclavian vascular catheters. This technique merits further study to confirm safety and efficacy. PMID:24611628

  20. Diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic mesenchymal tumors by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Linda; Ngae, Min Yi; Wilson, Andrew P; Crowder, Clinton D; Gulbahce, H Evin; Pambuccian, Stefan E

    2009-11-01

    Involvement of the pancreas by metastatic sarcoma is rare, and can prove challenging to differentiate from sarcomatoid carcinomas which occur more commonly. The endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) technique has been successfully used for the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinomas whether primary or metastatic, and is now considered the most effective noninvasive method for the identification of pancreatic metastases. However, to date very few reports detail the diagnosis of mesenchymal neoplasms by EUS-FNA. Herein, we report a series of four patients who underwent EUS-FNA of the pancreas, where the diagnosis of metastatic sarcoma was made based on morphology and ancillary studies. The cases include metastases of leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, and solitary fibrous tumor. The history of a primary sarcoma of the chest wall, mediastinum, and respectively lower extremity was known for the first three of these patients while in the case of the solitary fibrous tumor a remote history of a paraspinal "hemangiopericytoma" was only elicited after the EUS-FNA diagnosis was made. We conclude that EUS-FNA is efficient and accurate in providing a diagnosis of sarcoma, even in patients without a known primary sarcoma, thus allowing institution of therapy without additional biopsies.

  1. Disinfection of a probe used in ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Rutala, William A; Gergen, Maria F; Weber, David J

    2007-08-01

    Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsies are among the most common outpatient diagnostic procedures in urology clinics and carry the risk of introducing pathogens that may lead to infection. To investigate the effectiveness of procedures for disinfecting a probe used in ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy. The effectiveness of disinfection was determined by inoculating 10(7) colony forming units (cfu) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the following 3 sites on the probe: the interior lumen of the biopsy needle guide, the outside surface of the biopsy needle guide, and the interior lumen of the ultrasound probe where the needle guide passes through the transducer. Each site was investigated separately. After inoculation, the probe was immersed in 2% glutaraldehyde for 20 minutes and then assessed for the level of microbial contamination. The results demonstrated that disinfection (ie, a reduction in bacterial load of greater than 7 log(10) cfu) could be achieved if the needle guide was removed from the probe. However, if the needle guide was left in the probe channel during immersion in 2% glutaraldehyde, disinfection was not achieved (ie, the reduction was approximately 1 log(10) cfu). Recommendations for probe disinfection are provided and include disassembling the device and immersing the probe and the needle guide separately in a high-level disinfectant.

  2. The change in serum Thiol/Disulphide homeostasis after transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Tokgöz, Hüsnü; Taş, Selim; Giray, Özlem; Yalçınkaya, Soner; Tokgöz, Özlem; Koca, Cemile; Savaş, Murat; Erel, Özcan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The aim of this prospective clinical study was to investigate variations in a novel oxidative stress marker (thiol/disulphide homeostasis) in men who underwent transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy (TRUSB). Materials and Methods A total of 22 men undergoing TRUSB of the prostate were enrolled in the study. Patients with abnormal digital rectal examination and/or total prostate specific antigen (PSA) over 4ng/mL underwent TRUSB with 12 cores. Serum samples were obtained before and just after the procedure to evaluate the possible changes in thiol/disulphide homeostasis. Mean age, total PSA and free PSA, prostate volume and histopathological data were also recorded. Results Mean age of the study population was 65.05±8.89 years. Significant decreases in native and total thiol levels were documented after the biopsy procedure. However, serum disulphide levels and disulphide/native thiol, disulphide/total thiol and native/total thiol ratios did not significantly change after TRUSB. No correlation was observed between oxidative parameters and total PSA and free PSA levels, prostate volume and histopathology of the prostate. However, mean patient age was significantly correlated with mean native and total thiol levels. Conclusion Significant decreases in serum native and total thiol levels related to the prostate biopsy procedure suggest that TRUSB causes acute oxidative stress in the human body. Since our trial is the first in the current literature to investigate these oxidative stress markers in urology practice, additional studies are warranted. PMID:28128906

  3. A serious game for learning ultrasound-guided needle placement skills.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wing-Yin; Qin, Jing; Chui, Yim-Pan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle placement is a key step in a lot of radiological intervention procedures such as biopsy, local anesthesia and fluid drainage. To help training future intervention radiologists, we develop a serious game to teach the skills involved. We introduce novel techniques for realistic simulation and integrate game elements for active and effective learning. This game is designed in the context of needle placement training based on the some essential characteristics of serious games. Training scenarios are interactively generated via a block-based construction scheme. A novel example-based texture synthesis technique is proposed to simulate corresponding ultrasound images. Game levels are defined based on the difficulties of the generated scenarios. Interactive recommendation of desirable insertion paths is provided during the training as an adaptation mechanism. We also develop a fast physics-based approach to reproduce the shadowing effect of needles in ultrasound images. Game elements such as time-attack tasks, hints and performance evaluation tools are also integrated in our system. Extensive experiments are performed to validate its feasibility for training.

  4. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of pulmonary artery tumors: A systematic review (with video).

    PubMed

    Harris, Kassem; Modi, Kush; Kumar, Abhishek; Dhillon, Samjot Singh

    2015-01-01

    Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound (CP-EBUS) was originally introduced as a diagnostic and staging tool for lung cancer and subsequently utilized for diagnosis of other malignant and benign mediastinal diseases such as melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoidosis. More recently, CP-EBUS has been successfully used for the visualization and diagnosis of pulmonary emboli and other vascular lesions including primary and metastatic pulmonary artery (PA) tumors. In this review, we will underline the role of EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for the diagnosis of pulmonary arterial tumors such as sarcomas and tumor emboli. We will concisely discuss the clinical applications of EBUS-TBNA and the types of pulmonary arterial tumors and their different diagnostic modalities. We searched the Cochrane Library and PubMed from 2004 to 2014 to provide the most comprehensive review. Only 10 cases of EBUS-TBNA for intravascular lesions were identified in the literature. Although many cases of EBUS and EUS-guided transvascular tumor biopsies were described in the literature, there were no reported cases of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for intravascular tumor biopsies. Except for one paper, all cases were published as case reports.

  5. The change in serum Thiol/Disulphide homeostasis after transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Tokgöz, Hüsnü; Taş, Selim; Giray, Özlem; Yalçınkaya, Soner; Tokgöz, Özlem; Koca, Cemile; Savaş, Murat; Erel, Özcan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical study was to investigate variations in a novel oxidative stress marker (thiol/disulphide homeostasis) in men who underwent transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy (TRUSB). A total of 22 men undergoing TRUSB of the prostate were enrolled in the study. Patients with abnormal digital rectal examination and/or total prostate specific antigen (PSA) over 4ng/mL underwent TRUSB with 12 cores. Serum samples were obtained before and just after the procedure to evaluate the possible changes in thiol/disulphide homeostasis. Mean age, total PSA and free PSA, prostate volume and histopathological data were also recorded. Mean age of the study population was 65.05±8.89 years. Significant decreases in native and total thiol levels were documented after the biopsy procedure. However, serum disulphide levels and disulphide/native thiol, disulphide/total thiol and native / total thiol ratios did not significantly change after TRUSB. No correlation was observed between oxidative parameters and total PSA and free PSA levels, prostate volume and histopathology of the prostate. However, mean patient age was significantly correlated with mean native and total thiol levels. Significant decreases in serum native and total thiol levels related to the prostate biopsy procedure suggest that TRUSB causes acute oxidative stress in the human body. Since our trial is the first in the current literature to investigate these oxidative stress markers in urology practice, additional studies are warranted. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  6. Single-operator real-time ultrasound-guided spinal injection using SonixGPS™: a case series.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Silke; Tang, Raymond; Sawka, Andrew; Vaghadia, Himat

    2013-09-01

    The SonixGPS™ is a novel needle tracking system that has recently been approved in Canada for ultrasound-guided needle interventions. It allows optimization of needle-beam alignment by providing a real-time display of current and predicted needle tip position. Currently, there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of this technique for performance of real-time spinal anesthesia. This case series reports performance of the SonixGPS system for real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia in elective patients scheduled for joint arthroplasty. In this single-centre case series, 20 American Society of Anesthesiologists' class I-II patients scheduled for lower limb joint arthroplasty were recruited to undergo real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia with the SonixGPS after written informed consent. The primary outcome for this clinical cases series was the success rate of spinal anesthesia, and the main secondary outcome was time required to perform spinal anesthesia. Successful spinal anesthesia for joint arthroplasty was achieved in 18/20 patients, and 17 of these required only a single skin puncture. In 7/20 (35%) patients, dural puncture was achieved on the first needle pass, and in 11/20 (55%) patients, dural puncture was achieved with two or three needle redirections. Median (range) time taken to perform the block was 8 (5-14) min. The study procedure was aborted in two cases because our clinical protocol dictated using a standard approach if spinal anesthesia was unsuccessful after three ultrasound-guided insertion attempts. These two cases were classified as failures. No complications, including paresthesia, were observed during the procedure. All patients with successful spinal anesthesia found the technique acceptable and were willing to undergo a repeat procedure if deemed necessary. This case series shows that real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia with the SonixGPS system is possible within an acceptable time frame. It proved effective with

  7. [Efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided or neurostimulator-guided bilateral axillary brachial plexus block].

    PubMed

    Xu, C S; Zhao, X L; Zhou, H B; Qu, Z J; Yang, Q G; Wang, H J; Wang, G

    2017-10-17

    Objective: To explore the efficacy and safety of bilateral axillary brachial plexus block under the guidance of ultrasound or neurostimulator. Methods: From February 2012 to April 2014, 120 patients undergoing bilateral hand/forearm surgery in Beijing Jishuitan Hospital were enrolled and anaesthetized with bilateral axillary brachial plexus block. All patients were divided into two groups randomly using random number table: the ultrasound-guided group (group U, n =60) and the neurostimulator-guidedgroup (group N, n =60). The block was performed with 0.5% ropivacaine. Patients' age, sex and operation duration were recorded. Moreover, success rate, performance time, onset of sensor and motor block, performance pain, patient satisfaction degree and the incidence of related complications were also documented. Venous samples were collected at selected time points and the total and the plasma concentrations of ropivacaine were analyzed with HPLC. Results: The performance time, the onset of sensor block and the onset of motor block of group U were (8.2±1.5), (14.2± 2.2)and (24.0±3.5)min respectively, which were markedly shorter than those in group N( (14.6±3.9), (19.9±3.8), (28.8±4.2)min, respectively), and the differences were statistically significant( t =11.74, 10.09, 6.73, respectively, all P <0.01). The performance pain score of group N was (25.5± 13.2), which was obviously more serious than group U (31.7± 11.2) and a significant statistical difference was detected ( t =2.856, P <0.05). The patient satisfaction degree of group U was 95.0%, which was significantly higher than group N (83.3%) and a markedly statistical difference was detected (χ(2)=4.227, P <0.05). Fifty min after performance, the total plasma concentration of ropivacaine of group U was(1.76±0.48)mg/L, which was significantly lower than group N (1.88±0.53)mg/L and a significant statistical difference was detected ( t =2.43, P <0.05), while no significant differences were detected at the

  8. Biological characteristics of HCC by ultrasound-guided aspiration biopsy and its clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Wu; Lin, Xue-Ying; He, Yi-Mi; Gao, Shang-Da; Lin, Xiao-Dong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To probe the pathological biological characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by the ultrasound-guided aspiration biopsy and assess the clinical application value of this method. METHODS: The biopsy and DNA analysis by flow cytometry (FCM) were taken in 46 cases with HCC nodules, including 26 cases and 20 cases with nodules ≤ 3 cm and > 3 cm in diameters respectively, and 12 cases with intrahepatic benign hyperplastic nodules. They were taken in 22 cases of 46 cases with HCC before and after the therapy. Fine-needles and automatic histological incised biopsy needles were used. The fresh biopsy tissue was produced into the single cell suspension, which was sent for DNA detection and ratio analysis of cell period. The ratio of each DNA period of cell proliferation of each group was calculated and compared with each other. The DNA aneuploid (AN) and apoptosis cell peak were observed and their percentages were calculated. RESULTS: The ratios of S and G2/M periods of DNA, which reflect cell hyperproliferation, in the group with HCC tumors > 3 cm in diameter were markedly higher than those of the group with HCC nodules ≤ 3 cm in diameter and the group with the benign hyperplastic nodules (P < 0.01 except A:B of S period, P < 0.05). The ratios of the middle group were also apparently higher than those of the latter group (P < 0.01). The ratio of DNA AN of 46 cases with HCC nodules was 34.8% (16/46). None of the cases with the intrahepatic hyperplastic nodules appeared AN. The DNA AN appeared more apparently with the growth of the tumors. The AN ratio of the group with tumors > 3 cm in diameter was 55% (11/20), markedly higher than that of the group with tumors ≤ 3 cm in diameter which was 19.2% (5/26) (P < 0.01). The FCM DNA analysis of 22 specimens of hepatic carcinoma tissue before therapy showed that the aneuploid peaks appeared in 5 cases (22.7%). The ratio of G1 period rose after therapy while the S period and G2/M ratios fell (P < 0.01). The

  9. Greater physician involvement improves coding outcomes in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration procedures.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Anilkumar; Medford, Andrew R L

    2013-01-01

    Correct coding is essential for accurate reimbursement for clinical activity. Published data confirm that significant aberrations in coding occur, leading to considerable financial inaccuracies especially in interventional procedures such as endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA). Previous data reported a 15% coding error for EBUS-TBNA in a U.K. service. We hypothesised that greater physician involvement with coders would reduce EBUS-TBNA coding errors and financial disparity. The study was done as a prospective cohort study in the tertiary EBUS-TBNA service in Bristol. 165 consecutive patients between October 2009 and March 2012 underwent EBUS-TBNA for evaluation of unexplained mediastinal adenopathy on computed tomography. The chief coder was prospectively electronically informed of all procedures and cross-checked on a prospective database and by Trust Informatics. Cost and coding analysis was performed using the 2010-2011 tariffs. All 165 procedures (100%) were coded correctly as verified by Trust Informatics. This compares favourably with the 14.4% coding inaccuracy rate for EBUS-TBNA in a previous U.K. prospective cohort study [odds ratio 201.1 (1.1-357.5), p = 0.006]. Projected income loss was GBP 40,000 per year in the previous study, compared to a GBP 492,195 income here with no coding-attributable loss in revenue. Greater physician engagement with coders prevents coding errors and financial losses which can be significant especially in interventional specialties. The intervention can be as cheap, quick and simple as a prospective email to the coding team with cross-checks by Trust Informatics and against a procedural database. We suggest that all specialties should engage more with their coders using such a simple intervention to prevent revenue losses. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Polyplex-microbubble hybrids for ultrasound-guided plasmid DNA delivery to solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Sirsi, Shashank R; Hernandez, Sonia L; Zielinski, Lukasz; Blomback, Henning; Koubaa, Adel; Synder, Milo; Homma, Shunichi; Kandel, Jessica J; Yamashiro, Darrell J; Borden, Mark A

    2012-01-30

    Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents are being developed as image-guided gene carriers for targeted delivery in vivo. In this study, novel polyplex-microbubbles were synthesized, characterized and evaluated for systemic circulation and tumor transfection. Branched polyethylenimine (PEI; 25 kDa) was modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG; 5 kDa), thiolated and covalently attached to maleimide groups on lipid-coated microbubbles. The PEI-microbubbles demonstrated increasingly positive surface charge and DNA loading capacity with increasing maleimide content. The in vivo ultrasound contrast persistence of PEI-microbubbles was measured in the healthy mouse kidney, and a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model accounting for free and adherent microbubbles was developed to describe the anomalous time-intensity curves. The model suggested that PEI loading dramatically reduced free circulation and increased nonspecific adhesion to the vasculature. However, DNA loading to form polyplex-microbubbles increased circulation in the bloodstream and decreased nonspecific adhesion. PEI-microbubbles coupled to a luciferase bioluminescence reporter plasmid DNA were shown to transfect tumors implanted in the mouse kidney. Site-specific delivery was achieved using ultrasound applied over the tumor area following bolus injection of the DNA/PEI-microbubbles. In vivo imaging showed over 10-fold higher bioluminescence from the tumor region compared to untreated tissue. Ex vivo analysis of excised tumors showed greater than 40-fold higher expression in tumor tissue than non-sonicated control (heart) tissue. These results suggest that the polyplex-microbubble platform offers improved control of DNA loading and packaging suitable for ultrasound-guided tissue transfection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Sonoanatomical Change of Phrenic Nerve According to Posture During Ultrasound-Guided Stellate Ganglion Block

    PubMed Central

    Joeng, Eui Soo; Jeong, Young Cheol; Park, Bum Jun; Kang, Seok; Yang, Seung Nam

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the risk of phrenic nerve injury during ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block (US-SGB) according to sonoanatomy of the phrenic nerve, and determine a safer posture for needle insertion by assessing its relationship with surrounding structure according to positional change. Methods Twenty-nine healthy volunteers were recruited and underwent ultrasound in two postures, i.e., supine position with the neck extension and head rotation, and lateral decubitus position. The transducer was placed at the anterior tubercle of the C6 level to identify phrenic nerve. The cross-sectional area (CSA), depth from skin, distance between phrenic nerve and anterior tubercle of C6 transverse process, and the angle formed by anterior tubercle, posterior tubercle and phrenic nerve were measured. Results The phrenic nerve was clearly identified in the intermuscular fascia layer between the anterior scalene and sternocleidomastoid muscles. The distance between the phrenic nerve and anterior tubercle was 10.33±3.20 mm with the supine position and 9.20±3.31 mm with the lateral decubitus position, respectively. The mean CSA and skin depth of phrenic nerve were not statistically different between the two positions. The angle with the supine position was 48.37°±27.43°, and 58.89°±30.02° with the lateral decubitus position. The difference of angle between the two positions was statistically significant. Conclusion Ultrasound is a useful tool for assessing the phrenic nerve and its anatomical relation with other cervical structures. In addition, lateral decubitus position seems to be safer by providing wider angle for needle insertion than the supine position in US-SGB. PMID:27152274

  12. Sonoanatomical Change of Phrenic Nerve According to Posture During Ultrasound-Guided Stellate Ganglion Block.

    PubMed

    Joeng, Eui Soo; Jeong, Young Cheol; Park, Bum Jun; Kang, Seok; Yang, Seung Nam; Yoon, Joon Shik

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the risk of phrenic nerve injury during ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block (US-SGB) according to sonoanatomy of the phrenic nerve, and determine a safer posture for needle insertion by assessing its relationship with surrounding structure according to positional change. Twenty-nine healthy volunteers were recruited and underwent ultrasound in two postures, i.e., supine position with the neck extension and head rotation, and lateral decubitus position. The transducer was placed at the anterior tubercle of the C6 level to identify phrenic nerve. The cross-sectional area (CSA), depth from skin, distance between phrenic nerve and anterior tubercle of C6 transverse process, and the angle formed by anterior tubercle, posterior tubercle and phrenic nerve were measured. The phrenic nerve was clearly identified in the intermuscular fascia layer between the anterior scalene and sternocleidomastoid muscles. The distance between the phrenic nerve and anterior tubercle was 10.33±3.20 mm with the supine position and 9.20±3.31 mm with the lateral decubitus position, respectively. The mean CSA and skin depth of phrenic nerve were not statistically different between the two positions. The angle with the supine position was 48.37°±27.43°, and 58.89°±30.02° with the lateral decubitus position. The difference of angle between the two positions was statistically significant. Ultrasound is a useful tool for assessing the phrenic nerve and its anatomical relation with other cervical structures. In addition, lateral decubitus position seems to be safer by providing wider angle for needle insertion than the supine position in US-SGB.

  13. Real-time ultrasound-guided endoscopic surgery for putaminal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Nomura, Sadahiro; Goto, Hisaharu; Sugimoto, Kazutaka; Inamura, Akinori; Fujiyama, Yuichi; Yamane, Akiko; Oku, Takayuki; Shinoyama, Mizuya; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic surgery plays a significant role in the treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage. However, the residual hematoma cannot be measured intraoperatively from the endoscopic view, and it is difficult to determine the precise location of the endoscope within the hematoma cavity. The authors attempted to develop real-time ultrasound-guided endoscopic surgery using a bur-hole-type probe. From November 2012 to March 2014, patients with hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage who underwent endoscopic hematoma removal were enrolled in this study. Real-time ultrasound guidance was performed with a bur-hole-type probe that was advanced via a second bur hole, which was placed in the temporal region. Ultrasound was used to guide insertion of the endoscope sheath as well as to provide information regarding the location of the hematoma during surgical evacuation. Finally, the cavity was irrigated with artificial cerebrospinal fluid and was observed as a low-echoic space, which facilitated detection of residual hematoma. Ten patients with putaminal hemorrhage>30 cm3 were included in this study. Their mean age (±SD) was 60.9±8.6 years, and the mean preoperative hematoma volume was 65.2±37.1 cm3. The mean percentage of hematoma that was evacuated was 96%±3%. None of the patients exhibited rebleeding after surgery. This navigation method was effective in demonstrating both the real-time location of the endoscope and real-time viewing of the residual hematoma. Use of ultrasound guidance minimized the occurrence of brain injury due to hematoma evacuation.

  14. Consistent evaluation of an ultrasound-guided surgical navigation system by utilizing an active validation platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Kim, Sungmin; Boctor, Emad M.

    2017-03-01

    An ultrasound image-guided needle tracking systems have been widely used due to their cost-effectiveness and nonionizing radiation properties. Various surgical navigation systems have been developed by utilizing state-of-the-art sensor technologies. However, ultrasound transmission beam thickness causes unfair initial evaluation conditions due to inconsistent placement of the target with respect to the ultrasound probe. This inconsistency also brings high uncertainty and results in large standard deviations for each measurement when we compare accuracy with and without the guidance. To resolve this problem, we designed a complete evaluation platform by utilizing our mid-plane detection and time of flight measurement systems. The evaluating system uses a PZT element target and an ultrasound transmitting needle. In this paper, we evaluated an optical tracker-based surgical ultrasound-guided navigation system whereby the optical tracker tracks marker frames attached on the ultrasound probe and the needle. We performed ten needle trials of guidance experiment with a mid-plane adjustment algorithm and with a B-mode segmentation method. With the midplane adjustment, the result showed a mean error of 1.62+/-0.72mm. The mean error increased to 3.58+/-2.07mm without the mid-plane adjustment. Our evaluation system can reduce the effect of the beam-thickness problem, and measure ultrasound image-guided technologies consistently with a minimal standard deviation. Using our novel evaluation system, ultrasound image-guided technologies can be compared under equal initial conditions. Therefore, the error can be evaluated more accurately, and the system provides better analysis on the error sources such as ultrasound beam thickness.

  15. Real-time ultrasound-guided PCNL using a novel SonixGPS needle tracking system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Long, Qingzhi; Chen, Xingfa; He, Dalin; Dalin, He; He, Hui

    2014-08-01

    SonixGPS is a successful ultrasound guidance position system. It helps to improve accuracy in performing complex puncture operations. This study firstly used SonixGPS to perform kidney calyx access in PCNL to investigate its effectiveness and safety. This was a prospectively randomized controlled study performed from September 2011 to October 2012. A total of 97 patients were prospectively randomized into two groups using random number generated from SAS software. 47 Patients were enrolled in conventional ultrasound-guided (US-guided) group and 50 patients were classified into SonixGPS-guided group. Nine patients were lost during follow-up. Hence, a total of 88 patients were qualified and analyzed. Preoperative examinations included urine analysis, urine culture, kidney function, coagulation profile and routine analysis of blood. Ultrasonography was used to evaluate the degree of hydronephrosis. The intraoperative findings, including blood loss, operating time, time to successful puncture, the number of attempts for successful puncture and hospital stay were recorded. The stone clearance rate and complications were analyzed. The present study showed no significant difference between the two groups in terms of demographic data, preoperative markers, stone clearance rate and the stone composition. However, the time to successful puncture, the number of trials for successful puncture, operating time and hospital length of stay were significantly decreased in the SonixGPS-guided group. Furthermore, the hemoglobin decrease was also obviously lower in the SonixGPS group than that in conventional US-guided group. SonixGPS needle tacking system guided PCNL is safe and effective in treating upper urinary tract stones. This novel technology makes puncturing more accuracy and can significantly decrease the incidence of relative hemorrhage and accelerate recovery.

  16. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses

    PubMed Central

    Voss, M; Hammel, P; Molas, G; Palazzo, L; Dancour, A; O'Toole, D; Terris, B; Degott, C; Bernades, P; Ruszniewski, P

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To assess the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNAB) in patients with solid pancreatic masses.
METHODS—Ninety nine consecutive patients with pancreatic masses were studied. Histological findings obtained by EUS-FNAB were compared with the final diagnosis assessed by surgery, biopsy of other tumour site or at postmortem examination, or by using a combination of clinical course, imaging features, and tumour markers.
RESULTS—EUS-FNAB was feasible in 90 patients (adenocarcinomas, n = 59; neuroendocrine tumours, n = 15; various neoplasms, n = 6; pancreatitis, n = 10), and analysable material was obtained in 73. Tumour size (⩾ or < 25 mm in diameter) did not influence the ability to obtain informative biopsy samples. Diagnostic accuracy was 74.4% (adenocarcinomas, 81.4%; neuroendocrine tumours, 46.7%; other lesions, 75%; p<0.02). Overall, the diagnostic yield in all 99 patients was 68%. Successful biopsies were performed in six patients with portal hypertension. Minor complications (moderate bleeding or pain) occurred in 5% of cases.
CONCLUSIONS—EUS-FNAB is a useful and safe method for the investigation of pancreatic masses, with a high feasibility rate even when lesions are small. Overall diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNAB seems to depend on the tumour type.


Keywords: pancreas; tumour; endoscopic ultrasound; fine needle aspiration biopsy PMID:10644320

  17. Endobronchial ultrasound elastography: a new method in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-Hong; Turner, J Francis; Huang, Jian-An

    2015-12-01

    TBNA through the flexible bronchoscope is a 37-year-old technology that utilizes a TBNA needle to puncture the bronchial wall and obtain specimens of peribronchial and mediastinal lesions through the flexible bronchoscope for the diagnosis of benign and malignant diseases in the mediastinum and lung. Since 2002, the Olympus Company developed the first generation ultrasound equipment for use in the airway, initially utilizing an ultrasound probe introduced through the working channel followed by incoroporation of a fixed linear ultrasound array at the distal tip of the bronchoscope. This new bronchoscope equipped with a convex type ultrasound probe on the tip was subsequently introduced into clinical practice. The convex probe (CP)-EBUS allows real-time endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. EBUS-TBNA is a minimally invasive procedure performed under local anesthesia that has been shown to have a high sensitivity and diagnostic yield for lymph node staging of lung cancer. In 10 years of EBUS development, the Olympus Company developed the second generation EBUS bronchoscope (BF-UC260FW) with the ultrasound image processor (EU-M1), and in 2013 introduced a new ultrasound image processor (EU-M2) into clinical practice. FUJI company has also developed a curvilinear array endobronchial ultrasound bronchoscope (EB-530 US) that makes it easier for the operator to master the operation of the ultrasonic bronchoscope. Also, the new thin convex probe endobronchial ultrasound bronchoscope (TCP-EBUS) is able to visualize one to three bifurcations distal to the current CP-EBUS. The emergence of EBUS-TBNA has also been accompanied by innovation in EBUS instruments. EBUS elastography is, then, a new technique for describing the compliance of structures during EBUS, which may be of use in the determination of metastasis to the mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. This article describes these new EBUS

  18. Ultrasound-guided instrumental removal of the retained placenta after vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Melissa G; Vargas, Juan E; Drey, Eleanor A

    2014-08-01

    The standard treatment for retained placenta is manual extraction, in which a hand is introduced inside the uterus to cleave a plane between the placenta and the uterine wall. For women without an epidural, the procedure is extremely uncomfortable and may require additional measures such as intravenous narcotics or regional anesthesia. Although ultrasound-guided instrumental removal of the placenta is standard practice as part of second-trimester abortion by dilation and evacuation and may be done at many institutions, especially after failed manual extraction, it has not yet been described in the literature as a technique following vaginal birth. Our experience with this technique is that it causes less discomfort to the patient than a traditional manual extraction, because the instrument entering the uterus is much narrower than a hand. With the patient in dorsal lithotomy, we locate the cervix and stabilize it either with fingers or a ring forceps on the anterior lip. We introduce Bierer ovum forceps into the uterus under direct ultrasound guidance. The Bierer forceps are preferred because of their long length, large head, and serrated teeth that allow for a firm, secure grip on the placenta. We grasp the placental tissue with the forceps and apply slow, gentle traction in short strokes, regrasping increasingly more distal areas of placenta as necessary to tease out the placenta. After 1-2 minutes, the placenta separates and can be pulled out of the uterus, usually intact. Our experience suggests that this technique is a well-tolerated option for women without an epidural who have a retained placenta. Further study is needed to quantify the amount of discomfort and anesthesia that can be avoided with this technique, as well as whether there is any change in the frequency of infectious complications or the necessity of postremoval curettage. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Extravasation Risk Using Ultrasound-guided Peripheral Intravenous Catheters for Computed Tomography Contrast Administration.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Jordan D; Ferre, Robinson M; Boyd, Jeremy S; Dearing, Elizabeth; McNaughton, Candace D; Liu, Dandan; Jarrell, Kelli L; McWade, Conor M; Self, Wesley H

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound-guided intravenous catheter (USGIV) insertion is increasingly being used for administration of intravenous (IV) contrast for computed tomography (CT) scans. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the risk of contrast extravasation among patients receiving contrast through USGIV catheters. A retrospective observational study of adult patients who underwent a contrast-enhanced CT scan at a tertiary care emergency department during a recent 64-month period was conducted. The unadjusted prevalence of contrast extravasation was compared between patients with an USGIV and those with a standard peripheral IV inserted without ultrasound. Then, a two-stage sampling design was used to select a subset of the population for a multivariable logistic regression model evaluating USGIVs as a risk factor for extravasation while adjusting for potential confounders. In total, 40,143 patients underwent a contrasted CT scan, including 364 (0.9%) who had contrast administered through an USGIV. Unadjusted prevalence of extravasation was 3.6% for contrast administration through USGIVs and 0.3% for standard IVs (relative risk = 13.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.9 to 24.6). After potential confounders were adjusted for, CT contrast administered through USGIVs was associated with extravasation (adjusted odds ratio = 8.6, 95% CI = 4.6 to 16.2). No patients required surgical management for contrast extravasation; one patient in the standard IV group was admitted for observation due to extravasation. Patients who received contrast for a CT scan through an USGIV had a higher risk of extravasation than those who received contrast through a standard peripheral IV. Clinicians should consider this extravasation risk when weighing the risks and benefits of a contrast-enhanced CT scan in a patient with USGIV vascular access. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  20. Extravasation Risk Using Ultrasound Guided Peripheral Intravenous Catheters for Computed Tomography Contrast Administration

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Jordan D.; Ferre, Robinson M.; Boyd, Jeremy S.; Dearing, Elizabeth; McNaughton, Candace D.; Liu, Dandan; Jarrell, Kelli L.; McWade, Conor M.; Self, Wesley H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ultrasound guided intravenous catheter (USGIV) insertion is increasingly being used for administration of intravenous contrast for computed tomography (CT) scans. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the risk of contrast extravasation among patients receiving contrast through USGIV catheters. Methods A retrospective observational study of adult patients who underwent a contrast-enhanced CT scan at a tertiary-care emergency department during a recent 64-month period was conducted. The unadjusted prevalence of contrast extravasation was compared between patients with an USGIV and those with a standard peripheral IV inserted without ultrasound. Then, a two-stage sampling design was used to select a subset of the population for a multivariable logistic regression model evaluating USGIVs as a risk factor for extravasation while adjusting for potential confounders. Results In total, 40,143 patients underwent a contrasted CT scan, including 364 (0.9%) who had contrast administered through an USGIV. Unadjusted prevalence of extravasation was 3.6% for contrast administration through USGIVs and 0.3% for standard IVs (relative risk: 13.9, 95% CI: 7.7 to 24.6). After adjustment for potential confounders, CT contrast administered through USGIVs was associated with extravasation (adjusted odds ratio: 8.6; 95% CI: 4.6, 16.2). No patients required surgical management for contrast extravasation; one patient in the standard IV group was admitted for observation due to extravasation. Conclusions Patients who received contrast for a CT scan through an USGIV had a higher risk of extravasation than those who received contrast through a standard peripheral IV. Clinicians should consider this extravasation risk when weighing the risks and benefits of a contrast-enhanced CT scan in a patient with USGIV vascular access. PMID:27151898

  1. Lean Six Sigma Applied to Ultrasound Guided Needle Biopsy in the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Matt, Bruce H; Woodward-Hagg, Heather K; Wade, Christopher L; Butler, Penny D; Kokoska, Mimi S

    2014-07-01

    (1) Confirm the positive value stream of office-based ultrasound using Lean Six Sigma; (2) demonstrate how ultrasound reduces time to diagnosis, costs, patient inconvenience and travel, exposure to ionizing radiation, intravenous contrast, and laboratory tests. Case series with historical controls using chart review. Tertiary Veterans Administration Hospital (university-affiliated). Patients with a consult request or decision for ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (USFNA) from 2006 to 2012. Process evaluation using Lean Six Sigma methodologies; years study conducted: 2006-2012; outcome measurements: type of diagnostic tests and imaging studies including CT scans with associated radiation exposure, time to preliminary and final cytopathologic diagnosis, episodes of patient travel. Value stream mapping prior to and after implementing office-based ultrasound confirmed the time from consult request or decision for USFNA to completion of the USFNA was reduced from a range of 0 to 286 days requiring a maximum 17 steps to a range of 0 to 48 days, necessitating only a maximum of 9 steps. Office-based USFNA for evaluation of head and neck lesions reduced costs, time to diagnosis, risks and inconvenience to patients, radiation exposure, unnecessary laboratory, and patient complaints while increasing staff satisfaction. In addition, office-based ultrasound also changed the clinical management of specific patients. Lean Six Sigma reduces waste and optimizes quality and accuracy in manufacturing. This is the first known application of Lean Six Sigma to office-based USFNA in the evaluation of head and neck lesions. The literature supports the value of office-based ultrasound to patients and health care systems. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  2. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration: From the Past to the Future

    PubMed Central

    Costache, Mădălin-Ionuț; Iordache, Sevastița; Karstensen, John Gásdal; Săftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is a technique which allows the study of cells obtained through aspiration in different locations near the gastrointestinal tract. EUS-FNA is used to acquire tissue from mucosal/submucosal tumors, as well as peri-intestinal structures including lymph nodes, pancreas, adrenal gland, gallbladder, bile duct, liver, kidney, lung, etc. The pancreas and lymph nodes are still the most common organs targeted in EUS-FNA. The overall accuracy of EUS is superior to computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging for detecting pancreatic lesions. In most cases it is possible to avoid unnecessary surgical interventions in advanced pancreatic cancer, and EUS is considered the preferred method for loco-regional staging of pancreatic cancer. FNA improved the sensitivity and specificity compared to EUS imaging alone in detection of malignant lymph nodes. The negative predictive value of EUS-FNA is relatively low. The presence of a cytopathologist during EUS-FNA improves the diagnostic yield, decreasing unsatisfactory samples or need for additional passes, and consequently the procedural time. The size of the needle is another factor that could modify the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA. Even though the EUS-FNA technique started in early nineteen's, there are many remarkable progresses culminating nowadays with the discovery and performance of needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy. Last, but not least, identification and quantification of potential molecular markers for pancreatic cancer on cellular samples obtained by EUS-FNA could be a promising approach for the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. PMID:24949369

  3. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Derek; Sherebrin, Shi; Izawa, Jonathan; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Biopsy of the prostate using ultrasound guidance is the clinical gold standard for diagnosis of prostate adenocarinoma. However, because early stage tumors are rarely visible under US, the procedure carries high false-negative rates and often patients require multiple biopsies before cancer is detected. To improve cancer detection, it is imperative that throughout the biopsy procedure, physicians know where they are within the prostate and where they have sampled during prior biopsies. The current biopsy procedure is limited to using only 2D ultrasound images to find and record target biopsy core sample sites. This information leaves ambiguity as the physician tries to interpret the 2D information and apply it to their 3D workspace. We have developed a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system that provides 3D intra-biopsy information to physicians for needle guidance and biopsy location recording. The system is designed to conform to the workflow of the current prostate biopsy procedure, making it easier for clinical integration. In this paper, we describe the system design and validate its accuracy by performing an in vitro biopsy procedure on US/CT multi-modal patient-specific prostate phantoms. A clinical sextant biopsy was performed by a urologist on the phantoms and the 3D models of the prostates were generated with volume errors less than 4% and mean boundary errors of less than 1 mm. Using the 3D biopsy system, needles were guided to within 1.36 +/- 0.83 mm of 3D targets and the position of the biopsy sites were accurately localized to 1.06 +/- 0.89 mm for the two prostates.

  4. Evaluating the Minimal Specimens From Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration in Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo Kyung; Kang, Ki Joo; Oh, Cho Rong; Lee, Jong Kyun; Lee, Kyu Taek; Jang, Kee Taek; Park, Sang-Mo; Lee, Kwang Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has become one of the most useful diagnostic modalities for the diagnosis of pancreatic mass. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of analyzing the minimal specimens obtained by EUS-FNA for the diagnosis of solid masses of pancreas. This study consisted of retrospective and prospective analyses. The retrospective study was performed on 116 patients who underwent EUS-FNA of solid masses for cytological smear, histological analysis, and combined analysis including immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. In the prospective study, 79 patients were enrolled to evaluate the quality and accuracy of EUS-FNA histological analysis and feasibility of IHC staining. The final diagnoses of all patients included pancreatic cancer (n = 126), nonpancreatic cancer (n = 21), other neoplasm (n = 27), and benign lesions (n = 21). In our retrospective study, the combined analysis was more sensitive than cytological analysis alone (P < 0.01). The overall sensitivity of cytology, histology, and combined analysis was 69.8%, 67.2%, and 81.8%, respectively. In the prospective analysis, 64.2% of all punctures were helpful for determining the diagnosis and 40.7% provided sufficient tissue for IHC staining. Histological analysis was helpful for diagnosis in 74.7% of patients. IHC staining was necessary for a definite diagnosis in 11.4% of patients, especially in the cases of nonmalignant pancreatic mass. Histological analysis and IHC study of EUS-FNA specimens was useful for the accurate diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic lesions. Combined analysis showed significantly higher sensitivity than cytology alone because IHC staining was helpful for a diagnosis in some patients. PMID:27227937

  5. Implementing Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided (EBUS) for Staging and Diagnosis of Lung Cancer: A Cost Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Slavova-Azmanova, Neli S.; Phillips, Martin; Trevenen, Michelle L.; Li, Ian W.; Johnson, Claire E.

    2018-01-01

    Background Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and guide sheath (EBUS-GS) are gaining popularity for diagnosis and staging of lung cancer compared to CT-guided transthoracic needle aspiration (CT-TTNA), blind fiber-optic bronchoscopy, and mediastinoscopy. This paper aimed to examine predictors of higher costs for diagnosing and staging lung cancer, and to assess the effect of EBUS techniques on hospital cost. Material/Methods Hospital costs for diagnosis and staging of new primary lung cancer patients presenting in 2007–2008 and 2010–2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Multiple linear regression was used to determine relationships with hospital cost. Results We reviewed 560 lung cancer patient records; 100 EBUS procedures were performed on 90 patients. Higher hospital costs were associated with: EBUS-TBNA performed (p<0.0001); increasing inpatient length of stay (p<0.0001); increasing number of other surgical/diagnostic procedures (p<0.0001); whether the date of management decision fell within an inpatient visit (p<0.0001); and if the patient did not have a CT-TTNA, then costs increased as the number of imaging events increased (interaction p<0.0001). Cohort was not significantly related to cost. Location of the procedure (outside vs. inside theater) was a predictor of lower one-day EBUS costs (p<0.0001). Cost modelling revealed potential cost saving of $1506 per EBUS patient if all EBUS procedures were performed outside rather than in the theater ($66,259 per annum). Conclusions EBUS-TBNA only was an independent predictor of higher cost for diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. Performing EBUS outside compared to in the theater may lower costs for one-day procedures; potential future savings are considerable if more EBUS procedures could be performed outside the operating theater. PMID:29377878

  6. Complications, Consequences, and Practice Patterns of Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Archan M.; Lei, Xiudong; Jimenez, Carlos A.; Morice, Rodolfo C.; Yarmus, Lonny; Filner, Joshua; Ray, Cynthia; Michaud, Gaetane; Greenhill, Sara R.; Sarkiss, Mona; Casal, Roberto; Rice, David; Ost, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Few studies of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) have been large enough to identify risk factors for complications. The primary objective of this study was to quantify the incidence of and risk factors for complications in patients undergoing EBUS-TBNA. Methods: Data on prospectively enrolled patients undergoing EBUS-TBNA in the American College of Chest Physicians Quality Improvement Registry, Evaluation, and Education (AQuIRE) database were extracted and analyzed for the incidence, consequences, and predictors of complications. Results: We enrolled 1,317 patients at six hospitals. Complications occurred in 19 patients (1.44%; 95% CI, 0.87%-2.24%). Transbronchial lung biopsy (TBBx) was the only risk factor for complications, which occurred in 3.21% of patients who underwent the procedure and in 1.15% of those who did not (OR, 2.85; 95% CI, 1.07-7.59; P = .04). Pneumothorax occurred in seven patients (0.53%; 95% CI, 0.21%-1.09%). Escalations in level of care occurred in 14 patients (1.06%; 95% CI, 0.58%-1.78%); its risk factors were age > 70 years (OR, 4.06; 95% CI, 1.36-12.12; P = .012), inpatient status (OR, 4.93; 95% CI, 1.30-18.74; P = .019), and undergoing deep sedation or general anesthesia (OR, 4.68; 95% CI, 1.02-21.61; P = .048). TBBx was performed in only 12.6% of patients when rapid onsite cytologic evaluation (ROSE) was used and in 19.1% when it was not used (P = .006). Interhospital variation in TBBx use when ROSE was used was significant (P < .001). Conclusions: TBBx was the only risk factor for complications during EBUS-TBNA procedures. ROSE significantly reduced the use of TBBx. PMID:23117878

  7. Triple Gene Analysis Using Samples Obtained by Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungjong; Um, Sang-Won; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Yang, Jung Wook; Choi, Yoon-La; Han, Joungho; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung

    2016-01-01

    Objective A mutational analysis of tumor tissue samples is an important part of advanced lung cancer treatment strategies. This study evaluated the efficacy of a triple gene analysis using samples obtained via endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA). Methods Either metastatic lymph nodes or primary lung mass samples obtained by EBUS-TBNA were collected between May 2011 and May 2013. We consecutively analyzed epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion genes using remnant tissue samples. Results A total of 109 patients were diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Of these, 70% were adenocarcinoma, 27% squamous cell carcinoma with NSCLC, and 3% were related to other types of lung cancer. EGFR mutations were detected in 23 cases (21.1%), KRAS mutations in 13 cases (11.9%), and ALK fusion genes in 5 cases (4.9%). The ALK fusion genes could not be analyzed in four cases because of insufficient tissue samples remaining after routine histochemistry and an EGFR/KRAS mutation analysis. We found that small biopsy samples from EBUS-TBNA were adequate for performing a triple gene analysis in 97 patients (96%). ALK fusion protein immunohistochemistry (IHC) was 100% consistent with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Conclusion Small samples obtained by EBUS-TBNA were found to be sufficient for performing a triple gene analysis following routine histology and IHC. ALK IHC showed a very good concordance with FISH for detecting ALK fusion genes. PMID:27803402

  8. Transcriptional Profiling of Synovial Macrophages Using Minimally Invasive Ultrasound-Guided Synovial Biopsies in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mandelin, Arthur M; Homan, Philip J; Shaffer, Alexander M; Cuda, Carla M; Dominguez, Salina T; Bacalao, Emily; Carns, Mary; Hinchcliff, Monique; Lee, Jungwha; Aren, Kathleen; Thakrar, Anjali; Montgomery, Anna B; Bridges, S Louis; Bathon, Joan M; Atkinson, John P; Fox, David A; Matteson, Eric L; Buckley, Christopher D; Pitzalis, Costantino; Parks, Deborah; Hughes, Laura B; Geraldino-Pardilla, Laura; Ike, Robert; Phillips, Kristine; Wright, Kerry; Filer, Andrew; Kelly, Stephen; Ruderman, Eric M; Morgan, Vince; Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Misharin, Alexander V; Budinger, G Scott; Bartom, Elizabeth T; Pope, Richard M; Perlman, Harris; Winter, Deborah R

    2018-06-01

    Currently, there are no reliable biomarkers for predicting therapeutic response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The synovium may unlock critical information for determining efficacy, since a reduction in the numbers of sublining synovial macrophages remains the most reproducible biomarker. Thus, a clinically actionable method for the collection of synovial tissue, which can be analyzed using high-throughput strategies, must become a reality. This study was undertaken to assess the feasibility of utilizing synovial biopsies as a precision medicine-based approach for patients with RA. Rheumatologists at 6 US academic sites were trained in minimally invasive ultrasound-guided synovial tissue biopsy. Biopsy specimens obtained from patients with RA and synovial tissue from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were subjected to histologic analysis, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). An optimized protocol for digesting synovial tissue was developed to generate high-quality RNA-seq libraries from isolated macrophage populations. Associations were determined between macrophage transcriptional profiles and clinical parameters in RA patients. Patients with RA reported minimal adverse effects in response to synovial biopsy. Comparable RNA quality was observed from synovial tissue and isolated macrophages between patients with RA and patients with OA. Whole tissue samples from patients with RA demonstrated a high degree of transcriptional heterogeneity. In contrast, the transcriptional profile of isolated RA synovial macrophages highlighted different subpopulations of patients and identified 6 novel transcriptional modules that were associated with disease activity and therapy. Performance of synovial tissue biopsies by rheumatologists in the US is feasible and generates high-quality samples for research. Through the use of cutting-edge technologies to analyze synovial biopsy specimens in conjunction with corresponding clinical

  9. Ultrasound-guided injection for MR arthrography of the hip: comparison of two different techniques.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, Fatih; Ozbayrak, Mustafa; Gulsen, Fatih; Gencturk, Mert; Botanlioglu, Huseyin; Mihmanli, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the two different ultrasound-guided injection techniques for MR arthrography of the hip. Fifty-nine consecutive patients (21 men, 38 women) referred for MR arthrographies of the hip were prospectively included in the study. Three patients underwent bilateral MR arthrography. The two injection techniques were quantitatively and qualitatively compared. Quantitative analysis was performed by the comparison of injected contrast material volume into the hip joint. Qualitative analysis was performed with regard to extraarticular leakage of contrast material into the soft tissues. Extraarticular leakage of contrast material was graded as none, minimal, moderate, or severe according to the MR images. Each patient rated discomfort after the procedure using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The injected contrast material volume was less in femoral head puncture technique (mean 8.9 ± 3.4 ml) when compared to femoral neck puncture technique (mean 11.2 ± 2.9 ml) (p < 0.05). The chi-squared test showed significantly more contrast leakage by femoral head puncture technique (p < 0.05). Statistical analysis showed no difference between the head and neck puncture groups in terms of feeling of pain (p = 0.744) or in the body mass index (p = 0.658) of the patients. The femoral neck injection technique provides high intraarticular contrast volume and produces less extraarticular contrast leakage than the femoral head injection technique when US guidance is used for MR arthrography of the hip.

  10. Toward a real-time system for temporal enhanced ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Shekoofeh; Van Woudenberg, Nathan; Sojoudi, Samira; Li, Ming; Xu, Sheng; Abu Anas, Emran M; Yan, Pingkun; Tahmasebi, Amir; Kwak, Jin Tae; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford; Mousavi, Parvin; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2018-03-27

    We have previously proposed temporal enhanced ultrasound (TeUS) as a new paradigm for tissue characterization. TeUS is based on analyzing a sequence of ultrasound data with deep learning and has been demonstrated to be successful for detection of cancer in ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy. Our aim is to enable the dissemination of this technology to the community for large-scale clinical validation. In this paper, we present a unified software framework demonstrating near-real-time analysis of ultrasound data stream using a deep learning solution. The system integrates ultrasound imaging hardware, visualization and a deep learning back-end to build an accessible, flexible and robust platform. A client-server approach is used in order to run computationally expensive algorithms in parallel. We demonstrate the efficacy of the framework using two applications as case studies. First, we show that prostate cancer detection using near-real-time analysis of RF and B-mode TeUS data and deep learning is feasible. Second, we present real-time segmentation of ultrasound prostate data using an integrated deep learning solution. The system is evaluated for cancer detection accuracy on ultrasound data obtained from a large clinical study with 255 biopsy cores from 157 subjects. It is further assessed with an independent dataset with 21 biopsy targets from six subjects. In the first study, we achieve area under the curve, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 0.94, 0.77, 0.94 and 0.92, respectively, for the detection of prostate cancer. In the second study, we achieve an AUC of 0.85. Our results suggest that TeUS-guided biopsy can be potentially effective for the detection of prostate cancer.

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Specimen Collection and Evaluation Techniques Affect Diagnostic Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Bang, Ji Young; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Hasan, Muhammad K; Hawes, Robert; Varadarajulu, Shyam

    2018-03-11

    Outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) evaluation vary with technique, needles, and methods of specimen evaluation. We performed a direct comparison of diagnostic yields of EUS-FNA samples collected using different gauge needles (22- vs 25-gauge), with or without suction. We performed a randomized controlled study of 352 patients with suspected pancreatic masses, referred for EUS-FNA at a tertiary referral center. Patients were randomly assigned to 22-gauge needles with or without suction or 25-gauge needles with or without suction. Specimens were evaluated offsite by cell block and rapid onsite cytologic evaluation (ROSE). Final diagnoses were made based on histologic analyses or 12-month follow-up evaluations. The primary outcome was diagnostic adequacy of cell blocks. Secondary outcomes were operating characteristics of ROSE and EUS-FNA, number of passes required for accurate onsite diagnosis, and amount of blood in specimens. The final diagnoses were malignancy (81.5% of patients) and benign disease (17.0% of patients); 1.4% of patients were lost during follow up. Cell block, ROSE, and EUS-FNA led to diagnostic accuracies of 71.9%, 95.5%, and 96.6%, respectively. A 22-gauge needle with suction was associated with more passes for adequate onsite diagnosis (P = .003) and specimens contained more blood (P = .01). Diagnostic accuracy of specimens collected by transduodenal EUS-FNA was lower with 22-gauge needles with suction compared to other techniques (P = .004). In a randomized trial of patients undergoing EUS-FNA for pancreatic masses, samples collected with 22-gauge vs 25-gauge needles performed equally well for offsite specimen evaluation. Use of suction appears to increase number of passes needed and specimen bloodiness. Specimen collection techniques should be individualized based on method of evaluation. ClinicalTrials.gov no: NCT02424838. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasound guided electrocoagulation in patients with chronic non‐insertional Achilles tendinopathy: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Boesen, M Ilum; Torp‐Pedersen, S; Koenig, M Juhl; Christensen, R; Langberg, H; Hölmich, P; Nielsen, M Bachmann; Bliddal, H

    2006-01-01

    Background High resolution colour Doppler ultrasound shows intratendinous Doppler activity in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Treatment of this neovascularisation with sclerosing therapy seems to relieve the pain. However, the procedure often has to be repeated. Objective To investigate the effect of electrocoagulation of the neovessels on tendon pain and tendon vascularity in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Methods Colour Doppler ultrasound guided electrocoagulation was used on vessels in the ventral portion of the Achilles tendon in 11 patients (seven men, four women, mean age 41 years) with painful chronic mid‐portion Achilles tendinosis. A unipolar coagulation device was used. Results One patient dropped out after two months (dissatisfied with the results). The remaining 10 patients (91%) were satisfied. These 10 patients were still satisfied at six months of follow up and had returned to their previous level of activity. All 10 patients were “cured” after one treatment. The patient who dropped out received two treatments because of lack of progress. There was significantly reduced pain (Likert pain scale, 0–10) during activity, from a median of 7 (range 4 to 10) at baseline to 0 (0 to 8) at six months' follow up (p<0.005); and at rest, from 1.5 (1 to 5) to 0 (0 to 8) (p = 0.005). In all patients, vascularisation was unchanged at the six months follow up, with no significant change in semiquantitative or quantitative colour scoring. Conclusions Coagulation in the area with vessels entering the tendon appears to be effective treatment for painful chronic mid‐tendinous Achilles tendinopathy. No effect on the intratendinous Doppler activity could be detected, suggesting that the effect is independent of changes in blood flow. Localisation of hyperaemia appears to be the key to the pathology and for targeting the treatment. One explanation could be that the effect is obtained by destruction of nerves accompanying the vessels

  13. Safety and efficiency of ultrasound-guided intermediate cervical plexus block for carotid surgery.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Isabelle; Chterev, Vladimir; Rekik, Mohamed; Boura, Benoit; Costanzo, Alessandro; Bourel, Patrick; Combes, Myriam; Philip, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Since stroke and myocardial ischaemia are major causes of perioperative morbidity and mortality associated with carotid endarterectomy, monitoring the brain and ensuring the best haemodynamic stability are important goals of the management. As regional anaesthesia was reported to improve haemodynamic stability during carotid endarterectomy (CEA), we conducted a prospective observational study on the efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided intermediate cervical plexus blocks (CPB), with early (immediate postoperative) and mid-term (day 30) outcomes in awake patients undergoing CEA. After the ethics committee approval, 50 patients undergoing a carotid endarterectomy with CPB from April 2011 to May 2013 were included. Anaesthesia and surgical dissection parameters, early complications and haemodynamic stability were recorded, as well as neurologic and cardiac outcomes initially and one month later. Cervical space was easy to locate by ultrasound in 90% of the patients. The quality of anaesthesia and surgical dissection was good in 86 and 88% of patients, respectively. No conversion to GA was required, secondary to a lack of analgesia. Two patients (4%) had severe hypotension (<100mmHg). Three patients required a shunt after carotid clamping for loss of consciousness with a favourable neurological outcome. We observed one elevation of cTnI (0.95ng·ml(-1)) without ECG change and 1 death occurred after a postoperative haemorrhagic stroke. The present work reports our first 50 cases of intermediate CPB using ultrasound guidance. The results underline that this technique is easy to perform, safe and reliable, provided good surgical conditions with continuous intraoperative neurologic monitoring and stable haemodynamics are respected. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Percutaneous microwave ablation with artificial ascites for symptomatic uterine adenomyosis: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Hai, Ning; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Ruifang; Han, Zhi-Yu; Liu, Fang Yi

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety and technical efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation with artificial ascites for adenomyosis. Between May 2015 and May 2016, a total of 25 patients with symptomatic adenomyosis who underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation with artificial ascites were included in this retrospective study. A matching cohort of 50 patients underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation without artificial ascites as controls. The technical efficacy, complications and short-term treatment effectiveness were assessed and compared with the controls. Artificial ascites was successfully achieved in all of the 25 patients with the administration of a median of 550 mL (range, 250-1200 mL) of solution. There was substantial improvement in achieving a better antenna path in 100% (20/20) of the cases with a poor antenna path. The complete separation was achieved in 23 of 25 patients. The mean ablation time was 26.5 ± 7.3 min and the median non-perfusion volume ratio was 76% which was similar to the control group (p > .05). No serious complications were observed. Patient pain scores for dysmenorrhoea showed a statistically significant decline from the baseline of 6.71 ± 0.96 to 2.92 ± 0.79 and the symptom severity score declined statistically significantly from 21.8 ± 5.5 to 16.4 ± 4.8 at 3 months follow-up. Percutaneous microwave ablation with artificial ascites is feasible, safe and can be effective in improving access for treatment of adenomyosis.

  15. Influence of arm position on catheter placement during real-time ultrasound-guided right infraclavicular proximal axillary venous catheterization.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J H; Kim, I S; Shin, K M; Kang, S S; Hong, S J; Park, J H; Kim, H J; Lee, S H; Kim, D Y; Jung, J H

    2016-03-01

    Real-time ultrasound-guided infraclavicular proximal axillary venous catheterization is used in many clinical situations and provides the advantages of catheter stabilization, a reduced risk of catheter-related infection, and comfort for the patient without limitation of movement. However, unintended catheter tip dislocation and accidental arterial puncture occur occasionally. This study was designed to investigate the influence of arm position on catheter placement and complications. Patients were randomized to either the neutral group (n=240) or the abduction group (n=241). In the neutral group, patients were positioned with the head and shoulders placed in an anatomically neutral position and the arms kept by the side during catheterization. In the abduction group, the right upper arm was abducted at 90° from the trunk during catheterization. After real-time ultrasound-guided catheterization was carried out in the right infraclavicular proximal axillary vein, misplacement of the catheter and all complications were evaluated with ultrasound and chest radiography. The success rate of complete catheterization before evaluating the placement of the catheter was high in both groups (97.1 vs 98.8%, P=not significant). The incidence of accidental arterial puncture was not different (1.7 vs 0%, P=not significant). The incidence of misplacement of the catheter was higher in the neutral group than in the abduction group (3.9 vs 0.4%, P=0.01). There were no complications, such as haemothorax, pneumothorax, or injury to the brachial plexus and phrenic nerve, in either group. Upper arm abduction may minimize the risk of misplacement of the catheter during real-time ultrasound-guided infraclavicular proximal axillary venous catheterization. The trial was registered with the Clinical Trial Registry of Korea: https://cris.nih.go.kr/cris/index.jsp. Identifier: KCT0001417. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia

  16. Experimental and clinical trial of measuring urinary velocity with the pitot tube and a transrectal ultrasound guided video urodynamic system.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Yukio; Nose, Yorihito; Ohba, Kenkichi

    2003-01-01

    The pitot tube is a common device to measure flow velocity. If the pitot tube is used as an urodynamic catheter, urinary velocity and urethral pressure may be measured simultaneously. However, to our knowledge, urodynamic studies with the pitot tube have not been reported. We experimentally and clinically evaluated the feasibility of the pitot tube to measure urinary velocity with a transrectal ultrasound guided video urodynamic system. We carried out a basal experiment measuring flow velocity in model urethras of 4.5-8.0 mm in inner diameter with a 12-Fr pitot tube. In a clinical trial, 79 patients underwent transrectal ultrasound guided video urodynamic studies with the 12-Fr pitot tube. Urinary velocity was calculated from dynamic pressure (Pd) with the pitot tube formula and the correcting equation according to the results of the basal experiment. Velocity measured by the pitot tube was proportional to the average velocity in model urethras and the coefficients were determined by diameters of model urethras. We obtained a formula to calculate urinary velocity from the basal experiment. The urinary velocity could be obtained in 32 of 79 patients. Qmax was 8.1 +/- 4.3 mL/s (mean +/- SD; range, 18.4-1.3 mL/s), urethral diameter was 7.3 +/- 3.0 mm (mean +/- SD; range, 18.7-4.3 mm) and urinary velocity was 69.4 +/- 43.6 (mean +/- SD; range, 181.3-0 cm/s) at maximum flow rate. The correlation coefficient of Qmax measured by a flowmeter versus Qdv flow rate calculated with urethral diameter and velocity was 0.41 without significant difference. The use of the pitot tube as an urodynamic catheter to a transrectal ultrasound-guided video urodynamic system can measure urethral pressure, diameter and urinary velocity simultaneously. However, a thinner pitot tube and further clinical trials are needed to obtain more accurate results.

  17. Use of the cumulative sum method (CUSUM) to assess the learning curves of ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block.

    PubMed

    Kollmann-Camaiora, A; Brogly, N; Alsina, E; Gilsanz, F

    2017-10-01

    Although ultrasound is a basic competence for anaesthesia residents (AR) there is few data available on the learning process. This prospective observational study aims to assess the learning process of ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block and to determine the number of procedures that a resident would need to perform in order to reach proficiency using the cumulative sum (CUSUM) method. We recruited 19 AR without previous experience. Learning curves were constructed using the CUSUM method for ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block considering 2 success criteria: a decrease of pain score>2 in a [0-10] scale after 15minutes, and time required to perform it. We analyse data from 17 AR for a total of 237 ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve blocks. 8/17 AR became proficient for pain relief, however all the AR who did more than 12 blocks (8/8) became proficient. As for time of performance 5/17 of AR achieved the objective of 12minutes, however all the AR who did more than 20 blocks (4/4) achieved it. The number of procedures needed to achieve proficiency seems to be 12, however it takes more procedures to reduce performance time. The CUSUM methodology could be useful in training programs to allow early interventions in case of repeated failures, and develop competence-based curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison between ultrasound-guided compression and para-aneurysmal saline injection in the treatment of postcatheterization femoral artery pseudoaneurysms.

    PubMed

    ElMahdy, Mahmoud Farouk; Kassem, Hussien Heshmat; Ewis, Essam Baligh; Mahdy, Soliman Gharieb

    2014-03-01

    Management of postcatheterization femoral artery pseudoaneurysm (FAP) is problematic. Ultrasound-guided compression (UGC) is painful and cumbersome. Thrombin injection is costly and may cause thromboembolism. Ultrasound-guided para-aneurysmal saline injection (PASI) has been described but was never compared against other treatment methods of FAP. We aimed at comparing the success rate and complications of PASI versus UGC. We randomly assigned 80 patients with postcatheterization FAPs to either UGC (40 patients) or PASI (40 patients). We compared the 2 procedures regarding successful obliteration of the FAP, incidence of vasovagal attacks, procedure time, discontinuation of antiplatelet and/or anticoagulants, and the Doppler waveform in the ipsilateral pedal arteries at the end of the procedure. There was no significant difference between patients in both groups regarding clinical and vascular duplex data. The mean durations of UGC and PASI procedures were 58.14 ± 28.45 and 30.33 ± 8.56 minutes, respectively (p = 0.045). Vasovagal attacks were reported in 10 (25%) and 2 patients (5%) treated with UGC and PASI, respectively (p = 0.05). All patients in both groups had triphasic Doppler waveform in the infrapopliteal arteries before and after the procedure. The primary and final success rates were 75%, 92.5%, 87.5%, and 95% for UGC and PASI, respectively (p = 0.43). In successfully treated patients, there was no reperfusion of the FAP in the follow-up studies (days 1 and 7) in both groups. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided PASI is an effective method for the treatment of FAP. Compared with UGC, PASI is faster, less likely to cause vasovagal reactions, and can be more convenient to patients and physicians. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sonoanatomy relevant for ultrasound-guided central neuraxial blocks via the paramedian approach in the lumbar region

    PubMed Central

    Karmakar, M K; Li, X; Kwok, W H; Ho, A M-H; Ngan Kee, W D

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The use of ultrasound to guide peripheral nerve blocks is now a well-established technique in regional anaesthesia. However, despite reports of ultrasound guided epidural access via the paramedian approach, there are limited data on the use of ultrasound for central neuraxial blocks, which may be due to a poor understanding of spinal sonoanatomy. The aim of this study was to define the sonoanatomy of the lumbar spine relevant for central neuraxial blocks via the paramedian approach. Methods The sonoanatomy of the lumbar spine relevant for central neuraxial blocks via the paramedian approach was defined using a “water-based spine phantom”, young volunteers and anatomical slices rendered from the Visible Human Project data set. Results The water-based spine phantom was a simple model to study the sonoanatomy of the osseous elements of the lumbar spine. Each osseous element of the lumbar spine, in the spine phantom, produced a “signature pattern” on the paramedian sagittal scans, which was comparable to its sonographic appearance in vivo. In the volunteers, despite the narrow acoustic window, the ultrasound visibility of the neuraxial structures at the L3/L4 and L4/L5 lumbar intervertebral spaces was good, and we were able to delineate the sonoanatomy relevant for ultrasound-guided central neuraxial blocks via the paramedian approach. Conclusion Using a simple water-based spine phantom, volunteer scans and anatomical slices from the Visible Human Project (cadaver) we have described the sonoanatomy relevant for ultrasound-guided central neuraxial blocks via the paramedian approach in the lumbar region. PMID:22010025

  20. Technical communication: new teaching model for practicing ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia techniques: no perishable food products!

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Glass, Nancy L; Power, Robert W

    2010-04-01

    There is a pronounced learning curve for the technique of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. Practicing with a simulator model has been shown to speed the acquisition of these skills for various ultrasound-guided procedures. However, commercial models for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia may be too costly or not readily available. Models using turkey breasts or tofu blocks have the disadvantage of containing perishable food products that can be a source for infection. We describe an alternative inexpensive model that is made from nonperishable components readily available in the operating room. The materials required include 1 clean used 500-mL bag of IV fluids, a bottle of Premisorb (TYCO Healthcare Group, Mansfield, MA), and a piece of foam material approximately 0.3 cm in diameter and 5 cm in length trimmed from operating room foam pads. After filling the IV bag with tap water and inserting the foam into the IV bag from the outlet port of the IV bag, one-third of a bottle of Premisorb (approximately 15 g) is poured into the IV bag. The outlet port of the bag is then sealed by taping the rubber stopper that originally came with the bag. Premisorb, a solidifying agent frequently used to absorb irrigating fluids or blood in operating room suction canisters, produces a gel-like material in the IV bag. The foam inserted into the bag creates a relatively hyperechoic target. This gel-like substance in the bag will seal the holes created after multiple practice needle insertions, resulting in minimal leakage. The semitransparent nature of the gel allows the trainee to visualize the target directly and on the ultrasound screen. The model we describe is inexpensive and easy to make from materials readily available in the operating room with the advantages of being nonperishable, easy to carry, and reusable.

  1. Dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to 0.5% ropivacaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Koraki, E; Stachtari, C; Kapsokalyvas, I; Stergiouda, Z; Katsanevaki, A; Trikoupi, A

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of dexmedetomidine added to ropivacaine on the onset and duration of sensory and motor block and duration of analgesia of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block. Thirty-seven ASA physical status I-II patients with elective forearm and hand surgery under ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block were randomly divided into 2 groups. Patients in ropivacaine-dexmedetomidine group (group RD, n = 19) received 15 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine with 100 μg (1 mL) dexmedetomidine, and patients in ropivacaine group (group R, n = 18) received 15 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine with 1 mL of normal saline. Onset time and duration of sensory and motor block and duration of analgesia were assessed. Duration of sensory block (U-value = 35, P < .001), duration of motor block (P = .001) and duration of analgesia (P < .001) were extended in group RD compared to group R. Onset time of sensory block in group RD was significantly faster than in group R (U-value = 65.5, P = .001). Onset time of motor block showed no significant difference between the 2 groups (U-value = 116.5, P = .096). Adverse reactions were reported only in group RD (bradycardia in 2 and hypotension in 3 patients). Our study indicated that dexmedetomidine 100 μg as adjuvant on ultrasound-guided axillary plexus block significantly prolonged the duration of sensory block and analgesia, as well as accelerated the time to onset of sensory block. These results should be weighed against the increased risks of motor block prolongation, transient bradycardia and hypotension and allow for attentive optimism, only if prolonged clinical trials provide a definitive answer. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia using the SonixGPS ultrasound guidance system: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Niazi, A U; Chin, K J; Jin, R; Chan, V W

    2014-08-01

    Real-time ultrasound-guided neuraxial blockade remains a largely experimental technique. SonixGPS® is a new needle tracking system that displays needle tip position on the ultrasound screen. We investigated if this novel technology might aid performance of real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia. Twenty patients with body mass index < 35 kg/m(2) undergoing elective total joint arthroplasty under spinal anesthesia were recruited. Patients with previous back surgery and spinal abnormalities were excluded. Following a pre-procedural ultrasound scan, a 17G proprietary needle-sensor assembly was inserted in-plane to the transducer in four patients and out-of-plane in 16 patients. In both approaches, the trajectory of insertion was adjusted in real-time until the needle tip lay just superficial to the ligamentum flavum-dura mater complex. At this point, a 25G 120 mm Whitacre spinal needle was inserted through the 17G SonixGPS® needle. Successful dural puncture was confirmed by backflow of cerebrospinal fluid from the spinal needle. An overall success rate of 14/20 (70%) was seen with two failures (50%) and four failures (25%) in the in-plane and out-of-plane groups respectively. Dural puncture was successful on the first skin puncture in 71% of patients and in a single needle pass in 57% of patients. The median total procedure time was 16.4 and 11.1 min in the in-plane and out-of-plane groups respectively. The SonixGPS® system simplifies real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia to a large extent, especially the out-of-plane approach. Nevertheless, it remains a complex multi-step procedure that requires time, specialized equipment, and a working knowledge of spinal sonoanatomy. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Long-term follow-up of ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin-A injections for sialorrhea in neurological dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Pierangelo; Busso, Marco; Tinivella, Marco; Artusi, Carlo Alberto; De Mercanti, Stefania; Cucci, Angele; Veltri, Andrea; Avagnina, Paolo; Calvo, Andrea; Chio', Adriano; Durelli, Luca; Clerico, Marinella

    2015-12-01

    Literature provides reports only of a limited follow-up single injection of botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) in patients with sialorrhea. The aim of our study is to evaluate the long-lasting efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections for severe sialorrhea secondary to neurological dysphagia. We enrolled 38 severe adult sialorrhea patients referred consecutively to the neurology unit and performed bilateral parotid and submandibular gland BoNT-A injections under ultrasound guidance. The outcomes of the study were reduction of sialorrhea, duration of therapeutic effect, and subjective patient- and caregiver-reported satisfaction. A total of 113 BoNT-A administrations were given during the study period with a mean duration of follow-up of 20.2 ± 4.4 months. We observed a significant decrease from baseline in mean number of daily aspirations and a significant improvement in patient- and caregiver-reported outcomes following ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections (p < 0.001 vs baseline for all comparisons) and the mean duration of the efficacy was 5.6 ± 1 months. No major treatment-related adverse events occurred and a low incidence of minor adverse events was reported. This study confirms the long-lasting efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections for sialorrhea, regardless of the causative neurological disorder. These results should encourage the use of BoNT-A in the treatment of severe sialorrhea and highlight the role of ultrasound guidance to obtain optimal results in terms of safety and reproducible outcomes.

  4. Ultrasound guided intra-articular ketorolac versus corticosteroid injection in osteoarthritis of the hip: a retrospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Deok; Kim, Tai Kon; Bae, Byung Woo; Ahn, JaeKi; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yongbum

    2015-09-01

    Intra-articular steroid injection has been widely used in the management of symptomatic osteoarthritis; however, its frequent use is avoided since there is an increase in the incidence of articular infection and several mechanical side effects such as cartilage breakdown and loss of elasticity of the articular cartilage. For these reasons, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs instead of corticosteroids can be considered for intra-articular injection. On this basis, we investigated the effects and safety of ultrasound-guided intra-articular ketorolac versus corticosteroid injection for patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. This retrospective study included 98 patients with diagnoses of hip osteoarthritis who underwent ultrasound-guided intra-articular ketorolac or corticosteroid injection. Fifty patients who received ultrasound-guided intra-articular corticosteroid injection were administered a mixture of 0.5% lidocaine and triamcinolone. Forty-eight patients who received ultrasound-guided intra-articular ketorolac injection were administered 0.5% lidocaine and ketorolac. Outcome measurement was assessed using the Harris hip score and verbal numeric pain scale, which were evaluated before the injections and at 1, 3 and 6 months following the injection. Univariate analysis (using the x (2) test) and multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the relationship between the possible outcome predictors (injected medications, patients' age, gender, pain duration and Kellgren-Lawrence classification) and the therapeutic effects. The Harris hip score and verbal numeric pain scale were improved at 1, 3 and 6 months after the injection in both groups. No statistical differences in the Harris hip score and verbal numeric pain scale were observed between the groups. The success rate was also not significantly different among the time periods of 1, 3 and 6 months. Multiple logistic regression and univariate analysis showed that injected medications

  5. A prospective, randomized comparison between single- and multiple-injection techniques for ultrasound-guided subgluteal sciatic nerve block.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroto; Sakura, Shinichi; Wada, Minori; Shido, Akemi

    2014-12-01

    It is believed that local anesthetic injected to obtain circumferential spread around nerves produces a more rapid onset and successful blockade after some ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks. However, evidence demonstrating this point is limited only to the popliteal sciatic nerve block, which is relatively easy to perform by via a high-frequency linear transducer. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that multiple injections of local anesthetic to make circumferential spread would improve the rate of sensory and motor blocks compared with a single-injection technique for ultrasound-guided subgluteal sciatic nerve block, which is considered a relatively difficult block conducted with a low-frequency, curved-array transducer. Ninety patients undergoing knee surgery were divided randomly into 2 groups to receive the ultrasound-guided subgluteal approach to sciatic nerve block with 20 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine with epinephrine. For group M (the multiple-injection technique), the local anesthetic was injected to create circumferential spread around the sciatic nerve without limitation on the number of needle passes. For group S (the single-injection technique), the number of needle passes was limited to 1, and the local anesthetic was injected to create spread along the dorsal surface of the sciatic nerve, during which no adjustment of the needle tip was made. Sensory and motor blockade were assessed in double-blind fashion for 30 minutes after completion of the block. The primary outcome was sensory blockade of all sciatic components tested, including tibial, superficial peroneal, and sural nerves at 30 minutes after injection. Data from 86 patients (43 in each group) were analyzed. Block execution took more time for group M than group S. The proportion of patients with complete sensory blockade of all sciatic components at 30 minutes after injection was significantly larger for group M than group S (41.9% vs 16.3%, P = 0.018). Complete motor blockade of

  6. Adapting Gel Wax into an Ultrasound-Guided Pericardiocentesis Model at Low Cost

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Robert; Planas, Jason H.; Edens, Mary Ann

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is a life-threatening emergency for which pericardiocentesis may be required. Real-time bedside ultrasound has obviated the need for routine blind procedures in cardiac arrest, and the number of pericardiocenteses being performed has declined. Despite this fact, pericardiocentesis remains an essential skill in emergency medicine. While commercially available training models exist, cost, durability, and lack of anatomical landmarks limit their usefulness. We sought to create a pericardiocentesis model that is realistic, simple to build, reusable, and cost efficient. We constructed the model using a red dye-filled ping pong ball (simulating the right ventricle) and a 250cc normal saline bag (simulating the effusion) encased in an artificial rib cage and held in place by gel wax. The inner saline bag was connected to a 1L saline bag outside of the main assembly to act as a fluid reservoir for repeat uses. The entire construction process takes approximately 16–20 hours, most of which is attributed to cooling of the gel wax. Actual construction time is approximately four hours at a cost of less than $200. The model was introduced to emergency medicine residents and medical students during a procedure simulation lab and compared to a model previously described by dell’Orto.1 The learners performed ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis using both models. Learners who completed a survey comparing realism of the two models felt our model was more realistic than the previously described model. On a scale of 1–9, with 9 being very realistic, the previous model was rated a 4.5. Our model was rated a 7.8. There was also a marked improvement in the perceived recognition of the pericardium, the heart, and the pericardial sac. Additionally, 100% of the students were successful at performing the procedure using our model. In simulation, our model provided both palpable and ultrasound landmarks and held up to several months of repeated use. It was less

  7. Treatment of cervical pregnancy with ultrasound-guided local methotrexate injection.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M; Honda, R; Erdenebaatar, C; Monsur, M; Honda, T; Sakaguchi, I; Okamura, Y; Ohba, T; Katabuchi, H

    2017-12-01

    Cervical pregnancy (CP) is a rare type of ectopic pregnancy. While methotrexate (MTX) is generally the first-line method of choice for clinically stable women, there is still no consensus on the most appropriate treatment for this abnormal pregnancy. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a single local MTX injection under transvaginal ultrasound guidance for the initial treatment of CP and to assess post-treatment fertility. We reviewed retrospectively 15 patients with CP treated with local MTX injection under transvaginal ultrasound guidance. In all patients, the serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) levels were monitored and the gestational sac was evaluated using ultrasonography after treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed as necessary. We evaluated the patients' clinical characteristics and clinical course after treatment, the efficacy of the treatment and the post-treatment fertility in patients desiring subsequent pregnancy. The median estimated gestational age at the time of MTX injection was 6 + 2 (range, 5 + 2 to 11 + 0) weeks. All 15 patients were treated successfully, without the need for blood transfusion or surgical procedures; however, three patients required an additional local MTX injection due to a poor decline in serum hCG level following the initial injection, while one patient required uterine artery embolization due to persistent vaginal bleeding and an enlarging gestational sac with blood vessels visible on contrast-enhanced MRI. The mean time following initial MTX injection for hCG normalization was 43.8 (95% CI, 33.3-54.3) days and for resumption of menses was 68.4 (95% CI, 51.9-84.9) days. Seven of the 10 women desiring subsequent pregnancy following treatment had uneventful pregnancy, one became pregnant but miscarried spontaneously at 8 weeks of gestation, one was treated by laparoscopic surgery after diagnosis of a tubal pregnancy and one did not conceive. A single, ultrasound-guided

  8. Comparison of the coracoid and retroclavicular approaches for ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Kavrut Ozturk, Nilgun; Kavakli, Ali Sait

    2017-08-01

    This prospective randomized study compared the coracoid and retroclavicular approaches to ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block (IBPB) in terms of needle tip and shaft visibility and quality of block. We hypothesized that the retroclavicular approach would increase needle tip and shaft visibility and decrease the number of needle passes compared to the coracoid approach. A total of 100 adult patients who received IBPB block for upper limb surgery were randomized into two groups: a coracoid approach group (group C) and a retroclavicular approach group (group R). In group C, the needle was inserted 2 cm medial and 2 cm inferior to the coracoid process and directed from ventral to dorsal. In group R, the needle insertion point was posterior to the clavicle and the needle was advanced from cephalad to caudal. All ultrasound images were digitally stored for analysis. The primary aim of the present study was to compare needle tip and shaft visibility between the coracoid approach and retroclavicular approach in patients undergoing upper limb surgery. The secondary aim was to investigate differences between the two groups in the number of needle passes, sensory and motor block success rates, surgical success rate, block performance time, block performance-related pain, patient satisfaction, use of supplemental local anesthetic and analgesic, and complications. Needle tip visibility and needle shaft visibility were significantly better in group R (p = 0.040, p = 0.032, respectively). Block performance time and anesthesia-related time were significantly shorter in group R (p = 0.022, p = 0.038, respectively). Number of needle passes was significantly lower in group R (p = 0.044). Paresthesia during block performance was significantly higher in group C (p = 0.045). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of sensory or motor block success, surgical success, block-related pain, and patient satisfaction

  9. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Tambouret, R; Szyfelbein, W M; Pitman, M B

    1999-10-25

    We reviewed the Massachusetts General Hospital experience with ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNABs) of the thyroid to determine the indications, rate of unsatisfactory smears, correlation with excisional biopsy results, and verification of efficient use of personnel time. All radiologically guided FNABs of the thyroid from January 1993 through June 1997 were reviewed. As a measure of efficient use of technologist time, a sample of times spent by the technologist during the procedure for 20 cases in 1993 and 1997 was compared with that of an equal number of random nonthyroid image guided FNABs. Two hundred-ninety FNABs were identified in 251 patients, representing 12% of all thyroid FNABs and 11% of all radiologically guided FNABs. Indications in the 251 patients included multiple nodules (78), solitary nodules (61), complex nodules (39), prior failed FNAB (39), thyroid bed abnormalities post-thyroidectomy (21), difficult access (7), and investigation of recurrent tumor in residual thyroid lobe (6). Available records indicated 118 lesions were palpable and 45 were nonpalpable; the physical examination characteristics of the remainder (88) were not stated. Diagnoses included 44 unsatisfactory cases (15%), 103 macrofollicular lesions, 20 microfollicular lesions, 26 mixed macro/microfollicular lesions, 5 oxyphilic lesions, 1 trabecular pattern, 15 nonspecific follicular cell pattern, 9 follicular cell atypia, 30 cysts, 11 thyroiditis, 23 malignant tumors, and 3 other (1 parathyroid, 2 lymph node). Eighty-nine FNABs from 76 patients had subsequent surgical biopsy. Excisional biopsies in 14 unsatisfactory FNABs were benign. In the remaining 75 FNABs from 67 patients, 18 malignancies on FNAB were correctly diagnosed, but 3 other papillary carcinomas were only qualified as atypical follicular cells on cytology. No false-positive cases occurred. Of 15 macrofollicular lesions on cytology, 10 were adenomas on excision, only 2 of which were microfollicular

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for suspected malignancies adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Gambitta, Pietro; Armellino, Antonio; Forti, Edoardo; Vertemati, Maurizio; Colombo, Paola Enrica; Aseni, Paolo

    2014-07-14

    To investigate the impact of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in association with a multidisciplinary team evaluation for the detection of gastrointestinal malignancies. A cohort of 1019 patients with suspected malignant lesions adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract received EUS-FNA after a standardized multidisciplinary team evaluation (MTE) and were divided into 4 groups according to their specific malignant risk score (MRS). Patients with a MRS of 0 (without detectable risk of malignancy) received only EUS without FNA. For patients with a MRS score ranging from 1 (low risk) - through 2 (intermediate risk) - to 3 (high risk), EUS-FNA cytology of the lesion was planned for a different time and was prioritized for those patients at higher risk for cancer. The accuracy, efficiency and quality assessment for the early detection of patients with potentially curable malignant lesions were evaluated for the whole cohort and in the different classes of MRSs. The time to definitive cytological diagnosis (TDCD), accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and the rate of inconclusive tests were calculated for all patients and for each MRS group. A total of 1019 patients with suspected malignant lesions were evaluated by EUS-FNA. In 515 patients of 616 with true malignant lesions the tumor was diagnosed by EUS-FNA; 421 patients with resectable lesions received early surgical treatment, and 94 patients received chemo-radiotherapy. The overall diagnostic accuracy for the 1019 lesions in which a final diagnosis was obtained by EUS-FNA was 0.95. When patients were stratified by MTE into 4 classes of MRSs, a higher rate of patients in the group with higher cancer risk (MRS-3) received early treatment and EUS-FNA showed the highest level of accuracy (1.0). TDCD was also shorter in the MRS-3 group. The number of patients who received surgical treatment or chemo-radiotherapy was significantly higher in the MRS-3 patient

  11. Cost-effectiveness comparison between palpation- and ultrasound-guided thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsies.

    PubMed

    Can, Ahmet Selçuk

    2009-05-16

    The aim of this study is to perform a cost-effectiveness comparison between palpation-guided thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsies (P-FNA) and ultrasound-guided thyroid FNA biopsies (USG-FNA). Each nodule was considered as a case. Diagnostic steps were history and physical examination, TSH measurement, Tc99m thyroid scintigraphy for nodules with a low TSH level, initial P-FNA versus initial USG-FNA, repeat USG-FNA for nodules with initial inadequate P-FNA or USG-FNA, hemithyroidectomy for inadequate repeat USG-FNA. American Thyroid Association thyroid nodule management guidelines were simulated in estimating the cost of P-FNA strategy. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists guidelines were simulated for USG-FNA strategy. Total costs were estimated by adding the cost of each diagnostic step to reach a diagnosis for 100 nodules. Strategy cost was found by dividing the total cost to 100. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated by dividing the difference between strategy cost of USG-FNA and P-FNA to the difference between accuracy of USG-FNA and P-FNA. A positive ICER indicates more and a negative ICER indicates less expense to achieve one more additional accurate diagnosis of thyroid cancer for USG-FNA. Seventy-eight P-FNAs and 190 USG-FNAs were performed between April 2003 and May 2008. There were no differences in age, gender, thyroid function, frequency of multinodular goiter, nodule location and diameter (median nodule diameter: 18.4 mm in P-FNA and 17.0 mm in USG-FNA) between groups. Cytology results in P-FNA versus USG-FNA groups were as follows: benign 49% versus 62% (p = 0.04), inadequate 42% versus 29% (p = 0.03), malignant 3% (p = 1.00) and indeterminate 6% (p = 0.78) for both. Eleven nodules from P-FNA and 18 from USG-FNA group underwent surgery. The accuracy of P-FNA was 0.64 and USG-FNA 0.72. Unit cost of P-FNA was 148 Euros and USG-FNA 226 Euros. The cost of P-FNA strategy was 534 Euros and USG-FNA strategy 523 Euros

  12. Cost-effectiveness comparison between palpation- and ultrasound-guided thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Can, Ahmet Selçuk

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to perform a cost-effectiveness comparison between palpation-guided thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsies (P-FNA) and ultrasound-guided thyroid FNA biopsies (USG-FNA). Methods Each nodule was considered as a case. Diagnostic steps were history and physical examination, TSH measurement, Tc99m thyroid scintigraphy for nodules with a low TSH level, initial P-FNA versus initial USG-FNA, repeat USG-FNA for nodules with initial inadequate P-FNA or USG-FNA, hemithyroidectomy for inadequate repeat USG-FNA. American Thyroid Association thyroid nodule management guidelines were simulated in estimating the cost of P-FNA strategy. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists guidelines were simulated for USG-FNA strategy. Total costs were estimated by adding the cost of each diagnostic step to reach a diagnosis for 100 nodules. Strategy cost was found by dividing the total cost to 100. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated by dividing the difference between strategy cost of USG-FNA and P-FNA to the difference between accuracy of USG-FNA and P-FNA. A positive ICER indicates more and a negative ICER indicates less expense to achieve one more additional accurate diagnosis of thyroid cancer for USG-FNA. Results Seventy-eight P-FNAs and 190 USG-FNAs were performed between April 2003 and May 2008. There were no differences in age, gender, thyroid function, frequency of multinodular goiter, nodule location and diameter (median nodule diameter: 18.4 mm in P-FNA and 17.0 mm in USG-FNA) between groups. Cytology results in P-FNA versus USG-FNA groups were as follows: benign 49% versus 62% (p = 0.04), inadequate 42% versus 29% (p = 0.03), malignant 3% (p = 1.00) and indeterminate 6% (p = 0.78) for both. Eleven nodules from P-FNA and 18 from USG-FNA group underwent surgery. The accuracy of P-FNA was 0.64 and USG-FNA 0.72. Unit cost of P-FNA was 148 Euros and USG-FNA 226 Euros. The cost of P-FNA strategy was 534 Euros and USG

  13. [Cost analysis of ultrasound-guided transrectal needle biopsy in prostatic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Bissoli, E; Fandella, A; La Torre, E; Faggiano, L; Anselmo, G; Frasson, F

    1998-04-01

    The literature mortality and morbidity rates from prostatic carcinoma prompt to the better use of some routine diagnostic tools such as transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy. We evaluated the overall cost of transrectal ultrasound biopsy (TRUSB) of the prostate and investigated the economic impact of the procedures currently used to diagnose prostatic carcinoma. The total cost of TRUSB was calculated with reference to 247 procedures performed in 1996. The following cost factors were evaluated: personnel, materials, maintenance-equipment depreciation, energy consumption and hospital overheads. A literature review was also carried out to check if our extrapolated costs corresponded to those of other authors worldwide and to consider them in the wider framework of the cost effectiveness of the strategies for the early diagnosis of prostatic cancer. The overall cost of TRUSB was Itl. 249,000, obtained by adding together the costs of: personnel (Itl. 160,000); materials (Itl. 59,000); equipment maintenance and depreciation (Itl. 12,400); energy consumption (Itl. 100); hospital overheads (Itl. 17,500). The literature review points out TRUSB as a clinically invasive tool for diagnosing prostatic carcinoma whose cost-effectiveness is debated. Cadaver studies report the presence of cancer cells in the prostate of 50% of 70-year-old men, while extrapolations calculate a morbidity from prostatic carcinoma in 9.5% of 50-year-old men. It is therefore obvious that randomized prostatic biopsies, methods apart, are very likely to be positive. This probability varies with the patient's age, the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA), the density of PSA/cm3 of prostate volume (PSAD), and the positivity of exploration and/or transrectal ultrasound findings. Despite the strict application of all these criteria and the critical assessment of the patient's general conditions, TRUSB is indicated for 16% of the male population over 50, with obvious implications. It has been recently

  14. Ultrasound-guided transhepatic puncture of the hepatic veins for TIPS placement.

    PubMed

    Gazzera, C; Fonio, P; Gallesio, C; Camerano, F; Doriguzzi Breatta, A; Righi, D; Veltri, A; Gandini, G

    2013-04-01

    This retrospective analysis was carried out to assess the feasibility and results of transjugular intrahepatic portal systemic shunt (TIPS) performed with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous puncture of the hepatic veins. Over a period of 3 years, 153 patients were treated with TIPS at our centre. In eight cases, a percutaneous puncture of the middle (n=7) or right (n=1) hepatic vein was required because the hepatic vein ostium was not accessible. Indications for TIPS were bleeding (n=1), Budd-Chiari syndrome (n=1), ascites (n=2), reduced portal flow (n=1) and incomplete portal thrombosis (n=3). A 0.018-in. guidewire was anterogradely introduced into the hepatic vein to the inferior vena cava (IVC) through a 21-gauge needle. In the meantime, a 25-mm snare-loop catheter was introduced through the jugular access to retrieve the guidewire, achieving through-andthrough access. Then, a Rosch-Uchida set was used to place the TIPS with the traditional technique. Technical success was achieved in all patients. There was one case of stent thrombosis. One patient died of pulmonary oedema. Three patients were eligible for liver transplantation, whereas the others were excluded due to shunt thrombosis (n=1) and previous nonhepatic neoplasms (n=3). The percutaneous approach to hepatic veins is rapid and safe and may be useful for avoiding traumatic liver injuries.

  15. Training for percutaneous renal access on a virtual reality simulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Yu, Cheng-fan; Liu, Jin-shun; Wang, Gang; Zhu, He; Na, Yan-qun

    2013-01-01

    The need to develop new methods of surgical training combined with advances in computing has led to the development of virtual reality surgical simulators. The PERC Mentor(TM) is designed to train the user in percutaneous renal collecting system access puncture. This study aimed to validate the use of this kind of simulator, in percutaneous renal access training. Twenty-one urologists were enrolled as trainees to learn a fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous renal accessing technique. An assigned percutaneous renal access procedure was immediately performed on the PERC Mentor(TM) after watching instruction video and an analog operation. Objective parameters were recorded by the simulator and subjective global rating scale (GRS) score were determined. Simulation training followed and consisted of 2 hours daily training sessions for 2 consecutive days. Twenty-four hours after the training session, trainees were evaluated performing the same procedure. The post-training evaluation was compared to the evaluation of the initial attempt. During the initial attempt, none of the trainees could complete the appointed procedure due to the lack of experience in fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous renal access. After the short-term training, all trainees were able to independently complete the procedure. Of the 21 trainees, 10 had primitive experience in ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Trainees were thus categorized into the group of primitive experience and inexperience. The total operating time and amount of contrast material used were significantly lower in the group of primitive experience versus the inexperience group (P = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). The training on the virtual reality simulator, PERC Mentor(TM), can help trainees with no previous experience of fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous renal access to complete the virtual manipulation of the procedure independently. This virtual reality simulator may become an important training and evaluation tool in

  16. Pathological fracture of the patella due to an atypical located aneurysmal bone cyst: verification by means of ultrasound-guided biopsy.

    PubMed

    Plaikner, Michaela; Gruber, Hannes; Henninger, Benjamin; Gruber, Leonhard; Kosiol, Juana; Loizides, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    We report on a rare case of an atypical located aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) in the patella presenting with pathological fracture after trauma. Using all available diagnostic modalities and by means of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy an unclear and suspected pathological fractured cystic bone lesion in the patella of a young man could be further clarified. The acquired images suggested the diagnosis of a pathological fractured aneurysmal bone cyst after mild trauma. However, due to the extraordinary location and clinical presentation the diagnosis was secured by means of ultrasound-guided biopsy through a small cortical gap. As shown in this rare case of an atypical aneurysmal bone cyst of the patella, the quite seldom but sometimes possible ultrasound-guided biopsy of intraosseous lesions can help to achieve the diagnostic clarification and should also be taken into account as a non-standard procedure.

  17. Dexamethasone as a ropivacaine adjuvant for ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block: A randomized, double-blinded clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sakae, Thiago Mamôru; Marchioro, Patricia; Schuelter-Trevisol, Fabiana; Trevisol, Daisson José

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of intravenous or perineural dexamethasone added to ropivacaine on the duration of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus blocks (BPB). Randomized clinical trial. Sixty ASA physical status I-II patients with elective shoulder arthroscopic surgeries under interscalene brachial plexus blocks were randomly allocated to receive 20ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1ml of isotonic saline (C group, n=20), 20ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1ml (4mg) of perineural dexamethasone (Dpn group, n=20), or 20ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1ml of isotonic saline and intravenous 4mg dexamethasone (IV) (Div group, n=20). A nerve stimulation technique with ultrasound was used in all patients. The onset time and duration of sensory blocks were assessed. Secondary outcomes were pain scores (VAS) and postoperative vomiting and nausea (PONV). The duration of the motor and sensory block was extended in group Dpn compared with group Div and group C (P<0.05). In addition, within 24h, group Dpn presented lower levels of VAS and lower incidence of PONV as compared with the other groups. Moreover, there was a significant reduction on onset time between group Dpn and the other groups. Perineural 4mg dexamethasone was more effective than intravenous in extending the duration of ropivacaine in ultrasound-guided interscalene BPB. Moreover, Dpn has significant effects on onset time, PONV, and VAS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Intrathecal Spread of Injectate Following an Ultrasound-Guided Selective C5 Nerve Root Injection in a Human Cadaver Model.

    PubMed

    Falyar, Christian R; Abercrombie, Caroline; Becker, Robert; Biddle, Chuck

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided selective C5 nerve root blocks have been described in several case reports as a safe and effective means to anesthetize the distal clavicle while maintaining innervation of the upper extremity and preserving diaphragmatic function. In this study, cadavers were injected with 5 mL of 0.5% methylene blue dye under ultrasound guidance to investigate possible proximal and distal spread of injectate along the brachial plexus, if any. Following the injections, the specimens were dissected and examined to determine the distribution of dye and the structures affected. One injection revealed dye extended proximally into the epidural space, which penetrated the dura mater and was present on the spinal cord and brainstem. Dye was noted distally to the divisions in 3 injections. The anterior scalene muscle and phrenic nerve were stained in all 4 injections. It appears unlikely that local anesthetic spread is limited to the nerve root following an ultrasound-guided selective C5 nerve root injection. Under certain conditions, intrathecal spread also appears possible, which has major patient safety implications. Additional safety measures, such as injection pressure monitoring, should be incorporated into this block, or approaches that are more distal should be considered for the acute pain management of distal clavicle fractures.

  19. Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Complicating Liver Cirrhosis: Utility of Repeat Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy after Unsuccessful First Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Caturelli, Eugenio; Biasini, Elisabetta; Bartolucci, Francesca

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a second ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy of liver nodules thought to be hepatocellular carcinoma when the original biopsy has failed to provide a reliable diagnosis. Methods: Thirty-seven cirrhotic patients underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy of liver nodules that were subsequently diagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma. Each biopsy involved a single puncture with a 20 G cutting needle, which yielded pathologic material used both for cytologic and histologic studies. In 23 cases (mean diameter of nodules 48 mm) the biopsy furnished exclusively necrotic material (non-diagnostic subgroup); in the other 14 cases (mean diameter 26 mm) the biopsy yieldedmore » no neoplastic elements (false-negative subgroup). All 37 nodules were subjected to repeat biopsies performed in the same manner. Results: The repeat biopsies provided a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma in six of the 23 patients from the non-diagnostic subgroup and in seven of the 14 in the false-negative subgroup. Overall, repeat biopsy produced a diagnostic gain of 35.1%. Conclusion: The chance of success with repeat biopsy of hepatocellular carcinoma is limited and may depend to some extent on the characteristics of the lesions (i.e., areas of necrosis in large nodules, well-differentiated cellular populations in small ones)« less

  20. Ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks combined with sedoanalgesia versus spinal anesthesia in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tekelioglu, Umit Yasar; Demirhan, Abdullah; Ozturan, Kutay Engin; Bayir, Hakan; Kocoglu, Hasan; Bilgi, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Background Although regional anesthesia is the first choice for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA), it may not be effective and the risk of complications is greater in patients who are obese or who have spinal deformities. We compared the success of ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks with sedoanalgesia versus spinal anesthesia in unilateral TKA patients in whom spinal anesthesia was difficult. Methods We enrolled 30 patients; 15 for whom spinal anesthesia was expected to be difficult were classified as the block group, and 15 received spinal anesthesia. Regional anesthesia was achieved with bupivacaine 62.5 mg and prilocaine 250 mg to the sciatic nerve, and bupivacaine 37.5 mg and prilocaine 150 mg to the femoral nerve. Bupivacaine 20 mg was administered to induce spinal anesthesia. Hemodynamic parameters, pain and sedation scores, and surgical and patient satisfaction were compared. Results A sufficient block could not be obtained in three patients in the block group. The arterial pressure was significantly lower in the spinal group (P < 0.001), and the incidence of nausea was higher (P = 0.017) in this group. Saturation and patient satisfaction were lower in the block group (P < 0.028), while the numerical pain score (P < 0.046) and the Ramsay sedation score were higher (P = 0.007). Conclusions Ultrasound-guided sciatic and femoral nerve blocks combined with sedoanalgesia were an alternative anesthesia method in selected TKA patients. PMID:25237444

  1. Advantages of caudal block over intrarectal local anesthesia plus periprostatic nerve block for transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Fu, Yaowen; Ma, Haichun; Wang, Jinguo; Gao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare caudal block with intrarectal local anesthesia plus periprostatic nerve block for transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Methods: One hundred and ninety patients scheduled for transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy were randomized equally into Group-A who received caudal block (20 ml 1.2% lidocaine) and Group-B who received intrarectal local anesthesia (0.3% oxybuprocaine cream) plus periprostatic nerve block (10 ml 1% lidocaine plus 0.5% ropivacaine) before biopsy. During and after the procedure, the patients rated the level of pain/discomfort at various time points. Complications during the whole study period and the patient overall satisfaction were also evaluated. Results: More pain and discomfort was detected during periprostatic nerve block than during caudal block. Pain and discomfort was significantly lower during prostate biopsy and during the manipulation of the probe in the rectum in Group-A than in Group-B. No significant differences were detected in the pain intensity after biopsy and side effects between the two groups. Conclusions: Caudal block provides better anesthesia than periprostatic nerve block plus intrarectal local anesthesia for TRUS guided prostate biopsy without an increase of side effects. PMID:27648052

  2. Musculoskeletal ultrasound: how to treat calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff by ultrasound-guided single-needle lavage technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kenneth S; Rosas, Humberto G

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this video article is to illustrate the ultrasound appearance of calcium deposition in the rotator cuff and provide a detailed step-by-step protocol for performing the ultrasound-guided single-needle lavage technique for the treatment of calcific tendinitis with emphasis on patient positioning, necessary supplies, real-time lavage technique, and steroid injection into the subacromial subdeltoid bursa. Musculoskeletal ultrasound is well established as a safe, cost-effective imaging tool in diagnosing and treating common musculoskeletal disorders. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff is a common disabling cause of shoulder pain. Although most cases are self-limiting, a subset of patients is refractory to conservative therapy and requires treatment intervention. Ultrasound-guided lavage is an effective and safe minimally-invasive treatment not readily offered in the United States as an alternative to surgery, perhaps because of the limited prevalence of musculoskeletal ultrasound programs and limited training. On completion of this video article, the participant should be able to develop an appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for the treatment of calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff using ultrasound.

  3. Ultrasound-guided approach to the cervical articular process joints in horses: a validation of the technique in cadavers.

    PubMed

    Purefoy Johnson, Jessica; Stack, John David; Rowan, Conor; Handel, Ian; O'Leary, John Mark

    2017-05-22

    To compare accuracy of the ultrasound-guided craniodorsal (CrD) approach with the dorsal (D) approach to the cervical articular process joints, and to evaluate the effect of the transducer, needle gauge, and operator experience. Cervical articular process joints from 14 cadaveric neck specimens were injected using either a D or CrD approach, a linear (13 MHx) or microconvex transducer (10 MHz), and an 18 or 20 gauge needle, by an experienced or inexperienced operator. Injectate consisted of an iodinated contrast material solution. Time taken for injection, number of redirects, and retrieval of synovial fluid were recorded. Accuracy was assessed using a scoring system for contrast seen on computed tomography (CT). The successful performance of intra-articular injections of contrast detected by CT using the D (61/68) and CrD (57/64) approaches was comparable. No significant effect of approach, transducer or needle gauge was observed on injection accuracy, time taken to perform injection, or number of redirects. The 18 gauge needle had a positive correlation with retrieval of synovial fluid. A positive learning curve was observed for the inexperienced operator. Both approaches to the cervical articular process joints were highly accurate. Ultrasound-guided injection of the cervical articular process joints is an easily-learnt technique for an inexperienced veterinarian. Either approach may be employed in the field with a high level of accuracy, using widely available equipment.

  4. Evaluation of a simplified augmented reality device for ultrasound-guided vascular access in a vascular phantom.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yunseok; Choi, Seungpyo; Kim, Heechan

    2014-09-01

    To investigate whether a novel ultrasound device may be used with a simplified augmented reality technique, and to compare this device with conventional techniques during vascular access using a vascular phantom. Prospective, randomized study. Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine departments of a university-affiliated hospital. 20 physicians with no experience with ultrasound-guided techniques. All participants performed the vascular access technique on the vascular phantom model using both a conventional device and the new ultrasound device. Time and the number of redirections of the needle until aspiration of dye into a vessel of the vascular phantom were measured. The median/interquartile range of time was 39.5/41.7 seconds versus 18.6/10.0 seconds (P < 0.001) and number of redirections was 3/3.5 versus 1/0 (P < 0.001) for the conventional and novel ultrasound devices, respectively. During vascular access in a vascular phantom model, the novel device decreased the time and the number of redirections significantly. The device successfully improved the efficiency of the ultrasound-guided vascular access technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment by ultrasound-guided local infiltration in adhesion-related abdominal pain and intractable hiccups: A case report.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Gu, Zhi-Yong; Lin, Chia-Shiang; Nie, Fa-Chuan; Cui, Jian

    2018-04-01

    Abdominal pain and hiccups secondary to intra-abdominal adhesion are surgical complications that are often treated by painkillers and secondary surgeries with an unsatisfactory therapeutic effect. This study presents a new treatment method that uses ultrasound-guided local infiltration in peritoneal and abdominal wall adhesions in patients with hiccups and abdominal pain. A 62-year-old patient presented to our hospital with a history of intractable hiccups and abdominal pain for 30 years. Her abdominal examination revealed a scar with an approximate length of 10 cm on the abdominal umbilical plane; pressing the right scar area could simultaneously induce abdominal pain and hiccups. Intraperitoneal computed tomography examination clearly demonstrated that the bowel had no obvious expansion. Ultrasonographic examination found that peritoneal motility below the normal peritoneal adhesion regions was significantly slower than in the normal regions. The diagnosis of chronic postoperative pain syndrome was clear. The symptoms were significantly alleviated by a successful treatment with ultrasound-guided local infiltration in the peritoneal and abdominal wall scar adhesions. After 3 stages of hospitalization and 1 year of follow-up, the patient's abdominal wall pain was relieved by approximately 80% and hiccups were relieved by approximately 70%. The above treatment is a useful option for managing abdominal adhesion and accompanying pain or hiccups resulting from abdominal surgery. This method could ease the psychological and economic burden of patients and improve their quality of life.

  6. Mondor's disease of the breast as a complication of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy: management and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Salemis, Nikolaos S; Vasilara, Georgia; Lagoudianakis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Mondor's disease is a rare benign and self-limiting condition characterized by thrombophlebitis of the superficial veins of the anterolateral thoracoabdominal wall. We describe a case of Mondor's disease of the breast as a complication of an ultrasound-guided core needle biospy. The patient presented with a palpable cord-like structure in her left breast, associated with severe pain and tenderness. She was treated concervatively and complete resolution was observed after four weeks. We conclude that emergency clinicians and interventional breast radiologists should be aware of Mondor's disease as a potential complication of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of the breast.

  7. Ultrasound-guided breast-sparing surgery to improve cosmetic outcomes and quality of life. A prospective multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial comparing ultrasound-guided surgery to traditional palpation-guided surgery (COBALT trial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer was developed as a method to preserve healthy breast tissue, thereby improving cosmetic outcomes. Thus far, the primary aim of breast-conserving surgery has been the achievement of tumour-free resection margins and prevention of local recurrence, whereas the cosmetic outcome has been considered less important. Large studies have reported poor cosmetic outcomes in 20-40% of patients after breast-conserving surgery, with the volume of the resected breast tissue being the major determinant. There is clear evidence for the efficacy of ultrasonography in the resection of nonpalpable tumours. Surgical resection of palpable breast cancer is performed with guidance by intra-operative palpation. These palpation-guided excisions often result in an unnecessarily wide resection of adjacent healthy breast tissue, while the rate of tumour-involved resection margins is still high. It is hypothesised that the use of intra-operative ultrasonography in the excision of palpable breast cancer will improve the ability to spare healthy breast tissue while maintaining or even improving the oncological margin status. The aim of this study is to compare ultrasound-guided surgery for palpable tumours with the standard palpation-guided surgery in terms of the extent of healthy breast tissue resection, the percentage of tumour-free margins, cosmetic outcomes and quality of life. Methods/design In this prospective multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial, 120 women who have been diagnosed with palpable early-stage (T1-2N0-1) primary invasive breast cancer and deemed suitable for breast-conserving surgery will be randomised between ultrasound-guided surgery and palpation-guided surgery. With this sample size, an expected 20% reduction of resected breast tissue and an 18% difference in tumour-free margins can be detected with a power of 80%. Secondary endpoints include cosmetic outcomes and quality of life. The rationale, study

  8. Defining the reliability of sonoanatomy identification by novices in ultrasound-guided pediatric ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve blockade.

    PubMed

    Ford, Simon; Dosani, Maryam; Robinson, Ashley J; Campbell, G Claire; Ansermino, J Mark; Lim, Joanne; Lauder, Gillian R

    2009-12-01

    The ilioinguinal (II)/iliohypogastric (IH) nerve block is a safe, frequently used block that has been improved in efficacy and safety by the use of ultrasound guidance. We assessed the frequency with which pediatric anesthesiologists with limited experience with ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia could correctly identify anatomical structures within the inguinal region. Our primary outcome was to compare the frequency of correct identification of the transversus abdominis (TA) muscle with the frequency of correct identification of the II/IH nerves. We used 2 ultrasound machines with different capabilities to assess a potential equipment effect on success of structure identification and time taken for structure identification. Seven pediatric anesthesiologists with <6 mo experience with ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia performed a total of 127 scans of the II region in anesthetized children. The muscle planes and the II and IH nerves were identified and labeled. The ultrasound images were reviewed by a blinded expert to mark accuracy of structure identification and time taken for identification. Two ultrasound machines (Sonosite C180plus and Micromaxx, both from Sonosite, Bothell, WA) were used. There was no difference in the frequency of correct identification of the TA muscle compared with the II/IH nerves (chi(2) test, TA versus II, P = 0.45; TA versus IH, P = 0.50). Ultrasound machine selection did show a nonsignificant trend in improving correct II/IH nerve identification (II nerve chi(2) test, P = 0.02; IH nerve chi(2) test, P = 0.04; Bonferroni corrected significance 0.17) but not for the muscle planes (chi(2) test, P = 0.83) or time taken (1-way analysis of variance, P = 0.07). A curve of improving accuracy with number of scans was plotted, with reliability of TA recognition occurring after 14-15 scans and II/IH identification after 18 scans. We have demonstrated that although there is no difference in the overall accuracy of muscle plane versus II

  9. [Application of lower abdominal aorta balloon occlusion technique by ultrasound guiding during caesarean section in patients with pernicious placenta previa].

    PubMed

    Wei, L C; Gong, G Y; Chen, J H; Hou, P Y; Li, Q Y; Zheng, Z Y; Su, Y M; Zheng, Y; Luo, C Z; Zhang, K; Xu, T F; Ye, Y H; Lan, Y J; Wei, X M

    2018-03-27

    Objective: To discuss the feasibility, effect and safety of lower abdominal aorta balloon occlusion technique by ultrasound guiding during caesarean section in patients with pernicious placenta previa. Methods: The clinical data of 40 patients with pernicious placenta previa complicated with placenta accreta from January 2015 to August 2017 in Liuzhou workers hospital were analyzed retrospectively. The study group included 20 cases, which were operated in the way of cesarean section combined lower abdominal aorta balloon occlusion technique by ultrasound guiding, while the control group also included 20 cases, which were operated in the way of the conventional cesarean section without balloon occlusion technique. The bleeding amount, blood transfusion volume, operative total time, hysterectomy and complications of the two groups were compared. Results: The bleeding amount and blood transfusion volume in study group were(850±100)ml and (400±50)ml, which were lower than that of the control group[(2 500±230)ml and (1 500±100)ml], the difference was statistically significant( t =35.624, 16.523, all P <0.05). In addition, the hysterectomy rate in study group was 5%, which was lower than that in the control group(30%), the difference was statistically significant(χ 2 =8.672, P <0.05). And the total time of operation was (2.0±0.5)h in the study group, which was shorter than that in the control group[(3.5±0.4)h]. The difference was statistically significant( t =11.362, P <0.05). No postoperative complications took place in the study group.The blood pressure, heart rate and blood oxygen fluctuated significantly, and the postoperative renal function was significantly reduced in the control group. Conclusions: The lower abdominal aorta balloon occlusion technique by ultrasound guiding during a caesarean section in patients with pernicious placenta previa can effectively control the bleeding during operation, and preserve reproductive function to the utmost degree

  10. Safety of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation for diffuse adenomyosis: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yujie; Hu, Liang; Chen, Wenzhi; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Xi; Chen, Jinyun

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the safety of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for patients with diffuse adenomyosis. This was a retrospective cohort study. The data was collected from 417 symptomatic adenomyosis patients who underwent ultrasound-guided HIFU between January 2012 and December 2015 at 1st Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China. Among them were 260 patients with diffuse adenomyosis (Group D) and 157 patients with focal adenomyosis (Group F). All patients underwent contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) one week before and the day after HIFU treatment. Successful treatment with HIFU was measured by the non-perfused volume ratio (NPVR). Intraprocedural and postprocedural adverse effects and complications were recorded to assess the safety of the procedure. Patients were followed-up for three months post-treatment. Complications were given a grade A through F according to the SIR Standards. All patients successfully completed the procedure, non-perfused regions appeared in 415 (99.5%) patients. The non-perfused volume ratio (NPVR) of Group D was significantly lower than that of Group F (P<0.05). During the procedure, the odds ratio of skin-burning pain was 1.7 (OR=1.617, 95% CI: 1.103-2.532), when comparing Group D with Group F, while the odds ratio of inguinal pain was equal to 2.0 (OR=2.038, 95% CI: 1.161-3.580), when Group F was compared to Group D. 97 patients (23.3%) received nominal therapy due to complications ([Society of interventional radiology, SIR]-B grade), among them, there were 62 cases (23.8%) in Group D and 35 cases (22.3%) in Group F. No significant difference was found between the two groups (P>0.05) and neither of the reported complications of SIR-C-SIR-F occurred within the two groups. Based on our results, ultrasound-guided HIFU is safe for the treatment of diffuse adenomyosis, and controlling the ablation zone is crucial to ensure patients' safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  11. Novel needle guide reduces time to perform ultrasound-guided femoral nerve catheter placement: A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Turan, Alparslan; Babazade, Rovnat; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Esa, Wael Ali Sakr; Maheshwari, Kamal; Farag, Ehab; Zimmerman, Nicole M; Soliman, Loran Mounir; Sessler, Daniel I

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks have become the standard when performing regional nerve blocks in anaesthesia. Infiniti Plus (CIVCO Medical Solutions, Kalona, Iowa, USA) is a needle guide that has been recently developed to help clinicians in performing ultrasound-guided nerve blocks. We tested the hypothesis that femoral nerve catheter placement carried out with the Infiniti Plus needle guide will be quicker to perform than without the Infiniti Plus. Secondary aims were to assess whether the Infiniti Plus needle guide decreased the number of block attempts and also whether it improved needle visibility. A randomised, controlled trial. Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. We enrolled adult patients having elective total knee arthroplasty with a femoral nerve block and femoral nerve catheter. Patients, who were pregnant or those who had preexisting neuropathy involving the surgical limb, coagulopathy, infection at the block site or allergy to local anaesthetics were excluded. Patients were randomised into two groups to receive the ultrasound-guided femoral nerve catheter placement with or without the Infiniti Plus needle guide. The time taken to place the femoral nerve catheter, the number of attempts, the success rate and needle visibility were recorded. We used an overall α of 0.05 for both the primary and secondary analyses; the secondary analyses were Bonferroni corrected to control for multiple comparisons. The median (interquartile range Q1 to Q3) time to perform the femoral nerve catheter placement was 118 (100 to 150) s with Infiniti Plus and 177 (130 to 236) s without Infiniti Plus. Infiniti Plus significantly reduced the time spent performing femoral nerve catheterisation, with estimated ratio of means [(95% confidence interval), P value] of 0.67 [(0.60 to 0.75), P < 0.001] with Infiniti Plus compared with no Infiniti Plus. However, Infiniti Plus had no effect on the odds of a successful femoral nerve catheter placement, number of attempts or

  12. Minimal invasive complete excision of benign breast tumors using a three-dimensional ultrasound-guided mammotome vacuum device.

    PubMed

    Baez, E; Huber, A; Vetter, M; Hackelöer, B-J

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonography in the complete excision of benign breast tumors using ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted core-needle biopsy (Mammotome). A protocol for the management of benign breast tumors is proposed. Twenty consecutive patients with sonographically benign breast lesions underwent 3D ultrasound-guided mammotome biopsy under local anesthesia. The indication for surgical biopsy was a solid lesion with benign characteristics on both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D ultrasound imaging, increasing in size over time or causing pain or irritation. Preoperatively, the size of the lesion was assessed using 2D and 3D volumetry. During vacuum biopsy the needle was visualized sonographically in all three dimensions, including the coronal plane. Excisional biopsy was considered complete when no residual tumor tissue could be seen sonographically. Ultrasonographic follow-up examinations were performed on the following day and 3-6 months later to assess residual tissue and scarring. All lesions were histologically benign. Follow-up examinations revealed complete excision of all lesions of < 1.5 mL in volume as assessed by 3D volumetry. 3D ultrasonographic volume assessment was more accurate than 2D using the ellipsoid formula or assessment of the maximum diameter for the prediction of complete excision of the tumor. No bleeding or infections occurred postoperatively and no scarring was seen ultrasonographically on follow-up examinations. Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy allows complete excision of benign breast lesions that are

  13. Ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion blocks combined with pharmacological and occupational therapy in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS): a pilot case series ad interim.

    PubMed

    Wei, Karin; Feldmann, Robert E; Brascher, Anne-Kathrin; Benrath, Justus

    2014-12-01

    This preliminary and retrospective pilot case series examines a treatment concept consisting of ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion blocks (SGBs) combined with pharmacological and occupational therapy in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) of the hand. Efficacy of combined treatment concepts and safety of ultrasound-guided SGB have not been sufficiently investigated yet. A total number of 156 blocks were evaluated in 16 patients with CRPS in a retrospective analysis. All patients received pharmacotherapy and a standard regimen of occupational therapy offered simultaneously to the SGBs. Changes in both spontaneous and evoked pain levels were assessed by numerical pain rating score before and after the last blockade of a series. Side effects were documented. The overall mean pain reduction was 63.2% regarding spontaneous and 45.3% regarding evoked pain. Mild complications, such as hoarseness or dysphagia, occurred in 13.5% of the blocks (21 SGBs). Serious complications, such as plexus paresis or accidental puncture of vessels or other structures, did not occur. Time between symptom onset and start of treatment did not affect the extent of pain reduction. The combination of ultrasound-guided SGB and simultaneous pharmacological and occupational therapy showed encouraging treatment results under conditions of this pilot case series. Assessment of efficacy of this combined treatment concept and safety of ultrasound-guided SGB require further prospective clinical studies with larger number of participants. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Right atrial and right ventricular ultrasound-guided biopsy technique in standing horses.

    PubMed

    Decloedt, A; de Clercq, D; Ven, S; van der Vekens, N; Chiers, K; van Loon, G

    2016-05-01

    Endomyocardial biopsies could be a valuable tool in equine cardiology for diagnosing myocardial disease, which is probably underdiagnosed in horses because of lack of specific diagnostic measures and limitations of currently available diagnostic methods. To describe a technique for serial right atrial and right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy in standing horses using a percutaneous approach through the jugular vein. Prospective study. Biopsy was performed in 10 healthy standing horses sedated with detomidine, under continuous electrocardiography monitoring. A 10 cm (n = 6), 45 cm (n = 1) or 98 cm (n = 3) introducer sheath was inserted into the right jugular vein. Under echocardiographic guidance, a biopsy forceps was introduced through the sheath into the right ventricle and right atrium and endomyocardial biopsies were acquired. In all horses, 3 right ventricular biopsies were obtained from the right ventricular apex and 3 right atrial biopsies were obtained from the dorsal right atrial wall near the tuberculum intervenosum. The presence of myocardial tissue was confirmed by histology. All horses showed atrial and ventricular premature depolarisations associated with acquisition of the biopsies. In 9 horses, the arrhythmia disappeared after retraction of the forceps and introducer sheath. In one horse, ventricular premature depolarisations disappeared only after 8 h. No other complications were observed. Endomyocardial biopsy of the right atrium and right ventricle could be performed in standing horses using a percutaneous approach through the jugular vein and was not associated with complications other than temporary arrhythmias. This technique may be useful for research purposes or as a diagnostic tool, although further research is needed to establish the safety of the technique in clinical patients with myocardial disease. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  15. Cell-block procedure in endoscopic ultrasound-guided-fine-needle-aspiration of gastrointestinal solid neoplastic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ieni, Antonio; Barresi, Valeria; Todaro, Paolo; Caruso, Rosario Alberto; Tuccari, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In the present review we have analyzed the clinical applications of endoscopic ultrasound-guided-fine-needle-aspiration (EUS-FNA) and the methodological aspects obtained by cell-block procedure (CBP) in the diagnostic approach to the gastrointestinal neoplastic pathology. CBP showed numerous advantages in comparison to the cytologic routine smears; in particular, better preservation of cell architecture, achievement of routine haematoxylin-eosin staining equivalent to histological slides and possibility to perform immunohistochemistry or molecular analyses represented the most evident reasons to choose this method. Moreover, by this approach, the differential diagnosis of solid gastrointestinal neoplasias may be more easily achieved and the background of contaminant non-neoplastic gastrointestinal avoided. Finally, biological samples collected by EUS-FNA CBP-assisted should be investigated in order to identify and quantify further potential molecular markers. PMID:26322154

  16. Long-axis view for ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement via the internal jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Angel F; McEvoy, Matthew D; Gravenstein, Nikolaus

    2016-04-01

    In modern practice, real-time ultrasound guidance is commonly employed for the placement of internal jugular vein catheters. With a new tool, such as ultrasound, comes the opportunity to refine and further optimize the ultrasound view during jugular vein catheterization. We describe jugular vein access techniques and use the long-axis view as an alternative to the commonly employed short-axis cross-section view for internal jugular vein access and cannulation. The long-axis ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein approach for internal jugular vein cannulation is a useful alternative technique that can provide better needle tip and guidewire visualization than the more traditional short-axis ultrasound view.

  17. Pilot study of intraoperative ultrasound-guided instrument placement in nerve transection surgery for peripheral nerve pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Henning, P Troy; Wilson, Thomas J; Willsey, Matthew; John, Jessin K; Popadich, Miriana; Yang, Lynda J S

    2017-03-01

    Surgical transection of sensory nerves in the treatment of intractable neuropathic pain is a commonly performed procedure. At times these cases can be particularly challenging when encountering obese patients, when targeting deeper nerves or those with a variable branching pattern, or in the case of repeat operations. In this case series, the authors describe their experience with ultrasound-guided surgical instrument placement during transection of a saphenous nerve in the region of prior vascular surgery in 1 patient and in the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve in 2 obese patients. The authors also describe this novel technique and provide pilot data that suggests ultrasound-assisted surgery may allow for complex cases to be completed in an expedited fashion through smaller incisions.

  18. Subsurface PpIX imaging in vivo with ultrasound-guided tomographic spectroscopy: reconstruction vs. born-normalized data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Brendan P.; D'Souza, Alisha V.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Maytin, Edward; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    Aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX)-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective treatment for skin cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Topically applied ALA promotes PpIX production preferentially in tumors, and many strategies have been developed to increase PpIX distribution and PDT treatment efficacy at depths > 1mm is not fully understood. While surface imaging techniques provide useful diagnosis, dosimetry, and efficacy information for superficial tumors, these methods cannot interrogate deeper tumors to provide in situ insight into spatial PpIX distributions. We have developed an ultrasound-guided, white-light-informed, tomographics spectroscopy system for the spatial measurement of subsurface PpIX. Detailed imaging system specifications, methodology, and optical-phantom-based characterization will be presented separately. Here we evaluate preliminary in vivo results using both full tomographic reconstruction and by plotting individual tomographic source-detector pair data against US images.

  19. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING OUTCOME OF ULTRASOUND-GUIDED RADIOFREQUENCY HEAT ABLATION FOR TREATMENT OF PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM IN DOGS.

    PubMed

    Bucy, Daniel; Pollard, Rachel; Nelson, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) parathyroid ablation is a noninvasive treatment for hyperparathyroidism in dogs. There are no published data assessing factors associated with RF parathyroid ablation success or failure in order to guide patient selection and improve outcome. The purpose of this retrospective analytical study was to determine whether imaging findings, biochemical data, or concurrent diseases were associated with RF heat ablation treatment failure. For inclusion in the study, dogs must have had a clinical diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism, undergone cervical ultrasound and RF ablation of abnormal parathyroid tissue, and must have had at least 3 months of follow-up information available following the date of ultrasound-guided parathyroid ablation. Dogs were grouped based on those with recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia and those without recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia following therapy. Parathyroid nodule size, thyroid lobe size, nodule location, and presence of concurrent disease were recorded. Recurrence of hypercalcemia occurred in 9/32 dogs that had ablation of abnormal parathyroid tissue (28%) and one patient had persistent hypercalcemia (3%) following parathyroid ablation. Nodule width (P = 0.036), height (P = 0.028), and largest cross-sectional area (P = 0.023) were larger in dogs that had recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia following ablation. Hypothyroidism was more common in dogs with recurrent disease (P = 0.044). Radiofrequency ablation was successful in 22/32 (69%) dogs. Larger parathyroid nodule size and/or concurrent hypothyroidism were associated with treatment failure in dogs that underwent ultrasound-guided RF parathyroid nodule ablation. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  20. Two-dimensional mapping of needle visibility with linear and curved array for ultrasound-guided interventional procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanti, Hesty; Suprijanto, Kurniadi, Deddy

    2018-02-01

    Needle visibility in ultrasound-guided technique has been a crucial factor for successful interventional procedure. It has been affected by several factors, i.e. puncture depth, insertion angle, needle size and material, and imaging technology. The influences of those factors made the needle not always well visible. 20 G needles of 15 cm length (Nano Line, facet) were inserted into water bath with variation of insertion angles and depths. Ultrasound measurements are performed with BK-Medical Flex Focus 800 using 12 MHz linear array and 5 MHz curved array in Ultrasound Guided Regional Anesthesia mode. We propose 3 criteria to evaluate needle visibility, i.e. maximum intensity, mean intensity, and the ratio between minimum and maximum intensity. Those criteria were then depicted into representative maps for practical purpose. The best criterion candidate for representing the needle visibility was criterion 1. Generally, the appearance pattern of the needle from this criterion was relatively consistent, i.e. for linear array, it was relatively poor visibility in the middle part of the shaft, while for curved array, it is relatively better visible toward the end of the shaft. With further investigations, for example with the use of tissue-mimicking phantom, the representative maps can be built for future practical purpose, i.e. as a tool for clinicians to ensure better needle placement in clinical application. It will help them to avoid the "dead" area where the needle is not well visible, so it can reduce the risks of vital structures traversing and the number of required insertion, resulting in less patient morbidity. Those simple criteria and representative maps can be utilized to evaluate general visibility patterns of the needle in vast range of needle types and sizes in different insertion media. This information is also important as an early investigation for future research of needle visibility improvement, i.e. the development of beamforming strategies and

  1. Ultrasound-guided steroid tendon sheath injections in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a 10-year single-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Peters, Shannon E; Laxer, Ronald M; Connolly, Bairbre L; Parra, Dimitri A

    2017-04-11

    The aims of this study were to: (a) Identify tendon sheaths most commonly treated with steroid injections in a pediatric patient population with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA); (b) Describe technical aspects of the procedure; (c) Characterize sonographic appearance of tenosynovitis in JIA; (d) Assess agreement between clinical request and sites injected. This was a 10 year single-center retrospective study (May 2006-April 2016) of patients with JIA referred by Rheumatology for ultrasound-guided tendon sheath injections. Patient demographics, clinical referral information, sonographic appearance of the tendon sheaths and technical aspects of the procedure were analyzed. There were 308 procedures of 244 patients (75% female, mean age 9.6 years) who underwent a total of 926 tendon sheath injections. Ankle tendons were most commonly injected (84.9%), specifically the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior (22.3%), peroneus longus (20%) and brevis (19.7%). The majority of treated sites (91.9%) showed peritendinous fluid and sheath thickening on ultrasound. There were 2 minor intra-procedure complications without sequelae. A good agreement between clinical request and sites injected was observed. Ultrasound-guided tendon sheath injections with steroids are used frequently to treat patients with JIA. It is a safe intervention with a high technical success rate. The ankle region, specifically the medial compartment, is the site most commonly injected in this group of patients. The most common sonographic finding is peritendinous fluid and sheath thickening. These findings might assist clinicians and radiologists to characterize and more effectively manage tenosynovitis in patients with JIA.

  2. Ultrasound-guided bilateral greater occipital nerve block for the treatment of post-dural puncture headache

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Fethi; Binici, Orhan; Kuyrukluyildiz, Ufuk; Karabakan, Guldane

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) is one of the complications frequently observed after spinal or epidural anesthesia with dural penetration. For PDPH patients who do not respond to conservative medical treatment, alternative treatments such as bilateral occipital nerve block should be considered.In this study the efficacy of bilateral occipital nerve block was retrospectively evaluated in patients with post-dural puncture headache. Methods: Ultrasound-guided bilateral occipital nerve block was administrated in 21 patients who developed PDPH after spinal anesthesia, but did not respond to conservative medical treatment within 48 hours between January 2012 and February 2014. The study was conducted at Erzincan University Faculty of Medicine Gazi Mengucek Education and Research Hospital Results: Mean Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain scores at 10 minutes and 6, 10, 15 and 24 hours after the block were significantly improved compared to the patients with a pre-block VAS score between 4 and 6 as well as patients with a pre-block VAS score between 7 and 9 (p<0.01). After 24 hours of the block applied, VAS pain score dropped to 1 for all 12 patients who had a pre-block VAS score between 4 and 6. Whereas, VAS score decreased to 2 at 24 hours after the block in only one of the patients with a pre-block VAS between 7 and 9. For the patients with a pre-block VAS score between 7 and 9, there was no significant improvement in the mean VAS score 24 hours after the block. Conclusions: For patients with PDPH and a pre-block VAS score between 4 and 6 who do not respond to conservative medical treatment, an ultrasound-guided bilateral occipital nerve block may be effective. PMID:25878625

  3. Mechanical Metatarsalgia as a Risk Factor for Relapse of Morton's Neuroma After Ultrasound-Guided Alcohol Injection.

    PubMed

    Lorenzon, Paolo; Rettore, Carlo

    2018-05-17

    Although many treatment modalities are available for Morton's neuroma, the injection of the neuroma with alcohol has gained popularity. However, recently, some investigators have observed a progressive deterioration in pain scores for patients initially pain free after the treatment. The purpose of the present retrospective comparative study was to determine whether mechanical metatarsalgia is related to symptom recurrence. We included 104 consecutive cases of ultrasound-guided alcohol injection for Morton's neuroma in 92 patients. Of these 104 cases, 51 were in group A (49%; Morton's neuroma) and 53 in group B (51%; Morton's neuroma associated with mechanical metatarsalgia). We evaluated each patient using a visual analog scale and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society forefoot scale, and Johnson satisfaction scale, with a mean follow-up period of 24 (range 12 to 39) months. Concomitant functional and mechanical disorders have been identified and treated with orthopedic inserts. The present study compared the clinical results and recurrence of symptoms in patients with isolated Morton's disease or Morton's disease associated with mechanical metatarsalgia. Of the 104 cases, the patients for 93 cases (89%) were completely satisfied or satisfied with minor reservations. No major complications developed. Symptoms recurred in 6 patients (6%), in whom neuroma was associated with mechanical disorders (p = .0269). Ultrasound-guided alcohol injection of Morton's neuroma is a relatively safe and well-tolerated treatment. Symptom recurrence is often associated with mechanical metatarsalgia. The treatment of the concomitant anatomical and functional disorders that target the genesis of the neuroma has an important role in the prevention of recurrence of this pathology. Copyright © 2018 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Port-Site Metastases and Chimney Effect of B-Ultrasound-Guided and Laparoscopically-Assisted Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Perfusion Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang-Liang; Gong, Yuan-Feng; Yan, Zhao-Fei; Wang, Shuai; Tang, Yun-Qiang; Cui, Shu-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose CO2 leakage along the trocar (chimney effect) has been proposed to be an important factor underlying port-site metastasis after laparoscopic surgery. This study aimed to test this hypothesis by comparing the incidence of port-site metastasis between B-ultrasound-guided and laparoscopically-assisted hyperthermic intraperitoneal perfusion chemotherapy (HIPPC). Materials and Methods Sixty-two patients with malignant ascites induced by gastrointestinal or ovarian cancer were divided into two groups to receive either B-ultrasound-guided or laparoscopically-assisted HIPPC. Clinical efficacy was assessed from the objective remission rate (ORR), the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score, and overall survival. The incidence of port-site metastasis was compared between the two groups. Results Patients in the B-ultrasound (n=32) and laparoscopy (n=30) groups were comparable in terms of age, sex, primary disease type, volume of ascites, and free cancer cell (FCC)-positive ascites. After HIPPC, there were no significant differences between the B-ultrasound and laparoscopy groups in the KPS score change, ORR, and median survival time. The incidence of port-site metastasis after HIPPC was not significantly different between the B-ultrasound (3 of 32, 9.36%) and laparoscopy (3 of 30, 10%) groups, but significantly different among pancreatic, gastric, ovarian, and colorectal cancer (33.33, 15.79, 10.00, and 0.00%, p<0.001). Conclusion The chimney effect may not be the key reason for port-site metastasis after laparoscopy. Other factors may play a role, including the local microenvironment at the trocar site and the delivery of viable FCCs (from the tumor or malignant ascites) to the trauma site during laparoscopic surgery. PMID:28332353

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Thrombin Injection Is a Safe and Effective Treatment for Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm in the Morbidly Obese.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Taehwan; Starr, Jean E; Go, Michael R; Vaccaro, Patrick S; Satiani, Bhagwan; Haurani, Mounir J

    2017-08-01

    Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection (UGTI) is a well-established practice for the treatment of femoral artery pseudoaneurysm. This procedure is highly successful but dependent on appropriate pseudoaneurysm anatomy and adequate ultrasound visualization. Morbid obesity can present a significant technical challenge due to increased groin adiposity, resulting in poor visualization of critical structures needed to safely perform the procedure. We aim to evaluate the safety and efficacy of UGTI to treat femoral artery pseudoaneurysm in the morbidly obese. This is a retrospective cohort study in which all patients who underwent UGTI at The Ohio State University Ross Heart Hospital from 2009 to 2014 were analyzed for patient characteristics and stratified by body mass index (BMI). Patients with BMI ≥ 35 were considered morbidly obese and were compared to patients with a BMI < 35. Outcome was failed treatment resulting in residual pseudoaneurysm. Our cohort consisted of 54 patients who underwent thrombin injection. There were 41 nonmorbidly obese and 13 morbidly obese patients. Mean age was 64.5 years. The cohort was 44.4% male. There were 6 failures, of which 1 underwent successful repeat injection and 5 underwent open surgical repair. There was no statistically significant difference in failure between nonmorbidly obese and morbidly obese patients (9.8% vs 15.4%, P = .45). There were no embolic/thrombotic complications. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection is a safe and effective therapy in the morbidly obese for the treatment of femoral artery pseudoaneurysm. In the hands of experienced sonographers and surgeons with adequate visualization of the pseudoaneurysm sac, UGTI should remain a standard therapy in the morbidly obese.

  6. Ultrasound-guided therapeutic injections for neural pathology about the foot and ankle: a 4 year retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Walter, William R; Burke, Christopher J; Adler, Ronald S

    2017-06-01

    To describe a 4-year clinical experience with ultrasound-guided therapeutic perineural injections of peripheral nerves about the foot and ankle. Retrospective analysis of foot and ankle perineural injections performed between January 2012 and August 2016. Demographics, clinical indications, presence of structural pathology, immediate and interval pain relief, as well as complications were recorded. Fifty-nine therapeutic injections were performed among 46 patients, accounting for multiple injections in a single visit or multiple visits [mean age = 43 years (range 18-75), 31 female (67%) and 15 male (33%)]. Most commonly, perineural injections involved the hallux branch of the medial plantar nerve (n = 17, 22%). Least commonly, perineural injections involved the saphenous nerve (n = 3, 4%). Other injections in our series include sural (10), superficial (11) and deep (7) peroneal, medial (5) and lateral (3) plantar nerves, and the posterior tibial nerve (3). Ultrasound evaluation revealed structural abnormality associated with the nerve in 30 cases (51%)-most commonly thickening with perineural scarring (n = 14). Of 45 injections with complete documentation, immediate relief of symptoms was reported in 43 (96%) cases. Interval symptom relief was achieved in 23 injections [short term (n = 12), intermediate (n = 6), and long term (n = 5)] out of 38 for which follow-up was available (61%). Complications are rare, occurring in only one case. Ultrasound-guided perineural injections about the foot and ankle are safe and provide lasting symptomatic relief for many indications. Concomitant sonographic evaluation identifies structural abnormalities that may contribute to neuropathic symptoms, allowing targeting of injection or clinical therapy.

  7. A comparison of longitudinal and transverse approaches to ultrasound-guided axillary vein cannulation by experienced operators.

    PubMed

    He, Yi-Zhou; Zhong, Ming; Wu, Wei; Song, Jie-Qiong; Zhu, Du-Ming

    2017-04-01

    The axillary vein is an easily accessible vessel that can be used for ultrasound-guided central vascular access and offers an alternative to the internal jugular and subclavian veins. The objective of this study was to identify which transducer orientation, longitudinal or transverse, is better for imaging the axillary vein with ultrasound. We analyzed 236 patients who had undergone central venous cannulation of axillary vein in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into two groups, the longitudinal approach group (n=120) and transverse approach group (n=116). Recorded the one-attempt success rate, operation time, arterial puncture rate and pneumothorax rate. We perform chest radiography to confirm pneumothorax on all patients. We compared the one-attempt success rate, operation time, arterial puncture rate and pneumothorax rate between the two groups. The two groups were comparable with clinical characters of patients. The overall success rates of the longitudinal group and the transverse group were both 100%. The rate of one-attempt success in the longitudinal approach group is higher than the transverse approach group (91.7% vs. 82.8%, P=0.040). The transverse approach group had shorter operation time than the longitudinal group (184.7±8.1 vs. 287.5±19.6 seconds, P=0.000). The two groups had lower postoperative complications. Arterial puncture occurred in 1 of 120 longitudinal and 2 of 116 transverse attempts and this difference was no significant (P=0.541). No pneumothorax occurred in the two groups. The longitudinal approach during ultrasound-guided axillary vein cannulation is associated with greater one-attempt success rate compared with the transverse approach by experienced operators. The transverse approach has shorter operation time. The two groups have lower postoperative complications and are comparable with pneumothorax and arterial puncture.

  8. A comparison of longitudinal and transverse approaches to ultrasound-guided axillary vein cannulation by experienced operators

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi-Zhou; Zhong, Ming; Wu, Wei; Song, Jie-Qiong

    2017-01-01

    Background The axillary vein is an easily accessible vessel that can be used for ultrasound-guided central vascular access and offers an alternative to the internal jugular and subclavian veins. The objective of this study was to identify which transducer orientation, longitudinal or transverse, is better for imaging the axillary vein with ultrasound. Methods We analyzed 236 patients who had undergone central venous cannulation of axillary vein in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into two groups, the longitudinal approach group (n=120) and transverse approach group (n=116). Recorded the one-attempt success rate, operation time, arterial puncture rate and pneumothorax rate. We perform chest radiography to confirm pneumothorax on all patients. We compared the one-attempt success rate, operation time, arterial puncture rate and pneumothorax rate between the two groups. Results The two groups were comparable with clinical characters of patients. The overall success rates of the longitudinal group and the transverse group were both 100%. The rate of one-attempt success in the longitudinal approach group is higher than the transverse approach group (91.7% vs. 82.8%, P=0.040). The transverse approach group had shorter operation time than the longitudinal group (184.7±8.1 vs. 287.5±19.6 seconds, P=0.000). The two groups had lower postoperative complications. Arterial puncture occurred in 1 of 120 longitudinal and 2 of 116 transverse attempts and this difference was no significant (P=0.541). No pneumothorax occurred in the two groups. Conclusions The longitudinal approach during ultrasound-guided axillary vein cannulation is associated with greater one-attempt success rate compared with the transverse approach by experienced operators. The transverse approach has shorter operation time. The two groups have lower postoperative complications and are comparable with pneumothorax and arterial puncture. PMID:28523170

  9. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided system for thermal ablation of liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshat, Hamid R. S.; Cool, Derek W.; Barker, Kevin; Gardi, Lori; Kakani, Nirmal; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-03-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasound (2D US) imaging is commonly used for diagnostic and intraoperative guidance of interventional abdominal procedures including percutaneous thermal ablation of focal liver tumors with radiofrequency (RF) or microwave (MW) induced energy. However, in many situations 2D US may not provide enough anatomical detail and guidance information. Therefore, intra-procedural CT or MR imaging are used in many centers for guidance purposes. These modalities are costly and are mainly utilized to confirm tool placement rather than guiding the insertion. Three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) has been introduced to address these issues. In this paper, we present our integrated solution to provide 3D US images using a newly developed mechanical transducer with a large field-ofview and without the need for external tracking devices to combine diagnostic and planning information of different modalities for intraoperative guidance. The system provides tools to segment the target(s), plan the treatment, and detect the ablation applicators during the procedure for guiding purposes. We present experimental results used to ensure that our system generates accurate measurements and our early clinical evaluation results. The results suggest that 3D US used for focal liver ablation can provide a more reliable planning and guidance tool compared to 2D US only, and in many cases offers comparable measurements to other alternatives at significantly lower cost, faster time and with no harmful radiation.

  10. Ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection of the subtalar joint for treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Young, Cody M; Horst, Deanna M; Murakami, James W; Shiels, William E

    2015-07-01

    The subtalar joint is commonly affected in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and is challenging to treat percutaneously. To describe the technique for treating the subtalar joint with US-guided corticosteroid injections in children and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and to evaluate the safety of the treatment. We retrospectively analyzed 122 patients (age 15 months-29 years) with juvenile idiopathic arthritis who were referred by a pediatric rheumatologist for corticosteroid injection therapy for symptoms related to the hindfoot or ankle. In these patients the diseased subtalar joint was targeted for therapy, often in conjunction with adjacent affected joints or tendon sheaths of the ankle. We used a protocol based on age, weight and joint for triamcinolone hexacetonide or triamcinolone acetonide dose prescription. We describe the technique for successful treatment of the subtalar joint. A total of 241 subtalar joint corticosteroid injections were performed under US guidance, including 68 repeat injections for recurrent symptoms in 26 of the 122 children and young adults. The average time interval between repeat injections was 24.8 months (range 2.2-130.7 months, median 14.2 months). Subcutaneous tissue atrophy and skin hypopigmentation were the primary complications observed. These complications occurred in 3.9% of the injections. With appropriate training and practice, the subtalar joint can be reliably and safely targeted with US-guided corticosteroid injection to treat symptoms related to juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  11. Intravascular ultrasound-guided unprotected left main coronary artery stenting in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qiang; Wang, Qingsheng; Liu, Dongtian; Zhang, Shuangyue; Zhang, Yang; Li, Yang

    2015-05-01

    To investigate whether intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) could improve clinical outcomes compared with angiography-guided PCI in the treatment of unprotected left main coronary artery stenosis (ULMCA) in the elderly. This controlled study was carried out between October 2009 and September 2012, in Qinhuangdao First Hospital, Hebei Province, China. One hundred and twenty-three consecutive patients with ULMCA, aged 70 or older, were randomized to an IVUS-guided group and a control group. The occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE): death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or target lesion revascularizations) were recorded after 2 years of follow-up. The IVUS-guided group had a lower rate of 2-year MACE than the control group (13.1% versus 29.3%, p=0.031). The incidence of target lesion revascularization was lower in the IVUS-guided group than in the control group (9.1% versus 24%, p=0.045). However, there were no differences in death and myocardial infarction in the 2 groups. On Cox proportional hazard analysis, distal lesion was the independent predictor of MACE (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.99, confidence interval [CI]: 1.129-2.367; p=0.043); IVUS guidance was independent factor of survival free of MACE (HR: 0.414, CI: 0.129-0.867; p=0.033). The use of IVUS could reduce MACE in elderly patients undergoing ULMCA intervention.

  12. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of Undetermined Abdominal Lesions: A Multidisciplinary Decision-Making Approach.

    PubMed

    Mao, Feng; Dong, Yi; Ji, Zhengbiao; Cao, Jiaying; Wang, Wen-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) guided biopsy of undetermined abdominal lesions in multidisciplinary treatment (MDT) decision-making approach. Methods. Between Jan 2012 and Dec 2015, 60 consecutive patients (male, 37; female, 23; mean age, 51.3 years ± 14.6) who presented with undetermined abdominal lesions were included. CEUS and core needle percutaneous biopsy was performed under real-time CEUS guidance in all lesions. Data were recorded and compared with conventional ultrasound (US) guidance group ( n = 75). All CEUS findings and clinical data were evaluated in MDT. Results. CEUS enabled the delimitation of more (88.3% versus 41.3%) and larger (14.1 ± 10.7 mm versus 32.3 ± 18.5 mm) nonenhanced necrotic areas. More inner (20.0% versus 6.7%) and surrounding (18.3% versus 2.7%) major vessels were visualized and avoided during biopsies. CEUS-guided biopsy increased the diagnostic accuracy from 93.3% to 98.3%, with correct diagnosis in 57 of 60 lesions (95.0%). The therapeutic plan was influenced by CEUS guided biopsies findings in the majority of patients (98.3%). Conclusion. The combination of CEUS guided biopsy and MDT decision-making approach is useful in the diagnostic work-up and therapeutic management.

  13. Correlation of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection of the quadratus femoris with MRI findings of ischiofemoral impingement.

    PubMed

    Backer, Matthew W; Lee, Kenneth S; Blankenbaker, Donna G; Kijowski, Richard; Keene, James S

    2014-09-01

    MRI findings of ischiofemoral impingement (IFI) have been described, but there is little evidence for treatment with ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection of the quadratus femoris muscle as a treatment of IFI syndrome and to correlate the MRI findings with injection outcome. The medical records of 61 consecutively registered subjects who underwent bony pelvis MRI in which either IFI or quadratus femoris edema was described in the radiology report were retrospectively reviewed. Subjects with MRI findings of IFI and clinical confirmation of pain that could be attributed to IFI were included and divided into injection and control groups based on clinical management. Control subjects had MRI findings and clinical symptoms suggestive of IFI but underwent conservative therapy rather than injection. The control patients had adequate follow-up and clinical documentation to determine their response to treatment. Quadratus femoris muscle edema, fat atrophy, and hamstring tendinopathy were graded from none to severe (grades 0-3). The ischiofemoral and quadratus femoris spaces were also measured. Clinical presentation was classified as typical, somewhat typical, or not typical of IFI. Injection effectiveness was determined by reported pain reduction assessed before, immediately after, and 2 weeks after the procedure with a standard 10-cm visual analog scale. Response to treatment was classified as good (reduction in pain level > 2), mild or partial (reduced by 1 or 2), or no improvement. For patients who did not return their 2-week postinjection pain surveys, injection effectiveness was determined by qualitative assessments found in their clinical notes. A Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test was used to compare effectiveness of injection between groups (p < 0.05). The Fisher exact test was used to evaluate for associations between each MRI finding and injection outcome. Of

  14. An automated spring-loaded needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided abdominal paracentesis in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Irisawa, Atsushi; Bhutani, Manoop S; Hikichi, Takuto; Takagi, Tadayuki; Shibukawa, Goro; Sato, Ai; Sato, Masaki; Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Watanabe, Ko; Nakamura, Jun; Annangi, Srinadh; Tasaki, Kazuhiro; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of using an automated spring-loaded needle device for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided abdominal paracentesis (EUS-P) to see if this would make it easier to puncture the mobile and lax gastric wall for EUS-P. METHODS: The EUS database and electronic medical records at Fukushima Medical University Hospital were searched from January 2001 to April 2011. Patients with a history of cancer and who underwent EUS-P using an automated spring-loaded needle device with a 22-gauge puncture needle were included. The needle was passed through the instrument channel and advanced through the gastrointestinal wall under EUS guidance into the echo-free space in the abdominal cavity and ascitic fluid was collected. The confirmed diagnosis of malignant ascites included positive cytology and results from careful clinical observation for at least 6 mo in patients with negative cytology. The technical success rate, cytology results and complications were evaluated. RESULTS: We found 11 patients who underwent EUS-P with an automated spring-loaded needle device. In 4 cases, ascites was revealed only with EUS but not in other imaging modalities. EUS-P was done in 7 other cases because there was minimal ascitic fluid and no safe window for percutaneous abdominal aspiration. Ascitic fluid was obtained in all cases by EUS-P. The average amount aspirated was 14.1 mL (range 0.5-38 mL) and that was sent for cytological exam. The etiology of ascitic fluid was benign in 5 patients and malignant in 6. In all cases, ascitic fluid was obtained with the first needle pass. No procedure-related adverse effects occurred. CONCLUSION: EUS-P with an automated spring-loaded needle device is a feasible and safe method for ascites evaluation. PMID:24567793

  15. Emergency percutaneous treatment in surgical bile duct injury.

    PubMed

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Laganà, Domenico; Dizonno, Massimiliano; Ianniello, Andrea; Cotta, Elisa; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Dionigi, Renzo; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of emergency percutaneous treatment in patients with surgical bile duct injury (SBDI). From May 2004 to May 2007, 11 patients (five men, six women; age range 26-80 years; mean age 58 years) with a critical clinical picture (severe jaundice, bile peritonitis, septic state) due to SBDI secondary to surgical or laparoscopic procedures were treated by percutaneous procedures. We performed four ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainages, four external-internal biliary drainages, one bilioplasty, and two plastic biliary stenting after 2 weeks of external-internal biliary drainage placement. All procedures had 100% technical success with no complications. The clinical emergencies resolved in 3-4 days in 100% of cases. All patients had a benign clinical course, and reoperation was avoided in 100% of cases. Interventional radiological procedures are effective in the emergency management of SBDI since they are minimally invasive and have a high success rate and a low incidence of complications compared to the more complex and dangerous surgical or laparoscopic options.

  16. Treatment of Refractory Idiopathic Supraorbital Neuralgia Using Percutaneous Pulsed Radiofrequency.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fang; Lu, Jingjing; Ji, Nan

    2018-02-26

    No ideal therapeutic method currently exists for refractory idiopathic supraorbital neuralgia patients who do not respond to conservative therapy, including medications and nerve blocks. Pulsed radiofrequency is a neuromodulation technique that does not produce sequelae of nerve damage after treatment. However, the efficacy of percutaneous pulsed radiofrequency for the treatment of refractory idiopathic supraorbital neuralgia is still not clear. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the supraorbital nerve for refractory supraorbital neuralgia patients. We prospectively investigated the long-term effects of ultrasound-guided percutaneous pulsed radiofrequency in the treatment of 22 refractory idiopathic supraorbital neuralgia patients. A reduction in the verbal pain numeric rating scale score of more than 50% was used as the standard of effectiveness. The effectiveness rates at different time points within 2 years were calculated. After a single pulsed radiofrequency treatment, the effectiveness rate at 1 and 3 months was 77%, and the rates at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years were 73%, 64%, and 50%, respectively. Except for a small portion of patients (23%) who experienced mild upper eyelid ecchymosis that gradually disappeared after approximately 2 weeks, no obvious complications were observed. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate that for patients with refractory idiopathic supraorbital neuralgia, percutaneous pulsed radiofrequency may be an effective and safe treatment choice. © 2018 World Institute of Pain.

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Out-of-Plane vs. In-Plane Interscalene Catheters: A Randomized, Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Eric S; Gandhi, Kishor; Baratta, Jaime L; Torjman, Marc; Epstein, Richard H; Chung, Jaeyoon; Vaghari, Benjamin A; Beausang, David; Bojaxhi, Elird; Grady, Bernadette

    2015-12-01

    Continuous interscalene blocks provide excellent analgesia after shoulder surgery. Although the safety of the ultrasound-guided in-plane approach has been touted, technical and patient factors can limit this approach. We developed a caudad-to-cephalad out-of-plane approach and hypothesized that it would decrease pain ratings due to better catheter alignment with the brachial plexus compared to the in-plane technique in a randomized, controlled study. To compare an out-of-plane interscalene catheter technique to the in-plane technique in a randomized clinical trial. Eighty-four patients undergoing open shoulder surgery were randomized to either the in-plane or out-of-plane ultrasound-guided continuous interscalene technique. The primary outcome was VAS pain rating at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes included pain ratings in the recovery room and at 48 hours, morphine consumption, the incidence of catheter dislodgments, procedure time, and block difficulty. Procedural data and all pain ratings were collected by blinded observers. There were no differences in the primary outcome of median VAS pain rating at 24 hours between the out-of-plane and in-plane groups (1.50; IQR, [0 - 4.38] vs. 1.25; IQR, [0 - 3.75]; P = 0.57). There were also no differences, respectively, between out-of-plane and in-plane median PACU pain ratings (1.0; IQR, [0 - 3.5] vs. 0.25; IQR, [0 - 2.5]; P = 0.08) and median 48-hour pain ratings (1.25; IQR, [1.25 - 2.63] vs. 0.50; IQR, [0 - 1.88]; P = 0.30). There were no differences in any other secondary endpoint. Our out-of-plane technique did not provide superior analgesia to the in-plane technique. It did not increase the number of complications. Our technique is an acceptable alternative in situations where the in-plane technique is difficult to perform.

  18. Introducing a Fresh Cadaver Model for Ultrasound-guided Central Venous Access Training in Undergraduate Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ryan; Ho, Hang; Ng, Vivienne; Tran, Melissa; Rappaport, Douglas; Rappaport, William J.A.; Dandorf, Stewart J.; Dunleavy, James; Viscusi, Rebecca; Amini, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Over the past decade, medical students have witnessed a decline in the opportunities to perform technical skills during their clinical years. Ultrasound-guided central venous access (USG-CVA) is a critical procedure commonly performed by emergency medicine, anesthesia, and general surgery residents, often during their first month of residency. However, the acquisition of skills required to safely perform this procedure is often deficient upon graduation from medical school. To ameliorate this lack of technical proficiency, ultrasound simulation models have been introduced into undergraduate medical education to train venous access skills. Criticisms of simulation models are the innate lack of realistic tactile qualities, as well as the lack of anatomical variances when compared to living patients. The purpose of our investigation was to design and evaluate a life-like and reproducible training model for USG-CVA using a fresh cadaver. Methods This was a cross-sectional study at an urban academic medical center. An 18-point procedural knowledge tool and an 18-point procedural skill evaluation tool were administered during a cadaver lab at the beginning and end of the surgical clerkship. During the fresh cadaver lab, procedure naïve third-year medical students were trained on how to perform ultrasound-guided central venous access of the femoral and internal jugular vessels. Preparation of the fresh cadaver model involved placement of a thin-walled latex tubing in the anatomic location of the femoral and internal jugular vein respectively. Results Fifty-six third-year medical students participated in this study during their surgical clerkship. The fresh cadaver model provided high quality and lifelike ultrasound images despite numerous cannulation attempts. Technical skill scores improved from an average score of 3 to 12 (p<0.001) and procedural knowledge scores improved from an average score of 4 to 8 (p<0.001). Conclusion The use of this novel cadaver

  19. Introducing a Fresh Cadaver Model for Ultrasound-guided Central Venous Access Training in Undergraduate Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ryan; Ho, Hang; Ng, Vivienne; Tran, Melissa; Rappaport, Douglas; Rappaport, William J A; Dandorf, Stewart J; Dunleavy, James; Viscusi, Rebecca; Amini, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Over the past decade, medical students have witnessed a decline in the opportunities to perform technical skills during their clinical years. Ultrasound-guided central venous access (USG-CVA) is a critical procedure commonly performed by emergency medicine, anesthesia, and general surgery residents, often during their first month of residency. However, the acquisition of skills required to safely perform this procedure is often deficient upon graduation from medical school. To ameliorate this lack of technical proficiency, ultrasound simulation models have been introduced into undergraduate medical education to train venous access skills. Criticisms of simulation models are the innate lack of realistic tactile qualities, as well as the lack of anatomical variances when compared to living patients. The purpose of our investigation was to design and evaluate a life-like and reproducible training model for USG-CVA using a fresh cadaver. This was a cross-sectional study at an urban academic medical center. An 18-point procedural knowledge tool and an 18-point procedural skill evaluation tool were administered during a cadaver lab at the beginning and end of the surgical clerkship. During the fresh cadaver lab, procedure naïve third-year medical students were trained on how to perform ultrasound-guided central venous access of the femoral and internal jugular vessels. Preparation of the fresh cadaver model involved placement of a thin-walled latex tubing in the anatomic location of the femoral and internal jugular vein respectively. Fifty-six third-year medical students participated in this study during their surgical clerkship. The fresh cadaver model provided high quality and lifelike ultrasound images despite numerous cannulation attempts. Technical skill scores improved from an average score of 3 to 12 (p<0.001) and procedural knowledge scores improved from an average score of 4 to 8 (p<0.001). The use of this novel cadaver model prevented extravasation of fluid

  20. Randomized controlled study of the safety and efficacy of nitrous oxide-sedated endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for digestive tract diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cai-Xia; Wang, Jian; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Jia-Ni; Yu, Xin; Yang, Feng; Sun, Si-Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy and safety of nitrous oxide-sedated endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration. METHODS Enrolled patients were divided randomly into an experimental group (inhalation of nitrous oxide) and a control group (inhalation of pure oxygen) and heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, blood pressure, electrocardiogram (ECG) changes, and the occurrence of complications were monitored and recorded. All patients and physicians completed satisfaction questionnaires about the examination and scored the process using a visual analog scale. RESULTS There was no significant difference in heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, blood pressure, ECG changes, or complication rate between the two groups of patients (P > 0.05). However, patient and physician satisfaction were both significantly higher in the nitrous oxide compared with the control group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Nitrous oxide-sedation is a safe and effective option for patients undergoing endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration. PMID:28028373

  1. Randomized controlled study of the safety and efficacy of nitrous oxide-sedated endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for digestive tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cai-Xia; Wang, Jian; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Jia-Ni; Yu, Xin; Yang, Feng; Sun, Si-Yu

    2016-12-14

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of nitrous oxide-sedated endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration. Enrolled patients were divided randomly into an experimental group (inhalation of nitrous oxide) and a control group (inhalation of pure oxygen) and heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, blood pressure, electrocardiogram (ECG) changes, and the occurrence of complications were monitored and recorded. All patients and physicians completed satisfaction questionnaires about the examination and scored the process using a visual analog scale. There was no significant difference in heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, blood pressure, ECG changes, or complication rate between the two groups of patients ( P > 0.05). However, patient and physician satisfaction were both significantly higher in the nitrous oxide compared with the control group ( P < 0.05). Nitrous oxide-sedation is a safe and effective option for patients undergoing endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration.

  2. Percutaneous connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picha, G. J.; Taylor, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    A surface possessing a regular array of micro-pillars was evaluated with regard to its ability to control epithelial downgrowth at the percutaneous interface. A range of pillar sizes were applied to the vertical segment of T shaped Biomer (R) implants. These percutaneous tabs were implanted into the dorsum of cats for a period of 6 weeks using a standardized surgical technique. Comments were made post-operatively and at the time of retrieval. A quantitative scoring system was applied to these observations as well as histological results. As observed, the pillar morphology used displayed the ability to control epithelial downgrowth. Collagen ingrowth into the interpillar spaces and possibly direct interactions of the epithelial cells with the morphology may account for the inhibition. The reproducibility of epithelial inhibition is, however, limited by other factors which are currently not well understood. These factors and potential methods of assessment are discussed.

  3. Percutaneous absorption

    PubMed Central

    Brisson, Paul

    1974-01-01

    Clinical effectiveness of topically applied medications depends on the ability of the active ingredient to leave its vehicle and penetrate into the epidermis. The stratum corneum is that layer of the epidermis which functionally is the most important in limiting percutaneous absorption, showing the characteristics of a composite semipermeable membrane. A mathematical expression of transepidermal diffusion may be derived from Fick's Law of mass transport; factors altering the rate of diffusion are discussed. PMID:4597976

  4. Pain related to robotic cholecystectomy with lower abdominal ports: effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique of rectus sheath block in female patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Soo; Choi, Jong Bum; Lee, Sook Young; Kim, Wook Hwan; Baek, Nam Hyun; Kim, Jayoun; Park, Chu Kyung; Lee, Yeon Ju; Park, Sung Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Robotic cholecystectomy (RC) using port sites in the lower abdominal area (T12-L1) rather than the upper abdomen has recently been introduced as an alternative procedure for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Therefore, we investigated the time course of different components of pain and the analgesic effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique for rectus sheath block (sRSB) after RC in female patients. Methods: We randomly assigned 40 patients to undergo ultrasound-guided sRSB (RSB group, n = 20) or to not undergo any block (control group, n = 20). Pain was subdivided into 3 components: superficial wound pain, deep abdominal pain, and referred shoulder pain, which were evaluated with a numeric rating scale (from 0 to 10) at baseline (time of awakening) and at 1, 6, 9, and 24 hours postoperatively. Consumption of fentanyl and general satisfaction were also evaluated 1 hour (before discharge from the postanesthesia care unit) and 24 hours postoperatively (end of study). Results: Superficial wound pain was predominant only at awakening, and after postoperative 1 hour in the control group. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB significantly decreased superficial pain after RC (P < 0.01) and resulted in a better satisfaction score (P < 0.05) 1 hour after RC in the RSB group compared with the control group. The cumulative postoperative consumption of fentanyl at 6, 9, and 24 hours was not significantly different between groups. Conclusions: After RC with lower abdominal ports, superficial wound pain predominates over deep intra-abdominal pain and shoulder pain only at the time of awakening. Afterwards, superficial and deep pain decreased to insignificant levels in 6 hours. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB was effective only during the first hour. This limited benefit should be balanced against the time and risks entailed in performing RSB. PMID:27495072

  5. Regeneration of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tendon Tear After Ultrasound-Guided Injection With Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Lee, Sang Chul

    2015-11-01

    Rotator cuff tendon tear is one of the most common causes of chronic shoulder pain and disability. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of ultrasound-guided human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) injection to regenerate a full-thickness subscapularis tendon tear in a rabbit model by evaluating the gross morphology and histology of the injected tendon and motion analysis of the rabbit's activity. At 4 weeks after ultrasound-guided UCB-derived MSC injection, 7 of the 10 full-thickness subscapularis tendon tears were only partial-thickness tears, and 3 remained full-thickness tendon tears. The tendon tear size and walking capacity at 4 weeks after UCB-derived MSC injection under ultrasound guidance were significantly improved compared with the same parameters immediately after tendon tear. UCB-derived MSC injection under ultrasound guidance without surgical repair or bioscaffold resulted in the partial healing of full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tears in a rabbit model. Histology revealed that UCB-derived MSCs induced regeneration of rotator cuff tendon tear and that the regenerated tissue was predominantly composed of type I collagens. In this study, ultrasound-guided injection of human UCB-derived MSCs contributed to regeneration of the full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tear without surgical repair. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of local injection of MSCs into the rotator cuff tendon. The results of this study suggest that ultrasound-guided umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cell injection may be a useful conservative treatment for full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tear repair. ©AlphaMed Press.

  6. Regeneration of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tendon Tear After Ultrasound-Guided Injection With Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gi-Young; Lee, Sang Chul

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tendon tear is one of the most common causes of chronic shoulder pain and disability. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of ultrasound-guided human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) injection to regenerate a full-thickness subscapularis tendon tear in a rabbit model by evaluating the gross morphology and histology of the injected tendon and motion analysis of the rabbit’s activity. At 4 weeks after ultrasound-guided UCB-derived MSC injection, 7 of the 10 full-thickness subscapularis tendon tears were only partial-thickness tears, and 3 remained full-thickness tendon tears. The tendon tear size and walking capacity at 4 weeks after UCB-derived MSC injection under ultrasound guidance were significantly improved compared with the same parameters immediately after tendon tear. UCB-derived MSC injection under ultrasound guidance without surgical repair or bioscaffold resulted in the partial healing of full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tears in a rabbit model. Histology revealed that UCB-derived MSCs induced regeneration of rotator cuff tendon tear and that the regenerated tissue was predominantly composed of type I collagens. In this study, ultrasound-guided injection of human UCB-derived MSCs contributed to regeneration of the full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tear without surgical repair. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of local injection of MSCs into the rotator cuff tendon. Significance The results of this study suggest that ultrasound-guided umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cell injection may be a useful conservative treatment for full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tear repair. PMID:26371340

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Core-Needle Versus Vacuum-Assisted Breast Biopsy: A Cost Analysis Based on the American Society of Breast Surgeons' Mastery of Breast Surgery Registry.

    PubMed

    Grady, Ian; Vasquez, Tony; Tawfik, Sara; Grady, Sean

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the cost-efficacy of vacuum-assisted ultrasound-guided breast biopsy instruments compared to ultrasound-guided 14-gauge spring-loaded core-needle biopsy. The American Society of Breast Surgeons' Mastery of Breast Surgery Registry was reviewed. Biopsy findings, any rebiopsy, and the instrument used were abstracted for 31,451 ultrasound-guided biopsy procedures performed between 2001 and July 2014. Rates of cancer diagnosis and rebiopsy were calculated for each instrument. A linear mathematical model was developed to calculate total cost per cancer diagnosis, including procedural costs and the costs of any additional surgical rebiopsy procedures. Mean cost per cancer diagnosis with confidence limits was then determined for 14-gauge spring-loaded core-needle biopsy and 14 different vacuum-assisted instruments. For 14-gauge spring-loaded core-needle biopsy, mean cost per cancer diagnosis was $4346 (4327-$4366). For the vacuum-assisted instruments, mean cost per cancer diagnosis ranged from a low of $3742 ($3732-$3752) to a high of $4779 ($4750-$4809). Vacuum-assisted instruments overall were more cost-effective than core with a mean cost per cancer diagnosis of $4052 ($4038-$4067) (p < 0.05). Tethered vacuum-assisted instruments performed best with a mean cost per cancer diagnosis of $3978 ($3964-$3991) (p < 0.05). Nontethered devices had a mean cost per cancer diagnosis of $4369 ($4350-$4388), a result no better than core (p < 0.05). Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy had a lower mean cost per cancer diagnosis than 14-gauge spring-loaded core-needle biopsy. This advantage was only seen in tethered vacuum-assisted instruments. Within device families, larger instruments tended to outperform smaller instruments.

  8. Prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant rectal flora in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy: A prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ho Seok; Hwang, Eu Chang; Yu, Ho Song; Jung, Seung Il; Lee, Sun Ju; Lim, Dong Hoon; Cho, Won Jin; Choe, Hyun Sop; Lee, Seung-Ju; Park, Sung Woon

    2018-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant rectal flora in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy and to identify the high-risk groups. From January 2015 to March 2016, rectal swabs of 557 men who underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy were obtained from five institutions. Clinical variables, including demographics, rectal swab culture results and infectious complications, were evaluated. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to identify the risk factors for fluoroquinolone resistance of rectal flora and infectious complications. The incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production was 48.1 and 11.8%, respectively. The most common fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria was Escherichia coli (81% of total fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria, 39% of total rectal flora), and 16 (2.9%) patients had infectious complications. Univariable and multivariable analysis of clinical parameters affecting fluoroquinolone resistance showed no factor associated with fluoroquinolone resistance of rectal flora. The clinical parameter related to infectious complications after prostate biopsy was a history of operation within 6 months (relative risk 6.60; 95% confidence interval 1.99-21.8, P = 0.002). These findings suggest that a risk-based approach by history taking cannot predict antibiotic resistance of rectal flora, and physicians should consider targeted antibiotic prophylaxis or extended antibiotic prophylaxis for Korean patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy because of high antibiotic resistance of rectal flora. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  9. Stiffness at shear-wave elastography and patient presentation predicts upgrade at surgery following an ultrasound-guided core biopsy diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Evans, A; Purdie, C A; Jordan, L; Macaskill, E J; Flynn, J; Vinnicombe, S

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to establish predictors of invasion in lesions yielding an ultrasound-guided biopsy diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Patients subjected to ultrasound-guided core biopsy yielding DCIS were studied. At shear-wave elastography (SWE) a threshold of 50 kPa was used for mean elasticity (Emean) to dichotomise the elasticity data between invasive and non-invasive masses. Data recorded included the mammographic and ultrasound features, the referral source, and grade of DCIS in the biopsy. The chi-square test was used to detect statistical significance. Of 57 lesions, 24 (42%) had invasion at excision. Symptomatic patients and patients with stiff lesions were more likely to have invasion than patients presenting through screening and with soft lesions (58% [14 of 24] versus 30% [10 of 33], p=0.03) and (51% [20 of 39] versus 22% [4 of 18], p=0.04). No other factors showed a relationship with invasion. Combining the two predictors of invasion improved risk stratification with symptomatic and stiff lesions having a risk of invasion of 67% (12 of 18) and soft lesions presenting at screening having only a 17% (2 of 12) risk of invasion (p=0.02). Stiffness on SWE and the referral source of the patient are predictors of occult invasion in women with an ultrasound-guided core biopsy diagnosis of DCIS. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Randomized Double-Blinded Trial on the Effects of Ultrasound Transducer Orientation on Teaching and Learning Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nicholas C K; Baker, Elizabeth B; Fishburn, Steven J; Hammer, Angie R; Petersen, Timothy R; Mariano, Edward R

    2016-07-01

    Learning ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia skills, especially needle/ beam alignment, can be especially difficulty for trainees, who can often become frustrated. We hypothesized that teaching novices to orient the transducer and needle perpendicular to their shoulders will improve performance on a standardized task, compared to holding the transducer and needle parallel to the shoulders. This study compared the effects of transducer orientation on trainees' ability to complete a standardized ultrasound-guided nerve block simulation. The time to task completion and percentage of the attempt time without adequate needle visualization were measured. Participants were right-handed healthy adults with no previous ultrasound experience and were randomly assigned to training in either transducer and needle alignment in a coronal plane, parallel to the shoulders (parallel group) or transducer and needle alignment in a sagittal plane, perpendicular to the shoulders (perpendicular group). Participants used ultrasound to direct a needle to 3 targets in a standardized gelatin phantom and repeated this task 3 times. Their efforts were timed and evaluated by an assessor, who was blinded to group assignment. Data were analyzed on 28 participants. The perpendicular group was able to complete the task more quickly (P < .001) and with a smaller proportion of time lost to inadequate needle visualization (P < .001). Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia trainees complete a standardized task more quickly and efficiently when instructed to hold the transducer and needle in an orientation perpendicular to their shoulders.

  11. Laparoscopic-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks in the pediatric population: a novel technique with comparison to ultrasound-guided blocks and local wound infiltration alone.

    PubMed

    Landmann, Alessandra; Visoiu, Mihaela; Malek, Marcus M

    2018-03-01

    Abdominal wall nerve blocks have been gaining popularity for the treatment of perioperative pain in children. Our aim was to compare a technique of surgeon-performed, laparoscopic abdominal wall nerve blocks to anesthesia-placed, ultrasound-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks and the current standard of local wound infiltration. After institutional review board approval was obtained, a retrospective chart review was performed of pediatric patients treated at a single institution during a 2-year period. Statistics were calculated using analysis of variance with post-hoc Bonferonni t tests for pair-wise comparisons. Included in this study were 380 patients who received ultrasound-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks (n = 125), laparoscopic-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks (n = 88), and local wound infiltration (n = 117). Groups were well matched for age, sex, and weight. There was no significant difference in pain scores within the first 8 hours or narcotic usage between groups. Local wound infiltration demonstrated the shortest overall time required to perform (P < .0001). Patients who received a surgeon-performed abdominal wall nerve block demonstrated a shorter duration of hospital stay when compared to the other groups (P = .02). Our study has demonstrated that laparoscopic-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks show similar efficacy to ultrasound-guided nerve blocks performed by pain management physicians without increasing time in the operating room. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Full-length silicone insoles versus ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection in the management of plantar fasciitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Ufuk; Kucuksen, Sami; Cingoz, Havva T; Anliacik, Emel; Ozbek, Orhan; Salli, Ali; Ugurlu, Hatice

    2013-12-01

    Plantar fasciitis often leads to disability. Optimal treatment for this clinical condition is still unknown. To compare the effectiveness of wearing a full-length silicone insole with ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection in the management of plantar fasciitis. Randomized clinical trial. Forty-two patients with chronic unilateral plantar fasciitis were allocated randomly to have an ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection or wear a full-length silicone insole. Data were collected before the procedure and 1 month after. The primary outcome measures included first-step heel pain via Visual Analogue Scale and Heel Tenderness Index. Other outcome measures were the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score and ultrasonographic thickness of the plantar fascia. After 1 month, a significant improvement was shown in Visual Analogue Scale, Heel Tenderness Index, Foot and Ankle Outcome Score, and ultrasonographic thickness of plantar fascia in both groups. Visual Analogue Scale scores, Foot and Ankle Outcome Score pain, Foot and Ankle Outcome Score for activities of daily living, Foot and Ankle Outcome Score for sport and recreation function, and plantar fascia thickness were better in injection group than in insole group (p < 0.05). Although both ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection and wearing a full-length silicone insole were effective in the conservative treatment of plantar fasciitis, we recommend the use of silicone insoles as a first line of treatment for persons with plantar fasciitis.

  13. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Rendezvous Technique after Failed Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography: Which Approach Route Is the Best?

    PubMed Central

    Okuno, Nozomi; Hara, Kazuo; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Hijioka, Susumu; Tajika, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ishihara, Makoto; Hirayama, Yutaka; Onishi, Sachiyo; Niwa, Yasumasa; Yamao, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Objective The endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous technique (EUS-RV) is a salvage method for failed selective biliary cannulation. Three puncture routes have been reported, with many comparisons between the intra-hepatic and extra-hepatic biliary ducts. We used the trans-esophagus (TE) and trans-jejunum (TJ) routes. In the present study, the utility of EUS-RV for biliary access was evaluated, focusing on the approach routes. Methods and Patients In 39 patients, 42 puncture routes were evaluated in detail. EUS-RV was performed between January 2010 and December 2014. The patients were prospectively enrolled, and their clinical data were retrospectively collected. Results The patients' median age was 71 (range 29-84) years. The indications for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) were malignant biliary obstruction in 24 patients and benign biliary disease in 15. The technical success rate was 78.6% (33/42) and was similar among approach routes (p=0.377). The overall complication rate was 16.7% (7/42) and was similar among approach routes (p=0.489). However, mediastinal emphysema occurred in 2 TE route EUS-RV patients. No EUS-RV-related deaths occurred. Conclusion EUS-RV proved reliable after failed ERCP. The selection of the appropriate route based on the patient's condition is crucial. PMID:28943555

  14. Management of Dupuytren contracture with ultrasound-guided lidocaine injection and needle aponeurotomy coupled with osteopathic manipulative treatment.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Steven; Meng, Michael; Schulte, Adam; Trainor, Drew; Montenegro, Roberto; Aufiero, Danielle

    2011-02-01

    Dupuytren contracture is a debilitating disease that characteristically presents as a firm nodularity on the palmar surface of the hand with coalescing cords of soft tissue on the webs and digits. With few nonsurgical modalities providing clinical benefits, open surgical procedures are the standard of care for patients with this condition. However, recent studies have associated surgical intervention with many complications, necessitating further exploration of nonsurgical treatment options. We describe the case of a 64-year-old woman who presented with decreased extension of the fourth and fifth digits on the upper extremities bilaterally; previous conservative treatment regimens had been unsuccessful. After a diagnostic ultrasound, the patient was diagnosed as having Dupuytren contracture and underwent 5 treatments consisting of ultrasound-guided dry-needle aponeurotomy, lidocaine injections, and osteopathic manipulative treatment. During the fifth treatment session, the patient experienced dramatic relief of her symptoms after a palpable release during the manual manipulation portion of her therapeutic regimen. At 2-week follow-up, the patient was symptom-free. Based on this desirable outcome, the authors suggest future research be directed at minimally invasive therapeutic options in the management of Dupuytren contracture.

  15. Rating scale for the assessment of competence in ultrasound-guided peripheral vascular access - a Delphi Consensus Study.

    PubMed

    Primdahl, Stine C; Todsen, Tobias; Clemmesen, Louise; Knudsen, Lars; Weile, Jesper

    2016-09-21

    Peripheral vascular access is vital for treatment and diagnostics of hospitalized patients. Ultrasound-guided vascular access (UGVA) is superior to the landmark technique. To ensure competence-based education, an assessment tool of UGVA competence is needed. We aimed to develop a global rating scale (RS) for assessment of UGVA competence based on opinions on the content from ultrasound experts in a modified Delphi consensus study. We included experts from anesthesiology, emergency medicine and radiology across university hospitals in Denmark. Nine elements were drafted based on existing literature and recommendations from international societies. In a multi-round survey, the experts rated the elements on a five-point Likert scale according to importance, and suggested missing elements. The final Delphi round occurred when >80% of the experts rated all elements ≥4 on the Likert scale. Sixteen experts consented to participate in the study, one withdrew consent prior to the first Delphi round, and 14 completed all three Delphi rounds. In the first Delphi round the experts excluded one element from the scale and changed the content of two elements. In the second Delphi round, the experts excluded one element from the scale. In the third Delphi round, consensus was obtained on the eight elements: preparation of utensils, ergonomics, preparation of the ultrasound device, identification of blood vessels, anatomy, hygiene, coordination of the needle, and completion of the procedure. We developed an RS for assessment of UGVA competence based on opinions of ultrasound experts through a modified Delphi consensus study.

  16. A resected perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) of the pancreas diagnosed using endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Okuwaki, Kosuke; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Masutani, Hironori; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Katagiri, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Tetuo; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Takezawa, Miyoko; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2013-01-01

    Primary perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) of the pancreas are extremely rare. We herein report our experience with a patient who had a primary PEComa of the pancreas that was diagnosed by the preoperative histopathological examination of a biopsy specimen obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). The patient was a 43-year-old woman whose chief complaint was abdominal pain. Imaging studies revealed a pancreatic tumor. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), solid pseudopapillary tumor and neuroendocrine tumor were considered in the differential diagnosis. A histopathological examination of a specimen of the tumor obtained using EUS-FNA showed spindle-shaped tumor cells with enlarged nuclei and eosinophilic cytoplasm. The tumor cells proliferated in a sheet-like fashion and stained positive for the melanoma-associated antigen HMB-45. A PEComa was thus diagnosed. If an adequate tumor specimen can be obtained using EUS-FNA, immunostaining may facilitate the diagnosis of extremely rare diseases and therefore assist in deciding the treatment policy.

  17. Ultrasound-guided Combined Fascial Plane Blocks as an Intervention for Pain Management after Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Randomized Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramkiran, Seshadri; Jacob, Mathews; Honwad, Manish; Vivekanand, Desiraju; Krishnakumar, Mathangi; Patrikar, Seema

    2018-01-01

    Background: Pain associated with laparoscopic cholecystectomy is most severe during the first 24 h and the port sites are the most painful. Recent multimodal approaches target incisional pain instead of visceral pain which has led to the emergence of abdominal fascial plane blocks. This study embraces a novel combination of two independently effective fascial plane blocks, namely rectus sheath block and subcostal transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block to alleviate postoperative pain. Study Objective: The aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of the combination of rectus sheath block and subcostal TAP block, to compare its efficacy with that of subcostal TAP block alone and with conventional port site infiltration (PSI) in alleviating postoperative pain in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methodology: This prospective, randomized control, pilot study included 61 patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy and distributed among three groups, namely Group 1: Combined subcostal TAP block with rectus sheath block (n = 20); Group 2: Oblique subcostal TAP block alone (n = 21); and Group 3: PSI group as an active control (n = 20). Results: Combined group had significantly lower pain scores, higher satisfaction scores, and reduced rescue analgesia both in early and late postoperative periods than the conventional PSI group. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided combined fascial plane blocks is a novel intervention in pain management of patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy and should become the standard of care. PMID:29628547

  18. Surgical vs ultrasound-guided drainage of deep neck space abscesses: a randomized controlled trial: surgical vs ultrasound drainage.

    PubMed

    Biron, Vincent L; Kurien, George; Dziegielewski, Peter; Barber, Brittany; Seikaly, Hadi

    2013-02-26

    Deep neck space abscesses (DNAs) are relatively common otolaryngology-head and neck surgery emergencies and can result in significant morbidity with potential mortality. Traditionally, surgical incision and drainage (I&D) with antibiotics has been the mainstay of treatment. Some reports have suggested that ultrasound-guided drainage (USD) is a less invasive and effective alternative in select cases. To compare I&D vs USD of well-defined DNAs, using a randomized controlled clinical trial design. The primary outcome measure was effectiveness (length of hospital stay (LOHS) and safety), and the secondary outcome measure was overall cost to the healthcare system. Patients presenting to the University of Alberta Emergency Department with a well-defined deep neck space abscess were recruited in the study. Patients were randomized to surgical or US-guided drainage, placed on intravenous antibiotics and admitted with airway precautions. Following drainage with either intervention, abscess collections were cultured and drains were left in place until discharge. Seventeen patients were recruited in the study. We found a significant difference in mean LOHS between patients who underwent USD (3.1 days) vs I&D (5.2 days). We identified significant cost savings associated with USD with a 41% cost reduction in comparison to I&D. USD drainage of deep neck space abscesses in a certain patient population is effective, safe, and results in a significant cost savings to the healthcare system.

  19. Surgical vs ultrasound-guided drainage of deep neck space abscesses: a randomized controlled trial: surgical vs ultrasound drainage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Deep neck space abscesses (DNAs) are relatively common otolaryngology-head and neck surgery emergencies and can result in significant morbidity with potential mortality. Traditionally, surgical incision and drainage (I&D) with antibiotics has been the mainstay of treatment. Some reports have suggested that ultrasound-guided drainage (USD) is a less invasive and effective alternative in select cases. Objectives To compare I&D vs USD of well-defined DNAs, using a randomized controlled clinical trial design. The primary outcome measure was effectiveness (length of hospital stay (LOHS) and safety), and the secondary outcome measure was overall cost to the healthcare system. Methods Patients presenting to the University of Alberta Emergency Department with a well-defined deep neck space abscess were recruited in the study. Patients were randomized to surgical or US-guided drainage, placed on intravenous antibiotics and admitted with airway precautions. Following drainage with either intervention, abscess collections were cultured and drains were left in place until discharge. Results Seventeen patients were recruited in the study. We found a significant difference in mean LOHS between patients who underwent USD (3.1 days) vs I&D (5.2 days). We identified significant cost savings associated with USD with a 41% cost reduction in comparison to I&D. Conclusions USD drainage of deep neck space abscesses in a certain patient population is effective, safe, and results in a significant cost savings to the healthcare system. PMID:23672735

  20. Two-step reconstruction method using global optimization and conjugate gradient for ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Zhu, Quing

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a promising method for characterizing malignant and benign lesions in the female breast. We introduce a new two-step algorithm for DOT inversion in which the optical parameters are estimated with the global optimization method, genetic algorithm. The estimation result is applied as an initial guess to the conjugate gradient (CG) optimization method to obtain the absorption and scattering distributions simultaneously. Simulations and phantom experiments have shown that the maximum absorption and reduced scattering coefficients are reconstructed with less than 10% and 25% errors, respectively. This is in contrast with the CG method alone, which generates about 20% error for the absorption coefficient and does not accurately recover the scattering distribution. A new measure of scattering contrast has been introduced to characterize benign and malignant breast lesions. The results of 16 clinical cases reconstructed with the two-step method demonstrates that, on average, the absorption coefficient and scattering contrast of malignant lesions are about 1.8 and 3.32 times higher than the benign cases, respectively.

  1. Management of cystic or predominantly cystic thyroid nodules: the role of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy.

    PubMed

    Bellantone, Rocco; Lombardi, Celestino Pio; Raffaelli, Marco; Traini, Emanuela; De Crea, Carmela; Rossi, Esther Diana; Fadda, Guido

    2004-01-01

    Conventional fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) for cystic thyroid nodules (CTNs) has a high rate of nondiagnostic and false-negative results. Ultrasound-guided FNAB (UG-FNAB) permits direct sampling of the wall and/or the solid portion of CTNs, increasing the possibility of a representative sample. In this study we evaluated the role of UG-FNAB in CTNs management. Five-hundred-seventy-five UG-FNAB of CTNs were performed. Thyroidectomy was carried out in 119 of these cases. The medical records of these 119 patients were reviewed and form the basis of this report. The nondiagnostic smear rate was 9.2%. Cytological diagnosis was benign nodule in 42 cases, predominantly follicular lesion in 50 cases, and suspicious or malignant lesion in 16 cases. The final pathology revealed a benign nodule in 98 cases (82.4%) and a carcinoma in 21 (17.6%). The overall accuracy of UG-FNAB was 88.0%. No significant differences were found in age, sex, lesion size, or echographic pattern (p = NS) comparing patients with benign CTNs to patients with malignant CTNs. UG-FNAB has a low rate of nondiagnostic smears and a high overall accuracy in CTNs. All CTNs should undergo UG-FNAB to select patients for surgery, since the malignancy rate is not negligible and no clinical parameter can reliably predict it.

  2. Endoscopic Ultrasound Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy in Diagnosis of Pancreatic and Peripancreatic Lesions: A Single Center Experience in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Chang Yun; Song, Tae Jun; Moon, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Don; Park, Do Hyun; Seo, Dong Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Although endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been introduced and its use has been increasing in Korea, there have not been many reports about its performance. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of EUS-FNA without on-site cytopathologist in establishing the diagnosis of solid pancreatic and peripancreatic masses from a single institution in Korea. Methods Medical records of 139 patients who underwent EUS-FNA for pancreatic and peripancreatic solid mass in the year 2007, were retrospectively reviewed. By comparing cytopathologic diagnosis of FNA with final diagnosis, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were determined, and factors influencing the accuracy as well as complications were analyzed. Results One hundred twenty out of 139 cases had final diagnosis of malignancy. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of EUS-FNA were 82%, 89%, and 83%, respectively, and positive and negative predictive values were 100% and 46%, respectively. As for factors influencing the accuracy of FNA, lesion size was marginally significant (p-value 0.08) by multivariate analysis. Conclusions EUS-FNA performed without on-site cytopathologist was found to be accurate and safe, and thus EUS-FNA should be a part of the standard management algorithm for pancreatic and peripancreatic mass. PMID:20431733

  3. Ultrasound-guided greater occipital nerve blocks and pulsed radiofrequency ablation for diagnosis and treatment of occipital neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Vanderhoek, Matthew David; Hoang, Hieu T; Goff, Brandon

    2013-09-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a condition manifested by chronic occipital headaches and is thought to be caused by irritation or trauma to the greater occipital nerve (GON). Treatment for occipital neuralgia includes medications, nerve blocks, and pulsed radiofrequency ablation (PRFA). Landmark-guided GON blocks are the mainstay in both the diagnosis and treatment of occipital neuralgia. Ultrasound is being utilized more and more in the chronic pain clinic to guide needle advancement when performing procedures; however, there are no reports of ultrasound used to guide a diagnostic block or PRFA of the GON. We report two cases in which ultrasound was used to guide diagnostic greater occipital nerve blocks and greater occipital nerve pulsed radiofrequency ablation for treatment of occipital neuralgia. Two patients with occipital headaches are presented. In Case 1, ultrasound was used to guide diagnostic blocks of the greater occipital nerves. In Case 2, ultrasound was utilized to guide placement of radiofrequency probes for pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the greater occipital nerves. Both patients reported immediate, significant pain relief, with continued pain relief for several months. Further study is needed to examine any difference in outcomes or morbidity between the traditional landmark method versus ultrasound-guided blocks and pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the greater occipital nerves.

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Greater Occipital Nerve Blocks and Pulsed Radiofrequency Ablation for Diagnosis and Treatment of Occipital Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    VanderHoek, Matthew David; Hoang, Hieu T; Goff, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a condition manifested by chronic occipital headaches and is thought to be caused by irritation or trauma to the greater occipital nerve (GON). Treatment for occipital neuralgia includes medications, nerve blocks, and pulsed radiofrequency ablation (PRFA). Landmark-guided GON blocks are the mainstay in both the diagnosis and treatment of occipital neuralgia. Ultrasound is being utilized more and more in the chronic pain clinic to guide needle advancement when performing procedures; however, there are no reports of ultrasound used to guide a diagnostic block or PRFA of the GON. We report two cases in which ultrasound was used to guide diagnostic greater occipital nerve blocks and greater occipital nerve pulsed radiofrequency ablation for treatment of occipital neuralgia. Two patients with occipital headaches are presented. In Case 1, ultrasound was used to guide diagnostic blocks of the greater occipital nerves. In Case 2, ultrasound was utilized to guide placement of radiofrequency probes for pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the greater occipital nerves. Both patients reported immediate, significant pain relief, with continued pain relief for several months. Further study is needed to examine any difference in outcomes or morbidity between the traditional landmark method versus ultrasound-guided blocks and pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the greater occipital nerves. PMID:24282778

  5. Comparative analysis of laparoscopic and ultrasound-guided biopsy methods for gene expression analysis in transgenic goats.

    PubMed

    Melo, C H; Sousa, F C; Batista, R I P T; Sanchez, D J D; Souza-Fabjan, J M G; Freitas, V J F; Melo, L M; Teixeira, D I A

    2015-07-31

    The present study aimed to compare laparoscopic (LP) and ultrasound-guided (US) biopsy methods to obtain either liver or splenic tissue samples for ectopic gene expression analysis in transgenic goats. Tissue samples were collected from human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF)-transgenic bucks and submitted to real-time PCR for the endogenous genes (Sp1, Baff, and Gapdh) and the transgene (hG-CSF). Both LP and US biopsy methods were successful in obtaining liver and splenic samples that could be analyzed by PCR (i.e., sufficient sample sizes and RNA yield were obtained). Although the number of attempts made to obtain the tissue samples was similar (P > 0.05), LP procedures took considerably longer than the US method (P = 0.03). Finally, transgene transcripts were not detected in spleen or liver samples. Thus, for the phenotypic characterization of a transgenic goat line, investigation of ectopic gene expression can be made successfully by LP or US biopsy, avoiding the traditional approach of euthanasia.

  6. Deep and superficial infrapatellar bursae: cadaveric investigation of regional anatomy using magnetic resonance after ultrasound-guided bursography.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Flavio C; Aguiar, Rodrigo O C; Gasparetto, Emerson; Marchiori, Edson; Trudell, Debbie J; Haghighi, Parviz; Resnick, Donald

    2007-01-01

    To demonstrate the anatomy of the deep and superficial infrapatellar bursae using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and anatomic correlation in cadavers. MR imaging of the infrapatellar bursae of nine cadaveric knees was performed after ultrasound-guided bursography. The images were compared with those seen on anatomic sectioning. Histologic analysis was obtained in two specimens. The deep infrapatellar bursa (DIB) was visualized in all specimens (n=9) and the superficial infrapatellar bursa (SIB) in five specimens (55%). The mean dimensions of the DIB in the craniocaudal, mediolateral, and anteroposterior planes were respectively 25, 28.7, and 6 mm, and for SIB 19.5, 21.2 and 2.2 mm. A fat apron dividing the DIB was depicted in eight knees (89%). Lateral extension of the DIB beyond the patellar tendon was observed in 100% of cases. Cadaveric analysis depicted a thin septum in the SIB in four of five cases (80%). The DIB is generally present and extends beyond the lateral margin of the patellar tendon. A fat apron partially separating this structure is usual. The SIB is not an unusual finding and may have a septum separating its compartments.

  7. Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominal plane block with multimodal analgesia for pain management after total abdominal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Gasanova, Irina; Grant, Erica; Way, Megan; Rosero, Eric B; Joshi, Girish P

    2013-07-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has been shown to provide pain relief after abdominal procedures. However, TAP block combined with multimodal analgesia technique have not been assessed in a randomized controlled trial. This randomized, controlled, observer-blinded study was designed to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of bilateral ultrasound-guided TAP blocks with or without acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) combination. Patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy were randomized to one of three groups. Group 1 (n = 25) received a TAP block and ketorolac 30 mg, IV at the end of surgery and then ketorolac plus paracetamol 650 mg, orally, every 6 h for 24 h. Group 2 (n = 24) received only TAP block at the end of surgery. Group 3 (n = 25) received ketorolac 30 mg, IV at the end of surgery and then ketorolac plus paracetamol 650 mg, orally, every 6 h for 24 h. All patients received IV-PCA morphine for 24-h, postoperatively. All patients received a standardized general anaesthetic technique and dexamethasone 4 mg and ondansetron 4 mg, IV for antiemetic prophylaxis. There were no statistically significant differences in pain at rest between the groups. However, the pain on coughing (dynamic pain) in Group 1 was significantly less variable, compared with the other two groups (P = 0.012). Opioid consumption and occurrences of nausea, vomiting, and rescue antiemetic were similar in three the groups. The combination of TAP block and acetaminophen and NSAID provided less variability in dynamic pain compared with either treatment alone.

  8. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: performance of biomedical scientists on rapid on-site evaluation and preliminary diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Schacht, M J; Toustrup, C B; Madsen, L B; Martiny, M S; Larsen, B B; Simonsen, J T

    2016-10-01

    Rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) followed by a subsequent preliminary adequacy assessment and a preliminary diagnosis, was performed at Aarhus University Hospital by biomedical scientists (BMS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the BMS accuracy of ROSE adequacy assessment, the preliminary adequacy assessment and the preliminary diagnosis as compared with the cytopathologist-rendered final adequacy assessment and final diagnosis. The BMS-rendered assessments for 717 sites from 319 consecutive patients over a 4-month period were compared with the cytopathologist-rendered assessments. Comparisons of adequacy and preliminary diagnoses were based on inter-observer Cohen's Kappa coefficient with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Strong correlations between ROSE and final adequacy assessments [Kappa coefficient of 0.90 (CI: 0.85-0.96)] and between the preliminary and final adequacy assessments [Kappa coefficient of 0.93 (CI: 0.87-0.99)] were found. As for the correlation between the preliminary and final diagnoses, the Kappa coefficient was 0.99 (CI: 0.98-1). Both ROSE and preliminary adequacy assessments as well as preliminary diagnoses, all performed by BMS, were highly accurate when compared with the final assessment by the cytopathologist. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Reproducibility of Ultrasound-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Thermal Lesions in Minimally-Invasive Brain Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Sulmaz

    This study aims to prove the feasibility of using Ultrasound-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (USg-HIFU) to create thermal lesions in neurosurgical applications, allowing for precise ablation of brain tissue, while simultaneously providing real time imaging. To test the feasibility of the system, an optically transparent HIFU compatible tissue-mimicking phantom model was produced. USg-HIFU was then used for ablation of the phantom, with and without targets. Finally, ex vivo lamb brain tissue was imaged and ablated using the USg-HIFU system. Real-time ultrasound images and videos obtained throughout the ablation process showing clear lesion formation at the focal point of the HIFU transducer. Post-ablation gross and histopathology examinations were conducted to verify thermal and mechanical damage in the ex vivo lamb brain tissue. Finally, thermocouple readings were obtained, and HIFU field computer simulations were conducted to verify findings. Results of the study concluded reproducibility of USg-HIFU thermal lesions for neurosurgical applications.

  10. Photoplethysmographic venous refilling times following ultrasound guided foam sclerotherapy for symptomatic superficial venous reflux: relationship with clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Darvall, K A L; Sam, R C; Bate, G R; Adam, D J; Silverman, S H; Bradbury, A W

    2010-08-01

    Digital photoplethysmography (PPG) provides an inexpensive, reproducible, quantitative, non-invasive assessment of lower limb venous function. To examine the relationship between venous refilling time (VRT) and severity of venous disease, and also between changes in VRT and symptomatic improvement after ultrasound guided foam sclerotherapy (UGFS) for symptomatic superficial venous reflux (SVR). Prior to and 6 months after UGFS, 246 patients (317 limbs) completed a symptom questionnaire, underwent duplex ultrasonography and clinical assessment, and VRT measurement by digital PPG. Health related quality of life (HRQL) questionnaires were also completed. Median VRT improved from 11 to 31 s (P < 0.0005, Wilcoxon Signed Ranks). Abnormal VRT (<20 s) correlated well with the presence of SVR on duplex (sensitivity 75%, specificity 94%). Pre-treatment there was a significant relationship between reducing VRT and increasing CEAP clinical grade (P < 0.0005, chi(2)), extent of SVR on duplex (P < 0.0005) and a non-significant relationship with overall increasing symptom severity (P = 0.097). Relief of all symptoms was more likely when there was normalisation of VRT after treatment (80% vs. 65%, P < 0.0005, chi(2)). Pre-treatment VRT correlated with both generic physical (r = 0.428, P = 0.002) and disease-specific (r = -0.413, P = 0.003, Spearman's rank) HRQL. UGFS for SVR improves VRT measured by digital PPG and that improvement correlates with symptom relief. Copyright (c) 2010 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Rectal Administration of Lignocaine Gel and Periprostatic Lignocaine Infiltration During Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsy Provides Effective Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, EJ; Ali, S; Koneru, S

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Transrectal ultrasound guided prostate needle biopsy (TRUS) is the standard procedure to diagnose or exclude prostate cancer. This procedure can be associated with significant discomfort, both on insertion of the ultrasound probe as well as on taking the biopsy. We evaluated a new technique for pain relief during TRUS biopsy. PATIENTS AND METHODS In Group 1 (n = 60), the biopsies were taken without any analgesia. In Group 2 (n = 60), 11 ml of Instillagel (2% lignocaine) was administered rectally prior to probe insertion and 5 ml of 1% lignocaine periprostatic injection was administered before taking the biopsy. The discomfort encountered during the procedure was graded by the patient on a scale ranging from no discomfort to mild, moderate and severe pain. RESULTS In Group 2, there was a marked reduction in the pain experienced during the procedure. The Chi-squared test for trend showed a significant association between the rectal administration of local anaesthetic gel and reduction in pain on probe insertion (P = 0.0001). There was also a significant association between the use of periprostatic lignocaine injection and reduction in pain on taking the biopsy (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS The use of lignocaine gel prior to probe insertion and periprostatic infiltration of lignocaine before taking the needle biopsy significantly reduces the pain experienced by the patient during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. PMID:16551424

  12. Comparative Effectiveness of Radial Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy and Ultrasound-Guided Local Corticosteroid Injection Treatment for Plantar Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Hocaoglu, Sehriban; Vurdem, Umit Erkan; Cebicci, Mehtap Aykac; Sutbeyaz, Serap Tomruk; Guldeste, Zuhal; Yunsuroglu, Serap Gurek

    2017-05-01

    We compared the long-term clinical and ultrasonographic effects of radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy (rESWT) versus ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection treatment in patients with plantar fasciitis unresponsive to conservative therapy. Seventy-two patients with unilateral plantar fasciitis were randomized to receive either rESWT (three times once per week) (n = 36) or corticosteroid treatment (a single 1-mL dose of betamethasone sodium plus 0.5 mL of prilocaine under ultrasound guidance by injection into the plantar fascia) (n = 36). The primary outcome measures were visual analog scale (VAS) and Foot Function Index (FFI) scores. Secondary outcome measures included the heel tenderness index (HTI) score and plantar fascia thickness (PFT) as obtained by ultrasound examination. All of the assessments were performed at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. Significant improvements were observed in the rESWT group in VAS, HTI, and FFI scores and PFT at the end of treatment and were maintained during follow-up. Posttreatment improvements in VAS, HTI, and FFI scores and PFT were also seen in the corticosteroid group but were not maintained for VAS and FFI scores after the completion of therapy and were lost at 1 and 6 months, respectively. No serious treatment-related complications occurred. Both rESWT and corticosteroid injection therapy are effective modalities for treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis. However, rESWT seems to be superior to corticosteroid injection therapy due to its longer duration of action.

  13. Surgical treatment for mediastinal abscess induced by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yujiro; Nakagomi, Takahiro; Shikata, Daichi; Higuchi, Rumi; Oyama, Toshio; Goto, Taichiro

    2017-07-14

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a useful and less invasive procedure for the definitive diagnosis of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. However, infectious complications can occur after EBUS-TBNA, although they are extremely rare. A 66-year-old man with necrotic and swollen lower paratracheal lymph nodes underwent EBUS-TBNA. A mediastinal abscess developed 9 days post-procedure. Surgical drainage and debridement of the abscess were performed along with lymph node biopsy followed by daily washing of the thoracic cavity. Surgical treatment was effective, leading to remission of the abscess. Biopsy revealed that the tumor was squamous cell carcinoma with no radiologically detected cancer elsewhere in the body. Mediastinal lung cancer was thus confirmed. Subsequent chemoradiotherapy led to the remission of the tumor. Mediastinitis after EBUS-TBNA is rare but should be considered, particularly if the target lymph nodes are necrotic. Mediastinitis can lead to serious and rapid deterioration of the patient's condition, for which surgical intervention is the treatment of choice.

  14. Endogenous Catalytic Generation of O2 Bubbles for In Situ Ultrasound-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianzhi; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Zhigang; Wu, Meiying; Chen, Yu; Ma, Ming; Chen, Hangrong; Shi, Jianlin

    2017-09-26

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) surgery generally suffers from poor precision and low efficiency in clinical application, especially for cancer therapy. Herein, a multiscale hybrid catalytic nanoreactor (catalase@MONs, abbreviated as C@M) has been developed as a tumor-sensitive contrast and synergistic agent (C&SA) for ultrasound-guided HIFU cancer surgery, by integrating dendritic-structured mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (MONs) and catalase immobilized in the large open pore channels of MONs. Such a hybrid nanoreactor exhibited sensitive catalytic activity toward H 2 O 2 , facilitating the continuous O 2 gas generation in a relatively mild manner even if incubated with 10 μM H 2 O 2 , which finally led to enhanced ablation in the tissue-mimicking PAA gel model after HIFU exposure mainly resulting from intensified cavitation effect. The C@M nanoparticles could be accumulated within the H 2 O 2 -enriched tumor region through enhanced permeability and retention effect, enabling durable contrast enhancement of ultrasound imaging, and highly efficient tumor ablation under relatively low power of HIFU exposure in vivo. Very different from the traditional perfluorocarbon-based C&SA, such an on-demand catalytic nanoreactor could realize the accurate positioning of tumor without HIFU prestimulation and efficient HIFU ablation with a much safer power output, which is highly desired in clinical HIFU application.

  15. Effect of warming bupivacaine 0.5% on ultrasound-guided axillary plexus block. Randomized prospective double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, W; Ben Gabsia, A; Lebbi, A; Sammoud, W; Labbène, I; Kchelfi, S; Ferjani, M

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of warming bupivacaine 0.5% on ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block. Prospective, randomized, double-blind. Eighty patients undergoing elective or emergency surgery beyond the distal third of the upper limb were divided into two groups of 40 patients: the warm group received 15mL bupivacaine 0.5% heated to 37°C; the cold group received 15mL 0.5% bupivacaine stored for at least 24hours in the lower compartment of a refrigerator at 13-15°C. Onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks were evaluated every 5minutes for 40minutes. Postoperative pain was evaluated at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24hours. Effective analgesia time was recorded as the interval between anesthetic injection and the first analgesia requirement (VAS>30mm). Time to onset of sensory and motor block was significantly shorter in the warm group, and mean duration of sensory and motor block and of postoperative analgesia significantly longer. Warming bupivacaine 0.5% to 37°C accelerated onset of sensory and motor block and extended action duration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison between ultrasound guided technique and digital palpation technique for radial artery cannulation in adult patients: An updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Sulagna; Maitra, Souvik; Baidya, Dalim K

    2018-06-01

    Possible advantages and risks associated with ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation in-comparison to digital palpation guided method in adult patients are not fully known. We have compared ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation with digital palpation technique in this meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Trials conducted in operating room, emergency department, cardiac catheterization laboratory. PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched (from 1946 to 20th November 2017) to identify prospective randomized controlled trials in adult patients. Two-dimensional ultrasound guided radial artery catheterization versus digital palpation guided radial artery cannulation. Overall cannulation success rate, first attempt success rate, time to cannulation and mean number of attempts to successful cannulation. Odds ratio (OR) and standardized mean difference (SMD) or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for categorical and continuous variables respectively. Data of 1895 patients from 10 studies have been included in this meta- analysis. Overall cannulation success rate was similar between ultrasound guided technique and digital palpation [OR (95% CI) 2.01 (1.00, 4.06); p = 0.05]. Ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation is associated with higher first attempt success rate of radial artery cannulation in comparison to digital palpation [OR (95% CI) 2.76 (186, 4.10); p < 0.001]. No difference was seen in time to cannulate [SMD (95% CI) -0.31 (-0.65, 0.04); p = 0.30] and mean number of attempt [MD (95% CI) -0.65 (-1.32, 0.02); p = 0.06] between USG guided technique with palpation technique. Radial artery cannulation by ultrasound guidance may increase the first attempt success rate but not the overall cannulation success when compared to digital palpation technique. However, results of this meta-analysis should be interpreted with caution due presence of

  17. A comparison of ultrasound-guided interscalene and supraclavicular blocks for post-operative analgesia after shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, B G; Han, J U; Song, J H; Yang, C; Lee, B W; Baek, J S

    2017-04-01

    In contrast to interscalene block, there was little information regarding the analgesic efficacy of supraclavicular block for shoulder surgery. This study aimed to compare the analgesic efficacy and side effects of interscalene and supraclavicular blocks for shoulder surgery. Patients scheduled for shoulder surgery were assigned to receive either ultrasound-guided interscalene (n = 25) or supraclavicular block (n = 24) with 20 ml of 0.375% ropivacaine. We assessed the duration of post-operative analgesia as a primary outcome and pain scores, supplemental analgesia, diaphragmatic excursion, motor block, fingertip numbness, side effects, and patient satisfaction as secondary outcomes. The duration of post-operative analgesia was not statistically different between groups: 868 (800-1440) min for supraclavicular block vs. 800 (731-922) min for interscalene block (median difference -85 min, 95% CI, -283 to 3 min, P = 0.095). The incidence of diaphragmatic paresis was significantly lower in the supraclavicular block group compared with that in the interscalene block group, both at 30 min after the block (66.7% vs. 92%, P = 0.021) and in the post-anaesthesia care unit (62.5% vs. 92%, P = 0.024). Motor block was higher in the supraclavicular block group in the post-anaesthesia care unit, however, not at 24 h. Other secondary outcomes were similar for both groups. This study showed no statistically significant difference in the duration of post-operative analgesia between the supraclavicular and interscalene blocks. However, the supraclavicular block was associated with a lower incidence of diaphragmatic paresis compared with that of the interscalene block after shoulder surgery. © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Use of transabdominal ultrasound-guided amniocentesis for detection of equid herpesvirus 1-induced fetal infection in utero.

    PubMed

    Smith, K C; McGladdery, A J; Binns, M M; Mumford, J A

    1997-09-01

    To evaluate transabdominal ultrasound-guided amniocentesis for detection of equid herpes-virus 1 (EHV-1)-induced fetal infection in utero. 4 Welsh Mountain mares. Pregnant mares were inoculated intranasally with EHV-1 during the ninth month of gestation. Amniocentesis was initiated on postinoculation day (PID) 12, and was performed at 2- to 3-day intervals in standing mares under deep sedation. Amniotic fluid samples were tested by virus isolation (VI), polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and immunoperoxidase cytologic examination (IC) for detection of EHV-1. Exposure to EHV-1 in the ninth month of gestation resulted in nasal shedding of infective virus, establishment of cell-associated viremia, and seroconversion. Equid herpesvirus 1 was detected by VI, PCR, and IC in amniotic fluid collected on PID 14 from 1 mare and on PID 16 and 17 from a second mare. Specimens of amniotic fluid from a third mare were VI negative until PID 18, when collections ceased, although this mare subsequently aborted an EHV-1-infected fetus on PID 28. The fourth mare aborted an EHV-1 infected fetus on PID 14. The 2 mares with VI-positive amniotic fluid were each carrying an EHV-1 infected fetus in utero, confirmed by examination of the uterus, placenta, and fetus, using specific immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Endothelial cells in the endometrium and allantochorion were often virus-infected, with accompanying vascular lesions. The fetus had been infected via the chorionic vasculature in the first and fourth mares, and by inhalation of infected amniotic fluid in the second mare. Amniocentesis permits specific detection of EHV-1-induced fetal infection in utero. Amniocentesis may have a clinical role in the specific identification and isolation of mares carrying virus-infected fetuses during EHV-1-induced abortion epizootics.

  19. Block of the superior cervical ganglion, description of a novel ultrasound-guided technique in human cadavers.

    PubMed

    Siegenthaler, Andreas; Haug, Matthias; Eichenberger, Urs; Suter, Marc Rene; Moriggl, Bernhard

    2013-05-01

    Injection of opioids to the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) has been reported to provide pain relief in patients suffering from different kinds of neuropathic facial pain conditions, such as trigeminal neuralgia, postherpetic neuralgia, and atypical facial pain. The classic approach to the SCG is a transoral technique using a so-called "stopper" to prevent accidental carotid artery puncture. The main disadvantage of this technique is that the needle tip is positioned distant from the actual target, possibly impeding successful block of the SCG. A further limitation is that injection of local anesthetics due to potential carotid artery puncture is contraindicated. We hypothesized that the SCG can be identified and blocked using ultrasound imaging, potentially increasing precision of this technique. In this pilot study, 20 US-guided simulated blocks of the SCG were performed in 10 human cadavers in order to determine the accuracy of this novel block technique. After injection of 0.1 mL of dye, the cadavers were dissected to evaluate the needle position and coloring of the SCG. Nineteen of the 20 needle tips were located in or next to the SCG. This corresponded to a simulated block success rate of 95% (95% confidence interval 85-100%). In 17 cases, the SCG was completely colored, and in two cases, the caudal half of the SCG was colored with dye. The anatomical dissections confirmed that our ultrasound-guided approach to the SCG is accurate. Ultrasound could become an attractive alternative to the "blind" transoral technique of SCG blocks. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Ultrasound-guided Pleural Effusion Drainage With a Small Catheter Using the Single-step Trocar or Modified Seldinger Technique.

    PubMed

    Abusedera, Mohammad; Alkady, Ola

    2016-04-01

    Studies have shown that small-catheter pleural effusion drainage is safe and has a lower complication rate. Our objective was to evaluate the outcomes and the safety of the single-step trocar or the modified Seldinger technique. A total of 124 patients (83 men and 41 women), with mean age of 46±18 years and mean duration of drainage 5.3±2 days, were include in the study. The trocar technique was attempted in 201 (86.5%) cases, and the modified Seldinger technique was used in 38 (16.5%) cases. Technical success was obtained in 96% for the trocar technique and in 100% for the modified Seldinger technique. The procedure time for the trocar and the modified Seldinger techniques was approximately 7 and 12 minutes, respectively (P-value=0.02). The overall success rate was 72.9%. The success rate was highest for massive transudative effusions (98%) followed by malignant effusions (87%), and it was least for parapneumonic effusion/empyema (72 %). Pneumothorax occurred in 10.5% (n=4) for modified Seldinger versus 0.5% (n=1) (P=0.12) for trocar, whereas bleeding occurred in 0% for modified Seldinger and in 1% (n=2) for trocar (P=0.04). The single-step trocar technique was technically unsuccessful in 8 cases (7 had empyema with narrow intercostal spaces and one had kyphoscoliosis); technical success was achieved by using the modified Seldinger. Ultrasound-guided pleural effusion drainage by catheter insertion is a safe and effective procedure. The success rate is low when the effusion is loculated and septated. Both the trocar and the modified Seldinger techniques can be used. The trocar technique is faster and easier.

  1. Ultrasound-Guided Phrenic Nerve Block for Intractable Hiccups following Placement of Esophageal Stent for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Arsanious, David; Khoury, Spiro; Martinez, Edgar; Nawras, Ali; Filatoff, Gregory; Ajabnoor, Hossam; Darr, Umar; Atallah, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    Hiccups are actions consisting of sudden contractions of the diaphragm and intercostals followed by a sudden inspiration and transient closure of the vocal cords. They are generally short lived and benign; however, in extreme and rare cases, such as esophageal carcinoma, they can become persistent or intractable, up to and involving significant pain, dramatically impacting the patient's quality of life. This case involves a 60-year-old man with a known history of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. He was considered to have high surgical risk, and therefore he received palliative care through the use of fully covered metallic esophageal self-expandable stents due to a spontaneous perforated esophagus, after which he developed intractable hiccups and associated mediastinal pain. Conservative treatment, including baclofen, chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, and omeprazole, provided no relief for his symptoms. The patient was referred to pain management from gastroenterology for consultation on pain control. He ultimately received an ultrasound-guided left phrenic nerve block with bupivacaine and depomedrol, and 3 days later underwent the identical procedure on the right phrenic nerve. This led to complete resolution of his hiccups and associated mediastinal pain. At follow-up, 2 and 4 weeks after the left phrenic nerve block, the patient was found to maintain complete alleviation of the hiccups. Esophageal dilatation and/or phrenic or vagal afferent fiber irritation can be suspected in cases of intractable hiccups secondary to esophageal stenting. Regional anesthesia of the phrenic nerve through ultrasound guidance offers a long-term therapeutic option for intractable hiccups and associated mediastinal pain in selected patients with esophageal carcinoma after stent placement. Esophageal stent, esophageal stenting, intractable hiccups, intractable singultus, phrenic nerve block, phrenic nerve, ultrasound, palliative care, esophageal carcinoma.

  2. Cytological Results of Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology for Thyroid Nodules: Emphasis on Correlation with Sonographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Jung; Hong, Soon Won; Chung, Woung Youn; Kwak, Jin Young; Kim, Min Jung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare the cytological results of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (US-FNA) cytology of thyroid nodules to sonographic findings and determine whether US findings are helpful in the interpretation of cytological results. Materials and Methods Among the thyroid nodules that underwent US-FNA cytology, we included the 819 nodules which had a conclusive diagnosis. Final diagnosis was based on pathology from surgery, repeated FNA cytology or follow-up of more than one year. Cytological results were divided into five groups: benign, indeterminate (follicular or Hurthle cell neoplasm), suspicious for malignancy, malignant, and inadequate. US findings were categorized as benign or suspicious. Cytological results and US categories were analyzed. Results Final diagnosis was concluded upon in 819 nodules based on pathology (n=311), repeated FNA cytology (n=204) and follow-up (n=304), of which 634 were benign and 185 were malignant. There were 560 benign nodules, 141 malignant nodules, 49 nodules with inadequate results, 21 with indeterminate results, and 48 that were suspicious for malignancy. The positive and negative predictive values of the US categories were 59.1% and 97.0%, and those of the cytological results were 93.7% and 98.9%. The US categories were significantly correlated with final diagnosis in the benign (p=0.014) and suspicious for malignancy (p<0.001) cytological result groups, but not in the inadequate and indeterminate cytological results groups. The false positive and negative rates of cytological results were 1.9% and 3.2%. Conclusion Sonographic findings can be useful when used alongside cytological results, especially in nodules with cytological results that are benign or suspicious for malignancy. PMID:21786450

  3. Ultrasound guided placement of the distal catheter in paediatric ventriculoatrial shunts-an appraisal of efficacy and complications.

    PubMed

    Clark, David J; Chakraborty, Aabir; Roebuck, Derek J; Thompson, Dominic N P

    2016-07-01

    Ventriculoatrial (VA) shunts are commonly used as a second-line treatment of hydrocephalus when the peritoneum is an unsuitable site for the distal catheter. Many centres now utilise ultrasound and interventional radiology techniques to aid placement of the distal catheter. The purpose of this study was to conduct a contemporary audit of VA shunting in children using interventional radiology techniques for placement of the distal catheter. A retrospective analysis of all patients who had VA shunts inserted between June 2000 and June 2010 was conducted using a prospectively updated surgical database and case notes review. Ninety-four VA shunts were inserted in 38 patients. Thirty-seven patients had been treated initially with ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts. Twenty-two patients required at least 1 shunt revision (58 %). The 6-month, 1- and 2-year shunt survival rates were 53, 43 and 27 %, respectively. Blockage was the commonest reason for shunt failure (68 %). The site of failure was proximal (ventricular catheter +/- valve) in 32 % and distal (atrial catheter) in 21 % of cases. The overall infection rate was 6 % per procedure and 11 % per patient. There were 7 deaths, of which 3 were shunt related. VA shunting provides a viable second-line option for shunt placement in complex hydrocephalus. The causes of shunt failure (blockage, infection and equipment failure) are similar to VP shunting though shunt survival rates are inferior to VP shunts. Ultrasound guided VA shunt placement provides a relatively safe, second-line alternative to the placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt when this route is unsuitable.

  4. Outbreak of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli infections after transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Dumford, Donald; Suwantarat, Nuntra; Bhasker, Vineet; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Zabarsky, Trina F; Drawz, Paul; Zhu, Hui; Donskey, Curtis J

    2013-03-01

    We conducted an investigation after identifying a cluster of 4 serious infections following transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate (TRUBP) during a 2-month period. Veterans Affairs medical center. Patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) after TRUBP and time-matched controls with no evidence of infection. The incidence of UTI within 30 days after TRUBP was calculated from 2002 through 2010. We evaluated the correlation between infection with fluoroquinolone-resistant gram-negative bacilli (GNB) and fluoroquinolone resistance in outpatient Escherichia coli urinary isolates and performed a case-control study to determine risk factors for infection with fluoroquinolone-resistant GNB. Processes for TRUBP prophylaxis, procedures, and equipment sterilization were reviewed. An outbreak of UTI due to fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli after TRUBP began 2 years before the cluster was identified and was correlated with increasing fluoroquinolone resistance in outpatient E. coli. No deficiencies were identified in equipment processing or biopsy procedures. Fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli UTI after TRUBP was independently associated with prior infection with fluoroquinolone-resistant GNB (adjusted odds ratio, 20.8; P=.005). A prediction rule including prior UTI, hospitalization in the past year, and previous infection with fluoroquinolone-resistant GNB identified only 17 (49%) of 35 cases. The outbreak of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli infections after TRUBP closely paralleled rising rates of fluoroquinolone resistance among outpatient E. coli isolates. The delayed detection of the outbreak and the absence of sensitive predictors of infection suggest that active surveillance for infection after TRUBP is necessary in the context of increasing fluoroquinolone resistance in the United States.

  5. Pethidine efficacy in achieving the ultrasound-guided oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane block in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Breazu, Caius Mihai; Ciobanu, Lidia; Bartos, Adrian; Bodea, Raluca; Mircea, Petru Adrian; Ionescu, Daniela

    2017-02-21

    Pethidine is a synthetic opioid with local anesthetic properties. Our goal was to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of pethidine for achieving the ultrasound-guided oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane (OSTAP) block in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This prospective, double-blind study included 79 patients of physical status I and II according to American Society of Anesthesiologists, scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The patients were randomly allocated into three groups, depending on the drug used to achieve preoperative bilateral OSTAP block: 1) OSTAP-Placebo (treated with normal saline); 2) OSTAP-Bupivacaine (treated with 0.25% bupivacaine); and 3) OSTAP-Pethidine (treated with 1% pethidine). The efficacy of pethidine in achieving the OSTAP block was analyzed using visual analog scale (VAS), intraoperative opioid dose, opioid consumption in post anesthesia care unit, and opioid consumption in the first 24 postoperative hours. The pain scores assessed by VAS at 0, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours were significantly lower in OSTAP-Pethidine than in OSTAP-Placebo group (p < 0.001). The mean intraoperative opioid consumption was significantly lower in OSTAP-Pethidine compared to OSTAP-Placebo group (150 versus 400 mg, p < 0.001), as well as the mean opioid consumption in the first 24 hours (20.4 versus 78 mg, p < 0.001). Comparing VAS assessment between OSTAP-Bupivacaine and OSTAP-Pethidine groups, statistically significant differences were observed only for the immediate postoperative pain assessment (0 hours), where lower values were observed in OSTAP-Pethidine group (p = 0.004). There were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (p = 0.131) between the groups. The use of 1% pethidine can be an alternative to 0.25% bupivacaine in achieving OSTAP block for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  6. [Efficiency of bupivacaine and association with dexmedetomidine in transversus abdominis plane block ultrasound guided in postoperative pain of abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Aksu, Recep; Patmano, Gülçin; Biçer, Cihangir; Emek, Ertan; Çoruh, Aliye Esmaoğlu

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine used in tranversus abdominis plane (TAP) block on postoperative pain and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Patients submitted to lower abdominal surgery were enrolled in the study. After anesthesia induction, ultrasound guided TAP block was performed. TAP block was obtained with 21mL 0.9% saline in Group C (n=31), 20mL 0.5% bupivacaine+1mL saline in Group B (n=31), and 20mL 0.5% bupivacaine+1mL dexmedetomidine (100μg) in Group BD (n=31). Visual analog scale scores were lower in Group BD compared to Group C, at all time points (p<0.05); it was lower in group BD than in group B at 10-24h. In Group B, it was lower than Group C at 2-8h (p<0.05). Total morphine consumption was lower in Group BD compared to other groups and lower in group B than in the controls (p<0.001). Patient satisfaction was higher in Group BD than in other groups and was higher in both study groups than in the controls (p<0.001). Nausea-vomiting scores, antiemetic requirement, or additional analgesic administration were not significant among groups (p>0.05). The addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine on TAP block decreased postoperative pain scores and morphine consumption; it also increased patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Dexmedetomidine did not have any effect on nausea and vomiting score and antiemetic requirement. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Selective Versus Conventional Block of the Medial Brachial Cutaneous and the Intercostobrachial Nerves: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Magazzeni, Philippe; Jochum, Denis; Iohom, Gabriella; Mekler, Gérard; Albuisson, Eliane; Bouaziz, Hervé

    2018-06-13

    For superficial surgery of anteromedial and posteromedial surfaces of the upper arm, the medial brachial cutaneous nerve (MBCN) and the intercostobrachial nerve (ICBN) must be selectively blocked, in addition to an axillary brachial plexus block. We compared efficacy of ultrasound-guided (USG) versus conventional block of the MBCN and the ICBN. Eighty-four patients, undergoing upper limb surgery, were randomized to receive either USG (n = 42) or conventional (n = 42) block of the MBCN and the ICBN with 1% mepivacaine. Sensory block was evaluated using light-touch on the upper and lower half of the anteromedial and posteromedial surfaces of the upper arm at 5, 10, 15, 20 minutes after nerve blocks. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who had no sensation in all 4 regions innervated by the MBCN and the ICBN at 20 minutes. Secondary outcomes were onset time of complete anesthesia, volume of local anesthetic, tourniquet tolerance, and quality of ultrasound images. In the USG group, 37 patients (88%) had no sensation at 20 minutes in any of the 4 areas tested versus 8 patients (19%) in the conventional group (P < 0.001). When complete anesthesia was obtained, it occurred within 10 minutes in more than 90% of patients, in both groups. Mean total volumes of local anesthetic used for blocking the MBCN and the ICBN were similar in the 2 groups. Ultrasound images were of good quality in only 20 (47.6%) of 42 patients. Forty-one patients (97.6%) who received USG block were comfortable with the tourniquet versus 16 patients (38.1%) in the conventional group (P < 0.001). Ultrasound guidance improved the efficacy of the MBCN and ICBN blocks. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT02940847.

  8. Cost comparison between ultrasound-guided 14-g large core breast biopsy and open surgical biopsy: an analysis for Austria.

    PubMed

    Gruber, R; Walter, E; Helbich, T H

    2010-06-01

    To examine the budget impact of ultrasound-guided 14-g large core breast biopsy (US-guided LCBB) by comparing the costs of US-guided LCBB and open surgical biopsy (OSB); to calculate the cost savings attributable to US-guided LCBB; and to assess the frequency with which US-guided LCBB obviates the need for an OSB. In a retrospective study, we reviewed 399 suspicious breast lesions on which US-guided LCBB and OSB or, in cases of benign histology, clinical follow-up, were performed. Cost savings were calculated using nationally allowed flat rates (A-drg) and patient charges. Costs were measured from both, a hospital and a socioeconomic perspective. Deterministic sensitivity analyses were simulated to assess the extent of achievable cost savings. Overall cost savings for US-guided LCBB over OSB were euro 977 (euro 2,337/euro 3,314) per case from a hospital perspective, resulting in a total cost decrease of 30% for the diagnosis of suspicious breast lesions. From a socioeconomic perspective, cost savings were euro 1,542 (euro 2,600/euro 4,142) per case, resulting in a 37% reduction in biopsy cost. US-guided LCBB obviated the need for a surgical procedure in 240 (60%) of 399 women. In all four sensitivity analyses, costs of US-guided LCBB remained lower than that of OSB. From an economic perspective, US-guided LCBB is highly recommended for the diagnosis of suspicious breast lesions, as this procedure reduces the cost of diagnosis substantially. In Austria, annual cost savings would be euro 18.5 million. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of bupivacaine after bilateral ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block following cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, B; Charfi, R; Bennasr, L; Marzouk, S Ben; Eljebari, H; Jebabli, N; Sassi, M Ben; Trabelsi, S; Maghrebi, H

    2017-11-01

    Transversus abdominis plane block is an effective method of post-cesarean analgesia. There are no data available about plasma bupivacaine levels after this block in adults. This study aimed to assess bupivacaine pharmacokinetic parameters after ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane blocks following cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia. A prospective observational study in parturients undergoing elective cesarean delivery under hyperbaric bupivacaine spinal anesthesia was conducted. After surgery, patients received bilateral transversus abdominis plane block (50mg bupivacaine each side). Venous blood samples were collected immediately before performing the block and at 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 720 and 1440minutes. High performance liquid chromatography was used to measure total plasma bupivacaine concentrations. Mean bupivacaine area under the curve (AUC) was calculated from 0 to 24hours. Data were collected from 17 parturients. Mean age and body mass index were 31±6y and 30±4kg/m 2 respectively. Mean plasma bupivacaine concentration before the block was 171ng/mL. Mean peak concentration was 802.36ng/mL (range 231.8 to 3504.5ng/mL). Mean time to peak concentration was 30min and mean area-under-the-curve (0-24h) was 4505.4h.ng/mL. Mean elimination half-life was 8.75h. Three subjects had concentrations above the quoted toxic threshold and mild symptoms suggestive of neurotoxicity were reported by two subjects, but no treatment was required. Single-dose bilateral transversus abdominis plane block using 100mg of bupivacaine, after spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery, can result in toxic plasma bupivacaine concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Clinical Usefulness of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration and Biopsy for Rectal and Perirectal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Jae Seung; Lee, Ho-Su; Lee, Seohyun; Bae, Jungho; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Park, Sang Hyoung; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Ye, Byong Duk; Myung, Seung-Jae; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Kim, Jin-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and/or biopsy (EUS-FNA/B) have been used to diagnose subepithelial tumors (SETs) and extraluminal lesions in the gastrointestinal tract. Our group previously reported the usefulness of EUS-FNA/B for rectal and perirectal lesions. This study reports our expanded experience with EUS-FNA/B for rectal and perirectal lesions in terms of diagnostic accuracy and safety. We also included our new experience with EUS-FNB using the recently introduced ProCore needle. Methods From April 2009 to March 2014, EUS-FNA/B for rectal and perirectal lesions was performed in 30 consecutive patients. We evaluated EUS-FNA/B performance by comparing histological diagnoses with final results. We also investigated factors affecting diagnostic accuracy. Results Among 10 patients with SETs, EUS-FNA/B specimen results revealed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor in 4 patients and malignant lymphoma in 1 patient. The diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA/B was 50% for SETs (5/10). Among 20 patients with non-SET lesions, 8 patients were diagnosed with malignant disease and 7 were diagnosed with benign disease based on both EUS-FNA/B and the final results. The diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA/B for non-SET lesions was 75% (15/20). The size of lesions was the only factor related to diagnostic accuracy (P=0.027). Two complications of mild fever and asymptomatic pneumoperitoneum occurred after EUS-FNA/B. Conclusions The overall diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA/B for rectal and perirectal lesions was 67% (20/30). EUS-FNA/B is a clinically useful method for cytological and histological diagnoses of rectal and perirectal lesions. PMID:25931998

  11. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in the diagnosis of non-lymph node thoracic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huizhen; Zhao, Heng; Garfield, David H.; Teng, Jiajun; Han, Baohui; Sun, Jiayuan

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has shown excellent diagnostic capabilities for mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy. However, its value in thoracic non-lymph node lesions is less clear. This study was designed to assess the value of EBUS-TBNA in distinguishing malignant from benign thoracic non-lymph node lesions. METHODS: From October 2009 to August 2011, 552 patients underwent EBUS-TBNA under local anesthesia and with conscious sedation. We retrospectively reviewed 81 of these patients who had tracheobronchial wall-adjacent intrapulmonary or isolated mediastinal non-lymph node lesions. On-site cytological evaluation was not used. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed to distinguish the origin or type of malignancy when necessary. RESULTS: EBUS-TBNA was performed in 68 tracheobronchial wall-adjacent intrapulmonary and 13 isolated mediastinal non-lymph node lesions. Of the 81 patients, 77 (95.1%, 60 malignancies and 17 benignancies) were diagnosed through EBUS-TBNA, including 57 primary lung cancers, 2 mediastinal tumors, 1 pulmonary metastatic adenocarcinoma, 7 inflammation, 5 tuberculosis, 3 mediastinal cysts, 1 esophageal schwannoma, and 1 focal fibrosis. There were four false-negative cases (4.9%). Of the 60 malignancies, there were 9 (15.0%) which originally had no definite histologic origin or type. Thus, IHC was performed, with 7 (77.8%) being subsequently confirmed. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of EBUS-TBNA in distinguishing malignant from benign lesions were 93.4% (60/64), 100% (17/17), 100% (60/60), 81.0% (17/21), and 95.1% (77/81), respectively. CONCLUSION: EBUS-TBNA is a safe procedure with a high sensitivity for distinguishing malignant from benign thoracic non-lymph node lesions within the reach of EBUS-TBNA, with IHC usually providing a more definitive diagnosis. PMID:23439919

  12. Rare pancreatic neoplasms: the utility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration-a large single center study.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Hiroshi; Yamao, Kenji; Bhatia, Vikram; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Yatabe, Yasushi; Koshikawa, Takashi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2009-01-01

    Tumors other than ductal adenocarcinomas constitute 10%-15% of all pancreatic tumors. We describe the performance and pitfalls of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for diagnosis of these rare pancreatic tumors and their characteristic cytopathological features. The records of 455 pancreatic fine-needle aspiration procedures done between March 1997 and August 2006 at Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya, Japan, were reviewed. Besides cytology, aspirated material was routinely submitted in formalin for cell-block analysis. The reference standard for final diagnosis was surgical pathology from resected specimens. Twenty-eight rare (nonductal adenocarcinomas) pancreatic tumors were identified. Overall, EUS-FNA with the results of cytology, cell-block processing, and immunohistochemistry could correctly diagnose the type of neoplasm in 19 (67.9%) cases. EUS-FNA could distinguish benign from malignant rare tumors with a sensitivity of 69.2%, a specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100%, negative predictive value of 79.0%, and accuracy of 85.7%. None of three malignant pancreatic endocrine neoplasms could be diagnosed as malignant. An adequate core tissue sample could be obtained in 21 cases (75.0%) and provide a histopathological diagnosis in 19 (67.9%) cases. EUS-FNA could change the presumptive diagnosis in 11 (39.3%) cases. Specific immunochemical studies were useful adjuncts to the diagnosis. No major or minor complication was noted in any patient. Pancreatic neoplasms other than ductal adenocarcinomas have diverse imaging and histopathological features. EUS-FNA is accurate and safe for their identification.

  13. Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration versus Standard Bronchoscopic Modalities for Diagnosis of Sarcoidosis: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Li-Xing; Chen, Ru-Xuan; Huang, Hui; Shao, Chi; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yong-Zhe; Xu, Zuo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is an effective technique used to precisely detect enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. The efficacy of EBUS-TBNA versus standard modalities for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis remains to be elucidated. In this meta-analysis, we compared the efficacies of these methods. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, Wanfang, Cpvip, CNKI, and the bibliographies of the relevant references. We analyzed the data obtained with Revman 5.2 (Nordic Cochrane Center, Copenhagen, Denmark) and Stata 12.0 software (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA). The Mantel-Haenszel method was used to calculate the pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Sixteen studies with a total of 1823 participants met the inclusion criteria, and data were extracted regarding the diagnostic yield of each approach. The ORs for EBUS-TBNA versus transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis ranged from 0.26 to 126.58, and the pooled OR was 5.89 (95% CI, 2.20–15.79, P = 0.0004). These findings indicated that EBUS-TBNA provided a much higher diagnostic yield than TBLB. The pooled OR for EBUS-TBNA + TBLB + endobronchial biopsy (EBB) versus TBNA + TBLB + EBB was 1.54 (95% CI, 0.61–3.93, P = 0.36), implying that there was no significant difference between their diagnostic yields. However, clinical heterogeneity was reflected in the nature of the studies and in the operative variables. Conclusions: The results of this meta-analysis suggest that EBUS-TBNA + TBLB + EBB could be used for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis, if available. At medical centers without EBUS-TBNA, TBNA + TBLB + EBB could be used instead. PMID:27364799

  14. Ultrasound-guided core biopsy in the diagnosis of lymphoma of the head and neck. A 9 year experience

    PubMed Central

    Burke, C; Thomas, R; Inglis, C; Baldwin, A; Ramesar, K; Grace, R; Howlett, D C

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utility of ultrasound-guided core biopsy (USCB) in lymphoma of the head and neck, in particular whether core biopsy can provide sufficient diagnostic information for definitive treatment. Methods All lymphomas diagnosed in the head and neck at Eastbourne General Hospital between January 2000 and June 2009 were identified. Radiology and pathology reports were reviewed and the diagnostic techniques recorded. The type of biopsy (fine needle aspiration, needle core, surgical excision biopsy) used to establish a diagnosis sufficient to allow treatment, i.e. the "index" diagnostic technique, was identified. Previous inconclusive or inadequate biopsies were noted. Pathology reports based on USCB were graded 0–3 according to diagnostic completeness and ability to provide treatment information. Results Of 691 overall cases of lymphoma diagnosed over the 9 year period, 171 different patients presented with lymphoma in the head and neck. Of these 171, 83 had USCB biopsy during diagnostic work up. 60 were regarded as grade 3 where a confident diagnosis of lymphoma was made. In seven patients, clinical management proceeded on the basis of a suggestive (grade 2) pathology report without surgical excision, and these were therefore also included as "index" biopsies. Overall therefore, 67/83 core biopsies (81%) provided adequate information to allow treatment. Surgical excision biopsy was the index modality in 104 cases. Conclusion In the majority of cases USCB is adequate for confident histopathological diagnosis avoiding the need for surgical excision biopsy in cases of suspected head and neck lymphoma. PMID:21427181

  15. Comparison of 22G reverse-beveled versus standard needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling of solid pancreatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Alatawi, Abdullah; Beuvon, Frédéric; Grabar, Sophie; Leblanc, Sarah; Chaussade, Stanislas; Terris, Benoit; Barret, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) using standard needles has a high diagnostic value in the evaluation of solid pancreatic masses. Fenestrated needles have been developed to improve the quality of EUS-guided tissue sampling by providing core biopsies (FNB). Methods Patients with solid pancreatic masses of >2 cm were prospectively included in our study and randomized to receive EUS sampling, using either a standard 22G FNA or a 22G Procore® FNB needle. The main study endpoint was the number of needle passes required to obtain a diagnosis in more than 90% of cases. Results We included 100 patients (male = 63, female = 37; mean age = 68.4 years) in our study. We found that 88% of the lesions were malignant, with a mean size of 32 mm. A sample adequate for diagnosis was obtained in more than 90% of cases after the second needle pass in the FNB group, versus the third needle pass in the FNA group. Slide cellularity and presence of tissue microfragments were significantly higher in the FNB group. Sensitivity for the diagnosis of malignancy was 88.4% versus 97.8% for the EUS-FNA and EUS-FNB group, respectively, while specificity for both techniques was 100%. No complications were recorded. Conclusions Although the accuracy of both needle types for proving malignancy was similar, a lower number of passes was required with the FNB needles to achieve the same contributive sample rate as with the FNA needles. FNB also improved the histopathological quality of specimens, suggesting an overall superiority of FNB sampling. PMID:26279842

  16. Comparison of 21-Gauge and 22-Gauge Aspiration Needle in Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Akulian, Jason; Lechtzin, Noah; Yasin, Faiza; Kamdar, Biren; Ernst, Armin; Ost, David E.; Ray, Cynthia; Greenhill, Sarah R.; Jimenez, Carlos A.; Filner, Joshua; Feller-Kopman, David

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive procedure originally performed using a 22-gauge (22G) needle. A recently introduced 21-gauge (21G) needle may improve the diagnostic yield and sample adequacy of EBUS-TBNA, but prior smaller studies have shown conflicting results. To our knowledge, this is the largest study undertaken to date to determine whether the 21G needle adds diagnostic benefit. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the results of 1,299 patients from the American College of Chest Physicians Quality Improvement Registry, Education, and Evaluation (AQuIRE) Diagnostic Registry who underwent EBUS-TBNA between February 2009 and September 2010 at six centers throughout the United States. Data collection included patient demographics, sample adequacy, and diagnostic yield. Analysis consisted of univariate and multivariate hierarchical logistic regression comparing diagnostic yield and sample adequacy of EBUS-TBNA specimens by needle gauge. Results: A total of 1,235 patients met inclusion criteria. Sample adequacy was obtained in 94.9% of the 22G needle group and in 94.6% of the 21G needle group (P = .81). A diagnosis was made in 51.4% of the 22G and 51.3% of the 21G groups (P = .98). Multivariate hierarchical logistic regression showed no statistical difference in sample adequacy or diagnostic yield between the two groups. The presence of rapid onsite cytologic evaluation was associated with significantly fewer needle passes per procedure when using the 21G needle (P < .001). Conclusions: There is no difference in specimen adequacy or diagnostic yield between the 21G and 22G needle groups. EBUS-TBNA in conjunction with rapid onsite cytologic evaluation and a 21G needle is associated with fewer needle passes compared with a 22G needle. PMID:23632441

  17. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block at wrist level for the treatment of idiopathic palmar hyperhidrosis with botulinum toxin].

    PubMed

    Olea, E; Fondarella, A; Sánchez, C; Iriarte, I; Almeida, M V; Martínez de Salinas, A

    2013-12-01

    Evaluation of pain and degree of satisfaction in patients undergoing ultrasound-assisted peripheral regional block for the treatment of idiopathic palmar hyperhidrosis with botulinum toxin. A descriptive, observational study of patients with palmar hyperhidrosis treated with botulinum toxin A, who underwent ultrasound-guided peripheral regional block of the median and ulnar nerves with 3 ml of mepivacaine 1% in each one. The radial nerve block was injected in the anatomical snuffbox. After establishing blocking, the dermatologist performed a mapping and injected around 100 IU of botulinum toxin across the whole palm. The pain experienced during the injection of botulinum toxin was evaluated by verbal numerical scale (from 0 to 10), along with the degree of satisfaction with the anesthetic technique, and the post-anesthetic complications. A total of 40 patients were enrolled in the study, 11 men and 29 women with no significant differences. The pain intensity assessed with verbal numerical scale was 1.03 (standard deviation of 1.37). No patients had a value greater than 5. The degree of patient satisfaction with the anesthetic technique was very good for 85% of the patients, and good for 7.5%. There were no complications related to type of anesthesia. The ultrasound-assisted peripheral regional block could be a simple, effective and safe technique for patients undergoing palmar injection of botulinum toxin. Pain intensity was very low, and it provided a very good level of satisfaction in most patients. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Ultrasound-guided photoacoustic imaging of lymph nodes with biocompatible gold nanoparticles as a novel contrast agent (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, In-Cheol; Dumani, Diego; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2017-02-01

    A key step in staging cancer is the diagnosis of metastasis that spreads through lymphatic system. For this reason, researchers develop various methods of sentinel lymph node mapping that often use a radioactive tracer. This study introduces a safe, cost-effective, high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time method of visualizing the sentinel lymph node: ultrasound-guided photoacoustic (US/PA) imaging augmented by a contrast agent. In this work, we use clearable gold nanoparticles covered by a biocompatible polymer (glycol chitosan) to enhance cellular uptake by macrophages abundant in lymph nodes. We incubate macrophages with glycol-chitosan-coated gold nanoparticles (0.05 mg Au/ml), and then fix them with paraformaldehyde solution for an analysis of in vitro dark-field microscopy and cell phantom. The analysis shows enhanced cellular uptake of nanoparticles by macrophages and strong photoacoustic signal from labeled cells in tissue-mimicking cell phantoms consisting gelatin solution (6 %) with silica gel (25 μm, 0.3%) and fixed macrophages (13 X 105 cells). The in-vivo US/PA imaging of cervical lymph nodes in healthy mice (nu/nu, female, 5 weeks) indicates a strong photoacoustic signal from a lymph node 10 minutes post-injection (2.5 mg Au/ml, 80 μl). The signal intensity and the nanoparticle-labeled volume of tissue within the lymph node continues to increase until 4 h post-injection. Histological analysis further confirms the accumulation of gold nanoparticles within the lymph nodes. This work suggests the feasibility of molecular/cellular US/PA imaging with biocompatible gold nanoparticles as a photoacoustic contrast agent in the diagnosis of lymph-node-related diseases.

  19. Ultrasound-guided intrasphincteric botulinum toxin injection relieves obstructive defecation due to Hirschsprung's disease and internal anal sphincter achalasia.

    PubMed

    Church, Joseph T; Gadepalli, Samir K; Talishinsky, Toghrul; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Jarboe, Marcus D

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive defecation can occur in patients with Hirschsprung Disease (HD) and internal anal sphincter (IAS) achalasia. Injection of Botulinum Toxin (BoTox) into the IAS can temporarily relieve obstructive defecation, but can be challenging when performed by tactile sense alone. We compared results of BoTox injections with and without ultrasound (US) guidance. We retrospectively reviewed BoTox injections into the IAS for obstructive defecation over 5years. Analyzed outcomes included short-term improvement, defined as resolution of enterocolitis, new ability to spontaneously defecate, and/or normalization of bowel movement frequency 2weeks post-operatively, as well as requirement of more definitive surgical therapy (myotomy/myomectomy, colectomy, colostomy, cecostomy/appendicostomy, and/or sacral nerve stimulator implantation). Outcomes were compared using t-test and Fisher's Exact test, with significance defined as p<0.05. Twelve patients who underwent BoTox injection were included, including 5 patients who underwent injections both with and without ultrasound. Ten underwent an ultrasound-guided injection (13 injection procedures), 5 of whom had HD. Seven underwent an injection without ultrasound guidance (17 injection procedures), 5 of whom had HD. Procedures performed with US resulted in greater short-term improvement (76% versus 65% without ultrasound) and less requirement of a definitive procedure for obstructive defecation (p<0.05). US-guided BoTox injection is safe and effective for obstructive defecation, and may decrease the need for a definitive operation. III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Results of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in lung cancer: importance of the lymph node involvement prevalence].

    PubMed

    De Dominicis, F; Fourdrain, A; Iquille, J; Toublanc, B; François, G; Basille, D; Monconduit, J; Merlusca, G; Jounieaux, V; Andrejak, C; Berna, P

    2015-08-01

    We studied the non-surgical invasive staging by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and we detailed the differences of our series, in order to understand the criteria allowing to achieve a better performance. Retrospective observational study conducted between 2007 and 2011, including all patients with proven NSCLC who underwent EBUS-TBNA. For the 92 EBUS-TBNA performed, we found a sensitivity of 78%, a specificity of 93%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 98%, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 45%, an accuracy of 80% and a prevalence of lymph node involvement at 84%. A learning curve has been demonstrated and a significant difference was found based on the number of punctures by procedure (P=0.02) or on histological type (P=0.02). By analyzing the data of the literature, we have been able to demonstrate that the accuracy and the negative predictive value are correlated with the prevalence. If we take into account this correlation, we can consider the results of our study close to those of the literature. We highlighted a number of criteria that will influence the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA. While some have already been described, other criteria such as histological type or patient selection criteria are less discussed. The key point is the correlation between the prevalence and EBUS-TBNA results. Results of the assessment of lymph node involvement techniques should be interpreted according to the prevalence of lymph node involvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Management of benign papilloma without atypia diagnosed at ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy: Scoring system for predicting malignancy.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Soo Kyung; Han, Wonshik; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Kim, Min Kyoon; Noh, Dong-Young; Jung, Bong-Wha; Kim, Sung-Won; Ko, Eunyoung

    2018-01-01

    The management of benign intraductal papilloma diagnosed on core needle biopsy (CNB) remains unclear. This study was designed to evaluate factors predicting malignancy in patients diagnosed with benign papilloma without atypia at ultrasound-guided CNB and to develop a scoring system predicting malignancy based on clinical, radiological and pathological factors on further excisional biopsy. The study enrolled patients diagnosed with benign papillomas (including benign and atypical papillary lesions) at CNB. Multivariate analysis was used to identify relevant clinical, radiological and pathological factors that may predict malignancy. A total of 520 CNBs were diagnosed with benign or atypical papilloma. Of these, 452 were benign papilloma without atypia. Of the 250 lesions subsequently excised surgically from 234 women, 17 (6.8%) were diagnosed with malignancy. Multivariate analysis revealed that bloody nipple discharge, size on imaging ≥15 mm, BI-RADS≥4b, peripheral location and palpability were independent predictors of malignancy. A scoring system was developed based on logistic regression models and beta coefficients for each variable. The area under the ROC curve was 0.947 (95% CI: 0.913-0.981, p < 0.001) and a negative predictive value was 100%. In a validation set of 62 patients, an area under the ROC curve was 0.926 (95% CI: 0.857-0.995, p < 0.001). A scoring system predicting malignancy in patients diagnosed by CNB with benign papilloma without atypia was developed. This system was able to identify a subset of patients with lesions likely to be benign, indicating that imaging follow-up rather than surgical excision may be appropriate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrasound-guided posterior quadratus lumborum block for postoperative pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A randomized controlled double blind study.

    PubMed

    Ökmen, Korgün; Metin Ökmen, Burcu; Topal, Serra

    2018-06-18

    Laparoscopic techniques are commonly used in surgical operations of the gallbladder. There are very few regional anesthesia methods used to achieve this goal. We aimed to investigate the effect of ultrasound-guided posterior quadratus lumborum block (QLB), administered bilaterally on pain scores after laparoscopic cholecystectomy operations. Prospective, double blind, randomized controlled clinical trial. Single-institution, tertiary hospital. 60 patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in the study. Patients were randomized to either Group B (intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) + posterior QLB with 0.3 ml/kg 0.25% bupivacaine; n = 30) or Group S (IV PCA + posterior QLB with 0.3 ml/kg 0,9% saline; n = 30). Postoperative pain (during rest) was evaluated at the 30th minute, 2nd, 6th, 12th, and 24th hours using the VAS scores. Postoperative activity pain was also evaluated with VAS at the 2nd, 6th, 12th, and 24th hours. Postoperative 6th, 12th, and 24th hour follow-up results were recorded to identify the quantity of tramadol use. Secondary outcomes included the Ramsey sedation scale (RSS), side effect profile, and additional analgesic use. The VAS scores between the two groups were found to be statistically significantly lower in Group B (p < 0.001). The mean values of the quantity of tramadol use at the 6th, 12th, and 24th hours were found to be statistically significantly lower in Group B (p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of side effects (p = 0.309) and RSS (p = 0.505) outcomes between the groups. As a result of this study, we think that posterior QLB administered for pain palliation after laparoscopic cholecystectomy operation is an effective analgesia technique. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluoroscopy-assisted vs fluoroless endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural drainage of pancreatic fluid collections: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Consiglieri, Claudia F; Gornals, Joan B; Busquets, Juli; Peláez, Nuria; Secanella, Lluis; De-La-Hera, Meritxell; Sanzol, Resurrección; Fabregat, Joan; Castellote, José

    2018-01-01

    The need for fluoroscopy guidance in patients undergoing endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural drainage (EUS-TMD) of peripancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare general outcomes of EUS-TMD of PFCs under fluoroscopy (F) vs fluoroless (FL). This is a comparative study with a retrospective analysis of a prospective and consecutive inclusion database at a tertiary centre, from 2009 to 2015. All patients were symptomatic pseudocyst (PSC) and walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WON). Two groups were assigned depending on availability of fluoroscopy. The groups were heterogeneous in terms of their demographic characteristics, PFCs and procedure. The main outcome measures included technical and clinical success, incidences, adverse events (AEs), and follow-up. Fifty EUS-TMD of PFCs from 86 EUS-guided drainages were included during the study period. Group F included 26 procedures, PSC 69.2%, WON 30.8%, metal stents 61.5% (46.1% lumen-apposing stent) and plastic stents 38.5%. Group FL included 24 procedures, PSC 37.5%, WON 62.5%, and metal stents 95.8% (lumen-apposing stents). Technical success was 100% in both groups, and clinical success was similar (F 88.5%, FL 87.5%). Technical incidences and intra-procedure AEs were only described in group F (7.6% and 11.5%, respectively) and none in group FL. Procedure time was less in group FL (8min, p=0.0341). Fluoroless in the EUS-TMD of PFCs does not involve more technical incidences or intra-procedure AEs. Technical and clinical success was similar in the two groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular Nodal Staging Using miRNA Expression in Lung Cancer Patients by Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Inage, Terunaga; Nakajima, Takahiro; Itoga, Sakae; Ishige, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Taiki; Sakairi, Yuichi; Wada, Hironobu; Suzuki, Hidemi; Iwata, Takekazu; Chiyo, Masako; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2018-06-13

    The limited negative predictive value of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has often been discussed. The aim of this study was to identify a highly sensitive molecular biomarker for lymph node staging by EBUS-TBNA. Five microRNAs (miRNAs) (miR-200a, miR-200b, miR-200c, miR-141, and let-7e) were selected as biomarker candidates for the detection of nodal metastasis in a miRNA expression analysis. After having established a cutoff level of expression for each marker to differentiate malignant from benign lymph nodes among surgically dissected lymph nodes, the cutoff level was applied to snap-frozen EBUS-TBNA samples. Archived formalin-fixed paraffin- embedded (FFPE) samples rebiopsied by EBUS-TBNA after induction chemoradiotherapy were also analyzed. The expression of all candidate miRNAs was significantly higher in metastatic lymph nodes than in benign ones (p < 0.05) among the surgical samples. miR-200c showed the highest diagnostic yield, with a sensitivity of 95.4% and a specificity of 100%. When the cutoff value for miR-200c was applied to the snap-frozen EBUS-TBNA samples, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy were 97.4, 81.8, 95.0, 90.0, and 94.0%, respectively. For restaging FFPE EBUS- TBNA samples, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy were 100, 60.0, 80.0, 100, and 84.6%, respectively. Among the restaged samples, 4 malignant lymph nodes were false negative by EBUS-TBNA, but they were accurately identified by miR-200c. miR-200c can be used as a highly sensitive molecular staging biomarker that will enhance nodal staging of lung cancer. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. [Ultrasound-guided Rectus Sheath Block vs Transversus Abdominis Plane Block in Children Undergoing Umbilical Hernia Repair].

    PubMed

    Torii, Naoko; Tachibana, Kazuya; Iwasaki, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Muneyuki; Kinouchi, Keiko

    2016-06-01

    Although many reports describe the usefulness of the rectus sheath block (RSB) in the umbilical hernia repair, the efficacy of the transversus abdominis plane block (TAPB) is rarely reported. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy and technique of ultrasound-guided RSB and TAPB in children undergoing umbilical hernia repair. Thirty-four children younger than 12 years of age scheduled for umbilical hernia repair were enrolled in this prospective observer-blinded randomized clinical trial. They were randomly assigned either to RSB group (median age, 3.7 years) or TAPB group (median age, 3.8 years). After the induction of general anesthesia with sevoflurane, nitrous oxide, and oxygen children in both groups received regional anesthesia with 0.3 ml x kg(-1) of 0.25% ropivacaine on each side under ultrasound guidance. Hemodynamic changes at the skin incision, postoperative pain scores and parental satisfaction were recorded. Anesthesiologists rated the quality of ultrasound images and easiness of the block performance. The patients' demographics of the two groups were similar. There were no significant differences in the time needed for the block procedure, quality of ultrasound images and the change of the heart rate and blood pressure at the skin incision between the two groups. Postoperative pain score (immediately, 2 and 4 hours after the operation), need for rescue analgesia and satisfaction of the parents also did not differ. There were no major complications in the patients. TAPB provided comparable perioperative analgesia and easiness of block performance to RSB in the pediatric umbilical hernia repair.

  6. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block or wound infiltration in children: A randomized blinded study of analgesia and bupivacaine absorption

    PubMed Central

    Flack, Sean H.; Martin, Lizabeth D.; Walker, Benjamin J.; Bosenberg, Adrian T.; Helmers, Laurilyn D.; Goldin, Adam B.; Haberkern, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Rectus sheath block can provide analgesia following umbilical hernia repair. However, conflicting reports on its analgesic effectiveness exist. No study has investigated plasma local anesthetic concentration following ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block (USGRSB) in children. Objectives Compare the effectiveness and bupivacaine absorption following USGRSB or wound infiltration (WI) for umbilical hernia repair in children. Methods A randomized blinded study comparing WI to USGRSB in 40 children undergoing umbilical hernia repair was performed. Group WI (n=20) received wound infiltration 1mg/kg 0.25% bupivacaine. Group RS (n=20) received USGRSB 0.5mg/kg 0.25% bupivacaine per side in the posterior rectus sheath compartment. Pain scores and rescue analgesia were recorded. Blood samples were drawn at 0, 10, 20, 30, 45 and 60 minutes. Results Patients in the WI group had a 2-fold increased risk of requiring morphine (Hazard ratio 2.06, 95% CI 1.01, 4.20, p=0.05). When required, median time to first morphine dose was longer in the USGRSB group (65.5 min vs 47.5 min, p=0.049). Peak plasma bupivacaine concentration was higher following USGRSB than WI (median: 631.9 ng/ml IQR: 553.9 – 784.1 vs 389.7 ng/ml IQR: 250.5-502.7, p= 0.002). Tmax was longer in the USGRSB group (median 45 min IQR: 30 - 60 vs 20 min IQR: 20 – 45, p= 0.006). Conclusions USGRSB provides more effective analgesia than WI for umbilical hernia repair. USGRSB with 1mg/kg 0.25% bupivacaine is associated with safe plasma bupivacaine concentration that peaks higher and later than WI. Caution against using larger volumes of higher concentration local anesthetic for USGRSB is advised. PMID:24853314

  7. Needle localization using a moving stylet/catheter in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Parmida; Rohling, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Despite the wide range and long history of ultrasound guided needle insertions, an unresolved issue in many cases is clear needle visibility. A well-known ad hoc technique to detect the needle is to move the stylet and look for changes in the needle appearance. We present a new method to automatically locate a moving stylet/catheter within a stationary cannula using motion detection. We then use this information to detect the needle trajectory and the tip. The differences between the current frame and the previous frame are detected and localized, to minimize the influence of tissue global motions. A polynomial fit based on the detected needle axis determines the estimated stylet shaft trajectory, and the extent of the differences along the needle axis represents the tip. Over a few periodic movements of the stylet including its full insertion into the cannula to the tip, a combination of polynomial fits determines the needle trajectory and the last detected point represents the needle tip. Experiments are conducted in water bath and bovine muscle tissue for several stylet/catheter materials. Results show that a plastic stylet has the best needle shaft and tip localization accuracy in the water bath with RMSE = 0:16 mm and RMSE = 0:51 mm, respectively. In the bovine tissue, the needle tip was best localized with the plastic catheter with RMSE = 0:33 mm. The stylet tip localization was most accurate with the steel stylet, with RMSE = 2:81 mm and the shaft was best localized with the plastic catheter, with RMSE = 0:32 mm.

  8. Success of ultrasound-guided versus landmark-guided arthrocentesis of hip, ankle, and wrist in a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Berona, Kristin; Abdi, Amin; Menchine, Michael; Mailhot, Tom; Kang, Tarina; Seif, Dina; Chilstrom, Mikaela

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate emergency medicine resident-performed ultrasound for diagnosis of effusions, compare the success of a landmark-guided (LM) approach with an ultrasound-guided (US) technique for hip, ankle and wrist arthrocentesis, and compare change in provider confidence with LM and US arthrocentesis. After a brief video on LM and US arthrocentesis, residents were asked to identify artificially created effusions in the hip, ankle and wrist in a cadaver model and to perform US and LM arthrocentesis of the effusions. Outcomes included success of joint aspiration, time to aspiration, and number of attempts. Residents were surveyed regarding their confidence in identifying effusions with ultrasound and performing LM and US arthrocentesis. Eighteen residents completed the study. Sensitivity of ultrasound for detecting joint effusion was 86% and specificity was 90%. Residents were successful with ultrasound in 96% of attempts and with landmark 89% of attempts (p=0.257). Median number of attempts was 1 with ultrasound and 2 with landmarks (p=0.12). Median time to success with ultrasound was 38s and 51s with landmarks (p=0.23). After the session, confidence in both US and LM arthrocentesis improved significantly, however the post intervention confidence in US arthrocentesis was higher than LM (4.3 vs. 3.8, p<0.001). EM residents were able to successfully identify joint effusions with ultrasound, however we were unable to detect significant differences in actual procedural success between the two modalities. Further studies are needed to define the role of ultrasound for arthrocentesis in the emergency department. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Young Investigator Challenge: Building an ultrasound-guided FNA clinic-our 5-year experience: From project to practice.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Oana C; Klein, Melissa; Serbonich, Melissa M; Vadalia, Bhumika; Das, Kasturi; Gimenez, Cecilia E

    2017-03-01

    The authors' fine-needle aspiration (FNA) clinic opened in 2010, allowing cytopathologists to increase their proficiency and experience in FNA performance. Here, they report their 5-year experience. The FNA clinic log book and the institution's database were retrospectively reviewed to record patients' demographics, the number of FNAs performed per year by each cytopathologist, the number of passes, rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) and diagnosis, adequacy-diagnosis concordance, and follow-up histology when available. The numbers and types of cases per year and variations among cytopathologists were compared. In total, 474 cases were identified within a 5-year time-frame. The discrepancy rate between the on-site and final diagnoses decreased progressively, from 4.4% to 2.4%. The nondiagnostic rate decreased from 2011 to 2015, with the exception of 2014, when an increase was noted, possibly because of a lower number of cases. Cytopathologists' performance was assessed over a 3-year period. The number of passes for each FNA decreased over time. The cytology-histology concordance was 100% over time for all cytopathologists. There was a diagnostic discrepancy between the ROSE and final diagnoses for 3 of 104 cases in 2013 and for 3 of 124 cases in 2015. The total number of passes was not consistently recorded until 2014, when a final report template was instituted. The technique improved over time because of accumulated experience, constant practice with phantoms, and attending the College of American Pathologists' training in ultrasound-guided FNA. FNAs performed by cytopathologists have a high-rate of ROSE/adequacy and a low diagnostic discrepancy rate. Cytopathologists as interventionalists provide optimal care and excellent patient satisfaction. Cancer Cytopathol 2017;125:161-168. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  10. Feasibility of Retrograde Ureteral Contrast Injection to Guide Ultrasonographic Percutaneous Renal Access in the Nondilated Collecting System.

    PubMed

    Usawachintachit, Manint; Tzou, David T; Mongan, John; Taguchi, Kazumi; Weinstein, Stefanie; Chi, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has become increasingly utilized. Patients with nondilated collecting systems represent a challenge: the target calix is often difficult to visualize. Here we report pilot study results for retrograde ultrasound contrast injection to aid in percutaneous renal access during ultrasound-guided PCNL. From April to July 2016, consecutive patients over the age of 18 years with nondilated collecting systems on preoperative imaging who presented for PCNL were enrolled. B-mode ultrasound imaging was compared with contrast-enhanced mode with simultaneous retrograde injection of Optison™ via an ipsilateral ureteral catheter. Five patients (four males and one female) with renal stones underwent PCNL with retrograde ultrasound contrast injection during the study period. Mean body mass index was 28.3 ± 5.6 kg/m 2 and mean stone size was 24.5 ± 12.0 mm. Under B-mode ultrasound, all patients demonstrated nondilated renal collecting systems that appeared as hyperechoic areas, where it was difficult to identify a target calix for puncture. Retrograde contrast injection facilitated delineation of all renal calices initially difficult to visualize under B-mode ultrasound. Renal puncture was then performed effectively in all cases with a mean puncture time of 55.4 ± 44.8 seconds. All PCNL procedures were completed without intraoperative complications and no adverse events related to ultrasound contrast injection occurred. Retrograde ultrasound contrast injection as an aide for renal puncture during PCNL is a feasible technique. By improving visualization of the collecting system, it facilitates needle placement in challenging patients without hydronephrosis. Future larger scale studies comparing its use to standard ultrasound-guided technique will be required to validate this concept.

  11. Approach for chronic total occlusion with intravascular ultrasound-guided reverse controlled antegrade and retrograde tracking technique: single center experience.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian; Katoh, Osamu; Kyo, Eisho; Tsuji, Takafumi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ohya, Hidefumi

    2013-10-01

    Controlled antegrade and retrograde subintimal tracking (CART) or reverse CART techniques is the final step for percutaneous revascularization of coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO), but it still represents technical challenges and risk in interventional procedures. Our purpose was to utilize intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided reverse CART approach for percutaneous revascularization of CTO in our heart center, focusing on its safety, efficacy, and latest technical developments. From November 2006 to November 2012, 49 patients with CTO failed to antegrade and/or retrograde percutaneous revascularization of CTO from true lumen to true lumen were enrolled in and underwent IVUS guided reverse CART approach. The mean J-CTO score of cases was 2.5. IVUS guidance was successfully implemented in 95.9%; IVUS identified that 61.7% of retrograde wires were located at intimal space, and 59.5% of antegrade wires were located at subintimal space. A Corsair channel dilator was used in 77.6% of cases. The success rates of technique and procedure were 95.9% and 93.9%, respectively; the technical minor complications were observed in 10.2% of cases, without significant clinic outcomes; 2.0% of cases occurred with a major adverse cardiac event of non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction; and no case occurred with target vessel revascularization or death. The mean length of stent implanted in a single CTO vessel was 51.3 mm. No patient appeared with radiation dermatitis and contrast-induced rise of creatinine. IVUS guided reverse CART approach is effective and safe for percutaneous revascularization of complex CTO, with a high success and a low complication rate. It is feasible to develop this approach for percutaneous revascularization of complex CTO. However, suitable case selection and lately device handling by experienced operators are the crucial points of success. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effects of arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block combined with ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Jun; Hwang, Jung-Taek; Kim, Do-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Hwang, Sung Mi; Lee, Na Rea; Kwak, Byung-Chan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pain relieving effect of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) combined with arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) with that of ultrasound-guided ISB alone within the first 48 h after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Forty-eight patients with rotator cuff tears who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled. The 24 patients in group 1 received ultrasound-guided ISB and arthroscopy-guided SSNB; the remaining 24 patients in group 2 underwent ultrasound-guided ISB alone. Visual analogue scale pain score and patient satisfaction score were checked at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively. Group 1 had a lower visual analogue scale pain score at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively (1.7 < 2.6, 1.6 < 4.0, 3.5 < 5.8, 3.6 < 5.2, 3.2 < 4.2, 1.3 < 2.0), and a higher patient satisfaction score at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 h post-operatively than group 2 (7.8 > 6.0, 6.2 > 4.3, 6.4 > 5.1, 6.9 > 5.9, 7.9 > 7.1). Six patients in group 1 developed rebound pain twice, and the others in group 1 developed it once. All of the patients in group 2 had one rebound phenomenon each (p = 0.010). The mean timing of rebound pain in group 1 was later than that in group 2 (15.5 > 9.3 h, p < 0.001), and the mean size of rebound pain was smaller in group 1 than that in group 2 (2.5 > 4.0, p = 0.001). Arthroscopy-guided SSNB combined with ultrasound-guided ISB resulted in lower visual analogue scale pain scores at 3-24 and 48 h post-operatively, and higher patient satisfaction scores at 6-36 h post-operatively with the attenuated rebound pain compared to scores in patients who received ultrasound-guided ISB alone after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The combined blocks may relieve post-operative pain more effectively than the single block within 48 h after arthroscopic cuff repair. Randomized controlled trial, Level I. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier

  13. Ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane vs surgeon administered intraoperative regional field infiltration with bupivacaine for early postoperative pain control in children undergoing open pyeloplasty.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Armando J; Lynch, Johanne; Matava, Clyde; El-Beheiry, Hossam; Hayes, Jason

    2014-07-01

    Regional analgesic techniques are commonly used in pediatric urology. Ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block has recently gained popularity. However, there is a paucity of information supporting a benefit over regional field infiltration. We present a parallel group, randomized, controlled trial evaluating ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block superiority over surgeon delivered regional field infiltration for children undergoing open pyeloplasty at a tertiary referral center. Following ethics board approval and registration, children 0 to 6 years old were recruited and randomized to undergo perioperative transversus abdominis plane block or regional field infiltration for early post-pyeloplasty pain control. General anesthetic delivery, surgical technique and postoperative analgesics were standardized. A blinded assessor regularly captured pain scores in the recovery room using the FLACC (Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability) scale. The primary outcome was the need for rescue morphine administration based on a FLACC score of 3 or higher. Two pediatric urologists performed 57 pyeloplasties during a 2.5-year period, enrolling 32 children (16 in each group, balanced for age and weight). There were statistically significant differences in the number of children requiring rescue morphine administration (13 of 16 receiving transversus abdominis plane block and 6 of 16 receiving regional field infiltration, p = 0.011), mean ± SD total morphine consumption (0.066 ± 0.051 vs 0.028 ± 0.040 mg/kg, p = 0.021) and mean ± SD pain scores (5 ± 5 vs 2 ± 3, p = 0.043) in the recovery room, in favor of surgeon administered regional field infiltration. No local anesthetic specific adverse events were noted. Ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block is not superior to regional field infiltration with bupivacaine as a strategy to minimize early opioid requirements following open pyeloplasty in children. Instead, our data suggest that

  14. Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency of the genicular nerves in the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis knee pain

    PubMed Central

    Valentí, Pedro; Hernández, Beatriz; Mir, Bartolome; Aguilar, Jose Luis

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The goals for the management of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee are to control pain and to minimise disability. Because the number of patients will increase as the population ages, alternative approaches to alleviate their joint pain other than conventional treatments are necessary. The purpose of this article is to present a refined protocol to determine if there is long-term improvement in pain and function after ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the genicular nerves (GNs) in patients with chronic painful knee OA. Methods and analysis This study is a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design trial. One hundred and forty-two outpatients with OA of the knee will be recruited from Mallorca, Spain. Participants will be randomly allocated into two groups: ultrasound-guided sham GN pulsed radiofrequency without active treatment and ultrasound-guided real GN pulsed radiofrequency. The primary outcome measures will be the observed changes from baseline pain intensity based on visual analogue scale (VAS). The possible changes in the secondary efficacy variables from the baseline as assessed by the Goldberg Anxiety and Depression Scale, pain medication use, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC subscales) and VAS pain intensity are also to be included in the study. These variables will be assessed at baseline, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year after treatment. Ethics and dissemination The protocol was approved by the Research Ethic Committee of the Balearic Islands (IB 3223/16 PI). The results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals and at scientific conferences. Trial registration Trial registration numberNCT02915120; Pre-results PMID:29102985

  15. The effect of morphine added to bupivacaine in ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block for postoperative analgesia following lower abdominal cancer surgery, a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    El Sherif, Fatma Adel; Mohamed, Sahar Abdel-Baky; Kamal, Shereen Mamdouh

    2017-06-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block used for management of surgical abdominal pain by injecting local anesthetics into the plane between the internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles. We aimed to explore the effect of adding morphine to bupivacaine in ultrasound guided TAP-block in patients undergoing lower abdominal cancer surgery. Randomized, double-blind, prospective study. Clinical trial identifier: NCT02566096. Academic medical center. Sixty patients were enrolled in this study after ethical committee approval. Patients divided into 2 groups (30 each): Bupivacaine group (GB): given ultrasound guided TAP-block 20ml 0.5% bupivacaine diluted in 20ml saline; Morphine group (GM): given ultrasound guided TAP-block with 20ml 0.5% bupivacaine+10mg morphine sulphate diluted in 20ml saline. Patients were observed for total morphine consumption, time for first request of rescue analgesia, sedation scores, hemodynamics and side effects for 24h postoperatively. Morphine added to bupivacaine in TAP block compared to bupivacaine alone reduced total morphine consumption (5.33±1.28mg) (10.70±3.09mg) respectively (p<0.001), prolonged the time to first request of analgesia (10.40±4.96h) (6.97±3.26h) respectively (p<0.008), with a statistically significant decrease in (VAS-M) in GM compared with GB at 12h postoperatively (p<0.002). No significant differences in hemodynamics, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, sedation score, and side effects except for nausea were observed (p>0.05). Addition of morphine to bupivacaine in TAP block is effective method for pain management in patients undergoing major abdominal cancer surgery without serious side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. In-line positioning of ultrasound images using wireless remote display system with tablet computer facilitates ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Masahiko; Mizutani, Koh; Funai, Yusuke; Nakamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided procedures may be easier to perform when the operator's eye axis, needle puncture site, and ultrasound image display form a straight line in the puncture direction. However, such methods have not been well tested in clinical settings because that arrangement is often impossible due to limited space in the operating room. We developed a wireless remote display system for ultrasound devices using a tablet computer (iPad Mini), which allows easy display of images at nearly any location chosen by the operator. We hypothesized that the in-line layout of ultrasound images provided by this system would allow for secure and quick catheterization of the radial artery. We enrolled first-year medical interns (n = 20) who had no prior experience with ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization to perform that using a short-axis out-of-plane approach with two different methods. With the conventional method, only the ultrasound machine placed at the side of the head of the patient across the targeted forearm was utilized. With the tablet method, the ultrasound images were displayed on an iPad Mini positioned on the arm in alignment with the operator's eye axis and needle puncture direction. The success rate and time required for catheterization were compared between the two methods. Success rate was significantly higher (100 vs. 70 %, P = 0.02) and catheterization time significantly shorter (28.5 ± 7.5 vs. 68.2 ± 14.3 s, P < 0.001) with the tablet method as compared to the conventional method. An ergonomic straight arrangement of the image display is crucial for successful and quick completion of ultrasound-guided arterial catheterization. The present remote display system is a practical method for providing such an arrangement.

  17. Acute bacterial prostatitis after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy: epidemiological, bacteria and treatment patterns from a 4-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Campeggi, Alexandre; Ouzaid, Idir; Xylinas, Evanguelos; Lesprit, Philippe; Hoznek, Andras; Vordos, Dimitri; Abbou, Claude-Clément; Salomon, Laurent; de la Taille, Alexandre

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the incidence, and clinical and bacterial features of iatrogenic prostatitis within 1 month after transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy for detection of prostate cancer. From January 2006 to December 2009, 3000 patients underwent a 21-core transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy at Henri Mondor Hospital (Créteil, France) and were prospectively followed. All patients had a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial prophylaxis for 7 days. The primary study end-point was to evaluate the incidence of iatrogenic acute prostatitis within 1 month after the biopsy. The secondary end-point was to analyze the clinical and the bacterial features of the prostatitis. Overall, 20 patients of the entire study population (0.67%) had an acute bacterial prostatitis within 2.90 ± 1.77 days (range 1-7 days) after the transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy. The groups of patients with (n = 20) and without (n = 2980) infection were similar in terms of age, prostate-specific antigen level and prostate volume. Escherichia coli was the only isolated bacteria. The subsequent tests for antibiotic susceptibility showed a 95% resistance for fluroquinolone and amoxicillin. Resistance to amoxiclav, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, third generation cephalosporin and amikacin was 70%, 70%, 25% and 5% respectively. No resistance to imipenem was reported. They were all admitted for treatment without the need of intensive care unit referral. Complete recovery was achieved after 21.4 ± 7 days of antibiotic treatment. A fluroquinolone-based regimen still represents an appropriate prophylaxis protocol to minimize the risk of acute prostatitis secondary to prostate biopsy. Patients should be provided the appropriate care soon after the onset of the symptoms. An intravenous third generation cephalosporin or imipenem-based therapy seem to provide satisfying results. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  18. A Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating the See, Tilt, Align, and Rotate (STAR) Maneuver on Skill Acquisition for Simulated Ultrasound-Guided Interventional Procedures.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nicholas C K; Fishburn, Steven J; Hammer, Angie R; Petersen, Timothy R; Gerstein, Neal S; Mariano, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    Achieving the best view of the needle and target anatomy when performing ultrasound-guided interventional procedures requires technical skill, which novices may find difficult to learn. We hypothesized that teaching novice performers to use 4 sequential steps (see, tilt, align, and rotate [STAR] method) to identify the needle under ultrasound guidance is more efficient than training with the commonly described probe movements of align, rotate, and tilt (ART). This study compared 2 instructional methods for transducer manipulation including alignment of a probe and needle by novices during a simulated ultrasound-guided nerve block. Right-handed volunteers between the ages of 18 and 55 years who had no previous ultrasound experience were recruited and randomized to 1 of 2 groups; one group was trained to troubleshoot misalignment with the ART method, and the other was trained with the new STAR maneuver. Participants performed the task, consisting of directing a needle in plane to 3 targets in a standardized gelatin phantom 3 times. The performance assessor and data analyst were blinded to group assignment. Thirty-five participants were recruited. The STAR group was able to complete the task more quickly (P < .001) and visualized the needle in a greater proportion of the procedure time (P = .004) compared to the ART group. All STAR participants were able to complete the task, whereas 41% of ART participants abandoned the task (P = .003). Novices are able to complete a simulated ultrasound-guided nerve block more quickly and efficiently when trained with the 4-step STAR maneuver compared to the ART method. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  19. Evaluation of cost-effectiveness from the funding body's point of view of ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared with the conventional technique.

    PubMed

    Noritomi, Danilo Teixeira; Zigaib, Rogério; Ranzani, Otavio T; Teich, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness, from the funding body's point of view, of real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared to the traditional method, which is based on the external anatomical landmark technique. A theoretical simulation based on international literature data was applied to the Brazilian context, i.e., the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS). A decision tree was constructed that showed the two central venous catheter insertion techniques: real-time ultrasonography versus external anatomical landmarks. The probabilities of failure and complications were extracted from a search on the PubMed and Embase databases, and values associated with the procedure and with complications were taken from market research and the Department of Information Technology of the Unified Health System (DATASUS). Each central venous catheter insertion alternative had a cost that could be calculated by following each of the possible paths on the decision tree. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated by dividing the mean incremental cost of real-time ultrasound compared to the external anatomical landmark technique by the mean incremental benefit, in terms of avoided complications. When considering the incorporation of real-time ultrasound and the concomitant lower cost due to the reduced number of complications, the decision tree revealed a final mean cost for the external anatomical landmark technique of 262.27 Brazilian reals (R$) and for real-time ultrasound of R$187.94. The final incremental cost of the real-time ultrasound-guided technique was -R$74.33 per central venous catheter. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was -R$2,494.34 due to the pneumothorax avoided. Real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion was associated with decreased failure and complication rates and hypothetically reduced costs from the view of the funding body, which in this case was the SUS.

  20. Application of a topical vapocoolant spray decreases pain at the site of initial intradermal anaesthetic injection during ultrasound-guided breast needle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Collado-Mesa, F; Net, J M; Arheart, K; Klevos, G A; Yepes, M M

    2015-09-01

    To assess whether the application of a topical vapocoolant spray immediately prior to initial intradermal anaesthetic injection during ultrasound-guided breast biopsy decreases pain at the site of the initial injection. In this institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant study, 50 women aged 49.1 ± 1.6 years (mean ± standard error) were recruited and provided written informed consent. Participants served as their own controls and were blinded as to whether a topical vapocoolant spray or a placebo was used immediately prior to the initial local anaesthetic injection at two separate biopsy sites. With the exception of the application of vapocoolant or placebo, the entire ultrasound-guided procedure was performed according to a routine protocol. Participants recorded pain at initial injection site on a visual analogue scale. General linear mixed models for repeated measures analysis of variance and a 0.05 significance level were used. Application of topical vapocoolant spray was shown to significantly decrease pain at the site of initial intradermal anaesthetic injection as compared to placebo (p<0.001). Treatment effect was independent of age of the subject, race/ethnicity, operator, type of biopsy device, and histopathology result. No complications from vapocoolant spray use were reported. Application of a topical vapocoolant spray immediately prior to initial intradermal anaesthetic injection during ultrasound-guided breast biopsy significantly decreases pain at the site of the initial injection and could contribute to improve the patient's overall procedural experience. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Flurbiprofen Axetil Provides Effective Analgesia Without Changing the Pregnancy Rate in Ultrasound-Guided Transvaginal Oocyte Retrieval: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Feng, Yi; Jiang, Yan; Lu, Qun

    2017-10-01

    In this prospective double-blind randomized study, we evaluated the analgesic effect and potential effect on pregnancy rate of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen axetil in patients undergoing ultrasound-guided transvaginal oocyte retrieval under propofol-remifentanil anesthesia. A total of 200 patients scheduled to undergo ultrasound-guided transvaginal oocyte retrieval were randomly allocated to receive 1.5 mg/kg of flurbiprofen axetil (FA group) or placebo (control group) 30 minutes before the procedure. Postoperative pain scores, embryo implantation rate, and pregnancy rate were recorded. Neuroendocrine biomarkers and prostaglandin E2 levels in follicular fluid were tested after oocyte retrieval. Patients in the FA group awakened earlier after surgery than patients in the control group (3.3 ± 2.6 vs 5.3 ± 3.4 minutes, P < .05) and had lower pain scores than patients in the control group (2.0 [0.0, 2.8] vs 5.0 [3.0, 5.0], P< .001). The difference in pregnancy rates between the 2 groups (44%-44%) was 0% (conventional 2-sided 95% confidence interval, -13.8% to 13.8%). The lower limit of the 90% 1-sided confidence interval for this difference was -9.0%, which was within the predefined noninferiority margin of -15.0%. The concentration of prostaglandin E2 in follicular fluid was decreased in the FA group (24.51 ± 1.52 vs 25.15 ± 1.49 pg/mL, P = .039), although the difference does not appear to be clinically important. Flurbiprofen axetil given before ultrasound-guided transvaginal oocyte