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Sample records for ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecysto-cholangiography

  1. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff.

  2. Ultrasound-guided, percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation: technical note.

    PubMed

    Chan, Isaac; Brown, Anthony R; Park, Kenneth; Winfree, Christopher J

    2010-09-01

    Peripheral nerve stimulation is a form of neuromodulation that applies electric current to peripheral nerves to induce stimulation paresthesias within the painful areas. To report a method of ultrasound-guided, percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation. This technique utilizes real-time imaging to avoid injury to adjacent vascular structures during minimally invasive placement of peripheral nerve stimulator electrodes. We describe a patient that presented with chronic, bilateral foot pain following multiple foot surgeries, for whom a comprehensive, pain management treatment strategy had failed. We utilized ultrasound-guided, percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation at a thigh level to provide durable pain relief on the right side, and open peripheral nerve stimulation on the left. The patient experienced appropriate stimulation paresthesias and excellent pain relief on the plantar aspect of the right foot with the percutaneous electrode. On the left side, we were unable to direct the stimulation paresthesias to the sole of the foot, despite multiple electrode repositionings. A subsequent, open placement of a left tibial nerve stimulator was performed. This revealed that the correct electrode position against the tibial nerve was immediately adjacent to the popliteal artery, and was thus not appropriate for percutaneous placement. We describe a method of ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve stimulation that avoids the invasiveness of electrode placement via an open procedure while providing excellent pain relief. We further describe limitations of the percutaneous approach when navigating close to large blood vessels, a situation more appropriately managed with open peripheral nerve stimulator placement. Ultrasound-guided placement may be considered for patients receiving peripheral nerve stimulators placed within the deep tissues, and not easily placed in a blind fashion.

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Renal Access for Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Description of Three Novel Ultrasound-Guided Needle Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Carissa; Masic, Selma; Usawachintachit, Manint; Hu, Weiguo; Yang, Wenzeng; Stoller, Marshall; Li, Jianxing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ultrasound-guided renal access for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is a safe, effective, and low-cost procedure commonly performed worldwide, but a technique underutilized by urologists in the United States. The purpose of this article is to familiarize the practicing urologist with methods for ultrasound guidance for percutaneous renal access. We discuss two alternative techniques for gaining renal access for PCNL under ultrasound guidance. We also describe a novel technique of using the puncture needle to reposition residual stone fragments to avoid additional tract dilation. With appropriate training, ultrasound-guided renal access for PCNL can lead to reduced radiation exposure, accurate renal access, and excellent stone-free success rates and clinical outcomes. PMID:26414304

  4. [Percutaneous renal puncture guide by a novel real-time needle-tracking ultrasound system for percutaneous nephrolithotomy: analysis of 16 cases].

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai; Huang, Xiao-bo; Xiong, Liu-lin; Xu, Qing-quan; Xu, Tao; Ye, Hai-yun; Yu, Lu-ping; Wang, Xiao-feng

    2014-08-18

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of percutaneous renal puncture in percutaneous nephrolithotomy guided by novel needle-tracking ultrasound system. From may to october 2013, 16 cases of percutaneous nephrolithotomy were performed under the guidance of ultrasound system. The clinical data including the time of completing percutaneous renal puncture, the color of urine sucked out from the kidney calices, and the complications were analyzed retrospectively. Of the 16 patients, 18 percutaneous renal access were established guided by ultrasound system. All of them were successtul for the first time, and the average time of completing percutaneous renal punctures was (26.90 ± 11.37) s (15 to 54 s). After the operation, the hemoglobin decreased by (9.56 ± 5.27)%(1.41% to 24.06%), and no complications occurred except for postoperative fever in 2 case. The novel ultrasound system is a safe and effective technique that can reduce the technical difficulty of percutaneous renal puncture in percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Tenotomy of Biceps Tendon: Technical Feasibility on Cadavers.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Mauri, Giovanni; Messina, Carmelo; Aliprandi, Alberto; Secchi, Francesco; Sardanelli, Francesco; Randelli, Pietro Simone

    2016-10-01

    We tested the technical feasibility of ultrasound-guided percutaneous tenotomy of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) in cadavers. Both shoulders of two fresh cadavers were scanned anteriorly to evaluate the extra-articular portion of the LHBT. Under ultrasound monitoring, a scalpel was advanced obliquely up to touch the superficial medial side of the LHBT, cutting it until the tendon was not visible anymore. Ultrasound evaluation was repeated after the procedure, and anatomic dissection was performed. The procedure was 100% feasible: four cuts were made to completely sever the tendon; the duration was less than 1 min. Skin incision measured 5 mm in two cases and 6 mm in two cases. Anatomic dissection confirmed complete tendon cut in all cases with proximal and distal tendon stumps very close to each other. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous LHBT tenotomy was 100% technically feasible in cadavers with a quick procedure and minimal cutaneous incision. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Randelli, Filippo; Sdao, Silvana; Sardanelli, Francesco; Randelli, Pietro

    2014-08-01

    Calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff is a common condition. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration is one of several options to treat this condition. The main advantages of this procedure are short duration, good outcome, and low cost. Furthermore, only minor complications have been reported in the literature, namely, vagal reactions during the procedure and mild postprocedural pain. We report the first case of septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of calcific tendinopathy. Although this is generally considered a very safe procedure, a risk of infection should be taken into account. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Drainage of Neonatal Pyometrocolpos Under Local Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Algin, Oktay, E-mail: droktayalgin@gmail.com; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Kilic, Nizamettin

    2011-02-15

    Hydrometrocolpos is an uncommon congenital disorder with cystic dilatation of the vagina and uterus that occurs as a result of accumulated secretions from the reproductive tract due to distal genital tract obstruction. Secondary infection may also occur, resulting in pyometrocolpos, a potentially lethal disease. Immediate drainage of the cystic mass in patients determined to have pyometrocolpos is required to prevent or treat uropathy and septicemia until definitive corrective surgery can be performed. We report an unusual cause of obstructive uropathy in three infants: pyometrocolpos due to lower genital tract atresia. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage of the pyometrocolpos resulted in dramatically improvedmore » clinical and laboratory findings in these patients. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage under local anesthesia is a simple, minimally invasive, safe, and effective procedure that facilitates later successful corrective surgery and avoids the need for more complex drainage procedures.« less

  8. Realtime ultrasound guided percutaneous tracheostomy in emergency setting: the glass ceiling has been broken.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Parli Raghavan; Vijai, M N; Shouche, Sachin

    2017-01-01

    In recent years ultrasound guided percutaneous tracheostomy (USPCT) has become a routine practice in critical care units. Its safety and superiority over conventional percutaneous tracheostomy and bronchoscopic guided PCT is proven to be non-inferior in elective cases. However its role in emergency percutaneous tracheostomy has never been studied, since percutaneous tracheostomy itself remains an enigma in accessing emergency airway. There is no report of use of ultrasound guided percutaneous tracheostomy in emergency setting so far in the literature. We report our early experience with USPCT in emergency setting. Sixteen adult patients who required access to an emergency surgical airway after failure to accomplish emergency oro-tracheal intubation were the study population. Their airway was accessed by USPCT. Recorded data included clinical and demographic data including time taken to perform the procedure and complications. Short term and long term follow ups for a period of 2 years were done for the survivors. Twelve male and four female patients underwent the procedure and the average time of the procedure was 3.6 min with no failures nor conversions to surgical tracheostomy and no complications. The average oxygen saturation was 86% and average Glasgow coma scale was 8.4. This time period included the oxygen insufflation time. 10 patients were decannulated while six patients died due to the pathology of the disease itself. There were no complications in either short term or long term follow up. USPCT has a definitive role in emergency both in trauma and non-trauma setting. It is safe, feasible and faster in experienced hands. Use of USPCT in emergency setting has further narrowed the list of contraindications of percutaneous tracheostomy.

  9. Ultrasound-guided, minimally invasive, percutaneous needle puncture treatment for tennis elbow.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiaan; Hu, Bing; Xing, Chunyan; Li, Jia

    2008-10-01

    This report evaluates the efficacy of percutaneous needle puncture under sonographic guidance in treating lateral epicondylitis (tennis-elbow). Ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle puncture was performed on 76 patients who presented with persistent elbow pain. Under a local anesthetic and sonographic guidance, a needle was advanced into the calcification foci and the calcifications were mechanically fragmented. This was followed by a local injection of 25 mg prednisone acetate and 1% lidocaine. If no calcification was found then multiple punctures were performed followed by local injection of 25 mg prednisone acetate and 1% lidocaine. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the degree of pain pre-and posttreatment at 1 week to 24 weeks. Elbow function improvement and degree of self-satisfaction were also evaluated. Of the 76 patients, 55% were rated with excellent treatment outcome, 32% good, 11% average, and 3% poor. From 3 weeks posttreatment, VAS scores were significantly reduced compared with the pretreatment score (P<0.05) and continued to gradually decline up to 24 weeks posttreatment. Sonography demonstrated that the calcified lesions disappeared completely in 13% of the patients, were reduced in 61% of the patients, and did not change in 26% of the patients. Color Doppler flow signal used to assess hemodynamic changes showed a significant improvement after treatment in most patients. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle puncture is an effective and minimally invasive treatment for tennis elbow. Sonography can be used to accurately identify the puncture location and monitor changes.

  10. Intravascular Ultrasound to Guide Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as an adjunctive imaging tool to coronary angiography for guiding percutaneous coronary interventions. Background Intravascular Ultrasound Intravascular ultrasound is a procedure that uses high frequency sound waves to acquire 3-dimensional images from the lumen of a blood vessel. The equipment for performing IVUS consists of a percutaneous transducer catheter and a console for reconstructing images. IVUS has been used to study the structure of the arterial wall and nature of atherosclerotic plaques, and obtain measurements of the vessel lumen. Its role in guiding stent placement is also being investigated. IVUS is presently not an insured health service in Ontario. Clinical Need Coronary artery disease accounts for approximately 55% of cardiovascular deaths, the leading cause of death in Canada. In Ontario, the annual mortality rate due to ischemic heart disease was 141.8 per 100,000 population between 1995 and 1997. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a less invasive approach to treating coronary artery disease, is used more frequently than coronary bypass surgery in Ontario. The number of percutaneous coronary intervention procedures funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care is expected to increase from approximately 17, 780 in 2004/2005 to 22,355 in 2006/2007 (an increase of 26%), with about 95% requiring the placement of one or more stents. Restenosis following percutaneous coronary interventions involving bare metal stents occurs in 15% to 30% of the cases, mainly because of smooth muscle proliferation and migration, and production of extracellular matrix. In-stent restenosis has been linked to suboptimal stent expansion and inadequate lesion coverage, while stent thrombosis has been attributed to incomplete stent-to-vessel wall apposition. Since

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Buría, José L.; Truyols-Domínguez, Sebastián; Valero-Alcaide, Raquel; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Atín-Arratibel, María A.; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US-) guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n = 17) group or exercise (n = 19) group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous electrolysis group also received the application of galvanic current through acupuncture needle on each session once a week (total 4 sessions). Shoulder pain (NPRS) and disability (DASH) were assessed at baseline, after 2 sessions, and 1 week after the last session. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant Group∗Time interactions for shoulder pain and disability (all, P < 0.01): individuals receiving US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with the eccentric exercises experienced greater improvement than those receiving eccentric exercise alone. Conclusions. US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with eccentric exercises resulted in small better outcomes at short term compared to when only eccentric exercises were applied in subacromial pain syndrome. The effect was statistically and clinically significant for shoulder pain but below minimal clinical difference for function. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects and potential placebo effect of this intervention. PMID:26649058

  12. X-ray–free Ultrasound-guided Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: How to Select the Right Patient?

    PubMed Central

    Usawachintachit, Manint; Tzou, David T.; Hu, Weiguo; Li, Jianxing; Chi, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify factors associated with successful ultrasound guidance for each surgical step of ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). PATIENTS AND METHODS Consecutive patients undergoing PCNL between March 2015 and June 2016 were prospectively enrolled. An attempt was made to use ultrasound guidance in renal access, tract dilation, and nephrostomy tube placement for each patient. For steps during which ultrasound guidance was unsuccessful, fluoroscopic screening was applied. Regression analysis identified patient characteristics associated with successful use of ultrasound guidance. RESULTS A total of 96 patients composed this cohort, with a mean body mass index of 28.7 kg/m2. Mean stone size was 33.1 ± 18.9 mm, and no hydronephrosis was found in 63.5% of cases. Fluoroscopic screening was required for renal access in 27 cases (28.1%), tract dilation in 38 (39.6%), and nephrostomy tube placement in 80 (83.3%). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that successful ultrasound guidance was significantly associated with the presence of hydronephrosis for renal access and the absence of staghorn calculi for tract dilation. Ultrasound-guided nephrostomy tube placement appeared linked to surgeon experience. CONCLUSION To achieve completely x-ray–free ultrasound-guided PCNL, the ideal patient should have a hydronephrotic collecting system with no staghorn stone present. For practitioners looking to adopt ultrasound guidance into their PCNL practice, these represent the most appropriate patients to safely initiate a surgical experience. PMID:27720776

  13. [Antegrade visualization of the billiary duct system by percutaneous transjugular cholangiography (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Huchzermeyer, H; Luska, G; Freuschmidt, J

    1976-01-01

    Percutaneous transjugular cholangiography (PTJC) is a new technique for visualization of the biliary duct system and for diagnosis of obstructive jaundice. First experiences of the authors in 22 patients are described. The advantages and disadvantages of this procedure, which at the present time is used rather rarely, are discussed and compared to various other cholangiographic methods. The endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) was used for patients with obstructive jaundice of unknown origine in the first place. If the biliary duct system could not be visualized by ERC (failure of complete obstruction of the common bile duct), the antegrade technique (PTJC) was performed. The peritoneoscopic and the transjugular cholangiography yield about the same percentage of positive results (90%), as far as visualization of the biliary tree is concerned. However in contrast to the peritoneoscopic methods PTJC seems to bear a smaller risk of complications. Some further diagnostic and therapeutical advantages, which might result from the use of PTJC are pointed out.

  14. Benign Biliary Strictures: Diagnostic Evaluation and Approaches to Percutaneous Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fidelman, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    Interventional radiologists are often consulted to help identify and treat biliary strictures that can result from a variety of benign etiologies. Mainstays of noninvasive imaging for benign biliary strictures include ultrasound, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and computed tomography cholangiography. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography is the invasive diagnostic procedure of choice, allowing both localization of a stricture and treatment. Percutaneous biliary interventions are reserved for patients who are not candidates for endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (eg, history of distal gastrectomy and biliary-enteric anastomosis to a jejunal roux limb). This review discusses the roles of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary drainage in the diagnosis of benign biliary strictures. The methodology for crossing benign biliary strictures, approaches to balloon dilation, management of recalcitrant strictures (ie, large-bore biliary catheters and retrievable covered stents), and the expected outcomes and complications of percutaneous treatment of benign biliary strictures are also addressed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultrasonographic percutaneous anatomy of the atlanto-occipital region and indirect ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture in the dog and the cat.

    PubMed

    Etienne, A-L; Audigié, F; Peeters, D; Gabriel, A; Busoni, V

    2015-04-01

    Cisternal puncture in dogs and cats is commonly carried out. This article describes the percutaneous ultrasound anatomy of the cisternal region in the dog and the cat and an indirect technique for ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture. Ultrasound images obtained ex vivo and in vivo were compared with anatomic sections and used to identify the landmarks for ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture. The ultrasound-guided procedure was established in cadavers and then applied in vivo in seven dogs and two cats. The anatomic landmarks for the ultrasound-guided puncture are the cisterna magna, the spinal cord, the two occipital condyles on transverse images, the external occipital crest and the dorsal arch of the first cervical vertebra on longitudinal images. Using these ultrasound anatomic landmarks, an indirect ultrasound-guided technique for cisternal puncture is applicable in the dog and the cat. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided vs. intraoperative rectus sheath block for pediatric umbilical hernia repair: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Litz, Cristen N; Farach, Sandra M; Fernandez, Allison M; Elliott, Richard; Dolan, Jenny; Patel, Nikhil; Zamora, Lillian; Colombani, Paul M; Walford, Nebbie E; Amankwah, Ernest K; Snyder, Christopher W; Danielson, Paul D; Chandler, Nicole M

    2017-06-01

    Regional anesthesia is commonly used in children. Our hypothesis was that percutaneous ultrasound-guided (PERC) rectus sheath blocks would result in lower postoperative pain scores compared to intraoperative (IO) rectus sheath blocks following umbilical hernia repair. A single-institution randomized blinded trial was conducted in pediatric patients undergoing elective umbilical hernia repair. The primary outcome was mean postoperative Wong-Baker pain score. Secondary outcomes included narcotic requirements and length of postoperative stay. Fifty-eight patients were included: 28 PERC and 30 IO. Operating room time was significantly longer in the PERC group (41 vs. 35min, p<0.01). Mean postoperative pain scores (PERC-2.6 vs. IO-3.3, p=0.11), morphine equivalents intraoperatively (PERC-0 vs. IO-0.04mg/kg, p=0.29) and postoperatively (PERC-0.04 vs. IO-0.09mg/kg, p=0.17), time to first postoperative narcotic dose (PERC-30 vs. IO-22min, p=0.33, log-rank test), and postoperative length of stay (PERC-76 vs. IO-80min, p=0.44) were similar. Following umbilical hernia repair in children, percutaneous ultrasound-guided and intraoperative rectus sheath blocks resulted in similar mean postoperative pain scores. There were no differences in secondary outcomes such as time to first narcotic, narcotic requirements, and length of stay. The additional resources required to complete a percutaneous ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block may not be warranted. Randomized controlled trial. Level I. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 'X-ray'-free balloon dilation for totally ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tie; Chen, Guanghua; Gao, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Chuanliang; Li, Lei; Sun, Yinghao

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of balloon dilation for 'X-ray'-free ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). From January 2012 to December 2012, patients underwent 'X-ray'-free ultrasound-guided PCNL with Amplatz dilator (Group A). From January 2013 to April 2014, patients underwent 'X-ray'-free ultrasound-guided PCNL with balloon dilator (Group B). For balloon dilation, a 10 F fascial dilator was used to dilate the tract. Subsequently, the 6 F nephrostomy balloon (8 mm in diameter) was indwelled along the guidewire with a marked length equal to the dilation depth. Under the monitoring of ultrasound, the location of balloon was secured and disappearance of balloon waist was confirmed when the balloon was inflated at a pressure of 20 atm. A total of 163 patients were involved in this study. Of 81 procedures in Group A, 45 procedures were performed by a senior urologist while 36 procedures by a resident. Of 82 patients in Group B, 47 procedures were performed by the same senior urologist while 35 procedures by another resident. For the senior urologist, there was no statistically significant difference between two groups in calyx of entry, stone-free rate, decline of hemoglobin and hematocrit, operation time and hospitalization. But for the residents, there was less decline of hemoglobin and hematocrit, tract development time and hospitalization in Group B compared to Group A (0.6 vs. 1.7 g/dl, p = 0.001; 2.3% vs. 5.5%, p = 0.003; 10.1 vs. 11.0 min, p = 0.027; 7.8 vs. 13.9 days, p < 0.001). Balloon dilation method introduced in this study is compensable for tract development when 'X-ray'-free ultrasound-guided PCNL is performed. Modified techniques make totally ultrasound guidance for PCNL feasible, easy and safe. In addition, such a procedure is preferable for initial operators because of less hemorrhage complication.

  18. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous tracheostomy in critically ill obese patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous tracheostomy (PCT) and the incidence of complications in critically ill, obese patients. Methods Fifty consecutive patients were included in a prospective study in two surgical and critical care medicine departments. Obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at least 30 kg/m2. The feasibility of PCT and the incidence of complications were compared in obese patients (n = 26) and non-obese patients (n = 24). Results are expressed as the median (25th-75th percentile) or number (percentage). Results The median BMIs were 34 kg/m2 (32-38) in the obese patient group and 25 kg/m2 (24-28) in the non-obese group (p < 0.001). The median times for tracheostomy were 10 min (8-14) in non-obese patients and 9 min (5-10) in obese-patients (p = 0.1). The overall complication rate was similar in obese and non-obese patient groups (35% vs. 33%, p = 0.92). Most complications were minor (hypotension, desaturation, tracheal cuff puncture and minor bleeding), with no differences between obese and non-obese groups. Bronchoscopic inspection revealed two cases of granuloma (8%) in obese patients. One non-obese patient developed a peristomal skin infection, which was treated with intravenous antibiotics. Ultrasound-guided PCT was possible in all enrolled patients and there were no surgical conversions or deaths. Conclusions This study demonstrated that US-guided PCT is feasible in obese patients with a low complication rate. Obesity may not constitute a contra-indication for US-guided PCT. A US examination provides information on cervical anatomy and hence modifies and guides choice of the PCT puncture site. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01502657. PMID:22390815

  19. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous tracheostomy in critically ill obese patients.

    PubMed

    Guinot, Pierre-Grégoire; Zogheib, Elie; Petiot, Sandra; Marienne, Jean-Pierre; Guerin, Anne-Marie; Monet, Pauline; Zaatar, Rody; Dupont, Hervé

    2012-12-12

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous tracheostomy (PCT) and the incidence of complications in critically ill, obese patients. Fifty consecutive patients were included in a prospective study in two surgical and critical care medicine departments. Obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at least 30 kg/m². The feasibility of PCT and the incidence of complications were compared in obese patients (n = 26) and non-obese patients (n = 24). Results are expressed as the median (25th-75th percentile) or number (percentage). The median BMIs were 34 kg/m² (32-38) in the obese patient group and 25 kg/m² (24-28) in the non-obese group (p < 0.001). The median times for tracheostomy were 10 min (8-14) in non-obese patients and 9 min (5-10) in obese-patients (p = 0.1). The overall complication rate was similar in obese and non-obese patient groups (35% vs. 33%, p = 0.92). Most complications were minor (hypotension, desaturation, tracheal cuff puncture and minor bleeding), with no differences between obese and non-obese groups. Bronchoscopic inspection revealed two cases of granuloma (8%) in obese patients. One non-obese patient developed a peristomal skin infection, which was treated with intravenous antibiotics. Ultrasound-guided PCT was possible in all enrolled patients and there were no surgical conversions or deaths. This study demonstrated that US-guided PCT is feasible in obese patients with a low complication rate. Obesity may not constitute a contra-indication for US-guided PCT. A US examination provides information on cervical anatomy and hence modifies and guides choice of the PCT puncture site. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01502657.

  20. Treatment efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency ablation for benign thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-long; Lu, Feng; Yue, Wen-wen; Sun, Li-ping; Bo, Xiao-wan; Guo, Le-hang; Xu, Jun-mei; Liu, Bo-ji; Li, Dan-dan; Qu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency ablation (BRFA) of benign thyroid nodules by comparison with a matched untreated control group. Methods: The therapeutic efficacy and safety in 35 patients who were subjected to a single session of ultrasound-guided percutaneous BRFA (Group A) for benign thyroid nodules were compared with those in 35 untreated patients (Group B) with benign nodules. The benign nature of all the nodules was confirmed by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB), and all the patients had normal thyroid functions. BRFA was performed with a bipolar electrode (CelonProSurge 150–T20) with an output power of 20 W. Nodule volume, thyroid function and clinical symptoms of all the patients were compared before treatment and during follow-up. Results: In Group A, the BRFA procedures were completed with a mean time of 10.02 ± 3.30 min (range, 5.47–16.03 min) and with a mean total energy deposition of 10.747 ± 3704 J (range, 5510–17.770 J). The procedures were tolerated well in all the patients without causing any major complications. At the 6-month follow-up, all of the nodule volume decreased significantly (from 8.81 ± 8.66 to 1.59 ± 1.55 ml, p < 0.001) in Group A, whereas the nodule volume increased from 6.90 ± 3.77 to 7.87 ± 3.95 ml in Group B (p < 0.001). All (100%) the 35 nodules in Group A had volume reduction ratios (VRRs) of >50%, among which 3 (8.57%) had VRRs >90%. In Group A, the clinical symptoms of the patients who had symptoms before BRFA disappeared, whereas in Group B, the patients had no resolution of clinical symptoms at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided percutaneous BRFA seems to be an effective and safe method for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. It may gain a wide use in clinical practice. Advances in knowledge: Based on the comparable efficacy and clinical

  1. Acute Calcific Bursitis After Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Barbotage of Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bo-Sung; Lee, Seung Hak; Cho, Yung; Chung, Sun Gun

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous barbotage is an effective treatment for rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, providing rapid and substantial pain relief. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with aggravated pain early after ultrasound-guided barbotage of a large calcific deposit in the supraspinatus tendon. Subsequent examination revealed a thick calcification spreading along the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa space, suggesting acute calcific bursitis complicated by barbotage. Additional barbotage alleviated her pain completely. Therefore, a high index of suspicion for acute calcific bursitis is required in patients with unresolved or aggravated pain after barbotage. Repeated barbotage could be effective for this condition. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Percutaneous cholangiography: Chiba method, a diagnostic advance].

    PubMed

    Correia, R A; Sampaio, R N; Soares, A C; Feijó, S G; Pessoa, J B

    1979-01-01

    Employing percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography by CHIBA method in 15 patients, it was possible to visualize biliary system in 93.3% of the cases. The radiologic diagnostic of KLATSKIN tumor was observed in 2 cases, 4 cases of carcinoma of the papila of VATER, 1 case of carcinoma of the terminal choledochus, 1 case of intrahepatic neoplasia, 1 case of stenosis secondary to choledocal, trauma, and in another it was damaged by subcapsular hepatic leakage of contrast. The complications were minor. In 5 cases the patients had biliary colic at the time of the exam. In 2 cases, signals of baeteremia occurred in the day following the exam, and in 4 cases there was a small subcapsular hepatic leakage of contrast. In one case it was encountered hematoma under the capsule of the liver, during surgery. The diagnosis was confirmed at surgery in 12 cases. We concluded that the simplicity of the technic, its low cost and its diagnostic, accuracy have made it extremely useful.

  3. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided TOPAZ Radiofrequency Coblation: A Novel Coaxial Technique for the Treatment of Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis-Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit; Best, Alistair J; Rennie, Winston J

    2016-06-01

    Various therapeutic options are available for treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Studies using TOPAZ coblation (ArthroCare, Sunnyvale, CA) have had good early results. The current coblation technique involves a surgical incision or breach of the highly specialized plantar fat pad, which can be associated with risks. We describe a novel technique of ultrasound-guided percutaneous coblation with a lateral heel approach. Advantages include precise targeting of the plantar fascia by direct dynamic visualization of the coblation tip, a true percutaneous approach with a needle skin puncture (<5 mm), and preservation of the plantar fat pad by using a lateral heel approach. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  4. Ethnicity influences pain after ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Mahfudz, Anis S; Vijayananthan, Anushya

    2015-12-01

    The influence of ethnicity on pain complicating ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy (US-guided PLB) and its clinical impact has not been reported to date. Consecutive adults from a multiethnic background, undergoing an US-guided PLB, were independently assessed for pain up to 6 h after the procedure. Clinical and demographic parameters were analysed to determine independent predictors of significant pain after PLB. Willingness to undergo a repeat procedure was assessed 1 week after PLB. Data from 203 patients (median age 50 years; 43.9% female; ethnicity: Malay 41.5%, Chinese 40%, Indian 18%; median BMI 27.7 kg/m; median waist circumference 92.0 cm) were analysed. Pain after US-guided PLB was experienced in 133 (61.1%) patients, with severity grades as follows: none, n=81 (39.9%); mild, n=56 (27.6%); moderate, n=51 (25.1%); and severe, n=15 (7.4%). Analgesia requirements correlated well with severity of pain. Independent predictors of significant pain after PLB (moderate and severe categories) in patients included age less than 50 years [odds ratio (OR) 3.0], female sex (OR 3.7), Indian ethnicity (OR 2.9) and Malay ethnicity (OR 2.7), but not number of needle passes, BMI and educational levels. Patients who experienced moderate/severe pain were less willing to undergo a repeat PLB compared with those who experienced mild/no pain (60.9 vs. 82.8%, P=0.001). Ethnicity has an important role in the development of pain after US-guided PLB. This has a significant impact on willingness to repeat the procedure.

  5. Ultrasound-guided Interdigital Neuroma Injections: Short-term Clinical Outcomes after a Single Percutaneous Injection—Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Ronald S.; Ciavarra, Gina A.; Pavlov, Helene

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To describe the procedure of ultrasound-guided Morton’s neuroma and recurrent stump neuroma injections and early clinical outcomes after a single injection. Materials and Methods Retrospective review of 44 percutaneous ultrasound-guided neuroma injections in 24 patients who had completed clinical outcomes questionnaires. A 10-point pain scale [scale of 1 (no pain) to 10 (severe pain)] in a 7-day pain log format was distributed to patients at the time percutaneous neuroma injection was performed. Results Neuromas were clearly visualized with sonography as hypoechoic nodules and were distinguishable from other causes of forefoot pain, such as metatarsophalangeal joint synovitis and intermetatarsal bursae. The sizes of the neuromas injected ranged between 4 and 19 mm. Postinjection, all neuromas displayed increased echogenicity and/or the appearance of fluid surrounding it, confirming localization of the therapeutic mixture. We arbitrarily subdivided the pain ratings into symptomatic (greater than 4) and asymptomatic (less than or equal to 4) for statistical analysis. Average pain level pre injection was 5.2 and average pain level was 3.7 at 7 days post single injection, with 62% of the initially symptomatic patients asymptomatic on day 7 (p < 0.000001). Overall, 76% of the total number of neuromas injected once were asymptomatic on day 7. Conclusion Ultrasound can be used to accurately target Morton’s neuromas and, therefore, appropriately direct therapeutic interventions, with good short-term clinical results. PMID:18751769

  6. Ultrasound guided percutaneous cholecystostomy in high-risk patients for surgical intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bakkaloglu, Huseyin; Yanar, Hakan; Guloglu, Recep; Taviloglu, Korhan; Tunca, Fatih; Aksoy, Murat; Ertekin, Cemalettin; Poyanli, Arzu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of ultrasound guided percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC) in the treatment of acute cholecystitis in a well-defined high risk patients under general anesthesia. METHODS: The data of 27 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous transhepatic cholecystostomy for the management of acute cholecystitis from January 1999 to June 2003 was retrospectively evaluated. All of the patients had both clinical and sonographic signs of acute cholecystitis and had comorbid diseases. RESULTS: Ultrasound revealed gallbladder stones in 25 patients and acalculous cholecystitis in two patients. Cholecystostomy catheters were removed 14-32 d (mean 23 d) after the procedure in cases where complete regression of all symptoms was achieved. There were statistically significant reductions in leukocytosis, (13.7 × 103 ± 1.3 × 103 μg/L vs 13 × 103 ± 1 × 103 μg/L, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 13.7 × 103 ± 1.3 × 103 μg/L vs 8.3 × 103 ± 1.2 × 103 μg/L, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC), C -reactive protein (51.2 ± 18.5 mg/L vs 27.3 ± 10.4 mg/L, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 51.2 ± 18.5 mg/L vs 5.4 ± 1.5 mg/L, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC), and fever (38 ± 0.35°C vs 37.3 ± 0.32°C, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 38 ± 0.35°C vs 36.9 ± 0.15°C, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC). Sphincterotomy and stone extraction was performed successfully with endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) in three patients. After cholecystostomy, 5 (18%) patients underwent delayed cholecystectomy without any complications. Three out of 22 patients were admitted with recurrent acute cholecystitis during the follow-up and recovered with medical treatment. Catheter dislodgement occurred in three patients spontaneously, and two of them were managed by reinsertion of the catheter. CONCLUSION: As an alternative to surgery, percutan-eous cholecystostomy seems to be a safe method in critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis and can be performed with low

  7. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration versus Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration in Diagnosis of Focal Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Naga, Mazen Ibrahim; Esmat, Serag; Naguib, Mohamed; Hassanein, Mohamed; Hassani, Mohamed; El-Kassas, Mohamed; Mahdy, Reem Ezzat; El-Gemeie, Emad; Farag, Ali Hassan; Foda, Ayman Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the leading cancer morbidity and mortality world-wide. Controversy has arisen about whether the percutaneous approach with computed tomography/ultrasonography-guidance fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) or endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred method to obtain diagnostic tissue. Our purpose of this study is to compare between the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA and percutaneous US-FNA in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 197 patients with pancreatic masses were included in the study, 125 patients underwent US-FNA (Group 1) and 72 patients underwent EUS-FNA (Group 2). Results: EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy (88.9%) as US-FNA (87.2%) in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for EUS-FNA was 84%, 100%, 100%, 73.3% respectively. It was 85.5%, 90.4%, 94.7%, 76% respectively for US-FNA. EUS-FNA had a lower complication rate (1.38%) than US-FNA (5.6%). Conclusion: EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy as US-FNA of pancreatic masses with a lower complication rate. PMID:24949394

  8. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography in the investigation of the persistent postoperative bile leak.

    PubMed

    Kissin, C M; Grundy, A

    1987-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC) is now a widely available, inexpensive investigation with a low incidence of complications, especially in the nonobstructed system, and a high success rate. Its role in the management of obstructive jaundice is well established but it is only infrequently performed in the investigation of persistent bile leakage following biliary tract surgery. Four cases are reported in which the superior demonstration of biliary anatomy provided by PTHC allowed successful identification of the site of postoperative biliary leakage. We compared PTHC with other diagnostic imaging techniques available and conclude that it is a safe, accurate, and reliable technique.

  9. Ultrasound guided percutaneous cholecystostomy in high-risk patients for surgical intervention.

    PubMed

    Bakkaloglu, Huseyin; Yanar, Hakan; Guloglu, Recep; Taviloglu, Korhan; Tunca, Fatih; Aksoy, Murat; Ertekin, Cemalettin; Poyanli, Arzu

    2006-11-28

    To assess the efficacy and safety of ultrasound guided percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC) in the treatment of acute cholecystitis in a well-defined high risk patients under general anesthesia. The data of 27 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous transhepatic cholecystostomy for the management of acute cholecystitis from January 1999 to June 2003 was retrospectively evaluated. All of the patients had both clinical and sonographic signs of acute cholecystitis and had comorbid diseases. Ultrasound revealed gallbladder stones in 25 patients and acalculous cholecystitis in two patients. Cholecystostomy catheters were removed 14-32 d (mean 23 d) after the procedure in cases where complete regression of all symptoms was achieved. There were statistically significant reductions in leukocytosis, (13.7 x 10(3)+/-1.3 x 10(3) microg/L vs 13 x 10(3)+/-1 x 10(3) microg/L, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 13.7 x 10(3)+/-1.3 x 10(3) microg/L vs 8.3 x 10(3)+/-1.2 x 10(3) microg/L, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC), C -reactive protein (51.2+/-18.5 mg/L vs 27.3+/-10.4 mg/L, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 51.2+/-18.5 mg/L vs 5.4+/-1.5 mg/L, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC), and fever (38+/-0.35 centigrade vs 37.3+/-0.32 centigrade, P < 0.05 for 24 h after PC; 38+/-0.35 centigrade vs 36.9+/-0.15 centigrade, P < 0.0001 for 72 h after PC). Sphincterotomy and stone extraction was performed successfully with endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) in three patients. After cholecystostomy, 5 (18%) patients underwent delayed cholecystectomy without any complications. Three out of 22 patients were admitted with recurrent acute cholecystitis during the follow-up and recovered with medical treatment. Catheter dislodgement occurred in three patients spontaneously, and two of them were managed by reinsertion of the catheter. As an alternative to surgery, percutaneous cholecystostomy seems to be a safe method in critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis and can be performed with

  10. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Release: Study Upon Clinical Efficacy and Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Petrover, David, E-mail: dpetrover@yahoo.fr; Silvera, Jonathan, E-mail: silvera.jonathan@gmail.com; Baere, Thierry De, E-mail: Debaere@igr.fr

    ObjectivesTo evaluate the feasibility and 6 months clinical result of sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) and median nerve decompression after ultra-minimally invasive, ultrasound-guided percutaneous carpal tunnel release (PCTR) surgery.MethodsConsecutive patients with carpal tunnel syndrome were enrolled in this descriptive, open-label study. The procedure was performed in the interventional radiology room. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at baseline and 1 month. The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire was administered at baseline, 1, and 6 months.Results129 patients were enrolled. Significant decreases in mean symptom severity scores (3.3 ± 0.7 at baseline, 1.7 ± 0.4 at Month 1, 1.3 ± 0.3 at Month 6) and mean functional status scores (2.6 ± 1.1 atmore » baseline, 1.6 ± 0.4 at Month 1, 1.3 ± 0.5 at Month 6) were noted. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a complete section of all TCL and nerve decompression in 100% of patients. No complications were identified.ConclusionsUltrasound-guided PCTR was used successfully to section the TCL, decompress the median nerve, and reduce self-reported symptoms.« less

  11. Computer tomography urography assisted real-time ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy on renal calculus.

    PubMed

    Fang, You-Qiang; Wu, Jie-Ying; Li, Teng-Cheng; Zheng, Hao-Feng; Liang, Guan-Can; Chen, Yan-Xiong; Hong, Xiao-Bin; Cai, Wei-Zhong; Zang, Zhi-Jun; Di, Jin-Ming

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of pre-designed route on computer tomography urography (CTU) in the ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for renal calculus.From August 2013 to May 2016, a total of 100 patients diagnosed with complex renal calculus in our hospital were randomly divided into CTU group and control group (without CTU assistance). CTU was used to design a rational route for puncturing in CTU group. Ultrasound was used in both groups to establish a working trace in the operation areas. Patients' perioperative parameters and postoperative complications were recorded.All operations were successfully performed, without transferring to open surgery. Time of channel establishment in CTU group (6.5 ± 4.3 minutes) was shorter than the control group (10.0 ± 6.7 minutes) (P = .002). In addition, there was shorter operation time, lower rates of blood transfusion, secondary operation, and less establishing channels. The incidence of postoperative complications including residual stones, sepsis, severe hemorrhage, and perirenal hematoma was lower in CTU group than in control group.Pre-designing puncture route on CTU images would improve the puncturing accuracy, lessen establishing channels as well as improve the security in the ultrasound-guided PCNL for complex renal calculus, but at the cost of increased radiation exposure.

  12. Accuracy and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle core biopsy of renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianding; Lv, Yuanhang; Xu, Zilin; Aniu, Muguo; Qiu, Yang; Wei, Bing; Li, Xiaohong; Wei, Qiang; Dong, Qiang; Lin, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Our aim is to determine the sufficiency, accuracy, and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle core biopsy of renal masses in Chinese patients. Patients who had undergone ultrasound-guided needle core renal mass biopsy from June 2012 to June 2016 at West China Hospital, China were retrospectively reviewed. The information obtained included demographics, mass-related parameters, biopsy indications, technique, complications, pathologic results, and follow-up. Concordance of surgical resection pathology and follow-up data were assessed. Renal mass biopsies were performed in 106 patients. Thirty-nine (36.8%) were asymptomatic. The male/female ratio was 60/46, with a median age of 49.5 years. Median mass size was 8.1 cm (range 1.8–20). Biopsy was performed through a 16-gauge needle, with median cores of 2 taken (range 1–5). Only one significant biopsy-related complication (hemorrhage requiring transfusion) was encountered. An adequate tissue sample was obtained in 97.2% (103/106) of biopsies. Eighty-seven biopsies (82.1%) showed malignant neoplasms, 16 (15.1%) yielded benignity, and 3 (2.8%) were nondiagnostic. After biopsy, 46 patients (43.4%) underwent surgery. Compared with the subsequent mass resection pathology, the biopsy diagnoses were identical in 43 cases. The accuracy rate of biopsy distinguishing malignant from benign lesions was 99.1%, and the rate for determining tumor histological type (excluding the nondiagnostic biopsies) was 95.1%. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting malignancy were 98.9% and 100%, respectively. In several situations, there is still a role for biopsy before intervention. Percutaneous needle core biopsy under ultrasonography guidance is highly accurate and safe, and can determine the proper management of undefinable masses. PMID:29595650

  13. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous bone drilling for the treatment of lateral epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang Ho; Cha, Jang Gyu; Lee, Bo Ra

    2018-01-01

    To determine the clinical efficacy of sonographically-guided percutaneous bone drilling of the lateral epicondyle (LE) for the treatment of patients with LE. We included 24 patients with LE who reported pain in this study. All patients underwent sonographically-guided percutaneous bone drilling of the lateral epicondyle. Follow-up sonography and physical examinations were performed 1, 3 and 6 months after the procedure. The outcome measures included sonographic findings, visual analogue scale (VAS) score, maximum voluntary grip strength (MVGS) and patient-related tennis elbow evaluation (PRTEE) score. None of the patients had immediate complications during the procedure. The area of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) tears decreased significantly at 1 month and declined gradually over the remaining 5 months of the study (p < 0.001). The mean pain VAS score was significantly lower at 6 months than preoperatively (respectively; p < 0.001). The mean MVGS increased significantly between pretreatment and 6 months post-treatment (p < 0.001), whereas the PRTEE score decreased significantly during the same period (p < 0.001). Sonographically-guided percutaneous drilling is a quick and safe treatment option for LE that can be performed in an outpatient setting. • Percutaneous drilling of the lateral condyle is effective for the treatment of LE. • The area of ECRB tears can be measured by US-guided saline injection. • US-guided percutaneous drilling is a quick and safe treatment option for LE.

  14. Value of Artisanal Simulators to Teach Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Biopsy Using a Tru-Cut Needle for Veterinary and Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Araújo Setin, Raíza; Fortes Cirimbelli, Carolina; Mazeto Ercolin, Anna Carolina; Pires, Sâmara Turbay; Disselli, Tamiris; Ferrarini Nunes Soares Hage, Maria Cristina

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the applicability of artisanal simulators to teach veterinary and medical students the ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy using a tru-cut needle. The artisanal simulators consisted of bovine liver between two layers of commercially available grape gelatin. Students were paired, with one doing the biopsy and…

  15. Ultrasound imaging-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinitis: success in short-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Bazzocchi, Alberto; Pelotti, Patrizia; Serraino, Salvatore; Battaglia, Milva; Bettelli, Graziano; Fusaro, Isabella; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Rotini, Roberto; Albisinni, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinitis (RCCT) is a common cause of shoulder pain in adults and typically presents as activity-related shoulder pain. Between non-surgical and surgical treatment options, today a few minimal invasive techniques are available to remove the calcific deposit, and they represent a cornerstone in the management of this painful clinical condition. The aim of the work was a retrospective evaluation of double-needle ultrasound-guided percutaneous fragmentation and lavage (DNL), focused on understanding the factors which are of major importance in determining a quick and good response at 1 month. A series of 147 patients affected by RCCT and suitable for DNL were evaluated. A systematic review of anamnestic, clinical and imaging data was performed in 144 shoulders treated in a single-centre setting. Clinical reports and imaging examinations were revisited. The inclusion criteria were submission to DNL, therefore fitness for the percutaneous procedure, and following 1-month follow-up. There was no exclusion owing to risk of bias. The treatment was defined as successful for constant shoulder modified score (CSS) improvement of >50% at 1 month. In 70% of shoulders, the treatment resulted in a quick and significant reduction of symptoms (successful). On the whole, CSS increase at 1 month was estimated at 91.5 ± 69.1%. CSS variations were significantly related to age of patients (better results between 30 and 40 years old), calcification size (more relevant improvement for middle-sized calcifications, 12-17 mm), sonographic and radiographic features of calcific deposits (softer calcifications) and thickening of subacromial/subdeltoid bursa walls. In the final model of stepwise regression for CSS variation, ultrasound score pre-treatment and post-treatment, the distance between bursa and calcification before treatment and the size of post-treatment calcification area were shown to be independently correlated to success. Numeric rating scale score

  16. [Value of injection hepato-lymphography during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography in patients with cholestasis].

    PubMed

    Sharipov, V Sh

    2000-01-01

    Injection hepatography (IH) was made in 278 patients with cholestasis to study the drainage function of the liver. In 208 cases. IH was performed as a test during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC). The hepatic lymph pathways were imaged in 167 (60%) patients. Images of the biliary tract were obtained in 245 (88.1%) patients with cholestasis, it being not dilated in 34 (12.2%) patients. The fact that hepatolymphography may be performed during PTHC as an independent test permits verification of hepatic lymph circulatory disorders that are an index of the rate of inflammation in the organ.

  17. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided renal biopsy: A Libyan experience

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, A.; Tarsin, R.; ElHabbash, B.; Zagan, N.; Markus, R.; Drebeka, S.; AbdElmola, K.; Shawish, T.; Shebani, A.; AbdElmola, T.; ElUsta, A.; Ehtuish, E. F.

    2010-01-01

    This study was done to assess the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB), to ascertain the risk factors for complications and determine the optimal period of observation. The radiologist (A.M.) at the National Organ Transplant Centre, Central Hospital, Tripoli, Libya, performed 86 PRBs between February 1, 2006, and January 31, 2008, using an automated biopsy gun with 16-gauge needle. Coagulation profile was done in all the patients. All patients were kept on strict bed rest for six hours post-procedure. Eighty six renal biopsies were performed on 78 patients referred from rheumatology department and eight post-kidney transplant recipients; 23 were males with age range 15 – 56 years and 63 females with age range 16 – 66 years. A mean of 17.5 glomeruli were present in each specimen. A glomerular yield of less than five glomeruli was seen in four biopsies. Class I lupus nephritis (LN) was seen in 1 patient, class II lupus nephritis in 7 patients, class III LN in 13 patients and class IV LN in 29 patients. All the eight renal allografts were diagnosed as acute tubular necrosis or acute interstitial rejection. The risk of post-biopsy bleeding was higher in women, older patients and higher PTT. The overall complication rate was 5.8%. Three complications were observed within six hours of biopsy. No late complication was seen. PRB under real-time ultrasound-guidance is a safe and efficacious procedure to establish the histological diagnosis and should be done as out-patient procedure. Observation time of six hours post-biopsy is optimal. PMID:20835320

  18. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography for choledocholithiasis after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Marialessia; Alfa-Wali, Maryam; Leuratti, Luca; McCall, James; Bonanomi, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gallstones are a common condition in bariatric patients after a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). The management of ductal stones is challenging due to the altered gastrointestinal anatomy. Various techniques have been reported to manage bile duct stones. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present the successful percutaneous trans hepatic management of common bile duct stones after LRYGB. One year after a LRYGB for morbid obesity, a 59-year-old female presented with acute cholecystitis. One month after laparoscopic cholecystectomy a 1 cm calculus was found within the distal CBD and patient underwent a percutaneous trans hepatic cholangiography under local anesthetic. This involved a right sided anterior segmental duct puncture. With the sphincter dilated to 10 mm, a balloon catheter was used to push the stone into the duodenum leaving an internal- external drain. Patient recovered completely at follow up. DISCUSSION Patients with morbid obesity have a higher incidence of gallstones. After LRYGB, the altered anatomy does not allow the conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for choledocholithiasis. Various techniques have been reported as means of managing bile duct stones in LRYGB patients. These include a double balloon enteroscope-assisted ERCP, laparoscopic transgastric ERCP, laparoscopic or open biliary surgery and interventional radiology. We report a non-surgical approach using percutaneous transhepatic technique under local anesthetic that resulted effective and could be applied more extensively. CONCLUSION Due to the increase of global obesity, bariatric centers need to strategically plan resources such as interventional radiology in order to manage post LRYGB choledocholithiasis safely, efficiently and in a cost effective manner. PMID:24705194

  19. Two Cases of Lethal Complications Following Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Fine-Needle Biopsy of the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Drinkovic, Ivan; Brkljacic, Boris

    1996-09-15

    Two cases with lethal complications are reported among 1750 ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous fine-needle liver biopsies performed in our department. The first patient had angiosarcoma of the liver which was not suspected after computed tomography (CT) and US studies had been performed. The other patient had hepatocellular carcinoma in advanced hepatic cirrhosis. Death was due to bleeding in both cases. Pre-procedure laboratory tests did not reveal the existence of major bleeding disorders in either case. Normal liver tissue was interposed in the needle track between the liver capsule and the lesions which were targeted.

  20. Ultrasound imaging-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinitis: success in short-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Pelotti, Patrizia; Serraino, Salvatore; Battaglia, Milva; Bettelli, Graziano; Fusaro, Isabella; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Rotini, Roberto; Albisinni, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Rotator cuff calcific tendinitis (RCCT) is a common cause of shoulder pain in adults and typically presents as activity-related shoulder pain. Between non-surgical and surgical treatment options, today a few minimal invasive techniques are available to remove the calcific deposit, and they represent a cornerstone in the management of this painful clinical condition. The aim of the work was a retrospective evaluation of double-needle ultrasound-guided percutaneous fragmentation and lavage (DNL), focused on understanding the factors which are of major importance in determining a quick and good response at 1 month. Methods: A series of 147 patients affected by RCCT and suitable for DNL were evaluated. A systematic review of anamnestic, clinical and imaging data was performed in 144 shoulders treated in a single-centre setting. Clinical reports and imaging examinations were revisited. The inclusion criteria were submission to DNL, therefore fitness for the percutaneous procedure, and following 1-month follow-up. There was no exclusion owing to risk of bias. The treatment was defined as successful for constant shoulder modified score (CSS) improvement of >50% at 1 month. Results: In 70% of shoulders, the treatment resulted in a quick and significant reduction of symptoms (successful). On the whole, CSS increase at 1 month was estimated at 91.5 ± 69.1%. CSS variations were significantly related to age of patients (better results between 30 and 40 years old), calcification size (more relevant improvement for middle-sized calcifications, 12–17 mm), sonographic and radiographic features of calcific deposits (softer calcifications) and thickening of subacromial/subdeltoid bursa walls. In the final model of stepwise regression for CSS variation, ultrasound score pre-treatment and post-treatment, the distance between bursa and calcification before treatment and the size of post-treatment calcification area were shown to be independently correlated to

  1. [Percutaneous ultrasound-guided drainage in the surgical treatment of acute severe pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Delattre, J-F; Levy Chazal, N; Lubrano, D; Flament, J-B

    2004-11-01

    To report results of percutaneous ultrasound-guided drainage, performed by a surgeon, in the treatment of complications of acute pancreatitis (AP), and to determine the role of this technique in the therapeutic armamentarium of severe AP. From 1986 to 2001, 59 patients were included in this retrospective study. All patients initially had severe necrotizing AP (mean Ranson score = 4.1 ; range : 2-7). Anatomical lesions included pancreatic abscess in 6 patients and necrosis in 53 (17 stage D and 36 stage E according to Balthazar's classification). Necrosis was infected in 42 and sterile in 11 respectively. Drainage was performed under ultrasound guidance and local anaesthesia using small-diameter drains (7-14 French). Drainage was performed on average 23 days after onset of AP. Infection was proven by fine-needle aspiration in 47 (80 %) patients (41 infected necrosis and 6 localized abscess). In one patient, culture of aspirated fluid was negative but necrosis was infected (one false negative). Culture of aspirated fluid was negative and necrosis was sterile in 11 patients. Nineteen (32%) patients healed without subsequent surgery: 7 (16%) in the infected necrosis group, 6(55%) in the sterile necrosis group, and 6 (100%) in the abscess group. Forty (68%) patients had subsequent necrosectomy including 8 (14%) who died. Twenty (34 %) digestive fistulas healed spontaneously, except one treated by diversion stomia. Of the 16 (27 %) pancreatic fistulas, 6 needed subsequent interventional treatment. In selected patients, percutaneous drainage can represent an alternative to surgery with a 14% mortality rate. The high rate of subsequent necrosectomy suggests that drains with larger diameter, possibly associated with continuous irrigation, should be used.

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage

    PubMed Central

    Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya; Draganov, Peter V

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biliary drainage has emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to percutaneous and surgical interventions for patients with biliary obstruction who had failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). EUS-guided biliary drainage has become feasible due to the development of large channel curvilinear therapeutic echo-endoscopes and the use of real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopy imaging in addition to standard ERCP devices and techniques. EUS-guided biliary drainage is an attractive option because of its minimally invasive, single step procedure which provides internal biliary decompression. Multiple investigators have reported high success and low complication rates. Unfortunately, high quality prospective data are still lacking. We provide detailed review of the use of EUS for biliary drainage from the perspective of practicing endoscopists with specific focus on the technical aspects of the procedure. PMID:22363114

  3. Breast cancer: determining the genetic profile from ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy specimens obtained during the diagnostic workups.

    PubMed

    López Ruiz, J A; Zabalza Estévez, I; Mieza Arana, J A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the possibility of determining the genetic profile of primary malignant tumors of the breast from specimens obtained by ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsies during the diagnostic imaging workup. This is a retrospective study in 13 consecutive patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer by B-mode ultrasound-guided 12 G core needle biopsy. After clinical indication, the pathologist decided whether the paraffin block specimens seemed suitable (on the basis of tumor size, validity of the sample, and percentage of tumor cells) before sending them for genetic analysis with the MammaPrint® platform. The size of the tumors on ultrasound ranged from 0.6cm to 5cm. In 11 patients the preserved specimen was considered valid and suitable for use in determining the genetic profile. In 1 patient (with a 1cm tumor) the pathologist decided that it was necessary to repeat the core biopsy to obtain additional samples. In 1 patient (with a 5cm tumor) the specimen was not considered valid by the genetic laboratory. The percentage of tumor cells in the samples ranged from 60% to 70%. In 11/13 cases (84.62%) it was possible to do the genetic analysis on the previously diagnosed samples. In most cases, regardless of tumor size, it is possible to obtain the genetic profile from tissue specimens obtained with ultrasound-guided 12 G core biopsy preserved in paraffin blocks. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Assistive technology for ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Ikhsan, Mohammad; Tan, Kok Kiong; Putra, Andi Sudjana

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the existing technology used to improve the safety and ease of ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. Electronic database searches were conducted in Scopus, IEEE, Google Patents, and relevant conference databases (SPIE, MICCAI, and IEEE conferences) for related articles on assistive technology for ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. A total of 89 articles were examined and pointed to several fields that are currently the focus of improvements to ultrasound-guided procedures. These include improving needle visualization, needle guides and localization technology, image processing algorithms to enhance and segment important features within the ultrasound image, robotic assistance using probe-mounted manipulators, and improving procedure ergonomics through in situ projections of important information. Probe-mounted robotic manipulators provide a promising avenue for assistive technology developed for freehand ultrasound-guided percutaneous procedures. However, there is currently a lack of clinical trials to validate the effectiveness of these devices.

  5. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography for choledocholithiasis after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Milella, Marialessia; Alfa-Wali, Maryam; Leuratti, Luca; McCall, James; Bonanomi, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Gallstones are a common condition in bariatric patients after a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). The management of ductal stones is challenging due to the altered gastrointestinal anatomy. Various techniques have been reported to manage bile duct stones. We present the successful percutaneous trans hepatic management of common bile duct stones after LRYGB. One year after a LRYGB for morbid obesity, a 59-year-old female presented with acute cholecystitis. One month after laparoscopic cholecystectomy a 1cm calculus was found within the distal CBD and patient underwent a percutaneous trans hepatic cholangiography under local anesthetic. This involved a right sided anterior segmental duct puncture. With the sphincter dilated to 10mm, a balloon catheter was used to push the stone into the duodenum leaving an internal- external drain. Patient recovered completely at follow up. Patients with morbid obesity have a higher incidence of gallstones. After LRYGB, the altered anatomy does not allow the conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for choledocholithiasis. Various techniques have been reported as means of managing bile duct stones in LRYGB patients. These include a double balloon enteroscope-assisted ERCP, laparoscopic transgastric ERCP, laparoscopic or open biliary surgery and interventional radiology. We report a non-surgical approach using percutaneous transhepatic technique under local anesthetic that resulted effective and could be applied more extensively. Due to the increase of global obesity, bariatric centers need to strategically plan resources such as interventional radiology in order to manage post LRYGB choledocholithiasis safely, efficiently and in a cost effective manner. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Doppler ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy with two-step tract dilation for management of complex renal stones.

    PubMed

    Xu, Youming; Wu, Zhonghua; Yu, Jianhua; Wang, Shulong; Li, Fang; Chen, Jiushun; Liu, Jin; Chen, Kan

    2012-06-01

    To report our experience and assess the safety and efficacy of Doppler ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) with 2-step tract dilation for complex renal stones. From March 2009 to February 2011, 262 patients underwent PCNL. Eighty-three patients had a complete and 105 had partial staghorn calculus, and 74 had a renal pelvic stone of >2 cm in diameter. Thirty-five patients had renal surgical history. Doppler ultrasound-guided PCNL with 2-step tract dilation were performed. Stones were fragmented and cleared using a combination of ultrasonic and pneumatic lithotripters. All PCNL procedures were successful. Successful access to the collecting system was 100%. Although most of the cases (231/262) were managed satisfactorily by a single tract, a second tract was used in 31 cases. Mean operation time was 56 minutes (range 25-145). The primary stone-free rate of PCNL was 80.9%. There were 39 auxiliary procedures (13 second PCNL and 26 extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy). One month after treatment, the overall stone-free rate was 92.7%. Five patients (1.9%) received blood transfusion. Eight patients (3.1%) with a postoperative fever of ≥38.5°C were cured by intravenous antibiotics. No other severe complications occurred. The mean postoperative stay was 3.8 days (range 2-12). Doppler ultrasound-guided PCNL with 2-step tract dilation for complex renal stones is safe, effective, and worthy of wider use in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasound-guided venous access for pacemakers and defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Seto, Arnold H; Jolly, Aaron; Salcedo, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    Ultrasound guidance is widely recommended to reduce the risk of complications during central venous catheter placement. However, ultrasound guidance is not commonly utilized for implanting leads for cardiac rhythm management devices. We describe our technique of ultrasound-guided pacemaker implantation, including a novel pull-through technique that allows percutaneous guidewire insertion prior to the first incision. We review the literature and recent advances in ultrasound imaging technology that may facilitate the adoption of ultrasound guidance. Ultrasound guidance provides a safe and rapid technique for extrathoracic subclavian or axillary venous lead placement. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Transvaginal Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy of Deep Pelvic Masses: How We Do It.

    PubMed

    Plett, Sara K; Poder, Liina; Brooks, Rebecca A; Morgan, Tara A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the rationale and indications for transvaginal ultrasound-guided biopsy. Transvaginal ultrasound-guided biopsy can be a helpful tool for diagnosis and treatment planning in the evaluation of pelvic masses, particularly when the anatomy precludes a transabdominal or posterior transgluteal percutaneous biopsy approach. A step-by-step summary of the technique with preprocedure and postprocedure considerations is included. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and intraductal radiofrequency ablation combined with biliary stent placement for malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, Teng-Fei; Huang, Guo-Hao; Li, Zhen; Hao, Chang-Fu; Ren, Jian-Zhuang; Duan, Xu-Hua; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Chen; Han, Xin-Wei; Jiao, De-Chao; Zhang, Meng-Fan; Wang, Yan-Li

    2015-05-01

    To determine the safety and feasibility of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and intraductal radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with biliary stent placement for malignant biliary obstruction. Data from patients with unresectable malignant biliary obstruction who underwent PTC, intraductal RF ablation, and biliary stent placement (n = 12) or PTC and biliary stent placement only (control group; n = 14) were reviewed. Postoperative complications, jaundice remission, and stent patency were assessed. All procedures were successful. No severe complications (eg, biliary bleeding, perforation) occurred. Two experimental group patients developed cholangitis, which resolved with conservative treatment. The 1-week jaundice remission and 3-month stent patency rates were similar in both groups, but the 6-month stent patency rate was higher in the experimental group (P < .05). In the experimental group, one death occurred as a result of gastrointestinal hemorrhage (unrelated to stent placement) by 3 months, and there were two cases of recurrent jaundice by 6 months. The latter two patients underwent repeat PTC, ablation, and stent placement. In the control group, one death occurred as a result of hepatic failure caused by progressive jaundice at 3 months, and another death resulted from disseminated intravascular coagulation caused by jaundice recurrence at 138 days after stent placement. In addition, seven patients developed jaundice recurrence (50-151 d after stent placement). PTC and repeat stent placement were performed in these patients. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and intraductal RF ablation combined with biliary stent placement for malignant biliary obstruction is safe and feasible and effectively prolongs stent patency time. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block and local anesthetic infiltration for laparoscopic percutaneous extraperitoneal closure in children.

    PubMed

    Uchinami, Yuka; Sakuraya, Fumika; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Hoshino, Koji; Mikami, Eri; Ishikawa, Taro; Fujii, Hitomi; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Morimoto, Yuji

    2017-05-01

    Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block and local anesthetic infiltration are the standard options to improve postoperative pain for children undergoing surgery with a midline incision. However, there is no study comparing the effect of ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block with local anesthetic infiltration for children undergoing laparoscopic surgery. The aim of this trial was to compare the onset of ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block with that of local anesthetic infiltration for laparoscopic percutaneous extraperitoneal closure in children. We performed an observer-blinded, randomized, prospective trial. Enrolled patients were assigned to either an ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block group or a local anesthetic infiltration group. The ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block group (n = 17) received ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block with 0.2 ml·kg -1 of 0.375% ropivacaine per side in the posterior rectus sheath compartment. The local anesthetic infiltration group (n = 17) received local anesthetic infiltration with 0.2 ml·kg -1 of 0.75% ropivacaine. The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability (FLACC) pain scores were recorded at 0, 30, 60 min after arrival at the postanesthesia care unit. Of the 37 patients enrolled in this study, 34 completed the study protocol. A significant difference in the pain scale between the ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block group and local anesthetic infiltration group was found at 0 min (median: 0, interquartile range [IQR]: 0-1.5, vs median: 1, IQR 0-5, confidence interval of median [95% CI]: 0-3, P = 0.048), but no significant difference was found at 30 min (median: 1, IQR: 0-4 vs median: 6, IQR: 0-7, 95% CI: 0-5, P = 0.061), or 60 min (median: 0, IQR: 0-2 vs median: 1, IQR: 0-3, 95% CI: -1 to 1, P = 0.310). No significant difference was found in anesthesia time between the ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block and local anesthetic infiltration groups. No procedure-related complications were observed in either group

  11. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle treatment of calcific tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, K Nithin; McDowall, Adam; Simunovic, Nicole; Bhandari, Mohit; Choudur, Hema N

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the efficacy of ultrasound-guided needle lavage in treating calcific tendinitis. Two independent assessors searched medical databases and screened studies for eligibility. Eleven articles were included. Heterogeneity among included studies precluded meta-analysis. Results of randomized controlled trials suggested no difference in pain relief between needle lavage and other interventions, but the studies were of low quality. Additional high-quality evidence is required to determine the relative efficacy of ultrasound-guided needle lavage in the management of calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff.

  12. Outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention in intermediate coronary artery disease: fractional flow reserve-guided versus intravascular ultrasound-guided.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chang-Wook; Yoon, Hyuck-Jun; Cho, Yun-Kyeong; Park, Hyoung-Seob; Kim, Hyungseop; Hur, Seung-Ho; Kim, Yoon-Nyun; Chung, In-Sung; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Tahk, Seung-Jae; Fearon, William F; Kim, Kwon-Bae

    2010-08-01

    This study sought to evaluate the long-term clinical outcomes of a fractional flow reserve (FFR)-guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) strategy compared with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided PCI for intermediate coronary lesions. Both FFR- and IVUS-guided PCI strategies have been reported to be safe and effective in intermediate coronary lesions. The study included 167 consecutive patients, with intermediate coronary lesions evaluated by FFR or IVUS (FFR-guided, 83 lesions vs. IVUS-guided, 94 lesions). Cutoff value of FFR in FFR-guided PCI was 0.80, whereas that for minimal lumen cross sectional area in IVUS-guided PCI was 4.0 mm(2). The primary outcome was defined as a composite of major adverse cardiac events including death, myocardial infarction, and ischemia-driven target vessel revascularization at 1 year after the index procedure. Baseline percent diameter stenosis and lesion length were similar in both groups (51 +/- 8% and 24 +/- 12 mm in the FFR group vs. 52 +/- 8% and 24 +/- 13 mm in the IVUS group, respectively). However, the IVUS-guided group underwent revascularization therapy significantly more often (91.5% vs. 33.7%, p < 0.001). No significant difference was found in major adverse cardiac event rates between the 2 groups (3.6% in FFR-guided PCI vs. 3.2% in IVUS-guided PCI). Independent predictors for performing intervention were guiding device: FFR versus IVUS (relative risk [RR]: 0.02); left anterior descending coronary artery versus non-left anterior descending coronary artery disease (RR: 5.60); and multi- versus single-vessel disease (RR: 3.28). Both FFR- and IVUS-guided PCI strategy for intermediate coronary artery disease were associated with favorable outcomes. The FFR-guided PCI reduces the need for revascularization of many of these lesions. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Yield and complications in percutaneous renal biopsy. A comparison between ultrasound-guided gun-biopsy and manual techniques in native and transplant kidneys.

    PubMed

    Nyman, R S; Cappelen-Smith, J; al Suhaibani, H; Alfurayh, O; Shakweer, W; Akhtar, M

    1997-05-01

    To compare the yield and complications of ultrasound-guided gun-biopsy and manual Tru-Cut techniques in percutaneous renal biopsy. A total of 448 biopsies were reviewed. They comprised 124 manual and 131 gun-biopsies in native kidneys, and 111 manual and 82 gun-biopsies in transplant kidneys. The gun-biopsies were performed under real-time ultrasound (US) guidance. The manual technique used US mainly for marking the position of the kidney. There was a significantly higher diagnostic yield and fewer complications in the gun-biopsy group. A total of 8 major complications were found, all in the manual group. Provided that the operator is experienced in US scanning, a switch from the manual technique to real-time US-guided gun-biopsy will result in the improvement of diagnostic accuracy together with a reduced risk of complications.

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural drainage of postoperative pancreatic collections.

    PubMed

    Tilara, Amy; Gerdes, Hans; Allen, Peter; Jarnagin, William; Kingham, Peter; Fong, Yuman; DeMatteo, Ronald; D'Angelica, Michael; Schattner, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic leak is a major cause of morbidity after pancreatectomy. Traditionally, peripancreatic fluid collections have been managed by percutaneous or operative drainage. Data for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage of postoperative fluid collections are limited. Here we report on the safety, efficacy, and timing of EUS-guided drainage of postoperative peripancreatic collections. This is a retrospective review of 31 patients who underwent EUS-guided drainage of fluid collections after pancreatic resection. Technical success was defined as successful transgastric deployment of at least one double pigtail plastic stent. Clinical success was defined as resolution of the fluid collection on follow-up CT scan and resolution of symptoms. Early drainage was defined as initial transmural stent placement within 30 days after surgery. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage was performed effectively with a technical success rate of 100%. Clinical success was achieved in 29 of 31 patients (93%). Nineteen of the 29 patients (65%) had complete resolution of their symptoms and collection with the first endoscopic procedure. Repeat drainage procedures, including some with necrosectomy, were required in the remaining 10 patients, with eventual resolution of collection and symptoms. Two patients who did not achieve durable clinical success required percutaneous drainage by interventional radiology. Seventeen (55%) of 31 patients had successful early drainage completed within 30 days of their operation. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of fluid collections after pancreatic resection is safe and effective. Early drainage (<30 days) of postoperative pancreatic fluid collections was not associated with increased complications in this series. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultrasound-guided chest biopsies.

    PubMed

    Middleton, William D; Teefey, Sharlene A; Dahiya, Nirvikar

    2006-12-01

    Pulmonary nodules that are surrounded by aerated lung cannot be visualized with sonography. Therefore, percutaneous biopsy must be guided with computed tomography or fluoroscopy. Although this restriction only applies to central lung nodules, it has permeated referral patterns for other thoracic lesions and has retarded the growth of ultrasound-guided interventions. Nevertheless, sonography is an extremely flexible modality that can expeditiously guide many biopsy procedures in the thorax. Peripheral pulmonary nodules can be successfully biopsied with success rates exceeding 90% and complications rates of less than 5%. Orienting the probe parallel to the intercostal space facilitates biopsies of peripheral pulmonary nodules. Anterior mediastinal masses that extend to the parasternal region are often easily approachable provided the internal mammary vessels, costal cartilage, and deep great vessels are identified and avoided. Superior mediastinal masses can be sampled from a suprasternal or supraclavicular approach. Phased array probes or tightly curved arrays may provide improved access for biopsies in this location. Posterior mediastinal masses are more difficult to biopsy with ultrasound guidance because of the overlying paraspinal muscles. However, when posterior mediastinal masses extend into the posterior medial pleural region, they can be biopsied with ultrasound guidance. Because many lung cancers metastasize to the supraclavicular nodes, it is important to evaluate the supraclavicular region when determining the best approach to obtain a tissue diagnosis. When abnormal supraclavicular nodes are present, they often are the easiest and safest lesions to biopsy.

  16. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of methylene blue to identify nerve pathology and guide surgery.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Joseph A; Breshears, Jonathan D; Arnaout, Omar; Simon, Neil G; Hastings-Robinson, Ashley M; Aleshi, Pedram; Kliot, Michel

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to provide a technique that could be used in the preoperative period to facilitate the surgical exploration of peripheral nerve pathology. METHODS The authors describe a technique in which 1) ultrasonography is used in the immediate preoperative period to identify target peripheral nerves, 2) an ultrasound-guided needle electrode is used to stimulate peripheral nerves to confirm their position, and then 3) a methylene blue (MB) injection is performed to mark the peripheral nerve pathology to facilitate surgical exploration. RESULTS A cohort of 13 patients with varying indications for peripheral nerve surgery is presented in which ultrasound guidance, stimulation, and MB were used to localize and create a road map for surgeries. CONCLUSIONS Preoperative ultrasound-guided MB administration is a promising technique that peripheral nerve surgeons could use to plan and execute surgery.

  17. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage of calcific bursitis of the medial collateral ligament of the knee: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo-González, Federico; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; González-Pérez, José; Jiménez-Herranz, Elena; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    Calcification of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) of the knee is rare. The literature reports no positive outcomes when conservative treatment has been followed. This paper reports a case of such calcification and its treatment using ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage (UGPL). A 66-year-old patient presented with medial knee pain. X-ray, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance (MR) examinations revealed calcific bursitis of the MCL, which was treated by UGPL. One month after treatment the patient was asymptomatic. X-ray, ultrasound, and MR examinations confirmed the almost complete disappearance of the calcification; only very tiny fragments remained. Calcific bursitis of the MCL of the knee is very uncommon, but should be taken into account in differential diagnoses for medial knee pain. UGPL is proposed as a treatment for this condition.

  18. Reality named endoscopic ultrasound biliary drainage

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; de Oliveira, Joel Fernandez; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is used for diagnosis and evaluation of many diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the past, it was used to guide a cholangiography, but nowadays it emerges as a powerful therapeutic tool in biliary drainage. The aims of this review are: outline the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD); detail the procedural technique; evaluate the clinical outcomes and limitations of the method; and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. In cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), patients are usually referred for either percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or surgical bypass. Both these procedures have high rates of undesirable complications. EGBD is an attractive alternative to PTBD or surgery when ERCP fails. EGBD can be performed at two locations: transhepatic or extrahepatic, and the stent can be inserted in an antegrade or retrograde fashion. The drainage route can be transluminal, duodenal or transpapillary, which, again, can be antegrade or retrograde [rendezvous (EUS-RV)]. Complications of all techniques combined include pneumoperitoneum, bleeding, bile leak/peritonitis and cholangitis. We recommend EGBD when bile duct access is not possible because of failed cannulation, altered upper GI tract anatomy, gastric outlet obstruction, a distorted ampulla or a periampullary diverticulum, as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery or radiology. PMID:26504507

  19. Treatment of proximal hamstring tendinopathy-related sciatic nerve entrapment: presentation of an ultrasound-guided "Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis" application.

    PubMed

    Mattiussi, Gabriele; Moreno, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy-related Sciatic Nerve Entrapment (PHTrSNE) is a neuropathy caused by fibrosis interposed between the semimembranosus tendon and the sciatic nerve, at the level of the ischial tuberosity. Ultrasound-guided Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (US-guided EPI) involves galvanic current transfer within the treatment target tissue (fibrosis) via a needle 0.30 to 0.33 mm in diameter. The galvanic current in a saline solution instantly develops the chemical process of electrolysis, which in turn induces electrochemical ablation of fibrosis. In this article, the interventional procedure is presented in detail, and both the strengths and limits of the technique are discussed. US-guided EPI eliminates the fibrotic accumulation that causes PHTrSNE, without the semimembranosus tendon or the sciatic nerve being directly involved during the procedure. The technique is however of limited use in cases of compression neuropathy. US-guided EPI is a technique that is quick to perform, minimally invasive and does not force the patient to suspend their activities (work or sports) to make the treatment effective. This, coupled to the fact that the technique is generally well-tolerated by patients, supports use of US-guided EPI in the treatment of PHTrSNE.

  20. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided renal biopsy in supine antero-lateral position: a new approach for obese and non-obese patients.

    PubMed

    Gesualdo, Loreto; Cormio, Luigi; Stallone, Giovanni; Infante, Barbara; Di Palma, Anna Maria; Delli Carri, Paolo; Cignarelli, Mauro; Lamacchia, Olga; Iannaccone, Salvatore; Di Paolo, Salvatore; Morrone, Luigi; Aucella, Filippo; Carrieri, Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    Percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided renal biopsy is the gold standard in the evaluation of renal diseases, but some patients, such as the obese, may not be eligible for this procedure. Aim of this study was to determine the feasibility, efficacy and safety of US-guided percutaneous renal biopsy in supine antero-lateral position (SALP) in high-risk patients (BMI > 30 and/or respiratory difficulty), as well as to compare the overall outcome of SALP with that of traditional prone position (PP) in low-risk patients (BMI < or = 30/no respiratory difficulty). One hundred and ten consecutive patients scheduled for native kidney biopsy were recruited. Ninety low-risk patients were randomized following a permuted block randomization list to receive either US-guided renal biopsy in PP (Group 1) or SALP (Group 2), whereas 20 high-risk patients received US-guided renal biopsy in SALP (Group 3) and were our observational cohort study. Comfort compliance and breathing difficulty in each group were evaluated by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Bleeding complications were evaluated through US renal scanning. Mean operating time was 7 min. Comfort compliance and breathing difficulty were significantly better for SALP in both low- and high-risk patients; there were no significant differences in pain after biopsy among the three groups. Bleeding complications were slightly higher in Group 1. Diagnostic yield was similar in all groups. SALP is reliable, minimally invasive, easy, highly successful, timesaving and almost free from severe side-effects. A better VAS score for breathing difficulty and comfort compliance characterizes this procedure, making it particularly suitable for obese patients.

  1. Ultrasound-guided placement of a permanent percutaneous femoral nerve stimulator leads for the treatment of intractable femoral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Narouze, Samer N; Zakari, Adel; Vydyanathan, Amaresh

    2009-01-01

    Femoral nerve injury is a rare complication of cardiac catheterization and is usually caused by direct trauma during femoral artery access, compression from a hematoma, or prolonged digital pressure for post-procedural hemostasis. Peripheral nerve stimulation has been used to treat different pain syndromes in the upper and lower extremities with variable success and it typically requires direct vision with open surgical approach. Since the femoral nerve can be readily seen with ultrasonography, an ultrasound-guided lead placement seemed practical. A 61-year-old morbidly obese male who sustained femoral nerve injury during cardiac catheterization continued to complain of intractable femoral neuropathy 18 months afterwords. He failed multiple treatment modalities and continued to complain of severe neuropathic pains that markedly interfere with his daily activities. Two percutaneous leads were placed under real-time ultrasonography and the placement was confirmed with fluoroscopy. One lead was placed along the longitudinal axis of the nerve and the patient had good coverage over the anterior thigh but not below the knee. So another lead was placed horizontally across the femoral nerve in order to stimulate all the branches and the patient reported good coverage along the saphenous nerve distribution down to the foot. The patient continues to be pain free 20 months after the implant. Here we described a novel non-invasive percutaneous approach for femoral nerve stimulation with ultrasound guidance which allowed precise placement of the stimulating lead very close to the femoral nerve without the need for surgical exploration.

  2. Efficacy of Ultrasound-Guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block for Analgesia During Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty for Dialysis Access

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Emiko, E-mail: chibaemi23@comet.ocn.ne.jp; Hamamoto, Kohei, E-mail: hkouhei917@gmail.com; Nagashima, Michio, E-mail: nagamic00@gmail.com

    PurposeTo evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided axillary brachial plexus block (ABPB) for analgesia during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for dialysis access.Subjects and MethodsTwenty-one patients who underwent PTA for stenotic dialysis access shunts and who had previous experience of PTA without sedation, analgesia, and anesthesia were included. The access type in all patients was native arteriovenous fistulae in the forearm. Two radiologists performed US-guided ABPB for the radial and musculocutaneous nerves before PTA. The patients’ pain scores were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) after PTA, and these were compared with previous sessions without US-guided ABPB. Themore » patient’s motor/sensory paralysis after PTA was also examined.ResultsThe mean time required to achieve US-guided ABPB was 8 min. The success rate of this procedure was 100 %, and there were no significant complications. All 21 patients reported lower VAS with US-guided ABPB as compared to without the block (p < 0.01). All patients expressed the desire for an ABPB for future PTA sessions, if required. Transient motor paralysis occurred in 8 patients, but resolved in all after 60 min.ConclusionUS-guided ABPB is feasible and effective for analgesia in patients undergoing PTA for stenotic dialysis access sites.Level of EvidenceLevel 4 (case series).« less

  3. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous fine-needle aspiration of 545 focal pancreatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Giulia A; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Idili, Antonio; Malagò, Roberto; Iozzia, Roberta; Manfrin, Erminia; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy and short-term complication rate of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytologic sampling of focal pancreatic lesions. We reviewed 545 consecutive ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytologic sampling procedures for focal pancreatic lesions from January 2004 through June 2008. The procedures were performed with a 20- or 21-gauge needle. The onsite cytopathologist evaluated the appropriateness of the sample and made a diagnosis. We reviewed the final diagnosis and the radiologic and medical records of all patients for onset of complications during or within 7 days of the procedure. The study sample included 262 women and 283 men (mean age, 62 years; range, 25-86 years). The head or uncinate process of the pancreas was the location of 63.0% of the lesions, and 35.2% of the lesions were located in the body or tail of the pancreas. The site of 10 lesions (1.8%) was not specified. Sampling was diagnostic in 509 of the 545 cases (93.4%). Excluding the 36 nondiagnostic samples, ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytologic sampling had 99.4% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 99.4% accuracy. In 537 of the 545 cases (98.5%), the procedure was uneventful. In two cases, abdominal fluid was found after the procedure that was not present before the procedure. Six patients experienced postprocedural pain without abnormal findings at subsequent imaging. No major complications occurred. Ultrasound-guided cytologic sampling is safe and accurate for the diagnosis and planning of management of focal pancreatic lesions. With a cytologist on site, the rate of acquisition of samples adequate for diagnosis is high, reducing the need for patient recall.

  4. Feasibility of Retrograde Ureteral Contrast Injection to Guide Ultrasonographic Percutaneous Renal Access in the Nondilated Collecting System.

    PubMed

    Usawachintachit, Manint; Tzou, David T; Mongan, John; Taguchi, Kazumi; Weinstein, Stefanie; Chi, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has become increasingly utilized. Patients with nondilated collecting systems represent a challenge: the target calix is often difficult to visualize. Here we report pilot study results for retrograde ultrasound contrast injection to aid in percutaneous renal access during ultrasound-guided PCNL. From April to July 2016, consecutive patients over the age of 18 years with nondilated collecting systems on preoperative imaging who presented for PCNL were enrolled. B-mode ultrasound imaging was compared with contrast-enhanced mode with simultaneous retrograde injection of Optison™ via an ipsilateral ureteral catheter. Five patients (four males and one female) with renal stones underwent PCNL with retrograde ultrasound contrast injection during the study period. Mean body mass index was 28.3 ± 5.6 kg/m 2 and mean stone size was 24.5 ± 12.0 mm. Under B-mode ultrasound, all patients demonstrated nondilated renal collecting systems that appeared as hyperechoic areas, where it was difficult to identify a target calix for puncture. Retrograde contrast injection facilitated delineation of all renal calices initially difficult to visualize under B-mode ultrasound. Renal puncture was then performed effectively in all cases with a mean puncture time of 55.4 ± 44.8 seconds. All PCNL procedures were completed without intraoperative complications and no adverse events related to ultrasound contrast injection occurred. Retrograde ultrasound contrast injection as an aide for renal puncture during PCNL is a feasible technique. By improving visualization of the collecting system, it facilitates needle placement in challenging patients without hydronephrosis. Future larger scale studies comparing its use to standard ultrasound-guided technique will be required to validate this concept.

  5. Percutaneous imaging-guided interventions for acute biliary disorders in high surgical risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Donkol, Ragab Hani; Latif, Nahed Abdel; Moghazy, Khaled

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous imaging-guided biliary interventions in the management of acute biliary disorders in high surgical risk patients. METHODS: One hundred and twenty two patients underwent 139 percutaneous imaging-guided biliary interventions during the period between January 2007 to December 2009. The patients included 73 women and 49 men with a mean age of 61 years (range 35-90 years). Fifty nine patients had acute biliary obstruction, 26 patients had acute biliary infection and 37 patients had abnormal collections. The procedures were performed under computed tomography (CT)- (73 patients), sonographic- (41 patients), and fluoroscopic-guidance (25 patients). Success rates and complications were determined. The χ2 test with Yates’ correction for continuity was applied to compare between these procedures. A P value < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: The success rates for draining acute biliary obstruction under CT- , fluoroscopy- or ultrasound-guidance were 93.3%, 62.5% and 46.1%, respectively with significant P values (P = 0.026 and 0.002, respectively). In acute biliary infection, successful drainage was achieved in 22 patients (84.6%). The success rates in patients drained under ultrasound- and CT-guidance were 46.1% and 88.8%, respectively and drainage under CT-guidance was significantly higher (P = 0.0293). In 13 patients with bilomas, percutaneous drainage was successful in 11 patients (84.6%). Ten out of 12 cases with hepatic abscesses were drained with a success rate of 83.3%. In addition, the success rate of drainage in 12 cases with pancreatic pseudocysts was 83.3%. The reported complications were two deaths, four major and seven minor complications. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous imaging-guided biliary interventions help to promptly diagnose and effectively treat acute biliary disorders. They either cure the disorders or relieve sepsis and jaundice before operations. PMID:21160698

  6. Treatment of proximal hamstring tendinopathy-related sciatic nerve entrapment: presentation of an ultrasound-guided “Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis” application

    PubMed Central

    Mattiussi, Gabriele; Moreno, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy-related Sciatic Nerve Entrapment (PHTrSNE) is a neuropathy caused by fibrosis interposed between the semimembranosus tendon and the sciatic nerve, at the level of the ischial tuberosity. Methods Ultrasound-guided Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (US-guided EPI) involves galvanic current transfer within the treatment target tissue (fibrosis) via a needle 0.30 to 0.33 mm in diameter. The galvanic current in a saline solution instantly develops the chemical process of electrolysis, which in turn induces electrochemical ablation of fibrosis. In this article, the interventional procedure is presented in detail, and both the strengths and limits of the technique are discussed. Results US-guided EPI eliminates the fibrotic accumulation that causes PHTrSNE, without the semimembranosus tendon or the sciatic nerve being directly involved during the procedure. The technique is however of limited use in cases of compression neuropathy. Conclusion US-guided EPI is a technique that is quick to perform, minimally invasive and does not force the patient to suspend their activities (work or sports) to make the treatment effective. This, coupled to the fact that the technique is generally well-tolerated by patients, supports use of US-guided EPI in the treatment of PHTrSNE. PMID:27900300

  7. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided drainage of an abdominal fluid collection following Whipple’s resection

    PubMed Central

    Jah, Asif; Jamieson, Neville; Huguet, Emmanuel; Griffiths, William; Carroll, Nicholas; Praseedom, Raaj

    2008-01-01

    Percutaneous aspiration and drainage of post-operative abdominal fluid collections is a well established standard technique. However, some fluid collections are not amenable to percutaneous drainage either due to location or the presence of surrounding visceral structures. Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) has been widely used for the drainage of pancreatitis-related abdominal fluid collections. However, there are no reports on the use of this technique in the post-operative setting. We report a case where the EUS-guided technique was used to drain a percutaneously inaccessible post-operative collection which had developed after Whipple’s resection. PMID:19058316

  8. Percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency ablation for treatment of biliary stent occlusion: A preliminary result.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ning; Gong, Ju; Lu, Jian; Chen, Zhi-Jin; Zhang, Li-Yun; Wang, Zhong-Min

    2017-03-14

    To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a novel application of percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency (RF) for the treatment of biliary stent obstruction. We specifically report a retrospective study presenting the results of percutaneous intraductal RF in patients with biliary stent occlusion. A total of 43 cases involving biliary stent obstruction were treated by placing an EndoHPB catheter and percutaneous intraductal RF was performed to clean stents. The stent patency was evaluated by cholangiography and follow-up by contrast enhanced computed tomography or ultrasound after the removal of the drainage catheter. Following the procedures, of the 43 patients, 40 survived and 3 died with a median survival of 80.5 (range: 30-243) d. One patient was lost to follow-up. One patient had the stent patent at the time of last follow-up. Two patients with stent blockage at 35 d and 44 d after procedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion only. The levels of bilirubin before and after the procedure were 128 ± 65 μmol/L and 63 ± 29 μmol/L, respectively. There were no related complications (haemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak or pancreatitis) and all patients' stent patency was confirmed by cholangiography after the procedure, with a median patency time of 107 (range: 12-180) d. This preliminary clinical study demonstrated that percutaneous intraductal RF is safe and effective for the treatment of biliary stent obstruction, increasing the duration of stent patency, although randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the effectiveness of this approach.

  9. Percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency ablation for treatment of biliary stent occlusion: A preliminary result

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ning; Gong, Ju; Lu, Jian; Chen, Zhi-Jin; Zhang, Li-Yun; Wang, Zhong-Min

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a novel application of percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency (RF) for the treatment of biliary stent obstruction. METHODS We specifically report a retrospective study presenting the results of percutaneous intraductal RF in patients with biliary stent occlusion. A total of 43 cases involving biliary stent obstruction were treated by placing an EndoHPB catheter and percutaneous intraductal RF was performed to clean stents. The stent patency was evaluated by cholangiography and follow-up by contrast enhanced computed tomography or ultrasound after the removal of the drainage catheter. RESULTS Following the procedures, of the 43 patients, 40 survived and 3 died with a median survival of 80.5 (range: 30-243) d. One patient was lost to follow-up. One patient had the stent patent at the time of last follow-up. Two patients with stent blockage at 35 d and 44 d after procedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion only. The levels of bilirubin before and after the procedure were 128 ± 65 μmol/L and 63 ± 29 μmol/L, respectively. There were no related complications (haemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak or pancreatitis) and all patients’ stent patency was confirmed by cholangiography after the procedure, with a median patency time of 107 (range: 12-180) d. CONCLUSION This preliminary clinical study demonstrated that percutaneous intraductal RF is safe and effective for the treatment of biliary stent obstruction, increasing the duration of stent patency, although randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the effectiveness of this approach. PMID:28348491

  10. Adopting Ultrasound Guidance for Prone Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: Evaluating the Learning Curve for the Experienced Surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Usawachintachit, Manint; Masic, Selma; Allen, Isabel E.; Li, Jianxing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To define the learning curve associated with adopting ultrasound guidance for prone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for the experienced surgeon. Methods: A prospective cohort study of consecutive patients undergoing PCNL with ultrasound guidance for renal tract access and dilation was performed. Clinical data reviewed included success in gaining renal access with ultrasound guidance, total fluoroscopic screening time, and radiation exposure dose. PCNL cases performed with fluoroscopic guidance matched for stone size served as control cases. Results: One hundred consecutive ultrasound-guided procedures performed by a single experienced endourologist were divided into five experience groups. Significant improvement in renal access success rate with ultrasound was seen after 20 cases (p < 0.05). Total fluoroscopic screening time, radiation exposure dose, and operative time were also statistically significantly improved over the study period. When compared with fluoroscopy-guided PCNL, significant decreases in total fluoroscopic screening time (33.4 ± 35.3 seconds vs 157.5 ± 84.9 seconds, p < 0.05) and radiation exposure (7.0 ± 8.7 mGy vs 47.8 ± 45.9 mGy, p < 0.05) were seen. No differences in complication rates were found. Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided renal access for PCNL can be performed effectively after 20 cases. Transition to the use of ultrasound will quickly reduce radiation exposure for patients and intraoperative personnel. PMID:27150671

  11. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of thyroid: Report of two cases and systematic review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Karan; Mittal, Saurabh; Hadda, Vijay; Jain, Deepali; Mohan, Anant; Guleria, Randeep

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive and safe technique for a sampling of mediastinal lesions. Indications for EBUS-TBNA have gradually expanded since its introduction. The usual approach to cytological sampling of the thyroid gland is percutaneous ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) performed under local anesthesia. US-FNA may be risky or not feasible in intrathoracic/substernal thyroid location. Feasibility of aspirating thyroid lesions with EBUS-TBNA has been occasionally reported. We report two patients wherein EBUS-TBNA was utilized for thyroid lesion aspiration and definitive diagnosis. We highlight the utility and safety of EBUS-TBNA in the evaluation of intrathoracic thyroid lesions wherein image-guided percutaneous aspiration may be risky/sometimes impossible to perform. A systematic review of literature has also been performed summarizing and discussing the issues pertaining to EBUS-TBNA of the thyroid gland. PMID:27891005

  12. Outcomes of Ultrasound-Guided Thrombin Injection of Nongroin Arterial Pseudoaneurysms.

    PubMed

    Valesano, Johnathan C; Schmitz, John J; Kurup, A Nicholas; Schmit, Grant D; Moynagh, Michael R; Atwell, Thomas D; Lewis, Bradley D; Lee, Robert A; Callstrom, Matthew R

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate success and complication rates of percutaneous ultrasound-guided thrombin injection of nongroin pseudoaneurysms (PSAs). Retrospective review of a prospectively maintained institutional database yielded 39 cases of arterial PSAs occurring at nongroin sites that were treated with percutaneous ultrasound-guided thrombin injection between 2000 and 2016 (average patient age 69.2 y ± 14.0). Of PSAs, 74.4% (29/39) arose in the upper extremities, and 92.3% (36/39) were iatrogenic. The brachial artery was the most commonly affected vessel (51.3% [20/39]), and arterial access was the most common cause (56.4% [22/39]). Average overall PSA size was 2.4 cm (range, 0.5-7.2 cm); average amount of thrombin injected was 320 IU (range, 50-2,000 IU). Technical success was defined as absence of flow within the PSA immediately after thrombin injection. Treatment success was defined as sustained thrombosis on follow-up imaging obtained at 1-3 days after treatment. Technical and treatment success rates of thrombin injections were 100% (39/39) and 84.8% (28/33), respectively. Longer term follow-up imaging (average 71 d; range, 12-201 d) was available for 7 of the treatment successes with 100% (7/7) showing sustained thrombosis. Comparing treatment successes and failures, there was no significant difference in average PSA size (2.3 cm vs 2.0 cm, P = .51) or average amount of thrombin injected (360 IU vs 180 IU, P = .14). There were no complications. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection is a safe, efficacious treatment option for PSAs arising in nongroin locations. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrasound Guidance for Renal Tract Access and Dilation Reduces Radiation Exposure during Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purposes. To present our series of 38 prone percutaneous nephrolithotomy procedures performed with renal access and tract dilation purely under ultrasound guidance and describe the benefits and challenges accompanying this approach. Methods. Thirty-eight consecutive patients presenting for percutaneous nephrolithotomy for renal stone removal were included in this prospective cohort study. Ultrasonographic imaging in the prone position was used to obtain percutaneous renal access and guide tract dilation. Fluoroscopic screening was used only for nephrostomy tube placement. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative procedural and patient data were collected for analysis. Results. Mean age of patients was 52.7 ± 17.2 years. Forty-five percent of patients were male with mean BMI of 26.1 ± 7.3 and mean stone size of 27.2 ± 17.6 millimeters. Renal puncture was performed successfully with ultrasonographic guidance in all cases with mean puncture time of 135.4 ± 132.5 seconds. Mean dilation time was 11.5 ± 3.8 min and mean stone fragmentation time was 37.5 ± 29.0 min. Mean total operative time was 129.3 ± 41.1. No patients experienced any significant immediate postoperative complication. All patients were rendered stone-free and no additional secondary procedures were required. Conclusions. Ultrasound guidance for renal access and tract dilation in prone percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a feasible and effective technique. It can be performed safely with significantly reduced fluoroscopic radiation exposure to the patient, surgeon, and intraoperative personnel. PMID:27042176

  14. Ultrasound-guided vs endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for pancreatic cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Masato; Ishii, Hiroshi; Kuraoka, Kensuke; Yukisawa, Seigo; Kasuga, Akiyoshi; Ozaka, Masato; Suzuki, Sho; Takano, Kouichi; Sugiyama, Yuko; Itoi, Takao

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the effectiveness and safety of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: Patients who were diagnosed with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic PC between February 2006 and September 2011 were selected for this retrospective study. FNA biopsy for pancreatic tumors had been performed percutaneously under extracorporeal ultrasound guidance until October 2009; then, beginning in November 2009, EUS-FNA has been performed. We reviewed the complete medical records of all patients who met the selection criteria for the following data: sex, age, location and size of the targeted tumor, histological and/or cytological findings, details of puncture procedures, time from day of puncture until day of definitive diagnosis, and details of severe adverse events. RESULTS: Of the 121 patients who met the selection criteria, 46 had a percutaneous biopsy (Group A) and 75 had an EUS-FNA biopsy (Group B). Adequate cytological specimens were obtained in 42 Group A patients (91.3%) and all 75 Group B patients (P = 0.0192), and histological specimens were obtained in 41 Group A patients (89.1%) and 65 Group B patients (86.7%). Diagnosis of malignancy by cytology was positive in 33 Group A patients (78.6%) and 72 Group B patients (94.6%) (P = 0.0079). Malignancy by both cytology and pathology was found in 43 Group A (93.5%) and 73 Group B (97.3%) patients. The mean period from the puncture until the cytological diagnosis in Group B was 1.7 d, which was significantly shorter than that in Group A (4.1 d) (P < 0.0001). Severe adverse events were experienced in two Group A patients (4.3%) and in one Group B patient (1.3%). CONCLUSION: EUS-FNA, as well as percutaneous needle aspiration, is an effective modality to obtain cytopathological confirmation in patients with advanced PC. PMID:23613631

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy after a failed or impossible ERCP.

    PubMed

    Mora Soler, Ana María; Álvarez Delgado, Alberto; Piñero Pérez, María Concepción; Velasco-Guardado, Antonio; Marcos Prieto, Héctor; Rodríguez Pérez, Antonio

    2018-05-01

    endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) is an alternative to percutaneous trans-hepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) in cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). this is a retrospective description of six cases of endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage via choledochoduodenostomy (EUCD), as well as the clinical characteristics, endoscopic procedure, complications and monitoring. all cases had malignant distal biliary obstruction. The procedure was concluded with good drainage in four out of six patients. Two late complications were recorded that were caused by stent migration and there were no deaths related with the procedure. The average monitoring period was six months. EUCD can be considered as a valid therapeutic choice in some selected cases and when performed by a team of expert endoscopists in cases of failed ERCP drainage or as an alternative to PTBD. However, the procedure has some associated complications.

  16. Autonomic responses to ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis of the patellar tendon in healthy male footballers.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz Torres, Blanca; Albornoz Cabello, Manuel; García Bermejo, Paula; Naranjo Orellana, José

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis (PNE) is a novel minimally invasive approach, which involves the application of a galvanic current via an acupuncture needle. As in any procedure involving needling, vagal reactions have been reported during PNE. To examine for changes in autonomic activity during the US-guided PNE technique on healthy patellar tendons by measurement and analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). Twenty-two male footballers were randomly allocated to: a control group (11 players), for whom HRV was recorded for 10 min, both at rest and during an exhaustive US examination of the patellar tendon and adjacent structures; and an experimental group (11 players), for whom HRV was recorded for 10 min, both at rest and during application of US-guided PNE on the patellar tendon. The following HRV parameters were assessed: mean NN interval, mean heart rate, time domain parameters (SDNN, rMSSD, pNN50), diameters of the Poincaré plot (SD1, SD2), stress score, and sympathetic/parasympathetic ratio. There were no differences between groups in any baseline measurements, nor were there any significant differences between control group measurements (baseline vs intervention). The experimental group exhibited statistically significant increases in SDNN/SD1 (p=0.02/p=0.03) and SD2 (p=0.03), indicating increased parasympathetic and decreased sympathetic activity, respectively. US-guided PNE was associated with an autonomic imbalance characterised by greater parasympathetic activity, which could potentially result in a vasovagal reaction. Care should be taken to monitor for adverse reactions during US-guided PNE and simple HRV indicators may have a role in early detection. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. A prototype percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography training simulator with real-time breathing motion.

    PubMed

    Villard, P F; Vidal, F P; Hunt, C; Bello, F; John, N W; Johnson, S; Gould, D A

    2009-11-01

    We present here a simulator for interventional radiology focusing on percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC). This procedure consists of inserting a needle into the biliary tree using fluoroscopy for guidance. The requirements of the simulator have been driven by a task analysis. The three main components have been identified: the respiration, the real-time X-ray display (fluoroscopy) and the haptic rendering (sense of touch). The framework for modelling the respiratory motion is based on kinematics laws and on the Chainmail algorithm. The fluoroscopic simulation is performed on the graphic card and makes use of the Beer-Lambert law to compute the X-ray attenuation. Finally, the haptic rendering is integrated to the virtual environment and takes into account the soft-tissue reaction force feedback and maintenance of the initial direction of the needle during the insertion. Five training scenarios have been created using patient-specific data. Each of these provides the user with variable breathing behaviour, fluoroscopic display tuneable to any device parameters and needle force feedback. A detailed task analysis has been used to design and build the PTC simulator described in this paper. The simulator includes real-time respiratory motion with two independent parameters (rib kinematics and diaphragm action), on-line fluoroscopy implemented on the Graphics Processing Unit and haptic feedback to feel the soft-tissue behaviour of the organs during the needle insertion.

  18. Ultrasound-guided cable-free 13-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy of non-mass breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jiwoon; Jang, Mijung; Yun, Bo La; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Kang, Eunyoung; Park, So Yeon; Moon, Woo Kyung; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Bohyoung

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the outcomes of ultrasound-guided core biopsy for non-mass breast lesions by the novel 13-gauge cable-free vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) and by the conventional 14-gauge semi-automated core needle biopsy (CCNB). Materials and methods Our institutional review board approved this prospective study, and all patients provided written informed consent. Among 1840 ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsies performed from August 2013 to December 2014, 145 non-mass breast lesions with suspicious microcalcifications on mammography or corresponding magnetic resonance imaging finding were subjected to 13-gauge VAB or 14-gauge CCNB. We evaluated the technical success rates, average specimen numbers, and tissue sampling time. We also compared the results of percutaneous biopsy and final surgical pathologic diagnosis to analyze the rates of diagnostic upgrade or downgrade. Results Ultrasound-guided VAB successfully targeted and sampled all lesions, whereas CCNB failed to demonstrate calcification in four (10.3%) breast lesions with microcalcification on specimen mammography. The mean sampling time were 238.6 and 170.6 seconds for VAB and CCNB, respectively. No major complications were observed with either method. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) lesions were more frequently upgraded after CCNB (8/23 and 3/5, respectively) than after VAB (2/26 and 0/4, respectively P = 0.028). Conclusion Non-mass breast lesions were successfully and accurately biopsied using cable-free VAB. The underestimation rate of ultrasound-detected non-mass lesion was significantly lower with VAB than with CCNB. Trial registration CRiS KCT0002267. PMID:28628656

  19. Usefulness of rehabilitation in patients with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment.

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Schiavone, Cosima; Salini, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a specific rehabilitation program for patients in whom ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment (UGPT) was performed for rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy (RCCT). In this prospective observational study, 86 patients (22 males and 64 females) with shoulder calcific tendinopathy treated with UGPT were enrolled. At the end of the procedure, a corticosteroid injection into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa was performed. The patients were then asked to follow a specific rehabilitation protocol (2 times/week for 5 weeks) that focused on mobility, strength and function. At baseline and after 6 weeks, clinical parameters, visual analog scale (VAS) and Constant-Murley scale (CMS) scores and ultrasound (US) features were collected. The mean age of the patients was 48.9 ± 8.4 years and their mean BMI was 22.7 ± 2.1. Considering the whole cohort, the treatment was effective, with a significant decrease in the VAS score and an improvement in the CMS score. Thereafter, on the basis of the compliance to the rehabilitation program (by self-report), 53 and 33 patients were included in the rehabilitation group (Rehab group; performed exercises ≥2 times/week) and the No Rehab group (performed exercises <2 times/week), respectively. The comparison between the groups showed that the subjects who performed the exercises regularly had better results in terms of pain and functional recovery, and less associated diseases (e.g. adhesive bursitis and tenosynovitis of the long head of the biceps) than those who were less compliant with the program. UGPT, followed by a specific postprocedure rehabilitation program, was an effective treatment for RCCT. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis in chronic lateral epicondylitis: short-term and long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Valera-Garrido, Fermín; Minaya-Muñoz, Francisco; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Background Ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis (PNE) is a novel minimally invasive approach which consists of the application of a galvanic current through an acupuncture needle. Objective To evaluate the clinical and ultrasonographic effectiveness of a multimodal programme (PNE, eccentric exercise (EccEx) and stretching) in the short term for patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, and to determine whether the clinical outcomes achieved decline over time. Methods A one-way repeated measures study was performed in a clinical setting in 36 patients presenting with lateral epicondylitis. The patients received one session of US-guided PNE per week over 4–6 weeks, associated with a home programme of EccEx and stretching. The main outcome measures were severity of pain, disability (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire), structural tendon changes (US), hypervascularity and patients’ perceptions of overall outcome. Measurements at 6, 26 and 52 weeks follow-up included recurrence rates (increase in severity of pain or disability compared with discharge), perception of overall outcome and success rates. Results All outcome measures registered significant improvements between pre-intervention and discharge. Most patients (n=30, 83.3%) rated the overall outcome as ‘successful’ at 6 weeks. The ultrasonographic findings showed that the hypoechoic regions and hypervascularity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis changed significantly. At 26 and 52 weeks, all participants (n=32) perceived a ‘successful’ outcome. Recurrence rates were null after discharge and at follow-up at 6, 26 and 52 weeks. Conclusions Symptoms and degenerative structural changes of chronic lateral epicondylitis are reduced after US-guided PNE associated with EccEx and stretching, with encouragingly low recurrences in the mid to long term. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02085928. PMID:25122629

  1. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis in chronic lateral epicondylitis: short-term and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Valera-Garrido, Fermín; Minaya-Muñoz, Francisco; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis (PNE) is a novel minimally invasive approach which consists of the application of a galvanic current through an acupuncture needle. To evaluate the clinical and ultrasonographic effectiveness of a multimodal programme (PNE, eccentric exercise (EccEx) and stretching) in the short term for patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, and to determine whether the clinical outcomes achieved decline over time. A one-way repeated measures study was performed in a clinical setting in 36 patients presenting with lateral epicondylitis. The patients received one session of US-guided PNE per week over 4-6 weeks, associated with a home programme of EccEx and stretching. The main outcome measures were severity of pain, disability (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire), structural tendon changes (US), hypervascularity and patients' perceptions of overall outcome. Measurements at 6, 26 and 52 weeks follow-up included recurrence rates (increase in severity of pain or disability compared with discharge), perception of overall outcome and success rates. All outcome measures registered significant improvements between pre-intervention and discharge. Most patients (n=30, 83.3%) rated the overall outcome as 'successful' at 6 weeks. The ultrasonographic findings showed that the hypoechoic regions and hypervascularity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis changed significantly. At 26 and 52 weeks, all participants (n=32) perceived a 'successful' outcome. Recurrence rates were null after discharge and at follow-up at 6, 26 and 52 weeks. Symptoms and degenerative structural changes of chronic lateral epicondylitis are reduced after US-guided PNE associated with EccEx and stretching, with encouragingly low recurrences in the mid to long term. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02085928. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  2. Extracorporeal shockwaves versus ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage for the treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo-González, Federico; Ramos-Alvarez, Juan J; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo; González-Pérez, José; Jiménez-Herranz, Elena; Varela, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave treatment (ESWT) and ultrasound-guided percutaneous lavage (UGPL) are two effective ways of treating rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy (RCCT). The aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of these techniques in the treatment of RCCT. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Patients treated in our sports medicine and rehabilitation center (Centro Médico Deyre, Madrid. Spain) between January 2007 and December 2013. This randomized study compares the results achieved with these techniques over one year following their use to treat the above condition. Eighty patients received ESWT and 121 received UGPL. A visual analogue scale was used to measure pain, and ultrasound to determine the extent of calcification, at 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Pain and the amount of calcification were significantly reduced by both techniques at 3, 6 and 12 months (P<0.001 for each), but significantly more so by UGPL (P<0.001). Both techniques are valid for the treatment of RCCT, although UGPL is associated with a greater reduction of calcification and greater reduction in pain. The results obtained applying UGPL, the low cost and the lack of complications should therefore make the treatment of choice in centers that are appropriately equipped and staffed.

  3. The value of percutaneous cholangiography

    PubMed Central

    Evison, Gordon; McNulty, Myles; Thomson, Colin

    1973-01-01

    Percutaneous cholangiograms performed on fifty patients in a district general hospital have been reviewed, and the advantages and limitations of the examination are described. The investigation is considered to have sufficient diagnostic value to warrant its inclusion in the diagnostic armamentarium of every general radiological department. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4788917

  4. Laparoscopy-guided intracorporeal ultrasound accurately delineates hepatobiliary anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, M; Stiegmann, G V; Durham, J; Berguer, R; Oba, Y; Fujiyama, Y; McIntyre, R C

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a technique and assess the ability of a laparoscopic ultrasound probe to delineate biliary antomy and to determine the presence or absence of duct stones. Five pigs had ultrasonography of biliary structures and liver at laparoscopy followed by cholangiograms and anatomical dissection. Five patients had ultrasonography of the biliary tract at laparoscopic cholecystectomy. All animals had adequate visualization of important hepatobiliary structure, and an optimal method of accessing these structures at laparoscopy was established. Patients had ultrasonography which used methods developed in the animal trial. All had adequate visualization of the entire common bile duct confirmed by cholangiography. Limitations in demonstrating the relationship of the cystic duct to the common duct were technical and can be corrected. Laparoscopic ultrasonography has significant potential for delineation of biliary anatomy and determination of presence or absence of duct calculi. Clinical implementation could minimize the risk of iatrogenic duct injury and the need for operative cholangiography.

  5. Autonomic Responses to Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Needle Electrolysis: Effect of Needle Puncture or Electrical Current?

    PubMed

    García Bermejo, Paula; De La Cruz Torres, Blanca; Naranjo Orellana, José; Albornoz Cabello, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish if the changes in sympathetic and parasympathetic activity (analyzed through heart-rate variability [HRV]) during ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous needle electrolysis (PNE) is due to the effect of needle puncture only or of the PNE technique per se where the puncture and galvanic current are combined. This was an experimental, case-control study that took place at the University of Seville. Subjects were 36 male footballers who were randomly allocated to three groups: a control group (CG; 12 players), for whom HRV was recorded for 10 min, both at rest and during an exhaustive US examination of the patellar tendon and adjacent structures; a first experimental group (PNE group; 12 players), for whom HRV was recorded for 10 min, both at rest and during application of US-guided PNE in the patellar tendon; and a second experimental group (needle group; 12 players), for whom HRV was recorded for 10 min, both at rest and during application of US-guided PNE without electrical current in the patellar tendon. The outcome measures were the diameters of the Poincaré plot (SD1, SD2), stress score, and sympathetic/parasympathetic ratio. There were no differences between groups in any baseline measurements, nor were there any significant differences between CG measurements (baseline vs. intervention). The PNE group exhibited statistically significant increases in SD1 (p = 0.01) and SD2 (p = 0.004) and statistically significant decreases in SS and S/PS ratio (p = 0.03), indicating increased parasympathetic and decreased sympathetic activity, respectively. The needle group exhibited statistically significant increases in SD2 (p = 0.02) and statistically significant decreases in SS (p = 0.02), indicating decreased sympathetic activity. The application of the US-guided PNE technique caused a measurable increase in parasympathetic activity (detected by HRV), which was due to the combination of needle puncture and

  6. ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASOUND-GUIDED FINE-NEEDLE ASPIRATION IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF ADRENAL METASTASIS IN A HIGH-RISK POPULATION.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Catherine D; Erickson, Dana; Levy, Michael J; Gleeson, Ferga C; Salomao, Diva R; Delivanis, Danae A; Bancos, Irina

    2017-12-01

    While the left adrenal gland is readily accessible via endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), data regarding the utility of EUS-FNA in the diagnosis of adrenal lesions remain limited. We aimed to ( 1) describe the clinical context, adverse event rate, and diagnostic performance of EUS-FNA, and ( 2) compare the safety profile and diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA with percutaneous adrenal biopsy. Single-center, retrospective cohort study. Medical records of patients who underwent adrenal EUS-FNA from 2005-2016 were reviewed. Biopsy outcomes were evaluated using a predefined reference standard. Results were compared to patients who underwent percutaneous biopsy (n = 419; 1994-2014) at the same institution. A total of 121 patients underwent EUS-FNA of 122 adrenal lesions (left [n = 121]; right [n = 1]; mean lesion size, 1.8 cm). Cytology was positive for malignancy in 35 (29%), suspicious for malignancy in 1 (1%), atypical in 1 (1%), negative for malignancy in 81 (66%), and nondiagnostic in 4 (3%). No adverse events were reported. EUS-FNA diagnosed metastasis with a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 97.4%, positive predictive value of 91.7%, and negative predictive value of 100%. When compared to percutaneous biopsy, lesion size (1.8 cm vs. 3.7 cm; P<.001) and biopsy site (99% vs. 62% left adrenal; P<.001) were significantly different. EUS-FNA adverse event rate was lower than percutaneous biopsy (0% vs. 4%; P = .024), but nondiagnostic rates were similar (3.3% vs. 4.8%; P = .48). EUS-FNA is a sensitive technique to sample adrenal lesions in patients at high risk for adrenal metastasis with fewer adverse events compared to percutaneous biopsy. CI = confidence interval CT = computed tomography EUS-FNA = endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration NPV = negative predictive value PPV = positive predictive value TUS = transabdominal ultra-sound.

  7. Evaluating the Learning Curve for Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy under Total Ultrasound Guidance.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Ma, YaNan; Song, YongSheng; Fei, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the learning curve of percutaneous nephrolithotomy under total ultrasound guidance. One hundred and twenty consecutive PCNL operations under total ultrasound guidance performed by a novice surgeon in a tertiary referral center were studied. Operations were analyzed in cohorts of 15 to determine when a plateau was reached for the variables such as operation duration, ultrasound screening time, tract dilation time, stone-free rate and complication rate. Comparison was made with the results of a surgeon who had performed more than 1000 PCNLs. Fluoroscopy was not used at all during procedure. The mean operation time dropped from 82.5 min for the first 15 patients to a mean of 64.7 min for cases 46 through 60(P = 0.047). The ultrasound screening time was a peak of 6.4 min in the first 15 cases, whereas it dropped to a mean of 3.9 min for cases 46 through 60(P = 0.01). The tract dilation time dropped from 4.9 min for the first 15 patients to a mean of 3.8 min for cases 46 through 60(P = 0.036). The senior surgeon had a mean operating time, screening time and tract dilation time equivalent to those of the novice surgeon after 60 cases. There was no significant difference in stone free rate and complication rate. The competence of ultrasound guided PCNL is reached after 60 cases with good stone free rate and without major complications.

  8. First Experience of Ultrasound-guided Percutaneous Ablation for Recurrent Hepatoblastoma after Liver Resection in Children

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoxian; Zhou, Luyao; Huang, Guangliang; Zhong, Zhihai; Jiang, Chunlin; Shan, Quanyuan; Xu, Ming; Kuang, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to summarize the first experience with ultrasound-guided percutaneous ablation treatment (PAT) for recurrent hepatoblastoma (HB) after liver resection in children. From August 2013 to October 2014, PAT was used to treat 5 children with a total of 8 recurrent HB (mean size, 1.4 ± 0.8 cm; size range, 0.7–3.1 cm), including 4 patients with 7 tumors in the liver and 1 patient with 1 tumor in the lung. Technical success was achieved in all patients (5/5, 100%). The complete ablation rate after the first ablation session was 80% (4/5) on a patient-by-patient basis and 87.5% (7/8) on a tumor-by-tumor basis. Only 1 patient developed a fever with temperature >39 °C; it lasted 4 days after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and was resolved by conservative therapy. During the follow-up period, new intrahepatic recurrences after PAT were detected in two patients. One died due to tumor progression 4 months after ablation. The median overall survival time after PAT was 13.8 months. PAT is a safe and promising therapy for children with recurrent HB after liver resection, and further investigation in large-scale randomized clinical trials is required to determine its role in the treatment of this disease. PMID:26578035

  9. Does ultrasound-guided lidocaine injection improve local anaesthesia before femoral artery catheterization?

    PubMed

    Spiliopoulos, S; Katsanos, K; Diamantopoulos, A; Karnabatidis, D; Siablis, D

    2011-05-01

    To present the results of a prospective, randomized, single-centre study investigating local anaesthesia before percutaneous common femoral artery (CFA) puncture and catheterization with the use of ultrasound-guided injection of lidocaine versus standard infiltration by manual palpation. Patients scheduled to undergo diagnostic or therapeutic transfemoral catheter-based procedures gave informed consent and were randomized in two groups. In the first arm local anaesthesia with lidocaine hydrochloride 1% was performed under ultrasound guidance (group U/S), while in the second arm the standard method of manual artery palpation was applied (group M). In both groups, subsequent CFA catheterization was achieved under ultrasound guidance. The primary study endpoint was peri-procedural pain level evaluated with a visual-analogue scale (VAS score 0-10). Between January 2009 and 2010, 200 patients (161 men, mean age 63±12 years) were equally assigned to each group without any significant differences in baseline demographics. Patients in group U/S experienced significantly less pain during CFA catheterization in comparison with group M with a difference of three points in mean VAS score reported (1.6±1.6 versus 4.6±1.9, p<0.0001). In addition, significantly less volume of lidocaine was used in group U/S compared to group M (16±2.7 versus 19±0.8ml, p<0.001).Total vascular access time was similar in both groups (4.4±1.3 versus 4.5±1.3min). Overall complications included two small groin haematomas in each group. Ultrasound-guided local anaesthesia of the CFA prior to percutaneous transcatheter procedures is safe and achieves superior levels of analgesia with minimal patient pain and discomfort compared to the standard method of manual palpation. Copyright © 2011 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of synovium is an increasingly performed procedure with a high diagnostic yield. In this review, we discuss the normal synovium, as well as the indications, technique, tissue handling and clinical applications of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. PMID:26581578

  11. MR-guided Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z MR-guided Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound ( ... are the limitations of MRgFUS? What is Focused Ultrasound of Uterine Fibroids? Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound ( ...

  12. Mechanically assisted 3D ultrasound for pre-operative assessment and guiding percutaneous treatment of focal liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi Neshat, Hamid; Bax, Jeffery; Barker, Kevin; Gardi, Lori; Chedalavada, Jason; Kakani, Nirmal; Fenster, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    Image-guided percutaneous ablation is the standard treatment for focal liver tumors deemed inoperable and is commonly used to maintain eligibility for patients on transplant waitlists. Radiofrequency (RFA), microwave (MWA) and cryoablation technologies are all delivered via one or a number of needle-shaped probes inserted directly into the tumor. Planning is mostly based on contrast CT/MRI. While intra-procedural CT is commonly used to confirm the intended probe placement, 2D ultrasound (US) remains the main, and in some centers the only imaging modality used for needle guidance. Corresponding intraoperative 2D US with planning and other intra-procedural imaging modalities is essential for accurate needle placement. However, identification of matching features of interest among these images is often challenging given the limited field-of-view (FOV) and low quality of 2D US images. We have developed a passive tracking arm with a motorized scan-head and software tools to improve guiding capabilities of conventional US by large FOV 3D US scans that provides more anatomical landmarks that can facilitate registration of US with both planning and intra-procedural images. The tracker arm is used to scan the whole liver with a high geometrical accuracy that facilitates multi-modality landmark based image registration. Software tools are provided to assist with the segmentation of the ablation probes and tumors, find the 2D view that best shows the probe(s) from a 3D US image, and to identify the corresponding image from planning CT scans. In this paper, evaluation results from laboratory testing and a phase 1 clinical trial for planning and guiding RFA and MWA procedures using the developed system will be presented. Early clinical results show a comparable performance to intra-procedural CT that suggests 3D US as a cost-effective alternative with no side-effects in centers where CT is not available.

  13. Palliative percutaneous transhepatic drainage for inoperable obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed Central

    Baxter-Smith, D. C.; Temple, J. G.; Howarth, F.

    1982-01-01

    A technique of percutaneous transhepatic drainage under local anaesthesia is described for the relief of intractable pruritus in patients with obstructive jaundice due to inoperable carcinoma. After standard percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography a polyethylene catheter is introduced into one of the large dilated bile ducts and left in situ, thereby establishing external retrograde biliary drainage. The technique has been used successfully in 6 cases with reduction in serum bilirubin levels and relief of pruritus. PMID:6182832

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Application of Percutaneous Electrolysis as an Adjunct to Exercise and Manual Therapy for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    de-Miguel-Valtierra, Lorena; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Arias-Buría, José L

    2018-05-16

    This randomized clinical trial compared the effects of adding US-guided percutaneous electrolysis into a program consisting of manual therapy and exercise on pain, related-disability, function and pressure sensitivity in subacromial pain syndrome. Fifty patients with subacromial pain syndrome were randomized into manual therapy and exercise or percutaneous electrolysis group. All patients received the same manual therapy and exercise program, one session per week for 5 consecutive weeks. Patients assigned to the electrolysis group also received the application of percutaneous electrolysis at each session. The primary outcome was Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH). Secondary outcomes included pain, function (Shoulder Pain and Disability Index-SPADI) pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) and Global Rating of Change (GROC). They were assessed at baseline, post-treatment, and 3, and 6 months after treatment. Both groups showed similar improvements in the primary outcome (DASH) at all follow-ups (P=0.051). Subjects receiving manual therapy, exercise, and percutaneous electrolysis showed significantly greater changes in shoulder pain (P<0.001) and SPADI (P<0.001) than those receiving manual therapy and exercise alone at all follow-ups. Effect sizes were large (SMD>0.91) for shoulder pain and function at 3 and 6 months in favour of the percutaneous electrolysis group. No between-groups differences in PPT were found. The current clinical trial found that the inclusion of US-guided percutaneous electrolysis in combination with manual therapy and exercise resulted in no significant differences for related-disability (DASH) than the application of manual therapy and exercise alone in patients with subacromial pain syndrome. Nevertheless, differences were reported for some secondary outcomes such as shoulder pain and function (SPADI). Whether or not these effects are reliable should be addressed in future studies Perspective This study found that the inclusion of US-guided

  15. Pure ultrasonography-guided radiation-free percutaneous nephrolithotomy: report of 357 cases.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad Mehdi; Yousefi, Alireza; Rastegari, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    To assess the safety and effectiveness of pure ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Three hundred fifty-seven patients were treated; 139 women and 218 men, with a mean age of 33.7 years (range 21-69 years) and a mean stone size of 33.5 mm in maximum diameter (range 20-52 mm). Stone locations were renal pelvis (174), lower calyx (68) or both (115) with mild to moderate hydronephrosis seen on excretory urography. A ureteral stent was inserted by cystoscope, and saline was injected for better localization of the pelvicaliceal system (PCS), if needed. Puncture of the PCS was done by an 18-gauge nephrostomy needle through the lower pole calyx, and all the steps, including dilatation, were done under the guidance of ultrasonography. The day after the operation, 318 (89.07%) patients were stone-free in the kidneys, ureters, and bladder x-rays. Nineteen patients (5.3%) had multiple fragments that measured equal or less than 5 mm and passed them spontaneously in 2-4 weeks (total stone-free rate 94.4%). Access failure occurred in ten obese patients (2.8%) and fluoroscopy was required. Residual fragments with sizes of 10-12 mm were seen in seven patients, all of who underwent shock wave lithotripsy. In one patient, a fragment measuring 7-8 mm migrated into the distal part of the ureter. It was fragmented with ureteroscopy and pneumatic lithoclast 2 days after the operation. In two patients who had large (>15 mm) residual stone redo percutaneous nephrolithotomy was performed 48 h after the first procedure. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy guided by ultrasonography seems to be as effective as fluoroscopy in selected cases and poses no risk of surgeon and patient exposure to radiation; however, more experience is required.

  16. Efficiency and Safety of One-Step Procedure Combined Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy and Eretrograde Cholangiopancreatography for Treatment of Cholecysto-Choledocholithiasis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyi; Zhang, Luyao; Liu, Yanling; Gu, Yang; Sun, Tieliang

    2017-11-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficiency and safety of one-step procedure combined endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) for treatment of patients with cholecysto-choledocholithiasis. A prospective randomized study was performed on 63 consecutive cholecysto-choledocholithiasis patients during 2008 and 2011. The efficiency and safety of one-step procedure was assessed by comparing the two-step LC with ERCP + endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST). Outcomes including intraoperative features, postoperative features (length of stay and postoperative complications) were evaluated. One- or two-step procedure of LC with ERCP + EST was successfully performed in all patients, and common bile duct stones were completely removed. Statistical analyses showed that length of stay and pulmonary infection rate were significantly lower in the test group compared with that in the control group (P < 0.05), whereas no statistical difference in other outcomes was found between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The one-step procedure of LC with ERCP + EST is superior to the two-step procedure for treatment of patients with cholecysto-choledocholithiasis regarding to the reduced hospital stay and inhibited occurrence of pulmonary infections. Compared with two-step procedure, one-step procedure of LC with ERCP + EST may be a superior option for cholecysto-choledocholithiasis patients treatment regarding to hospital stay and pulmonary infections.

  17. A comparison of operation, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography in biliary complications after hepatic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, P C; Lewis, W D; Stokes, K; Pleskow, D; Simpson, M A; Jenkins, R L

    1994-08-01

    Biliary complications (BC) remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). In an effort to determine the incidence of BC after OLT and the success of management options, 157 hepatic transplants performed from January 1987 to July 1991 were reviewed. The incidence of BC was 25 percent, with a one year mortality rate of 43.5 percent compared with 23.4 percent for patients in a control group (p < 0.05). Most BC occurring before postoperative day 30 presented as leaks, with a one year mortality rate of 50 percent (p < 0.03 versus control group). Biliary complications presenting after postoperative day 30 presented as strictures, with a one year mortality rate of 36.8 percent (p = NS versus control group). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC), and operative treatment were analyzed to determine relative patency rates after intervention for BC. The analysis showed that ERCP and PTHC were equivalent, with a one year patency rate of 45 percent. Operative treatment had a patency rate of 89 percent (p < 0.05 compared to ERCP and PTHC). The results from ERCP and PTHC may be useful for delineation of rejection versus BC after OLT. However, operative treatment is significantly more effective for definitive treatment of BC after OLT.

  18. Safety of pediatric percutaneous liver biopsy performed by interventional radiologists.

    PubMed

    Potter, Carol; Hogan, Mark J; Henry-Kendjorsky, Katherine; Balint, Jane; Barnard, John A

    2011-08-01

    National data suggest that pediatric percutaneous liver biopsy is increasingly being performed by interventional radiologists rather than pediatric gastroenterologists. The objective of the present report is to describe the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous liver biopsy performed by interventional radiologists in a large cohort of children and to compare the results with the existing literature on biopsies performed by pediatric gastroenterologists. The medical records of 249 children undergoing ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy by interventional radiologists were reviewed for adverse events and success of obtaining tissue. Two hundred ninety-four biopsies were reviewed. There were no deaths. There were 2 instances of a 2-g or greater drop in hemoglobin following biopsy, neither of which was associated with clinical signs of hemorrhage. A small, asymptomatic pneumothorax quickly resolved without treatment. One patient developed Klebsiella sepsis 48  hours after biopsy. In all but 1 case, an adequate sample size was obtained. This low incidence of adverse events compares favorably with existing published reports of morbidity and mortality following percutaneous liver biopsy performed by pediatric gastroenterologists. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy performed by experienced pediatric interventional radiologists in a children's hospital setting is as safe and effective as biopsy performed by pediatric gastroenterologists.

  19. Therapeutic results after ultrasound-guided intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI®) in the treatment of rectus abdominis-related groin pain in professional footballers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Carlos; Mattiussi, Gabriele; Núñez, Francisco J

    2016-10-01

    Rectus abdominis-related groin pain (RAGP) is one of the possible clinical patterns that determine pubalgia. RAGP is one of the typical patterns in footballers and is due to the degeneration and tendinopathy of the distal tendon, at the level of the two pubic tubercles. Intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI) is a novel technique used in the treatment of tendinopathies. The aim of this study was to examine the therapeutic benefits of EPI by contrasting the two basic components that characterize RAGP: painful symptoms and resultant functional deficits. Eight professional footballers at Udinese Calcio Spa Football Club underwent ultrasound-guided EPI intervention. No other type of treatment was combined with EPI. Pain was monitored with the Verbal Rating Scale, while functional deficit was monitored using the Patient Specific Functional Scale. The scales implementation took place before treatment, then 24 hours, 1 week, 1 month and 6 months after the end of treatment. Treatment with EPI produced a complete reduction of pain symptoms in one month and enabled excellent functional recovery for walking and jogging in one week; for getting out of bed, running, jumping and kicking within one month from the end of the treatment. Treatment with ultrasound-guided EPI has shown encouraging clinical results for RAGP. Data are preliminary: considering the limitations of this study more complex design studies are necessary to test the efficacy of the technique. This study introduces the EPI technique for the first time in the treatment of professional footballers suffering from RAGP. Its future use is proposed as a treatment solution, including complementary to conservative treatment.

  20. Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade.

    PubMed

    Chin, Ki Jinn; Chan, Vincent

    2008-10-01

    The use of ultrasound for peripheral nerve blockade is becoming popular. Although the feasibility of ultrasound-guided nerve blockade is now clear, it is uncertain at this time whether it represents the new standard for regional anesthesia in terms of efficacy and safety. The ability to visualize nerve location, needle advancement, needle-nerve interaction, and local anesthetic spread makes ultrasound-guided nerve block an attractive option. Study results indicate that these advantages can improve the ease of block performance, block success rates, and complications. At the same time there is evidence that ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia is a unique skill in its own right, and that proficiency in it requires training and experience. Ultrasound is a valuable tool that is now available to the regional anesthesiologist, and it is fast becoming a standard part of practice. It promises to be of especial value to the less experienced practitioner. Ultrasound does not in itself, however, guarantee the efficacy and safety of peripheral nerve blockade. Proper training in its use is required and we can expect to see the development of formal standards and guidelines in this regard.

  1. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral catheterization].

    PubMed

    Salleras-Duran, Laia; Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral catheterization is a technique that can be difficult in some patients. Some studies have recently described the use of ultrasound to guide the venous catheterization. To describe the success rate, time required, complications of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization. and patients and professionals satisfaction The search was performed in databases (Medline-PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Cuiden Plus) for studies published about ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization performed on patients that provided results on the success of the technique, complications, time used, patient satisfaction and the type of professional who performed the technique. A total of 21 studies were included. Most of them get a higher success rate 80% in the catheterization ecoguide and time it is not higher than the traditional technique. The Technical complications analyzed were arterial puncture rates and lower nerve 10%. In all studies measuring and comparing patient satisfaction in the art ecoguide is greater. Various professional groups perform the technique. The use of ultrasound for peripheral pipes has a high success rate, complications are rare and the time used is similar to that of the traditional technique. The technique of inserting catheters through ultrasound may be learned by any professional group performing venipuncture. Finally, it gets underscores the high patient satisfaction with the use of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Fluoroscopy guided percutaneous renal access in prone position

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gyanendra R; Maheshwari, Pankaj N; Sharma, Anshu G; Maheshwari, Reeta P; Heda, Ritwik S; Maheshwari, Sakshi P

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a very commonly done procedure for management of renal calculus disease. Establishing a good access is the first and probably the most crucial step of this procedure. A proper access is the gateway to success. However, this crucial step has the steepest learning curve for, in a fluoroscopy guided access, it involves visualizing a three dimensional anatomy on a two dimensional fluoroscopy screen. This review describes the anatomical basis of the renal access. It provides a literature review of all aspects of percutaneous renal access along with the advances that have taken place in this field over the years. The article describes a technique to determine the site of skin puncture, the angle and depth of puncture using a simple mathematical principle. It also reviews the common problems faced during the process of puncture and dilatation and describes the ways to overcome them. The aim of this article is to provide the reader a step by step guide for percutaneous renal access. PMID:25789297

  3. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of Undetermined Abdominal Lesions: A Multidisciplinary Decision-Making Approach.

    PubMed

    Mao, Feng; Dong, Yi; Ji, Zhengbiao; Cao, Jiaying; Wang, Wen-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) guided biopsy of undetermined abdominal lesions in multidisciplinary treatment (MDT) decision-making approach. Methods. Between Jan 2012 and Dec 2015, 60 consecutive patients (male, 37; female, 23; mean age, 51.3 years ± 14.6) who presented with undetermined abdominal lesions were included. CEUS and core needle percutaneous biopsy was performed under real-time CEUS guidance in all lesions. Data were recorded and compared with conventional ultrasound (US) guidance group ( n = 75). All CEUS findings and clinical data were evaluated in MDT. Results. CEUS enabled the delimitation of more (88.3% versus 41.3%) and larger (14.1 ± 10.7 mm versus 32.3 ± 18.5 mm) nonenhanced necrotic areas. More inner (20.0% versus 6.7%) and surrounding (18.3% versus 2.7%) major vessels were visualized and avoided during biopsies. CEUS-guided biopsy increased the diagnostic accuracy from 93.3% to 98.3%, with correct diagnosis in 57 of 60 lesions (95.0%). The therapeutic plan was influenced by CEUS guided biopsies findings in the majority of patients (98.3%). Conclusion. The combination of CEUS guided biopsy and MDT decision-making approach is useful in the diagnostic work-up and therapeutic management.

  4. Outcome and safety of transrectal US-guided percutaneous cryotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Saliken, J C; Donnelly, B J; Brasher, P; Ali-Ridha, N; Ernst, S; Robinson, J

    1999-02-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided cryotherapy as a primary treatment for localized prostate cancer. A prospective study of percutaneous transrectal US (TRUS)-guided cryotherapy was performed on 71 patients with T1-T3, N0, M0 prostatic cancer: 10 patients underwent two or more procedures. All cases were newly diagnosed and patients had no previous treatment for cancer. For all patients, TRUS biopsies were performed at 5-6 months. Patients were monitored at 6 weeks; 3, 6, 9, and 12 months; and twice yearly thereafter for prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels, complications, and clinical evidence of residual disease. Follow-up from 10 to 36 months was available for 70 of 71 patients; one patient died of unrelated disease. Initially, 10 of 69 patients had positive postcryotherapy biopsy results. After repeated treatment, nine of these 10 patients had negative biopsy results and one patient had no follow-up. Overall, 68 of 69 patients had negative biopsy results. At 1 year, 43 of 64 (67%) had an undetectable PSA level. Two patients had proven metastases. Complications include three cases with urethral sloughing requiring transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). One patient had orchitis. Two patients had persistent incontinence, one as the result of a TURP. There was no death, acute serious morbidity, or fistula formation. Impotence was universal at 6 months, but many patients demonstrated late recovery. Cryoablation is an imaging-guided percutaneous intervention for prostate cancer that can safely yield disease-free status in a high percentage of patients with localized disease.

  5. Percutaneous microwave ablation with artificial ascites for symptomatic uterine adenomyosis: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Hai, Ning; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Ruifang; Han, Zhi-Yu; Liu, Fang Yi

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety and technical efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation with artificial ascites for adenomyosis. Between May 2015 and May 2016, a total of 25 patients with symptomatic adenomyosis who underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation with artificial ascites were included in this retrospective study. A matching cohort of 50 patients underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation without artificial ascites as controls. The technical efficacy, complications and short-term treatment effectiveness were assessed and compared with the controls. Artificial ascites was successfully achieved in all of the 25 patients with the administration of a median of 550 mL (range, 250-1200 mL) of solution. There was substantial improvement in achieving a better antenna path in 100% (20/20) of the cases with a poor antenna path. The complete separation was achieved in 23 of 25 patients. The mean ablation time was 26.5 ± 7.3 min and the median non-perfusion volume ratio was 76% which was similar to the control group (p > .05). No serious complications were observed. Patient pain scores for dysmenorrhoea showed a statistically significant decline from the baseline of 6.71 ± 0.96 to 2.92 ± 0.79 and the symptom severity score declined statistically significantly from 21.8 ± 5.5 to 16.4 ± 4.8 at 3 months follow-up. Percutaneous microwave ablation with artificial ascites is feasible, safe and can be effective in improving access for treatment of adenomyosis.

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Nephrostomy Performed on Neonates and Infants Using a "14-4" (Trocar and Cannula) Technique.

    PubMed

    Bas, Ahmet; Gülşen, Fatih; Emre, Senol; Samanci, Cesur; Uzunlu, Osman; Cantasdemir, Murat; Emir, Haluk; Numan, Furuzan

    2015-12-01

    Percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) catheters are placed under combined ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance in the interventional radiology suite and present unique challenges in neonates and infants. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate feasibility of PCN using a "14-4" (trocar and cannula) technique on neonates and infants. Between September 2009 and June 2014, data for 27 kidneys from consecutive 22 neonates or infants who underwent PCN catheter placement using the "14-4" technique were retrospectively analyzed. The median age at the time of placement of the PCN catheters was 11 days (range 5-300 days). There were 18 males and 4 females. All procedures were performed in the interventional radiology suite but without using fluoroscopy. Unilateral PCN was performed on 17 out of 22 patients, while bilateral drainage was performed on five patients. The technical success rate was 100%. The median duration of PCN catheter was 75 days (range 10-138 days). Minor macroscopic hematuria not requiring blood transfusion was present in two of the patients in which the hematuria lasted in 2 days. Placement of PCN catheters using a "14-4" technique with ultrasound as the sole imaging modality is a technically feasible and desirable option for neonates or infants. The technique obviates the need for ionizing radiation and potentially could be performed in the ultrasound room or even at the bedside.

  7. Successful treatment of tumor-induced osteomalacia with CT-guided percutaneous ethanol and cryoablation.

    PubMed

    Tutton, Sean; Olson, Erik; King, David; Shaker, Joseph L

    2012-10-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia is a rare condition usually caused by benign mesenchymal tumors. When the tumor can be found, patients are usually managed by wide excision of the tumor. We report a 51-yr-old male with clinical and biochemical evidence of tumor-induced osteomalacia caused by a mesenchymal tumor in the right iliac bone. He declined surgery and appears to have been successfully managed by computed tomography-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation and percutaneous cryoablation. Our patient appears to have had an excellent clinical and biochemical response to computed tomography-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation and percutaneous cryoablation. We found one prior case of image-guided ablation using radiofrequency ablation for tumor-induced osteomalacia. Although the standard treatment for tumor-induced osteomalacia is wide excision of the tumor, image-guided ablation may be an option in patients who cannot have appropriate surgery or who decline surgery.

  8. Accuracy of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography in predicting the location and nature of major bile duct injuries.

    PubMed

    Fidelman, Nicholas; Kerlan, Robert K; Laberge, Jeanne M; Gordon, Roy L

    2011-06-01

    To determine the ability of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) to predict accurately the anatomic location and nature of major bile duct injuries, to examine the contribution of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and PTC to the diagnosis of injuries to the low-inserting right posterior segmental ducts, and to compare the ability of radiologists and gastroenterologists to detect injuries to the low-inserting right posterior segmental duct. PTC images and operative reports of 78 consecutive patients who underwent surgical repair of major bile duct injuries at the authors' institution were retrospectively reviewed. The location of injury was assessed according to the Bismuth classification. Images were also evaluated for the presence of a biliary stricture, biliary leak, or both. Imaging observations were compared with findings obtained during surgical biliary reconstruction. PTC correctly predicted the anatomic location of injuries in 85% of patients. Incorrect Bismuth type was assigned in 12 patients. Seven of the errors (58%) originated from the inability to distinguish injuries at the confluence of the lobar ducts from injuries involving the cephalad 2 cm of the common hepatic duct. Injuries to the right posterior segmental duct were detected more often on ERCP images by gastroenterologists than by diagnostic radiologists. In four patients (5%), biliary strictures were masked on PTC by the presence of a concomitant leak. PTC accurately depicts the location and nature of major bile duct injuries in most patients. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A-scan ultrasound system for real-time puncture safety assessment during percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Pedro L.; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; von Krüger, M. A.; Pereira, W. C. A.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2015-03-01

    Background: Kidney stone is a major universal health problem, affecting 10% of the population worldwide. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a first-line and established procedure for disintegration and removal of renal stones. Its surgical success depends on the precise needle puncture of renal calyces, which remains the most challenging task for surgeons. This work describes and tests a new ultrasound based system to alert the surgeon when undesirable anatomical structures are in between the puncture path defined through a tracked needle. Methods: Two circular ultrasound transducers were built with a single 3.3-MHz piezoelectric ceramic PZT SN8, 25.4 mm of radius and resin-epoxy matching and backing layers. One matching layer was designed with a concave curvature to work as an acoustic lens with long focusing. The A-scan signals were filtered and processed to automatically detect reflected echoes. Results: The transducers were mapped in water tank and tested in a study involving 45 phantoms. Each phantom mimics different needle insertion trajectories with a percutaneous path length between 80 and 150 mm. Results showed that the beam cross-sectional area oscillates around the ceramics radius and it was possible to automatically detect echo signals in phantoms with length higher than 80 mm. Conclusions: This new solution may alert the surgeon about anatomical tissues changes during needle insertion, which may decrease the need of X-Ray radiation exposure and ultrasound image evaluation during percutaneous puncture.

  10. Double Guiding Catheters for Complex Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shing-Hsien; Lin, Chia-Pin; Lin, Yen-Chen; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Lin, Ming-Shyan; Chang, Chi-Jen

    2012-01-01

    A large-lumen guiding catheter is often used for complex percutaneous coronary intervention—particularly when a final kissing-balloon or 2-stent technique is required. However, catheter insertion is sometimes restricted by diseased vascular access sites or a tortuous vascular route. We report 2 cases in which a unique double guiding catheter technique was used to create a lumen of sufficient size for complex percutaneous coronary intervention. In each patient, two 6F guiding catheters were used concurrently to engage the ostium of 1 target vessel. In 1 patient, these catheters were used for the delivery of 2 balloons to complete kissing-balloon dilation after single-stent placement. In the other patient, the catheters were used to deliver 2 stents sequentially to their respective target lesions. The stents were then deployed simultaneously as kissing stents, followed by high-pressure kissing-balloon postdilation. PMID:22412243

  11. Percutaneous Image-Guided Aspiration and Sclerosis of Adventitial Cystic Disease of the Femoral Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jason M.; Kiankhooy, Armin; Bertges, Daniel J.

    2009-07-15

    Adventitial cystic disease (ACD), also known as cystic mucoid or myxomatous degeneration, is a rare vascular disease mainly seen in arteries. Seventeen cases have been reported in the world literature. We report the first known case of ACD successfully treated with percutaneous image-guided ethanol sclerosis. Computed tomography showed a cystic mass adherent to the wall of the common femoral vein. An ultrasound examination revealed a deep venous thrombosis of the leg, secondary to extrinsic compression of the common femoral vein. Three years prior to our procedure, the cyst was aspirated, which partially relieved the patient's symptoms. Over the following 3more » years the patient's symptoms worsened and a 10-cm discrepancy in thigh size developed, in addition to the deep venous thrombosis associated with lower-extremity edema. Using ultrasound guidance and fluoroscopic control, the cyst was drained and then sclerosed with absolute ethanol. The patient's symptoms and leg swelling resolved completely within several weeks. Follow-up physical examination and duplex ultrasound 6 months following sclerosis demonstrated resolution of the symptoms and elimination of the extrinsic compression effect of the ACD on the common femoral vein.« less

  12. Recurrent pyogenic cholangitis in Asian immigrants: use of ultrasonography, computed tomography, and cholangiography

    SciTech Connect

    Federle, M.P.; Cello J.P.; Laing, F.C.

    1982-04-01

    Five cases of recurrent pyogenic cholangitis (RPC) were studied by ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and cholangiography. All patients were recent immigrants from the Orient or Indonesia and had had recurrent attacks of cholangitis for many years. The bile was infected by E. coli and the biliary ducts were dilated; in addition, extrahepatic bile-pigment calculi we represent in all 5 and intrahepatic calculi in 4. Abdominal ultrasound usually failed to demonstrate duct calculi and extrahepatic dilatation due to the soft, mud-like consistency of the stones. CT was successful in showing the calculi and the full extent of dilatation. The authors concludemore » that preoperative diagnosis of RPC is best achieved by awareness of the characteristic clinical presentation and the findings on abdominal CT. Preoperative cholangiography provides excellent detail, but poses the danger of biliary sepsis requiring antibiotics.« less

  13. Ultrasound-guided transhepatic puncture of the hepatic veins for TIPS placement.

    PubMed

    Gazzera, C; Fonio, P; Gallesio, C; Camerano, F; Doriguzzi Breatta, A; Righi, D; Veltri, A; Gandini, G

    2013-04-01

    This retrospective analysis was carried out to assess the feasibility and results of transjugular intrahepatic portal systemic shunt (TIPS) performed with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous puncture of the hepatic veins. Over a period of 3 years, 153 patients were treated with TIPS at our centre. In eight cases, a percutaneous puncture of the middle (n=7) or right (n=1) hepatic vein was required because the hepatic vein ostium was not accessible. Indications for TIPS were bleeding (n=1), Budd-Chiari syndrome (n=1), ascites (n=2), reduced portal flow (n=1) and incomplete portal thrombosis (n=3). A 0.018-in. guidewire was anterogradely introduced into the hepatic vein to the inferior vena cava (IVC) through a 21-gauge needle. In the meantime, a 25-mm snare-loop catheter was introduced through the jugular access to retrieve the guidewire, achieving through-andthrough access. Then, a Rosch-Uchida set was used to place the TIPS with the traditional technique. Technical success was achieved in all patients. There was one case of stent thrombosis. One patient died of pulmonary oedema. Three patients were eligible for liver transplantation, whereas the others were excluded due to shunt thrombosis (n=1) and previous nonhepatic neoplasms (n=3). The percutaneous approach to hepatic veins is rapid and safe and may be useful for avoiding traumatic liver injuries.

  14. Validation of percutaneous puncture trajectory during renal access using 4D ultrasound reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Pedro L.; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2015-03-01

    An accurate percutaneous puncture is essential for disintegration and removal of renal stones. Although this procedure has proven to be safe, some organs surrounding the renal target might be accidentally perforated. This work describes a new intraoperative framework where tracked surgical tools are superimposed within 4D ultrasound imaging for security assessment of the percutaneous puncture trajectory (PPT). A PPT is first generated from the skin puncture site towards an anatomical target, using the information retrieved by electromagnetic motion tracking sensors coupled to surgical tools. Then, 2D ultrasound images acquired with a tracked probe are used to reconstruct a 4D ultrasound around the PPT under GPU processing. Volume hole-filling was performed in different processing time intervals by a tri-linear interpolation method. At spaced time intervals, the volume of the anatomical structures was segmented to ascertain if any vital structure is in between PPT and might compromise the surgical success. To enhance the volume visualization of the reconstructed structures, different render transfer functions were used. Results: Real-time US volume reconstruction and rendering with more than 25 frames/s was only possible when rendering only three orthogonal slice views. When using the whole reconstructed volume one achieved 8-15 frames/s. 3 frames/s were reached when one introduce the segmentation and detection if some structure intersected the PPT. The proposed framework creates a virtual and intuitive platform that can be used to identify and validate a PPT to safely and accurately perform the puncture in percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

  15. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous irrigation in rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy: what is the evidence? A systematic review with proposals for future reporting.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Ezio; Banfi, Giuseppe; Serafini, Giovanni; Lacelli, Francesca; Orlandi, Davide; Bandirali, Michele; Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2015-07-01

    We performed a systematic review of current evidence regarding ultrasound-guided percutaneous irrigation of calcific tendinopathy (US-PICT) in the shoulder aimed to: assess different published techniques; evaluate clinical outcome in a large combined cohort; and propose suggestions for homogeneous future reporting. Cochrane Collaboration for Systematic Reviews of Interventions Guidelines were followed. We searched MEDLINE/MEDLINE In-Process/EMBASE/Cochrane databases from 1992-2013 using the keywords 'ultrasound, shoulder, needling, calcification, lavage, rotator cuff' combined in appropriate algorithms. References of resulting papers were also screened. Risk of bias was assessed with a modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Of 284 papers found, 15 were included, treating 1,450 shoulders in 1,403 patients (females, n = 838; mean age interval 40-63 years). There was no exclusion due to risk of bias. US-PICT of rotator cuff is a safe and effective procedure, with an estimated average 55% pain improvement at an average of 11 months, with a 10% minor complication rate. No evidence exists in favour of using a specific size/number of needles. Imaging follow-up should not be used routinely. Future studies should aim at structural uniformity, including the use of the Constant Score to assess outcomes and 1-year minimum follow-up. Alternatives to steroid injections should also be explored. • US-PICT of rotator cuff is a safe and effective procedure. • On average 55% pain improvement with 10% minor complication rate. • No evidence exists in favour of using a specific size/number of needles. • Future need to assess outcome using Constant Score with 1-year minimum follow-up.

  16. Diagnostic laparoscopy-assisted cholangiography in infants with prolonged jaundice.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Tadaharu; Miyano, Go; Yamataka, Atsuyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Koga, Hiroyuki; Lane, Geoffrey J; Miyano, Takeshi

    2006-02-01

    Cholangiography is often crucial for establishing the definitive cause of neonatal jaundice. We present our protocol for using laparoscopy-assisted cholangiography in infants with prolonged jaundice and discuss its benefits. Firstly, a 5 mm supra-umbilical trocar is introduced to create a port for a 0 degrees laparoscope. A 5 mm trocar is then inserted through a right subcostal incision to allow the liver and gallbladder to be visualized. If the gallbladder is of good size, the fundus is exteriorized through the right subcostal trocar site and a catheter is inserted into the gallbladder for cholangiography. If the gallbladder is atretic, the fundus is not exteriorized and a laparotomy is performed for open intraoperative cholangiography because the lumen of an atretic gallbladder is usually not fully patent and cholangiography through its exteriorized fundus often fails. We reviewed 18 jaundiced infants thought to have biliary atresia (BA) who had laparoscopy-assisted cholangiography. At laparoscopy, four patients had good sized gallbladders and minimal to mild liver fibrosis. They underwent cholangiography via the exteriorized fundus, and BA in two cases and biliary hypoplasia in two cases were identified. The remaining 14 had atretic gallbladders and varying degrees of liver fibrosis. Cholangiography via the exteriorized fundus was performed in one patient, but failed and converted to open cholangiography. Open intraoperative cholangiography identified BA in all 14 cases. All BA cases progressed to Kasai portoenterostomy directly after diagnosis. Laparoscopy is used to determine the type of cholangiography to be performed based on the appearance of the gallbladder and this simple, accurate, and safe protocol allows the anatomical structure of the biliary tree to be obtained accurately with minimal surgical intervention.

  17. A new technique of laparoscopic cholangiography.

    PubMed

    Hagan, K D; Rosemurgy, A S; Albrink, M H; Carey, L C

    1992-04-01

    With the advent and rapid proliferation of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, numerous techniques and "tips" have been described. Intraoperative cholangiography during laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be tedious, frustrating, and time consuming. Described herein is a technique of intraoperative cholangiography during laparoscopic cholecystectomy which has proven to be easy, fast, and succinct. This method utilizes a rigid cholangiogram catheter which is placed into the peritoneal cavity through a small additional puncture site. This catheter is easily inserted into the cystic duct by extracorporeal manipulation. We suggest this method to surgeons who have shared our prior frustration with intraoperative cholangiography.

  18. Duplex-guided percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in iliac arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Krasznai, A G; Sigterman, T A; Welten, R J; Heijboer, R; Sikkink, C J J M; van de Akker, L H J M; Bouwman, L H

    2013-11-01

    Chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) is a growing global problem. PTA can be performed without nephrotoxic contrast, utilizing Doppler-ultrasound (Duplex) guidance. Duplex-guided infra-inguinal interventions and access-related interventions have been reported. Duplex-guided iliac interventions have not been performed to any extent because of the anatomic location. In our study we evaluated the safety and efficacy of Duplex-guided percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (DuPTA) in iliac arteries. From June 2012 until February 2013, 31 patients (35 iliac lesions), underwent DuPTA. Indications ranged from Rutherford 3 to 5. Preoperative evaluation included Ankle Brachial Index (ABI), Duplex and MRA. Procedural success was defined as crossing the lesion with a guidewire and dilating or stenting the lesion. Clinical success was defined as 50% reduction in peak systolic velocity (PSV) or clinical improvement. PSV was evaluated after PTA, then at 2 weeks. Clinical results were assessed 2 weeks after the procedure. Procedural success was achieved in 94% of patients (33/35), all of whom also had clinical success. Post-procedural PSV reduction showed an average improvement of 63% (431 cm/s to 153 cm/s). Mean preoperative ABI was 0.72 and improved to 0.88 postoperatively. PTA using Duplex-guidance in significant iliac stenosis is a safe method with major advantages in patients at high risk for developing contrast-induced nephropathy. Copyright © 2013 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Training for percutaneous renal access on a virtual reality simulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Yu, Cheng-fan; Liu, Jin-shun; Wang, Gang; Zhu, He; Na, Yan-qun

    2013-01-01

    The need to develop new methods of surgical training combined with advances in computing has led to the development of virtual reality surgical simulators. The PERC Mentor(TM) is designed to train the user in percutaneous renal collecting system access puncture. This study aimed to validate the use of this kind of simulator, in percutaneous renal access training. Twenty-one urologists were enrolled as trainees to learn a fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous renal accessing technique. An assigned percutaneous renal access procedure was immediately performed on the PERC Mentor(TM) after watching instruction video and an analog operation. Objective parameters were recorded by the simulator and subjective global rating scale (GRS) score were determined. Simulation training followed and consisted of 2 hours daily training sessions for 2 consecutive days. Twenty-four hours after the training session, trainees were evaluated performing the same procedure. The post-training evaluation was compared to the evaluation of the initial attempt. During the initial attempt, none of the trainees could complete the appointed procedure due to the lack of experience in fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous renal access. After the short-term training, all trainees were able to independently complete the procedure. Of the 21 trainees, 10 had primitive experience in ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Trainees were thus categorized into the group of primitive experience and inexperience. The total operating time and amount of contrast material used were significantly lower in the group of primitive experience versus the inexperience group (P = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). The training on the virtual reality simulator, PERC Mentor(TM), can help trainees with no previous experience of fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous renal access to complete the virtual manipulation of the procedure independently. This virtual reality simulator may become an important training and evaluation tool in

  20. Single-Institution Results of Image-Guided Nonplugged Percutaneous Versus Transjugular Liver Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Hardman, Rulon L., E-mail: hardmanr@uthscsa.edu; Perrich, Kiley D.; Silas, Anne M.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review patients who underwent transjugular and image-guided percutaneous biopsy and compare the relative risk of ascites, thrombocytopenia, and coagulopathy. Materials and Methods: From August 2001 through February 2006, a total of 238 liver biopsies were performed. The radiologist reviewed all patient referrals for transjugular biopsy. These patients either underwent transjugular biopsy or were reassigned to percutaneous biopsy (crossover group). Patients referred to percutaneous image-guided liver biopsy underwent this same procedure. Biopsies were considered successful if a tissue diagnosis could be made from the samples obtained. Results: A total of 36 transjugular biopsies were performed with 3 totalmore » (8.3%) and 1 major (2.8%) complications. A total of 171 percutaneous biopsies were performed with 10 (5.8%) total and 3 (1.8%) major complications. The crossover group showed a total of 4 (12.9%) complications with 1 (3.2%) major complication. Sample adequacy was 91.9% for transjugular and 99.5% for percutaneous biopsy. Conclusion: Both transjugular and percutaneous liver biopsy techniques are efficacious and safe. Contraindications such as thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, and ascites are indicators of greater complications but are not necessarily prevented by transjugular biopsy. Percutaneous biopsy more frequently yields a diagnostic specimen than transjugular biopsy.« less

  1. Major Bleeding after Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsies: Frequency, Predictors, and Periprocedural Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean A.; Milovanovic, Lazar; Midia, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Major bleeding remains an uncommon yet potentially devastating complication following percutaneous image-guided biopsy. This article reviews two cases of major bleeding after percutaneous biopsy and discusses the frequency, predictors, and periprocedural management of major postprocedural bleeding. PMID:25762845

  2. Ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation for treating uterine arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Yan, X; Zhao, C; Tian, C; Wen, S; He, X; Zhou, Y

    2017-08-01

    To explore HIFU treatment for uterine arteriovenous malformation. A case report. Gynaecological department in a university teaching hospital of China. A patient with uterine arteriovenous malformation. The diagnosis of uterine arteriovenous malformation was made through MRI. Ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU) ablation was performed. HIFU is effective in treating uterine arteriovenous malformation. The patient had reduction of the lesion volume and obvious symptom relief, without significant adverse effects. HIFU can be used as a new treatment option for uterine arteriovenous malformation. Ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation is effective in treating uterine arteriovenous malformation. © 2017 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  3. Approach for chronic total occlusion with intravascular ultrasound-guided reverse controlled antegrade and retrograde tracking technique: single center experience.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian; Katoh, Osamu; Kyo, Eisho; Tsuji, Takafumi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ohya, Hidefumi

    2013-10-01

    Controlled antegrade and retrograde subintimal tracking (CART) or reverse CART techniques is the final step for percutaneous revascularization of coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO), but it still represents technical challenges and risk in interventional procedures. Our purpose was to utilize intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided reverse CART approach for percutaneous revascularization of CTO in our heart center, focusing on its safety, efficacy, and latest technical developments. From November 2006 to November 2012, 49 patients with CTO failed to antegrade and/or retrograde percutaneous revascularization of CTO from true lumen to true lumen were enrolled in and underwent IVUS guided reverse CART approach. The mean J-CTO score of cases was 2.5. IVUS guidance was successfully implemented in 95.9%; IVUS identified that 61.7% of retrograde wires were located at intimal space, and 59.5% of antegrade wires were located at subintimal space. A Corsair channel dilator was used in 77.6% of cases. The success rates of technique and procedure were 95.9% and 93.9%, respectively; the technical minor complications were observed in 10.2% of cases, without significant clinic outcomes; 2.0% of cases occurred with a major adverse cardiac event of non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction; and no case occurred with target vessel revascularization or death. The mean length of stent implanted in a single CTO vessel was 51.3 mm. No patient appeared with radiation dermatitis and contrast-induced rise of creatinine. IVUS guided reverse CART approach is effective and safe for percutaneous revascularization of complex CTO, with a high success and a low complication rate. It is feasible to develop this approach for percutaneous revascularization of complex CTO. However, suitable case selection and lately device handling by experienced operators are the crucial points of success. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy in ectopically located kidneys and in patients with musculoskeletal deformities.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Gupta, P; Chaturvedi, S; Singh, P; Kapoor, R; Dubey, D; Kumar, A

    2010-01-01

    To assess the feasibility, safety and results of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) in ectopically located kidneys and in patients with musculoskeletal deformities. Thirteen such patients underwent PNL between June 2005 and May 2008. Mean stone size was 27.4 mm (16-37 mm). Six patients had severe kyphoscoliosis, 2 patients each had achondroplasia, cross-fused ectopia and pelvic ectopic kidney, and 1 patient had thoracic kidney. All had a preoperative CT scan of the abdomen. Preoperative ultrasound- or CT-guided percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) was done in 10 patients. Three patients underwent laparoscopic-assisted PNL. All underwent standard PNL. The stone-free rate, complication rate and need for secondary intervention were evaluated. PNL was successfully completed in all. A second ultrasound-guided intraoperative puncture was required in 2 patients. Re-look PNL was required in 1 patient and the same patient later required shock wave lithotripsy for complete stone clearance. The remaining 12 patients (92.3%) were rendered stone-free in a single sitting. PNL is a feasible and effective modality in anomalous kidneys. Preoperative planning with CT and image-guided PCN is helpful in these situations. Laparoscopic-assisted PNL can be safely performed in patients where access to a renal collecting system by fluoroscopy or image-guided assistance (ultrasound or CT scan) is not possible. Copyright (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Clinical results after ultrasound-guided intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI®) and eccentric exercise in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Abat, F; Gelber, P E; Polidori, F; Monllau, J C; Sanchez-Ibañez, J M

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the outcome of ultrasound (US)-guided intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI(®)) and eccentric exercise in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy during a long-term follow-up. Forty patients with patellar tendinopathy were prospectively evaluated over a 10-year follow-up period. Pain and function were evaluated before treatment, at 3 months and at 2, 5 and 10 years using the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Patella (VISA-P) score, the Tegner score and Blazina's classification. According to VISA-P score at baseline, patients were also dichotomized into Group 1 (<50 points) and Group 2 (≥50 points). There were 21 patients in Group 1 and 19 in Group 2. Patient satisfaction was measured according to the Roles and Maudsley score. The VISA-P score improved globally by 41.2 points (p < 0.01) after a mean 4.1 procedures. In Group 1, VISA-P score improved from 33.1 ± 13 to 78.9 ± 14.4 at 3-month and to 88.8 ± 10.1 at 10-year follow-up (p < 0.001). In Group 2, VISA-P score improved from 69.3 ± 10.5 to 84.9 ± 9 at 3-month and to 96.0 ± 4.3 at 10-year follow-up (p < 0.001). After 10 years, 91.2 % of the patients had a VISA-P score >80 points. The same level (80 % of patients) or the Tegner score at no more than one level lower (20 % of patients) was restored, and 97.5 % of the patients were satisfied with the procedure. Treatment with the US-guided EPI(®) technique and eccentric exercises in patellar tendinopathy resulted in a great improvement in knee function and a rapid return to the previous level of activity after few sessions. The procedure has proved to be safe with no recurrences on a long-term basis. Therapeutic study, Level IV.

  6. [Pancreatic tail pseudoaneurysm: percutaneous treatment by thrombin injection].

    PubMed

    Pacheco Jiménez, M; Moreno Sánchez, T; Moreno Rodríguez, F; Guillén Rico, M

    2014-01-01

    Visceral artery pseudoaneurysms secondary to acute and/or chronic pancreatitis are a relatively common and potentially serious complication. Endovascular techniques are the most currently accepted techniques, given the higher morbidity-mortality of surgery. The thrombosis of the pseudoaneurysm using an ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection is emerging as a useful option in those cases in which endovascular embolisation is not possible. We present the case of a patient with a pseudoaneurysm of the transverse pancreatic artery secondary to chronic pancreatitis, and successfully treated by administering percutaneous thrombin. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of the SonixGPS system for its application in real-time ultrasonography navigation-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy for the treatment of complex kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Long, Qingzhi; Chen, Xingfa; He, Dalin; He, Hui

    2017-04-01

    SonixGPS is a novel real-time ultrasonography navigation technology, which has been demonstrated to promote accuracy of puncture in surgical operations. The aim of this study is to evaluate its application in guiding the puncture during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). We retrospectively reviewed our experience in treating a total of 74 patients with complex kidney stones with PCNL, in which puncture in 37 cases were guided by SonixGPS system, while the other 37 by conventional ultrasound. The effectiveness of operation was evaluated in terms of stone clearance rate, operation time, time to successful puncture, number of attempts for successful puncture and hospital stay. The safety of operation was examined by evaluating postoperative complications. Our retrospective review showed that although there were no significant differences in stone clearance rates between the groups, SonixGPS guidance resulted in more puncture accuracy with shorter puncture time and higher successful puncture rate. Under the help of SonixGPS, most patients (92 %) had no or just mild complications, compared to that (73 %) in conventional ultrasound group. Post-operative decrease of hemoglobin in SonixGPS group was 13.79 (7-33) mg/dl, significantly lower than that 20.97 (8-41) mg/dl in conventional ultrasound group. Our experience demonstrates that SonixGPS is superior to conventional ultrasound in guiding the puncture in PCNL for the treatment of complex kidney stone.

  8. Outcomes of ultrasound guided renal mass biopsies.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Edward L; Choromanska, Agnieszka; Al-Katib, Sayf; Coffey, Mary

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate of nondiagnostic ultrasound-guided renal mass biopsies (RMBs) at our institution and to determine what patient, procedural, and focal renal mass (FRM) factors were associated with nondiagnostic ultrasound-guided RMBs. Eighty-two ultrasound-guided renal mass biopsies performed between January 2014 and October 2016 were included in our study. Biopsy outcomes (diagnostic vs. nondiagnostic) and patient, procedural, and FRM characteristics were retrospectively reviewed and recorded. Univariate statistical analyses were performed to identify biopsy characteristics that were indicative of nondiagnostic biopsy. Ultrasound-guided RMBs were diagnostic in 70 out of 82 cases (85%) and non-diagnostic in 12 cases (15%). Among the diagnostic biopsies, 54 (77%) were malignant cases, 94% of which were renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Of the 12 nondiagnostic cases, the final diagnosis was RCC in 4 cases and angiomyolipoma in one case; seven of the nondiagnostic cases were lost to follow-up. A weak association (p = 0.04) was found between the number of needle passes and the biopsy outcome. None of the remaining collected RMB characteristics showed a significant correlation with a diagnostic or nondiagnostic RMB. Six patients (7%) experienced complications. Ultrasound-guided renal mass biopsy is a safe and effective method for the diagnosis of renal masses with a low rate of nondiagnostic outcomes. A nondiagnostic biopsy should not be treated as a surrogate for a diagnosis since a significant number of patients with nondiagnostic biopsies have subsequently been shown to have renal malignancies. Repeat biopsy should be considered in such cases.

  9. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid ... Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? What is Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? ...

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Single-Injection Infraclavicular Block Versus Ultrasound-Guided Double-Injection Axillary Block: A Noninferiority Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Ariane; Nadeau, Marie-Josée; Dion, Nicolas; Lévesque, Simon; Nicole, Pierre C; Turgeon, Alexis F

    2016-01-01

    Single-injection ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block is a simple, reliable, and effective technique. A simplified double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block technique with a high success rate recently has been described. It has the advantage of being performed in a superficial and compressible location, with a potentially improved safety profile. However, its effectiveness in comparison with single-injection infraclavicular block has not been established. We hypothesized that the double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block would show rates of complete sensory block at 30 minutes noninferior to the single-injection ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block. After approval by our research ethics committee and written informed consent, adults undergoing distal upper arm surgery were randomized to either group I, ultrasound-guided single-injection infraclavicular block, or group A, ultrasound-guided double-injection axillary block. In group I, 30 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine was injected posterior to the axillary artery. In group A, 25 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine was injected posteromedial to the axillary artery, after which 5 mL was injected around the musculocutaneous nerve. Primary outcome was the rate of complete sensory block at 30 minutes. Secondary outcomes were the onset of sensory and motor blocks, surgical success rates, performance times, and incidence of complications. All outcomes were assessed by a blinded investigator. The noninferiority of the double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block was considered if the limits of the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) were within a 10% margin of the rate of complete sensory block of the infraclavicular block. At 30 minutes, the rate of complete sensory block was 79% in group A (90% CI, 71%-85%) compared with 91% in group I (90% CI, 85%-95%); the upper limit of CI of group A is thus included in the established noninferiority margin of 10%. The rate of complete sensory block was lower in group A (proportion

  11. Use of magnetic resonance cholangiography in the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis: prospective comparison with a reference imaging method

    PubMed Central

    Zidi, S; Prat, F; Le Guen, O; Rondeau, Y; Rocher, L; Fritsch, J; Choury, A; Pelletier, G

    1999-01-01

    Background—Magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) is a new technique for non-invasive imaging of the biliary tract. 
Aim—To assess the results of MRC in patients with suspected bile duct stones as compared with those obtained with reference imaging methods. 
Patients/Methods—70 patients (34 men and 36 women, mean (SD) age 71 (15.5) years; median 75) with suspected bile duct stones were included (cholangitis, 33; pancreatitis, three; suspected post-cholecystectomy choledocholithiasis, nine; cholestasis, six; stones suspected on ultrasound or computed tomography scan, 19). MR cholangiograms with two dimensional turbo spin echo sequences were acquired. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with or without sphincterotomy (n = 63), endosonography (n = 5), or intraoperative cho- langiography (n = 2) were the reference imaging techniques used for the study and were performed within 12 hours of MRC. Radiologists were blinded to the results of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and previous investigations. 
Results—49 patients (70%) had bile duct stones on reference imaging (common bile duct, 44, six of which impacted in the papilla; intrahepatic, four; cystic duct stump, one). Stone size ranged from 1 to 20 mm (mean 6.1, median 5.5). Twenty seven patients (55%) had bile duct stones smaller than 6 mm. MRC diagnostic accuracy for bile duct lithiasis was: sensitivity, 57.1%; specificity, 100%; positive predictive value, 100%; negative predictive value, 50%. 
Conclusions—Stones smaller than 6 mm are still often missed by MRC when standard equipment is used. The general introduction of new technical improvements is needed before this method can be considered reliable for the diagnosis of bile duct stones. 

 Keywords: bile duct calculi; endoscopic retrograde cholangiography; magnetic resonance cholangiography PMID:9862837

  12. PLUS: open-source toolkit for ultrasound-guided intervention systems.

    PubMed

    Lasso, Andras; Heffter, Tamas; Rankin, Adam; Pinter, Csaba; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2014-10-01

    A variety of advanced image analysis methods have been under the development for ultrasound-guided interventions. Unfortunately, the transition from an image analysis algorithm to clinical feasibility trials as part of an intervention system requires integration of many components, such as imaging and tracking devices, data processing algorithms, and visualization software. The objective of our paper is to provide a freely available open-source software platform-PLUS: Public software Library for Ultrasound-to facilitate rapid prototyping of ultrasound-guided intervention systems for translational clinical research. PLUS provides a variety of methods for interventional tool pose and ultrasound image acquisition from a wide range of tracking and imaging devices, spatial and temporal calibration, volume reconstruction, simulated image generation, and recording and live streaming of the acquired data. This paper introduces PLUS, explains its functionality and architecture, and presents typical uses and performance in ultrasound-guided intervention systems. PLUS fulfills the essential requirements for the development of ultrasound-guided intervention systems and it aspires to become a widely used translational research prototyping platform. PLUS is freely available as open source software under BSD license and can be downloaded from http://www.plustoolkit.org.

  13. Intravascular ultrasound-guided unprotected left main coronary artery stenting in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qiang; Wang, Qingsheng; Liu, Dongtian; Zhang, Shuangyue; Zhang, Yang; Li, Yang

    2015-05-01

    To investigate whether intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) could improve clinical outcomes compared with angiography-guided PCI in the treatment of unprotected left main coronary artery stenosis (ULMCA) in the elderly. This controlled study was carried out between October 2009 and September 2012, in Qinhuangdao First Hospital, Hebei Province, China. One hundred and twenty-three consecutive patients with ULMCA, aged 70 or older, were randomized to an IVUS-guided group and a control group. The occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE): death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or target lesion revascularizations) were recorded after 2 years of follow-up. The IVUS-guided group had a lower rate of 2-year MACE than the control group (13.1% versus 29.3%, p=0.031). The incidence of target lesion revascularization was lower in the IVUS-guided group than in the control group (9.1% versus 24%, p=0.045). However, there were no differences in death and myocardial infarction in the 2 groups. On Cox proportional hazard analysis, distal lesion was the independent predictor of MACE (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.99, confidence interval [CI]: 1.129-2.367; p=0.043); IVUS guidance was independent factor of survival free of MACE (HR: 0.414, CI: 0.129-0.867; p=0.033). The use of IVUS could reduce MACE in elderly patients undergoing ULMCA intervention.

  14. Accuracy of non-operative identification of the sentinel lymph node using combined gamma and ultrasound scanning.

    PubMed

    Whelehan, P; Vinnicombe, S J; Brown, D C; McLean, D; Evans, A

    2014-08-01

    To assess how accurately the sentinel lymph node (SLN) can be identified percutaneously, using gamma probe and ultrasound technology. Women with breast cancer, scheduled for wide local excision or mastectomy with SLN biopsy (SLNB), were included. Peri-areolar intradermal injection of technetium-99 nanocolloid was performed on the morning of surgery and 1-2 ml of blue dye was injected in the peri-areolar region once the patient was anaesthetized. Prior to surgery, a gamma probe was used over the skin to identify any hot spot that could represent a SLN. Ultrasound, guided by the hot spot, was then used to visualize potential SLNs and guide the insertion of a localizing wire. The accuracy in localizing the SLN by preoperative gamma-probe guided ultrasonography was assessed by comparison to SLNB. A SLN was correctly identified and marked using gamma-probe guided ultrasonography in 44 of 59 cases (75%; 95% CI: 63-86%). This study supports the case for investigating percutaneous gamma probe and ultrasound guided interventions in the axilla in women with breast cancer, as a potential alternative to surgical SLNB. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Percutaneous transhepatic bile drainage.

    PubMed Central

    Mori, K; Misumi, A; Sugiyama, M; Okabe, M; Matsuoka, T

    1977-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic bile drainage was performed in 13 patients with obstructive jaundice, using a combination of the PTC technique and a Seldinger angiography catheter. In 11 cases, the outflow of bile through the catheter was satisfactory and complications were few. Since the risk of the procedure is low and it can be done without laparotomy, it is an ideal technic for biliary decompression before attempting to do a resection. Also, repeated cholangiography through a catheter which is left in place is helpful as a diagnostic aid before and after surgery. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:831630

  16. CT-Guided Percutaneous Biopsy of Intrathoracic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Hira; Nath, Alok; Borah, Samudra

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous CT-guided needle biopsy of mediastinal and pulmonary lesions is a minimally invasive approach for obtaining tissue for histopathological examination. Although it is a widely accepted procedure with relatively few complications, precise planning and detailed knowledge of various aspects of the biopsy procedure is mandatory to avert complications. In this pictorial review, we reviewed important anatomical approaches, technical aspects of the procedure, and its associated complications. PMID:22438689

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Liver Biopsy With Gelatin Sponge Pledget Tract Embolization in Infants Weighing Less Than 10 kg.

    PubMed

    Lungren, Matthew P; Lindquester, Will S; Seidel, Frank Glen; Kothary, Nishita; Monroe, Eric J; Shivaram, Giri; Gill, Anne E; Hawkins, Matthew C

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to describe and assess the technical success and safety of ultrasound-guided liver biopsy with gelatin sponge pledget tract embolization technique in infants <10 kg across 3 tertiary pediatric hospitals. There were 67 pediatric patients weighing <10 kg (36 boys; 31 girls; average age 202 days; average weight 6 kg, range 1.5-9.9 kg) referred for liver biopsy performed with ultrasound guidance and gelatin sponge pledget tract embolization during a 2-year period. Patient history, procedural records, and clinical follow-up documents were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 67 procedures were included. There was 100% technical success rate and all samples obtained provided adequate tissue for histological assessment. Average number of 18 G biopsy passes was 3 (range 1-6). There were no procedure-related deaths. There was 1 complication (1%) in a 5-kg infant who was readmitted 36 hours after biopsy with a fever and fully recovered after antibiotics were administered. Biliary atresia was the most common underlying diagnosis (20%), whereas others included acute rejection (16%) and biliary obstruction (7%). Ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy with gelatin sponge pledget tract embolization technique in children weighing <10 kg is safe, effective, and use of this technique may lead to a reduction in rates of adverse events reported in other pediatric series.

  18. Long-term outcome of ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation of selected "recurrent" neck nodal metastases in 25 patients with TNM stages III or IVA papillary thyroid carcinoma previously treated by surgery and 131I therapy.

    PubMed

    Hay, Ian D; Lee, Robert A; Davidge-Pitts, Caroline; Reading, Carl C; Charboneau, J William

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation (UPEA) of neck nodal metastases (NNM) has rarely been reported in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) patients with advanced localized disease. We ablated 25 PTC patients with stage III or IVA disease (mean age 58 years) who had "recurrent" NNM after surgery and 131I therapy. Diagnosis of 37 selected NNM was proven by ultrasound-guided biopsy. UPEA was usually performed in 2 outpatient sessions. After UPEA, 35 of 37 NNM (95%) decreased in size. None had significant Doppler flow. Seventeen (46%) disappeared on rescanning. Serum thyroglobulin fell in 19 of 22 (86%) without thyroglobulin autoantibodies. None of the UPEA-treated NNM, followed on average for 5.4 years, required further intervention. Six patients (24%) subsequently developed 18 "new" recurrences. Of the 18, 15 (83%) were managed successfully by UPEA rather than operation. None of the 25 patients developed permanent hoarseness or have died from PTC. At our institution, where patients undergoing nodal dissections are charged $35-45,000, each outpatient UPEA procedure saves health providers approximately $38,400. Our 25 ablated patients, by avoiding 40 further neck reexplorations, on average, saved $61,440 in charges. UPEA for NNM in advanced localized PTC has proved safe and effective. It is also considerably less expensive than the conventional operative alternative of nodal dissection. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment of the calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff by ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle lavage. Two years prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-González, Federico Del; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo; González-Pérez, José; Calderón-Montero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: to evaluate the short and long term effectiveness of ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous needle lavage in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. To study the evolution of the size of calcifications and pain in the two years after treatment. Methods: study design: A 2 year longitudinal prospective study is carried out after applying the UGPL technique on a number of patients diagnosed with calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. Clinical, ultrasound and radiology follow-up controls were performed, 3 months, 6 months, one year and two years after the treatment. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to assess the pain. The degree and point of pain is selected on a 10 cm line, arranged horizontally or vertically. The “0” represents no pain and “10” represents worst pain. The population studied was made up of 121 patients that required our service as a result of suffering from a painful shoulder. Results: the pain (VAS) and the size of the calcification significantly decreased with the application of the technique (p< 0,001 in both cases) and regardless of the sex (p: 0.384 for pain and p: 0.578 for the size of the calcification). This occurred from the first check-up (3 months) and was maintained for two year. Conclusions: we consider this technique to be a valid alternative as a first-choice treatment of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. The intervention is simple, cost-effective, does not require hospitalization, involves no complications, rehabilitation treatment is not required and it shows very few side effects without sequelae, significantly reducing the size of the calcification and pain in the majority of patients. PMID:25332939

  20. Treatment of the calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff by ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle lavage. Two years prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Del Castillo-González, Federico; Ramos-Álvarez, Juan José; Rodríguez-Fabián, Guillermo; González-Pérez, José; Calderón-Montero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Purpose: to evaluate the short and long term effectiveness of ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous needle lavage in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. To study the evolution of the size of calcifications and pain in the two years after treatment. Methods: a 2 year longitudinal prospective study is carried out after applying the UGPL technique on a number of patients diagnosed with calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff. Clinical, ultrasound and radiology follow-up controls were performed, 3 months, 6 months, one year and two years after the treatment. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to assess the pain. The degree and point of pain is selected on a 10cm line, arranged horizontally or vertically. The “0” represents no pain and “10” represents worst pain. The population studied was made up of 121 patients that required our service as a result of suffering from a painful shoulder. Results: the pain (VAS) and the size of the calcification significantly decreased with the application of the technique (p< 0,001 in both cases) and regardless of the sex (p: 0.384 for pain and p: 0.578 for the size of the calcification). This occurred from the first check-up (3 months) and was maintained for two year. Conclusion: we consider this technique to be a valid alternative as a first-choice treatment of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. The intervention is simple, cost-effective, does not require hospitalization, involves no complications, rehabilitation treatment is not required and it shows very few side effects without sequelae, significantly reducing the size of the calcification and pain in the majority of patients. PMID:25767776

  1. Analysis of "dry" mesothelioma with ultrasound guided biopsies.

    PubMed

    Stigt, Jos A; Boers, James E; Groen, Harry J M

    2012-12-01

    Image-guided sampling of the thickened pleura is a sensitive approach in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma with pleural effusion. Malignant pleural mesothelioma presenting without effusion however is more of a diagnostic challenge. In this study we report the diagnostic yield and complications of ultrasound-guided cutting needle biopsies in this particular category of patients. A retrospective database analysis from September 2007 until January 2012 was performed in 56 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Clinical characteristics and results of diagnostic evaluations were analysed. Of the 56 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma, 20 patients presented without pleural effusion of with locular effusion. Ultrasound-guided cutting needle biopsy was performed in 14/20 patients with a diagnostic accuracy of 80%. Only 1 patient had mild haemoptysis immediately following biopsies. Diagnosing patients with pleural thickenings suspect for malignant mesothelioma without pleural effusion or with loculated pleural effusion is effective and safe with ultrasound-guided cutting needle biopsies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided system for thermal ablation of liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshat, Hamid R. S.; Cool, Derek W.; Barker, Kevin; Gardi, Lori; Kakani, Nirmal; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-03-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasound (2D US) imaging is commonly used for diagnostic and intraoperative guidance of interventional abdominal procedures including percutaneous thermal ablation of focal liver tumors with radiofrequency (RF) or microwave (MW) induced energy. However, in many situations 2D US may not provide enough anatomical detail and guidance information. Therefore, intra-procedural CT or MR imaging are used in many centers for guidance purposes. These modalities are costly and are mainly utilized to confirm tool placement rather than guiding the insertion. Three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) has been introduced to address these issues. In this paper, we present our integrated solution to provide 3D US images using a newly developed mechanical transducer with a large field-ofview and without the need for external tracking devices to combine diagnostic and planning information of different modalities for intraoperative guidance. The system provides tools to segment the target(s), plan the treatment, and detect the ablation applicators during the procedure for guiding purposes. We present experimental results used to ensure that our system generates accurate measurements and our early clinical evaluation results. The results suggest that 3D US used for focal liver ablation can provide a more reliable planning and guidance tool compared to 2D US only, and in many cases offers comparable measurements to other alternatives at significantly lower cost, faster time and with no harmful radiation.

  3. A Single-Institution Experience in Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsy of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, B. T., E-mail: Welch.brian@mayo.edu; Eiken, P. W.; Atwell, T. D.

    PurposeMesothelioma has been considered a difficult pathologic diagnosis to achieve via image-guided core needle biopsy. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic sensitivity of percutaneous image-guided biopsy for diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review was performed to identify patients with a confirmed diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma and who underwent image-guided needle biopsy between January 1, 2002, and January 1, 2016. Thirty-two patients with pleural mesothelioma were identified and included for analysis in 33 image-guided biopsy procedures. Patient, procedural, and pathologic characteristics were recorded. Complications were characterized via standardized nomenclature [Common Terminology for Clinically Adverse Events (CTCAE)].ResultsPercutaneousmore » image-guided biopsy was associated with an overall sensitivity of 81%. No CTCAE clinically significant complications were observed. No image-guided procedures were complicated by pneumothorax or necessitated chest tube placement. No patients had tumor seeding of the biopsy tract.ConclusionPercutaneous image-guided biopsy can achieve high sensitivity for pathologic diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma with a low procedural complication rate, potentially obviating need for surgical biopsy.« less

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Pathology.

    PubMed

    Dettori, Nathan; Choudur, Hema; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2018-07-01

    High-resolution ultrasound serves as a fast, accessible, reliable, and radiation-free tool for anatomical and dynamic evaluation of various peripheral nerves. It can be used not only to identify and diagnose peripheral nerve and perineural pathology accurately but also to guide various nerve and perineural interventions. We describe the normal and pathologic appearances of peripheral nerves, the pathologies commonly affecting the individual peripheral nerves, and the current ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve interventions and techniques. Future directions are also highlighted. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Biliary Ascariasis: MR Cholangiography Findings in Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Cheol Mok; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2001-01-01

    We describe the imaging features of two cases of biliary ascariasis. Ultrasonography and CT showed no specific abnormal findings, but MR cholangiography clearly demonstrated an intraductal linear filling defect that led to the correct diagnosis. MR cholangiography is thus a useful technique for the diagnosis of biliary ascariasis. PMID:11752990

  6. Defining intrahepatic biliary anatomy in living liver transplant donor candidates at mangafodipir trisodium-enhanced MR cholangiography versus conventional T2-weighted MR cholangiography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian S; Krinsky, Glenn A; Nazzaro, Carol A; Chang, Jerry S; Babb, James S; Lin, Jennifer C; Morgan, Glyn R; Teperman, Lewis W

    2004-12-01

    To compare three-dimensional (3D) mangafodipir trisodium-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) cholangiography with conventional T2-weighted MR cholangiography for depiction and definition of intrahepatic biliary anatomy in liver transplant donor candidates. One hundred eight healthy liver transplant donor candidates were examined with two MR cholangiographic methods. All candidates gave written informed consent, and the study was approved by the institutional review board. First, breath-hold transverse and coronal half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin-echo and breath-hold oblique coronal heavily T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences were performed. Second, mangafodipir trisodium-enhanced breath-hold fat-suppressed 3D gradient-echo sequences were performed through the ducts (oblique coronal plane) and through the entire liver (transverse plane). Interpretation of biliary anatomy findings, particularly variants affecting right liver lobe biliary drainage, and degree of interpretation confidence at both 3D mangafodipir trisodium-enhanced MR cholangiography and T2-weighted MR cholangiography were recorded and compared by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Then, consensus interpretations of both MR image sets together were performed. Intraoperative cholangiography was the reference-standard examination for 51 subjects who underwent right lobe hepatectomy. The McNemar test was used to compare the accuracies of the individual MR techniques with that of the consensus interpretation of both image sets together and to compare each technique with intraoperative cholangiography. Biliary anatomy was visualized with mangafodipir trisodium enhancement in all patients. Mangafodipir trisodium-enhanced image findings agreed with findings seen at combined interpretations significantly more often than did T2-weighted image findings (in 107 [99%] vs 88 [82%] of 108 donor candidates, P < .001). Confidence was significantly higher with the mangafodipir trisodium-enhanced images

  7. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage for pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weitian; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Ningming; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The factors influencing the efficacy of ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage were investigated in the present study. A retrospective analysis of clinical data from 435 patients who presented with a pleural effusion was performed. Patients were divided into a control group and an intervention group. Thirty-seven patients in the control group were given standard care using pleural puncture to draw the excess fluid. The 398 patients in the intervention group were treated using ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage. The rate of successful drainage of a pleural effusion was significantly higher (P<0.05), while the rate of complication was lower, in the ultrasound-guided thoracentesis cases compared to standard care treatment. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage is an efficient, safe and minimally invasive procedure to alleviate pleural effusion. The efficacy of the procedure is related to the separation of pleural effusion, drainage tube type and tube diameter. PMID:28105155

  8. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Silvestri, Enzo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an established modality for shoulder evaluation, being accurate, low cost and radiation free. Different pathological conditions can be diagnosed using ultrasound and can be treated using ultrasound guidance, such as degenerative, traumatic or inflammatory diseases. Subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis is the most common finding on ultrasound evaluation for painful shoulder. Therapeutic injections of corticosteroids are helpful to reduce inflammation and pain. Calcific tendinopathy of rotator cuff affects up to 20% of painful shoulders. Ultrasound-guided treatment may be performed with both single- and double-needle approach. Calcific enthesopathy, a peculiar form of degenerative tendinopathy, is a common and mostly asymptomatic ultrasound finding; dry needling has been proposed in symptomatic patients. An alternative is represented by autologous platelet-rich plasma injections. Intra-articular injections of the shoulder can be performed in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory and degenerative diseases with corticosteroids or hyaluronic acid respectively. Steroid injections around the long head of the biceps brachii tendon are indicated in patients with biceps tendinopathy, reducing pain and humeral tenderness. The most common indication for acromion-clavicular joint injection is degenerative osteoarthritis, with ultrasound representing a useful tool in localizing the joint space and properly injecting various types of drugs (steroids, lidocaine or hyaluronic acid). Suprascapular nerve block is an approved treatment for chronic shoulder pain non-responsive to conventional treatments as well as candidate patients for shoulder arthroscopy. This review provides an overview of these different ultrasonography-guided procedures that can be performed around the shoulder.

  9. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Catheter Drainage of Large Breast Abscesses in Lactating Women: How to Preserve Breastfeeding Safely.

    PubMed

    Falco, Giuseppe; Foroni, Monica; Castagnetti, Fabio; Marano, Luigi; Bordoni, Daniele; Rocco, Nicola; Marchesi, Vanessa; Iotti, Valentina; Vacondio, Rita; Ferrari, Guglielmo

    2016-12-01

    Management of breast abscess in lactating women remains controversial. During pregnancy, women may develop different kinds of benign breast lesions that could require a surgical incision performed under general anesthesia with consequent breastfeeding interruption. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the management of large breast abscesses with ultrasound-assisted drainage aiming at breastfeeding preservation. 34 lactating women with a diagnosis of unilateral breast abscess have been treated with an ultrasound (US)-assisted drainage of the abscess. A pigtail catheter was inserted into the fluid collection using the Seldinger technique under US guide and connected to a three stop way to allow drainage and irrigation of the cavity until its resolution. All procedures have been found safe and well tolerated. No recurrence was observed and breastfeeding was never interrupted. The described technique allows to avoid surgery and to preserve breastfeeding in well-selected patients with a safe, well-tolerated and cost-effective procedure.

  10. Ultrasound guided therapeutic injections of the cervical spine and brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Cormick, Wes

    2014-02-01

    Introduction : Recent applications in ultrasound imaging include ultrasound assessment and ultrasound guided therapeutic injections of the spine and brachial plexus. Discussion : Ultrasound is an ideal modality for these regions as it allows accurate safe and quick injection of single or multiple sites. It has the added advantages of lack of ionising radiation, and can be done without requiring large expensive radiology equipment. Conclusion : Brachial plexus pathology may be present in patients presenting for shoulder symptoms where very little is found at imaging the shoulder. It is important to understand the anatomy and normal variants that may exist to be able to recognise when pathology is present. When pathology is demonstrated it is easy to do a trial of therapy with ultrasound guided injection of steroid around the nerve lesion. This review will outline the normal anatomy and variants and common pathology, which can be amenable to ultrasound guided injection of steroid.

  11. Percutaneous aspiration of fluid for management of peritonitis in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Nicolaou, S.; Campbell, M. R.; Sargsyan, A. E.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Melton, S.; Beck, G.; Dawson, D. L.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L.; hide

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a medical emergency that can affect even well-screened, healthy individuals, peritonitis developing during a long-duration space exploration mission may dictate deviation from traditional clinical practice due to the absence of otherwise indicated surgical capabilities. Medical management can treat many intra-abdominal processes, but treatment failures are inevitable. In these circumstances, percutaneous aspiration under sonographic guidance could provide a "rescue" strategy. Hypothesis: Sonographically guided percutaneous aspiration of intra-peritoneal fluid can be performed in microgravity. METHODS: Investigations were conducted in the microgravity environment of NASA's KC-135 research aircraft (0 G). The subjects were anesthetized female Yorkshire pigs weighing 50 kg. The procedures were rehearsed in a terrestrial animal lab (1 G). Colored saline (500 mL) was introduced through an intra-peritoneal catheter during flight. A high-definition ultrasound system (HDI-5000, ATL, Bothell, WA) was used to guide a 16-gauge needle into the peritoneal cavity to aspirate fluid. RESULTS: Intra-peritoneal fluid collections were easily identified, distinct from surrounding viscera, and on occasion became more obvious during weightless conditions. Subjectively, with adequate restraint of the subject and operators, the procedure was no more demanding than during the 1-G rehearsals. CONCLUSIONS: Sonographically guided percutaneous aspiration of intra-peritoneal fluid collections is feasible in weightlessness. Treatment of intra-abdominal inflammatory conditions in spaceflight might rely on pharmacological options, backed by sonographically guided percutaneous aspiration for the "rescue" of treatment failures. While this risk mitigation strategy cannot guarantee success, it may be the most practical option given severe resource limitations.

  12. Technical tips for peroral transluminal cholangioscopy using novel single-operator cholangioscope (with videos).

    PubMed

    Ogura, Takeshi; Takagi, Wataru; Kurisu, Yoshitaka; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-10-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the gold-standard modality for diagnosis and therapy of bilio-pancreatic disease. In particular, peroral cholangiography (POCS) is a useful modality not only for diagnosing biliary disease, but also for therapeutic procedures such as electrohydraulic lithotripsy. The SPY-DS single-operator cholangioscope has recently become available, and offers favorable visualization, a wide view, suction function and a larger accessory working channel. However, if the duodenoscope cannot be advanced into the ampulla of Vater for reasons such as surgical anatomy, POCS cannot be performed. On the other hand, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage (PTCD) has been developed as an alternative endoscopic ultrasound-guided approach to the biliary tract. Peroral transluminal cholangioscopy (PTLC) using SPY-DS is a novel approach. Because transluminal interventional procedures under endoscopic ultrasound guidance have recently been developed, our technique may have clinical impact for selected cases. © 2016 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  13. Guiding Intramuscular Diaphragm Injections Using Real-time Ultrasound & Electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Sarwal, Aarti; Cartwright, Michael S.; Mitchell, Erin; Williams, Koudy; Walker, Francis O.; Childers, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We describe a unique method that combines ultrasound and electromyography to guide intramuscular diaphragm injections in anesthetized large animals. Methods Ultrasound was used to visualize the diaphragm on each side of spontaneously breathing, anesthetized beagle dogs and cynomolgus macaques. An electromyography needle was introduced and directed by ultrasound to confirm that the needle entered the muscular portion of the diaphragm, and methylene blue was injected. Injection accuracy was confirmed upon necropsy by tracking the spread of methylene blue. Results All methylene blue injections were confirmed to have been placed appropriately into the diaphragm. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility and accuracy of using ultrasound and EMG to guide injections and to reduce complications associated with conventional blind techniques. Ultrasound guidance can be used for clinical electromyography of the diaphragm. Future applications may include targeted diaphragm injections with gene replacement therapy in neuromuscular diseases. PMID:25354257

  14. Outcome of percutaneous continuous drainage of psoas abscess: A clinically guided technique.

    PubMed

    Dave, Bharat R; Kurupati, Ranganatha Babu; Shah, Dipak; Degulamadi, Devanand; Borgohain, Nitu; Krishnan, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous aspiration of abscesses under ultrasonography (USG) and computer tomography (CT) scan has been well described. With recurrence rate reported as high as 66%. The open drainage and percutaneous continuous drainage (PCD) has reduced the recurrence rate. The disadvantage of PCD under CT is radiation hazard and problems of asepsis. Hence a technique of clinically guided percutaneous continuous drainage of the psoas abscess without real-time imaging overcomes these problems. We describe clinically guided PCD of psoas abscess and its outcome. Twenty-nine patients with dorsolumbar spondylodiscitis without gross neural deficit with psoas abscess of size >5 cm were selected for PCD. It was done as a day care procedure under local anesthesia. Sequentially, aspiration followed by guide pin-guided trocar and catheter insertion was done without image guidance. Culture sensitivity was done and chemotherapy initiated and catheter kept till the drainage was <10 ml for 48 hours. Outcome assessment was done with relief of pain, successful abscess drainage and ODI (Oswestry Disability Index) score at 2 years. PCD was successful in all cases. Back and radicular pain improved in all cases. Average procedure time was 24.30 minutes, drain output was 234.40 ml, and the drainage duration was 7.90 days. One patient required surgical stabilisation due to progression of the spondylodiscitis resulting in instability inspite of successful drainage of abscess. Problems with the procedure were noticed in six patients. Multiple attempts (n = 2), persistent discharge (n = 1) for 2 weeks, blocked catheter (n = 2) and catheter pull out (n = 1) occurred with no effect on the outcome. The average ODI score improved from 62.47 to 5.51 at 2 years. Clinically guided PCD is an efficient, safe and easy procedure in drainage of psoas abscess.

  15. Accuracy of ultrasound-guided nerve blocks of the cervical zygapophysial joints.

    PubMed

    Siegenthaler, Andreas; Mlekusch, Sabine; Trelle, Sven; Schliessbach, Juerg; Curatolo, Michele; Eichenberger, Urs

    2012-08-01

    Cervical zygapophysial joint nerve blocks typically are performed with fluoroscopic needle guidance. Descriptions of ultrasound-guided block of these nerves are available, but only one small study compared ultrasound with fluoroscopy, and only for the third occipital nerve. To evaluate the potential usefulness of ultrasound-guidance in clinical practice, studies that determine the accuracy of this technique using a validated control are essential. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of ultrasound-guided nerve blocks of the cervical zygapophysial joints using fluoroscopy as control. Sixty volunteers were studied. Ultrasound-imaging was used to place the needle to the bony target of cervical zygapophysial joint nerve blocks. The levels of needle placement were determined randomly (three levels per volunteer). After ultrasound-guided needle placement and application of 0.2 ml contrast dye, fluoroscopic imaging was performed for later evaluation by a blinded pain physician and considered as gold standard. Raw agreement, chance-corrected agreement κ, and chance-independent agreement Φ between the ultrasound-guided placement and the assessment using fluoroscopy were calculated to quantify accuracy. One hundred eighty needles were placed in 60 volunteers. Raw agreement was 87% (95% CI 81-91%), κ was 0.74 (0.64-0.83), and Φ 0.99 (0.99-0.99). Accuracy varied significantly between the different cervical nerves: it was low for the C7 medial branch, whereas all other levels showed very good accuracy. Ultrasound-imaging is an accurate technique for performing cervical zygapophysial joint nerve blocks in volunteers, except for the medial branch blocks of C7.

  16. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block: outcome of 510 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Perlas, Anahi; Lobo, Giovanni; Lo, Nick; Brull, Richard; Chan, Vincent W S; Karkhanis, Reena

    2009-01-01

    Supraclavicular brachial plexus block provides consistently effective anesthesia to the upper extremity. However, traditional nerve localization techniques may be associated with a high risk of pneumothorax. In the present study, we report block success and clinical outcome data from 510 consecutive patients who received an ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block for upper extremity surgery. After institutional review board approval, the outcome of 510 consecutive patients who received an ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block for upper extremity surgery was reviewed. Real-time ultrasound guidance was used with a high-frequency linear probe. The neurovascular structures were imaged on short axis, and the needle was inserted using an in-plane technique with either a medial-to-lateral or lateral-to-medial orientation. Five hundred ten ultrasound-guided supraclavicular blocks were performed (50 inpatients, 460 outpatients) by 47 different operators at different levels of training over a 24-month period. Successful surgical anesthesia was achieved in 94.6% of patients after a single attempt; 2.8% required local anesthetic supplementation of a single peripheral nerve territory; and 2.6% received an unplanned general anesthetic. No cases of clinically symptomatic pneumothorax developed. Complications included symptomatic hemidiaphragmatic paresis (1%), Horner syndrome (1%), unintended vascular punctures (0.4%), and transient sensory deficits (0.4%). Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block is associated with a high rate of successful surgical anesthesia and a low rate of complications and thus may be a safe alternative for both inpatients and outpatients. Severe underlying respiratory disease and coagulopathy should remain a contraindication for this brachial plexus approach.

  17. Disinfection of a probe used in ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Rutala, William A; Gergen, Maria F; Weber, David J

    2007-08-01

    Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsies are among the most common outpatient diagnostic procedures in urology clinics and carry the risk of introducing pathogens that may lead to infection. To investigate the effectiveness of procedures for disinfecting a probe used in ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy. The effectiveness of disinfection was determined by inoculating 10(7) colony forming units (cfu) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the following 3 sites on the probe: the interior lumen of the biopsy needle guide, the outside surface of the biopsy needle guide, and the interior lumen of the ultrasound probe where the needle guide passes through the transducer. Each site was investigated separately. After inoculation, the probe was immersed in 2% glutaraldehyde for 20 minutes and then assessed for the level of microbial contamination. The results demonstrated that disinfection (ie, a reduction in bacterial load of greater than 7 log(10) cfu) could be achieved if the needle guide was removed from the probe. However, if the needle guide was left in the probe channel during immersion in 2% glutaraldehyde, disinfection was not achieved (ie, the reduction was approximately 1 log(10) cfu). Recommendations for probe disinfection are provided and include disassembling the device and immersing the probe and the needle guide separately in a high-level disinfectant.

  18. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration versus core needle biopsy: comparison of post-biopsy hematoma rates and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Chae, In Hye; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Park, Vivian Y; Kwak, Jin Young

    2017-07-01

    To compare post-biopsy hematoma rates between ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy, and to investigate risk factors for post-biopsy hematoma. A total of 5304 thyroid nodules which underwent ultrasound guided biopsy were included in this retrospective study. We compared clinical and US features between patients with and without post-biopsy hematoma. Associations between these features and post-biopsy hematoma were analyzed. Post-biopsy hematoma rate was 0.8% (43/5121) for ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and 4.9% (9/183) for ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy (P < 0.001). For ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration, gender, age, size, presence of vascularity, and suspicious US features were not associated with post-biopsy hematoma according to experience level. Post-biopsy hematoma occurred significantly more with ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy (9/179, 5.0%) than with ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration (9/1138, 0.8%) (P < 0.001) in experienced performers and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy was the only significant risk factor for post-biopsy hematoma (adjusted Odds Ratio, 6.458, P < 0.001). Post-biopsy hematoma occurred significantly more in ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy than in ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy was the only independent factor of post-biopsy hematoma in thyroid nodules.

  19. Ultrasound image-guided therapy enhances antitumor effect of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Noboru; Kudo, Nobuki; Nakamura, Kensuke; Lim, Sue Yee; Murakami, Masahiro; Kumara, W R Bandula; Tamura, Yu; Ohta, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify whether ultrasound image-guided cisplatin delivery with an intratumor microbubble injection enhances the antitumor effect in a xenograft mouse model. Canine thyroid adenocarcinoma cells were used for all experiments. Before in vivo experiments, the cisplatin and microbubble concentration and ultrasound exposure time were optimized in vitro. For in vivo experiments, cells were implanted into the back of nude mice. Observed by a diagnostic ultrasound machine, a mixture of cisplatin and ultrasound contrast agent, Sonazoid, microbubbles was injected directly into tumors. The amount of injected cisplatin and microbubbles was 1 μg/tumor and 1.2 × 10(7) microbubbles/tumor, respectively, with a total injected volume of 20 μl. Using the same diagnostic machine, tumors were exposed to ultrasound for 15 s. The treatment was repeated four times. The combination of cisplatin, microbubbles, and ultrasound significantly delayed tumor growth as compared with no treatment (after 18 days, 157 ± 55 vs. 398 ± 49 mm(3), P = 0.049). Neither cisplatin alone nor the combination of cisplatin and ultrasound delayed tumor growth. The treatment did not decrease the body weight of mice. Ultrasound image-guided anticancer drug delivery may enhance the antitumor effects of drugs without obvious side effects.

  20. Retrospective Analysis of Ultrasound-guided Flexible Ureteroscopy in the Management of Calyceal Diverticular Calculi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Qing; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Nian-Zeng

    2016-09-05

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is the most widely recommended treatment for calyceal diverticular calculi, providing excellent stone-free results. However, its invasiveness is not negligible considering its major complication rates. Flexible ureteroscopy (FURS) is currently used to treat calyceal diverticula. However, the greatest drawback of FURS is locating the diverticulum since its neck is narrow and concealed. In such a case, the FURS procedure must be converted to PCNL. The aim of this study was to evaluate ultrasound-guided flexible ureteroscopy (UFURS) identifying diverticulum and the management of calyceal diverticular calculi. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 24 patients who had calyceal diverticular calculi. In all 12 patients in the UFURS group, direct FURS failed to find evidence of calyceal diverticula but were confirmed with imaging. The other 12 patients in the PCNL group received PCNL plus fulguration of the diverticular walls. Puncture of calyceal diverticulum was successful in all 12 UFURS patients. Two patients in this group had postoperative residual calculi and two patients developed fever. In the PCNL group, percutaneous renal access and lithotomy were successful in all 12 patients. One patient in this group had residual calculi, one had perirenal hematoma, and two patients developed fever. No significant difference was found in the operating time (UFURS vs. PCNL, 91.8 ± 24.2 vs. 86.3 ± 18.7 min), stone-free rate (UFURS vs. PCNL, 9/12 vs. 10/12), and rate of successful lithotripsy (UFURS vs. PCNL, 10/12 vs. 11/12) between the two groups (all P> 0.05). Postoperative pain scores in the FURS group were significantly lower than that in the PCNL group (2.7 ± 1.2 vs. 6.2 ± 1.5, P< 0.05). Hospital stay in the UFURS group was significantly shorter than that in the PCNL group (3.4 ± 0.8 vs. 5.4 ± 1.0 days, P< 0.05). All patients were symptom-free following surgery (UFURS vs. PCNL, 10/10 vs. 12/12). Ultrasound-guided puncture

  1. Lower Extremity Injury Patterns in Elite Ballet Dancers: Ultrasound/MRI Imaging Features and an Institutional Overview of Therapeutic Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Interventions.

    PubMed

    Rehmani, Razia; Endo, Yoshimi; Bauman, Phillip; Hamilton, William; Potter, Hollis; Adler, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    Altered biomechanics from repetitive microtrauma, such as long practice hours in en pointe (tip of the toes) or demi pointe (balls of the feet) predispose ballet dancers to a multitude of musculoskeletal pathologies particularly in the lower extremities. Both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are radiation-sparing modalities which can be used to confidently evaluate these injuries, with ultrasound (US) offering the added utility of therapeutic intervention at the same time in experienced hands. The purposes of this paper were: (1) to illustrate the US and MRI features of lower extremity injury patterns in ballet dancers, focusing on pathologies commonly encountered at a single orthopedic hospital; (2) to present complementary roles of both ultrasound and MRI in the evaluation of these injuries whenever possible; (3) to review and present our institutional approach towards therapeutic ultrasound-guided interventions by presenting explicit cases. Online searches were performed using the search criteria of "ballet biomechanics" and "ballet injuries." The results were then further narrowed down by limiting articles published in the past 15 years, modality (US and MRI), anatomical region (foot and ankle, hip and knee) and to major radiology, orthopedics, and sports medicine journals. Performing ballet poses major stress to lower extremities and predisposes dancer to several musculoskeletal injuries. These can be adequately evaluated by both US and MRI. US is useful for evaluating superficial structures such as soft tissues, tendons, and ligaments, particularly in the foot and ankle. MRI provides superior resolution of deeper structures such as joints, bone marrow, and cartilage. In addition, US can be used as a therapeutic tool for providing quick symptomatic improvement in these athletes for who "time is money". Performing ballet may cause major stress to the lower extremities, predominantly affecting the foot and ankle, followed by the knee and hip. US

  2. Pregnancies following ultrasound-guided drainage of tubo-ovarian abscess.

    PubMed

    Gjelland, Knut; Granberg, Seth; Kiserud, Torvid; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Ekerhovd, Erling

    2012-07-01

    To study fertility among women treated by means of ultrasound-guided drainage and antibiotics for tubo-ovarian abscess (TOA). Retrospective cohort study. A tertiary referral center. One hundred women of reproductive age treated for TOA between June 1986 and July 2003. Transvaginal ultrasound-guided drainage of TOA was performed in all patients. The procedure was repeated if a substantial amount of pus was seen using ultrasonography 2-5 days after the initial aspiration, and repeated later if necessary. Frequency of naturally conceived pregnancies. Twenty of 38 (52.6%; 95% CI 36.5-68.9%) women who intended to have a child achieved pregnancy naturally and became mothers. In addition, 7 (50%) of 14 women who were not on birth control on a regular basis became pregnant. No ectopic pregnancies were registered. Ultrasound-guided drainage of TOA in combination with antibiotics seems to preserve fertility in approximately half of the patients. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transurethral ultrasound-guided laser-induced prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayan, Richard K.; Roth, Robert A.

    1991-07-01

    A transurethral ultrasound-guided Nd:YAG laser delivery system has been developed for use as an alternative approach to the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The TULIP system has been extensively tested in canine models and is currently undergoing FDA trials in humans.

  4. Focused ultrasound guided relocation of kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Abrol, Nitin; Kekre, Nitin S

    2015-01-01

    Complete removal of all fragments is the goal of any intervention for urinary stones. This is more important in lower pole stones where gravity and spatial orientation of lower pole infundibulum may hinder spontaneous passage of fragments. Various adjuvant therapies (inversion, diuresis, percussion, oral citrate, etc.) are described to enhance stone-free rate but are not widely accepted. Focused ultrasound-guided relocation of fragments is a recently described technique aimed at improving results of intervention for stone disease. Purpose of this review is to discuss development of this technology and its potential clinical applications. Pubmed search was made using key words "Focused ultrasound" and "kidney stone". All English language articles were reviewed by title. Relevant studies describing development and application of focused ultrasound in renal stones were selected for review. Focused ultrasound has proven its efficacy in successfully relocating up to 8 mm stone fragments in vitro and in pigs. Relocation is independent of stone composition. The latest model allows imaging and therapy with a single handheld probe facilitating its use by single operator. The acoustic energy delivered by the new prototype is even less than that used for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Therapeutic exposure has not caused thermal injury in pig kidneys. Focused ultrasound-guided relocation of stones is feasible. Though it is safe in application in pigs, technology is awaiting approval for clinical testing in human beings. This technology has many potential clinical applications in the management of stone disease.

  5. CT-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Retrospective Evaluation in 177 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Akio, E-mail: a.akahane@gmail.com; Kato, Kenichi, E-mail: kkato@iwate-med.ac.jp; Suzuki, Michiko, E-mail: mamimichiko@me.com

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous gastrostomy for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC).Materials and MethodsThis retrospective study included patients with HNC who had undergone CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy between February 2007 and December 2013. Information regarding the patients’ backgrounds, CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy techniques, technical success rate, and AEs were obtained from the medical records. In all patients, the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy with a Funada gastropexy device.ResultsDuring the study period, 177 patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy. The most common tumor locationmore » was the oral cavity, followed by the pharynx and maxilla. The indication for CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy were tumor obstruction in 78 patients, postoperative dysphagia in 55 patients, radiation edema in 43 patients, and cerebral infarction in 1 patient. The technical success rate was 97.7 %. The overall mean procedure time was 25.3 min. Major AEs occurred in seven patients (4.0 %), including bleeding (n = 4), colonic injury (n = 1), gastric tear (n = 1), and aspiration pneumonia (n = 1). Minor AEs occurred in 15 patients (8.5 %), which included peristomal leakage (n = 6), irritation (n = 4), inadvertent removal (n = 2), peristomal hemorrhage (n = 1), peristomal infection (n = 1), and wound granulation (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 111 days (range 1–1106 days).ConclusionOur study suggests that CT-guided gastrostomy may be suitable in patients with HNC.« less

  6. Ultrasound- versus Palpation-Guided Injection of Corticosteroid for Plantar Fasciitis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Aixi; Qi, Baiwen

    2014-01-01

    Background It is controversial whether ultrasound-guided injection of corticosteroid is superior to palpation-guided injection for plantar fasciitis. This meta-analysis was performed to compare the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided and palpation-guided injection of corticosteroid for the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods Databases (MEDLINE, Cochrane library and EMBASE) and reference lists were searched from their establishment to August 30, 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing ultrasound-guided with palpation-guided injection for plantar fasciitis. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) tool was used to assess the methodological quality. Outcome measurements were visual analogue scale (VAS), tenderness threshold (TT), heel tenderness index (HTI), response rate, plantar fascia thickness (PFT), hypoechogenicity and heel pad thickness (HPT). The statistical analysis was performed with software RevMan 5.2 and Stata 12.0. When I2<50%, the fixed-effects model was adopted. Otherwise the randomized-effects model was adopted. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to assess the quality of evidence. Results Five RCTs with 149 patients were identified and analyzed. Compared with palpation-guided injection, ultrasound-guided injection was superior with regard to VAS, TT, response rate, PFT and hypoechogenicity. However, there was no statistical significance between the two groups for HPT and HTI. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided injection of corticosteroid tends to be more effective than palpation-guided injection. However, it needs to be confirmed by further research. PMID:24658102

  7. Guiding intramuscular diaphragm injections using real-time ultrasound and electromyography.

    PubMed

    Sarwal, Aarti; Cartwright, Michael S; Mitchell, Erin; Williams, Koudy; Walker, Francis O; Childers, Martin K

    2015-02-01

    We describe a unique method that combines ultrasound and electromyography to guide intramuscular diaphragm injections in anesthetized large animals. Ultrasound was used to visualize the diaphragm on each side of spontaneously breathing, anesthetized beagle dogs and cynomolgus macaques. An electromyography (EMG) needle was introduced and directed by ultrasound to confirm that the needle entered the muscular portion of the diaphragm, and methylene blue was injected. Injection accuracy was confirmed upon necropsy by tracking the spread of methylene blue. All methylene blue injections were confirmed to have been placed appropriately into the diaphragm. This study demonstrates the feasibility and accuracy of using ultrasound and EMG to guide injections and to reduce complications associated with conventional blind techniques. Ultrasound guidance can be used for clinical EMG of the diaphragm. Future applications may include targeted diaphragm injections with gene replacement therapy in neuromuscular diseases. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Clinical Utility and Pitfalls of Ultrasound Guided Foreign Body Removal in War Fighters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    1 AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-08-2-0162 TITLE: Clinical Utility and Pitfalls of Ultrasound Guided Foreign Body Removal in War...Clinical Utility and Pitfalls of Ultrasound Guided Foreign Body Removal in War Fighters 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER: W81XWH-08-2-0162 5c...Purpose: To demonstrate that 1) ultrasound guided foreign body removal (USFBR) is superior to conventional surgery in the cadaver model, 2) USFBR can be

  9. Ultrasound-guided suprascapular nerve block: a correlation with fluoroscopic and cadaveric findings.

    PubMed

    Peng, Philip W H; Wiley, Michael J; Liang, James; Bellingham, Geoff A

    2010-02-01

    Previous work on the ultrasound-guided injection technique and the sonoanatomy of the suprascapular region relevant to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) block suggested that the ultrasound scan showed the presence of the suprascapular notch and transverse ligament. The intended target of the ultrasound-guided injection was the notch. The objective of this case report and the subsequent cadaver dissection findings is to reassess the interpretation of the ultrasound images when locating structures for SSN block. A 45-yr-old man with chronic shoulder pain received an ultrasound-guided SSN block using the suprascapular notch as the intended target. The position of the needle was verified by fluoroscopy, which showed the tip of the needle well outside the suprascapular notch. Similar ultrasound-guided SSN blocks were performed in two cadavers. Dissections were performed which showed that the needle tips were not at the suprascapular notch but, more accurately, were close to the SSN but at the floor of the suprascapular fossa between the suprascapular and spinoglenoid notch. Our fluoroscopic and cadaver dissection findings both suggest that the ultrasound image of the SSN block shown by the well-described technique is actually targeting the nerve on the floor of the suprascapular spine between the suprascapular and spinoglenoid notches rather than the suprascapular notch itself. The structure previously identified as the transverse ligament is actually the fascia layer of the supraspinatus muscle.

  10. Fusion imaging of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and contrast-enhanced CT or MRI before radiofrequency ablation for liver cancers.

    PubMed

    Bo, Xiao-Wan; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Wang, Dan; Guo, Le-Hang; Sun, Li-Ping; Li, Xiao-Long; Zhao, Chong-Ke; He, Ya-Ping; Liu, Bo-Ji; Li, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Kun

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the usefulness of fusion imaging of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and CECT/CEMRI before percutaneous ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for liver cancers. 45 consecutive patients with 70 liver lesions were included between March 2013 and October 2015, and all the lesions were identified on CEMRI/CECT prior to inclusion in the study. Planning ultrasound for percutaneous RFA was performed using conventional ultrasound, ultrasound-CECT/CEMRI and CEUS and CECT/CEMRI fusion imaging during the same session. The numbers of the conspicuous lesions on ultrasound and fusion imaging were recorded. RFA was performed according to the results of fusion imaging. Complete response (CR) rate was calculated and the complications were recorded. On conventional ultrasound, 25 (35.7%) of the 70 lesions were conspicuous, whereas 45 (64.3%) were inconspicuous. Ultrasound-CECT/CEMRI fusion imaging detected additional 24 lesions thus increased the number of the conspicuous lesions to 49 (70.0%) (70.0% vs 35.7%; p < 0.001 in comparison with conventional ultrasound). With the use of CEUS and CECT/CEMRI fusion imaging, the number of the conspicuous lesions further increased to 67 (95.7%, 67/70) (95.7% vs 70.0%, 95.7% vs 35.7%; both p < 0.001 in comparison with ultrasound and ultrasound-CECT/CEMRI fusion imaging, respectively). With the assistance of CEUS and CECT/CEMRI fusion imaging, the confidence level of the operator for performing RFA improved significantly with regard to visualization of the target lesions (p = 0.001). The CR rate for RFA was 97.0% (64/66) in accordance to the CECT/CEMRI results 1 month later. No procedure-related deaths and major complications occurred during and after RFA. Fusion of CEUS and CECT/CEMRI improves the visualization of those inconspicuous lesions on conventional ultrasound. It also facilitates improvement in the RFA operators' confidence and CR of RFA. Advances in knowledge: CEUS and CECT/CEMRI fusion imaging

  11. Fusion imaging of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and contrast-enhanced CT or MRI before radiofrequency ablation for liver cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Dan; Guo, Le-Hang; Sun, Li-Ping; Li, Xiao-Long; Zhao, Chong-Ke; He, Ya-Ping; Liu, Bo-Ji; Li, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the usefulness of fusion imaging of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and CECT/CEMRI before percutaneous ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for liver cancers. Methods: 45 consecutive patients with 70 liver lesions were included between March 2013 and October 2015, and all the lesions were identified on CEMRI/CECT prior to inclusion in the study. Planning ultrasound for percutaneous RFA was performed using conventional ultrasound, ultrasound-CECT/CEMRI and CEUS and CECT/CEMRI fusion imaging during the same session. The numbers of the conspicuous lesions on ultrasound and fusion imaging were recorded. RFA was performed according to the results of fusion imaging. Complete response (CR) rate was calculated and the complications were recorded. Results: On conventional ultrasound, 25 (35.7%) of the 70 lesions were conspicuous, whereas 45 (64.3%) were inconspicuous. Ultrasound-CECT/CEMRI fusion imaging detected additional 24 lesions thus increased the number of the conspicuous lesions to 49 (70.0%) (70.0% vs 35.7%; p < 0.001 in comparison with conventional ultrasound). With the use of CEUS and CECT/CEMRI fusion imaging, the number of the conspicuous lesions further increased to 67 (95.7%, 67/70) (95.7% vs 70.0%, 95.7% vs 35.7%; both p < 0.001 in comparison with ultrasound and ultrasound-CECT/CEMRI fusion imaging, respectively). With the assistance of CEUS and CECT/CEMRI fusion imaging, the confidence level of the operator for performing RFA improved significantly with regard to visualization of the target lesions (p = 0.001). The CR rate for RFA was 97.0% (64/66) in accordance to the CECT/CEMRI results 1 month later. No procedure-related deaths and major complications occurred during and after RFA. Conclusion: Fusion of CEUS and CECT/CEMRI improves the visualization of those inconspicuous lesions on conventional ultrasound. It also facilitates improvement in the RFA operators' confidence and CR of RFA. Advances in

  12. Diagnostic Yield of CT-Guided Percutaneous Transthoracic Needle Biopsy for Diagnosis of Anterior Mediastinal Masses.

    PubMed

    Petranovic, Milena; Gilman, Matthew D; Muniappan, Ashok; Hasserjian, Robert P; Digumarthy, Subba R; Muse, Victorine V; Sharma, Amita; Shepard, Jo-Anne O; Wu, Carol C

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic yield and accuracy of CT-guided percutaneous biopsy of anterior mediastinal masses and assess prebiopsy characteristics that may help to select patients with the highest diagnostic yield. Retrospective review of all CT-guided percutaneous biopsies of the anterior mediastinum conducted at our institution from January 2003 through December 2012 was performed to collect data regarding patient demographics, imaging characteristics of biopsied masses, presence of complications, and subsequent surgical intervention or medical treatment (or both). Cytology, core biopsy pathology, and surgical pathology results were recorded. A per-patient analysis was performed using two-tailed t test, Fisher's exact test, and Pearson chi-square test. The study cohort included 52 patients (32 men, 20 women; mean age, 49 years) with mean diameter of mediastinal mass of 6.9 cm. Diagnostic yield of CT-guided percutaneous biopsy was 77% (40/52), highest for thymic neoplasms (100% [11/11]). Non-diagnostic results were seen in 12 of 52 patients (23%), primarily in patients with lymphoma (75% [9/12]). Fine-needle aspiration yielded the correct diagnosis in 31 of 52 patients (60%), and core biopsy had a diagnostic rate of 77% (36/47). None of the core biopsies were discordant with surgical pathology. There was no statistically significant difference between the diagnostic and the nondiagnostic groups in patient age, lesion size, and presence of necrosis. The complication rate was 3.8% (2/52), all small self-resolving pneumothoraces. CT-guided percutaneous biopsy is a safe diagnostic procedure with high diagnostic yield (77%) for anterior mediastinal lesions, highest for thymic neoplasms (100%), and can potentially obviate more invasive procedures.

  13. CT-Guided Percutaneous Step-by-Step Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of Carcinoma in the Caudate Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jun; Li, Wang; Zeng, Qi; Li, Sheng; Gong, Xiao; Shen, Lujun; Mao, Siyue; Dong, Annan; Wu, Peihong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The location of the caudate lobe and its complex anatomy make caudate lobectomy and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) under ultrasound guidance technically challenging. The objective of the exploratory study was to introduce a novel modality of treatment of lesions in caudate lobe and discuss all details with our experiences to make this novel treatment modality repeatable and educational. The study enrolled 39 patients with liver caudate lobe tumor first diagnosed by computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). After consultation of multi-disciplinary team, 7 patients with hepatic caudate lobe lesions were enrolled and accepted CT-guided percutaneous step-by-step RFA treatment. A total of 8 caudate lobe lesions of the 7 patients were treated by RFA in 6 cases and RFA combined with percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) in 1 case. Median tumor diameter was 29 mm (range, 18–69 mm). A right approach was selected for 6 patients and a dorsal approach for 1 patient. Median operative time was 64 min (range, 59–102 min). Median blood loss was 10 mL (range, 8-16 mL) and mainly due to puncture injury. Median hospitalization time was 4 days (range, 2–5 days). All lesions were completely ablated (8/8; 100%) and no recurrence at the site of previous RFA was observed during median 8 months follow-up (range 3–11 months). No major or life-threatening complications or deaths occurred. In conclusion, percutaneous step-by-step RFA under CT guidance is a novel and effective minimally invasive therapy for hepatic caudate lobe lesions with well repeatability. PMID:26426638

  14. Endovascular treatment of iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis in pregnancy using US-guided percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Gedikoglu, Murat; Oguzkurt, Levent

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to describe ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy in pregnant women with iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis. This study included nine pregnant women with acute and subacute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis, who were severe symptomatic cases with massive swelling and pain of the leg. Patients were excluded from the study if they had only femoropopliteal deep vein thrombosis or mild symptoms of deep vein thrombosis. US-guided percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy was applied to achieve thrombus removal and uninterrupted venous flow. The treatment was considered successful if there was adequate venous patency and symptomatic relief. Complete or significant thrombus removal and uninterrupted venous flow from the puncture site up to the iliac veins were achieved in all patients at first intervention. Complete relief of leg pain was achieved immediately in seven patients (77.8%). Two patients (22.2%) had a recurrence of thrombosis in the first week postintervention. One of them underwent a second intervention, where percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy was performed again with successful removal of thrombus and establishment of in line flow. Two patients were lost to follow-up after birth. None of the remaining seven patients had rethrombosis throughout the postpartum period. Symptomatic relief was detected clinically in these patients. Endovascular treatment with US-guided percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy can be considered as a safe and effective way to remove thrombus from the deep veins in pregnant women with acute and subacute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis.

  15. Endovascular treatment of iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis in pregnancy using US-guided percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gedikoglu, Murat; Oguzkurt, Levent

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to describe ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy in pregnant women with iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis. METHODS This study included nine pregnant women with acute and subacute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis, who were severe symptomatic cases with massive swelling and pain of the leg. Patients were excluded from the study if they had only femoropopliteal deep vein thrombosis or mild symptoms of deep vein thrombosis. US-guided percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy was applied to achieve thrombus removal and uninterrupted venous flow. The treatment was considered successful if there was adequate venous patency and symptomatic relief. RESULTS Complete or significant thrombus removal and uninterrupted venous flow from the puncture site up to the iliac veins were achieved in all patients at first intervention. Complete relief of leg pain was achieved immediately in seven patients (77.8%). Two patients (22.2%) had a recurrence of thrombosis in the first week postintervention. One of them underwent a second intervention, where percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy was performed again with successful removal of thrombus and establishment of in line flow. Two patients were lost to follow-up after birth. None of the remaining seven patients had rethrombosis throughout the postpartum period. Symptomatic relief was detected clinically in these patients. CONCLUSION Endovascular treatment with US-guided percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy can be considered as a safe and effective way to remove thrombus from the deep veins in pregnant women with acute and subacute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis. PMID:27801353

  16. Emergency percutaneous treatment in surgical bile duct injury.

    PubMed

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Laganà, Domenico; Dizonno, Massimiliano; Ianniello, Andrea; Cotta, Elisa; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Dionigi, Renzo; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of emergency percutaneous treatment in patients with surgical bile duct injury (SBDI). From May 2004 to May 2007, 11 patients (five men, six women; age range 26-80 years; mean age 58 years) with a critical clinical picture (severe jaundice, bile peritonitis, septic state) due to SBDI secondary to surgical or laparoscopic procedures were treated by percutaneous procedures. We performed four ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainages, four external-internal biliary drainages, one bilioplasty, and two plastic biliary stenting after 2 weeks of external-internal biliary drainage placement. All procedures had 100% technical success with no complications. The clinical emergencies resolved in 3-4 days in 100% of cases. All patients had a benign clinical course, and reoperation was avoided in 100% of cases. Interventional radiological procedures are effective in the emergency management of SBDI since they are minimally invasive and have a high success rate and a low incidence of complications compared to the more complex and dangerous surgical or laparoscopic options.

  17. Ultrasound and bronchoscopic controlled percutaneous tracheostomy on trauma ICU.

    PubMed

    Kollig, E; Heydenreich, U; Roetman, B; Hopf, F; Muhr, G

    2000-11-01

    Tracheostomy is a common surgical procedure performed in long-term ventilated patients in intensive care. Since the role of percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) on Intensive Care Unit (ICU) has become steadily more important in the last few years, a prospective study was started to evaluate the economic efficiency and to show the minimization of the complication rate of this procedure. In 72 patients we performed PDT as a bedside procedure. Initially the thyroid gland and the subcutaneous vessels were studied by ultrasound in every patient. The puncture of the trachea, the dilatational procedure and the insertion of the tracheal cannula were executed under bronchoscopic monitoring. Finally, a bronchoscopic control view followed via the new cannula to detect intratracheal complications. Mechanical ventilation was maintained during the procedure and controlled by continuous pulse oximetry. According to prior ultrasound findings the place to puncture the trachea was changed in 24% of the patients, in one case tracheostomy was performed as an open conventional procedure. The following complications could be observed: one case involving perforation of a cartilaginous ring, one case with venous bleeding of a small subcutaneous vein and two cases with punctures of the bronchoscope. There were no cases of miscannulation, penetration of the posterior tracheal wall or major bleeding requiring intervention or conversion. The followup study revealed that there was no sign of further complications in any patient. In addition, cost analysis demonstrated that there was a significant economical advantage of PDT in comparison with open standard tracheostomy. Standardized ultrasonographically and bronchoscopically controlled PDT turns out to be a safe, simple and cost effective bedside procedure on ICU. Because of ultrasound examination performed before the procedure, and bronchoscopic surveillance during the procedure, safety of this procedure can be enhanced, thus

  18. Photoacoustic-guided ultrasound therapy with a dual-mode ultrasound array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prost, Amaury; Funke, Arik; Tanter, Mickaël; Aubry, Jean-François; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustics has recently been proposed as a potential method to guide and/or monitor therapy based on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). We experimentally demonstrate the creation of a HIFU lesion at the location of an optical absorber, by use of photoacoustic signals emitted by the absorber detected on a dual mode transducer array. To do so, a dedicated ultrasound array intended to both detect photoacoustic waves and emit HIFU with the same elements was used. Such a dual-mode array provides automatically coregistered reference frames for photoacoustic detection and HIFU emission, a highly desired feature for methods involving guidance or monitoring of HIFU by use of photoacoustics. The prototype is first characterized in terms of both photoacoustic and HIFU performances. The probe is then used to perform an idealized scenario of photoacoustic-guided therapy, where photoacoustic signals generated by an absorbing thread embedded in a piece of chicken breast are used to automatically refocus a HIFU beam with a time-reversal mirror and necrose the tissue at the location of the absorber.

  19. 3D ultrasound imaging in image-guided intervention.

    PubMed

    Fenster, Aaron; Bax, Jeff; Neshat, Hamid; Cool, Derek; Kakani, Nirmal; Romagnoli, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is used extensively in diagnosis and image-guidance for interventions of human diseases. However, conventional 2D ultrasound suffers from limitations since it can only provide 2D images of 3-dimensional structures in the body. Thus, measurement of organ size is variable, and guidance of interventions is limited, as the physician is required to mentally reconstruct the 3-dimensional anatomy using 2D views. Over the past 20 years, a number of 3-dimensional ultrasound imaging approaches have been developed. We have developed an approach that is based on a mechanical mechanism to move any conventional ultrasound transducer while 2D images are collected rapidly and reconstructed into a 3D image. In this presentation, 3D ultrasound imaging approaches will be described for use in image-guided interventions.

  20. Comparison of Ultrasound-Guided and Fluoroscopy-Assisted Antegrade Common Femoral Artery Puncture Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Michael M.; Goh, Gerard S.; Power, Sarah

    PurposeTo prospectively compare the procedural time and complication rates of ultrasound-guided and fluoroscopy-assisted antegrade common femoral artery (CFA) puncture techniques.Materials and MethodsHundred consecutive patients, undergoing a vascular procedure for which an antegrade approach was deemed necessary/desirable, were randomly assigned to undergo either ultrasound-guided or fluoroscopy-assisted CFA puncture. Time taken from administration of local anaesthetic to vascular sheath insertion in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), patients’ age, body mass index (BMI), fluoroscopy radiation dose, haemostasis method and immediate complications were recorded. Mean and median values were calculated and statistically analysed with unpaired t tests.ResultsSixty-nine male and 31 female patients underwent antegrademore » puncture (mean age 66.7 years). The mean BMI was 25.7 for the ultrasound-guided (n = 53) and 25.3 for the fluoroscopy-assisted (n = 47) groups. The mean time taken for the ultrasound-guided puncture was 7 min 46 s and for the fluoroscopy-assisted technique was 9 min 41 s (p = 0.021). Mean fluoroscopy dose area product in the fluoroscopy group was 199 cGy cm{sup 2}. Complications included two groin haematomas in the ultrasound-guided group and two retroperitoneal haematomas and one direct SFA puncture in the fluoroscopy-assisted group.ConclusionUltrasound-guided technique is faster and safer for antegrade CFA puncture when compared to the fluoroscopic-assisted technique alone.« less

  1. Ultrasound-guided central venous access using Google Glass.

    PubMed

    Wu, Teresa S; Dameff, Christian J; Tully, Jeffrey L

    2014-12-01

    The use of ultrasound during invasive bedside procedures is quickly becoming the standard of care. Ultrasound machine placement during procedures often requires the practitioner to turn their head during the procedure to view the screen. Such turning has been implicated in unintentional hand movements in novices. Google Glass is a head-mounted computer with a specialized screen capable of projecting images and video into the view of the wearer. Such technology may help decrease unintentional hand movements. Our aim was to evaluate whether or not medical practitioners at various levels of training could use Google Glass to perform an ultrasound-guided procedure, and to explore potential advantages of this technology. Forty participants of varying training levels were randomized into two groups. One group used Google Glass to perform an ultrasound-guided central line. The other group used traditional ultrasound during the procedure. Video recordings of eye and hand movements were analyzed. All participants from both groups were able to complete the procedure without difficulty. Google Glass wearers took longer to perform the procedure at all training levels (medical student year 1 [MS1]: 193 s vs. 77 s, p > 0.5; MS4: 197s vs. 91s, p ≤ 0.05; postgraduate year 1 [PGY1]: 288s vs. 125 s, p > 0.5; PGY3: 151 s vs. 52 s, p ≤ 0.05), and required more needle redirections (MS1: 4.4 vs. 2.0, p > 0.5; MS4: 4.8 vs. 2.8, p > 0.5; PGY1: 4.4 vs. 2.8, p > 0.5; PGY3: 2.0 vs. 1.0, p > 0.5). In this study, it was possible to perform ultrasound-guided procedures with Google Glass. Google Glass wearers, on average, took longer to gain access, and had more needle redirections, but less head movements were noted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and image fusion for procedures of liver interventions].

    PubMed

    Jung, E M; Clevert, D A

    2018-06-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is becoming increasingly important for the detection and characterization of malignant liver lesions and allows percutaneous treatment when surgery is not possible. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound image fusion with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) opens up further options for the targeted investigation of a modified tumor treatment. Ultrasound image fusion offers the potential for real-time imaging and can be combined with other cross-sectional imaging techniques as well as CEUS. With the implementation of ultrasound contrast agents and image fusion, ultrasound has been improved in the detection and characterization of liver lesions in comparison to other cross-sectional imaging techniques. In addition, this method can also be used for intervention procedures. The success rate of fusion-guided biopsies or CEUS-guided tumor ablation lies between 80 and 100% in the literature. Ultrasound-guided image fusion using CT or MRI data, in combination with CEUS, can facilitate diagnosis and therapy follow-up after liver interventions. In addition to the primary applications of image fusion in the diagnosis and treatment of liver lesions, further useful indications can be integrated into daily work. These include, for example, intraoperative and vascular applications as well applications in other organ systems.

  3. Image-guided endobronchial ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, William E.; Zang, Xiaonan; Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Byrnes, Patrick; Kuhlengel, Trevor; Bascom, Rebecca; Toth, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is now recommended as a standard procedure for in vivo verification of extraluminal diagnostic sites during cancer-staging bronchoscopy. Yet, physicians vary considerably in their skills at using EBUS effectively. Regarding existing bronchoscopy guidance systems, studies have shown their effectiveness in the lung-cancer management process. With such a system, a patient's X-ray computed tomography (CT) scan is used to plan a procedure to regions of interest (ROIs). This plan is then used during follow-on guided bronchoscopy. Recent clinical guidelines for lung cancer, however, also dictate using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for identifying suspicious ROIs and aiding in the cancer-staging process. While researchers have attempted to use guided bronchoscopy systems in tandem with PET imaging and EBUS, no true EBUS-centric guidance system exists. We now propose a full multimodal image-based methodology for guiding EBUS. The complete methodology involves two components: 1) a procedure planning protocol that gives bronchoscope movements appropriate for live EBUS positioning; and 2) a guidance strategy and associated system graphical user interface (GUI) designed for image-guided EBUS. We present results demonstrating the operation of the system.

  4. Emergency ultrasound-guided percutaneous embolization of post-traumatic bleeding hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Sameer; Ahuja, Chirag Kamal; Yadav, Thakur Deen; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2012-09-01

    Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm (HAP) is an uncommon but serious complication of blunt trauma abdomen which can be managed by non-surgical interventional methods. We describe the case of a young boy with blunt trauma abdomen having a large hepatic laceration associated with two pseudoaneurysms of the hepatic artery branches. Both these HAPs were successfully managed by percutaneous injection of cyanoacrylate glue under sonographic guidance. A major surgery was thus averted. A brief review of the etiology, diagnosis and management of HAP including the present case is discussed.

  5. Predictors and Long-Term Clinical Impact of Acute Stent Malapposition: An Assessment of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy With Drug-Eluting Stents (ADAPT-DES) Intravascular Ultrasound Substudy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Mintz, Gary S; Witzenbichler, Bernhard; Souza, Cristiano F; Metzger, D Christopher; Rinaldi, Michael J; Duffy, Peter L; Weisz, Giora; Stuckey, Thomas D; Brodie, Bruce R; Matsumura, Mitsuaki; Yamamoto, Myong-Hwa; Parvataneni, Rupa; Kirtane, Ajay J; Stone, Gregg W; Maehara, Akiko

    2016-12-22

    The impact of acute stent malapposition (ASM) on long-term clinical outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention is still controversial. We sought to evaluate predictors and long-term clinical outcomes of ASM. ADAPT-DES (Assessment of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy With Drug-Eluting Stents) was a prospective multicenter study of 8663 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention using drug-eluting stents. In a prespecified intravascular ultrasound-guided substudy, 2072 patients with 2446 culprit lesions had post-percutaneous coronary intervention intravascular ultrasound and were classified according to the presence or absence of ASM. After intravascular ultrasound-guided percutaneous coronary intervention, the overall prevalence of ASM after successful drug-eluting stents implantation was 14.4% per patient and 12.6% per lesion. Compared to lesions without ASM, lesions with ASM had larger in-stent lumen areas, larger stent areas, and larger in-stent vessel areas. A larger mean plaque area along with more attenuated plaque was observed in lesions with ASM versus lesions without ASM. Lesions with ASM had greater proximal and distal reference lumen areas and more distal, but not proximal, reference calcium compared to lesions without ASM. At 2-year follow-up, there was no significant difference in the incidence of cardiac death; myocardial infarction; early, late, or very late stent thrombosis; or clinically driven target lesion revascularization in patients with ASM versus those without ASM. Furthermore, ASM was not an independent predictor of 2-year major adverse cardiac events or target lesion revascularization even when forced into the multivariate model. In patients treated with intravascular ultrasound-guided drug-eluting stents implantation, ASM was not associated with adverse clinical events during long-term follow-up including, but not limited to, stent thrombosis. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00638794

  6. Guided percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.S.; McLoughlin, M.J.; Tao, L.C.

    1981-04-01

    Forty patients with suspected malignant disease of the liver underwent percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy with radioisotope scintigraphic and fluoroscopic guidance. The needle was aimed at focal defects identified on the liver scan and several passes were made. When the scan was diffusely abnormal, the liver was widely sampled with multiple passes. Thirty patients were eventually considered to have malignant disease and aspiration biopsy was positive in 28 (93%) of these patients, including 25 of 26 with liver metastases (96%). There were two false-positive results and one minor complication. In 24 patients, conventional wide-bore needle biopsy was also performed. In thismore » group, 16 patients had a final diagnosis of hepatic malignancy. Aspiration biopsies were positive in 14 of these (87%) and conventional needle biopsies were positive in four (25%). Guided percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy is recommended for pathologic diagnosis of hepatic malignancy because of its simplicity, high yield, and reasonable safety.« less

  7. Guided Interventions for Prostate Cancer Using 3D-Transurethral Ultrasound and MRI Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0461 TITLE: Guided Interventions for Prostate Cancer Using 3D-Transurethral Ultrasound and MRI Fusion PRINCIPAL...Sep 2014 - 28 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Guided Interventions for Prostate Cancer Using 3D- Transurethral Ultrasound and...Magnetic Resonance- Ultrasound (MR-US) fusion allows for specific targeting of the tumors in real-time during clinical interventions, outside of an MR

  8. Percutaneous Thermal Ablation with Ultrasound Guidance. Fusion Imaging Guidance to Improve Conspicuity of Liver Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Hakime, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com; Yevich, Steven; Tselikas, Lambros

    PurposeTo assess whether fusion imaging-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) can improve visibility and targeting of liver metastasis that were deemed inconspicuous on ultrasound (US).Materials and MethodsMWA of liver metastasis not judged conspicuous enough on US was performed under CT/US fusion imaging guidance. The conspicuity before and after the fusion imaging was graded on a five-point scale, and significance was assessed by Wilcoxon test. Technical success, procedure time, and procedure-related complications were evaluated.ResultsA total of 35 patients with 40 liver metastases (mean size 1.3 ± 0.4 cm) were enrolled. Image fusion improved conspicuity sufficiently to allow fusion-targeted MWA in 33 patients. The time requiredmore » for image fusion processing and tumors’ identification averaged 10 ± 2.1 min (range 5–14). Initial conspicuity on US by inclusion criteria was 1.2 ± 0.4 (range 0–2), while conspicuity after localization on fusion imaging was 3.5 ± 1 (range 1–5, p < 0.001). Technical success rate was 83% (33/40) in intention-to-treat analysis and 100% in analysis of treated tumors. There were no major procedure-related complications.ConclusionsFusion imaging broadens the scope of US-guided MWA to metastasis lacking adequate conspicuity on conventional US. Fusion imaging is an effective tool to increase the conspicuity of liver metastases that were initially deemed non visualizable on conventional US imaging.« less

  9. Percutaneous treatment of calculi in reconstructed bladder.

    PubMed

    Paez, Edgar; Reay, Emma; Murthy, L N S; Pickard, Robert S; Thomas, David J

    2007-03-01

    To report our results with percutaneous removal of calculi from reconstructed bladders. Twelve patients with reconstructed bladders who underwent endoscopic cystolithotomy were identified from our departmental database, and retrospective review of case notes and imaging was performed. Access was gained via an ultrasound-guided new tract in 9 patients (75%). An old suprapubic tract site was used in two patients, and the Mitrofanoff stoma was the route of access in one patient. The procedure was successful, with stone clearance achieved in all 12 cases. No major complications were observed. At a median follow up of 24 months, stone recurrence was observed in 5 patients (42%), 4 of whom underwent repeat procedures. Follow-up showed no change in continence in the patient with a Mitroffanoff stoma. Percutaneous cystolithotomy is a safe and effective minimally invasive option for removal of stones in a reconstructed bladder. We recommend endoscopic removal as the treatment of choice in these patients.

  10. Ultrasound guided double injection of blood into cisterna magna: a rabbit model for treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongchao; Zhu, Youzhi; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Zixuan; Lian, Juan; Luo, Fucheng; Deng, Xuefei; Wong, Kelvin K L

    2016-02-06

    Double injection of blood into cisterna magna using a rabbit model results in cerebral vasospasm. An unacceptably high mortality rate tends to limit the application of model. Ultrasound guided puncture can provide real-time imaging guidance for operation. The aim of this paper is to establish a safe and effective rabbit model of cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage with the assistance of ultrasound medical imaging. A total of 160 New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into four groups of 40 each: (1) manual control group, (2) manual model group, (3) ultrasound guided control group, and (4) ultrasound guided model group. The subarachnoid hemorrhage was intentionally caused by double injection of blood into their cisterna magna. Then, basilar artery diameters were measured using magnetic resonance angiography before modeling and 5 days after modeling. The depth of needle entering into cisterna magna was determined during the process of ultrasound guided puncture. The mortality rates in manual control group and model group were 15 and 23 %, respectively. No rabbits were sacrificed in those two ultrasound guided groups. We found that the mortality rate in ultrasound guided groups decreased significantly compared to manual groups. Compared with diameters before modeling, the basilar artery diameters after modeling were significantly lower in manual and ultrasound guided model groups. The vasospasm aggravated and the proportion of severe vasospasms was greater in ultrasound guided model group than that of manual group. In manual model group, no vasospasm was found in 8 % of rabbits. The ultrasound guided double injection of blood into cisterna magna is a safe and effective rabbit model for treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

  11. Bowel lesions: percutaneous US-guided 18-gauge needle biopsy--preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Tudor, G R; Rodgers, P M; West, K P

    1999-08-01

    Ultrasonography-guided percutaneous biopsy was performed with local anesthesia and an 18-gauge needle in 10 patients with bowel-wall lesions. All patients underwent clinical review within 1 month. Biopsy was diagnostic in all patients. There were no complications, and all patients tolerated the procedure well. The technique appears to be safe and had an excellent diagnostic yield in our series.

  12. Musculoskeletal ultrasound: how to treat calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff by ultrasound-guided single-needle lavage technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kenneth S; Rosas, Humberto G

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this video article is to illustrate the ultrasound appearance of calcium deposition in the rotator cuff and provide a detailed step-by-step protocol for performing the ultrasound-guided single-needle lavage technique for the treatment of calcific tendinitis with emphasis on patient positioning, necessary supplies, real-time lavage technique, and steroid injection into the subacromial subdeltoid bursa. Musculoskeletal ultrasound is well established as a safe, cost-effective imaging tool in diagnosing and treating common musculoskeletal disorders. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff is a common disabling cause of shoulder pain. Although most cases are self-limiting, a subset of patients is refractory to conservative therapy and requires treatment intervention. Ultrasound-guided lavage is an effective and safe minimally-invasive treatment not readily offered in the United States as an alternative to surgery, perhaps because of the limited prevalence of musculoskeletal ultrasound programs and limited training. On completion of this video article, the participant should be able to develop an appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for the treatment of calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff using ultrasound.

  13. Minimally Invasive Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Release: Preliminary Clinical Results.

    PubMed

    Henning, P Troy; Yang, Lynda; Awan, Tariq; Lueders, Daniel; Pourcho, Adam M

    2018-04-02

    Ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release was performed on 14 patients (18 wrists) using dynamic expansion of the transverse safe zone. Our patient population included able-bodied patients and those with impairments. The first 8 cases (12 wrists) underwent the procedure in an operating room, the remainder in an outpatient setting. No complications occurred, and all patients were able to immediately resume use of their hands without therapy. Improvements in the Quick Form of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand Index and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire at 3 months were comparable to results reported with mini-open and endoscopic release. Our results show that ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release can be safely and effectively performed in an outpatient setting. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  14. Percutaneous CT-Guided Treatment of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Sacroiliac Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Becce, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.becce@chuv.ch; Mouhsine, Elyazid; Mosimann, Pascal John

    2012-08-15

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a joint disorder that affects the articular cartilage and subchondral bone, most commonly at the knee. OCD of the sacroiliac joint is extremely rare. Management of OCD remains controversial, and surgery is often needed, especially when conservative treatment fails. We present a rare case of OCD involving the left sacroiliac joint successfully treated by percutaneous computed tomography-guided retrograde drilling and debridement.

  15. Technical success, technique efficacy and complications of minimally-invasive imaging-guided percutaneous ablation procedures of breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Giovanni; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Pescatori, Lorenzo Carlo; Fedeli, Maria Paola; Alì, Marco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    To systematically review studies concerning imaging-guided minimally-invasive breast cancer treatments. An online database search was performed for English-language articles evaluating percutaneous breast cancer ablation. Pooled data and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Technical success, technique efficacy, minor and major complications were analysed, including ablation technique subgroup analysis and effect of tumour size on outcome. Forty-five studies were analysed, including 1,156 patients and 1,168 lesions. Radiofrequency (n=577; 50%), microwaves (n=78; 7%), laser (n=227; 19%), cryoablation (n=156; 13%) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, n=129; 11%) were used. Pooled technical success was 96% (95%CI 94-97%) [laser=98% (95-99%); HIFU=96% (90-98%); radiofrequency=96% (93-97%); cryoablation=95% (90-98%); microwave=93% (81-98%)]. Pooled technique efficacy was 75% (67-81%) [radiofrequency=82% (74-88); cryoablation=75% (51-90); laser=59% (35-79); HIFU=49% (26-74)]. Major complications pooled rate was 6% (4-8). Minor complications pooled rate was 8% (5-13%). Differences between techniques were not significant for technical success (p=0.449), major complications (p=0.181) or minor complications (p=0.762), but significant for technique efficacy (p=0.009). Tumour size did not impact on variables (p>0.142). Imaging-guided percutaneous ablation techniques of breast cancer have a high rate of technical success, while technique efficacy remains suboptimal. Complication rates are relatively low. • Imaging-guided ablation techniques for breast cancer are 96% technically successful. • Overall technique efficacy rate is 75% but largely inhomogeneous among studies. • Overall major and minor complication rates are low (6-8%).

  16. The evaluation of radiologic methods for access guidance in percutaneous nephrolithotomy: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Breda, Alberto; Territo, Angelo; Scoffone, Cesare; Seitz, Christian; Knoll, Thomas; Herrmann, Thomas; Brehmer, Mariannhe; Osther, Palle J S; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2017-11-12

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) is the treatment of choice for larger and complex renal calculi. First step in performing PNL is to obtain access to the renal cavity using either fluoroscopy or ultrasound (US) guidance or a combination of both. Which guiding method to choose is controversial? A systematic review of the literature was performed comparing image guidance modalities for obtaining access in PNL. Evidence acquisition and synthesis: A PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane search for peer-reviewed studies was performed using the keywords "ultrasound" AND "fluoroscopy" AND "Percutaneous nephrolithotomy". Eligible articles were reviewed according to PRISMA criteria. Two hundred and forty records were identified using the keywords. Of these twelve studies were considered relevant. US guidance seems to be associated with a slightly lower complication rate, which may be related to fewer puncture attempts needed for obtaining access and to better peri-renal organ visualization. On the other hand, US-guidance alone needs the adjunct of fluoroscopy in a significant number of cases for achieving access. Stone free rate (SFR) was comparable between groups. Using US for renal access unequivocally reduces radiation exposure. Current evidence indicates that both fluoroscopy and US guidance may be successfully used for obtaining percutaneous renal access. Combining the image-guiding modalities - US and fluoroscopy - seems to increase outcome in PNL both with regard to success in achieving access and reducing complications. Furthermore, including US in the access strategy of PNL reduces radiation exposure to surgeon and staff as well as patients.

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Intervention for Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia: An Updated Review of Anatomy and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Abdallah El-Sayed; Khalil, Adham Aboul Fotouh; Eltawab, Basma Aly; Wu, Wei-Ting

    2018-01-01

    Orofacial myofascial pain is prevalent and most often results from entrapment of branches of the trigeminal nerves. It is challenging to inject branches of the trigeminal nerve, a large portion of which are shielded by the facial bones. Bony landmarks of the cranium serve as important guides for palpation-guided injections and can be delineated using ultrasound. Ultrasound also provides real-time images of the adjacent muscles and accompanying arteries and can be used to guide the needle to the target region. Most importantly, ultrasound guidance significantly reduces the risk of collateral injury to vital neurovascular structures. In this review, we aimed to summarize the regional anatomy and ultrasound-guided injection techniques for the trigeminal nerve and its branches, including the supraorbital, infraorbital, mental, auriculotemporal, maxillary, and mandibular nerves. PMID:29808105

  18. Sonographically guided percutaneous muscle biopsy in diagnosis of neuromuscular disease: a useful alternative to open surgical biopsy.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Paul J; Gorman, Grainne M; Hardiman, Orla M; Farrell, Michael J; Logan, P Mark

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of sonographically guided percutaneous muscle biopsy in the investigation of neuromuscular disorders. Sonographically guided percutaneous needle biopsy of skeletal muscle was performed with a 14-gauge core biopsy system in 40 patients over a 24-month period. Patients were referred from the Department of Neurology under investigation for neuromuscular disorders. Sonography was used to find suitable tissue and to avoid major vascular structures. A local anesthetic was applied below skin only. A 3- to 4-mm incision was made. Three 14-gauge samples were obtained from each patient. All samples were placed on saline-dampened gauze and sent for neuropathologic analysis. As a control, we retrospectively assessed results of the 40 most recent muscle samples acquired via open surgical biopsy. With the use of sonography, 32 (80%) of 40 patients had a histologic diagnosis made via percutaneous needle biopsy. This included 26 (93%) of 28 patients with acute muscular disease and 6 (50%) of 12 patients with chronic disease. In the surgical group (all acute disease), 38 (95%) of 40 patients had diagnostic tissue attained. Sonographically guided percutaneous 14-gauge core skeletal muscle biopsy is a useful procedure, facilitating diagnosis in acute muscular disease. It provides results comparable with those of open surgical biopsy in acute muscular disease. It may also be used in chronic muscular disease but repeated or open biopsy may be needed.

  19. US-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation for the treatment of solid benign hyperfunctioning or compressive thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Deandrea, Maurilio; Limone, Paolo; Basso, Edoardo; Mormile, Alberto; Ragazzoni, Federico; Gamarra, Elena; Spiezia, Stefano; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria; Molinari, Filippo; Garberoglio, Roberto

    2008-05-01

    The aim of the study was to define the effectiveness and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) thermal ablation in the treatment of compressive solid benign thyroid nodules. Thirty-one patients not eligible for surgery or radioiodine (131I) treatment underwent RF ablation for benign nodules; a total of 33 nodules were treated (2 patients had 2 nodules treated in the same session): 10 cold nodules and 23 hyperfunctioning. Fourteen patients complained of compressive symptoms. Nodule volume, thyroid function and compressive symptoms were evaluated before treatment and at 1, 3 and 6 mo. Ultrasound-guided RF ablation was performed using a Starbust RITA needle, with nine expandable prongs; total exposure time was 6 to 10 min at 95 degrees C in one area or more of the nodule. Baseline volume (measured at the time of RF ablation) was 27.7 +/- 21.5 mL (mean +/- SD), but significantly decreased during follow-up: 19.2 +/- 16.2 at 1 mo (-32.7%; p < 0.001), 15.9 +/- 14.1 mL at 3 mo (-46.4 %; p < 0.001) and 14.6 +/- 12.6 mL at 6 mo (-50.7%; p < 0.001). After treatment, all patients with cold nodules remained euthyroid: five patients with hot nodules normalized thyroid function, and the remaining sixteen showed a partial remission of hyperthyroidism. Besides a sensation of heat and mild swelling of the neck, no major complications were observed. Improvement in compressive symptoms was reported by 13 patients, with a reduction on severity scale from 6.1 +/- 1.4 to 2.2 +/- 1.9 (p < 0.0001). Radiofrequency was effective and safe in reducing volume by about 50% and compressive symptoms in large benign nodules. Hyperfunction was fully controlled in 24% of patients and partially reduced in the others.

  20. Rapid diagnosis of liver cancer by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy.

    PubMed

    Huber, K; Heuhold, N

    1987-01-01

    Because of the relatively favorable prognosis to the patient with early detected hepatocarcinoma followed by surgical treatment if resection is possible, it is important to differentiate quickly between primary and secondary liver cancer. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNAB) was used as a first diagnostic measure in patients with sonographic evidence of liver tumors. Biopsies were done under sonographic control and antiseptic conditions from the center and the border zone of solid tumors of the liver, and the aspirated cell material was air dried on glass slides and Giemsa stained. The cytologic diagnosis was proved by clinical course and in most cases by surgical or autoptic histology. Cytologic evaluation lead in 15 cases to the diagnosis of definitive or suspicious malignant liver disease; the sensitivity was 93% and the specificity was 87%. One case classified as suspicious for malignancy by cytologic examination could be identified as cirrhotic nodule by further investigations. In none of the patients did we find complications from the biopsy procedure. From these data it is concluded that US-FNAB can serve as a rapid, inexpensive, safe, and highly accurate first diagnostic step in patients with solid lesions of the liver.

  1. Endoscopic ultrasonography guided drainage: Summary of consortium meeting, May 21, 2012, San Diego, California

    PubMed Central

    Kahaleh, Michel; Artifon, Everson LA; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Gaidhane, Monica; Rondon, Carlos; Itoi, Takao; Giovannini, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the preferred procedure for biliary and pancreatic drainage. While ERCP is successful in about 95% of cases, a small subset of cases are unsuccessful due to altered anatomy, peri-ampullary pathology, or malignant obstruction. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage is a promising technique for biliary, pancreatic and recently gallbladder decompression, which provides multiple advantages over percutaneous or surgical biliary drainage. Multiple retrospective and some prospective studies have shown endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage to be safe and effective. Based on the currently reported literature, regardless of the approach, the cumulative success rate is 84%-93% with an overall complication rate of 16%-35%. endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage seems a viable therapeutic modality for failed conventional drainage when performed by highly skilled advanced endoscopists at tertiary centers with expertise in both echo-endoscopy and therapeutic endoscopy PMID:25624708

  2. Point-of-Care Ultrasonography Findings and Care Use Among Patients Undergoing Ultrasound-Guided Shoulder Injections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se Won; Tiu, Timothy; Roberts, Jeremy; Lee, Brian; Bartels, Matthew N; Oh-Park, Mooyeon

    2018-01-01

    The aims of the study were to assess the overall reduction of pain in patients undergoing ultrasound-guided shoulder injections and to characterize the preinjection point-of-care ultrasound findings and use of clinical services postinjection including the use of magnetic resonance imaging and surgeries. Data of 172 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided subacromial subdeltoid injection or glenohumeral joint injection were reviewed for preinjection point-of-care ultrasound findings, change in pain intensity at 2 mos from baseline, and use of care at 6 mos' postinjection. Pain intensity was measured by the numeric rating scale and a dichotomous report of global impression of significant improvement in pain. Responders were defined as those with 50% or more reduction in numeric rating scale or those with global impression of 50% or more improvement. There were 141 responders among the 172 patients analyzed. Full-thickness rotator cuff tears were higher in the ultrasound-guided subacromial subdeltoid injection group when compared with the glenohumeral joint injection group (P = 0.038) and abnormal bicipital tendon findings higher in the glenohumeral joint injection group (P = 0.016). There were no significant differences in specific abnormal U findings between responders versus nonresponders. Twelve patients had a shoulder magnetic resonance imaging and four patients underwent operative interventions after the injection. Overall pain reduction after ultrasound-guided shoulder injections was favorable in the short term. There was no specific preinjection point-of-care ultrasound findings associated with clinical pain reduction after injection. Additional imaging and operative intervention after ultrasound-guided shoulder injections seemed to be relatively low.

  3. MRI-guided focused ultrasound surgery in musculoskeletal diseases: the hot topics

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Alessandro; Sacconi, Beatrice; Battista, Giuseppe; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Catalano, Carlo; Albisinni, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    MRI-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is a minimally invasive treatment guided by the most sophisticated imaging tool available in today's clinical practice. Both the imaging and therapeutic sides of the equipment are based on non-ionizing energy. This technique is a very promising option as potential treatment for several pathologies, including musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders. Apart from clinical applications, MRgFUS technology is the result of long, heavy and cumulative efforts exploring the effects of ultrasound on biological tissues and function, the generation of focused ultrasound and treatment monitoring by MRI. The aim of this article is to give an updated overview on a “new” interventional technique and on its applications for MSK and allied sciences. PMID:26607640

  4. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: Current Status for Image-Guided Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Copelan, Alexander; Hartman, Jason; Chehab, Monzer; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an innovative therapeutic technology, permitting extracorporeal or endocavitary delivery of targeted thermal ablation while minimizing injury to the surrounding structures. While ultrasound-guided HIFU was the original image-guided system, MR-guided HIFU has many inherent advantages, including superior depiction of anatomic detail and superb real-time thermometry during thermoablation sessions, and it has recently demonstrated promising results in the treatment of both benign and malignant tumors. HIFU has been employed in the management of prostate cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, uterine leiomyomas, and breast tumors, and has been associated with success in limited studies for palliative pain management in pancreatic cancer and bone tumors. Nonthermal HIFU bioeffects, including immune system modulation and targeted drug/gene therapy, are currently being explored in the preclinical realm, with an emphasis on leveraging these therapeutic effects in the care of the oncology patient. Although still in its early stages, the wide spectrum of therapeutic capabilities of HIFU offers great potential in the field of image-guided oncologic therapy. PMID:26622104

  5. A successful model to learn and implement ultrasound-guided venous catheterization in apheresis.

    PubMed

    Gopalasingam, Nigopan; Thomsen, Anna-Marie Eller; Folkersen, Lars; Juhl-Olsen, Peter; Sloth, Erik

    2017-12-01

    Apheresis treatments can be performed with peripheral venous catheters (PVC), although central venous catheters (CVC) are inserted when PVCs fail or patient with history of difficult vascular access prior to the apheresis. Ultrasound guidance for PVC has shown promising results in other settings. To investigate if ultrasound guidance for PVC could be implemented among apheresis nurses. Second, how implementation of ultrasound guidance affected the number of CVCs used for apheresis per patient. Apheresis nurses completed a systematic training program for ultrasound-guided vascular access. All independent catheterizations were registered during the implementation stage. The number of CVCs in the pre- and postimplementation stages of the ultrasound guidance was compared. Six nurses completed the training program within a median of 48 days (range 38-83 days). In 77 patients, 485 independent ultrasound-guided PVC placements were performed during the implementation stage. All apheresis treatments (485/485) were accomplished using PVCs without requiring CVC as rescue. During the preimplementation stage, 125 of 273 (45.8%) procedures required a CVC for completion of apheresis procedures; during the postimplementation stage only 30 of 227 (13.2%) procedures required a CVC (p < 0.001). In the postimplementation stage, no CVCs were placed as rescue caused by failed PVCs but were only placed for patients where the ultrasound machine was unavailable. It indicates an effective success rate of 100% for ultrasound-guided PVC use. This study showed that ultrasound guidance could be implemented among apheresis nurses as a routine tool eliminating the need of CVC as a rescue. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bradford J.; Yanof, J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kruecker, J.; Bauer, C.; Seip, R.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.

    2006-05-01

    animals and humans for HIFU-induced ablation and drug delivery. Integrated CT-guided focused ultrasound holds promise for tissue ablation, enhancing local drug delivery, and CT thermometry for monitoring ablation in near real-time.

  7. Technical tips to perform safe and effective ultrasound guided steroid joint injections in children.

    PubMed

    Parra, Dimitri A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the technique used to perform ultrasound guided steroid joint injections in children in a group of joints that can be injected using ultrasound as the only image guidance modality. The technique is described and didactic figures are provided to illustrate key technical concepts. It is very important to be familiar with the sonographic appearance of the pediatric joints and the developing bone when performing ultrasound-guided joint injections in children.

  8. Ultrasound-guided greater occipital nerve blocks and pulsed radiofrequency ablation for diagnosis and treatment of occipital neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Vanderhoek, Matthew David; Hoang, Hieu T; Goff, Brandon

    2013-09-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a condition manifested by chronic occipital headaches and is thought to be caused by irritation or trauma to the greater occipital nerve (GON). Treatment for occipital neuralgia includes medications, nerve blocks, and pulsed radiofrequency ablation (PRFA). Landmark-guided GON blocks are the mainstay in both the diagnosis and treatment of occipital neuralgia. Ultrasound is being utilized more and more in the chronic pain clinic to guide needle advancement when performing procedures; however, there are no reports of ultrasound used to guide a diagnostic block or PRFA of the GON. We report two cases in which ultrasound was used to guide diagnostic greater occipital nerve blocks and greater occipital nerve pulsed radiofrequency ablation for treatment of occipital neuralgia. Two patients with occipital headaches are presented. In Case 1, ultrasound was used to guide diagnostic blocks of the greater occipital nerves. In Case 2, ultrasound was utilized to guide placement of radiofrequency probes for pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the greater occipital nerves. Both patients reported immediate, significant pain relief, with continued pain relief for several months. Further study is needed to examine any difference in outcomes or morbidity between the traditional landmark method versus ultrasound-guided blocks and pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the greater occipital nerves.

  9. Ultrasound-Guided Greater Occipital Nerve Blocks and Pulsed Radiofrequency Ablation for Diagnosis and Treatment of Occipital Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    VanderHoek, Matthew David; Hoang, Hieu T; Goff, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a condition manifested by chronic occipital headaches and is thought to be caused by irritation or trauma to the greater occipital nerve (GON). Treatment for occipital neuralgia includes medications, nerve blocks, and pulsed radiofrequency ablation (PRFA). Landmark-guided GON blocks are the mainstay in both the diagnosis and treatment of occipital neuralgia. Ultrasound is being utilized more and more in the chronic pain clinic to guide needle advancement when performing procedures; however, there are no reports of ultrasound used to guide a diagnostic block or PRFA of the GON. We report two cases in which ultrasound was used to guide diagnostic greater occipital nerve blocks and greater occipital nerve pulsed radiofrequency ablation for treatment of occipital neuralgia. Two patients with occipital headaches are presented. In Case 1, ultrasound was used to guide diagnostic blocks of the greater occipital nerves. In Case 2, ultrasound was utilized to guide placement of radiofrequency probes for pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the greater occipital nerves. Both patients reported immediate, significant pain relief, with continued pain relief for several months. Further study is needed to examine any difference in outcomes or morbidity between the traditional landmark method versus ultrasound-guided blocks and pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the greater occipital nerves. PMID:24282778

  10. MLESAC Based Localization of Needle Insertion Using 2D Ultrasound Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fei; Gao, Dedong; Wang, Shan; Zhanwen, A.

    2018-04-01

    In the 2D ultrasound image of ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle insertions, it is difficult to determine the positions of needle axis and tip because of the existence of artifacts and other noises. In this work the speckle is regarded as the noise of an ultrasound image, and a novel algorithm is presented to detect the needle in a 2D ultrasound image. Firstly, the wavelet soft thresholding technique based on BayesShrink rule is used to denoise the speckle of ultrasound image. Secondly, we add Otsu’s thresholding method and morphologic operations to pre-process the ultrasound image. Finally, the localization of the needle is identified and positioned in the 2D ultrasound image based on the maximum likelihood estimation sample consensus (MLESAC) algorithm. The experimental results show that it is valid for estimating the position of needle axis and tip in the ultrasound images with the proposed algorithm. The research work is hopeful to be used in the path planning and robot-assisted needle insertion procedures.

  11. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection of genicular artery pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Rachakonda, Aditya; Qato, Khalil; Khaddash, Tamim; Carroccio, Alfio; Pamoukian, Vicken; Giangola, Gary

    2015-07-01

    Pseudoaneurysm is a rare complication after arthroscopic procedures involving the knee. A 38-year-old man presented 1 month after right-knee arthroscopy with a 2-cm pulsating mass on the medial side of the right knee. Duplex ultrasound evaluation revealed 2.5 × 2.1-cm pseudoaneurysm just distal to the patella with arterialized flow communicating with the inferior medial genicular artery. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection was performed in an office setting, and the resolution of active flow within the pseudoaneurysm was confirmed with duplex ultrasonography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia Simulation Training: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao Xu; Trivedi, Vatsal; AlSaflan, AbdulHadi A; Todd, Suzanne Clare; Tricco, Andrea C; McCartney, Colin J L; Boet, Sylvain

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) has become the criterion standard of regional anesthesia practice. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia teaching programs often use simulation, and guidelines have been published to help guide URGA education. This systematic review aimed to examine the effectiveness of simulation-based education for the acquisition and maintenance of competence in UGRA. Studies identified in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ERIC were included if they assessed simulation-based UGRA teaching with outcomes measured at Kirkpatrick level 2 (knowledge and skills), 3 (transfer of learning to the workplace), or 4 (patient outcomes). Two authors independently reviewed all identified references for eligibility, abstracted data, and appraised quality. After screening 176 citations and 45 full-text articles, 12 studies were included. Simulation-enhanced training improved knowledge acquisition (Kirkpatrick level 2) when compared with nonsimulation training. Seven studies measuring skill acquisition (Kirkpatrick level 2) found that simulation-enhanced UGRA training was significantly more effective than alternative teaching methods or no intervention. One study measuring transfer of learning into the clinical setting (Kirkpatrick level 3) found no difference between simulation-enhanced UGRA training and non-simulation-based training. However, this study was discontinued early because of technical challenges. Two studies examined patient outcomes (Kirkpatrick level 4), and one of these found that simulation-based UGRA training improved patient outcomes compared with didactic teaching. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia knowledge and skills significantly improved with simulation training. The acquired UGRA skills may be transferred to the clinical setting; however, further studies are required to confirm these changes translate to improved patient outcomes.

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided transesophageal thoracentesis for minimal pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Rana, Surinder Singh; Sharma, Ravi; Gupta, Rajesh

    2018-06-19

    Pleural effusion is a common finding both in patients with benign and malignant diseases of pleura and lung with diagnostic thoracentesis establishing the diagnosis in the majority of cases. The diagnostic thoracentesis can be done either blindly or under the guidance of ultrasound or computed tomography. However, minimal pleural effusion is difficult to sample even under image guidance. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is known to detect smaller volume of pleural effusion and, thus, can help in guiding thoracentesis. To analyze the safety and efficacy of EUS-guided diagnostic thoracentesis in patients with undiagnosed minimal pleural effusion retrospectively. Retrospective analysis of the data of patients with minimal pleural effusion, who underwent EUS-guided transesophageal diagnostic thoracentesis over last 2 years, was performed. Thirteen patients (11 male; mean age 46.7 ± 16.2 years) with undiagnosed minimal pleural effusion underwent successful EUS-guided transesophageal diagnostic thoracentesis using a 22-G needle. Seven (53%) patients had fever on presentation whereas two presented with cough and loss of appetite. Eight to 54 mL fluid was aspirated with an attempt to completely empty the pleural cavity. There were no complications of the procedure. EUS-guided diagnostic thoracentesis is a safe and effective alternative for evaluating patients with minimal pleural effusion.

  14. Real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia using the SonixGPS ultrasound guidance system: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Niazi, A U; Chin, K J; Jin, R; Chan, V W

    2014-08-01

    Real-time ultrasound-guided neuraxial blockade remains a largely experimental technique. SonixGPS® is a new needle tracking system that displays needle tip position on the ultrasound screen. We investigated if this novel technology might aid performance of real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia. Twenty patients with body mass index < 35 kg/m(2) undergoing elective total joint arthroplasty under spinal anesthesia were recruited. Patients with previous back surgery and spinal abnormalities were excluded. Following a pre-procedural ultrasound scan, a 17G proprietary needle-sensor assembly was inserted in-plane to the transducer in four patients and out-of-plane in 16 patients. In both approaches, the trajectory of insertion was adjusted in real-time until the needle tip lay just superficial to the ligamentum flavum-dura mater complex. At this point, a 25G 120 mm Whitacre spinal needle was inserted through the 17G SonixGPS® needle. Successful dural puncture was confirmed by backflow of cerebrospinal fluid from the spinal needle. An overall success rate of 14/20 (70%) was seen with two failures (50%) and four failures (25%) in the in-plane and out-of-plane groups respectively. Dural puncture was successful on the first skin puncture in 71% of patients and in a single needle pass in 57% of patients. The median total procedure time was 16.4 and 11.1 min in the in-plane and out-of-plane groups respectively. The SonixGPS® system simplifies real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia to a large extent, especially the out-of-plane approach. Nevertheless, it remains a complex multi-step procedure that requires time, specialized equipment, and a working knowledge of spinal sonoanatomy. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Ultrasound-guided synovial Tru-cut biopsy: indications, technique, and outcome in 111 cases.

    PubMed

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Griffith, James F; Lai, Fernand M; Hui, Mamie; Chiu, K H; Lee, Ryan K L; Ng, Alex W H; Leung, Jason

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. Clinical notes, pathology and microbiology reports, ultrasound and other imaging studies of 100 patients who underwent 111 ultrasound-guided synovial biopsies were reviewed. Biopsies were compared with the final clinical diagnosis established after synovectomy (n = 43) or clinical/imaging follow-up (n = 57) (mean 30 months). Other than a single vasovagal episode, no complication of synovial biopsy was encountered. One hundred and seven (96 %) of the 111 biopsies yielded synovium histologically. Pathology ± microbiology findings for these 107 conclusive biopsies comprised synovial tumour (n = 30, 28 %), synovial infection (n = 18, 17 %), synovial inflammation (n = 45, 42 %), including gouty arthritis (n = 3), and no abnormality (n = 14, 13 %). The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of synovial biopsy was 99 %, 97 %, and 100 % for synovial tumour; 100 %, 100 %, and 100 % for native joint infection; and 78 %, 45 %, and 100 % for prosthetic joint infection. False-negative synovial biopsy did not seem to be related to antibiotic therapy. Ultrasound-guided Tru-cut synovial biopsy is a safe and reliable technique with a high diagnostic yield for diagnosing synovial tumour and also, most likely, for joint infection. Regarding joint infection, synovial biopsy of native joints seems to have a higher diagnostic yield than that for infected prosthetic joints. • Ultrasound-guided Tru-cut synovial biopsy has high accuracy (99 %) for diagnosing synovial tumour. • It has good accuracy, sensitivity, and high specificity for diagnosis of joint infection. • Synovial biopsy of native joints works better than biopsy of prosthetic joints. • A negative synovial biopsy culture from a native joint largely excludes septic arthritis. • Ultrasound-guided Tru-cut synovial biopsy is a safe and well-tolerated procedure.

  16. Consistent evaluation of an ultrasound-guided surgical navigation system by utilizing an active validation platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Kim, Sungmin; Boctor, Emad M.

    2017-03-01

    An ultrasound image-guided needle tracking systems have been widely used due to their cost-effectiveness and nonionizing radiation properties. Various surgical navigation systems have been developed by utilizing state-of-the-art sensor technologies. However, ultrasound transmission beam thickness causes unfair initial evaluation conditions due to inconsistent placement of the target with respect to the ultrasound probe. This inconsistency also brings high uncertainty and results in large standard deviations for each measurement when we compare accuracy with and without the guidance. To resolve this problem, we designed a complete evaluation platform by utilizing our mid-plane detection and time of flight measurement systems. The evaluating system uses a PZT element target and an ultrasound transmitting needle. In this paper, we evaluated an optical tracker-based surgical ultrasound-guided navigation system whereby the optical tracker tracks marker frames attached on the ultrasound probe and the needle. We performed ten needle trials of guidance experiment with a mid-plane adjustment algorithm and with a B-mode segmentation method. With the midplane adjustment, the result showed a mean error of 1.62+/-0.72mm. The mean error increased to 3.58+/-2.07mm without the mid-plane adjustment. Our evaluation system can reduce the effect of the beam-thickness problem, and measure ultrasound image-guided technologies consistently with a minimal standard deviation. Using our novel evaluation system, ultrasound image-guided technologies can be compared under equal initial conditions. Therefore, the error can be evaluated more accurately, and the system provides better analysis on the error sources such as ultrasound beam thickness.

  17. Actual Time Required for Dynamic Fluoroscopic Intraoperative Cholangiography

    PubMed Central

    Whitwam, Paul; Turner, David; Kennedy, Kathy; Hashmi, Syed

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This study was undertaken to determine the actual amount of time a dynamic fluoroscopic intraoperative cholangiogram adds to a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A secondary objective was to define the information gained from this procedure. Methods: A consecutive case study of 52 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy was used. Time was recorded from placement of a laparoscopic hemoclip across the cystic duct at its junction with the gallbladder until successful completion of the intraoperative cholangiogram. The mean, median, and range of times for these cases, as well as the results and false-negative rates, were determined. Results: Cholangiography was successfully completed in 96% of patients. The mean time added to laparoscopic cholecystectomy by the addition of dynamic fluoroscopic intraoperative cholangiography was 4.3 minutes. The median time was 3.0 minutes. The times ranged from 2.0 minutes to 16.0 minutes. Choledocholithiasis was present in 15.4% of these patients. The false-positive rate was zero in this study. Conclusions: Dynamic fluoroscopic intraoperative cholangiogram was fast and efficient. The information gained was significant in that 15% of patients proceeded on to laparoscopic common bile duct exploration. We conclude that intraoperative cholangiography should be a routine addition to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:15984705

  18. Role of ultrasonography in percutaneous renal access in patients with renal anatomic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Penbegul, Necmettin; Hatipoglu, Namik Kemal; Bodakci, Mehmet Nuri; Atar, Murat; Bozkurt, Yasar; Sancaktutar, Ahmet Ali; Tepeler, Abdulkadir

    2013-05-01

    To present our experience regarding the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy in anatomically abnormal kidneys. We performed US-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy in 15 patients with anatomically abnormal kidneys and renal calculi. Of the 15 patients, 5 had horseshoe kidneys, 5 had rotation anomalies, 2 had kyphoscoliosis, and 3 had scoliosis. The stone size, number of access tracts, operative time, hospitalization duration, rate of stone clearance, and complication rate were recorded. Percutaneous access was achieved with US guidance in the operating room by the urologist. Successful renal access was obtained by the surgeon using US guidance in all patients, and a single access was obtained in all cases. Of the 15 patients, 8 were females, and 7 were males; 8 patients had solitary stones, and 7 had multiple calculi. The renal calculi were on the right in 7 patients and on the left in 8. Three patients had previously undergone unsuccessful shock wave lithotripsy. Complete stone clearance was achieved in 13 patients. The mean operative time was 54.2 minutes. No patient required a blood transfusion because of bleeding. Urinary tract infections occurred in 2 patients, who were treated with antibiotics. A double-J catheter was not inserted in any patient; however, a ureteral catheter was used in 3 patients for 1 day. None of the patients had any major complications during the postoperative period. The stone-free rate was 87%, and 2 patients had clinically insignificant residual fragments. Our results have demonstrated that US-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy can be performed feasibly, safely, and effectively in anatomically abnormal kidneys. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Conventional Landmark-Guided Midline Versus Preprocedure Ultrasound-Guided Paramedian Techniques in Spinal Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kallidaikurichi Srinivasan, Karthikeyan; Iohom, Gabriella; Loughnane, Frank; Lee, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    Multiple passes and attempts while administering spinal anesthesia are associated with a greater incidence of postdural puncture headache, paraesthesia, and spinal hematoma. We hypothesized that the routine use of a preprocedural ultrasound-guided paramedian technique for spinal anesthesia would reduce the number of passes required to achieve entry into the subarachnoid space when compared with the conventional landmark-guided midline approach. One hundred consenting patients scheduled for elective total joint replacements (hip and knee) were randomized into group C (conventional) and group P (preprocedural ultrasound-guided paramedian technique) with 50 in each group. The patients were blinded to the study group. All spinal anesthetics were administered by a consultant anesthesiologist. In group C, spinal anesthetic was done via the midline approach using clinically palpated landmarks. In group P, a preprocedural ultrasound scan was used to mark the paramedian insertion site, and spinal anesthetic was performed via the paramedian approach. The average number of passes (defined as the number of forward advancements of the spinal needle in a given interspinous space, i.e., withdrawal and redirection of spinal needle without exiting the skin) in group P was approximately 0.34 times that in group C, a difference that was statistically significant (P = 0.01). Similarly, the average number of attempts (defined as the number of times the spinal needle was withdrawn from the skin and reinserted) in group P was approximately 0.25 times that of group C (P = 0.0021). In group P, on an average, it took 81.5 (99% confidence interval, 68.4-97 seconds) seconds longer to identify the landmarks than in group C (P = 0.0002). All other parameters, including grading of palpated landmarks, time taken for spinal anesthetic injection, periprocedural pain scores, periprocedural patient discomfort visual analog scale score, conversion to general anesthetic, paresthesia, and radicular pain

  20. Radiofrequency Ablation Followed by Percutaneous Ethanol Ablation Leading to Long-Term Remission of Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Arun S.; Nazar, P. K.; Moorthy, Srikanth; Kumar, Harish; Nair, Vasantha; Pavithran, Praveen Valiyaparambil; Bhavani, Nisha; Menon, Vadayath Usha; Abraham, Nithya; Jayakumar, R. Vasukutty

    2017-01-01

    A 30-year-old male with cerebral palsy and motor impairment presented with right femur fracture. He had gradually worsening mobility and contractures of all extremities for the preceding 5 years. Evaluation showed multiple vertebral and femoral fractures, severe osteoporosis, a large parathyroid adenoma, and parathormone (PTH) exceeding 2500 pg/mL. Because of poor general health and high anesthetic risk, parathyroidectomy was deemed impractical. Ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) helped achieve 50% size reduction and PTH levels with better control of hypercalcemia. Later, as calcium and PTH remained elevated, percutaneous ethanol ablation was performed with resultant normalization of PTH and substantial symptomatic improvement. Two years later, he still remains normocalcaemic with normal PTH levels. We propose that RFA and percutaneous ethanol ablation be considered as effective short-term options for surgically difficult cases, which could even help achieve long-term remission. Although not previously reported, our case illustrates that both RFA and percutaneous ethanol ablation could be safely performed successively achieving long-term remission. PMID:29264521

  1. Sonographically guided percutaneous needle tenotomy for treatment of common extensor tendinosis in the elbow.

    PubMed

    McShane, John M; Nazarian, Levon N; Harwood, Marc I

    2006-10-01

    Chronic tendinosis of the common extensor tendon of the lateral elbow can be a difficult problem to treat. We report our experience with sonographically guided percutaneous needle tenotomy to relieve pain and improve function in patients with this condition. We performed sonographically guided percutaneous needle tenotomy on 58 consecutive patients who had persistent pain and disability resulting from common extensor tendinosis. Under a local anesthetic and sonographic guidance, a needle was advanced into the common extensor tendon, and the tip of the needle was used to repeatedly fenestrate the tendinotic tissue. Calcifications, if present, were mechanically fragmented, and the adjacent bony surface of the apex and face of the epicondyle were abraded. Finally, the fenestrated tendon was infiltrated with a solution containing corticosteroid mixed with bupivacaine. After the procedure, patients were instructed to perform passive stretches and to undergo physical therapy. During a subsequent telephone interview, patients answered questions about their experience, their functioning level, and their perceptions of procedure outcome. Fifty-five (95%) of 58 patients were contacted by telephone and agreed to participate in the study. Thirty-five (63.6%) of 55 respondents reported excellent outcomes, 16.4% good, 7.3% fair, and 12.7% poor. The average follow-up time from the date of the procedure to the date of the interview was 28 months (range, 17-44 months). No adverse events were reported; 85.5% stated that they would refer a friend or close relative for the procedure. Sonographically guided percutaneous needle tenotomy for lateral elbow tendinosis is a safe, effective, and viable alternative for patients in whom all other nonsurgical treatments failed.

  2. Transthoracic Echocardiography-Guided Percutaneous Patent Ductus Arteriosus Occlusion: A New Strategy for Interventional Treatment.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiang-Bin; Ouyang, Wen-Bin; Wang, Shou-Zheng; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Da-Wei; Zhang, Feng-Wen; Pang, Kun-Jing; Zhang, Zhe; Hu, Sheng-Shou

    2016-07-01

    Percutaneous patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) occlusion has become the preferred therapeutic option, which uses fluoroscopy as the guidance. To reduce the x-ray exposure, PDA occlusion using the Amplatzer Duct Occluder II (ADO II) under guidance of transthoracic echocardiography only was conducted. This single center study aims to access the safety and efficiency of this new strategy. From June 2013 to May 2015, 63 consecutive PDA patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography-guided PDA occlusion through the femoral artery. Outpatient follow-up was conducted at 1, 3, and 6 months, and yearly. Sixty-two patients successfully underwent echocardiography-guided percutaneous PDA occlusion. One patient was converted to minimally invasive transthoracic occlusion due to failure of delivery sheath passage through tortuous PDA. Mean procedure duration was 24.3 ± 7.0 minutes; ADO II diameter averaged 4.6 ± 0.9 mm; 8 cases showed traces of residual shunt immediately after operation which resolved after 24 hours; and mean hospital stay was 3.4 ± 0.5 days. There was no occluder migration, hemolysis, pericardial effusion, pulmonary branch or aortic stenosis at mean 13.5 ± 4.8 months follow-up. This study demonstrated that percutaneous PDA occlusion can be successfully performed under guidance of transthoracic echocardiography only and appears safe and effective while avoiding radiation and contrast agent use. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Ultrasound-guided interventional therapy for recurrent ovarian chocolate cysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Lu; Dong, Xiao-Qiu; Shao, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Si-Ming

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided interventional therapy in the treatment of postoperative recurrent chocolate cysts. The 198 patients enrolled in this study were divided into three groups. In group 1, the saline washing group, the cavity of the cyst was washed thoroughly with warm saline. In group 2, the ethanol short-time retention group, after washing with saline, the cyst was injected with 95% ethanol with a volume of half of the fluid aspirated from the cyst. Ten minutes later, the rest of the ethanol was aspirated. In group 3, the ethanol retention group, the procedures were the same as with the ethanol short-time retention group, except that 95% of the ethanol was retained in the cyst. An ultrasound examination was performed in the third, sixth and 12th months after therapy. The chocolate cyst cure rate was significantly higher in the ethanol retention group (96%, 66/69) than in the ethanol short-time retention group (82%, 56/68) and no case was cured in the first group (saline washing). We conclude that ultrasound-guided injection and 95% ethanol retention are an effective therapy for the treatment of postoperative recurrent chocolate cysts. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. In-line positioning of ultrasound images using wireless remote display system with tablet computer facilitates ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Masahiko; Mizutani, Koh; Funai, Yusuke; Nakamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided procedures may be easier to perform when the operator's eye axis, needle puncture site, and ultrasound image display form a straight line in the puncture direction. However, such methods have not been well tested in clinical settings because that arrangement is often impossible due to limited space in the operating room. We developed a wireless remote display system for ultrasound devices using a tablet computer (iPad Mini), which allows easy display of images at nearly any location chosen by the operator. We hypothesized that the in-line layout of ultrasound images provided by this system would allow for secure and quick catheterization of the radial artery. We enrolled first-year medical interns (n = 20) who had no prior experience with ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization to perform that using a short-axis out-of-plane approach with two different methods. With the conventional method, only the ultrasound machine placed at the side of the head of the patient across the targeted forearm was utilized. With the tablet method, the ultrasound images were displayed on an iPad Mini positioned on the arm in alignment with the operator's eye axis and needle puncture direction. The success rate and time required for catheterization were compared between the two methods. Success rate was significantly higher (100 vs. 70 %, P = 0.02) and catheterization time significantly shorter (28.5 ± 7.5 vs. 68.2 ± 14.3 s, P < 0.001) with the tablet method as compared to the conventional method. An ergonomic straight arrangement of the image display is crucial for successful and quick completion of ultrasound-guided arterial catheterization. The present remote display system is a practical method for providing such an arrangement.

  5. Success of ultrasound-guided versus landmark-guided arthrocentesis of hip, ankle, and wrist in a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Berona, Kristin; Abdi, Amin; Menchine, Michael; Mailhot, Tom; Kang, Tarina; Seif, Dina; Chilstrom, Mikaela

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate emergency medicine resident-performed ultrasound for diagnosis of effusions, compare the success of a landmark-guided (LM) approach with an ultrasound-guided (US) technique for hip, ankle and wrist arthrocentesis, and compare change in provider confidence with LM and US arthrocentesis. After a brief video on LM and US arthrocentesis, residents were asked to identify artificially created effusions in the hip, ankle and wrist in a cadaver model and to perform US and LM arthrocentesis of the effusions. Outcomes included success of joint aspiration, time to aspiration, and number of attempts. Residents were surveyed regarding their confidence in identifying effusions with ultrasound and performing LM and US arthrocentesis. Eighteen residents completed the study. Sensitivity of ultrasound for detecting joint effusion was 86% and specificity was 90%. Residents were successful with ultrasound in 96% of attempts and with landmark 89% of attempts (p=0.257). Median number of attempts was 1 with ultrasound and 2 with landmarks (p=0.12). Median time to success with ultrasound was 38s and 51s with landmarks (p=0.23). After the session, confidence in both US and LM arthrocentesis improved significantly, however the post intervention confidence in US arthrocentesis was higher than LM (4.3 vs. 3.8, p<0.001). EM residents were able to successfully identify joint effusions with ultrasound, however we were unable to detect significant differences in actual procedural success between the two modalities. Further studies are needed to define the role of ultrasound for arthrocentesis in the emergency department. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhanced Lesion Visualization in Image-Guided Noninvasive Surgery With Ultrasound Phased Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    81, 1995. [4] N. Sanghvi et al., “Noninvasive surgery of prostate tissue by high-intensity focused ultrasound ,” IEEE Trans. UFFC, vol. 43, no. 6, pp...ENHANCED LESION VISUALIZATION IN IMAGE-GUIDED NONINVASIVE SURGERY WITH ULTRASOUND PHASED ARRAYS Hui Yao, Pornchai Phukpattaranont and Emad S. Ebbini...Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Minnesota Minneapolis, MN 55455 Abstract- We describe dual-mode ultrasound phased

  7. Ultrasound-guided injection of triamcinolone and bupivacaine in the management of De Quervain's disease.

    PubMed

    Jeyapalan, Kanagaratnam; Choudhary, Surabhi

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the technique and usefulness of ultrasound-guided intrasynovial injection of triamcinolone and bupivacaine in treatment of de Quervain's disease. A total of 17 patients with symptomatic De Quervain's disease were included in this study. The procedure involved confirmation of diagnosis with ultrasound followed by guided injection of a mixture of 20 mg of triamcinolone (40 mg/ml) and 1 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. Ultrasound guidance with a high resolution 15-Mhz footprint probe was used for injection into the first dorsal extensor compartment tendon sheath (E1). The response to ultrasound-guided injection was ascertained at the post procedure outpatient clinic appointment according to the follow-up clinic notes. There were 14 female and 3 male patients aged 29 to 74 years. Mean duration of symptoms was 8.9 months. One patient had an atypical septum in the first extensor compartment and the extensor pollicis brevis alone was involved. The mean post-injection follow-up was at 6.75 weeks. One patient was lost to follow-up. Fifteen out of 16 patients had significant symptomatic relief (93.75%). There were no immediate or delayed complications. Recurrence of symptoms was seen in 3 (20%) patients. Ultrasound-guided injection of triamcinolone and bupivacaine is safe and useful in controlling symptoms of De Quervain's disease. Correct needle placement with ultrasound guidance avoids intratendinous injection as well as local complications like fat atrophy and depigmentation.

  8. [Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block for upper abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Osaka, Yoshimune; Kashiwagi, Masanori; Nagatsuka, Yukio; Oosaku, Masayoshi; Hirose, Chikako

    2010-08-01

    Upper abdominal surgery leads to severe postoperative pain. Insufficient postoperative analgesia accompanies a high incidence of complications. Therefore, postoperative analgesia is very important. The epidural analgesia has many advantages. However it has a high risk of epidural hematoma in anticoagulated patients. Rectus sheath block provided safer and more reliable analgesia in recent years, by the development of ultrasound tools. We experienced two cases of the rectus sheath block in upper abdominal surgery under ultrasound guidance. Ultrasound guided rectus sheath block can reduce the risk of peritoneal puncture, bleeding, and other complications. Rectus sheath block is very effective to reduce postoperative pain in upper abdominal surgery as an alternative method to epidural anesthesia in anticoagulated patients.

  9. The advent of ultrasound-guided ablation techniques in nodular thyroid disease: towards a patient-tailored approach.

    PubMed

    Papini, Enrico; Pacella, Claudio M; Misischi, Irene; Guglielmi, Rinaldo; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Døssing, Helle; Hegedus, Laszlo

    2014-08-01

    Surgery is the long-established therapeutic option for benign thyroid nodules, which steadily grow and become symptomatic. The cost of thyroid surgery, the risk of temporary or permanent complications, and the effect on quality of life, however, remain relevant concerns. Therefore, various minimally invasive treatments, directed towards office-based management of symptomatic nodules, without requiring general anaesthesia, and with negligible damage to the skin and cervical tissues, have been proposed during the past two decades. Today, ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol injection and thermal ablation with laser or radiofrequency have been thoroughly evaluated, and are accessible procedures in specialized centres. In clinical practice, relapsing thyroid cysts are effectively managed with percutaneous ethanol injection treatment, which should be considered therapy of choice. In solid non-functioning thyroid nodules that grow or become symptomatic, trained operators may safely induce, with a single session of laser ablation treatment or radiofrequency ablation, a 50% volume decrease and, in parallel, improve local symptoms. In contrast, hyperfunctioning nodules remain best treated with radioactive iodine, which results in a better control of hyperthyroidism, also in the long-term, and fewer side-effects. Currently, minimally invasive treatment is also investigated for achieving local control of small size neck recurrences of papillary thyroid carcinoma in patients who are poor candidates for repeat cervical lymph node dissection. This particular use should still be considered experimental. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasound-guided interventional PDT of liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chaoying; Yang, Dong; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Huijuan; Huang, Muyin; Chen, Ji; Lu, Guorong

    1996-09-01

    Thirty patients with advanced liver cancer were treated by interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT). These included 28 hepatocellular carcinoma and two adenocarcinoma, 19 primary tumors and 11 recurred follow other treatments. The diameter of tumors were 7-10cm in 13 cases and 10-16cm in 17 cases. In this study, an argon laser pumped dye laser system was used to give a CW laser beam at 630 nm which was split and coupled into there optical fibers. The patients were injected intravenously with photosensitizer hematoporphyrin derivative at a dose of 5mg/kg body weight 48 hours before PDT. Then the fibers were inserted into tumor by ultrasound- guided percutaneous puncture. The inserted irradiation points were spaced in entire tumor with the light release power 300mW and the irradiation time 12 minutes per point. Total 52 treatments were performed in 30 patients. Among them, 14 cases were treated only one time and 16 cases via 2-3 times. The follow-up was carried out in 25 cases for 12- 24 months. The results show that significant remission was 22 percent in those patients by only one treatment and 62 percent in those via 2 to 3 treatments. The shrink rate of tumor size was over 90 percent in five of six cases after treatment 3. The survival time has been over one year in 12 cases. No obvious change to be found for all patients in liver function test, renal function test and blood routine examination. The level of AFP indicated a descending trend after PDT. This work indicate that PDT is effective and safe for the treatment of large liver cancers including those recurred follow hepatic resection and those failed in hepatic artery infusion embolic chemotherapy.

  11. Real-time computed tomography dosimetry during ultrasound-guided brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Irving D; Meskell, Paul; Oldenburg, Nicklas E; Saltzman, Brian; Kearney, Gary P; Holupka, Edward J

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided implantation of permanent radioactive seeds is a treatment option for localized prostate cancer. Several techniques have been described for the optimal placement of the seeds in the prostate during this procedure. Postimplantation dosimetric calculations are performed after the implant. Areas of underdosing can only be corrected with either an external beam boost or by performing a second implant. We demonstrate the feasibility of performing computed tomography (CT)-based postplanning during the ultrasound-guided implant and subsequently correcting for underdosed areas. Ultrasound-guided brachytherapy is performed on a modified CT table with general anesthesia. The postplanning CT scan is performed after the implant, while the patient is still under anesthesia. Additional seeds are implanted into "cold spots," and the resultant dosimetry confirmed with CT. Intraoperative postplanning was successfully performed. Dose-volume histograms demonstrated adequate dose coverage during the initial implant, but on detailed analysis, for some patients, areas of underdosing were observed either at the apex or the peripheral zone. Additional seeds were implanted to bring these areas to prescription dose. Intraoperative postplanning is feasible during ultrasound-guided brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Although the postimplant dose-volume histograms for all patients, before the implantation of additional seeds, were adequate according to the American Brachytherapy Society criteria, specific critical areas can be underdosed. Additional seeds can then be implanted to optimize the dosimetry and reduce the risk of underdosing areas of cancer.

  12. An alternative and inexpensive percutaneous access needle in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Penbegul, Necmettin; Soylemez, Haluk; Bozkurt, Yasar; Sancaktutar, Ahmet Ali; Bodakci, Mehmet Nuri; Hatipoglu, Namik Kemal; Atar, Murat; Yildirim, Kadir

    2012-10-01

    The most important factor that increases the cost of percutaneous surgery is the disposable instruments used for the surgery. In this study we present the advantages of using an intravenous cannula instead of a percutaneous access needle for renal access. Recently, percutaneous stone surgery has grown in use in pediatric cases and is considered a minimally invasive surgery. The most important step in this surgery is access to the renal collecting systems. Although fluoroscopy has been used frequently at this stage, the use of ultrasound has recently increased. During percutaneous accesses under all types of imaging techniques, disposable 11- to 15-cm-long 18-ga needles are used. In pediatric cases, these longer needles are difficult to use. Using disposable materials in percutaneous nephrolithotomy increases the cost of the procedure. Therefore, we asserted that percutaneous access especially in pediatric cases could be performed using a 16-ga intravenous cannula (angiocath). Indeed, percutaneous access was performed successfully, especially in pediatric preschool patients. Shorter needle length, easy skin entry, comfort of manipulation, clear visualization of the metal needle on ultrasound, and wide availability can be considered advantages of this method. The angiocath is also less expensive than a percutaneous access needle. Angiocath is inexpensive, easily available, and practical, and it is the shortest needle to perform percutaneous access in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Backscattering analysis of high frequency ultrasonic imaging for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Thomas; Akiyama, Takahiro; Lee, Changyang; Martin, Sue E.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2017-03-01

    A new ultrasound-guided breast biopsy technique is proposed. The technique utilizes conventional ultrasound guidance coupled with a high frequency embedded ultrasound array located within the biopsy needle to improve the accuracy in breast cancer diagnosis.1 The array within the needle is intended to be used to detect micro- calcifications indicative of early breast cancers such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Backscattering analysis has the potential to characterize tissues to improve localization of lesions. This paper describes initial results of the application of backscattering analysis of breast biopsy tissue specimens and shows the usefulness of high frequency ultrasound for the new biopsy related technique. Ultrasound echoes of ex-vivo breast biopsy tissue specimens were acquired by using a single-element transducer with a bandwidth from 41 MHz to 88 MHz utilizing a UBM methodology, and the backscattering coefficients were calculated. These values as well as B-mode image data were mapped in 2D and matched with each pathology image for the identification of tissue type for the comparison to the pathology images corresponding to each plane. Microcalcifications were significantly distinguished from normal tissue. Adenocarcinoma was also successfully differentiated from adipose tissue. These results indicate that backscattering analysis is able to quantitatively distinguish tissues into normal and abnormal, which should help radiologists locate abnormal areas during the proposed ultrasound-guided breast biopsy with high frequency ultrasound.

  14. Teaching medical students ultrasound-guided vascular access - which learning method is best?

    PubMed

    Lian, Alwin; Rippey, James C R; Carr, Peter J

    2017-05-15

    Ultrasound is recommended to guide insertion of peripheral intravenous vascular cannulae (PIVC) where difficulty is experienced. Ultrasound machines are now common-place and junior doctors are often expected to be able to use them. The educational standards for this skill are highly varied, ranging from no education, to self-guided internet-based education, to formal, face-to-face traditional education. In an attempt to decide which educational technique our institution should introduce, a small pilot trial comparing educational techniques was designed. Thirty medical students were enrolled and allocated to one of three groups. PIVC placing ability was then observed, tested and graded on vascular access phantoms. The formal, face-to-face traditional education was rated best by the students, and had the highest success rate in PIVC placement, the improvement statistically significant compared to no education (p = 0.01) and trending towards significance when compared to self-directed internet-based education (p<0.06). The group receiving traditional face-to-face teaching on ultrasound-guided vascular access, performed significantly better than those not receiving education. As the number of ultrasound machines in clinical areas increases, it is important that education programs to support their safe and appropriate use are developed.

  15. Ultrasound guided electrical impedance tomography for 2D free-interface reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guanghui; Ren, Shangjie; Dong, Feng

    2017-07-01

    The free-interface detection problem is normally seen in industrial or biological processes. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive technique with advantages of high-speed and low cost, and is a promising solution for free-interface detection problems. However, due to the ill-posed and nonlinear characteristics, the spatial resolution of EIT is low. To deal with the issue, an ultrasound guided EIT is proposed to directly reconstruct the geometric configuration of the target free-interface. In the method, the position of the central point of the target interface is measured by a pair of ultrasound transducers mounted at the opposite side of the objective domain, and then the position measurement is used as the prior information for guiding the EIT-based free-interface reconstruction. During the process, a constrained least squares framework is used to fuse the information from different measurement modalities, and the Lagrange multiplier-based Levenberg-Marquardt method is adopted to provide the iterative solution of the constraint optimization problem. The numerical results show that the proposed ultrasound guided EIT method for the free-interface reconstruction is more accurate than the single modality method, especially when the number of valid electrodes is limited.

  16. Preliminary study of ergonomic behavior during simulated ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia using a head-mounted display.

    PubMed

    Udani, Ankeet D; Harrison, T Kyle; Howard, Steven K; Kim, T Edward; Brock-Utne, John G; Gaba, David M; Mariano, Edward R

    2012-08-01

    A head-mounted display provides continuous real-time imaging within the practitioner's visual field. We evaluated the feasibility of using head-mounted display technology to improve ergonomics in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia in a simulated environment. Two anesthesiologists performed an equal number of ultrasound-guided popliteal-sciatic nerve blocks using the head-mounted display on a porcine hindquarter, and an independent observer assessed each practitioner's ergonomics (eg, head turning, arching, eye movements, and needle manipulation) and the overall block quality based on the injectate spread around the target nerve for each procedure. Both practitioners performed their procedures without directly viewing the ultrasound monitor, and neither practitioner showed poor ergonomic behavior. Head-mounted display technology may offer potential advantages during ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

  17. A cMUT probe for ultrasound-guided focused ultrasound targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Gross, Dominique; Coutier, Caroline; Legros, Mathieu; Bouakaz, Ayache; Certon, Dominique

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound-mediated targeted therapy represents a promising strategy in the arsenal of modern therapy. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) technology could overcome some difficulties encountered by traditional piezoelectric transducers. In this study, we report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of an ultrasound-guided focused ultrasound (USgFUS) cMUT probe dedicated to preclinical evaluation of targeted therapy (hyperthermia, thermosensitive liposomes activation, and sonoporation) at low frequency (1 MHz) with simultaneous ultrasonic imaging and guidance (15 to 20 MHz). The probe embeds two types of cMUT arrays to perform the modalities of targeted therapy and imaging respectively. The wafer-bonding process flow employed for the manufacturing of the cMUTs is reported. One of its main features is the possibility of implementing two different gap heights on the same wafer. All the design and characterization steps of the devices are described and discussed, starting from the array design up to the first in vitro measurements: optical (microscopy) and electrical (impedance) measurements, arrays' electroacoustic responses, focused pressure field mapping (maximum peak-to-peak pressure = 2.5 MPa), and the first B-scan image of a wire-target phantom.

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Cryoanalgesia of Peripheral Nerve Lesions.

    PubMed

    Djebbar, Sahlya; Rossi, Ignacio M; Adler, Ronald S

    2016-11-01

    The real-time nature of ultrasound makes it ideally suited to provide guidance for a variety of musculoskeletal interventional procedures involving peripheral nerves. Continuous observation of the needle ensures proper placement and allows continuous monitoring when performing localized ablative therapy and therefore more accurate positioning of a cryoprobe, use of smaller needles, as well as access to small structures. We describe our experience performing cryoablative procedures. Patients undergoing cryoneurolysis have largely reported varying degrees of long-term pain relief and improvement in function; no serious complications have yet been identified. Ultrasound-guided cryoneurolysis can provide a useful, safe alternative to other ablative techniques to achieve long-term analgesia from painful peripheral nerve lesions. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Transcranial MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound: A Review of the Technology and Neuro Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ghanouni, Pejman; Pauly, Kim Butts; Elias, W. Jeff; Henderson, Jaimie; Sheehan, Jason; Monteith, Stephen; Wintermark, Max

    2015-01-01

    MR guided focused ultrasound is a new, minimally invasive method of targeted tissue thermal ablation that may be of use to treat central neuropathic pain, essential tremor, Parkinson tremor, and brain tumors. The system has also been used to temporarily disrupt the blood-brain barrier to allow targeted drug delivery to brain tumors. This article reviews the physical principles of MR guided focused ultrasound and discusses current and potential applications of this exciting technology. PMID:26102394

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Vascular Access Simulator for Medical Training: Proposal of a Simple, Economic and Effective Model.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Rafael Vilhena de Carvalho; Polimanti, Afonso César; Galego, Sidnei José; Bicudo, Maria Claudia; Montagna, Erik; Corrêa, João Antônio

    2017-03-01

    To present a simple and affordable model able to properly simulate an ultrasound-guided venous access. The simulation was made using a latex balloon tube filled with water and dye solution implanted in a thawed chicken breast with bones. The presented model allows the simulation of all implant stages of a central catheter. The obtained echogenicity is similar to that observed in human tissue, and the ultrasound identification of the tissues, balloon, needle, wire guide and catheter is feasible and reproducible. The proposed model is simple, economical, easy to manufacture and capable of realistically and effectively simulating an ultrasound-guided venous access.

  1. Surgery or EUS-guided choledochoduodenostomy for malignant distal biliary obstruction after ERCP failure

    PubMed Central

    Artifon, Everson L.A.; Loureiro, Jarbas F.; Baron, Todd H.; Fernandes, Kaie; Kahaleh, Michel; Marson, Fernando P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the method of choice for drainage in patients with distal malignant biliary obstruction, but it fails in up to 10% of cases. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and surgical bypass are the traditional drainage alternatives. This study aimed to compare technical and clinical success, quality of life, and survival of surgical biliary bypass or hepaticojejunostomy (HJT) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided choledochoduodenostomy (CDT) in patients with distal malignant bile duct obstruction and failed ERCP. Patients and Methods: A prospective, randomized trial was conducted. From March 2011 to September 2013, 32 patients with malignant distal biliary obstruction and failed ERCP were studied. The HJT group consisted of 15 patients and the CDT group consisted of 14 patients. Technical and clinical success, quality of life, and survival were assessed prospectively. Results: Technical success was 94% (15/16) in the HJT group and 88% (14/16) in the CDT group (P = 0.598). Clinical success occurred in 14 (93%) patients in the HJT group and in 10 (71%) patients in the CDT group (P = 0.169). During follow-up, a statistically significant difference was seen in mean functional capacity scores, physical health, pain, social functioning, and emotional and mental health aspects in both techniques (P < 0.05). The median survival time in both groups was the same (82 days). Conclusion: Data relating to technical and clinical success, quality of life, and survival were similar in patients who underwent HJT and CDT drainage after failed ERCP for malignant distal biliary obstruction. PMID:26374583

  2. Malignant biliary disease: percutaneous interventions.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R A; Adam, A N

    2001-09-01

    Interventional radiologists have an important role in the management of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. This article describes the techniques for percutaneous biliary drainage, insertion of biliary endoprostheses, and the management of occluded biliary endoprostheses. Most procedures are performed by using fluoroscopic guidance alone. Ultrasound is also a useful modality for guiding biliary drainage, particularly drainage of the left biliary ducts. Patients should be treated by internal drainage if possible. Metallic endoprostheses can be inserted at the time of the initial biliary drainage procedure. Plastic tubes should be inserted a few days after biliary drainage because of their relatively large size compared with metallic stents. Occluded plastic stents should be replaced. Blocked metallic stents should be treated either by placement of additional overlapping metallic stents or by placement of plastic stents within the metallic stent lumen. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  3. A multimodal image guiding system for Navigated Ultrasound Bronchoscopy (EBUS): A human feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Hofstad, Erlend Fagertun; Amundsen, Tore; Langø, Thomas; Bakeng, Janne Beate Lervik; Leira, Håkon Olav

    2017-01-01

    Background Endobronchial ultrasound transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is the endoscopic method of choice for confirming lung cancer metastasis to mediastinal lymph nodes. Precision is crucial for correct staging and clinical decision-making. Navigation and multimodal imaging can potentially improve EBUS-TBNA efficiency. Aims To demonstrate the feasibility of a multimodal image guiding system using electromagnetic navigation for ultrasound bronchoschopy in humans. Methods Four patients referred for lung cancer diagnosis and staging with EBUS-TBNA were enrolled in the study. Target lymph nodes were predefined from the preoperative computed tomography (CT) images. A prototype convex probe ultrasound bronchoscope with an attached sensor for position tracking was used for EBUS-TBNA. Electromagnetic tracking of the ultrasound bronchoscope and ultrasound images allowed fusion of preoperative CT and intraoperative ultrasound in the navigation software. Navigated EBUS-TBNA was used to guide target lymph node localization and sampling. Navigation system accuracy was calculated, measured by the deviation between lymph node position in ultrasound and CT in three planes. Procedure time, diagnostic yield and adverse events were recorded. Results Preoperative CT and real-time ultrasound images were successfully fused and displayed in the navigation software during the procedures. Overall navigation accuracy (11 measurements) was 10.0 ± 3.8 mm, maximum 17.6 mm, minimum 4.5 mm. An adequate sample was obtained in 6/6 (100%) of targeted lymph nodes. No adverse events were registered. Conclusions Electromagnetic navigated EBUS-TBNA was feasible, safe and easy in this human pilot study. The clinical usefulness was clearly demonstrated. Fusion of real-time ultrasound, preoperative CT and electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy provided a controlled guiding to level of target, intraoperative overview and procedure documentation. PMID:28182758

  4. Real-time visualization of ultrasound-guided retrobulbar blockade: an imaging study.

    PubMed

    Luyet, C; Eichenberger, U; Moriggl, B; Remonda, L; Greif, R

    2008-12-01

    Retrobulbar anaesthesia allows eye surgery in awake patients. Severe complications of the blind techniques are reported. Ultrasound-guided needle introduction and direct visualization of the spread of local anaesthetic may improve quality and safety of retrobulbar anaesthesia. Therefore, we developed a new ultrasound-guided technique using human cadavers. In total, 20 blocks on both sides in 10 embalmed human cadavers were performed. Using a small curved array transducer and a long-axis approach, a 22 G short bevel needle was introduced under ultrasound guidance lateral and caudal of the eyeball until the needle tip was seen 2 mm away from the optic nerve. At this point, 2 ml of contrast dye as a substitute for local anaesthetic was injected. Immediately after the injection, the spread of the contrast dye was documented by means of CT scans performed in each cadaver. The CT scans showed the distribution of the contrast dye in the muscle cone and behind the posterior sclera in all but one case. No contrast dye was found inside the optic nerve or inside the eyeball. In one case, there could be an additional trace of contrast dye behind the orbita. Our new ultrasound-guided technique has the potential to improve safety and efficacy of the procedure by direct visualization of the needle placement and the distribution of the injected fluid. Furthermore, the precise injection near the optic nerve could lead to a reduction of the amount of the local anaesthetic needed with fewer related complications.

  5. A Randomized Double-Blinded Trial on the Effects of Ultrasound Transducer Orientation on Teaching and Learning Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nicholas C K; Baker, Elizabeth B; Fishburn, Steven J; Hammer, Angie R; Petersen, Timothy R; Mariano, Edward R

    2016-07-01

    Learning ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia skills, especially needle/ beam alignment, can be especially difficulty for trainees, who can often become frustrated. We hypothesized that teaching novices to orient the transducer and needle perpendicular to their shoulders will improve performance on a standardized task, compared to holding the transducer and needle parallel to the shoulders. This study compared the effects of transducer orientation on trainees' ability to complete a standardized ultrasound-guided nerve block simulation. The time to task completion and percentage of the attempt time without adequate needle visualization were measured. Participants were right-handed healthy adults with no previous ultrasound experience and were randomly assigned to training in either transducer and needle alignment in a coronal plane, parallel to the shoulders (parallel group) or transducer and needle alignment in a sagittal plane, perpendicular to the shoulders (perpendicular group). Participants used ultrasound to direct a needle to 3 targets in a standardized gelatin phantom and repeated this task 3 times. Their efforts were timed and evaluated by an assessor, who was blinded to group assignment. Data were analyzed on 28 participants. The perpendicular group was able to complete the task more quickly (P < .001) and with a smaller proportion of time lost to inadequate needle visualization (P < .001). Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia trainees complete a standardized task more quickly and efficiently when instructed to hold the transducer and needle in an orientation perpendicular to their shoulders.

  6. Microendoscopic stereotactic-guided percutaneous radiofrequency trigeminal nucleotractotomy.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; de Almeida, Fabrício Freitas; de Oliveira, Ywzhe Sifuentes Almeida; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni

    2012-02-01

    Over the past few decades, various authors have performed open or stereotactic trigeminal nucleotractotomy for the treatment of neuropathic facial pain resistant to medical treatment. Stereotactic procedures can be performed percutaneously under local anesthesia, allowing intraoperative neurological examination as a method for target refinement. However, blind percutaneous procedures in the region of the atlantooccipital transition carry a considerably high risk of vascular injuries that may bring prohibitive neurological deficit or even death. To avoid such complications, the authors present the first clinical use of microendoscopy to assist percutaneous radiofrequency trigeminal nucleotractotomy. The aim of this article is to demonstrate intradural microendoscopic visualization of the medulla oblongata through an atlantooccipital percutaneous approach. The authors present a case of severe postherpetic facial neuralgia in a patient who underwent the procedure and had satisfactory results. Stereotactic computational image planning for targeting the spinal trigeminal tract and nucleus in the posterolateral medulla was performed, allowing for an accurate percutaneous approach. Immediately before radiofrequency electrode insertion, a fine endoscope was introduced to visualize the structures in the cisterna magna. Microendoscopic visualization offered clear identification of the pial surface of the medulla oblongata and its blood vessels, the arachnoid membrane, cranial nerve rootlets and their entry zone, and larger vessels such as the vertebral arteries and the branches of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The initial application of this technique suggests that percutaneous microendoscopy may be useful for particular manipulation of the medulla oblongata, increasing the safety of the procedure and likely improving its effectiveness.

  7. Ultrasound-Guided 50% Ethyl Alcohol Injection for Patients With Malleolar and Olecranon Bursitis: A Prospective Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji Seong; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and effect of ultrasound-guided ethyl alcohol injection on malleolar and olecranon synovial proliferative bursitis. Methods Twenty-four patients received ultrasound-guided 50% diluted ethyl alcohol injection at the site of synovial proliferative bursitis after aspiration of the free fluid. Results Swelling and symptoms significantly decreased in 13 of the 24 patients without any complications. Eleven patients had partial improvement in swelling and symptoms. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided alcohol injection could be an alternative therapeutic option before surgery in patients with chronic intractable malleolar and olecranon synovial proliferative bursitis. PMID:27152282

  8. TU-B-210-00: MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound Therapy in Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    MR guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), or alternatively high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU), is approved for thermal ablative treatment of uterine fibroids and pain palliation in bone metastases. Ablation of malignant tumors is under active investigation in sites such as breast, prostate, brain, liver, kidney, pancreas, and soft tissue. Hyperthermia therapy with MRgFUS is also feasible, and may be used in conjunction with radiotherapy and for local targeted drug delivery. MRI allows in situ target definition and provides continuous temperature monitoring and subsequent thermal dose mapping during HIFU. Although MRgHIFU can be very precise, treatment of mobile organs is challenging and advancedmore » techniques are required because of artifacts in MR temperature mapping, the need for intercostal firing, and need for gated HIFU or tracking of the lesion in real time. The first invited talk, “MR guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Tumors in Bone and Soft Tissue”, will summarize the treatment protocol and review results from treatment of bone tumors. In addition, efforts to extend this technology to treat both benign and malignant soft tissue tumors of the extremities will be presented. The second invited talk, “MRI guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound – Advanced Approaches for Ablation and Hyperthermia”, will provide an overview of techniques that are in or near clinical trials for thermal ablation and hyperthermia, with an emphasis of applications in abdominal organs and breast, including methods for MRTI and tracking targets in moving organs. Learning Objectives: Learn background on devices and techniques for MR guided HIFU for cancer therapy Understand issues and current status of clinical MRg HIFU Understand strategies for compensating for organ movement during MRgHIFU Understand strategies for strategies for delivering hyperthermia with MRgHIFU CM - research collaboration with Philips.« less

  9. Mini access guide to simplify calyceal access during percutaneous nephrolithotomy: A novel device.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Puskar Shyam; Nayak, Prasant; David, Deepak; Mallick, Sujata

    2017-01-01

    A precise puncture of the renal collecting system is the most essential step for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). There are many techniques describing this crucial first step in PCNL including the bull's eye technique, triangulation technique, free-hand technique, and gradual descensus technique. We describe a novel puncture guide to assist accurate percutaneous needle placement during bull's eye technique. The mini access guide (MAG) stabilizes the initial puncture needle by mounting it on an adjustable multidirectional carrier fixed to the patient's skin, which aids in achieving the "bull's eye" puncture. It also avoids a direct fluoroscopic exposure of the urologist's hand during the puncture. Sixty consecutive patients with solitary renal calculus were randomized to traditional hand versus MAG puncture during bull's eye technique of puncture and the fluoroscopy time was assessed. The median fluoroscopy screening time for traditional free-hand bull's eye and MAG-guided bull's eye puncture (fluoroscopic screening time for puncture) was 55 versus 21 s ( P = 0.001) and the median time to puncture was 80 versus 55 s ( P = 0.052), respectively. Novice residents also learned puncture technique faster with MAG on simulator. The MAG is a simple, portable, cheap, and novel assistant to achieve successful PCNL puncture. It would be of great help for novices to establish access during their learning phase of PCNL. It would also be an asset toward significantly decreasing the radiation dose during PCNL access.

  10. Percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging-guided bone tumor management and magnetic resonance imaging-guided bone therapy.

    PubMed

    Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Fritz, Jan; Ojala, Risto; Carrino, John A

    2011-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is promising tool for image-guided therapy. In musculoskeletal setting, image-guided therapy is used to direct diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and to steer patient management. Studies have demonstrated that MRI-guided interventions involving bone, soft tissue, joints, and intervertebral disks are safe and in selected indications can be the preferred action to manage clinical situation. Often, these procedures are technically similar to those performed in other modalities (computed tomography, fluoroscopy) for bone and soft tissue lesions. However, the procedural perception to the operator can be very different to other modalities because of the vastly increased data.Magnetic resonance imaging guidance is particularly advantageous should the lesion not be visible by other modalities, for selective lesion targeting, intra-articular locations, cyst aspiration, and locations adjacent to surgical hardware. Palliative tumor-related pain management such as ablation therapy forms a subset of procedures that are frequently performed under MRI. Another suitable entity for MRI guidance are the therapeutic percutaneous osseous or joint-related benign or reactive conditions such as osteoid osteoma, epiphyseal bone bridging, osteochondritis dissecans, bone cysts, localized bone necrosis, and posttraumatic lesions. In this article, we will describe in detail the technical aspects of performing MRI-guided therapeutic musculoskeletal procedures as well as the clinical indications.

  11. Anaesthetics, steroids and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal procedures.

    PubMed

    Barile, Antonio; La Marra, Alice; Arrigoni, Francesco; Mariani, Silvia; Zugaro, Luigi; Splendiani, Alessandra; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Reginelli, Alfonso; Zappia, Marcello; Brunese, Luca; Duka, Ejona; Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    This review aims to evaluate the role of anaesthetics, steroids and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) employed with ultrasound-guided injection in the management of musculoskeletal pathology of the extremities. Ultrasound-guided injection represents an interesting and minimally invasive solution for the treatment of tendon and joint inflammatory or degenerative diseases. The availability of a variety of new drugs such as hyaluronic acid and PRP provides expansion of the indications and therapeutic possibilities. The clinical results obtained in terms of pain reduction and functional recovery suggest that the use of infiltrative procedures can be a good therapeutic alternative in degenerative and inflammatory joint diseases.

  12. Palpation- and ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Anderson F; Strain, George M; Rademacher, Nathalie; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Tully, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    To compare palpation-guided with ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Prospective randomized experimental trial. Eighteen adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) weighing 252-295 g. After induction of anesthesia with isoflurane, parrots received an injection of lidocaine (2 mg kg(-1)) in a total volume of 0.3 mL at the axillary region. The birds were randomly assigned to equal groups using either palpation or ultrasound as a guide for the brachial plexus block. Nerve evoked muscle potentials (NEMP) were used to monitor effectiveness of brachial plexus block. The palpation-guided group received the local anesthetic at the space between the pectoral muscle, triceps, and supracoracoideus aticimus muscle, at the insertion of the tendons of the caudal coracobrachial muscle, and the caudal scapulohumeral muscle. For the ultrasound-guided group, the brachial plexus and the adjacent vessels were located with B-mode ultrasonography using a 7-15 MHz linear probe. After location, an 8-5 MHz convex transducer was used to guide injections. General anesthesia was discontinued 20 minutes after lidocaine injection and the birds recovered in a padded cage. Both techniques decreased the amplitude of NEMP. Statistically significant differences in NEMP amplitudes, were observed within the ultrasound-guided group at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection and within the palpation-guided group at 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. No effect on motor function, muscle relaxation or wing droop was observed after brachial plexus block. The onset of the brachial plexus block tended to be faster when ultrasonography was used. Brachial plexus injection can be performed in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and nerve evoked muscle potentials were useful to monitor the effects on nerve conduction in this avian species. Neither technique produced an effective block at the

  13. Endobronchial ultrasound elastography: a new method in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-Hong; Turner, J Francis; Huang, Jian-An

    2015-12-01

    TBNA through the flexible bronchoscope is a 37-year-old technology that utilizes a TBNA needle to puncture the bronchial wall and obtain specimens of peribronchial and mediastinal lesions through the flexible bronchoscope for the diagnosis of benign and malignant diseases in the mediastinum and lung. Since 2002, the Olympus Company developed the first generation ultrasound equipment for use in the airway, initially utilizing an ultrasound probe introduced through the working channel followed by incoroporation of a fixed linear ultrasound array at the distal tip of the bronchoscope. This new bronchoscope equipped with a convex type ultrasound probe on the tip was subsequently introduced into clinical practice. The convex probe (CP)-EBUS allows real-time endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. EBUS-TBNA is a minimally invasive procedure performed under local anesthesia that has been shown to have a high sensitivity and diagnostic yield for lymph node staging of lung cancer. In 10 years of EBUS development, the Olympus Company developed the second generation EBUS bronchoscope (BF-UC260FW) with the ultrasound image processor (EU-M1), and in 2013 introduced a new ultrasound image processor (EU-M2) into clinical practice. FUJI company has also developed a curvilinear array endobronchial ultrasound bronchoscope (EB-530 US) that makes it easier for the operator to master the operation of the ultrasonic bronchoscope. Also, the new thin convex probe endobronchial ultrasound bronchoscope (TCP-EBUS) is able to visualize one to three bifurcations distal to the current CP-EBUS. The emergence of EBUS-TBNA has also been accompanied by innovation in EBUS instruments. EBUS elastography is, then, a new technique for describing the compliance of structures during EBUS, which may be of use in the determination of metastasis to the mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. This article describes these new EBUS

  14. MR guided FUS therapy with a Robotic Assistance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenne, Jürgen W.; Krafft, Axel J.; Maier, Florian; Rauschenberg, Jaane; Semmler, Wolfhard; Huber, Peter E.; Bock, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Magnetic Resonance imaging guided Focus Ultrasound Surgery (MRgFUS) is a highly precise method to ablate tissue non-invasively. To date, there is only one commercial MRgFUS system available and only a few are in a prototype stage. The objective of this ongoing project is to establish an MRgFUS therapy unit as add-on for a commercially available robotic assistance system originally designed for percutaneous needle interventions in whole-body MR scanners.

  15. Transvaginal ultrasound-guided embryo transfer in IVF.

    PubMed

    Larue, L; Keromnes, G; Massari, A; Roche, C; Moulin, J; Gronier, H; Bouret, D; Cassuto, N G; Ayel, J P

    2017-05-01

    To determine whether transvaginal ultrasound-guided embryo transfer is a technique that can be used routinely, whether it improves IVF outcomes and whether it makes difficult transfers easier and more successful. Non-randomized retrospective study conducted between 2012 and 2016 in the fertility center of the Diaconesses-Croix St-Simon hospital group. The outcomes of 3910 transfers, performed by 5 senior operators, under transabdominal ultrasound guidance are compared with those of 800 transfers, performed by 1 senior operator under transvaginal ultrasound guidance. The criteria studied are the feasibility of the technique and the percentage of pregnancies per transfer in the two populations described, as well as in the difficult and very difficult transfer populations. All the transfers were feasible under transvaginal ultrasound guidance without the use of forceps or additional instruments. The percentage of pregnancies per transfer is significantly increased, when the transfer is performed under transvaginal ultrasound guidance compared with that performed under transabdominal ultrasound guidance, in the general population (38%, n=800 vs 30%, n=3910; P 0.0004) and in the reference population characterized by age <38 years and >6 oocytes collected per puncture (45%, n=490 vs 36%, n=1968; P 0.002). The percentage of pregnancies per transfer (P/T) is not significantly different in the populations of easy transfers (n 695, 38% P/T), difficult transfers (n 58, 46% P/T; P=ns) and very difficult transfers (n 47, 34% P/T; P=ns). Embryo transfer is a key stage in IVF, in which the quality of performance determines the outcome. In this study, transvaginal ultrasound guidance of the transfer, which is the reference procedure in gynaecological imaging, significantly increases the percentage of pregnancies per transfer, both in the general population and in the reference population, compared with transfers performed under transabdominal ultrasound guidance. Transvaginal

  16. Treatment of Partial Rotator Cuff Tear with Ultrasound-guided Platelet-rich Plasma.

    PubMed

    Sengodan, Vetrivel Chezian; Kurian, Sajith; Ramasamy, Raghupathy

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of symptomatic partial rotator cuff tear has presented substantial challenge to orthopaedic surgeons as it can vary from conservative to surgical repair. Researches have established the influence of platelet rich plasma in healing damaged tissue. Currently very few data are available regarding the evidence of clinical and radiological outcome of partial rotator cuff tear treated with ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection in English literature. 20 patients with symptomatic partial rotator cuff tears were treated with ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection. Before and after the injection of platelet rich plasma scoring was done with visual analogue score, Constant shoulder score, and UCLA shoulder score at 8 weeks and third month. A review ultrasound was performed 8 weeks after platelet rich plasma injection to assess the rotator cuff status. Our study showed statistically significant improvements in 17 patients in VAS pain score, constant shoulder score and UCLA shoulder score. No significant changes in ROM were noted when matched to the contra-lateral side ( P < 0.001) at the 3 month follow-up. The study also showed good healing on radiological evaluation with ultrasonogram 8 weeks after platelet rich plasma injection. Ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection for partial rotator cuff tears is an effective procedure that leads to significant decrease in pain, improvement in shoulder functions, much cost-effective and less problematic compared to a surgical treatment.

  17. Minimizing radiation exposure during percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Chen, T T; Preminger, G M; Lipkin, M E

    2015-12-01

    Given the recent trends in growing per capita radiation dose from medical sources, there have been increasing concerns over patient radiation exposure. Patients with kidney stones undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) are at particular risk for high radiation exposure. There exist several risk factors for increased radiation exposure during PNL which include high Body Mass Index, multiple access tracts, and increased stone burden. We herein review recent trends in radiation exposure, radiation exposure during PNL to both patients and urologists, and various approaches to reduce radiation exposure. We discuss incorporating the principles of As Low As reasonably Achievable (ALARA) into clinical practice and review imaging techniques such as ultrasound and air contrast to guide PNL access. Alternative surgical techniques and approaches to reducing radiation exposure, including retrograde intra-renal surgery, retrograde nephrostomy, endoscopic-guided PNL, and minimally invasive PNL, are also highlighted. It is important for urologists to be aware of these concepts and techniques when treating stone patients with PNL. The discussions outlined will assist urologists in providing patient counseling and high quality of care.

  18. Value of cytopathologist-performed ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration as a screening test for ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy in nonpalpable breast masses.

    PubMed

    Lieu, David

    2009-04-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of breast masses in the United States has been on the decline for the last decade and has been largely replaced by ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy (UG-CNB). Some studies show core-needle biopsy (CNB) is superior to FNA in terms of absolute sensitivity, specificity, and inadequate rate. However, the importance of a skilled aspirator, experienced cytopathologist, and immediate cytological evaluation (ICE) in FNA is often not considered. CNB is more expensive, invasive, risky, and painful than FNA. This prospective study examines the value of cytopathologist-performed ultrasound-guided FNA (UG-FNA) with ICE as a screening test for cytopathologist-performed UG-CNB on nonpalpable or difficult-to-palpate solid breast masses visible on ultrasound. One hundred twenty consecutive nonpalpable or difficult-to-palpate presumably solid breast masses in 109 female patients from January2, 2008 to June 30, 2008 underwent cytopathologist-performed UG-FNA with ICE. Twenty cases were converted to cytopathologist-performed UG-CNB because ICE was inadequate, hypocellular, atypical, suspicious, or malignant. Patients with clearly benign cytology did not undergo UG-CNB. UG-FNA with ICE reduced the percentage of patients undergoing UG-CNB by 87%. A new role for cytopathologist-performed UG-FNA of nonpalpable breast masses has been identified.

  19. Plantar fascia: imaging diagnosis and guided treatment.

    PubMed

    McNally, Eugene G; Shetty, Shilpa

    2010-09-01

    Plantar fasciopathy is a common cause of heel pain. This article covers the imaging anatomy of the hindfoot, the imaging findings on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of plantar fasciopathy, plantar fibromas, trauma, Achilles tendonopathy, neural compression, stress fractures of the os calcis and other heel pad lesions. Thickening of the plantar fascia insertion more than 5 mm either on ultrasound or MRI is suggestive of plantar fasciopathy. Ultrasound is superior to MRI for diagnosis of plantar fibroma as small low signal lesions on MRI are similar to the normal plantar fascia signal. Ultrasound demonstrates low echogenicity compared with the echogenic plantar fascia. Penetrating injuries can appear bizarre due to associated foreign body impaction and infection. Achilles tendonopathy can cause heel pain and should be considered as a possible diagnosis. Treatment options include physical therapy, ECSWT, corticosteroid injection, and dry needling. Percutaneous US guided treatment methods will be described. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  20. Real-time ultrasound-guided endoscopic surgery for putaminal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Nomura, Sadahiro; Goto, Hisaharu; Sugimoto, Kazutaka; Inamura, Akinori; Fujiyama, Yuichi; Yamane, Akiko; Oku, Takayuki; Shinoyama, Mizuya; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic surgery plays a significant role in the treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage. However, the residual hematoma cannot be measured intraoperatively from the endoscopic view, and it is difficult to determine the precise location of the endoscope within the hematoma cavity. The authors attempted to develop real-time ultrasound-guided endoscopic surgery using a bur-hole-type probe. From November 2012 to March 2014, patients with hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage who underwent endoscopic hematoma removal were enrolled in this study. Real-time ultrasound guidance was performed with a bur-hole-type probe that was advanced via a second bur hole, which was placed in the temporal region. Ultrasound was used to guide insertion of the endoscope sheath as well as to provide information regarding the location of the hematoma during surgical evacuation. Finally, the cavity was irrigated with artificial cerebrospinal fluid and was observed as a low-echoic space, which facilitated detection of residual hematoma. Ten patients with putaminal hemorrhage>30 cm3 were included in this study. Their mean age (±SD) was 60.9±8.6 years, and the mean preoperative hematoma volume was 65.2±37.1 cm3. The mean percentage of hematoma that was evacuated was 96%±3%. None of the patients exhibited rebleeding after surgery. This navigation method was effective in demonstrating both the real-time location of the endoscope and real-time viewing of the residual hematoma. Use of ultrasound guidance minimized the occurrence of brain injury due to hematoma evacuation.

  1. Ultrasound-guided Subclavian Vein Cannulation Using a Micro-Convex Ultrasound Probe

    PubMed Central

    Fair, James; Hirshberg, Eliotte L.; Grissom, Colin K.; Brown, Samuel M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The subclavian vein is the preferred site for central venous catheter placement due to infection risk and patient comfort. Ultrasound guidance is useful in cannulation of other veins, but for the subclavian vein, current ultrasound-guided techniques using high-frequency linear array probes are generally limited to axillary vein cannulation. Methods: We report a series of patients who underwent clinically indicated subclavian venous catheter placement using a micro-convex pediatric probe for real-time guidance in the vein’s longitudinal axis. We identified rates of successful placement and complications by chart review. Results: Twenty-four catheters were placed using the micro-convex pediatric probe with confirmation of placement of the needle medial to the lateral border of the first rib. Sixteen of the catheters were placed by trainee physicians. In 23 patients, the catheter was placed without complication (hematoma, pneumothorax, infection). In one patient, the vein could not be safely cannulated without risk of arterial puncture, so an alternative site was selected. Conclusions: Infraclavicular subclavian vein cannulation using real-time ultrasound with a micro-convex pediatric probe appears to be a safe and effective method of placing subclavian vascular catheters. This technique merits further study to confirm safety and efficacy. PMID:24611628

  2. Ultrasound guided V3 segment vertebral artery direct percutaneous puncture for basilar artery mechanical thrombectomy in acute stroke: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Desai, Jamsheed A; Almekhlafi, Mohammed A; Hill, Michael D; Goyal, Mayank; Eesa, Muneer

    2014-04-01

    A middle aged patient presented with acute ischemic stroke due to basilar artery occlusion. The patient clinically deteriorated despite intravenous thrombolysis and was referred for mechanical thrombectomy. The right vertebral artery was occluded and could not be accessed despite attempting various shaped catheters, even when a radial artery access was used. The left vertebral artery ended in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Eventually, ultrasound guided V3 segment vertebral artery direct puncture was successfully done and the procedure was completed. No access related complications were encountered. Direct cervical arterial puncture can be safely used by experienced operators as a last resort in acute stroke cases with difficult access.

  3. Ultrasound-guided piriformis muscle injection. A new approach.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua Alén, E; Diz Villar, A; Curt Nuño, F; Illodo Miramontes, G; Refojos Arencibia, F J; López González, J M

    2016-12-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an uncommon cause of buttock and leg pain. Some treatment options include the injection of piriformis muscle with local anesthetic and steroids. Various techniques for piriformis muscle injection have been described. Ultrasound allows direct visualization and real time injection of the piriformis muscle. We describe 5 consecutive patients, diagnosed of piriformis syndrome with no improvement after pharmacological treatment. Piriformis muscle injection with local anesthetics and steroids was performed using an ultrasound technique based on a standard technique. All 5 patients have improved their pain measured by numeric verbal scale. One patient had a sciatic after injection that improved in 10 days spontaneously. We describe an ultrasound-guided piriformis muscle injection that has the advantages of being effective, simple, and safe. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Interstitial ablation and imaging of soft tissue using miniaturized ultrasound arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makin, Inder R. S.; Gallagher, Laura A.; Mast, T. Douglas; Runk, Megan M.; Faidi, Waseem; Barthe, Peter G.; Slayton, Michael H.

    2004-05-01

    A potential alternative to extracorporeal, noninvasive HIFU therapy is minimally invasive, interstitial ultrasound ablation that can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Research in this area at Guided Therapy Systems and Ethicon Endo-Surgery has included development of miniaturized (~3 mm diameter) linear ultrasound arrays capable of high power for bulk tissue ablation as well as broad bandwidth for imaging. An integrated control system allows therapy planning and automated treatment guided by real-time interstitial B-scan imaging. Image quality, challenging because of limited probe dimensions and channel count, is aided by signal processing techniques that improve image definition and contrast. Simulations of ultrasonic heat deposition, bio-heat transfer, and tissue modification provide understanding and guidance for development of treatment strategies. Results from in vitro and in vivo ablation experiments, together with corresponding simulations, will be described. Using methods of rotational scanning, this approach is shown to be capable of clinically relevant ablation rates and volumes.

  5. PERCUTANEOUS RADIOFREQUENCY ASSISTED LIVER PARTITION WITH PORTAL VEIN EMBOLIZATION FOR STAGED HEPATECTOMY (PRALPPS).

    PubMed

    Giménez, Mariano E; Houghton, Eduardo J; Davrieux, C Federico; Serra, Edgardo; Pessaux, Patrick; Palermo, Mariano; Acquafresca, Pablo A; Finger, Caetano; Dallemagne, Bernard; Marescaux, Jacques

    2018-03-01

    When a major hepatic resection is necessary, sometimes the future liver remnant is not enough to maintain sufficient liver function and patients are more likely to develop liver failure after surgery. To test the hypothesis that performing a percutaneous radiofrecuency liver partition plus percutaneous portal vein embolization (PRALPPS) for stage hepatectomy in pigs is feasible. Four pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus) both sexes with weights between 25 to 35 kg underwent percutaneous portal vein embolization with coils of the left portal vein. By contrasted CT, the difference between the liver parenchyma corresponding to the embolized zone and the normal one was identified. Immediately, using the fusion of images between ultrasound and CT as a guide, radiofrequency needles were placed percutaneouslyand then ablated until the liver partition was complete. Finally, hepatectomy was completed with a laparoscopic approach. All animals have survived the procedures, with no reported complications. The successful portal embolization process was confirmed both by portography and CT. In the macroscopic analysis of the pieces, the depth of the ablation was analyzed. The hepatic hilum was respected. On the other hand, the correct position of the embolization material on the left portal vein could be also observed. "Percutaneous radiofrequency assisted liver partition with portal vein embolization" (PRALLPS) is a feasible procedure.

  6. Design and Production of an Articulating Needle Guide for Ultrasound-Guided Needle Block Manufactured With a Three-Dimensional Printer: Technical Communication.

    PubMed

    Bigeleisen, Paul E

    2017-05-15

    Needle guides may allow the practitioner to align the needle with the probe when ultrasound-guided nerve block is performed. The author's goal was to design and fabricate an inexpensive ($1.90), disposable, needle guide that could articulate over a range from 85 degrees to 0 degrees with a three-dimension printer. Three-dimensional representations of an L50, L25, and C 60 ultrasound probe (Sono Site, Bothell, WA) were created using a laser scanner. Computer-aided design software (Solid Works, Waltham, MA) was used to design a needle bracket and needle guide to attach to these probes. A three-dimensional printer was used to fabricate the needle bracket and guide with acrylonitrile polybutadiene polystyrene. An echogenic needle was held in plane with the needle guide. The author performed a supraclavicular block in a morbidly obese patient. The needle was easily visualized. Similar guides that are commercially available cost as much as $400. A knowledge of computer-aided design is necessary for this work.

  7. Neurologic Outcomes After Low-Volume, Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Block and Ambulatory Shoulder Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rajpal, Gaurav; Winger, Daniel G; Cortazzo, Megan; Kentor, Michael L; Orebaugh, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative neurologic symptoms after interscalene block and shoulder surgery have been reported to be relatively frequent. Reports of such symptoms after ultrasound-guided block have been variable. We evaluated 300 patients for neurologic symptoms after low-volume, ultrasound-guided interscalene block and arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients underwent ultrasound-guided interscalene block with 16 to 20 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine or a mix of 0.2% bupivacaine/1.2% mepivacaine solution, followed by propofol/ketamine sedation for ambulatory arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients were called at 10 days for evaluation of neurologic symptoms, and those with persistent symptoms were called again at 30 days, at which point neurologic evaluation was initiated. Details of patient demographics and block characteristics were collected to assess any association with persistent neurologic symptoms. Six of 300 patients reported symptoms at 10 days (2%), with one of these patients having persistent symptoms at 30 days (0.3%). This was significantly lower than rates of neurologic symptoms reported in preultrasound investigations with focused neurologic follow-up and similar to other studies performed in the ultrasound era. There was a modest correlation between the number of needle redirections during the block procedure and the presence of postoperative neurologic symptoms. Ultrasound guidance of interscalene block with 16- to 20-mL volumes of local anesthetic solution results in a lower frequency of postoperative neurologic symptoms at 10 and 30 days as compared with investigations in the preultrasound period.

  8. Osteoid osteoma: CT-guided percutaneous resection and follow-up in 38 patients.

    PubMed

    Sans, N; Galy-Fourcade, D; Assoun, J; Jarlaud, T; Chiavassa, H; Bonnevialle, P; Railhac, N; Giron, J; Morera-Maupomé, H; Railhac, J J

    1999-09-01

    To reevaluate at medium term the results of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous resection of osteoid osteomas. Thirty-eight patients who had undergone treatment by means of this technique were reexamined with a mean follow-up of 3.7 years. The short- and medium-term clinical course and histologic features of the resection specimens were analyzed. The bone fragment could be analyzed in all cases, and the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma was confirmed in 28 patients (74%). A different diagnosis was made in six patients: mucoid cyst, subchondral arthritic geode, fibrous dysplastic lesion, focal osteochondritis, or focal chronic osteomyelitis. Cure was obtained in 32 patients (84%), whatever the cause. Complications, generally minor and transient, were observed in nine patients (24%). The most severe complications were two femoral fractures and one focal chronic osteomyelitis due to Staphylococcus aureus infection. The results of this study confirm the efficacy of percutaneous resection of osteoid osteomas and the possibility of using this method for successful treatment of other small bone lesions.

  9. Gestrinone combined with ultrasound-guided aspiration and ethanol injection for treatment of chocolate cyst of ovary.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyun; Xu, Yun

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine clinical performance of gestrinone combined with ultrasound-guided aspiration and ethanol injection in treating chocolate cyst of ovary. Sixty-eight patients enrolled in this study were randomly divided into two groups: control group and combination treatment group. In the control group, 34 patients were treated with ultrasound-guided aspiration and ethanol injection. In the combination treatment group, 34 patients received gestrinone p.o. following ultrasound-guided aspiration and ethanol injection. The recurrence rate of chocolate cyst was 10-fold lower in the combination treatment group (2.94%, 1/34) than in the control group (29.4%, 10/34) at 12 months. The effective rate for reduction of chocolate cyst was significantly higher in the combination treatment group (94.12%, 32/34) than in the control group (64.71%, 22/34) (P = 0.009). Gestrinone combined with ultrasound-guided aspiration and ethanol injection therapy is an effective treatment for ovarian chocolate cyst with low recurrence rate. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  10. Image-Guided Surgical Robotic System for Percutaneous Reduction of Joint Fractures.

    PubMed

    Dagnino, Giulio; Georgilas, Ioannis; Morad, Samir; Gibbons, Peter; Tarassoli, Payam; Atkins, Roger; Dogramadzi, Sanja

    2017-11-01

    Complex joint fractures often require an open surgical procedure, which is associated with extensive soft tissue damages and longer hospitalization and rehabilitation time. Percutaneous techniques can potentially mitigate these risks but their application to joint fractures is limited by the current sub-optimal 2D intra-operative imaging (fluoroscopy) and by the high forces involved in the fragment manipulation (due to the presence of soft tissue, e.g., muscles) which might result in fracture malreduction. Integration of robotic assistance and 3D image guidance can potentially overcome these issues. The authors propose an image-guided surgical robotic system for the percutaneous treatment of knee joint fractures, i.e., the robot-assisted fracture surgery (RAFS) system. It allows simultaneous manipulation of two bone fragments, safer robot-bone fixation system, and a traction performing robotic manipulator. This system has led to a novel clinical workflow and has been tested both in laboratory and in clinically relevant cadaveric trials. The RAFS system was tested on 9 cadaver specimens and was able to reduce 7 out of 9 distal femur fractures (T- and Y-shape 33-C1) with acceptable accuracy (≈1 mm, ≈5°), demonstrating its applicability to fix knee joint fractures. This study paved the way to develop novel technologies for percutaneous treatment of complex fractures including hip, ankle, and shoulder, thus representing a step toward minimally-invasive fracture surgeries.

  11. [Feasibility of device closure for multiple atrial septal defects using 3D printing and ultrasound-guided intervention technique].

    PubMed

    Qiu, X; Lü, B; Xu, N; Yan, C W; Ouyang, W B; Liu, Y; Zhang, F W; Yue, Z Q; Pang, K J; Pan, X B

    2017-04-25

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of trans-catheter closure of multiple atrial septal defects (ASD) monitored by trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) under the guidance of 3D printing heart model. Methods: Between April and August 2016, a total of 21 patients (8 male and 13 female) with multiple ASD in Fuwai Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences underwent CT scan and 3-dimensional echocardiography for heart disease model produced by 3D printing technique. The best occlusion program was determined through the simulation test on the model. Percutaneous device closure of multiple ASD was performed follow the predetermined program guided by TTE. Clinical follow-up including electrocardiogram and TTE was arranged at 1 month after the procedure. Results: The trans-catheter procedure was successful in all 21 patients using a single atrial septal occluder. Mild residual shunt was found in 5 patient in the immediate postoperative period, 3 of them were disappeared during postoperative follow-up. There was no death, vascular damage, arrhythmia, device migration, thromboembolism, valvular dysfunction during the follow-up period. Conclusion: The use of 3D printing heart model provides a useful reference for transcatheter device closure of multiple ASD achieving through ultrasound-guided intervention technique, which appears to be safe and feasible with good outcomes of short-term follow-up.

  12. Ultrasound-guided microwave ablation in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules in 435 patients

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Lin-Xue; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Jun-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of ultrasound-guided microwave ablation in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. A total of 474 benign thyroid nodules in 435 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided microwave ablation from September 2012 to August 2015 were included. Nodule volume and thyroid function were measured before treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and subsequently after every 6 months. The nodule volume reduction rate and changes of thyroid function were evaluated. The volume of all thyroid nodules significantly decreased after ultrasound-guided microwave ablation. The average volume was 13.07 ± 0.95 ml before treatment, and 1.14 ± 0.26 ml at 12-months follow-up. The mean volume reduction rate was 90% and the final volume reduction rate was 94%. The volume reduction rate of mainly cystic nodules was significantly higher than that of simple solid and mainly solid nodules (all P < 0.05). The pretreatment volume of nodules was positively correlated with the final volume reduction rate at final follow-up (P = 0.004). No serious complications were observed after treatment. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided microwave ablation is an effective and safe technique for treatment of benign thyroid nodules, and has the potential for clinical applications. Impact statement Ultrasound-guided MWA is an effective and safe technique for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. It can significantly reduce the nodule volume, improve the patients’ clinical symptoms, has less complication, guarantees quick recovery, meets patients' aesthetic needs, and shows less interference on the physiological and psychological aspects of the body. MWA should be a good complement to traditional open surgery and has potentials in clinical applications. PMID:28847173

  13. Ultrasound-guided microwave ablation in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules in 435 patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Jiang; Qian, Lin-Xue; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Jun-Feng

    2017-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of ultrasound-guided microwave ablation in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. A total of 474 benign thyroid nodules in 435 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided microwave ablation from September 2012 to August 2015 were included. Nodule volume and thyroid function were measured before treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and subsequently after every 6 months. The nodule volume reduction rate and changes of thyroid function were evaluated. The volume of all thyroid nodules significantly decreased after ultrasound-guided microwave ablation. The average volume was 13.07 ± 0.95 ml before treatment, and 1.14 ± 0.26 ml at 12-months follow-up. The mean volume reduction rate was 90% and the final volume reduction rate was 94%. The volume reduction rate of mainly cystic nodules was significantly higher than that of simple solid and mainly solid nodules (all P < 0.05). The pretreatment volume of nodules was positively correlated with the final volume reduction rate at final follow-up ( P = 0.004). No serious complications were observed after treatment. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided microwave ablation is an effective and safe technique for treatment of benign thyroid nodules, and has the potential for clinical applications. Impact statement Ultrasound-guided MWA is an effective and safe technique for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. It can significantly reduce the nodule volume, improve the patients' clinical symptoms, has less complication, guarantees quick recovery, meets patients' aesthetic needs, and shows less interference on the physiological and psychological aspects of the body. MWA should be a good complement to traditional open surgery and has potentials in clinical applications.

  14. The role of CT-guided percutaneous drainage of loculated air collections: an institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhavik N; Morgan, Madeline; Tyler, Douglas; Paulson, Erik; Jaffe, Tracy A

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe our experience with the role of CT-guided percutaneous drainage of loculated intra-abdominal collections consisting entirely of gas. An IRB-approved retrospective study analyzing patients with air-only intra-abdominal collections over an 8-year period was undertaken. Seven patients referred for percutaneous drainage were included. Size of collections, subsequent development of fluid, and microbiological yield were determined. Clinical outcome was also analyzed. Out of 2835 patients referred for percutaneous drainage between 2004 and 2012, seven patients (5M, 2F; average age 63, range 54-85) met criteria for inclusion with CT showing air-only collections. Percutaneous drain placement (five 8 Fr, one 10 Fr, and one 12 Fr) using Seldinger technique was performed. Four patients (57%) had recently undergone surgery (2 Whipple, 1 colectomy, 1 hepatic resection) while two (29%) had a remote surgery (1 abdominoperineal resection, 1 sigmoidectomy). Despite the lack of detectable fluid on the original CT, 6 patients (86%) had air and fluid aspirated at drainage, 5 (83%) of the aspirates developed positive microbacterial cultures. Four patients (57%) presented with fever at the time of the initial scan, all of whom had positive cultures from aspirated fluid. Four patients (57%) had leukocytosis, all of whom had positive cultures from aspirated fluid. Although relatively rare in occurrence, patients with air-only intra-abdominal collections with signs of infection should be considered for percutaneous management similar to that of conventional infected fluid collections. Although fluid is not visible on CT, these collections can produce fluid that contains organisms.

  15. Ultrasound-guided thoracenthesis: the V-point as a site for optimal drainage positioning.

    PubMed

    Zanforlin, A; Gavelli, G; Oboldi, D; Galletti, S

    2013-01-01

    In the latest years the use of lung ultrasound is increasing in the evaluation of pleural effusions, because it makes follow-up easier and drainage more efficient by providing guidance on the most appropriate sampling site. However, no standardized approach for ultrasound-guided thoracenthesis is actually available. To evaluate our usual ultrasonographic landmark as a possible standard site to perform thoracenthesis by assessing its value in terms of safety and efficiency (success at first attempt, drainage as complete as possible). Hospitalized patients with non organized pleural effusion underwent thoracenthesis after ultrasound evaluation. The point showing on ultrasound the maximum thickness of the effusion ("V-point") was chosen for drainage. 45 ultrasound guided thoracenthesis were performed in 12 months. In 22 cases there were no complications; 16 cases of cough, 2 cases of mild dyspnea without desaturation, 4 cases of mild pain; 2 cases of complications requiring medical intervention occurred. No case of pneumothorax related to the procedure was detected. In all cases drainage was successful on the first attempt. The collected values of maximum thickness at V-point (min 3.4 cm - max 15.3 cm) and drained fluid volume (min 70 ml - max 2000 ml) showed a significative correlation (p < 0.0001). When the thickness was greater or equal to 9.9 cm, drained volume was always more than 1000 ml. The measure of the maximum thickness at V-point provides high efficiency to ultrasound guided thoracentesis and allows to estimate the amount of fluid in the pleural cavity. It is also an easy parameter that makes the proposed method quick to learn and apply.  

  16. Anaesthetics, steroids and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal procedures

    PubMed Central

    La Marra, Alice; Arrigoni, Francesco; Mariani, Silvia; Zugaro, Luigi; Splendiani, Alessandra; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Reginelli, Alfonso; Zappia, Marcello; Brunese, Luca; Duka, Ejona; Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    This review aims to evaluate the role of anaesthetics, steroids and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) employed with ultrasound-guided injection in the management of musculoskeletal pathology of the extremities. Ultrasound-guided injection represents an interesting and minimally invasive solution for the treatment of tendon and joint inflammatory or degenerative diseases. The availability of a variety of new drugs such as hyaluronic acid and PRP provides expansion of the indications and therapeutic possibilities. The clinical results obtained in terms of pain reduction and functional recovery suggest that the use of infiltrative procedures can be a good therapeutic alternative in degenerative and inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:27302491

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Drainage of Supralevator Hematoma in a Hemodynamically Stable Patient.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Debjani; Jennings, Paul E; Banerjee, Mamta; Gada, Ruta

    2015-12-01

    Paravaginal hematomas can be life-threatening. In patients with intact vaginal walls and perineum, they may pose a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Supralevator hematomas are much less common than infralevator hematomas. We present a case of puerperal hemorrhagic shock after a normal vaginal delivery in a low-risk parous woman resulting from an occult supralevator hematoma. Because the woman was hemodynamically unstable initially, she underwent a vaginal surgical drainage. A week later, the supravaginal hematoma reformed. At this time the patient was hemodynamically stable, and ultrasound-guided drainage was performed, which resulted in complete resolution of the hematoma within 10 days. In a clinically stable puerperal patient, ultrasound-guided drainage of a supralevator hematoma resulted in rapid and complete resolution of symptoms.

  18. 3-Dimensional printing guide template assisted percutaneous vertebroplasty: Technical note.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Lin, JiSheng; Yang, Yong; Xu, JunChuan; Fei, Qi

    2018-06-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is currently considered as an effective treatment for pain caused by acute osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture. Recently, puncture-related complications are increasingly reported. It's important to find a precise technique to reduce the puncture-related complications. We report a case and discussed the novel surgical technique with step-by-step operating procedures, to introduce the precise PVP assisted by a 3-dimensional printing guide template. Based on the preoperative CT scan and infrared scan data, a well-designed individual guide template could be established in a 3-dimensional reconstruction software and printed out by a 3-dimensional printer. In real operation, by matching the guide template to patient's back skin, cement needles' insertion orientation and depth were easily established. Only 14 times C-arm fluoroscopy with HDF mode (total exposure dose was 4.5 mSv) were required during the procedure. The operation took only 17 min. Cement distribution in the vertebral body was very good without any puncture-related complications. Pain was significantly relieved after surgery. In conclusion, the novel precise 3-dimensional printing guide template system may allow (1) comprehensive visualization of the fractured vertebral body and the individual surgical planning, (2) the perfect fitting between skin and guide template to ensure the puncture stability and accuracy, and (3) increased puncture precision and decreased puncture-related complications, surgical time and radiation exposure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. US-guided percutaneous treatment and physical therapy in rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder: outcome at 3 and 12 months.

    PubMed

    Pasquotti, Giulio; Faccinetto, Alex; Marchioro, Umberto; Todisco, Matteo; Baldo, Vincenzo; Cocchio, Silvia; De Conti, Giorgio

    2016-08-01

    To monitor the results of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous treatment of calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder at 12 months (T12) after treatment (T0). To verify the possible relations between some pre- and post-procedural variables with the clinical outcome at T12. Forty-seven patients (26 female and 21 male) were enrolled in the study. Patients' approval and written informed consent were obtained. Symptoms were assessed by Constant Shoulder Score (CSS) at T0 and T12. Thirty of these also underwent a CSS control at 3 months (T3). The treatment efficacy was statistically tested for relation with location and type of calcification, characteristics of the tendon and subdeltoid bursa, impingement, and rehabilitation treatments. There was a significant increase in the average CSS value between T0 and T12 (40.7 vs. 75.3). The variables analysed did not show a statistically significant effect on the outcome at T12. A link was noticed only between patients' increasing age and score improvement, particularly among female subjects. US-guided treatment of calcific tendonitis is a viable therapeutic option. No pre- or intra-procedural parameters emerged which might help in predicting the outcome, apart from patients' needs in everyday life. • US-guided tcreatment of shoulder calcific tendinopathy is an excellent therapeutic option • Long-term results seem greatly affected by patients' features and needs in everyday life • No proven pre- or intra-procedural parameters emerged that might predict the outcome.

  20. Noninvasive Label-Free Detection of Micrometastases in the Lymphatics with Ultrasound-Guided Photoacoustic Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    imaging can be used to guide dissection. We have also successfully integrated a programmable ultrasound machine (Verasonics Vantage ) and tunable pulsed...Mobile HE) with the programmable ultrasound machine (Verasonics Vantage ). We have synchronized the signals to enable interleaved acquisition of US

  1. Impact of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in prospective liver transplant recipients with hepatocellular carcinoma and lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Narendra S; Puri, Rajesh; Saigal, Sanjiv; Bhangui, Prashant; Saraf, Neeraj; Shah, Vinit; Nasa, Mukesh; Sarin, Haimanti; Guleria, Mridula; Sud, Randhir; Soin, Arvinder S

    2016-11-01

    Diagnosis of metastatic disease is important in patients with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to prevent futile liver transplantation. Some of these patients have metastatic lymphadenopathy; however, it is difficult to perform percutaneous fine-needle aspiration due to presence of collateral and anatomic location. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of lymph nodes offers several advantages like real-time vision, proximity to target, and avoidance of collaterals. The aim of this study was to look for metastatic lymphadenopathy by EUS-guided FNA (EUS-FNA) in prospective liver transplant recipients with HCC. A prospective study was conducted from January 2013 to January 2016 at a tertiary care center. All prospective liver transplant recipients with HCC had PET-CT and bone scan to look for metastatic disease. EUS-FNA was done in patients with abdominal or mediastinal lymphadenopathy and no evidence of extrahepatic disease. Data is shown as median (25-75 interquartile range). EUS-guided FNA was done for 50 patients (42 abdominal and 8 mediastinal lymph nodes), age 57 (53-62) years, Child-Turcotte-Pugh 7 (6-9), and model for end-stage liver disease 10 (7-16). FNA material was adequate in 92% patients, metastasis in 15 (30%), granulomatous lymphadenopathy in 4 (8%), and reactive change in 27 patients (54%). The material was inadequate for diagnosis in 4 (8%) patients. Thus, EUS-guided FNA precluded transplantation in 30% of patients with lymphadenopathy, and 4 (8%) patients received anti-tubercular therapy before liver transplantation. In patients with HCC and lymphadenopathy, EUS-guided FNA detected metastatic disease and precluded liver transplantation in approximately one third of patients.

  2. Comparison of Stereotactic and Ultrasound-guided Biopsy of Solid Supratentorial Tumor: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Chandra, P. Sarat; Sharma, Bhawani S.; Mehta, V. S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The computed tomography (CT) guided stereotactic biopsy (STB) is considered as method of choice for biopsy of intracranial mass lesions. However, it's disadvantages are frame fixation, time requirement for transportation between CT scan suit to the operation theater with added much higher equipment cost in the relatively resource scarred developing country. Ultrasound-guided biopsy (USGB) is relatively simpler, economical, less time consuming, and real-time procedure. Clinical Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven consecutively admitted patients with supratentorial brain tumors, who underwent biopsy of the lesion using CT compatible stereotactic and ultrasound-guided (USGB) procedure formed cohort of the study. Based on location and size of the lesions, the cases were divided into two groups, superficial and deep. Twenty-two patients underwent ultrasound-guided biopsy and 15 with STB. Results: The diagnostic yield of STB was 93% and 91% for ultrasound-guided biopsy. The mean operation time of STB group was 149.00 min and 94 min for USGB, which was statistically significant. Two cases in each group developed hematoma; however, one case in USGB group needed surgical evacuation. The real-time monitoring detected two hematoma intraoperatively, which were further also confirmed on postoperative CT scan head. Conclusions: The ultrasound-guided biopsy procedure (USGB) was simple, relatively shorter time-consuming procedure and equally efficacious and utilizing economical equipment and can act as a safer alternative to CT STB process for biopsy of the intracranial mass lesion. Furthermore, USGB also provided intra-operative real-time monitoring, which provided clue for close monitoring in the postoperative period after completion of biopsy to look for development of fresh hematoma development not only at the biopsy site but also along the biopsy track and adjoining area. Perhaps, a longer period of ultrasonic monitoring following the procedure would be of

  3. Treatment of Partial Rotator Cuff Tear with Ultrasound-guided Platelet-rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Sengodan, Vetrivel Chezian; Kurian, Sajith; Ramasamy, Raghupathy

    2017-01-01

    Background: The treatment of symptomatic partial rotator cuff tear has presented substantial challenge to orthopaedic surgeons as it can vary from conservative to surgical repair. Researches have established the influence of platelet rich plasma in healing damaged tissue. Currently very few data are available regarding the evidence of clinical and radiological outcome of partial rotator cuff tear treated with ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection in English literature. Materials and Methods: 20 patients with symptomatic partial rotator cuff tears were treated with ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection. Before and after the injection of platelet rich plasma scoring was done with visual analogue score, Constant shoulder score, and UCLA shoulder score at 8 weeks and third month. A review ultrasound was performed 8 weeks after platelet rich plasma injection to assess the rotator cuff status. Results: Our study showed statistically significant improvements in 17 patients in VAS pain score, constant shoulder score and UCLA shoulder score. No significant changes in ROM were noted when matched to the contra-lateral side (P < 0.001) at the 3 month follow-up. The study also showed good healing on radiological evaluation with ultrasonogram 8 weeks after platelet rich plasma injection. Conclusion: Ultrasound guided platelet rich plasma injection for partial rotator cuff tears is an effective procedure that leads to significant decrease in pain, improvement in shoulder functions, much cost-effective and less problematic compared to a surgical treatment. PMID:28900553

  4. Simulators for training in ultrasound guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Farjad Sultan, Syed; Shorten, George; Iohom, Gabrielle

    2013-06-01

    The four major categories of skill sets associated with proficiency in ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia are 1) understanding device operations, 2) image optimization, 3) image interpretation and 4) visualization of needle insertion and injection of the local anesthetic solution. Of these, visualization of needle insertion and injection of local anaesthetic solution can be practiced using simulators and phantoms. This survey of existing simulators summarizes advantages and disadvantages of each. Current deficits pertain to the validation process.

  5. The development of an automatically produced cholangiography procedure using the reconstruction of portal-phase multidetector-row computed tomography images: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Tomoaki; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Koga, Kusuto; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Ebata, Tomoki; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Sugawara, Gen; Mizuno, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Junpei; Mori, Kensaku; Nagino, Masato

    2017-03-01

    Fusion angiography using reconstructed multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) images, and cholangiography using reconstructed images from MDCT with a cholangiographic agent include an anatomical gap due to the different periods of MDCT scanning. To conquer such gaps, we attempted to develop a cholangiography procedure that automatically reconstructs a cholangiogram from portal-phase MDCT images. The automatically produced cholangiography procedure utilized an original software program that was developed by the Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya University. This program structured 5 candidate biliary tracts, and automatically selected one as the candidate for cholangiography. The clinical value of the automatically produced cholangiography procedure was estimated based on a comparison with manually produced cholangiography. Automatically produced cholangiograms were reconstructed for 20 patients who underwent MDCT scanning before biliary drainage for distal biliary obstruction. The procedure showed the ability to extract the 5 main biliary branches and the 21 subsegmental biliary branches in 55 and 25 % of the cases, respectively. The extent of aberrant connections and aberrant extractions outside the biliary tract was acceptable. Among all of the cholangiograms, 5 were clinically applied with no correction, 8 were applied with modest improvements, and 3 produced a correct cholangiography before automatic selection. Although our procedure requires further improvement based on the analysis of additional patient data, it may represent an alternative to direct cholangiography in the future.

  6. Magnetic Resonance-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma: A Case Series Report.

    PubMed

    Rovella, Marcello S; Martins, Guilherme L P; Cavalcanti, Conrado F A; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Camargo, Olavo P; Cerri, Giovanni G; Menezes, Marcos R

    2016-04-01

    Osteoid osteoma is painful benign tumor. The aim of this study was to report our initial experience using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound to treat osteoid osteomas. This retrospective single-center study included four patients treated with magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound. They presented with severe pain with reduced quality of life and a poor response to clinical treatment. The pre- and post-treatment evaluation comprised computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging and focused on quality of life and the impact of pain on daily activities. After treatment, three patients had complete pain resolution with no recurrence. One patient had a recurrence of symptoms after 2 wk and underwent a new successful treatment with increased energy levels. On average, 13 sonications were administered (8-18 sonications/treatment) with an average energy of 2,003 J (range: 1,063-3,522 J). Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound appears to be a feasible, tolerable and effective treatment in selected patients with osteoid osteomas. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... perform an ultrasound-guided biopsy . Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it is often used to guide biopsy ...

  8. Safety of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation for diffuse adenomyosis: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yujie; Hu, Liang; Chen, Wenzhi; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Xi; Chen, Jinyun

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the safety of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for patients with diffuse adenomyosis. This was a retrospective cohort study. The data was collected from 417 symptomatic adenomyosis patients who underwent ultrasound-guided HIFU between January 2012 and December 2015 at 1st Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China. Among them were 260 patients with diffuse adenomyosis (Group D) and 157 patients with focal adenomyosis (Group F). All patients underwent contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) one week before and the day after HIFU treatment. Successful treatment with HIFU was measured by the non-perfused volume ratio (NPVR). Intraprocedural and postprocedural adverse effects and complications were recorded to assess the safety of the procedure. Patients were followed-up for three months post-treatment. Complications were given a grade A through F according to the SIR Standards. All patients successfully completed the procedure, non-perfused regions appeared in 415 (99.5%) patients. The non-perfused volume ratio (NPVR) of Group D was significantly lower than that of Group F (P<0.05). During the procedure, the odds ratio of skin-burning pain was 1.7 (OR=1.617, 95% CI: 1.103-2.532), when comparing Group D with Group F, while the odds ratio of inguinal pain was equal to 2.0 (OR=2.038, 95% CI: 1.161-3.580), when Group F was compared to Group D. 97 patients (23.3%) received nominal therapy due to complications ([Society of interventional radiology, SIR]-B grade), among them, there were 62 cases (23.8%) in Group D and 35 cases (22.3%) in Group F. No significant difference was found between the two groups (P>0.05) and neither of the reported complications of SIR-C-SIR-F occurred within the two groups. Based on our results, ultrasound-guided HIFU is safe for the treatment of diffuse adenomyosis, and controlling the ablation zone is crucial to ensure patients' safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  9. A novel ultrasound-guided shoulder arthroscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyryshkin, K.; Mousavi, P.; Beek, M.; Chen, T.; Pichora, D.; Abolmaesumi, P.

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a novel ultrasound-guided computer system for arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder joint. Intraoperatively, the system tracks and displays the surgical instruments, such as arthroscope and arthroscopic burrs, relative to the anatomy of the patient. The purpose of this system is to improve the surgeon's perception of the three-dimensional space within the anatomy of the patient in which the instruments are manipulated and to provide guidance towards the targeted anatomy. Pre-operatively, computed tomography images of the patient are acquired to construct virtual threedimensional surface models of the shoulder bone structure. Intra-operatively, live ultrasound images of pre-selected regions of the shoulder are captured using an ultrasound probe whose three-dimensional position is tracked by an optical camera. These images are used to register the surface model to the anatomy of the patient in the operating room. An initial alignment is obtained by matching at least three points manually selected on the model to their corresponding points identified on the ultrasound images. The registration is then improved with an iterative closest point or a sequential least squares estimation technique. In the present study the registration results of these techniques are compared. After the registration, surgical instruments are displayed relative to the surface model of the patient on a graphical screen visible to the surgeon. Results of laboratory experiments on a shoulder phantom indicate acceptable registration results and sufficiently fast overall system performance to be applicable in the operating room.

  10. Ultrasound-guided injection for plantar fasciitis: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Nair, AS; Sahoo, RK

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a distressing condition experienced by many patients. Although self-limiting, it tends to become a chronic ailment if the precipitating factors are not addressed. One of the modality of treating PF is intra-lesional corticosteroid injection. This was done using palpation technique earlier but nowadays many specialists use ultrasound (US) imaging as a guide to give injection accurately instead of inadvertently damaging the plantar fascia or injecting into surrounding soft tissue, both of which can have serious implications. We did a literature search in Medline, Scopus, and Embase databases to find out articles describing US-guided corticosteroid injection for treating PF and whether guided injection was effective than injection given by palpation. PMID:27833490

  11. Percutaneous CT and Fluoroscopy-Guided Screw Fixation of Pathological Fractures in the Shoulder Girdle: Technical Report of 3 Cases.

    PubMed

    Garnon, Julien; Koch, Guillaume; Ramamurthy, Nitin; Caudrelier, Jean; Rao, Pramod; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Gangi, Afshin

    2016-09-01

    To review our initial experience with percutaneous CT and fluoroscopy-guided screw fixation of pathological shoulder-girdle fractures. Between May 2014 and June 2015, three consecutive oncologic patients (mean age 65 years; range 57-75 years) with symptomatic pathological shoulder-girdle fractures unsuitable for surgery and radiotherapy underwent percutaneous image-guided screw fixation. Fractures occurred through metastases (n = 2) or a post-ablation cavity (n = 1). Mechanical properties of osteosynthesis were adjudged superior to stand-alone cementoplasty in each case. Cannulated screws were placed under combined CT and fluoroscopic guidance with complementary radiofrequency ablation or cementoplasty to optimise local palliation and secure screw fixation, respectively, in two cases. Follow-up was undertaken every few weeks until mortality or most recent appointment. Four pathological fractures were treated in three patients (2 acromion, 1 clavicular, 1 coracoid). Mean size of associated lesion was 2.6 cm (range 1-4.5 cm). Technical success was achieved in all cases (100 %), without complications. Good palliation and restoration of mobility were observed in two cases at 2-3 months; one case could not be followed due to early post-procedural oncologic mortality. Percutaneous image-guided shoulder-girdle osteosynthesis appears technically feasible with good short-term efficacy in this complex patient subset. Further studies are warranted to confirm these promising initial results.

  12. Comparison of a novel real-time SonixGPS needle-tracking ultrasound technique with traditional ultrasound for vascular access in a phantom gel model.

    PubMed

    Kopac, Daniel S; Chen, Jerry; Tang, Raymond; Sawka, Andrew; Vaghadia, Himat

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous vascular access for endovascular procedures is well established in surgical practice. Despite this, rates of complications from venous and arterial access procedures remain a significant cause of morbidity. We hypothesized that the use of a new technique of vascular access using an ultrasound with a novel needle-guidance positioning system (GPS) would lead to improved success rates of vascular puncture for both in-plane and out-of-plane techniques compared with traditional ultrasound. A prospective, randomized crossover study of medical students from all years of medical school was conducted using a phantom gel model. Each medical student performed three ultrasound-guided punctures with each of the four modalities (in-plane no GPS, in-plane with GPS, out-of-plane no GPS, out-of-plane with GPS) for a total of 12 attempts. The success or failure was judged by the ability to aspirate a simulated blood solution from the model. The time to successful puncture was also recorded. A poststudy validated NASA Task Load Index workload questionnaire was conducted to assess the student's perceptions of the two different techniques. A total of 30 students completed the study. There was no significant difference seen in the mean times of vascular access for each of the modalities. Higher success rates for vascular access using the GPS for both the in-plane (94% vs 91%) and the out-of-plane (86% vs 70%) views were observed; however, this was not statistically significant. The students perceived the mental demand (median 12.0 vs 14.00; P = .035) and effort to be lower (mean 11.25 vs 14.00; P = .044) as well as the performance to be higher (mean 15.50 vs 14.00; P = .041) for the GPS vs the traditional ultrasound-guided technique. Students also perceived their ability to access vessels increased with the aid of the GPS (7.00 vs 6.50; P = .007). The majority of students expressed a preference for GPS (26/30, 87%) as opposed to the traditional counterpart

  13. Utility of rapid on-site cytologic evaluation during endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath for peripheral pulmonary lesions.

    PubMed

    Izumo, Takehiro; Matsumoto, Yuji; Sasada, Shinji; Chavez, Christine; Nakai, Toshiyuki; Tsuchida, Takaaki

    2017-03-01

    The utility of rapid on-site evaluation during endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath for peripheral pulmonary lesions is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of rapid on-site evaluation during endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath for peripheral pulmonary lesions. Consecutive patients who underwent endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath for the diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions at our hospital between September 2012 and July 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Cytology slides were air-dried, and modified Giemsa (Diff-Quik) staining was used for rapid on-site evaluation. Additional smears were prepared for Papanicolaou staining and tissue samples were placed in formalin for histologic evaluation. The results of rapid on-site evaluation were compared with the final diagnoses of endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath. A total of 718 cases were included in the study population. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy of rapid on-site evaluation during endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath for peripheral pulmonary lesions was 88.6%, 65.9%, 81.2%, 77.7% and 80.1%, respectively. There were no procedure-related deaths. Rapid on-site evaluation during endobronchial ultrasound with a guide sheath had high sensitivity for peripheral pulmonary lesions. When carrying out rapid on-site evaluation of transbronchial biopsy samples from peripheral pulmonary lesions, careful interpretation and clinical correlation are necessary. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Toward a real-time system for temporal enhanced ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Shekoofeh; Van Woudenberg, Nathan; Sojoudi, Samira; Li, Ming; Xu, Sheng; Abu Anas, Emran M; Yan, Pingkun; Tahmasebi, Amir; Kwak, Jin Tae; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter; Pinto, Peter; Wood, Bradford; Mousavi, Parvin; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2018-03-27

    We have previously proposed temporal enhanced ultrasound (TeUS) as a new paradigm for tissue characterization. TeUS is based on analyzing a sequence of ultrasound data with deep learning and has been demonstrated to be successful for detection of cancer in ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy. Our aim is to enable the dissemination of this technology to the community for large-scale clinical validation. In this paper, we present a unified software framework demonstrating near-real-time analysis of ultrasound data stream using a deep learning solution. The system integrates ultrasound imaging hardware, visualization and a deep learning back-end to build an accessible, flexible and robust platform. A client-server approach is used in order to run computationally expensive algorithms in parallel. We demonstrate the efficacy of the framework using two applications as case studies. First, we show that prostate cancer detection using near-real-time analysis of RF and B-mode TeUS data and deep learning is feasible. Second, we present real-time segmentation of ultrasound prostate data using an integrated deep learning solution. The system is evaluated for cancer detection accuracy on ultrasound data obtained from a large clinical study with 255 biopsy cores from 157 subjects. It is further assessed with an independent dataset with 21 biopsy targets from six subjects. In the first study, we achieve area under the curve, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 0.94, 0.77, 0.94 and 0.92, respectively, for the detection of prostate cancer. In the second study, we achieve an AUC of 0.85. Our results suggest that TeUS-guided biopsy can be potentially effective for the detection of prostate cancer.

  15. An ultrasound-guided fluorescence tomography system: design and specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Alisha V.; Flynn, Brendan P.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Torosean, Sason; Davis, Scott C.; Maytin, Edward V.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    An ultrasound-guided fluorescence molecular tomography system is under development for in vivo quantification of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) during Aminolevulinic Acid - Photodynamic Therapy (ALA-PDT) of Basal Cell Carcinoma. The system is designed to combine fiber-based spectral sampling of PPIX fluorescence emission with co-registered ultrasound images to quantify local fluorophore concentration. A single white light source is used to provide an estimate of the bulk optical properties of tissue. Optical data is obtained by sequential illumination of a 633nm laser source at 4 linear locations with parallel detection at 5 locations interspersed between the sources. Tissue regions from segmented ultrasound images, optical boundary data, white light-informed optical properties and diffusion theory are used to estimate the fluorophore concentration in these regions. Our system and methods allow interrogation of both superficial and deep tissue locations up to PpIX concentrations of 0.025ug/ml.

  16. Ultrasound-guided breast-sparing surgery to improve cosmetic outcomes and quality of life. A prospective multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial comparing ultrasound-guided surgery to traditional palpation-guided surgery (COBALT trial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer was developed as a method to preserve healthy breast tissue, thereby improving cosmetic outcomes. Thus far, the primary aim of breast-conserving surgery has been the achievement of tumour-free resection margins and prevention of local recurrence, whereas the cosmetic outcome has been considered less important. Large studies have reported poor cosmetic outcomes in 20-40% of patients after breast-conserving surgery, with the volume of the resected breast tissue being the major determinant. There is clear evidence for the efficacy of ultrasonography in the resection of nonpalpable tumours. Surgical resection of palpable breast cancer is performed with guidance by intra-operative palpation. These palpation-guided excisions often result in an unnecessarily wide resection of adjacent healthy breast tissue, while the rate of tumour-involved resection margins is still high. It is hypothesised that the use of intra-operative ultrasonography in the excision of palpable breast cancer will improve the ability to spare healthy breast tissue while maintaining or even improving the oncological margin status. The aim of this study is to compare ultrasound-guided surgery for palpable tumours with the standard palpation-guided surgery in terms of the extent of healthy breast tissue resection, the percentage of tumour-free margins, cosmetic outcomes and quality of life. Methods/design In this prospective multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial, 120 women who have been diagnosed with palpable early-stage (T1-2N0-1) primary invasive breast cancer and deemed suitable for breast-conserving surgery will be randomised between ultrasound-guided surgery and palpation-guided surgery. With this sample size, an expected 20% reduction of resected breast tissue and an 18% difference in tumour-free margins can be detected with a power of 80%. Secondary endpoints include cosmetic outcomes and quality of life. The rationale, study

  17. Magnetic resonance guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of musculoskeletal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Avedian, Raffi S.; Gold, Garry; Ghanouni, Pejman; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the fundamental principles and clinical experimental uses of magnetic resonance guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) ablation of musculoskeletal tumors. MRgHIFU is a noninvasive treatment modality that takes advantage of the ability of magnetic resonance to measure tissue temperature and uses this technology to guide high-intensity focused ultrasound waves to a specific focus within the human body that results in heat generation and complete thermal necrosis of the targeted tissue. Adjacent normal tissues are spared because of the accurate delivery of thermal energy, as well as, local blood perfusion that provides a cooling effect. MRgHIFU is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of uterine fibroids and is used on an experimental basis to treat breast, prostate, liver, bone, and brain tumors. PMID:26120376

  18. Objective assessment of operator performance during ultrasound-guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Tabriz, David M; Street, Mandie; Pilgram, Thomas K; Duncan, James R

    2011-09-01

    Simulation permits objective assessment of operator performance in a controlled and safe environment. Image-guided procedures often require accurate needle placement, and we designed a system to monitor how ultrasound guidance is used to monitor needle advancement toward a target. The results were correlated with other estimates of operator skill. The simulator consisted of a tissue phantom, ultrasound unit, and electromagnetic tracking system. Operators were asked to guide a needle toward a visible point target. Performance was video-recorded and synchronized with the electromagnetic tracking data. A series of algorithms based on motor control theory and human information processing were used to convert raw tracking data into different performance indices. Scoring algorithms converted the tracking data into efficiency, quality, task difficulty, and targeting scores that were aggregated to create performance indices. After initial feasibility testing, a standardized assessment was developed. Operators (N = 12) with a broad spectrum of skill and experience were enrolled and tested. Overall scores were based on performance during ten simulated procedures. Prior clinical experience was used to independently estimate operator skill. When summed, the performance indices correlated well with estimated skill. Operators with minimal or no prior experience scored markedly lower than experienced operators. The overall score tended to increase according to operator's clinical experience. Operator experience was linked to decreased variation in multiple aspects of performance. The aggregated results of multiple trials provided the best correlation between estimated skill and performance. A metric for the operator's ability to maintain the needle aimed at the target discriminated between operators with different levels of experience. This study used a highly focused task model, standardized assessment, and objective data analysis to assess performance during simulated

  19. Combined Ultrasound and MR Imaging to Guide Focused Ultrasound Therapies in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation – the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength, and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. Materials and Methods We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. Results The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood-brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. Conclusion While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood-brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate it will also prove to

  20. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-07-01

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood-brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood-brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that will

  1. Novel ultrasound-responsive chitosan/perfluorohexane nanodroplets for image-guided smart delivery of an anticancer agent: Curcumin.

    PubMed

    Baghbani, Fatemeh; Chegeni, Mahdieh; Moztarzadeh, Fathollah; Hadian-Ghazvini, Samaneh; Raz, Majid

    2017-05-01

    Ultrasound-responsive nanodroplets are a class of new emerging smart drug delivery systems which provide image-guided nano-therapy of various diseases, especially cancers. Here, we developed multifunctional smart curcumin-loaded chitosan/perfluorohexane nanodroplets for contrast-ultrasound imaging and on-demand drug delivery. The nanodroplets were synthesized via nanoemulsion process. The optimal formulation with the size of 101.2nm and 77.8% curcumin entrapment was chosen for release study and cytotoxicity evaluation. Sonication at the frequency of 1MHz, 2W/cm 2 for 4min triggered the release of 63.5% of curcumin from optimal formulation (Cur-NDs-2). Ultrasound aided release study indicated that the concentration of perfluorohexane and the degree of acoustic droplet vaporization play important role in ultrasound-active drug release. B-mode ultrasound imaging confirmed strong ultrasound contrast of chitosan nanodroplets even at low concentrations via droplet to bubble transition. Finally, cytotoxicity of the ultrasound-responsive nanodroplets in the presence of ultrasound was evaluated in-vitro on 4T1 human breast cancer cells. Cell growth inhibitory effects of curcumin-loaded nanodroplets significantly increased by ultrasound exposure. According to the obtained results, these ultrasound responsive curcumin-loaded chitosan/perfluorohexane nanodroplets have a great potential for imaged-guided cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A review of randomised controlled trials comparing ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy with endothermal ablation for the treatment of great saphenous varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Davies, Huw Ob; Popplewell, Matthew; Darvall, Katy; Bate, Gareth; Bradbury, Andrew W

    2016-05-01

    The last 10 years have seen the introduction into everyday clinical practice of a wide range of novel non-surgical treatments for varicose veins. In July 2013, the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommended the following treatment hierarchy for varicose veins: endothermal ablation, ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy, surgery and compression hosiery. The aim of this paper is to review the randomised controlled trials that have compared endothermal ablation and ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy to determine if the level 1 evidence base still supports an "endothermal ablation first" strategy for the treatment of varicose veins. A PubMed and OVID literature search (until 31 January 2015) was performed and randomised controlled trials comparing endothermal ablation and ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy were obtained. Although anatomical success appeared higher with endothermal ablation than ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy, clinical success and patient-reported outcomes measures were similar. Morbidity and complication rates were very low and not significantly different between endothermal ablation and ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy. Ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy was consistently less expensive that endothermal ablation. All endovenous modalities appear to be successful and have a role in modern day practice. Although further work is required to optimise ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy technique to maximise anatomical success and minimise retreatment, the present level 1 evidence base shows there is no significant difference in clinical important outcomes between ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy and endothermal ablation. As ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy is less expensive, it is likely to be a more cost-effective option in most patients in most healthcare settings. Strict adherence to the treatment hierarchy recommended by National Institute for Health and Care Excellence seems unjustified. © The Author

  3. A technical report on ultrasound-guided scapulocostal syndrome injection.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, C; Harmon, D

    2016-08-01

    We describe a case report and technique for using an ultrasound scanner and a linear transducer to guide serratus posterior superior (SPS) muscle injection. A 43-year-old female presented with chronic pain centered under the right upper portion of her scapula impacting her activities of daily living. For the ultrasound-guided SPS muscle injection, the patient was placed in the prone position. The transducer was oriented in a transverse orientation at the level of the C6-T1 vertebrae. Here the SPS muscle attaches to the lower portion of the ligament nuchae and the intervening interspinous ligaments. The muscle fibers run inferiorly and laterally to attach to the 2nd-5th ribs which were identified along with the lateral portion of the serratus posterior superior muscle which is covered by the scapula. Real-time imaging was used to direct a spinal needle into the trigger points of the SPS muscle, where solution was injected under direct vision. The patient's pain symptoms improved significantly. Serratus posterior superior injection can confirm a diagnosis of scapulocostal syndrome and be therapeutically beneficial.

  4. Effects of arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block combined with ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Jun; Hwang, Jung-Taek; Kim, Do-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Hwang, Sung Mi; Lee, Na Rea; Kwak, Byung-Chan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pain relieving effect of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) combined with arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) with that of ultrasound-guided ISB alone within the first 48 h after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Forty-eight patients with rotator cuff tears who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled. The 24 patients in group 1 received ultrasound-guided ISB and arthroscopy-guided SSNB; the remaining 24 patients in group 2 underwent ultrasound-guided ISB alone. Visual analogue scale pain score and patient satisfaction score were checked at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively. Group 1 had a lower visual analogue scale pain score at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively (1.7 < 2.6, 1.6 < 4.0, 3.5 < 5.8, 3.6 < 5.2, 3.2 < 4.2, 1.3 < 2.0), and a higher patient satisfaction score at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 h post-operatively than group 2 (7.8 > 6.0, 6.2 > 4.3, 6.4 > 5.1, 6.9 > 5.9, 7.9 > 7.1). Six patients in group 1 developed rebound pain twice, and the others in group 1 developed it once. All of the patients in group 2 had one rebound phenomenon each (p = 0.010). The mean timing of rebound pain in group 1 was later than that in group 2 (15.5 > 9.3 h, p < 0.001), and the mean size of rebound pain was smaller in group 1 than that in group 2 (2.5 > 4.0, p = 0.001). Arthroscopy-guided SSNB combined with ultrasound-guided ISB resulted in lower visual analogue scale pain scores at 3-24 and 48 h post-operatively, and higher patient satisfaction scores at 6-36 h post-operatively with the attenuated rebound pain compared to scores in patients who received ultrasound-guided ISB alone after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The combined blocks may relieve post-operative pain more effectively than the single block within 48 h after arthroscopic cuff repair. Randomized controlled trial, Level I. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier

  5. Image-guided percutaneous cryotherapy for the management of gynecologic cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Leigh A; Munkarah, Adnan R; Vorugu, Vinaya R; Deppe, Gunter; Adam, Barbara; Malone, John M; Littrup, Peter J

    2008-11-01

    To report the clinical response to image-guided percutaneous cryotherapy (IPC) for the palliative management of localized metastases in patients with gynecologic malignancies. Institutional review board approval and patient consent were obtained. Gynecologic oncology patients were identified from our institution's cryotherapy database from August 2003 to August 2007. Cryotherapy was performed with 2.4 mm diameter probes (Endocare, Irvine, CA) with ultrasound or computerized tomography (CT) guidance under conscious sedation and local anesthesia. Follow-up was conducted by imaging studies and clinical encounters, using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST criteria). Twenty-eight ablation sessions were performed for 41 metastatic foci in 15 patients with gynecologic malignancies. Twelve patients had prior chemotherapy and 5 patients had prior radiation. Median follow-up was 317.5 days (range 95-1189). Median post-procedure pain score: 3/10 (range 0-5). Mean initial tumor size was 2.6 cm in maximal diameter. Median reduction in tumor diameter at 1 month was 21.4% (range 2-67.4%), at 3 months was 43.6% (range 16-80.4%), at 6 months was 54.7% (range (16.6-88.9%) and at 9 months was 58.2% (range 32-88.9%). Ten patients received concurrent chemotherapy, 8 had progression of disease at other sites and 2 had stable disease, while the cryotherapy site improved. One of 5 patients who had cryotherapy in the previously irradiated zone had recurrence. A liver capsule hematoma developed as an immediate complication in one patient and an enterocutaneous fistula developed in another. IPC is a well-tolerated, effective tool for local control of isolated metastatic foci as a single-modality treatment and for local control of symptomatic metastases in select patients undergoing systemic therapy for the management of gynecologic malignancies.

  6. Sonoanatomy relevant for ultrasound-guided central neuraxial blocks via the paramedian approach in the lumbar region

    PubMed Central

    Karmakar, M K; Li, X; Kwok, W H; Ho, A M-H; Ngan Kee, W D

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The use of ultrasound to guide peripheral nerve blocks is now a well-established technique in regional anaesthesia. However, despite reports of ultrasound guided epidural access via the paramedian approach, there are limited data on the use of ultrasound for central neuraxial blocks, which may be due to a poor understanding of spinal sonoanatomy. The aim of this study was to define the sonoanatomy of the lumbar spine relevant for central neuraxial blocks via the paramedian approach. Methods The sonoanatomy of the lumbar spine relevant for central neuraxial blocks via the paramedian approach was defined using a “water-based spine phantom”, young volunteers and anatomical slices rendered from the Visible Human Project data set. Results The water-based spine phantom was a simple model to study the sonoanatomy of the osseous elements of the lumbar spine. Each osseous element of the lumbar spine, in the spine phantom, produced a “signature pattern” on the paramedian sagittal scans, which was comparable to its sonographic appearance in vivo. In the volunteers, despite the narrow acoustic window, the ultrasound visibility of the neuraxial structures at the L3/L4 and L4/L5 lumbar intervertebral spaces was good, and we were able to delineate the sonoanatomy relevant for ultrasound-guided central neuraxial blocks via the paramedian approach. Conclusion Using a simple water-based spine phantom, volunteer scans and anatomical slices from the Visible Human Project (cadaver) we have described the sonoanatomy relevant for ultrasound-guided central neuraxial blocks via the paramedian approach in the lumbar region. PMID:22010025

  7. Real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia using the SonixGPS® needle tracking system: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wong, Simon W; Niazi, Ahtsham U; Chin, Ki J; Chan, Vincent W

    2013-01-01

    The SonixGPS® is an electromagnetic needle tracking system for ultrasound-guided needle intervention. Both current and predicted needle tip position are displayed on the ultrasound screen in real-time, facilitating needle-beam alignment and guidance to the target. This case report illustrates the use of the SonixGPS system for successful performance of real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia in a patient with difficult spinal anatomy. A 67-yr-old male was admitted to our hospital to undergo revision of total right hip arthroplasty. His four previous arthroplasties for hip revision were performed under general anesthesia because he had undergone L3-L5 instrumentation for spinal stenosis. The L4-L5 interspace was viewed with the patient in the left lateral decubitus position. A 19G 80-mm proprietary needle (Ultrasonix Medical Corp, Richmond, BC, Canada) was inserted and directed through the paraspinal muscles to the ligamentum flavum in plane to the ultrasound beam. A 120-mm 25G Whitacre spinal needle was then inserted through the introducer needle in a conventional fashion. Successful dural puncture was achieved on the second attempt, as indicated by a flow of clear cerebrospinal fluid. The patient tolerated the procedure well, and the spinal anesthetic was adequate for the duration of the surgery. The SonixGPS is a novel technology that can reduce the technical difficulty of real-time ultrasound-guided neuraxial blockade. It may also have applications in other advanced ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia techniques where needle-beam alignment is critical.

  8. Sonothrombolysis of Intra-Catheter Aged Venous Thrombi Using Microbubble Enhancement and Guided Three Dimensional Ultrasound Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Kutty, Shelby; Xie, Feng; Gao, Shunji; Drvol, Lucas K; Lof, John; Fletcher, Scott E; Radio, Stanley J; Danford, David A; Hammel, James M; Porter, Thomas R

    2010-01-01

    Central venous and arterial catheters are a major source of thrombo-embolic disease in children. We hypothesized that guided high mechanical index (MI) impulses from diagnostic three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound during an intravenous microbubble infusion could dissolve these thrombi. An in vitro system simulating intra-catheter thrombi was created and then treated with guided high MI impulses from 3D ultrasound, utilizing low MI microbubble sensitive imaging pulse sequence schemes to detect the microbubbles (Perflutren Lipid Microsphere, Definity®, Lantheus). Ten aged thrombi over 24 hours old were tested using 3D ultrasound coupled with a continuous diluted microbubble infusion (Group A), and ten with 3D ultrasound alone (Group B). Mean thrombus age was 28.6 hours (range 26.6–30.3). Groups A exhibited a 55 ± 19 % reduction in venous thrombus size, compared to 31±10 % for Group B (p=0.008). Feasibility testing was performed in 4 pigs, establishing a model to further investigate the efficacy. Sonothrombolysis of aged intra-catheter venous thrombi can be achieved with commercially available microbubbles and guided high MI ultrasound from a diagnostic 3D transducer. PMID:20696549

  9. [An easy, safe and affective method for the treatment of intussusception: ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction].

    PubMed

    Ülger, Fatma Esra Bahadır; Ülger, Aykut; Karakaya, Ali Erdal; Tüten, Fatih; Katı, Ömer; Çolak, Mustafa

    2014-03-01

    Intussusception is one of the important causes of intestinal obstruction in children. Hydrostatic reduction under ultrasound guidance is a popular treatment method for intussusception. In the present study, we aimed to explain the demographic characteristics of and treatment approaches in patients diagnosed with intussusception by ultrasound. Forty-one patients diagnosed with intussusception by ultrasound between August 2011 and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-four of these patients who had no contraindications had been treated with ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction. Twenty-four of the patients were male and 17 were female, a 1.4/1 male-to-female ratio. The majority of the patients were between the ages of 6-24 months and 2-5 years. The mean age was 31.12±26.32 months (range 3-125). Patients were more frequently diagnosed in April and May. Seventeen patients who had clinical contraindications enrolled directly for surgery. In 20 of the 24 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction, reduction was achieved. Three experienced recurrence. In two of these patients, successful reduction was achieved with the second attempt. The remaining patient was enrolled for surgery. Hydrostatic reduction was performed 26 times on these 24 patients, and in 22, success was achieved (84.6%). No procedure-related complications occurred in the patients. Ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction, with its high success rates and lack of radiation risk, should be the first choice therapeutic approach for children diagnosed with intussusception.

  10. Feasibility of virtual 3-Fr percutaneous coronary intervention using standard guiding catheters

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Kazuteru; Miyao, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Recent studies have reported the efficacy of sheathless percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using hydrophilic-coated 5-Fr guiding catheters that are one to two Fr sizes smaller in diameter than the corresponding introducer sheath (virtual 3-Fr PCI). However, the limited number of shapes of hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters occasionally makes them difficult to engage and control. Aim To evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of virtual 3-Fr PCI using standard guiding catheters of various shapes. Material and methods We identified 35 consecutive patients with stable angina, who underwent virtual 3-Fr PCI using either hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters (Works™, Medikit, Japan) or standard guiding catheters (Heartrail™, Terumo, Japan). Results Thirty-five patients were identified (63% men; mean age 70 ±13 years). In 2 cases, hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters were exchanged to standard guiding catheters because of difficulty in engaging the target coronary arteries. Ultimately, standard guiding catheters were used in 20 patients (57%) and hydrophilic-coated catheters were used in 15 (43%). One of 20 patients treated with standard guiding catheters and 1 of 15 treated with hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters underwent the 4-in-3 “slender mother and child” PCI technique due to difficulty of stent deployment. There were no differences between the two groups in PCI procedural variables such as procedural time, fluoroscopy time, radiation dose, or contrast dye volume. There were no access site-related complications in this study. Conclusions These findings indicate that virtual 3-Fr PCI using standard guiding catheters is as efficient and safe as virtual 3-Fr PCI using hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters. PMID:25489315

  11. Ultrasound-guided medical thoracoscopy in the absence of pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Giampietro; Valsecchi, Alberto; Indellicati, Davide; Arondi, Sabrina; Trigiani, Marco; Pinelli, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    Medical thoracoscopy (MT) is a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure that permits the study of the pleural space. The presence of pleural adhesions is the most important contraindication to performing MT. Lesions of the pleura in absence of pleural effusion are usually studied in video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) with preoperative ultrasound evaluation. No data are available about ultrasound-guided MT in the absence of pleural effusion. From January 2007 to June 2013, 622 consecutive MTs were performed under ultrasound guidance without inducing a pneumothorax. A retrospective cohort of 29 patients affected by pleural diseases without fluid was reviewed. The fifth or sixth intercostal spaces along the midaxillary line with a good echographic "sliding sign" and normal appearance of the pleural line were chosen as the entry site. The pleural cavity was explored, and biopsies were performed. The mean age of the patient cohort was 62.8 years; there were 20 male patients and nine female patients. Pleural adherences were avoided, and adequate number of pleural biopsies were performed. No parenchymal lung injuries, bleeding, or hematoma occurred. Seventeen patients had a completely free pleural cavity, four patients had a single pleural adhesion, and eight had multiple pleural adhesions; in all cases, however, endoscopic exploration was possible and biopsy specimens were adequate. The most frequent histopathologic diagnosis was malignant pleural mesothelioma. We have shown that thoracic ultrasound accurately identifies intrathoracic adhesions and, in experienced hands, can guide MT access, replacing the VATS approach, even in the complete absence of pleural effusion.

  12. Single-operator real-time ultrasound-guided spinal injection using SonixGPS™: a case series.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Silke; Tang, Raymond; Sawka, Andrew; Vaghadia, Himat

    2013-09-01

    The SonixGPS™ is a novel needle tracking system that has recently been approved in Canada for ultrasound-guided needle interventions. It allows optimization of needle-beam alignment by providing a real-time display of current and predicted needle tip position. Currently, there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of this technique for performance of real-time spinal anesthesia. This case series reports performance of the SonixGPS system for real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia in elective patients scheduled for joint arthroplasty. In this single-centre case series, 20 American Society of Anesthesiologists' class I-II patients scheduled for lower limb joint arthroplasty were recruited to undergo real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia with the SonixGPS after written informed consent. The primary outcome for this clinical cases series was the success rate of spinal anesthesia, and the main secondary outcome was time required to perform spinal anesthesia. Successful spinal anesthesia for joint arthroplasty was achieved in 18/20 patients, and 17 of these required only a single skin puncture. In 7/20 (35%) patients, dural puncture was achieved on the first needle pass, and in 11/20 (55%) patients, dural puncture was achieved with two or three needle redirections. Median (range) time taken to perform the block was 8 (5-14) min. The study procedure was aborted in two cases because our clinical protocol dictated using a standard approach if spinal anesthesia was unsuccessful after three ultrasound-guided insertion attempts. These two cases were classified as failures. No complications, including paresthesia, were observed during the procedure. All patients with successful spinal anesthesia found the technique acceptable and were willing to undergo a repeat procedure if deemed necessary. This case series shows that real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anesthesia with the SonixGPS system is possible within an acceptable time frame. It proved effective with

  13. Ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of iliopsoas spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sconfienza, L.M.; Perrone, N.; Lacelli, F.; Lentino, C.; Serafini, G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) is a common treatment for iliopsoas muscle spasticity, but it is not easy to position the needle in this muscle without guidance. In this paper we describe an ultrasound-guided technique for the intramuscular injection of BTX-A to treat spasticity of the iliopsoas muscle. Its effectiveness was assessed in 10 patients. Method and materials The ultrasound-guided technique for BTX-A injection was used on 10 patients. The needle was inserted into the muscle belly at an angle of 45° along the longitudinal axis of the muscle when allowed by patient's condition. Results In all cases, the iliopsoas muscle was easily identified and both the iliac and psoas components were assessed. Introduction of the needle and drug injection were entirely carried out under ultrasonographic guidance. The procedure was successful in all patients, even in those with a high-grade spasticity, and general anesthesia was not required. Conclusions This ultrasound-guided technique allows accurate guidance for the injection of BTX-A, and it can be considered as an alternate supportive therapy in patients with spasticity and dystonia. PMID:23396653

  14. Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome: Percutaneous Tendon Fenestration Versus Platelet-Rich Plasma Injection for Treatment of Gluteal Tendinosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jon A; Yablon, Corrie M; Henning, P Troy; Kazmers, Irene S; Urquhart, Andrew; Hallstrom, Brian; Bedi, Asheesh; Parameswaran, Aishwarya

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare ultrasound-guided percutaneous tendon fenestration to platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection for treatment of greater trochanteric pain syndrome. After Institutional Review Board approval was obtained, patients with symptoms of greater trochanteric pain syndrome and ultrasound findings of gluteal tendinosis or a partial tear (<50% depth) were blinded and treated with ultrasound-guided fenestration or autologous PRP injection of the abnormal tendon. Pain scores were recorded at baseline, week 1, and week 2 after treatment. Retrospective clinic record review assessed patient symptoms. The study group consisted of 30 patients (24 female), of whom 50% were treated with fenestration and 50% were treated with PRP. The gluteus medius was treated in 73% and 67% in the fenestration and PRP groups, respectively. Tendinosis was present in all patients. In the fenestration group, mean pain scores were 32.4 at baseline, 16.8 at time point 1, and 15.2 at time point 2. In the PRP group, mean pain scores were 31.4 at baseline, 25.5 at time point 1, and 19.4 at time point 2. Retrospective follow-up showed significant pain score improvement from baseline to time points 1 and 2 (P< .0001) but no difference between treatment groups (P= .1623). There was 71% and 79% improvement at 92 days (mean) in the fenestration and PRP groups, respectively, with no significant difference between the treatments (P >.99). Our study shows that both ultrasound-guided tendon fenestration and PRP injection are effective for treatment of gluteal tendinosis, showing symptom improvement in both treatment groups. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. Modelling and characterisation of a ultrasound-actuated needle for improved visibility in ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia and tissue biopsy.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Y; Hilgers, A; Sadiq, M; Cochran, S; Corner, G; Huang, Z

    2016-07-01

    Clear needle visualisation is recognised as an unmet need for ultrasound guided percutaneous needle procedures including regional anaesthesia and tissue biopsy. With inadequate needle visibility, these procedures may result in serious complications or a failed operation. This paper reports analysis of the modal behaviour of a previously proposed ultrasound-actuated needle configuration, which may overcome this problem by improving needle visibility in colour Doppler imaging. It uses a piezoelectric transducer to actuate longitudinal resonant modes in needles (outer diameter 0.8-1.2mm, length>65mm). The factors that affect the needle's vibration mode are identified, including the needle length, the transducer's resonance frequency and the gripping position. Their effects are investigated using finite element modelling, with the conclusions validated experimentally. The actuated needle was inserted into porcine tissue up to 30mm depth and its visibility was observed under colour Doppler imaging. The piezoelectric transducer is able to generate longitudinal vibration with peak-to-peak amplitude up to 4μm at the needle tip with an actuating voltage of 20Vpp. Actuated in longitudinal vibration modes (distal mode at 27.6kHz and transducer mode at 42.2kHz) with a drive amplitude of 12-14Vpp, a 120mm needle is delineated as a coloured line in colour Doppler images, with both needle tip and shaft visualised. The improved needle visibility is maintained while the needle is advanced into the tissue, thus allowing tracking of the needle position in real time. Moreover, the needle tip is highlighted by strong coloured artefacts around the actuated needle generated by its flexural vibration. A limitation of the technique is that the transducer mode requires needles of specific lengths so that the needle's resonance frequency matches the transducer. This may restrict the choice of needle lengths in clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B

  16. Propogation loss with frequency of ultrasound guided waves in a composite metal-honeycomb structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Indu F.; Baid, Harsh K.; Guzman, Narciso; Kempen, Lothar U.; Mal, Ajit

    2009-05-01

    Non-destructive testing of critical structural components is time consuming, while necessary for maintaining safe operation. Large aerospace structures, such as the vertical stabilizers of aircraft undergo inspection at regular intervals for damage diagnostics. However, conventional techniques for damage detection and identification before repair can be scheduled are conducted off-line and therefore can take weeks. The use of guided ultrasound waves is being investigated to expedite damage detection in composites. We measure the frequency dependent loss of ultrasonic guided waves for a structure comprising a boron-nitride composite skin sandwiching an aluminum honeycomb. A wide range of ultrasound frequencies propagate as measured using PZTs, with the lowest attenuation observed about 200-250 kHz. These measurements are confirmed using optical fiber Bragg grating arrays used as ultrasound transducers.

  17. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided epidural access at the lumbo-sacral space in dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa; Busoni, Valeria; Carrozzo, Maria Valentina; Sandersen, Charlotte; Gabriel, Annick; Bolen, Géraldine

    2015-01-01

    Epidural injections are commonly performed blindly in veterinary medicine. The aims of this study were to describe the lumbosacral ultrasonographic anatomy and to assess the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique in dogs. A cross sectional anatomic atlas of the lumbosacral region and ex vivo ultrasound images were obtained in two cadavers to describe the ultrasound anatomy and to identify the landmarks. Sixteen normal weight canine cadavers were used to establish two variations of the technique for direct ultrasound-guided injection, using spinal needles or epidural catheters. The technique was finally performed in two normal weight cadavers, in two overweight cadavers and in five live dogs with radiographic abnormalities resulting of the lumbosacral spine. Contrast medium was injected and CT was used to assess the success of the injection. The anatomic landmarks to carry out the procedure were the seventh lumbar vertebra, the iliac wings, and the first sacral vertebra. The target for directing the needle was the trapezoid-shaped echogenic zone between the contiguous articular facets of the lumbosacral vertebral canal visualized in a parasagittal plane. The spinal needle or epidural catheter was inserted in a 45° craniodorsal-caudoventral direction through the subcutaneous tissue and the interarcuate ligament until reaching the epidural space. CT examination confirmed the presence of contrast medium in the epidural space in 25/25 dogs, although a variable contamination of the subarachnoid space was also noted. Findings indicated that this ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique is feasible for normal weight and overweight dogs, with and without radiographic abnormalities of the spine. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  18. MR-guided focused ultrasound robot for performing experiments on large animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylonas, N.; Damianou, C.

    2011-09-01

    Introduction: In this paper an experimental MRI-guided focused ultrasound robot for large animals is presented. Materials and methods: A single element spherically focused transducer of 4 cm diameter, focusing at 10 cm and operating at 1 MHz was used. A positioning device was developed in order to scan the ultrasound transducer for performing MR-guided focused ultrasound experiments in large animals such as pig, sheep and dog. The positioning device incorporates only MRI compatible materials such as piezoelectric motors, Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic, brass screws, and brass pulleys. The system is manufactured automatically using a rapid prototyping system. Results: The system was tested successfully in a number of animals for various tasks (creation of single lesions, creation of overlapping lesions, and MR compatibility). Conclusions: A simple, cost effective, portable positioning device has been developed which can be used in virtually any clinical MRI scanner since it can be sited on the scanner's table. The propagation of HIFU can be via a lateral or superior-inferior approach. This system has the potential to be marketed as a cost effective solution for performing experiments in small and large animals.

  19. New platform for evaluating ultrasound-guided interventional technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle tracking systems are frequently used in surgical procedures. Various needle tracking technologies have been developed using ultrasound, electromagnetic sensors, and optical sensors. To evaluate these new needle tracking technologies, 3D volume information is often acquired to compute the actual distance from the needle tip to the target object. The image-guidance conditions for comparison are often inconsistent due to the ultrasound beam-thickness. Since 3D volumes are necessary, there is often some time delay between the surgical procedure and the evaluation. These evaluation methods will generally only measure the final needle location because they interrupt the surgical procedure. The main contribution of this work is a new platform for evaluating needle tracking systems in real-time, resolving the problems stated above. We developed new tools to evaluate the precise distance between the needle tip and the target object. A PZT element transmitting unit is designed as needle introducer shape so that it can be inserted in the needle. We have collected time of flight and amplitude information in real-time. We propose two systems to collect ultrasound signals. We demonstrate this platform on an ultrasound DAQ system and a cost-effective FPGA board. The results of a chicken breast experiment show the feasibility of tracking a time series of needle tip distances. We performed validation experiments with a plastisol phantom and have shown that the preliminary data fits a linear regression model with a RMSE of less than 0.6mm. Our platform can be applied to more general needle tracking methods using other forms of guidance.

  20. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Joronen, Kirsi; Komar, Gaber; Koskinen, Seppo K

    HIFU (high intensity focused ultrasound) is a method in which high-frequency ultrasound is focused on a tissue in order to achieve a thermal effect and the subsequent percutaneously ablation, or tissue modulation. HIFU is non-invasive and results in an immediate tissue destruction effect corresponding to surgery, either percutaneously or through body cavities. HIFU can be utilized in the treatment of both benign and malignant tumors. In neurological diseases, focused HIFU can be used in the treatment of disorders of the basal ganglia.

  1. Comparison of infection between internal-external and external percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in treating patients with malignant obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuan; Huang, Xin-En; Wang, Shu-Xiang; Lv, Peng-Hua; Sun, Ling; Wang, Fu-An

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is a form of palliative care for patients with malignant obstructive jaundice. We here compared the infection incidence between internal-external and external drainage for patients with malignant obstructive jaundice. Patients with malignant obstructive jaundice without infection before surgery receiving internal-external or external drainage from January 2008 to July 2014 were recruited. According to percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC), if the guide wire could pass through the occlusion and enter the duodenum, we recommended internal-external drainage, and external drainage biliary drainage was set up if the occlusion was not crossed. All patients with infection after procedure received a cultivation of blood and a bile bacteriological test. Among 110 patients with malignant obstructive jaundice, 22 (52.4%) were diagnosed with infection after the procedure in the internal-external drainage group, whereas 19 (27.9%) patients were so affected in the external drainage group, the difference being significant (p<0.05). In 8 patients (36.3%) in the internal-external group infection was controlled, as compared to 12 (63.1%) in the external group (p<0.05). The mortality rate for patients with infection not controlled in internal-external group in one month was 42.8%, while this rate in external group was 28.6% (p<0.05). External drainage is a good choice, which could significantly reduce the chance of biliary infection caused by bacteria, and decrease the mortality rate at one month and improve the long-term prognosis.

  2. Robotic active positioning for magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xu; Huang, Zhihong; Volovick, Alexander; Melzer, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) guided High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive method producing thermal necrosis and cavitation at the position of tumors with high accuracy. Because the typical size of the high-intensity focused ultrasound focus are much smaller than the targeted tumor or other tissues, multiple sonications and focus repositioning become necessary for HIFU treatment. In order to reach a much wider range, manual repositioning or using MR compatible mechanical actuators could be used. The repositioning technique is a time consuming procedure because it needs a series of MR imaging to detect the transducer and markers preplaced on the mechanical devices. We combined an active tracking technique into the MR guided HIFU system. In this work, the robotic system used is the MR-compatible robotics from InnoMotion{trade mark, serif} (IBSMM, Engineering spol. s r.o. / Ltd, Czech) which is originally designed for MR-guided needle biopsy. The precision and positioning speed of the combined robotic HIFU system are evaluated in this study. Compared to the existing MR guided HIFU systems, the combined robotic system with active tracking techniques provides a potential that allows the HIFU treatment to operate in a larger spatial range and with a faster speed.

  3. Percutaneous CT and Fluoroscopy-Guided Screw Fixation of Pathological Fractures in the Shoulder Girdle: Technical Report of 3 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juliengarnon@gmail.com; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: Guillaume.koch@gmail.com; Ramamurthy, Nitin, E-mail: Nitin-ramamurthy@hotmail.com

    ObjectiveTo review our initial experience with percutaneous CT and fluoroscopy-guided screw fixation of pathological shoulder-girdle fractures.Materials and MethodsBetween May 2014 and June 2015, three consecutive oncologic patients (mean age 65 years; range 57–75 years) with symptomatic pathological shoulder-girdle fractures unsuitable for surgery and radiotherapy underwent percutaneous image-guided screw fixation. Fractures occurred through metastases (n = 2) or a post-ablation cavity (n = 1). Mechanical properties of osteosynthesis were adjudged superior to stand-alone cementoplasty in each case. Cannulated screws were placed under combined CT and fluoroscopic guidance with complementary radiofrequency ablation or cementoplasty to optimise local palliation and secure screw fixation, respectively, in two cases. Follow-up wasmore » undertaken every few weeks until mortality or most recent appointment.ResultsFour pathological fractures were treated in three patients (2 acromion, 1 clavicular, 1 coracoid). Mean size of associated lesion was 2.6 cm (range 1–4.5 cm). Technical success was achieved in all cases (100 %), without complications. Good palliation and restoration of mobility were observed in two cases at 2–3 months; one case could not be followed due to early post-procedural oncologic mortality.ConclusionPercutaneous image-guided shoulder-girdle osteosynthesis appears technically feasible with good short-term efficacy in this complex patient subset. Further studies are warranted to confirm these promising initial results.« less

  4. Rapid guiding catheter swapping for management of rupture during percutaneous venoplasty for idiopathic occlusion of superior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Bhagya Narayan; Chaturvedi, Vivek; Parakh, Neeraj; Gade, Sandeep; Trehan, Vijay

    2015-04-01

    Treatment for superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) by percutaneous interventions has become established as a definitive therapy. However, there is a significant risk of rupture during SVC intervention. We describe an uncommon case that developed SVC rupture during percutaneous intervention for idiopathic SVCS. This was managed successfully with pericardiocentesis and rapid implantation of covered stent in SVC by rapid guiding catheter swapping technique. This, however, led to inadvertent obstruction of left innominate vein which was successfully treated by kissing balloon inflation. At 18-month follow-up, he is asymptomatic with a well apposed patent stent-graft in the SVC.

  5. Ultrahigh-resolution ultrasound characterization of access site trauma and intimal hyperplasia following use of a 7F sheathless guide versus 6F sheath/guide combination for transradial artery PCI: Results of the PRAGMATIC trial.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Wayne; Dahya, Vishal; McGee, Dan; Katopodis, John; Dixon, William; Campbell, James; Meredith, Ashley; Knap, Patty; Parkin, Mathew; Noel, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    There exist limited data on the relative degree of acute injury and late healing of the radial artery after transradial artery (TRA) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a 7F sheathless guide catheter compared with a 6F sheath/guide combination. We used ultrahigh-resolution (55 MHz) vascular ultrasound to compare intimal-medial thickening (IMT) and early and late radial artery (RA) injury resulting from a sheathless 7F guide catheter versus a 6F sheath/guide combination for TRA-PCI. Forty-one consecutive consenting patients undergoing elective nonemergent TRA-PCI at a single institution from June 2016 to December 2016 were included. Patients were randomized (stratified by sex) to undergo TRA-PCI using a 7F sheathless guide catheter versus a 6F sheath/6F guide combination. Ultrahigh-resolution vascular ultrasound (55MHz) of the RA access site was performed at 24hours and 90days post-TRA-PCI. The primary outcome of the study was a noninferiority comparison of radial artery IMT thickness at 90days. PCI success rates, fluoroscopy times, number of guides used, and crossover rates to a femoral approach were also compared. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. Radial arterial IMT (mm) was similar between the 7F sheathless and 6F sheath/guide groups at 24hours (0.27 vs 0.29, respectively; P=.43) and at 90days (0.35 vs 0.34, respectively; P=.96). The P value for the noninferiority testing of a 0.07-mm limit was .002. Limited access site intimal tears were relatively common in both groups at 24hours (4 vs 5, P=.53) but often healed by 90days. Radial artery occlusion was infrequent at 90days (2 vs 1, P=.10), and no frank dissections were noted. PCI success rates (100% vs 95%, P=.59), fluoroscopy times (16 vs 12minutes, P=.17), number of guides used (1.1 vs 1.2, P=.48), and femoral crossover rates (0% vs 0%) were similar between the 2 respective groups. A 7F sheathless approach to TRA-PCI results in no more IMT and early or late RA trauma than a

  6. Guiding tissue regeneration with ultrasound in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalecki, Diane; Comeau, Eric S.; Raeman, Carol H.; Child, Sally Z.; Hobbs, Laura; Hocking, Denise C.

    2015-05-01

    Developing new technologies that enable the repair or replacement of injured or diseased tissues is a major focus of regenerative medicine. This paper will discuss three ultrasound technologies under development in our laboratories to guide tissue regeneration both in vitro and in vivo. A critical obstacle in tissue engineering is the need for rapid and effective tissue vascularization strategies. To address this challenge, we are developing acoustic patterning techniques for microvascular tissue engineering. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields provide a rapid, non-invasive approach to spatially pattern cells in three dimensions without affecting cell viability. Acoustic patterning of endothelial cells leads to the rapid formation of microvascular networks throughout the volumes of three-dimensional hydrogels, and the morphology of the resultant microvessel networks can be controlled by design of the ultrasound field. A second technology under development uses ultrasound to noninvasively control the microstructure of collagen fibers within engineered tissues. The microstructure of extracellular matrix proteins provides signals that direct cell functions critical to tissue regeneration. Thus, controlling collagen microfiber structure with ultrasound provides a noninvasive approach to regulate the mechanical properties of biomaterials and control cellular responses. The third technology employs therapeutic ultrasound to enhance the healing of chronic wounds. Recent studies demonstrate increased granulation tissue thickness and collagen deposition in murine dermal wounds exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In summary, ultrasound technologies offer noninvasive approaches to control cell behaviors and extracellular matrix organization and thus hold great promise to advance tissue regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Ergonomic task analysis of ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ajmal, Muhammad; Power, Susan; Smith, Tim; Shorten, George D

    2011-02-01

    To apply ergonomic task analysis to the performance of ultrasound-guided (US-guided) femoral nerve block (FNB) in an acute hospital setting. Pilot prospective observational study. Orthopedic operating room of a regional trauma hospital. 15 anesthesiologists of various levels of experience in US-guided FNB (estimated minimum experience < 10 procedures; maximum about 50 procedures, and from basic trainees to consultants); and 15 patients (5 men and 10 women), aged 77 ± 15 (mean ± SD yrs) years. MEASUREMENTS/OBSERVATIONS: A data capture "tool", which was modified from one previously developed for ergonomic study of spinal anesthesia, was studied. Patient, operator, and heterogeneous environmental factors related to ergonomic performance of US-guided FNB were identified. The observation period started immediately before commencement of positioning the patient and ended on completion of perineural injection. Data were acquired using direct observations, photography, and application of a questionnaire. The quality of ergonomic performance was generally suboptimal and varied greatly among operators. Eight (experience < 10 procedures) of 15 operators excessively rotated their head, neck, and/or back to visualize the image on the ultrasound machine. Eight operators (experience < 10 procedures) performed the procedure with excessive thoracolumbar flexion. Performance of US-guided FNB presents ergonomic challenges and was suboptimal during most of the procedures observed. Formal training in US-guided peripheral nerve blockade should include reference to ergonomic factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Safety of Ultrasound-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injections for Sialorrhea as Performed by Pediatric Otolaryngologists.

    PubMed

    Shariat-Madar, Bahbak; Chun, Robert H; Sulman, Cecille G; Conley, Stephen F

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate incidence of complications and hospital readmission as a result of ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injections to manage sialorrhea. Case series with chart review. Children's Hospital of Wisconsin. A case series with chart review was performed of all cases of ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin by pediatric otolaryngologists from March 5, 2010, to September 26, 2014,. Primary outcomes included complications such as dysphagia, aspiration pneumonia, and motor paralysis. Secondary outcomes included hospitalization, intubation, and nasogastric tube placement. There were 48 patients, 111 interventions, and 306 intraglandular injections identified. Botulinum toxin type A and type B were utilized in 4 and 107 operative interventions, respectively. Type A was injected into 4 parotid and 4 submandibular glands, utilizing doses of 20 U per parotid and 30 U per submandibular gland. Type B was injected into 98 parotid and 200 submandibular glands, with average dosing of 923 U per parotid and 1170 U per submandibular gland, respectively. There were 2 instances of subjectively worsening of baseline dysphagia that self-resolved. No cases were complicated by aspiration pneumonia or motor paralysis. No patients required hospital readmission, intubation, or nasogastric tube placement. Prior published data indicated 16% complication incidence with ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin. Our study found a low complication rate (0.6%) with ultrasound-guided injections of botulinum toxin to manage sialorrhea, without cases of aspiration pneumonia or motor paralysis. Of 306 intraglandular injections, there were 2 cases of worsening baseline subjective dysphagia that self-resolved. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  9. Feasibility of MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound as Organ-Sparing Treatment for Testicular Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staruch, Robert; Curiel, Laura; Chopra, Rajiv; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    High cure rates for testicular cancer have prompted interest in organ-sparing surgery for patients with bilateral disease or single testis. Focused ultrasound (FUS) ablation could offer a noninvasive approach to organ-sparing surgery. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using MR thermometry to guide organ-sparing focused ultrasound surgery in the testis. The testes of anesthetized rabbits were sonicated in several discrete locations using a single-element focused transducer operating at 2.787MHz. Focal heating was visualized with MR thermometry, using a measured PRF thermal coefficient of -0.0089±0.0003 ppm/° C. Sonications at 3.5-14 acoustic watts applied for 30 seconds produced maximum temperature elevations of 10-80° C, with coagulation verified by histology. Coagulation of precise volumes in the testicle is feasible with MRI-guided focused ultrasound. Variability in peak temperature for given sonication parameters suggests the need for online temperature feedback control.

  10. Comparison of ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block according to the various volumes of local anesthetic

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok Kon; Kang, Bong Jin; Kwon, Min A; Song, Jae Gyok; Jeon, Soo Mi

    2013-01-01

    Background The ultrasound guidance in regional nerve blocks has recently been introduced and gaining popularity. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block has many advantages including the higher success rate, faster onset time, and fewer complications. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical data according to the varied volume of local anesthetics in the ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block. Methods One hundred twenty patients were randomized into four groups, according to the local anesthetic volume used: Group 35 (n = 30), Group 30 (n = 30), Group 25 (n = 30), and Group 20 (n = 30). Supraclavicular blocks were performed with 1% mepivacaine 35 ml, 30 ml, 25 ml, and 20 ml, respectively. The success rate, onset time, and complications were checked and evaluated. Results The success rate (66.7%) was lower in Group 20 than that of Group 35 (96.7%) (P < 0.05). The average onset times of Group 35, Group 30, Group 25, and Group 20 were 14.3 ± 6.9 min, 13.6 ± 4.5 min, 16.7 ± 4.6 min, and 16.5 ± 3.7 min, respectively. There were no significant differences. Horner's syndrome was higher in Group 35 (P < 0.05). Conclusions In conclusion, we achieved 90% success rate with 30 ml of 1% mepivacaine. Therefore, we suggest 30 ml of local anesthetic volume for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block. PMID:23814648

  11. Percutaneous Transhepatic Removal of Bile Duct Stones: Results of 261 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Nevzat, E-mail: nevzatcan@yahoo.com; Kahriman, Guven, E-mail: guvenkahriman@hotmail.com; Mavili, Ertugrul, E-mail: ertmavili@yahoo.com

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of percutaneous transhepatic removal of bile duct stones when the procedure of endoscopic therapy fails for reasons of anatomical anomalies or is rejected by the patient. Methods: Between April 2001 and May 2010, 261 patients (138 male patients and 123 female patients; age range, 14-92 years; mean age, 64.6 years) with bile duct stones (common bile duct [CBD] stones = 248 patients and hepatolithiasis = 13 patients) were included in the study. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography was performed, and stones were identified. Percutaneous transhepatic balloon dilation of the papilla of Vater was performed. Then stones weremore » pushed out into the duodenum with a Fogarty balloon catheter. If the stone diameter was larger than 15 mm, then basket lithotripsy was performed before balloon dilation. Results: Overall success rate was 95.7%. The procedure was successful in 97.5% of patients with CBD stones and in 61.5% of patients with hepatolithiasis. A total of 18 major complications (6.8%), including cholangitis (n = 7), subcapsular biloma (n = 4), subcapsular hematoma (n = 1), subcapsular abscess (n = 1), bile peritonitis (n = 1), duodenal perforation (n = 1), CBD perforation (n = 1), gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm (n = 1), and right hepatic artery transection (n = 1), were observed after the procedure. There was no mortality. Conclusion: Our experience suggests that percutaneous transhepatic stone expulsion into the duodenum through the papilla is an effective and safe approach in the nonoperative management of the bile duct stones. It is a feasible alternative to surgery when endoscopic extraction fails or is rejected by the patient.« less

  12. Comparing treatment outcomes of fractional flow reserve-guided and angiography-guided percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with multi-vessel coronary artery diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Jiancheng; Chen, Gangbin; Zheng, Hua; Wang, Yuegang; Chen, Haibin; Liu, Xuewei; Wu, Juefei; Bin, Jianping

    2016-02-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR)-guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is used to assess the need for angioplasty in vessels with intermediate blockages. The treatment outcomes of FFR-guided vs. conventional angiography-guided PCI were evaluated in patients with multi-vessel coronary artery disease (CAD). Prospective and retrospective studies comparing FFR-guided vs. angiography-guided PCI in patients with multi-vessel CAD were identified from medical databases by two independent reviewers using the terms "percutaneous coronary intervention, fractional flow reserve, angiography, coronary heart disease, major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and myocardial infarction". The primary outcome was the number of stents placed, and the secondary outcomes were procedure time, mortality, myocardial infarction (MI) and MACE rates. Seven studies (three retrospective and four prospective), which included 49,517 patients, were included in this review. A total of 4,755 patients underwent FFR, while 44,697 received angiography-guided PCI. The mean patient age ranged from 58 to 71.7 years. The average number of stents used in FFR patients ranged from 0.3-1.9, and in angiography-guided PCI patients ranged from 0.7-2.7. Analysis indicated there was a greater number of stents placed in the angiography-guided group compared with the FFR group (pooled difference in means: -0.64, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.81 to -0.47, P < 0.001). There were no differences in the secondary outcomes between the two groups. Both procedures produce similar clinical outcomes, but the fewer number of stents used with FFR may have clinical as was as cost implications.

  13. Size and Ultrasound Features Affecting Results of Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration of Thyroid Nodules.

    PubMed

    Dong, YiJie; Mao, MinJing; Zhan, WeiWei; Zhou, JianQiao; Zhou, Wei; Yao, JieJie; Hu, YunYun; Wang, Yan; Ye, TingJun

    2018-06-01

    Our goal was to assess the diagnostic efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of thyroid nodules according to size and US features. A retrospective correlation was made with 1745 whole thyroidectomy and hemithyroidectomy specimens with preoperative US-guided FNA results. All cases were divided into 5 groups according to nodule size (≤5, 5.1-10, 10.1-15, 15.1-20, and >20 mm). For target nodules, static images and cine clips of conventional US and color Doppler were obtained. Ultrasound images were reviewed and evaluated by two radiologists with at least 5 years US working experience without knowing the results of pathology, and then agreement was achieved. The Bethesda category I rate was higher in nodules larger than 15 mm (P < .05). The diagnostic accuracy was best in nodules of 5 to 10 mm in diameter. The sensitivity, accuracy, PPV, and LR for negative US-guided FNA results were better in nodules with a size range of 5 to 15 mm. The specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), and LR for positive results and the Youden index rose with increasing nodule size. Seventeen false-positive and 60 false-negative results were found in this study. The false-negative rate rose with increasing nodule size. However, the false-positive rate was highest in the group containing the smallest nodules. Nodules with circumscribed margins and those that were nonsolid and nonhypoechoic and had no microcalcifications correlated with Bethesda I FNA results. Nodules with circumscribed margins and those that were nonsolid, heterogeneous, and nonhypoechoic and had increased vascularity correlated with false-negative FNA results. Borders correlated with Bethesda I false-negative and false-positive FNA results. Tiny nodules (≤5 mm) with obscure borders tended to yield false-positive FNA results. Large nodules (>20 mm) with several US features tended to yield false-negative FNA results. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  14. Ultrasound criteria and guided fine-needle aspiration diagnostic yields in small animal peritoneal, mesenteric and omental disease.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Daniel A; Ober, Christopher P; Snyder, Laura A; Hill, Sara A; Jessen, Carl R

    2013-01-01

    Peritoneal, mesenteric, and omental diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality in humans and animals, although information in the veterinary literature is limited. The purposes of this retrospective study were to determine whether objectively applied ultrasound interpretive criteria are statistically useful in differentiating among cytologically defined normal, inflammatory, and neoplastic peritoneal conditions in dogs and cats. A second goal was to determine the cytologically interpretable yield on ultrasound-guided, fine-needle sampling of peritoneal, mesenteric, or omental structures. Sonographic criteria agreed upon by the authors were retrospectively and independently applied by two radiologists to the available ultrasound images without knowledge of the cytologic diagnosis and statistically compared to the ultrasound-guided, fine-needle aspiration cytologic interpretations. A total of 72 dogs and 49 cats with abdominal peritoneal, mesenteric, or omental (peritoneal) surface or effusive disease and 17 dogs and 3 cats with no cytologic evidence of inflammation or neoplasia were included. The optimized, ultrasound criteria-based statistical model created independently for each radiologist yielded an equation-based diagnostic category placement accuracy of 63.2-69.9% across the two involved radiologists. Regional organ-associated masses or nodules as well as aggregated bowel and peritoneal thickening were more associated with peritoneal neoplasia whereas localized, severely complex fluid collections were more associated with inflammatory peritoneal disease. The cytologically interpretable yield for ultrasound-guided fine-needle sampling was 72.3% with no difference between species, making this a worthwhile clinical procedure. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  15. Treatment of Parkinson's disease in rats by Nrf2 transfection using MRI-guided focused ultrasound delivery of nanomicrobubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Ling; Cai, Xiaodong; Guo, Ruomi

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a very common neurological disorder. However, effective therapy is lacking. Although the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) protects the brain, it prevents the delivery of about 90% of drugs and nucleotides into the brain, thereby hindering the development of gene therapy for PD. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound delivery of microbubbles enhances the delivery of gene therapy vectors across the BBB and improves transfection efficiency. In the present study, we delivered nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, NFE2L2) contained in nanomicrobubbles into the substantia nigra of PD rats by MRI-guided focused ultrasound, and we examined the effect ofmore » Nrf2 over-expression in this animal model of PD. The rat model of PD was established by injecting 6-OHDA in the right substantia nigra stereotactically. Plasmids (pDC315 or pDC315/Nrf2) were loaded onto nanomicrobubbles, and then injected through the tail vein with the assistance of MRI-guided focused ultrasound. MRI-guided focused ultrasound delivery of nanomicrobubbles increased gene transfection efficiency. Furthermore, Nrf2 gene transfection reduced reactive oxygen species levels, thereby protecting neurons in the target region. - Highlights: • MRI-guided focused ultrasound enhances gene transfection into the brain of rats. • Increased Nrf2 expression protects neurons in the rat model of PD. • Nrf2 protects neurons in PD by inhibiting ROS production.« less

  16. Percutaneous management of urolithiasis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kavoussi, L R; Albala, D M; Basler, J W; Apte, S; Clayman, R V

    1992-09-01

    A total of 6 pregnant women with obstructing urinary calculi was managed by percutaneous nephrostomy drainage placed under ultrasound guidance with the patient under local anesthesia. All patients initially had relief of acute obstruction. However, occlusion of the percutaneous nephrostomy tubes with debris necessitated tube changes in 5 of 6 patients. In 2 patients recurrent nephrostomy tube obstruction, fever and pain led to percutaneous stone removal during pregnancy. In the remaining 4 patients the nephrostomy tubes were left indwelling through delivery. During the postpartum period 3 patients successfully underwent ureteroscopic stone extraction and 1 passed the stone spontaneously. Bacteriuria developed in each patient despite the use of preventive antibiotics. All 6 women had uncomplicated vaginal deliveries of healthy newborns and are currently asymptomatic with no evidence of obstruction. Percutaneous drainage of an acutely obstructed kidney in a pregnant woman is an effective temporizing alternative to ureteral stent placement until definitive treatment can be performed.

  17. In-vivo ultrasound and photoacoustic image- guided photothermal cancer therapy using silica-coated gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungsoo; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Luke, Geoffrey P; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2014-05-01

    In nanoparticle-augmented photothermal therapy, evaluating the delivery and spatial distribution of nanoparticles, followed by remote temperature mapping and monitoring, is essential to ensure the optimal therapeutic outcome. The utility of ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging to assist photothermal therapy has been previously demonstrated. Here, using a mouse xenograft tumor model, it is demonstrated in vivo that ultrasound-guided photoacoustic imaging can be used to plan the treatment and to guide the therapy. To evaluate nanoparticle delivery and spatial distribution, three-dimensional ultrasound and spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging of a mouse with a tumor was performed before and after intravenous injection of silica-coated gold nanorods. After injection and sufficient circulation of nanoparticles, photothermal therapy was performed for 5 min using an 808-nm continuous-wave laser. During the photothermal therapy, photoacoustic images were acquired continuously and used to measure the temperature changes within tissue. A heterogeneous distribution of temperature, which was spatially correlated with the measured distribution of nanoparticles, indicated that peak temperatures of 53°C were achieved in the tumor. An Arrhenius thermal damage model determined that this thermal deposition would result in significant cell death. The results of this study suggest that ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging can effectively guide photothermal therapy to achieve the desired thermal treatment.

  18. Sonographically guided percutaneous needle release of the carpal tunnel for treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    McShane, John M; Slaff, Samantha; Gold, Judith E; Nazarian, Levon N

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel treatment procedure, sonographically guided percutaneous needle release of the carpal tunnel, for individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome. Seventeen patients (89% female; mean age, 62 years; SD, 13.6 years) with a clinical diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome who had undergone a sonographically guided percutaneous needle release of the carpal tunnel at least 6 months before follow-up evaluation were retrospectively reviewed. At the follow-up evaluation, to ascertain previous and current symptoms as well as functional impairment, the patients filled out a hand diagram and a questionnaire. In addition, medical records were reviewed, and patients were queried regarding complications such as infection or nerve damage. Median nerve sonographic measurements and a physical evaluation were performed on a subset of 13 patients who came to the office for evaluation. Postprocedure sonography showed that patients had a significantly smaller (P = .03) cross-sectional area of the median nerve compared to pretreatment values. In addition, patients had significantly fewer symptoms (P < .0001), less functional impairment (P = .0002), and an improved hand diagram score (P < .0001). Postprocedure patients had grip strength that was 12 lb below average (≈1 SD below) compared to grip strength norms. However, most patients (84.6%) had negative clinical diagnostic test results for carpal tunnel syndrome, and 86% said they were satisfied with the procedure. There were no procedure-related infections or nerve injuries. Of the patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who agreed to participate in this study, most had favorable symptomatic and functional outcomes. Sonographically guided percutaneous needle release of the carpal tunnel may be an alternative option to traditional surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  19. Reproducibility of Ultrasound-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Thermal Lesions in Minimally-Invasive Brain Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Sulmaz

    This study aims to prove the feasibility of using Ultrasound-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (USg-HIFU) to create thermal lesions in neurosurgical applications, allowing for precise ablation of brain tissue, while simultaneously providing real time imaging. To test the feasibility of the system, an optically transparent HIFU compatible tissue-mimicking phantom model was produced. USg-HIFU was then used for ablation of the phantom, with and without targets. Finally, ex vivo lamb brain tissue was imaged and ablated using the USg-HIFU system. Real-time ultrasound images and videos obtained throughout the ablation process showing clear lesion formation at the focal point of the HIFU transducer. Post-ablation gross and histopathology examinations were conducted to verify thermal and mechanical damage in the ex vivo lamb brain tissue. Finally, thermocouple readings were obtained, and HIFU field computer simulations were conducted to verify findings. Results of the study concluded reproducibility of USg-HIFU thermal lesions for neurosurgical applications.

  20. Transvaginal 3D Image-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Robert; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a transvaginal image-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) device using piezocomposite HIFU array technology, and commercially-available ultrasound imaging. Potential applications include treatment of uterine fibroids and abnormal uterine bleeding. The HIFU transducer was an annular phased array, with a focal length range of 30-60 mm, an elliptically-shaped aperture of 35×60 mm, and an operating frequency of 3 MHz. A pillow-shaped bag with water circulation will be used for coupling the HIFU energy into the tissue. An intra-cavity imaging probe (C9-5, Philips) was integrated with the HIFU array such that the focal axis of the HIFU transducer was within the image plane. The entire device will be covered by a gel-filled condom when inserted in the vaginal cavity. To control it, software packages were developed in the LabView programming environment. An imaging algorithm processed the ultrasound image to remove noise patterns due to the HIFU signal. The device will be equipped with a three-dimensional tracking system, using a six-degrees-of-freedom articulating arm. Necrotic lesions were produced in a tissue-mimicking phantom and a turkey breast sample for all focal lengths. Various HIFU doses allow various necrotic lesion shapes, including thin ellipsoidal, spherical, wide cylindrical, and teardrop-shaped. Software control of the device allows multiple foci to be activated sequentially for desired lesion patterns. Ultrasound imaging synchronization can be achieved using hardware signals obtained from the imaging system, or software signals determined empirically for various imaging probes. The image-guided HIFU device will provide a valuable tool in visualization of uterine fibroid tumors for the purposes of planning and subsequent HIFU treatment of the tumor, all in a 3D environment. The control system allows for various lesions of different shapes to be optimally positioned in the tumor to cover the entire tumor

  1. Ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma injection for distal biceps tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Barker, Scott L; Bell, Simon N; Connell, David; Coghlan, Jennifer A

    2015-04-01

    Distal biceps tendinopathy is an uncommon cause of elbow pain. The optimum treatment for cases refractory to conservative treatment is unclear. Platelet-rich plasma has been used successfully for other tendinopathies around the elbow. Six patients with clinical and radiological evidence of distal biceps tendinopathy underwent ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. Clinical examination findings, visual analogue score (VAS) for pain and Mayo Elbow Performance scores were recorded. The Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 68.3 (range 65 to 85) (fair function) to 95 (range 85 to 100) (excellent function). The VAS at rest improved from a mean of 2.25 (range 2 to 5) pre-injection to 0. The VAS with movement improved from a mean of 7.25 (range 5 to 8) pre-injection to 1.3 (range 0 to 2). No complications were noted. Ultrasound-guided PRP injection appears to be a safe and effective treatment for recalcitrant cases of distal biceps tendinopathy. Further investigation with a randomized controlled trial is needed to fully assess its efficacy.

  2. Ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma injection for distal biceps tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Simon N; Connell, David; Coghlan, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Background Distal biceps tendinopathy is an uncommon cause of elbow pain. The optimum treatment for cases refractory to conservative treatment is unclear. Platelet-rich plasma has been used successfully for other tendinopathies around the elbow. Methods Six patients with clinical and radiological evidence of distal biceps tendinopathy underwent ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. Clinical examination findings, visual analogue score (VAS) for pain and Mayo Elbow Performance scores were recorded. Results The Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 68.3 (range 65 to 85) (fair function) to 95 (range 85 to 100) (excellent function). The VAS at rest improved from a mean of 2.25 (range 2 to 5) pre-injection to 0. The VAS with movement improved from a mean of 7.25 (range 5 to 8) pre-injection to 1.3 (range 0 to 2). No complications were noted. Discussion Ultrasound-guided PRP injection appears to be a safe and effective treatment for recalcitrant cases of distal biceps tendinopathy. Further investigation with a randomized controlled trial is needed to fully assess its efficacy. PMID:27582965

  3. Training and certification in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Konge, Lars; Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Clementsen, Paul Frost

    2017-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) plays a key role in the staging of lung cancer, which is crucial for allocation to surgical treatment. EBUS-TBNA is a complicated procedure and simulation-based training is helpful in the first part of the long learning curve prior to performing the procedure on actual patients. New trainees should follow a structured training programme consisting of training on simulators to proficiency as assessed with a validated test followed by supervised practice on patients. The simulation-based training is superior to the traditional apprenticeship model and is recommended in the newest guidelines. EBUS-TBNA and oesophageal ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA or EUS-B-FNA) are complementary to each other and the combined techniques are superior to either technique alone. It is logical to learn and to perform the two techniques in combination, however, for lung cancer staging solely EBUS-TBNA simulators exist, but hopefully in the future simulation-based training in EUS will be possible. PMID:28840013

  4. Percutaneous Image-guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Tumors in Inoperable Patients - Immediate Complications and Overall Safety.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Anubha; Sahay, Nishant; Kapoor, Ashok; Kapoor, Jyoti; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous destruction of cancer cells using a radiofrequency energy source has become an accepted part of the modern armamentarium for managing malignancies. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a relatively novel procedure for treating recurrent and metastatic tumors. It is used for debulking tumors and as adjuvant therapy for palliative care apart from its role as a pain management tool. Its use in the third world countries is limited by various factors such as cost and expertise. In the remotest parts of India, where economic development has been slow, abject poverty with poor health care facilities advanced malignancies present a challenge to health care providers. We undertook this study to assess the safety of the percutaneous RFA tumor ablation as a therapeutic or palliative measure in patients where surgery was not possible. We observed that RFA may be an effective, alternative therapeutic modality for some inoperable tumors where other therapeutic modalities cannot be considered. Palliative and therapeutic image-guided RFAs of tumors may be the only treatment option in patients who are inoperable for a variety of reasons. To assess the safety and complications of RFA in such a patient population is important before embarking upon any interventions given their physically, mentally, and socially compromised status in a country such as India. To assess the safety of percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency tumor ablation and to note the various immediate and early complications of the intervention. This was a prospective, observational study conducted in Tata Main Hospital, Jamshedpur, Jharkhand, India. After approval by the Hospital Approval Committee all patients who consented for percutaneous RFA of their tumor admitted in the hospital were included after taking fully informed consent from patient/close relative keeping the following criteria in view. Patients who were likely to derive a direct benefit in the survival or as a palliative measure for relief

  5. Novel needle guide reduces time to perform ultrasound-guided femoral nerve catheter placement: A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Turan, Alparslan; Babazade, Rovnat; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Esa, Wael Ali Sakr; Maheshwari, Kamal; Farag, Ehab; Zimmerman, Nicole M; Soliman, Loran Mounir; Sessler, Daniel I

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks have become the standard when performing regional nerve blocks in anaesthesia. Infiniti Plus (CIVCO Medical Solutions, Kalona, Iowa, USA) is a needle guide that has been recently developed to help clinicians in performing ultrasound-guided nerve blocks. We tested the hypothesis that femoral nerve catheter placement carried out with the Infiniti Plus needle guide will be quicker to perform than without the Infiniti Plus. Secondary aims were to assess whether the Infiniti Plus needle guide decreased the number of block attempts and also whether it improved needle visibility. A randomised, controlled trial. Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. We enrolled adult patients having elective total knee arthroplasty with a femoral nerve block and femoral nerve catheter. Patients, who were pregnant or those who had preexisting neuropathy involving the surgical limb, coagulopathy, infection at the block site or allergy to local anaesthetics were excluded. Patients were randomised into two groups to receive the ultrasound-guided femoral nerve catheter placement with or without the Infiniti Plus needle guide. The time taken to place the femoral nerve catheter, the number of attempts, the success rate and needle visibility were recorded. We used an overall α of 0.05 for both the primary and secondary analyses; the secondary analyses were Bonferroni corrected to control for multiple comparisons. The median (interquartile range Q1 to Q3) time to perform the femoral nerve catheter placement was 118 (100 to 150) s with Infiniti Plus and 177 (130 to 236) s without Infiniti Plus. Infiniti Plus significantly reduced the time spent performing femoral nerve catheterisation, with estimated ratio of means [(95% confidence interval), P value] of 0.67 [(0.60 to 0.75), P < 0.001] with Infiniti Plus compared with no Infiniti Plus. However, Infiniti Plus had no effect on the odds of a successful femoral nerve catheter placement, number of attempts or

  6. Percutaneous CT-Guided Biopsies of the Cervical Spine: Technique, Histopathologic and Microbiologic Yield, and Safety at a Single Academic Institution.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, E L; Hillen, T J; Long, J; Jennings, J W

    2018-05-01

    Cervical spine biopsies can be challenging due to the anatomy and the adjacent critical structures. Percutaneous image-guided biopsies can obviate the need for an open biopsy, however there have been few studies looking at the approaches, safety, and efficacy of percutaneous cervical spine biopsies. This retrospective study evaluated technical considerations, histopathologic and microbiologic yield, and safety in CT-guided cervical bone biopsies. A retrospective review of cervical bone and/or bone/disc biopsies performed from January 2010 to January 2017 was included in this study. Clinical diagnosis and indication, patient demographics, biopsy location, biopsy needle type, technical approach, lesion size, dose-length product, conscious sedation details, complications, and diagnostic histopathologic and/or microbiologic yield were recorded for each case and summarized. A total of 73 patients underwent CT-guided cervical bone biopsies. Fifty-three percent (39/73) were for clinical/imaging concern for infection and 47% (34/73) were for primary tumors or metastatic disease. Thirty-four percent (25/73) were of the inferior cervical spine (ie, C6 and C7). A sufficient sample was obtained for histopathologic and microbiologic analyses in 96% (70/73) of the biopsies. Forty-six percent (18/39) of those samples taken for infection had positive cultures. Two intraprocedural complications occurred in which the patients became hypotensive during the procedure without long-term complications. Percutaneous CT-guided biopsy of the cervical spine is an effective and safe procedure with high diagnostic yield and can obviate open procedures for histopathologic and microbiologic analyses of patients with clinical and imaging findings concerning for infection or primary and metastatic osseous lesions. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  7. Long-axis view for ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement via the internal jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Angel F; McEvoy, Matthew D; Gravenstein, Nikolaus

    2016-04-01

    In modern practice, real-time ultrasound guidance is commonly employed for the placement of internal jugular vein catheters. With a new tool, such as ultrasound, comes the opportunity to refine and further optimize the ultrasound view during jugular vein catheterization. We describe jugular vein access techniques and use the long-axis view as an alternative to the commonly employed short-axis cross-section view for internal jugular vein access and cannulation. The long-axis ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein approach for internal jugular vein cannulation is a useful alternative technique that can provide better needle tip and guidewire visualization than the more traditional short-axis ultrasound view.

  8. Treatment of great auricular neuralgia with real-time ultrasound-guided great auricular nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Younghoon; Kim, Saeyoung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: The great auricular nerve can be damaged by the neck surgery, tumor, and long-time pressure on the neck. But, great auricular neuralgia is very rare condition. It was managed by several medication and landmark-based great auricular nerve block with poor prognosis. Patient concerns: A 25-year-old man presented with a pain in the left lateral neck and auricle. Diagnosis: He was diagnosed with great auricular neuralgia. Interventions: His pain was not reduced by medication. Therefore, the great auricular nerve block with local anesthetics and steroid was performed under ultrasound guidance. Outcomes: Ultrasound guided great auricular nerve block alleviated great auricular neuralgia. Lessons: This medication-resistant great auricular neuralgia was treated by the ultrasound guided great auricular nerve block with local anesthetic agent and steroid. Therefore, great auricular nerve block can be a good treatment option of medication resistant great auricular neuralgia. PMID:28328811

  9. Intravascular ultrasound guided directional atherectomy versus directional atherectomy guided by angiography for the treatment of femoropopliteal in-stent restenosis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Prakash; Tarricone, Arthur; K-Raman, Purushothaman; Majeed, Farhan; Kapur, Vishal; Gujja, Karthik; Wiley, Jose; Vasquez, Miguel; Lascano, Rheoneil A; Quiles, Katherine G; Distin, Tashanne; Fontenelle, Ran; Atallah-Lajam, Farah; Kini, Annapoorna; Sharma, Samin

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 1-year outcomes for patients with femoropopliteal in-stent restenosis using directional atherectomy guided by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) versus directional atherectomy guided by angiography. This was a retrospective analysis for patients with femoropopliteal in-stent restenosis treated with IVUS-guided directional atherectomy versus directional atherectomy guided by angiography from a single center between March 2012 and February 2016. Clinically driven target lesion revascularization was the primary endpoint and was evaluated through medical chart review as well as phone call follow up. Directional atherectomy guided by IVUS reduces clinically driven target lesion revascularization for patients with femoropopliteal in-stent restenosis.

  10. An ultrasound needle insertion guide in a porcine phantom model.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, S; Lethbridge, G; Kim, C; Keon Cohen, Z; Ng, I

    2013-08-01

    We compared nerve blockade with and without the Infiniti(TM) needle guide in an ultrasound in-plane porcine simulation. We recruited 30 anaesthetists with varying blockade experience. Using the guide, the needle tip was more visible (for a median (IQR [range]) of 67 (56-100]) % of the time; and invisible for 2 (1-4 [0-19]) s) than when the guide was not used (respectively 23 (13-43 [0-80]) % and 25 (9-52 [1-198]) s; both p < 0.001). The corresponding block times were 8 (6-10 [3-28]) s and 32 (15-67 [5-225]) s, respectively; p < 0.001. The needle guide reduced the block time and the time that the needle was invisible, irrespective of anaesthetist experience. Anaesthesia © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness Comparison of Imaging-Guided Prostate Biopsy Techniques: Systematic Transrectal Ultrasound, Direct In-Bore MRI, and Image Fusion.

    PubMed

    Venderink, Wulphert; Govers, Tim M; de Rooij, Maarten; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Sedelaar, J P Michiel

    2017-05-01

    Three commonly used prostate biopsy approaches are systematic transrectal ultrasound guided, direct in-bore MRI guided, and image fusion guided. The aim of this study was to calculate which strategy is most cost-effective. A decision tree and Markov model were developed to compare cost-effectiveness. Literature review and expert opinion were used as input. A strategy was deemed cost-effective if the costs of gaining one quality-adjusted life year (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio) did not exceed the willingness-to-pay threshold of €80,000 (≈$85,000 in January 2017). A base case analysis was performed to compare systematic transrectal ultrasound- and image fusion-guided biopsies. Because of a lack of appropriate literature regarding the accuracy of direct in-bore MRI-guided biopsy, a threshold analysis was performed. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for fusion-guided biopsy compared with systematic transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy was €1386 ($1470) per quality-adjusted life year gained, which was below the willingness-to-pay threshold and thus assumed cost-effective. If MRI findings are normal in a patient with clinically significant prostate cancer, the sensitivity of direct in-bore MRI-guided biopsy has to be at least 88.8%. If that is the case, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is €80,000 per quality-adjusted life year gained and thus cost-effective. Fusion-guided biopsy seems to be cost-effective compared with systematic transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy. Future research is needed to determine whether direct in-bore MRI-guided biopsy is the best pathway; in this study a threshold was calculated at which it would be cost-effective.

  12. Effectiveness of ultrasound-guided injections combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis.

    PubMed

    Gasparre, Giuseppe; Fusaro, Isabella; Galletti, Stefano; Volini, Silvia; Benedetti, Maria Grazia

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the association of exercises for the shoulder with ultrasound-guided injection into the bursa significantly improves the treatment outcome in adhesive bursitis. Two groups of 35 patients, one treated with ultrasound-guided injection (UGI) and the other one with ultrasound-guided injection and home exercise program (UGI-exercise) for 1 month, were assessed for pain and shoulder function before treatment, 1 and 3 months post-treatment. Fourteen patients in UGI group and 23 patients in the UGI-exercises group were completely free of pain after 1 month (p = 0.031). At 3 months' follow-up, patients in the UGI-exercise group showed a significant improvement with respect to the other group (p = 0.005). No differences were found in function assessment. The UGI combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis is effective to ensure a more frequent complete pain relief in the medium term.

  13. Evaluation of a simplified augmented reality device for ultrasound-guided vascular access in a vascular phantom.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yunseok; Choi, Seungpyo; Kim, Heechan

    2014-09-01

    To investigate whether a novel ultrasound device may be used with a simplified augmented reality technique, and to compare this device with conventional techniques during vascular access using a vascular phantom. Prospective, randomized study. Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine departments of a university-affiliated hospital. 20 physicians with no experience with ultrasound-guided techniques. All participants performed the vascular access technique on the vascular phantom model using both a conventional device and the new ultrasound device. Time and the number of redirections of the needle until aspiration of dye into a vessel of the vascular phantom were measured. The median/interquartile range of time was 39.5/41.7 seconds versus 18.6/10.0 seconds (P < 0.001) and number of redirections was 3/3.5 versus 1/0 (P < 0.001) for the conventional and novel ultrasound devices, respectively. During vascular access in a vascular phantom model, the novel device decreased the time and the number of redirections significantly. The device successfully improved the efficiency of the ultrasound-guided vascular access technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimizing MR imaging-guided navigation for focused ultrasound interventions in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, B.; Martin, E.; Bauer, R.; O'Gorman, R.

    2017-03-01

    MR imaging during transcranial MR imaging-guided Focused Ultrasound surgery (tcMRIgFUS) is challenging due to the complex ultrasound transducer setup and the water bolus used for acoustic coupling. Achievable image quality in the tcMRIgFUS setup using the standard body coil is significantly inferior to current neuroradiologic standards. As a consequence, MR image guidance for precise navigation in functional neurosurgical interventions using tcMRIgFUS is basically limited to the acquisition of MR coordinates of salient landmarks such as the anterior and posterior commissure for aligning a stereotactic atlas. Here, we show how improved MR image quality provided by a custom built MR coil and optimized MR imaging sequences can support imaging-guided navigation for functional tcMRIgFUS neurosurgery by visualizing anatomical landmarks that can be integrated into the navigation process to accommodate for patient specific anatomy.

  15. Percutaneous CT-Guided Sympathicolysis with Radiofrequency for the Treatment of Palmar Hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    García-Barquín, Paula; Aquerreta Beola, Jesús Dámaso; Bondía Gracía, José María; España Alonso, Agustín; Pérez Cajaraville, Juan; Bartolomé Leal, Pablo; Bastarrika, Gorka

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the benefits of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous sympathicolysis with radiofrequency in patients with primary palmar hyperhidrosis (PPHH) in terms of safety, patient satisfaction, and short- and long-term efficacy. A total of 139 procedures in 108 patients (mean age, 29.89 y ± 10.94), including 50 men and 58 women, with PPHH and therapy-resistance of nonsurgical treatments were retrospectively analyzed. Treatment was performed bilaterally at T2, T3, and T4 levels, reaching 90°C during 8 minutes. Technical success, immediate efficacy, and presence of complications were analyzed. For follow-up, the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale was used to evaluate the hyperhidrosis before, at one month, and in the long-term through a survey of 42 patients. Patients' satisfaction and complications were also recorded. The technical success rate was 98.56%. The increase in palmar skin temperature was 4.88°C ± 1.85. A total of 85.3% of participants had completely dry hands immediately after treatment. The mean follow-up time was 41.34 months (range, 6-62 mo). One month after treatment, the response rate was 77.38% (P < .001). At long-term follow-up, the response rate was 69.04% (P < .001). Two major complications were observed (1.8%), 52.38% of patients were satisfied, and 59.52% of patients presented compensatory hyperhidrosis at long-term follow-up. Percutaneous CT-guided sympathicolysis is a safe and effective technique for the treatment of PPHH and can be considered as a second choice in patients in whom other nonsurgical therapeutic options have failed, despite the compensatory hyperhidrosis rates. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of ultrasound in the assessment of percutaneous laser ablation of cervical metastatic lymph nodes from thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Wei; Zhan, WeiWei

    2018-04-01

    Background Few studies have examined the feasibility and efficiency of performing ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) after percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) of cervical metastatic lymph nodes from thyroid cancer. Purpose To investigate and describe the use of conventional ultrasound and CEUS in evaluating PLA of metastatic lymph nodes. Material and Methods PLA was performed in a small, prospective, observational study of 21 metastatic lymph nodes in 17 thyroid cancer patients who underwent radical thyroid resection. CEUS was conducted prior to PLA and 1 h and seven days after ablation. Conventional ultrasound examination of all nodes was performed during follow-up after ablation. We observed contrast agent perfusion in the lymph nodes, calculated perfusion defect volumes using CEUS and determined the rates of reduction for metastatic lymph nodes for a mean duration of 17.86 ± 4.704 months (range = 12-27 months). Results CEUS demonstrated that the perfusion defect volume was larger on day 7 than on day 1 post-ablation in 47% of the ablated nodes. Compared to the largest diameters and volumes pre-PLA, the corresponding post-PLA values significantly decreased ( P < 0.05 versus baseline). No statistically significant change in thyroglobulin (Tg) levels before and after PLA was observed in this study ( P > 0.05 versus baseline). Conclusion CEUS can be effectively used to distinguish the margins of ablated regions, assess the accuracy of PLA, and monitor short-term changes in necrotic areas. However, long-term follow-up assessments of the curative effect of PLA will predominantly rely on conventional ultrasonography.

  17. Pre-procedure ultrasound-guided paramedian spinal anaesthesia at L5–S1: Is this better than landmark-guided midline approach? A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Karthikeyan Kallidaikurichi; Leo, Anne-Marie; Iohom, Gabriella; Loughnane, Frank; Lee, Peter J

    2018-01-01

    Background and Aims: Routine use of pre-procedural ultrasound guided midline approach has not shown to improve success rate in administering subarachnoid block. The study hypothesis was that the routine use of pre-procedural (not real time) ultrasound-guided paramedian spinals at L5-S1 interspace could reduce the number of passes (i.e., withdrawal and redirection of spinal needle without exiting the skin) required to enter the subarachnoid space when compared to the conventional landmark-guided midline approach. Methods: After local ethics approval, 120 consenting patients scheduled for elective total joint replacements (Hip and Knee) were randomised into either Group C where conventional midline approach with palpated landmarks was used or Group P where pre-procedural ultrasound was used to perform subarachnoid block by paramedian approach at L5-S1 interspace (real time ultrasound guidance was not used). Results: There was no difference in primary outcome (difference in number of passes) between the two groups. Similarly there was no difference in the number of attempts (i.e., the number of times the spinal needle was withdrawn from the skin and reinserted). The first pass success rates (1 attempt and 1 pass) was significantly greater in Group C compared to Group P [43% vs. 22%, P = 0.02]. Conclusion: Routine use of paramedian spinal anaesthesia at L5-S1 interspace, guided by pre-procedure ultrasound, in patients undergoing lower limb joint arthroplasties did not reduce the number of passes or attempts needed to achieve successful dural puncture. PMID:29416151

  18. Percutaneous CT-guided cryoablation of the dorsal penile nerve for treatment of symptomatic premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    David Prologo, J; Snyder, Laura L; Cherullo, Edward; Passalacqua, Matthew; Pirasteh, Ali; Corn, David

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate expansion of image-guided interventional cryoablation techniques usually employed for pain management to address the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of treatment for a urologic condition with otherwise limited treatment options, premature ejaculation (PE). Prospective institutional review board approval was obtained, and 24 subjects with PE were enrolled. All patients underwent unilateral percutaneous computed tomography-guided cryoablation of the dorsal penile nerve (DPN). Postprocedural intravaginal ejaculatory latency times (IELTs) and PE Profile (PEP) results served as outcome variables. In addition, subjects were asked whether they would have the procedure done again based on their experience at the 180- and 360-day marks. The technical success rate was 100%. Baseline average IELT was 54.7 seconds ± 7.8 (n = 24), which increased to a maximum of 256 seconds ± 104 (n = 11; P = .241) by day 7 and decreased to 182.5 seconds ± 87.8 (n = 6; P = .0342) by day 90. The mean IELT remained at 182.5 seconds ± 27.6 at day 180 (n = 23; P<.0001) and decreased to 140.9 seconds ± 83.6 by 1 year (n = 22; P<.001). PEP scores improved overall, IELTs significantly improved at 180 and 360 days, and 83% of subjects reported that they would undergo the procedure again if given the same opportunity. There were no procedure-related complications. CT-guided percutaneous unilateral cryoablation of the DPN is a feasible, safe, single-day outpatient procedure for the treatment of symptomatic PE. Copyright © 2013 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Guided Interventions for Prostate Cancer Using 3D-Transurethral Ultrasound and MRI Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-01

    standard transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe, a TUUS probe, and MRI. (a) (b) Figure 2: 3D printed prostate phantom mold (a), and pelvis phantom mold...with prostate agar phantom in place (b). The TUUS phantoms were prepared using a standard recipe [ii] for the prostate and the 3D printed mold...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0461 TITLE: Guided Interventions for Prostate Cancer Using 3D -Transurethral Ultrasound and MRI Fusion PRINCIPAL

  20. Review of MRI positioning devices for guiding focused ultrasound systems.

    PubMed

    Yiallouras, C; Damianou, C

    2015-06-01

    This article contains a review of positioning devices that are currently used in the area of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS). The paper includes an extensive review of literature published since the first prototype system was invented in 1991. The technology has grown into a fast developing area with application to any organ accessible to ultrasound. The initial design operated using hydraulic principles, while the latest technology incorporates piezoelectric motors. Although, in the beginning there were fears regarding MRI safety, during recent years, the deployment of MR-safe positioning devices in FUS has become routine. Many of these positioning devices are now undergoing testing in clinical trials. Existing MRgFUS systems have been utilized mostly in oncology (fibroids, brain, liver, kidney, bone, pancreas, eye, thyroid, and prostate). It is anticipated that, in the near future, there will be a positioning device for every organ that is accessible by focused ultrasound. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Evaluation of the eZono 4000 with eZGuide for ultrasound-guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Gadsden, Jeff; Latmore, Malikah; Levine, Daniel M

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasound-guided procedures are increasingly common in a variety of acute care settings, such as the operating room, critical care unit and emergency room. However, accurate judgment of needle tip position using traditional ultrasound technology is frequently difficult, and serious injury can result from inadvertently advancing beyond or through the target. Needle navigation is a recent innovation that allows the clinician to visualize the needle position and trajectory in real time as it approaches the target. A novel ultrasound machine has recently been introduced that is portable and designed for procedural guidance. The eZono 4000™ features an innovative needle navigation technology that is simple to use and permits the use of a wide range of commercially available needles, avoiding the inconvenience and cost of proprietary equipment. This article discusses this new ultrasound machine in the context of other currently available ultrasound machines featuring needle navigation.

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Rectus Sheath Block in Gynaecological Surgery with Pfannenstiel Incision

    PubMed Central

    Cüneyitoğlu, Şule; Türktan, Mediha; Biricik, Ebru; Özcengiz, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the effects of ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block in gynaecological surgery with Pfannenstiel incision. Methods After the approval of the ethics committee and the patients’ consent, 75 ASA I–II patients who were aged between 20 and 70 years and scheduled for a gynaecological surgery with Pfannenstiel incision were included in this study. After induction of general anaesthesia, patients were randomly divided into three groups. In Group UR patients (n=25), ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block with 0.25% levobupivacaine (0.2 mL kg−1) was performed. In Group SR patients (n=25), surgical rectus sheath block with 0.25% levobupivacaine (0.2 mL kg−1) was applied. In Group T (n=25) patients, tramadol (2 mg kg−1) was intravenously administered 30 min before the end of surgery. Patient-controlled analgesia device was established for postoperative pain relief in all groups. Haemodynamic data and inspired sevoflurane concentration were recorded during the operation. Pain scores, total tramadol consumption, supplemental analgesic requirement and side effects were postoperatively evaluated. Results Demographic characteristics, duration of surgery and haemodynamic parameters were similar between the groups. Inspired sevoflurane concentration (%) and VAS scores were significantly lower in Group UR than those in Groups SR and T. Total tramadol consumption was significantly lower in Groups UR and SR than that in Group T. There was no significant difference in the incidence of side effects. Conclusion This study demonstrates that ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block helps to provide the effective analgesia without any side effects compared with surgical rectus sheath block and intravenous tramadol for gynaecological surgery with Pfannenstiel incision. PMID:27366521

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Rectus Sheath Block in Gynaecological Surgery with Pfannenstiel Incision.

    PubMed

    Cüneyitoğlu, Şule; Türktan, Mediha; Biricik, Ebru; Özcengiz, Dilek

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block in gynaecological surgery with Pfannenstiel incision. After the approval of the ethics committee and the patients' consent, 75 ASA I-II patients who were aged between 20 and 70 years and scheduled for a gynaecological surgery with Pfannenstiel incision were included in this study. After induction of general anaesthesia, patients were randomly divided into three groups. In Group UR patients (n=25), ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block with 0.25% levobupivacaine (0.2 mL kg(-1)) was performed. In Group SR patients (n=25), surgical rectus sheath block with 0.25% levobupivacaine (0.2 mL kg(-1)) was applied. In Group T (n=25) patients, tramadol (2 mg kg(-1)) was intravenously administered 30 min before the end of surgery. Patient-controlled analgesia device was established for postoperative pain relief in all groups. Haemodynamic data and inspired sevoflurane concentration were recorded during the operation. Pain scores, total tramadol consumption, supplemental analgesic requirement and side effects were postoperatively evaluated. Demographic characteristics, duration of surgery and haemodynamic parameters were similar between the groups. Inspired sevoflurane concentration (%) and VAS scores were significantly lower in Group UR than those in Groups SR and T. Total tramadol consumption was significantly lower in Groups UR and SR than that in Group T. There was no significant difference in the incidence of side effects. This study demonstrates that ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block helps to provide the effective analgesia without any side effects compared with surgical rectus sheath block and intravenous tramadol for gynaecological surgery with Pfannenstiel incision.

  4. Value of three-dimensional gradient-echo magnetic resonance cholangiography in diagnosing choledocholithiasis.

    PubMed

    Rawat, B; Loewy, J

    1996-08-01

    To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) in patients with suspected choledocholithiasis. Twenty-six consecutive patients with suspected choledocholithiasis (11 men and 15 women ranging in age from 25 to 81 years) underwent three-dimensional gradient-echo MRC; each patient also underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiography or operative cholangiography. Each set of images for each patient was reviewed independently by a radiologist who was unaware of the results of the other type of imaging. Diagnostic-quality MRC images were obtained for 17 of the patients. Of these, 13 had stones in the common bile duct, as confirmed by another imaging method, and MRC indicated the presence of these stones in all 13 patients. In the other four patients bile duct obstruction was due to either acute pancreatitis (in three) or cholangiocarcinoma (in one). For seven of the nine nondiagnostic-quality MRC studies, the bile duct was not obstructed, so there was no bile stasis and the MRC images could not be obtained. Motion artifacts due to inability to hold the breath were the limiting factors in the other two patients. Although MRC has some limitations, this new noninvasive technique may be used as a screening test in selected patients with suspected choledocholithiasis.

  5. Ultrasound-guided approach for axillary brachial plexus, femoral nerve, and sciatic nerve blocks in dogs.

    PubMed

    Campoy, Luis; Bezuidenhout, Abraham J; Gleed, Robin D; Martin-Flores, Manuel; Raw, Robert M; Santare, Carrie L; Jay, Ariane R; Wang, Annie L

    2010-03-01

    To describe an ultrasound-guided technique and the anatomical basis for three clinically useful nerve blocks in dogs. Prospective experimental trial. Four hound-cross dogs aged 2 +/- 0 years (mean +/- SD) weighing 30 +/- 5 kg and four Beagles aged 2 +/- 0 years and weighing 8.5 +/- 0.5 kg. Axillary brachial plexus, femoral, and sciatic combined ultrasound/electrolocation-guided nerve blocks were performed sequentially and bilaterally using a lidocaine solution mixed with methylene blue. Sciatic nerve blocks were not performed in the hounds. After the blocks, the dogs were euthanatized and each relevant site dissected. Axillary brachial plexus block Landmark blood vessels and the roots of the brachial plexus were identified by ultrasound in all eight dogs. Anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the four ventral nerve roots (C6, C7, C8, and T1) and the axillary vessels. Three roots (C7, C8, and T1) were adequately stained bilaterally in all dogs. Femoral nerve block Landmark blood vessels (femoral artery and femoral vein), the femoral and saphenous nerves and the medial portion of the rectus femoris muscle were identified by ultrasound in all dogs. Anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the femoral vessels, femoral nerve, and the rectus femoris muscle. The femoral nerves were adequately stained bilaterally in all dogs. Sciatic nerve block. Ultrasound landmarks (semimembranosus muscle, the fascia of the biceps femoris muscle and the sciatic nerve) could be identified in all of the dogs. In the four Beagles, anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the biceps femoris muscle, the semimembranosus muscle, and the sciatic nerve. In the Beagles, all but one of the sciatic nerves were stained adequately. Ultrasound-guided needle insertion is an accurate method for depositing local anesthetic for axillary brachial plexus, femoral, and sciatic nerve blocks.

  6. Usefulness and Safety of a Guide Catheter Extension System for the Percutaneous Treatment of Complex Coronary Lesions by a Transradial Approach

    PubMed Central

    García-Blas, Sergio; Núñez, Julio; Mainar, Luis; Miñana, Gema; Bonanad, Clara; Racugno, Paolo; Rodríguez, Juan Carlos; Moyano, Patricia; Sanchis, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to describe our initial experience with the GuideLiner® catheter (Vascular Solutions Inc.) in the transradial treatment of complex lesions. Materials and Methods The clinical, angiographic and procedural data of percutaneous coronary interventions where GuideLiner was used during 2013 were collected. The transradial approach was used in all cases. The indication for its use, efficacy and periprocedural complications were determined. Sixteen consecutive procedures (in 15 patients; 12 males and 3 females) were evaluated. The indication for the use of GuideLiner was a difficulty to advance and properly position a stent through a tortuous and/or calcified artery despite using high-support guide catheters or other useful techniques. Results Of the 16 angiographic procedures, 14 (87.5s%) were successful (stent deployment in 13 cases and a drug-eluting balloon in 1 case). Unsuccessful cases were a chronic total occlusion and a diffusely diseased left anterior descendant artery. A type B dissection of a proximal left circumflex artery was the only periprocedural complication. Conclusion Use of the GuideLiner was an effective and safe technique for the percutaneous treatment of complex coronary lesions in which the adequate progress of angioplasty devices had failed. GuideLiner was particularly helpful when using the transradial approach. Only one minor complication was recorded. PMID:25531292

  7. Usefulness and safety of a guide catheter extension system for the percutaneous treatment of complex coronary lesions by a transradial approach.

    PubMed

    García-Blas, Sergio; Núñez, Julio; Mainar, Luis; Miñana, Gema; Bonanad, Clara; Racugno, Paolo; Rodríguez, Juan Carlos; Moyano, Patricia; Sanchis, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe our initial experience with the GuideLiner® catheter (Vascular Solutions Inc.) in the transradial treatment of complex lesions. The clinical, angiographic and procedural data of percutaneous coronary interventions where GuideLiner was used during 2013 were collected. The transradial approach was used in all cases. The indication for its use, efficacy and periprocedural complications were determined. Sixteen consecutive procedures (in 15 patients; 12 males and 3 females) were evaluated. The indication for the use of GuideLiner was a difficulty to advance and properly position a stent through a tortuous and/or calcified artery despite using high-support guide catheters or other useful techniques. Of the 16 angiographic procedures, 14 (87.5%) were successful (stent deployment in 13 cases and a drug-eluting balloon in 1 case). Unsuccessful cases were a chronic total occlusion and a diffusely diseased left anterior descendant artery. A type B dissection of a proximal left circumflex artery was the only periprocedural complication. Use of the GuideLiner was an effective and safe technique for the percutaneous treatment of complex coronary lesions in which the adequate progress of angioplasty devices had failed. GuideLiner was particularly helpful when using the transradial approach. Only one minor complication was recorded. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. MR-guided focused ultrasound: a potentially disruptive technology.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William G

    2009-07-01

    A disruptive technology is a technological innovation that overturns the existing dominant technologies in a market. Magnetic resonance (MR)-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) is a noninvasive procedure based on the combination of real-time MR anatomic guidance, MR thermometry, and high-intensity focused ultrasound. Several hundred transducer elements become convergent at a point under MR guidance, leading to heating and coagulation necrosis. Outside the focal point, there is no significant heating. There is no need to break the skin for procedures in the body or to perform a craniotomy for procedures in the brain. This lack of invasiveness is what makes MRgFUS so disruptive compared with surgery. At present, MRgFUS has been used for the ablation of uterine fibroids, breast tumors, painful bony metastases, and liver tumors. In the brain, it has been used for the ablation of glioblastomas and for functional neurosurgery. Phantom and animal studies suggest future applications for prostate cancer and acute stroke treatment.

  9. Intravascular ultrasound guided directional atherectomy versus directional atherectomy guided by angiography for the treatment of femoropopliteal in-stent restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Prakash; Tarricone, Arthur; K-Raman, Purushothaman; Majeed, Farhan; Kapur, Vishal; Gujja, Karthik; Wiley, Jose; Vasquez, Miguel; Lascano, Rheoneil A.; Quiles, Katherine G.; Distin, Tashanne; Fontenelle, Ran; Atallah-Lajam, Farah; Kini, Annapoorna; Sharma, Samin

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare 1-year outcomes for patients with femoropopliteal in-stent restenosis using directional atherectomy guided by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) versus directional atherectomy guided by angiography. Methods and results: This was a retrospective analysis for patients with femoropopliteal in-stent restenosis treated with IVUS-guided directional atherectomy versus directional atherectomy guided by angiography from a single center between March 2012 and February 2016. Clinically driven target lesion revascularization was the primary endpoint and was evaluated through medical chart review as well as phone call follow up. Conclusions: Directional atherectomy guided by IVUS reduces clinically driven target lesion revascularization for patients with femoropopliteal in-stent restenosis. PMID:29265002

  10. Prospective evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging guided in-bore prostate biopsy versus systematic transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy in biopsy naïve men with elevated prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Quentin, Michael; Blondin, Dirk; Arsov, Christian; Schimmöller, Lars; Hiester, Andreas; Godehardt, Erhard; Albers, Peter; Antoch, Gerald; Rabenalt, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy is increasingly performed to diagnose prostate cancer. However, there is a lack of well controlled, prospective trials to support this treatment method. We prospectively compared magnetic resonance imaging guided in-bore biopsy with standard systematic transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy in biopsy naïve men with increased prostate specific antigen. We performed a prospective study in 132 biopsy naïve men with increased prostate specific antigen (greater than 4 ng/ml). After 3 Tesla functional multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging patients were referred for magnetic resonance imaging guided in-bore biopsy of prostate lesions (maximum 3) followed by standard systematic transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy (12 cores). We analyzed the detection rates of prostate cancer and significant prostate cancer (greater than 5 mm total cancer length or any Gleason pattern greater than 3). A total of 128 patients with a mean ± SD age of 66.1 ± 8.1 years met all study requirements. Median prostate specific antigen was 6.7 ng/ml (IQR 5.1-9.0). Transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsies provided the same 53.1% detection rate, including 79.4% and 85.3%, respectively, for significant prostate cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies missed 7.8% and 9.4% of clinically significant prostate cancers, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging biopsy required significantly fewer cores and revealed a higher percent of cancer involvement per biopsy core (each p <0.01). Combining the 2 methods provided a 60.9% detection rate with an 82.1% rate for significant prostate cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging guided in-bore and systematic transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies achieved equally high detection rates in biopsy naïve patients with increased prostate specific antigen. Magnetic resonance imaging guided in-bore biopsies required significantly fewer cores and revealed a

  11. Treatment of Refractory Idiopathic Supraorbital Neuralgia Using Percutaneous Pulsed Radiofrequency.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fang; Lu, Jingjing; Ji, Nan

    2018-02-26

    No ideal therapeutic method currently exists for refractory idiopathic supraorbital neuralgia patients who do not respond to conservative therapy, including medications and nerve blocks. Pulsed radiofrequency is a neuromodulation technique that does not produce sequelae of nerve damage after treatment. However, the efficacy of percutaneous pulsed radiofrequency for the treatment of refractory idiopathic supraorbital neuralgia is still not clear. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the supraorbital nerve for refractory supraorbital neuralgia patients. We prospectively investigated the long-term effects of ultrasound-guided percutaneous pulsed radiofrequency in the treatment of 22 refractory idiopathic supraorbital neuralgia patients. A reduction in the verbal pain numeric rating scale score of more than 50% was used as the standard of effectiveness. The effectiveness rates at different time points within 2 years were calculated. After a single pulsed radiofrequency treatment, the effectiveness rate at 1 and 3 months was 77%, and the rates at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years were 73%, 64%, and 50%, respectively. Except for a small portion of patients (23%) who experienced mild upper eyelid ecchymosis that gradually disappeared after approximately 2 weeks, no obvious complications were observed. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate that for patients with refractory idiopathic supraorbital neuralgia, percutaneous pulsed radiofrequency may be an effective and safe treatment choice. © 2018 World Institute of Pain.

  12. [Prognostic analysis of plantar fasciitis treated by pneumatic ballistic extracorporeal shock wave versus ultrasound guided intervention].

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiu-Lin; Wang, Ke-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Yang, Yi-Tian; Cao, Fu-Yang; Yang, Jing; Yuan, Wei-Xiu; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2018-02-20

    To compare the medium- and long-term effect of pneumatic ballistic extracorporeal shock wave versus ultrasound-guided hormone injection in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. The clinical data were collected from patients with plantar fasciitis admitted to PLA General Hospital pain department from September, 2015 to February, 2017. The patients were randomly divided into ultrasound-guided drug injection group and shock wave group. The therapeutic parameters including the numerical rating scale (NRS) scores in the first step pain in the morning, American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle Hindfoot Scale, and thickness of the plantar fascia were monitored before and at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after the treatment. The recurrence rate, effectiveness, and patient satisfaction were compared between the two groups at 6 months after the treatment. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled in shock wave group and 38 patients in ultrasound group. The NRS scores in the first step pain in the morning were lowered after treatment in both groups (P<0.05), and the scores were significantly lower in ultrasound group than in shock wave group at 1 week and 1 month (P<0.01), but significantly higher in ultrasound group than in shock wave group at 3 and 6 months after treatment (P<0.05). The AOFAS functional scores were increased in both groups (P<0.05) at 6 months after treatment, was significantly lower in ultrasound group than in shock wave group than group B (90.44∓13.27 vs 75.76∓21.40; P<0.05). The effective rates in shock wave group and ultrasound group were 92.31% and 76.32%, respectively (P<0.05). Recurrence was found in 1 patient (2.56%) in shock wave group and in 8 (21.05%) in ultrasound group (P<0.05). The patient satisfaction scores were significantly higher in shock wave group than in ultrasound group (8.13∓2.67 vs 6.63∓3.75, P=0.048). Pneumatic ballistic extracorporeal shock achieves better medium- and long-term outcomes than ultrasound-guided

  13. Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve interventions for common pain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Krishna Prasad, B P; Joy, Binu; Raghavendra, Vijayakumar A; Toms, Ajith; George, Danny; Ray, Brijesh

    2018-01-01

    There are a number of common pain disorders that can be managed effectively by injections around or ablation of peripheral nerves. Ultrasound is a universally available imaging tool, is safe, cost-effective, and is excellent in imaging many peripheral nerves and guiding needles to the site of the nerves. This article aims to present an overview of indications and techniques of such procedures that can be effectively performed by a radiologist. PMID:29692534

  14. Pathologic fracture through a unicameral bone cyst of the pelvis: CT-guided percutaneous curettage, biopsy, and bone matrix injection.

    PubMed

    Tynan, Jennifer R; Schachar, Norman S; Marshall, Geoffrey B; Gray, Robin R

    2005-02-01

    Unicameral bone cysts of the pelvis are extremely rare. A 19-year old man presented with a pathologic fracture through a pelvic unicameral bone cyst. He was treated with computed tomography-guided percutaneous curettage, biopsy, and demineralized bone matrix injection. Treatment has proven successful in short-term follow-up.

  15. Single-Pass Percutaneous Liver Biopsy for Diffuse Liver Disease Using an Automated Device: Experience in 154 Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Sanfeliz, Gerant, E-mail: gerantrivera@ucsd.edu; Kinney, Thomas B.; Rose, Steven C.

    2005-06-15

    Purpose: To describe our experience with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous liver biopsies using the INRAD 18G Express core needle biopsy system.Methods: One hundred and fifty-four consecutive percutaneous core liver biopsy procedures were performed in 153 men in a single institution over 37 months. The medical charts, pathology reports, and radiology files were retrospectively reviewed. The number of needle passes, type of guidance, change in hematocrit level, and adequacy of specimens for histologic analysis were evaluated.Results: All biopsies were performed for histologic staging of chronic liver diseases. The majority of patients had hepatitis C (134/153, 90.2%). All patients were discharged to homemore » after 4 hr of postprocedural observation. In 145 of 154 (94%) biopsies, a single needle pass was sufficient for diagnosis. US guidance was utilized in all but one of the procedures (153/154, 99.4%). The mean hematocrit decrease was 1.2% (44.1-42.9%). Pain requiring narcotic analgesia, the most frequent complication, occurred in 28 of 154 procedures (18.2%). No major complications occurred. The specimens were diagnostic in 152 of 154 procedures (98.7%).Conclusions: Single-pass percutaneous US-guided liver biopsy with the INRAD 18G Express core needle biopsy system is safe and provides definitive pathologic diagnosis of chronic liver disease. It can be performed on an outpatient basis. Routine post-biopsy monitoring of hematocrit level in stable, asymptomatic patients is probably not warranted.« less

  16. SU-E-J-04: Integration of Interstitial High Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound Applicators On a Clinical MRI-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment Planning Software Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Ellens, N; Partanen, A; Ghoshal, G

    Purpose: Interstitial high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) applicators can be used to ablate tissue percutaneously, allowing for minimally-invasive treatment without ionizing radiation [1,2]. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and usability of combining multielement interstitial HITU applicators with a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound software platform. Methods: The Sonalleve software platform (Philips Healthcare, Vantaa, Finland) combines anatomical MRI for target selection and multi-planar MRI thermometry to provide real-time temperature information. The MRI-compatible interstitial US applicators (Acoustic MedSystems, Savoy, IL, USA) had 1–4 cylindrical US elements, each 1 cm long with either 180° or 360°more » of active surface. Each applicator (4 Fr diameter, enclosed within a 13 Fr flexible catheter) was inserted into a tissue-mimicking agar-silica phantom. Degassed water was circulated around the transducers for cooling and coupling. Based on the location of the applicator, a virtual transducer overlay was added to the software to assist targeting and to allow automatic thermometry slice placement. The phantom was sonicated at 7 MHz for 5 minutes with 6–8 W of acoustic power for each element. MR thermometry data were collected during and after sonication. Results: Preliminary testing indicated that the applicator location could be identified in the planning images and the transducer locations predicted within 1 mm accuracy using the overlay. Ablation zones (thermal dose ≥ 240 CEM43) for 2 active, adjacent US elements ranged from 18 mm × 24 mm (width × length) to 25 mm × 25 mm for the 6 W and 8 W sonications, respectively. Conclusion: The combination of interstitial HITU applicators and this software platform holds promise for novel approaches in minimally-invasive MRI-guided therapy, especially when bony structures or air-filled cavities may preclude extracorporeal HIFU.[1

  17. Percutaneous Transhepatic Removal of Bile Duct Stones: Results of 261 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Nevzat, E-mail: nevzatcan@yahoo.com; Kahriman, Guven, E-mail: guvenkahriman@hotmail.com; Mavili, Ertugrul, E-mail: ertmavili@yahoo.com

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of percutaneous transhepatic removal of bile duct stones when the procedure of endoscopic therapy fails for reasons of anatomical anomalies or is rejected by the patient. Methods: Between April 2001 and May 2010, 261 patients (138 male patients and 123 female patients; age range, 14-92 years; mean age, 64.6 years) with bile duct stones (common bile duct [CBD] stones = 248 patients and hepatolithiasis = 13 patients) were included in the study. First, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography was performed and stones were identified. Percutaneous transhepatic balloon dilation of the papilla of Vater was performed. Then stonesmore » were pushed out into the duodenum with a Fogarty balloon catheter. If the stone diameter was larger than 15 mm, then basket lithotripsy was performed before balloon dilation. Results: Overall success rate was 95.7%. The procedure was successful in 97.5% of patients with CBD stones and in 61.5% of patients with hepatolithiasis. A total of 18 (6.8%) major complications, including cholangitis (n = 7), subcapsular biloma (n = 4), subcapsular hematoma (n = 1), subcapsular abscess (n = 1), bile peritonitis (n = 1), duodenal perforation (n = 1), CBD perforation (n = 1), gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm (n = 1), and right hepatic artery transection (n = 1), were seen after the procedure. There was no mortality. Conclusion: Our experience suggests that percutaneous transhepatic stone expulsion into the duodenum through the papilla is an effective and safe approach in the nonoperative management of the bile duct stones. It is a feasible alternative to surgery when endoscopic extraction fails or is rejected by the patient.« less

  18. In-Plane Ultrasound-Guided Knee Injection Through a Lateral Suprapatellar Approach: A Safe Technique.

    PubMed

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco A; Taneja, Atul K; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to describe a technique for in-plane ultrasound-guided knee arthrography through a lateral suprapatellar approach, reporting its accuracy and related complications. A retrospective search was performed for computed tomography and magnetic resonance reports from June 2013 through June 2015. Imaging studies, puncture descriptions, and guided-procedure images were reviewed along with clinical and surgical history. A fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist performed all procedures under sterile technique and ultrasound guidance with the probe in oblique position on the lateral suprapatellar recess after local anesthesia with the patient on dorsal decubitus, hip in neutral rotation, and 30 to 45 degrees of knee flexion. A total of 86 consecutive subjects were evaluated (mean, 55 years). All subjects underwent intra-articular injection of contrast, which was successfully reached in the first attempt in 94.2% of the procedures (81/86), and in the second attempt in 5.8% (5/86) after needle repositioning without a second puncture. There were no postprocedural reports of regional complications at the puncture site, such as significant pain, bleeding, or vascular lesions. Our study demonstrates that in-plane ultrasound-guided injection of the knee in semiflexion approaching the lateral suprapatellar recess is a safe and useful technique to administer intra-articular contrast solution, as an alternative method without radiation exposure.

  19. Improving Echo-Guided Procedures Using an Ultrasound-CT Image Fusion System.

    PubMed

    Diana, Michele; Halvax, Peter; Mertz, Damien; Legner, Andras; Brulé, Jean-Marcel; Robinet, Eric; Mutter, Didier; Pessaux, Patrick; Marescaux, Jacques

    2015-06-01

    Image fusion between ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance can increase operator accuracy in targeting liver lesions, particularly when those are undetectable with US alone. We have developed a modular gel to simulate hepatic solid lesions for educational purposes in imaging and minimally invasive ablation techniques. We aimed to assess the impact of image fusion in targeting artificial hepatic lesions during the hands-on part of 2 courses (basic and advanced) in hepatobiliary surgery. Under US guidance, 10 fake tumors of various sizes were created in the livers of 2 pigs, by percutaneous injection of a biocompatible gel engineered to be hyperdense on CT scanning and barely detectable on US. A CT scan was obtained and a CT-US image fusion was performed using the ACUSON S3000 US system (Siemens Healthcare, Germany). A total of 12 blinded course attendants, were asked in turn to perform a 10-minute liver scan with US alone followed by a 10-minute scan using image fusion. Using US alone, the expert managed to identify all lesions successfully. The true positive rate for course attendants with US alone was 14/36 and 2/24 in the advanced and basic courses, respectively. The total number of false positives identified was 26. With image fusion, the rate of true positives significantly increased to 31/36 (P < .001) in the advanced group and 16/24 in the basic group (P < .001). The total number of false positives, considering all participants, decreased to 4 (P < .001). Image fusion significantly increases accuracy in targeting hepatic lesions and might improve echo-guided procedures. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Laparoscopic-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks in the pediatric population: a novel technique with comparison to ultrasound-guided blocks and local wound infiltration alone.

    PubMed

    Landmann, Alessandra; Visoiu, Mihaela; Malek, Marcus M

    2018-03-01

    Abdominal wall nerve blocks have been gaining popularity for the treatment of perioperative pain in children. Our aim was to compare a technique of surgeon-performed, laparoscopic abdominal wall nerve blocks to anesthesia-placed, ultrasound-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks and the current standard of local wound infiltration. After institutional review board approval was obtained, a retrospective chart review was performed of pediatric patients treated at a single institution during a 2-year period. Statistics were calculated using analysis of variance with post-hoc Bonferonni t tests for pair-wise comparisons. Included in this study were 380 patients who received ultrasound-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks (n = 125), laparoscopic-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks (n = 88), and local wound infiltration (n = 117). Groups were well matched for age, sex, and weight. There was no significant difference in pain scores within the first 8 hours or narcotic usage between groups. Local wound infiltration demonstrated the shortest overall time required to perform (P < .0001). Patients who received a surgeon-performed abdominal wall nerve block demonstrated a shorter duration of hospital stay when compared to the other groups (P = .02). Our study has demonstrated that laparoscopic-guided abdominal wall nerve blocks show similar efficacy to ultrasound-guided nerve blocks performed by pain management physicians without increasing time in the operating room. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Percutaneous puncture of renal calyxes guided by a novel device coupled with ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chen Jen; Srougi, Victor; Tanno, Fabio Yoshiaki; Jordão, Ricardo Duarte; Srougi, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the efficiency of a novel device coupled with ultrassound for renal percutaneous puncture. Materials and Methods: After establishing hydronephrosis, ten pigs had three calyxes of each kidney punctured by the same urology resident, with and without the new device (“Punctiometer”). Time for procedure completion, number of attempts to reach the calyx, puncture precision and puncture complications were recorded in both groups and compared. Results: Puncture success on the first attempt was achieved in 25 punctures (83%) with the Punctiometer and in 13 punctures (43%) without the Punctiometer (p=0.011). The mean time required to perform three punctures in each kidney was 14.5 minutes with the Punctiometer and 22.4 minutes without the Punctiometer (p=0.025). The only complications noted were renal hematomas. In the Punctiometer group, all kidneys had small hematomas. In the no Punctiometer group 80% had small hematomas, 10% had a medium hematoma and 10% had a big hematoma. There was no difference in complications between both groups. Conclusions: The Punctiometer is an effective device to increase the likelihood of an accurate renal calyx puncture during PCNL, with a shorter time required to perform the procedure. PMID:26689521

  2. CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous drainage: comparison of the one step and the Seldinger techniques.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Kenji; Yamagami, Takuji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Baba, Yasutaka; Nakamura, Yuko; Fukumoto, Wataru; Awai, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the one step technique compared with the Seldinger technique in computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous drainage of abdominal and pelvic abscess. Seventy-six consecutive patients (49 men, 27 women; mean age 63.5 years, range 19-87 years) with abdominal and pelvic abscess were included in this study. Drainages were performed with the one step (n = 46) and with the Seldinger (n = 48) technique between September 2012 and June 2014. The technical success and clinical success rates were 95.8% and 93.5%, respectively, for the one step group, and 97.8% and 95.7%, respectively, for the Seldinger group. The mean procedure time was significantly shorter with the one step than with the Seldinger method (15.0 ± 4.3 min, range 10-29 min vs. 21.0 ± 9.5 min, range 13-54 min, p < .01). The mean abscess size and depth were 73.4 ± 44.0 mm and 42.5 ± 19.3 mm, respectively, in the one step group, and 61.0 ± 22.8 mm and 35.0 ± 20.7 mm in the Seldinger group. The one step technique was easier and faster than the Seldinger technique. The effectiveness of both techniques was similar for the CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous drainage of abdominal and pelvic abscess.

  3. Ultrasound Imaging and Guided Injection for the Lateral and Posterior Hip.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ke-Vin; Wu, Wei-Ting; Lew, Henry L; Özçakar, Levent

    2018-04-01

    Ultrasound has emerged as one of the most utilized tools to diagnose musculoskeletal disorders and to assist in interventions. Traditionally, sonographic examination of the hip joint has been challenging because most of the major structures are deeply situated, thus requiring the use of curvilinear transducer for better penetrance. The posterior lateral hip is a frequent area for musculoskeletal pain and nerve entrapments. Common disorders include greater trochanteric pain syndrome, gluteus medius tendinopathy, piriformis syndrome, pudendal neuralgia, and proximal hamstring tendinopathy. The present review article aims to delineate sonoanatomy of the posterior lateral hip and to exemplify several common ultrasound guided procedures at the greater trochanteric, gluteal, and ischial tuberosity regions.

  4. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) array system for image-guided ablative therapy (IGAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczkowski, Peter J.; Keilman, George W.; Cunitz, Bryan W.; Martin, Roy W.; Vaezy, Shahram; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-06-01

    Recent interest in using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for surgical applications such as hemostasis and tissue necrosis has stimulated the development of image-guided systems for non-invasive HIFU therapy. Seeking an all-ultrasound therapeutic modality, we have developed a clinical HIFU system comprising an integrated applicator that permits precisely registered HIFU therapy delivery and high quality ultrasound imaging using two separate arrays, a multi-channel signal generator and RF amplifier system, and a software program that provides the clinician with a graphical overlay of the ultrasound image and therapeutic protocol controls. Electronic phasing of a 32 element 2 MHz HIFU annular array allows adjusting the focus within the range of about 4 to 12 cm from the face. A central opening in the HIFU transducer permits mounting a commercial medical imaging scanhead (ATL P7-4) that is held in place within a special housing. This mechanical fixture ensures precise coaxial registration between the HIFU transducer and the image plane of the imaging probe. Recent enhancements include development of an acoustic lens using numerical simulations for use with a 5-element array. Our image-guided therapy system is very flexible and enables exploration of a variety of new HIFU therapy delivery and monitoring approaches in the search for safe, effective, and efficient treatment protocols.

  5. Targeted Ultrasound-Guided Perineural Hydrodissection of the Sciatic Nerve for the Treatment of Piriformis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burke, Christopher J; Walter, William R; Adler, Ronald S

    2018-05-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a common cause of lumbar, gluteal, and thigh pain, frequently associated with sciatic nerve symptoms. Potential etiologies include muscle injury or chronic muscle stretching associated with gait disturbances. There is a common pathological end pathway involving hypertrophy, spasm, contracture, inflammation, and scarring of the piriformis muscle, leading to impingement of the sciatic nerve. Ultrasound-guided piriformis injections are frequently used in the treatment of these pain syndromes, with most of the published literature describing injection of the muscle. We describe a safe, effective ultrasound-guided injection technique for the treatment of piriformis syndrome using targeted sciatic perineural hydrodissection followed by therapeutic corticosteroid injection.

  6. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle injection for local control of recurrent non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Farrah; Anker, Christopher J; Garrison, Garth; Kinsey, C Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is an established technique for the diagnosis of thoracic malignancies. Non-ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle injection has been used previously to deliver chemotherapeutic agents. To use endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle injection (EBUS-TBNI) to achieve local control of recurrent early-stage lung cancer. A 63-year-old man presented with recurrent early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma after chemotherapy and external beam radiation. We used EBUS-TBNI to deliver cisplatin into the tumor located outside the airway. This procedure was performed on three separate occasions without complication. EBUS-TBNI resulted in resolution of fluorodeoxyglucose avidity, measured by positron emission tomography-computed tomography, in the region at 4 weeks. However, at 5 months, there was evidence of distal recurrence. This is the first description of EBUS-TBNI to treat local recurrence of lung cancer and one of the first reports of the use of EBUS for intratumoral therapy. Additional research is warranted to determine the clinical usefulness and safety of this therapeutic approach.

  7. Electromagnetic-Tracked Biopsy under Ultrasound Guidance: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hakime, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com; Deschamps, Frederic; Marques De Carvalho, Enio Garcia

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and safety of electromagnetic needle tracking for sonographically guided percutaneous liver biopsies. Methods: We performed 23 consecutive ultrasound-guided liver biopsies for liver nodules with an electromagnetic tracking of the needle. A sensor placed at the tip of a sterile stylet (18G) inserted in a coaxial guiding trocar (16G) used for biopsy was localized in real time relative to the ultrasound imaging plane, thanks to an electromagnetic transmitter and two sensors on the ultrasound probe. This allows for electronic display of the needle tip location and the future needle path overlaid onmore » the real-time ultrasound image. Distance between needle tip position and its electronic display, number of needle punctures, number of needle pull backs for redirection, technical success (needle positioned in the target), diagnostic success (correct histopathology result), procedure time, and complication were evaluated according to lesion sizes, depth and location, operator experience, and 'in-plane' or 'out-of-plane' needle approach. Results: Electronic display was always within 2 mm from the real position of the needle tip. The technical success rate was 100%. A single needle puncture without repuncture was used in all patients. Pull backs were necessary in six patients (26%) to obtain correct needle placement. The overall diagnostic success rate was 91%. The overall true-positive, true-negative, false-negative, and failure rates of the biopsy were 100% (19/19) 100% (2/2), 0% (0/23), and 9% (2/23). The median total procedure time from the skin puncture to the needle in the target was 30 sec (from 5-60 s). Lesion depth and localizations, operator experience, in-plane or out-of-plane approach did not affect significantly the technical, diagnostic success, or procedure time. Even when the tumor size decreased, the procedure time did not increase. Conclusions: Electromagnetic-tracked biopsy is accurate to

  8. Accuracy of electromyography needle placement in cadavers: non-guided vs. ultrasound guided.

    PubMed

    Boon, Andrea J; Oney-Marlow, Theresa M; Murthy, Naveen S; Harper, Charles M; McNamara, Terrence R; Smith, Jay

    2011-07-01

    Accuracy of needle electromyography is typically ensured by use of anatomical landmarks and auditory feedback related to voluntary activation of the targeted muscle; however, in certain clinical situations, landmarks may not be palpable, auditory feedback may be limited or not present, and targeting a specific muscle may be more critical. In such settings, image guidance might significantly enhance accuracy. Two electromyographers with different levels of experience examined 14 muscles in each of 4 fresh-frozen cadaver lower limbs. Each muscle was tested a total of eight times; four fine wires were inserted without ultrasound (US) guidance and four were inserted under US guidance. Overall accuracy as well as accuracy rates for the individual electromyographers were calculated. Non-guided needle placement was significantly less accurate than US-guided needle placement, particularly in the hands of less experienced electromyographers, supporting the use of real-time US guidance in certain challenging situations in the electromyography laboratory. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A pitfall during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial forceps biopsy of the mediastinal lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Krenke, Rafal; Korczynski, Piotr; Gorska, Katarzyna; Chazan, Ryszarda

    2014-03-01

    The high diagnostic yield and favorable safety profile of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial forceps biopsy of the mediastinal lymph nodes have been recently demonstrated. We report an unusual technical problem during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial forceps biopsy that could be a prerequisite for severe complications. A rupture of the steering band precluded closure of the forceps jaws opened in the subcarinal lymph node. A solution to the problem is presented, together with other procedure-related complications reported in the literature. The report emphasizes that a dysfunction of the forceps steering band can result in severe complications when it occurs during transbronchial sampling of mediastinal lesions. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Polyplex-microbubble hybrids for ultrasound-guided plasmid DNA delivery to solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Sirsi, Shashank R; Hernandez, Sonia L; Zielinski, Lukasz; Blomback, Henning; Koubaa, Adel; Synder, Milo; Homma, Shunichi; Kandel, Jessica J; Yamashiro, Darrell J; Borden, Mark A

    2012-01-30

    Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents are being developed as image-guided gene carriers for targeted delivery in vivo. In this study, novel polyplex-microbubbles were synthesized, characterized and evaluated for systemic circulation and tumor transfection. Branched polyethylenimine (PEI; 25 kDa) was modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG; 5 kDa), thiolated and covalently attached to maleimide groups on lipid-coated microbubbles. The PEI-microbubbles demonstrated increasingly positive surface charge and DNA loading capacity with increasing maleimide content. The in vivo ultrasound contrast persistence of PEI-microbubbles was measured in the healthy mouse kidney, and a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model accounting for free and adherent microbubbles was developed to describe the anomalous time-intensity curves. The model suggested that PEI loading dramatically reduced free circulation and increased nonspecific adhesion to the vasculature. However, DNA loading to form polyplex-microbubbles increased circulation in the bloodstream and decreased nonspecific adhesion. PEI-microbubbles coupled to a luciferase bioluminescence reporter plasmid DNA were shown to transfect tumors implanted in the mouse kidney. Site-specific delivery was achieved using ultrasound applied over the tumor area following bolus injection of the DNA/PEI-microbubbles. In vivo imaging showed over 10-fold higher bioluminescence from the tumor region compared to untreated tissue. Ex vivo analysis of excised tumors showed greater than 40-fold higher expression in tumor tissue than non-sonicated control (heart) tissue. These results suggest that the polyplex-microbubble platform offers improved control of DNA loading and packaging suitable for ultrasound-guided tissue transfection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pocket ultrasound device as a complement to physical examination for ascites evaluation and guided paracentesis.

    PubMed

    Keil-Ríos, Daniel; Terrazas-Solís, Hiram; González-Garay, Alejandro; Sánchez-Ávila, Juan Francisco; García-Juárez, Ignacio

    2016-04-01

    The pocket ultrasound device (PUD) is a new tool that may be of use in the early detection of ascites. Abdominal ultrasound-guided paracentesis has been reported to decrease the rate of complications due to the procedure, but must be performed in a healthcare setting; this new tool may be a useful on an ambulatory basis. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic usefulness of the PUD in the diagnosis of ascites and the safety of guided paracentesis. We conducted a retrospective study that included adult patients suspected of having ascites and in whom an evaluation was performed with the PUD to identify it. Concordance with abdominal ultrasound (AUS) was determined with the Kappa coefficient. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp) and likelihood ratios (LR) were determined and compared with physical examination, AUS, computed tomography and procurement of fluid by paracentesis. Complications resulting from the guided paracentesis were analyzed. 89 participants were included and 40 underwent a paracentesis. The PUD for ascites detection had 95.8 % Se, 81.8 % Sp, 5.27 +LR and 0.05 -LR. It had a concordance with AUS of 0.781 (p < 0.001). Technical problems during the guided paracentesis were present in only two participants (5 %) and three patients (7.5 %) developed minor complications that required no further intervention. There were no severe complications or deaths. This study suggests that the PUD is a reliable tool for ascites detection as a complement to physical examination and appears to be a safe method to perform guided paracentesis.

  12. A serious game for learning ultrasound-guided needle placement skills.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wing-Yin; Qin, Jing; Chui, Yim-Pan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle placement is a key step in a lot of radiological intervention procedures such as biopsy, local anesthesia and fluid drainage. To help training future intervention radiologists, we develop a serious game to teach the skills involved. We introduce novel techniques for realistic simulation and integrate game elements for active and effective learning. This game is designed in the context of needle placement training based on the some essential characteristics of serious games. Training scenarios are interactively generated via a block-based construction scheme. A novel example-based texture synthesis technique is proposed to simulate corresponding ultrasound images. Game levels are defined based on the difficulties of the generated scenarios. Interactive recommendation of desirable insertion paths is provided during the training as an adaptation mechanism. We also develop a fast physics-based approach to reproduce the shadowing effect of needles in ultrasound images. Game elements such as time-attack tasks, hints and performance evaluation tools are also integrated in our system. Extensive experiments are performed to validate its feasibility for training.

  13. Long-term follow-up of ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin-A injections for sialorrhea in neurological dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Pierangelo; Busso, Marco; Tinivella, Marco; Artusi, Carlo Alberto; De Mercanti, Stefania; Cucci, Angele; Veltri, Andrea; Avagnina, Paolo; Calvo, Andrea; Chio', Adriano; Durelli, Luca; Clerico, Marinella

    2015-12-01

    Literature provides reports only of a limited follow-up single injection of botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) in patients with sialorrhea. The aim of our study is to evaluate the long-lasting efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections for severe sialorrhea secondary to neurological dysphagia. We enrolled 38 severe adult sialorrhea patients referred consecutively to the neurology unit and performed bilateral parotid and submandibular gland BoNT-A injections under ultrasound guidance. The outcomes of the study were reduction of sialorrhea, duration of therapeutic effect, and subjective patient- and caregiver-reported satisfaction. A total of 113 BoNT-A administrations were given during the study period with a mean duration of follow-up of 20.2 ± 4.4 months. We observed a significant decrease from baseline in mean number of daily aspirations and a significant improvement in patient- and caregiver-reported outcomes following ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections (p < 0.001 vs baseline for all comparisons) and the mean duration of the efficacy was 5.6 ± 1 months. No major treatment-related adverse events occurred and a low incidence of minor adverse events was reported. This study confirms the long-lasting efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections for sialorrhea, regardless of the causative neurological disorder. These results should encourage the use of BoNT-A in the treatment of severe sialorrhea and highlight the role of ultrasound guidance to obtain optimal results in terms of safety and reproducible outcomes.

  14. Effectiveness of imaging-guided intra-articular injection: a comparison study between fluoroscopy and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Rita Nely Vilar; Pereira, Daniele Freitas; da Luz, Karine Rodrigues; dos Santos, Marla Francisca; Konai, Monique Sayuri; Mitraud, Sonia de Aguiar Vilela; Rosenfeld, Andre; Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa; Natour, Jamil

    2013-01-01

    Compare the effectiveness of ultrasound and fluoroscopy to guide intra-articular injections (IAI) in selected cases. A prospective study in our outpatient clinics at the Rheumatology Division at Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), Brazil, was conducted to compare the short-term (4 weeks) effectiveness of ultrasound and fluoroscopy-guided IAI in patients with rheumatic diseases. Inclusion criteria were: adults with refractory synovitis undergoing IAI with glucocorticoid. All patients had IAI performed with triamcinolone hexacetonide (20mg/ml) with varying doses according to the joint injected. A total of 71 rheumatic patients were evaluated (52 women, 44 whites). Mean age was 51.9 ± 13 years and 47 of them (66.2%) were on regular DMARD use. Analysis of the whole sample (71 patients) and hip sub-analysis (23 patients) showed that significant improvement was observed for both groups in terms of pain (P < 0.001). Global analysis also demonstrated better outcomes for patients in the FCG in terms of joint flexion (P < 0.001) and percentage change in joint flexion as compared to the USG. Likert scale score analyses demonstrated better results for the patients in the USG as compared to the FCG at the end of the study (P < 0.05). No statistically significant difference between groups was observed for any other study variable. Imaging-guided IAI improves regional pain in patients with various types of synovitis in the short term. For the vast majority of variables, no significant difference in terms of effectiveness was observed between fluoroscopy and ultrasound guided IAI.

  15. Value of artisanal simulators to train veterinary students in performing invasive ultrasound-guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Hage, Maria Cristina F N S; Massaferro, Ana Beatriz; Lopes, Érika Rondon; Beraldo, Carolina Mariano; Daniel, Jéssika

    2016-03-01

    Pericardial effusion can lead to cardiac tamponade, which endangers an animal's life. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis is used to remove abnormal liquid; however, it requires technical expertise. In veterinary medical education, the opportunity to teach this procedure to save lives during emergencies is rare; therefore, simulators are recommended for this practice. The present study aimed to create a model that can be made "at home" at low cost for ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis training and to gather feedback about this model through questionnaires given to the participants. Eighteen professionals and thirty-six students were introduced to the simulator in pairs. After the simulation training session, participants filled out the questionnaire. Participants considered the model strong in the following areas: visualization of the pericardium, the heart, fluid in the pericardium, and fluid decrease during fictitious pericardiocentesis and its realism. They considered the model weak or moderate in the following areas: visualization of the surrounding tissues, difficulty of pericardial puncture, and visualization of the catheter. The professionals classified the realism of the experimental heart as moderate, whereas the undergraduate students classified it as strong. All participants believed that the experimental model could be useful in preparing for a future real situation. This model fulfills the need for a practical, realistic, and cost-effective model for ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis training. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  16. Percutaneous intrapericardial echocardiography during catheter ablation: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Barbara Natterson; Vaseghi, Marmar; Mahajan, Aman; Cesario, David A; Buch, Eric; Valderrábano, Miguel; Boyle, Noel G; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2006-11-01

    Percutaneous pericardial access, epicardial mapping, and ablation have been used successfully for catheter ablation procedures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of closed-chest direct epicardial ultrasound imaging for aiding cardiac catheter ablation procedures. An intracardiac ultrasound catheter was used for closed-chest epicardial imaging of the heart in 10 patients undergoing percutaneous epicardial access for catheter ablation. All patients underwent concomitant intracardiac echocardiography and preprocedural transesophageal echocardiography. Using a double-wire technique, two sheaths were placed in the pericardium, and a phased-array ultrasound catheter was manipulated within the pericardial sinuses for imaging. Multiple images from varying angles were obtained for catheter navigation. Notably, image stability was excellent, and structures such as the left atrial appendage were seen in great detail. No complications resulting from use of the ultrasound catheter in the pericardium occurred, and no restriction of movement due to the presence of the additional catheter in the pericardial space was observed. Wall motion was correlated to voltage maps in five patients and showed that areas of scars correlated with wall-motion abnormalities. Normal wall-motion score correlated to sensed signals of 4.2 +/- 0.3 mV (normal myocardium >1.5 mV), and scores >1 correlated to areas with signals <0.5 mV in that territory). Intrapericardial imaging using an ultrasound catheter is feasible and safe and has the potential to provide additional valuable information for complex ablation procedures.

  17. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma in challenging locations: safety and efficacy of high-power microwave platforms.

    PubMed

    Filippiadis, Dimitrios K; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Konstantos, Chrysostomos; Reppas, Lazaros; Kelekis, Alexis; Brountzos, Elias; Kelekis, Nikolaos

    2017-09-03

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy/safety of CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation for HCC in challenging locations using high-power microwave platforms. A retrospective review was conducted in 26 patients with 36 HCC tumours in challenging locations (hepatic dome, subcapsular, close to the heart/diaphragm/hepatic hilum, exophytic) undergoing CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation in a single centre since January 2011. Two different microwave platforms were used both operating at 2.45 GHz: AMICA and Acculis MWA System. Patient demographics including age, sex, tumour size and location, as well as technical details were recorded. Technical success, treatment response, patients survival and complication rate were evaluated. Treated tumours were located in the hepatic dome (n = 14), subcapsularly (n = 16), in proximity to the heart (n = 2) or liver hilum (n = 2), while two were exophytic tumours at segment VI (n = 2). Mean tumour diameter was 3.30 cm (range 1.4-5 cm). In 3/26 patients (diameter >4 cm), an additional session of DEB-TACE was performed due to tumour size. Technical success rate was 100%; complete response rate was recorded in 33/36 tumours (91.6%). According to Kaplan-Meier analysis, survival rate was 92.3% and 72.11% at 24- and 60-month follow-up, respectively. There were no major complications; two cases of minor pneumothorax and two cases of small subcapsular haematoma were resolved only with observation requiring no further treatment. CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma tumours in challenging locations and up to 5 cm in diameter can be performed with high efficacy and safety rates.

  18. Imaging for percutaneous renal access and management of renal calculi.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangtae; Pearle, Margaret S

    2006-08-01

    Percutaneous renal stone surgery requires detailed imaging to define stone burden and delineate the anatomy of the kidney and nearby organs. It is also essential to carry out safe percutaneous access and to assess postoperative outcomes. The emergence of CT as the imaging modality of choice for detecting renal calculi and the ability of CT urography with or without three-dimensional reconstruction to delineate the collecting system makes this the most versatile and sensitive imaging modality for pre- and postoperative evaluation. At present, intravenous urogram continues to play an important role in the evaluation of patients considered for percutaneous nephrostolithotomy. Fluoroscopy re-mains the mainstay of intraoperative imaging, although ultrasound is a useful alternative. Selection and application of appropriate imaging modalities for patients undergoing per-cutaneous nephrostolithotomy enhances the safety and success of the procedure.

  19. Evaluation of a Standardized Program for Training Practicing Anesthesiologists in Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia Skills.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Edward R; Harrison, T Kyle; Kim, T Edward; Kan, Jack; Shum, Cynthia; Gaba, David M; Ganaway, Toni; Kou, Alex; Udani, Ankeet D; Howard, Steven K

    2015-10-01

    Practicing anesthesiologists have generally not received formal training in ultrasound-guided perineural catheter insertion. We designed this study to determine the efficacy of a standardized teaching program in this population. Anesthesiologists in practice for 10 years or more were recruited and enrolled to participate in a 1-day program: lectures and live-model ultrasound scanning (morning) and faculty-led iterative practice and mannequin-based simulation (afternoon). Participants were assessed and recorded while performing ultrasound-guided perineural catheter insertion at baseline, at midday (interval), and after the program (final). Videos were scored by 2 blinded reviewers using a composite tool and global rating scale. Participants were surveyed every 3 months for 1 year to report the number of procedures, efficacy of teaching methods, and implementation obstacles. Thirty-two participants were enrolled and completed the program; 31 of 32 (97%) completed the 1-year follow-up. Final scores [median (10th-90th percentiles)] were 21.5 (14.5-28.0) of 30 points compared to 14.0 (9.0-20.0) at interval (P < .001 versus final) and 12.0 (8.5-17.5) at baseline (P < .001 versus final), with no difference between interval and baseline. The global rating scale showed an identical pattern. Twelve of 26 participants without previous experience performed at least 1 perineural catheter insertion after training (P < .001). However, there were no differences in the monthly average number of procedures or complications after the course when compared to baseline. Practicing anesthesiologists without previous training in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia can acquire perineural catheter insertion skills after a 1-day standardized course, but changing clinical practice remains a challenge. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  20. Analytical estimation of ultrasound properties, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound temperature data

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, C R; Borasi, G; Payne, A

    2016-01-01

    For thermal modeling to play a significant role in treatment planning, monitoring, and control of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal therapies, accurate knowledge of ultrasound and thermal properties is essential. This study develops a new analytical solution for the temperature change observed in MRgFUS which can be used with experimental MR temperature data to provide estimates of the ultrasound initial heating rate, Gaussian beam variance, tissue thermal diffusivity, and Pennes perfusion parameter. Simulations demonstrate that this technique provides accurate and robust property estimates that are independent of the beam size, thermal diffusivity, and perfusion levels in the presence of realistic MR noise. The technique is also demonstrated in vivo using MRgFUS heating data in rabbit back muscle. Errors in property estimates are kept less than 5% by applying a third order Taylor series approximation of the perfusion term and ensuring the ratio of the fitting time (the duration of experimental data utilized for optimization) to the perfusion time constant remains less than one. PMID:26741344

  1. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Derek; Sherebrin, Shi; Izawa, Jonathan; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Biopsy of the prostate using ultrasound guidance is the clinical gold standard for diagnosis of prostate adenocarinoma. However, because early stage tumors are rarely visible under US, the procedure carries high false-negative rates and often patients require multiple biopsies before cancer is detected. To improve cancer detection, it is imperative that throughout the biopsy procedure, physicians know where they are within the prostate and where they have sampled during prior biopsies. The current biopsy procedure is limited to using only 2D ultrasound images to find and record target biopsy core sample sites. This information leaves ambiguity as the physician tries to interpret the 2D information and apply it to their 3D workspace. We have developed a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system that provides 3D intra-biopsy information to physicians for needle guidance and biopsy location recording. The system is designed to conform to the workflow of the current prostate biopsy procedure, making it easier for clinical integration. In this paper, we describe the system design and validate its accuracy by performing an in vitro biopsy procedure on US/CT multi-modal patient-specific prostate phantoms. A clinical sextant biopsy was performed by a urologist on the phantoms and the 3D models of the prostates were generated with volume errors less than 4% and mean boundary errors of less than 1 mm. Using the 3D biopsy system, needles were guided to within 1.36 +/- 0.83 mm of 3D targets and the position of the biopsy sites were accurately localized to 1.06 +/- 0.89 mm for the two prostates.

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Intermediate Site Greater Occipital Nerve Infiltration: A Technical Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Jonathan; Kastler, Adrian; Tatu, Laurent; Behr, Julien; Kechidi, Rachid; Kastler, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Two studies recently reported that computed tomography (CT) guided infiltration of the greater occipital nerve at its intermediate site allows a high efficacy rate with long-lasting pain relief following procedure in occipital neuralgia and in various craniofacial pain syndromes. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the technical feasibility and safety of ultrasound-guided intermediate site greater occipital nerve infiltration. Retrospective study. This study was conducted at the imaging department of a 1,409 bed university hospital. Local institutional review board approval was obtained and written consent was waived. In this retrospective study, 12 patients suffering from refractory occipital neuralgia or craniofacial pain syndromes were included between April and October 2014. They underwent a total of 21 ultrasound-guided infiltrations. Infiltration of the greater occipital nerve was performed at the intermediate site of the greater occipital nerve, at its first bend between obliqus capitis inferior and semispinalis capitis muscles with local anestetics and cortivazol. Technical success was defined as satisfactory diffusion of added iodinated contrast media in the fatty space between these muscles depicted on control CT scan. We also reported first data of immediate block test efficacy and initial clinical efficacy at 7 days, one month, and 3 months, defined by a decrease of at least 50% of visual analog scale (VAS) scores. Technical success rate was 95.24%. Patients suffered from right unilateral occipital neuralgia in 3 cases, left unilateral occipital neuralgia in 2 cases, bilateral occipital neuralgia in 2 cases, migraine in one case, cervicogenic headache in one case, tension-type headache in 2 cases, and cluster headache in one case. Block test efficacy was found in 93.3% (14/15) cases. Clinical efficacy was found in 80% of cases at 7 days, in 66.7% of cases at one month and in 60% of cases at 3 months. No major complications were noted. Some of the

  3. Ultrasound-guided versus computed tomography-scan guided biopsy of pleural-based lung lesions

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, Rahul; McLean, Anna W; Smith, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography (CT) guided biopsies have long been the standard technique to obtain tissue from the thoracic cavity and is traditionally performed by interventional radiologists. Ultrasound (US) guided biopsy of pleural-based lesions, performed by pulmonologists is gaining popularity and has the advantage of multi-planar imaging, real-time technique, and the absence of radiation exposure to patients. In this study, we aim to determine the diagnostic accuracy, the time to diagnosis after the initial consult placement, and the complications rates between the two different modalities. Methods: A retrospective study of electronic medical records was done of patients who underwent CT-guided biopsies and US-guided biopsies for pleural-based lesions between 2005 and 2014 and the data collected were analyzed for comparing the two groups. Results: A total of 158 patients underwent 162 procedures during the study period. 86 patients underwent 89 procedures in the US group, and 72 patients underwent 73 procedures in the CT group. The overall yield in the US group was 82/89 (92.1%) versus 67/73 (91.8%) in the CT group (P = 1.0). Average days to the procedure was 7.2 versus 17.5 (P = 0.00001) in the US and CT group, respectively. Complication rate was higher in CT group 17/73 (23.3%) versus 1/89 (1.1%) in the US group (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: For pleural-based lesions the diagnostic accuracy of US guided biopsy is similar to that of CT-guided biopsy, with a lower complication rate and a significantly reduced time to the procedure. PMID:27625440

  4. Models to teach lung sonopathology and ultrasound-guided thoracentesis.

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, Jacek A

    2014-12-01

    Lung sonography allows rapid diagnosis of lung emergencies such as pulmonary edema, hemothorax or pneumothorax. The ability to timely diagnose an intraoperative pneumothorax is an important skill for the anesthesiologist. However, lung ultrasound exams require an interpretation of not only real images but also complex acoustic artifacts such as A-lines and B-lines. Therefore, appropriate training to gain proficiency is important. Simulated environment using ultrasound phantom models allows controlled, supervised learning. We have developed hybrid models that combine dry or wet polyurethane foams, porcine rib cages and human hand simulating a rib cage. These models simulate fairly accurately pulmonary sonopathology and allow supervised teaching of lung sonography with the immediate feedback. In-vitro models can also facilitate learning of procedural skills, improving transducer and needle positioning and movement, rapid recognition of thoracic anatomy and hand - eye coordination skills. We described a new model to teach an ultrasound guided thoracentesis. This model consists of the experimenter's hand placed on top of the water-filled container with a wet foam. Metacarpal bones of the human hand simulate a rib cage and a wet foam simulates a diseased lung immersed in the pleural fluid. Positive fluid flow offers users feedback when a simulated pleural effusion is accurately assessed.

  5. Rapid percutaneous nephrostomy catheter placement in neonates with the trocar technique.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, O; Kaya, H E; Nayman, A; Saritas, T B; Guler, I; Koc, O; Karakus, H

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a modified percutaneous nephrostomy procedure for grade III-IV hydronephrosis in neonates. Eleven neonates (five girls, six boys) with a mean age of 13.7days±9.9 (SD) (range, 4-28days) with pronounced hydronephrosis had percutaneous nephrostomy using a modified procedure. In all patients, percutaneous nephrostomy was performed with a trocar catheter under ultrasound guidance and then the catheter was placed into the collecting system without prior dilatation. Technical success was achieved in all patients. There were no major procedure-related complications. There was no perirenal hematoma on control ultrasound examinations and no hematuria was observed after the procedure. The median drainage time was 75days (range: 42-120days). Two children had urinary tract infection, which was controlled by using antibiotics. The trocar nephrostomy is a practical and feasible method, which can be used for neonates with grade III-IV hydronephrosis. Copyright © 2016 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided transluminal drainage for peripancreatic fluid collections: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hiroshi; Itoi, Takao; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2014-07-01

    Endoscopic drainage for pancreatic and peripancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) has been increasingly used as a minimally invasive alternative to surgical or percutaneous drainage. Recently, endoscopic ultrasound-guided transluminal drainage (EUS-TD) has become the standard of care and a safe procedure for nonsurgical PFC treatment. EUS-TD ensures a safe puncture, avoiding intervening blood vessels. Single or multiple plastic stents (combined with a nasocystic catheter) were used for the treatment of PFCs for EUS-TD. More recently, the use of covered self-expandable metallic stents (CSEMSs) has provided a safer and more efficient approach route for internal drainage. We focused our review on the best approach and stent to use in endoscopic drainage for PFCs. We reviewed studies of EUS-TD for PFCs based on the original Atlanta Classification, including case reports, case series, and previous review articles. Data on clinical outcomes and adverse events were collected retrospectively. A total of 93 patients underwent EUS-TD of pancreatic pseudocysts using CSEMSs. The treatment success and adverse event rates were 94.6% and 21.1%, respectively. The majority of complications were of mild severity and resolved with conservative therapy. A total of 56 patients underwent EUS-TD using CSEMSs for pancreatic abscesses or infected walled-off necroses. The treatment success and adverse event rates were 87.8% and 9.5%, respectively. EUS-TD can be performed safely and efficiently for PFC treatment. Larger diameter CSEMSs without additional fistula tract dilation for the passage of a standard scope are needed to access and drain for PFCs with solid debris.

  7. Radiography of the bile ducts: a symposium of the use of new modalities for diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, R.N.; Cooperberg, P.L.; Gold, R.P.

    1982-10-01

    New diagnostic and therapeutic techniques have enabled the radiologist to assume a significant role in the management of jaundice, whereas before he was powerless to make any contribution at all. In this symposium, sonography, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography, and interventional procedures are analyzed and placed in perspective.

  8. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in diagnosis of abdominal and pelvic neoplasm in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailing; Li, Fangxuan; Liu, Juntian; Zhang, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of abdominal and pelvic masses in adults has gained tremendous popularity. However, the application of the same treatment in children is not as popular because of apprehensions regarding inadequate tissues for the biopsy and accidental puncture of vital organs. Data of the application of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in 105 pediatric patients with clinically or ultrasound-diagnosed abdominopelvic masses were reviewed. Diagnostic procedures were conducted in our institution from May 2011 to May 2013. The biopsies were conducted on 86 malignant lesions and 19 benign lesions. 86 malignant tumors comprised neuroblastomas (30 cases), hepatoblastomas (15 cases), nephroblastomas (11 cases), and primitive neuroectodermal tumors/malignant small round cells (6 cases). Among malignant tumor cases, only a pelvic primitive neuroectodermal tumor did not receive a pathological diagnosis. Therefore, the biopsy accuracy was 98.8 % in malignant tumor. However, the biopsies for one neuroblastomas and one malignant small round cell tumor were inadequate for cytogenetic analysis. Therefore, 96.5 % of the malignant tumor patients received complete diagnosis via biopsy. 19 benign tumors comprised mature teratoma (10 cases), hemangioendothelioma (3 cases), paraganglioma (2 cases), and infection (2 cases). The diagnostic accuracy for benign neoplasm was 100 %. Five patients experienced postoperative complications, including pain (2 patients), bleeding from the biopsy site (2 patients), and wound infection (1 patient). Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy is an efficient, minimally invasive, accurate, and safe diagnostic method that can be applied in the management of abdominal or pelvic mass of pediatric patients.

  9. Clinical use of intracoronary imaging. Part 1: guidance and optimization of coronary interventions. An expert consensus document of the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions: Endorsed by the Chinese Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Räber, Lorenz; Mintz, Gary S; Koskinas, Konstantinos C; Johnson, Thomas W; Holm, Niels R; Onuma, Yoshinubo; Radu, Maria D; Joner, Michael; Yu, Bo; Jia, Haibo; Menevau, Nicolas; de la Torre Hernandez, Jose M; Escaned, Javier; Hill, Jonathan; Prati, Francesco; Colombo, Antonio; di Mario, Carlo; Regar, Evelyn; Capodanno, Davide; Wijns, William; Byrne, Robert A; Guagliumi, Giulio

    2018-05-22

    This Consensus Document is the first of two reports summarizing the views of an expert panel organized by the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) on the clinical use of intracoronary imaging including intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The first document appraises the role of intracoronary imaging to guide percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) in clinical practice. Current evidence regarding the impact of intracoronary imaging guidance on cardiovascular outcomes is summarized, and patients or lesions most likely to derive clinical benefit from an imaging-guided intervention are identified. The relevance of the use of IVUS or OCT prior to PCI for optimizing stent sizing (stent length and diameter) and planning the procedural strategy is discussed. Regarding post-implantation imaging, the consensus group recommends key parameters that characterize an optimal PCI result and provides cut-offs to guide corrective measures and optimize the stenting result. Moreover, routine performance of intracoronary imaging in patients with stent failure (restenosis or stent thrombosis) is recommended. Finally, strengths and limitations of IVUS and OCT for guiding PCI and assessing stent failures and areas that warrant further research are critically discussed.

  10. 3D conformal MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy: results of gel phantom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Djin, W. A.; Burtnyk, M.; McCormick, S.; Bronskill, M.; Chopra, R.

    2011-09-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy shows promise for minimally invasive treatment of localized prostate cancer. Previous in-vivo studies demonstrated the feasibility of performing conservative treatments using real-time temperature feedback to control accurately the establishment of coagulative lesions within circumscribed prostate regions. This in-vitro study tested device configuration and control options for achieving full prostate treatments. A multi-channel MRI compatible ultrasound therapy system was evaluated in gel phantoms using 3 canine prostate models. Prostate profiles were 5 mm-step-segmented from T2-weighted MR images performed during previous in-vivo experiments. During ultrasound exposures, each ultrasound element was controlled independently by the 3D controller. Decisions on acoustic power, frequency, and device rotation rate were made in real time based on MR thermometry feedback and prostate radii. Low and high power treatment approaches using maximum acoustic powers of 10 or 20 W.cm-2 were tested as well as single and dual-frequency strategies (4.05/13.10 MHz). The dual-frequency strategy used either the fundamental frequency or the 3rd harmonic component, depending on the prostate radius. The 20 W.cm-2 dual frequency approach was the most efficient configuration in achieving full prostate treatments. Treatment times were about half the duration of those performed with 10 W.cm-2 configurations. Full prostate coagulations were performed in 16.3±6.1 min at a rate of 1.8±0.2 cm3.min-1, and resulted in very little undertreated tissue (<3%). Surrounding organs positioned beyond a safety distance of 1.4±1.0 mm from prostate boundaries were not damaged, particularly rectal wall tissues. In this study, a 3D, MR-thermometry-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy was validated in vitro in a tissue-mimicking phantom for performing full prostate treatment. A dual-frequency configuration with 20 W.cm-2 ultrasound intensity exposure showed good

  11. Primary malignant tumours of the bony pelvis: US-guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Wei; Tang, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the value of ultrasound (US)-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in the treatment of primary malignant tumours of the bony pelvis. Eleven patients with primary malignant tumours of the bony pelvis received US-guided HIFU ablation. The maximum tumour size ranged from 5.6 to 25.0 cm (median 10.5 cm). Treatment was curative in four patients and palliative in seven patients. During follow-up, the effectiveness of HIFU ablation was assessed by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR). Significant coagulative necrosis was obtained in all patients after scheduled HIFU ablations; the volume ablation ratio was 86.7% ± 12.5% (range 65-100%). Complete tumour necrosis was achieved in all patients receiving curative HIFU ablation. No major complications were encountered. No patients died of local tumour progression during follow-up. US-guided HIFU ablation may be a safe and effective minimally invasive technique for the local treatment of primary malignant tumours of the bony pelvis.

  12. Successful percutaneous coronary intervention with GuideLiner® catheter for subtotal occlusive lesion in the right coronary artery with anomalous origin from the left sinus of Valsalva: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Ayumi; Nomura, Tetsuya; Kubota, Hiroshi; Taminishi, Shunta; Urata, Ryota; Sugimoto, Takeshi; Higuchi, Yusuke; Kato, Taku; Keira, Natsuya; Tatsumi, Tetsuya

    2015-07-28

    Because of the unusual anatomy of an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the left sinus of Valsalva, selective cannulation of the guiding catheter in percutaneous coronary intervention for these cases is always challenging. A 58-year-old Japanese man was admitted to our hospital complaining of worsening exertional chest pain. He was suspected of having unstable angina pectoris and underwent cardiac catheterization. We found a subtotal occlusive lesion in the mid-portion of his right coronary artery that originated from the left sinus of Valsalva. On the previous percutaneous coronary intervention, we failed to cannulate the guiding catheter to the anomalous orifice of the right coronary artery. Therefore, we decided to use the GuideLiner catheter for stable back-up support from the beginning. A 6Fr GuideLiner catheter was introduced into the right coronary artery by anchoring it coaxially with a semi-compliant balloon catheter. And we successfully deployed two drug-eluting stents by crossing over the posterior-descending artery. Final angiography demonstrated favorable dilatation of the target lesion, and native blood flow in the right coronary artery was completely recovered. GuideLiner is a monorail-type "child" support catheter that facilitates coaxial guiding catheter engagement and an appropriate back-up force, achieving successful device delivery to target lesions in this kind of complex percutaneous coronary intervention.

  13. CT-Guided Percutaneous Drainage of Infected Collections Due to Gastric Leak After Sleeve Gastrectomy for Morbid Obesity: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kelogrigoris, M., E-mail: kelogre.mic@hotmail.com; Sotiropoulou, E.; Stathopoulos, K.

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of computed tomography (CT)-guided drainage in treating infected collections due to gastric leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. From January 2007 to June 2009, 21 patients (9 men and 12 women; mean age, 39.2 (range, 26-52) years) with infected collections due to gastric leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity underwent image-guided percutaneous drainage. All procedures were performed using CT guidance and 8- to 12-Fr pigtail drainage catheters. Immediate technical success was achieved in all 21 infected collections. In 18 of 21 collections, we obtained progressive shrinkagemore » of the collection with consequent clinical success (success rate 86%). In three cases, the abdominal fluid collection was not resolved, and the patients were reoperated. Among the 18 patients who avoided surgery, 2 needed replacement of the catheter due to obstruction. No major complications occurred during the procedure. The results of our study support that CT-guided percutaneous drainage is an effective and safe method to treat infected abdominal fluid collections due to gastric leak in patients who had previously underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. It may be considered both as a preparatory step for surgery and a valuable alternative to open surgery. Failure of the procedure does not, however, preclude a subsequent surgical operation.« less

  14. Percutaneous insertion of peritoneal dialysis catheters using ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance: A single centre experience and review of literature.

    PubMed

    De Boo, Diederick W; Mott, Nigel; Tregaskis, Peter; Quach, Trung; Menahem, Solomon; Walker, Rowan G; Koukounaras, Jim

    2015-12-01

    Various methods of peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter insertion are available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a percutaneous insertion technique using ultrasound (US) and fluoroscopy performed under conscious sedation and as day case procedure. Data of 87 percutaneous inserted dialysis catheters were prospectively collected, including patients' age, gender, body mass index, history of previous abdominal surgery and cause of end stage renal failure. Length of hospital stay, early complications and time to first use were also recorded. Institutional review board approval was obtained. A 100% technical success rate was observed. Early complications included bleeding (n = 3), catheter dysfunction (n = 6), exit site infection (n = 1) and exit site leakage (n = 1). All cases of catheter dysfunction and one case of bleeding required surgical revision. Median time of follow-up was 18 months (range 3-35), and median time from insertion to first use was days 14 (1-47). Of the 82 patients who started dialysis, 20 (23%) ceased PD at some stage during follow-up. Most frequently encountered reasons include deteriorating patient cognitive or functional status (n = 5), successful transplant kidney (n = 4) and pleuro-peritoneal fistula (n = 4). Sixty-two (71%) PD catheter insertions were performed as day case. The remaining insertions were performed on patients already admitted to the hospital. Percutaneous insertion of dialysis catheter using US and fluoroscopy is not only safe but can be performed as day case procedure in most patients, even with a medical history of abdominal surgery and/or obesity. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Stimulation of Posterior Tibial Nerve: A Potential Novel Intervention for Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yung-Tsan; Chang, Chih-Ya; Chou, Yu-Ching; Yeh, Chun-Chang; Li, Tsung-Ying; Chu, Heng-Yi; Chen, Liang-Cheng

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic benefit of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) stimulation at the posterior tibial nerve (PTN) in patients with recalcitrant plantar fasciitis (PF). A prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial (12-wk follow-up). Outpatient local medical center settings. Patients (N=36) with recalcitrant PF underwent randomization, and all were included in the final data analysis. Patients in the PRF group were treated with 1 dose of ultrasound-guided PRF stimulation at the PTN, and those in the control group received 1 dose of 2% lidocaine, 0.5mL, injected at the PTN under ultrasound guidance. The visual analog scale (first-step and overall pain), American Orthopedic Foot-Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale, and ultrasonographic thickness of the plantar fascia were evaluated at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. Thirty-six patients (20 feet per group) completed the study. The PRF group had a significantly larger improvement in first-step pain, overall pain, and AOFAS score (all P<.001), as well as plantar fascia thickness (P<.05), compared with those of the control group at all observed time points. This study shows that ultrasound-guided PRF stimulation at the PTN is effective for treating recalcitrant PF. This simple, reproducible method could be a novel strategy for managing recalcitrant PF. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound guided transarterial coil placement in the internal and external carotid artery in horses.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Juan; Iglesias, Manuel; Chao, Eduardo Lloret; Bussy, Christian

    2015-04-01

    To assess ultrasound guided transarterial coil placement (UGTACP) for occlusion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and external carotid artery (ECA) in horses. Cadaveric and in vivo study. Cadaveric horses (n = 10), healthy horses (3), and 1 clinical case. Cadaveric and in vivo (healthy horses): UGTACP was performed in the caudal part of the ICA and ECA. Coil placement in the rostral part of the ICA was performed blindly and controlled by conventional radiography. No coils were placed in the rostral part of the ECA. UGTACP of the ICA was in a horse with guttural pouch mycosis of the left guttural pouch. Accurate ultrasound-guided catheterization of the ICA and ECA was performed in all specimens. Ultrasound-guided coil placement was successfully performed in all cases except 1. No complications occurred in the in vivo study. The clinical case fully recovered and returned to its intended use. Based on our study, UGTACP of the ICA and ECA caudal part is a feasible alternative to fluoroscopy. An advantage of this technique is the accuracy with which you can catheterize both ICA and ECA and the ability to identify unusual branching at the origin of the ICA. Regarding the rostral part of the ICA, angiographic catheter guidance in this region is probably more precise using fluoroscopy as it is performed blindly. In a clinical situation, combination of US and fluoroscopy guidance can result in reduction of radiation exposure time. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  17. Improving needle tip identification during ultrasound-guided procedures in anaesthetic practice.

    PubMed

    Scholten, H J; Pourtaherian, A; Mihajlovic, N; Korsten, H H M; A Bouwman, R

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasound guidance is becoming standard practice for needle-based interventions in anaesthetic practice, such as vascular access and peripheral nerve blocks. However, difficulties in aligning the needle and the transducer can lead to incorrect identification of the needle tip, possibly damaging structures not visible on the ultrasound screen. Additional techniques specifically developed to aid alignment of needle and probe or identification of the needle tip are now available. In this scoping review, advantages and limitations of the following categories of those solutions are presented: needle guides; alterations to needle or needle tip; three- and four-dimensional ultrasound; magnetism, electromagnetic or GPS systems; optical tracking; augmented (virtual) reality; robotic assistance; and automated (computerised) needle detection. Most evidence originates from phantom studies, case reports and series, with few randomised clinical trials. Improved first-pass success and reduced performance time are the most frequently cited benefits, whereas the need for additional and often expensive hardware is the greatest limitation to widespread adoption. Novice ultrasound users seem to benefit most and great potential lies in education. Future research should focus on reporting relevant clinical parameters to learn which technique will benefit patients most in terms of success and safety. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  18. Prospective randomized trial comparing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided in-bore biopsy to MRI-ultrasound fusion and transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy in patients with prior negative biopsies.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Christian; Rabenalt, Robert; Blondin, Dirk; Quentin, Michael; Hiester, Andreas; Godehardt, Erhard; Gabbert, Helmut E; Becker, Nikolaus; Antoch, Gerald; Albers, Peter; Schimmöller, Lars

    2015-10-01

    A significant proportion of prostate cancers (PCas) are missed by conventional transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy (TRUS-GB). It remains unclear whether the combined approach using targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy (FUS-GB) and systematic TRUS-GB is superior to targeted MRI-guided in-bore biopsy (IB-GB) for PCa detection. To compare PCa detection between IB-GB alone and FUS-GB + TRUS-GB in patients with at least one negative TRUS-GB and prostate-specific antigen ≥4 ng/ml. Patients were prospectively randomized after multiparametric prostate MRI to IB-GB (arm A) or FUS-GB + TRUS-GB (arm B) from November 2011 to July 2014. The study was powered at 80% to demonstrate an overall PCa detection rate of ≥60% in arm B compared to 40% in arm A. Secondary endpoints were the distribution of highest Gleason scores, the rate of detection of significant PCa (Gleason ≥7), the number of biopsy cores to detect one (significant) PCa, the positivity rate for biopsy cores, and tumor involvement per biopsy core. The study was halted after interim analysis because the primary endpoint was not met. The trial enrolled 267 patients, of whom 210 were analyzed (106 randomized to arm A and 104 to arm B). PCa detection was 37% in arm A and 39% in arm B (95% confidence interval for difference, -16% to 11%; p=0.7). Detection rates for significant PCa (29% vs 32%; p=0.7) and the highest percentage tumor involvement per biopsy core (48% vs 42%; p=0.4) were similar between the arms. The mean number of cores was 5.6 versus 17 (p<0.001). A limitation is the limited number of patients because of early cessation of accrual. This trial failed to identify an important improvement in detection rate for the combined biopsy approach over MRI-targeted biopsy alone. A prospective comparison between MRI-targeted biopsy alone and systematic TRUS-GB is justified. Our randomized study showed similar prostate cancer detection rates between targeted prostate biopsy

  19. Percutaneous Management of Accidentally Retained Foreign Bodies During Image-Guided Non-vascular Procedures: Novel Technique Using a Large-Bore Biopsy System

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: gigicazzato@hotmail.it; Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juleiengarnon@gmail.com; Ramamurthy, Nitin, E-mail: nitin-ramamurthy@hotmail.com

    ObjectiveTo describe a novel percutaneous image-guided technique using a large-bore biopsy system to retrieve foreign bodies (FBs) accidentally retained during non-vascular interventional procedures.Materials and MethodsBetween May 2013 and October 2015, five patients underwent percutaneous retrieval of five iatrogenic FBs, including a biopsy needle tip in the femoral head following osteoblastoma biopsy and radiofrequency ablation (RFA); a co-axial needle shaft within a giant desmoid tumour following cryoablation; and three post-vertebroplasty cement tails within paraspinal muscles. All FBs were retrieved immediately following original procedures under local or general anaesthesia, using combined computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopic guidance. The basic technique involved positioningmore » a 6G trocar sleeve around the FB long axis and co-axially advancing an 8G biopsy needle to retrieve the FB within the biopsy core. Retrospective chart review facilitated analysis of procedures, FBs, technical success, and complications.ResultsMean FB size was 23 mm (range 8–74 mm). Four FBs were located within 10 mm of non-vascular significant anatomic structures. The basic technique was successful in 3 cases; 2 cases required technical modifications including using a stiff guide-wire to facilitate retrieval in the case of the post-cryoablation FB; and using the central mandrin of the 6G trocar to push a cement tract back into an augmented vertebra when initial retrieval failed. Overall technical success (FB retrieval or removal to non-hazardous location) was 100 %, with no complications.ConclusionPercutaneous image-guided retrieval of iatrogenic FBs using a large-bore biopsy system is a feasible, safe, effective, and versatile technique, with potential advantages over existing methods.« less

  20. Inexpensive homemade models for ultrasound-guided vein cannulation training.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Stefano; Santori, Gregorio; Porcile, Elisa; Licausi, Martina; Centanaro, Monica; Valente, Umberto

    2007-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that low-cost homemade models may be used to acquire the basic skills for ultrasound-guided central vein puncture. Training study. University transplantation department. Training was performed using three different homemade models (A, B, and C). Segments of a common rubber tourniquet (V1) and Silastic tube (V2) were used to simulate vessels within agar-based models. Overall cost for each model was less than 5 euro (US$7). For each test (test I, A-V1; II, A-V2; III, B-V1; IV, C-V2), the number of punctures and attempts needed to locate the needle inside the lumen were recorded. Each test was considered completed when participants punctured the vessels at the first attempt for three consecutive times. In test I, the mean number of punctures and attempts were 3.85 +/- 1.26 and 4.95 +/- 3.05; in test II, 4.60 +/- 1.14 and 6.30 +/- 2.51; in test III, 4.80 +/- 1.06 and 4.65 +/- 2.21; and in test IV, 4.45 +/- 1.23 and 6.05 +/- 2.92, respectively. For each test, no statistical difference was found by comparison of number of punctures and attempts for anesthesiologists versus nonanesthesiologists, men versus women, or previous experience versus no experience with central vein cannulation (CVC). Video game users obtained better results than did nonusers in test I (punctures, P = 0.033; attempts, P = 0.038), test II (punctures, P = 0.052; attempts, P = 0.011), and test IV (punctures, P = 0.001; attempts, P = 0.003). A posttraining questionnaire showed favorable opinions about the clarity of the instructions, aptness of the models, and adequacy of the training. In our operative unit, the use of ultrasound guidance for CVC increased from 2% to 23% in the first month after training. Low-cost homemade models are useful in acquiring basic coordination skills for ultrasound-guided CVC.

  1. Use of gadoxetic acid for computed tomographic cholangiography in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Chau, Jennifer; Podadera, Juan M; Young, Alex C; Makara, Mariano A

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of gadoxetic acid (contrast) dose on biliary tract enhancement, determine the optimal time after contrast injection for CT image acquisition, and assess the feasibility of CT cholangiography in sedated dogs. ANIMALS 8 healthy dogs. PROCEDURES The study had 2 parts. In part 1, 4 dogs were anesthetized and underwent CT cholangiography twice. Gadoxetic acid was administered IV at a low dose (0.025 mmol/kg) for the first procedure and high dose (0.3 mmol/kg) for the second procedure. Serial CT scans were obtained at predetermined times after contrast injection. In part 2, 4 dogs were sedated and underwent CT angiography 85 minutes after IV administration of the high contrast dose. Contrast enhancement of the biliary tract on all scans was objectively assessed by measurement of CT attenuation and qualitatively assessed by use of a subjective 4-point scoring system by 3 independent reviewers. All measurements were compared over time and between contrast doses for the dogs of part 1. Subjective measurements were compared between the sedated dogs of part 2 and anesthetized dogs of part 1. RESULTS Enhancement of the biliary tract was positively associated with contrast dose and time after contrast injection. Optimal enhancement was achieved 65 minutes after contrast injection. Subjective visualization of most biliary structures did not differ significantly between sedated and anesthetized dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated CT cholangiography with gadoxetic acid was feasible in sedated dogs. The high contrast dose provided better visualization of biliary structures than the low dose; CT scans should be obtained 65 minutes after contrast injection.

  2. First noninvasive thermal ablation of a brain tumor with MR-guided focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) allows for precise thermal ablation of target tissues. While this emerging modality is increasingly used for the treatment of various types of extracranial soft tissue tumors, it has only recently been acknowledged as a modality for noninvasive neurosurgery. MRgFUS has been particularly successful for functional neurosurgery, whereas its clinical application for tumor neurosurgery has been delayed for various technical and procedural reasons. Here, we report the case of a 63-year-old patient presenting with a centrally located recurrent glioblastoma who was included in our ongoing clinical phase I study aimed at evaluating the feasibility and safety of transcranial MRgFUS for brain tumor ablation. Applying 25 high-power sonications under MR imaging guidance, partial tumor ablation could be achieved without provoking neurological deficits or other adverse effects in the patient. This proves, for the first time, the feasibility of using transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound to safely ablate substantial volumes of brain tumor tissue. PMID:25671132

  3. Comparison between ultrasound guided technique and digital palpation technique for radial artery cannulation in adult patients: An updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Sulagna; Maitra, Souvik; Baidya, Dalim K

    2018-06-01

    Possible advantages and risks associated with ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation in-comparison to digital palpation guided method in adult patients are not fully known. We have compared ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation with digital palpation technique in this meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Trials conducted in operating room, emergency department, cardiac catheterization laboratory. PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched (from 1946 to 20th November 2017) to identify prospective randomized controlled trials in adult patients. Two-dimensional ultrasound guided radial artery catheterization versus digital palpation guided radial artery cannulation. Overall cannulation success rate, first attempt success rate, time to cannulation and mean number of attempts to successful cannulation. Odds ratio (OR) and standardized mean difference (SMD) or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for categorical and continuous variables respectively. Data of 1895 patients from 10 studies have been included in this meta- analysis. Overall cannulation success rate was similar between ultrasound guided technique and digital palpation [OR (95% CI) 2.01 (1.00, 4.06); p = 0.05]. Ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation is associated with higher first attempt success rate of radial artery cannulation in comparison to digital palpation [OR (95% CI) 2.76 (186, 4.10); p < 0.001]. No difference was seen in time to cannulate [SMD (95% CI) -0.31 (-0.65, 0.04); p = 0.30] and mean number of attempt [MD (95% CI) -0.65 (-1.32, 0.02); p = 0.06] between USG guided technique with palpation technique. Radial artery cannulation by ultrasound guidance may increase the first attempt success rate but not the overall cannulation success when compared to digital palpation technique. However, results of this meta-analysis should be interpreted with caution due presence of

  4. Real-time ultrasound-guided PCNL using a novel SonixGPS needle tracking system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Long, Qingzhi; Chen, Xingfa; He, Dalin; Dalin, He; He, Hui

    2014-08-01

    SonixGPS is a successful ultrasound guidance position system. It helps to improve accuracy in performing complex puncture operations. This study firstly used SonixGPS to perform kidney calyx access in PCNL to investigate its effectiveness and safety. This was a prospectively randomized controlled study performed from September 2011 to October 2012. A total of 97 patients were prospectively randomized into two groups using random number generated from SAS software. 47 Patients were enrolled in conventional ultrasound-guided (US-guided) group and 50 patients were classified into SonixGPS-guided group. Nine patients were lost during follow-up. Hence, a total of 88 patients were qualified and analyzed. Preoperative examinations included urine analysis, urine culture, kidney function, coagulation profile and routine analysis of blood. Ultrasonography was used to evaluate the degree of hydronephrosis. The intraoperative findings, including blood loss, operating time, time to successful puncture, the number of attempts for successful puncture and hospital stay were recorded. The stone clearance rate and complications were analyzed. The present study showed no significant difference between the two groups in terms of demographic data, preoperative markers, stone clearance rate and the stone composition. However, the time to successful puncture, the number of trials for successful puncture, operating time and hospital length of stay were significantly decreased in the SonixGPS-guided group. Furthermore, the hemoglobin decrease was also obviously lower in the SonixGPS group than that in conventional US-guided group. SonixGPS needle tacking system guided PCNL is safe and effective in treating upper urinary tract stones. This novel technology makes puncturing more accuracy and can significantly decrease the incidence of relative hemorrhage and accelerate recovery.

  5. Pathological fracture of the patella due to an atypical located aneurysmal bone cyst: verification by means of ultrasound-guided biopsy.

    PubMed

    Plaikner, Michaela; Gruber, Hannes; Henninger, Benjamin; Gruber, Leonhard; Kosiol, Juana; Loizides, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    We report on a rare case of an atypical located aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) in the patella presenting with pathological fracture after trauma. Using all available diagnostic modalities and by means of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy an unclear and suspected pathological fractured cystic bone lesion in the patella of a young man could be further clarified. The acquired images suggested the diagnosis of a pathological fractured aneurysmal bone cyst after mild trauma. However, due to the extraordinary location and clinical presentation the diagnosis was secured by means of ultrasound-guided biopsy through a small cortical gap. As shown in this rare case of an atypical aneurysmal bone cyst of the patella, the quite seldom but sometimes possible ultrasound-guided biopsy of intraosseous lesions can help to achieve the diagnostic clarification and should also be taken into account as a non-standard procedure.

  6. Ultrasound-guided drainages and sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lohela, P

    2002-02-01

    Ultrasonically guided fluid collection and abscess drainage have become routine procedures in various parts of the body. In most cases ultrasound is the only imaging and guidance modality needed; however, it is of the utmost importance to remember that CT and fluoroscopy with contrast often give invaluable information when the true extent of the process has to be determined and when assessing the safest route for the catheter in anatomically complicated areas. The importance of irrigation of the abscess cavity with fluids and the ready use of urokinase should be emphasized. Ethanol sclerotherapy is a simple and safe procedure to treat symptomatic hepatic or renal cysts. Parathyroid adenomas and cysts, as well as thyroid cysts, can also be treated with ethanol sclerotherapy in selected cases. Purified mineral talc has been used in pleurodesis and hydrocele sclerotherapy, whereas doxycycline or ethanol is used for postoperative lymphoceles. Both abscess drainages and sclerotherapy procedures are minimally invasive, simple, safe, inexpensive and reasonably efficacious treatment in many clinical instances and may be at least an alternative to surgical treatment, often offering significant advantages over surgery.

  7. MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    2014-01-01

    MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) surgery is a noninvasive thermal ablation method that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for target definition, treatment planning, and closed-loop control of energy deposition. Integrating FUS and MRI as a therapy delivery system allows us to localize, target, and monitor in real time, and thus to ablate targeted tissue without damaging normal structures. This precision makes MRgFUS an attractive alternative to surgical resection or radiation therapy of benign and malignant tumors. Already approved for the treatment of uterine fibroids, MRgFUS is in ongoing clinical trials for the treatment of breast, liver, prostate, and brain cancer and for the palliation of pain in bone metastasis. In addition to thermal ablation, FUS, with or without the use of microbubbles, can temporarily change vascular or cell membrane permeability and release or activate various compounds for targeted drug delivery or gene therapy. A disruptive technology, MRgFUS provides new therapeutic approaches and may cause major changes in patient management and several medical disciplines. PMID:19630579

  8. Open versus percutaneous repair in the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture: a randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gigante, A; Moschini, A; Verdenelli, A; Del Torto, M; Ulisse, S; de Palma, L

    2008-02-01

    There is no agreement on the ideal type of surgical management for Achilles tendon rupture. The present randomized prospective study was performed to compare outcome data of open and percutaneous repair in the treatment of Achilles tendon rupture. Forty consecutive patients with acute rupture of Achilles tendon were recruited. Patients were randomized to receive open (group A) or percutaneous repair with Tenolig (group B). All patients followed the same rehabilitation protocol except for slight differences in the duration of immobilization. Follow-up included objective evaluation (at 4 and 12 months), subjective evaluation using the SF-12 questionnaire (at 24 months), and bilateral ultrasound scanning and isokinetic testing (at 12 months). The differences in the parameters evaluated clinically were not significant except for ankle circumference, which was significantly greater in group B. There were two minor complications in the open repair group and one case of failed repair in the percutaneous group. SF-12 questionnaire, ultrasound and isokinetic test data did not show significant differences between the groups. The present study demonstrates that the open and the percutaneous technique are both safe and effective in repairing the ruptured Achilles tendon and that both afford the same degree of restoration of clinical, ultrasound and isokinetic patterns. Medium-term results were substantially comparable. Percutaneous repair is performed on a day-surgery basis, it reduces cutaneous complications and operation times, and enables faster recovery, enhancing overall patient compliance. To us, these characteristics make it preferable to open repair in managing subcutaneous ruptures of Achilles tendon in non-professional sports practicing adults.

  9. Paraffin-gel tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound-guided needle biopsy phantom.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Sílvio L; Pavan, Theo Z; Junior, Jorge E; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2013-12-01

    Paraffin-gel waxes have been investigated as new soft tissue-mimicking materials for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy training. Breast phantoms were produced with a broad range of acoustical properties. The speed of sound for the phantoms ranged from 1425.4 ± 0.6 to 1480.3 ± 1.7 m/s at room temperature. The attenuation coefficients were easily controlled between 0.32 ± 0.27 dB/cm and 2.04 ± 0.65 dB/cm at 7.5 MHz, depending on the amount of carnauba wax added to the base material. The materials do not suffer dehydration and provide adequate needle penetration, with a Young's storage modulus varying between 14.7 ± 0.2 kPa and 34.9 ± 0.3 kPa. The phantom background material possesses long-term stability and can be employed in a supine position without changes in geometry. These results indicate that paraffin-gel waxes may be promising materials for training radiologists in ultrasound biopsy procedures. Copyright © 2013 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinopathy: Randomized Comparison of US-guided Percutaneous Treatments by Using One or Two Needles.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Davide; Mauri, Giovanni; Lacelli, Francesca; Corazza, Angelo; Messina, Carmelo; Silvestri, Enzo; Serafini, Giovanni; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2017-11-01

    Purpose To determine whether the use of one or two needles influences procedure performance and patient outcomes for ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous irrigation of calcific tendinopathy. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and written informed patient consent were obtained. From February 2012 to December 2014, 211 patients (77 men and 134 women; mean age, 41.6 years ± 11.6; range, 24-69 years) with painful calcific tendinopathy diagnosed at US were prospectively enrolled and randomized. Operators subjectively graded calcifications as hard, soft, or fluid according to their appearance at US. US-guided percutaneous irrigation of calcific tendinopathy (local anesthesia, needle lavage, intrabursal steroid injection) was performed in 100 patients by using the single-needle procedure and in 111 patients by using the double-needle procedure. Calcium dissolution was subjectively scored (easy = 1; intermediate = 2; difficult = 3). Procedure duration was recorded. Clinical evaluation was performed by using the Constant score up to 1 year after the procedure. The occurrence of postprocedural bursitis was recorded. Mann-Whitney U, χ 2 , and analysis of variance statistics were used. Results No difference in procedure duration was seen overall (P = .060). Procedure duration was shorter with the double-needle procedure in hard calcifications (P < .001) and with the single-needle procedure in fluid calcifications (P = .024). Ease of calcium dissolution was not different between single- and double-needle procedures, both overall and when considering calcification appearance (P > .089). No clinical differences were found (Constant scores for single-needle group: baseline, 55 ± 7; 1 month, 69 ± 7; 3 month, 90 ± 5; 1 year, 92 ± 4; double-needle group: 57 ± 6; 71 ± 9; 89 ± 7; 92 ± 4, respectively; P = .241). In the single-needle group, nine of 100 cases (9%) of postprocedural bursitis were seen, whereas four of 111 cases (3.6%) were seen in the

  11. US-guided percutaneous cholecystostomy: features predicting culture-positive bile and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Sosna, Jacob; Kruskal, Jonathan B; Copel, Laurian; Goldberg, S Nahum; Kane, Robert A

    2004-03-01

    To assess sonographic and clinical features that might be used to predict infected bile and/or patient outcome from ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous cholecystostomy. Between February 1997 and August 2002 at one institution, 112 patients underwent US-guided percutaneous cholecystostomy (59 men, 53 women; average age, 69.3 years). All US images were scored on a defined semiquantitative scale according to preset parameters: (a) gallbladder distention, (b) sludge and/or stones, (c) wall appearance, (d) pericholecystic fluid, and (e) common bile duct size and/or choledocholithiasis. Separate and total scores were generated. Retrospective evaluation of (a) the bacteriologic growth of aspirated bile and its color and (b) clinical indices (fever, white blood cell count, bilirubin level, liver function test results) was conducted by reviewing medical records. For each patient, the clinical manifestation was classified into four groups: (a) localized right upper quadrant symptoms, (b) generalized abdominal symptoms, (c) unexplained sepsis, or (d) sepsis with other known infection. Logistic regression models, exact Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test, and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used. Forty-seven (44%) of 107 patients had infected bile. A logistic regression model showed that wall appearance, distention, bile color, and pericholecystic fluid were not individually significant predictors for culture-positive bile, leaving sludge and/or stones (P =.003, odds ratio = 1.647), common bile duct status (P =.02, odds ratio = 2.214), and total score (P =.007, odds ratio = 1.267). No US covariates or clinical indices predicted clinical outcome. Clinical manifestation was predictive of clinical outcome (P =.001) and aspirating culture-positive bile (P =.008); specifically, 30 (86%) of 35 patients with right upper quadrant symptoms had their condition improve, compared with one (7%) of 15 asymptomatic patients with other known causes of infection. US variables can be used to predict

  12. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath block in children with umbilical hernia: Case series.

    PubMed

    Alsaeed, Abdul Hamid; Thallaj, Ahmed; Khalil, Nancy; Almutaq, Nada; Aljazaeri, Ayman

    2013-10-01

    Umbilical hernia repair, a common day-case surgery procedure in children, is associated with a significant postoperative pain. The most popular peripheral nerve blocks used in umbilical hernia repair are rectus sheath infiltration and caudal block. The rectus sheath block may offer improved pain relief following umbilical hernia repair with no undesired effects such as lower limb motor weakness or urinary retention seen with caudal block which might delay discharge from the hospital. Ultrasound guidance of peripheral nerve blocks has reduced the number of complications and improved the quality of blocks. The aim of this case series is to assess the post rectus sheath block pain relief in pediatric patients coming for umbilical surgery. Twenty two (22) children (age range: 1.5-8 years) scheduled for umbilical hernia repair were included in the study. Following the induction of general anesthesia, the ultrasonographic anatomy of the umbilical region was studied with a 5-16 MHz 50 mm linear probe. An ultrasound-guided posterior rectus sheath block of both rectus abdominis muscles (RMs) was performed (total of 44 punctures). An in-plain technique using Stimuplex A insulated facet tip needle 22G 50mm. Surgical conditions, intraoperative hemodynamic parameters, and postoperative analgesia by means of the modified CHEOPS scale were evaluated. ultrasonograghic visualization of the posterior sheath was possible in all patients. The ultrasound guided rectus sheath blockade provided sufficient analgesia in all children with no need for additional analgesia except for one patient who postoperatively required morphine 0.1 mg/kg intravenously. There were no complications. Ultrasound guidance enables performances of an effective rectus sheath block for umbilical hernia. Use of the Stimuplex A insulated facet tip needle 22G 50mm provides easy, less traumatic skin and rectus muscle penetration and satisfactory needle visualiza.

  13. Update on Clinical MR-guided Focused Ultrasound Applications

    PubMed Central

    McDannold, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Focused ultrasound (FUS) can be used to thermally ablate tissue. The performance of FUS under magnetic resonance (MR) guidance enables aiming the focus at the target, accurate treatment planning, real-time temperature mapping, and evaluation of the treatment. This review updates several clinical applications of MR-guided FUS. MR-guided FUS has a CE mark and FDA approval for thermal ablation for uterine fibroids and bone metastases related pain management. Thousands of uterine fibroid patients have successfully been treated with minor side effects. Technical improvements, increased experience, and the use of a screening MRI examination should further improve treatment outcome. When used for bone metastases and other bone diseases, thermal ablation leads to pain relief due to denervation, and debulking of the tumor. The use of a hemi-spherical multi-element transducer and phase corrections have enabled application of FUS through the skull. Transcranial MR-guided FUS has received CE certification for ablation of deep, central locations in the brain such as the thalamus. Thermal ablation of specific parts of the thalamus can result in relief of the symptoms in neurological disorders such as essential tremor, Parkinson’s, and neuropathic pain. No CE mark or FDA approval has been obtained as yet for treatment of prostate cancer or breast cancer, but several approaches have been proposed and clinical trials should show the potential of MR-guided FUS for these and other applications. PMID:26499282

  14. Effect of abdominal liposuction on sonographically guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Peng; Chen, Jin-Yun; Chen, Wen-Zhi

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of abdominal liposuction on sonographically guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. A total of 10 women with uterine fibroids or adenomyosis who had received abdominal liposuction were analyzed after sonographically guided HIFU ablation. Of the 10 women, 6 had a diagnosis of uterine fibroids, and 4 had a diagnosis of uterine adenomyosis. All of them had a history of a horizontal-margin split-cesarean delivery. In addition, 26 women with a history of a single horizontal-margin split-cesarean delivery who had a diagnosis of uterine fibroids or adenomyosis but had not received liposuction were analyzed together as a control group. Of the 10 women, 1 woman with uterine fibroids developed local skin erythema after treatment; 1 women with uterine adenomyosis developed a skin burn after treatment; and the remaining women had obvious skin-burning pain during treatment. All women who had not received liposuction finished the treatment with no serious adverse events during or after treatment. The pain scores and incidence of skin-burning pain were significantly higher in the liposuction group than the control group (P= .021 and .038, respectively). Abdominal liposuction may increase the risk of skin burns during sonographically guided HIFU ablation. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. Defining the reliability of sonoanatomy identification by novices in ultrasound-guided pediatric ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve blockade.

    PubMed

    Ford, Simon; Dosani, Maryam; Robinson, Ashley J; Campbell, G Claire; Ansermino, J Mark; Lim, Joanne; Lauder, Gillian R

    2009-12-01

    The ilioinguinal (II)/iliohypogastric (IH) nerve block is a safe, frequently used block that has been improved in efficacy and safety by the use of ultrasound guidance. We assessed the frequency with which pediatric anesthesiologists with limited experience with ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia could correctly identify anatomical structures within the inguinal region. Our primary outcome was to compare the frequency of correct identification of the transversus abdominis (TA) muscle with the frequency of correct identification of the II/IH nerves. We used 2 ultrasound machines with different capabilities to assess a potential equipment effect on success of structure identification and time taken for structure identification. Seven pediatric anesthesiologists with <6 mo experience with ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia performed a total of 127 scans of the II region in anesthetized children. The muscle planes and the II and IH nerves were identified and labeled. The ultrasound images were reviewed by a blinded expert to mark accuracy of structure identification and time taken for identification. Two ultrasound machines (Sonosite C180plus and Micromaxx, both from Sonosite, Bothell, WA) were used. There was no difference in the frequency of correct identification of the TA muscle compared with the II/IH nerves (chi(2) test, TA versus II, P = 0.45; TA versus IH, P = 0.50). Ultrasound machine selection did show a nonsignificant trend in improving correct II/IH nerve identification (II nerve chi(2) test, P = 0.02; IH nerve chi(2) test, P = 0.04; Bonferroni corrected significance 0.17) but not for the muscle planes (chi(2) test, P = 0.83) or time taken (1-way analysis of variance, P = 0.07). A curve of improving accuracy with number of scans was plotted, with reliability of TA recognition occurring after 14-15 scans and II/IH identification after 18 scans. We have demonstrated that although there is no difference in the overall accuracy of muscle plane versus II

  16. Ultrasound-guided microinjection into the mouse forebrain in utero at E9.5.

    PubMed

    Pierfelice, Tarran J; Gaiano, Nicholas

    2010-11-13

    In utero survival surgery in mice permits the molecular manipulation of gene expression during development. However, because the uterine wall is opaque during early embryogenesis, the ability to target specific parts of the embryo for microinjection is greatly limited. Fortunately, high-frequency ultrasound imaging permits the generation of images that can be used in real time to guide a microinjection needle into the embryonic region of interest. Here we describe the use of such imaging to guide the injection of retroviral vectors into the ventricular system of the mouse forebrain at embryonic day (E) 9.5. This method uses a laparotomy to permit access to the uterine horns, and a specially designed plate that permits host embryos to be bathed in saline while they are imaged and injected. Successful surgeries often result in most or all of the injected embryos surviving to any subsequent time point of interest (embryonically or postnatally). The principles described here can be used with slight modifications to perform injections into the amnionic fluid of E8.5 embryos (thereby permitting infection along the anterior posterior extent of the neural tube, which has not yet closed), or into the ventricular system of the brain at E10.5/11.5. Furthermore, at mid-neurogenic ages (~E13.5), ultrasound imaging can be used direct injection into specific brain regions for viral infection or cell transplantation. The use of ultrasound imaging to guide in utero injections in mice is a very powerful technique that permits the molecular and cellular manipulation of mouse embryos in ways that would otherwise be exceptionally difficult if not impossible.

  17. Learning Ultrasound-Guided Needle Insertion Skills through an Edutainment Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wing-Yin; Ni, Dong; Pang, Wai-Man; Qin, Jing; Chui, Yim-Pan; Yu, Simon Chun-Ho; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    Ultrasound-guided needle insertion is essential in many of minimally invasive surgeries or procedures, such as biopsy, drug delivery, spinal anaesthesia, etc. Accurate and safe needle insertion is a difficult task due to the high requirement of hand-eye coordination skills. Many proposed virtual reality (VR) based training systems put their emphasis on realistic simulation instead of pedagogical efficiency. The lack of schematic training scenario leads to boredom of repetitive operations. To solve this, we present our novel training system with the integration of game elements in order to retain the trainees' enthusiasm. Task-oriented scenarios, time attack scenarios and performance evaluation are introduced. Besides, some state-of-art technologies are also presented, including ultrasound simulation, needle haptic rendering as well as a mass-spring-based needle-tissue interaction simulation. These works are shown to be effective to keep the trainees up with learning.

  18. An orthopedist's guide to shoulder ultrasound: a systematic review of examination protocols.

    PubMed

    Amoo-Achampong, Kelms; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; McCormick, Frank

    2016-11-01

    The utilization of musculoskeletal ultrasound has expanded within the setting of the orthopedic clinic as a cost-effective, point-of-care diagnostic tool for shoulder pathology. In experienced hands, ultrasound exhibits capabilities equivalent to that of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of many shoulder diseases including full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. Although similarly effective in identifying additional shoulder disease processes, major obstacles to its widespread use include user dependence and intrinsic limitation to extra-articular diagnosis. The purpose of this review is to present a step-by-step guide of how to perform a comprehensive shoulder examination and to discuss the appropriate use, economic benefit and implementation of ultrasound within the clinic. A systematic search (June 2016) of PubMed, Scopus, and EMBASE databases was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines for literature presenting shoulder ultrasound examination protocols. Included studies were peer-reviewed articles or academic society endorsed protocols presenting comprehensive sonographic examinations of the adult shoulder. Papers with limited or single structure examination descriptions, non-English language, and publication dates before 1980 were excluded. Final papers meeting criteria were secondarily screened for publication after 2005 to reflect the current state of ultrasound imaging. The search yielded 1,725 unique articles with 17 studies meeting final selection criteria. Information from identified studies was summarized to formulate a 4-part shoulder examination protocol, including steps most pertinent to orthopedic in-office diagnoses. In agreement with previous studies, the inexperienced orthopedic surgeon can be quickly trained to expert level proficiency in shoulder ultrasound diagnosis. Using an established protocol, a comprehensive, yet effective shoulder