Science.gov

Sample records for ultrasound-guided steroid injection

  1. Ultrasound-Guided Versus Fluoroscopy-Guided Caudal Epidural Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Unilateral Lower Lumbar Radicular Pain

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki Deok; Kim, Tai Kon; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, JaeKi; Koh, Sung Hoon; Park, Yongbum

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the article is to investigate the efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided Caudal Epidural Steroid Injection (CESI) compared with fluoroscopy (FL)-guided CESI in patients with unilateral lower lumbar radicular pain. This case-controlled, retrospective, comparative study was done at the university hospital. A total of 110 patients treated with US- or FL-guided CESI were administered a mixture of 20 cc (0.5% lidocaine 18.0 mL + dexamethason 10 mg 2 mL). Outcome measurement was assessed by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), verbal numeric pain scale (VNS) before injections and at 3, 6, and 12 months after the last injections. Successful outcome was defined as measured by >50% improvement in the VNS score and >40% improvement in the ODI. ODI and VNS showed improvement at 3, 6, and 12 months after the last injection in both groups. No statistical differences in ODI, VNS were observed between groups (P < 0.05). No significant differences in the proportion of patients with successful treatment were observed between the groups from the 3-month to 6-month to 12-month outcomes. US-guided CESI is deserving of consideration in conservative management of unilateral lower lumbar radicular pain. PMID:26683948

  2. Ultrasound-guided piriformis muscle injection. A new approach.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua Alén, E; Diz Villar, A; Curt Nuño, F; Illodo Miramontes, G; Refojos Arencibia, F J; López González, J M

    2016-12-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an uncommon cause of buttock and leg pain. Some treatment options include the injection of piriformis muscle with local anesthetic and steroids. Various techniques for piriformis muscle injection have been described. Ultrasound allows direct visualization and real time injection of the piriformis muscle. We describe 5 consecutive patients, diagnosed of piriformis syndrome with no improvement after pharmacological treatment. Piriformis muscle injection with local anesthetics and steroids was performed using an ultrasound technique based on a standard technique. All 5 patients have improved their pain measured by numeric verbal scale. One patient had a sciatic after injection that improved in 10 days spontaneously. We describe an ultrasound-guided piriformis muscle injection that has the advantages of being effective, simple, and safe.

  3. Ultrasound-guided aspiration and steroid injection of a posterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Vilella, Giuseppe Maria; Guerrisi, Pietro; Lucignani, Giulia; Pasquali, Gaia; Drudi, Francesco Maria

    2015-09-01

    Ganglion cysts are benign masses that originate from mucinous degeneration of the connective tissues and are quite rare when arising from the knee joint. Symptoms are often represented by pain, joint tenderness, effusion and occasional swelling with a palpable mass in the popliteal region of the knee. Percutaneous aspiration followed by a corticosteroid injection of a ganglion cyst has either a diagnostic or therapeutic meaning and its guidance through ultrasound allows the operator to make more accurate the procedure, ensuring the correct placement of the needle inside the lesion. We report our experience in the treatment of a voluminous ganglion cyst of the posterior cruciate ligament performed through the ultrasound guidance in a symptomatic young patient.

  4. Ultrasound guided therapeutic injections of the cervical spine and brachial plexus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Recent applications in ultrasound imaging include ultrasound assessment and ultrasound guided therapeutic injections of the spine and brachial plexus. Discussion: Ultrasound is an ideal modality for these regions as it allows accurate safe and quick injection of single or multiple sites. It has the added advantages of lack of ionising radiation, and can be done without requiring large expensive radiology equipment. Conclusion: Brachial plexus pathology may be present in patients presenting for shoulder symptoms where very little is found at imaging the shoulder. It is important to understand the anatomy and normal variants that may exist to be able to recognise when pathology is present. When pathology is demonstrated it is easy to do a trial of therapy with ultrasound guided injection of steroid around the nerve lesion. This review will outline the normal anatomy and variants and common pathology, which can be amenable to ultrasound guided injection of steroid. PMID:28191203

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Versus Fluoroscopy-Guided Caudal Epidural Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Unilateral Lower Lumbar Radicular Pain: Case-Controlled, Retrospective, Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Deok; Kim, Tai Kon; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, JaeKi; Koh, Sung Hoon; Park, Yongbum

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the article is to investigate the efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided Caudal Epidural Steroid Injection (CESI) compared with fluoroscopy (FL)-guided CESI in patients with unilateral lower lumbar radicular pain. This case-controlled, retrospective, comparative study was done at the university hospital. A total of 110 patients treated with US- or FL-guided CESI were administered a mixture of 20 cc (0.5% lidocaine 18.0  mL + dexamethason 10  mg 2  mL). Outcome measurement was assessed by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), verbal numeric pain scale (VNS) before injections and at 3, 6, and 12 months after the last injections. Successful outcome was defined as measured by >50% improvement in the VNS score and >40% improvement in the ODI. ODI and VNS showed improvement at 3, 6, and 12 months after the last injection in both groups. No statistical differences in ODI, VNS were observed between groups (P < 0.05). No significant differences in the proportion of patients with successful treatment were observed between the groups from the 3-month to 6-month to 12-month outcomes. US-guided CESI is deserving of consideration in conservative management of unilateral lower lumbar radicular pain.

  6. Successful Treatment of Rectus Femoris Calcification with Ultrasound-guided Injection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Myong Joo; Park, Jeong Ki; Kang, Tai Ug

    2015-01-01

    Painful periarticular calcification most commonly occurs within the rotator cuff of the shoulder and rarely around the elbow, hip, foot, and neck. As acute inflammatory reaction develops, severe pain, exquisite tenderness, local swelling, and limitation of motion with pain occur. In case of calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, it can be easily diagnosed according to the symptoms and with x-ray. However, in lesions of the hip, as it is a rare location and usually involves pain in the posterolateral aspect of the thigh, which can simulate radicular pain from a lumbar intervertebral disc, it could be difficult to diagnose. Hence, physicians usually focus on lumbar lesions; therefore, misdiagnosis is common and leads to a delayed management. Here, we report the case of a 30-year-old female patient with calcific tendinitis of the rectus femoris that was successfully managed with ultrasound-guided steroid injection. This study offers knowledge about the rectus femoris calcification. PMID:25589947

  7. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Thrombin Injection as First-Line Treatment of Pancreatic Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    McErlean, Aoife; Looby, Seamus; Lee, Michael J.

    2007-06-15

    Pancreatic pseudoaneurysms are a rare but potentially fatal complication of pancreatitis. Surgical intervention and transcatheter embolization are not always feasible therapeutic options. In this report we present a case of a pseudoaneurysm secondary to pancreatitis which, despite being angiographically invisible, was successfully embolized with a single ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of thrombin.

  8. Ultrasound-guided injection for the biceps brachii tendinitis: results and experience.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwei; Ebraheim, Nabil; Lause, Gregory E

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the results of ultrasound-guided injection of corticosteroid for biceps brachii tendinitis. In this randomized and prospective study, we evaluated 45 patients who were treated by free-hand injection without ultrasound guidance (group A) and 53 patients who were treated by ultrasound-guided injection (group B). The mean age was 47 y (range, 28 to 72). The average follow-up was 33 weeks (range, 24 to 56). The visual analog scale score decreased from 7.1 ± 2.3 before injection to 4.2 ± 3.1 at follow-up in group A and from 6.9 ± 2.6 to 2.1 ± 1.9 in group B (p < 0.05). The Constant-Murley score improved from 31.4 ± 11.6 before injection to 73.5 ± 19.2 at follow-up in group A and from 32.5 ± 14.7 to 85.5 ± 10.3 (p < 0.01). The ultrasound-guided injection therefore demonstrated a statistically significantly greater degree of pain relief. However, the outcome of injection was not satisfactory for the patients who demonstrated severely frayed tendons at arthroscopy. There were no complications related to the injection in both groups. Corticosteroid injection under ultrasound guidance is a safe and well-tolerated procedure with a satisfactory rate of symptom relief in patients with biceps brachii tendinitis.

  9. Feasibility and accuracy of ultrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeryl C; Gonzalez, Luis M; Larson, Martha M; Freeman, Larry E; Werre, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    Frozen cadaver specimens from three dogs were used to create a sectional anatomic atlas of the sacroiliac region. Frozen/thawed cadaver specimens from 12 dogs were used to develop an ultrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection technique. Accuracy of the technique was tested in 15 additional canine cadaver specimens, using injectate containing blue dye and iodinated contrast medium. Sonoanatomic landmarks for consistently identifying a caudodorsal window into the canine sacroiliac joint space included the L7-S1 articular process joints, ilial wing, sacral wing, sacral lamina, and median sacral crest. Accuracy of ultrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection was not significantly affected by operator, but was affected by the tissue location targeted and the reference standard used for calculations. Accuracy of the technique was good for placing injectate into either the synchondrosis component, dorsal sacroiliac ligament or ventral sacroiliac ligament; fair to poor for placing injectate into the synovial component; and poor for placing injectate into all four sacroiliac soft tissue structures. Concurrent placement of injectate into extraarticular tissues occurred frequently. We conclude that ultrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection is feasible for evaluation as a treatment method for lumbosacral region pain in dogs, but is not sufficiently accurate for localizing pain to the sacroiliac joint alone.

  10. Ultrasound-guided mesenteric lymph node iohexol injection for thoracic duct computed tomographic lymphography in cats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mieun; Lee, Hyeyeon; Lee, Namsoon; Choi, Mihyeon; Kim, Junyoung; Chang, Dongwoo; Choi, Mincheol; Yoon, Junghee

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) lymphography was performed in cats using percutaneous ultrasound-guided injection of contrast medium into a mesenteric lymph node. The thoracic duct and its branches were clearly delineated in CT images of seven cats studied. The thoracic duct was characterized by anatomic variation and appeared as single or multiple branches. The thoracic duct and the cisterna chyli were identified along the ventral or left ventral aspect of the vertebrae from the level of the cranial lumbar to the caudal cervical vertebrae. The thoracic duct was identified in the central caudal mediastinum, deviated to the left in the cranial mediastinum, and finally moved toward the venous system. Small volumes of extranodal contrast medium leakage were identified in all cats. After injection, the mesenteric lymph nodes were cytologically normal. Ultrasound-guided CT lymphography via percutaneous mesenteric lymph node injection appears safe and effective in cats.

  11. Ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of iliopsoas spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sconfienza, L.M.; Perrone, N.; Lacelli, F.; Lentino, C.; Serafini, G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) is a common treatment for iliopsoas muscle spasticity, but it is not easy to position the needle in this muscle without guidance. In this paper we describe an ultrasound-guided technique for the intramuscular injection of BTX-A to treat spasticity of the iliopsoas muscle. Its effectiveness was assessed in 10 patients. Method and materials The ultrasound-guided technique for BTX-A injection was used on 10 patients. The needle was inserted into the muscle belly at an angle of 45° along the longitudinal axis of the muscle when allowed by patient's condition. Results In all cases, the iliopsoas muscle was easily identified and both the iliac and psoas components were assessed. Introduction of the needle and drug injection were entirely carried out under ultrasonographic guidance. The procedure was successful in all patients, even in those with a high-grade spasticity, and general anesthesia was not required. Conclusions This ultrasound-guided technique allows accurate guidance for the injection of BTX-A, and it can be considered as an alternate supportive therapy in patients with spasticity and dystonia. PMID:23396653

  12. Ultrasound-guided injection for plantar fasciitis: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Nair, AS; Sahoo, RK

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a distressing condition experienced by many patients. Although self-limiting, it tends to become a chronic ailment if the precipitating factors are not addressed. One of the modality of treating PF is intra-lesional corticosteroid injection. This was done using palpation technique earlier but nowadays many specialists use ultrasound (US) imaging as a guide to give injection accurately instead of inadvertently damaging the plantar fascia or injecting into surrounding soft tissue, both of which can have serious implications. We did a literature search in Medline, Scopus, and Embase databases to find out articles describing US-guided corticosteroid injection for treating PF and whether guided injection was effective than injection given by palpation. PMID:27833490

  13. Nonoperative Management (Including Ultrasound-Guided Injections) of Proximal Biceps Disorders.

    PubMed

    Schickendantz, Mark; King, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Nonoperative management of conditions of the long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) involves a multifaceted approach, addressing the entire shoulder complex in addition to conditions that involve the LHBT. LHBT pathologic conditions are divided into 3 categories: inflammation, instability and rupture. This article provides an overview of a nonoperative treatment algorithm that addresses these specific categories and includes a review of ultrasound-guided injection techniques used in the diagnosis and management of LHBT disorders.

  14. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of methylene blue to identify nerve pathology and guide surgery.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Joseph A; Breshears, Jonathan D; Arnaout, Omar; Simon, Neil G; Hastings-Robinson, Ashley M; Aleshi, Pedram; Kliot, Michel

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to provide a technique that could be used in the preoperative period to facilitate the surgical exploration of peripheral nerve pathology. METHODS The authors describe a technique in which 1) ultrasonography is used in the immediate preoperative period to identify target peripheral nerves, 2) an ultrasound-guided needle electrode is used to stimulate peripheral nerves to confirm their position, and then 3) a methylene blue (MB) injection is performed to mark the peripheral nerve pathology to facilitate surgical exploration. RESULTS A cohort of 13 patients with varying indications for peripheral nerve surgery is presented in which ultrasound guidance, stimulation, and MB were used to localize and create a road map for surgeries. CONCLUSIONS Preoperative ultrasound-guided MB administration is a promising technique that peripheral nerve surgeons could use to plan and execute surgery.

  15. Ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma injection for distal biceps tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Simon N; Connell, David; Coghlan, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Background Distal biceps tendinopathy is an uncommon cause of elbow pain. The optimum treatment for cases refractory to conservative treatment is unclear. Platelet-rich plasma has been used successfully for other tendinopathies around the elbow. Methods Six patients with clinical and radiological evidence of distal biceps tendinopathy underwent ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. Clinical examination findings, visual analogue score (VAS) for pain and Mayo Elbow Performance scores were recorded. Results The Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 68.3 (range 65 to 85) (fair function) to 95 (range 85 to 100) (excellent function). The VAS at rest improved from a mean of 2.25 (range 2 to 5) pre-injection to 0. The VAS with movement improved from a mean of 7.25 (range 5 to 8) pre-injection to 1.3 (range 0 to 2). No complications were noted. Discussion Ultrasound-guided PRP injection appears to be a safe and effective treatment for recalcitrant cases of distal biceps tendinopathy. Further investigation with a randomized controlled trial is needed to fully assess its efficacy. PMID:27582965

  16. Methylprednisolone versus triamcinolone in painful shoulder using ultrasound-guided injection.

    PubMed

    Chávez-López, Mario Alfredo; Navarro-Soltero, Luis Alberto; Rosas-Cabral, Alejandro; Gallaga, Adán; Huerta-Yáñez, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    There is little evidence about the comparative efficacy of corticosteroids in the treatment of painful shoulder. The main aim was to compare the efficacy of methylprednisolone (MTP) versus triamcinolone (TMC) in the treatment of painful shoulder using an ultrasound-guided injection. Patients with painful shoulder due to subacromial bursitis and partial or full-thickness rotator cuff tears demonstrated by musculoskeletal ultrasound received a guided-injection of MTP acetate 40 mg (12 patients) or TMC acetonide 40 mg (12 patients). Range of motion and pain visual analogue scale were registered at 10 and 30 min, 1 and 2 weeks postinjection. Two weeks postinjection, both groups reported a mean improvement in range of motion (33%) and relief of pain (61%). Relief of pain of 50% or more was observed in 92% of patients in MTP group and 50% of TMC group (p = 0.02). Two months postinjection, 50% of the patients in MTP group and 25% in TMC group reported total relief of pain (p = 0.3). Patients with painful shoulder receiving an ultrasound-guided injection of MTP or TMC have a rapid and sustained overall response. Relief of pain tends to be more rapid with MTP than TMC.

  17. Comparison of the Effects of Ultrasound-Guided Interfascial Pulsed Radiofrequency and Ultrasound-Guided Interfascial Injection on Myofascial Pain Syndrome of the Gastrocnemius

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the comparative treatment effects of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment (UG-PRF) in the gastrocnemius interfascial space and ultrasound-guided interfascial injection (UG-INJ) on myofascial pain syndrome. Methods Forty consecutive patients with myofascial pain syndrome of the gastrocnemius were enrolled and were allocated to one of the two groups. Twenty patients were treated by UG-PRF delivered to the gastrocnemius interfascial space (UG-PRF group) and the other 20 patients were treated by interfascial injection (UG-INJ group). The primary outcome measure was the numeric rating score (NRS) for pain on pressing the tender point in the gastrocnemius, and the secondary outcome measure was health-related quality of life as determined by the Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36). NRSs were obtained at the first visit, immediately after treatment, and at 2 and 4 weeks post-treatment, and physical component summary scores (PCS) and mental component summary scores (MCS) of the SF-36 questionnaire were measured at the first visit and at 4 weeks post-treatment. Results Immediately after treatments, mean NRS in the UG-PRF group was significantly higher than that in the UG-INJ group (p<0.0001). However, at 2 and 4 weeks post-treatment, the mean NRS was significantly lower in the UG-PRF group (both p<0.0001). Similarly, at 4 weeks post-treatment, mean PCS and MCS were significantly higher in the UG-PRF group (p<0.0001 and p=0.002, respectively). Conclusion Based on these results, the authors conclude that ultrasound-guided gastrocnemius interfascial PRF provides an attractive treatment for myofascial pain syndrome of the gastrocnemius. PMID:27847719

  18. Distribution of Platelet-rich Plasma after Ultrasound-Guided Injection for Chronic Elbow Tendinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Cho, Hee Kyung; Park, Jinyoung; Park, Jung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Characteristics of the spreads of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) are not widely known despite commonly use. This study aims to evaluate whether PRP stays within the injected area by using ultrasonography, to improve understanding of the spreads of intratendinous injected PRP. Thirty-nine patients (15 males, 24 females; mean age, 49.3 years), who had symptoms on their elbows (> 6 months) and diagnosed as lateral (25 elbows) or medial (14 elbows) tendinopathies of elbow, were included. The severity of tendon pathology was assessed by ultrasonography as tear or no tear. Immediately after ultrasound-guided PRP injection, ultrasound images were evaluated to assess the area of PRP distribution, which was defined as the presence of fluid or microbubbles. Ultrasound revealed that 13 elbows had tendon tear and 26 had no tear, respectively. Post-injection ultrasound confirmed the injected PRP was within the tendon in all cases. The mean distance of distribution from the injection site was 12.6 mm (5.0–26.0 mm). There was no difference in the distance of PRP distribution between tendon tear and no tear. Injected PRP spread to soft tissue outside the tendon in 20 of 39 cases. Intra-articular extension of PRP was observed in 5 cases. Although PRP remained intratendinous after the injection in all cases, some portion tended to spread outside from the injection site in a short space of time. Postinjection ultrasonographic imaging has a value for observing the spreading patterns of intratendinous PRP injection. Key points This study aims to evaluate whether PRP stays within the injected area by using ultrasonography, to improve understanding of the spreads of intratendinous injected PRP. Although PRP remained intratendinous after the injection in all cases, some portion tended to spread outside from the injection site in a short space of time. PMID:28344444

  19. Accuracy of Ultrasound-Guided and Non-ultrasound-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injection Into Cadaver Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the accuracy of ultrasound (US)-guided and non-US-guided botulinum toxin (BTX) injection into the salivary glands (parotid and submandibular glands) of cadavers. Methods Two rehabilitation physician injected dye into three sites in the salivary glands (two sites in the parotid gland and one site in the submandibular gland) on one side of each cadaver (one was injected on the right side, while the other was injected on the left side), using either a non-US-guided injection procedure based on superficial landmarks or a US-guided procedure. Orange dye was used for the US-guided procedure, and green dye was used for the blind procedure. Two physicians uninvolved with the injection procedures and who were blinded to the method of injection dissected the cadavers to identify whether the dye was accurately injected into each target site. Results The accuracies of the blind and US-guided injections into the parotid gland were 79.17% and 95.83%, respectively. In the submandibular gland, the accuracies of the blind and US-guided injections were 50.00% and 91.67%, respectively. The difference in accuracy between the two procedures was statistically significant only in the submandibular gland (p=0.025). There were no significant differences in the accuracy of US-guided and non-US-guided injections between the two physicians for the two sites in the parotid gland (p=0.278 and p=0.146, respectively). Conclusion US-guided BTX injection into the submandibular gland offers significantly greater accuracy over blind injection. For the treatment of drooling by injecting BTX into the submandibular gland, clinicians should consider using US guidance for improved accuracy. PMID:28289635

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Trigger Point Injection for Serratus Anterior Muscle Pain Syndrome: Description of Technique and Case Series.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Schaffer, Grisell; Nowakowsky, Michal; Eghtesadi, Marzieh; Cogan, Jennifer

    2015-09-15

    Chronic chest pain is a challenge, and serratus anterior muscle pain syndrome (SAMPS) is often overlooked. We have developed an ultrasound-guided technique for infiltrating local anesthetics and steroids in patients with SAMPS. In 8 patients, the duration of chronic pain was approximately 19 months. Three months after treatment, all patients had experienced a significant reduction in pain. Infiltration for SAMPS confirms the diagnosis and provides adequate pain relief.

  1. Clinical Effectiveness of Ultrasound-guided Costotransverse Joint Injection in Thoracic Back Pain Patients.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kyung Bong; Kim, Shin Hyung; Park, Sang Jun; Moon, Ji Ae; Yoon, Duck Mi

    2016-07-01

    Because of its anatomical location and function, the costotransverse (CTRV) joint can be a source of thoracic back pain. In this retrospective observational study, we evaluated the clinical effectiveness of the CTRV joint injection in thoracic back pain patients with suspected CTRV joint problems. We enrolled 20 thoracic back pain patients with localized tenderness that was provoked by the application of pressure on the affected CTRV joints. We injected it with 0.5 ml of a ropivacaine and triamcinolone mixture at each level. The mean pre-injection pain score decreased by 37.9% (7.2 ± 1.5 to 4.5 ± 1.7, P < 0.001) two weeks after CTRV joint injection. In addition, 70% of patients reported an excellent or good level of satisfaction. We demonstrated that an ultrasound-guided injection of the CTRV joint reduced patients' pain scores and led to a high level of satisfaction at short-term follow-ups in patients with suspected CTRV joint problems.

  2. Clinical Effectiveness of Ultrasound-guided Costotransverse Joint Injection in Thoracic Back Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Hyung; Park, Sang Jun; Moon, Ji Ae; Yoon, Duck Mi

    2016-01-01

    Because of its anatomical location and function, the costotransverse (CTRV) joint can be a source of thoracic back pain. In this retrospective observational study, we evaluated the clinical effectiveness of the CTRV joint injection in thoracic back pain patients with suspected CTRV joint problems. We enrolled 20 thoracic back pain patients with localized tenderness that was provoked by the application of pressure on the affected CTRV joints. We injected it with 0.5 ml of a ropivacaine and triamcinolone mixture at each level. The mean pre-injection pain score decreased by 37.9% (7.2 ± 1.5 to 4.5 ± 1.7, P < 0.001) two weeks after CTRV joint injection. In addition, 70% of patients reported an excellent or good level of satisfaction. We demonstrated that an ultrasound-guided injection of the CTRV joint reduced patients' pain scores and led to a high level of satisfaction at short-term follow-ups in patients with suspected CTRV joint problems. PMID:27413487

  3. The role of ultrasound-guided triamcinolone injection in the treatment of de Quervain's disease: treatment and a diagnostic tool?

    PubMed

    Hajder, E; de Jonge, M C; van der Horst, C M A M; Obdeijn, M C

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the technique and usefulness of ultrasound-guided intrasheath injection of triamcinolone in the treatment of de Quervain's disease (dQD). Our study was retrospective in design. Seventy-one wrists of 62 patients who were treated with an ultrasound-guided triamcinolone injection for dQD were included. A literature search was performed to compare our results. In the literature we found supportive evidence that accurate injection of triamcinolone in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist is important for a good outcome. In this retrospective study we found that treatment with ultrasound-guided injections of triamcinolone is both safe and effective. After two injections, 91% of the patients had good long-term results, which is a higher cure rate than found in most other studies. Furthermore, we found that Finkelstein's test can give a false positive result. Therefore, ultrasound should not only be considered to improve the treatment outcome, but can also be useful as a diagnostic tool in the management of de Quervain's disease.

  4. Effectiveness of ultrasound-guided injections combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis.

    PubMed

    Gasparre, Giuseppe; Fusaro, Isabella; Galletti, Stefano; Volini, Silvia; Benedetti, Maria Grazia

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the association of exercises for the shoulder with ultrasound-guided injection into the bursa significantly improves the treatment outcome in adhesive bursitis. Two groups of 35 patients, one treated with ultrasound-guided injection (UGI) and the other one with ultrasound-guided injection and home exercise program (UGI-exercise) for 1 month, were assessed for pain and shoulder function before treatment, 1 and 3 months post-treatment. Fourteen patients in UGI group and 23 patients in the UGI-exercises group were completely free of pain after 1 month (p = 0.031). At 3 months' follow-up, patients in the UGI-exercise group showed a significant improvement with respect to the other group (p = 0.005). No differences were found in function assessment. The UGI combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis is effective to ensure a more frequent complete pain relief in the medium term.

  5. Improved efficacy and reduced toxicity by ultrasound-guided intrahepatic injections of helper-dependent adenoviral vector in Gunn rats.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Nunzia; Nusco, Edoardo; Piccolo, Pasquale; Castaldo, Sigismondo; Vaníkova, Jana; Vetrini, Francesco; Palmer, Donna J; Vitek, Libor; Ng, Philip; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2013-10-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I is caused by mutations of the uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene resulting in life-threatening increase of serum bilirubin. Life-long correction of hyperbilirubinemia was previously shown with intravenous injection of high doses of a helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vector expressing UGT1A1 in the Gunn rat, the animal model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome. However, such high vector doses can activate an acute and potentially lethal inflammatory response with elevated serum interleukin-6 (IL-6). To overcome this obstacle, we investigated safety and efficacy of direct injections of low HDAd doses delivered directly into the liver parenchyma of Gunn rats. Direct hepatic injections performed by either laparotomy or ultrasound-guided percutaneous injections were compared with the same doses given by intravenous injections. A greater reduction of hyperbilirubinemia and increased conjugated bilirubin in bile were achieved with 1 × 10(11) vp/kg by direct liver injections compared with intravenous injections. In sharp contrast to intravenous injections, direct hepatic injections neither raised serum IL-6 nor resulted in thrombocytopenia. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of HDAd vectors into liver parenchyma resulted in improved hepatocyte transduction and reduced toxicity compared with systemic injections and is clinically attractive for liver-directed gene therapy of Crigler-Najjar syndrome.

  6. Long-term follow-up of ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin-A injections for sialorrhea in neurological dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Pierangelo; Busso, Marco; Tinivella, Marco; Artusi, Carlo Alberto; De Mercanti, Stefania; Cucci, Angele; Veltri, Andrea; Avagnina, Paolo; Calvo, Andrea; Chio', Adriano; Durelli, Luca; Clerico, Marinella

    2015-12-01

    Literature provides reports only of a limited follow-up single injection of botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) in patients with sialorrhea. The aim of our study is to evaluate the long-lasting efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections for severe sialorrhea secondary to neurological dysphagia. We enrolled 38 severe adult sialorrhea patients referred consecutively to the neurology unit and performed bilateral parotid and submandibular gland BoNT-A injections under ultrasound guidance. The outcomes of the study were reduction of sialorrhea, duration of therapeutic effect, and subjective patient- and caregiver-reported satisfaction. A total of 113 BoNT-A administrations were given during the study period with a mean duration of follow-up of 20.2 ± 4.4 months. We observed a significant decrease from baseline in mean number of daily aspirations and a significant improvement in patient- and caregiver-reported outcomes following ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections (p < 0.001 vs baseline for all comparisons) and the mean duration of the efficacy was 5.6 ± 1 months. No major treatment-related adverse events occurred and a low incidence of minor adverse events was reported. This study confirms the long-lasting efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections for sialorrhea, regardless of the causative neurological disorder. These results should encourage the use of BoNT-A in the treatment of severe sialorrhea and highlight the role of ultrasound guidance to obtain optimal results in terms of safety and reproducible outcomes.

  7. Use of platelet-rich plasma in the care of sports injuries: our experience with ultrasound-guided injection

    PubMed Central

    Bernuzzi, Gino; Petraglia, Federica; Pedrini, Martina Francesca; De Filippo, Massimo; Pogliacomi, Francesco; Verdano, Michele Arcangelo; Costantino, Cosimo

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich plasma is being used more frequently to promote healing of muscle injuries. The growth factors contained in platelet-rich plasma accelerate physiological healing processes and the use of these factors is simple and minimally invasive. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of ultrasound-guided injection of platelet-rich plasma in muscle strains and the absence of side effects. Materials and methods Fifty-three recreational athletes were enrolled in the study. The patients were recruited from the Emergency Room in the University Hospital at Parma according to a pre-defined protocol. Every patient was assessed by ultrasound imaging to evaluate the extent and degree of muscle injuries. Only grade II lesions were treated with three ultrasound-guided injections of autologous platelet-rich plasma every 7 days. Platelet concentrate was produced according to standard methods, with a 10% variability in platelet count. The platelet gel for clinical use was obtained by adding thrombin to the concentrates under standardised conditions. Outcomes assessed were: pain reduction, muscle function recovery and return to sports activity, ultrasound-imaging tissue healing, relapses, local infections, and any side effect during the treatment. Results In all cases muscle lesions healed fully on ultrasound-imaging, the pain disappeared, and muscle function recovery was documented with a return to sports activity. A single patient had a relapse 1 year after treatment. Discussion Platelet-rich plasma injected into the injury site is one of the most important factors rendering the treatment effective. To maximise its efficacy the preliminary ultrasound must be done accurately to localise the lesion and guide the needle into the corresponding lesion. According to the current results, which document full muscle recovery and no relapse except for one case, platelet-rich plasma ultrasound-guided injection represents a valid mini-invasive treatment for

  8. Ultrasound-guided joint injections for MR arthrography in pediatric patients: how we do it.

    PubMed

    Otjen, Jeffrey; Parnell, Shawn E; Menashe, Sarah; Thapa, Mahesh M

    2015-03-01

    In children, MR arthrography is typically performed using fluoroscopic guidance. This article explores the role of US-guided joint injections as an alternative for MR arthrography in children, discussing its advantages and disadvantages compared to standard methods. We describe techniques for performing US-guided injection of the shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, ankle and posterior subtalar joints, highlighting pertinent anatomy, routes of access and unique considerations for this modality in children. Written descriptions, images and links to video clips are used to illustrate proper arthrographic technique. We conclude that US provides effective guidance for intra-articular injection prior to MR arthrography, with the advantages of improved visualization of internal structures, reduced radiation exposure, convenience of performing the procedure portably and ease of performance. Although this paper does not address therapeutic steroid injections, these techniques could easily be translated for such purposes. We propose US guidance as a viable alternative to fluoroscopic technique for arthrography in children.

  9. Effectiveness of Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Injection Using In-Plane Ulnar Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Young; Park, Yongbum; Park, Ki Deok; Lee, Ju Kang; Lim, Oh Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study is to evaluate the degree of symptom improvement and the change of electrophysiological and ultrasonographic findings after sonographically guided local steroid injection using an in-plane ulnar approach in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Seventy-five cases of 44 patients diagnosed with CTS were included and evaluated at baseline and at 4 and 12 weeks after injection. All patients received injection with 40 mg of triamcinolone mixed with 1 mL of 1% lidocaine into the carpal tunnel using an in-plane Ultrasound (US)-guided ulnar approach, out-plane US-guided approach, and blind injection. For clinical evaluation, we used the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) and electrophysiological tests. The ultrasonographic findings were also evaluated with regard to cross-sectional area and the flattening ratio of the median nerve. Subjective symptoms measured by BCTQ and median nerve conduction parameters showed significant improvement at 4 weeks in the in-plane ulnar approach group compared with the out-plane ulnar approach and blind injection. This improvement was still observed at 12 weeks. The flattening ratio and cross-sectional area of the median nerve showed a more significant decrease with the in-plane ulnar approach than with the out-plane ulnar approach and blind injection (P < 0.05). US-guided local steroid injection using an in-plane ulnar approach in the CTS may be more effective than out-plane or blind injection. PMID:25546691

  10. Murine ultrasound-guided transabdominal para-aortic injections of self-assembling type I collagen oligomers.

    PubMed

    Yrineo, Alexa A; Adelsperger, Amelia R; Durkes, Abigail C; Distasi, Matthew R; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Murphy, Michael P; Goergen, Craig J

    2017-03-10

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) represent a potentially life-threatening condition that predominantly affects the infrarenal aorta. Several preclinical murine models that mimic the human condition have been developed and are now widely used to investigate AAA pathogenesis. Cell- or pharmaceutical-based therapeutics designed to prevent AAA expansion are currently being evaluated with these animal models, but more minimally invasive strategies for delivery could improve their clinical translation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of self-assembling type I collagen oligomers as an injectable therapeutic delivery vehicle in mice. Here we show the success and reliability of a para-aortic, ultrasound-guided technique for injecting quickly-polymerizing collagen oligomer solutions into mice to form a collagen-fibril matrix at body temperature. A commonly used infrarenal mouse AAA model was used to determine the target location of these collagen injections. Ultrasound-guided, closed-abdominal injections supported consistent delivery of collagen to the area surrounding the infrarenal abdominal aorta halfway between the right renal artery and aortic trifurcation into the iliac and tail arteries. This minimally invasive approach yielded outcomes similar to open-abdominal injections into the same region. Histological analysis on tissue removed on day 14 post-operatively showed minimal in vivo degradation of the self-assembled fibrillar collagen and the majority of implants experienced minimal inflammation and cell invasion, further confirming this material's potential as a method for delivering therapeutics. Finally, we showed that the typical length and position of this infrarenal AAA model was statistically similar to the length and targeted location of the injected collagen, increasing its feasibility as a localized therapeutic delivery vehicle. Future preclinical and clinical studies are needed to determine if specific therapeutics incorporated into

  11. Successful treatment of de Quervain tenosynovitis with ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle tenotomy and platelet-rich plasma injection: a case presentation.

    PubMed

    Peck, Evan; Ely, Erin

    2013-05-01

    De Quervain tenosynovitis is a disorder of the tendons of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist that causes pain and functional disability, which may be refractory to conservative treatments. We present a case of ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle tenotomy and platelet-rich plasma injection for the successful treatment of de Quervain tenosynovitis.

  12. Successful Localization of Abnormal Parathyroid Gland Using Ultrasound-Guided Methylene Blue Dye Injection in the Reoperative Neck.

    PubMed

    Haciyanli, Mehmet; Koruyucu, Melike Bedel; Erdoğan, Nezahat Karaca; Dere, Ozcan; Sarı, Erdem; Kumkumoğlu, Yusuf; Tavusbay, Cengiz; Kamer, Erdinc

    2015-12-01

    Persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism is a challenging problem for endocrine surgeons. The aim of this study was to review our experience using ultrasound-guided (US-G) methylene blue dye injection for the localization and removal of abnormal parathyroid glands in patients having primary hyperparathyroidism and previous neck surgery. Between January 2012 and May 2013, six consecutive patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and previous neck surgery underwent focused parathyroidectomy with the use of US-G methylene blue dye injections to localize the presumed parathyroid adenoma were included in the study. We analyzed the data of six patients who underwent reoperative parathyroid surgery using US-G methylene blue dye injection retrospectively. The dye injection was performed just prior to surgery. All patients were successfully treated for their hyperparathyroidism which was confirmed by at least 50 % drop in intraoperative parathormone level 10 min after resection. There were no complications related with US-G dye injection or with surgery. US-G methylene blue dye injection is a cheap, safe, and effective method for localization of diseased parathyroid glands and guiding surgery in the reoperative neck.

  13. Steroid injections - tendon, bursa, joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/007678.htm Steroid injections - tendon, bursa, joint To use the sharing features on this page, ... often painful. It can be injected into a joint, tendon, or bursa. Description Your health care provider ...

  14. Regeneration of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tendon Tear After Ultrasound-Guided Injection With Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gi-Young; Lee, Sang Chul

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tendon tear is one of the most common causes of chronic shoulder pain and disability. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of ultrasound-guided human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) injection to regenerate a full-thickness subscapularis tendon tear in a rabbit model by evaluating the gross morphology and histology of the injected tendon and motion analysis of the rabbit’s activity. At 4 weeks after ultrasound-guided UCB-derived MSC injection, 7 of the 10 full-thickness subscapularis tendon tears were only partial-thickness tears, and 3 remained full-thickness tendon tears. The tendon tear size and walking capacity at 4 weeks after UCB-derived MSC injection under ultrasound guidance were significantly improved compared with the same parameters immediately after tendon tear. UCB-derived MSC injection under ultrasound guidance without surgical repair or bioscaffold resulted in the partial healing of full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tears in a rabbit model. Histology revealed that UCB-derived MSCs induced regeneration of rotator cuff tendon tear and that the regenerated tissue was predominantly composed of type I collagens. In this study, ultrasound-guided injection of human UCB-derived MSCs contributed to regeneration of the full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tear without surgical repair. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of local injection of MSCs into the rotator cuff tendon. Significance The results of this study suggest that ultrasound-guided umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cell injection may be a useful conservative treatment for full-thickness rotator cuff tendon tear repair. PMID:26371340

  15. Presentation of Neurolytic Effect of 10% Lidocaine after Perineural Ultrasound Guided Injection of a Canine Sciatic Nerve: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Asma; Kataria, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Background Phenol and alcohol have been used to ablate nerves to treat pain but are not specific for nerves and can damage surrounding soft tissue. Lidocaine at concentrations > 8% injected intrathecal in the animal model has been shown to be neurotoxic. Tests the hypothesis that 10% lidocaine is neurolytic after a peri-neural blockade in an ex vivo experiment on the canine sciatic nerve. Methods Under ultrasound, one canine sciatic nerve was injected peri-neurally with 10 cc saline and another with 10 cc of 10% lidocaine. After 20 minutes, the sciatic nerve was dissected with gross inspection. A 3 cm segment was excised and preserved in 10% buffered formalin fixative solution. Both samples underwent progressive dehydration and infusion of paraffin after which they were placed on paraffin blocks. The sections were cut at 4 µm and stained with hemoxylin and eosin. Microscopic review was performed by a pathologist from Henry Ford Hospital who was blinded to which experimental group each sample was in. Results The lidocaine injected nerve demonstrated loss of gross architecture on visual inspection while the saline injected nerve did not. No gross changes were seen in the surrounding soft tissue seen in either group. The lidocaine injected sample showed basophilic degeneration with marked cytoplasmic vacuolation in the nerve fibers with separation of individual fibers and endoneurial edema. The saline injected sample showed normal neural tissue. Conclusions Ten percent lidocaine causes rapid neurolytic changes with ultrasound guided peri-neural injection. The study was limited by only a single nerve being tested with acute exposure. PMID:27413480

  16. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... slipped vertebrae’, also known as spondylolisthesis). The epidural space is a fat filled ‘sleeve’ that surrounds the ... spinal cord. Steroids (‘cortisone’) placed into the epidural space have a very potent anti-inflammatory action that ...

  17. Efficacy of triamcinolone acetate and methylprednisolone acetonide for intrabursal injection after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment in painful shoulder calcific tendonitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Milva; Guaraldi, Federica; Gori, Davide; Castiello, Emanuela; Arvat, Emanuela; Sudanese, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Ultrasound-guided percutaneous irrigation of calcific tendinopathy (US-PICT) with intrabursal steroid injection is an elective treatment for painful rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy. Purpose To compare the efficacy of post-US-PICT intrabursal 40 mg injection of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) versus methylprednisolone acetate (MA). Material and Methods Forty patients (22 women; mean age 48.7 ± 7.2 years) with painful shoulder calcific tendinopathy, treated with TA or MA injected intrabursally after US-PICT, were included in this randomized controlled trial. At baseline and after 1, 7, 15, 30, 45, and 180 days, patients underwent US and clinical examination, using Constant (CS) and VAS (VS) scores. Complications and analgesic use were also recorded. Results Compared to baseline, at the 45-day follow-up, TA and MA group showed a similar improvement (Δ) in CS (42 ± 10 versus 36 ± 9 points) and VS (-4.4 ± 1.3 versus -3.6 ± 1.3 points). At the 180-day follow-up, the improvement was higher in TA versus MA (ΔCS: 53 ± 7 versus 44 ± 7 points; ΔVS: -4.9 ± 1.1 versus -3.9 ± 1 points). Multivariate analysis showed a mean CS higher ( P = 0.02) in TA versus MA group, while VS was similar. TA had a 5 × higher ( P = 0.007) chance of reaching complete remission (CS = 100 points) than MA group. A progressive decrease in analgesic use, concomitant to a significant and similar reduction of bursitis and calcifications, was observed in both groups. No major complications occurred. Conclusion Two-needle US-PICT with intrabursal steroid injection is safe and effective. The chance of reaching better scores and, even more important for a clinical perspective, of functional recovery, is higher in patients treated with TA than MA.

  18. Pain reduction and improvement of function following ultrasound-guided intra-articular injections of triamcinolone hexacetonide and hyaluronic acid in hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Araújo, J P; Silva, L; Andrade, R; Paços, M; Moreira, H; Migueis, N; Pereira, R; Sarmento, A; Pereira, H; Loureiro, N; Espregueira-Mendes, J

    2016-01-01

    The scientific literature has shown positive results regarding intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritic joints. When injecting in the hip joint, the guidance of ultrasound can provide higher injection accuracy and repeatability. However, due to the methodological limitations in the current available literature, its recommendation in the current practice is still controversial. This study shows that ultrasound-guided intra-articular injections of triamcinolone hexacetonide and hyaluronic acid can improve pain, function and quality of life in patients with symptomatic and radiographic hip osteoarthritis. In addition, the administration of triamcinolone hexacetonide and hyaluronic acid to the hip joint in these patients can delay the need for interventional surgery.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-fei; Wang, Yi-ru; Huo, Hui-ping; Wang, Yue-xiang; Tang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration. PMID:26807123

  20. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Fei; Wang, Yi-Ru; Huo, Hui-Ping; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Tang, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration.

  1. Successful Treatment of Gluteal Pain from Obturator Internus Tendinitis and Bursitis with Ultrasound-Guided Injection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Boqing; Rispoli, Leia; Stitik, Todd; Leong, Michelle

    2017-01-31

    This case report describes what the authors believe is the first case of a patient with obturator internus tendinitis and bursitis successfully treated with a corticosteroid injection using a trans-tendinous lateral to medial approach. The patient presented with right gluteal pain not relieved by physical therapy or right hip and ischial bursa corticosteroid injections. Pelvic and lumbar spine MRIs and EMG/NCS findings were unremarkable. Physical examination demonstrated tenderness to palpation at the right middle lower gluteal region. Ultrasound imaging with sonopalpation identified the maximal local tender point as the right obturator internus muscle and/or its underlying bursa. A 22-gauge 3.5-inch needle was inserted in-plane to the transducer and longitudinal to the obturator internus from a lateral to medial direction, an approach previously described in cadavers. The obturator internus tendon sheath and bursa were injected with 2.5 ml of 0.5% lidocaine combined with 10 mg of triamcinolone. The patient reported immediate complete relief of pain with continued relief at 2 and 6 months post-injection. This case report demonstrates an injection of the obturator internus tendon sheath and bursa using a trans-tendinous approach, which may be successful for treatment of patients presenting with persistent gluteal pain from obturator internus tendinitis and bursitis.

  2. Technical Innovation Case Report: Ultrasound-Guided Prolotherapy Injection for Insertional Achilles Calcific Tendinosis

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, Jesse P.; Lammlein, Kyle P.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the use of ultrasound guidance for hyperosmolar dextrose (prolotherapy) injection of the distal calcaneal tendon specifically just anterior to identified enthesophytes in patients with insertional Achilles calcific tendinosis refractory to conservative treatment. This specific technique has not to our knowledge been described or used in literature previously. PMID:27974984

  3. Treatment of a Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm by Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Thrombin Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Mark Richards, Dafydd; Carr, Nicholas

    2007-06-15

    We present a case of a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm secondary to pancreatitis that was successfully treated by transgastric injection of thrombin under endoscopic ultrasound guidance. There has been no recurrence on follow-up CT angiography, and thus complex surgery or endovascular intervention has been avoided.

  4. Ultrasound guided platelet-rich plasma injection for the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tahririan, Mohammad Ali; Moezi, Mehdi; Motififard, Mahdi; Nemati, Mahdi; Nemati, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Degenerative changes and inflammation in the rotator cuff (RC) are the most important causes of shoulder pain. The aim of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in patients with chronic RC tendinopathy. Materials and Methods: This study was an open-label study performed at Kashani Hospital between April 2012 and June 2014. Patients with a <1 cm partial tearing of the bursal side of RC with no or little response to conservative management were included. PRP injection was done using ultrasonography guide via posterior subacromial approach. Demographic data were obtained in all patient before the study, and shoulder function was evaluated using Constant shoulder score (CSS) before and 3 months after PRP injection. Results: A total number of 17 patients were enrolled. The mean of CSS before and after intervention was 37.05 ± 11.03 and 61.76 ± 14.75, respectively (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant correlation between the pain score before the study and the improvement in CSS (P = 0.45, r = 0.03). Significant relation was observed between the individuals’ age and improvement of CSS (P = 0.02, r = −0.49). There was no significant difference in CSS improvement between genders (P = 0.23). Conclusion: Single injection of PRP is effective to reduce pain and improve range of motion in patients with bursal side partial tearing of RC who failed to respond to conservative treatments. PMID:28217638

  5. Clinical outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol injection for hepatocellular carcinoma in the caudate lobe

    PubMed Central

    Nakaji, So; Hirata, Nobuto; Mikata, Rintaro; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Shiratori, Toshiyasu; Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Ooka, Yoshihiko; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Accurately puncturing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) that arise from the caudate lobe is generally considered to be technically difficult. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the feasibility and safety (the therapeutic outcomes and adverse events) of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided ethanol injection as a novel treatment for HCC in the caudate lobe. Patients and methods: Twelve patients with early-stage HCC of the caudate lobe that were treated with EUS-guided ethanol injection at two tertiary referral centers were reviewed retrospectively. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of the treatment, a local control curve and an overall survival curve were constructed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results: The mean follow-up duration was 31.0 months. The 1-year local control rate was 80.2 %, and recurrent lesions developed in 2 cases (after 3 and 9 months, respectively). The overall survival rate was 91.7 %, 75.0 %, and 53.3 % at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Concerning procedure-related adverse events (AEs), 2 patients suffered episodes of fever lasting a few days; however, no serious AEs occurred. Conclusions: EUS-guided ethanol injection could be a useful treatment for early-stage HCC in the caudate lobe because of its simplicity and reduced invasiveness. PMID:27747288

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Glue Injection as Alternative Treatment of Femoral Pseudoaneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Aytekin, Cueneyt; Firat, Ali; Yildirim, Erkan; Kirbas, Ismail; Boyvat, Fatih

    2004-11-15

    The interventional angiographic techniques using the percutaneous femoral approach for endovascular revascularization are becoming increasingly more popular. These methods usually require larger sheaths, and most patients need postprocedural anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy. As a consequence, the interventional procedure is associated with a higher rate of complications at the arterial entry site compared to diagnostic angiography. The reported incidence of iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm formation after coronary artery interventions ranges from 3.2% to 7.7%, and the rates noted after diagnostic angiography range from 0.2% to 1%. Peripheral pseudoaneurysms have traditionally been treated by surgical intervention, but nonsurgical alternatives, such as ultrasound (US)-guided compression, coil embolization, stent-graft placement, and percutaneous thrombin injection with or without balloon occlusion have also been documented. Of these alternatives, direct percutaneous embolization with embolic agents is the most popular method. The tissue adhesive n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) (Hystoacryl) (B. Braun, Melsungen, Germany) is one of the most popular occluding agents for neurovascular interventions, and has been widely used for more than 20 years [5,6]. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and utility of direct percutaneous injection of NBCA for embolization of femoral pseudoaneurysms.

  7. Pain related to robotic cholecystectomy with lower abdominal ports: effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique of rectus sheath block in female patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Soo; Choi, Jong Bum; Lee, Sook Young; Kim, Wook Hwan; Baek, Nam Hyun; Kim, Jayoun; Park, Chu Kyung; Lee, Yeon Ju; Park, Sung Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Robotic cholecystectomy (RC) using port sites in the lower abdominal area (T12-L1) rather than the upper abdomen has recently been introduced as an alternative procedure for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Therefore, we investigated the time course of different components of pain and the analgesic effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique for rectus sheath block (sRSB) after RC in female patients. Methods: We randomly assigned 40 patients to undergo ultrasound-guided sRSB (RSB group, n = 20) or to not undergo any block (control group, n = 20). Pain was subdivided into 3 components: superficial wound pain, deep abdominal pain, and referred shoulder pain, which were evaluated with a numeric rating scale (from 0 to 10) at baseline (time of awakening) and at 1, 6, 9, and 24 hours postoperatively. Consumption of fentanyl and general satisfaction were also evaluated 1 hour (before discharge from the postanesthesia care unit) and 24 hours postoperatively (end of study). Results: Superficial wound pain was predominant only at awakening, and after postoperative 1 hour in the control group. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB significantly decreased superficial pain after RC (P < 0.01) and resulted in a better satisfaction score (P < 0.05) 1 hour after RC in the RSB group compared with the control group. The cumulative postoperative consumption of fentanyl at 6, 9, and 24 hours was not significantly different between groups. Conclusions: After RC with lower abdominal ports, superficial wound pain predominates over deep intra-abdominal pain and shoulder pain only at the time of awakening. Afterwards, superficial and deep pain decreased to insignificant levels in 6 hours. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB was effective only during the first hour. This limited benefit should be balanced against the time and risks entailed in performing RSB. PMID:27495072

  8. Successful treatment of athletic pubalgia in a lacrosse player with ultrasound-guided needle tenotomy and platelet-rich plasma injection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Paul M; Massimi, Stephen; Dahmen, Nick; Diamond, Joanne; Wyss, James

    2015-01-01

    Athletic pubalgia is a syndrome of persistent groin pain due to chronic repetitive trauma or stress involving the pelvic joints and many musculotendinous structures that cross the anterior pelvis. As a result, the differential diagnosis can be complex, but insertional tendinopathies are the most common. This case report describes a novel approach to the treatment of distal rectus abdominis tendinopathies with ultrasound-guided needle tenotomy and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. After injection, the patient returned to pain-free play at his previous level of intensity. This suggests that PRP may be a useful treatment for this diagnosis.

  9. "Hemosuccus pancreaticus"--primarily ultrasound-guided successful intervention using transcutaneous fibrin glue application and histoacryl injection.

    PubMed

    Will, U; Mueller, A-K; Grote, R; Meyer, F

    2008-12-01

    There is a broad spectrum of causes for upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding that can be stopped by various approaches. On the basis of the report of an extraordinary case, the favorable minimally invasive approach of applying fibrin glue and histoacryl/lipiodol to the vascular basis of a bleeding pseudoaneurysm leading to "Hemosuccus pancreaticus" as a rare cause of recurrent bleeding in the upper GI tract and dangerous complications in the case of chronic pancreatitis is described. There were recurrent bleeding episodes within the upper GI tract in a 40-year-old female patient. Her medical history was significant for chronic pancreatitis and pseudocyst. Abdominal ultrasound plus duplex ultrasonography revealed a pseudoaneurysm within the tail of the pancreas as the cause of "Hemosuccus pancreaticus". Ultrasound guidance was used to repeatedly apply 2 ml of fibrin glue and 2 x 2 ml of the mixture of lipiodol and histoacryl to the basis of the pseudoaneurysm which led to complete and permanent cessation of the bleeding. Immediate and follow-up control duplex ultrasonographies (up to one year) demonstrated sufficient exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm but a preservation of the lienal artery with no disturbance of the blood perfusion in the splenic parenchyma. In conclusion, this is one of the first reports of the successful cessation of recurrent bleeding into a pseudocyst out of pseudoaneurysm ("Hemosuccus pancreaticus") by an ultrasound-guided transcutaneous fibrin glue and histoacryl/lipiodol application, which 1. is recommended as an alternative but feasible and safe therapeutic tool, 2. can provide sufficient and permanent cessation of bleeding but preserve the perfusion of the natural vessel as an initial step in the possible therapeutic algorithm, and 3. can avoid, in case of success, more invasive approaches such as angiography-guided embolization with coils or implantation of a prosthesis and even open surgical intervention, in particular, in high

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Injection of Botulinum Toxin Type A for Piriformis Muscle Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Valeno, Giovanni; Beatrice, Raffaele; Cinone, Nicoletta; Baricich, Alessio; Picelli, Alessandro; Panza, Francesco; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2015-08-10

    Piriformis muscle syndrome (PMS) is caused by prolonged or excessive contraction of the piriformis muscle associated with pain in the buttocks, hips, and lower limbs because of the close proximity to the sciatic nerve. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) reduces muscle hypertonia as well as muscle contracture and pain inhibiting substance P release and other inflammatory factors. BoNT-A injection technique is important considering the difficult access of the needle for deep location, the small size of the muscle, and the proximity to neurovascular structures. Ultrasound guidance is easy to use and painless and several studies describe its use during BoNT-A administration in PMS. In the present review article, we briefly updated current knowledge regarding the BoNT therapy of PMS, describing also a case report in which this syndrome was treated with an ultrasound-guided injection of incobotulinumtoxin A. Pain reduction with an increase of hip articular range of motion in this patient with PMS confirmed the effectiveness of BoNT-A injection for the management of this syndrome.

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Injection of Botulinum Toxin Type A for Piriformis Muscle Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Santamato, Andrea; Micello, Maria Francesca; Valeno, Giovanni; Beatrice, Raffaele; Cinone, Nicoletta; Baricich, Alessio; Picelli, Alessandro; Panza, Francesco; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Fiore, Pietro; Ranieri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Piriformis muscle syndrome (PMS) is caused by prolonged or excessive contraction of the piriformis muscle associated with pain in the buttocks, hips, and lower limbs because of the close proximity to the sciatic nerve. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) reduces muscle hypertonia as well as muscle contracture and pain inhibiting substance P release and other inflammatory factors. BoNT-A injection technique is important considering the difficult access of the needle for deep location, the small size of the muscle, and the proximity to neurovascular structures. Ultrasound guidance is easy to use and painless and several studies describe its use during BoNT-A administration in PMS. In the present review article, we briefly updated current knowledge regarding the BoNT therapy of PMS, describing also a case report in which this syndrome was treated with an ultrasound-guided injection of incobotulinumtoxin A. Pain reduction with an increase of hip articular range of motion in this patient with PMS confirmed the effectiveness of BoNT-A injection for the management of this syndrome. PMID:26266421

  12. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Silvestri, Enzo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an established modality for shoulder evaluation, being accurate, low cost and radiation free. Different pathological conditions can be diagnosed using ultrasound and can be treated using ultrasound guidance, such as degenerative, traumatic or inflammatory diseases. Subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis is the most common finding on ultrasound evaluation for painful shoulder. Therapeutic injections of corticosteroids are helpful to reduce inflammation and pain. Calcific tendinopathy of rotator cuff affects up to 20% of painful shoulders. Ultrasound-guided treatment may be performed with both single- and double-needle approach. Calcific enthesopathy, a peculiar form of degenerative tendinopathy, is a common and mostly asymptomatic ultrasound finding; dry needling has been proposed in symptomatic patients. An alternative is represented by autologous platelet-rich plasma injections. Intra-articular injections of the shoulder can be performed in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory and degenerative diseases with corticosteroids or hyaluronic acid respectively. Steroid injections around the long head of the biceps brachii tendon are indicated in patients with biceps tendinopathy, reducing pain and humeral tenderness. The most common indication for acromion-clavicular joint injection is degenerative osteoarthritis, with ultrasound representing a useful tool in localizing the joint space and properly injecting various types of drugs (steroids, lidocaine or hyaluronic acid). Suprascapular nerve block is an approved treatment for chronic shoulder pain non-responsive to conventional treatments as well as candidate patients for shoulder arthroscopy. This review provides an overview of these different ultrasonography-guided procedures that can be performed around the shoulder.

  13. A review of viscosupplementation for osteoarthritis of the hip and a description of an ultrasound-guided hip injection technique.

    PubMed

    Mulvaney, Sean W

    2009-01-01

    Viscosupplementation of the hip for symptomatic osteoarthritis appears to be safe and effective in more than 25 yr of use in Europe. More than 11 studies suggest that viscosupplementation in the hip is as effective as viscosupplementation in the knee. It appears to be a safe and reasonable alternative to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs or intra-articular steroids for the treatment of osteoarthritis pain. Viscosupplementation in the hip may delay the need for hip replacement surgery. Viscosupplementation in the hip appears to work better in patients with fewer radiographic changes of osteoarthritis. Placement of viscosupplement in the hip under real-time ultrasound or fluoroscopic guidance is safe and well tolerated. Hip joint communication with the iliopsoas bursa may be a factor in studies of the effectiveness of viscosupplementation in the hip.

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Biceps Peritendinous Injections in the Absence of a Distended Tendon Sheath: A Novel Rotator Interval Approach.

    PubMed

    Stone, Taylor J; Adler, Ronald S

    2015-12-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the technical success rate of a novel injection into the long head of the biceps tendon sheath by a rotator interval approach in 26 patients. A 25-gauge, 1.5-in needle was positioned into the rotator interval from a lateral approach, where a therapeutic injection was performed. Postinjection sonograms images were reviewed to assess for fluid within the sheath to calculate the technical success rate. Fluid distention of the biceps tendon sheath was shown in all 26 cases, corresponding to a 100% technical success rate. In addition, postinjection ultrasound imaging of the anterior shoulder provided additional diagnostic findings in 6 of 26 patients (23%).

  15. Effectiveness of ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel injection using in-plane ulnar approach: a prospective, randomized, single-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Young; Park, Yongbum; Park, Ki Deok; Lee, Ju Kang; Lim, Oh Kyung

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the degree of symptom improvement and the change of electrophysiological and ultrasonographic findings after sonographically guided local steroid injection using an in-plane ulnar approach in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Seventy-five cases of 44 patients diagnosed with CTS were included and evaluated at baseline and at 4 and 12 weeks after injection. All patients received injection with 40 mg of triamcinolone mixed with 1 mL of 1% lidocaine into the carpal tunnel using an in-plane Ultrasound (US)-guided ulnar approach, out-plane US-guided approach, and blind injection. For clinical evaluation, we used the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) and electrophysiological tests. The ultrasonographic findings were also evaluated with regard to cross-sectional area and the flattening ratio of the median nerve. Subjective symptoms measured by BCTQ and median nerve conduction parameters showed significant improvement at 4 weeks in the in-plane ulnar approach group compared with the out-plane ulnar approach and blind injection. This improvement was still observed at 12 weeks. The flattening ratio and cross-sectional area of the median nerve showed a more significant decrease with the in-plane ulnar approach than with the out-plane ulnar approach and blind injection (P < 0.05). US-guided local steroid injection using an in-plane ulnar approach in the CTS may be more effective than out-plane or blind injection.

  16. Treatment of liver cancer of middle and advanced stages using ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol injection combined with radiofrequency ablation: A clinical analysis

    PubMed Central

    SUN, XUE; LI, RU; ZHANG, BOTAO; YANG, YUEJIE; CUI, ZHIFEI

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is a malignancy of the digestive system and has a high morbidity and mortality rate. Local intervention has become a viable option in identifying liver treatment. The aim of the present study was to analyze the clinical effects of treating liver cancer in middle and advanced stages using ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) in tumors combined with radiofrequency ablation (RFA). A total of 100 patients with stage III–IV liver cancers were selected to participate in the study. Patients were divided into groups. In group A, treatment was initiated with PEI and after 1–2 weeks RFA was applied while in group B treatment was initiated with RFA and after 1–2 weeks PEI was applied. Patients in group C received PEI and RFA simultaneously. The clinical effects in the 3 groups were compared after 6-month follow ups. The volume of tumor ablation necrosis in group A was significantly greater than that in the groups B and C, while the size was significantly smaller compared to groups B and C after ablation. For group A, the complete ablation rate was significantly higher than that in groups B and C, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). Liver damage indices, including raising levels of glutamic-pyruvic transaminase and total bilirubin, were significantly decreased in group A (P<0.05). The survival rate in group A was also significantly higher than in groups B and C (P<0.05). In conclusion, for patients with liver cancer in middle and advanced stages, the treatment method using PEI followed by RFA was more beneficial in terms of improving the tumor ablation rate, alleviating liver damages and increasing survival rates. PMID:26998128

  17. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff.

  18. Ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of synovium is an increasingly performed procedure with a high diagnostic yield. In this review, we discuss the normal synovium, as well as the indications, technique, tissue handling and clinical applications of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. PMID:26581578

  19. Technique for iliopsoas ultrasound-guided active electromyography-directed botulinum a toxin injection in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Willenborg, Michael J; Shilt, Jeffrey S; Smith, Beth Paterson; Estrada, Roquel L; Castle, Jason A; Koman, L Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Symptomatic hip flexion deformity secondary to iliopsoas spasticity may interfere with gait, impair sitting balance, or contribute to hip subluxation or dislocation. A nonsurgical, minimally invasive technique to ameliorate iliopsoas spasticity is presented. The technique uses intramuscular injections of botulinum A toxin to provide selective neuromuscular blockade of the iliacus or psoas muscles or both. Because of the anatomic location of the target muscles, this technique uses ultrasound guidance for needle placement. Active electromyographic stimulation is used to verify the needle position adjacent to active myoneural interfaces. The authors' experience to date includes the treatment of 28 patients (53 hips). Use of this technique has resulted in improved hip range of motion. No intraoperative or postoperative adverse events or complications have been observed.

  20. Paraplegia After Thoracic Epidural Steroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Vivek; Kaveeshvar, Hirsh; Dwivedi, Samvid

    2016-09-01

    Epidural steroid injections are a common procedure performed by pain physicians. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia along with several other groups recently provided guidelines for performing epidural injections in the setting of anticoagulants. We present a case of a patient who developed an epidural hematoma and subsequent paraplegia despite strict adherence to these guidelines. Although new guidelines serve to direct practice, risks of devastating neurologic complications remain as evidenced by our case.

  1. Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Biopsy An ultrasound-guided breast biopsy uses sound waves to help locate a lump or abnormality ... exam. The transducer sends out inaudible, high—frequency sound waves into the body and then listens for ...

  2. Cervical epidural steroid injection for cervicobrachialgia.

    PubMed

    Stav, A; Ovadia, L; Sternberg, A; Kaadan, M; Weksler, N

    1993-08-01

    Fifty patients with chronic resistant cervicobrachialgia were randomly divided into two groups. Twenty-five patients (group A) were treated with cervical epidural steroid/lidocaine injections and 17 patients (group B) were treated with steroid/lidocaine injections into the posterior neck muscles. Another eight patients from group B were excluded from the study because they had started the process of litigation of insurance claims and their subjective analysis of pain relief might therefore not be trustworthy. One to three injections were administered at 2-week intervals according to the clinical response. All patients continued their various pre-study treatments: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, non-opioid analgesics and physiotherapy. Pain relief was evaluated by the visual analogue scale 1 week after the last injection and then 1 year later. One week after the last injection we rated pain relief as very good and good in 76% of the patients in group A, as compared to 35.5% of the patients in group B. One year after the treatment 68% of the group A patients still had very good and good pain relief, whereas only 11.8% of group B patients reported this degree of pain relief. These differences were statistically significant. We failed to achieve significant improvement of tendon reflexes or of sensory loss in both groups, but the increase in the range of motion, the fraction of patients who were able to decrease their daily dose of analgesics, and recovery of the capacity for work were significantly better in group A. We encountered no complications in either group of patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Myofascial Trigger Point Injection Into Brachialis Muscle for Rotator Cuff Disease Patients With Upper Arm Pain: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Mi Ri; Chang, Won Hyuk; Choi, Hyo Seon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of trigger point injection into brachialis muscle for rotator cuff disease patients with upper arm pain. Methods A prospective, randomized, and single-blinded clinical pilot trial was performed at university rehabilitation hospital. Twenty-one patients clinically diagnosed with rotator cuff disease suspected of having brachialis myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) were randomly allocated into two groups. Effect of ultrasound (US)-guided trigger point injection (n=11) and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (n=10) was compared by visual analog scale (VAS). Results US-guided trigger point injection of brachialis muscle resulted in excellent outcome compared to the oral NSAID group. Mean VAS scores decreased significantly after 2 weeks of treatment compared to the baseline in both groups (7.3 vs. 4.5 in the injection group and 7.4 vs. 5.9 in the oral group). The decrease of the VAS score caused by injection (ДVAS=-2.8) was significantly larger than caused by oral NSAID (ДVAS=-1.5) (p<0.05). Conclusion In patients with rotator cuff disease, US-guided trigger point injection of the brachialis muscle is safe and effective for both diagnosis and treatment when the cause of pain is suspected to be originated from the muscle. PMID:25379497

  4. [Clinical effect of ultrasound-guided injection of biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-Fe3O4 in situ implant for magnetic thermal ablation in treatment of nude mice with human liver cancer SMMC-7721 cells].

    PubMed

    Liang, B; Zuo, G Q; Zheng, Y Y; He, S; Zuo, D Y

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To prepare the Fe3O4-loaded biodegradable liquid-solid phase inversion poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) in situ implant for ultrasound-guided injection into nude mouse tumor model, and to investigate its clinical effect in thermomagnetic treatment of nude mice with human liver cancer SMMC-7721 cells in an alternating magnetic field. Methods: An in situ implant containing 10% Fe3O4 was prepared, and 50 μl Fe3O4-PLGA-NMP gel was injected into the subcutaneous tissue of Kunming mice. The degradation of this material was observed for 2 consecutive months, and the changes in body weight were recorded. HE staining and Prussian blue staining were performed for the heart, liver, spleen, lung, and kidney of Kunming mice. Fresh ex vivo bovine liver was taken and cut into cubes with a dimension of 2 cm×2 cm×2 cm and then 50 μl Fe3O4-PLGA-NMP gel was injected; after phase inversion, the cubes of ex vivo bovine liver were heated for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes, respectively, and then cut open for observing the range of ablation; HE staining was also performed. Micro-CT scan was performed after ultrasound-guided injection of 50 μl Fe3O4-PLGA gel into the tumors of the nude mice, and then the nude mice were divided into treatment group and control group. The mice in the treatment group were given thermomagnetic treatment for 3 minutes, and tumor growth was observed daily. Results: The biodegradation of Fe3O4-PLGA-NMP implant showed that the subcutaneously injected material was gradually metabolized at 2 weeks after injection and that the nude mice were in good condition. The bovine liver ablation experiment showed that the range of ablation of 50 μl Fe3O4-PLGA implant reached 1.46 ± 0.11 cm. HE staining showed that part of bovine liver had coagulative necrosis. The phase inversion experiment of Fe3O4-PLGA gel showed quick liquid-solid phase inversion of the material after injection into the tumor, and the process of liquid-solid phase inversion could be

  5. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Silvestri, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an established modality for shoulder evaluation, being accurate, low cost and radiation free. Different pathological conditions can be diagnosed using ultrasound and can be treated using ultrasound guidance, such as degenerative, traumatic or inflammatory diseases. Subacromial–subdeltoid bursitis is the most common finding on ultrasound evaluation for painful shoulder. Therapeutic injections of corticosteroids are helpful to reduce inflammation and pain. Calcific tendinopathy of rotator cuff affects up to 20% of painful shoulders. Ultrasound-guided treatment may be performed with both single- and double-needle approach. Calcific enthesopathy, a peculiar form of degenerative tendinopathy, is a common and mostly asymptomatic ultrasound finding; dry needling has been proposed in symptomatic patients. An alternative is represented by autologous platelet-rich plasma injections. Intra-articular injections of the shoulder can be performed in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory and degenerative diseases with corticosteroids or hyaluronic acid respectively. Steroid injections around the long head of the biceps brachii tendon are indicated in patients with biceps tendinopathy, reducing pain and humeral tenderness. The most common indication for acromion–clavicular joint injection is degenerative osteoarthritis, with ultrasound representing a useful tool in localizing the joint space and properly injecting various types of drugs (steroids, lidocaine or hyaluronic acid). Suprascapular nerve block is an approved treatment for chronic shoulder pain non-responsive to conventional treatments as well as candidate patients for shoulder arthroscopy. This review provides an overview of these different ultrasonography-guided procedures that can be performed around the shoulder. PMID:26313499

  6. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  7. Incidence of intradiscal injection during lumbar fluoroscopically guided transforaminal and interlaminar epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Candido, Kenneth D; Katz, Jeffrey A; Chinthagada, Mariadas; McCarthy, Robert A; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2010-05-01

    Intradiscal injections during transforaminal epidural steroid injections and interlaminar lumbar epidural steroid injections have been reported rarely. In that regard, this retrospective observational report is the first attempt to quantify the overall rate of this complication. A retrospective analysis of 3 years of accrued data (2004-2007) showed that 2412 transforaminal epidural steroid injections were performed at the 2 training institutions (Loyola University Medical Center and Northwestern University/Feinberg School of Medicine). There were 6 intradiscal (annular) injections of contrast, for a rate of 1:402. Over the same interval, 4723 lumbar epidural steroid injections were performed, with 1 intradiscal injection, for a rate of 1:4723.

  8. Comparison between Steroid Injection and Stretching Exercise on the Scalene of Patients with Upper Extremity Paresthesia: Randomized Cross-Over Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Wook; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Park, Yongbum; Chang, Won Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the therapeutic effects on upper extremity paresthesia of intra-muscular steroid injections into the scalene muscle with those of stretching exercise only. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with upper extremity paresthesia who met the criteria were recruited to participate in this single-blind, crossover study. Fourteen of 20 patients were female. The average age was 45.0±10.5 years and duration of symptom was 12.2±8.7 months. Each participant completed one injection and daily exercise program for 2 weeks. After randomization, half of all patients received ultrasound-guided injection of scalene muscles before exercise, while the other was invested for the other patients. Results After two weeks, there was a significant decrease of the visual analog scale score of treatment effect compared with baseline in both groups (6.90 to 2.85 after injection and 5.65 to 4.05 after stretching exercise, p<0.01). However, injection resulted in greater improvements than stretching exercise (p<0.01). The number of patients with successful treatment, defined as >50% reduction in post-treatment visual analog scale, was 18 of 20 (90.0%) after injection, compared to 5 of 20 (25.0%) after stretching exercise. There were no cases of unintended brachial plexus block after injection. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided steroid injection or stretching exercise of scalene muscles led to reduced upper extremity paresthesia in patients who present with localized tenderness in the scalene muscle without electrodiagnostic test abnormalities, although injection treatment resulted in more improvements. The results suggest that symptoms relief might result from injection into the muscle alone not related to blockade of the brachial plexus. PMID:26847305

  9. Exserohilum Infections Associated with Contaminated Steroid Injections

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Jana M.; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Blau, Dianna M.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Drew, Clifton P.; Batten, Brigid C.; Bartlett, Jeanine H.; Metcalfe, Maureen G.; Pham, Cau D.; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Patel, Mitesh; Liu, Lindy; Jones, Tara L.; Greer, Patricia W.; Montague, Jeltley L.; White, Elizabeth; Rollin, Dominique C.; Seales, Cynthia; Stewart, Donna; Deming, Mark V.; Brandt, Mary E.; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2014-01-01

    September 2012 marked the beginning of the largest reported outbreak of infections associated with epidural and intra-articular injections. Contamination of methylprednisolone acetate with the black mold, Exserohilum rostratum, was the primary cause of the outbreak, with >13,000 persons exposed to the potentially contaminated drug, 741 confirmed drug-related infections, and 55 deaths. Fatal meningitis and localized epidural, paraspinal, and peripheral joint infections occurred. Tissues from 40 laboratory-confirmed cases representing these various clinical entities were evaluated by histopathological analysis, special stains, and IHC to characterize the pathological features and investigate the pathogenesis of infection, and to evaluate methods for detection of Exserohilum in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Fatal cases had necrosuppurative to granulomatous meningitis and vasculitis, with thrombi and abundant angioinvasive fungi, with extensive involvement of the basilar arterial circulation of the brain. IHC was a highly sensitive method for detection of fungus in FFPE tissues, demonstrating both hyphal forms and granular fungal antigens, and PCR identified Exserohilum in FFPE and fresh tissues. Our findings suggest a pathogenesis for meningitis involving fungal penetration into the cerebrospinal fluid at the injection site, with transport through cerebrospinal fluid to the basal cisterns and subsequent invasion of the basilar arteries. Further studies are needed to characterize Exserohilum and investigate the potential effects of underlying host factors and steroid administration on the pathogenesis of infection. PMID:23809916

  10. Treatment of chalazions with injection of a steroid suspension.

    PubMed

    Watson, A P; Austin, D J

    1984-11-01

    A trial was conducted to compare the efficacy of the treatment of chalazions by injection of triamcinolone acetonide with conventional incision and curettage. Of the 39 injected cases 77% resolved completely, though 54% of the injected cases required a second injection. Of the 30 surgically treated cases 90% resolved, but 27% required a second operation. Injection of chalazions with a steroid suspension is a convenient and reasonably effective alternative to the standard surgical management of this common condition.

  11. Is epidural steroid injection effective for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Molina, Marcelo

    2015-11-16

    There are several nonsurgical alternatives to treat radicular pain in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Epidural steroid injections have been used for several decades, but the different studies have shown variable effects. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified nine systematic reviews including seven pertinent randomized controlled trials. We concluded epidural steroid injection probably leads to little or no effect on reducing radicular pain of spinal stenosis.

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid An ultrasound-guided thyroid biopsy ... Thyroid? What is Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? During a fine needle aspiration ...

  13. Rupture of the triceps tendon associated with steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Stannard, J P; Bucknell, A L

    1993-01-01

    Rupture of the triceps mechanism is an uncommon injury that has been recognized with increasing frequency in recent years. It has been proposed that such injuries commonly accompany fractures of the radial head and must be actively evaluated in the presence of such a fracture. We present a unique case of isolated rupture of the triceps tendon in an athlete who was lifting weights. This case was complicated by a history of olecranon bursitis that had been treated with numerous local steroid injections, as well as a history of anabolic steroid abuse. Both systemic steroids and local injections may predispose tendons to rupture. Triceps tendon ruptures may result in uniformly good to excellent results if recognized and treated surgically. This case also serves as a reminder of the risks of treating inflamed tissues with local steroid injections, especially in strength athletes who place high demands on their musculoskeletal structures. Finally, this case documents a second case of triceps mechanism rupture in an athlete who has abused anabolic steroids. A study by Hunter et al. suggests that oral steroid abuse may be associated with detrimental effects on the mechanical properties of connective tissue, demonstrating another negative effect of anabolic steroid use in athletes.

  14. Ultrasound-guided retro-calcaneal bursa corticosteroid injection for refractory Achilles tendinitis in patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathy: efficacy and follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Puja; Aggarwal, Amita

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided corticosteroid injection has been shown to be safe and effective for varied causes of plantar fasciitis; however, its use for Achilles tendinitis is controversial. We studied the efficacy and changes in US findings at Achilles enthesitis after corticosteroid injection in patients with spondyloarthropathy (SpA). Patients with SpA with symptomatic Achilles enthesitis, refractory to 6 weeks of full-dose NSAIDs, were offered US-guided local corticosteroid injection. Injected entheses were examined by US (both B mode and power Doppler) at baseline and 6 weeks after injection. Standard OMERACT definitions were used to define enthesitis. Achilles tendon thickness >5.29 mm, 2 cm proximal to insertion in long axis, was considered thickened. Twenty-seven symptomatic Achilles tendons (in 18 patients) were injected with 20 mg methylprednisolone under US guidance baseline, and 6-week follow-up US features were compared. All patients reported improvement in pain (VAS) in the affected tendon after injection (p < 0.0001). Simultaneously, improvement in local inflammatory changes were noted, in the form of significant reduction in tendon thickness (p < 0.0001), vascularity (p < 0.0001), peritendinous oedema (p = 0.001), bursitis and bursal vascularity (p < 0.001 and < 0.0001, respectively). There was no change in bone erosions and enthesophyte. None of the patients had tendon rupture or other injection-related complications at 6 weeks of follow-up. US-guided local corticosteroid injection is an effective and safe modality for refractory Achilles enthesitis in patients with SpA and leads to reversion of acute changes at entheseal site.

  15. Application of Ultrasound-Guided Trigger Point Injection for Myofascial Trigger Points in the Subscapularis and Pectoralis Muscles to Post-Mastectomy Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyuk Jai; Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Wan Sung; Chang, Won Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the therapeutic effectiveness of ultrasound (US)-guided trigger point injection for myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the internal rotator muscles of the shoulder in post-mastectomy patients. Materials and Methods This pilot study was a non-controlled, prospective, clinical trial. Nineteen post-mastectomy patients with a diagnosis of at least one active MTrP in the subscapularis and/or pectoralis muscles were included. We performed trigger point injections into the subscapularis muscle deep behind the scapula as well as the pectoralis muscle for diagnostic and therapeutic purpose by the newly developed US-guided method. Results Visual analogue scale and range of motion of the shoulder for external rotation and of abduction showed significant improvement immediately after the first injection and 3 months after the last injection compared with baseline (p<0.05 for both). Duration from onset to surgery and duration of myofascial pain syndrome in the good responder group were significantly shorter than in the bad responder group (p<0.05). Patients did not report any complications related to the procedure or serious adverse events attributable to the treatment. Conclusion In post-mastectomy patients with shoulder pain, US-guided trigger point injections of the subscapularis and/or pectoralis muscles are effective for both diagnosis and treatment when the cause of shoulder pain is suspected to originate from active MTrPs in these muscles, particularly, the subscapularis. PMID:24719150

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Therapy for Knee and Foot Ganglion Cysts.

    PubMed

    Ju, Brian L; Weber, Kristy L; Khoury, Viviane

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided aspiration/injection of ganglion cysts in the lower extremities (knee and foot) that required referral to the radiology department for precise localization. The present study is the first series to describe such results. The study population consisted of 15 patients who had undergone treatment from April 2012 to January 2015. Follow-up was by telephone survey, which was performed at a mean of 15 ± 6 months after treatment. Almost 90% of patients experienced immediate improvement in symptoms (mostly pain), and 77% of these patients had not experienced a recurrence of symptoms at a mean follow-up time of 14 ± 6 months. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided therapy is a safe and potentially effective treatment for most cases of symptomatic lower extremity ganglion cysts.

  17. Clinically applicable procedure for gene delivery to fetal gut by ultrasound-guided gastric injection: toward prenatal prevention of early-onset intestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    David, A L; Peebles, D M; Gregory, L; Waddington, S N; Themis, M; Weisz, B; Ruthe, A; Lawrence, L; Cook, T; Rodeck, C H; Coutelle, C

    2006-07-01

    Targeting gene therapy vectors to the fetal intestinal tract could provide a novel means toward prevention of the early postnatal intestinal pathology of cystic fibrosis and other conditions, such as congenital enteropathy, that cause intestinal failure. Among these conditions, cystic fibrosis is by far the most common lethal genetic disease. It is caused by a functional absence or deficiency of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and manifests in the gut as meconium ileus. Prenatal treatment of genetic disease may avoid early-onset tissue damage and immune sensitization, and may target cells that are less accessible in the adult. We investigated gene transfer to the fetal gut, using a minimally invasive injection technique. First-generation replication-deficient adenoviral vectors encoding the beta-galactosidase gene and transduction-enhancing agents were injected into the stomach of early-gestation fetal sheep (n = 8, 60 days of gestation; term, 145 days) under ultrasound guidance. Reporter gene expression was observed 2 days after injection in the villi of the gastrointestinal epithelia after 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside staining and beta-galactosidase immunohistochemistry of fetal tissues. Expression of beta-galactosidase, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, was enhanced after pretreatment of the fetal gut with sodium caprate, which opens tight junctions, and after adenovirus complexation with DEAE-dextran, which confers a positive charge to the virus. Instillation of the fluorocarbon perflubron after virus delivery resulted in tissue transduction from the fetal stomach to the colon. Using a clinically relevant technique, we have demonstrated widespread gene transfer to the fetal gastrointestinal epithelia.

  18. Refractory strictures despite steroid injection after esophageal endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Noboru; Ishihara, Ryu; Uedo, Noriya; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Kanesaka, Takashi; Matsuura, Noriko; Yamasaki, Yasushi; Hamada, Kenta; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although steroid injection prevents stricture after esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), some patients require repeated sessions of endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD). We investigated the risk for refractory stricture despite the administration of steroid injections to prevent stricture in patients undergoing esophageal ESD. Refractory stricture was defined as the requirement for more than three sessions of EBD to resolve the stricture. In addition, the safety of steroid injections was assessed based on the rate of complications. Patients and methods: We analyzed data from 127 consecutive patients who underwent esophageal ESD and had mucosal defects with a circumferential extent greater than three-quarters of the esophagus. To prevent stricture, steroid injection was performed. EBD was performed whenever a patient had symptoms of dysphagia. Results: The percentage of patients with a tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % was significantly higher in those with refractory stricture than in those without stricture (P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, history of radiation therapy, tumor location, and tumor diameter showed that a tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % was an independent risk factor for refractory stricture (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 5.49 [95 %CI 1.91 – 15.84], P = 0.002). Major adverse events occurred in 3 patients (2.4 %): perforation during EBD in 2 patients and delayed perforation after EBD in 1 patient. The patient with delayed perforation underwent esophagectomy because of mediastinitis. Conclusions: A tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % is an independent risk factor for refractory stricture despite steroid injections. The development of more extensive interventions is warranted to prevent refractory stricture. PMID:27004256

  19. Fungal Infections Associated with Contaminated Steroid Injections.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, Carol A; Malani, Anurag N

    2016-04-01

    In mid-September 2012, the largest healthcare-associated outbreak in U.S. history began. Before it was over, 751 patients were reported with fungal meningitis, stroke, spinal or paraspinal infection, or peripheral osteoarticular infection, and 64 (8.5%) died. Most patients had undergone epidural injection, and a few osteoarticular injection, of methylprednisolone acetate that had been manufactured at the New England Compounding Center (NECC). The offending pathogen in most cases was Exserohilum rostratum, a brown-black soil organism that previously was a rare cause of human infection. Three lots of methylprednisolone were contaminated with mold at NECC; the mold from unopened bottles of methylprednisolone was identical by whole-genome sequencing to the mold that was isolated from ill patients. Early cases manifested as meningitis, some patients suffered posterior circulation strokes, and later cases were more likely to present with localized infection at the injection site, including epidural abscess or phlegmon, vertebral diskitis or osteomyelitis, and arachnoiditis with intradural involvement of nerve roots. Many patients with spinal or paraspinal infection required surgical intervention. Recommendations for treatment evolved over the first few weeks of the outbreak. Initially, combination therapy with liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole was recommended for all patients; later, combination therapy was recommended only for those who were most ill, and voriconazole monotherapy was recommended for most patients. Among those patients who continued antifungal therapy for at least 6 months, outcomes for most appeared to be successful, although a few patients remain on therapy.

  20. Transient Glaucoma after an Epidural Steroid Injection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Manjiani, Deepak; Said, Salam; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-01-01

    Background Steroids are recognized as a beneficial treatment for various medical conditions, yet clinically relevant side effects of steroids are common and problematic, ranging from a minor case of acne to a potentially life-threatening Addisonian crisis. In anesthetic medicine, the use of epidural steroid injections (ESIs) for chronic low back pain and other radicular pain-related conditions has become standard practice in interventional pain management. Case Report We report the case of a patient who experienced sudden bilateral blurred vision after receiving an ESI and required urgent ophthalmic interventions and follow-up care. The main clinical findings from this case showed that the patient had high intraocular pressure (IOP) that caused unexpected short-term vision loss. The symptom resolved after 3½ months without ophthalmic treatment. Conclusion Clinicians should inform patients about the possibility of visual complications associated with pain procedures involving steroids. Among the high-risk groups with predisposing factors, such as uncontrolled hypertension and diabetes mellitus, routine eye tests that include measuring IOP prior to ESI should be recommended as a preventive measure. Alternative pain management therapies should be considered if possible. Comprehensive planning of patient care will also ensure safety and prevent unwanted outcomes, particularly with high-risk patients receiving steroids for pain procedures. PMID:25829885

  1. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Oncologic Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Irisawa, Atsushi; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2013-01-01

    Since the development of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the early 1990s, its application has been extended to various diseases. For pancreatic cancer, EUS-FNA can obtain specimens from the tumor itself with fewer complications than other methods. Interventional EUS enables various therapeutic options: local ablation, brachytherapy, placement of fiducial markers for radiotherapy, and direct injection of antitumor agents into cancer. This paper will focus on EUS-guided oncologic therapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:23533319

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Elbow Procedures.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Walter I; Williams, Christopher J; Mautner, Ken

    2016-08-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography can help clinicians visualize key anatomic structures of the elbow and guide periarticular and intra-articular injections. Historically, most procedures done around the elbow have been done using landmark guidance, and few studies have reported the accuracy of ultrasonography-guided injections in the elbow region. This article reviews common musculoskeletal disorders about the elbow that can be evaluated with ultrasonography, reviews the literature on ultrasonography-guided injections of the elbow region, and describes the senior author's preferred approach for the most commonly performed elbow region injections.

  3. Treatment of great auricular neuralgia with real-time ultrasound-guided great auricular nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Younghoon; Kim, Saeyoung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: The great auricular nerve can be damaged by the neck surgery, tumor, and long-time pressure on the neck. But, great auricular neuralgia is very rare condition. It was managed by several medication and landmark-based great auricular nerve block with poor prognosis. Patient concerns: A 25-year-old man presented with a pain in the left lateral neck and auricle. Diagnosis: He was diagnosed with great auricular neuralgia. Interventions: His pain was not reduced by medication. Therefore, the great auricular nerve block with local anesthetics and steroid was performed under ultrasound guidance. Outcomes: Ultrasound guided great auricular nerve block alleviated great auricular neuralgia. Lessons: This medication-resistant great auricular neuralgia was treated by the ultrasound guided great auricular nerve block with local anesthetic agent and steroid. Therefore, great auricular nerve block can be a good treatment option of medication resistant great auricular neuralgia. PMID:28328811

  4. Pain-relieving effect of local steroid injection in uvulopalatopharyngoplasty.

    PubMed

    Hirunwiwatkul, P

    2001-06-01

    An analytical prospective study was performed to determine the post-operative pain-relieving effect of local steroid suspension injection in uvulopalatopharyngoplasty. From February 2000 to October 2000, 48 adult patients from 20 to 67 years of age, were scheduled to receive uvulopalatopharyngoplasty. Triamcinolone acetonide (Kenacort A) was injected onto the raw surface of the left-sided tonsillar fossa and left-sided soft palate after tonsillectomy and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty. Other preoperative and post-operative medications including antibiotics, anesthesia and surgical techniques were standardized. Visual analog scales were used to assess the level of pain sensation on the left and right side of the throat daily from day 0 (Operative day) to post-operative day 10. A paired t-test showed significant differences in post-operative pain level between the study side (left) and the control side (right) at day 2, day 4, and in the overall analysis (p < 0.05).

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Intercostobrachial Nerve Block for Intercostobrachial Neuralgia in Breast Cancer Patients: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Wisotzky, Eric M; Saini, Vikramjeet; Kao, Cyrus

    2016-03-01

    This case series describes 3 cases in which ultrasound-guided intercostobrachial perineural injection was used for intercostobrachial neuralgia, a common cause of postmastectomy pain syndrome. All cases had undergone modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer. Two cases developed axillary and unilateral chest wall pain. The third case initially presented with axillary pain and lateral shoulder pain 1 year out from radical mastectomy. After a cervical epidural steroid injection, her lateral shoulder pain resolved, but she continued to have residual chest wall paresthesia. It was at this time, we decided to treat with an intercostobrachial nerve perineural injection. Injury to the intercostobrachial nerve is thought to be a common cause of postmastectomy pain. In our case series, all patients had pain relief after the intercostobrachial perineural injection. There is a relative dearth of published information on the treatment of postmastectomy pain and more specifically intercostobrachial neuralgia. We review the anatomy of the intercostobrachial nerve and its variants, etiologies of intercostobrachial neuralgia, and current indications and methods of an intercostobrachial perineural injection.

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Genicular Nerve Thermal Radiofrequency Ablation for Chronic Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Joshua; Weyker, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is one of the most common joint diseases affecting adults in the United States. For elderly patients with multiple medical comorbidities who do not wish to undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA), lifestyle modification, pharmacologic management, and injections are the mainstay of therapy. Previously, pain management interventions were limited to intra-articular joint injections and viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid. Fluoroscopic-guided techniques for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the genicular nerves have been previously described and a recent cadaveric study suggests that ultrasound-guided genicular nerve blocks can be performed accurately. We performed an ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of the genicular nerves in 88-year-old woman who had deferred surgical management given her age. Following successful ultrasound guided diagnostic genicular nerve blocks, she proceeded to RFA using the same ultrasound guided technique. The procedure resulted in significant pain relief and improvement in overall function for greater than 6 months. The use of ultrasound provides a relatively rapid and noninvasive method to directly visualize genicular nerves and surrounding vasculature. Our case suggests that, for genicular nerve blockade and RFA, ultrasound may be a useful alternative to fluoroscopy. Not only did the procedure result in significant pain relief that has persisted for greater than 6 months but also more importantly her function status and quality of life were improved. PMID:27822391

  7. Ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block: safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Narouze, Samer

    2014-06-01

    Cervical sympathetic and stellate ganglion blocks (SGB) provide a valuable diagnostic and therapeutic benefit to sympathetically maintained pain syndromes in the head, neck, and upper extremity. With the ongoing efforts to improve the safety of the procedure, the techniques for SGB have evolved over time, from the use of the standard blind technique, to fluoroscopy, and recently to the ultrasound (US)-guided approach. Over the past few years, there has been a growing interest in the ultrasound-guided technique and the many advantages that it might offer. Fluoroscopy is a reliable method for identifying bony surfaces, which facilitates identifying the C6 and C7 transverse processes. However, this is only a surrogate marker for the cervical sympathetic trunk. The ideal placement of the needle tip should be anterolateral to the longus colli muscle, deep to the prevertebral fascia (to avoid spread along the carotid sheath) but superficial to the fascia investing the longus colli muscle (to avoid injecting into the muscle substance). Identifying the correct fascial plane can be achieved with ultrasound guidance, thus facilitating the caudal spread of the injectate to reach the stellate ganglion at C7-T1 level, even if the needle is placed at C6 level. This allows for a more effective and precise sympathetic block with the use of a small injectate volume. Ultrasound-guided SGB may also improve the safety of the procedure by direct visualization of vascular structures (inferior thyroidal, cervical, vertebral, and carotid arteries) and soft tissue structures (thyroid, esophagus, and nerve roots). Accordingly, the risk of vascular and soft tissue injury may be minimized.

  8. Steroid injections in the upper extremity: experienced clinical opinion versus evidence-based practices.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Gary; Marshall, Astrid; Barron, O Alton; Catalano, Louis W; Glickel, Steven Z; Kuhn, Margaret

    2013-09-01

    A survey regarding upper-extremity steroid injection practices was distributed to all active members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) using SurveyMonkey. Response rates for the ASSH and ASES were 26% and 24%, respectively. The potency-adjusted dose of steroid injected for common hand and wrist injections ranged from 0.375 to 133.33 mg and for shoulder injections ranged from 0.375 to 250 mg. These ranges span 356-fold and 667-fold differences, respectively. Potency-adjusted doses differed significantly between steroid types for all injections evaluated in this study. American Society for Surgery of the Hand members gave significantly smaller doses of steroid for the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints than ASES members. Only 9% of respondents based injection practice on a scientific reference. Sixteen percent of ASSH and 31% of ASES respondents reported no specific rationale for their steroid injection practice; 78% of ASSH and 52% of ASES respondents attributed their rationale to some kind of instruction from their mentors or colleagues. Upper-extremity surgeons demonstrate substantial variability in their practice of steroid injections, with up to a 667-fold range in steroid dose. Experienced clinical opinion is the principal rationale for these injection practices; little rationale is based on formal scientific evidence.

  9. Extraforaminal needle tip position reduces risk of intravascular injection in CT-fluoroscopic lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Robinson K.; Ghodadra, Anish; Agarwal, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Background Lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injection is a common and effective tool for managing lumbar radicular pain, although accidental intravascular injection can rarely result in paralysis. The purpose of this study is to determine the safest needle tip position for computed tomography (CT)-guided lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections as determined by incidence of intravascular injection. Methods Three radiologists, in consensus, reviewed procedural imaging for consecutive CT-fluoroscopic lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections performed during a 16-month period. Intravascular injections were identified and categorized by needle tip position, vessel type injected, intravascular injection volume and procedural phase containing the intravascular injection. Pearson chi-square and logistic regression testing were used to assess differences between groups, as appropriate. Results Intravascular injections occurred in 9% (52/606) of injections. The intravascular injection rate was significantly lower (P<0.001) for extraforaminal needle position (0%, 0/109) compared to junctional (8%, 27/319) and foraminal (14%, 25/178) needle tip positions. Of the intravascular injections, 4% (2/52) were likely arterial, 35% (18/52) were likely venous, and 62% (32/52) were indeterminate for vessel type injected. 46% (24/52) of intravascular injections were large volume, 33% (17/52) were small volume, and 21% (11/52) were trace volume. 56% (29/52) of intravascular injections occurred with the contrast trial dose, 29% (15/52) with the steroid/analgesic cocktail, and 15% (8/52) with both. Conclusions An extraforaminal needle position for CT-fluoroscopic lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections decreases the risk of intravascular injection and therefore may be safer than other needle tip positions. PMID:28097241

  10. Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... steroids (say: STARE-oydz), they often mean illegal anabolic steroids. Anabolic steroids are artificially produced hormones that are the same ... these is testosterone (say: tes-TOSS-tuh-rone). Anabolic steroids can be taken in the form of pills, ...

  11. Seasonal, extratrigeminal, episodic paroxysmal hemicrania successfully treated with single suboccipital steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Rossi, P; Di Lorenzo, G; Faroni, J; Sauli, E

    2005-11-01

    This case report describes a case of extratrigeminal, episodic paroxysmal hemicrania with a clear seasonal temporal pattern, successfully treated with repeated single suboccipital steroid injections. The pathophysiological and clinical implications of this observation are discussed.

  12. A jaundiced bodybuilder Cholestatic hepatitis as side effect of injectable anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Boks, Marije N; Tiebosch, Anton T; van der Waaij, Laurens A

    2016-12-12

    The use of anabolic steroids is prevalent in recreational athletes. This case report describes a young amateur bodybuilder who was referred to our outpatient clinic with jaundice and loss of appetite due to cholestatic hepatitis. Additional tests including a liver biopsy made it likely that the hepatitis was caused by the injectable anabolic steroid trenbolone enanthate. Cholestatic hepatitis may not be limited to the use of oral anabolic-androgenic steroids, as is widely assumed. Therefore, and because of other side effects, the recreational use of all forms of anabolic steroids should be discouraged.

  13. Role of Guided Ultrasound in the Treatment of De Quervain Tenosynovitis by Local Steroid Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Danda, Raja Shekar; Kamath, Jagannath; Jayasheelan, Nikil; Kumar, Prashanth

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound guidance for steroid injection in de Quervain disease is useful in identifying the presence of subcompartments and effectively injecting the drug into tendon sheath. We prospectively studied 50 patients with features of de Quervain disease to determine the effectiveness of ultrasound in positioning of needle for steroid injection and effectiveness of single versus multiple injections in the presence of subcompartments. Scalp vein set was inserted into the tendon sheath under ultrasound guidance and sterile conditions. Mixture containing 1 mL of methylprednisolone 40 mg with 1 mL of 2% lignocaine was injected and the patient followed for 6 months. In patients having subcompartments, improvement was better when two separate injections into each subcompartment were given compared with single. Ultrasound guidance is helpful in identifying the existence of subcompartment and injecting the subcompartments separately. Scalp vein set may be very effective in ultrasound-guided injection. This is a level III study.

  14. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Suppression and Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome as a Complication of Epidural Steroid Injections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections are well accepted as a treatment for radicular back pain in appropriate candidates. While overall incidence of systemic side effects has not been well established, at least five biochemically proven cases of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome have been reported as complications of epidural steroid treatment. We present an additional case of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome and adrenal suppression in a middle-aged woman who received three epidural steroid injections over a four-month period. We review this case in the context of previous cases and discuss diagnostic and management issues. PMID:23991341

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block and neurolysis.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Ichiro; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2017-02-03

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) is widely used for reducing pain originating from upper abdominal organs. It is mainly indicated to treat pancreatic cancer pain, but also to relieve pain as a result of chronic pancreatitis. Real-time guidance and color Doppler imaging by EUS made the procedure easier and safer, resulting in greater pain relief. Currently, two techniques are used for EUS-CPN. The classic approach, known as the central technique, involves injection of a neurolytic agent at the base of the celiac axis. In the bilateral technique, the neurolytic agent is injected on both sides of the celiac axis. In addition, EUS-guided direct celiac ganglia neurolysis (EUS-CGN) was introduced recently. Pain relief is achieved by EUS-CPN in 70-80% of patients with pancreatic cancer and in 50-60% of those with chronic pancreatitis. The bilateral technique may be more efficient than the central technique, although the central technique is easier and possibly safer. Moreover, EUS-CGN may provide greater pain relief than conventional EUS-CPN. Procedure-related complications include transient pain exacerbation, transient hypotension, transient diarrhea, and inebriation. Although most complications are not serious, major adverse events such as retroperitoneal bleeding, abscess, and ischemic complications occasionally occur.

  16. Acute Paraplegia After Lumbar Steroid Injection in Patients With Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas: Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) are the most common type of spinal vascular malformations. However, SDAVFs are still underdiagnosed entities because their clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, as they include low back pain or radiating pain to the limb. There have been several reports of acute paraplegia after lumbar epidural steroid injections in patients with SDAVFs. We present 4 patients with SDAVFs who received lumbar steroid injection. Among the 4 cases, acute paraplegia developed in 2 cases that received a larger volume of injectate than the other cases. Thus, we are suggesting that the volume of injectate may be a contributing factor for acute paraplegia after lumbar steroid injection in patients with SDAVFs. PMID:27847727

  17. Cervical epidural steroid injections for the treatment of cervical spinal (neck) pain.

    PubMed

    Candido, Kenneth D; Knezevic, Nebojsa 'nick'

    2013-02-01

    Cervical epidural steroid injections (CESI) are an accepted treatment for neck pain with a radicular component, and may be accomplished by using either transforaminal (CTFESI) or interlaminar (CILESI) approaches. CESIs are routinely performed using real-time fluoroscopic-guidance in conjunction with the injection of water soluble, iodine-based contrast media to enhance visualization of intravascular injections. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging is an adjuvant to fluoroscopic methods for visualizing blood vessels while performing spinal injections. However, as with any neuraxial procedure, various complications associated with CESIs have been reported. Complications are directly associated with the technical procedures of CESIs. Particulate steroids may have a prolonged duration of action but non-particulate steroids are safer for CESIs. Blunt-beveled needles are less likely than sharp-beveled needles to penetrate blood vessels to cause bleeding complications during CTFESI procedures. Small doses of local anesthetics appear to be safe and assist in identifying intravascular injections previously overlooked by conventional techniques.

  18. Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... 19-23, 2016 DEA Museum and Visitors' Center Steroids Last Updated: Monday, April 3, 2017 What is ... heart disease, liver damage Addiction Read More about Steroids Be Informed. Search for information about a drug ...

  19. Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... about being the very best in your favorite sport, not to mention earning a big salary. But ... t the kind of steroids getting attention in sports. When people say steroids (say: STARE-oydz), they ...

  20. Symptomatic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis After a Single Local Epidural Steroid Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, Chung Hong Kaur, Shaleen; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-02-15

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare disorder that can manifest with progressive neurological deficits. It is characterized by abnormal accumulation of unencapsulated epidural fat commonly associated with the administration of exogenous steroids associated with a variety of systemic diseases, endocrinopathies, and Cushing syndrome (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). Occasionally, spinal epidural lipomatosis may occur in patients not exposed to steroids or in patients with endocrinopathies, primarily in obese individuals (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). However, spinal lumbar epidural lipomatosis resulting from local steroid injection has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 45-year-old diabetic man with claudication that was probably due to symptomatic lumbar spinal lipomatosis resulting from a single local epidural steroid injection.

  1. Short-term effect of ultrasound-guided low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid injection on clinical outcomes and imaging changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the ankle and foot joints. A randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chien-Chih; Lee, Si-Huei; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Liu, Fu-Wei; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Chan, Rai-Chi; Chou, Chen-Liang

    2017-01-06

    To determine whether hyaluronic acid (HA) injection into rheumatoid arthritis ankles and feet can achieve improvement in foot function and reduce synovial hyper-vascularization. Forty-four patients with RA having unilateral or bilateral painful ankle and foot involvement (N = 75) were studied. All the patients were randomized to receive HA (N = 40) or lidocaine (LI) (N = 35) injection at 2-week intervals; Clinical assessments were performed using a visual analog scale (VAS) and foot function index (FFItotal) including subscales of pain (FFIpain) before injection at baseline, 4 weeks (first evaluation) and 12 weeks (secondary evaluation). Imaging evaluation based on color Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) and synovitis scores was performed simultaneously. HA injection improved the VAS score (p = .009), FFIpain (p = .041), and FFItotal (p = .032) considerably more than LI injections did at the first evaluation. The CDUS values at first evaluation (p = .005) and secondary evaluation (p < .001) decreased significantly compared with the base line values. HA injections reduced the CDUS values of more than half of the joints (54%, p = .042) while the control group exhibited no change (20%, p = .56). However, HA injection did not reduce the CDUS values more than LI injection did. Regarding the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy, no significant difference was observed between or within the groups in the synovitis scores. HA injection improved short-term foot function and pain reduction. HA injection may have a modest effect in reducing synovial hyper-vascularization. Further large-scale study is warranted to confirm this result.

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Needle Technique Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Angela N.; Peiffer, Jeffery S.; Halmann, Nahi; Delaney, Luke; Owen, Cindy A.; Hersh, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia facilitates an approach to sensitive targets such as nerve clusters without contact or inadvertent puncture. We compared accuracy of needle placement with a novel passive magnetic ultrasound needle guidance technology (NGT) versus conventional ultrasound (CU) with echogenic needles. Methods Sixteen anesthesiologists and 19 residents performed a series of 16 needle insertion tasks each, 8 using NGT (n = 280) and 8 using CU (n = 280), in high-fidelity porcine phantoms. Tasks were stratified based on aiming to contact (target-contact) or place in close proximity with (target-proximity) targets, needle gauge (no. 18/no. 22), and in-plane (IP) or out-of-plane (OOP) approach. Distance to the target, task completion by aim, number of passes, and number of tasks completed on the first pass were reported. Results Needle guidance technology significantly improved distance, task completion, number of passes, and completion on the first pass compared with CU for both IP and OOP approaches (P ≤ 0.001). Average NGT distance to target was lower by 57.1% overall (n = 560, 1.5 ± 2.4 vs 3.5 ± 3.7 mm), 38.5% IP (n = 140, 1.6 ± 2.6 vs 2.6 ± 2.8 mm), and 68.2% OOP (n = 140, 1.4 ± 2.2 vs 4.4 ± 4.3 mm) (all P ≤ 0.01). Subgroup analyses revealed accuracy gains were largest among target-proximity tasks performed by residents and for OOP approaches. Needle guidance technology improved first-pass completion from 214 (76.4%) per 280 to 249 (88.9%) per 280, a significant improvement of 16.4% (P = 0.001). Conclusions Passive magnetic NGT can improve accuracy of needle procedures, particularly among OOP procedures requiring close approach to sensitive targets, such as nerve blocks in anesthesiology practice. PMID:28079754

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid infection after lumbar nerve root steroid injection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Su; Shim, Sung Min; Cho, Hae Jun

    2017-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman was admitted due to severe headache and neck stiffness. She had visited a local clinic for back pain and received a lumbar nerve root steroid injection 10 days before admission. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed psoas abscess, pneumocephalus, and subdural hygroma. She was diagnosed with psoas abscess and meningitis. The abscess and external ventricle were drained, and antibiotics were administered. Unfortunately, the patient died on hospital day 19 due to diffuse leptomeningitis. Lumbar nerve root steroid injections are commonly used to control back pain. Vigilance to "red flag signs" and a rapid diagnosis can prevent lethal outcomes produced by rare and unexpected complications related to infection. Here, we report a case of fatal meningitis after infection of the cerebrospinal fluid following a lumbar nerve root steroid injection. PMID:28184274

  4. Steroid injections for shoulder disorders: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, G J; van der Windt, D A; Kleijnen, J; Koes, B W; Bouter, L M

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with shoulder disorders are believed to benefit considerably from steroid injections. However, the controversy about their efficacy persists. AIM: The study was designed to assess the efficacy of steroid injections for shoulder disorders. METHOD: A systematic computerized literature search in Medline (Index Medicus 1/1966-10/1995) and Embase (Excerpta Medica 1/1984-10/1995) was conducted, supplemented with citation tracking of all relevant publications. Studies published before November 1995 were selected if steroid injections were randomly allocated to patients with shoulder disorders and when clinically relevant outcome measures were reported. Because the validity of study outcomes depends heavily on the strength of methodological quality, the methods were assessed systematically by two 'blinded' independent reviewers. This resulted in a method score (maximum 100 points) that was based on four categories: study population, interventions, measurement of effect, and data presentation and analysis. Confidence intervals for the differences between groups in success rates were calculated in order to summarize the efficacy of steroid injections. RESULTS: Only three out of the 16 studies scored more than 50 points, indicating a generally poor quality of methods. Most studies reported small sample sizes. The flaws most often found were incomparability of co-interventions and poor blinding of therapist. The methods assessment was frequently hampered by incomplete information about randomization, prognostic comparability, compliance, outcome measures included, blinding of patients and blinding of outcome measurement. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence in favour of the efficacy of steroid injections for shoulder disorders is scarce. The methods of most studies appear to be of poor quality. The few studies that appear to be credible do not provide conclusive evidence about which patients at what time in the course of shoulder disorders benefit most from steroid

  5. Simultaneous bilateral septic arthritis of the knee after intraarticular steroid injection: A clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; O’Sullivan, Theresa A.; Lenehan, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of knee is one of the common problems in elderly population. Intraarticular corticosteroid injection is a conservative management modality in osteoarthritis of knee. Septic arthritis is an infective complication of intraarticular corticosteroid injection. Septic arthritis in rheumatoid arthritis patients have worse prognosis because of delay in diagnosis. A higher rate of infectious complications following intraarticular injection is expected in immunocompromised and rheumatoid patients. We would like to report an extremely rare case of simultaneous bilateral knee septic arthritis after bilateral knee intraarticular steroid injection in a rheumatoid arthritis patient. Patient was treated successfully with multiple bilateral knee arthroscopic washouts and long-term intravenous antibiotics. This case report emphasizes the increased risk of infection in rheumatoid arthritis patients and a risk benefit assessment on individual basis before carrying out intraarticular steroid injection. Patient should be aware of this increased risk of infection. PMID:25097444

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Lateral Femoral Cutaneous Nerve Conduction Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bum Jun; Joeng, Eui Soo; Choi, Jun Kyu; Kang, Seok; Yoon, Joon Shik

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify the utility of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) ultrasound-guided conduction technique compared to that of the conventional nerve conduction technique. Methods Fifty-eight legs of 29 healthy participants (18 males and 11 females; mean age, 42.7±14.9 years) were recruited. The conventional technique was performed bilaterally. The LFCN was localized by ultrasound. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the LFCN and the distance between the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) and the LFCN was measured. The nerve conduction study was repeated with the corrected cathode location. Sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitudes of the LFCN were recorded and compared between the ultrasound-guided and conventional techniques. Results Mean body mass index of the participants was 23.7±3.5 kg/m2, CSA was 4.2±1.9 mm2, and the distance between the ASIS and LFCN was 5.6±1.7 mm. The mean amplitude values were 6.07±0.52 µV and 6.66±0.54 µV using the conventional and ultrasound-guided techniques, respectively. The SNAP amplitude of the LFCN using the ultrasound-guided technique was significantly larger than that recorded using the conventional technique. Conclusion Correcting the stimulation position using the ultrasound-guided technique helped obtain increased SNAP amplitude. PMID:25750871

  7. The Impact of Epidural Steroid Injections on the Outcomes of Patients Treated for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Radcliff, Kristen; Hilibrand, Alan; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Delasotta, Lawrence; Rihn, Jeffrey; Zhao, Wenyan; Vaccaro, Alexander; Albert, Todd J.; Weinstein, James N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) is a prospective, multicenter study of operative versus nonoperative treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. It has been suggested that epidural steroid injections may help improve patient outcomes and lower the rate of crossover to surgical treatment. Methods: One hundred and fifty-four patients included in the intervertebral disc herniation arm of the SPORT who had received an epidural steroid injection during the first three months of the study and no injection prior to the study (the ESI group) were compared with 453 patients who had not received an injection during the first three months of the study or prior to the study (the No-ESI group). Results: There was a significant difference in the preference for surgery between groups (19% in the ESI group compared with 56% in the No-ESI group, p < 0.001). There was no difference in primary or secondary outcome measures at four years between the groups. A higher percentage of patients changed from surgical to nonsurgical treatment in the ESI group (41% versus 12% in the No-ESI, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Patients with lumbar disc herniation treated with epidural steroid injection had no improvement in short or long-term outcomes compared with patients who were not treated with epidural steroid injection. There was a higher prevalence of crossover to nonsurgical treatment among surgically assigned ESI-group patients, although this was confounded by the increased baseline desire to avoid surgery among patients in the ESI group. Given these data, we concluded that more studies are necessary to establish the value of epidural steroid injection for symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22739998

  8. A brief report on a technical description of ultrasound-guided lumbar sympathetic block

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Kyu; Shin, Ji Yeon; Chon, Sung Won; Dev, Sushmitha

    2017-01-01

    The lumbar sympathetic ganglion block (LSGB) is widely used for diagnosing and treating sympathetically maintained pain disorders. The LSGB has been conventionally carried out under fluoroscopy or computed tomography guidance. However, as ultrasound technology improved, ultrasound-guided interventions have been expanding their territory to deeper structures. Ultrasound guidance provides many benefits including protecting vascular injection, shortening procedure time in some cases, and reducing the emission of radiation. In this report, we describe a successful case of a US-guided LSGB without major complications. We expect that US-guided LSGBs can be implemented and furnished in the daily outpatient clinical setting by highly trained pain physicians. PMID:28119774

  9. A brief report on a technical description of ultrasound-guided lumbar sympathetic block.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jee Youn; Choi, Jae Kyu; Shin, Ji Yeon; Chon, Sung Won; Dev, Sushmitha

    2017-01-01

    The lumbar sympathetic ganglion block (LSGB) is widely used for diagnosing and treating sympathetically maintained pain disorders. The LSGB has been conventionally carried out under fluoroscopy or computed tomography guidance. However, as ultrasound technology improved, ultrasound-guided interventions have been expanding their territory to deeper structures. Ultrasound guidance provides many benefits including protecting vascular injection, shortening procedure time in some cases, and reducing the emission of radiation. In this report, we describe a successful case of a US-guided LSGB without major complications. We expect that US-guided LSGBs can be implemented and furnished in the daily outpatient clinical setting by highly trained pain physicians.

  10. Calcaneal osteomyelitis following steroid injection for plantar fasciitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wronka, Konrad Sebastian; Sinha, Amit

    2012-08-01

    This study reports a case of a 57-year-old woman diabetic patient who presented to the authors' institution with signs and symptoms typical of plantar fasciitis. Her condition did not resolve with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy, podiatry, and physiotherapy input and she was given a steroid injection for treatment of plantar fasciitis. She was admitted to the hospital 17 days following injection with signs of acute infection. Diagnostic workup revealed an acute calcaneal osteomyelitis. Infection did not respond to conservative treatment and the patient required a partial calcanectomy. This case highlights the significant risk of steroid injection in plantar fasciitis, especially in diabetic patient. The authors urge surgeons to consider this when obtaining consent for injection and they advise very close follow-up of such patients.

  11. Pneumocephalus during cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Joong; Park, Hae-Gyun; Park, Yong-Hee; Shin, Mee-Ran; Koo, Gill-Hoi; Shin, Hwa-Yong

    2015-01-01

    A cervical transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids (CTFESI) is a frequently used procedure for cervical radiculopathy. Most cases of pneumocephalus after an epidural block occur when using an interlaminar approach with the loss-of-resistance technique. The authors present the first case of pneumocephalus after cervical transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids. A 64-yr-old woman with left C7 radiculopathy was undergoing C6-7 transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids. The epidural spread of contrast was checked by fluoroscope, and 5 mg of dexamethasone in 4 ml of 0.1875% ropivacaine was injected. She lost consciousness 5 mins after the procedure and regained awareness after manual ventilation. She subsequently complained of nausea and headache, and a computed tomography brain scan revealed pneumocephalus. After carefully assessing the fluoroscopic images, the authors believe that the needle may have punctured the dura mater of the nerve root sleeve, allowing air to enter the subdural space. Thus, fluoroscopic images should be carefully examined to reduce dural puncture when performing cervical transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids, and air should be completely removed from the needle, extension tube, and syringe.

  12. Ultrasound-guided interventional PDT of liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chaoying; Yang, Dong; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Huijuan; Huang, Muyin; Chen, Ji; Lu, Guorong

    1996-09-01

    Thirty patients with advanced liver cancer were treated by interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT). These included 28 hepatocellular carcinoma and two adenocarcinoma, 19 primary tumors and 11 recurred follow other treatments. The diameter of tumors were 7-10cm in 13 cases and 10-16cm in 17 cases. In this study, an argon laser pumped dye laser system was used to give a CW laser beam at 630 nm which was split and coupled into there optical fibers. The patients were injected intravenously with photosensitizer hematoporphyrin derivative at a dose of 5mg/kg body weight 48 hours before PDT. Then the fibers were inserted into tumor by ultrasound- guided percutaneous puncture. The inserted irradiation points were spaced in entire tumor with the light release power 300mW and the irradiation time 12 minutes per point. Total 52 treatments were performed in 30 patients. Among them, 14 cases were treated only one time and 16 cases via 2-3 times. The follow-up was carried out in 25 cases for 12- 24 months. The results show that significant remission was 22 percent in those patients by only one treatment and 62 percent in those via 2 to 3 treatments. The shrink rate of tumor size was over 90 percent in five of six cases after treatment 3. The survival time has been over one year in 12 cases. No obvious change to be found for all patients in liver function test, renal function test and blood routine examination. The level of AFP indicated a descending trend after PDT. This work indicate that PDT is effective and safe for the treatment of large liver cancers including those recurred follow hepatic resection and those failed in hepatic artery infusion embolic chemotherapy.

  13. National Utilization Patterns of Steroid Injection and Operative Intervention for Treatment of Common Hand Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Erika D.; Swiatek, Peter R.; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To conduct a population-level analysis of practice trends and probability of surgery based on the number of steroid injections for common hand conditions. Methods Patients at least 18 years old receiving injection or surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), trigger finger (TF), or De Quervain tenovaginitis (DQ) were identified for inclusion using the 2009–2013 Truven MarketScan databases. The number of injections performed was counted, and time between injection and operation was calculated for patients receiving both treatments. A multivariable logistic regression model was created to evaluate the odds of undergoing surgery based on the number of injections performed, controlling for patient age, sex, comorbidities, and insurance type. Results The study sample included 251,030 patients who underwent steroid injection or operative release for CTS (n=129,917), TF (n=102,778), and DQ (n=18,335). The majority of CTS patients were managed with immediate surgery (71%), whereas most patients with TF and DQ were managed initially with injection (74% and 84%, respectively). Among patients receiving both an injection and an operation, a single injection was the most common practice prior to surgery (69%, 58%, and 67% of patients with CTS, TF, and DQ, respectively). Multiple injections for DQ and TF were associated with relatively low predicted probability of surgery (17% and 26%, respectively, after 2 injections). However, the predicted probability of surgery after two injections was higher in patients with CTS (44%). Conclusions Given the associated probability of surgery after multiple injections for the three hand conditions examined, the practice of repeat injections should be critically examined to determine whether underuse or overuse is present and whether efficiency and resource utilization can be improved upon. Level of Evidence Level II (retrospective prognostic study) PMID:26774548

  14. Transurethral ultrasound-guided laser-induced prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayan, Richard K.; Roth, Robert A.

    1991-07-01

    A transurethral ultrasound-guided Nd:YAG laser delivery system has been developed for use as an alternative approach to the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The TULIP system has been extensively tested in canine models and is currently undergoing FDA trials in humans.

  15. Intra-articular steroid injections for painful knees. Systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, Marshall; Dawes, Martin

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Do intra-articular steroid injections relieve the pain of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee? DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Cochrane, and Internet databases were searched for randomized controlled trials. STUDY SELECTION: Five randomized controlled trials involving 312 patients were found. SYNTHESIS: One week after injection, treated patients were less likely to have continuing pain and had significantly lower scores on a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. Three to 4 weeks after injection, treated patients still had significantly less pain, but their VAS scores were no longer significantly lower than scores in the control group. Six to 8 weeks after injection, neither pain reduction nor VAS scores were significantly different between groups. CONCLUSION: Intra-articular corticosteroid injection results in clinically and statistically significant reduction in osteoarthritic knee pain 1 week after injection. The beneficial effect could last for 3 to 4 weeks, but is unlikely to continue beyond that. PMID:15000335

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Obturator Nerve Block: A Focused Review on Anatomy and Updated Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Tatsuo; Kamibayashi, Takahiko

    2017-01-01

    This review outlines the anatomy of the obturator nerve and the indications for obturator nerve block (ONB). Ultrasound-guided ONB techniques and unresolved issues regarding these procedures are also discussed. An ONB is performed to prevent thigh adductor jerk during transurethral resection of bladder tumor, provide analgesia for knee surgery, treat hip pain, and improve persistent hip adductor spasticity. Various ultrasound-guided ONB techniques can be used and can be classified according to whether the approach is distal or proximal. In the distal approach, a transducer is placed at the inguinal crease; the anterior and posterior branches of the nerve are then blocked by two injections of local anesthetic directed toward the interfascial planes where each branch lies. The proximal approach comprises a single injection of local anesthetic into the interfascial plane between the pectineus and obturator externus muscles. Several proximal approaches involving different patient and transducer positions are reported. The proximal approach may be superior for reducing the dose of local anesthetic and providing successful blockade of the obturator nerve, including the hip articular branch, when compared with the distal approach. This hypothesis and any differences between the proximal ONB techniques need to be explored in future studies. PMID:28280738

  17. Comparative study of intralesional steroid injection and cryotherapy in alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Amirnia, Mehdi; Mahmoudi, Seyed-Sajjad; Karkon-Shayan, Farid; Alikhah, Hossein; Piri, Reza; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Ranjkesh, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Alopecia areata (AA) is a common, non-scarring type of hair loss, affecting approximately 2.1% of the population, many modality of treatment recommended like steroid injection, topical Immunotherapy and several systemic therapies. The aim of this study was to compare intralesional steroid injection and cryotherapyoutcomes in AA. Materials and Methods: In an analytical-descriptive study, 120 AA patients treated with intralesionalsteroid injection and 120 AA patients treated with cryotherapy were randomly selected. These two groups matched for location, duration and size of lesion and also matched for age and gender. From March 2011 to September 2013, the effect and complications of the therapies after 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks were assessed and results were compared between the two groups. Results: Mean age of patients in steroid injection group was 30.2 ± 6.8 and in cryotherapy group was 31.8 ± 7.1. Sexual distribution in both groups was 56.7% and 43.3 % for male and female, respectively. Location of disease in 80% was in scalp and 20% was in face in both groups. The time of beginning response in steroid group was 4.13 ± 2.13 weeks and in cryotherapy group was 6.14 ± 0.29 weeks, difference between two groups was significant (P = 0.001). In term of clinical response at the end of study, in steroid group,20 patients (16.7%) no response, 32 patients (26.7%), moderate response and68 patients (56.7%) had a complete response, and also in cryotherapy group was, 52 patients (43.3%) no response, 40 patients (33.3%) moderate response and 28 patients (23.3%) had a complete response. There was significant different in complete response rate and steroid injection was more effective than cryotherapy(P < 0.05). Conclusion: As the cryotherapy isa considerable treatment of AA, alsothis study proposes intralesional injection of corticosteroid, as a replacement of AA therapy; particularly the short-term complications are not significantly different. PMID

  18. [Why and how to perform an ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block: A step-by-step approach].

    PubMed

    Nohuz, E; El Drayi, B; Triki, A; Grossmannova, K; Boudier, B; Koffi, K; Albaut, M; Dualé, C

    2016-12-01

    Used in clinical practice as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen, the transversus abdominis plane block (TAP block) is a relative novel procedure in which local anaesthetic agents are injected into the anatomic neurofascial space between the internal oblique and the transversus abdominis muscle. It allows a significantly prolonged duration of analgesia during the early postoperative stage in abdominal surgery. This regional anesthesia technique provides analgesia to the skin, muscles of the anterior abdominal wall and parietal peritoneum in order to decrease the incision-related pain. Thus, it reduces postoperative opiate requirements and opioids-related side effects (nausea, vomiting, delayed resumption of intestinal transit, drowsiness, respiratory depression, urine retention). Additionally, the TAP block appears particularly interesting when neuraxial techniques or opioids are contraindicated. Moreover, the ultrasound-guided procedure provides a significant success rate of this block and additionally avoids major complications. We describe our technique of ultrasound-guided TAP block and discuss its indications, contraindication and potential complications.

  19. Acute respiratory distress following intravenous injection of an oil-steroid solution

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Michael; Storck, Aric; Ainslie, Martha

    2011-01-01

    A case of acute respiratory distress and hypoxemia following accidental intravenous injection of an oil-steroid solution in a body builder is presented. Chest roentography at the time of presentation showed diffuse bilateral opacities, and computed tomography revealed predominantly peripheral ground-glass opacifications. The patient’s symptoms gradually improved over 48 h and imaging of the chest was unremarkable one week later. The pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of this rare but potentially life-threatening complication of intravenous oil injection are discussed. PMID:22059184

  20. The Effects of a Forceful Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection on Radicular Pain: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Jong Min; Woo, Jae Hee; Kim, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Background Lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs) are performed to provide symptom relief in patients with radicular pain. Recent articles suggested that injected volume itself have analgesic effects and higher volumes are associated with better outcomes. To date, few studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of volume. Therefore, well-designed controlled studies were necessary to confirm the effect of volume itself on pain relief. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a forceful saline injection on lumbar TFESI using non-particulate steroids. Methods Fifty consecutive patients with lumbar radicular pain were enrolled. The participants were allocated into one of two groups: dexamethasone with volume (Group DV) and dexamethasone alone (Group DO). The volume was delivered by a forceful injection of 5ml of normal saline. The primary end-point for this study was a VAS pain score and modified MacNab score indicating the rate of effectiveness at the four-week follow-up. Results There were no significant post-procedural VAS differences between two groups (P = .252). The effectiveness rate among the patients was 47.8% in DV group, 34.8% in DO group, measured by modified MacNab score. The difference was not statistically significant (P = .117). Conclusions A forceful saline injection did not have a significant effect during the treatment of radicular pain. Further studies with greater volumes and with additional techniques would offer a more conclusive perspective. PMID:25317282

  1. [Ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation: procedure description and literature review].

    PubMed

    Carmona Monge, F J; Martínez Lareo, M; Núñez Reiz, A

    2011-01-01

    Arterial catheterization is the second most common invasive procedure performed in critical care units. These devices are essential in certain types of patients (the hemodinamically unstable or those who require regular evaluation of the gasometric values). Complications related to arterial cannulation are relatively scarce. However, there are no reliable indicators to predict the occurrence of radial artery occlusions or ischemic lesions in the hand after a radial cannulation procedure has been performed. Ultrasound-guided catheter insertion has been used for years to guide central venous cannulation in critical care, but its use has been more limited for arterial catheterization. This paper aims to describe the technique of ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization and reviews the most important research papers that have evaluated the safety and efficacy of this procedure in the adult population.

  2. Ultrasound-guided needle aspiration of amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, A.; Ramani, R.; Kumar, M. S.; Lakhkar, B. N.; Kundaje, G. N.

    1993-01-01

    This prospective study was carried out on 200 patients with clinically, ultrasonographically and serologically confirmed amoebic liver abscess. The role of ultrasound-guided needle aspiration in addition to medications was evaluated compared to drug treatment alone. Both the groups were monitored clinically and sonographically for up to 6 months after diagnosis. The initial response (after 15 days) was better in the aspirated group (P < 0.05) but resolution of abscess after 6 months were similar. There was a more rapid clinical response in the aspirated group, particularly in those with larger (> 6 cm) abscesses and there were no complications. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided needle aspiration is a safe diagnostic and therapeutic approach which enhances clinical recovery, accelerates resolution, especially in large abscesses, and prevents complications. PMID:8346134

  3. Dynamic multiplanar real time ultrasound guided infraclavicular subclavian vein catheterization.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Hamill, Mark; Collier, Bryan; Bradburn, Eric; Ferrara, John

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound guided vascular access has been well-characterized as a safe and effective technique for internal jugular and femoral vein catheterization. However, there is limited experience with the use of ultrasound to access the infraclavicular subclavian vein. Multiple ultrasound techniques do exist to identify the subclavian vein, but real time access is limited by vessel identification in a single planar view. To overcome this limitation, a novel technique of ultrasound guided infraclavicular subclavian vein catheterization using a real time multiplanar approach has been developed. The initial experience with this approach is described. A single surgeon used combined oblique, transverse, and longitudinal views along with Doppler color flow images to both define the infraclavicular anatomy and to obtain subclavian vein access in 42 adult patients (20 M/22 F and 22 L/20 R) with a mean body mass index of 29.2 (range = 18.9-55.4). Chest x-ray was obtained to confirm position and to rule out pneumothorax. Subclavian vein cannulation was achieved in 100 per cent of patients; subsequent catheterization was successful in 92.9 per cent. The number of attempts required for cannulation averaged 1.3 (range = 1-5), and decreased after a five patient learning curve. No patient developed a pneumothorax, hematoma, or cannula malposition. Ultrasound guided multiplanar infraclavicular subclavian vein access appears to be a safe and effective adjunct for central line placement.

  4. Advanced Ultrasound-Guided Interventions for Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Peck, Evan; Jelsing, Elena; Onishi, Kentaro

    2016-08-01

    Tendinopathy is increasingly recognized as an important cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability. Tendinopathy is thought to be principally a degenerative process, rather than inflammatory as was traditionally believed. Consequently, traditional tendinopathy treatments focused solely on decreasing inflammation have often been ineffective or even harmful. The advancement of ultrasonography as for guidance of outpatient musculoskeletal procedures has facilitated the development of novel percutaneous procedures for the treatment of tendinopathy, mostly by using mechanical intervention to stimulate regeneration. Several of these techniques, including percutaneous needle tenotomy, percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy, high-volume injection, and percutaneous needle scraping, are reviewed in this article.

  5. Perspectives in ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal interventions

    PubMed Central

    Daftary, Aditya Ravindra; Karnik, Alpana Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is a safe, easily available, and cost-effective modality, which has the additional advantage of being real time for imaging and image-guided interventions of the musculoskeletal system. Musculoskeletal interventions are gaining popularity in sports and rehabilitation for rapid healing of muscle and tendon injuries in professional athletes, healing of chronic tendinopathies, aspiration of joint effusions, periarticular bursae and ganglia, and perineural injections in acute and chronic pain syndromes. This article aims to provide an overview of the spectrum of musculoskeletal interventions that can be done under USG guidance both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:26288519

  6. Editorial Commentary: Big Data Suggest That Because of a Significant Increased Risk of Postoperative Infection, Steroid Injection Is Not Recommended After Ankle Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-02-01

    A recent study addressing infection rate after intra-articular steroid injection during ankle arthroscopy gives pause to this practice, with an odds ratio of 2.2 in the entire population that was injected with a steroid simultaneously with ankle arthroscopy compared with patients who did not receive an ankle injection. Big data, used in the study upon which the Editor comments here, suggest that because of a significant increased risk of postoperative infection, steroid injection is not recommended after ankle arthroscopy.

  7. Preoperative ultrasound-guided carbon nanoparticles localization for metastatic lymph nodes in papillary thyroid carcinoma during reoperation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wan-jun; Luo, Han; Zhou, Yi-mei; Gou, Ze-hui; Wang, Bin; Zhu, Jing-qiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Due to the damaged anatomical structure and a large amount of fibrous and scar tissues in the surgical field, reoperation of papillary thyroid carcinoma is difficult. This study introduces a new method of locating metastatic lymph nodes during reoperation and evaluates the effectiveness and safety of the preoperative ultrasound-guided carbon nanoparticles (CNs) localization. This retrospective cohort study enrolled 52 patients who were diagnosed with lymph node metastasis by histopathology and underwent reoperation from October 2015 to February 2016. The modified radical neck dissection or selective neck node dissection was performed. A total of 26 patients underwent preoperative ultrasound-guided CNs injection, and other 26 patients did not. Tolerance, the result of injection, the number of resected metastatic lymph nodes, and postoperative complications were recorded and analyzed. In CNs group, 102 suspicious nonpalpable lesions in 26 patients were injected with CNs, and 99 of the 102 lesions were successfully identified by surgeon in the reoperation. The positive rate of resected lymph nodes in total, in the central compartment, and in the lateral compartment were 31.6%, 31.2%, and 32.8%, respectively, which was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P = 0.041). In addition, the positive rates of levels III, IV, and V in the CNs group were 35.6%, 21.9%, and 30.5%, respectively, which was significantly higher than that in the control group (P < 0.001, P = 0.005, and P = 0.01). In additional, in the CNs group, the rate of temporary hypoparathyroidism was significantly lower compared with the control group (0% vs 26.9%, P = 0.021). Preoperative ultrasound-guided CNs injection is a safe and effective method for localization of the metastatic lymph nodes during reoperation. PMID:28272249

  8. Analgesic Efficacy and Technique of Ultrasound-Guided Suprascapular Nerve Catheters after Shoulder Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Elsharkawy, Hesham A.; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A.; Cummings, Kenneth C.; Soliman, Loran Mounir

    2014-01-01

    Background Conventional approaches to brachial plexus blocks may not cover the suprascapular nerve. Accordingly, after shoulder arthroscopy, sensation from the posterior part of the shoulder is commonly spared. Most previous research involving suprascapular nerve blocks described single-injection techniques. However, with the widespread availability and fairly reasonable cost of disposable infusion pumps, continuous catheter techniques provide a more appealing method of prolonging postoperative analgesia. Case Report We describe 2 patients who were successfully treated with ultrasound-guided continuous suprascapular nerve catheters. With the patient seated, a high-frequency linear ultrasound probe was used. Both patients experienced excellent pain relief without complications. Conclusion Continuous suprascapular catheter techniques provide good pain relief and improve postoperative analgesia after shoulder arthroscopy. PMID:24940138

  9. Spinal Cord Infarction after Cervical Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jangsup; Kwon, Hyung-Min

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) is a widely used nonsurgical procedure in the treatment of patients with radiculopathy. It is efficacious in relieving pain, but a number of complications are being reported. Recently, increasing frequency of major complications, such as spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction, has been reported with the use of a particulate steroid within fluoroscopic-guided procedures. Methods We report a 49-year-old man with a history of chronic cervical radiculopathy, who experienced a devastating complication after TFESI. Results After 2 min of regular TFESI, the patient abruptly experienced muscle weakness in both upper extremities and within 5 min the patient became quadriplegic. Despite active rehabilitation, the patient remained bed-ridden 4 years after the catastrophic event. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of spinal cord infarction that occurred after TFESI in Korea. Conclusion Considering the risk of dreadful complications, which appear in an unpredictable manner, TFESI with fluoroscopic guidance should be done only with a nonparticulate steroid. PMID:28203184

  10. Body Builder’s Nightmare: Black Market Steroid Injection Gone Wrong: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arad, Ehud; Ben Amotz, Oded

    2016-01-01

    Summary: In the pursuit of success in sports, some athletes are not deterred by health risks associated with the (mis)use of black market preparations of dubious origin as performance-enhancing agents. Several studies published in the recent years demonstrated that anabolic-androgenic steroids, but also stimulants and growth hormones, are misused by numerous recreational athletes from all over the world. Trenbolone is an anabolic steroid routinely used in the finishing phase of beef production to improve animal performance and feed efficiency. A 35-year-old male patient presented to our plastic surgery clinic after self-intramuscular administration of Trenbolone to the superior gluteal area bilaterally, which led to a full-thickness defect in a cone-like distribution. The wounds underwent surgical debridement and were treated locally with mafenide acetate irrigation and wound dressings. Closure was achieved by secondary intention healing. In this report, we discuss the first documented case of full-thickness skin and subcutaneous tissue necrosis after black market anabolic steroid injection. This illustrates a plastic complication and resolution of a widespread but seldom reported problem. PMID:27757350

  11. Body Builder's Nightmare: Black Market Steroid Injection Gone Wrong: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Or; Arad, Ehud; Ben Amotz, Oded

    2016-09-01

    In the pursuit of success in sports, some athletes are not deterred by health risks associated with the (mis)use of black market preparations of dubious origin as performance-enhancing agents. Several studies published in the recent years demonstrated that anabolic-androgenic steroids, but also stimulants and growth hormones, are misused by numerous recreational athletes from all over the world. Trenbolone is an anabolic steroid routinely used in the finishing phase of beef production to improve animal performance and feed efficiency. A 35-year-old male patient presented to our plastic surgery clinic after self-intramuscular administration of Trenbolone to the superior gluteal area bilaterally, which led to a full-thickness defect in a cone-like distribution. The wounds underwent surgical debridement and were treated locally with mafenide acetate irrigation and wound dressings. Closure was achieved by secondary intention healing. In this report, we discuss the first documented case of full-thickness skin and subcutaneous tissue necrosis after black market anabolic steroid injection. This illustrates a plastic complication and resolution of a widespread but seldom reported problem.

  12. An augmented reality simulator for ultrasound guided needle placement training.

    PubMed

    Magee, D; Zhu, Y; Ratnalingam, R; Gardner, P; Kessel, D

    2007-10-01

    Details are presented of a low cost augmented-reality system for the simulation of ultrasound guided needle insertion procedures (tissue biopsy, abscess drainage, nephrostomy etc.) for interventional radiology education and training. The system comprises physical elements; a mannequin, a mock ultrasound probe and a needle, and software elements; generating virtual ultrasound anatomy and allowing data collection. These two elements are linked by a pair of magnetic 3D position sensors. Virtual anatomic images are generated based on anatomic data derived from full body CT scans of live humans. Details of the novel aspects of this system are presented including; image generation, registration and calibration.

  13. Normalisation of asymmetric astigmatism after intralesional steroid injection for upper eye lid hemangioma in childhood.

    PubMed

    Langmann, A; Lindner, S

    1994-01-01

    Infantile hemangiomas affect about 5% (3%-8%) of the population, showing a predilection for the face. After a phase of rapid enlargement between the 3rd and the 9th month of life, 70% regress by the age of six after a period of stability. 43%-60% of the children with eye lid hemangiomas develop strabismic, anisometropic, or deprivation amblyopia. Previous studies found the majority of cases resulting from anisometropia (especially asymmetric astigmatism) rather than strabism or occlusion of the visual axis. Several methods of treatment--surgical excision, irradiation, sclerosing agents, systemic steroids, ligation, cryotherapy--have been used but all with a risk of local or systemic complications. Local injections of steroids are a simple method of therapy with a high rate of resolution of hemangiomas, but still with a high degree of bad visual output because of persistent astigmatism. In four children with asymmetric astigmatism (axis of astigmatism towards the hemangioma) in which the injection was given at the beginning of the phase of enlargement, amblyopia could be avoided by preventing corneal steepening from becoming permanent.

  14. Ultrasound guided neural stem cell transplantation through the lateral ventricle for treatment of cerebral palsy in children☆

    PubMed Central

    He, Sheng; Luan, Zuo; Qu, Suqing; Qiu, Xuan; Xin, Daqing; Jia, Wenkai; Shen, Yanhua; Yu, Zehui; Xu, Tao

    2012-01-01

    A total of 24 children with cerebral palsy were enrolled in this study and underwent ultrasound guided transplantation of neural stem cells through the lateral ventricle. Neural stem cells (3.8 × 106–7.3 × 107) were injected into the lateral ventricles. Mild injury of lateral ventricular blood vessels occurred in only two cases (8.3%). Seven cases (29.2%) experienced a fever. Clinical manifestations were improved to varying degrees in eight cases (28.0%) within 3 months after transplantation. Patient condition did not worsen, and no patient experienced severe adverse reactions. PMID:25337105

  15. Development of an ultrasound-guided PICC insertion service.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Jackie

    Use of the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) has gained popularity over the past 30 years in the USA and over the past 15 years in the UK. The PICC was initially used for specific purposes, such as the delivery of parenteral nutrition and chemotherapy, but its use has expanded both within the acute hospital and community settings. This article describes an ultrasound-guided PICC insertion service that has been set up in a district general hospital to expand the service within the oncology department and to begin a service for non-oncology patients. As expected, patients who have benefited from the development of this service include those requiring parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy and intravenous therapy in the community. However, retrospective audit has shown that the largest group of patients to benefit from the ultrasound-guided PICC insertion service was those with difficult venous access for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are discussed, along with an overview of the benefits the service has provided to other groups of patients, and associated benefits to the hospital trust.

  16. Clinical experience with ultrasound guided angioplasty for vascular access

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong; Lee, Yu-Ji; Kim, Sung-Rok

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of ultrasound guided percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (UG-PTA), which use ultrasound as an imaging modality, is an evolving strategy. But, in Korea, this method is rarely used. We report our experiences with UG-PTA with respect to technical success rates and complication rates compared to conventional PTA (C-PTA), performed between 2010 and 2015 at Samsung Changwon Hospital, Korea. Methods In our series, 53 cases of UG-PTA and 90 cases of C-PTA were reviewed, respectively. Cases of central vein stenosis, cephalic arch stenosis, arterial stenosis and thrombosis were excluded. However, cases of juxta-anastomotic stenosis and outflow vein stenosis were included. Results Technical success was achieved in 96.2% (51 of 53) of cases in the UG-PTA group and in 93.3% (84 of 90) of cases in the C-PTA group, respectively (P = 0.710). Technical failure was experienced in a total 8 cases (UG-PTA group: 2/53, 3.8%; C-PTA group: 6/90, 6.7%). No differences were observed in complications. Conclusion Duplex ultrasound-guided angioplasty for dialysis access in the outpatient setting is feasible, safe, and effective for peripheral venous stenotic lesions. It offers many advantages over conventional angiographic procedures, and, in the future, it has great potential to play a significant role in the management of these challenging patients. PMID:28393000

  17. Strategies for prevention of ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy infections

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Diane D; Raman, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male patients and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in males. To confirm the diagnosis of prostate cancer, an ultrasound-guided needle biopsy is necessary to obtain prostate tissue sufficient for histologic analysis by pathologists. Ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy can be accomplished via a transperineal or transrectal approach. The latter biopsy technique involves placing an ultrasound probe into the rectum, visualizing the prostate located just anterior to it, and then obtaining 12–14 biopsies. Each biopsy core requires piercing of the rectal mucosa which can inherently contribute to infection. The increasing infectious risk of prostate needle biopsy requires refinement and re-evaluation of the process in which the technique is performed. Such processes include (but are not limited to) prebiopsy risk stratification, antibiotic prophylaxis, use of rectal preparations, and equipment processing. In the subsequent review, we highlight the current available information on different strategies to reduce the risk of infection following prostate needle biopsy. PMID:27468242

  18. Infectious disease, injection practices, and risky sexual behavior among anabolic steroid users.

    PubMed

    Ip, Eric J; Yadao, Michael A; Shah, Bijal M; Lau, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) and other performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) are commonly misused to increase muscle size and strength, as well as improve physical appearance. Many AAS and certain PEDs are administered via injection and therefore pose a risk for transmission of infectious diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Further, AAS users may be more likely to take part in high-risk sexual behaviors than non-AAS users. This review explores the prevalence of infectious diseases as well as risky injection practices and sexual behaviors of AAS users in the current literature. A comprehensive MEDLINE search (1984-17 April 2015) for English language reports was performed on AAS users. Ten studies analyzed the prevalence of HIV infection, 6 studies analyzed HBV infection, and 6 studies analyzed HCV infection; 20 studies analyzed injection practices and 7 studies analyzed high-risk sexual behaviors of AAS users. HIV, HBV, HCV, and SSTIs have been associated with AAS users. In particular, HIV infection seems much higher among homosexual male AAS users. AAS users also take part in high-risk injection practices but to a much lower extent than intravenous drug users. AAS users are also more likely to engage in high-risk sexual behaviors than the general population. Clinicians and health-policy leaders may utilize these findings to implement strategies to decrease the spread of infectious diseases.

  19. Miniscalpel-Needle versus Steroid Injection for Plantar Fasciitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial with a 12-Month Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuming; Shen, Tong; Liang, Yongshan; Zhang, Ying; Bai, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain in adults. A novel alternative medical instrument, the miniscalpel-needle (MSN), which is based on an acupuncture needle, has been recently developed in China. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the MSN release treatment versus that of traditional steroid injection for plantar fasciitis. Patients with plantar fasciitis were randomly assigned to 2 groups and followed up for 12 months, with 29 receiving MSN treatment and 25 receiving steroid injection treatment. The results showed that visual analog scale scores for morning pain, active pain, and overall heel pain all were decreased significantly in the MSN group from 1 to 12 months after treatment. In contrast, treatment with steroid injection showed a significant effect only at the 1-month follow-up but not at 6 or 12 months after treatment. Moreover, the MSN group achieved more rapid and sustained improvements than the steroid group throughout the duration of this study. No severe side effects were observed with MSN treatment. Our data suggest that the MSN release treatment is safe and has a significant benefit for plantar fasciitis compared to steroid injection. PMID:25114704

  20. Ultrasound-guided alcohol neurolysis and radiofrequency ablation of painful stump neuroma: effective treatments for post-amputation pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Xu, Yongming; Zhou, Jin; Pu, Shaofeng; Lv, Yingying; Chen, Yueping; Du, Dongping

    2017-01-01

    Background Post-amputation pain (PAP) is highly prevalent after limb amputation, and stump neuromas play a key role in the generation of the pain. Presently, PAP refractory to medical management is frequently treated with minimally invasive procedures guided by ultrasound, such as alcohol neurolysis and radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Objective To record the immediate and long-term efficacy of alcohol neurolysis and RFA. We first used alcohol neurolysis and then, when necessary, we performed RFA on PAP patients. Study design Prospective case series. Setting Pain management center. Methods Thirteen subjects were treated with ultrasound-guided procedures. Results All patients were treated with neurolysis using alcohol solutions guided by ultrasound. Seven (54%) of 13 subjects achieved pain relief after 1–3 alcohol injection treatments. The remaining 6 subjects obtained pain relief after receiving 2 administrations of ultrasound-guided RFA. After a 6-month follow-up evaluation period, pain quantities were also assessed. Both stump pain (including intermittent sharp pain and continuous burning pain) and phantom pain were relieved. The frequency of intermittent sharp pain was decreased, and no complications were noted during the observation. Conclusion The use of ultrasound guidance for alcohol injection and RFA of painful stump neuromas is a simple, radiation-free, safe, and effective procedure that provides sustained pain relief in PAP patients. In this case series, RFA was found to be an effective alternative to alcohol injection. PMID:28223839

  1. Efficacy of hyaluronic acid or steroid injections for the treatment of a rat model of rotator cuff injury.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Sasaki, Yu; Kijima, Takehiro; Hashimoto, Eiko; Sasaki, Yasuhito; Kenmoku, Tomonori; Yamazaki, Hironori; Miyagi, Masayuki; Ohtori, Seiji; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated dorsal root ganglia from C3-C7, analyzed gait, and compared the expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) which was a marker of inflammatory pain in a rat rotator cuff tear model in which the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons were detached; comparisons were made to a sham group in which only the tendons were exposed. Fluorogold was injected into the glenohumeral joint 21 days after surgery in both groups, and saline, steroids, or hyaluronic acid was injected into the glenohumeral joint in the rotator cuff tear group 26 days after surgery. The proportions of CGRP-immunoreactive neurons were higher and the gait parameters were impaired in the rotator cuff tear group compared to in the sham group. However, the CGRP expression was reduced and the gait was improved with steroid or hyaluronic acid injection compared to saline, suggesting that both hyaluronic acid and steroid injections suppressed of inflammation which thought to be provided pain relief. While there were no significant differences, the suppression of CGRP expression and the improved gait after hyaluronic acid and steroid injections suggested that both methods were effective for rat rotator cuff tear model.

  2. Prospective Randomized Comparison of the Effectiveness of Radiation Therapy and Local Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis

    SciTech Connect

    Canyilmaz, Emine; Canyilmaz, Fatih; Aynaci, Ozlem; Colak, Fatma; Serdar, Lasif; Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Aynaci, Osman; Yoney, Adnan

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for plantar fasciitis and to compare radiation therapy with local steroid injections. Methods and Materials: Between March 2013 and April 2014, 128 patients with plantar fasciitis were randomized to receive radiation therapy (total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy three times a week) or local corticosteroid injections a 1 ml injection of 40 mg methylprednisolone and 0.5 ml 1% lidocaine under the guidance of palpation. The results were measured using a visual analog scale, a modified von Pannewitz scale, and a 5-level function score. The fundamental phase of the study was 3 months, with a follow-up period of up to 6 months. Results: The median follow-up period for all patients was 12.5 months (range, 6.5-18.6 months). For the radiation therapy patients, the median follow-up period was 13 months (range, 6.5-18.5 months), whereas in the palpation-guided (PG) steroid injection arm, it was 12.1 months (range, 6.5-18.6 months). After 3 months, results in the radiation therapy arm were significantly superior to those in the PG steroid injection arm (visual analog scale, P<.001; modified von Pannewitz scale, P<.001; 5-level function score, P<.001). Requirements for a second treatment did not significantly differ between the 2 groups, but the time interval for the second treatment was significantly shorter in the PG steroid injection group (P=.045). Conclusion: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy compared to mean PG steroid injection on plantar fasciitis for at least 6 months after treatment.

  3. Ultrasound guided percutaneous EVAR success is predicted by vessel diameter

    PubMed Central

    Bensley, Rodney P.; Hurks, Rob; Huang, Zhen; Pomposelli, Frank; Hamdan, Allen; Wyers, Mark; Chaikof, Elliot; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound guided access allows for direct visualization of the access artery during percutaneous endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. We hypothesize that the use of ultrasound guidance allowed us to safely increase the utilization of percutaneous endovascular aortic aneurysm repair to almost all patients and decrease access complications. Methods A retrospective chart review of all elective endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs, both abdominal and descending thoracic, from 2005-2010 was performed. Patients were identified using ICD9 codes and stratified based on access type: percutaneous vs. cutdown. We examined the success rate of percutaneous access and the cause of failure. Sheath size was large (18-24 Fr) or small (12-16 Fr). Minimum access vessel diameter was also measured. Outcomes were wound complications (infections or clinically significant hematomas that delayed discharge or required transfusion), operative and incision time, length of stay, and discharge disposition. Predictors of percutaneous failure were identified. Results 168 patients (296 arteries) had percutaneous access (P-EVAR) while 131 patients (226 arteries) had femoral cutdown access (C-EVAR). Ultrasound guided access was introduced in 2007. P-EVAR increased from zero cases in 2005 to 92.3% of all elective cases in 2010. The success rate with percutaneous access was 96%. Failures requiring open surgical repair of the artery included 7 for hemorrhage and 6 for flow limiting stenosis or occlusion of the femoral artery. P-EVAR had fewer wound complications (0.7% vs. 7.4%, P = .001) shorter operative time (153.3 vs. 201.5 minutes, P < .001) and larger minimal access vessel diameter (6.7 mm vs. 6.1 mm, P < .01). Patients with failed percutaneous access had smaller minimal access vessel diameters when compared to successful P-EVAR (4.9 mm vs. 6.8 mm, P < .001). More failures occurred in small sheaths than large ones (7.4% vs. 1.9%, P = .02). Access vessel diameter < 5 mm is predictive

  4. Ultrasound-guided paravertebral block using an intercostal approach.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Alon; Moreno, Milena; Chelly, Jacques E; Bigeleisen, Paul E

    2009-11-01

    We describe an ultrasound-guided technique of continuous bilateral paravertebral block using an intercostal approach in 12 patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery. Postoperatively, each of the patient's paravertebral catheters was bolused with 10 mL lidocaine (15 mg/mL), and each of the patient's catheters was infused with 0.2% ropivacaine at 10 mL/h. Using a pinprick test, the median number of dermatomes blocked after the initial bolus was 5 (interquartile range, 4-6), and 23 of 24 catheters produced a local anesthetic block. The median verbal pain score on postoperative day 1 was 5.5 (interquartile range, 3.5-6), and median dose of IV hydromorphone consumed during the first 24 h after surgery was 1.9 mg (interquartile range, 0.7-5.05). All catheters were removed within 72 h after surgery.

  5. Transurethral ultrasound-guided laser prostatectomy: initial Luebeck experince

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Stephen; Spitzenpfeil, Elisabeth; Knipper, Ansgar; Jocham, Dieter

    1994-02-01

    Transurethral ultrasound guided laser prostatectomy is one of the most promising alternative invasive treatment modalities for benign prostatic hyperplasia. The principle feature is an on- line 3-D controlling of Nd:YAG laser denaturation of the periurethral tissue. Necrotic tissue is not removed, but sloughs away with the urinary stream within weeks. The bleeding hazard during and after the operation is minimal. By leaving the bladder neck untouched, sexual function is not endangered. Thirty-one patients with symptomatic BPH were treated with the TULIP system and followed up for at least 12 weeks. Suprapubic bladder drainage had to be maintained for a mean time of 37 days. Conventional TURP was performed in four patients due to chronic infection, recurrent bleeding, and poor results. Our initial experience with the TULIP system shows it to be very efficient and safe. A longer follow up of a larger patient population is necessary to compare the therapeutic efficiency to conventional transurethral resection.

  6. An ultrasound-guided fluorescence tomography system: design and specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Alisha V.; Flynn, Brendan P.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Torosean, Sason; Davis, Scott C.; Maytin, Edward V.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    An ultrasound-guided fluorescence molecular tomography system is under development for in vivo quantification of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) during Aminolevulinic Acid - Photodynamic Therapy (ALA-PDT) of Basal Cell Carcinoma. The system is designed to combine fiber-based spectral sampling of PPIX fluorescence emission with co-registered ultrasound images to quantify local fluorophore concentration. A single white light source is used to provide an estimate of the bulk optical properties of tissue. Optical data is obtained by sequential illumination of a 633nm laser source at 4 linear locations with parallel detection at 5 locations interspersed between the sources. Tissue regions from segmented ultrasound images, optical boundary data, white light-informed optical properties and diffusion theory are used to estimate the fluorophore concentration in these regions. Our system and methods allow interrogation of both superficial and deep tissue locations up to PpIX concentrations of 0.025ug/ml.

  7. Ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of pelvic collections.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Anuj; Sundareyan, Ramaniwas; Kumar, Sheo; Arora, Divya

    2015-01-01

    The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain intra-abdominal collections not reached by the transabdominal approach. We discuss 6 patients with such pelvic collections treated with transrectal drainage using catheter placement via Seldinger technique. Transrectal drainage helped achieve clinical and radiological resolution of pelvic collections in 6 and 5 of 6 cases, respectively. It simultaneously helped avoid injury to intervening bowel loops and neurovascular structures using real-time visualization of armamentarium used for drainage. Radiation exposure from fluoroscopic/CT guidance was avoided. Morbidity and costs incurred in surgical exploration were reduced using this much less invasive ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of deep-seated pelvic collections.

  8. Geometric Evaluation of Systematic Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Misop; Chang, Doyoung; Kim, Chunwoo; Lee, Brian J.; Zuo, Yihe; Kim, Hyung-Joo; Petrisor, Doru; Trock, Bruce; Partin, Alan W.; Rodriguez, Ronald; Carter, H. Ballentine; Allaf, Mohamad; Kim, Jongwon; Stoianovici, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy results rely on physician ability to target the gland according to the biopsy schema. However, to our knowledge it is unknown how accurately the freehand, transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy cores are placed in the prostate and how the geometric distribution of biopsy cores may affect the prostate cancer detection rate. Materials and Methods To determine the geometric distribution of cores, we developed a biopsy simulation system with pelvic mock-ups and an optical tracking system. Mock-ups were biopsied in a freehand manner by 5 urologists and by our transrectal ultrasound robot, which can support and move the transrectal ultrasound probe. We compared 1) targeting errors, 2) the accuracy and precision of repeat biopsies, and 3) the estimated significant prostate cancer (0.5 cm3 or greater) detection rate using a probability based model. Results Urologists biopsied cores in clustered patterns and under sampled a significant portion of the prostate. The robot closely followed the predefined biopsy schema. The mean targeting error of the urologists and the robot was 9.0 and 1.0 mm, respectively. Robotic assistance significantly decreased repeat biopsy errors with improved accuracy and precision. The mean significant prostate cancer detection rate of the urologists and the robot was 36% and 43%, respectively (p <0.0001). Conclusions Systematic biopsy with freehand transrectal ultrasound guidance does not closely follow the sextant schema and may result in suboptimal sampling and cancer detection. Repeat freehand biopsy of the same target is challenging. Robotic assistance with optimized biopsy schemas can potentially improve targeting, precision and accuracy. A clinical trial is needed to confirm the additional benefits of robotic assistance. PMID:23088974

  9. Hybrid therapy with locoregional steroid injection and polyglycolic acid sheets to prevent stricture after esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Nagami, Yasuaki; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Ominami, Masaki; Fukunaga, Shusei; Sugimori, Satoshi; Tanaka, Fumio; Kamata, Noriko; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Toshio; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aim: The incidence of stricture formation caused by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for widespread lesions is high, and stricture formation can reduce quality of life. We evaluated the prophylactic efficacy of hybrid therapy using a locoregional steroid injection and polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheets with fibrin glue to prevent stricture formation after esophageal ESD in high risk patients in whom we predicted stricture formation would be difficult to prevent with a single prophylactic steroid injection. Methods: Ten patients who underwent esophageal ESD were enrolled (entire-circumference: n = 6; sub-circumference, more than 5/6 of the circumference: n = 4). A single locoregional steroid injection and PGA sheets with fibrin glue were used after ESD. We evaluated the incidence of stricture formation, the number of endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) procedures needed to treat the stricture formation, and adverse events of the therapy. Results: Esophageal stricture formation occurred in 50.0 % of patients (5/10) (median EBD sessions 0.5, range 0 – 16). Subanalysis showed that stricture formation occurred in 37.5 % of patients (3/8) excluded the lesions located near a previous scar from ESD or surgical anastomosis site (median EBD sessions 0, range 0 – 4). Conclusion: Hybrid therapy using a locoregional steroid injection and PGA sheets with fibrin glue may have the potential to prevent esophageal stricture formation after esophageal ESD in high risk patients. PMID:27652294

  10. Ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy of great saphenous vein with 2% polidocanol – one-year follow-up results

    PubMed Central

    Osęka, Marcin; Tworus, Robert; Gałązka, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy (UGFS) of varicose veins is a useful treatment option. It is a relatively safe method in the case of limited, small varicose veins. In theory, a justified concern could be raised that the injection of an active drug into the large superficial venous vessels may potentially cause life-threatening consequences. Aim To assess the safety and efficacy of UGFS using a 2% solution of polidocanol (Aethoxysklerol 2%) in the case of great saphenous vein incompetence. Material and methods Fifty-two patients with great saphenous vein incompetence underwent ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy. The efficacy criterion was the elimination of reflux measured ultrasonographically and withdrawal or decrease of complaints: 1 week, and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the treatment. Complications of sclerotherapy were reported during follow-up. Results Decrease or withdrawal of complaints of chronic venous insufficiency was reported in 96% of cases (50 patients). Disappearance or decrease of varicose veins was noted in all patients (100%). During examination after 12 months, full success of ultrasound was achieved in 38 (73%) cases, and 11 (21%) patients presented a partial desired effect according to the consensus from Tegernsee. Persistence of reflux longer than 1 s in the treated great saphenous vein was reported in 3 (6%) cases. Serious complications, such as deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, dyspnea, anaphylaxis, or neurological abnormalities, were not recorded. Conclusions Ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy of incompetent great saphenous vein and varicosities with 2% polidocanol was found to be an effective and safe method of treatment during 1 year of observation. However, longer observation is necessary. PMID:27458485

  11. Exserohilum infections associated with contaminated steroid injections: a clinicopathologic review of 40 cases.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Jana M; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Blau, Dianna M; Paddock, Christopher D; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Drew, Clifton P; Batten, Brigid C; Bartlett, Jeanine H; Metcalfe, Maureen G; Pham, Cau D; Lockhart, Shawn R; Patel, Mitesh; Liu, Lindy; Jones, Tara L; Greer, Patricia W; Montague, Jeltley L; White, Elizabeth; Rollin, Dominique C; Seales, Cynthia; Stewart, Donna; Deming, Mark V; Brandt, Mary E; Zaki, Sherif R

    2013-09-01

    September 2012 marked the beginning of the largest reported outbreak of infections associated with epidural and intra-articular injections. Contamination of methylprednisolone acetate with the black mold, Exserohilum rostratum, was the primary cause of the outbreak, with >13,000 persons exposed to the potentially contaminated drug, 741 confirmed drug-related infections, and 55 deaths. Fatal meningitis and localized epidural, paraspinal, and peripheral joint infections occurred. Tissues from 40 laboratory-confirmed cases representing these various clinical entities were evaluated by histopathological analysis, special stains, and IHC to characterize the pathological features and investigate the pathogenesis of infection, and to evaluate methods for detection of Exserohilum in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Fatal cases had necrosuppurative to granulomatous meningitis and vasculitis, with thrombi and abundant angioinvasive fungi, with extensive involvement of the basilar arterial circulation of the brain. IHC was a highly sensitive method for detection of fungus in FFPE tissues, demonstrating both hyphal forms and granular fungal antigens, and PCR identified Exserohilum in FFPE and fresh tissues. Our findings suggest a pathogenesis for meningitis involving fungal penetration into the cerebrospinal fluid at the injection site, with transport through cerebrospinal fluid to the basal cisterns and subsequent invasion of the basilar arteries. Further studies are needed to characterize Exserohilum and investigate the potential effects of underlying host factors and steroid administration on the pathogenesis of infection.

  12. Does Electrodiagnostic Confirmation of Radiculopathy Predict Pain Reduction after Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection? A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Zachary; Cushman, Daniel; Caldwell, Mary; Marshall, Benjamin; Ghannad, Leda; Eng, Christine; Patel, Jaymin; Makovitch, Steven; Chu, Samuel K; Babu, Ashwin N.; Walega, David R.; Marciniak, Christina; Press, Joel; Kennedy, David J.; Plastaras, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Objective Minimal definitive literature identifies patients with radicular pain who would benefit most from epidural steroid injection (ESI). This study investigated if electromyographic (EMG) confirmation of radiculopathy with active or chronic denervation predicts a positive treatment outcome following ESI. Design Longitudinal cohort study of adults who underwent EMG and subsequent transforaminal ESI within 6 months. The proportion of individuals who experienced >50% pain relief and mean change in daily morphine equivalents (DME) were calculated. Results 170 individuals with respective mean (Standard Deviation) age and duration of symptoms of 55 (15) years and 36 (56) months were included. Mean time to <30 day and >30 day follow-up post-injection were 18 (6) and 99 (130) days, respectively. At >30 day follow-up, a larger proportion of EMG-confirmed individuals (37.7%) reported >50% pain reduction compared to EMG-negative individuals (17.8%) (p=0.03). This was significant for lumbosacral (40% vs. 15%, p=0.01) but not cervical symptoms (p>0.05). Mean decrease in DME at long-term follow-up in EMG-confirmed compared to EMG-negative individuals trended toward significance (-4 vs. -1, p=0.11). There was no significant relationship between myotomal spontaneous activity and pain or opioid use. Conclusions Needle EMG predicts long-term pain reduction from transforaminal ESI in patients with lumbosacral radiculopathy, regardless of the presence of active denervation. PMID:26251843

  13. The risks of epidural and transforaminal steroid injections in the Spine: Commentary and a comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Multiple type of spinal injections, whether epidural/translaminar or transforaminal, facet injections, are offered to patients with/without surgical spinal lesions by pain management specialists (radiologists, physiatrists, and anesthesiologists). Although not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), injections are being performed with an increased frequency (160%), are typically short-acting and ineffective over the longer-term, while exposing patients to major risks/complications. Methods: For many patients with spinal pain alone and no surgical lesions, the “success” of epidural injections may simply reflect the self-limited course of the disease. Alternatively, although those with surgical pathology may experience transient or no pain relief, undergoing these injections (typically administered in a series of three) unnecessarily exposes them to the inherent risks, while also delaying surgery and potentially exposing them to more severe/permanent neurological deficits. Results: Multiple recent reports cite contaminated epidural steroid injections resulting in meningitis, stroke, paralysis, and death. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) specifically identified 25 deaths (many due to Aspergillosis), 337 patients sickened, and 14,000 exposed to contaminated steroids. Nevertheless, many other patients develop other complications that go unreported/underreported: Other life-threatening infections, spinal fluid leaks (0.4-6%), positional headaches (28%), adhesive arachnoiditis (6-16%), hydrocephalus, air embolism, urinary retention, allergic reactions, intravascular injections (7.9-11.6%), stroke, blindness, neurological deficits/paralysis, hematomas, seizures, and death. Conclusions: Although the benefits for epidural steroid injections may include transient pain relief for those with/without surgical disease, the multitude of risks attributed to these injections outweighs the benefits. PMID:23646278

  14. Multiple epidural steroid injections and body mass index linked with occurrence of epidural lipomatosis: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural lipomatosis (EL) is an increase of adipose tissue, normally occurring in the epidural space, sufficient to distort the thecal sac and compress neural elements. There is a lack of knowledge of risk factors, impact on patient’s symptoms, and its possible association with epidural steroid injections. Methods History, physical examination, patient chart, and MRI were analyzed from 856 outpatients referred for epidural steroid injections. Seventy patients with signs of EL on MRI comprised the study group. Thirty-four randomly selected patients comprised the control group. The severity of EL was determined by the MRI assessment. The impact of EL was determined by the patient’s history and physical examination. Logistic regression was used to correlate the probability of developing EL with BMI and epidural steroid injections. Results EL was centered at L5 and S1 segments. The average BMI for patients with EL was significantly greater than that of control group (36.0 ± 0.9 vs. 29.2 ± 0.9, p <0.01). The probability of developing EL with increasing BMI was linear up to the BMI of 35 after which it plateaued. Triglycerides were significantly higher for the EL group as compared to controls (250 ± 30 vs. 186 ± 21 mg/dL p < 0.01). The odds of having EL were 60% after two epidural steroid injections, 90% after three epidural steroid injections and approached 100% with further injections, independent of BMI. Other risk factors considered included alcohol abuse, use of protease inhibitors, levels of stress, hypothyroidism and genetic predisposition. However there were insufficient quantities to determine statistical significance with a degree of confidence. The impact of EL on patient’s symptoms correlated with EL severity with Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.73 at p < 0.01 significance level. Conclusions The BMI and triglycerides levels were found to be significantly elevated for the EL group, pointing to an increased

  15. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage for pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weitian; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Ningming; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The factors influencing the efficacy of ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage were investigated in the present study. A retrospective analysis of clinical data from 435 patients who presented with a pleural effusion was performed. Patients were divided into a control group and an intervention group. Thirty-seven patients in the control group were given standard care using pleural puncture to draw the excess fluid. The 398 patients in the intervention group were treated using ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage. The rate of successful drainage of a pleural effusion was significantly higher (P<0.05), while the rate of complication was lower, in the ultrasound-guided thoracentesis cases compared to standard care treatment. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage is an efficient, safe and minimally invasive procedure to alleviate pleural effusion. The efficacy of the procedure is related to the separation of pleural effusion, drainage tube type and tube diameter. PMID:28105155

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Carlo; Luigiano, Carmelo; Maimone, Antonella; Polifemo, Anna Maria; Tarantino, Ilaria; Cennamo, Vincenzo

    2012-11-16

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) develop secondary to either fluid leakage or liquefaction of pancreatic necrosis following acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, surgery or abdominal trauma. Pancreatic fluid collections include acute fluid collections, acute and chronic pancreatic pseudocysts, pancreatic abscesses and pancreatic necrosis. Before the introduction of linear endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the 1990s and the subsequent development of endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage (EUS-GD) procedures, the available options for drainage in symptomatic PFCs included surgical drainage, percutaneous drainage using radiological guidance and conventional endoscopic transmural drainage. In recent years, it has gradually been recognized that, due to its lower morbidity rate compared to the surgical and percutaneous approaches, endoscopic treatment may be the preferred first-line approach for managing symptomatic PFCs. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage has the following advantages, when compared to other alternatives such as surgical, percutaneous and non-EUS-guided endoscopic drainage. EUS-GD is less invasive than surgery and therefore does not require general anesthesia. The morbidity rate is lower, recovery is faster and the costs are lower. EUS-GD can avoid local complications related to percutaneous drainage. Because the endoscope is placed adjacent to the fluid collection, it can have direct access to the fluid cavity, unlike percutaneous drainage which traverses the abdominal wall. Complications such as bleeding, inadvertent puncture of adjacent viscera, secondary infection and prolonged periods of drainage with resultant pancreatico-cutaneous fistulae may be avoided. The only difference between EUS and non-EUS drainage is the initial step, namely, gaining access to the pancreatic fluid collection. All the subsequent steps are similar, i.e., insertion of guide-wires with fluoroscopic guidance, balloon dilatation of the cystogastrostomy and insertion of

  17. A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial to Determine the Effectiveness of Caudal Epidural Steroid Injection in Lumbosacral Sciatica

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhery, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Caudal epidural steroid injection have been a part of nonsurgical management of lumbosacral sciatica since last half a century but various randomized controlled trials fail to provide convincing evidence in favour of its effectiveness. Aim To assess the efficacy of caudal epidural steroid injection in patients of lumbosacral sciatica in comparison to placebo. Materials and Methods The study consisted of patients of sciatica caused by lumbosacral disc prolapse (observed on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scan). Caudal epidural injections of 80 mg methyl prednisolone were injected in 47 patients in one group. The other group consisted of 46 patients who were injected isotonic saline as placebo. Self-evaluation was the main judgment criterion at 4th week using a descriptive four item scale (recovery, marked improvement, slight improvement, or worse). Patients rating the improvement as “recovery” or “marked improvement” were considered as success. Patients rating the improvement as “slight improvement” or “worse” were considered as failure. Only paracetamol were authorized and patients requiring Non Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) before 4th week were also considered as failure. Results On analysis per protocol, at 4 weeks, the two groups differed significantly with respect to the primary outcome: among the 93 patients, 8/46 (17%) in the placebo group and 32/47 (68%) in the steroid group (p=0.000) were considered as success (difference 50.7%; 95% CI for the difference 33.4 to 67.99). But at the end of the study (week 12) there was no significant difference in primary outcome between the groups: 22/46 (48%) patients in the placebo group and 28/47 (60%) in the steroid group (p=0.25) were considered as success (difference 11.8%; 95% CI for the difference -8.38 to 31.9). Conclusion Caudal epidural steroid injections provide no additional improvement over placebo in the long term natural history of lumbosacral sciatica. However, it

  18. Transvaginal Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy of Deep Pelvic Masses: How We Do It.

    PubMed

    Plett, Sara K; Poder, Liina; Brooks, Rebecca A; Morgan, Tara A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the rationale and indications for transvaginal ultrasound-guided biopsy. Transvaginal ultrasound-guided biopsy can be a helpful tool for diagnosis and treatment planning in the evaluation of pelvic masses, particularly when the anatomy precludes a transabdominal or posterior transgluteal percutaneous biopsy approach. A step-by-step summary of the technique with preprocedure and postprocedure considerations is included.

  19. Confirmation and 3D profiling of anabolic steroid esters in injection sites using imaging desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Rijke, Eva; Hooijerink, Dick; Sterk, Saskia S; Nielen, Michel W F

    2013-01-01

    In this study, desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) was applied for the confirmation and three-dimensional profiling of anabolic steroid esters in an injection site of bovine muscle. The spatial resolution of the DESI-MS(n) was demonstrated by scanning hormone esters and marker ink lines drawn at various distances on a microscopic slide at set distances, using an x-scanner with manual y and z adjustment. Tissue slices of bovine muscle injected with a hormone cocktail were analysed. All anabolic steroid esters could be directly detected in the sample and confirmed on the basis of identification points awarded for selected MS/MS transitions according to the performance criteria given in Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Moreover, the injection site could be mapped by two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging MS, showing a horizontal and vertical distribution through the muscle tissue. This DESI approach offers potential for analysis of injection sites of steroid esters from illegally treated animals; moreover, direct analysis by ambient imaging DESI-MS still allows conventional extraction and analysis of the whole tissue for further confirmatory or contra-analysis afterwards.

  20. Fluoroscopy-guided Sacroiliac Joint Steroid Injection for Low Back Pain in a Patient with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, PUA; Rose, REC; Wade, NA

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Osteogenesis imperfecta, also known as ‘brittle bone disease’, is a genetic connective tissue disease. It is characterized by bone fragility and osteopenia (low bone density). In this case, a 57-year old female presented to the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI), Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic with left low back pain rated 6/10 on the numeric rating scale (NRS). Clinically, the patient had sacroiliac joint-mediated pain although X-rays did not show the sacroiliac joint changes. Fluoroscopy-guided left sacroiliac joint steroid injection was done. Methods: Numeric rating scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire were used to evaluate outcome. This was completed at baseline, one week follow-up and at eight weeks post fluoroscopy-guided sacroiliac joint steroid injection. Results: Numeric rating scale improved from 6/10 before the procedure to 0/10 post procedure, and ODI questionnaire score improved from a moderate disability score of 40% to a minimal disability score of 13%. Up to eight weeks, the NRS was 0/10 and ODI remained at minimal disability of 15%. Conclusion: Fluoroscopy-guided sacroiliac joint injection is a known diagnostic and treatment method for sacroiliac joint mediated pain. To our knowledge, this is the first case published on the use of fluoroscopy-guided sacroiliac joint steroid injection in the treatment of sacroiliac joint mediated low back pain in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta. PMID:26624601

  1. Primary observation of early transtympanic steroid injection in patients with delayed treatment of noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yide; Zheng, Guiliang; Zheng, Hongliang; Zhou, Ronjue; Zhu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 5% of the population worldwide suffer from varieties of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Prevention and early identification remain the best methods of approaching NIHL. Over the years, numerous methods of improving the outcome in patients presenting with NIHL have been evaluated; however, these are far from sufficient. The present trial aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of early transtympanic steroid injection in patients with delayed treatment of NIHL. Because systemic steroid treatment is the most common treatment of choice in the management of NIHL, it was considered unethical to replace the first-line systemic steroid treatment with transtympanic treatment. Therefore, the present study evaluated the combination of conventional steroid treatment with a transtympanic steroid injection. A total of 53 patients diagnosed with delayed treatment of NIHL were randomized into a transtympanic group (TR group, n=27) and a control group (n=26). The TR group received the conventional steroid treatment plus four courses of additional transtympanic injections of methylprednisolone 3 days after NIHL onset, and the control group received the conventional steroid treatment. Transtympanic injection was performed through laser-assisted myringotomy (a 0.5- to 1-mm perforation was made in the tympanic membrane) under an operation microscope. A total of 51.9% of the patients in the TR group had a ≥15-dB HL improvement in pure-tone average, compared with 23.1% of the patients in the control group, at the 8-week follow-up audiogram. A total of 66.7% of the patients in the TR group had an improvement of ≥15% in the speech discrimination score, compared with 30.8% of patients in the control group, 8 weeks after the treatment. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant. The outcome of this trial indicates that delayed treatment of NIHL may be preferable if transtympanic therapy can be applied earlier. The large variability in the

  2. Factors Affecting Radiation Exposure during Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection: A Prospective Study in 759 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suyoung; Shin, Joon-Ho; Lee, Joon Woo; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Guen Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate and compare radiation exposure and intervention time during lumbar epidural steroid injection (ESI) 1) under different practitioners and methods with continuous fluoroscopic monitoring, and 2) under one practitioner with different methods and monitoring. Materials and Methods We consecutively recruited 804 patients who underwent lumbar ESI and 759 patients who underwent 922 interventions were included for analysis in this investigation. Three different practitioners (a senior faculty member, junior faculty member, trainee) performed lumbar ESI using different methods (caudal, interlaminar, transforaminal). The senior faculty member performed lumbar ESI under two different methods of fluoroscopic monitoring (continuous [CM] and intermittent monitoring [IM]). The dose area product (DAP) fluoroscopy time, and intervention time during lumbar ESI were compared for 1) ESI methods and practitioners under CM, and 2) ESI methods and monitoring. Results With CM, interaction between the effects of the practitioner and the intervention on DAP was significant (p < 0.001), but not fluoroscopy time (p = 0.672) or intervention time (p = 0.852). The significant main effects included the practitioner and intervention on DAP, fluoroscopy time, and intervention time with CM (p < 0.001). DAPs and fluoroscopy time for caudal, interlaminar, and transforaminal ESI were higher with CM than with IM (p < 0.001). Intervention time did not differ between CM and IM. Conclusion Radiation exposure is dependent on the practitioners and methods and within the established safety limits during lumbar ESIs under CM. With an experienced practitioner, IM leads to less radiation exposure than CM. PMID:27134528

  3. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy after lumbar epidural steroid injection in a diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Gozal, Yair M.; Atchley, Kristine; Curt, Bradford A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients with diabetes mellitus, epidural steroid injections (ESI) have been noted to cause significant elevation of blood glucose levels, typically lasting 1–3 days. Here, we describe a previously unreported complication of a diabetic third nerve palsy associated with an ESI. Case Description: A 66-year-old man with a history of coronary artery disease, hypertension, and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus presented with low back pain and left lower extremity radiculopathy. The lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed mild spondylosis, most severe at the L4-5 level, accompanied by a broad based disc protrusion resulting in mild central and moderate biforaminal stenosis. The patient underwent a left-sided L4-L5 transforaminal ESI resulting in transient elevation of his blood glucose levels. On post-procedure day 2, he developed a frontal headache and a complete right third nerve palsy with partial pupillary involvement. The MRI and MR angiography (MRA) of the brain revealed no compressive lesions or oculomotor abnormalities. Ophthalmoplegia and pupillary dysfunction resolved spontaneously over 4 months. Conclusions: Although rare, a history of a recent ESI should be considered as the etiology of an isolated oculomotor palsy in diabetic patients. PMID:28144494

  4. Characterization of polymeric poly(epsilon-caprolactone) injectable implant delivery system for the controlled delivery of contraceptive steroids.

    PubMed

    Dhanaraju, Magharla Dasaratha; Gopinath, Damodaran; Ahmed, Mohamed Rafiuddin; Jayakumar, Rajadas; Vamsadhara, Chandrasekar

    2006-01-01

    Contraceptive steroids levonorgestrel (LNG) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) have been encapsulated with poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) microspheres using a w / o /w double emulsion method. The microspheres prepared were smooth and spherical, with a mean size from 8-25 microm. In vitro release profiles of microspheres showed a trend of increasing initially at the first week, and thereafter the release was sustained. At the end of the seventh week LNG/EE from 1:5 and 1:10 PCL microspheres were 60 and 48%, 52 and 46%, respectively. An in vitro degradation study shows that at the 20th week the microspheres maintained the surface integrity. The PCL microspheres showed a triphasic in vivo release profile with an initial burst effect due to the release of the steroid adsorbed on the microsphere surface, a second sustained release phase due to the steroid diffusion through the pores or channels formed in the polymer matrix, and third phase due to polymer bioerodible. Histological examination of PCL microspheres injected intramuscularly into thigh muscle of a rat showed a minimal inflammatory reaction demonstrating that contraceptive steroid-loaded microspheres were biocompatible. The level of inflammatory cytokines determined by immunostaining for IL-1alpha, the tissue response to formulations at the first week was considered mild, whereas at the end of the 20th week the inflammatory response ceased. Thus, this study helped us to evaluate the feasibility of using these microspheres as a long-acting biodegradable drug delivery system for contraceptive steroids.

  5. Ultrasound-guided serial transabdominal cardiac biopsies in cats.

    PubMed

    van Essen, Vivian J; Uilenreef, Joost J; Szatmári, Viktor; Veldhuis Kroeze, Edwin J B; Kuiper, Raoul V; Rothuizen, Jan; de Bruin, Alain

    2012-03-01

    A percutaneous/transdiaphragmatic core needle biopsy technique was developed in cats to obtain serial biopsies from different locations of the left ventricle, through which morphological and molecular changes within the same individual can be studied to unravel the mechanisms of feline cardiomyopathies. Transmural left ventricular myocardial samples were obtained from 29 anesthetized, healthy, adult cats with ultrasound guidance. An 18G automatic biopsy needle was inserted between the last left rib and the sternum through the diaphragm into the thorax. Biopsies were obtained from the left ventricular wall. In five cats, three single biopsies were taken with 4-week intervals. Autopsy was performed on six cats, of which three cats had serial biopsies. In total, 87 biopsies were obtained without long-term effects on cardiac function or structure. The biopsies caused transient single ventricular premature complexes and mild pericardial effusion without tamponade. Necropsy revealed a minimal amount of fibrous connective tissue in the diaphragm and the heart without any significant microscopic lesions in the adjacent muscle tissue. The high quality biopsy material was suitable for morphological and molecular studies. This minimally invasive, ultrasound-guided cardiac biopsy technique thus allows for the safe collection of serial biopsies to study feline cardiomyopathies in an experimental setting.

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Reduction of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Arhami Dolatabadi, Ali; Manouchehrifar, Mohammad; Asadi, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Distal radius fractures are a common traumatic injury, particularly in the elderly population. In the present study we examined the effectiveness of ultrasound guidance in the reduction of distal radius fractures in adult patients presenting to emergency department (ED). Methods: In this prospective case control study, eligible patients were adults older than 18 years who presented to the ED with distal radius fractures. 130 consecutive patient consisted of two group of Sixty-Five patients were prospectively enrolled for around 1 years. The first group underwent ultrasound-guided reduction and the second (control group) underwent blind reduction. All procedures were performed by two trained emergency residents under supervision of senior emergency physicians. Results: Baseline characteristics between two groups were similar. The rate of repeat reduction was reduced in the ultrasound group (9.2% vs 24.6%; P = .019). The post reduction radiographic indices were similar between the two groups, although the ultrasound group had improved volar tilt (mean, 7.6° vs 3.7°; P = .000). The operative rate was reduced in the ultrasound groups (10.8% vs 27.7%; P = .014). Conclusion: Ultrasound guidance is effective and recommended for routine use in the reduction of distal radius fractures. PMID:27299141

  7. Epidural steroid injections compared with gabapentin for lumbosacral radicular pain: multicenter randomized double blind comparative efficacy study

    PubMed Central

    Hanling, Steven; Bicket, Mark C; White, Ronald L; Veizi, Elias; Kurihara, Connie; Zhao, Zirong; Hayek, Salim; Guthmiller, Kevin B; Griffith, Scott R; Gordin, Vitaly; White, Mirinda Anderson; Vorobeychik, Yakov; Pasquina, Paul F

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether an epidural steroid injection or gabapentin is a better treatment for lumbosacral radiculopathy. Design A multicenter randomized study conducted between 2011 and 2014. Computer generated randomization was stratified by site. Patients and evaluating physicians were blinded to treatment outcomes. Settings Eight military, Veterans Administration, and civilian hospitals. Participants 145 people with lumbosacral radicular pain secondary to herniated disc or spinal stenosis for less than four years in duration and in whom leg pain is as severe or more severe than back pain. Interventions Participants received either epidural steroid injection plus placebo pills or sham injection plus gabapentin. Main outcome measures Average leg pain one and three months after the injection on a 0-10 numerical rating scale. A positive outcome was defined as a ≥2 point decrease in leg pain coupled with a positive global perceived effect. All patients had one month follow-up visits; patients whose condition improved remained blinded for their three month visit. Results There were no significant differences for the primary outcome measure at one month (mean pain score 3.3 (SD 2.6) and mean change from baseline −2.2 (SD 2.4) in epidural steroid injection group versus 3.7 (SD 2.6) and −1.7 (SD 2.6) in gabapentin group; adjusted difference 0.4, 95% confidence interval −0.3 to 1.2; P=0.25) and three months (mean pain score 3.4 (SD 2.7) and mean change from baseline −2.0 (SD 2.6) versus 3.7 (SD 2.8) and −1.6 (SD 2.7), respectively; adjusted difference 0.3, −0.5 to 1.2; P=0.43). Among secondary outcomes, one month after treatment those who received epidural steroid injection had greater reductions in worst leg pain (−3.0, SD 2.8) than those treated with gabapentin (−2.0, SD 2.9; P=0.04) and were more likely to experience a positive successful outcome (66% v 46%; number needed to treat=5.0, 95% confidence interval 2.8 to 27.0; P=0.02). At three

  8. Shenqi Fuzheng Injection Alleviates the Transient Worsening Caused by Steroids Pulse Therapy in Treating Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Guo-Yan; Liu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the treatment effect and side effect of Shenqi Fuzheng Injection (SFI) on alleviating transient worsening of myasthenia gravis (MG) symptoms caused by high-dose steroids pulse therapy. Methods. Sixty-six consecutive patients with MG were randomly divided into two groups: the treatment group treated with SFI and methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPT) and the control group treated with MPT alone. The severity of MG before, during, and after MPT and the duration of transient worsening (TW) were evaluated and compared with the clinical absolute scoring (AS) and relative scoring (RS) system. Results. Twenty-nine patients experienced TW in each group. At TW, the AS was significantly increased (P < 0.000) in both groups compared with baseline data, with the AS increase in the treatment group (16.8 ± 2) significantly smaller (P < 0.05) than in the control group (24.9 ± 2.5). At the end of the treatment course, the AS for the treatment group was significantly decreased (7.5 ± 0.9) compared with at TW, although no significant difference compared with the control (9.7 ± 1.1). The TW lasted 1–6 days (mean 3.7) for the treatment group, significantly shorter (P < 0.05) than 2–12 days (mean 7.8) for the control. The RS for the treatment group at the end of treatment was 43.8%–100% (mean 76.8% ± 2.6%), significantly better than the control group: 33.3%–100% (mean 67.2 ± 3.6%). Slight side effects (18.75%) included maldigestion and rash in the treatment group. Conclusion. SFI has a better treatment effect and few side effects and can alleviate the severity and shorten the duration of the transient worsening of MG during steroids pulse therapy. PMID:24348721

  9. White light-informed optical properties improve ultrasound-guided fluorescence tomography of photoactive protoporphyrin IX

    PubMed Central

    DSouza, Alisha V.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Subsurface fluorescence imaging is desirable for medical applications, including protoporphyrin-IX (PpIX)-based skin tumor diagnosis, surgical guidance, and dosimetry in photodynamic therapy. While tissue optical properties and heterogeneities make true subsurface fluorescence mapping an ill-posed problem, ultrasound-guided fluorescence-tomography (USFT) provides regional fluorescence mapping. Here USFT is implemented with spectroscopic decoupling of fluorescence signals (auto-fluorescence, PpIX, photoproducts), and white light spectroscopy-determined bulk optical properties. Segmented US images provide a priori spatial information for fluorescence reconstruction using region-based, diffuse FT. The method was tested in simulations, tissue homogeneous and inclusion phantoms, and an injected-inclusion animal model. Reconstructed fluorescence yield was linear with PpIX concentration, including the lowest concentration used, 0.025  μg/ml. White light spectroscopy informed optical properties, which improved fluorescence reconstruction accuracy compared to the use of fixed, literature-based optical properties, reduced reconstruction error and reconstructed fluorescence standard deviation by factors of 8.9 and 2.0, respectively. Recovered contrast-to-background error was 25% and 74% for inclusion phantoms without and with a 2-mm skin-like layer, respectively. Preliminary mouse-model imaging demonstrated system feasibility for subsurface fluorescence measurement in vivo. These data suggest that this implementation of USFT is capable of regional PpIX mapping in human skin tumors during photodynamic therapy, to be used in dosimetric evaluations. PMID:23584445

  10. White light-informed optical properties improve ultrasound-guided fluorescence tomography of photoactive protoporphyrin IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Brendan P.; DSouza, Alisha V.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-04-01

    Subsurface fluorescence imaging is desirable for medical applications, including protoporphyrin-IX (PpIX)-based skin tumor diagnosis, surgical guidance, and dosimetry in photodynamic therapy. While tissue optical properties and heterogeneities make true subsurface fluorescence mapping an ill-posed problem, ultrasound-guided fluorescence-tomography (USFT) provides regional fluorescence mapping. Here USFT is implemented with spectroscopic decoupling of fluorescence signals (auto-fluorescence, PpIX, photoproducts), and white light spectroscopy-determined bulk optical properties. Segmented US images provide a priori spatial information for fluorescence reconstruction using region-based, diffuse FT. The method was tested in simulations, tissue homogeneous and inclusion phantoms, and an injected-inclusion animal model. Reconstructed fluorescence yield was linear with PpIX concentration, including the lowest concentration used, 0.025 μg/ml. White light spectroscopy informed optical properties, which improved fluorescence reconstruction accuracy compared to the use of fixed, literature-based optical properties, reduced reconstruction error and reconstructed fluorescence standard deviation by factors of 8.9 and 2.0, respectively. Recovered contrast-to-background error was 25% and 74% for inclusion phantoms without and with a 2-mm skin-like layer, respectively. Preliminary mouse-model imaging demonstrated system feasibility for subsurface fluorescence measurement in vivo. These data suggest that this implementation of USFT is capable of regional PpIX mapping in human skin tumors during photodynamic therapy, to be used in dosimetric evaluations.

  11. Ultrasound-Guided versus Fluoroscopy-Guided Deep Cervical Plexus Block for the Treatment of Cervicogenic Headache

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qing; Yang, Haiyun; Li, Xiao; Lin, Caina; Ke, Songjian

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of ultrasound-guided deep cervical plexus block with fluoroscopy-guided deep cervical plexus block for patients with cervicogenic headache (CeH). Methods. A total of 56 patients with CeH were recruited and randomly assigned to either the ultrasound-guided (US) or the fluoroscopy-guided (FL) injection group. A mixture of 2–4 mL 1% lidocaine and 7 mg betamethasone was injected along C2 and/or C3 transverse process. The measurement of pain was evaluated by patients' ratings of a 10-point numerical pain scale (NPS) before and 2 wks, 12 wks, and 24 wks after treatments. Results. The blocking procedures were well tolerated. The pain intensity, as measured by NPS, significantly decreased at 2 wks after injection treatment in both US and FL groups, respectively, compared with that of baseline (P < 0.05). The blocking procedures had continued, and comparable pain relieving effects appeared at 12 wks and 24 wks after treatment in both US and FL groups. There were no significant differences observed in the NPS before and 2 wks, 12 wks, and 24 wks after treatment between US and FL groups. Conclusions. The US-guided approach showed similar satisfactory effect as the FL-guided block. Ultrasonography can be an alternative method for its convenience and efficacy in deep cervical plexus block for CeH patients without radiation exposure. PMID:28326321

  12. Unnecessary multiple epidural steroid injections delay surgery for massive lumbar disc: Case discussion and review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epidural steroid injections (ESI) in the lumbar spine are not effective over the long-term for resolving “surgical” lesions. Here, we present a patient with a massive L2–L3 lumbar disk herniation whose surgery was delayed for 4 months by multiple unnecessary ESI, resulting in a cauda equina syndrome. Methods: A 54-year-old male acutely developed increased low back and radiating left leg pain in October of 2014. In December of 2014, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed a massive central/left sided disk herniation at the L2–L3 level resulting in marked thecal sac and left L2 foraminal and L3 lateral recess root compression. Despite the marked degree of neural compression, pain management treated him with 3 ESI over the next 3 months. Results: At the end of April of 2015, he presented to spine surgeon with a cauda equina syndrome. When the new MRI scan confirmed the previously documented massive central-left sided L2–L3 disk herniation, the patient emergently underwent an L1–L3 laminectomy with central-left sided L2–L3 lateral/foraminal diskectomy. Postoperatively, the patient was neurologically intact. Conclusions: Pain specialists performed multiple unnecessary lumbar ESI critically delaying spinal surgery for 4 months in this patient with a massive lumbar disk herniation who ultimately developed a cauda equina syndrome. Unfortunately, pain specialists (e.g., radiologists, anesthesiologists, and physiatrists), not specifically trained to perform neurological examinations or spinal surgery, are increasingly mismanaging spinal disease with ESI/variants. It is time for spine surgeons to speak out against this, and “take back” the care of patients with spinal surgical disease. PMID:26425398

  13. New platform for evaluating ultrasound-guided interventional technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle tracking systems are frequently used in surgical procedures. Various needle tracking technologies have been developed using ultrasound, electromagnetic sensors, and optical sensors. To evaluate these new needle tracking technologies, 3D volume information is often acquired to compute the actual distance from the needle tip to the target object. The image-guidance conditions for comparison are often inconsistent due to the ultrasound beam-thickness. Since 3D volumes are necessary, there is often some time delay between the surgical procedure and the evaluation. These evaluation methods will generally only measure the final needle location because they interrupt the surgical procedure. The main contribution of this work is a new platform for evaluating needle tracking systems in real-time, resolving the problems stated above. We developed new tools to evaluate the precise distance between the needle tip and the target object. A PZT element transmitting unit is designed as needle introducer shape so that it can be inserted in the needle. We have collected time of flight and amplitude information in real-time. We propose two systems to collect ultrasound signals. We demonstrate this platform on an ultrasound DAQ system and a cost-effective FPGA board. The results of a chicken breast experiment show the feasibility of tracking a time series of needle tip distances. We performed validation experiments with a plastisol phantom and have shown that the preliminary data fits a linear regression model with a RMSE of less than 0.6mm. Our platform can be applied to more general needle tracking methods using other forms of guidance.

  14. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Hydrodissection of a Symptomatic Sural Neuroma.

    PubMed

    Fader, Ryan R; Mitchell, Justin J; Chadayammuri, Vivek P; Hill, John; Wolcott, Michelle L

    2015-11-01

    Symptomatic neuromas of the sural nerve are a rare but significant cause of pain and debilitation in athletes. Presentation is usually in the form of chronic pain and dysesthesias or paresthesias of the lateral foot and ankle. Treatment traditionally ranges from conservative measures, such as removing all external compressive forces, to administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin B6, tricyclic antidepressants, antiepileptics, or topical anesthetics. This article reports a case of sural nerve entrapment in a 34-year-old male triathlete with a history of recurrent training-induced right-sided gastrocnemius strains. The patient presented with numbness in the right lateral foot and ankle that had persisted for 3 months, after he was treated unsuccessfully with extensive nonoperative measures, including anti-inflammatory drugs, activity modification, and a dedicated physical therapy program of stretching and strengthening. Orthopedic assessment showed worsening pain with forced passive dorsiflexion and manual pressure applied over the distal aspect of the gastrocnemius. Plain radiographs showed normal findings, but in-office ultrasound imaging showed evidence of sural nerve entrapment with edema and neuromatous scar formation in the absence of gastrocnemius or soleus pathology. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided hydrodissection of the sural nerve at the area of symptomatic neuroma and neural edema was performed the same day. The patient had complete relief of symptoms and full return to the preinjury level of participation in competitive sports. This case report shows that hydrodissection, when performed by an experienced physician, can be an effective, minimally invasive technique for neurolysis in the setting of sural nerve entrapment, resulting in improvement in clinical symptoms.

  15. Comparative Study of: Non-Invasive Conservative Treatments with Local Steroid Injection in the Management of Planter Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Iraqi, Aftab Ahmed; Narula, Kusum; Katyal, Rashmi; Saxena, Mridul Shanker

    2014-01-01

    Background: Planter Fasciitis is an annoying and painful condition that limits function. There is pain and tenderness in the sole of the foot, mostly under the heel, with standing or walking and is considered a self limiting condition. Symptoms resolve in 80% to 90% of cases within ten months. However, this long interval is frustrating for both patients and clinicians. Aim: This study was undertaken to compare the two different modalities of non operative treatment: Non- invasive conservative methods: NSAID’s, Soft Insoles, Stretching, Ultrasound therapy and Contrast baths versus local Steroid injection therapy. Materials and Methods: Patients by random sampling were divided in two groups. Group A as: Conservative group and Group B as Local Steroid Injections group, 100 patients in each. Patients were assessed as per Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at the start of treatment and then after 4 wk and 8 wk duration on follow up. Statistical analysis used: SPSS for Windows (version 10.0) by the Chi-Square test. Results: The difference in the distribution of subjects belonging to either of the treatment modalities regarding the treatment outcome at four and eight week was found to be statistically insignificant. Conclusion: As both treatment modalities are at par on comparison of their treatment outcome it is better to go for conservative approach because this can save the patients from the complications of steroid therapy. PMID:25386470

  16. Internal Jugular Vein Cannulation: An Ultrasound-Guided Technique Versus a Landmark-Guided Technique

    PubMed Central

    Turker, Gurkan; Kaya, Fatma Nur; Gurbet, Alp; Aksu, Hale; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Atlas, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To compare the landmark-guided technique versus the ultrasound-guided technique for internal jugular vein cannulation in spontaneously breathing patients. METHODS A total of 380 patients who required internal jugular vein cannulation were randomly assigned to receive internal jugular vein cannulation using either the landmark- or ultrasound-guided technique in Bursa, Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, between April and November, 2008. Failed catheter placement, risk of complications from placement, risk of failure on first attempt at placement, number of attempts until successful catheterization, time to successful catheterization and the demographics of each patient were recorded. RESULTS The overall complication rate was higher in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group (p < 0.01). Carotid puncture rate and hematoma were more frequent in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group (p < 0.05). The number of attempts for successful placement was significantly higher in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group, which was accompanied by a significantly increased access time observed in the landmark group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Although there were a higher number of attempts, longer access time, and a more frequent complication rate in the landmark group, the success rate was found to be comparable between the two groups. CONCLUSION The findings of this study indicate that internal jugular vein catheterization guided by real-time ultrasound results in a lower access time and a lower rate of immediate complications. PMID:19841706

  17. Factitial soft tissue pseudotumor due to injection of anabolic steroids: a report of 3 cases in 2 patients.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, Ilan; Goldblum, John R; Rubin, Brian P

    2010-03-01

    Traumatically induced inflammation or reactive processes are a relatively well-known phenomenon in both skin and soft tissue. These include panniculitides, fat necrosis, nodular fasciitis, and nonspecific fibrosis. Occasionally, traumatic reactions can be associated with factitial injury due to self-induced blunt trauma or injection of chemical agents. Factitial pseudotumors of soft tissue mimicking neoplasms and occurring in deep-seated locations are rare and not well recognized. We have had the opportunity to review a handful of cases over the years of soft tissue pseudotumors caused by self injection of steroids for the purposes of bodybuilding. Three of these cases in 2 patients are presented here. One patient developed a deep lateral thigh mass that was radiologically suspicious for sarcoma but upon core biopsy was found to be a lipogranulomatous reaction. The second patient had 2 masses occurring in the upper and lower extremity with an interval of 1 year between the two. This patient had both masses resected. The first had the appearance of a giant cell tumor with no immediately discernible foreign material. The second mass was initially presumed to be a metastasis from the upper extremity tumor and showed similar areas to the first specimen; however, it also had areas of obvious reactive features with foreign material. These features were found in the first tumor as well upon retrospective review. Both patients admitted to self injection of anabolic steroids after further history was sought by the clinicians. Deep soft tissue pseudosarcomas caused by injection of steroids are not well documented, and patient's reluctance to provide this information leads to difficulty in arriving at a correct diagnosis. Recognition of this possibility is important in avoiding incorrect diagnoses and unnecessary treatments.

  18. Comparison of Ultrasound-Guided and Fluoroscopy-Assisted Antegrade Common Femoral Artery Puncture Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Michael M.; Goh, Gerard S.; Power, Sarah; Given, Mark F.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo prospectively compare the procedural time and complication rates of ultrasound-guided and fluoroscopy-assisted antegrade common femoral artery (CFA) puncture techniques.Materials and MethodsHundred consecutive patients, undergoing a vascular procedure for which an antegrade approach was deemed necessary/desirable, were randomly assigned to undergo either ultrasound-guided or fluoroscopy-assisted CFA puncture. Time taken from administration of local anaesthetic to vascular sheath insertion in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), patients’ age, body mass index (BMI), fluoroscopy radiation dose, haemostasis method and immediate complications were recorded. Mean and median values were calculated and statistically analysed with unpaired t tests.ResultsSixty-nine male and 31 female patients underwent antegrade puncture (mean age 66.7 years). The mean BMI was 25.7 for the ultrasound-guided (n = 53) and 25.3 for the fluoroscopy-assisted (n = 47) groups. The mean time taken for the ultrasound-guided puncture was 7 min 46 s and for the fluoroscopy-assisted technique was 9 min 41 s (p = 0.021). Mean fluoroscopy dose area product in the fluoroscopy group was 199 cGy cm{sup 2}. Complications included two groin haematomas in the ultrasound-guided group and two retroperitoneal haematomas and one direct SFA puncture in the fluoroscopy-assisted group.ConclusionUltrasound-guided technique is faster and safer for antegrade CFA puncture when compared to the fluoroscopic-assisted technique alone.

  19. Cervical Interlaminar Epidural Steroid Injection for Unilateral Cervical Radiculopathy: Comparison of Midline and Paramedian Approaches for Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ji Young; Yoon, Young Cheol; Lee, Jongseok

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Results Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion There is no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the midline and paramedian approaches in CIESI, for unilateral radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis. PMID:25995690

  20. Septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Randelli, Filippo; Sdao, Silvana; Sardanelli, Francesco; Randelli, Pietro

    2014-08-01

    Calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff is a common condition. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration is one of several options to treat this condition. The main advantages of this procedure are short duration, good outcome, and low cost. Furthermore, only minor complications have been reported in the literature, namely, vagal reactions during the procedure and mild postprocedural pain. We report the first case of septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of calcific tendinopathy. Although this is generally considered a very safe procedure, a risk of infection should be taken into account.

  1. Clinical Utility and Pitfalls of Ultrasound Guided Foreign Body Removal in War Fighters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    ultrasound guided foreign body removal P4 #5861 Female Right leg 68 years old Cause of death: Huntington " s Chorea 1 5 Yes 23 23 0 N/A...68 years old Cause of death: Huntington " s Chorea 1 5 Yes 26 26 0 N/A Radiological Procedure Removal Technique - Percutaneous - interventional...radiological ultrasound guided foreign body removal P6 #5861 Female Right leg 68 years old Cause of death: Huntington " s Chorea 1 9 Yes 17 17 0 N/A

  2. Novel use of ultrasound in the ED: ultrasound-guided hematoma block of a proximal humeral fracture.

    PubMed

    Lovallo, Emily; Mantuani, Daniel; Nagdev, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Proximal humeral fractures are a common injury after falls, particularly in the elderly population. An ultrasound-guided hematoma block is a novel technique for analgesia in cases when standard intravenous analgesia is not efficacious. We present a case in which ultrasound-guided hematoma block was the ideal method for adjunctive pain control in a patient with a comminuted humeral head fracture.

  3. Pitfalls in Interventional Pain Medicine: Hyponatremia after DDAVP for a Patient with Von Willebrand Disease Undergoing an Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Desmopressin (DDAVP), a synthetic analog of vasopressin, has been used in patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD), mild hemophilia A, and platelet dysfunction to reduce the risk of bleeding associated with surgical and interventional procedures. We report the case of a patient with VWD presenting with a bulging disc and radicular pain that underwent transforaminal epidural steroid injections. Her course was complicated with the interval development of headaches and dizziness symptomatic of moderate hyponatremia, likely due to excessive fluid intake. This report highlights a relatively rare side effect of DDAVP when used for prophylaxis in patients with VWD and reinforces the need for vigilance in these patients. PMID:28392945

  4. Polyplex-Microbubble Hybrids for Ultrasound-Guided Plasmid DNA Delivery to Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sirsi, Shashank; Hernandez, Sonia; Zielinski, Lukasz; Blomback, Henning; Koubaa, Adel; Synder, Milo; Homma, Shunichi; Kandel, Jessica J.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Borden, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents are being developed as image-guided gene carriers for targeted delivery in vivo. In this study, novel polyplex-microbubbles were synthesized, characterized and evaluated for systemic circulation and tumor transfection. Branched polyethylenimine (PEI; 25 kDa) was modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG; 5 kDa), thiolated and covalently attached to maleimide groups on lipid-coated microbubbles. The PEI-microbubbles demonstrated increasingly positive surface charge and DNA loading capacity with increasing maleimide content. The in vivo ultrasound contrast persistence of PEI-microbubbles was measured in the healthy mouse kidney, and a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model accounting for free and adherent microbubbles was developed to describe the anomalous time-intensity curves. The model suggested that PEI loading dramatically reduced free circulation and increased nonspecific adhesion to the vasculature. However, DNA loading to form polyplex-microbubbles increased circulation in the bloodstream and decreased nonspecific adhesion. PEI-microbubbles coupled to a luciferase bioluminescence reporter plasmid DNA were shown to transfect tumors implanted in the mouse kidney. Site-specific delivery was achieved using ultrasound applied over the tumor area following bolus injection of the DNA/PEI-microbubbles. In vivo imaging showed over 10-fold higher bioluminescence from the tumor region compared to untreated tissue. Ex vivo analysis of excised tumors showed greater than 40-fold higher expression in tumor tissue than non-sonicated control (heart) tissue. These results suggest that the polyplex-microbubble platform offers improved control of DNA loading and packaging suitable for ultrasound-guided tissue transfection. PMID:21945680

  5. Assessment: use of epidural steroid injections to treat radicular lumbosacral pain: report of the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    PubMed

    Armon, Carmel; Argoff, Charles E; Samuels, Jeffrey; Backonja, Misha-Miroslav

    2007-03-06

    Based on the available evidence, the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment subcommittee concluded that 1) epidural steroid injections may result in some improvement in radicular lumbosacral pain when assessed between 2 and 6 weeks following the injection, compared to control treatments (Level C, Class I-III evidence). The average magnitude of effect is small and generalizability of the observation is limited by the small number of studies, highly selected patient populations, few techniques and doses, and variable comparison treatments; 2) in general, epidural steroid injection for radicular lumbosacral pain does not impact average impairment of function, need for surgery, or provide long-term pain relief beyond 3 months. Their routine use for these indications is not recommended (Level B, Class I-III evidence); 3) there is insufficient evidence to make any recommendation for the use of epidural steroid injections to treat radicular cervical pain (Level U).

  6. Value of Artisanal Simulators to Train Veterinary Students in Performing Invasive Ultrasound-Guided Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hage, Maria Cristina F. N. S.; Massaferro, Ana Beatriz; Lopes, Érika Rondon; Beraldo, Carolina Mariano; Daniel, Jéssika

    2016-01-01

    Pericardial effusion can lead to cardiac tamponade, which endangers an animal's life. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis is used to remove abnormal liquid; however, it requires technical expertise. In veterinary medical education, the opportunity to teach this procedure to save lives during emergencies is rare; therefore, simulators are…

  7. PLUS: open-source toolkit for ultrasound-guided intervention systems

    PubMed Central

    Lasso, Andras; Heffter, Tamas; Rankin, Adam; Pinter, Csaba; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    A variety of advanced image analysis methods have been under development for ultrasound-guided interventions. Unfortunately, the transition from an image analysis algorithm to clinical feasibility trials as part of an intervention system requires integration of many components, such as imaging and tracking devices, data processing algorithms, and visualization software. The objective of our work is to provide a freely available open-source software platform – PLUS: Public software Library for Ultrasound – to facilitate rapid prototyping of ultrasound-guided intervention systems for translational clinical research. PLUS provides a variety of methods for interventional tool pose and ultrasound image acquisition from a wide range of tracking and imaging devices, spatial and temporal calibration, volume reconstruction, simulated image generation, and recording and live streaming of the acquired data. This paper introduces PLUS, explains its functionality and architecture, and presents typical uses and performance in ultrasound-guided intervention systems. PLUS fulfills the essential requirements for the development of ultrasound-guided intervention systems and it aspires to become a widely used translational research prototyping platform. PLUS is freely available as open source under BSD license, the code and documentation are available at http://www.plustoolkit.org. PMID:24833412

  8. Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access for therapeutic apheresis procedures reduces need for central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Eric; Garcia, Salvador; Miguel, Robin; Segura, Francisco J; Ipe, Tina S; Leveque, Christopher

    2016-08-10

    Therapeutic and donor apheresis requires adequate vascular access to achieve inlet flow rates of ∼50-100 mL/min. While central dialysis-type venous catheters can usually provide such access, their use includes several associated risks. Some of these risks can be avoided or diminished if adequate peripheral venous access can be established. Some patients have adequate peripheral veins for apheresis that cannot be readily identified visually or by palpation. We hypothesized that ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access would benefit such patients and would lead to placement of fewer central venous catheters. The technique of ultrasound-guided peripheral access for apheresis has been in use at Houston Methodist Hospital since 2012. We performed a prospective review of patients undergoing inpatient and outpatient apheresis at Houston Methodist Hospital from July 1, 2015 to September 30, 2015, to assess its benefit. During this time, we performed 831 procedures on 186 patients, including 787 therapeutic plasma exchanges, three red blood cell exchanges, 41 peripheral stem cell collections. Ultrasound-guided vascular access was used for 68 procedures (8% of all procedures), including 62 therapeutic plasma exchanges, 4 peripheral stem cell collections, and 2 red blood cell changes. Use of ultrasound-guided peripheral access prevented the placement of central venous catheters in 37 (20%) patients, demonstrating its utility in a busy transfusion service.

  9. Pain control for sternal fracture using an ultrasound-guided hematoma block.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sharon R; Price, Daniel D; Penner, Erik

    2010-04-01

    In this case report, an ultrasound-guided hematoma block was performed in the Emergency Department (ED) for immediate and effective pain control in a patient suffering from a sternal fracture. This technique of anesthesia may allow safer and more effective analgesia and a more rapid discharge from the hospital or ED in selected cases.

  10. PLUS: open-source toolkit for ultrasound-guided intervention systems.

    PubMed

    Lasso, Andras; Heffter, Tamas; Rankin, Adam; Pinter, Csaba; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2014-10-01

    A variety of advanced image analysis methods have been under the development for ultrasound-guided interventions. Unfortunately, the transition from an image analysis algorithm to clinical feasibility trials as part of an intervention system requires integration of many components, such as imaging and tracking devices, data processing algorithms, and visualization software. The objective of our paper is to provide a freely available open-source software platform-PLUS: Public software Library for Ultrasound-to facilitate rapid prototyping of ultrasound-guided intervention systems for translational clinical research. PLUS provides a variety of methods for interventional tool pose and ultrasound image acquisition from a wide range of tracking and imaging devices, spatial and temporal calibration, volume reconstruction, simulated image generation, and recording and live streaming of the acquired data. This paper introduces PLUS, explains its functionality and architecture, and presents typical uses and performance in ultrasound-guided intervention systems. PLUS fulfills the essential requirements for the development of ultrasound-guided intervention systems and it aspires to become a widely used translational research prototyping platform. PLUS is freely available as open source software under BSD license and can be downloaded from http://www.plustoolkit.org.

  11. Utility of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block for day-case inguinal hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    Pitoni, Sara; Gonnella, Gianluigi; Alfieri, Sergio; Catarci, Stefano; Draisci, Gaetano

    2017-01-01

    Background The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a regional anesthesia technique that effectively reduces the pain intensity and use of analgesia in abdominal surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the utility of the ultrasound-guided TAP block in improving the efficacy of the ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric nerve (IIN/IHN) block for intraoperative anesthesia and postoperative pain control in day-case inguinal hernia repair (IHR). Methods We conducted a descriptive study of patients undergoing elective primary unilateral open IHR. Fifty-nine patients were divided into two groups according to the anesthetic technique used: ultrasound-guided TAP block plus ultrasound-guided IIN/IHN block (TAP group) vs. ultrasound-guided IIN/IHN block alone (IIN/IHN group). The outcome measures were the adequacy of anesthesia during surgery and postoperative analgesia. Results Four patients (12.5%) in the TAP group and 10 patients (37.0%) in the IIN/IHN group experienced inadequate anesthesia and needed systemic sedation (P < 0.05). No significant differences in additional local anesthetic volume were found between the two groups. Patients in the TAP group reported lower pain scores at the end of surgery (0.4 ± 0.8 vs. 2.1 ± 2.5, P < 0.01), at 2 hours after surgery (0.8 ± 1.3 vs. 3.0 ± 2.2, P < 0.01), at discharge (1.4 ± 1.2 vs. 4.3 ± 2.2, P < 0.01), and at 24 hours (1.5 ± 1.1 vs. 4.5 ± 2.3, P < 0.01). Conclusions The combination of the TAP and IIN/IHN blocks is associated with better intraoperative anesthesia and lower postoperative pain scores compared with the IIN/IHN block alone. PMID:28184266

  12. Effectiveness of splinting and splinting plus local steroid injection in severe carpal tunnel syndrome: A Randomized control clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Khosrawi, Saeid; Emadi, Masoud; Mahmoodian, Amir Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Study aimed to compare the effectiveness of two commonly used conservative treatments, splinting and local steroid injection in improving clinical and nerve conduction findings of the patients with severe carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Materials and Methods: In this randomized control clinical trial, the patients with severe CTS selected and randomized in two interventional groups. Group A was prescribed to use full time neutral wrist splint and group B was injected with 40 mg Depo-Medrol and prescribed to use the full time neutral wrist splint for 12 weeks. Clinical and nerve conduction findings of the patients was evaluated at baseline, 4 and 12 weeks after interventions. Results: Twenty-two and 21 patients were allocated in group A and B, respectively. Mean of clinical symptoms and functional status scores, nerve conduction variables and patients’ satisfaction score were not significant between group at baseline and 4 and 12 weeks after intervention. Within the group comparison, there was significant improvement in the patients’ satisfaction, clinical and nerve conduction items between the baseline level and 4 weeks after intervention and between the baseline and 12 weeks after intervention (P < 0.01). The difference was significant for functional status score between 4 and 12 weeks after intervention in group B (P = 0.02). Conclusion: considering some findings regarding the superior effect of splinting plus local steroid injection on functional status scale and median nerve distal motor latency, it seems that using combination therapy could be more effective for long-term period specially in the field of functional improvement of CTS. PMID:26962518

  13. Ultrasound-guided intervention in the ankle and foot

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Gina M; Watura, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In this comprehensive review, we discuss the main interventions performed in the foot and ankle for Achilles tendinopathy, Morton's neuromas and Plantar fasciitis as well as techniques for intra-articular and peritendinous injections. We present the different imaging techniques and injectable agents that can be used in clinical practice, trying to help the reader decide the most appropriate way of managing the patient with a problem in the ankle and foot. PMID:26537692

  14. Ultrasound-guided procedure for the treatment of trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Di Sante, Luca; Cacchio, Angelo; Scettri, Paola; Paoloni, Marco; Ioppolo, Francesco; Santilli, Valter

    2011-09-01

    Initial treatment of trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis (TMO) often consists of intra-articular injection of corticosteroids or hyaluronic acid. Several studies have shown that ultrasound (US)-guided injections demonstrate greater precision and effectiveness when compared to blind techniques. The aim of our study was to describe a simple and reliable procedure of US-guided intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid solution in patients with TMO. Thirty-one patients with TMO received one administration per week, for 3 weeks, of US-guided intra-articular injection with 1 ml of hyaluronic acid solution. Patients were evaluated before treatment and at 1, 3, and 6 months after the first injection with visual analog scale (VAS) score and Duruöz Hand Index (DHI). One month after the end of treatment, subjective patient response to therapy was evaluated using a 6-point Likert scale. A statistically significant VAS score reduction was observed at 1 and 3 months after the end of treatment (P<0.01) but not at 6-month follow-up (P=0.6). No statistically significant difference was found on the DHI total score at 1- (P=0.08), 3- (P=0.1) and 6-month (P=0.9) follow-ups. One month after the end of treatment, 29 (93.5%) patients reported a Likert scale score of "1" or "2." The described US-guided technique of trapeziometacarpal joint injection is easy to perform and revealed excellent accuracy. Nevertheless, intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid provided significant pain relief only for a 6-month follow-up period and did not improve hand function. No pain relief was detected at 6-month follow-up, suggesting that periodic injections should be required to gain long-term effectiveness.

  15. [Influence of steroid therapy local injection of steroidal in the region of the stylomastoid foramen and physiotherapy on the recovery of stapedial reflex in patients with facial nerve paralysis].

    PubMed

    Krukowska, Jolanta; Czernicki, Jan; Zalewski, Piotr

    2004-01-01

    There are much more publications which informates about positive effects of advisability propose steroid's cure in patients with facial nerve palsy. The aim of the studies was to evaluate the influence of steroidal and physical treatment on the recovery of stapedial reflex and of functions of the damaged nerve. The studies were performed on 37 patients with palsy of facial nerve. Taking into account the stapedial reflex (before the beginning of the treatment) and local injection of steroidal in the region of the stylomastoid foramen, the patients were divided into two groups: I group--21 persons with lacking stapedial reflex, who were not given steroid, II group--16 persons with lacking stapedial reflex who received steroid. Evaluation of results of treatment was performed by means of the Pietruski, House and Brackmann scales, registration of stapedial reflex and accommodation coefficient. The results indicate that local steroid in palsy facial nerve is the treatment of choice in cases of intratemporal branches injury (lack of stapedial reflex) and shortens of duration of stapedial reflex and the nerve function recovery.

  16. Giardia lamblia infection diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Carter, J Elliot; Nelson, John J; Eves, Matthew; Boudreaux, Carole

    2007-06-01

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia is a major cause of gastrointestinal disease worldwide. We report the case of a 59-yr-old male who presented to his primary care physician with complaints of abdominal pain and weight loss. Imaging studies revealed a liver mass and a pancreatic head mass. Biopsy of the liver mass proved to be benign, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of the mass in the head of the pancreas showed no evidence of malignancy; however, numerous pear-shaped, binucleated, flagellated organisms morphologically consistent with trophozoites of Giardia lamblia were identified in the specimen. With the increasing use of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for sampling of gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, and pancreatic lesions, cytopathologists examining such specimens will need to be familiar with the diagnostic characteristics of this protozoal parasite.

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Tenotomy of Biceps Tendon: Technical Feasibility on Cadavers.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Mauri, Giovanni; Messina, Carmelo; Aliprandi, Alberto; Secchi, Francesco; Sardanelli, Francesco; Randelli, Pietro Simone

    2016-10-01

    We tested the technical feasibility of ultrasound-guided percutaneous tenotomy of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) in cadavers. Both shoulders of two fresh cadavers were scanned anteriorly to evaluate the extra-articular portion of the LHBT. Under ultrasound monitoring, a scalpel was advanced obliquely up to touch the superficial medial side of the LHBT, cutting it until the tendon was not visible anymore. Ultrasound evaluation was repeated after the procedure, and anatomic dissection was performed. The procedure was 100% feasible: four cuts were made to completely sever the tendon; the duration was less than 1 min. Skin incision measured 5 mm in two cases and 6 mm in two cases. Anatomic dissection confirmed complete tendon cut in all cases with proximal and distal tendon stumps very close to each other. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous LHBT tenotomy was 100% technically feasible in cadavers with a quick procedure and minimal cutaneous incision.

  18. Benefits and Pitfalls of Cadavers as Learning Tool for Ultrasound-guided Regional Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Chhavi; Lalwani, Sanjeev; Ray, Bikash Ranjan; Sinha, Sumit; Kumar, Abhyuday

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA), like other basic skills, should be learnt in a simulation laboratory before performing on the patient. Cadavers provide an ideal tool for learning sonoanatomy and skills required for performing UGRA. On the basis of preservation technique used, the cadavers can be formalin embalmed cadavers, Thiel cadavers (soft cadavers), and fresh frozen cadavers. We compared three types of cadavers for performing ultrasound-guided upper and lower limb blocks. We observed that fresh frozen and Thiel cadavers were less smelling and had more realistic appearance as compared to formalin embalmed cadavers. It was seen that Thiel cadavers were more flexible and hence, rotation of neck, shoulder and knee was easier. Although images seen in most cadavers were comparable with live subjects but, Thiel cadavers provided more realistic model. PMID:28298747

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Drainage of Neonatal Pyometrocolpos Under Local Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Algin, Oktay; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Kilic, Nizamettin

    2011-02-15

    Hydrometrocolpos is an uncommon congenital disorder with cystic dilatation of the vagina and uterus that occurs as a result of accumulated secretions from the reproductive tract due to distal genital tract obstruction. Secondary infection may also occur, resulting in pyometrocolpos, a potentially lethal disease. Immediate drainage of the cystic mass in patients determined to have pyometrocolpos is required to prevent or treat uropathy and septicemia until definitive corrective surgery can be performed. We report an unusual cause of obstructive uropathy in three infants: pyometrocolpos due to lower genital tract atresia. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage of the pyometrocolpos resulted in dramatically improved clinical and laboratory findings in these patients. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage under local anesthesia is a simple, minimally invasive, safe, and effective procedure that facilitates later successful corrective surgery and avoids the need for more complex drainage procedures.

  20. Ultrasound guided electrochemotherapy for the treatment of a clear cell thymoma in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Menicagli, Francesco; Pettorali, Michela; Baldi, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    A twelve-year-old male castrated domestic shorthair cat was presented for rapidly progressing respiratory distress. The cat was depressed, tachypneic and moderately responsive. Ultrasonography showed a mediastinal mass associated with a significant pleural effusion that needed tapping every five to seven days. Ultrasound guided biopsy yielded a diagnosis of clear cell thymoma upon histopathology. After complete staging procedures, the owner elected to treat the cat with electrochemotherapy (ECT) using systemic bleomycin. Two sessions of ultrasound guided ECT were performed at two week intervals with trains of biphasic electric pulses applied using needle electrodes until complete coverage of the area was achieved. The treatment was well tolerated and resulted in partial remission (PR). Additional sessions were performed on a monthly basis. The cat is still in PR after fourteen months. ECT resulted in improved local control and should be considered among the available adjuvant treatments in pets carrying visceral tumors. PMID:28331834

  1. Ultrasound-guided continuous quadratus lumborum block for postoperative analgesia in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Goswami, Jyotsna; Patro, Viplab

    2015-02-01

    Quadratus lumborum block is a recently introduced variation of transversus abdominis plane block. In this report, we describe the use of ultrasound-guided continuous quadratus lumborum block for postoperative analgesia in a 7-year-old child scheduled to undergo radical nephrectomy (left-sided) for Wilms tumor. The result was excellent postoperative analgesia and minimal requirement for rescue analgesics. The modification described may allow easier placement of a catheter for continuous infusion of local anesthetic.

  2. A scoping review of the evidence for teaching ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Nix, Catherine M; Margarido, Clarita B; Awad, Imad T; Avila, Arsenio; Cheung, Jeffrey J H; Dubrowski, Adam; McCartney, Colin J L

    2013-01-01

    A scoping review was performed to assess published evidence regarding how best to teach ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA). The literature search yielded 205 articles, of which 35 met the inclusion criteria. Current literature on the topic can be divided into 3 main themes: the development of motor skills, learning and teaching sonoanatomy, and understanding of the requirements for establishing a UGRA education program and evaluation. We discuss the current status and future direction of research on UGRA training.

  3. Noninvasive Label-Free Detection of Micrometastases in the Lymphatics with Ultrasound-Guided Photoacoustic Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0356 TITLE: Noninvasive Label- Free Detection of Micrometastases in the Lymphatics With Ultrasound-Guided...Report 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Noninvasive Label- Free Detection of Micrometastases in the Lymphatics With...Journal publications. Geoffrey P. Luke and Stanislav Y. Emelianov; Label- free Detection of Lymph Node Metastases with US-guided Functional Photoacoustic

  4. Clinical Outcomes of Ultrasound-Guided Aspiration and Lavage in Calcific Tendinosis of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Julie T.; Bracilovic, Ana; Cooper, Grant; Sofka, Carolyn; Lutz, Gregory E.

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided aspiration and lavage in the treatment of patients with calcific tendinosis of the shoulder. Materials and methods Retrospective chart review resulted in 44 patients who were identified as having received ultrasound-guided aspiration of calcific tendinosis of the shoulder between 2000 and 2003. Of these, 36 patients were interviewed by telephone for pre- and posttreatment assessment of pain, shoulder function, prior shoulder surgery, injury, and prescribed treatment modalities with a follow-up time of 8 months to 3.1 years (mean = 22.5 months). L’Insalata score, numeric rating scale (NRS), and patient satisfaction score served as outcome measures. Results Our criteria for a successful outcome included (1) 12-point or greater improvement in the L’Insalata shoulder rating questionnaire, (2) 2-point or greater improvement in the NRS, (3) patient satisfaction rating of “good”, “very good”, or “excellent”, (4) patients’ willingness to undergo the procedure again if they experienced recurrent symptoms, and (5) 1 month or less of analgesic medication use after the aspiration procedure. We determined that ultrasound-guided aspiration of calcific tendinosis of the shoulder resulted in a successful outcome for 75% (27/36) of patients with a mean 20.2-point improvement in the L’Insalata shoulder rating questionnaire score and a mean 6.4-point improvement in the NRS (p < 0.01). Conclusion: This retrospective study suggests that ultrasound-guided aspiration and lavage of calcific shoulder deposits appears to be an efficacious therapeutic modality for treatment of calcific tendinosis. Further studies involving prospective randomized controlled trials would be helpful to further assess the long-term efficacy of this procedure as a minimally invasive treatment for calcific tendinosis of the shoulder. PMID:18751778

  5. Ultrasound-guided subclavian venous catheterisation - is this the way forward? A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Shah, A; Smith, A; Panchatsharam, S

    2013-08-01

    Central venous catheterisation is a commonly performed procedure in anaesthesia, critical care, acute and emergency medicine. Traditionally, subclavian venous catheterisation has been performed using the landmark technique and because of the complications associated with this technique, it is not commonly performed in the United Kingdom - where the accepted practice is ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein catheterisation. Subclavian vein catheterisation offers particular advantages over the internal jugular and femoral vein sites such as reduced rates of line-related sepsis, improved patient comfort and swifter access in trauma situations where the internal jugular vein may not be easily accessible. There is a growing body of evidence to suggest a potential emerging role for ultrasound-guided subclavian vein catheterisation. Barriers to this approach include many physicians still believing that the clavicle obscures imaging of the vein. In this article, we review the evidence supporting ultrasound-guided subclavian vein catheterisation and ask the question whether, in view of it potential advantages, it could be the way forward?

  6. Ultrasound-guided breast biopsy using a 10-gauge self-contained vacuum-assisted device.

    PubMed

    Vag, Tibor; Pfleiderer, Stefan O R; Böttcher, Joachim; Wurdinger, Susanne; Gajda, Mieczyslaw; Camara, Oumar; Kaiser, Werner A

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of a self-contained battery-driven vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) system for the sampling of breast masses under ultrasound guidance. Sixty-five patients with 70 lesions underwent percutaneous 10-gauge ultrasound-guided VABB using the coaxial technique. In 38 lesions, subsequent surgery and comparison of histology was performed. The remaining 32 cases were followed-up and defined as true negative after a cancer-free interval of 24 months. VABB revealed malignant histology in 28 (40%) cases. Twenty-four malignancies were confirmed after surgery. Four invasive cancers verified in VABB were not found during surgery because they were completely removed, as proved by a disease-free interval of 24 months. One cancer missed in ultrasound-guided VABB due to its small size was successfully diagnosed with stereotactic VABB and thus turned out to be false negative, resulting in an overall sensitivity of 96.6%. Forty-one patients were free of cancer during the follow-up period of at least 24 months. In conclusion, the self-contained VABB device is well suited for ultrasound-guided breast biopsies.

  7. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous portal transplantation of peripheral blood monocytes in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Su Jong; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Yun Bin; Cho, Yuri; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Lee, Minjong; Yoo, Jeong-Ju; Cho, Eun Ju; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Yoon Jun; Kim, Chung Yong

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Liver transplantation offers the only definite cure for cirrhosis but lacking donors is problem. Stem cell therapy is attractive in this setting. In this study, we aimed to explore the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous portal transplantation of peripheral blood monocyte cell (PBMC) in cirrhotic patients. Methods A total of nine decompensated cirrhotic patients were randomized into three groups: group 1 (n = 3) was control group, group 2 (n = 3) received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilization for 3 days, and group 3 (n = 3) received G-CSF mobilized PBMCs by leukapheresis and PBMC transplantation through ultrasound-guided percutaneous portal vein puncture. Liver function and clinical features were evaluated. Results At baseline, the Child-Turcotte-Pugh and the model for end-stage liver disease scores were comparable in study groups. Compared with group 1, there was a tendency to improve liver function in group 3 at 6 months after treatment. Treatment was tolerable and no complications were encountered related to the G-CSF mobilization or percutaneous portal administration of PBMCs. Imaging studies showed patent portal veins at the end of the study period. Conclusions Autologous PBMC transplantation through ultrasound-guided percutaneous portal vein puncture could be considered as a safe alternative treatment for decompensated cirrhotic patients. PMID:27044856

  8. New developments in endoscopic ultrasound-guided therapies.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Manoop S; Arora, Ayush

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has opened new horizons in minimally invasive therapies for diverse gastrointestinal pathologies. Digestive Disease Weak 2015 held in Washington, DC., USA featured exciting research articles on EUS-guided therapeutic procedures. EUS-guided biliary drainage has been attempted and described for many years. There seems to be a lot of interest among various international groups to compare this technique with other alternatives in terms of efficacy and safety. Similarly, EUS-guided pancreatic drainage of cysts and fluid collections continues to evolve with new stents and devices being developed specifically for deployment under endosonographic guidance. EUS-guided ablation of cystic pancreatic tumors is innovative but not always effective. Combining alcohol ablation with injecting chemotherapeutic agents may improve long-term results regarding efficacy. Similarly, for solid pancreatic tumors there appears to be ongoing interest and continuing efforts in injecting different chemotherapeutic or ablative agents, delivering fiducials for radiation guidance and even attempting ablation with radiofrequency. Gastric variceal treatment and EUS-guided anastomoses also continue to be investigated. This review article is focused on the recent developments in EUS-guided therapies presented at Digestive Disease Week (DDW) 2015.

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation therapy for tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Ying; Li, Zhao-Shen; Jin, Zhen-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has evolved into a useful therapeutic tool for treating a broad range of tumors since being introduced into clinical practice as a diagnostic modality nearly three decades ago. In particular, EUS-guided fine-needle injection has proven a successful minimally invasive approach for treating benign lesions such as pancreatic cysts, relieving pancreatic pain through celiac plexus neurolysis, and controlling local tumor growth of unresectable malignancies by direct delivery of anti-tumor agents. One such ablative agent, ethanol, is capable of safely ablating solid or cystic lesions in hepatic tissues via percutaneous injection. Recent research and clinical interest has focused on the promise of EUS-guided ethanol ablation as a safe and effective method for treating pancreatic tumor patients with small lesions or who are poor operative candidates. Although it is not likely to replace radical resection of localized lesions or systemic treatment of metastatic tumors in all patients, EUS-guided ablation is an ideal method for patients who refuse or are not eligible for surgery. Moreover, this treatment modality may play an active role in the development of future pancreatic tumor treatments. This article reviews the most recent clinical applications of EUS-guided ethanol ablation in humans for treating pancreatic cystic tumors, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, and metastatic lesions. PMID:23801831

  10. [Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita complicated by esophageal stenosis. Endoscopic treatment with thermoplastic dilators and intralesional steroid injection].

    PubMed

    Moura, E G; Couto-Júnior, D S; Alvarado-Escobar, H; da Costa-Martins, B; Sallum, R A; Artifon, E L; Sakai, P

    2011-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a rare auto-immune dermatologic disease, produced by auto-antibodies against colagen VII. We report a 44 years old male patient with EBA diagnosed 15 years before, who presented with progressive disphagia, being diagnosed an esophageal involvement of EBA. The patient was submitted to endoscopic treatment with thermoplastic bougie dilation and intralesional corticosteroid injection. The patient improved clinically with recovery of nutritional status. Esophageal involvement in EBA is very rare and its reason is still unknown. Endoscopic approach must be cautiously performed with the use of small diameter endoscopes, small caliber dilators, intralesional injection of corticosteroid and enteral tube in order to minimize the risks of complications, as well as esophageal rest from food trauma and better reparatory molding of the epithelium.

  11. Safety of 1000 CT-guided steroid injections with air used to localize the epidural space.

    PubMed

    Chang, A; Pochert, S; Romano, C; Brook, A; Miller, T

    2011-10-01

    Historically, ESIs were performed without any imaging guidance, resulting in erroneous placement in up to 30% of injections. Fluoroscopic imaging is now used to guide most procedures. Recently, several reports have described the use of CT to guide ESIs instead of fluoroscopy. CT provides the ability to use air as contrast to localize the epidural space. This retrospective review will discuss findings in 1000 CT-guided ESIs with air localization.

  12. Sentinel lymph node biopsy revisited: ultrasound-guided photoacoustic detection of micrometastases using molecularly targeted plasmonic nanosensors

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Geoffrey P.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.

    2014-01-01

    Metastases rather than primary tumors are responsible for killing most cancer patients. Cancer cells often invade regional lymph nodes (LN) before colonizing other parts of the body. However, due to the low sensitivity and specificity of current imaging methods to detect localized nodal spread, an invasive surgical procedure - sentinel lymph node biopsy - is generally employed to identify metastatic cancer cells. Here we introduce a new approach for more sensitive in vivo detection of lymph node micrometastases, based on the use of ultrasound-guided spectroscopic photoacoustic (sPA) imaging of molecularly-activated plasmonic nanosensors (MAPS). Using a metastatic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma, we showed that MAPS targeted to the EGFR shifted their optical absorption spectrum to the red-near-infrared region after specific interactions with nodal metastatic cells, enabling their non-invasive detection by sPA. Notably, LN metastases as small as 50 μm were detected at centimeter-depth range with high sensitivity and specificity. Large sPA signals appeared in metastatic LN within 30 minutes of MAPS injection, in support of the clinical utility of this method. Our findings offer a rapid and effective tool to non-invasively identify micrometastases as an alternate to sentinal node biopsy analysis. PMID:25106426

  13. Fluoroscopy-guided intra-articular steroid injection for sternoclavicular joint arthritis secondary to limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Emel; Cüce, Isa; Erol, Kemal

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of fluoroscopy-guided intraarticular steroid injection for sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) arthritis caused by limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (SSc). A 50-year-old woman diagnosed with limited cutaneous SSc presented with swelling and pain in the right SCJ. MRI revealed signs of inflammation consistent with right-sided sternoclavicular joint arthritis. After the failure of oral medications, we performed fluoroscopy-guided injection in this region. She reported complete resolution of her symptoms at 4 and 12-week follow-ups. This outcome suggests that a fluoroscopy-guided SCJ injection might be a safe and successful treatment option for sternoclavicular joint arthritis. PMID:28119772

  14. Should routine MRI of the lumbar spine be required prior to lumbar epidural steroid injection for sciatica pain?

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Ramis F.; Lissounov, Alexei; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2015-01-01

    Background: We describe three patients who received lumbar epidural steroid injections (LESI) for lumbosacral radicular pain that resulted in worsening of their symptoms. The procedures were performed following a review of remote diagnostic imaging studies. These cases demonstrate the lack of consensus in pain management domains for how to approach the workup and treatment of persistent/chronic low back pain, with a noted fragmentation in pain management strategies and applied therapies. Case Description: We present three patients; two female patients (37 and 38 years old) undergoing LESI for remotely diagnosed disc herniations, and one 61-year-old male receiving an LESI for a presumed, unverified lumbar intervertebral disc disorder. Following a worsening of symptoms after LESI, neurosurgical consultations ultimately determined the presence of, respectively, an epidural hematoma, a neurilemoma, and a lung cancer metastasis to the sacrum as the source of symptoms, instead of being due to the intervertebral disc pathology. Conclusions: We would like to emphasize several principles in the diagnosis and use of imaging of the lumbosacral region prior to undertaking invasive neuraxial procedures. PMID:25883840

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Single-Blinded Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed the therapeutic efficiency of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment of the median nerve in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blinded study. Forty-four patients with CTS were randomized into intervention or control groups. Patients in the intervention group were treated with PRF and night splint, and the control group was prescribed night splint alone. Primary outcome was the onset time of significant pain relief assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS), and secondary outcomes included evaluation of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) results, cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve, sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) of the median nerve, and finger pinch strength. All outcome measurements were performed at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. Results Thirty-six patients completed the study. The onset time of pain relief in the intervention group was significantly shorter (median onset time of 2 days vs. 14 days; hazard ratio = 7.37; 95% CI, 3.04–17.87) compared to the control group (p < 0.001). Significant improvement in VAS and BCTQ scores (p < 0.05) was detected in the intervention group at all follow-up periods compared to the controls (except for the severity subscale of BCTQ at week 1). Ultrasound-guided PRF treatment resulted in a lower VAS score and stronger finger pinch compared to the control group over the entire study. Conclusions Our study shows that ultrasound-guided PRF serves as a better approach for pain relief in patients with CTS. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02217293 PMID:26067628

  16. Long-term outcome of benign fibroadenomas treated by ultrasound-guided percutaneous excision.

    PubMed

    Grady, Ian; Gorsuch, Heidi; Wilburn-Bailey, Shelly

    2008-01-01

    Surgical as well as conservative treatment has been described for fibroadenomas. Both have disadvantages. A minimally invasive treatment, ultrasound-guided, vacuum-assisted percutaneous excision has been shown to facilitate the removal of all imaged evidence of benign breast lesions, including fibroadenomas up to 3 cm in diameter. This study is performed to assess the long-term outcome of ultrasound-guided percutaneous excision as a minimally invasive treatment for fibroadenomas. A retrospective review of 69 consecutive fibroadenomas treated with ultrasound-guided percutaneous excision between May, 2001 and December, 2005 was carried out. All these lesions underwent percutaneous excision of all imaged lesion evidence. Clinical and sonographic follow-up was recommended for all patients every 6 months. Initial size, location, and patient age were recorded for each treated lesion. Of 69 lesions treated, 52 were available for follow-up. The median follow-up period was 22 months, with a range of 7 to 59 months. At 6 months, there were no fibroadenoma recurrences. Follow-up sonography demonstrated recurrences in 13 lesions distributed across eight patients. The overall recurrence rate was 15% (8/52) with an actuarial recurrence rate of 33% at 59 months. All of the recurrences were in lesions which were larger than 2 cm in size at initial presentation. Our data suggest that the mechanism of recurrence is the regrowth of retained lesion fragments too small to be detected by ultrasound--not the incomplete excision of all imaged lesion evidence. Despite successful percutaneous excision, fibroadenomas do recur. Lesions smaller than 2 cm in size, so treated, do not need additional therapy or surveillance. Fibroadenomas larger than 2 cm are prone to recurrence and require additional treatment.

  17. Effectiveness of single-session ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy in simple breast cysts

    PubMed Central

    Özgen, Ali

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of single-session ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy in simple breast cysts. METHODS From January 2002 to January 2014, 35 simple breast cysts (mean volume, 8.2 mL; range, 4–33 mL) in 28 females (mean age, 39 years) were evaluated. In a single session, all cysts were aspirated using 20G needles, refilled with 99% ethanol (90% of the volume of the aspirated fluid), and reaspirated completely after 10 minutes of exposure under ultrasound guidance. Follow-up ultrasonography examinations were performed at one week, one month, three months, and six months for all patients and 12 months, 18 months, and 24 months for available patients. Follow-up duration varied between 6 and 24 months (mean, 15 months). RESULTS The technical success rate of ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy was 97%. The needle tip was dislocated and ethanol was given into the breast parenchyma in one patient (3%). One cyst (3%) was reaspirated at the first week follow-up due to intracystic hemorrhage. Of the 34 cysts treated, 25 (74%) completely responded to therapy and were no longer detectable on follow-up examinations. Eight cysts (24%) significantly decreased in size and then completely disappeared at six months. At the end of the follow-up period, the clinical success rate reached 100%, and none of the cysts were visible. Except mild to moderate sensation of burning or pain which disappeared or subsided significantly in a couple of minutes, no other complications were observed in patients. CONCLUSION Ultrasound-guided ethanol sclerotherapy is a fast, safe, and highly effective method in the treatment of simple breast cysts. PMID:27087190

  18. Peridural Anesthesia or Ultrasound-Guided Continuous 3-in-1 Block

    PubMed Central

    Luger, Thomas J.; Kammerlander, Christian; Benz, Maureen; Luger, Markus F.; Garoscio, Ivo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to investigate the clinical relevance of preoperative acute pain management and cardiovascular stability by ultrasound-guided continuous 3-in-1 nerve block in very elderly patients with hip fracture when compared to epidural anesthesia (PDA). Methods: To study the analgesic effect, we enrolled 37 very elderly patients with hip fractures, of whom 3 patients with dementia had to be excluded. Thus, 34 patients were randomized to 1 of the 3 groups: group A (ultrasound-guided continuous 3-in-1 block, bupivacaine; n = 10, dropout rate: 0), group B (PDA, bupivacaine; n = 14, dropout rate: 8), and group C (systemic pain therapy, piritramide/paracetamol; n = 10, dropout rate: 0). Pain intensity was assessed preoperatively and up to 24 hours postoperatively using a visual analog scale, verbal rating scale, analgesic consumption, scale of well-being, and cardiocirculatory parameters (eg, serum troponin T). Results: Our data show that in the preoperative period both regional anesthesia (RA) procedures (analgesia responders after 1 hour: 86.7% and 100%; P = .001) were superior to systemic analgesia (analgesia responders: 46.7%), and the rescue medication requirement in the 2 RA groups was significantly lower (P = .02). Serum troponin T level increased only in the systemic analgesia group (P = .04). In the emergency department, the disadvantage of PDA in geriatric patients with hip fracture was the fact that procedures were more complex, resulting in a high dropout rate (57.1%). The use of PDA has to be critically discussed for ethical concerns. Conclusion: In the specific situation of acute hospital admission, the ultrasound-guided continuous 3-in-1 block appears to be indicated as a stress-free means of providing adequate preoperative pain relief in very elderly patients with hip fracture. However, these findings should be corroborated by studies involving larger numbers of patients. PMID:23569705

  19. Ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy for benign non-thyroid cystic mass in the neck

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Surgical excision has traditionally been the treatment of choice for benign non-thyroid cystic neck masses, including lymphatic malformation, ranula, branchial cleft cyst, thyroglossal duct cyst, and parathyroid cyst. However, there is a tendency toward recurrence after surgery, and surgery may be accompanied by complications, including nerve injuries, vascular injuries, and scar formation. Ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy using various agents has been challenged and successfully applied as an alternative treatment for benign non-thyroid cystic neck masses. This report reviews the available sclerosing agents and describes the applications of sclerotherapy to the treatment of benign cystic masses in the neck. PMID:24936500

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Serratus Anterior Plane Block in Breast Reconstruction Surgery.

    PubMed

    Khemka, Rakhi; Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Ahmed, Rosina; Datta, Taniya; Agarwal, Sanjit

    2016-05-01

    Pecs block and its variations have been used for various breast surgeries. We describe 2 cases of mastectomy and breast reconstruction by latissimus dorsi (LD) flap where regional analgesia was provided by a combination of ultrasound-guided Pecs-I block and serratus anterior plane block, a recently described technique in which local anesthetic is deposited in the plane between the LD and serratus anterior muscle. This resulted in excellent intraoperative and postoperative analgesia and a minimum of systemic analgesics. The described technique is safe to administer and provides good analgesia for breast reconstruction surgery by LD flap.

  1. [Ultrasound-guided cutaneous intercostal branches nerves block: A good analgesic alternative for gallbladder open surgery].

    PubMed

    Fernández Martín, M T; López Álvarez, S; Mozo Herrera, G; Platero Burgos, J J

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become the standard treatment for gallbladder diseases. However, there are still some patients for whom conversion to open surgery is required. This surgery can produce significant post-operative pain. Opioids drugs have traditionally been used to treat this pain, but side effects have led to seeking alternatives (plexus, nerve or fascia blocks or wound). The cases are presented of 4 patients subjected to ultrasound-guided intercostal branches blocks in the mid-axillary line from T6 to T12 with levobupivacaine as an analgesic alternative in open surgery of gallbladder, with satisfactory results.

  2. Treatment efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency ablation for benign thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-long; Lu, Feng; Yue, Wen-wen; Sun, Li-ping; Bo, Xiao-wan; Guo, Le-hang; Xu, Jun-mei; Liu, Bo-ji; Li, Dan-dan; Qu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency ablation (BRFA) of benign thyroid nodules by comparison with a matched untreated control group. Methods: The therapeutic efficacy and safety in 35 patients who were subjected to a single session of ultrasound-guided percutaneous BRFA (Group A) for benign thyroid nodules were compared with those in 35 untreated patients (Group B) with benign nodules. The benign nature of all the nodules was confirmed by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB), and all the patients had normal thyroid functions. BRFA was performed with a bipolar electrode (CelonProSurge 150–T20) with an output power of 20 W. Nodule volume, thyroid function and clinical symptoms of all the patients were compared before treatment and during follow-up. Results: In Group A, the BRFA procedures were completed with a mean time of 10.02 ± 3.30 min (range, 5.47–16.03 min) and with a mean total energy deposition of 10.747 ± 3704 J (range, 5510–17.770 J). The procedures were tolerated well in all the patients without causing any major complications. At the 6-month follow-up, all of the nodule volume decreased significantly (from 8.81 ± 8.66 to 1.59 ± 1.55 ml, p < 0.001) in Group A, whereas the nodule volume increased from 6.90 ± 3.77 to 7.87 ± 3.95 ml in Group B (p < 0.001). All (100%) the 35 nodules in Group A had volume reduction ratios (VRRs) of >50%, among which 3 (8.57%) had VRRs >90%. In Group A, the clinical symptoms of the patients who had symptoms before BRFA disappeared, whereas in Group B, the patients had no resolution of clinical symptoms at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided percutaneous BRFA seems to be an effective and safe method for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. It may gain a wide use in clinical practice. Advances in knowledge: Based on the comparable efficacy and clinical

  3. Ultrasound-guided truncal blocks: A new frontier in regional anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Khemka, Rakhi; Datta, Taniya

    2016-01-01

    The practice of regional anaesthesia is rapidly changing with the introduction of ultrasound into the working domain of the anaesthesiologist. New techniques are being pioneered. Among the recent techniques, notable are the truncal blocks, for example, the transversus abdominis plane block, rectus sheath block, hernia block and quadratus lumborum block in the abdomen and the pectoral nerves (Pecs) block 1 and 2, serratus anterior plane block and intercostal nerve block. This narrative review covers the brief anatomical discourse along with technical description of the ultrasound-guided truncal blocks. PMID:27761032

  4. Fortuitous Diagnosis of Preexisting Neuropathy During Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia Performance: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Marty, Philippe; Basset, Bertrand; Marquis, Constance; Merouani, Medhi; Rontes, Olivier; Delbos, Alain

    2017-03-31

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia requires the anesthesia provider to interpret new information. This article reports on the case of a 38-year-old man scheduled for a fifth metacarpal fracture repair. Ultrasound nerve examination revealed abnormal pathology of the axillary brachial plexus consisting of an increased volume of the terminal nerves of the brachial plexus. Ultrasound scanning initiated the subsequent diagnosis of multifocal motor neuropathy. Regional anesthesia was abandoned in favor of general anesthesia. Ultrasonography training needs to be expanded in the coming years to include awareness of the abnormal pathology, as it might impact the choice of anesthetic procedure and patient outcome.

  5. Pulmonary artery sarcoma diagnosed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Shingyoji, Masato; Ikebe, Dai; Itakura, Meiji; Nakajima, Takahiro; Itami, Makiko; Kimura, Hideki; Iizasa, Toshihiko

    2013-08-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare tumor that is often detected at an advanced stage, when disease is so widespread that a radical surgical procedure is no longer indicated. Therefore, less invasive biopsy techniques are required to establish a definitive preoperative diagnosis. Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is useful for producing real-time images of both lymph nodes and the interior of pulmonary arteries adjacent to the bronchi. We report a case with masslike lesions in the pulmonary artery that were observed by EBUS and from which tissue was obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) to establish a diagnosis of PAS.

  6. Hemobilia and other complications caused by percutaneous ultrasound-guided liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Bo

    2014-04-07

    Hemobilia accounts for approximately 3% of all major percutaneous liver biopsy complications, and rarely results from arterioportal fistula. We report a patient who suffered from four complications over 11 d after ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy: hemobilia, acute pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, and multiple stomach ulcers. Digital subtraction angiography was done after consultation with doctors, and showed obvious arteriovenous fistula of the right liver. The hepatic artery was selected and embolized by spring orbs. The active bleeding was stopped after embolization of the hepatic artery. The patient was discharged home on day 12 after embolization and remained well.

  7. Hemobilia and other complications caused by percutaneous ultrasound-guided liver biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Hemobilia accounts for approximately 3% of all major percutaneous liver biopsy complications, and rarely results from arterioportal fistula. We report a patient who suffered from four complications over 11 d after ultrasound-guided percutaneous liver biopsy: hemobilia, acute pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, and multiple stomach ulcers. Digital subtraction angiography was done after consultation with doctors, and showed obvious arteriovenous fistula of the right liver. The hepatic artery was selected and embolized by spring orbs. The active bleeding was stopped after embolization of the hepatic artery. The patient was discharged home on day 12 after embolization and remained well. PMID:24707158

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Scraping for Chronic Patellar Tendinopathy: A Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mederic M; Rajasekaran, Sathish

    2016-06-01

    Chronic patellar tendinopathy is a common complaint among athletes who repetitively stress the extensor mechanism of the knee. Multiple treatment options have been described, but evidence is lacking, specifically when eccentric loading has failed. Debate continues regarding the patho-etiology of chronic patellar tendon pain. There has been recent interest regarding the neurogenic influences involved in chronic tendinopathy, and interventions targeting neovessels and accompanying neonerves have shown promise. This is the first description of an ultrasound-guided technique in which the neovessels and accompanying neonerves in patellar tendinopathy were targeted using a needle scraping technique of the posterior surface of the patellar tendon.

  9. Cognitive Task Analysis for Instruction in Single-Injection Ultrasound Guided-Regional Anesthesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gucev, Gligor V.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive task analysis (CTA) is methodology for eliciting knowledge from subject matter experts. CTA has been used to capture the cognitive processes, decision-making, and judgments that underlie expert behaviors. A review of the literature revealed that CTA has not yet been used to capture the knowledge required to perform ultrasound guided…

  10. Transforaminal epidural steroid injections prevent the need for surgery in patients with sciatica secondary to lumbar disc herniation: a retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Neil A.; McKeon, Melissa D.; Abraham, Edward P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The median orthopedic surgery wait time in Canada is 33.7 weeks, thus alternative treatments for pathologies such as lumbar disc herniations (LDH) are needed. We sought to determine whether transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs) alleviate or merely delay the need for surgery. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients with LDH who received TFESIs between September 2006 and July 2008. Patient demographics, level and side of pathology, workers’ compensation status, levels injected, treatment outcome and time from referral to treatment were evaluated. The primary outcome measure was the need for versus the avoidance of surgery. Results We included 91 patients in our analysis. Time from family physician referral to injection was 123 (standard deviation [SD] 88) days; no significant differences in wait times were found between TFESI patients and those requiring surgery. In all, 51 patients (22 women, 29 men) with a mean age of 45.8 (SD 10.2) years avoided surgery following TFESI, whereas 40 patients (16 women, 24 mean) with a mean age of 43.1 (SD 12.0) years proceeded to surgery within 189 (SD 125) days postinjection. In all, 15 patients received multiple injections, and of these, 9 did not require surgical intervention. Age, sex and level/side of pathology did not influence the treatment outcome. Workers’ compensation status influenced outcome significantly; these patients demonstrated less benefit from TFESI. Conclusion Transforaminal epidural steroid injections are an important treatment tool, preventing the need for surgery in 56% of patients with LDH. PMID:23351495

  11. Predictors of response to intra-articular steroid injections in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Fatimah, Nibah; Salim, Babur; Raja, Ejaz-Ul-Haq; Nasim, Amjad

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the factors associated with response to intra-articular steroid injection (IASI) in patients with knee joint osteoarthritis. One hundred seventy-four female patients, age ranging from 30 to 80 years, diagnosed to have osteoarthritis of the knee joint, were given IASI. Response to IASI was assessed by using WOMAC and VAS at 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 3 months. At 3 months, the subjects were categorized as responders, partial responders and non-responders to treatment by IASI. Various factors were narrowed down to see their effect on response, namely age, BMI, smoking habits, comorbidities, presence of clinical effusion, radiographic score, local knee tenderness, range of movement and socioeconomic status. One hundred twenty-four patients completed the study. 16.1 % showed 50 % or more improvement in WOMAC score at 3 months post IASI therapy, whereas 38.7 % of OA patients had more than 50 % improvement in VAS score. Out of all factors, range of movement, local knee tenderness and radiographic score of the affected joint are the three parameters which can predict the improvement in WOMAC score after 3 months of IASI therapy (P = 0.013, P = 0.045 and P = 0.000, respectively). Age of the patient can predict improvement in VAS at 3 months post IASI (P = 0.027). We conclude that age, range of movement, local knee tenderness and radiographic score of the affected joint can predict response to IASI after 3 months of IASI therapy.

  12. Effect of Cervical Interlaminar Epidural Steroid Injection: Analysis According to the Neck Pain Patterns and MRI Findings

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Won; Lim, Hyung Woo; Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Won Il; Lee, Eun Kyung; Chang, Choo Hoon; Yang, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Background It is widely accepted that cervical interlaminar steroid injection (CIESI) is more effective in treating radicular pain than axial neck pain, but without direct comparison. And the differences of effect after CIESI according to MRI findings are inconsistent. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the therapeutic response of CIESI according to pain sites, durations, MRI findings, and other predictive factors altogether, unlike previous studies, which evaluated them separately. Methods The medical records of 128 patients who received fluoroscopy guided CIESI were analyzed. We evaluated the therapeutic response (more than a 50% reduction on the visual analog scale [VAS] by their second visit) after CIESI by (1) pain site; neck pain without radicular pain/radicular pain with or without neck pain, (2) pain duration; acute/chronic (more than 6 month), and (3) findings of MRI; herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD)/spinal stenosis, respectively and altogether. Results Eighty-eight patients (68%) responded to CIESI, and there were no significant differences in demographic data, initial VAS score, or laboratory findings. And there were no significant differences in the response rate relating to pain site, pain duration, or MRI findings, respectively. In additional analysis, acute radicular pain with HIVD patients showed significantly better response than chronic neck pain with spinal stenosis (P = 0.04). Conclusions We cannot find any sole predictive factor of therapeutic response to the CIESI. But the patients having acute radicular pain with HIVD showed the best response, and those having other chronic neck pain showed the worst response to CIESI. PMID:27103964

  13. Inhaled Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medications Long-Term Control Medications Inhaled Steroids Inhaled Steroids Make an Appointment Ask a Question Refer Patient ... more about steroids? What are some common inhaled steroids? Common inhaled steroids include: Asmanex ® (mometasone) Alvesco ® (ciclesonide) ...

  14. Effect of Ultrasound-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation in Incompletely Treated Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Nam Kyu; Kim, Jin Woong; Kim, Hyung Jun; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Jae Kyu; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation in patients with incompletely treated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) and to evaluate possible prognostic factors for this therapy. Subjects and Methods Thirty nine patients with incompletely treated single HCC (≤ 5 cm) after TACE were treated with RF ablation. All patients were evaluated for complete tumor ablation rate, local recurrence-free rate, overall survival rate, and complications. Local recurrence-free rate and overall survival rate were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The possible prognostic factors of local recurrence-free rate and survival rate were analyzed using Cox proportional-hazards regression model. Results The complete tumor ablation rate was 92.3%. Local recurrence-free rates for 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-years were 81.7%, 63.1%, 53.6%, and 35.7%, respectively. One-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 96.9%, 82.9%, 67.8%, and 48.4%, respectively. Among prognostic factors included in the analysis, only tumor diameter (≤ 2 cm versus > 2 cm) was statistically significant in terms of predicting local recurrence. Complications were observed in two patients, one with liver abscess and the other with portal venous thrombosis. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided RF ablation could be effective and safe in treating incompletely treated HCC after TACE. The diameter of HCC was a significant prognostic factor for local recurrence. PMID:22563280

  15. Delphi Method Validation of a Procedural Performance Checklist for Insertion of an Ultrasound-Guided Internal Jugular Central Line.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Nicholas; Wittler, Mary; Askew, Kim; Manthey, David

    2016-01-01

    Placement of ultrasound-guided central lines is a critical skill for physicians in several specialties. Improving the quality of care delivered surrounding this procedure demands rigorous measurement of competency, and validated tools to assess performance are essential. Using the iterative, modified Delphi technique and experts in multiple disciplines across the United States, the study team created a 30-item checklist designed to assess competency in the placement of ultrasound-guided internal jugular central lines. Cronbach α was .94, indicating an excellent degree of internal consistency. Further validation of this checklist will require its implementation in simulated and clinical environments.

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Removal of Wooden Foreign Bodies in the Extremities with Hydro-Dissection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Son, Eun Seok; Chung, Eun Chul; Rho, Myung Ho; Lee, Sun Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective We described the technique of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous removal of the foreign bodies (FB) with hydro-dissection in the radiologic department and presented video files of several cases. Materials and Methods Four patients referred to the radiology department for US evaluation and US-guided percutaneous removal of the FBs in the upper and lower extremities between November, 2006 and November, 2013 were included in this study. The procedures started with US evaluation for the exact location and shape of the FB. A 5 mm-sized skin incision was made at the site of the nearest point from the FB where no passing arteries or tendons were present. We adopted a hydrodissection technique to separate the FB from adjacent tissue using a 2% lidocaine solution. Injected anesthetics detached the FBs from surrounding tissue and thereby facilitated removal. After the tip of the mosquito forceps reached the FB, the wooden FBs were removed. Results The mean time required for the entire procedure was approximately 20 minutes. There were no significant complications during the US-guided removal or long-term complications after the procedure. All 4 FBs were successfully removed from the soft tissue under US guidance. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided percutaneous removal of the FBs with hydro-dissection in the radiology department is a less invasive and safe method over surgical removal in the operating room. Additionally, the use of a guide wire and serial dilator may help minimize soft tissue injury and facilitate the introduction of forceps. PMID:26576123

  17. Ultrasonographic percutaneous anatomy of the atlanto-occipital region and indirect ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture in the dog and the cat.

    PubMed

    Etienne, A-L; Audigié, F; Peeters, D; Gabriel, A; Busoni, V

    2015-04-01

    Cisternal puncture in dogs and cats is commonly carried out. This article describes the percutaneous ultrasound anatomy of the cisternal region in the dog and the cat and an indirect technique for ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture. Ultrasound images obtained ex vivo and in vivo were compared with anatomic sections and used to identify the landmarks for ultrasound-guided cisternal puncture. The ultrasound-guided procedure was established in cadavers and then applied in vivo in seven dogs and two cats. The anatomic landmarks for the ultrasound-guided puncture are the cisterna magna, the spinal cord, the two occipital condyles on transverse images, the external occipital crest and the dorsal arch of the first cervical vertebra on longitudinal images. Using these ultrasound anatomic landmarks, an indirect ultrasound-guided technique for cisternal puncture is applicable in the dog and the cat.

  18. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration versus Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration in Diagnosis of Focal Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Naga, Mazen Ibrahim; Esmat, Serag; Naguib, Mohamed; Hassanein, Mohamed; Hassani, Mohamed; El-Kassas, Mohamed; Mahdy, Reem Ezzat; El-Gemeie, Emad; Farag, Ali Hassan; Foda, Ayman Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the leading cancer morbidity and mortality world-wide. Controversy has arisen about whether the percutaneous approach with computed tomography/ultrasonography-guidance fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) or endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred method to obtain diagnostic tissue. Our purpose of this study is to compare between the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA and percutaneous US-FNA in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 197 patients with pancreatic masses were included in the study, 125 patients underwent US-FNA (Group 1) and 72 patients underwent EUS-FNA (Group 2). Results: EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy (88.9%) as US-FNA (87.2%) in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for EUS-FNA was 84%, 100%, 100%, 73.3% respectively. It was 85.5%, 90.4%, 94.7%, 76% respectively for US-FNA. EUS-FNA had a lower complication rate (1.38%) than US-FNA (5.6%). Conclusion: EUS-FNA has nearly the same accuracy as US-FNA of pancreatic masses with a lower complication rate. PMID:24949394

  19. Analgesic Efficacy of Ultrasound Guided FICB in Patients with Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Hooda, Sarla; Kiran, Shashi; Devi, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hip fractures are often encountered in the elderly and present special problems to the anaesthesiologist. Fascia iliaca compartment block is another technique with the intent to block all the three nerves like 3-in-1 nerve block. Aim To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound guided fascia iliaca compartment block to facilitate positioning of patients with hip fracture for spinal anaesthesia. Materials and Methods This prospective study was conducted in 50 patients aged between 40-80 years, belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I-III undergoing surgery for hip fracture. All 50 patients received an ultrasound guided Fascia Iliaca Compartment Block (FICB) in the premedication room with 30 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine by 23G spinal needle. Sensory blockade was evaluated 5, 10 and 20 minutes after ropivacaine administration using loss of perception to cold in the lateral, anterior and medial part of the thigh. Visual analogue scale scores were noted before the block, 20 minutes after block and during positioning for spinal anaesthesia. Patient’s acceptance for FICB was evaluated 24 hour after arriving back to the orthopaedics ward using a two-point score. Any episode of hypotension or bradycardia was noted and managed accordingly. Results In lateral part of thigh, at 5 minutes sensory blockade was present in 33 patients (66%) and at 10 minutes sensory blockade was present in 45 cases (90%). In anterior part of thigh, sensory blockade was present in 34 cases (68%) at 5 minutes time interval and at 10 minutes sensory blockade was present in 48 cases (96%). In medial part of thigh, 28 cases (56%) had sensory blockade at 5 minutes and at 10 minutes in 43 cases (86%). Sensory blockage was same at 20 minutes as on 10 minutes interval in all thigh parts. Before FIC block average VAS was 7.5 which was decreased to average of 2.94 at 20 minutes after block which was statistically significant (p<0.01). During positioning for

  20. Pain management via Ultrasound-guided Nerve Block in Emergency Department; a Case Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Nejati, Amir; Teymourian, Houman; Behrooz, Leili; mohseni, Gholamreza

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Pain is the most common complaint of patients referring to emergency department (ED). Considering the importance of pain management in ED, this study aimed to investigate the efficacy and feasibility of ultrasound-guided nerve blocks in this setting. Methods: 46 patients who came to the ED with injured extremities were enrolled in the study and received either femoral, axillary or sciatic nerve block depending on their site of injury (1.5 mg Bupivacaine per kg of patient’s weight). Patients were asked about their level of pain before and after receiving the nerve block based on numerical rating scale. The difference between pre and post block pain severity was measured. Both patients and physicians were asked about their satisfaction with the nerve block in 5 tiered Likert scale. Results: 46 patients with the mean age of 37.5 ± 12.5 years (8-82 years) received ultrasound-guided nerve block (84.8% male). 6 Sciatic, 25 axillary, and 15 femoral nerve blocks were performed. Mean pain severity on NRS score at the time of admission was 8.1 ± 1.4, which reduced to 2.04 ± 2.06 after block. 25 (54.3%) patients were highly satisfied (Likert scale 5), 15 (32.6%) were satisfied (Likert scale 4), 3 (6.5%) were neutral and had no opinion (Likert scale 3), 1 (2.1%) was not satisfied (Likert scale 2), and 2 (4.3%) were highly unsatisfied (Likert scale 1). There was no significant difference among the satisfaction scores within the three block locations (p = 0.8). There was no significant difference in physicians’ level of satisfaction between the three block locations either (p = 0.9). 1 (2.1%) case of agitation and tachycardia and 1 (2.1%) case of vomiting were observed after the procedure. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided nerve block of extremities is a safe and effective method that can be used for pain management in the ED. It results in high levels of satisfaction among both patients and physicians.

  1. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ESI; Spinal injection for back pain; Back pain injection; Steroid injection - epidural; Steroid injection - back ... pillow under your stomach. If this position causes pain, you either sit up or lie on your ...

  2. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecystostomy in acute cholecystitis: case vignette and review of the technique.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Pablo A; Do Pico, Juan J

    2015-12-01

    Acute cholecystitis is a frequent condition. Although cholecystectomy is the indicated treatment of this entity, it cannot be performed in some high-risk surgery patients, such as critically ill or those with multiple comorbidities. In these non-uncommon scenarios, percutaneous cholecystostomy is the recommended alternative treatment, which allows immediate decompression and drainage of the acutely inflamed gallbladder and thus reducing the patient's symptoms and the systemic inflammatory response. Ultrasound is the imaging method of choice to guide the percutaneous cholecystostomy procedure due to its real-time guidance, lack of ionizing radiation and portability, avoiding the need to transfer unhealthy patients to the radiology department. We will review the ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecystostomy procedure, of special interest for radiologists, surgeons, and also intensive care and emergency physicians.

  3. Rectouterine fistula after laparoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of a uterine fibroid

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyo Joo; Kwon, Byung-Su; Choi, Young Joon

    2014-01-01

    In the conservative management of uterine fibroids is radiofrequency ablation (RFA) considered to be one of the safe, effective and minimal invasive approaches in selected women who desire to retain their uterus. Few studies were conducted on its adverse outcomes and most of the reported complications were minor events such as pain, discharge, adhesion which didn't require any intervention. However, although safe and effective, the RFA of a uterine myoma can be the cause for severe complications such as penetration and burn injuries of pelvic organs. In general, a rectouterine fistula is one of the rarest complications but can lead to serious adverse outcomes. Herein, to our knowledge, we report the first case involving a rectouterine fistula after laparoscopic ultrasound-guided RFA of a uterine myoma with pelvic endometriosis. In addition, we provide a brief review of the relevant literature. PMID:25469349

  4. Rectouterine fistula after laparoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of a uterine fibroid.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyo Joo; Kwon, Byung-Su; Choi, Young Joon; Huh, Chu Yeop

    2014-11-01

    In the conservative management of uterine fibroids is radiofrequency ablation (RFA) considered to be one of the safe, effective and minimal invasive approaches in selected women who desire to retain their uterus. Few studies were conducted on its adverse outcomes and most of the reported complications were minor events such as pain, discharge, adhesion which didn't require any intervention. However, although safe and effective, the RFA of a uterine myoma can be the cause for severe complications such as penetration and burn injuries of pelvic organs. In general, a rectouterine fistula is one of the rarest complications but can lead to serious adverse outcomes. Herein, to our knowledge, we report the first case involving a rectouterine fistula after laparoscopic ultrasound-guided RFA of a uterine myoma with pelvic endometriosis. In addition, we provide a brief review of the relevant literature.

  5. Learning Ultrasound-Guided Needle Insertion Skills through an Edutainment Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wing-Yin; Ni, Dong; Pang, Wai-Man; Qin, Jing; Chui, Yim-Pan; Yu, Simon Chun-Ho; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    Ultrasound-guided needle insertion is essential in many of minimally invasive surgeries or procedures, such as biopsy, drug delivery, spinal anaesthesia, etc. Accurate and safe needle insertion is a difficult task due to the high requirement of hand-eye coordination skills. Many proposed virtual reality (VR) based training systems put their emphasis on realistic simulation instead of pedagogical efficiency. The lack of schematic training scenario leads to boredom of repetitive operations. To solve this, we present our novel training system with the integration of game elements in order to retain the trainees' enthusiasm. Task-oriented scenarios, time attack scenarios and performance evaluation are introduced. Besides, some state-of-art technologies are also presented, including ultrasound simulation, needle haptic rendering as well as a mass-spring-based needle-tissue interaction simulation. These works are shown to be effective to keep the trainees up with learning.

  6. [Ultrasound-guided central venous access in adults and children: Procedure and pathological findings].

    PubMed

    Scheiermann, P; Seeger, F H; Breitkreutz, R

    2010-01-01

    Central venous line placement is a standard procedure in critical care and peri-operative medicine. This procedure can be associated with severe complications. In contrast to the landmark technique, ultrasound-guided punctures can significantly reduce the rate of complications. Patients with a high risk for difficult vascular access include critical care and emergency patients as well as patients on anticoagulation medication and dialysis. Placement of central venous catheters can be difficult in ventilated patients and if there has been prior surgery in the puncture area. In children and small infants central venous access can also be challenging due to the anatomical relationship in the head and neck region. Puncture techniques are explained briefly by means of ultrasound anatomy. Typical ultrasonographic images visualize pathological findings in order to identify dangers and complications in central venous catheterization.

  7. The role of ultrasound-guided needle biopsy in the diagnosis of soft-tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, M; Pollastri, P; Ferraro, A; Betoni, F; Bacci, G; Galletti, S

    2007-06-01

    Soft-tissue tumors are not very common, but their diagnosis can be very difficult. In the final analysis, their diagnosis requires a biopsy, which must furnish a sufficient amount of material to allow a reliable histological diagnosis. The authors evaluated the diagnostic efficacy of ultrasound-guided needle biopsy in the diagnosis of soft-tissue tumors of the musculoskeletal system. The aim of the study was to optimize the biopsy procedure, with particular emphasis on the choice of the biopsy needle (large-gauge manual versus semiautomatic) based on the characteristics of the neoplastic mass (consistency, depth, size, location). The results of the study showed that appropriate needle selection significantly reduced the frequency of biopsies that were insufficient for histological diagnosis. The method proved to be highly reliable for diagnosis of soft-tissue tumors but strongly related to the proper selection of the needle to be used.

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Quadrilateral Space Block for the Diagnosis of Quadrilateral Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hamilton; Narvaez, Vincent Reginald

    2015-01-01

    Quadrilateral space syndrome (QSS) is a rare nerve entrapment disorder that occurs when the axillary nerve and posterior circumflex humeral artery (PCHA) become compressed in the quadrilateral space. QSS presents as vague posterolateral shoulder pain that is exacerbated upon the abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. Diagnosis of QSS is difficult because of the vague presentation of QSS. In addition, even though MRI and MR angiography can be used in QSS diagnosis, there is currently no “gold standard” diagnostic imaging studies for QSS. In this case report, we describe a novel ultrasound-guided technique for a diagnostic quadrilateral space block and present a case where the diagnostic block was used to diagnose QSS. We believe that a diagnostic block of the quadrilateral space is a useful adjunct in the evaluation of patients with suspected QSS, especially in cases where examination findings and other diagnostic modalities are indeterminate. PMID:25685573

  9. Pulmonary artery sarcoma diagnosed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Chan, Johnny W M; Chu, Stephanie Y Y; Lam, Connie H K; O, W H; Cheung, O Y; Kwan, T L; Leung, Alex K C; Law, W L

    2014-04-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma is a rare disease with poor prognosis that has not been reported in Hong Kong. Its clinical and radiological presentation frequently mimics pulmonary embolism. Diagnosis is usually delayed until surgery, which is the treatment option that provides the best survival. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration is an effective non-surgical technique for lymph node staging of lung cancer and diagnosis of mediastinal lesions via bronchoscopy. Here we discuss a case of pulmonary artery sarcoma diagnosed by this method, the second one in the literature, which serves to illustrate its potential use for early and minimally invasive diagnosis of the condition. Although such aspiration is a safe procedure, tissue sampling of extravascular extensions is advisable wherever possible.

  10. Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed using endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Caraway, Nancy P; Salina, Davide; Deavers, Michael T; Morice, Rodolfo; Landon, Gene

    2015-01-01

    Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery is a rare intraluminal malignant neoplasm that has an aggressive biological behavior, and early diagnosis may improve patient outcome. We describe a case of pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed on cytologic material obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) biopsy with rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE). The aspirate showed loosely cohesive clusters of pleomorphic malignant spindled and epithelioid cells. An immunostain panel did not demonstrate any definitive mesenchymal or epithelial differentiation. The tumor's intraluminal origin was supported by radiographic imaging studies. Subsequently, the patient received preoperative chemotherapy and underwent tumor resection with reconstruction. This report describes the cytomorphologic features of this rare intravascular tumor and demonstrates how EBUS-TBNA with ROSE was instrumental in obtaining optimal cytologic sampling for ancillary studies, thus expediting the management.

  11. Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed using endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Caraway, Nancy P.; Salina, Davide; Deavers, Michael T.; Morice, Rodolfo; Landon, Gene

    2015-01-01

    Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery is a rare intraluminal malignant neoplasm that has an aggressive biological behavior, and early diagnosis may improve patient outcome. We describe a case of pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed on cytologic material obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) biopsy with rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE). The aspirate showed loosely cohesive clusters of pleomorphic malignant spindled and epithelioid cells. An immunostain panel did not demonstrate any definitive mesenchymal or epithelial differentiation. The tumor's intraluminal origin was supported by radiographic imaging studies. Subsequently, the patient received preoperative chemotherapy and underwent tumor resection with reconstruction. This report describes the cytomorphologic features of this rare intravascular tumor and demonstrates how EBUS-TBNA with ROSE was instrumental in obtaining optimal cytologic sampling for ancillary studies, thus expediting the management. PMID:25745502

  12. Bronchogenic Cyst Rupture and Pneumonia after Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Goohyeon; Song, Junwhi; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Jeon, Kyeongman; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung

    2013-01-01

    We report a 54-year-old woman who presented with a well-defined, homogeneous, and non-enhancing mass in the retrobronchial region of the bronchus intermedius. The patient underwent endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for histological confirmation. Serous fluid was aspirated by EBUS-TBNA. Cytological examination identified an acellular smear with negative microbiological cultures. The patient was finally diagnosed with bronchogenic cysts by chest computed tomography (CT) and EBUS-TBNA findings. However, 1 week after EBUS-TBNA, the patient developed bronchogenic cyst rupture and pneumonia. Empirical antibiotics were administered, and pneumonia from the bronchogenic cyst rupture had resolved on follow-up chest CT. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of pneumonia from bronchogenic cyst rupture after EBUS-TBNA. PMID:23678359

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided techniques for diagnosing pancreatic mass lesions: Can we do better?

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Andrew C; Lee, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic approach to a possible pancreatic mass lesion relies first upon various non-invasive imaging modalities, including computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Once a suspect lesion has been identified, tissue acquisition for characterization of the lesion is often paramount in developing an individualized therapeutic approach. Given the high prevalence and mortality associated with pancreatic cancer, an ideal approach to diagnosing pancreatic mass lesions would be safe, highly sensitive, and reproducible across various practice settings. Tools, in addition to radiologic imaging, currently employed in the initial evaluation of a patient with a pancreatic mass lesion include serum tumor markers, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). EUS-FNA has grown to become the gold standard in tissue diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. PMID:27818584

  14. Ultrasound-guided procedures to treat sport-related muscle injuries

    PubMed Central

    Orlandi, Davide; Corazza, Angelo; Arcidiacono, Alice; Messina, Carmelo; Serafini, Giovanni; Sconfienza, Luca M

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is well known as a low-cost, radiation-free and effective imaging technique to guide percutaneous procedures. The lower limb muscles represent a good target to perform such procedures under ultrasound guidance, thus allowing for clear and precise visualization of the needle during the whole procedure. The knowledge of guidelines and technical aspects is mandatory to act in the most safe and accurate way on target tissues that can be as small as a few millimetres. This review will focus above the local treatments of traumatic lower limb muscle injuries described in literature, focusing on new and promising approaches, such as platelet-rich plasma treatment of muscle tears in athletes. For each procedure, a brief how-to-do practical guide will be provided, emphasizing precautions and tricks based on day-by-day experience that may help to improve the outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided procedures around the lower limb muscles. PMID:26562097

  15. Correlation between Epidurographic Contrast Flow Patterns and Clinical Effectiveness in Chronic Lumbar Discogenic Radicular Pain Treated with Epidural Steroid Injections Via Different Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Saru; Kaur, Sukhdeep; Singh, Kulvinder; Aujla, Kuljeet

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural steroid injections are an accepted procedure for the conservative management of chronic backache caused by lumbar disc pathology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the epidurographic findings for the midline, transforaminal and parasagittal approaches in lumbar epidural steroid injections, and correlating them with the clinical improvement. Methods Sixty chronic lower back pain patients with unilateral radiculitis from a herniated/degenerated disc were enrolled. After screening the patients according to the exclusion criteria and randomly allocating them to 3 groups of 20 patients, fluoroscopic contrast enhanced epidural steroids were injected via midline (group 1), transforaminal (group 2) and parasagittal interlaminar (group 3) approaches at the level of the pathology. The fluoroscopic patterns of the three groups were studied and correlated with the clinical improvement measured by the VAS over the next 3 months; any incidences of complications were recorded. Results The transforaminal group presented better results in terms of VAS reduction than the midline and parasagittal approach groups (P < 0.05). The epidurography showed a better ventral spread for both the transforaminal (P < 0.001) and the paramedian approaches (P < 0.05), as compared to the midline approach. The nerve root filling was greater in the transforaminal group (P < 0.001) than in the other two groups. The ventral spread of the contrast agent was associated with improvement in the VAS score and this difference was statistically significant in group 1 (P < 0.05), and highly significant in groups 2 and 3 (P < 0.001). In all the groups, any complications observed were transient and minor. Conclusions The midline and paramedian approaches are technically easier and statistically comparable, but clinically less efficacious than the transforaminal approach. The incidence of ventral spread and nerve root delineation show a definite correlation with clinical improvement

  16. Usefulness of a Hanging Position With Internal Rotation of Shoulder in Ultrasonography-Guided Intra-articular Steroid Injection for Adhesive Capsulitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of a new position (internal rotation in hanging) in ultrasonography, we compared the length of the glenohumeral joint space and the effectiveness of steroid injection with the hanging position and with the commonly used abdomen or cross position. Methods A prospective, randomized controlled trial was performed in 42 patients with adhesive capsulitis of shoulder. We used three arm positions for the posterior approach as follows: the patient's palm on thigh, other hand on abdomen (abdomen position); hand on patient's opposite shoulder (cross position); arm in hanging position with internal rotation of shoulder (hanging position). The order of shoulder position was randomized and blinded. Real-time ultrasonography-guided intra-articular steroid injection was performed by posterior approach at the first position in each patient. The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), and range of motion (ROM) were measured before steroid injection and 2 weeks after injection. Results The lengths of the joint space were 2.88±0.75, 2.93±0.89, and 2.82±0.79 mm in abdomen, cross, and hanging position respectively, with no significant difference among the three positions (p=0.429). Treatment efficacy was significantly improved in ROM, total BPI, and SPADI in all three positions (p<0.001). The changes in ROM for shoulder abduction were 23.6°±19.7°, 22.2°±20.9°, and 10.0°±7.8° in abdomen, cross, and hanging position, respectively. Changes in total BPI scores were 25.1±15.7, 23.6.±18.0, 11.6±6.1, and changes in total SPADI score were 35.0±14.2, 30.9±28.9, and 16.5±10.3 in abdomen, cross, and hanging position, respectively. There were no significant difference among the three positions for all parameters (p=0.194, p=0.121, and p=0.108, respectively. Conclusion For patients with adhesive capsulitis who cannot achieve or maintain abdomen or cross position, scanning and injection with the shoulder in

  17. Adverse Events of Extracorporeal Ultrasound-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tinghe; Luo, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Background High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is considered to be an alternative to surgery. Extracorporeal ultrasound-guided HIFU (USgFU) has been clinically used to treat solid tumors. Preliminary trials in a small sample of a Western population suggested that this modality was safe. Most trials are performed in China thereby providing comprehensive data for understanding the safety profile. The aim of this study was to evaluate adverse events of USgFU therapy. Methods and Findings Clinical data were searched in 2 Chinese databases. Adverse events of USgFU were summarized and compared with those of magnetic resonance-guided HIFU (MRgFU; for uterine, bone or breast tumor) and transrectal ultrasound-guided HIFU (for prostate cancer or benign prostate hyperplasia). USgFU treatment was performed using 7 types of device. Side effects were evaluated in 13262 cases. There were fewer adverse events in benign lesions than in malignant lesions (11.81% vs. 21.65%, p<0.0001). Rates of adverse events greatly varied between the disease types (0–280%, p<0.0001) and between the applied HIFU devices in both malignant (10.58–44.38%, p<0.0001) and benign lesions (1.67–17.57%, p<0.0001). Chronological analysis did not demonstrate a decrease in the rate of adverse events. Based upon evaluable adverse events, incidences in USgFU were consistent with those in MRgFU or transrectal HIFU. Some side effects frequently occurred following transrectal HIFU were not reported in USgFU. Several events including intrahepatic metastasis, intraoperative high fever, and occlusions of the superior mesenteric artery should be of particular concern because they have not been previously noted. The types of adverse events suggested that they were ultrasonic lesions. Conclusion The frequency of adverse events depended on the location of the lesion and the type of HIFU device; however, side effects of USgFU were not yet understood. USgFU did not decrease the incidence of adverse events compared

  18. Retrospective Analysis of Ultrasound-guided Flexible Ureteroscopy in the Management of Calyceal Diverticular Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji-Qing; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Nian-Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is the most widely recommended treatment for calyceal diverticular calculi, providing excellent stone-free results. However, its invasiveness is not negligible considering its major complication rates. Flexible ureteroscopy (FURS) is currently used to treat calyceal diverticula. However, the greatest drawback of FURS is locating the diverticulum since its neck is narrow and concealed. In such a case, the FURS procedure must be converted to PCNL. The aim of this study was to evaluate ultrasound-guided flexible ureteroscopy (UFURS) identifying diverticulum and the management of calyceal diverticular calculi. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted on 24 patients who had calyceal diverticular calculi. In all 12 patients in the UFURS group, direct FURS failed to find evidence of calyceal diverticula but were confirmed with imaging. The other 12 patients in the PCNL group received PCNL plus fulguration of the diverticular walls. Results: Puncture of calyceal diverticulum was successful in all 12 UFURS patients. Two patients in this group had postoperative residual calculi and two patients developed fever. In the PCNL group, percutaneous renal access and lithotomy were successful in all 12 patients. One patient in this group had residual calculi, one had perirenal hematoma, and two patients developed fever. No significant difference was found in the operating time (UFURS vs. PCNL, 91.8 ± 24.2 vs. 86.3 ± 18.7 min), stone-free rate (UFURS vs. PCNL, 9/12 vs. 10/12), and rate of successful lithotripsy (UFURS vs. PCNL, 10/12 vs. 11/12) between the two groups (all P > 0.05). Postoperative pain scores in the FURS group were significantly lower than that in the PCNL group (2.7 ± 1.2 vs. 6.2 ± 1.5, P < 0.05). Hospital stay in the UFURS group was significantly shorter than that in the PCNL group (3.4 ± 0.8 vs. 5.4 ± 1.0 days, P < 0.05). All patients were symptom-free following surgery (UFURS vs. PCNL, 10/10 vs. 12

  19. Dominant hand operating probe vs needle: a comparison study of ultrasound-guided needle placement in phantom models.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D F; Stafford, M

    2015-08-01

    We conducted a replicated crossover design study to assess if using one's dominant hand for operating a probe vs directing a needle would affect the time taken, the number of needle passes and the accuracy of an ultrasound-guided procedure in phantom models. Twenty ultrasound-novice participants completed the task 10 times for each hand arrangement (alternating between attempts). The time taken and number of needle passes required for both dominant hand-probe and hand-needle decreased over time (p = 0.001). Dominant hand-needle had a lower mean time used (p = 0.001) and fewer needle passes (p = 0.02) compared with hand-probe. Sixty-five per cent of participants preferred using their dominant hand to direct the needle. When learning ultrasound-guided needle procedures on phantom models, use of the dominant hand to operate the needle is associated with a shorter procedure time and fewer needle passes.

  20. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous 'push-introducer' gastrostomy is a valuable method for accessing the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Klek, Stanislaw; Hermanowicz, Adam; Salowka, Jerzy; Cegielny, Tomasz; Matysiak, Konrad; Chourdakis, Michael; Szybinski, Piotr

    2014-02-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the most effective and least invasive method for enteral nutrition (EN). The most common system for PEG is the 'pull' technique, which . It is not available in case endoscopy cannot be performed. The 'push' technique may be an option if effective identification of the abdominal structures can be achieved. X-ray or ultrasonography can be used for that purpose. The aim was to assess the clinical value of ultrasound-guided 'push' gastrostomy. A retrospective analysis of eleven patients (6 F, 5 M, mean age 65.1) including the procedure itself, complication rate, and cost was conducted. In all eleven patients the surgery was successful, and EN was introduced 4-6 hours afterwards. Complications included pain requiring removal of a supporting stitch (n = 1) and balloon deflation (n = 1). All patients were successfully fed enterally. Ultrasound-guided 'push' technique gastrostomy should become a method of choice if the 'pull' method is unavailable.

  1. Risk of Encountering Dorsal Scapular and Long Thoracic Nerves during Ultrasound-guided Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block with Nerve Stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Dong; Yu, Jae Yong; Shim, Junho; Heo, Hyun Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, ultrasound has been commonly used. Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) by posterior approach is more commonly used because anterior approach has been reported to have the risk of phrenic nerve injury. However, posterior approach also has the risk of causing nerve injury because there are risks of encountering dorsal scapular nerve (DSN) and long thoracic nerve (LTN). Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of encountering DSN and LTN during ultrasound-guided IBPB by posterior approach. Methods A total of 70 patients who were scheduled for shoulder surgery were enrolled in this study. After deciding insertion site with ultrasound, awake ultrasound-guided IBPB with nerve stimulator by posterior approach was performed. Incidence of muscle twitches (rhomboids, levator scapulae, and serratus anterior muscles) and current intensity immediately before muscle twitches disappeared were recorded. Results Of the total 70 cases, DSN was encountered in 44 cases (62.8%) and LTN was encountered in 15 cases (21.4%). Both nerves were encountered in 10 cases (14.3%). Neither was encountered in 21 cases (30.4%). The average current measured immediately before the disappearance of muscle twitches was 0.44 mA and 0.50 mA at DSN and LTN, respectively. Conclusions Physicians should be cautious on the risk of injury related to the anatomical structures of nerves, including DSN and LTN, during ultrasound-guided IBPB by posterior approach. Nerve stimulator could be another option for a safer intervention. Moreover, if there is a motor response, it is recommended to select another way to secure better safety. PMID:27413483

  2. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous splenic biopsy using an 18-G core biopsy needle: our experience with 52 cases

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, Gemma; Tung, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The spleen is more commonly affected in multiorgan disease, but alternative sites are selected for biopsy owing to perceived haemorrhage risk. If these sites are inaccessible or, less commonly, the spleen is the only disease site, then splenic biopsy is considered, with most studies using a 20- to 22-G needle. The primary aim of biopsy is to exclude underlying malignancy or to obtain histological analysis in known malignancy, usually lymphoma, when reclassification is required for therapy. We present, to our knowledge, the largest series of 18-G ultrasound-guided splenic core needle biopsy assessing diagnostic and complication rates. Methods: All ultrasound-guided splenic biopsy cases from May 1990 to May 2015 were identified on the radiology information system. Histological diagnosis and complications were identified from laboratory reports, case notes and discharge summaries to assess diagnostic positive and complication rates. Haemorrhages requiring transfusion, embolization or splenectomy, pneumothorax, other significant intra-abdominal injury or death are classified as major complications, whilst conservative haemorrhage management is considered a minor complication. Results: A total of 52 splenic biopsies were performed in 47 patients. A positive diagnostic yield for all biopsies was 90.4%. The major and minor complication rates were 0% and 1.9% (1/52), respectively. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided 18-G splenic biopsy is a safe and accurate procedure with no added risk of complications when compared with smaller needles or biopsy of other abdominal organs. Advances in knowledge: This is the largest case series of ultrasound-guided splenic biopsy with an 18-G needle, and our experience confirms a high diagnostic yield and a complication rate which compares favourably with the biopsy of other abdominal organs. PMID:26337505

  3. Feasibility, repeatability, and safety of ultrasound-guided stimulation of the first cervical nerve at the alar foramen in horses.

    PubMed

    Mespoulhès-Rivière, Céline; Brandenberger, Olivier; Rossignol, Fabrice; Robert, Céline; Perkins, Justin D; Marie, Jean-Paul; Ducharme, Norm

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop and assess the feasibility, repeatability, and safety of an ultrasound-guided technique to stimulate the first cervical nerve (FCN) at the level of the alar foramen of the atlas of horses. ANIMALS 4 equine cadavers and 6 clinically normal Standardbreds. PROCEDURES In each cadaver, the FCN pathway was determined by dissection, and any anastomosis between the first and second cervical nerves was identified. Subsequently, each of 6 live horses underwent a bilateral ultrasound-guided stimulation of the FCN at the alar foramen 3 times at 3-week intervals. After each procedure, horses were examined daily for 5 days. RESULTS In each cadaver, the FCN passed through the alar foramen; a communicating branch between the FCN and the accessory nerve and anastomoses between the ventral branches of the FCN and second cervical nerve were identified. The anastomoses were located in the upper third of the FCN pathway between the wing of the atlas and the nerve's entry in the omohyoideus muscle. Successful ultrasound-guided electrical stimulation was confirmed by twitching of the ipsilateral omohyoideus muscle in all 6 live horses; this finding was observed bilaterally during each of the 3 experimental sessions. No complications developed at the site of stimulation. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that ultrasound-guided stimulation of the FCN at the alar foramen appears to be a safe and straightforward procedure in horses. The procedure may have potential for use in horses with naturally occurring recurrent laryngeal neuropathy to assess reinnervation after FCN transplantation or nerve-muscle pedicle implantation in the cricoarytenoideus dorsalis muscle.

  4. High resolution ultrasound-guided microinjection for interventional studies of early embryonic and placental development in vivo in mice

    PubMed Central

    Slevin, John C; Byers, Lois; Gertsenstein, Marina; Qu, Dawei; Mu, Junwu; Sunn, Nana; Kingdom, John CP; Rossant, Janet; Adamson, S Lee

    2006-01-01

    similar in sham experiments, 54% (33/61), for which procedures were identical but no microinjection was performed, suggesting that surgery and manipulation of the uterus were the main causes of embryonic death. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided microinjection into the ectoplacental cone region at E6.5 or E7.5 and the amniotic cavity at E7.5 was achieved with a 7 day postnatal survival of ≥60%. Target accuracy of these sites and of the exocoelomic cavity at E7.5 was ≥51%. We suggest that this approach may be useful for exploring gene function during early placental and embryonic development. PMID:16504164

  5. Unilateral versus bilateral ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane blocks during ureteric shock wave lithotripsy: A prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Elnabtity, Ali Mohamed Ali; Shabana, Waleed Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has been used for intra- and post-operative analgesia during abdominal operations and for ureteric shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) as well. Aim: This study aimed at comparing ultrasound-guided unilateral versus bilateral TAP blocks as analgesic techniques for unilateral ureteric SWL. Settings and Design: Prospective randomized comparative study. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients scheduled for unilateral ureteric SWL were randomly allocated into two groups: Group (U) received unilateral TAP block in the form of 25 ml of bupivacaine 0.25% (i.e., 62.5 mg), and Group (B) received bilateral TAP blocks in the form of 25 ml of bupivacaine 0.25% (i.e., 62.5 mg) on each side. Statistical Analysis: This was performed using SPSS program version 19 ((IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA) and EP 16 program. Results: The mean values of intra- and post-procedural visual analog scale at different time intervals were around (30), which was statistically insignificant between groups (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences between groups regarding cardiopulmonary stability, postanesthesia care unit time, the total amount of rescue fentanyl and patient satisfaction scores (P > 0.05). There were no significant side effects in both groups. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided unilateral TAP block is as safe and effective analgesic technique as bilateral TAP blocks during unilateral ureteric SWL. It can be used as the sole analgesic technique during ureteric SWL. PMID:27453645

  6. Preoperative Ultrasound Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Ovarian Lesions- Is It a Rapid and Effective Diagnostic Modality?

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Saikat; Chaudhuri, Snehamay; Paul, Prabir Chandra; Khandakar, Binny; Mandal, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The deep seated ovarian lesions unapproachable by unguided aspiration cytology were easily done under ultrasound guidance. It gave a before hand cytological diagnosis of the lesion to the surgeon determining the modality of treatment for the patient. Aim To find the diagnostic accuracy of the method of ultrasound guided cytological assessment of ovarian lesion. Materials and Methods The study was conducted as a prospective observational study over a period of one year, in hospital setting, where ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration had been used to aspirate ovarian lesions, giving a rapid cytological diagnosis. In 43 sample cases, aspiration of fluid done from ovarian lesions were followed by cyto-centrifugation and staining by May-Grunwald-Giemsa (MGG) and Papanicolaou (Pap) stain providing a cytological opinion regarding benign/malignant nature of the lesion and further categorization. Later the cytological diagnosis was compared with final histopathological diagnosis, taking it as a gold standard. Results The overall sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound guided aspiration and cytological analysis were high, 96%, 76.92% and 89.47% respectively as calculated by comparing the cytological diagnosis with histological diagnosis, taking it as gold standard. Conclusion This method has evolved as a highly sensitive, rapid, simple and effective modality for screening and as well as accurate preoperative diagnosis of ovarian lesions. PMID:27134878

  7. Accuracy Evaluation of a 3D Ultrasound-guided Biopsy System.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Walter J; Nye, Jonathan A; Schuster, David M; Nieh, Peter T; Master, Viraj A; Votaw, John R; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-14

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions.

  8. Accuracy evaluation of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Walter J.; Nye, Jonathan A.; Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj A.; Votaw, John R.; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions.

  9. Ultrasound-guided catheterisation of the subclavian vein: freehand vs needle-guided technique.

    PubMed

    Maecken, T; Heite, L; Wolf, B; Zahn, P K; Litz, R J

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this prospective, randomised study was to examine the impact of a multi-angle needle guide for ultrasound-guided, in-plane, central venous catheter placement in the subclavian vein. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly allocated to two groups, freehand or needle-guided, and then 159 catheterisations were analysed. Cannulation of the first examined access site was successful in 96.9% of cases with no significant difference between groups. There were three arterial punctures and no other severe injuries. Catheter misplacements did not differ between the groups. Higher success rates within the first and second attempts in the needle-guided group were observed (p = 0.041 and p = 0.019, respectively). Use of the needle guide reduced the access time from a median (IQR [range]) of 30 (18-76 [6-1409]) s to 16 (10-30 [4-295]) s; p = 0.0001, and increased needle visibility from 31.8% (9.7%-52.2% [0-96.67]) to 86.2% (62.5%-100% [0-100]); p < 0.0001. A multi-angle needle guide significantly improved aligning the needle and ultrasound plane compared with the freehand technique when cannulating the subclavian vein. Use of the guide resulted in faster access times and increased success at the first and second attempts.

  10. Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of the Prostate: Is the Information Accessible, Usable, Reliable and Readable?

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, Ciaran E.; Nason, Gregory J.; Kelly, Michael E.; McMahon, Colm; Cantwell, Colin P.; Quinlan, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate the accessibility, usability, reliability and readability of Internet information regarding transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided biopsy of the prostate. Materials and Methods The terms “prostate biopsy”, “TRUS biopsy” and “transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the prostate” were separately entered into the each of the top 5 most accessed Internet search engines. Websites were evaluated for accessibility, usability and reliability using the LIDA tool – a validated tool for the assessment of health related websites. Website readability was assessed using the Flesch Reading Ease Score and the Flesch Kincaid Grade Level. Results Following the application of exclusion criteria, 82 unique websites were analyzed. There was a significant difference in scores depending on authorship categories (p ≤ 0.001), with health related charity websites scoring highest (mean 122.29 ± 13.98) and non-academic affiliated institution websites scoring lowest (mean 87 ± 19.76). The presence of advertisements on a website was associated with a lower mean overall LIDA tool score (p = 0.024). Only a single website adhered to the National Institutes for Health recommendations on readability. Conclusions This study demonstrates variability in the quality of information available to Internet users regarding TRUS biopsies. Collaboration of website design and clinical acumen are necessary to develop appropriate websites for patient benefit. PMID:26195961

  11. Ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration cytology of breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Pagani, C; Coscia, D R; Dellabianca, C; Bonardi, M; Alessi, S; Calliada, F

    2011-12-01

    Breast biopsy consists in the collection of cells or tissue fragments from a breast lesion and their analysis by a pathologist. There are several types of breast biopsy defined on the basis of the type of needle used: fine-needle aspiration and biopsy performed with a spring-based needle. This article focuses on fine-needle aspiration performed under sonographic guidance.It is used mainly to assess cysts that appear to contain vegetations or blood or that are associated with symptoms; lesions and solid nodules that are not unequivocally benign; and axillary lymph nodes that appear suspicious on physical examination and/or sonography.In addition to distinguishing between benign and malignant lesions, ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration also plays an important role in tumor grading and in immunocytochemical identifying specific tumor markers. This article describes the technique used and the possible causes of false negative and false positive findings. Despite its limitations, fine-needle aspiration has become a fundamental tool for the identification and preoperative management of malignant breast lesions.

  12. Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block: What are the benefits of adding dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine?

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Manjaree; Mishra, Shashi Prakash; Singh, Somendra Pal

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has recently come up as a modality to take care of postoperative pain. It can somewhat avoid the use of intravenous opioid analgesics and hence to avoid its complications. We have performed a prospective, double-blinded, randomized study to assess the analgesic effect of adding dexmedetomidine to local ropivacaine on TAP block for patients undergoing lower abdominal surgeries. Aim: The aim is to assess whether addition of dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine may bring some improvements to the analgesic efficacy of TAP blocks in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgeries. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on forty patients undergoing lower abdominal surgeries under general anesthesia. The patients were divided into two groups: one receiving plain ropivacaine (Group 1) and other receiving ropivacaine with dexmedetomidine (Group 2) during TAP block. The patients in the two groups were compared for age, sex, body mass index, incidence of postoperative nausea, and vomiting and pain as measured on visual analog scale (VAS). Results: There was significantly lower pain score on VAS at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 h in Group 2 than in Group 1. Conclusion: The addition of dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine during TAP block improves analgesic effect of TAP block and prolongs the duration of analgesia as well. PMID:28217055

  13. Diagnostic yield of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for mediastinal staging in lung cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Bussy, Sebastián; Labarca, Gonzalo; Canals, Sofia; Caviedes, Iván; Folch, Erik; Majid, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive diagnostic test with a high diagnostic yield for suspicious central pulmonary lesions and for mediastinal lymph node staging. The main objective of this study was to describe the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA for mediastinal lymph node staging in patients with suspected lung cancer. METHODS: Prospective study of patients undergoing EBUS-TBNA for diagnosis. Patients ≥ 18 years of age were recruited between July of 2010 and August of 2013. We recorded demographic variables, radiological characteristics provided by axial CT of the chest, location of the lesion in the mediastinum as per the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer classification, and definitive diagnostic result (EBUS with a diagnostic biopsy or a definitive diagnostic method). RESULTS: Our analysis included 354 biopsies, from 145 patients. Of those 145 patients, 54.48% were male. The mean age was 63.75 years. The mean lymph node size was 15.03 mm, and 90 lymph nodes were smaller than 10.0 mm. The EBUS-TBNA method showed a sensitivity of 91.17%, a specificity of 100.0%, and a negative predictive value of 92.9%. The most common histological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: EBUS-TBNA is a diagnostic tool that yields satisfactory results in the staging of neoplastic mediastinal lesions. PMID:26176519

  14. Paraffin-gel tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound-guided needle biopsy phantom.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Sílvio L; Pavan, Theo Z; Junior, Jorge E; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2013-12-01

    Paraffin-gel waxes have been investigated as new soft tissue-mimicking materials for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy training. Breast phantoms were produced with a broad range of acoustical properties. The speed of sound for the phantoms ranged from 1425.4 ± 0.6 to 1480.3 ± 1.7 m/s at room temperature. The attenuation coefficients were easily controlled between 0.32 ± 0.27 dB/cm and 2.04 ± 0.65 dB/cm at 7.5 MHz, depending on the amount of carnauba wax added to the base material. The materials do not suffer dehydration and provide adequate needle penetration, with a Young's storage modulus varying between 14.7 ± 0.2 kPa and 34.9 ± 0.3 kPa. The phantom background material possesses long-term stability and can be employed in a supine position without changes in geometry. These results indicate that paraffin-gel waxes may be promising materials for training radiologists in ultrasound biopsy procedures.

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy with a lumen-apposing metal stent: a multicenter, international experience

    PubMed Central

    Tyberg, Amy; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Sanchez-Ocaña, Ramon; Peñas, Irene; de la Serna, Carlos; Shah, Janak; Binmoeller, Kenneth; Gaidhane, Monica; Grimm, Ian; Baron, Todd; Kahaleh, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgical gastrojejunostomy and enteral self-expanding metal stents are efficacious for the management of gastric outlet obstruction but limited by high complication rates and short-term efficacy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy (EUS-GJ) is a novel alternative option. Patients and methods: Patients who underwent EUS-GJ between March 2014 and September 2015 as part of a prospective multicenter registry at four academic centers in two countries were included. Technical success was defined as successful placement of a gastrojejunal lumen-apposing metal stent. Clinical success was defined as the ability of the patient to tolerate an oral diet. Post-procedural adverse events were recorded. Results: The study included 26 patients, of whom 11 (42 %) were male. Technical success was achieved in 24 patients (92 %). Clinical success was achieved in 22 patients (85 %). Of the 4 patients in whom clinical success was not achieved, 2 had persistent nausea and vomiting despite a patent EUS-GJ and required enteral feeding for nutrition, 1 died before the initiation of an oral diet, and 1 underwent surgery for suspected perforation. Adverse events, including peritonitis, bleeding, and surgery, occurred in 3 patients (11.5 %). Conclusion: EUS-GJ is an emerging procedure that has efficacy and safety comparable with those of current therapies and should hold a place as a new minimally invasive option for patients with gastric outlet obstruction. Clinical trial identification number: NCT01522573 PMID:27004243

  16. Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration for the Diagnosis of Central Lung Parenchymal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Akash; Jeon, Kyeongman; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of convex probe endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for detecting malignancy in parenchymal pulmonary lesions located adjacent to the central airways. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the diagnostic performance of EBUS-TBNA in consecutive patients with high clinical suspicion of a centrally located primary lung cancer who had undergone EBUS-TBNA at the Samsung Medical Center between May 2009 and June 2011. Results Thirty-seven patients underwent EBUS-TBNA for intrapulmonary lesions adjacent to the central airways. Seven lesions were located adjacent to the trachea and 30 lesions were located adjacent to the bronchi. Cytologic and histologic samples obtained via EBUS-TBNA were diagnostic in 32 of 37 (86.4%) of patients. The final diagnosis was lung cancer in 30 patients (7 small cell lung cancer, 23 non-small cell lung cancer), lymphoma in one and malignant fibrous histiocytoma in one patient. The diagnostic sensitivity of EBUS-TBNA in detecting malignancy and detecting both malignancy and benignity was 91.4% and 86.5%, respectively. Two patients experienced minor complications. Conclusion EBUS-TBNA is an effective and safe method for tissue diagnosis of parenchymal lesions that lie centrally close to the airways. EBUS-TBNA should be considered the procedure of choice for patients with centrally located lesions without endobronchial involvement. PMID:23549813

  17. Analysis of Efficacy Differences between Caudal and Lumbar Interlaminar Epidural Injections in Chronic Lumbar Axial Discogenic Pain: Local Anesthetic Alone vs. Local Combined with Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Benyamin, Ramsin M.; Boswell, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design: Comparative assessment of randomized controlled trials of caudal and lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in chronic lumbar discogenic pain. Objective: To assess the comparative efficacy of caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches of epidural injections in managing axial or discogenic low back pain. Summary of Background Data: Epidural injections are commonly performed utilizing either a caudal or lumbar interlaminar approach to treat chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain, which is pain exclusive of that associated with a herniated intervertebral disc, or that is due to degeneration of the zygapophyseal joints, or due to dysfunction of the sacroiliac joints, respectively. The literature on the efficacy of epidural injections in managing chronic axial lumbar pain of presumed discogenic origin is limited. Methods: The present analysis is based on 2 randomized controlled trials of chronic axial low back pain not caused by disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain, utilizing either a caudal or lumbar interlaminar approach, with a total of 240 patients studied, and a 24-month follow-up. Patients were assigned to receive either local anesthetic only or local anesthetic with a steroid in each 60 patient group. Results: The primary outcome measure was significant improvement, defined as pain relief and functional status improvement of at least 50% from baseline, which was reported at 24-month follow-ups in 72% who received local anesthetic only with a lumbar interlaminar approach and 54% who received local anesthetic only with a caudal approach. In patients receiving local anesthetic with a steroid, the response rate was 67% for those who had a lumbar interlaminar approach and 68% for those who had a caudal approach at 12 months. The response was significantly better in the lumbar interlaminar group who received local anesthetic only, 77% versus 56% at 12 months and 72% versus 54% at 24 months. Conclusion: This assessment shows that in patients

  18. Ultrasound versus fluoroscopy-guided caudal epidural steroid injection for the treatment of chronic low back pain with radiculopathy: A randomised, controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Arindam Kumar; Bhattacharya, Dipasri; Mukherjee, Sayantan; Ghosh, Santanu; Mitra, Manasij; Mandal, Mohanchandra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal epidural steroid administration is an effective treatment for chronic low back pain (LBP). Fluoroscopy guidance is the gold standard for pain procedures. Ultrasound guidance is recently being used in pain clinic procedures. We compared the fluoroscopy guidance and ultrasound guidance for caudal epidural steroid injection with respect to the time needed for correct placement of the needle and clinical effectiveness in patients with chronic LBP. Methods: Fifty patients with chronic LBP with radiculopathy, not responding to conventional medical management, were randomly allocated to receive injection depot methyl prednisolone (40 mg) through caudal route either using ultrasound guidance (Group U, n = 25) or fluoroscopy guidance (Group F, n = 25). Pre-procedural visual analogue scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were noted. During the procedure, the time needed for correct placement of needle was observed. Adverse events, if any, were also noted. All patients were followed up for next 2 months to evaluate Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and ODI at the 2nd week and again at the end of 1st and 2nd month. Results: The needle-placement time was less using ultrasound guidance as compared to fluoroscopy guidance (119 ± 7.66 vs. 222.28 ± 29.65 s, respectively, P < 0.001). Significant reduction in VAS score and ODI (clinical improvement) was noted in the follow-up time points and comparable between the groups at all time points. Conclusion: Ultrasound guidance can be a safe alternative tool for achieving faster needle placement in caudal epidural space. Clinical effectiveness (reduction of VAS and ODI scores) remains comparable between both the techniques. PMID:27330199

  19. Exuberant local tissue reaction to intramuscular injection of nandrolone decanoate (Deca-Durabolin)--a steroid compound in a sesame seed oil base--mimicking soft tissue malignant tumors: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khankhanian, N K; Hammers, Y A; Kowalski, P

    1992-12-01

    We present an unusual pseudotumor that formed in reaction to self-administered intramuscular injections of an anabolic steroid, nandrolone decanoate (Deca-Durabolin) in a young soldier. The histopathologic features which closely mimicked several malignant neoplasms could have led to an incorrect diagnosis of malignancy and unnecessary extensive surgery. To our knowledge, this phenomenon has not been previously reported.

  20. Specimen acquisition training with a new biosimulator in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Taiki; Saegusa, Fumie; Inage, Terunaga; Sakairi, Yuichi; Wada, Hironobu; Suzuki, Hidemi; Iwata, Takekazu; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Nakatani, Yukio; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Training for endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) has focused on the procedure itself; however, the techniques for obtaining adequate sample are also important for achieving a pathological diagnosis as well as for molecular testing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a biosimulator for training subjects in adequate sample acquisition during EBUS-TBNA. A total of 19 bronchoscopists voluntarily participated in this study. A biosimulator (ArtiCHEST, HARADA Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) was used for the training. After a 10-minute briefing, the first pass was performed by pairs of trainees. The trainees then received a 30-minute lecture that focused on the acquisition of samples using EBUS-TBNA. The trainees next performed their second pass under the supervision of the trainers. Each participant obtained a cytological smear that was coded and evaluated for quantity as well as quality by an independent cytotechnologist. The trainees had an average of 5.9 years of bronchoscopy experience. With regard to the quantity evaluation, 9 (47.4%) subjects sampled a greater number of lymphocytes on the second pass than on the first, whereas 2 were better on the first pass, and the others sampled roughly the same amount both times. With regard to the quality assessment, 9 (47.4%) subjects obtained better quality samples on the second pass, whereas the quality of the first and second pass was deemed to be roughly the same for the remaining subjects. A biosimulator can be used to train doctors in specimen acquisition and evaluate their skills with sampling using EBUS-TBNA. PMID:28353607

  1. Analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided subcostal transversus abdominis plane block

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianfeng; Jiang, Yifei; Tang, Shiyi; Wang, Benfu; Lian, Qingquan; Xie, Zuokai; Li, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: To evaluate the analgesic efficacy on defined areas of the abdomen and back after ultrasound-guided subcostal transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block using 0.25% levobupivacaine 0.5 mL/kg. Methods: Twenty patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, between 20 and 60 years of age with operative time <1 hour, received subcostal TAP block using 0.25% levobupivacaine 0.5 mL/kg on the left side. Surgery started after 1 hour of observation. Sensory assessment was undertaken using pinprick and 75% ethyl alcohol at 10, 20, 30 minutes, 1, 3, and 12 hours after TAP block at 19 testing zones that were divided by anatomic landmark lines on the abdomen and the back. Efficacy of zone was defined as loss of cold temperature sensation or loss of pinprick pain sensation in more than 50% patients in that testing zone. Duration was determined by analgesia and loss of temperature sensation beginning within 30 minutes of TAP block placement lasting until time points of 1, 3, and 12 hours. All of the testing zones were divided as Group I effective at 20 minutes in less than 50% patients (0%–50%), Group II 50% to 70% patients, Group III 70% to 90% patients, and Group IV 90% to 100% patients. Results: Twenty patients meeting the study requirements were included. At each time point, the efficacies among 4 groups were significantly different. Subcostal TAP had good efficacy and stable duration in zones 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6. Conclusion: Subcostal TAP block with 0.25% levobupivacaine 0.5 mL/kg dose provided effective analgesia in the anterior abdominal wall between medioventral line to anterior axillary line except the lateral upper abdominal region. PMID:28272260

  2. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in the suspicion of pancreatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metastases to the pancreas are rare, and usually mistaken for primary pancreatic cancers. This study aimed to describe the histology results of solid pancreatic tumours obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) for diagnosis of metastases to the pancreas. Methods In a retrospective review, patients with pancreatic solid tumours and history of previous extrapancreatic cancer underwent EUS-FNA from January/1997 to December/2010. Most patients were followed-up until death and some of them were still alive at the end of the study. The performance of EUS-FNA for diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was analyzed. Symptoms, time frame between primary tumour diagnosis and the finding of metastases, and survival after diagnosis were also analyzed. Results 37 patients underwent EUS-FNA for probable pancreas metastases. Most cases (65%) presented with symptoms, especially upper abdominal pain (46%). Median time between detection of the first tumour and the finding of pancreatic metastases was 36 months. Metastases were confirmed in 32 (1.6%) cases, 30 of them by EUS-FNA, and 2 by surgery. Other 5 cases were non-metastatic. Most metastases were from lymphoma, colon, lung, and kidney. Twelve (32%) patients were submitted to surgery. Median survival after diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was 9 months, with no difference of survival between surgical and non-surgical cases. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of EUS-FNA with histology analysis of the specimens for diagnosis of pancreatic metastases were, respectively, 93.8%, 60%, 93.8%, 60% and 89%. Conclusion EUS-FNA with histology of the specimens is a sensitive and accurate method for definitive diagnosis of metastatic disease in patients with a previous history of extrapancreatic malignancies. PMID:23578194

  3. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and drainage in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Laméris, J S; Hesselink, E J; Van Leeuwen, P A; Nijs, H G; Meerwaldt, J H; Terpstra, O T

    1990-05-01

    The use of ultrasound-guided PTCD in 49 patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma was evaluated. In 11 patients PTCD was performed as a preoperative measure either to outline tumor extension or to treat cholangitis. Postoperatively, the catheters were used to stent bilioenteric anastomoses and served to guide iridium wires for radiotherapy in nine patients with nonresectable tumor or tumor residue after resection. In 20 inoperable patients with tumor diameter smaller than 3 cm and in whom at least one catheter could be manipulated through the tumor, PTCD was combined with internal and external radiotherapy. The remaining 18 patients were palliated with PTCD only. In 29 patients (59%) complete drainage of the biliary system was achieved. Twenty-seven of these had complete internal drainage using endoprostheses. Two had a combination of an endoprosthesis and external catheter drainage. Of the 20 patients (41%) with incomplete drainage, 12 had endoprostheses, four had a catheter and an endoprosthesis, and in the remaining four external catheter drainage was the optimum result. PTCD was successful in treating eight of ten patients with cholangitis and 12 of 16 patients with pruritus. Procedure-related complication occurred in 11 patients (22%). With the exception of one, all complications could be classified as minor, requiring only conservative measures. A major complication was seen in a patient with ascitic fluid and severe cholangitis. PTCD caused a bacterial peritonitis, of which the patient died. The median survival of patients treated with PTCD alone only was 4 months. A significant increase in survival was noted in patients treated with PTCD and radiotherapy (median survival 8 months).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. An integrated ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system for in-vivo experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2017-03-01

    We present the system architecture of an integrated Ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (USgHIFU) system for image-guided surgery and temperature tracking in vivo. The system is capable of operating with multiple frontends. Current implementation has a SonixRP for imaging and a custom designed dual mode ultrasound array (DMUA) system (32Tx/32Rx) for imaging/therapy. The highlights of the system include a fully-programmable, multiple data stream capable data processing engine, and an arbitrarily programmable high power array driver that is able to synthesize complex beam patterns in space and time. The data processing engine features a pipeline-style design that can be programmed on-the-fly by re-arranging the pre-verified GPU-accelerated high performance pipeline blocks, which cover an extensive range from basic functions such as filtering to specialized processing like speckle tracking. Furthermore, the pipeline design also has the option of bringing in MATLAB (Mathworks, Natick, MA, US) as part of the processing chain, thus vastly increase the capability of the system. By properly balancing the processing load between GPU-enabled routine and MATLAB script. This allows one to achieve a high degree of flexibility while meeting real-time constraints. Results are presented from in vivo rat experiment. Where low dose of therapeutic ultrasound was delivered into the hind limb of the Copenhagen rats using DMUA and temperature was tracked using a linear probe (HST, Ultrasonix). The data is processed in realtime with MATLAB in the loop to perform temperature regularization. Results show that we can reliably track the low temperature heating in the presence of motion artifacts (respiration and pulsation).

  5. Diagnostic value of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in various lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ortakoylu, Mediha Gonenc; Iliaz, Sinem; Bahadir, Ayse; Aslan, Asuman; Iliaz, Raim; Ozgul, Mehmet Akif; Urer, Halide Nur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a new method for the diagnosis and staging of lung disease, and its use is increasing worldwide. It has been used as a means of diagnosing lung cancer in its initial stages, and there are data supporting its use for the diagnosis of benign lung disease. The aim of this study was to share our experience with EBUS-TBNA and discuss its diagnostic value. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the results related to 159 patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA at our pulmonary medicine clinic between 2010 and 2013. We recorded the location and size of lymph nodes seen during EBUS. Lymph nodes that appeared to be affected on EBUS were sampled at least twice. We recorded the diagnostic results of EBUS-TBNA and (for cases in which EBUS-TBNA yielded an inconclusive diagnosis) the final diagnoses after further investigation and follow-up. Results: We evaluated 159 patients, of whom 89 (56%) were male and 70 (44%) were female. The mean age was 54.6 ± 14.2 years among the male patients and 51.9 ± 11.3 years among the female patients. Of the 159 patients evaluated, 115 (84%) were correctly diagnosed by EBUS. The diagnostic accuracy of EBUS-TBNA was 83% for benign granulomatous diseases and 77% for malignant diseases. Conclusions: The diagnostic value of EBUS-TBNA is also high for benign pathologies, such as sarcoidosis and tuberculosis. In patients with mediastinal disorders, the use of EBUS-TBNA should be encouraged, primarily because it markedly reduces the need for mediastinoscopy. PMID:26578131

  6. Current status of ultrasound-guided surgery in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Volders, José H; Haloua, Max H; Krekel, Nicole Ma; Meijer, Sybren; van den Tol, Petrousjka M

    2016-02-10

    The primary goal of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is to obtain tumour-free resection margins. Margins positive or focally positive for tumour cells are associated with a high risk of local recurrence, and in the case of tumour-positive margins, re-excision or even mastectomy are sometimes needed to achieve definite clear margins. Unfortunately, tumour-involved margins and re-excisions after lumpectomy are still reported in up to 40% of patients and additionally, unnecessary large excision volumes are described. A secondary goal of BCS is the cosmetic outcome and one of the main determinants of worse cosmetic outcome is a large excision volume. Up to 30% of unsatisfied cosmetic outcome is reported. Therefore, the search for better surgical techniques to improve margin status, excision volume and consequently, cosmetic outcome has continued. Nowadays, the most commonly used localization methods for BCS of non-palpable breast cancers are wire-guided localization (WGL) and radio-guided localization (RGL). WGL and RGL are invasive procedures that need to be performed pre-operatively with technical and scheduling difficulties. For palpable breast cancer, tumour excision is usually guided by tactile skills of the surgeon performing "blind" surgery. One of the surgical techniques pursuing the aims of radicality and small excision volumes includes intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). The best evidence available demonstrates benefits of IOUS with a significantly high proportion of negative margins compared with other localization techniques in palpable and non-palpable breast cancer. Additionally, IOUS is non-invasive, easy to learn and can centralize the tumour in the excised specimen with low amount of healthy breast tissue being excised. This could lead to better cosmetic results of BCS. Despite the advantages of IOUS, only a small amount of surgeons are performing this technique. This review aims to highlight the position of ultrasound-guided surgery for malignant breast

  7. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Derek; Sherebrin, Shi; Izawa, Jonathan; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Biopsy of the prostate using ultrasound guidance is the clinical gold standard for diagnosis of prostate adenocarinoma. However, because early stage tumors are rarely visible under US, the procedure carries high false-negative rates and often patients require multiple biopsies before cancer is detected. To improve cancer detection, it is imperative that throughout the biopsy procedure, physicians know where they are within the prostate and where they have sampled during prior biopsies. The current biopsy procedure is limited to using only 2D ultrasound images to find and record target biopsy core sample sites. This information leaves ambiguity as the physician tries to interpret the 2D information and apply it to their 3D workspace. We have developed a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system that provides 3D intra-biopsy information to physicians for needle guidance and biopsy location recording. The system is designed to conform to the workflow of the current prostate biopsy procedure, making it easier for clinical integration. In this paper, we describe the system design and validate its accuracy by performing an in vitro biopsy procedure on US/CT multi-modal patient-specific prostate phantoms. A clinical sextant biopsy was performed by a urologist on the phantoms and the 3D models of the prostates were generated with volume errors less than 4% and mean boundary errors of less than 1 mm. Using the 3D biopsy system, needles were guided to within 1.36 +/- 0.83 mm of 3D targets and the position of the biopsy sites were accurately localized to 1.06 +/- 0.89 mm for the two prostates.

  8. Real-time ultrasound-guided PCNL using a novel SonixGPS needle tracking system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Long, Qingzhi; Chen, Xingfa; He, Dalin; Dalin, He; He, Hui

    2014-08-01

    SonixGPS is a successful ultrasound guidance position system. It helps to improve accuracy in performing complex puncture operations. This study firstly used SonixGPS to perform kidney calyx access in PCNL to investigate its effectiveness and safety. This was a prospectively randomized controlled study performed from September 2011 to October 2012. A total of 97 patients were prospectively randomized into two groups using random number generated from SAS software. 47 Patients were enrolled in conventional ultrasound-guided (US-guided) group and 50 patients were classified into SonixGPS-guided group. Nine patients were lost during follow-up. Hence, a total of 88 patients were qualified and analyzed. Preoperative examinations included urine analysis, urine culture, kidney function, coagulation profile and routine analysis of blood. Ultrasonography was used to evaluate the degree of hydronephrosis. The intraoperative findings, including blood loss, operating time, time to successful puncture, the number of attempts for successful puncture and hospital stay were recorded. The stone clearance rate and complications were analyzed. The present study showed no significant difference between the two groups in terms of demographic data, preoperative markers, stone clearance rate and the stone composition. However, the time to successful puncture, the number of trials for successful puncture, operating time and hospital length of stay were significantly decreased in the SonixGPS-guided group. Furthermore, the hemoglobin decrease was also obviously lower in the SonixGPS group than that in conventional US-guided group. SonixGPS needle tacking system guided PCNL is safe and effective in treating upper urinary tract stones. This novel technology makes puncturing more accuracy and can significantly decrease the incidence of relative hemorrhage and accelerate recovery.

  9. Optimal biliary access point and learning curve for endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy with transmural stenting

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dongwook; Park, Do Hyun; Song, Tae Jun; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy (EUS-HGS) with transmural stenting has increased for biliary decompression in patients with an inaccessible papilla, the optimal biliary access point and the learning curve of EUS-HGS have not been studied. We evaluated the optimal biliary access point and learning curve for technically successful EUS-HGS. Methods: 129 consecutive patients (male n = 81, 62.3%; malignant n = 113, 87.6%) who underwent EUS-HGS due to an inaccessible papilla were enrolled. EUS finding and procedure times according to each needle puncture attempt in EUS-HGS were prospectively measured. Learning curves of EUS-HGS were calculated for two main outcome measurements (procedure time and adverse events) by using the moving average method and cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis, respectively. Results: A total of 174 EUS-HGS attempts were performed in 129 patients. The mean number of needle punctures was 1.35 ± 0.57. Using the logistic regression model, bile duct diameter of the puncture site ⩽ 5 mm [odds ratio (OR) 3.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.71–8.1, p < 0.01] and hepatic portion length [linear distance from the mural wall to the punctured bile duct wall on EUS; mean hepatic portion length was 27 mm (range 10–47 mm)] > 3 cm (OR 5.7, 95% CI: 2.7–12, p < 0.01) were associated with low technical success. Procedure time and adverse events were shorter after 24 cases, and stabilized at 33 cases of EUS-HGS, respectively. Conclusions: Our data suggest that a bile duct diameter > 5 mm and hepatic portion length 1 cm to ⩽ 3 cm on EUS may be suitable for successful EUS-HGS. In our learning curve analysis, over 33 cases might be required to achieve the plateau phase for successful EUS-HGS. PMID:28286558

  10. Current status of ultrasound-guided surgery in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Volders, José H; Haloua, Max H; Krekel, Nicole MA; Meijer, Sybren; van den Tol, Petrousjka M

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is to obtain tumour-free resection margins. Margins positive or focally positive for tumour cells are associated with a high risk of local recurrence, and in the case of tumour-positive margins, re-excision or even mastectomy are sometimes needed to achieve definite clear margins. Unfortunately, tumour-involved margins and re-excisions after lumpectomy are still reported in up to 40% of patients and additionally, unnecessary large excision volumes are described. A secondary goal of BCS is the cosmetic outcome and one of the main determinants of worse cosmetic outcome is a large excision volume. Up to 30% of unsatisfied cosmetic outcome is reported. Therefore, the search for better surgical techniques to improve margin status, excision volume and consequently, cosmetic outcome has continued. Nowadays, the most commonly used localization methods for BCS of non-palpable breast cancers are wire-guided localization (WGL) and radio-guided localization (RGL). WGL and RGL are invasive procedures that need to be performed pre-operatively with technical and scheduling difficulties. For palpable breast cancer, tumour excision is usually guided by tactile skills of the surgeon performing “blind” surgery. One of the surgical techniques pursuing the aims of radicality and small excision volumes includes intra-operative ultrasound (IOUS). The best evidence available demonstrates benefits of IOUS with a significantly high proportion of negative margins compared with other localization techniques in palpable and non-palpable breast cancer. Additionally, IOUS is non-invasive, easy to learn and can centralize the tumour in the excised specimen with low amount of healthy breast tissue being excised. This could lead to better cosmetic results of BCS. Despite the advantages of IOUS, only a small amount of surgeons are performing this technique. This review aims to highlight the position of ultrasound-guided surgery for malignant

  11. Intratympanic steroids injection is effective for the treatment of drop attacks with Ménière's disease and delayed endolymphatic hydrops

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Leng, Yangming; Zhou, Renhong; Liu, Jingjing; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Su-Lin; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Drop attack (DA) associated with Ménière's disease (MD) and delayed endolymphatic hydrops (DEH) is not common and may cause life-threatening clinical problems. The intratympanic dexamethasone (ITD) is one of primary treatments for MD or DEH. Our study investigated the effect of ITD on the DA associated with endolymphatic hydrops (EH). We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients with MD- and DEH-associated DA between January 2009 and December 2013 in Outpatient Department of Otolaryngology, Union Hospital, Wuhan, China. Among them, 7 patients (5 cases with MD, 2 cases of DEH) received ITD (4 times, on weekly basis). Further repeated ITD courses or intratympanic gentamicin (ITG) were given if the vertigo was not satisfactorily controlled. The number of DA and status of vertigo control after intratympanic injection were evaluated. After a follow-up study lasting from 19 to 35 months, DA in 5 cases (71.4%) disappeared after initial ITD course. In 2 cases, DA was altogether controlled after an additional intratympanic injection (repeated ITD or/and ITG). This study showed that ITD promises to be a first-line conservative treatment for MD- or DEH-related DA since the steroid possesses no inner-ear toxicity. Furthermore, for MD- or DEH-related DA refractory to ITD, ITG can be an effective alternative. PMID:28033296

  12. Estimated deaths and illnesses averted during fungal meningitis outbreak associated with contaminated steroid injections, United States, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel M; Derado, Gordana; Wise, Matthew; Harris, Julie R; Chiller, Tom; Meltzer, Martin I; Park, Benjamin J

    2015-06-01

    During 2012-2013, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and partners responded to a multistate outbreak of fungal infections linked to methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) injections produced by a compounding pharmacy. We evaluated the effects of public health actions on the scope of this outbreak. A comparison of 60-day case-fatality rates and clinical characteristics of patients given a diagnosis on or before October 4, the date the outbreak was widely publicized, with those of patients given a diagnosis after October 4 showed that an estimated 3,150 MPA injections, 153 cases of meningitis or stroke, and 124 deaths were averted. Compared with diagnosis after October 4, diagnosis on or before October 4 was significantly associated with a higher 60-day case-fatality rate (28% vs. 5%; p<0.0001). Aggressive public health action resulted in a substantially reduced estimated number of persons affected by this outbreak and improved survival of affected patients.

  13. Successful Xenograft of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Specimen from Human Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma into an Immunodeficient Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Se Young; Bae, Han Ik; Lee, In Kyu; Park, Hwan Ki; Cho, Chang-Min

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived tumor xenograft is the transfer of primary human tumors directly into an immunodeficient mouse. Patient-derived tumor xenograft plays an important role in the development and evaluation of new chemotherapeutic agents. We succeeded in generating a patient-derived tumor xenograft of a biliary tumor obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration from a patient who had an inoperable extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. This patient-derived tumor xenograft will be a promising tool for individualized cancer therapy and can be used in developing new chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of biliary cancer in the future. PMID:26087785

  14. Practical Guidelines for Ultrasound-Guided Core Needle Biopsy of Soft-Tissue Lesions: Transformation from Beginner to Specialist

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Yoon; Oh, Tack Sun; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (US-CNB) is an important step in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions. To maximize efficacy and minimize the complications of US-CNB, it is critical to collaborate with a multidisciplinary team and to understand the particular considerations of US-CNB for these lesions. The purpose of this article is to provide a systematic review and step-by-step tips for using US-CNB to diagnose musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions. PMID:28246516

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Proximal Suprascapular Nerve Block With Radiofrequency Lesioning for Patients With Malignancy-Associated Recalcitrant Shoulder Pain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ke-Vin; Hung, Chen-Yu; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Yang, Rong-Sen; Sun, Wei-Zen; Lin, Chih-Peng

    2015-11-01

    The classic suprascapular nerve block has limitations, such as postural requirements and lack of direct nerve visualization. This series investigated the analgesic effect of ultrasound-guided supraclavicular suprascapular nerve blocks in patients with malignancy-associated shoulder pain. Ablative radiofrequency lesioning of the suprascapular nerve in 6 patients provided substantial pain relief. The mean distance from the suprascapular nerve to the brachial plexus was 8.05 mm, and the mean angle of needle entry was 20.6°. This approach appears to be effective in relieving malignancy-associated shoulder pain and is tolerated by patients unable to sit or lie prone.

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Suprainguinal Fascia Iliaca Technique Provides Benefit as an Analgesic Adjunct for Patients Undergoing Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bullock, W Michael; Yalamuri, Suraj M; Gregory, Stephen H; Auyong, David B; Grant, Stuart A

    2017-02-01

    Analgesia after total hip arthroplasty is often accomplished by the fascia iliaca compartment block, traditionally performed below the inguinal ligament, to anesthetize both femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves. The course of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve below the inguinal ligament is variable as opposed to consistent above the inguinal ligament in the pelvis. In this case series including 5 patients, we demonstrate that an ultrasound-guided suprainguinal fascia iliaca approach would consistently anesthetize the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve along with anterior cutaneous femoral nerve branches and provide cutaneous analgesia after total hip arthroplasty, as shown by decreased opioid consumption.

  17. FaceTime(®) for teaching ultrasound-guided anesthetic procedures in remote place.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Tetsuya; Iketani, Yasuhiro; Nagamine, Yusuke; Goto, Takahisa

    2014-04-01

    In isolated area in Japan, only one anesthesiologist must often do new anesthetic techniques such as ultrasound-guided procedures without receiving any teaching. One solution to this problem may involve teleanesthesia, by which experienced anesthesiologists teach novices in remote places, by utilizing information communication technologies. FaceTime™ (Apple, USA), which provides 120p of the resolution and 30 frames per second (fps) is an application of free visual communications using iPod Touch™, iPhone™ or iPad™ (Apple, USA). We investigated the delay time, the loss of the frames and the picture quality of iPad (as the device in the teaching site) in combination with iPod Touch, iPhone4 or iPhone5 (as the device in the isolated site) during FaceTime. At the operating rooms in Sado General Hospital (SGH) located in Sado Island (population; approximately 60,000), Japan, an anesthesiologist prepared 3 mobile devices (iPod Touch, iPhone4 or iPhone5). He called the other anesthesiologist at Yokohama City University Hospital (YCUH; approximately 300 km apart) by FaceTime using 1 of 3 mobile devices. The anesthesiologist at YCUH received the FaceTime call using iPad. After the connection was established, the display of the same cervical ultrasound image at SGH was sent to YCUH to evaluate the distinctness visually. Then we measured the delay time of every second (n = 60) and the loss of the frames (total frames = 30 fps × 60 s = 1,800) in each device for a minute. P < 0.01 was statistically significant. The quality of the pictures on the iPad display sent from iPhone5 was distinctly the best visually. The delay time of iPhone5 was significantly longer than the others (iPod Touch; 0.14 ± 0.02 s, iPhone4; 0.13 ± 0.02 s, iPhone5; 0.19 ± 0.03 s), but clinically acceptable. The loss of the frames of iPhone5 (20; 1.1%) was significantly less than the others (iPhone4; 900, 50.0%, iPod Touch; 902, 50.1%). To teach anesthetic techniques in remote place by FaceTime, i

  18. The role of sedation in endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Aswanetmanee, Pantaree; Limsuwat, Chok; Kabach, Mohamad; Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Kheir, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is a minimally invasive procedure that has become an important tool in diagnosis and staging of mediastinal lymph node (LN) lesions in lung cancer. Adequate sedation is an important part of the procedure since it provides patient's comfort and potentially increases diagnostic yield. We aimed to compare deep sedation (DS) versus moderate sedation (MS) in patients undergoing EBUS-TBNA procedure. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Library were searched for English studies of clinical trials comparing the two different methods of sedations in EBUS-TBNA until December 2015. The overall diagnostic yield, LN size sampling, procedural time, complication, and safety were evaluated. Results: Six studies with 3000 patients which compared two different modalities of sedation in patients performing EBUS-TBNA were included in the study. The overall diagnostic yield of DS method was 52.3%–100% and MS method was 46.1%–85.7%. The overall sensitivity of EBUS-TBNA of DS method was 98.15%–100% as compared with 80%–98.08% in MS method. The overall procedural times were 27.2–50.9 min and 20.6-44.1 min in DS and MS groups, respectively. The numbers of LN sampled were between 1.33–3.20 nodes and 1.36–2.80 nodes in DS and MS groups, respectively. The numbers of passes per LN were 3.21–3.70 passes in DS group as compared to 2.73–3.00 passes in MS group. The mean of LN size was indifferent between two groups. None of the studies included reported serious adverse events. Conclusions: Using MS in EBUS-TBNA has comparable diagnostic yield and safety profile to DS. The decision on the method of sedation for EBUS-TBNA should be individually selected based on operator experience, patient preference, as well as duration of the anticipated procedure. PMID:27803902

  19. Adapting Gel Wax into an Ultrasound-Guided Pericardiocentesis Model at Low Cost

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Robert; Planas, Jason H.; Edens, Mary Ann

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is a life-threatening emergency for which pericardiocentesis may be required. Real-time bedside ultrasound has obviated the need for routine blind procedures in cardiac arrest, and the number of pericardiocenteses being performed has declined. Despite this fact, pericardiocentesis remains an essential skill in emergency medicine. While commercially available training models exist, cost, durability, and lack of anatomical landmarks limit their usefulness. We sought to create a pericardiocentesis model that is realistic, simple to build, reusable, and cost efficient. We constructed the model using a red dye-filled ping pong ball (simulating the right ventricle) and a 250cc normal saline bag (simulating the effusion) encased in an artificial rib cage and held in place by gel wax. The inner saline bag was connected to a 1L saline bag outside of the main assembly to act as a fluid reservoir for repeat uses. The entire construction process takes approximately 16–20 hours, most of which is attributed to cooling of the gel wax. Actual construction time is approximately four hours at a cost of less than $200. The model was introduced to emergency medicine residents and medical students during a procedure simulation lab and compared to a model previously described by dell’Orto.1 The learners performed ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis using both models. Learners who completed a survey comparing realism of the two models felt our model was more realistic than the previously described model. On a scale of 1–9, with 9 being very realistic, the previous model was rated a 4.5. Our model was rated a 7.8. There was also a marked improvement in the perceived recognition of the pericardium, the heart, and the pericardial sac. Additionally, 100% of the students were successful at performing the procedure using our model. In simulation, our model provided both palpable and ultrasound landmarks and held up to several months of repeated use. It was less

  20. Adapting Gel Wax into an Ultrasound-Guided Pericardiocentesis Model at Low Cost.

    PubMed

    Daly, Robert; Planas, Jason H; Edens, Mary Ann

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is a life-threatening emergency for which pericardiocentesis may be required. Real-time bedside ultrasound has obviated the need for routine blind procedures in cardiac arrest, and the number of pericardiocenteses being performed has declined. Despite this fact, pericardiocentesis remains an essential skill in emergency medicine. While commercially available training models exist, cost, durability, and lack of anatomical landmarks limit their usefulness. We sought to create a pericardiocentesis model that is realistic, simple to build, reusable, and cost efficient. We constructed the model using a red dye-filled ping pong ball (simulating the right ventricle) and a 250cc normal saline bag (simulating the effusion) encased in an artificial rib cage and held in place by gel wax. The inner saline bag was connected to a 1L saline bag outside of the main assembly to act as a fluid reservoir for repeat uses. The entire construction process takes approximately 16-20 hours, most of which is attributed to cooling of the gel wax. Actual construction time is approximately four hours at a cost of less than $200. The model was introduced to emergency medicine residents and medical students during a procedure simulation lab and compared to a model previously described by dell'Orto.1 The learners performed ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis using both models. Learners who completed a survey comparing realism of the two models felt our model was more realistic than the previously described model. On a scale of 1-9, with 9 being very realistic, the previous model was rated a 4.5. Our model was rated a 7.8. There was also a marked improvement in the perceived recognition of the pericardium, the heart, and the pericardial sac. Additionally, 100% of the students were successful at performing the procedure using our model. In simulation, our model provided both palpable and ultrasound landmarks and held up to several months of repeated use. It was less expensive

  1. Role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration in the diagnosis of mass lesions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chaoqun; Lin, Rong; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Jun; Ding, Zhen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is an accurate technique for sampling the pancreas and mediastinum; however, limited data are available for other mass lesions. The aim of this study was to explore the value of EUS-FNA in the differential diagnosis of all mass lesions. Data from patients who underwent EUS-FNA for the diagnosis of mass lesions, including pancreatic, mediastinal, celiac and retroperitoneal lesions were retrospectively analyzed. The accuracy was calculated by comparing the results of FNA with the results of pathological examination or follow-up surveillances in non-operated cases. A total of 150 cases were included. The location of the mass varied from the pancreas (n=62) to the mediastinum (n=29), gastrointestinal tract (n=36), celiac cavity and retroperitoneum (n=23). The sensitivity and Youdens index of EUS-FNA in the diagnosis of all lesions were 92.97% and 0.93 respectively. The accuracy of diagnosis of pancreatic, mediastinal, gastrointestinal, celiac and retroperitoneal lesions was 85.48, 89.66, 83.33 and 78.23%, respectively. Masses were categorized into parenchymal organs (n=66), luminal organs (n=36) and enlarged lymph nodes (n=33). Lesions in parenchymal organs were likely to be bigger than those in luminal organs (P=0.03) and enlarged lymph nodes (P=0.01). For solid and cystic masses, which constituted 63.3 and 14.7% of the total masses, no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was observed (P=0.56); however, lesion sizes were significantly different between these two groups (P=0.04) and the majority of cystic masses were identified in women (P=0.03). Malignant lesions were more common in older (P=0.01) and male (P=0.03) patients. In conclusion, EUS-FNA is an effective tool in the diagnosis of unexplained mass lesions; it influences the management of patients by enabling the appropriate treatment to be identified. PMID:27446324

  2. Patient information leaflets for Transrectal Ultrasound guided prostate biopsy: Results of North Thames deanery survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We evaluated the quality of patient information leaflets for Trans-Rectal Ultrasound guided prostate biopsies (TRUS-Bx) in North Thames region. TRUS-Bx information leaflets were requested from 24 hospitals in the region. All hospitals were contacted by telephone, and non-responders were followed-up by postal survey. Leaflets received were evaluated for a clear description of the procedure, directions to TRUS-Bx location, a clear description of the procedure, contact for queries/concerns, information about preparation prior to procedure, information about regular medication, information on how to obtain results, instructions for follow-up arrangements, analgesia used and risk of morbidity/mortality. Additionally, the leaflets were evaluated for diagrams to clarify the procedure and the anatomy, and sources of additional information, such as reference to published articles or prostate cancer patient support groups/internet websites. Findings In summary, a total of 17 leaflets (77%) were received. Of these, the majority (94%) had a clear description of the procedure, contact for queries/concerns (82%), information about preparation prior to TRUS-Bx (71%). Directions to TRUS-Bx location (29%), and analgesia used (35%), was very poorly described, and information on obtaining results and follow-up arrangements were described in only 12 (71%) leaflets. Complications such as risks of infection, haematuria, haematospermia and rectal bleeding, were generally explained (71%-76% of leaflets), urinary retention was mentioned in only 5 (29%) leaflets and mortality in only 1 case. Descriptive diagrams of the procedure and prostate anatomy were very rarely used, and sources of additional information were limited to 1 published article and reference to 1 prostate cancer support group. Conclusions This study demonstrates that there is large variation in the information supplied in TRUS-Bx patient information leaflets in the North Thames region, with some leaflets lacking

  3. The potential contributing effect of ketorolac and fluoxetine to a spinal epidural hematoma following a cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection: a case report and narrative review.

    PubMed

    Chien, George C Chang; McCormick, Zack; Araujo, Marco; Candido, Kenneth D

    2014-01-01

    Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections (ESIs) are commonly performed as one part of a multi-modal analgesic regimen in the management of upper extremity radicular pain. Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare complication with a reported incidence ranging from 1.38 in 10,000 to 1 in 190,000 epidurals. Current American Society of Regional Anesthesia (ASRA), American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP), and the International Spine Intervention Society (ISIS) recommendations are that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) do not need to be withheld prior to epidural anesthesia. We report a case wherein intramuscular ketorolac and oral fluoxetine contributed to a SEH and tetraplegia following a cervical interlaminar (ESI). A 66 year-old woman with chronic renal insufficiency and neck pain radiating into her right upper extremity presented for evaluation and was deemed an appropriate CESI candidate. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multi-level neuroforaminal stenosis and degenerative intervertebral discs. Utilizing a loss of resistance to saline technique, an 18-gauge Tuohy-type needle entered the epidural space at C6-7. After negative aspiration, 4 mL of saline with 80 mg of methyl-prednisolone was injected. Immediately thereafter, the patient reported significant spasmodic-type localized neck pain with no neurologic status changes. A decision was made to administer 30 mg intramuscular ketorolac as treatment for the spasmodic-type pain. En route home, she developed a sudden onset of acute tetraplegia. She was brought to the emergency department for evaluation including platelet and coagulation studies which were normal. MRI demonstrated an epidural hematoma extending from C5 to T7. She underwent a bilateral C5-T6 laminectomy with epidural hematoma evacuation and was discharged to an acute inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Chronic renal insufficiency, spinal stenosis, female gender, and increasing age have been

  4. Effects of using simulation versus CD-ROM in the performance of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Gasko, John; Johnson, Arthur; Sherner, John; Craig, John; Gegel, Brian; Burgert, James; Sama, Samuel; Franzen, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which method of teaching, CD-ROM, simulation, or a combination of both, was more effective in increasing the performance of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. No studies have investigated these methods. The framework for this study was critical thinking. The study was a prospective, mixed (between and within) subjects, experimental design. The sample consisted of 29 student registered nurse anesthetists randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: CD-ROM (n = 11), simulation (n = 11), and combination (n = 7). All groups were evaluated by the use of cadavers before and 2 months after the intervention using a valid and reliable instrument of performance. A repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated that the combination was significantly better than the CD-ROM and simulation (P < .05). The means and standard deviations for pretest and posttest results, respectively, were: CD-ROM, 33 +/- 7%, 41 +/- 9%; simulation, 35 +/- 10%, 49 +/- 13%; and combination, 36 +/- 8%, 64 +/- 17%. The baseline for each group was 0. Use of a combination of CD-ROM and simulation should be considered in teaching ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia techniques.

  5. Automatic Segmentation and Probe Guidance for Real-Time Assistance of Ultrasound-Guided Femoral Nerve Blocks.

    PubMed

    Smistad, Erik; Iversen, Daniel Høyer; Leidig, Linda; Lervik Bakeng, Janne Beate; Johansen, Kaj Fredrik; Lindseth, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia can be challenging, especially for inexperienced physicians. The goal of the proposed methods is to create a system that can assist a user in performing ultrasound-guided femoral nerve blocks. The system indicates in which direction the user should move the ultrasound probe to investigate the region of interest and to reach the target site for needle insertion. Additionally, the system provides automatic real-time segmentation of the femoral artery, the femoral nerve and the two layers fascia lata and fascia iliaca. This aids in interpretation of the 2-D ultrasound images and the surrounding anatomy in 3-D. The system was evaluated on 24 ultrasound acquisitions of both legs from six subjects. The estimated target site for needle insertion and the segmentations were compared with those of an expert anesthesiologist. Average target distance was 8.5 mm with a standard deviation of 2.5 mm. The mean absolute differences of the femoral nerve and the fascia segmentations were about 1-3 mm.

  6. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy in the diagnosis of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bulakci, Mesut; Ilhan, Mehmet; Bademler, Suleyman; Yilmaz, Erdem; Gulluoglu, Mine; Bayraktar, Adem; Asik, Murat; Guloglu, Recep

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study retrospectively analyzed the clinical data, laboratory results, imaging findings, and histopathological features of 28 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy from a hepatic lesion and were diagnosed with alveolar echinococcosis. Results: Among 28 patients included in the study, 16 were females and 12 were males. The mean age of the studied population was 53 ± 16 years, and the age range was 18–79 years. The most common presenting symptom was abdominal pain, which was observed in 14 patients. A total of 36 lesions were detected in the patients’ livers, out of which 7 had a cystic appearance. Hepatic vascular involvement, bile duct involvement, and other organ involvement were depicted in 14, 5, and 7 patients, respectively. The average number of cores taken from the lesions was 2.7, ranging between 2 and 5. In histopathological evaluation, PAS+ parasitic membrane structures were visualized on a necrotic background in all cases. Regarding seven patients, who were operated, the pathological findings of preoperative percutaneous biopsies were in perfect agreement with the pathological examinations after surgical resections. None of the patients developed major complications after biopsy. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy is a minimally invasive, reliable, and effective diagnostic tool for the definitive diagnosis of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis. PMID:27101838

  7. Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Complicating Liver Cirrhosis: Utility of Repeat Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy after Unsuccessful First Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Caturelli, Eugenio; Biasini, Elisabetta; Bartolucci, Francesca; Facciorusso, Domenico; Decembrino, Francesco; Attino, Vito; Bisceglia, Michele

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a second ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy of liver nodules thought to be hepatocellular carcinoma when the original biopsy has failed to provide a reliable diagnosis. Methods: Thirty-seven cirrhotic patients underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy of liver nodules that were subsequently diagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma. Each biopsy involved a single puncture with a 20 G cutting needle, which yielded pathologic material used both for cytologic and histologic studies. In 23 cases (mean diameter of nodules 48 mm) the biopsy furnished exclusively necrotic material (non-diagnostic subgroup); in the other 14 cases (mean diameter 26 mm) the biopsy yielded no neoplastic elements (false-negative subgroup). All 37 nodules were subjected to repeat biopsies performed in the same manner. Results: The repeat biopsies provided a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma in six of the 23 patients from the non-diagnostic subgroup and in seven of the 14 in the false-negative subgroup. Overall, repeat biopsy produced a diagnostic gain of 35.1%. Conclusion: The chance of success with repeat biopsy of hepatocellular carcinoma is limited and may depend to some extent on the characteristics of the lesions (i.e., areas of necrosis in large nodules, well-differentiated cellular populations in small ones)

  8. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING OUTCOME OF ULTRASOUND-GUIDED RADIOFREQUENCY HEAT ABLATION FOR TREATMENT OF PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM IN DOGS.

    PubMed

    Bucy, Daniel; Pollard, Rachel; Nelson, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) parathyroid ablation is a noninvasive treatment for hyperparathyroidism in dogs. There are no published data assessing factors associated with RF parathyroid ablation success or failure in order to guide patient selection and improve outcome. The purpose of this retrospective analytical study was to determine whether imaging findings, biochemical data, or concurrent diseases were associated with RF heat ablation treatment failure. For inclusion in the study, dogs must have had a clinical diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism, undergone cervical ultrasound and RF ablation of abnormal parathyroid tissue, and must have had at least 3 months of follow-up information available following the date of ultrasound-guided parathyroid ablation. Dogs were grouped based on those with recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia and those without recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia following therapy. Parathyroid nodule size, thyroid lobe size, nodule location, and presence of concurrent disease were recorded. Recurrence of hypercalcemia occurred in 9/32 dogs that had ablation of abnormal parathyroid tissue (28%) and one patient had persistent hypercalcemia (3%) following parathyroid ablation. Nodule width (P = 0.036), height (P = 0.028), and largest cross-sectional area (P = 0.023) were larger in dogs that had recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia following ablation. Hypothyroidism was more common in dogs with recurrent disease (P = 0.044). Radiofrequency ablation was successful in 22/32 (69%) dogs. Larger parathyroid nodule size and/or concurrent hypothyroidism were associated with treatment failure in dogs that underwent ultrasound-guided RF parathyroid nodule ablation.

  9. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Drainage of Intra-Abdominal Abscess after Gastric Perforation in a Patient Receiving Ramucirumab and Paclitaxel for Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandai, Koichiro; Shirakawa, Atsushi; Uno, Koji; Yasuda, Kenjiro

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal perforation is a serious adverse event that occurs in approximately 1% of patients receiving ramucirumab and paclitaxel. A 67-year-old man with unresectable advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital and treated with ramucirumab and paclitaxel. Gastric perforation occurred during the second cycle of chemotherapy. Although the patient's condition improved without surgery, an abscess developed in the intra-abdominal fluid collection resulting from the perforation. We performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided abscess drainage. The patient improved and was discharged in satisfactory condition. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage is a treatment option for patients with intra-abdominal abscess following gastric perforation due to ramucirumab.

  10. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes detected on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Daisuke; Takigawa, Nagio; Oda, Naohiro; Ninomiya, Takashi; Kubo, Toshio; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Sato, Akiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Tabata, Masahiro; Kaji, Mitsumasa; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration is of diagnostic value in hilar/mediastinal (N1/N2) lymph node staging. We assessed the utility of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in lung cancer patients with N1/N2 lymph nodes detected on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Methods Fifty lung cancer patients with N1/N2 disease on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography underwent endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for pathological lymph nodes between November 2012 and April 2015. The diagnostic performance of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration, lymph node site and size, number of needle passes and complications were evaluated retrospectively from patients' medical records. Malignancy was defined as a maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) >2.5. Results The median longest diameter of the 61 lymph nodes (29 subcarinal, 21 right lower paratracheal, 6 left lower paratracheal, 4 right hilar and 1 upper paratracheal) was 23.4 mm (range: 10.4–45.7); the median number of needle passes was 2 (range: 1–5). There were no severe complications. A definitive diagnosis was made by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in 39 patients (31 adenocarcinomas, 3 small-cell carcinomas, 2 squamous-cell carcinomas, 3 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas). In the remaining 11 patients, the diagnosis was indefinite: insufficient endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration material was collected in two patients and non-specific lymphadenopathy was confirmed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration or thoracotomy in the other nine patients. The mean lymph node SUVmax was 7.09 (range: 2.90–26.9) and was significantly higher in true-positive than in false-positive nodes (P < 0.05, t-test). Non-specific lymphadenopathy was

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Drainage of Intra-Abdominal Abscess after Gastric Perforation in a Patient Receiving Ramucirumab and Paclitaxel for Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mandai, Koichiro; Shirakawa, Atsushi; Uno, Koji; Yasuda, Kenjiro

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal perforation is a serious adverse event that occurs in approximately 1% of patients receiving ramucirumab and paclitaxel. A 67-year-old man with unresectable advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital and treated with ramucirumab and paclitaxel. Gastric perforation occurred during the second cycle of chemotherapy. Although the patient's condition improved without surgery, an abscess developed in the intra-abdominal fluid collection resulting from the perforation. We performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided abscess drainage. The patient improved and was discharged in satisfactory condition. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage is a treatment option for patients with intra-abdominal abscess following gastric perforation due to ramucirumab. PMID:28203161

  12. Omalizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... steroids. Omalizumab is also used to treat chronic hives without a known cause that cannot successfully be ... is not used to treat other forms of hives or allergic conditions. Omalizumab injection is in a ...

  13. Comparison of fluoroscopic Guided Transforaminal Epidural Injections of Steroid and Local Anaesthetic with Conservative Management in Patients with Chronic Lumbar Radiculopathies

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nandita; Salaria, Misbah; Salaria, A. Q.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic lumbar radiculopathy is a common medical problem and the treatment modalities used over years have been many ranging from conservative or symptomatic management to open decompression surgery. This study was aimed at to compare two modalities of treatment, i.e., conservative and lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs). Materials and Methods: A total of 120 patients of American Society of Anesthesiology class - (a healthy patient or a patient with mild systemic disease) were randomized to two groups. Group C (n = 60) were managed conservatively with bed rest, analgesics, and physiotherapy. Group T (n = 60) received lumbar TFESIs with methylprednisolone 40 mg with 2 ml bupivacaine (0.5%). Measurements using visual analog scale (VAS) were taken before treatment and at various time intervals after the start of treatment. Results: There was no statistically significant difference regarding the demographic characteristics of both groups. The VAS scores were less and statistically significant in Group T after 30 min postinjection, at the 2nd week and after 1 month. Recovery rate of straight leg raise test was found to be 98% in those treated with TFESI. The Group T had significantly better patient satisfaction score and additionally there was drug dose intake reduction before and after the treatment. Conclusion: Patients treated with fluoroscopic-guided TFESI have better pain relief, quality-of-life, and less analgesic requirement than those managed conservatively. PMID:28298750

  14. Effect of Interlaminar Epidural Steroid Injection in Acute and Subacute Pain Due to Lumbar Disk Herniation: A Randomized Comparison of 2 Different Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Gelalis, I.D; Arnaoutoglou, E; Pakos, E.E; Politis, A.N; Rapti, M; Xenakis, T.A; Papadopoulos, G

    2009-01-01

    In order to assess the efficacy of epidural steroid injections (ESI) in acute and subacute pain due to lumbar spine disk herniation, we conducted a randomized trial, comparing 2 different protocols. Fourty patients with radicular pain due to L4-L5 and L5-S1 disc herniation were assigned to receive either 3 consecutive ESI every 24 hours through a spinal catheter (group A) or 3 consecutive ESI every 10 days with an epidural needle (group B). All patients had improved Oswestry Disabilty Index (ODI) and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain scores at 1 month of follow-up compared to baseline, while no significant differences were observed between the 2 groups. The scores for group B were statistically significant lower at 2 months of follow-up compared to those of group A. The improvement in the scores of group B was continuous since the mean scores at 2 months of follow up were lower compared to the respective scores at 1 month. Protocol B (3 consecutive ESI every 10 days) was found more effective in the treatment of subacute pain compared to Protocol A (3 consecutive ESI every 24 hours) with statistically significant differences in the ODI and VAS scores at 2 months of follow-up. PMID:20111695

  15. The Prognostic Value of Enhanced-MRI and Fluoroscopic Factors for Predicting the Effects of Transforaminal Steroid Injections on Lumbosacral Radiating Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the predictive value of enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluoroscopic factors regarding the effects of transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs) in low back pain (LBP) patients with lumbosacral radiating pain. Methods A total of 51 patients who had LBP with radiating pain were recruited between January 2011 and December 2012. The patient data were classified into the two groups ‘favorable group’ and ‘non-favorable group’ after 2 weeks of follow-up results. The favorable group was defined as those with a 50%, or more, reduction of pain severity according to the visual analogue scale (VAS) for back or leg pain. The clinical and radiological data were collected for univariate and multivariate analyses to determine the predictors of the effectiveness of TFESIs between the two groups. Results According to the back or the leg favorable-VAS group, the univariate analysis revealed that the corticosteroid approach for the enhanced nerve root, the proportion of the proximal flow, and the contrast dispersion of epidurography are respectively statistically significant relative to the other factors. Lastly, the multiple logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between the corticosteroid approach and the enhanced nerve root in the favorable VAS group. Conclusion Among the variables, MRI showed that the corticosteroid approach for the enhanced target root is the most important prognostic factor in the predicting of the clinical parameters of the favorable TFESIs group. PMID:28119838

  16. Percutaneous Adhesiolysis Versus Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection for the Treatment of Chronic Radicular Pain Caused by Lumbar Foraminal Spinal Stenosis: A Retrospective Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yongbum; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Jae Ki; Nam, Hee-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of percutaneous adhesiolysis (PA) compared to fluoroscopy (FL)-guided transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) in patients with radicular pain caused by lumbar foraminal spinal stenosis (LFSS) by assessing pain relief and functional improvement at 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure. Methods This retrospective study included 45 patients who underwent PA or FL-guided TFSEI for radicular pain caused by LFSS of at least 3 months' duration. Outcomes were assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Verbal Numeric Pain Scale (VNS) before the procedure and at 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure. A successful outcome was defined by >50% improvement in the VNS score and >40% improvement in the ODI score. Results ODI and VNS scores improved 4 and 12 weeks post-procedure in both groups. Statistically significant differences between groups were observed in ODI and VNS at 12 weeks (p<0.05). The proportion of patients with successful outcomes was significantly different between the two groups only at the 12-week time point. Conclusion Our study suggests that PA is effective for pain reduction and functional improvement in patients with chronic radicular pain caused by LFSS. Therefore, PA can be considered for patients with previous ineffective responses to conservative treatment. Although PA seems to be more effective than TFEFI according to the results of our study, in order to fully elucidate the difference in effectiveness, a prospective study with a larger sample size is necessary. PMID:26798608

  17. Anabolic Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    Anabolic steroids are man-made substances related to male sex hormones. Doctors use anabolic steroids to treat some hormone problems in men, delayed ... from some diseases. Bodybuilders and athletes often use anabolic steroids to build muscles and improve athletic performance. Using ...

  18. The role of full-thickness skin grafting and steroid injection in the treatment of auricular keloids.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nefertiti A; Ortega, F Raymond

    2010-05-01

    Keloids are a response to wound healing that occurs due to hyperproliferation of dermal collagen in response to skin injury (Olabanji et al, Surg Pract. 2005;9:2-7). Multiple modalities have been described in the literature to target these lesions, but treatment and prevention remain a challenge because of the high rate of recurrence (Brissett and Sherris, Facial Plast Surg. 2001;17:263-272; Kelly, Dermatol Ther. 2004;17:212-218; Robles and Berg, Clin Dermatol. 2007;25:26-32; Porter, Otolaryngol Clin North Am. 2002;35:207-220, viii). We studied the rate of recurrence of auricular keloids through a technique previously described in the literature (Converse and Stallings, Plast Reconstr Surg. 1972;49:461-463), but over a series of patients. Keloids were treated with total excision in combination with coverage of the resulting defect with a full-thickness skin graft and intradermal injection of triamcinolone acetonide solution at the periphery of the donor and recipient sites. From April 2006 to February 2007, 10 patients with auricular keloids were done using this technique, and during an 11-month follow-up no recurrence was observed. These results support that full-thickness skin grafts can be used to address keloid lesions without recurrence.

  19. Effect of CRF injected into the median eminence on GH secretion in female rats under different steroid status.

    PubMed

    Puertas, A; Frias, J; Ruiz, E; Ortega, E

    1996-08-01

    To evaluate whether the median eminence (ME) is a site of action of CRF (corticotropin releasing factor) on GH secretion and to determine the possible role of estradiol and progesterone in modifying theses secretion, we injected CRF (0.25, 0.75, 1, and 1.5 nmol of peptide dissolved in 1 microliter of water) directly into the ME in three experimental groups of rats: Long-term ovariectomized (OVX); OVX primed by estradiol (OVX +/- E) and OVX primed by estradiol plus progesterone (OVX +/- EP). Blood was collected to determine GH (30, 60, 90, and 120 min postinjection). Serum T3, T4, and glucose levels were measured in OVX +/- E rats 30 min postinjection. CRF at all doses studied significantly decreased serum GH levels in the three experimental groups. Serum T3, T4, and glucose levels were unchanged after CRF administration. The results suggest that: CRF inhibits "per se" GH secretion, at least in part, by a central action in the ME. The inhibitory effect of CRF on GH is independent of the estrogen/progesterone status of the animal. CRF at ME levels may participate in a variety of stress-related responses, including growth inhibition, through GH suppression.

  20. Oral Steroids (Steroid Pills and Syrups)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Medications Quick-Relief Medications Oral Steroids Oral Steroids Make an Appointment Ask a Question Refer Patient ... Want to learn more about steroids? How are steroid pills and syrups used? Steroid pills and syrups ...

  1. Steroidal Saponins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, N. P.; Banerjee, S.; Mondal, N. B.; Mandal, D.

    The medicinal activities of plants are generally due to the secondary metabolites (1) which often occur as glycosides of steroids, terpenoids, phenols etc. Saponins are a group of naturally occurring plant glycosides, characterized by their strong foam-forming properties in aqueous solution. The cardiac glycosides also possess this, property but are classified separately because of their specific biological activity. Unlike the cardiac glycosides, saponins generally do not affect the heart. These are classified as steroid or triterpenoid saponins depending on the nature of the aglycone. Steroidal glycosides are naturally occurring sugar conjugates of C27 steroidal compounds. The aglycone of a steroid saponin is usually a spirostanol or a furostanol. The glycone parts of these compounds are mostly oligosaccharides, arranged either in a linear or branched fashion, attached to hydroxyl groups through an acetal linkage (2, 3). Another class of saponins, the basic steroid saponins, contain nitrogen analogues of steroid sapogenins as aglycones.

  2. Ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block, a comparison with the conventional technique: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Khedkar, Sunita Milind; Bhalerao, Pradnya Milind; Yemul-Golhar, Shweta Rahul; Kelkar, Kalpana Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Background: The conventional technique of ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve block may be associated with drug toxicity, block failure and needs large drug volume. The ultrasound-guided (USG) nerve block enables accurate needle positioning that may reduce the chances of drug toxicity, drug dose and block failure. Aim: In this study, we compared the onset and duration of the motor and sensory nerve block, the drug volume required and time to rescue analgesic between USG and conventional technique. Settings and Design: Sixty male patients aged between 18 and 60 years, belonging to American society of Anesthesiology I-II, scheduled for inguinal hernia repair were enrolled in this prospective study and were randomly allocated into two groups of thirty each by computerized method. Materials and Methods: Group A patients received hernia block by conventional method using 0.75% ropivacaine 15 ml, and Group B patients were given the block guided by ultrasound using 0.75% ropivacaine, till the nerves were surrounded on all sides by the drug. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using two independent sample t-tests for demographic and hemodynamic parameters. Nonparametric test (Mann-Whitney U-test) was used to find the significance between visual analog scale. Results: There was significantly early onset of sensory block in Group B 14.03 ± 2.82 min as compared to Group A 15.57 ± 1.52 min (P = 0.047). The onset of motor block was also earlier in Group B 19.40 ± 2.85 min as compared to Group A 20.67 ± 1.90 min. The time to rescue analgesia was more in Group B 7.22 ± 0.97 h as compared to Group A 6.80 ± 0.70 h (P = 0.062). The volume of drug required was less with ultrasound guided block. Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided hernia block thus has the advantage of early onset, less dose requirement and increase in time to rescue analgesia. PMID:26240549

  3. Perisciatic Ultrasound-Guided Infiltration for Treatment of Deep Gluteal Syndrome: Description of Technique and Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Julio; García, Nicolás; Rafols, Claudio; Pérez, Marcelo; Verdugo, Marco A

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to describe a perisciatic ultrasound-guided infiltration technique for treatment of deep gluteal syndrome and to report its preliminary clinical results. A mixture of saline (20 mL), a local anesthetic (4 mL), and a corticosteroid solution (1 mL) was infiltrated in the perisciatic region between the gluteus maximus and pelvitrochanteric muscles. Relative pain relief was achieved in 73.7% of the patients, with average preprocedural and postprocedural visual analog scale scores of 8.3 and 2.8, respectively. Fifty percent of patients reported recurrence of discomfort, and the average duration of the therapeutic effect in these patients was 5.3 weeks.

  4. Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Aspiration of an Endotracheal Bronchogenic Cyst: Case Report and Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Maturu, Venkata N; Dhooria, Sahajal; Agarwal, Ritesh; Behera, Digambar

    2016-04-01

    The most common location of bronchogenic cysts is the mediastinum, adjacent to the major airways. Endotracheal bronchogenic cysts are rare and most present in infancy with respiratory failure. Although surgical resection has remained the treatment of choice, there is increasing interest in the management of these cysts with therapeutic aspiration alone. In this article, we describe a 68-year-old man with endotracheal bronchogenic cyst who was managed with endobronchial ultrasound-guided needle aspiration. We also systematically review the literature for reports of endotracheal bronchogenic cysts. The review identified 9 reports (10 patients) with endotracheal bronchogenic cysts. The most common age at presentation was infancy (n=8) and surgical resection was the most common treatment modality used (n=7).

  5. Unplanned ultrasound-guided puncture of a tracheal balloon in a premature infant with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Rugolotto, S; Giacomello, L; El-Dalati, G; Sacchetto, L; Antonello, L; De Luca, G; Raffaelli, R

    2014-01-01

    Temporary tracheal balloons have been shown to improve lung growth in fetuses with severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Fetoscopic Endoluminal Tracheal Occlusion (FETO) is performed at 26-28 weeks gestation, and then is removed in utero at 34 weeks gestation at highly specialized centers. In case of preterm labor at a hospital without a specialized team, a number of techniques have been used to remove the balloon, sometimes with death of the newborn. We have successfully performed an ultrasound-guided approach to puncture and remove the tracheal balloon in a premature infant in an emergency setting at birth. After that she was treated for congenital diaphragmatic hernia at our Newborn Intensive Care Unit.

  6. Subsurface PpIX imaging in vivo with ultrasound-guided tomographic spectroscopy: reconstruction vs. born-normalized data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Brendan P.; D'Souza, Alisha V.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Maytin, Edward; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    Aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX)-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective treatment for skin cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Topically applied ALA promotes PpIX production preferentially in tumors, and many strategies have been developed to increase PpIX distribution and PDT treatment efficacy at depths > 1mm is not fully understood. While surface imaging techniques provide useful diagnosis, dosimetry, and efficacy information for superficial tumors, these methods cannot interrogate deeper tumors to provide in situ insight into spatial PpIX distributions. We have developed an ultrasound-guided, white-light-informed, tomographics spectroscopy system for the spatial measurement of subsurface PpIX. Detailed imaging system specifications, methodology, and optical-phantom-based characterization will be presented separately. Here we evaluate preliminary in vivo results using both full tomographic reconstruction and by plotting individual tomographic source-detector pair data against US images.

  7. Pancreatic and Gastric Plasmacytoma Presenting with Obstructive Jaundice, Diagnosed with Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Padda, Manmeet S; Milless, Tiffani; Adeniran, Adebowale J; Mahooti, Sepi; Aslanian, Harry R

    2010-09-28

    Pancreatic plasmacytoma is a rare disorder which may present with obstructive jaundice. Only eighteen cases have been reported in the English language literature. We present the first case of pancreatic plasmacytoma and gastric plasmacytoma diagnosed with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). A 75-year-old male with a known history of multiple myeloma presented with obstructive jaundice and a pancreatic mass. A concomitant gastric mass due to gastric plasmacytoma was seen. The diagnosis was established via EUS-FNA of the pancreatic mass. Pancreatic plasmacytoma should be suspected in patients with a history of myeloma. EUS-FNA is a safe and effective modality in the diagnosis of pancreatic plasmacytoma. Radiation therapy should be the first-line of therapy in treating pancreatic plasmacytomas.

  8. Pancreatic and Gastric Plasmacytoma Presenting with Obstructive Jaundice, Diagnosed with Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Padda, Manmeet S.; Milless, Tiffani; Adeniran, Adebowale J.; Mahooti, Sepi; Aslanian, Harry R.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic plasmacytoma is a rare disorder which may present with obstructive jaundice. Only eighteen cases have been reported in the English language literature. We present the first case of pancreatic plasmacytoma and gastric plasmacytoma diagnosed with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). A 75-year-old male with a known history of multiple myeloma presented with obstructive jaundice and a pancreatic mass. A concomitant gastric mass due to gastric plasmacytoma was seen. The diagnosis was established via EUS-FNA of the pancreatic mass. Pancreatic plasmacytoma should be suspected in patients with a history of myeloma. EUS-FNA is a safe and effective modality in the diagnosis of pancreatic plasmacytoma. Radiation therapy should be the first-line of therapy in treating pancreatic plasmacytomas. PMID:21060710

  9. Non-involuting congenital haemangioma of the eyelid: successful treatment with fluroscopic ultrasound guided sclerotherapy and surgical excision.

    PubMed

    Christou, E; Parsi, K

    2014-02-01

    We present a case of non-involuting congenital haemangioma (NICH) of the right eyelid which was present at birth as a purpuric macule but increased in size to cause significant obstruction of vision. At four years of age the lesion was treated with fluroscopic ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy using 0.5% sodium tetradecyl suphate foam and surgically debulked 16 days later. Histopathology was negative for glucose transporter-1 stain confirming the diagnosis. The residual segments were subsequently treated in three further sessions of sclerotherapy in the ensuing three years. This treatment approach resulted in a good cosmetic and functional outcome with no associated complications. To our knowledge, this is the first published case of a histologically confirmed NICH treated primarily with sclerotherapy.

  10. Ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block vs continuous fascia iliaca compartment block for hip replacement in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bin; He, Miao; Cai, Guang-Yu; Zou, Tian-Xiao; Zhang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block are 2 traditional anesthesia methods in orthopedic surgeries, but it is controversial which method is better. The objective of this study was to compare the practicality, efficacy, and complications of the 2 modalities in hip replacement surgery in the elderly and to assess the utility of a novel cannula-over-needle set. Methods: In this prospective, randomized controlled clinical investigation, 60 elderly patients undergoing hip replacement were randomly assigned to receive either continuous femoral nerve block or continuous fascia iliaca compartment block. After ultrasound-guided nerve block, all patients received general anesthesia for surgery and postoperative analgesia through an indwelling cannula. Single-factor analysis of variance was used to compare the outcome variables between the 2 groups. Results: There was a significant difference between the 2 groups in the mean visual analog scale scores (at rest) at 6 hours after surgery: 1.0 ± 1.3 in the femoral nerve block group vs 0.5 ± 0.8 in the fascia iliaca compartment block group (P < 0.05). The femoral nerve block group had better postoperative analgesia on the medial aspect of the thigh, whereas the fascia iliaca compartment block group had better analgesia on the lateral aspect of the thigh. There were no other significant differences between the groups. Conclusions: Both ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block with the novel cannula-over-needle provide effective anesthesia and postoperative analgesia for elderly hip replacement patients. PMID:27759633

  11. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Laser Ablation with Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography for Hyperfunctioning Parathyroid Adenoma: A Preliminary Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tianan; Chen, Fen; Zhou, Xiang; Hu, Ying; Zhao, Qiyu

    2015-01-01

    The study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of ultrasound-guided percutaneous laser ablation (pLA) as a nonsurgical treatment for primary parathyroid adenoma. Surgery was contraindicated in, or refused by, the included patients. No lesion enhancement on contrast-enhanced ultrasound immediately after pLA was considered “complete ablation.” Nodule size, serum calcium, and parathyroid hormone level were compared before and after pLA. Complete ablation was achieved in all 21 patients with 1 (n = 20) or 2 (n = 1) sessions. Nodule volume decreased from 0.93 ± 0.58 mL at baseline to 0.53 ± 0.38 and 0.48 ± 0.34 mL at 6 and 12 months after pLA (P < 0.05). At 1 day, 6 months, and 12 months after pLA, serum PTH decreased from 15.23 ± 3.00 pmol/L at baseline to 7.41 ± 2.79, 6.95 ± 1.78, and 6.90 ± 1.46 pmol/L, serum calcium decreased from 3.77 ± 0.77 mmol/L at baseline to 2.50 ± 0.72, 2.41 ± 0.37, and 2.28 ± 0.26 mmol/L, respectively (P < 0.05). At 12 months, treatment success (normalization of PTH and serum calcium) was achieved in 81%. No serious complications were observed. Ultrasound-guided pLA with contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a viable alternative to surgery for primary parathyroid adenoma. PMID:26788059

  12. Steroid osteopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J.J.; Weiss, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Patients receiving steroids or having disease processes which increase natural steroid production often demonstrate ''the classic x-ray changes'' of avascular necrosis of bone. Bone scintigraphy in these patients most frequently demonstrates an increased radionuclide localization. The literature suggests that the increased activity is related to healing of the avascular process. In a recent study of Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease (LCPD), 37 of the children had multiple studies and increased activity within the epiphysis during revascularization was extremely rare. Not only are the scintigraphic findings in steroid osteopathy dissimilar to that in healing LCPD, but the time interval for healing is much to short for that of a vascular necrosis and no patients demonstrated an avascular phase on bone scintigraphy. Of 15 children with renal transplants on steroid therapy, 9 demonstrated x-ray and clinical findings of osteopathy. In 8 of 9 instances, bone scintigraphy showed increased localization of radionuclide in the affected bone. Improvement or a return to normal occurred in those patients in whom steroids were discontinued. The following is a proposed mechanism for steroid osteopathy. Steroids affect the osteoblastic and osteoclastic activity of bone and weaken its internal structure. Ordinary stress produces microtrabecular fractures. Fractures characteristically stimulate reactive hyperemia and increase bone metabolism. The result is increased bone radiopharmaceutical localization. The importance of recognizing this concept is that steroid osteopathy is preventable by reducing the administered steroid dose. As opposed to avascular necrosis, bone changes are reversible.

  13. Landmark-based versus ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric nerve blocks in the treatment of chronic postherniorrhaphy groin pain: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Trainor, Drew; Moeschler, Susan; Pingree, Matthew; Hoelzer, Brian; Wang, Zhen; Mauck, William; Qu, Wenchun

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic postherniorrhaphy groin pain (CPGP) is a debilitating condition, which is often refractory to conservative medical management. To our knowledge, there have been no studies directly comparing landmarked-based and ultrasound-guided approaches in this population. Objective To compare the effectiveness of landmark-based and ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric nerve blocks in the treatment of CPGP. Study design This is a retrospective chart review of patients who presented to our tertiary care pain medicine clinic with a diagnosis of CPGP. Inclusion criteria were the following: age >18 years, diagnosis of groin pain, and prior history of herniorrhaphy. Exclusion criteria included those who were seen for initial consultation but were lost to follow-up. Primary outcomes were 50% or greater reduction in pain on visual analog scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes were 30% or greater reduction in VAS pain score, changes in VAS pain scores, and reported complications. Results A total of 36 patients were included in the study. Of them, 20 patients underwent the landmark-based and 16 underwent the ultrasound-guided techniques. There was no significant difference in baseline demographics. The average VAS score preinjection was 7.08 in the landmark-based and 7.0 in the ultrasound-guided groups (P=0.65). A total of 14 patients (70%) in the landmark-based and eleven patients (79%) in the ultrasound-guided groups experienced at least a 50% reduction in VAS scores. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P=1.0), and no complications were noted. We also did not find a significant difference in terms of number of patients with 30% or greater reduction (P=0.71) and changes in VAS pain scores (P=0.64). No complications were reported in either group. Conclusion In our study, there was no statistically significant difference between the landmark-based and ultrasound-guided groups in terms of a reduction in VAS pain scores, and no

  14. Percutaneous Thrombin Injection of a Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm with Simultaneous Venous Balloon Occlusion of a Communicating Arteriovenous Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Mittleider, Derek Cicuto, Kenneth; Dykes, Thomas

    2008-07-15

    An 82-year-old woman developed acute occlusion of her right coronary artery. She underwent percutaneous coronary stent placement and aortic balloon pump installation. In the postprocedural period, she developed a common femoral artery pseudoaneurysm (PSA) that communicated with the common femoral vein via an arteriovenous fistula (AVF). After unsuccessful ultrasound-guided compression, ultrasound-guided thrombin injection of the PSA was performed, with simultaneous balloon occlusion of the common femoral vein at the level of the AVF. There was complete thrombosis of the PSA and AVF.

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Out-of-Plane vs. In-Plane Interscalene Catheters: A Randomized, Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwenk, Eric S.; Gandhi, Kishor; Baratta, Jaime L.; Torjman, Marc; Epstein, Richard H.; Chung, Jaeyoon; Vaghari, Benjamin A.; Beausang, David; Bojaxhi, Elird; Grady, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuous interscalene blocks provide excellent analgesia after shoulder surgery. Although the safety of the ultrasound-guided in-plane approach has been touted, technical and patient factors can limit this approach. We developed a caudad-to-cephalad out-of-plane approach and hypothesized that it would decrease pain ratings due to better catheter alignment with the brachial plexus compared to the in-plane technique in a randomized, controlled study. Objectives: To compare an out-of-plane interscalene catheter technique to the in-plane technique in a randomized clinical trial. Patients and Methods: Eighty-four patients undergoing open shoulder surgery were randomized to either the in-plane or out-of-plane ultrasound-guided continuous interscalene technique. The primary outcome was VAS pain rating at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes included pain ratings in the recovery room and at 48 hours, morphine consumption, the incidence of catheter dislodgments, procedure time, and block difficulty. Procedural data and all pain ratings were collected by blinded observers. Results: There were no differences in the primary outcome of median VAS pain rating at 24 hours between the out-of-plane and in-plane groups (1.50; IQR, [0 - 4.38] vs. 1.25; IQR, [0 - 3.75]; P = 0.57). There were also no differences, respectively, between out-of-plane and in-plane median PACU pain ratings (1.0; IQR, [0 - 3.5] vs. 0.25; IQR, [0 - 2.5]; P = 0.08) and median 48-hour pain ratings (1.25; IQR, [1.25 - 2.63] vs. 0.50; IQR, [0 - 1.88]; P = 0.30). There were no differences in any other secondary endpoint. Conclusions: Our out-of-plane technique did not provide superior analgesia to the in-plane technique. It did not increase the number of complications. Our technique is an acceptable alternative in situations where the in-plane technique is difficult to perform. PMID:26705526

  16. Complications of transrectal ultrasound-guided 12-core prostate biopsy: a single center experience with 2049 patients

    PubMed Central

    Efesoy, Ozan; Bozlu, Murat; Çayan, Selahittin; Akbay, Erdem

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Currently, transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) systematic prostate biopsy is the standard procedure in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Although TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is a safe method, it is an invasive procedure that is not free from complications. In this prospective study we evaluated the complications of a TRUS-guided 12-core prostate biopsy. Material and methods: The study included 2049 patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided 12-core prostate biopsy used in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. The indications for the prostate biopsy were abnormal digital rectal examination findings and/or an elevated serum total prostate specific antigen (PSA) level (greater than 4 ng/mL). The participants received prophylactic oral ciprofloxacin (500 mg) the night before and the morning of the biopsy, followed by 500 mg orally twice daily for 2 days. To prevent development of voiding disorders, the patients also received oral alpha blockers for 30 days starting the day before the procedure. A Fleet enema was self-administered the night before the procedure for rectal cleansing. The complications were assessed both 10 days and 1 month after the biopsy. Results: The mean age, serum total PSA level and prostate volume of the patients were 65.4±9.6 years, 18.6±22.4 ng/mL and 51.3±22.4 cc, respectively. From these 2.042 biopsies, 596 cases (29.1%) were histopathologically diagnosed as prostate adenocarcinoma. Minor complications, such as hematuria (66.3%), hematospermia (38.8%), rectal bleeding (28.4%), mild to moderate degrees of vasovagal episodes (7.7%), and genitourinary tract infection (6.1%) were noted frequently. Major complications were rare and included urosepsis (0.5%), rectal bleeding requiring intervention (0.3%), acute urinary retention (0.3%), hematuria necessitating transfusion (0.05%), Fournier’s gangrene (0.05%), and myocardial infarction (0.05%). Conclusion: TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is safe for diagnosing prostate cancer with few

  17. Introducing a Fresh Cadaver Model for Ultrasound-guided Central Venous Access Training in Undergraduate Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ryan; Ho, Hang; Ng, Vivienne; Tran, Melissa; Rappaport, Douglas; Rappaport, William J.A.; Dandorf, Stewart J.; Dunleavy, James; Viscusi, Rebecca; Amini, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Over the past decade, medical students have witnessed a decline in the opportunities to perform technical skills during their clinical years. Ultrasound-guided central venous access (USG-CVA) is a critical procedure commonly performed by emergency medicine, anesthesia, and general surgery residents, often during their first month of residency. However, the acquisition of skills required to safely perform this procedure is often deficient upon graduation from medical school. To ameliorate this lack of technical proficiency, ultrasound simulation models have been introduced into undergraduate medical education to train venous access skills. Criticisms of simulation models are the innate lack of realistic tactile qualities, as well as the lack of anatomical variances when compared to living patients. The purpose of our investigation was to design and evaluate a life-like and reproducible training model for USG-CVA using a fresh cadaver. Methods This was a cross-sectional study at an urban academic medical center. An 18-point procedural knowledge tool and an 18-point procedural skill evaluation tool were administered during a cadaver lab at the beginning and end of the surgical clerkship. During the fresh cadaver lab, procedure naïve third-year medical students were trained on how to perform ultrasound-guided central venous access of the femoral and internal jugular vessels. Preparation of the fresh cadaver model involved placement of a thin-walled latex tubing in the anatomic location of the femoral and internal jugular vein respectively. Results Fifty-six third-year medical students participated in this study during their surgical clerkship. The fresh cadaver model provided high quality and lifelike ultrasound images despite numerous cannulation attempts. Technical skill scores improved from an average score of 3 to 12 (p<0.001) and procedural knowledge scores improved from an average score of 4 to 8 (p<0.001). Conclusion The use of this novel cadaver

  18. A standardized method for 4D ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade and catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Clendenen, N J; Robards, C B; Clendenen, S R

    2014-01-01

    We present a standardized method for using four-dimensional ultrasound (4D US) guidance for peripheral nerve blocks. 4D US allows for needle tracking in multiple planes simultaneously and accurate measurement of the local anesthetic volume surrounding the nerve following injection. Additionally, the morphology and proximity of local anesthetic spread around the target nerve is clearly seen with the described technique. This method provides additional spatial information in real time compared to standard two-dimensional ultrasound.

  19. Multiparameter evaluation of in vivo gene delivery using ultrasound-guided, microbubble-enhanced sonoporation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Galina; Wong, Andrew W; Bez, Maxim; Yang, Fang; Tam, Sarah; Even, Lisa; Sheyn, Dmitriy; Ben-David, Shiran; Tawackoli, Wafa; Pelled, Gadi; Ferrara, Katherine W; Gazit, Dan

    2016-02-10

    More than 1800 gene therapy clinical trials worldwide have targeted a wide range of conditions including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and monogenic diseases. Biological (i.e. viral), chemical, and physical approaches have been developed to deliver nucleic acids into cells. Although viral vectors offer the greatest efficiency, they also raise major safety concerns including carcinogenesis and immunogenicity. The goal of microbubble-mediated sonoporation is to enhance the uptake of drugs and nucleic acids. Insonation of microbubbles is thought to facilitate two mechanisms for enhanced uptake: first, deflection of the cell membrane inducing endocytotic uptake, and second, microbubble jetting inducing the formation of pores in the cell membrane. We hypothesized that ultrasound could be used to guide local microbubble-enhanced sonoporation of plasmid DNA. With the aim of optimizing delivery efficiency, we used nonlinear ultrasound and bioluminescence imaging to optimize the acoustic pressure, microbubble concentration, treatment duration, DNA dosage, and number of treatments required for in vivo Luciferase gene expression in a mouse thigh muscle model. We found that mice injected with 50μg luciferase plasmid DNA and 5×10(5) microbubbles followed by ultrasound treatment at 1.4MHz, 200kPa, 100-cycle pulse length, and 540 Hz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) for 2min exhibited superior transgene expression compared to all other treatment groups. The bioluminescent signal measured for these mice on Day 4 post-treatment was 100-fold higher (p<0.0001, n=5 or 6) than the signals for controls treated with DNA injection alone, DNA and microbubble injection, or DNA injection and ultrasound treatment. Our results indicate that these conditions result in efficient gene delivery and prolonged gene expression (up to 21days) with no evidence of tissue damage or off-target delivery. We believe that these promising results bear great promise for the development of microbubble

  20. Management of pudendal neuralgia using ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency: a report of two cases and discussion of pudendal nerve block techniques.

    PubMed

    Hong, Myong-Joo; Kim, Yeon-Dong; Park, Jeong-Ki; Hong, Hyon-Joo

    2016-04-01

    Pudendal neuralgia is characterized by chronic pain or discomfort in the area innervated by the pudendal nerve, with no obvious cause. A successful pudendal nerve block is crucial for the diagnosis of pudendal neuralgia. Blind or fluoroscopy-guided pudendal nerve blocks have been conventionally used for diagnosis and treatment; however, ultrasound-guided pudendal nerve blocks were also reported recently. With regard to the achievement of long-term effects, although pulsed radiofrequency performed under fluoroscopic guidance has been reported, that performed under ultrasound guidance is not well reported. This report describes two cases of pudendal neuralgia that were successfully managed using ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency and presents a literature review of pudendal nerve block techniques. However, in the management of chronic neuropathic pain, physicians should keep in mind that the placebo effect related to invasive approaches must not be neglected.

  1. Randomized controlled study of the safety and efficacy of nitrous oxide-sedated endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for digestive tract diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cai-Xia; Wang, Jian; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Jia-Ni; Yu, Xin; Yang, Feng; Sun, Si-Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy and safety of nitrous oxide-sedated endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration. METHODS Enrolled patients were divided randomly into an experimental group (inhalation of nitrous oxide) and a control group (inhalation of pure oxygen) and heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, blood pressure, electrocardiogram (ECG) changes, and the occurrence of complications were monitored and recorded. All patients and physicians completed satisfaction questionnaires about the examination and scored the process using a visual analog scale. RESULTS There was no significant difference in heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, blood pressure, ECG changes, or complication rate between the two groups of patients (P > 0.05). However, patient and physician satisfaction were both significantly higher in the nitrous oxide compared with the control group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Nitrous oxide-sedation is a safe and effective option for patients undergoing endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration. PMID:28028373

  2. Reduction in mechanical allodynia in complex regional pain syndrome patients with ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the superficial peroneal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Won Soek; Kim, Sang Hyun; Cho, Sung Hwan; Lee, Mi Sun

    2016-01-01

    The superficial peroneal nerve is vulnerable to damage from ankle sprain injuries and fractures as well as surgery to this region. And it is also one of the most commonly involved nerves in complex regional pain syndrome type II in the foot and ankle region. We report two cases of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment of superficial peroneal nerve for reduction of allodynia in CRPS patients. PMID:27738506

  3. Comparison of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block with bupivacaine and ropivacaine as adjuncts for postoperative analgesia in laparoscopic cholecystectomies

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Shradha; Palta, Sanjeev; Saroa, Richa; Prasad, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a popular technique for post-operative analgesia in abdominal surgeries. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relative efficacy of bupivacaine versus ropivacaine for post-operative analgesia using ultrasound-guided TAP block in laparoscopic cholecystectomies. Methods: Sixty adults undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomised to receive ultrasound-guided TAP block at the end of the surgical procedure with either 0.25% bupivacaine (Group I, n = 30) or 0.375% ropivacaine (Group II, n = 30). All patients were assessed for post-operative pain and rescue analgesic consumption at 10 min, 30 min, 1 h, 4 h, 8 h, 12 h and 24 h time points. Means for normally distributed data were compared using Student's t-test, and proportions were compared using Chi-square or Fisher's exact test whichever was applicable. Results: Patients receiving ultrasound-guided TAP block with ropivacaine (Group II) had significantly lower pain scores when compared to patients who received the block with bupivacaine (Group I) at 10 min, 30 min and 1 h. However, both the drugs were equivalent for post-operative analgesia and 24 h cumulative rescue analgesic requirement (median [interquartile range]) (75.00 [75.00–75.00] in Group I vs. 75.00 [75.00–93.75] in Group II, P = 0.366). Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided TAP block with ropivacaine provides effective analgesia in the immediate post-operative period up to 1 h as compared to bupivacaine. However, both the drugs are similar in terms of 24 h cumulative rescue analgesic requirement. PMID:27141110

  4. Anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Mottram, D R; George, A J

    2000-03-01

    Anabolic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone modified to enhance the anabolic rather than the androgenic actions of the hormone. The anabolic effects are considered to be those promoting protein synthesis, muscle growth and crythopoiesis. There are numerous side-effects to anabolic steroids, including hypertension and atherosclerosis, blood clotting, jaundice, hepatic carcinoma, tendon damage, psychiatric and behavioural effects and, in males, reduced fertility and gynaccomastia. Anabolic steroids were added to the International Olympic Committee's list of banned substances in 1975. The majority of 'evidence' concerning the efficacy of anabolic steroids as performance enhancing agents is anecdotal. In the main, experimental investigations have been poorly designed scientifically, clinically and statistically. The percentage of positive test results from IOC accredited laboratories has remained consistently low. However, athletes take their steroids during training and out-of-competition testing is not conducted in all countries, although international co-operation is now under consideration. Despite the lack of conclusive evidence, steroids users will continue to hold the view that their effects are efficacious and they are therefore unlikely to be persuaded to curtail their use.

  5. Ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia for a parturient with severe malformations of the skeletal system undergoing cesarean delivery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Luo, LinLi; Ni, Juan; Wu, Lan; Luo, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic management of patients with preexisting diseases is challenging and individualized approaches need to be determined based on patients’ complications. We report here a case of ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia in combination with low-dose ketamine during cesarean delivery on a parturient with severe malformations of the skeletal system and airway problems. The ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia was performed in the L1–L2 space, followed by an intravenous administration of ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) for sedation and analgesia. Satisfactory anesthesia was provided to the patient and spontaneous ventilation was maintained during the surgery. The mother and the baby were discharged 5 days after surgery, no complications were reported for either of them. Our work demonstrated that an ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia combined with low-dose ketamine can be used to successfully maintain spontaneous ventilation and provide effective analgesia during surgery and reduce the risk of postoperative anesthesia-related pulmonary infection. PMID:25999759

  6. Fetoscopic and ultrasound-guided decompression of the fetal trachea in a human fetus with Fraser syndrome and congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) from laryngeal atresia.

    PubMed

    Kohl, T; Hering, R; Bauriedel, G; Van de Vondel, P; Heep, A; Keiner, S; Müller, A; Franz, A; Bartmann, P; Gembruch, U

    2006-01-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) from laryngeal atresia bears a poor prognosis for hydropic fetuses owing to cardiac failure. We attempted percutaneous fetoscopic and ultrasound-guided tracheal decompression in a hydropic human fetus with CHAOS associated with Fraser syndrome. Percutaneous fetoscopic and ultrasound-guided tracheal decompression was performed using three trocars under general materno-fetal anesthesia at 19 + 5 weeks of gestation. Abnormal fetoplacental blood flow normalized within hours as a result of the intervention. Furthermore, a normalization of lung : heart size and lung echogenicity was observed within days. Resolution of hydrops was complete within 3 weeks. Premature rupture of membranes and premature contractions prompted emergency delivery of the fetus by ex-utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) at 28 + 2 weeks of gestation. Following delivery, the lungs could be ventilated at low pressures and ambient oxygen concentration. Weaning from ventilation was achieved at 18 days of postnatal life. Our experience indicated that percutaneous fetoscopic and ultrasound-guided decompression of the fetal trachea is feasible and may permit normalization of hemodynamics in hydropic human fetuses with CHAOS from laryngeal atresia. The procedure may also result in normalization of heart : lung size and provide the time needed to regain the function of the overstretched diaphragm in this grave fetal condition.

  7. Ultrasound-guided Interventions for Core and Hip Injuries in Athletes.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Eoghan; Hegazi, Tarek M; Zoga, Adam C; Morrison, William B; Meyers, William C; Poor, Alex E; Nevalainen, Mika T; Roedl, Johannes B

    2016-09-01

    Trauma and the mechanical strain of high-energy activity predispose athletes to pelvic injuries. Magnetic resonance imaging remains the primary modality for diagnosing these conditions, but ultrasonography-guided interventions are important in the management of core muscle, hip, and other pelvic conditions. This article reviews ultrasonography-guided interventions for injuries at the core, including the pelvis and hips. It reviews common injuries, procedure optimization, medication preparation, clinical evidence behind injections, tenotomy, and platelet-rich plasma. These interventions are especially important in athletes, because ultrasonography-guided procedures are often undertaken early in the treatment process, paralleling conservative rehabilitation to facilitate a faster return to play.

  8. Ultrasound-guided procedures: techniques and usefulness in controlling inflammation and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Koski, Juhani M; Hammer, Hilde Berner

    2012-12-01

    US allows us to detect joint alterations and to perform procedures such as aspiration of fluid as well as therapeutic injections; it helps in placing the needle correctly, greatly improving the outcome. Tissue biopsies (of, for example, synovium, muscle or salivary glands) can be performed with US guidance, and this method may be of significant importance in diagnostic examinations. Other imaging methods may be fused with US, and thus detailed maps are available to navigate in soft tissues. The new era in rheumatology will include US as an important part of its armament.

  9. Two-step reconstruction method using global optimization and conjugate gradient for ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Zhu, Quing

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a promising method for characterizing malignant and benign lesions in the female breast. We introduce a new two-step algorithm for DOT inversion in which the optical parameters are estimated with the global optimization method, genetic algorithm. The estimation result is applied as an initial guess to the conjugate gradient (CG) optimization method to obtain the absorption and scattering distributions simultaneously. Simulations and phantom experiments have shown that the maximum absorption and reduced scattering coefficients are reconstructed with less than 10% and 25% errors, respectively. This is in contrast with the CG method alone, which generates about 20% error for the absorption coefficient and does not accurately recover the scattering distribution. A new measure of scattering contrast has been introduced to characterize benign and malignant breast lesions. The results of 16 clinical cases reconstructed with the two-step method demonstrates that, on average, the absorption coefficient and scattering contrast of malignant lesions are about 1.8 and 3.32 times higher than the benign cases, respectively.

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage versus percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baniya, Ramkaji; Upadhaya, Sunil; Madala, Seetharamprasad; Subedi, Subash Chandra; Shaik Mohammed, Tabrez; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2017-01-01

    The failure rate of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for biliary cannulation is approximately 6%–7% in cases of obstructive jaundice. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is the procedure of choice in such cases. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD) is a novel technique that allows biliary drainage by echoendoscopy and fluoroscopy using a stent from the biliary tree to the gastrointestinal tract. Information in PubMed, Scopus, clinicaltrials.gov and Cochrane review were analyzed to obtain studies comparing EGBD and PTBD. Six studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Technical (odds ratio (OR): 0.34; confidence interval (CI) 0.10–1.14; p=0.05) and clinical (OR: 1.48; CI 0.46–4.79; p=0.51) success rates were not statistically significant between the EGBD and PTBD groups. Mild adverse events were nonsignificantly different (OR: 0.36; CI 0.10–1.24; p=0.11) but not the moderate-to-severe adverse events (OR: 0.16; CI 0.08–0.32; p≤0.00001) and total adverse events (OR: 0.34; CI 0.20–0.59; p≤0.0001). EGBD is equally effective but safer than PTBD.

  11. Assessment of Postoperative Analgesia after Application of Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia for Surgery in a Swine Femoral Fracture Model

    PubMed Central

    Royal, Joseph M; Settle, Timothy L; Bodo, Michael; Lombardini, Eric; Kent, Michael L; Upp, Justin; Rothwell, Stephen W

    2013-01-01

    Management of pain in research swine used for studies involving painful procedures is a considerable challenge. Here we assessed whether a regional anesthesia method is effective for pain control of hindlimb injuries in pigs used for research in bone fracture healing. For this randomized controlled study, we administered regional anesthesia before an experimental femoral injury was produced. Using ultrasound guidance, we placed sterile infusion catheters near the sciatic and femoral nerves and administered local anesthetic (bupivacaine) for the first 24 h after surgery. We evaluated various behavioral and physiologic parameters to test the hypothesis that this regional anesthesia would provide superior analgesia compared with systemic analgesia alone. We also collected blood samples to evaluate serum levels of cortisol and fentanyl postoperatively. At the end of the study period, we collected sciatic and femoral nerves and surrounding soft tissues for histopathologic evaluation. Treatment pigs had lower subjective pain scores than did control animals. Control pigs had a longer time to first feed consumption and required additional analgesia earlier in the postoperative period than did treatment pigs. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia is a viable and effective adjunct to systemic analgesics for providing pain control in swine with experimental femoral fractures. PMID:23849409

  12. [Treatment of a solitary adenoma of the parathyroid gland with ultrasound-guided percutaneous Radio-Frequency-Tissue-Ablation (RFTA)].

    PubMed

    Hänsler, J; Harsch, I A; Strobel, D; Hahn, E G; Becker, D

    2002-06-01

    Radio-Frequency-Tissue-Ablation (RFTA) for the treatment of primary and secondary tumours of the liver has been used for several years, but this minimally invasive treatment is not limited to the liver. A patient suffering from symptomatic postmenopausal osteoporosis, additionally having primary hyperparathyroidism since 1995, refused a surgical resection of the adenoma of the parathyroid gland. Sonographically a 16 mm hypoechoic tumour dorsal of the right upper pole of the thyroid gland was detected. Osteodensitometry: severe osteoporosis of the lumbar spine (88 % of the norm for this age group). Blood check: Elevation of serum calcium level (3.1mmol/l) and serum parathormone level 274 pg/dl (N: 10-50). A percutaneous ultrasound guided RFTA of the adenoma of the thyroid gland was carried out. After RFTA the serum parathormone levels and the serum calcium levels dropped back to normal. The patient was followed-up for one year. For the first time a sufficient therapy for osteoporosis comprising calcium, etidronate and cholecalciferol could be carried out. The osteodensitometry carried out one year after treatment showed an increase in bone density. For the treatment of symptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism RFTA can be a therapeutic alternative for patients with contraindications for surgery.

  13. Ultrasound Guided Core Biopsy versus Fine Needle Aspiration for Evaluation of Axillary Lymphadenopathy in Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ganott, Marie A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Abrams, Gordon S.; Lu, Amy H.; Kelly, Amy E.; Chivukula, Mamatha; Carter, Gloria; Austin, R. Marshall; Bandos, Andriy I.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives. To compare the sensitivities of ultrasound guided core biopsy and fine needle aspiration (FNA) for detection of axillary lymph node metastases in patients with a current diagnosis of ipsilateral breast cancer. Materials and Methods. From December 2008 to December 2010, 105 patients with breast cancer and abnormal appearing lymph nodes in the ipsilateral axilla consented to undergo FNA of an axillary node immediately followed by core biopsy of the same node, both with ultrasound guidance. Experienced pathologists evaluated the aspirate cytology without knowledge of the core histology. Cytology and core biopsy results were compared to sentinel node excision or axillary dissection pathology. Sensitivities were compared using McNemar's test. Results. Of 70 patients with axillary node metastases, FNA was positive in 55/70 (78.6%) and core was positive in 61/70 (87.1%) (P = 0.18). The FNA and core results were discordant in 14/70 (20%) patients. Ten cases were FNA negative/core positive. Four cases were FNA positive/core negative. Conclusion. Core biopsy detected six (8.6%) more cases of metastatic lymphadenopathy than FNA but the difference in sensitivities was not statistically significant. Core biopsy should be considered if the node is clearly imaged and readily accessible. FNA is a good alternative when a smaller needle is desired due to node location or other patient factors. This trial is registered with NCT01920139. PMID:24649373

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided forceps biopsy from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions using a forward-viewing echoendoscope

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Ippei; Miyahara, Ryoji; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Funasaka, Kohei; Yamamura, Takeshi; Ohno, Eizaburo; Nakamura, Masanao; Kawashima, Hiroki; Watanabe, Osamu; Kobayashi, Makoto; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Nakamura, Shigeo; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic tissue acquisition techniques using needle-knife and biopsy forceps allow abundant tissue acquisition from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions; however, these techniques cannot capture real-time intratumor information. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided forceps biopsy (EUS-FB) from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions using a forward-viewing echoendoscope. Patients and methods: This study was a prospective case series. After mucosal cuts, several specimens were taken using a hot biopsy forceps under real-time EUS visualization. The incision was closed using hemoclips. Diagnostic yield, rate of diagnosable samples obtained under EUS visualization, procedure time, and adverse events were assessed. Results: Ten patients (median lesion size 16 mm, range 15 – 44 mm) underwent EUS-FB. The overall rate of histological diagnosis by EUS-FB was 100 % (10/10). The rate of diagnosable samples among all cases was 97.6 % (41/42). The median procedure times for EUS-FB and complete closure were 28.5 and 4.5 minutes, respectively. No adverse events occurred. Conclusions: This newly developed EUS-FB is feasible and allowed forceps biopsy from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions. Study registration: UMIN000015364 PMID:27556070

  15. Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block for post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Mankikar, Maitreyi Gajanan; Sardesai, Shalini Pravin; Ghodki, Poonam Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a fascial plane block providing post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing surgery with infra-umbilical incisions. We evaluated analgesic efficacy of TAP block with ropivacaine for 24 h after caesarean section through a Pfannenstiel incision. Methods: Sixty patients undergoing caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia were randomised to undergo TAP block with ropivacaine (n = 30) versus control group (n = 30) with normal saline, in addition to standard analgesia with intravenous paracetamol and tramadol. At the end of the surgery, ultrasound-guided TAP plane block was given bilaterally using ropivacaine or normal saline (15 ml on either side). Each patient was assessed post-operatively by a blinded investigator at regular intervals up to 24 h for visual analogue score (VAS) and requirement of analgesia. SPSS version 18.0 software was used. Demographic data were analysed using Student's t-test and the other parameters using paired t-test. Results: TAP block with ropivacaine compared with normal saline reduced post-operative VAS at 24 h (P = 0.004918). Time for rescue analgesia in the study group was prolonged from 4.1 to 9.53 h (P = 0.01631). Mean requirement of tramadol in the first 24 h was reduced in the study group. Conclusion: US guided TAP block after caesarean section reduces the analgesic requirement in the first 24 h. PMID:27141108

  16. Randomized double-blind clinical trial comparing two anesthetic techniques for ultrasound-guided transvaginal follicular puncture

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Gilvandro Lins; Serralheiro, Fernando Cesar; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso; Ribeiro, Onésimo Duarte; Adami, Fernando; Christofolini, Denise Maria; Bianco, Bianca; Barbosa, Caio Parente

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the anesthetic techniques using propofol and fentanyl versus midazolam and remifentanil associated with a paracervical block with lidocaine in performing ultrasound-guided transvaginal oocyte aspiration. Methods: A randomized double-blind clinical trial (#RBR-8kqqxh) performed in 61 women submitted to assisted reproductive treatment. The patients were divided into two groups: anesthetic induction with 1mcg/kg of fentanyl associated with 1.5mg/kg of propofol (FP Group, n=32), in comparison with anesthetic induction using 0.075mg/kg of midazolam associated with 0.25mcg/kg/min of remifentanil, and paracervical block with 3mL of 2% lidocaine (MRPB Group, n=29). Main outcome measures: human reproduction outcomes, modified Aldrete-Kroulik index, hemodynamic parameters, and salivary cortisol. Results: The results revealed a higher number of embryos formed in the FP Group (p50=2 versus 1; p=0.025), gestation rate two times higher in the FP Group (44.4% versus 22.2%; p=0.127), less time to reach AK=10 in the MRPB Group (p50=10 versus 2; p<0.001), and lower mean of hemodynamic parameters in the MRPB Group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Anesthesia with fentanyl and propofol as well as with midazolam, remifentanil, and paracervical block offered satisfactory anesthetic conditions when performing assisted reproduction procedures, providing comfort for the patient and physician. PMID:27759816

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Core Needle Biopsy of Abdominal Viscera: Tips to Ensure Safe and Effective Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Woong

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy (USPCB) is used extensively in daily clinical practice for the pathologic confirmation of both focal and diffuse diseases of the abdominal viscera. As a guidance tool, US has a number of clear advantages over computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging: fewer false-negative biopsies, lack of ionizing radiation, portability, relatively short procedure time, real-time intra-procedural visualization of the biopsy needle, ability to guide the procedure in almost any anatomic plane, and relatively lower cost. Notably, USPCB is widely used to retrieve tissue specimens in cases of hepatic lesions. However, general radiologists, particularly beginners, find USPCB difficult to perform in abdominal organs other than the liver; indeed, a full understanding of the entire USPCB process and specific considerations for specific abdominal organs is necessary to safely obtain adequate specimens. In this review, we discuss some points and techniques that need to be borne in mind to increase the chances of successful USPCB. We believe that the tips and considerations presented in this review will help radiologists perform USPCB to successfully retrieve target tissue from different organs with minimal complications. PMID:28246511

  18. Effective Concentration of Lidocaine Plus Fentanyl for Caudal Block in Patients Undergoing Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinguo; Zhou, Honglan; An, Wei; Gao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study determined the effective concentration (EC) of lidocaine plus 75 μg fentanyl for caudal block in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy. Methods. Consecutive male patients scheduled for TRUS guided prostate biopsy were enrolled. The mixed solution for caudal block contained lidocaine and 75 μg fentanyl, in total 20 mL. The concentration of lidocaine was determined using the up-and-down method, starting at 0.8% (a step size of 0.1%). A successful caudal block was defined by no pain perception during biopsy. The EC50 of lidocaine for successful caudal block was calculated and side effects were evaluated. Results. A total of 23 patients were recruited. The EC50 of lidocaine for successful caudal block was 0.53%. Conclusions. Lidocaine of 0.53% combined with 75 μg fentanyl resulted in excellent caudal block in 50% of male patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. PMID:27872761

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma metastatic to the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Jane; Adeniran, Adebowale J; Cai, Guoping; Theoharis, Constantine G A; Ustun, Berrin; Beckman, Danita; Aslanian, Harry R; Harigopal, Malini

    2014-03-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and highly aggressive primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin with a high propensity for local, regional, and distant spread. Distant metastasis of MCC to the pancreas is uncommonly seen and may impose a diagnostic challenge cytologically. Here we report a case of MCC with pancreatic metastasis, which was diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). The aspirates revealed both single and clustered epithelial cells with scant cytoplasm and round nuclei with stippled chromatin and inconspicuous nucleoli. Immunocytochemically, the tumor cells were positive for CK20, synaptophysin, CD56, and CD117. The neoplastic cells were also identified by flow cytometry as non-hematopoietic cells which were positive for CD56 and negative for CD45. To our knowledge, this is only the second case report of MCC metastatic to the pancreas diagnosed by EUS-FNA. There have been several reports of MCC metastatic to the pancreas diagnosed only at the time of surgical resection. However, a preoperative diagnosis allows for appropriate management while sparing a patient the morbidity of unnecessary procedures.

  20. Diagnosis of pancreatic lesions collected by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration using next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kameta, Eri; Sugimori, Kazuya; Kaneko, Takashi; Ishii, Tomohiro; Miwa, Haruo; Sato, Takeshi; Ishii, Yasuaki; Sue, Soichiro; Sasaki, Tomohiko; Yamashita, Yuki; Shibata, Wataru; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Maeda, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUF-FNA) has improved the diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) facilitates the production of millions of sequences concurrently. Therefore, in the current study, to improve the detectability of oncogenic mutations in pancreatic lesions, an NGS system was used to diagnose EUS-FNA samples. A total of 38 patients with clinically diagnosed EUS-FNA specimens were analyzed; 27 patients had pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and 11 had non-PDAC lesions. DNA samples were isolated and sequenced by NGS using an Ion Personal Genome Machine system. The Cancer Hotspot Panel v2, which includes 50 cancer-related genes and 2,790 COSMIC mutations, was used. A >2% mutation frequency was defined as positive. KRAS mutations were detected in 26 of 27 PDAC aspirates (96%) and 0 of 11 non-PDAC lesions (0%). The G12, G13, and Q61 KRAS mutations were found in 25, 0, and 1 of the 27 PDAC samples, respectively. Mutations were confirmed by TaqMan® polymerase chain reaction analysis. TP53 mutations were detected in 12 of 27 PDAC aspirates (44%). SMAD4 was observed in 3 PDAC lesions and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A in 4 PDAC lesions. Therefore, the current study was successfully able to develop an NGS assay with high clinical sensitivity for EUS-FNA samples. PMID:27895743

  1. Differential diagnosis between pancreatic neuroendocrine and solid pseudopapillary neoplasms on endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Raddaoui, Emad M.; Almadi, Majid A.; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.; Alsaif, Faisal A.; AlShedoukhy, Ahlam A.; Al-Lehibi, Abed H.; Almohameed, Khalid A.; Tsolakis, Apostolos V.; AlAbbadi, Mousa A.; Almutrafi, Amna R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the role of applying a limited panel of immunohistochemical stains on the cellblock preparation from samples obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the aim of differentiating solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Methods: We retrospectively retrieved all the EUS-FNAs of the pancreas that have a diagnosis of NET or SPN that were performed at 2 tertiary care hospitals in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from May 2004 to December 2014. Diff-Quik, Papanicolaou, and Immunohistochemistry stains on cellblock preparations were performed. Results: Twenty cases were available (16 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and 4 SPNs). The pNETs were immunoreactive for synaptophysin, chromogranin A and CD56 while E-cadherin was diffusely to focally cytoplasmic positive. β-catenin was negative or showed focal cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. In comparison, SPNs were positive for vimentin, CD10, CD-56, focally positive for progesterone receptors and synaptophysin, and revealed nuclear immunostaining for β-catenin. They were negative for chromogranin A and E-cadherin. Conclusion: Based on EUS-FNA samples, nuclear immunoreactivity for β-catenin with loss of membranous immunostaining for E-Cadherin can potentially facilitate differentiating SPNs from pNETs. PMID:27381533

  2. Endoscopic Ultrasound Guided Rendezvous Drainage of Biliary Obstruction Using a New Flexible 19-Gauge Fine Needle Aspiration Needle

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhouwen; Igbinomwanhia, Efehi; Elhanafi, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. A successful endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous (EUS-RV) biliary drainage is dependent on accurate puncture of the bile duct and precise guide wire manipulation across the ampulla of Vater. We aim to study the feasibility of using a flexible 19-gauge fine aspiration needle in the performance of EUS-RV biliary drainage. Method. This is a retrospective case series of EUS-RV biliary drainage procedures at a single center. Patients who failed ERCP during the same session for benign or malignant biliary obstruction underwent EUS-RV using a flexible, nitinol covered, 19-gauge needle for biliary access and guide wire manipulation. Result. 24 patients underwent EUS-RV biliary drainage via extrahepatic access while 1 attempt was via intrahepatic access. The technical success rate was 80%, including 83.3% of cases via extrahepatic access. There was no significant difference in success rate of inpatient and outpatient procedures, benign or malignant indications, or type of guide wire used. Adverse events included mild pancreatitis (3 patients) and cholangitis (1 patient). Conclusion. A flexible 19-gauge needle for biliary access can be safe and effective when used to perform EUS-RV biliary drainage. Direct comparison between the nitinol needle and conventional metal needles in the performance of EUS guided biliary drainage is needed. PMID:27822005

  3. Comparative analysis of laparoscopic and ultrasound-guided biopsy methods for gene expression analysis in transgenic goats.

    PubMed

    Melo, C H; Sousa, F C; Batista, R I P T; Sanchez, D J D; Souza-Fabjan, J M G; Freitas, V J F; Melo, L M; Teixeira, D I A

    2015-07-31

    The present study aimed to compare laparoscopic (LP) and ultrasound-guided (US) biopsy methods to obtain either liver or splenic tissue samples for ectopic gene expression analysis in transgenic goats. Tissue samples were collected from human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF)-transgenic bucks and submitted to real-time PCR for the endogenous genes (Sp1, Baff, and Gapdh) and the transgene (hG-CSF). Both LP and US biopsy methods were successful in obtaining liver and splenic samples that could be analyzed by PCR (i.e., sufficient sample sizes and RNA yield were obtained). Although the number of attempts made to obtain the tissue samples was similar (P > 0.05), LP procedures took considerably longer than the US method (P = 0.03). Finally, transgene transcripts were not detected in spleen or liver samples. Thus, for the phenotypic characterization of a transgenic goat line, investigation of ectopic gene expression can be made successfully by LP or US biopsy, avoiding the traditional approach of euthanasia.

  4. Visualization of molecular composition and functionality of cancer cells using nanoparticle-augmented ultrasound-guided photoacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Kim, Seungsoo; Karpiouk, Andrei; Joshi, Pratixa P.; Sokolov, Konstantin; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of molecular signatures of tumors in addition to their anatomy and morphology is desired for effective diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Development of in vivo imaging techniques that can identify and monitor molecular composition of tumors remains an important challenge in pre-clinical research and medical practice. Here we present a molecular photoacoustic imaging technique that can visualize the presence and activity of an important cancer biomarker – epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), utilizing the effect of plasmon resonance coupling between molecular targeted gold nanoparticles. Specifically, spectral analysis of photoacoustic images revealed profound changes in the optical absorption of systemically delivered EGFR-targeted gold nanospheres due to their molecular interactions with tumor cells overexpressing EGFR. In contrast, no changes in optical properties and, therefore, photoacoustic signal, were observed after systemic delivery of non-targeted gold nanoparticles to the tumors. The results indicate that multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging augmented with molecularly targeted gold nanoparticles has the ability to monitor molecular specific interactions between nanoparticles and cell-surface receptors, allowing visualization of the presence and functional activity of tumor cells. Furthermore, the approach can be used for other cancer cell-surface receptors such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Therefore, ultrasound-guided molecular photoacoustic imaging can potentially aid in tumor diagnosis, selection of customized patient-specific treatment, and monitor the therapeutic progression and outcome in vivo. PMID:25893171

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Quadratus Lumborum Block: An Updated Review of Anatomy and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Otake, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of Review. Since the original publication on the quadratus lumborum (QL) block, the technique has evolved significantly during the last decade. This review highlights recent advances in various approaches for administering the QL block and proposes directions for future research. Recent Findings. The QL block findings continue to become clearer. We now understand that the QL block has several approach methods (anterior, lateral, posterior, and intramuscular) and the spread of local anesthetic varies with each approach. In particular, dye injected using the anterior QL block approach spread to the L1, L2, and L3 nerve roots and within psoas major and QL muscles. Summary. The QL block is an effective analgesic tool for abdominal surgery. However, the best approach is yet to be determined. Therefore, the anesthetic spread of the several QL blocks must be made clear. PMID:28154824

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Quadratus Lumborum Block: An Updated Review of Anatomy and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Ueshima, Hironobu; Otake, Hiroshi; Lin, Jui-An

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of Review. Since the original publication on the quadratus lumborum (QL) block, the technique has evolved significantly during the last decade. This review highlights recent advances in various approaches for administering the QL block and proposes directions for future research. Recent Findings. The QL block findings continue to become clearer. We now understand that the QL block has several approach methods (anterior, lateral, posterior, and intramuscular) and the spread of local anesthetic varies with each approach. In particular, dye injected using the anterior QL block approach spread to the L1, L2, and L3 nerve roots and within psoas major and QL muscles. Summary. The QL block is an effective analgesic tool for abdominal surgery. However, the best approach is yet to be determined. Therefore, the anesthetic spread of the several QL blocks must be made clear.

  7. Anatomic Variation of Subclavian Artery Visualized on Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Arunima; Banerjee, Sumantra Sarathi

    2014-01-01

    Use of ultrasonography for performance of nerve and plexus blocks has made the process simpler and safer. However, at times, variant anatomy of the visualized structures can lead to failure of blocks or complications such as intravascular injections. This is especially true in case of novice operators. We report a case of a variant branch of subclavian artery, possibly the dorsal scapular artery passing through the brachial plexus nerve bundles in the supraclavicular area. Since this variation in anatomy was visualized in the scout scan prior to the performance of the block, it was possible to avoid any accidental puncture. Hence, a thorough knowledge of the ultrasound anatomy is important in order to identify various aberrations and variations. It is also prudent to perform a preliminary scan, prior to performance of the block to localize the target area and avoid any inadvertent complications. PMID:25143765

  8. Local anesthesia for transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingchao; Wang, Zhengyun; Li, Hao; Yang, Jun; Rao, Ke; Wang, Tao; Wang, Shaogang; Liu, Jihong

    2017-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy of local anesthesia in alleviating pain during prostate biopsy. We searched relevant articles in PubMed and Embase. The included studies should be randomized controlled trials (RCT) using local anesthesia to alleviate pain during biopsy, which was recorded by a pain scale. Analgesic efficacy of different local anesthesia techniques were analyzed, including intrarectal local anesthesia (IRLA), periprostatic nerve block (PNB), pelvic plexus block (PPB) and intraprostatic local anesthesia (IPLA). We included 46 RCTs. PNB significantly reduced pain score compared with placebo (−1.27 [95% confidence interval [95% CI] −1.72, −0.82]) or no injection (−1.01 [95% CI −1.2, −0.82]). IRLA with prilocaine-lidocaine cream could also reduced pain (−0.45 [95% CI −0.76, −0.15]), while the IRLA with lidocaine gel was not effective (−0.1 [95% CI −0.24, 0.04]). PNB lateral to the neurovascular bundle had better analgesic effect than at prostate apex (P = 0.02). Combination use of PPB and IRLA considerably alleviated pain of patients compared with the combination of PNB and IRLA (−1.32 [95% CI −1.59, −1.06]). In conclusion, local anesthesia could alleviate patients’ pain during the prostate biopsy. PNB was not so effective as PPB. PMID:28079154

  9. Nerve Stimulator versus Ultrasound-Guided Femoral Nerve Block; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Forouzan, Arash; Masoumi, Kambiz; Motamed, Hasan; Gousheh, Mohammad Reza; Rohani, Akram

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Pain control is the most important issue in emergency department management of patients with femoral bone fractures. The present study aimed to compare the procedural features of ultrasonography and nerve stimulator guided femoral nerve block in this regard. Method: In this randomized clinical trial, patients with proximal femoral fractures presenting to emergency department were randomly divided into two groups of ultrasonography or nerve stimulator guided femoral block and compared regarding success rate, procedural time, block time, and need for rescue doses of morphine sulfate, using SPSS 20. Results: 50 patients were randomly divided into two groups of 25 (60% male). The mean age of studied patients was 35.14 ± 12.95 years (19 – 69). The two groups were similar regarding age (p= 0.788), sex (p = 0.564), and initial pain severity (p = 0.513). In 2 cases of nerve stimulator guided block, loss of pinprick sensation did not happen within 30 minutes of injection (success rate: 92%; p = 0.490). Ultrasonography guided nerve block cases had significantly lower procedural time (8.06 ± 1.92 vs 13.60 ± 4.56 minutes; p < 0.001) and lower need for rescue doses of opioid (2.68 ± 0.74 vs 5.28 ± 1.88 minutes; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Ultrasonography and nerve stimulator guided femoral block had the same success rate and block duration. However, the ultrasonography guided group had lower procedure time and lower need for rescue doses of morphine sulfate. Therefore, ultrasonography guided femoral block could be considered as an available, safe, rapid, and efficient method for pain management of femoral fracture in emergency department.

  10. Pethidine efficacy in achieving the ultrasound-guided oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane block in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Breazu, Caius Mihai; Ciobanu, Lidia; Bartos, Adrian; Bodea, Raluca; Mircea, Petru Adrian; Ionescu, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Pethidine is a synthetic opioid with local anesthetic properties. Our goal was to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of pethidine for achieving the ultrasound-guided oblique subcostal transversus abdominis plane (OSTAP) block in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This prospective, double-blind study included 79 patients of physical status I and II according to American Society of Anesthesiologists, scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The patients were randomly allocated into three groups, depending on the drug used to achieve preoperative bilateral OSTAP block: 1) OSTAP-Placebo (treated with normal saline); 2) OSTAP-Bupivacaine (treated with 0.25% bupivacaine); and 3) OSTAP-Pethidine (treated with 1% pethidine). The efficacy of pethidine in achieving the OSTAP block was analyzed using visual analog scale (VAS), intraoperative opioid dose, opioid consumption in post anesthesia care unit, and opioid consumption in the first 24 postoperative hours. The pain scores assessed by VAS at 0, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours were significantly lower in OSTAP-Pethidine than in OSTAP-Placebo group (p < 0.001). The mean intraoperative opioid consumption was significantly lower in OSTAP-Pethidine compared to OSTAP-Placebo group (150 versus 400 mg, p < 0.001), as well as the mean opioid consumption in the first 24 hours (20.4 versus 78 mg, p < 0.001). Comparing VAS assessment between OSTAP-Bupivacaine and OSTAP-Pethidine groups, statistically significant differences were observed only for the immediate postoperative pain assessment (0 hours), where lower values were observed in OSTAP-Pethidine group (p = 0.004). There were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (p = 0.131) between the groups. The use of 1% pethidine can be an alternative to 0.25% bupivacaine in achieving OSTAP block for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:28027453

  11. Usefulness of lymphoid granulomatous inflammation culture obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in a fungal endemic area

    PubMed Central

    Berger, John; Zamora, Felix; Podgaetz, Eitan; Andrade, Rafael; Dincer, H. Erhan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is the procedure of choice for the evaluation of mediastinal/hilar lymph node enlargements. Granulomatous inflammation of the mediastinal/hilar lymph nodes is often identified on routine histology. In addition, mediastinal lymphadenopathy may be present with undiagnosed infection. We sought to determine the usefulness of routine cultures and histology for infectious etiologies in a fungal endemic area when granulomatous inflammation is identified. Materials and Methods: We identified 56 of 210 patients with granulomatous inflammation on EBUS-TBNA biopsies from October 2012 through October 2014. An onsite cytologist evaluated all biopsies and an additional TBNA pass for microbiologic stains and cultures were obtained in those with granulomatous inflammation. Results: Of the 56 patients with granulomatous inflammation, 20 patients had caseating (necrotizing) granulomas while noncaseating (nonnecrotizing) granulomas were detected in 36 of the remainder patients. In patients with caseating granulomas, fungal elements were identified in 6 of 20 (30%) patients (histoplasma; N = 5, blastomyces; N = 1) on Grocott methenamine silver (GMS) stain. Lymph node cultures identified 3 of 20 (20%) patients as being positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (N = 1), Histoplasma capsulatum (N = 1), and Blastomyces dermatitidis (N = 1). Among patients with noncaseating granulomas, only 2 out of 36 (5%) were positive for fungal elements on GMS stain, identified as Histoplasma, although the lymph node cultures remained negative. Conclusion: The incidence of granulomatous inflammation of mediastinal lymph nodes was 26.6% in our series. Of these patients, noncaseating granulomas were more common (64% vs. 36%). Infectious organisms, fungal or acid-fast bacilli (AFB), on either staining or lymph node culture were rarely identified in noncaseating granulomas, 5% and none, respectively

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of secondary tumors involving the pancreas: An institution's experience

    PubMed Central

    Alomari, Almed K.; Ustun, Berrin; Aslanian, Harry R.; Ge, Xinquan; Chhieng, David; Cai, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic masses may seldom represent a metastasis or secondary involvement by lymphoproliferative disorders. Recognition of this uncommon occurrence may help render an accurate diagnosis and avoid diagnostic pitfalls during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we review our experience in diagnosing secondary tumors involving the pancreas. Materials and Methods: The electronic database of cytopathology archives was searched for cases of secondary tumors involving the pancreas at our institution and a total of 31 cases were identified. The corresponding clinical presentations, imaging study findings, cytological diagnoses, the results of ancillary studies, and surgical follow-up, if available, were reviewed. Results: Nineteen of the patients were male and 12 female, with a mean age of 66 years. Twenty-three patients (74%) had a prior history of malignancy, with the latency ranging from 6 months to 19 years. The secondary tumors involving the pancreas included metastatic carcinoma (24 cases), metastatic sarcoma (3 cases), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (2 cases), and plasma cell neoplasm (2 cases). The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell carcinoma (8 cases) and lung carcinoma (7 cases). Correct diagnoses were rendered in 29 cases (94%). The remaining two cases were misclassified as primary pancreatic carcinoma. In both cases, the patients had no known history of malignancy, and no ancillary studies were performed. Conclusions: Secondary tumors involving the pancreas can be accurately diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Recognizing uncommon cytomorphologic features, knowing prior history of malignancy, and performing ancillary studies are the keys to improve diagnostic performance and avoid diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:26955395

  13. Infections caused by fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli following transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Suwantarat, Nuntra; Rudin, Susan D.; Marshall, Steven H.; Hujer, Andrea M.; Perez, Federico; Hujer, Kristine M.; Domitrovic, T. Nicholas J.; Dumford, Donald M.; Donskey, Curtis J.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    An increase in the number of infections with fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Escherichia coli following transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate (TRUBP) was observed in Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. This study investigated whether these infections were caused by a single strain of E. coli possessing distinct resistance and virulence determinants. Of 15 patients with urinary tract infection, 5 were complicated with bacteraemia and 1 with prostate abscess. Thirteen FQ-resistant isolates demonstrated mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA and parC but did not contain plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants; blaCTX-M and blaCMY as well as genes coding for extended-spectrum β-lactamases were also absent. Genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes were discovered in an isolate that was gentamicin-resistant. The most prevalent sequence type (ST) was ST43 (n = 7), corresponding to ST131 in Achtman's multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. These isolates (i) were distinguished as >95% similar by repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), (ii) belonged to the virulent phylogenetic group B2 and (iii) contained plasmid types FIB, FIA and Frep. Several other strain types were present (ST2, ST27, ST30, ST44, ST472, ST494, ST511 and ST627). Non-ST43 isolates infected patients with more co-morbidities but contained similar virulence factors (kpsMTII, iutA, papAH/papC and sfa/focDE). In our hospital, E. coli isolates causing TRUBP-related infection are quite heterogeneous (ST131 and other ST types) and are part of phylogenetic groups containing multiple virulence factors. PMID:25024933

  14. Needle localization using a moving stylet/catheter in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigi, Parmida; Rohling, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Despite the wide range and long history of ultrasound guided needle insertions, an unresolved issue in many cases is clear needle visibility. A well-known ad hoc technique to detect the needle is to move the stylet and look for changes in the needle appearance. We present a new method to automatically locate a moving stylet/catheter within a stationary cannula using motion detection. We then use this information to detect the needle trajectory and the tip. The differences between the current frame and the previous frame are detected and localized, to minimize the influence of tissue global motions. A polynomial fit based on the detected needle axis determines the estimated stylet shaft trajectory, and the extent of the differences along the needle axis represents the tip. Over a few periodic movements of the stylet including its full insertion into the cannula to the tip, a combination of polynomial fits determines the needle trajectory and the last detected point represents the needle tip. Experiments are conducted in water bath and bovine muscle tissue for several stylet/catheter materials. Results show that a plastic stylet has the best needle shaft and tip localization accuracy in the water bath with RMSE = 0:16 mm and RMSE = 0:51 mm, respectively. In the bovine tissue, the needle tip was best localized with the plastic catheter with RMSE = 0:33 mm. The stylet tip localization was most accurate with the steel stylet, with RMSE = 2:81 mm and the shaft was best localized with the plastic catheter, with RMSE = 0:32 mm.

  15. Ultrasound-guided tissue fractionation by high intensity focused ultrasound in an in vivo porcine liver model

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Simon, Julianna C.; Cunitz, Bryan W.; Starr, Frank; Paun, Marla; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy for noninvasive tissue ablation has been recently gaining momentum. In HIFU, ultrasound energy from an extracorporeal source is focused within the body to ablate tissue at the focus while leaving the surrounding organs and tissues unaffected. Most HIFU therapies are designed to use heating effects resulting from the absorption of ultrasound by tissue to create a thermally coagulated treatment volume. Although this approach is often successful, it has its limitations, such as the heat sink effect caused by the presence of a large blood vessel near the treatment area or heating of the ribs in the transcostal applications. HIFU-induced bubbles provide an alternative means to destroy the target tissue by mechanical disruption or, at its extreme, local fractionation of tissue within the focal region. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a recently developed approach to HIFU-induced ultrasound-guided tissue fractionation in an in vivo pig model. In this approach, termed boiling histotripsy, a millimeter-sized boiling bubble is generated by ultrasound and further interacts with the ultrasound field to fractionate porcine liver tissue into subcellular debris without inducing further thermal effects. Tissue selectivity, demonstrated by boiling histotripsy, allows for the treatment of tissue immediately adjacent to major blood vessels and other connective tissue structures. Furthermore, boiling histotripsy would benefit the clinical applications, in which it is important to accelerate resorption or passage of the ablated tissue volume, diminish pressure on the surrounding organs that causes discomfort, or insert openings between tissues. PMID:24843132

  16. A comparison between endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous and percutaneous biliary drainage after failed ERCP for malignant distal biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Jason G.; Darcy, Michael; Fujii-Lau, Larissa L.; Mullady, Daniel K.; Gaddam, Srinivas; Murad, Faris M.; Early, Dayna S.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Kushnir, Vladimir M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study Aims: Selective biliary cannulation is unsuccessful in 5 % to 10 % of patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for malignant distal biliary obstruction (MDBO). Percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) has been the gold standard, but endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous (EUSr) have been increasingly used for biliary decompression in this patient population. Our aim was to compare the initial success rate, long-term efficacy, and safety of PBD and EUSr in relieving MDBO after failed ERC Patients and methods: A retrospective study involving 50 consecutive patients who had an initial failed ERCP for MDBO. Twenty-five patients undergoing EUSr between 2008 – 2014 were compared to 25 patients who underwent PBD immediately prior to the introduction of EUSr at our center (2002 – 2008). Comparisons were made between the two groups with regard to technical success, duration of hospital stay and adverse event rates after biliary decompression. Results: The mean age at presentation was 66.5 (± 12.6 years), 28 patients (54.9 %) were female. The etiology of MDBO was pancreaticobiliary malignancy in 44 (88 %) and metastatic disease in 6 (12 %) cases. Biliary drainage was technically successful by EUSr in 19 (76 %) cases and by PBD in 25 (100 %) (P = 0.002). Median length of hospital stay after initial drainage was 1 day in the EUSr group vs 5 days in PBD group (P = 0.02). Repeat biliary intervention was required for 4 patients in the EUSr group and 15 in the PBD group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Initial technical success with EUSr was significantly lower than with PBD, however when EUSr was successful, patients had a significantly shorter post-procedure hospital stay and required fewer follow-up biliary interventions. Meeting presentations: Annual Digestive Diseases Week 2015 PMID:27652305

  17. Improved perioperative analgesia with ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric nerve or transversus abdominis plane block for open inguinal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexiang; Wu, Tao; Terry, Marisa J.; Eldrige, Jason S.; Tong, Qiang; Erwin, Patricia J.; Wang, Zhen; Qu, Wenchun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric (II/IH) nerve and transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks have been increasingly utilized in patients for perioperative analgesia. We conducted this meta-analysis to evaluate the clinical efficacy of ultrasound-guided II/IH nerve or TAP blocks for perioperative analgesia in patients undergoing open inguinal surgery. [Subjects and Methods] A systematic search was conducted of 7 databases from the inception to March 5, 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the clinical efficacy of ultrasound-guided vs. landmark-based techniques to perform II/IH nerve and TAP blocks in patients with open inguinal surgery were included. We constructed random effects models to pool the standardized mean difference (SMD) for continuous outcomes and the odds ratio (OR) for dichotomized outcomes. [Results] Ultrasound-guided II/IH nerve or TAP blocks were associated with a reduced use of intraoperative additional analgesia and a significant reduction of pain scores during day-stay. The use of rescue drugs was also significantly lower in the ultrasound-guided group. [Conclusion] The use of ultrasound-guidance to perform an II/IH nerve or a TAP block was associated with improved perioperative analgesia in patients following open inguinal surgery compared to landmark-based methods. PMID:27134411

  18. Evaluation of cost-effectiveness from the funding body's point of view of ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared with the conventional technique

    PubMed Central

    Noritomi, Danilo Teixeira; Zigaib, Rogério; Ranzani, Otavio T.; Teich, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness, from the funding body's point of view, of real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared to the traditional method, which is based on the external anatomical landmark technique. Methods A theoretical simulation based on international literature data was applied to the Brazilian context, i.e., the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS). A decision tree was constructed that showed the two central venous catheter insertion techniques: real-time ultrasonography versus external anatomical landmarks. The probabilities of failure and complications were extracted from a search on the PubMed and Embase databases, and values associated with the procedure and with complications were taken from market research and the Department of Information Technology of the Unified Health System (DATASUS). Each central venous catheter insertion alternative had a cost that could be calculated by following each of the possible paths on the decision tree. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated by dividing the mean incremental cost of real-time ultrasound compared to the external anatomical landmark technique by the mean incremental benefit, in terms of avoided complications. Results When considering the incorporation of real-time ultrasound and the concomitant lower cost due to the reduced number of complications, the decision tree revealed a final mean cost for the external anatomical landmark technique of 262.27 Brazilian reals (R$) and for real-time ultrasound of R$187.94. The final incremental cost of the real-time ultrasound-guided technique was -R$74.33 per central venous catheter. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was -R$2,494.34 due to the pneumothorax avoided. Conclusion Real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion was associated with decreased failure and complication rates and hypothetically reduced costs from the view of the funding body, which in this

  19. In-line positioning of ultrasound images using wireless remote display system with tablet computer facilitates ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Masahiko; Mizutani, Koh; Funai, Yusuke; Nakamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided procedures may be easier to perform when the operator's eye axis, needle puncture site, and ultrasound image display form a straight line in the puncture direction. However, such methods have not been well tested in clinical settings because that arrangement is often impossible due to limited space in the operating room. We developed a wireless remote display system for ultrasound devices using a tablet computer (iPad Mini), which allows easy display of images at nearly any location chosen by the operator. We hypothesized that the in-line layout of ultrasound images provided by this system would allow for secure and quick catheterization of the radial artery. We enrolled first-year medical interns (n = 20) who had no prior experience with ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization to perform that using a short-axis out-of-plane approach with two different methods. With the conventional method, only the ultrasound machine placed at the side of the head of the patient across the targeted forearm was utilized. With the tablet method, the ultrasound images were displayed on an iPad Mini positioned on the arm in alignment with the operator's eye axis and needle puncture direction. The success rate and time required for catheterization were compared between the two methods. Success rate was significantly higher (100 vs. 70 %, P = 0.02) and catheterization time significantly shorter (28.5 ± 7.5 vs. 68.2 ± 14.3 s, P < 0.001) with the tablet method as compared to the conventional method. An ergonomic straight arrangement of the image display is crucial for successful and quick completion of ultrasound-guided arterial catheterization. The present remote display system is a practical method for providing such an arrangement.

  20. Multi-drug resistant E.coli urosepsis in physicians following transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies--three cases including one death.

    PubMed

    Carlson, William H; Bell, David G; Lawen, Joseph G; Rendon, Ricardo A

    2010-04-01

    Three male physicians underwent transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies for elevated prostate-specific antigen levels or irregular digital rectal exam findings. All three of these patients developed urosepsis secondary to multi-drug resistant organisms despite antibiotic prophylaxis. There are increasing reports of infectious complications following prostate biopsy caused by multi-drug resistant organisms. These cases highlight the potentially lethal risks to healthcare workers who are more likely to harbor multi-drug resistant organisms than the general population. Further research into preoperative assessment and appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis in all potentially high risk patients is warranted.

  1. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a renal transplant patient diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Alastal, Yaseen; Hammad, Tariq A; Rafiq, Ehsan; Nawras, Mohamad; Alaradi, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy sampling of enlarged lymph nodes is increasingly used to diagnose metastatic tumors, especially of the gastrointestinal tract and the lungs. Herein, we describe the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a 54 year-old male patient, who had a 5-years history of renal transplant, by EUS-FNA of mediastinal and celiac lymph nodes. Histological and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the origin of metastatic tumor. EUS-FNA with proper cytological evaluation can be useful in the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in renal transplant patients. PMID:28326261

  2. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided TOPAZ Radiofrequency Coblation: A Novel Coaxial Technique for the Treatment of Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis-Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit; Best, Alistair J; Rennie, Winston J

    2016-06-01

    Various therapeutic options are available for treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Studies using TOPAZ coblation (ArthroCare, Sunnyvale, CA) have had good early results. The current coblation technique involves a surgical incision or breach of the highly specialized plantar fat pad, which can be associated with risks. We describe a novel technique of ultrasound-guided percutaneous coblation with a lateral heel approach. Advantages include precise targeting of the plantar fascia by direct dynamic visualization of the coblation tip, a true percutaneous approach with a needle skin puncture (<5 mm), and preservation of the plantar fat pad by using a lateral heel approach.

  3. An exploration of fluoroscopically guided spinal steroid injections in patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain

    PubMed Central

    Neve, Leon; Orchard, John; Gibbs, Nathan; van Mechelen, Willem; Verhagen, Evert; Sesel, Ken; Burgess, Ian; Hines, Brett

    2010-01-01

    Background Fluoroscopically guided lumbar cortisone injections have been proven useful in cases of lower-limb pain caused by lumbar disc prolapse (with evidence levels ll-1/ll-2). These injections are also sometimes used clinically in sports medicine for patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain, where no prolapse or other obvious cause of nerve-impingement is diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT), even though this treatment scenario has not been adequately studied for this last diagnosis. Objectives To explore whether fluoroscopically guided transforaminal lumbar cortisone injections may be a valid treatment method for non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain. Study design Retrospective case series. Methods Patients were selected from databases at two sports clinics and divided into two groups: Group D, with back-related lower-limb pain and disc prolapse proven on CT or MR; and Group N, with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain. Patients were sent a questionnaire regarding: symptoms, improvement, effect of injections, satisfaction, side effects and other used treatments. Outcomes were compared between Group D and N. Results 153 patients were eligible for the study (Group D: 93/Group N: 60). Eventually 110 patients responded (Group D: 67/Group N: 43). Twelve percent of Group D and 14% of Group N indicated that the injections had fully cured their symptoms. Altogether, 27% of Group D and 24% of Group N were certain the injections had improved their symptoms in the long term. A larger proportion however, indicated that the injection had certainly improved their symptoms in the short term, but noted that the effects were non-lasting (Group D: 28%/Group N: 30%). Two patients were certain the injections had actually worsened their symptoms. No significant differences in characteristics and outcomes between Group D and Group N were noted. Conclusions Outcomes of this study suggest fluoroscopically

  4. Anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Cynthia M

    2002-01-01

    The term "anabolic steroids" refers to testosterone derivatives that are used either clinically or by athletes for their anabolic properties. However, scientists have questioned the anabolic effects of testosterone and its derivatives in normal men for decades. Most scientists concluded that anabolic steroids do not increase muscle size or strength in people with normal gonadal function and have discounted positive results as unduly influenced by positive expectations of athletes, inferior experimental design, or poor data analysis. There has been a tremendous disconnect between the conviction of athletes that these drugs are effective and the conviction of scientists that they aren't. In part, this disconnect results from the completely different dose regimens used by scientists to document the correction of deficiency states and by athletes striving to optimize athletic performance. Recently, careful scientific study of suprapharmacologic doses in clinical settings - including aging, human immunodeficiency virus, and other disease states - supports the efficacy of these regimens. However, the mechanism by which these doses act remains unclear. "Anabolism" is defined as any state in which nitrogen is differentially retained in lean body mass, either through stimulation of protein synthesis and/or decreased breakdown of protein anywhere in the body. Testosterone, the main gonadal steroid in males, has marked anabolic effects in addition to its effects on reproduction that are easily observed in developing boys and when hypogonadal men receive testosterone as replacement therapy. However, its efficacy in normal men, as during its use in athletes or in clinical situations in which men are eugonadal, has been debated. A growing literature suggests that use of suprapharmacologic doses can, indeed, be anabolic in certain situations; however, the clear identification of these situations and the mechanism by which anabolic effects occur are unclear. Furthermore, the

  5. Early experiences of intraoperative ultrasound guided angioplasty of the arterial stenosis during upper limb arteriovenous fistula creation.

    PubMed

    Napoli, M; Montinaro, A; Russo, F; De Pascalis, A; Patruno, P; Proia, S; Valletta, A; Vitale, O; Buongiorno, E

    2007-01-01

    In recent years the high prevalence of diabetes and atherosclerosis in elderly uremic patients starting hemodialysis (HD) has led to the increase in the risk of vascular access (VA) failure caused by pre-existing arterial diseases, including both VA slow maturation and early failure, and upper limb ischemic symptoms. Recently, in performing radial (R), brachial (B) and ulnar (U) artery (A) percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in HD patients affected by access thrombosis, with insufficient blood flow and severe upper limb ischemia, good outcomes have been reported. Nevertheless, these procedures were performed after arteriovenous fistula (AVF) creation. About 2 years ago, we approached an intra-operative ultrasound-guided transluminal angioplasty (IUTA) performed during AVF creation, using the arterial incision, necessary because of the anastomosis, to introduce the necessary devices for the IUTA. The arterial stenosis having undergone IUTA was diagnosed by a preliminary ultrasound examination. Ultrasound guidance during the procedure is necessary for correct balloon location in the stenosis site. We treated seven patients (four diabetics), mean age 76 + 5 yrs. In all cases, the radial arteries because of hyposphygmia, were unfit for AVF creation. Four distal radio-cephalic AVFs at the wrist were created in patients 1, 3, 4 and 5; in the other three patients (2, 6 and 7), with failure or thrombosis of previous distal AVFs, an immediately upstream anastomosis was performed. In all cases, first, the area selected to perform the AV anastomosis was exposed, then the AR was incised, and the introductory metallic guide wire and the angioplasty catheter (with dimensions decided after PUS), were introduced. The balloon was inflated to 8-13 atm for 30-35 sec. In two patients a stent was also positioned. Later, a side-to-side AVF was created, closing the distal venous vessel. Patient follow-up ranged from 6-22 months. The ultrasound evaluation after IUTA showed the

  6. Addition of fentanyl to the ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block does not improve analgesia following cesarean delivery

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LI-ZHONG; LIU, XIA; ZHANG, YING-FA; HU, XIAO-XIA; ZHANG, XIAO-MING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether the addition of fentanyl to the transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block procedure may improve analgesic duration following cesarean delivery. A total of 147 nulliparous women with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I–II, scheduled for elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia, were enrolled in the present study. All patients underwent cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia with 10 mg bupivacaine and 10 µg fentanyl, after which the patients underwent an ultrasound-guided bilateral TAP block with either 0.375% ropivacaine (group TR; n=48), 0.375% ropivacaine and 50 µg subcutaneous fentanyl (group TRSF; n=49), or a mixture of 0.375% ropivacaine and 50 µg fentanyl (2.5 µg/ml; group TRF; n=50) per side. The TAP block formed part of a multimodal analgesic regimen comprising patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with intravenous fentanyl, and regular treatment with diclofenac and paracetamol. The TAP block was performed in the midaxillary line using an in-plane technique. The primary outcome was the time to the first PCA, whereas secondary outcomes were the cumulative and interval PCA consumptions, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores at rest and during movement, side effects assessed at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h postoperatively, and patient satisfaction with postoperative analgesia. No significant differences were observed in the median time to the first PCA among the three groups (P=0.640), which were 150 min (70–720 min) in group TR, 165 min (90–670 min) in group TRSF, and 190 min (70–680 min) in group TRF. Fentanyl consumption, VAS pain scores, side effects and patient satisfaction were similar among the three groups; however, the demand for fentanyl was significantly decreased in the TRSF and TRF groups at 2 h postoperatively (P=0.001 and 0.002, respectively), as compared with group TR. No complications attributed to the TAP block were detected. In conclusion, the results of the

  7. High risk of acute pancreatitis after endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of side branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Ali A.; Shahid, Haroon; Shah, Apeksha; Khurana, Tanvi; Huntington, William; Ghumman, Saad S.; Loren, David E.; Kowalski, Thomas E.; Laique, Sobia; Hayat, Umar; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Data on the risk of acute pancreatitis following endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic cystic lesions are limited. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of acute pancreatitis after EUS-FNA of pancreatic cysts and solid lesions, and determine whether there was a difference in pancreatitis risk in patients with side branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (SB-IPMN). Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of patients who underwent EUS-FNA of pancreatic cysts and solid lesions was performed. The primary outcome measure was development of acute pancreatitis after EUS-FNA. Factors associated with acute pancreatitis were examined by statistical analysis to determine independent predictors of acute pancreatitis. Statistical significance was determined at a P ≤ 0.05. Results: We identified 186 patients with pancreatic cystic lesions and 557 with solid lesions in which EUS-FNA was performed. The median size of the cysts was 19 mm (range: 10-66 mm). There were 37 IPMNs, 33 mucinous cystic neoplasms, 58 serous cysts and 46 pseudocysts and 12 solid-cystic ductal carcinomas. The majority of patients (75%) with solid lesions were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma. Patients with pancreatic cysts had a statistically greater frequency of developing pancreatitis after EUS-FNA when compared to those with solid lesions (2.6% vs. 0.36% respectively; P = 0.13). In patients with cysts, there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups (with and without pancreatitis) with regard to a cyst location, size of the cyst, and number of needle passes or trainee involvement. Patients with SB-IPMN had a statistically higher frequency of pancreatitis after EUS-FNA compared to those with other cyst types (8% vs. 1.3% respectively; odds ratio = 6.4, 95% confidence intervals = 1.0-40.3, P = 0.05). Discussion: Patients with SB-IPMN are at a higher risk of developing acute pancreatitis after

  8. 22-gauge core vs 22-gauge aspiration needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling of abdominal masses

    PubMed Central

    Sterlacci, William; Sioulas, Athanasios D; Veits, Lothar; Gönüllü, Pervin; Schachschal, Guido; Groth, Stefan; Anders, Mario; Kontos, Christos K; Topalidis, Theodoros; Hinsch, Andrea; Vieth, Michael; Rösch, Thomas; Denzer, Ulrike W

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the aspiration needle (AN) and core biopsy needle (PC) in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of abdominal masses. METHODS Consecutive patients referred for EUS-FNA were included in this prospective single-center trial. Each patient underwent a puncture of the lesion with both standard 22-gauge (G) AN (Echo Tip Ultra; Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, United States) and the novel 22G PC (EchoTip ProCore; Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, United States) in a randomized fashion; histology was attempted in the PC group only. The main study endpoint was the overall diagnostic accuracy, including the contribution of histology to the final diagnosis. Secondary outcome measures included material adequacy, number of needle passes, and complications. RESULTS Fifty six consecutive patients (29 men; mean age 68 years) with pancreatic lesions (n = 38), lymphadenopathy (n = 13), submucosal tumors (n = 4), or others lesions (n = 1) underwent EUS-FNA using both of the needles in a randomized order. AN and PC reached similar overall results for diagnostic accuracy (AN: 88.9 vs PC: 96.1, P = 0.25), specimen adequacy (AN: 96.4% vs PC: 91.1%, P = 0.38), mean number of passes (AN: 1.5 vs PC: 1.7, P = 0.14), mean cellularity score (AN: 1.7 vs PC: 1.1, P = 0.058), and complications (none). A diagnosis on the basis of histology was achieved in the PC group in 36 (64.3%) patients, and in 2 of those as the sole modality. In patients with available histology the mean cellularity score was higher for AN (AN: 1.7 vs PC: 1.0, P = 0.034); no other differences were of statistical significance. CONCLUSION Both needles achieved high overall diagnostic yields and similar performance characteristics for cytological diagnosis; histological analysis was only possible in 2/3 of cases with the new needle. PMID:27818598

  9. Ultrasound guided fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoqiang; Lesage, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a hybrid-model imaging system combining fluorescence and ultrasound (US) was investigated with the motivation of providing structural priors towards improvement of fluorescence reconstruction. A single element transducer was scanned over the sample for anatomy. In the fluorescence part, a laser source was scanned over the sample with the emission received by an EMCCD camera. Synchronization was achieved by a pair of motorized linear stages. Structural information was derived from the US images and a profilometry and used to constrain reconstruction. In the reconstruction, we employed a GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation for forward modeling and a pattern-based method to take advantage of the huge dataset for the inverse problem. Performance of this system was validated with two phantoms with fluorophore inclusions. The results indicated that the fluorophore distribution could be accurately reconstructed. And the system has a potential for the future in-vivo study.

  10. Comparison of sample adequacy, pain-scale ratings, and complications associated with ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of thyroid nodules between two radiologists with different levels of experience.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jung, Soo Jin

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to assess and compare the sample adequacy, patient pain ratings, and complications associated with ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of thyroid nodules between two radiologists with different levels of experience. From March 2012 to May 2012, two radiologists performed ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration to diagnose thyroid nodules in consecutive patients using the same techniques. 157 patients were divided into two groups: group 1 consisted of 75 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration by an experienced radiologist and group 2 consisted of 82 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration by a less experienced radiologist. The sample adequacy, pain-scale ratings, and complications related to ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration were compared between the two groups. There was no statistical difference in sex, age, nodule size, or location between the two groups. There was no statistical difference (p = 0.710) in the prevalence of adequate cytology between group 1 (94.7 % [71/75]) and group 2 (96.3 % [79/82]). The mean ± standard deviation of pain-scale ratings was 1.99 ± 1.68 in group 1 and 2.30 ± 1.83 in group 2, but there was no statistical difference (p = 0.326). There were no significant complications related to the procedure and no sonographic changes on follow-up ultrasound for either group. The study results demonstrated good outcomes for ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of thyroid nodules and no statistically significant differences in sample adequacy, pain-scale ratings, or complication rates between two radiologists with different levels of experience.

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Femoral and Sciatic Nerve Blocks for Repair of Tibia and Fibula Fractures in a Bennett's Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus)

    PubMed Central

    Campoy, Luis; Adami, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Locoregional anesthetic techniques may be a very useful tool for the anesthetic management of wallabies with injuries of the pelvic limbs and may help to prevent capture myopathies resulting from stress and systemic opioids' administration. This report describes the use of ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks in Bennett's wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) referred for orthopaedic surgery. Ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks were attempted at the femoral triangle and proximal thigh level, respectively. Whilst the sciatic nerve could be easily visualised, the femoral nerve could not be readily identified. Only the sciatic nerve was therefore blocked with ropivacaine, and methadone was administered as rescue analgesic. The ultrasound images were stored and sent for external review. Anesthesia and recovery were uneventful and the wallaby was discharged two days postoperatively. At the time of writing, it is challenging to provide safe and effective analgesia to Macropods. Detailed knowledge of the anatomy of these species is at the basis of successful locoregional anesthesia. The development of novel analgesic techniques suitable for wallabies would represent an important step forward in this field and help the clinicians dealing with these species to improve their perianesthetic management. PMID:27803817

  12. Detection of the Single-Session Complete Ablation Rate by Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound during Ultrasound-Guided Laser Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuhua; Zhou, Ping; Wu, Xiaomin; Tian, Shuangming; Zhao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the single-session complete ablation rate of ultrasound-guided percutaneous laser ablation (LA) for benign thyroid nodules. LA was performed in 90 patients with 118 benign thyroid nodules. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) was used to evaluate complete nodule ablation one day after ablation. Thyroid nodule volumes, thyroid functions, clinical symptoms and complications were evaluated 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after ablation. Results showed that all benign thyroid nodules successfully underwent LA. The single-session complete ablation rates for nodules with maximum diameters ≤2 cm, 2-3 cm and ≥3 cm were 93.4%, 70.3% and 61.1%, respectively. All nodule volumes significantly decreased than that one day after ablation (P < 0.05); at the final evaluation, the volume decreased from 6.16 ± 5.21 mL to 0.05 ± 0.01 mL. Thyroid functions did not show significant differences at one month after ablation compared with that before (P > 0.05). Three patients had obvious pain during ablation; one (1.1%) had recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, but the voice returned to normal within 6 months after treatment. Thus, ultrasound-guided LA can effectively inactivate benign thyroid nodules. LA is a potentially viable minimally invasive treatment that offers good cosmetic effects.

  13. The role of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients: SEED-SEPD-AEG Joint Guideline.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; González-Panizo-Tamargo, Fernando; Barturen, Ángel; Calderón, Ángel; Esteban, José Miguel; Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria; Gimeno-García, Antonio; Ginés, Angels; Lariño, José; Pérez-Carreras, Mercedes; Romero, Rafael; Súbtil, José Carlos; Vila, Juan

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms in our environment, and represents the first cause of cancer related death in western countries. Diagnostic and therapeutic approach to these patients may be complicated, with endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA), classically performed by gastroenterologists, playing a very important role. As this disease is not closely related to the "digestive tract", gastroenterologists have been forced to update their knowledge on this field o adequately diagnose this significant group of patients. The recent advent of modern and promising techniques like endobronchial ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EBUS-FNA) have prompted new approaches for diagnosis and staging of this type of patients. In this clinical guideline, the "Sociedad Española de Endoscopia Digestiva" (SEED), "Sociedad Española de Patología Digestiva" (SEPD) and the "AsociaciónEspañola de Gastroenterología", have jointed efforts to update the existing knowledge on the field and provide their members with evidence based recommendations.

  14. Detection of the Single-Session Complete Ablation Rate by Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound during Ultrasound-Guided Laser Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shuhua; Wu, Xiaomin; Tian, Shuangming; Zhao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the single-session complete ablation rate of ultrasound-guided percutaneous laser ablation (LA) for benign thyroid nodules. LA was performed in 90 patients with 118 benign thyroid nodules. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) was used to evaluate complete nodule ablation one day after ablation. Thyroid nodule volumes, thyroid functions, clinical symptoms and complications were evaluated 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after ablation. Results showed that all benign thyroid nodules successfully underwent LA. The single-session complete ablation rates for nodules with maximum diameters ≤2 cm, 2-3 cm and ≥3 cm were 93.4%, 70.3% and 61.1%, respectively. All nodule volumes significantly decreased than that one day after ablation (P < 0.05); at the final evaluation, the volume decreased from 6.16 ± 5.21 mL to 0.05 ± 0.01 mL. Thyroid functions did not show significant differences at one month after ablation compared with that before (P > 0.05). Three patients had obvious pain during ablation; one (1.1%) had recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, but the voice returned to normal within 6 months after treatment. Thus, ultrasound-guided LA can effectively inactivate benign thyroid nodules. LA is a potentially viable minimally invasive treatment that offers good cosmetic effects. PMID:27999819

  15. Anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Brower, K J

    1993-03-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids are controlled substances that are taken illicitly to enhance physical appearance and performance. In addition to the desired somatic effects, reasonably good evidence suggests that AASs are capable of influencing mood and behavior. A myriad of adverse effects have been reported. Although many of these effects appear to reverse with cessation of use, fatalities due to suicides, homicides, liver disease, heart attacks, and cancer have been reported infrequently among illicit users. Although studies are needed to quantify more precisely the long-term consequences and risks of using AASs, patterns of illicit use are particularly troublesome. The use of extremely high doses, needles, counterfeit and veterinary drugs, and multiple steroidal and nonsteroidal drugs simultaneously may further enhance the risks of using AASs. The clinician should suspect AAS use in high-risk individuals who manifest any of the possible consequences described in this article. Laboratory tests can be valuable for detection of use and assessment of consequences. Treatment approaches may borrow from proven techniques employed with other substance abusers, but should also address the special value that physical attributes and body image have for the AAS user.

  16. Local Methotrexate Injection as the First-line Treatment for Cesarean Scar Pregnancy: Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Vincent Y T

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the outcome of using ultrasound-guided local methotrexate injection as the first-line treatment of cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP). A literature review was performed on all eligible reports using this modality as the first-line treatment of CSP. Relevant publications were obtained from the PubMed electronic database from inception to December 2014. Ninety-six cases from 95 women reported in 17 articles were reviewed. The success rate was 73.9% after a single local methotrexate injection. An accumulated success rate of 88.5% could be achieved after additional local or intramuscular methotrexate administration. Eleven cases (11.5%) failed methotrexate treatment and required surgical interventions. Except for women with serum human chorionic gonadotropin levels higher than 100 000 IU/L, ultrasound-guided local methotrexate injection could be considered as a first-line treatment modality for CSP.

  17. Lung cancer diagnosis and staging with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration compared with conventional approaches: an open-label, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Navani, Neal; Nankivell, Matthew; Lawrence, David R; Lock, Sara; Makker, Himender; Baldwin, David R; Stephens, Richard J; Parmar, Mahesh K; Spiro, Stephen G; Morris, Stephen; Janes, Sam M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The diagnosis and staging of lung cancer is an important process that identifies treatment options and guides disease prognosis. We aimed to assess endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration as an initial investigation technique for patients with suspected lung cancer. Methods In this open-label, multicentre, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial, we recruited patients who had undergone a CT scan and had suspected stage I to IIIA lung cancer, from six UK centres and randomly assigned them to either endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) or conventional diagnosis and staging (CDS), for further investigation and staging. If a target node could not be accessed by EBUS-TBNA, then endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) was allowed as an alternative procedure. Randomisation was stratified according to the presence of mediastinal lymph nodes measuring 1 cm or more in the short axis and by recruiting centre. We used a telephone randomisation method with permuted blocks of four generated by a computer. Because of the nature of the intervention, masking of participants and consenting investigators was not possible. The primary endpoint was the time-to-treatment decision after completion of the diagnostic and staging investigations and analysis was by intention-to-diagnose. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00652769. Findings Between June 10, 2008, and July 4, 2011, we randomly allocated 133 patients to treatment: 66 to EBUS-TBNA and 67 to CDS (one later withdrew consent). Two patients from the EBUS-TBNA group underwent EUS-FNA. The median time to treatment decision was shorter with EBUS-TBNA (14 days; 95% CI 14–15) than with CDS (29 days; 23–35) resulting in a hazard ratio of 1·98, (1·39–2·82, p<0·0001). One patient in each group had a pneumothorax from a CT-guided biopsy sample; the patient from the CDS group needed intercostal drainage

  18. Injection of MTX for the treatment of cesarean scar pregnancy: comparison between different methods.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiang-Hua; Yang, Shi-Zhang; Wang, Zhong-Qin; Jia, Hong-Yan; Shi, Min

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze clinical treatment and outcome of injection MTX for Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP). We use retrospective study to compare the time in CSP of blood chorionic gonadotropin (β-HCG) and progesterone drooped to the normal, blood flow resistance and hospitalization days. 34 patients diagnosed with CSP were reviewed in our department from 2000 to 2013, including clinical characteristics, early diagnosis, treatment methods and treatment outcome. All patients were divided into B ultrasound-guided gestational MTX inject group (Group one), local intramuscular treatment group (Group two) and uterine artery perfusion MTX group (Group three). All cases had responded well to treatment. Except three cases of local intramuscular serum β-HCG decreased slowly MTX 10 mg intramuscular again, the average serum β-HCG decline of 65% the 4th day after treatment. In intramuscular group, the average length of stay is 19 ± 2.1 days. Serum β-HCG, progesterone recovery time were 20 to 89 days, an average of 54.5 days. B ultrasound-guided group hospital stay were 15 ± 3.1 days, serum β-HCG, progesterone recovery time were 18 to 71 days, an average of 44.5 days. In Uterine artery embolization group, the average length of stay is 16 ± 2.4 days, serum β-HCG, progesterone recovery time were 20 to 70 days, an average of 45 days. Statistical data results using T-test and chi-square test analysis. Three groups of β-HCG, progesterone decreased to normal days the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05), but uterine artery embolization group and ultrasound-guided group B showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). B ultrasound-guided gestational injection of MTX and uterine artery embolization perfusion MTX are the better ways to treat uterine scar pregnancy.

  19. Adolescent Steroid Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    The study focused on non-medical steroid use by adolescents according to data obtained from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, professional literature, 30 key informants knowledgeable in steroid issues, and 72 current or former steroid users. The findings indicated: (1) over 250,000 adolescents, primarily males, used or have used steroids, and…

  20. Ultrasound-guided trans-hepatic embolization of a renal artery pseudoaneurysm in a patient with acquired solitary kidney and with chronic renal failure secondary to phenacetin abuse.

    PubMed

    Ferramosca, Emiliana; Serra, Carla; Di Felice, Antonio; Mandreoli, Marcora; Brunocilla, Eugenio; Santoro, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    A patient with a pseudoaneurysm of the right renal artery underwent treatment with percutaneous approach. No complications were observed. Based on the experience described in this report, a percutaneous ultrasound guided approach can be proposed in selected patients. Renal insufficiency and allergic reactions are potential contraindications to angiography with conventional ionic iodinated contrast dye in patients who need endovascular stent-graft placement. Real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) guided endovascular procedures may provide an alternative to overcome these limitations. We report an endovascular renal artery repair in a solitary kidney patient with an asymptomatic infrarenal aortic aneurysm and renal insufficiency due to phenacetin abuse. The precise placement of the stent-graft was performed with CEUS and intraprocedural angiographic fluoroscopy without the use of any nephrotoxic contrast dye. During follow-up, CEUS was used to exclude endoleaks, stent-graft failure or malposition.

  1. [An application of low-invasive access in ultrasound-guided surgery of liquid formation of the abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space].

    PubMed

    Demin, D B; Laĭkov, A V; Funygin, M S; Chegodaeva, A A; Solodov, Iu Iu; Butina, K V

    2014-01-01

    The article presents a low-invasive method in the intraoperative ultrasound-guided surgery. The method had several steps: an access (2-3 cm) was made to a liquid formation with the following aspiration of contents, a necrotic detritus was removed through the wound tract using simultaneous ultrasound examination of efficacy of emptying the cavity with drainage. This means allowed the performance of single-stage sanitization and drainage of cavity formations, which contained the liquid and dense necrotic tissues in the lumen. The method was effective, technically workable in any surgical hospital. At the same time, it was economically reasonable, because there wasn't need to buy an additional equipment. The application of the means considerably shortened a hospital stay and the lethality was reduced.

  2. Use of a novel covered self-expandable metal stent with an anti-migration system for endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of a pseudocyst

    PubMed Central

    Téllez-Ávila, Félix Ignacio; Villalobos-Garita, Álvaro; Ramírez-Luna, Miguel Ángel

    2013-01-01

    The development of pseudocysts in patients with chronic pancreatitis has been reported in 23%-60% of cases and drainage is indicated when they become symptomatic. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage with the placement of plastic or metallic stents to create a cystogastric anastomosis has been shown to be a reliable and efficacious maneuver. Metallic stent use appears to be a safe and effective alternative that shortens the length of time of the procedure and maintains a greater diameter in the cystogastric communication. However, important migration rates have been reported. The use of new metallic stents that are specially designed to prevent migration represents a promising development in the treatment of these group of patients that appears to be safe and effective for pseudocyst drainage and could importantly reduce migration rates, while at the same time having the advantage of a single step procedure and a larger fistula diameter in the endoscopic cystogastric anastomosis. PMID:23772268

  3. Steroid Shots Offer No Long-Term Relief for Low-Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164172.html Steroid Shots Offer No Long-Term Relief for Low- ... back pain affects millions of Americans. Many try steroid injections to ease their discomfort, but researchers now ...

  4. An ultrasound-guided fascia iliaca catheter technique does not impair ambulatory ability within a clinical pathway for total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mudumbai, Seshadri C.; Kim, T. Edward; Howard, Steven K.; Giori, Nicholas J.; Woolson, Steven; Ganaway, Toni; Kou, Alex; King, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Both neuraxial and peripheral regional analgesic techniques offer postoperative analgesia for total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients. While no single technique is preferred, quadriceps muscle weakness from peripheral nerve blocks may impede rehabilitation. We designed this study to compare postoperative ambulation outcome in THA patients who were treated with a new ultrasound-guided fascia iliaca catheter (FIC) technique or intrathecal morphine (ITM). Methods We reviewed the electronic health records of a sequential series of primary unilateral THA patients who were part of a standardized clinical pathway; apart from differences in regional analgesic technique, all other aspects of the pathway were the same. Our primary outcome was total ambulation distance (meters) combined for postoperative days 1 and 2. Secondary outcomes included daily opioid consumption (morphine milligram equivalents) and analgesic-related side effects. We examined the association between the primary outcome and analgesic technique by performing crude and adjusted ordinary least-squares linear regression. A P value < 0.05 was considered statistically-significant. Results The study analyzed the records of 179 patients (fascia iliaca, n = 106; intrathecal, n = 73). The primary outcome (total ambulation distance) did not differ between the groups (P = 0.08). Body mass index (BMI) was the only factor (β = -1.7 [95% CI -0.5 to -2.9], P < 0.01) associated with ambulation distance. Opioid consumption did not differ, while increased pruritus was seen in the intrathecal group (P < 0.01). Conclusions BMI affects postoperative ambulation outcome after hip arthroplasty, whereas the type of regional analgesic technique used does not. An ultrasound-guided FIC technique offers similar analgesia with fewer side effects when compared with ITM. PMID:27482314

  5. Intratympanic steroid therapy for treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Bear, Zachary W; Mikulec, Anthony A

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) is the sudden loss of unilateral hearing of unknown etiology. The standard treatment consist of a high dose oral steroid taper. This article serves to review the current literature on intratympanic steroid injections for ISSHL. Current literature suggested intratympanic steroids are equivalent to oral steroid therapy, primary combined therapy is superior to either alone and intratympanic steroids should be offered for salvage therapy in ISSHL.

  6. The Effectiveness of Intraocular Methotrexate in the Treatment of Posterior Uveitis in Behçet's Disease Patients Compared to Retrobulbar Steroids Injection

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Hossam El Din Mohamed; Youssef, Hala Ahmed Raafat; Haroun, Hazem Effat; Gheita, Tamer Atef; Bakir, Hossam Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Aim of Work. To evaluate the efficacy of intravitreal methotrexate (MTX) compared to retrobulbar triamcinolone acetonide (TAA), in controlling posterior segment involvement and inducing remissions among Behçet's disease (BD) patients. Study Design. This is a cross-sectional nonrandomized comparative study. Patients and Methods. 31 adult BD male patients with a mean disease duration of 5.45 years who presented with bilateral posterior segment involvement were included. Each patient received intravitreal injection of 400 μg/0.1 mL (MTX) for the right eye (Group A) and 1 mL of retrobulbar 40 mg/mL TAA for the left eye (Group B). Results. 90% of eyes showed complete improvement of anterior chamber reaction, whereas an improvement in vitreous activity in 77% with no significant differences between both groups (p ≤ 0.1). BCVA improved in 77.4% eyes (Group A) compared to 87.1% (Group B) (p ≤ 0.4). Relapses were noted in 11 eyes (35.5%), in group A, with the mean duration of remission being 19.1 weeks ± 2.13 compared to 7.35 ± 2.8 in 20 eyes (64.5%) in group B (p ≤ 0.1). Conclusion. No statistical differences were found between both treatment modalities; however, based on clinical observations, intravitreal MTX may ensure better control of inflammatory reaction and may encourage longer remission as compared to retrobulbar TAA in BD patients. PMID:28070412

  7. [Pancreatic tail pseudoaneurysm: percutaneous treatment by thrombin injection].

    PubMed

    Pacheco Jiménez, M; Moreno Sánchez, T; Moreno Rodríguez, F; Guillén Rico, M

    2014-01-01

    Visceral artery pseudoaneurysms secondary to acute and/or chronic pancreatitis are a relatively common and potentially serious complication. Endovascular techniques are the most currently accepted techniques, given the higher morbidity-mortality of surgery. The thrombosis of the pseudoaneurysm using an ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection is emerging as a useful option in those cases in which endovascular embolisation is not possible. We present the case of a patient with a pseudoaneurysm of the transverse pancreatic artery secondary to chronic pancreatitis, and successfully treated by administering percutaneous thrombin.

  8. Gym and tonic: a profile of 100 male steroid users.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, N A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify unsupervised anabolic steroid regimens used by athletes. METHODS: 100 athletes attending four gymnasia were surveyed using an anonymous self administered questionnaire. RESULTS: Anabolic steroid doses ranged from 250 to 3200 mg per week and users combined different drugs to achieve these doses. Injectable and oral preparations were used in cycles lasting four to 12 weeks. Eighty six per cent of users admitted to the regular use of drugs other than steroids for various reasons, including additional anabolic effects, the minimisation of steroid related side effects, and withdrawal symptoms. Acne, striae, and gynaecomastia were the most commonly reported subjective side effects. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple steroids are combined in megadoses and self administered in a cyclical fashion. Polypharmacy is practised by over 80% of steroid users. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy along with acne, striae, and gynaecomastia are frequent physical signs associated with steroid use. Images Figure 2 PMID:9132214

  9. Eosinophilic esophageal myositis diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Ryo; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Yamabe, Akane; Fujisawa, Mariko; Sato, Ai; Maki, Takumi; Arakawa, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Yoshitsugu; Yamamoto, Shogo; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2016-10-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is diagnosed by microscopic findings of eosinophilic infiltration into the squamous epithelium. In contrast, another disease concept termed "eosinophilic esophageal myositis (EoEM)" has been proposed, whereby there is eosinophilic infiltration into the muscularis propria instead. A 60-year-old man was referred to our hospital for chest pain, dysphagia, and several episodes of esophageal food impaction. Although EoE was suspected based on clinical features, biopsy specimens showed no mucosal eosinophilic infiltration. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) showed thickening of the muscularis propria layer and subsequent EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) revealed eosinophilic infiltration into the muscularis propria. Although the patient's symptoms gradually improved after steroid administration, complete remission was not achieved after 1 year of treatment. This case may reflect a disorder distinct from typical EoE based on eosinophilic infiltration of the muscularis propria but not the squamous epithelium, and we, therefore, diagnosed it as EoEM using the EUS-FNA findings as reference.

  10. Comparative clinical study of ultrasound-guided A1 pulley release vs open surgical intervention in the treatment of trigger finger

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Vasileios S; Malahias, Michael-Alexander; Kaseta, Maria-Kyriaki; Sourlas, Ioannis; Babis, George C

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided release of the first annular pulley and compare results with the conventional open operative technique. METHODS In this prospective randomized, single-center, clinical study, 32 patients with trigger finger or trigger thumb, grade II-IV according to Green classification system, were recruited. Two groups were formed; Group A (16 patients) was treated with an ultrasound-guided percutaneous release of the affected A1 pulley under local anesthesia. Group B (16 patients) underwent an open surgical release of the A1 pulley, through a 10-15 mm incision. Patients were assessed pre- and postoperatively (follow-up: 2, 4 and 12 wk) by physicians blinded to the procedures. Treatment of triggering (primary variable of interest) was expressed as the “success rate” per digit. The time for taking postoperative pain killers, range of motion recovery, QuickDASH test scores (Greek version), return to normal activities (including work), complications and cosmetic results were assessed. RESULTS The success rate in group A was 93.75% (15/16) and in group B 100% (16/16). Mean times in group A patients were 3.5 d for taking pain killers, 4.1 d for returning to normal activities, and 7.2 and 3.9 d for complete extension and flexion recovery, respectively. Mean QuickDASH scores in group A were 45.5 preoperatively and, 7.5, 0.5 and 0 after 2, 4, and 12 wk postoperatively. Mean times in group B patients were 2.9 d for taking pain killers, 17.8 d for returning to normal activities, and 5.6 and 3 d for complete extension and flexion recovery. Mean QuickDASH scores in group B were 43.2 preoperatively and, 8.2, 1.3 and 0 after 2, 4, and 12 wk postoperatively. The cosmetic results found excellent or good in 87.5% (14/16) of group A patients, while in 56.25% (9/16) of group B patients were evaluated as fair or poor. CONCLUSION Treatment of the trigger finger using ultrasonography resulted in fewer absence of work days, and better

  11. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided treatment of shoulder tendon calcifications: Clinical and radiological follow-up at 6 months☆

    PubMed Central

    De Conti, G.; Marchioro, U.; Dorigo, A.; Boscolo, N.; Vio, S.; Trevisan, M.; Meneghini, A.; Baldo, V.; Angelini, F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Calcific tendinitis of the shoulder is a common condition characterized by chronic pain and/or very painful acute episodes. Different treatments are used during painful flare-up, but they are often ineffective. US-guided percutaneous needle aspiration/lavage is proving to be an effective means for eliminating these calcifications. Materials and methods We treated 123 consecutive patients (mean age 48 years) with calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Fifty-five patients had persistent symptoms requiring 2 or more treatments with lavage and intrabursal steroid infiltration. Before and after treatment, US studies were done independently by 2 radiologists with experience in musculoskeletal ultrasound. Results were concordant in over 90% of the cases. Constant Shoulder Scores were calculated before and 6 months after treatment. At 6 months, MRI was performed to identify impingement and/or bursitis. Results Post-treatment Constant scores were significantly improved in all 68 patients treated once (Group 1: mean scores 28.6 vs. 81.4) and in 52 of the 55 treated twice or more (Group 2: mean scores 34.1 vs. 71.1) (p < 0.0001 in both cases). Pretreatment Constant scores were similar in patients with and without shoulder impingement on MRI (31.2 vs. 30.9, respectively), but after treatment the impingement group’s scores were significantly higher (82.2 vs. 73.3, respectively; p < 0.001). Conclusions US-guided percutaneous needle aspiration/lavage is an effective and economic treatment for calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Pretreatment MRI should be done to check for impingement since it is often associated with an incomplete response to the first treatment. PMID:23396318

  12. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies Joint Committee recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures.

    PubMed

    Narouze, Samer N; Provenzano, David; Peng, Philip; Eichenberger, Urs; Lee, Sang Chul; Nicholls, Barry; Moriggl, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in pain medicine for interventional axial, nonaxial, and musculoskeletal pain procedures is rapidly evolving and growing. Because of the lack of specialty-specific guidelines for ultrasonography in pain medicine, an international collaborative effort consisting of members of the Special Interest Group on Ultrasonography in Pain Medicine from the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies developed the following recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures. The purpose of these recommendations is to define the required skills for performing ultrasound-guided pain procedures, the processes for appropriate education, and training and quality improvement. Training algorithms are outlined for practice- and fellowship-based pathways. The previously published American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy education and teaching recommendations for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia served as a foundation for the pain medicine recommendations. Although the decision to grant ultrasound privileges occurs at the institutional level, the committee recommends that the training guidelines outlined in this document serve as the foundation for educational training and the advancement of the practice of ultrasonography in pain medicine.

  13. Thrombin Injection for Treatment of Brachial Artery Pseudoaneurysm at the Site of a Hemodialysis Fistula: Report of Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Timothy W.I.; Abraham, Robert J.

    2000-09-15

    We report two patients with arteriovenous hemodialysis fistulas that were complicated by brachial artery pseudoaneurysms. Each pseudoanerysm was percutaneously thrombosed with an injection of thrombin, using techniques to prevent escape of thrombin into the native brachial artery. In one patient, an angioplasty balloon was inflated across the neck of the aneurysm during thrombin injection. In the second patient, thrombin was injected during ultrasound-guided compression of the neck of the pseudoaneurysm. Complete thrombosis of each pseudoaneurysm was achieved within 30 sec. No ischemic or embolic events occurred. This technique may be useful in treating pseudoaneurysms of smaller peripheral arteries.

  14. Percutaneous Thrombin Injection to Complete SMA Pseudoaneurysm Exclusion After Failing of Endograft Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Szopinski, Piotr Ciostek, Piotr; Pleban, Eliza; Iwanowski, Jaroslaw; Krol, Malgorzata Serafin-; Marianowska, Agnieszka; Noszczyk, Wojciech

    2005-05-15

    Visceral aneurysms are potentially life-threatening vascular lesions. Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pseudoaneurysms are a rare but well-recognized complication of chronic pancreatitis. Open surgical repair of such an aneurysm, especially in patients after previous surgical treatment, might be dangerous and risky. Stent graft implantation makes SMA pseudoaneurysm exclusion possible and therefore avoids a major abdominal operation. Percutaneous direct thrombin injection is also one of the methods of treating aneurysms in this area. We report a first case of percutaneous ultrasound-guided thrombin injection to complete SMA pseudoaneurysm exclusion after an unsuccessful endograft placement. Six-month follow-up did not demonstrate any signs of aneurysm recurrence.

  15. Traumatic Inferior Gluteal Artery Aneurysm Managed with Emergency Transcatheter Thrombin Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert; Zielinski, Maciej; Wykretowicz, Mateusz; Piekarek, Alina; Majewski, Waclaw

    2010-06-15

    Pseudoaneurysms of the inferior gluteal artery (IGA) are rare and are often caused by trauma. Treatment options vary and include surgery, ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection, and endovascular procedures such as stent-graft placement, coil embolization, and glue injection. We report a 70-year-old male who presented to the hospital after a road accident with a posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm that was treated by endovascular thrombin embolization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of inferior gluteal artery false aneurysm treated by this method.

  16. Treatment of proximal hamstring tendinopathy-related sciatic nerve entrapment: presentation of an ultrasound-guided “Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis” application

    PubMed Central

    Mattiussi, Gabriele; Moreno, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy-related Sciatic Nerve Entrapment (PHTrSNE) is a neuropathy caused by fibrosis interposed between the semimembranosus tendon and the sciatic nerve, at the level of the ischial tuberosity. Methods Ultrasound-guided Intratissue Percutaneous Electrolysis (US-guided EPI) involves galvanic current transfer within the treatment target tissue (fibrosis) via a needle 0.30 to 0.33 mm in diameter. The galvanic current in a saline solution instantly develops the chemical process of electrolysis, which in turn induces electrochemical ablation of fibrosis. In this article, the interventional procedure is presented in detail, and both the strengths and limits of the technique are discussed. Results US-guided EPI eliminates the fibrotic accumulation that causes PHTrSNE, without the semimembranosus tendon or the sciatic nerve being directly involved during the procedure. The technique is however of limited use in cases of compression neuropathy. Conclusion US-guided EPI is a technique that is quick to perform, minimally invasive and does not force the patient to suspend their activities (work or sports) to make the treatment effective. This, coupled to the fact that the technique is generally well-tolerated by patients, supports use of US-guided EPI in the treatment of PHTrSNE. PMID:27900300

  17. Toward optical guidance during endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirations of pancreatic masses using single fiber reflectance spectroscopy: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegehuis, Paulien L.; Boogerd, Leonora S. F.; Inderson, Akin; Veenendaal, Roeland A.; van Gerven, P.; Bonsing, Bert A.; Sven Mieog, J.; Amelink, Arjen; Veselic, Maud; Morreau, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Robinson, Dominic J.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2017-02-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirations (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic masses suffer from sample errors and low-negative predictive values. Fiber-optic spectroscopy in the visible to near-infrared wavelength spectrum can noninvasively extract physiological parameters from tissue and has the potential to guide the sampling process and reduce sample errors. We assessed the feasibility of single fiber (SF) reflectance spectroscopy measurements during EUS-FNA of pancreatic masses and its ability to distinguish benign from malignant pancreatic tissue. A single optical fiber was placed inside a 19-gauge biopsy needle during EUS-FNA and at least three reflectance measurements were taken prior to FNA. Spectroscopy measurements did not cause any related adverse events and prolonged procedure time with ˜5 min. An accurate correlation between spectroscopy measurements and cytology could be made in nine patients (three benign and six malignant). The oxygen saturation and bilirubin concentration were significantly higher in benign tissue compared with malignant tissue (55% versus 21%, p=0.038; 166 μmol/L versus 17 μmol/L, p=0.039, respectively). To conclude, incorporation of SF spectroscopy during EUS-FNA was feasible, safe, and relatively quick to perform. The optical properties of benign and malignant pancreatic tissue are different, implying that SF spectroscopy can potentially guide the FNA sampling.

  18. Comparative study of ultrasound-guided abdominal field blocks versus port infiltration in laparoscopic cholecystectomies for post-operative pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ruchi; Joshi, Saurabh; Srivastava, Kuldeep; Tiwari, Shashank; Sharma, Nitin; Valecha, Umesh K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Post-operative pain is a major concern for day care surgeries like laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of ultrasound guided abdominal field blocks (USAFB) with port site infiltrations for post-operative analgesia in terms of quality of pain relief, opioid consumption and patient satisfaction for day care surgeries Methods: Eighty patients presenting for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to two groups either to receive port-site infiltration of local anaesthetic (n = 40, Group A) or USAFB (n = 40, Group B group). Numeric rating scores (NRS) were measured postoperatively to primarily assess the pain severity and opioid requirements. Data were analysed using Chi-Square test/Fisher's exact test for categorical data and Mann–Whitney test/unpaired t-test for quantitative data. Results: The study group (Group B) had significantly reduced NRS and opioid consumption over 24 h. The overall fentanyl consumption in patients receiving port infiltrations was approximately twice (200 ΁ 100 μg) as compared to patients in USAFB group (120 ΁ 74 μg) (P < 0.0001). Maximum fentanyl consumption was 400 μg (Group A) and 262 μg (Group B) over 24 h and the minimum requirement was 50 μg and zero, respectively. Conclusion: Superior post-operative analgesia was observed with USAFB which may help in minimising opioid-related adverse effects and facilitating faster recovery. PMID:27601741

  19. Addition of Ceftriaxone and Amikacin to a Ciprofloxacin plus Metronidazole Regimen for Preventing Infectious Complications of Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanahi, Mohammad-Hossein; Majidi, Seyed Mahmood; Khorrami, Mohammad-Hatef; Mohammadi-Sichani, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adding single doses of ceftriaxone and amikacin to a ciprofloxacin plus metronidazole regimen on the reduction of infectious complications following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUS Bx). Materials and Methods. Four hundred and fifty patients who were candidates for TRUS Bx were divided into two groups of 225 each. The control group received ciprofloxacin 500 mg orally every 12 hours together with metronidazole 500 mg orally every 8 hours from the day prior to the procedure until the fifth postoperative day. In the second group, single doses of ceftriaxone 1 g by intravenous infusion and amikacin 5 mg/kg intramuscularly were administered 30–60 minutes before TRUS Bx in addition to the oral antimicrobials described for group 1. The incidence of infection was compared between the groups. Results. The incidence of infectious complications in the intervention group was significantly lower than that in the control group (4.6% versus 0.9%, p = 0.017). Conclusion. The addition of single doses of intramuscular amikacin and intravenously infused ceftriaxone to our prophylactic regimen of ciprofloxacin plus metronidazole resulted in a statistically significant reduction of infectious complications following TRUS Bx. PMID:28167960

  20. The effects of twisting and type of aspiration needle on the efficiency of transvaginal ultrasound-guided ovum pick-up in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Yoshihiko; Sakaguchi, Minoru; Katagiri, Seiji; Yamada, Yutaka; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    2003-10-01

    The effects of twisting and type (single- or double-lumen) of aspiration needle on the efficiency of transvaginal ultrasound-guided ovum pick-up (US-guided OPU) were investigated in cattle. The first study using slaughterhouse ovaries revealed that twisting of the needle during follicle aspiration improved the oocyte recovery rate without deleterious effects on the attachment of cumulus layers. Vacuum pressure affected the oocyte recovery and cumulus attachment, regardless of the needle type. The needle type did not affect the oocyte recovery or cumulus attachment with an optimized vacuum pressure. In the second study, US-guided OPU was performed in live cows using two types of needles with a vacuum pressure of 75 mmHg. The needle type did not affect the oocyte recovery or cumulus attachment of the recovered oocytes. The results revealed that twisting of the needle is effective in follicle aspiration, and suggested that a single-lumen needle is as useful as a double-lumen needle for US-guided OPU in cattle.

  1. The prevalence of urinary tract infection, or urosepsis following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy in a subset of the Saudi population and patterns of susceptibility to flouroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    AlKhateeb, Sultan S.; AlShammari, Nayf A.; AlZughaibi, Mohand A.; Ghazwani, Yahya G.; Alrabeeah, Khalid A.; Albqami, Nasser M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To study the prevalence of urinary tract infections (UTI), or sepsis secondary to trans-rectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) biopsy of the prostate, the pathogens involved, and patterns of antibiotic resistance in a cohort of patients. Methods: This is a descriptive study of a consecutive cohort of patients who underwent elective TRUS biopsy at King Abdulaziz Medical City Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between January 2012 and December 2014. All patients who underwent the TRUS guided prostate biopsy were prescribed the standard prophylactic antibiotics. Variables included were patients’ demographics, type of antibiotic prophylaxis, results of biopsy, the rate of UTI, and urosepsis with the type of pathogen(s) involved and its/their antimicrobial sensitivity. Results: Simple descriptive statistics were used in a total of 139 consecutive patients. Urosepsis requiring hospital admission was encountered in 7 (5%) patients and uncomplicated UTI was observed in 4 (2.8%). The most common pathogens were Escherichia coli (90.1%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (9.1%). Resistance to the routinely used prophylaxis (ciprofloxacin) was observed in 10 of these patients (90.9%). Conclusion: This showed an increase in the rate of infectious complications after TRUS prostate biopsy. Ciprofloxacin resistance was found in 90.9% of patients with no sepsis. PMID:27464862

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle core biopsy for the diagnosis of pancreatic malignant lesions: a systematic review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongtao; Li, Lianyong; Qu, Changmin; Liang, Shuwen; Zeng, Bolun; Luo, Zhiwen

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle core biopsy (EUS-FNB) has been used as an effective method of diagnosing pancreatic malignant lesions. It has the advantage of providing well preserved tissue for histologic grading and subsequent molecular biological analysis. In order to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNB for pancreatic malignant lesions, studies assessing EUS-FNB to diagnose solid pancreatic masses were selected via Medline. Sixteen articles published between 2005 and 2015, covering 828 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for EUS-FNB differentiating malignant from benign solid pancreatic masses were: sensitivity 0.84 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82–0.87); specificity 0.98 (95% CI, 0.93–1.00); positive likelihood ratio 8.0 (95% CI 4.5–14.4); negative likelihood ratio 0.17 (95% CI 0.10–0.26); and DOR 64 (95% CI 30.4–134.8). The area under the sROC curve was 0.96. Subgroup analysis did not identify other factors that could substantially affect the diagnostic accuracy, such as the study design, location of study, number of centers, location of lesion, whether or not a cytopathologist was present, and so on. EUS-FNB is a reliable diagnostic tool for solid pancreatic masses and should be especially considered for pathology where histologic morphology is preferred for diagnosis. PMID:26960914

  3. A clinical study of thermal monitoring techniques of ultrasound-guided microwave ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma in high-risk locations

    PubMed Central

    Zhi-yu, Han; Ping, Liang; Xiao-ling, Yu; Zhi-gang, Cheng; Fang-yi, Liu; Jie, Yu

    2017-01-01

    To confirm the safety and effectiveness of the minimally invasive thermal monitor technique on percutaneous ultrasound-guided microwave ablation (MWA) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in high-risk locations, a total of 189 patients with 226 HCC nodules in high-risk locations were treated with MWA. The real-time temperature of the tissue between the lesion margin and the vital structures was monitored by inserting a 21G thermal monitoring needle. The major indexes of technical success, technique effectiveness, local tumour progression and complications were observed during the follow-up period. Technical success was acquired in all patients. Technique effectiveness was achieved with one session in 119 lesions based on contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) 3–5 days after treatment. An additional 95 lesions achieved technique effectiveness at the second session. Within the follow–up period of 6–58 months (median 38 months), the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year local tumour progression rate was 11.1%, 18.1%, 19.1%, and 19.9%, respectively. There were no major complications in all the patients except for the common side effects. These results indicate that the thermal monitor technique can be applied to prevent major complications in vulnerable structures and allow percutaneous MWA to achieve satisfactory technique effectiveness in the treatment of HCC in high-risk locations. PMID:28112263

  4. Effect of Ultrasound-Guided Placement of Difficult-to-Place Peripheral Venous Catheters: A Prospective Study of a Training Program for Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Partovi-Deilami, Kohyar; Nielsen, Jesper K; Moller, Ann M; Nesheim, Sara-Sophie S; Jorgensen, Vibeke L

    2016-04-01

    Patients with difficult intravenous access (DIVA) often experience discomfort because of failed attempts to place peripheral venous catheters (PVCs); however, ultrasound guidance may improve this problem with catheter placement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of ultrasound when operated by nurse anesthetists for these patients. This prospective observational study with a pre/post design focused on inpatients with DIVA referred for PVC placement, a service provided by nurse anesthetists in most Scandinavian hospitals. The rate of success, procedure time, number of skin punctures, discomfort, catheter size, location, and incidence of central venous catheter placement are reported before and after implementation of a training program and a mobile service using ultrasound to place difficult-to-place PVCs. The success rate increased from 0% (0 of 33 patients) to 83% (58 of 70 patients) with ultrasound. Procedure time was reduced from 20 to 10 minutes, discomfort was unchanged, and the median number of skin punctures decreased from 3 to 2. The incidence of central venous catheter placement dropped from 34% to 7%. Implementation of a training program and a mobile service in which nurse anesthetists performed ultrasound-guided PVC placement improved the success rate and quality of care in patients with DIVA.

  5. A foreign body reaction to Surgicel® in a lymph node diagnosed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Badenes, Diana; Pijuan, Lara; Curull, Víctor; Sánchez-Font, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Surgicel® (Ethicon, North Ryde, NSW, Australia) is an absorbable sheet of oxidized cellulose polyanhydroglucuronic acid polymer used as an hemostatic in cardiovascular and thoracic surgery. In some cases, the retained material may cause foreign body granulomatous reactions and simulate tumor recurrence, an abscess, an hematoma, or an infection. We report the case of a 55-year-old patient who was operated of a lung adenocarcinoma. In the thoracic computed tomography scan 1 year after the surgery, a right paratracheal lymph node was detected, so endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) was performed suspecting recurrence of the tumor. The cytology results of the lymph node showed a nonnecrotizing granulomatous reaction secondary to Surgicel®, used as an hemostatic during the surgery. The objective of presenting this case is to consider foreign body reaction to Surgicel® in the differential diagnosis of postoperative suspicion of neoplastic recurrence, and on the other hand, to note that EBUS-TBNA enables diagnosis. PMID:28197224

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided tissue sampling of small subepithelial tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle

    PubMed Central

    Schlag, Christoph; Menzel, Christoph; Götzberger, Manuela; Nennstiel, Simon; Klare, Peter; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Schmid, Roland M.; Weirich, Gregor; von Delius, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims The optimal approach to small subepithelial tumors (SETs) of the upper gastrointestinal tract remains inconclusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) for less invasive tissue sampling of small SETs of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Patients and methods In this prospective observational study patients with small ( ≤ 3 cm) SETs of the upper gastrointestinal tract were eligible and underwent EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle. The main outcome measure was the diagnostic yield. The number of obtained core biopsies was also assessed. Results Twenty patients were included. The mean SET size was 16 mm (range 10 – 27 mm). EUS-FNB was technically feasible in all cases and no complications were observed. The diagnostic yield was 75 %. Core biopsy specimens were obtained in only 25 % of cases. Conclusion EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle of small SETs can achieve a definite diagnosis in the majority of cases. However, because core samples cannot regularly be obtained, EUS-FNB seems not to be convincingly superior to standard EUS-FNA in this setting PMID:28299351

  7. Comparison of two different doses of lidocaine on the pain sensation during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Ateş, Ferhat; Dursun, Furkan; Malkoç, Ercan; Yılmaz, Ömer; Soydan, Hasan; Şen, Hüseyin; Başal, Şeref; Zekey, Fatih; Karademir, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare two different doses of lidocaine used for periprostatic nerve block on pain perception during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy. Material and methods A total of 288 patients with elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels and/or abnormal digital rectal examination who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were included in the study. The patients were divided into 3 groups: Group 1 (n=103) prostate biopsy were performed after administering perianal intrarectal application of 10 mL 2% lidocaine gel, Group 2 (n=98) 2 mL of 2% lidocaine injection on each side following rectal installation of lidocaine gel and Group 3 (n=87) 4 mL of 2% lidocaine injection on each side after rectal instillation of lidocaine gel. Patients’ pain scores during biopsy procedure were reported using visual analogue score (VAS). Independent sample t test, ANOVA test and Tukey test were used for statistical evaluation. Results The mean age, prostate volume and PSA level were 65.6±8.4 years, 58.2±34.8 mL, and 11.8±3.4 ng/mL respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in baseline characteristics between the groups. The mean VAS scores were 2.4±1.8 in Group 1, 2.5±1.9 in Group 2 and 1.6±1.6 in Group 3. Patients in Group 3, reported significant pain reduction compared with patients in Groups 1 and 2 (p=0.002, and 0.001, respectively). However, there was no statistically significant difference in VAS scores between Groups 1 and 2 (p=0.815). Conclusion According to our results we recommend the use of perianal intrarectal lidocain gel application, and periprostatic nerve block with injection of 4 ml 2% lidocaine per side combination in TRUS-guided prostate biopsies. Further large-scale randomized control studies are needed to validate these finding. PMID:27635288

  8. Local anesthesia for pain control during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Pu; Wang, Xiao-yan; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intrarectal local anesthestic (IRLA), periprostatic nerve block (PPNB), and the combined modalities in alleviating the pain during transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy. Materials and methods A literature review was performed to identify all published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about IRLA vs no anesthesia or placebo gel; PPNB vs no injection, periprostatic placebo injection, or IRLA; combined PPNB and IRLA vs PPNB alone; and combined PPNB and intraprostatic nerve block (IPNB) vs PPNB alone before TRUS-guided biopsy. Sources included MEDILINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library from 1980 to 2016. The main outcomes were biopsy pain score, probe manipulation pain score, and anesthetic infiltration pain score assessed by the visual pain scale. Results A total of 26 articles involving 36 RCTs were used in this analysis: Although IRLA can lead to pain reduction, the result was not statistically significant when compared with no anesthesia or placebo gel (weighted mean difference [WMD]: −0.22, 95% CI: −0.45 to 0, P=0.06). PPNB can lead to significantly lower biopsy pain scores when compared with no analgesia (WMD: −1.32, 95% CI: −1.68 to −0.95, P<0.00001), placebo injection (WMD: −2.62, 95% CI: −3.16 to −2.07, P<0.00001), or IRLA (WMD: −1.31, 95% CI: −1.40 to −1.22, P<0.00001). PPNB + IRLA can lead to significantly lower biopsy pain scores when compared with PPNB alone (WMD: −0.45, 95% CI: −0.62 to −0.28, P<0.00001). PPNB + IPNB can lead to significantly lower biopsy pain scores when compared with PPNB alone (WMD: −0.73, 95% CI: −0.92 to −0.55, P<0.00001). There were no severe reported general or local complications related to local anesthesia. Conclusion This meta-analysis indicates that a combination of PPNB and IRLA/IPNB is effective and safe in alleviating the pain during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. Further high-quality RCTs are needed

  9. Subacromial impingement syndrome and pain: protocol for a randomised controlled trial of exercise and corticosteroid injection (the SUPPORT trial)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most frequent cause of shoulder problems which themselves affect 1 in 3 adults. Management commonly includes exercise and corticosteroid injection. However, the few existing trials of exercise or corticosteroid injection for subacromial impingement syndrome are mostly small, of poor quality, and focus only on short-term results. Exercise packages tend to be standardised rather than individualised and progressed. There has been much recent interest in improving outcome from corticosteroid injections by using musculoskeletal ultrasound to guide injections. However, there are no high-quality trials comparing ultrasound-guided and blind corticosteroid injection in subacromial impingement syndrome. This trial will investigate how to optimise the outcome of subacromial impingement syndrome from exercise (standardised advice and information leaflet versus physiotherapist-led exercise) and from subacromial corticosteroid injection (blind versus ultrasound-guided), and provide long-term follow-up data on clinical and cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design The study design is a 2x2 factorial randomised controlled trial. 252 adults with subacromial impingement syndrome will be recruited from two musculoskeletal Clinical Assessment and Treatment Services at the primary-secondary care interface in Staffordshire, UK. Participants will be randomised on a 1:1:1:1 basis to one of four treatment groups: (1) ultrasound-guided subacromial corticosteroid injection and a physiotherapist-led exercise programme, (2) ultrasound-guided subacromial corticosteroid injection and an advice and exercise leaflet, (3) blind subacromial corticosteroid injection and a physiotherapist-led exercise programme, or (4) blind subacromial corticosteroid injection and an advice and exercise leaflet. The primary intention-to-treat analysis will be the mean differences in Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) scores at 6 weeks for the comparison between

  10. Ultrasound-guided photoacoustic imaging for the selective detection of EGFR-expressing breast cancer and lymph node metastases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meihua; Kim, Hoe Suk; Jin, Tiefeng; Yi, Ann; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the use of ultrasound (US)-guided photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and anti-EGFR antibody-conjugated gold nanorods (anti-EGFR-GNs) to non-invasively detect EGFR-expressing primary tumor masses and regional lymph node (LN) metastases in breast tumor mice generated by injecting MCF-7 (EGFR-negative) or MDA-MB-231 (EGFR-positive) human breast cells using a preclinical Vevo 2100 LAZR Imaging system. Anti-EGFR-GNs provided a significant enhancement in the PA signal in MDA-MB-231 tumor and the axillary LN metastases relative to MCF-7 tumor and non-LN metastases. We demonstrated that US-guided PAI using anti-EGFR-GNs is highly sensitive for the selective visualization of EGFR-expressing breast primary tumors as well as LN micrometastases. PMID:27231631

  11. Ultrasound-guided direct delivery of 3-bromopyruvate blocks tumor progression in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ota, Shinichi; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Buijs, Manon; Wijlemans, Joost W; Kwak, Byung Kook; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2013-06-01

    Studies in animal models of cancer have demonstrated that targeting tumor metabolism can be an effective anticancer strategy. Previously, we showed that inhibition of glucose metabolism by the pyruvate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), induces anticancer effects both in vitro and in vivo. We have also documented that intratumoral delivery of 3-BrPA affects tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor model of human liver cancer. However, the efficacy of such an approach in a clinically relevant orthotopic tumor model has not been reported. Here, we investigated the feasibility of ultrasound (US) image-guided delivery of 3-BrPA in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer and evaluated its therapeutic efficacy. In vitro, treatment of Panc-1 cells with 3-BrPA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability. The loss of viability correlated with a dose-dependent decrease in the intracellular ATP level and lactate production confirming that disruption of energy metabolism underlies these 3-BrPA-mediated effects. In vivo, US-guided delivery of 3-BrPA was feasible and effective as demonstrated by a marked decrease in tumor size on imaging. Further, the antitumor effect was confirmed by (1) a decrease in the proliferative potential by Ki-67 immunohistochemical staining and (2) the induction of apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphospate nick end labeling staining. We therefore demonstrate the technical feasibility of US-guided intratumoral injection of 3-BrPA in a mouse model of human pancreatic cancer as well as its therapeutic efficacy. Our data suggest that this new therapeutic approach consisting of a direct intratumoral injection of antiglycolytic agents may represent an exciting opportunity to treat patients with pancreas cancer.

  12. Oral Steroids for Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew D; Clarke, Jesse; Williams, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Contact/allergic dermatitis is frequently treated inappropriately with lower-than-recommended doses or inadequate duration of treatment with oral and intramuscular glucocorticoids. This article highlights a case of dermatitis in a Ranger Assessment and Selection Program student who was improperly treated over 2 weeks with oral steroids after being bit by Cimex lectularius, commonly known as bed bugs. The article also highlights the pitfalls of improper oral steroid dosing and provides reasoning for longer-duration oral steroid treatment.

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation of a large metastatic carcinoid tumor: success with a note of caution

    PubMed Central

    Mathers, Bradley W.; Harvey, Harold A.; Dye, Charles E.; Dougherty-Hamod, Brandy; Moyer, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine needle infusion (EUS-FNI) of alcohol is the most reported method for EUS-guided tumor ablation. Several studies have reported successful EUS-guided ablation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, these tumors have been relatively small (< 3 cm). In this report, a 50-year-old man with a metastatic carcinoid tumor with a large porta hepatis mass was referred to our clinic for EUS-guided ethanol ablation. After two separate EUS-FNI ablations, there was a 36 % reduction in tumor size (9.0 × 11.4 cm to 6.7 × 9.8 cm) with associated tumor lysis syndrome. Chromogranin A levels decreased from 460 to 132 ng/mL. The patient reported complete resolution of abdominal pain within 2 weeks, but only mild improvement in flushing and diarrhea. In conclusion, large metastatic neuroendocrine tumors can be successfully treated with EUS-guided ethanol ablation. Evidence-based guidelines are needed with regard to the appropriate volume of ethanol injected in EUS-guided ablation to promote the efficacy and safety of this emerging procedure. PMID:26135103

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided inoculation of transmissible venereal tumor in the colon: A large animal model for colon neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Manoop S.; Uthamanthil, Rajesh; Suzuki, Rei; Shetty, Anil; Klumpp, Sherry A.; Nau, William; Stafford, Roger Jason

    2016-01-01

    Background: To develop and evaluate the feasibility of emerging interventions, animal models with accurate anatomical environment are required. Objectives: We aimed to establish a clinically relevant colorectal tumor model with canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) utilizing endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) imaging guidance. Design: Survival study using a canine model. Setting: Endoscopic animal research laboratory at a tertiary cancer center. Materials and Methods: This study involved five canines. Interventions: A colorectal tumor model was established and evaluated in five canines under cyclosporine immune suppression. Under endoscopic imaging guidance, saline was injected into the submucosal layer forming a bleb. Subsequently, CTVT was inoculated into the bleb under EUS guidance. Endoscopy was the primary method of assessing tumor growth. Tumors developed in 60-130 days. Upon detection of lesions >1 cm, the animals were euthanized and the tumors were harvested for histopathological characterization. Main outcome measurements: Success rate of tumor growth. The presence or absence of vasculature inside tumors. Results: Colorectal tumor successfully developed in three out of the five animals (60%). Among the ones with tumor growth, average inoculated CTVT volume, incubation time, and tumor size was 1.8 cc, 65.7 days, and 2.0 cm, respectively. The two animals without tumor growth were observed for >100 days. In all the tumors, vascular structure was characterized with CD31 imunohistochemical stain. Limitations: Small number of animals. Conclusion: We succeeded in creating a new colorectal tumor canine model with CTVT utilizing EUS. PMID:27080606

  15. Musculoskeletal injections: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mark B; Beutler, Anthony I; O'Connor, Francis G

    2008-10-15

    Injections are valuable procedures for managing musculoskeletal conditions commonly encountered by family physicians. Corticosteroid injections into articular, periarticular, or soft tissue structures relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and improve mobility. Injections can provide diagnostic information and are commonly used for postoperative pain control. Local anesthetics may be injected with corticosteroids to provide additional, rapid pain relief. Steroid injection is the preferred and definitive treatment for de Quervain tenosynovitis and trochanteric bursitis. Steroid injections can also be helpful in controlling pain during physical rehabilitation from rotator cuff syndrome and lateral epicondylitis. Intra-articular steroid injection provides pain relief in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. There is little systematic evidence to guide medication selection for therapeutic injections. The medication used and the frequency of injection should be guided by the goal of the injection (i.e., diagnostic or therapeutic), the underlying musculoskeletal diagnosis, and clinical experience. Complications from steroid injections are rare, but physicians should understand the potential risks and counsel patients appropriately. Patients with diabetes who receive periarticular or soft tissue steroid injections should closely monitor their blood glucose for two weeks following injection.

  16. Helpful tips for performing musculoskeletal injections.

    PubMed

    Metz, John P

    2010-01-01

    Injections are valuable procedures for managing musculoskeletal conditions commonly encountered by family physicians. Corticosteroid injections into articular, periarticular, or soft tissue structures relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and improve mobility. Injections can provide diagnostic information and are commonly used for postoperative pain control. Local anesthetics may be injected with corticosteroids to provide additional, rapid pain relief. Steroid injection is the preferred and definitive treatment for de Quervain tenosynovitis and trochanteric bursitis. Steroid injections can also be helpful in controlling pain during physical rehabilitation from rotator cuff syndrome and lateral epicondylitis. Intra-articular steroid injection provides pain relief in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. There is little systematic evidence to guide medication selection for therapeutic injections. The medication used and the frequency of injection should be guided by the goal of the injection (i.e., diagnostic or therapeutic), the underlying musculoskeletal diagnosis, and clinical experience. Complications from steroid injections are rare, but physicians should understand the potential risks and counsel patients appropriately. Patients with diabetes who receive periarticular or soft tissue steroid injections should closely monitor their blood glucose for two weeks following injection.

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gallbladder drainage for acute cholecystitis: Long-term outcomes after removal of a self-expandable metal stent

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, Ken; Takenaka, Mamoru; Kitano, Masayuki; Omoto, Shunsuke; Miyata, Takeshi; Minaga, Kosuke; Yamao, Kentaro; Imai, Hajime; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Nishida, Naoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the long-term outcomes of this procedure after removal of self-expandable metal stent (SEMS). The efficacy and safety of endoscopic ultrasound-guided gallbladder drainage (EUS-GBD) with SEMS were also assessed. METHODS Between January 2010 and April 2015, 12 patients with acute calculous cholecystitis, who were deemed unsuitable for cholecystectomy, underwent EUS-GBD with a SEMS. EUS-GBD was performed under the guidance of EUS and fluoroscopy, by puncturing the gallbladder with a needle, inserting a guidewire, dilating the puncture hole, and placing a SEMS. The SEMS was removed and/or replaced with a 7-Fr plastic pigtail stent after cholecystitis improved. The technical and clinical success rates, adverse event rate, and recurrence rate were all measured. RESULTS The rates of technical success, clinical success, and adverse events were 100%, 100%, and 0%, respectively. After cholecystitis improved, the SEMS was removed without replacement in eight patients, whereas it was replaced with a 7-Fr pigtail stent in four patients. Recurrence was seen in one patient (8.3%) who did not receive a replacement pigtail stent. The median follow-up period after EUS-GBD was 304 d (78-1492). CONCLUSION EUS-GBD with a SEMS is a possible alternative treatment for acute cholecystitis. Long-term outcomes after removal of the SEMS were excellent. Removal of the SEMS at 4-wk after SEMS placement and improvement of symptoms might avoid migration of the stent and recurrence of cholecystitis due to food impaction. PMID:28216973

  18. Prospective Study for Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Tissue Acquisition Using 25- and 22-Gauge Core Biopsy Needles in Solid Pancreatic Masses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Jeong Yup; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Kim, Hoguen; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although thicker needles theoretically allow more tissue to be collected, their decreased flexibility can cause mechanical damage to the endoscope, technical failure, and sample blood contamination. The effects of needle gauge on diagnostic outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) of pancreatic mass lesions remain unknown. This study compared procurement rates of histologic cores obtained from EUS-FNB of pancreatic masses using 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Patients and Methods From March 2014 to July 2014, 66 patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent EUS-FNB with both 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Among them, 10 patients were excluded and thus 56 patients were eligible for the analyses. Needle sequences were randomly assigned, and two passes were made with each needle, consisting of 10 uniform to-and-fro movements on each pass with 10 mL syringe suction. A pathologist blinded to needle sequence evaluated specimens for the presence of histologic core. Results The mean patient age was 65.8 ± 9.5 years (range, 44–89 years); 35 patients (62.5%) were men. The mean pancreatic mass size was 35.3 ± 17.1 mm (range 14–122.3 mm). Twenty-eight patients (50%) had tumors at the pancreas head or uncinate process. There were no significant differences in procurement rates of histologic cores between 25-gauge (49/56, 87.5%) and 22-gauge (46/56, 82.1%, P = 0.581) needles or diagnostic accuracy using only histologic cores (98% and 95%). There were no technical failures or procedure-related adverse events. Conclusions The 25-gauge core biopsy needle could offer acceptable and comparable outcomes regarding diagnostic performance including histologic core procurement rates compared to the 22-gauge core biopsy needle, although the differences were not statistically significant. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01795066 PMID:27149404

  19. Treatment of venous leg ulcers with ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy: Healing, long-term recurrence and quality of life evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lloret, Pedro; Redondo, Pedro; Cabrera, Juan; Sierra, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLU) generally have slow healing rates (HR) and frequent recurrence rates (RR). The underlying etiology is venous hypertension. The present observational cohort study was to determine healing and RR in VLU treated with ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy (UGFS). One hundred and eighty VLU were treated with polidocanol microfoam monthly under ultrasound control. Median follow-up was 30 months (range: 17-40). One hundred seventy-two (95.6%) ulcers healed during the study. The overall twenty-four week HR was 79.4% and was significantly higher (95.1%) in patients with isolated great saphenous vein incompetence than in those with great saphenous vein plus perforator (91.7%) or exclusive perforator incompetence (78.9%) (p < 0.01). Patients without deep vein incompetence had a significantly higher 6-month HR (89.8%) than those with (67.4%) (p < 0.01). Multivariate analysis identified the following independent risk factors: chronicity > 12 months (OR 7.69), area > 6 cm(2) (OR 4.24), lipodermatoesclerosis (OR 12.22), history of > 3 previous ulcers (OR 5.57) and history of deep vein thrombosis (OR 6.18). One, two and three year ulcer RR were 8.1%, 14.9%, and 20.8%, respectively. Isolated perforator incompetence and previous history of venous surgery were significantly (p = 0.03) associated with a higher RR. VLU treated with microfoam sclerotherapy are associated with high HR and low mid-term RR.

  20. Incidence of infectious complications following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: A retrospective population-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rudzinski, Jan Krzysztof; Kawakami, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We have seen an increased risk of infectious complications following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUS-PB). Fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics are common for prophylaxis prior to TRUS-PB. We evaluate whether increasing FQ resistance correlates with increased incidence of post-biopsy infectious complications at our institution. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart and electronic health record review on 927 patients who underwent TRUS-PB between January and July of 2012 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. We prospectively collected the following variables: age, pre-biopsy prostate-specific antigen, and date of biopsy. We documented presentation to an emergency department within 30 days of TRUS-PB for infectious and non-infectious complications. Results: Of the 927 patients, 58 patients (6.3%) were admitted to the emergency department due to post-TRUS-PB complications within 30 days post-biopsy. The most common infectious complications were sepsis in 21 patients (2.2%), followed by urinary tract infection (UTI) in 9 (0.9%), and prostatitis in 4 (0.4%). We found that 83% of the septic episodes and 66.6% of the UTIs were attributed to ciprofloxacin resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli). The incidence of non-infectious complications was as follows: urinary retention in 12 (1.2%), hematuria in 9 (0.9%), and rectal bleeding in 8 (0.8%). Conclusion: Our results suggest an increased incidence of infectious complications caused by FQ resistant organisms following TRUS-PB. This finding could be attributed to increasing community resistance to ciprofloxacin. The current antimicrobial prophylactic regimen needs to be re-evaluated, and a novel approach may need to be considered. PMID:24940454

  1. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirate-derived preclinical pancreatic cancer models reveal panitumumab sensitivity in KRAS wild-type tumors.

    PubMed

    Berry, William; Algar, Elizabeth; Kumar, Beena; Desmond, Christopher; Swan, Michael; Jenkins, Brendan J; Croagh, Daniel

    2017-05-15

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is largely refractory to existing therapies used in unselected patient trials, thus emphasizing the pressing need for new approaches for patient selection in personalized medicine. KRAS mutations occur in 90% of PC patients and confer resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors (e.g., panitumumab), suggesting that KRAS wild-type PC patients may benefit from targeted panitumumab therapy. Here, we use tumor tissue procured by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirate (EUS-FNA) to compare the in vivo sensitivity in patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) of KRAS wild-type and mutant PC tumors to panitumumab, and to profile the molecular signature of these tumors in patients with metastatic or localized disease. Specifically, RNASeq of EUS-FNA-derived tumor RNA from localized (n = 20) and metastatic (n = 20) PC cases revealed a comparable transcriptome profile. Screening the KRAS mutation status of tumor genomic DNA obtained from EUS-FNAs stratified PC patients into either KRAS wild-type or mutant cohorts, and the engraftment of representative KRAS wild-type and mutant EUS-FNA tumor samples into NOD/SCID mice revealed that the growth of KRAS wild-type, but not mutant, PDXs was selectively suppressed with panitumumab. Furthermore, in silico transcriptome interrogation of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)-derived KRAS wild-type (n = 38) and mutant (n = 132) PC tumors revealed 391 differentially expressed genes. Taken together, our study validates EUS-FNA for the application of a novel translational pipeline comprising KRAS mutation screening and PDXs, applicable to all PC patients, to evaluate personalized anti-EGFR therapy in patients with KRAS wild-type tumors.

  2. Manual rupture versus transvaginal ultrasound-guided aspiration of allanto-amniotic fluid in multiple pregnancies: a clinical approach to embryo reduction in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Andreu-Vázquez, Cristina; Garcia-Ispierto, Irina; López-Gatius, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    To avoid the problems associated with twinning in dairy cattle, one of the embryos may be eliminated. This study compares the effect on pregnancy maintenance of two embryo reduction techniques, manual rupture (MR) and transvaginal ultrasound-guided aspiration (TUGA) of allanto-amniotic fluid, in Holstein-Friesian cows with multiple pregnancies. In the first experiment, 61 lactating cows bearing unilateral twins (n=27), bilateral twins (n=30) or triplets/quadruplets (n=4) were subjected to MR (n=45) or TUGA using a 17-G neddle (n=16) on day 28-34 of gestation. In 21 and 10 cows undergoing MR and TUGA embryo reduction, respectively, pregnancy loss occurred before day 90 (46.7 vs. 62.5%, P= 0.28). Through binary logistic regression, the type of pregnancy was identified as the only variable significantly affecting pregnancy maintenance (P=0.03). Based on the odds ratio, the risk of pregnancy loss was 4.1 times higher for unilateral twins than for bilateral twins (70.4 vs. 36.7%, respectively, P=0.01). No effect was detected on pregnancy maintenance of the technique used (P=0.17) or of the interaction technique by type of pregnancy (P=0.22). In the second experiment, a 22-G needle was used to perform TUGA on 22 lactating cows. The pregnancy loss rates were 44.4% (4/9), 18.2% (2/11) and 50% (1/2) for cows bearing unilateral twins, bilateral twins and triplets, respectively. The total pregnancy loss rate following TUGA using the 22-G needle tended to be lower than that using the 17-G needle (31.8 vs. 62.5%; P=0.06). Our results suggest that TUGA using a 22-G needle could be the method of choice to perform embryo reduction in cows carrying multiple pregnancies.

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration plus KRAS and GNAS mutation in malignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Bournet, Barbara; Vignolle-Vidoni, Alix; Grand, David; Roques, Céline; Breibach, Florence; Cros, Jérome; Muscari, Fabrice; Carrère, Nicolas; Selves, Janick; Cordelier, Pierre; Buscail, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Background: KRAS and GNAS mutations are common in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia of the pancreas (IPMN). The aims of this study were to assess the role of pre-therapeutic cytopathology combined with KRAS and GNAS mutation assays within cystic fluid sampled by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) to predict malignancy of IPMN. Patients and methods: We prospectively included 37 IPMN patients with clinical and/or imaging predictors of malignancy (men: 24; mean age: 69.5 years). Cytopathology (performed on cystic fluid and/or IPMN nodules), KRAS (Exon 2, codon 12) and GNAS (Exon 8, codon 201) mutations assays (using TaqMan® allelic discrimination) were performed on EUS-FNA material. The final diagnosis was obtained from IPMN resections (n = 18); surgical biopsies, EUS-FNA analyses, and follow-up (n = 19): 10 and 27 IPMN were benign and malignant, respectively. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of cytopathology alone to diagnose IPMN malignancy were 55 %, 100 %, 100 %, 45 %, and 66 %, respectively. When KRAS-mutation analysis was combined with cytopathology these values were 92 %, 50 %, 83 %, 71 %, and 81 %, respectively. GNAS assays did not improve the performances of cytopathology alone or those of cytopathology plus a KRAS assay. Conclusions: In patients with a likelihood of malignant IPMN at pre-therapeutic investigation, testing for KRAS mutations in cystic fluid sampling by EUS-FNA improved the results of cytopathology for the diagnosis of malignancy whereas GNAS mutation assay did not. PMID:27995180

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Salla, Charitini; Chatzipantelis, Paschalis; Konstantinou, Panagiotis; Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Pantazopoulou, Akrivi; Dappola, Victoria

    2007-10-14

    We describe the clinical, imaging and cytopathological features of solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas (SPTP) diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided (EUS-guided) fine-needle aspiration (FNA). A 17-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with complaints of an unexplained episodic abdominal pain for 2 mo and a short history of hypertension in the endocrinology clinic. Clinical laboratory examinations revealed polycystic ovary syndrome, splenomegaly and low serum amylase and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. Computed tomography (CT) analysis revealed a mass of the pancreatic tail with solid and cystic consistency. EUS confirmed the mass, both in body and tail of the pancreas, with distinct borders, which caused dilation of the peripheral part of the pancreatic duct (major diameter 3.7 mm). The patient underwent EUS-FNA. EUS-FNA cytology specimens consisted of single cells and aggregates of uniform malignant cells, forming microadenoid structures, branching, papillary clusters with delicate fibrovascular cores and nuclear overlapping. Naked capillaries were also seen. The nuclei of malignant cells were round or oval, eccentric with fine granular chromatin, small nucleoli and nuclear grooves in some of them. The malignant cells were periodic acid Schiff (PAS)-Alcian blue (+) and immunocytochemically they were vimentin (+), CA 19.9 (+), synaptophysin (+), chromogranin (-), neuro-specific enolase (-), a1-antitrypsin and a1-antichymotrypsin focal positive. Cytologic findings were strongly suggestive of SPTP. Biopsy confirmed the above cytologic diagnosis. EUS-guided FNA diagnosis of SPTP is accurate. EUS findings, cytomorphologic features and immunostains of cell block help distinguish SPTP from pancreatic endocrine tumors, acinar cell carcinoma and papillary mucinous carcinoma.

  5. Application of transrectal ultrasound-guided repeat needle biopsy in the diagnosis of prostate cancer in Chinese population: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Xizhi; Yu, Jiang; Ouyang, Jun; Shen, Weidong; Zhou, Yibin; Hou, Jianquan; Wen, Duangai; Pu, Jinxian; Shan, Yuxi; Xue, Boxin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transrectal ultrasound-guided repeat needle biopsy (TUGRNB) is widely used for diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). However, significance of TUGRNB in Chinese population was rarely reported. A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the significance of TUGRNB applied in prediction of PCa in Chinese population. Materials and Methods: A total of 960 from January 2009 to December 2012 were included. Repeat needle biopsy rate and PCa positive detection rate were evaluated. Relationship between prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels and PCa positive rates was analyzed. Results: PCa positive detection rate after initial needle biopsy was 28.4%, which was lower than the rate of repeat needle biopsy (40%). The rate for immediate transurethral resection (TUR), surgery after initial needle biopsy, was 27.1%, however with a low PCa positive detection rate (0.66%). The repeat needle biopsy rate was lower compared with the initial biopsy rate (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, immediate TUR rate was significantly higher than that of the repeat needle biopsy rate (P < 0.05). Among the three groups, the PCa positive detection rate in repeat needle biopsy group was the highest. In subgroups with different PSA levels, the PCa positive rate increased with the elevation of PSA level. In cases with PSA > 20 ng/ml, PCa positive rate was significantly higher than those with PSA < 20 ng/ml (P < 0.05). Conclusion: PCa positive detection rate following repeat needle biopsy in Chinese population was higher, although the repeated needle biopsy rate was still in a low level. TUGRNB should attract more attention in the diagnosis of PCa. PMID:27904624

  6. Are Steroids Worth the Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... more different anabolic steroids. Other steroid users may "pyramid" their steroids, starting with a low dose and ... and training the healthy way: eating the right foods , practicing, and strength training without the use of ...

  7. Repeated ultrasound-guided transvaginal oocyte retrieval from cyclic Murrah buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis): oocyte recovery and quality.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V; Manik, R S; Chauhan, M S; Singla, S K; Akshey, Y S; Palta, P

    2006-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the potential of the Murrah breed of buffaloes as donors of oocytes and to find out the recovery rate and oocyte quality in cyclic Murrah buffaloes subjected to oocyte recovery once a week. Murrah buffaloes (n = 5) were synchronized for estrus by a single prostaglandin injection schedule. The animals were subjected to transvaginal oocyte retrieval (TVOR) once weekly for 6 weeks, starting from Day 7 of the oestrous cycle (Day 0 = day of oestrus). TVOR was performed using an ultrasound machine with a 5 MHz transvaginal transducer, single lumen 19-gauge, 60 cm long needle and a constant vacuum pressure of 50 mmHg. The number and size of follicles in each ovary was determined before puncture. The follicles were characterized on the basis of their diameter as small (3-5 mm), medium (6-9 mm) and large (> or = 10 mm). The oocytes recovered were classified as grade A, cumulus-oocytes complexes (COCs) with > or = 5 layers of cumulus cells; grade B, those with two to four layers; grade C, partially denuded oocytes; and grade D, completely denuded oocytes. The mean (+/- S.E.M) number of small, medium and large follicles, and the number of total follicles observed per animal per session, which was 2.2 +/- 0.3, 0.6 +/- 0.2, 0.9 +/- 0.1 and 3.7 +/- 0.3, respectively, did not differ between animals or between puncture sessions. Small follicles constituted a major proportion (59%) of the total observed follicles. A mean (+/- S.E.M) number of 3.0 +/- 0.3 follicles were punctured and 2.0 +/- 0.3 oocytes recovered per animal per session, with a recovery rate of 68%. Out of the total 61 oocytes recovered, 36 (59%) were of grades A + B whereas 25 (41%) were of grades C + D. In conclusion, this study describes the potential of cyclic Murrah buffaloes as donors of oocytes collected by repeated TVOR once a week, without any adverse effects on follicular growth and oocyte recovery. It also describes an efficient system for carrying out TVOR in

  8. [Steroid-induced osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Perrot, Serge; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2012-04-01

    Bone-related steroid involvement is one of the most frequent complications of steroid treatment. Epidemiological data demonstrate that osteoporosis starts early during the treatment, predominantly involves trabecular bone and is correlated to dosage and treatment duration. Mechanisms and consequences of steroid bone involvement are related to osseous and extra-osseous mechanisms. In clinical practice, steroid-induced osteoporosis remains underdiagnosed and undertreated both in preventive and curative approaches. Recently, new molecules as teriparatide and zoledronic acid got indication for the treatment of steroid-induced osteoporosis. To guide treatment strategies, several recommendations are available: French, not updated recommendations since 2003 (Afssaps, 2003), European elaborated by the EULAR in 2007 and those of the ACR updated in 2010.

  9. Pharmacology of anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Kicman, A T

    2008-06-01

    Athletes and bodybuilders have recognized for several decades that the use of anabolic steroids can promote muscle growth and strength but it is only relatively recently that these agents are being revisited for clinical purposes. Anabolic steroids are being considered for the treatment of cachexia associated with chronic disease states, and to address loss of muscle mass in the elderly, but nevertheless their efficacy still needs to be demonstrated in terms of improved physical function and quality of life. In sport, these agents are performance enhancers, this being particularly apparent in women, although there is a high risk of virilization despite the favourable myotrophic-androgenic dissociation that many xenobiotic steroids confer. Modulation of androgen receptor expression appears to be key to partial dissociation, with consideration of both intracellular steroid metabolism and the topology of the bound androgen receptor interacting with co-activators. An anticatabolic effect, by interfering with glucocorticoid receptor expression, remains an attractive hypothesis. Behavioural changes by non-genomic and genomic pathways probably help motivate training. Anabolic steroids continue to be the most common adverse finding in sport and, although apparently rare, designer steroids have been synthesized in an attempt to circumvent the dope test. Doping with anabolic steroids can result in damage to health, as recorded meticulously in the former German Democratic Republic. Even so, it is important not to exaggerate the medical risks associated with their administration for sporting or bodybuilding purposes but to emphasize to users that an attitude of personal invulnerability to their adverse effects is certainly misguided.

  10. Oral steroid contraception.

    PubMed

    Sech, Laura A; Mishell, Daniel R

    2015-11-01

    Oral steroid contraception is a popular method of family planning worldwide. Over the past several decades, this method of contraception has changed significantly by decreasing the estrogen dose, changing the progestin component, and reducing the hormone free interval. Despite the popularity of oral steroid contraception, there has been much criticism regarding the associated risks of venous thromboembolism and stroke. Despite these established, yet uncommon risks, oral steroid contraception has many important health benefits. This review highlights the available formulations of oral contraceptives along with their evidence-based associated risks and benefits. Highlights regarding future directions for development of novel oral contraceptives are also addressed.

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of Thyroid Nodules: is it Necessary to Use Local Anesthesia for the Application of One Needle Puncture?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Ki Nam

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluate the difference in the degree of patient pain for an ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (USFNAB) of a thyroid nodule with one needle puncture with and without local anesthesia. Materials and Methods A total of 50 patients participated in the study. We examined prospective patients who would undergo US-FNABs of two thyroid nodules (larger than 10 mm maximum diameter), which were located in separate thyroid lobes. For one of these thyroid nodules, US-FNAB was performed following the administration of local anesthesia; for the other nodule, no anesthesia was administered. The application of anesthesia was alternatively administered between patients (either prior to the first US-FNAB procedure or prior to the second procedure). For all patients, the degree of pain during and after each US-guided FNAB was evaluated according to a 4-category verbal rating scale (VRS), an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS) and a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Results The mean maximum diameters of thyroid nodules examined by US-FNAB with the use of local anesthesia and with no local anesthesia were 13.6 mm and 13.0 mm, respectively. There was no significant difference in nodule size (p > 0.05) between two groups. For the VRS, there were 27 patients with a higher pain score when local anesthesia was used and four patients with a higher pain score when no local anesthesia was administered. Nineteen patients had equivalent pain score for both treatments. This finding was statistically significant (p < 0.001). For the NRS, there were 33 patients with a higher pain score when local anesthesia was used and 10 patients with a higher pain score when no local anesthesia was administered. Seven patients had an equivalent pain score for each treatment. This finding was statistically significant (p < 0.001). For the VAS, there were 35 patients with a higher pain score when local anesthesia was used and 11 patients with a higher pain score

  12. Slow-pull and different conventional suction techniques in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of pancreatic solid lesions using 22-gauge needles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Ying; Ding, Qing-Yu; Lv, Yang; Guo, Wen; Zhi, Fa-Chao; Liu, Si-De; Cheng, Tian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the cytological diagnostic capacity and sample quality of the slow-pull technique and compare them with different suction techniques. METHODS From July 2010 to December 2015, 102 patients with pancreatic solid lesions who underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) with 22-gauge needles were retrospectively evaluated. EUS-FNA diagnosis was based on a cytological examination, and final diagnosis was based on a comprehensive standard of cytological diagnosis, surgical pathology and clinical or imaging follow-up. Cytological specimens were characterized for cellularity and blood contamination. The cytological diagnostic capacity and sample quality of the slow-pull technique and suction techniques with 5-mL/10-mL/20-mL syringes were analyzed. RESULTS Of all of the EUS-FNA procedures, the slow-pull technique and suction techniques with 5-mL/10-mL/20-mL syringes were used in 31, 19, 34 and 18 procedures, respectively. There were significant differences between these four suction techniques in terms of cytological diagnostic accuracy (90.3% vs 63.2% vs 58.8% vs 55.6%, P = 0.019), sensitivity (88.2% vs 41.7% vs 40.0% vs 36.4%, P = 0.009) and blood contamination (score ≥ 2 for 29.0% vs 52.6% vs 70.6% vs 72.2%, P = 0.003). The accuracy and sensitivity of the slow-pull technique were significantly higher than those of the suction techniques using 5-mL (P = 0.03, P = 0.014), 10-mL (P = 0.005; P = 0.006) and 20-mL syringes (P = 0.01, P = 0.01). Blood contamination was significantly lower in the slow-pull technique than in the suction techniques with 10-mL (P = 0.001) and 20-mL syringes (P = 0.007). CONCLUSION The slow-pull technique may increase the cytological diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity with slight blood contamination during EUS-FNA when using 22-gauge needles for solid pancreatic masses. PMID:27818594

  13. Learning curve for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic lesions in a novel ex-vivo simulation model

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J. M.; Cohen, J.; Gromski, M. A.; Saito, K.; Loundou, A.; Matthes, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is essential in the management of digestive cancers. However, teaching and learning this technique remain challenging due to the lack of cost-effective models. Material and methods: This was a prospective experimental study using a complete porcine upper gastrointestinal ex-vivo organ package, placed in an Erlangen Active Simulator for Interventional Endoscopy (EASIE-R), and prepared with one cyst and two solid masses (2 cm). Five fellows inexperienced in EUS-FNA were enrolled, performing 10 procedures on each lesion, alternatively. The total time, number of attempts for success, of needle view losses, and of scope handling were recorded, associated with an independent skills rating by procedure. We compared the first 15 procedures with the last 15 for each fellow. Results: The fellows successfully performed all procedures in 2 to 40 minutes, requiring 1 to 6 attempts. All (5/5) improved their total time taken (P < 0.001), number of times when the EUS view of the needle was lost (P < 0.05), scope handling (P < 0.005), and skills rating (P < 0.001), whereas 4/5 (80 %) improved their number of attempts. The overall evaluation showed a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in the total time taken (11.2 ± 7.8 vs 4.3 ± 2.2 minutes), number of attempts (2.6 ± 1.2 vs 1.2 ± 0.7), number of times when the EUS view of the needle was lost (2.3 ± 2 vs 0.5 ± 0.7), and need for scope handling (1.1 ± 1.7 vs 0.1 ± 0.2). We also observed an improvement in skills rating (5 ± 1.9 vs. 7.7 ± 1.1). Conclusion: This newly designed ex-vivo model seems to be an effective way to improve the initial learning of EUS-FNA, by performing 30 procedures. PMID:27995190

  14. Prospective international multicenter study on endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage for patients with malignant distal biliary obstruction after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Khashab, Mouen A.; Van der Merwe, Schalk; Kunda, Rastislav; El Zein, Mohamad H.; Teoh, Anthony Y.; Marson, Fernando P.; Fabbri, Carlo; Tarantino, Ilaria; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Modayil, Rani J.; Stavropoulos, Stavros N.; Peñas, Irene; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Kumbhari, Vivek; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Shah, Raj; Kalloo, Anthony N.; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Artifon, Everson L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has emerged as an alternative to traditional radiologic and surgical drainage procedures after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). However, prospective multicenter data are lacking. The aims of this study were to prospectively assess the short- and long-term efficacy and safety of EUS-BD in patients with malignant distal biliary obstruction. Patients and methods: Consecutive patients at 12 tertiary centers (5 US, 5 European, 1 Asian, 1 South American) with malignant distal biliary obstruction and failed ERCP underwent EUS-BD. Technical success was defined as successful stent placement in the desired position. Clinical success was defined as a reduction in bilirubin by 50 % at 2 weeks or to below 3 mg/dL at 4 weeks. Adverse events were prospectively tracked and graded according to the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) lexicon’s severity grading system. Overall survival and duration of stent patency were calculated using Kaplan–Meier analysis. Results: A total of 96 patients (mean age 66 years, female 45 %, pancreatic cancer 55 %) underwent EUS-BD. Stent placement (technical success) was achieved in 92 (95.8 %) patients (metallic stent 84, plastic stent 8). Mean procedure time was 40 minutes. Clinical success was achieved in 86 (89.5 %) patients. A total of 10 (10.5 %) adverse events occurred: pneumoperitoneum (n = 2), sheared wire (n = 1), bleeding (n = 1), bile leak (n = 3), cholangitis (n = 2), and unintentional perforation (n = 1); 4 graded as mild, 4 moderate, 1 severe, and 1 fatal (due to perforation). A total of 38 (44 %) patients died of disease progression during the study period. The median patient survival was 167 days (95 %CI 112 – 221) days. The 6-month stent patency rate was 95 % (95 %CI 94.94 – 95.06 %) and the 1-year stent patency was 86 % (95 %CI 85.74 – 86

  15. A meta-analysis and systematic review: Success of endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary stenting in patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures and a failed ERCP

    PubMed Central

    Moole, Harsha; Bechtold, Matthew L.; Forcione, David; Puli, Srinivas R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: In patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) guided biliary stenting fails in 5% to 10% patients due to difficult anatomy/inability to cannulate the papilla. Recently, endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has been described. Primary outcomes were to evaluate the biliary drainage success rates with EUS and compare it to percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Secondary outcomes were to evaluate overall procedure related complications. Methods: Study selection criteria: Studies evaluating the efficacy of EUS-BD and comparing EUS-BD versus PTBD in inoperable malignant biliary stricture patients with a failed ERCP were included in this analysis. Data collection and extraction: Articles were searched in Medline, PubMed, and Ovid journals. Two authors independently searched and extracted data. The study design was written in accordance to PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. Subgroup analyses of prospective studies and EUS-BD versus PTBD were performed. Statistical method: Pooled proportions were calculated using fixed and random effects model. I2 statistic was used to assess heterogeneity among studies. Results: Initial search identified 846 reference articles, of which 124 were selected and reviewed. Sixteen studies (N = 528) that met the inclusion criteria were included in this analysis. In the pooled patient population, the percentage of patients that had a successful biliary drainage with EUS was 90.91% (95% CI = 88.10–93.38). The proportion of patients that had overall procedure related complications with EUS-PD was 16.46% (95% CI = 13.20–20.01). The pooled odds ratio for successful biliary drainage in EUS-PD versus PTBD group was 3.06 (95% CI = 1.11–8.43). The risk difference for overall procedure related complications in EUS-PD versus PTBD group was −0.21 (95% CI = −0

  16. Steroids (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... steroids can face legal consequences, including jail time, monetary fines, being banned from an event or team, ... Nemours.org Reading BrightStart! Contact Us Partners Editorial Policy Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Visit the Nemours ...

  17. Drug Facts: Anabolic Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... can avoid unwanted side effects or maximize the drugs' effects by taking them in ways that include: cycling— ... despite physical problems, high costs to buy the drugs, and negative effects on their relationships. These behaviors reflect steroids' addictive ...

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... anesthesia. Discuss any medications you’re taking, including herbal supplements and aspirin. You will be advised to stop ... doctor all medications that you are taking, including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to ...

  19. Ultrasound guided spine needle insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Elvis C. S.; Mousavi, Parvin; Gill, Sean; Fichtinger, Gabor; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2010-02-01

    An ultrasound (US) guided, CT augmented, spine needle insertion navigational system is introduced. The system consists of an electromagnetic (EM) sensor, an US machine, and a preoperative CT volume of the patient anatomy. Three-dimensional (3D) US volume is reconstructed intraoperatively from a set of two-dimensional (2D) freehand US slices, and is coregistered with the preoperative CT. This allows the preoperative CT volume to be used in the intraoperative clinical coordinate. The spatial relationship between the patient anatomy, surgical tools, and the US transducer are tracked using the EM sensor, and are displayed with respect to the CT volume. The pose of the US transducer is used to interpolate the CT volume, providing the physician with a 2D "x-ray vision" to guide the needle insertion. Many of the system software components are GPU-accelerated, allowing real-time performance of the guidance system in a clinical setting.

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as an important diagnostic and therapeutic modality in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy. EUS provides access to many organs and lesions which are in proximity to the gastrointestinal tract and thus giving an opportunity to target them for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. This modality also provides a real time opportunity to target the required area while avoiding adjacent vascular and other structures. Therapeutic EUS has found role in management of pancreatic fluid collections, biliary and pancreatic duct drainage in cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, drainage of gallbladder, celiac plexus neurolysis/blockage, drainage of mediastinal and intra-abdominal abscesses and collections and in targeted cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Infact, therapeutic EUS has emerged as the therapy of choice for management of pancreatic pseudocysts and recent innovations like fully covered removable metallic stents have improved results in patients with organised necrosis. Similarly, EUS guided drainage of biliary tract and pancreatic duct helps drainage of these systems in patients with failed cannulation, inaccessible papilla as with duodenal/gastric obstruction or surgically altered anatomy. EUS guided gall bladder drainage is a useful emergent procedure in patients with acute cholecystitis who are not fit for surgery. EUS guided celiac plexus neurolysis and blockage is more effective and less morbid vis-à-vis the percutaneous technique. The field of interventional EUS is rapidly advancing and many more interventions are being continuously added. This review focuses on the current status of evidence vis-à-vis the established indications of therapeutic EUS. PMID:26078831

  1. New questions about steroids.

    PubMed

    Finch, C E

    1986-05-01

    After years of research on the effects of steroids on development, recent reports indicate that prolonged physiologic doses of steroids may damage brains of adult rodents. For example, corticosteroids kill specific neurons in the hippocampus, the same cells that die off during aging. Female rodents given steroids exhibit pituitary tumors that affect prolactin and luteinizing hormone: a process that can be prevented by ovariectomy. Further, removing the pituitary retards several aspects of aging in rodents. Detailed actions of steroids on humans differ significantly from those in rodents. No clinical research on these lines has been done. The author estimates that 50-100 million people in the U.S. have taken steroids, either contraceptive or postmenopausal estrogens, corticosteroids, or androgens daily for 5 or more years. Many athletes have self-administered extraordinarily high doses of androgens. The consequences of this intake are unknown. These considerations prompt future research on the effect of stress hormones on brain cells, in particular the hippocampus, affected by Alzheimer's disease. Meanwhile, in the absence of any definite information, clinicians should prescribe the lowest effective doses of steroids.

  2. Anabolic steroid abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kirk J

    2002-10-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are mainly used to treat androgen deficiency syndromes and, more recently, catabolic states such as AIDS-associated wasting. There is no evidence in the reviewed literature that AAS abuse or dependence develops from the therapeutic use of AAS. Conversely, 165 instances of AAS dependence have been reported among weightlifters and bodybuilders who, as part of their weight training regimens, chronically administered supraphysiologic doses, often including combinations of injected and oral AAS as well as other drugs of abuse. A new model is proposed in which both the "myoactive" and psychoactive effects of AAS contribute to the development of AAS dependence. The adverse consequences of AAS are reviewed, as well as their assessment by means of a history and physical, mental status examination, and laboratory testing. When patients with AAS use disorders are compared with patients with other substance use disorders, both similarities and differences become apparent and have implications for treatment.

  3. Pharmacology of anabolic steroids

    PubMed Central

    Kicman, A T

    2008-01-01

    Athletes and bodybuilders have recognized for several decades that the use of anabolic steroids can promote muscle growth and strength but it is only relatively recently that these agents are being revisited for clinical purposes. Anabolic steroids are being considered for the treatment of cachexia associated with chronic disease states, and to address loss of muscle mass in the elderly, but nevertheless their efficacy still needs to be demonstrated in terms of improved physical function and quality of life. In sport, these agents are performance enhancers, this being particularly apparent in women, although there is a high risk of virilization despite the favourable myotrophic–androgenic dissociation that many xenobiotic steroids confer. Modulation of androgen receptor expression appears to be key to partial dissociation, with consideration of both intracellular steroid metabolism and the topology of the bound androgen receptor interacting with co-activators. An anticatabolic effect, by interfering with glucocorticoid receptor expression, remains an attractive hypothesis. Behavioural changes by non-genomic and genomic pathways probably help motivate training. Anabolic steroids continue to be the most common adverse finding in sport and, although apparently rare, designer steroids have been synthesized in an attempt to circumvent the dope test. Doping with anabolic steroids can result in damage to health, as recorded meticulously in the former German Democratic Republic. Even so, it is important not to exaggerate the medical risks associated with their administration for sporting or bodybuilding purposes but to emphasize to users that an attitude of personal invulnerability to their adverse effects is certainly misguided. PMID:18500378

  4. Prophylactic steroid administration for strictures after endoscopic resection of large superficial esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Tomohiro; Yano, Tomonori; Kato, Tomoji; Imajoh, Maomi; Noguchi, Masaaki; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Osera, Shozo; Yoda, Yusuke; Oono, Yasuhiro; Ikematsu, Hiroaki; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: One of the major complications after endoscopic resection (ER) for large superficial esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is benign esophageal stricture, which can reduce quality of life even if ESCC achieves a cure without organ resection. Recently, steroid administration has been reported as a prophylactic treatment to prevent esophageal strictures. This retrospective study evaluated the stricture rate according to the different width of mucosal defects due to ER and compared it to that seen with prophylactic steroid administration. Patients and methods: Between June 2007 and December 2013, we enrolled patients with ESCC who had 3/4 or larger circumferential mucosal defects due to ER. In December 2009, steroid injections (triamcinolone acetonide 50 mg) into the ulcer bed due to ER were introduced. Beginning in November 2012, we commenced oral steroid administration (prednisolone 30 mg/day, tapered gradually for 8 weeks) in addition to steroid injection. Patients were classified into 3 groups according to the width of mucosal defect after ER (Group A, ≥ 3/4 and < 7/8; Group B, ≥ 7/8 and less than the entire circumference; and Group C, the entire circumference). We retrospectively evaluated the stricture rate by comparing no treatment, steroid injection, or steroid injection followed by oral steroid according to the width of mucosal defect. Results: A total of 115 patients met the selection criteria. In Group B, no treatment had a significantly higher stricture rate (100 %, vs. steroid injection: 56 % P = 0.015; vs steroid injection followed by oral steroid: 20 % P < 0.001). Conversely, in Group C, the stricture rate was high, regardless of treatment (no treatment: 100 %; steroid injection: 100 %; steroid injection followed by oral steroid: 71 %). Conclusions: Although prophylactic steroid administration is effective to prevent strictures for 7/8 circumference or larger mucosal defects, it is

  5. Interactions of anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Kopera, H

    1993-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions, or interference between drugs and other treatments, depend on many factors and are therefore difficult to predict. However, a number are clearly established in the case of anabolic-androgenic steroids. The beneficial interactions between anabolic steroids and radiotherapy or cytostatic drugs respectively are of therapeutic value. Adjuvant treatment with anabolic compounds in patients undergoing radiation and/or cytostatic therapy is beneficial because it can prevent or reduce depression of erythropoiesis, granulopoiesis and thrombopoiesis. It also diminishes protein catabolism, supports recovery, improves the general condition of the patient and minimizes radiation sickness. Potentially adverse interactions with anabolic steroids must be expected in the case of oral anticoagulants and antidiabetic drugs, since sensitivity to each of the latter is increased. This makes it particularly advisable to monitor patients receiving either oral anticoagulants or antidiabetic treatment concurrently with anabolic drugs.

  6. Anabolic steroid boosts weight.

    PubMed

    1996-09-01

    A randomized study of nandrolone decanoate (Deca-Durabolin) showed that the anabolic steroid can increase weight in people with HIV infections. The group receiving nandrolone experienced a greater increase both in fat-free mass and body cell mass (although the latter measure did not reach statistical significance) than those on placebo. Deca-Durabolin had little to do with two occurrences of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) in the study group, but until further studies are completed, caution is advised when using this steroid in patients with KS. A new study comparing nandrolone to growth hormone in patients with wasting is slated to begin in the next 3 or 4 months.

  7. Detection of designer steroids

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaohui; Forman, Barry Marc

    2005-01-01

    Illicit use of performance-enhancing steroids has proliferated among a wide range of professional and amateur athletes. This problem has attracted broad public attention and has led the United States Congress to draft legislation that proposes frequent testing of athletes. However, current testing protocols are inadequate as athletes can evade detection by using novel steroids that are unknown to authorities. We have developed a strategy that overcomes this limitation by virtue of its ability to detect “designer steroids” without prior knowledge of their existence. PMID:16604170

  8. Mind Over Matter: Anabolic Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Matter Teaching Guide and Series / Anabolic Steroids Print Mind Over Matter: Anabolic Steroids Order Free Publication in: ... how drugs affect the brain and nervous system. Mind Over Matter is produced by the National Institute ...

  9. Cardiac effects of anabolic steroids

    PubMed Central

    Payne, J R; Kotwinski, P J; Montgomery, H E

    2004-01-01

    Anabolic steroid abuse in athletes has been associated with a wide range of adverse conditions, including hypogonadism, testicular atrophy, impaired spermatogenesis, gynaecomastia, and psychiatric disturbance. But what effect does steroid abuse have on the cardiovascular system? PMID:15084526

  10. Vertical Small-Needle Caudal Epidural Injection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Maniquis Smigel, Liza; Dean Reeves, Kenneth; Jeffrey Rosen, Howard; Patrick Rabago, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Anecdotal evidence suggests that a vertical small-needle injection method enters the caudal epidural space with comparable efficacy to cephalad-directed methods, with less intravascular injection. Objectives Assess the success rate of vertical caudal epidural injection using epidurography and the frequency of intravascular injection using a vertical small-needle approach. Patients and Methods Participants had chronic generalized non-surgical low back pain and either gluteal and/or leg pain and were enrolled in a simultaneous clinical trial assessing the analgesic effect of 5% dextrose epidural injection. A 25 gauge 3.7 cm hypodermic needle was placed at the sacral hiatus using a fingertip-guided vertical technique without imaging assistance, followed by fluoroscopic epidurography. Minimal needle redirection was allowed up to 10 degrees from the vertical plane if the initial epidurogram showed an extradural pattern, followed by repeat epidurography. Results First needle placement without imaging resulted in blood return in 1/199 participants and positive epidurography in 179/199 (90%). Minimal needle repositioning resulted in a positive epidurogram in the remaining 19 attempts. No intravascular injection patterns were observed. Conclusions This compares favorably to published success rates of fluoroscopically-guided technique and was well tolerated. Vertical caudal epidural injection may be suitable for combination with ultrasound-guided methods with Doppler flow monitoring. PMID:27826539

  11. Anabolic Steroids (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... typically spend a large amount of time and money obtaining the drugs, another sign they could be addicted. When they ... get more information? Drug Facts NIDA: Commonly Abused Drugs Chart DrugFacts: ... Report Series: Anabolic Steroid Abuse Statistics and Trends ...

  12. Steroids. A Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of School Health Education and Services.

    This guide provides information on steroid use as well as prevention and intervention strategies. It is intended to serve as a supplement to drug abuse education and prevention programs in elementary and secondary schools and as the basis for local curriculum development and instructional activities. The following topics are covered: (1) history…

  13. Embryonic modulation of maternal steroids in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Paitz, Ryan T; Bowden, Rachel M; Casto, Joseph M

    2011-01-07

    In birds, maternally derived yolk steroids are a proposed mechanism by which females can adjust individual offspring phenotype to prevailing conditions. However, when interests of mother and offspring differ, parent-offspring conflict will arise and embryonic interests, not those of the mother, should drive offspring response to maternal steroids in eggs. Because of this potential conflict, we investigated the ability of developing bird embryos to process maternally derived yolk steroids. We examined how progesterone, testosterone and oestradiol levels changed in both the yolk/albumen (YA) and the embryo of European starling eggs during the first 10 days of development. Next, we injected tritiated testosterone into eggs at oviposition to characterize potential metabolic pathways during development. Ether extractions separated organic and aqueous metabolites in both the embryo and YA homogenate, after which major steroid metabolites were identified. Results indicate that the concentrations of all three steroids declined during development in the YA homogenate. Exogenous testosterone was primarily metabolized to an aqueous form of etiocholanolone that remained in the YA. These results clearly demonstrate that embryos can modulate their local steroid environment, setting up the potential for parent-offspring conflict. Embryonic regulation must be considered when addressing the evolutionary consequences of maternal steroids in eggs.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of sulfur-containing steroids against methylmercuric chloride toxicity.

    PubMed

    Steinrauf, L K; Cox, B; Foster, E; Sattar, A; Blickenstaff, R T

    1978-12-01

    Sulfur-containing steroids, analogs, and derivatives were synthesized for evaluation in mice suffering acute toxicity from methylmercuric chloride. Steroids were administered by intraperitoneal injection, by stomach tube feeding, or by absorption through the tail skin. Thiocholesterol and the thiocholanoic acids were effective if given prior to poisoning. The thiosteroids were significantly more effective than penicillamine or dimercaprol under these conditions.

  15. Anabolic Steroids...What's the Hype?...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Gregory L.; Wagner, Lauris L.

    This pamphlet uses a question-and-answer format to examine the use and abuse of anabolic steroids. It begins by explaining that all steroids are not anabolic steroids and that anabolic steroids are those used specifically to build muscles quickly. Medical uses of anabolic steroids are reviewed; how people get steroids, how they take them, and…

  16. Long-Term Results of a Phase II Trial of Ultrasound-Guided Radioactive Implantation of the Prostate for Definitive Management of Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate (RTOG 98-05)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Hunt, Daniel; Lee, W. Robert; Gomella, Leonard; Grignon, David; Gillin, Michael; Morton, Gerard; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Sandler, Howard

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive I{sup 125} implantation of the prostate for organ confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate compared with historical data of prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy within a cooperative group setting. Methods and Materials: Patients accrued to this study had histologically confirmed, locally confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate clinical stage T1b, T1c, or T2a; no nodal or metastatic disease; prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}10 ng/ml; and a Gleason score of {<=}6. All patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided radioactive I{sup 125} seed implantation into the prostate. The prescribed dose was 145 Gy to the prostate planning target volume. Results: A total of 101 patients from 27 institutions were accrued to this protocol; by design, no single institution accrued more than 8 patients. There were 94 eligible patients. The median follow up was 8.1 years (range, 0.1-9.2 years). After 8 years, 8 patients had protocol-defined biochemical (prostate-specific antigen) failure (cumulative incidence, 8.0%); 5 patients had local failure (cumulative incidence, 5.5%); and 1 patient had distant failure (cumulative incidence, 1.1%; this patient also had biochemical failure and died of causes not related to prostate cancer). The 8-year overall survival rate was 88%. At last follow-up, no patient had died of prostate cancer or related toxicities. Three patients had maximum late toxicities of Grade 3, all of which were genitourinary. No Grade 4 or 5 toxicities were observed. Conclusions: The long-term results of this clinical trial have demonstrated that this kind of trial can be successfully completed through the RTOG and that results in terms of biochemical failure and toxicity compare very favorably with other brachytherapy published series as well as surgical and external beam radiotherapy series. In addition, the prospective, multicenter design highlights the

  17. Nonprescription Steroids on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Christen L.; Marlowe, Douglas B.; Patapis, Nicholas S.; Festinger, David S.; Forman, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the degree to which anabolic-androgenic steroids are proffered for sale over the Internet and how they are characterized on popular websites. Searches for specific steroid product labels (e.g., Dianabol) between March and June, 2006 revealed that approximately half of the websites advocated their “safe” use, and roughly one-third offered to sell them without prescriptions. The websites frequently presented misinformation about steroids and minimized their dangers. Less than 5% of the websites presented accurate health risk information about steroids or provided information to abusers seeking to discontinue their steroid use. Implications for education, prevention, treatment and policy are discussed. PMID:22080724

  18. Nonprescription steroids on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Clement, Christen L; Marlowe, Douglas B; Patapis, Nicholas S; Festinger, David S; Forman, Robert F

    2012-02-01

    This study evaluated the degree to which anabolic-androgenic steroids are proffered for sale over the Internet and how they are characterized on popular Web sites. Searches for specific steroid product labels (e.g., Dianabol) between March 2006 and June 2006 revealed that approximately half of the Web sites advocated their "safe" use, and roughly one third offered to sell them without prescriptions. The Web sites frequently presented misinformation about steroids and minimized their dangers. Less than 5% of the Web sites presented accurate health risk information about steroids or provided information to abusers seeking to discontinue their steroid use. Implications for education, prevention, treatment, and policy are discussed.

  19. Anabolic steroids and growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Haupt, H A

    1993-01-01

    Athletes are generally well educated regarding substances that they may use as ergogenic aids. This includes anabolic steroids and growth hormone. Fortunately, the abuse of growth hormone is limited by its cost and the fact that anabolic steroids are simply more enticing to the athlete. There are, however, significant potential adverse effects regarding its use that can be best understood by studying known growth hormone excess, as demonstrated in the acromegalic syndrome. Many athletes are unfamiliar with this syndrome and education of the potential consequences of growth hormone excess is important in counseling athletes considering its use. While athletes contemplating the use of anabolic steroids may correctly perceive their risks for significant physiologic effects to be small if they use the steroids for brief periods of time, many of these same athletes are unaware of the potential for habituation to the use of anabolic steroids. The result may be incessant use of steroids by an athlete who previously considered only short-term use. As we see athletes taking anabolic steroids for more prolonged periods, we are likely to see more severe medical consequences. Those who eventually do discontinue the steroids are dismayed to find that the improvements made with the steroids generally disappear and they have little to show for hours or even years of intense training beyond the psychological scars inherent with steroid use. Counseling of these athletes should focus on the potential adverse psychological consequences of anabolic steroid use and the significant risk for habituation.

  20. Therapeutic uses of contraceptive steroids.

    PubMed

    Starks, G C

    1984-09-01

    During the past 20 years, contraceptive steroids have undergone significant changes as the result of an increased understanding of their metabolic, pharmacologic, and hormonal activities. During this time, prospective and retrospective epidemiologic studies have elucidated several noncontraceptive health benefits of oral contraceptive steroids, including their therapeutic effects for endometriosis, dysmenorrhea, polycystic ovarian disease, and benign breast disease. From this review it appears that the benefits of oral contraceptive steroids in young, healthy, nonsmoking women far outweigh their more publicized, infrequent risks.

  1. Sex steroids and bone.

    PubMed

    Manolagas, S C; Kousteni, S; Jilka, R L

    2002-01-01

    The adult skeleton is periodically remodeled by temporary anatomic structures that comprise juxtaposed osteoclast and osteoblast teams and replace old bone with new. Estrogens and androgens slow the rate of bone remodeling and protect against bone loss. Conversely, loss of estrogen leads to increased rate of remodeling and tilts the balance between bone resorption and formation in favor of the former. Studies from our group during the last 10 years have elucidated that estrogens and androgens decrease the number of remodeling cycles by attenuating the birth rate of osteoclasts and osteoblasts from their respective progenitors. These effects result, in part, from the transcriptional regulation of genes responsible for osteoclastogenesis and mesenchymal cell replication and/or differentiation and are exerted through interactions of the ligand-activated receptors with other transcription factors. However, increased remodeling alone cannot explain why loss of sex steroids tilts the balance of resorption and formation in favor of the former. Estrogens and androgens also exert effects on the lifespan of mature bone cells: pro-apoptotic effects on osteoclasts but anti-apoptotic effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. These latter effects stem from a heretofore unexpected function of the classical "nuclear" sex steroid receptors outside the nucleus and result from activation of a Src/Shc/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signal transduction pathway probably within preassembled scaffolds called caveolae. Strikingly, estrogen receptor (ER) alpha or beta or the androgen receptor can transmit anti-apoptotic signals with similar efficiency, irrespective of whether the ligand is an estrogen or an androgen. More importantly, these nongenotropic, sex-nonspecific actions are mediated by the ligand-binding domain of the receptor and can be functionally dissociated from transcriptional activity with synthetic ligands. Taken together, these lines of evidence strongly suggest that

  2. Long-acting steroid contraceptive technology.

    PubMed

    Grubb, G

    1991-01-01

    Long-acting steroid contraceptive technologies that have either been recently approved or are currently under study are reviewed and the status of contraceptive research in the US is noted. The benefits and drawbacks, as well as the duration and possible cost, of each method are discussed. Approved by the Food and Drug Administration on December 10, 1990, Norplant is reportedly the first new contraceptive technology available to women in the US since the 1960s. This implant delivery system, which lasts up to 5 years, is cheaper than the pill and nearly as effective as sterilization. Study is currently under way on other multiyear, nonbiodegradable and biodegradable implants. Although already used by 4 million women worldwide, the long-acting injectable Depo-Provera has yet to be approved for use in the US. 5 new types of injectables are being developed. Steroid-containing IUDs have been in the market for some time, and current research is attempting to increase their contraceptive life beyond 1 year. Contraceptive developers are also exploring transdermal delivery systems, vaginal rings, and buccal and sublingual delivery. It is considered misleading to call Norplant the first new contraceptive introduced since the pill. Over the past 20 years, virtually every contraceptive has been significantly improved, developments that have enhanced the contraceptive options of couples. Because new contraceptive technologies are increasingly complex, their development is much slower. Consequently, it is concluded that in the foreseeable future, the demand for more acceptable contraceptives will be met through improvements of currently available technologies.

  3. Steroid hormones and BDNF.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, N; Russo, M; Santoro, A N; Litta, P; Cela, V; Genazzani, A R

    2013-06-03

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin abundantly expressed in several areas of the central nervous system (CNS) and is known to induce a lasting potentiation of synaptic efficacy, to enhance specific learning and memory processes. BDNF is one of the key molecules modulating brain plasticity and it affects cognitive deficit associated with aging and neurodegenerative disease. Several studies have shown an altered BDNF production and secretion in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases but also in mood disorders like depression, eating disorders and schizophrenia. Plasma BDNF is also a biomarker of impaired memory and general cognitive function in aging women. Gonadal steroids are involved in the regulation of several CNS processes, specifically mood, affective and cognitive functions during fertile life and reproductive