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Sample records for umeboshi dried plum

  1. Comparative effects of dried plum and dried apple on bone in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Hooshmand, Shirin; Chai, Sheau C; Saadat, Raz L; Payton, Mark E; Brummel-Smith, Kenneth; Arjmandi, Bahram H

    2011-09-01

    Aside from existing drug therapies, certain lifestyle and nutritional factors are known to reduce the risk of osteoporosis. Among the nutritional factors, dried plum or prunes (Prunus domestica L.) is the most effective fruit in both preventing and reversing bone loss. The objective of the present study was to examine the extent to which dried plum reverses bone loss in osteopenic postmenopausal women. We recruited 236 women, 1-10 years postmenopausal, not on hormone replacement therapy or any other prescribed medication known to influence bone metabolism. Qualified participants (n 160) were randomly assigned to one of the two treatment groups: dried plum (100 g/d) or dried apple (comparative control). Participants received 500 mg Ca plus 400 IU (10 μg) vitamin D daily. Bone mineral density (BMD) of lumbar spine, forearm, hip and whole body was assessed at baseline and at the end of the study using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Blood samples were collected at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months to assess bone biomarkers. Physical activity recall and 1-week FFQ were obtained at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months to examine physical activity and dietary confounders as potential covariates. Dried plum significantly increased BMD of ulna and spine in comparison with dried apple. In comparison with corresponding baseline values, only dried plum significantly decreased serum levels of bone turnover markers including bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b. The findings of the present study confirmed the ability of dried plum in improving BMD in postmenopausal women in part due to suppressing the rate of bone turnover.

  2. Physicochemical properties of whole fruit plum powders obtained using different drying technologies.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Anna; Wojdyło, Aneta; Lech, Krzysztof; Łysiak, Grzegorz P; Figiel, Adam

    2016-09-15

    Physicochemical quality parameters of plum powders obtained by applying conventional drying methods and their combination devised to process plums were evaluated. The effect of freeze-drying (FD), vacuum drying (VD), convective drying (CD), microwave-vacuum drying (MVD) and combination of convective pre-drying and microwave finish-drying (CPD-MVFD) affected physical (bulk density, porosity, colour, solubility) and chemical (polyphenolic compounds determined by UPLC and antioxidant capacity by TEAC ABTS and FRAP methods) properties of plum powders. The MVD at 1.2 W g(-1) and a novel combination for plum powders production - CPD-MVFD at 70 °C/1.2 W g(-1) allowed the best preservation of phenolic compounds and increased the efficiency of production. Results obtained support the use of MVD and its combination for better quality of dried plum products. The study proved that the determination of the browning index and HMF level (formed via Maillard reaction) might be good tool for monitoring the thermal processing of plum powders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dried plum prevents bone loss in a male osteoporosis model via IGF-I and the RANK pathway.

    PubMed

    Franklin, M; Bu, S Y; Lerner, M R; Lancaster, E A; Bellmer, D; Marlow, D; Lightfoot, S A; Arjmandi, B H; Brackett, D J; Lucas, E A; Smith, B J

    2006-12-01

    Previously, dietary supplementation with dried plums, a rich source of polyphenolic compounds with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, has been shown to improve bone density, microstructure and biomechanics in female animal models of osteopenia. We designed this study to determine the extent to which dried plum prevents skeletal deterioration in gonadal hormone deficient male animals and to begin to understand its mechanism of action. Sixty 6-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were either sham-operated (Sham = 1 group) or orchidectomized (ORX = 4 groups) and randomly assigned to dietary treatments: standard semi-purified diet (Control) with either LD = 5%, MD = 15%, or HD = 25% (w/w) dried plum for 90 days. At the end of the treatment period, both the MD and HD dried plum completely prevented the ORX-induced decrease in whole body, femur, and lumbar vertebra bone mineral density (BMD). Biomechanical testing indicated that the MD and HD of dried plum prevented the ORX-induced decrease in ultimate load of the cortical bone as well as the compressive force and stiffness of trabecular bone within the vertebrae. Analyses of trabecular microarchitecture of the distal femur metaphysis and vertebral body revealed that HD dried plum protected against the decrease in trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) induced by ORX. In the distal femur, all doses of dried plum improved trabecular number (TbN) and separation (TbSp) compared to the ORX-control group, while MD and HD dried plum prevented the ORX-induced changes in vertebral TbN and TbSp. At the end of the 90-day treatment, no remarkable changes in serum osteocalcin or alkaline phosphatase in any of the treatment groups were observed, while serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I was increased by dried plum. The ORX-induced increase in urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD) excretion was completely prevented by all doses of dried plum coinciding with down-regulation of gene expression for receptor activator of NFkappa-B ligand

  4. Dried plum products as a substitute for phosphate in chicken marinade.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Nathan; Clement, Ashley R; O'Bryan, Corliss A; Babu, Dinesh; Crandall, Philip G; Owens, Casey M; Meullenet, Jean-Francois; Ricke, Steven C

    2012-06-01

    In order to address the growing demand for more natural poultry products, alkaline phosphates commonly used in chicken breast meat marinades were replaced with plum ingredients and evaluated. For initial sensory evaluation, 200 consumers of chicken were served a small portion of the chicken breast on a plate and were asked to evaluate the product for overall impression, flavor, and texture on a 9-point hedonic scale with 1 = "dislike extremely" and 9 = "like extremely." Also, a 5-point just-about-right (JAR) scale was used on questions about tenderness, juiciness, overall flavor, and saltiness. Both hedonic and JAR demonstrated that the marinades of plum concentrate and the blend of plum fiber and powder were not distinguishable from the control (P > 0.05). Using two different percentages of fiber/powder blend, two different percentages of concentrate, sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP), and no marinade, measurements were made for marinade per cent pickup, thaw loss, and cook loss. Plum concentrate at 1.1% was most similar to STPP in marinade per cent pickup, thaw loss, drip loss, and cook loss. These results show that plum ingredients can potentially be used as a substitute in standard phosphate marinades. Consumers are increasingly demanding more natural foods with less artificial additives. This research presents the results of experiments using dried plum ingredients as a substitute for phosphates commonly used in marinades for chicken. Results indicate that dried plum ingredients may be a suitable substitute for phosphates in marinades. Journal of Food Science © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists® No claim to original US government works.

  5. A comparative study of the bone metabolic response to dried plum supplementation and PTH treatment in adult, osteopenic ovariectomized rat.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brenda J; Bu, So Young; Wang, Yan; Rendina, Elizabeth; Lim, Yin F; Marlow, Denver; Clarke, Stephen L; Cullen, Diane M; Lucas, Edralin A

    2014-01-01

    Dried plum has been reported to have potent effects on bone in osteopenic animal models, but the mechanisms through which bone metabolism is altered in vivo remain unclear. To address this issue, a study comparing the metabolic response of dried plum to the anabolic agent, parathyroid hormone (PTH), was undertaken. Six month-old female Sprague Dawley rats (n=84) were sham-operated (SHAM) or ovariectomized (OVX) and maintained on a control diet for 6wks until osteopenia was confirmed. Treatments were initiated consisting of a control diet (AIN-93M) supplemented with dried plum (0, 5, 15 or 25%; w/w) or a positive control group receiving PTH. At the end of 6wks of treatment, whole body and femoral bone mineral density (BMD) were restored by the two higher doses of dried plum to the level of the SHAM group. Trabecular bone volume and cortical thickness were also improved with these two doses of dried plum. Dried plum suppressed the OVX-induced increase in bone turnover as indicated by systemic biomarkers of bone metabolism, N-terminal procollagen type 1 (P1NP) and deoxypyridinoline (DPD). Dynamic bone histomorphometric analysis of the tibial metaphysis revealed that dried plum restored the OVX-induced increase in cancellous bone formation rate (BFR) and mineralizing surface (MS/BS) to the SHAM group, but some doses of dried plum increased endocortical mineral apposition rate (MAR). As expected, PTH significantly increased endocortical MAR and BFR, periosteal BFR, and trabecular MAR and BFR beyond that of the OVX and maintained the accelerated rate of bone resorption associated with OVX. Dried plum up-regulated bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) while down-regulating nuclear factor T cell activator 1 (Nfatc1). These findings demonstrate that in the adult osteopenic OVX animal, the effects of dried plum differ from that of PTH in that dried plum primarily suppressed bone turnover with the exception of the indices of bone

  6. Bone-Protective Effects of Dried Plum in Postmenopausal Women: Efficacy and Possible Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Arjmandi, Bahram H.; Johnson, Sarah A.; Pourafshar, Shirin; Navaei, Negin; George, Kelli S.; Hooshmand, Shirin; Chai, Sheau C.; Akhavan, Neda S.

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis is an age-related chronic disease characterized by a loss of bone mass and quality, and is associated with an increased risk of fragility fractures. Postmenopausal women are at the greatest risk of developing osteoporosis due to the cessation in ovarian hormone production, which causes accelerated bone loss. As the demographic shifts to a more aged population, a growing number of postmenopausal women will be afflicted with osteoporosis. Certain lifestyle factors, including nutrition and exercise, are known to reduce the risk of developing osteoporosis and therefore play an important role in bone health. In terms of nutrition, accumulating evidence suggests that dried plum (Prunus domestica L.) is potentially an efficacious intervention for preventing and reversing bone mass and structural loss in an ovariectomized rat model of osteoporosis, as well as in osteopenic postmenopausal women. Here, we provide evidence supporting the efficacy of dried plum in preventing and reversing bone loss associated with ovarian hormone deficiency in rodent models and in humans. We end with the results of a recent follow-up study demonstrating that postmenopausal women who previously consumed 100 g dried plum per day during our one-year clinical trial conducted five years earlier retained bone mineral density to a greater extent than those receiving a comparative control. Additionally, we highlight the possible mechanisms of action by which bioactive compounds in dried plum exert bone-protective effects. Overall, the findings of our studies and others strongly suggest that dried plum in its whole form is a promising and efficacious functional food therapy for preventing bone loss in postmenopausal women, with the potential for long-lasting bone-protective effects. PMID:28505102

  7. The effect of two doses of dried plum on bone density and bone biomarkers in osteopenic postmenopausal women: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hooshmand, S; Kern, M; Metti, D; Shamloufard, P; Chai, S C; Johnson, S A; Payton, M E; Arjmandi, B H

    2016-07-01

    Daily consumption of 50 g of dried plum (equivalent to 5-6 dried plums) for 6 months may be as effective as 100 g of dried plum in preventing bone loss in older, osteopenic postmenopausal women. To some extent, these results may be attributed to the inhibition of bone resorption with the concurrent maintenance of bone formation. The objective of our current study was to examine the possible dose-dependent effects of dried plum in preventing bone loss in older osteopenic postmenopausal women. Forty-eight osteopenic women (65-79 years old) were randomly assigned into one of three treatment groups for 6 months: (1) 50 g of dried plum; (2) 100 g of dried plum; and (3) control. Total body, hip, and lumbar bone mineral density (BMD) were evaluated at baseline and 6 months using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Blood biomarkers including bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-5b), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and sclerostin were measured at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), calcium, phosphorous, and vitamin D were measured at baseline and 6 months. Both doses of dried plum were able to prevent the loss of total body BMD compared with that of the control group (P < 0.05). TRAP-5b, a marker of bone resorption, decreased at 3 months and this was sustained at 6 months in both 50 and 100 g dried plum groups (P < 0.01 and P < 0.04, respectively). Although there were no significant changes in BAP for either of the dried plum groups, the BAP/TRAP-5b ratio was significantly (P < 0.05) greater at 6 months in both dried plum groups whereas there were no changes in the control group. These results confirm the ability of dried plum to prevent the loss of total body BMD in older osteopenic postmenopausal women and suggest that a lower dose of dried plum (i.e., 50 g) may be

  8. Select polyphenolic fractions from dried plum enhance osteoblast activity through BMP-2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Graef, Jennifer L; Rendina-Ruedy, Elizabeth; Crockett, Erica K; Ouyang, Ping; King, Jarrod B; Cichewicz, Robert H; Lucas, Edralin A; Smith, Brenda J

    2018-05-01

    Dried plum supplementation has been shown to enhance bone formation while suppressing bone resorption. Evidence from previous studies has demonstrated that these responses can be attributed in part to the fruit's polyphenolic compounds. The purpose of this study was to identify the most bioactive polyphenolic fractions of dried plum with a focus on their osteogenic activity and to investigate their mechanisms of action under normal and inflammatory conditions. Utilizing chromatographic techniques, six fractions of polyphenolic compounds were prepared from a crude extract of dried plum. Initial screening assays revealed that two fractions (DP-FrA and DP-FrB) had the greatest osteogenic potential. Subsequent experiments using primary bone-marrow-derived osteoblast cultures demonstrated these two fractions enhanced extracellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an indicator of osteoblast activity, and mineralized nodule formation under normal conditions. Both fractions enhanced bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, as indicated by increased Bmp2 and Runx2 gene expression and protein levels of phosphorylated Smad1/5. DP-FrB was most effective at up-regulating Tak1 and Smad1, as well as protein levels of phospho-p38. Under inflammatory conditions, TNF-α suppressed ALP and tended to decrease nodule formation (P=.0674). This response coincided with suppressed gene expression of Bmp2 and the up-regulation of Smad6, an inhibitor of BMP signaling. DP-FrA and DP-FrB partially normalized these responses. Our results show that certain fractions of polyphenolic compounds in dried plum up-regulate osteoblast activity by enhancing BMP signaling, and when this pathway is inhibited by TNF-α, the osteogenic response is attenuated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The functionality of plum ingredients in meat products: a review.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Nathan; O'Bryan, Corliss A; Ricke, Steven C; Crandall, Philip G

    2015-04-01

    Dried plums (prunes) have been marketed to consumers for consumption directly from the package as a convenient snack and have been reported to have broad health benefits. Only recently have fractionated, dried plum ingredients been investigated for their functionality in food and feed products. Dried plum puree, dried plum fiber, dried plum powder, dried plum concentrate, and fresh plum concentrate have been investigated to date. They have been evaluated as fat replacers in baked goods, antioxidants in meat formulations, phosphate replacers in chicken marinades, and antimicrobials in food systems. Overall, dried plum products have been shown to be effective at reducing lipid oxidation and show promise as antimicrobials. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Dried plum diet protects from bone loss caused by ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Shahnazari, M.; Alwood, J. S.; Truong, T. A.; Tahimic, C. G. T.; Limoli, C. L.; Turner, N. D.; Halloran, B.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss caused by ionizing radiation is a potential health concern for radiotherapy patients, radiation workers and astronauts. In animal studies, exposure to ionizing radiation increases oxidative damage in skeletal tissues, and results in an imbalance in bone remodeling initiated by increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Therefore, we evaluated various candidate interventions with antioxidant or anti-inflammatory activities (antioxidant cocktail, dihydrolipoic acid, ibuprofen, dried plum) both for their ability to blunt the expression of resorption-related genes in marrow cells after irradiation with either gamma rays (photons, 2 Gy) or simulated space radiation (protons and heavy ions, 1 Gy) and to prevent bone loss. Dried plum was most effective in reducing the expression of genes related to bone resorption (Nfe2l2, Rankl, Mcp1, Opg, TNF-α) and also preventing later cancellous bone decrements caused by irradiation with either photons or heavy ions. Thus, dietary supplementation with DP may prevent the skeletal effects of radiation exposures either in space or on Earth. PMID:26867002

  11. Dried plum diet protects from bone loss caused by ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schreurs, A. -S.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Shahnazari, M.

    Bone loss caused by ionizing radiation is a potential health concern for radiotherapy patients, radiation workers and astronauts. In animal studies, exposure to ionizing radiation increases oxidative damage in skeletal tissues, and results in an imbalance in bone remodeling initiated by increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Therefore, we evaluated various candidate interventions with antioxidant or antiinflammatory activities (antioxidant cocktail, dihydrolipoic acid, ibuprofen, dried plum) both for their ability to blunt the expression of resorption-related genes in marrow cells after irradiation with either gamma rays (photons, 2 Gy) or simulated space radiation (protons and heavy ions, 1 Gy) and to prevent bone loss.more » Dried plum was most effective in reducing the expression of genes related to bone resorption ( Nfe2l2, Rankl, Mcp1, Opg, TNF-α) and also preventing later cancellous bone decrements caused by irradiation with either photons or heavy ions. Furthermore, dietary supplementation with DP may prevent the skeletal effects of radiation exposures either in space or on Earth.« less

  12. Dried plum diet protects from bone loss caused by ionizing radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Schreurs, A. -S.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Shahnazari, M.; ...

    2016-02-11

    Bone loss caused by ionizing radiation is a potential health concern for radiotherapy patients, radiation workers and astronauts. In animal studies, exposure to ionizing radiation increases oxidative damage in skeletal tissues, and results in an imbalance in bone remodeling initiated by increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Therefore, we evaluated various candidate interventions with antioxidant or antiinflammatory activities (antioxidant cocktail, dihydrolipoic acid, ibuprofen, dried plum) both for their ability to blunt the expression of resorption-related genes in marrow cells after irradiation with either gamma rays (photons, 2 Gy) or simulated space radiation (protons and heavy ions, 1 Gy) and to prevent bone loss.more » Dried plum was most effective in reducing the expression of genes related to bone resorption ( Nfe2l2, Rankl, Mcp1, Opg, TNF-α) and also preventing later cancellous bone decrements caused by irradiation with either photons or heavy ions. Furthermore, dietary supplementation with DP may prevent the skeletal effects of radiation exposures either in space or on Earth.« less

  13. Influence of combined pretreatments on color parameters during convective drying of Mirabelle plum ( Prunus domestica subsp. syriaca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghannya, Jalal; Gorbani, Rasoul; Ghanbarzadeh, Babak

    2017-07-01

    Discoloration and browning are caused primarily by various reactions, including Maillard condensation of hexoses and amino components, phenol polymerization and pigment destruction. Convective drying can be combined with various pretreatments to help reduce undesired color changes and improve color parameters of dried products. In this study, effects of ultrasound-assisted osmotic dehydration as a pretreatment before convective drying on color parameters of Mirabelle plum were investigated. Variations of L* (lightness), a* (redness/greenness), b* (yellowness/blueness), total color change (ΔE), chroma, hue angle and browning index values were presented versus drying time during convective drying of control and pretreated Mirabelle plums as influenced by ultrasonication time, osmotic solution concentration and immersion time in osmotic solution. Samples pretreated with ultrasound for 30 min and osmotic solution concentration of 70% had a more desirable color among all other pretreated samples, with the closest L*, a* and b* values to the fresh one, showing that ultrasound and osmotic dehydration are beneficial to the color of final products after drying.

  14. 7 CFR 993.162 - Voluntary prune plum diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED... dried weight equivalent of prune plums so diverted on a dryaway basis as follows: (1) For prune plums of..., which would not, under normal producer practices, be dried and delivered to a handler. On or before July...

  15. 7 CFR 993.162 - Voluntary prune plum diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED... dried weight equivalent of prune plums so diverted on a dryaway basis as follows: (1) For prune plums of..., which would not, under normal producer practices, be dried and delivered to a handler. On or before July...

  16. 7 CFR 993.162 - Voluntary prune plum diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED... dried weight equivalent of prune plums so diverted on a dryaway basis as follows: (1) For prune plums of..., which would not, under normal producer practices, be dried and delivered to a handler. On or before July...

  17. 7 CFR 993.162 - Voluntary prune plum diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED... dried weight equivalent of prune plums so diverted on a dryaway basis as follows: (1) For prune plums of..., which would not, under normal producer practices, be dried and delivered to a handler. On or before July...

  18. Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Properties of Powders Obtained from Different Plum Juice Formulations.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Anna; Wojdyło, Aneta; Łysiak, Grzegorz P; Figiel, Adam

    2017-01-17

    Among popular crops, plum ( Prunus domestica L.) has received special attention due to its health-promoting properties. The seasonality of this fruit makes it impossible to consume it throughout the year, so new products in a powder form may offer an alternative to fresh consumption and may be used as high-quality natural food ingredients. A 100% plum (cultivar "Valor") juice was mixed with three different concentrations of maltodextrin or subjected to sugars removal by amberlite-XAD column, and dried using the freeze, spray, and vacuum (40, 60, and 80 °C) drying techniques. The identification and quantification of phenolic acids, flavonols, and anthocyanins in plum powders was performed by LC-MS QTof and UPLC-PDA, respectively. l-ascorbic acid, hydroxymethylfurfural, and antioxidant capacity were measured by the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) ABTS and ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) methods in order to compare the influence of the drying methods on product quality. The results indicated that the profile of polyphenolic compounds in the plum juice powders significantly differed from the whole plum powders. The drying of a sugar free plum extract resulted in higher content of polyphenolic compounds, l-ascorbic acid and antioxidant capacity, but lower content of hydroxymethylfurfural, regardless of drying method applied. Thus, the formulation of plum juice before drying and the drying method should be carefully selected in order to obtain high-quality powders.

  19. New model for colour kinetics of plum under infrared vacuum condition and microwave drying.

    PubMed

    Chayjan, Reza Amiri; Alaei, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Quality of dried foods is affected by the drying method and physiochemical changes in tissue. The drying method affects properties such as colour. The colour of processed food is one of the most important quality indices and plays a determinant role in consumer acceptability of food materials and the processing method. The colour of food materials can be used as an indirect factor to determine changes in quality, since it is simpler and faster than chemical methods. The study focused on the kinetics of colour changes of plum slices, under infrared vacuum and microwave conditions. Drying the samples was implemented at the absolute pressures of 20 and 60 kPa, drying temperatures of 50 and 60°C and microwave power of 90, 270, 450 and 630 W. Colour changes were quantified by the tri-stimulus L* (whiteness/darkness), a* (redness/greenness) and b* (yellowness/blueness) model, which is an international standard for color measurement developed by the Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE). These values were also used to calculate total colour change (∆E), chroma, hue angle, and browning index (BI). A new model was used for mathematical modelling of colour change kinetics. The drying process changed the colour parameters of L*, a*, and b*, causing a colour shift toward the darker region. The values of L* and hue angle decreased, whereas the values of a*, b*, ∆E, chroma and browning index increased during exposure to infrared vacuum conditions and microwave drying. Comparing the results obtained using the new model with two conventional models of zero-order and first-order kinetics indicated that the new model presented more compatibility with the data of colour kinetics for all colour parameters and drying conditions. All kinetic changes in colour parameters can be explained by the new model presented in this study. The hybrid drying system included infrared vacuum conditions and microwave power for initial slow drying of plum slices and provided the desired

  20. Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Properties of Powders Obtained from Different Plum Juice Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Michalska, Anna; Wojdyło, Aneta; Łysiak, Grzegorz P.; Figiel, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Among popular crops, plum (Prunus domestica L.) has received special attention due to its health-promoting properties. The seasonality of this fruit makes it impossible to consume it throughout the year, so new products in a powder form may offer an alternative to fresh consumption and may be used as high-quality natural food ingredients. A 100% plum (cultivar “Valor”) juice was mixed with three different concentrations of maltodextrin or subjected to sugars removal by amberlite-XAD column, and dried using the freeze, spray, and vacuum (40, 60, and 80 °C) drying techniques. The identification and quantification of phenolic acids, flavonols, and anthocyanins in plum powders was performed by LC-MS QTof and UPLC-PDA, respectively. l-ascorbic acid, hydroxymethylfurfural, and antioxidant capacity were measured by the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) ABTS and ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) methods in order to compare the influence of the drying methods on product quality. The results indicated that the profile of polyphenolic compounds in the plum juice powders significantly differed from the whole plum powders. The drying of a sugar free plum extract resulted in higher content of polyphenolic compounds, l-ascorbic acid and antioxidant capacity, but lower content of hydroxymethylfurfural, regardless of drying method applied. Thus, the formulation of plum juice before drying and the drying method should be carefully selected in order to obtain high-quality powders. PMID:28106740

  1. Pitless plum: reality or fantasy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Luther Burbank began a breeding program to produce stoneless plums (Prunus domestica) over 100 years ago. He released two plums, 'Miracle' and 'Conquest', whose fruit contained only a very small part of the stone. These plums are no longer available. In today's world of convenience, a plum that d...

  2. Inheritance of plum pox virus resistance in transgenic plums

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have studied the heritability of the virus transgene engineered in 'HoneySweet' plum through different cross-hybridization with two commercial cultivars of Prunus domestica (Prunier d’Ente 303 and Quetsche 2906) and one wild species, P. spinosa 2862, rootstock using 'HoneySweet' plum as the polle...

  3. 'HoneySweet' (C5), the first genetically engineered Plum pox virus-resistant plum (Prunus domestica L.) cultivar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ‘HoneySweet’ plum was released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, to provide U.S. growers and P. domestica plum breeders with a high fruit quality plum cultivar resistant to Plum pox virus (PPV). ‘HoneySweet’ was developed through genetic engineering utilizing the...

  4. 33 CFR 117.615 - Plum Island River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.615 Plum Island River. The draw of the Plum Island Turnpike Bridge, mile 3.3 between Newburyport and Plum Island, shall operate as... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Plum Island River. 117.615...

  5. 33 CFR 117.615 - Plum Island River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.615 Plum Island River. The draw of the Plum Island Turnpike Bridge, mile 3.3 between Newburyport and Plum Island, shall operate as... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Plum Island River. 117.615...

  6. 33 CFR 117.615 - Plum Island River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.615 Plum Island River. The draw of the Plum Island Turnpike Bridge, mile 3.3 between Newburyport and Plum Island, shall operate as... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Plum Island River. 117.615...

  7. 33 CFR 117.615 - Plum Island River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.615 Plum Island River. The draw of the Plum Island Turnpike Bridge, mile 3.3 between Newburyport and Plum Island, shall operate as... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plum Island River. 117.615...

  8. 33 CFR 117.615 - Plum Island River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.615 Plum Island River. The draw of the Plum Island Turnpike Bridge, mile 3.3 between Newburyport and Plum Island, shall operate as... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Plum Island River. 117.615...

  9. Development and deregulation of the plum pox virus resistant transgenic plum 'HoneySweet'

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have demonstrated that genetic engineering can be an important source of high level and durable resistance against Plum pox virus (PPV). We have shown, through a number of field studies, the environmental safety of this genetically engineered plum. Nevertheless, the utilization of this demonstr...

  10. 21 CFR 145.185 - Canned plums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... “golden” or “red” or “purple”, as appropriate, or the specific name of the variety or “Greengage plums... tree or other harmless extraneous plant material per 200 grams (7 ounces) of drained plums. (v) Loose pits in whole style. Not more than three loose pits per 500 grams (17.6 ounces) of drained plums. (vi...

  11. 21 CFR 145.185 - Canned plums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... “golden” or “red” or “purple”, as appropriate, or the specific name of the variety or “Greengage plums... tree or other harmless extraneous plant material per 200 grams (7 ounces) of drained plums. (v) Loose pits in whole style. Not more than three loose pits per 500 grams (17.6 ounces) of drained plums. (vi...

  12. 21 CFR 145.185 - Canned plums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... “golden” or “red” or “purple”, as appropriate, or the specific name of the variety or “Greengage plums... tree or other harmless extraneous plant material per 200 grams (7 ounces) of drained plums. (v) Loose pits in whole style. Not more than three loose pits per 500 grams (17.6 ounces) of drained plums. (vi...

  13. 21 CFR 145.185 - Canned plums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... “golden” or “red” or “purple”, as appropriate, or the specific name of the variety or “Greengage plums... tree or other harmless extraneous plant material per 200 grams (7 ounces) of drained plums. (v) Loose pits in whole style. Not more than three loose pits per 500 grams (17.6 ounces) of drained plums. (vi...

  14. Plum orchards can remain Plum pox virus free for the life of the orchard

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plum pox virus (PPV), the cause of sharka disease, is a quarantine virus pathogen that can cause devastating losses mainly to plum. Estimated costs associated with sharka management worldwide in the last 30 years exceeded 10 billion Euros. To prevent the spread of PPV, we suggest three requirement...

  15. Sugars and organic acids in plum fruit affected by Plum pox virus.

    PubMed

    Usenik, Valentina; Marn, Mojca Virscek

    2017-05-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) causes severe economic losses in stone fruit production, but little is known about its effect on plum fruit composition. In this study, the influence of PPV on sugars and organic acids was evaluated in a susceptible plum (Prunus domestica L.) cultivar. PPV infection significantly affected the content and composition of sugars and organic acids. The composition of necrotic tissue was modified the most. A short-time infected tree yielded fruit with similar sugar composition to fruit from a healthy tree, but the decline of organic acids was faster. Prematurely ripened symptomatic fruit had reduced fruit weight and low sugar content. Infected trees of the studied cultivar produce fruit of inferior quality. Fruits are not suitable for processing, especially when most of them exhibit visual symptoms of PPV infection. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Impact of insecticide and fungicide residue contact on plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), mobility and mortality: implications for pest management

    PubMed Central

    Leskey, Tracy C; Wright, Starker E; Saguez, Julien; Vincent, Charles

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND An evaluation was made of the effects of seven neurotoxic insecticides (esfenvalerate, indoxacarb, clothianidin, thiacloprid, azinphosmethyl, phosmet and imidacloprid), one insect growth regulator (novaluron) and two fungicides (myclobutanin and mancozeb), with water as the control, on the horizontal mobility of plum curculios exposed to dried pesticide residues. Mobility was recorded over a 2 h period using ethological tracking software. Mortality was recorded immediately after horizontal mobility experiments and 24 h later. RESULTS Esfenvalerate had the greatest impact on mobility. Immediately after exposure to this compound, plum curculios moved significantly greater distances and for a significantly longer period of time compared with all other compounds. After 24 h, esfenvalerate also led to high mortality rates (>86.0%). Exposure to azinphosmethyl and phosmet also led to high rates of mortality, although the impact on mobility was less pronounced. Exposure to indoxacarb, thiacloprid, imidacloprid, novaluron, myclobutanin and mancozeb had no impact on mobility and resulted in little to no mortality. Clothianidin affected mobility after a 2 h exposure period, and high mortality (60%) was recorded after 24 h. CONCLUSIONS The results indicate that, in the context of a treated orchard, plum curculios exposed to dried pesticide residues may be capable of foraging before succumbing to toxicant exposure, while exposure to pesticides such as esfenvalerate may rapidly incapacitate adult plum curculios. PMID:23213003

  17. Changes in polyphenolics during maturation of Java plum (Syzygium cumini Lam.).

    PubMed

    Lestario, Lydia Ninan; Howard, Luke R; Brownmiller, Cindi; Stebbins, Nathan B; Liyanage, Rohana; Lay, Jackson O

    2017-10-01

    Java plum (Syzygium cumini Lam.) is a rich source of polyphenolics with many purported health benefits, but the effect of maturation on polyphenolic content is unknown. Freeze-dried samples of Java plum from seven different maturity stages were analyzed for anthocyanin, flavonol, flavanonol and hydrolysable tannin composition by HPLC. Anthocyanins were first detected at the green-pink stage of maturity and increased throughout maturation with the largest increase occurring from the dark purple to black stages of maturation. Levels of gallotannins, ellagitannins, flavonols, gallic acid and ellagic acid were highest at early stages of maturation and decreased as the fruit ripened. For production of antioxidant-rich nutraceutical ingredients, fruit should be harvested immature to obtain extracts rich in hydrolysable tannins and flavonols. The exceptional anthocyanin content of black fruit may prove useful as a source of a natural colorant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Buchanania obovata: Functionality and Phytochemical Profiling of the Australian Native Green Plum.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, Selina A; Netzel, Gabriele; Netzel, Michael E; Sultanbawa, Yasmina

    2018-05-04

    The green plum is the fruit of Buchanania obovata Engl. and is an Australian Indigenous bush food. Very little study has been done on the green plum, so this is an initial screening study of the functional properties and phytochemical profile found in the flesh and seed. The flesh was shown to have antimicrobial properties effective against gram negative ( Escherichia coli 9001—NCTC) and gram positive ( Staphylococcus aureus 6571—NCTC) bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy analysis shows that the antimicrobial activity causes cell wall disintegration and cytoplasmic leakage in both bacteria. Antioxidant 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) testing shows the flesh has high radical scavenging activity (106.3 ± 28.6 μM Trolox equivalant/g Dry Weight in methanol). The flesh and seed contain a range of polyphenols including gallic acid, ellagic acid, p-coumaric acid, kaempferol, quercetin and trans-ferulic acid that may be responsible for this activity. The seed is eaten as a bush food and contains a delphinidin-based anthocyanin. The green plum has potential as a functional ingredient in food products for its antimicrobial and antioxidant activity, and further investigation into its bioactivity, chemical composition and potential applications in different food products is warranted.

  19. Hairpin plum pox virus coat protein (hpPPV-CP) structure in 'HoneySweet' C5 plum provides PPV resistance when genetically engineered into plum (Prunus domestica) seedlings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genetically engineered plum 'HoneySweet' (aka C5) has proven to be highly resistant to Plum pox virus (PPV) for over 10 years in field trials. The original vector used for transformation to develop 'HoneySweet' carried a single sense sequence of the full length PPV coat protein (ppv-cp) gene, y...

  20. Space Pomology: Dwarf Plums for Fresh Food Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, LaShelle; Graham, Thomas; Stutte, Gary; Massa, Gioia; Mickens, Matthew; Wheeler, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Recently, USDA ARS researchers genetically modified plums for rapid breeding work and noticed the plants could flower and develop fruit rapidly on relatively small plants. We have tested several of these genetically modified (GM) plums in plant chambers to assess their potential as a space crop. We have been able to clone these genetic lines using cuttings that are rooted using growth regulating compounds. Results showed that the GM plums indeed flower and fruit on small plants in controlled environments similar to what might be used in space, but they require cross-pollination with pollen from a standard plum. Analysis of stomatal conductance and leaf transpiration showed that water use went up in the light period, as expected, and but that GM types typically showed higher conductance than a standard plum. Analysis of tissue showed that fruit could be a good source of potassium and phenolic compounds, which could be beneficial as a bone loss countermeasure (Smith et al., 2014). These findings are all promising for using dwarf GM plums as a supplemental food for space, but further horticultural testing is needed before they are ready.

  1. Plum Brook Station Open House - 2016

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-11

    Astronaut Sunita Williams gives a talk at NASA's Plum Brook Station. In June, NASA Glenn hosted an Open House at Plum Brook Station in Sandusky to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Center. Thousands of people attended, and some lucky kids got to see awesome experiments and meet astronaut Suni Williams.

  2. Plum coatings of lemongrass oil-incorporating carnauba wax-based nanoemulsion.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Hah; Lee, Hanna; Kim, Jung Eun; Song, Kyung Bin; Lee, Youn Suk; Chung, Dae Sung; Min, Sea C

    2013-10-01

    Nanoemulsions containing lemongrass oil (LO) were developed for coating plums and the effects of the nanoemulsion coatings on the microbial safety and physicochemical storage qualities of plums during storage at 4 and 25 °C were investigated. The emulsions used for coating were produced by mixing a carnauba wax-based solution (18%, w/w) with LO at various concentrations (0.5% to 4.0%, w/w) using dynamic high pressure processing at 172 MPa. The coatings were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7 and their ability to preserve various physicochemical qualities of plums. Uniform and continuous coatings on plums, formed with stable emulsions, initially inhibited S. Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 by 0.2 to 2.8 and 0.8 to 2.7 log CFU/g, respectively, depending on the concentration of LO and the sequence of coating. The coatings did not significantly alter the flavor, fracturability, or glossiness of the plums. The antimicrobial effects of the coatings against S. Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 were demonstrated during storage at 4 and 25 °C. The coatings reduced weight loss and ethylene production by approximately 2 to 3 and 1.4 to 4.0 fold, respectively, and also retarded the changes in lightness and the concentration of phenolic compounds in plums during storage. The firmness of coated plums was generally higher than uncoated plums when stored at 4 °C and plum respiration rates were reduced during storage. Coatings containing nanoemulsions of LO have the potential to inhibit Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 contamination of plums and may extend plum shelf life. Journal of Food Science © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists® No claim to original US government works.

  3. Analysis of GMO Plum Plant Culture in System Operations Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercado, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    GMO plum trees are being evaluated at the Kennedy Space Center as a possible candidate for future space crops. Previously conducted horticultural testing compared the performance of several plum genotypes in controlled environment chambers, resulting in a down-selection to the NASA-11 genotype. Precursory studies determined the water use requirements to sustain the plants as well as the feasibility of grafting non-GMO plum scions onto GMO plum rootstocks of NASA-5, NASA-10, and NASA-11 genotypes. This study follows the growth and horticultural progress of plum trees and in-vitro cultures from August 2017 to November 2017, and provides supplemental support for future GMO plum studies. The presence of Hurricane Irma in early September 2017 resulted in the plants undergoing material deterioration from major changes to their overall horticultural progress.

  4. Home garden plums

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The paper is to provide extension information on plums for home owners in Georgia and other Southeastern states. It includes seven sections: introduction, varieties, planting, pruning, fertilization, pests/diseases, and long term care....

  5. 75 FR 81087 - Plum Pox Virus; Update of Quarantined Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    .... APHIS-2010-0089] Plum Pox Virus; Update of Quarantined Areas AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule and request for comments. SUMMARY: We are amending the plum pox virus.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The plum pox virus (PPV) is an extremely serious viral disease of plants...

  6. Process and formulation effects on solar thermal drum dried prune pomace

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The processing of dried plums into prune juice and concentrate yields prune pomace as a coproduct; the pomace could potentially be utilized as a food ingredient but requires stabilization for long-term storage. Drum drying is one method that could be used to dry and stabilize prune pomace, and a dru...

  7. 7 CFR 457.157 - Plum crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Plum crop insurance provisions. 457.157 Section 457.157 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.157 Plum crop insurance...

  8. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahito; Kobayashi, Mirina; Nagaya, Masaki; Matsunari, Hitomi; Nakano, Kazuaki; Maehara, Miki; Hayashida, Gota; Takayanagi, Shuko; Sakai, Rieko; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Onodera, Masafumi; Nagashima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36-37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum.

  9. Ammonia Oxidation Plant at Plum Brook Ordnance Works

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1943-06-21

    An ammonia oxidation plant at the Plum Brook Ordnance Works near Sandusky, Ohio, which later became the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Plum Brook Station. During World War II the ordnance works produced trinitroluene (TNT), dinitrotoluene (DNT), and pentolite which were crated and shipped to an arsenal in Ravenna, Ohio. There, the explosives were packed into shells and sent to Allied forces overseas. Plum Brook was the third largest producer of TNT during World War II. Toluene, sulfuric acid, and nitric acid were used to manufacture the TNT. Nitric Acid is made by oxidizing ammonia, adding water, and concentrating it. The facility in this photograph was used for this oxidation. The structure included air compressors, filters, aftercoolers, power recovery systems, air receivers, heaters, ammonia gasifiers, gas mixers, cooler condensers, absorption columns, and bleaching columns. The Plum Brook Ordnance Works was shut down immediately after the war and remained vacant for the next ten years. NASA’s predecessor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), acquired the 500 acres of the site in 1955 to build a nuclear test reactor. By 1963, the agency had acquired the entire 9000 acres from the Army. Almost all of the military facilities were removed in the early 1960s. Plum Brook Station contained over 30 test facilities at its peak in the late 1960s. Today there are four major facilities in operation.

  10. Detection of plum pox virus infection in selection plum trees using spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, Liliya; Stoev, Antoniy; Borisova, Ekaterina; Avramov, Latchezar

    2016-01-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) is among the most studied viral diseases in the world in plants. It is considered to be one of the most devastating diseases of stone fruits in terms of agronomic impact and economic importance. Noninvasive, fast and reliable techniques are required for evaluation of the pathology in selection trees with economic impact. Such advanced tools for PPV detection could be optical techniques as light-induced fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopies. Specific regions in the electromagnetic spectra have been found to provide information about the physiological stress in plants, and consequently, diseased plants usually exhibit different spectral signature than non-stressed healthy plants in those specific ranges. In this study spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence were used for the identification of biotic stress caused by the pox virus on plum trees. The spectral responses of healthy and infected leaves from cultivars, which are widespread in Bulgaria were investigated. The two applied techniques revealed statistically significant differences between the spectral data of healthy plum leaves and those infected by PPV in the visible and near-infrared spectral ranges. Their application for biotic stress detection helps in monitoring diseases in plants using the different plant spectral properties in these spectral ranges. The strong relationship between the results indicates the applicability of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence techniques for conducting health condition assessments of vegetation and their importance for plant protection practices.

  11. Japanese plums (Prunus salicina Lindl.) and phytochemicals--breeding, horticultural practice, postharvest storage, processing and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Kent J; Topp, Bruce; Russell, Dougal; Stanley, Roger; Netzel, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Previous reviews of plum phytochemical content and health benefits have concentrated on the European plum, Prunus domestica L. However, the potential bioactivity of red- and dark red-fleshed Japanese plums, Prunus salicina Lindl., so-called blood plums, appears to warrant a significant increase in exposure, as indicated in a recent review of the whole Prunus genus. Furthermore, Japanese plums are the predominant plum produced on an international basis. In this review the nutrient and phytochemical content, breeding, horticultural practice, postharvest treatment and processing as well as bioactivity (emphasising in vivo studies) of Japanese plum are considered, with a focus on the anthocyanin content that distinguishes the blood plums. © 2014 State of Queensland Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. 7 CFR 503.4 - Conformity with Plum Island regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conformity with Plum Island regulations. 503.4 Section 503.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.4 Conformity with...

  13. 7 CFR 503.4 - Conformity with Plum Island regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conformity with Plum Island regulations. 503.4 Section 503.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.4 Conformity with...

  14. 7 CFR 503.4 - Conformity with Plum Island regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conformity with Plum Island regulations. 503.4 Section 503.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.4 Conformity with...

  15. 7 CFR 503.4 - Conformity with Plum Island regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conformity with Plum Island regulations. 503.4 Section 503.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.4 Conformity with...

  16. 7 CFR 503.4 - Conformity with Plum Island regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conformity with Plum Island regulations. 503.4 Section 503.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.4 Conformity with...

  17. 76 FR 48881 - Recovery Plan for the Endangered Pyne's Ground-plum (Astragalus bibullatus

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ...] Recovery Plan for the Endangered Pyne's Ground-plum (Astragalus bibullatus) AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., announce the availability of the final recovery plan for Pyne's ground-plum (Astragalus bibullatus), a... Pyne's ground-plum as an endangered species under the Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), on September 26...

  18. Overview on the investigations of transgenic plums in Romania

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic plums of Prunus domestica L. transformed with the Plum pox virus coat protein gene (PPV-CP) were the subjects of three experiments undertaken in Romania. In the first experiment, PPV-CP transgenic clones C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, PT3 and PT5 were evaluated for Sharka resistance under high natu...

  19. Overview of the investigation of transgenic plums in Romania

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic plums of Prunus domestica L. transformed with the Plum pox virus coat protein gene (PPV-CP) were the subjects of three experiments undertaken in Romania. In the first experiment, PPV-CP transgenic clones C2, C3, C4, C5, C6 and PT3 were evaluated for Sharka resistance under high natural i...

  20. INCIDENCE AND SEVERITY OF LEAF AND FRUIT DISEASES OF PLUMS IN LATVIA.

    PubMed

    Grantina-Ievina, L; Stanke, L

    2015-01-01

    In the present study six plum orchards in Latvia were examined during 2014. One orchard was commercial with integrated pest management (IPM) practices, one was with organic management, two orchards were scientific collections and in two orchards plums were grown as a minor crop, using IPM practices. The shot-hole disease (Wilsonomyces carpophilus) and fruit rot were monitored in the field. Samples of twigs and leaves were taken for further examination if some other disease symptoms were observed. In total, 50 European plum (Prunus domestica) and six diploid plum cultivars were inspected. The fruit rot was assessed also in the laboratory to determine the latent infection with Monilinia spp. on immature fruits. Monilinia spp. isolates from all orchards were subjected to fungicide sensitivity tests. Incidence and severity of shot-hole disease was significantly different among various orchards when the same cultivar was compared, as well as between diploid and European plum cultivars. The average incidence of shot-hole disease was 41% in diploid plums and 80% in European plums, while the average severity was 9 and 15%, respectively. In the field, fruit rot caused only by Monilinia spp. was detected. The average incidence of brown rot on diploid plums was less than 1%, but on European plums it was 3.6%. The latent infection tests showed that plum fruits had higher incidence of brown rot than was observed in the field, up to 44% on particular cultivars. Additionally, from the fruits subjected to these tests, Botrytis cinerea, Diaporthe eres and Colletotrichum spp. were isolated. This means that in specific weather and management conditions the fruit rot incidence in the field could be several times higher. Examination of samples of twigs, leaves and fruits in the laboratory showed the presence of D. eres in samples from all orchards. In one of the scientific collections D. eres was isolated from twigs, leaves and fruits, and was more often found on the individuals

  1. Evaluation of the genetic diversity of Plum pox virus in a single plum tree.

    PubMed

    Predajňa, Lukáš; Šubr, Zdeno; Candresse, Thierry; Glasa, Miroslav

    2012-07-01

    Genetic diversity of Plum pox virus (PPV) and its distribution within a single perennial woody host (plum, Prunus domestica) has been evaluated. A plum tree was triply infected by chip-budding with PPV-M, PPV-D and PPV-Rec isolates in 2003 and left to develop untreated under open field conditions. In September 2010 leaf and fruit samples were collected from different parts of the tree canopy. A 745-bp NIb-CP fragment of PPV genome, containing the hypervariable region encoding the CP N-terminal end was amplified by RT-PCR from each sample and directly sequenced to determine the dominant sequence. In parallel, the PCR products were cloned and a total of 105 individual clones were sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed that after 7 years of infection, only PPV-M was still detectable in the tree and that the two other isolates (PPV-Rec and PPV-D) had been displaced. Despite the fact that the analysis targeted a relatively short portion of the genome, a substantial amount of intra-isolate variability was observed for PPV-M. A total of 51 different haplotypes could be identified from the 105 individual sequences, two of which were largely dominant. However, no clear-cut structuration of the viral population by the tree architecture could be highlighted although the results obtained suggest the possibility of intra-leaf/fruit differentiation of the viral population. Comparison of the consensus sequence with the original source isolate showed no difference, suggesting within-plant stability of this original isolate under open field conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Groundbreaking Ceremony at the NACA's Plum Brook Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1956-09-21

    Addison Rothrock, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics’s (NACA) Assistant Director of Research, speaks at the groundbreaking ceremony for the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory’s new test reactor at Plum Brook Station. This dedication event was held almost exactly one year after the NACA announced that it would build its $4.5 million nuclear reactor on 500 acres of the army’s 9000-acre Plum Brook Ordnance Works. The site was located in Sandusky, Ohio, approximately 60 miles west of the NACA Lewis laboratory in Cleveland. Lewis Director Raymond Sharp is seated to the left of Rothrock, Congressman Albert Baumhart and NACA Secretary John Victory are to the right. Many government and local officials were on hand for the press conference and ensuing luncheon. In the wake of World War II the military, the Atomic Energy Commission, and the NACA became interested in the use of atomic energy for propulsion and power. A Nuclear Division was established at NACA Lewis in the early 1950s. The division’s request for a 60-megawatt research reactor was approved in 1955. The semi-remote Plum Brook location was selected over 17 other possible sites. Construction of the Plum Brook Reactor Facility lasted five years. By the time of its first trial runs in 1961 the aircraft nuclear propulsion program had been cancelled. The space age had arrived, however, and the reactor would be used to study materials for a nuclear powered rocket.

  3. [Effect of processing on the antioxidant capacity of the plum (Prunus domestica)].

    PubMed

    Valero, Yolmar; Colina, Jhoana; Ineichen, Emilio

    2012-12-01

    Fruits are considered sources of antioxidant compounds whose properties could impair due to processing. The objective of this work was to determine the effect of blanching and osmotic dehydration on the total polyphenols content, tannins and antioxidant capacity of plums (Prunus domestica) in yellow and red varieties. The total phenolic content in plums was determined according to the Folin-Ciocalteu assay and tannins were determined by vanillin assay. The antiradical efficiency (AE) and ferric reducing power (FRP) were used to estimate the total antioxidant capacity. The content of total polyphenols and tannins were higher in the red plum. The content of polyphenols in the pulp was higher that the peel while for tannins the opposite was observed in both varieties. The red plum had higher antioxidant capacity. The AE was low and slow kinetics for the two varieties. There was a linear correlation between polyphenols and tannins with antiradical efficiency; however, there was no correlation with the reducing power. The total polyphenols content was increased with blanching, while the tannins and the AE decreased, ferric reducing power is unaffected. For osmotic dehydration, the tannins and the AE were decreased, while the total polyphenols content and ferric reducing power are unaffected. It is recommended the blanched as an alternative to consumption and conservation in the plum.

  4. Science in Flux: NASA's Nuclear Program at Plum Brook Station 1955-2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    Science in Flux traces the history of one of the most powerful nuclear test reactors in the United States and the only nuclear facility ever built by NASA. In the late 1950's NASA constructed Plum Brook Station on a vast tract of undeveloped land near Sandusky, Ohio. Once fully operational in 1963, it supported basic research for NASA's nuclear rocket program (NERVA). Plum Brook represents a significant, if largely forgotten, story of nuclear research, political change, and the professional culture of the scientists and engineers who devoted their lives to construct and operate the facility. In 1973, after only a decade of research, the government shut Plum Brook down before many of its experiments could be completed. Even the valiant attempt to redefine the reactor as an environmental analysis tool failed, and the facility went silent. The reactors lay in costly, but quiet standby for nearly a quarter-century before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission decided to decommission the reactors and clean up the site. The history of Plum Brook reveals the perils and potentials of that nuclear technology. As NASA, Congress, and space enthusiasts all begin looking once again at the nuclear option for sending humans to Mars, the echoes of Plum Brook's past will resonate with current policy and space initiatives.

  5. The effect of plum juice on the prevention of struvite calculus formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huaijun; Sun, Xizhao; Lu, Jianlin; Wang, Meihua; Fang, Yun; Ge, Weihong

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of plum juice on struvite calculus formation in vitro and to explore the effect of plum juice on urease-producing bacteria and urease activity. The compliance of available drugs is low for struvite calculus after surgical treatment and functional food may represent a good choice as an alternative therapy. Antibacterial activity was assessed using a microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility test. Urease activity was determined by measuring ammonia production. Struvite crystals were induced by Proteus mirabilis in artificial urine with natural and pH-adjusted plum juice. The optical density (OD)(600) and pH of artificial urine were examined, as well the shape and weights of crystals. Natural plum juice showed an antibacterial effect on urease-producing bacteria, whereas the pH-adjusted juice did not. A concentration-dependent inhibition on urease activity was found for both natural and pH-adjusted juice. Natural plum juice at a high concentration of 0.5% showed an obvious inhibition on the increase of OD(600) and pH of the artificial urine, and crystal formation was prevented by up to or more than 8 h, depending on the concentration of juice. Crystal weight in the natural plum juice groups was decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. The pH-adjusted plum juice did not show any effect on OD(600) and pH, although the presence of juice changed the crystal habit, indicating that the juice slowed the growth rate of crystals. Natural plum juice at high and moderate concentrations prevented the formation of P. mirabilis-induced crystals for up to 8 h in artificial urine. Although pH-adjusted and low-concentration natural juice did not prevent the occurrence of crystals, both types of juice slowed their growth rate.

  6. Performance Analysis and Portability of the PLUM Load Balancing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Gabow, Harold N.

    1998-01-01

    The ability to dynamically adapt an unstructured mesh is a powerful tool for solving computational problems with evolving physical features; however, an efficient parallel implementation is rather difficult. To address this problem, we have developed PLUM, an automatic portable framework for performing adaptive numerical computations in a message-passing environment. PLUM requires that all data be globally redistributed after each mesh adaption to achieve load balance. We present an algorithm for minimizing this remapping overhead by guaranteeing an optimal processor reassignment. We also show that the data redistribution cost can be significantly reduced by applying our heuristic processor reassignment algorithm to the default mapping of the parallel partitioner. Portability is examined by comparing performance on a SP2, an Origin2000, and a T3E. Results show that PLUM can be successfully ported to different platforms without any code modifications.

  7. Optimization of technological procedure for amygdalin isolation from plum seeds (Pruni domesticae semen)

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Ivan M.; Nikolic, Vesna D.; Savic-Gajic, Ivana M.; Nikolic, Ljubisa B.; Ibric, Svetlana R.; Gajic, Dragoljub G.

    2015-01-01

    The process of amygdalin extraction from plum seeds was optimized using central composite design (CCD) and multilayer perceptron (MLP). The effect of time, ethanol concentration, solid-to-liquid ratio, and temperature on the amygdalin content in the extracts was estimated using both mathematical models. The MLP 4-3-1 with exponential function in hidden layer and linear function in output layer was used for describing the extraction process. MLP model was more superior compared with CCD model due to better prediction ability. According to MLP model, the suggested optimal conditions are: time of 120 min, 100% (v/v) ethanol, solid-to liquid ratio of 1:25 (m/v) and temperature of 34.4°C. The predicted value of amygdalin content in the dried extract (25.42 g per 100 g) at these conditions was experimentally confirmed (25.30 g per 100 g of dried extract). Amygdalin (>90%) was isolated from the complex extraction mixture and structurally characterized by FT-IR, UV, and MS methods. PMID:25972881

  8. 75 FR 16499 - Notice of Availability of a Technical Agency Draft Recovery Plan for Pyne's Ground-Plum...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ...] Notice of Availability of a Technical Agency Draft Recovery Plan for Pyne's Ground-Plum (Astragalus... availability of the technical agency draft recovery plan for Pyne's ground-plum (Astragalus bibullatus), a...: Background We listed Pyne's ground-plum as an endangered species under the Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), on...

  9. 'HoneySweet' plum - a valuable genetically engineered fruit-tree cultivar and germplasm resource

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ‘HoneySweet’ is a plum variety developed through genetic engineering to be highly resistant to plum pox potyvirus (PPV), the causal agent of sharka disease, that threatens stone-fruit industries world-wide and most specifically, in Europe. Field testing for over 15 years in Europe has demonstrated ...

  10. 40 CFR 174.531 - Coat protein of plum pox virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coat protein of plum pox virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.531 Coat protein of plum pox virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the coat protein of plum pox virus in or on the...

  11. 40 CFR 174.531 - Coat protein of plum pox virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coat protein of plum pox virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.531 Coat protein of plum pox virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the coat protein of plum pox virus in or on the...

  12. 40 CFR 174.531 - Coat protein of plum pox virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coat protein of plum pox virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.531 Coat protein of plum pox virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the coat protein of plum pox virus in or on the...

  13. 40 CFR 174.531 - Coat protein of plum pox virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coat protein of plum pox virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.531 Coat protein of plum pox virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the coat protein of plum pox virus in or on the...

  14. 40 CFR 174.531 - Coat protein of plum pox virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coat protein of plum pox virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.531 Coat protein of plum pox virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the coat protein of plum pox virus in or on the...

  15. 77 FR 5381 - Plum Pox Compensation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... to provide for the payment of compensation to eligible owners of non-fruit-bearing ornamental tree... fruit orchards and fruit tree nurseries whose trees are required to be destroyed in order to prevent the... for treating trees or other plant material infected with plum pox, nor are there any known effective...

  16. Effect of high-hydrostatic pressure and moderate-intensity pulsed electric field on plum.

    PubMed

    García-Parra, J; González-Cebrino, F; Delgado-Adámez, J; Cava, R; Martín-Belloso, O; Élez-Martínez, P; Ramírez, R

    2018-03-01

    Moderate intensity pulse electric fields were applied in plum with the aim to increase bioactive compounds content of the fruit, while high-hydrostatic pressure was applied to preserve the purées. High-hydrostatic pressure treatment was compared with an equivalent thermal treatment. The addition of ascorbic acid during purée manufacture was also evaluated. The main objective of this study was to assess the effects on microorganisms, polyphenoloxidase, color and bioactive compounds of high-hydrostatic pressure, or thermal-processed plum purées made of moderate intensity pulse electric field-treated or no-moderate intensity pulse electric field-treated plums, after processing during storage. The application of moderate intensity pulse electric field to plums slightly increased the levels of anthocyanins and the antioxidant activity of purées. The application of Hydrostatic-high pressure (HHP) increased the levels of bioactive compounds in purées, while the thermal treatment preserved better the color during storage. The addition of ascorbic acid during the manufacture of plum purée was an important factor for the final quality of purées. The color and the bioactive compounds content were better preserved in purées with ascorbic acid. The no inactivation of polyphenoloxidase enzyme with treatments applied in this study affected the stability purées. Probably more intense treatments conditions (high-hydrostatic pressure and thermal treatment) would be necessary to reach better quality and shelf life during storage.

  17. Enhancing the polyphenol content of a red-fleshed Japanese plum (Prunus salicina Lindl.) nectar by incorporating a polyphenol-rich extract from the skins.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Dalene; Steyn, Naomi; Joubert, Elizabeth; Muller, Nina

    2012-10-01

    Plum skins are a waste product generated during production of plum juice or pulp. Polyphenols, shown to have various health-promoting properties, can be recovered from this waste product. Red-fleshed plum nectar formulations containing plum skin extract in varying amounts were characterised in terms of intensity of sensory attributes, consumer acceptability, colour, polyphenol content and antioxidant activity. Commercial beverages containing red fruits were used as benchmarks. The polyphenolic profile of the plum skin extract was similar to that of the pulp, including anthocyanins, flavonols, flavan-3-ols and a phenolic acid. Addition of the extract to plum nectar, which enhanced the colour, polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity, was limited by its negative sensory impact. The formulations were deemed acceptable by consumers, although a decrease in positive sensory attributes (plum flavour, plum aroma and sweetness) and an increase in negative sensory attributes (plant-like flavour, plant-like aroma, acidity and astringency) were observed with increasing skin extract content. The formulations compared favourably with commercial beverages in terms of colour total polyphenol content and antioxidant activity. Plum skins were successfully used to enhance the functional status of plum nectar. Use of a functional ingredient from plum skins is, therefore, a feasible value-addition strategy. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Carpoglyphus lactis (Acari: Astigmata) from various dried fruits differed in associated micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Hubert, J; Nesvorná, M; Kopecký, J; Ságová-Marečková, M; Poltronieri, P

    2015-02-01

    Carpoglyphus lactis is a stored product mite infesting saccharide-rich stored commodities including dried fruits, wine, beer, milk products, jams and honey. The association with micro-organisms can improve the survival of mites on dried fruits. The microbial communities associated with C. lactis were studied in specimens originating from the packages of dried apricot, plums and figs and compared to the laboratory strain reared on house dust mite diet (HDMd). Clone libraries of bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region were constructed and analysed by operational taxonomic unit (OTU) approach. The 16S rRNA gene libraries differed among the compared diets. The sequences classified to the genera Leuconostoc, Elizabethkingia, Ewingella, Erwinia, Bacillus and Serratia were prevailing in mites sampled from the dried fruits. The ITS library showed smaller differences between the laboratory strain on HDMd and the isolates from dried fruits packages, with the exception of the mite strain from dried plums. The population growth was used as an indirect indicator of fitness and decreased in the order from yeast diet to HDMd and dried fruits. The treatment and pretreatment of mites by antibiotics did not reveal the presence of antagonistic bacteria which might slow down the C. lactis population growth. The shifts of the microbial community in the gut of C. lactis were induced by the diet changes. The identified yeasts and bacteria are suggested as the main food source of stored product mites on dried fruits. The study describes the adaptation of C. lactis to feeding on dried fruits including the interaction with micro-organisms. We also identified potentially pathogenic bacteria carried by the mites to dried fruits for human consumption. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Gamma-irradiated dry fruits. An example of a wide variety of long-time dependent EPR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Pachova, Zdravka

    2006-03-01

    EPR spectra of dry, sugar containing fruits—raisins, sultanas, figs, dates, peaches, blue plums and chokeberry recorded before and after irradiation with gamma-rays, are reported. It is shown that weak singlet EPR line with 2.0031 ± 0.0005 can be recorded before irradiation of seeds, stones or skin of chokeberry, figs and raisins as well as flesh of blue plum, raisins and peaches. EPR signals of various shape are distinguished after irradiation in different parts of the fruits, as well as in randomly cut pieces of them: Seeds of raisins, chokeberry and figs give a singlet line. Stones from blue plums and peaches exhibit typical "cellulose-like" EPR signal consisting of an intense singlet line with g = 2.0033 ± 0.0005 and 2 week satellite lines situated ca. 30 G left and right to it. Stones of dates are the only sample in which "sugar-like" spectrum is recorded. Skin of raisins and figs exhibits "sugar-like" EPR spectrum whereas that of dates and chokeberry—a singlet line. Under the same experimental conditions skin of sultanas, peaches and blue plums are EPR silent. Flesh of raisins, sultanas, figs, dates and peaches exhibits "sugar-like" EPR spectrum, flesh of blue plums gives a singlet EPR line and that of chokeberry is EPR silent. As a result, randomly cut pieces of dry fruits suitable for EPR studies, containing various constituents, exhibit different in shape and intensity EPR spectra. Kinetic studies followed for 1 year on the time stability of all reported EPR signals indicate that intensity ratio between the simultaneously appearing EPR signals in particular fruit varies from 1:20 immediately after irradiation to 1:0.5 at the end of the period. These observations open a new possibility for identification of irradiated fruits - using the magnitude of the intensity ratio to find the approximate date of radiation processing in the first ca. 30-100 days.

  20. Behavioral and electroantennogram responses of plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar, to selected noxious plant extracts and insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Gӧkçe, A.; Stelinski, L. L.; Nortman, D. R.; Bryan, W. W.; Whalon, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Behavioral and electroantennogram responses of plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), adults were tested for several methanolic plant extracts and organically approved insecticides. Plant extracts were evaluated for their potential as antifeedants or oviposition deterrents. These extract responses were also compared to those elicited by the non-neurotoxic, organic irritant-insecticide kaolin clay. Both sexes of plum curculio exhibited antennal response as measured by electroantennogram, which ranged from 0.2 to 1.1 mV, to plant extracts and the organic irritant/insecticide, with the greatest response to the extract of rough cocklebur, Xanthium strumarium L. (1.1 mV). No choice tests were conducted to compare feeding and oviposition by plum curculio on untreated apples or on apples treated with one of the extracts or the insecticide. The insecticide pyrethrum and extracts of X. strumarium and greater burdock, Arctium lappa L., significantly reduced feeding. Also, pyrethrum , A. lappa, Humulus lupulus L. (common hop), X. strumarium, and Verbascum songaricum Schrenk extracts completely inhibited egg deposition. In no-choice assays, the effects of kaolin clay with incorporated plant extracts on plum curculio feeding and oviposition were monitored as complementary tests. A. lappa-kaolin, H. lupulus –kaolin, and X. strumarium-kaolin mixtures significantly reduced the feeding of plum curculio compared to the control or kaolin clay alone. Each of the plant extract-kaolin mixtures evaluated, with the exception of Bifora radians Bieberstein (wild bishop), completely inhibited plum curculio oviposition as compared to controls. PMID:25368046

  1. PLUM: Parallel Load Balancing for Adaptive Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Mesh adaption is a powerful tool for efficient unstructured-grid computations but causes load imbalance among processors on a parallel machine. We present a novel method called PLUM to dynamically balance the processor workloads with a global view. This paper presents the implementation and integration of all major components within our dynamic load balancing strategy for adaptive grid calculations. Mesh adaption, repartitioning, processor assignment, and remapping are critical components of the framework that must be accomplished rapidly and efficiently so as not to cause a significant overhead to the numerical simulation. A data redistribution model is also presented that predicts the remapping cost on the SP2. This model is required to determine whether the gain from a balanced workload distribution offsets the cost of data movement. Results presented in this paper demonstrate that PLUM is an effective dynamic load balancing strategy which remains viable on a large number of processors.

  2. Expression of the poplar Flowering Locus T1 (FT1) gene reduces the generation time in plum (Prunus domestica L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plums normally begin to flower and fruit three to seven years from seed. To shorten this generation time, early flowering plum genotypes were produced by transforming plum hypocotyls with the poplar (Populus trichocarpa) Flowering Locus T1 (PtFT1) gene. Ectopic expression of 35S::PtFT1 induced ear...

  3. Current achievements and future directions in genetic engineering of European plum (Prunus domestica L.).

    PubMed

    Petri, Cesar; Alburquerque, Nuria; Faize, Mohamed; Scorza, Ralph; Dardick, Chris

    2018-06-01

    In most woody fruit species, transformation and regeneration are difficult. However, European plum (Prunus domestica) has been shown to be amenable to genetic improvement technologies from classical hybridization, to genetic engineering, to rapid cycle crop breeding ('FasTrack' breeding). Since the first report on European plum transformation with marker genes in the early 90 s, numerous manuscripts have been published reporting the generation of new clones with agronomically interesting traits, such as pests, diseases and/or abiotic stress resistance, shorter juvenile period, dwarfing, continuous flowering, etc. This review focuses on the main advances in genetic transformation of European plum achieved to date, and the lines of work that are converting genetic engineering into a contemporary breeding tool for this species.

  4. mi-siRNAs and plum pox virus resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The agricultural sector is expecting to derive tangible benefits from the investments that have been made in plant biotechnology. Although plant biotechnology research has been carried out for decades, only a few examples of biotech horticultural crops have reached the market. Plum pox virus (PPV)...

  5. Plum Brook Reactor Facility Control Room during Facility Startup

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-02-21

    Operators test the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Plum Brook Reactor Facility systems in the months leading up to its actual operation. The “Reactor On” signs are illuminated but the reactor core was not yet ready for chain reactions. Just a couple weeks after this photograph, Plum Brook Station held a media open house to unveil the 60-megawatt test reactor near Sandusky, Ohio. More than 60 members of the print media and radio and television news services met at the site to talk with community leaders and representatives from NASA and Atomic Energy Commission. The Plum Brook reactor went critical for the first time on the evening of June 14, 1961. It was not until April 1963 that the reactor reached its full potential of 60 megawatts. The reactor control room, located on the second floor of the facility, was run by licensed operators. The operators manually operated the shim rods which adjusted the chain reaction in the reactor core. The regulating rods could partially or completely shut down the reactor. The control room also housed remote area monitoring panels and other monitoring equipment that allowed operators to monitor radiation sensors located throughout the facility and to scram the reactor instantly if necessary. The color of the indicator lights corresponded with the elevation of the detectors in the various buildings. The reactor could also shut itself down automatically if the monitors detected any sudden irregularities.

  6. Behavioral and electroantennogram responses of plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar, to selected noxious plant extracts and insecticides.

    PubMed

    Gӧkçe, A; Stelinski, L L; Nortman, D R; Bryan, W W; Whalon, M E

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and electroantennogram responses of plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), adults were tested for several methanolic plant extracts and organically approved insecticides. Plant extracts were evaluated for their potential as antifeedants or oviposition deterrents. These extract responses were also compared to those elicited by the non-neurotoxic, organic irritant-insecticide kaolin clay. Both sexes of plum curculio exhibited antennal response as measured by electroantennogram, which ranged from 0.2 to 1.1 mV, to plant extracts and the organic irritant/insecticide, with the greatest response to the extract of rough cocklebur, Xanthium strumarium L. (1.1 mV). No choice tests were conducted to compare feeding and oviposition by plum curculio on untreated apples or on apples treated with one of the extracts or the insecticide. The insecticide pyrethrum and extracts of X. strumarium and greater burdock, Arctium lappa L., significantly reduced feeding. Also, pyrethrum, A. lappa, Humulus lupulus L. (common hop), X. strumarium, and Verbascum songaricum Schrenk extracts completely inhibited egg deposition. In no-choice assays, the effects of kaolin clay with incorporated plant extracts on plum curculio feeding and oviposition were monitored as complementary tests. A. lappa-kaolin, H. lupulus-kaolin, and X. strumarium-kaolin mixtures significantly reduced the feeding of plum curculio compared to the control or kaolin clay alone. Each of the plant extract-kaolin mixtures evaluated, with the exception of Bifora radians Bieberstein (wild bishop), completely inhibited plum curculio oviposition as compared to controls. This is an open access paper. We use the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license that permits unrestricted use, provided that the paper is properly attributed.

  7. Impact of radiation processing on quality during storage and post-refrigeration decay of plum (Prunus domestica L.) cv. Santaroza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Peerzada R.; Dar, Mohd A.; Wani, Ali M.

    2013-04-01

    Gamma irradiation treatment was tested for maintaining storage quality and extending the shelf life of plum fruit. Matured green plums were irradiated in the dose range of 0.2-1.5 kGy and stored under ambient (temperature 25±2 °C, RH 70%) and refrigerated (temperature 3±1 °C, RH 80%) conditions. Studies revealed that irradiation treatment significantly (p≤0.05) maintained the storage quality of plum fruit under ambient as well as refrigerated conditions. Positive correlations (r=0.88) existed between the irradiation doses and firmness retention under both the storage conditions. In samples irradiated at 1.0 kGy, 1.2 kGy and 1.5 kGy, no microbial load was detected up to 8 and 12 days of ambient storage. Dose range of 1.2-1.5 kGy significantly inhibited the decaying of plums up to 16 days of ambient storage. Irradiation in combination with refrigeration prevented the decaying of plums up to 35 days as against the 12.5% decay in un-irradiated control samples. Irradiation dose of 1.2-1.5 kGy also gave an extension of 8 days during additional ambient storage of the plums at 25±2 °C, RH 70% following 35 days of refrigeration.

  8. Surficial geology of the sea floor in Long Island Sound offshore of Plum Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Danforth, W.W.; Blackwood, D.S.; Schaer, J.D.; Ostapenko, A.J.; Glomb, K.A.; Doran, E.F.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been working cooperatively to interpret surficial sea-floor geology along the coast of the Northeastern United States. NOAA survey H11445 in eastern Long Island Sound, offshore of Plum Island, New York, covers an area of about 12 square kilometers. Multibeam bathymetry and sidescan-sonar imagery from the survey, as well as sediment and photographic data from 13 stations occupied during a USGS verification cruise are used to delineate sea-floor features and characterize the environment. Bathymetry gradually deepens offshore to over 100 meters in a depression in the northwest part of the study area and reaches 60 meters in Plum Gut, a channel between Plum Island and Orient Point. Sand waves are present on a shoal north of Plum Island and in several smaller areas around the basin. Sand-wave asymmetry indicates that counter-clockwise net sediment transport maintains the shoal. Sand is prevalent where there is low backscatter in the sidescan-sonar imagery. Gravel and boulder areas are submerged lag deposits produced from the Harbor Hill-Orient Point-Fishers Island moraine segment and are found adjacent to the shorelines and just north of Plum Island, where high backscatter is present in the sidescan-sonar imagery.

  9. Essential oils to control Botrytis cinerea in vitro and in vivo on plum fruits.

    PubMed

    Aminifard, Mohammad Hossein; Mohammadi, Samane

    2013-01-01

    The consequence of misusing chemical biocides in controlling pests and diseases has drawn the attention of policy makers to the development of methods potentially available in nature for this purpose. In the present study the inhibitory effects of black caraway, fennel and peppermint essential oils against Botrytis cinerea were tested at various concentrations in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro results showed that the growth of B. cinerea was completely inhibited by the application of black caraway and fennel oils at concentrations of 400 and 600 µL L⁻¹ respectively. The in vivo results indicated that black caraway, fennel and peppermint oils at all applied concentrations inhibited B. cinerea growth on plum fruits compared with the control. In addition, all three oils at higher concentrations showed positive effects on fruit quality characteristics such as titrable acidity, total soluble solids, carbohydrate content, pH and weight loss percentage. Thus the oils inhibited the infection of plum fruits by B. cinerea and increased their storage life. This research confirms the antifungal effects of black caraway, fennel and peppermint essential oils both in vitro and in vivo on plum fruits postharvest. Therefore these essential oils could be an alternative to chemicals to control postharvest phytopathogenic fungi on plum fruits. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Salak plum peel extract as a safe and efficient antioxidant appraisal for cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Kanlayavattanakul, Mayuree; Lourith, Nattaya; Ospondpant, Dusadee; Ruktanonchai, Uracha; Pongpunyayuen, Siriluck; Chansriniyom, Chaisak

    2013-01-01

    The antioxidant activities of Salak plum (Salacca edulis) peel extracts were assessed by 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothaiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS), and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) assays. The ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction was the most potent (DPPHIC50=2.932 ± 0.030 µg/mL, ABTSIC50=7.933 ± 0.049 µg/mL, FRAPEC=7,844.44 ± 40.734). Chlorogenic acid was detected as the marker (1.400 ± 0.102 g/kg). The EtOAc fraction was non-cytotoxic in vero and normal human fibroblast (NHF) cells. It exhibited cellular oxidative prevention and damage treatment at 5-40 µg/mL in NHF cells. Salak plum peel loaded liposome consisting of lecithin and hydrophobically modified hydroxyethylcellulose (HMHEC) was developed and found stable with adequate entrapment efficacy. Thus Salak plum peel was highlighted as a potential ecological antioxidant for health promotion aspects, and for cosmetics.

  11. Fermentation Characteristics and Aromatic Profile of Plum Wines Produced with Indigenous Microbiota and Pure Cultures of Selected Yeast.

    PubMed

    Miljić, Uroš; Puškaš, Vladimir; Vučurović, Vesna; Muzalevski, Ana

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare fermentation characteristics and aromatic profile of plum wines produced with indigenous microbiota and pure cultures of different selected yeast. Experiments were carried out with plum (Prunus domestica L.) varieties of different fruit ripening times (Čačanska rana, Čačanska lepotica, and Požegača). Wine fermentations were conducted by the activity of indigenous microbiota, commercially available Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus yeast strains and joint activity of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and S. cerevisiae (sequential inoculation). Statistically significant differences in fermentative characteristics and the content of certain volatile compounds were observed as a result of metabolic activity of various indigenous and/or selected yeasts during fermentation of plum pomace. Minimal duration of fermentation (4 to 5 d) and fastest ethanol production rate (from 12.3 to 15.5 g/L/d) were the characteristics of the studied S. cerevisiae strains. Isobutanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-heptanol, and 1-octanol were the most prevalent higher alcohols in the tested plum wine samples. The predominant ester in plum wines was ethyl acetate, ethyl lactate, amyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, and ethyl palmitate, esters responsible for the floral and fruity olfactory tones, were also present in large amounts. Also, the use of S. cerevisiae strains resulted in the production of plum wines with better sensory characteristics than ones produced with other investigated yeasts. Obtained results are significant since there is limited data on the compounds responsible for the unique flavor of plum wine, as well as on the impact of different yeast starter cultures application on the overall quality of fruit wines. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  12. Dried Plum Protects From Radiation-Induced Bone Loss by Attenuating Pro-Osteoclastic and Oxidative Stress Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Future space explorations beyond the earths magnetosphere will increase human exposure to space radiation and associated risks to skeletal health. We hypothesize that oxidative stress resulting from radiation exposure plays a major role in progressive bone loss and dysfunction in associated tissue. In animal studies, increased free radical formation is associated with pathological changes in bone structure, enhanced bone resorption, reduced bone formation and decreased bone mineral density, which can lead to skeletal fragility. Our long-term goals are to define the mechanisms and risk of bone loss in the spaceflight environment and to facilitate the development of effective countermeasures. We had previously reported that exposure to low or high-LET radiation correlates with an acute increase in the expression of pro-osteoclastic and oxidative stress genes in bone during the early response to radiation followed by pathological changes in skeletal structure. We then conducted systematic screening for potential countermeasures against bone loss where we tested the ability of various antioxidants to mitigate the radiation-induced increase in expression of these markers. For the screen, 16-week old C57Bl6J mice were treated with a dietary antioxidant cocktail, injectable DHLA or a dried plum-enriched diet (DP). Mice were then exposed to 2Gy 137Cs radiation and one day later, marrow cells were collected and the relevant genes analyzed for expression levels. Among the candidate countermeasures tested, DP was most effective in reducing the expression of genes associated with bone loss. Furthermore, analysis of skeletal structure by microcomputed tomography (microCT) revealed that DP also prevents the radiation-induced deterioration in skeletal microarchitecture as indicated by parameters such as percent bone volume (BVTV), trabecular spacing and trabecular number. We also found that DP has similar protective effects on skeletal structure in a follow-up study using 1 Gy of

  13. 75 FR 52374 - National Environmental Policy Act; NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station Wind Farm Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ...; NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station Wind Farm Project AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the NASA GRC Plum Brook Station Wind Farm Project located near Sandusky... obtain public comments on construction and operation of the wind farm. The purpose of constructing and...

  14. Silencing in genetically engineered Prunus domestica provides durable and safe resistance to Plum pox virus (sharka disease)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Originally identified in Bulgaria in 1915, Plum pox virus (PPV) is the most damaging virus of stone fruit trees including apricot, plum, peach, and cherry. PPV steadily spread throughout Europe over the years since its discovery, and at the turn of the century (1999-2000), it reached North America ...

  15. HPLC-DAD-ESIMS analysis of phenolic compounds in nectarines, peaches, and plums.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Barberán, F A; Gil, M I; Cremin, P; Waterhouse, A L; Hess-Pierce, B; Kader, A A

    2001-10-01

    The phenolic compounds of 25 peach, nectarine, and plum cultivars were studied and quantified by HPLC-DAD-ESIMS. Hydroxycinnamates, procyanidins, flavonols, and anthocyanins were detected and quantified. White and yellow flesh nectarines and peaches, and yellow and red plums, were analyzed at two different maturity stages with consideration of both peel and flesh tissues. HPLC-MS analyses allowed the identification of procyanidin dimers of the B- and A-types, as well as the presence of procyanidin trimers in plums. As a general rule, the peel tissues contained higher amounts of phenolics, and anthocyanins and flavonols were almost exclusively located in this tissue. No clear differences in the phenolic content of nectarines and peaches were detected or between white flesh and yellow flesh cultivars. There was no clear trend in phenolic content with ripening of the different cultivars. Some cultivars, however, had a very high phenolic content. For example, the white flesh nectarine cultivar Brite Pearl (350-460 mg/kg hydroxycinnamates and 430-550 mg/kg procyanidins in flesh) and the yellow flesh cv. Red Jim (180-190 mg/kg hydroxycinnamates and 210-330 mg/kg procyanidins in flesh), contained 10 times more phenolics than cultivars such as Fire Pearl (38-50 mg/kg hydroxycinnamates and 23-30 mg/kg procyanidins in flesh). Among white flesh peaches, cultivars Snow King (300-320 mg/kg hydroxycinnamates and 660-695 mg/kg procyanidins in flesh) and Snow Giant (125-130 mg/kg hydroxycinnamates and 520-540 mg/kg procyanidins in flesh) showed the highest content. The plum cultivars Black Beaut and Angeleno were especially rich in phenolics.

  16. Plum (Prunus domestica) Trees Transformed with Poplar FT1 Result in Altered Architecture, Dormancy Requirement, and Continuous Flowering

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Ann; Scorza, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    The Flowering Locus T1 (FT1) gene from Populus trichocarpa under the control of the 35S promoter was transformed into European plum (Prunus domestica L). Transgenic plants expressing higher levels of FT flowered and produced fruits in the greenhouse within 1 to 10 months. FT plums did not enter dormancy after cold or short day treatments yet field planted FT plums remained winter hardy down to at least −10°C. The plants also displayed pleiotropic phenotypes atypical for plum including shrub-type growth habit and panicle flower architecture. The flowering and fruiting phenotype was found to be continuous in the greenhouse but limited to spring and fall in the field. The pattern of flowering in the field correlated with lower daily temperatures. This apparent temperature effect was subsequently confirmed in growth chamber studies. The pleitropic phenotypes associated with FT1 expression in plum suggests a fundamental role of this gene in plant growth and development. This study demonstrates the potential for a single transgene event to markedly affect the vegetative and reproductive growth and development of an economically important temperate woody perennial crop. We suggest that FT1 may be a useful tool to modify temperate plants to changing climates and/or to adapt these crops to new growing areas. PMID:22859952

  17. Aphid Transmission of the Ontario Isolate of Plum Pox Virus.

    PubMed

    Lowery, D Thomas; Vickers, Patricia M; Bittner, Lori A; Stobbs, Lorne W; Foottit, Robert G

    2015-10-01

    Utilization of timed virus acquisition access probes in studies of plum pox virus (PPV) transmission by aphids demonstrated that endemic species transmitted the virus readily from plum, Prunus domestica (L.) Batsch; peach, P. persica (L.); or dwarf flowering almond, P. glandulosa Thunberg., to peach seedlings. The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), was shown to be the most efficient vector. Acquisition of virus by green peach aphids from infected peach leaves resulted in 18-28% infected peach seedlings, while aphids previously fed on infected leaves of plum transferred virus to 36% of peach seedlings. Although the spirea aphid, Aphis spiraecola (Patch), was a less efficient vector than M. persicae it is perhaps more important for the spread of PPV due to its greater abundance and occurrence earlier in the season when peach trees are thought to be more susceptible to infection. Virus transmission rates varied depending on the virus source and healthy test plant species. In contrast to many previous studies, aphid inoculation of the experimental host Nicotiana benthamiana Domin occurred at a low rate, never exceeding 4%. Acquisition of PPV by M. persicae from infected peach fruit was greatly reduced compared with acquisition from leaves. The results of this research indicate that the Ontario isolate of PPV-D is readily transmissible by aphids to peach and natural spread of the virus needs to be considered in future management or eradication programs. © Her Majesty in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  18. The addition of rosehip oil to Aloe gels improves their properties as postharvest coatings for maintaining quality in plum.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Romero, Domingo; Zapata, Pedro J; Guillén, Fabián; Paladines, Diego; Castillo, Salvador; Valero, Daniel; Serrano, María

    2017-02-15

    The effect of Aloe vera gel (AV) and Aloe arborescens gel (AA) alone or in combination with rosehip oil (RO) at 2% on ethylene production, respiration rate, quality parameters, bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity during plum postharvest storage was studied. Coated plums showed a delay in ethylene production and respiration rate at 20°C and during cold storage and subsequent shelf life, the main effect being observed for those fruits coated with AA+RO. Quality parameters such as softening, colour and maturity index was also delayed during storage by the use of the coatings, which led to a 2-fold increase in plum storability. Accumulation of bioactive compounds was also delayed although at the end of the experiment the content of bioactive compounds was higher than those found for control fruits at the estimated shelf life. The most effective coating for maintaining plum quality and bioactive compounds was AA+RO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Carbohydrate-Free Peach (Prunus persica) and Plum (Prunus domestica) Juice Affects Fecal Microbial Ecology in an Obese Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Markel, Melissa; Martino, Hercia S.; Minamoto, Yasushi; Steiner, Jörg M.; Byrne, David; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U.

    2014-01-01

    Background Growing evidence shows the potential of nutritional interventions to treat obesity but most investigations have utilized non-digestible carbohydrates only. Peach and plum contain high amounts of polyphenols, compounds with demonstrated anti-obesity effects. The underlying process of successfully treating obesity using polyphenols may involve an alteration of the intestinal microbiota. However, this phenomenon is not well understood. Methodology/Principal Findings Obese Zucker rats were assigned to three groups (peach, plum, and control, n = 10 each), wild-type group was named lean (n = 10). Carbohydrates in the fruit juices were eliminated using enzymatic hydrolysis. Fecal samples were obtained after 11 weeks of fruit or control juice administration. Real-time PCR and 454-pyrosequencing were used to evaluate changes in fecal microbiota. Over 1,500 different Operational Taxonomic Units at 97% similarity were detected in all rats. Several bacterial groups (e.g. Lactobacillus and members of Ruminococcacea) were found to be more abundant in the peach but especially in the plum group (plum juice contained 3 times more total polyphenolics compared to peach juice). Principal coordinate analysis based on Unifrac-based unweighted distance matrices revealed a distinct separation between the microbiota of control and treatment groups. These changes in fecal microbiota occurred simultaneously with differences in fecal short-chain acids concentrations between the control and treatment groups as well as a significant decrease in body weight in the plum group. Conclusions This study suggests that consumption of carbohydrate-free peach and plum juice has the potential to modify fecal microbial ecology in an obese animal model. The separate contribution of polyphenols and non-polyphenols compounds (vitamins and minerals) to the observed changes is unknown. PMID:25007331

  20. The use of transgenic fruit trees as a resistance strategy for virus epidemics: the plum pox (sharka) model.

    PubMed

    Ravelonandro, M; Scorza, R; Callahan, A; Levy, L; Jacquet, C; Monsion, M; Damsteegt, V

    2000-11-01

    Sharka or plum pox, caused by Plum pox virus (PPV: genus Potyvirus; Family Potyviridae), is the most serious disease of Prunus. Most cultivated Prunus species are highly susceptible and conventional breeding has not produced highly resistant and commercially acceptable varieties. Success in developing virus-resistant herbaceous crops through genetic engineering led us to investigate this approach for resistance to PPV. Our programme aims to develop a biotechnological approach to PPV control that is effective and shown to be environmentally safe. The programme began with the cloning of the PPV coat protein (CP) gene and the development of a transformation system for plum (Prunus domestica). The CP construct was first tested in Nicotiana benthamiana in which it proved effective in producing transgenic plants with varying levels of CP expression. Some of these plants, particularly low PPV CP expressers, were resistant to PPV, or recovered from initial infection. Based on these results plum was transformed using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens system and both low and high PPV CP-expressing transgenic plum lines were obtained. These were inoculated with PPV by bud grafts in the greenhouse. Line C-5 proved to be highly resistant. It contained multiple copies of the insert, produced low levels of PPV CP mRNA, no detectable CP and the insert appeared to be methylated. These characteristics all suggest that the resistance of the C-5 clone is based on post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Field tests of C-5 and other transgenic lines in Poland, Romania and Spain have demonstrated that such trees when inoculated by bud-grafts allow a low level of PPV multiplication, from which they rapidly recover. C-5 plants exposed to natural infection for 3 years did not become infected, whereas control trees were infected in the first year. Hybrid plums having the C-5 PPV CP insert inherited from C-5 are virus-resistant, demonstrating the usefulness of C-5 as a parent in developing

  1. Dedication of the Mod-0 Wind Turbine at Plum Brook Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1975-10-21

    Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) Administrator Robert Seamans addresses the crowd at the dedication ceremony for the Mod-0 100-kilowatt wind turbine at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Plum Brook Station. The wind turbine program was a joint NASA/ERDA effort to develop less expensive forms of energy during the 1970s. NASA Lewis was able to use its experience with aerodynamics, powerplants, and energy transfer to develop efficient and cost-effective wind energy systems. The Plum Brook wind turbine was the first of a series of increasingly powerful NASA-ERDA wind turbines built around the nation. From left to right: Congressional Committee aide John Dugan, retired S. Morgan Smith Company chief engineer Carl Wilcox, windmill pioneer Beauchamp Smith, NASA Administrator James Fletcher, Seamans, and Lewis Center Director Bruce Lundin. The three men to the right are unidentified.

  2. Sensory profiles for dried fig (Ficus carica L.) cultivars commercially grown and processed in California.

    PubMed

    Haug, Megan T; King, Ellena S; Heymann, Hildegarde; Crisosto, Carlos H

    2013-08-01

    A trained sensory panel evaluated the 6 fig cultivars currently sold in the California dried fig market. The main flavor and aroma attributes determined by the sensory panel were "caramel," "honey," "raisin," and "fig," with additional aroma attributes: "common date," "dried plum," and "molasses." Sensory differences were observed between dried fig cultivars. All figs were processed by 2 commercial handlers. Processing included potassium sorbate as a preservative and SO2 application as an antibrowning agent for white cultivars. As a consequence of SO2 use during processing, high sulfite residues affected the sensory profiles of the white dried fig cultivars. Significant differences between dried fig cultivars and sources demonstrate perceived differences between processing and storage methods. The panel-determined sensory lexicon can help with California fig marketing. © 2013 The Regents of California, Davis Campus Department of Plant Sciences.

  3. NASA's Hydrogen Outpost: The Rocket Systems Area at Plum Brook Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrighi, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    "There was pretty much a general knowledge about hydrogen and its capabilities," recalled former researcher Robert Graham. "The question was, could you use it in a rocket engine? Do we have the technology to handle it? How will it cool? Will it produce so much heat release that we can't cool the engine? These were the questions that we had to address." The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Glenn Research Center, referred to historically as the Lewis Research Center, made a concerted effort to answer these and related questions in the 1950s and 1960s. The center played a critical role transforming hydrogen's theoretical potential into a flight-ready propellant. Since then NASA has utilized liquid hydrogen to send humans and robots to the Moon, propel dozens of spacecraft across the universe, orbit scores of satellite systems, and power 135 space shuttle flights. Rocket pioneers had recognized hydrogen's potential early on, but its extremely low boiling temperature and low density made it impracticable as a fuel. The Lewis laboratory first demonstrated that liquid hydrogen could be safely utilized in rocket and aircraft propulsion systems, then perfected techniques to store, pump, and cleanly burn the fuel, as well as use it to cool the engine. The Rocket Systems Area at Lewis's remote testing area, Plum Brook Station, played a little known, but important role in the center's hydrogen research efforts. This publication focuses on the activities at the Rocket Systems Area, but it also discusses hydrogen's role in NASA's space program and Lewis's overall hydrogen work. The Rocket Systems Area included nine physically modest test sites and three test stands dedicated to liquid-hydrogen-related research. In 1962 Cleveland Plain Dealer reporter Karl Abram claimed, "The rocket facility looks more like a petroleum refinery. Its test rigs sprout pipes, valves and tanks. During the night test runs, excess hydrogen is burned from special stacks in the best

  4. Effectiveness of odor-baited trap trees for plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) monitoring in commercial apple orchards in the northeast.

    PubMed

    Piñero, Jaime C; Agnello, Arthur M; Tuttle, Arthur; Leskey, Tracy C; Faubert, Heather; Koehler, Glen; Los, Lorraine; Morin, Glenn; Leahy, Kathleen; Cooley, Daniel R; Prokopy, Ronald J

    2011-10-01

    The plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), is a key pest of pome and stone fruit in eastern and central North America. For effective management of this insect pest in commercial apple (Malus spp.) orchards in the northeastern United States and Canada, one of the greatest challenges has been to determine the need for and timing of insecticide applications that will protect apple fruit from injury by adults. In a 2004-2005 study, we assessed the efficacy and economic viability of a reduced-risk integrated pest management strategy involving an odor-baited trap tree approach to determine need for and timing of insecticide use against plum curculio based on appearance of fresh egg-laying scars. Evaluations took place in commercial apple orchards in seven northeastern U.S. states. More specifically, we compared the trap-tree approach with three calendar-driven whole-block sprays and with heat-unit accumulation models that predict how long insecticide should be applied to orchard trees to prevent injury by plum curculio late in the season. Trap tree plots received a whole-plot insecticide spray by the time of petal fall, and succeeding sprays (if needed) were applied to peripheral-row trees only, depending on a threshold of one fresh plum curculio egg-laying scar out of 25 fruit sampled from a single trap tree. In both years, level of plum curculio injury to fruit sampled from perimeter-row, the most interior-row trees and whole-plot injury in trap tree plots did not differ significantly from that recorded in plots subject to conventional management or in plots managed using the heat-unit accumulation approach. The amount of insecticide used in trap tree plots was reduced at least by 43% compared with plots managed with the conventional approach. Advantages and potential pitfalls of the bio-based trap tree approach to plum curculio monitoring in apple orchards are discussed.

  5. De novo transcriptome assembly of 'Angeleno' and 'Lamoon' Japanese plum cultivars (Prunus salicina).

    PubMed

    González, Máximo; Maldonado, Jonathan; Salazar, Erika; Silva, Herman; Carrasco, Basilio

    2016-09-01

    Japanese plum (Prunus salicina L.) is a fruit tree of the Rosaceae family, which is an economically important stone fruit around the world. Currently, Japanese plum breeding programs combine traditional breeding and plant physiology strategies with genetic and genomic analysis. In order to understand the flavonoid pathway regulation and to develop molecular markers associated to the fuit skin color (EST-SSRs), we performed a next generation sequencing based on Illumina Hiseq2000 platform. A total of 22.4 GB and 21 GB raw data were obtained from 'Lamoon' and 'Angeleno' respectively, corresponding to 85,404,726 raw reads to 'Lamoon' and 79,781,666 to 'Angeleno'. A total of 139,775,975 reads were filtered after removing low-quality reads and trimming the adapter sequences. De novo transcriptome assembly was performed using CLC Genome Workbench software and a total of 54,584 unique contigs were generated, with an N50 of 1343 base pair (bp) and a mean length of 829 bp. This work contributed with a specific Japanese plum skin transcriptome, providing two libraries of contrasting fruit skin color phenotype (yellow and red) and increasing substantially the GB of raw data available until now for this specie.

  6. Astronaut John Young on rim of Plum crater gathering lunar rock samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, stands on the rim of Plum crater while collecting lunar rock samples at Station No.1 during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-1) at the Descartes landing site. This scene, looking eastward, was photographed by Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. The small boulder in the center foreground was chip sampled by the crewmen. Plum crater is 40 meters in diameter and 10 meters deep. The Lunar Roving Vehicle is parked on the far rim of the crater. The gnomon, which is used as a photographic reference to establish local vertical sun angle, scale, and lunar color, is deployed in the center of the picture. Young holds a geological hammer in his right hand.

  7. Plum pudding random medium model of biological tissue toward remote microscopy from spectroscopic light scattering

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Min

    2017-01-01

    Biological tissue has a complex structure and exhibits rich spectroscopic behavior. There has been no tissue model until now that has been able to account for the observed spectroscopy of tissue light scattering and its anisotropy. Here we present, for the first time, a plum pudding random medium (PPRM) model for biological tissue which succinctly describes tissue as a superposition of distinctive scattering structures (plum) embedded inside a fractal continuous medium of background refractive index fluctuation (pudding). PPRM faithfully reproduces the wavelength dependence of tissue light scattering and attributes the “anomalous” trend in the anisotropy to the plum and the powerlaw dependence of the reduced scattering coefficient to the fractal scattering pudding. Most importantly, PPRM opens up a novel venue of quantifying the tissue architecture and microscopic structures on average from macroscopic probing of the bulk with scattered light alone without tissue excision. We demonstrate this potential by visualizing the fine microscopic structural alterations in breast tissue (adipose, glandular, fibrocystic, fibroadenoma, and ductal carcinoma) deduced from noncontact spectroscopic measurement. PMID:28663913

  8. Non-climacteric ripening and sorbitol homeostasis in plum fruits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Youn; Farcuh, Macarena; Cohen, Yuval; Crisosto, Carlos; Sadka, Avi; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    During ripening fruits undergo several physiological and biochemical modifications that influence quality-related properties, such as texture, color, aroma and taste. We studied the differences in ethylene and sugar metabolism between two genetically related Japanese plum cultivars with contrasting ripening behaviors. 'Santa Rosa' (SR) behaved as a typical climacteric fruit, while the bud sport mutant 'Sweet Miriam' (SM) displayed a non-climacteric ripening pattern. SM fruit displayed a delayed ripening that lasted 120 days longer than that of the climacteric fruit. At the full-ripe stage, both cultivars reached similar final size and weight but the non-climacteric fruits were firmer than the climacteric fruits. Fully ripe non-climacteric plum fruits, showed an accumulation of sorbitol that was 2.5 times higher than that of climacteric fruits, and the increase in sorbitol were also paralleled to an increase in sucrose catabolism. These changes were highly correlated with decreased activity and expression of NAD(+)-dependent sorbitol dehydrogenase and sorbitol oxidase and increased sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, suggesting an enhanced sorbitol synthesis in non-climacteric fruits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Carotenoids, polyphenols and micronutrient profiles of Brassica oleraceae and plum varieties and their contribution to measures of total antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Kaulmann, Anouk; Jonville, Marie-Caroline; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Hoffmann, Lucien; Bohn, Torsten

    2014-07-15

    The consumption of phytochemicals such as carotenoids and polyphenols within whole fruits and vegetables has been associated with decreased incidence of various inflammation and oxidative stress related chronic diseases, which may be due to direct antioxidant effects, or indirect mechanisms such as affecting signal transduction/gene expression. Within the present study, we investigated the antioxidant composition of two major groups of vegetables and fruits, Brassica oleraceae and prunus spp., and estimated their contribution to antioxidant capacity. For this purpose, 17 plum and 27 Brassica varieties were collected in Luxembourg, and analysed for their individual polyphenol and carotenoid profile, vitamin C, dietary fibre, and minerals/trace elements, and their correlation with markers of antioxidant capacity (FRAP, ABTS, Folin-Ciocalteu). Total carotenoid and polyphenol content varied considerably between the different Brassica and plum varieties, with highest concentrations in the variety Kale (13.3 ± 0.58 mg/100g wet weight) and Cherry plum (1.96 ± 0.28 mg/100g) for carotenoids; and Kale (27.0 ± 0.91 mg/100g) and Kirks plum (185 ± 14 mg/100g) for polyphenols. In developed multiple linear-regression-models for Brassica, flavonoids, anthocyanins, lutein and vitamin C were found to be the best predictors of antioxidant capacity as assessed by FRAP (R(2)=0.832) and flavonoids, neochlorogenic acid and vitamin C as assessed by ABTS (R(2)=0.831); while for plums these were selenium, total sugars, chlorogenic acid and vitamin C (R(2)=0.853), and selenium, chlorogenic acid and flavonoids for FRAP (R(2)=0.711). When considering Brassica and plum consumption in Luxembourg, it is estimated that both contribute to an antioxidant intake equivalent to 26 and 6 mg per day of ascorbic acid equivalents, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 40 CFR 180.578 - Acetamiprid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shelled, subgroup 6B 0.40 Pistachio 0.10 Plum, prune, dried 0.40 Plum, prune, fresh 0.20 Tea, dried1 50.0... 10, 2010, for the use of acetamiprid on dried tea. (2) Tolerances are established for residues of the...

  11. 40 CFR 180.578 - Acetamiprid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shelled, subgroup 6B 0.40 Pistachio 0.10 Plum, prune, dried 0.40 Plum, prune, fresh 0.20 Tea, dried1 50.0... 10, 2010, for the use of acetamiprid on dried tea. (2) Tolerances are established for residues of the...

  12. Plum polyphenols inhibit colorectal aberrant crypt foci formation in rats: potential role of the miR-143/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin axis.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Nivedita; Kim, Hyemee; Talcott, Stephen T; Turner, Nancy D; Byrne, David H; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2016-10-01

    The nutritional prevention of aberrant crypt foci by polyphenols may be a crucial step to dietary cancer prevention. The objective of this study was to determine the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the anti-inflammatory and antitumorigenic properties of plum (Prunus salicina L.) polyphenols, including chlorogenic acid and neochlorogenic acid, in azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rats. The hypothesis was that plum polyphenolics suppress AOM-induced aberrant crypt foci formation through alterations in the protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and relative micro-RNA expressions. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=10/group) received plum beverage (1346mg gallic acid equivalents/L) or a control beverage ad libitum for 10 weeks with subcutaneous injections of AOM (15mg/kg) at weeks 2 and 3. Results show that the consumption of the plum beverage decreased the number of dysplastic aberrant crypt foci by 48% (P<.05) and lowered proliferation of mucosal cells by 24% (P<.05). The plum beverage decreased the activity of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase in mucosal scrapings, as well as the superoxide dismutase activity in serum. The results were accompanied by a down-regulation of proinflammatory enzymes nuclear factor κB, nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 messenger RNA. Plum inhibited the expression of AKT and mTOR messenger RNA, phosphorylated AKT, mTOR, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α protein levels, and the ratio of the phosphorylated/total protein expression of mTOR. Also, the plum beverage increased the expression of miR-143, which is involved in the regulation of AKT. These results suggest that plum polyphenols may exhibit a chemopreventive potential against colon carcinogenesis by impacting the AKT/mTOR pathway and miR-143. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Odor-baited trap trees: a novel management tool for plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Leskey, Tracy C; Piñero, Jaime C; Prokopy, Ronald J

    2008-08-01

    The plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), one of the most important pests of apple (Malus spp.) in eastern and central North America, historically has been managed in New England apple orchards by three full block insecticide applications. Efforts to reduce insecticide inputs against plum curculio include perimeter row sprays, particularly after petal fall, to control immigrating adults. The odor-baited trap tree approach represents a new reduced input strategy for managing plum curculio based on the application of insecticides to a few perimeter-row trap trees rather than the entire perimeter row or full orchard block. Here, we compared the efficacy of a trap tree approach with perimeter row treatments to manage populations after petal fall in commercial apple orchards in 2005 and 2006. Injury was significantly greater in trap trees compared with unbaited perimeter row treated trees in both years of the study. In 2005, heavy rains prevented growers from applying insecticide applications at regular intervals resulting in high injury in nearly all blocks regardless of type of management strategy. In 2006, both the trap-tree and perimeter-row treatments prevented penetration by immigrating populations and resulted in economically acceptable levels of injury. The trap tree management strategy resulted in a reduction of approximately 70% total trees being treated with insecticide compared with perimeter row sprays and 93% compared with standard full block sprays.

  14. Plum pox virus (PPV) genome expression in genetically engineered RNAi plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An important approach to controlling sharka disease caused by Plum pox virus (PPV) is the development of PPV resistant plants using small interfering RNAs (siRNA) technology. In order to evaluate siRNA induced gene silencing, we studied, based on knowledge of the PPV genome sequence, virus genome t...

  15. HPLC method for the simultaneous quantification of the major organic acids in Angeleno plum fruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanwei; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Wei; Zhao, Zhilei; Cao, Jiankang

    2014-08-01

    A method was developed to profile major organic acids in Angeleno fruit by high performance liquid chromatography. Organic acids in plum were extracted by water with ultra- sonication at 50°C for 30 min. The extracts were chromatographed on Waters Atlantis T3 C18 column (4.6 mm×250 mm, 5 μm) with 0.01mol/L sulfuric acid and water as mobile phase, and flow rate was 0.5 ml/min. The column temperature was 40C, and chromatography was monitored by a diode array detector at 210 nm. The result showed that malic acid, citric acid, tartaric acid, oxalic acid, pyruvic acid, acetic acid, succinic acid in Angeleno plum, and the malic acid was the major organic acids. The coefficient of determination of the standard calibration curve is R2 > 0.999. The organic acids recovery ranged from 99.11% for Malic acid to 106.70% for Oxalic acid, and CV (n=6) ranged from 0.95% for Malic acid to 6.23% for Oxalic acid, respectively. The method was accurate, sensitive and feasible in analyzing the organic acids in Angeleno plum.

  16. W. Ritchie Russell, A.B. Baker, and Fred Plum: Pioneers of ventilatory management in poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2016-09-13

    Historically, neurologists were not involved in the day-to-day management of critically ill patients with bulbar poliomyelitis, but some were. The major contributions of 3 neurologists-W. Ritchie Russell, A.B. Baker, and Fred Plum-in the respiratory management of poliomyelitis have not been recognized. Russell's work was instrumental in identifying multiple types of poliomyelitis defined by their respiratory needs, and he advised treatment that varied from simple postural drainage to use of respirators. He participated in the development of the Radcliffe respiratory pump. Baker recognized the essential involvement of the vagal nerve in respiratory distress, but also observed that involvement of vital centers without cranial nerve involvement would lead to irregular and shallow respiration in some patients and in others with marked dysautonomic features. A similar finding of central involvement of respiration was noted by Plum, who also stressed the importance of hypercapnia. Plum emphasized measurements of vital capacity and techniques to minimize trauma with suctioning after tracheostomy. These 3 neurologists understood the importance of airway and ventilator management, which is currently one of the many pillars of neurocritical care. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Interior of the Plum Brook Reactor Facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-02-21

    A view inside the 55-foot high containment vessel of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Plum Brook Reactor Facility in Sandusky, Ohio. The 60-megawatt test reactor went critical for the first time in 1961 and began its full-power research operations in 1963. From 1961 to 1973, this reactor performed some of the nation’s most advanced nuclear research. The reactor was designed to determine the behavior of metals and other materials after long durations of irradiation. The materials would be used to construct a nuclear-powered rocket. The reactor core, where the chain reaction occurred, sat at the bottom of the tubular pressure vessel, seen here at the center of the shielding pool. The core contained fuel rods with uranium isotopes. A cooling system was needed to reduce the heat levels during the reaction. A neutron-impervious reflector was also employed to send many of the neutrons back to the core. The Plum Brook Reactor Facility was constructed from high-density concrete and steel to prevent the excess neutrons from escaping the facility, but the water in the pool shielded most of the radiation. The water, found in three of the four quadrants served as a reflector, moderator, and coolant. In this photograph, the three 20-ton protective shrapnel shields and hatch have been removed from the top of the pressure tank revealing the reactor tank. An overhead crane could be manipulated to reach any section of this room. It was used to remove the shrapnel shields and transfer equipment.

  18. Classification of plum spirit drinks by synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sádecká, J; Jakubíková, M; Májek, P; Kleinová, A

    2016-04-01

    Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy was used in combination with principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) for the differentiation of plum spirits according to their geographical origin. A total of 14 Czech, 12 Hungarian and 18 Slovak plum spirit samples were used. The samples were divided in two categories: colorless (22 samples) and colored (22 samples). Synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) obtained at a wavelength difference of 60 nm provided the best results. Considering the PCA-LDA applied to the SFS of all samples, Czech, Hungarian and Slovak colorless samples were properly classified in both the calibration and prediction sets. 100% of correct classification was also obtained for Czech and Hungarian colored samples. However, one group of Slovak colored samples was classified as belonging to the Hungarian group in the calibration set. Thus, the total correct classifications obtained were 94% and 100% for the calibration and prediction steps, respectively. The results were compared with those obtained using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Applying PCA-LDA to NIR spectra (5500-6000 cm(-1)), the total correct classifications were 91% and 92% for the calibration and prediction steps, respectively, which were slightly lower than those obtained using SFS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Organic and Conventional Management on Bio-Functional Quality of Thirteen Plum Cultivars (Prunus salicina Lindl.).

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Francisco Julián; Pradas, Inmaculada; Ruiz-Moreno, María José; Arroyo, Francisco Teodoro; Perez-Romero, Luis Felipe; Montenegro, José Carlos; Moreno-Rojas, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, thirteen Japanese plum cultivars (Prunus salicina Lindl.) grown under conventional and organic conditions were compared to evaluate the influence of the culture system on bioactive compounds. Their organic acids content (malic, citric, tartaric, succinic, shikimic, ascorbic and fumaric acid), total polyphenols, total anthocyanins, total carotenoids and antioxidant capacity (FRAP, ABTS) were evaluated. The study was performed during two consecutive seasons (2012 and 2013) in two experimental orchards located at the IFAPA centre Las Torres-Tomejil (Seville, SW Spain). The culture system affected all the studied parameters except for total carotenoid content. The organic plums had significantly higher polyphenol and anthocyanin concentrations and a greater antioxidant capacity. Additionally, significant differences between cultivars were also found. 'Showtime' and 'Friar' were the cultivars with the highest polyphenol concentration and antioxidant capacity. 'Black Amber' had the highest anthocyanin content and 'Larry Ann' and 'Songold' the highest carotenoid content. 'Sapphire' and 'Black amber' were the cultivars with the highest concentration of ascorbic acid. Our results showed a strong year effect. In conclusion, organic management had an impact on the production of phytochemical compounds in plums.

  20. Abiotic factors and trap design modulate the performance of traps used to monitor the plum curculio.

    PubMed

    Lamothe, Steve; Chouinard, Gérald; Vincent, Charles

    2008-12-01

    All published studies on effects of abiotic factors on plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Hersbt), adults have taken a retrospective approach. Here, we present the results of experiments where factors and their levels were determined and controlled a priori. We compared the effectiveness of miniature pyramidal traps (45 by 20 by 20 cm) constructed of four kind of materials--wood, geotextile, nylon screening, and corrugated plastic--to monitor overwintered and summer adults of univoltine plum curculio. We also studied the effects of photoperiod, temperature, wind, and rain on pyramidal trap effectiveness. The experiments, which were replicated over time, were done in two controlled chambers that were divided into four sections, corresponding to simulated combinations (wind or no wind/rain or no rain). The temperatures tested (15, 20, and 25 degrees C) were randomly assigned in the chambers. During scotophase, geotextile traps captured significantly more overwintered and summer adults than traps made of other materials. The maximum proportion of captures (for overwintered and summer adults) during photophase was obtained at 25 degrees C, and it was significantly different than captures at 15 and 20 degrees C. During scotophase, significantly more overwintered and summer plum curculios were caught at 20 and 25 degrees C than at 15 degrees C. Our experiments demonstrated that geotextile is a good alternative to wooden pyramidal trap. Our results suggest that captures were higher 1) at night, 2) during warmer periods (20 and 25 degrees C), 3) when wind velocity was low and 4) during or shortly after rainfall, and 5) that photoperiod is a factor having an important predictive value for plum curculio captures.

  1. 7 CFR 81.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... means “Application for Prune Tree Removal Program.” (d) Committee means the Prune Marketing Committee... of prune-plum trees after approval of applications by the Committee through June 30, 2002. (f... prune/plums that are dehydrated into dried plums for market. (g) Removal means that the prune-plum trees...

  2. Resident bacteria of plums and their potential for controlling brown rot after harvest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fruit microflora has been the richest source of antagonists against fruit decays and the active ingredient in all currently available commercial biocontrol products. A comprehensive evaluation of plum bacteria for biocontrol activity against Monilinia fructicola, causing brown rot of stone fruit, w...

  3. 77 FR 63897 - Notice of License Terminations for National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Plum Brook...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... test reactor, constructed to perform irradiation testing of fueled and unfueled experiments for space... constructed to test ``mock-up'' irradiation components for the Plum Brook Reactor. The reactors operated from...

  4. Preliminary plan for testing a thermionic reactor in the Plum Brook Space Power Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haley, F. A.

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary plan is presented for testing a thermionic reactor in the Plum Brook Space Power Facility (SPF). A technical approach, cost estimate, manpower estimate, and schedule are presented to cover a 2 year full power reactor test.

  5. NASA's Plum Brook Station Water Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puzak, Robert M.; Kimpton, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    Plum Brook Station's water systems were built in the 1940s to support a World War II ordnance production complex. Because the systems had not been analyzed for current NASA usage, it was unknown if they could meet current requirements and codes or if they were efficient for current use. NASA wanted to determine what improvements would be needed or advisable to support its research projects, so it contracted a hydraulic analysis of the raw and domestic water systems. Burgess and Niple determined current water demands and water flow, developed and calibrated models of the two water systems, and evaluated efficiency improvements and cost-cutting options. They recommended replacing some water mains, installing a new service connection, and removing some high-maintenance items (an underground reservoir, some booster pumps, and a tower).

  6. Chlorophyll Catabolites in Senescent Leaves of the Plum Tree (Prunus domestica).

    PubMed

    Erhart, Theresia; Mittelberger, Cecilia; Vergeiner, Clemens; Scherzer, Gerhard; Holzner, Barbara; Robatscher, Peter; Oberhuber, Michael; Kräutler, Bernhard

    2016-11-01

    In cold extracts of senescent leaves of the plum tree (Prunus domestica ssp. domestica), six colorless non-fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (NCCs) were characterized, named Pd-NCCs. In addition, several minor NCC fractions were tentatively classified. The structure of the most polar one of the NCCs, named Pd-NCC-32, featured an unprecedented twofold glycosidation pattern. Three of the NCCs are also functionalized at their 3 2 -position by a glucopyranosyl group. In addition, two of these glycosidated NCCs carry a dihydroxyethyl group at their 18-position. In the polar Pd-NCC-32, the latter group is further glycosidated at the terminal 18 2 -position. Four other major Pd-NCCs and one minor Pd-NCC were identified with five NCCs from higher plants known to belong to the 'epi'-series. In addition, tentative structures were derived for two minor fractions, classified as yellow chlorophyll catabolites, which represented (formal) oxidation products of two of the observed Pd-NCCs. The chlorophyll catabolites in leaves of plum feature the same basic structural pattern as those found in leaves of apple and pear trees. © 2016 The Authors. Chemistry & Biodiversity Published by Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  7. Effect of Organic and Conventional Management on Bio-Functional Quality of Thirteen Plum Cultivars (Prunus salicina Lindl.)

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Francisco Julián; Pradas, Inmaculada; Ruiz‐Moreno, María José; Arroyo, Francisco Teodoro; Perez-Romero, Luis Felipe; Montenegro, José Carlos; Moreno‐Rojas, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, thirteen Japanese plum cultivars (Prunus salicina Lindl.) grown under conventional and organic conditions were compared to evaluate the influence of the culture system on bioactive compounds. Their organic acids content (malic, citric, tartaric, succinic, shikimic, ascorbic and fumaric acid), total polyphenols, total anthocyanins, total carotenoids and antioxidant capacity (FRAP, ABTS) were evaluated. The study was performed during two consecutive seasons (2012 and 2013) in two experimental orchards located at the IFAPA centre Las Torres-Tomejil (Seville, SW Spain). The culture system affected all the studied parameters except for total carotenoid content. The organic plums had significantly higher polyphenol and anthocyanin concentrations and a greater antioxidant capacity. Additionally, significant differences between cultivars were also found. ‘Showtime’ and ‘Friar’ were the cultivars with the highest polyphenol concentration and antioxidant capacity. ‘Black Amber’ had the highest anthocyanin content and ‘Larry Ann’ and ‘Songold’ the highest carotenoid content. ‘Sapphire’ and ‘Black amber’ were the cultivars with the highest concentration of ascorbic acid. Our results showed a strong year effect. In conclusion, organic management had an impact on the production of phytochemical compounds in plums. PMID:26313546

  8. 7 CFR 944.350 - Safeguard procedures for avocados, grapefruit, kiwifruit, olives, oranges, prune variety plums...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... plums (fresh prunes), and table grapes for processing; (3) Olives for processing into oil; (4) Grapefruit for animal feed; or (5) Avocados for seed shall obtain an “Importer's Exempt Commodity Form” (FV-6...

  9. 7 CFR 944.350 - Safeguard procedures for avocados, grapefruit, kiwifruit, olives, oranges, prune variety plums...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... plums (fresh prunes), and table grapes for processing; (3) Olives for processing into oil; (4) Grapefruit for animal feed; or (5) Avocados for seed shall obtain an “Importer's Exempt Commodity Form” (FV-6...

  10. 7 CFR 944.350 - Safeguard procedures for avocados, grapefruit, kiwifruit, olives, oranges, prune variety plums...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... plums (fresh prunes), and table grapes for processing; (3) Olives for processing into oil; (4) Grapefruit for animal feed; or (5) Avocados for seed shall obtain an “Importer's Exempt Commodity Form” (FV-6...

  11. 7 CFR 944.350 - Safeguard procedures for avocados, grapefruit, kiwifruit, olives, oranges, prune variety plums...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... plums (fresh prunes), and table grapes for processing; (3) Olives for processing into oil; (4) Grapefruit for animal feed; or (5) Avocados for seed shall obtain an “Importer's Exempt Commodity Form” (FV-6...

  12. 7 CFR 944.350 - Safeguard procedures for avocados, grapefruit, kiwifruit, olives, oranges, prune variety plums...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... plums (fresh prunes), and table grapes for processing; (3) Olives for processing into oil; (4) Grapefruit for animal feed; or (5) Avocados for seed shall obtain an “Importer's Exempt Commodity Form” (FV-6...

  13. Current achievements and future directions in genetic engineering of european plum (Prunus domestica L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In most woody fruit species, transformation and regeneration are difficult. However, European plum (Prunus domestica) has been shown to be amenable to genetic improvement technologies from classical hybridization, to genetic engineering, to rapid cycle crop breeding (‘FasTrack’ breeding). Since th...

  14. Effect on lipopolysaccharide structure of aeration during growth of a plum isolate of Pseudomonas syringae pv. morsprunorum.

    PubMed

    Smith, A R; Munro, S M; Wait, R; Hignett, R C

    1994-07-01

    The composition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted with aqueous phenol from a virulent English plum isolate of Pseudomonas syringae pv. morsprunorum varied according to the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in the culture medium at the time of harvest. When pO2 was low, the organism grew slowly and produced smooth LPS bearing rhamnan sidechains. As pO2 was raised, the rate of growth increased and smooth LPS was replaced by a rough species deficient in rhamnose, which co-extracted with a D-glucan. Organization of rhamnose and glucose into separate polymers was shown by the selective susceptibility of the rhamnose-containing polymer to hydrolysis by rhamnanase of the phage A7. By methylation analysis, GC-MS, and 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy, the glucan was shown to consist of alpha (1-->4)-linked residues with alpha (1-->4,6)-branch points and non-reducing terminal residues in the approximate ratio 4:1:1, resembling glycogen in composition. A glucan which co-extracted with LPS using phenol/water from an avirulent plum isolate that was resistant to lysis by phages A1 and A7 was shown by methylation analysis to have a similar structure. Whether the effect on LPS composition was due directly to pO2, or was dependent on the rate of growth, has not been established. It is suggested that, because epiphytic growth would entail exposure to high pO2, English plum isolates growing on the surfaces of host plants might be unable to produce smooth LPS. Since cell surface composition affects virulence in plant-pathogenic pseudomonads, this effect could account for the observed failure of the English plum isolates to enter the host via leaf scars.

  15. Water quality, sources of nitrate, and chemical loadings in the Geronimo Creek and Plum Creek watersheds, south-central Texas, April 2015–March 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, Rebecca B.; Opsahl, Stephen P.; Musgrove, MaryLynn

    2017-12-22

    Located in south-central Texas, the Geronimo Creek and Plum Creek watersheds have long been characterized by elevated nitrate concentrations. From April 2015 through March 2016, an assessment was done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority and the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, to characterize nitrate concentrations and to document possible sources of elevated nitrate in these two watersheds. Water-quality samples were collected from stream, spring, and groundwater sites distributed across the two watersheds, along with precipitation samples and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent samples from the Plum Creek watershed, to characterize endmember concentrations and isotopic compositions from April 2015 through March 2016. Stream, spring, and groundwater samples from both watersheds were collected during four synoptic sampling events to characterize spatial and temporal variations in water quality and chemical loadings. Water-quality and -quantity data from the WWTPs and stream discharge data also were considered. Samples were analyzed for major ions, selected trace elements, nutrients, and stable isotopes of water and nitrate.The dominant land use in both watersheds is agriculture (cultivated crops, rangeland, and grassland and pasture). The upper part of the Plum Creek watershed is more highly urbanized and has five major WWTPs; numerous smaller permitted wastewater outfalls are concentrated in the upper and central parts of the Plum Creek watershed. The Geronimo Creek watershed, in contrast, has no WWTPs upstream from or near the sampling sites.Results indicate that water quality in the Geronimo Creek watershed, which was evaluated only during base-flow conditions, is dominated by groundwater, which discharges to the stream by numerous springs at various locations. Nitrate isotope values for most Geronimo Creek samples were similar, which indicates that they likely have a common source (or

  16. Transformation of plum plants with a cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase transgene leads to enhanced water stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Vivancos, Pedro; Faize, Lydia; Nicolás, Emilio; Clemente-Moreno, Maria José; Bru-Martinez, Roque; Burgos, Lorenzo; Hernández, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Water deficit is the most serious environmental factor limiting agricultural production. In this work, the tolerance to water stress (WS) of transgenic plum lines harbouring transgenes encoding cytosolic antioxidant enzymes was studied, with the aim of achieving the durable resistance of commercial plum trees. Methods The acclimatization process was successful for two transgenic lines: line C3-1, co-expressing superoxide dismutase (two copies) and ascorbate peroxidase (one copy) transgenes simultaneously; and line J8-1, harbouring four copies of the cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase gene (cytapx). Plant water relations, chlorophyll fluorescence and the levels of antioxidant enzymes were analysed in both lines submitted to moderate (7 d) and severe (15 d) WS conditions. Additionally, in line J8-1, showing the best response in terms of stress tolerance, a proteomic analysis and determination of the relative gene expression of two stress-responsive genes were carried out. Key Results Line J8-1 exhibited an enhanced stress tolerance that correlated with better photosynthetic performance and a tighter control of water-use efficiency. Furthermore, this WS tolerance also correlated with a higher enzymatic antioxidant capacity than wild-type (WT) and line C3-1 plum plants. On the other hand, line C3-1 displayed an intermediate phenotype between WT plants and line J8-1 in terms of WS tolerance. Under severe WS, the tolerance displayed by J8-1 plants could be due to an enhanced capacity to cope with drought-induced oxidative stress. Moreover, proteomic analysis revealed differences between WT and J8-1 plants, mainly in terms of the abundance of proteins related to carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, antioxidant defences and protein fate. Conclusions The transformation of plum plants with cytapx has a profound effect at the physiological, biochemical, proteomic and genetic levels, enhancing WS tolerance. Although further experiments under field

  17. Retention of storage quality and post-refrigeration shelf-life extension of plum (Prunus domestica L.) cv. Santa Rosa using combination of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) coating and gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Peerzada R.; Suradkar, Prashant P.; Wani, Ali M.; Dar, Mohd A.

    2015-02-01

    Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) coatings alone and in combination with gamma irradiation was tested for maintaining the storage quality and extending shelf-life of plum. Matured green plums were CMC coated at levels 0.5-1.0% w/v and gamma irradiated at 1.5 kGy. The treated fruit including control was stored under ambient (temperature 25±2 °C, RH 70%) and refrigerated (temperature 3±1 °C, RH 80%) conditions. In fruits treated with individual treatments of 1.0% w/v CMC; 1.5 kGy irradiation and combination of 1.0% w/v CMC and 1.5 kGy irradiation, no decay was recorded up to 11, 17 and 21 days of ambient storage. Irradiation alone at 1.5 kGy gave 8 days extension in shelf-life of plum compared to 5 days by 1.0% w/v CMC coating following 45 days of refrigeration. All combinatory treatments of CMC coating and irradiation proved beneficial in maintaining the storage quality as well as delaying the decaying of plum during post-refrigerated storage at 25±2 °C, RH 70% but, combination of CMC at 1.0% w/v and 1.5 kGy irradiation was found significantly (p≤0.05) superior to all other treatments in maintaining the storage quality and delaying the decaying of plum. CMC coating of plums at 1.0% w/v followed by irradiation at 1.5 kGy resulted in chlorophyll retention of 19.4% after 16 days compared to 10% in control after 8 days of ambient storage. Under refrigerated conditions, same treatment gave retention of 67.6% in chlorophyll compared to 10.6% in control after 35 days of storage. The above combinatory treatment resulted in extension of 11 days in shelf-life of plum during post-refrigerated storage at 25±2 °C, RH 70% following 45 days of refrigeration. Based on microbial analysis, irradiation alone at 1.5 kGy and in combination with 1.0% w/v CMC resulted in 2.0 and 1.8 log reduction in yeast and mold count of plum fruit after 20 and 35 days of ambient and refrigerated storage, thereby ensuring consumer safety.

  18. Culturable bacteria from plum fruit surfaces and their potential for controlling brown rot after harvest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fruit microflora has been the richest source of antagonists against fruit decays and the active ingredient in all currently available commercial biocontrol products. A comprehensive evaluation of plum bacteria for biocontrol activity against Monilinia fructicola, causing brown rot of stone fruit, w...

  19. Chemical and Nutritional Composition of Terminalia ferdinandiana (Kakadu Plum) Kernels: A Novel Nutrition Source

    PubMed Central

    Netzel, Michael E.; Tinggi, Ujang

    2018-01-01

    Terminalia ferdinandiana (Kakadu plum) is a native Australian fruit. Industrial processing of T. ferdinandiana fruits into puree generates seeds as a by-product, which are generally discarded. The aim of our present study was to process the seed to separate the kernel and determine its nutritional composition. The proximate, mineral and fatty acid compositions were analysed in this study. Kernels are composed of 35% fat, while proteins account for 32% dry weight (DW). The energy content and fiber were 2065 kJ/100 g and 21.2% DW, respectively. Furthermore, the study showed that kernels were a very rich source of minerals and trace elements, such as potassium (6693 mg/kg), calcium (5385 mg/kg), iron (61 mg/kg) and zinc (60 mg/kg) DW, and had low levels of heavy metals. The fatty acid composition of the kernels consisted of omega-6 fatty acid, linoleic acid (50.2%), monounsaturated oleic acid (29.3%) and two saturated fatty acids namely palmitic acid (12.0%) and stearic acid (7.2%). The results indicate that T. ferdinandiana kernels have the potential to be utilized as a novel protein source for dietary purposes and non-conventional supply of linoleic, palmitic and oleic acids. PMID:29649154

  20. INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY REPORT FOR THE REACTOR BUILDING, HOT LABORATORY, PRIMARY PUMP HOUSE, AND LAND AREAS AT THE PLUM BROOK REACTOR FACILITY, SANDUSKY, OHIO

    SciTech Connect

    Erika N. Bailey

    2011-10-10

    In 1941, the War Department acquired approximately 9,000 acres of land near Sandusky, Ohio and constructed a munitions plant. The Plum Brook Ordnance Works Plant produced munitions, such as TNT, until the end of World War II. Following the war, the land remained idle until the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics later called the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) obtained 500 acres to construct a nuclear research reactor designed to study the effects of radiation on materials used in space flight. The research reactor was put into operation in 1961 and was the first of fifteen test facilities eventuallymore » built by NASA at the Plum Brook Station. By 1963, NASA had acquired the remaining land at Plum Brook for these additional test facilities« less

  1. Pesticide extraction from table grapes and plums using ionic liquid based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Ravelo-Pérez, Lidia M; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Herrera-Herrera, Antonio V; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Angel

    2009-12-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) have been used as extraction solvents in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) for the determination of eight multi-class pesticides (i.e. thiophanate-methyl, carbofuran, carbaryl, tebuconazole, iprodione, oxyfluorfen, hexythiazox, and fenazaquin) in table grapes and plums. The developed method involves the combination of DLLME and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. Samples were first homogenized and extracted with acetonitrile. After evaporation and reconstitution of the extract in water containing sodium chloride, a quick DLLME procedure that used the ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C(6)MIM][PF(6)]) and methanol was developed. The RTIL dissolved in a very small volume of acetonitrile was directed injected in the chromatographic system. The comparison between the calibration curves obtained from standards and from spiked sample extracts (matrix-matched calibration) showed the existence of a strong matrix effect for most of the analyzed pesticides. A recovery study was also developed with five consecutive extractions of the two types of fruits spiked at three concentration levels. Mean recovery values were in the range of 72-100% for table grapes and 66-105% for plum samples (except for thiophanate-methyl and carbofuran, which were 64-75% and 58-66%, respectively). Limits of detection (LODs) were in the range 0.651-5.44 microg/kg for table grapes and 0.902-6.33 microg/kg for plums, representing LODs below the maximum residue limits (MRLs) established by the European Union in these fruits. The potential of the method was demonstrated by analyzing 12 commercial fruit samples (six of each type).

  2. Effects of solid-state fermentation with two filamentous fungi on the total phenolic contents, flavonoids, antioxidant activities and lipid fractions of plum fruit (Prunus domestica L.) by-products.

    PubMed

    Dulf, Francisc Vasile; Vodnar, Dan Cristian; Socaciu, Carmen

    2016-10-15

    Evolutions of phenolic contents and antioxidant activities during solid-state fermentation (SSF) of plum pomaces (from the juice industry) and brandy distillery wastes with Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oligosporus were investigated. The effect of fermentation time on the oil content and major lipid classes in the plum kernels was also studied. Results showed that total phenolic (TP) amounts increased by over 30% for SSF with Rhizopus oligosporus and by >21% for SSF with A. niger. The total flavonoid contents presented similar tendencies to those of the TPs. The free radical scavenging activities of methanolic extracts were also significantly enhanced. The HPLC-MS analysis showed that quercetin-3-glucoside was the major phenolic compound in both fermented plum by-products. The results also demonstrated that SSF not only helped to achieve higher lipid recovery from plum kernels, but also resulted in oils with better quality attributes (high sterol ester and n-3 PUFA-rich polar lipid contents). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transformation of plum plants with a cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase transgene leads to enhanced water stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Vivancos, Pedro; Faize, Lydia; Nicolás, Emilio; Clemente-Moreno, Maria José; Bru-Martinez, Roque; Burgos, Lorenzo; Hernández, José Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Water deficit is the most serious environmental factor limiting agricultural production. In this work, the tolerance to water stress (WS) of transgenic plum lines harbouring transgenes encoding cytosolic antioxidant enzymes was studied, with the aim of achieving the durable resistance of commercial plum trees. The acclimatization process was successful for two transgenic lines: line C3-1, co-expressing superoxide dismutase (two copies) and ascorbate peroxidase (one copy) transgenes simultaneously; and line J8-1, harbouring four copies of the cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase gene (cytapx). Plant water relations, chlorophyll fluorescence and the levels of antioxidant enzymes were analysed in both lines submitted to moderate (7 d) and severe (15 d) WS conditions. Additionally, in line J8-1, showing the best response in terms of stress tolerance, a proteomic analysis and determination of the relative gene expression of two stress-responsive genes were carried out. Line J8-1 exhibited an enhanced stress tolerance that correlated with better photosynthetic performance and a tighter control of water-use efficiency. Furthermore, this WS tolerance also correlated with a higher enzymatic antioxidant capacity than wild-type (WT) and line C3-1 plum plants. On the other hand, line C3-1 displayed an intermediate phenotype between WT plants and line J8-1 in terms of WS tolerance. Under severe WS, the tolerance displayed by J8-1 plants could be due to an enhanced capacity to cope with drought-induced oxidative stress. Moreover, proteomic analysis revealed differences between WT and J8-1 plants, mainly in terms of the abundance of proteins related to carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, antioxidant defences and protein fate. The transformation of plum plants with cytapx has a profound effect at the physiological, biochemical, proteomic and genetic levels, enhancing WS tolerance. Although further experiments under field conditions will be required, it is proposed that J8

  4. [Investigation of Acaroid mites breeding in stored dry fruits].

    PubMed

    Tao, Ning; Zhan, Xiao-dong; Sun, En-tao; Li, Chao-pin

    2015-12-01

    To study the species and density of Acaroid mites breeding in stored dry fruits. The samples from the dried fruit stores and warehouses were collected, and the mites breeding in them were separated, then the slides with mites were prepared and observed by a light microscope for species identification and counting. The indexes such as the breeding density, species richness index, diversity index and evenness index were calculated. Totally 12 species of Acaroid mites belonging to 6 families and 10 genera were obtained from the total 49 samples. The dominant mite species were Carpoglyphus lactis, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Acarus siro, and Caloglyphus berlesei. The breeding densities of mites in longans, filberts and plum candies were 79.78, 48.91, 35.73 mites/g, respectively, which were higher than those in other dry fruits. The seasonal variation experiment of mites found that the average breeding density of acaroid mites was higher in July and October, the richness index and diversity index reached the highest value in July, and the evenness index was higher in January and April. The observation of the growth and decline of Acaroid mites under the artificial condition found the number of Caloglyphus berlesei declined sharply and Tyrophagus putrescentiae first increased and then decreased. The pollution of Acaroid mites is serious in the stored dried fruits, for which the positive prevention and control measures to the mite breeding should be taken to reduce the harm.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of Plum pox virus in Japan.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Kensaku; Himeno, Misako; Komatsu, Ken; Takinami, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Shuichiro; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Oshima, Kenro; Namba, Shigetou

    2011-05-01

    For a molecular epidemiological study based on complete genome sequences, 37 Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates were collected from the Kanto region in Japan. Pair-wise analyses revealed that all 37 Japanese isolates belong to the PPV-D strain, with low genetic diversity (less than 0.8%). In phylogenetic analysis of the PPV-D strain based on complete nucleotide sequences, the relationships of the PPV-D strain were reconstructed with high resolution: at the global level, the American, Canadian, and Japanese isolates formed their own distinct monophyletic clusters, suggesting that the routes of viral entry into these countries were independent; at the local level, the actual transmission histories of PPV were precisely reconstructed with high bootstrap support. This is the first description of the molecular epidemiology of PPV based on complete genome sequences.

  6. Tempo-spatial dynamics of adult plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) based on semiochemical-baited trap captures in blueberries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), has become an important pest of highbush blueberries in the northeastern USA. Here, we conducted experiments in 2010-2013 to compare the efficacy of semiochemical-baited traps for C. nenuphar versus conventional (beating cloth) sampling methods in blu...

  7. A high throughput transformation system allows the regeneration of marker-free plum plants (Prunus domestica L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A high-throughput transformation system previously developed in our laboratory was used for the regeneration of transgenic plum plants without the use of antibiotic selection. The system was first tested with two experimental constructs, pGA482GGi and pCAMBIAgfp94(35S), that contain selective marke...

  8. Precise and low-cost monitoring of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) pest activity in pyramid traps with cameras.

    PubMed

    Selby, R D; Gage, S H; Whalon, M E

    2014-04-01

    Incorporating camera systems into insect traps potentially benefits insect phenology modeling, nonlethal insect monitoring, and research into the automated identification of traps counts. Cameras originally for monitoring mammals were instead adapted to monitor the entrance to pyramid traps designed to capture the plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Using released curculios, two new trap designs (v.I and v.II) were field-tested alongside conventional pyramid traps at one site in autumn 2010 and at four sites in autumn 2012. The traps were evaluated on the basis of battery power, ease-of-maintenance, adaptability, required-user-skills, cost (including labor), and accuracy-of-results. The v.II design fully surpassed expectations, except that some trapped curculios were not photographed. In 2012, 13 of the 24 traps recorded every curculio entering the traps during the 18-d study period, and in traps where some curculios were not photographed, over 90% of the omissions could be explained by component failure or external interference with the motion sensor. Significantly more curculios entered the camera traps between 1800 and 0000 hours. When compared with conventional pyramid traps, the v.I traps collected a similar number of curculios. Two observed but not significant trends were that the v.I traps collected twice as many plum curculios as the v.II traps, while at the same time the v.II traps collected more than twice as many photos per plum curculio as the v.I traps. The research demonstrates that low-cost, precise monitoring of field insect populations is feasible without requiring extensive technical expertise.

  9. 40 CFR 180.593 - Etoxazole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., undelinted seed 0.05 Cucumber 0.02 Fruit, pome, group 11 0.20 Fruit, stone, group 12, except plum 1.0 Goat..., liver 0.01 Milk, fat 0.01 Nut, tree, group 14 0.01 Peppermint, oil 20 Peppermint, tops 10 Pistachio 0.01 Plum 0.15 Plum, prune, dried 0.30 Sheep, fat 0.02 Sheep, liver 0.01 Spearmint, oil 20 Spearmint, tops...

  10. 40 CFR 180.553 - Fenhexamid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 10 Pepper, nonbell 0.02 Pistachio 0.02 Plum, prune, dried 2.5 Plum, prune, fresh 1.5 Pomegranate 2.0 Salal 5.0 Strawberry 3.0 Vegetable, fruiting, group 8, except nonbell pepper 2.0 (b) Section 18...

  11. Evaluating food additives as antifungal agents against Monilinia fructicola in vitro and in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose-lipid composite edible coatings for plums.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Hakan; Pérez-Gago, María B; Taberner, Verònica; Palou, Lluís

    2014-06-02

    Common food preservative agents were evaluated in in vitro tests for their antifungal activity against Monilinia fructicola, the most economically important pathogen causing postharvest disease of stone fruits. Radial mycelial growth was measured in Petri dishes of PDA amended with three different concentrations of the agents (0.01-0.2%, v/v) after 7 days of incubation at 25 °C. Thirteen out of fifteen agents tested completely inhibited the radial growth of the fungus at various concentrations. Among them, ammonium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate and sodium bicarbonate were the most effective while sodium acetate and sodium formate were the least effective. The effective agents and concentrations were tested as ingredients of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)-lipid edible coatings against brown rot disease on plums previously inoculated with M. fructicola (curative activity). 'Friar' and 'Larry Ann' plums were inoculated with the pathogen, coated with stable edible coatings about 24h later, and incubated at 20 °C and 90% RH. Disease incidence (%) and severity (lesion diameter) were determined after 4, 6, and 8 days of incubation and the 'area under the disease progress stairs' (AUDPS) was calculated. Coatings containing bicarbonates and parabens significantly reduced brown rot incidence in plums, but potassium sorbate, used at 1.0% in the coating formulation, was the most effective agent with a reduction rate of 28.6%. All the tested coatings reduced disease severity to some extent, but coatings containing 0.1% sodium methylparaben or sodium ethylparaben or 0.2% ammonium carbonate or ammonium bicarbonate were superior to the rest, with reduction rates of 45-50%. Overall, the results showed that most of the agents tested in this study had significant antimicrobial activity against M. fructicola and the application of selected antifungal edible coatings is a promising alternative for the control of postharvest brown rot in plums. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B

  12. Ectopic expression of class 1 KNOX genes induce adventitious shoot regeneration and alter growth and development of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and European plum (Prunus domestica L).

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, C; Liu, Zongrang; Scorza, Ralph

    2011-04-01

    Transgenic plants of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and European plum (Prunus domestica L) were produced by transforming with the apple class 1 KNOX genes (MdKN1 and MdKN2) or corn KNOX1 gene. Transgenic tobacco plants were regenerated in vitro from transformed leaf discs cultured in a medium lacking cytokinin. Ectopic expression of KNOX genes retarded shoot growth by suppressing elongation of internodes in transgenic tobacco plants. Expression of each of the three KNOX1 genes induced malformation and extensive lobbing in tobacco leaves. In situ regeneration of adventitious shoots was observed from leaves and roots of transgenic tobacco plants expressing each of the three KNOX genes. In vitro culture of leaf explants and internode sections excised from in vitro grown MdKN1 expressing tobacco shoots regenerated adventitious shoots on MS (Murashige and Skoog 1962) basal medium in the absence of exogenous cytokinin. Transgenic plum plants that expressed the MdKN2 or corn KNOX1 gene grew normally but MdKN1 caused a significant reduction in plant height, leaf shape and size and produced malformed curly leaves. A high frequency of adventitious shoot regeneration (96%) was observed in cultures of leaf explants excised from corn KNOX1-expressing transgenic plum shoots. In contrast to KNOX1-expressing tobacco, leaf and internode explants of corn KNOX1-expressing plum required synthetic cytokinin (thidiazuron) in the culture medium to induce adventitious shoot regeneration. The induction of high-frequency regeneration of adventitious shoots in vitro from leaves and stem internodal sections of plum through the ectopic expression of a KNOX1 gene is the first such report for a woody perennial fruit trees.

  13. 75 FR 20558 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Plum Pox Compensation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... owners of commercial stone fruit orchards and fruit tree nurseries whose trees or nursery stock were... trees or other plant material infected with PPV, nor are there any known effective preventive treatments... of infected and exposed trees and other infected plant material. The regulations in ``Subpart-Plum...

  14. Plant and environment interactions: Growth and yield response of commercial bearing-age {open_quote}Casselman{close_quote} plum trees to various ozone partial pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Retzlaff, W.A.; Williams, L.E.; DeJong, T.M.

    1997-05-01

    Nursery stock of plum (Prunus salicina Lindel., cv. Casselman) was planted 1 Apr. 1988 in an experimental orchard at the Univ. of California Kearney Agricultural Center near Fresno, CA. Trees in this study were enclosed in open-top fumigation chambers on 1 May 1989, and exposed to three atmospheric ozone partial pressures (charcoal filtered air, ambient air, and ambient air + ozone) during the 1989 through 1992 growing seasons (typically 1 Apr. - 1 Nov.). A nonchamber treatment plot was used to assess chamber effects on tree performance. This study details the results of the exposures during the initial commercial bearingmore » period (1991 through 1993) in this orchard. The mean 12-h (0800-2000 h Pacific Daylight Time [PDT]) ozone partial pressures during the experimental periods in the charcoal filtered, ambient, ambient + ozone, and nonchamber treatments averaged 0.031, 0.048, 0.091, and 0.056 {mu}Pa Pa{sup {minus}1} in 1991 and 1992, respectively. Fruit number per tree decreased as atmospheric ozone partial pressure increased from the charcoal filtered to ambient + ozone treatment, significantly affecting yield. Yield of plum trees averaged 23.6, 19.8, 13.7, and 17.9 kg tree{sup {minus}1} in 1991 and 1992 in the charcoal filtered, ambient, ambient + ozone, and nonchamber treatments, respectively. Only one out of the five original treatment plots was exposed to ozone treatments during the 1993 growing season. Yield of plum trees in this single replicate in 1993 was reduced by increased atmospheric ozone partial pressure. Yield of plum trees in the four remaining unexposed treatment plots in 1993 was 16.7, 17.9, and 16.0 kg tree{sup {minus}1} in the previous charcoal filtered, ambient, and ambient + ozone treatments respectively. The similarity in yield of the post-chamber treatments indicates that a change in air quality in the current growing season can affect yield of Casselman plum trees. 26 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.« less

  15. Plum Fruit Development Occurs via Gibberellin–Sensitive and –Insensitive DELLA Repressors

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, Islam; Sherif, Sherif; Abdulla, Mahboob

    2017-01-01

    Fruit growth depends on highly coordinated hormonal activities. The phytohormone gibberellin (GA) promotes growth by triggering degradation of the growth-repressing DELLA proteins; however, the extent to which such proteins contribute to GA-mediated fruit development remains to be clarified. Three new plum genes encoding DELLA proteins, PslGAI, PslRGL and PslRGA were isolated and functionally characterized. Analysis of expression profile during fruit development suggested that PslDELLA are transcriptionally regulated during flower and fruit ontogeny with potential positive regulation by GA and ethylene, depending on organ and developmental stage. PslGAI and PslRGL deduced proteins contain all domains present in typical DELLA proteins. However, PslRGA exhibited a degenerated DELLA domain and subsequently lacks in GID1–DELLA interaction property. PslDELLA–overexpression in WT Arabidopsis caused dramatic disruption in overall growth including root length, stem elongation, plant architecture, flower structure, fertility, and considerable retardation in development due to dramatic distortion in GA-metabolic pathway. GA treatment enhanced PslGAI/PslRGL interaction with PslGID1 receptors, causing protein destabilization and relief of growth-restraining effect. By contrast, PslRGA protein was not degraded by GA due to its inability to interact with PslGID1. Relative to other PslDELLA–mutants, PslRGA–plants displayed stronger constitutive repressive growth that was irreversible by GA application. The present results describe additional complexities in GA-signalling during plum fruit development, which may be particularly important to optimize successful reproductive growth. PMID:28076366

  16. Complete genome sequence of a novel Plum pox virus strain W isolate determined by 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Sheveleva, Anna; Kudryavtseva, Anna; Speranskaya, Anna; Belenikin, Maxim; Melnikova, Natalia; Chirkov, Sergei

    2013-10-01

    The near-complete (99.7 %) genome sequence of a novel Russian Plum pox virus (PPV) isolate Pk, belonging to the strain Winona (W), has been determined by 454 pyrosequencing with the exception of the thirty-one 5'-terminal nucleotides. This region was amplified using 5'RACE kit and sequenced by the Sanger method. Genomic RNA released from immunocaptured PPV particles was employed for generation of cDNA library using TransPlex Whole transcriptome amplification kit (WTA2, Sigma-Aldrich). The entire Pk genome has identity level of 92.8-94.5 % when compared to the complete nucleotide sequences of other PPV-W isolates (W3174, LV-141pl, LV-145bt, and UKR 44189), confirming a high degree of variability within the PPV-W strain. The isolates Pk and LV-141pl are most closely related. The Pk has been found in a wild plum (Prunus domestica) in a new region of Russia indicating widespread dissemination of the PPV-W strain in the European part of the former USSR.

  17. 40 CFR 180.593 - Etoxazole; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Papaya 0.20 Pepper/eggplant subgroup 8-10B 0.20 Peppermint, oil 20 Peppermint, tops 10 Pistachio 0.01 Plum 0.15 Plum, prune, dried 0.30 Sapodilla 0.20 Sapote, black 0.20 Sapote, mamey 0.20 Sheep, fat 0.02...

  18. S genotyping in Japanese plum and sweet cherry by allele-specific hybridization using streptavidin-coated magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Tonosaki, Kaoru; Kitashiba, Hiroyasu; Nishio, Takeshi

    2013-04-01

    We report a rapid and reliable method for S genotyping of Rosaceae fruit trees, which would to be useful for successful planting of cross-compatible cultivars in orchards. Japanese plum (Prunus salicina) and sweet cherry (Prunus avium), belonging to the family Rosaceae, possess gametophytic self-incompatibility controlled by a single polymorphic locus containing at least two linked genes, S-RNase and SFB (S-haplotype-specific F-box gene). For successful planting of cross-compatible cultivars of Rosaceae fruit trees in commercial orchards, it is necessary to obtain information on S genotypes of cultivars. Recently, a method of dot-blot analysis utilizing allele-specific oligonucleotides having sequences of SFB-HVa region has been developed for identification of S haplotypes in Japanese plum and sweet cherry. However, dot-blot hybridization requires considerable time and skill for analysis even of a small number of plant samples. Thus, a quick and efficient method for S genotyping was developed in this study. In this method, instead of a nylon membrane used for dot-blot hybridization, streptavidin-coated magnetic beads are used to immobilize PCR products, which are hybridized with allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. Our improved method allowed us to identify 10 S haplotypes (S-a, S-b, S-c, S-d, S-e, S-f, S-h, S-k, S-7 and S-10) of 13 Japanese plum cultivars and 10 S haplotypes (S-1, S-2, S-3, S-4, S-4', S-5, S-6, S-7, S-9 and S-16) of 13 sweet cherry cultivars utilizing SFB or S-RNase gene polymorphism. This method would be suitable for identification of S genotypes of a small number of plant samples.

  19. Lethality of reduced-risk insecticides against plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in blueberries with emphasis on their curative activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ongoing regulatory changes are eliminating or restricting the use of broad-spectrum insecticides in fruit crops in the USA, and current IPM programs for plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), in highbush blueberries, Vaccinium corymbosum L, need to address these changes. To assist in this ...

  20. The effects of a 6-month resistance training and dried plum consumption intervention on strength, body composition, blood markers of bone turnover, and inflammation in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Simonavice, Emily; Liu, Pei-Yang; Ilich, Jasminka Z; Kim, Jeong-Su; Arjmandi, Bahram; Panton, Lynn B

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of resistance training (RT) and dried plum (DP) consumption on strength, body composition, blood markers of bone, and inflammation in breast cancer survivors (BCS). Twenty-three BCS (RT, n = 12; RT+DP, n = 11), aged 64 ± 7 years, were evaluated at baseline and after 6 months of intervention on the following: muscular strength (chest press and leg extension) via 1-repetition maximums (1RMs); body composition, specifically bone mineral density (BMD) by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; biochemical markers of bone turnover (bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-5b)); and inflammation (C-reactive protein (CRP)). Target RT prescription was 2 days/week of 10 exercises, including 2 sets of 8-12 repetitions at ∼60%-80% of 1RM. RT+DP also consumed 90 g of DP daily. There were no baseline differences between groups or any group-by-time interactions for any of the variables. BCS increased upper (p < 0.05) (RT: 64 ± 14 to 80 ± 17 kg; RT+DP: 72 ± 23 to 91 ± 20 kg) and lower (p < 0.05) (RT: 69 ± 20 to 87 ± 28 kg; RT+DP: 78 ± 19 to 100 ± 21 kg) body strength. Body composition and BMD improvements were not observed. TRAP-5b decreased in the RT group (p < 0.05) (4.55 ± 1.57 to 4.04 ± 1.63 U/L) and the RT+DP group (p = 0.07) (5.10 ± 2.75 to 4.27 ± 2.03 U/L). Changes in BAP and CRP were not observed. RT was effective for improving biochemical markers of bone turnover and muscular strength in BCS. A longer and higher intensity intervention may be needed to reveal the true effects of RT and DP on body composition and biochemical markers of inflammation.

  1. An inexpensive alternative to routine section adhesives for histology: the mucilaginous substance of the Assyrian plum.

    PubMed

    Al-Shammary, Hayfaa A

    2014-05-01

    We found that the mucilaginous substance of the Assyrian plum, Cordia myxa, can be used as an adhesive for attaching sections of animal tissues to slides. Unlike Mayer's albumen, this material left no stainable residue and had no noticeable effect on the histological structure of the tissue sections. The mucilaginous substance of C. myxa is a useful and inexpensive alternative to standard adhesives.

  2. 7 CFR 81.17 - Death, incompetency, or disappearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Death, incompetency, or disappearance. 81.17 Section... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.17 Death, incompetency, or disappearance. In the case of death, incompetency, disappearance, or dissolution of a prune/plum producer that...

  3. 7 CFR 81.17 - Death, incompetency, or disappearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Death, incompetency, or disappearance. 81.17 Section... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.17 Death, incompetency, or disappearance. In the case of death, incompetency, disappearance, or dissolution of a prune/plum producer that...

  4. 7 CFR 81.17 - Death, incompetency, or disappearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Death, incompetency, or disappearance. 81.17 Section... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.17 Death, incompetency, or disappearance. In the case of death, incompetency, disappearance, or dissolution of a prune/plum producer that...

  5. 7 CFR 81.17 - Death, incompetency, or disappearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Death, incompetency, or disappearance. 81.17 Section... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.17 Death, incompetency, or disappearance. In the case of death, incompetency, disappearance, or dissolution of a prune/plum producer that...

  6. 7 CFR 81.17 - Death, incompetency, or disappearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Death, incompetency, or disappearance. 81.17 Section... DOMESTIC CONSUMPTION PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.17 Death, incompetency, or disappearance. In the case of death, incompetency, disappearance, or dissolution of a prune/plum producer that...

  7. 7 CFR 81.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .../DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.3 Definitions. (a) Administrator means the Administrator of AMS. (b... means “Application for Prune Tree Removal Program.” (d) Committee means the Prune Marketing Committee... of prune-plum trees after approval of applications by the Committee through June 30, 2002. (f...

  8. 7 CFR 81.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .../DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.3 Definitions. (a) Administrator means the Administrator of AMS. (b... means “Application for Prune Tree Removal Program.” (d) Committee means the Prune Marketing Committee... of prune-plum trees after approval of applications by the Committee through June 30, 2002. (f...

  9. 7 CFR 81.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .../DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.3 Definitions. (a) Administrator means the Administrator of AMS. (b... means “Application for Prune Tree Removal Program.” (d) Committee means the Prune Marketing Committee... of prune-plum trees after approval of applications by the Committee through June 30, 2002. (f...

  10. 7 CFR 81.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .../DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.3 Definitions. (a) Administrator means the Administrator of AMS. (b... means “Application for Prune Tree Removal Program.” (d) Committee means the Prune Marketing Committee... of prune-plum trees after approval of applications by the Committee through June 30, 2002. (f...

  11. Water Use and Requirements of PtFT1 Plums for Long Duration Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Early applications of bioregenerative life support technologies for space exploration will likely start with supplemental food production for the crew. This could include fresh, perishable foods that cannot be stored for long and but have a high impact on the diet acceptability bioavailable nutrients. Because of the limited working volume in spacecraft, these plants must be small in size. A combination of CIF (Center Innovation Fund) and NASA Post Doctoral funding was used in FY15 to develop horticultural approaches for propagation, production and fruiting of several dwarf plum lines and evaluate their suitability as candidates for long duration space missions. Collaborators at the USDA Agricultural Research Service transformed Prunus domestica with the FT1 (Flowering Locus T1) flowering gene from Populus trichocarpa (PtFTl), which resulted in early flowering, driving the plant out of its juvenile growth phase and into reproductive development years earlier than would normally occur. The result is a plum line that has potential as a component of food production system on long-duration space missions since it completes complete generation (seed-to-seed) within less than a year and maintains a dwarf-bush or vine-like growth habit. Further, there appears to be no obligatory requirement for a dormancy period, resulting in continuous fruit production on a given plant. This potential is described in Graham et al (2015, in press).

  12. Olfactometer responses of plum curculio Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to host plant volatiles, synthetic grandisoic acid, and live conspecifics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The plum curculio Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a major pest of pome and stone fruit, but will also attack other fruits. Males produce the aggregation pheromone grandisoic acid; emitting only the (+)- enantiomer which is attractive to both sexes of the univoltine an...

  13. Nutrients and organic compounds in Deer Creek and south branch Plum Creek in southwestern Pennsylvania, April 1996 through September 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, D.R.; Clark, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents results of an analysis of nutrient and pesticide data from two surface-water sites and volatile organic compound (VOC) data from one of the sites that are within the Allegheny and Monongahela River Basins study unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. The Deer Creek site was located in a 27.0 square-mile basin within the Allegheny River Basin in Allegheny County. The primary land uses consist of small urban areas, large areas of residential housing, and some agricultural land in the upper part of the basin. The South Branch Plum Creek site was located in a 33.3 square-mile basin within the Allegheny River Basin in Indiana County. The primary land uses throughout this basin are mostly agriculture and forestland.Water samples for analysis of nutrients were collected monthly and during high-flow events from April 1996 through September 1998. Concentrations of dissolved nitrite, dissolved ammonia plus organic nitrogen, and dissolved phosphorus were less than the method detection limits in more than one-half of the samples collected. The median concentration of dissolved nitrite plus nitrate in South Branch Plum Creek was 0.937 mg/L and 0.597 mg/L in Deer Creek. The median concentration of dissolved orthophosphate was 0.01 mg/L in both streams. High loads of nitrate were measured in both streams from March to June. Concentrations of dissolved ammonia nitrogen, dissolved nitrate, and total phosphorus were lower during the summer months. Measured concentrations of nitrate nitrogen in both streams were well below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 mg/L.Water samples for analysis of pesticides were collected throughout 1997 in both streams and during a storm event on August 25-26, 1998, in Deer Creek. Samples were collected monthly at both sites and more frequently during the spring and early summer months to coincide with application of pesticides. Seventy

  14. 7 CFR 81.5 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... separations from other blocks and contain at least 1,000 eligible trees or comprise an entire orchard. (b) Any... program, the trees to be removed must have yielded at least 1.5 tons of dried prune/plums per net-planted...-plum trees. Abandoned orchards and dead trees will not qualify. In new orchards diverted, qualifying...

  15. 7 CFR 81.5 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... separations from other blocks and contain at least 1,000 eligible trees or comprise an entire orchard. (b) Any... program, the trees to be removed must have yielded at least 1.5 tons of dried prune/plums per net-planted...-plum trees. Abandoned orchards and dead trees will not qualify. In new orchards diverted, qualifying...

  16. 7 CFR 81.5 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... separations from other blocks and contain at least 1,000 eligible trees or comprise an entire orchard. (b) Any... program, the trees to be removed must have yielded at least 1.5 tons of dried prune/plums per net-planted...-plum trees. Abandoned orchards and dead trees will not qualify. In new orchards diverted, qualifying...

  17. 7 CFR 81.5 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... separations from other blocks and contain at least 1,000 eligible trees or comprise an entire orchard. (b) Any... program, the trees to be removed must have yielded at least 1.5 tons of dried prune/plums per net-planted...-plum trees. Abandoned orchards and dead trees will not qualify. In new orchards diverted, qualifying...

  18. Plum pox virus and sharka: a model potyvirus and a major disease.

    PubMed

    García, Juan Antonio; Glasa, Miroslav; Cambra, Mariano; Candresse, Thierry

    2014-04-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) is a member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae. PPV diversity is structured into at least eight monophyletic strains. First discovered in Bulgaria, PPV is nowadays present in most of continental Europe (with an endemic status in many central and southern European countries) and has progressively spread to many countries on other continents. Typical of potyviruses, the PPV genome is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), with a protein linked to its 5' end and a 3'-terminal poly A tail. It is encapsidated by a single type of capsid protein (CP) in flexuous rod particles and is translated into a large polyprotein which is proteolytically processed in at least 10 final products: P1, HCPro, P3, 6K1, CI, 6K2, VPg, NIapro, NIb and CP. In addition, P3N-PIPO is predicted to be produced by a translational frameshift. PPV causes sharka, the most damaging viral disease of stone fruit trees. It also infects wild and ornamental Prunus trees and has a large experimental host range in herbaceous species. PPV spreads over long distances by uncontrolled movement of plant material, and many species of aphid transmit the virus locally in a nonpersistent manner. A few natural sources of resistance to PPV have been found so far in Prunus species, which are being used in classical breeding programmes. Different genetic engineering approaches are being used to generate resistance to PPV, and a transgenic plum, 'HoneySweet', transformed with the viral CP gene, has demonstrated high resistance to PPV in field tests in several countries and has obtained regulatory approval in the USA. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  19. 7 CFR 81.5 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... program, the trees to be removed must have yielded at least 1.5 tons of dried prune/plums per net-planted...-plum trees. Abandoned orchards and dead trees will not qualify. In new orchards diverted, qualifying trees must be at least 5 years of age (6th leaf), contain at least two scaffolds, and be capable of...

  20. 7 CFR 993.57 - Holding requirement and delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED... § 993.58(a); (b) of prune plums (dried weight natural condition basis) diverted pursuant to § 993.62 as...

  1. 7 CFR 993.57 - Holding requirement and delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED... § 993.58(a); (b) of prune plums (dried weight natural condition basis) diverted pursuant to § 993.62 as...

  2. 7 CFR 993.57 - Holding requirement and delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED... § 993.58(a); (b) of prune plums (dried weight natural condition basis) diverted pursuant to § 993.62 as...

  3. 7 CFR 993.57 - Holding requirement and delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED... § 993.58(a); (b) of prune plums (dried weight natural condition basis) diverted pursuant to § 993.62 as...

  4. 7 CFR 993.57 - Holding requirement and delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED... § 993.58(a); (b) of prune plums (dried weight natural condition basis) diverted pursuant to § 993.62 as...

  5. 40 CFR 180.491 - Propylene oxide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances... commodities: Commodity Parts per million Basil, dried leaves 6000 Cacao bean, dried bean 20.0 Cacao bean... basil 1500 Nutmeat, processed, except peanuts 10.0 Onion, dried 6000 Plum, prune, dried 2.0 (b) Section...

  6. Protecting trees against virus diseases in the 21st century: genetic engineering of Plum pox virus resistance - from concept to product

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sharka disease, caused by Plum pox virus (PPV), was first recorded in Bulgaria during the early twentieth century. Since that first report, the disease has progressively spread throughout Europe where it has infected over 100 million stone fruit trees. From Europe, sharka disease spread to Asia, A...

  7. The biosynthesis of polysaccharides. Incorporation of d-[1-14C]glucose and d-[6-14C]glucose into plum-leaf polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, P.; Hough, L.; Picken, J. M.

    1965-01-01

    1. The utilization of specifically labelled d-glucose in the biosynthesis of plum-leaf polysaccharides has been studied. After these precursors had been metabolized in plum leaves, the polysaccharides were isolated from the leaves, and their monosaccharide constituents isolated and purified. 2. Both the specific activities and the distribution of 14C along the carbon chains of the monosaccharides were determined. Significant 14C activity was found in units of d-galactose, d-glucose, d-xylose and l-arabinose, but their specific activities varied widely. The labelling patterns suggest that in the leaves the other monosaccharides all arise directly from d-glucose without any skeletal change in the carbon chain, other than the loss of a terminal carbon atom in the synthesis of pentoses. 3. The results indicated that within the leaf there are various precursor pools for polysaccharide synthesis and that these pools are not in equilibrium with one another. PMID:14342252

  8. 7 CFR 993.5 - Prunes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED PRUNES PRODUCED IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 993.5 Prunes. Prunes means and includes all sun-dried or artificially...) plums which have not been dried or dehydrated to a point where they are capable of being stored prior to...

  9. 7 CFR 993.5 - Prunes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED PRUNES PRODUCED IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 993.5 Prunes. Prunes means and includes all sun-dried or artificially...) plums which have not been dried or dehydrated to a point where they are capable of being stored prior to...

  10. 7 CFR 993.5 - Prunes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED PRUNES PRODUCED IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 993.5 Prunes. Prunes means and includes all sun-dried or artificially...) plums which have not been dried or dehydrated to a point where they are capable of being stored prior to...

  11. 7 CFR 993.5 - Prunes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED PRUNES PRODUCED IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 993.5 Prunes. Prunes means and includes all sun-dried or artificially...) plums which have not been dried or dehydrated to a point where they are capable of being stored prior to...

  12. [Geostatistics analysis on spatial patterns of Myzus persicae and Erigonidium graminicola in plum orchard].

    PubMed

    Ding, Chengcheng; Zou, Yunding; Bi, Shoudong; Gao, Caiqiu; Liu, Xiaolin; Cao, Cuanwang; Meng, Qinglei; Li, Changgen

    2005-07-01

    Investigations on the spatial construction and distribution of Myzus persicae and Erigonidium graminicola in a plum orchard were conducted from March 2003 to November 2003. The results indicated that the semivariogram of Myzus persicae could be described by spherical model, except on June 27 and November 22, which should be described by lined model, and that of Erigonidium graminicola could be described by spherical model, except on May 21, May 31, October 19 and November 22, which should be described by lined model. It could be concluded that the amount and spatial distribution of Erigonidium graminicola was closely related to those of Myzus persicae.

  13. Changes in the Chemical Composition of Plum Distillate During Maturation with Oak Chips under Different Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Summary This study investigates the effect of ageing on the qualitative and quantitative composition of plum distillate in contact with oak wood chips. Maturation was performed with lightly toasted French oak (Quercus sessiflora and Quercus robur) chips or oak chips made from fragments of empty barrels that had been used for ageing cognac. The effects of oak chip dose, process temperature, ageing system (static or circulatory) and ultrasound treatment were assessed. Maturation of plum distillate samples with oak chips resulted in higher levels of extractable organics (including tannins) and colour changes, which were correlated with the type and dose of oak chips, and the conditions of maturation. The content of sugars such as glucose, xylose and arabinose also increased, depending on the conditions and type of oak chips. Degradation of lignin resulted in liberation of sinapaldehyde, syringaldehyde, coniferaldehyde and vanillin, with intensities depending on the applied parameters. In terms of volatiles, decreases in the concentration of higher alcohols and aliphatic aldehydes were observed in the majority of maturation experiments, while concentrations of furanic aldehydes increased depending on the type and dose of oak chips, as well as on the conditions of maturation. The quantities of esters such as ethyl acetate decreased in the majority of experimental variants, whereas concentrations of ethyl caproate, ethyl caprylate and ethyl caprate increased gradually. Some phenols and lactones were detected in all matured samples, with the lowest levels found in the samples aged with oak chips made from cognac barrels. PMID:29089848

  14. Changes in the Chemical Composition of Plum Distillate During Maturation with Oak Chips under Different Conditions.

    PubMed

    Balcerek, Maria; Pielech-Przybylska, Katarzyna; Dziekońska-Kubczak, Urszula; Patelski, Piotr; Strąk, Ewelina

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the effect of ageing on the qualitative and quantitative composition of plum distillate in contact with oak wood chips. Maturation was performed with lightly toasted French oak ( Quercus sessiflora and Quercus robur ) chips or oak chips made from fragments of empty barrels that had been used for ageing cognac. The effects of oak chip dose, process temperature, ageing system (static or circulatory) and ultrasound treatment were assessed. Maturation of plum distillate samples with oak chips resulted in higher levels of extractable organics (including tannins) and colour changes, which were correlated with the type and dose of oak chips, and the conditions of maturation. The content of sugars such as glucose, xylose and arabinose also increased, depending on the conditions and type of oak chips. Degradation of lignin resulted in liberation of sinapaldehyde, syringaldehyde, coniferaldehyde and vanillin, with intensities depending on the applied parameters. In terms of volatiles, decreases in the concentration of higher alcohols and aliphatic aldehydes were observed in the majority of maturation experiments, while concentrations of furanic aldehydes increased depending on the type and dose of oak chips, as well as on the conditions of maturation. The quantities of esters such as ethyl acetate decreased in the majority of experimental variants, whereas concentrations of ethyl caproate, ethyl caprylate and ethyl caprate increased gradually. Some phenols and lactones were detected in all matured samples, with the lowest levels found in the samples aged with oak chips made from cognac barrels.

  15. Plum pox virus accumulates mutations in different genome parts during a long-term maintenance in Prunus host plants and passage in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Vozárová, Z; Kamencayová, M; Glasa, M; Subr, Z

    2013-01-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates of the strain PPV-M prevalently infect peaches under natural conditions in Middle Europe. Comparison of complete genome sequences obtained from subisolates of a PPV-M isolate maintained experimentally over a 6-year period in different Prunus host species and passaged in Nicotiana benthamiana was performed with the aim to highlight the mutations potentially connected with the virus-host adaptation. The results showed that the lowest number of non-silent mutations was accumulated in PPV-M maintained in peach (original host species), approximately two times higher diversity was recorded in plum, apricot and N. benthamiana, indicating the genetic determination of the PPV host preference. The sequence variability of Prunus subisolates was distributed more or less evenly along the PPV genome and no amino acid motif could be outlined as responsible for the host adaptation. In N. benthamiana the mutations were accumulated notably in the P1 and P3 genes indicating their non-essentiality in the infection of this experimental host plant.

  16. 7 CFR 993.15 - Dehydrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dehydrator. 993.15 Section 993.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... prunes by drying or dehydrating plums by means of sun-drying or artificial heat. ...

  17. Restoration of the Hypersonic Tunnel Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center, Plum Brook Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodling, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center's Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF), located at the Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, is a non-vitiated, free-jet facility, capable of testing large-scale propulsion systems at Mach Numbers from 5 to 7. As a result of a component failure in September of 1996, a restoration project was initiated in mid- 1997 to repair the damage to the facility. Following the 2-1/2 year effort, the HTF has been returned to an operational condition. Significant repairs and operational improvements have been implemented in order to ensure facility reliability and personnel safety. As of January 2000, this unique, state-of-the-art facility was ready for integrated systems testing.

  18. Occurrence and characterization of plum pox virus strain D isolates from European Russia and Crimea.

    PubMed

    Chirkov, Sergei; Ivanov, Peter; Sheveleva, Anna; Kudryavtseva, Anna; Prikhodko, Yuri; Mitrofanova, Irina

    2016-02-01

    Numerous plum pox virus (PPV) strain D isolates have been found in geographically distant regions of European Russia and the Crimean peninsula on different stone fruit hosts. Phylogenetic analysis of their partial and complete genomes suggests multiple introductions of PPV-D into Russia. Distinct natural isolates from Prunus tomentosa were found to bear unique amino acid substitutions in the N-terminus of the coat protein (CP) that may contribute to the adaptation of PPV-D to this host. Serological analysis using the PPV-D-specific monoclonal antibody 4DG5 provided further evidence that mutations at positions 58 and 59 of the CP are crucial for antibody binding.

  19. Assessing Wetland Hydroperiod and Soil Moisture With Remote Sensing: A Demonstration for the NASA Plum Brook Station Year 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Colin; Bourgeau-Chavez, Laura; Endres, Sarah; Battaglia, Michael; Shuchman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Primary Goal: Assist with the evaluation and measuring of wetlands hydroperiod at the PlumBrook Station using multi-source remote sensing data as part of a larger effort on projecting climate change-related impacts on the station's wetland ecosystems. MTRI expanded on the multi-source remote sensing capabilities to help estimate and measure hydroperiod and the relative soil moisture of wetlands at NASA's Plum Brook Station. Multi-source remote sensing capabilities are useful in estimating and measuring hydroperiod and relative soil moisture of wetlands. This is important as a changing regional climate has several potential risks for wetland ecosystem function. The year two analysis built on the first year of the project by acquiring and analyzing remote sensing data for additional dates and types of imagery, combined with focused field work. Five deliverables were planned and completed: 1) Show the relative length of hydroperiod using available remote sensing datasets 2) Date linked table of wetlands extent over time for all feasible non-forested wetlands 3) Utilize LIDAR data to measure topographic height above sea level of all wetlands, wetland to catchment area radio, slope of wetlands, and other useful variables 4) A demonstration of how analyzed results from multiple remote sensing data sources can help with wetlands vulnerability assessment 5) A MTRI style report summarizing year 2 results. This report serves as a descriptive summary of our completion of these our deliverables. Additionally, two formal meetings were held with Larry Liou and Amanda Sprinzl to provide project updates and receive direction on outputs. These were held on 2/26/15 and 9/17/15 at the Plum Brook Station. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is a multivariate statistical technique used to identify dominant spatial and temporal backscatter signatures. PCA reduces the information contained in the temporal dataset to the first few new Principal Component (PC) images. Some advantages of PCA

  20. Over-expression of FT1 in plum (Prunus domestica) results in phenotypes compatible with spaceflight: a potential new candidate crop for bioregenerative life support systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tree fruits (e.g., apples, plums, cherries) are appealing constituents of a crew menu for long-duration exploration missions (i.e., Mars), both in terms of their nutritive and menu diversity contributions. Although appealing, tree fruit species have long been precluded as candidate crops for use in...

  1. Assessing Wetland Hydroperiod and Soil Moisture with Remote Sensing: A Demonstration for the NASA Plum Brook Station Year 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Colin; Bourgeau-Chavez, Laura; Endres, Sarah; Battaglia, Michael; Shuchman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Assist with the evaluation and measuring of wetlands hydroperiod at the Plum Brook Station using multi-source remote sensing data as part of a larger effort on projecting climate change-related impacts on the station's wetland ecosystems. MTRI expanded on the multi-source remote sensing capabilities to help estimate and measure hydroperiod and the relative soil moisture of wetlands at NASA's Plum Brook Station. Multi-source remote sensing capabilities are useful in estimating and measuring hydroperiod and relative soil moisture of wetlands. This is important as a changing regional climate has several potential risks for wetland ecosystem function. The year two analysis built on the first year of the project by acquiring and analyzing remote sensing data for additional dates and types of imagery, combined with focused field work. Five deliverables were planned and completed: (1) Show the relative length of hydroperiod using available remote sensing datasets, (2) Date linked table of wetlands extent over time for all feasible non-forested wetlands, (3) Utilize LIDAR data to measure topographic height above sea level of all wetlands, wetland to catchment area radio, slope of wetlands, and other useful variables (4), A demonstration of how analyzed results from multiple remote sensing data sources can help with wetlands vulnerability assessment; and (5) A MTRI style report summarizing year 2 results.

  2. Two psammophilic noctuids (Lepidoptera) newly associated with beach plum Prunus maritima: The Dune Noctuid (Sympistis riparia) and Coastal Heathland Cutworm (Abagrotis nefascia) in Northeastern North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beach Plum Prunus maritima Marshall 1785 not Wangenh. 1787 (Rosaceae) represents both a new crop under development and an under-acknowledged host plant for several Lepidoptera rthat have undergone declines in the Northeastern USA. The Coastal Heathland Cutworm Abagrotis nefascia (Smith) and the Dune...

  3. Proposed Facility Modifications to Support Propulsion Systems Testing Under Simulated Space Conditions at Plum Brook Station's Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Daryl A.

    2008-01-01

    Preparing NASA's Plum Brook Station's Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) to support NASA's new generation of launch vehicles has raised many challenges for B-2's support staff. The facility provides a unique capability to test chemical propulsion systems/vehicles while simulating space thermal and vacuum environments. Designed and constructed in the early 1960s to support upper stage cryogenic engine/vehicle system development, the Plum Brook Station B-2 facility will require modifications to support the larger, more powerful, and more advanced engine systems for the next generation of vehicles leaving earth's orbit. Engine design improvements over the years have included large area expansion ratio nozzles, greater combustion chamber pressures, and advanced materials. Consequently, it has become necessary to determine what facility changes are required and how the facility can be adapted to support varying customers and their specific test needs. Exhaust system performance, including understanding the present facility capabilities, is the primary focus of this work. A variety of approaches and analytical tools are being employed to gain this understanding. This presentation discusses some of the challenges in applying these tools to this project and expected facility configuration to support the varying customer needs.

  4. Proposed Facility Modifications to Support Propulsion Systems Testing Under Simulated Space Conditions at Plum Brook Station's Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Daryl A.

    2007-01-01

    Preparing NASA's Plum Brook Station's Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) to support NASA's new generation of launch vehicles has raised many challenges for B-2 s support staff. The facility provides a unique capability to test chemical propulsion systems/vehicles while simulating space thermal and vacuum environments. Designed and constructed 4 decades ago to support upper stage cryogenic engine/vehicle system development, the Plum Brook Station B-2 facility will require modifications to support the larger, more powerful, and more advanced engine systems for the next generation of vehicles leaving earth's orbit. Engine design improvements over the years have included large area expansion ratio nozzles, greater combustion chamber pressures, and advanced materials. Consequently, it has become necessary to determine what facility changes are required and how the facility can be adapted to support varying customers and their specific test needs. Instrumental in this task is understanding the present facility capabilities and identifying what reasonable changes can be implemented. A variety of approaches and analytical tools are being employed to gain this understanding. This paper discusses some of the challenges in applying these tools to this project and expected facility configuration to support the varying customer needs.

  5. NMR fingerprinting as a tool to evaluate post-harvest time-related changes of peaches, tomatoes and plums.

    PubMed

    Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Luchinat, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    The time-related changes of three agricultural products, coming from two distribution routes, have been followed using NMR fingerprinting to monitor metabolic variations occurring during several days of cold storage. An NMR profiling approach was employed to evaluate the variations in metabolic profile and metabolite content in three different agricultural products highly consumed in Italy (peaches, tomatoes and plums) coming from Tuscanian farms and how they change with time after collection. For each product, we followed the time-related changes during cold storage along three different collection periods. We monitored the variations in metabolic fingerprint and the trend of a set of metabolites, focusing our attention on nutritive and health-promoting metabolites (mainly, essential amino acids and antioxidants) as well as metabolites that contribute to the taste. Concurrently, for comparison, the time-dependent changes of the same kind of products coming from large-scale distribution have been also analyzed under the same conditions. In this second category, only slight variations in the metabolic fingerprint and metabolite levels were seen during cold storage. Unsupervised and supervised multivariate statistics was also employed to enlighten the differences between the three collections. In particular it seems that the metabolic fingerprint of large-scale distribution products is quite similar in the early, middle and late collection, while peaches and plums locally collected are markedly different among the three periods. The metabolic profiles of the agricultural products belonging to these two different distribution routes are intrinsically different, and they show different changes during the time of cold storage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fabrication of (U, Zr) C-fueled/tungsten-clad specimens for irradiation in the Plum Brook Reactor Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Fuel samples, 90UC - 10 ZrC, and chemically vapor deposited tungsten fuel cups were fabricated for the study of the long term dimensional stability and compatibility of the carbide-tungsten fuel-cladding systems under irradiation. These fuel samples and fuel cups were assembled into the fuel pins of two capsules, designated as V-2E and V-2F, for irradiation in NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility at a fission power density of 172 watts/c.c. and a miximum cladding temperature of 1823 K. Fabrication methods and characteristics of the fuel samples and fuel cups prepared are described.

  7. Molecular characterization of Plum pox virus Rec isolates from Russia suggests a new insight into evolution of the strain.

    PubMed

    Chirkov, Sergei; Ivanov, Peter; Sheveleva, Anna; Kudryavtseva, Anna; Mitrofanova, Irina

    2018-04-01

    Field isolates of Plum pox virus (PPV), belonging to the strain Rec, have been found for the first time in Russia. Full-size genomes of the isolates K28 and Kisl-1pl from myrobalan and plum, respectively, were sequenced on the 454 platform. Analysis of all known PPV-Rec complete genomes using the Recombination Detection Program (RDP4) revealed yet another recombination event in the 5'-terminal region. This event was detected by seven algorithms, implemented in the RDP4, with statistically significant P values and supported by a phylogenetic analysis with the bootstrap value of 87%. A putative PPV-M-derived segment, encompassing the C-terminus of the P1 gene and approximately two-thirds of the HcPro gene, is bordered by breakpoints at positions 760-940 and 1838-1964, depending on the recombinant isolate. The predicted 5'-distal breakpoint for the isolate Valjevka is located at position 2804. The Dideron (strain D) and SK68 (strain M) isolates were inferred as major and minor parents, respectively. Finding of another recombination event suggests more complex evolutionary history of PPV-Rec than previously assumed. Perhaps the first recombination event led to the formation of a PPV-D variant harboring the PPV-M-derived fragment within the 5'-proximal part of the genome. Subsequent recombination of its descendant with PPV-M in the 3'-proximal genomic region resulted in the emergence of the evolutionary successful strain Rec.

  8. ERDA/NASA 100 kilowatt mod-o wind turbine operations and performance. [at the NASA Plum Brook Station, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Richards, T. R.

    1977-01-01

    The ERDA/NASA 100 kW Mod-0 wind turbine is operating at the NASA Plum Brook Station near Sandusky, Ohio. The operation of the wind turbine has been fully demonstrated and includes start-up, synchronization to the utility network, blade pitch control for control of power and speed, and shut-down. Also, fully automatic operation has been demonstrated by use of a remote control panel, 50 miles from the site, similar to what a utility dispatcher might use. The operation systems and experience with the wind turbine loads, electrical power and aerodynamic performance obtained from testing are described.

  9. [Comparison of the efficiency of polygalacturonase and beta-glucosidase enzyme preparations in stabilization of cherry plum wine material].

    PubMed

    Stepanova, E V; Landesman, E O; Fedorova, T V; Iakovleva, K E; Koroleva, O V

    2006-01-01

    Pektofoetidin and Pectinex, enzyme preparations with the highest polygalacturonase and beta-glucosidase activities, were covalently immobilized on DEAE cellulose and Aminosilochromes 10 and 30. After treatment of cherry plum wine material with the soluble and immobilized enzyme preparations, the content of phenolics increased by 26 and 40%, respectively. The increase was accompanied by a decrease in the protein content (by up to 37%), carbohydrate content (by 17% on the average), and antioxidant activity (5-37%). The most efficient treatment involved Pektofoetidin immobilized on Aminosilochrome 10. It increased the clarity of the wine material and its antioxidant activity by 100 and 10%, respectively.

  10. Operators in the Plum Brook Reactor Facility Control Room

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-03-21

    Donald Rhodes, left, and Clyde Greer, right, monitor the operation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Plum Brook Reactor Facility from the control room. The 60-megawatt test reactor, NASA’s only reactor, was the eighth largest test reactor in the world. The facility was built by the Lewis Research Center in the late 1950s to study the effects of radiation on different materials that could be used to construct nuclear propulsion systems for aircraft or rockets. The reactor went critical for the first time in 1961. For the next two years, two operators were on duty 24 hours per day working on the fission process until the reactor reached its full-power level in 1963. Reactor Operators were responsible for monitoring and controlling the reactor systems. Once the reactor was running under normal operating conditions, the work was relatively uneventful. Normally the reactor was kept at a designated power level within certain limits. Occasionally the operators had to increase the power for a certain test. The shift supervisor and several different people would get together and discuss the change before boosting the power. All operators were required to maintain a Reactor Operator License from the Atomic Energy Commission. The license included six months of training, an eight-hour written exam, a four-hour walkaround, and testing on the reactor controls.

  11. Sharka: how do plants respond to Plum pox virus infection?

    PubMed

    Clemente-Moreno, María J; Hernández, José A; Diaz-Vivancos, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV), the causal agent of sharka disease, is one of the most studied plant viruses, and major advances in detection techniques, genome characterization and organization, gene expression, transmission, and the description of candidate genes involved in PPV resistance have been described. However, information concerning the plant response to PPV infection is very scarce. In this review, we provide an updated summary of the research carried out to date in order to elucidate how plants cope with PPV infection and their response at different levels, including the physiological, biochemical, proteomic, and genetic levels. Knowledge about how plants respond to PPV infection can contribute to the development of new strategies to cope with this disease. Due to the fact that PPV induces an oxidative stress in plants, the bio-fortification of the antioxidative defences, by classical or biotechnological approaches, would be a useful tool to cope with PPV infection. Nevertheless, there are still some gaps in knowledge related to PPV-plant interaction that remain to be filled, such as the effect of PPV on the hormonal profile of the plant or on the plant metabolome. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Use of CT imaging to examine the coarse roots, rhizomes, and peat associated with creek bank Spartina alterniflora in fertilized and control creeks in Plum Island (MA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used computer-aided tomography (CT) to quantify the wet mass, abundance, and diameter of coarse roots and rhizomes as well as the wet mass and particle density of marsh peat in 7-year fertilized and control creeks in Plum Island (MA). In shallow soils (0 – 10 cm) and at dep...

  13. [Efficacy on hemiplegic spasticity treated with plum blossom needle tapping therapy at the key points and Bobath therapy: a randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Jianhua; Shi, Yan; Zheng, Liya

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy on hemiplegic spasticity after cerebral infarction treated with plum blossom needle tapping therapy at the key points and Bobath therapy. Eighty patients were collected, in compliance with the inclusive criteria of hemiplegic spasticity after cerebral infarction, and randomized into an observation group and a control group, 40 cases in each one. In the control group, Bobath manipulation therapy was adopted to relieve spasticity and the treatment of 8 weeks was required. In the observation group, on the basis of the treatment as the control group, the tapping therapy with plum blossom needle was applied to the key points, named Jianyu (LI 15), Jianliao (LI 14), Jianzhen (SI 9), Hegu (LI 4), Chengfu (BL 36), Zusanli (ST 36), Xiyangguan (GB 33), etc. The treatment was given for 15 min each time, once a day. Before treatment, after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) and Barthel index (BI) were adopted to evaluate the motor function of the extremity and the activity of daily life in the patients of the two groups separately. The modified Ashworth scale was used to evaluate the effect of anti-spasticity. In 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, FMA: scores and BI scores were all significantly increased as compared with those before treatment in the two groups: (both P<0. 05). The results in 8 weeks of treatment in the observation group were significantly better than those in the control group (all P<0. 05). In 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, the scores of spasticity state were improved as compared with those before treatment in the patients of the two groups (all P<0. 05). The result in 8 weeks of treatment in the observation group was significantly better than that in the control group (P<0. 05). In 8 weeks of treatment, the total effective rate of anti-spasticity was 90. 0% (36/40) in the observation group, better than 75. 0% (30/40) in the control group (P<0. 05). The tapping therapy with plum blossom needle at the key points

  14. Formation of acrylamide at temperatures lower than 100°C: the case of prunes and a model study

    PubMed Central

    Becalski, A.; Brady, B.; Feng, S.; Gauthier, B.R.; Zhao, T.

    2011-01-01

    Acrylamide concentrations in prune products – baby strained prunes (range = 75–265 μg kg−−1), baby apple/prune juice (33–61 μg kg−−1), prune juice (186–916 μg kg−−1) and prunes (58–332 μg kg−−1) – on the Canadian market were determined. The formation of acrylamide in a simulated plum juice was also investigated under ‘drying conditions’ in an open vessel at temperatures <100°C for 24 h and under ‘wet conditions’ in a closed vessel at a temperature of 120°C for 1 h. Acrylamide was produced in a simulated plum juice under ‘drying conditions’ in amounts comparable with those found in prunes and prune juices. Acrylamide was not produced in simulated plum juice under ‘wet conditions’ in a closed vessel at temperature of 120°C for 1 h, but under the same condition an authentic prune juice doubled its acrylamide concentration. Formation of acrylamide in prune products was attributed to the presence of asparagine and sugars in the starting materials. PMID:21623495

  15. New highly divergent Plum pox virus isolates infecting sour cherry in Russia.

    PubMed

    Chirkov, Sergei; Ivanov, Peter; Sheveleva, Anna; Zakubanskiy, Alexander; Osipov, Gennady

    2017-02-01

    Unusual Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates (named Tat isolates) were discovered on sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) in Russia. They failed to be recognized by RT-PCR using commonly employed primers specific to the strains C or CR (the only ones that proved able to infect sour cherry) as well as to the strains M and W. Some of them can be detected by RT-PCR using the PPV-D-specific primers P1/PD or by TAS-ELISA with the PPV-C-specific monoclonal antibody AC. Phylogenetic analysis of the 3'-terminal genomic region assigned the Tat isolates into the cluster of cherry-adapted strains. However, they grouped separately from the C and CR strains and from each other as well. The sequence divergence of the Tat isolates is comparable to the differences between the known PPV strains. They may represent new group(s) of cherry-adapted isolates which do not seem to belong to any known strain of the virus. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Space Power Facility at NASA’s Plum Brook Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-02-21

    Exterior view of the Space Power Facility at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. The $28.4-million facility, which began operations in 1969, is the largest high vacuum chamber ever built. The chamber is 100 feet in diameter and 120 feet high. It produces a vacuum deep enough to simulate the conditions at 300 miles altitude. The facility can sustain a high vacuum; simulate solar radiation via a 4-megawatt quartz heat lamp array, solar spectrum by a 400-kilowatt arc lamp, and cold environments. The Space Power Facility was originally designed to test nuclear power sources for spacecraft during long durations in a space atmosphere, but it was never used for that purpose. The facility’s first test in 1970 involved a 15 to 20-kilowatt Brayton Cycle Power System for space applications. Three different methods of simulating solar heat were employed during the Brayton tests. The facility was also used for jettison tests of the Centaur Standard Shroud. The shroud was designed for the new Titan-Centaur rocket that was scheduled to launch the Viking spacecraft to Mars. The new shroud was tested under conditions that simulated the time from launch to the separation of the stages. Test programs at the facility include high-energy experiments, shroud separation tests, Mars Lander system tests, deployable Solar Sail tests and International Space Station hardware tests.

  17. Ectopic expression of class 1 KNOX genes induce and adventitious shoot regeneration and alter growth and development of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and European plum (Prunus domestica L)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic plants of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L) and plum (Prunus domestica L) were produced by transforming with apple class 1 KNOX genes (MdKN1 and MdKN2) or corn KN1 gene. Transgenic tobacco plants were regenerated in vitro from transformed leaf discs cultured in a tissue medium lacking cytoki...

  18. Rapid diagnostic detection of plum pox virus in Prunus plants by isothermal AmplifyRP(®) using reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shulu; Ravelonandro, Michel; Russell, Paul; McOwen, Nathan; Briard, Pascal; Bohannon, Seven; Vrient, Albert

    2014-10-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) causes the most destructive viral disease known as plum pox or Sharka disease in stone fruit trees. As an important regulated pathogen, detection of PPV is thus of critical importance to quarantine and eradication of the spreading disease. In this study, the innovative development of two AmplifyRP(®) tests is reported for a rapid isothermal detection of PPV using reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification. In an AmplifyRP(®) test, all specific recombination and amplification reactions occur at a constant temperature without thermal cycling and the test results are either recorded in real-time with a portable fluorescence reader or displayed using a lateral flow strip contained inside an amplicon detection chamber. The major improvement of this assay is that the entire test from sample preparation to result can be completed in as little as 20min and can be performed easily both in laboratories and in the field. The results from this study demonstrated the ability of the AmplifyRP(®) technique to detect all nine PPV strains (An, C, CR, D, EA, M, Rec, T, or W). Among the economic benefits to pathogen surveys is the higher sensitivity of the AmplifyRP(®) to detect PPV when compared to the conventional ELISA and ImmunoStrip(®) assays. This is the first report describing the use of such an innovative technique to detect rapidly plant viruses affecting perennial crops. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Residual determination and risk assessment of buprofezin in plum (Prunus domestica) grown in open-field conditions following the application of three different formulations.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Md Humayun; Abd El-Aty, A M; Kim, Sung-Woo; Lee, Han Sol; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Lee, Young-Jun; Chung, Hyung Suk; Lieu, Truong; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Shin, Ho-Chul; Im, Geon-Jae; Hong, Su Myeong; Shim, Jae-Han

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to characterize the residual level and perform a risk assessment on buprofezin formulated as an emulsifiable concentrate, wettable powder, and suspension concentrate over various treatment schedules in plum (Prunus domestica). The samples were extracted with an AOAC quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe, 'QuEChERS', method after major modifications. As intrinsic interferences were observed in blank plum samples following dispersive-solid phase extraction (consisting of primary secondary amine and C 18 sorbents), amino cartridges were used for solid-phase extraction. Analysis was carried out using liquid chromatography with diode array detection and confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The method showed excellent linearity with determination coefficient (R 2  = 1) and satisfactory recoveries (at two spiking levels, 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg) between 90.98 and 94.74% with relative standard deviation (RSD) ≤8%. The limit of quantification (0.05 mg/kg) was considerably lower than the maximum residue limit (2 mg/kg) set by the Codex Alimentarius. Absolute residue levels for emulsifiable concentrates were highest, perhaps owing to the dilution rate and adjuvant. Notably, all formulation residues were lower than the maximum residue limit, and safety data proved that the fruits are safe for consumers. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. 40 CFR 180.666 - Fluxapyroxad; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....005 Oilseeds, group 20 (except cottonseed) 0.9 Pea and bean, dried shelled except soybean, subgroup 6C 0.4 Pea and bean, succulent shelled, subgroup 6B 0.5 Peanut 0.01 Peanut, refined oil 0.02 Plum...

  1. Differentially expressed genes in healthy and plum pox virus-infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants.

    PubMed

    Vozárová, Z; Žilová, M; Šubr, Z

    2015-12-01

    Viruses use both material and energy sources of their hosts and redirect the production of disposable compounds in order to make viral replication more efficient. Metabolism of infected organisms is modified by these enhanced requirements as well by their own defense response. Resulting complex story consists of many regulation events on various gene expression levels. Elucidating these processes may contribute to the knowledge on virus-host interactions and to evolving new antiviral strategies. In our work we applied a subtractive cloning technique to compare the transcriptomes of healthy and plum pox virus (PPV)-infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Several genes were found to be induced or repressed by the PPV infection. The induced genes were mainly related to general stress response or photosynthesis, several repressed genes could be connected with growth defects evoked by the infection. Interestingly, some genes usually up-regulated by fungal or bacterial infection were found repressed in PPV-infected plants. Potential involvement of particular differently expressed genes in the process of PPV infection is discussed.

  2. Development a of multiplex TaqMan real-time RT-PCR assay for simultaneous detection of Asian prunus viruses, plum bark necrosis stem pitting associated virus, and peach latent mosaic virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Asian prunus viruses (APV 1, APV 2 and APV 3) and Plum bark necrosis stem pitting associated virus (PBNSPaV) are two recently described viruses infecting Prunus spp., and Peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd) is a viroid that infects the same species. A single-tube multiplex, TaqMan real-time RT-PCR as...

  3. Comparison of drying characteristic and uniformity of banana cubes dried by pulse-spouted microwave vacuum drying, freeze drying and microwave freeze drying.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Min; Mujumdar, Arun S; Lim, Rui-Xin

    2014-07-01

    To overcome the flaws of high energy consumption of freeze drying (FD) and the non-uniform drying of microwave freeze drying (MFD), pulse-spouted microwave vacuum drying (PSMVD) was developed. The results showed that the drying time can be dramatically shortened if microwave was used as the heating source. In this experiment, both MFD and PSMVD could shorten drying time by 50% as compared to the FD process. Depending on the heating method, MFD and PSMVD dried banana cubes showed trends of expansion while FD dried samples demonstrated trends of shrinkage. Shrinkage also brought intensive structure and highest fracturability of all three samples dried by different methods. The residual ascorbic acid content of PSMVD dried samples can be as high as in FD dried samples, which were superior to MFD dried samples. The tests confirmed that PSMVD could bring about better drying uniformity than MFD. Besides, compared with traditional MFD, PSMVD can provide better extrinsic feature, and can bring about improved nutritional features because of the higher residual ascorbic acid content. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. The Mothball, Sustainment, and Proposed Reactivation of the Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) at NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Scott R.; Lee, Jinho; Stephens, John W.; Hostler, Robert W., Jr.; VonKamp, William D.

    2010-01-01

    The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, is the nation s only large-scale, non-vitiated, hypersonic propulsion test facility. The HTF, with its 4-story graphite induction heater, is capable of duplicating Mach 5, 6, and 7 flight conditions. This unique propulsion system test facility has experienced several standby and reactivation cycles. The intent of the paper is to overview the HTF capabilities to the propulsion community, present the current status of HTF, and share the lessons learned from putting a large-scale facility into mothball status for a later restart

  5. 21 CFR 150.110 - Fruit butter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., canned, and/or dried (evaporated) mature fruits, with or without added water, and screening out skins... Apricot 7.0 Grape 7.0 Peach 8.5 Pear 6.5 Plum (other than prune) 7.0 Prune 7.0 Quince 7.5 (2) The...

  6. 21 CFR 150.110 - Fruit butter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., canned, and/or dried (evaporated) mature fruits, with or without added water, and screening out skins... Apricot 7.0 Grape 7.0 Peach 8.5 Pear 6.5 Plum (other than prune) 7.0 Prune 7.0 Quince 7.5 (2) The...

  7. 21 CFR 150.110 - Fruit butter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., canned, and/or dried (evaporated) mature fruits, with or without added water, and screening out skins... Apricot 7.0 Grape 7.0 Peach 8.5 Pear 6.5 Plum (other than prune) 7.0 Prune 7.0 Quince 7.5 (2) The...

  8. Tracking the potyviral P1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana plants during plum pox virus infection.

    PubMed

    Vozárová, Z; Glasa, M; Šubr, Z W

    The P1 protein is derived from the N terminus of potyvirus-coded polyprotein. In addition to the proteolytic activity essential for its maturation, it probably participates in suppression of host defense and/or in virus replication. Clear validation of the P1 in vivo function(s), however, is not yet available. We applied an infectious cDNA clone of plum pox virus (PPV), where the P1 was N-fused with a hexahistidine tag, to trace this protein in Nicotiana benthamiana plants during the PPV infection. Immunoblot analysis with the anti-his antibody showed a diffuse band corresponding to the molecular weight about 70-80 kDa (about twice larger than expected) in the root samples from early stage of infection. This signal culminated on the sixth day post inoculation, later it rapidly disappeared. Sample denaturation by boiling in SDS before centrifugal clarification was essential, indicating strong affinity of P1-his to some plant compound sedimenting with the tissue and cell debris.

  9. Identification of Immunogenic Hot Spots within Plum Pox Potyvirus Capsid Protein for Efficient Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Fernández, M. Rosario; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Roncal, Fernando; Domínguez, Elvira; García, Juan Antonio

    2002-01-01

    PEPSCAN analysis has been used to characterize the immunogenic regions of the capsid protein (CP) in virions of plum pox potyvirus (PPV). In addition to the well-known highly immunogenic N- and C-terminal domains of CP, regions within the core domain of the protein have also shown high immunogenicity. Moreover, the N terminus of CP is not homogeneously immunogenic, alternatively showing regions frequently recognized by antibodies and others that are not recognized at all. These results have helped us to design efficient antigen presentation vectors based on PPV. As predicted by PEPSCAN analysis, a small displacement of the insertion site in a previously constructed vector, PPV-γ, turned the derived chimeras into efficient immunogens. Vectors expressing foreign peptides at different positions within a highly immunogenic region (amino acids 43 to 52) in the N-terminal domain of CP were the most effective at inducing specific antibody responses against the foreign sequence. PMID:12438590

  10. Analysis of the epitope structure of Plum pox virus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Candresse, Thierry; Saenz, Pilar; García, Juan Antonio; Boscia, Donato; Navratil, Milan; Gorris, Maria Teresa; Cambra, Mariano

    2011-05-01

    Typing of the particular Plum pox virus (PPV) strain responsible in an outbreak has important practical implications and is frequently performed using strain-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Analysis in Western blots of the reactivity of 24 MAbs to a 112-amino-acid N-terminal fragment of the PPV coat protein (CP) expressed in Escherichia coli showed that 21 of the 24 MAbs recognized linear or denaturation-insensitive epitopes. A series of eight C-truncated CP fragments allowed the mapping of the epitopes recognized by the MAbs. In all, 14 of them reacted to the N-terminal hypervariable region, defining a minimum of six epitopes, while 7 reacted to the beginning of the core region, defining a minimum of three epitopes. Sequence comparisons allowed the more precise positioning of regions recognized by several MAbs, including those recognized by the 5B-IVIA universal MAb (amino acids 94 to 100) and by the 4DG5 and 4DG11 D serogroup-specific MAbs (amino acids 43 to 64). A similar approach coupled with infectious cDNA clone mutagenesis showed that a V74T mutation in the N-terminus of the CP abolished the binding of the M serogroup-specific AL MAb. Taken together, these results provide a detailed positioning of the epitopes recognized by the most widely used PPV detection and typing MAbs.

  11. Detection and partial molecular characterization of atypical plum pox virus isolates from naturally infected sour cherry.

    PubMed

    Chirkov, Sergei; Ivanov, Peter; Sheveleva, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Atypical isolates of plum pox virus (PPV) were discovered in naturally infected sour cherry in urban ornamental plantings in Moscow, Russia. The isolates were detected by polyclonal double antibody sandwich ELISA and RT-PCR using universal primers specific for the 3'-non-coding and coat protein (CP) regions of the genome but failed to be recognized by triple antibody sandwich ELISA with the universal monoclonal antibody 5B and by RT-PCR using primers specific to for PPV strains D, M, C and W. Sequence analysis of the CP genes of nine isolates revealed 99.2-100 % within-group identity and 62-85 % identity to conventional PPV strains. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the atypical isolates represent a group that is distinct from the known PPV strains. Alignment of the N-terminal amino acid sequences of CP demonstrated their close similarity to those of a new tentative PPV strain, CR.

  12. 7 CFR 81.2 - Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administration. 81.2 Section 81.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.2 Administration. The program will be administered under...

  13. 7 CFR 81.2 - Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administration. 81.2 Section 81.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.2 Administration. The program will be administered under...

  14. 7 CFR 81.2 - Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administration. 81.2 Section 81.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.2 Administration. The program will be administered under...

  15. 7 CFR 81.2 - Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administration. 81.2 Section 81.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.2 Administration. The program will be administered under...

  16. 77 FR 46306 - Fluxapyroxad; Pesticide Tolerances Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ...; Pesticide Tolerances Technical Amendment AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule; technical amendment. SUMMARY: EPA issued a final rule in the Federal Register of May 14, 2012, concerning.... Inadvertently, the terminology for the oilseed crop group and for dried plums was incorrect. This technical...

  17. Molecular, ultrastructural, and biological characterization of Pennsylvania isolates of Plum pox virus.

    PubMed

    Schneider, William L; Damsteegt, Vernon D; Gildow, Fred E; Stone, Andrew L; Sherman, Diana J; Levy, Laurene E; Mavrodieva, Vessela; Richwine, Nancy; Welliver, Ruth; Luster, Douglas G

    2011-05-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) was identified in Pennsylvania in 1999. The outbreak was limited to a four-county region in southern Pennsylvania. Initial serological and molecular characterization indicated that the isolates in Pennsylvania belong to the D strain of PPV. The Pennsylvania isolates were characterized by sequence analysis, electron microscopy, host range, and vector transmission to determine how these isolates related to their previously studied European counterparts. Genetically, Pennsylvania (PPV-Penn) isolates were more closely related to each other than to any other PPV-D strains, and isolates from the United States, Canada, and Chile were more closely related to each other than to European isolates. The PPV-Penn isolates exist as two clades, suggesting the possibility of multiple introductions. Electron microscopy analysis of PPV-Penn isolates, including cytopathological studies, indicated that the virions were similar to other Potyvirus spp. PPV-Penn isolates had a herbaceous host range similar to that of European D isolates. There were distinct differences in the transmission efficiencies of the two PPV-Penn isolates using Myzus persicae and Aphis spiraecola as vectors; however, both PPV-Penn isolates were transmitted by M. persicae more efficiently than a European D isolate but less efficiently than a European M isolate.

  18. NASA Plum Brook's B-2 Test Facility: Thermal Vacuum and Propellant Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudlac, Maureen T.; Weaver, Harold F.; Cmar, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) Plum Brook Station (PBS) Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility, commonly referred to as B-2, is NASA's third largest thermal vacuum facility. It is the largest designed to store and transfer large quantities of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, and is perfectly suited to support developmental testing of upper stage chemical propulsion systems as well as fully integrated stages. The facility is also capable of providing thermal-vacuum simulation services to support testing of large lightweight structures, Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) systems, electric propulsion test programs, and other In-Space propulsion programs. A recently completed integrated system test demonstrated the refurbished thermal vacuum capabilities of the facility. The test used the modernized data acquisition and control system to monitor the facility. The heat sink provided a uniform temperature environment of approximately 77 K. The modernized infrared lamp array produced a nominal heat flux of 1.4 kW/sq m. With the lamp array and heat sink operating simultaneously, the thermal systems produced a heat flux pattern simulating radiation to space on one surface and solar exposure on the other surface.

  19. Optimization and kinetic modeling of esterification of the oil obtained from waste plum stones as a pretreatment step in biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Milan D; Veličković, Ana V; Joković, Nataša M; Stamenković, Olivera S; Veljković, Vlada B

    2016-02-01

    This study reports on the use of oil obtained from waste plum stones as a low-cost feedstock for biodiesel production. Because of high free fatty acid (FFA) level (15.8%), the oil was processed through the two-step process including esterification of FFA and methanolysis of the esterified oil catalyzed by H2SO4 and CaO, respectively. Esterification was optimized by response surface methodology combined with a central composite design. The second-order polynomial equation predicted the lowest acid value of 0.53mgKOH/g under the following optimal reaction conditions: the methanol:oil molar ratio of 8.5:1, the catalyst amount of 2% and the reaction temperature of 45°C. The predicted acid value agreed with the experimental acid value (0.47mgKOH/g). The kinetics of FFA esterification was described by the irreversible pseudo first-order reaction rate law. The apparent kinetic constant was correlated with the initial methanol and catalyst concentrations and reaction temperature. The activation energy of the esterification reaction slightly decreased from 13.23 to 11.55kJ/mol with increasing the catalyst concentration from 0.049 to 0.172mol/dm(3). In the second step, the esterified oil reacted with methanol (methanol:oil molar ratio of 9:1) in the presence of CaO (5% to the oil mass) at 60°C. The properties of the obtained biodiesel were within the EN 14214 standard limits. Hence, waste plum stones might be valuable raw material for obtaining fatty oil for the use as alternative feedstock in biodiesel production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Functional Link between RNA Replication and Virion Assembly in the Potyvirus Plum Pox Virus.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Araiz; Valli, Adrian; Calvo, María; García, Juan Antonio

    2018-05-01

    Accurate assembly of viral particles in the potyvirus Plum pox virus (PPV) has been shown to depend on the contribution of the multifunctional viral protein HCPro. In this study, we show that other viral factors, in addition to the capsid protein (CP) and HCPro, are necessary for the formation of stable PPV virions. The CP produced in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves from a subviral RNA termed LONG, which expresses a truncated polyprotein that lacks P1 and HCPro, together with HCPro supplied in trans , was assembled into virus-like particles and remained stable after in vitro incubation. In contrast, deletions in multiple regions of the LONG coding sequence prevented the CP stabilization mediated by HCPro. In particular, we demonstrated that the first 178 amino acids of P3, but not a specific nucleotide sequence coding for them, are required for CP stability and proper assembly of PPV particles. Using a sequential coagroinfiltration assay, we observed that the subviral LONG RNA replicates and locally spreads in N. benthamiana leaves expressing an RNA silencing suppressor. The analysis of the effect of both point and deletion mutations affecting RNA replication in LONG and full-length PPV demonstrated that this process is essential for the assembly of stable viral particles. Interestingly, in spite of this requirement, the CP produced by a nonreplicating viral RNA can be stably assembled into virions as long as it is coexpressed with a replication-proficient RNA. Altogether, these results highlight the importance of coupling encapsidation to other viral processes to secure a successful infection. IMPORTANCE Viruses of the family Potyviridae are among the most dangerous threats for basically every important crop, and such socioeconomical relevance has made them a subject of many research studies. In spite of this, very little is currently known about proteins and processes controlling viral genome encapsidation by the coat protein. In the case of Plum pox virus (genus

  1. Plum pox virus capsid protein suppresses plant pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Nicaise, Valerie; Candresse, Thierry

    2017-08-01

    The perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by immune receptors launches defence mechanisms referred to as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Successful pathogens must suppress PTI pathways via the action of effectors to efficiently colonize their hosts. So far, plant PTI has been reported to be active against most classes of pathogens, except viruses, although this defence layer has been hypothesized recently as an active part of antiviral immunity which needs to be suppressed by viruses for infection success. Here, we report that Arabidopsis PTI genes are regulated upon infection by viruses and contribute to plant resistance to Plum pox virus (PPV). Our experiments further show that PPV suppresses two early PTI responses, the oxidative burst and marker gene expression, during Arabidopsis infection. In planta expression of PPV capsid protein (CP) was found to strongly impair these responses in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis, revealing its PTI suppressor activity. In summary, we provide the first clear evidence that plant viruses acquired the ability to suppress PTI mechanisms via the action of effectors, highlighting a novel strategy employed by viruses to escape plant defences. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Solubility Curve of Polyglutamine for the PLUM Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutlu, Songul; Haaga, Jason; Gunton, James D.

    A recent study by Crick et al determined the saturation (solubility) curve for polyglutamine (PolyQ) for several different repeat lengths, n, of Qn, and for different flanking sequences, such as K2. The degree of supersaturation S, (S =ln(Co/Ce), where Co and Ce are the metastable and equilibrium saturation monomer concentrations, respectively) plays a crucial role in the kinetics of aggregation of misfolded proteins containing polyQ. Thus the degree of supersaturation is an important factor in diseases such as Huntington's disease for which polyQ is a major component. We present here preliminary results of a molecular dynamics study for the solubility curve for a PLUM model of Q10. (An extensive study of the kinetics of aggregation for this model is being carried out in a separate study) Our results display a normal solubility curve behavior, with the saturation concentration increasing with increasing temperature. This is only in partial qualitative agreement with the experimental results, which show a retrograde behavior at low temperatures. We are extending this study to other repeat lengths, including Q40. ∖ ∖ ∖ ∖ This work is supported by the G. Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Foundation and used an allocation of time from XSEDE.

  3. 7 CFR 993.162 - Voluntary prune plum diversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRIED... production/dehydration characteristics. The addition of a county or counties, as the case may be, to one of...

  4. 7 CFR 81.10 - Claim for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.10 Claim for payment. (a) To obtain payment for the trees... Committee. Such form shall include the Committee's certification that the qualifying trees from the blocks... check to the producer in the amount of $8.50 per eligible tree removed. (b) [Reserved] ...

  5. 7 CFR 81.10 - Claim for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... check to the producer in the amount of $8.50 per eligible tree removed. (b) [Reserved] ... PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.10 Claim for payment. (a) To obtain payment for the trees... Committee. Such form shall include the Committee's certification that the qualifying trees from the blocks...

  6. 7 CFR 81.10 - Claim for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... check to the producer in the amount of $8.50 per eligible tree removed. (b) [Reserved] ... PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.10 Claim for payment. (a) To obtain payment for the trees... Committee. Such form shall include the Committee's certification that the qualifying trees from the blocks...

  7. 7 CFR 81.10 - Claim for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... check to the producer in the amount of $8.50 per eligible tree removed. (b) [Reserved] ... PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.10 Claim for payment. (a) To obtain payment for the trees... Committee. Such form shall include the Committee's certification that the qualifying trees from the blocks...

  8. 7 CFR 81.10 - Claim for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... check to the producer in the amount of $8.50 per eligible tree removed. (b) [Reserved] ... PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.10 Claim for payment. (a) To obtain payment for the trees... Committee. Such form shall include the Committee's certification that the qualifying trees from the blocks...

  9. 77 FR 28493 - Propylene Oxide; Tolerance Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... pine nuts for both the fumigant propylene oxide and the reaction product from the use of propylene... oxide and the reaction product from the use of propylene oxide, known as propylene chlorohydrin. Also... Pistachio 300 Plum, prune, dried 2.0 (2) Tolerances are established for residues of the reaction product...

  10. Stabilization of Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccines by Freeze Drying, Spray Drying, and Foam Drying.

    PubMed

    Lovalenti, Phillip M; Anderl, Jeff; Yee, Luisa; Nguyen, Van; Ghavami, Behnaz; Ohtake, Satoshi; Saxena, Atul; Voss, Thomas; Truong-Le, Vu

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this research is to develop stable formulations for live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) by employing the drying methods freeze drying, spray drying, and foam drying. Formulated live attenuated Type-A H1N1 and B-strain influenza vaccines with a variety of excipient combinations were dried using one of the three drying methods. Process and storage stability at 4, 25 and 37°C of the LAIV in these formulations was monitored using a TCID50 potency assay. Their immunogenicity was also evaluated in a ferret model. The thermal stability of H1N1 vaccine was significantly enhanced through application of unique formulation combinations and drying processes. Foam dried formulations were as much as an order of magnitude more stable than either spray dried or freeze dried formulations, while exhibiting low process loss and full retention of immunogenicity. Based on long-term stability data, foam dried formulations exhibited a shelf life at 4, 25 and 37°C of >2, 1.5 years and 4.5 months, respectively. Foam dried LAIV Type-B manufactured using the same formulation and process parameters as H1N1 were imparted with a similar level of stability. Foam drying processing methods with appropriate selection of formulation components can produce an order of magnitude improvement in LAIV stability over other drying methods.

  11. Dry and Semi-Dry Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, T.; Chavas, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    Our understanding of dynamics in our real moist atmosphere is strongly informed by idealized dry models. It is widely believed that tropical cyclones (TCs) are an intrinsically moist phenomenon - relying fundamentally on evaporation and latent heat release - yet recent numerical modeling work has found formation of dry axisymmetric tropical cyclones from a state of dry radiative-convective equilibrium. What can such "dry hurricanes" teach us about intensity, structure, and size of real moist tropical cyclones in nature? Are dry TCs even stable in 3D? What about surfaces that are nearly dry but have some latent heat flux - can they also support TCs? To address these questions, we use the SAM cloud-system resolving model to simulate radiative-convective equilibrium on a rapidly rotating f-plane, subject to constant tropospheric radiative cooling. We use a homogeneous surface with fixed temperature and with surface saturation vapor pressure scaled by a factor 0-1 relative to that over pure water - allowing for continuous variation between moist and dry limits. We also explore cases with surface enthalpy fluxes that are uniform in space and time, where partitioning between latent and sensible heat fluxes is specified directly. We find that a completely moist surface yields a TC-world where multiple vortices form spontaneously and persist for tens of days. A completely dry surface can also yield a parallel dry TC-world with many vortices that are even more stable and persistent. Spontaneous cyclogenesis, however, is impeded for a range of low to intermediate surface wetness values, and by the combination of large rotation rates and a dry surface. We discuss whether these constraints on spontaneous cyclogenesis might arise from: 1) rain evaporation in the subcloud layer limiting the range of viable surface wetness values, and 2) a natural convective Rossby number limiting the range of viable rotation rates. Finally, we discuss simulations with uniform surface enthalpy

  12. Data Acquisition System Architecture and Capabilities At NASA GRC Plum Brook Station's Space Environment Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Richard K.; Hill, Gerald M.

    2012-01-01

    Very large space environment test facilities present unique engineering challenges in the design of facility data systems. Data systems of this scale must be versatile enough to meet the wide range of data acquisition and measurement requirements from a diverse set of customers and test programs, but also must minimize design changes to maintain reliability and serviceability. This paper presents an overview of the common architecture and capabilities of the facility data acquisition systems available at two of the world?s largest space environment test facilities located at the NASA Glenn Research Center?s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio; namely, the Space Propulsion Research Facility (commonly known as the B-2 facility) and the Space Power Facility (SPF). The common architecture of the data systems is presented along with details on system scalability and efficient measurement systems analysis and verification. The architecture highlights a modular design, which utilizes fully-remotely managed components, enabling the data systems to be highly configurable and support multiple test locations with a wide-range of measurement types and very large system channel counts.

  13. Data Acquisition System Architecture and Capabilities at NASA GRC Plum Brook Station's Space Environment Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Richard K.; Hill, Gerald M.

    2014-01-01

    Very large space environment test facilities present unique engineering challenges in the design of facility data systems. Data systems of this scale must be versatile enough to meet the wide range of data acquisition and measurement requirements from a diverse set of customers and test programs, but also must minimize design changes to maintain reliability and serviceability. This paper presents an overview of the common architecture and capabilities of the facility data acquisition systems available at two of the world's largest space environment test facilities located at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio; namely, the Space Propulsion Research Facility (commonly known as the B-2 facility) and the Space Power Facility (SPF). The common architecture of the data systems is presented along with details on system scalability and efficient measurement systems analysis and verification. The architecture highlights a modular design, which utilizes fully-remotely managed components, enabling the data systems to be highly configurable and support multiple test locations with a wide-range of measurement types and very large system channel counts.

  14. Drying and decontamination of raw pistachios with sequential infrared drying, tempering and hot air drying.

    PubMed

    Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar; Brandl, Maria T; Wang, Bini; McHugh, Tara H; Zhang, Ruihong; Pan, Zhongli

    2017-04-04

    Pistachio nuts have been associated with outbreaks of foodborne disease and the industry has been impacted by numerous product recalls due to contamination with Salmonella enterica. The current hot air drying of pistachios has low energy efficiency and drying rates, and also does not guarantee the microbial safety of products. In the study described herein, dehulled and water-sorted pistachios with a moisture content (MC) of 38.14% (wet basis) were dried in a sequential infrared and hot air (SIRHA) drier to <9% MC. The decontamination efficacy was assessed by inoculating pistachios with Enterococcus faecium, a surrogate of Salmonella enterica used for quality control in the almond industry. Drying with IR alone saved 105min (34.4%) of drying time compared with hot air drying. SIRHA drying of pistachios for 2h with infrared (IR) heat followed by tempering at a product temperature of 70°C for 2h and then by hot air drying shortened the drying time by 40min (9.1%) compared with drying by hot air only. This SIRHA method also reduced the E. faecium cell population by 6.1-logCFU/g kernel and 5.41-logCFU/g shell of pistachios. The free fatty acid contents of SIRHA dried pistachios were on par with that of hot air dried samples. Despite significant differences in peroxide values (PV) of pistachio kernels dried with the SIRHA method compared with hot air drying at 70°C, the PV were within the permissible limit of 5Meq/kg for edible oils. Our findings demonstrate the efficacy of SIRHA drying in achieving simultaneous drying and decontamination of pistachios. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. B-1 and B-3 Test Stands at NASA’s Plum Brook Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-09-21

    Operation of the High Energy Rocket Engine Research Facility (B-1), left, and Nuclear Rocket Dynamics and Control Facility (B-3) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. The test stands were constructed in the early 1960s to test full-scale liquid hydrogen fuel systems in simulated altitude conditions. Over the next decade each stand was used for two major series of liquid hydrogen rocket tests: the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) and the Centaur second-stage rocket program. The different components of these rocket engines could be studied under flight conditions and adjusted without having to fire the engine. Once the preliminary studies were complete, the entire engine could be fired in larger facilities. The test stands were vertical towers with cryogenic fuel and steam ejector systems. B-1 was 135 feet tall, and B-3 was 210 feet tall. Each test stand had several levels, a test section, and ground floor shop areas. The test stands relied on an array of support buildings to conduct their tests, including a control building, steam exhaust system, and fuel storage and pumping facilities. A large steam-powered altitude exhaust system reduced the pressure at the exhaust nozzle exit of each test stand. This allowed B-1 and B-3 to test turbopump performance in conditions that matched the altitudes of space.

  16. 76 FR 28675 - Spirotetramat; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ...; vegetables, legume, group 06 (except soybean) at 4 ppm; plum, prune, dried at 4.5 ppm; vegetables, foliage of legume, except soybean, subgroup 07A at 5 ppm; cotton, gin byproducts at 7 ppm; soybean at 4 ppm; soybean..., 264-1050, 264-1051, 264-1065), on cotton; soybeans; vegetable, legume, crop group 6; acerola; atemoya...

  17. 7 CFR 81.13 - Records and accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records and accounts. 81.13 Section 81.13 Agriculture... PROGRAMS PRUNE/DRIED PLUM DIVERSION PROGRAM § 81.13 Records and accounts. (a) The producers participating... is reason to know, believe, or suspect that matters may be or could be in dispute or remain in...

  18. Fruit-based Natural Antioxidants in Meat and Meat Products: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S R; Gokulakrishnan, P; Giriprasad, R; Yatoo, M A

    2015-01-01

    Due to the potential toxic effects of synthetic antioxidants, natural antioxidant sources especially fruits are being preferred now-a-days for use in different meat products. The majority of the antioxidant capacity of a fruit is especially because of numerous phenolic compounds. Many of the phytochemicals present in fruits may help protect cells against the oxidative damage caused by free radicals, thereby reducing the risk of degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, various types of cancers, and neurological diseases. Various parts of the fruit including their byproducts like skin and seeds have been used in meat products. Plum has been used as plum puree, prunes (dried plum), and plum extracts. Grape skin, seed, peel extracts, and grape pomace; berries as cakes and powder extracts; pomegranate rind powder and its juice; and most of the citrus fruits have proved beneficial sources of antioxidants. All these natural sources have effectively reduced the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) values and free radical frequency. Thus, lipid oxidation is prevented and shelf life is greatly enhanced by incorporating various kinds of fruits and their byproducts in meat and meat products. There is a great scope for the use of fruits as natural sources of antioxidants in meat industry. The review is intended to provide an overview of the fruit-based natural antioxidants in meat and meat products.

  19. Genotyping by Sequencing for SNP-Based Linkage Analysis and Identification of QTLs Linked to Fruit Quality Traits in Japanese Plum (Prunus salicina Lindl.).

    PubMed

    Salazar, Juan A; Pacheco, Igor; Shinya, Paulina; Zapata, Patricio; Silva, Claudia; Aradhya, Mallikarjuna; Velasco, Dianne; Ruiz, David; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro; Infante, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    Marker-assisted selection (MAS) in stone fruit ( Prunus species) breeding is currently difficult to achieve due to the polygenic nature of the most relevant agronomic traits linked to fruit quality. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS), however, provides a large quantity of useful data suitable for fine mapping using Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) from a reference genome. In this study, GBS was used to genotype 272 seedlings of three F1 Japanese plum ( Prunus salicina Lindl) progenies derived from crossing "98-99" (as a common female parent) with "Angeleno," "September King," and "September Queen" as male parents. Raw sequences were aligned to the Peach genome v1, and 42,909 filtered SNPs were obtained after sequence alignment. In addition, 153 seedlings from the "98-99" × "Angeleno" cross were used to develop a genetic map for each parent. A total of 981 SNPs were mapped (479 for "98-99" and 502 for "Angeleno"), covering a genetic distance of 688.8 and 647.03 cM, respectively. Fifty five seedlings from this progeny were phenotyped for different fruit quality traits including ripening time, fruit weight, fruit shape, chlorophyll index, skin color, flesh color, over color, firmness, and soluble solids content in the years 2015 and 2016. Linkage-based QTL analysis allowed the identification of genomic regions significantly associated with ripening time (LG4 of both parents and both phenotyping years), fruit skin color (LG3 and LG4 of both parents and both years), chlorophyll degradation index (LG3 of both parents in 2015) and fruit weight (LG7 of both parents in 2016). These results represent a promising situation for GBS in the identification of SNP variants associated to fruit quality traits, potentially applicable in breeding programs through MAS, in a highly heterozygous crop species such as Japanese plum.

  20. O-GlcNAc modification of the coat protein of the potyvirus Plum pox virus enhances viral infection.

    PubMed

    Pérez, José de Jesús; Udeshi, Namrata D; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Ciordia, Sergio; Juárez, Silvia; Scott, Cheryl L; Olszewski, Neil E; Hunt, Donald F; García, Juan Antonio

    2013-08-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic protein modification which has been studied mainly in metazoans. We reported previously that an Arabidopsis thaliana O-GlcNAc transferase modifies at least two threonine residues of the Plum pox virus (PPV) capsid protein (CP). Now, six additional residues were shown to be involved in O-GlcNAc modification of PPV CP. CP O-GlcNAcylation was abolished in the PPV CP7-T/A mutant, in which seven threonines were mutated. PPV CP7-T/A infected Nicotiana clevelandii, Nicotiana benthamiana, and Prunus persica without noticeable defects. However, defects in infection of A. thaliana were readily apparent. In mixed infections of wild-type arabidopsis, the CP7-T/A mutant was outcompeted by wild-type virus. These results indicate that CP O-GlcNAcylation has a major role in the infection process. O-GlcNAc modification may have a role in virion assembly and/or stability as the CP of PPV CP7-T/A was more sensitive to protease digestion than that of the wild-type virus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessing the Effects of Sea Level Rise on Plum Island Estuary Marshes Using a Hydrodynamic-marsh Modeling Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, H. K.; Bilskie, M. V.; Hagen, S. C.; Morris, J. T.; Alizad, K.

    2015-12-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) can significantly impact both human and ecological habitats in coastal and inland regions. Studies show that coastal estuaries and marsh systems are at the risk of losing their productivity under increasing rates of SLR (Donnelly and Bertness, 2001; Warren and Niering, 1993). The integrated hydrodynamic-marsh model (Hagen et al., 2013 & Alizad et al., 2015) uses a set of parameters and conditions to simulate tidal flow through the salt marsh of Plum Island Estuary, Massachusetts. The hydrodynamic model computes mean high water (MHW) and mean low water (MLW) and is coupled to the zero-dimensional Marsh Equilibrium Model (Morris et al. 2002) to estimate changes in biomass productivity and accretion. The coupled hydrodynamic-marsh model was used to examine the effects of different scenarios of SLR (Parris et al., 2012) on salt marsh productivity for the year 2100 in the Plum Island Estuary. In this particular study, responses of salt marsh production for different scenarios of SLR were compared. The study shows higher productivity of salt marsh under a low SLR scenario and lower productivity under the higher SLR. The study also demonstrates the migration of salt marshes under higher SLR scenarios. References: Alizad, K., S. C. Hagen, Morris, J.T., Bacopoulos, P., Bilskie, M.V., and John, F.W. 2015. A coupled, two-dimensional hydrodynamic-marsh model with biological feedback. Limnology and Oceanography, In review. Donnelly, J.P., and M.D. Bertness. 2001. Rapid shoreward encroachment of salt marsh cordgrass in response to accelerated sea-level rise. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 98: 14218-14223.Hagen, S.C., J.T. Morris, P. Bacopoulos, and J. Weishampel. 2013. Sea-Level Rise Impact on a Salt Marsh System of the Lower St. Johns River. ASCE Journal of Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Engineering, Vol. 139, No. 2, March/April 2013, pp. 118-125.Morris, J.T., P.V. Sundareshwar, C.T. Nietch, B. Kjerfve, and D.R. Cahoon. 2002. Responses

  2. Transcriptomic analysis of Prunus domestica undergoing hypersensitive response to plum pox virus infection.

    PubMed

    Rodamilans, Bernardo; San León, David; Mühlberger, Louisa; Candresse, Thierry; Neumüller, Michael; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; García, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) infects Prunus trees around the globe, posing serious fruit production problems and causing severe economic losses. One variety of Prunus domestica, named 'Jojo', develops a hypersensitive response to viral infection. Here we compared infected and non-infected samples using next-generation RNA sequencing to characterize the genetic complexity of the viral population in infected samples and to identify genes involved in development of the resistance response. Analysis of viral reads from the infected samples allowed reconstruction of a PPV-D consensus sequence. De novo reconstruction showed a second viral isolate of the PPV-Rec strain. RNA-seq analysis of PPV-infected 'Jojo' trees identified 2,234 and 786 unigenes that were significantly up- or downregulated, respectively (false discovery rate; FDR≤0.01). Expression of genes associated with defense was generally enhanced, while expression of those related to photosynthesis was repressed. Of the total of 3,020 differentially expressed unigenes, 154 were characterized as potential resistance genes, 10 of which were included in the NBS-LRR type. Given their possible role in plant defense, we selected 75 additional unigenes as candidates for further study. The combination of next-generation sequencing and a Prunus variety that develops a hypersensitive response to PPV infection provided an opportunity to study the factors involved in this plant defense mechanism. Transcriptomic analysis presented an overview of the changes that occur during PPV infection as a whole, and identified candidates suitable for further functional characterization.

  3. Infrared Drying as a Quick Preparation Method for Dried Tangerine Peel

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mingyue; Zhao, Chengying; Ahmad, Aftab; Zhang, Huijuan; Xiao, Hang

    2017-01-01

    To establish the most convenient and effective method to dry tangerine peels, different methods (sun drying, hot-air drying, freeze drying, vacuum drying, and medium- and short-wave infrared drying) were exploited. Our results indicated that medium- and short-wave infrared drying was the best method to preserve nutraceutical components; for example, vitamin C was raised to 6.77 mg/g (D.W.) from 3.39 mg/g (sun drying). Moreover, the drying time can be shortened above 96% compared with sun drying. Importantly, the efficiency of DPPH radical scavenging was enhanced from 26.66% to 55.92%. These findings would provide a reliable and time-saving methodology to produce high-quality dried tangerine peels. PMID:29348752

  4. Drying and decontamination of pistachios with sequential infrared drying, tempering and hot air drying

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pistachio industry is in need of improved drying technology as the current hot air drying has low energy efficiency and drying rate and high labor cost and also does not produce safe products against microbial contamination. In the current study, dehulled and water- sorted pistachios with a mois...

  5. Drying hardwood lumber

    Treesearch

    Joseph Denig; Eugene M. Wengert; William T. Simpson

    2000-01-01

    Drying Hardwood Lumber focuses on common methods for drying lumber of different thickness, with minimal drying defects, for high quality applications. This manual also includes predrying treatments that, when part of an overall quality-oriented drying system, reduce defects and improve drying quality, especially of oak lumber. Special attention is given to drying white...

  6. [Drying characteristics and apparent change of sludge granules during drying].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Wen; Weng, Huan-Xin; Zhang, Jin-Jun

    2011-08-01

    Three different weight grades of sludge granules (2.5, 5, 10 g) were dried at constant temperature of 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 degrees C, respectively. Then characteristics of weight loss and change of apparent form during sludge drying were analyzed. Results showed that there were three stages during sludge drying at 100-200 degrees C: acceleration phase, constant-rate phase, and falling-rate phase. At 300-500 degrees C, there were no constant-rate phase, but due to lots of cracks generated at sludge surface, average drying rates were still high. There was a quadratic nonlinear relationship between average drying rate and drying temperature. At 100-200 degrees C, drying processes of different weight grade sludge granules were similar. At 300-500 degrees C, drying processes of same weight grade of sludge granules were similar. Little organic matter decomposed till sludge burning at 100-300 degrees C, while some organic matter began to decompose at the beginning of sludge drying at 400-500 degrees C.

  7. The influence of different types of pesticides on elemental profiles of some fruit trees: Apple and plum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheboianu, Anca Irina; Setnescu, Tanta; Setnescu, Radu; Culicov, Otilia; Zinicovscaia, Inga

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the elemental content of various samples from apple and plum orchard - located in Dambovita and Arges Counties - (soil, bark and leaves) and to characterize the influence of different types of pesticides commonly used in orchards. For this purpose, the effect of pesticide/ natural fertilizer couples was studied by characterization of treated and untreated soil composition. Heavy metals were also used as tracers for pesticides concentration monitoring, aiming to get information about their overall concentration and eventually, their critical accumulation into some parts of the studied plants (which shall not exceed the limits regulated by Romanian law and UE directives for pesticides use in fruit-grower). Solid samples were analyzed by wavelength dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) and instrumental nuclear activation methods (INAA). Moreover, soil properties (pH and electrical conductivity) were determined in order to characterize agricultural soils and to analyze relationships between heavy metal contents and soil properties. Multivariate data analysis was performed to identify a common source for heavy metals. Correlations between the concentrations of heavy metals in the analyzed samples and pesticides used in these areas were found.

  8. Genome-wide association links candidate genes to resistance to Plum Pox Virus in apricot (Prunus armeniaca).

    PubMed

    Mariette, Stéphanie; Wong Jun Tai, Fabienne; Roch, Guillaume; Barre, Aurélien; Chague, Aurélie; Decroocq, Stéphane; Groppi, Alexis; Laizet, Yec'han; Lambert, Patrick; Tricon, David; Nikolski, Macha; Audergon, Jean-Marc; Abbott, Albert G; Decroocq, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    In fruit tree species, many important traits have been characterized genetically by using single-family descent mapping in progenies segregating for the traits. However, most mapped loci have not been sufficiently resolved to the individual genes due to insufficient progeny sizes for high resolution mapping and the previous lack of whole-genome sequence resources of the study species. To address this problem for Plum Pox Virus (PPV) candidate resistance gene identification in Prunus species, we implemented a genome-wide association (GWA) approach in apricot. This study exploited the broad genetic diversity of the apricot (Prunus armeniaca) germplasm containing resistance to PPV, next-generation sequence-based genotyping, and the high-quality peach (Prunus persica) genome reference sequence for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification. The results of this GWA study validated previously reported PPV resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL) intervals, highlighted other potential resistance loci, and resolved each to a limited set of candidate genes for further study. This work substantiates the association genetics approach for resolution of QTL to candidate genes in apricot and suggests that this approach could simplify identification of other candidate genes for other marked trait intervals in this germplasm. © 2015 INRA, UMR 1332 BFP New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. 40 CFR 180.443 - Myclobutanil; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....0 Cherry, tart 5.0 Cilantro, leaves 9.0 Cotton, undelinted seed 0.02 Currant 3.0 Egg 0.02 Fruit... 0.70 Milk 0.2 Okra 4.0 Papaya 3.0 Peppermint, tops 3.0 Plum, prune, dried 8.0 Poultry, fat 0.02... Vegetable, leafy, except brassica, group 4 0.03 Vegetable, leaves of root and tuber, group 2 0.03 Vegetable...

  10. 40 CFR 180.443 - Myclobutanil; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....0 Cherry, tart 5.0 Cilantro, leaves 9.0 Cotton, undelinted seed 0.02 Currant 3.0 Egg 0.02 Fruit... 0.70 Milk 0.2 Okra 4.0 Papaya 3.0 Peppermint, tops 3.0 Plum, prune, dried 8.0 Poultry, fat 0.02... Vegetable, leafy, except brassica, group 4 0.03 Vegetable, leaves of root and tuber, group 2 0.03 Vegetable...

  11. 40 CFR 180.443 - Myclobutanil; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....0 Cherry, tart 5.0 Cilantro, leaves 9.0 Cotton, undelinted seed 0.02 Currant 3.0 Egg 0.02 Fruit... 0.70 Milk 0.2 Okra 4.0 Papaya 3.0 Peppermint, tops 3.0 Plum, prune, dried 8.0 Poultry, fat 0.02... Vegetable, leafy, except brassica, group 4 0.03 Vegetable, leaves of root and tuber, group 2 0.03 Vegetable...

  12. 40 CFR 180.364 - Glyphosate; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., shoots 0.2 Banana 0.2 Barley, bran 30 Beet, sugar, dried pulp 25 Beet, sugar, roots 10 Beet, sugar, tops..., roots 0.2 Ginger, white, flower 0.2 Gourd, buffalo, seed 0.1 Governor's plum 0.2 Gow kee, leaves 0.2... Mamey apple 0.2 Mango 0.2 Mangosteen 0.2 Marmaladebox 0.2 Meadowfoam, seed 0.1 Mioga, flower 0.2 Mustard...

  13. Biotechnological strategies and tools for Plum pox virus resistance: trans-, intra-, cis-genesis, and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Ilardi, Vincenza; Tavazza, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) is the etiological agent of sharka, the most devastating and economically important viral disease affecting Prunus species. It is widespread in most stone fruits producing countries even though eradication and quarantine programs are in place. The development of resistant cultivars and rootstocks remains the most ecologically and economically suitable approach to achieve long-term control of sharka disease. However, the few PPV resistance genetic resources found in Prunus germplasm along with some intrinsic biological features of stone fruit trees pose limits for efficient and fast breeding programs. This review focuses on an array of biotechnological strategies and tools, which have been used, or may be exploited to confer PPV resistance. A considerable number of scientific studies clearly indicate that robust and predictable resistance can be achieved by transforming plant species with constructs encoding intron-spliced hairpin RNAs homologous to conserved regions of the PPV genome. In addition, we discuss how recent advances in our understanding of PPV biology can be profitably exploited to develop viral interference strategies. In particular, genetic manipulation of host genes by which PPV accomplishes its infection cycle already permits the creation of intragenic resistant plants. Finally, we review the emerging genome editing technologies based on ZFN, TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 engineered nucleases and how the knockout of host susceptibility genes will open up next generation of PPV resistant plants. PMID:26106397

  14. Drying behaviour, effective diffusivity and energy of activation of olive leaves dried by microwave, vacuum and oven drying methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhussein, Elaf Abdelillah Ali; Şahin, Selin

    2018-07-01

    Drying is the crucial food processing for bioactive components from plant materials before strating extraction in addition to preservation of raw plant materials during storage period. Olive leaves were dried by various methods such as microwave drying (MD), oven drying (OD) and vacuum drying (VD) at several temperature values in the present study. Mathematical models allow to develop, design and control the processes. 14 emprical equations were used to estimate the drying behaviour and the time required for drying. Convenience of the models were evaluated according to the correlation coefficient ( R 2 ), varience ( S 2 ) and root mean square deviation ( D RMS ). On the other hand, the effective diffusion coefficient and energy for activation were also calculated. Effects of the drying methods on the total phenolic (TPC), flavonoid (TFC) and oleuropein contents and free radical scavenging activity (FRSA) of the olive leaves were also investigated to take into considiration the quality of the dried product. MD has proved to be the fastest drying method having the highest effective diffusivity and the lowest activation energy with a more qualitive product.

  15. Drying behaviour, effective diffusivity and energy of activation of olive leaves dried by microwave, vacuum and oven drying methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhussein, Elaf Abdelillah Ali; Şahin, Selin

    2018-01-01

    Drying is the crucial food processing for bioactive components from plant materials before strating extraction in addition to preservation of raw plant materials during storage period. Olive leaves were dried by various methods such as microwave drying (MD), oven drying (OD) and vacuum drying (VD) at several temperature values in the present study. Mathematical models allow to develop, design and control the processes. 14 emprical equations were used to estimate the drying behaviour and the time required for drying. Convenience of the models were evaluated according to the correlation coefficient (R 2 ), varience (S 2 ) and root mean square deviation (D RMS ). On the other hand, the effective diffusion coefficient and energy for activation were also calculated. Effects of the drying methods on the total phenolic (TPC), flavonoid (TFC) and oleuropein contents and free radical scavenging activity (FRSA) of the olive leaves were also investigated to take into considiration the quality of the dried product. MD has proved to be the fastest drying method having the highest effective diffusivity and the lowest activation energy with a more qualitive product.

  16. BIOMASS DRYING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines the technologies used for drying of biomass and the energy requirements of biomass dryers. Biomass drying processes, drying methods, and the conventional types of dryers are surveyed generally. Drying methods and dryer studies using superheated steam as the d...

  17. Feasibility of Conducting J-2X Engine Testing at the Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station B-2 Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, Charles F.; Cheston, Derrick J.; Worlund, Armis L.; Brown, James R.; Hooper, William G.; Monk, Jan C.; Winstead, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    A trade study of the feasibility of conducting J-2X testing in the Glenn Research Center (GRC) Plum Brook Station (PBS) B-2 facility was initiated in May 2006 with results available in October 2006. The Propulsion Test Integration Group (PTIG) led the study with support from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Jacobs Sverdrup Engineering. The primary focus of the trade study was on facility design concepts and their capability to satisfy the J-2X altitude simulation test requirements. The propulsion systems tested in the B-2 facility were in the 30,000-pound (30K) thrust class. The J-2X thrust is approximately 10 times larger. Therefore, concepts significantly different from the current configuration are necessary for the diffuser, spray chamber subsystems, and cooling water. Steam exhaust condensation in the spray chamber is judged to be the key risk consideration relative to acceptable spray chamber pressure. Further assessment via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and other simulation capabilities (e.g. methodology for anchoring predictions with actual test data and subscale testing to support investigation.

  18. Ambient Dried Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for creating aerogel using normal pressure and ambient temperatures. All spacecraft, satellites, and landers require the use of thermal insulation due to the extreme environments encountered in space and on extraterrestrial bodies. Ambient dried aerogels introduce the possibility of using aerogel as thermal insulation in a wide variety of instances where supercritically dried aerogels cannot be used. More specifically, thermoelectric devices can use ambient dried aerogel, where the advantages are in situ production using the cast-in ability of an aerogel. Previously, aerogels required supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) to be dried. Ambient dried aerogels can be dried at room temperature and pressure. This allows many materials, such as plastics and certain metal alloys that cannot survive supercritical conditions, to be directly immersed in liquid aerogel precursor and then encapsulated in the final, dried aerogel. Additionally, the metalized Mylar films that could not survive the previous methods of making aerogels can survive the ambient drying technique, thus making multilayer insulation (MLI) materials possible. This results in lighter insulation material as well. Because this innovation does not require high-temperature or high-pressure drying, ambient dried aerogels are much less expensive to produce. The equipment needed to conduct supercritical drying costs many tens of thousands of dollars, and has associated running expenses for power, pressurized gasses, and maintenance. The ambient drying process also expands the size of the pieces of aerogel that can be made because a high-temperature, high-pressure system typically has internal dimensions of up to 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. In the case of this innovation, the only limitation on the size of the aerogels produced would be in the ability of the solvent in the wet gel to escape from the gel network.

  19. Family-based linkage and association mapping reveals novel genes affecting Plum pox virus infection in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pagny, Gaëlle; Paulstephenraj, Pauline S; Poque, Sylvain; Sicard, Ophélie; Cosson, Patrick; Eyquard, Jean-Philippe; Caballero, Mélodie; Chague, Aurélie; Gourdon, Germain; Negrel, Lise; Candresse, Thierry; Mariette, Stéphanie; Decroocq, Véronique

    2012-11-01

    Sharka is a devastating viral disease caused by the Plum pox virus (PPV) in stone fruit trees and few sources of resistance are known in its natural hosts. Since any knowledge gained from Arabidopsis on plant virus susceptibility factors is likely to be transferable to crop species, Arabidopsis's natural variation was searched for host factors essential for PPV infection. To locate regions of the genome associated with susceptibility to PPV, linkage analysis was performed on six biparental populations as well as on multiparental lines. To refine quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, a genome-wide association analysis was carried out using 147 Arabidopsis accessions. Evidence was found for linkage on chromosomes 1, 3 and 5 with restriction of PPV long-distance movement. The most relevant signals occurred within a region at the bottom of chromosome 3, which comprises seven RTM3-like TRAF domain-containing genes. Since the resistance mechanism analyzed here is recessive and the rtm3 knockout mutant is susceptible to PPV infection, it suggests that other gene(s) present in the small identified region encompassing RTM3 are necessary for PPV long-distance movement. In consequence, we report here the occurrence of host factor(s) that are indispensable for virus long-distance movement. © 2012 INRA. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. [Concentration and Size Distribution of Bioaerosols in Indoor Environment of University Dormitory During the Plum Rain Period].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Li, Lu; Zhang, Jia-quan; Zhan, Chang-lin; Liu, Hong-xia; Zheng, Jing-ru; Yao, Rui-zhen; Cao, Jun-ji

    2016-04-15

    Bioaerosols of university dormitory can spread through air and cause a potential health risk for student staying in indoor environment. To quantify the characteristics of bioaerosols in indoor environment of university dormitory, concentration and size distribution of culturable bioaerosols were detected during the plum rain period, the correlations of culturable bioaerosol with concentration of particulate matter, the ambient temperature and relative humidity were analyzed using Spearman's correlation coefficient and finally the changes of size distribution of culturable bioaerosol caused by activities of students were detected. The results showed that the mean concentrations of culturable airborne bacteria and fungi were (2133 +/- 1617) CFUm' and (3111 +/- 2202) CFU x m(-3). The concentrations of culturable airborne bacteria and fungi exhibited negative correlation with PM1, PM2.5, and PM10, respectively. The respirable fractions of bacteria exhibited positive correlation with PM2.5, and the respirable fractions of fungi exhibited significant positive correlation with PM10. Ambient temperature had positive correlation with culturable airborne bacteria and fungi, and relative humidity had negative correlation with culturable airborne bacteria and fungi. In the afternoon, concentrations of culturable airborne fungi in indoor environment of university dormitory significantly increased, and the size distribution of culturable hioaerosols was different in the morning and afternoon.

  1. Dry hair

    MedlinePlus

    ... harsh soaps or alcohols Excessive blow-drying Dry air due to the climate Menkes kinky hair syndrome Malnutrition Underactive parathyroid ( hypoparathyroidism ) Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) Other hormone abnormalities

  2. Dry Sources of Plume Emissions on Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.

    2009-12-01

    rapidly frozen early oceanic water. A lack of highly saline particles in E ring that are expected to form due to significant evaporation of an aqueous reservoir also argues for dry sources. The E-ring grains [1,3] may represent neither thick salt deposits at the core-ice boundary nor brines that may exist at that boundary today [5]. A low upper limit for atomic Na content at Enceladus [6] is consistent with Na emission in salt particles from dry sources. A low (far from eutectic) NH3/H2O ratio in plumes [2] implies dry sources as well. If present, primary species (e.g. NH3, HCN) in plums [2] and Mg silicates in E-ring particles [3] could originate from unmelted fragments of sunken primordial crust that have been incorporated into the formed icy shell. The structural heterogeneity of current icy shell may account for the chemical diversity of gases [2] and solids [1,3] emitted from Enceladus. Refs.: [1] Portberg F. et al. (2009) Nature 459, 1098-1101. [2] Waite J. et al. et al. (2009) Nature 460, 487-490. [3] Postberg F. et al. (2008) Icarus 193, 438-454. [4] Schubert G. et al. (2007) Icarus 188, 335-345. [5] Zolotov M. (2007) GRL 34, L23203. [6] Schneider N. et al. (2009) Nature 459, 1098-1101.

  3. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  4. Heterologous RNA-silencing suppressors from both plant- and animal-infecting viruses support plum pox virus infection.

    PubMed

    Maliogka, Varvara I; Calvo, María; Carbonell, Alberto; García, Juan Antonio; Valli, Adrian

    2012-07-01

    HCPro, the RNA-silencing suppressor (RSS) of viruses belonging to the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae, is a multifunctional protein presumably involved in all essential steps of the viral infection cycle. Recent studies have shown that plum pox potyvirus (PPV) HCPro can be replaced successfully by cucumber vein yellowing ipomovirus P1b, a sequence-unrelated RSS from a virus of the same family. In order to gain insight into the requirement of a particular RSS to establish a successful potyviral infection, we tested the ability of different heterologous RSSs from both plant- and animal-infecting viruses to substitute for HCPro. Making use of engineered PPV chimeras, we show that PPV HCPro can be replaced functionally by some, but not all, unrelated RSSs, including the NS1 protein of the mammal-infecting influenza A virus. Interestingly, the capacity of a particular RSS to replace HCPro does not correlate strictly with its RNA silencing-suppression strength. Altogether, our results suggest that not all suppression strategies are equally suitable for efficient escape of PPV from the RNA-silencing machinery. The approach followed here, based on using PPV chimeras in which an under-consideration RSS substitutes for HCPro, could further help to study the function of diverse RSSs in a 'highly sensitive' RNA-silencing context, such as that taking place in plant cells during the process of a viral infection.

  5. Drying and color characteristics of coriander foliage using convective thin-layer and microwave drying.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Mark; Meda, Venkatesh; Tabil, Lope; Opoku, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Heat sensitive properties (aromatic, medicinal, color) provide herbs and spices with their high market value. In order to prevent extreme loss of heat sensitive properties when drying herbs, they are normally dried at low temperatures for longer periods of time to preserve these sensory properties. High energy consumption often results from drying herbs over a long period. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L., Umbelliferae) was dehydrated in two different drying units (thin layer convection and microwave dryers) in order to compare the drying and final product quality (color) characteristics. Microwave drying of the coriander foliage was faster than convective drying. The entire drying process took place in the falling rate period for both microwave and convective dried samples. The drying rate for the microwave dried samples ranged from 42.3 to 48.2% db/min and that of the convective dried samples ranged from 7.1 to 12.5% db/min. The fresh sample color had the lowest L value at 26.83 with higher L values for all dried samples. The results show that convective thin layer dried coriander samples exhibited a significantly greater color change than microwave dried coriander samples. The color change index values for the microwave dried samples ranged from 2.67 to 3.27 and that of the convective dried samples varied from 4.59 to 6.58.

  6. Impact of trap architecture, adjacent habitats, abiotic factors, and host plant phenology on captures of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) adults.

    PubMed

    Lafleur, Gérald; Chouinard, Gérald; Vincent, Charles; Cormier, Daniel

    2007-06-01

    Pyramid traps, 2.44 m and 3.66 m in height, were compared with standard-sized pyramid traps, 1.22 m in height, to assess the impact of trap architecture on captures of adult plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in two apple (Malus spp.) orchards and a blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) planting. The effects of adjacent habitat (organic orchard versus wooded areas), abiotic factors, and phenological stages of apple also were assessed to determine whether these variables influenced trap captures. Standard-sized pyramidal traps captured significantly more adults than larger trap variants. In the apple orchards, most adults (70-80%) were captured before petal fall with the exception of blocks adjacent to the organic orchard (25%). Significantly more adults were captured along the edge of an apple orchard (managed using an integrated pest management strategy) facing an organic apple orchard (76%) than along the edge facing wooded areas (24%). There was a significant positive correlation between daily trap captures and mean daily temperatures before petal fall in apple orchards.

  7. Dry dock no. 4. Service Building between dry docks 4 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dry dock no. 4. Service Building between dry docks 4 and 5. Floor plans (Navy Yard Public Works Office 1941). In files of Cushman & Wakefield, building 501. Philadelphia Naval Business Center. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Service Building, Dry Docks No. 4 & 5, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. Implications of drying temperature and humidity on the drying kinetics of seaweed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Majid Khan Majahar; Fudholi, Ahmad; Muthuvalu, M. S.; Sulaiman, Jumat; Yasir, Suhaimi Md

    2017-11-01

    A Low Temperature and Humidity Chamber Test tested in the Solar Energy Laboratory, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia. Experiments are attempted to study the effect of drying air temperature and humidity on the drying kinetics of seaweed Kappaphycus species Striatum besides to develop a model to estimate the drying curves. Simple method using a excel software is used in the analysis of raw data obtained from the drying experiment. The values of the parameters a, n and the constant k for the models are determined using a plot of curve drying models. Three different drying models are compared with experiment data seaweed drying at 30, 40, 50 and 60°C and relative humidity 20, 30 and 40% for seaweed. The higher drying temperatures and low relative humidity effects the moisture content that will be rapidly reduced. The most suitable model is selected to best describe the drying behavior of seaweed. The values of the coefficient of determination (R2), mean bias error (MBE) and root mean square error (RMSE) are used to determine the goodness or the quality of the fit. The Page model is showed a better fit to drying seaweed. The results from this study crucial for solar dryer development on pilot scale in Malaysia.

  9. The influence of lysozyme on mannitol polymorphism in freeze-dried and spray-dried formulations depends on the selection of the drying process.

    PubMed

    Grohganz, Holger; Lee, Yan-Ying; Rantanen, Jukka; Yang, Mingshi

    2013-04-15

    Freeze-drying and spray-drying are often applied drying techniques for biopharmaceutical formulations. The formation of different solid forms upon drying is often dependent on the complex interplay between excipient selection and process parameters. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the chosen drying method on the solid state form. Mannitol-lysozyme solutions of 20mg/mL, with the amount of lysozyme varying between 2.5% and 50% (w/w) of total solid content, were freeze-dried and spray-dried, respectively. The resulting solid state of mannitol was analysed by near-infrared spectroscopy in combination with multivariate analysis and further, results were verified with X-ray powder diffraction. It was seen that the prevalence of the mannitol polymorphic form shifted from β-mannitol to δ-mannitol with increasing protein concentration in freeze-dried formulations. In spray-dried formulations an increase in protein concentration resulted in a shift from β-mannitol to α-mannitol. An increase in final drying temperature of the freeze-drying process towards the temperature of the spray-drying process did not lead to significant changes. It can thus be concluded that it is the drying process in itself, rather than the temperature, that leads to the observed solid state changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Degradation of anionic surfactants during drying of UASBR sludges on sand drying beds.

    PubMed

    Mungray, Arvind Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2008-09-01

    Anionic surfactant (AS) concentrations in wet up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASBR) sludges from five sewage treatment plants (STPs) were found to range from 4480 to 9,233 mg kg(-1)dry wt. (average 7,347 mg kg(-1)dry wt.) over a period of 18 months. After drying on sand drying beds (SDBs), AS in dried-stabilized sludges averaged 1,452 mg kg(-1)dry wt., a reduction of around 80%. The kinetics of drying followed simple first-order reduction of moisture with value of drying constant (k(d))=0.051 d(-1). Reduction of AS also followed first-order kinetics. AS degradation rate constant (k(AS)) was found to be 0.034 d(-1) and half-life of AS as 20 days. The order of rates of removal observed was k(d)>k(AS)>k(COD)>k(OM) (drying >AS degradation>COD reduction>organic matter reduction). For the three applications of dried-stabilized sludges (soil, agricultural soil, grassland), values of risk quotient (RQ) were found to be <1, indicating no risk.

  11. Microwave and hot air drying of garlic puree: drying kinetics and quality characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İlter, Işıl; Akyıl, Saniye; Devseren, Esra; Okut, Dilara; Koç, Mehmet; Kaymak Ertekin, Figen

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effect of hot air and microwave drying on drying kinetics and some quality characteristics such as water activity, color, optic index and volatile oil of garlic puree was investigated. Optic index representing browning of the garlic puree increased excessively with an increase in microwave power and hot air drying temperature. However, volatile oil content of the dried samples was decreased by increasing of temperature and microwave power. By increasing drying temperature (50, 60 and 70 °C) and microwave power (180, 360 and 540 W), the drying time decreased from 8.5 h to 4 min. In order to determine the kinetic parameters, the experimental drying data were fitted to various semi-empirical models beside 2nd Fick's diffusion equation. Among them, the Page model gave a better fit for microwave-drying, while Logarithmic model gave a better fit for hot air drying. By increasing the microwave power and hot air drying temperature, the effective moisture diffusivity, De values ranged from 0.76×10-8 to 2.85×10-8 m2/s and from 2.21×10-10 to 3.07×10-10 m2/s, respectively. The activation energy was calculated as 20.90 kJ/mol for hot air drying and 21.96 W/g for microwave drying using an Arrhenius type equation.

  12. Determination of end point of primary drying in freeze-drying process control.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sajal M; Doen, Takayuki; Pikal, Michael J

    2010-03-01

    Freeze-drying is a relatively expensive process requiring long processing time, and hence one of the key objectives during freeze-drying process development is to minimize the primary drying time, which is the longest of the three steps in freeze-drying. However, increasing the shelf temperature into secondary drying before all of the ice is removed from the product will likely cause collapse or eutectic melt. Thus, from product quality as well as process economics standpoint, it is very critical to detect the end of primary drying. Experiments were conducted with 5% mannitol and 5% sucrose as model systems. The apparent end point of primary drying was determined by comparative pressure measurement (i.e., Pirani vs. MKS Baratron), dew point, Lyotrack (gas plasma spectroscopy), water concentration from tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, condenser pressure, pressure rise test (manometric temperature measurement or variations of this method), and product thermocouples. Vials were pulled out from the drying chamber using a sample thief during late primary and early secondary drying to determine percent residual moisture either gravimetrically or by Karl Fischer, and the cake structure was determined visually for melt-back, collapse, and retention of cake structure at the apparent end point of primary drying (i.e., onset, midpoint, and offset). By far, the Pirani is the best choice of the methods tested for evaluation of the end point of primary drying. Also, it is a batch technique, which is cheap, steam sterilizable, and easy to install without requiring any modification to the existing dryer.

  13. Gravimetric measurement of momentary drying rate of spray freeze-dried powders in vials.

    PubMed

    Gieseler, Henning; Lee, Geoffrey

    2009-09-01

    The profile of drying rate versus primary drying time for a spray freeze-dried trehalose aqueous solution is much different from that determined for regular freeze-drying. Drying rate declines very rapidly, attributed to rate-limiting heat transfer through the packed bed of frozen microparticles contained in a vial. The inter-particulate spaces appear to be the cause of this rate limitation. Use of either liquid nitrogen or liquid propane as a cryogenic produced strong differences in both SFD particle morphology and drying rate using trehalose, sucrose, or mannitol. The lack of any evident correlation supports the argument that the inter-particulate voids determine drying behavior.

  14. Dry socket

    MedlinePlus

    Alveolar osteitis; Alveolitis; Septic socket ... You may be more at risk for dry socket if you: Have poor oral health Have a ... after having a tooth pulled Have had dry socket in the past Drink from a straw after ...

  15. Drying kinetics and characteristics of dried gambir leaves using solar heating and silica gel dessicant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasibuan, R.; Hidayati, J.; Sundari, R.; Wicaksono, A. S.

    2018-02-01

    A drying combination of solar heating and silica gel dessicant has been applied to dry gambir leaves. The solar energy is captured by a collector to heat the air and the hot air is used to dry gambir leaves in a drying chamber. An exhaust fan in drying chamber assists to draw water molecules from gambir leaves accelerated by silica gel dessicant. This study has investigated the drying kinetics and drying characteristics of gambir leaves drying. In drying operation the air velocity is tuned by a PWM (pulse width modulation) controller to adjust minimum and maximum level, which is based on the rotation speed of the exhaust fan. The results show that the air velocity influenced the drying kinetics and drying characteristics of gambir leaves using solar-dessicant drying at 40 cm distance between exhaust fan and silica gel dessicant.

  16. New insights into the history of domesticated and wild apricots and its contribution to Plum pox virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Decroocq, Stéphane; Cornille, Amandine; Tricon, David; Babayeva, Sevda; Chague, Aurélie; Eyquard, Jean-Philippe; Karychev, Raul; Dolgikh, Svetlana; Kostritsyna, Tatiana; Liu, Shuo; Liu, Weisheng; Geng, Wenjuan; Liao, Kang; Asma, Bayram M; Akparov, Zeynal; Giraud, Tatiana; Decroocq, Véronique

    2016-10-01

    Studying domesticated species and their wild relatives allows understanding of the mechanisms of population divergence and adaptation, and identifying valuable genetic resources. Apricot is an important fruit in the Northern hemisphere, where it is threatened by the Plum pox virus (PPV), causing the sharka disease. The histories of apricot domestication and of its resistance to sharka are however still poorly understood. We used 18 microsatellite markers to genotype a collection of 230 wild trees from Central Asia and 142 cultivated apricots as representatives of the worldwide cultivated apricot germplasm; we also performed experimental PPV inoculation tests. The genetic markers revealed highest levels of diversity in Central Asian and Chinese wild and cultivated apricots, confirming an origin in this region. In cultivated apricots, Chinese accessions were differentiated from more Western accessions, while cultivated apricots were differentiated from wild apricots. An approximate Bayesian approach indicated that apricots likely underwent two independent domestication events, with bottlenecks, from the same wild population. Central Asian native apricots exhibited genetic subdivision and high frequency of resistance to sharka. Altogether, our results contribute to the understanding of the domestication history of cultivated apricot and point to valuable genetic diversity in the extant genetic resources of wild apricots. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Dry Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Meibomian glands. Autoimmune disorders such as Sjögren’s syndrome, lupus, scleroderma, and rheumatoid arthritis and other disorders such as diabetes, thyroid disorders, and Vitamin A deficiency are associated with dry eye. Women are more likely to develop dry eye. ...

  18. Effects of Raindrop Shape Parameter on the Simulation of Plum Rains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, H.; Zhou, L.; Li, X.; Huang, X.; Guo, W.

    2017-12-01

    The raindrop shape parameter of particle distribution is generally set as constant in a Double-moment Bulk Microphysics Scheme (DBMS) using Gama distribution function though which suggest huge differences in time and space according to observations. Based on Milbrandt 2-mon(MY) DBMS, four cases during Plum Rains season are simulated coupled with four empirical relationships between shape parameter (μr) and slope parameter of raindrop which have been concluded from observations of raindrop distributions. The analysis of model results suggest that μr have some influences on rainfall. Introducing the diagnostic formulas of μr may have some improvement on systematic biases of 24h accumulated rainfall and show some correction ability on local characteristics of rainfall distribution. Besides,the tendency to improve strong rainfall could be sensitive to μr. With the improvement of the diagnosis of μr using the empirically diagnostic formulas, μr increases generally in the middle- and lower-troposphere and decreases with the stronger rainfall. Its conclued that, the decline in raindrop water content and the increased raindrop mass-weighted average terminal velocity directly related to μr are the direct reasons of variations in the precipitation.On the other side, the environmental conditions including relative humidity and dynamical parameters are the key indirectly causes which has close relationships with the changes in cloud particles and rainfall distributions.Furthermore,the differences in the scale of improvement between the weak and heavy rainfall mainly come from the distinctions of response features about their variable fields respectively. The extent of variation in the features of cloud particles in warm clouds of heavy rainfall differs greatly from that of weak rainfall, though they share the same trend of variation. On the conditions of weak rainfall, the response of physical characteristics to μr performed consistent trends and some linear features

  19. Drying kinetics of onion ( Allium cepa L.) slices with convective and microwave drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiray, Engin; Seker, Anıl; Tulek, Yahya

    2017-05-01

    Onion slices were dried using two different drying techniques, convective and microwave drying. Convective drying treatments were carried out at different temperatures (50, 60 and 70 °C). Three different microwave output powers 328, 447 and 557 W were used in microwave drying. In convective drying, effective moisture diffusivity was estimated to be between 3.49 × 10-8 and 9.44 × 10-8 m2 s-1 within the temperature range studied. The effect of temperature on the diffusivity was described by the Arrhenius equation with an activation energy of 45.60 kJ mol-1. At increasing microwave power values, the effective moisture diffusivity values ranged from 2.59 × 10-7 and 5.08 × 10-8 m2 s-1. The activation energy for microwave drying of samples was calculated using an exponential expression based on Arrhenius equation. Among of the models proposed, Page's model gave a better fit for all drying conditions used.

  20. [Conversion methods of freshwater snail tissue dry mass and ash free dry mass].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Hua; Wang, Hai-Jun; Wang, Hong-Zhu; Liu, Xue-Qin

    2009-06-01

    Mollusk biomass is usually expressed as wet mass with shell, but this expression fails to represent real biomass due to the high calcium carbonate content in shells. Tissue dry mass and ash free dry mass are relatively close to real biomass. However, the determination process of these two parameters is very complicated, and thus, it is necessary to establish simple and practical conversion methods for these two parameters. A total of six taxa of freshwater snails (Bellamya sp., Alocinma longicornis, Parafossarulus striatulus, Parafossarulus eximius, Semisulcospira cancellata, and Radix sp.) common in the Yangtze Basin were selected to explore the relations of their five shell dimension parameters, dry and wet mass with shells with their tissue dry mass and ash free dry mass. The regressions of the tissue dry mass and ash free dry mass with the five shell dimension parameters were all exponential (y = ax(b)). Among them, shell width and shell length were more precise (the average percentage error between observed and predicted value being 22.0% and 22.5%, respectively) than the other three parameters in the conversion of dry mass. Wet mass with shell could be directly converted to tissue dry mass and ash free dry mass, with an average percentage error of 21.7%. According to the essence of definition and the errors of conversion, ash free dry mass would be the optimum parameter to express snail biomass.

  1. Erection of a Centaur Standard Shroud at Plum Brook Station’s B-3 Test Stand

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-08-21

    A section of the Centaur Standard Shroud transported to Nuclear Rocket Dynamics and Control Facility, or B-3 Test Stand, at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Plum Brook Station. B-3 was built in the early 1960s to test full-scale liquid hydrogen fuel systems in simulated altitude conditions. The facility was used in 1972, however, for testing of the Centaur Standard Shroud’s ejection system. In the late 1960s NASA engineers were planning the ambitious new Viking mission to send two rover vehicles to the surface of Mars. The Viking rovers were the heaviest payloads ever attempted and were over three times the weight of Atlas-Centaur’s previous heaviest payload. Consequently, NASA engineers selected the more powerful the Titan III rocket booster to mate with the Centaur. Concurrently, General Dynamics was in the process of introducing a new Centaur model for Titan—the D-1T. The biggest change for the D-1T was a completely new shroud designed by Lockheed, called the Centaur Standard Shroud. The shroud, its insulation, the Centaur ground-hold purge system, and the hydrogen tank venting system were all studied in B-3. After more than two years of preparations, the tests were run between April and July 1973. The tests determined the ultimate flight loads on two axes, established the Centaur’s load sharing, the level of propellant boiloff during launch holds, and the vent system capacity. The Centaur Standard Shroud performed flawlessly during the August 20 and September 9, 1975 launches of Viking 1 and 2.

  2. Study on vitamin D₂ stability in dried mushrooms during drying and storage.

    PubMed

    Sławińska, Aneta; Fornal, Emilia; Radzki, Wojciech; Skrzypczak, Katarzyna; Zalewska-Korona, Marta; Michalak-Majewska, Monika; Parfieniuk, Ewa; Stachniuk, Anna

    2016-05-15

    The main objective of this work was to determine the stability of vitamin D2 in dried mushrooms Agaricus bisporus, Pleurotus ostreatus and Lentinula edodes during storage, as well as to examine the possibility of inducing vitamin D2 production in dried mushrooms by UVB irradiation. After 1.5 year storage of dried mushrooms, the level of vitamin D2 in button mushrooms was found to be 6.90 μg/g dw, which is a 48.32% of initial level of vitamin D2. In the case of dried oyster and shiitake mushrooms there was a decrease to the level of 66.90% and 68.40%, respectively. It was determined that dried mushrooms can produce ergocalciferol under UVB irradiation. The highest content of vitamin D2 was observed in A. bisporus. Freeze-dried A. bisporus contained from 42.08 to 119.21 μg/g dw and hot-air dried mushrooms contained from 21.51 to 81.17 μg/g dw vitamin D2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. TG-DSC method applied to drying characteristics of areca inflorescence during drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Fei; Wang, Hui; Huang, Yulin; Zhang, Yufeng; Chen, Weijun; Zhao, Songlin; Zhang, Ming

    2017-10-01

    In this study, suitability of eight drying models available in literature on defining drying characteristics of areca inflorescence has been examined by non-linear regression analysis using the Statistic Computer Program. The coefficient of determination ( R 2 ) and the reduced chi-square (χ2) are used as indicators to evaluate the best suitable model. According to the results, the Verma et al. model gave the best results for explaining the drying characteristics of areca inflorescence. The drying process could be divided into three periods: rising rate, constant rate and the falling rate period. Fick's second law can describe the moisture transport during the food drying process that takes place in the falling rate period. The values of effective diffusivity during the drying of areca inflorescence ranged from 2.756 × 10-7 to 6.257 × 10-7 m2/s and the activation energy was tested for 35.535 kJ/mol. The heat requirement of areca inflorescence at 40-60 °C was calculated from 50.57 to 60.50 kJ/kg during the drying process.

  4. Cumulative ventilation air drying potential as an indication of dry mass content in wastewater sludge in a thin-layer solar drying facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Piotr

    2013-12-01

    Controlling low-temperature drying facilities which utilise nonprepared air is quite difficult, due to very large variability of ventilation air parameters - both in daily and seasonal cycles. The paper defines the concept of cumulative drying potential of ventilation air and presents experimental evidence that there is a relation between this parameter and condition of the dried matter (sewage sludge). Knowledge on current dry mass content in the dried matter (sewage sludge) provides new possibilities for controlling such systems. Experimental data analysed in the paper was collected in early 2012 during operation of a test solar drying facility in a sewage treatment plant in Błonie near Warsaw, Poland.

  5. Electrohydrodynamic drying of carrot slices.

    PubMed

    Ding, Changjiang; Lu, Jun; Song, Zhiqing

    2015-01-01

    Carrots have one of the highest levels of carotene, and they are rich in vitamins, fiber and minerals. However, since fresh carrots wilt rapidly after harvest under inappropriate storage conditions, drying has been used to improve their shelf life and retain nutritional quality. Therefore, to further investigate the potential of this method, carrot slices were dried in an EHD system in order to study the effect of different voltages on drying rate. As measures of quality, carotene content and rehydration ratio were, respectively, compared against the conventional oven drying regime. Carotene, the main component of the dried carrot, and rehydration characteristics of the dried product can both indicate quality by physical and chemical changes during the drying process. Mathematical modeling and simulation of drying curves were also performed, using root mean square error, reduced mean square of the deviation and modeling efficiency as the primary criteria to select the equation that best accounts for the variation in the drying curves of the dried samples. Theoretically, the Page model was best suited for describing the drying rate curve of carrot slices at 10kV to 30kV. Experimentally, the drying rate of carrots was notably greater in the EHD system when compared to control, and quality, as determined by carotene content and rehydration ratio, was also improved when compared to oven drying. Therefore, this work presents a facile and effective strategy for experimentally and theoretically determining the drying properties of carrots, and, as a result, it provides deeper insight into the industrial potential of the EHD drying technique.

  6. Development of Biodegradable Polycation-Based Inhalable Dry Gene Powders by Spray Freeze Drying

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Yuko; Ishii, Takehiko; Uchida, Satoshi; Itaka, Keiji; Kataoka, Kazunori; Okamoto, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, two types of biodegradable polycation (PAsp(DET) homopolymer and PEG-PAsp(DET) copolymer) were applied as vectors for inhalable dry gene powders prepared by spray freeze drying (SFD). The prepared dry gene powders had spherical and porous structures with a 5~10-μm diameter, and the integrity of plasmid DNA could be maintained during powder production. Furthermore, it was clarified that PEG-PAsp(DET)-based dry gene powder could more sufficiently maintain both the physicochemical properties and in vitro gene transfection efficiencies of polyplexes reconstituted after powder production than PAsp(DET)-based dry gene powder. From an in vitro inhalation study using an Andersen cascade impactor, it was demonstrated that the addition of l-leucine could markedly improve the inhalation performance of dry powders prepared by SFD. Following pulmonary delivery to mice, both PAsp(DET)- and PEG-PAsp(DET)-based dry gene powders could achieve higher gene transfection efficiencies in the lungs compared with a chitosan-based dry gene powder previously reported by us. PMID:26343708

  7. Effect of drying conditions on drying kinetics and quality of aromatic Pandanus amaryllifolius leaves.

    PubMed

    Rayaguru, Kalpana; Routray, Winny

    2010-12-01

    Pandanus amaryllifolius is a plant with aromatic leaves, which impart the characteristic flavour of aromatic rice. The quality of aromatic Pandanus leaves dried at low temperature (35 °C) and low RH (27%) in a heat pump dryer was evaluated and compared with those obtained from hot air drying at 45 °C. Thin-layer drying kinetics has been studied for both the conditions. To determine the kinetic parameters, the drying data were fitted to various semi-theoretical models. The goodness of fit was determined using the coefficient of determination, reduced chi square, and root mean square error. Aroma, colour, and overall acceptability determination of fresh and dried leaves were made using sensory evaluation. Drying of leaves took place mainly under the falling-rate period. The Page equation was found to be best among the proposed models to describe the thin-layer drying of Pandanus leaves with higher coefficient of determination. The effective moisture diffusivity values were also determined. The effect of low RH was prominent during the initial drying when the product was moist. The effect of temperature was prominent in the later part of drying, which acted as a driving force for moisture diffusion and hence the total drying time was reduced. Retention of aromatic compound 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline content was more in low temperature dried samples with higher sensory scores.

  8. Experimental study on drying kinetic of cassava starch in a pneumatic drying system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suherman, Kumoro, Andri Cahyo; Kusworo, Tutuk Djoko

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this study are to present the experimental research on the drying of cassava starch in a pneumatic dryer, to describe its drying curves, as well as to calculate its thermal efficiency. The effects of operating conditions, namely the inlet air temperature (60-100 °C) and solid-gas flow rate ratio (Ms/Mg 0.1-0.3) were studied. Heat transfer is accomplished through convection mechanism in a drying chamber based on the principle of direct contact between the heated air and the moist material. During the drying process, intensive heat and mass transfer between the drying air and the cassava starch take place. In order to meet the SNI standards on solid water content, the drying process was done in two cycles. The higher the temperature of the drying air, the lower the water content of the solids exiting the dryer. Thermal efficiency of the 2nd cycle was found to be lower than the 1st cycle.

  9. Transient expression of the influenza A virus PB1-F2 protein using a plum pox virus-based vector in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Kamencayová, M; Košík, I; Hunková, J; Subr, Z W

    2014-01-01

    PB1-F2 protein of influenza A virus (IAV) was cloned in a plum pox virus (PPV) genome-based vector and attempts to express it in biolistically transfected Nicotiana benthamiana plants were performed. The vector-insert construct replicated in infected plants properly and was stable during repeated passage by mechanical inoculation, as demonstrated by disease symptoms and immunoblot detection of PPV capsid protein, while PB1-F2-specific band was more faint. We showed that it was due its low solubility. Modification of sample preparation (denaturation/solubilization preceding the centrifugation of cell debris) led to substantial signal enhancement. Maximal level of PB1-F2 expression in plants was observed 12 days post inoculation (dpi). Only 1% SDS properly solubilized the protein, other detergents were much less efficient. Solubilization with 8M urea released approximately 50% of PB1-F2 from the plant tissues, thus the treatment with this removable chaotropic agent may be a good starting point for the purification of the protein for eventual functional studies in the future.

  10. Improvements In solar dry kiln design

    Treesearch

    E. M. Wengert

    1971-01-01

    Interest in solar drying of lumber has increased in recent years because previous results had indicated that: Drying times are shorter and final moisture contents are lower in solar drying than in air drying; much less lumber degrade occurs in solar drying when compared to air drying; and the cost of energy is less in solar drying than in kiln drying. Work in the field...

  11. Freeze drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  12. Freeze drying method

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  13. Influence of pre-drying treatments on physicochemical and organoleptic properties of explosion puff dried jackfruit chips.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jianyong; Zhou, Linyan; Bi, Jinfeng; Chen, Qinqin; Liu, Xuan; Wu, Xinye

    2016-02-01

    The effects of hot air drying (AD), freeze drying (FD), infrared drying (IR), microwave drying (MV), vacuum drying (VD) as pre-drying treatments for explosion puff drying (EPD) on qualities of jackfruit chips were studied. The lowest total color differences (∆E) were found in the FD-, MV- and VD-EPD dried chips. Volume expansion effect (9.2 %) was only observed in the FD-EPD dried chips, which corresponded to its well expanded honeycomb microstructures and high rehydration rate. Compared with AD-, IR-, MV- and VD-EPD, the FD-EPD dried fruit chips exhibited lower hardness and higher crispness, indicative of a crispier texture. FD-EPD dried fruits also obtained high retentions of ascorbic acid, phenolics and carotenoids compared with that of the other puffed products. The results of sensory evaluation suggested that the FD-EPD was a more beneficial combination because it enhanced the overall qualities of jackfruit chips. In conclusion, the FD-EPD could be used as a novel combination drying method for processing valuable and/or high quality fruit chips.

  14. Foam-mat drying technology: A review.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Z; Jideani, V A

    2017-08-13

    This article reviews various aspects of foam-mat drying such as foam-mat drying processing technique, main additives used for foam-mat drying, foam-mat drying of liquid and solid foods, quality characteristics of foam-mat dried foods, and economic and technical benefits for employing foam-mat drying. Foam-mat drying process is an alternative method that allows the removal of water from liquid materials and pureed materials. In this drying process, a liquid material is converted into foam that is stable by being whipped after adding an edible foaming agent. The stable foam is then spread out in sheet or mat and dried by using hot air (40-90°C) at atmospheric pressure. Methyl cellulose (0.25-2%), egg white (3-20%), maltodextrin (0.5-05%), and gum Arabic (2-9%) are the commonly utilized additives for the foam-mat drying process at the given range, either combined together for their effectiveness or individual effect. The foam-mat drying process is suitable for heat sensitive, viscous, and sticky products that cannot be dried using other forms of drying methods such as spray drying because of the state of product. More interest has developed for foam-mat drying because of the simplicity, cost effectiveness, high speed drying, and improved product quality it provides.

  15. Drying based on temperature-detection-assisted control in microwave-assisted pulse-spouted vacuum drying.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaohuang; Zhang, Min; Qian, He; Mujumdar, Arun S

    2017-06-01

    An online temperature-detection-assisted control system of microwave-assisted pulse-spouted vacuum drying was newly developed. By using this system, temperature control can be automatically and continuously adjusted based on the detection of drying temperature and preset temperature. Various strategies for constant temperature control, linear temperature control and three-step temperature control were applied to drying carrot cubes. Drying kinetics and the quality of various temperature-controlled strategies online are evaluated for the new drying technology as well as its suitability as an alternative drying method. Drying time in 70 °C mode 1 had the shortest drying time and lowest energy consumption in all modes. A suitable colour, highest re-hydration ratio and fracture-hardness, and longest drying time occurred in 30-40-50 °C mode 3. The number of hot spots was reduced in 40-50-60 °C mode 3. Acceptable carrot snacks were obtained in 50-60-70 °C mode 3 and 70 °C mode 2. All temperature curves showed that the actual temperatures followed the preset temperatures appropriately. With this system, a linear temperature-controlled strategy and a three-step temperature-controlled strategy can improve product quality and heating non-uniformity compared to constant temperature control, but need greater energy consumption and longer drying time. A temperature-detection-assisted control system was developed for providing various drying strategies as a suitable alternative in making a snack product. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Gene Expression Analysis of Plum pox virus (Sharka) Susceptibility/Resistance in Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.).

    PubMed

    Rubio, Manuel; Ballester, Ana Rosa; Olivares, Pedro Manuel; Castro de Moura, Manuel; Dicenta, Federico; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq has proven to be a very powerful tool in the analysis of the Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka disease)/Prunus interaction. This technique is an important complementary tool to other means of studying genomics. In this work an analysis of gene expression of resistance/susceptibility to PPV in apricot is performed. RNA-Seq has been applied to analyse the gene expression changes induced by PPV infection in leaves from two full-sib apricot genotypes, "Rojo Pasión" and "Z506-7", resistant and susceptible to PPV, respectively. Transcriptomic analyses revealed the existence of more than 2,000 genes related to the pathogen response and resistance to PPV in apricot. These results showed that the response to infection by the virus in the susceptible genotype is associated with an induction of genes involved in pathogen resistance such as the allene oxide synthase, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase 2 and the major MLP-like protein 423. Over-expression of the Dicer protein 2a may indicate the suppression of a gene silencing mechanism of the plant by PPV HCPro and P1 PPV proteins. On the other hand, there were 164 genes involved in resistance mechanisms that have been identified in apricot, 49 of which are located in the PPVres region (scaffold 1 positions from 8,050,804 to 8,244,925), which is responsible for PPV resistance in apricot. Among these genes in apricot there are several MATH domain-containing genes, although other genes inside (Pleiotropic drug resistance 9 gene) or outside (CAP, Cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5 and Pathogenesis-related 1 protein; and LEA, Late embryogenesis abundant protein) PPVres region could also be involved in the resistance.

  17. LASIK and dry eye.

    PubMed

    Toda, Ikuko

    2007-01-01

    Dry eye is one of the most common complications after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). The clinical signs of post-LASIK dry eye include positive vital staining of ocular surface, decreased tear film breakup time and Schirmer test, reduced corneal sensitivity, and decreased functional visual acuity. The symptoms and signs last at least 1 month after LASIK. Although the mechanisms for developing post-LASIK dry eye are not completely understood, loss of corneal innervation by flap-making may affect the reflex loops of the corneal-lacrimal gland, corneal-blinking, and blinking-meibomian gland, and blinking-meibomian gland, resulting in decreased aqueous and lipid tear secretion and mucin expression. As LASIK enhancement by flap-lifting induces less dry eye symptoms and signs than first surgery, it is suggested that other factors rather than loss of neurotrophic effect may be involved in the mechanisms of post-LASIK dry eye. The treatments of dry eye include artificial tears, topical cyclosporine, hot compress, punctal plugs, and autologous serum eye drops. For patients with severe preoperative dry eye, a combination of punctal plugs and serum eye drops is required to be used before surgery.

  18. Method and apparatus for in-situ drying investigation and optimization of slurry drying methodology

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, Beth L.; Daniel, Claus; Howe, Jane Y.; Kiggans, Jr, James O.; Sabau, Adrian S.; Wood, III, David L.; Kalnaus, Sergiy

    2016-05-10

    A method of drying casted slurries that includes calculating drying conditions from an experimental model for a cast slurry and forming a cast film. An infrared heating probe is positioned on one side of the casted slurry and a thermal probe is positioned on an opposing side of the casted slurry. The infrared heating probe may control the temperature of the casted slurry during drying. The casted slurry may be observed with an optical microscope, while applying the drying conditions from the experimental model. Observing the casted slurry includes detecting the incidence of micro-structural changes in the casted slurry during drying to determine if the drying conditions from the experimental model are optimal.

  19. Effects of four different drying methods on the carotenoid composition and antioxidant capacity of dried Gac peel.

    PubMed

    Chuyen, Hoang V; Roach, Paul D; Golding, John B; Parks, Sophie E; Nguyen, Minh H

    2017-03-01

    Gac fruit (Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng.) is a rich source of carotenoids for the manufacture of powder, oil and capsules for food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical uses. Currently, only the aril of the Gac fruit is processed and the peel, similar to the other components, is discarded, although it contains high level of carotenoids, which could be extracted for commercial use. In the present study, four different drying methods (hot-air, vacuum, heat pump and freeze drying), different temperatures and drying times were investigated for producing dried Gac peel suitable for carotenoid extraction. The drying methods and drying temperatures significantly affected the drying time, carotenoid content and antioxidant capacity of the dried Gac peel. Among the investigated drying methods, hot-air drying at 80  o C and vacuum drying at 50  o C produced dried Gac peel that exhibited the highest retention of carotenoids and the strongest antioxidant capacity. Hot-air drying at 80  o C and vacuum drying at 50  o C are recommended for the drying of Gac peel. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Raman mapping of mannitol/lysozyme particles produced via spray drying and single droplet drying.

    PubMed

    Pajander, Jari Pekka; Matero, Sanni; Sloth, Jakob; Wan, Feng; Rantanen, Jukka; Yang, Mingshi

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of a model protein on the solid state of a commonly used bulk agent in spray-dried formulations. A series of lysozyme/mannitol formulations were spray-dried using a lab-scale spray dryer. Further, the surface temperature of drying droplet/particles was monitored using the DRYING KINETICS ANALYZER™ (DKA) with controllable drying conditions mimicking the spray-drying process to estimate the drying kinetics of the lysozyme/mannitol formulations. The mannitol polymorphism and the spatial distribution of lysozyme in the particles were examined using X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) and Raman microscopy. Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis was used for analyzing the Raman microscopy data. XRPD results indicated that a mixture of β-mannitol and α-mannitol was produced in the spray-drying process which was supported by the Raman analysis, whereas Raman analysis indicated that a mixture of α-mannitol and δ-mannitol was detected in the single particles from DKA. In addition Raman mapping indicated that the presence of lysozyme seemed to favor the appearance of α-mannitol in the particles from DKA evidenced by close proximity of lysozyme and mannitol in the particles. It suggested that the presence of lysozyme tend to induce metastable solid state forms upon the drying process.

  1. Effect of different drying technologies on drying characteristics and quality of red pepper (Capsicum frutescens L.): a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen-Zhen; Zhou, Lin-Yan; Bi, Jin-Feng; Yi, Jian-Yong; Chen, Qin-Qin; Wu, Xin-Ye; Zheng, Jin-Kai; Li, Shu-Rong

    2016-08-01

    Hot air drying and sun drying are traditional drying technologies widely used in the drying of agricultural products for a long time, but usually recognized as time-consuming or producing lower-quality products. Infrared drying is a rather effective drying technology that has advantages over traditional drying technologies. Thus, in order to investigate the application of infrared drying in the dehydration of red pepper, the drying characteristics and quality of infrared-dried red pepper were compared with those of sun-dried and hot air-dried red pepper. The infrared drying technology significantly enhanced the drying rate when compared with hot air drying and sun drying. Temperature was the most important factor affecting the moisture transfer during the process of infrared drying as well as hot air drying. Effective moisture diffusivity (Deff ) values of infrared drying ranged from 1.58 × 10(-9) to 3.78 × 10(-9) m(2) s(-1) . The Ea values of infrared drying and hot air drying were 42.67 and 44.48 kJ mol(-1) respectively. Infrared drying and hot air drying produced color loss to a similar extent. Relatively higher crispness values were observed for infrared-dried samples. Sun drying produced dried red pepper with the best color when compared with hot air drying and infrared drying. Meanwhile, infrared drying markedly improved the drying rate at the same drying temperature level of hot air drying, and the products obtained had relatively better quality with higher crispness values. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Drying kinetics and mathematical modeling of hot air drying of coconut coir pith.

    PubMed

    Fernando, J A K M; Amarasinghe, A D U S

    2016-01-01

    Drying kinetics of coir pith was studied and the properties of compressed coir pith discs were analyzed. Coir pith particles were oven dried in the range of temperatures from 100 to 240 °C and the rehydration ability of compressed coir pith was evaluated by finding the volume expansion. The optimum drying temperature was found to be 140 °C. Hot air drying was carried out to examine the drying kinetics by allowing the coir pith particles to fluidize and circulate inside the drying chamber. Particle motion within the drying chamber closely resembled the particle motion in a flash dryer. The effective moisture diffusivity was found to increase from 1.18 × 10(-8) to 1.37 × 10(-8) m(2)/s with the increase of air velocity from 1.4 to 2.5 m/s respectively. Correlation analysis and residual plots were used to determine the adequacy of existing mathematical models for describing the drying behavior of coir pith. The empirical models, Wang and Singh model and Linear model, were found to be adequate for accurate prediction of drying behavior of coir pith. A new model was proposed by modifying the Wang and Singh model and considering the effect of air velocity. It gave the best correlation between observed and predicted moisture ratio with high value of coefficient of determination (R(2)) and lower values of root mean square error, reduced Chi square (χ(2)) and mean relative deviation (E%).

  3. Infrared pre-drying and dry-dehulling of walnuts for improved processing efficiency and product quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The walnut industry is faced with an urgent need to improve post-harvest processing efficiency, particularly drying and dehulling operations. This research investigated the feasibility of dry-dehulling and infrared (IR) pre-drying of walnuts for improved processing efficiency and dried product quali...

  4. Investigation of drying kinetics of tomato slices dried by using a closed loop heat pump dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşkun, Salih; Doymaz, İbrahim; Tunçkal, Cüneyt; Erdoğan, Seçil

    2017-06-01

    In this study, tomato slices were dried at three different drying air temperatures (35, 40 and 45 °C) and at 1 m/s air velocities by using a closed loop heat pump dryer (HPD). To explain the drying characteristics of tomato slices, ten thin-layer drying models were applied. The drying of tomato slices at each temperature occurred in falling-rate period; no constant-rate period of drying was observed. The drying rate was significantly influenced by drying temperature. The effective moisture diffusivity varied between 8.28 × 10-11 and 1.41 × 10-10 m2/s, the activation energy was found to be 43.12 kJ/mol. Besides, at the end of drying process, the highest mean specific moisture extraction ratio and coefficient of performance of HPD system were obtained as 0.324 kg/kWh and 2.71, respectively, at the highest drying air temperature (45 °C).

  5. 7 CFR 35.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Definitions § 35.1 Act. Act or Export Grape and Plum Act means “An Act to promote the foreign trade of the United States in grapes and plums, to protect the reputation of American-grown grapes and plums in...

  6. Infrared Drying as a Potential Alternative to Convective Drying for Biltong Production.

    PubMed

    Cherono, Kipchumba; Mwithiga, Gikuru; Schmidt, Stefan

    2016-06-03

    Two infrared systems set at an intensity of 4777 W/m 2 with peak emission wavelengths of 2.5 and 3.5 µm were used to produce biltong by drying differently pre-treated meat. In addition to meat texture and colour, the microbial quality of the biltong produced was assessed by quantifying viable heterotrophic microorganisms using a most probable number (MPN) method and by verifying the presence of presumptive Escherichia coli in samples produced using infrared and conventional convective drying. The two infrared drying systems reduced the heterotrophic microbial burden from 5.11 log 10 MPN/g to 2.89 log 10 MPN/g (2.5 µm) and 3.42 log 10 MPN/g (3.5 µm), respectively. The infrared systems achieved an up to one log higher MPN/g reduction than the convective system. In biltong samples produced by short wavelength (2.5 µm) infrared drying, E. coli was not detectable. This study demonstrates that the use of short wavelength infrared drying is a potential alternative to conventional convective drying by improving the microbiological quality of biltong products while at the same time delivering products of satisfactory quality.

  7. Field evaluation of plant odor and pheromonal combinations for attracting plum curculios.

    PubMed

    Piñero, Jaime C; Prokopy, Ronald J

    2003-12-01

    The attractiveness of different synthetic host odors and a synthetic aggregation pheromone (grandisoic acid [GA]) to overwintered adult plum curculios (PCs), Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), was examined using two types of traps (sticky panels and black pyramids) placed in border areas surrounding an unsprayed section of an apple orchard in Massachusetts. In 2001, we evaluated the response of PCs to three synthetic fruit volatiles (benzaldehyde [BEN], ethyl isovalerate [EIV], and limonene [LIM]) assessed alone and in combination with GA, as well as the response to GA alone and a no-odor (control) treatment. BEN was the only host volatile that synergized the response of PCs to GA for both trap types. For both trap types, GA was as attractive to PCs as a single component as when in combination with either EIV or LIM. In 2002, four release rates of BEN (0, 2.5, 10, and 40 mg/day) and two release rates of GA (1 and 2 mg/day) were evaluated for attractiveness to PCs using panel and pyramid traps. For panel traps, an increase in amount of GA released (from 1 to 2 mg/day) was associated with a 35% increase in captures. However, PC captures by pyramid traps were similar regardless of the amount of GA released. For panel traps, 10 and 40 mg/day of BEN were the most attractive release rates regardless of the amount of GA released. For pyramid traps baited with GA. PC captures were enhanced by the presence of BEN, regardless of release rate. In 2003, GA at 1 mg/day + BEN at 80 mg/day of release did not enhance PC captures by panel traps relative to lower release rates of BEN. Pyramid traps releasing GA at 1 mg/day performed best when baited with BEN at 10 mg/day of release; a release rate of 80 mg/day of BEN decreased the attractiveness of the binary combination of BEN + GA. Combined results suggest that BEN at 10 mg/day + GA at 1 mg/day of release constitutes an attractive lure that may improve the effectiveness of monitoring traps for PCs.

  8. Post-LASIK dry eye

    PubMed Central

    Shtein, Roni M

    2011-01-01

    Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) is a frequently performed corneal refractive surgery with excellent refractive outcomes. The most common complication of LASIK is dry eyes, with virtually all patients developing some degree of dryness in the immediate postoperative period. Identifying preoperative dry eyes, and conscientious attention and treatment in the perioperative time period, can lead to enhanced patient satisfaction and more accurate visual outcomes. Improved understanding of the development of dry eyes after LASIK will advance our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of dry eye disease. PMID:22174730

  9. Space and Industrial Brine Drying Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.; Wisniewski, Richard S.; Flynn, Michael; Shaw, Hali

    2014-01-01

    This survey describes brine drying technologies that have been developed for use in space and industry. NASA has long considered developing a brine drying system for the International Space Station (ISS). Possible processes include conduction drying in many forms, spray drying, distillation, freezing and freeze drying, membrane filtration, and electrical processes. Commercial processes use similar technologies. Some proposed space systems combine several approaches. The current most promising candidates for use on the ISS use either conduction drying with membrane filtration or spray drying.

  10. Air drying of lumber.

    Treesearch

    1999-01-01

    This report describes how lumber can be air-dried most effectively under outdoor conditions and illustrates the principles and procedures of air-drying lumber that were developed through field investigations and observations of industrial practices. Particular emphasis is placed on the yarding of lumber in unit packages. Included are topics such as why lumber is dried...

  11. German register for glaucoma patients with dry eye. I. Basic outcome with respect to dry eye.

    PubMed

    Erb, Carl; Gast, Ulrike; Schremmer, Dieter

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this register was to determine the links between glaucoma, age, concomitant disease, medication, and dry eye in a large group of glaucoma patients. A total of 20,506 patients from 900 centers across Germany were included. The first 30 consecutive glaucoma patients at each center were recruited. Epidemiological data as well as information on glaucoma, medication, concomitant diseases, dry eye, and local symptoms were elicited by means of a questionnaire. We analyzed primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), pseudoexfoliation glaucoma (PEX), and pigmentary glaucoma (PDG). According to the register data, more women develop dry eye and glaucoma than men (56.9 vs. 45.7%). The most frequent concomitant systemic diseases were hypertension (48.1%), diabetes mellitus (22.5%), and dry mouth, nose, and skin (11.3%). As expected, the highest incidence of dry eye was found in those patients with dry mouth, nose, and skin. Dry eye occurred with dissimilar frequencies in association with the various glaucoma types: PEX>POAG>PDG. The incidence of dry eye increases with age. The gender difference in the occurrence of dry eye becomes apparent from the age of 50. Dry eye occurred more frequently when three or more antiglaucoma drugs were used and increased with the duration of glaucoma disease. We publish the first results from the German Glaucoma and Dry Eye Register. We found that the occurrence of dry eye is linked to several factors. Thus, the type of glaucoma has an impact on the risk of dry eye. The quantity of eye drops applied also plays a role in the development of the dry eye syndrome if more than three medications are used. While POAG is usually treated with one drug, PEX and PDG tend to be treated with multiple drugs. The gender difference in the occurrence of dry eye becomes apparent from the age 50 years. Because of the vicious circle of dry eye, antiglaucoma eye drops containing benzalkonium chloride compromises patient compliance. The results of the register

  12. Dry eye syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000426.htm Dry eye syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, ... second-hand smoke exposure Cold or allergy medicines Dry eye can also be caused by: Heat or ... Symptoms may include: Blurred vision Burning, itching, ...

  13. Inflammation in dry eye.

    PubMed

    Stern, Michael E; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2004-04-01

    Dry eye is a condition of altered tear composition that results from a diseased or dysfunctional lacrimal functional unit. Evidence suggests that inflammation causes structural alterations and/or functional paralysis of the tear-secreting glands. Changes in tear composition resulting from lacrimal dysfunction, increased evaporation and/or poor clearance have pro-inflammatory effects on the ocular surface. This inflammation is responsible in part for the irritation symptoms, ocular surface epithelial disease, and altered corneal epithelial barrier function in dry eye. Anti-inflammatory therapies for dry eye target one or more of the inflammatory mediators/pathways that have been identified in dry eye.

  14. Antibacterial effect of citrus press-cakes dried by high speed and far-infrared radiation drying methods

    PubMed Central

    Samarakoon, Kalpa; Senevirathne, Mahinda; Lee, Won-Woo; Kim, Young-Tae; Kim, Jae-Il; Oh, Myung-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the antibacterial effect was evaluated to determine the benefits of high speed drying (HSD) and far-infrared radiation drying (FIR) compared to the freeze drying (FD) method. Citrus press-cakes (CPCs) are released as a by-product in the citrus processing industry. Previous studies have shown that the HSD and FIR drying methods are much more economical for drying time and mass drying than those of FD, even though FD is the most qualified drying method. The disk diffusion assay was conducted, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined with methanol extracts of the dried CPCs against 11 fish and five food-related pathogenic bacteria. The disk diffusion results indicated that the CPCs dried by HSD, FIR, and FD prevented growth of all tested bacteria almost identically. The MIC and MBC results showed a range from 0.5-8.0 mg/mL and 1.0-16.0 mg/mL respectively. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the extracts changed the morphology of the bacteria cell wall, leading to destruction. These results suggest that CPCs dried by HSD and FIR showed strong antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria and are more useful drying methods than that of the classic FD method in CPCs utilization. PMID:22808341

  15. Radiation processing as a post-harvest quarantine control for raisins, dried figs and dried apricots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetinkaya, N.; Ozyardımci, B.; Denli, E.; Ic, E.

    2006-03-01

    The commercially packed samples of raisins, dried figs and dried apricots were irradiated using doses in the range of 0.5-1.0 kGy for disinfestation and 0.5-5.0 kGy for sensory analysis with the dose rate ranging from 1.44 to 1.92 kGy/h. Pests on dried fruits were evaluated after 0, 1, 2 and 3 months of storage for irradiated dried figs and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months of storage for raisins and dried apricots. Sensory analysis of dried figs, dried apricots and raisins were carried out after 0, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months of storage. The results indicated that radiation processing at low doses, (˜1.0 kGy) is an effective post-harvest treatment and quarantine control for these products with no adverse effects on sensory (marketing) attributes.

  16. Compact dry chemistry instruments.

    PubMed

    Terashima, K; Tatsumi, N

    1999-01-01

    Compact dry chemistry instruments are designed for use in point-of-care-testing (POCT). These instruments have a number of advantages, including light weight, compactness, ease of operation, and the ability to provide accurate results in a short time with a very small sample volume. On the other hand, reagent costs are high compared to liquid method. Moreover, differences in accuracy have been found between dry chemistry and the liquid method in external quality assessment scheme. This report examines reagent costs and shows how the total running costs associated with dry chemistry are actually lower than those associated with the liquid method. This report also describes methods for minimizing differences in accuracy between dry chemistry and the liquid method. Use of these measures is expected to increase the effectiveness of compact dry chemistry instruments in POCT applications.

  17. Infrared drying of strawberry.

    PubMed

    Adak, Nafiye; Heybeli, Nursel; Ertekin, Can

    2017-03-15

    The effects of different drying conditions, such as infrared power, drying air temperature and velocity, on quality of strawberry were evaluated. Drying time decreased with increased infrared power, air temperature and velocity. An increase in power from 100W to 300W, temperature from 60 to 80°C and velocity from 1.0m.s -1 to 2.0m.s -1 decreased fruit color quality index. For total phenol and anthocyanin content, 300W, 60°C, and 1.0m.s -1 were superior to the other experimental conditions. The drying processes increased N, P and K and decreased Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu contents. The optimal conditions to preserve nutrients in infrared drying of strawberry were 200W, 100°C and 1.5m.s -1 . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Drying kinetics and characteristics of combined infrared-vacuum drying of button mushroom slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Fakhreddin; Kashaninejad, Mahdi; Jafarianlari, Ali

    2017-05-01

    Infrared-vacuum drying characteristics of button mushroom ( Agaricus bisporus) were evaluated in a combined dryer system. The effects of drying parameters, including infrared radiation power (150-375 W), system pressure (5-15 kPa) and time (0-160 min) on the drying kinetics and characteristics of button mushroom slices were investigated. Both the infrared lamp power and vacuum pressure influenced the drying time of button mushroom slices. The rate constants of the nine different kinetic's models for thin layer drying were established by nonlinear regression analysis of the experimental data which were found to be affected mainly by the infrared power level while system pressure had a little effect on the moisture ratios. The regression results showed that the Page model satisfactorily described the drying behavior of button mushroom slices with highest R value and lowest SE values. The effective moisture diffusivity increases as power increases and range between 0.83 and 2.33 × 10-9 m2/s. The rise in infrared power has a negative effect on the ΔE and with increasing in infrared radiation power it was increased.

  19. Advances in drying: Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Mujumdar, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    Topics covered in this volume include recent thoughts in modeling of drying phenomena, use of computers in rational design of drying particulates, recent advances in drying of wood, and heat/mass transfer phenomena in drying of solids. As the readers will no doubt notice, special effort is made to ensure the truly international nature of the contents of this serial publication. As existing knowledge on drying and dryers becomes more widely and readily accessible, it is expected that more and more dryers will be designed rationally rather than built solely with the benefit of empiricism.

  20. The secondary drying and the fate of organic solvents for spray dried dispersion drug product.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Daniel S; Yue, Hongfei; Nicholson, Sarah J; Roberts, Daniel; Schild, Richard; Gamble, John F; Lindrud, Mark

    2015-05-01

    To understand the mechanisms of secondary drying of spray-dried dispersion (SDD) drug product and establish a model to describe the fate of organic solvents in such a product. The experimental approach includes characterization of the SDD particles, drying studies of SDD using an integrated weighing balance and mass spectrometer, and the subsequent generation of the drying curve. The theoretical approach includes the establishment of a Fickian diffusion model. The kinetics of solvent removal during secondary drying from the lab scale to a bench scale follows Fickian diffusion model. Excellent agreement is obtained between the experimental data and the prediction from the modeling. The diffusion process is dependent upon temperature. The key to a successful scale up of the secondary drying is to control the drying temperature. The fate of primary solvents including methanol and acetone, and their potential impurity such as benzene can be described by the Fickian diffusion model. A mathematical relationship based upon the ratio of diffusion coefficient was established to predict the benzene concentration from the fate of the primary solvent during the secondary drying process.

  1. Optimization of the secondary drying step in freeze drying using TDLAS technology.

    PubMed

    Schneid, Stefan C; Gieseler, Henning; Kessler, William J; Luthra, Suman A; Pikal, Michael J

    2011-03-01

    The secondary drying phase in freeze drying is mostly developed on a trial-and-error basis due to the lack of appropriate noninvasive process analyzers. This study describes for the first time the application of Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy, a spectroscopic and noninvasive sensor for monitoring secondary drying in laboratory-scale freeze drying with the overall purpose of targeting intermediate moisture contents in the product. Bovine serum albumin/sucrose mixtures were used as a model system to imitate high concentrated antibody formulations. First, the rate of water desorption during secondary drying at constant product temperatures (-22 °C, -10 °C, and 0 °C) was investigated for three different shelf temperatures. Residual moisture contents of sampled vials were determined by Karl Fischer titration. An equilibration step was implemented to ensure homogeneous distribution of moisture (within 1%) in all vials. The residual moisture revealed a linear relationship to the water desorption rate for different temperatures, allowing the evaluation of an anchor point from noninvasive flow rate measurements without removal of samples from the freeze dryer. The accuracy of mass flow integration from this anchor point was found to be about 0.5%. In a second step, the concept was successfully tested in a confirmation experiment. Here, good agreement was found for the initial moisture content (anchor point) and the subsequent monitoring and targeting of intermediate moisture contents. The present approach for monitoring secondary drying indicated great potential to find wider application in sterile operations on production scale in pharmaceutical freeze drying. © 2011 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists

  2. Drying hardwoods with impinging jets.

    Treesearch

    Howard N. Rosen

    1980-01-01

    Silver maple, yellow poplar, and black walnut lumber was dried in a prototype jet dryer over a range of temperatures from 120 degrees to 400 degrees Fahrenheit and air velocities from 1,000 to 9,000 fpm. Different drying schedules were developed for each type of wood. The quality of the jet-dried lumber was good and compared favorably with kiln-dried lumber.

  3. A comparative study of spray-dried and freeze-dried hydrocortisone/polyvinyl pyrrolidone solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Dontireddy, Rakesh; Crean, Abina M

    2011-10-01

    Poor water solubility of new chemical entities (NCEs) is one of the major challenges the pharmaceutical industry currently faces. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of freeze-drying as an alternative technique to spray-drying to produce solid dispersions of poorly water-soluble drugs. Also investigated was the use of aqueous solvent mixtures in place of pure solvent for the production of solid dispersions. Aqueous solvent systems would reduce the environmental impact of pure organic solvent systems. Spray-dried and freeze-dried hydrocortisone/polyvinyl pyrrolidone solid dispersions exhibited differences in dissolution behavior. Freeze-dried dispersions exhibited faster dissolution rates than the corresponding spray-dried dispersions. Spray-dried systems prepared using both solvent systems (20% v/v and 96% v/v ethanol) displayed similar dissolution performance despite displaying differences in glass transition temperatures (T(g)) and surface areas. All dispersions showed drug/polymer interactions indicated by positive deviations in T(g) from the predicted values calculated using the Couchman-Karasz equation. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic results confirmed the conversion of crystalline drug to the amorphous in the dispersions. Stability studies were preformed at 40°C and 75% relative humidity to investigate the physical stability of prepared dispersions. Recrystallization was observed after a month and the resultant dispersions were tested for their dissolution performance to compare with the dissolution performance of the dispersions prior to the stability study. The dissolution rate of the freeze-dried dispersions remained higher than both spray-dried dispersions after storage.

  4. Gene Expression Analysis of Plum pox virus (Sharka) Susceptibility/Resistance in Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.)

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Manuel; Ballester, Ana Rosa; Olivares, Pedro Manuel; Castro de Moura, Manuel; Dicenta, Federico; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq has proven to be a very powerful tool in the analysis of the Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka disease)/Prunus interaction. This technique is an important complementary tool to other means of studying genomics. In this work an analysis of gene expression of resistance/susceptibility to PPV in apricot is performed. RNA-Seq has been applied to analyse the gene expression changes induced by PPV infection in leaves from two full-sib apricot genotypes, “Rojo Pasión” and “Z506-7”, resistant and susceptible to PPV, respectively. Transcriptomic analyses revealed the existence of more than 2,000 genes related to the pathogen response and resistance to PPV in apricot. These results showed that the response to infection by the virus in the susceptible genotype is associated with an induction of genes involved in pathogen resistance such as the allene oxide synthase, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase 2 and the major MLP-like protein 423. Over-expression of the Dicer protein 2a may indicate the suppression of a gene silencing mechanism of the plant by PPV HCPro and P1 PPV proteins. On the other hand, there were 164 genes involved in resistance mechanisms that have been identified in apricot, 49 of which are located in the PPVres region (scaffold 1 positions from 8,050,804 to 8,244,925), which is responsible for PPV resistance in apricot. Among these genes in apricot there are several MATH domain-containing genes, although other genes inside (Pleiotropic drug resistance 9 gene) or outside (CAP, Cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5 and Pathogenesis-related 1 protein; and LEA, Late embryogenesis abundant protein) PPVres region could also be involved in the resistance. PMID:26658051

  5. Scalable organic solvent free supercritical fluid spray drying process for producing dry protein formulations.

    PubMed

    Nuchuchua, O; Every, H A; Hofland, G W; Jiskoot, W

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated the influence of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) spray drying conditions, in the absence of organic solvent, on the ability to produce dry protein/trehalose formulations at 1:10 and 1:4 (w/w) ratios. When using a 4L drying vessel, we found that decreasing the solution flow rate and solution volume, or increasing the scCO2 flow rate resulted in a significant reduction in the residual water content in dried products (Karl Fischer titration). The best conditions were then used to evaluate the ability to scale the scCO2 spray drying process from 4L to 10L chamber. The ratio of scCO2 and solution flow rate was kept constant. The products on both scales exhibited similar residual moisture contents, particle morphologies (SEM), and glass transition temperatures (DSC). After reconstitution, the lysozyme activity (enzymatic assay) and structure (circular dichroism, HP-SEC) were fully preserved, but the sub-visible particle content was slightly increased (flow imaging microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis). Furthermore, the drying condition was applicable to other proteins resulting in products of similar quality as the lysozyme formulations. In conclusion, we established scCO2 spray drying processing conditions for protein formulations without an organic solvent that holds promise for the industrial production of dry protein formulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 21 CFR 160.105 - Dried eggs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dried eggs. 160.105 Section 160.105 Food and Drugs... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.105 Dried eggs. (a) Dried eggs, dried whole eggs are prepared by drying liquid eggs that conform to § 160.115...

  7. Stage- and tissue-expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis and signalling of ethylene in reproductive organs of damson plum (Prunus domestica L. subsp. insititia).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Otero, C I; de la Torre, F; Iglesias, R; Rodríguez-Gacio, M C; Matilla, A J

    2007-01-01

    In this work, four cDNA clones (Pd-ACS1,AJ890088; Pd-ETR1 and Pd-ERS1, AJ890092, AJ890091; and Pd-CTR1, AJ890089) encoding an ACC-synthase, two putative ethylene (ET) receptors, and a putative MAPKKK, respectively, were isolated and phylogenetically characterized in Prunus domestica L. subsp. insititia. Their expression was studied by real-time PCR during flower (closed, open and senescent) and fruit (early green, late green, maturation and ripening) development of damson plum, which is climateric. While two peaks of ET production were quantified at early green and ripening stages in whole fruits, the seed was not able to produce it during maturation and ripening stages. All studied genes were differentially expressed during flower and fruit development. In general, the level of transcripts of Pd-ACS1 was higher in fruits than in flowers. However, it was noteworthy that: (1) Pd-ACS1 expression was hardly detected in closed flowers and at low levels during early green stage; and fruit development provoked a notable differential expression in seeds, and pericarp; (2) the results of Pd-ACS1 expression during fruit development suggest a preponderant role of this gene from late green stage onward. The stamen was the only floral organ in which expression of both Pd-ETR1 and Pd-ERS1 receptor genes was not significantly altered during development; however, their expression decreased concomitantly with development of pistil (only floral organ to register a net ET production when fertilized) and during first days of ovary development (the highest ET production during all fruit development). Contrary to Pd-ERS1, the level of Pd-ETR1 mRNA was temporally quite similar in the seed. With regard Pd-ETR1, even its expression was very scarce during maturation of mesocarp, was stimulated during ripening. In the epicarp, Pd-ERS1 and Pd-ETR1 were low expressed during pit hardening increasing onward and decreasing during ripening. Pd-CTR1 expression was in the seed

  8. Ion-channel genosensor for the detection of specific DNA sequences derived from Plum Pox Virus in plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Malecka, Kamila; Michalczuk, Lech; Radecka, Hanna; Radecki, Jerzy

    2014-10-09

    A DNA biosensor for detection of specific oligonucleotides sequences of Plum Pox Virus (PPV) in plant extracts and buffer is proposed. The working principles of a genosensor are based on the ion-channel mechanism. The NH2-ssDNA probe was deposited onto a glassy carbon electrode surface to form an amide bond between the carboxyl group of oxidized electrode surface and amino group from ssDNA probe. The analytical signals generated as a result of hybridization were registered in Osteryoung square wave voltammetry in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3-/4- as a redox marker. The 22-mer and 42-mer complementary ssDNA sequences derived from PPV and DNA samples from plants infected with PPV were used as targets. Similar detection limits of 2.4 pM (31.0 pg/mL) and 2.3 pM (29.5 pg/mL) in the concentration range 1-8 pM were observed in the presence of the 22-mer ssDNA and 42-mer complementary ssDNA sequences of PPV, respectively. The genosensor was capable of discriminating between samples consisting of extracts from healthy plants and leaf extracts from infected plants in the concentration range 10-50 pg/mL. The detection limit was 12.8 pg/mL. The genosensor displayed good selectivity and sensitivity. The 20-mer partially complementary DNA sequences with four complementary bases and DNA samples from healthy plants used as negative controls generated low signal.

  9. Allelic variation at the rpv1 locus controls partial resistance to Plum pox virus infection in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Poque, S; Pagny, G; Ouibrahim, L; Chague, A; Eyquard, J-P; Caballero, M; Candresse, T; Caranta, C; Mariette, S; Decroocq, V

    2015-06-25

    Sharka is caused by Plum pox virus (PPV) in stone fruit trees. In orchards, the virus is transmitted by aphids and by grafting. In Arabidopsis, PPV is transferred by mechanical inoculation, by biolistics and by agroinoculation with infectious cDNA clones. Partial resistance to PPV has been observed in the Cvi-1 and Col-0 Arabidopsis accessions and is characterized by a tendency to escape systemic infection. Indeed, only one third of the plants are infected following inoculation, in comparison with the susceptible Ler accession. Genetic analysis showed this partial resistance to be monogenic or digenic depending on the allelic configuration and recessive. It is detected when inoculating mechanically but is overcome when using biolistic or agroinoculation. A genome-wide association analysis was performed using multiparental lines and 147 Arabidopsis accessions. It identified a major genomic region, rpv1. Fine mapping led to the positioning of rpv1 to a 200 kb interval on the long arm of chromosome 1. A candidate gene approach identified the chloroplast phosphoglycerate kinase (cPGK2) as a potential gene underlying the resistance. A virus-induced gene silencing strategy was used to knock-down cPGK2 expression, resulting in drastically reduced PPV accumulation. These results indicate that rpv1 resistance to PPV carried by the Cvi-1 and Col-0 accessions is linked to allelic variations at the Arabidopsis cPGK2 locus, leading to incomplete, compatible interaction with the virus.

  10. Drying of restructured chips made from the old stalks of Asparagus officinalis: impact of different drying methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Min; Wang, Yuchuan

    2016-06-01

    Old stalks of Asparagus officinalis, which account for one third of the total length of each spear, are always discarded as waste. To make full use of the resource, a kind of restructured Asparagus officinalis chip was made. The effects of pulse-spouted microwave-assisted vacuum drying (PSMVD), microwave-assisted vacuum drying (MVD) and vacuum drying (VD) on texture, color and other quality parameters of restructured chips were then studied to obtain high-quality dried chips. Results indicated that the drying time was significantly affected by drying methods, and PSMVD had much better drying uniformity than MVD. The expansion ratio and crispness of chips increased with increasing microwave power and vacuum degree. The browning reaction of samples in VD was more serious, which was confirmed by the results of color test and electronic nose. The PSMVD drying method showed much better drying uniformity than MVD. The dried chips obtained by PSMVD showed optimal quality and were more readily accepted by consumers. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Dry Arthroscopy of the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, Joideep; Bain, Gregory

    2015-08-01

    Dry arthroscopy is attractive because it affords an unsurpassed clarity of view and minimizes swelling. The elbow is a challenging joint to assess arthroscopically; however, dry arthroscopy has some particular benefits in the elbow. The primary benefit is the quality of the tissue definition, but dry arthroscopy also increases the working time for surgery by reducing swelling and results in less postoperative discomfort for the patient. With dry arthroscopy, all joint surfaces are covered in synovial fluid, which reflects light, to provide a clearer image of the joint surfaces and depth of field. The air-fluid interface provides an uninterrupted appreciation of the synovial recesses and tissue perfusion. This article describes the technique and indications for dry elbow arthroscopy, which will allow other surgeons to reap the benefits of dry arthroscopy without the need for special equipment or changes in their basic technique.

  12. Open sun drying of green bean: influence of pretreatments on drying kinetics, colour and rehydration capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İsmail, Osman; Kantürk Figen, Aysel; Pişkin, Sabriye

    2017-04-01

    Green bean ( Phaseolus Vulgaris L), classified under legume family, is a primary source of dietary protein in human diets especially in the agricultural countries. Green bean is susceptible to rapid deterioration because of their high moisture content and in order to prevent and present the green bean drying process is applied. In this study, effects of pretreatments on drying kinetics, colour and rehydration capacity of green bean were investigated. It was observed that the pretreatment affected the drying time. The shortest drying times were obtained from pretreated samples with blanched. Drying times were determined as 47, 41 and 29 h for natural, salted and blanch, respectively. The results showed that pretreatment and ambient temperature significantly ( P = 0.05) affected the drying rate and the drying time. The effective moisture diffusivity was determined by using Fick's second law and was found to be range between 3.15 × 10-10 and 1.2 × 10-10 m2/s for the pre-treated and natural green bean samples. The rehydration values were obtained 2.75, 2.71, 2.29 (g water/g dry matter) for the blanched, salted and natural samples. The effective diffusion coefficients were calculated using the data collected during the falling rate period and the experimental data are fitted to seven thin layer drying models which found in the literature. The Logarithmic model was found to best describe the drying behavior of fresh green beans under open air sun. Rehydration time and color parameters had been determined in order to improve the quality of dried green bean. Regarding with rehydration time and colour data, the best results were obtained at blanched drying conditions.

  13. Dry stone masonry culvert restoration.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-05-01

    A damaged dry stone masonry culvert on KY 1268 Jessamine County was restored by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. The work was performed by the Dry Stone Conservancy, a non-profit agency promoting dry stone masonry. The work included replacement o...

  14. Impingement drying for preparing dried apple pomace flour and its fortification in bakery and meat products.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jooyeoun; Cavender, George; Zhao, Yanyun

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate impingement drying (ID) as a rapid drying method to dry wet apple pomace (WAP) and to investigate the fortification of dried apple pomace flour (APF) or WAP in bakery and meat products. ID at ~110 °C reduced the moisture content of apple pomace from 80 % (wet basis) to 4.5 % within 3 h, compared with 24 h to 2.2 % using 40 °C forced-air drying and ~60 h to 2.3 % using freeze drying. Furthermore, ID enhanced the extractable phenolic compounds, allowing for a 58 % increase in total phenolic content (TPC) compared with wet pomace, a 110 % and 83 % higher than TPC in forced-air dried and freeze dried samples, respectively. The 15-20 % APF-fortified cookies were found to be ~44-59 % softer, ~30 % more chewy, and ~14 % moister than those of the control. WAP-fortified meat products had significantly higher dietary fiber content (0.7-1.8 % vs. 0.1-0.2 % in control) and radical scavenging activity than that of the control. These results suggest that impingement drying is a fast and effective method for preparing dried APF with highly retained bioactive compounds, and apple pomace fortified products maintained or even had improved quality.

  15. Fundamentals of freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Nail, Steven L; Jiang, Shan; Chongprasert, Suchart; Knopp, Shawn A

    2002-01-01

    Given the increasing importance of reducing development time for new pharmaceutical products, formulation and process development scientists must continually look for ways to "work smarter, not harder." Within the product development arena, this means reducing the amount of trial and error empiricism in arriving at a formulation and identification of processing conditions which will result in a quality final dosage form. Characterization of the freezing behavior of the intended formulation is necessary for developing processing conditions which will result in the shortest drying time while maintaining all critical quality attributes of the freeze-dried product. Analysis of frozen systems was discussed in detail, particularly with respect to the glass transition as the physical event underlying collapse during freeze-drying, eutectic mixture formation, and crystallization events upon warming of frozen systems. Experiments to determine how freezing and freeze-drying behavior is affected by changes in the composition of the formulation are often useful in establishing the "robustness" of a formulation. It is not uncommon for seemingly subtle changes in composition of the formulation, such as a change in formulation pH, buffer salt, drug concentration, or an additional excipient, to result in striking differences in freezing and freeze-drying behavior. With regard to selecting a formulation, it is wise to keep the formulation as simple as possible. If a buffer is needed, a minimum concentration should be used. The same principle applies to added salts: If used at all, the concentration should be kept to a minimum. For many proteins a combination of an amorphous excipient, such as a disaccharide, and a crystallizing excipient, such as glycine, will result in a suitable combination of chemical stability and physical stability of the freeze-dried solid. Concepts of heat and mass transfer are valuable in rational design of processing conditions. Heat transfer by conduction

  16. Improved shelf life of dried Beauveria bassiana blastospores using convective drying and active packaging processes.

    PubMed

    Mascarin, Gabriel Moura; Jackson, Mark A; Behle, Robert W; Kobori, Nilce N; Júnior, Ítalo Delalibera

    2016-10-01

    The yeast form (blastospore) of the dimorphic insect-pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana can be rapidly produced using liquid fermentation methods but is generally unable to survive rapid dehydration processes or storage under non-refrigerated conditions. In this study, we evaluated the influence of two convective drying methods, various modified atmosphere packaging systems, and storage temperatures on the desiccation tolerance, storage stability, and virulence of blastospores of B. bassiana ESALQ 1432. All blastospore formulations were dried to <5 % water content equivalent to aw < 0.3. The viability of B. bassiana blastospores after air drying and spray drying was greater than 80 %. Vacuum-packaged blastospores remained viable longer when stored at 4 °C compared with 28 °C with virtually no loss in viability over 9 months regardless the drying method. When both oxygen and moisture scavengers were added to sealed packages of dried blastospore formulations stored at 28 °C, viability was significantly prolonged for both air- and spray-dried blastospores. The addition of ascorbic acid during spray drying did not improve desiccation tolerance but enhanced cell stability (∼twofold higher half-life) when stored at 28 °C. After storage for 4 months at 28 °C, air-dried blastospores produced a lower LC80 and resulted in higher mortality to whitefly nymphs (Bemisia tabaci) when compared with spray-dried blastospores. These studies identified key storage conditions (low aw and oxygen availability) that improved blastospore storage stability at 28 °C and will facilitate the commercial development of blastospores-based bioinsecticides.

  17. Designing CAF-adjuvanted dry powder vaccines: spray drying preserves the adjuvant activity of CAF01.

    PubMed

    Ingvarsson, Pall Thor; Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Christensen, Dennis; Larsen, Niels Bent; Hinrichs, Wouter Leonardus Joseph; Andersen, Peter; Rantanen, Jukka; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Yang, Mingshi; Foged, Camilla

    2013-05-10

    Dry powder vaccine formulations are highly attractive due to improved storage stability and the possibility for particle engineering, as compared to liquid formulations. However, a prerequisite for formulating vaccines into dry formulations is that their physicochemical and adjuvant properties remain unchanged upon rehydration. Thus, we have identified and optimized the parameters of importance for the design of a spray dried powder formulation of the cationic liposomal adjuvant formulation 01 (CAF01) composed of dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide and trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate (TDB) via spray drying. The optimal excipient to stabilize CAF01 during spray drying and for the design of nanocomposite microparticles was identified among mannitol, lactose and trehalose. Trehalose and lactose were promising stabilizers with respect to preserving liposome size, as compared to mannitol. Trehalose and lactose were in the glassy state upon co-spray drying with the liposomes, whereas mannitol appeared crystalline, suggesting that the ability of the stabilizer to form a glassy matrix around the liposomes is one of the prerequisites for stabilization. Systematic studies on the effect of process parameters suggested that a fast drying rate is essential to avoid phase separation and lipid accumulation at the surface of the microparticles during spray drying. Finally, immunization studies in mice with CAF01 in combination with the tuberculosis antigen Ag85B-ESAT6-Rv2660c (H56) demonstrated that spray drying of CAF01 with trehalose under optimal processing conditions resulted in the preservation of the adjuvant activity in vivo. These data demonstrate the importance of liposome stabilization via optimization of formulation and processing conditions in the engineering of dry powder liposome formulations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of freeze-drying and oven-drying on volatiles and phenolics composition of grape skin.

    PubMed

    de Torres, C; Díaz-Maroto, M C; Hermosín-Gutiérrez, I; Pérez-Coello, M S

    2010-02-15

    Grape skins are the part of the fruit with the highest amount of volatile and polyphenolic compounds. Volatile compounds give the fruit and other grape derivatives their flavour. Polyphenolic compounds are responsible for the colour of the fruit, juice and wine, and also act as very important natural antioxidant compounds. Dehydration is a method used to prevent the damage of these compounds over time. Nevertheless, in the case of volatile compounds, removing water can cause compound degradation or the evaporation of such compounds. This work studied two drying methods, freeze-drying and oven-drying, at 60 degrees C, as skin preservation methods. The skins from two grape varieties, Carménère and Cabernet Sauvignon, were dried. Many volatile compounds, which are of interest in the aroma profile, were identified in both varieties as terpenes (linalool, etc.), sesquiterpenes (farnesol), norisoprenoids (vitispirane, etc.), C(6) alcohols (1-hexanol, etc.), etc., and their amount decreased significantly with the oven-drying method, in contrast to the freeze-drying method. Both phenolic compounds, anthocyanins and flavonols, were identified in fresh and dehydrated samples, thus resulting in the freeze-drying method being less aggressive than oven-drying methods. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dry Arthroscopy of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis, Joideep; Bain, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Dry arthroscopy is attractive because it affords an unsurpassed clarity of view and minimizes swelling. The elbow is a challenging joint to assess arthroscopically; however, dry arthroscopy has some particular benefits in the elbow. The primary benefit is the quality of the tissue definition, but dry arthroscopy also increases the working time for surgery by reducing swelling and results in less postoperative discomfort for the patient. With dry arthroscopy, all joint surfaces are covered in synovial fluid, which reflects light, to provide a clearer image of the joint surfaces and depth of field. The air-fluid interface provides an uninterrupted appreciation of the synovial recesses and tissue perfusion. This article describes the technique and indications for dry elbow arthroscopy, which will allow other surgeons to reap the benefits of dry arthroscopy without the need for special equipment or changes in their basic technique. PMID:26759772

  20. Hibiscus sabdariffa L extract drying with different carrier agent: Drying rate evaluation and color analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djaeni, M.; Utari, F. D.; Kumoro, A. C.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different carrier agents on roselle or Hibiscus sabdariffa L.extract drying. Carrier agent was used for reducing stickiness of material and avoiding agglomeration as well as improving stability. The method consisted of two steps involving roselle extraction and drying process. The liquid roselle extract was mixed with carrier agent (maltodextrin-arabic gum) in various composition. The mixture was then dried at different air temperature ranging 40 - 80°C. As a response, moisture content in the extract was observed by gravimetry every 10 minutes during90 minutes. The procedurewas repeated for the drying without carrieragent. The result showed that constant rate of drying with carrier agent was higher up to l.7 times than that of without carrier agent. Based on the color analysis,roselle extract drying with carrier agent also showed reasonable quality.

  1. Rehydration of freeze-dried and convective dried boletus edulis mushrooms: effect on some quality parameters.

    PubMed

    Hernando, I; Sanjuán, N; Pérez-Munuera, I; Mulet, A

    2008-10-01

    Quality of rehydrated products is a key aspect linked to rehydration conditions. To assess the effect of rehydration temperature on some quality parameters, experiments at 20 and 70 degrees C were performed with convective dried and freeze-dried Boletus edulis mushrooms. Rehydration characteristics (through Peleg's parameter, k(1), and equilibrium moisture, W(e)), texture (Kramer), and microstructure (Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy) were evaluated. Freeze-dried samples absorbed water more quickly and attained higher W(e) values than convective dried ones. Convective dehydrated samples rehydrated at 20 degrees C showed significantly lower textural values (11.9 +/- 3.3 N/g) than those rehydrated at 70 degrees C (15.7 +/- 1.2 N/g). For the freeze-dried Boletus edulis, the textural values also exhibited significant differences, being 8.2 +/- 1.3 and 10.5 +/- 2.3 N/g for 20 and 70 degrees C, respectively. Freeze-dried samples showed a porous structure that allows rehydration to take place mainly at the extracellular level. This explains the fact that, regardless of temperature, freeze-dried mushrooms absorbed water more quickly and reached higher W(e) values than convective dried ones. Whatever the dehydration technique used, rehydration at 70 degrees C produced a structural damage that hindered water absorption; consequently lower W(e) values and higher textural values were attained than when rehydrating at 20 degrees C.

  2. Microwave drying of wood strands

    Treesearch

    Guanben Du; Siqun Wang; Zhiyong Cai

    2005-01-01

    Characteristics of microwave drying of wood strands with different initial moisture contents and geometries were investigated using a commercial small microwave oven under different power inputs. Temperature and moisture changes along with the drying efficiency were examined at different drying scenarios. Extractives were analyzed using gas chromatography=mass...

  3. Drying of Pigment-Cellulose Nanofibril Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, Oleg; Torvinen, Katariina; Sievänen, Jenni; Kaljunen, Timo; Kouko, Jarmo; Ketoja, Jukka A.

    2014-01-01

    A new substrate containing cellulose nanofibrils and inorganic pigment particles has been developed for printed electronics applications. The studied composite structure contains 80% fillers and is mechanically stable and flexible. Before drying, the solids content can be as low as 20% due to the high water binding capacity of the cellulose nanofibrils. We have studied several drying methods and their effects on the substrate properties. The aim is to achieve a tight, smooth surface keeping the drying efficiency simultaneously at a high level. The methods studied include: (1) drying on a hot metal surface; (2) air impingement drying; and (3) hot pressing. Somewhat surprisingly, drying rates measured for the pigment-cellulose nanofibril substrates were quite similar to those for the reference board sheets. Very high dewatering rates were observed for the hot pressing at high moisture contents. The drying method had significant effects on the final substrate properties, especially on short-range surface smoothness. The best smoothness was obtained with a combination of impingement and contact drying. The mechanical properties of the sheets were also affected by the drying method and associated temperature. PMID:28788220

  4. Monitoring of the secondary drying in freeze-drying of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Fissore, Davide; Pisano, Roberto; Barresi, Antonello A

    2011-02-01

    This paper is focused on the in-line monitoring of the secondary drying phase of a lyophilization process. An innovative software sensor is presented to estimate reliably the residual moisture in the product and the time required to complete secondary drying, that is, to reach the target value of the residual moisture or of the desorption rate. Such results are obtained by coupling a mathematical model of the process and the in-line measurement of the solvent desorption rate and by means of the pressure rise test or another sensors (e.g., windmills, laser sensors) that can measure the vapor flux in the drying chamber. The proposed method does not require extracting any vial during the operation or using expensive sensors to measure off-line the residual moisture. Moreover, it does not require any preliminary experiment to determine the relationship between the desorption rate and residual moisture in the product. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated by means of experiments carried out in a pilot-scale apparatus: in this case, some vials were extracted from the drying chamber and the moisture content was measured to validate the estimations provided by the soft-sensor. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. 7 CFR 58.813 - Dry whey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dry whey. 58.813 Section 58.813 Agriculture... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.813 Dry whey. The quality requirements for dry whey shall be in accordance with the U.S. Standards for Dry Whey. Supplemental Specifications for Plants...

  6. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis...

  7. Variability and trends in dry day frequency and dry event length in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, Gregory J.; Legates, David R.; Lins, Harry F.

    2010-01-01

    Daily precipitation from 22 National Weather Service first-order weather stations in the southwestern United States for water years 1951 through 2006 are used to examine variability and trends in the frequency of dry days and dry event length. Dry events with minimum thresholds of 10 and 20 consecutive days of precipitation with less than 2.54 mm are analyzed. For water years and cool seasons (October through March), most sites indicate negative trends in dry event length (i.e., dry event durations are becoming shorter). For the warm season (April through September), most sites also indicate negative trends; however, more sites indicate positive trends in dry event length for the warm season than for water years or cool seasons. The larger number of sites indicating positive trends in dry event length during the warm season is due to a series of dry warm seasons near the end of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century. Overall, a large portion of the variability in dry event length is attributable to variability of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation, especially for water years and cool seasons. Our results are consistent with analyses of trends in discharge for sites in the southwestern United States, an increased frequency in El Niño events, and positive trends in precipitation in the southwestern United States.

  8. Combined control of morphology and polymorph in spray drying of mannitol for dry powder inhalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Feng; Liu, Jing J.; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Xue Z.

    2017-06-01

    The morphology and polymorphism of mannitol particles were controlled during spray drying with the aim of improving the aerosolization properties of inhalable dry powders. The obtained microparticles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction and inhaler testing with a next generation impactor. Mannitol particles of varied α-mannitol content and surface roughness were prepared via spray drying by manipulating the concentration of NH4HCO3 in the feed solution. The bubbles produced by NH4HCO3 led to the formation of spheroid particles with a rough surface. Further, the fine particle fraction was increased by the rough surface of carriers and the high α-mannitol content. Inhalable dry powders with a 29.1 ± 2.4% fine particle fraction were obtained by spray-drying using 5% mannitol (w/v)/2% NH4HCO3 (w/v) as the feed solution, proving that this technique is an effective method to engineer particles for dry powder inhalation.

  9. CO2 (dry ice) cleaning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Donald M.

    1995-01-01

    Tomco Equipment Company has participated in the dry ice (solid carbon dioxide, CO2) cleaning industry for over ten years as a pioneer in the manufacturer of high density, dry ice cleaning pellet production equipment. For over four years Tomco high density pelletizers have been available to the dry ice cleaning industry. Approximately one year ago Tomco introduced the DI-250, a new dry ice blast unit making Tomco a single source supplier for sublimable media, particle blast, cleaning systems. This new blast unit is an all pneumatic, single discharge hose device. It meters the insertion of 1/8 inch diameter (or smaller), high density, dry ice pellets into a high pressure, propellant gas stream. The dry ice and propellant streams are controlled and mixed from the blast cabinet. From there the mixture is transported to the nozzle where the pellets are accelerated to an appropriate blasting velocity. When directed to impact upon a target area, these dry ice pellets have sufficient energy to effectively remove most surface coatings through dry, abrasive contact. The meta-stable, dry ice pellets used for CO2 cleaning, while labeled 'high density,' are less dense than alternate, abrasive, particle blast media. In addition, after contacting the target surface, they return to their equilibrium condition: a superheated gas state. Most currently used grit blasting media are silicon dioxide based, which possess a sharp tetrahedral molecular structure. Silicon dioxide crystal structures will always produce smaller sharp-edged replicas of the original crystal upon fracture. Larger, softer dry ice pellets do not share the same sharp-edged crystalline structures as their non-sublimable counterparts when broken. In fact, upon contact with the target surface, dry ice pellets will plastically deform and break apart. As such, dry ice cleaning is less harmful to sensitive substrates, workers and the environment than chemical or abrasive cleaning systems. Dry ice cleaning system

  10. Space Technology for Crop Drying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    McDonnell Douglas came up with a new method of drying agricultural crops derived from vacuum chamber technology called MIVAC, a compression of microwave vacuum drying system. A distant cousin of the home microwave oven, MIVAC dries by means of electrically- generated microwaves introduced to a crop-containing vacuum chamber. Microwaves remove moisture quickly and the very low pressure atmosphere in the chamber permits effective drying at much lower than customary temperatures. Thus energy demand is doubly reduced by lower heat requirement and by the shorter time electric power is needed.

  11. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic acid...

  12. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic acid...

  13. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic acid...

  14. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic acid...

  15. Suitability of microwave drying for mealworms (Tenebrio molitor) as alternative to freeze drying: Impact on nutritional quality and colour.

    PubMed

    Lenaerts, S; Van Der Borght, M; Callens, A; Van Campenhout, L

    2018-07-15

    Freeze drying represents the current practice to stabilize mealworms, even though it is an energy demanding technique. Therefore, it was examined in the present study whether microwave drying could be a proper alternative. To this end, the impact of both drying techniques on the proximate composition, vitamin B 12 content, fatty acid profile, oxidation status and colour parameters of mealworms was investigated. Furthermore, the influence of the application of vacuum during microwave drying was studied. The different drying technologies resulted in small differences in the proximate composition, while the vitamin B 12 content was only reduced by microwave drying. The fat fraction of freeze dried mealworms showed a higher oxidation status than the fat of microwave dried mealworms. Application of a vacuum during the microwave drying process did not appear to offer advantages. This research shows that for mealworms microwave drying can be a proper alternative to freeze drying. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. No Heat Spray Drying Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Beetz, Charles

    No Heat Spray Drying Technology. ZoomEssence has developed our Zooming™ spray drying technology that atomizes liquids to powders at ambient temperature. The process of drying a liquid into a powder form has been traditionally achieved by mixing a heated gas with an atomized (sprayed) fluid within a vessel (drying chamber) causing the solvent to evaporate. The predominant spray drying process in use today employs air heated up to 400° Fahrenheit to dry an atomized liquid into a powder. Exposing sensitive, volatile liquid ingredients to high temperature causes molecular degradation that negatively impacts solubility, stability and profile of the powder. Inmore » short, heat is detrimental to many liquid ingredients. The completed award focused on several areas in order to advance the prototype dryer to a commercial scale integrated pilot system. Prior to the award, ZoomEssence had developed a prototype ‘no-heat’ dryer that firmly established the feasibility of the Zooming™ process. The award focused on three primary areas to improve the technology: (1) improved ability to formulate emulsions for specific flavor groups and improved understanding of the relationship of emulsion properties to final dry particle properties, (2) a new production atomizer, and (3) a dryer controls system.« less

  17. Impact of dry eye on work productivity.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masakazu; Mizuno, Yoshinobu; Shigeyasu, Chika

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of dry eye on work productivity of office workers, especially in terms of presenteeism. A total of 396 individuals aged ≥20 years (258 men and 138 women, mean age 43.4 ± 13.0 years) were recruited through an online survey. Data from 355 responders who did not have missing values were included in the analysis. They were classified into the following four groups according to the diagnostic status and subjective symptoms of dry eye: a definite dry eye group; a marginal dry eye group; a self-reported dry eye group; and a control group. The impact of dry eye on work productivity was evaluated using the Japanese version of the Work Limitations Questionnaire. The cost of work productivity loss associated with dry eye and the economic benefits of providing treatment for dry eye were also assessed. The degree of work performance loss was 5.65% in the definite dry eye group, 4.37% in the marginal dry eye group, 6.06% in the self-reported dry eye group, and 4.27% in the control group. Productivity in the self-reported dry eye group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05). The annual cost of work productivity loss associated with dry eye was estimated to be USD 741 per person. Dry eye impairs work performance among office workers, which may lead to a substantial loss to industry. Management of symptoms of dry eye by providing treatment may contribute to improvement in work productivity.

  18. Microwave-assisted drying of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) fruits: Drying kinetics, polyphenols, anthocyanins, antioxidant capacity, colour and texture.

    PubMed

    Zielinska, Magdalena; Michalska, Anna

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of hot air convective drying (HACD), microwave vacuum drying (MWVD) and their combination (HACD+MWVD) on the drying kinetics, colour, total polyphenols, anthocyanins antioxidant capacity and texture of frozen/thawed blueberries. Drying resulted in reduction of total polyphenols content and antioxidant capacity (69 and 77%, respectively). The highest content of total polyphenols was noted after HACD at 90°C. Lower air temperature and prolonged exposure to oxygen resulted in greater degradation of polyphenols and antioxidant capacity. Drying processes caused a significant decrease (from 70 to 95%) in the content of anthocyanins. The highest content of anthocyanins and the strongest antioxidant capacity was found in blueberries dried using HACD at 90°C+MWVD. Among drying methods, HACD at 90°C+MWVD satisfied significant requirements for dried fruits i.e. short drying time and improved product quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Compton Dry-Cask Imaging System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2017-12-09

    The Compton-Dry Cask Imaging Scanner is a system that verifies and documents the presence of spent nuclear fuel rods in dry-cask storage and determines their isotopic composition without moving or opening the cask. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/compton-dry-cask-imaging-system/

  20. Comparison of postoperative corneal changes between dry eye and non-dry eye in a murine cataract surgery model.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jin Woo; Chung, Yeon Woong; Choi, Jin A; La, Tae Yoon; Jee, Dong Hyun; Cho, Yang Kyung

    2016-01-01

    To compare the effects of the surgical insult of cataract surgery on corneal inflammatory infiltration, neovascularization (NV) and lymphangiogenesis (LY) between the dry eye and non-dry eye in murine cataract surgery models. We established two groups of animals, one with normal eyes (non-dry eye) and the second with induced dry eyes. In both groups, we used surgical insults to mimic human cataract surgery, which consisted of lens extraction, corneal incision and suture. After harvesting of corneas on the 9(th) postoperative day and immunohistochemical staining, we compared NV, LY and CD11b+ cell infiltration in the corneas. Dry eye group had significantly more inflammatory infiltration (21.75%±7.17% vs 3.65%±1.49%; P=0.049). The dry eye group showed significantly more NV (48.21%±4.02% vs 26.24%±6.01%; P=0.016) and greater levels of LY (9.27%±0.48% vs 4.84%±1.15%; P=0.007). In corneas on which no surgery was performed, there was no induction of NV in both the dry and non-dry group, but dry eye group demonstrated more CD11b+ cells infiltration than the non-dry eye group (0.360%±0.160% vs 0.023%±0.006%; P=0.068). Dry eye group showed more NV than non-dry eye group in both topical PBS application and subconjunctival PBS injection (P=0.020 and 0.000, respectively). In a murine cataract surgery model, preexisting dry eye can induce more postoperative NV, LY, and inflammation in corneal tissue.

  1. FINAL REPORT: Transformational electrode drying process

    SciTech Connect

    Claus Daniel, C.; Wixom, M.

    2013-12-19

    This report includes major findings and outlook from the transformational electrode drying project performance period from January 6, 2012 to August 1, 2012. Electrode drying before cell assembly is an operational bottleneck in battery manufacturing due to long drying times and batch processing. Water taken up during shipment and other manufacturing steps needs to be removed before final battery assembly. Conventional vacuum ovens are limited in drying speed due to a temperature threshold needed to avoid damaging polymer components in the composite electrode. Roll to roll operation and alternative treatments can increase the water desorption and removal rate without overheatingmore » and damaging other components in the composite electrode, thus considerably reducing drying time and energy use. The objective of this project was the development of an electrode drying procedure, and the demonstration of processes with no decrease in battery performance. The benchmark for all drying data was an 80°C vacuum furnace treatment with a residence time of 18 – 22 hours. This report demonstrates an alternative roll to roll drying process with a 500-fold improvement in drying time down to 2 minutes and consumption of only 30% of the energy compared to vacuum furnace treatment.« less

  2. System for drying and heating particulate coal

    SciTech Connect

    Offergeld, E.; Wischniewski, M.

    1978-04-04

    Wet particulate coal and a current of hot dry gas at superatmospheric pressure are introduced into a substantially closed drying chamber to contact the material with the gas while maintaining the drying chamber under superatmospheric pressure so that the material is dried by the gas. The dried material is withdrawn from the drying chamber and the gas is withdrawn from the drying chamber and itself mixed with a stream of hot dry gas produced by burning a combustible and a combustion-supporting gas. This mixture is then reintroduced into the drying chamber as the current of hot gas used to drymore » the coal. The burner is operated at superatmospheric pressure and is formed of a jet-pump type injector, and a diffusor is provided downstream of this injector in the circulation path.« less

  3. Accelerating oak air drying by presurfacing

    Treesearch

    W. T. Simpson; R. C. Baltes

    1972-01-01

    A comparison was made between the air-drying rates of rough and presurfaced northern red oak and white oak. In both species, the presurfaced material was about 1/8 inch thinner than the rough material and dried faster than the rough material. The reduction in drying time depends on the method of analyzing the drying curves, but is slightly less than 10 percent.

  4. Biological/Horticultural Internship Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Shane R.; Spencer, Lashelle (Editor)

    2017-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine water use requirements of genetically modified (GMO) dwarf plum. GMO plum and unmodified standard plum plants were grown in a controlled environment chamber under varying CO2 concentrations (400 ppm, 1500 ppm, and 5000 ppm). Pepper plants were also grown in the chamber for additional comparison. Leaf stomatal conductance, biomass accumulation, soil moisture and pot weights were measured; Stomatal conductance of GMO plum and pepper plants decreased at sustained elevated CO2 concentrations. The stomatal conductance rates of the standard plums, however, increased at sustained elevated CO2 concentrations. Further data analysis (statistical analysis, biomass, soil moisture and pot weight measurements) is ongoing and required to gain better understanding of the data. An additional proof-of-concept study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of grafting unmodified standard plum scions onto genetically modified rootstocks as a propagation method. Bud grafts were performed on three GMO plum rootstocks: NASA-5, NASA-10, and NASA-11. All of the standard plum buds grafted onto NASA-5 and NASA-10 rootstocks began growing, indicating that this grafting method is highly successful for the formation of a graft union and initial bud growth. However, bud growth during stem elongation was curtailed on several grafts due to a combination of nutritional deficiency and physical damage/obstruction of the grafted tissues. Bud growth on the NASA-5 rootstock occurred sooner than in grafts on the NASA-10 rootstock, while only one bud graft has shown growth on the NASA-11 rootstock thus far. These marked differences in the onset of bud growth suggest genotypic differences between the rootstocks may affect bud graft vigor. Mature standard plum scions grown on the NASA-5 rootstock appeared to retain most or all of the physical characteristics of the standard plum donor plant.

  5. Comparison of postoperative corneal changes between dry eye and non-dry eye in a murine cataract surgery model

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jin Woo; Chung, Yeon Woong; Choi, Jin A; La, Tae Yoon; Jee, Dong Hyun; Cho, Yang Kyung

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the effects of the surgical insult of cataract surgery on corneal inflammatory infiltration, neovascularization (NV) and lymphangiogenesis (LY) between the dry eye and non-dry eye in murine cataract surgery models. METHODS We established two groups of animals, one with normal eyes (non-dry eye) and the second with induced dry eyes. In both groups, we used surgical insults to mimic human cataract surgery, which consisted of lens extraction, corneal incision and suture. After harvesting of corneas on the 9th postoperative day and immunohistochemical staining, we compared NV, LY and CD11b+ cell infiltration in the corneas. RESULTS Dry eye group had significantly more inflammatory infiltration (21.75%±7.17% vs 3.65%±1.49%; P=0.049). The dry eye group showed significantly more NV (48.21%±4.02% vs 26.24%±6.01%; P=0.016) and greater levels of LY (9.27%±0.48% vs 4.84%±1.15%; P=0.007). In corneas on which no surgery was performed, there was no induction of NV in both the dry and non-dry group, but dry eye group demonstrated more CD11b+ cells infiltration than the non-dry eye group (0.360%±0.160% vs 0.023%±0.006%; P=0.068). Dry eye group showed more NV than non-dry eye group in both topical PBS application and subconjunctival PBS injection (P=0.020 and 0.000, respectively). CONCLUSION In a murine cataract surgery model, preexisting dry eye can induce more postoperative NV, LY, and inflammation in corneal tissue. PMID:26949638

  6. Vacuum drying of apples (cv. Golden Delicious): drying characteristics, thermodynamic properties, and mass transfer parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadi, Fatemeh; Tzempelikos, Dimitrios

    2018-01-01

    In this work, apples of cv. Golden Delicious were cut into slices that were 5 and 7 mm thick and then vacuum dried at 50, 60 and 70 °C and pressure of 0.02 bar. The thin layer model drying kinetics was studied, and mass transfer properties, specifically effective moisture diffusivity and convective mass transfer coefficient, were evaluated using the Fick's equation of diffusion. Also, thermodynamic parameters of the process, i.e. enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG), were determined. Colour properties were evaluated as one of the important indicators of food quality and marketability. Determination of mass transfer parameters and thermodynamic properties of vacuum dried apple slices has not been discussed much in the literature. In conclusion, the Nadi's model fitted best the observed data that represent the drying process. Thermodynamic properties were determined based on the dependence of the drying constant of the Henderson and Pabis model on temperature, and it was concluded that the variation in drying kinetics depends on the energy contribution of the surrounding environment. The enthalpy and entropy diminished, while the Gibbs free energy increased with the increase of the temperature of drying; therefore, it was possible to verify that variation in the diffusion process in the apple during drying depends on energetic contributions of the environment. The obtained results showed that diffusivity increased for 69%, while the mass transfer coefficient increase was even higher, 75%, at the variation of temperature of 20 °C. The increase in the dimensionless Biot number was 20%.

  7. Vacuum drying of apples (cv. Golden Delicious): drying characteristics, thermodynamic properties, and mass transfer parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadi, Fatemeh; Tzempelikos, Dimitrios

    2018-07-01

    In this work, apples of cv. Golden Delicious were cut into slices that were 5 and 7 mm thick and then vacuum dried at 50, 60 and 70 °C and pressure of 0.02 bar. The thin layer model drying kinetics was studied, and mass transfer properties, specifically effective moisture diffusivity and convective mass transfer coefficient, were evaluated using the Fick's equation of diffusion. Also, thermodynamic parameters of the process, i.e. enthalpy ( ΔH), entropy ( ΔS) and Gibbs free energy ( ΔG), were determined. Colour properties were evaluated as one of the important indicators of food quality and marketability. Determination of mass transfer parameters and thermodynamic properties of vacuum dried apple slices has not been discussed much in the literature. In conclusion, the Nadi's model fitted best the observed data that represent the drying process. Thermodynamic properties were determined based on the dependence of the drying constant of the Henderson and Pabis model on temperature, and it was concluded that the variation in drying kinetics depends on the energy contribution of the surrounding environment. The enthalpy and entropy diminished, while the Gibbs free energy increased with the increase of the temperature of drying; therefore, it was possible to verify that variation in the diffusion process in the apple during drying depends on energetic contributions of the environment. The obtained results showed that diffusivity increased for 69%, while the mass transfer coefficient increase was even higher, 75%, at the variation of temperature of 20 °C. The increase in the dimensionless Biot number was 20%.

  8. 7 CFR 58.250 - Dry whole milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dry whole milk. 58.250 Section 58.250 Agriculture... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.250 Dry whole milk. Dry whole milk in commercial bulk... Grades of Dry Whole Milk. Quality requirements for dry whole milk in consumer packages shall be for U.S...

  9. Effects of steam-microwave blanching and different drying processes on drying characteristics and quality attributes of Thunbergia laurifolia Linn. leaves.

    PubMed

    Phahom, Traiphop; Phoungchandang, Singhanat; Kerr, William L

    2017-08-01

    Dried Thunbergia laurifolia leaves are usually prepared using tray drying, resulting in products that have lost substantial amounts of bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity. The maturity of the raw material, blanching techniques and drying methods were investigated in order to select the best condition to produce high qualities of dried T. laurifolia leaves. The 1st stage of maturity was selected and steam-microwave blanching (SMB) for 4 min was adequate for blanching leading to the maximum recovery of bioactive compounds. The modified Halsey model was the best desorption isotherm model. A new drying model proposed in this study was the best to fit the drying curves as compared to five common drying models. Moisture diffusivities were increased with the increase of drying temperature when combining SMB and heat pump-dehumidified drying. Microwave heat pump-dehumidified drying (MHPD) provided the shortest drying time, high specific moisture extraction rate (SMER) and could reduce drying time by 67.5% and increase caffeic acid and quercetin by 51.24% and 60.89%, respectively. MHPD was found to be the best drying method and provided the highest antioxidant activity and bioactive compounds content, high SMER and short drying time. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Experimental study of cassava sun drying

    SciTech Connect

    Njie, D.N.; Rumsey, T.R.

    1997-03-01

    Sun drying experiments were performed to compare drying of cassava chips in sheet-metal trays with drying on mesh wire trays. In the sheet-metal trays, there was air flow across the top of the bed chips, while the mesh wire trays permitted air to flow through the bed. Drying rate was faster and more uniform in the trays with through-flow air circulation. Higher temperatures were reached by chips in the sheet-metal trays than those in the mesh trays because of contact heating, but the drying rate was lower because of the reduced air flow.

  11. 21 CFR 160.185 - Dried egg yolks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dried egg yolks. 160.185 Section 160.185 Food and... CONSUMPTION EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Eggs and Egg Products § 160.185 Dried egg yolks. (a) Dried egg yolks, dried yolks is the food prepared by drying egg yolks that conform to...

  12. Dry dock gate stability modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktoberty; Widiyanto; Sasono, E. J.; Pramono, S.; Wandono, A. T.

    2018-03-01

    The development of marine transportation needs in Indonesia increasingly opens national shipyard business opportunities to provide shipbuilding services to the shipbuilding vessels. That emphasizes the stability of prime. The ship's decking door becomes an integral part of the efficient place and the specification of the use of the asset of its operational ease. This study aims to test the stability of Dry Dock gate with the length of 35.4 meters using Maxsurf and Hydromax in analyzing the calculation were in its assessment using interval per 500 mm length so that it can get detail data toward longitudinal and transverse such as studying Ship planning in general. The test result shows dry dock gate meets IMO standard with ballast construction containing 54% and 68% and using fix ballast can produce GMt 1,924 m, tide height 11,357m. The GMt value indicates dry dick gate can be stable and firmly erect at the base of the mouth dry dock. When empty ballast produces GMt 0.996 which means dry dock date is stable, but can easily be torn down. The condition can be used during dry dock gate treatment.

  13. Dry eyes: etiology and management.

    PubMed

    Latkany, Robert

    2008-07-01

    Until recently, the cause of dry eye syndrome was uncertain and the treatment was palliative. Since discovering that dry eyes are caused by inflammation, there has been an abundance of research focusing on anti-inflammatory therapies, other contributing causes, and better diagnostic testing. This review summarizes some of the interesting published research on ocular surface disease over the past year. The definition of dry eye now highlights the omnipresent symptom of blurry vision. The re-evaluation of ocular surface staining, tear meniscus height, and visual change will allow for a better diagnosis and understanding of dry eyes. Punctal plugs, and oral and topical anti-inflammatory use will strengthen our arsenal against ocular surface disease. Major progress has occurred in the past few years in gaining a better understanding of the etiology of dry eye syndrome, which will inevitably lead to more effective therapeutic options.

  14. Cadmium distribution in field-grown fruit trees

    SciTech Connect

    Korcak, R.F.

    The effect of soil applied Cd on Cd distribution in and growth of five species of fruit trees was investigated. Cadmium was applied at three rates (0, 5, and 10 mg kg{sup {minus}1} soil) as CdSO{sub 4} to orchard plots established at two pH levels, low (5.5) and high (6.5). Five fruit tree types were planted: Gala apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) budded on M.26 (dwarfing) or MM.111 (semistandard) rootstocks, Redskin peach (Prunus persica L.) on Lovell rootstock, Stanley plum (Prunus domestica L.) on Myrobalon rootstock, and Seckel pear (Pyrus communis L.) on seedling rootstock. The trees were grown for 6more » yr, 7 yr in the case of pear, and leaf, bark, wood, fruit, and root Cd concentrations were monitored. Gala apple on both rootstocks accumulated very small concentrations of Cd, usually 0.1 mg kg{sup {minus}1} dry wt. in all tissues tested. Peach and plum were intermediate in Cd accumulation, but both still relatively low. Seckel pear had high Cd concentrations in all tissues including fruit flesh and peel. Pear leaf Cd concentrations were 2.0 mg kg{sup {minus}1} from the 10 mg kg{sup {minus}1} soil Cd application after 5 yr. Pear fruit peel and flesh showed elevated, although nonsignificant, Cd concentrations with increased Cd applied. There was little difference between bark and wood tissue Cd concentrations independent of tree type. Root Cd concentrations were highest for pear followed by peach and plum, and lowest in apple.« less

  15. High strength air-dried aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2012-11-06

    A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

  16. Dry Eyes and Glaucoma: Double Trouble

    MedlinePlus

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Dry Eyes and Glaucoma: Double Trouble email Send this article ... eye disease bothers the patient more. What Causes Dry Eye Syndrome? Dry eye can be caused by many ...

  17. Quality of dry-cured ham compared with quality of dry-cured shoulder.

    PubMed

    Reina, Raquel; Sánchez del Pulgar, José; Tovar, Jorge; López-Buesa, Pascual; García, Carmen

    2013-08-01

    The physicochemical and sensory properties of 30 dry-cured hams and 30 dry-cured shoulders were analyzed to determine the relationships between them. The variables used to characterize both products were: compositional parameters, instrumental texture, amino acid and fatty acid composition, and sensory profile. Despite being products from the same animal and composed mainly of fat, lean, and bone, their morphological differences determine the conditions of the processing time, which produced differences between products in most of the parameters evaluated. Dry-cured shoulders showed lower moisture content and greater instrumental hardness due to their morphology and muscular structure. Besides, these samples showed lower amino acid content according to the shorter ripening time. For the same reason, the dry-cured hams showed higher moisture content, lower instrumental hardness, and higher amino acid content. However, the differences in the muscular structure did not affect the sensory characteristics, which were more related with some compositional parameters, such as chloride, moisture, and amino acid content and with the length of the curing process. © 2013 Extremadura University.

  18. Evaluating energy efficient strategies and product quality for distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS) in dry-grind ethanol plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Tian

    The drying of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), a coproduct of dry-grind corn processing to ethanol utilizes about 30% of the total energy required for the production of a liter of fuel ethanol. Therefore, improving DDGS drying energy efficiency could have significant impact on the economics of the dry-grind corn-to-ethanol process. Drying process improvements must take account into the effects of various drying strategies on the final quality of DDGS which is primarily utilized as a feed ingredient. Previous studies in the literature have shown that physical and chemical properties of DDGS vary according to the ratio of the two primarily feed streams, wet distillers grains (WDG) and condensed distillers solubles (CDS) which make up DDGS. Extensive research using plant-scale and bench-scale experiments have been conducted on the effect of process variables (ratios of WDG, CDS and DDGS add-back) during drying on the physical and chemical properties of DDGS. However, these investigations did not correlate the product characteristics data to drying efficiency. Additionally, it cannot be clearly determined from the literature on DDGS drying that processes used in the industry are optimized for both product quality and energy efficiency. A bench-scale rotary drum dryer heated by an electrically powered heat gun was used to investigate the effects of WDG, CDS and add-back ratios on both energy efficiency, drying performance and DDGS physical and chemical properties. A two stage drying process with the bench-scale rotary dryer was used to simulate the drying of DDGS using ICM (ICM, Inc., Colwich, KS) dry-grind process technology for DDGS drying which uses two rotary drum dryers in series. Effects of drying process variables, CDS content (0, 10, 20 and 40% by mass) and percent DDGS add-back (0, 20, 40 and 60% by mass) on energy performance and product quality were determined. Sixteen different drying strategies based on drying process variable ratios were

  19. Dry Mouth - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment - العربية (Arabic) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect) (简体中文) Expand Section Dry ... Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) Expand Section Dry ...

  20. An Old-Growth Definition for Dry and Dry-Mesic Oak-Pine Forests.

    Treesearch

    David L. White; F. Thomas Lloyd

    1998-01-01

    Dry and dry-mesic oak-pine forests are widely distributed from New Jersey to Texas, but representative old-growth stands are rare. Historical accounts of composition, along with information from existing old-growth stands, were used to characterize this type. Shortleaf pine and white oak were the most widely distributed trees across all old-growth stands. Shortleaf was...

  1. Pharmaceutical patent applications in freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Ekenlebie, Edmond; Einfalt, Tomaž; Karytinos, Arianna Irò; Ingham, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Injectable products are often the formulation of choice for new therapeutics; however, formulation in liquids often enhances degradation through hydrolysis. Thus, freeze-drying (lyophilization) is regularly used in pharmaceutical manufacture to reduce water activity. Here we examine its contribution to 'state of the art' and look at its future potential uses. A comprehensive search of patent databases was conducted to characterize the international patent landscape and trends in the use of freeze-drying. A total of 914 disclosures related to freeze-drying, lyophilization or drying of solid systems in pressures and temperatures equivalent to those of freeze-drying were considered over the period of 1992-2014. Current applications of sublimation technology were contrasted across two periods those with patents due to expire (1992-1993) and those currently filed. The number of freeze-drying technology patents has stabilized after initial activity across the biotechnology sector in 2011 and 2012. Alongside an increasing trend for patent submissions, freeze-drying submissions have slowed since 2002 and is indicative of a level of maturity.

  2. Quality of dry chemistry testing.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Tatsumi, N

    1999-01-01

    Since the development of the qualitative test paper for urine in 1950s, several kinds of dry-state-reagents and their automated analyzers have been developed. "Dry chemistry" has become to be called since the report on the development of quantitative test paper for serum bilirubin with reflectometer in the end of 1960s and dry chemistry has been world widely known since the presentation on the development of multilayer film reagent for serum biochemical analytes by Eastman Kodak Co at the 10th IFCC Meeting in the end of 1970s. We have reported test menu, results in external quality assessment, merits and demerits, and the future possibilities of dry chemistry.

  3. Evaluation of treatment for dry eye with 2-hydroxyestradiol using a dry eye rat model.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Akihiro; Oonishi, Erina; Kawakita, Tetsuya; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    2-hydroxy estradiol (2-OHE2) is a catechol derivative of 17β -Estradiol (E2) and it is synthesized from E2 catalyzed by cytochrome P4501A1. Previous studies reported that 2-OHE2 is a physiologic antioxidant in lipoproteins, liver microsomes, and the brain. Catechol derivatives show an anti-inflammatory effect through the inhibition of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase (PGS) activity. Corneal erosion caused by dry eye is related to an increase in oxidative stress and inflammation in ocular surface cells. We investigated the therapeutic effects of 2-OHE2 on corneal damage caused by dry eye. Steroidal radical scavenging activity was confirmed through the electron spin resonance (ESR) method. PGS activity was measured using the COX Fluorescent Activity Assay Kit. To evaluate the effect of 2-OHE2 on the treatment for dry eye, 2-OHE2 was applied as an eye drop experiment using dry eye model rats. 2-OHE2 scavenged tyrosyl radical and possibly suppressed oxidative stress in corneal epithelial cells. In addition, 2-OHE2 inhibited PGS activity, and 2-OHE2 is probably a competitive inhibitor of PGS. Corneal PGS activity was upregulated in the dry eye group. Therefore, 2-OHE2 eye drops improved corneal erosion in dry eye model rats. 2-OHE2 is a candidate for the treatment of dry eye through the suppression of inflammation and oxidative stress in the cornea.

  4. Morphology of drying blood pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laan, Nick; Smith, Fiona; Nicloux, Celine; Brutin, David; D-Blood project Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Often blood pools are found on crime scenes providing information concerning the events and sequence of events that took place on the scene. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the drying dynamics of blood pools. This study focuses on the drying process of blood pools to determine what relevant information can be obtained for the forensic application. We recorded the drying process of blood pools with a camera and measured the weight. We found that the drying process can be separated into five different: coagulation, gelation, rim desiccation, centre desiccation, and final desiccation. Moreover, we found that the weight of the blood pool diminishes similarly and in a reproducible way for blood pools created in various conditions. In addition, we verify that the size of the blood pools is directly related to its volume and the wettability of the surface. Our study clearly shows that blood pools dry in a reproducible fashion. This preliminary work highlights the difficult task that represents blood pool analysis in forensic investigations, and how internal and external parameters influence its dynamics. We conclude that understanding the drying process dynamics would be advancement in timeline reconstitution of events. ANR funded project: D-Blood Project.

  5. Dry mouth and older people.

    PubMed

    Thomson, W M

    2015-03-01

    Dry mouth is more common among older people than in any other age group. Appropriate definition and accurate measurement of dry mouth is critical for better understanding, monitoring and treatment of the condition. Xerostomia is the symptom(s) of dry mouth; it can be measured using methods ranging from single questions to multi-item summated rating scales. Low salivary flow (known as salivary gland hypofunction, or SGH) must be determined by measuring that flow. The relationship between SGH and xerostomia is not straightforward, but both conditions are common among older people, and they affect sufferers' day-to-day lives in important ways. The major risk factor for dry mouth is the taking of particular medications, and older people take more of those than any other age group, not only for symptomatic relief of various age-associated chronic diseases, but also in order to reduce the likelihood of complications which may arise from those conditions. The greater the number taken, the greater the associated anticholinergic burden, and the more likely it is that the individual will suffer from dry mouth. Since treating dry mouth is such a challenge for clinicians, there is a need for dentists, doctors and pharmacists to work together to prevent it occurring. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  6. Freeze-dried spermatozoa: A future tool?

    PubMed

    Olaciregui, M; Gil, L

    2017-04-01

    Cryopreservation has been routinely used to preserve sperm of human and different animal species. However, frozen sperm storage for a long time brings many inconveniences because of liquid nitrogen. Many attempts have been made to overcome the disadvantages of the current cryopreservation method. Freeze-drying has been proposed as alternative method for sperm preservation to achieve the ability to store sperm doses indefinitely at ambient temperature or in ordinary refrigerators. At present, it has been reported successfully sperm freeze-drying on many animal species including canine and feline. It is well known that during freeze-drying process, sperm DNA could be damaged, but if suitable protection is provided, the sperm nucleus could preserve the ability to activate the oocyte and embryos could be generated by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Many factors influence the freeze-drying efficacy, so current researches have been conducted to find strategies to control these factors to maintain the sperm DNA integrity. This review describes the latest method of sperm freeze-drying for practical application in preserving and transporting genetic resources. In addition, the approaches to improve the efficiency of the technique were studied. We demonstrated that the DNA integrity of freeze-dried dog sperm is affected by the composition of the freeze-drying solution as well as the temperature and period of storage. Further studies are necessary to refine freeze-drying protocol in order to protect the DNA and maintain the sperm functionality and obtain offspring from freeze-dried sperm. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Effect of salt concentrations and drying methods on the quality and formation of histamine in dried milkfish (Chanos chanos).

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chiu-Chu; Lin, Chia-Min; Kung, Hsien-Feng; Huang, Ya-Ling; Hwang, Deng-Fwu; Su, Yi-Cheng; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang

    2012-11-15

    The effects of salt concentrations (0-15.0%) and drying methods on the quality of dried milkfish were studied. The results showed that the levels of aerobic plate counts, total coliform, water activity, moisture contents, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVBN) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) of the dried milkfish samples prepared with the same drying method decreased with increased salt concentrations. The samples prepared with the cold-air drying method had better quality in term of lower TVBN and TBA values than those of samples prepared with other drying methods. The histamine contents in all samples, except two, prepared with various salt concentrations by different drying methods were less than 1.9 mg/100 g. Two unsalted samples prepared with hot-air drying at 35 °C and sun drying methods were found to contain histamine at levels of 249.7 and 67.4 mg/100 g, respectively, which were higher than the potential hazard level of 50 mg/100 g. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrasound-Assisted Hot Air Drying of Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulet, Antonio; Cárcel, Juan Andrés; García-Pérez, José Vicente; Riera, Enrique

    This chapter deals with the application of power ultrasound, also named high-intensity ultrasound, in the hot air drying of foods. The aim of ultrasound-assisted drying is to overcome some of the limitations of traditional convective drying systems, especially by increasing drying rate without reducing quality attributes. The effects of ultrasound on drying rate are responsible for some of the phenomena produced in the internal and/or external resistance to mass transfer.

  9. Impact of Dry Eye Disease on Work Productivity, and Patients' Satisfaction With Over-the-Counter Dry Eye Treatments.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Kelly K; Bacharach, Jason; Holland, Edward; Kislan, Thomas; Shettle, Lee; Lunacsek, Orsolya; Lennert, Barb; Burk, Caroline; Patel, Vaishali

    2016-06-01

    To assess the effect of dry eye disease on work productivity and performance of non-work-related activities, and patients' satisfaction with over-the-counter (OTC) dry eye treatments. In this prospective, noninterventional, cross-sectional study, conducted at 10 U.S. optometry/ophthalmology practices, 158 symptomatic dry eye patients naïve to prescription medication underwent standard dry eye diagnostic tests and completed Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI) and Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaires. Use of OTC dry eye medication, and satisfaction with OTC medication and symptom relief were also assessed. On average, dry eye resulted in loss of 0.36% of work time (∼5 minutes over 7 days) and ∼30% impairment of workplace performance (presenteeism), work productivity, and non-job-related activities. Presenteeism and productivity impairment scores showed significant correlation with OSDI total (r = 0.55) and symptom domain (r = 0.50) scores, but not with dry eye clinical signs. Activity impairment score showed stronger correlation with OSDI total (r = 0.61) and symptom domain (r = 0.53) scores than with clinical signs (r ≤ 0.20). Almost 75% of patients used OTC dry eye medication. Levels of patient satisfaction with OTC medication (64.2%) and symptom relief from OTC (37.3%) were unaffected by administration frequency (≥3 vs. ≤2 times daily). Dry eye causes negligible absenteeism, but markedly reduces workplace and non-job-related performances. Impairment of work performance is more closely linked to dry eye symptoms than to clinical signs. Patients' perceptions of OTC dry eye medication tend to be more positive than their perceptions of symptom relief.

  10. Effects of Aging in Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    de Paiva, Cintia S.

    2017-01-01

    Dry eye affects millions of people worldwide and causes eye well recognized risk factors for dry eye. Anatomical and inflammation-induced age-related changes affect all components of the lacrimal gland functional unit, inclusive of lacrimal gland, conjunctiva, meibomian gland and compromise ocular surface health. There is increased evidence that inflammation plays a role in dry eye. This review will summarize the current knowledge about aging and dry eye, inclusive of lessons learned from animal models and promising therapies. PMID:28282314

  11. 7 CFR 301.74-3 - Quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Plum Pox § 301.74-3 Quarantined areas. (a... quarantined area in paragraph (c) of this section each State, or each portion of a State, in which plum pox... to believe that plum pox is present, or that the Administrator considers necessary to quarantine...

  12. Drying Characteristics and Water-soluble Polysaccharides Evaluation of Kidney Shape Ganoderma lucidum Drying in Air Circulation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyo, D. J.; Jatmiko, T. H.; Poeloengasih, C. D.; Kismurtono, M.

    2017-12-01

    In this project, drying kinetic of kidney shape Ganoderma lucidum fruiting body in air circulation system was studied. The drying experiments were conducted at 40, 50 and 60°C with air flow rate of 1.3 ms-1. Samples were weighted periodically until no change in sample weight was recorded, and then the samples were analyzed for its moisture content. Four different thin-layer mathematical models (Newton, Page, Two-term, Midilli) were used and compare to evaluate the drying curves of kidney shape G. lucidum. The water-soluble polysaccharides were evaluated in order to find the best drying temperature condition. The results indicates that Midilli model was the fittest model to describe the characteristic of kidney shape G. lucidum in the air circulation drying system and temperature of 50°C was the best drying condition to get highest value of water-soluble polysaccharides.

  13. 7 CFR 51.2287 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2287 Section 51.2287 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Shelled English Walnuts (Juglans Regia) Definitions § 51.2287 Well dried. Well dried means...

  14. 7 CFR 51.2086 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2086 Section 51.2086 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Well dried. Well dried means that the kernel is firm and brittle, not pliable or leathery. ...

  15. 7 CFR 51.2287 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2287 Section 51.2287 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Shelled English Walnuts (Juglans Regia) Definitions § 51.2287 Well dried. Well dried means...

  16. 7 CFR 51.2961 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2961 Section 51.2961 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Well dried. Well dried means that the kernel is firm and crisp, not pliable or leathery. ...

  17. 7 CFR 51.2961 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2961 Section 51.2961 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Well dried. Well dried means that the kernel is firm and crisp, not pliable or leathery. ...

  18. 7 CFR 51.2086 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2086 Section 51.2086 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Well dried. Well dried means that the kernel is firm and brittle, not pliable or leathery. ...

  19. 7 CFR 51.2287 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2287 Section 51.2287 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Shelled English Walnuts (Juglans Regia) Definitions § 51.2287 Well dried. Well dried means...

  20. Freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are of great importance for the food and biotechnology industry. They are widely used as starters for manufacturing food (e.g., yogurt, cheese, fermented meats, and vegetables) and probiotic products, as well as for green chemistry applications. Freeze-drying or lyophilization is a convenient method for preservation of bacteria. By reducing water activity to values below 0.2, it allows long-term storage and low-cost distribution at suprazero temperatures, while minimizing losses in viability and functionality. Stabilization of bacteria via freeze-drying starts with the addition of a protectant solution to the bacterial suspension. Freeze-drying includes three steps, namely, (1) freezing of the concentrated and protected cell suspension, (2) primary drying to remove ice by sublimation, and (3) secondary drying to remove unfrozen water by desorption. In this chapter we describe a method for freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria at a pilot scale, thus allowing control of the process parameters for maximal survival and functionality recovery.

  1. Dry Cleaning Sector (NAICS 8123)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The dry cleaning sector includes establishments engaged in providing laundry services and industrial launderers. Find environmental regulatory information for perchloroethylene (PERC) cleaners as well as hazardous waste regulations for dry cleaners.

  2. Chemical composition, antioxidant capacity, and sensory quality of dried jujube fruits as affected by cultivar and drying method.

    PubMed

    Wojdyło, Aneta; Figiel, Adam; Legua, Pilar; Lech, Krzysztof; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel A; Hernández, Francisca

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different dying methods, such as convective drying (CD: 50, 60, 70 °C), vacuum-microwave drying (VMD: 120, 480, 480-120 W), a combination of convective pre-drying and vacuum-microwave finish drying [(CPD (60 °C)-VMFD (480-120 W)], and freeze-drying (FD) on key quality parameters of dried jujube fruits (cv. "GAL", "MSI", and "PSI"). The parameters studied included bioactive compounds (flavan-3-ols and flavonols, identified by LC-PDA-MS, and vitamin C), antioxidant capacity (ABTS and FRAP), and sensory attributes (e.g. hardness, jujube-ID, and sweetness). The best quality of the dried product (high contents of bioactive compounds and high intensity of key sensory attributes) was found in fruits treated by FD and VMD 480-120 W. The best cultivars were "PSI" and "GAL" from the point of view of bioactive content and sensory quality, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Drying Rate and Product Quality Evaluation of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) Calyces Extract Dried with Foaming Agent under Different Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Djaeni, Mohamad; Kumoro, Andri Cahyo; Sasongko, Setia Budi; Utari, Febiani Dwi

    2018-01-01

    The utilisation of roselle ( Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) calyx as a source of anthocyanins has been explored through intensive investigations. Due to its perishable property, the transformation of roselle calyces into dried extract without reducing their quality is highly challenging. The aim of this work was to study the effect of air temperatures and relative humidity on the kinetics and product quality during drying of roselle extract foamed with ovalbumin and glycerol monostearate (GMS). The results showed that foam mat drying increased the drying rate significantly and retained the antioxidant activity and colour of roselle calyces extract. Shorter drying time was achieved when higher air temperature and/or lower relative humidity was used. Foam mat drying produced dried brilliant red roselle calyces extract with better antioxidant activity and colour qualities when compared with nonfoam mat drying. The results showed the potential for retaining the roselle calyces extract quality under suggested drying conditions.

  4. 33 CFR 127.609 - Dry chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dry chemical systems. 127.609... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Firefighting § 127.609 Dry chemical systems. (a) Each marine transfer area for LNG must have a dry chemical system that provides at least two dry chemical...

  5. 33 CFR 127.609 - Dry chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dry chemical systems. 127.609... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Firefighting § 127.609 Dry chemical systems. (a) Each marine transfer area for LNG must have a dry chemical system that provides at least two dry chemical...

  6. 33 CFR 127.609 - Dry chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dry chemical systems. 127.609... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Firefighting § 127.609 Dry chemical systems. (a) Each marine transfer area for LNG must have a dry chemical system that provides at least two dry chemical...

  7. 33 CFR 127.609 - Dry chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dry chemical systems. 127.609... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Firefighting § 127.609 Dry chemical systems. (a) Each marine transfer area for LNG must have a dry chemical system that provides at least two dry chemical...

  8. 33 CFR 127.609 - Dry chemical systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dry chemical systems. 127.609... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Firefighting § 127.609 Dry chemical systems. (a) Each marine transfer area for LNG must have a dry chemical system that provides at least two dry chemical...

  9. 7 CFR 51.2086 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2086 Section 51.2086 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Almonds in the Shell Definitions § 51.2086 Well dried. Well dried means that the...

  10. 7 CFR 51.2961 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2961 Section 51.2961 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2961 Well dried. Well dried means that the...

  11. 7 CFR 51.2119 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2119 Section 51.2119 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2119 Well dried. Well dried means that the kernel...

  12. 7 CFR 51.2086 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2086 Section 51.2086 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Almonds in the Shell Definitions § 51.2086 Well dried. Well dried means that the...

  13. 7 CFR 51.2086 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2086 Section 51.2086 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Almonds in the Shell Definitions § 51.2086 Well dried. Well dried means that the...

  14. 7 CFR 51.2119 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2119 Section 51.2119 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2119 Well dried. Well dried means that the kernel...

  15. 7 CFR 51.1444 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Well dried. 51.1444 Section 51.1444 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Definitions § 51.1444 Well dried. Well dried means that the portion...

  16. 7 CFR 51.1444 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Well dried. 51.1444 Section 51.1444 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Definitions § 51.1444 Well dried. Well dried means that the portion...

  17. 7 CFR 51.2119 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2119 Section 51.2119 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2119 Well dried. Well dried means that the kernel...

  18. 7 CFR 51.2961 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2961 Section 51.2961 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2961 Well dried. Well dried means that the...

  19. 7 CFR 51.2961 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2961 Section 51.2961 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Walnuts in the Shell Definitions § 51.2961 Well dried. Well dried means that the...

  20. 7 CFR 51.1444 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Well dried. 51.1444 Section 51.1444 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Definitions § 51.1444 Well dried. Well dried means that the portion...

  1. New Perspectives on Dry Eye Definition and Diagnosis: A Consensus Report by the Asia Dry Eye Society.

    PubMed

    Tsubota, Kazuo; Yokoi, Norihiko; Shimazaki, Jun; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Dogru, Murat; Yamada, Masakazu; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Kim, Hyo-Myung; Tchah, Hung-Won; Hyon, Joon Young; Yoon, Kyung-Chul; Seo, Kyoung Yul; Sun, Xuguang; Chen, Wei; Liang, Lingyi; Li, Mingwu; Liu, Zuguo

    2017-01-01

    For the last 20 years, a great amount of evidence has accumulated through epidemiological studies that most of the dry eye disease encountered in daily life, especially in video display terminal (VDT) workers, involves short tear film breakup time (TFBUT) type dry eye, a category characterized by severe symptoms but minimal clinical signs other than short TFBUT. An unstable tear film also affects the visual function, possibly due to the increase of higher order aberrations. Based on the change in the understanding of the types, symptoms, and signs of dry eye disease, the Asia Dry Eye Society agreed to the following definition of dry eye: "Dry eye is a multifactorial disease characterized by unstable tear film causing a variety of symptoms and/or visual impairment, potentially accompanied by ocular surface damage." The definition stresses instability of the tear film as well as the importance of visual impairment, highlighting an essential role for TFBUT assessment. This paper discusses the concept of Tear Film Oriented Therapy (TFOT), which evolved from the definition of dry eye, emphasizing the importance of a stable tear film. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 7 CFR 58.248 - Nonfat dry milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nonfat dry milk. 58.248 Section 58.248 Agriculture... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.248 Nonfat dry milk. (a) Nonfat dry milk in commercial....S. Standard Grade. (b) Regular nonfat dry milk in consumer size packages which bears an official...

  3. 7 CFR 58.248 - Nonfat dry milk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Nonfat dry milk. 58.248 Section 58.248 Agriculture... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.248 Nonfat dry milk. (a) Nonfat dry milk in commercial....S. Standard Grade. (b) Regular nonfat dry milk in consumer size packages which bears an official...

  4. Tempo-Spatial Dynamics of Adult Plum Curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Based on Semiochemical-Baited Trap Captures in Blueberries.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Cumplido, Johnattan; Leskey, Tracy C; Holdcraft, Robert; Zaman, Faruque U; Hahn, Noel G; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar

    2017-06-01

    Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst), has become an important pest of highbush blueberries in the northeastern United States. Here, we conducted experiments in 2010-2013 to compare the efficacy of semiochemical-baited traps for C. nenuphar versus conventional (beating cloth) sampling methods in blueberries, and to understand the seasonal abundance and distribution of C. nenuphar adults within and among blueberry fields using these traps. Black pyramid traps baited with the C. nenuphar aggregation pheromone grandisoic acid and the fruit volatile benzaldehyde caught three to four times more adults than unbaited traps without causing an increase in injury to berries in neighboring bushes. Numbers of adult weevils caught in traps correlated with those on bushes (beating cloth samples), indicating that trap counts can predict C. nenuphar abundance in the field. Early in the season, traps placed 20 m from field edges near a forest caught higher C. nenuphar numbers than traps placed at farther distances, suggesting movement of overwintered weevils from outside fields. Using a trapping network across multiple fields in an organic farm, we found evidence of C. nenuphar aggregation in "hotspots"; early in the season, C. nenuphar numbers in traps were higher in the middle of fields, and there was a correlation between these numbers and distance from the forest in 2013 but not in 2012. These results show that semiochemical-baited traps are effective in capturing C. nenuphar adults in blueberries, and that these traps should be placed in the interior of fields preferably, but not exclusively, near wooded habitats to maximize their efficacy. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. 7 CFR 51.2287 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2287 Section 51.2287 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... § 51.2287 Well dried. Well dried means that the portion of kernel is firm and crisp, not pliable or...

  6. 7 CFR 51.1444 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Well dried. 51.1444 Section 51.1444 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Definitions § 51.1444 Well dried. Well dried means that the portion of kernel is firm and crisp, not pliable or leathery. ...

  7. 7 CFR 51.1444 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Well dried. 51.1444 Section 51.1444 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Definitions § 51.1444 Well dried. Well dried means that the portion of kernel is firm and crisp, not pliable or leathery. ...

  8. 7 CFR 51.2287 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2287 Section 51.2287 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... § 51.2287 Well dried. Well dried means that the portion of kernel is firm and crisp, not pliable or...

  9. 7 CFR 51.2119 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2119 Section 51.2119 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2119 Well dried. Well dried means that the kernel is firm and brittle, and not pliable or leathery. ...

  10. 7 CFR 51.2119 - Well dried.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Well dried. 51.2119 Section 51.2119 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Almonds Definitions § 51.2119 Well dried. Well dried means that the kernel is firm and brittle, and not pliable or leathery. ...

  11. Drying Rate and Product Quality Evaluation of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) Calyces Extract Dried with Foaming Agent under Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Kumoro, Andri Cahyo; Sasongko, Setia Budi; Utari, Febiani Dwi

    2018-01-01

    The utilisation of roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) calyx as a source of anthocyanins has been explored through intensive investigations. Due to its perishable property, the transformation of roselle calyces into dried extract without reducing their quality is highly challenging. The aim of this work was to study the effect of air temperatures and relative humidity on the kinetics and product quality during drying of roselle extract foamed with ovalbumin and glycerol monostearate (GMS). The results showed that foam mat drying increased the drying rate significantly and retained the antioxidant activity and colour of roselle calyces extract. Shorter drying time was achieved when higher air temperature and/or lower relative humidity was used. Foam mat drying produced dried brilliant red roselle calyces extract with better antioxidant activity and colour qualities when compared with nonfoam mat drying. The results showed the potential for retaining the roselle calyces extract quality under suggested drying conditions. PMID:29755991

  12. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture broth...

  13. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture broth...

  14. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture broth...

  15. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture broth...

  16. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture broth...

  17. Dry Mouth Treatment: Tips for Controlling Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dry Mouth Mouthwash, which also offer protection against tooth decay. Avoid using over-the-counter antihistamines and decongestants ... and drinks because they increase your risk of tooth decay. Brush with a fluoride toothpaste — ask your dentist ...

  18. Physical and chemical properties and adsorption type of activated carbon prepared from plum kernels by NaOH activation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ru-Ling

    2007-08-25

    Activated carbon was prepared from plum kernels by NaOH activation at six different NaOH/char ratios. The physical properties including the BET surface area, the total pore volume, the micropore ratio, the pore diameter, the burn-off, and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation as well as the chemical properties, namely elemental analysis and temperature programmed desorption (TPD), were measured. The results revealed a two-stage activation process: stage 1 activated carbons were obtained at NaOH/char ratios of 0-1, surface pyrolysis being the main reaction; stage 2 activated carbons were obtained at NaOH/char ratios of 2-4, etching and swelling being the main reactions. The physical properties of stage 2 activated carbons were similar, and specific area was from 1478 to 1887m(2)g(-1). The results of reaction mechanism of NaOH activation revealed that it was apparently because of the loss ratio of elements C, H, and O in the activated carbon, and the variations in the surface functional groups and the physical properties. The adsorption of the above activated carbons on phenol and three kinds of dyes (MB, BB1, and AB74) were used for an isotherm equilibrium adsorption study. The data fitted the Langmuir isotherm equation. Various kinds of adsorbents showed different adsorption types; separation factor (R(L)) was used to determine the level of favorability of the adsorption type. In this work, activated carbons prepared by NaOH activation were evaluated in terms of their physical properties, chemical properties, and adsorption type; and activated carbon PKN2 was found to have most application potential.

  19. Thin Layer Drying Model of Bacterial Cellulose Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi Jatmiko, Tri; Taufika Rosyida, Vita; Wheni Indrianingsih, Anastasia; Apriyana, Wuri

    2017-12-01

    The bacterial cellulose film produced by Acetobacter xylinum using coconut water as a carbon source was dried at a temperature of 60 to 100 C. The drying process of bacterial cellulose film occur at falling rate drying period. Increasing drying temperature will shorten the drying time. The drying data fitted with thin layer drying models that widely used, Newton, Page and Henderson and Pabis models. All thin layer drying models describe the experimental data well, but Page model is better than the other models on all various temperature with coefficients of determination (R2) range from 0.9908 to 0.9979, chi square range from 0.000212 to 0.000851 and RMSE range from 0.014307 to 0.0289458.

  20. 46 CFR 154.1145 - Dry chemical supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dry chemical supply. 154.1145 Section 154.1145 Shipping... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1145 Dry chemical supply. (a) A vessel with a cargo carrying capacity less that 1000 m3 (35,300 ft.3) must have at least one self-contained dry chemical storage unit for the...

  1. 46 CFR 154.1145 - Dry chemical supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dry chemical supply. 154.1145 Section 154.1145 Shipping... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1145 Dry chemical supply. (a) A vessel with a cargo carrying capacity less that 1000 m3 (35,300 ft.3) must have at least one self-contained dry chemical storage unit for the...

  2. 21 CFR 880.6870 - Dry-heat sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dry-heat sterilizer. 880.6870 Section 880.6870... Devices § 880.6870 Dry-heat sterilizer. (a) Identification. A dry-heat sterilizer is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of dry heat. (b...

  3. 21 CFR 880.6870 - Dry-heat sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dry-heat sterilizer. 880.6870 Section 880.6870... Devices § 880.6870 Dry-heat sterilizer. (a) Identification. A dry-heat sterilizer is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of dry heat. (b...

  4. 21 CFR 880.6870 - Dry-heat sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dry-heat sterilizer. 880.6870 Section 880.6870... Devices § 880.6870 Dry-heat sterilizer. (a) Identification. A dry-heat sterilizer is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of dry heat. (b...

  5. 21 CFR 880.6870 - Dry-heat sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dry-heat sterilizer. 880.6870 Section 880.6870... Devices § 880.6870 Dry-heat sterilizer. (a) Identification. A dry-heat sterilizer is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of dry heat. (b...

  6. 21 CFR 880.6870 - Dry-heat sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dry-heat sterilizer. 880.6870 Section 880.6870... Devices § 880.6870 Dry-heat sterilizer. (a) Identification. A dry-heat sterilizer is a device that is intended for use by a health care provider to sterilize medical products by means of dry heat. (b...

  7. 46 CFR 154.1145 - Dry chemical supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dry chemical supply. 154.1145 Section 154.1145 Shipping... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1145 Dry chemical supply. (a) A vessel with a cargo carrying capacity less that 1000 m3 (35,300 ft.3) must have at least one self-contained dry chemical storage unit for the...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1145 - Dry chemical supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dry chemical supply. 154.1145 Section 154.1145 Shipping... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1145 Dry chemical supply. (a) A vessel with a cargo carrying capacity less that 1000 m3 (35,300 ft.3) must have at least one self-contained dry chemical storage unit for the...

  9. 46 CFR 154.1145 - Dry chemical supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dry chemical supply. 154.1145 Section 154.1145 Shipping... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1145 Dry chemical supply. (a) A vessel with a cargo carrying capacity less that 1000 m3 (35,300 ft.3) must have at least one self-contained dry chemical storage unit for the...

  10. 21 CFR 168.121 - Dried glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... type of starch, the name may alternatively be “Dried ___ sirup” or “___ sirup solids”, the blank to be filled in with the name of the starch; for example, “Dried corn sirup”, “Corn sirup solids”, “Dried wheat sirup”, “Wheat sirup solids”, “Dried tapioca sirup”, “Tapioca sirup solids”. When the starch is derived...

  11. 21 CFR 168.121 - Dried glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... type of starch, the name may alternatively be “Dried ___ sirup” or “___ sirup solids”, the blank to be filled in with the name of the starch; for example, “Dried corn sirup”, “Corn sirup solids”, “Dried wheat sirup”, “Wheat sirup solids”, “Dried tapioca sirup”, “Tapioca sirup solids”. When the starch is derived...

  12. 21 CFR 168.121 - Dried glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... type of starch, the name may alternatively be “Dried ___ sirup” or “___ sirup solids”, the blank to be filled in with the name of the starch; for example, “Dried corn sirup”, “Corn sirup solids”, “Dried wheat sirup”, “Wheat sirup solids”, “Dried tapioca sirup”, “Tapioca sirup solids”. When the starch is derived...

  13. 21 CFR 168.121 - Dried glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... type of starch, the name may alternatively be “Dried ___ sirup” or “___ sirup solids”, the blank to be filled in with the name of the starch; for example, “Dried corn sirup”, “Corn sirup solids”, “Dried wheat sirup”, “Wheat sirup solids”, “Dried tapioca sirup”, “Tapioca sirup solids”. When the starch is derived...

  14. 21 CFR 168.121 - Dried glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... type of starch, the name may alternatively be “Dried ___ sirup” or “___ sirup solids”, the blank to be filled in with the name of the starch; for example, “Dried corn sirup”, “Corn sirup solids”, “Dried wheat sirup”, “Wheat sirup solids”, “Dried tapioca sirup”, “Tapioca sirup solids”. When the starch is derived...

  15. Recent developments in drying of food products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valarmathi, T. N.; Sekar, S.; Purushothaman, M.; Sekar, S. D.; Rama Sharath Reddy, Maddela; Reddy, Kancham Reddy Naveen Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Drying is a dehydration process to preserve agricultural products for long period usage. The most common and cheapest method is open sun drying in which the products are simply laid on ground, road, mats, roof, etc. But the open sun drying has some disadvantages like dependent on good weather, contamination by dust, birds and animals consume a considerable quantity, slow drying rate and damages due to strong winds and rain. To overcome these difficulties solar dryers are developed with closed environment for drying agricultural products effectively. To obtain good quality food with reduced energy consumption, selection of appropriate drying process and proper input parameters is essential. In recent years several researchers across the world have developed new drying systems for improving the product quality, increasing the drying rate, decreasing the energy consumption, etc. Some of the new systems are fluidized bed, vibrated fluidized bed, desiccant, microwave, vacuum, freeze, infrared, intermittent, electro hydrodynamic and hybrid dryers. In this review the most recent progress in the field of drying of agricultural food products such as new methods, new products and modeling and optimization techniques has been presented. Challenges and future directions are also highlighted. The review will be useful for new researchers entering into this ever needed and ever growing field of engineering.

  16. Radiation data input for the design of dry or semi-dry U tailings disposal.

    PubMed

    Kvasnicka, J

    1986-09-01

    Before discussion of design criteria for the handling of dry or semi-dry tailings, it is necessary to obtain an insight into the radiation levels associated with the tailings particles and to study the basic physical properties of dry tailings. This article presents the experimental results of assessing Ra and specific alpha-activity distribution with respect to particle size of the Ranger (RUM) and Nabarlek (QML) uranium mines dry tailings samples. The variation of Rn emanation coefficient versus particle size of dry tailings has also been measured. The nuclear-track detection technique, gamma spectrometry and alpha counting were used for the above measurements. Surface Rn flux from the hypothetical Nabarlek semi-infinite dry tailings pile is 32 Bq m-2 s-1 and the Rn flux for Ranger is 10 Bq m-2 s-1. The theoretical exposure rates for 1 m above these hypothetical tailings piles are 0.95 microC kg-1 h-1 and 0.28 microC kg-1 h-1, respectively. The derived air alpha-contamination limits (DAAC) for the tailings dust were calculated to be 1.2 Bq m-3 for workers and 0.034 Bq m-3 for a member of the public. The limit for workers corresponds to the air tailings dust concentration of 0.79 mg m-3 for QML tailings and 2.2 mg m-3 for RUM tailings. The DAAC limit for the public corresponds to the air tailings dust concentration of 0.022 mg m-3 for QML tailings and 0.064 mg m-3 for RUM tailings.

  17. Residual tetrachloroethylene in dry-cleaned clothes

    SciTech Connect

    Kawauchi, T.; Nishiyama, K.

    1989-04-01

    A large amount of residual tetrachloroethylene (TCE), up to 13.6 mg/g, was found in dry-cleaned clothes. The amounts varied among dry-cleaning establishments as well as with the type of fiber. The causes of these variations are discussed. Air TCE concentrations in the closed environment of dry-cleaning outlets were elevated: the highest reading was 4.8 mg/m3. The expired air of outlet employees also showed an increased level of TCE (average, 36.9 micrograms/m3). Increased air contamination from TCE released from dry-cleaned clothes was also observed in the home of a consumer. To reduce environmental contamination from TCE released from any of thesemore » sources, the amount of residual TCE in dry-cleaned clothes should be minimized.« less

  18. Effects of pulsed electric fields pretreatment and drying method on drying characteristics and nutritive quality of blueberries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fresh blueberries were pretreated with pulsed electric fields (PEF) at 2 kV/cm and then dried at 45, 60 and 75 degrees C by conventional hot air or vacuum drying. Drying characteristics and changes in contents of moisture, anthocyanin, total phenolics, vitamin C, and antioxidant activity in the blu...

  19. Effect of management (organic vs conventional) on volatile profiles of six plum cultivars (Prunus salicina Lindl.). A chemometric approach for varietal classification and determination of potential markers.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, F J; Moreno-Rojas, J M; Arroyo, F; Daza, A; Ruiz-Moreno, M J

    2016-05-15

    The volatile profiles of six plum cultivars ('Laetitia', 'Primetime', 'Sapphire', 'Showtime', 'Songold' and 'Souvenir') produced under two management systems (conventional and organic) and harvested in two consecutive years were obtained by HS-SPME-GC-MS. Twenty-five metabolites were determined, five of which (pentanal, (E)-2-heptenal, 1-octanol, eucalyptol and 2-pentylfuran) are reported for the first time in Prunus salicina Lindl. Hexanal stood out as a major volatile compound affected by the management system. In addition, partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) achieved an effective classification of genotypes based on their volatile profiles. A high classification accuracy model was obtained with a sensitivity of 97.9% and a specificity of 99.6%. Furthermore, the application of a dual criterion, based on a method of variable selection, VIP (variable importance in projection) and the results of a univariate analysis (ANOVA), allowed the identification of potential volatile markers in 'Primetime', 'Showtime' and 'Souvenir' genotypes (cultivars not characterised to date). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Continuous measurement of drying rate of crystalline and amorphous systems during freeze-drying using an in situ microbalance technique.

    PubMed

    Roth, C; Winter, G; Lee, G

    2001-09-01

    The use of a novel microbalance (Christ) technique to monitor continuously the weight loss of a vial standing on a shelf of a freeze-dryer has been investigated. The drying rates of the following aqueous solutions were measured during the primary drying phase of a complete freeze-drying cycle: sucrose (75 mg/mL, 2.5-mL fill volume), sucrose and phenylalanine (1:0.2 by weight, 75 mg/mL, 2.5-mL fill volume), and mannitol (75mg/mL, 2.5-mL fill volume). The microbalance yields the cumulative water loss, m(cu) in grams, and the momentary drying rate, Deltam(cu)/Deltat in mg/10 min, of the frozen cake. The momentary drying rate curves were especially useful for examining how Deltam(cu)/Deltat changes with time during primary drying. Initially, Deltam(cu)/Deltat rises to a sharp maximum and then decreases in a fashion depending on shelf temperature, chamber pressure, and the nature of the substance being dried. Different drying behavior was observed for the sucrose and sucrose/phenylalanine systems, which was attributed to the presence of crystalline phenylalanine in the amorphous sucrose. At low shelf-temperature (-24 degrees C) the crystalline mannitol showed lower Deltam(cu)/Deltat than with either sucrose or sucrose/phenylalanine. The balance could also detect differences in Deltam(cu)/Deltat when using different freezing protocols. "Slow" and "moderate" freezing protocols gave similar drying behavior, but "rapid" freezing in liquid nitrogen produced greatly altered drying rate and internal cake morphology. The balance also could be used to detect the endpoint of primary drying. Different endpoint criteria and their influence on final dried cake properties were examined. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmaceutical Association

  1. Mechanistic modelling of infrared mediated energy transfer during the primary drying step of a continuous freeze-drying process.

    PubMed

    Van Bockstal, Pieter-Jan; Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F C; De Meyer, Laurens; Corver, Jos; Vervaet, Chris; Nopens, Ingmar; De Beer, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Conventional pharmaceutical freeze-drying is an inefficient and expensive batch-wise process, associated with several disadvantages leading to an uncontrolled end product variability. The proposed continuous alternative, based on spinning the vials during freezing and on optimal energy supply during drying, strongly increases process efficiency and improves product quality (uniformity). The heat transfer during continuous drying of the spin frozen vials is provided via non-contact infrared (IR) radiation. The energy transfer to the spin frozen vials should be optimised to maximise the drying efficiency while avoiding cake collapse. Therefore, a mechanistic model was developed which allows computing the optimal, dynamic IR heater temperature in function of the primary drying progress and which, hence, also allows predicting the primary drying endpoint based on the applied dynamic IR heater temperature. The model was validated by drying spin frozen vials containing the model formulation (3.9mL in 10R vials) according to the computed IR heater temperature profile. In total, 6 validation experiments were conducted. The primary drying endpoint was experimentally determined via in-line near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and compared with the endpoint predicted by the model (50min). The mean ratio of the experimental drying time to the predicted value was 0.91, indicating a good agreement between the model predictions and the experimental data. The end product had an elegant product appearance (visual inspection) and an acceptable residual moisture content (Karl Fischer). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Colloid Mobilization in a Fractured Soil during Dry-Wet Cycles: Role of Drying Duration and Flow Path Permeability.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Saiers, James E; Ryan, Joseph N

    2015-08-04

    In subsurface soils, colloids are mobilized by infiltrating rainwater, but the source of colloids and the process by which colloids are generated between rainfalls are not clear. We examined the effect of drying duration and the spatial variation of soil permeability on the mobilization of in situ colloids in intact soil cores (fractured and heavily weathered saprolite) during dry-wet cycles. Measuring water flux at multiple sampling ports at the core base, we found that water drained through flow paths of different permeability. The duration of antecedent drying cycles affected the amount of mobilized colloids, particularly in high-flux ports that received water from soil regions with a large number of macro- and mesopores. In these ports, the amount of mobilized colloids increased with increased drying duration up to 2.5 days. For drying durations greater than 2.5 days, the amount of mobilized colloids decreased. In contrast, increasing drying duration had a limited effect on colloid mobilization in low-flux ports, which presumably received water from soil regions with fewer macro- and mesopores. On the basis of these results, we attribute this dependence of colloid mobilization upon drying duration to colloid generation from dry pore walls and distribution of colloids in flow paths, which appear to be sensitive to the moisture content of soil after drying and flow path permeability. The results are useful for improving the understanding of colloid mobilization during fluctuating weather conditions.

  3. From 32 ounces to zero: a medical geographic study of dispensing a cultivated batch of "plum" cannabis flowers to medical marijuana patients in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Sunil K; Carter, Gregory T; Zumbrunnen, Craig; Morrill, Richard; Sullivan, Mark; Mayer, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    The medicinal use of cannabis is a growing phenomenon in the U.S. predicated on the success of overcoming specific spatial challenges and establishing particular human-environment relationships. This article takes a medical geographic "snapshot" of an urban site in Washington State where qualifying chronically ill and debilitated patients are delivered locally produced botanical cannabis for medical use. Using interview, survey, and observation, this medical geographic research project collected information on the social space of the particular delivery site and tracked the production cost, reach, and health value of a 32-ounce batch of strain-specific medical cannabis named "Plum" dispensed over a four-day period. A convenience sample of 37 qualifying patients delivered this batch of cannabis botanical medicine was recruited and prospectively studied with survey instruments. Results provide insight into patients' self-rated health, human-plant relationships, and travel-to-clinic distances. An overall systematic geographic understanding of the medical cannabis delivery system gives a grounded understanding of the lengths that patients and care providers go, despite multiple hurdles, to receive and deliver treatment with botanical cannabis that relieves diverse symptoms and improves health-related quality-of-life.

  4. Air drying of softwood lumber, Fairbanks, Alaska.

    Treesearch

    George R Sampson; Forrest A. Ruppert

    1985-01-01

    Air-drying rates for two stacks of 2-inch-thick white spruce were observed in the Fairbanks area during summer 1982. The air-drying rate for the same size lumber was also observed during winter 1982-83. Very little drying occurred during the winter. Drying rates in summer were correlated with average daily temperature and average daily dew point to derive predictive...

  5. Accelerating the kiln drying of oak

    Treesearch

    William T. Simpson

    1980-01-01

    Reducing kiln-drying time for oak lumber can reduce energy requirements as well as reduce lumber inventories. In this work, l-inch northern red oak and white oak were kiln dried from green by a combination of individual accelerating techniques– presurfacing, presteaming, accelerated and smooth schedule, and high-temperature drying below 18 percent moisture content....

  6. Potential evapotranspiration and continental drying

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, Paul C.D.; Dunne, Krista A.

    2016-01-01

    By various measures (drought area and intensity, climatic aridity index, and climatic water deficits), some observational analyses have suggested that much of the Earth’s land has been drying during recent decades, but such drying seems inconsistent with observations of dryland greening and decreasing pan evaporation. ‘Offline’ analyses of climate-model outputs from anthropogenic climate change (ACC) experiments portend continuation of putative drying through the twenty-first century, despite an expected increase in global land precipitation. A ubiquitous increase in estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET), driven by atmospheric warming, underlies the drying trends, but may be a methodological artefact. Here we show that the PET estimator commonly used (the Penman–Monteith PET for either an open-water surface or a reference crop) severely overpredicts the changes in non-water-stressed evapotranspiration computed in the climate models themselves in ACC experiments. This overprediction is partially due to neglect of stomatal conductance reductions commonly induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in climate models. Our findings imply that historical and future tendencies towards continental drying, as characterized by offline-computed runoff, as well as other PET-dependent metrics, may be considerably weaker and less extensive than previously thought.

  7. 33 CFR 80.155 - Watch Hill, RI to Montauk Point, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Montauk Point, NY. (a) A line drawn from Watch Hill Light to East Point on Fishers Island. (b) A line drawn from Race Point to Race Rock Light; thence to Little Gull Island Light thence to East Point on Plum Island. (c) A line drawn from Plum Island Harbor East Dolphin Light to Plum Island Harbor West...

  8. Effects of hot-air and hybrid hot air-microwave drying on drying kinetics and textural quality of nectarine slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miraei Ashtiani, Seyed-Hassan; Sturm, Barbara; Nasirahmadi, Abozar

    2018-04-01

    Drying and physicochemical characteristics of nectarine slices were investigated using hot-air and hybrid hot air-microwave drying methods under fixed air temperature and air speed (50 °C and 0.5 m/s, respectively). Microwave power levels for the combined hot air-microwave method were 80, 160, 240, and 320 W. Drying kinetics were analyzed and compared using six mathematical models. For both drying methods the model with the best fitness in explaining the drying behavior was the Midilli-Kucuk model. The coefficient of determination ( R 2), root mean square error (RMSE) and reduced chi square ( χ 2) for this model have been obtained greater than 0.999 and less than 0.006 and 0.0001 for hybrid hot air-microwave drying while those values for hot-air drying were more than 0.999 and less than 0.003 and 0.0001, respectively. Results showed that the hybrid method reduced the drying time considerably and produced products with higher quality. The range of effective moisture diffusivity ( D eff ) of hybrid and hot-air drying was between 8.15 × 10-8 and 2.83 × 10-7 m2/s and 1.27 × 10-8 m2/s, respectively. The total color difference (ΔE) has also been obtained from 36.68 to 44.27 for hybrid method; however this value for hot-air drying was found 49.64. Although reduced microwave power output led to a lower drying rate, it reduced changes in product parameters i.e. total color change, surface roughness, shrinkage and microstructural change and increased hardness and water uptake.

  9. 46 CFR 154.1150 - Distribution of dry chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Distribution of dry chemical. 154.1150 Section 154.1150... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1150 Distribution of dry chemical. (a) All locations on the above deck... chemical hand hose lines; or (2) At least one dry chemical hand hose line and one dry chemical monitor. (b...

  10. 46 CFR 154.1150 - Distribution of dry chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Distribution of dry chemical. 154.1150 Section 154.1150... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1150 Distribution of dry chemical. (a) All locations on the above deck... chemical hand hose lines; or (2) At least one dry chemical hand hose line and one dry chemical monitor. (b...

  11. 46 CFR 154.1150 - Distribution of dry chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Distribution of dry chemical. 154.1150 Section 154.1150... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1150 Distribution of dry chemical. (a) All locations on the above deck... chemical hand hose lines; or (2) At least one dry chemical hand hose line and one dry chemical monitor. (b...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1150 - Distribution of dry chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Distribution of dry chemical. 154.1150 Section 154.1150... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1150 Distribution of dry chemical. (a) All locations on the above deck... chemical hand hose lines; or (2) At least one dry chemical hand hose line and one dry chemical monitor. (b...

  13. 46 CFR 154.1150 - Distribution of dry chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Distribution of dry chemical. 154.1150 Section 154.1150... Firefighting System: Dry Chemical § 154.1150 Distribution of dry chemical. (a) All locations on the above deck... chemical hand hose lines; or (2) At least one dry chemical hand hose line and one dry chemical monitor. (b...

  14. A dry-inoculation method for nut kernels.

    PubMed

    Blessington, Tyann; Theofel, Christopher G; Harris, Linda J

    2013-04-01

    A dry-inoculation method for almonds and walnuts was developed to eliminate the need for the postinoculation drying required for wet-inoculation methods. The survival of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis PT 30 on wet- and dry-inoculated almond and walnut kernels stored under ambient conditions (average: 23 °C; 41 or 47% RH) was then compared over 14 weeks. For wet inoculation, an aqueous Salmonella preparation was added directly to almond or walnut kernels, which were then dried under ambient conditions (3 or 7 days, respectively) to initial nut moisture levels. For the dry inoculation, liquid inoculum was mixed with sterilized sand and dried for 24 h at 40 °C. The dried inoculated sand was mixed with kernels, and the sand was removed by shaking the mixture in a sterile sieve. Mixing procedures to optimize the bacterial transfer from sand to kernel were evaluated; in general, similar levels were achieved on walnuts (4.8-5.2 log CFU/g) and almonds (4.2-5.1 log CFU/g). The decline of Salmonella Enteritidis populations was similar during ambient storage (98 days) for both wet-and dry-inoculation methods for both almonds and walnuts. The dry-inoculation method mimics some of the suspected routes of contamination for tree nuts and may be appropriate for some postharvest challenge studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... A sticky, dry feeling in the mouth Trouble chewing, swallowing, tasting, or speaking A burning feeling in ... avoiding drinks with caffeine, tobacco, and alcohol, and chewing sugarless gum or sucking on sugarless hard candy. ...

  16. Dry kiln operator's manual

    Treesearch

    William T. Simpson

    1991-01-01

    The modern dry kiln is a unique product of research, development, and experience. It is the only practical means now in wide use for rapid, high- volume drying of lumber to conditions necessary for maximum serviceability in housing, furniture, millwork, and many other wood products. As part of our charge to help further the efficient utilization of our nation’s timber...

  17. Mechanisms of Drying of Skin Forming Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Haydar Mahmood

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The literature relating to evaporation from single droplets of pure liquids, and to the drying of droplets containing solids and of droplet sprays has been reviewed. The heat and mass transfer rates for a single droplet suspended from a nozzle were studied within a 42mm I.D. horizontal wind tunnel designed to supply hot dry air, to simulate conditions encountered in practical spray dryer. A novel rotating glass nozzle was developed to facilitate direct measurements of droplet weight and core temperature. This design minimised heat conduction through the nozzle. Revised correlations were obtained for heat and mass transfer coefficients, for evaporation from pure water droplets suspended from a rotating nozzle. (UNFORMATTED TABLE OR EQUATION FOLLOWS)eqalign {rm Nu&= rm 2.0 + 0.27 ({1over B})^{0.18}Re^{0.5}Pr ^{0.33}crrm Sh&= rm 2.0 + 0.575({Ta-Ts over Tamb})^{ -0.04}Re^{0.5}Sc^{0.33 }cr}(TABLE/EQUATION ENDS)Experimental drying studies were carried out on single droplets of different types of skin-forming materials, namely, custard, starch, gelatin, skim milk and fructose at air temperatures ranging from 19^circC to 198 ^circC. Dried crusts were recovered and examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Skin-forming materials were classified into three types according to the mechanisms of skin formation. In the first type (typified by droplets of custard and starch) skin formed due to gelatinisation at high temperatures. Increasing the drying temperature resulted in increased crust resistance to mass transfer due to increased granule swelling and the crust resistance was completely transferred to a skin resistance at drying temperatures >150 ^circC. In the second type e.g. gelatin droplets the skin formed immediately drying had taken place at any drying temperature. At drying temperature >60^circC a more resistant skin was formed. In the third type (typified by droplets of skim milk and fructose) the skin

  18. A field study of lignite as a drying aid in the superheated steam drying of anaerobically digested sludge.

    PubMed

    Hoadley, A F A; Qi, Y; Nguyen, T; Hapgood, K; Desai, D; Pinches, D

    2015-10-01

    Dried sludge is preferred when the sludge is either to be incinerated or used as a soil amendment. This paper focuses on superheated steam drying which has many benefits, because the system is totally enclosed, thereby minimising odours and particulate emissions. This work reports on field trials at a wastewater treatment plant where anaerobically digested sludge is dried immediately after being dewatered by belt press. The trials showed that unlike previous off-site tests, the sludge could be dried without the addition of a filter aid at a low production rate. However, the trials also confirmed that the addition of the lignite (brown coal) into the anaerobically digested sludge led to a more productive drying process, improved product quality and a greater fraction of the product being in the desired product size range. It is concluded that these results were achieved because the lignite helped to control the granule size in the dryer. Furthermore neither Salmonella spp or E coli were detected in the dried samples. Tests on spontaneous combustion show that this risk is increased in proportion to the amount of lignite used as a drying aid. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Drying a tuberculosis vaccine without freezing.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yun-Ling; Sampson, Samantha; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Caponetti, Giovanni; Sadoff, Jerry; Bloom, Barry R; Edwards, David

    2007-02-20

    With the increasing incidence of tuberculosis and drug resistant disease in developing countries due to HIV/AIDS, there is a need for vaccines that are more effective than the present bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. We demonstrate that BCG vaccine can be dried without traditional freezing and maintained with remarkable refrigerated and room-temperature stability for months through spray drying. Studies with a model Mycobacterium (Mycobacterium smegmatis) revealed that by removing salts and cryoprotectant (e.g., glycerol) from bacterial suspensions, the significant osmotic pressures that are normally produced on bacterial membranes through droplet drying can be reduced sufficiently to minimize loss of viability on drying by up to 2 orders of magnitude. By placing the bacteria in a matrix of leucine, high-yield, free-flowing, "vial-fillable" powders of bacteria (including M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG) can be produced. These powders show relatively minor losses of activity after maintenance at 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C up to and beyond 4 months. Comparisons with lyophilized material prepared both with the same formulation and with a commercial formulation reveal that the spray-dried BCG has better overall viability on drying.

  20. Dry Socket Etiology, Diagnosis, and Clinical Treatment Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mamoun, John

    2018-04-01

    Dry socket, also termed fibrinolytic osteitis or alveolar osteitis, is a complication of tooth exodontia. A dry socket lesion is a post-extraction socket that exhibits exposed bone that is not covered by a blood clot or healing epithelium and exists inside or around the perimeter of the socket or alveolus for days after the extraction procedure. This article describes dry socket lesions; reviews the basic clinical techniques of treating different manifestations of dry socket lesions; and shows how microscope level loupe magnification of 6× to 8× or greater, combined with co-axial illumination or a dental operating microscope, facilitate more precise treatment of dry socket lesions. The author examines the scientific validity of the proposed causes of dry socket lesions (such as bacteria, inflammation, fibrinolysis, or traumatic extractions) and the scientific validity of different terminologies used to describe dry socket lesions. This article also presents an alternative model of what causes dry socket lesions, based on evidence from dental literature. Although the clinical techniques for treating dry socket lesions seem empirically correct, more evidence is required to determine the causes of dry socket lesions.