Sample records for uml modeling tools

  1. Comparison of BrainTool to other UML modeling and model transformation tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforova, Oksana; Gusarovs, Konstantins

    2017-07-01

    In the last 30 years there were numerous model generated software systems offered targeting problems with the development productivity and the resulting software quality. CASE tools developed due today's date are being advertised as having "complete code-generation capabilities". Nowadays the Object Management Group (OMG) is calling similar arguments in regards to the Unified Modeling Language (UML) models at different levels of abstraction. It is being said that software development automation using CASE tools enables significant level of automation. Actual today's CASE tools are usually offering a combination of several features starting with a model editor and a model repository for a traditional ones and ending with code generator (that could be using a scripting or domain-specific (DSL) language), transformation tool to produce the new artifacts from the manually created and transformation definition editor to define new transformations for the most advanced ones. Present paper contains the results of CASE tool (mainly UML editors) comparison against the level of the automation they are offering.

  2. An Infrastructure for UML-Based Code Generation Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrmeister, Marco A.; Freitas, Edison P.; Pereira, Carlos E.

    The use of Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) techniques in the domain of distributed embedded real-time systems are gain importance in order to cope with the increasing design complexity of such systems. This paper discusses an infrastructure created to build GenERTiCA, a flexible tool that supports a MDE approach, which uses aspect-oriented concepts to handle non-functional requirements from embedded and real-time systems domain. GenERTiCA generates source code from UML models, and also performs weaving of aspects, which have been specified within the UML model. Additionally, this paper discusses the Distributed Embedded Real-Time Compact Specification (DERCS), a PIM created to support UML-based code generation tools. Some heuristics to transform UML models into DERCS, which have been implemented in GenERTiCA, are also discussed.

  3. Model-Driven Theme/UML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, Andrew; Driver, Cormac; Jackson, Andrew; Clarke, Siobhán

    Theme/UML is an existing approach to aspect-oriented modelling that supports the modularisation and composition of concerns, including crosscutting ones, in design. To date, its lack of integration with model-driven engineering (MDE) techniques has limited its benefits across the development lifecycle. Here, we describe our work on facilitating the use of Theme/UML as part of an MDE process. We have developed a transformation tool that adopts model-driven architecture (MDA) standards. It defines a concern composition mechanism, implemented as a model transformation, to support the enhanced modularisation features of Theme/UML. We evaluate our approach by applying it to the development of mobile, context-aware applications-an application area characterised by many non-functional requirements that manifest themselves as crosscutting concerns.

  4. CASE tools and UML: state of the ART.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, S

    2001-05-01

    With increasing need for automated tools to assist complex systems development, software design methods are becoming popular. This article analyzes the state of art in computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools and unified modeling language (UML), focusing on their evolution, merits, and industry usage. It identifies managerial issues for the tools' adoption and recommends an action plan to select and implement them. While CASE and UML offer inherent advantages like cheaper, shorter, and efficient development cycles, they suffer from poor user satisfaction. The critical success factors for their implementation include, among others, management and staff commitment, proper corporate infrastructure, and user training.

  5. A UML profile for framework modeling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-liang; Wang, Le-yu; Zhou, Hong

    2004-01-01

    The current standard Unified Modeling Language(UML) could not model framework flexibility and extendability adequately due to lack of appropriate constructs to distinguish framework hot-spots from kernel elements. A new UML profile that may customize UML for framework modeling was presented using the extension mechanisms of UML, providing a group of UML extensions to meet the needs of framework modeling. In this profile, the extended class diagrams and sequence diagrams were defined to straightforwardly identify the hot-spots and describe their instantiation restrictions. A transformation model based on design patterns was also put forward, such that the profile based framework design diagrams could be automatically mapped to the corresponding implementation diagrams. It was proved that the presented profile makes framework modeling more straightforwardly and therefore easier to understand and instantiate.

  6. Use of Unified Modeling Language (UML) in Model-Based Development (MBD) For Safety-Critical Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    appears that UML is becoming the de facto MBD language. OMG® states the following on the MDA® FAQ page: “Although not formally required [for MBD], UML...a known limitation [42], so UML users should plan accordingly, especially for safety-critical programs. For example, “models are not used to...description of the MBD tool chain can be produced. That description could be resident in a Plan for Software Aspects of Certification (PSAC) or Software

  7. Representing clinical guidelines in UMl: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hederman, Lucy; Smutek, Daniel; Wade, Vincent; Knape, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Clinical guidelines can be represented using models, such as GLIF, specifically designed for healthcare guidelines. This paper demonstrates that they can also be modelled using a mainstream business modelling language such as UML. The paper presents a guideline in GLIF and as UML activity diagrams, and then presents a mapping of GLIF primitives to UML. The potential benefits of using a mainstream modelling language are outlined. These include availability of advanced modelling tools, transfer between modelling tools, and automation via business workflow technology.

  8. Scrutinizing UML Activity Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Fedaghi, Sabah

    Building an information system involves two processes: conceptual modeling of the “real world domain” and designing the software system. Object-oriented methods and languages (e.g., UML) are typically used for describing the software system. For the system analysis process that produces the conceptual description, object-oriented techniques or semantics extensions are utilized. Specifically, UML activity diagrams are the “flow charts” of object-oriented conceptualization tools. This chapter proposes an alternative to UML activity diagrams through the development of a conceptual modeling methodology based on the notion of flow.

  9. A UML approach to process modelling of clinical practice guidelines for enactment.

    PubMed

    Knape, T; Hederman, L; Wade, V P; Gargan, M; Harris, C; Rahman, Y

    2003-01-01

    Although clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been suggested as a means of encapsulating best practice in evidence-based medical treatment, their usage in clinical environments has been disappointing. Criticisms of guideline representations have been that they are predominantly narrative and are difficult to incorporate into clinical information systems. This paper analyses the use of UML process modelling techniques for guideline representation and proposes the automated generation of executable guidelines using XMI. This hybrid UML-XMI approach provides flexible authoring of guideline decision and control structures whilst integrating appropriate data flow. It also uses an open XMI standard interface to allow the use of authoring tools and process control systems from multiple vendors. The paper first surveys CPG modelling formalisms followed by a brief introduction to process modelling in UMI. Furthermore, the modelling of CPGs in UML is presented leading to a case study of encoding a diabetes mellitus CPG using UML.

  10. The Neighborhood Auditing Tool: a hybrid interface for auditing the UMLS.

    PubMed

    Morrey, C Paul; Geller, James; Halper, Michael; Perl, Yehoshua

    2009-06-01

    The UMLS's integration of more than 100 source vocabularies, not necessarily consistent with one another, causes some inconsistencies. The purpose of auditing the UMLS is to detect such inconsistencies and to suggest how to resolve them while observing the requirement of fully representing the content of each source in the UMLS. A software tool, called the Neighborhood Auditing Tool (NAT), that facilitates UMLS auditing is presented. The NAT supports "neighborhood-based" auditing, where, at any given time, an auditor concentrates on a single-focus concept and one of a variety of neighborhoods of its closely related concepts. Typical diagrammatic displays of concept networks have a number of shortcomings, so the NAT utilizes a hybrid diagram/text interface that features stylized neighborhood views which retain some of the best features of both the diagrammatic layouts and text windows while avoiding the shortcomings. The NAT allows an auditor to display knowledge from both the Metathesaurus (concept) level and the Semantic Network (semantic type) level. Various additional features of the NAT that support the auditing process are described. The usefulness of the NAT is demonstrated through a group of case studies. Its impact is tested with a study involving a select group of auditors.

  11. HRT-UML: a design method for hard real-time systems based on the UML notation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Massimo; Mazzini, Silvia; di Natale, Marco; Lipari, Giuseppe

    2002-07-01

    The Hard Real-Time-Unified Modelling Language (HRT-UML) method aims at providing a comprehensive solution to the modeling of Hard Real Time systems. The experience shows that the design of Hard Real-Time systems needs methodologies suitable for the modeling and analysis of aspects related to time, schedulability and performance. In the context of the European Aerospace community a reference method for design is Hierarchical Object Oriented Design (HOOD) and in particular its extension for the modeling of hard real time systems, Hard Real-Time-Hierarchical Object Oriented Design (HRT-HOOD), recommended by the European Space Agency (ESA) for the development of on-board systems. On the other hand in recent years the Unified Modelling Language (UML) has been gaining a very large acceptance in a wide range of domains, all over the world, becoming a de-facto international standard. Tool vendors are very active in this potentially big market. In the Aerospace domain the common opinion is that UML, as a general notation, is not suitable for Hard Real Time systems, even if its importance is recognized as a standard and as a technological trend in the near future. These considerations suggest the possibility of replacing the HRT-HOOD method with a customized version of UML, that incorporates the advantages of both standards and complements the weak points. This approach has the clear advantage of making HRT-HOOD converge on a more powerful and expressive modeling notation. The paper identifies a mapping of the HRT-HOOD semantics into the UML one, and proposes a UML extension profile, that we call HRT-UML, based on the UML standard extension mechanisms, to fully represent HRT-HOOD design concepts. Finally it discusses the relationships between our profile and the UML profile for schedulability, performance and time, adopted by OMG in November 2001.

  12. Comprehensive Aspectual UML approach to support AspectJ.

    PubMed

    Magableh, Aws; Shukur, Zarina; Ali, Noorazean Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Unified Modeling Language is the most popular and widely used Object-Oriented modelling language in the IT industry. This study focuses on investigating the ability to expand UML to some extent to model crosscutting concerns (Aspects) to support AspectJ. Through a comprehensive literature review, we identify and extensively examine all the available Aspect-Oriented UML modelling approaches and find that the existing Aspect-Oriented Design Modelling approaches using UML cannot be considered to provide a framework for a comprehensive Aspectual UML modelling approach and also that there is a lack of adequate Aspect-Oriented tool support. This study also proposes a set of Aspectual UML semantic rules and attempts to generate AspectJ pseudocode from UML diagrams. The proposed Aspectual UML modelling approach is formally evaluated using a focus group to test six hypotheses regarding performance; a "good design" criteria-based evaluation to assess the quality of the design; and an AspectJ-based evaluation as a reference measurement-based evaluation. The results of the focus group evaluation confirm all the hypotheses put forward regarding the proposed approach. The proposed approach provides a comprehensive set of Aspectual UML structural and behavioral diagrams, which are designed and implemented based on a comprehensive and detailed set of AspectJ programming constructs.

  13. Comprehensive Aspectual UML Approach to Support AspectJ

    PubMed Central

    Magableh, Aws; Shukur, Zarina; Mohd. Ali, Noorazean

    2014-01-01

    Unified Modeling Language is the most popular and widely used Object-Oriented modelling language in the IT industry. This study focuses on investigating the ability to expand UML to some extent to model crosscutting concerns (Aspects) to support AspectJ. Through a comprehensive literature review, we identify and extensively examine all the available Aspect-Oriented UML modelling approaches and find that the existing Aspect-Oriented Design Modelling approaches using UML cannot be considered to provide a framework for a comprehensive Aspectual UML modelling approach and also that there is a lack of adequate Aspect-Oriented tool support. This study also proposes a set of Aspectual UML semantic rules and attempts to generate AspectJ pseudocode from UML diagrams. The proposed Aspectual UML modelling approach is formally evaluated using a focus group to test six hypotheses regarding performance; a “good design” criteria-based evaluation to assess the quality of the design; and an AspectJ-based evaluation as a reference measurement-based evaluation. The results of the focus group evaluation confirm all the hypotheses put forward regarding the proposed approach. The proposed approach provides a comprehensive set of Aspectual UML structural and behavioral diagrams, which are designed and implemented based on a comprehensive and detailed set of AspectJ programming constructs. PMID:25136656

  14. OBO to UML: Support for the development of conceptual models in the biomedical domain.

    PubMed

    Waldemarin, Ricardo C; de Farias, Cléver R G

    2018-04-01

    A conceptual model abstractly defines a number of concepts and their relationships for the purposes of understanding and communication. Once a conceptual model is available, it can also be used as a starting point for the development of a software system. The development of conceptual models using the Unified Modeling Language (UML) facilitates the representation of modeled concepts and allows software developers to directly reuse these concepts in the design of a software system. The OBO Foundry represents the most relevant collaborative effort towards the development of ontologies in the biomedical domain. The development of UML conceptual models in the biomedical domain may benefit from the use of domain-specific semantics and notation. Further, the development of these models may also benefit from the reuse of knowledge contained in OBO ontologies. This paper investigates the support for the development of conceptual models in the biomedical domain using UML as a conceptual modeling language and using the support provided by the OBO Foundry for the development of biomedical ontologies, namely entity kind and relationship types definitions provided by the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO) and the OBO Core Relations Ontology (OBO Core), respectively. Further, the paper investigates the support for the reuse of biomedical knowledge currently available in OBOFFF ontologies in the development these conceptual models. The paper describes a UML profile for the OBO Core Relations Ontology, which basically defines a number of stereotypes to represent BFO entity kinds and OBO Core relationship types definitions. The paper also presents a support toolset consisting of a graphical editor named OBO-RO Editor, which directly supports the development of UML models using the extensions defined by our profile, and a command-line tool named OBO2UML, which directly converts an OBOFFF ontology into a UML model. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Modeling Value Chain Analysis of Distance Education using UML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Anal; Mukherjee, Soumen

    2010-10-01

    Distance education continues to grow as a methodology for the delivery of course content in higher education in India as well as abroad. To manage this growing demand and to provide certain flexibility, there must be certain strategic planning about the use of ICT tools. Value chain analysis is a framework for breaking down the sequence of business functions into a set of activities through which utility could be added to service. Thus it can help to determine the competitive advantage that is enjoyed by an institute. To implement these business functions certain visual representation is required. UML allows for this representation by using a set of structural and behavioral diagrams. In this paper, the first section defines a framework for value chain analysis and highlights its advantages. The second section gives a brief overview of related work in this field. The third section gives a brief discussion on distance education. The fourth section very briefly introduces UML. The fifth section models value chain of distance education using UML. Finally we discuss the limitations and the problems posed in this domain.

  16. BGen: A UML Behavior Network Generator Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terry; Reder, Leonard J.; Balian, Harry

    2010-01-01

    BGen software was designed for autogeneration of code based on a graphical representation of a behavior network used for controlling automatic vehicles. A common format used for describing a behavior network, such as that used in the JPL-developed behavior-based control system, CARACaS ["Control Architecture for Robotic Agent Command and Sensing" (NPO-43635), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 10 (October 2008), page 40] includes a graph with sensory inputs flowing through the behaviors in order to generate the signals for the actuators that drive and steer the vehicle. A computer program to translate Unified Modeling Language (UML) Freeform Implementation Diagrams into a legacy C implementation of Behavior Network has been developed in order to simplify the development of C-code for behavior-based control systems. UML is a popular standard developed by the Object Management Group (OMG) to model software architectures graphically. The C implementation of a Behavior Network is functioning as a decision tree.

  17. The Neighborhood Auditing Tool: A Hybrid Interface for Auditing the UMLS

    PubMed Central

    Morrey, C. Paul; Geller, James; Halper, Michael; Perl, Yehoshua

    2009-01-01

    The UMLS’s integration of more than 100 source vocabularies, not necessarily consistent with one another, causes some inconsistencies. The purpose of auditing the UMLS is to detect such inconsistencies and to suggest how to resolve them while observing the requirement of fully representing the content of each source in the UMLS. A software tool, called the Neighborhood Auditing Tool (NAT), that facilitates UMLS auditing is presented. The NAT supports “neighborhood-based” auditing, where, at any given time, an auditor concentrates on a single focus concept and one of a variety of neighborhoods of its closely related concepts. Typical diagrammatic displays of concept networks have a number of shortcomings, so the NAT utilizes a hybrid diagram/text interface that features stylized neighborhood views which retain some of the best features of both the diagrammatic layouts and text windows while avoiding the shortcomings. The NAT allows an auditor to display knowledge from both the Metathesaurus (concept) level and the Semantic Network (semantic type) level. Various additional features of the NAT that support the auditing process are described. The usefulness of the NAT is demonstrated through a group of case studies. Its impact is tested with a study involving a select group of auditors. PMID:19475725

  18. Translation from UML to Markov Model: A Performance Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Razib Hayat; Heegaard, Poul E.

    Performance engineering focuses on the quantitative investigation of the behavior of a system during the early phase of the system development life cycle. Bearing this on mind, we delineate a performance modeling framework of the application for communication system that proposes a translation process from high level UML notation to Continuous Time Markov Chain model (CTMC) and solves the model for relevant performance metrics. The framework utilizes UML collaborations, activity diagrams and deployment diagrams to be used for generating performance model for a communication system. The system dynamics will be captured by UML collaboration and activity diagram as reusable specification building blocks, while deployment diagram highlights the components of the system. The collaboration and activity show how reusable building blocks in the form of collaboration can compose together the service components through input and output pin by highlighting the behavior of the components and later a mapping between collaboration and system component identified by deployment diagram will be delineated. Moreover the UML models are annotated to associate performance related quality of service (QoS) information which is necessary for solving the performance model for relevant performance metrics through our proposed framework. The applicability of our proposed performance modeling framework in performance evaluation is delineated in the context of modeling a communication system.

  19. Tracing the Rationale Behind UML Model Change Through Argumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jureta, Ivan J.; Faulkner, Stéphane

    Neglecting traceability—i.e., the ability to describe and follow the life of a requirement—is known to entail misunderstanding and miscommunication, leading to the engineering of poor quality systems. Following the simple principles that (a) changes to UML model instances ought be justified to the stakeholders, (b) justification should proceed in a structured manner to ensure rigor in discussions, critique, and revisions of model instances, and (c) the concept of argument instantiated in a justification process ought to be well defined and understood, the present paper introduces the UML Traceability through Argumentation Method (UML-TAM) to enable the traceability of design rationale in UML while allowing the appropriateness of model changes to be checked by analysis of the structure of the arguments provided to justify such changes.

  20. Path generation algorithm for UML graphic modeling of aerospace test software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, MingCheng; Wu, XiangHu; Tao, YongChao; Chen, Chao

    2018-03-01

    Aerospace traditional software testing engineers are based on their own work experience and communication with software development personnel to complete the description of the test software, manual writing test cases, time-consuming, inefficient, loopholes and more. Using the high reliability MBT tools developed by our company, the one-time modeling can automatically generate test case documents, which is efficient and accurate. UML model to describe the process accurately express the need to rely on the path is reached, the existing path generation algorithm are too simple, cannot be combined into a path and branch path with loop, or too cumbersome, too complicated arrangement generates a path is meaningless, for aerospace software testing is superfluous, I rely on our experience of ten load space, tailor developed a description of aerospace software UML graphics path generation algorithm.

  1. Model-based testing with UML applied to a roaming algorithm for bluetooth devices.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhen Ru; Grabowski, Jens; Neukirchen, Helmut; Pals, Holger

    2004-11-01

    In late 2001, the Object Management Group issued a Request for Proposal to develop a testing profile for UML 2.0. In June 2003, the work on the UML 2.0 Testing Profile was finally adopted by the OMG. Since March 2004, it has become an official standard of the OMG. The UML 2.0 Testing Profile provides support for UML based model-driven testing. This paper introduces a methodology on how to use the testing profile in order to modify and extend an existing UML design model for test issues. The application of the methodology will be explained by applying it to an existing UML Model for a Bluetooth device.

  2. SSBRP Communication & Data System Development using the Unified Modeling Language (UML)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windrem, May; Picinich, Lou; Givens, John J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is the standard method for specifying, visualizing, and documenting the artifacts of an object-oriented system under development. UML is the unification of the object-oriented methods developed by Grady Booch and James Rumbaugh, and of the Use Case Model developed by Ivar Jacobson. This paper discusses the application of UML by the Communications and Data Systems (CDS) team to model the ground control and command of the Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) User Operations Facility (UOF). UML is used to define the context of the system, the logical static structure, the life history of objects, and the interactions among objects.

  3. CoLeMo: A Collaborative Learning Environment for UML Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Weiqin; Pedersen, Roger Heggernes; Pettersen, Oystein

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of a distributed collaborative UML modelling environment, CoLeMo. CoLeMo is designed for students studying UML modelling. It can also be used as a platform for collaborative design of software. We conducted formative evaluations and a summative evaluation to improve the environment and…

  4. Preface to FP-UML 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Juan; Kim, Dae-Kyoo

    The Unified Modeling Language (UML) has been widely accepted as the standard object-oriented (OO) modeling language for modeling various aspects of software and information systems. The UML is an extensible language, in the sense that it provides mechanisms to introduce new elements for specific domains if necessary, such as web applications, database applications, business modeling, software development processes, data warehouses. Furthermore, the latest version of UML 2.0 got even bigger and more complicated with more diagrams for some good reasons. Although UML provides different diagrams for modeling different aspects of a software system, not all of them need to be applied in most cases. Therefore, heuristics, design guidelines, lessons learned from experiences are extremely important for the effective use of UML 2.0 and to avoid unnecessary complication. Also, approaches are needed to better manage UML 2.0 and its extensions so they do not become too complex too manage in the end.

  5. Bioinformatics for transporter pharmacogenomics and systems biology: data integration and modeling with UML.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Bioinformatics is the rational study at an abstract level that can influence the way we understand biomedical facts and the way we apply the biomedical knowledge. Bioinformatics is facing challenges in helping with finding the relationships between genetic structures and functions, analyzing genotype-phenotype associations, and understanding gene-environment interactions at the systems level. One of the most important issues in bioinformatics is data integration. The data integration methods introduced here can be used to organize and integrate both public and in-house data. With the volume of data and the high complexity, computational decision support is essential for integrative transporter studies in pharmacogenomics, nutrigenomics, epigenetics, and systems biology. For the development of such a decision support system, object-oriented (OO) models can be constructed using the Unified Modeling Language (UML). A methodology is developed to build biomedical models at different system levels and construct corresponding UML diagrams, including use case diagrams, class diagrams, and sequence diagrams. By OO modeling using UML, the problems of transporter pharmacogenomics and systems biology can be approached from different angles with a more complete view, which may greatly enhance the efforts in effective drug discovery and development. Bioinformatics resources of membrane transporters and general bioinformatics databases and tools that are frequently used in transporter studies are also collected here. An informatics decision support system based on the models presented here is available at http://www.pharmtao.com/transporter . The methodology developed here can also be used for other biomedical fields.

  6. A UML Profile for State Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Alex; Rasmussen, Robert

    2010-01-01

    State Analysis is a systems engineering methodology for the specification and design of control systems, developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The methodology emphasizes an analysis of the system under control in terms of States and their properties and behaviors and their effects on each other, a clear separation of the control system from the controlled system, cognizance in the control system of the controlled system's State, goal-based control built on constraining the controlled system's States, and disciplined techniques for State discovery and characterization. State Analysis (SA) introduces two key diagram types: State Effects and Goal Network diagrams. The team at JPL developed a tool for performing State Analysis. The tool includes a drawing capability, backed by a database that supports the diagram types and the organization of the elements of the SA models. But the tool does not support the usual activities of software engineering and design - a disadvantage, since systems to which State Analysis can be applied tend to be very software-intensive. This motivated the work described in this paper: the development of a preliminary Unified Modeling Language (UML) profile for State Analysis. Having this profile would enable systems engineers to specify a system using the methods and graphical language of State Analysis, which is easily linked with a larger system model in SysML (Systems Modeling Language), while also giving software engineers engaged in implementing the specified control system immediate access to and use of the SA model, in the same language, UML, used for other software design. That is, a State Analysis profile would serve as a shared modeling bridge between system and software models for the behavior aspects of the system. This paper begins with an overview of State Analysis and its underpinnings, followed by an overview of the mapping of SA constructs to the UML metamodel. It then delves into the details of these mappings and the

  7. Vehicle System Management Modeling in UML for Ares I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Newton W.; Biehn, Bradley A.; Curry, Tristan D.; Martinez, Mario R.

    2011-01-01

    The Spacecraft & Vehicle Systems Department of Marshall Space Flight Center is responsible for modeling the Vehicle System Management for the Ares I vehicle which was a part of the now canceled Constellation Program. An approach to generating the requirements for the Vehicle System Management was to use the Unified Modeling Language technique to build and test a model that would fulfill the Vehicle System Management requirements. UML has been used on past projects (flight software) in the design phase of the effort but this was the first attempt to use the UML technique from a top down requirements perspective.

  8. Implementation of UML Schema to RDBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagni, M.; Ventouras, S.; Parton, G.

    2012-04-01

    Multiple disciplines - especially those within the earth and physical sciences, and increasingly those within social science and medical fields - require Geographic Information (GI) i.e. information concerning phenomena implicitly or explicitly associated with a location relative to the Earth [1]. Therefore geographic datasets are increasingly being shared, exchanged and frequently used for purposes other than those for which they were originally intended. The ISO Technical Committee 211 (ISO/TC 211) together with Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) provide a series of standards and guidelines for developing application schemas which should: a) capture relevant conceptual aspects of the data involved; and b) be sufficient to satisfy previously defined use-cases of a specific or cross-domain concerns. In addition, the Hollow World technology offers an accessible and industry-standardised methodology for creating and editing Application Schema UML models which conform to international standards for interoperable GI [2]. We present a technology which seamlessly transforms an Application Schema UML model to a relational database model (RDBM). This technology, using the same UML information model, complements the XML transformation of an information model produced by the FullMoon tool [2]. In preparation for the generation of a RDBM the UML model is first mapped to a collection of OO classes and relationships. Any external dependencies that exist are then resolved through the same mechanism. However, a RDBM does not support a hierarchical (relational) data structure - a function that may be required by UML models. Previous approaches have addressed this problem through use of nested sets or an adjacent list to represent such structure. Our unique strategy addresses the hierarchical data structure issue, whether singular or multiple inheritance, by hiding a delegation pattern within an OO class. This permits the object-relational mapping (ORM) software used to generate the

  9. A UML model for the description of different brain-computer interface systems.

    PubMed

    Quitadamo, Lucia Rita; Abbafati, Manuel; Saggio, Giovanni; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Cardarilli, Gian Carlo; Bianchi, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    BCI research lacks a universal descriptive language among labs and a unique standard model for the description of BCI systems. This results in a serious problem in comparing performances of different BCI processes and in unifying tools and resources. In such a view we implemented a Unified Modeling Language (UML) model for the description virtually of any BCI protocol and we demonstrated that it can be successfully applied to the most common ones such as P300, mu-rhythms, SCP, SSVEP, fMRI. Finally we illustrated the advantages in utilizing a standard terminology for BCIs and how the same basic structure can be successfully adopted for the implementation of new systems.

  10. The UMLS Knowledge Sources: Tools for Building Better User Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Donald A. B.; Humphreys, Betsy L.

    1990-01-01

    The current focus of the National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) project is the development, testing, and evaluation of the first versions of three new knowledge sources: the Metathesaurus, the Semantic Network, and the Information Sources Map. These three knowledge sources can be used by interface programs to conduct an intelligent interaction with the user and to make the conceptual link between the user's question and relevant machine-readable information. NLM is providing experimental copies of the initial versions of the UMLS knowledge sources in exchange for feedback on ways they can and should be improved. The hope is that the results of such experimentation will provide both immediate improvements in biomedical information service and useful suggestions for enhancements to the UMLS.

  11. Visualization of Learning Scenarios with UML4LD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laforcade, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Present Educational Modelling Languages are used to formally specify abstract learning scenarios in a machine-interpretable format. Current tooling does not provide teachers/designers with some graphical facilities to help them in reusing existent scenarios. They need human-readable representations. This paper discusses the UML4LD experimental…

  12. UML and Model Checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, F.

    1999-01-01

    UML use cases conceptually identify function points or major requirements that a software system must satisfy. Sequence diagrams expand each use case to show in temporal sequence a more detailed notion of intended system behavior.

  13. Dependability modeling and assessment in UML-based software development.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Simona; Merseguer, José; Petriu, Dorina C

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of software nonfunctional properties (NFP) is an important problem in software development. In the context of model-driven development, an emerging approach for the analysis of different NFPs consists of the following steps: (a) to extend the software models with annotations describing the NFP of interest; (b) to transform automatically the annotated software model to the formalism chosen for NFP analysis; (c) to analyze the formal model using existing solvers; (d) to assess the software based on the results and give feedback to designers. Such a modeling→analysis→assessment approach can be applied to any software modeling language, be it general purpose or domain specific. In this paper, we focus on UML-based development and on the dependability NFP, which encompasses reliability, availability, safety, integrity, and maintainability. The paper presents the profile used to extend UML with dependability information, the model transformation to generate a DSPN formal model, and the assessment of the system properties based on the DSPN results.

  14. Dependability Modeling and Assessment in UML-Based Software Development

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Simona; Merseguer, José; Petriu, Dorina C.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of software nonfunctional properties (NFP) is an important problem in software development. In the context of model-driven development, an emerging approach for the analysis of different NFPs consists of the following steps: (a) to extend the software models with annotations describing the NFP of interest; (b) to transform automatically the annotated software model to the formalism chosen for NFP analysis; (c) to analyze the formal model using existing solvers; (d) to assess the software based on the results and give feedback to designers. Such a modeling→analysis→assessment approach can be applied to any software modeling language, be it general purpose or domain specific. In this paper, we focus on UML-based development and on the dependability NFP, which encompasses reliability, availability, safety, integrity, and maintainability. The paper presents the profile used to extend UML with dependability information, the model transformation to generate a DSPN formal model, and the assessment of the system properties based on the DSPN results. PMID:22988428

  15. Evaluation of a UMLS Auditing Process of Semantic Type Assignments

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huanying; Hripcsak, George; Chen, Yan; Morrey, C. Paul; Elhanan, Gai; Cimino, James J.; Geller, James; Perl, Yehoshua

    2007-01-01

    The UMLS is a terminological system that integrates many source terminologies. Each concept in the UMLS is assigned one or more semantic types from the Semantic Network, an upper level ontology for biomedicine. Due to the complexity of the UMLS, errors exist in the semantic type assignments. Finding assignment errors may unearth modeling errors. Even with sophisticated tools, discovering assignment errors requires manual review. In this paper we describe the evaluation of an auditing project of UMLS semantic type assignments. We studied the performance of the auditors who reviewed potential errors. We found that four auditors, interacting according to a multi-step protocol, identified a high rate of errors (one or more errors in 81% of concepts studied) and that results were sufficiently reliable (0.67 to 0.70) for the two most common types of errors. However, reliability was low for each individual auditor, suggesting that review of potential errors is resource-intensive. PMID:18693845

  16. Applying Real-Time UML: Real-World Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooling, Niall; Pachschwoell, Stefan

    2004-06-01

    This paper presents Austrian Aerospace's experiences of applying UML for the design of an embedded real-time avionics system based on Feabhas' "Pragma Process". It describes the complete lifecycle from adoption of UML, through training, CASE-tool selection, system analysis, and software design and development of the project itself. It concludes by reflecting on the experiences obtained and some lessons learnt.

  17. Using Unified Modelling Language (UML) as a process-modelling technique for clinical-research process improvement.

    PubMed

    Kumarapeli, P; De Lusignan, S; Ellis, T; Jones, B

    2007-03-01

    The Primary Care Data Quality programme (PCDQ) is a quality-improvement programme which processes routinely collected general practice computer data. Patient data collected from a wide range of different brands of clinical computer systems are aggregated, processed, and fed back to practices in an educational context to improve the quality of care. Process modelling is a well-established approach used to gain understanding and systematic appraisal, and identify areas of improvement of a business process. Unified modelling language (UML) is a general purpose modelling technique used for this purpose. We used UML to appraise the PCDQ process to see if the efficiency and predictability of the process could be improved. Activity analysis and thinking-aloud sessions were used to collect data to generate UML diagrams. The UML model highlighted the sequential nature of the current process as a barrier for efficiency gains. It also identified the uneven distribution of process controls, lack of symmetric communication channels, critical dependencies among processing stages, and failure to implement all the lessons learned in the piloting phase. It also suggested that improved structured reporting at each stage - especially from the pilot phase, parallel processing of data and correctly positioned process controls - should improve the efficiency and predictability of research projects. Process modelling provided a rational basis for the critical appraisal of a clinical data processing system; its potential maybe underutilized within health care.

  18. minimUML: A Minimalist Approach to UML Diagramming for Early Computer Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Scott A.; Perez-Quinones, Manuel A.; Edwards, Stephen H.

    2005-01-01

    In introductory computer science courses, the Unified Modeling Language (UML) is commonly used to teach basic object-oriented design. However, there appears to be a lack of suitable software to support this task. Many of the available programs that support UML focus on developing code and not on enhancing learning. Programs designed for…

  19. The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS): integrating biomedical terminology

    PubMed Central

    Bodenreider, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    The Unified Medical Language System (http://umlsks.nlm.nih.gov) is a repository of biomedical vocabularies developed by the US National Library of Medicine. The UMLS integrates over 2 million names for some 900 000 concepts from more than 60 families of biomedical vocabularies, as well as 12 million relations among these concepts. Vocabularies integrated in the UMLS Metathesaurus include the NCBI taxonomy, Gene Ontology, the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), OMIM and the Digital Anatomist Symbolic Knowledge Base. UMLS concepts are not only inter-related, but may also be linked to external resources such as GenBank. In addition to data, the UMLS includes tools for customizing the Metathesaurus (MetamorphoSys), for generating lexical variants of concept names (lvg) and for extracting UMLS concepts from text (MetaMap). The UMLS knowledge sources are updated quarterly. All vocabularies are available at no fee for research purposes within an institution, but UMLS users are required to sign a license agreement. The UMLS knowledge sources are distributed on CD-ROM and by FTP. PMID:14681409

  20. The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS): integrating biomedical terminology.

    PubMed

    Bodenreider, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    The Unified Medical Language System (http://umlsks.nlm.nih.gov) is a repository of biomedical vocabularies developed by the US National Library of Medicine. The UMLS integrates over 2 million names for some 900,000 concepts from more than 60 families of biomedical vocabularies, as well as 12 million relations among these concepts. Vocabularies integrated in the UMLS Metathesaurus include the NCBI taxonomy, Gene Ontology, the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), OMIM and the Digital Anatomist Symbolic Knowledge Base. UMLS concepts are not only inter-related, but may also be linked to external resources such as GenBank. In addition to data, the UMLS includes tools for customizing the Metathesaurus (MetamorphoSys), for generating lexical variants of concept names (lvg) and for extracting UMLS concepts from text (MetaMap). The UMLS knowledge sources are updated quarterly. All vocabularies are available at no fee for research purposes within an institution, but UMLS users are required to sign a license agreement. The UMLS knowledge sources are distributed on CD-ROM and by FTP.

  1. A rule-based approach to model checking of UML state machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobelna, Iwona; Grobelny, Michał; Stefanowicz, Łukasz

    2016-12-01

    In the paper a new approach to formal verification of control process specification expressed by means of UML state machines in version 2.x is proposed. In contrast to other approaches from the literature, we use the abstract and universal rule-based logical model suitable both for model checking (using the nuXmv model checker), but also for logical synthesis in form of rapid prototyping. Hence, a prototype implementation in hardware description language VHDL can be obtained that fully reflects the primary, already formally verified specification in form of UML state machines. Presented approach allows to increase the assurance that implemented system meets the user-defined requirements.

  2. A UML Profile for Developing Databases that Conform to the Third Manifesto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eessaar, Erki

    The Third Manifesto (TTM) presents the principles of a relational database language that is free of deficiencies and ambiguities of SQL. There are database management systems that are created according to TTM. Developers need tools that support the development of databases by using these database management systems. UML is a widely used visual modeling language. It provides built-in extension mechanism that makes it possible to extend UML by creating profiles. In this paper, we introduce a UML profile for designing databases that correspond to the rules of TTM. We created the first version of the profile by translating existing profiles of SQL database design. After that, we extended and improved the profile. We implemented the profile by using UML CASE system StarUML™. We present an example of using the new profile. In addition, we describe problems that occurred during the profile development.

  3. Unified Modeling Language (UML) for hospital-based cancer registration processes.

    PubMed

    Shiki, Naomi; Ohno, Yuko; Fujii, Ayumi; Murata, Taizo; Matsumura, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    Hospital-based cancer registry involves complex processing steps that span across multiple departments. In addition, management techniques and registration procedures differ depending on each medical facility. Establishing processes for hospital-based cancer registry requires clarifying specific functions and labor needed. In recent years, the business modeling technique, in which management evaluation is done by clearly spelling out processes and functions, has been applied to business process analysis. However, there are few analytical reports describing the applications of these concepts to medical-related work. In this study, we initially sought to model hospital-based cancer registration processes using the Unified Modeling Language (UML), to clarify functions. The object of this study was the cancer registry of Osaka University Hospital. We organized the hospital-based cancer registration processes based on interview and observational surveys, and produced an As-Is model using activity, use-case, and class diagrams. After drafting every UML model, it was fed-back to practitioners to check its validity and improved. We were able to define the workflow for each department using activity diagrams. In addition, by using use-case diagrams we were able to classify each department within the hospital as a system, and thereby specify the core processes and staff that were responsible for each department. The class diagrams were effective in systematically organizing the information to be used for hospital-based cancer registries. Using UML modeling, hospital-based cancer registration processes were broadly classified into three separate processes, namely, registration tasks, quality control, and filing data. An additional 14 functions were also extracted. Many tasks take place within the hospital-based cancer registry office, but the process of providing information spans across multiple departments. Moreover, additional tasks were required in comparison to using a

  4. A remote sensing computer-assisted learning tool developed using the unified modeling language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, J.; Karslioglu, M. O.

    The goal of this work has been to create an easy-to-use and simple-to-make learning tool for remote sensing at an introductory level. Many students struggle to comprehend what seems to be a very basic knowledge of digital images, image processing and image arithmetic, for example. Because professional programs are generally too complex and overwhelming for beginners and often not tailored to the specific needs of a course regarding functionality, a computer-assisted learning (CAL) program was developed based on the unified modeling language (UML), the present standard for object-oriented (OO) system development. A major advantage of this approach is an easier transition from modeling to coding of such an application, if modern UML tools are being used. After introducing the constructed UML model, its implementation is briefly described followed by a series of learning exercises. They illustrate how the resulting CAL tool supports students taking an introductory course in remote sensing at the author's institution.

  5. Statistical Techniques Complement UML When Developing Domain Models of Complex Dynamical Biosystems.

    PubMed

    Williams, Richard A; Timmis, Jon; Qwarnstrom, Eva E

    2016-01-01

    Computational modelling and simulation is increasingly being used to complement traditional wet-lab techniques when investigating the mechanistic behaviours of complex biological systems. In order to ensure computational models are fit for purpose, it is essential that the abstracted view of biology captured in the computational model, is clearly and unambiguously defined within a conceptual model of the biological domain (a domain model), that acts to accurately represent the biological system and to document the functional requirements for the resultant computational model. We present a domain model of the IL-1 stimulated NF-κB signalling pathway, which unambiguously defines the spatial, temporal and stochastic requirements for our future computational model. Through the development of this model, we observe that, in isolation, UML is not sufficient for the purpose of creating a domain model, and that a number of descriptive and multivariate statistical techniques provide complementary perspectives, in particular when modelling the heterogeneity of dynamics at the single-cell level. We believe this approach of using UML to define the structure and interactions within a complex system, along with statistics to define the stochastic and dynamic nature of complex systems, is crucial for ensuring that conceptual models of complex dynamical biosystems, which are developed using UML, are fit for purpose, and unambiguously define the functional requirements for the resultant computational model.

  6. Statistical Techniques Complement UML When Developing Domain Models of Complex Dynamical Biosystems

    PubMed Central

    Timmis, Jon; Qwarnstrom, Eva E.

    2016-01-01

    Computational modelling and simulation is increasingly being used to complement traditional wet-lab techniques when investigating the mechanistic behaviours of complex biological systems. In order to ensure computational models are fit for purpose, it is essential that the abstracted view of biology captured in the computational model, is clearly and unambiguously defined within a conceptual model of the biological domain (a domain model), that acts to accurately represent the biological system and to document the functional requirements for the resultant computational model. We present a domain model of the IL-1 stimulated NF-κB signalling pathway, which unambiguously defines the spatial, temporal and stochastic requirements for our future computational model. Through the development of this model, we observe that, in isolation, UML is not sufficient for the purpose of creating a domain model, and that a number of descriptive and multivariate statistical techniques provide complementary perspectives, in particular when modelling the heterogeneity of dynamics at the single-cell level. We believe this approach of using UML to define the structure and interactions within a complex system, along with statistics to define the stochastic and dynamic nature of complex systems, is crucial for ensuring that conceptual models of complex dynamical biosystems, which are developed using UML, are fit for purpose, and unambiguously define the functional requirements for the resultant computational model. PMID:27571414

  7. Indexing Anatomical Phrases in Neuro-Radiology Reports to the UMLS 2005AA

    PubMed Central

    Bashyam, Vijayaraghavan; Taira, Ricky K.

    2005-01-01

    This work describes a methodology to index anatomical phrases to the 2005AA release of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). A phrase chunking tool based on Natural Language Processing (NLP) was developed to identify semantically coherent phrases within medical reports. Using this phrase chunker, a set of 2,551 unique anatomical phrases was extracted from brain radiology reports. These phrases were mapped to the 2005AA release of the UMLS using a vector space model. Precision for the task of indexing unique phrases was 0.87. PMID:16778995

  8. Describing different brain computer interface systems through a unique model: a UML implementation.

    PubMed

    Quitadamo, Lucia Rita; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Cardarilli, Gian Carlo; Bianchi, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    All the protocols currently implemented in brain computer interface (BCI) experiments are characterized by different structural and temporal entities. Moreover, due to the lack of a unique descriptive model for BCI systems, there is not a standard way to define the structure and the timing of a BCI experimental session among different research groups and there is also great discordance on the meaning of the most common terms dealing with BCI, such as trial, run and session. The aim of this paper is to provide a unified modeling language (UML) implementation of BCI systems through a unique dynamic model which is able to describe the main protocols defined in the literature (P300, mu-rhythms, SCP, SSVEP, fMRI) and demonstrates to be reasonable and adjustable according to different requirements. This model includes a set of definitions of the typical entities encountered in a BCI, diagrams which explain the structural correlations among them and a detailed description of the timing of a trial. This last represents an innovation with respect to the models already proposed in the literature. The UML documentation and the possibility of adapting this model to the different BCI systems built to date, make it a basis for the implementation of new systems and a mean for the unification and dissemination of resources. The model with all the diagrams and definitions reported in the paper are the core of the body language framework, a free set of routines and tools for the implementation, optimization and delivery of cross-platform BCI systems.

  9. Doclet To Synthesize UML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Osborne, Richard N.

    2005-01-01

    The RoseDoclet computer program extends the capability of Java doclet software to automatically synthesize Unified Modeling Language (UML) content from Java language source code. [Doclets are Java-language programs that use the doclet application programming interface (API) to specify the content and format of the output of Javadoc. Javadoc is a program, originally designed to generate API documentation from Java source code, now also useful as an extensible engine for processing Java source code.] RoseDoclet takes advantage of Javadoc comments and tags already in the source code to produce a UML model of that code. RoseDoclet applies the doclet API to create a doclet passed to Javadoc. The Javadoc engine applies the doclet to the source code, emitting the output format specified by the doclet. RoseDoclet emits a Rose model file and populates it with fully documented packages, classes, methods, variables, and class diagrams identified in the source code. The way in which UML models are generated can be controlled by use of new Javadoc comment tags that RoseDoclet provides. The advantage of using RoseDoclet is that Javadoc documentation becomes leveraged for two purposes: documenting the as-built API and keeping the design documentation up to date.

  10. Program Synthesizes UML Sequence Diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Osborne, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    A computer program called "Rational Sequence" generates Universal Modeling Language (UML) sequence diagrams of a target Java program running on a Java virtual machine (JVM). Rational Sequence thereby performs a reverse engineering function that aids in the design documentation of the target Java program. Whereas previously, the construction of sequence diagrams was a tedious manual process, Rational Sequence generates UML sequence diagrams automatically from the running Java code.

  11. Standardizing clinical trials workflow representation in UML for international site comparison.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Elias Cesar Araujo; Jayanti, Madhav Kishore; Batilana, Adelia Portero; Kozan, Andreia M O; Rodrigues, Maria J; Shah, Jatin; Loures, Marco R; Patil, Sunita; Payne, Philip; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2010-11-09

    With the globalization of clinical trials, a growing emphasis has been placed on the standardization of the workflow in order to ensure the reproducibility and reliability of the overall trial. Despite the importance of workflow evaluation, to our knowledge no previous studies have attempted to adapt existing modeling languages to standardize the representation of clinical trials. Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a computational language that can be used to model operational workflow, and a UML profile can be developed to standardize UML models within a given domain. This paper's objective is to develop a UML profile to extend the UML Activity Diagram schema into the clinical trials domain, defining a standard representation for clinical trial workflow diagrams in UML. Two Brazilian clinical trial sites in rheumatology and oncology were examined to model their workflow and collect time-motion data. UML modeling was conducted in Eclipse, and a UML profile was developed to incorporate information used in discrete event simulation software. Ethnographic observation revealed bottlenecks in workflow: these included tasks requiring full commitment of CRCs, transferring notes from paper to computers, deviations from standard operating procedures, and conflicts between different IT systems. Time-motion analysis revealed that nurses' activities took up the most time in the workflow and contained a high frequency of shorter duration activities. Administrative assistants performed more activities near the beginning and end of the workflow. Overall, clinical trial tasks had a greater frequency than clinic routines or other general activities. This paper describes a method for modeling clinical trial workflow in UML and standardizing these workflow diagrams through a UML profile. In the increasingly global environment of clinical trials, the standardization of workflow modeling is a necessary precursor to conducting a comparative analysis of international clinical trials

  12. Standardizing Clinical Trials Workflow Representation in UML for International Site Comparison

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Elias Cesar Araujo; Jayanti, Madhav Kishore; Batilana, Adelia Portero; Kozan, Andreia M. O.; Rodrigues, Maria J.; Shah, Jatin; Loures, Marco R.; Patil, Sunita; Payne, Philip; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Background With the globalization of clinical trials, a growing emphasis has been placed on the standardization of the workflow in order to ensure the reproducibility and reliability of the overall trial. Despite the importance of workflow evaluation, to our knowledge no previous studies have attempted to adapt existing modeling languages to standardize the representation of clinical trials. Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a computational language that can be used to model operational workflow, and a UML profile can be developed to standardize UML models within a given domain. This paper's objective is to develop a UML profile to extend the UML Activity Diagram schema into the clinical trials domain, defining a standard representation for clinical trial workflow diagrams in UML. Methods Two Brazilian clinical trial sites in rheumatology and oncology were examined to model their workflow and collect time-motion data. UML modeling was conducted in Eclipse, and a UML profile was developed to incorporate information used in discrete event simulation software. Results Ethnographic observation revealed bottlenecks in workflow: these included tasks requiring full commitment of CRCs, transferring notes from paper to computers, deviations from standard operating procedures, and conflicts between different IT systems. Time-motion analysis revealed that nurses' activities took up the most time in the workflow and contained a high frequency of shorter duration activities. Administrative assistants performed more activities near the beginning and end of the workflow. Overall, clinical trial tasks had a greater frequency than clinic routines or other general activities. Conclusions This paper describes a method for modeling clinical trial workflow in UML and standardizing these workflow diagrams through a UML profile. In the increasingly global environment of clinical trials, the standardization of workflow modeling is a necessary precursor to conducting a comparative

  13. Graphical tool for navigation within the semantic network of the UMLS metathesaurus on a locally installed database.

    PubMed

    Frankewitsch, T; Prokosch, H U

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge in the environment of information technologies is bound to structured vocabularies. Medical data dictionaries are necessary for uniquely describing findings like diagnoses, procedures or functions. Therefore we decided to locally install a version of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) of the U.S. National Library of Medicine as a repository for defining entries of a medical multimedia database. Because of the requirement to extend the vocabulary in concepts and relations between existing concepts a graphical tool for appending new items to the database has been developed: Although the database is an instance of a semantic network the focus on single entries offers the opportunity of reducing the net to a tree within this detail. Based on the graph theorem, there are definitions of nodes of concepts and nodes of knowledge. The UMLS additionally offers the specification of sub-relations, which can be represented, too. Using this view it is possible to manage these 1:n-Relations in a simple tree view. On this background an explorer like graphical user interface has been realised to add new concepts and define new relationships between those and existing entries for adapting the UMLS for specific purposes such as describing medical multimedia objects.

  14. Towards refactoring the Molecular Function Ontology with a UML profile for function modeling.

    PubMed

    Burek, Patryk; Loebe, Frank; Herre, Heinrich

    2017-10-04

    Gene Ontology (GO) is the largest resource for cataloging gene products. This resource grows steadily and, naturally, this growth raises issues regarding the structure of the ontology. Moreover, modeling and refactoring large ontologies such as GO is generally far from being simple, as a whole as well as when focusing on certain aspects or fragments. It seems that human-friendly graphical modeling languages such as the Unified Modeling Language (UML) could be helpful in connection with these tasks. We investigate the use of UML for making the structural organization of the Molecular Function Ontology (MFO), a sub-ontology of GO, more explicit. More precisely, we present a UML dialect, called the Function Modeling Language (FueL), which is suited for capturing functions in an ontologically founded way. FueL is equipped, among other features, with language elements that arise from studying patterns of subsumption between functions. We show how to use this UML dialect for capturing the structure of molecular functions. Furthermore, we propose and discuss some refactoring options concerning fragments of MFO. FueL enables the systematic, graphical representation of functions and their interrelations, including making information explicit that is currently either implicit in MFO or is mainly captured in textual descriptions. Moreover, the considered subsumption patterns lend themselves to the methodical analysis of refactoring options with respect to MFO. On this basis we argue that the approach can increase the comprehensibility of the structure of MFO for humans and can support communication, for example, during revision and further development.

  15. Sculpting the UMLS Refined Semantic Network.

    PubMed

    He, Zhe; Morrey, C Paul; Perl, Yehoshua; Elhanan, Gai; Chen, Ling; Chen, Yan; Geller, James

    2014-01-01

    inconsistencies that resulted in the reintroduction of unwarranted ISTs that had already been eliminated as a result of their previous corrections. Because of that, the transformation of the RSN into a compact network covering all necessary categories for the UMLS was slowed down. The corrections suggested by an audit of the 2013AA version of the UMLS achieve a compact RSN of equal magnitude as the UMLS SN. The number of ISTs has been reduced to 336. We also demonstrate how auditing the semantic type assignments of UMLS concepts can expose other modeling errors in the UMLS source terminologies, e.g., SNOMED CT, LOINC, and RxNORM that are important for health informatics. Such errors would otherwise stay hidden. It is hoped that the UMLS curators will implement all required corrections and use the RSN along with the SN when maintaining and extending the UMLS. When used correctly, the RSN will support the prevention of the accidental introduction of inconsistent semantic type assignments into the UMLS. Furthermore, this way the RSN will support the exposure of other hidden errors and inconsistencies in health informatics terminologies, which are sources of the UMLS. Notably, the development of the RSN materializes the deeper, more refined Semantic Network for the UMLS that its designers envisioned originally but had not implemented.

  16. Sculpting the UMLS Refined Semantic Network

    PubMed Central

    Morrey, C. Paul; Perl, Yehoshua; Elhanan, Gai; Chen, Ling; Chen, Yan; Geller, James

    2014-01-01

    editors of the UMLS introduced some new inconsistencies that resulted in the reintroduction of unwarranted ISTs that had already been eliminated as a result of their previous corrections. Because of that, the transformation of the RSN into a compact network covering all necessary categories for the UMLS was slowed down. The corrections suggested by an audit of the 2013AA version of the UMLS achieve a compact RSN of equal magnitude as the UMLS SN. The number of ISTs has been reduced to 336. We also demonstrate how auditing the semantic type assignments of UMLS concepts can expose other modeling errors in the UMLS source terminologies, e.g., SNOMED CT, LOINC, and RxNORM that are important for health informatics. Such errors would otherwise stay hidden. Conclusions It is hoped that the UMLS curators will implement all required corrections and use the RSN along with the SN when maintaining and extending the UMLS. When used correctly, the RSN will support the prevention of the accidental introduction of inconsistent semantic type assignments into the UMLS. Furthermore, this way the RSN will support the exposure of other hidden errors and inconsistencies in health informatics terminologies, which are sources of the UMLS. Notably, the development of the RSN materializes the deeper, more refined Semantic Network for the UMLS that its designers envisioned originally but had not implemented. PMID:25422719

  17. UML activity diagram swimlanes in logic controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobelny, Michał; Grobelna, Iwona

    2015-12-01

    Logic controller behavior can be specified using various techniques, including UML activity diagrams and control Petri nets. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. Application of both specification types in one project allows to take benefits from both of them. Additional elements of UML models make it possible to divide a specification into some parts, considered from other point of view (logic controller, user or system). The paper introduces an idea to use UML activity diagrams with swimlanes to increase the understandability of design models.

  18. A UML-based ontology for describing hospital information system architectures.

    PubMed

    Winter, A; Brigl, B; Wendt, T

    2001-01-01

    To control the heterogeneity inherent to hospital information systems the information management needs appropriate hospital information systems modeling methods or techniques. This paper shows that, for several reasons, available modeling approaches are not able to answer relevant questions of information management. To overcome this major deficiency we offer an UML-based ontology for describing hospital information systems architectures. This ontology views at three layers: the domain layer, the logical tool layer, and the physical tool layer, and defines the relevant components. The relations between these components, especially between components of different layers make the answering of our information management questions possible.

  19. A UML profile for the OBO relation ontology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ontologies have increasingly been used in the biomedical domain, which has prompted the emergence of different initiatives to facilitate their development and integration. The Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) Foundry consortium provides a repository of life-science ontologies, which are developed according to a set of shared principles. This consortium has developed an ontology called OBO Relation Ontology aiming at standardizing the different types of biological entity classes and associated relationships. Since ontologies are primarily intended to be used by humans, the use of graphical notations for ontology development facilitates the capture, comprehension and communication of knowledge between its users. However, OBO Foundry ontologies are captured and represented basically using text-based notations. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) provides a standard and widely-used graphical notation for modeling computer systems. UML provides a well-defined set of modeling elements, which can be extended using a built-in extension mechanism named Profile. Thus, this work aims at developing a UML profile for the OBO Relation Ontology to provide a domain-specific set of modeling elements that can be used to create standard UML-based ontologies in the biomedical domain. Results We have studied the OBO Relation Ontology, the UML metamodel and the UML profiling mechanism. Based on these studies, we have proposed an extension to the UML metamodel in conformance with the OBO Relation Ontology and we have defined a profile that implements the extended metamodel. Finally, we have applied the proposed UML profile in the development of a number of fragments from different ontologies. Particularly, we have considered the Gene Ontology (GO), the PRotein Ontology (PRO) and the Xenopus Anatomy and Development Ontology (XAO). Conclusions The use of an established and well-known graphical language in the development of biomedical ontologies provides a more

  20. Automatic Synthesis of UML Designs from Requirements in an Iterative Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Whittle, Jon; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is gaining wide popularity for the design of object-oriented systems. UML combines various object-oriented graphical design notations under one common framework. A major factor for the broad acceptance of UML is that it can be conveniently used in a highly iterative, Use Case (or scenario-based) process (although the process is not a part of UML). Here, the (pre-) requirements for the software are specified rather informally as Use Cases and a set of scenarios. A scenario can be seen as an individual trace of a software artifact. Besides first sketches of a class diagram to illustrate the static system breakdown, scenarios are a favorite way of communication with the customer, because scenarios describe concrete interactions between entities and are thus easy to understand. Scenarios with a high level of detail are often expressed as sequence diagrams. Later in the design and implementation stage (elaboration and implementation phases), a design of the system's behavior is often developed as a set of statecharts. From there (and the full-fledged class diagram), actual code development is started. Current commercial UML tools support this phase by providing code generators for class diagrams and statecharts. In practice, it can be observed that the transition from requirements to design to code is a highly iterative process. In this talk, a set of algorithms is presented which perform reasonable synthesis and transformations between different UML notations (sequence diagrams, Object Constraint Language (OCL) constraints, statecharts). More specifically, we will discuss the following transformations: Statechart synthesis, introduction of hierarchy, consistency of modifications, and "design-debugging".

  1. Practical Results from the Application of Model Checking and Test Generation from UML/SysML Models of On-Board Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, J. M.; Mahomad, S.; Silva, N.

    2009-05-01

    The deployment of complex safety-critical applications requires rigorous techniques and powerful tools both for the development and V&V stages. Model-based technologies are increasingly being used to develop safety-critical software, and arguably, turning to them can bring significant benefits to such processes, however, along with new challenges. This paper presents the results of a research project where we tried to extend current V&V methodologies to be applied on UML/SysML models and aiming at answering the demands related to validation issues. Two quite different but complementary approaches were investigated: (i) model checking and the (ii) extraction of robustness test-cases from the same models. These two approaches don't overlap and when combined provide a wider reaching model/design validation ability than each one alone thus offering improved safety assurance. Results are very encouraging, even though they either fell short of the desired outcome as shown for model checking, or still appear as not fully matured as shown for robustness test case extraction. In the case of model checking, it was verified that the automatic model validation process can become fully operational and even expanded in scope once tool vendors help (inevitably) to improve the XMI standard interoperability situation. For the robustness test case extraction methodology, the early approach produced interesting results but need further systematisation and consolidation effort in order to produce results in a more predictable fashion and reduce reliance on expert's heuristics. Finally, further improvements and innovation research projects were immediately apparent for both investigated approaches, which point to either circumventing current limitations in XMI interoperability on one hand and bringing test case specification onto the same graphical level as the models themselves and then attempting to automate the generation of executable test cases from its standard UML notation.

  2. Representing Thoughts, Words, and Things in the UMLS

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Keith E.; Oliver, Diane E.; Spackman, Kent A.; Shortliffe, Edward H.

    1998-01-01

    The authors describe a framework, based on the Ogden-Richards semiotic triangle, for understanding the relationship between the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and the source terminologies from which the UMLS derives its content. They pay particular attention to UMLS's Concept Unique Identifier (CUI) and the sense of “meaning” it represents as contrasted with the sense of “meaning” represented by the source terminologies. The CUI takes on emergent meaning through linkage to terms in different terminology systems. In some cases, a CUI's emergent meaning can differ significantly from the original sources' intended meanings of terms linked by that CUI. Identification of these different senses of meaning within the UMLS is consistent with historical themes of semantic interpretation of language. Examination of the UMLS within such a historical framework makes it possible to better understand the strengths and limitations of the UMLS approach for integrating disparate terminologic systems and to provide a model, or theoretic foundation, for evaluating the UMLS as a Possible World—that is, as a mathematical formalism that represents propositions about some perspective or interpretation of the physical world. PMID:9760390

  3. UML as a cell and biochemistry modeling language.

    PubMed

    Webb, Ken; White, Tony

    2005-06-01

    The systems biology community is building increasingly complex models and simulations of cells and other biological entities, and are beginning to look at alternatives to traditional representations such as those provided by ordinary differential equations (ODE). The lessons learned over the years by the software development community in designing and building increasingly complex telecommunication and other commercial real-time reactive systems, can be advantageously applied to the problems of modeling in the biology domain. Making use of the object-oriented (OO) paradigm, the unified modeling language (UML) and Real-Time Object-Oriented Modeling (ROOM) visual formalisms, and the Rational Rose RealTime (RRT) visual modeling tool, we describe a multi-step process we have used to construct top-down models of cells and cell aggregates. The simple example model described in this paper includes membranes with lipid bilayers, multiple compartments including a variable number of mitochondria, substrate molecules, enzymes with reaction rules, and metabolic pathways. We demonstrate the relevance of abstraction, reuse, objects, classes, component and inheritance hierarchies, multiplicity, visual modeling, and other current software development best practices. We show how it is possible to start with a direct diagrammatic representation of a biological structure such as a cell, using terminology familiar to biologists, and by following a process of gradually adding more and more detail, arrive at a system with structure and behavior of arbitrary complexity that can run and be observed on a computer. We discuss our CellAK (Cell Assembly Kit) approach in terms of features found in SBML, CellML, E-CELL, Gepasi, Jarnac, StochSim, Virtual Cell, and membrane computing systems.

  4. Auditing the Assignments of Top-Level Semantic Types in the UMLS Semantic Network to UMLS Concepts

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhe; Perl, Yehoshua; Elhanan, Gai; Chen, Yan; Geller, James; Bian, Jiang

    2018-01-01

    The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) is an important terminological system. By the policy of its curators, each concept of the UMLS should be assigned the most specific Semantic Types (STs) in the UMLS Semantic Network (SN). Hence, the Semantic Types of most UMLS concepts are assigned at or near the bottom (leaves) of the UMLS Semantic Network. While most ST assignments are correct, some errors do occur. Therefore, Quality Assurance efforts of UMLS curators for ST assignments should concentrate on automatically detected sets of UMLS concepts with higher error rates than random sets. In this paper, we investigate the assignments of top-level semantic types in the UMLS semantic network to concepts, identify potential erroneous assignments, define four categories of errors, and thus provide assistance to curators of the UMLS to avoid these assignments errors. Human experts analyzed samples of concepts assigned 10 of the top-level semantic types and categorized the erroneous ST assignments into these four logical categories. Two thirds of the concepts assigned these 10 top-level semantic types are erroneous. Our results demonstrate that reviewing top-level semantic type assignments to concepts provides an effective way for UMLS quality assurance, comparing to reviewing a random selection of semantic type assignments. PMID:29375930

  5. Auditing the Assignments of Top-Level Semantic Types in the UMLS Semantic Network to UMLS Concepts.

    PubMed

    He, Zhe; Perl, Yehoshua; Elhanan, Gai; Chen, Yan; Geller, James; Bian, Jiang

    2017-11-01

    The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) is an important terminological system. By the policy of its curators, each concept of the UMLS should be assigned the most specific Semantic Types (STs) in the UMLS Semantic Network (SN). Hence, the Semantic Types of most UMLS concepts are assigned at or near the bottom (leaves) of the UMLS Semantic Network. While most ST assignments are correct, some errors do occur. Therefore, Quality Assurance efforts of UMLS curators for ST assignments should concentrate on automatically detected sets of UMLS concepts with higher error rates than random sets. In this paper, we investigate the assignments of top-level semantic types in the UMLS semantic network to concepts, identify potential erroneous assignments, define four categories of errors, and thus provide assistance to curators of the UMLS to avoid these assignments errors. Human experts analyzed samples of concepts assigned 10 of the top-level semantic types and categorized the erroneous ST assignments into these four logical categories. Two thirds of the concepts assigned these 10 top-level semantic types are erroneous. Our results demonstrate that reviewing top-level semantic type assignments to concepts provides an effective way for UMLS quality assurance, comparing to reviewing a random selection of semantic type assignments.

  6. Unambiguous UML Composite Structures: The OMEGA2 Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ober, Iulian; Dragomir, Iulia

    Starting from version 2.0, UML introduced hierarchical composite structures, which are a very expressive way of defining complex software architectures, but which have a very loosely defined semantics in the standard. In this paper we propose a set of consistency rules that ensure UML composite structures are unambiguous and can be given a precise semantics. Our primary application of the static consistency rules defined in this paper is within the OMEGA UML profile [6], but these rules are general and applicable to other hierarchical component models based on the same concepts, such as MARTE GCM or SysML. The rule set has been formalized in OCL and is currently used in the OMEGA UML compiler.

  7. A UML profile for the OBO relation ontology.

    PubMed

    Guardia, Gabriela D A; Vêncio, Ricardo Z N; de Farias, Cléver R G

    2012-01-01

    Ontologies have increasingly been used in the biomedical domain, which has prompted the emergence of different initiatives to facilitate their development and integration. The Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) Foundry consortium provides a repository of life-science ontologies, which are developed according to a set of shared principles. This consortium has developed an ontology called OBO Relation Ontology aiming at standardizing the different types of biological entity classes and associated relationships. Since ontologies are primarily intended to be used by humans, the use of graphical notations for ontology development facilitates the capture, comprehension and communication of knowledge between its users. However, OBO Foundry ontologies are captured and represented basically using text-based notations. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) provides a standard and widely-used graphical notation for modeling computer systems. UML provides a well-defined set of modeling elements, which can be extended using a built-in extension mechanism named Profile. Thus, this work aims at developing a UML profile for the OBO Relation Ontology to provide a domain-specific set of modeling elements that can be used to create standard UML-based ontologies in the biomedical domain.

  8. Transforming Functional Requirements from UML into BPEL to Efficiently Develop SOA-Based Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemulapalli, Anisha; Subramanian, Nary

    The intended behavior of any system such as services, tasks or functions can be captured by functional requirements of the system. As our dependence on online services has grown steadily, the web applications are being developed employing the SOA. BPEL4WS provides a means for expressing functional requirements of an SOA-based system by providing constructs to capture business goals and objectives for the system. In this paper we propose an approach for transforming user-centered requirements captured using UML into a corresponding BPEL specification, where the business processes are captured by means of use-cases from which UML sequence diagrams and activity diagrams are extracted. Subsequently these UML models are mapped to BPEL specifications that capture the essence of the initial business requirements to develop the SOA-based system by employing CASE tools. A student housing system is used as a case study to illustrate this approach and the system is validated using NetBeans.

  9. Supporting Collaborative Learning and Problem-Solving in a Constraint-Based CSCL Environment for UML Class Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baghaei, Nilufar; Mitrovic, Antonija; Irwin, Warwick

    2007-01-01

    We present COLLECT-UML, a constraint-based intelligent tutoring system (ITS) that teaches object-oriented analysis and design using Unified Modelling Language (UML). UML is easily the most popular object-oriented modelling technology in current practice. While teaching how to design UML class diagrams, COLLECT-UML also provides feedback on…

  10. A Survey of UML Based Regression Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahad, Muhammad; Nadeem, Aamer

    Regression testing is the process of ensuring software quality by analyzing whether changed parts behave as intended, and unchanged parts are not affected by the modifications. Since it is a costly process, a lot of techniques are proposed in the research literature that suggest testers how to build regression test suite from existing test suite with minimum cost. In this paper, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of using UML diagrams for regression testing and analyze that UML model helps in identifying changes for regression test selection effectively. We survey the existing UML based regression testing techniques and provide an analysis matrix to give a quick insight into prominent features of the literature work. We discuss the open research issues like managing and reducing the size of regression test suite, prioritization of the test cases that would be helpful during strict schedule and resources that remain to be addressed for UML based regression testing.

  11. UML Profiles for Design Decisions and Non-Functional Requirements

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zhu, Liming; Gorton, Ian

    2007-06-30

    A software architecture is composed of a collection of design decisions. Each design decision helps or hinders certain Non-Functional Requirements (NFR). Current software architecture views focus on expressing components and connectors in the system. Design decisions and their relationships with non-functional requirements are often captured in separate design documentation, not explicitly expressed in any views. This disassociation makes architecture comprehension and architecture evolution harder. In this paper, we propose a UML profile for modeling design decisions and an associated UML profile for modeling non-functional requirements in a generic way. The two UML profiles treat design decisions and nonfunctional requirements asmore » first-class elements. Modeled design decisions always refer to existing architectural elements and thus maintain traceability between the two. We provide a mechanism for checking consistency over this traceability. An exemplar is given as« less

  12. The Use of UML for Software Requirements Expression and Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Alex; Clark, Ken

    2015-01-01

    It is common practice to write English-language "shall" statements to embody detailed software requirements in aerospace software applications. This paper explores the use of the UML language as a replacement for the English language for this purpose. Among the advantages offered by the Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a high degree of clarity and precision in the expression of domain concepts as well as architecture and design. Can this quality of UML be exploited for the definition of software requirements? While expressing logical behavior, interface characteristics, timeliness constraints, and other constraints on software using UML is commonly done and relatively straight-forward, achieving the additional aspects of the expression and management of software requirements that stakeholders expect, especially traceability, is far less so. These other characteristics, concerned with auditing and quality control, include the ability to trace a requirement to a parent requirement (which may well be an English "shall" statement), to trace a requirement to verification activities or scenarios which verify that requirement, and to trace a requirement to elements of the software design which implement that requirement. UML Use Cases, designed for capturing requirements, have not always been satisfactory. Some applications of them simply use the Use Case model element as a repository for English requirement statements. Other applications of Use Cases, in which Use Cases are incorporated into behavioral diagrams that successfully communicate the behaviors and constraints required of the software, do indeed take advantage of UML's clarity, but not in ways that support the traceability features mentioned above. Our approach uses the Stereotype construct of UML to precisely identify elements of UML constructs, especially behaviors such as State Machines and Activities, as requirements, and also to achieve the necessary mapping capabilities. We describe this approach in the

  13. A Collaborative Support Approach on UML Sequence Diagrams for Aspect-Oriented Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida Naufal, Rafael; Silveira, Fábio F.; Guerra, Eduardo M.

    AOP and its broader application on software projects brings the importance to provide the separation between aspects and OO components at design time, to leverage the understanding of AO systems, promote aspects' reuse and obtain the benefits of AO modularization. Since the UML is a standard for modeling OO systems, it can be applied to model the decoupling between aspects and OO components. The application of UML to this area is the subject of constant study and is the focus of this paper. In this paper it is presented an extension based on the default UML meta-model, named MIMECORA-DS, to show object-object, object-aspect and aspect-aspect interactions applying the UML's sequence diagram. This research also presents the application of MIMECORA-DS in a case example, to assess its applicability.

  14. Evaluation Methodology for UML and GML Application Schemas Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojka, Agnieszka

    2014-05-01

    INSPIRE Directive implementation in Poland has caused the significant increase of interest in making spatial data and services available, particularly among public administration and private institutions. This entailed a series of initiatives that aim to harmonise different spatial data sets, so to ensure their internal logical and semantic coherence. Harmonisation lets to reach the interoperability of spatial databases, then among other things enables joining them together. The process of harmonisation requires either working out new data structures or adjusting existing data structures of spatial databases to INSPIRE guidelines and recommendations. Data structures are described with the use of UML and GML application schemas. Although working out accurate and correct application schemas isn't an easy task. There should be considered many issues, for instance recommendations of ISO 19100 series of Geographic Information Standards, appropriate regulations for given problem or topic, production opportunities and limitations (software, tools). In addition, GML application schema is deeply connected with UML application schema, it should be its translation. Not everything that can be expressed in UML, though can be directly expressed in GML, and this can have significant influence on the spatial data sets interoperability, and thereby the ability to valid data exchange. For these reasons, the capability to examine and estimate UML and GML application schemas quality, therein also the capability to explore their entropy, would be very important. The principal subject of this research is to propose an evaluation methodology for UML and GML application schemas quality prepared in the Head Office of Geodesy and Cartography in Poland within the INSPIRE Directive implementation works.

  15. The Best of all Possible Worlds: Applying the Model Driven Architecture Approach to a JC3IEDM OWL Ontology Modeled in UML

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-25

    EA’s Java application programming interface (API), the team built a tool called OWL2EA that can ingest an OWL file and generate the corresponding UML...ObjectItemStructure specification shown in Figure 10. Running this script in the relational database server MySQL creates the physical schema that

  16. [Modeling the requirements on routine data of general practitioners from the health-care researcher's point of view with the help of unified modeling langauge (UML)].

    PubMed

    Kersting, M; Hauswaldt, J; Lingner, H

    2012-08-01

    Health-care research is, besides primary acquired study data, based on data from widely differing secondary sources. In order to link, compare and analyze data sources uniform models and methods are needed. This could be facilitated by a more structured description of requirements, models and methods of health-care research than those currently used. Suitable methods of presentation were sought in an approach to this target and the unified modeling language (UML) identified as a possible alternative. Using different tools 3 UML diagrams were created to represent some individual aspects of a scientific use file (SUF): A use case diagram as well as an activity and a class diagram. In the use case diagram we attempted to represent the general use cases of an SUF based on general practitioners routine data. Secondly a class diagram was constructed to visualize the contents and structure of a SUF. Thirdly an activity diagram was developed to graphically represent the concept of a general practitioner's episode of care. The creation of the UML diagrams was possible without any technical difficulties. Regarding the content the 3 diagrams must still be considered as prototypes. The use case diagram shows possible uses and users of an SUF, e. g. a research worker, industry but also the general practitioner who supplies the data. The class diagram reveals a general data structure that can serve information processes in practice and research. Besides aggregation, possibilities for specialization and generalization are essential elements of the class diagram that can be used meaningfully. The activity diagram for the schematic representation of a general practitioner's episode of care reveals the existence of multiple endpoints of an episode and the possibility to form relationships by means of episodes (diagnosis>therapy). The constructed diagrams are preliminary results and should be refined in future steps. Use case diagrams enable a rapid overview of the meaning and

  17. Biomedical Terminology Mapper for UML projects.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Julien C; Frey, Lewis

    2013-01-01

    As the biomedical community collects and generates more and more data, the need to describe these datasets for exchange and interoperability becomes crucial. This paper presents a mapping algorithm that can help developers expose local implementations described with UML through standard terminologies. The input UML class or attribute name is first normalized and tokenized, then lookups in a UMLS-based dictionary are performed. For the evaluation of the algorithm 142 UML projects were extracted from caGrid and automatically mapped to National Cancer Institute (NCI) terminology concepts. Resulting mappings at the UML class and attribute levels were compared to the manually curated annotations provided in caGrid. Results are promising and show that this type of algorithm could speed-up the tedious process of mapping local implementations to standard biomedical terminologies.

  18. Biomedical Terminology Mapper for UML projects

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Julien C.; Frey, Lewis

    As the biomedical community collects and generates more and more data, the need to describe these datasets for exchange and interoperability becomes crucial. This paper presents a mapping algorithm that can help developers expose local implementations described with UML through standard terminologies. The input UML class or attribute name is first normalized and tokenized, then lookups in a UMLS-based dictionary are performed. For the evaluation of the algorithm 142 UML projects were extracted from caGrid and automatically mapped to National Cancer Institute (NCI) terminology concepts. Resulting mappings at the UML class and attribute levels were compared to the manually curated annotations provided in caGrid. Results are promising and show that this type of algorithm could speed-up the tedious process of mapping local implementations to standard biomedical terminologies. PMID:24303278

  19. XMI2USE: A Tool for Transforming XMI to USE Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wuliang; Song, Eunjee; Grabow, Paul C.; Simmonds, Devon M.

    The UML-based Specification Environment (USE) tool supports syntactic analysis, type checking, consistency checking, and dynamic validation of invariants and pre-/post conditions specified in the Object Constraint Language (OCL). Due to its animation and analysis power, it is useful when checking critical non-functional properties such as security policies. However, the USE tool requires one to specify (i.e., "write") a model using its own textual language and does not allow one to import any model specification files created by other UML modeling tools. Hence, to make the best use of existing UML tools, we often create a model with OCL constraints using a modeling tool such as the IBM Rational Software Architect (RSA) and then use the USE tool for model validation. This approach, however, requires a manual transformation between the specifications of two different tool formats, which is error-prone and diminishes the benefit of automated model-level validations. In this paper, we describe our own implementation of a specification transformation engine that is based on the Model Driven Architecture (MDA) framework and currently supports automatic tool-level transformations from RSA to USE.

  20. Visual Modelling of Data Warehousing Flows with UML Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardillo, Jesús; Golfarelli, Matteo; Rizzi, Stefano; Trujillo, Juan

    Data warehousing involves complex processes that transform source data through several stages to deliver suitable information ready to be analysed. Though many techniques for visual modelling of data warehouses from the static point of view have been devised, only few attempts have been made to model the data flows involved in a data warehousing process. Besides, each attempt was mainly aimed at a specific application, such as ETL, OLAP, what-if analysis, data mining. Data flows are typically very complex in this domain; for this reason, we argue, designers would greatly benefit from a technique for uniformly modelling data warehousing flows for all applications. In this paper, we propose an integrated visual modelling technique for data cubes and data flows. This technique is based on UML profiling; its feasibility is evaluated by means of a prototype implementation.

  1. UML activity diagrams in requirements specification of logic controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobelna, Iwona; Grobelny, Michał

    2015-12-01

    Logic controller specification can be prepared using various techniques. One of them is the wide understandable and user-friendly UML language and its activity diagrams. Using formal methods during the design phase increases the assurance that implemented system meets the project requirements. In the approach we use the model checking technique to formally verify a specification against user-defined behavioral requirements. The properties are usually defined as temporal logic formulas. In the paper we propose to use UML activity diagrams in requirements definition and then to formalize them as temporal logic formulas. As a result, UML activity diagrams can be used both for logic controller specification and for requirements definition, what simplifies the specification and verification process.

  2. A unified representation of findings in clinical radiology using the UMLS and DICOM.

    PubMed

    Bertaud, Valérie; Lasbleiz, Jérémy; Mougin, Fleur; Burgun, Anita; Duvauferrier, Régis

    2008-09-01

    Collecting and analyzing findings constitute the basis of medical activity. Computer assisted medical activity raises the problem of modelling findings. We propose a unified representation of findings integrating the representations of findings in the GAMUTS in Radiology [M.M. Reeder, B. Felson, GAMUTS in radiology Comprehensive lists of roentgen differential diagnosis, fourth ed., 2003], the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), and the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine Structured Report (DICOM-SR). Starting from a corpus of findings in bone and joint radiology [M.M. Reeder, B. Felson, GAMUTS in Radiology comprehensive lists of roentgen differential diagnosis, fourth ed., 2003] (3481 words), an automated mapping to the UMLS was performed with the Metamap Program. The resulting UMLS terms and Semantic Types were analyzed in order to find a generic template in accordance with DICOM-SR structure. UMLS Concepts were missing for 45% of the GAMUTS findings. Three kinds of regularities were observed in the way the Semantic Types were combined: "pathological findings", "physiological findings" and "anatomical findings". A generic and original DICOM-SR template modelling finding was proposed. It was evaluated for representing GAMUTS jaws findings. 21% missing terms had to be picked up from Radlex (5%) or created (16%). This article shows that it is possible to represent findings using the UMLS and the DICOM SR formalism with a semi-automated method. The Metamap program helped to find a model to represent the semantic structure of free texts with standardized terms (UMLS Concepts). Nevertheless, the coverage of the UMLS is not comprehensive. This study shows that the UMLS should include more technical concepts and more concepts regarding findings, signs and symptoms to be suitable for radiology representation. The semi-automated translation of the whole GAMUTS using the UMLS concepts and the DICOM SR relations could help to create or supplement the DCMR

  3. Diagram, a Learning Environment for Initiation to Object-Oriented Modeling with UML Class Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Py, Dominique; Auxepaules, Ludovic; Alonso, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents Diagram, a learning environment for object-oriented modelling (OOM) with UML class diagrams. Diagram an open environment, in which the teacher can add new exercises without constraints on the vocabulary or the size of the diagram. The interface includes methodological help, encourages self-correcting and self-monitoring, and…

  4. Arranging ISO 13606 archetypes into a knowledge base using UML connectors.

    PubMed

    Kopanitsa, Georgy

    2014-01-01

    To enable the efficient reuse of standard based medical data we propose to develop a higher-level information model that will complement the archetype model of ISO 13606. This model will make use of the relationships that are specified in UML to connect medical archetypes into a knowledge base within a repository. UML connectors were analysed for their ability to be applied in the implementation of a higher-level model that will establish relationships between archetypes. An information model was developed using XML Schema notation. The model allows linking different archetypes of one repository into a knowledge base. Presently it supports several relationships and will be advanced in future.

  5. Representation of Nursing Terminologies in UMLS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Youn; Coenen, Amy; Hardiker, Nicholas; Bartz, Claudia C.

    2011-01-01

    There are seven nursing terminologies or classifications that are considered a standard to support nursing practice in the U.S. Harmonizing these terminologies will enhance the interoperability of clinical data documented across nursing practice. As a first step to harmonize the nursing terminologies, the purpose of this study was to examine how nursing problems or diagnostic concepts from select terminologies were cross-mapped in Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). A comparison analysis was conducted by examining whether cross-mappings available in UMLS through concept unique identifiers were consistent with cross-mappings conducted by human experts. Of 423 concepts from three terminologies, 411 (97%) were manually cross-mapped by experts to the International Classification for Nursing Practice. The UMLS semantic mapping among the 411 nursing concepts presented 33.6% accuracy (i.e., 138 of 411 concepts) when compared to expert cross-mappings. Further research and collaboration among experts in this field are needed for future enhancement of UMLS. PMID:22195127

  6. Generating Models of Surgical Procedures using UMLS Concepts and Multiple Sequence Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Frank; D’Avolio, Leonard W.; Chen, Andrew A.; Taira, Ricky K.; Kangarloo, Hooshang

    2005-01-01

    Surgical procedures can be viewed as a process composed of a sequence of steps performed on, by, or with the patient’s anatomy. This sequence is typically the pattern followed by surgeons when generating surgical report narratives for documenting surgical procedures. This paper describes a methodology for semi-automatically deriving a model of conducted surgeries, utilizing a sequence of derived Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts for representing surgical procedures. A multiple sequence alignment was computed from a collection of such sequences and was used for generating the model. These models have the potential of being useful in a variety of informatics applications such as information retrieval and automatic document generation. PMID:16779094

  7. A model-based design and validation approach with OMEGA-UML and the IF toolset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-hafaiedh, Imene; Constant, Olivier; Graf, Susanne; Robbana, Riadh

    2009-03-01

    Intelligent, embedded systems such as autonomous robots and other industrial systems are becoming increasingly more heterogeneous with respect to the platforms on which they are implemented, and thus the software architecture more complex to design and analyse. In this context, it is important to have well-defined design methodologies which should be supported by (1) high level design concepts allowing to master the design complexity, (2) concepts for the expression of non-functional requirements and (3) analysis tools allowing to verify or invalidate that the system under development will be able to conform to its requirements. We illustrate here such an approach for the design of complex embedded systems on hand of a small case study used as a running example for illustration purposes. We briefly present the important concepts of the OMEGA-RT UML profile, we show how we use this profile in a modelling approach, and explain how these concepts are used in the IFx verification toolbox to integrate validation into the design flow and make scalable verification possible.

  8. Piecewise synonyms for enhanced UMLS source terminology integration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Chuan; Geller, James; Halper, Michael; Cimino, James J

    2007-10-11

    The UMLS contains more than 100 source vocabularies and is growing via the integration of others. When integrating a new source, the source terms already in the UMLS must first be found. The easiest approach to this is simple string matching. However, string matching usually does not find all concepts that should be found. A new methodology, based on the notion of piecewise synonyms, for enhancing the process of concept discovery in the UMLS is presented. This methodology is supported by first creating a general synonym dictionary based on the UMLS. Each multi-word source term is decomposed into its component words, allowing for the generation of separate synonyms for each word from the general synonym dictionary. The recombination of these synonyms into new terms creates an expanded pool of matching candidates for terms from the source. The methodology is demonstrated with respect to an existing UMLS source. It shows a 34% improvement over simple string matching.

  9. Time process study with UML.

    PubMed

    Shiki, N; Ohno, Y; Fujii, A; Murata, T; Matsumura, Y

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new business-process analysis approach, Time Process Study (TPS), which comprises process analysis and time and motion studies (TMS). TPS offsets weaknesses of TMS; the cost of field studies and the difficulties in applying them to tasks whose time span differs from those of usual tasks. In TPS, the job procedures are first displayed using a unified modeling language (UML). Next, time and manpower for each procedure are studied through interviews and TMS, and the information is appended to the UML diagram. We applied TPS in the case of a hospital-based cancer registry (HCR) of a university hospital to clarify the work procedure and the time required, and investigated TPS's availability. Meetings for the study were held once a month from July to September in 2008, and one inquirer committed a total of eight hours to the hospital survey. TPS revealed that HCR consisted of three tasks and 14 functions. The registration required 123 hours/month/person, the quality control required 6.5 hours/ 6 months/person and filing data into the population-based cancer registry required 0.5 hours/6 months/person. Of the total tasks involved in registration, 116.5 hours/month/person were undertaken by a registration worker, which shows the necessity of employing one full-time staff. With TPS, it is straightforward to share the concept among the study-team because the job procedure is first displayed using UML. Therefore, it requires a few workload to conduct TMS and interview. The obtained results were adopted for the review of staff assignment of HCR by Japanese government.

  10. A UMLS-based spell checker for natural language processing in vaccine safety.

    PubMed

    Tolentino, Herman D; Matters, Michael D; Walop, Wikke; Law, Barbara; Tong, Wesley; Liu, Fang; Fontelo, Paul; Kohl, Katrin; Payne, Daniel C

    2007-02-12

    The Institute of Medicine has identified patient safety as a key goal for health care in the United States. Detecting vaccine adverse events is an important public health activity that contributes to patient safety. Reports about adverse events following immunization (AEFI) from surveillance systems contain free-text components that can be analyzed using natural language processing. To extract Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts from free text and classify AEFI reports based on concepts they contain, we first needed to clean the text by expanding abbreviations and shortcuts and correcting spelling errors. Our objective in this paper was to create a UMLS-based spelling error correction tool as a first step in the natural language processing (NLP) pipeline for AEFI reports. We developed spell checking algorithms using open source tools. We used de-identified AEFI surveillance reports to create free-text data sets for analysis. After expansion of abbreviated clinical terms and shortcuts, we performed spelling correction in four steps: (1) error detection, (2) word list generation, (3) word list disambiguation and (4) error correction. We then measured the performance of the resulting spell checker by comparing it to manual correction. We used 12,056 words to train the spell checker and tested its performance on 8,131 words. During testing, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) for the spell checker were 74% (95% CI: 74-75), 100% (95% CI: 100-100), and 47% (95% CI: 46%-48%), respectively. We created a prototype spell checker that can be used to process AEFI reports. We used the UMLS Specialist Lexicon as the primary source of dictionary terms and the WordNet lexicon as a secondary source. We used the UMLS as a domain-specific source of dictionary terms to compare potentially misspelled words in the corpus. The prototype sensitivity was comparable to currently available tools, but the specificity was much superior. The slow processing

  11. A UMLS-based spell checker for natural language processing in vaccine safety

    PubMed Central

    Tolentino, Herman D; Matters, Michael D; Walop, Wikke; Law, Barbara; Tong, Wesley; Liu, Fang; Fontelo, Paul; Kohl, Katrin; Payne, Daniel C

    2007-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine has identified patient safety as a key goal for health care in the United States. Detecting vaccine adverse events is an important public health activity that contributes to patient safety. Reports about adverse events following immunization (AEFI) from surveillance systems contain free-text components that can be analyzed using natural language processing. To extract Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts from free text and classify AEFI reports based on concepts they contain, we first needed to clean the text by expanding abbreviations and shortcuts and correcting spelling errors. Our objective in this paper was to create a UMLS-based spelling error correction tool as a first step in the natural language processing (NLP) pipeline for AEFI reports. Methods We developed spell checking algorithms using open source tools. We used de-identified AEFI surveillance reports to create free-text data sets for analysis. After expansion of abbreviated clinical terms and shortcuts, we performed spelling correction in four steps: (1) error detection, (2) word list generation, (3) word list disambiguation and (4) error correction. We then measured the performance of the resulting spell checker by comparing it to manual correction. Results We used 12,056 words to train the spell checker and tested its performance on 8,131 words. During testing, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) for the spell checker were 74% (95% CI: 74–75), 100% (95% CI: 100–100), and 47% (95% CI: 46%–48%), respectively. Conclusion We created a prototype spell checker that can be used to process AEFI reports. We used the UMLS Specialist Lexicon as the primary source of dictionary terms and the WordNet lexicon as a secondary source. We used the UMLS as a domain-specific source of dictionary terms to compare potentially misspelled words in the corpus. The prototype sensitivity was comparable to currently available tools, but the

  12. Revel8or: Model Driven Capacity Planning Tool Suite

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Zhu, Liming; Liu, Yan; Bui, Ngoc B.

    2007-05-31

    Designing complex multi-tier applications that must meet strict performance requirements is a challenging software engineering problem. Ideally, the application architect could derive accurate performance predictions early in the project life-cycle, leveraging initial application design-level models and a description of the target software and hardware platforms. To this end, we have developed a capacity planning tool suite for component-based applications, called Revel8tor. The tool adheres to the model driven development paradigm and supports benchmarking and performance prediction for J2EE, .Net and Web services platforms. The suite is composed of three different tools: MDAPerf, MDABench and DSLBench. MDAPerf allows annotation of designmore » diagrams and derives performance analysis models. MDABench allows a customized benchmark application to be modeled in the UML 2.0 Testing Profile and automatically generates a deployable application, with measurement automatically conducted. DSLBench allows the same benchmark modeling and generation to be conducted using a simple performance engineering Domain Specific Language (DSL) in Microsoft Visual Studio. DSLBench integrates with Visual Studio and reuses its load testing infrastructure. Together, the tool suite can assist capacity planning across platforms in an automated fashion.« less

  13. Logic-based assessment of the compatibility of UMLS ontology sources

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The UMLS Metathesaurus (UMLS-Meta) is currently the most comprehensive effort for integrating independently-developed medical thesauri and ontologies. UMLS-Meta is being used in many applications, including PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov. The integration of new sources combines automatic techniques, expert assessment, and auditing protocols. The automatic techniques currently in use, however, are mostly based on lexical algorithms and often disregard the semantics of the sources being integrated. Results In this paper, we argue that UMLS-Meta’s current design and auditing methodologies could be significantly enhanced by taking into account the logic-based semantics of the ontology sources. We provide empirical evidence suggesting that UMLS-Meta in its 2009AA version contains a significant number of errors; these errors become immediately apparent if the rich semantics of the ontology sources is taken into account, manifesting themselves as unintended logical consequences that follow from the ontology sources together with the information in UMLS-Meta. We then propose general principles and specific logic-based techniques to effectively detect and repair such errors. Conclusions Our results suggest that the methodologies employed in the design of UMLS-Meta are not only very costly in terms of human effort, but also error-prone. The techniques presented here can be useful for both reducing human effort in the design and maintenance of UMLS-Meta and improving the quality of its contents. PMID:21388571

  14. A review method for UML requirements analysis model employing system-side prototyping.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Shinpei; Matsuura, Saeko

    2013-12-01

    User interface prototyping is an effective method for users to validate the requirements defined by analysts at an early stage of a software development. However, a user interface prototype system offers weak support for the analysts to verify the consistency of the specifications about internal aspects of a system such as business logic. As the result, the inconsistency causes a lot of rework costs because the inconsistency often makes the developers impossible to actualize the system based on the specifications. For verifying such consistency, functional prototyping is an effective method for the analysts, but it needs a lot of costs and more detailed specifications. In this paper, we propose a review method so that analysts can verify the consistency among several different kinds of diagrams in UML efficiently by employing system-side prototyping without the detailed model. The system-side prototype system does not have any functions to achieve business logic, but visualizes the results of the integration among the diagrams in UML as Web pages. The usefulness of our proposal was evaluated by applying our proposal into a development of Library Management System (LMS) for a laboratory. This development was conducted by a group. As the result, our proposal was useful for discovering the serious inconsistency caused by the misunderstanding among the members of the group.

  15. Semi-Supervised Learning to Identify UMLS Semantic Relations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuan; Uzuner, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    The UMLS Semantic Network is constructed by experts and requires periodic expert review to update. We propose and implement a semi-supervised approach for automatically identifying UMLS semantic relations from narrative text in PubMed. Our method analyzes biomedical narrative text to collect semantic entity pairs, and extracts multiple semantic, syntactic and orthographic features for the collected pairs. We experiment with seeded k-means clustering with various distance metrics. We create and annotate a ground truth corpus according to the top two levels of the UMLS semantic relation hierarchy. We evaluate our system on this corpus and characterize the learning curves of different clustering configuration. Using KL divergence consistently performs the best on the held-out test data. With full seeding, we obtain macro-averaged F-measures above 70% for clustering the top level UMLS relations (2-way), and above 50% for clustering the second level relations (7-way).

  16. A passage retrieval method based on probabilistic information retrieval model and UMLS concepts in biomedical question answering.

    PubMed

    Sarrouti, Mourad; Ouatik El Alaoui, Said

    2017-04-01

    Passage retrieval, the identification of top-ranked passages that may contain the answer for a given biomedical question, is a crucial component for any biomedical question answering (QA) system. Passage retrieval in open-domain QA is a longstanding challenge widely studied over the last decades. However, it still requires further efforts in biomedical QA. In this paper, we present a new biomedical passage retrieval method based on Stanford CoreNLP sentence/passage length, probabilistic information retrieval (IR) model and UMLS concepts. In the proposed method, we first use our document retrieval system based on PubMed search engine and UMLS similarity to retrieve relevant documents to a given biomedical question. We then take the abstracts from the retrieved documents and use Stanford CoreNLP for sentence splitter to make a set of sentences, i.e., candidate passages. Using stemmed words and UMLS concepts as features for the BM25 model, we finally compute the similarity scores between the biomedical question and each of the candidate passages and keep the N top-ranked ones. Experimental evaluations performed on large standard datasets, provided by the BioASQ challenge, show that the proposed method achieves good performances compared with the current state-of-the-art methods. The proposed method significantly outperforms the current state-of-the-art methods by an average of 6.84% in terms of mean average precision (MAP). We have proposed an efficient passage retrieval method which can be used to retrieve relevant passages in biomedical QA systems with high mean average precision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rule-based support system for multiple UMLS semantic type assignments

    PubMed Central

    Geller, James; He, Zhe; Perl, Yehoshua; Morrey, C. Paul; Xu, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Background When new concepts are inserted into the UMLS, they are assigned one or several semantic types from the UMLS Semantic Network by the UMLS editors. However, not every combination of semantic types is permissible. It was observed that many concepts with rare combinations of semantic types have erroneous semantic type assignments or prohibited combinations of semantic types. The correction of such errors is resource-intensive. Objective We design a computational system to inform UMLS editors as to whether a specific combination of two, three, four, or five semantic types is permissible or prohibited or questionable. Methods We identify a set of inclusion and exclusion instructions in the UMLS Semantic Network documentation and derive corresponding rule-categories as well as rule-categories from the UMLS concept content. We then design an algorithm adviseEditor based on these rule-categories. The algorithm specifies rules for an editor how to proceed when considering a tuple (pair, triple, quadruple, quintuple) of semantic types to be assigned to a concept. Results Eight rule-categories were identified. A Web-based system was developed to implement the adviseEditor algorithm, which returns for an input combination of semantic types whether it is permitted, prohibited or (in a few cases) requires more research. The numbers of semantic type pairs assigned to each rule-category are reported. Interesting examples for each rule-category are illustrated. Cases of semantic type assignments that contradict rules are listed, including recently introduced ones. Conclusion The adviseEditor system implements explicit and implicit knowledge available in the UMLS in a system that informs UMLS editors about the permissibility of a desired combination of semantic types. Using adviseEditor might help accelerate the work of the UMLS editors and prevent erroneous semantic type assignments. PMID:23041716

  18. Concepts and Synonymy in the UMLS Metathesaurus

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Gary H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper advances a detailed exploration of the complex relationships among terms, concepts, and syn­onymy in the UMLS (Unified Medical Language System) Metathesaurus, and proposes the study and under­standing of the Metathesaurus from a model-theoretic perspective. Initial sections provide the background and motivation for such an approach, and a careful informal treatment of these notions is offered as a con­text and basis for the formal analysis. What emerges from this is a set of puzzles and confusions in the Metathesaurus and its literature pertaining to synonymy and its relation to terms and concepts. A model theory for a segment of the Metathesaurus is then constructed, and its adequacy relative to the informal treatment is demonstrated. Finally, it is shown how this approach clarifies and addresses the puzzles educed from the informal discussion, and how the model-theoretic perspective may be employed to eval­uate some fundamental criticisms of the Metathesaurus. For users of the UMLS, two significant results of this analysis are a rigorous clarification of the different senses of synonymy that appear in treatments of the Metathesaurus and an illustration of the dangers in computing inferences involving ambiguous terms. PMID:19838995

  19. Using the Unified Modelling Language (UML) to guide the systemic description of biological processes and systems.

    PubMed

    Roux-Rouquié, Magali; Caritey, Nicolas; Gaubert, Laurent; Rosenthal-Sabroux, Camille

    2004-07-01

    One of the main issues in Systems Biology is to deal with semantic data integration. Previously, we examined the requirements for a reference conceptual model to guide semantic integration based on the systemic principles. In the present paper, we examine the usefulness of the Unified Modelling Language (UML) to describe and specify biological systems and processes. This makes unambiguous representations of biological systems, which would be suitable for translation into mathematical and computational formalisms, enabling analysis, simulation and prediction of these systems behaviours.

  20. Mapping Japanese medical terms to UMLS Metathesaurus.

    PubMed

    Onogi, Yuzo; Ohe, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masaaki; Nozoe, Atsutake; Sasaki, Tetsuro; Sato, Megumi; Kikuchi, Yuko; Shinohara, Tsuneki; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Kaihara, Shigekoto; Seyama, Yousuke

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces and reports the results for a project to map Japanese medical terms to the UMLS Metathesaurus. The "Thesaurus for Medical and Health related Terms version 5" published in 2003 by the Japan Medical Abstracts Society and UMLS version 2002AC provided by NLM were used in this study. The goal was to judge the validity of the correlation between the Japanese and English terms that belong to the same MeSH concept. Fifteen medicine, nursing, and library science professionals, excluding JAMAS, used a custom designed Web interface to perform this task. About 10% of the concepts were judged as invalid, and the reasoning behind these failures were analyzed. Experience from this project can be used to estimate the manpower required to revise the Japanese thesaurus after future revisions to UMLS or MeSH.

  1. Automatic Debugging Support for UML Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Swanson, Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Design of large software systems requires rigorous application of software engineering methods covering all phases of the software process. Debugging during the early design phases is extremely important, because late bug-fixes are expensive. In this paper, we describe an approach which facilitates debugging of UML requirements and designs. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a set of notations for object-orient design of a software system. We have developed an algorithm which translates requirement specifications in the form of annotated sequence diagrams into structured statecharts. This algorithm detects conflicts between sequence diagrams and inconsistencies in the domain knowledge. After synthesizing statecharts from sequence diagrams, these statecharts usually are subject to manual modification and refinement. By using the "backward" direction of our synthesis algorithm. we are able to map modifications made to the statechart back into the requirements (sequence diagrams) and check for conflicts there. Fed back to the user conflicts detected by our algorithm are the basis for deductive-based debugging of requirements and domain theory in very early development stages. Our approach allows to generate explanations oil why there is a conflict and which parts of the specifications are affected.

  2. Semantic Mappings and Locality of Nursing Diagnostic Concepts in UMLS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Youn; Coenen, Amy; Hardiker, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    One solution for enhancing the interoperability between nursing information systems, given the availability of multiple nursing terminologies, is to cross-map existing nursing concepts. The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) developed and distributed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) is a knowledge resource containing cross-mappings of various terminologies in a unified framework. While the knowledge resource has been available for the last two decades, little research on the representation of nursing terminologies in UMLS has been conducted. As a first step, UMLS semantic mappings and concept locality were examined for nursing diagnostic concepts or problems selected from three terminologies (i.e., CCC, ICNP, and NANDA-I) along with corresponding SNOMED CT concepts. The evaluation of UMLS semantic mappings was conducted by measuring the proportion of concordance between UMLS and human expert mappings. The semantic locality of nursing diagnostic concepts was assessed by examining the associations of select concepts and the placement of the nursing concepts on the Semantic Network and Group. The study found that the UMLS mappings of CCC and NANDA-I concepts to SNOMED CT were highly concordant to expert mappings. The level of concordance in mappings of ICNP to SNOMED CT, CCC and NANDA-I within UMLS was relatively low, indicating the need for further research and development. Likewise, the semantic locality of ICNP concepts could be further improved. Various stakeholders need to collaborate to enhance the NLM knowledge resource and the interoperability of nursing data within the discipline as well as across health-related disciplines. PMID:21951759

  3. Conceptual Model of Clinical Governance Information System for Statistical Indicators by Using UML in Two Sample Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jeddi, Fatemeh Rangraz; Farzandipoor, Mehrdad; Arabfard, Masoud; Hosseini, Azam Haj Mohammad

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was investigating situation and presenting a conceptual model for clinical governance information system by using UML in two sample hospitals. However, use of information is one of the fundamental components of clinical governance; but unfortunately, it does not pay much attention to information management. A cross sectional study was conducted in October 2012- May 2013. Data were gathered through questionnaires and interviews in two sample hospitals. Face and content validity of the questionnaire has been confirmed by experts. Data were collected from a pilot hospital and reforms were carried out and Final questionnaire was prepared. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and SPSS 16 software. With the scenario derived from questionnaires, UML diagrams are presented by using Rational Rose 7 software. The results showed that 32.14 percent Indicators of the hospitals were calculated. Database was not designed and 100 percent of the hospital's clinical governance was required to create a database. Clinical governance unit of hospitals to perform its mission, do not have access to all the needed indicators. Defining of Processes and drawing of models and creating of database are essential for designing of information systems.

  4. Conceptual Model of Clinical Governance Information System for Statistical Indicators by Using UML in Two Sample Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jeddi, Fatemeh Rangraz; Farzandipoor, Mehrdad; Arabfard, Masoud; Hosseini, Azam Haj Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was investigating situation and presenting a conceptual model for clinical governance information system by using UML in two sample hospitals. However, use of information is one of the fundamental components of clinical governance; but unfortunately, it does not pay much attention to information management. A cross sectional study was conducted in October 2012- May 2013. Data were gathered through questionnaires and interviews in two sample hospitals. Face and content validity of the questionnaire has been confirmed by experts. Data were collected from a pilot hospital and reforms were carried out and Final questionnaire was prepared. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and SPSS 16 software. With the scenario derived from questionnaires, UML diagrams are presented by using Rational Rose 7 software. The results showed that 32.14 percent Indicators of the hospitals were calculated. Database was not designed and 100 percent of the hospital's clinical governance was required to create a database. Clinical governance unit of hospitals to perform its mission, do not have access to all the needed indicators. Defining of Processes and drawing of models and creating of database are essential for designing of information systems.

  5. UMLS content views appropriate for NLP processing of the biomedical literature vs. clinical text.

    PubMed

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Mork, James G; Shooshan, Sonya E; Aronson, Alan R

    2010-08-01

    Identification of medical terms in free text is a first step in such Natural Language Processing (NLP) tasks as automatic indexing of biomedical literature and extraction of patients' problem lists from the text of clinical notes. Many tools developed to perform these tasks use biomedical knowledge encoded in the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus. We continue our exploration of automatic approaches to creation of subsets (UMLS content views) which can support NLP processing of either the biomedical literature or clinical text. We found that suppression of highly ambiguous terms in the conservative AutoFilter content view can partially replace manual filtering for literature applications, and suppression of two character mappings in the same content view achieves 89.5% precision at 78.6% recall for clinical applications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Colaborated Architechture Framework for Composition UML 2.0 in Zachman Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermawan; Hastarista, Fika

    2016-01-01

    Zachman Framework (ZF) is the framework of enterprise architechture that most widely adopted in the Enterprise Information System (EIS) development. In this study, has been developed Colaborated Architechture Framework (CAF) to collaborate ZF with Unified Modeling Language (UML) 2.0 modeling. The CAF provides the composition of ZF matrix that each cell is consist of the Model Driven architechture (MDA) from the various UML models and many Software Requirement Specification (SRS) documents. Implementation of this modeling is used to develops Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP). Because ERP have a coverage of applications in large numbers and complexly relations, it is necessary to use Agile Model Driven Design (AMDD) approach as an advanced method to transforms MDA into components of application modules with efficiently and accurately. Finally, through the using of the CAF, give good achievement in fullfilment the needs from all stakeholders that are involved in the overall process stage of Rational Unified Process (RUP), and also obtaining a high satisfaction to fullfiled the functionality features of the ERP software in PT. Iglas (Persero) Gresik.

  7. Conceptual Model of Clinical Governance Information System for Statistical Indicators by Using UML in Two Sample Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jeddi, Fatemeh Rangraz; Farzandipoor, Mehrdad; Arabfard, Masoud; Hosseini, Azam Haj Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was investigating situation and presenting a conceptual model for clinical governance information system by using UML in two sample hospitals. Background: However, use of information is one of the fundamental components of clinical governance; but unfortunately, it does not pay much attention to information management. Material and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in October 2012- May 2013. Data were gathered through questionnaires and interviews in two sample hospitals. Face and content validity of the questionnaire has been confirmed by experts. Data were collected from a pilot hospital and reforms were carried out and Final questionnaire was prepared. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and SPSS 16 software. Results: With the scenario derived from questionnaires, UML diagrams are presented by using Rational Rose 7 software. The results showed that 32.14 percent Indicators of the hospitals were calculated. Database was not designed and 100 percent of the hospital’s clinical governance was required to create a database. Conclusion: Clinical governance unit of hospitals to perform its mission, do not have access to all the needed indicators. Defining of Processes and drawing of models and creating of database are essential for designing of information systems. PMID:27147804

  8. Conceptual Model of Clinical Governance Information System for Statistical Indicators by Using UML in Two Sample Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jeddi, Fatemeh Rangraz; Farzandipoor, Mehrdad; Arabfard, Masoud; Hosseini, Azam Haj Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was investigating situation and presenting a conceptual model for clinical governance information system by using UML in two sample hospitals. Background: However, use of information is one of the fundamental components of clinical governance; but unfortunately, it does not pay much attention to information management. Material and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in October 2012- May 2013. Data were gathered through questionnaires and interviews in two sample hospitals. Face and content validity of the questionnaire has been confirmed by experts. Data were collected from a pilot hospital and reforms were carried out and Final questionnaire was prepared. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and SPSS 16 software. Results: With the scenario derived from questionnaires, UML diagrams are presented by using Rational Rose 7 software. The results showed that 32.14 percent Indicators of the hospitals were calculated. Database was not designed and 100 percent of the hospital’s clinical governance was required to create a database. Conclusion: Clinical governance unit of hospitals to perform its mission, do not have access to all the needed indicators. Defining of Processes and drawing of models and creating of database are essential for designing of information systems. PMID:24825933

  9. Coverage criteria for test case generation using UML state chart diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Yasir Dawood; Hashim, Nor Laily; Rejab, Mawarny Md; Romli, Rohaida; Mohd, Haslina

    2017-10-01

    To improve the effectiveness of test data generation during the software test, many studies have focused on the automation of test data generation from UML diagrams. One of these diagrams is the UML state chart diagram. Test cases are generally evaluated according to coverage criteria. However, combinations of multiple criteria are required to achieve better coverage. Different studies used various number and types of coverage criteria in their methods and approaches. The objective of this paper to propose suitable coverage criteria for test case generation using UML state chart diagram especially in handling loops. In order to achieve this objective, this work reviewed previous studies to present the most practical coverage criteria combinations, including all-states, all-transitions, all-transition-pairs, and all-loop-free-paths coverage. Calculation to determine the coverage percentage of the proposed coverage criteria were presented together with an example has they are applied on a UML state chart diagram. This finding would be beneficial in the area of test case generating especially in handling loops in UML state chart diagram.

  10. Quality Assurance of UMLS Semantic Type Assignments Using SNOMED CT Hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Gu, H; Chen, Y; He, Z; Halper, M; Chen, L

    2016-01-01

    The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) is one of the largest biomedical terminological systems, with over 2.5 million concepts in its Metathesaurus repository. The UMLS's Semantic Network (SN) with its collection of 133 high-level semantic types serves as an abstraction layer on top of the Metathesaurus. In particular, the SN elaborates an aspect of the Metathesaurus's concepts via the assignment of one or more types to each concept. Due to the scope and complexity of the Metathesaurus, errors are all but inevitable in this semantic-type assignment process. To develop a semi-automated methodology to help assure the quality of semantic-type assignments within the UMLS. The methodology uses a cross-validation strategy involving SNOMED CT's hierarchies in combination with UMLS semantic types. Semantically uniform, disjoint concept groups are generated programmatically by partitioning the collection of all concepts in the same SNOMED CT hierarchy according to their respective semantic-type assignments in the UMLS. Domain experts are then called upon to review the concepts in any group having a small number of concepts. It is our hypothesis that a semantic-type assignment combination applicable only to a very small number of concepts in a SNOMED CT hierarchy is an indicator of potential problems. The methodology was applied to the UMLS 2013AA release along with the SNOMED CT from January 2013. An overall error rate of 33% was found for concepts proposed by the quality-assurance methodology. Supporting our hypothesis, that number was four times higher than the error rate found in control samples. The results show that the quality-assurance methodology can aid in effective and efficient identification of UMLS semantic-type assignment errors.

  11. Associating clinical archetypes through UMLS Metathesaurus term clusters.

    PubMed

    Lezcano, Leonardo; Sánchez-Alonso, Salvador; Sicilia, Miguel-Angel

    2012-06-01

    Clinical archetypes are modular definitions of clinical data, expressed using standard or open constraint-based data models as the CEN EN13606 and openEHR. There is an increasing archetype specification activity that raises the need for techniques to associate archetypes to support better management and user navigation in archetype repositories. This paper reports on a computational technique to generate tentative archetype associations by mapping them through term clusters obtained from the UMLS Metathesaurus. The terms are used to build a bipartite graph model and graph connectivity measures can be used for deriving associations.

  12. Quality evaluation of value sets from cancer study common data elements using the UMLS semantic groups

    PubMed Central

    Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to develop an approach to evaluate the quality of terminological annotations on the value set (ie, enumerated value domain) components of the common data elements (CDEs) in the context of clinical research using both unified medical language system (UMLS) semantic types and groups. Materials and methods The CDEs of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Data Standards Repository, the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) concepts and the UMLS semantic network were integrated using a semantic web-based framework for a SPARQL-enabled evaluation. First, the set of CDE-permissible values with corresponding meanings in external controlled terminologies were isolated. The corresponding value meanings were then evaluated against their NCI- or UMLS-generated semantic network mapping to determine whether all of the meanings fell within the same semantic group. Results Of the enumerated CDEs in the Cancer Data Standards Repository, 3093 (26.2%) had elements drawn from more than one UMLS semantic group. A random sample (n=100) of this set of elements indicated that 17% of them were likely to have been misclassified. Discussion The use of existing semantic web tools can support a high-throughput mechanism for evaluating the quality of large CDE collections. This study demonstrates that the involvement of multiple semantic groups in an enumerated value domain of a CDE is an effective anchor to trigger an auditing point for quality evaluation activities. Conclusion This approach produces a useful quality assurance mechanism for a clinical study CDE repository. PMID:22511016

  13. Representing nursing guideline with unified modeling language to facilitate development of a computer system: a case study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeeyae; Choi, Jeungok E

    2014-01-01

    To provide best recommendations at the point of care, guidelines have been implemented in computer systems. As a prerequisite, guidelines are translated into a computer-interpretable guideline format. Since there are no specific tools to translate nursing guidelines, only a few nursing guidelines are translated and implemented in computer systems. Unified modeling language (UML) is a software writing language and is known to well and accurately represent end-users' perspective, due to the expressive characteristics of the UML. In order to facilitate the development of computer systems for nurses' use, the UML was used to translate a paper-based nursing guideline, and its ease of use and the usefulness were tested through a case study of a genetic counseling guideline. The UML was found to be a useful tool to nurse informaticians and a sufficient tool to model a guideline in a computer program.

  14. k-neighborhood Decentralization: A Comprehensive Solution to Index the UMLS for Large Scale Knowledge Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yang; Lu, Kewei; James, Stephen L.; Borlawsky, Tara B.; Huang, Kun; Payne, Philip R.O.

    2011-01-01

    The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) is the largest thesaurus in the biomedical informatics domain. Previous works have shown that knowledge constructs comprised of transitively-associated UMLS concepts are effective for discovering potentially novel biomedical hypotheses. However, the extremely large size of the UMLS becomes a major challenge for these applications. To address this problem, we designed a k-neighborhood Decentralization Labeling Scheme (kDLS) for the UMLS, and the corresponding method to effectively evaluate the kDLS indexing results. kDLS provides a comprehensive solution for indexing the UMLS for very efficient large scale knowledge discovery. We demonstrated that it is highly effective to use kDLS paths to prioritize disease-gene relations across the whole genome, with extremely high fold-enrichment values. To our knowledge, this is the first indexing scheme capable of supporting efficient large scale knowledge discovery on the UMLS as a whole. Our expectation is that kDLS will become a vital engine for retrieving information and generating hypotheses from the UMLS for future medical informatics applications. PMID:22154838

  15. k-Neighborhood decentralization: a comprehensive solution to index the UMLS for large scale knowledge discovery.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang; Lu, Kewei; James, Stephen L; Borlawsky, Tara B; Huang, Kun; Payne, Philip R O

    2012-04-01

    The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) is the largest thesaurus in the biomedical informatics domain. Previous works have shown that knowledge constructs comprised of transitively-associated UMLS concepts are effective for discovering potentially novel biomedical hypotheses. However, the extremely large size of the UMLS becomes a major challenge for these applications. To address this problem, we designed a k-neighborhood Decentralization Labeling Scheme (kDLS) for the UMLS, and the corresponding method to effectively evaluate the kDLS indexing results. kDLS provides a comprehensive solution for indexing the UMLS for very efficient large scale knowledge discovery. We demonstrated that it is highly effective to use kDLS paths to prioritize disease-gene relations across the whole genome, with extremely high fold-enrichment values. To our knowledge, this is the first indexing scheme capable of supporting efficient large scale knowledge discovery on the UMLS as a whole. Our expectation is that kDLS will become a vital engine for retrieving information and generating hypotheses from the UMLS for future medical informatics applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Auditing the multiply-related concepts within the UMLS

    PubMed Central

    Mougin, Fleur; Grabar, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Objective This work focuses on multiply-related Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts, that is, concepts associated through multiple relations. The relations involved in such situations are audited to determine whether they are provided by source vocabularies or result from the integration of these vocabularies within the UMLS. Methods We study the compatibility of the multiple relations which associate the concepts under investigation and try to explain the reason why they co-occur. Towards this end, we analyze the relations both at the concept and term levels. In addition, we randomly select 288 concepts associated through contradictory relations and manually analyze them. Results At the UMLS scale, only 0.7% of combinations of relations are contradictory, while homogeneous combinations are observed in one-third of situations. At the scale of source vocabularies, one-third do not contain more than one relation between the concepts under investigation. Among the remaining source vocabularies, seven of them mainly present multiple non-homogeneous relations between terms. Analysis at the term level also shows that only in a quarter of cases are the source vocabularies responsible for the presence of multiply-related concepts in the UMLS. These results are available at: http://www.isped.u-bordeaux2.fr/ArticleJAMIA/results_multiply_related_concepts.aspx. Discussion Manual analysis was useful to explain the conceptualization difference in relations between terms across source vocabularies. The exploitation of source relations was helpful for understanding why some source vocabularies describe multiple relations between a given pair of terms. PMID:24464853

  17. Auditing the multiply-related concepts within the UMLS.

    PubMed

    Mougin, Fleur; Grabar, Natalia

    2014-10-01

    This work focuses on multiply-related Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts, that is, concepts associated through multiple relations. The relations involved in such situations are audited to determine whether they are provided by source vocabularies or result from the integration of these vocabularies within the UMLS. We study the compatibility of the multiple relations which associate the concepts under investigation and try to explain the reason why they co-occur. Towards this end, we analyze the relations both at the concept and term levels. In addition, we randomly select 288 concepts associated through contradictory relations and manually analyze them. At the UMLS scale, only 0.7% of combinations of relations are contradictory, while homogeneous combinations are observed in one-third of situations. At the scale of source vocabularies, one-third do not contain more than one relation between the concepts under investigation. Among the remaining source vocabularies, seven of them mainly present multiple non-homogeneous relations between terms. Analysis at the term level also shows that only in a quarter of cases are the source vocabularies responsible for the presence of multiply-related concepts in the UMLS. These results are available at: http://www.isped.u-bordeaux2.fr/ArticleJAMIA/results_multiply_related_concepts.aspx. Manual analysis was useful to explain the conceptualization difference in relations between terms across source vocabularies. The exploitation of source relations was helpful for understanding why some source vocabularies describe multiple relations between a given pair of terms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Applying CASE Tools for On-Board Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brammer, U.; Hönle, A.

    For many space projects the software development is facing great pressure with respect to quality, costs and schedule. One way to cope with these challenges is the application of CASE tools for automatic generation of code and documentation. This paper describes two CASE tools: Rhapsody (I-Logix) featuring UML and ISG (BSSE) that provides modeling of finite state machines. Both tools have been used at Kayser-Threde in different space projects for the development of on-board software. The tools are discussed with regard to the full software development cycle.

  19. Towards linking patients and clinical information: detecting UMLS concepts in e-mail.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Aronson, Alan R

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to explore the feasibility of detecting terms within the electronic messages of patients that could be used to effectively search electronic knowledge resources and bring health information resources into the hands of patients. Our team is exploring the application of the natural language processing (NLP) tools built within the Lister Hill Center at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) to the challenge of detecting relevant concepts from the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) within the free text of lay people's electronic messages (e-mail). We obtained a sample of electronic messages sent by patients participating in a randomized field evaluation of an internet-based home care support service to the project nurse, and we subjected elements of these messages to a series of analyses using several vocabularies from the UMLS Metathesaurus and the selected NLP tools. The nursing vocabularies provide an excellent starting point for this exercise because their domain encompasses patient's responses to health challenges. In successive runs we augmented six nursing vocabularies (NANDA Nursing Diagnosis, Nursing Interventions Classification, Nursing Outcomes Classification, Home Health Classification, Omaha System, and the Patient Care Data Set) with selected sets of clinical terminologies (International Classification of Primary Care; International Classification of Primary Care- American English; Micromedex DRUGDEX; National Drug Data File; Thesaurus of Psychological Terms; WHO Adverse Drug Reaction Terminology) and then additionally with either Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) or SNOMED International terms. The best performance was obtained when the nursing vocabularies were complemented with selected clinical terminologies. These findings have implications not only for facilitating lay people's access to electronic knowledge resources but may also be of assistance in developing new tools to aid in linking free text (e.g., clinical

  20. Sophia: A Expedient UMLS Concept Extraction Annotator.

    PubMed

    Divita, Guy; Zeng, Qing T; Gundlapalli, Adi V; Duvall, Scott; Nebeker, Jonathan; Samore, Matthew H

    2014-01-01

    An opportunity exists for meaningful concept extraction and indexing from large corpora of clinical notes in the Veterans Affairs (VA) electronic medical record. Currently available tools such as MetaMap, cTAKES and HITex do not scale up to address this big data need. Sophia, a rapid UMLS concept extraction annotator was developed to fulfill a mandate and address extraction where high throughput is needed while preserving performance. We report on the development, testing and benchmarking of Sophia against MetaMap and cTAKEs. Sophia demonstrated improved performance on recall as compared to cTAKES and MetaMap (0.71 vs 0.66 and 0.38). The overall f-score was similar to cTAKES and an improvement over MetaMap (0.53 vs 0.57 and 0.43). With regard to speed of processing records, we noted Sophia to be several fold faster than cTAKES and the scaled-out MetaMap service. Sophia offers a viable alternative for high-throughput information extraction tasks.

  1. Sophia: A Expedient UMLS Concept Extraction Annotator

    PubMed Central

    Divita, Guy; Zeng, Qing T; Gundlapalli, Adi V.; Duvall, Scott; Nebeker, Jonathan; Samore, Matthew H.

    2014-01-01

    An opportunity exists for meaningful concept extraction and indexing from large corpora of clinical notes in the Veterans Affairs (VA) electronic medical record. Currently available tools such as MetaMap, cTAKES and HITex do not scale up to address this big data need. Sophia, a rapid UMLS concept extraction annotator was developed to fulfill a mandate and address extraction where high throughput is needed while preserving performance. We report on the development, testing and benchmarking of Sophia against MetaMap and cTAKEs. Sophia demonstrated improved performance on recall as compared to cTAKES and MetaMap (0.71 vs 0.66 and 0.38). The overall f-score was similar to cTAKES and an improvement over MetaMap (0.53 vs 0.57 and 0.43). With regard to speed of processing records, we noted Sophia to be several fold faster than cTAKES and the scaled-out MetaMap service. Sophia offers a viable alternative for high-throughput information extraction tasks. PMID:25954351

  2. Overcoming an Obstacle in Expanding a UMLS Semantic Type Extent

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Gu, Huanying; Perl, Yehoshua; Geller, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper strives to overcome a major problem encountered by a previous expansion methodology for discovering concepts highly likely to be missing a specific semantic type assignment in the UMLS. This methodology is the basis for an algorithm that presents the discovered concepts to a human auditor for review and possible correction. We analyzed the problem of the previous expansion methodology and discovered that it was due to an obstacle constituted by one or more concepts assigned the UMLS Semantic Network semantic type Classification. A new methodology was designed that bypasses such an obstacle without a combinatorial explosion in the number of concepts presented to the human auditor for review. The new expansion methodology with obstacle avoidance was tested with the semantic type Experimental Model of Disease and found over 500 concepts missed by the previous methodology that are in need of this semantic type assignment. Furthermore, other semantic types suffering from the same major problem were discovered, indicating that the methodology is of more general applicability. The algorithmic discovery of concepts that are likely missing a semantic type assignment is possible even in the face of obstacles, without an explosion in the number of processed concepts. PMID:21925287

  3. ADEpedia 2.0: Integration of Normalized Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) Knowledge from the UMLS.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guoqian; Liu, Hongfang; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    A standardized Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) knowledge base that encodes known ADE knowledge can be very useful in improving ADE detection for drug safety surveillance. In our previous study, we developed the ADEpedia that is a standardized knowledge base of ADEs based on drug product labels. The objectives of the present study are 1) to integrate normalized ADE knowledge from the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) into the ADEpedia; and 2) to enrich the knowledge base with the drug-disorder co-occurrence data from a 51-million-document electronic medical records (EMRs) system. We extracted 266,832 drug-disorder concept pairs from the UMLS, covering 14,256 (1.69%) distinct drug concepts and 19,006 (3.53%) distinct disorder concepts. Of them, 71,626 (26.8%) concept pairs from UMLS co-occurred in the EMRs. We performed a preliminary evaluation on the utility of the UMLS ADE data. In conclusion, we have built an ADEpedia 2.0 framework that intends to integrate known ADE knowledge from disparate sources. The UMLS is a useful source for providing standardized ADE knowledge relevant to indications, contraindications and adverse effects, and complementary to the ADE data from drug product labels. The statistics from EMRs would enable the meaningful use of ADE data for drug safety surveillance.

  4. An Evaluation of the UMLS in Representing Corpus Derived Clinical Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Friedlin, Jeff; Overhage, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We performed an evaluation of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) in representing concepts derived from medical narrative documents from three domains: chest x-ray reports, discharge summaries and admission notes. We detected concepts in these documents by identifying noun phrases (NPs) and N-grams, including unigrams (single words), bigrams (word pairs) and trigrams (word triples). After removing NPs and N-grams that did not represent discrete clinical concepts, we processed the remaining with the UMLS MetaMap program. We manually reviewed the results of MetaMap processing to determine whether MetaMap found full, partial or no representation of the concept. For full representations, we determined whether post-coordination was required. Our results showed that a large portion of concepts found in clinical narrative documents are either unrepresented or poorly represented in the current version of the UMLS Metathesaurus and that post-coordination was often required in order to fully represent a concept. PMID:22195097

  5. A Pilot Study of Contextual UMLS Indexing to Improve the Precision of Concept-based Representation in XML-structured Clinical Radiology Reports

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yang; Lowe, Henry J.; Hersh, William R.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Despite the advantages of structured data entry, much of the patient record is still stored as unstructured or semistructured narrative text. The issue of representing clinical document content remains problematic. The authors' prior work using an automated UMLS document indexing system has been encouraging but has been affected by the generally low indexing precision of such systems. In an effort to improve precision, the authors have developed a context-sensitive document indexing model to calculate the optimal subset of UMLS source vocabularies used to index each document section. This pilot study was performed to evaluate the utility of this indexing approach on a set of clinical radiology reports. Design: A set of clinical radiology reports that had been indexed manually using UMLS concept descriptors was indexed automatically by the SAPHIRE indexing engine. Using the data generated by this process the authors developed a system that simulated indexing, at the document section level, of the same document set using many permutations of a subset of the UMLS constituent vocabularies. Measurements: The precision and recall scores generated by simulated indexing for each permutation of two or three UMLS constituent vocabularies were determined. Results: While there was considerable variation in precision and recall values across the different subtypes of radiology reports, the overall effect of this indexing strategy using the best combination of two or three UMLS constituent vocabularies was an improvement in precision without significant impact of recall. Conclusion: In this pilot study a contextual indexing strategy improved overall precision in a set of clinical radiology reports. PMID:12925544

  6. A pilot study of contextual UMLS indexing to improve the precision of concept-based representation in XML-structured clinical radiology reports.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Lowe, Henry J; Hersh, William R

    2003-01-01

    Despite the advantages of structured data entry, much of the patient record is still stored as unstructured or semistructured narrative text. The issue of representing clinical document content remains problematic. The authors' prior work using an automated UMLS document indexing system has been encouraging but has been affected by the generally low indexing precision of such systems. In an effort to improve precision, the authors have developed a context-sensitive document indexing model to calculate the optimal subset of UMLS source vocabularies used to index each document section. This pilot study was performed to evaluate the utility of this indexing approach on a set of clinical radiology reports. A set of clinical radiology reports that had been indexed manually using UMLS concept descriptors was indexed automatically by the SAPHIRE indexing engine. Using the data generated by this process the authors developed a system that simulated indexing, at the document section level, of the same document set using many permutations of a subset of the UMLS constituent vocabularies. The precision and recall scores generated by simulated indexing for each permutation of two or three UMLS constituent vocabularies were determined. While there was considerable variation in precision and recall values across the different subtypes of radiology reports, the overall effect of this indexing strategy using the best combination of two or three UMLS constituent vocabularies was an improvement in precision without significant impact of recall. In this pilot study a contextual indexing strategy improved overall precision in a set of clinical radiology reports.

  7. Exploring the possibility of modeling a genetic counseling guideline using agile methodology.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeeyae

    2013-01-01

    Increased demand of genetic counseling services heightened the necessity of a computerized genetic counseling decision support system. In order to develop an effective and efficient computerized system, modeling of genetic counseling guideline is an essential step. Throughout this pilot study, Agile methodology with United Modeling Language (UML) was utilized to model a guideline. 13 tasks and 14 associated elements were extracted. Successfully constructed conceptual class and activity diagrams revealed that Agile methodology with UML was a suitable tool to modeling a genetic counseling guideline.

  8. Physician nurse care: A new use of UMLS to measure professional contribution

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Andrew D.; Lopez, Karen Dunn; Lugaresi, Camillo; Macieira, Tamara; Sousa, Vanessa; Acharya, Sabita; Balasubramanian, Abhinaya; Roussi, Khawllah; Keenan, Gail M.; Lussier, Yves A.; ‘John’ Li, Jianrong; Burton, Michel; Di Eugenio, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    Background Physician and nurses have worked together for generations; however, their language and training are vastly different; comparing and contrasting their work and their joint impact on patient outcomes is difficult in light of this difference. At the same time, the EHR only includes the physician perspective via the physician-authored discharge summary, but not nurse documentation. Prior research in this area has focused on collaboration and the usage of similar terminology. Objective The objective of the study is to gain insight into interprofessional care by developing a computational metric to identify similarities, related concepts and differences in physician and nurse work. Methods 58 physician discharge summaries and the corresponding nurse plans of care were transformed into Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Concept Unique Identifiers (CUIs). MedLEE, a Natural Language Processing (NLP) program, extracted “physician terms” from free-text physician summaries. The nursing plans of care were constructed using the HANDS© nursing documentation software. HANDS© utilizes structured terminologies: nursing diagnosis (NANDA-I), outcomes (NOC), and interventions (NIC) to create “nursing terms”. The physician’s and nurse’s terms were compared using the UMLS network for relatedness, overlaying the physician and nurse terms for comparison. Our overarching goal is to provide insight into the care, by innovatively applying graph algorithms to the UMLS network. We reveal the relationships between the care provided by each professional that is specific to the patient level. Results We found that only 26% of patients had synonyms (identical UMLS CUIs) between the two professions’ documentation. On average, physicians’ discharge summaries contain 27 terms and nurses’ documentation, 18. Traversing the UMLS network, we found an average of 4 terms related (distance less than 2) between the professions, leaving most concepts as unrelated between

  9. Overcoming an obstacle in expanding a UMLS semantic type extent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Gu, Huanying; Perl, Yehoshua; Geller, James

    2012-02-01

    This paper strives to overcome a major problem encountered by a previous expansion methodology for discovering concepts highly likely to be missing a specific semantic type assignment in the UMLS. This methodology is the basis for an algorithm that presents the discovered concepts to a human auditor for review and possible correction. We analyzed the problem of the previous expansion methodology and discovered that it was due to an obstacle constituted by one or more concepts assigned the UMLS Semantic Network semantic type Classification. A new methodology was designed that bypasses such an obstacle without a combinatorial explosion in the number of concepts presented to the human auditor for review. The new expansion methodology with obstacle avoidance was tested with the semantic type Experimental Model of Disease and found over 500 concepts missed by the previous methodology that are in need of this semantic type assignment. Furthermore, other semantic types suffering from the same major problem were discovered, indicating that the methodology is of more general applicability. The algorithmic discovery of concepts that are likely missing a semantic type assignment is possible even in the face of obstacles, without an explosion in the number of processed concepts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The feasibility of using UML to compare the impact of different brands of computer system on the clinical consultation.

    PubMed

    Kumarapeli, Pushpa; de Lusignan, Simon; Koczan, Phil; Jones, Beryl; Sheeler, Ian

    2007-01-01

    UK general practice is universally computerised, with computers used in the consulting room at the point of care. Practices use a range of different brands of computer system, which have developed organically to meet the needs of general practitioners and health service managers. Unified Modelling Language (UML) is a standard modelling and specification notation widely used in software engineering. To examine the feasibility of UML notation to compare the impact of different brands of general practice computer system on the clinical consultation. Multi-channel video recordings of simulated consultation sessions were recorded on three different clinical computer systems in common use (EMIS, iSOFT Synergy and IPS Vision). User action recorder software recorded time logs of keyboard and mouse use, and pattern recognition software captured non-verbal communication. The outputs of these were used to create UML class and sequence diagrams for each consultation. We compared 'definition of the presenting problem' and 'prescribing', as these tasks were present in all the consultations analysed. Class diagrams identified the entities involved in the clinical consultation. Sequence diagrams identified common elements of the consultation (such as prescribing) and enabled comparisons to be made between the different brands of computer system. The clinician and computer system interaction varied greatly between the different brands. UML sequence diagrams are useful in identifying common tasks in the clinical consultation, and for contrasting the impact of the different brands of computer system on the clinical consultation. Further research is needed to see if patterns demonstrated in this pilot study are consistently displayed.

  11. Design of an UML conceptual model and implementation of a GIS with metadata information for a seismic hazard assessment cooperative project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Y.; Escalante, M. P.

    2009-04-01

    This work illustrates the advantages of using a Geographic Information System in a cooperative project with researchers of different countries, such as the RESIS II project (financed by the Norwegian Government and managed by CEPREDENAC) for seismic hazard assessment of Central America. As input data present different formats, cover distinct geographical areas and are subjected to different interpretations, data inconsistencies may appear and their management get complicated. To achieve data homogenization and to integrate them in a GIS, it is required previously to develop a conceptual model. This is accomplished in two phases: requirements analysis and conceptualization. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is used to compose the conceptual model of the GIS. UML complies with ISO 19100 norms and allows the designer defining model architecture and interoperability. The GIS provides a frame for the combination of large geographic-based data volumes, with an uniform geographic reference and avoiding duplications. All this information contains its own metadata following ISO 19115 normative. In this work, the integration in the same environment of active faults and subduction slabs geometries, combined with the epicentres location, has facilitated the definition of seismogenetic regions. This is a great support for national specialists of different countries to make easier their teamwork. The GIS capacity for making queries (by location and by attributes) and geostatistical analyses is used to interpolate discrete data resulting from seismic hazard calculations and to create continuous maps as well as to check and validate partial results of the study. GIS-based products, such as complete, homogenised databases and thematic cartography of the region, are distributed to all researchers, facilitating cross-national communication, the project execution and results dissemination.

  12. Analyzing polysemous concepts from a clinical perspective: Application to auditing concept categorization in the UMLS

    PubMed Central

    Mougin, Fleur; Bodenreider, Olivier; Burgun, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Polysemy is a frequent issue in biomedical terminologies. In the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), polysemous terms are either represented as several independent concepts, or clustered into a single, multiply-categorized concept. The objective of this study is to analyze polysemous concepts in the UMLS through their categorization and hierarchical relations for auditing purposes. Methods We used the association of a concept with multiple Semantic Groups (SGs) as a surrogate for polysemy. We first extracted multi-SG (MSG) concepts from the UMLS Metathesaurus and characterized them in terms of the combinations of SGs with which they are associated. We then clustered MSG concepts in order to identify major types of polysemy. We also analyzed the inheritance of SGs in MSG concepts. Finally, we manually reviewed the categorization of the MSG concepts for auditing purposes. Results The 1208 MSG concepts in the Metathesaurus are associated with 30 distinct pairs of SGs. We created 75 semantically homogeneous clusters of MSG concepts, and 276 MSG concepts could not be clustered for lack of hierarchical relations. The clusters were characterized by the most frequent pairs of semantic types of their constituent MSG concepts. MSG concepts exhibit limited semantic compatibility with their parent and child concepts. A large majority of MSG concepts (92%) are adequately categorized. Examples of miscategorized concepts are presented. Conclusion This work is a systematic analysis and manual review of all concepts categorized by multiple SGs in the UMLS. The correctly-categorized MSG concepts do reflect polysemy in the UMLS Metathesaurus. The analysis of inheritance of SGs proved useful for auditing concept categorization in the UMLS. PMID:19303057

  13. Modeling a Nursing Guideline with Standard Terminology and Unified Modeling Language for a Nursing Decision Support System: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeeyae; Jansen, Kay; Coenen, Amy

    In recent years, Decision Support Systems (DSSs) have been developed and used to achieve "meaningful use". One approach to developing DSSs is to translate clinical guidelines into a computer-interpretable format. However, there is no specific guideline modeling approach to translate nursing guidelines to computer-interpretable guidelines. This results in limited use of DSSs in nursing. Unified modeling language (UML) is a software writing language known to accurately represent the end-users' perspective, due to its expressive characteristics. Furthermore, standard terminology enabled DSSs have been shown to smoothly integrate into existing health information systems. In order to facilitate development of nursing DSSs, the UML was used to represent a guideline for medication management for older adults encode with the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®). The UML was found to be a useful and sufficient tool to model a nursing guideline for a DSS.

  14. Modeling a Nursing Guideline with Standard Terminology and Unified Modeling Language for a Nursing Decision Support System: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jeeyae; Jansen, Kay; Coenen, Amy

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, Decision Support Systems (DSSs) have been developed and used to achieve “meaningful use”. One approach to developing DSSs is to translate clinical guidelines into a computer-interpretable format. However, there is no specific guideline modeling approach to translate nursing guidelines to computer-interpretable guidelines. This results in limited use of DSSs in nursing. Unified modeling language (UML) is a software writing language known to accurately represent the end-users’ perspective, due to its expressive characteristics. Furthermore, standard terminology enabled DSSs have been shown to smoothly integrate into existing health information systems. In order to facilitate development of nursing DSSs, the UML was used to represent a guideline for medication management for older adults encode with the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP®). The UML was found to be a useful and sufficient tool to model a nursing guideline for a DSS. PMID:26958174

  15. Identifying UMLS concepts from ECG Impressions using KnowledgeMap

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Joshua C.; Spickard, Anderson; Miller, Randolph A; Schildcrout, Jonathan; Darbar, Dawood; Rosenbloom, S. Trent; Peterson, Josh F.

    2005-01-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) impressions represent a wealth of medical information for potential decision support and drug-effect discovery. Much of this information is inaccessible to automated methods in the free-text portion of the ECG report. We studied the application of the KnowledgeMap concept identifier (KMCI) to map Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts from ECG impressions. ECGs were processed by KMCI and the results scored for accuracy by multiple raters. Reviewers also recorded unidentified concepts through the scoring interface. Overall, KMCI correctly identified 1059 out of 1171 concepts for a recall of 0.90. Precision, indicating the proportion of ECG concepts correctly identified, was 0.94. KMCI was particularly effective at identifying ECG rhythms (330/333), perfusion changes (65/66), and noncardiac medical concepts (11/11). In conclusion, KMCI is an effective method for mapping ECG impressions to UMLS concepts. PMID:16779029

  16. INSULIN GLARGINE 300 U/ML IS ASSOCIATED WITH LESS WEIGHT GAIN WHILE MAINTAINING GLYCEMIC CONTROL AND LOW RISK OF HYPOGLYCEMIA COMPARED WITH INSULIN GLARGINE 100 U/ML IN AN AGING POPULATION WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Medha N; Gill, Jasvinder; Chao, Jason; Nikonova, Elena V; Patel, Meenakshi

    2018-02-01

    Assess efficacy, hypoglycemia, and weight gain in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) treated with insulin glargine 300 U/mL (Gla-300) or 100 U/mL (Gla-100) across different age groups. Pooled data were generated for patients randomized to Gla-300 or Gla-100 in the EDITION 2 (NCT01499095) and 3 (NCT01676220) studies. In 4 age groups (<55, ≥55 to <60, ≥60 to <65, ≥65 years), glycated hemoglobin A1C (A1C), percentage of patients reaching A1C <7.5% (58 mmol/mol), weight change, confirmed hypoglycemia (blood glucose ≤70 mg/dL), and/or severe hypoglycemia (events requiring third-party assistance) were analyzed with descriptive statistics and logistic, binomial, and analysis of covariance regression modeling. A1C reductions from baseline and proportions of patients at target were similar for Gla-300 and Gla-100 across all age groups at 6 and 12 months, but hypoglycemia incidence and event rate were lower with Gla-300 at 6 (both P<.001) and 12 months ( P<.001 and P = .005, respectively). Patients on Gla-300 gained less weight than those on Gla-100 at 6 ( P = .027) and 12 months ( P = .021). Changes in weight and daily weight-adjusted insulin dose decreased with increasing age at 6 ( P<.001 and P = .017, respectively) and 12 months ( P<.001 and P = .011, respectively). Older patients with T2D may benefit from treatment with Gla-300, which is associated with a lower hypoglycemia rate and less weight gain with similar efficacy compared with Gla-100. A1C = glycated hemoglobin A1C BMI = body mass index Gla-100 = insulin glargine 100 U/mL Gla-300 = insulin glargine 300 U/mL OAD = oral antidiabetes drug T2D = type 2 diabetes.

  17. Alignment of the UMLS semantic network with BioTop: methodology and assessment.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Stefan; Beisswanger, Elena; van den Hoek, László; Bodenreider, Olivier; van Mulligen, Erik M

    2009-06-15

    For many years, the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) semantic network (SN) has been used as an upper-level semantic framework for the categorization of terms from terminological resources in biomedicine. BioTop has recently been developed as an upper-level ontology for the biomedical domain. In contrast to the SN, it is founded upon strict ontological principles, using OWL DL as a formal representation language, which has become standard in the semantic Web. In order to make logic-based reasoning available for the resources annotated or categorized with the SN, a mapping ontology was developed aligning the SN with BioTop. The theoretical foundations and the practical realization of the alignment are being described, with a focus on the design decisions taken, the problems encountered and the adaptations of BioTop that became necessary. For evaluation purposes, UMLS concept pairs obtained from MEDLINE abstracts by a named entity recognition system were tested for possible semantic relationships. Furthermore, all semantic-type combinations that occur in the UMLS Metathesaurus were checked for satisfiability. The effort-intensive alignment process required major design changes and enhancements of BioTop and brought up several design errors that could be fixed. A comparison between a human curator and the ontology yielded only a low agreement. Ontology reasoning was also used to successfully identify 133 inconsistent semantic-type combinations. BioTop, the OWL DL representation of the UMLS SN, and the mapping ontology are available at http://www.purl.org/biotop/.

  18. Analysis and design of hospital management information system based on UML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Zhao, Huifang; You, Shi Jun; Ge, Wenyong

    2018-05-01

    With the rapid development of computer technology, computer information management system has been utilized in many industries. Hospital Information System (HIS) is in favor of providing data for directors, lightening the workload for the medical workers, and improving the workers efficiency. According to the HIS demand analysis and system design, this paper focus on utilizing unified modeling language (UML) models to establish the use case diagram, class diagram, sequence chart and collaboration diagram, and satisfying the demands of the daily patient visit, inpatient, drug management and other relevant operations. At last, the paper summarizes the problems of the system and puts forward an outlook of the HIS system.

  19. Five Year Results of US Intergroup/RTOG 9704 With Postoperative CA 19-9 {<=}90 U/mL and Comparison to the CONKO-001 Trial

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Berger, Adam C., E-mail: adam.berger@jefferson.edu; Winter, Kathryn; Hoffman, John P.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trial 9704 was the largest randomized trial to use adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer. This report analyzes 5-year survival by serum level of tumor marker CA 19-9 of {<=}90 vs >90 U/mL and compares results to the those of the CONKO-001 trial. Methods and Materials: CA 19-9 expression was analyzed as a dichotomized variable ({<=}90 vs >90 U/mL). Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify the impact of the CA 19-9 value on overall survival (OS). Actuarial estimates of OS were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Both univariate (hazardmore » ratio [HR] = 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-4.3, P<.0001) and multivariate (HR = 3.1; 95% CI, 2.2-4.2, P<.0001) analyses demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in OS for CA 19-9 serum level of {>=}90 U/mL. For patients in the gemcitabine (Gem) treatment arm with CA 19-9 <90 U/mL, median survival was 21 months. For patients with CA 19-9 {>=}90 U/mL, this number dropped to 10 months. In patients with pancreatic head tumors in the Gem treatment arm with RT quality assurance per protocol and CA 19-9 of <90 U/mL, median survival and 5-year rate were 24 months and 34%. In comparison, the median survival and 5-year OS rate for patients in the Gem arm of the CONKO trial were 22 months and 21%. Conclusions: This analysis demonstrates that patients with postresection CA 19-9 values {>=}90 U/mL had a significantly worse survival. Patients with pancreatic head tumors treated with Gem with CA 19-9 serum level of <90 U/mL and per protocol RT had favorable survival compared to that seen in the CONKO trial. CA 19-9 is a stratification factor for the current RTOG adjuvant pancreas trial (0848).« less

  20. Relating UMLS semantic types and task-based ontology to computer-interpretable clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anand; Ciccarese, Paolo; Quaglini, Silvana; Stefanelli, Mario; Caffi, Ezio; Boiocchi, Lorenzo

    2003-01-01

    Medical knowledge in clinical practice guideline (GL) texts is the source of task-based computer-interpretable clinical guideline models (CIGMs). We have used Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) semantic types (STs) to understand the percentage of GL text which belongs to a particular ST. We also use UMLS semantic network together with the CIGM-specific ontology to derive a semantic meaning behind the GL text. In order to achieve this objective, we took nine GL texts from the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) and marked up the text dealing with a particular ST. The STs we took into consideration were restricted taking into account the requirements of a task-based CIGM. We used DARPA Agent Markup Language and Ontology Inference Layer (DAML + OIL) to create the UMLS and CIGM specific semantic network. For the latter, as a bench test, we used the 1999 WHO-International Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension. We took into consideration the UMLS STs closest to the clinical tasks. The percentage of the GL text dealing with the ST "Health Care Activity" and subtypes "Laboratory Procedure", "Diagnostic Procedure" and "Therapeutic or Preventive Procedure" were measured. The parts of text belonging to other STs or comments were separated. A mapping of terms belonging to other STs was done to the STs under "HCA" for representation in DAML + OIL. As a result, we found that the three STs under "HCA" were the predominant STs present in the GL text. In cases where the terms of related STs existed, they were mapped into one of the three STs. The DAML + OIL representation was able to describe the hierarchy in task-based CIGMs. To conclude, we understood that the three STs could be used to represent the semantic network of the task-bases CIGMs. We identified some mapping operators which could be used for the mapping of other STs into these.

  1. Constraints Modeling in FRBR Data Model Using OCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudić, Gordana

    2011-09-01

    Transformation of the conceptual FRBR data model to the class diagram in UML 2.0 notation is given. The class diagram is formed using MagicDraw CASE tool. The paper presents a class diagram for the first group of FRBR entities ie. classes (the product of intellectual or artistic endeavour). It is demonstrated how to model constraints over relationships between classes in FRBR object data model using OCL 2.0.

  2. Auto-Coding UML Statecharts for Flight Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benowitz, Edward G; Clark, Ken; Watney, Garth J.

    2006-01-01

    Statecharts have been used as a means to communicate behaviors in a precise manner between system engineers and software engineers. Hand-translating a statechart to code, as done on some previous space missions, introduces the possibility of errors in the transformation from chart to code. To improve auto-coding, we have developed a process that generates flight code from UML statecharts. Our process is being used for the flight software on the Space Interferometer Mission (SIM).

  3. Structural Group-based Auditing of Missing Hierarchical Relationships in UMLS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Gu, Huanying(Helen); Perl, Yehoshua; Geller, James

    2009-01-01

    The Metathesaurus of the UMLS was created by integrating various source terminologies. The inter-concept relationships were either integrated into the UMLS from the source terminologies or specially generated. Due to the extensive size and inherent complexity of the Metathesaurus, the accidental omission of some hierarchical relationships was inevitable. We present a recursive procedure which allows a human expert, with the support of an algorithm, to locate missing hierarchical relationships. The procedure starts with a group of concepts with exactly the same (correct) semantic type assignments. It then partitions the concepts, based on child-of hierarchical relationships, into smaller, singly rooted, hierarchically connected subgroups. The auditor only needs to focus on the subgroups with very few concepts and their concepts with semantic type reassignments. The procedure was evaluated by comparing it with a comprehensive manual audit and it exhibits a perfect error recall. PMID:18824248

  4. Augmented halal food traceability system: analysis and design using UML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Y. V.; Fauzi, A. M.; Irawadi, T. T.; Djatna, T.

    2018-04-01

    Augmented halal food traceability is expanding the range of halal traceability in food supply chain where currently only available for tracing from the source of raw material to the industrial warehouse or inbound logistic. The halal traceability system must be developed in the integrated form that includes inbound and outbound logistics. The objective of this study was to develop a reliable initial model of integrated traceability system of halal food supply chain. The method was based on unified modeling language (UML) such as use case, sequence, and business process diagram. A goal programming model was formulated considering two objective functions which include (1) minimization of risk of halal traceability failures happened potentially during outbound logistics activities and (2) maximization of quality of halal product information. The result indicates the supply of material is the most important point to be considered in minimizing the risk of failure of halal food traceability system whereas no risk observed in manufacturing and distribution.

  5. Consumers' Use of UMLS Concepts on Social Media: Diabetes-Related Textual Data Analysis in Blog and Social Q&A Sites.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Sook; He, Zhe; Chen, Zhiwei; Oh, Sanghee; Bian, Jiang

    2016-11-24

    The widely known terminology gap between health professionals and health consumers hinders effective information seeking for consumers. The aim of this study was to better understand consumers' usage of medical concepts by evaluating the coverage of concepts and semantic types of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) on diabetes-related postings in 2 types of social media: blogs and social question and answer (Q&A). We collected 2 types of social media data: (1) a total of 3711 blogs tagged with "diabetes" on Tumblr posted between February and October 2015; and (2) a total of 58,422 questions and associated answers posted between 2009 and 2014 in the diabetes category of Yahoo! Answers. We analyzed the datasets using a widely adopted biomedical text processing framework Apache cTAKES and its extension YTEX. First, we applied the named entity recognition (NER) method implemented in YTEX to identify UMLS concepts in the datasets. We then analyzed the coverage and the popularity of concepts in the UMLS source vocabularies across the 2 datasets (ie, blogs and social Q&A). Further, we conducted a concept-level comparative coverage analysis between SNOMED Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) and Open-Access Collaborative Consumer Health Vocabulary (OAC CHV)-the top 2 UMLS source vocabularies that have the most coverage on our datasets. We also analyzed the UMLS semantic types that were frequently observed in our datasets. We identified 2415 UMLS concepts from blog postings, 6452 UMLS concepts from social Q&A questions, and 10,378 UMLS concepts from the answers. The medical concepts identified in the blogs can be covered by 56 source vocabularies in the UMLS, while those in questions and answers can be covered by 58 source vocabularies. SNOMED CT was the dominant vocabulary in terms of coverage across all the datasets, ranging from 84.9% to 95.9%. It was followed by OAC CHV (between 73.5% and 80.0%) and Metathesaurus Names (MTH) (between 55.7% and 73.5%). All of the social

  6. Consumers’ Use of UMLS Concepts on Social Media: Diabetes-Related Textual Data Analysis in Blog and Social Q&A Sites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiwei; Oh, Sanghee; Bian, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Background The widely known terminology gap between health professionals and health consumers hinders effective information seeking for consumers. Objective The aim of this study was to better understand consumers’ usage of medical concepts by evaluating the coverage of concepts and semantic types of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) on diabetes-related postings in 2 types of social media: blogs and social question and answer (Q&A). Methods We collected 2 types of social media data: (1) a total of 3711 blogs tagged with “diabetes” on Tumblr posted between February and October 2015; and (2) a total of 58,422 questions and associated answers posted between 2009 and 2014 in the diabetes category of Yahoo! Answers. We analyzed the datasets using a widely adopted biomedical text processing framework Apache cTAKES and its extension YTEX. First, we applied the named entity recognition (NER) method implemented in YTEX to identify UMLS concepts in the datasets. We then analyzed the coverage and the popularity of concepts in the UMLS source vocabularies across the 2 datasets (ie, blogs and social Q&A). Further, we conducted a concept-level comparative coverage analysis between SNOMED Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) and Open-Access Collaborative Consumer Health Vocabulary (OAC CHV)—the top 2 UMLS source vocabularies that have the most coverage on our datasets. We also analyzed the UMLS semantic types that were frequently observed in our datasets. Results We identified 2415 UMLS concepts from blog postings, 6452 UMLS concepts from social Q&A questions, and 10,378 UMLS concepts from the answers. The medical concepts identified in the blogs can be covered by 56 source vocabularies in the UMLS, while those in questions and answers can be covered by 58 source vocabularies. SNOMED CT was the dominant vocabulary in terms of coverage across all the datasets, ranging from 84.9% to 95.9%. It was followed by OAC CHV (between 73.5% and 80.0%) and Metathesaurus Names (MTH

  7. Working with the HL7 metamodel in a Model Driven Engineering context.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, A; García-García, J A; Escalona, M J; Parra-Calderón, C L

    2015-10-01

    HL7 (Health Level 7) International is an organization that defines health information standards. Most HL7 domain information models have been designed according to a proprietary graphic language whose domain models are based on the HL7 metamodel. Many researchers have considered using HL7 in the MDE (Model-Driven Engineering) context. A limitation has been identified: all MDE tools support UML (Unified Modeling Language), which is a standard model language, but most do not support the HL7 proprietary model language. We want to support software engineers without HL7 experience, thus real-world problems would be modeled by them by defining system requirements in UML that are compliant with HL7 domain models transparently. The objective of the present research is to connect HL7 with software analysis using a generic model-based approach. This paper introduces a first approach to an HL7 MDE solution that considers the MIF (Model Interchange Format) metamodel proposed by HL7 by making use of a plug-in developed in the EA (Enterprise Architect) tool. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. MODeLeR: A Virtual Constructivist Learning Environment and Methodology for Object-Oriented Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, John W.; Koonce, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This article contains a description of the organization and method of use of an active learning environment named MODeLeR, (Multimedia Object Design Learning Resource), a tool designed to facilitate the learning of concepts pertaining to object modeling with the Unified Modeling Language (UML). MODeLeR was created to provide an authentic,…

  9. Remodeling of legacy systems in health care using UML.

    PubMed

    Garde, Sebastian; Knaup, Petra; Herold, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    Research projects in the field of Medical Informatics often involve the development of application systems. Usually they are developed over a longer period of time, so that at a certain point of time a systematically planned reimplementation is necessary. The first step of reimplementation should be a systematic and comprehensive remodeling. When using UML for this task a systematic approach for remodeling activities is missing. Therefore, we developed a method for remodeling of legacy systems (Qumquad) and applied it to DOSPO, a documentation and therapy planning system for pediatric oncology. Qumquad helps to systematically carry out three steps: the modeling of the current actual state of the application system, the systematic identification of weak points and the development of a target concept for reimplementation considering the identified weak points. Results show that this approach is valuable and feasible and could be applied to various application systems in health care.

  10. Technical Data Exchange Software Tools Adapted to Distributed Microsatellite Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pache, Charly

    2002-01-01

    One critical issue concerning distributed design of satellites, is the collaborative work it requires. In particular, the exchange of data between each group responsible for each subsystem can be complex and very time-consuming. The goal of this paper is to present a design collaborative tool, the SSETI Design Model (SDM), specifically developed for enabling satellite distributed design. SDM is actually used in the ongoing Student Space Exploration &Technology (SSETI) initiative (www.sseti.net). SSETI is lead by European Space Agency (ESA) outreach office (http://www.estec.esa.nl/outreach), involving student groups from all over Europe for design, construction and launch of a microsatellite. The first part of this paper presents the current version of the SDM tool, a collection of Microsoft Excel linked worksheets, one for each subsystem. An overview of the project framework/structure is given, explaining the different actors, the flows between them, as well as the different types of data and the links - formulas - between data sets. Unified Modeling Language (UML) diagrams give an overview of the different parts . Then the SDM's functionalities, developed in VBA scripts (Visual Basic for Application), are introduced, as well as the interactive features, user interfaces and administration tools. The second part discusses the capabilities and limitations of SDM current version. Taking into account these capabilities and limitations, the third part outlines the next version of SDM, a web-oriented, database-driven evolution of the current version. This new approach will enable real-time data exchange and processing between the different actors of the mission. Comprehensive UML diagrams will guide the audience through the entire modeling process of such a system. Tradeoffs simulation capabilities, security, reliability, hardware and software issues will also be thoroughly discussed.

  11. A UML-based meta-framework for system design in public health informatics.

    PubMed

    Orlova, Anna O; Lehmann, Harold

    2002-01-01

    The National Agenda for Public Health Informatics calls for standards in data and knowledge representation within public health, which requires a multi-level framework that links all aspects of public health. The literature of public health informatics and public health informatics application were reviewed. A UML-based systems analysis was performed. Face validity of results was evaluated in analyzing the public health domain of lead poisoning. The core class of the UML-based system of public health is the Public Health Domain, which is associated with multiple Problems, for which Actors provide Perspectives. Actors take Actions that define, generate, utilize and/or evaluate Data Sources. The life cycle of the domain is a sequence of activities attributed to its problems that spirals through multiple iterations and realizations within a domain. The proposed Public Health Informatics Meta-Framework broadens efforts in applying informatics principles to the field of public health

  12. Consistent model driven architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  13. Model-Based GUI Testing Using Uppaal at Novo Nordisk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, Ulrik H.; Illum, Jacob; Larsen, Kim G.; Petersen, Michael A.; Skou, Arne

    This paper details a collaboration between Aalborg University and Novo Nordiskin developing an automatic model-based test generation tool for system testing of the graphical user interface of a medical device on an embedded platform. The tool takes as input an UML Statemachine model and generates a test suite satisfying some testing criterion, such as edge or state coverage, and converts the individual test case into a scripting language that can be automatically executed against the target. The tool has significantly reduced the time required for test construction and generation, and reduced the number of test scripts while increasing the coverage.

  14. The UMLS Knowledge Source Server: an experience in Web 2.0 technologies.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Karen E; Bangalore, Anantha K; Browne, Allen C

    2007-10-11

    The UMLS Knowledge Source Server (UMLSKS), developed at the National Library of Medicine (NLM), makes the knowledge sources of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) available to the research community over the Internet. In 2003, the UMLSKS was redesigned utilizing state-of-the-art technologies available at that time. That design offered a significant improvement over the prior version but presented a set of technology-dependent issues that limited its functionality and usability. Four areas of desired improvement were identified: software interfaces, web interface content, system maintenance/deployment, and user authentication. By employing next generation web technologies, newer authentication paradigms and further refinements in modular design methods, these areas could be addressed and corrected to meet the ever increasing needs of UMLSKS developers. In this paper we detail the issues present with the existing system and describe the new system's design using new technologies considered entrants in the Web 2.0 development era.

  15. Leveraging annotation-based modeling with Jump.

    PubMed

    Bergmayr, Alexander; Grossniklaus, Michael; Wimmer, Manuel; Kappel, Gerti

    2018-01-01

    The capability of UML profiles to serve as annotation mechanism has been recognized in both research and industry. Today's modeling tools offer profiles specific to platforms, such as Java, as they facilitate model-based engineering approaches. However, considering the large number of possible annotations in Java, manually developing the corresponding profiles would only be achievable by huge development and maintenance efforts. Thus, leveraging annotation-based modeling requires an automated approach capable of generating platform-specific profiles from Java libraries. To address this challenge, we present the fully automated transformation chain realized by Jump, thereby continuing existing mapping efforts between Java and UML by emphasizing on annotations and profiles. The evaluation of Jump shows that it scales for large Java libraries and generates profiles of equal or even improved quality compared to profiles currently used in practice. Furthermore, we demonstrate the practical value of Jump by contributing profiles that facilitate reverse engineering and forward engineering processes for the Java platform by applying it to a modernization scenario.

  16. Automated UMLS-Based Comparison of Medical Forms

    PubMed Central

    Dugas, Martin; Fritz, Fleur; Krumm, Rainer; Breil, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Medical forms are very heterogeneous: on a European scale there are thousands of data items in several hundred different systems. To enable data exchange for clinical care and research purposes there is a need to develop interoperable documentation systems with harmonized forms for data capture. A prerequisite in this harmonization process is comparison of forms. So far – to our knowledge – an automated method for comparison of medical forms is not available. A form contains a list of data items with corresponding medical concepts. An automatic comparison needs data types, item names and especially item with these unique concept codes from medical terminologies. The scope of the proposed method is a comparison of these items by comparing their concept codes (coded in UMLS). Each data item is represented by item name, concept code and value domain. Two items are called identical, if item name, concept code and value domain are the same. Two items are called matching, if only concept code and value domain are the same. Two items are called similar, if their concept codes are the same, but the value domains are different. Based on these definitions an open-source implementation for automated comparison of medical forms in ODM format with UMLS-based semantic annotations was developed. It is available as package compareODM from http://cran.r-project.org. To evaluate this method, it was applied to a set of 7 real medical forms with 285 data items from a large public ODM repository with forms for different medical purposes (research, quality management, routine care). Comparison results were visualized with grid images and dendrograms. Automated comparison of semantically annotated medical forms is feasible. Dendrograms allow a view on clustered similar forms. The approach is scalable for a large set of real medical forms. PMID:23861827

  17. Agile Model Driven Development of Electronic Health Record-Based Specialty Population Registries.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Vaishnavi; Fish, Jason C; Willett, DuWayne L

    2016-02-01

    The transformation of the American healthcare payment system from fee-for-service to value-based care increasingly makes it valuable to develop patient registries for specialized populations, to better assess healthcare quality and costs. Recent widespread adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) in the U.S. now makes possible construction of EHR-based specialty registry data collection tools and reports, previously unfeasible using manual chart abstraction. But the complexities of specialty registry EHR tools and measures, along with the variety of stakeholders involved, can result in misunderstood requirements and frequent product change requests, as users first experience the tools in their actual clinical workflows. Such requirements churn could easily stall progress in specialty registry rollout. Modeling a system's requirements and solution design can be a powerful way to remove ambiguities, facilitate shared understanding, and help evolve a design to meet newly-discovered needs. "Agile Modeling" retains these values while avoiding excessive unused up-front modeling in favor of iterative incremental modeling. Using Agile Modeling principles and practices, in calendar year 2015 one institution developed 58 EHR-based specialty registries, with 111 new data collection tools, supporting 134 clinical process and outcome measures, and enrolling over 16,000 patients. The subset of UML and non-UML models found most consistently useful in designing, building, and iteratively evolving EHR-based specialty registries included User Stories, Domain Models, Use Case Diagrams, Decision Trees, Graphical User Interface Storyboards, Use Case text descriptions, and Solution Class Diagrams.

  18. A HyperCard Implementation of Meta-1: The First Version of the UMLS Metathesaurus*

    PubMed Central

    Sherertz, David; Tuttle, Mark; Cole, William; Erlbaum, Mark; Olson, Nels; Nelson, Stuart

    1989-01-01

    The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) is being designed to provide uniform access to computer-based resources in biomedicine. For the foreseeable future, the foundation of the UMLS will be a metathesaurus of concepts, synthesized from existing biomedical nomenclatures. Meta-1, the first version of the Metathesaurus, will contain all of MeSH, a selection of terms from primary care, clinical medicine, and other domains, and all terms from SNOMED, ICD-9-CM, and CPT-4 which “match” them -- about 30,000 terms. In addition, Meta-1 will contain information about the occurrence and co-occurrence of its terms in selected resources, such as MEDLINE. As Meta-1 will contain about 100MB of terms and relationships, it is unlikely that it will be “printed.” Instead, some UMLS applications will support Metathesaurus browsing. One way of browsing Meta-1 will be via the Apple Macintosh® application called HyperCard®. A demonstration of a HyperCard interface, called Meta-Card™ will first acquaint viewers with the contents of the pre-human-review version of Meta-1, and second, illustrate how an object-oriented interface can be programmed to support various visual metaphors, e.g. “click-to-get-more-information,” and “click-to-follow-a-semantic-link,” and the notion of a Metathesaurus esthetic.

  19. Enhanced semantic interoperability by profiling health informatics standards.

    PubMed

    López, Diego M; Blobel, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Several standards applied to the healthcare domain support semantic interoperability. These standards are far from being completely adopted in health information system development, however. The objective of this paper is to provide a method and suggest the necessary tooling for reusing standard health information models, by that way supporting the development of semantically interoperable systems and components. The approach is based on the definition of UML Profiles. UML profiling is a formal modeling mechanism to specialize reference meta-models in such a way that it is possible to adapt those meta-models to specific platforms or domains. A health information model can be considered as such a meta-model. The first step of the introduced method identifies the standard health information models and tasks in the software development process in which healthcare information models can be reused. Then, the selected information model is formalized as a UML Profile. That Profile is finally applied to system models, annotating them with the semantics of the information model. The approach is supported on Eclipse-based UML modeling tools. The method is integrated into a comprehensive framework for health information systems development, and the feasibility of the approach is demonstrated in the analysis, design, and implementation of a public health surveillance system, reusing HL7 RIM and DIMs specifications. The paper describes a method and the necessary tooling for reusing standard healthcare information models. UML offers several advantages such as tooling support, graphical notation, exchangeability, extensibility, semi-automatic code generation, etc. The approach presented is also applicable for harmonizing different standard specifications.

  20. Model Based Analysis and Test Generation for Flight Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Schumann, Johann M.; Mehlitz, Peter C.; Lowry, Mike R.; Karsai, Gabor; Nine, Harmon; Neema, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    We describe a framework for model-based analysis and test case generation in the context of a heterogeneous model-based development paradigm that uses and combines Math- Works and UML 2.0 models and the associated code generation tools. This paradigm poses novel challenges to analysis and test case generation that, to the best of our knowledge, have not been addressed before. The framework is based on a common intermediate representation for different modeling formalisms and leverages and extends model checking and symbolic execution tools for model analysis and test case generation, respectively. We discuss the application of our framework to software models for a NASA flight mission.

  1. Agile Model Driven Development of Electronic Health Record-Based Specialty Population Registries

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Vaishnavi; Fish, Jason C.; Willett, DuWayne L.

    2018-01-01

    The transformation of the American healthcare payment system from fee-for-service to value-based care increasingly makes it valuable to develop patient registries for specialized populations, to better assess healthcare quality and costs. Recent widespread adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) in the U.S. now makes possible construction of EHR-based specialty registry data collection tools and reports, previously unfeasible using manual chart abstraction. But the complexities of specialty registry EHR tools and measures, along with the variety of stakeholders involved, can result in misunderstood requirements and frequent product change requests, as users first experience the tools in their actual clinical workflows. Such requirements churn could easily stall progress in specialty registry rollout. Modeling a system’s requirements and solution design can be a powerful way to remove ambiguities, facilitate shared understanding, and help evolve a design to meet newly-discovered needs. “Agile Modeling” retains these values while avoiding excessive unused up-front modeling in favor of iterative incremental modeling. Using Agile Modeling principles and practices, in calendar year 2015 one institution developed 58 EHR-based specialty registries, with 111 new data collection tools, supporting 134 clinical process and outcome measures, and enrolling over 16,000 patients. The subset of UML and non-UML models found most consistently useful in designing, building, and iteratively evolving EHR-based specialty registries included User Stories, Domain Models, Use Case Diagrams, Decision Trees, Graphical User Interface Storyboards, Use Case text descriptions, and Solution Class Diagrams. PMID:29750222

  2. The Latin American laws of correct nutrition: Review, unified interpretation, model and tools.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Bosquez, Oscar; Pozos-Parra, Pilar

    2016-03-01

    The "Laws of Correct Nutrition": the Law of Quantity, the Law of Quality, the Law of Harmony and the Law of Adequacy, provide the basis of a proper diet, i.e. one that provides the body with the energy required and nutrients it needs for daily activities and maintenance of vital functions. For several decades, these Laws have been the basis of nourishing menus designed in Latin America; however, they are stated in a colloquial language, which leads to differences in interpretation and ambiguities for non-experts and even experts in the field. We present a review of the different interpretations of the Laws and describe a consensus. We represent concepts related to nourishing menu design employing the Unified Modeling Language (UML). We formalize the Laws using the Object Constraint Language (OCL). We design a nourishing menu for a particular user through enforcement of the Laws. We designed a domain model with the essential elements to plan a nourishing menu and we expressed the necessary constraints to make the model׳s behavior conform to the four Laws. We made a formal verification and validation of the model via USE (UML-based Specification Environment) and we developed a software prototype for menu design under the Laws. Diet planning is considered as an art but consideration should be given to the need for a set of strict rules to design adequate menus. Thus, we model the "Laws of Nutrition" as a formal basis and standard framework for this task. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. A Web Terminology Server Using UMLS for the Description of Medical Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Burgun, Anita; Denier, Patrick; Bodenreider, Olivier; Botti, Geneviève; Delamarre, Denis; Pouliquen, Bruno; Oberlin, Philippe; Lévéque, Jean M.; Lukacs, Bertrand; Kohler, François; Fieschi, Marius; Le Beux, Pierre

    1997-01-01

    Abstract The Model for Assistance in the Orientation of a User within Coding Systems (MAOUSSC) project has been designed to provide a representation for medical and surgical procedures that allows several applications to be developed from several viewpoints. It is based on a conceptual model, a controlled set of terms, and Web server development. The design includes the UMLS knowledge sources associated with additional knowledge about medico-surgical procedures. The model was implemented using a relational database. The authors developed a complete interface for the Web presentation, with the intermediary layer being written in PERL. The server has been used for the representation of medico-surgical procedures that occur in the discharge summaries of the national survey of hospital activities that is performed by the French Health Statistics Agency in order to produce inpatient profiles. The authors describe the current status of the MAOUSSC server and discuss their interest in using such a server to assist in the coordination of terminology tasks and in the sharing of controlled terminologies. PMID:9292841

  4. Modelling biological behaviours with the unified modelling language: an immunological case study and critique

    PubMed Central

    Read, Mark; Andrews, Paul S.; Timmis, Jon; Kumar, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    We present a framework to assist the diagrammatic modelling of complex biological systems using the unified modelling language (UML). The framework comprises three levels of modelling, ranging in scope from the dynamics of individual model entities to system-level emergent properties. By way of an immunological case study of the mouse disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we show how the framework can be used to produce models that capture and communicate the biological system, detailing how biological entities, interactions and behaviours lead to higher-level emergent properties observed in the real world. We demonstrate how the UML can be successfully applied within our framework, and provide a critique of UML's ability to capture concepts fundamental to immunology and biology more generally. We show how specialized, well-explained diagrams with less formal semantics can be used where no suitable UML formalism exists. We highlight UML's lack of expressive ability concerning cyclic feedbacks in cellular networks, and the compounding concurrency arising from huge numbers of stochastic, interacting agents. To compensate for this, we propose several additional relationships for expressing these concepts in UML's activity diagram. We also demonstrate the ambiguous nature of class diagrams when applied to complex biology, and question their utility in modelling such dynamic systems. Models created through our framework are non-executable, and expressly free of simulation implementation concerns. They are a valuable complement and precursor to simulation specifications and implementations, focusing purely on thoroughly exploring the biology, recording hypotheses and assumptions, and serve as a communication medium detailing exactly how a simulation relates to the real biology. PMID:25142524

  5. Modelling biological behaviours with the unified modelling language: an immunological case study and critique.

    PubMed

    Read, Mark; Andrews, Paul S; Timmis, Jon; Kumar, Vipin

    2014-10-06

    We present a framework to assist the diagrammatic modelling of complex biological systems using the unified modelling language (UML). The framework comprises three levels of modelling, ranging in scope from the dynamics of individual model entities to system-level emergent properties. By way of an immunological case study of the mouse disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we show how the framework can be used to produce models that capture and communicate the biological system, detailing how biological entities, interactions and behaviours lead to higher-level emergent properties observed in the real world. We demonstrate how the UML can be successfully applied within our framework, and provide a critique of UML's ability to capture concepts fundamental to immunology and biology more generally. We show how specialized, well-explained diagrams with less formal semantics can be used where no suitable UML formalism exists. We highlight UML's lack of expressive ability concerning cyclic feedbacks in cellular networks, and the compounding concurrency arising from huge numbers of stochastic, interacting agents. To compensate for this, we propose several additional relationships for expressing these concepts in UML's activity diagram. We also demonstrate the ambiguous nature of class diagrams when applied to complex biology, and question their utility in modelling such dynamic systems. Models created through our framework are non-executable, and expressly free of simulation implementation concerns. They are a valuable complement and precursor to simulation specifications and implementations, focusing purely on thoroughly exploring the biology, recording hypotheses and assumptions, and serve as a communication medium detailing exactly how a simulation relates to the real biology.

  6. Semantically-Rigorous Systems Engineering Modeling Using Sysml and OWL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. Steven; Rouquette, Nicolas F.

    2012-01-01

    The Systems Modeling Language (SysML) has found wide acceptance as a standard graphical notation for the domain of systems engineering. SysML subsets and extends the Unified Modeling Language (UML) to define conventions for expressing structural, behavioral, and analytical elements, and relationships among them. SysML-enabled modeling tools are available from multiple providers, and have been used for diverse projects in military aerospace, scientific exploration, and civil engineering. The Web Ontology Language (OWL) has found wide acceptance as a standard notation for knowledge representation. OWL-enabled modeling tools are available from multiple providers, as well as auxiliary assets such as reasoners and application programming interface libraries, etc. OWL has been applied to diverse projects in a wide array of fields. While the emphasis in SysML is on notation, SysML inherits (from UML) a semantic foundation that provides for limited reasoning and analysis. UML's partial formalization (FUML), however, does not cover the full semantics of SysML, which is a substantial impediment to developing high confidence in the soundness of any conclusions drawn therefrom. OWL, by contrast, was developed from the beginning on formal logical principles, and consequently provides strong support for verification of consistency and satisfiability, extraction of entailments, conjunctive query answering, etc. This emphasis on formal logic is counterbalanced by the absence of any graphical notation conventions in the OWL standards. Consequently, OWL has had only limited adoption in systems engineering. The complementary strengths and weaknesses of SysML and OWL motivate an interest in combining them in such a way that we can benefit from the attractive graphical notation of SysML and the formal reasoning of OWL. This paper describes an approach to achieving that combination.

  7. Qumquad: a UML-based approach for remodeling of legacy systems in health care.

    PubMed

    Garde, Sebastian; Knaup, Petra; Herold, Ralf

    2003-07-01

    Health care information systems still comprise legacy systems to a certain extent. For reengineering legacy systems a thorough remodeling is inalienable. Current modeling techniques like the Unified Modeling Language (UML) do not offer a systematic and comprehensive process-oriented method for remodeling activities. We developed a systematic method for remodeling legacy systems in health care called Qumquad. Qumquad consists of three major steps: (i) modeling the actual state of the application system, (ii) systematic identification of weak points in this model and (iii) development of a target concept for the reimplementation considering the identified weak points. We applied Qumquad for remodeling a documentation and therapy planning system for pediatric oncology (DOSPO). As a result of our remodeling activities we regained an abstract model of the system, an analysis of the current weak points of DOSPO and possible (partly alternative) solutions to overcome the weak points. Qumquad proved to be very helpful in the reengineering process of DOSPO since we now have at our disposal a comprehensive model for the reimplementation of DOSPO that current users of the system agree on. Qumquad can easily be applied to other reengineering projects in health care.

  8. "UML Quiz": Automatic Conversion of Web-Based E-Learning Content in Mobile Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Franqué, Alexander; Tellioglu, Hilda

    2014-01-01

    Many educational institutions use Learning Management Systems to provide e-learning content to their students. This often includes quizzes that can help students to prepare for exams. However, the content is usually web-optimized and not very usable on mobile devices. In this work a native mobile application ("UML Quiz") that imports…

  9. Toward a Model-Based Approach for Flight System Fault Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John; Meakin, Peter; Murray, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Use SysML/UML to describe the physical structure of the system This part of the model would be shared with other teams - FS Systems Engineering, Planning & Execution, V&V, Operations, etc., in an integrated model-based engineering environment Use the UML Profile mechanism, defining Stereotypes to precisely express the concepts of the FP domain This extends the UML/SysML languages to contain our FP concepts Use UML/SysML, along with our profile, to capture FP concepts and relationships in the model Generate typical FP engineering products (the FMECA, Fault Tree, MRD, V&V Matrices)

  10. Toward a Bio-Medical Thesaurus: Building the Foundation of the UMLS

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Mark S.; Blois, Marsden S.; Erlbaum, Mark S.; Nelson, Stuart J.; Sherertz, David D.

    1988-01-01

    The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) is being designed to provide a uniform user interface to heterogeneous machine-readable bio-medical information resources, such as bibliographic databases, genetic databases, expert systems and patient records.1 Such an interface will have to recognize different ways of saying the same thing, and provide links to ways of saying related things. One way to represent the necessary associations is via a domain thesaurus. As no such thesaurus exists, and because, once built, it will be both sizable and in need of continuous maintenance, its design should include a methodology for building and maintaining it. We propose a methodology, utilizing lexically expanded schema inversion, and a design, called T. Lex, which together form one approach to the problem of defining and building a bio-medical thesaurus. We argue that the semantic locality implicit in such a thesaurus will support model-based reasoning in bio-medicine.2

  11. Power Plant Model Validation Tool

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    The PPMV is used to validate generator model using disturbance recordings. The PPMV tool contains a collection of power plant models and model validation studies, as well as disturbance recordings from a number of historic grid events. The user can import data from a new disturbance into the database, which converts PMU and SCADA data into GE PSLF format, and then run the tool to validate (or invalidate) the model for a specific power plant against its actual performance. The PNNL PPMV tool enables the automation of the process of power plant model validation using disturbance recordings. The tool usesmore » PMU and SCADA measurements as input information. The tool automatically adjusts all required EPCL scripts and interacts with GE PSLF in the batch mode. The main tool features includes: The tool interacts with GE PSLF; The tool uses GE PSLF Play-In Function for generator model validation; Database of projects (model validation studies); Database of the historic events; Database of the power plant; The tool has advanced visualization capabilities; and The tool automatically generates reports« less

  12. Augmenting Oracle Text with the UMLS for enhanced searching of free-text medical reports.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jing; Erdal, Selnur; Dhaval, Rakesh; Kamal, Jyoti

    2007-10-11

    The intrinsic complexity of free-text medical reports imposes great challenges for information retrieval systems. We have developed a prototype search engine for retrieving clinical reports that leverages the powerful indexing and querying capabilities of Oracle Text, and the rich biomedical domain knowledge and semantic structures that are captured in the UMLS Metathesaurus.

  13. Requirements UML Tool (RUT) Expanded for Extreme Programming (CI02)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCoy, James R.

    2003-01-01

    A procedure for capturing and managing system requirements that incorporates XP user stories. Because costs associated with identifying problems in requirements increase dramatically over the lifecycle of a project, a method for identifying sources of software risks in user stories is urgently needed. This initiative aims to determine a set of guide-lines for user stories that will result in high-quality requirement. To further this initiative, a tool is needed to analyze user stories that can assess the quality of individual user stories, detect sources cf software risk's, produce software metrics, and identify areas in user stories that can be improved.

  14. A preoperative serum signature of CEA+/CA125+/CA19-9 ≥ 1000 U/mL indicates poor outcome to pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang; Xu, Huaxiang; Wang, Wenquan; Wu, Chuntao; Chen, Yong; Yang, Jingxuan; Cen, Putao; Xu, Jin; Liu, Chen; Long, Jiang; Guha, Sushovan; Fu, Deliang; Ni, Quanxing; Jatoi, Aminah; Chari, Suresh; McCleary-Wheeler, Angela L; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Li, Min; Yu, Xianjun

    2015-05-01

    Pancreatectomy is associated with significant morbidity and unpredictable outcome, with few diagnostic tools to determine, which patients gain the most benefit from this treatment, especially before the operation. This study aimed to define a preoperative signature panel of serum markers to indicate response to pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer. Over 1000 patients with pancreatic cancer treated at two independent high-volume institutions were included in this study and were divided into three groups, including resected, locally advanced and metastatic. Eight serum tumor markers most commonly used in gastrointestinal cancers were analyzed for patient outcome. Preoperative CA19-9 independently indicated surgical response in pancreatic cancer. Patients with CA19-9 ≥1000 U/mL generally had a poor surgical benefit. However, a subset of these patients still achieved a survival advantage when CA19-9 levels decreased postoperatively. CEA and CA125 in the presence of CA19-9 ≥1000 U/mL could independently predict the non-decrease of CA19-9 postoperatively. The combination of the three markers was useful for predicting a worse surgical outcome with a median survival of 5.1 months vs. 23.0 months (p < 0.001) for the training cohort and 7.0 months vs. 18.2 months (p < 0.001) for the validation cohort and also suggested a higher prevalence of early distant metastasis after surgery. Resected patients with this proposed signature showed no survival advantage over patients in the locally advanced group who did not receive pancreatectomy. Therefore, a preoperative serum signature of CEA(+)/CA125(+)/CA19-9 ≥1000 U/mL is associated with poor surgical outcome and can be used to select appropriate patients with pancreatic cancer for pancreatectomy. © 2014 UICC.

  15. The application of the unified modeling language in object-oriented analysis of healthcare information systems.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vinod

    2002-10-01

    This paper concerns itself with the beneficial effects of the Unified Modeling Language (UML), a nonproprietary object modeling standard, in specifying, visualizing, constructing, documenting, and communicating the model of a healthcare information system from the user's perspective. The author outlines the process of object-oriented analysis (OOA) using the UML and illustrates this with healthcare examples to demonstrate the practicality of application of the UML by healthcare personnel to real-world information system problems. The UML will accelerate advanced uses of object-orientation such as reuse technology, resulting in significantly higher software productivity. The UML is also applicable in the context of a component paradigm that promises to enhance the capabilities of healthcare information systems and simplify their management and maintenance.

  16. Improved identification of noun phrases in clinical radiology reports using a high-performance statistical natural language parser augmented with the UMLS specialist lexicon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Lowe, Henry J; Klein, Dan; Cucina, Russell J

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a method of extracting noun phrases with full phrase structures from a set of clinical radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and to investigate the effects of using the UMLS(R) Specialist Lexicon to improve noun phrase identification within clinical radiology documents. The noun phrase identification (NPI) module is composed of a sentence boundary detector, a statistical natural language parser trained on a nonmedical domain, and a noun phrase (NP) tagger. The NPI module processed a set of 100 XML-represented clinical radiology reports in Health Level 7 (HL7)(R) Clinical Document Architecture (CDA)-compatible format. Computed output was compared with manual markups made by four physicians and one author for maximal (longest) NP and those made by one author for base (simple) NP, respectively. An extended lexicon of biomedical terms was created from the UMLS Specialist Lexicon and used to improve NPI performance. The test set was 50 randomly selected reports. The sentence boundary detector achieved 99.0% precision and 98.6% recall. The overall maximal NPI precision and recall were 78.9% and 81.5% before using the UMLS Specialist Lexicon and 82.1% and 84.6% after. The overall base NPI precision and recall were 88.2% and 86.8% before using the UMLS Specialist Lexicon and 93.1% and 92.6% after, reducing false-positives by 31.1% and false-negatives by 34.3%. The sentence boundary detector performs excellently. After the adaptation using the UMLS Specialist Lexicon, the statistical parser's NPI performance on radiology reports increased to levels comparable to the parser's native performance in its newswire training domain and to that reported by other researchers in the general nonmedical domain.

  17. A Framework to Manage Information Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. S.; King, T.; Crichton, D.; Walker, R.; Roberts, A.; Thieman, J.

    2008-05-01

    The Information Model is the foundation on which an Information System is built. It defines the entities to be processed, their attributes, and the relationships that add meaning. The development and subsequent management of the Information Model is the single most significant factor for the development of a successful information system. A framework of tools has been developed that supports the management of an information model with the rigor typically afforded to software development. This framework provides for evolutionary and collaborative development independent of system implementation choices. Once captured, the modeling information can be exported to common languages for the generation of documentation, application databases, and software code that supports both traditional and semantic web applications. This framework is being successfully used for several science information modeling projects including those for the Planetary Data System (PDS), the International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA), the National Cancer Institute's Early Detection Research Network (EDRN), and several Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) projects. The objective of the Space Physics Archive Search and Exchange (SPASE) program is to promote collaboration and coordination of archiving activity for the Space Plasma Physics community and ensure the compatibility of the architectures used for a global distributed system and the individual data centers. Over the past several years, the SPASE data model working group has made great progress in developing the SPASE Data Model and supporting artifacts including a data dictionary, XML Schema, and two ontologies. The authors have captured the SPASE Information Model in this framework. This allows the generation of documentation that presents the SPASE Information Model in object-oriented notation including UML class diagrams and class hierarchies. The modeling information can also be exported to semantic web languages such

  18. Physician nurse care: A new use of UMLS to measure professional contribution: Are we talking about the same patient a new graph matching algorithm?

    PubMed

    Boyd, Andrew D; Dunn Lopez, Karen; Lugaresi, Camillo; Macieira, Tamara; Sousa, Vanessa; Acharya, Sabita; Balasubramanian, Abhinaya; Roussi, Khawllah; Keenan, Gail M; Lussier, Yves A; Li, Jianrong 'John'; Burton, Michel; Di Eugenio, Barbara

    2018-05-01

    Physician and nurses have worked together for generations; however, their language and training are vastly different; comparing and contrasting their work and their joint impact on patient outcomes is difficult in light of this difference. At the same time, the EHR only includes the physician perspective via the physician-authored discharge summary, but not nurse documentation. Prior research in this area has focused on collaboration and the usage of similar terminology. The objective of the study is to gain insight into interprofessional care by developing a computational metric to identify similarities, related concepts and differences in physician and nurse work. 58 physician discharge summaries and the corresponding nurse plans of care were transformed into Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Concept Unique Identifiers (CUIs). MedLEE, a Natural Language Processing (NLP) program, extracted "physician terms" from free-text physician summaries. The nursing plans of care were constructed using the HANDS © nursing documentation software. HANDS © utilizes structured terminologies: nursing diagnosis (NANDA-I), outcomes (NOC), and interventions (NIC) to create "nursing terms". The physician's and nurse's terms were compared using the UMLS network for relatedness, overlaying the physician and nurse terms for comparison. Our overarching goal is to provide insight into the care, by innovatively applying graph algorithms to the UMLS network. We reveal the relationships between the care provided by each professional that is specific to the patient level. We found that only 26% of patients had synonyms (identical UMLS CUIs) between the two professions' documentation. On average, physicians' discharge summaries contain 27 terms and nurses' documentation, 18. Traversing the UMLS network, we found an average of 4 terms related (distance less than 2) between the professions, leaving most concepts as unrelated between nurse and physician care. Our hypothesis that physician

  19. Development of a State Machine Sequencer for the Keck Interferometer: Evolution, Development and Lessons Learned using a CASE Tool Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rede, Leonard J.; Booth, Andrew; Hsieh, Jonathon; Summer, Kellee

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the evolution of a sequencer from a simple EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) based sequencer into a complex implementation designed utilizing UML (Unified Modeling Language) methodologies and a CASE (Computer Aided Software Engineering) tool approach. The main purpose of the sequencer (called the IF Sequencer) is to provide overall control of the Keck Interferometer to enable science operations be carried out by a single operator (and/or observer). The interferometer links the two 10m telescopes of the W. M. Keck Observatory at Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The IF Sequencer is a high-level, multi-threaded, Hare1 finite state machine, software program designed to orchestrate several lower-level hardware and software hard real time subsystems that must perform their work in a specific and sequential order. The sequencing need not be done in hard real-time. Each state machine thread commands either a high-speed real-time multiple mode embedded controller via CORB A, or slower controllers via EPICS Channel Access interfaces. The overall operation of the system is simplified by the automation. The UML is discussed and our use of it to implement the sequencer is presented. The decision to use the Rhapsody product as our CASE tool is explained and reflected upon. Most importantly, a section on lessons learned is presented and the difficulty of integrating CASE tool automatically generated C++ code into a large control system consisting of multiple infrastructures is presented.

  20. Development of a state machine sequencer for the Keck Interferometer: evolution, development, and lessons learned using a CASE tool approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reder, Leonard J.; Booth, Andrew; Hsieh, Jonathan; Summers, Kellee R.

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the evolution of a sequencer from a simple Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) based sequencer into a complex implementation designed utilizing UML (Unified Modeling Language) methodologies and a Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tool approach. The main purpose of the Interferometer Sequencer (called the IF Sequencer) is to provide overall control of the Keck Interferometer to enable science operations to be carried out by a single operator (and/or observer). The interferometer links the two 10m telescopes of the W. M. Keck Observatory at Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The IF Sequencer is a high-level, multi-threaded, Harel finite state machine software program designed to orchestrate several lower-level hardware and software hard real-time subsystems that must perform their work in a specific and sequential order. The sequencing need not be done in hard real-time. Each state machine thread commands either a high-speed real-time multiple mode embedded controller via CORBA, or slower controllers via EPICS Channel Access interfaces. The overall operation of the system is simplified by the automation. The UML is discussed and our use of it to implement the sequencer is presented. The decision to use the Rhapsody product as our CASE tool is explained and reflected upon. Most importantly, a section on lessons learned is presented and the difficulty of integrating CASE tool automatically generated C++ code into a large control system consisting of multiple infrastructures is presented.

  1. Dynamic Gate Product and Artifact Generation from System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Maddalena; Delp, Christopher; Bindschadler, Duane; Sarrel, Marc; Wollaeger, Ryan; Lam, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is gaining acceptance as a way to formalize systems engineering practice through the use of models. The traditional method of producing and managing a plethora of disjointed documents and presentations ("Power-Point Engineering") has proven both costly and limiting as a means to manage the complex and sophisticated specifications of modern space systems. We have developed a tool and method to produce sophisticated artifacts as views and by-products of integrated models, allowing us to minimize the practice of "Power-Point Engineering" from model-based projects and demonstrate the ability of MBSE to work within and supersede traditional engineering practices. This paper describes how we have created and successfully used model-based document generation techniques to extract paper artifacts from complex SysML and UML models in support of successful project reviews. Use of formal SysML and UML models for architecture and system design enables production of review documents, textual artifacts, and analyses that are consistent with one-another and require virtually no labor-intensive maintenance across small-scale design changes and multiple authors. This effort thus enables approaches that focus more on rigorous engineering work and less on "PowerPoint engineering" and production of paper-based documents or their "office-productivity" file equivalents.

  2. Towards a semantic medical Web: HealthCyberMap's tool for building an RDF metadata base of health information resources based on the Qualified Dublin Core Metadata Set.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Maged N; Roudsari, Abdul V; Carson, Ewart R

    2002-07-01

    HealthCyberMap (http://healthcybermap.semanticweb.org/) aims at mapping Internet health information resources in novel ways for enhanced retrieval and navigation. This is achieved by collecting appropriate resource metadata in an unambiguous form that preserves semantics. We modelled a qualified Dublin Core (DC) metadata set ontology with extra elements for resource quality and geographical provenance in Prot g -2000. A metadata collection form helps acquiring resource instance data within Prot g . The DC subject field is populated with UMLS terms directly imported from UMLS Knowledge Source Server using UMLS tab, a Prot g -2000 plug-in. The project is saved in RDFS/RDF. The ontology and associated form serve as a free tool for building and maintaining an RDF medical resource metadata base. The UMLS tab enables browsing and searching for concepts that best describe a resource, and importing them to DC subject fields. The resultant metadata base can be used with a search and inference engine, and have textual and/or visual navigation interface(s) applied to it, to ultimately build a medical Semantic Web portal. Different ways of exploiting Prot g -2000 RDF output are discussed. By making the context and semantics of resources, not merely their raw text and formatting, amenable to computer 'understanding,' we can build a Semantic Web that is more useful to humans than the current Web. This requires proper use of metadata and ontologies. Clinical codes can reliably describe the subjects of medical resources, establish the semantic relationships (as defined by underlying coding scheme) between related resources, and automate their topical categorisation.

  3. The Equivalence of Two Methods of Parameter Estimation for the Rasch Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwood, Larry G.; Bradley, Edwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods of estimating parameters in the Rasch model are compared. The equivalence of likelihood estimations from the model of G. J. Mellenbergh and P. Vijn (1981) and from usual unconditional maximum likelihood (UML) estimation is demonstrated. Mellenbergh and Vijn's model is a convenient method of calculating UML estimates. (SLD)

  4. An online model composition tool for system biology models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are multiple representation formats for Systems Biology computational models, and the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is one of the most widely used. SBML is used to capture, store, and distribute computational models by Systems Biology data sources (e.g., the BioModels Database) and researchers. Therefore, there is a need for all-in-one web-based solutions that support advance SBML functionalities such as uploading, editing, composing, visualizing, simulating, querying, and browsing computational models. Results We present the design and implementation of the Model Composition Tool (Interface) within the PathCase-SB (PathCase Systems Biology) web portal. The tool helps users compose systems biology models to facilitate the complex process of merging systems biology models. We also present three tools that support the model composition tool, namely, (1) Model Simulation Interface that generates a visual plot of the simulation according to user’s input, (2) iModel Tool as a platform for users to upload their own models to compose, and (3) SimCom Tool that provides a side by side comparison of models being composed in the same pathway. Finally, we provide a web site that hosts BioModels Database models and a separate web site that hosts SBML Test Suite models. Conclusions Model composition tool (and the other three tools) can be used with little or no knowledge of the SBML document structure. For this reason, students or anyone who wants to learn about systems biology will benefit from the described functionalities. SBML Test Suite models will be a nice starting point for beginners. And, for more advanced purposes, users will able to access and employ models of the BioModels Database as well. PMID:24006914

  5. THE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL EVALUATION TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster describes a model evaluation tool that is currently being developed and applied for meteorological and air quality model evaluation. The poster outlines the framework and provides examples of statistical evaluations that can be performed with the model evaluation tool...

  6. A Software Hub for High Assurance Model-Driven Development and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-23

    verification of UML models in TLPVS. In Thomas Baar, Alfred Strohmeier, Ana Moreira, and Stephen J. Mellor, editors, UML 2004 - The Unified Modeling...volume 3785 of Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pages 52–65, Manchester, UK, Nov 2005. Springer. [GH04] Günter Graw and Peter Herrmann. Transformation

  7. Tool Support for Parametric Analysis of Large Software Simulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Gundy-Burlet, Karen; Pasareanu, Corina; Menzies, Tim; Barrett, Tony

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of large and complex parameterized software systems, e.g., systems simulation in aerospace, is very complicated and time-consuming due to the large parameter space, and the complex, highly coupled nonlinear nature of the different system components. Thus, such systems are generally validated only in regions local to anticipated operating points rather than through characterization of the entire feasible operational envelope of the system. We have addressed the factors deterring such an analysis with a tool to support envelope assessment: we utilize a combination of advanced Monte Carlo generation with n-factor combinatorial parameter variations to limit the number of cases, but still explore important interactions in the parameter space in a systematic fashion. Additional test-cases, automatically generated from models (e.g., UML, Simulink, Stateflow) improve the coverage. The distributed test runs of the software system produce vast amounts of data, making manual analysis impossible. Our tool automatically analyzes the generated data through a combination of unsupervised Bayesian clustering techniques (AutoBayes) and supervised learning of critical parameter ranges using the treatment learner TAR3. The tool has been developed around the Trick simulation environment, which is widely used within NASA. We will present this tool with a GN&C (Guidance, Navigation and Control) simulation of a small satellite system.

  8. Enhancement of the Acquisition Process for a Combat System-A Case Study to Model the Workflow Processes for an Air Defense System Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Business Process Modeling BPMN Business Process Modeling Notation SoA Service-oriented Architecture UML Unified Modeling Language CSP...system developers. Supporting technologies include Business Process Modeling Notation ( BPMN ), Unified Modeling Language (UML), model-driven architecture

  9. Web Based Tool for Mission Operations Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyles, Carole A.; Bindschadler, Duane L.

    2008-01-01

    A conventional practice for spaceflight projects is to document scenarios in a monolithic Operations Concept document. Such documents can be hundreds of pages long and may require laborious updates. Software development practice utilizes scenarios in the form of smaller, individual use cases, which are often structured and managed using UML. We have developed a process and a web-based scenario tool that utilizes a similar philosophy of smaller, more compact scenarios (but avoids the formality of UML). The need for a scenario process and tool became apparent during the authors' work on a large astrophysics mission. It was noted that every phase of the Mission (e.g., formulation, design, verification and validation, and operations) looked back to scenarios to assess completeness of requirements and design. It was also noted that terminology needed to be clarified and structured to assure communication across all levels of the project. Attempts to manage, communicate, and evolve scenarios at all levels of a project using conventional tools (e.g., Excel) and methods (Scenario Working Group meetings) were not effective given limitations on budget and staffing. The objective of this paper is to document the scenario process and tool created to offer projects a low-cost capability to create, communicate, manage, and evolve scenarios throughout project development. The process and tool have the further benefit of allowing the association of requirements with particular scenarios, establishing and viewing relationships between higher- and lower-level scenarios, and the ability to place all scenarios in a shared context. The resulting structured set of scenarios is widely visible (using a web browser), easily updated, and can be searched according to various criteria including the level (e.g., Project, System, and Team) and Mission Phase. Scenarios are maintained in a web-accessible environment that provides a structured set of scenario fields and allows for maximum

  10. Structuration and acquisition of medical knowledge. Using UMLS in the conceptual graph formalism.

    PubMed Central

    Volot, F.; Zweigenbaum, P.; Bachimont, B.; Ben Said, M.; Bouaud, J.; Fieschi, M.; Boisvieux, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The use of a taxonomy, such as the concept type lattice (CTL) of Conceptual Graphs, is a central structuring piece in a knowledge-based system. The knowledge it contains is constantly used by the system, and its structure provides a guide for the acquisition of other pieces of knowledge. We show how UMLS can be used as a knowledge resource to build a CTL and how the CTL can help the process of acquisition for other kinds of knowledge. We illustrate this method in the context of the MENELAS natural language understanding project. PMID:8130568

  11. An Information System Development Method Connecting Business Process Modeling and its Experimental Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Tsutomu; Kaminishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Yoshiyuki; Hirabayashi, Syuichi; Koizumi, Hisao

    Business process modeling (BPM) is gaining attention as a measure of analysis and improvement of the business process. BPM analyses the current business process as an AS-IS model and solves problems to improve the current business and moreover it aims to create a business process, which produces values, as a TO-BE model. However, researches of techniques that connect the business process improvement acquired by BPM to the implementation of the information system seamlessly are rarely reported. If the business model obtained by BPM is converted into UML, and the implementation can be carried out by the technique of UML, we can expect the improvement in efficiency of information system implementation. In this paper, we describe a method of the system development, which converts the process model obtained by BPM into UML and the method is evaluated by modeling a prototype of a parts procurement system. In the evaluation, comparison with the case where the system is implemented by the conventional UML technique without going via BPM is performed.

  12. Lessons learned from a pilot implementation of the UMLS information sources map.

    PubMed

    Miller, P L; Frawley, S J; Wright, L; Roderer, N K; Powsner, S M

    1995-01-01

    To explore the software design issues involved in implementing an operational information sources map (ISM) knowledge base (KB) and system of navigational tools that can help medical users access network-based information sources relevant to a biomedical question. A pilot biomedical ISM KB and associated client-server software (ISM/Explorer) have been developed to help students, clinicians, researchers, and staff access network-based information sources, as part of the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) multi-institutional Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) project. The system allows the user to specify and constrain a search for a biomedical question of interest. The system then returns a list of sources matching the search. At this point the user may request 1) further information about a source, 2) that the list of sources be regrouped by different criteria to allow the user to get a better overall appreciation of the set of retrieved sources as a whole, or 3) automatic connection to a source. The pilot system operates in client-server mode and currently contains coded information for 121 sources. It is in routine use from approximately 40 workstations at the Yale School of Medicine. The lessons that have been learned are that: 1) it is important to make access to different versions of a source as seamless as possible, 2) achieving seamless, cross-platform access to heterogeneous sources is difficult, 3) significant differences exist between coding the subject content of an electronic information resource versus that of an article or a book, 4) customizing the ISM to multiple institutions entails significant complexities, and 5) there are many design trade-offs between specifying searches and viewing sets of retrieved sources that must be taken into consideration. An ISM KB and navigational tools have been constructed. In the process, much has been learned about the complexities of development and evaluation in this new environment, which are different

  13. The relation between cerebral serotonin levels and conditioned behaviour in the rat following the administration of LSD-25 and UML.

    PubMed

    Torre, M; Torre, E; Bogetto, F

    1975-01-01

    Successive daily injections of LSD-25 and UML (1-methyl-d-lysergic acid butanolamide) caused progressive depression of brain 5-HT levels in the rat. On the fourth day, the decrease was significant with respect to the highly significant fall observed after a single administration, whereas it had been shown earlier that conditioned behaviour is no longer affected by LSD-25 after 3 days and that simultaneous administration of a single dose of LSD-25 and UML is equally ineffective in this respect. Its depression of 5-HT levels, however, has now been shown to be equal to that of LSD-25 alone at doses that influence conditioned behaviour. The findings indicate that changes in such behaviour are not dependent on brain 5-HT levels and that no link exists between such levels and the psychotomimetic effect of LSD-25 in man.

  14. Numerical modelling of tool wear in turning with cemented carbide cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, P.; Estrems, M.; Faura, F.

    2007-04-01

    A numerical model is proposed for analysing the flank and crater wear resulting from the loss of material on cutting tool surface in turning processes due to wear mechanisms of adhesion, abrasion and fracture. By means of this model, the material loss along cutting tool surface can be analysed, and the worn surface shape during the workpiece machining can be determined. The proposed model analyses the gradual degradation of cutting tool during turning operation, and tool wear can be estimated as a function of cutting time. Wear-land width (VB) and crater depth (KT) can be obtained for description of material loss on cutting tool surface, and the effects of the distinct wear mechanisms on surface shape can be studied. The parameters required for the tool wear model are obtained from bibliography and experimental observation for AISI 4340 steel turning with WC-Co cutting tools.

  15. Consistency of Rasch Model Parameter Estimation: A Simulation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Wollenberg, Arnold L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The unconditional--simultaneous--maximum likelihood (UML) estimation procedure for the one-parameter logistic model produces biased estimators. The UML method is inconsistent and is not a good alternative to conditional maximum likelihood method, at least with small numbers of items. The minimum Chi-square estimation procedure produces unbiased…

  16. Requirements for clinical information modelling tools.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Jódar-Sánchez, Francisco; Kalra, Dipak

    2015-07-01

    This study proposes consensus requirements for clinical information modelling tools that can support modelling tasks in medium/large scale institutions. Rather than identify which functionalities are currently available in existing tools, the study has focused on functionalities that should be covered in order to provide guidance about how to evolve the existing tools. After identifying a set of 56 requirements for clinical information modelling tools based on a literature review and interviews with experts, a classical Delphi study methodology was applied to conduct a two round survey in order to classify them as essential or recommended. Essential requirements are those that must be met by any tool that claims to be suitable for clinical information modelling, and if we one day have a certified tools list, any tool that does not meet essential criteria would be excluded. Recommended requirements are those more advanced requirements that may be met by tools offering a superior product or only needed in certain modelling situations. According to the answers provided by 57 experts from 14 different countries, we found a high level of agreement to enable the study to identify 20 essential and 21 recommended requirements for these tools. It is expected that this list of identified requirements will guide developers on the inclusion of new basic and advanced functionalities that have strong support by end users. This list could also guide regulators in order to identify requirements that could be demanded of tools adopted within their institutions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Improved Identification of Noun Phrases in Clinical Radiology Reports Using a High-Performance Statistical Natural Language Parser Augmented with the UMLS Specialist Lexicon

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yang; Lowe, Henry J.; Klein, Dan; Cucina, Russell J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a method of extracting noun phrases with full phrase structures from a set of clinical radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and to investigate the effects of using the UMLS® Specialist Lexicon to improve noun phrase identification within clinical radiology documents. Design: The noun phrase identification (NPI) module is composed of a sentence boundary detector, a statistical natural language parser trained on a nonmedical domain, and a noun phrase (NP) tagger. The NPI module processed a set of 100 XML-represented clinical radiology reports in Health Level 7 (HL7)® Clinical Document Architecture (CDA)–compatible format. Computed output was compared with manual markups made by four physicians and one author for maximal (longest) NP and those made by one author for base (simple) NP, respectively. An extended lexicon of biomedical terms was created from the UMLS Specialist Lexicon and used to improve NPI performance. Results: The test set was 50 randomly selected reports. The sentence boundary detector achieved 99.0% precision and 98.6% recall. The overall maximal NPI precision and recall were 78.9% and 81.5% before using the UMLS Specialist Lexicon and 82.1% and 84.6% after. The overall base NPI precision and recall were 88.2% and 86.8% before using the UMLS Specialist Lexicon and 93.1% and 92.6% after, reducing false-positives by 31.1% and false-negatives by 34.3%. Conclusion: The sentence boundary detector performs excellently. After the adaptation using the UMLS Specialist Lexicon, the statistical parser's NPI performance on radiology reports increased to levels comparable to the parser's native performance in its newswire training domain and to that reported by other researchers in the general nonmedical domain. PMID:15684131

  18. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of insulin glargine 300 U/mL in the treatment of diabetes and their clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Owens, David R

    2016-08-01

    A more concentrated insulin glargine formulation, containing 300 U/mL (Gla-300) was approved in 2015 in the US and Europe for the treatment of diabetes mellitus in adults. This drug evaluation focuses on the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of Gla-300 from studies published up to May 2016. The clinical relevance of this new formulation will be addressed. Gla-300 was developed to produce a flatter and more prolonged PK/PD profile compared with insulin glargine 100 U/mL (Gla-100) in order to maintain effective glycemic control and reduce the risk of hypoglycemia. Compared to Gla-100, Gla-300 achieves lower and delayed peak concentrations with a PK exposure that is more stable and evenly distributed across a 24-h dosing interval. As a consequence, Gla-300 results in a consistent glucose-lowering effect with less variability over a 24-h dosing interval, which translates to a reduction in the rate of hypoglycemia (particularly nocturnal events).

  19. Auditing hierarchical cycles to locate other inconsistencies in the UMLS.

    PubMed

    Halper, Michael; Morrey, C Paul; Chen, Yan; Elhanan, Gai; Hripcsak, George; Perl, Yehoshua

    2011-01-01

    A cycle in the parent relationship hierarchy of the UMLS is a configuration that effectively makes some concept(s) an ancestor of itself. Such a structural inconsistency can easily be found automatically. A previous strategy for disconnecting cycles is to break them with the deletion of one or more parent relationships-irrespective of the correctness of the deleted relationships. A methodology is introduced for auditing of cycles that seeks to discover and delete erroneous relationships only. Cycles involving three concepts are the primary consideration. Hypotheses about the high probability of locating an erroneous parent relationship in a cycle are proposed and confirmed with statistical confidence and lend credence to the auditing approach. A cycle may serve as an indicator of other non-structural inconsistencies that are otherwise difficult to detect automatically. An extensive auditing example shows how a cycle can indicate further inconsistencies.

  20. The OMG Modelling Language (SYSML)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, M.

    2007-08-01

    On July 6th 2006, the Object Management Group (OMG) announced the adoption of the OMG Systems Modeling Language (OMG SysML). The SysML specification was in response to the joint Request for Proposal issued by the OMG and INCOSE (the International Council on Systems Engineering) for a customized version of UML 2, designed to address the specific needs of system engineers. SysML is a visual modeling language that extends UML 2 in order to support the specification, analysis, design, verification and validation of complex systems. This paper will look at the background of SysML and summarize the SysML specification including the modifications to UML 2.0, along with the new requirement and parametric diagrams. It will also show how SysML artifacts can be used to specify the requirements for other solution spaces such as software and hardware to provide handover to other disciplines.

  1. Auditing Hierarchical Cycles to Locate Other Inconsistencies in the UMLS

    PubMed Central

    Halper, Michael; Morrey, C. Paul; Chen, Yan; Elhanan, Gai; Hripcsak, George; Perl, Yehoshua

    2011-01-01

    A cycle in the parent relationship hierarchy of the UMLS is a configuration that effectively makes some concept(s) an ancestor of itself. Such a structural inconsistency can easily be found automatically. A previous strategy for disconnecting cycles is to break them with the deletion of one or more parent relationships—irrespective of the correctness of the deleted relationships. A methodology is introduced for auditing of cycles that seeks to discover and delete erroneous relationships only. Cycles involving three concepts are the primary consideration. Hypotheses about the high probability of locating an erroneous parent relationship in a cycle are proposed and confirmed with statistical confidence and lend credence to the auditing approach. A cycle may serve as an indicator of other non-structural inconsistencies that are otherwise difficult to detect automatically. An extensive auditing example shows how a cycle can indicate further inconsistencies. PMID:22195107

  2. A Flexible Statechart-to-Model-Checker Translator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouquette, Nicolas; Dunphy, Julia; Feather, Martin S.

    2000-01-01

    Many current-day software design tools offer some variant of statechart notation for system specification. We, like others, have built an automatic translator from (a subset of) statecharts to a model checker, for use to validate behavioral requirements. Our translator is designed to be flexible. This allows us to quickly adjust the translator to variants of statechart semantics, including problem-specific notational conventions that designers employ. Our system demonstration will be of interest to the following two communities: (1) Potential end-users: Our demonstration will show translation from statecharts created in a commercial UML tool (Rational Rose) to Promela, the input language of Holzmann's model checker SPIN. The translation is accomplished automatically. To accommodate the major variants of statechart semantics, our tool offers user-selectable choices among semantic alternatives. Options for customized semantic variants are also made available. The net result is an easy-to-use tool that operates on a wide range of statechart diagrams to automate the pathway to model-checking input. (2) Other researchers: Our translator embodies, in one tool, ideas and approaches drawn from several sources. Solutions to the major challenges of statechart-to-model-checker translation (e.g., determining which transition(s) will fire, handling of concurrent activities) are retired in a uniform, fully mechanized, setting. The way in which the underlying architecture of the translator itself facilitates flexible and customizable translation will also be evident.

  3. Terminology tools: state of the art and practical lessons.

    PubMed

    Cimino, J J

    2001-01-01

    As controlled medical terminologies evolve from simple code-name-hierarchy arrangements, into rich, knowledge-based ontologies of medical concepts, increased demands are placed on both the developers and users of the terminologies. In response, researchers have begun developing tools to address their needs. The aims of this article are to review previous work done to develop these tools and then to describe work done at Columbia University and New York Presbyterian Hospital (NYPH). Researchers working with the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED), the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), and NYPH's Medical Entities Dictionary (MED) have created a wide variety of terminology browsers, editors and servers to facilitate creation, maintenance and use of these terminologies. Although much work has been done, no generally available tools have yet emerged. Consensus on requirement for tool functions, especially terminology servers is emerging. Tools at NYPH have been used successfully to support the integration of clinical applications and the merger of health care institutions. Significant advancement has occurred over the past fifteen years in the development of sophisticated controlled terminologies and the tools to support them. The tool set at NYPH provides a case study to demonstrate one feasible architecture.

  4. Using WYSIWYG GUI Tools with UML

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    diagram that shows the ports through which it sends and receives messages to and from other active classes. The behavior is described using a state...software that talks to its environment through ports (specified in the structure diagram), and performs actions as it transitions through a sequence of...used to trigger actions on the state diagram. As a result, the stimulus to these events is pro- vided by the system itself in the case of the timer port

  5. Cockpit System Situational Awareness Modeling Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, John; Lebiere, Christian; Shay, Rick; Latorella, Kara

    2004-01-01

    This project explored the possibility of predicting pilot situational awareness (SA) using human performance modeling techniques for the purpose of evaluating developing cockpit systems. The Improved Performance Research Integration Tool (IMPRINT) was combined with the Adaptive Control of Thought-Rational (ACT-R) cognitive modeling architecture to produce a tool that can model both the discrete tasks of pilots and the cognitive processes associated with SA. The techniques for using this tool to predict SA were demonstrated using the newly developed Aviation Weather Information (AWIN) system. By providing an SA prediction tool to cockpit system designers, cockpit concepts can be assessed early in the design process while providing a cost-effective complement to the traditional pilot-in-the-loop experiments and data collection techniques.

  6. Fire behavior modeling-a decision tool

    Treesearch

    Jack Cohen; Bill Bradshaw

    1986-01-01

    The usefulness of an analytical model as a fire management decision tool is determined by the correspondence of its descriptive capability to the specific decision context. Fire managers must determine the usefulness of fire models as a decision tool when applied to varied situations. Because the wildland fire phenomenon is complex, analytical fire spread models will...

  7. The caCORE Software Development Kit: Streamlining construction of interoperable biomedical information services

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Joshua; Chilukuri, Ram; Fragoso, Gilberto; Warzel, Denise; Covitz, Peter A

    2006-01-01

    Background Robust, programmatically accessible biomedical information services that syntactically and semantically interoperate with other resources are challenging to construct. Such systems require the adoption of common information models, data representations and terminology standards as well as documented application programming interfaces (APIs). The National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed the cancer common ontologic representation environment (caCORE) to provide the infrastructure necessary to achieve interoperability across the systems it develops or sponsors. The caCORE Software Development Kit (SDK) was designed to provide developers both within and outside the NCI with the tools needed to construct such interoperable software systems. Results The caCORE SDK requires a Unified Modeling Language (UML) tool to begin the development workflow with the construction of a domain information model in the form of a UML Class Diagram. Models are annotated with concepts and definitions from a description logic terminology source using the Semantic Connector component. The annotated model is registered in the Cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR) using the UML Loader component. System software is automatically generated using the Codegen component, which produces middleware that runs on an application server. The caCORE SDK was initially tested and validated using a seven-class UML model, and has been used to generate the caCORE production system, which includes models with dozens of classes. The deployed system supports access through object-oriented APIs with consistent syntax for retrieval of any type of data object across all classes in the original UML model. The caCORE SDK is currently being used by several development teams, including by participants in the cancer biomedical informatics grid (caBIG) program, to create compatible data services. caBIG compatibility standards are based upon caCORE resources, and thus the caCORE SDK has emerged as a key

  8. The caCORE Software Development Kit: streamlining construction of interoperable biomedical information services.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joshua; Chilukuri, Ram; Fragoso, Gilberto; Warzel, Denise; Covitz, Peter A

    2006-01-06

    Robust, programmatically accessible biomedical information services that syntactically and semantically interoperate with other resources are challenging to construct. Such systems require the adoption of common information models, data representations and terminology standards as well as documented application programming interfaces (APIs). The National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed the cancer common ontologic representation environment (caCORE) to provide the infrastructure necessary to achieve interoperability across the systems it develops or sponsors. The caCORE Software Development Kit (SDK) was designed to provide developers both within and outside the NCI with the tools needed to construct such interoperable software systems. The caCORE SDK requires a Unified Modeling Language (UML) tool to begin the development workflow with the construction of a domain information model in the form of a UML Class Diagram. Models are annotated with concepts and definitions from a description logic terminology source using the Semantic Connector component. The annotated model is registered in the Cancer Data Standards Repository (caDSR) using the UML Loader component. System software is automatically generated using the Codegen component, which produces middleware that runs on an application server. The caCORE SDK was initially tested and validated using a seven-class UML model, and has been used to generate the caCORE production system, which includes models with dozens of classes. The deployed system supports access through object-oriented APIs with consistent syntax for retrieval of any type of data object across all classes in the original UML model. The caCORE SDK is currently being used by several development teams, including by participants in the cancer biomedical informatics grid (caBIG) program, to create compatible data services. caBIG compatibility standards are based upon caCORE resources, and thus the caCORE SDK has emerged as a key enabling technology for

  9. Software Engineering Tools for Scientific Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Marc; Saboo, Pallabi; Sonsini, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Software tools were constructed to address issues the NASA Fortran development community faces, and they were tested on real models currently in use at NASA. These proof-of-concept tools address the High-End Computing Program and the Modeling, Analysis, and Prediction Program. Two examples are the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric model in Cell Fortran on the Cell Broadband Engine, and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) coupled atmosphere- ocean model called ModelE, written in fixed format Fortran.

  10. A New Tool to Facilitate Learning Reading for Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puspitasari, Cita; Subiyanto

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new android application for early childhood learning reading. The description includes a design, development, and an evaluation experiment of an educational game for learning reading on android. Before developing the game, Unified Modeling Language (UML) diagrams, interfaces, animation, narrative or audio were designed.…

  11. Vehicle Thermal Management Models and Tools | Transportation Research |

    Science.gov Websites

    NREL Models and Tools Vehicle Thermal Management Models and Tools The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) vehicle thermal management modeling tools allow researchers to assess the trade-offs and calculate the potential benefits of thermal design options. image of three models of semi truck cabs. Truck

  12. Rosen's (M,R) system in Unified Modelling Language.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Williams, Richard A; Gatherer, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Robert Rosen's (M,R) system is an abstract biological network architecture that is allegedly non-computable on a Turing machine. If (M,R) is truly non-computable, there are serious implications for the modelling of large biological networks in computer software. A body of work has now accumulated addressing Rosen's claim concerning (M,R) by attempting to instantiate it in various software systems. However, a conclusive refutation has remained elusive, principally since none of the attempts to date have unambiguously avoided the critique that they have altered the properties of (M,R) in the coding process, producing merely approximate simulations of (M,R) rather than true computational models. In this paper, we use the Unified Modelling Language (UML), a diagrammatic notation standard, to express (M,R) as a system of objects having attributes, functions and relations. We believe that this instantiates (M,R) in such a way than none of the original properties of the system are corrupted in the process. Crucially, we demonstrate that (M,R) as classically represented in the relational biology literature is implicitly a UML communication diagram. Furthermore, since UML is formally compatible with object-oriented computing languages, instantiation of (M,R) in UML strongly implies its computability in object-oriented coding languages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling stroke rehabilitation processes using the Unified Modeling Language (UML).

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Simona; Bonacina, Stefano; Pinciroli, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    In organising and providing rehabilitation procedures for stroke patients, the usual need for many refinements makes it inappropriate to attempt rigid standardisation, but greater detail is required concerning workflow. The aim of this study was to build a model of the post-stroke rehabilitation process. The model, implemented in the Unified Modeling Language, was grounded on international guidelines and refined following the clinical pathway adopted at local level by a specialized rehabilitation centre. The model describes the organisation of the rehabilitation delivery and it facilitates the monitoring of recovery during the process. Indeed, a system software was developed and tested to support clinicians in the digital administration of clinical scales. The model flexibility assures easy updating after process evolution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling and Simulation Tools for Heavy Lift Airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstetler, Ron; Chachad, Girish; Hardy, Gordon; Blanken, Matthew; Melton, John

    2016-01-01

    For conventional fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft a variety of modeling and simulation tools have been developed to provide designers the means to thoroughly investigate proposed designs and operational concepts. However, lighter-than-air (LTA) airships, hybrid air vehicles, and aerostats have some important aspects that are different from heavier-than-air (HTA) vehicles. In order to account for these differences, modifications are required to the standard design tools to fully characterize the LTA vehicle design and performance parameters.. To address these LTA design and operational factors, LTA development organizations have created unique proprietary modeling tools, often at their own expense. An expansion of this limited LTA tool set could be accomplished by leveraging existing modeling and simulation capabilities available in the National laboratories and public research centers. Development of an expanded set of publicly available LTA modeling and simulation tools for LTA developers would mitigate the reliance on proprietary LTA design tools in use today. A set of well researched, open source, high fidelity LTA design modeling and simulation tools would advance LTA vehicle development and also provide the analytical basis for accurate LTA operational cost assessments. This paper will present the modeling and analysis tool capabilities required for LTA vehicle design, analysis of operations, and full life-cycle support. A survey of the tools currently available will be assessed to identify the gaps between their capabilities and the LTA industry's needs. Options for development of new modeling and analysis capabilities to supplement contemporary tools will also be presented.

  15. Switching to insulin glargine 300 U/mL: is duration of prior basal insulin therapy important?

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Renard, Eric; Cheng, Alice; Fritsche, Andreas; Cali, Anna; Melas-Melt, Lydie; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2018-04-09

    To assess the impact of duration of prior basal insulin therapy on study outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus receiving insulin glargine 300 U/mL (Gla-300) or insulin glargine 100 U/mL (Gla-100) for 6 months. A post hoc patient-level meta-analysis of data from the EDITION 1 and 2 studies. Outcomes included: HbA 1c , percentage of participants with ≥1 confirmed or severe hypoglycaemic event at night (00:00-05:59 h) or any time (24 h), and body weight change. Data were analysed according to duration of prior basal insulin use: >0-≤2 years, >2-≤5 years, >5 years. This meta-analysis included 1618 participants. HbA 1c change from baseline to month 6 was comparable between Gla-300 and Gla-100 groups, regardless of duration of prior basal insulin therapy. The lower risk with Gla-300 versus Gla-100 of ≥1 confirmed (≤3.9 mmol/L [≤70 mg/dL]) or severe hypoglycaemic event, at night or any time (24 h), was unaffected by duration of prior basal insulin therapy. Similarly, weight change was unaffected by duration of prior basal insulin therapy. Switching to Gla-300 from other basal insulin therapies provided comparable glycaemic control with lower risk of hypoglycaemia versus Gla-100, regardless of duration of prior basal insulin therapy. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Green Infrastructure Modeling Tools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Modeling tools support planning and design decisions on a range of scales from setting a green infrastructure target for an entire watershed to designing a green infrastructure practice for a particular site.

  17. Model Rocketry: University-Level Educational Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrowman, James S.

    1974-01-01

    Describes how model rocketry can be a useful educational tool at the university level as a practical application of theoretical aerodynamic concepts and as a tool for students in experimental research. (BR)

  18. Modeling and Tool Wear in Routing of CFRP

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Iliescu, D.; Fernandez, A.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.

    2011-01-17

    This paper presents the prediction and evaluation of feed force in routing of carbon composite material. In order to extend tool life and improve quality of the machined surface, a better understanding of uncoated and coated tool behaviors is required. This work describes (1) the optimization of the geometry of multiple teeth tools minimizing the tool wear and the feed force, (2) the optimization of tool coating and (3) the development of a phenomenological model between the feed force, the routing parameters and the tool wear. The experimental results indicate that the feed rate, the cutting speed and the toolmore » wear are the most significant factors affecting the feed force. In the case of multiple teeth tools, a particular geometry with 14 teeth right helix right cut and 11 teeth left helix right cut gives the best results. A thick AlTiN coating or a diamond coating can dramatically improve the tool life while minimizing the axial force, roughness and delamination. A wear model has then been developed based on an abrasive behavior of the tool. The model links the feed rate to the tool geometry parameters (tool diameter), to the process parameters (feed rate, cutting speed and depth of cut) and to the wear. The model presented has been verified by experimental tests.« less

  19. eSPEM - A SPEM Extension for Enactable Behavior Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellner, Ralf; Al-Hilank, Samir; Drexler, Johannes; Jung, Martin; Kips, Detlef; Philippsen, Michael

    OMG's SPEM - by means of its (semi-)formal notation - allows for a detailed description of development processes and methodologies, but can only be used for a rather coarse description of their behavior. Concepts for a more fine-grained behavior model are considered out of scope of the SPEM standard and have to be provided by other standards like BPDM/BPMN or UML. However, a coarse granularity of the behavior model often impedes a computer-aided enactment of a process model. Therefore, in this paper we present eSPEM, an extension of SPEM, that is based on the UML meta-model and focused on fine-grained behavior and life-cycle modeling and thereby supports automated enactment of development processes.

  20. A Formal Modelling Language Extending SysML for Simulation of Continuous and Discrete System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    UNCLASSIFIED DSTO-GD-0734 16. A Formal Modelling Language Extending SysML for Simulation of Continuous and Discrete System – Mark Hodson1 and...be conceptual at some level because a one to one mapping with the real system will never exist. SysML is an extension and modification of UML that...simulation, which can provide great insights into the behaviour of complex systems. Although UML and SysML primarily support conceptual modelling they

  1. Efficacy and Safety of Switching from Insulin Glargine 100 U/mL to the Same Dose of Glargine 300 U/mL in Japanese Type 1 and 2 Diabetes Patients: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Shuhei; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Kamei, Shinji; Hirukawa, Hidenori; Shimoda, Masashi; Tatsumi, Fuminori; Kohara, Kenji; Obata, Atsushi; Kimura, Tomohiko; Kinoshita, Tomoe; Irie, Shintaro; Sanada, Junpei; Fushimi, Yoshiro; Nishioka, Momoyo; Mizoguchi, Akiko; Kameyama, Miyuki; Mune, Tomoatsu; Kaku, Kohei; Kaneto, Hideaki

    2018-01-01

    Objective Insulin glargine [300 U/mL (Gla-300)] achieved better glycemic control and reduced the risk of hypoglycemia in comparison to glargine [100 U/mL; (Gla-100)] in phase 3 trials. This is the first study to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of Gla-300 in Japanese type 1 and 2 diabetes patients in a routine clinical setting. Methods We analyzed 20 type 1 diabetes patients and 62 type 2 diabetes patients who switched from Gla-100 to the same dose of Gla-300. Sixty type 2 diabetes patients who continued the use of Gla-100 during the study were included as controls. Results At three months after switching, the HbA1c levels were decreased in the patients with type 1 diabetes, but not to a significant extent. In the type 2 diabetes patients, the HbA1c levels were significantly decreased after switching (p<0.01). In contrast, there was no change in the HbA1c levels of the type 2 diabetes patients who continued the use of Gla-100 over the same period. The BMI values of the type 1 diabetes patients tended to decrease (p=0.06) and there was a significant decrease in the BMI values of the type 2 diabetes patients (p<0.05). There was no change in the BMI values of the type 2 diabetes patients who continued the use of Gla-100. The rates of hypoglycemia and adverse events did not change during the follow-up period. Conclusion In the clinical setting, switching from Gla-100 to the same dose of Gla-300 had a favorable effect on glycemic control and body weight control in Japanese type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients, without any increase in adverse events; however, a prospective study should be performed to confirm these findings.

  2. Graphical User Interface for an Observing Control System for the UK Infrared Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, M.; Bridger, A.; Wright, G. S.; Adamson, A. J.; Currie, M. J.; Economou, F.

    A Graphical user interface for the observing control system of UK Infrared Telescope has been developed as a part of the ORAC (Observatory Reduction and Acquisition Control) Project. We analyzed and designed the system using the Unified Modelling Language (UML) with the CASE tool Rational Rose 98. The system has been implemented in a modular way with Java packages using Swing and RMI. This system is component-based with pluggability. Object orientation concepts and UML notations have been applied throughout the development.

  3. Modeling and MBL: Software Tools for Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinker, Robert F.

    Recent technological advances and new software packages put unprecedented power for experimenting and theory-building in the hands of students at all levels. Microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) and model-solving tools illustrate the educational potential of the technology. These tools include modeling software and three MBL packages (which are…

  4. Concept locator: a client-server application for retrieval of UMLS metathesaurus concepts through complex boolean query.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, P M

    1997-08-01

    Concept Locator (CL) is a client-server application that accesses a Sybase relational database server containing a subset of the UMLS Metathesaurus for the purpose of retrieval of concepts corresponding to one or more query expressions supplied to it. CL's query grammar permits complex Boolean expressions, wildcard patterns, and parenthesized (nested) subexpressions. CL translates the query expressions supplied to it into one or more SQL statements that actually perform the retrieval. The generated SQL is optimized by the client to take advantage of the strengths of the server's query optimizer, and sidesteps its weaknesses, so that execution is reasonably efficient.

  5. Object-oriented design tools for supramolecular devices and biomedical nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephen C; Bhalerao, Khaustaub; Ferrari, Mauro

    2004-05-01

    Nanotechnology provides multifunctional agents for in vivo use that increasingly blur the distinction between pharmaceuticals and medical devices. Realization of such therapeutic nanodevices requires multidisciplinary effort that is difficult for individual device developers to sustain, and identification of appropriate collaborations outside ones own field can itself be challenging. Further, as in vivo nanodevices become increasingly complex, their design will increasingly demand systems level thinking. System engineering tools such as object-oriented analysis, object-oriented design (OOA/D) and unified modeling language (UML) are applicable to nanodevices built from biological components, help logically manage the knowledge needed to design them, and help identify useful collaborative relationships for device designers. We demonstrate the utility of these systems engineering tools by reverse engineering an existing molecular device (the bacmid molecular cloning system) using them, and illustrate how object-oriented approaches identify fungible components (objects) in nanodevices in a way that facilitates design of families of related devices, rather than single inventions. We also explore the utility of object-oriented approaches for design of another class of therapeutic nanodevices, vaccines. While they are useful for design of current nanodevices, the power of systems design tools for biomedical nanotechnology will become increasingly apparent as the complexity and sophistication of in vivo nanosystems increases. The nested, hierarchical nature of object-oriented approaches allows treatment of devices as objects in higher-order structures, and so will facilitate concatenation of multiple devices into higher-order, higher-function nanosystems.

  6. Prototyping an institutional IAIMS/UMLS information environment for an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Miller, P L; Paton, J A; Clyman, J I; Powsner, S M

    1992-07-01

    The paper describes a prototype information environment designed to link network-based information resources in an integrated fashion and thus enhance the information capabilities of an academic medical center. The prototype was implemented on a single Macintosh computer to permit exploration of the overall "information architecture" and to demonstrate the various desired capabilities prior to full-scale network-based implementation. At the heart of the prototype are two components: a diverse set of information resources available over an institutional computer network and an information sources map designed to assist users in finding and accessing information resources relevant to their needs. The paper describes these and other components of the prototype and presents a scenario illustrating its use. The prototype illustrates the link between the goals of two National Library of Medicine initiatives, the Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) and the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS).

  7. Glycaemic control and hypoglycaemia in people with type 2 diabetes switching from twice-daily basal insulin to once-daily insulin glargine 300 U/mL or insulin glargine 100 U/mL (EDITION 1 and EDITION 2 subgroup analysis).

    PubMed

    Roussel, Ronan; d'Emden, Michael C; Fisher, Miles; Ampudia-Blasco, F Javier; Stella, Peter; Bizet, Florence; Cali, Anna M G; Wysham, Carol H

    2018-02-01

    In this post hoc analysis we compared glycaemic control and hypoglycaemia between insulin glargine 300 U/mL (Gla-300) and glargine 100 U/mL (Gla-100) administered once daily in people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) from the EDITION 1 (basal plus mealtime insulin) and EDITION 2 (basal insulin plus oral antihyperglycaemic drugs) trials who were previously receiving twice-daily insulin. At randomization, 16.9% and 20.0% of people in EDITION 1 and 2, respectively, were receiving twice-daily basal insulin. Glycated haemoglobin change from baseline to Month 6 was similar over 6 months with Gla-300 or Gla-100 (least squares mean difference -0.01%; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.27 to 0.24] in EDITION 1 and 0.16%; 95% CI -0.25 to 0.57, in EDITION 2). Participants previously receiving twice-daily insulin in EDITION 1 had a lower risk of confirmed (≤3.9 mmol/L [≤70 mg/dL]) or severe hypoglycaemia with Gla-300 vs Gla-100 at night (00:00-05:59 hours), but not at any time (24 hours); in EDITION 2 the risk was reduced at night and any time (24 hours). In conclusion, Gla-300 provided similar glycaemic control with less hypoglycaemia compared with Gla-100 in people with T2DM switching from twice-daily to once-daily basal insulin. © 2017 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Glycaemic control and hypoglycaemia in people with type 2 diabetes switching from twice‐daily basal insulin to once‐daily insulin glargine 300 U/mL or insulin glargine 100 U/mL (EDITION 1 and EDITION 2 subgroup analysis)

    PubMed Central

    d'Emden, Michael C.; Fisher, Miles; Ampudia‐Blasco, F. Javier; Stella, Peter; Bizet, Florence; Cali, Anna M. G.; Wysham, Carol H.

    2017-01-01

    In this post hoc analysis we compared glycaemic control and hypoglycaemia between insulin glargine 300 U/mL (Gla‐300) and glargine 100 U/mL (Gla‐100) administered once daily in people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) from the EDITION 1 (basal plus mealtime insulin) and EDITION 2 (basal insulin plus oral antihyperglycaemic drugs) trials who were previously receiving twice‐daily insulin. At randomization, 16.9% and 20.0% of people in EDITION 1 and 2, respectively, were receiving twice‐daily basal insulin. Glycated haemoglobin change from baseline to Month 6 was similar over 6 months with Gla‐300 or Gla‐100 (least squares mean difference −0.01%; 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.27 to 0.24] in EDITION 1 and 0.16%; 95% CI −0.25 to 0.57, in EDITION 2). Participants previously receiving twice‐daily insulin in EDITION 1 had a lower risk of confirmed (≤3.9 mmol/L [≤70 mg/dL]) or severe hypoglycaemia with Gla‐300 vs Gla‐100 at night (00:00–05:59 hours), but not at any time (24 hours); in EDITION 2 the risk was reduced at night and any time (24 hours). In conclusion, Gla‐300 provided similar glycaemic control with less hypoglycaemia compared with Gla‐100 in people with T2DM switching from twice‐daily to once‐daily basal insulin. PMID:28736942

  9. The MP (Materialization Pattern) Model for Representing Math Educational Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Namyoun; Song, Il-Yeol; An, Yuan

    Representing natural languages with UML has been an important research issue for various reasons. Little work has been done for modeling imperative mood sentences which are the sentence structure of math educational standard statements. In this paper, we propose the MP (Materialization Pattern) model that captures the semantics of English sentences used in math educational standards. The MP model is based on the Reed-Kellogg sentence diagrams and creates MP schemas with the UML notation. The MP model explicitly represents the semantics of the sentences by extracting math concepts and the cognitive process of math concepts from math educational standard statements, and simplifies modeling. This MP model is also developed to be used for aligning math educational standard statements via schema matching.

  10. On Using SysML, DoDAF 2.0 and UPDM to Model the Architecture for the NOAA's Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Ground System (GS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, Jeffrey L.; Jeffries, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The JPSS Ground System is a lIexible system of systems responsible for telemetry, tracking & command (TT &C), data acquisition, routing and data processing services for a varied lIeet of satellites to support weather prediction, modeling and climate modeling. To assist in this engineering effort, architecture modeling tools are being employed to translate the former NPOESS baseline to the new JPSS baseline, The paper will focus on the methodology for the system engineering process and the use of these architecture modeling tools within that process, The Department of Defense Architecture Framework version 2,0 (DoDAF 2.0) viewpoints and views that are being used to describe the JPSS GS architecture are discussed. The Unified Profile for DoOAF and MODAF (UPDM) and Systems Modeling Language (SysML), as ' provided by extensions to the MagicDraw UML modeling tool, are used to develop the diagrams and tables that make up the architecture model. The model development process and structure are discussed, examples are shown, and details of handling the complexities of a large System of Systems (SoS), such as the JPSS GS, with an equally complex modeling tool, are described

  11. The Cryosphere Model Comparison Tool (CmCt): Ice Sheet Model Validation and Comparison Tool for Greenland and Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, E.; Nowicki, S.; Neumann, T.; Tyahla, L.; Saba, J. L.; Guerber, J. R.; Bonin, J. A.; DiMarzio, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    The Cryosphere model Comparison tool (CmCt) is a web based ice sheet model validation tool that is being developed by NASA to facilitate direct comparison between observational data and various ice sheet models. The CmCt allows the user to take advantage of several decades worth of observations from Greenland and Antarctica. Currently, the CmCt can be used to compare ice sheet models provided by the user with remotely sensed satellite data from ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) laser altimetry, GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellite, and radar altimetry (ERS-1, ERS-2, and Envisat). One or more models can be uploaded through the CmCt website and compared with observational data, or compared to each other or other models. The CmCt calculates statistics on the differences between the model and observations, and other quantitative and qualitative metrics, which can be used to evaluate the different model simulations against the observations. The qualitative metrics consist of a range of visual outputs and the quantitative metrics consist of several whole-ice-sheet scalar values that can be used to assign an overall score to a particular simulation. The comparison results from CmCt are useful in quantifying improvements within a specific model (or within a class of models) as a result of differences in model dynamics (e.g., shallow vs. higher-order dynamics approximations), model physics (e.g., representations of ice sheet rheological or basal processes), or model resolution (mesh resolution and/or changes in the spatial resolution of input datasets). The framework and metrics could also be used for use as a model-to-model intercomparison tool, simply by swapping outputs from another model as the observational datasets. Future versions of the tool will include comparisons with other datasets that are of interest to the modeling community, such as ice velocity, ice thickness, and surface mass balance.

  12. Incremental checking of Master Data Management model based on contextual graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamolle, Myriam; Menet, Ludovic; Le Duc, Chan

    2015-10-01

    The validation of models is a crucial step in distributed heterogeneous systems. In this paper, an incremental validation method is proposed in the scope of a Model Driven Engineering (MDE) approach, which is used to develop a Master Data Management (MDM) field represented by XML Schema models. The MDE approach presented in this paper is based on the definition of an abstraction layer using UML class diagrams. The validation method aims to minimise the model errors and to optimisethe process of model checking. Therefore, the notion of validation contexts is introduced allowing the verification of data model views. Description logics specify constraints that the models have to check. An experimentation of the approach is presented through an application developed in ArgoUML IDE.

  13. Towards a generalized energy prediction model for machine tools

    PubMed Central

    Bhinge, Raunak; Park, Jinkyoo; Law, Kincho H.; Dornfeld, David A.; Helu, Moneer; Rachuri, Sudarsan

    2017-01-01

    Energy prediction of machine tools can deliver many advantages to a manufacturing enterprise, ranging from energy-efficient process planning to machine tool monitoring. Physics-based, energy prediction models have been proposed in the past to understand the energy usage pattern of a machine tool. However, uncertainties in both the machine and the operating environment make it difficult to predict the energy consumption of the target machine reliably. Taking advantage of the opportunity to collect extensive, contextual, energy-consumption data, we discuss a data-driven approach to develop an energy prediction model of a machine tool in this paper. First, we present a methodology that can efficiently and effectively collect and process data extracted from a machine tool and its sensors. We then present a data-driven model that can be used to predict the energy consumption of the machine tool for machining a generic part. Specifically, we use Gaussian Process (GP) Regression, a non-parametric machine-learning technique, to develop the prediction model. The energy prediction model is then generalized over multiple process parameters and operations. Finally, we apply this generalized model with a method to assess uncertainty intervals to predict the energy consumed to machine any part using a Mori Seiki NVD1500 machine tool. Furthermore, the same model can be used during process planning to optimize the energy-efficiency of a machining process. PMID:28652687

  14. Towards a generalized energy prediction model for machine tools.

    PubMed

    Bhinge, Raunak; Park, Jinkyoo; Law, Kincho H; Dornfeld, David A; Helu, Moneer; Rachuri, Sudarsan

    2017-04-01

    Energy prediction of machine tools can deliver many advantages to a manufacturing enterprise, ranging from energy-efficient process planning to machine tool monitoring. Physics-based, energy prediction models have been proposed in the past to understand the energy usage pattern of a machine tool. However, uncertainties in both the machine and the operating environment make it difficult to predict the energy consumption of the target machine reliably. Taking advantage of the opportunity to collect extensive, contextual, energy-consumption data, we discuss a data-driven approach to develop an energy prediction model of a machine tool in this paper. First, we present a methodology that can efficiently and effectively collect and process data extracted from a machine tool and its sensors. We then present a data-driven model that can be used to predict the energy consumption of the machine tool for machining a generic part. Specifically, we use Gaussian Process (GP) Regression, a non-parametric machine-learning technique, to develop the prediction model. The energy prediction model is then generalized over multiple process parameters and operations. Finally, we apply this generalized model with a method to assess uncertainty intervals to predict the energy consumed to machine any part using a Mori Seiki NVD1500 machine tool. Furthermore, the same model can be used during process planning to optimize the energy-efficiency of a machining process.

  15. Designing tools for oil exploration using nuclear modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauborgne, Marie-Laure; Allioli, Françoise; Manclossi, Mauro; Nicoletti, Luisa; Stoller, Chris; Evans, Mike

    2017-09-01

    When designing nuclear tools for oil exploration, one of the first steps is typically nuclear modeling for concept evaluation and initial characterization. Having an accurate model, including the availability of accurate cross sections, is essential to reduce or avoid time consuming and costly design iterations. During tool response characterization, modeling is benchmarked with experimental data and then used to complement and to expand the database to make it more detailed and inclusive of more measurement environments which are difficult or impossible to reproduce in the laboratory. We present comparisons of our modeling results obtained using the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-VII cross section data bases, focusing on the response to a few elements found in the tool, borehole and subsurface formation. For neutron-induced inelastic and capture gamma ray spectroscopy, major obstacles may be caused by missing or inaccurate cross sections for essential materials. We show examples of the benchmarking of modeling results against experimental data obtained during tool characterization and discuss observed discrepancies.

  16. Shape: A 3D Modeling Tool for Astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Wolfgang; Koning, Nicholas; Wenger, Stephan; Morisset, Christophe; Magnor, Marcus

    2011-04-01

    We present a flexible interactive 3D morpho-kinematical modeling application for astrophysics. Compared to other systems, our application reduces the restrictions on the physical assumptions, data type, and amount that is required for a reconstruction of an object's morphology. It is one of the first publicly available tools to apply interactive graphics to astrophysical modeling. The tool allows astrophysicists to provide a priori knowledge about the object by interactively defining 3D structural elements. By direct comparison of model prediction with observational data, model parameters can then be automatically optimized to fit the observation. The tool has already been successfully used in a number of astrophysical research projects.

  17. Modelling of Tool Wear and Residual Stress during Machining of AISI H13 Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outeiro, José C.; Umbrello, Domenico; Pina, José C.; Rizzuti, Stefania

    2007-05-01

    Residual stresses can enhance or impair the ability of a component to withstand loading conditions in service (fatigue, creep, stress corrosion cracking, etc.), depending on their nature: compressive or tensile, respectively. This poses enormous problems in structural assembly as this affects the structural integrity of the whole part. In addition, tool wear issues are of critical importance in manufacturing since these affect component quality, tool life and machining cost. Therefore, prediction and control of both tool wear and the residual stresses in machining are absolutely necessary. In this work, a two-dimensional Finite Element model using an implicit Lagrangian formulation with an automatic remeshing was applied to simulate the orthogonal cutting process of AISI H13 tool steel. To validate such model the predicted and experimentally measured chip geometry, cutting forces, temperatures, tool wear and residual stresses on the machined affected layers were compared. The proposed FE model allowed us to investigate the influence of tool geometry, cutting regime parameters and tool wear on residual stress distribution in the machined surface and subsurface of AISI H13 tool steel. The obtained results permit to conclude that in order to reduce the magnitude of surface residual stresses, the cutting speed should be increased, the uncut chip thickness (or feed) should be reduced and machining with honed tools having large cutting edge radii produce better results than chamfered tools. Moreover, increasing tool wear increases the magnitude of surface residual stresses.

  18. Sustained glycaemic control and less nocturnal hypoglycaemia with insulin glargine 300U/mL compared with glargine 100U/mL in Japanese adults with type 1 diabetes (EDITION JP 1 randomised 12-month trial including 6-month extension).

    PubMed

    Matsuhisa, Munehide; Koyama, Masayoshi; Cheng, Xi; Sumi, Mariko; Riddle, Matthew C; Bolli, Geremia B; Hirose, Takahisa

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of insulin glargine 300U/mL (Gla-300) versus glargine 100U/mL (Gla-100) in adults with type 1 diabetes in Japan over 12months. EDITION JP 1 was a multicentre, randomised, open-label phase 3 study. Following a 6-month on-treatment period, participants continued to receive Gla-300 or Gla-100 once daily, plus mealtime insulin, over a 6-month open-label extension phase. HbA1c, hypoglycaemia, body weight and adverse events were assessed. Overall, 114/122 (93%) and 114/121 (94%) of participants in the Gla-300 and Gla-100 group, respectively, completed the 6-month extension phase. Glycaemic control was sustained in both groups up to month 12 (mean HbA1c: Gla-300, 7.9% [62mmol/mol]; Gla-100, 7.8% [62mmol/mol]). Annualised rates of hypoglycaemia were lower with Gla-300 versus Gla-100; significantly for nocturnal confirmed (<3.0mmol/L [<54mg/dL]) or severe hypoglycaemia (2.39 and 3.85 events per participant-year; rate ratio: 0.62 [0.39-0.97]). No between-treatment differences in mean body weight change or adverse events were observed. Over 12months' treatment, participants with type 1 diabetes receiving Gla-300 achieved sustained glycaemic control and experienced less nocturnal hypoglycaemia that was confirmed (<3.0mmol/L [<54mg/dL]) or severe compared with Gla-100, supporting the 6-month results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fostering Multilinguality in the UMLS: A Computational Approach to Terminology Expansion for Multiple Languages

    PubMed Central

    Hellrich, Johannes; Hahn, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We here report on efforts to computationally support the maintenance and extension of multilingual biomedical terminology resources. Our main idea is to treat term acquisition as a classification problem guided by term alignment in parallel multilingual corpora, using termhood information coming from of a named entity recognition system as a novel feature. We report on experiments for Spanish, French, German and Dutch parts of a multilingual UMLS-derived biomedical terminology. These efforts yielded 19k, 18k, 23k and 12k new terms and synonyms, respectively, from which about half relate to concepts without a previously available term label for these non-English languages. Based on expert assessment of a novel German terminology sample, 80% of the newly acquired terms were judged as reasonable additions to the terminology. PMID:25954371

  20. Using UMLS to map from a library to a clinical classification: Improving the functionality of a digital library.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Judas; de Lusignan, Simon; Kostkova, Patty; Madge, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    The Metathesaurus of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) offers the possibility of mapping between various medical vocabularies. The Primary Care Electronic Library (PCEL) contains a database of over six thousand Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms) describing the resources of the electronic library. We were interested to know if it was possible to map from MeSH to the Systemized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT). Such a mapping would aid healthcare professionals to retrieve relevant data from our digital library as it would enable links between clinical systems and indexed material.

  1. COUNCIL FOR REGULATORY ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING (CREM) PILOT WATER QUALITY MODEL SELECTION TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Council for Regulatory Environmental Modeling (CREM) is currently supporting the development of a pilot model selection tool that is intended to help the states and the regions implement the total maximum daily load (TMDL) program. This tool will be implemented within the ...

  2. The Future of Architecture Collaborative Information Sharing: DoDAF Version 2.03 Updates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-30

    Salamander x Select Solution Factory Select Business Solutions BPMN , UML x SimonTool Simon Labs x SimProcess CACI BPMN x System Architecture Management...for DoDAF Mega UML x Metastorm ProVision Metastorm BPMN x Naval Simulation System - 4 Aces METRON x NetViz CA x OPNET OPNET x Tool Name Vendor Primary

  3. Executable Architecture Modeling and Simulation Based on fUML

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    SoS behaviors. Wang et al.[9] use SysML sequence diagram to model the behaviors and translate the models into Colored Petri Nets (CPN). Staines T.S...Renzhong and Dagli C H. An executable system architecture approach to discrete events system modeling using SysML in conjunction with colored Petri

  4. Collaboration tools and techniques for large model datasets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, R.P.; Carniel, S.; Chiggiato, J.; Janekovic, I.; Pullen, J.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    In MREA and many other marine applications, it is common to have multiple models running with different grids, run by different institutions. Techniques and tools are described for low-bandwidth delivery of data from large multidimensional datasets, such as those from meteorological and oceanographic models, directly into generic analysis and visualization tools. Output is stored using the NetCDF CF Metadata Conventions, and then delivered to collaborators over the web via OPeNDAP. OPeNDAP datasets served by different institutions are then organized via THREDDS catalogs. Tools and procedures are then used which enable scientists to explore data on the original model grids using tools they are familiar with. It is also low-bandwidth, enabling users to extract just the data they require, an important feature for access from ship or remote areas. The entire implementation is simple enough to be handled by modelers working with their webmasters - no advanced programming support is necessary. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. OISI dynamic end-to-end modeling tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersten, Michael; Weidler, Alexander; Wilhelm, Rainer; Johann, Ulrich A.; Szerdahelyi, Laszlo

    2000-07-01

    The OISI Dynamic end-to-end modeling tool is tailored to end-to-end modeling and dynamic simulation of Earth- and space-based actively controlled optical instruments such as e.g. optical stellar interferometers. `End-to-end modeling' is meant to denote the feature that the overall model comprises besides optical sub-models also structural, sensor, actuator, controller and disturbance sub-models influencing the optical transmission, so that the system- level instrument performance due to disturbances and active optics can be simulated. This tool has been developed to support performance analysis and prediction as well as control loop design and fine-tuning for OISI, Germany's preparatory program for optical/infrared spaceborne interferometry initiated in 1994 by Dornier Satellitensysteme GmbH in Friedrichshafen.

  6. The mathematical and computer modeling of the worm tool shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchuk, K. L.; Lyashkov, A. A.; Ayusheev, T. V.

    2017-06-01

    Traditionally mathematical profiling of the worm tool is carried out on the first T. Olivier method, known in the theory of gear gearings, with receiving an intermediate surface of the making lath. It complicates process of profiling and its realization by means of computer 3D-modeling. The purpose of the work is the improvement of mathematical model of profiling and its realization based on the methods of 3D-modeling. Research problems are: receiving of the mathematical model of profiling which excludes the presence of the making lath in it; realization of the received model by means of frame and superficial modeling; development and approbation of technology of solid-state modeling for the solution of the problem of profiling. As the basic, the kinematic method of research of the mutually envelope surfaces is accepted. Computer research is executed by means of CAD based on the methods of 3D-modeling. We have developed mathematical model of profiling of the worm tool; frame, superficial and solid-state models of shaping of the mutually enveloping surfaces of the detail and the tool are received. The offered mathematical models and the technologies of 3D-modeling of shaping represent tools for theoretical and experimental profiling of the worm tool. The results of researches can be used at design of metal-cutting tools.

  7. Patient-level meta-analysis of the EDITION 1, 2 and 3 studies: glycaemic control and hypoglycaemia with new insulin glargine 300 U/ml versus glargine 100 U/ml in people with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ritzel, R; Roussel, R; Bolli, G B; Vinet, L; Brulle-Wohlhueter, C; Glezer, S; Yki-Järvinen, H

    2015-09-01

    To conduct a patient-level meta-analysis of the EDITION 1, 2 and 3 studies, which compared the efficacy and safety of new insulin glargine 300 U/ml (Gla-300) with insulin glargine 100 U/ml (Gla-100) in people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) on basal and mealtime insulin, basal insulin and oral antihyperglycaemic drugs, or no prior insulin, respectively. The EDITION studies were multicentre, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, phase IIIa studies, with similar designs and endpoints. A patient-level meta-analysis of the studies enabled these endpoints to be examined over 6 months in a large population with T2DM (Gla-300, n = 1247; Gla-100, n = 1249). No significant study-by-treatment interactions across studies were found, enabling them to be pooled. The mean change in glycated haemoglobin was comparable for Gla-300 and Gla-100 [each -1.02 (standard error 0.03)%; least squares (LS) mean difference 0.00 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.08 to 0.07)%]. Annualized rates of confirmed (≤3.9 mmol/l) or severe hypoglycaemia were lower with Gla-300 than with Gla-100 during the night (31% difference in rate ratio over 6 months) and at any time (24 h, 14% difference). Consistent reductions were observed in percentage of participants with ≥1 hypoglycaemic event. Severe hypoglycaemia at any time (24 h) was rare (Gla-300: 2.3%; Gla-100: 2.6%). Weight gain was low (<1 kg) in both groups, with less gain with Gla-300 [LS mean difference -0.28 kg (95% CI -0.55 to -0.01); p = 0.039]. Both treatments were well tolerated, with similar rates of adverse events. Gla-300 provides comparable glycaemic control to Gla-100 in a large population with a broad clinical spectrum of T2DM, with consistently less hypoglycaemia at any time of day and less nocturnal hypoglycaemia. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A comparison of tools for modeling freshwater ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Vigerstol, Kari L; Aukema, Juliann E

    2011-10-01

    Interest in ecosystem services has grown tremendously among a wide range of sectors, including government agencies, NGO's and the business community. Ecosystem services entailing freshwater (e.g. flood control, the provision of hydropower, and water supply), as well as carbon storage and sequestration, have received the greatest attention in both scientific and on-the-ground applications. Given the newness of the field and the variety of tools for predicting water-based services, it is difficult to know which tools to use for different questions. There are two types of freshwater-related tools--traditional hydrologic tools and newer ecosystem services tools. Here we review two of the most prominent tools of each type and their possible applications. In particular, we compare the data requirements, ease of use, questions addressed, and interpretability of results among the models. We discuss the strengths, challenges and most appropriate applications of the different models. Traditional hydrological tools provide more detail whereas ecosystem services tools tend to be more accessible to non-experts and can provide a good general picture of these ecosystem services. We also suggest gaps in the modeling toolbox that would provide the greatest advances by improving existing tools. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Green Infrastructure Models and Tools

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to modify and refine existing models and develop new tools to support decision making for the complete green infrastructure (GI) project lifecycle, including the planning and implementation of stormwater control in urban and agricultural settings,...

  10. Authoring and verification of clinical guidelines: a model driven approach.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Beatriz; Porres, Ivan

    2010-08-01

    The goal of this research is to provide a framework to enable authoring and verification of clinical guidelines. The framework is part of a larger research project aimed at improving the representation, quality and application of clinical guidelines in daily clinical practice. The verification process of a guideline is based on (1) model checking techniques to verify guidelines against semantic errors and inconsistencies in their definition, (2) combined with Model Driven Development (MDD) techniques, which enable us to automatically process manually created guideline specifications and temporal-logic statements to be checked and verified regarding these specifications, making the verification process faster and cost-effective. Particularly, we use UML statecharts to represent the dynamics of guidelines and, based on this manually defined guideline specifications, we use a MDD-based tool chain to automatically process them to generate the input model of a model checker. The model checker takes the resulted model together with the specific guideline requirements, and verifies whether the guideline fulfils such properties. The overall framework has been implemented as an Eclipse plug-in named GBDSSGenerator which, particularly, starting from the UML statechart representing a guideline, allows the verification of the guideline against specific requirements. Additionally, we have established a pattern-based approach for defining commonly occurring types of requirements in guidelines. We have successfully validated our overall approach by verifying properties in different clinical guidelines resulting in the detection of some inconsistencies in their definition. The proposed framework allows (1) the authoring and (2) the verification of clinical guidelines against specific requirements defined based on a set of property specification patterns, enabling non-experts to easily write formal specifications and thus easing the verification process. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc

  11. Expanding the Extent of a UMLS Semantic Type via Group Neighborhood Auditing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Gu, Huanying; Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael; Xu, Junchuan

    2009-01-01

    Objective Each Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concept is assigned one or more semantic types (ST). A dynamic methodology for aiding an auditor in finding concepts that are missing the assignment of a given ST, S is presented. Design The first part of the methodology exploits the previously introduced Refined Semantic Network and accompanying refined semantic types (RST) to help narrow the search space for offending concepts. The auditing is focused in a neighborhood surrounding the extent of an RST, T (of S) called an envelope, consisting of parents and children of concepts in the extent. The audit moves outward as long as missing assignments are discovered. In the second part, concepts not reached previously are processed and reassigned T as needed during the processing of S's other RSTs. The set of such concepts is expanded in a similar way to that in the first part. Measurements The number of errors discovered is reported. To measure the methodology's efficiency, “error hit rates” (i.e., errors found in concepts examined) are computed. Results The methodology was applied to three STs: Experimental Model of Disease (EMD), Environmental Effect of Humans, and Governmental or Regulatory Activity. The EMD experienced the most drastic change. For its RST “EMD ∩ Neoplastic Process” (RST “EMD”) with only 33 (31) original concepts, 915 (134) concepts were found by the first (second) part to be missing the EMD assignment. Changes to the other two STs were smaller. Conclusion The results show that the proposed auditing methodology can help to effectively and efficiently identify concepts lacking the assignment of a particular semantic type. PMID:19567802

  12. NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Biomass Resource Models and Tools

    Science.gov Websites

    Models and Tools The Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC) features the following biomass models Models & Tools Publications Related Links Geothermal Resource Information Solar Resource Information

  13. A Comparison and Evaluation of Real-Time Software Systems Modeling Languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evensen, Kenneth D.; Weiss, Kathryn Anne

    2010-01-01

    A model-driven approach to real-time software systems development enables the conceptualization of software, fostering a more thorough understanding of its often complex architecture and behavior while promoting the documentation and analysis of concerns common to real-time embedded systems such as scheduling, resource allocation, and performance. Several modeling languages have been developed to assist in the model-driven software engineering effort for real-time systems, and these languages are beginning to gain traction with practitioners throughout the aerospace industry. This paper presents a survey of several real-time software system modeling languages, namely the Architectural Analysis and Design Language (AADL), the Unified Modeling Language (UML), Systems Modeling Language (SysML), the Modeling and Analysis of Real-Time Embedded Systems (MARTE) UML profile, and the AADL for UML profile. Each language has its advantages and disadvantages, and in order to adequately describe a real-time software system's architecture, a complementary use of multiple languages is almost certainly necessary. This paper aims to explore these languages in the context of understanding the value each brings to the model-driven software engineering effort and to determine if it is feasible and practical to combine aspects of the various modeling languages to achieve more complete coverage in architectural descriptions. To this end, each language is evaluated with respect to a set of criteria such as scope, formalisms, and architectural coverage. An example is used to help illustrate the capabilities of the various languages.

  14. Storm Water Management Model Climate Adjustment Tool (SWMM-CAT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA’s newest tool, the Stormwater Management Model (SWMM) – Climate Adjustment Tool (CAT) is meant to help municipal stormwater utilities better address potential climate change impacts affecting their operations. SWMM, first released in 1971, models hydrology and hydrauli...

  15. Dual deep modeling: multi-level modeling with dual potencies and its formalization in F-Logic.

    PubMed

    Neumayr, Bernd; Schuetz, Christoph G; Jeusfeld, Manfred A; Schrefl, Michael

    2018-01-01

    An enterprise database contains a global, integrated, and consistent representation of a company's data. Multi-level modeling facilitates the definition and maintenance of such an integrated conceptual data model in a dynamic environment of changing data requirements of diverse applications. Multi-level models transcend the traditional separation of class and object with clabjects as the central modeling primitive, which allows for a more flexible and natural representation of many real-world use cases. In deep instantiation, the number of instantiation levels of a clabject or property is indicated by a single potency. Dual deep modeling (DDM) differentiates between source potency and target potency of a property or association and supports the flexible instantiation and refinement of the property by statements connecting clabjects at different modeling levels. DDM comes with multiple generalization of clabjects, subsetting/specialization of properties, and multi-level cardinality constraints. Examples are presented using a UML-style notation for DDM together with UML class and object diagrams for the representation of two-level user views derived from the multi-level model. Syntax and semantics of DDM are formalized and implemented in F-Logic, supporting the modeler with integrity checks and rich query facilities.

  16. New insulin glargine 300 U/ml versus glargine 100 U/ml in Japanese adults with type 1 diabetes using basal and mealtime insulin: glucose control and hypoglycaemia in a randomized controlled trial (EDITION JP 1)

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, M.; Cheng, X.; Takahashi, Y.; Riddle, M. C.; Bolli, G. B.; Hirose, T.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To compare efficacy and safety of new insulin glargine 300 U/ml (Gla‐300) with that of insulin glargine 100 U/ml (Gla‐100) in Japanese adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods The EDITION JP 1 study (NCT01689129) was a 6‐month, multicentre, open‐label, phase III study. Participants (n = 243) were randomized to Gla‐300 or Gla‐100 while continuing mealtime insulin. Basal insulin was titrated with the aim of achieving a fasting self‐monitored plasma glucose target of 4.4–7.2 mmol/l. The primary endpoint was change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) over 6 months. Safety measures included hypoglycaemia and change in body weight. Results Gla‐300 was non‐inferior to Gla‐100 for the primary endpoint of HbA1c change over the 6‐month period {least squares [LS] mean difference 0.13 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) −0.03 to 0.29]}. The annualized rate of confirmed (≤3.9 mmol/l) or severe hypoglycaemic events was 34 % lower with Gla‐300 than with Gla‐100 at night [rate ratio 0.66 (95 % CI 0.48–0.92)] and 20 % lower at any time of day [24 h; rate ratio 0.80 (95 % CI 0.65–0.98)]; this difference was most pronounced during the first 8 weeks of treatment. Severe hypoglycaemia was infrequent. The basal insulin dose increased in both groups (month 6 dose: Gla‐300 0.35 U/kg/day, Gla‐100 0.29 U/kg/day). A between‐treatment difference in body weight change over 6 months favouring Gla‐300 was observed [LS mean difference −0.6 kg (95 % CI −1.1 to −0.0); p = 0.035]. Adverse event rates were comparable between the groups. Conclusions In Japanese adults with type 1 diabetes using basal plus mealtime insulin, less hypoglycaemia was observed with Gla‐300 than with Gla‐100, particularly during the night, while glycaemic control did not differ. PMID:26662964

  17. New insulin glargine 300 U/ml versus glargine 100 U/ml in Japanese adults with type 1 diabetes using basal and mealtime insulin: glucose control and hypoglycaemia in a randomized controlled trial (EDITION JP 1).

    PubMed

    Matsuhisa, M; Koyama, M; Cheng, X; Takahashi, Y; Riddle, M C; Bolli, G B; Hirose, T

    2016-04-01

    To compare efficacy and safety of new insulin glargine 300 U/ml (Gla-300) with that of insulin glargine 100 U/ml (Gla-100) in Japanese adults with type 1 diabetes. The EDITION JP 1 study (NCT01689129) was a 6-month, multicentre, open-label, phase III study. Participants (n = 243) were randomized to Gla-300 or Gla-100 while continuing mealtime insulin. Basal insulin was titrated with the aim of achieving a fasting self-monitored plasma glucose target of 4.4-7.2 mmol/l. The primary endpoint was change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) over 6 months. Safety measures included hypoglycaemia and change in body weight. Gla-300 was non-inferior to Gla-100 for the primary endpoint of HbA1c change over the 6-month period {least squares [LS] mean difference 0.13 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) -0.03 to 0.29]}. The annualized rate of confirmed (≤3.9 mmol/l) or severe hypoglycaemic events was 34 % lower with Gla-300 than with Gla-100 at night [rate ratio 0.66 (95 % CI 0.48-0.92)] and 20 % lower at any time of day [24 h; rate ratio 0.80 (95 % CI 0.65-0.98)]; this difference was most pronounced during the first 8 weeks of treatment. Severe hypoglycaemia was infrequent. The basal insulin dose increased in both groups (month 6 dose: Gla-300 0.35 U/kg/day, Gla-100 0.29 U/kg/day). A between-treatment difference in body weight change over 6 months favouring Gla-300 was observed [LS mean difference -0.6 kg (95 % CI -1.1 to -0.0); p = 0.035]. Adverse event rates were comparable between the groups. In Japanese adults with type 1 diabetes using basal plus mealtime insulin, less hypoglycaemia was observed with Gla-300 than with Gla-100, particularly during the night, while glycaemic control did not differ. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Kate's Model Verification Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Steve

    1991-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center's Knowledge-based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) is capable of monitoring electromechanical systems, diagnosing their errors, and even repairing them when they crash. A survey of KATE's developer/modelers revealed that they were already using a sophisticated set of productivity enhancing tools. They did request five more, however, and those make up the body of the information presented here: (1) a transfer function code fitter; (2) a FORTRAN-Lisp translator; (3) three existing structural consistency checkers to aid in syntax checking their modeled device frames; (4) an automated procedure for calibrating knowledge base admittances to protect KATE's hardware mockups from inadvertent hand valve twiddling; and (5) three alternatives for the 'pseudo object', a programming patch that currently apprises KATE's modeling devices of their operational environments.

  19. Federation of UML models for cyber physical use cases

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    This method employs the concept of federation, which is defined as the use of existing models that represent aspects of a system in specific domains (such as physical and cyber security domains) and building interfaces to link all of domain models. Federation seeks to build on existing bodies of work. Some examples include the Common Information Models (CIM) maintained by the International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Committee 57 (IEC TC 57) for the electric power industry. Another relevant model is the CIM maintained by the Distributed Management Task Force (DMTF)? this CIM defines a representation of the managed elements in anmore » Information Technology (IT) environment. The power system is an example of a cyber-physical system, where the cyber systems, consisting of computing infrastructure such as networks and devices, play a critical role in the operation of the underlying physical electricity delivery system. Measurements from remote field devices are relayed to control centers through computer networks, and the data is processed to determine suitable control actions. Control decisions are then relayed back to field devices. It has been observed that threat actors may be able to successfully compromise this cyber layer in order to impact power system operation. Therefore, future control center applications must be wary of potentially compromised measurements coming from field devices. In order to ensure the integrity of the field measurements, these applications could make use of compromise indicators from alternate sources of information such as cyber security. Thus, modern control applications may require access to data from sources that are not defined in the local information model. In such cases, software application interfaces will require integration of data objects from cross-domain data models. When incorporating or federating different domains, it is important to have subject matter experts work together, recognizing that not everyone

  20. THE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL EVALUATION TOOL (AMET); AIR QUALITY MODULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation reviews the development of the Atmospheric Model Evaluation Tool (AMET) air quality module. The AMET tool is being developed to aid in the model evaluation. This presentation focuses on the air quality evaluation portion of AMET. Presented are examples of the...

  1. Glycaemic control and hypoglycaemia with insulin glargine 300 U/mL compared with glargine 100 U/mL in Japanese adults with type 2 diabetes using basal insulin plus oral anti-hyperglycaemic drugs (EDITION JP 2 randomised 12-month trial including 6-month extension).

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Y; Koyama, M; Cheng, X; Sumi, M; Riddle, M C; Bolli, G B; Hirose, T

    2017-10-01

    To compare insulin glargine 300 U/mL (Gla-300) with glargine 100 U/mL (Gla-100) in Japanese adults with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes on basal insulin and oral anti-hyperglycaemic drugs over 12 months. EDITION JP 2 was a randomised, open-label, phase 3 study. Following a 6-month treatment period, participants continued receiving previously assigned once daily Gla-300 or Gla-100, plus oral anti-hyperglycaemic drugs, in a 6-month extension period. Glycaemic control, hypoglycaemia and adverse events were assessed. The 12-month completion rate was 88% for Gla-300 and 96% for Gla-100, with comparable reasons for discontinuation. Mean HbA 1c decrease from baseline to month 12 was 0.3% in both groups. Annualised rates of confirmed (≤3.9mmol/L [≤70mg/dL]) or severe hypoglycaemia were lower with Gla-300 than Gla-100 (nocturnal [00:00-05:59h]: rate ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval: 0.18 to 0.92; anytime [24h]: rate ratio 0.64; 95% confidence interval: 0.44 to 0.94). Cumulative number of hypoglycaemic events was lower with Gla-300 than Gla-100. Adverse event profiles were comparable between treatments. Over 12 months, Gla-300-treated participants achieved sustained glycaemic control and experienced less hypoglycaemia, particularly at night, versus Gla-100, supporting 6-month results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Planned NLM/AHCPR large-scale vocabulary test: using UMLS technology to determine the extent to which controlled vocabularies cover terminology needed for health care and public health.

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, B L; Hole, W T; McCray, A T; Fitzmaurice, J M

    1996-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR) are sponsoring a test to determine the extent to which a combination of existing health-related terminologies covers vocabulary needed in health information systems. The test vocabularies are the 30 that are fully or partially represented in the 1996 edition of the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus, plus three planned additions: the portions of SNOMED International not in the 1996 Metathesaurus Read Clinical Classification, and the Logical Observations Identifiers, Names, and Codes (LOINC) system. These vocabularies are available to testers through a special interface to the Internet-based UMLS Knowledge Source Server. The test will determine the ability of the test vocabularies to serve as a source of controlled vocabulary for health data systems and applications. It should provide the basis for realistic resource estimates for developing and maintaining a comprehensive "standard" health vocabulary that is based on existing terminologies. PMID:8816351

  3. THE AGWA – KINEROS2 SUITE OF MODELING TOOLS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A suite of modeling tools ranging from the event-based KINEROS2 flash-flood forecasting tool to the continuous (K2-O2) KINEROS-OPUS biogeochemistry tool. The KINEROS2 flash flood forecasting tool is being tested with the National Weather Service (NEW) is described. Tne NWS version assimilates Dig...

  4. Model-based setup assistant for progressive tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, Robert; Gräler, Manuel; Homberg, Werner; Henke, Christian; Trächtler, Ansgar

    2018-05-01

    In the field of production systems, globalization and technological progress lead to increasing requirements regarding part quality, delivery time and costs. Hence, today's production is challenged much more than a few years ago: it has to be very flexible and produce economically small batch sizes to satisfy consumer's demands and avoid unnecessary stock. Furthermore, a trend towards increasing functional integration continues to lead to an ongoing miniaturization of sheet metal components. In the industry of electric connectivity for example, the miniaturized connectors are manufactured by progressive tools, which are usually used for very large batches. These tools are installed in mechanical presses and then set up by a technician, who has to manually adjust a wide range of punch-bending operations. Disturbances like material thickness, temperatures, lubrication or tool wear complicate the setup procedure. In prospect of the increasing demand of production flexibility, this time-consuming process has to be handled more and more often. In this paper, a new approach for a model-based setup assistant is proposed as a solution, which is exemplarily applied in combination with a progressive tool. First, progressive tools, more specifically, their setup process is described and based on that, the challenges are pointed out. As a result, a systematic process to set up the machines is introduced. Following, the process is investigated with an FE-Analysis regarding the effects of the disturbances. In the next step, design of experiments is used to systematically develop a regression model of the system's behaviour. This model is integrated within an optimization in order to calculate optimal machine parameters and the following necessary adjustment of the progressive tool due to the disturbances. Finally, the assistant is tested in a production environment and the results are discussed.

  5. NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Geothermal Resource Models and Tools

    Science.gov Websites

    allow users to determine locations that are favorable to geothermal energy development. List of software Models and Tools The Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC) features the following geothermal models and tools. Geothermal Prospector The Geothermal Prospector tool provides the information needed to

  6. Novel Multiscale Modeling Tool Applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Matthew B.; Papin, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiscale modeling is used to represent biological systems with increasing frequency and success. Multiscale models are often hybrids of different modeling frameworks and programming languages. We present the MATLAB-NetLogo extension (MatNet) as a novel tool for multiscale modeling. We demonstrate the utility of the tool with a multiscale model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation that incorporates both an agent-based model (ABM) and constraint-based metabolic modeling. The hybrid model correctly recapitulates oxygen-limited biofilm metabolic activity and predicts increased growth rate via anaerobic respiration with the addition of nitrate to the growth media. In addition, a genome-wide survey of metabolic mutants and biofilm formation exemplifies the powerful analyses that are enabled by this computational modeling tool. PMID:24147108

  7. Novel multiscale modeling tool applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Matthew B; Papin, Jason A

    2013-01-01

    Multiscale modeling is used to represent biological systems with increasing frequency and success. Multiscale models are often hybrids of different modeling frameworks and programming languages. We present the MATLAB-NetLogo extension (MatNet) as a novel tool for multiscale modeling. We demonstrate the utility of the tool with a multiscale model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation that incorporates both an agent-based model (ABM) and constraint-based metabolic modeling. The hybrid model correctly recapitulates oxygen-limited biofilm metabolic activity and predicts increased growth rate via anaerobic respiration with the addition of nitrate to the growth media. In addition, a genome-wide survey of metabolic mutants and biofilm formation exemplifies the powerful analyses that are enabled by this computational modeling tool.

  8. Cloud-Based Tools to Support High-Resolution Modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, N.; Nelson, J.; Swain, N.; Christensen, S.

    2013-12-01

    The majority of watershed models developed to support decision-making by water management agencies are simple, lumped-parameter models. Maturity in research codes and advances in the computational power from multi-core processors on desktop machines, commercial cloud-computing resources, and supercomputers with thousands of cores have created new opportunities for employing more accurate, high-resolution distributed models for routine use in decision support. The barriers for using such models on a more routine basis include massive amounts of spatial data that must be processed for each new scenario and lack of efficient visualization tools. In this presentation we will review a current NSF-funded project called CI-WATER that is intended to overcome many of these roadblocks associated with high-resolution modeling. We are developing a suite of tools that will make it possible to deploy customized web-based apps for running custom scenarios for high-resolution models with minimal effort. These tools are based on a software stack that includes 52 North, MapServer, PostGIS, HT Condor, CKAN, and Python. This open source stack provides a simple scripting environment for quickly configuring new custom applications for running high-resolution models as geoprocessing workflows. The HT Condor component facilitates simple access to local distributed computers or commercial cloud resources when necessary for stochastic simulations. The CKAN framework provides a powerful suite of tools for hosting such workflows in a web-based environment that includes visualization tools and storage of model simulations in a database to archival, querying, and sharing of model results. Prototype applications including land use change, snow melt, and burned area analysis will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1135482

  9. 33 CFR 385.33 - Revisions to models and analytical tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Management District, and other non-Federal sponsors shall rely on the best available science including models..., and assessment of projects. The selection of models and analytical tools shall be done in consultation... system-wide simulation models and analytical tools used in the evaluation and assessment of projects, and...

  10. Modeling Real-Time Applications with Reusable Design Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekhis, Saoussen; Bouassida, Nadia; Bouaziz, Rafik

    Real-Time (RT) applications, which manipulate important volumes of data, need to be managed with RT databases that deal with time-constrained data and time-constrained transactions. In spite of their numerous advantages, RT databases development remains a complex task, since developers must study many design issues related to the RT domain. In this paper, we tackle this problem by proposing RT design patterns that allow the modeling of structural and behavioral aspects of RT databases. We show how RT design patterns can provide design assistance through architecture reuse of reoccurring design problems. In addition, we present an UML profile that represents patterns and facilitates further their reuse. This profile proposes, on one hand, UML extensions allowing to model the variability of patterns in the RT context and, on another hand, extensions inspired from the MARTE (Modeling and Analysis of Real-Time Embedded systems) profile.

  11. The caBIG® Life Science Business Architecture Model.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Lauren Becnel; Hunicke-Smith, Scott P; Stafford, Grace A; Freund, Elaine T; Ehlman, Michele; Chandran, Uma; Dennis, Robert; Fernandez, Anna T; Goldstein, Stephen; Steffen, David; Tycko, Benjamin; Klemm, Juli D

    2011-05-15

    Business Architecture Models (BAMs) describe what a business does, who performs the activities, where and when activities are performed, how activities are accomplished and which data are present. The purpose of a BAM is to provide a common resource for understanding business functions and requirements and to guide software development. The cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Life Science BAM (LS BAM) provides a shared understanding of the vocabulary, goals and processes that are common in the business of LS research. LS BAM 1.1 includes 90 goals and 61 people and groups within Use Case and Activity Unified Modeling Language (UML) Diagrams. Here we report on the model's current release, LS BAM 1.1, its utility and usage, and plans for future use and continuing development for future releases. The LS BAM is freely available as UML, PDF and HTML (https://wiki.nci.nih.gov/x/OFNyAQ).

  12. Unified modeling language and design of a case-based retrieval system in medical imaging.

    PubMed Central

    LeBozec, C.; Jaulent, M. C.; Zapletal, E.; Degoulet, P.

    1998-01-01

    One goal of artificial intelligence research into case-based reasoning (CBR) systems is to develop approaches for designing useful and practical interactive case-based environments. Explaining each step of the design of the case-base and of the retrieval process is critical for the application of case-based systems to the real world. We describe herein our approach to the design of IDEM--Images and Diagnosis from Examples in Medicine--a medical image case-based retrieval system for pathologists. Our approach is based on the expressiveness of an object-oriented modeling language standard: the Unified Modeling Language (UML). We created a set of diagrams in UML notation illustrating the steps of the CBR methodology we used. The key aspect of this approach was selecting the relevant objects of the system according to user requirements and making visualization of cases and of the components of the case retrieval process. Further evaluation of the expressiveness of the design document is required but UML seems to be a promising formalism, improving the communication between the developers and users. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9929346

  13. Unified modeling language and design of a case-based retrieval system in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    LeBozec, C; Jaulent, M C; Zapletal, E; Degoulet, P

    1998-01-01

    One goal of artificial intelligence research into case-based reasoning (CBR) systems is to develop approaches for designing useful and practical interactive case-based environments. Explaining each step of the design of the case-base and of the retrieval process is critical for the application of case-based systems to the real world. We describe herein our approach to the design of IDEM--Images and Diagnosis from Examples in Medicine--a medical image case-based retrieval system for pathologists. Our approach is based on the expressiveness of an object-oriented modeling language standard: the Unified Modeling Language (UML). We created a set of diagrams in UML notation illustrating the steps of the CBR methodology we used. The key aspect of this approach was selecting the relevant objects of the system according to user requirements and making visualization of cases and of the components of the case retrieval process. Further evaluation of the expressiveness of the design document is required but UML seems to be a promising formalism, improving the communication between the developers and users.

  14. Web tools for predictive toxicology model building.

    PubMed

    Jeliazkova, Nina

    2012-07-01

    The development and use of web tools in chemistry has accumulated more than 15 years of history already. Powered by the advances in the Internet technologies, the current generation of web systems are starting to expand into areas, traditional for desktop applications. The web platforms integrate data storage, cheminformatics and data analysis tools. The ease of use and the collaborative potential of the web is compelling, despite the challenges. The topic of this review is a set of recently published web tools that facilitate predictive toxicology model building. The focus is on software platforms, offering web access to chemical structure-based methods, although some of the frameworks could also provide bioinformatics or hybrid data analysis functionalities. A number of historical and current developments are cited. In order to provide comparable assessment, the following characteristics are considered: support for workflows, descriptor calculations, visualization, modeling algorithms, data management and data sharing capabilities, availability of GUI or programmatic access and implementation details. The success of the Web is largely due to its highly decentralized, yet sufficiently interoperable model for information access. The expected future convergence between cheminformatics and bioinformatics databases provides new challenges toward management and analysis of large data sets. The web tools in predictive toxicology will likely continue to evolve toward the right mix of flexibility, performance, scalability, interoperability, sets of unique features offered, friendly user interfaces, programmatic access for advanced users, platform independence, results reproducibility, curation and crowdsourcing utilities, collaborative sharing and secure access.

  15. New insulin glargine 300 U/ml versus glargine 100 U/ml in Japanese people with type 2 diabetes using basal insulin and oral antihyperglycaemic drugs: glucose control and hypoglycaemia in a randomized controlled trial (EDITION JP 2).

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Y; Koyama, M; Cheng, X; Takahashi, Y; Riddle, M C; Bolli, G B; Hirose, T

    2016-04-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of insulin glargine 300 U/ml (Gla-300) with glargine 100 U/ml (Gla-100) in Japanese people with type 2 diabetes using basal insulin plus oral antihyperglycaemic drug(s) [OAD(s)]. The EDITION JP 2 study (NCT01689142) was a 6-month, multicentre, open-label, phase III study. Participants (n = 241, male 61%, mean diabetes duration 14 years, mean weight 67 kg, mean body mass index 25 kg/m(2), mean glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) 8.02 %, mean basal insulin dose 0.24 U/kg/day) were randomized to Gla-300 or Gla-100, while continuing OAD(s). Basal insulin was titrated to target fasting self-monitored plasma glucose 4.4-5.6 mmol/l. The primary efficacy endpoint was HbA1c change over 6 months. Safety endpoints included hypoglycaemia and weight change. Gla-300 was non-inferior to Gla-100 for HbA1c reduction [least squares (LS) mean difference 0.10 (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.08, 0.27) %]. The mean HbA1c at month 6 was 7.56 and 7.52 % with Gla-300 and Gla-100, respectively. Nocturnal confirmed (≤3.9 mmol/l) or severe hypoglycaemia risk was 38% lower with Gla-300 versus Gla-100 [relative risk 0.62 (95% CI 0.44, 0.88)]; annualized rates were 55% lower at night [rate ratio 0.45 (95% CI 0.21, 0.96)] and 36% lower at any time [24 h; rate ratio 0.64 (95% CI 0.43, 0.96)]. Severe hypoglycaemia was infrequent. A significant between-treatment difference in weight change favoured Gla-300 [LS mean difference -1.0 (95% CI -1.5, -0.5) kg; p = 0.0003]. Adverse event rates were comparable between groups. Japanese people with type 2 diabetes using basal insulin plus OAD(s) experienced less hypoglycaemia with Gla-300 than with Gla-100, while glycaemic control did not differ. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. SCOUT: A Fast Monte-Carlo Modeling Tool of Scintillation Camera Output

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, William C. J.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Lewellen, Thomas K.; Miyaoka, Robert S.; Muzi, John P.; Li, Xiaoli; McDougald, Wendy; MacDonald, Lawrence R.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a Monte-Carlo photon-tracking and readout simulator called SCOUT to study the stochastic behavior of signals output from a simplified rectangular scintillation-camera design. SCOUT models the salient processes affecting signal generation, transport, and readout. Presently, we compare output signal statistics from SCOUT to experimental results for both a discrete and a monolithic camera. We also benchmark the speed of this simulation tool and compare it to existing simulation tools. We find this modeling tool to be relatively fast and predictive of experimental results. Depending on the modeled camera geometry, we found SCOUT to be 4 to 140 times faster than other modeling tools. PMID:22072297

  17. Modified UMS, Modified SemRep and SemMedDB-UTH | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Cancer.gov

    Modified UMLS, modified SemRep and SemMedDB-UTH – these are resources (UMLS, SemMedDB-UT) and tools (SemRep) created and maintained by National Library of Medicine that we have modified for personalized cancer therapy and returned to the NLM.

  18. Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling Tool

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    2014-06-19

    Analytical application performance models are critical for diagnosing performance-limiting resources, optimizing systems, and designing machines. Creating models, however, is difficult. Furthermore, models are frequently expressed in forms that are hard to distribute and validate. The Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling tool, or Palm, is a modeling tool designed to make application modeling easier. Palm provides a source code modeling annotation language. Not only does the modeling language divide the modeling task into sub problems, it formally links an application's source code with its model. This link is important because a model's purpose is to capture application behavior. Furthermore, this linkmore » makes it possible to define rules for generating models according to source code organization. Palm generates hierarchical models according to well-defined rules. Given an application, a set of annotations, and a representative execution environment, Palm will generate the same model. A generated model is a an executable program whose constituent parts directly correspond to the modeled application. Palm generates models by combining top-down (human-provided) semantic insight with bottom-up static and dynamic analysis. A model's hierarchy is defined by static and dynamic source code structure. Because Palm coordinates models and source code, Palm's models are 'first-class' and reproducible. Palm automates common modeling tasks. For instance, Palm incorporates measurements to focus attention, represent constant behavior, and validate models. Palm's workflow is as follows. The workflow's input is source code annotated with Palm modeling annotations. The most important annotation models an instance of a block of code. Given annotated source code, the Palm Compiler produces executables and the Palm Monitor collects a representative performance profile. The Palm Generator synthesizes a model based on the static and dynamic mapping of annotations to program

  19. Clinical, information and business process modeling to promote development of safe and flexible software.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Deveny, Elizabeth; Morrison, Iain; Lewis, Bryn

    2006-09-01

    Using a factorial vignette survey and modeling methodology, we developed clinical and information models - incorporating evidence base, key concepts, relevant terms, decision-making and workflow needed to practice safely and effectively - to guide the development of an integrated rule-based knowledge module to support prescribing decisions in asthma. We identified workflows, decision-making factors, factor use, and clinician information requirements. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) and public domain software and knowledge engineering tools (e.g. Protégé) were used, with the Australian GP Data Model as the starting point for expressing information needs. A Web Services service-oriented architecture approach was adopted within which to express functional needs, and clinical processes and workflows were expressed in the Business Process Execution Language (BPEL). This formal analysis and modeling methodology to define and capture the process and logic of prescribing best practice in a reference implementation is fundamental to tackling deficiencies in prescribing decision support software.

  20. Software Tools for Weed Seed Germination Modeling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The next generation of weed seed germination models will need to account for variable soil microclimate conditions. In order to predict this microclimate environment we have developed a suite of individual tools (models) that can be used in conjunction with the next generation of weed seed germinati...

  1. Model-Based Reasoning: Using Visual Tools to Reveal Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckie, Douglas; Harrison, Scott H.; Ebert-May, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Using visual models is common in science and should become more common in classrooms. Our research group has developed and completed studies on the use of a visual modeling tool, the Concept Connector. This modeling tool consists of an online concept mapping Java applet that has automatic scoring functions we refer to as Robograder. The Concept…

  2. New Insulin Glargine 300 U/mL for the Treatment of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Jennifer; White, John R

    2015-10-01

    To describe the studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of new insulin glargine 300 U/mL (Gla-300) as a basal insulin in the treatment of type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 (T2DM) diabetes mellitus. A literature search of MEDLINE was conducted (January 2008-June 2015) using the terms U300, Gla-300, and insulin glargine 300 units/mL and supplemented with congress abstracts published in 2014 and 2015. All English language studies assessing the efficacy and/or safety of Gla-300 were evaluated. The efficacy and safety of once-daily Gla-300 has been compared with insulin glargine 100 U/mL (Gla-100) in the EDITION trials, 6 phase-3, multinational, open-label studies in T1DM and T2DM. Across these studies, Gla-300 consistently demonstrated glycemic control comparable to Gla-100; a mean (standard error) change in glycated hemoglobin A1c of -1.02% (0.03) with both Gla-100 (n = 1235) and Gla-300 (n = 1239) was seen in a patient-level meta-analysis. Gla-300 was associated with comparable or reduced nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with Gla-100; the relative risk for nocturnal hypoglycemia with Gla-300 versus Gla-100 was 0.75 (95% CI = 0.68 to 0.83) in a patient-level meta-analysis. There is also some evidence for less weight gain with Gla-300 compared with Gla-100, despite a higher insulin dose. Gla-300 was well tolerated, with the number of adverse events being comparable to that with Gla-100. These results suggest that Gla-300 may have a place as an alternative, long-acting basal insulin for patients with T1DM or T2DM, with the possibility for improved tolerability. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. SCOUT: a fast Monte-Carlo modeling tool of scintillation camera output†

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, William C J; Barrett, Harrison H.; Muzi, John P.; McDougald, Wendy; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Miyaoka, Robert S.; Lewellen, Thomas K.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a Monte-Carlo photon-tracking and readout simulator called SCOUT to study the stochastic behavior of signals output from a simplified rectangular scintillation-camera design. SCOUT models the salient processes affecting signal generation, transport, and readout of a scintillation camera. Presently, we compare output signal statistics from SCOUT to experimental results for both a discrete and a monolithic camera. We also benchmark the speed of this simulation tool and compare it to existing simulation tools. We find this modeling tool to be relatively fast and predictive of experimental results. Depending on the modeled camera geometry, we found SCOUT to be 4 to 140 times faster than other modeling tools. PMID:23640136

  4. Tool wear modeling using abductive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masory, Oren

    1992-09-01

    A tool wear model based on Abductive Networks, which consists of a network of `polynomial' nodes, is described. The model relates the cutting parameters, components of the cutting force, and machining time to flank wear. Thus real time measurements of the cutting force can be used to monitor the machining process. The model is obtained by a training process in which the connectivity between the network's nodes and the polynomial coefficients of each node are determined by optimizing a performance criteria. Actual wear measurements of coated and uncoated carbide inserts were used for training and evaluating the established model.

  5. Animal models: an important tool in mycology.

    PubMed

    Capilla, Javier; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A

    2007-12-01

    Animal models of fungal infections are, and will remain, a key tool in the advancement of the medical mycology. Many different types of animal models of fungal infection have been developed, with murine models the most frequently used, for studies of pathogenesis, virulence, immunology, diagnosis, and therapy. The ability to control numerous variables in performing the model allows us to mimic human disease states and quantitatively monitor the course of the disease. However, no single model can answer all questions and different animal species or different routes of infection can show somewhat different results. Thus, the choice of which animal model to use must be made carefully, addressing issues of the type of human disease to mimic, the parameters to follow and collection of the appropriate data to answer those questions being asked. This review addresses a variety of uses for animal models in medical mycology. It focuses on the most clinically important diseases affecting humans and cites various examples of the different types of studies that have been performed. Overall, animal models of fungal infection will continue to be valuable tools in addressing questions concerning fungal infections and contribute to our deeper understanding of how these infections occur, progress and can be controlled and eliminated.

  6. Glycaemic control, hypoglycaemia, and weight change with insulin glargine 300 U/mL versus insulin glargine 100 U/mL in Japanese adults with type 2 diabetes: a 12-month comparison by concomitant sulphonylurea and/or glinide use.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Yasuo; Riddle, Matthew C; Hirose, Takahisa; Koyama, Masayoshi; Cheng, Xi; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Bolli, Geremia B

    2018-06-11

    To explore if clinical effects and hypoglycaemia risks associated with insulin glargine 300 U/mL (Gla-300) and 100 U/mL (Gla-100) differed by sulphonylurea and/or glinide (SU/G) treatment. This was a post hoc subgroup analysis of 12-month treatment data from EDITION JP 2 (randomised, open-label, phase 3 study of Japanese people with type 2 diabetes [T2DM] receiving once-daily Gla-300/Gla-100+oral antihyperglycaemic drugs). Participants previously receiving SU/G (+SU/G) were compared with those not taking SU/G (-SU/G). Endpoints included HbA 1c , hypoglycaemia and body weight. For +SU/G (n=152, 63%), HbA 1c was reduced from baseline to month 12 for Gla-300 (8.1 % to 7.6 %) and Gla-100 (8.2 % to 7.8 %). For -SU/G (n=89, 37%), reductions were 7.8 % to 7.4 %, and 7.9 % to 7.5 % for Gla-300 and Gla-100, respectively. A lower annualised rate of hypoglycaemia with Gla-300 versus Gla-100 was observed at night (00:00-05:59 h; p=0.0001) and any time of day (24 h; p=0.0015). Irrespective of the insulin used, the incidence and rate of confirmed (≤3.9 mmol/L [≤70 mg/dL]) or severe hypoglycaemia appeared higher in +SU/G versus -SU/G; overall, a reduced incidence of nocturnal hypoglycaemia, and rate of hypoglycaemia at any time, was observed in -SU/G versus +SU/G. In the -SU/G subgroup, weight gain differences were observed between Gla-300 and Gla-100 (p<0.0001). Participants with prior and continued SU/G use had similar therapeutic responses with basal insulin but greater risk of hypoglycaemia than those not using SU/G; hypoglycaemia risk was lower with Gla-300 than Gla-100 in both subgroups. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling surgical tool selection patterns as a "traveling salesman problem" for optimizing a modular surgical tool system.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Carl A; Miller, David J; Oleynikov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    As modular systems come into the forefront of robotic telesurgery, streamlining the process of selecting surgical tools becomes an important consideration. This paper presents a method for optimal queuing of tools in modular surgical tool systems, based on patterns in tool-use sequences, in order to minimize time spent changing tools. The solution approach is to model the set of tools as a graph, with tool-change frequency expressed as edge weights in the graph, and to solve the Traveling Salesman Problem for the graph. In a set of simulations, this method has shown superior performance at optimizing tool arrangements for streamlining surgical procedures.

  8. A Model-Driven Visualization Tool for Use with Model-Based Systems Engineering Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trase, Kathryn; Fink, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) promotes increased consistency between a system's design and its design documentation through the use of an object-oriented system model. The creation of this system model facilitates data presentation by providing a mechanism from which information can be extracted by automated manipulation of model content. Existing MBSE tools enable model creation, but are often too complex for the unfamiliar model viewer to easily use. These tools do not yet provide many opportunities for easing into the development and use of a system model when system design documentation already exists. This study creates a Systems Modeling Language (SysML) Document Traceability Framework (SDTF) for integrating design documentation with a system model, and develops an Interactive Visualization Engine for SysML Tools (InVEST), that exports consistent, clear, and concise views of SysML model data. These exported views are each meaningful to a variety of project stakeholders with differing subjects of concern and depth of technical involvement. InVEST allows a model user to generate multiple views and reports from a MBSE model, including wiki pages and interactive visualizations of data. System data can also be filtered to present only the information relevant to the particular stakeholder, resulting in a view that is both consistent with the larger system model and other model views. Viewing the relationships between system artifacts and documentation, and filtering through data to see specialized views improves the value of the system as a whole, as data becomes information

  9. Modeling the Car Crash Crisis Management System Using HiLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölzl, Matthias; Knapp, Alexander; Zhang, Gefei

    An aspect-oriented modeling approach to the Car Crash Crisis Management System (CCCMS) using the High-Level Aspect (HiLA) language is described. HiLA is a language for expressing aspects for UML static structures and UML state machines. In particular, HiLA supports both a static graph transformational and a dynamic approach of applying aspects. Furthermore, it facilitates methodologically turning use case descriptions into state machines: for each main success scenario, a base state machine is developed; all extensions to this main success scenario are covered by aspects. Overall, the static structure of the CCCMS is modeled in 43 classes, the main success scenarios in 13 base machines, the use case extensions in 47 static and 31 dynamic aspects, most of which are instantiations of simple aspect templates.

  10. The effective integration of analysis, modeling, and simulation tools.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-08-01

    The need for model integration arises from the recognition that both transportation decisionmaking and the tools supporting it continue to increase in complexity. Many strategies that agencies evaluate require using tools that are sensitive to supply...

  11. Model-Driven Configuration of SELinux Policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agreiter, Berthold; Breu, Ruth

    The need for access control in computer systems is inherent. However, the complexity to configure such systems is constantly increasing which affects the overall security of a system negatively. We think that it is important to define security requirements on a non-technical level while taking the application domain into respect in order to have a clear and separated view on security configuration (i.e. unblurred by technical details). On the other hand, security functionality has to be tightly integrated with the system and its development process in order to provide comprehensive means of enforcement. In this paper, we propose a systematic approach based on model-driven security configuration to leverage existing operating system security mechanisms (SELinux) for realising access control. We use UML models and develop a UML profile to satisfy these needs. Our goal is to exploit a comprehensive protection mechanism while rendering its security policy manageable by a domain specialist.

  12. A Model for Developing Meta-Cognitive Tools in Teacher Apprenticeships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Paige; Schatz, Steven

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates a model for developing meta-cognitive tools to be used by pre-service teachers during apprenticeship (student teaching) experience to operationalise the epistemological model of Cook and Brown (2009). Meta-cognitive tools have proven to be effective for increasing performance and retention of undergraduate students.…

  13. Towards automated traceability maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Mäder, Patrick; Gotel, Orlena

    2012-01-01

    Traceability relations support stakeholders in understanding the dependencies between artifacts created during the development of a software system and thus enable many development-related tasks. To ensure that the anticipated benefits of these tasks can be realized, it is necessary to have an up-to-date set of traceability relations between the established artifacts. This goal requires the creation of traceability relations during the initial development process. Furthermore, the goal also requires the maintenance of traceability relations over time as the software system evolves in order to prevent their decay. In this paper, an approach is discussed that supports the (semi-) automated update of traceability relations between requirements, analysis and design models of software systems expressed in the UML. This is made possible by analyzing change events that have been captured while working within a third-party UML modeling tool. Within the captured flow of events, development activities comprised of several events are recognized. These are matched with predefined rules that direct the update of impacted traceability relations. The overall approach is supported by a prototype tool and empirical results on the effectiveness of tool-supported traceability maintenance are provided. PMID:23471308

  14. The CMIP5 Model Documentation Questionnaire: Development of a Metadata Retrieval System for the METAFOR Common Information Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, Charlotte; Lawrence, Bryan; Moine, Marie-Pierre; Ford, Rupert; Devine, Gerry

    2010-05-01

    The EU METAFOR Project (http://metaforclimate.eu) has created a web-based model documentation questionnaire to collect metadata from the modelling groups that are running simulations in support of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project - 5 (CMIP5). The CMIP5 model documentation questionnaire will retrieve information about the details of the models used, how the simulations were carried out, how the simulations conformed to the CMIP5 experiment requirements and details of the hardware used to perform the simulations. The metadata collected by the CMIP5 questionnaire will allow CMIP5 data to be compared in a scientifically meaningful way. This paper describes the life-cycle of the CMIP5 questionnaire development which starts with relatively unstructured input from domain specialists and ends with formal XML documents that comply with the METAFOR Common Information Model (CIM). Each development step is associated with a specific tool. (1) Mind maps are used to capture information requirements from domain experts and build a controlled vocabulary, (2) a python parser processes the XML files generated by the mind maps, (3) Django (python) is used to generate the dynamic structure and content of the web based questionnaire from processed xml and the METAFOR CIM, (4) Python parsers ensure that information entered into the CMIP5 questionnaire is output as CIM compliant xml, (5) CIM compliant output allows automatic information capture tools to harvest questionnaire content into databases such as the Earth System Grid (ESG) metadata catalogue. This paper will focus on how Django (python) and XML input files are used to generate the structure and content of the CMIP5 questionnaire. It will also address how the choice of development tools listed above provided a framework that enabled working scientists (who we would never ordinarily get to interact with UML and XML) to be part the iterative development process and ensure that the CMIP5 model documentation questionnaire

  15. Tool Efficiency Analysis model research in SEMI industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ma; Nana, Zhang; Zhongqiu, Zhang

    2018-06-01

    One of the key goals in SEMI industry is to improve equipment through put and ensure equipment production efficiency maximization. This paper is based on SEMI standards in semiconductor equipment control, defines the transaction rules between different tool states, and presents a TEA system model which is to analysis tool performance automatically based on finite state machine. The system was applied to fab tools and verified its effectiveness successfully, and obtained the parameter values used to measure the equipment performance, also including the advices of improvement.

  16. Leveraging the UML Metamodel: Expressing ORM Semantics Using a UML Profile

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    CUYLER,DAVID S.

    2000-11-01

    Object Role Modeling (ORM) techniques produce a detailed domain model from the perspective of the business owner/customer. The typical process begins with a set of simple sentences reflecting facts about the business. The output of the process is a single model representing primarily the persistent information needs of the business. This type of model contains little, if any reference to a targeted computerized implementation. It is a model of business entities not of software classes. Through well-defined procedures, an ORM model can be transformed into a high quality objector relational schema.

  17. Data Modeling & the Infrastructural Nature of Conceptual Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesh, Richard; Caylor, Elizabeth; Gupta, Shweta

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to demonstrate the infrastructural nature of many modern conceptual technologies. The focus of this paper is on conceptual tools associated with elementary types of data modeling. We intend to show a variety of ways in which these conceptual tools not only express thinking, but also mold and shape thinking. And those ways…

  18. Artificial Intelligence versus Statistical Modeling and Optimization of Cholesterol Oxidase Production by using Streptomyces Sp.

    PubMed Central

    Niwas, Ram; Osama, Khwaja; Khan, Saif; Haque, Shafiul; Tripathi, C. K. M.; Mishra, B. N.

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase (COD) is a bi-functional FAD-containing oxidoreductase which catalyzes the oxidation of cholesterol into 4-cholesten-3-one. The wider biological functions and clinical applications of COD have urged the screening, isolation and characterization of newer microbes from diverse habitats as a source of COD and optimization and over-production of COD for various uses. The practicability of statistical/ artificial intelligence techniques, such as response surface methodology (RSM), artificial neural network (ANN) and genetic algorithm (GA) have been tested to optimize the medium composition for the production of COD from novel strain Streptomyces sp. NCIM 5500. All experiments were performed according to the five factor central composite design (CCD) and the generated data was analysed using RSM and ANN. GA was employed to optimize the models generated by RSM and ANN. Based upon the predicted COD concentration, the model developed with ANN was found to be superior to the model developed with RSM. The RSM-GA approach predicted maximum of 6.283 U/mL COD production, whereas the ANN-GA approach predicted a maximum of 9.93 U/mL COD concentration. The optimum concentrations of the medium variables predicted through ANN-GA approach were: 1.431 g/50 mL soybean, 1.389 g/50 mL maltose, 0.029 g/50 mL MgSO4, 0.45 g/50 mL NaCl and 2.235 ml/50 mL glycerol. The experimental COD concentration was concurrent with the GA predicted yield and led to 9.75 U/mL COD production, which was nearly two times higher than the yield (4.2 U/mL) obtained with the un-optimized medium. This is the very first time we are reporting the statistical versus artificial intelligence based modeling and optimization of COD production by Streptomyces sp. NCIM 5500. PMID:26368924

  19. Artificial Intelligence versus Statistical Modeling and Optimization of Cholesterol Oxidase Production by using Streptomyces Sp.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Lakshmi; Singh, Vineeta; Niwas, Ram; Osama, Khwaja; Khan, Saif; Haque, Shafiul; Tripathi, C K M; Mishra, B N

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase (COD) is a bi-functional FAD-containing oxidoreductase which catalyzes the oxidation of cholesterol into 4-cholesten-3-one. The wider biological functions and clinical applications of COD have urged the screening, isolation and characterization of newer microbes from diverse habitats as a source of COD and optimization and over-production of COD for various uses. The practicability of statistical/ artificial intelligence techniques, such as response surface methodology (RSM), artificial neural network (ANN) and genetic algorithm (GA) have been tested to optimize the medium composition for the production of COD from novel strain Streptomyces sp. NCIM 5500. All experiments were performed according to the five factor central composite design (CCD) and the generated data was analysed using RSM and ANN. GA was employed to optimize the models generated by RSM and ANN. Based upon the predicted COD concentration, the model developed with ANN was found to be superior to the model developed with RSM. The RSM-GA approach predicted maximum of 6.283 U/mL COD production, whereas the ANN-GA approach predicted a maximum of 9.93 U/mL COD concentration. The optimum concentrations of the medium variables predicted through ANN-GA approach were: 1.431 g/50 mL soybean, 1.389 g/50 mL maltose, 0.029 g/50 mL MgSO4, 0.45 g/50 mL NaCl and 2.235 ml/50 mL glycerol. The experimental COD concentration was concurrent with the GA predicted yield and led to 9.75 U/mL COD production, which was nearly two times higher than the yield (4.2 U/mL) obtained with the un-optimized medium. This is the very first time we are reporting the statistical versus artificial intelligence based modeling and optimization of COD production by Streptomyces sp. NCIM 5500.

  20. Three Software Tools for Viewing Sectional Planes, Volume Models, and Surface Models of a Cadaver Hand.

    PubMed

    Chung, Beom Sun; Chung, Min Suk; Shin, Byeong Seok; Kwon, Koojoo

    2018-02-19

    The hand anatomy, including the complicated hand muscles, can be grasped by using computer-assisted learning tools with high quality two-dimensional images and three-dimensional models. The purpose of this study was to present up-to-date software tools that promote learning of stereoscopic morphology of the hand. On the basis of horizontal sectioned images and outlined images of a male cadaver, vertical planes, volume models, and surface models were elaborated. Software to browse pairs of the sectioned and outlined images in orthogonal planes and software to peel and rotate the volume models, as well as a portable document format (PDF) file to select and rotate the surface models, were produced. All of the software tools were downloadable free of charge and usable off-line. The three types of tools for viewing multiple aspects of the hand could be adequately employed according to individual needs. These new tools involving the realistic images of a cadaver and the diverse functions are expected to improve comprehensive knowledge of the hand shape. © 2018 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  1. Three Software Tools for Viewing Sectional Planes, Volume Models, and Surface Models of a Cadaver Hand

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Background The hand anatomy, including the complicated hand muscles, can be grasped by using computer-assisted learning tools with high quality two-dimensional images and three-dimensional models. The purpose of this study was to present up-to-date software tools that promote learning of stereoscopic morphology of the hand. Methods On the basis of horizontal sectioned images and outlined images of a male cadaver, vertical planes, volume models, and surface models were elaborated. Software to browse pairs of the sectioned and outlined images in orthogonal planes and software to peel and rotate the volume models, as well as a portable document format (PDF) file to select and rotate the surface models, were produced. Results All of the software tools were downloadable free of charge and usable off-line. The three types of tools for viewing multiple aspects of the hand could be adequately employed according to individual needs. Conclusion These new tools involving the realistic images of a cadaver and the diverse functions are expected to improve comprehensive knowledge of the hand shape. PMID:29441756

  2. Integrated Modeling Tools for Thermal Analysis and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, Mark H.; Needels, Laura; Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    1999-01-01

    Integrated modeling of spacecraft systems is a rapidly evolving area in which multidisciplinary models are developed to design and analyze spacecraft configurations. These models are especially important in the early design stages where rapid trades between subsystems can substantially impact design decisions. Integrated modeling is one of the cornerstones of two of NASA's planned missions in the Origins Program -- the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) and the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). Common modeling tools for control design and opto-mechanical analysis have recently emerged and are becoming increasingly widely used. A discipline that has been somewhat less integrated, but is nevertheless of critical concern for high precision optical instruments, is thermal analysis and design. A major factor contributing to this mild estrangement is that the modeling philosophies and objectives for structural and thermal systems typically do not coincide. Consequently the tools that are used in these discplines suffer a degree of incompatibility, each having developed along their own evolutionary path. Although standard thermal tools have worked relatively well in the past. integration with other disciplines requires revisiting modeling assumptions and solution methods. Over the past several years we have been developing a MATLAB based integrated modeling tool called IMOS (Integrated Modeling of Optical Systems) which integrates many aspects of structural, optical, control and dynamical analysis disciplines. Recent efforts have included developing a thermal modeling and analysis capability, which is the subject of this article. Currently, the IMOS thermal suite contains steady state and transient heat equation solvers, and the ability to set up the linear conduction network from an IMOS finite element model. The IMOS code generates linear conduction elements associated with plates and beams/rods of the thermal network directly from the finite element structural

  3. Connecting Architecture and Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchgeher, Georg; Weinreich, Rainer

    Software architectures are still typically defined and described independently from implementation. To avoid architectural erosion and drift, architectural representation needs to be continuously updated and synchronized with system implementation. Existing approaches for architecture representation like informal architecture documentation, UML diagrams, and Architecture Description Languages (ADLs) provide only limited support for connecting architecture descriptions and implementations. Architecture management tools like Lattix, SonarJ, and Sotoarc and UML-tools tackle this problem by extracting architecture information directly from code. This approach works for low-level architectural abstractions like classes and interfaces in object-oriented systems but fails to support architectural abstractions not found in programming languages. In this paper we present an approach for linking and continuously synchronizing a formalized architecture representation to an implementation. The approach is a synthesis of functionality provided by code-centric architecture management and UML tools and higher-level architecture analysis approaches like ADLs.

  4. Extraction of UMLS® Concepts Using Apache cTAKES™ for German Language.

    PubMed

    Becker, Matthias; Böckmann, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Automatic information extraction of medical concepts and classification with semantic standards from medical reports is useful for standardization and for clinical research. This paper presents an approach for an UMLS concept extraction with a customized natural language processing pipeline for German clinical notes using Apache cTAKES. The objectives are, to test the natural language processing tool for German language if it is suitable to identify UMLS concepts and map these with SNOMED-CT. The German UMLS database and German OpenNLP models extended the natural language processing pipeline, so the pipeline can normalize to domain ontologies such as SNOMED-CT using the German concepts. For testing, the ShARe/CLEF eHealth 2013 training dataset translated into German was used. The implemented algorithms are tested with a set of 199 German reports, obtaining a result of average 0.36 F1 measure without German stemming, pre- and post-processing of the reports.

  5. Employing UMLS for generating hints in a tutoring system for medical problem-based learning.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Hameedullah; Haddawy, Peter; Suebnukarn, Siriwan

    2012-06-01

    While problem-based learning has become widely popular for imparting clinical reasoning skills, the dynamics of medical PBL require close attention to a small group of students, placing a burden on medical faculty, whose time is over taxed. Intelligent tutoring systems (ITSs) offer an attractive means to increase the amount of facilitated PBL training the students receive. But typical intelligent tutoring system architectures make use of a domain model that provides a limited set of approved solutions to problems presented to students. Student solutions that do not match the approved ones, but are otherwise partially correct, receive little acknowledgement as feedback, stifling broader reasoning. Allowing students to creatively explore the space of possible solutions is exactly one of the attractive features of PBL. This paper provides an alternative to the traditional ITS architecture by using a hint generation strategy that leverages a domain ontology to provide effective feedback. The concept hierarchy and co-occurrence between concepts in the domain ontology are drawn upon to ascertain partial correctness of a solution and guide student reasoning towards a correct solution. We describe the strategy incorporated in METEOR, a tutoring system for medical PBL, wherein the widely available UMLS is deployed and represented as the domain ontology. Evaluation of expert agreement with system generated hints on a 5-point likert scale resulted in an average score of 4.44 (Spearman's ρ=0.80, p<0.01). Hints containing partial correctness feedback scored significantly higher than those without it (Mann Whitney, p<0.001). Hints produced by a human expert received an average score of 4.2 (Spearman's ρ=0.80, p<0.01). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Toxicokinetic and Dosimetry Modeling Tools for Exposure ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New technologies and in vitro testing approaches have been valuable additions to risk assessments that have historically relied solely on in vivo test results. Compared to in vivo methods, in vitro high throughput screening (HTS) assays are less expensive, faster and can provide mechanistic insights on chemical action. However, extrapolating from in vitro chemical concentrations to target tissue or blood concentrations in vivo is fraught with uncertainties, and modeling is dependent upon pharmacokinetic variables not measured in in vitro assays. To address this need, new tools have been created for characterizing, simulating, and evaluating chemical toxicokinetics. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide estimates of chemical exposures that produce potentially hazardous tissue concentrations, while tissue microdosimetry PK models relate whole-body chemical exposures to cell-scale concentrations. These tools rely on high-throughput in vitro measurements, and successful methods exist for pharmaceutical compounds that determine PK from limited in vitro measurements and chemical structure-derived property predictions. These high throughput (HT) methods provide a more rapid and less resource–intensive alternative to traditional PK model development. We have augmented these in vitro data with chemical structure-based descriptors and mechanistic tissue partitioning models to construct HTPBPK models for over three hundred environmental and pharmace

  7. Data Analysis with Graphical Models: Software Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray L.

    1994-01-01

    Probabilistic graphical models (directed and undirected Markov fields, and combined in chain graphs) are used widely in expert systems, image processing and other areas as a framework for representing and reasoning with probabilities. They come with corresponding algorithms for performing probabilistic inference. This paper discusses an extension to these models by Spiegelhalter and Gilks, plates, used to graphically model the notion of a sample. This offers a graphical specification language for representing data analysis problems. When combined with general methods for statistical inference, this also offers a unifying framework for prototyping and/or generating data analysis algorithms from graphical specifications. This paper outlines the framework and then presents some basic tools for the task: a graphical version of the Pitman-Koopman Theorem for the exponential family, problem decomposition, and the calculation of exact Bayes factors. Other tools already developed, such as automatic differentiation, Gibbs sampling, and use of the EM algorithm, make this a broad basis for the generation of data analysis software.

  8. Tools and Equipment Modeling for Automobile Interactive Assembling Operating Simulation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wu Dianliang; Zhu Hongmin; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advance Manufacturing Environment

    Tools and equipment play an important role in the simulation of virtual assembly, especially in the assembly process simulation and plan. Because of variety in function and complexity in structure and manipulation, the simulation of tools and equipments remains to be a challenge for interactive assembly operation. Based on analysis of details and characteristics of interactive operations for automobile assembly, the functional requirement for tools and equipments of automobile assembly is given. Then, a unified modeling method for information expression and function realization of general tools and equipments is represented, and the handling methods of manual, semi-automatic, automatic tools andmore » equipments are discussed. Finally, the application in assembly simulation of rear suspension and front suspension of Roewe 750 automobile is given. The result shows that the modeling and handling methods are applicable in the interactive simulation of various tools and equipments, and can also be used for supporting assembly process planning in virtual environment.« less

  9. Data-Driven Modeling and Rendering of Force Responses from Elastic Tool Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Rakhmatov, Ruslan; Ogay, Tatyana; Jeon, Seokhee

    2018-01-01

    This article presents a new data-driven model design for rendering force responses from elastic tool deformation. The new design incorporates a six-dimensional input describing the initial position of the contact, as well as the state of the tool deformation. The input-output relationship of the model was represented by a radial basis functions network, which was optimized based on training data collected from real tool-surface contact. Since the input space of the model is represented in the local coordinate system of a tool, the model is independent of recording and rendering devices and can be easily deployed to an existing simulator. The model also supports complex interactions, such as self and multi-contact collisions. In order to assess the proposed data-driven model, we built a custom data acquisition setup and developed a proof-of-concept rendering simulator. The simulator was evaluated through numerical and psychophysical experiments with four different real tools. The numerical evaluation demonstrated the perceptual soundness of the proposed model, meanwhile the user study revealed the force feedback of the proposed simulator to be realistic. PMID:29342964

  10. SMOKE TOOL FOR MODELS-3 VERSION 4.1 STRUCTURE AND OPERATION DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SMOKE Tool is a part of the Models-3 system, a flexible software system designed to simplify the development and use of air quality models and other environmental decision support tools. The SMOKE Tool is an input processor for SMOKE, (Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissio...

  11. NCPP's Use of Standard Metadata to Promote Open and Transparent Climate Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treshansky, A.; Barsugli, J. J.; Guentchev, G.; Rood, R. B.; DeLuca, C.

    2012-12-01

    The National Climate Predictions and Projections (NCPP) Platform is developing comprehensive regional and local information about the evolving climate to inform decision making and adaptation planning. This includes both creating and providing tools to create metadata about the models and processes used to create its derived data products. NCPP is using the Common Information Model (CIM), an ontology developed by a broad set of international partners in climate research, as its metadata language. This use of a standard ensures interoperability within the climate community as well as permitting access to the ecosystem of tools and services emerging alongside the CIM. The CIM itself is divided into a general-purpose (UML & XML) schema which structures metadata documents, and a project or community-specific (XML) Controlled Vocabulary (CV) which constraints the content of metadata documents. NCPP has already modified the CIM Schema to accommodate downscaling models, simulations, and experiments. NCPP is currently developing a CV for use by the downscaling community. Incorporating downscaling into the CIM will lead to several benefits: easy access to the existing CIM Documents describing CMIP5 models and simulations that are being downscaled, access to software tools that have been developed in order to search, manipulate, and visualize CIM metadata, and coordination with national and international efforts such as ES-DOC that are working to make climate model descriptions and datasets interoperable. Providing detailed metadata descriptions which include the full provenance of derived data products will contribute to making that data (and, the models and processes which generated that data) more open and transparent to the user community.

  12. Expert models and modeling processes associated with a computer-modeling tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baohui; Liu, Xiufeng; Krajcik, Joseph S.

    2006-07-01

    Holding the premise that the development of expertise is a continuous process, this study concerns expert models and modeling processes associated with a modeling tool called Model-It. Five advanced Ph.D. students in environmental engineering and public health used Model-It to create and test models of water quality. Using think aloud technique and video recording, we captured their computer screen modeling activities and thinking processes. We also interviewed them the day following their modeling sessions to further probe the rationale of their modeling practices. We analyzed both the audio-video transcripts and the experts' models. We found the experts' modeling processes followed the linear sequence built in the modeling program with few instances of moving back and forth. They specified their goals up front and spent a long time thinking through an entire model before acting. They specified relationships with accurate and convincing evidence. Factors (i.e., variables) in expert models were clustered, and represented by specialized technical terms. Based on the above findings, we made suggestions for improving model-based science teaching and learning using Model-It.

  13. WMT: The CSDMS Web Modeling Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, M.; Hutton, E. W. H.; Overeem, I.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS) has a mission to enable model use and development for research in earth surface processes. CSDMS strives to expand the use of quantitative modeling techniques, promotes best practices in coding, and advocates for the use of open-source software. To streamline and standardize access to models, CSDMS has developed the Web Modeling Tool (WMT), a RESTful web application with a client-side graphical interface and a server-side database and API that allows users to build coupled surface dynamics models in a web browser on a personal computer or a mobile device, and run them in a high-performance computing (HPC) environment. With WMT, users can: Design a model from a set of components Edit component parameters Save models to a web-accessible server Share saved models with the community Submit runs to an HPC system Download simulation results The WMT client is an Ajax application written in Java with GWT, which allows developers to employ object-oriented design principles and development tools such as Ant, Eclipse and JUnit. For deployment on the web, the GWT compiler translates Java code to optimized and obfuscated JavaScript. The WMT client is supported on Firefox, Chrome, Safari, and Internet Explorer. The WMT server, written in Python and SQLite, is a layered system, with each layer exposing a web service API: wmt-db: database of component, model, and simulation metadata and output wmt-api: configure and connect components wmt-exe: launch simulations on remote execution servers The database server provides, as JSON-encoded messages, the metadata for users to couple model components, including descriptions of component exchange items, uses and provides ports, and input parameters. Execution servers are network-accessible computational resources, ranging from HPC systems to desktop computers, containing the CSDMS software stack for running a simulation. Once a simulation completes, its output, in NetCDF, is packaged

  14. Glycaemic control and hypoglycaemia with new insulin glargine 300 U/ml versus insulin glargine 100 U/ml in people with type 2 diabetes using basal insulin and oral antihyperglycaemic drugs: the EDITION 2 randomized 12-month trial including 6-month extension.

    PubMed

    Yki-Järvinen, H; Bergenstal, R M; Bolli, G B; Ziemen, M; Wardecki, M; Muehlen-Bartmer, I; Maroccia, M; Riddle, M C

    2015-12-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of new insulin glargine 300 U/ml (Gla-300) with insulin glargine 100 U/ml (Gla-100) over 12 months of treatment in people with type 2 diabetes using basal insulin and oral antihyperglycaemic drugs (OADs). EDITION 2 (NCT01499095) was a randomized, 6-month, multicentre, open-label, two-arm, phase IIIa study investigating once-daily Gla-300 versus Gla-100, plus OADs (excluding sulphonylureas), with a 6-month safety extension. Similar numbers of participants in each group completed 12 months of treatment [Gla-300, 315 participants (78%); Gla-100, 314 participants (77%)]. The reduction in glycated haemoglobin was maintained for 12 months with both treatments: least squares (LS) mean (standard error) change from baseline -0.55 (0.06)% for Gla-300 and -0.50 (0.06)% for Gla-100; LS mean difference -0.06 [95% confidence interval (CI) -0.22 to 0.10)%]. A significant relative reduction of 37% in the annualized rate of nocturnal confirmed [≤3.9 mmol/l (≤70 mg/dl)] or severe hypoglycaemia was observed with Gla-300 compared with Gla-100: rate ratio 0.63 [(95% CI 0.42-0.96); p = 0.031], and fewer participants experienced ≥1 event [relative risk 0.84 (95% CI 0.71-0.99)]. Severe hypoglycaemia was infrequent. Weight gain was significantly lower with Gla-300 than Gla-100 [LS mean difference -0.7 (95% CI -1.3 to -0.2) kg; p = 0.009]. Both treatments were well tolerated with a similar pattern of adverse events (incidence of 69 and 60% in the Gla-300 and Gla-100 groups). In people with type 2 diabetes treated with Gla-300 or Gla-100, and non-sulphonylurea OADs, glycaemic control was sustained over 12 months, with less nocturnal hypoglycaemia in the Gla-300 group. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Construction of an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter; Keller, Richard M.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Sims, Michael H.; Thompson, David E.

    1993-01-01

    Scientific model-building can be a time intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot be distributed easily and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complicated, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We propose to construct a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing, using and sharing models. The proposed tool will include an interactive intelligent graphical interface and a high-level domain-specific modeling language. As a testbed for this research, we propose to develop a software prototype in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling.

  16. Construction of an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter; Keller, Richard M.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Sims, Michael H.; Thompson, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Scientific model-building can be a time intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot be distributed easily and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complicated, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We propose to construct a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing, using and sharing models. The proposed tool will include an interactive intelligent graphical interface and a high-level domain-specific modeling language. As a test bed for this research, we propose to develop a software prototype in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling.

  17. A future Outlook: Web based Simulation of Hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, A. S.; Piasecki, M.

    2003-12-01

    Despite recent advances to present simulation results as 3D graphs or animation contours, the modeling user community still faces some shortcomings when trying to move around and analyze data. Typical problems include the lack of common platforms with standard vocabulary to exchange simulation results from different numerical models, insufficient descriptions about data (metadata), lack of robust search and retrieval tools for data, and difficulties to reuse simulation domain knowledge. This research demonstrates how to create a shared simulation domain in the WWW and run a number of models through multi-user interfaces. Firstly, meta-datasets have been developed to describe hydrodynamic model data based on geographic metadata standard (ISO 19115) that has been extended to satisfy the need of the hydrodynamic modeling community. The Extended Markup Language (XML) is used to publish this metadata by the Resource Description Framework (RDF). Specific domain ontology for Web Based Simulation (WBS) has been developed to explicitly define vocabulary for the knowledge based simulation system. Subsequently, this knowledge based system is converted into an object model using Meta Object Family (MOF). The knowledge based system acts as a Meta model for the object oriented system, which aids in reusing the domain knowledge. Specific simulation software has been developed based on the object oriented model. Finally, all model data is stored in an object relational database. Database back-ends help store, retrieve and query information efficiently. This research uses open source software and technology such as Java Servlet and JSP, Apache web server, Tomcat Servlet Engine, PostgresSQL databases, Protégé ontology editor, RDQL and RQL for querying RDF in semantic level, Jena Java API for RDF. Also, we use international standards such as the ISO 19115 metadata standard, and specifications such as XML, RDF, OWL, XMI, and UML. The final web based simulation product is deployed as

  18. MetaboTools: A comprehensive toolbox for analysis of genome-scale metabolic models

    DOE PAGES

    Aurich, Maike K.; Fleming, Ronan M. T.; Thiele, Ines

    2016-08-03

    Metabolomic data sets provide a direct read-out of cellular phenotypes and are increasingly generated to study biological questions. Previous work, by us and others, revealed the potential of analyzing extracellular metabolomic data in the context of the metabolic model using constraint-based modeling. With the MetaboTools, we make our methods available to the broader scientific community. The MetaboTools consist of a protocol, a toolbox, and tutorials of two use cases. The protocol describes, in a step-wise manner, the workflow of data integration, and computational analysis. The MetaboTools comprise the Matlab code required to complete the workflow described in the protocol. Tutorialsmore » explain the computational steps for integration of two different data sets and demonstrate a comprehensive set of methods for the computational analysis of metabolic models and stratification thereof into different phenotypes. The presented workflow supports integrative analysis of multiple omics data sets. Importantly, all analysis tools can be applied to metabolic models without performing the entire workflow. Taken together, the MetaboTools constitute a comprehensive guide to the intra-model analysis of extracellular metabolomic data from microbial, plant, or human cells. In conclusion, this computational modeling resource offers a broad set of computational analysis tools for a wide biomedical and non-biomedical research community.« less

  19. The effect of concomitant DPPIVi use on glycaemic control and hypoglycaemia with insulin glargine 300 U/mL (Gla-300) versus insulin glargine 100 U/mL (Gla-100) in people with type 2 diabetes: A patient-level meta-analysis of EDITION 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    Yale, Jean-François; Pettus, Jeremy Hodson; Brito-Sanfiel, Miguel; Lavalle-Gonzalez, Fernando; Merino-Trigo, Ana; Stella, Peter; Chevalier, Soazig; Buzzetti, Raffaella

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of concomitant dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor (DPPIVi) use on efficacy and safety of insulin glargine 300 U/mL (Gla-300) versus glargine 100 U/mL (Gla-100) in people with type 2 diabetes on oral antihyperglycaemic drugs. A post hoc patient-level meta-analysis was performed using data from EDITION 2 (basal insulin [N = 811]) and EDITION 3 (insulin-naïve [N = 878]), multicentre, randomised, open-label, parallel-group, phase 3a trials of similar design. Endpoints analysed included HbA1c, hypoglycaemia and adverse events, investigated in subgroups of participants with and without concomitant DPPIVi use. Of 1689 participants randomised, 107 (13%, Gla-300) and 133 (16%, Gla-100) received DPPIVi therapy. The least squares mean change in HbA1c (baseline to month 6) was comparable between treatment groups, irrespective of DPPIVi use (no evidence of heterogeneity of treatment effect across subgroups, p = 0.753), although group sizes were unbalanced. The cumulative mean number of confirmed (≤3.9 mmol/L [≤70 mg/dL]) or severe hypoglycaemic events, and the risk and annualised rate of such events, were consistently lower for Gla-300 than Gla-100 during the night (between 00:00 and 05:59 h) or at any time of day (24 h period), irrespective of DPPIVi use. Severe hypoglycaemia occurred in 8/838 and 10/844 participants in the Gla-300 and Gla-100 groups, respectively, and was not affected by DPPIVi use. The adverse event profile was similar between treatment groups and DPPIVi subgroups. Glycaemic control with Gla-300 was comparable to Gla-100, with less hypoglycaemia during the night and at any time of day (24 h), irrespective of concomitant DPPIVi use. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01499095; NCT01676220.

  20. Rapid State Space Modeling Tool for Rectangular Wing Aeroservoelastic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Conyers, Howard J.; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a modeling and simulation tool for aeroservoelastic analysis of rectangular wings with trailing edge control surfaces. The inputs to the code are planform design parameters such as wing span, aspect ratio and number of control surfaces. A doublet lattice approach is taken to compute generalized forces. A rational function approximation is computed. The output, computed in a few seconds, is a state space aeroservoelastic model which can be used for analysis and control design. The tool is fully parameterized with default information so there is little required interaction with the model developer. Although, all parameters can be easily modified if desired.The focus of this paper is on tool presentation, verification and validation. This process is carried out in stages throughout the paper. The rational function approximation is verified against computed generalized forces for a plate model. A model composed of finite element plates is compared to a modal analysis from commercial software and an independently conducted experimental ground vibration test analysis. Aeroservoelastic analysis is the ultimate goal of this tool. Therefore the flutter speed and frequency for a clamped plate are computed using V-g and V-f analysis. The computational results are compared to a previously published computational analysis and wind tunnel results for the same structure. Finally a case study of a generic wing model with a single control surface is presented. Verification of the state space model is presented in comparison to V-g and V-f analysis. This also includes the analysis of the model in response to a 1-cos gust.

  1. Light-weight Parallel Python Tools for Earth System Modeling Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickelson, S. A.; Paul, K.; Xu, H.; Dennis, J.; Brown, D. I.

    2015-12-01

    With the growth in computing power over the last 30 years, earth system modeling codes have become increasingly data-intensive. As an example, it is expected that the data required for the next Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Report (AR6) will increase by more than 10x to an expected 25PB per climate model. Faced with this daunting challenge, developers of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) have chosen to change the format of their data for long-term storage from time-slice to time-series, in order to reduce the required download bandwidth needed for later analysis and post-processing by climate scientists. Hence, efficient tools are required to (1) perform the transformation of the data from time-slice to time-series format and to (2) compute climatology statistics, needed for many diagnostic computations, on the resulting time-series data. To address the first of these two challenges, we have developed a parallel Python tool for converting time-slice model output to time-series format. To address the second of these challenges, we have developed a parallel Python tool to perform fast time-averaging of time-series data. These tools are designed to be light-weight, be easy to install, have very few dependencies, and can be easily inserted into the Earth system modeling workflow with negligible disruption. In this work, we present the motivation, approach, and testing results of these two light-weight parallel Python tools, as well as our plans for future research and development.

  2. Regional Sediment Management (RSM) Modeling Tools: Integration of Advanced Sediment Transport Tools into HEC-RAS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Integration of Advanced Sediment Transport Tools into HEC-RAS by Paul M. Boyd and Stanford A. Gibson PURPOSE: This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering...Technical Note (CHETN) summarizes the development and initial testing of new sediment transport and modeling tools developed by the U.S. Army Corps...sediment transport within the USACE HEC River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) software package and to determine its applicability to Regional Sediment

  3. Agent-based modeling as a tool for program design and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Jennifer A; McGirr, Sara

    2017-12-01

    Recently, systems thinking and systems science approaches have gained popularity in the field of evaluation; however, there has been relatively little exploration of how evaluators could use quantitative tools to assist in the implementation of systems approaches therein. The purpose of this paper is to explore potential uses of one such quantitative tool, agent-based modeling, in evaluation practice. To this end, we define agent-based modeling and offer potential uses for it in typical evaluation activities, including: engaging stakeholders, selecting an intervention, modeling program theory, setting performance targets, and interpreting evaluation results. We provide demonstrative examples from published agent-based modeling efforts both inside and outside the field of evaluation for each of the evaluative activities discussed. We further describe potential pitfalls of this tool and offer cautions for evaluators who may chose to implement it in their practice. Finally, the article concludes with a discussion of the future of agent-based modeling in evaluation practice and a call for more formal exploration of this tool as well as other approaches to simulation modeling in the field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Scenario Evaluator for Electrical Resistivity survey pre-modeling tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terry, Neil; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Robinson, Judith L.; Slater, Lee D.; Halford, Keith J.; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John W.; Werkema, Dale D.

    2017-01-01

    Geophysical tools have much to offer users in environmental, water resource, and geotechnical fields; however, techniques such as electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) are often oversold and/or overinterpreted due to a lack of understanding of the limitations of the techniques, such as the appropriate depth intervals or resolution of the methods. The relationship between ERI data and resistivity is nonlinear; therefore, these limitations depend on site conditions and survey design and are best assessed through forward and inverse modeling exercises prior to field investigations. In this approach, proposed field surveys are first numerically simulated given the expected electrical properties of the site, and the resulting hypothetical data are then analyzed using inverse models. Performing ERI forward/inverse modeling, however, requires substantial expertise and can take many hours to implement. We present a new spreadsheet-based tool, the Scenario Evaluator for Electrical Resistivity (SEER), which features a graphical user interface that allows users to manipulate a resistivity model and instantly view how that model would likely be interpreted by an ERI survey. The SEER tool is intended for use by those who wish to determine the value of including ERI to achieve project goals, and is designed to have broad utility in industry, teaching, and research.

  5. The caBIG® Life Science Business Architecture Model

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Lauren Becnel; Hunicke-Smith, Scott P.; Stafford, Grace A.; Freund, Elaine T.; Ehlman, Michele; Chandran, Uma; Dennis, Robert; Fernandez, Anna T.; Goldstein, Stephen; Steffen, David; Tycko, Benjamin; Klemm, Juli D.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Business Architecture Models (BAMs) describe what a business does, who performs the activities, where and when activities are performed, how activities are accomplished and which data are present. The purpose of a BAM is to provide a common resource for understanding business functions and requirements and to guide software development. The cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Life Science BAM (LS BAM) provides a shared understanding of the vocabulary, goals and processes that are common in the business of LS research. Results: LS BAM 1.1 includes 90 goals and 61 people and groups within Use Case and Activity Unified Modeling Language (UML) Diagrams. Here we report on the model's current release, LS BAM 1.1, its utility and usage, and plans for future use and continuing development for future releases. Availability and Implementation: The LS BAM is freely available as UML, PDF and HTML (https://wiki.nci.nih.gov/x/OFNyAQ). Contact: lbboyd@bcm.edu; laurenbboyd@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data) are avaliable at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21450709

  6. Assessment of wear dependence parameters in complex model of cutting tool wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antsev, A. V.; Pasko, N. I.; Antseva, N. V.

    2018-03-01

    This paper addresses wear dependence of the generic efficient life period of cutting tools taken as an aggregate of the law of tool wear rate distribution and dependence of parameters of this law's on the cutting mode, factoring in the random factor as exemplified by the complex model of wear. The complex model of wear takes into account the variance of cutting properties within one batch of tools, variance in machinability within one batch of workpieces, and the stochastic nature of the wear process itself. A technique of assessment of wear dependence parameters in a complex model of cutting tool wear is provided. The technique is supported by a numerical example.

  7. Modules: A New Tool in the Emissions Modeling Framework

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-08-14

    The Emissions Modeling Framework (EMF) is used by various organizations, including the US Environmental Protection Agency, to manage their emissions inventories, projections, and emissions modeling scenarios. Modules are a new tool under develo...

  8. Evaluation of clinical information modeling tools.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Austin, Tony; Moreno-Conde, Jesús; Parra-Calderón, Carlos L; Kalra, Dipak

    2016-11-01

    Clinical information models are formal specifications for representing the structure and semantics of the clinical content within electronic health record systems. This research aims to define, test, and validate evaluation metrics for software tools designed to support the processes associated with the definition, management, and implementation of these models. The proposed framework builds on previous research that focused on obtaining agreement on the essential requirements in this area. A set of 50 conformance criteria were defined based on the 20 functional requirements agreed by that consensus and applied to evaluate the currently available tools. Of the 11 initiative developing tools for clinical information modeling identified, 9 were evaluated according to their performance on the evaluation metrics. Results show that functionalities related to management of data types, specifications, metadata, and terminology or ontology bindings have a good level of adoption. Improvements can be made in other areas focused on information modeling and associated processes. Other criteria related to displaying semantic relationships between concepts and communication with terminology servers had low levels of adoption. The proposed evaluation metrics were successfully tested and validated against a representative sample of existing tools. The results identify the need to improve tool support for information modeling and software development processes, especially in those areas related to governance, clinician involvement, and optimizing the technical validation of testing processes. This research confirmed the potential of these evaluation metrics to support decision makers in identifying the most appropriate tool for their organization. Los Modelos de Información Clínica son especificaciones para representar la estructura y características semánticas del contenido clínico en los sistemas de Historia Clínica Electrónica. Esta investigación define, prueba y valida

  9. Thermomechanical modelling of laser surface glazing for H13 tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, I. R.; Yin, D.; Tamanna, N.; Naher, S.

    2018-03-01

    A two-dimensional thermomechanical finite element (FE) model of laser surface glazing (LSG) has been developed for H13 tool steel. The direct coupling technique of ANSYS 17.2 (APDL) has been utilised to solve the transient thermomechanical process. A H13 tool steel cylindrical cross-section has been modelled for laser power 200 W and 300 W at constant 0.2 mm beam width and 0.15 ms residence time. The model can predict temperature distribution, stress-strain increments in elastic and plastic region with time and space. The crack formation tendency also can be assumed by analysing the von Mises stress in the heat-concentrated zone. Isotropic and kinematic hardening models have been applied separately to predict the after-yield phenomena. At 200 W laser power, the peak surface temperature achieved is 1520 K which is below the melting point (1727 K) of H13 tool steel. For laser power 300 W, the peak surface temperature is 2523 K. Tensile residual stresses on surface have been found after cooling, which are in agreement with literature. Isotropic model shows higher residual stress that increases with laser power. Conversely, kinematic model gives lower residual stress which decreases with laser power. Therefore, both plasticity models could work in LSG for H13 tool steel.

  10. SOURCE APPORTIONMENT RESULTS, UNCERTAINTIES, AND MODELING TOOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advanced multivariate receptor modeling tools are available from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that use only speciated sample data to identify and quantify sources of air pollution. EPA has developed both EPA Unmix and EPA Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) and ...

  11. Visual Basic, Excel-based fish population modeling tool - The pallid sturgeon example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, Edward H.; Wildhaber, Mark L.; Green, Nicholas S.; Albers, Janice L.

    2016-02-10

    The model presented in this report is a spreadsheet-based model using Visual Basic for Applications within Microsoft Excel (http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7057D0Z) prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It uses the same model structure and, initially, parameters as used by Wildhaber and others (2015) for pallid sturgeon. The difference between the model structure used for this report and that used by Wildhaber and others (2015) is that variance is not partitioned. For the model of this report, all variance is applied at the iteration and time-step levels of the model. Wildhaber and others (2015) partition variance into parameter variance (uncertainty about the value of a parameter itself) applied at the iteration level and temporal variance (uncertainty caused by random environmental fluctuations with time) applied at the time-step level. They included implicit individual variance (uncertainty caused by differences between individuals) within the time-step level.The interface developed for the model of this report is designed to allow the user the flexibility to change population model structure and parameter values and uncertainty separately for every component of the model. This flexibility makes the modeling tool potentially applicable to any fish species; however, the flexibility inherent in this modeling tool makes it possible for the user to obtain spurious outputs. The value and reliability of the model outputs are only as good as the model inputs. Using this modeling tool with improper or inaccurate parameter values, or for species for which the structure of the model is inappropriate, could lead to untenable management decisions. By facilitating fish population modeling, this modeling tool allows the user to evaluate a range of management options and implications. The goal of this modeling tool is to be a user-friendly modeling tool for developing fish population models useful to natural resource

  12. Object-Oriented MDAO Tool with Aeroservoelastic Model Tuning Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Li, Wesley; Lung, Shun-fat

    2008-01-01

    An object-oriented multi-disciplinary analysis and optimization (MDAO) tool has been developed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center to automate the design and analysis process and leverage existing commercial as well as in-house codes to enable true multidisciplinary optimization in the preliminary design stage of subsonic, transonic, supersonic and hypersonic aircraft. Once the structural analysis discipline is finalized and integrated completely into the MDAO process, other disciplines such as aerodynamics and flight controls will be integrated as well. Simple and efficient model tuning capabilities based on optimization problem are successfully integrated with the MDAO tool. More synchronized all phases of experimental testing (ground and flight), analytical model updating, high-fidelity simulations for model validation, and integrated design may result in reduction of uncertainties in the aeroservoelastic model and increase the flight safety.

  13. Improving Power System Modeling. A Tool to Link Capacity Expansion and Production Cost Models

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Diakov, Victor; Cole, Wesley; Sullivan, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Capacity expansion models (CEM) provide a high-level long-term view at the prospects of the evolving power system. In simulating the possibilities of long-term capacity expansion, it is important to maintain the viability of power system operation in the short-term (daily, hourly and sub-hourly) scales. Production-cost models (PCM) simulate routine power system operation on these shorter time scales using detailed load, transmission and generation fleet data by minimizing production costs and following reliability requirements. When based on CEM 'predictions' about generating unit retirements and buildup, PCM provide more detailed simulation for the short-term system operation and, consequently, may confirm the validitymore » of capacity expansion predictions. Further, production cost model simulations of a system that is based on capacity expansion model solution are 'evolutionary' sound: the generator mix is the result of logical sequence of unit retirement and buildup resulting from policy and incentives. The above has motivated us to bridge CEM with PCM by building a capacity expansion - to - production cost model Linking Tool (CEPCoLT). The Linking Tool is built to onset capacity expansion model prescriptions onto production cost model inputs. NREL's ReEDS and Energy Examplar's PLEXOS are the capacity expansion and the production cost models, respectively. Via the Linking Tool, PLEXOS provides details of operation for the regionally-defined ReEDS scenarios.« less

  14. Tool Steel Heat Treatment Optimization Using Neural Network Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgornik, Bojan; Belič, Igor; Leskovšek, Vojteh; Godec, Matjaz

    2016-11-01

    Optimization of tool steel properties and corresponding heat treatment is mainly based on trial and error approach, which requires tremendous experimental work and resources. Therefore, there is a huge need for tools allowing prediction of mechanical properties of tool steels as a function of composition and heat treatment process variables. The aim of the present work was to explore the potential and possibilities of artificial neural network-based modeling to select and optimize vacuum heat treatment conditions depending on the hot work tool steel composition and required properties. In the current case training of the feedforward neural network with error backpropagation training scheme and four layers of neurons (8-20-20-2) scheme was based on the experimentally obtained tempering diagrams for ten different hot work tool steel compositions and at least two austenitizing temperatures. Results show that this type of modeling can be successfully used for detailed and multifunctional analysis of different influential parameters as well as to optimize heat treatment process of hot work tool steels depending on the composition. In terms of composition, V was found as the most beneficial alloying element increasing hardness and fracture toughness of hot work tool steel; Si, Mn, and Cr increase hardness but lead to reduced fracture toughness, while Mo has the opposite effect. Optimum concentration providing high KIc/HRC ratios would include 0.75 pct Si, 0.4 pct Mn, 5.1 pct Cr, 1.5 pct Mo, and 0.5 pct V, with the optimum heat treatment performed at lower austenitizing and intermediate tempering temperatures.

  15. Rapid State Space Modeling Tool for Rectangular Wing Aeroservoelastic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Conyers, Howard J.; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a modeling and simulation tool for aeroservoelastic analysis of rectangular wings with trailing-edge control surfaces. The inputs to the code are planform design parameters such as wing span, aspect ratio, and number of control surfaces. Using this information, the generalized forces are computed using the doublet-lattice method. Using Roger's approximation, a rational function approximation is computed. The output, computed in a few seconds, is a state space aeroservoelastic model which can be used for analysis and control design. The tool is fully parameterized with default information so there is little required interaction with the model developer. All parameters can be easily modified if desired. The focus of this paper is on tool presentation, verification, and validation. These processes are carried out in stages throughout the paper. The rational function approximation is verified against computed generalized forces for a plate model. A model composed of finite element plates is compared to a modal analysis from commercial software and an independently conducted experimental ground vibration test analysis. Aeroservoelastic analysis is the ultimate goal of this tool, therefore, the flutter speed and frequency for a clamped plate are computed using damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis. The computational results are compared to a previously published computational analysis and wind-tunnel results for the same structure. A case study of a generic wing model with a single control surface is presented. Verification of the state space model is presented in comparison to damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis, including the analysis of the model in response to a 1-cos gust.

  16. Rapid State Space Modeling Tool for Rectangular Wing Aeroservoelastic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suh, Peter M.; Conyers, Howard Jason; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2015-01-01

    This report introduces a modeling and simulation tool for aeroservoelastic analysis of rectangular wings with trailing-edge control surfaces. The inputs to the code are planform design parameters such as wing span, aspect ratio, and number of control surfaces. Using this information, the generalized forces are computed using the doublet-lattice method. Using Roger's approximation, a rational function approximation is computed. The output, computed in a few seconds, is a state space aeroservoelastic model which can be used for analysis and control design. The tool is fully parameterized with default information so there is little required interaction with the model developer. All parameters can be easily modified if desired. The focus of this report is on tool presentation, verification, and validation. These processes are carried out in stages throughout the report. The rational function approximation is verified against computed generalized forces for a plate model. A model composed of finite element plates is compared to a modal analysis from commercial software and an independently conducted experimental ground vibration test analysis. Aeroservoelastic analysis is the ultimate goal of this tool, therefore, the flutter speed and frequency for a clamped plate are computed using damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis. The computational results are compared to a previously published computational analysis and wind-tunnel results for the same structure. A case study of a generic wing model with a single control surface is presented. Verification of the state space model is presented in comparison to damping-versus-velocity and frequency-versus-velocity analysis, including the analysis of the model in response to a 1-cos gust.

  17. Open source Modeling and optimization tools for Planning

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Peles, S.

    Open source modeling and optimization tools for planning The existing tools and software used for planning and analysis in California are either expensive, difficult to use, or not generally accessible to a large number of participants. These limitations restrict the availability of participants for larger scale energy and grid studies in the state. The proposed initiative would build upon federal and state investments in open source software, and create and improve open source tools for use in the state planning and analysis activities. Computational analysis and simulation frameworks in development at national labs and universities can be brought forward tomore » complement existing tools. An open source platform would provide a path for novel techniques and strategies to be brought into the larger community and reviewed by a broad set of stakeholders.« less

  18. Multi-category micro-milling tool wear monitoring with continuous hidden Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kunpeng; Wong, Yoke San; Hong, Geok Soon

    2009-02-01

    In-process monitoring of tool conditions is important in micro-machining due to the high precision requirement and high tool wear rate. Tool condition monitoring in micro-machining poses new challenges compared to conventional machining. In this paper, a multi-category classification approach is proposed for tool flank wear state identification in micro-milling. Continuous Hidden Markov models (HMMs) are adapted for modeling of the tool wear process in micro-milling, and estimation of the tool wear state given the cutting force features. For a noise-robust approach, the HMM outputs are connected via a medium filter to minimize the tool state before entry into the next state due to high noise level. A detailed study on the selection of HMM structures for tool condition monitoring (TCM) is presented. Case studies on the tool state estimation in the micro-milling of pure copper and steel demonstrate the effectiveness and potential of these methods.

  19. Scratch as a Computational Modelling Tool for Teaching Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Victor; Hernandez, Maria Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The Scratch online authoring tool, which features a simple programming language that has been adapted to primary and secondary students, is being used more and more in schools as it offers students and teachers the opportunity to use a tool to build scientific models and evaluate their behaviour, just as can be done with computational modelling…

  20. Exploring a model-driven architecture (MDA) approach to health care information systems development.

    PubMed

    Raghupathi, Wullianallur; Umar, Amjad

    2008-05-01

    To explore the potential of the model-driven architecture (MDA) in health care information systems development. An MDA is conceptualized and developed for a health clinic system to track patient information. A prototype of the MDA is implemented using an advanced MDA tool. The UML provides the underlying modeling support in the form of the class diagram. The PIM to PSM transformation rules are applied to generate the prototype application from the model. The result of the research is a complete MDA methodology to developing health care information systems. Additional insights gained include development of transformation rules and documentation of the challenges in the application of MDA to health care. Design guidelines for future MDA applications are described. The model has the potential for generalizability. The overall approach supports limited interoperability and portability. The research demonstrates the applicability of the MDA approach to health care information systems development. When properly implemented, it has the potential to overcome the challenges of platform (vendor) dependency, lack of open standards, interoperability, portability, scalability, and the high cost of implementation.

  1. Irena : tool suite for modeling and analysis of small-angle scattering.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ilavsky, J.; Jemian, P.

    2009-04-01

    Irena, a tool suite for analysis of both X-ray and neutron small-angle scattering (SAS) data within the commercial Igor Pro application, brings together a comprehensive suite of tools useful for investigations in materials science, physics, chemistry, polymer science and other fields. In addition to Guinier and Porod fits, the suite combines a variety of advanced SAS data evaluation tools for the modeling of size distribution in the dilute limit using maximum entropy and other methods, dilute limit small-angle scattering from multiple non-interacting populations of scatterers, the pair-distance distribution function, a unified fit, the Debye-Bueche model, the reflectivity (X-ray and neutron)more » using Parratt's formalism, and small-angle diffraction. There are also a number of support tools, such as a data import/export tool supporting a broad sampling of common data formats, a data modification tool, a presentation-quality graphics tool optimized for small-angle scattering data, and a neutron and X-ray scattering contrast calculator. These tools are brought together into one suite with consistent interfaces and functionality. The suite allows robust automated note recording and saving of parameters during export.« less

  2. Ground-water models as a management tool in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, C.B.

    1984-01-01

    Highly sophisticated computer models provide powerful tools for analyzing historic data and for simulating future water levels, water movement, and water chemistry under stressed conditions throughout the ground-water system in Florida. Models that simulate the movement of heat and subsidence of land in response to aquifer pumping also have potential for application to hydrologic problems in the State. Florida, with 20 ground-water modeling studies reported since 1972, has applied computer modeling techniques to a variety of water-resources problems. Models in Florida generally have been used to provide insight to problems of water supply, contamination, and impact on the environment. The model applications range from site-specific studies, such as estimating contamination by wastewater injection at St. Petersburg, to a regional model of the entire State that may be used to assess broad-scale environmental impact of water-resources development. Recently, groundwater models have been used as management tools by the State regulatory authority to permit or deny development of water resources. As modeling precision, knowledge, and confidence increase, the use of ground-water models will shift more and more toward regulation of development and enforcement of environmental laws. (USGS)

  3. Business intelligence tools for radiology: creating a prototype model using open-source tools.

    PubMed

    Prevedello, Luciano M; Andriole, Katherine P; Hanson, Richard; Kelly, Pauline; Khorasani, Ramin

    2010-04-01

    Digital radiology departments could benefit from the ability to integrate and visualize data (e.g. information reflecting complex workflow states) from all of their imaging and information management systems in one composite presentation view. Leveraging data warehousing tools developed in the business world may be one way to achieve this capability. In total, the concept of managing the information available in this data repository is known as Business Intelligence or BI. This paper describes the concepts used in Business Intelligence, their importance to modern Radiology, and the steps used in the creation of a prototype model of a data warehouse for BI using open-source tools.

  4. Modeling Tool Advances Rotorcraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Continuum Dynamics Inc. (CDI), founded in 1979, specializes in advanced engineering services, including fluid dynamic modeling and analysis for aeronautics research. The company has completed a number of SBIR research projects with NASA, including early rotorcraft work done through Langley Research Center, but more recently, out of Ames Research Center. NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants on helicopter wake modeling resulted in the Comprehensive Hierarchical Aeromechanics Rotorcraft Model (CHARM), a tool for studying helicopter and tiltrotor unsteady free wake modeling, including distributed and integrated loads, and performance prediction. Application of the software code in a blade redesign program for Carson Helicopters, of Perkasie, Pennsylvania, increased the payload and cruise speeds of its S-61 helicopter. Follow-on development resulted in a $24 million revenue increase for Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, of Stratford, Connecticut, as part of the company's rotor design efforts. Now under continuous development for more than 25 years, CHARM models the complete aerodynamics and dynamics of rotorcraft in general flight conditions. CHARM has been used to model a broad spectrum of rotorcraft attributes, including performance, blade loading, blade-vortex interaction noise, air flow fields, and hub loads. The highly accurate software is currently in use by all major rotorcraft manufacturers, NASA, the U.S. Army, and the U.S. Navy.

  5. Potential for progress in carbon cycle modeling: models as tools and representations of reality (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, K.

    2013-12-01

    Some carbon cycle modelers conceive of themselves as developing a representation of reality that will serve as a general purpose tool that can be used to make a wide variety of predictions. However, models are tools used to solve particular problems. If we were to ask, 'what tool is best for fastening two pieces of wood together,' depending on the circumstances that tool could be hammer, a screw driver, or perhaps some sort of glue gun. And the best kind of screw driver might depend on whether we were thinking about Philips or flat headed screws. If there is no unique answer to the question of which type of tool is best for fastening two pieces of wood together, surely there is no unique answer to the question of which type of model is best for making carbon-cycle predictions. We must first understand what problem we are trying to solve. Some modeling studies try to make the most reliable projections, considering as many processes and predicting as many observables as possible, whereas other modeling studies try to show how general trends depend on relatively few (perhaps highly aggregated) processes. This talk will look at CMIP5 carbon-cycle model results and address the issue of the extent to which the overall global-scale trends projected by these detailed models might projected by models with many fewer degrees of freedom. It should be noted that an ocean carbon-cycle model that predicts many observables at local scale is much more easily falsified (and thus in some sense is more ';scientific') than an ocean model that predicts only global scale phenomena. Nevertheless, if all that is needed is a crude estimate of global ocean CO2 uptake (say, to permit as study of the carbon-cycle on land), a simple representation of the ocean carbon cycle may suffice. This talk will take as its jumping off point two quotes: 'All models are wrong, some are useful.' - George E.P. Box 'Models should be as simple as possible but no simpler.' - Albert Einstein (likely an erroneous

  6. Tampa Bay Water Clarity Model (TBWCM): As a Predictive Tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Bay Water Clarity Model was developed as a predictive tool for estimating the impact of changing nutrient loads on water clarity as measured by secchi depth. The model combines a physical mixing model with an irradiance model and nutrient cycling model. A 10 segment bi...

  7. Atmospheric Model Evaluation Tool for meteorological and air quality simulations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Atmospheric Model Evaluation Tool compares model predictions to observed data from various meteorological and air quality observation networks to help evaluate meteorological and air quality simulations.

  8. Introducing Modeling Transition Diagrams as a Tool to Connect Mathematical Modeling to Mathematical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czocher, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    This study contributes a methodological tool to reconstruct the cognitive processes and mathematical activities carried out by mathematical modelers. Represented as Modeling Transition Diagrams (MTDs), individual modeling routes were constructed for four engineering undergraduate students. Findings stress the importance and limitations of using…

  9. Modelling and Implementation of Catalogue Cards Using FreeMarker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radjenovic, Jelen; Milosavljevic, Branko; Surla, Dusan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study involving the specification (using Unified Modelling Language (UML) 2.0) of information requirements and implementation of the software components for generating catalogue cards. The implementation in a Java environment is developed using the FreeMarker software.…

  10. Leverage and Delegation in Developing an Information Model for Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. J.

    2007-12-01

    GeoSciML is an information model and XML encoding developed by a group of primarily geologic survey organizations under the auspices of the IUGS CGI. The scope of the core model broadly corresponds with information traditionally portrayed on a geologic map, viz. interpreted geology, some observations, the map legend and accompanying memoir. The development of GeoSciML has followed the methodology specified for an Application Schema defined by OGC and ISO 19100 series standards. This requires agreement within a community concerning their domain model, its formal representation using UML, documentation as a Feature Type Catalogue, with an XML Schema implementation generated from the model by applying a rule-based transformation. The framework and technology supports a modular governance process. Standard datatypes and GI components (geometry, the feature and coverage metamodels, metadata) are imported from the ISO framework. The observation and sampling model (including boreholes) is imported from OGC. The scale used for most scalar literal values (terms, codes, measures) allows for localization where necessary. Wildcards and abstract base- classes provide explicit extensibility points. Link attributes appear in a regular way in the encodings, allowing reference to external resources using URIs. The encoding is compatible with generic GI data-service interfaces (WFS, WMS, SOS). For maximum interoperability within a community, the interfaces may be specialised through domain-specified constraints (e.g. feature-types, scale and vocabulary bindings, query-models). Formalization using UML and XML allows use of standard validation and processing tools. Use of upper-level elements defined for generic GI application reduces the development effort and governance resonsibility, while maximising cross-domain interoperability. On the other hand, enabling specialization to be delegated in a controlled manner is essential to adoption across a range of subdisciplines and

  11. Numerical modeling tools for chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J.; Childs, Edward P.

    1992-01-01

    Development of general numerical simulation tools for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was the objective of this study. Physical models of important CVD phenomena were developed and implemented into the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT. The resulting software can address general geometries as well as the most important phenomena occurring with CVD reactors: fluid flow patterns, temperature and chemical species distribution, gas phase and surface deposition. The physical models are documented which are available and examples are provided of CVD simulation capabilities.

  12. AgMIP Training in Multiple Crop Models and Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boote, Kenneth J.; Porter, Cheryl H.; Hargreaves, John; Hoogenboom, Gerrit; Thornburn, Peter; Mutter, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) has the goal of using multiple crop models to evaluate climate impacts on agricultural production and food security in developed and developing countries. There are several major limitations that must be overcome to achieve this goal, including the need to train AgMIP regional research team (RRT) crop modelers to use models other than the ones they are currently familiar with, plus the need to harmonize and interconvert the disparate input file formats used for the various models. Two activities were followed to address these shortcomings among AgMIP RRTs to enable them to use multiple models to evaluate climate impacts on crop production and food security. We designed and conducted courses in which participants trained on two different sets of crop models, with emphasis on the model of least experience. In a second activity, the AgMIP IT group created templates for inputting data on soils, management, weather, and crops into AgMIP harmonized databases, and developed translation tools for converting the harmonized data into files that are ready for multiple crop model simulations. The strategies for creating and conducting the multi-model course and developing entry and translation tools are reviewed in this chapter.

  13. Petri Nets as Modeling Tool for Emergent Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Marto

    2004-01-01

    Emergent agents, those agents whose local interactions can cause unexpected global results, require a method of modeling that is both dynamic and structured Petri Nets, a modeling tool developed for dynamic discrete event system of mainly functional agents, provide this, and have the benefit of being an established tool. We present here the details of the modeling method here and discuss how to implement its use for modeling agent-based systems. Petri Nets have been used extensively in the modeling of functional agents, those agents who have defined purposes and whose actions should result in a know outcome. However, emergent agents, those agents who have a defined structure but whose interaction causes outcomes that are unpredictable, have not yet found a modeling style that suits them. A problem with formally modeling emergent agents that any formal modeling style usually expects to show the results of a problem and the results of problems studied using emergent agents are not apparent from the initial construction. However, the study of emergent agents still requires a method to analyze the agents themselves, and have sensible conversation about the differences and similarities between types of emergent agents. We attempt to correct this problem by applying Petri Nets to the characterization of emergent agents. In doing so, the emergent properties of these agents can be highlighted, and conversation about the nature and compatibility of the differing methods of agent creation can begin.

  14. AdViSHE: A Validation-Assessment Tool of Health-Economic Models for Decision Makers and Model Users.

    PubMed

    Vemer, P; Corro Ramos, I; van Voorn, G A K; Al, M J; Feenstra, T L

    2016-04-01

    A trade-off exists between building confidence in health-economic (HE) decision models and the use of scarce resources. We aimed to create a practical tool providing model users with a structured view into the validation status of HE decision models, to address this trade-off. A Delphi panel was organized, and was completed by a workshop during an international conference. The proposed tool was constructed iteratively based on comments from, and the discussion amongst, panellists. During the Delphi process, comments were solicited on the importance and feasibility of possible validation techniques for modellers, their relevance for decision makers, and the overall structure and formulation in the tool. The panel consisted of 47 experts in HE modelling and HE decision making from various professional and international backgrounds. In addition, 50 discussants actively engaged in the discussion at the conference workshop and returned 19 questionnaires with additional comments. The final version consists of 13 items covering all relevant aspects of HE decision models: the conceptual model, the input data, the implemented software program, and the model outcomes. Assessment of the Validation Status of Health-Economic decision models (AdViSHE) is a validation-assessment tool in which model developers report in a systematic way both on validation efforts performed and on their outcomes. Subsequently, model users can establish whether confidence in the model is justified or whether additional validation efforts should be undertaken. In this way, AdViSHE enhances transparency of the validation status of HE models and supports efficient model validation.

  15. An integrated modeling and design tool for advanced optical spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to the design and status of the Integrated Modeling of Optical Systems (IMOS) tool and to critical design issues. A multidisciplinary spacecraft design and analysis tool with support for structural dynamics, controls, thermal analysis, and optics, IMOS provides rapid and accurate end-to-end performance analysis, simulations, and optimization of advanced space-based optical systems. The requirements for IMOS-supported numerical arrays, user defined data structures, and a hierarchical data base are outlined, and initial experience with the tool is summarized. A simulation of a flexible telescope illustrates the integrated nature of the tools.

  16. Horizontal heat fluxes over complex terrain computed using a simple mixed-layer model and a numerical model

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kimura, Fujio; Kuwagata, Tuneo

    1995-02-01

    The thermally induced local circulation over a periodic valley is simulated by a two-dimensional numerical model that does-not include condensational processes. During the daytime of a clear, calm day, heat is transported from the mountainous region to the valley area by anabatic wind and its return flow. The specific humidity is, however, transported in an inverse manner. The horizontal exchange rate of sensible heat has a horizontal scale similarity, as long as the horizontal scale is less than a critical width of about 100 km. The sensible heat accumulated in an atmospheric column over an arbitrary point can be estimatedmore » by a simple model termed the uniform mixed-layer model (UML). The model assumes that the potential temperature is both vertically and horizontally uniform in the mixed layer, even over the complex terrain. The UML model is valid only when the horizontal scale of the topography is less than the critical width and the maximum difference in the elevation of the topography is less than about 1500 m. Latent heat is accumulated over the mountainous region while the atmosphere becomes dry over the valley area. When the horizontal scale is close to the critical width, the largest amount of humidity is accumulated during the late afternoon over the mountainous region. 18 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.« less

  17. Proposal for constructing an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael H.; Podolak, Esther; Mckay, Christopher P.; Thompson, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Scientific model building can be a time intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large and complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot easily be distributed and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complex, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We believe that advanced software techniques can facilitate both the model building and model sharing process. We propose to construct a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing and using models. The proposed tool will include an interactive intelligent graphical interface and a high level, domain specific, modeling language. As a testbed for this research, we propose development of a software prototype in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling.

  18. Teachers' Use of Computational Tools to Construct and Explore Dynamic Mathematical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos-Trigo, Manuel; Reyes-Rodriguez, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    To what extent does the use of computational tools offer teachers the possibility of constructing dynamic models to identify and explore diverse mathematical relations? What ways of reasoning or thinking about the problems emerge during the model construction process that involves the use of the tools? These research questions guided the…

  19. Data Provenance as a Tool for Debugging Hydrological Models based on Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wombacher, A.; Huq, M.; Wada, Y.; Van Beek, R.

    2012-12-01

    There is an increase in data volume used in hydrological modeling. The increasing data volume requires additional efforts in debugging models since a single output value is influenced by a multitude of input values. Thus, it is difficult to keep an overview among the data dependencies. Further, knowing these dependencies, it is a tedious job to infer all the relevant data values. The aforementioned data dependencies are also known as data provenance, i.e. the determination of how a particular value has been created and processed. The proposed tool infers the data provenance automatically from a python script and visualizes the dependencies as a graph without executing the script. To debug the model the user specifies the value of interest in space and time. The tool infers all related data values and displays them in the graph. The tool has been evaluated by hydrologists developing a model for estimating the global water demand [1]. The model uses multiple different data sources. The script we analysed has 120 lines of codes and used more than 3000 individual files, each of them representing a raster map of 360*720 cells. After importing the data of the files into a SQLite database, the data consumes around 40 GB of memory. Using the proposed tool a modeler is able to select individual values and infer which values have been used to calculate the value. Especially in cases of outliers or missing values it is a beneficial tool to provide the modeler with efficient information to investigate the unexpected behavior of the model. The proposed tool can be applied to many python scripts and has been tested with other scripts in different contexts. In case a python code contains an unknown function or class the tool requests additional information about the used function or class to enable the inference. This information has to be entered only once and can be shared with colleagues or in the community. Reference [1] Y. Wada, L. P. H. van Beek, D. Viviroli, H. H. Drr, R

  20. An ensemble model of QSAR tools for regulatory risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Prachi; Povinelli, Richard J; White, Shannon; Merrill, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs) are theoretical models that relate a quantitative measure of chemical structure to a physical property or a biological effect. QSAR predictions can be used for chemical risk assessment for protection of human and environmental health, which makes them interesting to regulators, especially in the absence of experimental data. For compatibility with regulatory use, QSAR models should be transparent, reproducible and optimized to minimize the number of false negatives. In silico QSAR tools are gaining wide acceptance as a faster alternative to otherwise time-consuming clinical and animal testing methods. However, different QSAR tools often make conflicting predictions for a given chemical and may also vary in their predictive performance across different chemical datasets. In a regulatory context, conflicting predictions raise interpretation, validation and adequacy concerns. To address these concerns, ensemble learning techniques in the machine learning paradigm can be used to integrate predictions from multiple tools. By leveraging various underlying QSAR algorithms and training datasets, the resulting consensus prediction should yield better overall predictive ability. We present a novel ensemble QSAR model using Bayesian classification. The model allows for varying a cut-off parameter that allows for a selection in the desirable trade-off between model sensitivity and specificity. The predictive performance of the ensemble model is compared with four in silico tools (Toxtree, Lazar, OECD Toolbox, and Danish QSAR) to predict carcinogenicity for a dataset of air toxins (332 chemicals) and a subset of the gold carcinogenic potency database (480 chemicals). Leave-one-out cross validation results show that the ensemble model achieves the best trade-off between sensitivity and specificity (accuracy: 83.8 % and 80.4 %, and balanced accuracy: 80.6 % and 80.8 %) and highest inter-rater agreement [kappa ( κ ): 0

  1. Spatial Modeling Tools for Cell Biology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    multiphysics modeling expertise. A graphical user interface (GUI) for CoBi, JCoBi, was written in Java and interactive 3D graphics. CoBi has been...tools (C++ and Java ) to simulate complex cell and organ biology problems. CoBi has been designed to interact with the other Bio-SPICE software...fall of 2002. VisIt supports C++, Python and Java interfaces. The C++ and Java interfaces make it possible to provide alternate user interfaces for

  2. A GIS Tool for evaluating and improving NEXRAD and its application in distributed hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Srinivasan, R.

    2008-12-01

    In this study, a user friendly GIS tool was developed for evaluating and improving NEXRAD using raingauge data. This GIS tool can automatically read in raingauge and NEXRAD data, evaluate the accuracy of NEXRAD for each time unit, implement several geostatistical methods to improve the accuracy of NEXRAD through raingauge data, and output spatial precipitation map for distributed hydrologic model. The geostatistical methods incorporated in this tool include Simple Kriging with varying local means, Kriging with External Drift, Regression Kriging, Co-Kriging, and a new geostatistical method that was newly developed by Li et al. (2008). This tool was applied in two test watersheds at hourly and daily temporal scale. The preliminary cross-validation results show that incorporating raingauge data to calibrate NEXRAD can pronouncedly change the spatial pattern of NEXRAD and improve its accuracy. Using different geostatistical methods, the GIS tool was applied to produce long term precipitation input for a distributed hydrologic model - Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). Animated video was generated to vividly illustrate the effect of using different precipitation input data on distributed hydrologic modeling. Currently, this GIS tool is developed as an extension of SWAT, which is used as water quantity and quality modeling tool by USDA and EPA. The flexible module based design of this tool also makes it easy to be adapted for other hydrologic models for hydrological modeling and water resources management.

  3. Modeling of Tool-Tissue Interactions for Computer-Based Surgical Simulation: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Sarthak; Ramesh, K. T.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2009-01-01

    Surgical simulators present a safe and potentially effective method for surgical training, and can also be used in robot-assisted surgery for pre- and intra-operative planning. Accurate modeling of the interaction between surgical instruments and organs has been recognized as a key requirement in the development of high-fidelity surgical simulators. Researchers have attempted to model tool-tissue interactions in a wide variety of ways, which can be broadly classified as (1) linear elasticity-based, (2) nonlinear (hyperelastic) elasticity-based finite element (FE) methods, and (3) other techniques that not based on FE methods or continuum mechanics. Realistic modeling of organ deformation requires populating the model with real tissue data (which are difficult to acquire in vivo) and simulating organ response in real time (which is computationally expensive). Further, it is challenging to account for connective tissue supporting the organ, friction, and topological changes resulting from tool-tissue interactions during invasive surgical procedures. Overcoming such obstacles will not only help us to model tool-tissue interactions in real time, but also enable realistic force feedback to the user during surgical simulation. This review paper classifies the existing research on tool-tissue interactions for surgical simulators specifically based on the modeling techniques employed and the kind of surgical operation being simulated, in order to inform and motivate future research on improved tool-tissue interaction models. PMID:20119508

  4. Numerical Model Metrics Tools in Support of Navy Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykes, J. D.; Fanguy, P.

    2017-12-01

    Increasing demands of accurate ocean forecasts that are relevant to the Navy mission decision makers demand tools that quickly provide relevant numerical model metrics to the forecasters. Increasing modelling capabilities with ever-higher resolution domains including coupled and ensemble systems as well as the increasing volume of observations and other data sources to which to compare the model output requires more tools for the forecaster to enable doing more with less. These data can be appropriately handled in a geographic information system (GIS) fused together to provide useful information and analyses, and ultimately a better understanding how the pertinent model performs based on ground truth.. Oceanographic measurements like surface elevation, profiles of temperature and salinity, and wave height can all be incorporated into a set of layers correlated to geographic information such as bathymetry and topography. In addition, an automated system that runs concurrently with the models on high performance machines matches routinely available observations to modelled values to form a database of matchups with which statistics can be calculated and displayed, to facilitate validation of forecast state and derived variables. ArcMAP, developed by Environmental Systems Research Institute, is a GIS application used by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and naval operational meteorological and oceanographic centers to analyse the environment in support of a range of Navy missions. For example, acoustic propagation in the ocean is described with a three-dimensional analysis of sound speed that depends on profiles of temperature, pressure and salinity predicted by the Navy Coastal Ocean Model. The data and model output must include geo-referencing information suitable for accurately placing the data within the ArcMAP framework. NRL has developed tools that facilitate merging these geophysical data and their analyses, including intercomparisons between model

  5. Improving smoothing efficiency of rigid conformal polishing tool using time-dependent smoothing evaluation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chi; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Haifei; Zeng, Xuefeng

    2017-06-01

    A rigid conformal (RC) lap can smooth mid-spatial-frequency (MSF) errors, which are naturally smaller than the tool size, while still removing large-scale errors in a short time. However, the RC-lap smoothing efficiency performance is poorer than expected, and existing smoothing models cannot explicitly specify the methods to improve this efficiency. We presented an explicit time-dependent smoothing evaluation model that contained specific smoothing parameters directly derived from the parametric smoothing model and the Preston equation. Based on the time-dependent model, we proposed a strategy to improve the RC-lap smoothing efficiency, which incorporated the theoretical model, tool optimization, and efficiency limit determination. Two sets of smoothing experiments were performed to demonstrate the smoothing efficiency achieved using the time-dependent smoothing model. A high, theory-like tool influence function and a limiting tool speed of 300 RPM were o

  6. Spindle Thermal Error Optimization Modeling of a Five-axis Machine Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qianjian; Fan, Shuo; Xu, Rufeng; Cheng, Xiang; Zhao, Guoyong; Yang, Jianguo

    2017-05-01

    Aiming at the problem of low machining accuracy and uncontrollable thermal errors of NC machine tools, spindle thermal error measurement, modeling and compensation of a two turntable five-axis machine tool are researched. Measurement experiment of heat sources and thermal errors are carried out, and GRA(grey relational analysis) method is introduced into the selection of temperature variables used for thermal error modeling. In order to analyze the influence of different heat sources on spindle thermal errors, an ANN (artificial neural network) model is presented, and ABC(artificial bee colony) algorithm is introduced to train the link weights of ANN, a new ABC-NN(Artificial bee colony-based neural network) modeling method is proposed and used in the prediction of spindle thermal errors. In order to test the prediction performance of ABC-NN model, an experiment system is developed, the prediction results of LSR (least squares regression), ANN and ABC-NN are compared with the measurement results of spindle thermal errors. Experiment results show that the prediction accuracy of ABC-NN model is higher than LSR and ANN, and the residual error is smaller than 3 μm, the new modeling method is feasible. The proposed research provides instruction to compensate thermal errors and improve machining accuracy of NC machine tools.

  7. A Quasiphysics Intelligent Model for a Long Range Fast Tool Servo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Lin, Jieqiong; Xu, Pengzi; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    Accurately modeling the dynamic behaviors of fast tool servo (FTS) is one of the key issues in the ultraprecision positioning of the cutting tool. Herein, a quasiphysics intelligent model (QPIM) integrating a linear physics model (LPM) and a radial basis function (RBF) based neural model (NM) is developed to accurately describe the dynamic behaviors of a voice coil motor (VCM) actuated long range fast tool servo (LFTS). To identify the parameters of the LPM, a novel Opposition-based Self-adaptive Replacement Differential Evolution (OSaRDE) algorithm is proposed which has been proved to have a faster convergence mechanism without compromising with the quality of solution and outperform than similar evolution algorithms taken for consideration. The modeling errors of the LPM and the QPIM are investigated by experiments. The modeling error of the LPM presents an obvious trend component which is about ±1.15% of the full span range verifying the efficiency of the proposed OSaRDE algorithm for system identification. As for the QPIM, the trend component in the residual error of LPM can be well suppressed, and the error of the QPIM maintains noise level. All the results verify the efficiency and superiority of the proposed modeling and identification approaches. PMID:24163627

  8. Mission Assurance in a Distributed Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Notation ( BPMN ) – Graphical representation of business processes in a workflow • Unified Modeling Language (UML) – Use standard UML diagrams to model the system – Component, sequence, activity diagrams

  9. Opening Up Architectures of Software-Intensive Systems: A First Prototype Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    9 4.1.2 Sequence Diagram Viewer NetBeans Module .................................. 11 4.1.3 Limitations of Static Analysis...Viewer NetBeans module [18]. Note that there exist other tools which can statically reverse engineer sequence diagrams such as Borland Together [19...and the NetBeans UML Modeling module [20]. The reason those are not presented in this document is because their functionalities are very similar

  10. Evaluating models of healthcare delivery using the Model of Care Evaluation Tool (MCET).

    PubMed

    Hudspeth, Randall S; Vogt, Marjorie; Wysocki, Ken; Pittman, Oralea; Smith, Susan; Cooke, Cindy; Dello Stritto, Rita; Hoyt, Karen Sue; Merritt, T Jeanne

    2016-08-01

    Our aim was to provide the outcome of a structured Model of Care (MoC) Evaluation Tool (MCET), developed by an FAANP Best-practices Workgroup, that can be used to guide the evaluation of existing MoCs being considered for use in clinical practice. Multiple MoCs are available, but deciding which model of health care delivery to use can be confusing. This five-component tool provides a structured assessment approach to model selection and has universal application. A literature review using CINAHL, PubMed, Ovid, and EBSCO was conducted. The MCET evaluation process includes five sequential components with a feedback loop from component 5 back to component 3 for reevaluation of any refinements. The components are as follows: (1) Background, (2) Selection of an MoC, (3) Implementation, (4) Evaluation, and (5) Sustainability and Future Refinement. This practical resource considers an evidence-based approach to use in determining the best model to implement based on need, stakeholder considerations, and feasibility. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  11. Greenhouse gases from wastewater treatment - A review of modelling tools.

    PubMed

    Mannina, Giorgio; Ekama, George; Caniani, Donatella; Cosenza, Alida; Esposito, Giovanni; Gori, Riccardo; Garrido-Baserba, Manel; Rosso, Diego; Olsson, Gustaf

    2016-05-01

    Nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and methane are greenhouse gases (GHG) emitted from wastewater treatment that contribute to its carbon footprint. As a result of the increasing awareness of GHG emissions from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), new modelling, design, and operational tools have been developed to address and reduce GHG emissions at the plant-wide scale and beyond. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art and the recently developed tools used to understand and manage GHG emissions from WWTPs, and discusses open problems and research gaps. The literature review reveals that knowledge on the processes related to N2O formation, especially due to autotrophic biomass, is still incomplete. The literature review shows also that a plant-wide modelling approach that includes GHG is the best option for the understanding how to reduce the carbon footprint of WWTPs. Indeed, several studies have confirmed that a wide vision of the WWPTs has to be considered in order to make them more sustainable as possible. Mechanistic dynamic models were demonstrated as the most comprehensive and reliable tools for GHG assessment. Very few plant-wide GHG modelling studies have been applied to real WWTPs due to the huge difficulties related to data availability and the model complexity. For further improvement in GHG plant-wide modelling and to favour its use at large real scale, knowledge of the mechanisms involved in GHG formation and release, and data acquisition must be enhanced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Linear modeling of human hand-arm dynamics relevant to right-angle torque tool interaction.

    PubMed

    Ay, Haluk; Sommerich, Carolyn M; Luscher, Anthony F

    2013-10-01

    A new protocol was evaluated for identification of stiffness, mass, and damping parameters employing a linear model for human hand-arm dynamics relevant to right-angle torque tool use. Powered torque tools are widely used to tighten fasteners in manufacturing industries. While these tools increase accuracy and efficiency of tightening processes, operators are repetitively exposed to impulsive forces, posing risk of upper extremity musculoskeletal injury. A novel testing apparatus was developed that closely mimics biomechanical exposure in torque tool operation. Forty experienced torque tool operators were tested with the apparatus to determine model parameters and validate the protocol for physical capacity assessment. A second-order hand-arm model with parameters extracted in the time domain met model accuracy criterion of 5% for time-to-peak displacement error in 93% of trials (vs. 75% for frequency domain). Average time-to-peak handle displacement and relative peak handle force errors were 0.69 ms and 0.21%, respectively. Model parameters were significantly affected by gender and working posture. Protocol and numerical calculation procedures provide an alternative method for assessing mechanical parameters relevant to right-angle torque tool use. The protocol more closely resembles tool use, and calculation procedures demonstrate better performance of parameter extraction using time domain system identification methods versus frequency domain. Potential future applications include parameter identification for in situ torque tool operation and equipment development for human hand-arm dynamics simulation under impulsive forces that could be used for assessing torque tools based on factors relevant to operator health (handle dynamics and hand-arm reaction force).

  13. An integrated user-friendly ArcMAP tool for bivariate statistical modeling in geoscience applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebur, M. N.; Pradhan, B.; Shafri, H. Z. M.; Yusof, Z.; Tehrany, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    Modeling and classification difficulties are fundamental issues in natural hazard assessment. A geographic information system (GIS) is a domain that requires users to use various tools to perform different types of spatial modeling. Bivariate statistical analysis (BSA) assists in hazard modeling. To perform this analysis, several calculations are required and the user has to transfer data from one format to another. Most researchers perform these calculations manually by using Microsoft Excel or other programs. This process is time consuming and carries a degree of uncertainty. The lack of proper tools to implement BSA in a GIS environment prompted this study. In this paper, a user-friendly tool, BSM (bivariate statistical modeler), for BSA technique is proposed. Three popular BSA techniques such as frequency ratio, weights-of-evidence, and evidential belief function models are applied in the newly proposed ArcMAP tool. This tool is programmed in Python and is created by a simple graphical user interface, which facilitates the improvement of model performance. The proposed tool implements BSA automatically, thus allowing numerous variables to be examined. To validate the capability and accuracy of this program, a pilot test area in Malaysia is selected and all three models are tested by using the proposed program. Area under curve is used to measure the success rate and prediction rate. Results demonstrate that the proposed program executes BSA with reasonable accuracy. The proposed BSA tool can be used in numerous applications, such as natural hazard, mineral potential, hydrological, and other engineering and environmental applications.

  14. An integrated user-friendly ArcMAP tool for bivariate statistical modelling in geoscience applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebur, M. N.; Pradhan, B.; Shafri, H. Z. M.; Yusoff, Z. M.; Tehrany, M. S.

    2015-03-01

    Modelling and classification difficulties are fundamental issues in natural hazard assessment. A geographic information system (GIS) is a domain that requires users to use various tools to perform different types of spatial modelling. Bivariate statistical analysis (BSA) assists in hazard modelling. To perform this analysis, several calculations are required and the user has to transfer data from one format to another. Most researchers perform these calculations manually by using Microsoft Excel or other programs. This process is time-consuming and carries a degree of uncertainty. The lack of proper tools to implement BSA in a GIS environment prompted this study. In this paper, a user-friendly tool, bivariate statistical modeler (BSM), for BSA technique is proposed. Three popular BSA techniques, such as frequency ratio, weight-of-evidence (WoE), and evidential belief function (EBF) models, are applied in the newly proposed ArcMAP tool. This tool is programmed in Python and created by a simple graphical user interface (GUI), which facilitates the improvement of model performance. The proposed tool implements BSA automatically, thus allowing numerous variables to be examined. To validate the capability and accuracy of this program, a pilot test area in Malaysia is selected and all three models are tested by using the proposed program. Area under curve (AUC) is used to measure the success rate and prediction rate. Results demonstrate that the proposed program executes BSA with reasonable accuracy. The proposed BSA tool can be used in numerous applications, such as natural hazard, mineral potential, hydrological, and other engineering and environmental applications.

  15. New V and V Tools for Diagnostic Modeling Environment (DME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecheur, Charles; Nelson, Stacy; Merriam, Marshall (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide correctness and reliability criteria for verification and validation (V&V) of Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Diagnostic Modeling Environment, describe current NASA Ames Research Center tools for V&V of Model Based Reasoning systems, and discuss the applicability of Advanced V&V to DME. This report is divided into the following three sections: (1) correctness and reliability criteria; (2) tools for V&V of Model Based Reasoning; and (3) advanced V&V applicable to DME. The Executive Summary includes an overview of the main points from each section. Supporting details, diagrams, figures, and other information are included in subsequent sections. A glossary, acronym list, appendices, and references are included at the end of this report.

  16. Modeling and modification of medical 3D objects. The benefit of using a haptic modeling tool.

    PubMed

    Kling-Petersen, T; Rydmark, M

    2000-01-01

    The Computer Laboratory of the medical faculty in Goteborg (Mednet) has since the end of 1998 been one of a limited numbers of participants in the development of a new modeling tool together with SensAble Technologies Inc [http:¿www.sensable.com/]. The software called SensAble FreeForm was officially released at Siggraph September 1999. Briefly, the software mimics the modeling techniques traditionally used by clay artists. An imported model or a user defined block of "clay" can be modified using different tools such as a ball, square block, scrape etc via the use of a SensAble Technologies PHANToM haptic arm. The model will deform in 3D as a result of touching the "clay" with any selected tool and the amount of deformation is linear to the force applied. By getting instantaneous haptic as well as visual feedback, precise and intuitive changes are easily made. While SensAble FreeForm lacks several of the features normally associated with a 3D modeling program (such as text handling, application of surface and bumpmaps, high-end rendering engines, etc) it's strength lies in the ability to rapidly create non-geometric 3D models. For medical use, very few anatomically correct models are created from scratch. However, FreeForm features tools enable advanced modification of reconstructed or 3D scanned models. One of the main problems with 3D laserscanning of medical specimens is that the technique usually leaves holes or gaps in the dataset corresponding to areas in shadows such as orifices, deep grooves etc. By using FreeForms different tools, these defects are easily corrected and gaps are filled out. Similarly, traditional 3D reconstruction (based on serial sections etc) often shows artifacts as a result of the triangulation and/or tessellation processes. These artifacts usually manifest as unnatural ridges or uneven areas ("the accordion effect"). FreeForm contains a smoothing algorithm that enables the user to select an area to be modified and subsequently apply

  17. The Visible Signature Modelling and Evaluation ToolBox

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Technology Organisation DSTO–TR–2212 ABSTRACT A new software suite, the Visible Signature ToolBox ( VST ), has been developed to model and evaluate the...visible signatures of maritime platforms. The VST is a collection of commercial, off-the-shelf software and DSTO developed pro- grams and procedures. The...suite. The VST can be utilised to model and assess visible signatures of maritime platforms. A number of examples are presented to demonstrate the

  18. Data Visualization Saliency Model: A Tool for Evaluating Abstract Data Visualizations

    DOE PAGES

    Matzen, Laura E.; Haass, Michael J.; Divis, Kristin M.; ...

    2017-08-29

    Evaluating the effectiveness of data visualizations is a challenging undertaking and often relies on one-off studies that test a visualization in the context of one specific task. Researchers across the fields of data science, visualization, and human-computer interaction are calling for foundational tools and principles that could be applied to assessing the effectiveness of data visualizations in a more rapid and generalizable manner. One possibility for such a tool is a model of visual saliency for data visualizations. Visual saliency models are typically based on the properties of the human visual cortex and predict which areas of a scene havemore » visual features (e.g. color, luminance, edges) that are likely to draw a viewer's attention. While these models can accurately predict where viewers will look in a natural scene, they typically do not perform well for abstract data visualizations. In this paper, we discuss the reasons for the poor performance of existing saliency models when applied to data visualizations. We introduce the Data Visualization Saliency (DVS) model, a saliency model tailored to address some of these weaknesses, and we test the performance of the DVS model and existing saliency models by comparing the saliency maps produced by the models to eye tracking data obtained from human viewers. In conclusion, we describe how modified saliency models could be used as general tools for assessing the effectiveness of visualizations, including the strengths and weaknesses of this approach.« less

  19. Data Visualization Saliency Model: A Tool for Evaluating Abstract Data Visualizations

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Matzen, Laura E.; Haass, Michael J.; Divis, Kristin M.

    Evaluating the effectiveness of data visualizations is a challenging undertaking and often relies on one-off studies that test a visualization in the context of one specific task. Researchers across the fields of data science, visualization, and human-computer interaction are calling for foundational tools and principles that could be applied to assessing the effectiveness of data visualizations in a more rapid and generalizable manner. One possibility for such a tool is a model of visual saliency for data visualizations. Visual saliency models are typically based on the properties of the human visual cortex and predict which areas of a scene havemore » visual features (e.g. color, luminance, edges) that are likely to draw a viewer's attention. While these models can accurately predict where viewers will look in a natural scene, they typically do not perform well for abstract data visualizations. In this paper, we discuss the reasons for the poor performance of existing saliency models when applied to data visualizations. We introduce the Data Visualization Saliency (DVS) model, a saliency model tailored to address some of these weaknesses, and we test the performance of the DVS model and existing saliency models by comparing the saliency maps produced by the models to eye tracking data obtained from human viewers. In conclusion, we describe how modified saliency models could be used as general tools for assessing the effectiveness of visualizations, including the strengths and weaknesses of this approach.« less

  20. Platelet to lymphocyte ratio as a novel prognostic tool for gallbladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Qing; Zhang, Ling-Qiang; Wang, Rui-Tao; Bi, Jian-Bin; Zhang, Jing-Yao; Qu, Kai; Liu, Su-Shun; Song, Si-Dong; Xu, Xin-Sen; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To preliminarily investigate the prognostic significance of the platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in patients with gallbladder carcinoma (GBC). METHODS: Clinical data of 316 surgical GBC patients were analyzed retrospectively, and preoperative serum platelet and lymphocyte counts were used to calculate the PLR. The optimal cut-off value of the PLR for detecting death was determined by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The primary outcome was overall survival, which was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The log-rank test was used to compare the differences in survival. Then, we conducted multivariate Cox analysis to assess the independent effect of the PLR on the survival of GBC patients. RESULTS: For the PLR, the area under the ROC curve was 0.620 (95%CI: 0.542-0.698, P = 0.040) in detecting death. The cut-off value for the PLR was determined to be 117.7, with 73.6% sensitivity and 53.2% specificity. The PLR was found to be significantly positively correlated with CA125 serum level, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, and tumor differentiation. Univariate analysis identified carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CA125 and CA199 levels, PLR, TNM stage, and the degree of differentiation as significant prognostic factors for GBC when they were expressed as binary data. Multivariate analysis showed that CA125 > 35 U/mL, CA199 > 39 U/mL, PLR ≥ 117.7, and TNM stage IV were independently associated with poor survival in GBC. When expressed as a continuous variable, the PLR was still an independent predictor for survival, with a hazard ratio of 1.018 (95%CI: 1.001-1.037 per 10-unit increase, P = 0.043). CONCLUSION: The PLR could be used as a simple, inexpensive, and valuable tool for predicting the prognosis of GBC patients. PMID:26074706

  1. New generation of exploration tools: interactive modeling software and microcomputers

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Krajewski, S.A.

    1986-08-01

    Software packages offering interactive modeling techniques are now available for use on microcomputer hardware systems. These packages are reasonably priced for both company and independent explorationists; they do not require users to have high levels of computer literacy; they are capable of rapidly completing complex ranges of sophisticated geologic and geophysical modeling tasks; and they can produce presentation-quality output for comparison with real-world data. For example, interactive packages are available for mapping, log analysis, seismic modeling, reservoir studies, and financial projects as well as for applying a variety of statistical and geostatistical techniques to analysis of exploration data. More importantly,more » these packages enable explorationists to directly apply their geologic expertise when developing and fine-tuning models for identifying new prospects and for extending producing fields. As a result of these features, microcomputers and interactive modeling software are becoming common tools in many exploration offices. Gravity and magnetics software programs illustrate some of the capabilities of such exploration tools.« less

  2. An Object Model for a Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, D.; Bhalla, P. N.; Pratap, V.; Reddy, P.

    1998-01-01

    Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS) is a packet of software which numerically simulates the behavior of a rocket engine. Different parameters of the components of an engine is the input to these programs. Depending on these given parameters the programs output the behaviors of those components. These behavioral values are then used to guide the design of or to diagnose a model of a rocket engine "built" by a composition of these programs simulating different components of the engine system. In order to use this software package effectively one needs to have a flexible model of a rocket engine. These programs simulating different components then should be plugged into this modular representation. Our project is to develop an object based model of such an engine system. We are following an iterative and incremental approach in developing the model, as is the standard practice in the area of object oriented design and analysis of softwares. This process involves three stages: object modeling to represent the components and sub-components of a rocket engine, dynamic modeling to capture the temporal and behavioral aspects of the system, and functional modeling to represent the transformational aspects. This article reports on the first phase of our activity under a grant (RENS) from the NASA Lewis Research center. We have utilized Rambaugh's object modeling technique and the tool UML for this purpose. The classes of a rocket engine propulsion system are developed and some of them are presented in this report. The next step, developing a dynamic model for RENS, is also touched upon here. In this paper we will also discuss the advantages of using object-based modeling for developing this type of an integrated simulator over other tools like an expert systems shell or a procedural language, e.g., FORTRAN. Attempts have been made in the past to use such techniques.

  3. Designing a training tool for imaging mental models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dede, Christopher J.; Jayaram, Geetha

    1990-01-01

    The training process can be conceptualized as the student acquiring an evolutionary sequence of classification-problem solving mental models. For example a physician learns (1) classification systems for patient symptoms, diagnostic procedures, diseases, and therapeutic interventions and (2) interrelationships among these classifications (e.g., how to use diagnostic procedures to collect data about a patient's symptoms in order to identify the disease so that therapeutic measures can be taken. This project developed functional specifications for a computer-based tool, Mental Link, that allows the evaluative imaging of such mental models. The fundamental design approach underlying this representational medium is traversal of virtual cognition space. Typically intangible cognitive entities and links among them are visible as a three-dimensional web that represents a knowledge structure. The tool has a high degree of flexibility and customizability to allow extension to other types of uses, such a front-end to an intelligent tutoring system, knowledge base, hypermedia system, or semantic network.

  4. An ensemble model of QSAR tools for regulatory risk assessment

    DOE PAGES

    Pradeep, Prachi; Povinelli, Richard J.; White, Shannon; ...

    2016-09-22

    Quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs) are theoretical models that relate a quantitative measure of chemical structure to a physical property or a biological effect. QSAR predictions can be used for chemical risk assessment for protection of human and environmental health, which makes them interesting to regulators, especially in the absence of experimental data. For compatibility with regulatory use, QSAR models should be transparent, reproducible and optimized to minimize the number of false negatives. In silico QSAR tools are gaining wide acceptance as a faster alternative to otherwise time-consuming clinical and animal testing methods. However, different QSAR tools often make conflictingmore » predictions for a given chemical and may also vary in their predictive performance across different chemical datasets. In a regulatory context, conflicting predictions raise interpretation, validation and adequacy concerns. To address these concerns, ensemble learning techniques in the machine learning paradigm can be used to integrate predictions from multiple tools. By leveraging various underlying QSAR algorithms and training datasets, the resulting consensus prediction should yield better overall predictive ability. We present a novel ensemble QSAR model using Bayesian classification. The model allows for varying a cut-off parameter that allows for a selection in the desirable trade-off between model sensitivity and specificity. The predictive performance of the ensemble model is compared with four in silico tools (Toxtree, Lazar, OECD Toolbox, and Danish QSAR) to predict carcinogenicity for a dataset of air toxins (332 chemicals) and a subset of the gold carcinogenic potency database (480 chemicals). Leave-one-out cross validation results show that the ensemble model achieves the best trade-off between sensitivity and specificity (accuracy: 83.8 % and 80.4 %, and balanced accuracy: 80.6 % and 80.8 %) and highest inter-rater agreement [kappa (κ): 0

  5. Experimental and Mathematical Modeling for Prediction of Tool Wear on the Machining of Aluminium 6061 Alloy by High Speed Steel Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okokpujie, Imhade Princess; Ikumapayi, Omolayo M.; Okonkwo, Ugochukwu C.; Salawu, Enesi Y.; Afolalu, Sunday A.; Dirisu, Joseph O.; Nwoke, Obinna N.; Ajayi, Oluseyi O.

    2017-12-01

    In recent machining operation, tool life is one of the most demanding tasks in production process, especially in the automotive industry. The aim of this paper is to study tool wear on HSS in end milling of aluminium 6061 alloy. The experiments were carried out to investigate tool wear with the machined parameters and to developed mathematical model using response surface methodology. The various machining parameters selected for the experiment are spindle speed (N), feed rate (f), axial depth of cut (a) and radial depth of cut (r). The experiment was designed using central composite design (CCD) in which 31 samples were run on SIEG 3/10/0010 CNC end milling machine. After each experiment the cutting tool was measured using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The obtained optimum machining parameter combination are spindle speed of 2500 rpm, feed rate of 200 mm/min, axial depth of cut of 20 mm, and radial depth of cut 1.0mm was found out to achieved the minimum tool wear as 0.213 mm. The mathematical model developed predicted the tool wear with 99.7% which is within the acceptable accuracy range for tool wear prediction.

  6. Rapid Modeling and Analysis Tools: Evolution, Status, Needs and Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Stone, Thomas J.; Ransom, Jonathan B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Advanced aerospace systems are becoming increasingly more complex, and customers are demanding lower cost, higher performance, and high reliability. Increased demands are placed on the design engineers to collaborate and integrate design needs and objectives early in the design process to minimize risks that may occur later in the design development stage. High performance systems require better understanding of system sensitivities much earlier in the design process to meet these goals. The knowledge, skills, intuition, and experience of an individual design engineer will need to be extended significantly for the next generation of aerospace system designs. Then a collaborative effort involving the designer, rapid and reliable analysis tools and virtual experts will result in advanced aerospace systems that are safe, reliable, and efficient. This paper discusses the evolution, status, needs and directions for rapid modeling and analysis tools for structural analysis. First, the evolution of computerized design and analysis tools is briefly described. Next, the status of representative design and analysis tools is described along with a brief statement on their functionality. Then technology advancements to achieve rapid modeling and analysis are identified. Finally, potential future directions including possible prototype configurations are proposed.

  7. Modeling Constellation Virtual Missions Using the Vdot(Trademark) Process Management Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Roger; ONeil, Daniel; Sturken, Ian; Nix, Michael; Yanez, Damian

    2011-01-01

    The authors have identified a software tool suite that will support NASA's Virtual Mission (VM) effort. This is accomplished by transforming a spreadsheet database of mission events, task inputs and outputs, timelines, and organizations into process visualization tools and a Vdot process management model that includes embedded analysis software as well as requirements and information related to data manipulation and transfer. This paper describes the progress to date, and the application of the Virtual Mission to not only Constellation but to other architectures, and the pertinence to other aerospace applications. Vdot s intuitive visual interface brings VMs to life by turning static, paper-based processes into active, electronic processes that can be deployed, executed, managed, verified, and continuously improved. A VM can be executed using a computer-based, human-in-the-loop, real-time format, under the direction and control of the NASA VM Manager. Engineers in the various disciplines will not have to be Vdot-proficient but rather can fill out on-line, Excel-type databases with the mission information discussed above. The author s tool suite converts this database into several process visualization tools for review and into Microsoft Project, which can be imported directly into Vdot. Many tools can be embedded directly into Vdot, and when the necessary data/information is received from a preceding task, the analysis can be initiated automatically. Other NASA analysis tools are too complex for this process but Vdot automatically notifies the tool user that the data has been received and analysis can begin. The VM can be simulated from end-to-end using the author s tool suite. The planned approach for the Vdot-based process simulation is to generate the process model from a database; other advantages of this semi-automated approach are the participants can be geographically remote and after refining the process models via the human-in-the-loop simulation, the

  8. Implementing Lumberjacks and Black Swans Into Model-Based Tools to Support Human-Automation Interaction.

    PubMed

    Sebok, Angelia; Wickens, Christopher D

    2017-03-01

    The objectives were to (a) implement theoretical perspectives regarding human-automation interaction (HAI) into model-based tools to assist designers in developing systems that support effective performance and (b) conduct validations to assess the ability of the models to predict operator performance. Two key concepts in HAI, the lumberjack analogy and black swan events, have been studied extensively. The lumberjack analogy describes the effects of imperfect automation on operator performance. In routine operations, an increased degree of automation supports performance, but in failure conditions, increased automation results in more significantly impaired performance. Black swans are the rare and unexpected failures of imperfect automation. The lumberjack analogy and black swan concepts have been implemented into three model-based tools that predict operator performance in different systems. These tools include a flight management system, a remotely controlled robotic arm, and an environmental process control system. Each modeling effort included a corresponding validation. In one validation, the software tool was used to compare three flight management system designs, which were ranked in the same order as predicted by subject matter experts. The second validation compared model-predicted operator complacency with empirical performance in the same conditions. The third validation compared model-predicted and empirically determined time to detect and repair faults in four automation conditions. The three model-based tools offer useful ways to predict operator performance in complex systems. The three tools offer ways to predict the effects of different automation designs on operator performance.

  9. Applications and issues of GIS as tool for civil engineering modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miles, S.B.; Ho, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    A tool that has proliferated within civil engineering in recent years is geographic information systems (GIS). The goal of a tool is to supplement ability and knowledge that already exists, not to serve as a replacement for that which is lacking. To secure the benefits and avoid misuse of a burgeoning tool, engineers must understand the limitations, alternatives, and context of the tool. The common benefits of using GIS as a supplement to engineering modeling are summarized. Several brief case studies of GIS modeling applications are taken from popular civil engineering literature to demonstrate the wide use and varied implementation of GIS across the discipline. Drawing from the case studies, limitations regarding traditional GIS data models find the implementation of civil engineering models within current GIS are identified and countered by discussing the direction of the next generation of GIS. The paper concludes by highlighting the potential for the misuse of GIS in the context of engineering modeling and suggests that this potential can be reduced through education and awareness. The goal of this paper is to promote awareness of the issues related to GIS-based modeling and to assist in the formulation of questions regarding the application of current GIS. The technology has experienced much publicity of late, with many engineers being perhaps too excited about the usefulness of current GIS. An undoubtedly beneficial side effect of this, however, is that engineers are becoming more aware of GIS and, hopefully, the associated subtleties. Civil engineers must stay informed of GIS issues and progress, but more importantly, civil engineers must inform the GIS community to direct the technology development optimally.

  10. MOD Tool (Microwave Optics Design Tool)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Daniel S.; Borgioli, Andrea; Cwik, Tom; Fu, Chuigang; Imbriale, William A.; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Springer, Paul L.

    1999-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is currently designing and building a number of instruments that operate in the microwave and millimeter-wave bands. These include MIRO (Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter), MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder), and IMAS (Integrated Multispectral Atmospheric Sounder). These instruments must be designed and built to meet key design criteria (e.g., beamwidth, gain, pointing) obtained from the scientific goals for the instrument. These criteria are frequently functions of the operating environment (both thermal and mechanical). To design and build instruments which meet these criteria, it is essential to be able to model the instrument in its environments. Currently, a number of modeling tools exist. Commonly used tools at JPL include: FEMAP (meshing), NASTRAN (structural modeling), TRASYS and SINDA (thermal modeling), MACOS/IMOS (optical modeling), and POPO (physical optics modeling). Each of these tools is used by an analyst, who models the instrument in one discipline. The analyst then provides the results of this modeling to another analyst, who continues the overall modeling in another discipline. There is a large reengineering task in place at JPL to automate and speed-up the structural and thermal modeling disciplines, which does not include MOD Tool. The focus of MOD Tool (and of this paper) is in the fields unique to microwave and millimeter-wave instrument design. These include initial design and analysis of the instrument without thermal or structural loads, the automation of the transfer of this design to a high-end CAD tool, and the analysis of the structurally deformed instrument (due to structural and/or thermal loads). MOD Tool is a distributed tool, with a database of design information residing on a server, physical optics analysis being performed on a variety of supercomputer platforms, and a graphical user interface (GUI) residing on the user's desktop computer. The MOD Tool client is being developed using Tcl

  11. Lightweight approach to model traceability in a CASE tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vileiniskis, Tomas; Skersys, Tomas; Pavalkis, Saulius; Butleris, Rimantas; Butkiene, Rita

    2017-07-01

    A term "model-driven" is not at all a new buzzword within the ranks of system development community. Nevertheless, the ever increasing complexity of model-driven approaches keeps fueling all kinds of discussions around this paradigm and pushes researchers forward to research and develop new and more effective ways to system development. With the increasing complexity, model traceability, and model management as a whole, becomes indispensable activities of model-driven system development process. The main goal of this paper is to present a conceptual design and implementation of a practical lightweight approach to model traceability in a CASE tool.

  12. An Overview of the Object Protocol Model (OPM) and the OPM Data Management Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, I-Min A.; Markowitz, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of database management tools for scientific information focuses on the Object Protocol Model (OPM) and data management tools based on OPM. Topics include the need for new constructs for modeling scientific experiments, modeling object structures and experiments in OPM, queries and updates, and developing scientific database applications…

  13. Thermal modelling of cooling tool cutting when milling by electrical analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabid, F.; Arrouf, M.; Assas, M.; Benmoussa, H.

    2010-06-01

    Measurement temperatures by (some devises) are applied immediately after shut-down and may be corrected for the temperature drop that occurs in the interval between shut-down and measurement. This paper presents a new procedure for thermal modelling of the tool cutting used just after machining; when the tool is out off the chip in order to extrapolate the cutting temperature from the temperature measured when the tool is at stand still. A fin approximation is made in enhancing heat loss (by conduction and convection) to air stream is used. In the modelling we introduce an equivalent thermal network to estimate the cutting temperature as a function of specific energy. In another hand, a local modified element lumped conduction equation is used to predict the temperature gradient with time when the tool is being cooled, with initial and boundary conditions. These predictions provide a detailed view of the global heat transfer coefficient as a function of cutting speed because the heat loss for the tool in air stream is an order of magnitude larger than in normal environment. Finally we deduct the cutting temperature by inverse method.

  14. Physical Modeling of Contact Processes on the Cutting Tools Surfaces of STM When Turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belozerov, V. A.; Uteshev, M. H.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes how to create an optimization model of the process of fine turning of superalloys and steel tools from STM on CNC machines, flexible manufacturing units (GPM), machining centers. Creation of the optimization model allows you to link (unite) contact processes simultaneously on the front and back surfaces of the tool from STM to manage contact processes and the dynamic strength of the cutting tool at the top of the STM. Established optimization model of management of the dynamic strength of the incisors of the STM in the process of fine turning is based on a previously developed thermomechanical (physical, heat) model, which allows the system thermomechanical approach to choosing brands STM (domestic and foreign) for cutting tools from STM designed for fine turning of heat resistant alloys and steels.

  15. Tools for model-building with cryo-EM maps

    DOE PAGES

    Terwilliger, Thomas Charles

    2018-01-01

    There are new tools available to you in Phenix for interpreting cryo-EM maps. You can automatically sharpen (or blur) a map with phenix.auto_sharpen and you can segment a map with phenix.segment_and_split_map. If you have overlapping partial models for a map, you can merge them with phenix.combine_models. If you have a protein-RNA complex and protein chains have been accidentally built in the RNA region, you can try to remove them with phenix.remove_poor_fragments. You can put these together and automatically sharpen, segment and build a map with phenix.map_to_model.

  16. Tools for model-building with cryo-EM maps

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Terwilliger, Thomas Charles

    There are new tools available to you in Phenix for interpreting cryo-EM maps. You can automatically sharpen (or blur) a map with phenix.auto_sharpen and you can segment a map with phenix.segment_and_split_map. If you have overlapping partial models for a map, you can merge them with phenix.combine_models. If you have a protein-RNA complex and protein chains have been accidentally built in the RNA region, you can try to remove them with phenix.remove_poor_fragments. You can put these together and automatically sharpen, segment and build a map with phenix.map_to_model.

  17. Introductory Tools for Radiative Transfer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, D.; Kuai, L.; Natraj, V.; Yung, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Satellite data are currently so voluminous that, despite their unprecedented quality and potential for scientific application, only a small fraction is analyzed due to two factors: researchers' computational constraints and a relatively small number of researchers actively utilizing the data. Ultimately it is hoped that the terabytes of unanalyzed data being archived can receive scientific scrutiny but this will require a popularization of the methods associated with the analysis. Since a large portion of complexity is associated with the proper implementation of the radiative transfer model, it is reasonable and appropriate to make the model as accessible as possible to general audiences. Unfortunately, the algorithmic and conceptual details that are necessary for state-of-the-art analysis also tend to frustrate the accessibility for those new to remote sensing. Several efforts have been made to have web- based radiative transfer calculations, and these are useful for limited calculations, but analysis of more than a few spectra requires the utilization of home- or server-based computing resources. We present a system that is designed to allow for easier access to radiative transfer models with implementation on a home computing platform in the hopes that this system can be utilized in and expanded upon in advanced high school and introductory college settings. This learning-by-doing process is aided through the use of several powerful tools. The first is a wikipedia-style introduction to the salient features of radiative transfer that references the seminal works in the field and refers to more complicated calculations and algorithms sparingly5. The second feature is a technical forum, commonly referred to as a tiki-wiki, that addresses technical and conceptual questions through public postings, private messages, and a ranked searching routine. Together, these tools may be able to facilitate greater interest in the field of remote sensing.

  18. Metabolic engineering tools in model cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Austin L; Case, Anna E; Zhang, Angela; Atsumi, Shota

    2018-03-26

    Developing sustainable routes for producing chemicals and fuels is one of the most important challenges in metabolic engineering. Photoautotrophic hosts are particularly attractive because of their potential to utilize light as an energy source and CO 2 as a carbon substrate through photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria are unicellular organisms capable of photosynthesis and CO 2 fixation. While engineering in heterotrophs, such as Escherichia coli, has result in a plethora of tools for strain development and hosts capable of producing valuable chemicals efficiently, these techniques are not always directly transferable to cyanobacteria. However, recent efforts have led to an increase in the scope and scale of chemicals that cyanobacteria can produce. Adaptations of important metabolic engineering tools have also been optimized to function in photoautotrophic hosts, which include Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9, 13 C Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA), and Genome-Scale Modeling (GSM). This review explores innovations in cyanobacterial metabolic engineering, and highlights how photoautotrophic metabolism has shaped their development. Copyright © 2018 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. CmapTools: A Software Environment for Knowledge Modeling and Sharing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canas, Alberto J.

    2004-01-01

    In an ongoing collaborative effort between a group of NASA Ames scientists and researchers at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC) of the University of West Florida, a new version of CmapTools has been developed that enable scientists to construct knowledge models of their domain of expertise, share them with other scientists, make them available to anybody on the Internet with access to a Web browser, and peer-review other scientists models. These software tools have been successfully used at NASA to build a large-scale multimedia on Mars and in knowledge model on Habitability Assessment. The new version of the software places emphasis on greater usability for experts constructing their own knowledge models, and support for the creation of large knowledge models with large number of supporting resources in the forms of images, videos, web pages, and other media. Additionally, the software currently allows scientists to cooperate with each other in the construction, sharing and criticizing of knowledge models. Scientists collaborating from remote distances, for example researchers at the Astrobiology Institute, can concurrently manipulate the knowledge models they are viewing without having to do this at a special videoconferencing facility.

  20. Portal of medical data models: information infrastructure for medical research and healthcare.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Martin; Neuhaus, Philipp; Meidt, Alexandra; Doods, Justin; Storck, Michael; Bruland, Philipp; Varghese, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Information systems are a key success factor for medical research and healthcare. Currently, most of these systems apply heterogeneous and proprietary data models, which impede data exchange and integrated data analysis for scientific purposes. Due to the complexity of medical terminology, the overall number of medical data models is very high. At present, the vast majority of these models are not available to the scientific community. The objective of the Portal of Medical Data Models (MDM, https://medical-data-models.org) is to foster sharing of medical data models. MDM is a registered European information infrastructure. It provides a multilingual platform for exchange and discussion of data models in medicine, both for medical research and healthcare. The system is developed in collaboration with the University Library of Münster to ensure sustainability. A web front-end enables users to search, view, download and discuss data models. Eleven different export formats are available (ODM, PDF, CDA, CSV, MACRO-XML, REDCap, SQL, SPSS, ADL, R, XLSX). MDM contents were analysed with descriptive statistics. MDM contains 4387 current versions of data models (in total 10,963 versions). 2475 of these models belong to oncology trials. The most common keyword (n = 3826) is 'Clinical Trial'; most frequent diseases are breast cancer, leukemia, lung and colorectal neoplasms. Most common languages of data elements are English (n = 328,557) and German (n = 68,738). Semantic annotations (UMLS codes) are available for 108,412 data items, 2453 item groups and 35,361 code list items. Overall 335,087 UMLS codes are assigned with 21,847 unique codes. Few UMLS codes are used several thousand times, but there is a long tail of rarely used codes in the frequency distribution. Expected benefits of the MDM portal are improved and accelerated design of medical data models by sharing best practice, more standardised data models with semantic annotation and better information

  1. Metadata mapping and reuse in caBIG™

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Isaac; Lin, Ming-Chin; Frey, Lewis

    2009-01-01

    Background This paper proposes that interoperability across biomedical databases can be improved by utilizing a repository of Common Data Elements (CDEs), UML model class-attributes and simple lexical algorithms to facilitate the building domain models. This is examined in the context of an existing system, the National Cancer Institute (NCI)'s cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG™). The goal is to demonstrate the deployment of open source tools that can be used to effectively map models and enable the reuse of existing information objects and CDEs in the development of new models for translational research applications. This effort is intended to help developers reuse appropriate CDEs to enable interoperability of their systems when developing within the caBIG™ framework or other frameworks that use metadata repositories. Results The Dice (di-grams) and Dynamic algorithms are compared and both algorithms have similar performance matching UML model class-attributes to CDE class object-property pairs. With algorithms used, the baselines for automatically finding the matches are reasonable for the data models examined. It suggests that automatic mapping of UML models and CDEs is feasible within the caBIG™ framework and potentially any framework that uses a metadata repository. Conclusion This work opens up the possibility of using mapping algorithms to reduce cost and time required to map local data models to a reference data model such as those used within caBIG™. This effort contributes to facilitating the development of interoperable systems within caBIG™ as well as other metadata frameworks. Such efforts are critical to address the need to develop systems to handle enormous amounts of diverse data that can be leveraged from new biomedical methodologies. PMID:19208192

  2. Metadata mapping and reuse in caBIG.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Isaac; Lin, Ming-Chin; Frey, Lewis

    2009-02-05

    This paper proposes that interoperability across biomedical databases can be improved by utilizing a repository of Common Data Elements (CDEs), UML model class-attributes and simple lexical algorithms to facilitate the building domain models. This is examined in the context of an existing system, the National Cancer Institute (NCI)'s cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG). The goal is to demonstrate the deployment of open source tools that can be used to effectively map models and enable the reuse of existing information objects and CDEs in the development of new models for translational research applications. This effort is intended to help developers reuse appropriate CDEs to enable interoperability of their systems when developing within the caBIG framework or other frameworks that use metadata repositories. The Dice (di-grams) and Dynamic algorithms are compared and both algorithms have similar performance matching UML model class-attributes to CDE class object-property pairs. With algorithms used, the baselines for automatically finding the matches are reasonable for the data models examined. It suggests that automatic mapping of UML models and CDEs is feasible within the caBIG framework and potentially any framework that uses a metadata repository. This work opens up the possibility of using mapping algorithms to reduce cost and time required to map local data models to a reference data model such as those used within caBIG. This effort contributes to facilitating the development of interoperable systems within caBIG as well as other metadata frameworks. Such efforts are critical to address the need to develop systems to handle enormous amounts of diverse data that can be leveraged from new biomedical methodologies.

  3. Ease of Use of the Insulin Glargine 300 U/mL Pen Injector in Insulin-Naïve People With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pohlmeier, Harald; Berard, Lori; Brulle-Wohlhueter, Claire; Wu, Junlong; Dahmen, Raphael; Nowotny, Irene; Klonoff, David

    2017-03-01

    Insulin glargine 300 U/mL (Gla-300) contains the same active ingredient as glargine 100 U/mL (Gla-100), and provides the same number of units in one-third of the volume. The SoloSTAR ® injector pen has been modified to ensure accurate administration of this reduced volume and to improve user experience. Insulin- and pen-naïve adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) inadequately controlled with oral antihyperglycemic drugs, who had glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels of 7.0-11.0 % (53-97 mmol/mol) were studied. They received once-daily Gla-300 in this 4-week, multicenter, open-label, single-arm study (NCT02227212). Ease of use/ease of learning (the primary endpoint), glycemic control, safety, and reliability of the disposable (prefilled) Gla-300 injector pen (secondary endpoints) were evaluated. At week 4, 95.0% of 40 participating subjects assessed the pen as excellent/good and none as poor/very poor; 97.5% would recommend it to others. Total Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire scores were stable throughout the study. Mean (SD) fasting plasma glucose levels decreased from 166.1 (35.0) mg/dL at baseline to 124.2 (41.1) mg/dL at week 4. No product technical complaints (PTCs) or adverse events (AEs) related to PTCs were reported. The number of subjects experiencing hypoglycemic events of any kind and the incidence of AEs were low. No serious AEs were reported. The Gla-300 injector pen is easy to use and easy to learn to use, with demonstrable reliability and high degrees of acceptance and treatment satisfaction. Once-daily Gla-300 basal insulin treatment was well tolerated and effective in pen- and insulin-naïve adult T2DM subjects.

  4. Evaluating the Usability of a Professional Modeling Tool Repurposed for Middle School Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Vanessa L.; Songer, Nancy Butler

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a three-stage usability test of a modeling tool designed to support learners' deep understanding of the impacts of climate change on ecosystems. The design process involved repurposing an existing modeling technology used by professional scientists into a learning tool specifically designed for middle school…

  5. A Decision Support Model and Tool to Assist Financial Decision-Making in Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhayat, Imtiaz; Manuguerra, Maurizio; Baldock, Clive

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a model and tool is proposed to assist universities and other mission-based organisations to ascertain systematically the optimal portfolio of projects, in any year, meeting the organisations risk tolerances and available funds. The model and tool presented build on previous work on university operations and decision support systems…

  6. Clarity versus complexity: land-use modeling as a practical tool for decision-makers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sohl, Terry L.; Claggett, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The last decade has seen a remarkable increase in the number of modeling tools available to examine future land-use and land-cover (LULC) change. Integrated modeling frameworks, agent-based models, cellular automata approaches, and other modeling techniques have substantially improved the representation of complex LULC systems, with each method using a different strategy to address complexity. However, despite the development of new and better modeling tools, the use of these tools is limited for actual planning, decision-making, or policy-making purposes. LULC modelers have become very adept at creating tools for modeling LULC change, but complicated models and lack of transparency limit their utility for decision-makers. The complicated nature of many LULC models also makes it impractical or even impossible to perform a rigorous analysis of modeling uncertainty. This paper provides a review of land-cover modeling approaches and the issues causes by the complicated nature of models, and provides suggestions to facilitate the increased use of LULC models by decision-makers and other stakeholders. The utility of LULC models themselves can be improved by 1) providing model code and documentation, 2) through the use of scenario frameworks to frame overall uncertainties, 3) improving methods for generalizing key LULC processes most important to stakeholders, and 4) adopting more rigorous standards for validating models and quantifying uncertainty. Communication with decision-makers and other stakeholders can be improved by increasing stakeholder participation in all stages of the modeling process, increasing the transparency of model structure and uncertainties, and developing user-friendly decision-support systems to bridge the link between LULC science and policy. By considering these options, LULC science will be better positioned to support decision-makers and increase real-world application of LULC modeling results.

  7. Enabling online studies of conceptual relationships between medical terms: developing an efficient web platform.

    PubMed

    Albin, Aaron; Ji, Xiaonan; Borlawsky, Tara B; Ye, Zhan; Lin, Simon; Payne, Philip Ro; Huang, Kun; Xiang, Yang

    2014-10-07

    The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) contains many important ontologies in which terms are connected by semantic relations. For many studies on the relationships between biomedical concepts, the use of transitively associated information from ontologies and the UMLS has been shown to be effective. Although there are a few tools and methods available for extracting transitive relationships from the UMLS, they usually have major restrictions on the length of transitive relations or on the number of data sources. Our goal was to design an efficient online platform that enables efficient studies on the conceptual relationships between any medical terms. To overcome the restrictions of available methods and to facilitate studies on the conceptual relationships between medical terms, we developed a Web platform, onGrid, that supports efficient transitive queries and conceptual relationship studies using the UMLS. This framework uses the latest technique in converting natural language queries into UMLS concepts, performs efficient transitive queries, and visualizes the result paths. It also dynamically builds a relationship matrix for two sets of input biomedical terms. We are thus able to perform effective studies on conceptual relationships between medical terms based on their relationship matrix. The advantage of onGrid is that it can be applied to study any two sets of biomedical concept relations and the relations within one set of biomedical concepts. We use onGrid to study the disease-disease relationships in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). By crossvalidating our results with an external database, the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD), we demonstrated that onGrid is effective for the study of conceptual relationships between medical terms. onGrid is an efficient tool for querying the UMLS for transitive relations, studying the relationship between medical terms, and generating hypotheses.

  8. Preoperative CA125 and fibrinogen in patients with endometrial cancer: a risk model for predicting lymphovascular space invasion

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to build a model to predict the risk of lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) in women with endometrial cancer (EC). Methods From December 2010 to June 2013, 211 patients with EC undergoing surgery at Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital were enrolled in this retrospective study. Those patients were divided into a positive LVSI group and a negative LVSI group. The clinical and pathological characteristics were compared between the two groups; logistic regression was used to explore risk factors associated with LVSI occurrence. The threshold values of significant factors were calculated to build a risk model and predict LVSI. Results There were 190 patients who were negative for LVSI and 21 patients were positive for LVSI out of 211 patients with EC. It was found that tumor grade, depth of myometrial invasion, number of pelvic lymph nodes, and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (p<0.05) were associated with LVSI occurrence. However, cervical involvement and age (p>0.05) were not associated with LVSI. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves revealed that the threshold values of the following factors were correlated with positive LVSI: 28.1 U/mL of CA19-9, 21.2 U/mL of CA125, 2.58 mg/dL of fibrinogen (Fn), 1.84 U/mL of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and (6.35×109)/L of white blood cell (WBC). Logistic regression analysis indicated that CA125 ≥21.2 (p=0.032) and Fn ≥2.58 mg/dL (p=0.014) were significantly associated with LVSI. Conclusion Positive LVSI could be predicted by CA125 ≥21.2 U/mL and Fn ≥2.58 mg/dL in women with EC. It could help gynecologists better adapt surgical staging and adjuvant therapies. PMID:27894164

  9. Validation of Multiple Tools for Flat Plate Photovoltaic Modeling Against Measured Data

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Freeman, J.; Whitmore, J.; Blair, N.

    2014-08-01

    This report expands upon a previous work by the same authors, published in the 40th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists conference. In this validation study, comprehensive analysis is performed on nine photovoltaic systems for which NREL could obtain detailed performance data and specifications, including three utility-scale systems and six commercial scale systems. Multiple photovoltaic performance modeling tools were used to model these nine systems, and the error of each tool was analyzed compared to quality-controlled measured performance data. This study shows that, excluding identified outliers, all tools achieve annual errors within +/-8% and hourly root mean squared errors less than 7% formore » all systems. It is further shown using SAM that module model and irradiance input choices can change the annual error with respect to measured data by as much as 6.6% for these nine systems, although all combinations examined still fall within an annual error range of +/-8.5%. Additionally, a seasonal variation in monthly error is shown for all tools. Finally, the effects of irradiance data uncertainty and the use of default loss assumptions on annual error are explored, and two approaches to reduce the error inherent in photovoltaic modeling are proposed.« less

  10. GAMBIT: the global and modular beyond-the-standard-model inference tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athron, Peter; Balazs, Csaba; Bringmann, Torsten; Buckley, Andy; Chrząszcz, Marcin; Conrad, Jan; Cornell, Jonathan M.; Dal, Lars A.; Dickinson, Hugh; Edsjö, Joakim; Farmer, Ben; Gonzalo, Tomás E.; Jackson, Paul; Krislock, Abram; Kvellestad, Anders; Lundberg, Johan; McKay, James; Mahmoudi, Farvah; Martinez, Gregory D.; Putze, Antje; Raklev, Are; Ripken, Joachim; Rogan, Christopher; Saavedra, Aldo; Savage, Christopher; Scott, Pat; Seo, Seon-Hee; Serra, Nicola; Weniger, Christoph; White, Martin; Wild, Sebastian

    2017-11-01

    We describe the open-source global fitting package GAMBIT: the Global And Modular Beyond-the-Standard-Model Inference Tool. GAMBIT combines extensive calculations of observables and likelihoods in particle and astroparticle physics with a hierarchical model database, advanced tools for automatically building analyses of essentially any model, a flexible and powerful system for interfacing to external codes, a suite of different statistical methods and parameter scanning algorithms, and a host of other utilities designed to make scans faster, safer and more easily-extendible than in the past. Here we give a detailed description of the framework, its design and motivation, and the current models and other specific components presently implemented in GAMBIT. Accompanying papers deal with individual modules and present first GAMBIT results. GAMBIT can be downloaded from gambit.hepforge.org.

  11. Integrated landscape/hydrologic modeling tool for semiarid watersheds

    Treesearch

    Mariano Hernandez; Scott N. Miller

    2000-01-01

    An integrated hydrologic modeling/watershed assessment tool is being developed to aid in determining the susceptibility of semiarid landscapes to natural and human-induced changes across a range of scales. Watershed processes are by definition spatially distributed and are highly variable through time, and this approach is designed to account for their spatial and...

  12. Inspection of the Math Model Tools for On-Orbit Assessment of Impact Damage Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Piascik, Robert S> ; KramerWhite, Julie A.; KramerWhite, Julie A.; Labbe, Steve G.; Rotter, Hank A.

    2007-01-01

    In Spring of 2005, the NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) was engaged by the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) to peer review the suite of analytical tools being developed to support the determination of impact and damage tolerance of the Orbiter Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). The NESC formed an independent review team with the core disciplines of materials, flight sciences, structures, mechanical analysis and thermal analysis. The Math Model Tools reviewed included damage prediction and stress analysis, aeroheating analysis, and thermal analysis tools. Some tools are physics-based and other tools are empirically-derived. Each tool was created for a specific use and timeframe, including certification, real-time pre-launch assessments. In addition, the tools are used together in an integrated strategy for assessing the ramifications of impact damage to tile and RCC. The NESC teams conducted a peer review of the engineering data package for each Math Model Tool. This report contains the summary of the team observations and recommendations from these reviews.

  13. Navy Network Dependability: Models, Metrics, and Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    different COP servers. The COP Synchronization Tool (CST) is the preferred method of exchanging data between COP servers: A critical component of COP...ASW mission’s equipment strings. A major difference in results between the new model and the old one is that the new one is far less optimistic about...understand why perceptions about the dependability (e.g., availability) of networks from users’ (e.g., sailors) per- spectives sometimes differ from the

  14. ISAC: A tool for aeroservoelastic modeling and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, William M., Jr.; Hoadley, Sherwood Tiffany

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of the Interaction of Structures, Aerodynamics, and Controls (ISAC) system of program modules is discussed. The major modeling, analysis, and data management components of ISAC are identified. Equations of motion are displayed for a Laplace-domain representation of the unsteady aerodynamic forces. Options for approximating a frequency-domain representation of unsteady aerodynamic forces with rational functions of the Laplace variable are shown. Linear time invariant state-space equations of motion that result are discussed. Model generation and analyses of stability and dynamic response characteristics are shown for an aeroelastic vehicle which illustrates some of the capabilities of ISAC as a modeling and analysis tool for aeroelastic applications.

  15. Detection of Cutting Tool Wear using Statistical Analysis and Regression Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Jaharah A.; Rizal, Muhammad; Nuawi, Mohd Zaki; Haron, Che Hassan Che; Ramli, Rizauddin

    2010-10-01

    This study presents a new method for detecting the cutting tool wear based on the measured cutting force signals. A statistical-based method called Integrated Kurtosis-based Algorithm for Z-Filter technique, called I-kaz was used for developing a regression model and 3D graphic presentation of I-kaz 3D coefficient during machining process. The machining tests were carried out using a CNC turning machine Colchester Master Tornado T4 in dry cutting condition. A Kistler 9255B dynamometer was used to measure the cutting force signals, which were transmitted, analyzed, and displayed in the DasyLab software. Various force signals from machining operation were analyzed, and each has its own I-kaz 3D coefficient. This coefficient was examined and its relationship with flank wear lands (VB) was determined. A regression model was developed due to this relationship, and results of the regression model shows that the I-kaz 3D coefficient value decreases as tool wear increases. The result then is used for real time tool wear monitoring.

  16. MARs Tools for Interactive ANalysis (MARTIAN): Google Maps Tools for Visual Exploration of Geophysical Modeling on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, L. L.; Haines, M.; Holt, W. E.; Schultz, R. A.; Richard, G.; Haines, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Interactive maps of surface-breaking faults and stress models on Mars provide important tools to engage undergraduate students, educators, and scientists with current geological and geophysical research. We have developed a map based on the Google Maps API -- an Internet based tool combining DHTML and AJAX, -- which allows very large maps to be viewed over the World Wide Web. Typically, small portions of the maps are downloaded as needed, rather than the entire image at once. This set-up enables relatively fast access for users with low bandwidth. Furthermore, Google Maps provides an extensible interactive interface making it ideal for visualizing multiple data sets at the user's choice. The Google Maps API works primarily with data referenced to latitudes and longitudes, which is then mapped in Mercator projection only. We have developed utilities for general cylindrical coordinate systems by converting these coordinates into equivalent Mercator projection before including them on the map. The MARTIAN project is available at http://rock.geo.sunysb.edu/~holt/Mars/MARTIAN/. We begin with an introduction to the Martian surface using a topography model. Faults from several datasets are classified by type (extension vs. compression) and by time epoch. Deviatoric stresses due to gravitational potential energy differences, calculated from the topography and crustal thickness, can be overlain. Several quantitative measures for the fit of the stress field to the faults are also included. We provide introductory text and exercises spanning a range of topics: how are faults identified, what stress is and how it relates to faults, what gravitational potential energy is and how variations in it produce stress, how the models are created, and how these models can be evaluated and interpreted. The MARTIAN tool is used at Stony Brook University in GEO 310: Introduction to Geophysics, a class geared towards junior and senior geosciences majors. Although this project is in its

  17. Analytical and Empirical Modeling of Wear and Forces of CBN Tool in Hard Turning - A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vallabh Dahyabhai; Gandhi, Anishkumar Hasmukhlal

    2017-08-01

    Machining of steel material having hardness above 45 HRC (Hardness-Rockwell C) is referred as a hard turning. There are numerous models which should be scrutinized and implemented to gain optimum performance of hard turning. Various models in hard turning by cubic boron nitride tool have been reviewed, in attempt to utilize appropriate empirical and analytical models. Validation of steady state flank and crater wear model, Usui's wear model, forces due to oblique cutting theory, extended Lee and Shaffer's force model, chip formation and progressive flank wear have been depicted in this review paper. Effort has been made to understand the relationship between tool wear and tool force based on the different cutting conditions and tool geometries so that appropriate model can be used according to user requirement in hard turning.

  18. A 100 GHz Polarimetric Compact Radar Range for Scale-Model Radar Cross Section Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    common radar bands. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors wish to thank David Jillson (UML STL – Electrical Engineer) for efforts involved in RF and DC wiring...Waldman J., Fetterman H.R., Duffy P.E., Bryant T.G., Tannenwald P.E., “Submillimeter Model Measurements and Their Applications to Millimeter Radar

  19. Tempest: Tools for Addressing the Needs of Next-Generation Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, P. A.; Guerra, J. E.; Pinheiro, M. C.; Fong, J.

    2015-12-01

    Tempest is a comprehensive simulation-to-science infrastructure that tackles the needs of next-generation, high-resolution, data intensive climate modeling activities. This project incorporates three key components: TempestDynamics, a global modeling framework for experimental numerical methods and high-performance computing; TempestRemap, a toolset for arbitrary-order conservative and consistent remapping between unstructured grids; and TempestExtremes, a suite of detection and characterization tools for identifying weather extremes in large climate datasets. In this presentation, the latest advances with the implementation of this framework will be discussed, and a number of projects now utilizing these tools will be featured.

  20. GridTool: A surface modeling and grid generation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid

    1995-01-01

    GridTool is designed around the concept that the surface grids are generated on a set of bi-linear patches. This type of grid generation is quite easy to implement, and it avoids the problems associated with complex CAD surface representations and associated surface parameterizations. However, the resulting surface grids are close to but not on the original CAD surfaces. This problem can be alleviated by projecting the resulting surface grids onto the original CAD surfaces. GridTool is designed primary for unstructured grid generation systems. Currently, GridTool supports VGRID and FELISA systems, and it can be easily extended to support other unstructured grid generation systems. The data in GridTool is stored parametrically so that once the problem is set up, one can modify the surfaces and the entire set of points, curves and patches will be updated automatically. This is very useful in a multidisciplinary design and optimization process. GridTool is written entirely in ANSI 'C', the interface is based on the FORMS library, and the graphics is based on the GL library. The code has been tested successfully on IRIS workstations running IRIX4.0 and above. The memory is allocated dynamically, therefore, memory size will depend on the complexity of geometry/grid. GridTool data structure is based on a link-list structure which allows the required memory to expand and contract dynamically according to the user's data size and action. Data structure contains several types of objects such as points, curves, patches, sources and surfaces. At any given time, there is always an active object which is drawn in magenta, or in their highlighted colors as defined by the resource file which will be discussed later.

  1. Model-independent analysis of quark mass matrices

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Choudhury, D.; Sarkar, U.

    1989-06-01

    In view of the apparent inconsistency of the Stech, Fritzsch-Stech, and Fritzsch-Shin models and only marginal agreement of the Fritzsch and modified Fritzsch-Stech models with recent data on /ital B//sub /ital d///sup 0/-/bar B/ /sub /ital d///sup 0/ mixing, we analyze the general quark mass matrices for three generations. Phenomenological considerations restrict the range of parameters involved to different sectors. In the present framework, the constraints corresponding to various /ital Ansa/$/ital uml/---/ital tze/ have been discussed.

  2. Novel 3D Approach to Flare Modeling via Interactive IDL Widget Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, G. M.; Fleishman, G. D.; Gary, D. E.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kontar, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, and soon-to-be, available sophisticated 3D models of particle acceleration and transport in solar flares require a new level of user-friendly visualization and analysis tools allowing quick and easy adjustment of the model parameters and computation of realistic radiation patterns (images, spectra, polarization, etc). We report the current state of the art of these tools in development, already proved to be highly efficient for the direct flare modeling. We present an interactive IDL widget application intended to provide a flexible tool that allows the user to generate spatially resolved radio and X-ray spectra. The object-based architecture of this application provides full interaction with imported 3D magnetic field models (e.g., from an extrapolation) that may be embedded in a global coronal model. Various tools provided allow users to explore the magnetic connectivity of the model by generating magnetic field lines originating in user-specified volume positions. Such lines may serve as reference lines for creating magnetic flux tubes, which are further populated with user-defined analytical thermal/non thermal particle distribution models. By default, the application integrates IDL callable DLL and Shared libraries containing fast GS emission codes developed in FORTRAN and C++ and soft and hard X-ray codes developed in IDL. However, the interactive interface allows interchanging these default libraries with any user-defined IDL or external callable codes designed to solve the radiation transfer equation in the same or other wavelength ranges of interest. To illustrate the tool capacity and generality, we present a step-by-step real-time computation of microwave and X-ray images from realistic magnetic structures obtained from a magnetic field extrapolation preceding a real event, and compare them with the actual imaging data obtained by NORH and RHESSI instruments. We discuss further anticipated developments of the tools needed to accommodate

  3. Diagnostic tools for mixing models of stream water chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooper, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    Mixing models provide a useful null hypothesis against which to evaluate processes controlling stream water chemical data. Because conservative mixing of end‐members with constant concentration is a linear process, a number of simple mathematical and multivariate statistical methods can be applied to this problem. Although mixing models have been most typically used in the context of mixing soil and groundwater end‐members, an extension of the mathematics of mixing models is presented that assesses the “fit” of a multivariate data set to a lower dimensional mixing subspace without the need for explicitly identified end‐members. Diagnostic tools are developed to determine the approximate rank of the data set and to assess lack of fit of the data. This permits identification of processes that violate the assumptions of the mixing model and can suggest the dominant processes controlling stream water chemical variation. These same diagnostic tools can be used to assess the fit of the chemistry of one site into the mixing subspace of a different site, thereby permitting an assessment of the consistency of controlling end‐members across sites. This technique is applied to a number of sites at the Panola Mountain Research Watershed located near Atlanta, Georgia.

  4. A Hyperbolic Ontology Visualization Tool for Model Application Programming Interface Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, Cody

    2011-01-01

    Spacecraft modeling, a critically important portion in validating planned spacecraft activities, is currently carried out using a time consuming method of mission to mission model implementations and integration. A current project in early development, Integrated Spacecraft Analysis (ISCA), aims to remedy this hindrance by providing reusable architectures and reducing time spent integrating models with planning and sequencing tools. The principle objective of this internship was to develop a user interface for an experimental ontology-based structure visualization of navigation and attitude control system modeling software. To satisfy this, a number of tree and graph visualization tools were researched and a Java based hyperbolic graph viewer was selected for experimental adaptation. Early results show promise in the ability to organize and display large amounts of spacecraft model documentation efficiently and effectively through a web browser. This viewer serves as a conceptual implementation for future development but trials with both ISCA developers and end users should be performed to truly evaluate the effectiveness of continued development of such visualizations.

  5. Modeling the milling tool wear by using an evolutionary SVM-based model from milling runs experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Paulino José García; García-Gonzalo, Esperanza; Vilán, José Antonio Vilán; Robleda, Abraham Segade

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this research work is to build a new practical hybrid regression model to predict the milling tool wear in a regular cut as well as entry cut and exit cut of a milling tool. The model was based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) in combination with support vector machines (SVMs). This optimization mechanism involved kernel parameter setting in the SVM training procedure, which significantly influences the regression accuracy. Bearing this in mind, a PSO-SVM-based model, which is based on the statistical learning theory, was successfully used here to predict the milling tool flank wear (output variable) as a function of the following input variables: the time duration of experiment, depth of cut, feed, type of material, etc. To accomplish the objective of this study, the experimental dataset represents experiments from runs on a milling machine under various operating conditions. In this way, data sampled by three different types of sensors (acoustic emission sensor, vibration sensor and current sensor) were acquired at several positions. A second aim is to determine the factors with the greatest bearing on the milling tool flank wear with a view to proposing milling machine's improvements. Firstly, this hybrid PSO-SVM-based regression model captures the main perception of statistical learning theory in order to obtain a good prediction of the dependence among the flank wear (output variable) and input variables (time, depth of cut, feed, etc.). Indeed, regression with optimal hyperparameters was performed and a determination coefficient of 0.95 was obtained. The agreement of this model with experimental data confirmed its good performance. Secondly, the main advantages of this PSO-SVM-based model are its capacity to produce a simple, easy-to-interpret model, its ability to estimate the contributions of the input variables, and its computational efficiency. Finally, the main conclusions of this study are exposed.

  6. Developing Formal Object-oriented Requirements Specifications: A Model, Tool and Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Robert B.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents a formal object-oriented specification model (OSS) for computer software system development that is supported by a tool that automatically generates a prototype from an object-oriented analysis model (OSA) instance, lets the user examine the prototype, and permits the user to refine the OSA model instance to generate a requirements…

  7. One-year sustained glycaemic control and less hypoglycaemia with new insulin glargine 300 U/ml compared with 100 U/ml in people with type 2 diabetes using basal plus meal-time insulin: the EDITION 1 12-month randomized trial, including 6-month extension.

    PubMed

    Riddle, M C; Yki-Järvinen, H; Bolli, G B; Ziemen, M; Muehlen-Bartmer, I; Cissokho, S; Home, P D

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the maintenance of efficacy and safety of insulin glargine 300 U/ml (Gla-300) versus glargine 100 U/ml (Gla-100) in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using basal plus meal-time insulin for 12 months in the EDITION 1 trial. EDITION 1 was a multicentre, randomized, open-label, two-arm, phase IIIa study. Participants completing the initial 6-month treatment period continued to receive Gla-300 or Gla-100, as previously randomized, once daily for a further 6-month open-label extension phase. Changes in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting plasma glucose concentrations, insulin dose, hypoglycaemic events and body weight were assessed. Of 807 participants enrolled in the initial phase, 89% (359/404) assigned to Gla-300 and 88% (355/403) assigned to Gla-100 completed 12 months. Glycaemic control was sustained in both groups (mean HbA1c: Gla-300, 7.24%; Gla-100, 7.42%), with more sustained HbA1c reduction for Gla-300 at 12 months: least squares mean difference Gla-300 vs Gla-100: HbA1c -0.17 [95% confidence interval (CI) -0.30 to -0.05]%. The mean daily basal insulin dose at 12 months was 1.03 U/kg for Gla-300 and 0.90 U/kg for Gla-100. Lower percentages of participants had ≥1 confirmed [≤3.9 mmol/l (≤70 mg/dl)] or severe hypoglycaemic event with Gla-300 than Gla-100 at any time of day [24 h; 86 vs 92%; relative risk 0.94 (95% CI 0.89-0.99)] and during the night [54 vs 65%; relative risk 0.84 (95% CI 0.75-0.94)], while the annualized rates of such hypoglycaemic events were similar. No between-treatment differences in adverse events were apparent. During 12 months of treatment of T2DM requiring basal and meal-time insulin, glycaemic control was better sustained and fewer individuals reported hypoglycaemia with Gla-300 than with Gla-100. The mean basal insulin dose was higher with Gla-300 compared with Gla-100, but total numbers of hypoglycaemic events and overall tolerability did not differ between treatments. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes

  8. An alternative perspective on assistive technology: the Person-Environment-Tool (PET) model.

    PubMed

    Jarl, Gustav; Lundqvist, Lars-Olov

    2018-04-20

    The medical and social models of disability are based on a dichotomy that categorizes people as able-bodied or disabled. In contrast, the biopsychosocial model, which forms the basis for the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), suggests a universalistic perspective on human functioning, encompassing all human beings. In this article we argue that the artificial separation of function-enhancing technology into assistive technology (AT) and mainstream technology might be one of the barriers to a universalistic view of human functioning. Thus, an alternative view of AT is needed. The aim of this article was to construct a conceptual model to demonstrate how all human activities and participation depend on factors related to the person, environment, and tools, emphasizing a universalistic perspective on human functioning. In the Person-Environment-Tool (PET) model, a person's activity and participation are described as a function of factors related to the person, environment, and tool, drawing on various ICF components. Importantly, the PET model makes no distinction between people of different ability levels, between environmental modifications intended for people of different ability levels, or between different function-enhancing technologies (AT and mainstream technology). A fictive patient case is used to illustrate how the universalistic view of the PET model lead to a different approach in rehabilitation. The PET model supports a universalistic view of technology use, environmental adaptations, and variations in human functioning.

  9. A Tabletop Tool for Modeling Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Majumdar, A.; McDaniels, D.; Stewart, E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the development plan for a comprehensive research and diagnostic tool for aspects of advanced life support systems in space-based laboratories. Specifically it aims to build a high fidelity tabletop model that can be used for the purpose of risk mitigation, failure mode analysis, contamination tracking, and testing reliability. We envision a comprehensive approach involving experimental work coupled with numerical simulation to develop this diagnostic tool. It envisions a 10% scale transparent model of a space platform such as the International Space Station that operates with water or a specific matched index of refraction liquid as the working fluid. This allows the scaling of a 10 ft x 10 ft x 10 ft room with air flow to 1 ft x 1 ft x 1 ft tabletop model with water/liquid flow. Dynamic similitude for this length scale dictates model velocities to be 67% of full-scale and thereby the time scale of the model to represent 15% of the full- scale system; meaning identical processes in the model are completed in 15% of the full- scale time. The use of an index matching fluid (fluid that matches the refractive index of cast acrylic, the model material) allows making the entire model (with complex internal geometry) transparent and hence conducive to non-intrusive optical diagnostics. So using such a system one can test environment control parameters such as core flows (axial flows), cross flows (from registers and diffusers), potential problem areas such as flow short circuits, inadequate oxygen content, build up of other gases beyond desirable levels, test mixing processes within the system at local nodes or compartments and assess the overall system performance. The system allows quantitative measurements of contaminants introduced in the system and allows testing and optimizing the tracking process and removal of contaminants. The envisaged system will be modular and hence flexible for quick configuration change and subsequent testing. The data

  10. Linear regression metamodeling as a tool to summarize and present simulation model results.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Hawre; Dowd, Bryan; Sainfort, François; Kuntz, Karen M

    2013-10-01

    Modelers lack a tool to systematically and clearly present complex model results, including those from sensitivity analyses. The objective was to propose linear regression metamodeling as a tool to increase transparency of decision analytic models and better communicate their results. We used a simplified cancer cure model to demonstrate our approach. The model computed the lifetime cost and benefit of 3 treatment options for cancer patients. We simulated 10,000 cohorts in a probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) and regressed the model outcomes on the standardized input parameter values in a set of regression analyses. We used the regression coefficients to describe measures of sensitivity analyses, including threshold and parameter sensitivity analyses. We also compared the results of the PSA to deterministic full-factorial and one-factor-at-a-time designs. The regression intercept represented the estimated base-case outcome, and the other coefficients described the relative parameter uncertainty in the model. We defined simple relationships that compute the average and incremental net benefit of each intervention. Metamodeling produced outputs similar to traditional deterministic 1-way or 2-way sensitivity analyses but was more reliable since it used all parameter values. Linear regression metamodeling is a simple, yet powerful, tool that can assist modelers in communicating model characteristics and sensitivity analyses.

  11. HOCOMOCO: towards a complete collection of transcription factor binding models for human and mouse via large-scale ChIP-Seq analysis.

    PubMed

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Yevshin, Ivan S; Sharipov, Ruslan N; Fedorova, Alla D; Rumynskiy, Eugene I; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Magana-Mora, Arturo; Bajic, Vladimir B; Papatsenko, Dmitry A; Kolpakov, Fedor A; Makeev, Vsevolod J

    2018-01-04

    We present a major update of the HOCOMOCO collection that consists of patterns describing DNA binding specificities for human and mouse transcription factors. In this release, we profited from a nearly doubled volume of published in vivo experiments on transcription factor (TF) binding to expand the repertoire of binding models, replace low-quality models previously based on in vitro data only and cover more than a hundred TFs with previously unknown binding specificities. This was achieved by systematic motif discovery from more than five thousand ChIP-Seq experiments uniformly processed within the BioUML framework with several ChIP-Seq peak calling tools and aggregated in the GTRD database. HOCOMOCO v11 contains binding models for 453 mouse and 680 human transcription factors and includes 1302 mononucleotide and 576 dinucleotide position weight matrices, which describe primary binding preferences of each transcription factor and reliable alternative binding specificities. An interactive interface and bulk downloads are available on the web: http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco11. In this release, we complement HOCOMOCO by MoLoTool (Motif Location Toolbox, http://molotool.autosome.ru) that applies HOCOMOCO models for visualization of binding sites in short DNA sequences. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. System capacity and economic modeling computer tool for satellite mobile communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedeman, Robert A.; Wen, Doong; Mccracken, Albert G.

    1988-01-01

    A unique computer modeling tool that combines an engineering tool with a financial analysis program is described. The resulting combination yields a flexible economic model that can predict the cost effectiveness of various mobile systems. Cost modeling is necessary in order to ascertain if a given system with a finite satellite resource is capable of supporting itself financially and to determine what services can be supported. Personal computer techniques using Lotus 123 are used for the model in order to provide as universal an application as possible such that the model can be used and modified to fit many situations and conditions. The output of the engineering portion of the model consists of a channel capacity analysis and link calculations for several qualities of service using up to 16 types of earth terminal configurations. The outputs of the financial model are a revenue analysis, an income statement, and a cost model validation section.

  13. Force sensor based tool condition monitoring using a heterogeneous ensemble learning model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guofeng; Yang, Yinwei; Li, Zhimeng

    2014-11-14

    Tool condition monitoring (TCM) plays an important role in improving machining efficiency and guaranteeing workpiece quality. In order to realize reliable recognition of the tool condition, a robust classifier needs to be constructed to depict the relationship between tool wear states and sensory information. However, because of the complexity of the machining process and the uncertainty of the tool wear evolution, it is hard for a single classifier to fit all the collected samples without sacrificing generalization ability. In this paper, heterogeneous ensemble learning is proposed to realize tool condition monitoring in which the support vector machine (SVM), hidden Markov model (HMM) and radius basis function (RBF) are selected as base classifiers and a stacking ensemble strategy is further used to reflect the relationship between the outputs of these base classifiers and tool wear states. Based on the heterogeneous ensemble learning classifier, an online monitoring system is constructed in which the harmonic features are extracted from force signals and a minimal redundancy and maximal relevance (mRMR) algorithm is utilized to select the most prominent features. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, a titanium alloy milling experiment was carried out and samples with different tool wear states were collected to build the proposed heterogeneous ensemble learning classifier. Moreover, the homogeneous ensemble learning model and majority voting strategy are also adopted to make a comparison. The analysis and comparison results show that the proposed heterogeneous ensemble learning classifier performs better in both classification accuracy and stability.

  14. Can We Practically Bring Physics-based Modeling Into Operational Analytics Tools?

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Granderson, Jessica; Bonvini, Marco; Piette, Mary Ann

    We present that analytics software is increasingly used to improve and maintain operational efficiency in commercial buildings. Energy managers, owners, and operators are using a diversity of commercial offerings often referred to as Energy Information Systems, Fault Detection and Diagnostic (FDD) systems, or more broadly Energy Management and Information Systems, to cost-effectively enable savings on the order of ten to twenty percent. Most of these systems use data from meters and sensors, with rule-based and/or data-driven models to characterize system and building behavior. In contrast, physics-based modeling uses first-principles and engineering models (e.g., efficiency curves) to characterize system and buildingmore » behavior. Historically, these physics-based approaches have been used in the design phase of the building life cycle or in retrofit analyses. Researchers have begun exploring the benefits of integrating physics-based models with operational data analytics tools, bridging the gap between design and operations. In this paper, we detail the development and operator use of a software tool that uses hybrid data-driven and physics-based approaches to cooling plant FDD and optimization. Specifically, we describe the system architecture, models, and FDD and optimization algorithms; advantages and disadvantages with respect to purely data-driven approaches; and practical implications for scaling and replicating these techniques. Finally, we conclude with an evaluation of the future potential for such tools and future research opportunities.« less

  15. Propel: Tools and Methods for Practical Source Code Model Checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansouri-Samani, Massoud; Mehlitz, Peter; Markosian, Lawrence; OMalley, Owen; Martin, Dale; Moore, Lantz; Penix, John; Visser, Willem

    2003-01-01

    The work reported here is an overview and snapshot of a project to develop practical model checking tools for in-the-loop verification of NASA s mission-critical, multithreaded programs in Java and C++. Our strategy is to develop and evaluate both a design concept that enables the application of model checking technology to C++ and Java, and a model checking toolset for C++ and Java. The design concept and the associated model checking toolset is called Propel. It builds upon the Java PathFinder (JPF) tool, an explicit state model checker for Java applications developed by the Automated Software Engineering group at NASA Ames Research Center. The design concept that we are developing is Design for Verification (D4V). This is an adaption of existing best design practices that has the desired side-effect of enhancing verifiability by improving modularity and decreasing accidental complexity. D4V, we believe, enhances the applicability of a variety of V&V approaches; we are developing the concept in the context of model checking. The model checking toolset, Propel, is based on extending JPF to handle C++. Our principal tasks in developing the toolset are to build a translator from C++ to Java, productize JPF, and evaluate the toolset in the context of D4V. Through all these tasks we are testing Propel capabilities on customer applications.

  16. Reach Adaptation: What Determines Whether We Learn an Internal Model of the Tool or Adapt the Model of Our Arm?

    PubMed Central

    Kluzik, JoAnn; Diedrichsen, Jörn; Shadmehr, Reza; Bastian, Amy J.

    2008-01-01

    We make errors when learning to use a new tool. However, the cause of error may be ambiguous: is it because we misestimated properties of the tool or of our own arm? We considered a well-studied adaptation task in which people made goal-directed reaching movements while holding the handle of a robotic arm. The robot produced viscous forces that perturbed reach trajectories. As reaching improved with practice, did people recalibrate an internal model of their arm, or did they build an internal model of the novel tool (robot), or both? What factors influenced how the brain solved this credit assignment problem? To investigate these questions, we compared transfer of adaptation between three conditions: catch trials in which robot forces were turned off unannounced, robot-null trials in which subjects were told that forces were turned off, and free-space trials in which subjects still held the handle but watched as it was detached from the robot. Transfer to free space was 40% of that observed in unannounced catch trials. We next hypothesized that transfer to free space might increase if the training field changed gradually, rather than abruptly. Indeed, this method increased transfer to free space from 40 to 60%. Therefore although practice with a novel tool resulted in formation of an internal model of the tool, it also appeared to produce a transient change in the internal model of the subject's arm. Gradual changes in the tool's dynamics increased the extent to which the nervous system recalibrated the model of the subject's own arm. PMID:18596187

  17. Hybrid ABC Optimized MARS-Based Modeling of the Milling Tool Wear from Milling Run Experimental Data

    PubMed Central

    García Nieto, Paulino José; García-Gonzalo, Esperanza; Ordóñez Galán, Celestino; Bernardo Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Milling cutters are important cutting tools used in milling machines to perform milling operations, which are prone to wear and subsequent failure. In this paper, a practical new hybrid model to predict the milling tool wear in a regular cut, as well as entry cut and exit cut, of a milling tool is proposed. The model was based on the optimization tool termed artificial bee colony (ABC) in combination with multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) technique. This optimization mechanism involved the parameter setting in the MARS training procedure, which significantly influences the regression accuracy. Therefore, an ABC–MARS-based model was successfully used here to predict the milling tool flank wear (output variable) as a function of the following input variables: the time duration of experiment, depth of cut, feed, type of material, etc. Regression with optimal hyperparameters was performed and a determination coefficient of 0.94 was obtained. The ABC–MARS-based model's goodness of fit to experimental data confirmed the good performance of this model. This new model also allowed us to ascertain the most influential parameters on the milling tool flank wear with a view to proposing milling machine's improvements. Finally, conclusions of this study are exposed. PMID:28787882

  18. Hybrid ABC Optimized MARS-Based Modeling of the Milling Tool Wear from Milling Run Experimental Data.

    PubMed

    García Nieto, Paulino José; García-Gonzalo, Esperanza; Ordóñez Galán, Celestino; Bernardo Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-01-28

    Milling cutters are important cutting tools used in milling machines to perform milling operations, which are prone to wear and subsequent failure. In this paper, a practical new hybrid model to predict the milling tool wear in a regular cut, as well as entry cut and exit cut, of a milling tool is proposed. The model was based on the optimization tool termed artificial bee colony (ABC) in combination with multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) technique. This optimization mechanism involved the parameter setting in the MARS training procedure, which significantly influences the regression accuracy. Therefore, an ABC-MARS-based model was successfully used here to predict the milling tool flank wear (output variable) as a function of the following input variables: the time duration of experiment, depth of cut, feed, type of material, etc . Regression with optimal hyperparameters was performed and a determination coefficient of 0.94 was obtained. The ABC-MARS-based model's goodness of fit to experimental data confirmed the good performance of this model. This new model also allowed us to ascertain the most influential parameters on the milling tool flank wear with a view to proposing milling machine's improvements. Finally, conclusions of this study are exposed.

  19. Dynamical and Mechanistic Reconstructive Approaches of T Lymphocyte Dynamics: Using Visual Modeling Languages to Bridge the Gap between Immunologists, Theoreticians, and Programmers

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Vaslin, Véronique; Six, Adrien; Ganascia, Jean-Gabriel; Bersini, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic modeling of lymphocyte behavior has primarily been based on populations based differential equations or on cellular agents moving in space and interacting each other. The final steps of this modeling effort are expressed in a code written in a programing language. On account of the complete lack of standardization of the different steps to proceed, we have to deplore poor communication and sharing between experimentalists, theoreticians and programmers. The adoption of diagrammatic visual computer language should however greatly help the immunologists to better communicate, to more easily identify the models similarities and facilitate the reuse and extension of existing software models. Since immunologists often conceptualize the dynamical evolution of immune systems in terms of “state-transitions” of biological objects, we promote the use of unified modeling language (UML) state-transition diagram. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, we present a UML refactoring of two published models on thymocyte differentiation. Originally built with different modeling strategies, a mathematical ordinary differential equation-based model and a cellular automata model, the two models are now in the same visual formalism and can be compared. PMID:24101919

  20. Design Optimization Tool for Synthetic Jet Actuators Using Lumped Element Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallas, Quentin; Sheplak, Mark; Cattafesta, Louis N., III; Gorton, Susan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    The performance specifications of any actuator are quantified in terms of an exhaustive list of parameters such as bandwidth, output control authority, etc. Flow-control applications benefit from a known actuator frequency response function that relates the input voltage to the output property of interest (e.g., maximum velocity, volumetric flow rate, momentum flux, etc.). Clearly, the required performance metrics are application specific, and methods are needed to achieve the optimal design of these devices. Design and optimization studies have been conducted for piezoelectric cantilever-type flow control actuators, but the modeling issues are simpler compared to synthetic jets. Here, lumped element modeling (LEM) is combined with equivalent circuit representations to estimate the nonlinear dynamic response of a synthetic jet as a function of device dimensions, material properties, and external flow conditions. These models provide reasonable agreement between predicted and measured frequency response functions and thus are suitable for use as design tools. In this work, we have developed a Matlab-based design optimization tool for piezoelectric synthetic jet actuators based on the lumped element models mentioned above. Significant improvements were achieved by optimizing the piezoceramic diaphragm dimensions. Synthetic-jet actuators were fabricated and benchtop tested to fully document their behavior and validate a companion optimization effort. It is hoped that the tool developed from this investigation will assist in the design and deployment of these actuators.

  1. Integrating Cache Performance Modeling and Tuning Support in Parallelization Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    With the resurgence of distributed shared memory (DSM) systems based on cache-coherent Non Uniform Memory Access (ccNUMA) architectures and increasing disparity between memory and processors speeds, data locality overheads are becoming the greatest bottlenecks in the way of realizing potential high performance of these systems. While parallelization tools and compilers facilitate the users in porting their sequential applications to a DSM system, a lot of time and effort is needed to tune the memory performance of these applications to achieve reasonable speedup. In this paper, we show that integrating cache performance modeling and tuning support within a parallelization environment can alleviate this problem. The Cache Performance Modeling and Prediction Tool (CPMP), employs trace-driven simulation techniques without the overhead of generating and managing detailed address traces. CPMP predicts the cache performance impact of source code level "what-if" modifications in a program to assist a user in the tuning process. CPMP is built on top of a customized version of the Computer Aided Parallelization Tools (CAPTools) environment. Finally, we demonstrate how CPMP can be applied to tune a real Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) application.

  2. Customer-experienced rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Fu; Li, Anbo

    2008-12-01

    In order to describe accurately and comprehend quickly the perfect GIS requirements, this article will integrate the ideas of QFD (Quality Function Deployment) and UML (Unified Modeling Language), and analyze the deficiency of prototype development model, and will propose the idea of the Customer-Experienced Rapid Prototyping (CE-RP) and describe in detail the process and framework of the CE-RP, from the angle of the characteristics of Modern-GIS. The CE-RP is mainly composed of Customer Tool-Sets (CTS), Developer Tool-Sets (DTS) and Barrier-Free Semantic Interpreter (BF-SI) and performed by two roles of customer and developer. The main purpose of the CE-RP is to produce the unified and authorized requirements data models between customer and software developer.

  3. Development of the Rice Convection Model as a Space Weather Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-31

    coupled to the ionosphere that is suitable for both scientific studies as well as a prediction tool. We are able to run the model faster than “real...of work by finding ways to fund a more systematic effort in making the RCM a space weather prediction tool for magnetospheric and ionospheric studies...convection electric field, total electron content, TEC, ionospheric convection, plasmasphere 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  4. California Geriatric Education Center Logic Model: An Evaluation and Communication Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Rachel M.; Alkema, Gretchen E.; Frank, Janet C.

    2009-01-01

    A logic model is a communications tool that graphically represents a program's resources, activities, priority target audiences for change, and the anticipated outcomes. This article describes the logic model development process undertaken by the California Geriatric Education Center in spring 2008. The CGEC is one of 48 Geriatric Education…

  5. Force Sensor Based Tool Condition Monitoring Using a Heterogeneous Ensemble Learning Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guofeng; Yang, Yinwei; Li, Zhimeng

    2014-01-01

    Tool condition monitoring (TCM) plays an important role in improving machining efficiency and guaranteeing workpiece quality. In order to realize reliable recognition of the tool condition, a robust classifier needs to be constructed to depict the relationship between tool wear states and sensory information. However, because of the complexity of the machining process and the uncertainty of the tool wear evolution, it is hard for a single classifier to fit all the collected samples without sacrificing generalization ability. In this paper, heterogeneous ensemble learning is proposed to realize tool condition monitoring in which the support vector machine (SVM), hidden Markov model (HMM) and radius basis function (RBF) are selected as base classifiers and a stacking ensemble strategy is further used to reflect the relationship between the outputs of these base classifiers and tool wear states. Based on the heterogeneous ensemble learning classifier, an online monitoring system is constructed in which the harmonic features are extracted from force signals and a minimal redundancy and maximal relevance (mRMR) algorithm is utilized to select the most prominent features. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, a titanium alloy milling experiment was carried out and samples with different tool wear states were collected to build the proposed heterogeneous ensemble learning classifier. Moreover, the homogeneous ensemble learning model and majority voting strategy are also adopted to make a comparison. The analysis and comparison results show that the proposed heterogeneous ensemble learning classifier performs better in both classification accuracy and stability. PMID:25405514

  6. Virtual Power Electronics: Novel Software Tools for Design, Modeling and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamar, Janos; Nagy, István; Funato, Hirohito; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Dranga, Octavian; Nishida, Yasuyuki

    The current paper is dedicated to present browser-based multimedia-rich software tools and e-learning curriculum to support the design and modeling process of power electronics circuits and to explain sometimes rather sophisticated phenomena. Two projects will be discussed. The so-called Inetele project is financed by the Leonardo da Vinci program of the European Union (EU). It is a collaborative project between numerous EU universities and institutes to develop state-of-the art curriculum in Electrical Engineering. Another cooperative project with participation of Japanese, European and Australian institutes focuses especially on developing e-learning curriculum, interactive design and modeling tools, furthermore on development of a virtual laboratory. Snapshots from these two projects will be presented.

  7. Integrated catchment modelling within a strategic planning and decision making process: Werra case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Jörg; Funke, Markus

    Integrated water resources management (IWRM) redefines conventional water management approaches through a closer cross-linkage between environment and society. The role of public participation and socio-economic considerations becomes more important within the planning and decision making process. In this paper we address aspects of the integration of catchment models into such a process taking the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive (WFD) as an example. Within a case study situated in the Werra river basin (Central Germany), a systems analytic decision process model was developed. This model uses the semantics of the Unified Modeling Language (UML) activity model. As an example application, the catchment model SWAT and the water quality model RWQM1 were applied to simulate the effect of phosphorus emissions from non-point and point sources on water quality. The decision process model was able to guide the participants of the case study through the interdisciplinary planning and negotiation of actions. Further improvements of the integration framework include tools for quantitative uncertainty analyses, which are crucial for real life application of models within an IWRM decision making toolbox. For the case study, the multi-criteria assessment of actions indicates that the polluter pays principle can be met at larger scales (sub-catchment or river basin) without significantly compromising cost efficiency for the local situation.

  8. A New Browser-based, Ontology-driven Tool for Generating Standardized, Deep Descriptions of Geoscience Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckham, S. D.; Kelbert, A.; Rudan, S.; Stoica, M.

    2016-12-01

    Standardized metadata for models is the key to reliable and greatly simplified coupling in model coupling frameworks like CSDMS (Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System). This model metadata also helps model users to understand the important details that underpin computational models and to compare the capabilities of different models. These details include simplifying assumptions on the physics, governing equations and the numerical methods used to solve them, discretization of space (the grid) and time (the time-stepping scheme), state variables (input or output), model configuration parameters. This kind of metadata provides a "deep description" of a computational model that goes well beyond other types of metadata (e.g. author, purpose, scientific domain, programming language, digital rights, provenance, execution) and captures the science that underpins a model. While having this kind of standardized metadata for each model in a repository opens up a wide range of exciting possibilities, it is difficult to collect this information and a carefully conceived "data model" or schema is needed to store it. Automated harvesting and scraping methods can provide some useful information, but they often result in metadata that is inaccurate or incomplete, and this is not sufficient to enable the desired capabilities. In order to address this problem, we have developed a browser-based tool called the MCM Tool (Model Component Metadata) which runs on notebooks, tablets and smart phones. This tool was partially inspired by the TurboTax software, which greatly simplifies the necessary task of preparing tax documents. It allows a model developer or advanced user to provide a standardized, deep description of a computational geoscience model, including hydrologic models. Under the hood, the tool uses a new ontology for models built on the CSDMS Standard Names, expressed as a collection of RDF files (Resource Description Framework). This ontology is based on core concepts

  9. Developing Technology Teachers: Questioning the Industrial Tool Use Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, John W.; Lovedahl, Gerald G.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author questions the role of technology teacher preparation programs that are based on an "industrial tool use" model to develop technology education teachers. It is the position of the authors that the manner by which technology education teachers are prepared may need revision and that technology teacher educators…

  10. Scale models: A proven cost-effective tool for outage planning

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Lee, R.; Segroves, R.

    1995-03-01

    As generation costs for operating nuclear stations have risen, more nuclear utilities have initiated efforts to improve cost effectiveness. Nuclear plant owners are also being challenged with lower radiation exposure limits and new revised radiation protection related regulations (10 CFR 20), which places further stress on their budgets. As source term reduction activities continue to lower radiation fields, reducing the amount of time spent in radiation fields becomes one of the most cost-effective ways of reducing radiation exposure. An effective approach for minimizing time spent in radiation areas is to use a physical scale model for worker orientation planning andmore » monitoring maintenance, modifications, and outage activities. To meet the challenge of continued reduction in the annual cumulative radiation exposures, new cost-effective tools are required. One field-tested and proven tool is the physical scale model.« less

  11. A model for flexible tools used in minimally invasive medical virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Soler, Francisco; Luzon, M Victoria; Pop, Serban R; Hughes, Chris J; John, Nigel W; Torres, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Within the limits of current technology, many applications of a virtual environment will trade-off accuracy for speed. This is not an acceptable compromise in a medical training application where both are essential. Efficient algorithms must therefore be developed. The purpose of this project is the development and validation of a novel physics-based real time tool manipulation model, which is easy to integrate into any medical virtual environment that requires support for the insertion of long flexible tools into complex geometries. This encompasses medical specialities such as vascular interventional radiology, endoscopy, and laparoscopy, where training, prototyping of new instruments/tools and mission rehearsal can all be facilitated by using an immersive medical virtual environment. Our model recognises and uses accurately patient specific data and adapts to the geometrical complexity of the vessel in real time.

  12. From Modelling to Execution of Enterprise Integration Scenarios: The GENIUS Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibler, Thorsten; Leymann, Frank

    One of the predominant problems IT companies are facing today is Enterprise Application Integration (EAI). Most of the infrastructures built to tackle integration issues are proprietary because no standards exist for how to model, develop, and actually execute integration scenarios. EAI patterns gain importance for non-technical business users to ease and harmonize the development of EAI scenarios. These patterns describe recurring EAI challenges and propose possible solutions in an abstract way. Therefore, one can use those patterns to describe enterprise architectures in a technology neutral manner. However, patterns are documentation only used by developers and systems architects to decide how to implement an integration scenario manually. Thus, patterns are not theoretical thought to stand for artefacts that will immediately be executed. This paper presents a tool supporting a method how EAI patterns can be used to generate executable artefacts for various target platforms automatically using a model-driven development approach, hence turning patterns into something executable. Therefore, we introduce a continuous tool chain beginning at the design phase and ending in executing an integration solution in a completely automatically manner. For evaluation purposes we introduce a scenario demonstrating how the tool is utilized for modelling and actually executing an integration scenario.

  13. Modeling of Passive Forces of Machine Tool Covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolar, Petr; Hudec, Jan; Sulitka, Matej

    The passive forces acting against the drive force are phenomena that influence dynamical properties and precision of linear axes equipped with feed drives. Covers are one of important sources of passive forces in machine tools. The paper describes virtual evaluation of cover passive forces using the cover complex model. The model is able to compute interaction between flexible cover segments and sealing wiper. The result is deformation of cover segments and wipers which is used together with measured friction coefficient for computation of cover total passive force. This resulting passive force is dependent on cover position. Comparison of computational results and measurement on the real cover is presented in the paper.

  14. Fuzzy regression modeling for tool performance prediction and degradation detection.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Er, M J; Lim, B S; Zhou, J H; Gan, O P; Rutkowski, L

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, the viability of using Fuzzy-Rule-Based Regression Modeling (FRM) algorithm for tool performance and degradation detection is investigated. The FRM is developed based on a multi-layered fuzzy-rule-based hybrid system with Multiple Regression Models (MRM) embedded into a fuzzy logic inference engine that employs Self Organizing Maps (SOM) for clustering. The FRM converts a complex nonlinear problem to a simplified linear format in order to further increase the accuracy in prediction and rate of convergence. The efficacy of the proposed FRM is tested through a case study - namely to predict the remaining useful life of a ball nose milling cutter during a dry machining process of hardened tool steel with a hardness of 52-54 HRc. A comparative study is further made between four predictive models using the same set of experimental data. It is shown that the FRM is superior as compared with conventional MRM, Back Propagation Neural Networks (BPNN) and Radial Basis Function Networks (RBFN) in terms of prediction accuracy and learning speed.

  15. Human-scale interaction for virtual model displays: a clear case for real tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, George C.; McDowall, Ian E.; Bolas, Mark T.

    1998-04-01

    We describe a hand-held user interface for interacting with virtual environments displayed on a Virtual Model Display. The tool, constructed entirely of transparent materials, is see-through. We render a graphical counterpart of the tool on the display and map it one-to-one with the real tool. This feature, combined with a capability for touch- sensitive, discrete input, results in a useful spatial input device that is visually versatile. We discuss the tool's design and interaction techniques it supports. Briefly, we look at the human factors issues and engineering challenges presented by this tool and, in general, by the class of hand-held user interfaces that are see-through.

  16. A temperature dependent cyclic plasticity model for hot work tool steel including particle coarsening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilg, Andreas; Seifert, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Hot work tools are subjected to complex thermal and mechanical loads during hot forming processes. Locally, the stresses can exceed the material's yield strength in highly loaded areas as e.g. in small radii in die cavities. To sustain the high loads, the hot forming tools are typically made of martensitic hot work steels. While temperatures for annealing of the tool steels usually lie in the range between 400 and 600 °C, the steels may experience even higher temperatures during hot forming, resulting in softening of the material due to coarsening of strengthening particles. In this paper, a temperature dependent cyclic plasticity model for the martensitic hot work tool steel 1.2367 (X38CrMoV5-3) is presented that includes softening due to particle coarsening and that can be applied in finite-element calculations to assess the effect of softening on the thermomechanical fatigue life of hot work tools. To this end, a kinetic model for the evolution of the mean size of secondary carbides based on Ostwald ripening is coupled with a cyclic plasticity model with kinematic hardening. Mechanism-based relations are developed to describe the dependency of the mechanical properties on carbide size and temperature. The material properties of the mechanical and kinetic model are determined on the basis of tempering hardness curves as well as monotonic and cyclic tests.

  17. Using UMLS to construct a generalized hierarchical concept-based dictionary of brain functions for information extraction from the fMRI literature.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Mei-Yu; Chen, Chien-Chung; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2009-10-01

    With a rapid progress in the field, a great many fMRI studies are published every year, to the extent that it is now becoming difficult for researchers to keep up with the literature, since reading papers is extremely time-consuming and labor-intensive. Thus, automatic information extraction has become an important issue. In this study, we used the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) to construct a hierarchical concept-based dictionary of brain functions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first generalized dictionary of this kind. We also developed an information extraction system for recognizing, mapping and classifying terms relevant to human brain study. The precision and recall of our system was on a par with that of human experts in term recognition, term mapping and term classification. Our approach presented in this paper presents an alternative to the more laborious, manual entry approach to information extraction.

  18. Prediction of the wear and evolution of cutting tools in a carbide / titanium-aluminum-vanadium machining tribosystem by volumetric tool wear characterization and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttolamadom, Mathew Abraham

    The objective of this research work is to create a comprehensive microstructural wear mechanism-based predictive model of tool wear in the tungsten carbide / Ti-6Al-4V machining tribosystem, and to develop a new topology characterization method for worn cutting tools in order to validate the model predictions. This is accomplished by blending first principle wear mechanism models using a weighting scheme derived from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of tools worn under different operational conditions. In addition, the topology of worn tools is characterized through scanning by white light interferometry (WLI), and then application of an algorithm to stitch and solidify data sets to calculate the volume of the tool worn away. The methodology was to first combine and weight dominant microstructural wear mechanism models, to be able to effectively predict the tool volume worn away. Then, by developing a new metrology method for accurately quantifying the bulk-3D wear, the model-predicted wear was validated against worn tool volumes obtained from corresponding machining experiments. On analyzing worn crater faces using SEM/EDS, adhesion was found dominant at lower surface speeds, while dissolution wear dominated with increasing speeds -- this is in conformance with the lower relative surface speed requirement for micro welds to form and rupture, essentially defining the mechanical load limit of the tool material. It also conforms to the known dominance of high temperature-controlled wear mechanisms with increasing surface speed, which is known to exponentially increase temperatures especially when machining Ti-6Al-4V due to its low thermal conductivity. Thus, straight tungsten carbide wear when machining Ti-6Al-4V is mechanically-driven at low surface speeds and thermally-driven at high surface speeds. Further, at high surface speeds, craters were formed due to carbon diffusing to the tool surface and

  19. A New Climate Adjustment Tool: An update to EPA’s Storm Water Management Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA’s newest tool, the Stormwater Management Model (SWMM) – Climate Adjustment Tool (CAT) is meant to help municipal stormwater utilities better address potential climate change impacts affecting their operations.

  20. Transposons As Tools for Functional Genomics in Vertebrate Models.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Koichi; Largaespada, David A; Ivics, Zoltán

    2017-11-01

    Genetic tools and mutagenesis strategies based on transposable elements are currently under development with a vision to link primary DNA sequence information to gene functions in vertebrate models. By virtue of their inherent capacity to insert into DNA, transposons can be developed into powerful tools for chromosomal manipulations. Transposon-based forward mutagenesis screens have numerous advantages including high throughput, easy identification of mutated alleles, and providing insight into genetic networks and pathways based on phenotypes. For example, the Sleeping Beauty transposon has become highly instrumental to induce tumors in experimental animals in a tissue-specific manner with the aim of uncovering the genetic basis of diverse cancers. Here, we describe a battery of mutagenic cassettes that can be applied in conjunction with transposon vectors to mutagenize genes, and highlight versatile experimental strategies for the generation of engineered chromosomes for loss-of-function as well as gain-of-function mutagenesis for functional gene annotation in vertebrate models, including zebrafish, mice, and rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Status of Computational Aerodynamic Modeling Tools for Aircraft Loss-of-Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Atkins, Harold L.; Viken, Sally A.; Petrilli, Justin L.; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Paul, Ryan C.

    2016-01-01

    A concerted effort has been underway over the past several years to evolve computational capabilities for modeling aircraft loss-of-control under the NASA Aviation Safety Program. A principal goal has been to develop reliable computational tools for predicting and analyzing the non-linear stability & control characteristics of aircraft near stall boundaries affecting safe flight, and for utilizing those predictions for creating augmented flight simulation models that improve pilot training. Pursuing such an ambitious task with limited resources required the forging of close collaborative relationships with a diverse body of computational aerodynamicists and flight simulation experts to leverage their respective research efforts into the creation of NASA tools to meet this goal. Considerable progress has been made and work remains to be done. This paper summarizes the status of the NASA effort to establish computational capabilities for modeling aircraft loss-of-control and offers recommendations for future work.

  2. Translating statistical species-habitat models to interactive decision support tools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wszola, Lyndsie S.; Simonsen, Victoria L.; Stuber, Erica F.; Gillespie, Caitlyn R.; Messinger, Lindsey N.; Decker, Karie L.; Lusk, Jeffrey J.; Jorgensen, Christopher F.; Bishop, Andrew A.; Fontaine, Joseph J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding species-habitat relationships is vital to successful conservation, but the tools used to communicate species-habitat relationships are often poorly suited to the information needs of conservation practitioners. Here we present a novel method for translating a statistical species-habitat model, a regression analysis relating ring-necked pheasant abundance to landcover, into an interactive online tool. The Pheasant Habitat Simulator combines the analytical power of the R programming environment with the user-friendly Shiny web interface to create an online platform in which wildlife professionals can explore the effects of variation in local landcover on relative pheasant habitat suitability within spatial scales relevant to individual wildlife managers. Our tool allows users to virtually manipulate the landcover composition of a simulated space to explore how changes in landcover may affect pheasant relative habitat suitability, and guides users through the economic tradeoffs of landscape changes. We offer suggestions for development of similar interactive applications and demonstrate their potential as innovative science delivery tools for diverse professional and public audiences.

  3. Translating statistical species-habitat models to interactive decision support tools.

    PubMed

    Wszola, Lyndsie S; Simonsen, Victoria L; Stuber, Erica F; Gillespie, Caitlyn R; Messinger, Lindsey N; Decker, Karie L; Lusk, Jeffrey J; Jorgensen, Christopher F; Bishop, Andrew A; Fontaine, Joseph J

    2017-01-01

    Understanding species-habitat relationships is vital to successful conservation, but the tools used to communicate species-habitat relationships are often poorly suited to the information needs of conservation practitioners. Here we present a novel method for translating a statistical species-habitat model, a regression analysis relating ring-necked pheasant abundance to landcover, into an interactive online tool. The Pheasant Habitat Simulator combines the analytical power of the R programming environment with the user-friendly Shiny web interface to create an online platform in which wildlife professionals can explore the effects of variation in local landcover on relative pheasant habitat suitability within spatial scales relevant to individual wildlife managers. Our tool allows users to virtually manipulate the landcover composition of a simulated space to explore how changes in landcover may affect pheasant relative habitat suitability, and guides users through the economic tradeoffs of landscape changes. We offer suggestions for development of similar interactive applications and demonstrate their potential as innovative science delivery tools for diverse professional and public audiences.

  4. Translating statistical species-habitat models to interactive decision support tools

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Victoria L.; Stuber, Erica F.; Gillespie, Caitlyn R.; Messinger, Lindsey N.; Decker, Karie L.; Lusk, Jeffrey J.; Jorgensen, Christopher F.; Bishop, Andrew A.; Fontaine, Joseph J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding species-habitat relationships is vital to successful conservation, but the tools used to communicate species-habitat relationships are often poorly suited to the information needs of conservation practitioners. Here we present a novel method for translating a statistical species-habitat model, a regression analysis relating ring-necked pheasant abundance to landcover, into an interactive online tool. The Pheasant Habitat Simulator combines the analytical power of the R programming environment with the user-friendly Shiny web interface to create an online platform in which wildlife professionals can explore the effects of variation in local landcover on relative pheasant habitat suitability within spatial scales relevant to individual wildlife managers. Our tool allows users to virtually manipulate the landcover composition of a simulated space to explore how changes in landcover may affect pheasant relative habitat suitability, and guides users through the economic tradeoffs of landscape changes. We offer suggestions for development of similar interactive applications and demonstrate their potential as innovative science delivery tools for diverse professional and public audiences. PMID:29236707

  5. A Model-Driven Architecture Approach for Modeling, Specifying and Deploying Policies in Autonomous and Autonomic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pena, Joaquin; Hinchey, Michael G.; Sterritt, Roy; Ruiz-Cortes, Antonio; Resinas, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Autonomic Computing (AC), self-management based on high level guidance from humans, is increasingly gaining momentum as the way forward in designing reliable systems that hide complexity and conquer IT management costs. Effectively, AC may be viewed as Policy-Based Self-Management. The Model Driven Architecture (MDA) approach focuses on building models that can be transformed into code in an automatic manner. In this paper, we look at ways to implement Policy-Based Self-Management by means of models that can be converted to code using transformations that follow the MDA philosophy. We propose a set of UML-based models to specify autonomic and autonomous features along with the necessary procedures, based on modification and composition of models, to deploy a policy as an executing system.

  6. Using the Model United Nations as a Teaching Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efird, L. Julian

    This document provides a description of the Model United Nations (MUN) program, its educational benefits, an overview of its practice within the United States, and outlines methods for using the MUN as a teaching tool. A total of 72 MUNs involving high school and college students was reported in 1977-78. As a simulation, the MUN provides…

  7. Benchmarking a Visual-Basic based multi-component one-dimensional reactive transport modeling tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torlapati, Jagadish; Prabhakar Clement, T.

    2013-01-01

    We present the details of a comprehensive numerical modeling tool, RT1D, which can be used for simulating biochemical and geochemical reactive transport problems. The code can be run within the standard Microsoft EXCEL Visual Basic platform, and it does not require any additional software tools. The code can be easily adapted by others for simulating different types of laboratory-scale reactive transport experiments. We illustrate the capabilities of the tool by solving five benchmark problems with varying levels of reaction complexity. These literature-derived benchmarks are used to highlight the versatility of the code for solving a variety of practical reactive transport problems. The benchmarks are described in detail to provide a comprehensive database, which can be used by model developers to test other numerical codes. The VBA code presented in the study is a practical tool that can be used by laboratory researchers for analyzing both batch and column datasets within an EXCEL platform.

  8. Visible Earthquakes: a web-based tool for visualizing and modeling InSAR earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funning, G. J.; Cockett, R.

    2012-12-01

    InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a technique for measuring the deformation of the ground using satellite radar data. One of the principal applications of this method is in the study of earthquakes; in the past 20 years over 70 earthquakes have been studied in this way, and forthcoming satellite missions promise to enable the routine and timely study of events in the future. Despite the utility of the technique and its widespread adoption by the research community, InSAR does not feature in the teaching curricula of most university geoscience departments. This is, we believe, due to a lack of accessibility to software and data. Existing tools for the visualization and modeling of interferograms are often research-oriented, command line-based and/or prohibitively expensive. Here we present a new web-based interactive tool for comparing real InSAR data with simple elastic models. The overall design of this tool was focused on ease of access and use. This tool should allow interested nonspecialists to gain a feel for the use of such data and greatly facilitate integration of InSAR into upper division geoscience courses, giving students practice in comparing actual data to modeled results. The tool, provisionally named 'Visible Earthquakes', uses web-based technologies to instantly render the displacement field that would be observable using InSAR for a given fault location, geometry, orientation, and slip. The user can adjust these 'source parameters' using a simple, clickable interface, and see how these affect the resulting model interferogram. By visually matching the model interferogram to a real earthquake interferogram (processed separately and included in the web tool) a user can produce their own estimates of the earthquake's source parameters. Once satisfied with the fit of their models, users can submit their results and see how they compare with the distribution of all other contributed earthquake models, as well as the mean and median

  9. Evaluating the Usability of a Professional Modeling Tool Repurposed for Middle School Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Vanessa L.; Songer, Nancy Butler

    2013-10-01

    This paper reports the results of a three-stage usability test of a modeling tool designed to support learners' deep understanding of the impacts of climate change on ecosystems. The design process involved repurposing an existing modeling technology used by professional scientists into a learning tool specifically designed for middle school students. To evaluate usability, we analyzed students' task performance and task completion time as they worked on an activity with the repurposed modeling technology. In stage 1, we conducted remote testing of an early modeling prototype with urban middle school students (n = 84). In stages 2 and 3, we used screencasting software to record students' mouse and keyboard movements during collaborative think-alouds (n = 22) and conducted a qualitative analysis of their peer discussions. Taken together, the study findings revealed two kinds of usability issues that interfered with students' productive use of the tool: issues related to the use of data and information, and issues related to the use of the modeling technology. The study findings resulted in design improvements that led to stronger usability outcomes and higher task performance among students. In this paper, we describe our methods for usability testing, our research findings, and our design solutions for supporting students' use of the modeling technology and use of data. The paper concludes with implications for the design and study of modeling technologies for science learning.

  10. Using enterprise architecture to analyse how organisational structure impact motivation and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Närman, Pia; Johnson, Pontus; Gingnell, Liv

    2016-06-01

    When technology, environment, or strategies change, organisations need to adjust their structures accordingly. These structural changes do not always enhance the organisational performance as intended partly because organisational developers do not understand the consequences of structural changes in performance. This article presents a model-based analysis framework for quantitative analysis of the effect of organisational structure on organisation performance in terms of employee motivation and learning. The model is based on Mintzberg's work on organisational structure. The quantitative analysis is formalised using the Object Constraint Language (OCL) and the Unified Modelling Language (UML) and implemented in an enterprise architecture tool.

  11. SEPEM: A tool for statistical modeling the solar energetic particle environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Norma; Heynderickx, Daniel; Jiggens, Piers; Aran, Angels; Sanahuja, Blai; Truscott, Pete; Lei, Fan; Jacobs, Carla; Poedts, Stefaan; Gabriel, Stephen; Sandberg, Ingmar; Glover, Alexi; Hilgers, Alain

    2015-07-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) events are a serious radiation hazard for spacecraft as well as a severe health risk to humans traveling in space. Indeed, accurate modeling of the SEP environment constitutes a priority requirement for astrophysics and solar system missions and for human exploration in space. The European Space Agency's Solar Energetic Particle Environment Modelling (SEPEM) application server is a World Wide Web interface to a complete set of cross-calibrated data ranging from 1973 to 2013 as well as new SEP engineering models and tools. Both statistical and physical modeling techniques have been included, in order to cover the environment not only at 1 AU but also in the inner heliosphere ranging from 0.2 AU to 1.6 AU using a newly developed physics-based shock-and-particle model to simulate particle flux profiles of gradual SEP events. With SEPEM, SEP peak flux and integrated fluence statistics can be studied, as well as durations of high SEP flux periods. Furthermore, effects tools are also included to allow calculation of single event upset rate and radiation doses for a variety of engineering scenarios.

  12. TREXMO: A Translation Tool to Support the Use of Regulatory Occupational Exposure Models.

    PubMed

    Savic, Nenad; Racordon, Dimitri; Buchs, Didier; Gasic, Bojan; Vernez, David

    2016-10-01

    Occupational exposure models vary significantly in their complexity, purpose, and the level of expertise required from the user. Different parameters in the same model may lead to different exposure estimates for the same exposure situation. This paper presents a tool developed to deal with this concern-TREXMO or TRanslation of EXposure MOdels. TREXMO integrates six commonly used occupational exposure models, namely, ART v.1.5, STOFFENMANAGER(®) v.5.1, ECETOC TRA v.3, MEASE v.1.02.01, EMKG-EXPO-TOOL, and EASE v.2.0. By enabling a semi-automatic translation between the parameters of these six models, TREXMO facilitates their simultaneous use. For a given exposure situation, defined by a set of parameters in one of the models, TREXMO provides the user with the most appropriate parameters to use in the other exposure models. Results showed that, once an exposure situation and parameters were set in ART, TREXMO reduced the number of possible outcomes in the other models by 1-4 orders of magnitude. The tool should manage to reduce the uncertain entry or selection of parameters in the six models, improve between-user reliability, and reduce the time required for running several models for a given exposure situation. In addition to these advantages, registrants of chemicals and authorities should benefit from more reliable exposure estimates for the risk characterization of dangerous chemicals under Regulation, Evaluation, Authorisation and restriction of CHemicals (REACH). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  13. Data and Tools | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Data and Tools Data and Tools NREL develops data sets, maps, models, and tools for the analysis of , models, and tools in the alphabetical listing. Popular Resources PVWatts Calculator Geospatial Data

  14. Extending the Will, Skill, Tool Model of Technology Integration: Adding Pedagogy as a New Model Construct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knezek, Gerald; Christensen, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    An expansion of the Will, Skill, Tool Model of Technology Integration to include teacher's pedagogical style is proposed by the authors as a means of advancing the predictive power of the model for level of classroom technology integration to beyond 90%. Suggested advantages to this expansion include more precise identification of areas to be…

  15. Proposal for a new content model for the Austrian Procedure Catalogue.

    PubMed

    Neururer, Sabrina B; Pfeiffer, Karl P

    2013-01-01

    The Austrian Procedure Catalogue is used for procedure coding in Austria. Its architecture and content has some major weaknesses. The aim of this study is the presentation of a new potential content model for this classification system consisting of main characteristics of health interventions. It is visualized using a UML class diagram. Based on this proposition, an implementation of an ontology for procedure coding is planned.

  16. Information Management Workflow and Tools Enabling Multiscale Modeling Within ICME Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Austin, Nic; Terentjev, Igor; Cebon, Dave; Marsden, Will

    2016-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on reducing the cost and time to market of new materials, the need for analytical tools that enable the virtual design and optimization of materials throughout their processing - internal structure - property - performance envelope, along with the capturing and storing of the associated material and model information across its lifecycle, has become critical. This need is also fueled by the demands for higher efficiency in material testing; consistency, quality and traceability of data; product design; engineering analysis; as well as control of access to proprietary or sensitive information. Fortunately, material information management systems and physics-based multiscale modeling methods have kept pace with the growing user demands. Herein, recent efforts to establish workflow for and demonstrate a unique set of web application tools for linking NASA GRC's Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) Granta MI database schema and NASA GRC's Integrated multiscale Micromechanics Analysis Code (ImMAC) software toolset are presented. The goal is to enable seamless coupling between both test data and simulation data, which is captured and tracked automatically within Granta MI®, with full model pedigree information. These tools, and this type of linkage, are foundational to realizing the full potential of ICME, in which materials processing, microstructure, properties, and performance are coupled to enable application-driven design and optimization of materials and structures.

  17. Modeling Tool for Decision Support during Early Days of an Anthrax Event.

    PubMed

    Rainisch, Gabriel; Meltzer, Martin I; Shadomy, Sean; Bower, William A; Hupert, Nathaniel

    2017-01-01

    Health officials lack field-implementable tools for forecasting the effects that a large-scale release of Bacillus anthracis spores would have on public health and hospitals. We created a modeling tool (combining inhalational anthrax caseload projections based on initial case reports, effects of variable postexposure prophylaxis campaigns, and healthcare facility surge capacity requirements) to project hospitalizations and casualties from a newly detected inhalation anthrax event, and we examined the consequences of intervention choices. With only 3 days of case counts, the model can predict final attack sizes for simulated Sverdlovsk-like events (1979 USSR) with sufficient accuracy for decision making and confirms the value of early postexposure prophylaxis initiation. According to a baseline scenario, hospital treatment volume peaks 15 days after exposure, deaths peak earlier (day 5), and recovery peaks later (day 23). This tool gives public health, hospital, and emergency planners scenario-specific information for developing quantitative response plans for this threat.

  18. Sampling and sensitivity analyses tools (SaSAT) for computational modelling

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, Alexander; Regan, David G; Wilson, David P

    2008-01-01

    SaSAT (Sampling and Sensitivity Analysis Tools) is a user-friendly software package for applying uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to mathematical and computational models of arbitrary complexity and context. The toolbox is built in Matlab®, a numerical mathematical software package, and utilises algorithms contained in the Matlab® Statistics Toolbox. However, Matlab® is not required to use SaSAT as the software package is provided as an executable file with all the necessary supplementary files. The SaSAT package is also designed to work seamlessly with Microsoft Excel but no functionality is forfeited if that software is not available. A comprehensive suite of tools is provided to enable the following tasks to be easily performed: efficient and equitable sampling of parameter space by various methodologies; calculation of correlation coefficients; regression analysis; factor prioritisation; and graphical output of results, including response surfaces, tornado plots, and scatterplots. Use of SaSAT is exemplified by application to a simple epidemic model. To our knowledge, a number of the methods available in SaSAT for performing sensitivity analyses have not previously been used in epidemiological modelling and their usefulness in this context is demonstrated. PMID:18304361

  19. A pandemic influenza modeling and visualization tool

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Maciejewski, Ross; Livengood, Philip; Rudolph, Stephen

    2011-08-01

    The National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza outlines a plan for community response to a potential pandemic. In this outline, state and local communities are charged with enhancing their preparedness. In order to help public health officials better understand these charges, we have developed a modeling and visualization toolkit (PanViz) for analyzing the effect of decision measures implemented during a simulated pandemic influenza scenario. Spread vectors based on the point of origin and distance traveled over time are calculated and the factors of age distribution and population density are taken into effect. Healthcare officials are able to explore the effects ofmore » the pandemic on the population through a spatiotemporal view, moving forward and backward through time and inserting decision points at various days to determine the impact. Linked statistical displays are also shown, providing county level summaries of data in terms of the number of sick, hospitalized and dead as a result of the outbreak. Currently, this tool has been deployed in Indiana State Department of Health planning and preparedness exercises, and as an educational tool for demonstrating the impact of social distancing strategies during the recent H1N1 (swine flu) outbreak.« less

  20. Computational science: shifting the focus from tools to models

    PubMed Central

    Hinsen, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    Computational techniques have revolutionized many aspects of scientific research over the last few decades. Experimentalists use computation for data analysis, processing ever bigger data sets. Theoreticians compute predictions from ever more complex models. However, traditional articles do not permit the publication of big data sets or complex models. As a consequence, these crucial pieces of information no longer enter the scientific record. Moreover, they have become prisoners of scientific software: many models exist only as software implementations, and the data are often stored in proprietary formats defined by the software. In this article, I argue that this emphasis on software tools over models and data is detrimental to science in the long term, and I propose a means by which this can be reversed. PMID:25309728

  1. Implementing the Mother-Baby Model of Nursing Care Using Models and Quality Improvement Tools.

    PubMed

    Brockman, Vicki

    As family-centered care has become the expected standard, many facilities follow the mother-baby model, in which care is provided to both a woman and her newborn in the same room by the same nurse. My facility employed a traditional model of nursing care, which was not evidence-based or financially sustainable. After implementing the mother-baby model, we experienced an increase in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge, increased patient satisfaction, improved staff productivity and decreased salary costs, all while the number of births increased. Our change was successful because it was guided by the use of quality improvement tools, change theory and evidence-based practice models. © 2015 AWHONN.

  2. A Proposed Pattern of Enterprise Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    consistent architecture descriptions. UPDM comprises extensions to both OMG’s Unified Modelling Language (UML) and Systems Modelling Language ( SysML ...those who use UML and SysML . These represent significant advancements that enable architecture trade-off analyses, architecture model execution...Language ( SysML ), and thus provides for architectural descriptions that contain a rich set of (formally) connected DoDAF/MoDAF viewpoints expressed

  3. Pre- and Post-Processing Tools to Create and Characterize Particle-Based Composite Model Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-11-01

    ARL-TR-8213 ● NOV 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Pre- and Post -Processing Tools to Create and Characterize Particle-Based...ARL-TR-8213 ● NOV 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Pre- and Post -Processing Tools to Create and Characterize Particle-Based Composite...AND SUBTITLE Pre- and Post -Processing Tools to Create and Characterize Particle-Based Composite Model Structures 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  4. Neural Networks for Hydrological Modeling Tool for Operational Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Divya; Jain, Ashu

    2010-05-01

    Hydrological models are useful in many water resources applications such as flood control, irrigation and drainage, hydro power generation, water supply, erosion and sediment control, etc. Estimates of runoff are needed in many water resources planning, design development, operation and maintenance activities. Runoff is generally computed using rainfall-runoff models. Computer based hydrologic models have become popular for obtaining hydrological forecasts and for managing water systems. Rainfall-runoff library (RRL) is computer software developed by Cooperative Research Centre for Catchment Hydrology (CRCCH), Australia consisting of five different conceptual rainfall-runoff models, and has been in operation in many water resources applications in Australia. Recently, soft artificial intelligence tools such as Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) have become popular for research purposes but have not been adopted in operational hydrological forecasts. There is a strong need to develop ANN models based on real catchment data and compare them with the conceptual models actually in use in real catchments. In this paper, the results from an investigation on the use of RRL and ANNs are presented. Out of the five conceptual models in the RRL toolkit, SimHyd model has been used. Genetic Algorithm has been used as an optimizer in the RRL to calibrate the SimHyd model. Trial and error procedures were employed to arrive at the best values of various parameters involved in the GA optimizer to develop the SimHyd model. The results obtained from the best configuration of the SimHyd model are presented here. Feed-forward neural network model structure trained by back-propagation training algorithm has been adopted here to develop the ANN models. The daily rainfall and runoff data derived from Bird Creek Basin, Oklahoma, USA have been employed to develop all the models included here. A wide range of error statistics have been used to evaluate the performance of all the models

  5. Word sense disambiguation in the clinical domain: a comparison of knowledge-rich and knowledge-poor unsupervised methods

    PubMed Central

    Chasin, Rachel; Rumshisky, Anna; Uzuner, Ozlem; Szolovits, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate state-of-the-art unsupervised methods on the word sense disambiguation (WSD) task in the clinical domain. In particular, to compare graph-based approaches relying on a clinical knowledge base with bottom-up topic-modeling-based approaches. We investigate several enhancements to the topic-modeling techniques that use domain-specific knowledge sources. Materials and methods The graph-based methods use variations of PageRank and distance-based similarity metrics, operating over