Science.gov

Sample records for unfolded protein response

  1. Prostate cancer and the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Arnoldussen, Yke Jildouw; Saatcioglu, Fahri

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an essential organelle that contributes to several key cellular functions, including lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, calcium storage, and organelle biogenesis. The ER also serves as the major site for protein folding and trafficking, especially in specialized secretory cells. Accumulation of misfolded proteins and failure of ER adaptive capacity activates the unfolded protein response (UPR) which has been implicated in several chronic diseases, including cancer. A number of recent studies have implicated UPR in prostate cancer (PCa) and greatly expanded our understanding of this key stress signaling pathway and its regulation in PCa. Here we summarize these developments and discuss their potential therapeutic implications. PMID:27303918

  2. Melanoma and the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Erin K.; Mactier, Swetlana; Christopherson, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    The UPR (unfolded protein response) has been identified as a key factor in the progression and metastasis of cancers, notably melanoma. Several mediators of the UPR are upregulated in cancers, e.g., high levels of GRP78 (glucose-regulator protein 78 kDa) correlate with progression and poor outcome in melanoma patients. The proliferative burden of cancer induces stress and activates several cellular stress responses. The UPR is a tightly orchestrated stress response that is activated upon the accumulation of unfolded proteins within the ER (endoplasmic reticulum). The UPR is designed to mediate two conflicting outcomtes, recovery and apoptosis. As a result, the UPR initiates a widespread signaling cascade to return the cell to homeostasis and failing to achieve cellular recovery, initiates UPR-induced apoptosis. There is evidence that ER stress and subsequently the UPR promote tumourigenesis and metastasis. The complete role of the UPR has yet to be defined. Understanding how the UPR allows for adaption to stress and thereby assists in cancer progression is important in defining an archetype of melanoma pathology. In addition, elucidation of the mechanisms of the UPR may lead to development of effective treatments of metastatic melanoma. PMID:26927180

  3. Analysis of Unfolded Protein Response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yani; Brandizzi, Federica

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is fundamental for development and adaption in eukaryotic cells. Arabidopsis has become one of the best model systems to uncover conserved mechanisms of the UPR in multicellular eukaryotes as well as organism-specific regulation of the UPR in plants. Monitoring the UPR in planta is an elemental approach to identifying regulatory components and to revealing molecular mechanisms of the plant UPR. In this chapter, we provide protocols for the induction and analyses of plant UPR at a molecular level in Arabidopsis. Three kinds of ER stress treatment methods and quantitation of the plant UPR activation are described here. PMID:23913037

  4. The Unfolded Protein Response and Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Arthur; Adolph, Timon Erik; Blumberg, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    As the inner lining of the gastrointestinal tract, the intestinal epithelium serves an essential role in innate immune function at the interface between the host and microbiota. Given the unique environmental challenges and thus physiologic secretory functions of this surface, it is exquisitely sensitive to perturbations that affect its capacity to resolve endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Genetic deletion of factors involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR), which functions in the resolution of ER stress that arises from misfolded proteins, result in spontaneous intestinal inflammation closely mimicking human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This is demonstrated by observations wherein deletion of genes such as Xbp1 and Agr2 profoundly affects the intestinal epithelium and results in spontaneous intestinal inflammation. Moreover, both genes, along with others (e.g. ORDML3) represent genetic risk factors for human IBD, both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Here we review the current mechanistic understanding for how unresolved ER stress can lead to intestinal inflammation, and highlight the findings that implicate ER stress as a genetically affected biological pathway in IBD. We further discuss environmental and microbial factors that might impact on the epithelium’s capacity to resolve ER stress, and which may constitute exogenous factors that may precipitate disease in genetically susceptible individuals. PMID:23588234

  5. Engineering of chaperone systems and of the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saeed U.

    2008-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins in mammalian cells is a successful technology that delivers protein pharmaceuticals for therapies and for diagnosis of human disorders. Cost effective production of protein biopharmaceuticals requires extensive optimization through cell and fermentation process engineering at the upstream and chemical engineering of purification processes at the downstream side of the production process. The majority of protein pharmaceuticals are secreted proteins. Accumulating evidence suggests that the folding and processing of these proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a general rate- and yield limiting step for their production. We will summarize our knowledge of protein folding in the ER and of signal transduction pathways activated by accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER, collectively called the unfolded protein response (UPR). On the basis of this knowledge we will evaluate engineering approaches to increase cell specific productivities through engineering of the ER-resident protein folding machinery and of the UPR. PMID:19003179

  6. Emerging functions of the unfolded protein response in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Sophie; Pulendran, Bali; Lambrecht, Bart N.

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) has traditionally been viewed as an adaptive response triggered upon accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), aimed at restoring ER function. The UPR can also be an anticipatory response that is activated well before the disruption of protein homeostasis. UPR signaling intersects at many levels with the innate and adaptive immune response. In some immune cell types like dendritic cells and B cells, particular UPR sensors appear constitutively active in the absence of traditional UPR gene program induction, necessary for antigen presentation and immunoglobulin synthesis. The UPR also influences Toll-like receptor signaling and NF-κB activation, and some pathogens subvert the UPR. This review summarizes these emerging non-canonical functions of the UPR in immunity. PMID:25232821

  7. Unfolded protein response in cancer: the Physician's perspective

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a cascade of intracellular stress signaling events in response to an accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Cancer cells are often exposed to hypoxia, nutrient starvation, oxidative stress and other metabolic dysregulation that cause ER stress and activation of the UPR. Depending on the duration and degree of ER stress, the UPR can provide either survival signals by activating adaptive and antiapoptotic pathways, or death signals by inducing cell death programs. Sustained induction or repression of UPR pharmacologically may thus have beneficial and therapeutic effects against cancer. In this review, we discuss the basic mechanisms of UPR and highlight the importance of UPR in cancer biology. We also update the UPR-targeted cancer therapeutics currently in clinical trials. PMID:21345215

  8. The unfolded protein response in immunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Grootjans, Joep; Kaser, Arthur; Kaufman, Randal J.; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2017-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a highly conserved pathway that allows the cell to manage endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that is imposed by the secretory demands associated with environmental forces. In this role, the UPR has increasingly been shown to have crucial functions in immunity and inflammation. In this Review, we discuss the importance of the UPR in the development, differentiation, function and survival of immune cells in meeting the needs of an immune response. In addition, we review current insights into how the UPR is involved in complex chronic inflammatory diseases and, through its role in immune regulation, antitumour responses. PMID:27346803

  9. The unfolded protein response and translation attenuation: a modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Trusina, A; Tang, C

    2010-10-01

    Unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress response to increased levels of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To deal with this stress, all eukaryotic cells share a well-conserved strategy--the upregulation of chaperons and proteases to facilitate protein folding and to degrade the misfolded proteins. For metazoans, however, an additional and seemingly redundant strategy has been evolved--translation attenuation (TA) of proteins targeted to the ER via the protein kinase PERK pathway. PERK is essential in secretory cells, such as the pancreatic β-cells, but not in non-secretory cell types. We have recently developed a mathematical model of UPR, focusing on the interplay and synergy between the TA arm and the conserved Ire1 arm of the UPR. The model showed that the TA mechanism is beneficial in highly fluctuating environment, for example, in the case where the ER stress changes frequently. Under highly variable levels of ER stress, tight regulation of the ER load by TA avoids excess amount of chaperons and proteases being produced. The model also showed that TA is of greater importance when there is a large flux of proteins through the ER. In this study, we further expand our model to investigate different types of ER stress and different temporal profiles of the stress. We found that TA is more desirable in dealing with the translation stress, for example, prolonged stimulation of proinsulin biosynthesis, than the chemical stress.

  10. Targeting unfolded protein response in cancer and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mkrtchian, Souren

    2015-06-01

    The maturation of secretory and membrane proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is tightly regulated by the unfolded protein response (UPR), a signal transduction pathway maintaining ER protein folding homeostasis. However, certain ER states are incompatible with cell survival and therefore the UPR may choose to eliminate severely disrupted cells by apoptosis. This is accomplished primarily through the activation of the transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). In the April 2015 issue of Endocrine-Related Cancer, researchers from the universities of South Carolina and Athens (Greece) suggested a novel mechanism of CHOP-mediated apoptosis connected with the suppression of a prominent cell cycle regulator with anti-apoptotic activity, p21. These findings and suggested clinical applications, such as potentiation of cancer chemotherapy and a novel therapeutic approach for type 2 diabetes, are discussed in the context of UPR.

  11. Cellular unfolded protein response against viruses used in gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Dwaipayan; Balakrishnan, Balaji; Jayandharan, Giridhara R.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are excellent vehicles for gene therapy due to their natural ability to infect and deliver the cargo to specific tissues with high efficiency. Although such vectors are usually “gutted” and are replication defective, they are subjected to clearance by the host cells by immune recognition and destruction. Unfolded protein response (UPR) is a naturally evolved cyto-protective signaling pathway which is triggered due to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress caused by accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in its lumen. The UPR signaling consists of three signaling pathways, namely PKR-like ER kinase, activating transcription factor 6, and inositol-requiring protein-1. Once activated, UPR triggers the production of ER molecular chaperones and stress response proteins to help reduce the protein load within the ER. This occurs by degradation of the misfolded proteins and ensues in the arrest of protein translation machinery. If the burden of protein load in ER is beyond its processing capacity, UPR can activate pro-apoptotic pathways or autophagy leading to cell death. Viruses are naturally evolved in hijacking the host cellular translation machinery to generate a large amount of proteins. This phenomenon disrupts ER homeostasis and leads to ER stress. Alternatively, in the case of gutted vectors used in gene therapy, the excess load of recombinant vectors administered and encountered by the cell can trigger UPR. Thus, in the context of gene therapy, UPR becomes a major roadblock that can potentially trigger inflammatory responses against the vectors and reduce the efficiency of gene transfer. PMID:24904562

  12. Inhibition of the Unfolded Protein Response Mechanism Prevents Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joanna; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Agellon, Luis B.; Michalak, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac fibrosis attributed to excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins is a major cause of heart failure and death. Cardiac fibrosis is extremely difficult and challenging to treat in a clinical setting due to lack of understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to cardiac fibrosis and effective anti-fibrotic therapies. The objective in this study was to examine whether unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway mediates cardiac fibrosis and whether a pharmacological intervention to modulate UPR can prevent cardiac fibrosis and preserve heart function. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate here that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse with increased expression of calreticulin, a model of heart failure, stems from impairment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis, transient activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and stimulation of the TGFβ1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway. Remarkably, sustained pharmacologic inhibition of the UPR pathway by tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is sufficient to prevent cardiac fibrosis, and improved exercise tolerance. Conclusions We show that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse model of heart failure stems from transient activation of UPR pathway leading to persistent remodelling of cardiac tissue. Blocking the activation of the transiently activated UPR pathway by TUDCA prevented cardiac fibrosis, and improved prognosis. These findings offer a window for additional interventions that can preserve heart function. PMID:27441395

  13. Unfolded protein response in hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Shiu-Wan

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus of clinical importance. The virus establishes a chronic infection and can progress from chronic hepatitis, steatosis to fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The mechanisms of viral persistence and pathogenesis are poorly understood. Recently the unfolded protein response (UPR), a cellular homeostatic response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, has emerged to be a major contributing factor in many human diseases. It is also evident that viruses interact with the host UPR in many different ways and the outcome could be pro-viral, anti-viral or pathogenic, depending on the particular type of infection. Here we present evidence for the elicitation of chronic ER stress in HCV infection. We analyze the UPR signaling pathways involved in HCV infection, the various levels of UPR regulation by different viral proteins and finally, we propose several mechanisms by which the virus provokes the UPR. PMID:24904547

  14. The unfolded protein response is required for dendrite morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xing; Howell, Audrey S; Dong, Xintong; Taylor, Caitlin A; Cooper, Roshni C; Zhang, Jianqi; Zou, Wei; Sherwood, David R; Shen, Kang

    2015-06-08

    Precise patterning of dendritic fields is essential for the formation and function of neuronal circuits. During development, dendrites acquire their morphology by exuberant branching. How neurons cope with the increased load of protein production required for this rapid growth is poorly understood. Here we show that the physiological unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced in the highly branched Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neuron PVD during dendrite morphogenesis. Perturbation of the IRE1 arm of the UPR pathway causes loss of dendritic branches, a phenotype that can be rescued by overexpression of the ER chaperone HSP-4 (a homolog of mammalian BiP/grp78). Surprisingly, a single transmembrane leucine-rich repeat protein, DMA-1, plays a major role in the induction of the UPR and the dendritic phenotype in the UPR mutants. These findings reveal a significant role for the physiological UPR in the maintenance of ER homeostasis during morphogenesis of large dendritic arbors.

  15. Neuropeptide signals cell non-autonomous mitochondrial unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Li-Wa; Niu, Rong; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Neurons have a central role in the systemic coordination of mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and the cell non-autonomous modulation of longevity. However, the mechanism by which the nervous system senses mitochondrial stress and communicates to the distal tissues to induce UPRmt remains unclear. Here we employ the tissue-specific CRISPR-Cas9 approach to disrupt mitochondrial function only in the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans, and reveal a cell non-autonomous induction of UPRmt in peripheral cells. We further show that a neural sub-circuit composed of three types of sensory neurons, and one interneuron is required for sensing and transducing neuronal mitochondrial stress. In addition, neuropeptide FLP-2 functions in this neural sub-circuit to signal the non-autonomous UPRmt. Taken together, our results suggest a neuropeptide coordination of mitochondrial stress response in the nervous system. PMID:27767096

  16. Unfolded protein response in filamentous fungi-implications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Heimel, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) represents a mechanism to preserve endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis that is conserved in eukaryotes. ER stress caused by the accumulation of potentially toxic un- or misfolded proteins in the ER triggers UPR activation and the induction of genes important for protein folding in the ER, ER expansion, and transport from and to the ER. Along with this adaptation, the overall capacity for protein secretion is markedly increased by the UPR. In filamentous fungi, various approaches to employ the UPR for improved production of homologous and heterologous proteins have been investigated. As the effects on protein production were strongly dependent on the expressed protein, generally applicable strategies have to be developed. A combination of transcriptomic approaches monitoring secretion stress and basic research on the UPR mechanism provided novel and important insight into the complex regulatory cross-connections between UPR signalling, cellular physiology, and developmental processes. It will be discussed how this increasing knowledge on the UPR might stimulate the development of novel strategies for using the UPR as a tool in biotechnology.

  17. Oxidative stress, unfolded protein response, and apoptosis in developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kupsco, Allison; Schlenk, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Physiological development requires precise spatiotemporal regulation of cellular and molecular processes. Disruption of these key events can generate developmental toxicity in the form of teratogenesis or mortality. The mechanism behind many developmental toxicants remains unknown. While recent work has focused on the unfolded protein response (UPR), oxidative stress, and apoptosis in the pathogenesis of disease, few studies have addressed their relationship in developmental toxicity. Redox regulation, UPR, and apoptosis are essential for physiological development and can be disturbed by a variety of endogenous and exogenous toxicants to generate lethality and diverse malformations. This review examines the current knowledge of the role of oxidative stress, UPR, and apoptosis in physiological development as well as in developmental toxicity, focusing on studies and advances in vertebrates model systems.

  18. Oxidative Stress, Unfolded Protein Response, and Apoptosis in Developmental Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kupsco, Allison; Schlenk, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Physiological development requires precise spatiotemporal regulation of cellular and molecular processes. Disruption of these key events can generate developmental toxicity in the form of teratogenesis or mortality. The mechanism behind many developmental toxicants remains unknown. While recent work has focused on the unfolded protein response (UPR), oxidative stress, and apoptosis in the pathogenesis of disease, few studies have addressed their relationship in developmental toxicity. Redox regulation, UPR, and apoptosis are essential for physiological development and can be disturbed by a variety of endogenous and exogenous toxicants to generate lethality and diverse malformations. This review examines the current knowledge of the role of oxidative stress, UPR, and apoptosis in physiological development as well as in developmental toxicity, focusing on studies and advances in vertebrates model systems. PMID:26008783

  19. Legionella suppresses the host unfolded protein response via multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Treacy-Abarca, Sean; Mukherjee, Shaeri

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, secretes ∼300 effector proteins to modulate the host environment. Given the intimate interaction between L. pneumophila and the endoplasmic reticulum, we investigated the role of the host unfolded protein response (UPR) during L. pneumophila infection. Interestingly, we show that the host identifies L. pneumophila infection as a form of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the sensor pATF6 is processed to generate pATF6(N), a transcriptional activator of downstream UPR genes. However, L. pneumophila is able to suppress the UPR and block the translation of prototypical UPR genes, BiP and CHOP. Furthermore, biochemical studies reveal that L. pneumophila uses two effectors (Lgt1 and Lgt2) to inhibit the splicing of XBP1u mRNA to spliced XBP1 (XBP1s), an UPR response regulator. Thus, we demonstrate that L. pneumophila is able to inhibit the UPR by multiple mechanisms including blocking XBP1u splicing and causing translational repression. This observation highlights the utility of L. pneumophila as a powerful tool for studying a critical protein homeostasis regulator. PMID:26219498

  20. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    De-Souza, Evandro A; Pimentel, Felipe S A; Machado, Caio M; Martins, Larissa S; da-Silva, Wagner S; Montero-Lomelí, Mónica; Masuda, Claudio A

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast), which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactokinase-encoding gene GAL1 completely abolishes unfolded protein response activation and galactose toxicity. Impairment of the unfolded protein response in both yeast models makes cells even more sensitive to galactose, unmasking its cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced under galactosemic conditions and underscores the importance of the unfolded protein response pathway to cellular adaptation in these models of classic galactosemia.

  1. The roles of unfolded protein response pathways in Chlamydia pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    George, Zenas; Omosun, Yusuf; Azenabor, Anthony A; Partin, James; Joseph, Kahaliah; Ellerson, Debra; He, Qing; Eko, Francis; Bandea, Claudiu; Svoboda, Pavel; Pohl, Jan; Black, Carolyn M; Igietseme, Joseph U

    2016-12-08

    Chlamydia is an obligate intracellular bacterium that relies on host cell for essential nutrients and ATP for a productive infection. Although the unfolded protein response (UPR) plays a major role in certain microbial infectivity, its role in chlamydial pathogenesis is unknown. We hypothesized that Chlamydia induces UPR and exploits it to upregulate host cell uptake and metabolism of glucose, production of ATP, phospholipids and other molecules required for its replicative development and host survival. Using a combination of biochemical and pathway inhibition assays, we showed that the three UPR pathway transducers: Protein kinase RNA-activated (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK), Inositol-requiring enzyme-1α (IRE1α), and Activating transcription factor-6α (ATF6α) were activated during Chlamydia infection. The kinase activity of PERK and RNase of IRE1α mediated the upregulation of Hexokinase II and production of ATP via substrate level phosphorylation. In addition, the activation of PERK and IRE1α promoted autophagy formation and apoptosis resistance or host survival. Moreover, the activation of IRE1α resulted in the generation of spliced XBP1 and upregulation of lipid production. The vital role of UPR pathways in Chlamydia development and pathogenesis could lead to the identification of potential molecular targets for therapeutics against Chlamydia.

  2. Ethanol Cellular Defense Induce Unfolded Protein Response in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is a valuable industrial product and a common metabolite used by many cell types. However, this molecule produces high levels of cytotoxicity affecting cellular performance at several levels. In the presence of ethanol, cells must adjust some of their components, such as the membrane lipids to maintain homeostasis. In the case of microorganism as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol is one of the principal products of their metabolism and is the main stress factor during fermentation. Although, many efforts have been made, mechanisms of ethanol tolerance are not fully understood and very little evidence is available to date for specific signaling by ethanol in the cell. This work studied two S. cerevisiae strains, CECT10094, and Temohaya-MI26, isolated from flor wine and agave fermentation (a traditional fermentation from Mexico) respectively, which differ in ethanol tolerance, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol stress response and the reasons for different ethanol tolerance. The transcriptome was analyzed after ethanol stress and, among others, an increased activation of genes related with the unfolded protein response (UPR) and its transcription factor, Hac1p, was observed in the tolerant strain CECT10094. We observed that this strain also resist more UPR agents than Temohaya-MI26 and the UPR-ethanol stress correlation was corroborated observing growth of 15 more strains and discarding UPR correlation with other stresses as thermal or oxidative stress. Furthermore, higher activation of UPR pathway in the tolerant strain CECT10094 was observed using a UPR mCherry reporter. Finally, we observed UPR activation in response to ethanol stress in other S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerant strains as the wine strains T73 and EC1118. This work demonstrates that the UPR pathway is activated under ethanol stress occurring in a standard fermentation and links this response to an enhanced ethanol tolerance. Thus, our data suggest that there

  3. New insights into the unfolded protein response in stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanzhou; Cheung, Hoi Hung; Tu, JiaJie; Miu, Kai Kei; Chan, Wai Yee

    2016-08-16

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an evolutionarily conserved adaptive mechanism to increase cell survival under endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress conditions. The UPR is critical for maintaining cell homeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. The vital functions of the UPR in development, metabolism and immunity have been demonstrated in several cell types. UPR dysfunction activates a variety of pathologies, including cancer, inflammation, neurodegenerative disease, metabolic disease and immune disease. Stem cells with the special ability to self-renew and differentiate into various somatic cells have been demonstrated to be present in multiple tissues. These cells are involved in development, tissue renewal and certain disease processes. Although the role and regulation of the UPR in somatic cells has been widely reported, the function of the UPR in stem cells is not fully known, and the roles and functions of the UPR are dependent on the stem cell type. Therefore, in this article, the potential significances of the UPR in stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, tissue stem cells, cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent cells, are comprehensively reviewed. This review aims to provide novel insights regarding the mechanisms associated with stem cell differentiation and cancer pathology.

  4. New insights into the unfolded protein response in stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanzhou; Cheung, Hoi Hung; Tu, JiaJie; Miu, Kai Kei; Chan, Wai Yee

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an evolutionarily conserved adaptive mechanism to increase cell survival under endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress conditions. The UPR is critical for maintaining cell homeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. The vital functions of the UPR in development, metabolism and immunity have been demonstrated in several cell types. UPR dysfunction activates a variety of pathologies, including cancer, inflammation, neurodegenerative disease, metabolic disease and immune disease. Stem cells with the special ability to self-renew and differentiate into various somatic cells have been demonstrated to be present in multiple tissues. These cells are involved in development, tissue renewal and certain disease processes. Although the role and regulation of the UPR in somatic cells has been widely reported, the function of the UPR in stem cells is not fully known, and the roles and functions of the UPR are dependent on the stem cell type. Therefore, in this article, the potential significances of the UPR in stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, tissue stem cells, cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent cells, are comprehensively reviewed. This review aims to provide novel insights regarding the mechanisms associated with stem cell differentiation and cancer pathology. PMID:27304053

  5. Review: Retinal degeneration: Focus on the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Gorbatyuk, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    Recently published literature has provided evidence that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is involved in the development of retinal degeneration. The scope of these studies encompassed diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, glaucoma, retinal detachment, light-induced retinal degeneration, age-related macular degeneration, and inherited retinal degeneration. Subsequent studies investigating the role of individual UPR markers in retinal pathogenesis and examining the therapeutic potential of reprogramming the UPR as a method for modulating the rate of retinal degeneration have been initiated. Manipulation of UPR markers has been made possible by the use of knockout mice, pharmacological agents, and viral vector-mediated augmentation of gene expression. Future research will aim at identifying specific inhibitors and/or inducers of UPR regulatory markers as well as expand the list of UPR-related animal models. Additionally, adeno-associated virus-mediated gene delivery is a safe and effective method for modulating gene expression, and thus is a useful research tool for manipulating individual UPR markers in affected retinas and a promising delivery vector for gene therapy in retinal degenerative disorders. PMID:24068865

  6. The unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway in Cryptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Seon Ah; Jung, Kwang-Woo; Bahn, Yong-Sun; Kang, Hyun Ah

    2014-01-01

    Unique and evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways allow an organism to sense, respond to, and adapt to internal and external environmental cues at its biological niche. In eukaryotic cells, the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway regulates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis upon exposure to environmental changes causing ER stress. The UPR pathway of Cryptococcus neoformans, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, which causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals, consists of the evolutionarily conserved Ire1 kinase, a unique bZIP transcription factor, Hxl1, and the ER-resident molecular chaperone Kar2/BiP. Although the Cryptococcus UPR pathway regulates ER stress, antifungal drug resistance, and virulence in an Ire1/Hxl1-dependent manner, Ire1 has Hxl1-independent roles in capsule biosynthesis and thermotolerance. In this review, we highlight the conserved and unique features of the Cryptococcus UPR pathway compared with other fungal UPR systems and its importance in the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis and discuss future challenges in this field. PMID:24504058

  7. Leishmania infantum Induces Mild Unfolded Protein Response in Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    De Santi, Mauro; Ceccarelli, Marcello; Vitale, Fabrizio; Brandi, Giorgio; Magnani, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The Leishmaniases are a group of parasitic diseases caused by protozoa of the Leishmania genus affecting both humans and other vertebrates. Leishmania is an intracellular pathogen able to confer resistance to apoptosis in the early phase of macrophages infection by activation of host PI3K/Akt pathway and inhibition of caspase-3 activation. Intracellular pathogens hijack organelles such as ER to facilitate survival and replication, thus eliciting ER stress and activating/modulating the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the host cell. The UPR is aimed to mitigate ER stress, thereby promoting cell survival. However, prolonged ER stress will activate the apoptotic pathway. The aim of this study was to investigate the ER stress response in Leishmania-infected macrophages to gain insights about the mechanisms underlying the apoptosis resistance in parasitized cells. Macrophages differentiated from human monocytic cell lines (U937 and THP-1) and murine primary macrophages were infected with Leishmania infantum MHOM/TN/80/IPT1 (WHO international reference strain). Several ER stress/autophagy expression markers, as well as cell survival/apoptosis markers (phospho-Akt and cleaved caspase-3) were evaluated by qPCR and/or by western blotting. As ER stress positive control, cells were treated with tunicamycin or dithiothreitol (DTT). The gene expression analyses showed a mild but significant induction of the ER stress/autophagy markers. The western blot analyses revealed that the Leishmania infection induced Akt phosphorylation and significantly inhibited the induction of caspase-3 cleavage, eIF2α phosphorylation and DDIT3/CHOP expression in tunicamycin and DTT treated cells. The mild but significant increase in ER stress expression markers and the delay/attenuation of the effects of ER stress inducers in infected cells support the hypothesis that L. infantum could promote survival of host cells by inducing a mild ER stress response. The host ER stress response could be not

  8. The effect of the unfolded protein response on the production of recombinant proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David Rhys; Walmsley, Amanda Maree

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant proteins are currently produced through a wide variety of host systems, including yeast, E. coli, insect and mammalian cells. One of the most recent systems developed uses plant cells. While considerable advances have been made in the yields and fidelity of plant-made recombinant proteins, many of these gains have arisen from the development of recombinant factors. This includes elements such as highly effective promoters and untranslated regions, deconstructed viral vectors, silencing inhibitors, and improved DNA delivery techniques. However, unlike other host systems, much of the work on recombinant protein production in plants uses wild-type hosts that have not been modified to facilitate recombinant protein expression. As such, there are still endogenous mechanisms functioning to maintain the health of the cell. The result is that these pathways, such as the unfolded protein response, can actively work to reduce recombinant protein production to maintain the integrity of the cell. This review examines how issues arising from the unfolded protein response have been addressed in other systems, and how these methods may be transferable to plant systems. We further identify several areas of host plant biology that present attractive targets for modification to facilitate recombinant protein production.

  9. Rationalizing translation attenuation in the network architecture of the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Trusina, Ala; Papa, Feroz R.; Tang, Chao

    2008-01-01

    Increased levels of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of all eukaryotes trigger the unfolded protein response (UPR). Lower eukaryotes solely use an ancient UPR mechanism, whereby they up-regulate ER-resident chaperones and other enzymatic activities to augment protein folding and enhance degradation of misfolded proteins. Metazoans have evolved an additional mechanism through which they attenuate translation of secretory pathway proteins by activating the ER protein kinase PERK. In mammalian professional secretory cells such as insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells, PERK is highly abundant and crucial for proper functioning of the secretory pathway. Through a modeling approach, we propose explanations for why a translation attenuation (TA) mechanism may be critical for β-cells, but is less important in nonsecretory cells and unnecessary in lower eukaryotes such as yeast. We compared the performance of a model UPR, both with and without a TA mechanism, by monitoring 2 variables: (i) the maximal increase in ER unfolded proteins during a response, and (ii) the accumulation of chaperones between 2 consecutive pulses of stress. We found that a TA mechanism is important for minimizing these 2 variables when the ER is repeatedly subjected to transient unfolded protein stresses and when it sustains a large flux of secretory pathway proteins which are both conditions encountered physiologically by pancreatic β-cells. Low expression of PERK in nonsecretory cells, and its absence in yeast, can be rationalized by lower trafficking of secretory proteins through their ERs. PMID:19075238

  10. The unfolded protein response triggers site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rising, Lisa; Mak, Raymond; Webb, Kristofor; Kaiser, Stephen E.; Zuzow, Nathan; Riviere, Paul; Yang, Bing; Fenech, Emma; Tang, Xin; Lindsay, Scott A.; Christianson, John C.; Hampton, Randolph Y.; Wasserman, Steven A.; Bennett, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Insults to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis activate the unfolded protein response (UPR), which elevates protein folding and degradation capacity and attenuates protein synthesis. While a role for ubiquitin in regulating the degradation of misfolded ER-resident proteins is well described, ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translational reprogramming during the UPR remains uncharacterized. Using global quantitative ubiquitin proteomics, we identify evolutionarily conserved, site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins. We demonstrate that these events occur on assembled cytoplasmic ribosomes and are stimulated by both UPR activation and translation inhibition. We further show that ER stress-stimulated regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation occurs on a timescale similar to eIF2α phosphorylation, is dependent upon PERK signaling, and is required for optimal cell survival during chronic UPR activation. In total, these results reveal regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation as a previously uncharacterized and important facet of eukaryotic translational control. PMID:26051182

  11. The Unfolded Protein Response Regulates Uterine Myocyte Antioxidant Responsiveness During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramnarayanan, Saiprasad; Kyathanahalli, Chandrashekara; Ingles, Judith; Park-York, MieJung; Jeyasuria, Pancharatnam; Condon, Jennifer C

    2016-12-01

    There is considerable evidence that implicates oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of human pregnancy complications. However, the role and the mechanism of maintaining an antioxidant prosurvival uterine environment during normal pregnancy is largely unresolved. Herein we report that the highly active uterine unfolded protein response plays a key role in promoting antioxidant activity in the uterine myocyte across gestation. The unfolded protein response (UPR) senses the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and activates a signaling network that consists of the transmembrane protein kinase eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 3/PKR-like-ER kinase (EIF2AK3), which acts to decrease protein translation levels, allowing for a lowered need for protein folding during periods of ER stress. However, independent of its translational regulatory capacity, EIF2AK3-dependent signals elicit the activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2) in response to oxidative stress. NFE2L2 binds to antioxidant response elements in the promoters of a variety of antioxidant genes that minimize the opportunities for generation of reactive oxygen intermediates. Our analysis demonstrates that in the absence of EIF2AK3, the uterine myocyte experiences increased levels of reactive oxygen species due to decreased NFE2L2 activation. Elevated levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species were observed in the EIF2AK3 null cells, and this was associated with the onset of apoptotic cell death. These findings confirm the prosurvival and antioxidant role of UPR-mediated EIF2AK3 activation in the context of the human uterine myocyte.

  12. Ethanol Effects Involve Non-canonical Unfolded Protein Response Activation in Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Tapia, Elisabet; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Querol, Amparo

    2017-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved intracellular signaling pathway that controls transcription of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis related genes. Ethanol stress has been recently described as an activator of the UPR response in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but very little is known about the causes of this activation. Although some authors ensure that the UPR is triggered by the unfolded proteins generated by ethanol in the cell, there are studies which demonstrate that protein denaturation occurs at higher ethanol concentrations than those used to trigger the UPR. Here, we studied UPR after ethanol stress by three different approaches and we concluded that unfolded proteins do not accumulate in the ER under. We also ruled out inositol depletion as an alternative mechanism to activate the UPR under ethanol stress discarding that ethanol effects on the cell decreased inositol levels by different methods. All these data suggest that ethanol, at relatively low concentrations, does not cause unfolded proteins in the yeasts and UPR activation is likely due to other unknown mechanism related with a restructuring of ER membrane due to the effect of ethanol. PMID:28326077

  13. Unfolded protein response and aggresome formation in hereditary reducing-body myopathy.

    PubMed

    Liewluck, Teerin; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Ohsawa, Maki; Kurokawa, Rumi; Fujita, Masako; Noguchi, Satoru; Nonaka, Ikuya; Nishino, Ichizo

    2007-03-01

    Reducing-body myopathy (RBM) is a rare myopathy characterized by the presence of unique sarcoplasmic inclusions called reducing bodies (RBs). We characterized the aggresomal features of RBs that contained gamma-tubulin, ubiquitin, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones, together with a set of membrane proteins, in a family with hereditary RBM. Increased messenger ribonucleic acid and protein levels of a molecular chaperone, glucose-related protein 78, were also observed. These results suggest that the unfolded protein response caused by the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum plays an important role in the formation of RBs.

  14. Unfolding of Proteins: Thermal and Mechanical Unfolding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hur, Joe S.; Darve, Eric

    2004-01-01

    We have employed a Hamiltonian model based on a self-consistent Gaussian appoximation to examine the unfolding process of proteins in external - both mechanical and thermal - force elds. The motivation was to investigate the unfolding pathways of proteins by including only the essence of the important interactions of the native-state topology. Furthermore, if such a model can indeed correctly predict the physics of protein unfolding, it can complement more computationally expensive simulations and theoretical work. The self-consistent Gaussian approximation by Micheletti et al. has been incorporated in our model to make the model mathematically tractable by signi cantly reducing the computational cost. All thermodynamic properties and pair contact probabilities are calculated by simply evaluating the values of a series of Incomplete Gamma functions in an iterative manner. We have compared our results to previous molecular dynamics simulation and experimental data for the mechanical unfolding of the giant muscle protein Titin (1TIT). Our model, especially in light of its simplicity and excellent agreement with experiment and simulation, demonstrates the basic physical elements necessary to capture the mechanism of protein unfolding in an external force field.

  15. The Unfolded Protein Response in Homeostasis and Modulation of Mammalian Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana Sofia; Alves, Inês; Helguero, Luisa; Domingues, Maria Rosário; Neves, Bruno Miguel

    2016-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays important roles in eukaryotic protein folding and lipid biosynthesis. Several exogenous and endogenous cellular sources of stress can perturb ER homeostasis leading to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the lumen. Unfolded protein accumulation triggers a signal-transduction cascade known as the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive mechanism which aims to protect cells from protein aggregates and to restore ER functions. Further to this protective mechanism, in immune cells, UPR molecular effectors have been shown to participate in a wide range of biological processes such as cell differentiation, survival and immunoglobulin and cytokine production. Recent findings also highlight the involvement of the UPR machinery in the maturational program and antigen presentation capacities of dendritic cells. UPR is therefore a key element in immune system homeostasis with direct implications on both adaptive and innate immune responses. The present review summarizes the knowledge on the emerging roles of UPR signaling cascades in mammalian immune cells as well as the consequences of their dysregulation in relation to the pathogenesis of several diseases.

  16. The Unfolded Protein Response Supports Plant Development and Defense as well as Responses to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yan; Howell, Stephen H.

    2017-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress response conserved in eukaryotic organisms and activated by the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Adverse environmental conditions disrupt protein folding in the ER and trigger the UPR. Recently, it was found that the UPR can be elicited in the course of plant development and defense. During vegetative plant development, the UPR is involved in normal root growth and development, the effect of which can be largely attributed to the influence of the UPR on plant hormone biology. The UPR also functions in plant reproductive development by protecting male gametophyte development from heat stress. In terms of defense, the UPR has been implicated in virus and microbial defense. Viral defense represents a double edge sword in that various virus infections activate the UPR, however, in a number of cases, the UPR actually supports viral infections. The UPR also plays a role in plant immunity to bacterial infections, again through the action of plant hormones in regulating basal immunity responses. PMID:28360918

  17. Severe Injury Is Associated With Insulin Resistance, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response, and Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Herndon, David N.; Song, Juquan; Boehning, Darren; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Baker, Henry V.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We determined whether postburn hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress/unfolded protein response (UPR) activation leading to impaired insulin receptor signaling. Background Inflammation and cellular stress, hallmarks of severely burned and critically ill patients, have been causally linked to insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes via induction of ER stress and the UPR. Methods Twenty severely burned pediatric patients were compared with 36 nonburned children. Clinical markers, protein, and GeneChip analysis were used to identify transcriptional changes in ER stress and UPR and insulin resistance–related signaling cascades in peripheral blood leukocytes, fat, and muscle at admission and up to 466 days postburn. Results Burn-induced inflammatory and stress responses are accompanied by profound insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. Genomic and protein analysis revealed that burn injury was associated with alterations in the signaling pathways that affect insulin resistance, ER/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation, and cell growth/apoptosis up to 466 days postburn. Conclusion Burn-induced insulin resistance is associated with persistent ER/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress/UPR and subsequent suppressed insulin receptor signaling over a prolonged period of time. PMID:22241293

  18. Novel roles of the unfolded protein response in the control of tumor development and aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Dejeans, Nicolas; Barroso, Kim; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Samali, Afshin; Chevet, Eric

    2015-08-01

    The hallmarks of cancer currently define the molecular mechanisms responsible for conferring specific tumor phenotypes. Recently, these characteristics were also connected to the status of the secretory pathway, thereby linking the functionality of this cellular machinery to the acquisition of cancer cell features. The secretory pathway ensures the biogenesis of proteins that are membrane-bound or secreted into the extracellular milieu and can control its own homeostasis through an adaptive signaling pathway named the unfolded protein response (UPR). In the present review, we discuss the specific features of the UPR in various tumor types and the impact of the selective activation of this pathway on cell transformation, tumor development and aggressiveness.

  19. Advances and New Concepts in Alcohol-Induced Organelle Stress, Unfolded Protein Responses and Organ Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol is a simple and consumable biomolecule yet its excessive consumption disturbs numerous biological pathways damaging nearly all organs of the human body. One of the essential biological processes affected by the harmful effects of alcohol is proteostasis, which regulates the balance between biogenesis and turnover of proteins within and outside the cell. A significant amount of published evidence indicates that alcohol and its metabolites directly or indirectly interfere with protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causing an accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins, which triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) leading to either restoration of homeostasis or cell death, inflammation and other pathologies under severe and chronic alcohol conditions. The UPR senses the abnormal protein accumulation and activates transcription factors that regulate nuclear transcription of genes related to ER function. Similarly, this kind of protein stress response can occur in other cellular organelles, which is an evolving field of interest. Here, I review recent advances in the alcohol-induced ER stress response as well as discuss new concepts on alcohol-induced mitochondrial, Golgi and lysosomal stress responses and injuries. PMID:26047032

  20. Spliced X-box Binding Protein 1 Couples the Unfolded Protein Response to Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao V.; Deng, Yingfeng; Gao, Ningguo; Pedrozo, Zully; Li, Dan L.; Morales, Cyndi R.; Criollo, Alfredo; Luo, Xiang; Tan, Wei; Jiang, Nan; Lehrman, Mark A.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Lavandero, Sergio; Mammen, Pradeep P.A.; Ferdous, Anwarul; Gillette, Thomas G.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) generates UDP-GlcNAc (uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine) for glycan synthesis and O-linked GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc) protein modifications. Despite the established role of the HBP in metabolism and multiple diseases, regulation of the HBP remains largely undefined. Here, we show that spliced X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1s), the most conserved signal transducer of the unfolded protein response (UPR), is a direct transcriptional activator of the HBP. We demonstrate that the UPR triggers HBP activation via Xbp1s-dependent transcription of genes coding for key, rate-limiting enzymes. We further establish that this previously unrecognized UPR-HBP axis is triggered in a variety of stress conditions. Finally, we demonstrate a physiologic role for the UPR-HBP axis, by showing that acute stimulation of Xbp1s in heart by ischemia/reperfusion confers robust cardioprotection in part through induction of the HBP. Collectively, these studies reveal that Xbp1s couples the UPR to the HBP to protect cells under stress. PMID:24630721

  1. Spliced X-box binding protein 1 couples the unfolded protein response to hexosamine biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao V; Deng, Yingfeng; Gao, Ningguo; Pedrozo, Zully; Li, Dan L; Morales, Cyndi R; Criollo, Alfredo; Luo, Xiang; Tan, Wei; Jiang, Nan; Lehrman, Mark A; Rothermel, Beverly A; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Lavandero, Sergio; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Ferdous, Anwarul; Gillette, Thomas G; Scherer, Philipp E; Hill, Joseph A

    2014-03-13

    The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) generates uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) for glycan synthesis and O-linked GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc) protein modifications. Despite the established role of the HBP in metabolism and multiple diseases, regulation of the HBP remains largely undefined. Here, we show that spliced X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1s), the most conserved signal transducer of the unfolded protein response (UPR), is a direct transcriptional activator of the HBP. We demonstrate that the UPR triggers HBP activation via Xbp1s-dependent transcription of genes coding for key, rate-limiting enzymes. We further establish that this previously unrecognized UPR-HBP axis is triggered in a variety of stress conditions. Finally, we demonstrate a physiologic role for the UPR-HBP axis by showing that acute stimulation of Xbp1s in heart by ischemia/reperfusion confers robust cardioprotection in part through induction of the HBP. Collectively, these studies reveal that Xbp1s couples the UPR to the HBP to protect cells under stress.

  2. Discovery of Sulfonamidebenzamides as Selective Apoptotic CHOP Pathway Activators of the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cellular proteins that fail to fold properly result in inactive or disfunctional proteins that can have toxic functions. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a two-tiered cellular mechanism initiated by eukaryotic cells that have accumulated misfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). An adaptive pathway facilitates the clearance of the undesired proteins; however, if overwhelmed, cells trigger apoptosis by upregulating transcription factors such as C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP). A high throughput screen was performed directed at identifying compounds that selectively upregulate the apoptotic CHOP pathway while avoiding adaptive signaling cascades, resulting in a sulfonamidebenzamide chemotype that was optimized. These efforts produced a potent and selective CHOP inducer (AC50 = 0.8 μM; XBP1 > 80 μM), which was efficacious in both mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and a human oral squamous cell cancer cell line, and demonstrated antiproliferative effects for multiple cancer cell lines in the NCI-60 panel. PMID:25530830

  3. Reactive oxygen species-mediated unfolded protein response pathways in preimplantation embryos

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ihsan; Shah, Syed Zahid Ali; Jin, Yi; Li, Zhong-Shu; Ullah, Obaid

    2017-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated responses are critical to embryonic development in the challenging in vitro environment. ROS production increases during early embryonic development with the increase in protein requirements for cell survival and growth. The ER is a multifunctional cellular organelle responsible for protein folding, modification, and cellular homeostasis. ER stress is activated by a variety of factors including ROS. Such stress leads to activation of the adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR), which restores homeostasis. However, chronic stress can exceed the toleration level of the ER, resulting in cellular apoptosis. In this review, we briefly describe the generation and impact of ROS in preimplantation embryo development, the ROS-mediated activation mechanism of the UPR via the ER, and the subsequent activation of signaling pathways following ER stress in preimplantation embryos. PMID:28057903

  4. Protein Unfolding and Alzheimer's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kelvin

    2012-10-01

    Early interaction events of beta-amyloid (Aβ) proteins with neurons have been associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Knowledge pertaining to the role of lipid molecules, particularly cholesterol, in modulating the single Aβ interactions with neurons at the atomic length and picosecond time resolutions, remains unclear. In our research, we have used atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to explore early molecular events including protein insertion kinetics, protein unfolding, and protein-induced membrane disruption of Aβ in lipid domains that mimic the nanoscopic raft and non-raft regions of the neural membrane. In this talk, I will summarize our current work on investigating the role of cholesterol in regulating the Aβ interaction events with membranes at the molecular level. I will also explain how our results will provide new insights into understanding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease associated with the Aβ proteins.

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Cartilage Pathophysiology; Contributing Factors to Apoptosis and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexandria; Oxford, Alexandra E.; Tawara, Ken; Jorcyk, Cheryl L.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2017-01-01

    Chondrocytes of the growth plate undergo apoptosis during the process of endochondral ossification, as well as during the progression of osteoarthritis. Although the regulation of this process is not completely understood, alterations in the precisely orchestrated programmed cell death during development can have catastrophic results, as exemplified by several chondrodystrophies which are frequently accompanied by early onset osteoarthritis. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie chondrocyte apoptosis during endochondral ossification in the growth plate has the potential to impact the development of therapeutic applications for chondrodystrophies and associated early onset osteoarthritis. In recent years, several chondrodysplasias and collagenopathies have been recognized as protein-folding diseases that lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress, endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation, and the unfolded protein response. Under conditions of prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress in which the protein folding load outweighs the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum, cellular dysfunction and death often occur. However, unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling is also required for the normal maturation of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Understanding how UPR signaling may contribute to cartilage pathophysiology is an essential step toward therapeutic modulation of skeletal disorders that lead to osteoarthritis. PMID:28335520

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Cartilage Pathophysiology; Contributing Factors to Apoptosis and Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alexandria; Oxford, Alexandra E; Tawara, Ken; Jorcyk, Cheryl L; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2017-03-20

    Chondrocytes of the growth plate undergo apoptosis during the process of endochondral ossification, as well as during the progression of osteoarthritis. Although the regulation of this process is not completely understood, alterations in the precisely orchestrated programmed cell death during development can have catastrophic results, as exemplified by several chondrodystrophies which are frequently accompanied by early onset osteoarthritis. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie chondrocyte apoptosis during endochondral ossification in the growth plate has the potential to impact the development of therapeutic applications for chondrodystrophies and associated early onset osteoarthritis. In recent years, several chondrodysplasias and collagenopathies have been recognized as protein-folding diseases that lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress, endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation, and the unfolded protein response. Under conditions of prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress in which the protein folding load outweighs the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum, cellular dysfunction and death often occur. However, unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling is also required for the normal maturation of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Understanding how UPR signaling may contribute to cartilage pathophysiology is an essential step toward therapeutic modulation of skeletal disorders that lead to osteoarthritis.

  7. Role for the Unfolded Protein Response in Heart Disease and Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Liu, Man; Dudley, Samuel C

    2015-12-31

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) has been extensively investigated in neurological diseases and diabetes, while its function in heart disease is less well understood. Activated UPR participates in multiple cardiac conditions and can either protect or impair heart function. Recently, the UPR has been found to play a role in arrhythmogenesis during human heart failure by affecting cardiac ion channels expression, and blocking UPR has an antiarrhythmic effect. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to targeting UPR in heart disease for treatment of arrhythmias.

  8. The mitochondrial unfolded protein response activator ATFS-1 protects cells from inhibition of the mevalonate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rauthan, Manish; Ranji, Parmida; Aguilera Pradenas, Nataly; Pitot, Christophe; Pilon, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of cholesterol via the mevalonate pathway. This pathway also produces coenzyme Q (a component of the respiratory chain), dolichols (important for protein glycosylation), and isoprenoids (lipid moieties responsible for the membrane association of small GTPases). We previously showed that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is useful to study the noncholesterol effects of statins because its mevalonate pathway lacks the sterol synthesis branch but retains all other branches. Here, from a screen of 150,000 mutagenized genomes, we isolated four C. elegans mutants resistant to statins by virtue of gain-of-function mutations within the first six amino acids of the protein ATFS-1, the key regulator of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response that includes activation of the chaperones HSP-6 and HSP-60. The atfs-1 gain-of-function mutants are also resistant to ibandronate, an inhibitor of an enzyme downstream of HMG-CoA reductase, and to gliotoxin, an inhibitor acting on a subbranch of the pathway important for protein prenylation, and showed improved mitochondrial function and protein prenylation in the presence of statins. Additionally, preinduction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response in wild-type worms using ethidium bromide or paraquat triggered statin resistance, and similar observations were made in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and in a mammalian cell line. We conclude that statin resistance through maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis is conserved across species, and that the cell-lethal effects of statins are caused primarily through impaired protein prenylation that results in mitochondria dysfunction. PMID:23530189

  9. Emerging Roles of ER Stress and Unfolded Protein Response Pathways in Skeletal Muscle Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Kyle R; McMillan, Joseph D; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-02-08

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in the human body and can adapt its mass as a consequence of physical activity, metabolism, growth factors, and disease conditions. Skeletal muscle contains an extensive network of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), called sarcoplasmic reticulum, which plays an important role in the regulation of proteostasis and calcium homeostasis. In many cell types, environmental and genetic factors that disrupt ER function cause an accumulation of misfolded and unfolded proteins in the ER lumen that ultimately leads to ER stress. To alleviate the stress and restore homeostasis, the ER activates a signaling network called the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR has three arms, which regulate protein synthesis and expression of many ER chaperone and regulatory proteins. However, the role of individual UPR pathways in skeletal muscle has just begun to be investigated. Recent studies suggest that UPR pathways play pivotal roles in muscle stem cell homeostasis, myogenic differentiation, and regeneration of injured skeletal muscle. Moreover, markers of ER stress and the UPR are activated in skeletal muscle in diverse conditions such as exercise, denervation, starvation, high fat diet, cancer cachexia, and aging. Accumulating evidence also suggests that ER stress may have important roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory myopathies and genetic muscle disorders. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the role and potential mechanisms by which ER stress and the individual arms of the UPR regulate skeletal muscle formation, plasticity, and function in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Mitochondrial unfolded protein response controls matrix pre-RNA processing and translation.

    PubMed

    Münch, Christian; Harper, J Wade

    2016-06-30

    The mitochondrial matrix is unique in that it must integrate the folding and assembly of proteins derived from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) senses matrix protein misfolding and induces a program of nuclear gene expression, including mitochondrial chaperonins, to promote mitochondrial proteostasis. While misfolded mitochondrial-matrix-localized ornithine transcarbamylase induces chaperonin expression, our understanding of mammalian UPRmt is rudimentary, reflecting a lack of acute triggers for UPRmt activation. This limitation has prevented analysis of the cellular responses to matrix protein misfolding and the effects of UPRmt on mitochondrial translation to control protein folding loads. Here we combine pharmacological inhibitors of matrix-localized HSP90/TRAP1 (ref. 8) or LON protease, which promote chaperonin expression, with global transcriptional and proteomic analysis to reveal an extensive and acute response of human cells to UPRmt. This response encompasses widespread induction of nuclear genes, including matrix-localized proteins involved in folding, pre-RNA processing and translation. Functional studies revealed rapid but reversible translation inhibition in mitochondria occurring concurrently with defects in pre-RNA processing caused by transcriptional repression and LON-dependent turnover of the mitochondrial pre-RNA processing nuclease MRPP3 (ref. 10). This study reveals that acute mitochondrial protein folding stress activates both increased chaperone availability within the matrix and reduced matrix-localized protein synthesis through translational inhibition, and provides a framework for further dissection of mammalian UPRmt.

  11. Unique roles of the unfolded protein response pathway in fungal development and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwang-Woo; So, Yee-Seul; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, a global fungal meningitis pathogen, employs the unfolded protein response pathway. This pathway, which consists of an evolutionarily conserved Ire1 kinase/endoribonuclease and a unique transcription factor (Hxl1), modulates the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and pathogenicity. Here, we report that the unfolded protein response pathway governs sexual and unisexual differentiation of C. neoformans in an Ire1-dependent but Hxl1-independent manner. The ire1∆ mutants showed defects in sexual mating, with reduced cell fusion and pheromone-mediated formation of the conjugation tube. Unexpectedly, these mating defects did not result from defective pheromone production because expression of the mating pheromone gene (MFα1) was strongly induced in the ire1∆ mutant. Ire1 controls sexual differentiation by modulating the function of the molecular chaperone Kar2 and by regulating mating-induced localisation of mating pheromone transporter (Ste6) and receptor (Ste3/Cprα). Deletion of IRE1, but not HXL1, also caused significant defects in unisexual differentiation in a Kar2-independent manner. Moreover, we showed that Rim101 is a novel downstream factor of Ire1 for production of the capsule, which is a unique structural determinant of C. neoformans virulence. Therefore, Ire1 uniquely regulates fungal development and differentiation in an Hxl1-independent manner. PMID:27629591

  12. Sorafenib enhances proteasome inhibitor-mediated cytotoxicity via inhibition of unfolded protein response and keratin phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Honma, Yuichi; Harada, Masaru

    2013-08-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is highly resistant to conventional systemic therapies and prognosis for advanced HCC patients remains poor. Recent studies of the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumor initiation and progression have identified several potential molecular targets in HCC. Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor shown to have survival benefits in advanced HCC. It acts by inhibiting the serine/threonine kinases and the receptor type tyrosine kinases. In preclinical experiments sorafenib had anti-proliferative activity in hepatoma cells and it reduced tumor angiogenesis and increased apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib include its inhibitory effects on protein ubiquitination, unfolded protein response (UPR) and keratin phosphorylation in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Moreover, we show that combined treatment with sorafenib and proteasome inhibitors (PIs) synergistically induced a marked increase in cell death in hepatoma- and hepatocyte-derived cells. These observations may open the way to potentially interesting treatment combinations that may augment the effect of sorafenib, possibly including drugs that promote ER stress. Because sorafenib blocked the cellular defense mechanisms against hepatotoxic injury not only in hepatoma cells but also in hepatocyte-derived cells, we must be careful to avoid severe liver injury. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •We examined the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib in hepatoma cells. •Sorafenib induces cell death via apoptotic and necrotic fashion. •Sorafenib inhibits protein ubiquitination and unfolded protein response. •Autophagy induced by sorafenib may affect its cytotoxicity. •Sorafenib inhibits keratin phosphorylation and cytoplasmic inclusion formation.

  13. THE UNFOLDED PROTEIN RESPONSE IN RELATION TO MITOCHONDRIAL BIOGENESIS IN SKELETAL MUSCLE CELLS.

    PubMed

    Mesbah Moosavi, Zahra S; Hood, David A

    2017-03-08

    Mitochondria are comprised of both nuclear- and mitochondrially-encoded proteins requiring precise stoichiometry for their integration into functional complexes. The augmented protein synthesis associated with mitochondrial biogenesis results in the accumulation of unfolded proteins, thus triggering cellular stress. As such, the unfolded protein responses emanating from the endoplasmic reticulum (UPR(ER)) or the mitochondrion (UPR(MT)) are triggered to ensure correct protein handling. Whether this response is necessary for mitochondrial adaptations is unknown. Two models of mitochondrial biogenesis were used: muscle differentiation and chronic contractile activity (CCA) in murine muscle cells. After 4 days of differentiation, our findings depict selective activation of the UPR(MT) in which chaperones decreased, however Sirt3 and UPR(ER) markers were elevated. To delineate the role of ER stress in mitochondrial adaptations, the ER stress inhibitor TUDCA was administered. Surprisingly, mitochondrial markers COX-I, COX-IV, and PGC-1α protein levels were augmented up to 1.5-fold above that of vehicle-treated cells. Similar results were obtained in myotubes undergoing CCA in which biogenesis was enhanced by ~2-3-fold, along with elevated UPR(MT) markers Sirt3 and CPN10. To verify whether the findings were attributable to the terminal UPRER branch directed by the transcription factor CHOP, cells were transfected with CHOP siRNA. Basally, COX-I levels increased (~20%) and COX-IV decreased (~30%), suggesting that CHOP influences mitochondrial composition. This effect was fully restored by CCA. Therefore, our results suggest that mitochondrial biogenesis is independent of the terminal UPR(ER) Under basal conditions CHOP is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial composition, but not for differentiation- or CCA-induced mitochondrial biogenesis.

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum and the Unfolded Protein Response: Dynamics and Metabolic Integration

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Roberto; Parra, Valentina; Gatica, Damián; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Torrealba, Natalia; Paredes, Felipe; Wang, Zhao V.; Zorzano, Antonio; Hill, Joseph A.; Jaimovich, Enrique; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic intracellular organelle with multiple functions essential for cellular homeostasis, development, and stress responsiveness. In response to cellular stress, a well-established signaling cascade, the unfolded protein response (UPR), is activated. This intricate mechanism is an important means of reestablishing cellular homeostasis and alleviating the inciting stress. Now, emerging evidence has demonstrated that the UPR influences cellular metabolism through diverse mechanisms, including calcium and lipid transfer, raising the prospect of involvement of these processes in the pathogenesis of disease, including neurodegeneration, cancer, diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Here, we review the distinct functions of the ER and UPR from a metabolic point of view, highlighting their association with prevalent pathologies. PMID:23317820

  15. Deletion of hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activates the unfolded protein response pathway and induces skeletal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Gareth G; Walker, Elizabeth A; Turan, Nil; Rogoff, Daniela; Ryder, Jeffery W; Shelton, John M; Richardson, James A; Falciani, Francesco; White, Perrin C; Stewart, Paul M; Parker, Keith L; McMillan, Daniel R

    2008-03-28

    Hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PD) is the initial component of a pentose phosphate pathway inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that generates NADPH for ER enzymes. In liver H6PD is required for the 11-oxoreductase activity of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, which converts inactive 11-oxo-glucocorticoids to their active 11-hydroxyl counterparts; consequently, H6PD null mice are relatively insensitive to glucocorticoids, exhibiting fasting hypoglycemia, increased insulin sensitivity despite elevated circulating levels of corticosterone, and increased basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscles normally enriched in type II (fast) fibers, which have increased glycogen content. Here, we show that H6PD null mice develop a severe skeletal myopathy characterized by switching of type II to type I (slow) fibers. Running wheel activity and electrically stimulated force generation in isolated skeletal muscle are both markedly reduced. Affected muscles have normal sarcomeric structure at the electron microscopy level but contain large intrafibrillar membranous vacuoles and abnormal triads indicative of defects in structure and function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). SR proteins involved in calcium metabolism, including the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), calreticulin, and calsequestrin, show dysregulated expression. Microarray analysis and real-time PCR demonstrate overexpression of genes encoding proteins in the unfolded protein response pathway. We propose that the absence of H6PD induces a progressive myopathy by altering the SR redox state, thereby impairing protein folding and activating the unfolded protein response pathway. These studies thus define a novel metabolic pathway that links ER stress to skeletal muscle integrity and function.

  16. Surveillance-activated defenses block the ROS-induced mitochondrial unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Runkel, Eva D; Liu, Shu; Baumeister, Ralf; Schulze, Ekkehard

    2013-01-01

    Disturbance of cellular functions results in the activation of stress-signaling pathways that aim at restoring homeostasis. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify components of the signal transduction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) to a nuclear chaperone promoter. We used the ROS generating complex I inhibitor paraquat to induce the UPR(mt), and we employed RNAi exposure post-embryonically to allow testing genes whose knockdown results in embryonic lethality. We identified 54 novel regulators of the ROS-induced UPR(mt). Activation of the UPR(mt), but not of other stress-signaling pathways, failed when homeostasis of basic cellular mechanisms such as translation and protein transport were impaired. These mechanisms are monitored by a recently discovered surveillance system that interprets interruption of these processes as pathogen attack and depends on signaling through the JNK-like MAP-kinase KGB-1. Mutation of kgb-1 abrogated the inhibition of ROS-induced UPR(mt), suggesting that surveillance-activated defenses specifically inhibit the UPR(mt) but do not compromise activation of the heat shock response, the UPR of the endoplasmic reticulum, or the SKN-1/Nrf2 mediated response to cytosolic stress. In addition, we identified PIFK-1, the orthologue of the Drosophila PI 4-kinase four wheel drive (FWD), and found that it is the only known factor so far that is essential for the unfolded protein responses of both mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. This suggests that both UPRs may share a common membrane associated mechanism.

  17. Functional analysis of the mammalian RNA ligase for IRE1 in the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Poothong, Juthakorn; Tirasophon, Witoon; Kaufman, Randal J

    2017-04-30

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved signalling pathway activated on the accumulation of unfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed ER stress. Upon ER stress, HAC1/XBP1 undergoes exon/intron-specific excision by inositol requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) to remove an intron and liberate the 5' and 3' exons. In yeast, the 5' and 3' HAC1 exons are subsequently ligated by tRNA ligase (Rlg1p), whereas XBP1 ligation in mammalian cells is catalysed by a recently identified ligase, RtcB. In the present study, RNA ligase activity of the human RtcB (hRtcB) involved in the unconventional splicing of XBP1/HAC1 mRNA was explored in an rlg1-100 mutant yeast strain. Distinct from Escherichia coli RtcB and Rlg1p, expression of hRtcB alone inefficiently complemented HAC1/XBP1 splicing and the hRtcB cofactor (archease) was required to promote enzymatic activity of hRtcB to catalyse RNA ligation.

  18. The PERK arm of the unfolded protein response regulates satellite cell-mediated skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guangyan; Hindi, Sajedah M; Mann, Aman K; Gallot, Yann S; Bohnert, Kyle R; Cavener, Douglas R; Whittemore, Scott R; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-03-23

    Regeneration of skeletal muscle in adults is mediated by satellite stem cells. Accumulation of misfolded proteins triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress that leads to unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR is relayed to the cell through the activation of PERK, IRE1/XBP1, and ATF6. Here, we demonstrate that levels of PERK and IRE1 are increased in satellite cells upon muscle injury. Inhibition of PERK, but not the IRE1 arm of the UPR in satellite cells inhibits myofiber regeneration in adult mice. PERK is essential for the survival and differentiation of activated satellite cells into the myogenic lineage. Deletion of PERK causes hyper-activation of p38 MAPK during myogenesis. Blocking p38 MAPK activity improves the survival and differentiation of PERK-deficient satellite cells in vitro and muscle formation in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that the PERK arm of the UPR plays a pivotal role in the regulation of satellite cell homeostasis during regenerative myogenesis.

  19. IRE1α nucleotide sequence cleavage specificity in the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Poothong, Juthakorn; Sopha, Pattarawut; Kaufman, Randal J; Tirasophon, Witoon

    2017-01-01

    Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) is a conserved sensor of the unfolded protein response that has protein kinase and endoribonuclease (RNase) enzymatic activities and thereby initiates HAC1/XBP1 splicing. Previous studies demonstrated that human IRE1α (hIRE1α) does not cleave Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAC1 mRNA. Using an in vitro cleavage assay, we show that adenine to cytosine nucleotide substitution at the +1 position in the 3' splice site of HAC1 RNA is required for specific cleavage by hIRE1α. A similar restricted nucleotide specificity in the RNA substrate was observed for XBP1 splicing in vivo. Together these findings underscore the essential role of cytosine nucleotide at +1 in the 3' splice site for determining cleavage specificity of hIRE1α.

  20. A chemical screen to identify inducers of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Rauthan, Manish; Pilon, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that inhibition of the mevalonate pathway in C. elegans causes inhibition of protein prenylation, developmental arrest and lethality. We also showed that constitutive activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, UPRmt, is an effective way for C. elegans to become resistant to the negative effects of mevalonate pathway inhibition. This was an important finding since statins, a drug class prescribed to lower cholesterol levels in patients, act by inhibiting the mevalonate pathway, and it is therefore possible that some of their undesirable side effects could be alleviated by activating the UPRmt. Here, we screened a chemical library and identified 4 compounds that specifically activated the UPRmt. One of these compounds, methacycline hydrochloride (a tetracycline antibiotic) also protected C. elegans and mammalian cells from statin toxicity. Methacycline hydrochloride and ethidium bromide, a known UPRmt activator, were also tested in mice: only ethidium bromide significantly activate the UPRmt in skeletal muscles. PMID:27123370

  1. Amyloidogenesis of Natively Unfolded Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2009-01-01

    Aggregation and subsequent development of protein deposition diseases originate from conformational changes in corresponding amyloidogenic proteins. The accumulated data support the model where protein fibrillogenesis proceeds via the formation of a relatively unfolded amyloidogenic conformation, which shares many structural properties with the pre-molten globule state, a partially folded intermediate first found during the equilibrium and kinetic (un)folding studies of several globular proteins and later described as one of the structural forms of natively unfolded proteins. The flexibility of this structural form is essential for the conformational rearrangements driving the formation of the core cross-beta structure of the amyloid fibril. Obviously, molecular mechanisms describing amyloidogenesis of ordered and natively unfolded proteins are different. For ordered protein to fibrillate, its unique and rigid structure has to be destabilized and partially unfolded. On the other hand, fibrillogenesis of a natively unfolded protein involves the formation of partially folded conformation; i.e., partial folding rather than unfolding. In this review recent findings are surveyed to illustrate some unique features of the natively unfolded proteins amyloidogenesis. PMID:18537543

  2. Domain compatibility in Ire1 kinase is critical for the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Poothong, Juthakorn; Sopha, Pattarawut; Kaufman, Randal J; Tirasophon, Witoon

    2010-07-16

    The unfolded protein response is a mechanism to cope with endoplasmic reticulum stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ire1 senses the stress and mediates a signaling cascade to upregulate responsive genes through an unusual HAC1 mRNA splicing. The splicing requires interconnected activity (kinase and endoribonuclease (RNase)) of Ire1 to cleave HAC1 mRNA at the non-canonical splice sites before translation into Hac1 transcription factor. Analysis of the truncated kinase domain from Ire1 homologs revealed that this domain is highly conserved. Characterization by domain swapping indicated that a functional ATP/ADP binding domain is minimally required. However the overall domain compatibility is critical for eliciting its full RNase function.

  3. Unfolded protein response-induced ERdj3 secretion links ER stress to extracellular proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Genereux, Joseph C; Qu, Song; Zhou, Minghai; Ryno, Lisa M; Wang, Shiyu; Shoulders, Matthew D; Kaufman, Randal J; Lasmézas, Corinne I; Kelly, Jeffery W; Wiseman, R Luke

    2015-01-01

    The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) indirectly regulates extracellular proteostasis through transcriptional remodeling of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis pathways. This remodeling attenuates secretion of misfolded, aggregation-prone proteins during ER stress. Through these activities, the UPR has a critical role in preventing the extracellular protein aggregation associated with numerous human diseases. Here, we demonstrate that UPR activation also directly influences extracellular proteostasis through the upregulation and secretion of the ER HSP40 ERdj3/DNAJB11. Secreted ERdj3 binds misfolded proteins in the extracellular space, substoichiometrically inhibits protein aggregation, and attenuates proteotoxicity of disease-associated toxic prion protein. Moreover, ERdj3 can co-secrete with destabilized, aggregation-prone proteins in a stable complex under conditions where ER chaperoning capacity is overwhelmed, preemptively providing extracellular chaperoning of proteotoxic misfolded proteins that evade ER quality control. This regulated co-secretion of ERdj3 with misfolded clients directly links ER and extracellular proteostasis during conditions of ER stress. ERdj3 is, to our knowledge, the first metazoan chaperone whose secretion into the extracellular space is regulated by the UPR, revealing a new mechanism by which UPR activation regulates extracellular proteostasis. PMID:25361606

  4. The unfolded protein response mediates fibrogenesis and collagen I secretion through regulating TANGO1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Maiers, Jessica L; Kostallari, Enis; Mushref, Malek; deAssuncao, Thiago M; Li, Haiyang; Jalan-Sakrikar, Nidhi; Huebert, Robert C; Cao, Sheng; Malhi, Harmeet; Shah, Vijay H

    2017-03-01

    Fibrogenesis encompasses the deposition of matrix proteins, such as collagen I, by hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) that culminates in cirrhosis. Fibrogenic signals drive transcription of procollagen I, which enters the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is trafficked through the secretory pathway, and released to generate extracellular matrix. Alternatively, disruption of procollagen I ER export could activate the unfolded protein response (UPR) and drive HSC apoptosis. Using a small interfering RNA screen, we identified Transport and Golgi organization 1 (TANGO1) as a potential participant in collagen I secretion. We investigated the role of TANGO1 in procollagen I secretion in HSCs and liver fibrogenesis. Depletion of TANGO1 in HSCs blocked collagen I secretion without affecting other matrix proteins. Disruption of secretion led to procollagen I retention within the ER, induction of the UPR, and HSC apoptosis. In wild-type (WT) HSCs, both TANGO1 and the UPR were induced by transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). As the UPR up-regulates proteins involved in secretion, we studied whether TANGO1 was a target of the UPR. We found that UPR signaling is responsible for up-regulating TANGO1 in response to TGFβ, and this mechanism is mediated by the transcription factor X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1). In vivo, murine and human cirrhotic tissue displayed increased TANGO1 messenger RNA levels. Finally, TANGO1(+/-) mice displayed less hepatic fibrosis compared to WT mice in two separate murine models: CCl4 and bile duct ligation.

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and the Unfolded Protein Responses in Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sarah X.; Sanders, Emily; Fliesler, Steven J.; Wang, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the primary intracellular organelle responsible for protein and lipid biosynthesis, protein folding and trafficking, calcium homeostasis, and several other vital processes in cell physiology. Disturbance in ER function results in ER stress and subsequent activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR up-regulates ER chaperones, reduces protein translation, and promotes clearance of cytotoxic misfolded proteins to restore ER homeostasis. If this vital process fails, the cell will be signaled to enter apoptosis, resulting in cell death. Sustained ER stress also can trigger an inflammatory response and exacerbate oxidative stress, both of which contribute synergistically to tissue damage. Studies performed over the past decade have implicated ER stress in a broad range of human diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, diabetes, and vascular disorders. Several of these diseases also entail retinal dysfunction and degeneration caused by injury to retinal neurons and/or to the blood vessels that supply retinal cells with nutrients, trophic and homeostatic factors, oxygen, and other essential molecules, as well as serving as a conduit for removal of waste products and potentially toxic substances from the retina. Collectively, such injuries represent the leading cause of blindness world-wide in all age groups. Herein, we summarize recent progress on the study of ER stress and UPR signaling in retinal biology and discuss the molecular mechanisms and the potential clinical applications of targeting ER stress as a new therapeutic approach to prevent and treat neuronal degeneration in the retina. PMID:24792589

  6. The role of unfolded protein response in differentiation of mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Megumi; Koizumi, Yumiko; Hayashi, Satoko; Hanaoka, Miyuki; Tokutake, Yukako; Yonekura, Shinichi

    2017-03-18

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER provokes ER stress by increasing the demand for energy, chaperones, and other proteins that are needed to fold client proteins or to degrade unfoldable secretory cargo. This stress activates a signaling network called the unfolded protein response (UPR). However, recent accumulated data suggested that the UPR also provides important signals for regulating cell differentiation and maturation. However, the relationship between UPR and mammary gland development has not been fully elucidated. To define the involvement of the UPR in mammary gland development, mammary glands were collected from non-pregnant mice, at days 5, 10 and 15 of pregnancy, at days 1 and 7 of lactation, and the expression patterns of UPR-related genes were determined by real-time PCR. We found that the mRNA expression of ATF4 and XBP1 significant increased during pregnancy. Moreover, we found that both ATF4 and XBP1 proteins are expressed in mammary epithelial cells by immunohistological analysis. In order to know the role of ATF4 and XBP1 in the differentiation of mammary epithelial cell, we performed gene knockdown experiment using HC11 cells. We found that ATF4 or XBP1 knockdown suppressed the mRNA expression of beta-casein and lactogenic hormone receptor in differentiating HC11 cells. Our results demonstrate that XBP1 and ATF4, which are UPR-related transcription factors, directly or indirectly participate in cell differentiation mechanisms through the regulation of the expression of lactogenic hormone receptors in mouse mammary epithelial cells.

  7. Lifespan Extension Conferred by Endoplasmic Reticulum Secretory Pathway Deficiency Requires Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M.; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Delaney, Joe R.; Kaya, Alaattin; Kennedy, Brian K.; Kaeberlein, Matt; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2014-01-01

    Cells respond to accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway. The UPR restores ER homeostasis by degrading misfolded proteins, inhibiting translation, and increasing expression of chaperones that enhance ER protein folding capacity. Although ER stress and protein aggregation have been implicated in aging, the role of UPR signaling in regulating lifespan remains unknown. Here we show that deletion of several UPR target genes significantly increases replicative lifespan in yeast. This extended lifespan depends on a functional ER stress sensor protein, Ire1p, and is associated with constitutive activation of upstream UPR signaling. We applied ribosome profiling coupled with next generation sequencing to quantitatively examine translational changes associated with increased UPR activity and identified a set of stress response factors up-regulated in the long-lived mutants. Besides known UPR targets, we uncovered up-regulation of components of the cell wall and genes involved in cell wall biogenesis that confer resistance to multiple stresses. These findings demonstrate that the UPR is an important determinant of lifespan that governs ER stress and identify a signaling network that couples stress resistance to longevity. PMID:24391512

  8. Cholesterol overloading leads to hepatic L02 cell damage through activation of the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Liu, Zhiguo; Guo, Jianli; Chen, Jiangyuan; Yang, Pu; Tian, Jun; Sun, Jun; Zong, Yiqiang; Qu, Shen

    2009-10-01

    Reported data indicate that cholesterol loading in the liver can cause hepatic injury. To explore the possible mechanisms of cell damage resulting from cholesterol overloading in hepatocytes, cell apoptosis, the unfolded protein response (UPR) and the correlation between them were assessed in the cholesterol-overloaded normal human hepatic cell line L02. L02 cells were incubated with 200 microg/ ml of low density lipoprotein (LDL) for 24 h with or without 20 microg/ml 58035, an inhibitor of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT). In the LDL+58035 group, the intracellular cholesterol level was dramatically increased, which was measured by an enzymatic combined high performance liquid chromatography assay. Expression of immunoglobulin-binding protein, X-box binding protein 1, activating transcription factor 6, activating transcription factor 4, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein-10, markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS)/ UPR, were up-regulated as determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or Western blot analysis. The rate of cell apoptic death increased 21.3+/-2.4%. Meanwhile, the active caspase-3 protein expression was increased 8.4-fold compared to the active caspase-3 protein expression in the controls. Furthermore, 4-phenylbutyric acid, an inhibitor of UPR, partly reduced cell apoptosis and activation of caspase-3. This study suggests that cholesterol overloading in hepatic L02 cells induces ERS and activates the UPR which, in part, leads to the apoptotic damage of cells.

  9. Inhibition of ER stress and unfolding protein response pathways causes skeletal muscle wasting during cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Kyle R; Gallot, Yann S; Sato, Shuichi; Xiong, Guangyan; Hindi, Sajedah M; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-09-01

    Cachexia is a devastating syndrome that causes morbidity and mortality in a large number of patients with cancer. However, the mechanisms of cancer cachexia remain poorly understood. Accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes stress. The ER responds to this stress through activating certain pathways commonly known as the unfolding protein response (UPR). The main function of UPR is to restore homeostasis, but excessive or prolonged activation of UPR can lead to pathologic conditions. In this study, we examined the role of ER stress and UPR in regulation of skeletal muscle mass in naïve conditions and during cancer cachexia. Our results demonstrate that multiple markers of ER stress are highly activated in skeletal muscle of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and Apc(Min/+) mouse models of cancer cachexia. Treatment of mice with 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA), a chemical chaperon and a potent inhibitor of ER stress, significantly reduced skeletal muscle strength and mass in both control and LLC-bearing mice. Blocking the UPR also increased the proportion of fast-type fibers in soleus muscle of both control and LLC-bearing mice. Inhibition of UPR reduced the activity of Akt/mTOR pathway and increased the expression of the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy in LLC-bearing mice. Moreover, we found that the inhibition of UPR causes severe atrophy in cultured myotubes. Our study provides initial evidence that ER stress and UPR pathways are essential for maintaining skeletal muscle mass and strength and for protection against cancer cachexia.-Bohnert, K. R., Gallot, Y. S., Sato, S., Xiong, G., Hindi, S. M., Kumar, A. Inhibition of ER stress and unfolding protein response pathways causes skeletal muscle wasting during cancer cachexia.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response in pancreatic islet inflammation.

    PubMed

    Meyerovich, Kira; Ortis, Fernanda; Allagnat, Florent; Cardozo, Alessandra K

    2016-07-01

    Insulin-secreting pancreatic β-cells are extremely dependent on their endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to cope with the oscillatory requirement of secreted insulin to maintain normoglycemia. Insulin translation and folding rely greatly on the unfolded protein response (UPR), an array of three main signaling pathways designed to maintain ER homeostasis and limit ER stress. However, prolonged or excessive UPR activation triggers alternative molecular pathways that can lead to β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis. An increasing number of studies suggest a role of these pro-apoptotic UPR pathways in the downfall of β-cells observed in diabetic patients. Particularly, the past few years highlighted a cross talk between the UPR and inflammation in the context of both type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this article, we describe the recent advances in research regarding the interplay between ER stress, the UPR, and inflammation in the context of β-cell apoptosis leading to diabetes.

  11. Low intensity focused ultrasound (LOFU) modulates unfolded protein response and sensitizes prostate cancer to 17AAG

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Subhrajit; Bhanja, Payel; Partanen, Ari; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Laibin; Tomé, Wolfgang; Guha, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxic tumor microenvironment generates oxidative Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress, resulting in protein misfolding and unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR induces several molecular chaperones including heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90), which corrects protein misfolding and improves survival of cancer cells and resistance to tumoricidal therapy although prolonged activation of UPR induces cell death. The HSP90 inhibitor, 17AAG, has shown promise against various solid tumors, including prostate cancer (PC). However, therapeutic doses of 17AAG elicit systemic toxicity. In this manuscript, we describe a new paradigm where the combination therapy of a non-ablative and non-invasive low energy focused ultrasound (LOFU) and a non-toxic, low dose 17AAG causes synthetic lethality and significant tumoricidal effects in mouse and human PC xenografts. LOFU induces ER stress and UPR in tumor cells without inducing cell death. Treatment with a non-toxic dose of 17AAG further increased ER stress in LOFU treated PC and switch UPR from a cytoprotective to an apoptotic response in tumors resulting significant induction of apoptosis and tumor growth retardation. These observations suggest that LOFU-induced ER stress makes the ultrasound-treated tumors more susceptible to chemotherapeutic agents, such as 17AAG. Thus, a novel therapy of LOFU-induced chemosensitization may be designed for locally advanced and recurrent tumors. PMID:25594042

  12. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Induces Apoptosis through the Unfolded Protein Response Activation of EGR1

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Alan; Lundberg, Lindsay; Swales, Danielle; Waybright, Nicole; Pinkham, Chelsea; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a previously weaponized arthropod-borne virus responsible for causing acute and fatal encephalitis in animal and human hosts. The increased circulation and spread in the Americas of VEEV and other encephalitic arboviruses, such as eastern equine encephalitis virus and West Nile virus, underscore the need for research aimed at characterizing the pathogenesis of viral encephalomyelitis for the development of novel medical countermeasures. The host-pathogen dynamics of VEEV Trinidad donkey-infected human astrocytoma U87MG cells were determined by carrying out RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of poly(A) and mRNAs. To identify the critical alterations that take place in the host transcriptome following VEEV infection, samples were collected at 4, 8, and 16 h postinfection and RNA-Seq data were acquired using an Ion Torrent PGM platform. Differential expression of interferon response, stress response factors, and components of the unfolded protein response (UPR) was observed. The protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) arm of the UPR was activated, as the expression of both activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and CHOP (DDIT3), critical regulators of the pathway, was altered after infection. Expression of the transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) was induced in a PERK-dependent manner. EGR1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) demonstrated lower susceptibility to VEEV-induced cell death than isogenic wild-type MEFs, indicating that EGR1 modulates proapoptotic pathways following VEEV infection. The influence of EGR1 is of great importance, as neuronal damage can lead to long-term sequelae in individuals who have survived VEEV infection. IMPORTANCE Alphaviruses represent a group of clinically relevant viruses transmitted by mosquitoes to humans. In severe cases, viral spread targets neuronal tissue, resulting in significant and life-threatening inflammation dependent on a combination

  13. Killing Me Softly: Connotations to Unfolded Protein Response and Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pająk, Beata; Kania, Elżbieta; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the possible causes of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD, underlying molecular mechanisms of this malfunction, possible causes and known consequences of APP, Aβ, and hyperphosphorylated tau presence in mitochondria, and the contribution of altered lipid metabolism (nonsterol isoprenoids) to pathological processes leading to increased formation and accumulation of the aforementioned hallmarks of AD. Abnormal protein folding and unfolded protein response seem to be the outcomes of impaired glycosylation due to metabolic disturbances in geranylgeraniol intermediary metabolism. The origin and consecutive fate of APP, Aβ, and tau are emphasized on intracellular trafficking apparently influenced by inaccurate posttranslational modifications. We hypothesize that incorrect intracellular processing of APP determines protein translocation to mitochondria in AD. Similarly, without obvious reasons, the passage of Aβ and tau to mitochondria is observed. APP targeted to mitochondria blocks the activity of protein translocase complex resulting in poor import of proteins central to oxidative phosphorylation. Besides, APP, Aβ, and neurofibrillary tangles of tau directly or indirectly impair mitochondrial biochemistry and bioenergetics, with concomitant generation of oxidative/nitrosative stress. Limited protective mechanisms are inadequate to prevent the free radical-mediated lesions. Finally, neuronal loss is observed in AD-affected brains typically by pathologic apoptosis. PMID:26881014

  14. Killing Me Softly: Connotations to Unfolded Protein Response and Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pająk, Beata; Kania, Elżbieta; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the possible causes of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD, underlying molecular mechanisms of this malfunction, possible causes and known consequences of APP, Aβ, and hyperphosphorylated tau presence in mitochondria, and the contribution of altered lipid metabolism (nonsterol isoprenoids) to pathological processes leading to increased formation and accumulation of the aforementioned hallmarks of AD. Abnormal protein folding and unfolded protein response seem to be the outcomes of impaired glycosylation due to metabolic disturbances in geranylgeraniol intermediary metabolism. The origin and consecutive fate of APP, Aβ, and tau are emphasized on intracellular trafficking apparently influenced by inaccurate posttranslational modifications. We hypothesize that incorrect intracellular processing of APP determines protein translocation to mitochondria in AD. Similarly, without obvious reasons, the passage of Aβ and tau to mitochondria is observed. APP targeted to mitochondria blocks the activity of protein translocase complex resulting in poor import of proteins central to oxidative phosphorylation. Besides, APP, Aβ, and neurofibrillary tangles of tau directly or indirectly impair mitochondrial biochemistry and bioenergetics, with concomitant generation of oxidative/nitrosative stress. Limited protective mechanisms are inadequate to prevent the free radical-mediated lesions. Finally, neuronal loss is observed in AD-affected brains typically by pathologic apoptosis.

  15. HY5, a positive regulator of light signaling, negatively controls the unfolded protein response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Nawkar, Ganesh M.; Kang, Chang Ho; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Joung Hun; Jung, Young Jun; Chae, Ho Byoung; Chi, Yong Hun; Jung, In Jung; Kim, Woe Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2017-01-01

    Light influences essentially all aspects of plant growth and development. Integration of light signaling with different stress response results in improvement of plant survival rates in ever changing environmental conditions. Diverse environmental stresses affect the protein-folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), thus evoking ER stress in plants. Consequently, the unfolded protein response (UPR), in which a set of molecular chaperones is expressed, is initiated in the ER to alleviate this stress. Although its underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown, light is believed to be required for the ER stress response. In this study, we demonstrate that increasing light intensity elevates the ER stress sensitivity of plants. Moreover, mutation of the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), a key component of light signaling, leads to tolerance to ER stress. This enhanced tolerance of hy5 plants can be attributed to higher expression of UPR genes. HY5 negatively regulates the UPR by competing with basic leucine zipper 28 (bZIP28) to bind to the G-box–like element present in the ER stress response element (ERSE). Furthermore, we found that HY5 undergoes 26S proteasome-mediated degradation under ER stress conditions. Conclusively, we propose a molecular mechanism of crosstalk between the UPR and light signaling, mediated by HY5, which positively mediates light signaling, but negatively regulates UPR gene expression. PMID:28167764

  16. Identification of Novel Components of the Unfolded Protein Response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Amir; Henríquez-Valencia, Carlos; Gómez-Páez, Marcela; Medina, Joaquín; Orellana, Ariel; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús; Zouhar, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Unfavorable environmental and developmental conditions may cause disturbances in protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are recognized and counteracted by components of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) signaling pathways. The early cellular responses include transcriptional changes to increase the folding and processing capacity of the ER. In this study, we systematically screened a collection of inducible transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a library of transcription factors for resistance toward UPR-inducing chemicals. We identified 23 candidate genes that may function as novel regulators of the UPR and of which only three genes (bZIP10, TBF1, and NF-YB3) were previously associated with the UPR. The putative role of identified candidate genes in the UPR signaling is supported by favorable expression patterns in both developmental and stress transcriptional analyses. We demonstrated that WRKY75 is a genuine regulator of the ER-stress cellular responses as its expression was found to be directly responding to ER stress-inducing chemicals. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing WRKY75 showed resistance toward salt stress, connecting abiotic and ER-stress responses. PMID:27242851

  17. HY5, a positive regulator of light signaling, negatively controls the unfolded protein response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nawkar, Ganesh M; Kang, Chang Ho; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Joung Hun; Jung, Young Jun; Chae, Ho Byoung; Chi, Yong Hun; Jung, In Jung; Kim, Woe Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2017-02-21

    Light influences essentially all aspects of plant growth and development. Integration of light signaling with different stress response results in improvement of plant survival rates in ever changing environmental conditions. Diverse environmental stresses affect the protein-folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), thus evoking ER stress in plants. Consequently, the unfolded protein response (UPR), in which a set of molecular chaperones is expressed, is initiated in the ER to alleviate this stress. Although its underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown, light is believed to be required for the ER stress response. In this study, we demonstrate that increasing light intensity elevates the ER stress sensitivity of plants. Moreover, mutation of the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), a key component of light signaling, leads to tolerance to ER stress. This enhanced tolerance of hy5 plants can be attributed to higher expression of UPR genes. HY5 negatively regulates the UPR by competing with basic leucine zipper 28 (bZIP28) to bind to the G-box-like element present in the ER stress response element (ERSE). Furthermore, we found that HY5 undergoes 26S proteasome-mediated degradation under ER stress conditions. Conclusively, we propose a molecular mechanism of crosstalk between the UPR and light signaling, mediated by HY5, which positively mediates light signaling, but negatively regulates UPR gene expression.

  18. Identification of Novel Components of the Unfolded Protein Response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Amir; Henríquez-Valencia, Carlos; Gómez-Páez, Marcela; Medina, Joaquín; Orellana, Ariel; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús; Zouhar, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Unfavorable environmental and developmental conditions may cause disturbances in protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are recognized and counteracted by components of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) signaling pathways. The early cellular responses include transcriptional changes to increase the folding and processing capacity of the ER. In this study, we systematically screened a collection of inducible transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a library of transcription factors for resistance toward UPR-inducing chemicals. We identified 23 candidate genes that may function as novel regulators of the UPR and of which only three genes (bZIP10, TBF1, and NF-YB3) were previously associated with the UPR. The putative role of identified candidate genes in the UPR signaling is supported by favorable expression patterns in both developmental and stress transcriptional analyses. We demonstrated that WRKY75 is a genuine regulator of the ER-stress cellular responses as its expression was found to be directly responding to ER stress-inducing chemicals. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing WRKY75 showed resistance toward salt stress, connecting abiotic and ER-stress responses.

  19. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin; Ke, Zun-Ji; Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific.

  20. Control of dopaminergic neuron survival by the unfolded protein response transcription factor XBP1

    PubMed Central

    Valdés, Pamela; Mercado, Gabriela; Vidal, Rene L.; Molina, Claudia; Parsons, Geoffrey; Court, Felipe A.; Martinez, Alexis; Galleguillos, Danny; Armentano, Donna; Schneider, Bernard L.; Hetz, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Although growing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a hallmark of PD, its exact contribution to the disease process is not well understood. Here we report that developmental ablation of X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1) in the nervous system, a key regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), protects dopaminergic neurons against a PD-inducing neurotoxin. This survival effect was associated with a preconditioning condition that resulted from induction of an adaptive ER stress response in dopaminergic neurons of the SNpc, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, silencing XBP1 in adult animals triggered chronic ER stress and dopaminergic neuron degeneration. Supporting this finding, gene therapy to deliver an active form of XBP1 provided neuroprotection and reduced striatal denervation in animals injected with 6-hydroxydopamine. Our results reveal a physiological role of the UPR in the maintenance of protein homeostasis in dopaminergic neurons that may help explain the differential neuronal vulnerability observed in PD. PMID:24753614

  1. The unfolded protein response governs integrity of the haematopoietic stem-cell pool during stress.

    PubMed

    van Galen, Peter; Kreso, Antonija; Mbong, Nathan; Kent, David G; Fitzmaurice, Timothy; Chambers, Joseph E; Xie, Stephanie; Laurenti, Elisa; Hermans, Karin; Eppert, Kolja; Marciniak, Stefan J; Goodall, Jane C; Green, Anthony R; Wouters, Bradly G; Wienholds, Erno; Dick, John E

    2014-06-12

    The blood system is sustained by a pool of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that are long-lived due to their capacity for self-renewal. A consequence of longevity is exposure to stress stimuli including reactive oxygen species (ROS), nutrient fluctuation and DNA damage. Damage that occurs within stressed HSCs must be tightly controlled to prevent either loss of function or the clonal persistence of oncogenic mutations that increase the risk of leukaemogenesis. Despite the importance of maintaining cell integrity throughout life, how the HSC pool achieves this and how individual HSCs respond to stress remain poorly understood. Many sources of stress cause misfolded protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and subsequent activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) enables the cell to either resolve stress or initiate apoptosis. Here we show that human HSCs are predisposed to apoptosis through strong activation of the PERK branch of the UPR after ER stress, whereas closely related progenitors exhibit an adaptive response leading to their survival. Enhanced ER protein folding by overexpression of the co-chaperone ERDJ4 (also called DNAJB9) increases HSC repopulation capacity in xenograft assays, linking the UPR to HSC function. Because the UPR is a focal point where different sources of stress converge, our study provides a framework for understanding how stress signalling is coordinated within tissue hierarchies and integrated with stemness. Broadly, these findings reveal that the HSC pool maintains clonal integrity by clearance of individual HSCs after stress to prevent propagation of damaged stem cells.

  2. Integration of the Unfolded Protein and Oxidative Stress Responses through SKN-1/Nrf

    PubMed Central

    Glover-Cutter, Kira M.; Lin, Stephanie; Blackwell, T. Keith

    2013-01-01

    The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) maintains homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and defends against ER stress, an underlying factor in various human diseases. During the UPR, numerous genes are activated that sustain and protect the ER. These responses are known to involve the canonical UPR transcription factors XBP1, ATF4, and ATF6. Here, we show in C. elegans that the conserved stress defense factor SKN-1/Nrf plays a central and essential role in the transcriptional UPR. While SKN-1/Nrf has a well-established function in protection against oxidative and xenobiotic stress, we find that it also mobilizes an overlapping but distinct response to ER stress. SKN-1/Nrf is regulated by the UPR, directly controls UPR signaling and transcription factor genes, binds to common downstream targets with XBP-1 and ATF-6, and is present at the ER. SKN-1/Nrf is also essential for resistance to ER stress, including reductive stress. Remarkably, SKN-1/Nrf-mediated responses to oxidative stress depend upon signaling from the ER. We conclude that SKN-1/Nrf plays a critical role in the UPR, but orchestrates a distinct oxidative stress response that is licensed by ER signaling. Regulatory integration through SKN-1/Nrf may coordinate ER and cytoplasmic homeostasis. PMID:24068940

  3. Molecular signal networks and regulating mechanisms of the unfolded protein response*

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jing; Wang, Xing-zhi; Wang, Tao; Chen, Jiao-jiao; Xie, Xiao-yuan; Hu, Hui; Yu, Fang; Liu, Hui-lin; Jiang, Xing-yan; Fan, Han-dong

    2017-01-01

    Within the cell, several mechanisms exist to maintain homeostasis of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). One of the primary mechanisms is the unfolded protein response (UPR). In this review, we primarily focus on the latest signal webs and regulation mechanisms of the UPR. The relationships among ER stress, apoptosis, and cancer are also discussed. Under the normal state, binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) interacts with the three sensors (protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), and inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α)). Under ER stress, misfolded proteins interact with BiP, resulting in the release of BiP from the sensors. Subsequently, the three sensors dimerize and autophosphorylate to promote the signal cascades of ER stress. ER stress includes a series of positive and negative feedback signals, such as those regulating the stabilization of the sensors/BiP complex, activating and inactivating the sensors by autophosphorylation and dephosphorylation, activating specific transcription factors to enable selective transcription, and augmenting the ability to refold and export. Apart from the three basic pathways, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-phospholipase C-γ (PLCγ)-mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, induced only in solid tumors, can also activate ATF6 and PERK signal cascades, and IRE1α also can be activated by activated RAC-alpha serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT). A moderate UPR functions as a pro-survival signal to return the cell to its state of homeostasis. However, persistent ER stress will induce cells to undergo apoptosis in response to increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS), Ca2+ in the cytoplasmic matrix, and other apoptosis signal cascades, such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and P38, when cellular damage exceeds the capacity of this adaptive response. PMID:28070992

  4. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Hempstead, Andrew D; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-12-08

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR.

  5. Cantharidins Induce ER Stress and a Terminal Unfolded Protein Response in OSCC

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Y.; Garshott, D.M.; Brownell, A.L.; Yoo, G.H.; Lin, H.-S.; Freeburg, T.L.; Yoo, N.G.; Kaufman, R.J.; Callaghan, M.U.

    2015-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain unacceptably high with disfiguring treatment options and a death rate of 1 per hour in the United States. The approval of cituximab for advanced OSCC has been the only new treatment for these patients since the 1970s, although it has not significantly increased overall survival. To address the paucity of effective new therapies, we undertook a high-throughput screen to discover small molecules and natural products that could induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and enforce a terminal unfolded protein response (UPR) in OSCC. The terpenoid cantharidin (CNT), previously used to treat various malignancies in culture-specific medical practices for over 2,000 y, emerged as a hit. CNT and its analog, cantharidic acid, potently induced protein and gene expression profiles consistent with the activation of ER stress, the UPR, and apoptosis in OSCC cells. Murine embryonic fibroblasts null for the UPR-associated transcription factors Atf4 or Chop were significantly protected from CNT, implicating a key role for the UPR in the death response. These data validate that our high-throughput screen can identify novel modulators of UPR signaling and that such compounds might provide a new therapeutic approach to treating patients with OSCC. PMID:25425581

  6. Inter-regulation of the unfolded protein response and auxin signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yani; Aung, Kyaw; Rolčík, Jakub; Walicki, Kathryn; Friml, Jiří; Brandizzi, Federica

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a signaling network triggered by overload of protein-folding demand in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a condition termed ER stress. The UPR is critical for growth and development; nonetheless, connections between the UPR and other cellular regulatory processes remain largely unknown. Here, we identify a link between the UPR and the phytohormone auxin, a master regulator of plant physiology. We show that ER stress triggers down-regulation of auxin receptors and transporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. We also demonstrate that an Arabidopsis mutant of a conserved ER stress sensor IRE1 exhibits defects in the auxin response and levels. These data not only support that the plant IRE1 is required for auxin homeostasis, they also reveal a species-specific feature of IRE1 in multicellular eukaryotes. Furthermore, by establishing that UPR activation is reduced in mutants of ER-localized auxin transporters, including PIN5, we define a long-neglected biological significance of ER-based auxin regulation. We further examine the functional relationship of IRE1 and PIN5 by showing that an ire1 pin5 triple mutant enhances defects of UPR activation and auxin homeostasis in ire1 or pin5. Our results imply that the plant UPR has evolved a hormone-dependent strategy for coordinating ER function with physiological processes.

  7. Exploring the Conserved Role of MANF in the Unfolded Protein Response in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Riitta; Lindholm, Päivi; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Palgi, Mari; Saarma, Mart; Heino, Tapio I.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in the homeostasis of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) referred to as ER stress is involved in a variety of human diseases. ER stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR), a cellular mechanism the purpose of which is to restore ER homeostasis. Previous studies show that Mesencephalic Astrocyte-derived Neurotrophic Factor (MANF) is an important novel component in the regulation of UPR. In vertebrates, MANF is upregulated by ER stress and protects cells against ER stress-induced cell death. Biochemical studies have revealed an interaction between mammalian MANF and GRP78, the major ER chaperone promoting protein folding. In this study we discovered that the upregulation of MANF expression in response to drug-induced ER stress is conserved between Drosophila and mammals. Additionally, by using a genetic in vivo approach we found genetic interactions between Drosophila Manf and genes encoding for Drosophila homologues of GRP78, PERK and XBP1, the key components of UPR. Our data suggest a role for Manf in the regulation of Drosophila UPR. PMID:26975047

  8. Proteomic analyses of brain tumor cell lines amidst the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Redzic, Jasmina S.; Gomez, Joe D.; Hellwinkel, Justin E.; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.; Graner, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors such as high grade gliomas are among the deadliest forms of human cancers. The tumor environment is subject to a number of cellular stressors such as hypoxia and glucose deprivation. The persistence of the stressors activates the unfolded proteins response (UPR) and results in global alterations in transcriptional and translational activity of the cell. Although the UPR is known to effect tumorigenesis in some epithelial cancers, relatively little is known about the role of the UPR in brain tumors. Here, we evaluated the changes at the molecular level under homeostatic and stress conditions in two glioma cell lines of differing tumor grade. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we identified proteins unique to each condition (unstressed/stressed) and within each cell line (U87MG and UPN933). Comparing the two, we find differences between both the conditions and cell lines indicating a unique profile for each. Finally, we used our proteomic data to identify the predominant pathways within these cells under unstressed and stressed conditions. Numerous predominant pathways are the same in both cell lines, but there are differences in biological and molecular classifications of the identified proteins, including signaling mechanisms, following UPR induction; we see that relatively minimal proteomic alterations can lead to signaling changes that ultimately promote cell survival. PMID:27323862

  9. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial dysfunction and a protective unfolded protein response in RPE cells.

    PubMed

    Cano, Marisol; Wang, Lei; Wan, Jun; Barnett, Bradley P; Ebrahimi, Katayoon; Qian, Jiang; Handa, James T

    2014-04-01

    How cells degenerate from oxidative stress in aging-related disease is incompletely understood. This study's intent was to identify key cytoprotective pathways activated by oxidative stress and determine the extent of their protection. Using an unbiased strategy with microarray analysis, we found that retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells treated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) had overrepresented genes involved in the antioxidant and unfolded protein response (UPR). Differentially expressed antioxidant genes were predominantly located in the cytoplasm, with no induction of genes that neutralize superoxide and H2O2 in the mitochondria, resulting in accumulation of superoxide and decreased ATP production. Simultaneously, CSE induced the UPR sensors IRE1α, p-PERK, and ATP6, including CHOP, which was cytoprotective because CHOP knockdown decreased cell viability. In mice given intravitreal CSE, the RPE had increased IRE1α and decreased ATP and developed epithelial-mesenchymal transition, as suggested by decreased LRAT abundance, altered ZO-1 immunolabeling, and dysmorphic cell shape. Mildly degenerated RPE from early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) samples had prominent IRE1α, but minimal mitochondrial TOM20 immunolabeling. Although oxidative stress is thought to induce an antioxidant response with cooperation between the mitochondria and the ER, herein we show that mitochondria become impaired sufficiently to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition despite a protective UPR. With similar responses in early AMD samples, these results suggest that mitochondria are vulnerable to oxidative stress despite a protective UPR during the early phases of aging-related disease.

  10. Insulin demand regulates β cell number via the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rohit B; O'Donnell, Amy C; Stamateris, Rachel E; Ha, Binh; McCloskey, Karen M; Reynolds, Paul R; Arvan, Peter; Alonso, Laura C

    2015-10-01

    Although stem cell populations mediate regeneration of rapid turnover tissues, such as skin, blood, and gut, a stem cell reservoir has not been identified for some slower turnover tissues, such as the pancreatic islet. Despite lacking identifiable stem cells, murine pancreatic β cell number expands in response to an increase in insulin demand. Lineage tracing shows that new β cells are generated from proliferation of mature, differentiated β cells; however, the mechanism by which these mature cells sense systemic insulin demand and initiate a proliferative response remains unknown. Here, we identified the β cell unfolded protein response (UPR), which senses insulin production, as a regulator of β cell proliferation. Using genetic and physiologic models, we determined that among the population of β cells, those with an active UPR are more likely to proliferate. Moreover, subthreshold endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) drove insulin demand-induced β cell proliferation, through activation of ATF6. We also confirmed that the UPR regulates proliferation of human β cells, suggesting that therapeutic UPR modulation has potential to expand β cell mass in people at risk for diabetes. Together, this work defines a stem cell-independent model of tissue homeostasis, in which differentiated secretory cells use the UPR sensor to adapt organ size to meet demand.

  11. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Elmets, Craig A.; Robbins, David J.; Matalon, Sadis; Deshane, Jessy S.; Afaq, Farrukh; Bickers, David R.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  12. Arctigenin suppresses unfolded protein response and sensitizes glucose deprivation-mediated cytotoxicity of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengrong; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Changhua; Nawaz, Ahmed; Wei, Wen; Li, Juanjuan; Wang, Lijun; Yu, De-Hua

    2011-01-01

    The involvement of unfolded protein response (UPR) activation in tumor survival and resistance to chemotherapies suggests a new anticancer strategy targeting UPR pathway. Arctigenin, a natural product, has been recently identified for its antitumor activity with selective toxicity against cancer cells under glucose starvation with unknown mechanism. Here we found that arctigenin specifically blocks the transcriptional induction of two potential anticancer targets, namely glucose-regulated protein-78 (GRP78) and its analog GRP94, under glucose deprivation, but not by tunicamycin. The activation of other UPR pathways, e.g., XBP-1 and ATF4, by glucose deprivation was also suppressed by arctigenin. A further transgene experiment showed that ectopic expression of GRP78 at least partially rescued arctigenin/glucose starvation-mediated cell growth inhibition, suggesting the causal role of UPR suppression in arctigenin-mediated cytotoxicity under glucose starvation. These observations bring a new insight into the mechanism of action of arctigenin and may lead to the design of new anticancer therapeutics.

  13. PRRT2 inhibits the proliferation of glioma cells by modulating unfolded protein response pathway.

    PubMed

    Bi, Guanghui; Yan, Jingfeng; Sun, Shuzhen; Qu, Xinhua

    2017-02-10

    Accumulating studies reported mutations in the gene encoding the proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) to be causative for several paroxysmal neurological disorders, including paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), PKD combined with infantile seizures (ICCA), and benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS). However, the impact of PRRT2 in tumorigenesis is not known. Based on a large-scale data analysis, we found that PRRT2 was down-regulated in glioma tumor tissues compared with normal brain tissue. Dysregulation of PRRT2 was not induced by mutation, copy number variation and epigenetic modification, but modulated by microRNA-30a-5p. Overexpression of PRRT2 strongly impaired the cell viability and promoted cell apoptosis and these anti-tumor effects could be largely reversed by microRNA-30a-5p. Mechanistically, PRRT2 expression was closely correlated genes involved in unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and introduction of PRRT2 inhibited gene expression in the three branches of UPR, including PERK axis, IRE1 axis and ATF6 axis. Taken together, our findings identify PRRT2 as a tumor suppressor in glioma and provide a promising target for potential therapeutic intervention.

  14. Mutations in the unfolded protein response regulator ATF6 cause the cone dysfunction disorder achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Susanne; Zobor, Ditta; Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Weisschuh, Nicole; Staller, Jennifer; Menendez, Irene Gonzalez; Chang, Stanley; Beck, Susanne C; Garrido, Marina Garcia; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Seeliger, Mathias W; Stanzial, Franco; Benedicenti, Francesco; Inzana, Francesca; Héon, Elise; Vincent, Ajoy; Beis, Jill; Strom, Tim M; Rudolph, Günther; Roosing, Susanne; den Hollander, Anneke I; Cremers, Frans P M; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Moore, Anthony T; Webster, Andrew R; Michaelides, Michel; Koenekoop, Robert K; Zrenner, Eberhart; Kaufman, Randal J; Tsang, Stephen H; Wissinger, Bernd; Lin, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by color blindness, photophobia, nystagmus and severely reduced visual acuity. Using homozygosity mapping and whole-exome and candidate gene sequencing, we identified ten families carrying six homozygous and two compound-heterozygous mutations in the ATF6 gene (encoding activating transcription factor 6A), a key regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and cellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis. Patients had evidence of foveal hypoplasia and disruption of the cone photoreceptor layer. The ACHM-associated ATF6 mutations attenuate ATF6 transcriptional activity in response to ER stress. Atf6−/− mice have normal retinal morphology and function at a young age but develop rod and cone dysfunction with increasing age. This new ACHM-related gene suggests a crucial and unexpected role for ATF6A in human foveal development and cone function and adds to the list of genes that, despite ubiquitous expression, when mutated can result in an isolated retinal photoreceptor phenotype. PMID:26029869

  15. Polyunsaturated Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Geranylgeranoic Acid Induces Unfolded Protein Response in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwao, Chieko; Shidoji, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The acyclic diterpenoid acid geranylgeranoic acid (GGA) has been reported to induce autophagic cell death in several human hepatoma-derived cell lines; however, the molecular mechanism for this remains unknown. In the present study, several diterpenoids were examined for ability to induce XBP1 splicing and/or lipotoxicity for human hepatoma cell lines. Here we show that three groups of diterpenoids emerged: 1) GGA, 2,3-dihydro GGA and 9-cis retinoic acid induce cell death and XBP1 splicing; 2) all-trans retinoic acid induces XBP1 splicing but little cell death; and 3) phytanic acid, phytenic acid and geranylgeraniol induce neither cell death nor XBP1 splicing. GGA-induced ER stress/ unfolded protein response (UPR) and its lipotoxicity were both blocked by co-treatment with oleic acid. The blocking activity of oleic acid for GGA-induced XBP1 splicing was not attenuated by methylation of oleic acid. These findings strongly suggest that GGA at micromolar concentrations induces the so-called lipid-induced ER stress response/UPR, which is oleate-suppressive, and shows its lipotoxicity in human hepatoma cells. PMID:26186544

  16. Unfolded protein response activates glycogen synthase kinase-3 via selective lysosomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Nijholt, Diana A T; Nölle, Anna; van Haastert, Elise S; Edelijn, Hessel; Toonen, Ruud F; Hoozemans, Jeroen J M; Scheper, Wiep

    2013-07-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress response that is activated upon disturbed homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum. In Alzheimer's disease, as well as in other tauopathies, the UPR is activated in neurons that contain early tau pathology. A recent genome-wide association study identified genetic variation in a UPR transducer as a risk factor for tauopathy, supporting a functional connection between UPR activation and tau pathology. Here we show that UPR activation increases the activity of the major tau kinase glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 in vitro via a selective removal of inactive GSK-3 phosphorylated at Ser(21/9). We demonstrate that this is mediated by the autophagy/lysosomal pathway. In brain tissue from patients with different tauopathies, lysosomal accumulations of pSer(21/9) GSK-3 are found in neurons with markers for UPR activation. Our data indicate that UPR activation increases the activity of GSK-3 by a novel mechanism, the lysosomal degradation of the inactive pSer(21/9) GSK-3. This may provide a functional explanation for the close association between UPR activation and early tau pathology in neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Glutathione Peroxidase-1 Suppresses the Unfolded Protein Response upon Cigarette Smoke Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias A.; D'Armiento, Jeanine M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress provokes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) in the lungs of chronic obstructive pulmonary (COPD) subjects. The antioxidant, glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), counters oxidative stress induced by cigarette smoke exposure. Here, we investigate whether GPx-1 expression deters the UPR following exposure to cigarette smoke. Expression of ER stress markers was investigated in fully differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells isolated from nonsmoking, smoking, and COPD donors and redifferentiated at the air liquid interface. NHBE cells from COPD donors expressed heightened ATF4, XBP1, GRP78, GRP94, EDEM1, and CHOP compared to cells from nonsmoking donors. These changes coincided with reduced GPx-1 expression. Reintroduction of GPx-1 into NHBE cells isolated from COPD donors reduced the UPR. To determine whether the loss of GPx-1 expression has a direct impact on these ER stress markers during smoke exposure, Gpx-1−/− mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 1 year. Loss of Gpx-1 expression enhanced cigarette smoke-induced ER stress and apoptosis. Equally, induction of ER stress with tunicamycin enhanced antioxidant expression in mouse precision-cut lung slices. Smoke inhalation also exacerbated the UPR response during respiratory syncytial virus infection. Therefore, ER stress may be an antioxidant-related pathophysiological event in COPD. PMID:28070146

  18. Aging and sleep deprivation induce the unfolded protein response in the pancreas: implications for metabolism.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Nirinjini; Davis, James G; Zhu, Jingxu; Yabumoto, Maya; Singletary, Kristan; Brown, Marishka; Galante, Raymond; Agarwal, Beamon; Baur, Joseph A

    2014-02-01

    Sleep disruption has detrimental effects on glucose metabolism through pathways that remain poorly defined. Although numerous studies have examined the consequences of sleep deprivation (SD) in the brain, few have directly tested its effects on peripheral organs. We examined several tissues in mice for induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR) following acute SD. In young animals, we found a robust induction of BiP in the pancreas, indicating an active UPR. At baseline, pancreata from aged animals exhibited a marked increase in a pro-apoptotic transcription factor, CHOP, that was amplified by SD, whereas BiP induction was not observed, suggesting a maladaptive response to cellular stress with age. Acute SD increased plasma glucose levels in both young and old animals. However, this change was not overtly related to stress in the pancreatic beta cells, as plasma insulin levels were not lower following acute SD. Accordingly, animals subjected to acute SD remained tolerant to a glucose challenge. In a chronic SD experiment, young mice were found to be sensitized to insulin and have improved glycemic control, whereas aged animals became hyperglycemic and failed to maintain appropriate plasma insulin concentrations. Our results show that both age and SD cooperate to induce the UPR in pancreatic tissue. While changes in insulin secretion are unlikely to play a major role in the acute effects of SD, CHOP induction in pancreatic tissues suggests that chronic SD may contribute to the loss or dysfunction of endocrine cells and that these effects may be exacerbated by normal aging.

  19. Antiviral Activity of a Small Molecule Deubiquitinase Inhibitor Occurs via Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Jeffrey W.; Ahmed, Mohammad; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Donato, Nicholas J.; Showalter, Hollis D.; Wobus, Christiane E.

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a vital regulatory component in various cellular processes, including cellular responses to viral infection. As obligate intracellular pathogens, viruses have the capacity to manipulate the ubiquitin (Ub) cycle to their advantage by encoding Ub-modifying proteins including deubiquitinases (DUBs). However, how cellular DUBs modulate specific viral infections, such as norovirus, is poorly understood. To examine the role of DUBs during norovirus infection, we used WP1130, a small molecule inhibitor of a subset of cellular DUBs. Replication of murine norovirus in murine macrophages and the human norovirus Norwalk virus in a replicon system were significantly inhibited by WP1130. Chemical proteomics identified the cellular DUB USP14 as a target of WP1130 in murine macrophages, and pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP14 inhibited murine norovirus infection. USP14 is a proteasome-associated DUB that also binds to inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), a critical mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR). WP1130 treatment of murine macrophages did not alter proteasome activity but activated the X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) through an IRE1-dependent mechanism. In addition, WP1130 treatment or induction of the UPR also reduced infection of other RNA viruses including encephalomyocarditis virus, Sindbis virus, and La Crosse virus but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Pharmacologic inhibition of the IRE1 endonuclease activity partially rescued the antiviral effect of WP1130. Taken together, our studies support a model whereby induction of the UPR through cellular DUB inhibition blocks specific viral infections, and suggest that cellular DUBs and the UPR represent novel targets for future development of broad spectrum antiviral therapies. PMID:22792064

  20. Antiviral activity of a small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor occurs via induction of the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jeffrey W; Ahmed, Mohammad; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Donato, Nicholas J; Showalter, Hollis D; Wobus, Christiane E

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a vital regulatory component in various cellular processes, including cellular responses to viral infection. As obligate intracellular pathogens, viruses have the capacity to manipulate the ubiquitin (Ub) cycle to their advantage by encoding Ub-modifying proteins including deubiquitinases (DUBs). However, how cellular DUBs modulate specific viral infections, such as norovirus, is poorly understood. To examine the role of DUBs during norovirus infection, we used WP1130, a small molecule inhibitor of a subset of cellular DUBs. Replication of murine norovirus in murine macrophages and the human norovirus Norwalk virus in a replicon system were significantly inhibited by WP1130. Chemical proteomics identified the cellular DUB USP14 as a target of WP1130 in murine macrophages, and pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP14 inhibited murine norovirus infection. USP14 is a proteasome-associated DUB that also binds to inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), a critical mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR). WP1130 treatment of murine macrophages did not alter proteasome activity but activated the X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) through an IRE1-dependent mechanism. In addition, WP1130 treatment or induction of the UPR also reduced infection of other RNA viruses including encephalomyocarditis virus, Sindbis virus, and La Crosse virus but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Pharmacologic inhibition of the IRE1 endonuclease activity partially rescued the antiviral effect of WP1130. Taken together, our studies support a model whereby induction of the UPR through cellular DUB inhibition blocks specific viral infections, and suggest that cellular DUBs and the UPR represent novel targets for future development of broad spectrum antiviral therapies.

  1. Identification and characterization of a mitochondrial unfolded protein response transcription factor ATFS-1 in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Gui; Yue, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Ze-Zhi; Yuan, Feng-Hua; Bi, Hai-Tao; Yuan, Kai; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yi-Hong

    2016-07-01

    A mitochondrial specific stress response termed mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) is activated in responding to disturbance of protein homeostasis in mitochondria. The activating transcription factor associated with stress-1 (designated as ATFS-1) is the key regulator of UPR(mt). To investigating the roles of ATFS-1 (LvATFS-1) in Litopenaeus vannamei mitochondrial stress remission and immunity, it's full length cDNA was cloned. The open reading frame of LvATFS-1 was 1, 557 bp in length, deducing to a 268 amino acids protein. LvATFS-1 was highly expressed in muscle, hemocytes and eyestalk. Subcellular location assays showed that N-terminal of LvATFS-1 contained a mitochondrial targeting sequence, which could directed the fused EGFP located to mitochondria. And the C-terminal of LvATFS-1, which had a nuclear localization signal, expressed in nucleus. The in vitro experiments verified that LvATFS-1 could reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). And results of real-time RT-PCR indicated that LvATFS-1 might scavenge excess ROS via ROS-eliminating genes regulation. Reporter gene assays showed that LvATFS-1 could upregulated the expression of the antimicrobial peptide genes in Drosophila Schneider 2 cells. Results of real-time RT-PCR showed that Vibrio alginolyticus or white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection induced the expression of LvATFS-1. And knocked-down LvATFS-1 by RNAi resulted in a higher cumulative mortality of L. vannamei upon V. alginolyticus or WSSV infection. These results suggested that LvATFS-1 not only rolled in mitochondrial specific stress responding, but also important for L. vannamei immunologic defence.

  2. Brucella Induces an Unfolded Protein Response via TcpB That Supports Intracellular Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Judith A.; Khan, Mike; Magnani, Diogo D.; Harms, Jerome S.; Durward, Marina; Radhakrishnan, Girish K.; Liu, Yi-Ping; Splitter, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes brucellosis, the most prevalent zoonosis worldwide. The Brucella intracellular replicative niche in macrophages and dendritic cells thwarts immune surveillance and complicates both therapy and vaccine development. Currently, host-pathogen interactions supporting Brucella replication are poorly understood. Brucella fuses with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to replicate, resulting in dramatic restructuring of the ER. This ER disruption raises the possibility that Brucella provokes an ER stress response called the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). In this study, B. melitensis infection up regulated expression of the UPR target genes BiP, CHOP, and ERdj4, and induced XBP1 mRNA splicing in murine macrophages. These data implicate activation of all 3 major signaling pathways of the UPR. Consistent with previous reports, XBP1 mRNA splicing was largely MyD88-dependent. However, up regulation of CHOP, and ERdj4 was completely MyD88 independent. Heat killed Brucella stimulated significantly less BiP, CHOP, and ERdj4 expression, but induced XBP1 splicing. Although a Brucella VirB mutant showed relatively intact UPR induction, a TcpB mutant had significantly compromised BiP, CHOP and ERdj4 expression. Purified TcpB, a protein recently identified to modulate microtubules in a manner similar to paclitaxel, also induced UPR target gene expression and resulted in dramatic restructuring of the ER. In contrast, infection with the TcpB mutant resulted in much less ER structural disruption. Finally, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, a pharmacologic chaperone that ameliorates the UPR, significantly impaired Brucella replication in macrophages. Together, these results suggest Brucella induces a UPR, via TcpB and potentially other factors, that enables its intracellular replication. Thus, the UPR may provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of brucellosis. These results also have implications for other

  3. ADP ribosylation adapts an ER chaperone response to short-term fluctuations in unfolded protein load

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Kseniya; Tomba, Giulia; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression programs that regulate the abundance of the chaperone BiP adapt the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to unfolded protein load. However, such programs are slow compared with physiological fluctuations in secreted protein synthesis. While searching for mechanisms that fill this temporal gap in coping with ER stress, we found elevated levels of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)–ribosylated BiP in the inactive pancreas of fasted mice and a rapid decline in this modification in the active fed state. ADP ribosylation mapped to Arg470 and Arg492 in the substrate-binding domain of hamster BiP. Mutations that mimic the negative charge of ADP-ribose destabilized substrate binding and interfered with interdomain allosteric coupling, marking ADP ribosylation as a rapid posttranslational mechanism for reversible inactivation of BiP. A kinetic model showed that buffering fluctuations in unfolded protein load with a recruitable pool of inactive chaperone is an efficient strategy to minimize both aggregation and costly degradation of unfolded proteins. PMID:22869598

  4. The Mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response Protects against Anoxia in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Salvador; Sherman, Teresa; Brookes, Paul S.; Nehrke, Keith

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) is a surveillance pathway that defends proteostasis in the “powerhouse” of the cell. Activation of the UPRmt protects against stresses imposed by reactive oxygen species, respiratory chain deficits, and pathologic bacteria. Consistent with the UPRmt’s role in adaption, we found that either its pharmacological or genetic activation by ethidium bromide (EtBr) or RNAi of the mitochondrial AAA-protease spg-7 was sufficient to reduce death in an anoxia-based Caenorhabditis elegans model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. The UPRmt-specific transcription factor atfs-1 was necessary for protection and atfs-1 gain-of-function (gf) mutants were endogenously protected from both death and dysfunction. Neurons exhibited less axonal degeneration following non-lethal anoxia-reperfusion (A-R) when the UPRmt was pre-activated, and consistent with the concept of mitochondrial stress leading to cell non-autonomous (ie. “remote”) effects, we found that restricted activation of the UPRmt in neurons decreased A-R death. However, expression of the atfs-1(gf) mutant in neurons, which resulted in a robust activation of a neuronal UPRmt, did not upregulate the UPRmt in distal tissues, nor did it protect the worms from A-R toxicity. These findings suggest that remote signaling requires additional component(s) acting downstream of de facto mitochondrial stress. PMID:27459203

  5. Divergent androgen regulation of unfolded protein response pathways drives prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Xia; Arnoldussen, Yke Jildouw; Storm, Margrethe; Tesikova, Martina; Nenseth, Hatice Zeynep; Zhao, Sen; Fazli, Ladan; Rennie, Paul; Risberg, Bjørn; Wæhre, Håkon; Danielsen, Håvard; Mills, Ian G; Jin, Yang; Hotamisligil, Gökhan; Saatcioglu, Fahri

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a homeostatic mechanism to maintain endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function. The UPR is activated by various physiological conditions as well as in disease states, such as cancer. As androgens regulate secretion and development of the normal prostate and drive prostate cancer (PCa) growth, they may affect UPR pathways. Here, we show that the canonical UPR pathways are directly and divergently regulated by androgens in PCa cells, through the androgen receptor (AR), which is critical for PCa survival. AR bound to gene regulatory sites and activated the IRE1α branch, but simultaneously inhibited PERK signaling. Inhibition of the IRE1α arm profoundly reduced PCa cell growth in vitro as well as tumor formation in preclinical models of PCa in vivo. Consistently, AR and UPR gene expression were correlated in human PCa, and spliced XBP-1 expression was significantly upregulated in cancer compared with normal prostate. These data establish a genetic switch orchestrated by AR that divergently regulates the UPR pathways and suggest that targeting IRE1α signaling may have therapeutic utility in PCa. PMID:25864123

  6. Implication of unfolded protein response in resveratrol-induced inhibition of K562 cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bao-Qin; Gao, Yan-Yan; Niu, Xiao-Fang; Xie, Ji-Sheng; Meng, Xin; Guan, Yifu; Wang, Hua-Qin

    2010-01-01

    Resveratrol (RES), a natural plant polyphenol, is an effective inducer of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a variety of carcinoma cell types. In addition, RES has been reported to inhibit tumorigenesis in several animal models suggesting that it functions as a chemopreventive and anti-tumor agent in vivo. The chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties associated with resveratrol offer promise for the design of new chemotherapeutic agents. However, the mechanisms by which RES mediates its effects are not yet fully understood. In this study, we showed that RES caused cell cycle arrest and proliferation inhibition via induction of unfolded protein response (UPR) in human leukemia K562 cell line. Treatment of K562 cells with RES induced a number of signature UPR markers, including transcriptional induction of GRP78 and CHOP, phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2{alpha} (eIF2{alpha}), ER stress-specific XBP-1 splicing, suggesting the induction of UPR by RES. RES inhibited proliferation of K562 in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that K562 cells were arrested in G1 phase upon RES treatment. Salubrinal, an eIF2{alpha} inhibitor, or overexpression of dominant negative mutants of PERK or eIF2{alpha}, effectively restored RES-induced cell cycle arrest, underscoring the important role of PERK/eIF2{alpha} branch of UPR in RES-induced inhibition of cell proliferation.

  7. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase promotes hypoxic survival by activating the mitochondrial unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Mao, X R; Kaufman, D M; Crowder, C M

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the mouse nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase type 1 (Nmnat1) produce two remarkable phenotypes: protection against traumatic axonal degeneration and reduced hypoxic brain injury. Despite intensive efforts, the mechanism of Nmnat1 cytoprotection remains elusive. To develop a new model to define this mechanism, we heterologously expressed a mouse Nmnat1 non-nuclear-localized gain-of-function mutant gene (m-nonN-Nmnat1) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and show that it provides protection from both hypoxia-induced animal death and taxol-induced axonal pathology. Additionally, we find that m-nonN-Nmnat1 significantly lengthens C. elegans lifespan. Using the hypoxia-protective phenotype in C. elegans, we performed a candidate screen for genetic suppressors of m-nonN-Nmnat1 cytoprotection. Loss of function in two genes, haf-1 and dve-1, encoding mitochondrial unfolded protein response (mitoUPR) factors were identified as suppressors. M-nonN-Nmnat1 induced a transcriptional reporter of the mitoUPR gene hsp-6 and provided protection from the mitochondrial proteostasis toxin ethidium bromide. M-nonN-Nmnat1 was also protective against axonal degeneration in C. elegans induced by the chemotherapy drug taxol. Taxol markedly reduced basal expression of a mitoUPR reporter; the expression was restored by m-nonN-Nmnat1. Taken together, these data implicate the mitoUPR as a mechanism whereby Nmnat1 protects from hypoxic and axonal injury. PMID:26913604

  8. Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetase Deficiency Promotes Angiogenesis via the Unfolded Protein Response Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Castranova, Daniel; Davis, Andrew E.; Lo, Brigid D.; Miller, Mayumi F.; Paukstelis, Paul J.; Swift, Matthew R.; Pham, Van N.; Torres-Vázquez, Jesús; Bell, Kameha; Shaw, Kenna M.; Kamei, Makoto; Weinstein, Brant M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Understanding the mechanisms regulating normal and pathologic angiogenesis is of great scientific and clinical interest. In this report, we show that mutations in two different aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, threonyl tRNA synthetase (tarsy58) or isoleucyl tRNA synthetase (iarsy68), lead to similar increased branching angiogenesis in developing zebrafish. Approach and Results The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) pathway is activated by aminoacyl tRNA synthetase deficiencies, and we show that UPR genes atf4, atf6, and xbp1, as well as the key pro-angiogenic ligand vascular endothelial growth factor (vegfaa), are all up-regulated in tarsy58 and iarsy68 mutants. Finally, we show that the PERK-ATF4 arm of the UPR pathway is necessary for both the elevated vegfaa levels and increased angiogenesis observed in tarsy58 mutants. Conclusions Our results suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress acts as a pro-angiogenic signal via UPR pathway-dependent up-regulation of vegfaa. PMID:26821951

  9. Mechanics of forced unfolding of proteins.

    PubMed

    Su, Tianxiang; Purohit, Prashant K

    2009-07-01

    We describe and solve a two-state kinetic model for the forced unfolding of proteins. The protein oligomer is modeled as a heterogeneous, freely jointed chain with two possible values of Kuhn length and contour length representing its folded and unfolded configurations. We obtain analytical solutions for the force-extension response of the protein oligomer for different types of loading conditions. We fit the analytical solutions for constant-velocity pulling to the force-extension data for ubiquitin and fibrinogen and obtain model parameters, such as Kuhn lengths and kinetic coefficients, for both proteins. We then predict their response under a linearly increasing force and find that our solutions for ubiquitin are consistent with a different set of experiments. Our calculations suggest that the refolding rate of proteins at low forces is several orders larger than the unfolding rate, and neglecting it can lead to lower predictions for the unfolding force, especially at high stretching velocities. By accounting for the refolding of proteins we obtain a critical force below which equilibrium is biased in favor of the folded state. Our calculations also suggest new methods to determine the distance of the transition state from the energy wells representing the folded and unfolded states of a protein.

  10. Keratin 12 missense mutation induces the unfolded protein response and apoptosis in Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Edwin H.A.; Courtney, David G.; Atkinson, Sarah D.; Moore, Johnny E.; Mairs, Laura; Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Schiroli, Davide; Maurizi, Eleonora; Cole, Christian; Hickerson, Robyn P.; James, John; Murgatroyd, Helen; Smith, Frances J.D.; MacEwen, Carrie; Enghild, Jan J.; Nesbit, M. Andrew; Leslie Pedrioli, Deena M.; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Moore, C.B. Tara

    2016-01-01

    Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy (MECD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by dominant-negative mutations within the KRT3 or KRT12 genes, which encode the cytoskeletal protein keratins K3 and K12, respectively. To investigate the pathomechanism of this disease, we generated and phenotypically characterized a novel knock-in humanized mouse model carrying the severe, MECD-associated, K12-Leu132Pro mutation. Although no overt changes in corneal opacity were detected by slit-lamp examination, the corneas of homozygous mutant mice exhibited histological and ultrastructural epithelial cell fragility phenotypes. An altered keratin expression profile was observed in the cornea of mutant mice, confirmed by western blot, RNA-seq and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Mass spectrometry (MS) and immunohistochemistry demonstrated a similarly altered keratin profile in corneal tissue from a K12-Leu132Pro MECD patient. The K12-Leu132Pro mutation results in cytoplasmic keratin aggregates. RNA-seq analysis revealed increased chaperone gene expression, and apoptotic unfolded protein response (UPR) markers, CHOP and Caspase 12, were also increased in the MECD mice. Corneal epithelial cell apoptosis was increased 17-fold in the mutant cornea, compared with the wild-type (P < 0.001). This elevation of UPR marker expression was also observed in the human MECD cornea. This is the first reporting of a mouse model for MECD that recapitulates the human disease and is a valuable resource in understanding the pathomechanism of the disease. Although the most severe phenotype is observed in the homozygous mice, this model will still provide a test-bed for therapies not only for corneal dystrophies but also for other keratinopathies caused by similar mutations. PMID:26758872

  11. Hepatocellular autophagy modulates the unfolded protein response and fasting-induced steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kwanten, Wilhelmus J; Vandewynckel, Yves-Paul; Martinet, Wim; De Winter, Benedicte Y; Michielsen, Peter P; Van Hoof, Viviane O; Driessen, Ann; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Bedossa, Pierre; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Francque, Sven M

    2016-10-01

    Autophagy and the unfolded protein response (UPR) are key cellular homeostatic mechanisms and are both involved in liver diseases, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Although increasing but conflicting results link these mechanisms to lipid metabolism, their role and potential cross talk herein have been poorly investigated. Therefore, we assessed the effects of hepatocyte-specific autophagy deficiency on liver parenchyma, the UPR, and lipid metabolism. Adult hepatocellular-specific autophagy-deficient mice (Atg7(F/F)Alb-Cre(+)) were compared with their autophagy-competent littermates (Atg7(+/+)Alb-Cre(+)). Livers were analyzed by electron microscopy, histology, real-time qPCR, and Western blotting. Atg7(F/F)Alb-Cre(+) mice developed hepatomegaly with significant parenchymal injury, as shown by inflammatory infiltrates, hepatocellular apoptosis, pericellular fibrosis, and a pronounced ductular reaction. Surprisingly, the UPR exhibited a pathway-selective pattern upon autophagy deficiency. The activity of the adaptive activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) pathway was abolished, whereas the proapoptotic protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase pathway was increased compared with Atg7(+/+)Alb-Cre(+) mice. The inositol-requiring enzyme-1α signal was unaltered. Fasting-induced steatosis was absent in Atg7(F/F)Alb-Cre(+) mice. Remarkably, some isolated islands of fat-containing and autophagy-competent cells were observed in these livers. Hepatocellular autophagy is essential for parenchymal integrity in mice. Moreover, in the case of autophagy deficiency, the three different UPR branches are pathway selectively modulated. Attenuation of the ATF6 pathway might explain the observed impairment of fasting-induced steatosis. Finally, autophagy and lipid droplets are directly linked to each other.

  12. Dysregulation of the unfolded protein response in db/db mice with diet induced steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rinella, Mary E.; Siddiqui, M. Shaddab; Gardikiotes, Konstantina; Gottstein, Jeanne; Elias, Marc; Green, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    In humans with non-alcoholic fatty liver, diabetes is associated with more advanced disease. We have previously shown that diabetic db/db mice are highly susceptible to methionine choline deficient diet (MCD) induced hepatic injury. Since activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) is an important adaptive cellular mechanism in diabetes, obesity and fatty liver, we hypothesized that dysregulation of the UPR may partially explain how diabetes could promote liver injury. Db/db and db/m mice were fed the MCD or control diet for 4 weeks to characterize differences in UPR activation and downstream injury. Wildtype mice (C57BLKS/J) fed the MCD or control diet, were treated with SP600125; a JNK inhibitor and its effect on liver injury and UPR activation was measured. The MCD diet resulted in global up-regulation of the UPR in both diabetic db/db and non-diabetic db/m mice. db/db mice had an inadequate activation of recovery pathways (GADD34, XBP-1(s)) and accentuated activation of injury pathways related to persistent eif2-α phosphorylation (ATF4, CHOP, ERO1α, JNK, NF-κB) compared to db/m mice. This led to increased expression of inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, ICAM-1 and MCP-1 compared to db/m mice. Interestingly, while pharmacologic JNK inhibition did not prevent the development of MCD diet induced steatohepatitis, it did attenuate UPR and downstream inflammatory signaling. CONCLUSIONS MCD fed db/db mice develop a more pro-inflammatory mileu than db/m mice associated with an impaired ability to de-phosphorylate eif2-α through GADD34, impairing cellular recovery. These data may enhance our understanding of why diabetics with NASH are prone to develop more severe liver injury than non-diabetic patients. PMID:21748768

  13. Statins inhibit protein lipidation and induce the unfolded protein response in the non-sterol producing nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Mörck, Catarina; Olsen, Louise; Kurth, Caroline; Persson, Annelie; Storm, Nadia Jin; Svensson, Emma; Jansson, John-Olov; Hellqvist, Marika; Enejder, Annika; Faergeman, Nils J.; Pilon, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Statins are compounds prescribed to lower blood cholesterol in millions of patients worldwide. They act by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway that leads to the synthesis of farnesyl pyrophosphate, a precursor for cholesterol synthesis and the source of lipid moieties for protein prenylation. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans possesses a mevalonate pathway that lacks the branch leading to cholesterol synthesis, and thus represents an ideal organism to specifically study the noncholesterol roles of the pathway. Inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase in C. elegans using statins or RNAi leads to developmental arrest and loss of membrane association of a GFP-based prenylation reporter. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is also strongly activated, suggesting that impaired prenylation of small GTPases leads to the accumulation of unfolded proteins and ER stress. UPR induction was also observed upon pharmacological inhibition of farnesyl transferases or RNAi inhibition of a specific isoprenoid transferase (M57.2) and found to be dependent on both ire-1 and xbp-1 but not on pek-1 or atf-6, which are all known regulators of the UPR. The lipid stores and fatty acid composition were unaffected in statin-treated worms, even though they showed reduced staining with Nile red. We conclude that inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase or of farnesyl transferases induce the UPR by inhibiting the prenylation of M57.2 substrates, resulting in developmental arrest in C. elegans. These results provide a mechanism for the pleiotropic effects of statins and suggest that statins could be used clinically where UPR activation may be of therapeutic benefit. PMID:19826081

  14. The Potyviral P3 Protein Targets Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1A to Promote the Unfolded Protein Response and Viral Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Luan, Hexiang; Shine, M B; Cui, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xin; Ma, Na; Kachroo, Pradeep; Zhi, Haijan; Kachroo, Aardra

    2016-09-01

    The biochemical function of the potyviral P3 protein is not known, although it is known to regulate virus replication, movement, and pathogenesis. We show that P3, the putative virulence determinant of soybean mosaic virus (SMV), targets a component of the translation elongation complex in soybean. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A), a well-known host factor in viral pathogenesis, is essential for SMV virulence and the associated unfolded protein response (UPR). Silencing GmEF1A inhibits accumulation of SMV and another ER-associated virus in soybean. Conversely, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducing chemicals promote SMV accumulation in wild-type, but not GmEF1A-knockdown, plants. Knockdown of genes encoding the eEF1B isoform, which is important for eEF1A function in translation elongation, has similar effects on UPR and SMV resistance, suggesting a link to translation elongation. P3 and GmEF1A promote each other's nuclear localization, similar to the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of eEF1A by the Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Nef protein. Our results suggest that P3 targets host elongation factors resulting in UPR, which in turn facilitates SMV replication and place eEF1A upstream of BiP in the ER stress response during pathogen infection.

  15. Smoking-Relevant Nicotine Concentration Attenuates the Unfolded Protein Response in Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Rahul; Henley, Beverley M.; Henderson, Brandon J.; Indersmitten, Tim; Cohen, Bruce N.; Kim, Charlene H.; McKinney, Sheri; Deshpande, Purnima; Xiao, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective epidemiological studies show an inverse correlation between susceptibility to Parkinson's disease and a person's history of tobacco use. Animal model studies suggest nicotine as a neuroprotective agent and nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs) as targets for neuroprotection, but the underlying neuroprotective mechanism(s) are unknown. We cultured mouse ventral midbrain neurons for 3 weeks. Ten to 20% of neurons were dopaminergic (DA), revealed by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity. We evoked mild endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with tunicamycin (Tu), producing modest increases in the level of nuclear ATF6, phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, nuclear XBP1, and the downstream proapoptotic effector nuclear C/EBP homologous protein. We incubated cultures for 2 weeks with 200 nm nicotine, the approximate steady-state concentration between cigarette smoking or vaping, or during nicotine patch use. Nicotine incubation suppressed Tu-induced ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR). Study of mice with fluorescent nAChR subunits showed that the cultured TH+ neurons displayed α4, α6, and β3 nAChR subunit expression and ACh-evoked currents. Gene expression profile in cultures from TH-eGFP mice showed that the TH+ neurons also express several other genes associated with DA release. Nicotine also upregulated ACh-induced currents in DA neurons by ∼2.5-fold. Thus, nicotine, at a concentration too low to activate an appreciable fraction of plasma membrane nAChRs, induces two sequelae of pharmacological chaperoning in the ER: UPR suppression and nAChR upregulation. Therefore, one mechanism of neuroprotection by nicotine is pharmacological chaperoning, leading to UPR suppression. Measuring this pathway may help in assessing neuroprotection. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkinson's disease (PD) cannot yet be cured or prevented. However, many retrospective epidemiological studies reveal that PD is diagnosed less frequently in

  16. Chikungunya virus non-structural protein 2-mediated host shut-off disables the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Fros, Jelke J; Major, Lee D; Scholte, Florine E M; Gardner, Joy; van Hemert, Martijn J; Suhrbier, Andreas; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2015-03-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a cellular defence mechanism against high concentrations of misfolded protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In the presence of misfolded proteins, ER-transmembrane proteins PERK and IRE1α become activated. PERK phosphorylates eIF2α leading to a general inhibition of cellular translation, whilst the expression of transcription factor ATF4 is upregulated. Active IRE1α splices out an intron from XBP1 mRNA, to produce a potent transcription factor. Activation of the UPR increases the production of several proteins involved in protein folding, degradation and apoptosis. Here, we demonstrated that transient expression of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) (family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus) envelope glycoproteins induced the UPR and that CHIKV infection resulted in the phosphorylation of eIF2α and partial splicing of XBP1 mRNA. However, infection with CHIKV did not increase the expression of ATF4 and known UPR target genes (GRP78/BiP, GRP94 and CHOP). Moreover, nuclear XBP1 was not observed during CHIKV infection. Even upon stimulation with tunicamycin, the UPR was efficiently inhibited in CHIKV-infected cells. Individual expression of CHIKV non-structural proteins (nsPs) revealed that nsP2 alone was sufficient to inhibit the UPR. Mutations that rendered nsP2 unable to cause host-cell shut-off prevented nsP2-mediated inhibition of the UPR. This indicates that initial UPR induction takes place in the ER but that expression of functional UPR transcription factors and target genes is efficiently inhibited by CHIKV nsP2.

  17. The Yeast Rab GTPase Ypt1 Modulates Unfolded Protein Response Dynamics by Regulating the Stability of HAC1 RNA

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetanova, Nikoleta G.; Riordan, Daniel P.; Brown, Patrick O.

    2012-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved mechanism that mitigates accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER. The yeast UPR is subject to intricate post-transcriptional regulation, involving recruitment of the RNA encoding the Hac1 transcription factor to the ER and its unconventional splicing. To investigate the mechanisms underlying regulation of the UPR, we screened the yeast proteome for proteins that specifically interact with HAC1 RNA. Protein microarray experiments revealed that HAC1 interacts specifically with small ras GTPases of the Ypt family. We characterized the interaction of HAC1 RNA with one of these proteins, the yeast Rab1 homolog Ypt1. We found that Ypt1 protein specifically associated in vivo with unspliced HAC1 RNA. This association was disrupted by conditions that impaired protein folding in the ER and induced the UPR. Also, the Ypt1-HAC1 interaction depended on IRE1 and ADA5, the two genes critical for UPR activation. Decreasing expression of the Ypt1 protein resulted in a reduced rate of HAC1 RNA decay, leading to significantly increased levels of both unspliced and spliced HAC1 RNA, and delayed attenuation of the UPR, when ER stress was relieved. Our findings establish that Ypt1 contributes to regulation of UPR signaling dynamics by promoting the decay of HAC1 RNA, suggesting a potential regulatory mechanism for linking vesicle trafficking to the UPR and ER homeostasis. PMID:22844259

  18. Domain compatibility in Ire1 kinase is critical for the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Poothong, Juthakorn; Sopha, Pattarawut; Kaufman, Randal J.; Tirasophon, Witoon

    2013-01-01

    The unfolded phrotein response is a mechanism to cope with endoplasmic reticulum stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ire1 senses the stress and mediates a signaling cascade to upregulate responsive genes through an unusual HAC1 mRNA splicing. The splicing requires interconnected activity (kinase and endoribonuclease) of Ire1 to cleave HAC1 mRNA at the non-canonical splice sites before translation into Hac1 transcription factor. Analysis of the truncated kinase domain from Ire1 homologs revealed that this domain is highly conserved. Characterization by domain swapping indicated that a functional ATP/ADP binding domain is minimally required. However the overall domain compatibility is critical for eliciting its full endoribonuclease function. PMID:20541549

  19. Polynomial algebra reveals diverging roles of the unfolded protein response in endothelial cells during ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Le Pape, Sylvain; Dimitrova, Elena; Hannaert, Patrick; Konovalov, Alexander; Volmer, Romain; Ron, David; Thuillier, Raphaël; Hauet, Thierry

    2014-08-25

    The unfolded protein response (UPR)--the endoplasmic reticulum stress response--is found in various pathologies including ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). However, its role during IRI is still unclear. Here, by combining two different bioinformatical methods--a method based on ordinary differential equations (Time Series Network Inference) and an algebraic method (probabilistic polynomial dynamical systems)--we identified the IRE1α-XBP1 and the ATF6 pathways as the main UPR effectors involved in cell's adaptation to IRI. We validated these findings experimentally by assessing the impact of their knock-out and knock-down on cell survival during IRI.

  20. Depletion of the cereblon gene activates the unfolded protein response and protects cells from ER stress-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Min; Yang, Seung-Joo; Park, Sojung; Choi, Yoo Duk; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Pak, Jhang Ho; Park, Chul-Seung; Kim, Inki

    2015-02-27

    Previous studies showed that cereblon (CRBN) binds to various cellular target proteins, implying that CRBN regulates a wide range of cell responses. In this study, we found that deletion of the Crbn gene desensitized mouse embryonic fibroblast cells to various cell death-promoting stimuli, including endoplasmic reticulum stress inducers. Mechanistically, deletion of Crbn activates pathways involved in the unfolded protein response prior to ER stress induction. Loss of Crbn activated PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) with enhanced phosphorylation of eIF2α. Following ER stress induction, loss of Crbn delayed dephosphorylation of eIF2α, while reconstitution of Crbn reversed enhanced phosphorylation of PERK and eIF2α. Lastly, we found that activation of the PERK/eIF2α pathway following Crbn deletion is caused by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). We propose that CRBN plays a role in cellular stress signaling, including the unfolded protein response, by controlling the activity of AMPK.

  1. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) Regulator Cib1 Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Virulence Factors in Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Hampel, Martin; Jakobi, Mareike; Schmitz, Lara; Meyer, Ute; Finkernagel, Florian; Doehlemann, Gunther; Heimel, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway to ensure protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), coordinates biotrophic development in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Exact timing of UPR activation is required for virulence and presumably connected to the elevated expression of secreted effector proteins during infection of the host plant Zea mays. In the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of UPR target genes is induced upon binding of the central regulator Hac1 to unfolded protein response elements (UPREs) in their promoters. While a role of the UPR in effector secretion has been described previously, we investigated a potential UPR-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted effector proteins. In silico prediction of UPREs in promoter regions identified the previously characterized effector genes pit2 and tin1-1, as bona fide UPR target genes. Furthermore, direct binding of the Hac1-homolog Cib1 to the UPRE containing promoter fragments of both genes was confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP) analysis. Targeted deletion of the UPRE abolished Cib1-dependent expression of pit2 and significantly affected virulence. Furthermore, ER stress strongly increased Pit2 expression and secretion. This study expands the role of the UPR as a signal hub in fungal virulence and illustrates, how biotrophic fungi can coordinate cellular physiology, development and regulation of secreted virulence factors. PMID:27093436

  2. Phycocyanin may suppress D-galactose-induced human lens epithelial cell apoptosis through mitochondrial and unfolded protein response pathways.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yu; Yuan, Zhijun; Li, Kepeng; Yang, Xuegan

    2012-11-23

    Apoptosis of lens epithelial cell (LEC) plays an important role in cataract formation, and its prevention may be one of the therapeutic strategies in treating cataract. This study used human lens epithelial cell (hLEC) line SRA01/04 to investigate the protective effect and mechanism of phycocyanin on glactose-induced apoptosis in hLEC. hLECs were cultured in D/F(12)-10% FBS medium containing 125mM d-galactose with or without phycocyanin. Cell viability was assessed by methylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Cell apoptosis was elevated with Wright-Giemsa staining, AO/EB double staining, and DNA fragmentation assay. Mitochondrial apoptosis-associated molecules and unfolded protein response-associated molecules from cultured SRA01/04 cells were quantified using protein blot analysis. The results demonstrated that phycocyanin suppressed SRA01/04 cells' morphologic changes and apoptosis induced by d-galactose, inhibited the expression and activation of caspase 3, alternated the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and down-regulated the level of p53, GRP78, and CHOP in d-galactose-treated SRA01/04 cells. These results suggest that phycocyanin might suppress d-galactose-induced hLEC apoptosis through two pathways: mitochondrial pathway, involving p53 and Bcl-2 family protein expression, and unfolded protein response pathway, involving GRP78 and CHOP expression.

  3. Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response in Sporadic Inclusion Body Myositis But Not in Hereditary GNE Inclusion Body Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nogalska, Anna; D’Agostino, Carla; Engel, W. King; Cacciottolo, Mafalda; Asada, Shinichi; Mori, Kazutoshi; Askanas, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Muscle fibers in patients with sporadic inclusion-body myositis (s-IBM), the most common age-associated myopathy, are characterized by autophagic vacuoles and accumulation of ubiquitinated and congophilic multiprotein aggregates that contain amyloid-β and phosphorylated tau. Muscle fibers of autosomal-recessive hereditary inclusion-body myopathy due to the GNE mutation (GNE-h-IBM) display similar pathologic features, except with less pronounced congophilia. Accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins inside the ER lumen leads to ER stress, which elicits the unfolded protein response (UPR) as a protective mechanism. Here we demonstrate for the first time that UPR is activated in s-IBM muscle biopsies, since there was a) increased ATF4 protein and increased mRNA of its target CHOP, b) cleavage of the ATF6 and increased mRNA of its target GRP78, and c) an increase of the spliced form of XBP-1 and increased mRNA of EDEM, target of heterodimer of cleaved ATF6 and spliced XBP-1. In contrast, we did not find similar evidence of the UPR induction in GNE-h-IBM patient muscle, suggesting that different intracellular mechanisms might lead to the similar pathological phenotypes. Interestingly, cultured GNE-h-IBM muscle fibers had a robust UPR response to experimental ER stress stimuli, suggesting that the GNE mutation per se is not responsible for the lack of UPR in GNE-h-IBM biopsied muscle. PMID:25978849

  4. A Multiplexed Single-Cell CRISPR Screening Platform Enables Systematic Dissection of the Unfolded Protein Response. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Functional genomics efforts face tradeoffs between number of perturbations examined and complexity of phenotypes measured. We bridge this gap with Perturb-seq, which combines droplet-based single-cell RNA-seq with a strategy for barcoding CRISPR-mediated perturbations, allowing many perturbations to be profiled in pooled format. We applied Perturb-seq to dissect the mammalian unfolded protein response (UPR) using single and combinatorial CRISPR perturbations. Two genome-scale CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) screens identified genes whose repression perturbs ER homeostasis.

  5. IRE1/bZIP60-Mediated Unfolded Protein Response Plays Distinct Roles in Plant Immunity and Abiotic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Francisca; Boatwright, Jon Lucas; Moreno, Ignacio; Jordan, Melissa R.; Chen, Yani; Brandizzi, Federica; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated protein secretion and quality control have been shown to play an important role in immune responses in both animals and plants. In mammals, the ER membrane-located IRE1 kinase/endoribonuclease, a key regulator of unfolded protein response (UPR), is required for plasma cell development to accommodate massive secretion of immunoglobulins. Plant cells can secrete the so-called pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins with antimicrobial activities upon pathogen challenge. However, whether IRE1 plays any role in plant immunity is not known. Arabidopsis thaliana has two copies of IRE1, IRE1a and IRE1b. Here, we show that both IRE1a and IRE1b are transcriptionally induced during chemically-induced ER stress, bacterial pathogen infection and treatment with the immune signal salicylic acid (SA). However, we found that IRE1a plays a predominant role in the secretion of PR proteins upon SA treatment. Consequently, the ire1a mutant plants show enhanced susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen and are deficient in establishing systemic acquired resistance (SAR), whereas ire1b is unaffected in these responses. We further demonstrate that the immune deficiency in ire1a is due to a defect in SA- and pathogen-triggered, IRE1-mediated cytoplasmic splicing of the bZIP60 mRNA, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the expression of UPR-responsive genes. Consistently, IRE1a is preferentially required for bZIP60 splicing upon pathogen infection, while IRE1b plays a major role in bZIP60 processing upon Tunicamycin (Tm)-induced stress. We also show that SA-dependent induction of UPR-responsive genes is altered in the bzip60 mutant resulting in a moderate susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen. These results indicate that the IRE1/bZIP60 branch of UPR is a part of the plant response to pathogens for which the two Arabidopsis IRE1 isoforms play only partially overlapping roles and that IRE1 has both bZIP60-dependent and bZIP60-independent functions in

  6. Nanomechanics of Protein Unfolding outside Protease Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong

    Protein folding and unfolding have been the subject of active research for decades. Most of previous studies in protein unfolding were focused on temperature, chemical and/or force (such as in AFM) induced denaturations. Recent studies on the functional roles of proteasomes (such as ClpXP) revealed a novel unfolding process in cell, during which a target protein is mechanically unfolded and pulled into a confined, pore-like geometry for degradation. While the proteasome nanomachine has been extensively studied, the mechanism for unfolding proteins with the proteasome pore is still poorly understood. Here, we investigate the mechanical unfolding process of ubiquitin with (or really outside) an idealized proteasome pore, and compare such process with that in the AFM pulling experiment. Unexpectedly, the required force by a proteosome can be much smaller than that by the AFM. Simulation results also unveiled different nanomechanics, tearing fracture vs. shearing friction, in these two distinct types of mechanical unfoldings.

  7. Activation of the unfolded protein response pathway causes ceramide accumulation in yeast and INS-1E insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Sharon; Kirkpatrick, Clare L; Castillon, Guillaume A; Muñiz, Manuel; Riezman, Isabelle; David, Fabrice P A; Wollheim, Claes B; Riezman, Howard

    2012-03-01

    Sphingolipids are not only important components of membranes but also have functions in protein trafficking and intracellular signaling. The LCB1 gene encodes a subunit of the serine palmitoyltransferase, which is responsible for the first step of sphingolipid synthesis. Here, we show that activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) can restore normal ceramide levels and viability in yeast cells with a conditional defect in LCB1. Dependence on UPR was demonstrated by showing the HAC1-dependence of the suppression. A similar induction of ceramides by UPR seems to take place in mammalian cells. In rat pancreatic INS-1E cells, UPR activation induces the transcription of the CerS6 gene, which encodes a ceramide synthase. This correlates with the specific accumulation of ceramide with a C16 fatty acyl chain upon UPR activation. Therefore, our study reveals a novel connection between UPR induction and ceramide synthesis that seems to be conserved between yeast and mammalian cells.

  8. The FKB2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding the immunosuppressant-binding protein FKBP-13, is regulated in response to accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Partaledis, J A; Berlin, V

    1993-01-01

    The FKB2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a homolog of mammalian FKBP-13, an FK506/rapamycin-binding protein that localizes to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have found that FKB2 mRNA levels increase in response to the accumulation of unfolded precursor proteins in the ER. FKB2 mRNA levels are elevated in cells blocked in N-glycosylation--i.e., in wild-type cells treated with tunicamycin and in the sec53-6 mutant grown at the nonpermissive temperature. Mutations that block other steps in secretion have no effect on FKB2 mRNA levels, indicating that increases in FKB2 mRNA are not the consequence of a general block in secretion. The increase in FKB2 mRNA in response to unfolded proteins in the ER is mediated through a 21-bp unfolded-protein response (UPR) element located in the 5' noncoding region of FKB2. UPR elements present in other ER chaperone genes, such as yeast KAR2 (BiP), mammalian GRP78 (BiP), and GRP94, function in an analogous manner to that in FKB2. As with KAR2, FKB2 mRNA levels are also elevated by heat shock. The similarities in the regulation of FKB2 and other ER chaperone genes suggest that FKBP-13 may play a role in protein trafficking in the ER. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7685904

  9. The Unfolded Protein Response Plays a Predominant Homeostatic Role in Response to Mitochondrial Stress in Pancreatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hsin-Yuan; Waldron, Richard T.; Gong, Raymond; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan; Pandol, Stephen J.; Lugea, Aurelia

    2016-01-01

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PaSC) are key participants in the stroma of pancreatic cancer, secreting extracellular matrix proteins and inflammatory mediators. Tumors are poorly vascularized, creating metabolic stress conditions in cancer and stromal cells that necessitate adaptive homeostatic cellular programs. Activation of autophagy and the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR) have been described in hepatic stellate cells, but the role of these processes in PaSC responses to metabolic stress is unknown. We reported that the PI3K/mTOR pathway, which AMPK can regulate through multiple inputs, modulates PaSC activation and fibrogenic potential. Here, using primary and immortalized mouse PaSC, we assess the relative contributions of AMPK/mTOR signaling, autophagy and the UPR to cell fate responses during metabolic stress induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. The mitochondrial uncoupler rottlerin at low doses (0.5–2.5 μM) was added to cells cultured in 10% FBS complete media. Mitochondria rapidly depolarized, followed by altered mitochondrial dynamics and decreased cellular ATP levels. This mitochondrial dysfunction elicited rapid, sustained AMPK activation, mTOR pathway inhibition, and blockade of autophagic flux. Rottlerin treatment also induced rapid, sustained PERK/CHOP UPR signaling. Subsequently, high doses (>5 μM) induced loss of cell viability and cell death. Interestingly, AMPK knock-down using siRNA did not prevent rottlerin-induced mTOR inhibition, autophagy, or CHOP upregulation, suggesting that AMPK is dispensable for these responses. Moreover, CHOP genetic deletion, but not AMPK knock-down, prevented rottlerin-induced apoptosis and supported cell survival, suggesting that UPR signaling is a major modulator of cell fate in PaSC during metabolic stress. Further, short-term rottlerin treatment reduced both PaSC fibrogenic potential and IL-6 mRNA expression. In contrast, expression levels of the angiogenic factors HGF and VEGF

  10. Chemical Genomics Identifies the PERK-Mediated Unfolded Protein Stress Response as a Cellular Target for Influenza Virus Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Landeras-Bueno, Sara; Fernández, Yolanda; Falcón, Ana; Oliveros, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A viruses generate annual epidemics and occasional pandemics of respiratory disease with important consequences for human health and the economy. Therefore, a large effort has been devoted to the development of new anti-influenza virus drugs directed to viral targets, as well as to the identification of cellular targets amenable to anti-influenza virus therapy. Here we have addressed the identification of such potential cellular targets by screening collections of drugs approved for human use. We reasoned that screening with a green fluorescent protein-based recombinant replicon system would identify cellular targets involved in virus transcription/replication and/or gene expression and hence address an early stage of virus infection. By using such a strategy, we identified Montelukast (MK) as an inhibitor of virus multiplication. MK inhibited virus gene expression but did not alter viral RNA synthesis in vitro or viral RNA accumulation in vivo. The low selectivity index of MK prevented its use as an antiviral, but it was sufficient to identify a new cellular pathway suitable for anti-influenza virus intervention. By deep sequencing of RNA isolated from mock- and virus-infected human cells, treated with MK or left untreated, we showed that it stimulates the PERK-mediated unfolded protein stress response. The phosphorylation of PERK was partly inhibited in virus-infected cells but stimulated in MK-treated cells. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of PERK phosphorylation led to increased viral gene expression, while inhibition of PERK phosphatase reduced viral protein synthesis. These results suggest the PERK-mediated unfolded protein response as a potential cellular target to modulate influenza virus infection. PMID:27094326

  11. SCFCdc4-mediated Degradation of the Hac1p Transcription Factor Regulates the Unfolded Protein Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Bhupinder; Chan, Nickie C.; Helfenbaum, Leon; Tan, Kaeling; Tansey, William P.

    2007-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae basic leucine zipper transcription factor Hac1p is synthesized in response to the accumulation of unfolded polypeptides in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and it is responsible for up-regulation of ∼5% of all yeast genes, including ER-resident chaperones and protein-folding catalysts. Hac1p is one of the most short-lived yeast proteins, having a half-life of ∼1.5 min. Here, we have shown that Hac1p harbors a functional PEST degron and that degradation of Hac1p by the proteasome involves the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc3/Cdc34p and the SCFCdc4 E3 complex. Consistent with the known nuclear localization of Cdc4p, rapid degradation of Hac1p requires the presence of a functional nuclear localization sequence, which we demonstrated to involve basic residues in the sequence 29RKRAKTK35. Two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that the PEST-dependent interaction of Hac1p with Cdc4p requires Ser146 and Ser149. Turnover of Hac1p may be dependent on transcription because it is inhibited in cell mutants lacking Srb10 kinase, a component of the SRB/mediator module of the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme. Stabilization of Hac1p by point mutation or deletion, or as the consequence of defects in components of the degradation pathway, results in increased unfolded protein response element-dependent transcription and improved cell viability under ER stress conditions. PMID:17108329

  12. SCFCdc4-mediated degradation of the Hac1p transcription factor regulates the unfolded protein response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pal, Bhupinder; Chan, Nickie C; Helfenbaum, Leon; Tan, Kaeling; Tansey, William P; Gething, Mary-Jane

    2007-02-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae basic leucine zipper transcription factor Hac1p is synthesized in response to the accumulation of unfolded polypeptides in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and it is responsible for up-regulation of approximately 5% of all yeast genes, including ER-resident chaperones and protein-folding catalysts. Hac1p is one of the most short-lived yeast proteins, having a half-life of approximately 1.5 min. Here, we have shown that Hac1p harbors a functional PEST degron and that degradation of Hac1p by the proteasome involves the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc3/Cdc34p and the SCF(Cdc4) E3 complex. Consistent with the known nuclear localization of Cdc4p, rapid degradation of Hac1p requires the presence of a functional nuclear localization sequence, which we demonstrated to involve basic residues in the sequence (29)RKRAKTK(35). Two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that the PEST-dependent interaction of Hac1p with Cdc4p requires Ser146 and Ser149. Turnover of Hac1p may be dependent on transcription because it is inhibited in cell mutants lacking Srb10 kinase, a component of the SRB/mediator module of the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme. Stabilization of Hac1p by point mutation or deletion, or as the consequence of defects in components of the degradation pathway, results in increased unfolded protein response element-dependent transcription and improved cell viability under ER stress conditions.

  13. Crosstalk between the unfolded protein response and NF-κB-mediated inflammation in the progression of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mohammed-Ali, Zahraa; Cruz, Gaile L; Dickhout, Jeffrey G

    2015-01-01

    The chronic inflammatory response is emerging as an important therapeutic target in progressive chronic kidney disease. A key transcription factor in the induction of chronic inflammation is NF-κB. Recent studies have demonstrated that sustained activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) can initiate this NF-κB signaling phenomenon and thereby induce chronic kidney disease progression. A key factor influencing chronic kidney disease progression is proteinuria and this condition has now been demonstrated to induce sustained UPR activation. This review details the crosstalk between the UPR and NF-κB pathways as pertinent to chronic kidney disease. We present potential tools to study this phenomenon as well as potential therapeutics that are emerging to regulate the UPR. These therapeutics may prevent inflammation specifically induced in the kidney due to proteinuria-induced sustained UPR activation.

  14. Whole genome expression profiling associates activation of unfolded protein response with impaired production and release of epinephrine after recurrent hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juhye Lena; La Gamma, Edmund F.; Estabrook, Todd; Kudrick, Necla

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent hypoglycemia can occur as a major complication of insulin replacement therapy, limiting the long-term health benefits of intense glycemic control in type 1 and advanced type 2 diabetic patients. It impairs the normal counter-regulatory hormonal and behavioral responses to glucose deprivation, a phenomenon known as hypoglycemia associated autonomic failure (HAAF). The molecular mechanisms leading to defective counter-regulation are not completely understood. We hypothesized that both neuronal (excessive cholinergic signaling between the splanchnic nerve fibers and the adrenal medulla) and humoral factors contribute to the impaired epinephrine production and release in HAAF. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanism(s) mediating the blunted epinephrine responses following recurrent hypoglycemia, we utilized a global gene expression profiling approach. We characterized the transcriptomes during recurrent (defective counter-regulation model) and acute hypoglycemia (normal counter-regulation group) in the adrenal medulla of normal Sprague-Dawley rats. Based on comparison analysis of differentially expressed genes, a set of unique genes that are activated only at specific time points after recurrent hypoglycemia were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network indicated activation of the unfolded protein response. Furthermore, at least three additional pathways/interaction networks altered in the adrenal medulla following recurrent hypoglycemia were identified, which may contribute to the impaired epinephrine secretion in HAAF: greatly increased neuropeptide signaling (proenkephalin, neuropeptide Y, galanin); altered ion homeostasis (Na+, K+, Ca2+) and downregulation of genes involved in Ca2+-dependent exocytosis of secretory vesicles. Given the pleiotropic effects of the unfolded protein response in different organs, involved in maintaining glucose homeostasis, these findings uncover

  15. Mitochondrial Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase Prevents Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response in Hydrogen Sulfide*

    PubMed Central

    Horsman, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced gaseous molecule with important roles in cellular signaling. In mammals, exogenous H2S improves survival of ischemia/reperfusion. We have previously shown that exposure to H2S increases the lifespan and thermotolerance in Caenorhabditis elegans, and improves protein homeostasis in low oxygen. The mitochondrial SQRD-1 (sulfide quinone oxidoreductase) protein is a highly conserved enzyme involved in H2S metabolism. SQRD-1 is generally considered important to detoxify H2S. Here, we show that SQRD-1 is also required to maintain protein translation in H2S. In sqrd-1 mutant animals, exposure to H2S leads to phosphorylation of eIF2α and inhibition of protein synthesis. In contrast, global protein translation is not altered in wild-type animals exposed to lethally high H2S or in hif-1(ia04) mutants that die when exposed to low H2S. We demonstrate that both gcn-2 and pek-1 kinases are involved in the H2S-induced phosphorylation of eIF2α. Both ER and mitochondrial stress responses are activated in sqrd-1 mutant animals exposed to H2S, but not in wild-type animals. We speculate that SQRD-1 activity in H2S may coordinate proteostasis responses in multiple cellular compartments. PMID:26677221

  16. Retention of chimeric Tat2-Gap1 permease in the endoplasmic reticulum induces unfolded protein response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Takahiro; Kimata, Yukio; Uemura, Satoshi; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2015-08-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, high-affinity tryptophan import is performed by subtle mechanisms involving tryptophan permease Tat2. We have shown that Tat2 requires 15 amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains (TMDs) for its import activity, whereas leucine permease Bap2 requires only seven corresponding residues for its leucine import. For this reason, the structure of Tat2 is elaborately designed to transport the hydrophobic and bulky tryptophan. Newly synthesized cell surface proteins first undergo endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated quality check before entering the secretory pathway. In this study, we used domain replacement with general amino acid permease Gap1 to show that Tat2 chimeric proteins were dysfunctional when TMD10 or TMD11 was replaced. These chimeras formed large 270-800-kDa protein complexes and were stably retained in the ER membrane without efficient degradation. In contrast, Tat2 chimeras of TMD9 or TMD12 retained some of their tryptophan import activity and underwent vacuolar degradation as observed with wild-type Tat2. Thus, ours results suggest that TMD10 and TMD11 are essential for the correct folding of Tat2, probably because of their interdomain interactions. Notably, overexpression of Tat2-Gap1 chimera of TMD10 activated the unfolded protein response (UPR) element-lacZ reporter, suggesting that ER retention of the protein aggregates induces the UPR.

  17. Screening and Characterization of Drugs That Protect Corneal Endothelial Cells Against Unfolded Protein Response and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Chul; Toyono, Tetsuya; Berlinicke, Cynthia A.; Zack, Donald J.; Jurkunas, Ula; Usui, Tomohiko; Jun, Albert S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To screen for and characterize compounds that protect corneal endothelial cells against unfolded protein response (UPR) and oxidative stress. Methods Bovine corneal endothelial cells (BCECs) were treated for 48 hours with 640 compounds from a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug library and then challenged with thapsigargin or H2O2 to induce UPR or oxidative stress, respectively. Cell viability was measured using the CellTiter-Glo survival assay. Selected “hits” were subjected to further dose-response testing, and their ability to modulate expression of UPR and oxidative stress markers was assessed by RT-PCR, Western blot, and measurement of protein carbonyl and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) adducts in immortalized human corneal endothelial cells (iHCECs). Results Forty-one drugs at 20 μM and 55 drugs at 100 μM increased survival of H2O2-challenged cells, and 8 drugs at 20 μM and 2 drugs at 100 μM increased survival of thapsigargin-challenged cells, compared with untreated control cells. Nicergoline, ergothioneine, nimesulide, oxotremorine, and mefenamic acid increased survival of both H2O2- and thapsigargin-challenged cells. Oxotremorine altered DNA damage inducible 3 (CHOP) gene expression, glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78) and activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) protein expression, and protein carbonyl and 8-OHdG levels. Mefenamic acid altered GRP78 protein expression and protein carbonyl and 8-OHdG levels. Conclusions Oxotremorine and mefenamic acid are potential survival factors for corneal endothelial cells under UPR and oxidative stress. The described assay can be further expanded to screen additional drugs for potential therapeutic effect in corneal endothelial diseases such as Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy. PMID:28159976

  18. Balancing life with glycoconjugates: monitoring unfolded protein response-mediated anti-angiogenic action of tunicamycin by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Longas, Maria O.; Kotapati, Ashok; Prasad, Kilari PVRK; Banerjee, Aditi; Santiago, Jesus; Baksi, Krishna; Banerjee, Dipak K.

    2012-01-01

    Asparagine-linked protein glycosylation is a hallmark for glycoprotein structure and function. Its impairment by tunicamycin [a competitive inhibitor of N-acetylglucosaminyl 1-phosphate transferase (GPT)] has been known to inhibit neo-vascularization (i.e., angiogenesis) in humanized breast tumor due to an induction of ER stress-mediated unfolded protein response (UPR). The studies presented here demonstrate that (i) tunicamycin (i) inhibits capillary endothelial cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner; (ii) treated cells are incapable of forming colonies upon its withdrawal; and (iii) tunicamycin treatment causes nuclear fragmentation. Tunicamycin-induced ER stress-mediated UPR event in these cells was studied with the aid of Raman spectroscopy, in particular, the interpretation of bands at 1672, 1684 and 1694 cm−1, which are characteristics of proteins and originate from C=O stretching vibrations of mono-substituted amides. In tunicamycin-treated cells these bands decreased in area as follows: at 1672 cm−1 by 41.85% at 3 h and 55.39% at 12 h; at 1684 cm−1 by 20.63% at 3 h and 40.08% at 12 h; and also at 1994 cm−1 by 33.33% at 3 h and 32.92% at 12 h, respectively. Thus, in the presence of tunicamycin, newly synthesized protein chains fail to arrange properly into their final secondary and/or tertiary structures, and the random coils they form had undergone further degradation. PMID:22936838

  19. Crosstalk between the Unfolded Protein Response and Pathways That Regulate Pathogenic Development in Ustilago maydis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Heimel, Kai; Freitag, Johannes; Hampel, Martin; Ast, Julia; Bölker, Michael; Kämper, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway regulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis during ER stress, which results, for example, from an increased demand for protein secretion. Here, we characterize the homologs of the central UPR regulatory proteins Hac1 (for Homologous to ATF/CREB1) and Inositol Requiring Enzyme1 in the plant pathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis and demonstrate that the UPR is tightly interlinked with the b mating-type-dependent signaling pathway that regulates pathogenic development. Exact timing of UPR is required for virulence, since premature activation interferes with the b-dependent switch from budding to filamentous growth. In addition, we found crosstalk between UPR and the b target Clampless1 (Clp1), which is essential for cell cycle release and proliferation in planta. The unusual C-terminal extension of the U. maydis Hac1 homolog, Cib1 (for Clp1 interacting bZIP1), mediates direct interaction with Clp1. The interaction between Clp1 and Cib1 promotes stabilization of Clp1, resulting in enhanced ER stress tolerance that prevents deleterious UPR hyperactivation. Thus, the interaction between Cib1 and Clp1 constitutes a checkpoint to time developmental progression and increased secretion of effector proteins at the onset of biotrophic development. Crosstalk between UPR and the b mating-type regulated developmental program adapts ER homeostasis to the changing demands during biotrophy. PMID:24179126

  20. Activated AMPK boosts the Nrf2/HO-1 signaling axis—A role for the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Kristin; Baldinger, Johannes; Mayerhofer, Barbara; Atanasov, Atanas G.; Dirsch, Verena M.; Heiss, Elke H.

    2015-01-01

    In light of the emerging interplay between redox and metabolic signaling pathways we investigated the potential cross talk between nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), central regulators of the cellular redox and energy balance, respectively. Making use of xanthohumol (XN) as an activator of both the AMPK and the Nrf2 signaling pathway we show that AMPK exerts a positive influence on Nrf2/heme oxygenase (HO)-1 signaling in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Genetic ablation and pharmacological inhibition of AMPK blunts Nrf2-dependent HO-1 expression by XN already at the mRNA level. XN leads to AMPK activation via interference with mitochondrial function and activation of liver kinase B1 as upstream AMPK kinase. The subsequent AMPK-mediated enhancement of the Nrf2/HO-1 response does not depend on inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin, inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β, or altered abundance of Nrf2 (total and nuclear). However, reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress was identified and elaborated as a step in the AMPK-augmented Nrf2/HO-1 response. Overall, we shed more light on the hitherto incompletely understood cross talk between the LKB1/AMPK and the Nrf2/HO-1 axis revealing for the first time involvement of the unfolded protein response as an additional player and suggesting tight cooperation between signaling pathways controlling cellular redox, energy, or protein homeostasis. PMID:25843659

  1. XBP1s Links the Unfolded Protein Response to the Molecular Architecture of Mature N-Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Dewal, Mahender B.; DiChiara, Andrew S.; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Taylor, Rebecca J.; Harmon, Chyleigh J.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Dell, Anne; Shoulders, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The molecular architecture of the mature N-glycome is dynamic, with consequences for both normal and pathologic processes. Elucidating cellular mechanisms that modulate the N-linked glycome is, therefore, crucial. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is classically responsible for maintaining proteostasis in the secretory pathway by defining levels of chaperones and quality control proteins. Here, we employ chemical biology methods for UPR regulation to show that stress-independent activation of the UPR’s XBP1s transcription factor also induces a panel of N-glycan maturation-related enzymes. The downstream consequence is a distinctive shift towards specific hybrid and complex N-glycans on N-glycoproteins produced from XBP1s-activated cells, which we characterize by mass spectrometry. Pulse-chase studies attribute this shift specifically to altered N-glycan processing, rather than to changes in degradation or secretion rates. Our findings implicate XBP1s in a new role for N-glycoprotein biosynthesis, unveiling an important link between intracellular stress responses and the molecular architecture of extracellular N-glycoproteins. PMID:26496683

  2. Targeting the unfolded protein response, XBP1, and the NLRP3 inflammasome in fibrosis and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Overley-Adamson, Beth; Artlett, Carol M; Stephens, Connie; Sassi-Gaha, Sihem; Weis, Ransome D; Thacker, James D

    2014-01-01

    Increasing health care costs in the US are due in a large part to the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases in an aging population. Current therapeutic strategies for treating chronic diseases alleviate symptoms allowing patients to live longer with these diseases, but they do little, however, to alter the underlying disease course. Recent advances in molecular biology are revealing new drug targets that may significantly alter the course of these diseases and, as a result, offer economic relief from burgeoning health care costs. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated as an underlying pathology in many chronic diseases, and, therefore, the development of therapies designed to ameliorate ER stress may yield novel, effective treatment strategies. Herein, we report that X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) may be one of the earliest proteins engaged in response to ER stress. We show that a new signaling peptide derived from the ER-embedded transient receptor potential calcium channel protein 1 (TRPC1) engages XBP1 upstream of NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated maturation and secretion of IL-1β/IL-18. Moreover, we show that a synthetic homolog of this signaling peptide (Naclynamide™) administered intravenously twice weekly over a 4-week treatment course induced suppuration and evoked partial or complete resolution of lesions associated with a fibrotic granuloma, a lymphosarcoma, and a colo-rectal carcinoma in canine patients. The mode of action for Naclynamide™ as a first-in-class anti-cancer drug candidate is discussed. PMID:24496016

  3. The importance of connections between the cell wall integrity pathway and the unfolded protein response in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Malavazi, Iran; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Brown, Neil Andrew

    2014-11-01

    In the external environment, or within a host organism, filamentous fungi experience sudden changes in nutrient availability, osmolality, pH, temperature and the exposure to toxic compounds. The fungal cell wall represents the first line of defense, while also performing essential roles in morphology, development and virulence. A polarized secretion system is paramount for cell wall biosynthesis, filamentous growth, nutrient acquisition and interactions with the environment. The unique ability of filamentous fungi to secrete has resulted in their industrial adoption as fungal cell factories. Protein maturation and secretion commences in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The unfolded protein response (UPR) maintains ER functionality during exposure to secretion and cell wall stress. UPR, therefore, influences secretion and cell wall homeostasis, which in turn impacts upon numerous fungal traits important to pathogenesis and biotechnology. Subsequently, this review describes the relevance of the cell wall and UPR systems to filamentous fungal pathogens or industrial microbes and then highlights interconnections between the two systems. Ultimately, the possible biotechnological applications of an enhanced understanding of such regulatory systems in combating fungal disease, or the removal of natural bottlenecks in protein secretion in an industrial setting, are discussed.

  4. Energy landscape in protein folding and unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Baglioni, Piero; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-01-01

    We use 1H NMR to probe the energy landscape in the protein folding and unfolding process. Using the scheme ⇄ reversible unfolded (intermediate) → irreversible unfolded (denatured) state, we study the thermal denaturation of hydrated lysozyme that occurs when the temperature is increased. Using thermal cycles in the range 295protein energy surface, we observe that the hydrophilic (the amide NH) and hydrophobic (methyl CH3 and methine CH) peptide groups evolve and exhibit different behaviors. We also discuss the role of water and hydrogen bonding in the protein configurational stability. PMID:26957601

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of unfolded protein response genes from large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) and their expression in response to dietary fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kai; Yan, Jing; Li, Songlin; Wang, Tianjiao; Xu, Wei; Mai, Kangsen; Ai, Qinghui

    2017-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a mechanism to cope with perturbed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) functions or accumulation of unfolded protein in the ER in eukaryotic cells. Furthermore, the UPR also participates in a number of physiological and pathological processes, such as nutrient sensing, lipid synthesis, and inflammatory response. In this study, four UPR-related genes (GRP78/BiP, ATF6α, XBP1 and CHO) were isolated characterized from large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea), and their expression in response to dietary lipid sources (various fatty acids) such as fish oil (FO), palmic acid (PA), olive oil (OO), sunflower oil (SO), and perilla oil (PO), were examined following feeding. The results showed that the four UPR-related proteins contained highly conserved functional domains and had the closest phylogenetic relationships with other fishes. Additionally, these genes were ubiquitously expressed in large yellow croaker, as in zebrafish and medaka. Moreover, GRP78, ATF6α and spliced XBP1 (XBP1s) mRNA levels in the liver, not in adipose tissue, were significantly increased in the SO group compared to the other groups (P<0.05). These results indicated that dietary SO activated UPR, and the activation of UPR might provide a mechanism to improve ER function, but probably stimulated lipid synthesis and caused inflammatory response in the liver of large yellow croaker.

  6. PLIN2 is a Key Regulator of the Unfolded Protein Response and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Resolution in Pancreatic β Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Elaine; Tsai, Tsung Huang; Li, Lan; Saha, Pradip; Chan, Lawrence; Chang, Benny Hung-Junn

    2017-01-01

    Progressive pancreatic β cell failure underlies the transition of impaired glucose tolerance to overt diabetes; endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress expedites β cell failure in this situation. ER stress can be elicited by lipotoxicity and an increased demand for insulin in diabetes. We previously reported that the lipid droplet protein perilipin 2 (PLIN2) modulates lipid homeostasis in the liver. Here, we show that PLIN2 modulates the unfolded protein response (UPR) and ER stress in pancreatic β cells. PLIN2 expression goes up when β cells are exposed to a lipid load or to chemical ER stress inducers. Downregulation of PLIN2 ameliorates the effects of fatty acid- and chemical-induced ER stress, whereas PLIN2 overexpression exacerbates them. Diabetic Akita mice, which carry a heterozygous C96Y Ins2 mutation, exhibit elevated PLIN2 expression and ER stress in their β cells. Genetic ablation of Plin2 in Akita mice leads to mitigation of ER stress, forestalling β cell apoptosis, partially restoring β cell mass, and ameliorating diabetes. Mechanistic experiments showed that PLIN2 downregulation is associated with enhanced autophagic flux and accelerated ER stress resolution. In sum, we have identified a crucial role for PLIN2 in modulating autophagy, ER stress resolution, and β cell apoptosis and survival. PMID:28102311

  7. The ATF6 branch of unfolded protein response and apoptosis are activated to promote African swine fever virus infection.

    PubMed

    Galindo, I; Hernáez, B; Muñoz-Moreno, R; Cuesta-Geijo, M A; Dalmau-Mena, I; Alonso, C

    2012-07-05

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection induces apoptosis in the infected cell; however, the consequences of this activation on virus replication have not been defined. In order to identify the role of apoptosis in ASFV infection, we analyzed caspase induction during the infection and the impact of caspase inhibition on viral production. Caspases 3, 9 and 12 were activated from 16 h post-infection, but not caspase 8. Indeed, caspase 3 activation during the early stages of the infection appeared to be crucial for efficient virus exit. In addition, the inhibition of membrane blebbing reduced the release of virus particles from the cell. ASFV uses the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as a site of replication and this process can trigger ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) of the host cell. In addition to caspase 12 activation, indicators of ER stress include the upregulation of the chaperones calnexin and calreticulin upon virus infection. Moreover, ASFV induces transcription factor 6 signaling pathway of the UPR, but not the protein kinase-like ER kinase or the inositol-requiring enzyme 1 pathways. Thus, the capacity of ASFV to regulate the UPR may prevent early apoptosis and ensure viral replication.

  8. EZH2 inhibitors transcriptionally upregulate cytotoxic autophagy and cytoprotective unfolded protein response in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Yu; Lo, Hsiang-Ling; Yang, Pei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) has been emerged as novel anticancer target. Various EZH2 small-molecule inhibitors have been developed in recent years. A major class of EZH2 inhibitors are S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-competitive inhibitors, such as EPZ005687, EI1, GSK126, UNC1999 and GSK343. Autophagy, a physiological process of self-digestion, is involved in the turnover of proteins or intracellular organelles. It can serve as cytoprotective or cytotoxic function in cancer. Our previous study has found that UNC1999 and GSK343 are potent autophagy inducers. In this study, the underlying molecular mechanisms were further investigated. Our results showed that UNC1999 and GSK343 transcriptionally upregulated autophagy of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells through inducing LC3B gene expression. Besides, UNC1999/GSK343-induced autophagy was partially dependent on ATG7 but independent to EZH2 inhibition. Microarray and PCR array analyses identified that UNC1999 and GSK343 also induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). UNC1999/GSK343-induced ER stress/UPR contributed to the survival of cancer cells, which was opposite to UNC1999/GSK343-induced autophagy that promoted cell death. PMID:27648357

  9. The XBP1 Arm of the Unfolded Protein Response Induces Fibrogenic Activity in Hepatic Stellate Cells Through Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Rosa S.; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Goossens, Nicolas; Tsuchida, Takuma; Athwal, Varinder; Sun, Xiaochen; Robinson, Christopher L.; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Chou, Hsin-I; Zhang, David Y.; Fuchs, Bryan C.; Lee, Youngmin; Hoshida, Yujin; Friedman, Scott L.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and the unfolded protein response (UPR) both promote activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), however the link between the two stimuli remains unclear. Here we have explored the role of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), one of three UPR effector pathways and sought to establish the interdependence between autophagy and the UPR during HSC activation. XBP1 induction accompanied both culture-based HSC activation and ER stress induced by tunicamycin. Ectopic overexpression of XBP1 induced collagen 1-alpha expression in HSCs, which was inhibited by knockdown of ATG7, a critical autophagy mediator. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling indicated an upregulation of collagen synthesis pathways, but not of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-b pathway, a canonical fibrogenic driver, suggesting that XBP1 activates a specific subset of fibrogenesis pathways independent of TGF-β1. XBP1 target gene signatures were significantly induced in rodent liver fibrosis models (n = 3–5) and in human samples of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 72–135). Thus, XBP1-mediated UPR contributes to fibrogenic HSC activation and is functionally linked to cellular autophagy. PMID:27996033

  10. Unconjugated secondary bile acids activate the unfolded protein response and induce golgi fragmentation via a src-kinase-dependant mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ruchika; Quilty, Francis; Gilmer, John F.; Long, Aideen; Byrne, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids are components of gastro-duodenal refluxate and regarded as causative agents in oesophageal disease but the precise mechanisms are unknown. Here we demonstrate that a specific subset of physiological bile acids affect the protein secretory pathway by inducing ER stress, activating the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) and causing disassembly of the Golgi apparatus in oesophageal cells. Deoxycholic acid (DCA), Chemodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and Lithocholic acid (LCA) activated the PERK arm of the UPR, via phosphorylation of eIF2α and up-regulation of ATF3, CHOP and BiP/GRP78. UPR activation by these bile acids is mechanistically linked with Golgi fragmentation, as modulating the UPR using a PERK inhibitor (GSK2606414) or salubrinal attenuated bile acid-induced effects on Golgi structure. Furthermore we demonstrate that DCA, CDCA and LA activate Src kinase and that inhibition of this kinase attenuated both bile acid-induced BiP/GRP78 expression and Golgi fragmentation. This study highlights a novel mechanism whereby environmental factors (bile acids) impact important cellular processes regulating cell homeostasis, including the UPR and Golgi structure, which may contribute to cancer progression in the oesophagus. PMID:27888615

  11. Cavities determine the pressure unfolding of proteins.

    PubMed

    Roche, Julien; Caro, Jose A; Norberto, Douglas R; Barthe, Philippe; Roumestand, Christian; Schlessman, Jamie L; Garcia, Angel E; García-Moreno, Bertrand E; Royer, Catherine A

    2012-05-01

    It has been known for nearly 100 years that pressure unfolds proteins, yet the physical basis of this effect is not understood. Unfolding by pressure implies that the molar volume of the unfolded state of a protein is smaller than that of the folded state. This decrease in volume has been proposed to arise from differences between the density of bulk water and water associated with the protein, from pressure-dependent changes in the structure of bulk water, from the loss of internal cavities in the folded states of proteins, or from some combination of these three factors. Here, using 10 cavity-containing variants of staphylococcal nuclease, we demonstrate that pressure unfolds proteins primarily as a result of cavities that are present in the folded state and absent in the unfolded one. High-pressure NMR spectroscopy and simulations constrained by the NMR data were used to describe structural and energetic details of the folding landscape of staphylococcal nuclease that are usually inaccessible with existing experimental approaches using harsher denaturants. Besides solving a 100-year-old conundrum concerning the detailed structural origins of pressure unfolding of proteins, these studies illustrate the promise of pressure perturbation as a unique tool for examining the roles of packing, conformational fluctuations, and water penetration as determinants of solution properties of proteins, and for detecting folding intermediates and other structural details of protein-folding landscapes that are invisible to standard experimental approaches.

  12. Ceapins are a new class of unfolded protein response inhibitors, selectively targeting the ATF6α branch.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Ciara M; Garri, Carolina; Cain, Erica L; Ang, Kenny Kean-Hooi; Wilson, Christopher G; Chen, Steven; Hearn, Brian R; Jaishankar, Priyadarshini; Aranda-Diaz, Andres; Arkin, Michelle R; Renslo, Adam R; Walter, Peter

    2016-07-20

    The membrane-bound transcription factor ATF6α plays a cytoprotective role in the unfolded protein response (UPR), required for cells to survive ER stress. Activation of ATF6α promotes cell survival in cancer models. We used cell-based screens to discover and develop Ceapins, a class of pyrazole amides, that block ATF6α signaling in response to ER stress. Ceapins sensitize cells to ER stress without impacting viability of unstressed cells. Ceapins are highly specific inhibitors of ATF6α signaling, not affecting signaling through the other branches of the UPR, or proteolytic processing of its close homolog ATF6β or SREBP (a cholesterol-regulated transcription factor), both activated by the same proteases. Ceapins are first-in-class inhibitors that can be used to explore both the mechanism of activation of ATF6α and its role in pathological settings. The discovery of Ceapins now enables pharmacological modulation all three UPR branches either singly or in combination.

  13. Exposure to inhaled particulate matter activates early markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and unfolded protein response in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Guerra, R; Vera-Aguilar, E; Uribe-Ramirez, M; Gookin, G; Camacho, J; Osornio-Vargas, A R; Mugica-Alvarez, V; Angulo-Olais, R; Campbell, A; Froines, J; Kleinman, T M; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, A

    2013-10-24

    To study central nervous system airborne PM related subchronic toxicity, SD male rats were exposed for eight weeks to either coarse (32 μg/m³), fine (178 μg/m³) or ultrafine (107 μg/m³) concentrated PM or filtered air. Different brain regions (olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus), were harvested from the rats following exposure to airborne PM. Subsequently, prooxidant (HO-1 and SOD-2), and inflammatory markers (IL-1β and TNFα), apoptotic (caspase 3), and unfolded protein response (UPR) markers (XBP-1S and BiP), were also measured using real-time PCR. Activation of nuclear transcription factors Nrf-2 and NF-κB, associated with antioxidant and inflammation processes, respectively, were also analyzed by GSMA. Ultrafine PM increased HO-1 and SOD-2 mRNA levels in the striatum and hippocampus, in the presence of Nrf-2 activation. Also, ultrafine PM activated NF-κB and increased IL-1β and TNFα in the striatum. Activation of UPR was observed after exposure to coarse PM through the increment of XBP-1S and BiP in the striatum, accompanied by an increase in antioxidant response markers HO-1 and SOD-2. Our results indicate that exposure to different size fractions of PM may induce physiological changes (in a neuroanatomical manner) in the central nervous system (CNS), specifically within the striatum, where inflammation, oxidative stress and UPR signals were effectively activated.

  14. Exposure to inhaled particulate matter activates early markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and unfolded protein response in rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, R.; Vera-Aguilar, E.; Uribe-Ramirez, M.; Gookin, G.; Camacho, J.; Osornio-Vargas, A.R.; Mugica-Alvarez, V.; Angulo-Olais, R.; Campbell, A.; Froines, J.; Kleinman, T.M.; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, A.

    2014-01-01

    To study central nervous system airborne PM related subchronic toxicity, SD male rats were exposed for eight weeks to either coarse (32 µg/m3), fine (178 µg/m3) or ultrafine (107 µg/m3) concentrated PM or filtered air. Different brain regions (olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus), were harvested from the rats following exposure to airborne PM. Subsequently, prooxidant (HO-1 and SOD-2), and inflammatory markers (IL-1β and TNFα), apoptotic (caspase 3), and unfolded protein response (UPR) markers (XBP-1S and BiP), were also measured using real-time PCR. Activation of nuclear transcription factors Nrf-2 and NF-κB, associated with antioxidant and inflammation processes, respectively, were also analyzed by GSMA. Ultrafine PM increased HO-1 and SOD-2 mRNA levels in the striatum and hippocampus, in the presence of Nrf-2 activation. Also, ultrafine PM activated NF-κB and increased IL-1β and TNFα in the striatum. Activation of UPR was observed after exposure to coarse PM through the increment of XBP-1S and BiP in the striatum, accompanied by an increase in antioxidant response markers HO-1 and SOD-2. Our results indicate that exposure to different size fractions of PM may induce physiological changes (in a neuroanatomical manner) in the central nervous system (CNS), specifically within the striatum, where inflammation, oxidative stress and UPR signals were effectively activated. PMID:23892126

  15. Ceapins are a new class of unfolded protein response inhibitors, selectively targeting the ATF6α branch

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Ciara M; Garri, Carolina; Cain, Erica L; Ang, Kenny Kean-Hooi; Wilson, Christopher G; Chen, Steven; Hearn, Brian R; Jaishankar, Priyadarshini; Aranda-Diaz, Andres; Arkin, Michelle R; Renslo, Adam R; Walter, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The membrane-bound transcription factor ATF6α plays a cytoprotective role in the unfolded protein response (UPR), required for cells to survive ER stress. Activation of ATF6α promotes cell survival in cancer models. We used cell-based screens to discover and develop Ceapins, a class of pyrazole amides, that block ATF6α signaling in response to ER stress. Ceapins sensitize cells to ER stress without impacting viability of unstressed cells. Ceapins are highly specific inhibitors of ATF6α signaling, not affecting signaling through the other branches of the UPR, or proteolytic processing of its close homolog ATF6β or SREBP (a cholesterol-regulated transcription factor), both activated by the same proteases. Ceapins are first-in-class inhibitors that can be used to explore both the mechanism of activation of ATF6α and its role in pathological settings. The discovery of Ceapins now enables pharmacological modulation all three UPR branches either singly or in combination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11878.001 PMID:27435960

  16. Model study of protein unfolding by interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakarova, S. D.; Carlsson, A. E.

    2004-02-01

    We study interface-induced protein unfolding on hydrophobic and polar interfaces by means of a two-dimensional lattice model and an exhaustive enumeration ground-state structure search, for a set of model proteins of length 20 residues. We compare the effects of the two types of interfaces, and search for criteria that influence the retention of a protein’s native-state structure upon adsorption. We find that the unfolding proceeds by a large, sudden loss of native contacts. The unfolding at polar interfaces exhibits similar behavior to that at hydrophobic interfaces but with a much weaker interface coupling strength. Further, we find that the resistance of proteins to unfolding in our model is positively correlated with the magnitude of the folding energy in the native-state structure, the thermal stability (or energy gap) for that structure, and the interface energy for native-state adsorption. We find these factors to be of roughly equal importance.

  17. Unfolded Protein Response Promotes Doxorubicin-Induced Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Cells Apoptosis via the mTOR Pathway Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaofang; Yang, Yan; Yao, Fuli; Xiao, Bin; Cheng, Ying; Feng, Chunhong; Duan, Chunyan; Zhang, Chunyan; Liu, Youping; Li, Hong; Xiao, Bo; Dai, Rongyang

    2016-12-01

    Drug resistance is extremely common in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and is one of the major problems in NSCLC chemotherapy. However, the detailed mechanisms remain largely unknown. Unfolded protein response (UPR) is involved in the tumorigenesis of NSCLC. Here, the authors demonstrated that the UPR promotes poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activation (PARP) cleavage in NSCLC cells on doxorubicin treatment, which is a hallmark of apoptosis and caspase activation. In NSCLC cells, doxorubicin treatment triggers the UPR activation, which subsequently promotes doxorubicin-mediated apoptosis. Importantly, mild endoplasmic reticulum stress precondition enhances the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to doxorubicin-initiated apoptosis. Furthermore, the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) branch of the UPR is involved in the synergistic role of the UPR in NSCLC cell apoptosis on doxorubicin treatment. They also demonstrated that the mTOR pathway plays an essential role in synergistic induction of apoptosis by the UPR and doxorubicin in NSCLC cells. Taken together, these results provide a potential mechanism that the UPR promotes doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in NSCLC cells, at least in part, by eIF2α-mediated mTOR signal inactivation.

  18. Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response Bypasses Trastuzumab-mediated Inhibition of the PI-3K Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kumandan, Sreekanth; Mahadevan, Navin R.; Chiu, Kevin; DeLaney, Alexandra; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    HER2-positive breast cancer initially responds to trastuzumab treatment, but over time, resistance develops and rapid cancer progression occurs, for which various explanations have been proposed. Here we tested the hypothesis that induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR) could override HER2 inhibition by trastuzumab, leading to the re-activation of growth signaling and the activation of the downstream target Lipocalin 2 (LCN2). Trastuzumab significantly inhibited the basal expression of LCN2 in HER2+ SKBr3 human breast cancer cells. The induction of the UPR completely abrogated trastuzumab-mediated LCN2 downregulation, and, in fact caused an increase in transcription and secretion of LCN2 over baseline. Reduction of the UPR using 4-phenyl butyric acid (PBA) a chemical chaperone that ameliorates ER stress, restored trastuzumab-mediated inhibition. Inhibition of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in trastuzumab-treated/UPR-induced SKBr3 cells partially reduced the upregulation of LCN2. These results suggest that the UPR is a possible way to override the effect of trastuzumab in HER2+ cancer cells. PMID:23200669

  19. The unfolded protein response is a negative regulator of scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) expression.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Tanja; Eigner, Karin; Filik, Yüksel; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert; Röhrl, Clemens

    2016-10-21

    Scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) is the main receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and an emerging atheroprotective candidate. A central function of SR-BI is the delivery of HDL-derived cholesterol to the liver for subsequent excretion into the bile. Here, we investigated the regulation of SR-BI by the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive mechanism induced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is frequently activated in metabolic disorders. We provide evidence that induction of acute ER stress by well-characterized chemical inducers leads to decreased SR-BI expression in hepatocyte-derived cell lines. This results in a functional reduction of selective lipid uptake from HDL. However, the regulation of SR-BI by ER stress is not a direct consequence of altered cellular cholesterol metabolism. Finally, we show that SR-BI down-regulation by the UPR might be a compensatory mechanism to provide partial adaption to ER stress. The observed down-regulation of SR-BI by ER stress in hepatic cells might contribute to the unfavorable effects of metabolic disorders on cholesterol homeostasis and cardiovascular diseases.

  20. HIV-1 Tat Activates Neuronal Ryanodine Receptors with Rapid Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response and Mitochondrial Hyperpolarization

    PubMed Central

    Norman, John P.; Perry, Seth W.; Reynolds, Holly M.; Kiebala, Michelle; De Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Trejo, Margarita; Volsky, David J.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.; Dewhurst, Stephen; Masliah, Eliezer; Gelbard, Harris A.

    2008-01-01

    Neurologic disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is ultimately refractory to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) because of failure of complete virus eradication in the central nervous system (CNS), and disruption of normal neural signaling events by virally induced chronic neuroinflammation. We have previously reported that HIV-1 Tat can induce mitochondrial hyperpolarization in cortical neurons, thus compromising the ability of the neuron to buffer calcium and sustain energy production for normal synaptic communication. In this report, we demonstrate that Tat induces rapid loss of ER calcium mediated by the ryanodine receptor (RyR), followed by the unfolded protein response (UPR) and pathologic dilatation of the ER in cortical neurons in vitro. RyR antagonism attenuated both Tat-mediated mitochondrial hyperpolarization and UPR induction. Delivery of Tat to murine CNS in vivo also leads to long-lasting pathologic ER dilatation and mitochondrial morphologic abnormalities. Finally, we performed ultrastructural studies that demonstrated mitochondria with abnormal morphology and dilated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in brain tissue of patients with HIV-1 inflammation and neurodegeneration. Collectively, these data suggest that abnormal RyR signaling mediates the neuronal UPR with failure of mitochondrial energy metabolism, and is a critical locus for the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 in the CNS. PMID:19009018

  1. A Whole Genome RNA Interference Screen Reveals a Role for Spry2 in Insulin Transcription and the Unfolded Protein Response.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Zachary; Chopra, Deeksha G; Hennings, Thomas G; Richards, Hunter; Choe, Justin; Yang, Katherine; Baeyens, Luc; Ang, Kenny; Chen, Steven; Arkin, Michelle; German, Michael S; McManus, Michael T; Ku, Gregory M

    2017-02-28

    Insulin production by the pancreatic beta cell is required for normal glucose homeostasis. While key transcription factors that bind to the insulin promoter are known, relatively little is known about the upstream regulators of insulin transcription. Using a whole genome RNA interference screen, we uncovered 26 novel regulators of insulin transcription that regulate diverse processes including oxidative phosphorylation, vesicle traffic, and the unfolded protein response(UPR). We focused on Spry2 -- a gene implicated in human type 2 diabetes by genome wide association studies but without a clear connection to glucose homeostasis. We showed that Spry2 is a novel UPR target and its up-regulation is dependent on PERK. Knockdown of Spry2 resulted in reduced expression of Serca2, reduced endoplasmic reticulum(ER) calcium levels and induction of the UPR. Spry2 deletion in the adult mouse beta cell caused hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia. Our study greatly expands the compendium of insulin promoter regulators and demonstrates a novel beta cell link between Spry2 and human diabetes.

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-independent activation of unfolded protein response kinases by a small molecule ATP-mimic

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Aaron S; Alfaro, Jennifer; Morales-Soto, Marisol A; Dar, Arvin C; McCullagh, Emma; Gotthardt, Katja; Li, Han; Acosta-Alvear, Diego; Sidrauski, Carmela; Korennykh, Alexei V; Bernales, Sebastian; Shokat, Kevan M; Walter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Two ER membrane-resident transmembrane kinases, IRE1 and PERK, function as stress sensors in the unfolded protein response. IRE1 also has an endoribonuclease activity, which initiates a non-conventional mRNA splicing reaction, while PERK phosphorylates eIF2α. We engineered a potent small molecule, IPA, that binds to IRE1's ATP-binding pocket and predisposes the kinase domain to oligomerization, activating its RNase. IPA also inhibits PERK but, paradoxically, activates it at low concentrations, resulting in a bell-shaped activation profile. We reconstituted IPA-activation of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation from purified components. We estimate that under conditions of maximal activation less than 15% of PERK molecules in the reaction are occupied by IPA. We propose that IPA binding biases the PERK kinase towards its active conformation, which trans-activates apo-PERK molecules. The mechanism by which partial occupancy with an inhibitor can activate kinases may be wide-spread and carries major implications for design and therapeutic application of kinase inhibitors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05434.001 PMID:25986605

  3. Ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress are required for unfolded protein response activation and steatosis in zebrafish with alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsedensodnom, Orkhontuya; Vacaru, Ana M.; Howarth, Deanna L.; Yin, Chunyue; Sadler, Kirsten C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Secretory pathway dysfunction and lipid accumulation (steatosis) are the two most common responses of hepatocytes to ethanol exposure and are major factors in the pathophysiology of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). However, the mechanisms by which ethanol elicits these cellular responses are not fully understood. Recent data indicates that activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in response to secretory pathway dysfunction can cause steatosis. Here, we examined the relationship between alcohol metabolism, oxidative stress, secretory pathway stress and steatosis using zebrafish larvae. We found that ethanol was immediately internalized and metabolized by larvae, such that the internal ethanol concentration in 4-day-old larvae equilibrated to 160 mM after 1 hour of exposure to 350 mM ethanol, with an average ethanol metabolism rate of 56 μmol/larva/hour over 32 hours. Blocking alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) and cytochrome P450 2E1 (Cyp2e1), the major enzymes that metabolize ethanol, prevented alcohol-induced steatosis and reduced induction of the UPR in the liver. Thus, we conclude that ethanol metabolism causes ALD in zebrafish. Oxidative stress generated by Cyp2e1-mediated ethanol metabolism is proposed to be a major culprit in ALD pathology. We found that production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased in larvae exposed to ethanol, whereas inhibition of the zebrafish CYP2E1 homolog or administration of antioxidants reduced ROS levels. Importantly, these treatments also blocked ethanol-induced steatosis and reduced UPR activation, whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) acted as a pro-oxidant that synergized with low doses of ethanol to induce the UPR. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress are conserved mechanisms required for the development of steatosis and hepatic dysfunction in ALD, and that these processes contribute to ethanol-induced UPR activation and secretory pathway stress in hepatocytes. PMID

  4. Disseminated Tumor Cells Persist in the Bone Marrow of Breast Cancer Patients through Sustained Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response.

    PubMed

    Bartkowiak, Kai; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Buck, Friedrich; Gorges, Tobias M; Nilse, Lars; Assmann, Volker; Andreas, Antje; Müller, Volkmar; Wikman, Harriet; Riethdorf, Sabine; Schlüter, Hartmut; Pantel, Klaus

    2015-12-15

    Disseminated tumor cells (DTC), which share mesenchymal and epithelial properties, are considered to be metastasis-initiating cells in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms supporting DTC survival are poorly understood. DTC extravasation into the bone marrow may be encouraged by low oxygen concentrations that trigger metabolic and molecular alterations contributing to DTC survival. Here, we investigated how the unfolded protein response (UPR), an important cytoprotective program induced by hypoxia, affects the behavior of stressed cancer cells. DTC cell lines established from the bone marrow of patients with breast cancer (BC-M1), lung cancer, (LC-M1), and prostate cancer (PC-E1) were subjected to hypoxic and hypoglycemic conditions. BC-M1 and LC-M1 exhibiting mesenchymal and epithelial properties adapted readily to hypoxia and glucose starvation. Upregulation of UPR proteins, such as the glucose-regulated protein Grp78, induced the formation of filamentous networks, resulting in proliferative advantages and sustained survival under total glucose deprivation. High Grp78 expression correlated with mesenchymal attributes of breast and lung cancer cells and with poor differentiation in clinical samples of primary breast and lung carcinomas. In DTCs isolated from bone marrow specimens from breast cancer patients, Grp78-positive stress granules were observed, consistent with the likelihood these cells were exposed to acute cell stress. Overall, our findings provide the first evidence that the UPR is activated in DTC in the bone marrow from cancer patients, warranting further study of this cell stress pathway as a predictive biomarker for recurrent metastatic disease.

  5. Cigarette smoke induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response in normal and malignant human lung cells

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Ellen; Stinson, Andy; Shan, Lin; Yang, Jin; Gietl, Diana; Albino, Anthony P

    2008-01-01

    Background Although lung cancer is among the few malignancies for which we know the primary etiological agent (i.e., cigarette smoke), a precise understanding of the temporal sequence of events that drive tumor progression remains elusive. In addition to finding that cigarette smoke (CS) impacts the functioning of key pathways with significant roles in redox homeostasis, xenobiotic detoxification, cell cycle control, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) functioning, our data highlighted a defensive role for the unfolded protein response (UPR) program. The UPR promotes cell survival by reducing the accumulation of aberrantly folded proteins through translation arrest, production of chaperone proteins, and increased degradation. Importance of the UPR in maintaining tissue health is evidenced by the fact that a chronic increase in defective protein structures plays a pathogenic role in diabetes, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's syndromes, and cancer. Methods Gene and protein expression changes in CS exposed human cell cultures were monitored by high-density microarrays and Western blot analysis. Tissue arrays containing samples from 110 lung cancers were probed with antibodies to proteins of interest using immunohistochemistry. Results We show that: 1) CS induces ER stress and activates components of the UPR; 2) reactive species in CS that promote oxidative stress are primarily responsible for UPR activation; 3) CS exposure results in increased expression of several genes with significant roles in attenuating oxidative stress; and 4) several major UPR regulators are increased either in expression (i.e., BiP and eIF2α) or phosphorylation (i.e., phospho-eIF2α) in a majority of human lung cancers. Conclusion These data indicate that chronic ER stress and recruitment of one or more UPR effector arms upon exposure to CS may play a pivotal role in the etiology or progression of lung cancers, and that phospho-eIF2α and BiP may have diagnostic and

  6. Pressure perturbation calorimetry of unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsamaloukas, Alekos D; Pyzocha, Neena K; Makhatadze, George I

    2010-12-16

    We report the application of pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) to study unfolded proteins. Using PPC we have measured the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient, α(T), in the unfolded state of apocytochrome C and reduced BPTI. We have shown that α(T) is a nonlinear function and decreases with increasing temperature. The decrease is most significant in the low (2-55 °C) temperature range. We have also tested an empirical additivity approach to predict α(T) of unfolded state from the amino acid sequence using α(T) values for individual amino acids. A comparison of the experimental and calculated functions shows a very good agreement, both in absolute values of α(T) and in its temperature dependence. Such an agreement suggests the applicability of using empirical calculations to predict α(T) of any unfolded protein.

  7. Unfolded protein response-induced dysregulation of calcium homeostasis promotes retinal degeneration in rat models of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, V; Kotla, P; Strang, C; Gorbatyuk, M

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) in rats is closely associated with a persistently activated unfolded protein response (UPR). If unchecked, the UPR might trigger apoptosis, leading to photoreceptor death. One of the UPR-activated cellular signaling culminating in apoptotic photoreceptor cell death is linked to an increase in intracellular Ca2+. Therefore, we validated whether ADRP retinas experience a cytosolic Ca2+ overload, and whether sustained UPR in the wild-type retina could promote retinal degeneration through Ca2+-mediated calpain activation. We performed an ex vivo experiment to measure intracellular Ca2+ in ADRP retinas as well as to detect the expression levels of proteins that act as Ca2+ sensors. In separate experiments with the subretinal injection of tunicamycin (UPR inducer) and a mixture of calcium ionophore (A231278) and thapsigargin (SERCA2b inhibitor) we assessed the consequences of a sustained UPR activation and increased intracellular Ca2+ in the wild-type retina, respectively, by performing scotopic ERG, histological, and western blot analyses. Results of the study revealed that induced UPR in the retina activates calpain-mediated signaling, and increased intracellular Ca2+ is capable of promoting retinal degeneration. A significant decline in ERG amplitudes at 6 weeks post treatment was associated with photoreceptor cell loss that occurred through calpain-activated CDK5-pJNK-Csp3/7 pathway. Similar calpain activation was found in ADRP rat retinas. A twofold increase in intracellular Ca2+ and up- and downregulations of ER membrane-associated Ca2+-regulated IP3R channels and SERCA2b transporters were detected. Therefore, sustained UPR activation in the ADRP rat retinas could promote retinal degeneration through increased intracellular Ca2+ and calpain-mediated apoptosis. PMID:26844699

  8. Developmental expression and regulation of flavin-containing monooxygenase by the unfolded protein response in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Kupsco, Allison; Schlenk, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) play a key role in xenobiotic metabolism, are regulated by environmental conditions, and are differentially regulated during mammalian development. Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) are a common model organism for toxicological studies. The goal of the current research was to characterize developmental expression and regulation of FMOs in Japanese medaka embryos to better understand the role of FMOs in this model species. Five putative medaka fmos were characterized from the medaka genome through the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database by protein motifs and alignments, then identified as fmo4, fmo5A, fmo5B, fmo5C and fmo5D for the current study. Fmo gene expression was analyzed at 1dpf, 3dpf, 6dpf and 9dpf and distinct developmental patterns of expression were observed. Fmo4 and fmo5D increased 3-fold during mid organogenesis (6dpf), while fmo5B and fmo5C decreased significantly in early organogenesis (3dpf) and fmo5A was unaltered. Promoter analysis was performed for transcription factor binding sites and indicated regulation by developmental factors and a role for the unfolded protein response in fmo modulation. Fmo regulation by the UPR was assessed with treatments of 1μg/ml, 2μg/ml, and 4μg/ml Tunicamycin (Tm), and 2mM and 4mM dithiothreitol (DTT), well-known inducers of endoplasmic reticulum stress, for 24h from 5-6dpf. High concentrations to Tm induced fmo4 and fmo5A up to two-fold, while DTT significantly decreased expression of fmo5A, fmo5B, and fmo5C. Results suggest that medaka fmos are variably regulated by the UPR during organogenesis with variable developmental expression, and suggesting potential stage-dependent activation or detoxification of xenobiotics.

  9. Transcriptome analysis of the unfolded protein response in hemocytes of Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Hong; Yuan, Feng-Hua; Bi, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Ze-Zhi; Yue, Hai-Tao; Yuan, Kai; Chen, Yong-Gui; Wen, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo

    2016-07-01

    In this study, Litopenaeus vannamei was injected with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) against L. vannamei immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (LvBip) to activating UPR in the hemocytes, shirmps injected dsRNA against enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) as control group. And genes expression in hemocytes of then were analyzed using Illumina Hiseq 2500 (PE100). By comparing the analyzed results, 1418 unigenes were significantly upregulated, and 596 unigenes were significantly down-regulated upon UPR. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes against known databases indicated that the distribution of gene pathways between the upregulated and down-regulated genes were substantially different. A total of 208 genes of UPR system were obtained, and 69 of them were differentially expressed between the two groups. Results also showed that L. vannamei UPR was involved in various metabolic processes, such as glycometabolism, lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and nucleic acid metabolism. In addition, UPR was emgaged in immune-assicoated signaling pathways, such as NF-κB signaling pathway, NOD-like receptor signaling pathway, Hippo signaling pathway, p38 MAPK signaling pathway and Wnt signaling pathway in L. vannamei. These results improved our current understanding of the L. vannamei UPR, and highlighted its importance in cell homeostasis upon environmental stress.

  10. The unfolded protein response and its potential role in Huntington's disease elucidated by a systems biology approach

    PubMed Central

    Kalathur, Ravi Kiran Reddy; Giner-Lamia, Joaquin; Machado, Susana; Barata, Tania; Ayasolla, Kameshwar R S; Futschik, Matthias E.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington ´s disease (HD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease with a fatal outcome. Although the disease-causing gene (huntingtin) has been known for over 20 years, the exact mechanisms leading to neuronal cell death are still controversial. One potential mechanism contributing to the massive loss of neurons observed in the brain of HD patients could be the unfolded protein response (UPR) activated by accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). As an adaptive response to counter-balance accumulation of un- or misfolded proteins, the UPR upregulates transcription of chaperones, temporarily attenuates new translation, and activates protein degradation via the proteasome. However, persistent ER stress and an activated UPR can also cause apoptotic cell death. Although different studies have indicated a role for the UPR in HD, the evidence remains inconclusive. Here, we present extensive bioinformatic analyses that revealed UPR activation in different experimental HD models based on transcriptomic data. Accordingly, we have identified 53 genes, including RAB5A, HMGB1, CTNNB1, DNM1, TUBB, TSG101, EEF2, DYNC1H1, SLC12A5, ATG5, AKT1, CASP7 and SYVN1 that provide a potential link between UPR and HD. To further elucidate the potential role of UPR as a disease-relevant process, we examined its connection to apoptosis based on molecular interaction data, and identified a set of 40 genes including ADD1, HSP90B1, IKBKB, IKBKG, RPS3A and LMNB1, which seem to be at the crossroads between these two important cellular processes. Remarkably, we also found strong correlation of UPR gene expression with the length of the polyglutamine tract of Huntingtin, which is a critical determinant of age of disease onset in human HD patients pointing to the UPR as a promising target for therapeutic intervention. The study is complemented by a newly developed web-portal called UPR-HD (http://uprhd.sysbiolab.eu) that enables visualization and interactive analysis

  11. Divergent forms of endoplasmic reticulum stress trigger a robust unfolded protein response in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Brittany A; Hooks, Katarzyna B; McKinstry, Mia; Snow, Jonathan W

    2016-03-01

    Honey bee colonies in the United States have suffered from an increased rate of die-off in recent years, stemming from a complex set of interacting stresses that remain poorly described. While we have some understanding of the physiological stress responses in the honey bee, our molecular understanding of honey bee cellular stress responses is incomplete. Thus, we sought to identify and began functional characterization of the components of the UPR in honey bees. The IRE1-dependent splicing of the mRNA for the transcription factor Xbp1, leading to translation of an isoform with more transactivation potential, represents the most conserved of the UPR pathways. Honey bees and other Apoidea possess unique features in the Xbp1 mRNA splice site, which we reasoned could have functional consequences for the IRE1 pathway. However, we find robust induction of target genes upon UPR stimulation. In addition, the IRE1 pathway activation, as assessed by splicing of Xbp1 mRNA upon UPR, is conserved. By providing foundational knowledge about the UPR in the honey bee and the relative sensitivity of this species to divergent stresses, this work stands to improve our understanding of the mechanistic underpinnings of honey bee health and disease.

  12. Antiestrogen Resistant Cell Lines Expressing Estrogen Receptor α Mutations Upregulate the Unfolded Protein Response and are Killed by BHPI

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Chengjian; Livezey, Mara; Kim, Ji Eun; Shapiro, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Outgrowth of metastases expressing ERα mutations Y537S and D538G is common after endocrine therapy for estrogen receptor α (ERα) positive breast cancer. The effect of replacing wild type ERα in breast cancer cells with these mutations was unclear. We used the CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing system and homology directed repair to isolate and characterize 14 T47D cell lines in which ERαY537S or ERαD538G replace one or both wild-type ERα genes. In 2-dimensional, and in quantitative anchorage-independent 3-dimensional cell culture, ERαY537S and ERαD538G cells exhibited estrogen-independent growth. A progestin further increased their already substantial proliferation in micromolar 4-hydroxytamoxifen and fulvestrant/ICI 182,780 (ICI). Our recently described ERα biomodulator, BHPI, which hyperactivates the unfolded protein response (UPR), completely blocked proliferation. In ERαY537S and ERαD538G cells, estrogen-ERα target genes were constitutively active and partially antiestrogen resistant. The UPR marker sp-XBP1 was constitutively activated in ERαY537S cells and further induced by progesterone in both cell lines. UPR-regulated genes associated with tamoxifen resistance, including the oncogenic chaperone BiP/GRP78, were upregulated. ICI displayed a greater than 2 fold reduction in its ability to induce ERαY537S and ERαD538G degradation. Progestins, UPR activation and perhaps reduced ICI-stimulated ERα degradation likely contribute to antiestrogen resistance seen in ERαY537S and ERαD538G cells. PMID:27713477

  13. Whole exome sequencing implicates eye development, the unfolded protein response and plasma membrane homeostasis in primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Sharma, Shiwani; Landers, John; Mills, Richard; Goldberg, Ivan; Healey, Paul R.; Graham, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W.; Mackey, David A.; Galanopoulos, Anna; Casson, Robert J.; Ruddle, Jonathan B.; Ellis, Jonathan; Leo, Paul; Brown, Matthew A.; MacGregor, Stuart; Lynn, David J.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Craig, Jamie E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To identify biological processes associated with POAG and its subtypes, high-tension (HTG) and normal-tension glaucoma (NTG), by analyzing rare potentially damaging genetic variants. Methods A total of 122 and 65 unrelated HTG and NTG participants, respectively, with early onset advanced POAG, 103 non-glaucoma controls and 993 unscreened ethnicity-matched controls were included in this study. Study participants without myocilin disease-causing variants and non-glaucoma controls were subjected to whole exome sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq2000. Exomes of participants were sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq2000. Qualifying variants were rare in the general population (MAF < 0.001) and potentially functionally damaging (nonsense, frameshift, splice or predicted pathogenic using SIFT or Polyphen2 software). Genes showing enrichment of qualifying variants in cases were selected for pathway and network analysis using InnateDB. Results POAG cases showed enrichment of rare variants in camera-type eye development genes (p = 1.40×10–7, corrected p = 3.28×10–4). Implicated eye development genes were related to neuronal or retinal development. HTG cases were significantly enriched for key regulators in the unfolded protein response (UPR) (p = 7.72×10–5, corrected p = 0.013). The UPR is known to be involved in myocilin-related glaucoma; our results suggest the UPR has a role in non-myocilin causes of HTG. NTG cases showed enrichment in ion channel transport processes (p = 1.05×10–4, corrected p = 0.027) including calcium, chloride and phospholipid transporters involved in plasma membrane homeostasis. Network analysis also revealed enrichment of the MHC Class I antigen presentation pathway in HTG, and the EGFR1 and cell-cycle pathways in both HTG and NTG. Conclusion This study suggests that mutations in eye development genes are enriched in POAG. HTG can result from aberrant responses to protein misfolding which may be amenable to molecular chaperone therapy. NTG

  14. The Potyviral P3 Protein Targets Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1A to Promote the Unfolded Protein Response and Viral Pathogenesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shine, M.B.; Cui, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xin; Ma, Na; Kachroo, Pradeep; Zhi, Haijan; Kachroo, Aardra

    2016-01-01

    The biochemical function of the potyviral P3 protein is not known, although it is known to regulate virus replication, movement, and pathogenesis. We show that P3, the putative virulence determinant of soybean mosaic virus (SMV), targets a component of the translation elongation complex in soybean. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A), a well-known host factor in viral pathogenesis, is essential for SMV virulence and the associated unfolded protein response (UPR). Silencing GmEF1A inhibits accumulation of SMV and another ER-associated virus in soybean. Conversely, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducing chemicals promote SMV accumulation in wild-type, but not GmEF1A-knockdown, plants. Knockdown of genes encoding the eEF1B isoform, which is important for eEF1A function in translation elongation, has similar effects on UPR and SMV resistance, suggesting a link to translation elongation. P3 and GmEF1A promote each other’s nuclear localization, similar to the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of eEF1A by the Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Nef protein. Our results suggest that P3 targets host elongation factors resulting in UPR, which in turn facilitates SMV replication and place eEF1A upstream of BiP in the ER stress response during pathogen infection. PMID:27356973

  15. The Unfolded Protein Response Element IRE1α Senses Bacterial Proteins Invading the ER to Activate RIG-I and Innate Immune Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin A.; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Platzer, Barbara; Cross, Benedict C.S.; Gardner, Brooke M.; De Luca, Heidi; Luong, Phi; Harding, Heather P.; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Walter, Peter; Fiebiger, Edda; Ron, David; Kagan, Jonathan C.; Lencer, Wayne I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The plasma membrane and all membrane-bound organelles except for the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are equipped with pattern-recognition molecules to sense microbes or their products and induce innate immunity for host defense. Here, we report that inositol-requiring-1α (IRE1α), an ER protein that signals in the unfolded protein response (UPR), is activated to induce inflammation by binding a portion of cholera toxin as it co-opts the ER to cause disease. Other known UPR transducers, including the IRE1α-dependent transcription factor XBP1, are dispensable for this signaling. The inflammatory response depends instead on the RNase activity of IRE1α to degrade endogenous mRNA, a process termed regulated IRE1α-dependent decay (RIDD) of mRNA. The mRNA fragments produced engage retinoic-acid inducible gene 1 (RIG-I), a cyto-solic sensor of RNA viruses, to activate NF-κB and interferon pathways. We propose IRE1α provides for a generalized mechanism of innate immune surveillance originating within the ER lumen. PMID:23684307

  16. Dual and opposing roles of the unfolded protein response regulated by IRE1alpha and XBP1 in proinsulin processing and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ann-Hwee; Heidtman, Keely; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S; Glimcher, Laurie H

    2011-05-24

    As a key regulator of the unfolded protein response, the transcription factor XBP1 activates genes in protein secretory pathways and is required for the development of certain secretory cells. To elucidate the function of XBP1 in pancreatic β-cells, we generated β-cell-specific XBP1 mutant mice. Xbp1(f/f);RIP-cre mice displayed modest hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance resulting from decreased insulin secretion from β-cells. Ablation of XBP1 markedly decreased the number of insulin granules in β-cells, impaired proinsulin processing, increased the serum proinsulin:insulin ratio, blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and inhibited cell proliferation. Notably, XBP1 deficiency not only compromised the endoplasmic reticulum stress response in β-cells but also caused constitutive hyperactivation of its upstream activator, IRE1α, which could degrade a subset of mRNAs encoding proinsulin-processing enzymes. Hence, the combined effects of XBP1 deficiency on the canonical unfolded protein response and its negative feedback activation of IRE1α caused β-cell dysfunction in XBP1 mutant mice. These results demonstrate that IRE1α has dual and opposing roles in β-cells, and that a precisely regulated feedback circuit involving IRE1α and its product XBP1s is required to achieve optimal insulin secretion and glucose control.

  17. Dual and opposing roles of the unfolded protein response regulated by IRE1α and XBP1 in proinsulin processing and insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ann-Hwee; Heidtman, Keely; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.; Glimcher, Laurie H.

    2011-01-01

    As a key regulator of the unfolded protein response, the transcription factor XBP1 activates genes in protein secretory pathways and is required for the development of certain secretory cells. To elucidate the function of XBP1 in pancreatic β-cells, we generated β-cell-specific XBP1 mutant mice. Xbp1f/f;RIP-cre mice displayed modest hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance resulting from decreased insulin secretion from β-cells. Ablation of XBP1 markedly decreased the number of insulin granules in β-cells, impaired proinsulin processing, increased the serum proinsulin:insulin ratio, blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and inhibited cell proliferation. Notably, XBP1 deficiency not only compromised the endoplasmic reticulum stress response in β-cells but also caused constitutive hyperactivation of its upstream activator, IRE1α, which could degrade a subset of mRNAs encoding proinsulin-processing enzymes. Hence, the combined effects of XBP1 deficiency on the canonical unfolded protein response and its negative feedback activation of IRE1α caused β-cell dysfunction in XBP1 mutant mice. These results demonstrate that IRE1α has dual and opposing roles in β-cells, and that a precisely regulated feedback circuit involving IRE1α and its product XBP1s is required to achieve optimal insulin secretion and glucose control. PMID:21555585

  18. HIV-1 Tat Induces Unfolded Protein Response and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Astrocytes and Causes Neurotoxicity through Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) Activation and Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan; He, Johnny J

    2016-10-21

    HIV-1 Tat is a major culprit for HIV/neuroAIDS. One of the consistent hallmarks of HIV/neuroAIDS is reactive astrocytes or astrocytosis, characterized by increased cytoplasmic accumulation of the intermediate filament glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). We have shown that that Tat induces GFAP expression in astrocytes and that GFAP activation is indispensable for astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. In this study, we showed that Tat expression or GFAP expression led to formation of GFAP aggregates and induction of unfolded protein response (UPR) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in astrocytes. In addition, we demonstrated that GFAP up-regulation and aggregation in astrocytes were necessary but also sufficient for UPR/ER stress induction in Tat-expressing astrocytes and for astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity. Importantly, we demonstrated that inhibition of Tat- or GFAP-induced UPR/ER stress by the chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate significantly alleviated astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity in vitro and in the brain of Tat-expressing mice. Taken together, these results show that HIV-1 Tat expression leads to UPR/ER stress in astrocytes, which in turn contributes to astrocyte-mediated Tat neurotoxicity, and raise the possibility of developing HIV/neuroAIDS therapeutics targeted at UPR/ER stress.

  19. Blunted activation of NF-{kappa}B and NF-{kappa}B-dependent gene expression by geranylgeranylacetone: Involvement of unfolded protein response

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Okamura, Maro; Yao, Jian; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Kitamura, Masanori

    2008-01-04

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an anti-ulcer agent, has anti-inflammatory potential against experimental colitis and ischemia-induced renal inflammation. However, molecular mechanisms involved in its anti-inflammatory effects are largely unknown. We found that, in glomerular mesangial cells, GGA blocked activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B and consequent induction of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) by inflammatory cytokines. It was inversely correlated with induction of unfolded protein response (UPR) evidenced by expression of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and suppression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive alkaline phosphatase. Various inducers of UPR including tunicamycin, thapsigargin, A23187, 2-deoxyglucose, dithiothreitol, and AB{sub 5} subtilase cytotoxin reproduced the suppressive effects of GGA. Furthermore, attenuation of UPR by stable transfection with GRP78 diminished the anti-inflammatory effects of GGA. These results disclosed a novel, UPR-dependent mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory potential of GGA.

  20. ATF6β-based fine-tuning of the unfolded protein response enhances therapeutic antibody productivity of Chinese Hamster Ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Lisa A; Strotbek, Michaela; Wenger, Till; Olayioye, Monilola A; Hausser, Angelika

    2017-02-06

    The dynamics of protein folding and secretion are key issues in improving the productivity and robustness of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) producer cells. High recombinant protein secretion in CHO producer clones triggers the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an intracellular response to the accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We previously reported that the human microRNA (miRNA) miR-1287 enhances productivity in IgG expressing CHO cells (CHO-IgG). Here, through next generation sequencing (NGS) we identified the activating transcription factor 6 beta (ATF6β), a repressor of the pro-survival and UPR promoting factor ATF6α, as a direct target gene of miR-1287 in CHO-IgG cells. We show that the transient depletion of ATF6β resulted in enhanced specific productivity comparable to that of miR-1287 expressing CHO-IgG cells. Strikingly, stable ATF6β knockdown in CHO-IgG cells significantly improved antibody titer and viable cell density under fed-batch conditions. This was associated with the elevated expression of the UPR genes glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78), homocysteine inducible ER protein with ubiquitin like domain 1 (Herpud1) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). We hence demonstrate that ATF6β-based cell line engineering is a promising strategy to improve the productivity of CHO producer cells by activating an optimally balanced UPR program. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Analyzing forced unfolding of protein tandems by ordered variates, 1: Independent unfolding times.

    PubMed

    Bura, E; Klimov, D K; Barsegov, V

    2007-08-15

    Most of the mechanically active proteins are organized into tandems of identical repeats, (D)N, or heterogeneous tandems, D1-D2-...-DN. In current atomic force microscopy experiments, conformational transitions of protein tandems can be accessed by employing constant stretching force f (force-clamp) and by analyzing the recorded unfolding times of individual domains. Analysis of unfolding data for homogeneous tandems relies on the assumption that unfolding times are independent and identically distributed, and involves inference of the (parent) probability density of unfolding times from the histogram of the combined unfolding times. This procedure cannot be used to describe tandems characterized by interdomain interactions, or heteregoneous tandems. In this article, we introduce an alternative approach that is based on recognizing that the observed data are ordered, i.e., first, second, third, etc., unfolding times. The approach is exemplified through the analysis of unfolding times for a computer model of the homogeneous and heterogeneous tandems, subjected to constant force. We show that, in the experimentally accessible range of stretching forces, the independent and identically distributed assumption may not hold. Specifically, the uncorrelated unfolding transitions of individual domains at lower force may become correlated (dependent) at elevated force levels. The proposed formalism can be used in atomic force microscopy experiments to infer the unfolding time distributions of individual domains from experimental histograms of ordered unfolding times, and it can be extended to analyzing protein tandems that exhibit interdomain interactions.

  2. Life-Span Extension by Axenic Dietary Restriction Is Independent of the Mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response and Mitohormesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huaihan; Rasulova, Madina; Vandemeulebroucke, Lieselot; Meagher, Lea; Vlaeminck, Caroline; Dhondt, Ineke; Braeckman, Bart P

    2017-03-17

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, a broad range of dietary restriction regimens extend life span to different degrees by separate or partially overlapping molecular pathways. One of these regimens, axenic dietary restriction, doubles the worm's life span but currently, almost nothing is known about the underlying molecular mechanism. Previous studies suggest that mitochondrial stress responses such as the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) or mitohormesis may play a vital role in axenic dietary restriction-induced longevity. Here, we provide solid evidence that axenic dietary restriction treatment specifically induces an UPRmt response in C elegans but this induction is not required for axenic dietary restriction-mediated longevity. We also show that reactive oxygen species-mediated mitohormesis is not involved in this phenotype. Hence, changes in mitochondrial physiology and induction of a mitochondrial stress response are not necessarily causal to large increases in life span.

  3. On the nature of the unfolded state: competing mechanisms in the unfolding of anhydrous protein ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteca, Gustavo A.; Tapia, O.

    2004-01-01

    Protein ions undergo folding-unfolding transitions unaided by water. Experiment and simulations suggest a critical protonation state below which the native fold might be metastable. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations of charged lysozyme to explore the underlying mechanism for the unfolding transition. Two processes are found to work simultaneously in vacuo: the unfolding bias associated with the repulsion between charged residues, and a bias induced by the unhindered rotation used in the simulation protocol. The latter emerges as a slow process that is always accessible to all lysozyme ions. The denatured state generated by centrifugal unfolding appears to be unique and independent of the total protein charge.

  4. Increasing temperature accelerates protein unfolding without changing the pathway of unfolding.

    PubMed

    Day, Ryan; Bennion, Brian J; Ham, Sihyun; Daggett, Valerie

    2002-09-06

    We have traditionally relied on extremely elevated temperatures (498K, 225 degrees C) to investigate the unfolding process of proteins within the timescale available to molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent. However, recent advances in computer hardware have allowed us to extend our thermal denaturation studies to much lower temperatures. Here we describe the results of simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 at seven temperatures, ranging from 298K to 498K. The simulation lengths vary from 94ns to 20ns, for a total simulation time of 344ns, or 0.34 micros. At 298K, the protein is very stable over the full 50ns simulation. At 348K, corresponding to the experimentally observed melting temperature of CI2, the protein unfolds over the first 25ns, explores partially unfolded conformations for 20ns, and then refolds over the last 35ns. Above its melting temperature, complete thermal denaturation occurs in an activated process. Early unfolding is characterized by sliding or breathing motions in the protein core, leading to an unfolding transition state with a weakened core and some loss of secondary structure. After the unfolding transition, the core contacts are rapidly lost as the protein passes on to the fully denatured ensemble. While the overall character and order of events in the unfolding process are well conserved across temperatures, there are substantial differences in the timescales over which these events take place. We conclude that 498K simulations are suitable for elucidating the details of protein unfolding at a minimum of computational expense.

  5. Urea impedes the hydrophobic collapse of partially unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Stumpe, Martin C; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2009-05-06

    Proteins are denatured in aqueous urea solution. The nature of the molecular driving forces has received substantial attention in the past, whereas the question how urea acts at different phases of unfolding is not yet well understood at the atomic level. In particular, it is unclear whether urea actively attacks folded proteins or instead stabilizes unfolded conformations. Here we investigated the effect of urea at different phases of unfolding by molecular dynamics simulations, and the behavior of partially unfolded states in both aqueous urea solution and in pure water was compared. Whereas the partially unfolded protein in water exhibited hydrophobic collapses as primary refolding events, it remained stable or even underwent further unfolding steps in aqueous urea solution. Further, initial unfolding steps of the folded protein were found not to be triggered by urea, but instead, stabilized. The underlying mechanism of this stabilization is a favorable interaction of urea with transiently exposed, less-polar residues and the protein backbone, thereby impeding back-reactions. Taken together, these results suggest that, quite generally, urea-induced protein unfolding proceeds primarily not by active attack. Rather, thermal fluctuations toward the unfolded state are stabilized and the hydrophobic collapse of partially unfolded proteins toward the native state is impeded. As a result, the equilibrium is shifted toward the unfolded state.

  6. The unfolded protein response is activated in disease-affected brain regions in progressive supranuclear palsy and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disorder pathologically characterized by intracellular tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau protein distributed throughout the neocortex, basal ganglia, and brainstem. A genome-wide association study identified EIF2AK3 as a risk factor for PSP. EIF2AK3 encodes PERK, part of the endoplasmic reticulum’s (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR). PERK is an ER membrane protein that senses unfolded protein accumulation within the ER lumen. Recently, several groups noted UPR activation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple system atrophy, and in the hippocampus and substantia nigra of PSP subjects. Here, we evaluate UPR PERK activation in the pons, medulla, midbrain, hippocampus, frontal cortex and cerebellum in subjects with PSP, AD, and in normal controls. Results We found UPR activation primarily in disease-affected brain regions in both disorders. In PSP, the UPR was primarily activated in the pons and medulla and to a much lesser extent in the hippocampus. In AD, the UPR was extensively activated in the hippocampus. We also observed UPR activation in the hippocampus of some elderly normal controls, severity of which positively correlated with both age and tau pathology but not with Aβ plaque burden. Finally, we evaluated EIF2AK3 coding variants that influence PERK activation. We show that a haplotype associated with increased PERK activation is genetically associated with increased PSP risk. Conclusions The UPR is activated in disease affected regions in PSP and the genetic evidence shows that this activation increases risk for PSP and is not a protective response. PMID:24252572

  7. Increase in gene-transcript levels as indicators of up-regulation of the unfolded protein response in spontaneous canine tumors.

    PubMed

    Elliot, Kirsten; MacDonald-Dickinson, Valerie; Linn, Kathleen; Simko, Elemir; Misra, Vikram

    2014-07-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved cellular response to stressors such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation, is associated with angiogenesis and metastasis in tumor cells. This article discusses a pilot study conducted to determine whether components of the UPR could be identified in spontaneous canine tumors and whether they were up-regulated within tumor tissue compared with adjacent normal tissue. Tissue samples of various spontaneous canine neoplasms were taken from 13 dogs shortly after surgical excision or euthanasia; control samples were taken from adjacent normal tissue. RNA purification and real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were done to measure the expression of 4 genes associated with the UPR (HERP, CHOP, GRP78, and XBP1s). The results indicated that UPR gene expression can be identified in spontaneous canine tumors and that the UPR is up-regulated, as indicated by significantly increased expression of CHOP and GRP78 within the tumor.

  8. Electrospray Ionization-Induced Protein Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Kitova, Elena N.; Johnson, Margaret A.; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth K. S.; Klassen, John S.

    2012-12-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) measurements were performed under a variety of solution conditions on a highly acidic sub-fragment (B3C) of the C-terminal carbohydrate-binding repeat region of Clostridium difficile toxin B, and two mutants (B4A and B4B) containing fewer acidic residues. ESI-MS measurements performed in negative ion mode on aqueous ammonium acetate solutions of B3C at low ionic strength ( I < 80 mM) revealed evidence, based on the measured charge state distribution, of protein unfolding. In contrast, no evidence of unfolding was detected from ESI-MS measurements made in positive ion mode at low I or in either mode at higher I. The results of proton nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism spectroscopy measurements and gel filtration chromatography performed on solutions of B3C under low and high I conditions suggest that the protein exists predominantly in a folded state in neutral aqueous solutions with I > 10 mM. The results of ESI-MS measurements performed on B3C in a series of solutions with high I at pH 5 to 9 rule out the possibility that the structural changes are related to ESI-induced changes in pH. It is proposed that unfolding of B3C, observed in negative mode for solutions with low I, occurs during the ESI process and arises due to Coulombic repulsion between the negatively charged residues and liquid/droplet surface charge. ESI-MS measurements performed in negative ion mode on B4A and B4B also reveal a shift to higher charge states at low I but the magnitude of the changes are smaller than observed for B3C.

  9. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver.

    PubMed

    Fusakio, Michael E; Willy, Jeffrey A; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T; Al Baghdadi, Rana J T; Adams, Christopher M; Anthony, Tracy G; Wek, Ronald C

    2016-05-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins-PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6-is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera.

  10. Translational and posttranslational regulation of XIAP by eIF2α and ATF4 promotes ER stress–induced cell death during the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Messah, Carissa; Han, Jaeseok; LaVail, Matthew M.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Lin, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein misfolding activates the unfolded protein response (UPR) to help cells cope with ER stress. If ER homeostasis is not restored, UPR promotes cell death. The mechanisms of UPR-mediated cell death are poorly understood. The PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) arm of the UPR is implicated in ER stress–induced cell death, in part through up-regulation of proapoptotic CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). Chop−/− cells are partially resistant to ER stress–induced cell death, and CHOP overexpression alone does not induce cell death. These findings suggest that additional mechanisms regulate cell death downstream of PERK. Here we find dramatic suppression of antiapoptosis XIAP proteins in response to chronic ER stress. We find that PERK down-regulates XIAP synthesis through eIF2α and promotes XIAP degradation through ATF4. Of interest, PERK's down-regulation of XIAP occurs independently of CHOP activity. Loss of XIAP leads to increased cell death, whereas XIAP overexpression significantly enhances resistance to ER stress–induced cell death, even in the absence of CHOP. Our findings define a novel signaling circuit between PERK and XIAP that operates in parallel with PERK to CHOP induction to influence cell survival during ER stress. We propose a “two-hit” model of ER stress–induced cell death involving concomitant CHOP up-regulation and XIAP down-regulation both induced by PERK. PMID:24623724

  11. Treatment with the HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir triggers the unfolded protein response and may overcome proteasome inhibitor resistance of multiple myeloma in combination with bortezomib: a phase I trial (SAKK 65/08)

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, Christoph; Kraus, Marianne; Joerger, Markus; Rosing, Hilde; Bader, Jürgen; Hitz, Felicitas; Berset, Catherine; Xyrafas, Alexandros; Hawle, Hanne; Berthod, Gregoire; Overkleeft, Hermann S.; Sessa, Christiana; Huitema, Alwin; Pabst, Thomas; von Moos, Roger; Hess, Dagmar; Mey, Ulrich J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Downregulation of the unfolded protein response mediates proteasome inhibitor resistance in multiple myeloma. The Human Immunodeficieny Virus protease inhibitor nelfinavir activates the unfolded protein response in vitro. We determined dose-limiting toxicity and recommended dose for phase II of nelfinavir in combination with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Twelve patients with advanced hematologic malignancies were treated with nelfinavir (2500–5000 mg/day p.o., days 1–14, 3+3 dose escalation) and bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2, days 1, 4, 8, 11; 21-day cycles). A run in phase with nelfinavir monotherapy allowed pharmakokinetic/pharmakodynamic assessment of nelfinavir in the presence or absence of concomittant bortezomib. End points included dose-limiting toxicity, activation of the unfolded protein response, proteasome activity, toxicity and response to trial treatment. Nelfinavir 2×2500 mg was the recommended phase II dose identified. Nelfinavir alone significantly up-regulated expression of proteins related to the unfolded protein response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and inhibited proteasome activity. Of 10 evaluable patients in the dose escalation cohort, 3 achieved a partial response, 4 stable disease for 2 cycles or more, while 3 had progressive disease as best response. In an exploratory extension cohort with 6 relapsed, bortezomib-refractory, lenalidomide-resistant myeloma patients treated at the recommended phase II dose, 3 reached a partial response, 2 a minor response, and one progressive disease. The combination of nelfinavir with bortezomib is safe and shows promising activity in advanced, bortezomib-refractory multiple myeloma. Induction of the unfolded protein response by nelfinavir may overcome the biological features of proteasome inhibitor resistance. PMID:26659919

  12. Sestrin2 is induced by glucose starvation via the unfolded protein response and protects cells from non-canonical necroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Boxiao; Parmigiani, Anita; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Archer, Kellie; Murphy, Anne N.; Budanov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Sestrin2 is a member of a family of stress responsive proteins, which controls cell viability via antioxidant activity and regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin protein kinase (mTOR). Sestrin2 is induced by different stress insults, which diminish ATP production and induce energetic stress in the cells. Glucose is a critical substrate for ATP production utilized via glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration as well as for glycosylation of newly synthesized proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi. Thus, glucose starvation causes both energy deficiency and activation of ER stress followed by the unfolding protein response (UPR). Here, we show that UPR induces Sestrin2 via ATF4 and NRF2 transcription factors and demonstrate that Sestrin2 protects cells from glucose starvation-induced cell death. Sestrin2 inactivation sensitizes cells to necroptotic cell death that is associated with a decline in ATP levels and can be suppressed by Necrostatin 7. We propose that Sestrin2 protects cells from glucose starvation-induced cell death via regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:26932729

  13. Autism-associated R451C mutation in neuroligin3 leads to activation of the unfolded protein response in a PC12 Tet-On inducible system

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrich, Lisa; Favaloro, Flores Lietta; Trobiani, Laura; Marchetti, Valentina; Patel, Vruti; Pascucci, Tiziana; Comoletti, Davide; Marciniak, Stefan J.; De Jaco, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Several forms of monogenic heritable autism spectrum disorders are associated with mutations in the neuroligin genes. The autism-linked substitution R451C in neuroligin3 induces local misfolding of its extracellular domain, causing partial retention in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) of expressing cells. We have generated a PC12 Tet-On cell model system with inducible expression of wild-type or R451C neuroligin3 to investigate whether there is activation of the UPR (unfolded protein response) as a result of misfolded protein retention. As a positive control for protein misfolding, we also expressed the mutant G221R neuroligin3, which is known to be completely retained within the ER. Our data show that overexpression of either R451C or G221R mutant proteins leads to the activation of all three signalling branches of the UPR downstream of the stress sensors ATF6 (activating transcription factor 6), IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) and PERK [PKR (dsRNA-dependent protein kinase)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase]. Each branch displayed different activation profiles that partially correlated with the degree of misfolding caused by each mutation. We also show that up-regulation of BiP (immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein) and CHOP [C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein)-homologous protein] was induced by both mutant proteins but not by wild-type neuroligin3, both in proliferative cells and cells differentiated to a neuron-like phenotype. Collectively, our data show that mutant R451C neuroligin3 activates the UPR in a novel cell model system, suggesting that this cellular response may have a role in monogenic forms of autism characterized by misfolding mutations. PMID:26621873

  14. Autism-associated R451C mutation in neuroligin3 leads to activation of the unfolded protein response in a PC12 Tet-On inducible system.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Lisa; Favaloro, Flores Lietta; Trobiani, Laura; Marchetti, Valentina; Patel, Vruti; Pascucci, Tiziana; Comoletti, Davide; Marciniak, Stefan J; De Jaco, Antonella

    2016-02-15

    Several forms of monogenic heritable autism spectrum disorders are associated with mutations in the neuroligin genes. The autism-linked substitution R451C in neuroligin3 induces local misfolding of its extracellular domain, causing partial retention in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) of expressing cells. We have generated a PC12 Tet-On cell model system with inducible expression of wild-type or R451C neuroligin3 to investigate whether there is activation of the UPR (unfolded protein response) as a result of misfolded protein retention. As a positive control for protein misfolding, we also expressed the mutant G221R neuroligin3, which is known to be completely retained within the ER. Our data show that overexpression of either R451C or G221R mutant proteins leads to the activation of all three signalling branches of the UPR downstream of the stress sensors ATF6 (activating transcription factor 6), IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) and PERK [PKR (dsRNA-dependent protein kinase)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase]. Each branch displayed different activation profiles that partially correlated with the degree of misfolding caused by each mutation. We also show that up-regulation of BiP (immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein) and CHOP [C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein)-homologous protein] was induced by both mutant proteins but not by wild-type neuroligin3, both in proliferative cells and cells differentiated to a neuron-like phenotype. Collectively, our data show that mutant R451C neuroligin3 activates the UPR in a novel cell model system, suggesting that this cellular response may have a role in monogenic forms of autism characterized by misfolding mutations.

  15. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Fusakio, Michael E.; Willy, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T.; Al Baghdadi, Rana J. T.; Adams, Christopher M.; Anthony, Tracy G.; Wek, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins—PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6—is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera. PMID:26960794

  16. Discovery of a novel unfolded protein response phenotype of cancer stem/progenitor cells from the bone marrow of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bartkowiak, Kai; Effenberger, Katharina E; Harder, Sönke; Andreas, Antje; Buck, Friedrich; Peter-Katalinic, Jasna; Pantel, Klaus; Brandt, Burkhard H

    2010-06-04

    Metastases arise from disseminated tumor cells (DTC) that colonize secondary organs. However, DTC survival strategies to start metastatic outgrowth are unclear. The hostile (hypoxic, hypoglycemic) microenvironmental conditions of the bone marrow serve as an ideal model environment for investigation of DTC survival strategies under environmental stress. We investigated the breast cancer DTC cell line BC-M1 established from the bone marrow of a cancer patient by 2-D DIGE and MS analysis. We observed specific overexpression of the unfolded protein response (UPR) proteins Grp78, Grp94, and protein disulfide-isomerase in breast, lung, and prostate cancer DTC cell lines from the bone marrow. The UPR contributes to survival under adverse environmental conditions including chemotherapy. We show in cellular models that Grp78 expression of the UPR is regulated by tyrosine 1248 of ErbB-2. The breast cancer DTC cell lines shared stem/progenitor cell cancer phenotypes (CD44(high)/CD24(low)). Immunocytochemical staining of bone marrow samples from breast cancer patients confirmed in situ high expression of Grp78 and Grp94 in DTC of breast cancer patients, indicating the potential of both proteins as novel markers for DTC detection. Our results suggest the presence of a previously not recognized stress resistant DTC population that combines stem/progenitor attributes with an UPR phenotype.

  17. The Graded Unfolding Model: A Unidimensional Item Response Model for Unfolding Graded Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Laughlin, James E.

    Binary or graded disagree-agree responses to attitude items are often collected for the purpose of attitude measurement. Although such data are sometimes analyzed with cumulative measurement models, recent investigations suggest that unfolding models are more appropriate (J. S. Roberts, 1995; W. H. Van Schuur and H. A. L. Kiers, 1994). Advances in…

  18. A Mouse Model Suggests Two Mechanisms for Thyroid Alterations in Infantile Cystinosis: Decreased Thyroglobulin Synthesis Due to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/Unfolded Protein Response and Impaired Lysosomal Processing

    PubMed Central

    Gaide Chevronnay, H. P.; Janssens, V.; Van Der Smissen, P.; Liao, X. H.; Abid, Y.; Nevo, N.; Antignac, C.; Refetoff, S.; Cherqui, S.; Pierreux, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are released from thyroglobulin (Tg) in lysosomes, which are impaired in infantile/nephropathic cystinosis. Cystinosis is a lysosomal cystine storage disease due to defective cystine exporter, cystinosin. Cystinotic children develop subclinical and then overt hypothyroidism. Why hypothyroidism is the most frequent and earliest endocrine complication of cystinosis is unknown. We here defined early alterations in Ctns−/− mice thyroid and identified subcellular and molecular mechanisms. At 9 months, T4 and T3 plasma levels were normal and TSH was moderately increased (∼4-fold). By histology, hyperplasia and hypertrophy of most follicles preceded colloid exhaustion. Increased immunolabeling for thyrocyte proliferation and apoptotic shedding indicated accelerated cell turnover. Electron microscopy revealed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dilation, apical lamellipodia indicating macropinocytic colloid uptake, and lysosomal cystine crystals. Tg accumulation in dilated ER contrasted with mRNA down-regulation. Increased expression of ER chaperones, glucose-regulated protein of 78 kDa and protein disulfide isomerase, associated with alternative X-box binding protein-1 splicing, revealed unfolded protein response (UPR) activation by ER stress. Decreased Tg mRNA and ER stress suggested reduced Tg synthesis. Coordinated increase of UPR markers, activating transcription factor-4 and C/EBP homologous protein, linked ER stress to apoptosis. Hormonogenic cathepsins were not altered, but lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 immunolabeling disclosed enlarged vesicles containing iodo-Tg and impaired lysosomal fusion. Isopycnic fractionation showed iodo-Tg accumulation in denser lysosomes, suggesting defective lysosomal processing and hormone release. In conclusion, Ctns−/− mice showed the following alterations: 1) compensated primary hypothyroidism and accelerated thyrocyte turnover; 2) impaired Tg production linked to ER stress/UPR response; and 3) altered

  19. Protein unfolding pathways explored through molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Daggett, V; Levitt, M

    1993-07-20

    Herein we describe the results of molecular dynamics simulations of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) in solution at a variety of temperatures both with and without disulfide bonds. The reduced form of the protein unfolded at high temperature to an ensemble of conformations with all the properties of the molten globule state. In this account we outline the structural details of the actual unfolding process between the native and molten globule states. The first steps of unfolding involved expansion of the protein, which disrupted packing interactions. The solvent-accessible surface area also quickly increased. The unfolding was localized mostly to the turn and loop regions of the molecule, while leaving the secondary structure intact. Then, there was more gradual unfolding of the secondary structure and non-native turns became prevalent. This same trajectory was continued and more drastic unfolding occurred that resulted in a relatively compact state devoid of stable secondary structure.

  20. Single-prolonged stress activates the transcription factor ATF6α branch of the unfolded protein response in rat neurons of dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Juhua; Han, Fang; Shi, Yuxiu

    2015-01-01

    In our previous studies, we have found that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), however, the activation of ER stress sensors in PTSD remains unclear. ATF6 alpha (ATF6α) is an ER-membrane-bound transcription factor and functions as a critical sensor and regulator of ER stress in mammalian cells. The goal of this study is to detect whether there is activation of the transcription factor ATF6α branch of the unfolded protein response in the dorsal raphe nucleus neurons of the rats exposed to single-prolonged stress (SPS), which is a model employed extensively in PTSD study. Our results have demonstrated that SPS activated the ER transmembrane protein ATF6α via its cleavage; and induced the up-regulation of the downstream targets of ATF6α, the mRNA of XBP1 and GRP94. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the relationship between the ATF6α pathways and PTSD, and our results show that SPS activates the ATF6α branch of the ER stress response, which may be contributed to the pathogenesis of PTSD.

  1. Modulation of the Unfolded Protein Response by Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid Counteracts Apoptotic Cell Death and Fibrosis in a Mouse Model for Secondary Biliary Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Paridaens, Annelies; Raevens, Sarah; Devisscher, Lindsey; Bogaerts, Eliene; Verhelst, Xavier; Hoorens, Anne; van Vlierberghe, Hans; Van Grunsven, Leo A.; Geerts, Anja; Colle, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    The role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in cholestatic liver disease and fibrosis is not fully unraveled. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a hydrophilic bile acid, has been shown to reduce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and counteract apoptosis in different pathologies. We aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of TUDCA in experimental secondary biliary liver fibrosis in mice, induced by common bile duct ligation. The kinetics of the hepatic UPR and apoptosis during the development of biliary fibrosis was studied by measuring markers at six different timepoints post-surgery by qPCR and Western blot. Next, we investigated the therapeutic potential of TUDCA, 10 mg/kg/day in drinking water, on liver damage (AST/ALT levels) and fibrosis (Sirius red-staining), in both a preventive and therapeutic setting. Common bile duct ligation resulted in the increased protein expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) at all timepoints, along with upregulation of pro-apoptotic caspase 3 and 12, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 1A (TNFRsf1a) and Fas-Associated protein with Death Domain (FADD) expression. Treatment with TUDCA led to a significant reduction of liver fibrosis, accompanied by a slight reduction of liver damage, decreased hepatic protein expression of CHOP and reduced gene and protein expression of pro-apoptotic markers. These data indicate that TUDCA exerts a beneficial effect on liver fibrosis in a model of cholestatic liver disease, and suggest that this effect might, at least in part, be attributed to decreased hepatic UPR signaling and apoptotic cell death. PMID:28117681

  2. Ligand binding to a high-energy partially unfolded protein.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Joseph R; Park, Chiwook

    2015-01-01

    The conformational energy landscape of a protein determines populations of all possible conformations of the protein and also determines the kinetics of the conversion between the conformations. Interaction with ligands influences the conformational energy landscapes of proteins and shifts populations of proteins in different conformational states. To investigate the effect of ligand binding on partial unfolding of a protein, we use Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and its functional ligand NADP(+) as a model system. We previously identified a partially unfolded form of DHFR that is populated under native conditions. In this report, we determined the free energy for partial unfolding of DHFR at varying concentrations of NADP(+) and found that NADP(+) binds to the partially unfolded form as well as the native form. DHFR unfolds partially without releasing the ligand, though the binding affinity for NADP(+) is diminished upon partial unfolding. Based on known crystallographic structures of NADP(+) -bound DHFR and the model of the partially unfolded protein we previously determined, we propose that the adenosine-binding domain of DHFR remains folded in the partially unfolded form and interacts with the adenosine moiety of NADP(+) . Our result demonstrates that ligand binding may affect the conformational free energy of not only native forms but also high-energy non-native forms.

  3. Deregulated unfolded protein response in chronic wounds of diabetic ob/ob mice: a potential connection to inflammatory and angiogenic disorders in diabetes-impaired wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Christoph; Goren, Itamar; Linke, Andreas; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Frank, Stefan

    2014-03-28

    Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) represents an important metabolic disorder, firmly connected to obesity and low level of chronic inflammation caused by deregulation of fat metabolism. The convergence of chronic inflammatory signals and nutrient overloading at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leads to activation of ER-specific stress responses, the unfolded protein response (UPR). As obesity and T2D are often associated with impaired wound healing, we investigated the role of UPR in the pathologic of diabetic-impaired cutaneuos wound healing. We determined the expression patterns of the three UPR branches during normal and diabetes-impaired skin repair. In healthy and diabetic mice, injury led to a strong induction of BiP (BiP/Grp78), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and splicing of X-box-binding protein (XBP)1. Diabetic-impaired wounds showed gross and sustained induction of UPR associated with increased expression of the pro-inflammatory chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)2 as compared to normal healing wounds. In vitro, treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages with tunicamycin, and subsequently stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon (IFN)-γ enhances MIP2 mRNA und protein expression compared to proinflammatory stimulation alone. However, LPS/IFNγ induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production was blunted by tunicamycin induced-ER stress. Hence, UPR is activated following skin injury, and functionally connected to the production of proinflammatory mediators. In addition, prolongation of UPR in diabetic non-healing wounds aggravates ER stress and weakens the angiogenic phenotype of wound macrophages.

  4. Absence of melatonin induces night-time hepatic insulin resistance and increased gluconeogenesis due to stimulation of nocturnal unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Tatiane C; Lellis-Santos, Camilo; Jesus, Daniel S; Taneda, Marco; Rodrigues, Sandra C; Amaral, Fernanda G; Lopes, Ana Maria S; Cipolla-Neto, José; Bordin, Silvana; Anhê, Gabriel F

    2011-04-01

    It is known that the circadian rhythm in hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression (a limiting catalytic step of gluconeogenesis) and hepatic glucose production is maintained by both daily oscillation in autonomic inputs to the liver and night feeding behavior. However, increased glycemia and reduced melatonin (Mel) levels have been recently shown to coexist in diabetic patients at the end of the night period. In parallel, pinealectomy (PINX) is known to cause glucose intolerance with increased basal glycemia exclusively at the end of the night. The mechanisms that underlie this metabolic feature are not completely understood. Here, we demonstrate that PINX rats show night-time hepatic insulin resistance characterized by reduced insulin-stimulated RAC-α serine/threonine-protein kinase phosphorylation and increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression. In addition, PINX rats display increased conversion of pyruvate into glucose at the end of the night. The regulatory mechanism suggests the participation of unfolded protein response (UPR), because PINX induces night-time increase in activating transcription factor 6 expression and prompts a circadian fashion of immunoglobulin heavy chain-binding protein, activating transcription factor 4, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein expression with Zenith values at the dark period. PINX also caused a night-time increase in Tribble 3 and regulatory-associated protein of mammalian target of rapamycin; both were reduced in liver of PINX rats treated with Mel. Treatment of PINX rats with 4-phenyl butyric acid, an inhibitor of UPR, restored night-time hepatic insulin sensitivity and abrogated gluconeogenesis in PINX rats. Altogether, the present data show that a circadian oscillation of UPR occurs in the liver due to the absence of Mel. The nocturnal UPR activation is related with night-time hepatic insulin resistance and increased gluconeogenesis in PINX rats.

  5. Muscadine Grape Skin Extract Induces an Unfolded Protein Response-Mediated Autophagy in Prostate Cancer Cells: A TMT-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Liza J.; Rivera, Mariela; Hawsawi, Ohuod; Zou, Jin; Hudson, Tamaro; Wang, Guangdi; Zhang, Qiang; Cubano, Luis; Boukli, Nawal; Odero-Marah, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Muscadine grape skin extract (MSKE) is derived from muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia), a common red grape used to produce red wine. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates the unfolded protein response (UPR) that serves as a survival mechanism to relieve ER stress and restore ER homeostasis. However, when persistent, ER stress can alter the cytoprotective functions of the UPR to promote autophagy and cell death. Although MSKE has been documented to induce apoptosis, it has not been linked to ER stress/UPR/autophagy. We hypothesized that MSKE may induce a severe ER stress response-mediated autophagy leading to apoptosis. As a model, we treated C4-2 prostate cancer cells with MSKE and performed a quantitative Tandem Mass Tag Isobaric Labeling proteomic analysis. ER stress response, autophagy and apoptosis were analyzed by western blot, acridine orange and TUNEL/Annexin V staining, respectively. Quantitative proteomics analysis indicated that ER stress response proteins, such as GRP78 were greatly elevated following treatment with MSKE. The up-regulation of pro-apoptotic markers PARP, caspase-12, cleaved caspase-3, -7, BAX and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic marker BCL2 was confirmed by Western blot analysis and apoptosis was visualized by increased TUNEL/Annexin V staining upon MSKE treatment. Moreover, increased acridine orange, and LC3B staining was detected in MSKE-treated cells, suggesting an ER stress/autophagy response. Finally, MSKE-mediated autophagy and apoptosis was antagonized by co-treatment with chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor. Our results indicate that MSKE can elicit an UPR that can eventually lead to apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. PMID:27755556

  6. Small-Molecule RA-9 Inhibits Proteasome-Associated DUBs and Ovarian Cancer in Vitro and in Vivo Via Exacerbating Unfolded Protein Responses

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Kathleen; Anchoori, Ravi; Iizuka, Yoshie; Meints, Joyce; MacNeill, Lauren; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Lee, Michael K.; Roden, Richard BS; Bazzaro, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies. Carcinogenic progression is accompanied by up-regulation of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation machinery as a mechanism to compensate with elevated endogenous proteotoxic stress. Recent studies support the notion that deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are essential factors in proteolytic degradation and that their aberrant activity is linked to cancer progression and chemoresistance. Thus, DUBs are an attractive therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. Experimental Design The potency and selectivity of RA-9 inhibitor for proteasome-associated DUBs was determined in ovarian cancer cell lines and primary cells. The anticancer activity of RA-9 and its mechanism of action was evaluated in multiple cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo in immunodeficient mice bearing an intra-peritoneal ES-2 xenograft model of human ovarian cancer. Results Here we report the characterization of RA-9 as a small-molecule inhibitor of proteasome-associated DUBs. Treatment with RA-9 selectively induces onset of apoptosis, in ovarian cancer cell lines and primary cultures derived from donors. Loss of cell viability following RA-9 exposure is associated with an Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) as mechanism to compensate for unsustainable levels of proteotoxic stress. In vivo treatment with RA-9 retards tumor growth, increases overall survival and was well tolerated by the host. Conclusions Our preclinical studies support further evaluation of RA-9 as an ovarian cancer therapeutic. PMID:24727327

  7. Unfolded protein response regulates yeast small GTPase Arl1p activation at late Golgi via phosphorylation of Arf GEF Syt1p

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jia-Wei; Tang, Pei-Hua; Wang, I-Hao; Liu, Chia-Lun; Chen, Wen-Hui; Tsai, Pei-Chin; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Jung; Yu, Chia-Jung

    2016-01-01

    ADP ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are key regulators of membrane traffic at the Golgi complex. In yeast, Arf guanine nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) Syt1p activates Arf-like protein Arl1p, which was accompanied by accumulation of golgin Imh1p at late Golgi, but whether and how this function of Syt1p is regulated remains unclear. Here, we report that the inositol-requiring kinase 1 (Ire1p)-mediated unfolded protein response (UPR) modulated Arl1p activation at late Golgi. Arl1p activation was dependent on both kinase and endo-RNase activities of Ire1p. Moreover, constitutively active transcription factor Hac1p restored the Golgi localization of Arl1p and Imh1p in IRE1-deleted cells. Elucidating the mechanism of Ire1p–Hac1p axis actions, we found that it regulated phosphorylation of Syt1p, which enhances Arl1p activation, recruitment of Imh1p to the Golgi, and Syt1p interaction with Arl1p. Consistent with these findings, the induction of UPR by tunicamycin treatment increases phosphorylation of Syt1p, resulting in Arl1p activation. Thus, these findings clarify how the UPR influences the roles of Syt1p, Arl1p, and Imh1p in Golgi transport. PMID:26966233

  8. Unfolded-protein response-associated stabilization of p27(Cdkn1b) interferes with lens fiber cell denucleation, leading to cataract.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Lei; Whitcomb, Elizabeth A; Jiang, Shuhong; Chang, Min-Lee; Gu, Yumei; Duncan, Melinda K; Cvekl, Ales; Wang, Wei-Lin; Limi, Saima; Reneker, Lixing W; Shang, Fu; Du, Linfang; Taylor, Allen

    2016-03-01

    Failure of lens fiber cell denucleation (LFCD) is associated with congenital cataracts, but the pathobiology awaits elucidation. Recent work has suggested that mechanisms that direct the unidirectional process of LFCD are analogous to the cyclic processes associated with mitosis. We found that lens-specific mutations that elicit an unfolded-protein response (UPR) in vivo accumulate p27(Cdkn1b), show cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-1 inhibition, retain their LFC nuclei, and are cataractous. Although a UPR was not detected in lenses expressing K6W-Ub, they also accumulated p27 and showed failed LFCD. Induction of a UPR in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) also induced accumulation of p27 associated with decreased levels of S-phase kinase-associated protein (Skp)-2, a ubiquitin ligase that regulates mitosis. These cells also showed decreased lamin A/C phosphorylation and metaphase arrest. The suppression of lamin A/C phosphorylation and metaphase transition induced by the UPR was rescued by knockdown of p27. Taken together, these data indicate that accumulation of p27, whether related to the UPR or not, prevents the phosphorylation of lamin A/C and LFCD in maturing LFCs in vivo, as well as in dividing HLECs. The former leads to cataract and the latter to metaphase arrest. These results suggest that accumulation of p27 is a common mechanism underlying retention of LFC nuclei.

  9. Oral glucosamine sulfate supplementation does not induce endoplasmic reticulum stress or activate the unfolded protein response in circulating leukocytes of human subjects.

    PubMed

    McAlpine, Cameron S; Beriault, Daniel R; Behdinan, Tina; Shi, Yuanyuan; Werstuck, Geoff H

    2014-04-01

    Glucosamine sulfate is a dietary supplement that is marketed as a treatment for osteoarthritis. Recent evidence from animal and cell culture models have suggested that glucosamine treatment can promote the misfolding of proteins and the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). We investigated whether glucosamine sulfate supplementation activates the UPR in circulating leukocytes of human subjects. Cultured Thp1 human monocytes were exposed to increasing concentrations of glucosamine (0, 0.25, 1.0, 4.0 mmol · L(-1)) for 18 h. We observed a dose-dependent increase in intracellular glucosamine levels as well as the activation of UPR. To test the effect of glucosamine sulfate supplementation in humans, 14 healthy human subjects took 1500 mg · day(-1) glucosamine sulfate for 14 days. Metabolic parameters and blood samples were collected before and after supplementation. In humans, glucosamine sulfate supplementation did not alter metabolic parameters including lipid levels and glucose tolerance. Further, glucosamine sulfate supplementation did not affect intracellular glucosamine levels or activate the UPR in the leukocytes of human subjects. Our results indicate that in healthy human subjects, the recommended dose of glucosamine sulfate (1500 mg · day(-1)) for 14 days does not significantly alter intracellular glucosamine levels and does not activate the UPR in circulating leukocytes.

  10. Bis(maltolato)oxovanadium(IV) (BMOV) Attenuates Apoptosis in High Glucose-Treated Cardiac Cells and Diabetic Rat Hearts by Regulating the Unfolded Protein Responses (UPRs).

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiao-Qiang; Piao, Mei-Hua; Li, Ying; Xie, Lin; Liu, Ya

    2016-10-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS)-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) and the subsequent cell deaths are essential steps in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), a main cause of diabetics' morbidity and mortalities. The bis(maltolato)oxovanadium(IV) (BMOV), a potent oral vanadium complex with anti-diabetic properties and insulin-mimicking effects, was shown to improve cardiac dysfunctions in diabetic models. Here, we examined the effects of BMOV on UPR pathway protein expression and apoptotic cell deaths in both high glucose-treated cardiac H9C2 cells and in the hearts of diabetic rats. We show that in both the high glucose-treated cardiac cells and in the hearts of streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats, there was an overall activation of the UPR signaling, including both apoptotic (e.g., the cascades of PERK/EIf2α/ATF4/CHOP and of IRE1/caspase 12/caspase 3) and pro-survival (GRP78 and XBP1) signaling. A high amount of apoptotic cell deaths was also detected in both diabetic conditions. The administration of BMOV suppressed both the apoptotic and pro-survival UPR signaling and significantly attenuated apoptotic cell deaths in both conditions. The overall suppression of UPR signaling by BMOV suggests that the drug protects diabetic cardiomyopathy by counteracting reactive oxygen species (ROS) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Our findings lend support to promote the use of BMOV in the treatment of diabetic heart diseases.

  11. Ask1 gene deletion blocks maternal diabetes-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress in the developing embryo by disrupting the unfolded protein response signalosome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Wu, Yanqing; Gu, Hui; Reece, E Albert; Fang, Shengyun; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat; Aberdeen, Graham; Yang, Peixin

    2015-03-01

    Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is activated by various stresses. The link between ASK1 activation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, two causal events in diabetic embryopathy, has not been determined. We sought to investigate whether ASK1 is involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) that leads to ER stress. Deleting Ask1 abrogated diabetes-induced UPR by suppressing phosphorylation of inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α), and double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) blocked the mitochondrial translocation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 members and ER stress. ASK1 participated in the IRE1α signalosome, and removing ASK1 abrogated the proapoptotic kinase activity of IRE1α. Ask1 deletion suppressed diabetes-induced IRE1α endoriboneclease activities, which led to X-box binding protein 1 mRNA cleavage, an ER stress marker, decreased expression of microRNAs, and increased expression of a miR-17 target, thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip), a thioredoxin binding protein, which enhanced ASK1 activation by disrupting the thioredoxin-ASK1 complexes. ASK1 is essential for the assembly and function of the IRE1α signalosome, which forms a positive feedback loop with ASK1 through Txnip. ASK1 knockdown in C17.2 neural stem cells diminished high glucose- or tunicamycin-induced IRE1α activation, which further supports our hypothesis that ASK1 plays a causal role in diabetes-induced ER stress and apoptosis.

  12. Ask1 Gene Deletion Blocks Maternal Diabetes–Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Developing Embryo by Disrupting the Unfolded Protein Response Signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Wu, Yanqing; Gu, Hui; Reece, E. Albert; Fang, Shengyun; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat; Aberdeen, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis signal–regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is activated by various stresses. The link between ASK1 activation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, two causal events in diabetic embryopathy, has not been determined. We sought to investigate whether ASK1 is involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) that leads to ER stress. Deleting Ask1 abrogated diabetes-induced UPR by suppressing phosphorylation of inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α), and double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) blocked the mitochondrial translocation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 members and ER stress. ASK1 participated in the IRE1α signalosome, and removing ASK1 abrogated the proapoptotic kinase activity of IRE1α. Ask1 deletion suppressed diabetes-induced IRE1α endoriboneclease activities, which led to X-box binding protein 1 mRNA cleavage, an ER stress marker, decreased expression of microRNAs, and increased expression of a miR-17 target, thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip), a thioredoxin binding protein, which enhanced ASK1 activation by disrupting the thioredoxin-ASK1 complexes. ASK1 is essential for the assembly and function of the IRE1α signalosome, which forms a positive feedback loop with ASK1 through Txnip. ASK1 knockdown in C17.2 neural stem cells diminished high glucose– or tunicamycin-induced IRE1α activation, which further supports our hypothesis that ASK1 plays a causal role in diabetes-induced ER stress and apoptosis. PMID:25249581

  13. Docosahexaenoic acid-induced unfolded protein response, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells are triggered by Ca2+-dependent induction of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Crnkovic, Slaven; Riederer, Monika; Lechleitner, Margarete; Hallström, Seth; Malli, Roland; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Lindenmann, Jörg; Popper, Helmut; Olschewski, Horst; Olschewski, Andrea; Frank, Saša

    2012-01-01

    Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells is a characteristic of pathological vascular remodeling and represents a significant therapeutic challenge in several cardiovascular diseases. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a member of the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, was shown to inhibit proliferation of numerous cell types, implicating several different mechanisms. In this study we examined the molecular events underlying the inhibitory effects of DHA on proliferation of primary human smooth muscle cells isolated from small pulmonary artery (hPASMCs). DHA concentration-dependently inhibited hPASMC proliferation, induced G1 cell cycle arrest, and decreased cyclin D1 protein expression. DHA activated the unfolded protein response (UPR), evidenced by increased mRNA expression of HSPA5, increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, and splicing of X-box binding protein 1. DHA altered cellular lipid composition and led to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. DHA-induced ROS were dependent on both intracellular Ca2+ release and entry of extracellular Ca2+. Overall cellular ROS and mitochondrial ROS were decreased by RU360, a specific inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. DHA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction was evidenced by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased cellular ATP content. DHA triggered apoptosis as found by increased numbers of cleaved caspase-3- and TUNEL-positive cells. The free radical scavenger Tempol counteracted DHA-induced ROS, cell cycle arrest, induction of UPR, and apoptosis. We conclude that Ca2+-dependent oxidative stress is the central and initial event responsible for induction of UPR, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in DHA-treated hPASMCs. PMID:22391221

  14. The bZIP Transcription Factor HAC-1 Is Involved in the Unfolded Protein Response and Is Necessary for Growth on Cellulose in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Larrondo, Luis F.

    2015-01-01

    High protein secretion capacity in filamentous fungi requires an extremely efficient system for protein synthesis, folding and transport. When the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is exceeded, a pathway known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) is triggered, allowing cells to mitigate and cope with this stress. In yeast, this pathway relies on the transcription factor Hac1, which mediates the up-regulation of several genes required under these stressful conditions. In this work, we identified and characterized the ortholog of the yeast HAC1 gene in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We show that its mRNA undergoes an ER stress-dependent splicing reaction, which in N. crassa removes a 23 nt intron and leads to a change in the open reading frame. By disrupting the N. crassa hac-1 gene, we determined it to be crucial for activating UPR and for proper growth in the presence of ER stress-inducing chemical agents. Neurospora is naturally found growing on dead plant material, composed primarily by lignocellulose, and is a model organism for the study of plant cell wall deconstruction. Notably, we found that growth on cellulose, a substrate that requires secretion of numerous enzymes, imposes major demands on ER function and is dramatically impaired in the absence of hac-1, thus broadening the range of physiological functions of the UPR in filamentous fungi. Growth on hemicellulose however, another carbon source that necessitates the secretion of various enzymes for its deconstruction, is not impaired in the mutant nor is the amount of proteins secreted on this substrate, suggesting that secretion, as a whole, is unaltered in the absence of hac-1. The characterization of this signaling pathway in N. crassa will help in the study of plant cell wall deconstruction by fungi and its manipulation may result in important industrial biotechnological applications. PMID:26132395

  15. Accumulation of mutant alpha1-antitrypsin Z in the endoplasmic reticulum activates caspases-4 and -12, NFkappaB, and BAP31 but not the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Hidvegi, Tunda; Schmidt, Bela Z; Hale, Pamela; Perlmutter, David H

    2005-11-25

    In alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) deficiency, a polymerogenic mutant form of the secretory glycoprotein alpha1AT, alpha1ATZ, is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of liver cells. It is not yet known how this results in liver injury in a subgroup of deficient individuals and how the remainder of deficient individuals escapes liver disease. One possible explanation is that the "susceptible" subgroup is unable to mount the appropriate protective cellular responses. Here we examined the effect of mutant alpha1ATZ on several potential protective signaling pathways by using cell lines with inducible expression of mutant alpha1AT as well as liver from transgenic mice with liver-specific inducible expression of mutant alpha1AT. The results show that ER retention of polymerogenic mutant alpha1ATZ does not result in an unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR can be induced in the presence of alpha1ATZ by tunicamycin excluding the possibility that the pathway has been disabled. In striking contrast, ER retention of nonpolymerogenic alpha1AT mutants does induce the UPR. These results indicate that the machinery responsible for activation of the UPR can distinguish the physical characteristics of proteins that accumulate in the ER in such a way that it can respond to misfolded but not relatively ordered polymeric structures. Accumulation of mutant alpha1ATZ does activate specific signaling pathways, including caspase-12 in mouse, caspase-4 in human, NFkappaB, and BAP31, a profile that was distinct from that activated by nonpolymerogenic alpha1AT mutants.

  16. Unfolding dynamics of the protein ubiquitin: insight from simulation.

    PubMed

    Dastidar, Shubhra Ghosh; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2005-11-01

    The temperature-induced unfolding pathway of ubiquitin has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulation at four different temperatures. It has been observed that the sequences of the unfolding events are same at all the temperatures. However, the time scale of the dynamics at different temperatures are different. The transition states at various temperatures also possess similar secondary structural elements. The intermediate conformations visited by the protein at different temperatures can help determination of the transition states. The well known " state" of ubiquitin, hitherto found to be stable only in methanol water mixture, have been observed to be a common transient intermediate conformation in the unfolding path of the protein in water. Our observation about the similarities of the unfolding process at different temperatures strongly recommend for a defined pathway for the unfolding process.

  17. The Malat1 long non-coding RNA is upregulated by signalling through the PERK axis of unfolded protein response during flavivirus infection.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Vrati, Sudhanshu

    2015-12-04

    Flavivirus infection causes host cell death by initiation of an unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR is initiated following activation of three ER-membrane resident sensors, PERK, IRE1α and ATF6, which are otherwise kept inactive through association with the ER-chaperone GRP78. Activation precedes cellular and molecular changes that act to restore homeostasis but might eventually initiate apoptosis. These changes involve influencing function of multiple genes by either transcriptional or post-transcriptional or post-translational mechanisms. Transcriptional control includes expression of transcription factor cascades, which influence cognate gene expression. Malat1 is a long non-coding RNA which is over-expressed in many human oncogenic tissues and regulates cell cycle and survival. In this report, for the first time we show activation of Malat1 following infection by two flaviviruses, both of which activate the UPR in host cells. The temporal kinetics of expression was restricted to later time points. Further, Malat1 was also activated by pharmacological inducer of UPR, to a similar degree. Using drugs that specifically inhibit or activate the PERK or IRE1α sensors, we demonstrate that signalling through the PERK axis activates this expression, through a transcriptional mechanism. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an UPR pathway regulating the expression of an lncRNA.

  18. Role of the unfolded protein response pathway in regulation of INO1 and in the sec14 bypass mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hak J; Jones, Elizabeth W; Henry, Susan A

    2002-01-01

    INO1, encoding inositol 1-phosphate synthase, is the most highly regulated of a class of genes containing the repeated element, UAS(INO), in their promoters. Transcription of UAS(INO)-containing genes is modulated by the availability of exogenous inositol and by signals generated by alteration of phospholipid metabolism. The unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway also is involved in INO1 expression and the ire1Delta and hac1Delta mutants are inositol auxotrophs. We examined the role of the UPR in transmitting a signal generated in response to inositol deprivation and to alteration of phospholipid biosynthesis created in the sec14(ts) cki1Delta genetic background. We report that the UPR is required for sustained high-level INO1 expression in wild-type strains, but not for transient derepression in response to inositol deprivation. Moreover, the UPR is not required for expression or regulation of INO1 in response to the change in lipid metabolism that occurs in the sec14(ts) cki1Delta genetic background. Thus, the UPR signal transduction pathway is not involved directly in transcriptional regulation of INO1 and other UAS(INO)-containing genes. However, we discovered that inactivation of Sec14p leads to activation of the UPR, and that sec14 cki1 strains exhibit defective vacuolar morphology, suggesting that the mechanism by which the cki1Delta mutation suppresses the growth and secretory defect of sec14 does not fully restore wild-type morphology. Finally, synthetic lethality involving sec14 and UPR mutations suggests that the UPR plays an essential role in survival of sec14 cki1 strains. PMID:12242221

  19. The aqueous extract of Glycyrrhiza inflata can upregulate unfolded protein response-mediated chaperones to reduce tau misfolding in cell models of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Chen, I-Cheng; Lin, Hsuan-Yuan; Chen, Hsuan-Chiang; Lin, Chih-Hsin; Lin, Te-Hsien; Weng, Yu-Ting; Chao, Chih-Ying; Wu, Yih-Ru; Lin, Jung-Yaw; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen; Chen, Chiung-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and several neurodegenerative disorders known as tauopathies are characterized by misfolding and aggregation of tau protein. Although several studies have suggested the potential of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) as treatment for neurodegenerative diseases, the role of TCM in treating AD and tauopathies have not been well explored. Materials and methods Tau protein was coupled to the DsRed fluorophore by fusing a pro-aggregation mutant of repeat domain of tau (ΔK280 tauRD) with DsRed. The ΔK280 tauRD-DsRed fusion gene was then used to generate Tet-On 293 and SH-SY5Y cell clones as platforms to test the efficacy of 39 aqueous extracts of TCM in reducing tau misfolding and in neuroprotection. Results Seven TCM extracts demonstrated a significant reduction in tau misfolding and reactive oxidative species with low cytotoxicity in the ΔK280 tauRD-DsRed 293 cell model. Glycyrrhiza inflata and Panax ginseng also demonstrated the potential to improve neurite outgrowth in the ΔK280 tauRD-DsRed SH-SY5Y neuronal cell model. G. inflata further rescued the upregulation of ERN2 (pro-apoptotic) and downregulation of unfolded-protein-response-mediated chaperones ERP44, DNAJC3, and SERP1 in ΔK280 tauRD-DsRed 293 cells. Conclusion This in vitro study provides evidence that G. inflata may be a novel therapeutic for AD and tauopathies. Future applications of G. inflata on animal models of AD and tauopathies are warranted to corroborate its effect of reducing misfolding and potential disease modification. PMID:27013866

  20. In silico Mapping of Protein Unfolding Mutations for Inherited Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCafferty, Caitlyn L.; Sergeev, Yuri V.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of disease-causing missense mutations on protein folding is difficult to evaluate. To understand this relationship, we developed the unfolding mutation screen (UMS) for in silico evaluation of the severity of genetic perturbations at the atomic level of protein structure. The program takes into account the protein-unfolding curve and generates propensities using calculated free energy changes for every possible missense mutation at once. These results are presented in a series of unfolding heat maps and a colored protein 3D structure to show the residues critical to the protein folding and are available for quick reference. UMS was tested with 16 crystal structures to evaluate the unfolding for 1391 mutations from the ProTherm database. Our results showed that the computational accuracy of the unfolding calculations was similar to the accuracy of previously published free energy changes but provided a better scale. Our residue identity control helps to improve protein homology models. The unfolding predictions for proteins involved in age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and Leber’s congenital amaurosis matched well with data from previous studies. These results suggest that UMS could be a useful tool in the analysis of genotype-to-phenotype associations and next-generation sequencing data for inherited diseases. PMID:27905547

  1. Sequential protein unfolding through a carbon nanotube pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhonghe; Zhang, Shuang; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Luan, Binquan; Zhou, Ruhong; Li, Jingyuan

    2016-06-01

    An assortment of biological processes, like protein degradation and the transport of proteins across membranes, depend on protein unfolding events mediated by nanopore interfaces. In this work, we exploit fully atomistic simulations of an artificial, CNT-based nanopore to investigate the nature of ubiquitin unfolding. With one end of the protein subjected to an external force, we observe non-canonical unfolding behaviour as ubiquitin is pulled through the pore opening. Secondary structural elements are sequentially detached from the protein and threaded into the nanotube, interestingly, the remaining part maintains native-like characteristics. The constraints of the nanopore interface thus facilitate the formation of stable ``unfoldon'' motifs above the nanotube aperture that can exist in the absence of specific native contacts with the other secondary structure. Destruction of these unfoldons gives rise to distinct force peaks in our simulations, providing us with a sensitive probe for studying the kinetics of serial unfolding events. Our detailed analysis of nanopore-mediated protein unfolding events not only provides insight into how related processes might proceed in the cell, but also serves to deepen our understanding of structural arrangements which form the basis for protein conformational stability.An assortment of biological processes, like protein degradation and the transport of proteins across membranes, depend on protein unfolding events mediated by nanopore interfaces. In this work, we exploit fully atomistic simulations of an artificial, CNT-based nanopore to investigate the nature of ubiquitin unfolding. With one end of the protein subjected to an external force, we observe non-canonical unfolding behaviour as ubiquitin is pulled through the pore opening. Secondary structural elements are sequentially detached from the protein and threaded into the nanotube, interestingly, the remaining part maintains native-like characteristics. The constraints of

  2. Signatures of unfolding in the early stages of protein denaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.; Kozak, John J.

    2012-04-01

    A comparative study of the early stages of unfolding of five proteins: cyt c, c-b 562, cyt c‧, azurin, and lysozyme is reported. From crystallographic data, helical regions and intervening non-helical (or 'turning') regions are identified in each. Exploiting a previously introduced geometrical model, the paper describes quantitatively the stepwise extension of a polypeptide chain subject to the geometrical constraint that the spatial relationship among the residues of each triplet is fixed by native-state crystallographic data. Despite differences among the above-cited proteins, remarkable universality of behavior is found in the early stages of unfolding. At the very earliest stages, internal residues in each helical region have a common unfolding history; the terminal residues, however, are extraordinarily sensitive to structural perturbations. Residues in non-helical sections of the polypeptide unfold after residues in the internal helical regions, but with increasing steric perturbation playing a dominant role in advancing denaturation.

  3. D-Penicillamine targets metastatic melanoma cells with induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and Noxa (PMAIP1)-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shuxi; Cabello, Christopher M; Lamore, Sarah D; Lesson, Jessica L; Wondrak, Georg T

    2012-10-01

    D-Penicillamine (3,3-dimethyl-D-cysteine; DP) is an FDA-approved redox-active D-cysteine-derivative with antioxidant, disulfide-reducing, and metal chelating properties used therapeutically for the control of copper-related pathology in Wilson's disease and reductive cystine-solubilization in cystinuria. Based on the established sensitivity of metastatic melanoma cells to pharmacological modulation of cellular oxidative stress, we tested feasibility of using DP for chemotherapeutic intervention targeting human A375 melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. DP treatment induced caspase-dependent cell death in cultured human metastatic melanoma cells (A375, G361) without compromising viability of primary epidermal melanocytes, an effect not observed with the thiol-antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and dithiothreitol. Focused gene expression array analysis followed by immunoblot detection revealed that DP rapidly activates the cytotoxic unfolded protein response (UPR; involving phospho-PERK, phospho-eIF2α, Grp78, CHOP, and Hsp70) and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis with p53 upregulation and modulation of Bcl-2 family members (involving Noxa, Mcl-1, and Bcl-2). DP (but not NAC) induced oxidative stress with early impairment of glutathione homeostasis and mitochondrial transmembrane potential. SiRNA-based antagonism of PMAIP1 expression blocked DP-induced upregulation of the proapoptotic BH3-only effector Noxa and prevented downregulation of the Noxa-antagonist Mcl-1, rescuing melanoma cells from DP-induced apoptosis. Intraperitoneal administration of DP displayed significant antimelanoma activity in a murine A375 xenograft model. It remains to be seen if melanoma cell-directed induction of UPR and apoptosis using DP or improved DP-derivatives can be harnessed for future chemotherapeutic intervention.

  4. Exclusion of the Unfolded Protein Response in Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in the Canine T4R RHO Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Marsili, Stefania; Genini, Sem; Sudharsan, Raghavi; Gingrich, Jeremy; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Beltran, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the occurrence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) following acute light damage in the naturally-occurring canine model of RHO-adRP (T4R RHO dog). Methods The left eyes of T4R RHO dogs were briefly light-exposed and retinas collected 3, 6 and 24 hours later. The contra-lateral eyes were shielded and used as controls. To evaluate the time course of cell death, histology and TUNEL assays were performed. Electron microscopy was used to examine ultrastructural alterations in photoreceptors at 15 min, 1 hour, and 6 hours after light exposure. Gene expression of markers of ER stress and UPR were assessed by RT-PCR, qRT-PCR and western blot at the 6 hour time-point. Calpain and caspase-3 activation were assessed at 1, 3 and 6 hours after exposure. Results A brief exposure to clinically-relevant levels of white light causes within minutes acute disruption of the rod outer segment disc membranes, followed by prominent ultrastructural alterations in the inner segments and the initiation of cell death by 6 hours. Activation of the PERK and IRE1 pathways, and downstream targets (BIP, CHOP) of the UPR was not observed. However increased transcription of caspase-12 and hsp70 occurred, as well as calpain activation, but not that of caspase-3. Conclusion The UPR is not activated in the early phase of light-induced photoreceptor cell death in the T4R RHO model. Instead, disruption in rods of disc and plasma membranes within minutes after light exposure followed by increase in calpain activity and caspase-12 expression suggests a different mechanism of degeneration. PMID:25695253

  5. How cooperative are protein folding and unfolding transitions?

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Pooja; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2016-11-01

    A thermodynamically and kinetically simple picture of protein folding envisages only two states, native (N) and unfolded (U), separated by a single activation free energy barrier, and interconverting by cooperative two-state transitions. The folding/unfolding transitions of many proteins occur, however, in multiple discrete steps associated with the formation of intermediates, which is indicative of reduced cooperativity. Furthermore, much advancement in experimental and computational approaches has demonstrated entirely non-cooperative (gradual) transitions via a continuum of states and a multitude of small energetic barriers between the N and U states of some proteins. These findings have been instrumental towards providing a structural rationale for cooperative versus noncooperative transitions, based on the coupling between interaction networks in proteins. The cooperativity inherent in a folding/unfolding reaction appears to be context dependent, and can be tuned via experimental conditions which change the stabilities of N and U. The evolution of cooperativity in protein folding transitions is linked closely to the evolution of function as well as the aggregation propensity of the protein. A large activation energy barrier in a fully cooperative transition can provide the kinetic control required to prevent the accumulation of partially unfolded forms, which may promote aggregation. Nevertheless, increasing evidence for barrier-less "downhill" folding, as well as for continuous "uphill" unfolding transitions, indicate that gradual non-cooperative processes may be ubiquitous features on the free energy landscape of protein folding.

  6. First Passage Times, Lifetimes, and Relaxation Times of Unfolded Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wei; Sengupta, Anirvan M.; Levy, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of proteins in the unfolded state can be quantified in computer simulations by calculating a spectrum of relaxation times which describes the time scales over which the population fluctuations decay to equilibrium. If the unfolded state space is discretized we can evaluate the relaxation time of each state. We derive a simple relation that shows the mean first passage time to any state is equal to the relaxation time of that state divided by the equilibrium population. This explains why mean first passage times from state to state within the unfolded ensemble can be very long but the energy landscape can still be smooth (minimally frustrated). In fact, when the folding kinetics is two-state, all of the unfolded state relaxation times within the unfolded free energy basin are faster than the folding time. This result supports the well-established funnel energy landscape picture and resolves an apparent contradiction between this model and the recently proposed kinetic hub model of protein folding. We validate these concepts by analyzing a Markov State Model of the kinetics in the unfolded state and folding of the mini-protein NTL9 constructed from a 2.9 millisecond simulation provided by D. E. Shaw Research. PMID:26252709

  7. Analysis and Interpretation of Single Molecule Protein Unfolding Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannon, Herbert; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of protein unfolding under a stretching force has been extensively studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) over the past decade [1]. Experimental artifacts at the single molecule level introduce uncertainties in the data analysis that have led to several competing physical models for the unfolding process. For example, the unfolding dynamics of the protein ubiquitin under constant force has been described by probability distributions as diverse as exponential [2,3], a sum of exponentials, log-normal [4], and more recently a function describing static disorder in the Arrhenius model [5]. A new method for data analysis is presented that utilizes maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) combined with other traditional statistical tests to unambiguously rank the consistency of these and other models with the experimental data. These techniques applied to the ubiquitin unfolding data shows that the probability of unfolding is best fit with a stretched exponential distribution, with important implications on the complexity of the mechanism of protein unfolding. [4pt] [1] Carrion-Vazquez, et. al. Springer Series in Biophys. 2006 [0pt] [2] Fernandez et. al. Science 2004 [0pt] [3] Brujic et. al. Nat. Phys 2006 [0pt] [4] Garcia-Manyes et. al. Biophys. J. 2007 [0pt] [5] Kuo et. al. PNAS 2010

  8. First Passage Times, Lifetimes, and Relaxation Times of Unfolded Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei; Sengupta, Anirvan M.; Levy, Ronald M.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of proteins in the unfolded state can be quantified in computer simulations by calculating a spectrum of relaxation times which describes the time scales over which the population fluctuations decay to equilibrium. If the unfolded state space is discretized, we can evaluate the relaxation time of each state. We derive a simple relation that shows the mean first passage time to any state is equal to the relaxation time of that state divided by the equilibrium population. This explains why mean first passage times from state to state within the unfolded ensemble can be very long but the energy landscape can still be smooth (minimally frustrated). In fact, when the folding kinetics is two-state, all of the unfolded state relaxation times within the unfolded free energy basin are faster than the folding time. This result supports the well-established funnel energy landscape picture and resolves an apparent contradiction between this model and the recently proposed kinetic hub model of protein folding. We validate these concepts by analyzing a Markov state model of the kinetics in the unfolded state and folding of the miniprotein NTL9 (where NTL9 is the N -terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9), constructed from a 2.9 ms simulation provided by D. E. Shaw Research.

  9. Distribution, Transition and Thermodynamic Stability of Protein Conformations in the Denaturant-Induced Unfolding of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Liujiao; Ji, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Background Extensive and intensive studies on the unfolding of proteins require appropriate theoretical model and parameter to clearly illustrate the feature and characteristic of the unfolding system. Over the past several decades, four approaches have been proposed to describe the interaction between proteins and denaturants, but some ambiguity and deviations usually occur in the explanation of the experimental data. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, a theoretical model was presented to show the dependency of the residual activity ratio of the proteins on the molar denaturant concentration. Through the characteristic unfolding parameters ki and Δmi in this model, the distribution, transition and thermodynamic stability of protein conformations during the unfolding process can be quantitatively described. This model was tested with the two-state unfolding of bovine heart cytochrome c and the three-state unfolding of hen egg white lysozyme induced by both guanidine hydrochloride and urea, the four-state unfolding of bovine carbonic anhydrase b induced by guanidine hydrochloride and the unfolding of some other proteins induced by denaturants. The results illustrated that this model could be used accurately to reveal the distribution and transition of protein conformations in the presence of different concentrations of denaturants and to evaluate the unfolding tendency and thermodynamic stability of different conformations. In most denaturant-induced unfolding of proteins, the unfolding became increasingly hard in next transition step and the proteins became more unstable as they attained next successive stable conformation. Conclusions/Significance This work presents a useful method for people to study the unfolding of proteins and may be used to describe the unfolding and refolding of other biopolymers induced by denaturants, inducers, etc. PMID:24603868

  10. A Unidimensional Item Response Model for Unfolding Responses from a Graded Disagree-Agree Response Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Laughlin, James E.

    1996-01-01

    A parametric item response theory model for unfolding binary or graded responses is developed. The graded unfolding model (GUM) is a generalization of the hyperbolic cosine model for binary data of D. Andrich and G. Luo (1993). Applicability of the GUM to attitude testing is illustrated with real data. (SLD)

  11. Down-modulation of SEL1L, an unfolded protein response and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation protein, sensitizes glioma stem cells to the cytotoxic effect of valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Monica; Baronchelli, Simona; Schiffer, Davide; Mellai, Marta; Caldera, Valentina; Saccani, Gloria Jotti; Dalpra, Leda; Daga, Antonio; Orlandi, Rosaria; DeBlasio, Pasquale; Biunno, Ida

    2014-01-31

    Valproic acid (VPA), an histone deacetylase inhibitor, is emerging as a promising therapeutic agent for the treatments of gliomas by virtue of its ability to reactivate the expression of epigenetically silenced genes. VPA induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptive pathway displaying a dichotomic yin yang characteristic; it initially contributes in safeguarding the malignant cell survival, whereas long-lasting activation favors a proapoptotic response. By triggering UPR, VPA might tip the balance between cellular adaptation and programmed cell death via the deregulation of protein homeostasis and induction of proteotoxicity. Here we aimed to investigate the impact of proteostasis on glioma stem cells (GSC) using VPA treatment combined with subversion of SEL1L, a crucial protein involved in homeostatic pathways, cancer aggressiveness, and stem cell state maintenance. We investigated the global expression of GSC lines untreated and treated with VPA, SEL1L interference, and GSC line response to VPA treatment by analyzing cell viability via MTT assay, neurosphere formation, and endoplasmic reticulum stress/UPR-responsive proteins. Moreover, SEL1L immunohistochemistry was performed on primary glial tumors. The results show that (i) VPA affects GSC lines viability and anchorage-dependent growth by inducing differentiative programs and cell cycle progression, (ii) SEL1L down-modulation synergy enhances VPA cytotoxic effects by influencing GSCs proliferation and self-renewal properties, and (iii) SEL1L expression is indicative of glioma proliferation rate, malignancy, and endoplasmic reticulum stress statuses. Targeting the proteostasis network in association to VPA treatment may provide an alternative approach to deplete GSC and improve glioma treatments.

  12. Do proteins really unfold in a shear flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaspe, Juan

    2005-11-01

    Many protein structures unfold (denature) when subjected to extremes of heat, cold, pH, solvent composition, or mechanical stress. One might expect that shearing forces induced by a nonuniform fluid flow would also destabilize proteins, as when a protein solution flows rapidly through a narrow channel. However, although we find many references to shear denaturation in the protein literature, we find no quantitative demonstration of the phenomenon. Therefore we have investigated whether a high shear can destabilize a protein to any measureable extent. We study a small globular protein (horse cytochrome c, 104 amino acids) whose fluorescence increases sharply upon unfolding. We pump the sample through a silica capillary (180 μm ID) at speeds ˜ 10 m/s to create a simple shear dvz/dx ˜ 5 x 10^5 s-1, under UV laser illumination. We can detect unfolding of as little as 1% of the sample, or (under favorable conditions) a reduction of ˜0.05 kJ/mol in the protein's stability. We will discuss preliminary results along with a simple theoretical perspective on shear denaturation.

  13. Are non-functional, unfolded proteins ('junk proteins') common in the genome?

    PubMed

    Lovell, Simon C

    2003-11-20

    It has recently been shown that many proteins are unfolded in their functional state. In addition, a large number of stretches of protein sequences are predicted to be unfolded. It has been argued that the high frequency of occurrence of these predicted unfolded sequences indicates that the majority of these sequences must also be functional. These sequences tend to be of low complexity. It is well established that certain types of low-complexity sequences are genetically unstable, and are prone to expand in the genome. It is possible, therefore, that in addition to these well-characterised functional unfolded proteins, there are a large number of unfolded proteins that are non-functional. Analogous to 'junk DNA' these protein sequences may arise due to physical characteristics of DNA. Their high frequency may reflect, therefore, the high probability of expansion in the genome. Such 'junk proteins' would not be advantageous, and may be mildly deleterious to the cell.

  14. Ising Model Reprogramming of a Repeat Protein's Equilibrium Unfolding Pathway.

    PubMed

    Millership, C; Phillips, J J; Main, E R G

    2016-05-08

    Repeat proteins are formed from units of 20-40 aa that stack together into quasi one-dimensional non-globular structures. This modular repetitive construction means that, unlike globular proteins, a repeat protein's equilibrium folding and thus thermodynamic stability can be analysed using linear Ising models. Typically, homozipper Ising models have been used. These treat the repeat protein as a series of identical interacting subunits (the repeated motifs) that couple together to form the folded protein. However, they cannot describe subunits of differing stabilities. Here we show that a more sophisticated heteropolymer Ising model can be constructed and fitted to two new helix deletion series of consensus tetratricopeptide repeat proteins (CTPRs). This analysis, showing an asymmetric spread of stability between helices within CTPR ensembles, coupled with the Ising model's predictive qualities was then used to guide reprogramming of the unfolding pathway of a variant CTPR protein. The designed behaviour was engineered by introducing destabilising mutations that increased the thermodynamic asymmetry within a CTPR ensemble. The asymmetry caused the terminal α-helix to thermodynamically uncouple from the rest of the protein and preferentially unfold. This produced a specific, highly populated stable intermediate with a putative dimerisation interface. As such it is the first step in designing repeat proteins with function regulated by a conformational switch.

  15. Protein Unfolding Coupled to Ligand Binding: Differential Scanning Calorimetry Simulation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celej, Maria Soledad; Fidelio, Gerardo Daniel; Dassie, Sergio Alberto

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical description of thermal protein unfolding coupled to ligand binding is presented. The thermodynamic concepts are independent of the method used to monitor protein unfolding but a differential scanning calorimetry is being used as a tool for examining the unfolding process.

  16. Reversible thermal unfolding of a yfdX protein with chaperone-like activity

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Paramita; Manna, Camelia; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb; Ghosh, Mahua

    2016-01-01

    yfdX proteins are ubiquitously present in a large number of virulent bacteria. A member of this family of protein in E. coli is known to be up-regulated by the multidrug response regulator. Their abundance in such bacteria suggests some important yet unidentified functional role of this protein. Here, we study the thermal response and stability of yfdX protein STY3178 from Salmonella Typhi using circular dichroism, steady state fluorescence, dynamic light scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. We observe the protein to be stable up to a temperature of 45 °C. It folds back to the native conformation from unfolded state at temperature as high as 80 °C. The kinetic measurements of unfolding and refolding show Arrhenius behavior where the refolding involves less activation energy barrier than that of unfolding. We propose a homology model to understand the stability of the protein. Our molecular dynamic simulation studies on this model structure at high temperature show that the structure of this protein is quite stable. Finally, we report a possible functional role of this protein as a chaperone, capable of preventing DTT induced aggregation of insulin. Our studies will have broader implication in understanding the role of yfdX proteins in bacterial function and virulence. PMID:27404435

  17. Protein's unfolding and the glass transition: a common thermodynamic signature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Quiroz, L.; Garcia-Colin, L. S.

    2008-02-01

    Recently, it has been recognized that protein's folding and unfolding mechanisms exhibit a wide range of common features with the glass transition observed in supercooled organic and inorganic liquids. Such similarities range from pure thermodynamic aspects such an anomalous ΔCp and a substantial entropy decrease ΔS<0, to strictly kinetic aspects as the existence of an excess of vibrational modes at low frequencies (bosonic peak) revealed by Raman and neutron scattering experiments. In this work, we discuss both the experimental and theoretical facts that might enable an extrapolation of the Adam-Gibbs scheme for the standard glass transition to describe the relaxation time τ as function of temperature T in biological macromolecules' unfolding.

  18. Usage of Simulated Response Matrices for the Scintillation Spectra Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klusoň, J.; Urban, T.

    2014-06-01

    Response of the scintillation spectrometer to incident photons has complex character due to complex character of photon interaction processes. Experimental spectrum thus provide qualitative information given by the identifiable peaks positions, while extraction of the full, quantitative information (i.e. photon flux energy distribution) require spectra unfolding based on the spectrometer response (represented by the response matrix) knowledge. As experimental determination of response matrix is difficult or impossible in most cases, the Monte Carlo simulation is the proved solution. Usage of the unfolding for experimental spectra processing enable to determine dosimetric characteristics of the incident photon fields and/or characteristics of the sources, creating those photon fields. The response matrices for scintillation spectrometers with different detectors (commonly used NaI, BGO and new LaBr) were calculated using Monte Carlo method. The response to the internal activity of the LaBr detector was also simulated and considered in spectra processing. Calculated matrices were used for unfolding of the experimental spectra from different applications to determine desired dosimetric quantities. Typical applications are environmental monitoring, monitoring of the working environment, accidental monitoring and contamination measurement, etc. Method is suitable also for the airborne monitoring or security applications. Results for individual detection systems are compared and discussed with aim to analyze potential advantages of the LaBr detector for considered applications.

  19. Tannin-assisted aggregation of natively unfolded proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, D.; Narayanan, T.; Hagenmuller, D.; Baron, A.; Guyot, S.; Cabane, B.; Bouhallab, S.

    2008-06-01

    Tannin-protein interactions are essentially physical: hydrophobic and hydrogen-bond-mediated. We explored the tannin-assisted protein aggregation on the case of β-casein, which is a natively unfolded protein known for its ability to form micellar aggregates. We used several tannins with specified length. Our SAXS results show that small tannins increase the number of proteins per micelle, but keeping their size constant. It leads to a tannin-assisted compactization of micelles. Larger tannins, with linear dimensions greater than the crown width of micelles, lead to the aggregation of micelles by a bridging effect. Experimental results can be understood within a model where tannins are treated as effective enhancers of hydrophobic attraction between specific sites in proteins.

  20. Thermodynamics of the temperature-induced unfolding of globular proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Khechinashvili, N. N.; Janin, J.; Rodier, F.

    1995-01-01

    The heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy changes for the temperature-induced unfolding of 11 globular proteins of known three-dimensional structure have been obtained by microcalorimetric measurements. Their experimental values are compared to those we calculate from the change in solvent-accessible surface area between the native proteins and the extended polypeptide chain. We use proportionality coefficients for the transfer (hydration) of aliphatic, aromatic, and polar groups from gas phase to aqueous solution, we estimate vibrational effects, and we discuss the temperature dependence of each constituent of the thermodynamic functions. At 25 degrees C, stabilization of the native state of a globular protein is largely due to two favorable terms: the entropy of non-polar group hydration and the enthalpy of interactions within the protein. They compensate the unfavorable entropy change associated with these interactions (conformational entropy) and with vibrational effects. Due to the large heat capacity of nonpolar group hydration, its stabilizing contribution decreases quickly at higher temperatures, and the two unfavorable entropy terms take over, leading to temperature-induced unfolding. PMID:7670374

  1. Counting peptide-water hydrogen bonds in unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haipeng; Porter, Lauren L; Rose, George D

    2011-02-01

    It is often assumed that the peptide backbone forms a substantial number of additional hydrogen bonds when a protein unfolds. We challenge that assumption in this article. Early surveys of hydrogen bonding in proteins of known structure typically found that most, but not all, backbone polar groups are satisfied, either by intramolecular partners or by water. When the protein is folded, these groups form approximately two hydrogen bonds per peptide unit, one donor or acceptor for each carbonyl oxygen or amide hydrogen, respectively. But when unfolded, the backbone chain is often believed to form three hydrogen bonds per peptide unit, one partner for each oxygen lone pair or amide hydrogen. This assumption is based on the properties of small model compounds, like N-methylacetamide, or simply accepted as self-evident fact. If valid, a chain of N residues would have approximately 2N backbone hydrogen bonds when folded but 3N backbone hydrogen bonds when unfolded, a sufficient difference to overshadow any uncertainties involved in calculating these per-residue averages. Here, we use exhaustive conformational sampling to monitor the number of H-bonds in a statistically adequate population of blocked polyalanyl-six-mers as the solvent quality ranges from good to poor. Solvent quality is represented by a scalar parameter used to Boltzmann-weight the population energy. Recent experimental studies show that a repeating (Gly-Ser) polypeptide undergoes a denaturant-induced expansion accompanied by breaking intramolecular peptide H-bonds. Results from our simulations augment this experimental finding by showing that the number of H-bonds is approximately conserved during such expansion⇋compaction transitions.

  2. Energetic and structural consequences of desolvation/solvation barriers to protein folding/unfolding assessed from experimental unfolding rates.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2006-09-01

    Theoretical work has suggested the existence of solvation/desolvation barriers in protein folding/unfolding processes. We propose that the energetic and structural consequences of such barriers for the folding transition state can be assessed from experimental unfolding rates using well-established structure-energetics relationships. For a set of proteins of size within the 60-130 number-of-residues range, we find energetic effects associated to solvation/desolvation on the order of 10(2) kJ/mol. This supports that the folding transition states may be characterized by large networks of water-unsatisfied, broken internal contacts. In terms of buried surface, we estimate the typical network size to be on the order of several thousands of A2, or approximately 50% of the total change in accessible surface area upon unfolding. The analyses reported here thus suggest a clear structural picture for the different energetic balance of native and folding transition states.

  3. Extremely slow intramolecular diffusion in unfolded protein L.

    PubMed

    Waldauer, Steven A; Bakajin, Olgica; Lapidus, Lisa J

    2010-08-03

    A crucial parameter in many theories of protein folding is the rate of diffusion over the energy landscape. Using a microfluidic mixer we have observed the rate of intramolecular diffusion within the unfolded B1 domain of protein L before it folds. The diffusion-limited rate of intramolecular contact is about 20 times slower than the rate in 6 M GdnHCl, and because in these conditions the protein is also more compact, the intramolecular diffusion coefficient decreases 100-500 times. The dramatic slowdown in diffusion occurs within the 250 micros mixing time of the mixer, and there appears to be no further evolution of this rate before reaching the transition state of folding. We show that observed folding rates are well predicted by a Kramers model with a denaturant-dependent diffusion coefficient and speculate that this diffusion coefficient is a significant contribution to the observed rate of folding.

  4. The unfolded protein response in human skeletal muscle is not involved in the onset of glucose tolerance impairment induced by a fat-rich diet.

    PubMed

    Deldicque, Louise; Van Proeyen, Karen; Francaux, Marc; Hespel, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in pancreas, liver, and adipose tissue is a key event in the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic disease. Lipid-induced ER stress in liver and adipose tissue leads to inhibition of insulin signaling. Whether this mechanism exists in skeletal muscle is currently unknown. The present study aimed at assessing the ER stress response in skeletal muscle of subjects receiving a hyper-caloric fat-rich diet (HFD). Seven healthy males (20.6 ± 0.5 years; 70.9 ± 3.4 kg) volunteered to participate in the study. They received a hyper-caloric (+30% kcal) fat-rich (50% kcal) diet for 6 weeks. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed, and muscle biopsies were taken before and after HFD. HFD increased body mass by ~3 kg (P = 0.007) and the sum of skinfolds by 15% (P = 0.003). After HFD, blood glucose concentrations were higher during OGTT (two-way ANOVA, P = 0.023; +45% at 20 min, P = 0.002), and fasting plasma insulin level tended to be higher (+20%). HFD increased intramyocellular lipids content by ~50 and 75% in type I (P = 0.0009) and IIa fibers (P = 0.002), respectively. The protein expression of inositol-requiring enzyme 1α, protein kinase R-like ER protein kinase, BiP and calnexin and the mRNA level of spliced X box binding protein-1, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein and activating transcription factor 4 were not changed after HFD. Despite the increase in body mass, subcutaneous fat deposits, and intramyocellular lipids content, ER stress markers were unchanged in skeletal muscle of subjects receiving a HFD for 6 weeks. This suggests that the onset of glucose intolerance is not related to ER stress in skeletal muscle.

  5. The Unfolded Protein Response and the Phosphorylations of Activating Transcription Factor 2 in the trans-Activation of il23a Promoter Produced by β-Glucans*

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Mario; Domingo, Esther; Alonso, Sara; Frade, Javier García; Eiros, José; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez; Fernández, Nieves

    2014-01-01

    Current views on the control of IL-23 production focus on the regulation of il23a, the gene encoding IL-23 p19, by NF-κB in combination with other transcription factors. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), X2-Box-binding protein 1 (XBP1), activator protein 1 (AP1), SMAD, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPβ), and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) have been involved in response to LPS, but no data are available regarding the mechanism triggered by the fungal mimic and β-glucan-containing stimulus zymosan, which produces IL-23 and to a low extent the related cytokine IL-12 p70. Zymosan induced the mobilization of CHOP from the nuclear fractions to phagocytic vesicles. Hypha-forming Candida also induced the nuclear disappearance of CHOP. Assay of transcription factor binding to the il23a promoter showed an increase of Thr(P)-71–Thr(P)-69-activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) binding in response to zymosan. PKC and PKA/mitogen- and stress-activated kinase inhibitors down-regulated Thr(P)-71–ATF2 binding to the il23a promoter and il23a mRNA expression. Consistent with the current concept of complementary phosphorylations on N-terminal Thr-71 and Thr-69 of ATF2 by ERK and p38 MAPK, MEK, and p38 MAPK inhibitors blunted Thr(P)-69–ATF2 binding. Knockdown of atf2 mRNA with siRNA correlated with inhibition of il23a mRNA, but it did not affect the expression of il12/23b and il10 mRNA. These data indicate the following: (i) zymosan decreases nuclear proapoptotic CHOP, most likely by promoting its accumulation in phagocytic vesicles; (ii) zymosan-induced il23a mRNA expression is best explained through coordinated κB- and ATF2-dependent transcription; and (iii) il23a expression relies on complementary phosphorylation of ATF2 on Thr-69 and Thr-71 dependent on PKC and MAPK activities. PMID:24982422

  6. Preferential binding of an unfolded protein to DsbA.

    PubMed Central

    Frech, C; Wunderlich, M; Glockshuber, R; Schmid, F X

    1996-01-01

    The oxidoreductase DsbA from the periplasm of escherichia coli introduces disulfide bonds into proteins at an extremely high rate. During oxidation, a mixed disulfide is formed between DsbA and the folding protein chain, and this covalent intermediate reacts very rapidly either to form the oxidized protein or to revert back to oxidized DsbA. To investigate its properties, a stable form of the intermediate was produced by reacting the C33A variant of DsbA with a variant of RNase T1. We find that in this stable mixed disulfide the conformational stability of the substrate protein is decreased by 5 kJ/mol, whereas the conformational stability of DsbA is increased by 5 kJ/mol. This reciprocal effect suggests strongly that DsbA interacts with the unfolded substrate protein not only by the covalent disulfide bond, but also by preferential non-covalent interactions. The existence of a polypeptide binding site explains why DsbA oxidizes protein substrates much more rapidly than small thiol compounds. Such a very fast reaction is probably important for protein folding in the periplasm, because the accessibility of the thiol groups for DsbA can decrease rapidly when newly exported polypeptide chains begin to fold. PMID:8617214

  7. Sequence- and Temperature-Dependent Properties of Unfolded and Disordered Proteins from Atomistic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zerze, Gül H; Best, Robert B; Mittal, Jeetain

    2015-11-19

    We use all-atom molecular simulation with explicit solvent to study the properties of selected intrinsically disordered proteins and unfolded states of foldable proteins, which include chain dimensions and shape, secondary structure propensity, solvent accessible surface area, and contact formation. We find that the qualitative scaling behavior of the chains matches expectations from theory under ambient conditions. In particular, unfolded globular proteins tend to be more collapsed under the same conditions than charged disordered sequences of the same length. However, inclusion of explicit solvent in addition naturally captures temperature-dependent solvation effects, which results in an initial collapse of the chains as temperature is increased, in qualitative agreement with experiment. There is a universal origin to the collapse, revealed in the change of hydration of individual residues as a function of temperature: namely, that the initial collapse is driven by unfavorable solvation free energy of individual residues, which in turn has a strong temperature dependence. We also observe that in unfolded globular proteins, increased temperature also initially favors formation of native-like (rather than non-native-like) structure. Our results help to establish how sequence encodes the degree of intrinsic disorder or order as well as its response to changes in environmental conditions.

  8. SANS and DLS Studies of Protein Unfolding in Presence of Urea and Surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Aswal, V. K.; Chodankar, S. N.; Wagh, A. G.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Vavrin, R.

    2008-03-17

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) have been used to study conformational changes in protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) during its unfolding in presence of protein denaturating agents urea and surfactant. On addition of urea, the BSA protein unfolds for urea concentrations greater than 4 M and acquires a random coil configuration with its radius of gyration increasing with urea concentration. The addition of surfactant unfolds the protein by the formation of micelle-like aggregates of surfactants along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. The fractal dimension of such a protein-surfactant complex decreases and the overall size of the complex increases on increasing the surfactant concentration. The conformation of the unfolded protein in the complex has been determined directly using contrast variation SANS measurements by contrast matching the surfactant to the medium. Results of DLS measurements are found to be in good agreement with those obtained using SANS.

  9. Using Data Augmentation and Markov Chain Monte Carlo for the Estimation of Unfolding Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Matthew S.; Junker, Brian W.

    2003-01-01

    Unfolding response models, a class of item response theory (IRT) models that assume a unimodal item response function (IRF), are often used for the measurement of attitudes. Verhelst and Verstralen (1993)and Andrich and Luo (1993) independently developed unfolding response models by relating the observed responses to a more common monotone IRT…

  10. Unfolding the Role of Stress Response Signaling in Endocrine Resistant Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Robert; Cook, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an ancient stress response that enables a cell to manage the energetic stress that accompanies protein folding. There has been a significant recent increase in our understanding of the UPR, how it integrates physiological processes within cells, and how this integration can affect cancer cells and cell fate decisions. Recent publications have highlighted the role of UPR signaling components on mediating various cell survival pathways, cellular metabolism and bioenergenics, and autophagy. We address the role of UPR on mediating endocrine therapy resistance and estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell survival. PMID:26157705

  11. Ligand-modulated parallel mechanical unfolding pathways of maltose-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vasudha; Kulothungan, S Rajendra; Balamurali, M M; Saranya, S R; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti

    2011-08-12

    Protein folding and unfolding are complex phenomena, and it is accepted that multidomain proteins generally follow multiple pathways. Maltose-binding protein (MBP) is a large (a two-domain, 370-amino acid residue) bacterial periplasmic protein involved in maltose uptake. Despite the large size, it has been shown to exhibit an apparent two-state equilibrium unfolding in bulk experiments. Single-molecule studies can uncover rare events that are masked by averaging in bulk studies. Here, we use single-molecule force spectroscopy to study the mechanical unfolding pathways of MBP and its precursor protein (preMBP) in the presence and absence of ligands. Our results show that MBP exhibits kinetic partitioning on mechanical stretching and unfolds via two parallel pathways: one of them involves a mechanically stable intermediate (path I) whereas the other is devoid of it (path II). The apoMBP unfolds via path I in 62% of the mechanical unfolding events, and the remaining 38% follow path II. In the case of maltose-bound MBP, the protein unfolds via the intermediate in 79% of the cases, the remaining 21% via path II. Similarly, on binding to maltotriose, a ligand whose binding strength with the polyprotein is similar to that of maltose, the occurrence of the intermediate is comparable (82% via path I) with that of maltose. The precursor protein preMBP also shows a similar behavior upon mechanical unfolding. The percentages of molecules unfolding via path I are 53% in the apo form and 68% and 72% upon binding to maltose and maltotriose, respectively, for preMBP. These observations demonstrate that ligand binding can modulate the mechanical unfolding pathways of proteins by a kinetic partitioning mechanism. This could be a general mechanism in the unfolding of other large two-domain ligand-binding proteins of the bacterial periplasmic space.

  12. A human coronavirus OC43 variant harboring persistence-associated mutations in the S glycoprotein differentially induces the unfolded protein response in human neurons as compared to wild-type virus

    SciTech Connect

    Favreau, Dominique J.; Desforges, Marc; St-Jean, Julien R.; Talbot, Pierre J.

    2009-12-20

    We have reported that human respiratory coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) is neurotropic and neuroinvasive in humans and mice, and that neurons are the primary target of infection in mice, leading to neurodegenerative disabilities. We now report that an HCoV-OC43 mutant harboring two persistence-associated S glycoprotein point mutations (H183R and Y241H), induced a stronger unfolded protein response (UPR) and translation attenuation in infected human neurons. There was a major contribution of the IRE1/XBP1 pathway, followed by caspase-3 activation and nuclear fragmentation, with no significant role of the ATF6 and eIF2-alpha/ATF4 pathways. Our results show the importance of discrete molecular viral S determinants in virus-neuronal cell interactions that lead to increased production of viral proteins and infectious particles, enhanced UPR activation, and increased cytotoxicity and cell death. As this mutant virus is more neurovirulent in mice, our results also suggest that two mutations in the S glycoprotein could eventually modulate viral neuropathogenesis.

  13. Extremely slow intramolecular diffusion in unfolded protein L

    PubMed Central

    Waldauer, Steven A.; Bakajin, Olgica; Lapidus, Lisa J.

    2010-01-01

    A crucial parameter in many theories of protein folding is the rate of diffusion over the energy landscape. Using a microfluidic mixer we have observed the rate of intramolecular diffusion within the unfolded B1 domain of protein L before it folds. The diffusion-limited rate of intramolecular contact is about 20 times slower than the rate in 6 M GdnHCl, and because in these conditions the protein is also more compact, the intramolecular diffusion coefficient decreases 100–500 times. The dramatic slowdown in diffusion occurs within the 250 μs mixing time of the mixer, and there appears to be no further evolution of this rate before reaching the transition state of folding. We show that observed folding rates are well predicted by a Kramers model with a denaturant-dependent diffusion coefficient and speculate that this diffusion coefficient is a significant contribution to the observed rate of folding. PMID:20643973

  14. Implementation of Multiple Spectroscopic Techniques to Simultaneously Observe Native and Mutated Protein Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Brennan; Ben, Kelty; Link, Justin

    A protein's natural, correctly folded structure can determine the protein's ability to carry out its function. If the unfolding process of proteins can be observed, then the relative stability can be better understood between native and mutated proteins. A global picture of the unfolding process may be completed through the studies of strategically mutated proteins using tryptophan as a probe. Horse heart cytochrome c, a thoroughly studied, model protein was used in our investigation to explore this idea. Various spectroscopic techniques such as circular dichroism (CD), absorbance, and fluorescence were simultaneously applied while slowly unfolding our protein by increasing the concentration of a chemical denaturant, guanidine hydrochloride. This provided us information about the thermodynamic properties of the protein and several mutants which can then be interpreted to gain relative stability information among mutations. Efforts to utilize these techniques on native and mutated proteins in comparison to current scientific unfolding theories will be presented in this session.

  15. Protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding

    PubMed Central

    Groitl, Bastian; Horowitz, Scott; Makepeace, Karl A. T.; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Reichmann, Dana; Bardwell, James C. A.; Jakob, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Stress-specific activation of the chaperone Hsp33 requires the unfolding of a central linker region. This activation mechanism suggests an intriguing functional relationship between the chaperone's own partial unfolding and its ability to bind other partially folded client proteins. However, identifying where Hsp33 binds its clients has remained a major gap in our understanding of Hsp33's working mechanism. By using site-specific Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance experiments guided by in vivo crosslinking studies, we now reveal that the partial unfolding of Hsp33's linker region facilitates client binding to an amphipathic docking surface on Hsp33. Furthermore, our results provide experimental evidence for the direct involvement of conditionally disordered regions in unfolded protein binding. The observed structural similarities between Hsp33's own metastable linker region and client proteins present a possible model for how Hsp33 uses protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding. PMID:26787517

  16. Understanding the dependence on the pulling speed of the unfolding pathway of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plata, C. A.; Cecconi, F.; Chinappi, M.; Prados, A.

    2015-08-01

    The dependence of the unfolding pathway of proteins on the pulling speed is investigated. This is done by introducing a simple one-dimensional chain comprising $N$ units, with different characteristic bistable free energies. These units represent either each of the modules in a modular protein or each of the intermediate "unfoldons" in a protein domain, which can be either folded or unfolded. The system is pulled by applying a force to the last unit of the chain, and the units unravel following a preferred sequence. We show that the unfolding sequence strongly depends on the pulling velocity $v_{p}$. In the simplest situation, there appears a critical pulling speed $v_{c}$: for pulling speeds $v_{p}unfolds first, whereas for $v_{p}>v_{c}$ it is the pulled unit that unfolds first. By means of a perturbative expansion, we find quite an accurate expression for this critical velocity.

  17. Sequence-Specific Solvent Accessibilities of Protein Residues in Unfolded Protein Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Bernadó, Pau; Blackledge, Martin; Sancho, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Protein stability cannot be understood without the correct description of the unfolded state. We present here an efficient method for accurate calculation of atomic solvent exposures for denatured protein ensembles. The method used to generate the ensembles has been shown to reproduce diverse biophysical experimental data corresponding to natively and chemically unfolded proteins. Using a data set of 19 nonhomologous proteins containing from 98 to 579 residues, we report average accessibilities for all residue types. These averaged accessibilities are considerably lower than those previously reported for tripeptides and close to the lower limit reported by Creamer and co-workers. Of importance, we observe remarkable sequence dependence for the exposure to solvent of all residue types, which indicates that average residue solvent exposures can be inappropriate to interpret mutational studies. In addition, we observe smaller influences of both protein size and protein amino acid composition in the averaged residue solvent exposures for individual proteins. Calculating residue-specific solvent accessibilities within the context of real sequences is thus necessary and feasible. The approach presented here may allow a more precise parameterization of protein energetics as a function of polar- and apolar-area burial and opens new ways to investigate the energetics of the unfolded state of proteins. PMID:17012314

  18. The inactivating factor of glutamine synthetase, IF7, is a "natively unfolded" protein

    PubMed Central

    Muro-Pastor, M. Isabel; Barrera, Francisco N.; Reyes, José C.; Florencio, Francisco J.; Neira, José L.

    2003-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the key enzyme responsible for the primary assimilation of ammonium in all living organisms, and it catalyses the synthesis of glutamine from glutamic acid, ATP, and ammonium. One of the recently discovered mechanisms of GS regulation involves protein-protein interactions with a small 65-residue-long protein named IF7. Here, we study the structure and stability of IF7 and its binding properties to GS, by using several biophysical techniques (fluorescence, circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and gel filtration chromatography) which provide complementary structural information. The findings show that IF7 has a small amount of residual secondary structure, but lacks a well defined tertiary structure, and is not compact. Thus, all of the studies indicate that IF7 is a "natively unfolded" protein. The binding of IF7 to GS, its natural binding partner, occurs with an apparent dissociation constant of KD = 0.3 ± 0.1 μM, as measured by fluorescence. We discuss the implications for the GS regulation mechanisms of IF7 being unfolded. PMID:12824490

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of IRE1α-ASK1 Pathway Reactions to Unfolded Protein Response in DRN Neurons of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Rats.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanzhen; Han, Fang; Xu, Yanhao; Shi, Yuxiu

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study was to further elucidate the molecular mechanisms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) pathogenesis and to provide experimental evidence for new drug targets for effective PTSD treatment. Expression changes of IRE1α, ASK1, and other downstream molecules of the IRE1α-ASK1 endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) signaling pathway were investigated. JNK, P38, CHOP, Bcl-2, and Bax were analyzed at both protein and mRNA levels of dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) neurons of PTSD rats. The rat PTSD model was established via the single-prolonged stress (SPS) method. Animals were randomly divided into five groups: a normal control group, a 1-day SPS group, a 4-days SPS group, a 7-day SPS group, and a 14-day SPS group. Spatial memory and learning ability of rats were evaluated subsequent to SPS using the Morris water maze test. Changes of IRE1α expression in the control and SPS groups were detected via immunohistochemistry (IHC). Protein and mRNA expressions of IRE1α, ASK1, JNK, P38, CHOP, Bcl-2, and Bax in the control and SPS groups were detected via Western blot and RT-PCR, respectively. The Morris water maze test revealed significantly longer average escape latencies in all SPS groups compared to the control group. In the spatial probe test, the percentage of time spent in the target quadrant was significantly lower in the SPS groups compared to control. IHC revealed increased positive expression of IRE1α subsequent to SPS challenge, reaching maximal levels on days four and seven (P < 0.01), while significantly decreasing on day 14 (P < 0.01). Western blot and RT-PCR revealed that protein and mRNA expressions of IRE1α, ASK1, JNK, CHOP, and P38 were significantly increased compared to control, peaking on days one, four, and seven post-SPS before returning to previous levels. Compared to control, expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax presented an initial increasing tendency followed by a decrease. A peak of Bcl-2 expression appeared early on day one

  20. Native-state interconversion of a metamorphic protein requires global unfolding.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Robert C; Murray, Nathan J; Peterson, Francis C; Volkman, Brian F

    2011-08-23

    Lymphotactin (Ltn) is a unique chemokine that under physiological solution conditions displays large-scale structural heterogeneity, defining a new category of "metamorphic proteins". Previous Ltn studies have indicated that each form is required for proper function, but the mechanism of interconversion remains unknown. Here we have investigated the temperature dependence of kinetic rates associated with interconversion and unfolding by stopped-flow fluorescence to determine transition-state free energies. Comparisons of derived thermodynamic parameters revealed striking similarities between interconversion and protein unfolding. We conclude that Ltn native-state rearrangement proceeds by way of a large-scale unfolding process rather than a unique intermediate structure.

  1. The use of fluorescence methods to monitor unfolding transitions in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Eftink, M R

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses several strategies for the use steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods to monitor unfolding transitions in proteins. The assumptions and limitations of several methods are discussed. Simulations are presented to show that certain fluorescence observables directly track the population of states in an unfolding transition, whereas other observables skew the transition toward the dominant fluorescing species. Several examples are given, involving the unfolding of Staphylococcal aureus nuclease A, in which thermodynamic information is obtained for the temperature and denaturant induced transitions in this protein. PMID:8161701

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of temperature induced unfolding of animal prion protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Duan, Danhui; Zhu, Shuyan; Zhang, Jinglai

    2013-10-01

    To elucidate the structural stability and the unfolding dynamics of the animal prion protein, the temperature induced structural evolution of turtle prion protein (tPrPc) and bank vole prion protein (bvPrPc) have been performed with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The unfolding behaviors of secondary structures showed that the α-helix was more stable than β-sheet. Extension and disruption of β-sheet commonly appeared in the temperature induced unfolding process. The conversion of α-helix to π-helix occurred more readily at the elevating temperature. Furthermore, it was suggested in this work that the unfolding of prion protein could be regulated by the temperature.

  3. A comprehensive multidimensional-embedded, one-dimensional reaction coordinate for protein unfolding/folding.

    PubMed

    Toofanny, Rudesh D; Jonsson, Amanda L; Daggett, Valerie

    2010-06-02

    The goal of the Dynameomics project is to perform, store, and analyze molecular dynamics simulations of representative proteins, of all known globular folds, in their native state and along their unfolding pathways. To analyze unfolding simulations, the location of the protein along the unfolding reaction coordinate (RXN) must be determined. Properties such as the fraction of native contacts and radius of gyration are often used; however, there is an issue regarding degeneracy with these properties, as native and nonnative species can overlap. Here, we used 15 physical properties of the protein to construct a multidimensional-embedded, one-dimensional RXN coordinate that faithfully captures the complex nature of unfolding. The unfolding RXN coordinates for 188 proteins (1534 simulations and 22.9 mus in explicit water) were calculated. Native, transition, intermediate, and denatured states were readily identified with the use of this RXN coordinate. A global native ensemble based on the native-state properties of the 188 proteins was created. This ensemble was shown to be effective for calculating RXN coordinates for folds outside the initial 188 targets. These RXN coordinates enable, high-throughput assignment of conformational states, which represents an important step in comparing protein properties across fold space as well as characterizing the unfolding of individual proteins.

  4. Digital force-feedback for protein unfolding experiments using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bippes, Christian A.; Janovjak, Harald; Kedrov, Alexej; Muller, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    Since its invention in the 1990s single-molecule force spectroscopy has been increasingly applied to study protein (un-)folding, cell adhesion, and ligand-receptor interactions. In most force spectroscopy studies, the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM) is separated from a surface at a constant velocity, thus applying an increasing force to folded bio-molecules or bio-molecular bonds. Recently, Fernandez and co-workers introduced the so-called force-clamp technique. Single proteins were subjected to a defined constant force allowing their life times and life time distributions to be directly measured. Up to now, the force-clamping was performed by analogue PID controllers, which require complex additional hardware and might make it difficult to combine the force-feedback with other modes such as constant velocity. These points may be limiting the applicability and versatility of this technique. Here we present a simple, fast, and all-digital (software-based) PID controller that yields response times of a few milliseconds in combination with a commercial AFM. We demonstrate the performance of our feedback loop by force-clamp unfolding of single Ig27 domains of titin and the membrane proteins bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and the sodium/proton antiporter NhaA.

  5. Studying the unfolding kinetics of proteins under pressure using long molecular dynamic simulation runs.

    PubMed

    Chara, Osvaldo; Grigera, José Raúl; McCarthy, Andrés N

    2007-12-01

    The usefulness of computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation has been extensively established for studying systems in equilibrium. Nevertheless, its application to complex non-equilibrium biological processes such as protein unfolding has been generally regarded as producing results which cannot be interpreted straightforwardly. In the present study, we present results for the kinetics of unfolding of apomyoglobin, based on the analysis of long simulation runs of this protein in solution at 3 kbar (1 atm = 1.01325, bar = 101,325 Pa). We hereby demonstrate that the analysis of the data collected within a simulated time span of 0.18 mus suffices for producing results, which coincide remarkably with the available unfolding kinetics experimental data. This not only validates molecular dynamics simulation as a valuable alternative for studying non-equilibrium processes, but also enables a detailed analysis of the actual structural mechanism which underlies the unfolding process of proteins under elusive denaturing conditions such as high pressure.

  6. Insulin relaxes bladder via PI3K/AKT/eNOS pathway activation in mucosa: unfolded protein response-dependent insulin resistance as a cause of obesity-associated overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Leiria, Luiz O; Sollon, Carolina; Báu, Fernando R; Mónica, Fabíola Z; D'Ancona, Carlos L; De Nucci, Gilberto; Grant, Andrew D; Anhê, Gabriel F; Antunes, Edson

    2013-05-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of insulin in the bladder and its relevance for the development of overactive bladder (OAB) in insulin-resistant obese mice. Bladders from male individuals who were involved in multiple organ donations were used. C57BL6/J mice were fed with a high-fat diet for 10 weeks to induce insulin-resistant obesity. Concentration-response curves to insulin were performed in human and mouse isolated mucosa-intact and mucosa-denuded bladders. Cystometric study was performed in terminally anaesthetized mice. Western blot was performed in bladders to detect phosphorylated endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) (Ser1177) and the phosphorylated protein kinase AKT (Ser473), as well as the unfolded protein response (UPR) markers TRIB3, CHOP and ATF4. Insulin (1-100 nm) produced concentration-dependent mouse and human bladder relaxations that were markedly reduced by mucosal removal or inhibition of the PI3K/AKT/eNOS pathway. In mouse bladders, insulin produced a 3.0-fold increase in cGMP levels (P < 0.05) that was prevented by PI3K/AKT/eNOS pathway inhibition. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibition abolished insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT and eNOS in bladder mucosa. Obese mice showed greater voiding frequency and non-voiding contractions, indicating overactive detrusor smooth muscle. Insulin failed to relax the bladder or to increase cGMP in the obese group. Insulin-stimulated AKT and eNOS phosphorylation in mucosa was also impaired in obese mice. The UPR markers TRIB3, CHOP and ATF4 were increased in the mucosa of obese mice. The UPR inhibitor 4-phenyl butyric acid normalized all the functional and molecular parameters in obese mice. Our data show that insulin relaxes human and mouse bladder via activation of the PI3K/AKT/eNOS pathway in the bladder mucosa. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-dependent insulin resistance in bladder contributes to OAB in obese mice.

  7. Dynamics and Energy Contributions for Transport of Unfolded Pertactin through a Protein Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Cressiot, Benjamin; Braselmann, Esther; Oukhaled, Abdelghani; Elcock, Adrian H.; Pelta, Juan; Clark, Patricia L.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the physical parameters governing translocation of an unfolded protein across a lipid bilayer, we studied protein transport through aerolysin, a passive protein channel, at the single molecule level. The protein model used was the passenger domain of pertactin, an autotransporter virulence protein. Transport of pertactin through the aerolysin nanopore was detected as transient partial current blockades as the unfolded protein partially occluded the aerolysin channel. We compared the dynamics of entry and transport for unfolded pertactin and a covalent end-to-end dimer of the same protein. For both the monomer and the dimer, the event frequency of current blockades increased exponentially with the applied voltage, while the duration of each event decreased exponentially as a function of the electrical potential. The blockade time was twice as long for the dimer as for the monomer. The calculated activation free energy includes a main enthalpic component that we attribute to electrostatic interactions between pertactin and the aerolysin nanopore (despite the low Debye length), plus an entropic component due to confinement of the unfolded chain within the narrow pore. Comparing our experimental results to previous studies and theory suggests that unfolded proteins cross the membrane by passing through the nanopore in a somewhat compact conformation according to the “blob” model of Daoud and de Gennes. PMID:26302243

  8. Toward a Taxonomy of the Denatured State: Small Angle Scattering Studies of Unfolded Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, I.S.; Doniach, S.; Plaxco, K.W.

    2005-02-15

    Despite the critical role the unfolded state plays in defining protein folding kinetics and thermodynamics (Berg et al., 2002; Dunker, 2002; Shortle, 2002; Wright and Dyson, 2002), our understanding of its detailed structure remains rather rudimentary; the heterogeneity of the unfolded ensemble renders difficult or impossible its study by traditional, atomic-level structural methods. Consequently, recent years have seen a significant expansion of small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS, respectively) techniques that provide direct, albeit rotationally and time-averaged, measures of the geometric properties of the unfolded ensemble. These studies have reached a critical mass, allowing us for the first time to define general observations regarding the nature of the geometry - and possibly the chemistry and physics - of unfolded proteins.

  9. Protein mechanical unfolding: Importance of non-native interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouza, Maksim; Hu, Chin-Kun; Zung, Hoang; Li, Mai Suan

    2009-12-01

    Mechanical unfolding of the fourth domain of Distyostelium discoideum filamin (DDFLN4) was studied by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, using the GROMOS96 force field 43a1 and the simple point charge explicit water solvent. Our study reveals an important role of non-native interactions in the unfolding process. Namely, the existence of a peak centered at the end-to-end extension ΔR ˜22 nm in the force-extension curve is associated with breaking of non-native hydrogen bonds. Such a peak has been observed in experiments but not in Go models, where non-native interactions are neglected. We predict that an additional peak occurs at ΔR ˜2 nm using not only GROMOS96 force field 43a1 but also Amber 94 and OPLS force fields. This result would stimulate further experimental studies on elastic properties of DDFLN4.

  10. Conformational dynamics of a protein in the folded and the unfolded state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitter, Jörg

    2003-08-01

    In a quasielastic neutron scattering experiment, the picosecond dynamics of α-amylase was investigated for the folded and the unfolded state of the protein. In order to ensure a reasonable interpretation of the internal protein dynamics, the protein was measured in D 2O-buffer solution. The much higher structural flexibility of the pH induced unfolded state as compared to the native folded state was quantified using a simple analytical model, describing a local diffusion inside a sphere. In terms of this model the conformational volume, which is explored mainly by confined protein side-chain movements, is parameterized by the radius of a sphere (folded state, r=1.2 Å; unfolded state, 1.8 Å). Differences in conformational dynamics between the folded and the unfolded state of a protein are of fundamental interest in the field of protein science, because they are assumed to play an important role for the thermodynamics of folding/unfolding transition and for protein stability.

  11. Models for Excluded Volume Interaction between an Unfolded Protein and Rigid Macromolecular Cosolutes: Macromolecular Crowding and Protein Stability Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Minton, Allen P.

    2005-01-01

    Statistical-thermodynamic models for the excluded volume interaction between an unfolded polypeptide chain and a hard sphere or hard rod cosolute are presented, permitting estimation of the free energy of transfer of a polypeptide chain with fixed radius of gyration from a dilute (ideal) solution to a solution containing volume fraction φ of either cosolute. Also presented is a general thermodynamic description of the equilibrium between a unique native state and a manifold of unfolded or partially unfolded states of a protein distinguished by their respective radii of gyration. Together with results of a Monte Carlo calculation of the distribution of radii of gyration of four different unfolded proteins published by Goldenberg in 2003, these models are used to estimate the effect of intermolecular excluded volume upon an experimentally measurable apparent two-state constant for equilibrium between native and nonnative conformations of each of the four proteins, and upon the experimentally measurable root mean-square radius of gyration of the unfolded protein. Model calculations predict that addition of inert cosolutes at volume fractions exceeding 0.1 stabilizes the native state relative to unfolded states by an amount that increases strongly with φ and with the size of the native protein relative to the size of inert cosolute, and results in significant compaction of the manifold of unfolded states. Predicted effects are in qualitative and/or semiquantitative accord with the results of several published experimental studies. PMID:15596487

  12. Solvation in protein (un)folding of melittin tetramer–monomer transition

    PubMed Central

    Othon, Christina M.; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Lin, Milo M.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2009-01-01

    Protein structural integrity and flexibility are intimately tied to solvation. Here, we examine the effect that changes in bulk and local solvent properties have on protein structure and stability. We observe the change in solvation of an unfolding of the protein model, melittin, in the presence of a denaturant, trifluoroethanol. The peptide system displays a well defined transition in that the tetramer unfolds without disrupting the secondary or tertiary structure. In the absence of local structural perturbation, we are able to reveal exclusively the role of solvation dynamics in protein structure stabilization and the (un)folding pathway. A sudden retardation in solvent dynamics, which is coupled to the change in protein structure, is observed at a critical trifluoroethanol concentration. The large amplitude conformational changes are regulated by the local solvent hydrophobicity and bulk solvent viscosity. PMID:19622745

  13. Solvation in protein (un)folding of melittin tetramer-monomer transition.

    PubMed

    Othon, Christina M; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Lin, Milo M; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2009-08-04

    Protein structural integrity and flexibility are intimately tied to solvation. Here, we examine the effect that changes in bulk and local solvent properties have on protein structure and stability. We observe the change in solvation of an unfolding of the protein model, melittin, in the presence of a denaturant, trifluoroethanol. The peptide system displays a well defined transition in that the tetramer unfolds without disrupting the secondary or tertiary structure. In the absence of local structural perturbation, we are able to reveal exclusively the role of solvation dynamics in protein structure stabilization and the (un)folding pathway. A sudden retardation in solvent dynamics, which is coupled to the change in protein structure, is observed at a critical trifluoroethanol concentration. The large amplitude conformational changes are regulated by the local solvent hydrophobicity and bulk solvent viscosity.

  14. Characterization of the Protein Unfolding Processes Induced by Urea and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Alessandro Guerini; Mollica, Luca; Ricchiuto, Piero; Baptista, António M.; Gianazza, Elisabetta; Eberini, Ivano

    2008-01-01

    Correct folding is critical for the biological activities of proteins. As a contribution to a better understanding of the protein (un)folding problem, we studied the effect of temperature and of urea on peptostreptococcal Protein L destructuration. We performed standard molecular dynamics simulations at 300 K, 350 K, 400 K, and 480 K, both in 10 M urea and in water. Protein L followed at least two alternative unfolding pathways. Urea caused the loss of secondary structure acting preferentially on the β-sheets, while leaving the α-helices almost intact; on the contrary, high temperature preserved the β-sheets and led to a complete loss of the α-helices. These data suggest that urea and high temperature act through different unfolding mechanisms, and protein secondary motives reveal a differential sensitivity to various denaturant treatments. As further validation of our results, replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations of the temperature-induced unfolding process in the presence of urea were performed. This set of simulations allowed us to compute the thermodynamical parameters of the process and confirmed that, in the configurational space of Protein L unfolding, both of the above pathways are accessible, although to a different relative extent. PMID:18065481

  15. Mechanical Folding and Unfolding of Protein Barnase at the Single-Molecule Level

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, Anna; Rey-Serra, Blanca; Frutos, Silvia; Cecconi, Ciro; Ritort, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The unfolding and folding of protein barnase has been extensively investigated in bulk conditions under the effect of denaturant and temperature. These experiments provided information about structural and kinetic features of both the native and the unfolded states of the protein, and debates about the possible existence of an intermediate state in the folding pathway have arisen. Here, we investigate the folding/unfolding reaction of protein barnase under the action of mechanical force at the single-molecule level using optical tweezers. We measure unfolding and folding force-dependent kinetic rates from pulling and passive experiments, respectively, and using Kramers-based theories (e.g., Bell-Evans and Dudko-Hummer-Szabo models), we extract the position of the transition state and the height of the kinetic barrier mediating unfolding and folding transitions, finding good agreement with previous bulk measurements. Measurements of the force-dependent kinetic barrier using the continuous effective barrier analysis show that protein barnase verifies the Leffler-Hammond postulate under applied force and allow us to extract its free energy of folding, ΔG0. The estimated value of ΔG0 is in agreement with our predictions obtained using fluctuation relations and previous bulk studies. To address the possible existence of an intermediate state on the folding pathway, we measure the power spectrum of force fluctuations at high temporal resolution (50 kHz) when the protein is either folded or unfolded and, additionally, we study the folding transition-path time at different forces. The finite bandwidth of our experimental setup sets the lifetime of potential intermediate states upon barnase folding/unfolding in the submillisecond timescale. PMID:26745410

  16. Probing osmolyte participation in the unfolding transition state of a protein

    PubMed Central

    Dougan, Lorna; Genchev, Georgi Z.; Lu, Hui; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of osmolyte protection in protein stability has proved to be challenging. In particular, little is known about the role of osmolytes in the structure of the unfolding transition state of a protein, the main determinant of its dynamics. We have developed an experimental protocol to directly probe the transition state of a protein in a range of osmolyte environments. We use an atomic force microscope in force-clamp mode to apply mechanical forces to the protein I27 and obtain force-dependent rate constants of protein unfolding. We measure the distance to the unfolding transition state, Δxu, along a 1D reaction coordinate imposed by mechanical force. We find that for the small osmolytes, ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, and glycerol, Δxu scales with the size of the molecule, whereas for larger osmolytes, sorbitol and sucrose, Δxu remains the same as that measured in water. These results are in agreement with steered molecular dynamics simulations that show that small osmolytes act as solvent bridges in the unfolding transition state structure, whereas only water molecules act as solvent bridges in large osmolyte environments. These results demonstrate that novel force protocols combined with solvent substitution can directly probe angstrom changes in unfolding transition state structure. This approach creates new opportunities to gain molecular level understanding of the action of osmolytes in biomolecular processes. PMID:21613570

  17. Methods for molecular dynamics simulations of protein folding/unfolding in solution.

    PubMed

    Beck, David A C; Daggett, Valerie

    2004-09-01

    All atom molecular dynamics simulations have become a standard method for mapping equilibrium protein dynamics and non-equilibrium events like folding and unfolding. Here, we present detailed methods for performing such simulations. Generic protocols for minimization, solvation, simulation, and analysis derived from previous studies are also presented. As a measure of validation, our water model is compared with experiment. An example of current applications of these methods, simulations of the ultrafast folding protein Engrailed Homeodomain are presented including the experimental evidence used to verify their results. Ultrafast folders are an invaluable tool for studying protein behavior as folding and unfolding events measured by experiment occur on timescales accessible with the high-resolution molecular dynamics methods we describe. Finally, to demonstrate the prospect of these methods for folding proteins, a temperature quench simulation of a thermal unfolding intermediate of the Engrailed Homeodomain is described.

  18. Understanding disordered and unfolded proteins using single-molecule FRET and polymer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Hagen

    2016-12-01

    Understanding protein folding and the functional properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) requires detailed knowledge of the forces that act in polypeptide chains. These forces determine the dimensions and dynamics of unfolded and disordered proteins and have been suggested to impact processes such as the coupled binding and folding of IDPs, or the rate of protein folding reactions. Much of the progress in understanding the physical and chemical properties of unfolded and intrinsically disordered polypeptide chains has been made possible by the recent developments in single-molecule fluorescence techniques. However, the interpretation of the experimental results requires concepts from polymer physics in order to be understood. Here, I review some of the theories used to describe the dimensions of unfolded polypeptide chains under varying solvent conditions together with their more recent application to experimental data.

  19. Unfolding proteins with mechanical forces: From toy models to atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Dmitrii

    2011-03-01

    The remarkable combination of strength and toughness, displayed by certain biological materials (e.g. spider silk) and often unmatched by artificial materials, is believed to originate from the mechanical response of individual load-bearing protein domains. Single-molecule pulling experiments carried out during the last decade showed that those proteins, when loaded, respond in a non-equilibrium fashion and can dissipate large amounts of energy though the breaking of sacrificial bonds. In my talk, I will discuss what structural properties correlate with mechanical strength and toughness at the single-molecule level, how thermodynamic stability is related to the mechanical stability, and why both atomistic simulations and simple models seem to fail to reconcile the mechanical responses of the same proteins measured under varied loading regimes. I will further discuss whether it is easier to unfold a protein mechanically by pulling at its ends or by threading it through a narrow pore. The latter process is believed to commonly occur in living organisms as an intermediate step in protein degradation. Supported by the NSF and the Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  20. Forced unfolding of proteins within cells -- a proteomic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Brian; Discher, Dennis

    2009-03-01

    Many cellular activities are mediated by conformational changes in proteins or else involve rearrangement of protein assemblies. These motions are now commonly investigated in vitro as well as at the single-molecule level. But we sought to develop an in-cell method to study these motions and to do so on a proteomic scale. We have been especially interested in studying molecular responses in cells under stress, and we initially developed a labeling technique in the simplest human cell, the red blood cell. The premise is to label cysteines with cell-viable, thiol-reactive fluorophores in both stressed and unstressed cells. Then, differential labeling of proteins would indicate that under stress, previously buried cysteine residues become exposed and thus accessible to the fluorescent probe. Fluorescence imaging and saparations provide initial clues to structures and proteins, but Mass Spectrometry precisely maps the sites that are exposed. Subsequent work on recombinants and in modeling is then used to explain the cell-derived findings, and the method has now been applied to several nucleated cell types.

  1. THE SURFACE-MEDIATED UNFOLDING KINETICS OF GLOBULAR PROTEINS IS DEPENDENT ON MOLECULAR WEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Patananan, A.N.; Goheen, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and unfolding pathways of proteins on rigid surfaces are essential in numerous complex processes associated with biomedical engineering, nanotechnology, and chromatography. It is now well accepted that the kinetics of unfolding are characterized by chemical and physical interactions dependent on protein deformability and structure, as well as environmental pH, temperature, and surface chemistry. Although this fundamental process has broad implications in medicine and industry, little is known about the mechanism because of the atomic lengths and rapid time scales involved. Therefore, the unfolding kinetics of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin were investigated by adsorbing the globular proteins to non-porous cationic polymer beads. The protein fractions were adsorbed at different residence times (0, 9, 10, 20, and 30 min) at near-physiological conditions using a gradient elution system similar to that in high-performance liquid chromatography. The elution profi les and retention times were obtained by ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometry. A decrease in recovery was observed with time for almost all proteins and was attributed to irreversible protein unfolding on the non-porous surfaces. These data, and those of previous studies, fi t a positively increasing linear trend between percent unfolding after a fi xed (9 min) residence time (71.8%, 31.1%, and 32.1% of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin, respectively) and molecular weight. Of all the proteins examined so far, only myoglobin deviated from this trend with higher than predicted unfolding rates. Myoglobin also exhibited an increase in retention time over a wide temperature range (0°C and 55°C, 4.39 min and 5.74 min, respectively) whereas ovalbumin and β-glucosidase did not. Further studies using a larger set of proteins are required to better understand the physiological and physiochemical implications of protein unfolding kinetics. This study confi rms that surface

  2. Free energy for blue copper protein unfolding determined by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cunsolo, V; Foti, S; La Rosa, C; Saletti, R; Canters, G W; Verbeet, M P

    2001-01-01

    An electrospray ionisation (ESI) mass spectrometric method for the determination of the free energy (DeltaG) of unfolding of proteins is described. The method was tested using three blue copper proteins: wild type azurin, Cys-3Ala/Cys-26Ala (C3A/C26A) azurin mutant and wild-type amicyanin. The time course of the denaturation process of the proteins dissolved in methanol/water (50:50, v/v, pH 3.5) was followed by recording ESI mass spectra at time intervals. The spectra showed two series of peaks, corresponding to the native holo-protein and the unfolded apo-protein. From the intensity ratio of these two series of peaks at increasing time and at equilibrium, the free energy for the unfolding process for the three proteins could be determined. To evaluate the reliability of the thermodynamic data obtained by the ESI mass spectrometric approach, the denaturation process was followed by UV-VIS spectroscopy. The two sets of data obtained by these independent methods were in good agreement indicating that the ESI-MS approach can be used to obtain reliable quantitative information about the protein unfolding process. In principle, this approach can be applied to other proteins and requires very low amounts of sample, due to the intrinsic sensitivity of mass spectrometry. This may prove particularly useful when the amount of sample available prevents the use of current methods.

  3. A hypothesis to reconcile the physical and chemical unfolding of proteins.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Guilherme A P; Silva, Jerson L

    2015-05-26

    High pressure (HP) or urea is commonly used to disturb folding species. Pressure favors the reversible unfolding of proteins by causing changes in the volumetric properties of the protein-solvent system. However, no mechanistic model has fully elucidated the effects of urea on structure unfolding, even though protein-urea interactions are considered to be crucial. Here, we provide NMR spectroscopy and 3D reconstructions from X-ray scattering to develop the "push-and-pull" hypothesis, which helps to explain the initial mechanism of chemical unfolding in light of the physical events triggered by HP. In studying MpNep2 from Moniliophthora perniciosa, we tracked two cooperative units using HP-NMR as MpNep2 moved uphill in the energy landscape; this process contrasts with the overall structural unfolding that occurs upon reaching a threshold concentration of urea. At subdenaturing concentrations of urea, we were able to trap a state in which urea is preferentially bound to the protein (as determined by NMR intensities and chemical shifts); this state is still folded and not additionally exposed to solvent [fluorescence and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)]. This state has a higher susceptibility to pressure denaturation (lower p1/2 and larger ΔVu); thus, urea and HP share concomitant effects of urea binding and pulling and water-inducing pushing, respectively. These observations explain the differences between the molecular mechanisms that control the physical and chemical unfolding of proteins, thus opening up new possibilities for the study of protein folding and providing an interpretation of the nature of cooperativity in the folding and unfolding processes.

  4. Reversibility and two state behaviour in the thermal unfolding of oligomeric TIM barrel proteins.

    PubMed

    Romero-Romero, Sergio; Costas, Miguel; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela; Alejandro Fernández-Velasco, D

    2015-08-28

    Temperature is one of the main variables that modulate protein function and stability. Thermodynamic studies of oligomeric proteins, the dominant protein natural form, have been often hampered because irreversible aggregation and/or slow reactions are common. There are no reports on the reversible equilibrium thermal unfolding of proteins composed of (β/α)8 barrel subunits, albeit this "TIM barrel" topology is one of the most abundant and versatile in nature. We studied the eponymous TIM barrel, triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), belonging to five species of different bacterial taxa. All of them were found to be catalytically efficient dimers. The three-dimensional structure of four enzymes was solved at high/medium resolution. Irreversibility and kinetic control were observed in the thermal unfolding of two TIMs, while for the other three the thermal unfolding was found to follow a two-state equilibrium reversible process. Shifts in the global stability curves of these three proteins are related to the organismal temperature range of optimal growth and modulated by variations in maximum stability temperature and in the enthalpy change at that temperature. Reversibility appears to correlate with the low isoelectric point, the absence of a residual structure in the unfolded state, small cavity volume in the native state, low conformational stability and a low melting temperature. Furthermore, the strong coupling between dimer dissociation and monomer unfolding may reduce aggregation and favour reversibility. It is therefore very thought-provoking to find that a common topological ensemble, such as the TIM barrel, can unfold/refold in the Anfinsen way, i.e. without the help of the cellular machinery.

  5. Application of principal component analysis in protein unfolding: an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Das, Atanu; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2007-10-28

    We have performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the thermal denaturation of one protein and one peptide-ubiquitin and melittin. To identify the correlation in dynamics among various secondary structural fragments and also the individual contribution of different residues towards thermal unfolding, principal component analysis method was applied in order to give a new insight to protein dynamics by analyzing the contribution of coefficients of principal components. The cross-correlation matrix obtained from MD simulation trajectory provided important information regarding the anisotropy of backbone dynamics that leads to unfolding. Unfolding of ubiquitin was found to be a three-state process, while that of melittin, though smaller and mostly helical, is more complicated.

  6. Is the unfolded state the Rosetta Stone of the protein folding problem?

    PubMed

    Hammarström, P; Carlsson, U

    2000-09-24

    Solving the protein folding problem is one of the most challenging tasks in the post genomic era. Identification of folding-initiation sites is very important in order to understand the protein folding mechanism. Detection of residual structure in unfolded proteins can yield important clues to the initiation sites in protein folding. A substantial number of studied proteins possess residual structure in hydrophobic regions clustered together in the protein core. These stable structures can work as seeds in the folding process. In addition, local preferences for secondary structure in the form of turns for beta-sheet initiation and helical turns for alpha-helix formation can guide the folding reaction. In this respect the unfolded states, studied at increasing structural resolution, can be the Rosetta Stone of the protein folding problem.

  7. A hypothesis to reconcile the physical and chemical unfolding of proteins

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2015-01-01

    High pressure (HP) or urea is commonly used to disturb folding species. Pressure favors the reversible unfolding of proteins by causing changes in the volumetric properties of the protein–solvent system. However, no mechanistic model has fully elucidated the effects of urea on structure unfolding, even though protein–urea interactions are considered to be crucial. Here, we provide NMR spectroscopy and 3D reconstructions from X-ray scattering to develop the “push-and-pull” hypothesis, which helps to explain the initial mechanism of chemical unfolding in light of the physical events triggered by HP. In studying MpNep2 from Moniliophthora perniciosa, we tracked two cooperative units using HP-NMR as MpNep2 moved uphill in the energy landscape; this process contrasts with the overall structural unfolding that occurs upon reaching a threshold concentration of urea. At subdenaturing concentrations of urea, we were able to trap a state in which urea is preferentially bound to the protein (as determined by NMR intensities and chemical shifts); this state is still folded and not additionally exposed to solvent [fluorescence and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)]. This state has a higher susceptibility to pressure denaturation (lower p1/2 and larger ΔVu); thus, urea and HP share concomitant effects of urea binding and pulling and water-inducing pushing, respectively. These observations explain the differences between the molecular mechanisms that control the physical and chemical unfolding of proteins, thus opening up new possibilities for the study of protein folding and providing an interpretation of the nature of cooperativity in the folding and unfolding processes. PMID:25964355

  8. Simulation of urea-induced protein unfolding: a lesson from bovine β-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Eberini, Ivano; Emerson, Andrew; Sensi, Cristina; Ragona, Laura; Ricchiuto, Piero; Pedretti, Alessandro; Gianazza, Elisabetta; Tramontano, Anna

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in the very initial stages of protein unfolding, we carried out one long (1 μs) simulation of bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG) together with three (500 ns) supporting MD runs, in which the unfolding conditions were produced by adding the osmolyte urea to the simulated systems and/or by increasing the thermal energy raising the temperature from 300 to 350 K. BLG was chosen, since it is a well-characterized model protein, for which structural and folding properties have been widely investigated by X-ray and NMR. MD trajectories were analyzed not only in terms of standard progress variables, such as backbone H-bonds, gyration radius width, secondary structure elements, but also through the scrutiny of interactions and dynamical behavior of specific key residues previously pointed out and investigated by NMR and belonging to a well known hydrophobic cluster. MD trajectories simulated in different unfolding conditions suggest that urea destabilizes BLG structure weakening protein::protein hydrophobic interactions and the hydrogen bond network. The early unfolding events, better observed at higher temperature, affect both secondary and tertiary structure of the protein.

  9. Precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding: From time series correlation analysis to atomistic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P. J.; Lai, S. K.; Cheong, S. A.

    2014-05-28

    Folded conformations of proteins in thermodynamically stable states have long lifetimes. Before it folds into a stable conformation, or after unfolding from a stable conformation, the protein will generally stray from one random conformation to another leading thus to rapid fluctuations. Brief structural changes therefore occur before folding and unfolding events. These short-lived movements are easily overlooked in studies of folding/unfolding for they represent momentary excursions of the protein to explore conformations in the neighborhood of the stable conformation. The present study looks for precursory signatures of protein folding/unfolding within these rapid fluctuations through a combination of three techniques: (1) ultrafast shape recognition, (2) time series segmentation, and (3) time series correlation analysis. The first procedure measures the differences between statistical distance distributions of atoms in different conformations by calculating shape similarity indices from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. The second procedure is used to discover the times at which the protein makes transitions from one conformation to another. Finally, we employ the third technique to exploit spatial fingerprints of the stable conformations; this procedure is to map out the sequences of changes preceding the actual folding and unfolding events, since strongly correlated atoms in different conformations are different due to bond and steric constraints. The aforementioned high-frequency fluctuations are therefore characterized by distinct correlational and structural changes that are associated with rate-limiting precursors that translate into brief segments. Guided by these technical procedures, we choose a model system, a fragment of the protein transthyretin, for identifying in this system not only the precursory signatures of transitions associated with α helix and β hairpin, but also the important role played by weaker correlations in such protein

  10. Maximum likelihood estimation of protein kinetic parameters under weak assumptions from unfolding force spectroscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aioanei, Daniel; Samorì, Bruno; Brucale, Marco

    2009-12-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is extensively used to characterize the mechanical unfolding behavior of individual protein domains under applied force by pulling chimeric polyproteins consisting of identical tandem repeats. Constant velocity unfolding SMFS data can be employed to reconstruct the protein unfolding energy landscape and kinetics. The methods applied so far require the specification of a single stretching force increase function, either theoretically derived or experimentally inferred, which must then be assumed to accurately describe the entirety of the experimental data. The very existence of a suitable optimal force model, even in the context of a single experimental data set, is still questioned. Herein, we propose a maximum likelihood (ML) framework for the estimation of protein kinetic parameters which can accommodate all the established theoretical force increase models. Our framework does not presuppose the existence of a single force characteristic function. Rather, it can be used with a heterogeneous set of functions, each describing the protein behavior in the stretching time range leading to one rupture event. We propose a simple way of constructing such a set of functions via piecewise linear approximation of the SMFS force vs time data and we prove the suitability of the approach both with synthetic data and experimentally. Additionally, when the spontaneous unfolding rate is the only unknown parameter, we find a correction factor that eliminates the bias of the ML estimator while also reducing its variance. Finally, we investigate which of several time-constrained experiment designs leads to better estimators.

  11. Solvent sensitivity of protein unfolding: dynamical study of chicken villin headpiece subdomain in water-ethanol binary mixture.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rikhia; Roy, Susmita; Bagchi, Biman

    2013-12-12

    We carry out a series of long atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the unfolding of a small protein, chicken villin headpiece (HP-36), in water-ethanol (EtOH) binary mixture. The prime objective of this work is to explore the sensitivity of protein unfolding dynamics toward increasing concentration of the cosolvent and unravel essential features of intermediates formed in search of a dynamical pathway toward unfolding. In water-ethanol binary mixtures, HP-36 is found to unfold partially, under ambient conditions, that otherwise requires temperature as high as ∼600 K to denature in pure aqueous solvent. However, an interesting course of pathway is observed to be followed in the process, guided by the formation of unique intermediates. The first step of unfolding is essentially the separation of the cluster formed by three hydrophobic (phenylalanine) residues, namely, Phe-7, Phe-11, and Phe-18, which constitute the hydrophobic core, thereby initiating melting of helix-2 of the protein. The initial steps are similar to temperature-induced unfolding as well as chemical unfolding using DMSO as cosolvent. Subsequent unfolding steps follow a unique path. As water-ethanol shows composition-dependent anomalies, so do the details of unfolding dynamics. With an increase in cosolvent concentration, different partially unfolded intermediates are found to be formed. This is reflected in a remarkable nonmonotonic composition dependence of several order parameters, including fraction of native contacts and protein-solvent interaction energy. The emergence of such partially unfolded states can be attributed to the preferential solvation of the hydrophobic residues by the ethyl groups of ethanol. We further quantify the local dynamics of unfolding by using a Marcus-type theory.

  12. Force-dependent switch in protein unfolding pathways and transition-state movements.

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, Pavel I; Hinczewski, Michael; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Marqusee, Susan; Thirumalai, D

    2016-02-09

    Although it is known that single-domain proteins fold and unfold by parallel pathways, demonstration of this expectation has been difficult to establish in experiments. Unfolding rate, [Formula: see text], as a function of force f, obtained in single-molecule pulling experiments on src SH3 domain, exhibits upward curvature on a [Formula: see text] plot. Similar observations were reported for other proteins for the unfolding rate [Formula: see text]. These findings imply unfolding in these single-domain proteins involves a switch in the pathway as f or [Formula: see text] is increased from a low to a high value. We provide a unified theory demonstrating that if [Formula: see text] as a function of a perturbation (f or [Formula: see text]) exhibits upward curvature then the underlying energy landscape must be strongly multidimensional. Using molecular simulations we provide a structural basis for the switch in the pathways and dramatic shifts in the transition-state ensemble (TSE) in src SH3 domain as f is increased. We show that a single-point mutation shifts the upward curvature in [Formula: see text] to a lower force, thus establishing the malleability of the underlying folding landscape. Our theory, applicable to any perturbation that affects the free energy of the protein linearly, readily explains movement in the TSE in a β-sandwich (I27) protein and single-chain monellin as the denaturant concentration is varied. We predict that in the force range accessible in laser optical tweezer experiments there should be a switch in the unfolding pathways in I27 or its mutants.

  13. Dataset of eye disease-related proteins analyzed using the unfolding mutation screen

    PubMed Central

    McCafferty, Caitlyn L.; Sergeev, Yuri V.

    2016-01-01

    A number of genetic diseases are a result of missense mutations in protein structure. These mutations can lead to severe protein destabilization and misfolding. The unfolding mutation screen (UMS) is a computational method that calculates unfolding propensities for every possible missense mutation in a protein structure. The UMS validation demonstrated a good agreement with experimental and phenotypical data. 15 protein structures (a combination of homology models and crystal structures) were analyzed using UMS. The standard and clustered heat maps, and patterned protein structure from the analysis were stored in a UMS library. The library is currently composed of 15 protein structures from 14 inherited eye diseases including retina degenerations, glaucoma, and cataracts, and contains data for 181,110 mutations. The UMS protein library introduces 13 new human models of eye disease related proteins and is the first collection of the consistently calculated unfolding propensities, which could be used as a tool for the express analysis of novel mutations in clinical practice, next generation sequencing, and genotype-to-phenotype relationships in inherited eye disease. PMID:27922631

  14. Single-molecule protein unfolding and translocation by an ATP-fueled proteolytic machine.

    PubMed

    Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Olivares, Adrian O; Sauer, Robert T; Baker, Tania A; Lang, Matthew J

    2011-04-15

    All cells employ ATP-powered proteases for protein-quality control and regulation. In the ClpXP protease, ClpX is a AAA+ machine that recognizes specific protein substrates, unfolds these molecules, and then translocates the denatured polypeptide through a central pore and into ClpP for degradation. Here, we use optical-trapping nanometry to probe the mechanics of enzymatic unfolding and translocation of single molecules of a multidomain substrate. Our experiments demonstrate the capacity of ClpXP and ClpX to perform mechanical work under load, reveal very fast and highly cooperative unfolding of individual substrate domains, suggest a translocation step size of 5-8 amino acids, and support a power-stroke model of denaturation in which successful enzyme-mediated unfolding of stable domains requires coincidence between mechanical pulling by the enzyme and a transient stochastic reduction in protein stability. We anticipate that single-molecule studies of the mechanical properties of other AAA+ proteolytic machines will reveal many shared features with ClpXP.

  15. Continuous dissolution of structure during the unfolding of a small protein

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Santosh Kumar; Dhar, Deepak; Krishnamoorthy, Guruswamy; Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    2009-01-01

    The unfolding kinetics of many small proteins appears to be first order, when measured by ensemble-averaging probes such as fluorescence and circular dichroism. For one such protein, monellin, it is shown here that hidden behind this deceptive simplicity is a complexity that becomes evident with the use of experimental probes that are able to discriminate between different conformations in an ensemble of structures. In this study, the unfolding of monellin has been probed by measurement of the changes in the distributions of 4 different intramolecular distances, using a multisite, time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer methodology. During the course of unfolding, the protein molecules are seen to undergo slow and continuous, diffusive swelling. The swelling process can be modeled as the slow diffusive swelling of a Rouse-like chain with some additional noncovalent, intramolecular interactions. Here, we show that specific structure is lost during the swelling process gradually, and not in an all-or-none manner, during unfolding. PMID:19553216

  16. Studying the Unfolding Kinetics of Proteins under Pressure Using Long Molecular Dynamic Simulation Runs

    PubMed Central

    Chara, Osvaldo; Grigera, José Raúl

    2008-01-01

    The usefulness of computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation has been extensively established for studying systems in equilibrium. Nevertheless, its application to complex non-equilibrium biological processes such as protein unfolding has been generally regarded as producing results which cannot be interpreted straightforwardly. In the present study, we present results for the kinetics of unfolding of apomyoglobin, based on the analysis of long simulation runs of this protein in solution at 3 kbar (1 atm = 1.01325, bar = 101 325 Pa). We hereby demonstrate that the analysis of the data collected within a simulated time span of 0.18 μs suffices for producing results, which coincide remarkably with the available unfolding kinetics experimental data. This not only validates molecular dynamics simulation as a valuable alternative for studying non-equilibrium processes, but also enables a detailed analysis of the actual structural mechanism which underlies the unfolding process of proteins under elusive denaturing conditions such as high pressure. PMID:19669536

  17. On the formation of highly charged gaseous ions from unfolded proteins by electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Konermann, Lars; Rodriguez, Antony D; Liu, Jiangjiang

    2012-08-07

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) of native proteins results in a narrow distribution of low protonation states. ESI for these folded species proceeds via the charged residue mechanism. In contrast, ESI of unfolded proteins yields a wide distribution of much higher charge states. The current work develops a model that can account for this effect. Recent molecular dynamics simulations revealed that ESI for unfolded polypeptide chains involves protein ejection from nanodroplets, representing a type of ion evaporation mechanism (IEM). We point out the analogies between this IEM, and the dissociation of gaseous protein complexes after collisional activation. The latter process commences with unraveling of a single subunit, in concert with Coulombically driven proton transfer. The subunit then separates from the residual complex as a highly charged ion. We propose that similar charge equilibration events accompany the IEM of unfolded proteins, thereby causing the formation of high ESI charge states. A bead chain model is used for examining how charge is partitioned as protein and droplet separate. It is shown that protein ejection from differently sized ESI droplets generates a range of protonation states. The predicted behavior agrees well with experimental data.

  18. Unfolding of a model protein on ion exchange and mixed mode chromatography surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gospodarek, Adrian M; Hiser, Diana E; O'Connell, John P; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-08-15

    Recent studies with proteins indicate that conformational changes and aggregation can occur during ion exchange chromatography (IEC). Such behavior is not usually expected, but could lead to decreased yield and product degradation from both IEC and multi mode chromatography (MMC) that has ligands of both hydrophobic and charged functionalities. In this study, we used hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry to investigate unfolding of the model protein BSA on IEC and MMC surfaces under different solution conditions at 25°C. Increased solvent exposure, indicating greater unfolding relative to that in solution, was found for protein adsorbed on cationic IEC and MMC surfaces in the pH range of 3.0 to 4.5, where BSA has decreased stability in solution. There was no effect of anionic surfaces at pH values in the range from 6.0 to 9.0. Differences of solvent exposure of whole molecules when adsorbed and in solution suggest that adsorbed BSA unfolds at lower pH values and may show aggregation, depending upon pH and the surface type. Measurements on digested peptides showed that classifications of stability can be made for various regions; these are generally retained as pH is changed. When salt was added to MMC systems, where electrostatic interactions would be minimized, less solvent exposure was seen, implying that it is the cationic moieties, rather than the hydrophobic ligands, which cause greater surface unfolding at low salt concentrations. These results suggest that proteins of lower stability may exhibit unfolding and aggregation during IEC and MMC separations, as they can with hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

  19. Protein unfolding transitions in an intrinsically unstable annexin domain: molecular dynamics simulation and comparison with nuclear magnetic resonance data.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tru; Smith, Jeremy C; Sanson, Alain

    2002-08-01

    Unfolding transitions of an intrinsically unstable annexin domain and the unfolded state structure have been examined using multiple approximately 10-ns molecular dynamics simulations. Three main basins are observed in the configurational space: native-like state, compact partially unfolded or intermediate compact state, and the unfolded state. In the native-like state fluctuations are observed that are nonproductive for unfolding. During these fluctuations, after an initial loss of approximately 20% of the core residue native contacts, the core of the protein transiently completely refolds to the native state. The transition from the native-like basin to the partially unfolded compact state involves approximately 75% loss of native contacts but little change in the radius of gyration or core hydration properties. The intermediate state adopts for part of the time in one of the trajectories a novel highly compact salt-bridge stabilized structure that can be identified as a conformational trap. The intermediate-to-unfolded state transition is characterized by a large increase in the radius of gyration. After an initial relaxation the unfolded state recovers a native-like topology of the domain. The simulated unfolded state ensemble reproduces in detail experimental nuclear magnetic resonance data and leads to a convincing complete picture of the unfolded domain.

  20. Universal convergence of the specific volume changes of globular proteins upon unfolding.

    PubMed

    Schweiker, Katrina L; Fitz, Victoria W; Makhatadze, George I

    2009-11-24

    Both pressure and temperature are important environmental variables, and to obtain a complete understanding of the mechanisms of protein folding, it is necessary to determine how protein stability is dependent on these fundamental thermodynamic parameters. Although the temperature dependence of protein stability has been widely explored, the dependence of protein stability on pressure is not as well studied. In this paper, we report the results of the direct thermodynamic determination of the change in specific volume (DeltaV/V) upon protein unfolding, which defines the pressure dependence of protein stability, for five model proteins (ubiquitin, eglin c, ribonuclease A, lysozyme, and cytochrome c). We have shown that the specific volumetric changes upon unfolding for four of the proteins (ubiquitin, eglin c, ribonuclease A, and lysozyme) appear to converge to a common value at high temperatures. Analysis of various contributions to the change in volume upon protein unfolding allowed us to put forth the hypothesis that the change in volume due to hydration is very close to zero at this temperature, such that DeltaV/V is defined largely by the total volume of cavities and voids within a protein, and that this is a universal property of all small globular proteins without prosthetic groups. To test this hypothesis, additional experiments were performed with variants of eglin c that had site-directed substitutions at two buried positions, to create an additional cavity in the protein core. The results of these experiments, coupled with the structural analysis of cytochrome c showing a lower packing density compared to those of the other four proteins, provided further support for the hypothesis. Finally, we have shown that the deviation of the high-temperature DeltaV value of a given protein from the convergence value can be used to determine the size of the excess cavities in globular proteins.

  1. Insight into Early-Stage Unfolding of GPI-Anchored Human Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Emilia L.; Qi, Yifei; Park, Soohyung; Mallajosyula, Sairam S.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Im, Wonpil

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders, which are characterized by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrPSc) converted from a normal host cellular prion protein (PrPC). Experimental studies suggest that PrPC is enriched with α-helical structure, whereas PrPSc contains a high proportion of β-sheet. In this study, we report the impact of N-glycosylation and the membrane on the secondary structure stability utilizing extensive microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. Our results reveal that the HB (residues 173 to 194) C-terminal fragment undergoes conformational changes and helix unfolding in the absence of membrane environments because of the competition between protein backbone intramolecular and protein-water intermolecular hydrogen bonds as well as its intrinsic instability originated from the amino acid sequence. This initiation of the unfolding process of PrPC leads to a subsequent increase in the length of the HB-HC loop (residues 195 to 199) that may trigger larger rigid body motions or further unfolding around this region. Continuous interactions between prion protein and the membrane not only constrain the protein conformation but also decrease the solvent accessibility of the backbone atoms, thereby stabilizing the secondary structure, which is enhanced by N-glycosylation via additional interactions between the N-glycans and the membrane surface. PMID:26588568

  2. Exploring the role of internal friction in the dynamics of unfolded proteins using simple polymer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ryan R.; Hawk, Alexander T.; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2013-02-01

    Recent experiments showed that the reconfiguration dynamics of unfolded proteins are often adequately described by simple polymer models. In particular, the Rouse model with internal friction (RIF) captures internal friction effects as observed in single-molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) studies of a number of proteins. Here we use RIF, and its non-free draining analog, Zimm model with internal friction, to explore the effect of internal friction on the rate with which intramolecular contacts can be formed within the unfolded chain. Unlike the reconfiguration times inferred from FCS experiments, which depend linearly on the solvent viscosity, the first passage times to form intramolecular contacts are shown to display a more complex viscosity dependence. We further describe scaling relationships obeyed by contact formation times in the limits of high and low internal friction. Our findings provide experimentally testable predictions that can serve as a framework for the analysis of future studies of contact formation in proteins.

  3. Apolar and polar solvation thermodynamics related to the protein unfolding process.

    PubMed Central

    Bakk, Audun; Høye, Johan S; Hansen, Alex

    2002-01-01

    Thermodynamics related to hydrated water upon protein unfolding is studied over a broad temperature range (5-125 degrees C). The hydration effect arising from the apolar interior is modeled as an increased number of hydrogen bonds between water molecules compared with bulk water. The corresponding contribution from the polar interior is modeled as a two-step process. First, the polar interior breaks hydrogen bonds in bulk water upon unfolding. Second, due to strong bonds between the polar surface and the nearest water molecules, we assume quantization using a simplified two-state picture. The heat capacity change upon hydration is compared with model compound data evaluated previously for 20 different proteins. We obtain good correspondence with the data for both the apolar and the polar interior. We note that the effective coupling constants for both models have small variations among the proteins we have investigated. PMID:11806913

  4. Chaperone activation by unfolding.

    PubMed

    Foit, Linda; George, Jenny S; Zhang, Bin W; Brooks, Charles L; Bardwell, James C A

    2013-04-02

    Conditionally disordered proteins can alternate between highly ordered and less ordered configurations under physiological conditions. Whereas protein function is often associated with the ordered conformation, for some of these conditionally unstructured proteins, the opposite applies: Their activation is associated with their unfolding. An example is the small periplasmic chaperone HdeA, which is critical for the ability of enteric bacterial pathogens like Escherichia coli to survive passage through extremely acidic environments, such as the human stomach. At neutral pH, HdeA is a chaperone-inactive dimer. On a shift to low pH, however, HdeA monomerizes, partially unfolds, and becomes rapidly active in preventing the aggregation of substrate proteins. By mutating two aspartic acid residues predicted to be responsible for the pH-dependent monomerization of HdeA, we have succeeded in isolating an HdeA mutant that is active at neutral pH. We find this HdeA mutant to be substantially destabilized, partially unfolded, and mainly monomeric at near-neutral pH at a concentration at which it prevents aggregation of a substrate protein. These results provide convincing evidence for direct activation of a protein by partial unfolding.

  5. Opioid peptides derived from food proteins suppress aggregation and promote reactivation of partly unfolded stressed proteins.

    PubMed

    Artemova, N V; Bumagina, Z M; Kasakov, A S; Shubin, V V; Gurvits, B Ya

    2010-02-01

    A new view of the opioid peptides is presented. The potential of small peptides derived from precursor food proteins, to bind to partly unfolded stressed proteins to prevent their irreversible aggregation and inactivation has been demonstrated in various in vitro test systems: dithiothreitol-induced aggregation of alpha-lactalbumin (LA), heat-induced aggregation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and aggregation and inactivation of bovine erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the process of its refolding after removal of stress conditions. Using dynamic light scattering (DLS), turbidimetry, fluorescence, and circular dichroism measurements protective effects of the synthetic opioid peptides: exorphin C from wheat gluten (Tyr-Pro-Ile-Ser-Leu), rubiscolin-5 from spinach ribulose-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) (Tyr-Pro-Leu-Asp-Leu), and hemorphin-6 from bovine hemoglobin (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Thr-Gln-Arg) have been revealed. We have demonstrated the concentration-dependent suppression of light scattering intensity of aggregates of LA and ADH in the presence of the peptides, the population of nanoparticles with higher hydrodynamic radii being shifted to the lower ones, accompanied by an increase in the lag period of aggregation. The presence of the peptides in the refolding solution was shown to assist reactivation of CA and enhance the yield of the CA soluble protein. The results suggest that bioactive food protein fragments may be regarded as exogenous supplements to the endogenous defense mechanisms of the human organism under stress conditions.

  6. Hyperbolic Cosine Latent Trait Models for Unfolding Direct Responses and Pairwise Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David

    1995-01-01

    The hyperbolic cosine unfolding model for direct responses (HCMDR) of persons to individual stimuli is elaborated in three ways. The specialization of the second parameter is shown to be a property of the data, and not arbitrary. The HCMDR is used to construct an elegant model for pairwise preferences. (SLD)

  7. Effect of interdomain linker length on an antagonistic folding-unfolding equilibrium between two protein domains.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Thomas A; Mills, Brandon M; Lubin, David J; Chong, Lillian T; Loh, Stewart N

    2009-02-27

    Fusion of one protein domain with another is a common event in both evolution and protein engineering experiments. When insertion is at an internal site (e.g., a surface loop or turn), as opposed to one of the termini, conformational strain can be introduced into both domains. Strain is manifested by an antagonistic folding-unfolding equilibrium between the two domains, which we previously showed can be parameterized by a coupling free-energy term (DeltaG(X)). The extent of strain is predicted to depend primarily on the ratio of the N-to-C distance of the guest protein to the distance between ends of the surface loop in the host protein. Here, we test that hypothesis by inserting ubiquitin (Ub) into the bacterial ribonuclease barnase (Bn), using peptide linkers from zero to 10 amino acids each. DeltaG(X) values are determined by measuring the extent to which Co(2+) binding to an engineered site on the Ub domain destabilizes the Bn domain. All-atom, unforced Langevin dynamics simulations are employed to gain structural insight into the mechanism of mechanically induced unfolding. Experimental and computational results find that the two domains are structurally and energetically uncoupled when linkers are long and that DeltaG(X) increases with decreasing linker length. When the linkers are fewer than two amino acids, strain is so great that one domain unfolds the other. However, the protein is able to refold as dimers and higher-order oligomers. The likely mechanism is a three-dimensional domain swap of the Bn domain, which relieves conformational strain. The simulations suggest that an effective route to mechanical unfolding begins with disruption of the hydrophobic core of Bn near the Ub insertion site.

  8. Deconvoluting Protein (Un)folding Structural Ensembles Using X-Ray Scattering, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Nasedkin, Alexandr; Marcellini, Moreno; Religa, Tomasz L; Freund, Stefan M; Menzel, Andreas; Fersht, Alan R; Jemth, Per; van der Spoel, David; Davidsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The folding and unfolding of protein domains is an apparently cooperative process, but transient intermediates have been detected in some cases. Such (un)folding intermediates are challenging to investigate structurally as they are typically not long-lived and their role in the (un)folding reaction has often been questioned. One of the most well studied (un)folding pathways is that of Drosophila melanogaster Engrailed homeodomain (EnHD): this 61-residue protein forms a three helix bundle in the native state and folds via a helical intermediate. Here we used molecular dynamics simulations to derive sample conformations of EnHD in the native, intermediate, and unfolded states and selected the relevant structural clusters by comparing to small/wide angle X-ray scattering data at four different temperatures. The results are corroborated using residual dipolar couplings determined by NMR spectroscopy. Our results agree well with the previously proposed (un)folding pathway. However, they also suggest that the fully unfolded state is present at a low fraction throughout the investigated temperature interval, and that the (un)folding intermediate is highly populated at the thermal midpoint in line with the view that this intermediate can be regarded to be the denatured state under physiological conditions. Further, the combination of ensemble structural techniques with MD allows for determination of structures and populations of multiple interconverting structures in solution.

  9. An Item Response Unfolding Model for Graphic Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ying

    2009-01-01

    The graphic rating scale, a measurement tool used in many areas of psychology, usually takes a form of a fixed-length line segment, with both ends bounded and labeled as extreme responses. The raters mark somewhere on the line, and the length of the line segment from one endpoint to the mark is taken as the measure. An item response unfolding…

  10. Overexpression of Smooth Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain Leads to Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response and Autophagic Turnover of Thick Filament-associated Proteins in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kwartler, Callie S.; Chen, Jiyuan; Thakur, Dhananjay; Li, Shumin; Baskin, Kedryn; Wang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao V.; Walker, Lori; Hill, Joseph A.; Epstein, Henry F.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    Duplications spanning nine genes at the genomic locus 16p13.1 predispose individuals to acute aortic dissections. The most likely candidate gene in this region leading to the predisposition for dissection is MYH11, which encodes smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). The effects of increased expression of MYH11 on smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypes were explored using mouse aortic SMCs with transgenic overexpression of one isoform of SM-MHC. We found that these cells show increased expression of Myh11 and myosin filament-associated contractile genes at the message level when compared with control SMCs, but not at the protein level due to increased protein degradation. Increased expression of Myh11 resulted in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in SMCs, which led to a paradoxical decrease of protein levels through increased autophagic degradation. An additional consequence of ER stress in SMCs was increased intracellular calcium ion concentration, resulting in increased contractile signaling and contraction. The increased signals for contraction further promote transcription of contractile genes, leading to a feedback loop of metabolic abnormalities in these SMCs. We suggest that overexpression of MYH11 can lead to increased ER stress and autophagy, findings that may be globally implicated in disease processes associated with genomic duplications. PMID:24711452

  11. Overexpression of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain leads to activation of the unfolded protein response and autophagic turnover of thick filament-associated proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kwartler, Callie S; Chen, Jiyuan; Thakur, Dhananjay; Li, Shumin; Baskin, Kedryn; Wang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao V; Walker, Lori; Hill, Joseph A; Epstein, Henry F; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2014-05-16

    Duplications spanning nine genes at the genomic locus 16p13.1 predispose individuals to acute aortic dissections. The most likely candidate gene in this region leading to the predisposition for dissection is MYH11, which encodes smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). The effects of increased expression of MYH11 on smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypes were explored using mouse aortic SMCs with transgenic overexpression of one isoform of SM-MHC. We found that these cells show increased expression of Myh11 and myosin filament-associated contractile genes at the message level when compared with control SMCs, but not at the protein level due to increased protein degradation. Increased expression of Myh11 resulted in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in SMCs, which led to a paradoxical decrease of protein levels through increased autophagic degradation. An additional consequence of ER stress in SMCs was increased intracellular calcium ion concentration, resulting in increased contractile signaling and contraction. The increased signals for contraction further promote transcription of contractile genes, leading to a feedback loop of metabolic abnormalities in these SMCs. We suggest that overexpression of MYH11 can lead to increased ER stress and autophagy, findings that may be globally implicated in disease processes associated with genomic duplications.

  12. ProtSA: a web application for calculating sequence specific protein solvent accessibilities in the unfolded ensemble

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Jorge; Bernadó, Pau; Blackledge, Martin; Sancho, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Background The stability of proteins is governed by the heat capacity, enthalpy and entropy changes of folding, which are strongly correlated to the change in solvent accessible surface area experienced by the polypeptide. While the surface exposed in the folded state can be easily determined, accessibilities for the unfolded state at the atomic level cannot be obtained experimentally and are typically estimated using simplistic models of the unfolded ensemble. A web application providing realistic accessibilities of the unfolded ensemble of a given protein at the atomic level will prove useful. Results ProtSA, a web application that calculates sequence-specific solvent accessibilities of the unfolded state ensembles of proteins has been developed and made freely available to the scientific community. The input is the amino acid sequence of the protein of interest. ProtSA follows a previously published calculation protocol which uses the Flexible-Meccano algorithm to generate unfolded conformations representative of the unfolded ensemble of the protein, and uses the exact analytical software ALPHASURF to calculate atom solvent accessibilities, which are averaged on the ensemble. Conclusion ProtSA is a novel tool for the researcher investigating protein folding energetics. The sequence specific atom accessibilities provided by ProtSA will allow obtaining better estimates of the contribution of the hydrophobic effect to the free energy of folding, will help to refine existing parameterizations of protein folding energetics, and will be useful to understand the influence of point mutations on protein stability. PMID:19356231

  13. Similarity and difference in the unfolding of thermophilic and mesophilic cold shock proteins studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoqin; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2006-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to unfold a homologous pair of thermophilic and mesophilic cold shock proteins at high temperatures. The two proteins differ in just 11 of 66 residues and have very similar structures with a closed five-stranded antiparallel beta-barrel. A long flexible loop connects the N-terminal side of the barrel, formed by three strands (beta1-beta3), with the C-terminal side, formed by two strands (beta4-beta5). The two proteins were found to follow the same unfolding pathway, but with the thermophilic protein showing much slower unfolding. Unfolding started with the melting of C-terminal strands, leading to exposure of the hydrophobic core. Subsequent melting of beta3 and the beta-hairpin formed by the first two strands then resulted in unfolding of the whole protein. The slower unfolding of the thermophilic protein could be attributed to ion pair formation of Arg-3 with Glu-46, Glu-21, and the C-terminal. These ion pairs were also found to be important for the difference in folding stability between the pair of proteins. Thus electrostatic interactions appear to play similar roles in the difference in folding stability and kinetics between the pair of proteins.

  14. Integrated prediction of protein folding and unfolding rates from only size and structural class.

    PubMed

    De Sancho, David; Muñoz, Victor

    2011-10-14

    Protein stability, folding and unfolding rates are all determined by the multidimensional folding free energy surface, which in turn is dictated by factors such as size, structure, and amino-acid sequence. Work over the last 15 years has highlighted the role of size and 3D structure in determining folding rates, resulting in many procedures for their prediction. In contrast, unfolding rates are thought to depend on sequence specifics and be much more difficult to predict. Here we introduce a minimalist physics-based model that computes one-dimensional folding free energy surfaces using the number of aminoacids (N) and the structural class (α-helical, all-β, or α-β) as only protein-specific input. In this model N sets the overall cost in conformational entropy and the net stabilization energy, whereas the structural class defines the partitioning of the stabilization energy between local and non-local interactions. To test its predictive power, we calibrated the model empirically and implemented it into an algorithm for the PREdiction of Folding and Unfolding Rates (PREFUR). We found that PREFUR predicts the absolute folding and unfolding rates of an experimental database of 52 proteins with accuracies of ±0.7 and ±1.4 orders of magnitude, respectively (relative to experimental spans of 6 and 8 orders of magnitude). Such prediction uncertainty for proteins vastly varying in size and structure is only two-fold larger than the differences in folding (±0.34) and unfolding rates (±0.7) caused by single-point mutations. Moreover, PREFUR predicts protein stability with an accuracy of ±6.3 kJ mol(-1), relative to the 5 kJ mol(-1) average perturbation induced by single-point mutations. The remarkable performance of our simplistic model demonstrates that size and structural class are the major determinants of the folding landscapes of natural proteins, whereas sequence variability only provides the final 10-20% tuning. PREFUR is thus a powerful bioinformatic tool

  15. Does deamidation cause protein unfolding? A top-down tandem mass spectrometry study

    PubMed Central

    Soulby, Andrew J; Heal, Jack W; Barrow, Mark P; Roemer, Rudolf A; O'Connor, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    Deamidation is a nonenzymatic post-translational modification of asparagine to aspartic acid or glutamine to glutamic acid, converting an uncharged amino acid to a negatively charged residue. It is plausible that deamidation of asparagine and glutamine residues would result in disruption of a proteins' hydrogen bonding network and thus lead to protein unfolding. To test this hypothesis Calmodulin and B2M were deamidated and analyzed using tandem mass spectrometry on a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICR-MS). The gas phase hydrogen bonding networks of deamidated and nondeamidated protein isoforms were probed by varying the infra-red multi-photon dissociation laser power in a linear fashion and plotting the resulting electron capture dissociation fragment intensities as a melting curve at each amino acid residue. Analysis of the unfolding maps highlighted increased fragmentation at lower laser powers localized around heavily deamidated regions of the proteins. In addition fragment intensities were decreased across the rest of the proteins which we propose is because of the formation of salt-bridges strengthening the intramolecular interactions of the central regions. These results were supported by a computational flexibility analysis of the mutant and unmodified proteins, which would suggest that deamidation can affect the global structure of a protein via modification of the hydrogen bonding network near the deamidation site and that top down FTICR-MS is an appropriate technique for studying protein folding. PMID:25653127

  16. Protein unfolding accounts for the unusual mechanical behavior of fibrin networks

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Prashant K.; Litvinov, Rustem I.; Brown, Andre E. X.; Discher, Dennis E.; Weisel, John W.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the mechanical behavior of isotropic fibrin networks at the macroscopic scale in terms of the nanoscale force response of fibrin molecules that are its basic building blocks. We show that the remarkable extensibility and compressibility of fibrin networks have their origins in the unfolding of fibrin molecules. The force-stretch behavior of a single fibrin fiber is described using a two-state model in which the fiber has a linear force-stretch relation in the folded phase and behaves like a worm-like-chain in the unfolded phase. The nanoscale force-stretch response is connected to the macro-scale stress-stretch response by means of the eight-chain model. This model is able to capture the macroscopic response of a fibrin network in uniaxial tension and appears remarkably simple given the molecular complexity. We use the eight-chain model to explain why fibrin networks have negative compressibility and Poisson’s ratio greater than one due to unfolding of fibrin molecules. PMID:21342665

  17. β-sheet-like formation during the mechanical unfolding of prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Weiwei; Yoon, Gwonchan; Cao, Penghui; Eom, Kilho; Park, Harold S.

    2015-09-01

    Single molecule experiments and simulations have been widely used to characterize the unfolding and folding pathways of different proteins. However, with few exceptions, these tools have not been applied to study prion protein, PrPC, whose misfolded form PrPSc can induce a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we apply novel atomistic modeling based on potential energy surface exploration to study the constant force unfolding of human PrP at time scales inaccessible with standard molecular dynamics. We demonstrate for forces around 100 pN, prion forms a stable, three-stranded β-sheet-like intermediate configuration containing residues 155-214 with a lifetime exceeding hundreds of nanoseconds. A mutant without the disulfide bridge shows lower stability during the unfolding process but still forms the three-stranded structure. The simulations thus not only show the atomistic details of the mechanically induced structural conversion from the native α-helical structure to the β-rich-like form but also lend support to the structural theory that there is a core of the recombinant PrP amyloid, a misfolded form reported to induce transmissible disease, mapping to C-terminal residues ≈160-220.

  18. Mechanisms of triggering H1 helix in prion proteins unfolding revealed by molecular dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chih-Yuan; Lee, H. C.

    2006-03-01

    In template-assistance model, normal Prion protein (PrP^C), the pathogen to cause several prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD) in human, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in cow, and scrapie in sheep, converts to infectious prion (PrP^Sc) through a transient interaction with PrP^Sc. Furthermore, conventional studies showed S1-H1-S2 region in PrP^C to be the template of S1-S2 β-sheet in PrP^Sc, and Prion protein's conformational conversion may involve an unfolding of H1 and refolding into β-sheet. Here we prepare several mouse prion peptides that contain S1-H1-S2 region with specific different structures, which are corresponding to specific interactions, to investigate possible mechanisms to trigger H1 α-helix unfolding process via molecular dynamic simulation. Three properties, conformational transition, salt-bridge in H1, and hydrophobic solvent accessible surface (SAS) are analyzed. From these studies, we found the interaction that triggers H1 unfolding to be the one that causes dihedral angle at residue Asn^143 changes. Whereas interactions that cause S1 segment's conformational changes play a minor in this process. These studies offers an additional evidence for template-assistance model.

  19. β-sheet-like formation during the mechanical unfolding of prion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Weiwei; Cao, Penghui; Park, Harold S.; Yoon, Gwonchan; Eom, Kilho

    2015-09-28

    Single molecule experiments and simulations have been widely used to characterize the unfolding and folding pathways of different proteins. However, with few exceptions, these tools have not been applied to study prion protein, PrP{sup C}, whose misfolded form PrP{sup Sc} can induce a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we apply novel atomistic modeling based on potential energy surface exploration to study the constant force unfolding of human PrP at time scales inaccessible with standard molecular dynamics. We demonstrate for forces around 100 pN, prion forms a stable, three-stranded β-sheet-like intermediate configuration containing residues 155-214 with a lifetime exceeding hundreds of nanoseconds. A mutant without the disulfide bridge shows lower stability during the unfolding process but still forms the three-stranded structure. The simulations thus not only show the atomistic details of the mechanically induced structural conversion from the native α-helical structure to the β-rich-like form but also lend support to the structural theory that there is a core of the recombinant PrP amyloid, a misfolded form reported to induce transmissible disease, mapping to C-terminal residues ≈160-220.

  20. Stochastic but highly coordinated protein unfolding and translocation by the CIpXP proteolytic machine

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, Juan Carlos; Olivares, Adrian O.; Shin, Yongdae; Stinson, Benjamin M.; Calmat, Stephane; Schmitz, Karl R.; Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Baker, Tania A.; Lang, Matthew J.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    CIpXP and other AAA+ proteases recognize, mechanically unfold, and translocate target proteins into a chamber for proteolysis. It is not known if these remarkable molecular machines operate by a stochastic or sequential mechanism or how power strokes relate to the ATP-hydrolysis cycle. Single-molecule optical trapping allows CIpXP unfolding to be directly visualized and reveals translocation steps of ~1–4 nm in length, but how these activities relate to solution degradation and the physical properties of substrate proteins remains unclear. By studying single-molecule degradation using different multi-domain substrates and CIpXP variants, we answer many of these questions and provide evidence for stochastic unfolding and translocation. We also present a mechanochemical model that accounts for single-molecule, biochemical, and structural results, for our observation of enzymatic memory in translocation stepping, for the kinetics of translocation steps of different sizes, and for probabilistic but highly coordinated subunit activity within the CIpX ring. PMID:25083874

  1. Protein folding and unfolding studied at atomic resolution by fast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schanda, Paul; Forge, Vincent; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2007-07-03

    Atom-resolved real-time studies of kinetic processes in proteins have been hampered in the past by the lack of experimental techniques that yield sufficient temporal and atomic resolution. Here we present band-selective optimized flip-angle short transient (SOFAST) real-time 2D NMR spectroscopy, a method that allows simultaneous observation of reaction kinetics for a large number of nuclear sites along the polypeptide chain of a protein with an unprecedented time resolution of a few seconds. SOFAST real-time 2D NMR spectroscopy combines fast NMR data acquisition techniques with rapid sample mixing inside the NMR magnet to initiate the kinetic event. We demonstrate the use of SOFAST real-time 2D NMR to monitor the conformational transition of alpha-lactalbumin from a molten globular to the native state for a large number of amide sites along the polypeptide chain. The kinetic behavior observed for the disappearance of the molten globule and the appearance of the native state is monoexponential and uniform along the polypeptide chain. This observation confirms previous findings that a single transition state ensemble controls folding of alpha-lactalbumin from the molten globule to the native state. In a second application, the spontaneous unfolding of native ubiquitin under nondenaturing conditions is characterized by amide hydrogen exchange rate constants measured at high pH by using SOFAST real-time 2D NMR. Our data reveal that ubiquitin unfolds in a gradual manner with distinct unfolding regimes.

  2. About the structural role of disulfide bridges in serum albumins: evidence from protein simulated unfolding.

    PubMed

    Paris, Guillaume; Kraszewski, Sebastian; Ramseyer, Christophe; Enescu, Mironel

    2012-11-01

    The role of the 17 disulfide (S-S) bridges in preserving the native conformation of human serum albumin (HSA) is investigated by performing classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on protein structures with intact and, respectively, reduced S-S bridges. The thermal unfolding simulations predict a clear destabilization of the protein secondary structure upon reduction of the S-S bridges as well as a significant distortion of the tertiary structure that is revealed by the changes in the protein native contacts fraction. The effect of the S-S bridges reduction on the protein compactness was tested by calculating Gibbs free energy profiles with respect to the protein gyration radius. The theoretical results obtained using the OPLS-AA and the AMBER ff03 force fields are in agreement with the available experimental data. Beyond the validation of the simulation method, the results here reported provide new insights into the mechanism of the protein reductive/oxidative unfolding/folding processes. It is predicted that in the native conformation of the protein, the thiol (-SH) groups belonging to the same reduced S-S bridge are located in potential wells that maintain them in contact. The -SH pairs can be dispatched by specific conformational transitions of the peptide chain located in the neighborhood of the cysteine residues.

  3. Dynamical properties of α-amylase in the folded and unfolded state: the role of thermal equilibrium fluctuations for conformational entropy and protein stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitter, J.; Herrmann, R.; Hauß, T.; Lechner, R. E.; Dencher, N. A.

    2001-07-01

    A comparative analysis of thermal equilibrium fluctuations occurring in a mesophilic and in a thermophilic α-amylase was performed to study the effect of structural fluctuations on thermostability. The thermal fluctuations determining the conformational entropy of both enzymes have been characterised for the folded (at 30°C and 60°C) and for the unfolded state by applying neutron spectroscopy (at 30°C). The folded state shows a higher structural flexibility for the thermophilic protein as compared to the mesophilic homologue. In contrast, the unfolded state of both enzymes is rather similar with respect to the structural fluctuations. On the basis of this result, a mechanism characterised by entropic stabilisation (i.e., smaller Δ S for the unfolding transition of thermophilic α-amylase) can be assumed to be responsible for the higher thermostability of the thermophilic enzyme.

  4. The push-and-pull hypothesis in protein unfolding, misfolding and aggregation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Guilherme A P; Silva, Jerson L

    2017-03-29

    The combination of biophysical and structural techniques has allowed the visualization of species classified as dry molten-globule states. Further destabilization causes these structures to follow through a wet-globule stage to reach an unfolded chain. We have recently combined small angle X-ray scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance to observe these species, and we introduce a push-and-pull hypothesis to explain the dissimilar actions of urea and high pressure on proteins. The implications of these molten-globule states are further discussed in light of their potential physiological and pathological roles, especially in protein misfolding diseases.

  5. Concerted dihedral rotations give rise to internal friction in unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Ignacia; Makarov, Dmitrii E; Papoian, Garegin A

    2014-06-18

    Protein chains undergo conformational diffusion during folding and dynamics, experiencing both thermal kicks and viscous drag. Recent experiments have shown that the corresponding friction can be separated into wet friction, which is determined by the solvent viscosity, and dry friction, where frictional effects arise due to the interactions within the protein chain. Despite important advances, the molecular origins underlying dry friction in proteins have remained unclear. To address this problem, we studied the dynamics of the unfolded cold-shock protein at different solvent viscosities and denaturant concentrations. Using extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations we estimated the internal friction time scales and found them to agree well with the corresponding experimental measurements (Soranno et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2012, 109, 17800-17806). Analysis of the reconfiguration dynamics of the unfolded chain further revealed that hops in the dihedral space provide the dominant mechanism of internal friction. Furthermore, the increased number of concerted dihedral moves at physiological conditions suggest that, in such conditions, the concerted motions result in higher frictional forces. These findings have important implications for understanding the folding kinetics of proteins as well as the dynamics of intrinsically disordered proteins.

  6. Water-protein interaction in native and partially unfolded equine cytochrome c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banci, Lucia

    1998-12-01

    The problem of the interaction of water solvent with proteins has been addressed by investigating the water 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles of cytochrome c solutions. It is shown that the 1H NMRD profiles are accounted for by 1, a sizeable contribution from exchangeable protein protons (mostly from lysine side chains) and 2, a modest contribution from long-lived water. It is also shown that the number of exchangeable protons is sizeably increased in the oxidized but not in the reduced protein in the presence of the unfolding agent guanidinium chloride at a 3M concentration. This additional contribution arises mostly from backbone protons, as evidenced by high resolution NMR data which provide significant and independent data on the structure and the dynamic behaviour of the partly unfolded oxidized protein. Higher accessibility to short lived water molecules is proposed also. For the analysis of the 1H NMRD data a complete relaxation matrix approach is presented that is analogous, but not identical, to one recently described. This approach permits the simultaneous incorporation of exchangeable protein protons and an unlimited number of water molecules in pre-defined protein binding sites.

  7. Simulation studies of protein folding/unfolding equilibrium under polar and nonpolar confinement.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianhui; Garcia, Angel E

    2011-09-28

    We study the equilibrium folding/unfolding thermodynamics of a small globular miniprotein, the Trp cage, that is confined to the interior of a 2 nm radius fullerene ball. The interactions of the fullerene surface are changed from nonpolar to polar to mimic the interior of the GroEL/ES chaperonin that assists proteins to fold in vivo. We find that nonpolar confinement stabilizes the folded state of the protein due to the effects of volume reduction that destabilize the unfolded state and also due to interactions with the fullerene surface. For the Trp cage, polar confinement has a net destabilizing effect that results from the stabilizing confinement and the competitive exclusion effect that keeps the protein away from the surface hydration shell and stronger interactions between charged side chains in the protein and the polar surface that compete against the formation of an ion pair that stabilizes the protein folded state. We show that confinement effects due to volume reduction can be overcome by sequence-specific interactions of the protein side chains with the encapsulating surface. This study shows that there is a complex balance among many competing effects that determine the mechanism of GroEL chaperonin in enhancing the folding rate of polypeptide inside its cavity.

  8. Single-Molecule FRET Spectroscopy and the Polymer Physics of Unfolded and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Benjamin; Soranno, Andrea; Hofmann, Hagen; Nettels, Daniel

    2016-07-05

    The properties of unfolded proteins have long been of interest because of their importance to the protein folding process. Recently, the surprising prevalence of unstructured regions or entirely disordered proteins under physiological conditions has led to the realization that such intrinsically disordered proteins can be functional even in the absence of a folded structure. However, owing to their broad conformational distributions, many of the properties of unstructured proteins are difficult to describe with the established concepts of structural biology. We have thus seen a reemergence of polymer physics as a versatile framework for understanding their structure and dynamics. An important driving force for these developments has been single-molecule spectroscopy, as it allows structural heterogeneity, intramolecular distance distributions, and dynamics to be quantified over a wide range of timescales and solution conditions. Polymer concepts provide an important basis for relating the physical properties of unstructured proteins to folding and function.

  9. Characterization of membrane protein non-native states. 2. The SDS-unfolded states of rhodopsin†

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arpana; Kim, Tai-Yang; Moeller, Martina; Wu, Jenny; Alexiev, Ulrike; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular nature of residual structure in unfolded states of membrane proteins. A screen of chemical denaturants to maximally unfold the mammalian membrane protein and prototypic G protein coupled receptor rhodopsin, without interference from aggregation – described in an accompanying paper (Dutta et al., 2010 ibid.) identified sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), alone or in combination with other chemicals, as the most suitable denaturant. Here, we initiate the biophysical characterization of SDS-denatured states of rhodopsin. Using absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and cysteine accessibility studies, tertiary structure of denatured states was characterized. In agreement with the pattern of secondary structure changes detected by circular dichroism described in the accompanying paper, tertiary structure changes are distinct over four SDS concentration ranges based on the expected predominant micellar structures. Dodecyl maltoside (DM)/SDS mixed micelle spheres (0.05-0.3% SDS) turn into SDS spheres (0.3-3% SDS) that gradually (3-15% SDS) become cylindrical (above 15% SDS). Denatured states in SDS spheres and cylinders show a relatively greater burial of cysteine and tryptophan residues and are more compact as compared to the states observed in mixed micellar structures. Protein structural changes at the membrane/water interface region are most prominent at very low SDS concentrations but reach transient stability in the compact conformations in SDS spheres. This is the first experimental evidence for the formation of a compact unfolding intermediate state with flexible surface elements in a membrane protein. PMID:20575562

  10. Comprehensive structural and dynamical view of an unfolded protein from the combination of single-molecule FRET, NMR, and SAXS

    PubMed Central

    Aznauryan, Mikayel; Delgado, Leonildo; Soranno, Andrea; Nettels, Daniel; Huang, Jie-rong; Labhardt, Alexander M.; Grzesiek, Stephan; Schuler, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The properties of unfolded proteins are essential both for the mechanisms of protein folding and for the function of the large group of intrinsically disordered proteins. However, the detailed structural and dynamical characterization of these highly dynamic and conformationally heterogeneous ensembles has remained challenging. Here we combine and compare three of the leading techniques for the investigation of unfolded proteins, NMR spectroscopy (NMR), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), with the goal of quantitatively testing their consistency and complementarity and for obtaining a comprehensive view of the unfolded-state ensemble. Using unfolded ubiquitin as a test case, we find that its average dimensions derived from FRET and from structural ensembles calculated using the program X-PLOR-NIH based on NMR and SAXS restraints agree remarkably well; even the shapes of the underlying intramolecular distance distributions are in good agreement, attesting to the reliability of the approaches. The NMR-based results provide a highly sensitive way of quantifying residual structure in the unfolded state. FRET-based nanosecond fluorescence correlation spectroscopy allows long-range distances and chain dynamics to be probed in a time range inaccessible by NMR. The combined techniques thus provide a way of optimally using the complementarity of the available methods for a quantitative structural and dynamical description of unfolded proteins both at the global and the local level. PMID:27566405

  11. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central “hubs”. Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates. PMID:26394388

  12. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central "hubs". Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates.

  13. Thermal denaturation of Bungarus fasciatus acetylcholinesterase: Is aggregation a driving force in protein unfolding?

    PubMed Central

    Shin, I.; Wachtel, E.; Roth, E.; Bon, C.; Silman, I.; Weiner, L.

    2002-01-01

    A monomeric form of acetylcholinesterase from the venom of Bungarus fasciatus is converted to a partially unfolded molten globule species by thermal inactivation, and subsequently aggregates rapidly. To separate the kinetics of unfolding from those of aggregation, single molecules of the monomeric enzyme were encapsulated in reverse micelles of Brij 30 in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, or in large unilamellar vesicles of egg lecithin/cholesterol at various protein/micelle (vesicle) ratios. The first-order rate constant for thermal inactivation at 45°C, of single molecules entrapped within the reverse micelles (0.031 min−1), was higher than in aqueous solution (0.007 min−1) or in the presence of normal micelles (0.020 min−1). This clearly shows that aggregation does not provide the driving force for thermal inactivation of BfAChE. Within the large unilamellar vesicles, at average protein/vesicle ratios of 1:1 and 10:1, the first-order rate constants for thermal inactivation of the encapsulated monomeric acetylcholinesterase, at 53°C, were 0.317 and 0.342 min−1, respectively. A crosslinking technique, utilizing the photosensitive probe, hypericin, showed that thermal denaturation produces a distribution of species ranging from dimers through to large aggregates. Consequently, at a protein/vesicle ratio of 10:1, aggregation can occur upon thermal denaturation. Thus, these experiments also demonstrate that aggregation does not drive the thermal unfolding of Bungarus fasciatus acetylcholinesterase. Our experimental approach also permitted monitoring of recovery of enzymic activity after thermal denaturation in the absence of a competing aggregation process. Whereas no detectable recovery of enzymic activity could be observed in aqueous solution, up to 23% activity could be obtained for enzyme sequestered in the reverse micelles. PMID:12142456

  14. Influence of local and residual structures on the scaling behavior and dimensions of unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhisong; Plaxco, Kevin W; Makarov, Dmitrii E

    2007-07-01

    Although recent spectroscopic studies of chemically denatured proteins hint at significant nonrandom residual structure, the results of extensive small angle X-ray scattering studies suggest random coil behavior, calling for a coherent understanding of these seemingly contradicting observations. Here, we report the results of a Monte Carlo study of the effects of two types of local structures, alpha helix and Polyproline II (PPII) helix, on the dimensions of random coil polyalanine chains viewed as a model of highly denatured proteins. We find that although Flory's power law scaling, long regarded as a signature of random coil behavior, holds for chains containing up to 90% alpha or PPII helix, the absolute magnitude of the chain dimensions is sensitive to helix content. As residual alpha helix content increases, the chain contracts until it reaches a minimum radius at approximately 70% helix, after which the chain dimensions expand rapidly. With an alpha helix content of approximately 20%, corresponding to the Ramachandran probability of being in the helical basin, experimentally observed radii of gyration are recovered. Experimental radii are similarly recovered at an alpha helix content of approximately 87%, providing an explanation for the previously puzzling experimental finding that the dimensions of the highly helical methanol-induced unfolded state are experimentally indistinguishable from those of the helix-poor urea-unfolded state. In contrast, the radius of gyration increases monotonically with increasing PPII content, and is always more expanded than the dimensions observed experimentally. These results suggest that PPII is unlikely the sole, dominant preferred conformation for unfolded proteins.

  15. XBP1, Unfolded Protein Response, and Endocrine Responsiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    relatively safe and effective endo- crine therapies , from the advent of tamoxifen and antiestro- gens (AEs) to the more recent application of third ...treatment (solid lines ) and those present with estradiol and Fulvestrant cotreatment (dashed lines ). Hence, solid lines are implied to disappear when the...BCL2 family, bioinformatics, drug resistance, endoplasmic reticulum, Faslodex, Fulvestrant , gene networks, mitochondria, molecular signaling, Tamoxifen

  16. XBP1, Unfolded Protein Response, and Endocrine Responsiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    iodide staining, increased ter- minal transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and cleavage of the DNA repair enzyme PARP-1 are associated with late...Flessate- Harley , R. Clarke, High throughput gene expression profiles associated with antiestrogen respon- sive vs. resistant breast cancer cells, Proc

  17. XBP1, Unfolded Protein Response, and Endocrine Responsiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    cells (HER2 amplified breast cancer cell line) [93]. These data suggest that targeting autophagy can be sufficient to restore chemotherapeutic drug...2006). 75 Colotta F, Allavena P, Sica A et al. Cancer- related inflammation, the seventh hallmark of cancer: links to genetic instability...A4396G polymorphism in interferon regulatory factor-1 is frequently expressed in breast cancer. Cancer Genet Cytogenet 2007;175:61–64. [PubMed: 17498560

  18. NMR unfolding studies on a liver bile acid binding protein reveal a global two-state unfolding and localized singular behaviors.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Ragona, Laura; Fessas, Dimitrios; Signorelli, Marco; Ugolini, Raffaella; Pedò, Massimo; Assfalg, Michael; Molinari, Henriette

    2009-01-01

    The folding properties of a bile acid binding protein, belonging to a subfamily of the fatty acid binding proteins, have been here investigated both by hydrogen exchange measurements, using the SOFAST NMR approach, and urea denaturation experiments. The urea unfolding profiles of individual residues, acting as single probes, were simultaneously analyzed through a global fit, according to a two-state unfolding model. The resulting conformational stability DeltaG(U)(H(2)O)=7.2+/-0.25kcal mol(-1) is in good agreement with hydrogen exchange stability DeltaG(op). While the majority of protein residues satisfy this model, few amino-acids display a singular behavior, not directly amenable to the presence of a folding intermediate, as reported for other fatty acid binding proteins. These residues are part of a protein patch characterized by enhanced plasticity. To explain this singular behavior a tentative model has been proposed which takes into account the interplay between the dynamic features and the formation of transient aggregates. A functional role for this plasticity, related to translocation across the nuclear membrane, is discussed.

  19. Highly Anomalous Energetics of Protein Cold Denaturation Linked to Folding-Unfolding Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Romero, M. Luisa; Inglés-Prieto, Alvaro; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite several careful experimental analyses, it is not yet clear whether protein cold-denaturation is just a “mirror image” of heat denaturation or whether it shows unique structural and energetic features. Here we report that, for a well-characterized small protein, heat denaturation and cold denaturation show dramatically different experimental energetic patterns. Specifically, while heat denaturation is endothermic, the cold transition (studied in the folding direction) occurs with negligible heat effect, in a manner seemingly akin to a gradual, second-order-like transition. We show that this highly anomalous energetics is actually an apparent effect associated to a large folding/unfolding free energy barrier and that it ultimately reflects kinetic stability, a naturally-selected trait in many protein systems. Kinetics thus emerges as an important factor linked to differential features of cold denaturation. We speculate that kinetic stabilization against cold denaturation may play a role in cold adaptation of psychrophilic organisms. Furthermore, we suggest that folding-unfolding kinetics should be taken into account when analyzing in vitro cold-denaturation experiments, in particular those carried out in the absence of destabilizing conditions. PMID:21829584

  20. Recognition and binding of human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA by unfolding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Jason S; Ding, Lei; Le, Vu; Lewis, Edwin; Graves, David

    2014-05-27

    The specific recognition by proteins of G-quadruplex structures provides evidence of a functional role for in vivo G-quadruplex structures. As previously reported, the ribonucleoprotein, hnRNP Al, and it is proteolytic derivative, unwinding protein 1 (UP1), bind to and destabilize G-quadruplex structures formed by the human telomeric repeat d(TTAGGG)n. UP1 has been proposed to be involved in the recruitment of telomerase to telomeres for chain extension. In this study, a detailed thermodynamic characterization of the binding of UP1 to a human telomeric repeat sequence, the d[AGGG(TTAGGG)3] G-quadruplex, is presented and reveals key insights into the UP1-induced unfolding of the G-quadruplex structure. The UP1-G-quadruplex interactions are shown to be enthalpically driven, exhibiting large negative enthalpy changes for the formation of both the Na(+) and K(+) G-quadruplex-UP1 complexes (ΔH values of -43 and -19 kcal/mol, respectively). These data reveal three distinct enthalpic contributions from the interactions of UP1 with the Na(+) form of G-quadruplex DNA. The initial interaction is characterized by a binding affinity of 8.5 × 10(8) M(-1) (strand), 200 times stronger than the binding of UP1 to a single-stranded DNA with a comparable but non-quadruplex-forming sequence [4.1 × 10(6) M(-1) (strand)]. Circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals the Na(+) form of the G-quadruplex to be completely unfolded by UP1 at a binding ratio of 2:1 (UP1:G-quadruplex DNA). The data presented here demonstrate that the favorable energetics of the initial binding event are closely coupled with and drive the unfolding of the G-quadruplex structure.

  1. Mechanism of Protein Denaturation: Partial Unfolding of the P22 Coat Protein I-Domain by Urea Binding.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Rebecca L; Fraser, LaTasha C R; Teschke, Carolyn M; Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2015-12-15

    The I-domain is an insertion domain of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein that drives rapid folding and accounts for over half of the stability of the full-length protein. We sought to determine the role of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in the unfolding of the I-domain by examining (3)JNC' couplings transmitted through H-bonds, the temperature and urea-concentration dependence of (1)HN and (15)N chemical shifts, and native-state hydrogen exchange at urea concentrations where the domain is predominantly folded. The native-state hydrogen-exchange data suggest that the six-stranded β-barrel core of the I-domain is more stable against unfolding than a smaller subdomain comprised of a short α-helix and three-stranded β-sheet. H-bonds, separately determined from solvent protection and (3)JNC' H-bond couplings, are identified with an accuracy of 90% by (1)HN temperature coefficients. The accuracy is improved to 95% when (15)N temperature coefficients are also included. In contrast, the urea dependence of (1)HN and (15)N chemical shifts is unrelated to H-bonding. The protein segments with the largest chemical-shift changes in the presence of urea show curved or sigmoidal titration curves suggestive of direct urea binding. Nuclear Overhauser effects to urea for these segments are also consistent with specific urea-binding sites in the I-domain. Taken together, the results support a mechanism of urea unfolding in which denaturant binds to distinct sites in the I-domain. Disordered segments bind urea more readily than regions in stable secondary structure. The locations of the putative urea-binding sites correlate with the lower stability of the structure against solvent exchange, suggesting that partial unfolding of the structure is related to urea accessibility.

  2. Tracking unfolding and refolding reactions of single proteins using atomic force microscopy methods.

    PubMed

    Bujalowski, Paul J; Oberhauser, Andres F

    2013-04-01

    During the last two decades single-molecule manipulation techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) has risen to prominence through their unique capacity to provide fundamental information on the structure and function of biomolecules. Here we describe the use of single-molecule AFM to track protein unfolding and refolding pathways, enzymatic catalysis and the effects of osmolytes and chaperones on protein stability and folding. We will outline the principles of operation for two different AFM pulling techniques: length clamp and force-clamp and discuss prominent applications. We provide protocols for the construction of polyproteins which are amenable for AFM experiments, the preparation of different coverslips, choice and calibration of AFM cantilevers. We also discuss the selection criteria for AFM recordings, the calibration of AFM cantilevers, protein sample preparations and analysis of the obtained data.

  3. Substrate-Induced Unfolding of Protein Disulfide Isomerase Displaces the Cholera Toxin A1 Subunit from Its Holotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael; Burress, Helen; Banerjee, Tuhina; Ray, Supriyo; Curtis, David; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2014-01-01

    To generate a cytopathic effect, the catalytic A1 subunit of cholera toxin (CT) must be separated from the rest of the toxin. Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is thought to mediate CT disassembly by acting as a redox-driven chaperone that actively unfolds the CTA1 subunit. Here, we show that PDI itself unfolds upon contact with CTA1. The substrate-induced unfolding of PDI provides a novel molecular mechanism for holotoxin disassembly: we postulate the expanded hydrodynamic radius of unfolded PDI acts as a wedge to dislodge reduced CTA1 from its holotoxin. The oxidoreductase activity of PDI was not required for CT disassembly, but CTA1 displacement did not occur when PDI was locked in a folded conformation or when its substrate-induced unfolding was blocked due to the loss of chaperone function. Two other oxidoreductases (ERp57 and ERp72) did not unfold in the presence of CTA1 and did not displace reduced CTA1 from its holotoxin. Our data establish a new functional property of PDI that may be linked to its role as a chaperone that prevents protein aggregation. PMID:24516389

  4. Effect of osmolytes on pressure-induced unfolding of proteins: a high-pressure SAXS study.

    PubMed

    Krywka, Christina; Sternemann, Christian; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Royer, Catherine; Winter, Roland

    2008-12-22

    Herein, we explore the effect of different types of osmolytes on the high-pressure stability and tertiary structure of a well-characterized monomeric protein, staphylococcal nuclease (SNase). Changes in the denaturation pressure and the radius of gyration are obtained in the presence of different concentrations of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), glycerol and urea. To reveal structural changes in the protein upon compression at various osmolyte conditions, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments were carried out. To this end, a new high-pressure cell suitable for high-precision SAXS studies at synchrotron sources was built, which allows one to carry out scattering experiments up to maximum pressures of about 7 kbar. Our data clearly indicate that the osmolytes that stabilize proteins against temperature-induced unfolding drastically increase their pressure stability and that the elliptically shaped curve of the pressure-temperature-stability diagram of proteins is shifted to higher temperatures and pressures with increasing osmolyte concentration. A drastic stabilization is observed for the osmolyte TMAO, which exhibits not only a significant stabilization against temperature-induced unfolding, but also a particularly strong stabilization of the protein against pressure. In fact, such findings are in accordance with in vivo studies (for example P. J. Yancey, J. Exp. Biol. 2005, 208, 2819-2830), where unusually high TMAO concentrations in some deep-sea animals were found. Conversely, chaotropic agents such as urea have a strong destabilizing effect on both the temperature and pressure stability of the protein. Our data also indicate that sufficiently high TMAO concentrations might be able to largely offset the destabilizing effect of urea. The different scenarios observed are discussed in the context of recent experimental and theoretical studies.

  5. Long-lived states to monitor protein unfolding by proton NMR.

    PubMed

    Bornet, Aurélien; Ahuja, Puneet; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Fernandes, Laetitia; Hadji, Sonia; Lee, Shirley Y; Haririnia, Aydin; Fushman, David; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Vasos, Paul R

    2011-10-24

    The relaxation of long-lived states (LLS) corresponds to the slow return to statistical thermal equilibrium between symmetric and antisymmetric proton spin states. This process is remarkably sensitive to the presence of external spins and can be used to obtain information about partial unfolding of proteins. We detected the appearance of a destabilized conformer of ubiquitin when urea is added to the protein in its native state. This conformer shows increased mobility in the C-terminus, which significantly extends the lifetimes of proton LLS magnetisation in Ser-65. These changes could not be detected by conventional measurements of T(1) and T(2) relaxation times of protons, and would hardly be sensed by carbon-13 or nitrogen-15 relaxation measurements. Conformers with similar dynamic and structural features, as revealed by LLS relaxation times, could be observed, in the absence of urea, in two ubiquitin mutants, L67S and L69S.

  6. Examining faking on personality inventories using unfolding item response theory models.

    PubMed

    Scherbaum, Charles A; Sabet, Jennifer; Kern, Michael J; Agnello, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A concern about personality inventories in diagnostic and decision-making contexts is that individuals will fake. Although there is extensive research on faking, little research has focused on how perceptions of personality items change when individuals are faking or responding honestly. This research demonstrates how the delta parameter from the generalized graded unfolding item response theory model can be used to examine how individuals' perceptions about personality items might change when responding honestly or when faking. The results indicate that perceptions changed from honest to faking conditions for several neuroticism items. The direction of the change varied, indicating that faking can operate to increase or decrease scores within a personality factor.

  7. GeoFold: Topology-based protein unfolding pathways capture the effects of engineered disulfides on kinetic stability

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Vibin; Srinivasan, Sai Praveen; Salem, Saeed M; Matthews, Suzanne J; Colón, Wilfredo; Zaki, Mohammed; Bystroff, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Protein unfolding is modeled as an ensemble of pathways, where each step in each pathway is the addition of one topologically possible conformational degree of freedom. Starting with a known protein structure, GeoFold hierarchically partitions (cuts) the native structure into substructures using revolute joints and translations. The energy of each cut and its activation barrier are calculated using buried solvent accessible surface area, side chain entropy, hydrogen bonding, buried cavities, and backbone degrees of freedom. A directed acyclic graph is constructed from the cuts, representing a network of simultaneous equilibria. Finite difference simulations on this graph simulate native unfolding pathways. Experimentally observed changes in the unfolding rates for disulfide mutants of barnase, T4 lysozyme, dihydrofolate reductase, and factor for inversion stimulation were qualitatively reproduced in these simulations. Detailed unfolding pathways for each case explain the effects of changes in the chain topology on the folding energy landscape. GeoFold is a useful tool for the inference of the effects of disulfide engineering on the energy landscape of protein unfolding. PMID:22189917

  8. Quasiequilibrium unfolding thermodynamics of a small protein studied by molecular dynamics simulation with an explicit water model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jihua; Zhang, Zhiyong; Liu, Haiyan; Shi, Yunyu

    2003-06-01

    The 124 independent molecular dynamics simulations are completed with total time of 196.8 ns. The calculated unfolding quasiequilibrium thermodynamics of G-IgG-binding domain B1 (GB1) shows the experimentally observed protein transitions: a coil to disordered globule transition, a disordered globule to molten globule transition, a molten globule to nativelike transition, and a nativelike to solidlike state transition. The first protein unfolding phase diagram has been constructed from molecular dynamics simulations with an explicit water model. The calculated melting temperature of GB1 agrees with early experiment. The results also agree with the recent experiment result in which GB1 has more than one intermediate.

  9. Probing the Folding-Unfolding Transition of a Thermophilic Protein, MTH1880

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Youngjin; Han, Jeongmin; Yun, Ji-Hye; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Weontae

    2016-01-01

    The folding mechanism of typical proteins has been studied widely, while our understanding of the origin of the high stability of thermophilic proteins is still elusive. Of particular interest is how an atypical thermophilic protein with a novel fold maintains its structure and stability under extreme conditions. Folding-unfolding transitions of MTH1880, a thermophilic protein from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, induced by heat, urea, and GdnHCl, were investigated using spectroscopic techniques including circular dichorism, fluorescence, NMR combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results suggest that MTH1880 undergoes a two-state N to D transition and it is extremely stable against temperature and denaturants. The reversibility of refolding was confirmed by spectroscopic methods and size exclusion chromatography. We found that the hyper-stability of the thermophilic MTH1880 protein originates from an extensive network of both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions coordinated by the central β-sheet. Spectroscopic measurements, in combination with computational simulations, have helped to clarify the thermodynamic and structural basis for hyper-stability of the novel thermophilic protein MTH1880. PMID:26766214

  10. Structural and dynamical characterization of a biologically active unfolded fibronectin-binding protein from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Penkett, C J; Redfield, C; Jones, J A; Dodd, I; Hubbard, J; Smith, R A; Smith, L J; Dobson, C M

    1998-12-01

    A 130-residue fragment (D1-D4) taken from a fibronectin-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus, which contains four fibronectin-binding repeats and is unfolded but biologically active at neutral pH, has been studied extensively by NMR spectroscopy. Using heteronuclear multidimensional techniques, the conformational properties of D1-D4 have been defined at both a global and a local level. Diffusion studies give an average effective radius of 26.2 +/- 0.1 A, approximately 75% larger than that expected for a globular protein of this size. Analysis of chemical shift, 3JHNalpha coupling constant, and NOE data show that the experimental parameters agree well overall with values measured in short model peptides and with predictions from a statistical model for a random coil. Sequences where specific features give deviations from these predictions for a random coil have however been identified. These arise from clustering of hydrophobic side chains and electrostatic interactions between charged groups. 15N relaxation studies demonstrate that local fluctuations of the chain are the dominant motional process that gives rise to relaxation of the 15N nuclei, with a persistence length of approximately 7-10 residues for the segmental motion. The consequences of the structural and dynamical properties of this unfolded protein for its biological role of binding to fibronectin have been considered. It is found that the regions of the sequence involved in binding have a high propensity for populating extended conformations, a feature that would allow a number of both charged and hydrophobic groups to be presented to fibronectin for highly specific binding.

  11. A Method To Measure Protein Unfolding at an Air-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Leiske, Danielle L; Shieh, Ian C; Tse, Martha Lovato

    2016-10-04

    Proteins are surface-active molecules that have a propensity to adsorb to hydrophobic interfaces, such as the air-liquid interface. Surface flow can increase aggregation of adsorbed proteins, which may be an undesirable consequence depending on the application. As changes in protein conformation upon adsorption are thought to induce aggregation, the ability to measure the folded state of proteins at interfaces is of particular interest. However, few techniques currently exist to measure protein conformation at interfaces. Here we describe a technique capable of measuring the hydrophobicity, and therefore the conformation and folded state, of proteins at air-liquid interfaces by exploiting the environmentally sensitive fluorophore Nile red. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with high (mAb1) and low (mAb2) surface activity were used to highlight the technique. Both mAbs showed low background fluorescence of Nile red in the liquid subphase and at a glass-liquid interface. In contrast, at the air-liquid interface Nile red fluorescence for mAb1 increased immediately after protein adsorption, whereas the Nile red fluorescence of the mAb2 film evolved more slowly in time even though the adsorbed quantity of protein remained constant. The results demonstrate that hydrophobicity upon mAb adsorption to the air-liquid interface evolves in a time-dependent manner. Interfacial hydrophobicity may be indicative of protein conformation or folded state, where rapid unfolding of mAb1 upon adsorption would be consistent with increased protein aggregation compared to mAb2. The ability to measure protein hydrophobicity at interfaces using Nile red, combined with small sample requirements and minimal sample preparation, fills a gap in existing interfacial techniques.

  12. The Stability and Formation of Native Proteins from Unfolded Monomers Is Increased through Interactions with Unrelated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Almazán, Claudia; Torner, Francisco J.; Costas, Miguel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; de Gómez-Puyou, Marieta Tuena; Puyou, Armando Gómez

    2007-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of protein may be as high as 400 mg per ml; thus it seems inevitable that within the cell, numerous protein-protein contacts are constantly occurring. A basic biochemical principle states that the equilibrium of an association reaction can be shifted by ligand binding. This indicates that if within the cell many protein-protein interactions are indeed taking place, some fundamental characteristics of proteins would necessarily differ from those observed in traditional biochemical systems. Accordingly, we measured the effect of eight different proteins on the formation of homodimeric triosephosphate isomerase from Trypanosoma brucei (TbTIM) from guanidinium chloride unfolded monomers. The eight proteins at concentrations of micrograms per ml induced an important increase on active dimer formation. Studies on the mechanism of this phenomenon showed that the proteins stabilize the dimeric structure of TbTIM, and that this is the driving force that promotes the formation of active dimers. Similar data were obtained with TIM from three other species. The heat changes that occur when TbTIM is mixed with lysozyme were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry; the results provided direct evidence of the weak interaction between apparently unrelated proteins. The data, therefore, are strongly suggestive that the numerous protein-protein interactions that occur in the intracellular space are an additional control factor in the formation and stability of proteins. PMID:17551578

  13. A Q3 Statistic for Unfolding Item Response Theory Models: Assessment of Unidimensionality with Two Factors and Simple Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habing, Brian; Finch, Holmes; Roberts, James S.

    2005-01-01

    Although there are many methods available for dimensionality assessment for items with monotone item response functions, there are few methods available for unfolding item response theory models. In this study, a modification of Yen's Q3 statistic is proposed for the case of these nonmonotone item response models. Through a simulation study, the…

  14. The secondary structure and the thermal unfolding parameters of the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Lighezan, Liliana; Georgieva, Ralitsa; Neagu, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Surface layer (S-layer) proteins have been identified in the cell envelope of many organisms, such as bacteria and archaea. They self-assemble, forming monomolecular crystalline arrays. Isolated S-layer proteins are able to recrystallize into regular lattices, which proved useful in biotechnology. Here we investigate the structure and thermal unfolding of the S-layer protein isolated from Lactobacillus salivarius 16 strain of human origin. Using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and the software CDSSTR from DICHROWEB, CONTINLL from CDPro, as well as CDNN, we assess the fractions of the protein's secondary structural elements at temperatures ranging between 10 and 90 °C, and predict the tertiary class of the protein. To study the thermal unfolding of the protein, we analyze the temperature dependence of the CD signal in the far- and near-UV domains. Fitting the experimental data by two- and three-state models of thermal unfolding, we infer the midpoint temperatures, the temperature dependence of the changes in Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of the unfolding transitions in standard conditions, and the temperature dependence of the equilibrium constant. We also estimate the changes in heat capacity at constant pressure in standard conditions. The results indicate that the thermal unfolding of the S-layer protein from L. salivarius is highly cooperative, since changes in the secondary and tertiary structures occur simultaneously. The thermodynamic analysis predicts a "cold" transition, at about -3 °C, of both the secondary and tertiary structures. Our findings may be important for the use of S-layer proteins in biotechnology and in biomedical applications.

  15. Cooperative hydration effect causes thermal unfolding of proteins and water activity plays a key role in protein stability in solutions.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Osato; Dozen, Michiko; Hirota, Kaede

    2016-08-01

    The protein unfolding process observed in a narrow temperature range was clearly explained by evaluating the small difference in the enthalpy of hydrogen-bonding between amino acid residues and the hydration of amino acid residue separately. In aqueous solutions, the effect of cosolute on the protein stability is primarily dependent on water activity, aw, the role of which has been long neglected in the literature. The effect of aw on protein stability works as a power law so that a small change in aw is amplified substantially through the cooperative hydration effect. In the present approach, the role of hydrophobic interaction stands behind. This affects protein stability indirectly through the change in solution structure caused by the existence of cosolute.

  16. Regulated unfolding: a basic principle of intraprotein signaling in modular proteins.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Joachim E; Natarajan, Janani

    2013-11-01

    Modular proteins possess N-terminal sensor domains connected with different C-terminal output domains. Different output domains, for example, phosphodiesterases adenylyl cyclases, are regulated by identical N-terminal domains. Therefore, the mechanisms of intraprotein signaling share properties suitable to regulation of disparate output enzymes, which see the same signal but react differently. The common denominator is a reversible switch of folding/unfolding that connects sensor and output domains. In the inhibited state, output domains are restrained, whereas in the activated state domains are released to assemble according to intrinsic domain properties. We review recent work investigating the mechanism of intraprotein signaling and discuss how this signaling mechanism may have contributed to the evolutionary diversity of specific small molecule-binding domains without loss of regulatory properties.

  17. Entropy reduction in unfolded peptides (and proteins) due to conformational preferences of amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Toal, Siobhan E

    2014-11-07

    As established by several groups over the last 20 years, amino acid residues in unfolded peptides and proteins do not exhibit the unspecific random distribution as assumed by the classical random coil model. Individual amino acid residues in small peptides were found to exhibit different conformational preferences. Here, we utilize recently obtained conformational distributions of guest amino acid residues in GxG peptides to estimate their conformational entropy, which we find to be significantly lower than the entropy of an assumed random coil like distribution. Only at high temperature do backbone entropies approach random coil like values. We utilized the obtained backbone entropies of the investigated amino acid residues to estimate the loss of conformational entropy caused by a coil → helix transition and identified two subsets of amino acid residues for which the thus calculated entropy losses correlate well with the respective Gibbs energy of helix formation obtained for alanine based host-guest systems. Calculated and experimentally derived entropic losses were found to be in good agreement. For most of the amino acid residues investigated entropic losses derived from our GxG distributions correlate very well with corresponding values recently obtained from MD simulations biased by conformational propensities derived from truncated coil libraries. Both, conformational entropy and the entropy of solvation exhibit a strong, residue specific temperature dependence, which can be expected to substantially affect the stability of unfolded states. Altogether, our results provide strong evidence for the notion that conformational preferences of amino acid residues matter with regard to the thermodynamics of peptide and protein folding.

  18. Mechanical response and conformational changes of alpha-actinin domains during unfolding: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Soncini, Monica; Vesentini, Simone; Ruffoni, Davide; Orsi, Mario; Deriu, Marco A; Redaelli, Alberto

    2007-11-01

    Alpha-actinin is a cytoskeleton-binding protein involved in the assembly and regulation of the actin filaments. In this work molecular dynamics method was applied to investigate the mechanical behaviour of the human skeletal muscle alpha-actinin. Five configurations were unfolded at an elongation speed of 0.1 nm/ps in order to investigate the conformational changes occurring during the extension process. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis at different velocities was performed for one of the R2-R3 spectrin-like repeat configuration extracted in order to evaluate the effect of the pulling speed on the mechanical behaviour of the molecule. Two different behaviours were recognized with respect to the pulling speed. In particular, at speed higher than 0.025 nm/ps a continuous rearrangement without evident force peaks was obtained, on the contrary at lower speed evident peaks in the range 500-750 pN were detected. R3 repeat resulted more stable than R2 during mechanical unfolding, due to the lower hydrophobic surface available to the solvent. The characterization of the R2-R3 units can be useful for the development of cytoskeleton network models based on stiffness values obtained by analyses performed at the molecular level.

  19. The origin of pH-dependent changes in m-values for the denaturant-induced unfolding of proteins.

    PubMed

    Whitten, S T; Wooll, J O; Razeghifard, R; García-Moreno E, B; Hilser, V J

    2001-06-22

    Denaturant-induced unfolding is one of the most prevalent means of evaluating the structural stability of proteins and of determining the energetic consequences of mutations or changes in solution conditions. In spite of the widespread use of this approach, controversies and inconsistencies still persist with regard to the interpretation of the results of such studies. For example, most proteins show either a significant increase or a decrease (as much as 100 %) in the denaturant-dependence of the free energy of unfolding (i.e. the m-value) under increasingly acidic conditions. The pH dependence of the m-value is given different interpretations depending on whether the m-values increase or decrease with decreasing pH. In cases where m-values decrease, the decrease is attributed to the presence of an intermediate that becomes transiently stabilized during the unfolding transition at low pH. Cases where m-values increase as pH is lowered are usually interpreted in terms of an increase in the amount of surface area exposed by the denatured state at low pH. We have developed a general thermodynamic model that accounts for both types of behavior in terms of an intermediate that is populated throughout the unfolding transition. The model provides a unified framework for explaining both types of observed behavior, and the validity of the model was tested through the analysis of the pH dependence of m-values of staphylococcal nuclease. According to the model, the observed increase in m-values with decreasing pH is consistent with the existence of an intermediate that is populated during urea and guanidine unfolding. The intermediate becomes less populated during the unfolding transition at lower pH values giving rise to the apparent increase in m-values. These results argue that the prevailing interpretation need not apply to all proteins.

  20. Lipid insertion domain unfolding regulates protein orientational transition behavior in a lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kwan Hon; Qiu, Liming; Cheng, Sara Y; Vaughn, Mark W

    2015-11-01

    We have used coarse-grained (CG) and united atom (UA) molecular dynamics simulations to explore the mechanisms of protein orientational transition of a model peptide (Aβ42) in a phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol (PC/CHO) lipid bilayer. We started with an inserted state of Aβ42 containing a folded (I) or unfolded (II) K28-A42 lipid insertion domain (LID), which was stabilized by the K28-snorkeling and A42-anchoring to the PC polar groups in the lipid bilayer. After a UA-to-CG transformation and a 1000ns-CG simulation for enhancing the sampling of protein orientations, we discovered two transitions: I-to-"deep inserted" state with disrupted K28-snorkeling and II-to-"deep surface" state with disrupted A42-anchoring. The new states remained stable after a CG-to-UA transformation and a 200ns-UA simulation relaxation. Significant changes in the cholesterol-binding domain of Aβ42 and protein-induced membrane disruptions were evident after the transitions. We propose that the conformation of the LID regulates protein orientational transitions in the lipid membrane.

  1. Equilibrium properties of realistic random heteropolymers and their relevance for globular and naturally unfolded proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiana, G.; Sutto, L.

    2011-12-01

    Random heteropolymers do not display the typical equilibrium properties of globular proteins, but are the starting point to understand the physics of proteins and, in particular, to describe their non-native states. So far, they have been studied with mean-field models in the thermodynamic limit, or with computer simulations of very small chains on lattice. After describing a self-adjusting parallel-tempering technique to sample efficiently the low-energy states of frustrated systems without the need of tuning the system-dependent parameters of the algorithm, we apply it to random heteropolymers moving in continuous space. We show that if the mean interaction between monomers is negative, the usual description through the random-energy model is nearly correct, provided that it is extended to account for noncompact conformations. If the mean interaction is positive, such a simple description breaks out and the system behaves in a way more similar to Ising spin glasses. The former case is a model for the denatured state of globular proteins, the latter of naturally unfolded proteins, whose equilibrium properties thus result as qualitatively different.

  2. Targeting electrostatic interactions in accelerated molecular dynamics with application to protein partial unfolding.

    PubMed

    Flores-Canales, Jose C; Kurnikova, Maria

    2015-06-09

    Accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) is a promising sampling method to generate an ensemble of conformations and to explore the free energy landscape of proteins in explicit solvent. Its success resides in its ability to reduce barriers in the dihedral and the total potential energy space. However, aMD simulations of large proteins can generate large fluctuations of the dihedral and total potential energy with little conformational changes in the protein structure. To facilitate wider conformational sampling of large proteins in explicit solvent, we developed a direct intrasolute electrostatic interactions accelerated MD (DISEI-aMD) approach. This method aims to reduce energy barriers within rapidly changing electrostatic interactions between solute atoms at short-range distances. It also results in improved reconstruction quality of the original statistical ensemble of the system. Recently, we characterized a pH-dependent partial unfolding of diphtheria toxin translocation domain (T-domain) using microsecond long MD simulations. In this work, we focus on the study of conformational changes of a low-pH T-domain model in explicit solvent using DISEI-aMD. On the basis of the simulations of the low-pH T-domain model, we show that the proposed sampling method accelerates conformational rearrangement significantly faster than multiple standard aMD simulations and microsecond long conventional MD simulations.

  3. Contrasting the individual reactive pathways in protein unfolding and disulfide bond reduction observed within a single protein.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Fernández, Julio M

    2011-03-09

    Identifying the dynamics of individual molecules along their reactive pathways remains a major goal of modern chemistry. For simple chemical reactions, the transition state position is thought to be highly localized. Conversely, in the case of more complex reactions involving proteins, the potential energy surfaces become rougher, resulting in heterogeneous reaction pathways with multiple transition state structures. Force-clamp spectroscopy experimentally probes the individual reaction pathways sampled by a single protein under the effect of a constant stretching force. Herein, we examine the distribution of conformations that populate the transition state of two different reactions; the unfolding of a single protein and the reduction of a single disulfide bond, both occurring within the same single protein. By applying the recently developed static disorder theory, we quantify the variance of the barrier heights, σ(2), governing each distinct reaction. We demonstrate that the unfolding of the I27 protein follows a nonexponential kinetics, consistent with a high value of σ(2) ∼ 18 (pN nm)(2). Interestingly, shortening of the protein upon introduction of a rigid disulfide bond significantly modulates the disorder degree, spanning from σ(2) ∼ 8 to ∼21 (pN nm)(2). These results are in sharp contrast with the exponential distribution of times measured for an S(N)2 chemical reaction, implying the absence of static disorder σ(2) ∼ 0 (pN nm)(2). Our results demonstrate the high sensitivity of the force-clamp technique to capture the signatures of disorder in the individual pathways that define two distinct force-induced reactions, occurring within the core of a single protein.

  4. The angiopoietin-like protein ANGPTL4 catalyzes unfolding of the hydrolase domain in lipoprotein lipase and the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 counteracts this unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Kovrov, Oleg; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas JD; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) undergoes spontaneous inactivation via global unfolding and this unfolding is prevented by GPIHBP1 (Mysling et al., 2016). We now show: (1) that ANGPTL4 inactivates LPL by catalyzing the unfolding of its hydrolase domain; (2) that binding to GPIHBP1 renders LPL largely refractory to this inhibition; and (3) that both the LU domain and the intrinsically disordered acidic domain of GPIHBP1 are required for this protective effect. Genetic studies have found that a common polymorphic variant in ANGPTL4 results in lower plasma triglyceride levels. We now report: (1) that this ANGPTL4 variant is less efficient in catalyzing the unfolding of LPL; and (2) that its Glu-to-Lys substitution destabilizes its N-terminal α-helix. Our work elucidates the molecular basis for regulation of LPL activity by ANGPTL4, highlights the physiological relevance of the inherent instability of LPL, and sheds light on the molecular defects in a clinically relevant variant of ANGPTL4. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20958.001 PMID:27929370

  5. Pressure-induced unfolding and aggregation of the proteins in whey protein concentrate solutions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hasmukh A; Singh, Harjinder; Havea, Palatasa; Considine, Thérèse; Creamer, Lawrence K

    2005-11-30

    Whey protein concentrate solutions (12% w/v, pH 6.65 +/- 0.05) were pressure treated at 800 MPa for 20-120 min and then examined using size exclusion chromatography (SEC), small deformation rheology, transmission electron microscopy, and various types of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The pressure-treated samples showed a time-dependent loss of native whey proteins by SEC and 1D PAGE and a corresponding increase in non-native proteins and protein aggregates of different sizes. These aggregates altered the viscosity and opacity of the samples and were shown to be cross-linked by intermolecular disulfide bonds and by noncovalent interactions using 1D PAGE [alkaline (or native), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and SDS of reduced samples (SDS(R))] and 2D PAGE (native:SDS and SDS:SDS(R)). The sensitivity of the major whey proteins to pressure was in the order beta-lactoglobulin B (beta-LG B) > beta-LG A > bovine serum albumin (BSA) > alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), and the large internal hydrophobic cavity of beta-LG may have been partially responsible for its sensitivity to high-pressure treatments. It seemed likely that, at 800 MPa, the formation of a beta-LG disulfide-bonded network preceded the formation of disulfide bonds between alpha-LA or BSA and beta-LG to form multiprotein aggregates, possibly because the disulfide bonds of alpha-LA and BSA are less exposed than those of beta-LG either during or after pressure treatment. It may be possible that intermolecular disulfide bond formation occurred at high pressure and that hydrophobic association became important after the high-pressure treatment.

  6. Measurement of protein unfolding/refolding kinetics and structural characterization of hidden intermediates by NMR relaxation dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Meinhold, Derrick W.; Wright, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed understanding of protein function and malfunction hinges on the ability to characterize transiently populated states and the transitions between them. Here, we use 15N, , and 13CO NMR R2 relaxation dispersion to investigate spontaneous unfolding and refolding events of native apomyoglobin. Above pH 5.0, dispersion is dominated by processes involving fluctuations of the F-helix region, which is invisible in NMR spectra. Measurements of R2 dispersion for residues contacted by the F-helix region in the native (N) structure reveal a transient state formed by local unfolding of helix F and undocking from the protein core. A similar state was detected at pH 4.75–4.95 and determined to be an on-pathway intermediate (I1) in a linear three-state unfolding scheme (N⇆I1⇆MG) leading to a transiently populated molten globule (MG) state. The slowest steps in unfolding and refolding are N → I1 (36 s-1) and MG → I1 (26 s-1), respectively. Differences in chemical shift between N and I1 are very small, except in regions adjacent to helix F, showing that their core structures are similar. Chemical shift changes between the N and MG states, obtained from R2 dispersion, reveal that the transient MG state is structurally similar to the equilibrium MG observed previously at high temperature and low pH. Analysis of MG state chemical shifts shows the location of residual helical structure in the transient intermediate and identifies regions that unfold or rearrange into nonnative structure during the N → MG transition. The experiments also identify regions of energetic frustration that “crack” during unfolding and impede the refolding process. PMID:21562212

  7. A simple two-state protein unfolds mechanically via multiple heterogeneous pathways at single-molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Schönfelder, Jörg; Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Muñoz, Victor

    2016-01-01

    A major drive in protein folding has been to develop experimental technologies to resolve the myriads of microscopic pathways and complex mechanisms that purportedly underlie simple two-state folding behaviour. This is key for cross-validating predictions from theory and modern computer simulations. Detecting such complexity experimentally has remained elusive even using methods with improved time, structural or single-molecule resolution. Here, we investigate the mechanical unfolding of cold shock protein B (Csp), a showcase two-state folder, using single-molecule force-spectroscopy. Under controlled-moderate pulling forces, the unfolding of Csp emerges as highly heterogeneous with trajectories ranging from single sweeps to different combinations of multiple long-lived mechanical intermediates that also vary in order of appearance. Steered molecular dynamics simulations closely reproduce the experimental observations, thus matching unfolding patterns with structural events. Our results provide a direct glimpse at the nanoscale complexity underlying two-state folding, and postulate these combined methods as unique tools for dissecting the mechanical unfolding mechanisms of such proteins. PMID:27248054

  8. A simple two-state protein unfolds mechanically via multiple heterogeneous pathways at single-molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönfelder, Jörg; Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Muñoz, Victor

    2016-06-01

    A major drive in protein folding has been to develop experimental technologies to resolve the myriads of microscopic pathways and complex mechanisms that purportedly underlie simple two-state folding behaviour. This is key for cross-validating predictions from theory and modern computer simulations. Detecting such complexity experimentally has remained elusive even using methods with improved time, structural or single-molecule resolution. Here, we investigate the mechanical unfolding of cold shock protein B (Csp), a showcase two-state folder, using single-molecule force-spectroscopy. Under controlled-moderate pulling forces, the unfolding of Csp emerges as highly heterogeneous with trajectories ranging from single sweeps to different combinations of multiple long-lived mechanical intermediates that also vary in order of appearance. Steered molecular dynamics simulations closely reproduce the experimental observations, thus matching unfolding patterns with structural events. Our results provide a direct glimpse at the nanoscale complexity underlying two-state folding, and postulate these combined methods as unique tools for dissecting the mechanical unfolding mechanisms of such proteins.

  9. Irradiation of the porphyrin causes unfolding of the protein in the protoporphyrin IX/beta-lactoglobulin noncovalent complex.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Nicholas F; Sansone, Samuel; Mazzini, Alberto; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2008-06-26

    Porphyrins such as protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) are known to occasionally cause conformational changes in proteins for which they are specific ligands. It has also been established that irradiation of porphyrins noncovalently intercalated between bases or bound to one of the grooves can cause conformational effects on DNA. Conversely, there is no evidence reported in the literature of conformational changes caused by noncovalently bound PPIX to globular proteins for which the porphyrin is not a specific ligand. This study shows that the irradiation of the porphyrin in the PPIX/lactoglobulin noncovalent complex indeed causes a local and limited (approximately 7%) unfolding of the protein near the location of Trp19. This event causes the intrinsic fluorescence spectrum of the protein to shift to the red by 2 nm and the average decay lifetime to lengthen by approximately 0.5 ns. The unfolding of lactoglobulin occurs only at pH >7 because of the increased instability of the protein at alkaline pH. The photoinduced unfolding does not depend on the presence of O2 in solution; therefore, it is not mediated by formation of singlet oxygen and is likely the result of electron transfer between the porphyrin and amino acid residues.

  10. Protein denaturation at a single-molecule level: the effect of nonpolar environments and its implications on the unfolding mechanism by proteases.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bo; Wu, Shaogui; Liu, Shixin; Rodriguez-Aliaga, Piere; Yu, Jin; Cui, Shuxun

    2015-02-21

    Most proteins are typically folded into predetermined three-dimensional structures in the aqueous cellular environment. However, proteins can be exposed to a nonpolar environment under certain conditions, such as inside the central cavity of chaperones and unfoldases during protein degradation. It remains unclear how folded proteins behave when moved from an aqueous solvent to a nonpolar one. Here, we employed single-molecule atomic force microscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the structural and mechanical variations of a polyprotein, I278, during the change from a polar to a nonpolar environment. We found that the polyprotein was unfolded into an unstructured polypeptide spontaneously when pulled into nonpolar solvents. This finding was corroborated by MD simulations where I27 was dragged from water into a nonpolar solvent, revealing details of the unfolding process at the water/nonpolar solvent interface. These results highlight the importance of water in maintaining folding stability, and provide insights into the response of folded proteins to local hydrophobic environments.

  11. Protein denaturation: a small-angle X-ray scattering study of the ensemble of unfolded states of cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Segel, D J; Fink, A L; Hodgson, K O; Doniach, S

    1998-09-08

    Solution X-ray scattering was used to study the equilibrium unfolding of cytochrome c as a function of guanidine hydrochloride concentration at neutral pH. The radius of gyration (Rg) shows a cooperative transition with increasing denaturant with a similar Cm to that observed with circular dichroism. However, the lack of an isoscattering point in the X-ray scattering patterns suggests the equilibrium unfolding is not simply a two-state process. Singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis was applied to the scattering patterns to determine the number of distinct scattering species. SVD analysis reveals the existence of three components, suggesting that at least three equilibrium states of the protein exist. A model was employed to determine the thermodynamic parameters and the scattering profiles of the three equilibrium states. These scattering profiles show that one state is native (N). The other two states (U1, U2) are unfolded, with U2 being fully unfolded and U1 having some residual structure. Using the thermodynamic parameters to calculate fractional populations, U1 is maximally populated at intermediate denaturant concentrations while U2 is maximally populated at high denaturant concentrations. It is likely that there is a multiplicity of denatured states with U1 and U2 representing an average of the denatured states populated at intermediate and high denaturant concentrations, respectively.

  12. Oxidative stress-dependent activation of the eIF2α–ATF4 unfolded protein response branch by skin sensitizer 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene modulates dendritic-like cell maturation and inflammatory status in a biphasic manner [corrected].

    PubMed

    Luís, Andreia; Martins, João Demétrio; Silva, Ana; Ferreira, Isabel; Cruz, Maria Teresa; Neves, Bruno Miguel

    2014-12-01

    The pathogenesis of allergic contact dermatitis, the most common manifestation of immunotoxicity in humans, is intimately connected to hapten-induced maturation of dendritic cells (DC). The molecular mechanisms driving this maturational program are not completely known; however, initial danger signals such as the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were shown to play a critical role. Recent evidence linking ROS production, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases led us to analyze, in the present work, the ability of the skin sensitizer 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB) to evoke ER stress in DC-like THP-1 cells and the concomitant consequences to their immunobiology. We found that DNFB triggers a ROS-dependent activation of the PERK-eIFα-ATF4 unfolded protein response (UPR) branch conferring cytoprotection and modulating the maturation/proinflammatory cell status in a biphasic manner. Early DNFB induction of ATF4 positively modulates autophagy-related genes MAP1LC3B and ATG3 and stabilizes the transcription factor Nrf2, causing a strong induction of the HMOX1-detoxifying gene. Moreover, we observed that in a first phase, DNFB-induced ATF4 upregulates IL8 mRNA levels while blocking CD86, IL1B, IL12B, and CXL10 transcription. Later, following ATF4 decay, HMOX1 and IL8 transcription drastically decrease and CD86, IL1B, and Il12B are upregulated. Overall, our results evidence a connection between sensitizer-induced redox imbalance and the establishment of ER stress in DC-like cells and provide new insights into the role of UPR effectors such as ATF4 to the complex DC maturational program.

  13. Loss of dispersion energy changes the stability and folding/unfolding equilibrium of the Trp-cage protein.

    PubMed

    Cerný, Jirí; Vondrásek, Jirí; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-04-23

    The structure of proteins as well as their folding/unfolding equilibrium are commonly attributed to H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions. We have used the molecular dynamic simulations in an explicit water environment based on the standard empirical potential as well as more accurately (and thus also more reliably) on the QM/MM potential. The simulations where the dispersion term was suppressed have led to a substantial change of the tryptophan-cage protein structure (unfolded structure). This structure cannot fold without the dispersion energy term, whereas, if it is covered fully, the system finds its native structure relatively quickly. This implies that after such physical factors as temperature and pH, the dispersion energy is an important factor in protein structure determination as well as in the protein folding/unfolding equilibrium. The loss of dispersion also affected the R-helical structure. On the other hand, weakening the electrostatic interactions (and thus H-bonding) affected the R-helical structure only to a minor extent.

  14. The pH-dependent unfolding mechanism of P2 myelin protein: an experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Polverini, Eugenia; Fornabaio, Micaela; Fasano, Anna; Carlone, Giulia; Riccio, Paolo; Cavatorta, Paolo

    2006-03-01

    The P2 protein is a small, extrinsic protein of the myelin membrane in the peripheral nervous system that structurally belongs to the fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) family, sharing with them a 10 strands beta-barrel structure. FABPs appear to be involved in cellular fatty acid transport, but very little is known about the role of P2 in the metabolism of peripheral myelin lipids. Study of protein conformation at different pHs is a useful tool for the characterization of the unfolding mechanisms and the intrinsic conformational properties of the protein, and may give insight into factors that guide protein folding pathways. In particular, low pH conditions have been shown to induce partially folded states in several proteins. In this paper, the acidic unfolding of purified P2 protein was studied with both spectroscopic techniques and molecular dynamics simulation. Both experimental and computational results indicate the presence of a partly folded state at low pH, which shows structural changes mainly involving the lid that is formed by the helix-turn-helix domain. The opening of the lid, together with a barrel relaxation, could regulate the ligand exchanges near the cell membrane, supporting the hypothesis that the P2 protein may transport fatty acids between Schwann cells and peripheral myelin.

  15. Sensitivity studies of SREM instrument response and spectral unfolding to particle environment anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdas, Wojtek; Xiao, Hualin; Marcinkowski, Radoslaw

    2016-04-01

    The Standard Radiation Environment Monitor (SREM) is installed on several ESA satellites to monitor space radiation environment of protons and electrons [1]. With its 15 spectroscopy channels the monitor can distinguish between particle species and provide information on their energy spectra. Measurements are based on three sensors located behind different shielding materials. Two of them are arranged into a telescope. All SREM instruments have been carefully calibrated and modelled during laboratory preparation phase. Space data are unfolded using a wide range of methods ranging from simple fit functions to response matrix inversions [2]. Cross comparisons often show discrepancies reaching even an order of magnitude. They are usually attributed to the particle environment anisotropy. Due to various thicknesses of the shielding given by SREM itself and the spacecraft mass distributions the response functions show directional sensitivity. Knowing the spacecraft orientation with respect to the magnetic field allows for more accurate spectral measurements [3]. It is not always possible as only some spacecraft with SREM on board provide such information. This study utilizes pitch angle distributions of particles in the radiation belts for improved unfolding of the SREM energy spectra. Both, random and known SREM orientations with respect to the magnetic field are investigated. Results are given for wide range of numerical studies and for space measurements based on the PROBA1 mission [4]. They contribute to improved accuracy of SREM spectral measurements and give valuable inputs to design of new spacecraft radiation instruments. Literature [1 A. Hajdas, P. Bühler, C. Eggel, P. Favre, A. Mchedlishvili, and A. Zehnder, "Radiation environment along the INTEGRAL orbit measured with the IREM monitor," Astro. Astrophys., vol. 411, pp. L43-L47, 2003. [2] I. Sandberg, I. A. Daglis, A. Anastasiadis, P. Bühler, P. Nieminen, and H. Evans, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. vol. 59, no. 4

  16. Unfolding of C-phycocyanin followed by loss of non-covalent chromophore-protein interactions 1. Equilibrium experiments.

    PubMed

    Kupka, Michaela; Scheer, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    Optical spectroscopic properties of the covalently linked chromophores of biliproteins are profoundly influenced by the state of the protein. This has been used to monitor the urea-induced denaturation of C-phycocyanin (CPC) from Mastigocladus laminosus and its subunits. Under equilibrium conditions, absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism of the chromophores were monitored, as well as the circular dichroism of the polypeptide. Treatment of CPC trimers (alphabeta)3 resulted first in monomerization (alphabeta), which was followed by a complex unfolding process of the protein. Loss of chromophore fluorescence is the next process at increasing urea concentrations; it indicates increased flexibility of the chromophore while maintaining the native, extended conformation, and a less compact but still native-like packing of the protein in the regions sampled by the chromophores. This was followed by relaxation of the chromophores from the energetically unfavorable extended to a cyclic-helical conformation, as reported by absorption and CD in the visible range, indicating local loss of protein structure. Only then is the protein secondary structure lost, as reported by the far-UV CD. Sequential processes were also seen in the subunits, where again the chromophore-protein interactions were reduced before the unfolding of the protein. It is concluded that the bilin chromophores are intrinsic probes suitable to differentiate among different processes involved in protein denaturation.

  17. Peptides as Model Systems for the Unfolded State of Proteins Explored By Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Measey, Thomas; Hagarman, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    Unfolded proteins are generally thought to be structurally random with a minimum of non-local interactions. This concept implies that with the exception of glycine and proline the conformational propensities of amino acid residues in polypeptides should be comparable in that they all sample the statistically allowed region of the Ramachandran plot. However, over the last ten years experimental and computational evidence has emerged for the notion that the conformational space of residues might be more restricted than predicted by random or statistical coil models. We have developed several algorithms which can be used to simulate the amide I band profile of the IR, isotropic Raman, anisotropic Raman and Vibrational Circular Dichroism (VCD) spectra of polypeptides based on assumed ensembles of side chain conformations. The simulations are generally restricted by 3JcαHNH coupling constants obtained from NMR spectroscopy. A comparison with experimental results reveals that e.g. alanine has a clear preference for the so called polyproline II (PPII) conformation in short peptides. The situation becomes more complex if longer polyalanines are doped with negatively charged residues. For the so-called XAO-peptide (X2A7O2, X: diaminobutyric acid, O;ornithine) we found a more compact structure owing to multiple turn conformations sampled by the X2A7 interfaces. For Salmon Calcitonin, a 32-residue hormone, we identified a mixture of PPII, β-strand and helical conformations. Currently, we are in the process of investigating short GxG (x; different natural amino acid residues) peptides in terms of conformational distributions obtained from coil libraries. This will enable us obtain the conformational preferences of amino acid residues in the absence of nearest neighbor interactions.

  18. Unfolding and Folding of the Three-Helix Bundle Protein KIX in the Absence of Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schennach, Moritz; Schneeberger, Eva-Maria; Breuker, Kathrin

    2016-06-01

    Electron capture dissociation was used to probe the structure, unfolding, and folding of KIX ions in the gas phase. At energies for vibrational activation that were sufficiently high to cause loss of small molecules such as NH3 and H2O by breaking of covalent bonds in about 5% of the KIX (M + nH)n+ ions with n = 7-9, only partial unfolding was observed, consistent with our previous hypothesis that salt bridges play an important role in stabilizing the native solution fold after transfer into the gas phase. Folding of the partially unfolded ions on a timescale of up to 10 s was observed only for (M + nH)n+ ions with n = 9, but not n = 7 and n = 8, which we attribute to differences in the distribution of charges within the (M + nH)n+ ions.

  19. CNA web server: rigidity theory-based thermal unfolding simulations of proteins for linking structure, (thermo-)stability, and function

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Dennis M.; Rathi, Prakash Chandra; Pfleger, Christopher; Gohlke, Holger

    2013-01-01

    The Constraint Network Analysis (CNA) web server provides a user-friendly interface to the CNA approach developed in our laboratory for linking results from rigidity analyses to biologically relevant characteristics of a biomolecular structure. The CNA web server provides a refined modeling of thermal unfolding simulations that considers the temperature dependence of hydrophobic tethers and computes a set of global and local indices for quantifying biomacromolecular stability. From the global indices, phase transition points are identified where the structure switches from a rigid to a floppy state; these phase transition points can be related to a protein’s (thermo-)stability. Structural weak spots (unfolding nuclei) are automatically identified, too; this knowledge can be exploited in data-driven protein engineering. The local indices are useful in linking flexibility and function and to understand the impact of ligand binding on protein flexibility. The CNA web server robustly handles small-molecule ligands in general. To overcome issues of sensitivity with respect to the input structure, the CNA web server allows performing two ensemble-based variants of thermal unfolding simulations. The web server output is provided as raw data, plots and/or Jmol representations. The CNA web server, accessible at http://cpclab.uni-duesseldorf.de/cna or http://www.cnanalysis.de, is free and open to all users with no login requirement. PMID:23609541

  20. Coarse-Grained Simulations of Topology-Dependent Mechanisms of Protein Unfolding and Translocation Mediated by ClpY ATPase Nanomachines

    PubMed Central

    Kravats, Andrea N.; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Stan, George

    2016-01-01

    Clp ATPases are powerful ring shaped nanomachines which participate in the degradation pathway of the protein quality control system, coupling the energy from ATP hydrolysis to threading substrate proteins (SP) through their narrow central pore. Repetitive cycles of sequential intra-ring ATP hydrolysis events induce axial excursions of diaphragm-forming central pore loops that effect the application of mechanical forces onto SPs to promote unfolding and translocation. We perform Langevin dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of the ClpY ATPase-SP system to elucidate the molecular details of unfolding and translocation of an α/β model protein. We contrast this mechanism with our previous studies which used an all-α SP. We find conserved aspects of unfolding and translocation mechanisms by allosteric ClpY, including unfolding initiated at the tagged C-terminus and translocation via a power stroke mechanism. Topology-specific aspects include the time scales, the rate limiting steps in the degradation pathway, the effect of force directionality, and the translocase efficacy. Mechanisms of ClpY-assisted unfolding and translocation are distinct from those resulting from non-allosteric mechanical pulling. Bulk unfolding simulations, which mimic Atomic Force Microscopy-type pulling, reveal multiple unfolding pathways initiated at the C-terminus, N-terminus, or simultaneously from both termini. In a non-allosteric ClpY ATPase pore, mechanical pulling with constant velocity yields larger effective forces for SP unfolding, while pulling with constant force results in simultaneous unfolding and translocation. PMID:26734937

  1. Structural and energetic determinants of thermal stability and hierarchical unfolding pathways of hyperthermophilic proteins, Sac7d and Sso7d.

    PubMed

    Priyakumar, U Deva; Ramakrishna, S; Nagarjuna, K R; Reddy, S Karunakar

    2010-02-04

    Identification of the structural and energetic determinants responsible for enhancing the stability of proteins is crucial. Hyperthermophilic proteins are naturally occurring proteins that exhibit high thermal stability and are good candidates for the investigation and understanding of structure-stability relationships. Sac7d from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Sso7d from Sulfolobus solfactaricus are two homologous hyperthermophilic proteins that were shown to be quite stable at high temperatures. Molecular dynamics simulations at the nanosecond time scale at different temperatures were performed to examine the factors affecting their stability. The three-dimensional structures of these proteins were observed to be similar to the experimental structure at 300 and 360 K but were found to undergo denaturation at 500 K. Both proteins exhibit similar unfolding pathways that correlates well with the calculated intermolecular interaction energies. The differential dynamic behaviors of these molecules at different temperatures were examined. Structural and energetic analysis of the contributions of salt bridges indicates a stabilizing effect at higher temperatures. However, the lifetimes of the salt bridges were found to be quite short, and several new salt bridges formed at 500 K supporting previous studies that the desolvation penalty due to the formation of salt bridges decreases at elevated temperatures. Hydrophobic interactions, which decrease with increase in temperature, were also found to be crucial in the stability of these proteins. Overall, the study shows that a balance among the salt bridge interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and solvent properties is primarily responsible for the high thermal stability of this class of proteins.

  2. Preferential melting of secondary structures during protein unfolding in different solvents: Competition between hydrophobic solvation and hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Biman; Roy, Susmita; Ghosh, Rikhia

    2014-03-01

    Aqueous binary mixtures such as water-DMSO, water-urea, and water-ethanol are known to serve as denaturants of a host of proteins, although the detailed mechanism is often not known. Here we combine studies on several proteins in multiple binary mixtures to obtain a unified understanding of the phenomenon. We compare with experiments to support the simulation findings. The proteins considered include (i) chicken villin head piece (HP-36), (ii) immunoglobulin binding protein G (GB1), (iii) myoglobin and (iv) lysozyme. We find that for amphiphilic solvents like DMSO, the hydrophobic groups and the strong hydrogen bonding ability of the >S =O oxygen atom act together to facilitate the unfolding. However, the hydrophilic solvents like urea, due to the presence of more hydrophilic ends (C =O and two NH2) has a high propensity of forming hydrogen bonds with the side-chain residues and backbone of beta-sheet than the same of alpha helix. Such diversity among the unfolding pathways of a given protein in different chemical environments is especially characterized by the preferential solvation of a particular secondary structure.

  3. The interaction of human serum albumin with selected lanthanide and actinide ions: Binding affinities, protein unfolding and conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Manjoor; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Mukesh; Pandey, Badri N

    2016-04-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant soluble protein in blood plays critical roles in transportation of biomolecules and maintenance of osmotic pressure. In view of increasing applications of lanthanides- and actinides-based materials in nuclear energy, space, industries and medical applications, the risk of exposure with these metal ions is a growing concern for human health. In present study, binding interaction of actinides/lanthanides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] with HSA and its structural consequences have been investigated. Ultraviolet-visible, Fourier transform-infrared, Raman, Fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques were applied to study the site of metal ions interaction, binding affinity determination and the effect of metal ions on protein unfolding and HSA conformation. Results showed that these metal ions interacted with carbonyl (CO..:)/amide(N..-H) groups and induced exposure of aromatic residues of HSA. The fluorescence analysis indicated that the actinide binding altered the microenvironment around Trp214 in the subdomain IIA. Binding affinity of U(VI) to HSA was slightly higher than that of Th(IV). Actinides and Ce(IV) altered the secondary conformation of HSA with a significant decrease of α-helix and an increase of β-sheet, turn and random coil structures, indicating a partial unfolding of HSA. A correlation was observed between metal ion's ability to alter HSA conformation and protein unfolding. Both cationic effects and coordination ability of metal ions seemed to determine the consequences of their interaction with HSA. Present study improves our understanding about the protein interaction of these heavy ions and their impact on its secondary structure. In addition, binding characteristics may have important implications for the development of rational antidote for the medical management of health effects of actinides and lanthanides.

  4. Protein l-isoaspartyl-O-methyltransferase of Vibrio cholerae: interaction with cofactors and effect of osmolytes on unfolding.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Pal, Aritrika; Chakravarty, Devlina; Dey, Sucharita; Saha, Rudra P; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2013-04-01

    Protein l-isoaspartyl-O-methyltransferase (PIMT) is an ubiquitous enzyme widely distributed in cells and plays a role in the repair of deamidated and isomerized proteins. In this study, we show that this enzyme is present in cytosolic extract of Vibrio cholerae, an enteric pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium and is enzymatically active. Additionally, we focus on the detailed biophysical characterization of the recombinant PIMT from V. cholerae to gain insight into its structure, stability and the cofactor binding. The equilibrium denaturation of PIMT has been studied using tryptophan fluorescence and CD spectroscopy. The far- and near-UV CD, as well as fluorescence experiments reveal the presence of a non-native intermediate in the folding pathway. Binding of the hydrophobic fluorescent probe, bis-ANS, to the intermediate occurs with high affinity because of the exposure of the hydrophobic clusters during the unfolding process. The existence of the probable intermediate has also been confirmed from limited tryptic digestion and DLS experiments. The protein shows higher binding affinity for AdoHcy, in comparison to AdoMet, and the binding increases the midpoint of thermal unfolding by 6 and 5 °C, respectively. Modeling and molecular dynamics simulations also support the higher stability of the protein in presence of AdoHcy.

  5. D19S Mutation of the Cationic, Cysteine-Rich Protein PAF: Novel Insights into Its Structural Dynamics, Thermal Unfolding and Antifungal Function

    PubMed Central

    Burtscher, Laura; Hajdu, Dorottya; Muñoz, Alberto; Gáspári, Zoltán; Read, Nick D.; Batta, Gyula; Marx, Florentine

    2017-01-01

    The cysteine-rich, cationic, antifungal protein PAF is abundantly secreted into the culture supernatant of the filamentous Ascomycete Penicillium chrysogenum. The five β-strands of PAF form a compact β-barrel that is stabilized by three disulphide bonds. The folding of PAF allows the formation of four surface-exposed loops and distinct charged motifs on the protein surface that might regulate the interaction of PAF with the sensitive target fungus. The growth inhibitory activity of this highly stable protein against opportunistic fungal pathogens provides great potential in antifungal drug research. To understand its mode of action, we started to investigate the surface-exposed loops of PAF and replaced one aspartic acid at position 19 in loop 2 that is potentially involved in PAF active or binding site, with a serine (Asp19 to Ser19). We analysed the overall effects, such as unfolding, electrostatic changes, sporadic conformers and antifungal activity when substituting this specific amino acid to the fairly indifferent amino acid serine. Structural analyses revealed that the overall 3D solution structure is virtually identical with that of PAF. However, PAFD19S showed slightly increased dynamics and significant differences in the surface charge distribution. Thermal unfolding identified PAFD19S to be rather a two-state folder in contrast to the three-state folder PAF. Functional comparison of PAFD19S and PAF revealed that the exchange at residue 19 caused a dramatic loss of antifungal activity: the binding and internalization of PAFD19S by target cells was reduced and the protein failed to trigger an intracellular Ca2+ response, all of which are closely linked to the antifungal toxicity of PAF. We conclude that the negatively charged residue Asp19 in loop 2 is essential for full function of the cationic protein PAF. PMID:28072824

  6. Temperature, pressure, and electrochemical constraints on protein speciation: Group additivity calculation of the standard molal thermodynamic properties of ionized unfolded proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, J. M.; Larowe, D. E.; Helgeson, H. C.

    2006-07-01

    Thermodynamic calculations can be used to quantify environmental constraints on the speciation of proteins, such as the pH and temperature dependence of ionization state, and the relative chemical stabilities of proteins in different biogeochemical settings. These calculations depend in part on values of the standard molal Gibbs energies of proteins and their ionization reactions as a function of temperature and pressure. Because these values are not generally available, we calculated values of the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25°C and 1 bar as well as the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equations of state parameters of neutral and charged zwitterionic reference model compounds including aqueous amino acids, polypeptides, and unfolded proteins. The experimental calorimetric and volumetric data for these species taken from the literature were combined with group additivity algorithms to calculate the properties and parameters of neutral and ionized sidechain and backbone groups in unfolded proteins. The resulting set of group contributions enables the calculation of the standard molal Gibbs energy, enthalpy, entropy, isobaric heat capacity, volume, and isothermal compressibility of unfolded proteins in a range of proton ionization states to temperatures and pressures exceeding 100°C and 1000 bar. This approach provides a useful frame of reference for thermodynamic studies of protein folding and complexation reactions. It can also be used to assign provisional values of the net charge and Gibbs energy of ionized proteins as a function of temperature and pH. Using these values, an Eh-pH diagram for a reaction representing the speciation of extracellular proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus and Bacillus subtilis was generated. The predicted predominance limits of these proteins correspond with the different electrochemical conditions of hydrothermal vents and soils. More comprehensive calculations of this kind may reveal pervasive chemical potential

  7. Toward the physical basis of thermophilic proteins: linking of enriched polar interactions and reduced heat capacity of unfolding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2002-12-01

    The enrichment of salt bridges and hydrogen bonding in thermophilic proteins has long been recognized. Another tendency, featuring lower heat capacity of unfolding (DeltaC(p)) than found in mesophilic proteins, is emerging from the recent literature. Here we present a simple electrostatic model to illustrate that formation of a salt-bridge or hydrogen-bonding network around an ionized group in the folded state leads to increased folding stability and decreased DeltaC(p). We thus suggest that the reduced DeltaC(p) of thermophilic proteins could partly be attributed to enriched polar interactions. A reduced DeltaC(p) might serve as an indicator for the contribution of polar interactions to folding stability.

  8. Unfolding the Role of Large Heat Shock Proteins: New Insights and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Daming; Subjeck, John; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) of eukaryotes are evolutionarily conserved molecules present in all the major intracellular organelles. They mainly function as molecular chaperones and participate in maintenance of protein homeostasis in physiological state and under stressful conditions. Despite their relative abundance, the large HSPs, i.e., Hsp110 and glucose-regulated protein 170 (Grp170), have received less attention compared to other conventional HSPs. These proteins are distantly related to the Hsp70 and belong to Hsp70 superfamily. Increased sizes of Hsp110 and Grp170, due to the presence of a loop structure, result in their exceptional capability in binding to polypeptide substrates or non-protein ligands, such as pathogen-associated molecules. These interactions that occur in the extracellular environment during tissue injury or microbial infection may lead to amplification of an immune response engaging both innate and adaptive immune components. Here, we review the current advances in understanding these large HSPs as molecular chaperones in proteostasis control and immune modulation as well as their therapeutic implications in treatment of cancer and neurodegeneration. Given their unique immunoregulatory activities, we also discuss the emerging evidence of their potential involvement in inflammatory and immune-related diseases. PMID:26973652

  9. Dynamics of protein folding: probing the kinetic network of folding-unfolding transitions with experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Ginka S; Murphy, Ronan D; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Kubelka, Jan

    2011-08-01

    The problem of spontaneous folding of amino acid chains into highly organized, biologically functional three-dimensional protein structures continues to challenge the modern science. Understanding how proteins fold requires characterization of the underlying energy landscapes as well as the dynamics of the polypeptide chains in all stages of the folding process. In recent years, important advances toward these goals have been achieved owing to the rapidly growing interdisciplinary interest and significant progress in both experimental techniques and theoretical methods. Improvements in the experimental time resolution led to determination of the timescales of the important elementary events in folding, such as formation of secondary structure and tertiary contacts. Sensitive single molecule methods made possible probing the distributions of the unfolded and folded states and following the folding reaction of individual protein molecules. Discovery of proteins that fold in microseconds opened the possibility of atomic-level theoretical simulations of folding and their direct comparisons with experimental data, as well as of direct experimental observation of the barrier-less folding transition. The ultra-fast folding also brought new questions, concerning the intrinsic limits of the folding rates and experimental signatures of barrier-less "downhill" folding. These problems will require novel approaches for even more detailed experimental investigations of the folding dynamics as well as for the analysis of the folding kinetic data. For theoretical simulations of folding, a main challenge is how to extract the relevant information from overwhelmingly detailed atomistic trajectories. New theoretical methods have been devised to allow a systematic approach towards a quantitative analysis of the kinetic network of folding-unfolding transitions between various configuration states of a protein, revealing the transition states and the associated folding pathways at

  10. Engineered bi-histidine metal chelation sites map the structure of the mechanical unfolding transition state of an elastomeric protein domain GB1.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Cao, Yi; Zhuang, Shulin; Li, Hongbin

    2012-08-22

    Determining the structure of the transition state is critical for elucidating the mechanism behind how proteins fold and unfold. Due to its high free energy, however, the transition state generally cannot be trapped and studied directly using traditional structural biology methods. Thus, characterizing the structure of the transition state that occurs as proteins fold and unfold remains a major challenge. Here, we report a novel (to our knowledge) method that uses engineered bi-histidine (bi-His) metal-binding sites to directly map the structure of the mechanical unfolding transition state of proteins. This method is adapted from the traditional ψ-value analysis, which uses engineered bi-His metal chelation sites to probe chemical (un)folding transition-state structure. The φ(M2+)(U)-value is defined as ΔΔG(‡-N)/ΔΔG(U-N), which is the energetic effects of metal chelation by the bi-His site on the unfolding energy barrier (ΔG(‡-N)) relative to its thermodynamic stability (ΔG(U-N)) and can be used to obtain information about the transition state in the mutational site. As a proof of principle, we used the small protein GB1 as a model system and set out to map its mechanical unfolding transition-state structure. Using single-molecule atomic force microscopy and spectrofluorimetry, we directly quantified the effect of divalent metal ion binding on the mechanical unfolding free energy and thermodynamic stability of GB1, which allowed us to quantify φ(M2+)(U)-values for different sites in GB1. Our results enabled us to map the structure of the mechanical unfolding transition state of GB1. Within GB1's mechanical unfolding transition state, the interface between force-bearing β-strands 1 and 4 is largely disrupted, and the first β-hairpin is partially disordered while the second β-hairpin and the α-helix remain structured. Our results demonstrate the unique application of ψ-value analysis in elucidating the structure of the transition state that occurs

  11. Covalently linked HslU hexamers support a probabilistic mechanism that links ATP hydrolysis to protein unfolding and translocation.

    PubMed

    Baytshtok, Vladimir; Chen, Jiejin; Glynn, Steven E; Nager, Andrew R; Grant, Robert A; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2017-04-07

    The HslUV proteolytic machine consists of HslV, a double-ring self-compartmentalized peptidase, and one or two AAA+ HslU ring hexamers that hydrolyze ATP to power the unfolding of protein substrates and their translocation into the proteolytic chamber of HslV. Here, we use genetic tethering and disulfide bonding strategies to construct HslU pseudohexamers containing mixtures of ATPase active and inactive subunits at defined positions in the hexameric ring. Genetic tethering impairs HslV binding and degradation, even for pseudohexamers with six active subunits, but disulfide-linked pseudohexamers do not have these defects, indicating that the peptide tether interferes with HslV interactions. Importantly, pseudohexamers containing different patterns of hydrolytically active and inactive subunits retain the ability to unfold protein substrates and/or collaborate with HslV in their degradation, supporting a model in which ATP hydrolysis and linked mechanical function in the HslU ring operate by a probabilistic mechanism.

  12. Unfolding four-helix bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.; Kozak, John J.

    2011-03-01

    A geometrical model has been developed to describe the early stages of unfolding of cytochromes c‧ and c-b562 . Calculations are based on a step-wise extension of the polypeptide chain subject to the constraint that the spatial relationship among the residues of each triplet is fixed by the native-state crystallographic data. The response of each protein to these structural perturbations allows the evolution of each of the four helices in these two proteins to be differentiated. It is found that the two external helices in c‧ unfold before its two internal helices, whereas exactly the opposite behaviour is demonstrated by c-b562 . Each of these cytochromes has an extended, internal, non-helical ('turning') region that initially lags behind the most labile helix but then, at a certain stage (identified for each cytochrome), unravels before any of the four helices present in the native structure. It is believed that these predictions will be useful in guiding future experimental studies on the unfolding of these two cytochromes.

  13. Insight into the Unfolding Properties of Chd64, a Small, Single Domain Protein with a Globular Core and Disordered Tails.

    PubMed

    Tarczewska, Aneta; Kozłowska, Małgorzata; Dobryszycki, Piotr; Kaus-Drobek, Magdalena; Dadlez, Michał; Ożyhar, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Two major lipophilic hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH), govern insect development and growth. While the mode of action of 20E is well understood, some understanding of JH-dependent signalling has been attained only in the past few years, and the crosstalk of the two hormonal pathways remains unknown. Two proteins, the calponin-like Chd64 and immunophilin FKBP39 proteins, have recently been found to play pivotal roles in the formation of dynamic, multiprotein complex that cross-links these two signalling pathways. However, the molecular mechanism of the interaction remains unexplored. The aim of this work was to determine structural elements of Chd64 to provide an understanding of molecular basis of multiple interactions. We analysed Chd64 in two unrelated insect species, Drosophila melanogaster (DmChd64) and Tribolium castaneum (TcChd64). Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS), we showed that both Chd64 proteins have disordered tails that outflank the globular core. The folds of the globular cores of both Chd64 resemble the calponin homology (CH) domain previously resolved by crystallography. Monitoring the unfolding of DmChd64 and TcChd64 by far-ultraviolet (UV) circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) revealed a highly complex process. Chd64 unfolds and forms of a molten globule (MG)-like intermediate state. Furthermore, our data indicate that in some conditions, Chd64 may exists in discrete structural forms, indicating that the protein is pliable and capable of easily acquiring different conformations. The plasticity of Chd64 and the existence of terminal intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) may be crucial for multiple interactions with many partners.

  14. Mineral proximity influences mechanical response of proteins in biological mineral-protein hybrid systems.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pijush; Katti, Dinesh R; Katti, Kalpana S

    2007-03-01

    The organic phase of nacre, which is composed primarily of proteins, has an extremely high elastic modulus as compared to that of bulk proteins, and also undergoes large deformation before failure. One reason for this unusually high modulus could be the mineral-organic interactions. In this work, we elucidate the specific role of mineral proximity on the structural response of proteins in biological structural composites such as nacre through molecular modeling. The "glycine-serine" domain of a nacre protein Lustrin A has been used as a model system. It is found that the amount of work needed to unfold is significantly higher when the GS domain is pulled in the proximity of aragonite. These results indicate that the proximity of aragonite has a significant effect on the unfolding mechanisms of proteins when pulled. These results will provide very useful information in designing synthetic biocomposites, as well as further our understanding of mechanical response in structural composites in nature.

  15. Folding studies of Purified LamB Protein, the Maltoporin from the Escherichia coli Outer Membrane: Trimer Dissociation can be separated from Unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Valerie; Bhatia, Mandeep; Luckey, Mary

    2011-01-01

    The folding mechanisms for β-barrel membrane proteins present unique challenges because acquisition of both secondary and tertiary structure is coupled with insertion into the bilayer. For the porins in Escherichia coli outer membrane, the assembly pathway also includes association into homotrimers. We study the folding pathway for purified LamB protein in detergent and observe extreme hysteresis in unfolding and refolding, as indicated by the shift in intrinsic fluorescence. The strong hysteresis is not seen in unfolding and refolding a mutant LamB protein lacking the disulfide bond, as it unfolds at much lower denaturant concentrations than wild type LamB protein. The disulfide bond is proposed to stabilize the structure of LamB protein by clasping together the two sides of Loop 1 as it lines the inner cavity of the barrel. In addition we find that low pH promotes dissociation of the LamB trimer to folded monomers, which run at about one third the size of the native trimer during SDS PAGE and are much more resistant to trypsin than the unfolded protein. We postulate the loss at low pH of two salt bridges between Loop 2 of the neighboring subunit and the inner wall of the monomer barrel destabilizes the quaternary structure. PMID:21640073

  16. Folding studies of purified LamB protein, the maltoporin from the Escherichia coli outer membrane: trimer dissociation can be separated from unfolding.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Valerie; Bhatia, Mandeep; Luckey, Mary

    2011-09-01

    The folding mechanisms for β-barrel membrane proteins present unique challenges because acquisition of both secondary and tertiary structure is coupled with insertion into the bilayer. For the porins in Escherichia coli outer membrane, the assembly pathway also includes association into homotrimers. We study the folding pathway for purified LamB protein in detergent and observe extreme hysteresis in unfolding and refolding, as indicated by the shift in intrinsic fluorescence. The strong hysteresis is not seen in unfolding and refolding a mutant LamB protein lacking the disulfide bond, as it unfolds at much lower denaturant concentrations than wild type LamB protein. The disulfide bond is proposed to stabilize the structure of LamB protein by clasping together the two sides of Loop 1 as it lines the inner cavity of the barrel. In addition we find that low pH promotes dissociation of the LamB trimer to folded monomers, which run at about one third the size of the native trimer during SDS PAGE and are much more resistant to trypsin than the unfolded protein. We postulate the loss at low pH of two salt bridges between Loop 2 of the neighboring subunit and the inner wall of the monomer barrel destabilizes the quaternary structure.

  17. The N-terminal domain of the enzyme I is a monomeric well-folded protein with a low conformational stability and residual structure in the unfolded state.

    PubMed

    Romero-Beviar, Manuel; Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; Prieto, Jesús; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Ariz, Usue; Martínez-Chantar, María de la Luz; Gómez, Javier; Neira, José L

    2010-09-01

    The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system is a multiprotein complex that phosphorylates and, concomitantly, transports carbohydrates across the membrane into the cell. The first protein of the cascade is a multidomain protein so-called enzyme I (EI). The N-terminal domain of EI from Streptomyces coelicolor, EIN(sc), responsible for the binding to the second protein in the cascade (the histidine phosphocarrier, HPr), was cloned and successfully expressed and purified. We have previously shown that EI(sc) binds to HPr(sc) with smaller affinity than other members of the EI and HPr families [Hurtado-Gómez et al. (2008) Biophys. J., 95, 1336-1348]. We think that the study of the isolated binding HPr(sc) domain, that is EIN(sc), could shed light on the small affinity value measured. Therefore, in this work we present a detailed description of the structural features of the EIN domain, as a first step towards a complete characterization of the molecular recognition process between the two proteins. We show that EIN(sc) is a folded protein, with alpha-helix and beta-sheet structures and also random-coil conformations, as shown by circular dichroism (CD), FTIR and NMR spectroscopies. The acquisition of secondary and tertiary structures, and the burial of hydrophobic regions, occurred concomitantly at acidic pHs, but at very low pH, the domain acquired a molten-globule conformation. The EIN(sc) protein was not very stable, with an apparent conformational free energy change upon unfolding, DeltaG, of 4.1 +/- 0.4 kcal mol(-1), which was pH independent in the range explored (from pH 6.0 to 8.5). The thermal denaturation midpoint, which was also pH invariant, was similar to that measured in the isolated intact EI(sc). Although EIN(sc) shows thermal- and chemical denaturations that seems to follow a two-state mechanism, there is evidence of residual structure in the chemical and thermally unfolded states, as indicated by differential scanning

  18. Dewetting-induced globule-coil transitions of model polymers and possible implications high-temperature and low-pressure unfolding of proteins.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Tomonari; Imazaki, Nobuyuki; Sekino, Hideo

    2010-04-28

    A thermodynamic analysis of high-temperature and low-pressure unfolding of proteins using a coarse-grained multiscale simulation combined with a liquid-state density-functional theory is presented. In this study, a hydrophobic polymer chain is employed as a probe molecule for investigating qualitative changes in a hydration free energy surface acting on proteins with changes in temperature and pressure. When water is heated so that its vapor pressure is equal to the atmospheric pressure, it boils. Long-ranged dewetting or drying caused by a hydrophobic planar wall and a large hydrophobic solute surface is significantly enhanced as it approaches the liquid-vapor coexistence curve of water. In this study, we demonstrate that high-temperature and low-pressure unfolding of the polymer chain is interpreted as dewetting-induced unfolding that occurs as it approaches the liquid-vapor coexistence. The unfolding of proteins due to high-temperature and low-pressure denaturation enhances the long-ranged dewetting or drying around them. The long-ranged dewetting phenomenon is considered to be originating from positive changes in both volume and entropy due to the high-temperature and low-pressure denaturation of the proteins.

  19. Proteins in vacuo: A molecular dynamics study of the unfolding behavior of highly charged disulfide-bond-intact lysozyme subjected to a temperature pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, C. T.; Velázquez, I.; Bittner, M.; Tapia, O.

    1999-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to interpret a variety of experimental data on highly charged disulfide-bond-intact lysozyme in vacuo. The simulation approach involved submitting a model of the protein [Reimann, Velázquez, and Tapia, J. Phys. Chem. B 102, 9344 (1998)] in a given charge state to a 3-ns-long heat pulse (usually at 500 K) followed by cooling or relaxation for 1 ns back to room temperature (293 K). This treatment yielded a charge threshold around Q0=8+ for obtaining significant unfolding, as indicated by an enhancement in collision cross section and conformer length. The collision cross sections and lengths theoretically obtained, along with the threshold charge state for initiating unfolding, were compatible with experimental results on lysozyme in vacuo. The unfolded, highly elongated conformations obtained for Q>=9+ displayed a significant level of non-native β-sheet content which appeared to be additionally stabilized by charge self-solvation.

  20. "Invisible" conformers of an antifungal disulfide protein revealed by constrained cold and heat unfolding, CEST-NMR experiments, and molecular dynamics calculations.

    PubMed

    Fizil, Ádám; Gáspári, Zoltán; Barna, Terézia; Marx, Florentine; Batta, Gyula

    2015-03-23

    Transition between conformational states in proteins is being recognized as a possible key factor of function. In support of this, hidden dynamic NMR structures were detected in several cases up to populations of a few percent. Here, we show by two- and three-state analysis of thermal unfolding, that the population of hidden states may weight 20-40 % at 298 K in a disulfide-rich protein. In addition, sensitive (15) N-CEST NMR experiments identified a low populated (0.15 %) state that was in slow exchange with the folded PAF protein. Remarkably, other techniques failed to identify the rest of the NMR "dark matter". Comparison of the temperature dependence of chemical shifts from experiments and molecular dynamics calculations suggests that hidden conformers of PAF differ in the loop and terminal regions and are most similar in the evolutionary conserved core. Our observations point to the existence of a complex conformational landscape with multiple conformational states in dynamic equilibrium, with diverse exchange rates presumably responsible for the completely hidden nature of a considerable fraction.

  1. Unfolding story of inclusion-body myositis and myopathies: role of misfolded proteins, amyloid-beta, cholesterol, and aging.

    PubMed

    Askanas, Valerie; Engel, W King

    2003-03-01

    Sporadic inclusion-body myositis and hereditary inclusion-body myopathies are progressive muscle diseases leading to severe disability. We briefly summarize their clinical pictures and pathologic diagnostic criteria and discuss the latest advances in illuminating their pathogenic mechanism(s). We emphasize how different etiologies might lead to the strikingly similar pathology and possibly similar pathogenic cascade. On the basis of our research, several processes seem to be important in relation to the still speculative pathogenesis, including (a) increased transcription and accumulation of amyloid-beta precursor protein and accumulation of its proteolytic fragment amyloid-beta; (b) abnormal accumulation of components related to lipid metabolism, for example, cholesterol, accumulation of which is possibly owing to its abnormal trafficking; (c) oxidative stress; (d) accumulations of other Alzheimer's disease-related proteins; and (e) a milieu of muscle cellular aging in which these changes occur. We discuss a potentially very important role of unfolded and/or misfolded proteins as a possible mechanism in the formations of the inclusion bodies and other abnormalities.

  2. Analysis of oligomeric proteins during unfolding by pH and temperature.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Pradip; Ganeshan, Tamil; Nandi, Soumiyadeep; Srivastava, Alok; Singh, Prashant; Rehan, Mohommad; Rashkush, Reshmi; Subbarao, Naidu; Lynn, Andrew

    2009-09-01

    During thermal transition and variation of pH, structural properties of 35 proteins and their complexes (bound with substrate and co-factor) were analyzed in detail. During pH alteration, these proteins were shown to have substantial differences in conformations. pH conformers were analyzed in detail. Free energy and other energy parameters were also estimated for these proteins at various pH and temperatures. Detailed structural analysis and binding interfaces of various substrates, inhibitors and cofactor of these proteins were also investigated using docking and molecular dynamic simulation.

  3. Substitution of aspartic acid with glutamic acid increases the unfolding transition temperature of a protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duck Yeon; Kim, Kyeong-Ae; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Key-Sun

    2004-07-30

    Proteins from thermophiles are more stable than those from mesophiles. Several factors have been suggested as causes for this greater stability, but no general rule has been found. The amino acid composition of thermophile proteins indicates that the content of polar amino acids such as Asn, Gln, Ser, and Thr is lower, and that of charged amino acids such as Arg, Glu, and Lys is higher than in mesophile proteins. Among charged amino acids, however, the content of Asp is even lower in thermophile proteins than in mesophile proteins. To investigate the reasons for the lower occurrence of Asp compared to Glu in thermophile proteins, Glu was substituted with Asp in a hyperthermophile protein, MjTRX, and Asp was substituted with Glu in a mesophile protein, ETRX. Each substitution of Glu with Asp decreased the Tm of MjTRX by about 2 degrees C, while each substitution of Asp with Glu increased the Tm of ETRX by about 1.5 degrees C. The change of Tm destabilizes the MjTRX by 0.55 kcal/mol and stabilizes the ETRX by 0.45 kcal/mol in free energy.

  4. Slow proton transfer coupled to unfolding explains the puzzling results of single-molecule experiments on BBL, a paradigmatic downhill folding protein.

    PubMed

    Cerminara, Michele; Campos, Luis A; Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-01-01

    A battery of thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural approaches has indicated that the small α-helical protein BBL folds-unfolds via the one-state downhill scenario. Yet, single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy offers a more conflicting view. Single-molecule experiments at pH 6 show a unique half-unfolded conformational ensemble at mid denaturation, whereas other experiments performed at higher pH show a bimodal distribution, as expected for two-state folding. Here we use thermodynamic and laser T-jump kinetic experiments combined with theoretical modeling to investigate the pH dependence of BBL stability, folding kinetics and mechanism within the pH 6-11 range. We find that BBL unfolding is tightly coupled to the protonation of one of its residues with an apparent pKa of ~ 7. Therefore, in chemical denaturation experiments around neutral pH BBL unfolds gradually, and also converts in binary fashion to the protonated species. Moreover, under the single-molecule experimental conditions (denaturant midpoint and 279 K), we observe that proton transfer is much slower than the ~ 15 microseconds folding-unfolding kinetics of BBL. The relaxation kinetics is distinctly biphasic, and the overall relaxation time (i.e. 0.2-0.5 ms) becomes controlled by the proton transfer step. We then show that a simple theoretical model of protein folding coupled to proton transfer explains quantitatively all these results as well as the two sets of single-molecule experiments, including their more puzzling features. Interestingly, this analysis suggests that BBL unfolds following a one-state downhill folding mechanism at all conditions. Accordingly, the source of the bimodal distributions observed during denaturation at pH 7-8 is the splitting of the unique conformational ensemble of BBL onto two slowly inter-converting protonation species. Both, the unprotonated and protonated species unfold gradually (one-state downhill), but they exhibit different degree of unfolding at any given

  5. The Low pH Unfolded State of the C-terminal Domain of the Ribosomal Protein L9 Contains Significant Secondary Structure in the Absence of Denaturant but is No More Compact than the Low pH Urea Unfolded State

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Bing; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Eliezer, David; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the properties of the unfolded states of proteins, particularly unfolded states which can be populated in the absence of high concentrations of denaturants. Interest in the unfolded state ensemble reflects the fact that it is the starting point for protein folding as well as the reference state for protein stability studies, and can be the starting state for pathological aggregation. The unfolded state of the C-terminal domain (residues 58 to 149) of the ribosomal protein L9 (CTL9) can be populated in the absence of denaturant at low pH. CTL9 is a 92 residue globular α, β protein. The low pH unfolded state contains more secondary structure than low pH urea unfolded state but it is not a molten globule. Backbone (1H, 13C and 15N) NMR assignments as well as side chain 13Cβ and 1Hβ assignments and 15N R2 values were obtained for the pH 2.0 unfolded form of CTL9 and for the urea unfolded state at pH 2.5. Analysis of the deviations of the chemical shifts from random coil values indicates that residues that comprise the two helices in the native state show a clear preference to adopt helical φ, ψ angles in the pH 2.0 unfolded state. There is a less pronounced but nevertheless clear tendency for residues 107 to 124 to preferentially populate helical φ, ψ values in the unfolded state. The urea unfolded state has no detectable tendency to populate any type of secondary structure even though it is as compact as the pH 2.0 unfolded state. Comparison of the two unfolded forms of CTL9 provides direct experimental evidence that states which differ significantly in their secondary structure can have identical hydrodynamic properties. This in turn demonstrates that global parameters such as Rh or Rg are very poor indicators of “random coil” behavior. PMID:18707127

  6. Stochastic emergence of multiple intermediates detected by single-molecule quasi-static mechanical unfolding of protein

    PubMed Central

    Fukagawa, Akihiro; Hiroshima, Michio; Sakane, Isao; Tokunaga, Makio

    2009-01-01

    Experimental probing of a protein-folding energy landscape can be challenging, and energy landscapes comprising multiple intermediates have not yet been defined. Here, we quasi-statically unfolded single molecules of staphylococcal nuclease by constant-rate mechanical stretching with a feedback positioning system. Multiple discrete transition states were detected as force peaks, and only some of the multiple transition states emerged stochastically in each trial. This finding was confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, and agreed with another result of the simulations which showed that individual trajectories took highly heterogeneous pathways. The presence of Ca2+ did not change the location of the transition states, but changed the frequency of the emergence. Transition states emerged more frequently in stabilized domains. The simulations also confirmed this feature, and showed that the stabilized domains had rugged energy surfaces. The mean energy required per residue to disrupt secondary structures was a few times the thermal energy (1–3 kBT), which agreed with the stochastic feature. Thus, single-molecule quasi-static measurement has achieved notable success in detecting stochastic features of a huge number of possible conformations of a protein. PMID:27857576

  7. Direct evidence for a two-state protein unfolding transition from hydrogen-deuterium exchange, mass spectrometry, and NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Q.; Baker, D.

    1996-01-01

    We use mass spectrometry in conjunction with hydrogen-deuterium exchange and NMR to characterize the conformational dynamics of the 62-residue IgG binding domain of protein L under conditions in which the native state is marginally stable. Mass spectra of protein L after short incubations in D2O reveal the presence of two distinct populations containing different numbers of protected protons. NMR experiments indicate that protons in the hydrophobic core are protected in one population, whereas all protons are exchanged for deuterons in the other. As the exchange period is increased, molecules are transferred from the former population to the latter. The absence of molecules with a subset of the core protons protected suggests that exchange occurs in part via a highly concerted transition to an excited state in which all protons exchange rapidly with deuterons. A steady increase in the molecular weight of the population with protected protons, and variation in the exchange rates of the individual protected protons indicates the presence of an additional exchange mechanism. A simple model in which exchange results from rapid (> 10(5)/s) local fluctuations around the native state superimposed upon transitions to an unfolded excited state at approximately 0.06/s is supported by qualitative agreement between the observed mass spectra and the mass spectra simulated according to the model using NMR-derived estimates of the proton exchange rates. PMID:8762137

  8. G protein-coupled receptors show unusual patterns of intrinsic unfolding.

    PubMed

    Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Prilusky, Jaime; Sussman, Joel L; Goldman, Adrian

    2005-02-01

    Intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs) or IUP-like regions often play key roles in controlling processes ranging from transcription to the cell cycle. In silico such proteins can be identified by their sequence properties; they have low hydrophobicity and high net charge. In this study, we applied the FoldIndex (http://bioportal.weizmann.ac.il/fldbin/findex) program to analyze human G protein-coupled receptors and compared them with membrane proteins of known structure and with IUPs. We show that human G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) extramembranous domains include long (>50 residues) disordered segments, unlike membrane proteins of known structure. The predicted disorder occurred primarily in the N-terminal, C-terminal and third intracellular domain regions: 55, 69 and 56% of the human GPCRs were disordered in these regions, respectively. This increased flexibility may therefore be critical for GPCR function. Surprisingly, however, the kinds of residues used in GPCR unstructured regions were different than in hitherto-identified IUPs. The GPCR third intracellular loop domains contain very high percentages of Arg, Lys and His residues, especially Arg, but the percentage of Glu, Asp and Pro is no higher than in folded proteins. We propose that this has structural and functional consequences.

  9. Cooperative Unfolding of Residual Structure in Heat Denatured Proteins by Urea and Guanidinium Chloride.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ritu; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan

    2015-01-01

    The denatured states of proteins have always attracted our attention due to the fact that the denatured state is the only experimentally achievable state of a protein, which can be taken as initial reference state for considering the in vitro folding and defining the native protein stability. It is known that heat and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) give structurally different states of RNase-A, lysozyme, α-chymotrypsinogen A and α-lactalbumin. On the contrary, differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetric measurements, reported in the literature, led to the conclusion that heat denatured and GdmCl denatured states are thermodynamically and structurally identical. In order to resolve this controversy, we have measured changes in the far-UV CD (circular dichroism) of these heat-denatured proteins on the addition of different concentrations of GdmCl. The observed sigmoidal curve of each protein was analyzed for Gibbs free energy change in the absence of the denaturant (ΔG0X→D) associated with the process heat denatured (X) state ↔ GdmCl denatured (D) state. To confirm that this thermodynamic property represents the property of the protein alone and is not a manifestation of salvation effect, we measured urea-induced denaturation curves of these heat denatured proteins under the same experimental condition in which GdmCl-induced denaturation was carried out. In this paper we report that (a) heat denatured proteins contain secondary structure, and GdmCl (or urea) induces a cooperative transition between X and D states, (b) for each protein at a given pH and temperature, thermodynamic cycle connects quantities, ΔG0N→X (native (N) state ↔ X state), ΔG0X→D and ΔG0N→D (N state ↔ D state), and

  10. Computational diagnosis of protein conformational diseases: short molecular dynamics simulations reveal a fast unfolding of r-LDL mutants that cause familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-López, S; Falo, F; Sancho, J

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis of conformational diseases frequently resides in mutant proteins constituting a subset of the vast mutational space. While the subtleties of protein structure point to molecular dynamics (MD) techniques as promising tools for an efficient exploration of such a space, the average size of proteins and the time scale of unfolding events make this goal difficult with present computational capabilities. We show here, nevertheless, that an efficient approach is already feasible for modular proteins. Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a conformational disease linked to mutations in the gene encoding the low density lipoprotein receptor. A high percentage of these mutations has been found in the seven small modular binding repeats of the receptor. Taking advantage of its small size, we have performed an in depth MD study of the fifth binding repeat. Fast unfolding dynamics have been observed in the absence of a structural bound calcium ion, which agrees with its reported essential role in the stability of the module. In addition, several mutations detected in FH patients have been analyzed, starting from the native conformation. Our results indicate that in contrast with the wild type protein and an innocuous control mutant, disease-related mutants experience, in short simulation times (2-8 ns), gross departures from the native state that lead to unfolded conformations and, in some cases, to binding site desorganization deriving in calcium release. Computational diagnosis of mutations leading to conformational diseases seems thus feasible, at least for small or modular pathogenic proteins.

  11. Mechanical unfolding of RNA hairpins.

    PubMed

    Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D

    2005-05-10

    Mechanical unfolding trajectories, generated by applying constant force in optical-tweezer experiments, show that RNA hairpins and the P5abc subdomain of the group I intron unfold reversibly. We use coarse-grained Go-like models for RNA hairpins to explore forced unfolding over a broad range of temperatures. A number of predictions that are amenable to experimental tests are made. At the critical force, the hairpin jumps between folded and unfolded conformations without populating any discernible intermediates. The phase diagram in the force-temperature (f, T) plane shows that the hairpin unfolds by an all-or-none process. The cooperativity of the unfolding transition increases dramatically at low temperatures. Free energy of stability, obtained from time averages of mechanical unfolding trajectories, coincides with ensemble averages, which establishes ergodicity. The hopping time between the native basin of attraction (NBA) and the unfolded basin increases dramatically along the phase boundary. Thermal unfolding is stochastic, whereas mechanical unfolding occurs in "quantized steps" with great variations in the step lengths. Refolding times, upon force quench, from stretched states to the NBA are at least an order of magnitude greater than folding times by temperature quench. Upon force quench from stretched states, the NBA is reached in at least three stages. In the initial stages, the mean end-to-end distance decreases nearly continuously, and there is a sudden transition to the NBA only in the last stage. Because of the generality of the results, we propose that similar behavior should be observed in force quench refolding of proteins.

  12. Verification of unfold error estimates in the unfold operator code

    SciTech Connect

    Fehl, D.L.; Biggs, F.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation that attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the unfold operator (UFO) code written at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, the UFO code also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by estimated random uncertainties in the data. In UFO the unfold uncertainty is obtained from the error matrix. This built-in estimate has now been compared to error estimates obtained by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the test problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5{percent} (standard deviation). One hundred random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95{percent} confidence level). A possible 10{percent} bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetermined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Verification of unfold error estimates in the unfold operator code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehl, D. L.; Biggs, F.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation that attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the unfold operator (UFO) code written at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, the UFO code also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by estimated random uncertainties in the data. In UFO the unfold uncertainty is obtained from the error matrix. This built-in estimate has now been compared to error estimates obtained by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the test problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5% (standard deviation). One hundred random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95% confidence level). A possible 10% bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetermined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums.

  14. Natively unfolded tubulin polymerization promoting protein TPPP/p25 is a common marker of alpha-synucleinopathies.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Gábor G; László, Lajos; Kovács, János; Jensen, Poul Henning; Lindersson, Evo; Botond, Gergo; Molnár, Tamás; Perczel, András; Hudecz, Ferenc; Mezo, Gábor; Erdei, Anna; Tirián, László; Lehotzky, Attila; Gelpi, Ellen; Budka, Herbert; Ovádi, Judit

    2004-11-01

    The novel basic, heat-stable tubulin polymerization promoting protein TPPP/p25 is associated with microtubules in vitro and can induce the formation of aberrant microtubule assemblies. We show by 1H-NMR spectroscopy that TPPP/p25 is natively unfolded. Antisera against peptide 186GKGKAGRVDLVDESG200NH2 (186-200) are highly specific to TPPP/p25. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy demonstrates that TPPP/p25 is enriched in filamentous alpha-synuclein bearing Lewy bodies of Parkinson's (PD) and diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD), as well as glial inclusions of multiple system atrophy (MSA). There is a correlation between TPPP/p25 and alpha-synuclein immunoreactivity in Western blot. In contrast, TPPP/p25 is not associated with abnormally phosphorylated tau in various inclusions of Pick's disease (PiD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). However, electron microscopy confirms clusters of TPPP/p25 immunoreactivity along filaments of unstructured but not compact neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease (AD). TPPP/p25 seems to be a novel marker of alpha-synucleinopathies.

  15. Proteins in frozen solutions: evidence of ice-induced partial unfolding.

    PubMed

    Strambini, G B; Gabellieri, E

    1996-02-01

    From a drastic decrease in the phosphorescence lifetime of tryptophan residues buried in compact rigid cores of globular proteins, it was possible to demonstrate that freezing of aqueous solutions is invariably accompanied by a marked loosening of the native fold, an alteration that entails considerable loss of secondary and tertiary structure. The phenomenon is largely reversible on ice melting although, in some cases, a small fraction of macromolecules recovers neither the initial phosphorescence properties nor the catalytic activity. The variation in the lifetime parameter was found to be a smooth function of the residual volume of liquid water in equilibrium with ice and to depend on the morphology of ice. The addition of cryoprotectants such as glycerol and sucrose profoundly attenuates or even eliminates the perturbation. These results are interpreted in terms of adsorption of protein molecules onto the surface of ice.

  16. A water-explicit lattice model of heat-, cold-, and pressure-induced protein unfolding.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bryan A; Debenedetti, Pablo G; Stillinger, Frank H; Rossky, Peter J

    2007-12-15

    We investigate the effect of temperature and pressure on polypeptide conformational stability using a two-dimensional square lattice model in which water is represented explicitly. The model captures many aspects of water thermodynamics, including the existence of density anomalies, and we consider here the simplest representation of a protein: a hydrophobic homopolymer. We show that an explicit treatment of hydrophobic hydration is sufficient to produce cold, pressure, and thermal denaturation. We investigate the effects of the enthalpic and entropic components of the water-protein interactions on the overall folding phase diagram, and show that even a schematic model such as the one we consider yields reasonable values for the temperature and pressure ranges within which highly compact homopolymer configurations are thermodynamically stable.

  17. Dissecting the Binding between Glutamine Synthetase and Its Two Natively Unfolded Protein Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Uceda, David; Neira, José L; Saelices, Lorena; Robles-Rengel, Rocío; Florencio, Francisco J; Muro-Pastor, M Isabel; Santoro, Jorge

    2016-06-21

    Ammonium is incorporated into carbon skeletons by the sequential action of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) in cyanobacteria. The activity of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 GS type I is controlled by protein-protein interactions with two intrinsically disordered inactivating factors (IFs): the 65-residue (IF7) and the 149-residue one (IF17). In this work, we studied both IF7 and IF17 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and we described their binding to GS by using NMR and biolayer interferometry. We assigned the backbone nuclei of all residues of IF7. Analyses of chemical shifts and the (15)N-{(1)H} NOEs at two field strengths suggest that IF7 region Thr3-Arg13 and a few residues around Ser27 and Phe41 populated helical conformations (although the percentage is smaller around Phe41). The two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N HSQC and CON experiments suggest that IF17 populated several conformations. We followed the binding between GS and IF7 by NMR at physiological pH, and the residues interacting first with IF7 were Gln6 and Ser27, belonging to those regions that appeared to be ordered in the isolated protein. We also determined the kon values and koff values for the binding of both IF7 and IF17 to GS, where the GS protein was bound to a biosensor. The measurements of the kinetic constants for the binding of IF7 to GS suggest that: (i) binding does not follow a kinetic two-state model ([Formula: see text]), (ii) there is a strong electrostatic component in the determined kon, and (iii) the binding is not diffusion-limited.

  18. Possible mechanism underlying high-pressure unfolding of proteins: formation of a short-period high-density hydration shell.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Tomonari; Sekino, Hideo

    2011-09-21

    Hydration effects on high-pressure unfolding of a hydrophobic polymer chain are investigated through a multiscale simulation based on density-functional theory. The results strongly suggest the following: a thermodynamic origin for high-pressure denaturation, i.e., the decrease in volume due to the unfolding can be explained by the formation of a short-period high-density hydration shell.

  19. Mechanics of collective unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruel, M.; Allain, J.-M.; Truskinovsky, L.

    2015-03-01

    Mechanically induced unfolding of passive crosslinkers is a fundamental biological phenomenon encountered across the scales from individual macro-molecules to cytoskeletal actin networks. In this paper we study a conceptual model of athermal load-induced unfolding and use a minimalistic setting allowing one to emphasize the role of long-range interactions while maintaining full analytical transparency. Our model can be viewed as a description of a parallel bundle of N bistable units confined between two shared rigid backbones that are loaded through a series spring. We show that the ground states in this model correspond to synchronized, single phase configurations where all individual units are either folded or unfolded. We then study the fine structure of the wiggly energy landscape along the reaction coordinate linking the two coherent states and describing the optimal mechanism of cooperative unfolding. Quite remarkably, our study shows the fundamental difference in the size and the structure of the folding-unfolding energy barriers in the hard (fixed displacements) and soft (fixed forces) loading devices which persists in the continuum limit. We argue that both, the synchronization and the non-equivalence of the mechanical responses in hard and soft devices, have their origin in the dominance of long-range interactions. We then apply our minimal model to skeletal muscles where the power-stroke in acto-myosin crossbridges can be interpreted as passive folding. A quantitative analysis of the muscle model shows that the relative rigidity of myosin backbone provides the long-range interaction mechanism allowing the system to effectively synchronize the power-stroke in individual crossbridges even in the presence of thermal fluctuations. In view of the prototypical nature of the proposed model, our general conclusions pertain to a variety of other biological systems where elastic interactions are mediated by effective backbones.

  20. First protein drug target's appraisal of lead-likeness descriptors to unfold the intervening chemical space.

    PubMed

    Athar, Mohd; Lone, Mohsin Y; Jha, Prakash C

    2017-03-01

    Despite the advances in combinatorial chemistry, high throughput and virtual screening experiments, plethora of clinical studies disquiet due to lead and drug-likeness attritions. For mitigation, the knowledge of physicochemical properties are really useful for guiding and selection of compounds from libraries dictated by certain rule of thumbs. However, robust bio-technological and instrumental innovations have created exponential increase in novel compounds and databases which compelled rethinking of the evaluation procedures. Known descriptive molecular property filters proposed by Lipinski, Verber and Hann are not efficient enough to encompass long array of compounds. Moreover, these filters do not take into account the specificity of biological target. In this pursuit, we have tried to appraise eight molecular properties for two major classes of biological targets viz membrane proteins and ion channels binding ligands. These molecular properties were utilized to search for the specific attributes that can be identified as an intervening space for dictating the biological activity.

  1. Desorption of Lipases Immobilized on Octyl-Agarose Beads and Coated with Ionic Polymers after Thermal Inactivation. Stronger Adsorption of Polymers/Unfolded Protein Composites.

    PubMed

    Virgen-Ortíz, Jose J; Pedrero, Sara G; Fernandez-Lopez, Laura; Lopez-Carrobles, Nerea; Gorines, Beatriz C; Otero, Cristina; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2017-01-05

    Lipases from Candida antarctica (isoform B) and Rhizomucor miehei (CALB and RML) have been immobilized on octyl-agarose (OC) and further coated with polyethylenimine (PEI) and dextran sulfate (DS). The enzymes just immobilized on OC supports could be easily released from the support using 2% SDS at pH 7, both intact or after thermal inactivation (in fact, after inactivation most enzyme molecules were already desorbed). The coating with PEI and DS greatly reduced the enzyme release during thermal inactivation and improved enzyme stability. However, using OC-CALB/RML-PEI-DS, the full release of the immobilized enzyme to reuse the support required more drastic conditions: a pH value of 3, a buffer concentration over 2 M, and temperatures above 45 °C. However, even these conditions were not able to fully release the thermally inactivated enzyme molecules from the support, being necessary to increase the buffer concentration to 4 M sodium phosphate and decrease the pH to 2.5. The formation of unfolded protein/polymers composites seems to be responsible for this strong interaction between the octyl and some anionic groups of OC supports. The support could be reused five cycles using these conditions with similar loading capacity of the support and stability of the immobilized enzyme.

  2. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas Jd; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-03

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia.

  3. Partially Unfolded Forms and Non-Two-State Folding of a β-Sandwich: FHA Domain from Arabidopsis Receptor Kinase-Associated Protein Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangyang; Lee, Gui-in; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    FHA domains adopt a β-sandwich fold with 11 strands. The first evidence of partially unfolded forms of a β-sandwich is derived from native-state hydrogen exchange (NHX) of the FHA domain from Kinase-Associated Protein Phosphatase from Arabidopsis. The folding kinetics of this FHA domain indicate that EX2 behavior prevails at pH 6.3. In the chevron plot, rollover in the folding arm and bends in the unfolding arm suggest folding intermediates. NHX of this FHA domain suggests a core of six most stable β-strands and two loops, characterized by rare global unfolding events. Flanking this stable core are β-strands and recognition loops with less stability, termed subglobal motifs. These suggest partially unfolded forms (near-native intermediates) with two levels of stability. The spatial separation of the subglobal motifs on the flanks suggests possible parallelism in their folding as additional β-strands align with the stable core of six strands. Intermediates may contribute to differences in stabilities and m-values suggested by NHX or kinetics relative to chemical denaturation. Residual structure in the unfolded regime is suggested by superprotection of β-strand 6 and by GdmCl-dependence of adjustments in amide NMR spectra and residual optical signal. The global folding stability depends strongly on pH, with at least 3 kcal/mol more stability at pH 7.3 than at pH 6.3. This FHA domain is hypothesized to fold progressively with initial hydrophobic collapse of its stable 6-stranded core followed by addition of less stable flanking β-strands and ordering of recognition loops. PMID:17007879

  4. Dwell-time distribution analysis of polyprotein unfolding using force-clamp spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brujic, Jasna; Hermans, Rodolfo I Z; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Walther, Kirstin A; Fernandez, Julio M

    2007-04-15

    Using the recently developed single molecule force-clamp technique we quantitatively measure the kinetics of conformational changes of polyprotein molecules at a constant force. In response to an applied force of 110 pN, we measure the dwell times of 1647 unfolding events of individual ubiquitin modules within each protein chain. We then establish a rigorous method for analyzing force-clamp data using order statistics. This allows us to test the success of a history-independent, two-state model in describing the kinetics of the unfolding process. We find that the average unfolding trajectory is independent of the number of protein modules N in each trajectory, which varies between 3 and 12 (the engineered protein length), suggesting that the unfolding events in each chain are uncorrelated. We then derive a binomial distribution of dwell times to describe the stochastic dynamics of protein unfolding. This distribution successfully describes 81% of the data with a single rate constant of alpha = 0.6 s(-1) for all N. The remainder of the data that cannot be accounted for suggests alternative unfolding barriers in the energy landscape of the protein. This method investigates the statistical features of unfolding beyond the average measurement of a single rate constant, thus providing an attractive alternative for measuring kinetics by force-clamp spectroscopy.

  5. Quantitative determination of site-specific conformational distributions in an unfolded protein by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Havlin, Robert H; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2009-10-02

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are used to investigate the structure of the 35-residue villin headpiece subdomain (HP35) in folded, partially denatured, and fully denatured states. Experiments are carried out in frozen glycerol/water solutions, with chemical denaturation by guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl). Without GdnHCl, two-dimensional solid-state (13)C NMR spectra of samples prepared with uniform (13)C labeling of selected residues show relatively sharp cross-peaks at chemical shifts that are consistent with the known three-helix bundle structure of folded HP35. At high GdnHCl concentrations, most cross-peaks broaden and shift, qualitatively indicating disruption of the folded structure and development of static conformational disorder in the frozen denatured state. Conformational distributions at one residue in each helical segment are probed quantitatively with three solid-state NMR techniques that provide independent constraints on backbone varphi and psi torsion angles in samples with sequential pairs of carbonyl (13)C labels. Without GdnHCl, the combined data are well fit by alpha-helical conformations. At [GdnHCl]=4.5 M, corresponding to the approximate denaturation midpoint, the combined data are well fit by a combination of alpha-helical and partially extended conformations at each site, but with a site-dependent population ratio. At [GdnHCl]=7.0 M, corresponding to the fully denatured state, the combined data are well fit by a combination of partially extended and polyproline II conformations, again with a site-dependent population ratio. Two entirely different models for conformational distributions lead to nearly the same best-fit distributions, demonstrating the robustness of these conclusions. This work represents the first quantitative investigation of site-specific conformational distributions in partially folded and unfolded states of a protein by solid-state NMR.

  6. The role of plastic β-hairpin and weak hydrophobic core in the stability and unfolding of a full sequence design protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hongxing; Duan, Yong

    2004-12-01

    In this study, the thermal stability of a designed α/β protein FSD (full sequence design) was studied by explicit solvent simulations at three moderate temperatures, 273 K, 300 K, and 330 K. The average properties of the ten trajectories at each temperature were analyzed. The thermal unfolding, as judged by backbone root-mean-square deviation and percentage of native contacts, was displayed with increased sampling outside of the native basin as the temperature was raised. The positional fluctuation of the hairpin residues was significantly higher than that of the helix residues at all three temperatures. The hairpin segment displayed certain plasticity even at 273 K. Apart from the terminal residues, the highest fluctuation was shown in the turn residues 7-9. Secondary structure analysis manifested the structural heterogeneity of the hairpin segment. It was also revealed by the simulation that the hydrophobic core was vulnerable to thermal denaturation. Consistent with the experiment, the I7Y mutation in the double mutant FSD-EY (FSD with mutations Q1E and I7Y) dramatically increased the protein stability in the simulation, suggesting that the plasticity of the hairpin can be partially compensated by a stronger hydrophobic core. As for the unfolding pathway, the breathing of the hydrophobic core and the separation of the two secondary structure elements (α helix and β hairpin) was the initiation step of the unfolding. The loss of global contacts from the separation further destabilized the hairpin structure and also led to the unwinding of the helix.

  7. Driving force behind adsorption-induced protein unfolding: a time-resolved X-ray reflectivity study on lysozyme adsorbed at an air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yohko F; Uruga, Tomoya; Tanida, Hajime; Toyokawa, Hidenori; Terada, Yasuko; Takagaki, Masafumi; Yamada, Hironari

    2009-01-06

    Time-resolved X-ray reflectivity measurements for lysozyme (LSZ) adsorbed at an air/water interface were performed to study the mechanism of adsorption-induced protein unfolding. The time dependence of the density profile at the air/water interface revealed that the molecular conformation changed significantly during adsorption. Taking into account previous work using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, we propose that the LSZ molecules initially adsorbed on the air/water interface have a flat unfolded structure, forming antiparallel beta-sheets as a result of hydrophobic interactions with the gas phase. In contrast, as adsorption continues, a second layer forms in which the molecules have a very loose structure having random coils as a result of hydrophilic interactions with the hydrophilic groups that protrude from the first layer.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of the unfolding of the human prion protein domain under low pH and high temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei; Wang, Tingting; Zhu, Jiang; Shi, Yunyu; Liu, Haiyan

    2003-05-01

    Four 10-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the human prion protein domain (HuPrP 125-228) in explicit water solution have been performed. Each of the simulations mimicked a different environment of the protein: the neutral pH environment was simulated with all histidine residues neutral and bearing a ND proton and with other titratable side chains charged, the weakly acidic environment was simulated with all titratable side chains charged, the strongly acidic environment was simulated with all titratable side chains protonated. The protein in neutral pH environment was simulated at both ambient (298 K) and higher (350 K) temperatures. The native fold is stable in the neutral pH/ambient temperature simulation. Through out all other simulations, a quite stable core consisted of 10-20 residues around the disulfide bond retain their initial conformations. However, the secondary structures of the protein show changes of various degrees compared to the native fold, parts of the helices unfolded and the beta-sheets extended. Our simulations indicated that the heat-induced unfolding and acid-induced unfolding of HuPrP might follow different pathways: the initial stage of the acid-induced unfolding may include not only changes in secondary structures, but also changes in the tertiary structures. Under the strongly acidic condition, obvious tertiary structure changes take place after 10-ns simulation, the secondary structure elements and the loops becoming more parallel to each other, resulting in a compact state, which was stabilized by a large number of new, non-native side chain-side chain contacts. Such tertiary structure changes were not observed in the higher temperature simulation, and intuitively, they may favor the further extension of the beta-sheets and eventually the agglomeration of multiple protein molecules. The driving forces for this tertiary structure changes are discussed. Two additional 10-ns MD simulations, one with Asp202 protonated and the other

  9. The cellular protein hnRNP A2/B1 enhances HIV-1 transcription by unfolding LTR promoter G-quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Scalabrin, Matteo; Frasson, Ilaria; Ruggiero, Emanuela; Perrone, Rosalba; Tosoni, Elena; Lago, Sara; Tassinari, Martina; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N.

    2017-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are four-stranded conformations of nucleic acids that act as cellular epigenetic regulators. A dynamic G-quadruplex forming region in the HIV-1 LTR promoter represses HIV-1 transcription when in the folded conformation. This activity is enhanced by nucleolin, which induces and stabilizes the HIV-1 LTR G-quadruplexes. In this work by a combined pull-down/mass spectrometry approach, we consistently found hnRNP A2/B1 as an additional LTR-G-quadruplex interacting protein. Surface plasmon resonance confirmed G-quadruplex specificity over linear sequences and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis indicated that hnRNP A2/B1 is able to efficiently unfold the LTR G-quadruplexes. Evaluation of the thermal stability of the LTR G-quadruplexes in different-length oligonucleotides showed that the protein is fit to be most active in the LTR full-length environment. When hnRNP A2/B1 was silenced in cells, LTR activity decreased, indicating that the protein acts as a HIV-1 transcription activator. Our data highlight a tightly regulated control of transcription based on G-quadruplex folding/unfolding, which depends on interacting cellular proteins. These findings provide a deeper understanding of the viral transcription mechanism and may pave the way to the development of drugs effective against the integrated HIV-1, present both in actively and latently infected cells. PMID:28338097

  10. Hsp110 Is a Bona Fide Chaperone Using ATP to Unfold Stable Misfolded Polypeptides and Reciprocally Collaborate with Hsp70 to Solubilize Protein Aggregates*

    PubMed Central

    Mattoo, Rayees U. H.; Sharma, Sandeep K.; Priya, Smriti; Finka, Andrija; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Structurally and sequence-wise, the Hsp110s belong to a subfamily of the Hsp70 chaperones. Like the classical Hsp70s, members of the Hsp110 subfamily can bind misfolding polypeptides and hydrolyze ATP. However, they apparently act as a mere subordinate nucleotide exchange factors, regulating the ability of Hsp70 to hydrolyze ATP and convert stable protein aggregates into native proteins. Using stably misfolded and aggregated polypeptides as substrates in optimized in vitro chaperone assays, we show that the human cytosolic Hsp110s (HSPH1 and HSPH2) are bona fide chaperones on their own that collaborate with Hsp40 (DNAJA1 and DNAJB1) to hydrolyze ATP and unfold and thus convert stable misfolded polypeptides into natively refolded proteins. Moreover, equimolar Hsp70 (HSPA1A) and Hsp110 (HSPH1) formed a powerful molecular machinery that optimally reactivated stable luciferase aggregates in an ATP- and DNAJA1-dependent manner, in a disaggregation mechanism whereby the two paralogous chaperones alternatively activate the release of bound unfolded polypeptide substrates from one another, leading to native protein refolding. PMID:23737532

  11. Group additivity calculation of the standard molal thermodynamic properties of aqueous amino acids, polypeptides and unfolded proteins as a function of temperature, pressure and ionization state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, J. M.; Larowe, D. E.; Helgeson, H. C.

    2005-10-01

    Thermodynamic calculation of the chemical speciation of proteins and the limits of protein metastability affords a quantitative understanding of the biogeochemical constraints on the distribution of proteins within and among different organisms and chemical environments. These calculations depend on accurate determination of the ionization states and standard molal Gibbs free energies of proteins as a function of temperature and pressure, which are not generally available. Hence, to aid predictions of the standard molal thermodynamic properties of ionized proteins as a function of temperature and pressure, calculated values are given below of the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25°C and 1 bar and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equations of state parameters of the structural groups comprising amino acids, polypeptides and unfolded proteins. Group additivity and correlation algorithms were used to calculate contributions by ionized and neutral sidechain and backbone groups to the standard molal Gibbs free energy (Δ G°), enthalpy (Δ H°), entropy (S°), isobaric heat capacity (C°P), volume (V°) and isothermal compressibility (κ°T) of multiple reference model compounds. Experimental values of C°P, V° and κ°T at high temperature were taken from the recent literature, which ensures an internally consistent revision of the thermodynamic properties and equations of state parameters of the sidechain and backbone groups of proteins, as well as organic groups. As a result, Δ G°, Δ H°, S° C°P, V° and κ°T of unfolded proteins in any ionization state can be calculated up to T~-300°C and P~-5000 bars. In addition, the ionization states of unfolded proteins as a function of not only pH, but also temperature and pressure can be calculated by taking account of the degree of ionization of the sidechain and backbone groups present in the sequence. Calculations of this kind represent a first step in the prediction of chemical affinities of many

  12. Solution structure of oxidized rat microsomal cytochrome b5 in the presence of 2 M guanidinium chloride: monitoring the early steps in protein unfolding.

    PubMed

    Arnesano, F; Banci, L; Bertini, I; Koulougliotis, D

    1998-12-01

    One- and two-dimensional proton NMR spectroscopy has been employed in order to study the denaturation effect of guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) on the oxidized state of the A-form of rat microsomal cytochrome b5 (cyt b5). The protein rapidly starts losing the heme at denaturant concentrations larger than approximately 2.0 M and a largely unfolded protein is eventually obtained. An estimate of the unfolding kinetics is obtained and, by use of a two-state model (folded left and right arrow unfolded), a value for DeltaG degrees. Below this concentration, small (protein core maintains its overall structure. The analysis of the two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (2D NOESY) maps has allowed the determination of the solution structure of the protein in the presence of 2 M GdmCl. By use of 1199 meaningful NOESY constraints (obtained from the assignment of 75% of the total protons) and 166 pseudocontact shifts, a family of 40 structures has been obtained through the program PSEUDYANA. The family was further refined through restrained energy minimization and the final root mean square deviation (RMSD) values with respect to the average structure are 0.67 +/- 0.10 A and 1.14 +/- 0.11 A for the backbone and heavy atoms, respectively. The quality of the present structure is equivalent to that of the one obtained recently for the native form [Arnesano et al. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 173-184], thus allowing a meaningful comparison between the two structures. Upon addition of 2 M GdmCl, significant local structural differences are induced to the protein backbone segments comprising residues 33-38 (helix alpha2) and 62-64 (end of helix alpha4-beginning of helix alpha5) while the overall folding scheme of the protein is still maintained. These protein regions form part of the "pocket

  13. Unfolding a linker between helical repeats.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Vanessa; Nielsen, Steven O; Klein, Michael L; Discher, Dennis E

    2005-06-10

    In many multi-repeat proteins, linkers between repeats have little secondary structure and place few constraints on folding or unfolding. However, the large family of spectrin-like proteins, including alpha-actinin, spectrin, and dystrophin, share three-helix bundle, spectrin repeats that appear in crystal structures to be linked by long helices. All of these proteins are regularly subjected to mechanical stress. Recent single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrate not only forced unfolding but also simultaneous unfolding of tandem repeats at finite frequency, which suggests that the contiguous helix between spectrin repeats can propagate a cooperative helix-to-coil transition. Here, we address what happens atomistically to the linker under stress by steered molecular dynamics simulations of tandem spectrin repeats in explicit water. The results for alpha-actinin repeats reveal rate-dependent pathways, with one pathway showing that the linker between repeats unfolds, which may explain the single-repeat unfolding pathway observed in AFM experiments. A second pathway preserves the structural integrity of the linker, which explains the tandem-repeat unfolding event. Unfolding of the linker begins with a splay distortion of proximal loops away from hydrophobic contacts with the linker. This is followed by linker destabilization and unwinding with increased hydration of the backbone. The end result is an unfolded helix that mechanically decouples tandem repeats. Molecularly detailed insights obtained here aid in understanding the mechanical coupling of domain stability in spectrin family proteins.

  14. Chemical- and thermal-induced unfolding of Leishmania donovani ribose-5-phosphate isomerase B: a single-tryptophan protein.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Preet Kamal; Supin, Jakka S; Rashmi, S; Singh, Sushma

    2014-08-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase B (RpiB), a crucial enzyme of pentose phosphate pathway, was proposed to be a potential drug target for visceral leishmaniasis. In this study, we have analyzed the biophysical properties of Leishmania donovani RpiB (LdRpiB) enzyme to gain insight into its unfolding pathway under various chemical and thermal denaturation conditions by using fluorescence and CD spectroscopy. LdRpiB inactivation precedes the structural transition at lower concentrations of both urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GdHCl). 8-Anilinonapthalene 1-sulfonic (ANS) binding experiments revealed the presence of molten globule intermediate at 1.5 M GdHCl and a nonnative intermediate state at 6-M urea concentration. Acrylamide quenching experiments further validated the above findings, as solvent accessibility of tryptophan residues increased with increase in GdHCl and urea concentration. The recombinant LdRpiB was completely unfolded at 6 M GdHCl, whereas the enzyme molecule was resistant to complete unfolding even at 8-M urea concentration. The GdHCl- and urea-mediated unfolding involves a three-state transition process. Thermal-induced denaturation revealed complete loss of enzyme activity at 65 °C with only 20 % secondary structure loss. The formation of the well-ordered β-sheet structures of amyloid fibrils was observed after 55 °C which increased linearly till 85 °C as detected by thioflavin T dye. This study depicts the stability of the enzyme in the presence of chemical and thermal denaturants and stability-activity relationship of the enzyme. The presence of the intermediate states may have major implications in the way the enzyme binds to its natural ligand under various conditions. Also, the present study provides insights into the properties of intermediate entities of this important enzyme.

  15. An energetic model for macromolecules unfolding in stretching experiments

    PubMed Central

    De Tommasi, D.; Millardi, N.; Puglisi, G.; Saccomandi, G.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simple approach, based on the minimization of the total (entropic plus unfolding) energy of a two-state system, to describe the unfolding of multi-domain macromolecules (proteins, silks, polysaccharides, nanopolymers). The model is fully analytical and enlightens the role of the different energetic components regulating the unfolding evolution. As an explicit example, we compare the analytical results with a titin atomic force microscopy stretch-induced unfolding experiment showing the ability of the model to quantitatively reproduce the experimental behaviour. In the thermodynamic limit, the sawtooth force–elongation unfolding curve degenerates to a constant force unfolding plateau. PMID:24047874

  16. The physics of pulling polyproteins: a review of single molecule force spectroscopy using the AFM to study protein unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Megan L.; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the field of biological physics in recent years is the ability to manipulate single molecules and probe their properties and function. Since its emergence over two decades ago, single molecule force spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to explore the response of biological molecules, including proteins, DNA, RNA and their complexes, to the application of an applied force. The force versus extension response of molecules can provide valuable insight into its mechanical stability, as well as details of the underlying energy landscape. In this review we will introduce the technique of single molecule force spectroscopy using the atomic force microscope (AFM), with particular focus on its application to study proteins. We will review the models which have been developed and employed to extract information from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments. Finally, we will end with a discussion of future directions in this field.

  17. Novel unfolding sequence of banana lectin: Folded, unfolded and natively unfolded-like monomeric states in guanidine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Goutam; Mandal, Dipak K

    2014-04-01

    The sequence of unfolding events of dimeric banana lectin (Banlec), as induced by guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), has been investigated by size-exclusion HPLC, fluorescence, far-UV CD, low temperature phosphorescence and selective chemical modification. 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS) binding indicates a structured unfolding intermediate which has been characterized as dissociated monomer by size-exclusion chromatography. Interestingly, the unfolding elution pattern reveals two distinct unfolded states. One is a usual random coil. The other represents a novel species having elution behavior and structural compactness (Stokes radius) similar to dissociated monomer but showing no regular secondary structure as determined by far-UV CD, thus resembling a natively unfolded state. N-Bromosuccinimide (NBS) oxidation shows that single tryptophan residue remains unmodified in dissociated monomer intermediate while the same is oxidized in natively unfolded-like species. Such difference in tryptophan environment in these species is supported by acrylamide quenching studies, and phosphorescence results at 77 K which show a blue-shift of (0,0) band from 414.8 nm to 409.2 nm. The present results reveal subtlety of structural characteristics of unfolded states of Banlec in GdnHCl, which pro