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Sample records for ureteral stones initial

  1. [Management of proximal ureteral stones].

    PubMed

    Lechevallier, E; Taxer, O; Saussine, C

    2008-12-01

    Proximal ureteral stone less than 4-6mm may initially be treated by surveillance. Generally, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the first line treatment for proximal ureteral stones, specially for stones less than 1cm. For stones greater than 1cm, the results of ureteroscopy (URS) are better than the results of ESWL and in these cases URS may be an option. In case of failure of ESWL, URS can be proposed. URS can be the first line treatment in case of severe ureteral obstruction with no urinary infection. Proximal ureteroscopy must be careful because severe complications are not infrequent. Open surgery has very rare indication. Metabolic check-up and annually follow-up with at least a renal imaging at three months are recommended.

  2. Laser lithotripsy for ureteric stones.

    PubMed

    Foo, K T; Wujanto, R; Wong, M Y

    1994-01-01

    The use of laser is a relatively new modality of treatment in urology. With the advent of the pulse-dye laser lithotripter and a finer 7.2 ureteroscope (miniscope), we found that it was more effective for treating ureteric stones than the conventional ultrasound lithotripsy. Between May 1989 and December 1991, 239 patients (162 males, 77 females) with 259 ureteric stones were treated endoscopically by this modality. Their ages ranged from 19 to 81 years (mean 46.3). The stones were mostly of 5 to 10 mm in their transverse diameters. They were situated in the upper ureter in 59, middle ureter in 39, and lower ureter in 161 cases. The miniscope was inserted into the ureter without prior dilatation and under direct vision. Stone fragmentation was performed using the 504-nm pulse-dye laser of 30 to 60 mJ energy. Complete fragmentation of the stone using the Candela laser lithotripter was achieved in 202 patients (85%). The average hospital stay was two days. Of the 37 unsuccessful cases, 11 were due to failed ureteroscopy, ten due to poor visibility from bleeding, 14 due to stone migrating up to the kidneys and two were monohydrate calculi which did not fragment with laser lithotripsy. Open ureterolithotomies were necessary in 14 patients (5.9%). Significant morbidity was perforation of the ureters which occurred in three patients (1.3%). This was due to ureteroscopy rather than the laser lithotripsy itself. With the availability of the new shockwave lithotripter (ESWL) which can treat ureteric stones in even less invasive ways, without anaesthesia and as outpatient, we are now reserving laser lithotripsy for those who failed ESWL. Generally they are the stones which cause severe obstruction to the ureter.

  3. Emergency management of ureteral stones: Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Luis; Lima, Estêvão; Autorino, Riccardo; Marcelo, Filinto

    2008-10-01

    Most ureteral stones can be observed with reasonable expectation of uneventful stone passage. When an active ureteral stone treatment is warranted, the best procedure to choose is dependent on several factors, besides stone size and location, including operators' experience, patients' preference, available equipment and related costs. Placement of double-J stent or nephrostomy tube represents the classical procedures performed in a renal colic due to acute ureteral obstruction when the conservative drug therapy does not resolve the symptoms. These maneuvers are usually followed by ureteroscopy or extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, which currently represent the mainstay of treatment for ureteral stones. In this review paper a literature search was performed to identify reports dealing with emergency management of renal colic due to ureteral stones. The main aspects related to this debated issue are analyzed and the advantages and disadvantages of each treatment option are carefully discussed.

  4. Large proximal ureteral stones: Ideal treatment modality?

    PubMed Central

    Kadyan, B.; Sabale, V.; Mane, D.; Satav, V.; Mulay, A.; Thakur, N.; Kankalia, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Ideal treatment modality for patients with large impacted proximal ureteral stone remains controversial. We compared laparoscopic transperitoneal ureterolithotomy (Lap-TPUL) and semirigid ureteroscopy for large proximal ureteric stones to evaluate their efficacy and safety. Patients and Methods: From November 2012 to December 2014, we enrolled 122 patients with large (≥1.5 cm) proximal ureteral stone in the study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A (60 patients), retrograde ureteroscopic lithotripsy using a semirigid ureteroscope; Group B (62 patients), transperitoneal LU (Lap-TPUL). Results: The overall stone-free rate was 71.6% and 93.5% for Group A and Group B respectively (P = 0.008). Auxiliary procedure rate was higher in Group A than in Group B (27.3% vs. 5.6%). The complication rate was 11.2% in Group B versus 25% in Group A. Mean procedure time was higher in laparoscopy group as compared to ureterorenoscopy (URS) groups (84.07 ± 16.80 vs. 62.82 ± 12.71 min). Hospital stay was 4.16 ± 0.67 days in laparoscopy group and 1.18 ± 0.38 days in URS group (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Laparoscopic transperitoneal ureterolithotomy is a minimally invasive, safe and effective treatment modality and should be recommended to all patients of impacted large proximal stones, which are not amenable to URS or extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy or as a primary modality of choice especially if patient is otherwise candidate for open surgery. PMID:27141190

  5. 21 CFR 876.4680 - Ureteral stone dislodger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ureteral stone dislodger. 876.4680 Section 876.4680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4680 Ureteral stone dislodger....

  6. 21 CFR 876.4680 - Ureteral stone dislodger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ureteral stone dislodger. 876.4680 Section 876.4680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4680 Ureteral stone dislodger....

  7. 21 CFR 876.4680 - Ureteral stone dislodger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ureteral stone dislodger. 876.4680 Section 876.4680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4680 Ureteral stone dislodger....

  8. 21 CFR 876.4680 - Ureteral stone dislodger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ureteral stone dislodger. 876.4680 Section 876.4680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4680 Ureteral stone dislodger....

  9. 21 CFR 876.4680 - Ureteral stone dislodger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ureteral stone dislodger. 876.4680 Section 876.4680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4680 Ureteral stone dislodger....

  10. Factors that predict the spontaneous passage of ureteric stones in children

    PubMed Central

    Mokhless, Ibrahim; Zahran, Abdel-Rahman; Youssif, Mohamed; Fouda, Khaled; Fahmy, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the natural history of stone passage in children with ureterolithiasis and to define factors predictive of spontaneous passage. Patients and methods In all, 72 children with ureteric stones were evaluated; patients with ureteric calculi of >10 mm were excluded, as were those with absolute indications for surgical stone removal. Stone size, location, side, presence of hydronephrosis, perinephric stranding and degree of the tissue-rim sign were estimated by unenhanced helical computed tomography (UHCT). All patients were sent home with no administration of an α-blocker. The stone status was evaluated by a plain abdominal film or CT at ≈6 weeks after the initial diagnostic evaluation. The time from the initial complaint to the passage of the stone was recorded for each patient. Results In all, 54 (75%) children with ureteric stones of ⩽6 mm eventually passed their stones spontaneously. However, stones of <4 mm and those in the distal ureter had a significantly higher spontaneous passage rate and shorter time to stone passage (P < 0.05). The UHCT findings of a higher degree of the tissue-rim sign, hydronephrosis and perinephric fat stranding were associated with a lower likelihood of stone passage. Conclusions The rate of spontaneous passage of ureteric stones in children varies with stone location, and perinephric stranding on UHCT seems to be useful for predicting the possibility of spontaneous passage. In cases with unfavourable signs an early intervention might have better outcomes than conservative therapy. PMID:26558058

  11. Is extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy suitable treatment for lower ureteric stones?

    PubMed

    Cole, R S; Shuttleworth, K E

    1988-12-01

    Forty patients with lower ureteric calculi for which intervention was considered desirable have been treated by in situ extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) on the Dornier HM3 Lithotripter using a modified technique. Stone localisation was satisfactory in all patients. Adequate disintegration was achieved in 90% of patients following one treatment; 34 patients have been followed up for at least 3 months and 27 of these are stone-free (79%). Treatment failed in 4 patients and 2 of these had dense lower ureteric stone streets as a result of previous ESWL. The retreatment rate, post-treatment auxiliary procedure rate and complication rate were minimal. It was concluded that in situ ESWL is an effective and safe method for treating certain selected lower ureteric stones and should be considered as a feasible alternative to the more conventional methods of treatment.

  12. Two-year experience with ureteral stones: extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy v ureteroscopic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Park, H; Park, M; Park, T

    1998-12-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) and ureteroscopic manipulation became the standard treatments for ureteral stones in recent years. There still exists significant debate as to the most appropriate treatment modality for ureteral stones. During a period of 2 years, from January 1994 to December 1995, 651 patients with ureteral stones were treated, and 589 patients were retrospectively reviewed, excluding 62 patients with incomplete follow-up. Four hundred forty-two patients were treated with SWL using the MPL 9000 with ultrasonic guidance and 115 patients with ureteroscopic manipulations using 7.9F to 11.5F rigid and semirigid ureteroscopes. In SWL treatments, the overall stone-free rate was 74.7% with one session. The stone-free rate was significantly affected by the size of stones, being 83.6% when the stone was <1.0 cm and 42.1% when the stone was >1.0 cm. The stone-free rate after a second SWL session was 84.4% and was 90.3% after a third session. The stone-free rates according to the site of the stone were 72.4 (proximal), 70.0 (mid), and 80.2% (distal) after a single session. In ureteroscopic manipulation, an overall stone-free rate of 87.8% was obtained regardless of the size of the stones. The success rates according to the location of stones were 75.0 (proximal), 94.6 (mid), and 86.4% (distal). Open ureterolithotomy was performed in 32 patients, with a 100% success rate. In our study, the size of the stones was the most important factor influencing the success rate of SWL treatment. We consider ureteroscopic manipulation as the first-line treatment modality when the stone is >1.0 cm, especially if it is in the distal ureter. Proper selection of patients for in situ SWL or ureteroscopy would improve the results of initial treatment.

  13. [Stone Cone® in ureteroscopic ballistic lithotripsy of proximal ureteral stones].

    PubMed

    Arancio, M; Guglielmetti, S; Delsignore, A; Landi, A; Marchetti, C; Mina, A; Marcato, M; Martinengo, C

    2008-01-01

    Stone Cone® (Microvasive-Boston Scientific Corp, USA) is a device which prevents retrograde calculus migration during endoscopic ureterolithotripsy. We have studied the safety and efficacy of this device in endoscopic ureterolithotripsy with ballistic energy in proximal ureteral stones. MATERIALS AND METHODS. From 01/02/2006 to 01/02/2008 we carried out 36 ureterorenoscopies (URS) for proximal ureteral stones (average age: 46, range: 15-73). A ballistic energy was used for stones fragmentation. In 18 patients (Group A) we carried out URS with the aid of Stone Cone®, which was not used in the other 18 patients (Group B). Semirigid 8 Ch or 10 Ch Storz ureteroscope and ballistic lithotriptor Swiss Lithoclast Master EMS® were used. In cases of migration, edema, and ureteral damage, a ureteral stent was used. RESULTS. In Group B patients (URS performed without Stone Cone®) the migration of the whole stone, or of clinically significant fragments, occurred 8 times (45%). All of these patients underwent external shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) at a center equipped with a lithotriptor. A ureteral stent was placed in 14 cases (78%). In Group A, the migration of a stone requiring ESWL treatment occurred only once (5%). The ureteral stent was placed 8 times (45%). We had no significant complications during the procedure. CONCLUSIONS. The Stone Cone® is a safe and easy-to-use device. The cost of this device can be balanced by the reduction of postoperative ESWL treatments for lithiasic fragments pushing up into the kidneys (p<0.01), and of ureteral stent applications at the end of the procedure (p<0.05).

  14. [Case of multiple encrusted stones on the ureteral stent left for 7 years: the efficacy of extracting the ureteral stent on transurethral lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Okuda, Hidenobu; Yamanaka, Masaki; Kimura, Toshio; Takeyama, Masami

    2009-09-01

    A 48 years-old man had undergone transurethral lithotripsy (TUL) and Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy (ESWL) for bilateral ureteral stones and bilateral ureteral stents had been placed in 2001. He was lost to the follow-up for about 7 years after the removal of left ureteral stent. He had complained of right back pain and fever for two months. KUB showed right ureteral stones and encrustation along the ureteral stent. We performed TUL extracting the ureteral stent by silk, referring to silk loop technique. All stones and the encrusted ureteral stent were removed. This was very effective for patients with encrusted ureteral stent.

  15. [Transurethral uretero-lithotripsy of ureteral stones in Osaka City University].

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, T; Sugimura, K; Nakatani, T; Yamamoto, K; Yasumoto, R; Wada, S; Sakamoto, W; Asakawa, M; Nishikawa, K; Ohyama, A

    1989-12-01

    During the 39 months since the introduction of transurethral lithotripsy (TUL) for the treatment of ureteral stones at our hospital in August 1985, TUL was performed a total of 200 times in 178 patients with ureteral stones. Among them, 111 patients had left ureteral stones and 65 had right ureteral stones, while 2 patients had ureteral stones in both sides. The stones were divided into upper ureteral stone (84 patients) and lower ureteral stone (94 patients) at above and below the iliac brim. 89% of the stones were less than 2 cm in diameter. Most of the patients were given lumbar anesthesia, and a guide wire was inserted into the ureter. The ureter was dilated with a ureteral bougie, and a 13F or 14F Storz ureteroscope was inserted. The stones were disintegrated by an ultrasound lithotripto and removed using forceps and a basket catheter. After the TUL procedure, a double J catheter was indwelled and removed within 5 days. The results were evaluated by DIP which was done 2 to 3 months after TUL. The success rate included residual stones less than 4 mm in diameter, as they could be spontaneously discharged. As a result, the success rate for upper ureteral stones was 53%, and it was higher for smaller stones. On the other hand, the success rate for lower ureteral stones was 85% and significantly higher. The main reasons for failure were the upper migration of the stones (60%) and inability to insert the ureteroscope up to the stone due to ureterostenosis and ureteral perforation (39%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Antegrade ureterolitholapaxy in the treatment of obstructing or incarcerated proximal ureteric stones.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, G; Bassi, E; Fandella, A; Merlo, F; Felici, E; Maccatrozzo, L

    1990-02-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) and retrograde ureterorenoscopy (RU) have transformed the management of ureteric calculi. Nevertheless, patients with obstructing proximal ureteric calculi are not suitable for ESWL or RU. From January 1986 to September 1988, 17 patients with fixed upper ureteric stones underwent antegrade renoureteroscopy and percutaneous surgery. The technique was effective in removing incarcerated proximal ureteric calculi: all patients were stone-free at follow-up 3 months later.

  17. Ureteral wall thickness at the impacted ureteral stone site: a critical predictor for success rates after SWL.

    PubMed

    Sarica, Kemal; Kafkasli, Alper; Yazici, Özgür; Çetinel, Ali Cihangir; Demirkol, Mehmet Kutlu; Tuncer, Murat; Şahin, Cahit; Eryildirim, Bilal

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the possible predictive value of certain patient- and stone-related factors on the stone-free rates and auxiliary procedures after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with impacted proximal ureteral calculi. A total of 111 patients (86 male, 25 females M/F: 3.44/1) with impacted proximal ureteral stones treated with shock wave lithotripsy were evaluated. Cases were retrieved from a departmental shock wave lithotripsy database. Variables analyzed included BMI of the case, diameter of proximal ureter and renal pelvis, stone size and Hounsfield unit, ureteral wall thickness at the impacted stone site. Stone-free status on follow-up imaging at 3 months was considered a successful outcome. All patients had a single impacted proximal ureteral stone. While the mean age of the cases was 46 ± 13 years (range 26-79 years), mean stone size was 8.95 mm (5.3-15.1 mm). Following shock wave lithotripsy although 87 patients (78.4%) were completely stone-free at 3-month follow-up visit, 24 (21.6%) cases had residual fragments requiring further repeat procedures. Prediction of the final outcome of SWL in patients with impacted proximal ureteral stones is a challenging issue and our data did clearly indicate a highly significant relationship between ureteral wall thickness and the success rates of shock wave lithotripsy particularly in cases requiring additional procedures. Of all the evaluated stone- and patient-related factors, only ureteral wall thickness at the impacted stone site independently predicted shock wave lithotripsy success.

  18. Unilateral ureteric stone associated with gross hydronephrosis and kidney shrinkage: a cadaveric report

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Ern-Wei; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2014-01-01

    Ureteric stones are a common cause of obstruction of the urinary tract, usually presenting with characteristic signs and symptoms, such as acute ureteric colic and hematuria. Occasionally, stones may present with non-specific symptoms such as low back pain and remain unidentified, leading to stone growth, chronic ureteric obstruction and complications such as hydronephrosis and renal damage. Here, we report a large ureteric stone in a cadaver with complete obstruction at the left ureterovesical junction, resulting in severe dilatation of the left ureter and renal pelvis. PMID:25548725

  19. Factors influencing the failure of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with Piezolith 3000 in the management of solitary ureteral stone.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Insang; Jung, Seung-Il; Kim, Kwang Ho; Hwang, Eu Chang; Yu, Ho Song; Kim, Sun-Ouck; Kang, Taek Won; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwangsung

    2014-06-01

    Studies of predictive factors of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) failure in patients with ureteral stones have not yielded results sufficient to prevent ESWL failure. The present study investigated patients with ureteral stone and analyzed the predictive factors of ESWL failure. Ninety patients with ureteral stone treated from January 2006 to June 2012 using ESWL for ureteral stone were enrolled. Patient's demographic data including age, gender, body mass index (BMI), symptoms and calculous characteristics including location, size, episode and the grade of hydronephrosis were recorded. Statistical results were performed using univariate and multivariate analyses for the predictive factors of ESWL failure. In univariate analysis, calculous location, size, and grade of hydronephrosis between two groups displayed significant differences (p < 0.05). The predictive factors of ESWL failure were BMI >25 kg/m(2) [Odds ratio (OR) = 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-11.0], calculous size ≥ 1 cm (OR = 10.5, 95% CI 3.0-36.2), calculous location (mid-ureter; OR = 8.49, 95% CI 1.5-45.7) and severe grade of hydronephrosis (OR = 12.3, 95% CI 1.9-79.5). In conclusions, ESWL failure can be predicted in cases of obesity, calculous size exceeding 1 cm, mid-ureteral stone and severe hydronephrosis. When we consider calculous management in patients with these risk factors, initial surgical approach is recommended instead of ESWL.

  20. Shockwave treatment of ureteric stones in situ with second-generation lithotriptor.

    PubMed

    Simon, J; Vanden Bossche, M; Schulman, C C

    1990-01-01

    During a 17-month period we treated in situ 334 patients with ureteric stones with a second-generation electromagnetic lithotriptor. Anxiety and discomfort were relieved with diazepam and pethidine chloride only. Ureteral stenting was used in 8.1% of upper, 36.4% of mid- and 5.7% of lower ureteric stones. The retreatment rate was 15%, but no patient had more than 3 sessions. The success rate of the treatment at 3 months was 88% for upper, 65% for mid- and 83% for lower ureteric stones. Open surgery had to be performed in 5 cases and ureteroscopies in 6 cases.

  1. Bolus injection v drip infusion contrast administration for ureteral stone targeting during shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Pearle, M S; McClennan, B L; Roehrborn, C G; Clayman, R V

    1997-06-01

    Intraoperative excretory urography may be used to facilitate stone targeting during in situ SWL for ureteral stones, precluding the need for ureteral catheter placement. We compared bolus injection with drip infusion urography for efficacy in stone localization. Twenty-seven patients with normal renal function and a solitary, difficult to visualize, radiopaque ureteral calculus were randomized to receive intravenous contrast by either bolus injection (N = 13) or drip infusion (N = 14). The bolus injection patients received an average of 74 mL of Conray 400 contrast over 1 minute; the drip infusion patients received an average of 92 mL of contrast over 15 minutes. After bolus injection, it took an average of 12 minutes to opacify the ureter compared with 14 minutes after drip infusion (P = 0.62). It took longer to initiate (5 minutes) and complete (6 minutes) treatment after drip infusion than after bolus injection (P = 0.28 and P = 0.16, respectively). Imaging time was significantly longer in the infusion group than in the bolus group (12 v 7 minutes; P = 0.04). Stone-free rates were similar in the two groups: 100% for the bolus group and 91% for the infusion group. No patient in either group experienced an adverse reaction to the contrast. Overall, the two methods of contrast administration were equally efficacious for stone targeting during SWL. However, bolus injection required lesser amounts of contrast, provided more rapid opacification of the ureter, and resulted in an overall shorter procedural time, although the only statistically significant differences were in imaging time and contrast volume.

  2. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in the treatment of distal ureteral stones larger than 10 mm in diameter].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Nobuyuki; Yoshinaga, Atsushi; Ohno, Rena; Chiba, Koji; Hayashi, Tetsuo; Kamata, Shigeyoshi; Watanabe, Toru; Yamada, Takumi

    2004-06-01

    Optimal treatment for distal ureteral stones remains controversial. During a period of 10 years, from December 1992 to December 2002, 103 distal ureteral stones larger than 10 mm in diameter were treated at our institution with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) using the Siemens Lithostar. Only 2 patients had a ureteral stent in place at the time of treatment. The overall stone-free rate was 98% with 1-12 session and 3-month stone-free rate was 95.1%. These data reveal that a high success rate was achieved in multisession ESWL. Therefore, ESWL is considered to be acceptable as first-line therapy for fragmentation of distal ureteral stones larger than 10 mm in diameter.

  3. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and ureteroscopic lithotripsy for ureteral stones. A comparative study].

    PubMed

    Xue, Z Y

    1991-04-01

    From June 1987 to December 1988, 212 cases of ureteral calculi were treated with ESWL and ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URSL) respectively. The lithotriptic success rates of ESWL for upper, mid and distal ureteric stones were 100.0%, 100.0% and 93.4% respectively as compared with 62.5%, 85.7% and 93.7% of URSL. ESWL for upper and mid ureteral stones was obviously superior to URSL (P less than 0.001). The incidence rate of complications of ESWL was lower than that of URSL (P less than 0.05). In the 212 cases, urinary extravasation caused by ureteral injury occurred in 4 cases treated by URSL. We suggest that ESWL should be the first treatment of choice for ureteral calculi and URSL is not recommended for the treatment of upper ureteral calculi, but it may be used as an adjunctive method.

  4. The use of extra-corporeal shockwave lithotripsy for obstructing ureteric stones.

    PubMed

    Porfyris, O T; Cutress, M L; Tolley, D A

    2011-06-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is a non-invasive treatment for urinary tract stones. This review presents the role of SWL for treating specifically ureteric calculi. The impact of hydronephrosis on SWL success, the use of SWL as emergency treatment (eSWL) for acute ureteric colic, the influence of ureteric stent placement on SWL outcome and the use of medical expulsive therapy to augment SWL success are discussed.

  5. Predictive parameters for medical expulsive therapy in ureteral stones: a critical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Cahit; Eryildirim, Bilal; Kafkasli, Alper; Coskun, Alper; Tarhan, Fatih; Faydaci, Gokhan; Sarica, Kemal

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the predictive value of some certain radiological as well as stone-related parameters for medical expulsive therapy (MET) success with an alpha blocker in ureteral stones. A total 129 patients receiving MET for 5 to 10 mm ureteral stones were evaluated. Patients were divided into two subgroups where MET was successful in 64 cases (49.61%) and unsuccessful in 65 cases (50.39%). Prior to management, stone size, location, position in the ureter, degree of hydronephrosis, diameter of ureteral lumen proximal to the stone, ureteral wall thickness along with patient's demographics including body mass index (BMI) values were evaluated and recorded. The possible predictive values of these parameters for stone expulsion (and stone expulsion time) were evaluated in a comparative manner between two groups. The overall mean patient age and stone size values were 38.02 ± 0.94 years and 40.31 ± 1.13 mm(2), respectively. Regarding the predictive values of these parameters for MET-success, while stone size and localization, degree of hydronephrosis, proximal ureteral diameter and ureteral wall thickness were found to be highly predictive for MET-success, patients age, BMI values and stone density had no predictive value on this aspect. Our findings indicated that some stone and anatomical factors may be used to predict the success of MET in an effective manner. With this approach unnecessary use of these drugs that may cause a delay for stone removal will be avoided and the possible adverse effects of obstruction as well as stone-related clinical symptoms could be minimized.

  6. 1500 cases of renal and ureteric calculi treated in an integrated stone centre.

    PubMed

    Das, G; Dick, J; Bailey, M J; Fletcher, M S; Birch, B; Coptcoat, M J; Webb, D R; Kellett, M J; Whitfield, H N; Wickham, J E

    1988-10-01

    Fifteen hundred consecutive cases of renal and ureteric calculi were treated in an integrated stone centre; 1464 of these were treated by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, ureterorenoscopy and ureteroscopic lasertripsy. Only 36 (2.4%) required open surgery.

  7. Functional aspects of silent ureteral stones investigated with MAG-3 renal scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate functional aspects of silent ureteral stones with special focus on obstruction and its relationship to renal anatomy. The present study is the first investigation of renal excretory function in patients with silent ureteral stones. Methods Patients with primarily asymptomatic ureteral stones underwent a mercapto-acetyltriglycine (MAG-3) renal scintigraphy prior to treatment, in addition to anatomic evaluation of renal units and serum creatinine levels. The primary outcome measure was the presence or absence of obstruction. Secondary outcome measures were kidney anatomy, grade of hydronephrosis, location of stones, stone size, and serum creatinine levels. Results During a ten-year period, 14 patients (median age 52.6 years; range 37.3 to 80.7 years) were included in the study. The relative frequency of primarily asymptomatic ureteral stones among all patients treated for ureteral stones in the study period was 0.7%. Eleven renal units showed some degree of hydronephrosis while 3 kidneys were not dilated. On the MAG-3 scan, 7 patients had an obstruction of the ureter, 5 had no obstruction, and 2 had dysfunction of the kidney. A statistically significant correlation was established between the grade of obstruction and stone size (p = 0.02). Conclusions At the time of presentation, only 64.3% of the patients revealed an obstruction in the stone-bearing renal unit. The degree of hydronephrosis and renal function were very diverse in this subgroup of patients with ureteral stones. The onset of ureterolithiasis and the chronological sequence of obstruction remain unclear in patients who have never experienced symptoms due to their stones. PMID:24397735

  8. In situ extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of distal ureteral stones: parameters for therapeutic success.

    PubMed

    Mattelaer, P; Schröder, T; Fischer, N; Jakse, G

    1994-01-01

    Between January and December 1989, 123 patients with distal ureteral stones were treated with in situ extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) using a modified HM3 Dornier lithotriptor. One hundred and three patients (83.7%) were stone-free, 20 patients (16.3%) had small residual stones (< 1 mm2) that passed spontaneously. In situ ESWL treatment alone was successful in 88 of the 103 stone-free patients (85.4%). Fifty-six (54.4%) needed 1 ESWL session, 26 (25.2%) needed 2 ESWL sessions. Nineteen of the 123 patients (15.4%) needed auxiliary endourological measures. The results of ESWL treatment were correlated to pretherapeutically identified parameters such as stone size, radiopacity, outer contour, shape, inner structure, biochemical analysis of the stones and grade of dilatation of the upper urinary tract. The results prove that size (> or = 75 mm2), radiopacity and grade of dilatation have a direct correlation to the difficulty to disintegrate ureteral stones.

  9. Anuria Secondary to Bilateral Obstructing Ureteral Stones in the Absence of Renal Colic

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Christopher; Altamar, Hernan O.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Obstructing ureteral stones are a rare cause of anuria, which is typically from prerenal or renal etiologies. Classically, obstructive stones cause moderate to severe renal colic. Urolithiasis is rarely considered during evaluation of painless anuria. Case Presentation: We present an unusual case of a 73-year-old Caucasian female who presented with anuria and was found to have large bilateral obstructing ureteral stones in the absence of renal colic. Conclusion: Given that patients with obstructive anuria can be asymptomatic, urolithiasis should be considered in all patients presenting with anuria. PMID:27579429

  10. Medical expulsive therapy for ureteral stones: where do we go from here?

    PubMed

    Somani, Bhaskar K; Aboumarzouk, Omar; Traxer, Olivier; Baard, Joyce; Kamphuis, Guido; de la Rosette, Jean

    2016-10-01

    Despite two decades of clinical use, the effectiveness of medical expulsive therapy (MET) for the noninvasive management of patients with ureteral stones has, in the past year, been called into in question. The primary aim of MET is to expedite stone passage, although it has also shown effectiveness in reducing time to stone passage, thus reducing the incidence of colic episodes, improving stone clearance and improving patients' quality of life. At least 11 systematic reviews and meta-analyses have been published showing clinical benefits of MET; however, the results of these analyses have been challenged by data from two randomized controlled, multicentre trials with large patient cohorts, thus providing higher quality evidence that MET is ineffective in patients with ureteral stones. Results of the various systematic reviews and meta-analyses have suggested that MET is effective, however, such analyses incorporate the biases and limitations of smaller cohort studies, resulting in their conclusions being based upon lower-quality evidence. Evidence for the use of MET for small (<5 mm) distal ureteral stones has weakened based on clinical trial data published in 2015. However, MET might remain effective in the management of larger ureteral stones (>5 mm).

  11. Medical expulsive therapy for ureteral stones: where do we go from here?

    PubMed

    Somani, Bhaskar K; Aboumarzouk, Omar; Traxer, Olivier; Baard, Joyce; Kamphuis, Guido; de la Rosette, Jean

    2016-10-01

    Despite two decades of clinical use, the effectiveness of medical expulsive therapy (MET) for the noninvasive management of patients with ureteral stones has, in the past year, been called into in question. The primary aim of MET is to expedite stone passage, although it has also shown effectiveness in reducing time to stone passage, thus reducing the incidence of colic episodes, improving stone clearance and improving patients' quality of life. At least 11 systematic reviews and meta-analyses have been published showing clinical benefits of MET; however, the results of these analyses have been challenged by data from two randomized controlled, multicentre trials with large patient cohorts, thus providing higher quality evidence that MET is ineffective in patients with ureteral stones. Results of the various systematic reviews and meta-analyses have suggested that MET is effective, however, such analyses incorporate the biases and limitations of smaller cohort studies, resulting in their conclusions being based upon lower-quality evidence. Evidence for the use of MET for small (<5 mm) distal ureteral stones has weakened based on clinical trial data published in 2015. However, MET might remain effective in the management of larger ureteral stones (>5 mm). PMID:27480950

  12. [A CASE OF RIGHT PYONEPHROSIS DUE TO URETERAL STONES IN A HEMODIALYSIS PATIENT].

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akiou; Yosimoto, Keiichi; Fuse, Hideki

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of a 64-year-old male with right pyonephrosis due to ureteral stones in association with chronic renal failure. The patient had been treated with hemodialysis for fourteen years. He was admitted to the Department of Internal Medicine of Kurobe City Hospital with chief complaints of fever and lumbago in January 2013. CT demonstrated a right pyonephrosis accompanied by right ureteral stones positioned in the middle and lower ureter. The stones could not be detected by KUB. He was consequently referred to the Department of Urology. Firstly, percutaneous nephrostomy for the right kidney was performed, and 200 ml of pyuria was discharged at that time. Urine culture demonstrated Escherichia coli. Secondly, rigid transurethral ureterolithotripsy (TUL) for the right ureteral stones was performed using Lithoclast, and a ureteral stent was indwelled on day 15 after nephrostomy construction. The nephrostomy catheter and ureteral stent were removed 10 and 21 days after the operation, respectively. The constituents of the stone were CaOx (26%) and CaP (74%). Right hydronephrosis improved and the patient showed no pyelonephritis for 1 year postoperatively.

  13. The Effect of Tamsulosin in the Medical Treatment of Distal Ureteral Stones

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, M.; Magsudi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Renal stones are common disorders that affect approximately 5% to 10% of the population and the incidence of renal stones is rising. Treatment of ureteral stones is an important part of urologists and minimally invasive procedures such as ESWL and ureteroscopy effectiveness has been proven in various studies. However, these methods are not completely safe and are expensive and can be complicated. Purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of tamsulosin in the medical treatment of distal ureteral stones. Patients and methods: A total of 96 patients with distal ureteral stones or UVj are randomly divided into two study group (50 patients) and control group (46 patients). Patients in the control group allowed to freely consuming fluids (hydration) and indomethacin 100 mg PRN. Study group in addition to indomethacin and daily analgesic 0.4 mg tamsulosin was administered. All subjects in terms of analgesic dose, duration of expulsion and expulsion were studied. Results: Spontaneous expulsion of stone was occurred in 62.5% (30 patients out of 46) of control group patients and 82% (41 patients out of 50) that there was no significant difference (P>0.05). Average time to fix the stone in control group 4.7±8.03 days (range 2 to 28 days) and in the study group, 3.7±5.70 days (range 1 to 23 days) is significantly different (P>0.05). The average amount of analgesic consumption in the control group was 2.3±4.31and in the study group was 1.48±2.15 that showed significant differences (P<0.05). Conclusions: In this study, although the addition of tamsulosin to conservative treatment of distal ureteral stones in the distal ureteral stone expulsion showed no significant difference between the two groups, but the reduction in the duration of expulsion, reduce pain and reduce the need for analgesic has been beneficial. PMID:25363178

  14. Flexible Ureteroscopy Can Be More Efficacious in the Treatment of Proximal Ureteral Stones in Select Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Erdal; Sarıbacak, Ali; Ozkanli, Ahmet Oguz; Basar, Mehmet Murad; Acar, Oguz; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed to compare and evaluate the outcomes and complications of two endoscopic treatment procedures, semirigid ureteroscopy (SR-URS) and flexible ureteroscopy (F-URS), in the treatment of proximal ureteral stones (PUS). Methods. SR-URS (group 1) was done on 68 patients whereas 64 patients underwent F-URS (group 2) for the treatment of PUS. Success rate was defined as the absence of stone fragments or presence of asymptomatic insignificant residual fragments < 2 mm. Outcomes and complications were recorded. Results. The differences were statistically not significant in age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and stone characteristics between groups. Mean ureteral stone size was 9.1 ± 0.4 mm and 8.9 ± 0.5 mm for groups 1 and 2. Mean operative time was 34.1 ± 1.5 min and 49.4 ± 2.3 min for groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.001). SFRs were 76.5% and 87.5% for groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.078). Two major complications (ureteral avulsion and ureteral rupture) occurred in group 1. Conclusion. F-URS is safer and less invasive than SR-URS in patients with PUS. There is no statistically significant difference in the efficacy of either technique. Nonetheless we recommend F-URS in the management of PUS as a first-line treatment option in select cases of proximal ureteral calculi. PMID:26617636

  15. Flexible Ureteroscopy Can Be More Efficacious in the Treatment of Proximal Ureteral Stones in Select Patients.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Erdal; Sarıbacak, Ali; Ozkanli, Ahmet Oguz; Basar, Mehmet Murad; Acar, Oguz; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed to compare and evaluate the outcomes and complications of two endoscopic treatment procedures, semirigid ureteroscopy (SR-URS) and flexible ureteroscopy (F-URS), in the treatment of proximal ureteral stones (PUS). Methods. SR-URS (group 1) was done on 68 patients whereas 64 patients underwent F-URS (group 2) for the treatment of PUS. Success rate was defined as the absence of stone fragments or presence of asymptomatic insignificant residual fragments < 2 mm. Outcomes and complications were recorded. Results. The differences were statistically not significant in age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and stone characteristics between groups. Mean ureteral stone size was 9.1 ± 0.4 mm and 8.9 ± 0.5 mm for groups 1 and 2. Mean operative time was 34.1 ± 1.5 min and 49.4 ± 2.3 min for groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.001). SFRs were 76.5% and 87.5% for groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.078). Two major complications (ureteral avulsion and ureteral rupture) occurred in group 1. Conclusion. F-URS is safer and less invasive than SR-URS in patients with PUS. There is no statistically significant difference in the efficacy of either technique. Nonetheless we recommend F-URS in the management of PUS as a first-line treatment option in select cases of proximal ureteral calculi. PMID:26617636

  16. Ureteral Stone Associated With a Middle Blind Ending of a Bifid Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Çalışkan, Selahattin

    2016-01-01

    A blind-ending bifid ureter is an anatomic variant of ureteral duplications. There are three forms of blind-ending bifid ureter, classified depending on their location. A proximal blind-ending bifid ureter is the most common subtype of this congenital anomaly. Most patients are asymptomatic and only show symptoms after the complication has occurred. These complications include stone formation, vesicoureteric reflux, and ureteral tumor. Intravenous urography is usually used to diagnose bifid ureter; voiding cystourethrography, photofluoroscopy, cineroentgenography, cystoscopy with retrograde pyelography, computed tomography (CT), multidetector CT, and magnetic resonance urographies are other imaging methods used. This is a case of a ureteral stone associated with a middle blind ending of a bifid ureter. PMID:27162516

  17. Ureteral Stone Associated With a Middle Blind Ending of a Bifid Ureter.

    PubMed

    Çalışkan, Selahattin

    2016-01-01

    A blind-ending bifid ureter is an anatomic variant of ureteral duplications. There are three forms of blind-ending bifid ureter, classified depending on their location. A proximal blind-ending bifid ureter is the most common subtype of this congenital anomaly. Most patients are asymptomatic and only show symptoms after the complication has occurred. These complications include stone formation, vesicoureteric reflux, and ureteral tumor. Intravenous urography is usually used to diagnose bifid ureter; voiding cystourethrography, photofluoroscopy, cineroentgenography, cystoscopy with retrograde pyelography, computed tomography (CT), multidetector CT, and magnetic resonance urographies are other imaging methods used. This is a case of a ureteral stone associated with a middle blind ending of a bifid ureter.

  18. Retrograde versus Antegrade Approach for the Management of Large Proximal Ureteral Stones

    PubMed Central

    Mykoniatis, Ioannis; Isid, Ayman; Gofrit, Ofer N.; Rosenberg, Shilo; Hidas, Guy; Landau, Ezekiel H.; Pode, Dov; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of retrograde versus antegrade ureteroscopic lithotripsy for the treatment of large proximal ureteral stones. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients with proximal ureteral stones >15 mm, treated in our institution from January 2011 to January 2016. Intraoperative parameters, postoperative outcomes, and complications were recorded and compared between the two techniques. Results. Our analysis included 57 patients. Thirty-four patients (59.6%) underwent retrograde and 23 patients (40.4%) underwent antegrade ureteroscopy. There was no significant difference in patients' demographics and stone characteristics between the groups. Stone-free rate was significantly higher (p = 0.033) in the antegrade group (100%) compared to retrograde one (82.4%). Fluoroscopy time, procedure duration, and length of hospitalization were significantly (p < 0.001) lower in retrograde approach. On the other hand, the need for postoperative stenting was significantly lower in the antegrade group (p < 0.001). No difference was found between the groups (p = 0.745) regarding postoperative complications. Conclusions. Antegrade ureteroscopy is an efficient and safe option for the management of large proximal ureteral stones. It may achieve high stone-free rates compared to retrograde ureteroscopy with the drawback of longer operative time, fluoroscopy time, and length of hospitalization. PMID:27766263

  19. Tamsulosin versus tadalafil as a medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteral stones: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Anil; Acharya, Ganesh Bhakta; Basnet, Robin Bahadur; Shah, Arvind Kumar; Shrestha, Parash Mani

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to compare the safety and efficacy of tamsulosin and tadalafil as medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteral stones. Materials and Methods This prospective randomized study was conducted at the Department of Urology of Bir Hospital over a period of 12 months in patients with distal ureteral stones sized 5 to 10 mm. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: group A received tamsulosin 0.4 mg and group B received tadalafil 10 mg at bedtime for 2 weeks. Stone expulsion rate, number of ureteric colic episodes and pain score, analgesic requirements, and adverse drug effects were noted in both groups. Statistical analyses were performed by using Student t-test and chi-square test. Results Altogether 85 patients, 41 in group A and 44 in group B, were enrolled in the study. The patients' average age was 31.72±12.63 years, and the male-to-female ratio was 1.5:1. Demographic profiles, stone size, and baseline investigations were comparable between the 2 groups. The stone expulsion rate was significantly higher in the tadalafil group than in the tamsulosin group (84.1% vs. 61.0%, p=0.017). Although the occurrence of side effects was higher with tadalafil, this difference was not significant (p=0.099). There were no serious adverse effects. Conclusions Tadalafil has a significantly higher stone expulsion rate than tamsulosin when used as a medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteral stones sized 5–10 mm. Both drugs are safe, effective, and well tolerated with minor side effects. PMID:27617317

  20. Tamsulosin versus tadalafil as a medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteral stones: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Anil; Acharya, Ganesh Bhakta; Basnet, Robin Bahadur; Shah, Arvind Kumar; Shrestha, Parash Mani

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to compare the safety and efficacy of tamsulosin and tadalafil as medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteral stones. Materials and Methods This prospective randomized study was conducted at the Department of Urology of Bir Hospital over a period of 12 months in patients with distal ureteral stones sized 5 to 10 mm. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: group A received tamsulosin 0.4 mg and group B received tadalafil 10 mg at bedtime for 2 weeks. Stone expulsion rate, number of ureteric colic episodes and pain score, analgesic requirements, and adverse drug effects were noted in both groups. Statistical analyses were performed by using Student t-test and chi-square test. Results Altogether 85 patients, 41 in group A and 44 in group B, were enrolled in the study. The patients' average age was 31.72±12.63 years, and the male-to-female ratio was 1.5:1. Demographic profiles, stone size, and baseline investigations were comparable between the 2 groups. The stone expulsion rate was significantly higher in the tadalafil group than in the tamsulosin group (84.1% vs. 61.0%, p=0.017). Although the occurrence of side effects was higher with tadalafil, this difference was not significant (p=0.099). There were no serious adverse effects. Conclusions Tadalafil has a significantly higher stone expulsion rate than tamsulosin when used as a medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteral stones sized 5–10 mm. Both drugs are safe, effective, and well tolerated with minor side effects.

  1. Fertility measures in women after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of distal ureteral stones.

    PubMed

    Erturk, E; Ptak, A M; Monaghan, J

    1997-10-01

    Long-term effects of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) on female fertility remain a concern. Thirty-nine women of childbearing age who were treated for distal ureteral stones were surveyed. The mean age of these women was 33 years, and the average stone size was 6.9 mm. The mean calculated radiation exposure to the ovaries and the uterus was 7.53 and 10.9 mSv, respectively. Ten women (26%) attempted to become pregnant. No fertility problems were noted in these women, and 11 healthy babies were delivered. These preliminary findings provide further information regarding the safety of SWL in the treatment of distal ureteral stones in women of reproductive age.

  2. LAPAROSCOPIC MANAGEMENT OF DISTAL URETERIC STONE IN BILHARZIAL URETER: RESULTS OF A SINGLE CENTER PROSPECTIVE STUDY.

    PubMed

    Nour, Hani H; Elgobashy, Samir E; Elkholy, Amr; Kamal, Ahmad M; Ali, Mohamed; Roshdy, Mamdouh A; Elbaz, Ahmad G; Riad, Essam

    2015-08-01

    No doubt, Bilharzial ureters are complicated by distal stricture due to precipitation of Bilharzial ova in distal ureter. These cases are associated with poorly functioning and grossly hydronephroic kidneys that hinder endoscopic manipulation of the coexistent distal, high burden, long standing impacted stones. Thus, laparoscopic uretrolithotomy was performed in 51 bilharzial patients with distal ureteric stones 4 trocars were used. The ureter was opened directly over the stone and the stone was extracted. A double-J stent was inserted into the ureter which was closed by 4-0 polyglactin running suture. The results showed that among 51 cases 33 males and 18 females; the mean age was 40.13 years. the mean stone size was 2.73 cm. Conversion to open surgery was in only one case; the mean operative time 92.05 (range 75-120 minutes); postoperative pain score ranged from 20 to 60, the mean number of PO analgesic request was 1.72 (range 1-3); it was once in 21, twice in 23 and thrice in 7 cases. Hospital stay ranged from 2 to 5 with a mean of 2.74 days; total duration of follow up ranged from 7 to 12 with a mean of 9.68. Stone recurrence reported in 4 cases; ureteric stricture reported in 2 cases. Stone free rate was reported to be 100%.

  3. Use of in situ extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in upper ureteric stone.

    PubMed

    Islam, M S; Rahman, S; Islam, M A; Ahmed, I; Maola, G; Uddin, M M

    2010-04-01

    This study was done to determine the effectiveness of in situ extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) in upper ureteric calculi in terms of stone clearance, peroperative & postoperative complications and also to determine some criteria for selection of patients for this procedure. From July, 2003 to July 2004, a total of 67 patients, with excreting kidneys and having stone size less than 2 cm were treated by in situ ESWL using Lithostar plus Lithotriptor. The patient group comprised of 52 men and 15 women, age ranged from 14 years to 65 years. Of the total 67 patients selected for study 44 patients were included in group I, having stone size ?1.5 and visible distal flow of contrast on IVU & 23 patients were included in Group II with stone size>1.5 cm to 2 cm and contrast seen only upto stone. Four (04) patients from Group I and three (03) patients from group II were dropped out during the follow up period so that data of 40 patients in group I and 20 patients in group II were analyzed finally. Number of shock wave was given in 1 to 3 sessions. Finally 95% of group I and 85% of group II achieved complete clearance of calculi at the end of 3 sessions. In situ ESWL is a good option for the treatment of upper ureteric calculi.

  4. Efficacy of silodosin in the treatment of distal ureteral stones 4 to 10 mm in diameter

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Serdar; Tokgoz, Husnu; Yalcinkaya, Soner; Baş, Serkan; Ipekci, Tümay; Yildiz, Ali; Ates, Nihat; Savas, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Few studies have investigated the efficacy of silodosin, a recently introduced selective alpha 1-A adrenoceptor antagonist, in medical expulsive therapy (MET) for ureteral calculi. The results of these studies, which all evaluated the efficacy of 8 mg/day, indicate that silodosin is a potential treatment for ureteral calculi. This study investigated the efficacy of 4 mg/day of silodosin for MET of distal ureteral stones 4 to 10 mm in diameter. Material and Method: After 70 patients had been randomized into 2 groups of 35 patients each, both the control and experimental groups (groups 1 and 2, respectively) were advised to take 75 mg/day of diclofenacsodiumas needed for pain relief but only the experimental group to take 4 mg/day of silodosin. After 21 days, the groups were compared regarding the stone expulsion rate and duration, number of renalcolicepisodes, and analgesicdosage. Results: The median expulsion rates were 71.4% and 91.4% in groups 1 and 2, respectively, and the difference between them was significant (P=0.031). The median expulsion durations were 12.91±6.14 and 8.03±4.99 days, respectively, and the difference between them was significant (P<0.001). No significant differences were found regarding the median number of renal colic episodes or median analgesic dosage. While no patients in group 1 experienced side effects, 5 patients (14%) in group 2 experienced retrograde ejaculation. Conclusion: These results indicate that 4 mg/day of silodos in facilitates the expulsion of distal ureteral stones 4 to 10 mm in diameter but does not significantly reduce the number of renal colic episodes or analgesic dosage. PMID:26770537

  5. Comparative efficacy of tadalafil versus tamsulosin as the medical expulsive therapy in lower ureteric stone: a prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Mylarappa, Prasad; Aggarwal, Kuldeep; Patil, Avinash; Joshi, Prarthan; Desigowda, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, medical expulsive therapy has been used in the management of distal ureteric stones as a supplement to conservative treatment. Therefore, we conducted a prospective randomized study to evaluate the possible role of tadalafil individually in comparison with proven tamsulosin therapy in ureteric stone expulsion. The aim of this study is to compare the safety and efficacy of a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor (tadalafil) and an α-1 blocker (tamsulosin) as medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteric calculi. Material and methods Between August 2014 and October 2015, 207 patients who presented with distal ureteric stones of size 5–10 mm were randomly divided into two groups: tadalafil (Group A) and tamsulosin (Group B). Therapy was given for a maximum of 4 weeks. Stone expulsion rate, time to stone expulsion, analgesic use, number of hospital visits for pain, follow-up, endoscopic treatment and adverse effects of drugs were noted. Both groups were compared for normally distributed data by percentage, analysis of variance, and T-test. All the classified and categorical data were analyzed for both groups using the chi-square test. Results A statistically significant expulsion rate of 84.0% in Group A compared with 68.0% in Group B (P value = 0.0130), and shorter stone expulsion time in Group A (14.7±3.8) in comparison to Group B (16.8 ±4.5) was observed. Statistically significant differences were noted in renal colic episodes and analgesic requirement in Group A than Group B. No serious adverse effects were noted. Conclusions Tadalafil is safe, efficacious, and well tolerated as medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteric stones. This study showed that tadalafil increases ureteric stone expulsion quite significantly along with better control of pain and significantly lower analgesic requirement. PMID:27551555

  6. Ureteroscopic treatment of ureteral stones: only an auxiliary measure of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy or a primary therapeutic option?

    PubMed

    Osti, A H; Hofmockel, G; Frohmüller, H

    1997-01-01

    Both extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) and ureteroscopy are well-established methods in stone treatment; however, the therapeutic procedure in ureteral calculi, especially in the distal third of the ureter, is still controversially discussed. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of ureteroscopy as an auxiliary measure after ESWL and its importance as an alternative therapeutic option in the treatment of distal ureteral stones. Between 1991 and 1994, 115 ureteroscopic procedures in 104 patients with ureteral stones or stone fragments were carried out at our institution. During the same period of time, 1,595 patients with ureteral calculi (in the proximal two thirds of the ureter: n = 956; in the distal third of the ureter: n = 639) were treated with a Dornier HM-3 lithotriptor. In 77 of those 104 patients treated by ureteroscopy, this procedure was indicated as an auxiliary measure after failure of ESWL including 34 out of the 639 patients (5.3%) with stones in the distal part of the ureter. The overall direct success rate during the ureteroscopic stone treatment (including 11 cases with a second procedure) in the proximal, middle and distal third of the ureter was 74, 81 and 92%, respectively. The success rate of primary ureteroscopic removal of distal-third ureteral stones alone was 100% in 27 of these 104 patients. After 3 months the overall stone-free rate of all patients treated with ureteroscopy was 94%. Ureteroscopy appears to be a safe and effective treatment modality, if used as an auxiliary measure after failure of ESWL as well as a primary treatment modality in the case of stones in the distal third of the ureter. On the other hand, ESWL alone is a noninvasive and also successful procedure in treating stones situated in the distal part of the ureter.

  7. Quantification of the Range of Motion of Kidney and Ureteral Stones During Shockwave Lithotripsy in Conscious Patients.

    PubMed

    Harrogate, Suzanne R; Yick, L M Shirley; Williams, James C; Cleveland, Robin O; Turney, Benjamin W

    2016-04-01

    Effective shockwave lithotripsy requires accurate targeting of the stone throughout the course of treatment. Stone movement secondary to respiratory movement can make this more difficult. In vitro work has shown that stone motion outside the focal region reduces the efficacy of stone fragmentation; however, there are few clinical data on the degree of stone movement in patients during treatment. To investigate this, X-ray fluoroscopic images of the kidney and ureteral stones at the upper and lower limits of the normal respiratory cycle were acquired during shock wave lithotripsy of 58 conscious patients, and stone excursion was calculated from these images. In addition, the respiration rate and patient perceived pain were recorded during the course of the treatment. It was found that stone motion secondary to respiration was 7.7 ± 2.9 mm for kidney stones and 3.6 ± 2.1 mm for ureteral stones-less than has been reported in studies with anesthetized patients. There was no significant change of motion over the course of treatment although pain was found to increase. These data suggest that stone motion in conscious patients is less than in anesthetized patients. Furthermore, it suggests that lithotripters with focal regions of 8 mm or greater should not suffer from a marked drop in fragmentation efficiency due to stone motion.

  8. Ureteric stone in the presence of existing backache: lessons to learn.

    PubMed

    Zulkifli, M Z; Ho, C C K; Goh, E H; Praveen, S; Das, S

    2012-01-01

    Incidence of urolithiasis is on the rise due to climatic changes especially global warming.The pain due to presence of ureteric stone is a well known identity but many times it may be asymptomatic or even masked by concurrent presence of backache. In the present article, we describe the case of a 43-year-old male who came to the clinic for treatment of backache persisting for more than two years. The patient complained of backache two years back for which he was treated with analgesics and physiotherapy which relieved his pain. No X-ray was taken earlier because the attending clinician thought the backache to be musculo-skeletal in origin. Recently, one day a sudden episode of backache in the midst of night compelled him to seek medical treatment. However, this time a X-ray was performed and it showed the presence of calculi in the right upper pelvis of ureter which measured 1.9 cm vertically. An ultrasound confirmed the diagnosis. The patient was treated with two episodes of shock wave therapy which failed to crush the stone. A Double-J stent was inserted under general anaesthesia. The stone was crushed using a ureteroscope guided laser. The present case report describes how backache in professionals cannot be lightly attended. Even the characteristic groin to loin pain may be absent. All cases of backache should be properly investigated with an X-ray to rule out renal or ureteric calculi.

  9. A Comparison of Antegrade Percutaneous and Laparoscopic Approaches in the Treatment of Proximal Ureteral Stones

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Sercan; Ozok, Hakki Ugur; Sagnak, Levent; Ersoy, Hamit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the effectiveness and safety of retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy (RLU) and percutaneous antegrade ureteroscopy (PAU) in which we use semirigid ureteroscopy in the treatment of proximal ureteral stones. Methods. Fifty-eight patients with large, impacted stones who had a history of failed shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and, retrograde ureterorenoscopy (URS) were included in the study between April 2007 and April 2014. Thirty-seven PAU and twenty-one RLU procedures were applied. Stone-free rates, operation times, duration of hospital stay, and follow-up duration were analyzed. Results. Overall stone-free rate was 100% for both groups. There was no significant difference between both groups with respect to postoperative duration of hospital stay and urinary leakage of more than 2 days. PAU group had a greater amount of blood loss (mean hemoglobin drops for PAU group and RLU group were 1.6 ± 1.1 g/dL versus 0.5 ± 0.3 g/dL, resp.; P = 0.022). RLU group had longer operation time (for PAU group and RLU group 80.1 ± 44.6 min versus 102.1 ± 45.5 min, resp.; P = 0.039). Conclusions. Both PAU and RLU appear to be comparable in the treatment of proximal ureteral stones when the history is notable for a failed retrograde approach or SWL. The decision should be based on surgical expertise and availability of surgical equipment. PMID:25295266

  10. Does the use of doxazosin influence the success of SWL in the treatment of upper ureteral stones? A multicenter, prospective and randomized study.

    PubMed

    Ateş, Ferhat; Eryıldırım, Bilal; Öztürk, Metin Ishak; Turan, Turgay; Gürbüz, Cenk; Ekinci, Mete Oğuz; Yıldırım, Asıf; Göktaş, Cemal; Şenkul, Temuçin; Sarıca, Kemal

    2012-10-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of doxazosin, administered to the subjects who underwent SWL due to upper ureteral stones, on therapeutic outcomes. The study enrolled the patients with a radio-opaque stone ≥5 mm in upper ureter. Patients were randomized into two groups: the first group underwent SWL following the diagnosis and they were recommended to receive oral hydration. The second group underwent SWL after initiating alpha blocker (doxazosin controlled-release tablet 4 mg/day) and drug therapy was continued until that the patient has been stone free. Parameters of SWL procedure, Steinstrasse, pain score at admission, time to stone passage, the complications developed, the additional procedures that were administered and number of hospital visits done due to pain during the treatment were recorded. A total of 79 patients were enrolled to the study. The subjects evaluated included 35 patients, who received an alpha blocker and 44 patients who did not receive an alpha blocker. For both groups, the level of energy applied per SWL session, the diameter of the stone, the number of hospital visits done due to pain, pain score and the need for analgesia were found to be similar (p > 0.05). The group of doxazosin was more advantageous in terms of stone-free rate, the need for additional procedures and Steinstrasse (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the addition of doxazosin to SWL therapy administered for upper ureteral stones reduces Steinstrasse, and thereby, the need for additional procedures and increases post-treatment stone-free rate. A positive effect of doxazosin on the time to stone passage was not shown.

  11. Laparoscopic management of distal ureteric stones in a bilharzial ureter: Results of a single-centre prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Hani H.; Elgobashy, Samir E.; Elkholy, Amr; Kamal, Ahmad M.; Roshdy, Mamdouh A.; Elbaz, Ahmad G.; Riad, Essam

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy and safety of the laparoscopic management of an impacted distal ureteric stone in a bilharzial ureter, as bilharzial ureters are complicated by distal stricture caused by the precipitation of bilharzial ova in the distal ureter. These cases are associated with poorly functioning and grossly hydronephrotic kidneys that hinder the endoscopic manipulation of the coexistent distal high burden of, and long-standing, impacted stones. Patients and methods We used laparoscopic ureterolithotomy, with four trocars, to manage 51 bilharzial patients (33 men and 18 women; mean age 40.13 years) with distal ureteric stones. The ureter was opened directly over the stone and the stone was extracted. A JJ stent was inserted into the ureter, which was then closed with a 4–0 polyglactin running suture. Results The mean stone size was 2.73 cm. Conversion to open surgery was required in only one patient. The mean operative duration was 92 min, the postoperative pain score was 20–60, the mean (range) number of analgesic requests after surgery was 1.72 (1–3), comprising once in 21 patients, twice in 23 and thrice in seven. The mean hospital stay was 2.74 days, and the total duration of follow-up was 7–12 months. The stone recurred in four patients and a ureteric stricture was reported in two. All patients were rendered stone-free. Conclusion Laparoscopy is a safe and effective minimally invasive procedure for distal ureteric stones in a bilharzial ureter with hydronephrosis. PMID:26413344

  12. Multichannel impedance monitoring for evaluation of alpha-adrenoblocker effect on the ureteral function in patients with stone disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolikhin, O. I.; Khodyreva, L. A.; Mudraya, I. S.; Kirpatovsky, V. I.; Serdyuk, A. A.

    2010-04-01

    The study of distal ureter function was carried out on patients with stones in the upper urinary tract, who underwent ureteroscopy and lithotripsy procedures. The parameters of ureteral peristalsis such as peristalsis amplitude, peristalsis rate, ureteral wall tone, contractile wave duration, and its direction obtained by multichannel impedance ureterography were assessed and compared from two groups of patients. The group I patients received tamsulosin in addition to standard regimen, while the group II patients matched according to the stone size and location were managed without tamsulosin medical therapy. In comparison with group II, the group I patients demonstrated smaller average peristalsis amplitude (0.60±0.08 vs 0.81±0.06 Ohm), shorter contractions (7.1±0.3 vs 7.7±0.3 s), greater peristalsis rate (3.3±0.3 vs 2.8±0.2 per minute), and diminished ureteral tone (4.0±0.5 vs 4.7±0.2 Ohm-1). Incidence of the retrograde contractile waves was two-fold greater in the group II, while normal antegrade regular contractions were 30% more frequent in the group I. In addition, our results showed that the effect of tamsulosin on ureteral function was manifested in the patients with different stone size and location in the upper urinary tract, and it depended pronouncedly on individual ureteral tone and contractility parameters.

  13. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of ureteral stone in a patient with en bloc kidney transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Markic, D; Valencic, M; Grskovic, A; Spanjol, J; Sotosek, S; Fuckar, Z; Maricic, A; Pavlovic, I; Budiselic, B

    2011-06-01

    We report a case of ureterolithiasis in a patient with an en bloc kidney transplantation, using extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL). The patient presented with asymptomatic macrohematuria. Computed tomography revealed a ureteral calculus just below the pyeloureteral junction with hydronephrosis of the medially positioned kidney. Took two sessions of ESWL were required for complete disintegration of the stone. At 3 years after successful treatment, the patient has an excellent functioning and stone-free graft.

  14. [Acute renal failure due to obstructive ureteral stone associated with norovirus gastroenteritis in an infant with congenital solitary kidney].

    PubMed

    Kato, Taiki; Hamano, Atsushi; Kawamura, Hideki

    2014-10-01

    We report a 35 month-old boy with acute renal failure caused by an obstructive ureteral stone associated with norovirus gastroenteritis. He visited his family physician because of fever, abdominal pain and vomiting. He was diagnosed as acute gastroenteritis. The symptoms relieved once, but abdominal pain and vomiting recurred two days after the visit and the volume of urine decreased. He was diagnosed as norovirus gastoenteritis and acute renal failure which was unresponsive to fluid replacement. Ultrasound study of the abdomen showed a solitary kidney with mild hydronephrosis. He was then admitted to our hospital. He was finally diagnosed as acute postrenal failure due to obstructive ureteral stone with left solitary kidney by abdominal computer tomography (CT). We performed transurethral catheterization immediately. The creatinine and blood urea nitrogen returned to normal level in 2 days. The CT performed on the 28th day post operation showed disappearance of the stone after uric alkalization. Recently, some cases of postrenal failure due to bilateral obstructive ureteral stones, mainly ammonium acid urate stones, associated with viral gastroenteritis were reported. As clinical features, they are common in boys three years or younger after an episode of rotavirus gastroenteritis with high uric acid concentration. By far, the most common cause of acute renal failure in patients with severe gastroenteritis is prerenal failure resulting from hypovolemia. But postrenal cause due to bilateral obstructive stones should be taken in a consideration.

  15. Evaluating the importance of mean stone density and skin-to-stone distance in predicting successful shock wave lithotripsy of renal and ureteric calculi.

    PubMed

    Wiesenthal, Joshua D; Ghiculete, Daniela; D'A Honey, R John; Pace, Kenneth T

    2010-08-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is considered the first line treatment for the majority of patients with renal and ureteric calculi, with success rates from contemporary series varying from 60 to 90%. Success is dependent on many patient and stone-related factors. We conducted a retrospective analysis of mean stone CT density (MSD) and skin-to-stone distance (SSD) to determine their influence on the success of SWL of renal and ureteric calculi. Data from all patients treated at the St. Michael's Hospital Lithotripsy Unit from May 2004 to June 2009 were reviewed. Analysis was restricted to those patients with a pre-treatment non-contrast CT scan conducted at our center demonstrating a solitary renal or ureteric calculus < or =20 mm in maximal diameter. Successful treatment of renal stones was defined as those patients who were stone free or had asymptomatic, clinically insignificant residual fragments < or =4 mm in diameter, as measured by KUB X-ray, 3 months after a single SWL treatment. Successful treatment of ureteric stones was defined as being stone free on KUB X-ray, 2-weeks post-SWL. Demographic, stone, patient, treatment and follow-up data were collected from a prospective database and review of CT and KUB imaging by two independent urologists and one radiologist. Data were analyzed with logistic regression, Chi square analysis and ANOVA where appropriate. 422 patients (69.7% male) with a mean age of 51.4 years (SD 12.9) and mean BMI 27.0 kg/m(2) (SD 4.9) were analyzed. Mean stone size was 78.9 mm(2) (SD 77.3) for ureteral stones and 66.1 mm(2) (SD 63.2) for renal stones, with 95 (43.6%) of the renal stones located in the lower pole. The single-treatment success rates for ureteral and renal stones were 62.3% and 68.8%, respectively. On univariate analysis, predictors of SWL success, regardless of stone location, were age (p = 0.01), BMI (p = 0.01), stone size (p < 0.01), MSD (p < 0.01) and SSD (p < 0.01). On multivariate analysis, MSD >900 HU (OR = 0.49, CI: 0

  16. Ten-year experience in the management of distal ureteral stones greater than 10 mm in size

    PubMed Central

    DELL’ATTI, L.; PAPA, S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) and semirigid ureteroscopy lithotripsy (URSL) have become standards of treatment for ureteral calculi. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare ESWL vs. URSL in terms of safety and efficacy for treatment of large distal ureteral stones ≥ 1cm. Patients and Methods This investigation assessed 637 patients with distal ureteral stones (10 to 15mm in size). 313 in the ESWL group were treated on an outpatient basis using the LithoDiamond machine without anaesthesia. URSL was performed in 324 patients with a 6–8 Fr semirigid ureterorenoscope and YAG laser under spinal anaesthesia. A successful outcome was defined as the patient being stone free 1 month after treatment. For all patients the parameters, including stone-free rate, operation time, complications, were inserted retrospectively in this study after review of medical records and operating room logs. Results The stone-free rate after URSL was 77.5% and 45.4% after ESWL treatment (p<0.001). The mean operative time between two groups was 74.7±9.8 for URSL group and 38.3±7.6 for ESWL group. The average number of office visits was 4.2 and 2.6 in patients treated with ESWL and URSL, respectively. Double j stents were inserted in 28.7% of patients. Twenty-one patients needed rehospitalisations for major complications. However, the differences in the overall complication rate were not statistically significant, with a rate of 16.3% for URSL and 14.4% for ESWL (p=0.246). Conclusion We have shown that URSL has enough safety and efficacy for the treatment of distal ureteral stones ≥ 1cm. URSL is associated with higher stone clearance rate as compared with ESWL. PMID:27142822

  17. Retrospective comparative study of rigid and flexible ureteroscopy for treatment of proximal ureteral stones

    PubMed Central

    Galal, Ehab Mohamad; Anwar, Ahmad Zaki; Fath El-Bab, Tarek Khalaf; Abdelhamid, Amr Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: We analyzed the outcome and complications of rigid (R-URS) and flexible (F-URS) ureteroscopic lithotripsy for treatment of proximal ureteric stone (PUS). Subjects and methods: Retrospective data of 135 patients (93 males and 42 females) submitted to R-URS and F-URS for treatment of PUS in the period between July 2013 and January 2015 were investigated. (R-URS, group 1) was performed in 72 patients while 63 patients underwent (F-URS, group 2).We compared the 2 groups for success, stone characteristics, operative time, intraoperative and postoperative complications. Results: The overall stone free rate (SFRs) was 49/72 (68%) in group 1 and 57/63 (91%) patients in group 2, (P=0.005). The operative time was shorter in group 1 in comparison to group 2 with statistically significant difference (P=0.005). There was not any statistically significant difference between 2 groups in complication rate (P=0.2). Conclusıon: Both R-URS and F-URS could be a feasible option for treatment of PUS. R-URS is less successful for treatment of PUS and should be used cautiously and with availability of F-URS. PMID:27622276

  18. Managing Small Ureteral Stones: A Retrospective Study on Follow-Up, Clinical Outcomes and Cost-Effectiveness of Conservative Management vs. Early Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alevizopoulos, Aristeidis; Zosimas, Dimitrios; Piha, Lamprini; Hanna, Milad; Charitopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of ureteral calculi has evolved over the past decades with the advent of new surgical and medical treatments. The current guidelines support conservative management as a possible approach for ureteral stones sized = 10 mm. Objectives We purport to follow the natural history of ureteral stones managed conservatively in this retrospective study, and attempt to ascribe an estimated health-care and cost-effectiveness, from presentation to time of being stone-free. Materials and methods 192 male and female patients with a single ureteral stone sized = 10 mm were included in this study. The clinical and cost-related outcome was analyzed for different stone sizes (0-4, 4-6 and 6-10 mm). The effectiveness of selected follow-up (FU) scans was also analyzed. Results Stone size was found to be related to the degree of hydronephrosis and to the likelihood of need for a surgical management. Conservative management was found to be clinically effective, as 88% of the patients did not require surgery for their stone. 96.1% of the patients with a stone 0-4mm managed to expel their ureteral stone. Bigger ureteral stones were found to be more costly. The cost-effectiveness of the single FU scans was found to be related to their efficiency, while the global cost-effectiveness of conservative management vs. early surgery was higher for smaller stones (26.8 vs. 17.32% for stones 0-4 vs. 6-10 mm). Conclusion Conservative management is clinically effective with a significant cost-benefit, particularly for the subgroup of stones sized 0-4 mm, where a need for FU scans is in dispute. PMID:26989370

  19. [The meaning and usefulness of spiral CT for radiolucent ureteric stones diagnosis: our experience].

    PubMed

    Passavanti, Giandomenico; Pizzuti, Valerio; Costantini, Fabio Massimo; Bragaglia, Alessandro; Franci, Luca; Paolini, Riccardo

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this work was to report some case histories on the usefulness of spiral TC, used for several years both to diagnose renal colic and urinary lithiasis and to study radio lucent stones that are often difficult to be detected with traditional radiology. 13 patients, aged between 31 and 76 (average age: 54.2), were therefore examined. Eight of them had a ureteral colic when examined, while five patients had shown symptoms some days before being hospitalised in our ward. In all cases, ultrasonography showed a significant hydronephrosis, while direct radiography of the urinary tract could not detect any images that could be associated with radio-opaque lithiasis. All patients therefore underwent an abdominal spiral TC with no contrast medium within 24 hours after hospitalisation. The confrontation between the results obtained by ultrasonography and those obtained by spiral TC, showed the usefulness of the former method to detect stones located in the proximal ureter or in its intramural tract, while the latter could detect the lithiasis of the proximal ureter in 3 cases (23%), of the mid ureter in 2 cases (15.3%), and of the distal ureter in 8 cases (61%). The stones had, approximately, a 5 mm diameter in 5 cases. In 6 cases the diameter was between 6 and 10 mm, and more than 1 cm in 2 cases. Both methods proved to be equally accurate in the assessment of the hydronephrosis degree and of the thickness of the renal parenchyma. The therapy was medical in 2 cases and open surgery in 3 cases, while 8 patients were treated with ureterolitholapaxy with a ballistic searcher. The usefulness of TC in the study of urolithiasis nowadays is supported by a large literature which clearly supplies with documentary evidence the high sensitivity and specificity of such a method in diagnosing the presence of urolithiasis in general and above all of ureteric stones. Such a method not only makes an accurate evaluation of the stones location possible, but it can also assess the

  20. Reduced time from diagnosis to stone-free status in patients with ureteral calculi.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Annelie; Rosengren, Kristina

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to describe an improvement project and its effects on decreasing the time from diagnosis to treatment for patients with kidney stones and to reduce the negative effects related to untreated stones at one hospital in western Sweden. Design/methodology/approach - A quantitative descriptive study based on Nolan's improvement model was used. The quality improvement effects were evaluated using statistical process control. Findings - Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy treatment's positive effects within 48 hours were described as efficiency (decreased waiting time) from diagnosis to treatment, even if a re-treatment was necessary. The results also showed a reduction in the usage of percutaneous nephropyelostomies as a treatment option. Research limitations/implications - This study includes data from one department at one hospital in one country. Comparative data include the time from acute radiological examination to final treatment but not total re-treatments, complications or time to up following radiological examination. However, the study was performed over one year and analyzed data from medical records in a systematic way. Practical implications - This study may inspire measuring and developing routines from diagnosis to treatment for patients who are transferred within different departments at one hospital. Social implications - By measuring the working process, resource use within a healthcare organization could be visualized. Planning and co-operation at different managerial levels are key factors for success when improvement projects are performed. Originality/value - Studies in improvement projects considering ureteral or kidney stones are generally lacking; thus, this study is important for improving the care of patients with this diagnose.

  1. Does morbid obesity influence the success and complication rates of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for upper ureteral stones?

    PubMed Central

    Dede, Onur; Şener, Nevzat Can; Baş, Okan; Dede, Gülay; Bağbancı, Muhammet Şahin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to investigate whether obesity influences the outcome of extra-corporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) treatment for upper ureteral stones. Material and methods: This is a retrospective study of 134 patients who underwent ESWL between June 2011 and May 2014. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 comprised 94 patients of normal weight, and group 2 comprised 40 morbidly obese patients. Patients in both groups had upper ureteral stones. Results: The mean age of groups 1 and 2 was 45.6±12.1 and 45.3±15.5 years, respectively (p=0.98). There was no significant difference in demographic variables between the groups. The mean stone size in groups 1 and 2 was 81.7±25.7 mm2 and 86.3±22.4 mm2, respectively (p=0.51), the mean body mass index (BMI) was 27.4±2.9 and 42.9±2.1, respectively (p<0.01), the mean number of ESWL sessions was 2.4±0.6 and 2.4±0.7, respectively (p=0.97), and the mean follow-up time was 7.1±3.4 and 6.6±2.8 weeks, respectively (p=0.67). The overall stone-free rate was 82% in group 1 and 67% in group 2 (p=0.01). Conclusion: It is well-known that morbidly obese patients have higher rates of anesthesia-related problems due to the comorbidities commonly observed in this population. In the current study, we found that ESWL is a safe and acceptable treatment option for morbidly obese patients with upper ureteral stones. PMID:26328193

  2. Tamsulosin versus nifedipin in medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteral stones and the predictive value of Hounsfield unit in stone expulsion.

    PubMed

    Balci, Melih; Tuncel, Altug; Aydin, Omur; Aslan, Yilmaz; Guzel, Ozer; Toprak, Ugur; Polat, Fazli; Atan, Ali

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of tamsulosin and nifedipine in medical expulsive therapy (MET) in patients with distal ureteral stone. In addition, we tried to determine the predictive value of Hounsfield Unit (HU) of the stone in the success of MET. A total of 75 patients with a distal ureteral stone of 5-10 mm diameter were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 25) received tamsulosin 0.4 mg/d; group 2 (n = 25) received nifedipine 10 mg/day p.o and group 3 (n = 25) received diclofenac sodium 50 mg p.o. when required. At the beginning of each treatment, the HU of the stone was also measured using a non-contrast computerized tomography in all the patients. The results were evaluated at week four. The mean age of the patients was 36.8 (range, 16-68) years. Stone expulsion was observed in 19 (76%) patients in group 1, 16 (64%) patients in group 2 and 9 (36%) patients in group 3 (pgroup1-3 = 0.004, pgroup2-3 = 0.048 and pgroup1-2 = 0.355). The mean expulsion time was 9, 9.1 and 10.3 d, respectively (pgroup1-3 < 0.001, pgroup2-3 < 0.001 and pgroup1-2 = 0.619). The mean diclofenac sodium dose per patient was 544, 602 and 1408 mg in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively (pgroup1-3 < 0.001, pgroup2-3 < 0.001 and pgroup1-2 = 0.977). The mean HU of the stone in patients with and without a successful MET was 363 and 389, respectively (p = 0.462). Our results showed that MET with both nifedipine and tamsulosin provided a similar increase in the expulsion rate for distal ureteral stones. HU does not seem to be a predictive parameter for stone expulsion.

  3. Semen quality after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for the management of lower ureteric stones: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gulur, Dev Mohan; Philip, Joe

    2011-10-01

    Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy has long been an important tool in the urologists' armamentarium for the treatment of distal ureteric stones. Several studies have been conducted on the morbidity and adverse effects of ESWL on human tissues but the effect of lithotripsy on semen and testes remains inconclusive. Impact on semen analysis and testes is important because the seminal vesicles and testes are exposed to the shock waves due to their anatomical proximity to the distal ureter. This article has reviewed all the published literature in English language on semen analysis after lithotripsy.

  4. Submucosal migration of ureteric calculi: related to ESWL?

    PubMed

    Vandeursen, H; Baert, L

    1993-01-01

    Three patients were reinspected by ureteroscopy after repeat ESWL. Ureteroscopy initially did not disclose an intraluminal stone and only visualized a severe inflammatory reaction of the ureteric wall and a boss of the ureter at the level of the fluoroscopically suspected stone location. An intact stone in all 3 cases was finally exposed by tactile contact at the top of the ureteroscope after perforating the mucosa with a guide wire. Retrospectively, the combination of long-standing stone impaction together with damage to the ureteric mucosa during shockwave interaction may cause an inflammatory reaction with submucosal migration of the stone.

  5. A comparison of nifedipine and tamsulosin as medical expulsive therapy for the management of lower ureteral stones without ESWL.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dehong; Yang, Lu; Liu, Liangren; Yuan, Haichao; Qian, Shenqiang; Lv, Xiao; Han, Pin; Wei, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Administration of nifedipine or tamsulosin has been suggested to augment stone expulsion rates. We aimed to compare the stone expulsion rates and adverse effects associated with the use of nifedipine or tamsulosin as medical expulsive therapy (MET) for the management of lower ureteral stones (LUS) without extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) via a literature review and meta-analysis. Relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from the Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and Google Scholar databases. Finally, a total of 7 RCTs with 3897 patients were included. Our meta-analysis showed that tamsulosin could significantly increase the stone expulsion rate relative to nifedipine in patients with LUS (random-effects model; risk ratio [RR] = 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75-0.88; P < 0.00001). The subgroup analysis indicated no statistically significant difference between the drugs with regard to minor or major adverse effects (fixed-effect model; RR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.91-1.54, P = 0.20; and RR = 1.63, 95% CI = 0.22-11.82, P = 0.63, respectively). This meta-analysis demonstrated that tamsulosin was more effective than nifedipine in patients with LUS, as evidenced by the higher stone expulsion rate. Tamsulosin treatment should therefore be considered for patients with LUS.

  6. In situ extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for ureteral calculi: investigation of factors influencing stone fragmentation and appropriate number of sessions for changing treatment modality.

    PubMed

    Kim, H H; Lee, J H; Park, M S; Lee, S E; Kim, S W

    1996-12-01

    To determine the factors influencing stone fragmentation and to suggest when to change treatment modality for ureteral calculi refractory to repetitive in situ extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL), we analyzed 369 patients treated primarily by the second-generation lithotripter, Siemens Lithostar, from March 1989 to December 1993. Three hundred forty-two (92.7%) of the patients were ultimately free of stones after repetitive in situ SWL. The cumulative stone-free rates of the first, second, and third session were 64%, 81%, and 88%, respectively, and the increment in the cumulative stone-free rate thereafter with further repeated in situ SWL was minimal (p < 0.01). The cumulative stone-free rate at the third session was 89%, 87%, and 86% for proximal, middle, and lower ureteral stones, respectively (p > 0.05). The cumulative stone-free rate at the third session was 100%, 90%, 87%, 70%, 67%, and 50% for stones <5 mm, 6 to 10 mm, 11 to 15 mm, 16 to 20 mm, 21 to 25 mm, and >25 mm, respectively (p < 0.001). According to the radiopacity of the stone, the cumulative stone-free rate at the third session was 96% for stones with minimal opacity, 94% for those with moderate opacity, and 70% for highly opaque stones (p < 0.001). The cumulative stone-free rate at the second session was 100% without ureteral obstruction; 80% with mild, 57% with moderate, and 67% with severe obstruction; and 50% in patients with nonappearance of the kidney (p < 0.05). From these observations, it could be concluded that the factors influencing fragmentation were the size and radiopacity of the calculi and the degree of ureteral obstruction, whereas the location of the calculi did not influence the cumulative stone-free rate of repetitive in situ SWL. It is preferable to restrict in situ SWL to three sessions in patients with ureteral calculi refractory to shockwaves. An early change of treatment modality either to ureteroscopic manipulation or to open surgery would be recommended if there

  7. As low as reasonably achievable: Methods for reducing radiation exposure during the management of renal and ureteral stones.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Fernando; Preminger, Glenn M; Lipkin, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Imaging for urolithiasis has evolved over the past 30 years. Currently, non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) remains the first line imaging modality for the evaluation of patients with suspected urolithiasis. NCCT is a dominant source of ionizing radiation for patients and one of its major limitation. However, new low dose NCCT protocols may help to reduce the risk. Fluoroscopy use during operating room (OR) surgical procedures can be a substantial source of radiation for patients, OR staff and surgeons. It is important to consider the amount of radiation patients are exposed to from fluoroscopy during operative interventions for stones. Radiation reduction can be accomplished by appropriate selection of imaging studies and multiple techniques, which minimize the use of fluoroscopy whenever possible. The purpose of this manuscript is to review common imaging modalities used for diagnosing and management of renal and ureteral stones associated with radiation exposure. We also review alternatives and techniques to reduce radiation exposure.

  8. Initial Experience with the Resonance Metallic Stent for Antegrade Ureteric Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Tze M. Irving, Henry C.; Cartledge, Jon

    2007-07-15

    Background and purpose. We describe our initial experience with a new metallic ureteric stent which has been designed to provide long-term urinary drainage in patients with malignant ureteric strictures. The aim is to achieve longer primary patency rates than conventional polyurethane ureteric stents, where encrustation and compression by malignant masses limit primary patency. The Resonance metallic double-pigtail ureteric stent (Cook, Ireland) is constructed from coiled wire spirals of a corrosion-resistant alloy designed to minimize tissue in-growth and resist encrustation, and the manufacturer recommends interval stent change at 12 months. Methods. Seventeen Resonance stents were inserted via an antegrade approach into 15 patients between December 2004 and March 2006. The causes of ureteric obstruction were malignancies of the bladder (n = 4), colon (n = 3), gynecologic (n = 5), and others (n = 3). Results. One patient had the stent changed after 12 months, and 3 patients had their stents changed at 6 months. These stents were draining adequately with minimal encrustation. Four patients are still alive with functioning stents in situ for 2-10 months. Seven patients died with functioning stents in place (follow-up periods of 1 week to 8 months). Three stents failed from the outset due to bulky pelvic malignancy resulting in high intravesical pressure, as occurs with conventional plastic stents. Conclusion. Our initial experience with the Resonance metallic ureteric stent indicates that it may provide adequate long-term urinary drainage (up to 12 months) in patients with malignant ureteric obstruction but without significantly bulky pelvic disease. This obviates the need for regular stent changes and would offer significant benefit for these patients with limited life expectancy.

  9. The effect of ureteroscope size in the treatment of ureteral stone: 15-year experience of an endoscopist

    PubMed Central

    Kılınç, Muhammet Fatih; Doluoğlu, Ömer Gökhan; Karakan, Tolga; Dalkılıç, Ayhan; Sönmez, Nurettin Cem; Yücetürk, Cem Nedim; Reşorlu, Berkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate the ureter stone treatment results performed by using different- caliber semirigid ureteroscopes (URS). Material and methods Adult patients who were treated for ureteral stones by a single endoscopist between January 2000 and March 2015 were analyzed. The patients were divided into 3 groups in accordance with the caliber of the ureteroscope used: 10/10.5 F Storz (Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany) (January 2002–January 2005) URS was used in group 1, 8.9/9.8 F Storz (February 2005–December 2011) URS was used in group 2, and 6/7.5 FWolf (Richard Wolf, Knittlingen, Germany) (January 2012–March 2015) URS was used in group 3. Patients’ age and gender, size and site of stones, stone-free rates (SFR), intra- and perioperative complication rates, and durations of surgery were compared among the groups. Intraoperative complications were classified according to modified Satava, and perioperative complications were classified according to modified Clavien classification systems. Results A total of 2461 patients treated for ureteral stones were analyzed. There were 583 patients in group 1 (10/10.5 F Storz), 1302 patients in group 2 (8.9/9.8 F Storz), and 576 patients in group 3 (6/7.5 F Wolf). SFR were 83.7%, 87.4%, and 92.2% in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (p=0.01). Duration of surgery was 30.34±10.36 min in group 1, 31.61±10.10 min in group 2, and 42.40±7.35 min in group 3 (p=0.01). The overall complication rates classified according to modified Satava classification were 10.8%, 7.6%, and 6.9% (p=0.01) while grade 3 modified Satava complication rates were 1.9%, 1.5%and 0.5% in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (p=0.01). Conclusion In this study, we found that more frequent use of a small- caliber URS resulted in a longer duration of surgery and an increased rate for JJ stent insertion, however it facilitated a safer and more successful ureteroscopy procedure. PMID:27274889

  10. [The action of dynamic amplipulse therapy on the urodynamics of the upper urinary tract in patients with kidney and ureteral stone fragments following extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Li, A A; Malikova, S N; Nesterov, N I

    1992-01-01

    Experimental data demonstrate that sinusoidal modulated currents are capable of increasing the frequency and amplitude of smooth muscle biopotentials in animal ureter. Basing on these findings, the authors conducted stone fragments elimination from the upper urinary tracts of patients subjected to pulse lithotripsy by means of an original physiotherapeutic complex: oral mineral water, sodium chloride baths, dynamic amplipulse therapy with 3-4 electrodes pairs applied on the renal area and different ureteral regions. The stones passage from the upper urinary tracts was reported in 91.7% of the cases. Functional improvement in the affected kidney is attributed to the stone elimination and antiinflammatory action of the above balneotherapeutic complex.

  11. Semi-rigid ureteroscopic lithotripsy versus laparoscopic ureterolithotomy for large upper ureteral stones: a meta – analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Torricelli, Fabio C. M.; Monga, Manoj; Marchini, Giovanni S.; Srougi, Miguel; Nahas, William C.; Mazzucchi, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: To provide a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing semi-rigid ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URS) with laparoscopic ureterolithotomy (LU) for the treatment of the large proximal ureteral stone. Materials and methods: A systematic literature review was performed in June 2015 using the PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science databases to identify relevant studies. Article selection proceeded according to the search strategy based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis criteria. Results: Six RCT including 646 patients were analyzed, 325 URS cases (50.3%) and 321 LU cases (49.7%). URS provided a significantly shorter operative time (weighted mean difference [WMD] = −31.26 min; 95%CI −46.88 to −15.64; p<0.0001) and length of hospital stay (WMD = −1.48 days; 95%CI −2.78 to −0.18; p=0.03) than LU. There were no significant differences in terms of overall complications (OR = 0.78; 95%CI 0.21-2.92; p=0.71) and major complications – Clavien ≥3 – (OR = 1.79; 95%CI 0.59-5.42; p=0.30). LU led to a significantly higher initial stone-free rate (OR = 8.65; 95%CI 4.18-17.91; p<0.00001) and final stone-free rate (OR = 6.41; 95%CI 2.24-18.32; p=0.0005) than URS. There was a significantly higher need for auxiliary procedures in URS cases (OR = 6.58; 95%CI 3.42-12.68; p<0.00001). Conclusions: Outcomes with LU for larger proximal ureteral calculi are favorable compared to semi-rigid URS and should be considered as a first-line alternative if flexible ureteroscopy is not available. Utilization of flexible ureteroscopy in conjunction with semi-rigid ureteroscopy may impact these outcomes, and deserves further systematic evaluation. PMID:27564273

  12. [Management of adult's renal and ureteral stones. Update of the Lithiasis Committee of the French Association of Urology (CLAFU). General considerations].

    PubMed

    Chabannes, É; Bensalah, K; Carpentier, X; Bringer, J-P; Conort, P; Denis, É; Dore, B; Estrade, V; Gautier, J-R; Hadjadj, H; Hubert, J; Hoznek, A; Lechevallier, É; Meria, P; Mozer, P; Saussine, C; Yonneau, L; Traxer, O

    2013-12-01

    The Lithiasis Committee of the French Association of Urology (CLAFU) aimed to update the current knowledge about urolithiasis. This update will be divided into four parts: 1) general considerations; 2) the management of ureteral stones; 3) the management of kidney stones; 4) metabolic assessment and medical treatment of urolithiasis. Recent technicals advances helped the urologists to improve stones management: new extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) devices, new flexible ureterorenoscopes, development of laser fragmentation. ESWL, semi-rigid and flexible ureteroscopy and the percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) remain currently the main therapeutic options. The first part of this update deals with the description and classification of stones, preoperative assessment, post-operative management and clinical follow-up. Main criteria of therapeutic choices are stone location, stone composition and stone size. Stone composition is assessed with infrared spectrophotometry analysis and its hardness is correlated with U.H. density on CT scan assessment. Preoperative assessment consists in urinary cytobacteriological examine, urinary PH, blood creatininemia, hemostasis. Low-dose CT scan is recommended before urological treatment. The result of the treatment must be done 1 or 3 months later with plain abdominal film and ultrasonography. Medical management of urolithiasis will be based on stone composition, metabolic and nutritional evaluation. Treatment success is definited by absence of residual fragments. Annual follow-up is recommended and based either on plain abdominal film and ultrasonography or low-dose CT scan.

  13. Procalcitonin is a strong predictor of urine culture results in patients with obstructing ureteral stones: A prospective, pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannopoulos, Dimitri; Whelan, Patrick; Ahmad, Waseem; Rybak, James; Hota, Bala; Deane, Leslie; Nehra, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The appropriate management of infected obstructing ureteral calculi is prompt genitourinary decompression. Urine cultures are the gold standard for confirming infection but often take 24–48 h to result. Although white blood cell (WBC) count is an important diagnostic laboratory test, it is a nonspecific inflammatory marker. Similarly, urinalysis (UA) can be misleading in the setting of a contaminated sample, bladder colonization, or in cases of a completely obstructed the upper urinary tract. Procalcitonin (PCT) has shown promise in predicting the presence and degree of bacterial infections. In this proof-of-concept study, we explore whether PCT is effective at predicting concomitant infections in the setting of obstructing ureteral stones. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective, single-institution observational pilot study examining adult patients who presented to the emergency room with acute obstructing ureterolithiasis. In total, 22 patients were enrolled. At the time of presentation, data obtained were vital signs, WBC count, PCT, UA, urine, and blood cultures. Fisher-exact two-tailed t-tests and receiver operating characteristic statistics with area under the curve (AUC) calculations were used to determine the correlation between urine culture results and PCT, WBC count, nitrite-positive UA, heart rate, and fever. Results: In total, 5/22 patients had bacteria-positive urine cultures. PCT (P = 0.020) and nitrite-positive UA (0.024) were the only statistically significant predictors of urine culture results. In comparing the AUC, PCT (0.812) was strongly correlated with eventual urine culture results. Conclusions: This proof-of-concept pilot study gives encouraging results, in that PCT was a good predictor of positive cultures (P = 0.02, AUC 0.812). Given, the small sample size, one cannot directly compare PCT to other markers of infection. However, PCT shows promise in this arena and warrants future investigation. PMID:27453647

  14. Perinephric Hematoma and Hemorrhagic Shock as a Rare Presentation for an Acutely Obstructive Ureteral Stone with Forniceal Rupture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zynger, Debra L.; Box, Geoffrey N.; Shah, Ketul K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Spontaneous perinephric hematoma (SPH) secondary to a forniceal rupture as the first presenting sign for an obstructive ureteral stone in a patient without history of urolithiasis has not been described previously. Case presentation: We report a 70-year-old Caucasian male patient who presented to our emergency room with fever, altered mental status, and left flank pain. He had a temperature of 103.3°F, tachycardia, but stable blood pressure. He had left flank tenderness. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen/pelvis with intravenous contrast revealed an intracapsular hematoma (13.3 × 10.0 × 6.4 cm) with an active bleeding and a 1.1 cm left proximal ureteral stone. The patient became quickly hemodynamically unstable and was taken for emergent exploratory laparotomy and left nephrectomy. An active bleeding was encountered secondary to a (2.4 × 2.0 cm) lateral capsular defect in the kidney. Conclusion: Hemorrhagic/septic shock as a presenting sign for an obstructive ureteral stone may require an emergent nephrectomy in a hemodynamically unstable patient. PMID:27579423

  15. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in the treatment of renal and ureteral stones.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Fábio César Miranda; Danilovic, Alexandre; Vicentini, Fábio Carvalho; Marchini, Giovanni Scala; Srougi, Miguel; Mazzucchi, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The use of certain technical principles and the selection of favorable cases can optimize the results of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). The aim of this study is to review how ESWL works, its indications and contraindications, predictive factors for success, and its complications. A search was conducted on the Pubmed® database between January 1984 and October 2013 using "shock wave lithotripsy" and "stone" as key-words. Only articles with a high level of evidence, in English, and conducted in humans, such as clinical trials or review/meta-analysis, were included. To optimize the search for the ESWL results, several technical factors including type of lithotripsy device, energy and frequency of pulses, coupling of the patient to the lithotriptor, location of the calculus, and type of anesthesia should be taken into consideration. Other factors related to the patient, stone size and density, skin to stone distance, anatomy of the excretory path, and kidney anomalies are also important. Antibiotic prophylaxis is not necessary, and routine double J stent placement before the procedure is not routinely recommended. Alpha-blockers, particularly tamsulosin, are useful for stones >10mm. Minor complications may occur following ESWL, which generally respond well to clinical interventions. The relationship between ESWL and hypertension/diabetes is not well established. PMID:25909212

  16. Sciaticum majus foramen and sciaticum minus foramen as the path of SWL in the supine position to treat distal ureteral stone.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianlin; Sun, Xizhao; He, Lei

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) using sciaticum majus foramen and sciaticum minus foramen as the path to treat distal ureteral stone in supine position. Between December 2006 and November 2008, 243 cases of distal urinary calculi were treated in our department using SWL or ureteroscopy. 189 cases for SWL were treated in supine position. The shockwave target on the stone in distal ureter via sciaticum majus foramen and sciaticum minus foramen, avoiding the sacroiliac joint. 54 cases were underwent ureteroscopy combined with holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy. The stone-free rate and the efficacy quotient (EQ) for SWL and ureteroscopy was 81.5%, 0.68; 94.4%, 0.78; respectively (p = 0.02). The retreatment rate for SWL and ureteroscopy was 14.6%, 0, respectively. The number of the shocks ranged from 600 to 3,000 (mean 2,566.3 ± 378.8). The energy per pulse of SWL ranged from 8 to 12 kV (mean 10.7). SWL in the supine position using sciaticum majus foramen and sciaticum minus foramen as the path is a choice of the treatment of distal ureteral stones with an excellent success rate and low side effect.

  17. Ureteral calculi: natural history and treatment in an era of advanced technology.

    PubMed

    Morse, R M; Resnick, M I

    1991-02-01

    Patients with ureteral stones may be managed expectantly, or treated with a variety of invasive and noninvasive techniques depending on stone composition, size and location, expectations of the patient and experience of the surgeon. Of 378 patients with documented ureteral calculi 60% passed the stones spontaneously. Passage rates from the proximal, middle and distal ureter were 22, 46 and 71%, respectively. Basketing under fluoroscopic control of distal stones was successful in 79% of the attempts and for those in whom this approach failed ureteroscopy was performed, with a success rate of 90%. When ureteroscopy was used as the initial treatment of distal stones removal was achieved in 81% of the patients. These statistics serve as a reminder that traditional therapy of ureteral stones has not lost its role in contemporary practice.

  18. A Case of Septic Shock caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans in an Immunocompetent Female Patient after Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for a Ureteral Stone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Yon; Park, In Young; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Jin Seo; Kang, Goeun; Kim, Jae Seok

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans can cause various types of infections, but its infection in humans is rare. A. xylosoxidans has been reported as a rare etiological agent of infections including primary bacteremia, catheter-related bloodstream infection, endocarditis, otitis, and pneumonia, particularly in immunocompromised hosts. We encountered a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 52-year-old, immunocompetent woman with no underlying disease, who received extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy to remove a left upper ureteral stone. She was treated with antibiotics to which the organism was susceptible but died as a result of septic shock. PMID:27104016

  19. Mini percutaneous nephrolithotomy in the treatment of renal and upper ureteral stones: Lessons learned from a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ferakis, Nikolaos; Stavropoulos, Marios

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present the most recent data regarding the indications of mini percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), the results and the complications of the method. Medline was searched from 1997 to January 2014, restricted to English language. The Medline search used a strategy including medical subject headings and free-text protocols. PCNL is a well-established treatment option for patients with large and complex renal calculi. In order to decrease morbidity associated with larger instruments like blood loss, postoperative pain and potential renal damage, a modification of the technique of standard PCNL has been developed. This is performed with a miniature endoscope via a small percutaneous tract (11–20 F) and was named as minimally invasive or mini-PCNL. This method was initially described as an alternative percutaneous approach to large renal stones in a pediatric patient population. Furthermore, it has become a treatment option for adults as well, and it is used as a treatment for calculi of various sizes and locations. However, the terminology has not been standardized yet, and the procedure lacks a clear definition. Nevertheless, mini-PCNL can achieve comparable stone-free rates to the conventional method, even for large stones. It is a safe procedure, and no major complications are reported. Although less invasiveness has not been clearly demonstrated so far, mini-PCNL is usually related to less blood loss and shorter hospital stay than the standard method. PMID:25837662

  20. Pulsed dye laser fragmentation of ureteral calculi: a review of the first 50 cases performed at Virginia Mason Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Govier, F E; Gibbons, R P; Correa, R J; Brannen, G E; Weissman, R M; Pritchett, T R

    1990-04-01

    During the preceding 2 1/2 years 50 patients have undergone laser fragmentation of ureteral calculi at our medical center. Of these 50 patients 48 (96%) became free of stones without the need for an open operation: 44 (88%) were managed in 1 setting and 4 required adjunctive extracorporeal shock wave or ultrasonic lithotripsy, or a repeat session with the laser. Two patients (4%) eventually required an open operation: 1 required ureterolithotomy for a large impacted stone overlying the bony pelvis after a ureteroscope could not be advanced to this level and 1 had a good initial result with the laser but a persistent ureteral stricture developed and he required ureteroureterostomy 4 months later. Both open procedures were necessitated by mid ureteral stones, and the ureteral stricture was believed to be related to ureteroscopy and the impacted nature of the stone, rather than any damage by the laser probe.

  1. Age-related delay in urinary stone clearance in elderly patients with solitary proximal ureteral calculi treated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Ichiyanagi, Osamu; Nagaoka, Akira; Izumi, Takuji; Kawamura, Yuko; Kato, Tomoyuki

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the effects of aging on the stone-free rate (SFR) after shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) for the treatment of proximal ureteral calculi. A total of 247 consecutive patients were retrospectively selected, classified into seven groups set at 10 year increments (from 20 to 90 years), and examined for SFR after SWL. According to our final analysis, 185 male and 62 female patients with an average age of 54.1 years had stones with a diameter of 11.5 mm and a density of 893.1 Hounsfield units. On average, SFR was 74.9 % at 3 months after 1.7 SWL sessions. SFR gradually reached ≥ 90 % for each age-group after 1.5-2 years. Median durations to achieve 50 % SFR were estimated to be 21 and 86 days for those in their 20 and 80 s, respectively. However, the difference between the two estimates was not significant (p = 0.064). The durations to achieve 50 % SFR for the other groups lay between these two estimates. Aging does not affect long-term SFR, but patients aged ≥ 80 years might experience delayed stone clearance within the first 12 months after SWL.

  2. Efficacy and safety of Ho:YAG Laser Lithotripsy for ureteroscopic removal of proximal and distal ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laser lithotripsy is an established endourological modality. Ho:YAG laser have broadened the indications for ureteroscopic stone managements to include larger stone sizes throughout the whole upper urinary tract. Aim of current work is to assess efficacy and safety of Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy during retrograde ureteroscopic management of ureteral calculi in different locations. Methods 88 patients were treated with ureteroscopic Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy in our institute. Study endpoint was the number of treatments until the patient was stone-free. Patients were classified according to the location of their stones as Group I (distal ureteric stones, 51 patients) and group II (proximal ureteral stones, 37). Group I patients have larger stones as Group II (10.70 mm vs. 8.24 mm, respectively, P = 0.020). Results Overall stone free rate for both groups was 95.8%. The mean number of procedures for proximal calculi was 1.1 ± 0.1 (1–3) and for distal calculi was 1.0 ± 0.0. The initial treatment was more successful in patients with distal ureteral calculi (100% vs. 82.40%, respectively, P = 0.008). No significant difference in the stone free rate was noticed after the second laser procedure for stones smaller versus larger than 10 mm (100% versus 94.1%, P = 0.13). Overall complication rate was 7.9% (Clavien II und IIIb). Overall and grade-adjusted complication rates were not dependant on the stone location. No laser induced complications were noticed. Conclusions The use of the Ho:YAG laser appears to be an adequate tool to disintegrate ureteral calculi independent of primary location. Combination of the semirigid and flexible ureteroscopes as well as the appropriate endourologic tools could likely improve the stone clearance rates for proximal calculi regardless of stone-size. PMID:25107528

  3. Safety and efficacy of ureteral access sheaths.

    PubMed

    Stern, Joshua M; Yiee, Jenny; Park, Sangtae

    2007-02-01

    The ureteral access sheath (UAS) was introduced as a means of passing a flexible ureteroscope. Although the device was initially lauded for its ability to facilitate ureteroscopic access, passage was difficult and risked ureteral injury, and the UAS fell out of favor until the development of a new generation of devices that was easier to insert. The UAS should be advanced under fluoroscopy over a stiff guidewire, and the surgeon should ensure copious hydration of all inner and outer surfaces. Use of the UAS is purported to improve irrigant flow and visibility. The UAS can induce transient ureteral ischemia and promote an acute inflammatory response, but it also prevents potentially harmful elevations in intrarenal pressure. Unequivocal data are not yet available to suggest that UAS use during ureteroscopy protects or harms the upper urinary tract. The UAS also has the potential to improve stone-free rates by allowing passive egress or active retrieval of fragments. A large prospective study is needed to unequivocally determine if UAS use is superior in terms of stone-free rates. Cost studies reported to favor UAS use, although a formal cost-effectiveness analysis has not been performed. Further study is needed before routine use of the UAS can be recommended.

  4. Urinary Tract Stones and Osteoporosis: Findings From the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Laura D; Hovey, Kathleen M; Andrews, Christopher A; Thomas, Fridtjof; Sorensen, Mathew D; Crandall, Carolyn J; Watts, Nelson B; Bethel, Monique; Johnson, Karen C

    2015-11-01

    Kidney and bladder stones (urinary tract stones) and osteoporosis are prevalent, serious conditions for postmenopausal women. Men with kidney stones are at increased risk of osteoporosis; however, the relationship of urinary tract stones to osteoporosis in postmenopausal women has not been established. The purpose of this study was to determine whether urinary tract stones are an independent risk factor for changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and incident fractures in women in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). Data were obtained from 150,689 women in the Observational Study and Clinical Trials of the WHI with information on urinary tract stones status: 9856 of these women reported urinary tract stones at baseline and/or incident urinary tract stones during follow-up. Cox regression models were used to determine the association of urinary tract stones with incident fractures and linear mixed models were used to investigate the relationship of urinary tract stones with changes in BMD that occurred during WHI. Follow-up was over an average of 8 years. Models were adjusted for demographic and clinical factors, medication use, and dietary histories. In unadjusted models there was a significant association of urinary tract stones with incident total fractures (HR 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.17). However, in covariate adjusted analyses, urinary tract stones were not significantly related to changes in BMD at any skeletal site or to incident fractures. In conclusion, urinary tract stones in postmenopausal women are not an independent risk factor for osteoporosis. PMID:25990099

  5. Urinary Tract Stones and Osteoporosis: Findings From the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Laura D; Hovey, Kathleen M; Andrews, Christopher A; Thomas, Fridtjof; Sorensen, Mathew D; Crandall, Carolyn J; Watts, Nelson B; Bethel, Monique; Johnson, Karen C

    2015-11-01

    Kidney and bladder stones (urinary tract stones) and osteoporosis are prevalent, serious conditions for postmenopausal women. Men with kidney stones are at increased risk of osteoporosis; however, the relationship of urinary tract stones to osteoporosis in postmenopausal women has not been established. The purpose of this study was to determine whether urinary tract stones are an independent risk factor for changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and incident fractures in women in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). Data were obtained from 150,689 women in the Observational Study and Clinical Trials of the WHI with information on urinary tract stones status: 9856 of these women reported urinary tract stones at baseline and/or incident urinary tract stones during follow-up. Cox regression models were used to determine the association of urinary tract stones with incident fractures and linear mixed models were used to investigate the relationship of urinary tract stones with changes in BMD that occurred during WHI. Follow-up was over an average of 8 years. Models were adjusted for demographic and clinical factors, medication use, and dietary histories. In unadjusted models there was a significant association of urinary tract stones with incident total fractures (HR 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.17). However, in covariate adjusted analyses, urinary tract stones were not significantly related to changes in BMD at any skeletal site or to incident fractures. In conclusion, urinary tract stones in postmenopausal women are not an independent risk factor for osteoporosis.

  6. Retroperitoneoscopic pyelolithotomy as initial treatment for upper urinary tract large stone.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Hideo; Nagai, Atsushi; Uematsu, Katsutoshi; Ohmori, Hiroyuki; Kumon, Hiromi

    2005-06-01

    We report a case in which retroperitoneoscopic pyelolithotomy was the procedure selected to treat a large stone in the upper urinary tract. A 71-year-old woman who had multiple cerebral infarction and dementia was admitted with a persistent high fever unresponsive to antibiotics. The diagnosis was pyelonephritis and urosepsis associated with ureteral calculus. A large calculus(3.0 x 2.0 cm)was found in the left ureter at the L3 level. She underwent nephrostomy of the left side. After the patient's general condition had improved, surgery was performed successfully with an uneventful recovery. The findings in this case confirm that retroperitoneoscopic surgery allows removal of a large stone in a single, minimally invasive procedures. PMID:16049564

  7. Bilateral ovarian metastases from ureteric urothelial cancer: Initial case report and distinguishing role of immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Venkatramani, Vivek; Banerji, John Samuel; Manojkumar, Ramani

    2015-01-01

    Urothelial cancers of the upper tract are aggressive malignancies with a propensity for distant metastases. Transitional cell carcinoma can also develop de novo in the ovaries and differentiation between these lesions requires immunohistochemistry. We report a case of right lower ureteric urothelial carcinoma with metastases to both ovaries. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral ovarian metastases from an upper tract primary, diagnosed with immunohistochemistry. PMID:25624971

  8. Use of drug therapy in the management of symptomatic ureteric stones in hospitalized adults (SUSPEND), a multicentre, placebo-controlled, randomized trial of a calcium-channel blocker (nifedipine) and an α-blocker (tamsulosin): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Urinary stone disease is common, with an estimated prevalence among the general population of 2% to 3%. Ureteric stones can cause severe pain and have a significant impact on quality of life, accounting for over 15,000 hospital admissions in England annually. Uncomplicated cases of smaller stones in the lower ureter are traditionally treated expectantly. Those who fail standard care or develop complications undergo active treatment, such as extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy or ureteroscopy with stone retrieval. Such interventions are expensive, require urological expertise and carry a risk of complications. Growing understanding of ureteric function and pathophysiology has led to the hypothesis that drugs causing relaxation of ureteric smooth muscle, such as the selective α-blocker tamsulosin and the calcium-channel blocker nifedipine, can enhance the spontaneous passage of ureteric stones. The use of drugs in augmenting stone passage, reducing the morbidity and costs associated with ureteric stone disease, is promising. However, the majority of clinical trials conducted to date have been small, poor to moderate quality and lacking in comprehensive economic evaluation. This trial aims to determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of tamsulosin and nifedipine in the management of symptomatic urinary stones. Methods/design The SUSPEND (Spontaneous Urinary Stone Passage ENabled by Drugs) trial is a multicentre, double-blind, randomized controlled trial evaluating two medical expulsive therapy strategies (nifedipine or tamsulosin) versus placebo. Patients aged 18 to 65 with a ureteric stone confirmed by non-contrast computed tomography of the kidney, ureter and bladder will be randomized to receive nifedipine, tamsulosin or placebo (400 participants per arm) for a maximum of 28 days. The primary clinical outcome is spontaneous passage of ureteric stones at 4 weeks (defined as no further intervention required to facilitate stone passage). The

  9. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy with combined ultrasound and roentgenologic calculus localization. Initial clinical experiences with the Lithostar plus].

    PubMed

    Zöller, G; Wassmann, K; Ludewig, M; Blech, M; Ringert, R H

    1990-11-01

    Since the introduction of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for non-invasive treatment of renal and ureteral stones, lithotripter units have relied on either fluoroscopic or ultrasound stone localization. While ultrasound stone localization reduces X-ray exposure and facilitates treatment of radiolucent renal stones, fluoroscopic stone localization is superior in the detection of ureteral stones. Since April 1989 we have been using the Lithostar plus, a new lithotriptor system, which provides both fluoroscopic and ultrasound stone localization. After treatment of 108 patients, the initial data suggest that this system combines the advantages of both localization principles, while being as efficient as other second-generation lithotriptor units in bringing about the disintegration of renal and ureteral stones.

  10. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: treatment of choice in ureteral calculi].

    PubMed

    Rigatti, P; Montorsi, F; Guazzoni, G; Maffezzini, M

    1989-05-15

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy represents the therapy of choice for reno-ureteral stone disease being resolutive in more than 85% of cases. This procedure can be successfully applied to ureteral stones providing appropriate preoperative cystoscopic manipulations and a correct positioning of the patient on the stretcher of the lithotripter. We hereby report our experience in 119 patients with ureteral lithiasis submitted to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with a 98% success rate.

  11. Spontaneous knotting of a pigtail ureteric stent in the ureter requiring percutaneous removal.

    PubMed

    Braslis, K G; Joyce, G

    1992-10-01

    Insertion of a ureteric stent is a common procedure in urologic practice. Ureteric stenting may be performed for: ureteric obstruction, benign or malignant: to prevent ureteric obstruction from stone fragments after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL); or to prevent leakage from the upper urinary tract. A case of spontaneous knotting of a ureteric stent in situ is reported. Although this complication has been reported previously it is rare.

  12. [Ambulatory ureteral lithotripsy with "Modulith SL-20"].

    PubMed

    González Enguita, C; Calahorra Fernández, F J; García de la Peña, E; Rodríguez-Miñón Cifuentes, J L; Vela Navarrete, R

    1993-03-01

    Analysis of our experience in 'in situ' ambulatory shockwave extracorporeal lithofragmentation of ureteral stones in 104 patients seen in the Lithotrity Unit, Urology Service, Fundación "Jiménez Díaz". Using Modulith SL 20, a third generation lithotripter, 'in situ' disintegration was achieved in 82.69% of cases, 51.92% of which were fragmented in a single lithotrity session. As a first choice, no ureteral handling was used in any of the patients prior to lithotrity. In 9.62% of patients it was necessary to place a 'double J' by-pass catheter, due to the disease presenting with a septic picture. The patient's position was either dorsal or ventral decubitus depending on the lithiatic site, while location and focusing of the stones was done radiologically. All patients were treated ambulatory without hospitalization. Only 18% was given oral or i.v. anaesthesia. Fursemide 40 mg was administered to all patients shortly before starting the session. Each patient received an average of 3,200 shockwaves per session (14-18 Kv, average 16 Kv). Haematuria was the single and modest side effect that happened during the 24 hours following lithofragmentation in 30% of patients, while 20% reported slight discomfort at the time of eliminating the gritted stones. We conclude stating that 'in situ' shockwave extracorporeal lithotrity of ureteral stones with Modulith SL 20 allows for elective disintegration of ureteral stones in whatever location they are found, due to the patient's easy positioning. The simple location and focusing of ureteral stones has allowed us to treat and solve some cases of ureteral lithiasis at the precise moment of the nephritic colic painful emergency, thus speeding up and facilitating the resolution of the condition. Our results and our strategy imply a new change of direction in the management of these lithiasis, as opposed to the well established and historical doctrines in existence regarding stones with ureteral location.

  13. Ureteral Interventions.

    PubMed

    Herr, Allen; Malhotra, Anuj; White, Mark; Siskin, Gary

    2016-09-01

    Interventional radiologists are commonly called upon to manage patients with benign and malignant ureteral pathologic conditions. Unfortunately, treatments for both cure and palliation can be fraught with problems causing patients to be undesirably maintained with lifelong catheters. This review describes outcomes for antegrade and retrograde therapeutic options and techniques for patients with most types of ureteral pathologic conditions that the interventional radiologist would encounter in practice. PMID:27641452

  14. Original lithotomy positioning for transperineal extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for distal ureteric calculi with Tripter X1.

    PubMed

    Andrianne, R; Vandeberg, C; Bonnet, P; Nicolas, H; Coppens, L; Bouffioux, C; de Leval, J

    1992-01-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been initially designed for stones located in the kidney and the upper ureter. Our lithotripter is no exception. Its components (the table and the orientation of the semi-ellipsoid reflector) are adapted for the treatment of kidney or lumbar ureter stones. However, the elements forming the unit of treatment (the table, the C-arm and the Tripter) can be modified in such a way that focalization of stones of the lower ureter becomes possible through a perineal exposure. The aim is to avoid the pelvic bone shield while a good focalization of the stone is realized. From June 1989 to March 1991, 35 patients were treated for distal ureteric stones by ESWL in this original positioning.

  15. An Everting Ureteral Access Sheath: Concepts and In Vitro Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keith L.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2007-04-01

    Ureteral access sheaths have been a recent innovation in facilitating ureteral stone surgery. Once properly placed, access sheaths allow the movement of ureteroscopes and other instruments through the ureter with minimal injury to the urothelium. However, there are shortcomings of the current device designs. Initial sheath placement requires significant force, and shear stress can injure the ureter. In addition, inadvertent advancement of the outer sheath without the inner introducer stylet can tear and avulse the ureter. A novel eversion design incorporating a lubricous film provides marked improvement over current access sheaths. In bench top and animal models, the eversion shealths require less force during advancement, cause less injury to the urothelial tissue, and have a lower potential of introducing extraneous materials (e.g., microbes) into a simulated urinary tract. While, the everting design provides important advantages over traditional non-everting designs, further preclinical and clinical trials are required.

  16. Bilateral Ureteral Obstruction in Children after Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Grande, M.; Lisi, G.; Bianchi, D.; Bove, P.; Miano, R.; Esser, A.; De Sanctis, F.; Neri, A.; Grande, S.; Villa, M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute renal failure due to bilateral ureteral obstruction is a rare complication after appendectomy in children. We report a case of bilateral ureteric obstruction in a 14-year-old boy nine days after surgery for an acute appendicitis. After saline-filling of the urinary bladder, transabdominal ultrasound demonstrated bilateral hydronephrosis of moderate degree. No abscess was found with CT but presence of millimetric stones on both distal ureters was shown, with bilateral calyceal dilatation. Cystoscopy revealed inflammatory changes in the bladder base. Following introduction of bilateral ureteric stents, there was rapid normalisation of urinary output and serum creatinine. PMID:26295001

  17. The Initial Appearance of Ashlar Stone in Cyprus. éssues of Provenance and Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philokyprou, M.

    In Cyprus stone was the primary building material, either as rubble or in a dressed form (called ashlar), since the Neolithic period. Initially stone was used only as rubble but later during the Late Brone Age ashlar stone appeared for the first time on the island. The aim of this paper is the presentation of the results of a systematic research regarding the different types and uses of ashlar stone and the techniques followed during the Late Bronze Age in Cyprus in comparison with other Mediterranean areas. The macroscopic and microscopic examination of selected samples showed that sedimentary rocks of various geological formations were used as ashlars. One, two or even three different types of stones were transported from the quarries nearest to the settlements. Some characteristic methods of stone dressing, such as finishing only the visible faces and creating drafted margins around the face of the ashlar blocks, are to be found not only in Late Bronze Age settlements but also in more recent examples from the last two centuries. The choice of ashlar and the methods of construction can be related to social, religious and political factors and were not only based on aesthetic criteria and practical issues. Thus, the most impressive structural solutions were followed in the construction of temples and public buildings, whereas more simple methods can be observed in residential complexes.

  18. An Indwelling Ureteral Stent Forgotten for Over 12 Years.

    PubMed

    Bidnur, Samir; Huynh, Melissa; Hoag, Nathan; Chew, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Ureteral stents are one of the most commonly used urologic devices with the purpose of establishing and maintaining ureteral patency. They are also associated with a number of complications including infection, migration, stent-related symptoms, and encrustation, leading to lithiasis. Prolonged stent dwell time is associated with a greater degree of these complications. We present the case of a 36-year-old man who presented with a severely encrusted ureteral stent that had been placed 12.5 years prior for an obstructive left-sided ureteral stone and was lost to follow-up. The patient underwent a combination of percutaneous nephrolithomy, cystolitholapaxy, and ureteroscopy to remove the stent and associated 1.7 cm renal pelvic stone and 4.1 cm bladder stone, necessitating two operative sittings to render him stone free. PMID:27579442

  19. An Indwelling Ureteral Stent Forgotten for Over 12 Years

    PubMed Central

    Bidnur, Samir; Huynh, Melissa; Hoag, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ureteral stents are one of the most commonly used urologic devices with the purpose of establishing and maintaining ureteral patency. They are also associated with a number of complications including infection, migration, stent-related symptoms, and encrustation, leading to lithiasis. Prolonged stent dwell time is associated with a greater degree of these complications. We present the case of a 36-year-old man who presented with a severely encrusted ureteral stent that had been placed 12.5 years prior for an obstructive left-sided ureteral stone and was lost to follow-up. The patient underwent a combination of percutaneous nephrolithomy, cystolitholapaxy, and ureteroscopy to remove the stent and associated 1.7 cm renal pelvic stone and 4.1 cm bladder stone, necessitating two operative sittings to render him stone free. PMID:27579442

  20. Managing acute and chronic renal stone disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, Conor P; Courtney, Aisling E

    2016-02-01

    Nephrolithiasis, or renal stone disease, is common and the incidence is increasing globally. In the UK the lifetime risk is estimated to be 8-10%. On a population level, the increase in stone incidence, erosion of gender disparity, and younger age of onset is likely to reflect increasing prevalence of obesity and a Western diet with a high intake of animal protein and salt. Stones can be detected by a variety of imaging techniques. The gold standard is a non-contrast CT of kidneys, ureters and bladder (CT KUB) which can identify > 99% of stones. CT KUB should be the primary mode of imaging for all patients with colic unless contraindicated. In such instances, or if a CT KUB is not available, an ultrasound KUB is an alternative. This has advantages in terms of radiation exposure and cost, but is limited in sensitivity, particularly for ureteric stones. Once diagnosed, a plain film KUB can be used for follow-up of radiopaque stones. For most patients diclofenac is a reasonable first choice of analgesia, e.g. 50-100 mg rectally, or 75 mg IM. Opioid medication can worsen nausea and be less effective, but should be used if there is a contraindication to NSAIDs. A combination of diclofenac, paracetamol, and/or codeine regularly can provide adequate pain control in many cases. Failure of this analgesic combination should prompt consideration of secondary care support. If a ureteric stone < 5 mm in diameter is identified, the expectation is that this will pass without intervention. Initially medical management is still useful for stones between 5 and 10mm in diameter, but urology input is more likely to be necessary as up to 50% of these may require intervention. Stones that are >10 mm in diameter should be discussed with the urology service as they are unlikely to pass spontaneously.

  1. [Laser lithotripsy of ureteral calculi].

    PubMed

    Schmeller, N; Ehsan, A; Kriegmair, M; Muschter, R; Liedl, B; Hofstetter, A

    1994-07-01

    A total of 149 patients with 152 ureteral stones were treated with intraureteral lithotripsy by Dye-laser (83.55%), Alexandrite-laser (41.27%), electrohydraulic lithotripsy adapted for use in the ureter (25.16%) or neodymium: YAG laser with optomechanic coupling (3.2%). The Dye-laser has an automatic pulse shut-off mechanism with spectral analysis of the reflected laser beam, so that effective laser pulses can only be released by contact with a stone. Most (127 of 83.5%) of the stones could be completely fragmented, so that no further treatment was necessary. In 16 cases (10.5%) the stone was too hard for fragmentation and had to be removed by alternative techniques. Intraureteral lithotripsy is a save and effective method of treating ureteral stones that cannot be reached or have not been treated successfully by shockwave lithotripsy. No significant differences in outcome were found between the different lasers or electrohydraulic lithotripsy. In selected cases endoscopic treatment may be recommended as treatment of first choice.

  2. [Monotherapy of ureteral calculi with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Robles, J E; de Castro, F; Isa, W A; Rosell, D; Agüera, L G; Sánchez, P L; Zudaire, J J; Berián, J M

    1992-05-01

    We reviewed our experience with ESWL in the treatment of 401 patients with ureteral stones in order to evaluate if a higher disintegration and clearance rates could be achieved without prior manipulation of ureteral calculi, i.e., ESWL used as "in situ" monotherapy. The global stone free rate were 83%, 85% and 91% at 15 days, 1 month and 3 months after ESWL. We also analyzed the results according to the efficiency quotient (EQ).

  3. Management of stone disease in infants.

    PubMed

    Azili, Mujdem Nur; Ozturk, Fatma; Inozu, Mihriban; Çayci, Fatma Şemsa; Acar, Banu; Ozmert, Sengul; Tiryaki, Tugrul

    2015-11-01

    Evaluating and treating renal stone disease in infants are technically challenging. In this study, we evaluated the surgical treatment of renal stones in children under 1 year of age. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients under 1 year old who were treated with ESWL, endourological or open surgical procedures for renal stone disease between January, 2009 and December, 2012. The patients' age, gender, stone size, stone location and number, complications, stone-free status, and postoperative complications were recorded. 19 of 121 infants with a mean age of 10.2 ± 3.07 months were treated with surgical procedures. Six (75%) of eight cystinuria patients required a surgical intervention. Retrograde endoscopic management was performed in thirteen patients (63.4%) as an initial surgical approach. There were three major (15.7%) complications. The rate of open surgical procedures was 31.6% (6 of 19 infants). The cutoff value of stone size for open surgery was 10 mm. There was a significant relationship between the conversion to open procedures and stone size, stone location, and symptom presentation especially the presence of obstruction (p < 0.05). After repeated treatments, the stone clearance rate of RIRS reached 84.6%. Retrograde intrarenal surgery is an effective and safe treatment method for renal stones in infants and can be used as a first-line therapy in most patients under 1 year old. This is especially important if an associated ureteral stone or lower pole stone that requires treatment is present and for patients with cystinuria, which does not respond favorably to ESWL.

  4. Management of acute hydronephrosis in pregnancy by ureteral stenting.

    PubMed

    Zwergel, T; Lindenmeir, T; Wullich, B

    1996-01-01

    Acute hydronephrosis during pregnancy that fails to respond to conservative treatment can be managed by ureteral stenting or in special cases by application of a percutaneous nephrostomy tube. We report the outcome in 116 pregnant women with symptomatic hydronephrosis. In 30 cases ureteric stents were passed under local anesthesia. In 2 cases (pyeloureteral stenosis, impacted ureteric stone) percutaneous nephrostomy was necessary. Overall each course of pregnancy and disease was individually decided. In case of persisting symptoms due to acute hydronephrosis, ureteral stenting was preferred, since it is a simple, safe and effective method of internal upper urinary tract drainage.

  5. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of distal ureteral calculi.

    PubMed

    Miller, K; Bubeck, J R; Hautmann, R

    1986-01-01

    To date, the use of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been limited to renal calculi and ureteral calculi above the pelvic brim. Modifying the position of the patient on the support of the Dornier lithotripter HM3, we were able to localize and treat distal ureteral calculi. Until April 1986, 43 patients with stones in the lower ureter underwent contact-free lithotripsy. Treatment was successful in 39 patients (90%), 2 of these requiring 2 sessions. In 4 patients treatment failed and stone removal was accomplished using ureteroscopy or open surgery. No complications or adverse side effects were encountered in the whole series. ESWL is now the method of choice for the treatment of distal ureteral calculi in our department.

  6. Kidney stone ablation times and peak saline temperatures during Holmium:YAG and Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy, in vitro, in a ureteral model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-02-01

    Using a validated in vitro ureter model for laser lithotripsy, the performance of an experimental Thulium fiber laser (TFL) was studied and compared to clinical gold standard Holmium:YAG laser. The Holmium laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with standard parameters of 600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz, and 270-μm-core optical fiber. TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with 35 mJ, 500 μs, 150-500 Hz, and 100-μm-core fiber. Urinary stones (60% calcium oxalate monohydrate / 40% calcium phosphate), of uniform mass and diameter (4-5 mm) were laser ablated with fibers through a flexible video-ureteroscope under saline irrigation with flow rates of 22.7 ml/min and 13.7 ml/min for the TFL and Holmium laser, respectively. The temperature 3 mm from tube's center and 1 mm above mesh sieve was measured by a thermocouple and recorded during experiments. Total laser and operation times were recorded once all stone fragments passed through a 1.5-mm sieve. Holmium laser time measured 167 +/- 41 s (n = 12). TFL times measured 111 +/- 49 s, 39 +/- 11 s, and 23 +/- 4 s, for pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz (n = 12 each). Mean peak saline irrigation temperatures reached 24 +/- 1 °C for Holmium, and 33 +/- 3 °C, 33 +/- 7 °C, and 39 +/- 6 °C, for TFL at pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz. To avoid thermal buildup and provide a sufficient safety margin, TFL lithotripsy should be performed with pulse rates below 500 Hz and/or increased saline irrigation rates. The TFL rapidly fragmented kidney stones due in part to its high pulse rate, high power density, high average power, and reduced stone retropulsion, and may provide a clinical alternative to the conventional Holmium laser for lithotripsy.

  7. Endoscopic management of upper urinary tract stones.

    PubMed Central

    Tolley, D. A.; Buist, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    In a two year period from March 1983, 157 patients with upper urinary tract stones were managed primarily by endoscopy. Of 90 patients with renal stones, extraction was achieved in 91% of patients with complete extraction in 76%. Of the remaining patients with ureteric stones, successful extraction was achieved in 75%. Ten patients required open surgery which was for failed extraction in 9. Morbidity is low with a mean hospital stay of 4.7 days for patients with kidney stones, and of 3.7 days for patients undergoing extraction of ureteric stones. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3954313

  8. Urinary tract stones--Part II: current status of treatment.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, C; Anson, K M; Patel, U

    2003-06-01

    The majority of renal and ureteric stones are now managed by minimally invasive techniques, for example nephrostomy, ureteral stents, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy. A multi-disciplinary approach is necessary, and this review examines the status of modern stone therapy and the contribution of the radiology department.

  9. Ureteropyeloscopy and homium: YAG laser lithotripsy for treatment of ureteral calculi (report of 356 cases)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhong; Din, Qiang; Jiang, Hao-wen; Zen, Jing-cun; Yu, Jiang; Zhang, Yuanfang

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of holmium YAG laser lithotripsy for the treatment of ureteral calculi. Methods: A total of 356 patients underwent ureteropyeloscopic lithotripsy using holmium YAG laser with a semirigid uretesopyeloscope, 93 upper, 135 middle, and 128 lower ureteral stones were treated. Results: The overall successful fragmentation rate for all ureteral stones in a single session achieved 98% (349/356). The successful fragmentation rate stratified by stone location was 95% 88/93 in the upper ureter, 99% (134/135) in the mid ureter , and 99%(127/128) in the distal ureter. 12 cases with bilateral ureteral stones which caused acute renal failure and anuria were treated rapidly and effectively by the holmium YAG laser lithotripsy. No complications such as perforation and severe trauma were encountered during the operations. 2 weeks 17months (with an average of 6.8 month ) follow up postoperatively revealed that the overall stone-free rate was 98%(343/349) and no ureteral stenosis was found. Conclusions Holmium YAG laser lithotripsy is a highly effective, minimally invasive and safe therapy for ureteral calculi. It is indicated as a first choice of treatment for patients with ureteral calculi, especially for the ones with mid- lower levels of ureteral calculi.

  10. Current trends in the management of urinary stones.

    PubMed

    Smith, T P; Castaneda-Zuniga, W R; Darcy, M D; Cragg, A H; Hunter, D W; Amplatz, K

    1988-01-01

    The treatment of renal and ureteral stones has undergone rapid and major changes over the past ten years. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy has become the most commonly used modality for the treatment of renal and upper ureteral stones. Lower ureteral stones are more commonly being approached by retrograde techniques. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy, medical therapy, and open surgical nephrolithotomy offer viable alternatives in given situations. Presented here is the current application of each of these techniques, both alone and in combination, for the treatment of urinary stones.

  11. The Gachon University Ureteral Narrowing score: A comprehensive standardized system for predicting necessity of ureteral dilatation to treat proximal ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Kyu; Kim, Tae Beom; Ko, Kwang-Pil; Kim, Chang Hee; Kim, Kwang Taek; Chung, Kyung Jin; Kim, Khae Hawn; Jung, Han; Yoon, Sang Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose For treating proximal ureteral calculi, treatment decision has been known still difficult to choose ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URS) or shockwave lithotripsy. The aims of our study are to identify the possible predictors for necessity of URS and to propose the Gachon University Ureteral Narrowing scoring system (GUUN score) as a helpful predictor. Materials and Methods We evaluated 83 consecutive patients who underwent semirigid URS due to proximal ureteral calculi between April 2011 and February 2014 by a single surgeon. We reviewed patient characteristics and pre- and postoperative parameters and surgical records. We divided the patients into 2 groups (group 1, nondilation group; group 2, dilation group) according to whether or not balloon dilation was performed. A stepwise logistic regression was performed to identify the factors that predict dilatation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted and areas under the ROC curve (AUC) were calculated to GUUN score. Results Mean patients' age and their stone size were 48.53±12.90 years and 7.79±2.57 cm, respectively. Significantly smaller stone size (p=0.009), lower stone density (p=0.005), and lower ureteral density differences between ureteral narrowing level and far distal ureter (UD) (p<0.001) were observed in group 1 (n=34) than in group 2 (n=49). GUUN score consists of age, stone size and UD (AUC, 0.938). Overall stone-free clearance rate was 85.5%. Conclusions We suggest that the GUUN score is an excellent scoring system to predict the necessity of ureteral dilatation for decision making whether or not to perform surgical manipulation. PMID:27437538

  12. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae- and urease-dependent clusters assemble in an extracellular niche to initiate bladder stone formation

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Norsworthy, Allison N.; Sun, Tung-Tien

    2016-01-01

    The catheter-associated uropathogen Proteus mirabilis frequently causes urinary stones, but little has been known about the initial stages of bladder colonization and stone formation. We found that P. mirabilis rapidly invades the bladder urothelium, but generally fails to establish an intracellular niche. Instead, it forms extracellular clusters in the bladder lumen, which form foci of mineral deposition consistent with development of urinary stones. These clusters elicit a robust neutrophil response, and we present evidence of neutrophil extracellular trap generation during experimental urinary tract infection. We identified two virulence factors required for cluster development: urease, which is required for urolithiasis, and mannose-resistant Proteus-like fimbriae. The extracellular cluster formation by P. mirabilis stands in direct contrast to uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which readily formed intracellular bacterial communities but not luminal clusters or urinary stones. We propose that extracellular clusters are a key mechanism of P. mirabilis survival and virulence in the bladder. PMID:27044107

  13. New concepts in the treatment of ureteral calculi.

    PubMed

    Painter, D J; Keeley, F X

    2001-07-01

    The management of patients with ureteral stones remains under debate in several areas. The ability to predict spontaneous passage has improved but remains imprecise, whilst the range of therapeutic options continues to widen. Excellent results can be obtained by both shockwave lithotripsy and ureteroscopic methods, with relatively minimal complications. Routine ureteral stenting is not warranted whichever treatment is chosen. In future, directly comparative studies should be designed to incorporate quality-of-life parameters rather than just stone-free status, to improve our understanding of the effect of treatment decisions on patients.

  14. Modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi: A single-surgeon experience of 382 cases

    PubMed Central

    YAN, ZEJUN; XIE, GUOHAI; YUAN, HESHENG; CHENG, YUE

    2015-01-01

    To determine the safety and efficacy of modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi, a retrospective chart review of a single surgeon's 3-year modular flexible ureteroscopy experience was performed. All of the patients were treated with modular flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy by a single surgeon. Stone-free status was defined as no fragments or a single fragment ≤4 mm in diameter at the 3-month follow-up. The procedure number, operative time, stone-free rates, repeat usage of the multilumen catheter, and perioperative complications were documented. The present study included 215 male patients and 167 female patients, with an average age of 48.5±13.7 years (range, 17–84 years). The mean stone size was 11.5±4.1 mm (range, 4–28 mm), and the mean total stone burden was 17.5±5.7 mm (range 15–46 mm). A total of 305 patients (79.8%) had a stone burden ≤20 mm, and 77 patients (20.2%) had a stone burden >20 mm. The mean number of primary procedures was 1.3±0.2 (range, 1–3). The stone-free rate following the first and the second procedure was 73.4 and 86.9%, respectively. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 3.1±1.2 days (range, 2–6 days). The highest clearance rates were observed for proximal ureteral stones (100%) and renal pelvic stones (88.7%), whereas the lowest clearance rates were observed for lower calyx stones (76.7%) and multiple calyx stones (77.8%). The higher the initial stone burden, the lower the postoperative stone-free rate (≤20 vs. >20 mm; 89.8 vs. 75.3%). The overall complication rate was 8.1%. The results of the present study suggest that modular flexible ureteroscopy with holmium laser lithotripsy may be considered the primary method for the treatment of renal and proximal ureteral calculi in select patients, due to its acceptable efficacy, low morbidity, and relatively low maintenance costs. PMID:26622508

  15. [A Case Report of 2,8-Dihydroxyadenine Stone].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shunsuke; Haba, Tomomi; Koike, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Here we report a case of a 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (2,8-DHA) stone. A 48-year-old woman arrived at our hospital with left flank pain. She was diagnosed with a left ureteral stone. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was tried, but the left ureteral stone was radiolucent and ESWL was not effective. Transurethral ureterolithotripsy (TUL) was successful. An analysis of the stone revealed 2,8-DHA. A 2,8-DHA stone is caused by adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency. By genetic tests, she was diagnosed with APRT deficiency. PMID:26278213

  16. Acute bilateral ureteral obstruction secondary to guaifenesin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cockerill, Patrick A; de Cógáin, Mitra R; Krambeck, Amy E

    2013-10-01

    Several medications or their metabolites have been associated with urolithiasis, although overall they remain an infrequent cause of urolithiasis. Guaifenesin stones were originally reported as complexed with ephedrine, and subsequent reports have demonstrated pure guaifenesin stones, occurring after long term abuse. We report a case of a 23-year-old male who ingested a large, one time dose of guaifenesin, resulting in acute bilateral ureteral obstruction, which, to our knowledge, is the first such reported case in the literature. PMID:24128843

  17. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of the ureteral calculus--clinical results with local shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Wilbert, D M; Voges, G E; Müller, S C; Alken, P

    1987-11-01

    Second generation local shockwave lithotripsy appliances (Lithostar) were used for the treatment of upper and lower ureteral stones in 199 patients, 145 of whom had upper ureteral stones. In 78 patients the calculi were pushed back and all but one disintegrated. In 33 patients a catheter was inserted past the stone, which resulted of primary disintegration in 66%. In 19 of 34 patients (56%) in whom the stones could not be moved, primary disintegration was achieved. Distal ureteral stones were present in 54 patients and these were treated successfully by ESWL alone in 83.3%. Auxiliary measures (total 10%) included ureteroscopy, percutaneous extraction and ureterolithotomy. The results are discussed under the aspects of 'in situ' versus 'push-and-smash' procedures.

  18. Evolving Guidance on Ureteric Calculi Management in the Acute Setting.

    PubMed

    Makanjuola, Jonathan K; Rintoul-Hoad, Sophie; Bultitude, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Ureteric colic is a common presentation to acute emergency services. The gold standard test for the diagnosis of acute ureteric colic is a non-contrast computer tomography of the kidneys ureters and bladder (CT KUB). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be used as first-line analgesia, with studies showing that there is no role for steroid or phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. There is emerging evidence that a high body mass index (BMI) is a risk factor. The drugs used to facilitate stone passage are known as medical expulsive therapy (MET). The most evaluated being alpha-blockers. The Spontaneous Urinary Stone Passage Enabled by Drugs (SUSPEND) trial was designed to evaluate the use of MET (tamsulosin and nifedipine). This trial showed that there was no difference with MET and placebo for the spontaneous passage of ureteric stones. There is an emerging role for the use of primary ureteroscopy in the management of non-infective ureteric stones. PMID:26874536

  19. [Endoscopic removal of ureteral calculi in the age of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, F; Heidler, H

    1990-03-15

    High success rates of the shock wave lithotripsy in the treatment of ureteral stones are only achieved by repeated sessions and auxiliary measures. Therefore no general therapy of choice can be established. If differentiation is made according to certain criteria the endoscopic removal of ureteral calculi still plays an effective role as a significant complement to the shock wave lithotripsy. With a primary success rate of 93% for the distal ureteral stone and a rate of 1.5% for severe complications the endoscopic removal of large and small ureteral calculi indicated by a high risk situation of a vain attempt of a spontaneous stone loss is presenting a highly effective and successful matter of therapy with low risk. These indications are considered unfavourable assumptions for a primary shock wave lithotripsy. The therapeutical concept, results and complications due to ureteroscopy are presented and compared with the shock wave treatment.

  20. Serial nominations for the AWH initiative: the paradigm of seven-stone antas and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, Juan Antonio; César González-García, A.; Hoskin, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Seven-stone antas are a group of megalithic monuments that were built in the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula for a period of some one thousand years in the 4th millennium B.C. They were constructed with a pattern of orientations that certainly situate them among the oldest monuments on Earth with undisputable astronomical orientations. They were built in an extended area of the present day regions of Alentejo, in Portugal and Extremadura, in Spain. The presence of such impressive, extremely old monuments at both sides of the Spanish-Portuguese frontier and their reliability as an extremely important Case Study for the UNESCO Astronomical Heritage initiative makes of this particular set of megalithic tombs a good opportunity as a paradigm for serial nominations. We believe that seven-stone antas as a group, and especially a particularly well-preserved set of them in the area of Valencia de Alcántara (Spain) and central Alentejo (Portugal), deserve recognition within the framework of the astronomical world heritage initiative. This would certainly serve for guarantee the protection of the sites for any possible challenge in the future and for gaining a deserved recognition among society. Interestingly, at the other extreme of the Mediterranean, in the Transjordan plateau there are some of the largest and most attractive groups of dolmens of the Levant, fully comparable to the best western exemplars. The orientations of 180 dolmens were measured, allowing the study of the astronomical aspect of the megalithic phenomena in the region. In this case, EBA populations orientated their tombs according to the sky, providing a 2nd potential case for serial nomination. However, in contrast to Iberia, we should stress that it is especially troubling that specialists in the Levant are now faced with the rapid destruction of Jordan’s megalithic heritage due to the huge quarries that are expanding as a plague. It is indeed necessary to increase the interest through UNESCO

  1. Matched pair analysis of ureteroscopy vs. shock wave lithotripsy for the treatment of upper ureteric calculi.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G D; Bariol, S V; Moussa, S A; Smith, G; Tolley, D A

    2007-05-01

    There is controversy over whether shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) or ureteroscopy (URS) is the best management of ureteric calculi, especially for stones located in the upper ureter. This study compares URS and SWL management of upper ureteric stones directly for the first time using a different analysis tool, the matched pair analysis study design. This method enables meaningful comparisons to be made on a small number of matched patients, using precise like-for-like matching. Adult patients undergoing primary treatment of solitary radiopaque proximal ureteric stones were identified. Patients with stents, nephrostomies or stones at the pelvi-ureteric junction were excluded. Patients had a minimum of 3 months follow-up. Patients treated by primary URS were matched using four parameters (sex, laterality, stone size and location) to patients treated on a Dornier Compact Delta Lithotriptor. A total of 1479 patients had URS or SWL from which 27 upper ureteric stone matched pairs were identified. Three-month stone free rates were 82% for URS and 89% for SWL (McNemar's test, p=0.625). Re-treatment was required in 11% and 26% following URS and SWL respectively (p=0.219). Forty-one per cent of URS patients required an ancillary treatment, such as stent removal, compared with only 22% of SWL patients (p=0.227). Introduction of a holmium:YAG laser for use with URS improved the stone free rate for URS to 100%. Using a robust like-for-like comparison of similar patients with very similar upper ureteric stones the outcomes following SWL and URS were comparable. Choice of treatment should therefore be based on parameters such as availability of equipment, waiting times and patient preference.

  2. Site of impaction of ureteric calculi requiring surgical intervention.

    PubMed

    El-Barky, Ehab; Ali, Yusuf; Sahsah, Mohammed; Terra, Ali A; Kehinde, Elijah O

    2014-02-01

    Textbooks describe three narrowest anatomic sites in the ureter as the most likely places for ureteral calculi to lodge, these are: the pelvi-ureteric junction (PUJ), the point where the ureters cross over the iliac vessels and the ureterovesical junction (UVJ). The purpose of this study is to determine whether calculi causing ureteric obstruction and requiring surgical treatment are found mostly at these three narrowest anatomic points of the ureter. Three hundred consecutive patients with impacted ureteric calculi who required surgical intervention were studied. The location of the impacted calculus on the day of surgical intervention was categorized according to nine predetermined levels outlined in a designed diagram based on findings on non-contrast CT of kidneys, ureters and bladder. Two peaks in stone distribution in the ureters were encountered; the first was above the ischial spine in the proximal part of the lower third ureter (84 patients, 28%), while the second was at the level between L3 and L4 lumbar vertebrae (66 patients, 22%). Overall, the location of impacted calculi was as follows, 53, 34, 10 and 3% in the lower third ureter, upper third ureter, PUJ and mid ureter, respectively. This study demonstrates two peaks of calculi distribution in the ureter where ureteric calculi become impacted: the upper ureter below the PUJ and a second in the lower ureter, more proximal than the UVJ. There was an absence of the peak in stone location over the iliac vessels, that is, the mid ureter.

  3. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for urinary stone disease: clinical experience with the electromagnetic lithotriptor 'Lithostar'.

    PubMed

    Simon, J; Corbusier, A; Mendes Leal, A; Van den Bossche, M; Wespes, E; Van Regemorter, G; Schulman, C C

    1989-01-01

    400 urinary stone patients were treated with the electromagnetic lithotriptor Siemens 'Lithostar': 66.3% had renal stones and 33.7% had ureteral stones. Ninety percent of the treatments were performed under intravenous sedation only: 14.5% of the patients had more than one session. After 3 months more than 80% of the patients with a single stone smaller than 1.5 cm and 46% of the patients with stones larger than 2.5 cm were 'stone-free'.

  4. Taking the STING Out of Ureteral Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Ivan; Tan, Philip Huang Min; Clarke, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is diagnosed in ∼1% of children. The main goal of treatment is preservation of renal function by preventing recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) refractory to antibiotic therapy. Surgical treatment options include endoscopic injection or ureteral reimplantation. Subureteral Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) injection (STING) is an endoscopic treatment option no longer in common practice. Use of Teflon is no longer advised because of a number of documented complications secondary to local and distant migration of injected material. We present a case of delayed ureteral obstruction secondary to the STING procedure occurring 21 years after initial surgery and managed using a novel endoscopic method. PMID:27785466

  5. [Pain-free piezoelectric extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in gallbladder stones. Initial experiences].

    PubMed

    Ackermann, C; Meyer, B; Rothenbühler, J M; Beglinger, C; Stalder, G A; Harder, F

    1989-05-27

    Efficacy and side effects of lithotripsy of gallbladder stones with a piezoelectric lithotriptor are assessed. 16 treatments were performed in 8 patients (1-3 per patient). Patients required no premedication, analgesia, infusion or monitoring. Gallstone fragmentation was achieved with all treatments. Laboratory findings remained unchanged after treatment, with the exception of one patient with mild pancreatitis. With adjuvant oral bile acid treatment, 6 of the 8 patients were stone-free within 3 days to 3 months. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy with piezoelectric shock waves provides painless and efficient gallstone fragmentation. Repeated treatments may speed complete fragment dissolution.

  6. Role of lasertripsy in the management of ureteral calculi: experience with alexandrite laser system in 232 patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, P; Wolff, J M; Mattelaer, P; Jakse, G

    1996-08-01

    In 232 patients with ureteral stones, lasertripsy was used as primary treatment or as second-line therapy after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). In all patients, a semirigid 6.5F ureteroscope or a flexible 6F ureteroscope was used. Lithotripsy was performed employing an alexandrite laser with an energy of 50 to 65 mJ. The immediate success rate was 67.5% for stones in the upper ureter, 86.1% for those in the midureter, and 94.5% for those in the distal ureter. In 16.5% of the treatments, it was necessary to insert a double-J stent. A perforation of the ureter happened in two patients (0.9%), but no laser-related complications were seen. Stone fragmentation was not dependent on stone composition or size. Using small semirigid or flexible ureteroscopes, lasertripsy of ureteral stones is a minimally invasive treatment with an insignificant complication rate. In case of midureteral stones, our results revealed a higher immediate stone-free rate than is reported in the literature after treatment by SWL, and we can therefore recommend lasertripsy as primary treatment. For upper ureteral stones, lasertripsy can be recommended as a helpful auxillary procedure. Furthermore, in cases of distal ureteral stones, lasertripsy challenges SWL as the primary treatment.

  7. Damage attributable to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and deposition of calcium oxalate crystals on ureteral stents.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, R; Suzuki, K; Tsugawa, R

    1997-04-01

    Ureteral stents have been widely used during and after SWL depending on the size of the stones and the condition of the urinary tracts. The use of stents can help to reduce complications and contributes to stone passage. However, some reports note complications that were attributed to indwelling ureteral stents. We attended to the role of obstruction of ureteral stents in those complications. The aim of this study was to analyze factors that influence ureteral stent obstruction and damage caused by SWL. Crystal deposition and the damage by SWL were examined in all ureteral stents by the use of continuous flow system and were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The degree of crystal deposition and damage differed depending on the individual stent. The material properties of the stent surface are the major factor influencing crystal deposition and the degree of damage by SWL. The indications for ureteral stenting must be considered in each case, because the routine use of ureteral stents has a possibility to increase complications.

  8. Unenhanced CT for the evaluation of acute ureteric colic: the essential pictorial guide.

    PubMed

    Kennish, Steven J; Wah, Tze M; Irving, Henry C

    2010-07-01

    Acute ureteric colic is a common emergency, often dealt with by the emergency physician or general practitioner and referred on to the urologist. Unenhanced CT of the kidneys, ureters and bladder (CTKUB) is the 'gold standard' imaging investigation for establishing a diagnosis and guiding management. An appreciation of the CTKUB signs, which support or refute a diagnosis of ureteric colic, is highly valuable to the clinician when making a urological referral, and to the urologist, who must make appropriate management plans. All salient diagnostic and supportive features of ureteric colic are carefully illustrated, as are important radiological mimics, with the objectives of educating and informing the non-radiologist. Ready access to the picture archive and communication system (PACS) allows all specialists involved to interpret the radiological report with the benefit of images. A stone within the ureter may not always be readily apparent. Soft tissue rim sign around a calcific focus is an important indicator of a ureteric stone, whereas a comet tail sign suggests a phlebolith (a calcified venous thrombosis), a radiological mimic of a ureteric stone. Numerous secondary signs of ureteric obstruction may be present including hydronephrosis and perinephric stranding, and can help to confirm the diagnosis. The relative diagnostic weighting of signs is discussed, and a checklist is provided to assist with interpretation. Unexpected alternative radiological diagnoses are also illustrated, which may have significant management consequences necessitating specialist referral. PMID:20634253

  9. Unenhanced CT for the evaluation of acute ureteric colic: the essential pictorial guide.

    PubMed

    Kennish, Steven J; Wah, Tze M; Irving, Henry C

    2010-07-01

    Acute ureteric colic is a common emergency, often dealt with by the emergency physician or general practitioner and referred on to the urologist. Unenhanced CT of the kidneys, ureters and bladder (CTKUB) is the 'gold standard' imaging investigation for establishing a diagnosis and guiding management. An appreciation of the CTKUB signs, which support or refute a diagnosis of ureteric colic, is highly valuable to the clinician when making a urological referral, and to the urologist, who must make appropriate management plans. All salient diagnostic and supportive features of ureteric colic are carefully illustrated, as are important radiological mimics, with the objectives of educating and informing the non-radiologist. Ready access to the picture archive and communication system (PACS) allows all specialists involved to interpret the radiological report with the benefit of images. A stone within the ureter may not always be readily apparent. Soft tissue rim sign around a calcific focus is an important indicator of a ureteric stone, whereas a comet tail sign suggests a phlebolith (a calcified venous thrombosis), a radiological mimic of a ureteric stone. Numerous secondary signs of ureteric obstruction may be present including hydronephrosis and perinephric stranding, and can help to confirm the diagnosis. The relative diagnostic weighting of signs is discussed, and a checklist is provided to assist with interpretation. Unexpected alternative radiological diagnoses are also illustrated, which may have significant management consequences necessitating specialist referral.

  10. The treatment of ureteric calculi before and after the introduction of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Gade, J; Holtveg, H; Nielsen, O S; Rasmussen, O V

    1995-09-01

    Indications and treatment results of ureteric calculi one year before and one year after the introduction of ESWL were analysed in 169 consecutive patients. Sex, age, former stone operation, stone localisation and stone size were not significantly different in the two groups. Before ESW1 47% of the patients received treatment against 54% after the introduction (p > 0.3). There was no tendency towards treatment of smaller calculi. Expectedly, the number of endoscopies and ureterolithotomies was significantly reduced (p < 0.05). The treatment period (from first contact till final control) was longer with ESWL, but not significantly. Judged from the length of the hospital stay there was no major economic benefit from ESWL. In conclusion, ESWL with a second generation lithotriptor is suitable for in situ treatment of ureteric calculi. It should be first choice for ureteric calculi.

  11. Procalcitonin determined at emergency department as an early indicator of progression to septic shock in patient with sepsis associated with ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young Hwii; Ji, Yoon Seob; Park, Sin-Youl; Kim, Su Jin; Song, Phil Hyun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: To investigate the role of initial procalcitonin (PCT) level as an early predictor of septic shock for the patient with sepsis induced by acute pyelonephritis (APN) secondary to ureteral calculi. Materials and Methods: The data from 49 consecutive patients who met criteria of sepsis due to APN following ureteral stone were collected and divided into two groups: with (n=15) or without (n=34) septic shock. The clinical variables including PCT level for this outcome were retrospectively compared by univariate analysis, followed by multivariable logistic regression model. Results: All subjects had hydronephrosis, and were hospitalized with the mean of 11.8 days (3–42 days). The mean size of the ureteral stones was 7.5mm (3–30mm), and 57% were located in upper ureter. At univariate analysis, patients with septic shock were significantly older, a higher proportion had hypertension, lower platelet count and serum albumin level, higher CRP and PCT level, and higher positive blood culture rate. Multivariate models indicated that lower platelet count and higher PCT level are independent risk factors (p=0.043 and 0.046, respectively). In ROC curve, the AUC was significantly wider in PCT (0.929), compared with the platelet count (0.822, p=0.004). At the cut-off of 0.52ng/mL, the sensitivity and specificity were 86.7% and 85.3%. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated elevated initial PCT levels as an early independent predictor to progress into septic shock in patients with sepsis associated with ureteral calculi. PMID:27256181

  12. Activity, Energy Intake, Obesity, and the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones in Postmenopausal Women: A Report from the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Thomas; Shara, Nawar M.; Wang, Hong; Hsi, Ryan S.; Orchard, Tonya; Kahn, Arnold J.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Miller, Joe; Reiner, Alex P.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a strong risk factor for nephrolithiasis, but the role of physical activity and caloric intake remains poorly understood. We evaluated this relationship in 84,225 women with no history of stones as part of the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study, a longitudinal, prospective cohort of postmenopausal women enrolled from 1993 to 1998 with 8 years’ median follow-up. The independent association of physical activity (metabolic equivalents [METs]/wk), calibrated dietary energy intake, and body mass index (BMI) with incident kidney stone development was evaluated after adjustment for nephrolithiasis risk factors. Activity intensity was evaluated in stratified analyses. Compared with the risk in inactive women, the risk of incident stones decreased by 16% in women with the lowest physical activity level (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.84; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.74 to 0.97). As activity increased, the risk of incident stones continued to decline until plateauing at a decrease of approximately 31% for activity levels ≥10 METs/wk (aHR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.79). Intensity of activity was not associated with stone formation. As dietary energy intake increased, the risk of incident stones increased by up to 42% (aHR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.98). However, intake <1800 kcal/d did not protect against stone formation. Higher BMI category was associated with increased risk of incident stones. In summary, physical activity may reduce the risk of incident kidney stones in postmenopausal women independent of caloric intake and BMI, primarily because of the amount of activity rather than exercise intensity. Higher caloric intake further increases the risk of incident stones. PMID:24335976

  13. Ureteroscopy and holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy: an emerging definitive management strategy for symptomatic ureteral calculi in pregnancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watterson, James D.; Girvan, Andrew R.; Beiko, Darren T.; Nott, Linda; Wollin, Timothy A.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Denstedt, John D.

    2003-06-01

    Objectives: Symptomatic urolithiasis in pregnancy that does not respond to conservative measures has traditionally been managed with ureteral stent insertion or percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN). Holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser lithotripsy using state-of-the-art ureteroscopes represents an emerging strategy for definitive stone management in pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to review the results of holmium laser lithotripsy in a cohort of patients who presented with symptomatic urolithiasis in pregnancy. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted at 2 tertiary stone centers from January 1996 to August 2001 to identify pregnant patients who were treated with ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy for symptomatic urolithiasis or encrusted stents. Eight patients with a total of 10 symptomatic ureteral calculi and 2 encrusted ureteral stents were treated. Mean gestational age at presentation was 22 weeks. Mean stone size was 8.1 mm. Stones were located in the proximal ureter/ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) (3), mid ureter (1), and distal ureter (6). Results: Complete stone fragmentation and/or removal of encrusted ureteral stents were achieved in all patients using the holmium:YAG laser. The overall procedural success rate was 91%. The overall stone-free rate was 89%. No obstetrical or urological complications were encountered. Conclusions: Ureteroscopy and holmium laser lithotripsy can be performed safely in all stages of pregnancy providing definitive management of symptomatic ureteral calculi. The procedure can be done with minimal or no fluoroscopy and avoids the undesirable features of stents or nephrostomy tubes.

  14. An Initial Attack of Urinary Stone Disease Is Associated with an Increased Risk of Developing New-Onset Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Chih-Yu; Wu, Jr-Hau; Lin, Fei-Hung; Hsu Chen, Cheng; Chang, Chin-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Background The neurotransmitter pathways in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and urinary stone attacks are both related to serotonin, and each disease may be influenced by viscero-visceral hyperalgesia. However, the relationship between urinary tract stone disease and IBS has never been addressed. We aimed to investigate the risk of suffering new-onset IBS after an initial urinary stone attack using a nationwide database. Methods A study group enrolled a total of 13,254 patients who were diagnosed with an initial urinary stone attack; a comparison group recruited 39,762 matched non-urinary stone participants during 2003 and 2007. We followed each patient for 3 years to determine new-onset IBS. We also used Cox proportional hazards models to analyze the risk of IBS between the study and comparison groups after modified by demographics, residence, patient characteristics and personal histories. Results The occurrence rates of IBS were 3.3% (n = 440) and 2.6% (n = 1,034) respectively in the study and comparison groups. A covariate-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of IBS in the study group that was 1.28 times greater (HR = 1.29, 95% CI, 1.15–1.44) than that in the comparison group was showed in the stratified Cox proportional analysis. The adjusted HRs of IBS did not decrease after considering demographics and past histories. The majority of IBS (30.5%) occurred within the first 6 months after the stone attack. Conclusion Patients with an initial urinary stone attack are at increased risk of developing new-onset IBS. The HRs of IBS did not decrease even after adjusting for patient demographics and past histories. Most importantly, 30.5% of IBS occurred within the first 6 months after the urinary stone attack. PMID:27337114

  15. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma in an Adolescent Male Presenting as Ureteral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Christopher D.; McAlvany, Kelly L.; Zingula, Shannon N.; Kramer, Stephen A.; Granberg, Candace F.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoma may affect the ureter in cases of retroperitoneal involvement. We present a case of an adolescent male found to have non-Hodgkin lymphoma initially presenting as ureteral stricture evident on imaging. He was treated and responded to multiagent chemotherapy with resolution of both the lymphoma and the ureteral stricture. Although rare, non-Hodgkin lymphoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of pediatric patients with noncalculous, idiopathic ureteral strictures. PMID:25093138

  16. Effects of PDE5 Inhibitors and sGC Stimulators in a Rat Model of Artificial Ureteral Calculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sandner, Peter; Tinel, Hanna; Affaitati, Giannapia; Costantini, Raffaele; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2015-01-01

    Urinary colics from calculosis are frequent and intense forms of pain whose current pharmacological treatment remains unsatisfactory. New and more effective drugs are needed to control symptoms and improve stone expulsion. Recent evidence suggested that the Nitric Oxide (NO) / cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) / phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) system may contribute to ureteral motility influencing stone expulsion. We investigated if PDE5 inhibitors and sGC stimulators influence ureteral contractility, pain behaviour and stone expulsion in a rat model of ureteral calculosis. We investigated: a)the sex-specific PDE5 distribution in the rat ureter; b)the functional in vitro effects of vardenafil and sildenafil (PDE5 inhibitors) and BAY41-2272 (sGC stimulator) on induced ureteral contractility in rats and c)the in vivo effectiveness of vardenafil and BAY41-2272, alone and combined with ketoprofen, vs hyoscine-N-butylbromide alone or combined with ketoprofen, on behavioural pain indicators and stone expulsion in rats with artificial calculosis in one ureter. PDE5 was abundantly expressed in male and female rats’ ureter. In vitro, both vardenafil and BAY41-2272 significantly relaxed pre-contracted ureteral strips. In vivo, all compounds significantly reduced number and global duration of “ureteral crises” and post-stone lumbar muscle hyperalgesia in calculosis rats. The highest level of reduction of the pain behaviour was observed with BAY41-2272 among all spasmolytics administered alone, and with the combination of ketoprofen with BAY41-2272. The percentage of stone expulsion was maximal in the ketoprofen+BAY41-2272 group. The NO/cGMP/PDE5 pathway is involved in the regulation of ureteral contractility and pain behaviour in urinary calculosis. PDE5 inhibitors and sGC stimulators could become a potent new option for treatment of urinary colic pain. PMID:26509272

  17. Effects of PDE5 Inhibitors and sGC Stimulators in a Rat Model of Artificial Ureteral Calculosis.

    PubMed

    Sandner, Peter; Tinel, Hanna; Affaitati, Giannapia; Costantini, Raffaele; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2015-01-01

    Urinary colics from calculosis are frequent and intense forms of pain whose current pharmacological treatment remains unsatisfactory. New and more effective drugs are needed to control symptoms and improve stone expulsion. Recent evidence suggested that the Nitric Oxide (NO) / cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)/phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) system may contribute to ureteral motility influencing stone expulsion. We investigated if PDE5 inhibitors and sGC stimulators influence ureteral contractility, pain behaviour and stone expulsion in a rat model of ureteral calculosis. We investigated: a) the sex-specific PDE5 distribution in the rat ureter; b) the functional in vitro effects of vardenafil and sildenafil (PDE5 inhibitors) and BAY41-2272 (sGC stimulator) on induced ureteral contractility in rats and c) the in vivo effectiveness of vardenafil and BAY41-2272, alone and combined with ketoprofen, vs hyoscine-N-butylbromide alone or combined with ketoprofen, on behavioural pain indicators and stone expulsion in rats with artificial calculosis in one ureter. PDE5 was abundantly expressed in male and female rats' ureter. In vitro, both vardenafil and BAY41-2272 significantly relaxed pre-contracted ureteral strips. In vivo, all compounds significantly reduced number and global duration of "ureteral crises" and post-stone lumbar muscle hyperalgesia in calculosis rats. The highest level of reduction of the pain behaviour was observed with BAY41-2272 among all spasmolytics administered alone, and with the combination of ketoprofen with BAY41-2272. The percentage of stone expulsion was maximal in the ketoprofen+BAY41-2272 group. The NO/cGMP/PDE5 pathway is involved in the regulation of ureteral contractility and pain behaviour in urinary calculosis. PDE5 inhibitors and sGC stimulators could become a potent new option for treatment of urinary colic pain.

  18. Ureteric re-implant for the strictured renal allograft: How I do it.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Thomas; Kroczak, Tadeuz; Huang, Chun; Koulack, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    Ureteric stricture is the most common urologic complication following renal transplantation. Initial treatment should consist of endoscopic management, however patients that fail endoscopic management or strictures that are not amendable to endoscopic management are appropriate candidates for open surgical repair. In this manuscript we describe the steps and surgical technique we use to manage complicated ureteric strictures refractory to endoscopic management at our center. Ureteric re-implant with the use of a Boari flap is a safe, effective and definitive option for repair of ureteric strictures following renal transplantation. This approach provides excellent long term outcomes in terms of renal function preservation and negligible recurrence rates.

  19. [Role of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy without anesthesia in the treatment of ureteral calculi].

    PubMed

    Miller, K; Sauter, T; Bachor, R; Hautmann, R

    1989-01-01

    With anesthesia-free lithotripsy recently being available, the discussion upon the treatment of choice of ureteral calculi has been renewed: is a preliminary retrograde manipulation still preferable for proximal calculi? Is ureteroscopy the better treatment for stones in the lower ureter? The retrospective evaluation of our patients with ureteral calculi (January-August 1988) failed to reveal a significantly compromised efficiency with the modified HM-3 lithotripter (40 nF. generator, 17 cm. ellipsoid): 70% (including 11% with repeated sessions) of the patients with proximal stones and 90% (including 28% with repeated sessions) of the patients with distal calculi were successfully treated in situ without the need for anesthesia, auxiliary measures, or ureteroscopy. These results do not substantially differ from those obtained with the old HM-3 in 1987, and confirm, that the majority of patients with ureteral calculi can bypass the discomfort of retrograde manipulation or the risks of ureteroscopy.

  20. Endoscopic management of upper urinary tract stones.

    PubMed

    Payne, S R; Ford, T F; Wickham, J E

    1985-10-01

    Since 1981, 525 renal and ureteric calculi have been removed with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCN) or transurethral ureteroscopy as the primary modalities of therapy. Successful extraction of the stone at the first attempt was achieved in 92 per cent of cases by PCN and 70 per cent of cases by ureteroscopy, whilst further endoscopic surgery improved the overall success rates to 98 per cent and to 80 per cent respectively. Complication rates from these procedures have both been low as has the morbidity, with most patients leaving hospital within 4 days and returning to work within 2 weeks. The successful development of endoscopic lithotomy and the use of in situ destruction techniques has meant that we now reserve open surgery for difficult multibranched staghorn calculi and ureteric stones embedded in the urothelium. With the advent of extracorporeally generated shockwave lithotripsy it is likely that even these types of stone will be amenable to minimally invasive procedures.

  1. Kidney stones during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Semins, Michelle J; Matlaga, Brian R

    2014-03-01

    Kidney stones affect 10% of people at some point in their lives and, for some unfortunate women, this happens during pregnancy. Pregnancy is a complex state and both physiological and mechanical changes alter risk factors for kidney stone formation. When a pregnant woman develops acute nephrolithiasis, the situation is more complicated than in nonpregnant women. Imaging limitations and treatment restrictions mean that special diagnostic and management algorithms are needed upon presentation. Ultrasonography remains the gold-standard first-line diagnostic imaging modality for kidney stones during pregnancy but several second-line alternatives exist. Acute renal colic during pregnancy is associated with risks to both mother and fetus. As such, these patients need to be handled with special attention. First-line management is generally conservative (trial of passage and pain management) and is associated with a high rate of stone passage. Presentation of obstructive nephrolithiasis with associated infection represents a unique and serious clinical situation requiring immediate drainage. If infection is not present and conservative management fails, ureteroscopy can be offered if clinically appropriate, but, in some circumstances, temporary drainage with ureteral stent or nephrostomy tube might be indicated. Shockwave lithotripsy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy are contraindicated during pregnancy.

  2. Impact of ureteric stent on outcome of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: A propensity score analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gołąb, Adam; Słojewski, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is one of the most frequently performed procedures in patients with urolithiasis. For ureter-localized stones, SWL is often preceded by a double J stent insertion. However, fear of serious complications, including sepsis associated with stents, is often expressed. The following study assessed the impact of stent insertions on the results of SWL in patients with ureteric stones. Material and methods The study group consisted of 411 ureteric stone patients who were treated with SWL from January 2010 to December 2014. In 60 cases, treatment was preceded by ureteric stent insertion. A propensity scoring system was used to pair non-stented patients with the stented group. Success rates were assessed and compared using the chi-squared test. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the influence of particular variables on the stone-free rate. Results The overall success rate was 82.2%. After matching, the success rate of the stented group was not significantly different from the control group (85.0% vs. 83.3% respectively, p = 0.80). The mean number of sessions was higher in the stented group (1.88 per patient). Stones located in the lower part of the ureter have the greatest chance of being successfully treated. Conclusions The double J stent has no influence on the outcome of SWL treatment. In view of the greater likelihood of having additional sessions, this approach should be reserved for selected cases. PMID:27551556

  3. The treatment of the reno-ureteral calculi by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL).

    PubMed

    Ceban, E

    2012-06-12

    Urolithiasis has an important role in the structure of urological pathology, due to its high incidence, frequency of recurrence and complications it might cause. There are many methods of treatment for kidney stones described in the scientific literature as conservative, surgical, laparoscopic, endoscopic, and ESWL. In this study, we have analyzed the ESWL method of treatment of reno-ureteral stones.There are still many controversies about the effectiveness of different models of lithotripters but the lithotripter type Modulith SLK Storz Medical (Germany) used in our clinic has proved to be very effective. ESWL is currently the first-line treatment for the majority of kidney and ureteral stones, which are up to 20 mm in diameter.

  4. Preventing stone retropulsion during intracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Elashry, Osama M; Tawfik, Ahmad M

    2012-12-01

    Several studies of ureteroscopic treatment for ureteral stones have reported that most stone clearance failures can be attributed to stone fragment retropulsion. Stone retropulsion can result in increased operative time and cost-resulting from the need to change from the semi-rigid ureteroscope to a flexible instrument to chase migrated calculi-and additional procedures to treat residual migrated fragments are often required. The degree of migration depends mainly on the energy source used for lithotripsy; pneumatic and electrohydraulic lithotripters are associated with a greater degree of retropulsion than lasers. Different stone-trapping strategies and devices have been developed to minimize stone migration. Novel devices include the Lithovac(®) suction device, the Passport(™) balloon, the Stone Cone(™), the PercSys Accordion(®), the NTrap(®), and stone baskets such as the LithoCatch(™), the Parachute(™), and the Escape(®). Some authors have also reported on the use of lubricating jelly and BackStop(®) gel (a reverse thermosensitive polymeric plug); these devices are instilled proximal to the stone prior to the application of kinetic energy in order to prevent retrograde stone migration.

  5. [ESWL treatment of urinary stones at an outpatient clinic].

    PubMed

    Takashima, M; Motoi, I; Hisazumi, H

    1992-12-01

    A total of 107 patients (age: mean 51.6, range 17-85, sex: male 71, female 36) with urinary stones in 112 renoureteral units were subjected to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) in situ using an EDAP LT-01 at an outpatient clinic between June 1990 and July 1991. All patients were given an analgesic suppository before ESWL. One ESWL session required 20-60 minutes with a repetition rate of 1.25 Hz, 2.5 Hz or 5 Hz. The effectiveness of the treatment was evaluated in 94 cases consisting of 50 renal units (R1 2, R2 46, R3 2) and 44 ureteral units (U1 16, U2 1, U3 27) three months after the final session according to the criteria reported by Sonoda. Of the 94 cases, 80 cases (85.1%) were stone free and 12 cases (12.8%) had residual fragments of less than 4 mm in diameter. Macroscopic hematuria was seen in all cases. Fever or colicky pain occurred in 3 cases. Outpatient ESWL using the EDAP LT-01 is considered to be safe and efficient for the initial treatment of urinary stones.

  6. History of Ureteral Stenting Negatively Affects the Outcomes of Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy. Results of a Matched-pair Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sfoungaristos, Stavros; Gofrit, Ofer N; Pode, Dov; Landau, Ezekiel H; Yutkin, Vladimir; Latke, Arie; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of ureteral stenting history to the outcomes of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, we retrospectively analysed patients who underwent shockwave lithotripsy with Dornier Gemini lithotripter between September 2010 and August 2012. Forty seven patients (group A) who had a double J stent which was removed just before the procedure were matched-paired with another 47 patients (group B) who underwent shockwave lithotripsy having no stent history. The correlation between ureteral stenting history and stone-free rates was assessed. Stone-free rates were 68.1% and 87.2% for patients of group A and B, respectively (p=0.026). Postoperative complications were not different between groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that stone size (p=0.007), stone location (p=0.044) and history of ureteral stenting (p=0.046) were independent predictors for stone clearance after shockwave lithotripsy. Ureteral stents adversely affect shockwave lithotripsy outcome, even if they are removed before the procedure. Stenting history should divert treatment plan towards intracorporeal lithotripsy.

  7. History of Ureteral Stenting Negatively Affects the Outcomes of Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy. Results of a Matched-pair Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sfoungaristos, Stavros; Gofrit, Ofer N; Pode, Dov; Landau, Ezekiel H; Yutkin, Vladimir; Latke, Arie; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of ureteral stenting history to the outcomes of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, we retrospectively analysed patients who underwent shockwave lithotripsy with Dornier Gemini lithotripter between September 2010 and August 2012. Forty seven patients (group A) who had a double J stent which was removed just before the procedure were matched-paired with another 47 patients (group B) who underwent shockwave lithotripsy having no stent history. The correlation between ureteral stenting history and stone-free rates was assessed. Stone-free rates were 68.1% and 87.2% for patients of group A and B, respectively (p=0.026). Postoperative complications were not different between groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that stone size (p=0.007), stone location (p=0.044) and history of ureteral stenting (p=0.046) were independent predictors for stone clearance after shockwave lithotripsy. Ureteral stents adversely affect shockwave lithotripsy outcome, even if they are removed before the procedure. Stenting history should divert treatment plan towards intracorporeal lithotripsy. PMID:26445394

  8. Initial presentation in psychiatry emergency room led to diagnosis of many urinary bladder stones in a male patient.

    PubMed

    El-Hennawy, Adel S; Nagaraja, Aarathi; Mahmood, Aza K

    2013-01-01

    The first case of man who presented to psychiatry emergency room for evaluation of abnormal behavior because of urinary stones was reported. Careful evaluation of patient led to a diagnosis of 37 urinary bladder stones in an Egyptian man with obstructive uropathy and metabolic defects in the form of hyperoxaluria and hypocitraturia. Knowledge of the differential diagnosis of metabolic defects can lead to successful outcome in preventing reformation of urinary tract stones after surgery. A 61-year-old Egyptian man presented to psychiatry emergency room because he was found lying on floor in bathroom to urinate by his wife who thought her husband needed psychiatric evaluation. Patient gave history of frequent urination and dysuria on and off for 3 years. In the last 3 months before his presentation to emergency room, he got into a habit of lying down on his left side when he went to bathroom to urinate because it was easier for him to pass urine. Renal consultation requested because of presence of red blood cells in urinalysis. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed bilateral hydronephrosis and multiple bladder stones. Twenty-four-hour urine collection showed low urinary citrate and high oxalate. Patient underwent open vesicolithotomy and removal of 36 stones. Stone analysis showed 75% uric acid and 25% calcium oxalate. Patient did very well after surgery, and 1 month later, he underwent transuretheral resection of prostate without any complications. Now patient has no difficulty passing urine and he has no recent attack of urinary tract infection. Knowledge of the differential diagnosis of metabolic defects in men with urinary bladder stones would hopefully provide clinicians with the proper diagnostic tools to more specifically treat such patients with improved success in preventing reformation of urinary tract stones after surgery.

  9. An Extremely Rare Complication of Ureteral Pigtail Stent Placement: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Arab, Davood; Ardestani Zadeh, Arash; Eskandarian, Rahimeh; Asaadi, Mehrshad; Ghods, Kamran

    2016-05-01

    Double-J (DJ) stents are the main tools used in urological practice for prevention and treatment of obstruction. Stenting is also mandatory after complicated ureteroscopy or TUL (Transureteral Lithotripsy). Known complications are upper migration of DJ stents into the kidney and lower migration to the bladder. In a man with an impacted right lower ureteral stone, a DJ stent was placed because the ureteroscope was not passed from an intramural ureter. We reported a very rare complication of DJ ureteral stent placement with intravascular migration to the pulmonary arteries, which was removed percutaneously through the right femoral vein under fluoroscopic guidance. PMID:27570754

  10. The ureteric bud epithelium: Morphogenesis and roles in metanephric kidney patterning

    PubMed Central

    Nagalakshmi, Vidya K.; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian metanephric kidney is composed of two epithelial components –the collecting duct system and the nephron epithelium– that differentiate from two different tissues –the ureteric bud epithelium and the nephron progenitors, respectively– of intermediate mesoderm origin. The collecting duct system is generated through reiterative ureteric bud branching morphogenesis whereas the nephron epithelium is formed in a process termed nephrogenesis, which is initiated with the mesenchymal-epithelial transition of the nephron progenitors. Ureteric bud branching morphogenesis is regulated by nephron progenitors, and in return the ureteric bud epithelium regulates nephrogenesis. The metanephric kidney is also physiologically divided along the cortico-medullary axis into subcompartments that are enriched with specific segments of these two epithelial structures. Here we provide an overview of the major molecular and cellular processes underlying the morphogenesis and patterning of the ureteric bud epithelium and its roles in the cortical-medullary patterning of the metanephric kidney. PMID:25783232

  11. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  12. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  13. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  14. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  15. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral...

  16. Experience with 395 extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in the treatment of renal and ureteric calculi.

    PubMed

    Tan, H M; Cheung, H S

    1990-06-01

    Three hundred and ninety five cases in 358 consecutive patients (male-232, female-126) with renal and ureteric stones were treated with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) from March to November 1988. They either had ESWL alone, or in combination with stone manipulation or debulking percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL). Seventy five percent of the stones were found in the pelvicalyceal system and 25% in the ureter. Seventy-six percent of the stones were less than 25mm size. Two hundred and ninety (79%) cases were followed up to three months. Two hundred and forty nine (85.9%) cases were stone free and 36 (12.4%) had residual sand less than 3mm size. Five (1.7%) cases failed to fragment with ESWL monotherapy and were salvaged by either percutaneous or ureteroscopic intervention. None of the cases required any open surgery intervention.

  17. [Calyceal stones].

    PubMed

    Netsch, C; Gross, A J

    2013-08-01

    The natural course of untreated, asymptomatic calyceal calculi has not yet been clearly defined regarding disease progression and risk of surgical interventions. The decision for an active treatment of calyceal calculi is based on stone composition, stone size and symptoms. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has a low complication rate and is recommended by the current guidelines of the German (DGU) and European (EAU) Associations of Urology as a first-line therapy for the treatment of calyceal stones <2 cm in diameter. However, immediate removal of stones is not achieved with ESWL. The primary stone-free rates (SFR) after ESWL depend on stone location and stone composition and can show remarkable differences. Minimally invasive procedures, such as percutaneous nephrolitholapaxy and ureteroscopy are alternatives for the treatment of calyceal stones which have low morbidity and high primary SFR when performed in centres of excellence.

  18. Bladder stones

    MedlinePlus

    Stones - bladder; Urinary tract stones; Bladder calculi ... Benway BM, Bhayani SM. Lower urinary tract calculi. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 89. Sharma R, Dill CE, Gelman DY. Urinary ...

  19. Kidney stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... for uric acid stones) Antibiotics (for struvite stones) Diuretics (water pills) Phosphate solutions Sodium bicarbonate or sodium citrate Water pills (thiazide diuretics) Tamsulosin to relax the ureter and help the ...

  20. Changes in stone composition over two decades: evaluation of over 10,000 stone analyses.

    PubMed

    Moses, Rachel; Pais, Vernon M; Ursiny, Michal; Prien, Edwin L; Miller, Nicole; Eisner, Brian H

    2015-04-01

    To examine the changes in stone composition from 1990 to 2010. A retrospective review was performed of all renal and ureteral stones submitted from the state of Massachusetts to a single laboratory (Laboratory for Stone Research, Newton, MA) for the years 1990 and 2010. Stone composition was determined by infrared spectroscopy and/or polarizing microscopy. A total of 11,099 stones were evaluated (56.7% from 1990, 43.3% from 2010). From 1990 to 2010, the percentage of stones from females (i.e., female/male ratio) increased significantly (29.8% in 1990 to 39.1% in 2010, p < 0.001). Among women, from 1990 to 2010, there was a significant increase in stones which were >50% uric acid (7.6-10.2%, p < 0.005) and a significant decrease in struvite stones (7.8-3.0%, p < 0.001). Among women with calcium stones, the % apatite per stone decreased significantly (20.0 vs. 11.7%, p < 0.001). Among men, there were no changes in stones which were majority uric acid (11.7-10.8%, p = 0.2). Among men with calcium stones, the % apatite per stone increased significantly (9.8 vs. 12.5%, p < 0.001). Males also demonstrated a significant increase in both cystine (0.1-0.6%, p < 0.001) and struvite stones (2.8-3.7%, p = 0.02). The epidemiology of stone disease continues to evolve and appears to vary according to gender. While some of these findings may be related to population changes in body mass index and obesity, the etiology of others remains unclear. PMID:25689875

  1. High-energy v low-energy shockwave lithotripsy in treatment of ureteral calculi.

    PubMed

    Mathes, G L; Mathes, L T

    1997-10-01

    The size of the crater formed in a urinary calculus subjected to shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is directly proportional to the energy delivered to the stone surface. This study compared the effect of high and low energy levels on the outcomes of ureteral SWL. Ureteral calculi (N = 336) were treated with the conventional low-energy Siemens Lithostar and 62 with the higher-energy (1.02 v 0.5 mJ/mm2) modification of the Lithostar, the Siemens Shock Tube C. Stone locations included all regions of the ureter. The average stone treated with the standard Lithostar measured 8.1 mm in diameter and received 5461 shockwaves (treatment time 45 minutes) at 17.2 kV (range 14.5-19.0 kV). The stone-free rate was 72%, with stents being used in 16% of patients and a retreatment rate of 9%. The typical stone treated with Shock Tube C was 10.4 mm in diameter and received 3528 shockwaves (treatment time 30 minutes) at an average energy setting of 4.1 (range 1.5-8.0). The stone-free rate was 75%, with stents being used in 9.8% of cases, and a retreatment rate of only 1.6% (P < 0.003). In this study, Shock Tube C yielded stone-free rates equivalent to those of the conventional machine. However, the number of shockwaves, treatment time, and retreatment rate were significantly lower with the new shock tube. High-energy lithotripsy is more efficient than low-energy treatment of ureteral calculi.

  2. ESWL and the future of stone management.

    PubMed

    Eisenberger, F; Schmidt, A

    1993-01-01

    Based on optimal efficacy regarding disintegration and stone clearance, combined with minimal invasiveness, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) represents the first choice therapy for urolithiasis. Further developments in ESWL have related more to economic aspects than to improvement of disintegration efficacy or reduction of side effects. Routine indications for ESWL are well known and widely accepted. Its limitations are also well established: silent calyceal stones, calyceal diverticula stones, nephrolithiasis in horse-shoe kidneys, medullary sponge kidney, and residual fragments after ESWL. Although endourology provides new, less invasive and traumatic means of stone retrieval or disintegration, including laser lithotripsy, small ureteroscopes and actively deflectable uretero- and pyeloscopes, indications for an aggressive approach in such cases are limited to those who are symptomatic. In the case of distal ureteral calculi ureteroscopy in traureteral laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy open up new and interesting possibilities for the future.

  3. [TRANSURETHRAL URETEROLITHOTRIPSY FOR UPPER URINARY TRACT STONE IN SMALL CHILDREN WEIGHNING AROUND 10KG].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yoko; Moriya, Kimihiko; Mitsui, Takahiko; Kitta, Takeya; Kanno, Yukiko; Kon, Masafumi; Shinohara, Nobuo

    2015-10-01

    Management strategy for upper urinary tract calculi in small children is still a matter controversial. We report successful management of ureteral stone with transurethral ureterolithotripsy (TUL) in 2 boys weighing around 10 kg. Case 1: A 2-year-old boy (78 cm in height, 9.6 kg in weight), who received hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone for the treatment of 21-hydroxylase deficiency, was referred to our hospital with a right 9-mm lower ureteral stone. For TUL, a 7.5 Fr rigid cystoscope was introduced into the ureter directly after dilation of the ureteral orifice. By using Holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy, complete stone evacuation was achieved. Stone analysis showed the composition of calcium phosphate and calcium oxalate. Case 2: A 1-year-old boy (80 cm in height, 10.5 kg in weight) with neurofibromatosis type 1 was referred to our hospital with a left 7.5-mm ureteral stone at the ureteropelvic junction. TUL was performed using a 4.5 F rigid ureteroscope and Holmium:YAG laser. No residual stone was identified. Stone analysis showed the composition of calcium oxalate. TUL is a safe and feasible option for small children, even in boys weighing approximately 10 kg. PMID:26717789

  4. The impact of extracorporeal piezoelectric lithotripsy on the management of ureteric calculi: an audit.

    PubMed

    Parr, N J; Ritchie, A W; Moussa, S A; Tolley, D A

    1991-01-01

    The presentation and management of 153 patients with ureteric calculi requiring active treatment over a 12-month period were reviewed; 74% of patients had primary ureteric calculi and 26% had ureteric calculi composed of fragments resulting from extracorporeal piezoelectric shockwave lithotripsy (EPL) to renal calculi; 32 patients (21%) had more than 1 calculus or a steinstrasse. The primary procedures included were in situ EPL (n = 54), push-bang (44), retrograde ureteroscopy (40), Dormia basket extraction (6), push-pull (1), antegrade ureteroscopy (1) and combinations of these (7). The success of the primary procedure could not be predicted from stone size, site or duration in the ureter, but upper tract dilatation was significantly less (p less than 0.01) in the successful group. The overall success rate for complete stone extraction was 97%, but 54 patients (35%) required more than 1 procedure to achieve this. In situ EPL and push-bang, as either primary or secondary procedures, were successful in treating 79 patients (52%); 2 patients required ureterolithotomy (1.3%). The overall complication rate was 18%. Since EPL is only successful in treating approximately half of ureteric calculi, a range of other treatments should be available to maintain a low rate of open surgery.

  5. Spontaneous retrograde migration of ureterovesical junction stone to the kidney; first ever reported case in the English literature in human.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ziauddin; Yaqoob, Alaeddin A; Bhatty, Tanweer A

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of spontaneous retrograde migration of ureterovesical junction stone to the kidney. A 26-year-old Bahraini male, diagnosed with left lower ureteric stone 7 months before this presentation. On his recent presentation, the stone has migrated down but not passed, confirmed on imaging. Operative removal was planned. X-ray kidney ureter bladder (KUB) in the morning of surgery did not reveal stone in the ureter, but the same shadow was seen in the kidney. An urgent computerized tomography-KUB was done, and this confirms the stone has migrated to the kidney. Surgery was canceled, and the stone was dealt with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and was fragmented in the first session. This retrograde migration of lower ureteric stone to the kidney is not reported in the English literature in human before.

  6. Spontaneous retrograde migration of ureterovesical junction stone to the kidney; first ever reported case in the English literature in human.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ziauddin; Yaqoob, Alaeddin A; Bhatty, Tanweer A

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of spontaneous retrograde migration of ureterovesical junction stone to the kidney. A 26-year-old Bahraini male, diagnosed with left lower ureteric stone 7 months before this presentation. On his recent presentation, the stone has migrated down but not passed, confirmed on imaging. Operative removal was planned. X-ray kidney ureter bladder (KUB) in the morning of surgery did not reveal stone in the ureter, but the same shadow was seen in the kidney. An urgent computerized tomography-KUB was done, and this confirms the stone has migrated to the kidney. Surgery was canceled, and the stone was dealt with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and was fragmented in the first session. This retrograde migration of lower ureteric stone to the kidney is not reported in the English literature in human before. PMID:27141199

  7. Spontaneous retrograde migration of ureterovesical junction stone to the kidney; first ever reported case in the English literature in human

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ziauddin; Yaqoob, Alaeddin A.; Bhatty, Tanweer A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of spontaneous retrograde migration of ureterovesical junction stone to the kidney. A 26-year-old Bahraini male, diagnosed with left lower ureteric stone 7 months before this presentation. On his recent presentation, the stone has migrated down but not passed, confirmed on imaging. Operative removal was planned. X-ray kidney ureter bladder (KUB) in the morning of surgery did not reveal stone in the ureter, but the same shadow was seen in the kidney. An urgent computerized tomography-KUB was done, and this confirms the stone has migrated to the kidney. Surgery was canceled, and the stone was dealt with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and was fragmented in the first session. This retrograde migration of lower ureteric stone to the kidney is not reported in the English literature in human before. PMID:27141199

  8. Assessment of stone composition in the management of urinary stones.

    PubMed

    Kijvikai, Kittinut; de la Rosette, J J M

    2011-02-01

    Several explanations have been suggested to account for the failure of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) treatment in patients with urinary stones, including large stone volume, unfavorable stone location or composition and the type of lithotriptor used. Unfavorable stone composition is considered a major cause of failure of ESWL treatment, and consequently knowledge of the stone composition before treatment is initiated is desirable. Plain abdominal radiographs cannot accurately determine either stone composition or fragility, and although the CT attenuation value in Hounsfield units (HU) (that is, normalized to the attenuation characteristics of water) is useful, this parameter has limited value as a predictor of stone composition or the response to ESWL treatment. By contrast, stone morphology as visualized by CT correlates well with both fragility and susceptibility to fragmentation by ESWL. For patients prone to recurrent calculi, analyses of stone composition are especially important, as they may reveal an underlying metabolic abnormality. The development of advanced imaging technologies that can predict stone fragility is essential, as they could provide extra information for physicians, enabling them to select the most appropriate treatment option for patients with urinary stones.

  9. Dimension stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2003-01-01

    Dimension stone can be defined as natural rock material quarried to obtain blocks or slabs that meet specifications as to size (width, length and thickness) and shape for architectural or engineering purposes. Color, grain texture and pattern, and surface finish of the stone are also normal requirements. Other important selection criteria are durability (based on mineral composition, hardness and past performance), strength and the ability of the stone to take a polish.

  10. Ureteral stents: new ideas, new designs

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aown, Abdulrahman; Kyriazis, Iason; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Kraniotis, Pantelis; Rigopoulos, Christos; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Petsas, Theodore; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    Ureteral stents represent a minimally invasive alternative to preserve urinary drainage whenever ureteral patency is deteriorated or is under a significant risk to be occluded due to extrinsic or intrinsic etiologies. The ideal stent that would combine perfect long-term efficacy with no stent-related morbidity is still lacking and stent usage is associated with several adverse effects that limit its value as a tool for long-term urinary drainage. Several new ideas on stent design, composition material and stent coating currently under evaluation, foreseen to eliminate the aforementioned drawbacks of ureteral stent usage. In this article we review the currently applied novel ideas and new designs of ureteral stents. Moreover, we evaluate potential future prospects of ureteral stent development adopted mostly by the pioneering cardiovascular stent industry, focusing, however, on the differences between ureteral and endothelial tissue. PMID:21789086

  11. The Efficacy of Medical Expulsive Therapy (MET) in Improving Stone-free Rate and Stone Expulsion Time, After Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL) for Upper Urinary Stones: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Skolarikos, Andreas; Grivas, Nikolaos; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Mourmouris, Panagiotis; Rountos, Thomas; Fiamegos, Alexandros; Stavrou, Sotirios; Venetis, Chris

    2015-12-01

    In this meta-analysis, we included randomized studies on medical expulsive therapy implemented following shock wave lithotripsy for renal and ureteral stones. Pooled results demonstrated the efficacy of α-blockers, nifedipine, Rowatinex, and Uriston in increasing stone clearance. In addition, the time to stone elimination, the intensity of pain, the formation of steinstrasse, and the need for auxiliary procedures were reduced mainly with α-blockers. Expulsion rate was not correlated with the type of α-blocker, the diameter, and the location of stone. Our results show that medical expulsive therapy for residual fragments after shock wave lithotripsy should be implemented in clinical practice. PMID:26383613

  12. Stone Mountain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This color image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the part of the rock outcrop dubbed Stone Mountain at Meridiani Planum, Mars. Scientists are examining Stone Mountain with the instruments on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' in search of clues about the composition of the rock outcrop. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] A Patch of Stone (Figure credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS)

    The colorless square in this color image of the martian rock formation called Stone Mountain is one portion of the rock being analyzed with tools on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The square area is approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. Stone Mountain is located within the rock outcrop on Meridiani Planum, Mars. The image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera.

  13. Unilateral ureteral obstruction secondary to rupture of liver echinococcal cyst.

    PubMed

    Shapira, O M; Simon, D; Rothstein, H; Mor, E; Pfeffermann, R

    1992-12-01

    We report a case of ureteral obstruction by reactive retroperitoneal fibrosis secondary to rupture of a liver echinococcal cyst after minimal blunt flank trauma. The patient presented initially with a cyst-cutaneous fistula and was treated with mebendazole, since surgery was refused. Unilateral ureteral obstruction due to reactive dense retroperitoneal fibrosis developed 2 years later, which presumably was initiated by intense inflammatory reaction to the cyst content. Diagnosis was established by excretory urography, ultrasonography and computerized tomography, and was histologically confirmed. Hydronephrosis and hydroureter resolved following ureterolysis. This complication is anticipated to be encountered more frequently with the use of the new potent anthelmintic agents, which may successfully prevent daughter cyst formation but fail to abolish reactive retroperitonitis.

  14. Probabilistic Modeling of the Renal Stone Formation Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, Lauren M.; Myers, Jerry G.; Goodenow, Debra A.; McRae, Michael P.; Jackson, Travis C.

    2013-01-01

    randomly sampling the probability distributions of the electrolyte concentrations and system parameters that are inputs into the deterministic model. The total urine chemistry concentrations are used to determine the urine chemistry activity using the Joint Expert Speciation System (JESS), a biochemistry model. Information used from JESS is then fed into the deterministic growth model. Outputs from JESS and the deterministic model are passed back to the probabilistic model where a multivariate regression is used to assess the likelihood of a stone forming and the likelihood of a stone requiring clinical intervention. The parameters used to determine to quantify these risks include: relative supersaturation (RS) of calcium oxalate, citrate/calcium ratio, crystal number density, total urine volume, pH, magnesium excretion, maximum stone width, and ureteral location. Methods and Validation: The RSFM is designed to perform a Monte Carlo simulation to generate probability distributions of clinically significant renal stones, as well as provide an associated uncertainty in the estimate. Initially, early versions will be used to test integration of the components and assess component validation and verification (V&V), with later versions used to address questions regarding design reference mission scenarios. Once integrated with the deterministic component, the credibility assessment of the integrated model will follow NASA STD 7009 requirements.

  15. Initial excavation and dating of Ngalue Cave: a Middle Stone Age site along the Niassa Rift, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Mercader, Julio; Asmerom, Yemane; Bennett, Tim; Raja, Mussa; Skinner, Anne

    2009-07-01

    Direct evidence for a systematic occupation of the African tropics during the early late Pleistocene is lacking. Here, we report a record of human occupation between 105-42ka, based on results from a radiometrically-dated cave section from the Mozambican segment of the Niassa (Malawi/Nyasa) Rift called Ngalue. The sedimentary sequence from bottom to top has five units. We concentrate on the so-called "Middle Beds," which contain a Middle Stone Age industry characterized by the use of the discoidal reduction technique. A significant typological feature is the presence of formal types such as points, scrapers, awls, and microliths. Special objects consist of grinders/core-axes covered by ochre. Ngalue is one of the few directly-dated Pleistocene sites located along the biogeographical corridor for modern human dispersals that links east, central, and southern Africa, and, with further study, may shed new light on hominin cave habitats during the late Pleistocene.

  16. Gallbladder stones: shockwave therapy.

    PubMed

    Sackmann, M

    1992-11-01

    Within the past 7 years, gallbladder lithotripsy by shockwaves has been proven to be a safe and effective non-invasive therapy for selected patients with gallstone disease. While regulatory decisions prevent shockwave therapy from being used more frequently in the USA, the number of patients treated in Europe and Asia is increasing constantly. At our institution, a relatively constant number of about 250 new patients per year have been treated since 1988 (Figure 4). About 20% of patients with gallstones are suitable for shockwave therapy according to present criteria. The rate of evacuation of all fragments is determined by the initial stone number and stone size, the success at stone fragmentation, adjuvant bile acid dissolution therapy, and gallbladder contractility. In contrast to laparoscopic cholecystectomy (Dubois et al, 1989; Perissat et al, 1989; Southern Surgeons Club, 1991), shockwave therapy does not require general anaesthesia. And in contrast to direct contact dissolution therapy of gallbladder stones using MTBE (Thistle et al, 1989), lithotripsy is non-invasive. In the majority of patients, complete fragment disappearance takes several months. Preliminary analyses of the cost-effectiveness of lithotripsy have revealed that lithotripsy, including retreatments and bile acid medication for recurrent stones, costs about as much as open cholecystectomy (Rothschild et al, 1990; Bass et al, 1991). The ideal patient for gallbladder lithotripsy has a single radiolucent stone < or = 20-25 mm in diameter in a functioning gallbladder (Figure 1). In patients with such stones, nearly all studies have confirmed a favourable outcome with rapid clearance of all fragments and a relatively low rate of stone recurrence. For carefully selected patients, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is therefore an attractive non-invasive therapy.

  17. Ultrasonic propulsion of kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    May, Philip C.; Bailey, Michael R.; Harper, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Ultrasonic propulsion is a novel technique that uses short bursts of focused ultrasonic pulses to reposition stones transcutaneously within the renal collecting system and ureter. The purpose of this review is to discuss the initial testing of effectiveness and safety, directions for refinement of technique and technology, and opinions on clinical application. Recent findings Preclinical studies with a range of probes, interfaces, and outputs have demonstrated feasibility and consistent safety of ultrasonic propulsion with room for increased outputs and refinement toward specific applications. Ultrasonic propulsion was used painlessly and without adverse events to reposition stones in 14 of 15 human study participants without restrictions on patient size, stone size, or stone location. The initial feasibility study showed applicability in a range of clinically relevant situations, including facilitating passage of residual fragments following ureteroscopy or shock wave lithotripsy, moving a large stone at the UPJ with relief of pain, and differentiating large stones from a collection of small fragments. Summary Ultrasonic propulsion shows promise as an office-based system for transcutaneously repositioning kidney stones. Potential applications include facilitating expulsion of residual fragments following ureteroscopy or shock wave lithotripsy, repositioning stones prior to treatment, and repositioning obstructing UPJ stones into the kidney to alleviate acute renal colic. PMID:26845428

  18. 21 CFR 876.5470 - Ureteral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ureteral dilator. 876.5470 Section 876.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5470 Ureteral dilator....

  19. 21 CFR 876.5470 - Ureteral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ureteral dilator. 876.5470 Section 876.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5470 Ureteral dilator....

  20. 21 CFR 876.5470 - Ureteral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ureteral dilator. 876.5470 Section 876.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5470 Ureteral dilator....

  1. 21 CFR 876.5470 - Ureteral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ureteral dilator. 876.5470 Section 876.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5470 Ureteral dilator....

  2. 21 CFR 876.5470 - Ureteral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ureteral dilator. 876.5470 Section 876.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5470 Ureteral dilator....

  3. Kidney stones

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... urine exits the kidney and enters the ureter. As urine can become very concentrated as it passes through the kidneys. When the urine ... chemicals dissolved in the urine can crystallize, forming a kidney stone (renal calculus). Usually the calculus is ...

  4. Double-pigtail stents for distal ureteral calculi: an alternative form of definitive treatment.

    PubMed

    Deliveliotis, C; Giannakopoulos, S; Louras, G; Koutsokalis, G; Alivizatos, G; Kostakopoulos, A

    1996-01-01

    In this study, we treated patients with a solitary distal ureteral stone of less than 10 mm in maximum diameter by placing a double-pigtail stent and subsequently removing it allowing the calculus to pass spontaneously. A total of 40 patients were enrolled in the study with a mean stone size of 5.1 x 3.5 mm (range 2-8 mm in length and 2-7 mm in width). The indication for intervention was intractable pain in 5 patients, infection due to obstruction in 2, highly obstructed urinary tract in 10, absence of progression for 30 days in 21 and desire of the patient to be free of stone in 2. A double-pigtail stent was inserted in the involved ureter under local anesthesia and left in place for 2 weeks. After stent removal, 34 patients succeeded in passing the stone within an average time of 5.8 days. The overall success rate was 85%. We suggest this method as an alternative form of treatment for distal ureteral calculi to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of ureterolithotripsy under selected clinical circumstances.

  5. Kidney Stones

    PubMed Central

    Kleeman, Charles R.; Coburn, Jack W.; Brickman, Arnold S.; Lee, David B. N.; Narins, Robert G.; Ehrlich, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones has steadily risen during this century; passage of a calculus and a positive family history increase the probability of recurrence. Findings from recent studies on the cause of renal calculi have stressed crystallization and crystal aggregation of stone minerals from supersaturated urine, rather than excessive organic matrix. Absence of normal urine inhibitors of calcium salts is also stressed. Formation of calcium oxalate stones is the major problem. Therapy with decreased calcium and oxalate intake, thiazides, phosphate salts and allopurinol in various combinations has substantially decreased the prevalence of recurrent stones. The rationale for the use of allopurinol is that uric acid salts enhance the tendency for calcium oxalate to crystallize from supersaturated urine. The hypercalciuria seen in 30 percent to 40 percent of patients with oxalate stones is usually caused by intestinal hyperabsorption of calcium. Although patients with uric acid calculi constitute only a small fraction of those in whom stones form, they represent a group in whom good medical therapy, based on sound physiologic principles, has proved extremely successful. Renal tubular syndromes lead to nephrocalcinosis and lithiasis through hypercalciuria, alkaline urine and hypocitraturia, the latter an inhibitor of calcium salt precipitation. Recent advances in surgical techniques are discussed, including the rationale for removing staghorn calculi. The ileal ureter and coagulum pyelolithotomy deserve special emphasis. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 7. PMID:7385835

  6. Percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent insertion in malignant disease.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, J R

    1993-01-01

    Untreated, progressive bilateral ureteric obstruction, or unilateral ureteric obstruction in patients with a solitary functioning kidney, will ultimately lead to uraemia, renal failure and death. This paper describes 34 successful percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent placements from 37 attempts, performed on 25 selected patients with a history of malignant disease, in whom retrograde ureteric stenting was impossible or difficult. PMID:8410885

  7. Stone heterogeneity index as the standard deviation of Hounsfield units: A novel predictor for shock-wave lithotripsy outcomes in ureter calculi.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Yong; Kim, Jae Heon; Kang, Dong Hyuk; Chung, Doo Yong; Lee, Dae Hun; Do Jung, Hae; Kwon, Jong Kyou; Cho, Kang Su

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether stone heterogeneity index (SHI), which a proxy of such variations, was defined as the standard deviation of a Hounsfield unit (HU) on non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT), can be a novel predictor for shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) outcomes in patients with ureteral stones. Medical records were obtained from the consecutive database of 1,519 patients who underwent the first session of SWL for urinary stones between 2005 and 2013. Ultimately, 604 patients with radiopaque ureteral stones were eligible for this study. Stone related variables including stone size, mean stone density (MSD), skin-to-stone distance, and SHI were obtained on NCCT. Patients were classified into the low and high SHI groups using mean SHI and compared. One-session success rate in the high SHI group was better than in the low SHI group (74.3% vs. 63.9%, P = 0.008). Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that smaller stone size (OR 0.889, 95% CI: 0.841-0.937, P < 0.001), lower MSD (OR 0.995, 95% CI: 0.994-0.996, P < 0.001), and higher SHI (OR 1.011, 95% CI: 1.008-1.014, P < 0.001) were independent predictors of one-session success. The radiologic heterogeneity of urinary stones or SHI was an independent predictor for SWL success in patients with ureteral calculi and a useful clinical parameter for stone fragility. PMID:27035621

  8. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: first 1000 cases at the London Stone Clinic.

    PubMed

    Das, G; Dick, J; Bailey, M J; Fletcher, M S; Webb, D R; Kellett, M J; Whitfield, H N; Wickham, J E

    1987-10-10

    One thousand patients underwent extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for renal and ureteric calculi at this clinic. An overall success rate of 91.8% was achieved (stone free or less than 2 mm fragments at three months) and for stones measuring 1 cm 96.3%. Lithotripsy produced extremely low morbidity, and no deaths have occurred at the clinic. Patients who had lithotripsy alone had a mean hospital stay of three days and in most instances were able to perform their full range of activities on discharge. Planned combination of lithotripsy with minimally invasive endourological procedures such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureterorenoscopy has allowed us to extend the range of treatable cases to include large stones. Prophylactic use of Double-J ureteric stents in selected cases has reduced the incidence of obstruction by stone fragments after lithotripsy, thereby decreasing morbidity and hospital stay.

  9. Use of percutaneous nephrostomy and ureteral stenting in management of ureteral obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Linda; Li, Hanhan; Pucheril, Daniel; Hansen, Moritz; Littleton, Raymond; Peabody, James; Sammon, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    The management options for ureteral obstruction are diverse, including retrograde ureteral stent insertion or antegrade nephrostomy placement, with or without eventual antegrade stent insertion. There is currently no consensus on the ideal treatment or treatment pathway for ureteral obstruction owing, in part, to the varied etiologies of obstruction and diversity of institutional practices. Additionally, different clinicians such as internists, urologists, oncologists and radiologists are often involved in the care of patients with ureteral obstruction and may have differing opinions concerning the best management strategy. The purpose of this manuscript was to review available literature that compares percutaneous nephrostomy placement vs ureteral stenting in the management of ureteral obstruction from both benign and malignant etiologies. PMID:26981442

  10. Image-guided ureteral reconstruction using rendezvous technique for complex ureteric transection after gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Mohammad; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz; Said, Mohammad T.; Bulbul, Muhammad; Haddad, Maurice; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-01-01

    Management of complex ureteric transection poses a significant clinical challenge, particularly after gunshot injuries due to marked distortion of anatomy and associated tissue loss. We report two cases of total ureteric transection due to gunshot injury successfully repaired using fluoroscopy-guided rendezvous procedure and double J stent placement. This minimally invasive approach may offer a safe and effective technique to repair complete ureteral transection and obviate the need for complex surgical procedures. PMID:26955601

  11. Holmium:YAG laser in the treatment of ureteral strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Rajiv K.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Chun, Samuel S.; Denstedt, John D.; Sales, Jack L.

    1996-05-01

    Endourologic intervention has become widely considered the initial procedure of choice for short segment ureteral strictures. Techniques employed in conjunction with endourologic access to manage the strictured area have included balloon dilation, cold knife and electrosurgical incision. More recently laser incision with the potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser has been employed. The holmium:YAG laser with a wavelength of 2100 nm has recently become available for urologic use. This wavelength is able to precisely vaporize and incise tissue. In this presentation we describe our results with holmium:YAG laser incision of ureteral strictures. Seventeen patients were treated including 12 patients with distal ureteral strictures, 4 patients with ureteroileal anastomotic strictures and 1 patient with a stricture in the ureter of a transplanted kidney. The holmium:YAG laser was employed using a 400 (mu) end-firing quartz fiber placed in contact with the tissue. Clinical and radiologic follow-up of at least 3 months post-surgery (range 3 - 21 months) is available in 14 patients. At last follow-up in these patients, 10/14 (71%) of strictures have remained open. While the ultimate success of endourological techniques of stricture management are determined by the inherent nature of the stricture rather than the technique employed, the holmium:YAG laser for endoureterotomy demonstrates short term efficacy and safety comparable to that reported for other minimally- invasive techniques of stricture management.

  12. Intracellular and extracellular regulation of ureteric bud morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    DAVIES, JAMIE

    2001-01-01

    The urinary collecting duct system of the permanent kidney develops by growth and branching of an initially unbranched epithelial tubule, the ureteric bud. Formation of the ureteric bud as an outgrowth of the wolffian duct is induced by signalling molecules (such as GDNF) that emanate from the adjacent metanephrogenic mesenchyme. Once it has invaded the mesenchyme, growth and branching of the bud is controlled by a variety of molecules, such as the growth factors GDNF, HGF, TGFβ, activin, BMP-2, BMP-7, and matrix molecules such as heparan sulphate proteoglycans and laminins. These various influences are integrated by signal transduction systems inside ureteric bud cells, with the MAP kinase, protein kinase A and protein kinase C pathways appearing to play major roles. The mechanisms of morphogenetic change that produce branching remain largely obscure, but matrix metalloproteinases are known to be necessary for the process, and there is preliminary evidence for the involvement of the actin/myosin contractile cytoskeleton in creating branch points. PMID:11322719

  13. Kidney Stones (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Kidney Stones KidsHealth > For Parents > Kidney Stones Print A ... remove the stones from their urinary tracts. How Kidney Stones Form It's the kidneys' job to remove ...

  14. Percutaneous Therapy of Ureteral Obstructions and Leak After Renal Transplantation: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Aytekin, Cueneyt Boyvat, Fatih; Harman, Ali; Ozyer, Umut; Colak, Turan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of percutaneous therapy of ureteral complications after renal transplantation. Between January 2000 and June 2006 we percutaneously treated 26 renal transplant patients with ureteral obstruction (n=19) and leak (n=7). Obstructions were classified as early (<2 months after transplantation) or late (>2 months). Patients with leak were treated with nephro-ureteral catheter placement and subsequent double-J stenting. Balloon dilatation, stent placement, and basket extraction were used to treat ureteral obstructions. Patients were followed with ultrasonography. No major procedure-related complication occurred. The mean follow-up time was 34.3 months (range: 6 to 74 months). Initial clinical success was achieved in all 19 patients with obstruction and 6 of 7 patients with leak. Four of 9 early obstructions and 4 of 10 late obstructions recurred during the follow-up. All recurrences were initially managed again with percutaneous methods, including cutting balloon technique and metallic stent placement. Although there was no recurrence in patients with successfully treated leak, stricture was seen at the previous leak site in two patients. These strictures were also successfully managed percutaneously. We conclude that in the treatment of ureteral obstruction and leak following renal transplantation, percutaneous therapy is an effective alternative to surgery. However, further interventions are usually needed to maintain long-term patency.

  15. Patient and Institutional Characteristics Associated with Initial CT Use for Children Presenting to the Emergency Department with Kidney Stones

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Justin B.; Canning, Douglas A.; Lavelle, Jane; Kalmus, Angela; Tasian, Gregory E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Professional associations recommend ultrasound as the initial imaging study for children with suspected nephrolithiasis; however, computed tomography (CT) remains frequently utilized. We sought to identify patient and institutional characteristics associated with use of CT as the first imaging study for children with nephrolithiasis diagnosed in the emergency department (ED). Materials and Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of children with nephrolithiasis aged 2-18 years referred to a free-standing children's hospital from 2003-2012 and identified the imaging modality first used to evaluate the child. ED medical directors where children were first evaluated were sent a questionnaire to ascertain ED characteristics. Multivariate hierarchical logistic regression models were used to determine patient and institutional characteristics associated with initial CT utilization. Results Of 536 eligible children, 323 (60.2%) were evaluated at EDs who returned surveys. Two hundred thirty-eight (71%) underwent CT as the first imaging study. All EDs had ultrasound. Older age was associated with higher initial CT utilization (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.04-1.16).A more recent year of diagnosis (OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.72-0.88) and a clinical care pathway that uses ultrasound as the initial imaging study (OR 0.29; 95% CI 0.01-0.38) were associated with lower initial CT utilization. Conclusions A clinical care pathway in the ED was the only institutional characteristic associated with lower CT utilization. Future studies are needed to determine if care pathways that use ultrasound as the initial imaging study for children with suspected nephrolithiasis decrease inappropriate CT utilization and improve adherence to national guidelines. PMID:25305359

  16. Fluoroscopy Guided Transurethral Placement of Ureteral Metallic Stents

    PubMed Central

    Myung Gyu, Song; Seo, Tae Seok; Park, Cheol Min; Choi, Jae Woong; Lee, Jong Mee; Park, Yang Shin

    2015-01-01

    Ureteral stent exchange is usually performed under both fluoroscopic and cystoscopic guidance. We experienced two cases with retrograde placement of metallic ureteral stent via urethra under fluoroscopic guidance. When patients with double-J ureteral stent (DJUS)have symptom and want to change DJUS to metallic stent, fluoroscopic guided transurethral placement of ureteral metallic stent is a good option as alternative of cystoscopic procedure or percutaneous procedure through percutaneous nephrostomy tract. PMID:26557281

  17. Lost Stones During Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Arozamena, C.; Gutierrez, L.; Bracco, J.; Mon, A.; Almeyra, R. Sanchez; Secchi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Gallbladder perforation, with loss of calculi in the abdomen is frequent during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Recent publications report complications in port sites or in the abdominal cavity. A study of 3686 laparsocopic cholecystectomies performed by 6 surgeons was undertaken. In 627 patients, perforation of the gallbladder occurred and in 254 stones were spilled into the abdominal cavity. In 214 they were retrieved and in 40 left in the abdomen. Twelve patients developed complications. Percutaneous drainage was successful in 2 with serous collections. Two patients with abdominal abscesses were reoperated, stones retrieved and the abdomen drained. One patient developed an intestinal obstruction due to a stone in the ileum. One patient who had a cholecystectomy in another hospital developed a paraumbilical tumor. At reoperation a stone was retrieved. In another six patients, stones were found in port sites. Stones lost into the abdomen should be removed because of their potential morbidity, especially if they are large or if infection is present in the gallbladder at the time of initial surgery. There is no indication for routine conversion to open surgery when stone spillage occurs, although patients should be informed to avoid legal consequence, and to hasten early diagnosis of later complications. PMID:9893240

  18. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  19. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  20. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  1. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  2. Socioeconomic evaluation of the treatment of ureteral lithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Rombi, T; Triantafyllidis, A; Fotas, A; Konstantinidis, T; Touloupidis, S

    2011-01-01

    Background and aim: This study attempts to estimate the socioeconomic differences between three major alternatives for the management of upper and lower ureteral lithiasis. Material and methods: Two hundred and forty patients with upper and lower ureteral lithiasis, have been studied retrospectively, divided in six equal groups of forty. These patients have been treated either by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL), or with ureteroscopy with semirigid ureteroscope and the use of pneumatic lithoclast, or with ureteroscopy with flexible ureteroscope and the use of Holmium YAG Laser. For cost calculation, the reimbursement fee paid by insurance to the hospital was taken into account. For the estimation of the social burden, the length of hospital stay and the number of outpatient visits have been included as countable parameters. Results: The percentage of effective stone removal for upper ureter was 81.0% for SWL, 62.5% for ureteroscopy with semirigid ureteroscope and the use of pneumatic lithoclast and, 82.5% for ureteroscopy with flexible ureteroscope and the use of Holmium YAG Laser. The same percentages for lower ureter were 82.5%, 92.5% and 97.5% respectively. The cost of stone removal for both the upper and lower ureter using extracorporeal lithotripsy was significantly higher compared to the other two procedures (median cost for upper ureter 828 € vs 474.50 € and 396 € respectively, and for lower ureter 826 € vs 396 € and 271 €, p<0.001). Regarding the social aspect, SWL is mainly an outpatient procedure, requiring a short hospital stay (for upper ureter 1.63 vs 2.48 and 2.45 respectively and for lower ureter 1.35 vs 2.43 and 2.13days), but needing more and prevailing clinic visits (for upper ureter 1.43 vs 1.45 and 1 respectively and for lower ureter 1.45 vs 1.15 and 0.55 visitsgive numbers, compare), both in outpatient and in accident and emergency (A&E) department. Conclusion: The increase in the expenses with regard to health management

  3. Diagnosis and management of postpercutaneous nephrolithotomy residual stone fragments.

    PubMed

    Skolarikos, Andreas; Papatsoris, Athanasios G

    2009-10-01

    Residual stone fragments can occur in up to 8% of patients who are treated with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). When left untreated, approximately half of these patients will experience a stone-related event, for which more than half will need a secondary surgical intervention. Predictors of adverse events are a residual fragment larger than 2 mm that is located in the pelvis or ureter. Preventive measures for the creation of residual fragments include a carefully selected access giving exposure to the bulk of the stone, the creation of multiple tracts, the use of single pulse pneumatic lithotripsy, the prevention of stone migration with ureteral balloons or stone cones, and careful flushing of the stones from the collecting system. Plain radiography of the kidneys, ureters, and bladder, linear tomography, and ultrasonography have all been used to judge the result of PCNL and to detect the presence of residual fragments. Thin-slice, unenhanced helical CT, however, is more sensitive and should be performed at 1 month after surgery. While medical therapy and shockwave lithotripsy possess a minor role, second-look flexible nephroscopy and/or flexible ureterorenoscopy seem to be the treatments of choice for residual stone fragments after PCNL.

  4. Efficacy and safety of tamsulosin as a medical expulsive therapy for stones in children

    PubMed Central

    Aldaqadossi, Hussein A.; Shaker, Hossam; Saifelnasr, Mohammed; Gaber, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of tamsulosin for promoting ureteric stone expulsion in children, based on the confirmed efficacy of tamsulosin as a medical expulsive therapy in adults. Patients and methods From February 2010 to July 2013, 67 children presenting with a distal ureteric stone of <1 cm as assessed on unenhanced computed tomography were included in the study. The patients were randomised into two groups, with group 1 (33 patients) receiving tamsulosin 0.4 mg and ibuprofen, and group 2 (34) receiving ibuprofen only. They were followed up for 4 weeks. Endoscopic intervention was indicated for patients with uncontrolled pain, recurrent urinary tract infection, hypersensitivity to tamsulosin and failure of stone passage after 4 weeks of conservative treatment. Results Sixty-three patients completed the study. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in patient age, body weight and stone size, the mean (SD) of which was 6.52 (1.8) mm in group 1 vs. 6.47 (1.79) mm in group 2 (P = 0.9). The mean (SD) time to stone expulsion in group 1 was 7.7 (1.9) days, vs. 18 (1.73) days in group 2 (P < 0.001). The analgesic requirement (mean number of ketorolac injections) in group 1 was significantly less than in group 2, at 0.55 (0.8) vs. 1.8 (1.6) (P < 0.001). The stone-free rate was 87% in group 1 and 63% in group 2 (P = 0.025). Conclusions Tamsulosin used as a medical expulsive therapy for children with ureteric stones is safe and effective, as it facilitates spontaneous expulsion of the stone. PMID:26413330

  5. Diet and calcium stones.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J; Norman, R W

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on the dietary modification of urinary risk factors as a means of reducing the likelihood of recurrent stone formation and to develop practical dietary recommendations that might be useful to this end. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for English-language articles published from 1983 to 1990. Additional references were selected from the bibliographies of identified articles. STUDY SELECTION: Nonrandomized trials and retrospective reviews were included because of a paucity of randomized controlled trials. DATA SYNTHESIS: Information on the dietary intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and fibre and on alcohol and fluid intake was used to develop practical guidelines on dietary modification. CONCLUSION: Dietary modification plays an important role in the reduction of urinary risk factors in patients with calcium stone disease of the urinary tract. As an initial form of prevention attention should be directed toward moderating the intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and alcohol and increasing the intake of fibre and water. Future research should include an assessment of the long-term reduction of dietary and urinary risk factors and the rates of recurrence of calcium stones. PMID:1310430

  6. [Pseudocystic ureteritis. Apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Joual, A; Sarf, I; Aboutaieb, R; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    1995-01-01

    The authors report one case of ureteritis cystica in a young adult. The diagnosis was made by intravenous urography and confirmed by histologic examination. The patient was treated surgically (nephro-ureterectomy). The etiopathogenic, clinical and therapeutic aspects are discussed with a review of literature.

  7. Factors predicting success of emergency extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (eESWL) in ureteric calculi--a single centre experience from the United Kingdom (UK).

    PubMed

    Panah, A; Patel, S; Bourdoumis, A; Kachrilas, S; Buchholz, N; Masood, J

    2013-10-01

    Few studies show that "emergency extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (eESWL)" reduces the incidence of ureteroscopy in patients with ureteric calculi. We assess success of eESWL and look to study and identify factors which predict successful outcome. We retrospectively studied patients presenting with their first episode of ureteric colic undergoing eESWL (within 72 h of presentation) over a 5-year period. Patient's age, gender, stone size and location, time between presentation and ESWL, number of shock waves and ESWL sessions, and Hounsfield units (HU) were recorded. 97 patients (mean age 40 years; 76 males, 21 females) were included. 71 patients were stone free after eESWL (73.2 %) (group 1) and 26 patients failed treatment and proceeded to ureteroscopy (group 2). The two groups were well matched for age and gender. Mean stone size in group 1 and 2 was 6.4 mm and 7.7 mm, respectively, (p = 0.00141). Stone location was 34, 21, and 16 in upper, middle and lower ureter in group 1 compared to 11, 5, and 10 in group 2, respectively. Mean HU in group 1 was 480 and 612 in group 2 (p value 0.0036). In group 2, significantly, more patients received treatment after 24 h compared with group 1 (38 vs 22.5 %). The number of shock waves, maximal intensity, and ESWL sessions were not significantly different in the two groups. No complications were noted. eESWL is safe and effective in patients with ureteric colic. Stone size and Hounsfield units are important factors in predicting success. Early treatment (≤24 h) minimizes stone impaction and increases the success rate of ESWL.

  8. The History of Urinary Stones: In Parallel with Civilization

    PubMed Central

    Tefekli, Ahmet; Cezayirli, Fatin

    2013-01-01

    The roots of modern science and history of urinary stone disease go back to the Ancient Egyptians and Mesopotamia. Hippocrates defined the symptoms of bladder stones. The first recorded details of “perineal lithotomy” were those of Cornelius Celsus. Ancient Arabic medicine was based mainly on classical Greco-Roman works. Interestingly, the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 forbade physicians from performing surgical procedures, as contact with blood or body fluids was viewed as contaminating to men. With Renaissance new procedures could be tried on criminals. The first recorded suprapubic lithotomy was carried out by Pierre Franco in 1561. In 1874, Bigelow developed a lithotrite, which was introduced into the bladder under anaesthesia (called as “litholopaxy”). Young was the first to report ureteroscopy (1929). With advances in intracorporeal lithotripsy techniques, ureteroscopy became the treatment of choice for ureteric stones. In 1976, Fernstrom and Johannson established percutaneous access to remove a renal stone. However, with the introduction of the first extracorporeal shock wave machine in 1980, a dramatic change in stone management was observed. Civilization in parallel with scientific developments has brought us to a point where we try not to “cut” our patients for stone disease, as Hippocrates admonishes, but rather manage them with minimal invasive alternatives. PMID:24348156

  9. The history of urinary stones: in parallel with civilization.

    PubMed

    Tefekli, Ahmet; Cezayirli, Fatin

    2013-01-01

    The roots of modern science and history of urinary stone disease go back to the Ancient Egyptians and Mesopotamia. Hippocrates defined the symptoms of bladder stones. The first recorded details of "perineal lithotomy" were those of Cornelius Celsus. Ancient Arabic medicine was based mainly on classical Greco-Roman works. Interestingly, the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 forbade physicians from performing surgical procedures, as contact with blood or body fluids was viewed as contaminating to men. With Renaissance new procedures could be tried on criminals. The first recorded suprapubic lithotomy was carried out by Pierre Franco in 1561. In 1874, Bigelow developed a lithotrite, which was introduced into the bladder under anaesthesia (called as "litholopaxy"). Young was the first to report ureteroscopy (1929). With advances in intracorporeal lithotripsy techniques, ureteroscopy became the treatment of choice for ureteric stones. In 1976, Fernstrom and Johannson established percutaneous access to remove a renal stone. However, with the introduction of the first extracorporeal shock wave machine in 1980, a dramatic change in stone management was observed. Civilization in parallel with scientific developments has brought us to a point where we try not to "cut" our patients for stone disease, as Hippocrates admonishes, but rather manage them with minimal invasive alternatives. PMID:24348156

  10. Radiology and treatment of urinary tract stone disease.

    PubMed

    Bush, W H

    1992-04-01

    Renal and ureteral calculi are treated primarily using extracorporeal lithotripsy, with percutaneous nephrostolithotomy retaining an important role for the treatment of large stones and complex situations. Aspects of pretherapy evaluation are reviewed. The vast majority of calculi 5 mm or less in diameter in the mid and lower ureter will pass spontaneously; in patients with acute ureteral obstruction, lower-osmolar nonionic contrast for urography caused as much discomfort as conventional high-osmolar contrast. Treatment planning for extracorporeal lithotripsy has changed in that internal stenting is no longer routinely recommended. Milk-of-calcium and calyceal diverticular stones respond poorly to extracorporeal lithotripsy. The access route used for percutaneous stone removal varies among investigators. Some advocate an intercostal approach for up to one third of patients; substantial complications occur with placement of a track above the 11th rib. Sepsis develops after percutaneous nephrostomy in up to 21% of patients, but the risk of sepsis can be decreased significantly by the administration of antibiotics during and after the procedure. Complications of extracorporeal lithotripsy include renal hematoma (especially if the patient is hypertensive or is taking aspirin), regional organ injury, and bacteremia. Although originally feared to occur frequently, hypertension occurring after or caused by extracorporeal lithotripsy was not confirmed to be a major problem. The incidence in a 2-year postlithotripsy follow-up was no greater than that for control subjects. PMID:1554585

  11. Stone orientation affects the mechanism of failure in artificial kidney stones subject to shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Cauwelaert, Javier; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2003-10-01

    Micro computed tomography (CT) imaging was used to follow the progressive development of cracks in artificial kidney stones. The artificial stones were made from U30 cement with a cylindrical shape (6.5 mm diameter and 8.5 mm long). The stones were held within a polypropylene vial in one of three orientations: vertical, horizontal, and angled at 45 deg. The stones were treated with an electromagnetic lithotripter and the initiation and growth of cracks was observed using microCT. The images show that the orientation of the stones with respect to the shock changes the dominant mechanism for fragmentation. Vertical stones developed a spall-like crack near the distal surface, which propagated from the surface to the interior of the stone. Initiation of a secondary spall-like crack was observed proximal to the first crack. Little surface damage was observed. Horizontal stones presented pitting in the proximal surface and erosion in lateral faces, indicating the action of cavitation. Angled stones presented both spall-like fracture in either the leading or the distal corners and surface damage (pitting) in the proximal surface. Experiments are being performed to follow the development of cracks in human kidney stones. [Work supported by the Whitaker Foundation.

  12. [Management of renal stones].

    PubMed

    Lechevallier, E; Traxer, O; Saussine, C

    2008-12-01

    The management of renal stones needs a recent and good quality imaging. Contrast medium injection is optional. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the most common treatment of renal stones. ESWL is indicated as first line treatment for less than 1.5cm stones. The stone-free (SF) rate at 3 months of ESWL is 70-80%. Results of ESWL for stones with more than 1000UH density or located in the lower calyx are poor. Flexible ureteroscopy (URS) is indicated in case of ESWL failure or for hyperdense, 1-2cm stones. The SF rate of flexible is 80%. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is indicated for complex or more than 2cm stones. Asymptomatic and non infected stones, especially if located in the lower calyx, do not need urological treatment but must be followed up. In all cases, renal stones needs a metabolic evaluation and treatment, and annual follow-up.

  13. [Intrinsic ureteral endometriosis: description of a striking instance].

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Finotto, Elena; Zambolin, Tiziano; Fisogni, Simona; Simeone, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic ureteral endometriosis is a very rare condition. A 41 y. o. woman with right hydroureteronephrosis and other aspecific symptoms came to our attention. The CT scan showed an ureteral obstacle causing the hydroureteronephrosis. She underwent ureterorenoscopy with biopsies of the lesion that did not result to be diriment. Suspecting a ureteral neoplasm, the patient then underwent ureteral resection and ureterocystoneostomy, and the extemporary histological examination resulted as endometriosis. The abdominal exploration showed a parametrial and a peritoneal growth - both compatible with the extemporary histological examination - that were also excised. The post-operative course was uneventful. The definitive hystological examination confirmed the perioperatory diagnosis. Intrinsic ureteral endometriosis is confirmed as a rare pathology with an indefinite clinical presentation; its typical presentation, namely cyclic hematuria, seems to be an anecdotal feature. Therefore the diagnostics of intrinsic ureteral endometriosis is still difficult even despite such a striking presentation.

  14. Ureteroscopy for treatment of upper urinary tract stones in children: technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Natasha; Ko, Joan; Matlaga, Brian R; Wang, Ming-Hsien

    2014-05-01

    The incidence of pediatric urolithiasis is increasing. While many smaller stones may pass spontaneously, surgical therapy is sometimes warranted. Surgical options include shock wave lithotripsy, ureteroscopy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, and open surgery. Ureteroscopy represents a minimally invasive approach, and it is increasingly being used to treat pediatric upper tract calculi. Ureteroscopy is performed under anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance, with basket extraction or lithotripsy of the calculi. Technical considerations include active or passive ureteral dilatation, the use of ureteral access sheaths for larger stone burdens, and post-operative stent placement. The current pediatric literature suggests high success rates (equal to or surpassing shock wave lithotripsy) and low complication rates. However, concerns remain regarding feasibility in patients with variant anatomies and risk due to intra-operative radiation exposure.

  15. Ureteral Metastasis Secondary to Prostate Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Morales, I.; Bassa, C.; Pavlovic, A.; Morales, C.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is very frequent, but secondary ureteral metastasis are extremely rare. We present a 55 year old man with a 2 month history of right flank pain and lower urinary tract symptoms. Prostatic specific antigen of 11.3 ng/mL. Computed tomography showed right hydroureteronephrosis, a developing urinoma and right iliac adenopathies. He underwent right ureteronephrectomy, iliac lymphadenectomy and prostate biopsy. Pathology revealed prostatic carcinoma infiltrating the ureteral muscularis propria, without mucosal involvement. There are 46 reported cases of prostate cancer with ureteral metastases. Ureteral metastasis are a rare cause of renal colic and need of a high index of suspicion. PMID:26793587

  16. Retroperitoneal fat necrosis producing ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Ross, J S; Prout, G R

    1976-05-01

    We present 3 cases of a rare syndrome of extrinsic ureteral obstruction produced by retroperitoneal fat necrosis and compare the medical records and histopathology to 19 cases of classic idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Clinical similarities include average age of onset in the fourth and fifth decades, male preponderance, abdominal or back pain as the presenting symptom, elevation of the blood urea concentration prior to diagnosis and tendency toward bilateral involvement. Histologically, the 2 conditions were different. Retroperitoneal fat necrosis is characterized by coalescence of fat cells into fat cysts bordered by foreign body giant cell granulomas, foam cells, light chronic inflammatory infiltrate and unimpressive fibrosis. The microscopic pathology of idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis is dominated by densely collagenized fibrous tissue of varying cellularity without evidence of fat necrosis. Of the 3 cases of retroperitoneal fat necrosis 2 featured prior ischiorectal abscesses and this is considered in a discussion of the etiology of this unusual cause of ureteral compression.

  17. Purbeck Stone - A possible Global Heritage Stone from England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marker, Brian

    2014-05-01

    By definition, a Global Heritage Stone Resource (GHSR) should have international significance. The Purbeck Group of uppermost Jurassic to lowermost Cretaceous age (Tithonian- Berriasian) outcrops mainly in the Purbeck area of Dorset, England. It was deposited in shallow freshwater to brackish lagoons with occasional marine incursions. Limestones, mainly biosparites, occur at 6 main levels. Differences in bed thickness, jointing and hardness make it suitable for a variety of purposes including dimension stone, monumental and ornamental stone, roofing tiles, paving, flooring and rockery stone. Near the top of the sequence is a dark gastropod biosparite, traditionally called Purbeck Marble, easily carved, which has been extensively used for decorative interior work in churches and cathedrals particularly for fonts, tombs, flooring and facings on columns for example in the medieval cathedrals of Salisbury, Exeter, Durham, York and Wells and Worcester and Westminster Abbey. The stone was extracted at least from Roman times (1st century AD) through the medieval period. Quarrying expanded from about 1700 reaching a peak in the late 18th and 19th centuries. Stone was transported first by sea but later by rail for wider use. Used in many local buildings, it gives an important element of local character. Many of the villages are designated conservation areas with a requirement for repair, maintenance and new building using local stone. Initially the stone was taken from quarries but was later mined. The number of operating companies declined from 15 to 5 over the past 40 years, with 10 active small quarries. Outputs are from few hundred tonnes to a few thousand tonnes per annum or about 9 to 12 years of permitted reserves but the Planning Authority intends to make sufficient provision for production at recent levels for their development plan period. The extraction sites are in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and close to Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site. This might

  18. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH URETERAL RUPTURES].

    PubMed

    Komjakov, B K; Guliev, B G

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the causes of ureteral ruptures and the types surgical procedures used for their management. Over the period from 2006 to 2014, 7 patients with ureteral ruptures underwent surgical treatment in the Mechnikov N-WSMU clinic. All of them were males aged 50 to 71 years. In all cases, the ureter was injured during ureteroscopy and contact lithotripsy. In two patients the right ureter was cut off at the border of the upper and middle third, in four--at 3-4 cm below pyeloureteral segment, one patient diagnosed with a complete separation of the ureter from the kidney pelvis. Patients, who have suffered a detachment of the ureter in other hospitals, previously underwent surgical exploration of the retroperitoneal space, drainage of the kidney by pyelonephrostomy (5) and ureterocutaneostomy (1). In a case of a patient with an injury that occurred in our clinic, laparoscopic nephrectomy with autologous renal transplantation was carried out. Five patients with extended ureter defects underwent ileo-ureteroplasty. The patient with left ureterocutaneostomy underwent nephrovesical bypass. Patency of the upper urinary tract and kidney function were restored in all patients, all of them were relieved from external drains. The duration of the intestinal plastic averaged 160 minutes, laparoscopic nephrectomy with autologous transplantation--210 min and nephrovesical bypass--110 min. Blood transfusion was required only in autologous graft patient. The ureteral rupture is a serious complication of ureteral endourological procedures in upper urinary tract. It requires such complicated reconstructive operations as autologous transplantation of the kidney or intestinal ureteroplasty. PMID:26390553

  19. Large impacted upper ureteral calculi: A comparative study between retrograde ureterolithotripsy and percutaneous antegrade ureterolithotripsy in the modified lateral position

    PubMed Central

    Moufid, Kamal; Abbaka, Najib; Touiti, Driss; Adermouch, Latifa; Amine, Mohamed; Lezrek, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Context: The treatment for patients with large impacted proximal ureteral stone remains controversial, especially at institutions with limited resources. Aim: The aim of this study is to compare and to evaluate the outcome and complications of two main treatment procedures for impacted proximal ureteral calculi, retrograde ureterolithotripsy (URS), and percutaneous antegrade ureterolithotripsy (Perc-URS). Settings and Design: Our inclusion criteria were solitary, radiopaque calculi, >15 mm in size in a functioning renal unit. Only those patients in whom the attempt at passing a guidewire or catheter beyond the calculus failed were included in this study. Patients and Methods: Between January 2007 and July 2011, a total of 52 patients (13 women and 39 men) with large impacted upper-ureteral calculi >15 mm and meeting the inclusion criteria were selected. Of these, Perc-URS was done in 22 patients (group 1) while retrograde ureteroscopy was performed in 30 patients (group 2). We analyzed operative time, incidence of complications during and after surgery, the number of postoperative recovery days, median total costs associated per patient per procedure, and the stone-free rate immediately after 5 days and after 1 month. Statistical Analysis Used: Bivariate analysis used the Student t-test and the Mann-Whitney test to compare two means and Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests to compare two percentages. The significance level was set at 0.05. Results: The mean age was 42.3 years (range 22-69). The mean stone sizes (mm) were 34 ± 1.2 and 29.3 ± 1.8 mm in group 1 and 2, respectively. In the Perc-URS group, 21 patients (95.45%) had complete calculus clearance through a single tract in one session of percutaneous surgery, whereas in the URS group, only 20 patients (66.7%) had complete stone clearance (P = 0.007). The mean operative time was higher in the Perc-URS group compared to group 2 (66.5 ± 21.7 vs. 52.13 ± 17.3 min, respectively; P = 0.013). Complications

  20. Rejoinder to Lynda Stone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    Responds to Lynda Stone's comments on the author's essay on the interpretation of history. Demonstrates the linkages between his argument and those of Stone. Concludes by contesting some of her interpretations of his philosophical forebear, Edmund Husserl, and by pointing to the common objectives of both his and Stone's research. (DSK)

  1. Right-sided Bochdalek hernia causing septic ureteric obstruction. Percutaneous treatment with placement of a nephroureteral double pigtail

    PubMed Central

    Hatzidakis, Adam; Kozana, Androniki; Glaritis, Dimitrios; Mamoulakis, Charalampos

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of an 86-year-old female patient who presented with a septic, right ureteric obstruction, caused by a symptomatic Bochdalek hernia. The patient was initially managed with percutaneous nephrostomy and final treatment was achieved by placement of an external-internal nephroureteral double pigtail. PMID:25362189

  2. Effectiveness of medical treatment in overcoming the ureteral double-J stent related symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuyumcuoglu, Ugur; Eryildirim, Bilal; Tuncer, Murat; Faydaci, Gokhan; Tarhan, Fatih; Ozgül, Aydin

    2012-01-01

    Background: We investigated whether the frequency of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) increased in patients in whom double-J stents were applied. We also evaluated several medical therapy protocols to treat symptoms related with ureteral stents. Materials and Methods: A total of 108 patients, in whom unilateral double-j stent was applied during ureteral stone treatment, were included. Before the double-J stent was applied, all patients completed storage components of the “International Prostate Symptom Score” (IPSSs), quality of life components of the IPSS (IPSS-QOL) and “Overactive Bladder Questionnaire” (OABq) forms and scores were calculated. After the procedure, cases were randomized into 5 groups, an antiinflammatory was given to Group 1, spasmolytic to Group 2, anticholinergic to Group 3 and α-blocker to Group 4. No additional drug was given to Group 5 as this control group. During the fourth week of the procedure, IPSSs, IPSS-QOL and OABq forms were again completed and scores were compared with the previous ones. Results: When all the cases were evaluated, the IPSSs, IPSS-QOL and OABq scores of patients in whom the double-J stent was applied were statistically significantly higher the procedure. Compared to the control group, the cases where the double-J stent was applied showed a higher IPSSs, IPSS-QOL and OABq scores and none of the medical therapies could prevent this increase. Interpretation: The frequency of LUTS increased in cases where the ureteral stent was applied and discomfort continued as long as the stent stayed in the body. PMID:21914427

  3. Effects of Tamsulosin, Solifenacin, and Combination Therapy for the Treatment of Ureteral Stent Related Discomforts

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kyoung Taek; Kim, Yong Tae; Lee, Tchun Yong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of tamsulosin, solifenacin, and combination therapy of two agents in improving the lower urinary tract symptoms of patients with indwelling double-J ureteral stents. Materials and Methods A total of 168 patients underwent placement of a double-J ureteral stent after retrograde ureteroscopy for urinary stone disease. All patients received polyurethane double-J ureteral stents (6 Fr, 24 or 26 cm), which were removed a mean of 14 days postoperatively. A total of 48 patients were given no medication (Group 1), 43 patients were given tamsulosin 0.2 mg once daily (Group 2), 45 patients were given solifenacin 5 mg once daily (Group 3), and 32 patients were given a combination of two agents postoperatively (Group 4). International Prostate Symptom Score/quality of life (IPSS/QoL) and visual analogue pain scale (VAPS) questionnaires were completed by each patient at 1 day postoperatively and on the day of stent removal. Results In the total group of patients, the mean age was 50.24±12.90 years. There was a significant difference in the IPSS total score between group 1 and groups 3 and 4. Group 4 also differed significantly from group 1 in the irritative subscore. The obstructive subscore differed between groups 2 and 4 and group 1. There was a statistically significant difference between group 1 and group 4 in the QoL score. There were no significant differences in the VAPS. Conclusions Combination therapy with tamsulosin and solifenacin improved both irritative and obstructive symptoms more than in the other groups. Combination therapy should be strongly considered for patients who complain of stent-related symptoms. PMID:21860770

  4. Microscopic hematuria and calculus-related ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stewart, D P; Kowalski, R; Wong, P; Krome, R

    1990-01-01

    The evaluation of patients with ureteral calculi in the emergency department has historically included urinalysis (UA) and intravenous pyelograms (IVP). This retrospective study was done to determine if a statistically significant relationship existed between the degree of calculus-related ureteral obstruction, proven by IVP, and the presence or absence of microscopic hematuria. Urine red blood cells were recorded as less than 3 rbc/hpf (negative) or greater than or equal to 3 rbc/hpf (positive). IVPs were recorded as nonsevere or severe. IVP criteria were based on the presence or absence of extravasation, greater than 2-hour ureteral filling times, and a numerical scoring system of 1 to 4 for ureteral or calyceal dilatation and nephrogenic effect. Eighty-nine men (72%) had non-severe obstructions and 34 (28%) had severe obstructions. Twenty-five women (68%) had nonsevere obstructions and 12 (32%) had severe obstructions. Of the 28 patients with normal UAs, 11 had severe ureteral obstructions and 17 had nonsevere ureteral obstructions. There were no statistically significant differences between the presence or absence of significant microscopic hematuria and the presence or absence of severe ureteral obstruction. Microscopic hematuria is neither sensitive nor specific in determining the degree of calculus-related ureteral obstruction.

  5. Acute kidney injury due to bilateral ureteral obstruction in children

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Daniele; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Bove, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral ureteral obstruction in children is a rare condition arising from several medical or surgical pictures. It needs to be promptly suspected in order to attempt a quick renal function recovery. In this paper we concentrated on uncommon causes of obstruction, with the aim of giving a summary of such multiple, rare and heterogeneous conditions joint together by the common denominator of sudden bilateral ureteral obstruction, difficult to be suspected at times. Conversely, typical and well-known diseases have been just run over. We considered pediatric cases of ureteral obstruction presenting as bilateral, along with some cases which truly appeared as single-sided, because of their potential bilateral presentation. We performed a review of the literature by a search on PubMed, CrossRef Metadata Search, internet and reference lists of single articles updated to May 2014, with no time limits in the past. Given that we deal with rare conditions, we decided to include also papers in non-English languages, published with an English abstract. For the sake of clearness, we divided our research results into 8 categories: (1) urolithiasis; (2) congenital urinary tract malformations; (3) immuno-rheumatologic causes of ureteral obstruction; (4) ureteral localization of infections; (5) other systemic infective causes of ureteral obstructions; (6) neoplastic intrinsic ureteral obstructions; (7) extrinsic ureteral obstructions; and (8) iatrogenic trigonal obstruction or inflammation. Of course, different pathogenic mechanisms underlay those clinical pictures, partly well-known and partly not completely understood. PMID:25374811

  6. Microscopic hematuria and calculus-related ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stewart, D P; Kowalski, R; Wong, P; Krome, R

    1990-01-01

    The evaluation of patients with ureteral calculi in the emergency department has historically included urinalysis (UA) and intravenous pyelograms (IVP). This retrospective study was done to determine if a statistically significant relationship existed between the degree of calculus-related ureteral obstruction, proven by IVP, and the presence or absence of microscopic hematuria. Urine red blood cells were recorded as less than 3 rbc/hpf (negative) or greater than or equal to 3 rbc/hpf (positive). IVPs were recorded as nonsevere or severe. IVP criteria were based on the presence or absence of extravasation, greater than 2-hour ureteral filling times, and a numerical scoring system of 1 to 4 for ureteral or calyceal dilatation and nephrogenic effect. Eighty-nine men (72%) had non-severe obstructions and 34 (28%) had severe obstructions. Twenty-five women (68%) had nonsevere obstructions and 12 (32%) had severe obstructions. Of the 28 patients with normal UAs, 11 had severe ureteral obstructions and 17 had nonsevere ureteral obstructions. There were no statistically significant differences between the presence or absence of significant microscopic hematuria and the presence or absence of severe ureteral obstruction. Microscopic hematuria is neither sensitive nor specific in determining the degree of calculus-related ureteral obstruction. PMID:2096163

  7. Laparoscopic ureteral reimplantation: a simplified dome advancement technique.

    PubMed

    Lima, Guilherme C; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Link, Richard E; Kavoussi, Louis R

    2005-12-01

    Laparoscopic Boari flap reimplantation has been used to treat long distal ureteral strictures. This technique requires extensive bladder mobilization and complex intracorporeal suturing. This demonstrates a novel laparoscopic bladder dome advancement approach for ureteral reimplantation. This technique obviates the need for bladder pedicle dissection and simplifies the required suturing.

  8. Inguinal bladder hernia associated with vesico-ureteric reflux.

    PubMed

    Noble, J G; Christmas, T J; Chapple, C R; Rickards, D

    1992-04-01

    The urinary bladder is frequently found as a component of inguinal herniae. This report describes a case of 'bladder hernia' associated with vesico-ureteric reflux. The current methods of investigation and subsequent treatment for this condition are reviewed along with the possible underlying cause of vesico-ureteric reflux in this case.

  9. A review of ureteral injuries after external trauma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Ureteral trauma is rare, accounting for less than 1% of all urologic traumas. However, a missed ureteral injury can result in significant morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this article is to review the literature since 1961 with the primary objective to present the largest medical literature review, to date, regarding ureteral trauma. Several anatomic and physiologic considerations are paramount regarding ureteral injuries management. Literature review Eighty-one articles pertaining to traumatic ureteral injuries were reviewed. Data from these studies were compiled and analyzed. The majority of the study population was young males. The proximal ureter was the most frequently injured portion. Associated injuries were present in 90.4% of patients. Admission urinalysis demonstrated hematuria in only 44.4% patients. Intravenous ureterogram (IVU) failed to diagnose ureteral injuries either upon admission or in the operating room in 42.8% of cases. Ureteroureterostomy, with or without indwelling stent, was the surgical procedure of choice for both trauma surgeons and urologists (59%). Complications occurred in 36.2% of cases. The mortality rate was 17%. Conclusion The mechanism for ureteral injuries in adults is more commonly penetrating than blunt. The upper third of the ureter is more often injured than the middle and lower thirds. Associated injuries are frequently present. CT scan and retrograde pyelography accurately identify ureteral injuries when performed together. Ureteroureterostomy, with or without indwelling stent, is the surgical procedure of choice of both trauma surgeons and urologists alike. Delay in diagnosis is correlated with a poor prognosis. PMID:20128905

  10. Application of Skin Electrical Conductance of Acupuncture Meridians for Ureteral Calculus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wu-Chou; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Xu, Jian-Ming; Chen, Der-Cherng; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lee, Chao-Te

    2011-01-01

    Renal colic is a common condition seen in the emergency department (ED). Our recent study showed that measures of electrical conductance may be used as supplementary diagnostic methods for patients with acute renal colic. Here, we describe the case of a 30-year-old male subject with a left ureteral calculus who presented with frequency and normal-looking urine. He had already visited the outpatient department, but in vain. Normal urinalysis and nonobstructive urogram were reported at that time. Two days later, he was admitted to the ED because of abdominal pain in the left lower quadrant. The urinalysis did not detect red blood cells. Ultrasonography did not indicate hydronephrosis. The meridian electrical conductance and index of sympathovagal balance were found to be abnormal. High level of electrical conductance on the left bladder meridian was found. An unenhanced helical computed tomography was scheduled to reveal a left ureterovesical stone. Ureteroscopic intervention was later uneventfully performed, and the patient's pain was relieved. The follow-up measurements showed that the meridian parameters had returned to normal one month after treatment. This case suggests that bladder meridian electrical conductance might be used as a supplemental method for ureteral calculus diagnosis. PMID:24533191

  11. [Update for the management of kidney stones in 2013. Lithiasis Committee of the French Association of Urology].

    PubMed

    Carpentier, X; Meria, P; Bensalah, K; Chabannes, E; Estrade, V; Denis, E; Yonneau, L; Mozer, P; Hadjadj, H; Hoznek, A; Traxer, O

    2014-04-01

    Since the publication of the latest recommendations of the Lithiasis Comity of the French Association of Urology (CLAFU) on the management of ureteral and renal stones, practices have evolved. This text provides an update for the treatment of kidney stones. It is especially the important advances in the field of laser-ureterorenoscopy that changed practices. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy has been enriched by technical modifications and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy confirmed its predominant place in the first line of treatment. For stones less than 20mm, extracorporeal lithotripsy remains the standard, but in some cases the possibility of recommending a flexible ureterorenoscopy is possible in first line. For stones more than 20mm, percutaneous nephrolithotomy is the standard treatment, but optional flexible ureteroscopy and extracorporeal lithotripsy are possible. The treatment carried out, collect the stone fragments for a morpho-constitutional analysis and achieve a metabolic evaluation is necessary, to investigate etiologic and give dietary advices to prevent recurrence.

  12. EDAX versus FTIR in mixed stones.

    PubMed

    Fazil Marickar, Y M; Lekshmi, P R; Varma, Luxmi; Koshy, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Mixed stones form a significant number of all urinary stones. Accurate analysis of individual areas of stones is fraught with uncertainties. Scanning electron microscopy with elemental distribution analysis (SEM-EDAX) is a very important tool in assessing stone composition. The objective of this paper is to project the role of the combination of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and SEM-EDAX combination in achieving a total understanding of mixed stone morphology. Ten mixed urinary stones were washed and dried and the composition recognized by analysis of FTIR spectra by comparing with the spectra of pure components. Spectra for different layers were obtained. Then the stone samples were further studied by SEM-EDAX analysis. The findings of FTIR were correlated with SEM-EDAX and detailed data generated. Using SEM-EDAX, the spatial distribution of major and trace elements were studied to understand their initiation and formation. As much as 80% of the stones studied were mixtures of calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite) and calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite) in various proportions. Quantitative evaluation of components was achieved through FTIR and SEM-EDAX analysis. It was possible to get an idea about the spatial distribution of molecules using SEM analysis. The composition of different areas was identified using EDAX. Analyzing with EDAX, it was possible to obtain the percentage of different elements present in a single sample. The study concludes that the most common mixed stone encountered in the study is a mixture of calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium phosphate in a definite proportion. The combination identified not only the molecular species present in the calculus, but also the crystalline forms within chemical constituents. Using EDAX, the amount of calcium, phosphorus, oxygen and carbon present in the stone sample could be well understood.

  13. Comparison of the clinical efficacy and safety of retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy and ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy in the treatment of obstructive upper ureteral calculi with concurrent urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-Tao; Li, Wei-Guo; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Sun, Wen-Lan; Zhao, Wei; Ruan, Yuan; Zhong, Chen; Wood, Kristofer; Wei, Hai-Bin; Xia, Shu-Jie; Sun, Xiao-Wen

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the clinical efficacy and safety of retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy (RPLU) and ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy (UHLL) as two minimally invasive procedures in managing obstructive upper ureteral calculi with concurrent urinary tract infections (UTI). The retrospective study included 189 patients who underwent unilateral obstructive upper ureteral stones with concurrent UTI from January 2007 to November 2014 at our institution. Patients received RPLU (81 cases) or UHLL (108 cases). All patients received preoperative anti-infection treatment (indwelling ureteral stent and/or preoperative antibiotics). Collected data, including sex, age, stone size, success rate, operation duration, post-operation hospitalization time, and post-operation complications, were compared. All patients were followed up for more than 6 months after surgeries, and no ureterostenosis occurred. The study included 189 patients, 41 (21.7 %) females and 148 (78.3 %) males with a medium age of 52 years (range 22-81 years). All surgeries were successfully performed without conversion to open surgery. Stone size in the RPLU group was larger than that of the UHLL group (16.1 ± 1.4 vs. 10.4 ± 1.6 mm, P = 0.012). Operative duration (P = 0.009) and hospitalization time (P < 0.001) in the UHLL group were significantly shorter than those in the RPLU group, whereas stone clearance rate was significantly higher in the RPLU group (100 vs. 88.9 %, P = 0.002). Of note, postoperative fever was more common in patients treated with UHLL (15 cases) versus RPLU (4 cases) (13.9 vs. 4.9 %, P = 0.043). Moreover, in the UHLL group, three patients without a preoperative indwelling ureteral stent were complicated with sepsis, which was not seen in RPLU group. In our study, the safety and stone clearance rate of RPLU are better than those of UHLL in the treatment of unilateral upper ureteric calculi with concurrent UTI

  14. Comparison of the clinical efficacy and safety of retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy and ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy in the treatment of obstructive upper ureteral calculi with concurrent urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-Tao; Li, Wei-Guo; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Sun, Wen-Lan; Zhao, Wei; Ruan, Yuan; Zhong, Chen; Wood, Kristofer; Wei, Hai-Bin; Xia, Shu-Jie; Sun, Xiao-Wen

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the clinical efficacy and safety of retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy (RPLU) and ureteroscopic holmium laser lithotripsy (UHLL) as two minimally invasive procedures in managing obstructive upper ureteral calculi with concurrent urinary tract infections (UTI). The retrospective study included 189 patients who underwent unilateral obstructive upper ureteral stones with concurrent UTI from January 2007 to November 2014 at our institution. Patients received RPLU (81 cases) or UHLL (108 cases). All patients received preoperative anti-infection treatment (indwelling ureteral stent and/or preoperative antibiotics). Collected data, including sex, age, stone size, success rate, operation duration, post-operation hospitalization time, and post-operation complications, were compared. All patients were followed up for more than 6 months after surgeries, and no ureterostenosis occurred. The study included 189 patients, 41 (21.7 %) females and 148 (78.3 %) males with a medium age of 52 years (range 22-81 years). All surgeries were successfully performed without conversion to open surgery. Stone size in the RPLU group was larger than that of the UHLL group (16.1 ± 1.4 vs. 10.4 ± 1.6 mm, P = 0.012). Operative duration (P = 0.009) and hospitalization time (P < 0.001) in the UHLL group were significantly shorter than those in the RPLU group, whereas stone clearance rate was significantly higher in the RPLU group (100 vs. 88.9 %, P = 0.002). Of note, postoperative fever was more common in patients treated with UHLL (15 cases) versus RPLU (4 cases) (13.9 vs. 4.9 %, P = 0.043). Moreover, in the UHLL group, three patients without a preoperative indwelling ureteral stent were complicated with sepsis, which was not seen in RPLU group. In our study, the safety and stone clearance rate of RPLU are better than those of UHLL in the treatment of unilateral upper ureteric calculi with concurrent UTI

  15. Minimally invasive treatment of ureteric calculi using modern techniques.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A; Rassweiler, J; Gumpinger, R; Mayer, R; Eisenberger, F

    1990-03-01

    Between July 1985 and July 1986, 226 upper and 62 distal ureteric calculi were treated. In situ extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the treatment of choice for upper and distal ureteric calculi, with success rates of 81 and 76% respectively. Retrograde manipulation of the calculus was undertaken only when in situ ESWL was impossible because of difficulty in localisation. Although ESWL after successful mobilisation was successful in 95% of patients, retrograde mobilisation was possible in only 80%. Antegrade ureterorenoscopy via a percutaneous nephrostomy was performed to avoid open surgery if retrograde mobilisation was not feasible, and was successful in 90%. Two second generation lithotripters, the modified Dornier HM3+ and the Wolf Piezolith 2200, both suitable for treatment without anaesthesia, were compared in terms of efficacy. In situ ESWL of upper ureteric calculi was successful in 70.6% with the HM3+ and 37.2% with the Piezolith 2200. In situ ESWL of middle ureteric calculi was successful in 81.8% with the modified HM3+, while in situ treatment of middle ureteric calculi was impossible with the Piezolith 2200 because of inadequate ultrasound localisation. Distal ureteric calculi were treated successfully in 71.4% with the modified Dornier HM3+ and in 64% with the Piezolith 2200. We report our experience of ESWL using the prone position for iliac ureteric calculi; 8 of 10 patients were treated successfully in situ.

  16. Cutting laser systems for ureteral strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durek, C.; Knipper, Ansgar; Brinkmann, Ralf; Miller, Ado; Gromoll, Bernd; Jocham, Dieter

    1994-02-01

    Acquired ureteral strictures are still treated either with a stent, balloon dilatation, by open surgery or by endoscopic therapy with a `cold knife' or high current density as intubated ureterotomy. The success rates described in the literature range between 50% and 90%. Using the experimental CTH:YAG laser (wavelength 2120 nm) and CT:YAG laser (wavelength 1950 nm), the reduction of invasiveness and of morbidity was evaluated. First, the CTH:YAG laser was investigated on 540 fresh porcine ureters varying the parameters. With a computerized morphometry system, defect depth, defect width, coagulation depth and coagulation width were measured. Then 21 female pigs underwent 7.5 F - 12 F ureteroscopy with CTH:YAG laser, CT:YAG laser, high current density and `cold knife' ureterotomy. An IVP and sacrification with explanation of the whole urinary tract was done on day 6 and around day 60. In practice, laser application via the endoscope was easy to handle and exact cutting was always seen. The CT:YAG laser seems to have the best success results with low ureteral stricture recurrence rates. However, its clinical use remains to be proven.

  17. Endoscopic lithotripsy for bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Lee, J G; Leung, J W

    1993-01-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy and common duct stone extraction is successful in 85-90% of patients using conventional balloons and baskets. However, most patients with biliary stones > 2 cm will require mechanical, electrohydraulic, or laser lithotripsy prior to stone extraction. Mechanical lithotripsy is inexpensive, easy to perform, and effective in 80-90% of cases. Most failures result from inability to entrap the stone in the lithotripsy basket. These cases may be successfully treated using either electrohydraulic or laser lithotripsy (intraductal shockwave lithotripsy). In most cases, intraductal shockwave lithotripsy requires direct visual control. Due to difficulty with peroral cholangioscopy, these techniques will not be widely used until a smaller, more maneuverable "mother and baby scope" system is developed. We recommend mechanical lithotripsy as the initial treatment for large biliary stones. Failed cases should be referred to specialized centers for a repeat attempt with intraductal shockwave lithotripsy. With this approach, an experienced endoscopist is successful in removing biliary stones in over 95% of patients. Long term biliary stenting remains a viable option for the high risk patients with large common bile duct stones.

  18. A novel ureter dilatation method for replacing hydromantic perfusion pump during ureteroscopic lithotripsy in patients with ureteral calculi and ibroepithelial polyps.

    PubMed

    Li, Tengcheng; Fang, Youqiang; Wu, Jieying; Zhou, Xiangfu

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinical value of a novel ureter dilatation method during ureteroscopic pneumatic lithotripsy in patients with ureteral calculi and polyps. Clinical information of 86 patients with ureter calculi and polyps who underwent ureteroscopic pneumatic lithotripsy was reviewed. A cavity-distention machine was used in 44 cases to inject normal saline for keeping clear operation view (cavity-distention machine-assisted group). A high handled water bag with artificial water injection (traditional pneumatic lithotripsy group) was used in 42 cases. The total operation time, time of stone removal, stone clearance rate and surgery complications were compared between two groups. All operations were successful with no patients transferred to open surgery. No ureter breakage or avulsion occurred in two groups. Two patients in traditional pneumatic lithotripsy group suffered from ureter perforation. In cavity-distention machine-assisted group and traditional pneumatic lithotripsy group, the total operation time was 30.1±4.8 min and 36.2±6.0 min, respectively (t=-5.22, P<0.01); the time of stone removal was 6.4±1.3 min and 9.3±1.5 min, respectively (t=-9.59, P<0.01); the stone clearance rate was 100% (44/44) and 95.2% (40/42; upper ureter stone immigrated to the renal pelvis in 2, and extraorgan shock wave lithotripsy was performed), respectively. Thus, intraoperative infusion of saline with a cavity-distention machine may replace the hydromantic perfusion pump to maintain a clear operation view and favor the stone removal in lesser time. This method has important clinical value in the treatment of ureteral calculi and polyps.

  19. Outcome of ureteroscopy for stone disease in patients with horseshoe kidney: Review of world literature

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Hiro; Rai, Bhavan; Traxer, Olivier; Kata, Slawomir G.; Somani, Bhaskar K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: The management of urolithiasis in patients with horseshoe kidney (HSK) is difficult. Stone formation occurred in 1:5 patients with HSK due to impaired urinary drainage and infections. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy and shock wave lithotripsy can be technically challenging due to altered anatomy. Materials and Methods: We conducted a systematic review of the literature to look at the role of ureteroscopy for stone management in these patients. We searched MEDLINE, PubMed and the Cochrane Library from January 1990 to April 2013 for results of ureteroscopy and stone treatment in HSK patients. Inclusion criteria were all English language articles reporting on ureteroscopy in patients with HSK. Data were extracted on the outcomes and complications. Results: A total of 3 studies was identified during this period. Forty-one patients with HSK underwent flexible ureteroscopy and stone treatment. The mean age was 42 with a male:female ratio nearly 3:1. The mean stone size was 16 mm (range: 3-35 mm). The mean operating time was 86 min with multiple stones seen in 15 patients. All 41 patients had a ureteral access sheath used and flexible ureteroscopy and holmium laser fragmentation done. Thirty-two (78%) patients were stone-free with a mean hospital stay of 1-day. Minor complications (Clavien I or II) were seen in 13 (32%) of which 6 had stent discomfort, 3 needed intravenous antibiotics for <24 h, 3 had hematuria of which 2 needed blood transfusion and one had pyelonephritis needing re-admission and antibiotics. There were no major complications found in the review. Conclusions: Retrograde stone treatment using ureteroscopy and lasertripsy in HSK patients can be performed with good stone clearance rate, but with a slightly higher complication rate. This procedure should, therefore, be done in high volume stone center with an experienced stone surgeon/team. PMID:26692667

  20. Prone split-leg position to manage encrusted ureteral stents in a single-stage procedure in women: Step-by-step surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Marchini, Giovanni Scala; Torricelli, Fábio César Miranda; Mazzucchi, Eduardo; Srougi, Miguel; Monga, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    The management of encrusted ureteral stents is costly, time consuming and may be risky for the patient and challenging for the urologist. Treatment modalities for encrusted stents include extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, cystolithopaxy, rigid or flexible ureteroscopy with intracorporeal lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, open surgery, and a combination of those methods. In this study we describe the management of severe forgotten encrusted ureteral stents in 3 female patients using a prone split-leg position. This position allows us to effectively treat any site and degree of stent encrustation in a single-session approach with the patient in the same position during the whole procedure. All patients were rendered stent and stone free. No complications occurred. PMID:26279723

  1. Ureteral Cannulation as a Complication of Urethral Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Greenlund, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary catheterization is a common procedure, particularly among patients with neurogenic bladder secondary to spinal cord injury. Urethral catheterization is associated with the well-recognized complications of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and limited genitourinary trauma. Unintentional ureteral cannulation represents a rare complication of urethral catheterization and has been previously described in only eight cases within the literature. We describe two cases of aberrant ureteral cannulation involving two patients with quadriplegia. These cases along with prior reports identify the spastic, insensate bladder and altered pelvic sensorium found in upper motor neuron syndromes as major risk factors for ureteral cannulation with a urinary catheter. PMID:25405021

  2. Percutaneous ureteral stent placement for the treatment of a benign ureteral obstruction in a Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae).

    PubMed

    Delk, Katie W; Wack, Raymund F; Burgdorf-Moisuk, Anne; Palm, Carrie A; Zwingenberger, Allison; Glaiberman, Craig B; Ferguson, Kenneth H; Culp, William T N

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old, 113 kg intact male Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) was evaluated for weight loss, polydipsia, and intermittent hematuria. The tiger was immobilized for diagnostic testing including blood work, urinalysis, and abdominal ultrasound. Laboratory testing demonstrated macro- and microhematuria, azotemia, and an increased urine protein:creatinine ratio. Abdominal ultrasound revealed bilateral ureterolithiasis as well as hydronephrosis and ureteral dilation. Ultrasonography performed 5 months later revealed worsening of the right-sided hydronephrosis and hydroureter and a decrease in the severity of dilation on the left side presumably from passage of the left-sided ureteral calculi. Nephroureteral decompression via the placement of a stent was elected. A pigtail ureteral catheter (8.2 French diameter) was placed in the right ureter via an antegrade percutaneous approach utilizing ultrasound and fluoroscopic-guidance. Following stent placement, macrohematuria resolved although microhematuria was noted in opportunistic urine samples. Five months after stent placement, the azotemia had mildly progressed, the urine protein:creatinine ratio was improved, the right hydronephrosis and hydroureter had completely resolved, and the ureteral stent remained in the appropriate position. The tiger had clinically improved with a substantial increase in appetite, weight, and activity level. Ureteral stenting allowed for nephroureteral decompression in the captive large felid of this report, and no complications were encountered. Ureteral stenting provided a minimally invasive method of managing ureteral obstruction in this patient and could be considered in future cases due to the clinical improvement and low morbidity.

  3. Percutaneous ureteral stent placement for the treatment of a benign ureteral obstruction in a Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae).

    PubMed

    Delk, Katie W; Wack, Raymund F; Burgdorf-Moisuk, Anne; Palm, Carrie A; Zwingenberger, Allison; Glaiberman, Craig B; Ferguson, Kenneth H; Culp, William T N

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old, 113 kg intact male Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) was evaluated for weight loss, polydipsia, and intermittent hematuria. The tiger was immobilized for diagnostic testing including blood work, urinalysis, and abdominal ultrasound. Laboratory testing demonstrated macro- and microhematuria, azotemia, and an increased urine protein:creatinine ratio. Abdominal ultrasound revealed bilateral ureterolithiasis as well as hydronephrosis and ureteral dilation. Ultrasonography performed 5 months later revealed worsening of the right-sided hydronephrosis and hydroureter and a decrease in the severity of dilation on the left side presumably from passage of the left-sided ureteral calculi. Nephroureteral decompression via the placement of a stent was elected. A pigtail ureteral catheter (8.2 French diameter) was placed in the right ureter via an antegrade percutaneous approach utilizing ultrasound and fluoroscopic-guidance. Following stent placement, macrohematuria resolved although microhematuria was noted in opportunistic urine samples. Five months after stent placement, the azotemia had mildly progressed, the urine protein:creatinine ratio was improved, the right hydronephrosis and hydroureter had completely resolved, and the ureteral stent remained in the appropriate position. The tiger had clinically improved with a substantial increase in appetite, weight, and activity level. Ureteral stenting allowed for nephroureteral decompression in the captive large felid of this report, and no complications were encountered. Ureteral stenting provided a minimally invasive method of managing ureteral obstruction in this patient and could be considered in future cases due to the clinical improvement and low morbidity. PMID:25653150

  4. Assessing the efficiency of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for stones in renal units with impaired function: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anand; Sinha, Tapan; Karan, S C; Sandhu, A S; Gupta, S K; Sethi, G S; Talwar, R; Narang, V; Adlakha, N; Agarwal, A

    2006-08-01

    The objective was to determine the efficiency of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) in clearing stones from renal units with impaired function. Thirty-five patients with poorly functioning kidneys determined by intravenous urogram and 99mtechnetium diethylene triamine pentacetic acid renal dynamic scan underwent ESWL. Stone clearance was assessed at 3 months and compared with that in normally functioning kidneys. The study group was divided into two subgroups. Those with split glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of the concerned kidney between 10 and 20 ml/min were in group 1. Group 2 consisted of patients with split GFR between 20 and 30 ml/min. A control group (group 3) was formed from patients with urolithiasis and normally functioning kidneys. The overall retreatment rate was 84.4%. The overall stone clearance rate in the study group was 34.2% while it was 57.7% in the control group. The stone clearance rate in group 2 was 40%. The difference in stone clearance rate between the study and control groups was statistically significant (P=0.023) but that between group 2 and the control group was not (P=0.159). The incidence of steinstrasse between the study group 2 and control group was not statistically significant (P=0.408). The clearance rate for ureteral stones was comparable in all the three groups. The stone-free rate and rate of steinstrasse for renal stones in kidneys with moderately impaired function were comparable to normally functioning kidneys. However, kidneys with severely impaired function had poor results. The clearance rate for ureteral stones was not influenced by the impairment of renal function.

  5. Tissue Engineering of Ureteral Grafts: Preparation of Biocompatible Crosslinked Ureteral Scaffolds of Porcine Origin

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Holger; Hammer, Niels; Ossmann, Susann; Schierle, Katrin; Sack, Ulrich; Hofmann, Jörg; Wecks, Mike; Boldt, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The surgical reconstruction of ureteric defects is often associated with post-operative complications and requires additional medical care. Decellularized ureters originating from porcine donors could represent an alternative therapy. Our aim was to investigate the possibility of manufacturing decellularized ureters, the characteristics of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the biocompatibility of these grafts in vitro/in vivo after treatment with different crosslinking agents. To achieve these goals, native ureters were obtained from pigs and were decellularized. The success of decellularization and the ECM composition were characterized by (immuno)histological staining methods and a DNA-assay. In vitro: scaffolds were crosslinked either with carbodiimide (CDI), genipin (GP), glutaraldehyde, left chemically untreated or were lyophilized. Scaffolds in each group were reseeded with Caco2, LS48, 3T3 cells, or native rat smooth muscle cells (SMC). After 2 weeks, the number of ingrown cells was quantified. In vivo: crosslinked scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously into rats and the type of infiltrating cells were determined after 1, 9, and 30 days. After decellularization, scaffold morphology and composition of ECM were maintained, all cellular components were removed, DNA destroyed and strongly reduced. In vitro: GP and CDI scaffolds revealed a higher number of ingrown 3T3 and SMC cells as compared to untreated scaffolds. In vivo: at day 30, implants were predominantly infiltrated by fibroblasts and M2 anti-inflammatory macrophages. A maximum of MMP3 was observed in the CDI group at day 30. TIMP1 was below the detection limit. In this study, we demonstrated the potential of decellularization to create biocompatible porcine ureteric grafts, whereas a CDI-crosslink may facilitate the remodeling process. The use of decellularized ureteric grafts may represent a novel therapeutic method in reconstruction of ureteric defects. PMID:26157796

  6. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites.

  7. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Kalan, Ammie K.; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D’Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E.; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  8. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  9. [Problems with Ureteral Stents – a Never-Ending Story].

    PubMed

    Betschart, Patrick; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Abt, Dominik

    2016-03-16

    Temporary drainage of the upper urinary tract by internal ureteral stents is a common procedure to assure renal function and to treat pain caused by ureteral obstruction. Ureteral stents are frequently associated with side effects like urinary symptoms, pain or hematuria resulting in frequent medical consultations. In addition to good patient education, symptomatic drug therapy of stent-associated symptoms is often indicated and sufficient. However, complications like stent dysfunction or significant urinary tract infections have to be kept in mind, as they require further diagnostics and treatment. Therefore, especially general practitioners as a primary point of contact for the patients should be familiar with common ureteral stent-associated problems, their treatment and indications for patient referrals.

  10. Spontaneous ureteral rupture in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.H.; Pennebaker, J.B.; Harisdangkul, V.; Songcharoen, S.

    1983-08-01

    A patient with known systemic lupus erythematosus had fever and symptoms of a lower urinary tract infection. Bone scintigraphy showed left ureteral perforation and necrosis with no demonstrable nephrolithiasis. It is speculated that this episode was due to lupus vasculitis.

  11. Systemic Weber-Christian disease with reversible bilateral ureteric obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Brawn, L. A.; Ramsay, L. E.; Shortland, J. R.; Williams, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    It has been proposed that idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis may be a consequence of 'healed' retroperitoneal lesions of systemic Weber-Christian disease. However ureteric obstruction which is the hallmark of idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, has not been described in systemic Weber-Christian disease. We report a patient with systemic Weber-Christian disease who, during a relapse, developed bilateral ureteric obstruction which resolved when the Weber-Christian disease remitted. The radiological appearances were consistent with a diagnosis of idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, but the clinical course was slightly atypical in that the ureteric obstruction resolved completely and rapidly. Ureteric obstruction can complicate systemic Weber-Christian disease and this observation gives support to the hypothesis that idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis is related to systemic Weber-Christian disease. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2608584

  12. Danazol in the management of ureteral obstruction secondary to endometriosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rivlin, M.E.; Krueger, R.P.; Wiser, W.L.

    1985-08-01

    A case is reported in which a woman was diagnosed with ureteral obstruction secondary to endometriosis after cystourethrogram, retrograde pyelogram and a renal scan. After unsuccessful treatment with danazol, a retroperitoneal ureteroneocystotomy was performed. The ureter was found to be obstructed by dense fibrous tissue that contained endometrial glands. It was concluded that danazol is unlikely to relieve endometriotic ureteric obstruction once dense fibrosis has occurred. 8 references, 2 figures.

  13. Robotic-assisted ureteral reimplantation with Boari flap and psoas hitch: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Yang, Christopher; Jones, Loren; Rivera, Marcelino E; Verlee, Graham T; Deane, Leslie A

    2011-11-01

    Robotic-assisted ureteral reimplantations were performed on 3 patients at a single institution, 2 with Boari flap and psoas hitch and 1 with psoas hitch alone. These were for urothelial carcinoma of the distal ureter, ureteral obstruction caused by distal ureteral endometriosis, and ureteral transaction during gynecologic surgery. We used intraoperative ureteroscopy to confirm tumor margins as well as a simple technique for retrograde placement of transvesicle wire prior to ureteral anastomosis. Surgery and recovery were uneventful. This illustrates that robotic-assisted ureteral reimplantation with Boari flap and psoas hitch is a safe and viable approach for ureterovesicle reconstruction. PMID:21859340

  14. The prophylactic use of ureteral catheters during colorectal operations.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Gordon, P H

    1994-03-01

    The necessity for preoperative ureteral catheter insertion for colorectal operations continues to be controversial. To determine our experience and what complications might be associated with ureteral catheter use, the charts of all patients in our department undergoing ureteral catheterization in combination with colorectal procedures between the years 1978 and 1989 were reviewed. The indications for operation, the presence or absence of urinary tract symptoms, and intravenous pyelogram findings (if performed) were recorded. Time for the procedure, size and number of catheters, and complications were noted. From the operative report, a retrospective grading of necessity for ureteral catheterization was assessed according to a scale from A to D. There were 120 ureteral catheterizations performed, bilaterally in 60 per cent of cases. Complications included renal colic (1), oliguria (1), and anuria (2). Intraoperatively, one ureter was cut and one ureter tied but recognized by palpation and ligature removed. Retrospective grading deemed ureteral catheterization necessary in 27.5 per cent of cases. We conclude that catheters are helpful in selected cases. For patients with bilateral catheter insertion, complications can be reduced by ensuring urine output prior to removal of the second catheter. PMID:8116985

  15. Recent advances in management of ureteral calculi.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard Daron; Shah, Mushtaq; Patel, Anup

    2009-01-01

    The management of patients with urinary tract stone disease has changed dramatically over recent years, with current treatment modalities focused on their minimal invasiveness. In this article we will discuss the recent advances in the field of urolithiasis management, with a focus on medical expulsive therapy, extra-corporeal shockwave lithotripsy and ureteroscopy.

  16. 12. FLOOR 2; STONE CRANE IN PLACE FOR ROCK STONES; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. FLOOR 2; STONE CRANE IN PLACE FOR ROCK STONES; STONE CRANE HAS OAK SPAR, JIB AND BRACE, METAL SCREW, IRON YOKE AND DOGS; IRON PINS FIT THROUGH HOLES IN DOGS INTO HOLES DRILLED IN RUNNER STONE - Hook Windmill, North Main Street at Pantigo Road, East Hampton, Suffolk County, NY

  17. Ureteroiliac Artery Fistula Caused by a Metallic Memokath Ureteral Stent in a Radiation-Induced Ureteral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Das, Krishanu; Ordones, Flavio; Welikumbura, Sumudu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Memokath 051™ stents are increasingly used for management of benign and malignant ureteral strictures refractory to management with single or tandem polymeric Double-J ureteral stents. Migration, encrustation, and difficulty in extraction during stent exchange are the chief problems reported so far with these thermoexpandable metallic stents. We report an unusual complication of ureteroexternal iliac artery fistula (UEAF) caused by Memokath stent inserted for radiation-induced ureteral stricture. Case Presentation: A 71-year-old male with history of colorectal cancer (underwent extirpative surgery + chemoradiotherapy) and subsequently radiation-induced ureteral stricture had bilateral Memokath ureteral stents inserted. Three months later, he presented with sepsis and hemodynamic instability secondary to UEAF, confirmed on angiography. A covered vascular stent was inserted as an immediate management. Conclusion: Memokath stent insertion in radiation-induced ureteral strictures may be associated with an increased risk of erosion and the rare potential complication of UEAF. This potential risk needs to be considered in the overall setting of such strictures and the difficulty in treating them. Prompt imaging (angiography) and placement of an endovascular stent are the ideal immediate options in such cases. PMID:27785465

  18. Analysis of early nephron patterning reveals a role for distal RV proliferation in fusion to the ureteric tip via a cap mesenchyme-derived connecting segment.

    PubMed

    Georgas, Kylie; Rumballe, Bree; Valerius, M Todd; Chiu, Han Sheng; Thiagarajan, Rathi D; Lesieur, Emmanuelle; Aronow, Bruce J; Brunskill, Eric W; Combes, Alexander N; Tang, Dave; Taylor, Darrin; Grimmond, Sean M; Potter, S Steven; McMahon, Andrew P; Little, Melissa H

    2009-08-15

    While nephron formation is known to be initiated by a mesenchyme-to-epithelial transition of the cap mesenchyme to form a renal vesicle (RV), the subsequent patterning of the nephron and fusion with the ureteric component of the kidney to form a patent contiguous uriniferous tubule has not been fully characterized. Using dual section in situ hybridization (SISH)/immunohistochemistry (IHC) we have revealed distinct distal/proximal patterning of Notch, BMP and Wnt pathway components within the RV stage nephron. Quantitation of mitoses and Cyclin D1 expression indicated that cell proliferation was higher in the distal RV, reflecting the differential developmental programs of the proximal and distal populations. A small number of RV genes were also expressed in the early connecting segment of the nephron. Dual ISH/IHC combined with serial section immunofluorescence and 3D reconstruction revealed that fusion occurs between the late RV and adjacent ureteric tip via a process that involves loss of the intervening ureteric epithelial basement membrane and insertion of cells expressing RV markers into the ureteric tip. Using Six2-eGFPCre x R26R-lacZ mice, we demonstrate that these cells are derived from the cap mesenchyme and not the ureteric epithelium. Hence, both nephron patterning and patency are evident at the late renal vesicle stage. PMID:19501082

  19. Analysis of early nephron patterning reveals a role for distal RV proliferation in fusion to the ureteric tip via a cap mesenchyme-derived connecting segment.

    PubMed

    Georgas, Kylie; Rumballe, Bree; Valerius, M Todd; Chiu, Han Sheng; Thiagarajan, Rathi D; Lesieur, Emmanuelle; Aronow, Bruce J; Brunskill, Eric W; Combes, Alexander N; Tang, Dave; Taylor, Darrin; Grimmond, Sean M; Potter, S Steven; McMahon, Andrew P; Little, Melissa H

    2009-08-15

    While nephron formation is known to be initiated by a mesenchyme-to-epithelial transition of the cap mesenchyme to form a renal vesicle (RV), the subsequent patterning of the nephron and fusion with the ureteric component of the kidney to form a patent contiguous uriniferous tubule has not been fully characterized. Using dual section in situ hybridization (SISH)/immunohistochemistry (IHC) we have revealed distinct distal/proximal patterning of Notch, BMP and Wnt pathway components within the RV stage nephron. Quantitation of mitoses and Cyclin D1 expression indicated that cell proliferation was higher in the distal RV, reflecting the differential developmental programs of the proximal and distal populations. A small number of RV genes were also expressed in the early connecting segment of the nephron. Dual ISH/IHC combined with serial section immunofluorescence and 3D reconstruction revealed that fusion occurs between the late RV and adjacent ureteric tip via a process that involves loss of the intervening ureteric epithelial basement membrane and insertion of cells expressing RV markers into the ureteric tip. Using Six2-eGFPCre x R26R-lacZ mice, we demonstrate that these cells are derived from the cap mesenchyme and not the ureteric epithelium. Hence, both nephron patterning and patency are evident at the late renal vesicle stage.

  20. Noncontrast computed tomography can predict the outcome of shockwave lithotripsy via accurate stone measurement and abdominal fat distribution determination.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jiun-Hung; Tu, Hung-Pin; Shih, Paul Ming-Chen; Shen, Jung-Tsung; Jang, Mei-Yu; Wu, Wen-Jen; Li, Ching-Chia; Chou, Yii-Her; Juan, Yung-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease of the urinary system. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) has become one of the standard treatments for renal and ureteral stones; however, the success rates range widely and failure of stone disintegration may cause additional outlay, alternative procedures, and even complications. We used the data available from noncontrast abdominal computed tomography (NCCT) to evaluate the impact of stone parameters and abdominal fat distribution on calculus-free rates following SWL. We retrospectively reviewed 328 patients who had urinary stones and had undergone SWL from August 2012 to August 2013. All of them received pre-SWL NCCT; 1 month after SWL, radiography was arranged to evaluate the condition of the fragments. These patients were classified into stone-free group and residual stone group. Unenhanced computed tomography variables, including stone attenuation, abdominal fat area, and skin-to-stone distance (SSD) were analyzed. In all, 197 (60%) were classified as stone-free and 132 (40%) as having residual stone. The mean ages were 49.35 ± 13.22 years and 55.32 ± 13.52 years, respectively. On univariate analysis, age, stone size, stone surface area, stone attenuation, SSD, total fat area (TFA), abdominal circumference, serum creatinine, and the severity of hydronephrosis revealed statistical significance between these two groups. From multivariate logistic regression analysis, the independent parameters impacting SWL outcomes were stone size, stone attenuation, TFA, and serum creatinine. [Adjusted odds ratios and (95% confidence intervals): 9.49 (3.72-24.20), 2.25 (1.22-4.14), 2.20 (1.10-4.40), and 2.89 (1.35-6.21) respectively, all p < 0.05]. In the present study, stone size, stone attenuation, TFA and serum creatinine were four independent predictors for stone-free rates after SWL. These findings suggest that pretreatment NCCT may predict the outcomes after SWL. Consequently, we can use these predictors for selecting

  1. [NEW OPTIONS OF ENDOSCOPIC TREATMENT FOR KIDNEY AND URETER STONES IN OBESE PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Martov, A G; Dutov, S V; Andronov, A S; Kil'chukov, Z I; Tahaev, R A

    2015-01-01

    Effective urolithiasis treatment, especially in overweight patients has a considerable medical and social implication. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) and percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL) in prone position of the patient are standard treatment options for kidney and ureter stones. These interventions are not always effective in patients with concomitant obesity and are associated with technical difficulties and an increased risk of complications. The study included 175 patients with obesity. The first group consisted of 96 (54.8%) patients treated with transurethral contact lithotripsy. The 2nd group consisted of 54 (30.9%) patients who underwent PCNL in the supine position. The third group comprised 25 (14.3%) patients with multiple stones of kidney and ureter, who underwent combined transurethral and percutaneous intervention in the supine position. The 1st and 3rd group had a higher prevalence of patients with II degree of obesity, in the 2nd group--with I degree of obesity. The mean duration of surgery in 1st group was 43.4 min, in the 2nd--70.3 min and in the third--84.6 min. Method of kidney drainage depended mainly on the presence, location and size of residual stone fragments. The average duration of the kidney drainage stent in patients of the 1st group was 39 days (ureteral catheter--1.3 days). In all patients of the 2nd and 3rd groups, at the final stage of the operation a nephrostomy tube was placed for an average of 2.7 days. The average postoperative hospital stay was 2.9 days in the 1st group, 4.1 days in the 2nd group and 4.5 days in the third group. In the 1st group, the stone-free status was achieved in 81 (84.4%) patients. Another 10 (10.4%) patients later needed ESWL for the complete disposal of the stones. In the 2nd group, the complete clearance of kidney stones was achieved in 49 (90.7%) patients. Another 3 (5.6%) patients required added ESWL to achieve the stone-free status. In the third group of patients stone free status

  2. [NEW OPTIONS OF ENDOSCOPIC TREATMENT FOR KIDNEY AND URETER STONES IN OBESE PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Martov, A G; Dutov, S V; Andronov, A S; Kil'chukov, Z I; Tahaev, R A

    2015-01-01

    Effective urolithiasis treatment, especially in overweight patients has a considerable medical and social implication. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) and percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL) in prone position of the patient are standard treatment options for kidney and ureter stones. These interventions are not always effective in patients with concomitant obesity and are associated with technical difficulties and an increased risk of complications. The study included 175 patients with obesity. The first group consisted of 96 (54.8%) patients treated with transurethral contact lithotripsy. The 2nd group consisted of 54 (30.9%) patients who underwent PCNL in the supine position. The third group comprised 25 (14.3%) patients with multiple stones of kidney and ureter, who underwent combined transurethral and percutaneous intervention in the supine position. The 1st and 3rd group had a higher prevalence of patients with II degree of obesity, in the 2nd group--with I degree of obesity. The mean duration of surgery in 1st group was 43.4 min, in the 2nd--70.3 min and in the third--84.6 min. Method of kidney drainage depended mainly on the presence, location and size of residual stone fragments. The average duration of the kidney drainage stent in patients of the 1st group was 39 days (ureteral catheter--1.3 days). In all patients of the 2nd and 3rd groups, at the final stage of the operation a nephrostomy tube was placed for an average of 2.7 days. The average postoperative hospital stay was 2.9 days in the 1st group, 4.1 days in the 2nd group and 4.5 days in the third group. In the 1st group, the stone-free status was achieved in 81 (84.4%) patients. Another 10 (10.4%) patients later needed ESWL for the complete disposal of the stones. In the 2nd group, the complete clearance of kidney stones was achieved in 49 (90.7%) patients. Another 3 (5.6%) patients required added ESWL to achieve the stone-free status. In the third group of patients stone free status

  3. Lunar Phases and Emergency Department Visits for Renal Colic Due to Ureteral Calculus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Andy W.; Johnson, Justin D.; Fronczak, Carolyn M.; LaGrange, Chad A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Urolithiasis affects an estimated 5% of the population and the lifetime risk of passing a stone in the urinary tract is estimated to be 8–10%. Urinary calculus formation is highly variable and while certain risk factors such as age, gender, seasonality, anatomic abnormality, and metabolic diseases have been identified, not much is known regarding the association of environmental factors such as lunar phases on renal colic. We conducted a retrospective study to test the hypothesis that full moon phase is an environmental factor associated for increased emergency department (ED) visits for renal colic due to ureteral calculus. Methods We analyzed 559 renal colic diagnoses by the ED at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in a 24-month period and compared them with corresponding lunar phases as well as supermoon events. The lunar phases were defined as full moon ± two days, new moon ± two days, and the days in-between as normal days according to the lunar calendar. Supermoon event dates were obtained from NASA. Results 90 cases (16.1%) were diagnosed during full moon phase, 89 cases (15.9%) were diagnosed during new moon phase, and 380 cases (68.0%) were diagnosed during normal days. The incidence of renal colic showed no statistically significant association with lunar phases or supermoon events. Conclusion In this retrospective longitudinal study with adequate power, neither full moon phase nor supermoon event exhibited an association with increased renal colic diagnoses due to ureteral calculus by the ED at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. PMID:27299307

  4. Novel application of an established technique for removing a knotted ureteric stent.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Heidi; Turney, Ben; Kumar, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a case whereby a ureteric stent became knotted during removal and lodged within the upper ureter. The authors describe a novel minimally invasive technique to remove the knotted ureteric stent using the holmium laser. PMID:22701009

  5. Kidney Stones in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nephrology American Kidney Fund National Kidney Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Kidney Stones in Children Page Content On this page: ...

  6. Renal stones in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Norma; DasGupta, Ranan

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of renal stones during pregnancy is a complex problem. Risks to the fetus from ionising radiation and interventional procedures need to be balanced with optimising clinical care for the mother. Management of such patients requires a clear understanding of available options, with a multidisciplinary team approach. In this review, we discuss the role of different diagnostic tests including ultrasound, magnetic resonance urography, and computerized tomography. We also provide an update on recent developments in the treatment of renal stones during pregnancy. Expectant management remains first-line treatment. Where definitive treatment of the stone is required, new evidence suggests that ureteroscopic stone removal may be equally safe, and possibly better than traditional temporising procedures. PMID:27512433

  7. Evidence for Ureterorenoscopy and Laser Fragmentation (URSL) for Large Renal Stones in the Modern Era.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Robert; Abourmarzouk, Omar; Rai, Bhavan; Biyani, Chandra Shakhar; Rukin, Nicholas J; Somani, Bhaskar K

    2015-08-01

    Large renal stones (>2 cm) are managed with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), which has a good stone-free rate (SFR) but a relatively high incidence of complications graded Clavien ≥ 3. We wanted to review the literature for the use of ureterorenoscopy and laser fragmentation (URSL) for the management of these stones. A systematic review was done from 1990 to April 2014 for all English language articles reporting on a minimum of 10 patients for stones >2 cm in size (done by 2 reviewers independently) in accordance with the PRISMA and Cochrane review guidelines. A total of 379 articles were identified and after screening for the titles (54) and abstracts (29), 12 papers (651 patients) were included. The male to female ratio was 356:232 with a mean age of 54 years (range 16-86 years). With a mean stone size of 2.7 cm (2-3.15 cm) and the mean operating time of 96 min (28-238 min); the SFR was 91 % (1.45 procedures/patient). The overall number of complications was 58 (8.6 %) of which 26 (4.5 %) were complications classed Clavien ≥ 3 (haematuria with subcapsular haematoma/clot retention-7; ureteral perforation-7; steinstrasse-5; sepsis/pyelonephritis-5; prostatitis-1; cerebrovascular accident-1). Ureterorenoscopy for large renal stones in the modern era has good SFR with a small risk of major complications. PMID:26077357

  8. Incidence of urinary tract infection in patients without bacteriuria undergoing SWL: comparison of stone types.

    PubMed

    Dinçel, C; Ozdiler, E; Ozenci, H; Tazici, N; Koşar, A

    1998-02-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) currently is accepted as the preferred treatment for most renal and upper ureteral calculi. However, little is known about the infection risks of SWL. In this study, the incidence and severity of urinary tract infection in 117 patients with renal calculi undergoing SWL were evaluated and the stone characteristics of those with and without infection were compared. The patients were followed clinically and bacteriologically 1 and 14 days after the procedure. Bacteriuria was noted in six patients within 24 hours after SWL. No bacteriuria was noted 2 weeks later. Of these patients, three were symptomatic (including dysuria, burning, and fever >38 degrees C). No patient was hospitalized. We found no significant correlation between the occurrence of bacteriuria and the number or size of the stones (P > 0.05), nor was there any correlation between bacteriuria and the stone-free rate or the location of the calculi (P > 0.05). However, there was a significantly higher risk of urinary tract infection in patients with struvite stones than in those with other types of stones (17.3% v 2.1%). In patients with infection stones, prophylactic antimicrobial chemotherapy is necessary even if bacteriuria is not present before SWL.

  9. Evidence for Ureterorenoscopy and Laser Fragmentation (URSL) for Large Renal Stones in the Modern Era.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Robert; Abourmarzouk, Omar; Rai, Bhavan; Biyani, Chandra Shakhar; Rukin, Nicholas J; Somani, Bhaskar K

    2015-08-01

    Large renal stones (>2 cm) are managed with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), which has a good stone-free rate (SFR) but a relatively high incidence of complications graded Clavien ≥ 3. We wanted to review the literature for the use of ureterorenoscopy and laser fragmentation (URSL) for the management of these stones. A systematic review was done from 1990 to April 2014 for all English language articles reporting on a minimum of 10 patients for stones >2 cm in size (done by 2 reviewers independently) in accordance with the PRISMA and Cochrane review guidelines. A total of 379 articles were identified and after screening for the titles (54) and abstracts (29), 12 papers (651 patients) were included. The male to female ratio was 356:232 with a mean age of 54 years (range 16-86 years). With a mean stone size of 2.7 cm (2-3.15 cm) and the mean operating time of 96 min (28-238 min); the SFR was 91 % (1.45 procedures/patient). The overall number of complications was 58 (8.6 %) of which 26 (4.5 %) were complications classed Clavien ≥ 3 (haematuria with subcapsular haematoma/clot retention-7; ureteral perforation-7; steinstrasse-5; sepsis/pyelonephritis-5; prostatitis-1; cerebrovascular accident-1). Ureterorenoscopy for large renal stones in the modern era has good SFR with a small risk of major complications.

  10. Post-renal acute renal failure due to a huge bladder stone.

    PubMed

    Celik, Orcun; Suelozgen, Tufan; Budak, Salih; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem

    2014-06-30

    A 63-year old male was referred to our emergency unit due to acute renal failure. The level of serum renal function tests levels, blood urea nitrogen (BUN)/creatinine, were 63 mmol/L/848 μmol/L. CT (Computarised Tomography) scan showed a huge bladder stone (5 cm x 6 cm x 5 cm) with increased bladder wall thickness. Post-renal acute renal failure due to bilateral ureterohydronephrosis was diagnosed. The huge bladder stone was considered to be the cause of ureterohydronephrosis and renal failure. The patient was catheterised and received haemodialysis immediately. He received haemodialysis four times during ten days of hospitalization and the level of serum renal function tests levels (BUN/ creatinine) decreased 18 mmol/L/123 μmol/L. After improvement of renal function, we performed cystoscopy that demonstrated normal prostatic urethra and bladder neck and bilaterally normal ureteral orifices. Bladder wall was roughly trabeculated and Bladder outlet was completely obstructed by a huge bladder stone. After cystoscopy open, cystolithotomy was performed to remove calcium phosphate and magnesium ammonium phosphate stone weighing 200 g removed. Four days after operation the patient was discharged uneventfully and urethral catheter was removed on the seventh day. Post-renal acute renal failure due to large bladder stones is rare in literature. According to the our knowledge; early diagnosis of the stone avoid growth to large size and prevent renal failure.

  11. Imaging of stone disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Masselli, Gabriele; Derme, Martina; Laghi, Francesca; Polettini, Elisabetta; Brunelli, Roberto; Framarino, Maria Luisa; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2013-12-01

    Renal colic is the most frequent non-obstetric cause for abdominal pain and subsequent hospitalization during pregnancy. Intervention is necessary in patients who do not respond to conservative treatment. Ultrasound (US) is widely used as the first-line diagnostic test in pregnant women with nephrolithiasis, despite it is highly nonspecific and may be unable to differentiate between ureteral obstruction secondary to calculi and physiologic hydronephrosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be considered as a second-line test, when US fails to establish a diagnosis and there are continued symptoms despite conservative management. Moreover, MRI is able to differentiate physiologic from pathologic dilatation. In fact in the cases of obstruction secondary to calculi, there is renal enlargement and perinephric edema, not seen with physiological dilatation. In the latter, there is smooth tapering of the middle third of the ureter because of the mass effect between the uterus and adjacent retroperitoneal musculature. When the stone is lodged in the lower ureter, a standing column of dilated ureter is seen below this physiological constriction. MRI is also helpful in demonstrating complications such as pyelonephritis. In the unresolved cases, Computed tomography remains a reliable technique for depicting obstructing urinary tract calculi in pregnant women, but it involves ionizing radiation. Nephrolithiasis during pregnancy requires a collaboration between urologists, obstetricians, and radiologists. PMID:23771120

  12. Monitoring for Renal Stone Recurrence in Astronauts With History of Stone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes, David P.; Sargsyan, Ashot; Locke, James; Davis, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    After an initial stone episode persons are at increased risk for future stone formation. A systematic approach is required to monitor the efficacy of treatment and preventive measures, and to assess the risk of developing new stones. This is important for persons working in critical jobs or austere environments, such as astronauts. A literature review of the current standards of care for renal stone monitoring and imaging was done. Military and civil aviation standards were also reviewed, as well as the medical precedents from the space program. Additionally, a new, more effective, renal stone ultrasound protocol has been developed. Using this work, a monitoring algorithm was proposed that takes into consideration the unique mission and operational environment of spaceflight. The approach to imaging persons with history of renal stones varies widely in the literature. Imaging is often done yearly or biannually, which may be too long for mission critical personnel. In the proposed algorithm astronauts with a history of renal stone, who may be under consideration for assignment, are imaged by a detailed, physiciandriven, ultrasound protocol. Unassigned personnel are monitored by yearly ultrasound and urine studies. Any positive ultrasound study is then followed by low-dose renal computed tomography scan. Other criteria are also established. The proposed algorithm provides a balanced approach between efficacy and reduced radiation exposure for the monitoring of astronauts with a renal stone history. This may eventually allow a transition from a risk-averse, to a risk-modifying approach that can enable continued service of individuals with history of renal stone that have adequately controlled risk factors.

  13. [Clinical experiences in 210 percutaneous removal of kidney and ureteral calculi].

    PubMed

    Brien, G; Schöpke, W; Althaus, P; Kirschner, P; Fahlenkamp, D; Gliech, V

    1988-05-01

    The introduction of percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureterolithotomy has greatly widened the therapeutical spectrum of urolithiasis. In this paper indications and contraindications of percutaneous stone removal will be discussed as well as techniques of this procedure. 210 percutaneous stone operations were performed after an initial training period primarily using local anesthesia (neuroleptanalgesia). This operative procedure allowed stone removal in patients otherwise inoperable because of increased operation risk or of advanced age. With increasing experience the success rate has been improved, though the stage of difficulties in nephrolithotomy and ureterolithotomy has increased too. Percutaneous operation primarily in connection with extracorporal shock wave lithotripsy is the first treatment modality for patients with staghorn stones. Possible complications (bleeding, perforation, injury to neighbouring organs) and their treatment are discussed.

  14. Comparing extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and ureteroscopy for treatment of proximal ureteric calculi: a cost-effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Izamin, I; Aniza, I; Rizal, A M; Aljunid, S M

    2009-03-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) and ureteroscopy (URS) are two main methods of treating proximal ureteric stones. Success rates and cost-effectiveness of the two methods were compared. A total of 67 patients who underwent treatment between January 2007 and July 2007 at a state general hospital were included in the study. The success rate for ESWL group was 81.8% and for URS group was 84.6%. ESWL technique produced a significant higher overall cost per patient than URS (RM930.02 versus RM621.95 respectively). There was no significant difference in quality of patient's life. Cost-effectiveness ratio was lower for URS. The analysis suggested that URS was more cost-effective than ESWL.

  15. [An unusual cause of ureteral obstruction in kidney transplant].

    PubMed

    Vigo, Valentina; Rossi, Luigi; Lisi, Piero; Antonelli, Maurizio; Lomonte, Carlo; Basile, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Inguinal herniation of the ureter in a kidney transplantation is a rare cause of late distal ureteral obstruction. Herniation is usually secondary to the implant of a long redundant ureter and to its course on the spermatic cord. This clinical condition can worsen graft function in the presence of ipsilateral hydroureteronephrosis. In this review, we describe the case of an asymptomatic 51-year-old man with a history of right iliac renal allotransplantation 12 years before. Kidney ultrasound showed moderate hydroureteronephrosis and ureteral kneeling at the upper third of the inguinal canal. The patient presented a mild increase in serum creatinine; physical examination revealed an ipsilateral inguinal hernia. A CT scan of the abdomen with no contrast medium confirmed middle-distal ureteral kneeling engaging in the sac of the right inguinal hernia. The patient underwent surgical hernia repair with no complications and his renal function recovered completely.

  16. Flexible ureteroscopy versus laparoscopy for the treatment of patients who initially presented with obstructive pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Selcuk; Resorlu, Berkan; Eksi, Mithat; Aras, Bekir; Atar, Arda; Tugcu, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the safety and effectiveness of flexible ureteroscopy (F-URS) with transperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy (TPLU) in cases of obstructive pyelonephritis secondary to large proximal ureteral stones. Methods: A series of 42 patients presenting with obstructive pyelonephritis due to proximal ureteral stones larger than 1.5 cm were included from April 2006 to February 2015 in this comparative study. After drainage of pyonephrosis and resolution of sepsis, 22 patients treated with TPLU (Group I), and 20 patients were treated with F-URS (Group II). Preoperative patient and stone characteristics, procedure-related parameters and clinical outcomes were assessed for each group. Results: It was seen that both methods were effective in the treatment of large proximal ureteral stones. However TPLU provided a higher stone- free rate (100% vs 80%. p=0.043) and lower retreatment rate. There was no difference between the groups for the operative time and complication rate. On the other hand, patients treated with F-URS had less postoperative pain (p=0.008), a shorter hospital stay (p<0.001) and a faster return to daily activities (p<0.001). Conclusions: The results of our study show that both F-URS and TPLU are safe and effective surgical procedures for treatment of large proximal ureteral stones after controlling obstructive pyelonephritis. However, TPLU has a higher stone-free rate with comparable operating time and complication rate as compared to F-URS. On the other hand F-URS has the advantages of less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay and faster return to daily activities. PMID:27375691

  17. Future Treatment of Common Bile Duct Stones.

    PubMed

    Johnson; Hunter

    1997-03-01

    Management options for patients found to have common bile duct stones have expanded as a function of improved instrumentation and radiographic support. Technological advances initially lead to increased costs but eventually result in improved quality for patients. Controversy exists for patients with either soft clinical findings or stones found at the time of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. As laparoscopic common duct exploration becomes more widespread the need for perioperative ERCP will likely decrease; however, this will depend on the experience of the surgeons at a given institution. Common bile duct stones found at the time of laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be approached in a variety of different ways. The most commonly used methods are laparoscopic transcystic common bile duct exploration, laparoscopic choledochotomy with common bile duct exploration, open common bile duct exploration, laparoscopic antegrade sphincterotomy, and postoperative ERCP. In the future, the treatment goal of biliary lithiasis will be to accomplish cholecystectomy and removal of bile duct stones in a single stage. Advances in fiberoptic technology will make transcystic duct exploration more effective, but it is likely that sphincterotomy (antegrade or retrograde) will be used preferentially for the distally impacted stone.

  18. Estimating the Rate of Occurrence of Renal Stones in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, J.; Goodenow, D.; Gokoglu, S.; Kassemi, M.

    2016-01-01

    system, the entire renal stone analysis model produces a probability distribution of the stone formation rate and an expected uncertainty in the estimate. The utility of this analysis will be demonstrated by showing the change in renal stone occurrence predicted by this method using urine chemistry distributions published in Whitson et al. 2009. A comparison to the model predictions to previous assessments of renal stone risk will be used to illustrate initial validation of the model.

  19. Bioresorbable ureteral stents from natural origin polymers.

    PubMed

    Barros, Alexandre A; Rita, Ana; Duarte, C; Pires, Ricardo A; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Ludovico, Paula; Lima, Estevão; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L

    2015-04-01

    In this work, stents were produced from natural origin polysaccharides. Alginate, gellan gum, and a blend of these with gelatin were used to produce hollow tube (stents) following a combination of templated gelation and critical point carbon dioxide drying. Morphological analysis of the surface of the stents was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. Indwelling time, encrustation, and stability of the stents in artificial urine solution was carried out up to 60 days of immersion. In vitro studies carried out with simulated urine demonstrated that the tubes present a high fluid uptake ability, about 1000%. Despite this, the materials are able to maintain their shape and do not present an extensive swelling behavior. The bioresorption profile was observed to be highly dependent on the composition of the stent and it can be tuned. Complete dissolution of the materials may occur between 14 and 60 days. Additionally, no encrustation was observed within the tested timeframe. The ability to resist bacterial adherence was evaluated with Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and two Gram-negatives Escherichia coli DH5 alpha and Klebsiella oxytoca. For K. oxytoca, no differences were observed in comparison with a commercial stent (Biosoft(®) duo, Porges), although, for S. aureus all tested compositions had a higher inhibition of bacterial adhesion compared to the commercial stents. In case of E. coli, the addition of gelatin to the formulations reduced the bacterial adhesion in a highly significant manner compared to the commercial stents. The stents produced by the developed technology fulfill the requirements for ureteral stents and will contribute in the development of biocompatible and bioresorbable urinary stents.

  20. Kidney stones - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Renal calculi - self-care; Nephrolithiasis - self-care; Stones - kidney - self-care ... You visited your health care provider or the hospital because you have a kidney stone. You will need to take self-care steps. Which steps ...

  1. Diet for Kidney Stone Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... may also help prevent kidney stones, such as citrus drinks. Recommendations based on the specific type of ... do to prevent kidney stones. Some studies suggest citrus drinks like lemonade and orange juice protect against ...

  2. Retrograde upper-pole calyceal access for percutaneous nephrolithotripsy of stones in the lower-pole calyx

    PubMed Central

    Al-Otaibi, Khalid M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To present the results of upper calyceal access during percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL) for stones in the lower calyx, as PCNL is considered the most effective minimally invasive surgery for managing lower calyceal stones, with percutaneous access either directly to the lower calyx or through an upper or middle calyx. Patients and methods The study included 76 patients with single (51) and multiple (25) stones in the lower calyx, and stones in the lower calyx plus renal pelvis (six) and associated pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction (PUJO, five). They were managed by PCNL using retrograde access through the upper-pole calyx in addition to laser endopyelotomy for the PUJO. Results The mean duration required for establishing the retrograde nephrostomy tract was 14.4 min, and for completing the procedure was 40 min. The mean fluoroscopy exposure time was 3.2 min. Access from the upper calyx allowed easy and rapid advancement of the nephroscope to the lower calyx. The stones varied in size, at 10–25 mm. Stones were cleared completely in 70 of the 76 patients (92%); the stone-free rate was 100%. The residual stone fragments (2–4 mm) in the remaining six patients (8%) were considered insignificant. Complications were minor in four patients (5%), and included pleural effusion in two, bleeding in one and an arteriovenous fistula in one. Conclusions Upper-pole calyceal access for PCNL provides easy and effective clearance of stones in the lower calyx. This access should be considered for PCNL of single or multiple stones in the lower calyx. PMID:26558049

  3. Challenging Case: Stones.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S; Ziemba, Justin B; Matlaga, Brian R; Monga, Manoj

    2016-10-01

    A 40-year-old woman presents to the emergency department after a motor vehicle accident, and a CT scan revealed no injuries but incidentally notes three non-obstructing stones in the left kidney of 3, 4, and 5 mm in size. She is completely asymptomatic and has no history of urolithiasis.

  4. Challenging Case: Stones.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S; Ziemba, Justin B; Matlaga, Brian R; Monga, Manoj

    2016-10-01

    A 40-year-old woman presents to the emergency department after a motor vehicle accident, and a CT scan revealed no injuries but incidentally notes three non-obstructing stones in the left kidney of 3, 4, and 5 mm in size. She is completely asymptomatic and has no history of urolithiasis. PMID:27566646

  5. When Stones Teach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucier, Todd

    2001-01-01

    Creating towers of balanced stones is a versatile outdoor learning activity that can be experienced in the classroom, school yard, forest, or parking lot. Students discover hidden talents, learn to work and communicate clearly with others, and reconnect with the natural world. Several variations on the exercise are given, along with principles of…

  6. An H-shaped complete ureteric duplication: embryology or erosion.

    PubMed

    Jayasekera, Ashan; Tempest, Heidi; Kumar, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the case of a duplex urinary collecting system that forms a single chamber about 2 cm proximal to the bladder with distal bifurcation and drainage into the bladder via distinct ureteric orifices. This anatomical variant has not been described before. PMID:22691584

  7. [Asymptomatic, right reno-ureteral calculi in a cake kidney].

    PubMed

    Cocimano, V; Marino, G; Genovese, M G; Cavallotti, G P; Cevoli, R

    1989-01-01

    The primary caudal site of the urogenital anlage in the embryo explains why certain positional anomalies occur during cranial migration and are the outcome of various associated factors. A case of ectopic fusion in the ileo-sacral site known as cake kidney whose peculiarity consists of totally asymptomatic right multiple reno-ureteral lithiasis identified by chance is reported.

  8. AN IN VITRO MODEL FOR MURINE URETERIC EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a model developed to study growth and differentiation of primary cultures of ureteric epithelial cells from embryonic C57BL/6N mouse urinary tracts. Single cells were resuspended in medium and plated onto transwells coated with collagen IV and laminin. Basa...

  9. Tbx18 regulates the development of the ureteral mesenchyme

    PubMed Central

    Airik, Rannar; Bussen, Markus; Singh, Manvendra K.; Petry, Marianne; Kispert, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Congenital malformations of the urinary tract are a major cause of renal failure in children and young adults. They are often caused by physical obstruction or by functional impairment of the peristaltic machinery of the ureter. The underlying molecular and cellular defects are, however, poorly understood. Here we present the phenotypic characterization of a new mouse model for congenital ureter malformation that revealed the molecular pathway important for the formation of the functional mesenchymal coating of the ureter. The gene encoding the T-box transcription factor Tbx18 was expressed in undifferentiated mesenchymal cells surrounding the distal ureter stalk. In Tbx18–/– mice, prospective ureteral mesenchymal cells largely dislocalized to the surface of the kidneys. The remaining ureteral mesenchymal cells showed reduced proliferation and failed to differentiate into smooth muscles, but instead became fibrous and ligamentous tissue. Absence of ureteral smooth muscles resulted in a short hydroureter and hydronephrosis at birth. Our analysis also showed that the ureteral mesenchyme derives from a distinct cell population that is separated early in kidney development from that of other mesenchymal cells of the renal system. PMID:16511601

  10. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020 Section 876.4020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic...

  11. Ureteral Stent Coatings: What's Here and What's Coming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razvi, Hassan

    2008-09-01

    Ureteral stents have become an indispensable tool to the urologist in the management of various disorders afflicting the urinary tract. While the ideal stent remains elusive, novel technical advances in stent coating technology offer the potential of enhancing stent biocompatibility and clinical application. Currently available stent coatings as well as new and emerging devices will be reviewed.

  12. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of stones in lower calices of kidney].

    PubMed

    Martov, A G; Peniukova, I V; Moskalenko, S A; Peniukov, V G; Peniukov, D V; Balykov, I S

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the results of the study aimed to evaluation of possible relationship between anatomical structure of the renal pelvis of the kidney, the size of the stone and the effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) of stones in lower calices of kidney, defined as "stone-free state". ESWL was performed in 285 patients. Sizes of stones varied from 5 to 25 mm. With interval distribution of stone sizes, the greatest number of cases was detected with size of 5 to 12 mm. The destruction of stone required one ESWL session in 196 cases, and three sessions only in 12 cases. The total number of pulses per one stone did not exceed 9500, and more than 70% of the stones have been effectively destroyed with less than 3000 pulses. The result of treatment was assessed 3-4 months after the last ESWL session on the basis of ultrasound and X-ray examination using nominal (dichotomous) scale. In addition, for verification of significant (expected and unexpected) correlations, exploratory analysis of the correlation matrices of factors possibly affecting the discharge of stone fragments was performed. Positive treatment outcome was recorded in 212 (74.4%) patients. Residual stone fragments (> or = 5 mm) were identified in 73 (25.6%) patients; in 69 patients fragments corresponded to the initial localization and 4 fragments were located in the pelvis and calices of middle and lower segments of the kidney. Statistical processing found no association between the size of the stone and the number of ESWL sessions required for its destruction (P = 0,4056). The analysis of relationship between the nature of the complications and size of stone revealed differences, but there were no significant differences in median test (p = 0.1067). Based on exploratory analysis and correlations identified, in-depth evaluation was carried out on three factors: the size of the stone, length of lower calices neck, and pyelocaliceal corner. Width of lower calices neck as a

  13. [Treatment of ureteral lithiasis using the laser].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Marcellán, F J; Ibarz Servio, L; Ramón Dalmau, M

    1991-06-01

    A review of the history of lasertripsy from continuous to intermittent Nd:YAG, Alexandrite, or liquid-dye laser is undertaken. Certain calculi require intraureteral fragmentation owing to stone hardness or location. Within a period spanning 20 months, we have treated 350 patients (199 males, 151 females) utilizing dye laser through a very fine caliber 7.5 F ureteroscope. Twenty-six had bilateral calculi. The calculi were located in the upper third in 10% (37), middle third in 25% (93), and lower third in 65% (241). Complete fragmentation was achieved in 341 (93%), push up + ESWL was performed in 24 (6.4%), and two calculi (0.6%) required ultrasonic fragmentation. No patient required surgery and there were no severe complications.

  14. [A CASE OF ASCENDING COLON CANCER RECURRENCE WITH INTRALUMINAL URETERAL DISSEMINATION MIMICKING PRIMARY URETERAL CANCER, DETECTED DURING INVESTIGATION FOR FEVER].

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Ryuichi; Kubota, Masashi; Kanno, Toru; Okada, Takashi; Higashi, Yoshihito; Yamada, Hitoshi

    2015-10-01

    A 69-year-old woman visited our hospital with a chief complaint of fever. Five years ago, she was diagnosed as ascending colon cancer and received right hemi-colectomy. One year later, local recurrence with right hydronephrosis was detected, and she received chemotherapy -4 cycles of modified fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX6) plus bevacizumab, and 12 cycles of fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) plus bevacizumab- for two years. Local recurrence and right hydronephrosis disappeared on positron emission tomography performed 4 years postoperatively. This time, abdominal computed tomography for investigation of fever showed a relapse of right hydronephrosis and pyonephrosis. Cystoscopy revealed non-papillary tumor from the right ureteral orifice. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple tumors in the right ureter, and the distal lesion projecting into the bladder. After the general condition became well by right nephrostomy for infection control, transurethral resection of bladder tumor was performed. Histological examination of the specimen revealed a metastatic tubular adenocarcinoma (colon origin). Although right nephrectomy was performed for pyonephrosis control, she died of local progression of ascending colon cancer 10 months after first visit. Intraluminal ureteral progression of carcinoma originating from organs other than urinary tract is very rare. To our knowledge, this is the 9th report in the English or Japanese literature. In this case we could not rule out primary ureteral cancer preoperatively, and histological examination revealed intraluminal ureteral dissemination of ascending colon cancer.

  15. Nutritional aspects of stone disease.

    PubMed

    Hess, Bernhard

    2002-12-01

    Kidney stones can form during a state of urinary supersaturation. Because urine often is supersaturated with respect to various salts, crystal formation is very common in nonstone formers and stone formers alike, and it may even be absent in kidney stone formers. Thus, uncomplicated crystalluria does not distinguish between stone formers and healthy people. Landmark clinical studies, however, have shown that under identical conditions of dietary and fluid intake, healthy controls almost exclusively excrete single calcium oxalate crystals 3 to 4 microns in diameter, whereas recurrent calcium stone formers pass larger crystals, 10 to 12 microns in diameter, often fused into polycrystalline aggregates 20 to 300 microns in diameter. Thus, those who form stones appear to be more "sensitive" to a given diet than nonstone formers. It is in these subjects that "bad dietary habits" induce nephrolithiasis, making nutritional aspects important. This article reviews the current evidence-based knowledge of the impact of nutrition on the recurrence of a kidney stone.

  16. Percutaneous Balloon Dilatation for the Treatment of Early and Late Ureteral Strictures After Renal Transplantation: Long-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Bachar, Gil N. Mor, E.; Bartal, G.; Atar, Eli; Goldberg, N.; Belenky, A.

    2004-08-15

    We report our experience with percutaneous balloon dilatation (PBD) for the treatment of ureteral strictures in patients with renal allografts. Of the 422 consecutive patients after renal transplantation in our center 10 patients had ureteral strictures. An additional 11 patients were referred from other centers. The 21 patients included 15 men and 6 women aged 16 to 67 years. Strictures were confirmed by sonography and scintigraphy in all cases. Patients underwent 2 to 4 PBDs at 7-10-day intervals. Clinical success was defined as resolution of the stenosis and hydronephrosis on sequential ultrasound and normalization of creatinine levels. Patients were divided into two groups: those who underwent transplantation more than 3 months previously and those who underwent transplantation less than 3 months previously. PBD was successful in 13 of the 21 patients (62%). There was no statistically significant difference in success rate between the patients with early (n 12) and those with late (n = 9) obstruction: 58.4% and 66%, respectively. No major complications were documented. PBD is a safe and simple tool for treating ureteral strictures and procedure-related morbidity is low. It can serve as an initial treatment in patients with early or late ureteral strictures after renal transplantation.

  17. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy--a versatile technique for both simple and complex renal stone.

    PubMed

    Hossain, T M S; Asaduzzaman, M; Uddin, M N; Rahman, M H; Jahan, M U; Bhuiyan, A K M Z I

    2013-12-01

    Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy is currently the preferred first line treatment for simple & complex renal calculi. The technique also being used increasingly for smaller stones that have failed ESWL. Aim of the study is to share our experience in PCNL in course of time. This study was conducted from January 2009 to December 2012, 131 patient's with 142 renal units of 5-75 yrs of age, PCNL were performed in NIKDU, BSMMU & JBFH. Stone were classified into simple (isolated renal pelvis or isolated calyceal stones) or complex (partial or complete staghorn stones, renal pelvic stone with accompanying calyceal stones). The stone size was 1.5-5cm approximately. We asses our initial puncture technique, need for multi-tract, supra 12th rib access, stone free rate, operative duration, postoperative complication, number of transfusion and hospital stay. Operative durations were 60 min -180 minutes. Puncture technique improved in course of time. 14 patients need multi-puncture and tract, all are supra 12th access. Out of 142 renal units 120 (83%) were stone free after first procedure, another 22 need and auxiliary procedure, (5 2nd look PCNL, 6 URS, 11 ESWL) to become stone free result in a 95% stone free rate. Complications occurred in 17 procedures which dealt accordingly. This study revealed PCNL is an effective, versatile safe and cosmetically acceptable procedure for all age groups in simple and complex renal stone.

  18. Perfusion Index Derived from a Pulse Oximeter Can Detect Changes in Peripheral Microcirculation during Uretero-Renal-Scopy Stone Manipulation (URS-SM)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ho-Shiang; Chu, Chun-Lin; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Wu, Cho-Kai; Lai, Ling-Ping; Yeh, Huei-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to test the effect of removal of a ureteral obstruction (renal calculus) from anesthetized patients on the perfusion index (PI), as measured by a pulse oximeter, and on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Patients and Methods This prospective study enrolled 113 patients with unilateral ureteral obstructions (kidney stones) who were scheduled for ureteroscopy (URS) laser lithotripsy. One urologist graded patient hydronephrosis before surgery. A pulse oximeter was affixed to each patient's index finger ipsilateral to the intravenous catheter, and a non-invasive blood pressure cuff was placed on the contralateral side. Ipsilateral double J stents and Foley catheters were inserted and left indwelling for 24 h. PI and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were determined at baseline, 5 min after anesthesia, and 10 min after surgery; eGFR was determined at admission, 1 day after surgery, and 14 days after surgery. Results Patients with different grades of hydronephrosis had similar age, eGFR, PI, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR). PI increased significantly in each hydronephrosis group after ureteral stone disintegration. None of the groups had significant post-URS changes in eGFR, although eGFR increased in the grade I hydronephrosis group after 14 days. The percent change of PI correlates significantly with the percent change of MAP, but not with that of eGFR. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that release of a ureteral obstruction leads to a concurrent increase of PI during anesthesia. Measurement of PI may be a valuable tool to monitor the successful release of ureteral obstructions and changes of microcirculation during surgery. There were also increases in eGFR after 14 days, but not immediately after surgery. PMID:25542000

  19. Wanted: suitable replacement stones for the Lede stone (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Kock, T.; Dewanckele, J.; Boone, M. A.; De Boever, W.; De Schutter, G.; Jacobs, P.; Cnudde, V.

    2012-04-01

    The Lede stone is an arenaceous limestone with a Lutetian age, occurring as discrete (most of the times three) stone banks in the marine sandy sediments of the Lede Formation (Belgium). It has a quartz content of approximate 40%. This increases abrasion strength and together with the cementation results in an average compressive strength of about 80-85 MPa. The cement is a microsparitic calcite cement. Other carbonate particles are both microfossils (mainly foraminifers) and macrofossils (bivalves, serpulids, echinoderms, …). This great diversity gives the stone a heterogeneous, animated appearance. The intra- and interparticle porosity is in total 5-10 % in average and the apparent density is 2400-2550 kg/m3. Another important constituent is glauconite, present in a few percent. In fresh state, the stone has a greenish-grey colour, but when it is exposed to atmospheric conditions for a couple of years, the stone acquires a yellowish to rust-coloured patina due to the weathering of glauconite. Sulphatation causes severe damage to the stone, and black gypsum crusts are common in urban environments on stones protected from runoff. This stone was excavated in both open air and underground quarries in the areas of Brussels and Ghent. The proximity of main rivers such as the Scheldt and Zenne provided transport routes for export towards the north (e.g. Antwerp and The Netherlands). Its first known use dates back to Roman times but the stone flourished in Gothic architecture due to its easy workability and its 'divine' light coloured patina. This results nowadays in a dominant occurrence in the cultural heritage of northwestern Belgium and the south of The Netherlands. Socio-economical reasons caused several declines and revivals of Lede stone in use. In the beginning of the 20th century, only a few excavation sites remained, with as main quarry the one located at Bambrugge (Belgium). By the end of the first half of the 20th century, however, no quarry sites remained

  20. Laparoscopic pyelolithotomy with intraperitoneal ultrasonic lithotripsy: report of a novel minimally invasive technique for intracorporeal stone ablation.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sean; Marruffo, Franzo; Durak, Evren; Hruby, Greg; Bergman, Ari; Gupta, Mantu; Landman, Jaime

    2006-12-01

    We present the case of a 71-year-old Hispanic woman with a 4-cm stone in the renal pelvis of a kidney with thin parenchyma. Retrograde pyelography revealed a normal ureter and normal ureteropelvic junction. A ureteral stent was placed. Six weeks after the stent was placed, a differential renal scan revealed 18% function of the involved kidney. A percutaneous nephrolithotomy was not performed because of the thin parenchyma and intrarenal anatomy, which would have complicated access. The patient underwent an uncomplicated laparoscopic pyelolithotomy. The stone was placed into an Endocatch entrapment sack. The open end of the Endocatch sack was brought through a trocar site, and a nephroscope and ultrasonic lithotripter were deployed. The stone was fragmented and aspirated in the standard manner, thereby avoiding the need to extend the 12-mm trocar incision for stone extraction. The stone fragmentation and extraction time was 14 minutes. The patient was stone-free and discharged home in the morning of the first postoperative day without complications. PMID:17277663

  1. Necromancing the stones.

    PubMed

    Goel, V

    1995-12-15

    Since its introduction 15 years ago extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has become a standard treatment for urinary stones. The author comments on the results of Adrian R. Levy and Maurice McGregor's study of the use of ESWL for urinary stones in Quebec (see pages 1729 to 1736 of this issue). The rapid increase in the use of ESWL that occurred in the first 2 years of the study points to the fact that the application of a new technology is often quickly expanded before thorough assessments of effectiveness and safety have been carried out. New technologies also lead to shifts in cost distribution that must be considered in cost analyses. The author argues that continuing research is needed to document the dissemination of new technologies and points to methodologic concerns that should be addressed to make such research as fruitful as possible.

  2. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  3. Pyrophosphate Transport and Stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, John A.; Carr, Georgina; Moochhala, Shabbir H.; Simmons, Nicholas L.

    2008-09-01

    Since the 1960's, inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) has been known to inhibit apatite precipitation. Recent findings suggest that PPi plays a central role in the control of normal bone mineralization. Knockout mice have established the functional importance of PPi transmembrane transport, via the pyrophosphate transporter ANKH. The molecular nature and transport function of ANKH are reviewed. PPi is present in urine and ANKH is expressed in the cortical collecting duct where PPi transport to both the tubular lumen and renal interstitium may occur. Arginine vasopressin stimulation of cortical collecting duct cells grown on semi-permeable supports appears to upregulate apical ANKH expression, which we postulate may be a mechanism of stone inhibition during urinary concentration and supersaturation of calcium salts. Hypopyrophosphaturia may be a forgotten metabolic risk factor for stone formation and polymorphisms of the ANKH gene may underlie this defect. The physiological importance and clinical significance of PPi generation and transport in preventing idiopathic renal stone disease and nephrocalcinosis now needs to be established.

  4. [Treatment of distal ureteral calculi with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: experiences with 310 cases].

    PubMed

    Zehntner, C; Lux, O; Casanova, G A; Marth, D; Zingg, E J

    1989-07-01

    Distal ureteral calculi are approached by ureterorenoscopy by most authors. With increasing experience ESWL of distal ureteral calculi gained in importance. The success rate of 96.2% in a large series of 310 consecutive patients treated in this manner, confirmed the results of other authors. Excluding women of child-bearing age and very large calculi (greater than 2 cm) the ESWL is a suitable treatment modality of distal ureteral calculi.

  5. Medical management of renal stones.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Monica S C; Pearle, Margaret S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing in industrialized nations, resulting in a corresponding rise in economic burden. Nephrolithiasis is now recognized as both a chronic and systemic condition, which further underscores the impact of the disease. Diet and environment play an important role in stone disease, presumably by modulating urine composition. Dietary modification as a preventive treatment to decrease lithogenic risk factors and prevent stone recurrence has gained interest because of its potential to be safer and more economical than drug treatment. However, not all abnormalities are likely to be amenable to dietary therapy, and in some cases drugs are necessary to reduce the risk of stone formation. Unfortunately, no new drugs have been developed for stone prevention since the 1980s when potassium citrate was introduced, perhaps because the long observation period needed to demonstrate efficacy discourages investigators from embarking on clinical trials. Nonetheless, effective established treatment regimens are currently available for stone prevention. PMID:26977089

  6. Medical management of renal stones.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Monica S C; Pearle, Margaret S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing in industrialized nations, resulting in a corresponding rise in economic burden. Nephrolithiasis is now recognized as both a chronic and systemic condition, which further underscores the impact of the disease. Diet and environment play an important role in stone disease, presumably by modulating urine composition. Dietary modification as a preventive treatment to decrease lithogenic risk factors and prevent stone recurrence has gained interest because of its potential to be safer and more economical than drug treatment. However, not all abnormalities are likely to be amenable to dietary therapy, and in some cases drugs are necessary to reduce the risk of stone formation. Unfortunately, no new drugs have been developed for stone prevention since the 1980s when potassium citrate was introduced, perhaps because the long observation period needed to demonstrate efficacy discourages investigators from embarking on clinical trials. Nonetheless, effective established treatment regimens are currently available for stone prevention.

  7. Laparoscopic conservative management of ureteral endometriosis: a survey of eighty patients submitted to ureterolysis

    PubMed Central

    Camanni, Marco; Bonino, Luca; Delpiano, Elena Maria; Berchialla, Paola; Migliaretti, Giuseppe; Revelli, Alberto; Deltetto, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Background this study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of laparoscopic conservative management of ureteral endometriosis. Methods Eighty cases of histologically confirmed endometriosis affecting the ureter, 10 of which with bladder involvement were prospectively studied. In detail, patients were 13 women with ureteral stenosis (7 with hydronephrosis), 32 with circular lesions totally encasing the ureter, and 35 with endometriotic foci on the ureteral wall, but not completely encasing it. They were submitted to laparoscopic ureterolysis with or without partial cystectomy, ureteroneocistostomy. The rate of surgical complications, the recurrence rate, the patients' satisfaction rate was assessed during 22 months (median) follow-up. Results Laparoscopic ureterolysis was employed for all patients and set free the ureter from the disease in 95% of cases, whereas ureteroneocystostomy was necessary for 4 patients showing severe stenosis with hydronephrosis, among which 2 had intrinsic endometriosis of the ureteral muscularis. Three post-surgery ureteral fistulae occurred in cases with ureteral involvement longer than 4 cm: two cases were successfully treated placing double J catheter, the third needed ureteroneocistostomy. During follow-up, ureteral endometriosis recurred in 2 patients who consequently underwent ureteroneocystostomy. Most patients expressed high satisfaction rate throughout the whole follow-up period. Conclusion laparoscopic ureterolysis is effective and well tolerated in most cases of ureteral endometriosis. Ureteroneocystostomy is a better strategy for patients with extended (more than 4 cm) ureteral involvement or with severe stenosis with or without hydronephrosis. PMID:19818156

  8. Simultaneous percutaneous nephrolithotomy and early endoscopic ureteric realignment for iatrogenic ureteropelvic junction avulsion during ureteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tayeb, Marawan El; Mellon, Matthew J.; Lingeman, James E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of successful management of ureteropelvice junction avulsion during ureteroscopy successfully managed with simultaneous percutaneous nephrolithotomy and early endoscopic ureteral realignment. PMID:26834898

  9. Ureteritis cystica: an interesting case with diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Zamri, Z; Harunarashid; Das, S; Ramzisham, A R M

    2010-01-01

    Ureteritis cystica is a rare, benign, proliferative condition. We report the case of a 51-year-old female who complained of dysuria and frequency for the last 10 years. The symptoms, however, increased in severity and frequency over the past one year. Urine culture and sensitivity showed presence of Escherichia Coli which was sensitive to augmentin and ciproflaxocin. The urinary tract ultrasonography and intravenous urography revealed bladder diverticula with multiple small, smooth well defects with sharp borders that protruded into the lumen along the proximal and mid left ureter. This finding was later confirmed by retrograde pyelogram. She was treated and currently is on long term antibiotic therapy. The diagnostic features and management of ureteritis cystic is being discussed in detail. PMID:20964103

  10. Stone Morphology: Implication for Pathogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daudon, Michel; Jungers, Paul; Bazin, Dominique

    2008-09-01

    Urinary stones of similar crystalline composition as identified by X-ray diffraction or Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) may exhibit distinct structures, which are reflected in distinctive stone morphology. Among factors involved in stone morphology—some reflecting lithogenic activity, others depending on the crystal shape, or on the propensity of crystalline phases to form large aggregates, finally the environment where the stone is growing—all of these factors influence the inner structure of the stone and its superficial characteristics. We present here examples of the clinical interest of refined morphologic examination of stones, in addition to X-ray diffraction or FT-IR identification of its components. Such combination of methods allows the identification of specific etiologies among calcium oxalate stones, especially a morphological type pathognomonic of primary hyperoxaluria and other types related to distinct conditions of stone formation. Among phosphatic stones—in addition to stone composition, which must be considered not only on the basis of the main component, but also taking into account the minor crystalline phases, which often are clinically relevant—morphological types also contribute to diagnosis of the underlying etiology, especially for stones related to distal tubular acidosis. Finally, common purine stones also exhibit different morphologies related to stone composition and etiology: two main structures for uric acid and two for ammonium urate help to distinguish risk factors and lithogenic conditions involved in the formation of these calculi. Morphologic examination is a simple, rapid and cheap method that points to specific diseases or lithogenic factors. Better awareness of its clinical relevance should lead to wider utilization.

  11. Delayed migration of embolized coil with large renal stone formation: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Jayant, Kumar; Singh, Shrawan K; Parmar, Kalpesh M; Devana, Sudheer K; Choudhari, Gautam R; Mittal, Ankur

    2014-01-01

    Delayed bleeding following percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) usually occurs due to development of the pseudoaneurysm which can be successfully managed with coil embolization. However very few cases of such complications have been reported in the literature. Here we are reporting a case of delayed post-PCNL bleeding that occurred in a 53-year-old diabetic patient operated on for renal stone. Computed tomography scan revealed a presence of the pseudoaneurysm in the segmental branch of right renal artery, which was successfully managed with coiling. Patient remained asymptomatic for the next 9 years after which he again presented with similar complaints. X-ray KUB was done which revealed a 2.7 cms renal pelvic calculus with the migrated coil in its center and a left upper ureteric calculus. His routine haemogram, coagulogram, serum electrolytes, and liver function tests, renal function tests, vitamin D3, and PTH (parathyroid hormone) were within normal limits. He underwent left laparoscopic ureterolithotomy and right percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). Intraoperatively the migrated stainless steel embolization coil was seen engulfed all around by the multiple stones in the right renal pelvis. Postoperative period was uneventful. Later he was followed in the outpatient department and was doing well. To conclude, this is the only case report of development of a large calculus around a migrated embolization coil which was successfully managed with PCNL. PCNL offers better stone clearance in cases of stones being formed over foreign bodies like fragmented double J stents, fragmented nephrostomies, or migrated embolization coil. PMID:25610700

  12. Inspection of Ureteral Orifices: The Pearl of Flexible Cystoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Charmaine; Bushra, Hamid; Das, Sanjay; Pettersson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cystoscopy is most common diagnostic investigation. The examination technique and the findings, both normal and pathological, were well described described a hundred years ago. With technological advances, there has been over-emphasis on imaging modalities for diagnostic purposes. A basic maneuver of examining the ureteral orifices is sometimes rushed through when in fact careful examination can clinch the diagnosis. The importance is exemplified by two cases, one of which is a rare case of Xanthoma of the ureter. PMID:27579373

  13. [Infection-induced urinary stones].

    PubMed

    Bichler, K-H; Eipper, E; Naber, K

    2003-01-01

    Infection stones make up approximately 15% of urinary stone diseases and are thus an important group. These stones are composed of struvite and/or carbonate apatite. The basic precondition for the formation of infection stones is a urease-positive urinary tract infection. Urease is necessary to split urea into ammonia and CO(2). As a result, ammonia ions can form and at the same time alkaline urine develops, both being preconditions for the formation of struvite and carbonate apatite crystals. When these crystals are deposited infection stones form. Pathogenetically, various risk factors play a role: urinary obstruction, neurogenic bladder, dRTA, and MSK. If these infections are not treated and the stones are not removed, the kidney will be damaged. Modern methods are available for stone removal, e.g., ESWL and/or instrumental urinary stone removal. Here, especially less invasive methods are preferable. Any treatment must be adjusted to the patient individually. Patients should be examined frequently for recurrent urinary tract infections and stone recurrences, and new infections must be resolutely treated. Good therapy and prophylaxis are possible with present-day treatment modalities. PMID:12574884

  14. Villamayor stone (Golden Stone) as a Global Heritage Stone Resource from Salamanca (NW of Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Talegon, Jacinta; Iñigo, Adolfo; Vicente-Tavera, Santiago

    2013-04-01

    Villamayor stone is an arkosic stone of Middle Eocene age and belongs to the Cabrerizos Sandstone Formation that comprising braided fluvial systems and paleosoils at the top of each stratigraphic sequence. The sandstone is known by several names: i) the Villamayor Stone because the quarries are located in Villamayor de Armuña village that are situated at 7 km to the North from Salamanca city; ii) the Golden Stone due to its patina that produced a ochreous/golden color on the façades of monuments of Salamanca (World Heritage City,1988) built in this Natural stone (one of the silicated rocks utilised). We present in this work, the Villamayor Stone to be candidate as Global Heritage Stone Resource. The Villamayor Stone were quarrying for the construction and ornamentation of Romanesque religious monuments as the Old Cathedral and San Julian church; Gothic (Spanish plateresc style) as the New Cathedral, San Esteban church and the sculpted façade of the Salamanca University, one of the oldest University in Europe (it had established in 1250); and this stone was one of the type of one of the most sumptuous Baroque monuments is the Main Square of the its galleries and arcades (1729). Also, this stone was used in building palaces, walls and reconstruction of Roman bridge. Currently, Villamayor Stone is being quarried by small and family companies, without a modernized processing, for cladding of the façades of the new buildings until that the construction sector was burst (in 2008 the international economic crisis). However, Villamayor Stone is the main stone material used in the city of Salamanca for the restoration of monuments and, even in small quantities when compared with just before the economic crisis, it would be of great importance for future generations protect their quarries and the craft of masonry. Villamayor Stone has several varieties from channels facies to floodplains facies, in this work the selected varieties are: i) the fine-grained stone

  15. Electrohydraulic lithotripsy of upper ureteral calculi with semirigid ureteroscope.

    PubMed

    Yang, S S; Hong, J S

    1996-02-01

    Forty-three patients with single ureteral calculi located above the pelvic brim were treated by electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) using a semirigid mini-ureteroscope. Of the 43 calculi, 36 (84%) were fragmented in one procedure. Six calculi (14%) were pushed back to the renal pelvis and treated successfully by complementary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). The total success rate of ureteroscopic manipulation thus was 98%. The operation time (mean 26.4 minutes) and postoperative hospital stay (mean 2.53 days) were relatively short. Complications were limited to four (9%) minor perforations of the ureter managed by internal stenting. Among these patients with complications, there were no significant ureteral strictures noted on excretory urography or ureteroscopic examination 1 to 3 months after ureterolithotripsy. The costs of ureteroscopy with EHL are lower than that of SWL or ureteroscopic lasertripsy. The total fees for ureteroscopy with EHL are about two thirds those for SWL in Taiwan. Despite the longer learning curve required for ureteroscopy, ureteroscopy associated with EHL is a cost-effective alternative for the treatment of upper ureteral calculi, especially when SWL is not readily available.

  16. Use of Ileum as Ureteral Replacement in Urological Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Armatys, Sandra A.; Mellon, Matthew J.; Beck, Stephen D. W.; Koch, Michael O.; Foster, Richard S.; Bihrle, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We reviewed indications and outcomes in patients undergoing ileal ureter replacement for ureteral reconstruction. Materials and Methods Between December 1989 and September 2007, 105 patients underwent ileal ureter replacement, of whom 14 were excluded from study due to incomplete data. The remaining 91 patients (99 renal units) comprised the study cohort. Results Mean patient age was 46.8 years and mean followup was 36.0 months. Indications for an ileal ureter were stricture following genitourinary surgery in 29 cases (31.9%), radiation induced stricture in 17 (18.7%), nonurological surgery iatrogenic injury in 16 (17.6%) and retroperitoneal fibrosis in 11 (12.1%). Only 4 patients (4.4%) had primary ureteral cancer. Long-term complications included anastomotic stricture in 3 patients (3.3%) and fistula in 6 (6.6%). Serum creatinine decreased or remained stable in 68 patients (74.7%) and hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis developed in 3. No patient complained of excessive urinary mucous production. Conclusions In 68.1% of patients indications for an ileal ureter included radiation induced stricture or iatrogenic injury. The ileal ureter is a reasonable option for long-term ureteral reconstruction with preserved renal function in carefully selected patients. PMID:19013597

  17. The Systematic Classification of Gallbladder Stones

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Tie; Ma, Rui-hong; Luo, Xiao-bing; Yang, Liu-qing; Luo, Zhen-liang; Zheng, Pei-ming

    2013-01-01

    Background To develop a method for systematic classification of gallbladder stones, analyze the clinical characteristics of each type of stone and provide a theoretical basis for the study of the formation mechanism of different types of gallbladder stones. Methodology A total of 807 consecutive patients with gallbladder stones were enrolled and their gallstones were studied. The material composition of gallbladder stones was analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and the distribution and microstructure of material components was observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy. The composition and distribution of elements were analyzed by an X-ray energy spectrometer. Gallbladder stones were classified accordingly, and then, gender, age, medical history and BMI of patients with each type of stone were analyzed. Principal Findings Gallbladder stones were classified into 8 types and more than ten subtypes, including cholesterol stones (297), pigment stones (217), calcium carbonate stones (139), phosphate stones (12), calcium stearate stones (9), protein stones (3), cystine stones (1) and mixed stones (129). Mixed stones were those stones with two or more than two kinds of material components and the content of each component was similar. A total of 11 subtypes of mixed stones were found in this study. Patients with cholesterol stones were mainly female between the ages of 30 and 50, with higher BMI and shorter medical history than patients with pigment stones (P<0.05), however, patients with pigment, calcium carbonate, phosphate stones were mainly male between the ages of 40 and 60. Conclusion The systematic classification of gallbladder stones indicates that different types of stones have different characteristics in terms of the microstructure, elemental composition and distribution, providing an important basis for the mechanistic study of gallbladder stones. PMID:24124459

  18. Progression of crack formation in artificial kidney stones subject to shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cauwelaert, Javier; Cleveland, Robin

    2002-11-01

    We used micro computed tomography (CT) imaging to follow the progressive development of cracks in artificial kidney stones. The artificial stones were made from U30 cement with a cylindrical shape (6.5 mm diameter and 7.5 mm long). The stones were held within a polypropylene vial in one of three different orientations: vertical, horizontal, and angled at 45 deg. The stones were treated with an electromagnetic lithotripter using between 50 and 150 shock waves. The initiation and growth of cracks was observed using microCT. We found that crack formation in the U30 stones was influenced by the orientation of the stone with respect to the shock wave (SW) propagation direction. Vertical stones developed a spall-like crack near the distal surface; horizontal stones had little internal damage for the number of shock waves applied; and angled stones were damaged primarily in the vicinity of the leading corner. The position of the cracks were in qualitative agreement with the numerical solutions of the pressure field inside the stones. The elastic properties of the U30 stones are being measured which will alow a quantitative analysis of crack growth to be performed and compared to the experimental data. [Work supported by the Whitaker Foundation.

  19. Direct Primary or Secondary Percutaneous Ureteral Stenting: What Is the Most Compliant Option in Patients with Malignant Ureteral Obstructions?

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Lagana, Domenico; Lumia, Domenico; Giorgianni, Andrea; Mangini, Monica; Santoro, Domenico; Cuffari, Salvatore; Marconi, Alberto; Novario, Raffaele; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2007-09-15

    The objective of this study was to analyze three ureteral stenting techniques in patients with malignant ureteral obstructions, considering the indications, techniques, procedural costs, and complications. In the period between June 2003 and June 2006, 45 patients with bilateral malignant ureteral obstructions were evaluated (24 males, 21 females; average age, 68.3; range, 42-87). All of the patients were treated with ureteral stenting: 30 (mild strictures) with direct stenting (insertion of the stent without predilation), 30 (moderate/severe strictures) with primary stenting (insertion of the stent after predilation in a one-stage procedure), and 30 (mild/moderate/severe strictures with infection) with secondary stenting (insertion of the stent after predilation and 2-3 days after nephrostomy). The incidence of complications and procedural costs were compared by a statistical analysis. The primary technical success rate was 98.89%. We did not observe any major complications. The minor complication rate was 11.1%. The incidence of complications for the various techniques was not statistically significantly. The statistical analysis of costs demonstrated that the average cost of secondary stenting ( Euro 637; SD, Euro 115) was significantly higher than that of procedures which involved direct or primary stenting ( Euro 560; SD, Euro 108). We conclude that one-step stenting (direct or primary) is a valid option to secondary stenting in correctly selected patients, owing to the fact that when the procedure is performed by expert interventional radiologists there are high technical success rates, low complication rates, and a reduction in costs.

  20. Stenting for malignant ureteral obstruction: Tandem, metal or metal-mesh stents.

    PubMed

    Elsamra, Sammy E; Leavitt, David A; Motato, Hector A; Friedlander, Justin I; Siev, Michael; Keheila, Mohamed; Hoenig, David M; Smith, Arthur D; Okeke, Zeph

    2015-07-01

    Extrinsic malignant compression of the ureter is not uncommon, often refractory to decompression with conventional polymeric ureteral stents, and frequently associated with limited survival. Alternative options for decompression include tandem ureteral stents, metallic stents and metal-mesh stents, though the preferred method remains controversial. We reviewed and updated our outcomes with tandem ureteral stents for malignant ureteral obstruction, and carried out a PubMed search using the terms "malignant ureteral obstruction," "tandem ureteral stents," "ipsilateral ureteral stents," "metal ureteral stent," "resonance stent," "silhouette stent" and "metal mesh stent." A comprehensive review of the literature and summary of outcomes is provided. The majority of studies encountered were retrospective with small sample sizes. The evidence is most robust for metal stents, whereas only limited data exists for tandem or metal-mesh stents. Metal and metal-mesh stents are considerably more expensive than tandem stenting, but the potential for less frequent stent exchanges makes them possibly cost-effective over time. Urinary tract infections have been associated with all stent types. A wide range of failure rates has been published for all types of stents, limiting direct comparison. Metal and metal-mesh stents show a high incidence of stent colic, migration and encrustation, whereas tandem stents appear to produce symptoms equivalent to single stents. Comparison is difficult given the limited evidence and heterogeneity of patients with malignant ureteral obstruction. It is clear that prospective, randomized studies are necessary to effectively scrutinize conventional, tandem, metallic ureteral and metal-mesh stents for their use in malignant ureteral obstruction.

  1. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for upper urinary tract stone].

    PubMed

    Lechevallier, E; Traxer, O; Saussine, C

    2008-12-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the fragmentation of stone by means of acoustic shockwaves created by an extracorporeal source. ESWL brakes the stone by spallation and squeezing. The optimal frequency for fragmentation is 1Hz. The initial power must be low, then progressively increased during the session. The contra-indications for ESWL are pregnancy, major deformities, severe obesity, aortic aneurism, uncontrolled coagulation disorders, untreated urinary infection, cardiac pacemaker. A stone density of 1000UH is a risk factor for fragmentation failure. The success rate for the kidney and the ureter is 60-80% and 80%, respectively. Stone clearance may be facilitated by alpha blockers. Asymptomatic and non-infected residual fragments less than 4mm must be followed-up annually.

  2. Recumbent Stone Circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    During the 1970s and early 1980s, British archaeoastronomers were striving to bridge the interpretative gulf between the "megalithic observatories" of Alexander Thom and an archaeological mainstream that, generally speaking, was hostile to any mention of astronomy in relation to the megalithic monuments of Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Britain. The Scottish recumbent stone circles (RSCs) came to represent an example where sounder methodology could overcome many of the data selection issues that had beset earlier studies and, with due restraint, produce credible interpretations. Systematic studies of their orientations consistently concluded that the RSCs had a strong lunar connection, and it was widely envisaged that they were the setting for ceremonies associated with the appearance of the moon over the recumbent stone. Other evidence such as the presence of white quartz and the spatial distribution of cupmarks appeared to back up this conclusion. New archaeological investigations since 1999 have challenged and modified these conclusions, confirming in particular that the circles were built to enclose cairns rather than to demarcate open spaces. Yet the restricted pattern of orientations of these structures could only have been achieved by reference to the basic diurnal motions of the skies, and orientation in relation to simple observations of the midsummer moon remains the most likely reading of the alignment evidence taken as a whole. On the other hand, a consideration of the broader context, which includes the nearby Clava cairns, highlights instead the symbolic importance of the sun.

  3. Scottish Short Stone Rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Short stone rows received a good deal of attention during the 1980s and 1990s, at a time when archaeoastronomy in prehistoric Britain and Ireland was moving beyond reassessments of Alexander Thom's "megalithic observatories" by identifying coherent groups of similar monuments with clear orientation trends. Many such rows are found in western Scotland, with the main concentration in Argyll and the island of Mull. Systematic analyses of their orientations produced credible evidence of an awareness of the 18.6-year lunar node cycle, within a "primary-secondary" pattern whereby isolated rows were oriented close to moonrise or moonset at the southern major standstill limit, while others oriented in this way were accompanied by a second row oriented in a declination range that could be interpreted either as lunar or solar. A detailed investigation of the landscape situation of the sites in northern Mull, accompanied by excavations at two of the sites, suggested that they were deliberately placed in locations where critical moonsets would be seen against prominent distant landscape features, but where the distant horizon in most or all other directions was hidden from view. A lack of independent archaeological evidence may help to explain why archaeoastronomical investigations at short stone rows have never progressed beyond "data-driven" studies of orientations and landscape situation. Nonetheless, the work that was done at these sites raised important general methodological issues, and pioneered techniques, that remain relevant across archaeoastronomy today.

  4. Hyaluronan and Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselman, Marino

    2008-09-01

    Kidney stones cannot be formed as long as crystals are passed in the urine. However, when crystals are retained it becomes possible for them to aggregate and form a stone. Crystals are expected to be formed not earlier than the distal tubules and collecting ducts. Studies both in vitro and in vivo demonstrate that calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals do not adhere to intact distal epithelium, but only when the epithelium is proliferating or regenerating, so that it possesses dedifferentiated cells expressing hyaluronan, osteopontin (OPN) and their mutual receptor CD44 at the apical cell membrane. The polysaccharide hyaluronan is an excellent crystal binding molecule because of its negative ionic charge. We hypothesized that the risk for crystal retention in the human kidney would be increased when tubular cells express hyaluronan at their apical cell membrane. Two different patient categories in which nephrocalcinosis frequently occurs were studied to test this hypothesis (preterm neonates and kidney transplant patients). Hyaluronan (and OPN) expression at the luminal membrane of tubular cells indeed was observed, which preceded subsequent retention of crystals in the distal tubules. Tubular nephrocalcinosis has been reported to be associated with decline of renal function and thus further studies to extend our knowledge of the mechanisms of retention and accumulation of crystals in the kidney are warranted. Ultimately, this may allow the design of new strategies for the prevention and treatment of both nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis in patients.

  5. Treatment of urinary tract stones.

    PubMed

    Wickham, J E

    1993-11-27

    Replacement of open surgery with minimally invasive techniques for treating stones in the renal tract has greatly reduced patients' morbidity and mortality and the period of hospitalisation and convalescence. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy does not require anaesthesia and requires little analgesia so that treatment can be given on an outpatient basis, and there is no wound to heal. Only a small puncture site is needed for percutaneous endoscopic lithotomy, and with the advent of prophylactic antibiotics there are few complications. Of renal stones, about 85% can now be successfully treated by extracorporeal lithotripsy alone, and almost all of the stones too large or hard for lithotripsy can be treated endoscopically, with ultrasonic or electrohydraulic probes being used to fragment the stone. Stones in the upper and lower thirds of the ureter can be treated by extracorporeal lithotripsy, but stones in the middle third, which cannot normally be visualised to allow focusing of the shockwaves, usually require ureteroscopy. Nearly all bladder stones can be treated by transurethral endoscopy with an electrohydraulic probe. Only the largest renal tract stones still require open surgery.

  6. The exposome for kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, David S

    2016-02-01

    The exposome is the assembly and measure of all the exposures of an individual in a lifetime. An individual's exposures begin before birth and include insults from environmental and occupational sources. The associated field is called exposomics, which relies on the application of internal and external exposure assessment methods. Exposomics has not yet been thoroughly applied to the study of kidney stones although much is known about how diet and fluid intake affect nephrolithiasis. Some other novel exposures that may contribute to kidney stones are discussed including use of antibiotics, urbanization and migration to urban heat islands, and occupation. People whose school and jobs limit their access to fluids and adequate bathroom facilities may have higher prevalence of stones. Examples include athletes, teachers, heathcare workers, and cab drivers. Occupational kidney stones have received scant attention and may represent a neglected, and preventable, type of stone. An exposomic-oriented history would include a careful delineation of occupation and activities. PMID:26615595

  7. Ureteral obstruction secondary to retained ovarian remnants: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zaitoon, M M

    1987-05-01

    A case is reported of ureteral obstruction from retained retroperitoneal corpus luteum. Previously, the patient had undergone a hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy with incomplete removal of ovarian tissue on the affected side. The ureteral obstruction was treated by excision of the mass and ureterolysis.

  8. Comparing non contrast computerized tomography criteria versus dual X-ray absorptiometry as predictors of radio-opaque upper urinary tract stone fragmentation after electromagnetic shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Diaa A; Elgammal, Mohammed A; ElGanainy, Ehab O; Hageb, Adel; Mohammed, Khaled; El-Taher, Ahmed Mohamed; Mostafa, Mostafa Mohamed; Ahmed, Abdelfatah Ibrahim

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the value of dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in comparison to non contrast computed tomography (NCCT) density as possible predictors of upper urinary tract stone disintegration by shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). This study included 100 consecutive patients, with solitary renal stone 0.5-2 cm or upper ureteral stone up to 1 cm. DXA to calculate stone mineral density (SMD) and stone mineral content (SMC) was done. NCCT was performed to measure Hounsfield units (HU). SWL was performed with an electromagnetic lithotripsy, plain X-ray documented disintegration after SWL. Successful treatment was defined as stone free or complete fragmentation after 1 or 2 sessions of SWL. The impact of patients age, sex, body mass index, stone laterality, location, volume, length, mean SMC and SMD, HU and Hounsfield density (HD), skin to stone distance (SSD) and number of shock waves were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. Only 76 patients were available for follow-up. Success of disintegration was observed in 50 out of 76 patients (65.8 %). On multivariate analysis, SMC and number of shock wave were the significant independent factors affecting SWL outcome (p = 0.04 and p = 0.000, respectively). SMC as detected by DXA is a significant predictor of success of stone disintegration by SWL. SMC measured by DXA is more accurate than HU measured by CT. Patients with high stone mineral content (SMC greater than 0.65 g) should be directly offered another treatment option.

  9. Bath Stone - a Possible Global Heritage Stone from England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marker, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The Middle Jurassic strata of England have several horizons of oolitic and bioclastic limestones that provide high quality dimension stone. One of the most important is found in and near the City of Bath. The Great Oolite Group (Upper Bathonian) contains the Combe Down and Bath Oolites, consisting of current bedded oolites and shelly oolites, that have been used extensively as freestones for construction nearby, for prestigious buildings through much of southern England and more widely. The stone has been used to some extent since Roman times when the city, then known as Aquae Sulis, was an important hot spa. The stone was used to a limited extent through medieval times but from the early 18th century onwards was exploited on a large scale through surface quarrying and underground mining. The City was extensively redeveloped in the 18th to early 19th century, mostly using Bath Stone, when the spas made it a fashionable resort. Buildings from that period include architectural "gems" such as the Royal Crescent and Pulteney Bridge, as well as the renovated Roman Baths. Many buildings were designed by some of the foremost British architects of the time. The consistent use of this stone gives the City an architectural integrity throughout. These features led to the designation of the City as a World Heritage Site. It is a requirement in current City planning policy documents that Bath Stone should be used for new building to preserve the appearance of the City. More widely the stone was used in major houses (e.g. Buckingham Palace and Apsley House in London; King's Pavilion in Brighton); civic buildings (e.g. Bristol Guildhall; Dartmouth Naval College in Devon); churches and cathedrals (e.g. Truro Cathedral in Cornwall); and engineered structures (e.g. the large Dundas Aqueduct on the Kennet and Avon Canal). More widely, Bath Stone has been used in Union Station in Washington DC; Toronto Bible College and the Town Hall at Cape Town, South Africa. Extraction declined in

  10. Intrarenal pressure and irrigation flow with commonly used ureteric access sheaths and instruments

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Anna; Williams, Kevin; Somani, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Flexible ureterorenoscopy is becoming a first-line treatment for many intrarenal stones. Ureteric access sheaths are commonly used to aid access, stone removal and reduce intrarenal pressure. We evaluated the effects of two commonly used access sheaths on irrigation flow and intrarenal pressure during flexible ureterorenoscopy. We measured the effect of scope instrumentation on flow and pressure. Material and methods We utilized a 10/12F and 12/14F, 35 cm Re-Trace™ access sheath with a FlexX2 scope in a cadaveric porcine kidney. We evaluated the effect of four Nitinol baskets (1.3F, 1.5F, 1.9F, 2.2F), three different 200 µm laser fibres and a hand-held pump. Measurements of irrigation flow and intrarenal pressure were recorded and compared between the different sized access sheaths. Results Flow rates varied widely between access sheaths. Without instrumentation, mean flow was 17 mls/min (10/12F access sheath), versus 33 mls/min (12/14F sheath) (p <0.0001). Increasing basket size produced a gradual reduction in flow and pressure in both access sheaths. Reassuringly, pressures were low overall (<40 cm H2O). Pressures were significantly reduced when using the larger 12/14F sheath, with and without all instrumentations (p <0.0001). Hand-held pump devices have a marked effect on flow and pressure in both sheaths; with pressures rising up to 121 cm H2O with a 10/12F sheath, versus 29 cm H2O (12/14F) (p <0.0001). Conclusions A 12/14F access sheath offered significantly improved irrigation whilst maintaining significantly lower intrarenal pressure, when compared to a 10/12F access sheath in a cadaveric porcine model. Scope instrumentation affects irrigation flow and pressure in both sized sheaths. Furthermore, there should be caution with hand-held pump devices, especially with smaller sized sheaths, as intrarenal pressure can be very high. PMID:26855796

  11. The bioreceptivity of building stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauko Pranjić, Alenka; Mulec, Janez; Muck, Tadeja; Hladnik, Aleš; Mladenovič, Ana

    2015-04-01

    Bioreceptivity is an intrinsic property of stone, and is defined as the ability of a material to be colonized by living organisms. The fouling and staining of building stone material due to the activity of microorganisms presents a serious problem in modern as well as historical buildings, not only due to the aesthetic impact but also due to the deterioration of the material. Biological colonisation on stone materials is influenced by a number of factors, e.g. the intrinsic properties of the stone (porosity, roughness, permeability, mineral composition), environmental parameters (e.g. solar radiation, temperature, water regime, climate, etc.), and specific microclimatic parameters (e.g. orientation, exposure to shadow, permanent capillary humidity, etc.). In order to assess the bioreceptivity of building stones, use is often made of artificial colonisation experiments compromising the inoculation of stones with a single species or a few isolated strains under laboratory conditions. In the present work the authors present the development of a method for the determination of bioreceptivity, as well as a study of the bioreceptivity of selected natural stone versus the latter's intrinsic properties. Field examples of biodeterioration are also presented. The study was supported by the Slovenian Research Agency (L1-5453).

  12. A heuristic model of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nathan B; Zhong, Pei

    2013-08-01

    A heuristic model is presented to describe the overall progression of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), accounting for the effects of shock wave dose and the average peak pressure, P+(avg), incident on the stone during the treatment. The model is developed through adaptation of the Weibull theory for brittle fracture, incorporating threshold values in dose and P+(avg) that are required to initiate fragmentation. The model is validated against experimental data of stone comminution from two stone types (hard and soft BegoStone) obtained at various positions in lithotripter fields produced by two shock wave sources of different beam width and pulse profile both in water and in 1,3-butanediol (which suppresses cavitation). Subsequently, the model is used to assess the performance of a newly developed acoustic lens for electromagnetic lithotripters in comparison with its original counterpart both under static and simulated respiratory motion. The results have demonstrated the predictive value of this heuristic model in elucidating the physical basis for improved performance of the new lens. The model also provides a rationale for the selection of SWL treatment protocols to achieve effective stone comminution without elevating the risk of tissue injury.

  13. A heuristic model of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathan B.; Zhong, Pei

    2013-01-01

    A heuristic model is presented to describe the overall progression of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), accounting for the effects of shock wave dose and the average peak pressure, P+(avg), incident on the stone during the treatment. The model is developed through adaptation of the Weibull theory for brittle fracture, incorporating threshold values in dose and P+(avg) that are required to initiate fragmentation. The model is validated against experimental data of stone comminution from two stone types (hard and soft BegoStone) obtained at various positions in lithotripter fields produced by two shock wave sources of different beam width and pulse profile both in water and in 1,3-butanediol (which suppresses cavitation). Subsequently, the model is used to assess the performance of a newly developed acoustic lens for electromagnetic lithotripters in comparison with its original counterpart both under static and simulated respiratory motion. The results have demonstrated the predictive value of this heuristic model in elucidating the physical basis for improved performance of the new lens. The model also provides a rationale for the selection of SWL treatment protocols to achieve effective stone comminution without elevating the risk of tissue injury. PMID:23927195

  14. Comparison of a biodegradable ureteral stent versus the traditional double-J stent for the treatment of ureteral injury: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei-Jun; Wang, Zhong-Xin; Li, Gang; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xu

    2012-12-01

    Ureteral injury remains a major clinical problem; here we developed a biodegradable ureteral stent and compared its effectiveness with a double-J stent for treating ureteral injury. Eighteen dogs with injured ureters were subdivided into two groups. In group A, one injured ureter was treated with a biodegradable stent, whereas only end-to-end anastomosis was performed on the other side. In group B, one injured ureter was treated with a biodegradable stent, while a double-J stent was used on the other side. Intravenous urography, radioactive renography, histological examinations, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and elemental composition analysis were performed at 40, 80 and 120 days postoperatively. Results showed that the biodegradable stent could effectively prevent hydronephrosis and hydroureter secondary to ureteral injury. Moreover all biodegradable stents gradually degraded and discharged completely in 120 days. SEM and elemental composition analysis of the surface of the double-J stent confirmed calcification at 80 days and calcific plaque at 120 days, while no signs of calcification were found in the biodegradable stent group. Histological studies found no difference between the biodegradable stented ureters and double-J stented ureters. It is concluded that the biodegradable ureteral stent was more advantageous than the double-J stent for treating ureteral injury in a canine model.

  15. Gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.; Mossotti, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of gypsum on carbonate stone has been investigated through exposure of fresh samples of limestone and marble at monitored sites, through examination of alteration crusts from old buildings and through laboratory experiments. Several factors contribute to gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone. Marble or limestone that is sheltered from direct washing by rain in an urban environment with elevated pollution levels is likely to accumulate a gypsum crust. Crust development may be enhanced if the stone is porous or has an irregular surface area. Gypsum crusts are a surficial alteration feature; gypsum crystals form at the pore opening-air interface, where evaporation is greatest.

  16. Minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of ureteral stump syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alenezi, Husain; Eltiraifi, Abdelmoniem E.; Alomar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to highlight the advantages and the feasibility of treating ureteral stump syndrome (USS) by different minimally invasive procedures. Materials and Methods: Four patients with USS who were treated by different minimally invasive surgery approaches depending on their presentation and findings on radiologic investigations. Results: Three patients had complete resolution of their symptoms, whereas the fourth patient had persistence of urinary tract infection. Conclusion: Minimally invasive surgery is a valid treatment option for patients with USS with possible less morbidity than conventional open surgical excision. PMID:26692664

  17. Primary Ureteral Lymphoma Presenting with Acute Flank Pain.

    PubMed

    Foote, Christopher; Henderson, Sean; Reddy, Shilpa; Horrow, Mindy; Leighton, John; Cahn, David; Diorio, Greg; Bickell, Michael; Ginsberg, Phillip; Metro, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) represents 4% of newly diagnosed cancer in 2013 with a 59-82% 5-year survival depending on the tumor location. Primary presentation of lymphoma consists of lymphadenopathy or swelling of the lymph nodes and non-specific systemic symptoms such as fevers, night sweats, and weight loss. Less commonly, NHL arises from non-lymphoid tissue. We report a unique case of NHL arising from the ureteral wall which was visualized via non-contrast CT and direct vision through ureteroscopy. PMID:26195954

  18. Retroperitoneoscopic pyelolithotomy via a posterior approach for large impacted renal pelvic stone.

    PubMed

    Yagisawa, T; Ito, F; Kobayashi, C; Onitsuka, S; Kondo, T; Goto, Y; Toma, H

    2001-06-01

    Retroperitoneal laparoscopic pyelolithotomy via a posterior approach was successful in a patient with a large impacted renal pelvic stone. This procedure is beneficial as an alternative to open surgery for stones that cannot be treated by SWL or intracorporeal lithotripsy. This procedure may also be the initial treatment in selected cases. PMID:11465333

  19. Nutritional Management of Kidney Stones (Nephrolithiasis)

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Adam M.; Seifter, Julian L.; Dwyer, Johanna T.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of kidney stones is common in the United States and treatments for them are very costly. This review article provides information about epidemiology, mechanism, diagnosis, and pathophysiology of kidney stone formation, and methods for the evaluation of stone risks for new and follow-up patients. Adequate evaluation and management can prevent recurrence of stones. Kidney stone prevention should be individualized in both its medical and dietary management, keeping in mind the specific risks involved for each type of stones. Recognition of these risk factors and development of long-term management strategies for dealing with them are the most effective ways to prevent recurrence of kidney stones. PMID:26251832

  20. [Electrohydraulic shockwave lithotripsy with ventral shockwave exposure--technic, indications and initial clinical results].

    PubMed

    Miller, K; Bachor, R; Hautmann, R

    1988-05-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy of ureteral or calyceal calculi covered by the bony pelvis and of anteriorly located stones, such as calculi in horseshoe kidneys or the common bile duct, requires ventral introduction of the shockwave into the body. Eleven patients underwent ESWL in the prone position for the aforementioned indications. All treatments were performed with the Dornier HM3 lithotripter, which allows prone positioning of the patient without technical modification of the stretcher. ESWL was successful in all patients, one requiring a second session for complete stone disintegration. Thus, the possibility of shockwave lithotripsy with the patient in the prone position allows further extension of the indications for noninvasive treatment of calculi.

  1. Histopathology Predicts the Mechanism of Stone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evan, Andrew P.

    2007-04-01

    About 5% of American women and 12% of men will develop a kidney stone at some time in their life and these numbers appear to be on the rise. Despite years of scientific research into the mechanisms of stone formation and growth, limited advances have been made until recently. Randall's original observations and thoughts on the mechanisms for kidney stone formation have been validated for idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers (ICSF) but not for most other stone forming groups. Our current studies on selected groups of human stone formers using intraoperative papillary biopsies has shown overwhelming evidence for the presence of Randall's plaque in ICSF and that stone formation and growth are exclusively linked to its availability to urinary ions and proteins. Intense investigation of the plaque-stone junction is needed if we are to understand the factors leading to the overgrowth process on exposed regions of plaque. Such information should allow the development of treatment strategies to block stone formation in ICSF patients. Patients who form brushite stones, or who form apatite stones because of distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), or patients with calcium oxalate stones due to obesity bypass procedures, or patients with cystinuria, get plugged inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD) which leads to total destruction of the lining cells and focal sites of interstitial fibrosis. These stone formers have plaque but at levels equal to or below non-stone formers, which would suggest that they form stones by a different mechanism than do ICSF patients.

  2. Lunar stone saw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Tom; Croker, Todd; Hines, Ken; Knight, Mike; Walton, Todd

    1988-01-01

    This project addresses the problem of cutting lunar stones into blocks to be used to construct shelters to protect personnel and equipment from harmful solar radiation. This plant will manufacture 6 in x 1 ft x 2 ft blocks and will be located near the south pole to allow it to be in the shade at all times. This design uses a computer controlled robot, a boulder handler that uses hydraulics for movement, a computer system that used 3-D vision to determine the size of boulders, a polycrystalline diamond tipped saw blade that utilizes radiation for cooling, and a solar tower to collect solar energy. Only two electric motors are used in this plant because of the heavy weight of electric motors and the problem of cooling them. These two motors will be cooled by thermoelectric cooling. All other motors and actuators are to be hydraulic. The architectural design for the building as well as the conceptual design of the machines for cutting the blocks are described.

  3. Letter Report: LAW Simulant Development for Cast Stone Screening Test

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Swanberg, David J.; Eibling, Russell E.; Cozzi, Alex; Lindberg, Michael J.; Josephson, Gary B.; Rinehart, Donald E.

    2013-03-27

    testing program was developed in fiscal year (FY) 2012 describing in some detail the work needed to develop and qualify Cast Stone as a waste form for the solidification of Hanford LAW (Westsik et al. 2012). Included within Westsik et al. (2012) is a section on the near-term needs to address Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-062-40ZZ. The objectives of the testing program to be conducted in FY 2013 and FY 2014 are to: • Determine an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form. • Evaluate sources of dry materials for preparing the LAW Cast Stone. • Demonstrate the robustness of the Cast Stone waste form for a range of LAW compositions. • Demonstrate the robustness of the formulation for variability in the Cast Stone process. • Provide Cast Stone contaminant release data for PA and risk assessment evaluations. The first step in determining an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form is to conduct screening tests to examine expected ranges in pretreated LAW composition, waste stream concentrations, dry-materials sources, and mix ratios of waste feed to dry blend. A statistically designed test matrix will be used to evaluate the effects of these key parameters on the properties of the Cast Stone as it is initially prepared and after curing. The second phase of testing will focus on selection of a baseline Cast Stone formulation for LAW and demonstrating that Cast Stone can meet expected waste form requirements for disposal in the IDF. It is expected that this testing will use the results of the screening tests to define a smaller suite of tests to refine the composition of the baseline Cast Stone formulation (e.g. waste concentration, water to dry mix ratio, waste loading).

  4. Evaluation of stone-free rate using Guy's Stone Score and assessment of complications using modified Clavien grading system for percutaneous nephro-lithotomy.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajan Kumar; Mukherjee, Subhabrata; Jindal, Tarun; Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Saha, Barun; Mitra, Nilanjan; Kumar, Jay; Mukhopadhyay, Chandranath; Ghosh, Nabankur; Kamal, Mir Reza; Mandal, Soumendra Nath; Karmakar, Dilip

    2015-08-01

    To prospectively evaluate the ability of Guy's Stone Score (GSS) in predicting stone clearance rate and complication rate (by modified Clavien grade) for renal stones treated by percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). From January 2013 to June 2014, a total of 142 patients undergoing PNL were evaluated prospectively. Patients with co-morbidities like hypertension, diabetes, renal failure were excluded from the study. All patients were classified according to GSS based on the findings of pre-operative intravenous urography (IVU) and per-operative retrograde pyelography (RGP). All PNL procedures were done by standard technique in prone position and success was defined as no residual stone visible on X-ray KUB done on the third postoperative day. Complications were classified according to modified Clavien grading system. The initial stone clearance rate was 71.1% and overall final stone clearance rate was 90.14%. The complication rate according to Clavien grading system was 40.1%. The final stone clearance rates were 93.9, 85.71, 90.47, and 77.77% in GSS I, II, III, and IV, respectively (p<0.001, <0.05, <0.05 and >0.05, respectively). The Clavien complication rates were 23, 61, 52, and 77.7% in GSS I, II, III, and IV, respectively (p<0.001). The GSS is a simple and easily reproducible system to preoperatively predict stone-free rate and perioperative complication rate. It helps in better patient counseling preoperatively. PMID:25850962

  5. Treating stones in transplanted kidneys.

    PubMed

    Saxena, S; Sadideen, H; Goldsmith, D

    2013-02-01

    The formation of calculi in renal allografts is an uncommon complication in renal transplant recipients, with a reported incidence of 0.2-1.7% according to retrospective studies. Although the majority of these stones appear to form de novo following renal transplantation (RTX), there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that more often than previously thought they may be transplanted with the donor graft itself. The etiology and pathophysiology of renal graft stones is multifactorial. A combination of metabolic and urodynamic factors predispose to stone formation and these are generally found more frequently in allograft rather than native kidneys. In addition tertiary hyperparathyroidism (following RTX) plays an important role. Renal allograft stones can pose significant challenges for the clinician. The diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and must be prompt, as these patients' reliance on a solitary kidney for their renal function leaves them susceptible to significant morbidity. However, reports in the literature come largely from anecdotal experience and case reports, meaning that there is a limited consensus regarding how best to manage the condition. We suggest that interventional treatment should be guided primarily by stone size and individual patient presentation. Good outcomes have been reported with shockwave lithotripsy (SWL), percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and ureteroscopy, but optimal management of the risk factors leading to calculi formation (i.e., prevention) will remain the most cost-effective management.

  6. Canada's National Building Stone: Tyndall Stone from Manitoba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Brian R.; Young, Graham A.; Dobrzanski, Edward P.

    2016-04-01

    Tyndall Stone is a distinctively mottled and highly fossiliferous dolomitic limestone that belongs to the Selkirk Member of the Red River Formation, of Late Ordovician (Katian) age. It has been quarried at Garson, Manitoba, 37 km northeast of Winnipeg, since 1895, although other quarries in the area go back to 1832. Tyndall Stone, so named because it was shipped by rail from nearby Tyndall, is currently produced by Gillis Quarries Limited. It has various uses as a dimension stone. Large slabs, most often cut parallel to bedding, face the exterior or interior of many important buildings such as the Parliament Buildings and the Canadian Museum of Civilization in the Ottawa area, the Empress Hotel in Victoria, and the provincial legislatures in Winnipeg and Regina, as well as many commercial buildings especially in the Canadian prairies. At the quarries, the stone is cut vertically, using eight foot (2.44 m) diameter saws mounted on one hundred foot (30.5 m) tracks, then split into 6-8 tonne blocks that are moved using front-end loaders. Gillis Quarries operates a large finishing plant with an area of about 4000 m2. Stone is processed along advanced cutting lines that feature eight primary saws and six gantry saw stations, allowing it to be made into a variety of sizes, shapes, and finishes. The Selkirk Member is 43 m thick and the stone is extracted from a 6-8 m thick interval within the lower part. The upper beds tend to be more buff-coloured than the grey lower beds due to weathering by groundwater. The stone is massive, but extracted blocks are less than ~1m thick due to splitting along stylolites. Consisting of bioturbated wackestone to packstone, the Tyndall Stone was deposited in a shallow-marine environment within the photic zone, in the central part of the vast equatorial epicontinental sea that covered much of Laurentia. Scattered thin, bioclastic grainstone lenses record brief, low-energy storm events. The distinctive mottles are formed by dolomitized

  7. Calcium oxalate crystal growth in human urinary stones

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.M.; Johnson, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Calcium oxalate stones are very common and increasing. Crystal growth is no less important than the crystal nucleation in the pathogenesis of stone formation. The crystal growth was studied in human calcium oxalate stones by a combined electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The main mode of weddellite growth was interpenetration twinning of tetrahedral bipyramids. Bipyramids may form as initial crystal seeds, develop from anhedral crystals (crystals which lack flat symmetric faces) of spherular or mulberry shape, develop on the surface of preformed bipyramids by spiral dislocation mechanisms, or develop on whewellite crystal by heterogeneous nucleation and epitaxy. Heterogeneous nucleations of whewellite on weddellite, and calcium apatite on whewellite were also observed. Whewellite grew mainly by parallel twinning. Interpenetration twinning was exceptional. Transformation of anhedral to euhedral (completely bounded by flat faces that are set ar fixed angles to one another) whewellite occurred by parallel fissurations followed by brick wall like stacking of the crystals, while euhedral transformation of weddellite occurred by protrusion of bipyramids frm anhedral crystal surface. Occasionally, an evidence of crystal dissolution was noted. Although an aggregation of crystals is believed to play a pivotal role in stone nidus formation, growth in size of the formed crystals, and twinning and epitactic crystal intergrowth apparently play a significant role in the obstructive urinary stone formation.

  8. [Rare cases of bladder stones].

    PubMed

    Sampalmieri, Gregorio; Moretti, Antonello; Sampalmieri, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    We present here two special cases of urolithiasis. The first one shows a giant bladder lithiasis resulting in severe renal insufficiency in a 63-year-old patient, who had previously had nicturia (2-3 times), occasional episodes of urinary frequency and burning micturition, in the absence of renal colic, hematuria or interrupted urination. The second case referes to an 85-year-old man suffering from prostatic enlargement and bladder stones, hospitalized to undergo intervention of trans-vesical prostatic adenomectomy, during which two star-shaped stones were found without obvious symptoms.

  9. Kidney Stones in Children and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Kidney Stones in Children and Teens Page Content Article ... teen girls having the highest incidence. Types of Kidney Stones There are many different types of kidney ...

  10. "Stone Age" Fun: Releasing the Animal Within.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geist, Janet Marie

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a fifth-grade sculpture project that uses a subtractive, rather than additive, technique. Students carve an animal sculpture from a block of simulated stone compound. Explains the process and how to make the simulated stone compound. (CMK)

  11. Luserna Stone: A nomination for "Global Heritage Stone Resource"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primavori, Piero

    2015-04-01

    Luserna Stone (Pietra di Luserna) is the commercial name of a grey-greenish leucogranitic orthogneiss, probably from the Lower Permian Age, that outcrops in the Luserna-Infernotto basin (Cottian Alps, Piedmont, NW Italy) on the border between the Turin and Cuneo provinces. Geologically speaking, it pertains to the Dora-Maira Massif that represents a part of the ancient European margin annexed to the Cottian Alps during the Alpine orogenesis; from a petrographic point of view, it is the metamorphic result of a late-Ercinian leucogranitic rock transformation. Lithological features and building applications allow the recognition of two main varieties: 1) a micro-augen gneiss with very regular schistosity planes with centimetric spacing and easy split workability, known as Splittable facies; 2) a micro-Augen gneiss characterized by lower schistosity and poor split, suitable for blocks cutting machines (diamond wires, gang-saws, traditional saws), known as Massive facies. A third, rare, white variety also exists, called "Bianchetta". Luserna stone extends over an area of approximately 50 km2, where more than fifty quarries are in operation, together with a relevant number of processing plants and artisanal laboratories. The stone is quarried and processed since almost the Middle Age, and currently represents one of the three most important siliceous production cluster in Italy (together with the Ossola and Sardegna Island granites). Some characteristics of this stone - such as the relevant physical-mechanical properties, an intrinsic versatility and its peculiar splittability - have made it one of the most widely used stone materials in Italy and in the countries surrounding the North Western border of Italy. Apart from its intrinsic geological, petrographic, commercial and technical properties, several issues related to the Luserna Stone are considered to be of relevant importance for its designation as a Global Heritage Stone Resource, such as the distinctive mark on

  12. Late ureteral obstruction in an adult who had STING/Teflon in childhood: Should we expect an epidemic?

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Shilo; Lorber, Amitay; Landau, Ezekiel H; Pode, Dov; Gofrit, Ofer N; Hidas, Guy; Duvdevani, Mordechai; Sfoungaristos, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of left renal colic in a 25-year-old female patient. She had subureteral injection of Teflon (STING) at the age of 10 due to vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) disease and recurrent urinary tract infections. Renal colic was the result of late ureteral obstruction due to Teflon-induced periureteral foreign body reaction. To our knowledge, this is the longest interval between STING and ureteral obstruction reported and the first case of delayed ureteral obstruction caused by Teflon. Monitoring the upper tracts of patients after STING should go beyond childhood. PMID:26664516

  13. Chronic kidney disease in kidney stone formers.

    PubMed

    Rule, Andrew D; Krambeck, Amy E; Lieske, John C

    2011-08-01

    Recent population studies have found symptomatic kidney stone formers to be at increased risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although kidney stones are not commonly identified as the primary cause of ESRD, they still may be important contributing factors. Paradoxically, CKD can be protective against forming kidney stones because of the substantial reduction in urine calcium excretion. Among stone formers, those with rare hereditary diseases (cystinuria, primary hyperoxaluria, Dent disease, and 2,8 dihydroxyadenine stones), recurrent urinary tract infections, struvite stones, hypertension, and diabetes seem to be at highest risk for CKD. The primary mechanism for CKD from kidney stones is usually attributed to an obstructive uropathy or pyelonephritis, but crystal plugs at the ducts of Bellini and parenchymal injury from shockwave lithotripsy may also contribute. The historical shift to less invasive surgical management of kidney stones has likely had a beneficial impact on the risk for CKD. Among potential kidney donors, past symptomatic kidney stones but not radiographic stones found on computed tomography scans were associated with albuminuria. Kidney stones detected by ultrasound screening have also been associated with CKD in the general population. Further studies that better classify CKD, better characterize stone formers, more thoroughly address potential confounding by comorbidities, and have active instead of passive follow-up to avoid detection bias are needed.

  14. Intraperitoneal stone migration during percutaneos nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Diri, Akif; Karakan, Tolga; Resorlu, Mustafa; Kabar, Mucahit; Germiyanoglu, Cankon

    2014-12-01

    Percutaneos nephrolithotomy (PNL) is the standard care for renal stones larger than 2 cm. The procedure has some major and minor complications. Renal pelvis laceration and stone migration to the retroperitoneum is one of the rare condition. We report the first case of intraperitoneal stone migration during PNL. PMID:25641455

  15. Barium stone impaction in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Erhan, Y; Koyuncu, A; Osmanoglu, N

    1995-06-01

    Autonomic symptoms such as orthostatic hypotension, abnormal sweating and constipation occur frequently in Parkinson's disease. In our case, barium meal used for upper gastrointestinal study caused barium stone formation and a paralytic-ileus-like syndrome. Therefore, attention should be paid while using barium meal for diagnostic purpose in Parkinsonism. PMID:7474296

  16. Developing disease resistant stone fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stone fruit (Prunus spp.) (peach, nectarine, plum, apricot, cherry) and almonds are susceptible to a number of pathogens. These pathogens can cause extensive losses in the field, during transport and storage, and in the market. Breeding for disease resistance requires an extensive knowledge of the...

  17. "Stone Cold": Worthy of Study?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthwaite, Alison

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on my experiences of teaching "Stone Cold" to respond to a blog post suggesting that the novel holds little educational value. I argue that the novel's narrative style helps to foster criticality while its subject matter can help students see the relevance of literature to the world around them. Relating this to…

  18. Primary vesico-ureteric reflux: The need for individualised risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Hidas, Guy; Nam, Alexander; Soltani, Tandis; Pribish, Maryellen; Watts, Blake; Khoury, Antoine E.

    2013-01-01

    The management of paediatric primary vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR) has undergone serial changes over the last decade. As this disorder is extremely heterogeneous, and high-quality prospective data are limited, the treatment strategies vary among centres. Current treatment options include observation only, continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, and surgery. Surgical intervention is indicated if a child has a breakthrough urinary tract infection (UTI) while on continuous antibiotic prophylaxis or if there are renal scars present. After excluding a secondary cause of VUR the physician should consider the risk factors affecting the severity of VUR and manage the child accordingly. Those factors include demographic factors (age at presentation, gender, ethnicity) and clinical factors (VUR grade, unilateral vs. bilateral, presence of renal scars, initial presentation, the number of UTIs, and presence of any voiding or bowel dysfunction). In this review we summarise the major controversial issues in current reports on VUR and highlight the importance of individualised patient management according to their risk stratification. PMID:26579238

  19. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency ameliorates renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Huang, Kuo-How; Wang, Ching-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Chen, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-04-19

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is an important pathogenic feature in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, regardless of the initiating insults. A recent study has shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is involved in acute ischemia/reperfusion-related acute kidney injury through oxidative stress induction. However, the influence of CHOP on chronic kidney disease-correlated renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of CHOP in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced experimental chronic tubulointerstital fibrosis. The CHOP knockout and wild type mice with or without UUO were used. The results showed that the increased expressions of renal fibrosis markers collagen I, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated wild type mice were dramatically attenuated in the kidneys of UUO-treated CHOP knockout mice. CHOP deficiency could also ameliorate lipid peroxidation and endogenous antioxidant enzymes depletion, tubular apoptosis, and inflammatory cells infiltration in the UUO kidneys. These results suggest that CHOP deficiency not only attenuates apoptotic death and oxidative stress in experimental renal fibrosis, but also reduces local inflammation, leading to diminish UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Our findings support that CHOP may be an important signaling molecule in the progression of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26942460

  20. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency ameliorates renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Huang, Kuo-How; Wang, Ching-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Chen, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-04-19

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is an important pathogenic feature in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, regardless of the initiating insults. A recent study has shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is involved in acute ischemia/reperfusion-related acute kidney injury through oxidative stress induction. However, the influence of CHOP on chronic kidney disease-correlated renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of CHOP in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced experimental chronic tubulointerstital fibrosis. The CHOP knockout and wild type mice with or without UUO were used. The results showed that the increased expressions of renal fibrosis markers collagen I, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated wild type mice were dramatically attenuated in the kidneys of UUO-treated CHOP knockout mice. CHOP deficiency could also ameliorate lipid peroxidation and endogenous antioxidant enzymes depletion, tubular apoptosis, and inflammatory cells infiltration in the UUO kidneys. These results suggest that CHOP deficiency not only attenuates apoptotic death and oxidative stress in experimental renal fibrosis, but also reduces local inflammation, leading to diminish UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Our findings support that CHOP may be an important signaling molecule in the progression of chronic kidney disease.

  1. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency ameliorates renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-Chia; Guan, Siao-Syun; Chen, Li-Ping; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is an important pathogenic feature in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease, regardless of the initiating insults. A recent study has shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is involved in acute ischemia/reperfusion-related acute kidney injury through oxidative stress induction. However, the influence of CHOP on chronic kidney disease-correlated renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of CHOP in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced experimental chronic tubulointerstital fibrosis. The CHOP knockout and wild type mice with or without UUO were used. The results showed that the increased expressions of renal fibrosis markers collagen I, fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated wild type mice were dramatically attenuated in the kidneys of UUO-treated CHOP knockout mice. CHOP deficiency could also ameliorate lipid peroxidation and endogenous antioxidant enzymes depletion, tubular apoptosis, and inflammatory cells infiltration in the UUO kidneys. These results suggest that CHOP deficiency not only attenuates apoptotic death and oxidative stress in experimental renal fibrosis, but also reduces local inflammation, leading to diminish UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Our findings support that CHOP may be an important signaling molecule in the progression of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26942460

  2. A Drosophila Model Identifies a Critical Role for Zinc in Mineralization for Kidney Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Sven; Bose, Neelanjan; Kahn, Arnold; Flechner, Lawrence; Blaschko, Sarah D.; Zee, Tiffany; Muteliefu, Gulinuer; Bond, Nichole; Kolipinski, Marysia; Fakra, Sirine C.; Mandel, Neil; Miller, Joe; Ramanathan, Arvind; Killilea, David W.; Brückner, Katja; Kapahi, Pankaj; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic calcification is a driving force for a variety of diseases, including kidney stones and atherosclerosis, but initiating factors remain largely unknown. Given its importance in seemingly divergent disease processes, identifying fundamental principal actors for ectopic calcification may have broad translational significance. Here we establish a Drosophila melanogaster model for ectopic calcification by inhibiting xanthine dehydrogenase whose deficiency leads to kidney stones in humans and dogs. Micro X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (μXANES) synchrotron analyses revealed high enrichment of zinc in the Drosophila equivalent of kidney stones, which was also observed in human kidney stones and Randall’s plaques (early calcifications seen in human kidneys thought to be the precursor for renal stones). To further test the role of zinc in driving mineralization, we inhibited zinc transporter genes in the ZnT family and observed suppression of Drosophila stone formation. Taken together, genetic, dietary, and pharmacologic interventions to lower zinc confirm a critical role for zinc in driving the process of heterogeneous nucleation that eventually leads to stone formation. Our findings open a novel perspective on the etiology of urinary stones and related diseases, which may lead to the identification of new preventive and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25970330

  3. A Drosophila model identifies a critical role for zinc in mineralization for kidney stone disease.

    PubMed

    Chi, Thomas; Kim, Man Su; Lang, Sven; Bose, Neelanjan; Kahn, Arnold; Flechner, Lawrence; Blaschko, Sarah D; Zee, Tiffany; Muteliefu, Gulinuer; Bond, Nichole; Kolipinski, Marysia; Fakra, Sirine C; Mandel, Neil; Miller, Joe; Ramanathan, Arvind; Killilea, David W; Brückner, Katja; Kapahi, Pankaj; Stoller, Marshall L

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic calcification is a driving force for a variety of diseases, including kidney stones and atherosclerosis, but initiating factors remain largely unknown. Given its importance in seemingly divergent disease processes, identifying fundamental principal actors for ectopic calcification may have broad translational significance. Here we establish a Drosophila melanogaster model for ectopic calcification by inhibiting xanthine dehydrogenase whose deficiency leads to kidney stones in humans and dogs. Micro X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (μXANES) synchrotron analyses revealed high enrichment of zinc in the Drosophila equivalent of kidney stones, which was also observed in human kidney stones and Randall's plaques (early calcifications seen in human kidneys thought to be the precursor for renal stones). To further test the role of zinc in driving mineralization, we inhibited zinc transporter genes in the ZnT family and observed suppression of Drosophila stone formation. Taken together, genetic, dietary, and pharmacologic interventions to lower zinc confirm a critical role for zinc in driving the process of heterogeneous nucleation that eventually leads to stone formation. Our findings open a novel perspective on the etiology of urinary stones and related diseases, which may lead to the identification of new preventive and therapeutic approaches.

  4. Screening and Management of Asymptomatic Renal Stones in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes, David; Locke, James; Sargsyan, Ashot; Garcia, Kathleen

    2017-01-01

    Management guidelines were created to screen and manage asymptomatic renal stones in U.S. astronauts. The true risk for renal stone formation in astronauts due to the space flight environment is unknown. Proper management of this condition is crucial to mitigate health and mission risks. The NASA Flight Medicine Clinic electronic medical record and the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health databases were reviewed. An extensive review of the literature and current aeromedical standards for the monitoring and management of renal stones was also done. This work was used to develop a screening and management protocol for renal stones in astronauts that is relevant to the spaceflight operational environment. In the proposed guidelines all astronauts receive a yearly screening and post-flight renal ultrasound using a novel ultrasound protocol. The ultrasound protocol uses a combination of factors, including: size, position, shadow, twinkle and dispersion properties to confirm the presence of a renal calcification. For mission-assigned astronauts, any positive ultrasound study is followed by a low-dose renal computed tomography scan and urologic consult. Other specific guidelines were also created. A small asymptomatic renal stone within the renal collecting system may become symptomatic at any time, and therefore affect launch and flight schedules, or cause incapacitation during a mission. Astronauts in need of definitive care can be evacuated from the International Space Station, but for deep space missions evacuation is impossible. The new screening and management algorithm has been implemented and the initial round of screening ultrasounds is under way. Data from these exams will better define the incidence of renal stones in U.S. astronauts, and will be used to inform risk mitigation for both short and long duration spaceflights.

  5. Management of lower-pole caliceal stones.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Glenn S

    2003-09-01

    A series of 205 urologists answered questions about their choice of treatment for lower-caliceal stones. The preferred approaches were extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) for stones <1 cm and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for those >2 cm. For stones of 1 to 2 cm, 65% preferred SWL and 30% would advise PCNL. Thus, SWL is recommended for lower-caliceal stones more frequently than is justified by published success rates. Continued efforts need to be made to inform practicing urologists regarding the most appropriate therapy for patients with lower-pole stones >1 cm.

  6. Treatment of ureteral calculus obstruction with laser lithotripsy in an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Todd L; Sur, Roger L

    2012-03-01

    An adult female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) presented with acute anorexia secondary to progressive azotemia (blood urea nitrogen = 213 mg/dl, creatinine [Cr] = 9.5 mg/dl) and electrolyte abnormalities (K = 7.4 mEq/L). It was later diagnosed with postrenal obstruction secondary to bilaterally obstructing ureteral calculi seen on ultrasound. Treatment of the obstruction required two endoscopic procedures, cystoscopy for ureteral stent placement and ureteroscopy to perform intracorporeal lithotripsy on the obstructing calculi. Before the first procedure, the dolphin's azotemia was stabilized with aggressive fluid therapy, peritoneal dialysis, and treatment for acidosis. Diuresis subsequent to the fluid therapy enabled passage of the right obstructing urolith. For both endoscopic procedures, the dolphin was placed in left lateral recumbency due to the peritoneal dialysis catheter in the right retroperitoneal region. For the first procedure, a 12-French (Fr) flexible cystoscope was inserted retrograde into the bladder via the urethra, whereupon a calculus was seen obstructing the left ureteral orifice. A 4.8-Fr, 26-cm double-pigtail ureteral stent was placed up the left ureter to relieve the postrenal obstruction. Inadvertent proximal migration of the left ureteral stent occurred during the procedure. However, renal parameters (serum Cr = 5.8, K = 5.4) improved significantly by the next day. For the second procedure, 28 hr later, ureteroscopy was performed to treat the calculus and replace the existing stent with a longer stent. The left ureteral calculus was pulverized into tiny fragments by using a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser inserted through a 6.9-Fr semirigid ureteroscope. The migrated stent was visualized in the distal left ureter and replaced with a 90-cm single-pigtail ureteral stent that was sutured exterior to the urogenital slit and removed 3 days later. Renal function normalized over the next several days, and the dolphin recovered over

  7. Treatment of ureteral calculus obstruction with laser lithotripsy in an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Todd L; Sur, Roger L

    2012-03-01

    An adult female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) presented with acute anorexia secondary to progressive azotemia (blood urea nitrogen = 213 mg/dl, creatinine [Cr] = 9.5 mg/dl) and electrolyte abnormalities (K = 7.4 mEq/L). It was later diagnosed with postrenal obstruction secondary to bilaterally obstructing ureteral calculi seen on ultrasound. Treatment of the obstruction required two endoscopic procedures, cystoscopy for ureteral stent placement and ureteroscopy to perform intracorporeal lithotripsy on the obstructing calculi. Before the first procedure, the dolphin's azotemia was stabilized with aggressive fluid therapy, peritoneal dialysis, and treatment for acidosis. Diuresis subsequent to the fluid therapy enabled passage of the right obstructing urolith. For both endoscopic procedures, the dolphin was placed in left lateral recumbency due to the peritoneal dialysis catheter in the right retroperitoneal region. For the first procedure, a 12-French (Fr) flexible cystoscope was inserted retrograde into the bladder via the urethra, whereupon a calculus was seen obstructing the left ureteral orifice. A 4.8-Fr, 26-cm double-pigtail ureteral stent was placed up the left ureter to relieve the postrenal obstruction. Inadvertent proximal migration of the left ureteral stent occurred during the procedure. However, renal parameters (serum Cr = 5.8, K = 5.4) improved significantly by the next day. For the second procedure, 28 hr later, ureteroscopy was performed to treat the calculus and replace the existing stent with a longer stent. The left ureteral calculus was pulverized into tiny fragments by using a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser inserted through a 6.9-Fr semirigid ureteroscope. The migrated stent was visualized in the distal left ureter and replaced with a 90-cm single-pigtail ureteral stent that was sutured exterior to the urogenital slit and removed 3 days later. Renal function normalized over the next several days, and the dolphin recovered over

  8. Ketoprofen-eluting biodegradable ureteral stents by CO2 impregnation: In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Barros, Alexandre A; Oliveira, Carlos; Reis, Rui L; Lima, Estevão; Duarte, Ana Rita C

    2015-11-30

    Ureteral stents are indispensable tools in urologic practice. The main complications associated with ureteral stents are dislocation, infection, pain and encrustation. Biodegradable ureteral stents are one of the most attractive designs with the potential to eliminate several complications associated with the stenting procedure. In this work we hypothesize the impregnation of ketoprofen, by CO2-impregnation in a patented biodegradable ureteral stent previously developed in our group. The biodegradable ureteral stents with each formulation: alginate-based, gellan gum-based were impregnated with ketoprofen and the impregnation conditions tested were 100 bar, 2 h and three different temperatures (35 °C, 40 °C and 50 °C). The impregnation was confirmed by FTIR and DSC demonstrated the amorphization of the drug upon impregnation. The in vitro elution profile in artificial urine solution (AUS) during degradation of a biodegradable ureteral stent loaded with ketoprofen was evaluated. According to the kinetics results these systems have shown to be very promising for the release ketoprofen in the first 72 h, which is the necessary time for anti-inflammatory delivery after the surgical procedure. The in vitro release studied revealed an influence of the temperature on the impregnation yield, with a higher impregnation yield at 40 °C. Higher yields were also obtained for gellan gum-based stents. The non-cytotoxicity characteristic of the developed ketoprofen-eluting biodegradable ureteral stents was evaluated in L929 cell line by MTS assay which demonstrated the feasibility of this product as a medical device.

  9. Is the Routine Check Nephrostogram Following Percutaneous Antegrade Ureteric Stent Placement Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Soh, Keng Chuan; Tay, Kiang Hiong Tan, Bien Soo; MM Htoo, Austin; HG Lo, Richard; Lin, Shueh En

    2008-05-15

    Our aim was to review our experience with percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent (PAUS) placement and to determine if the routinely conducted check nephrostogram on the day following ureteric stent placement was necessary. Retrospective review of patients who had undergone PAUS placement between January 2004 and December 2005 was performed. There were 83 subjects (36 males, 47 females), with a mean age of 59.9 years (range, 22-94 years). Average follow-up duration was 7.1 months (range, 1-24 months). The most common indications for PAUS placement were ureteric obstruction due to metastatic disease (n = 56) and urinary calculi (n = 34). Technical success was 93.2% (96/103 attempts), with no major immediate procedure-related complications or mortalities. The Bard 7Fr Urosoft DJ Stent was used in more than 95% of the cases. Eighty-one of 89 (91.0%) check nephrostograms demonstrated a patent ureteric stent with resultant safety catheter removal. Three check nephrostograms revealed distal stent migration requiring repositioning by a goose-snare, while five others showed stent occlusion necessitating permanent external drainage by nephrostomy drainage catheter reinsertion. Following PAUS placement, the serum creatinine level improved or stabilized in 82% of patients. The serum creatinine outcome difference between the groups with benign and malignant indications for PAUS placement was not statistically significant (p = 0.145) but resolution of hydronephrosis was significantly better (p = 0.008) in patients with benign indications. Percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent placement is a safe and effective means of relief for ureteric obstruction. The check nephrostogram following ureteric stent placement was unnecessary in the majority of patients.

  10. Collagen studies in newborn rat kidneys with incomplete ureteric obstruction.

    PubMed

    Haralambous-Gasser, A; Chan, D; Walker, R G; Powell, H R; Becker, G J; Jones, C L

    1993-09-01

    Collagen studies in newborn rats with incomplete ureteric obstruction were performed to describe and quantify changes in collagen deposition resulting from urinary tract obstruction at an early developmental age. Incomplete ureteric obstruction was created in three-day-old rats by placing the left ureter in a tunnel formed by the psoas muscle, and sham-operated controls underwent a laparotomy. The rats were sacrificed at 10, 17, 24 or 31 days. Collagen types I, III, IV, and V were localized by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, the total collagen content of the kidney was quantitated using hydroxyproline analysis, and collagen types I and III were quantitated using cyanogen bromide (CNBr) peptide analysis. Increased immunofluorescent staining for all of the collagens was found in the diffusely widened medullary interstitium of the obstructed kidney, and more focally in the cortical interstitium. Collagen types I, III and V, but not collagen type IV, were also found in bands in the interstitium at the junction of the cortex with the medulla. Increased staining for collagen type IV was found in thickened and tortuous tubular basement membranes (TBM) of the obstructed kidneys. The total collagen content of the obstructed kidney was significantly increased compared to the amounts in both the contralateral kidneys and in the kidneys from sham-operated controls at 24 and 31 days of age (P < 0.01 in each case, Wilcoxon matched pairs rank sum test and Mann Whitney U-test, respectively). The amount of collagen in the kidneys correlated with the degree of hydronephrosis (Spearman correlation test, r = 0.78, P < 0.02). CNBr peptide analysis demonstrated that over 50% of the collagen in the normal neonatal rat kidney was collagen type I and approximately 25% was collagen type III. In the obstructed kidneys most of the collagen was also collagen type I and collagen type III, although the proportion of total collagen comprised by these collagen types was decreased compared

  11. Acute renal infarction secondary to atrial fibrillation - mimicking renal stone picture.

    PubMed

    Salih, Salih Bin; Al Durihim, Huda; Al Jizeeri, Ahmed; Al Maziad, Ghassan

    2006-06-01

    Acute renal infarction presents in a similar clinical picture to that of a renal stone. We report a 55-year-old Saudi female, known to have atrial fibrillation secondary to mitral stenosis due to rheumatic heart disease. She presented with a two day history of right flank pain that was treated initially as a renal stone. Further investigations confirmed her as a case of renal infarction. Renal infarction is under-diagnosed because the similarity of its presentation to renal stone. Renal infarction should be considered in the differential diagnosis of loin pain, particularly in a patient with atrial fibrillation.

  12. Chronic kidney disease induced in mice by reversible unilateral ureteral obstruction is dependent on genetic background.

    PubMed

    Puri, Tipu S; Shakaib, Mohammed I; Chang, Anthony; Mathew, Liby; Olayinka, Oladunni; Minto, Andrew W M; Sarav, Menaka; Hack, Bradley K; Quigg, Richard J

    2010-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) begins with renal injury; the progression thereafter depends upon a number of factors, including genetic background. Unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) is a well-described model of renal fibrosis and as such is considered a model of CKD. We used an improved reversible unilateral ureteral obstruction (rUUO) model in mice to study the strain dependence of development of CKD after obstruction-mediated injury. C57BL/6 mice developed CKD after reversal of three or more days of ureteral obstruction as assessed by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) measurements (>40 mg/dl). In contrast, BALB/c mice were resistant to CKD with up to 10 days ureteral obstruction. During rUUO, C57BL/6 mice exhibited pronounced inflammatory and intrinsic proliferative cellular responses, disruption of renal architecture, and ultimately fibrosis. By comparison, BALB/c mice had more controlled and measured extrinsic and intrinsic responses to injury with a return to normal within several weeks after release of ureteral obstruction. Our findings provide a model that allows investigation of the genetic basis of events during recovery from injury that contribute to the development of CKD.

  13. Degradation and antibacterial properties of magnesium alloys in artificial urine for potential resorbable ureteral stent applications.

    PubMed

    Lock, Jaclyn Y; Wyatt, Eric; Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Whall, Andrew; Nuñez, Vicente; Vullev, Valentine I; Liu, Huinan

    2014-03-01

    This article presents an investigation on the effectiveness of magnesium and its alloys as a novel class of antibacterial and biodegradable materials for ureteral stent applications. Magnesium is a lightweight and biodegradable metallic material with beneficial properties for use in medical devices. Ureteral stent is one such example of a medical device that is widely used to treat ureteral canal blockages clinically. The bacterial colony formation coupled with the encrustation on the stent surface from extended use often leads to clinical complications and contributes to the failure of indwelling medical devices. We demonstrated that magnesium alloys decreased Escherichia coli viability and reduced the colony forming units over a 3-day incubation period in an artificial urine (AU) solution when compared with currently used commercial polyurethane stent. Moreover, the magnesium degradation resulted in alkaline pH and increased magnesium ion concentration in the AU solution. The antibacterial and degradation properties support the potential use of magnesium-based materials for next-generation ureteral stents. Further studies are needed for clinical translation of biodegradable metallic ureteral stents.

  14. Optimal management of distal ureteric strictures following renal transplantation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Justin; Schiefer, Danielle; Aboalsamh, Ghaleb; Archambault, Jason; Luke, Patrick P; Sener, Alp

    2016-05-01

    Our objective was to define optimal management of distal ureteric strictures following renal transplantation. A systematic review on PubMed identified 34 articles (385 patients). Primary endpoints were success rates and complications of specific primary and secondary treatments (following failure of primary treatment). Among primary treatments (n = 303), the open approach had 85.4% success (95% CI 72.5-93.1) and the endourological approach had 64.3% success (95% CI 58.3-69.9). Among secondary treatments (n = 82), the open approach had 93.1% success (95% CI 77.0-99.2) and the endourological approach had 75.5% success (95% CI 62.3-85.2). The most common primary open treatment was ureteric reimplantation (n = 33, 81.8% success, 95% CI 65.2-91.8). The most common primary endourological treatment was dilation (n = 133, 58.6% success, 95% CI 50.1-66.7). Fourteen complications, including death (4 weeks post-op) and graft loss (12 days post-op), followed endourological treatment. One complication followed open treatment. This is the first systematic review to examine the success rates and complications of specific treatments for distal ureteric strictures following renal transplantation. Our review indicates that open management has higher success rates and fewer complications than endourological management as a primary and secondary treatment for post-transplant distal ureteric strictures. We also outline a post-transplant ureteric stricture evaluation and treatment algorithm.

  15. Macromolecules Relevant to Stone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryall, Rosemary L.; Cook, Alison F.; Thurgood, Lauren A.; Grover, Phulwinder K.

    2007-04-01

    Despite years of research, no single macromolecule in kidney calculi or in urine has yet been shown to fulfill a specific function in stone pathogenesis. In this paper we briefly review papers investigating the urinary excretion of individual macromolecules, their effects on calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystallization and attachment of crystals to renal epithelial cells, and the influence of lithogenic conditions on their renal expression in cultured cells and animal models. Using prothrombin fragment 1 (PTF1) and human serum albumin as examples, we show the types of patterns resulting from the binding of a fluorescently tagged protein to a specific CaOx monohydrate (COM) crystal face and its incorporation into the crystal structure. Molecular modeling is also used to illustrate how PTF1 can align with the atomic array on a COM crystal surface. We conclude that although many macromolecules are, by strict definition, relevant to stone formation, very few are probably truly influential.

  16. Bariatric Surgery and Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieske, John C.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2008-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment strategy for patients with morbid obesity that can result in effective weight loss, resolution of diabetes mellitus and other weight related complications, and even improved mortality. However, it also appears that hyperoxaluria is common after modern bariatric surgery, perhaps occurring in up to 50% of patients after Rouxen-Y gastric bypass. Although increasing numbers of patients are being seen with calcium oxalate kidney stones after bariatric surgery, and even a few with oxalosis and renal failure, the true risk of these outcomes remains unknown. The mechanisms that contribute to this enteric hyperoxaluria are also incompletely defined, although fat malabsorption may be an important component. Since increasing numbers of these procedures are likely to be performed in the coming years, further study regarding the prevalence and mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and kidney stones after bariatric surgery is needed to devise effective methods of treatment in order to prevent such complications.

  17. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous antegrade hydropropulsion to relieve ureteral obstruction in a pet guinea pig (Cavia porcellus)

    PubMed Central

    Eshar, David; Lee-Chow, Bridget; Chalmers, Heather J.

    2013-01-01

    Severe hydroureter and hydronephrosis secondary to ureteral obstruction by calculus were present in a guinea pig. A palliative ultrasound-guided percutaneous antegrade hydropropulsion was performed under general anesthesia to relieve the ureteral obstruction and the associated clinical signs. We describe the technique and the considerations for its potential application in similar cases. PMID:24293674

  18. Greco-Roman Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael E.; Ruzhansky, Katherine

    2008-09-01

    Greek and Roman thought had a profound influence upon Western medical practice. From the fall of the Greek civilization to the fall of the Roman, remarkable progress of our understanding of human anatomy and physiology occurred. Here we review the attempts of Greek and Roman thinkers to develop the first understanding of the pathophysiology of urolithiasis, its epidemiology, differential diagnosis of renal versus bladder stones, medications for both colic and prevention, the role of familial syndromes, and dietary management.

  19. The Matariki Stone of Rapanui

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockey, T. A.

    2005-12-01

    Anthropological studies of Rapanui (Easter Island) are valuable insofar as the island's remoteness allowed its culture to develop independently until western contact. Of special importance to cultural astronomers is the indigenous inhabitants' expressed interest in the sky, through lore, monumental architecture, and rock art. 1 The Matariki Stone is a unique basaltic boulder found on Rapanui; my analysis of it is the result of in situ investigation (2000). The boulder is 1 m x 1.5 m x 2 m in approximate size and weighs in excess of 10,000 kg. According to local informants, at least six cupules, averaging 6 cm in diameter and 5 cm in depth, were placed in it prior to western contact with the island and prior to transport to the boulder's present location. Information about the Matariki Stone's original setting, orientation, and context is lost. "Matariki" means "Pleiades" (or, more generally, a group of stars). However, the pattern of the Matariki Stone cupules strongly resembles another familiar asterism of third-magnitude stars. 2 These zodiac stars were placed significantly in the Rapanui sky of 1500 CE. Yet no local ethnographic evidence mentions these stars, nor is association with these stars and other regional cultures (e. g., Australian aboriginal and Mayan) compelling. 3 Moreover, there is no Polynesian tradition of constellation depiction in rock art at all, whereas the Pleiades figure prominently in that culture's oral tradition. 4 Thus, the Matariki Stone remains a conundrum. 1 Liller, William. The Ancient Solar Observatories of Rapanui: The Archaeoastronomy of Easter Island. (1993) 2 Hockey, Thomas and Hoffman, Alice. "An Archaeoastronomical Investigation: Does A Constellation Pattern Appear in Rapanui Rock Art?" Rapa Nui Journal. 14, no. 3. (2000) 3 For example, Kelly, David H. and Milone, Eugene F. Exploring Ancient Skies: An Encyclopedic Survey of Archaeoastronomy. (2005) 4 For example, Makemson, Maude. The Morning Star Rises. (1941)

  20. Outcome after endoscopically assisted surgical retrieval of symptomatic parotid stones.

    PubMed

    Overton, A; Combes, J; McGurk, M

    2012-02-01

    10% of symptomatic parotid stones cannot be removed by minimally invasive radiological or endoscopic techniques alone. In these cases endoscopically assisted surgical parotid sialolithectomy can be performed via an extraoral approach, reconstituting the duct and preserving functioning glandular tissue. Between 2003 and 2010, 55 consecutive patients underwent endoscopically assisted surgical removal of parotid stones from 57 glands, two having bilateral procedures. Outcome was assessed using a structured questionnaire. 39/55 patients (71%) patients were successfully contacted (40 procedures; one bilateral case). At median follow-up of 3.1 years 28 glands (70%) were symptomless, whilst 11 (28%) were much improved but causing mild or occasional residual symptoms. One patient required postoperative lithotripsy and basket retrieval of a retained stone, but was subsequently symptom free. A further patient was initially symptom free then relapsed, did not respond to lithotripsy and is awaiting further assessment. In 10% of cases a short-lived sialocoele developed postoperatively. No individual reported facial weakness and one had a scar of concern. 37/39 (95%) patients were pleased to have had the operation and would have the procedure contralaterally in similar circumstances. Endoscopically assisted surgical removal of parotid stones is a successful technique with low morbidity that is well received by patients. PMID:22018956

  1. Flexible ureteroscopy for kidney stones in children.

    PubMed

    Defidio, Lorenzo; De Dominicis, Mauro

    2010-03-01

    Endoscopic evaluation and management of different pathological conditions involving the upper urinary tract using rigid or flexible endoscopes, is now readily feasible and has been shown to be safe and efficacious even in the smallest children. Paediatric ureteroscopic procedures are similar to their adult counterparts, so that basic endoscopic principles should be observed. Aims of the management should be complete clearance of stones, preservation of renal function and prevention of stone recurrence. In order to select the most appropriate surgical treatment, location, composition, and size of the stone(s), the anatomy of the collecting system, and the presence of obstruction along with the presence of infection of the urinary tract should be considered. Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is still the most important procedure for treating urinary stones, advances in flexible endoscopes, intracorporeal lithotripsy, and extraction instruments have led to a shift in the range of indications. According to the location of the stone the treatment can be done with the rigid or flexible ureteroscope. To obtain stone fragments is essentialfor biochemical analysis. The stone composition may give significant information to prevent the high rate of recurrence, with dietary modification and specific therapy. Successful outcomes for the retrograde treatment of renal calculi are similar to the ones obtained in the adult population (stone free rate 91-98%). The retrograde semirigid and flexible ureteropyeloscopy, using a small calibre ureteroscope, are a valuable technique for kidney stones treatment in children. With excellent technique and meticulous attention to details, the significant complications are rare.

  2. Flexible ureteroscopy for kidney stones in children.

    PubMed

    Defidio, Lorenzo; De Dominicis, Mauro

    2010-03-01

    Endoscopic evaluation and management of different pathological conditions involving the upper urinary tract using rigid or flexible endoscopes, is now readily feasible and has been shown to be safe and efficacious even in the smallest children. Paediatric ureteroscopic procedures are similar to their adult counterparts, so that basic endoscopic principles should be observed. Aims of the management should be complete clearance of stones, preservation of renal function and prevention of stone recurrence. In order to select the most appropriate surgical treatment, location, composition, and size of the stone(s), the anatomy of the collecting system, and the presence of obstruction along with the presence of infection of the urinary tract should be considered. Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is still the most important procedure for treating urinary stones, advances in flexible endoscopes, intracorporeal lithotripsy, and extraction instruments have led to a shift in the range of indications. According to the location of the stone the treatment can be done with the rigid or flexible ureteroscope. To obtain stone fragments is essentialfor biochemical analysis. The stone composition may give significant information to prevent the high rate of recurrence, with dietary modification and specific therapy. Successful outcomes for the retrograde treatment of renal calculi are similar to the ones obtained in the adult population (stone free rate 91-98%). The retrograde semirigid and flexible ureteropyeloscopy, using a small calibre ureteroscope, are a valuable technique for kidney stones treatment in children. With excellent technique and meticulous attention to details, the significant complications are rare. PMID:20593723

  3. Percutaneous cholecystolithotomy: is gall stone recurrence inevitable?

    PubMed Central

    Donald, J J; Cheslyn-Curtis, S; Gillams, A R; Russell, R C; Lees, W R

    1994-01-01

    Using radiological interventional techniques the gall bladder can be cleared of stones with a high success rate. As with any treatment option that leaves the gall bladder in situ there is an accompanying risk of stone recurrence, which is currently unknown for the radiological method. One hundred patients were studied prospectively to determine the recurrence rate of stones and clinical outcome after successful percutaneous cholecystolithotomy. Follow up included both clinical assessment and ultrasound examination at 3, 6, and 12 months and then annual intervals thereafter. The overall stone recurrence rate was 31% at a mean follow up of 26 months (range, 3-50 months). By actuarial life table analysis, the cumulative proportion of gall stone recurrence was 7, 19, 28, 35, and 44% at 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 months respectively. Of the 31 patients with recurrent stones; 17 remain asymptomatic, seven have experienced biliary colic, two abdominal pain, three non-specific upper gastrointestinal symptoms, and two jaundice secondary to common duct stones. Thirteen of the stone free patients have remained symptomatic; six with abdominal pain and seven with nonspecific upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Eight patients have subsequently had a cholecystectomy. No significant difference was found between the sex of the patient or the number of stones before treatment and the stone recurrence rates. The cumulative stone recurrence rate was significantly less in the 56 patients who received adjuvant chemolitholysis (p < 0.05). These data show that stone recurrence after successful percutaneous cholecystolithotomy occurs in the minority, and is usually asymptomatic. It is concluded that the technique remains justified in the management of selected patients with gall stones. PMID:8200568

  4. External iliac vein – transplant ureteral fistula combined with renal cell carcinoma: an unusual case of hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jin-dan; Liu, Ben; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Xiang-lai; Li, Shi-qi; Cai, Song-liang; Wang, Yi-min

    2014-01-01

    Iliac vein-ureteral fistula is a rare cause of hematuria. The diagnosis of an iliac vein-ureteral fistula can be elusive even with the use of multiple methods. With regards to the treatment, there appears to be a shift in management from primarily open surgical to primarily angiographic management. We present a unique case of an external iliac vein – transplant ureteral fistula. A 48 year-old female complained of recurrent gross hematuria. She underwent transplant nephrectomy and radical left nephrectomy because of rejection of transplanted kidney and cystic renal cell carcinoma when the hematuria arose for the first time. Ten months later, the hematuria recurred again, and cystoscopy showed bleeding from the right transplant ureteral orifice. Open exploration confirmed the diagnosis of external iliac vein – transplant ureteral fistula. Diagnostic difficulties and treatment dilemma of such a rare cause of hematuria are also discussed. PMID:25092990

  5. Laser spectroscopy and imaging of gallbladder stones, tissue and bile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafi, M.; Kokaj, J.; Bhatia, K. S.; Makdisi, Y.; Mathew, K.

    2007-01-01

    Laser spectroscopic study of billary calculi and tissues is described. Fluorescence spectra of human gallbladder stones, bile and tissues were recorded with streak camera in the frequency and time domain. Potential of fluorescence as a diagnostic tool to discriminate between the intended target and the surrounding tissues and bile is evaluated. Initiation of fragmentation process is visualized by high-speed shadowgraphy, interferometry performed during the laser impact and generation of plasma causing growth and collapse of bubbles.

  6. Ureteral rupture after blunt abdominal trauma in a child with unknown horseshoe kidney.

    PubMed

    Mariotto, Arianna; Zampieri, Nicola; Cecchetto, Mariangela; Camoglio, Francesco Saverio

    2015-01-01

    More than 90% of renal injuries in children result from blunt abdominal trauma. A 10-year-old female had a blunt abdominal trauma with macro-hematuria. The computed tomography scan revealed the presence of a horseshoe kidney and a 3rd grade renal lesion and contrast leakage from the right ureter. The ureteral rupture was confirmed by cystoscopy and ascendant pyelography and than a double J-stent was implanted. The stent was removed one month later. Non-surgical management has become the standard of care for both ureteral and renal lesions in children. Non-surgical treatment is a safe procedure for renal trauma with ureteral rupture in children. PMID:26429120

  7. [Extravasation into a renal sinus cyst due to ureteral calculus: a case report].

    PubMed

    Taue, R; Naroda, T; Tamura, M; Kanayama, H; Kagawa, S

    1999-07-01

    A 71-year-old man who had been treated conservatively for advanced prostate cancer with hormonal therapy presented with complaint of left flank pain. Intravenous urography demonstrated obstruction caused by a left upper ureteral calculus and leakage of contrast medium outside the renal pelvis and calyces. Left percutaneous nephrostomy was performed, and subsequent nephrostography showed extravasation into a parapelvic renal sinus cyst previously recognized on follow-up computed tomography (CT). The left ureteral calculus was treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), after which obstruction and extravasation disappeared. One month later, abdominal CT demonstrated no left renal nor ureteral calculi, as well as a reduction in the left renal sinus cyst. Urinary extravasation sometimes occurs as a complication of acute urinary obstruction. However, extravasation into a cyst is very rare. We have found only one case reported in the literature, so far.

  8. Ureteral Injury with Delayed Massive Hematuria after Transvaginal Ultrasound-Guided Oocyte Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Burnik Papler, Tanja; Vrtačnik Bokal, Eda; Šalamun, Vesna; Galič, Dejan; Smrkolj, Tomaž; Jančar, Nina

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of ureteral injury with delayed hematuria after transvaginal oocyte retrieval. A 28-year-old infertile patient with a history of previous laparoscopic resection of endometriotic nodes of both sacrouterine ligaments presented with abdominal pain one day after oocyte retrieval. Four days after oocyte retrieval, she presented with massive hematuria that reappeared 6 days after oocyte retrieval. Monopolar coagulation with wire electrode and insertion of a double-J-stent was performed during operative cystoscopy. The patient recovered completely after transfusion and had no signs of renal impairment after ureteric stent removal. This is the first report of ureteral injury after oocyte retrieval presenting itself with delayed massive hematuria and no signs of renal dysfunction or urinary leakage into retroperitoneal space. PMID:26146577

  9. Ureteral Injury with Delayed Massive Hematuria after Transvaginal Ultrasound-Guided Oocyte Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Burnik Papler, Tanja; Vrtačnik Bokal, Eda; Šalamun, Vesna; Galič, Dejan; Smrkolj, Tomaž; Jančar, Nina

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of ureteral injury with delayed hematuria after transvaginal oocyte retrieval. A 28-year-old infertile patient with a history of previous laparoscopic resection of endometriotic nodes of both sacrouterine ligaments presented with abdominal pain one day after oocyte retrieval. Four days after oocyte retrieval, she presented with massive hematuria that reappeared 6 days after oocyte retrieval. Monopolar coagulation with wire electrode and insertion of a double-J-stent was performed during operative cystoscopy. The patient recovered completely after transfusion and had no signs of renal impairment after ureteric stent removal. This is the first report of ureteral injury after oocyte retrieval presenting itself with delayed massive hematuria and no signs of renal dysfunction or urinary leakage into retroperitoneal space. PMID:26146577

  10. Urothelial-based reconstructive surgery for upper- and mid-ureteral defects: Long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Barak; Mor, Yoram; Erlich, Tomer; Laufer, Menachem; Winkler, Harry; Kaver, Issac; Ramon, Jacob; Dotan, Zohar A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ureteral strictures can result in obstructive nephropathy and renal function deterioration. Surgical management of ureteral defects, especially in the proximal- and mid-ureter, is particularly challenging. Our purpose was to analyze the long-term outcomes of urothelial-based reconstructive surgery for upper- and mid-ureteral defects. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of a single tertiary centre’s database, including 149 patients treated for ureteral defects between 2001 and 2011. Thirty-one patients (21%) underwent complex urothelial-based surgical repairs for upper- and mid-ureter defects. Patients’ median age was 61 years. The mean length of the ureteral strictures was 2.5 cm, located in upper-, mid-ureter, or in between in 19 (61%), 10 (32%), and two (6%) patients, respectively. All patients were treated with a primary urothelial-based repair. Median followup time was 26 months. The primary outcome of the study was the long-term preservation of renal function and lack of clinical obstruction. The secondary endpoint of the study was the assessment of the intra- and postoperative complication rates. Results: Most of the lesions were benign (22, 71%), while nine strictures (29%) were malignant. Seven patients (23%) suffered from postoperative complications, five of which were infectious. The median pre- and postoperative calculated glomerular filtration rates were 66 ml/min/1.72m2 and 64ml/min/1.72m2, respectively. Success rate was 84%, defined as lack of need for re-operation or kidney drainage at the last followup. Conclusions: Upper- and mid-ureteral defects present a complex pathology necessitating experienced reconstructive surgical skills. Our data suggest good long-term results for primary urothelial-based reconstructions for these pathologies. PMID:27695582

  11. Management of alternative pathology detected using CT KUB in suspected ureteric colic.

    PubMed

    Sarofim, Mina; Teo, Adrian; Wilson, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Acute flank pain is a common presentation to the emergency department (ED), and imaging studies play an important role in establishing an accurate diagnosis. Computed Tomography of Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder (CT KUB) has surpassed all other imaging modalities to become the gold standard in detection of ureteric calculi. The purpose of this study is to identify the range and management of alternative diagnoses established by CT KUB in patients with suspected ureteric colic. Two hundred and fifteen consecutive CT KUB examinations ordered in the ED of a tertiary-care centre for suspected ureteric colic were retrospectively reviewed. This comprised of 134 male (62.3%) and 81 female (37.7%) patients with a mean age of 53 years old. The positive detection rate for ureteric calculi in males was 43.3% compared to a lower rate for females of 29.6% (p < 0.05). Almost two-thirds of patients were discharged following CT KUB imaging, and admission rates were significantly higher in those with alternative radiological findings (p < 0.04) Alternative radiological findings occurred in 72 patients (33.5%), including 15 patients (7.0%) who had clinically important alternative pathology. The rate of clinically important alternative findings was significantly higher in males than females, 9.7% versus 2.5% respectively (p = 0.04). Surgical intervention was more common in patients with alternative radiological findings classified as gastrointestinal (18.2%) compared to non-gastrointestinal (3.6%), however this did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.07). In conclusion, significant alternative pathology was identified using CT KUB in 7% of patients with suspected ureteric colic. The low rates of detection of ureteric calculi and significant alternative pathology in female patients suggests a more thorough clinical assessment is warranted to improve their management, prior to ordering investigations with exposure to radiation. PMID:27373521

  12. Investigations of stone consolidants by neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, F.; Schillinger, B.; Rohatsch, A.; Zawisky, M.; Rauch, H.

    2009-06-01

    The chemical preservation and structural reintegration of natural stones applied in historical buildings is carried out by the use of different stone strengtheners. As these agents contain hydrogen, they offer good properties for neutron imaging. The main interest in the restoration process is the development of a suitable stone consolidant. In cooperation with the St. Stephans Cathedral and the geologists at Vienna University of Technology, we are investigating the penetration depth and distribution of different stone consolidants. These studies are being carried out with different stone samples, mostly porous natural building stones, limestones and sandstones. The two strengtheners used in this study are ethyl silicate ester (Wacker OH100) and dissolved polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA, Paraloid B72). Neutron radiography and neutron tomography can be used successfully to visualize the distribution of consolidants both in two and three dimensions.

  13. Clonorcis sinensis eggs are associated with calcium carbonate gallbladder stones.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Tie; Ma, Rui-hong; Luo, Zhen-liang; Yang, Liu-qing; Luo, Xiao-bing; Zheng, Pei-ming

    2014-10-01

    Calcium carbonate gallbladder stones were easily neglected because they were previously reported as a rare stone type in adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between calcium carbonate stones and Clonorchis sinensis infection. A total of 598 gallbladder stones were studied. The stone types were identified by FTIR spectroscopy. The C. sinensis eggs and DNA were detected by microscopic examination and real-time fluorescent PCR respectively. And then, some egg-positive stones were randomly selected for further SEM examination. Corresponding clinical characteristics of patients with different types of stones were also statistically analyzed. The detection rate of C. sinensis eggs in calcium carbonate stone, pigment stone, mixed stone and cholesterol stone types, as well as other stone types was 60%, 44%, 36%, 6% and 30%, respectively, which was highest in calcium carbonate stone yet lowest in cholesterol stone. A total of 182 stones were egg-positive, 67 (37%) of which were calcium carbonate stones. The C. sinensis eggs were found adherent to calcium carbonate crystals by both light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Patients with calcium carbonate stones were mainly male between the ages of 30 and 60, the CO2 combining power of patients with calcium carbonate stones were higher than those with cholesterol stones. Calcium carbonate gallbladder stones are not rare, the formation of which may be associated with C. sinensis infection.

  14. 6. GRIST MILL STONES IN CENTER (VERTICAL STAND WITH HANDLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. GRIST MILL STONES IN CENTER (VERTICAL STAND WITH HANDLE TO LEFT OF STONES ADJUSTS SPACE BETWEEN STONES, THUS CONTROLING FINENESS OF FLOUR. STONE CRANE AT RIGHT USED TO LIFT STONES FOR DRESSING). OTHER EQUIPMENT NOT IDENTIFIED. NOTE STAIRS IN LEFT REAR. - Hildebrand's Mill, Flint, Delaware County, OK

  15. Ureterocalycostomy - final resort in the management of secondary pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction: our experience

    PubMed Central

    Gite, Venkat A.; Siddiqui, Ayub Karam Nabi; Bote, Sachin M.; Patil, Saurabh Ramesh; Kandi, Anita J.; Nikose, Jayant V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ureterocalycostomy can be performed in patients in whom desired methods of treating secondary PUJ (Pelvi-Ureteric Junction) obstructions either failed or could not be used. In our study, one child and two adults in whom one redo-ureterocalycostomy and two ureterocalycostomies were performed for severely scarred PUJ. The causes for secondary PUJ obstruction were post-pyelolithotomy in one case, post-pyeloplasty and ureterocalycostomy for PUJ obstruction in the second patient and the third patient had long upper ureteric stricture post-ureteropyeloplasty due to tuberculosis. In all these cases ureterocalycostomy proved to be salvage/final resort for preserving functional renal unit. PMID:27286113

  16. Nephroureteral Obstructions: The Use of Stents and Ureteral Bypass Systems for Renal Decompression.

    PubMed

    Palm, Carrie A; Culp, William T N

    2016-11-01

    Canine and feline nephroureteral obstruction is a complex disease process that can be challenging to treat. Although the availability of various imaging modalities allows for a straightforward diagnosis to be made in most cases, the decision-making process for when a case should be taken to surgery and the optimal treatment modality that should be used for renal decompression remains controversial. In the following discussion, an overview of the perioperative management of cases with nephroureterolithiasis and nephroureteral obstruction is reviewed, with particular focus on the use of renal decompressive procedures, such as ureteral stenting and subcutaneous ureteral bypass system placement. PMID:27497503

  17. Misplacement or migration? Extremely rare case of cardiac migration of a ureteral j stent.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Nam; Lee, Chan Ho; Kong, Do Hoon; Shin, Dong Kil; Lee, Jeong Zoo

    2014-05-01

    A 29-year-old woman with mild back pain when coughing and suprapubic discomfort after voiding was admitted to Pusan National University Hospital. Two weeks earlier, she had undergone a hysterectomy and right-sided ureteroneocystostomy for uterine atony and right ureteral injury with bladder rupture. Computed tomography showed that a ureteral J stent extended from the right ovarian vein to the right cardiac chamber. The stent was retrieved via both femoral veins with a snare loop and pigtail catheter. Computed tomography showed that the urinary and vascular tracts were normal 5 months after the procedure. PMID:24868342

  18. Cost-effectiveness v patient preference in the choice of treatment for distal ureteral calculi: a literature-based decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Wolf, J S; Carroll, P R; Stoller, M L

    1995-06-01

    Ureteroscopy (URS) and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) battle for supremacy in the management distal ureteral calculi. In order to clarify issues surrounding this controversy, we created a decision tree modeling URS or SWL with literature-based probabilities and used as endpoints both cost and patient preferences. Ureteroscopy was more successful than single-session or multiple-session SWL, 92.1% v 74.3% or 84.5%, and had a lower retreatment/complication rate. Although initial SWL was only slightly more expensive than URS, $4,420 v $4,337, the difference increased when the additional costs of complications and retreatment were calculated, $6,745 v $5,555. Using values for an "average" patient, SWL was preferred to URS in terms of patient satisfaction. The most important factors distinguishing between URS and SWL were the success of treatment, the cost of initial therapy, and patient attitudes toward unplanned ancillary procedures and retreatment. Although no alteration of success rates and cost figures within reasonable ranges made URS less cost-effective than SWL, individual differences in patients' aversion for complications allowed URS to be preferred to SWL in some situations. Therefore, SWL is less cost-effective than URS and is not necessarily preferred by patients. The physician should be aware of the principal determinants of the choice between URS and SWL treatment of distal ureteral calculi.

  19. The recurrence rate of stones following ESWL.

    PubMed

    Köhrmann, K U; Rassweiler, J; Alken, P

    1993-01-01

    With extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) stone fragmentation and the potential creation of residual stones has become an integral part of the treatment strategy. Therefore true recurrence, regrowth and pseudo-recurrence determine the rate of new stone formation. In unselected series the overall recurrence rate after ESWL varies between 6% after 1 year and 20% after 4 years. The comparison between the recurrence rate after ESWL and the natural recurrence rate reveals that the results of ESWL are better than expected. Lithotripsy has no special effect on true stone recurrence, and even pseudo-recurrence is of minor clinical significance.

  20. Modern management of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, James

    2013-04-01

    It is imperative for gastroenterologists to understand the different formations of bile duct stones and the various medical treatments available. To minimize the complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), it is critical to appropriately assess the risk of bile duct stones before intervention. Biliary endoscopists should be comfortable with the basic techniques of stone removal, including sphincterotomy, mechanical lithotripsy, and stent placement. It is important to be aware of advanced options, including laser and electrohydraulic stone fragmentation, and papillary dilatation for problematic cases. The timing and need for ERCP in those who require a cholecystectomy is also a consideration. PMID:23540960

  1. Oxalate: from the environment to kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Brzica, Hrvoje; Breljak, Davorka; Burckhardt, Birgitta C; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Sabolić, Ivan

    2013-12-01

    Oxalate urolithiasis (nephrolithiasis) is the most frequent type of kidney stone disease. Epidemiological research has shown that urolithiasis is approximately twice as common in men as in women, but the underlying mechanism of this sex-related prevalence is unclear. Oxalate in the organism partially originate from food (exogenous oxalate) and largely as a metabolic end-product from numerous precursors generated mainly in the liver (endogenous oxalate). Oxalate concentrations in plasma and urine can be modified by various foodstuffs, which can interact in positively or negatively by affecting oxalate absorption, excretion, and/or its metabolic pathways. Oxalate is mostly removed from blood by kidneys and partially via bile and intestinal excretion. In the kidneys, after reaching certain conditions, such as high tubular concentration and damaged integrity of the tubule epithelium, oxalate can precipitate and initiate the formation of stones. Recent studies have indicated the importance of the SoLute Carrier 26 (SLC26) family of membrane transporters for handling oxalate. Two members of this family [Sulfate Anion Transporter 1 (SAT-1; SLC26A1) and Chloride/Formate EXchanger (CFEX; SLC26A6)] may contribute to oxalate transport in the intestine, liver, and kidneys. Malfunction or absence of SAT-1 or CFEX has been associated with hyperoxaluria and urolithiasis. However, numerous questions regarding their roles in oxalate transport in the respective organs and male-prevalent urolithiasis, as well as the role of sex hormones in the expression of these transporters at the level of mRNA and protein, still remain to be answered. PMID:24384768

  2. Uterine Artery Embolization for Ureteric Obstruction Secondary to Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsadraee, Saeed; Tuite, David; Nicholson, Anthony

    2008-11-15

    This case series examines the safety and efficacy of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in the treatment of obstructive nephropathy caused by large fibroids. Between 2004 and 2007, 10 patients referred with symptomatic uterine fibroids that were found to be causing either unilateral (7 patients) or bilateral (3 patients) hydronephrosis were treated by UAE. Presenting complaints included menorrhagia, dysmenorrhea, bulk symptoms, loin pain, postobstructive atrophy, and mild renal impairment. All had posterior intramural dominant fibroids >11 cm in maximum sagittal diameter and uterine volumes between 3776 and 15,625 ml. Outcome measures at between 12 and 36 months included procedural success, repeat intervention, relief of symptoms, resolution of hydronephrosis, stable renal function and size, and avoidance of hysterectomy. In all cases the cause of renal obstruction was confirmed to be a giant fibroid compressing the ureter at the pelvic brim. In all cases UAE was technically successful, though two patients required a repeat procedure. In eight patients hydronephrosis resolved and the obstruction was relieved, though two still had some bulk symptoms not requiring further treatment. Renal function improved or was stable in all cases. Renal size was stable in all cases. Where menorrhagia was part of the symptom complex it was relieved in all cases. Two patients diagnosed as having postobstructive atrophy of one kidney underwent retrograde ureteric stenting on the nonatrophied side prior to UAE. This was unsuccessful in one of the cases due to the distortion caused by the fibroid. Despite improvement in hydronephrosis this patient underwent hysterectomy at 7 months after a renogram demonstrated persistent obstruction at the pelvic brim. In the second patient a double pigtail stent was inserted with difficulty and eventually removed at 8 months. This patient has had stable renal function and size for 3 years post-UAE. We conclude that UAE is safe and effective in

  3. [Application of alpha1-adrenoblockers in treatment of ureteral calculi].

    PubMed

    Dutov, V V; Popov, D V; Rumiantsev, A A; Pashchenko, V B

    2012-01-01

    The results of evaluation of the efficacy of alpha1-adrenoblockers in treatment of ureteral calculi are presented. Comparative, prospective, placebo-uncontrolled nonrandomized single-center study was performed, which included 118 patients with solitary diagnosed calculi in various parts of ureter. After the pain relief, all the patients underwent conservative therapy aimed at spontaneous discharge of concretions. The maximum duration of conservative treatment was 28 days. Ultrasound monitoring was performed every week in all patients. The control group of patients received only Drotaverinum 40 mg three times a day, and analgesics. The main group received alpha1-adrenoblocker tamsulosin at a standard dose of 0.4 mg once a day along with Drotaverinum and analgesics. The overall probability of a discharge of concrements localized in the distal ureter was significantly (P = 0.02) higher in the patients treated with alpha1-adrenoblockers. Treatment regimen in main group of patients allowed better control of pain during all periods of observation, even if the discharge of concretions was not registered. The overall probability of migration of concrements from the proximal to the distal ureter in main group of patients was 52% versus 32% in controls (P = 0.17). The frequency of adverse effects was comparable in both groups. Vertigo, postural hypotension, and weakness were significantly more frequent in the main group of patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses of the proportional hazards model have demonstrated that the administration of alpha1-adrenoblocker increased the likelihood of a discharge of concrement from the distal ureter. It is shown that the nature of the applied therapy has directly influence on the risk of an earlier discharge of concretions. Inclusion of alpha1-adrenoblockers in the treatment scheme increased the probability of discharge of concrements at 4.11 times.

  4. STONES: Passing a stone in your sleep might be easier than you think

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Thomas; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Passing kidney calculi can be excruciatingly painful for patients, likened to childbirth in intensity. The mechanism of the simple act of passing a stone, however, is not well understood. A recent research article examined a novel approach for optimizing kidney stone clearance—sleep position, a simple noninvasive concept that might improve urinary stone passage. PMID:21878879

  5. Global stone heritage: larvikite, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heldal, Tom; Dahl, Rolv

    2013-04-01

    Larvikite has for more than hundred years been appreciated as one of the world's most attractive dimension-stones, and at present time its production and use is more extensive than ever. The main reason for the continuous success of the larvikite on the world market is the blue iridescence displayed on polished surfaces, which is caused by optical interference in microscopic lamellae within the ternary feldspars. The larvikite complex consists of different intrusions defining several ring-shaped structures, emplaced during a period of approximately five million years. Following this pattern, several commercial subtypes of larvikite, characterised by their colour and iridescence, have been identified. The name "larvikite" was first applied by Waldemar Brøgger, in his descriptions of the monzonitic rocks within the southern part of the Carboniferous-Permian Oslo Igneous Province. The name has its origin in the small coastal town of Larvik, situated almost right in the centre of the main plutonic complex of larvikite. From a geologist's point of view, the larvikites are important for understanding the igneous mechanisms behind the formation of the Oslo rift, representing a series of semi-circular intrusions, varying from quartz-bearing monzonites in the east (earliest phases) towards nepheline-bearing monzonites and nepheline syenite in the west (latest phases). However, most other people see larvikite as a particularly beautiful rock. Production started already in the 1880s, and at present time the export value of rough blocks of dimension-stone from the Larvik Region is close to 100 million euro, distributed on approximately 20 individual quarries. Different types of larvikite have different market value, and the customers can choose between a range of types and qualities under trade names such as "Blue Pearl", "Emerald Pearl" and "Marina Pearl". Globally, larvikite has put a significant mark on architecture around the world, and should be included in the global

  6. A Lion of a Stone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image of the rock called 'Lion Stone' was acquired by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera on sol 104 (May 9, 2004). The rock stands about 10 centimeters tall (about 4 inches) and is about 30 centimeters long (12 inches). Plans for the coming sols include investigating the rock with the spectrometers on the rover's instrument arm.

    This image was generated using the camera's L2 (750-nanometer), L5 (530-nanometer) and L6 (480-nanometer) filters.

  7. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of pancreatic duct stones.

    PubMed

    Rawat, B; Fache, J S; Burhenne, H J

    1992-01-01

    Encouraging results with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) for pancreatic duct stones have been reported from Europe. We present our experience with the first two North American patients, treated with excellent results in one and limited clinical improvement in the other patient at 1 year follow-up. Targeting of pancreatic duct stones was achieved with either fluoroscopy or ultrasound.

  8. Nutrition and renal stone disease in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Russian space program showing that humans exposed to the microgravity environment of space have a greater risk for developing renal stones. Increased bone resorption and the attendant hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia contribute significantly to raising the urinary state of saturation with respect to the calcium salts, namely calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. In addition, other environmental and dietary factors may adversely affect urine composition and increase stone formation risk during space flight. For example, reductions in urinary volume, pH, and citrate contribute to raising stone formation risk. In addition to raising the risk for calcium stone formation, this metabolic profile is conducive to the formation of uric acid stones. Although observations to date have suggested that there may actually be a reduced food intake during the early phase of flight, crew members on longer-duration flights may increase food intake and be at increased risk for stone formation. Taken together, these findings support the use of nutritional recommendations for crew members that would serve to reduce the stone-forming propensity of the urinary environment. Pharmacologic intervention should be directed at raising urinary volumes, diminishing bone losses, and preventing reductions in urinary pH and citrate. Success in reducing the risk for stone formation in astronauts would also be of potential major benefit to the estimated 20 million Americans with nephrolithiasis.

  9. Ventricular candidiasis in stone curlews (Burhinus oedicnemus).

    PubMed

    Caliendo, Valentina; Bull, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Ventricular candidiasis is consistently one of the most prominent pathologic conditions diagnosed in stone curlews (Burhinus oedicnemus) in the United Arab Emirates, predominately affecting the captive population. Predisposing factors are a humid environment, stress, immunosuppression, inadequate nutrition, and an extended use of oral antibiotics. In this report, we describe the clinical signs, diagnosis, and pathologic result in stone curlews with ventricular candidiasis.

  10. Sludge, stones and sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, A A; Olatunji, P O

    2002-12-01

    A total of ninety-seven paediatric and adult patients with sickle cell anaemia and fourty-eight control subjects were investigated with the aim of determining the content of the gallbladder. The patients and control subjects were categorised according to the presence or otherwise of gallbladder stones, and, or sludge. The age last birthday, PCV and number of crises per year were recorded in order to determine their influence on the development of gallbladder stones and sludge. The gallbladder contents were examined using ultrasonographic technique. The age and number of crises per year was determined from the clinical record files and direct questioning of patients. Seventy patients had normal gallbladder content while eighteen had sludge, six had stones, and three had a combination of sludge and stones. None of the control subjects had sludge or stone. The age of patients increased from progressively from those with normal content through those with sludge to those with stones. The PCV and number of crises per year only differentiated between normal and abnormal gallbladder contents. While the prevalence of gallbladder stones in this study falls within the range in previous studies, a high prevalence of sludge was observed. The association between the occurrence of sludge and stones with age, PVC and number of crises per year suggests the need for a larger series and that they may identify a group of patients requiring closer monitoring.

  11. Elemental Content of Calcium Oxalate Stones from a Canine Model of Urinary Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Killilea, David W.; Westropp, Jodi L.; Shiraki, Ryoji; Mellema, Matthew; Larsen, Jennifer; Kahn, Arnold J.; Kapahi, Pankaj; Chi, Thomas; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common types of urinary stones formed in humans and some other mammals is composed of calcium oxalate in ordered hydrated crystals. Many studies have reported a range of metals other than calcium in human stones, but few have looked at stones from animal models such as the dog. Therefore, we determined the elemental profile of canine calcium oxalate urinary stones and compared it to reported values from human stones. The content of 19 elements spanning 7-orders of magnitude was quantified in calcium oxalate stones from 53 dogs. The elemental profile of the canine stones was highly overlapping with human stones, indicating similar inorganic composition. Correlation and cluster analysis was then performed on the elemental profile from canine stones to evaluate associations between the elements and test for potential subgrouping based on elemental content. No correlations were observed with the most abundant metal calcium. However, magnesium and sulfur content correlated with the mineral hydration form, while phosphorous and zinc content correlated with the neuter status of the dog. Inter-elemental correlation analysis indicated strong associations between barium, phosphorous, and zinc content. Additionally, cluster analysis revealed subgroups within the stones that were also based primarily on barium, phosphorous, and zinc. These data support the use of the dog as a model to study the effects of trace metal homeostasis in urinary stone disease. PMID:26066810

  12. Safety and efficacy of the supracostal access for percutaneous nephrolithotomy: our initial experience.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M; Ullah, A T M A; Regmi, S; Rahman, H; Kibria, S A M G

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the supracostal access for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). Between July 2007 and June 2010, 122 patients underwent PCNL, of whom 28 (23%) had supracostal access. All procedures were performed in a single sitting under general anesthesia. The data were analysed for indications, stone clearance rates and the complications associated with supracostal puncture. The indications for a supracostal access were staghorn stones (50%), pelvis stones (28.5%), calyceal stones in high-lying kidney (18%) and upper ureter/ureteric stones (3.5%). All tracts were made in the 11th intercostal space. Single tract access was used in 22 cases (78%), but 6 (22%) required a second tract. Additional punctures were required mainly for staghorn stones (4 out of 14). Overall, 82% of the patients were rendered stone free or had clinically insignificant residual stones with PCNL monotherapy, and this increased to 96% with secondary procedures. In patients with staghorn stones, they were completely cleared in 78%. Overall complication rate was 28% and included hydrothorax in 3 (10%) patients, which required insertion of a chest tube. One (3.5%) patient developed haemothorax secondary to injury of the intercostal artery, pelvic perforation in 1 (3.5%), perinephric collection in 1 (3.5%), infection/sepsis in 2 (7%). Except those patients who had complication, all other patient recovered uneventfully. Postoperative hospital stay ranged from 2 to 9 days. In conclusion, supracostal access gives high clearance rate with acceptable complications and should not be avoided for fear of chest complications. PMID:21710814

  13. Bilateral ureteric obstruction: an unusual complication of male-to-female gender reassignment surgery.

    PubMed

    Rezwan, Nivin; Abdel Basit, Anas; Andrews, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Gender reassignment surgery is a form of treatment for gender dysphoria. It can be male-to-female or female-to-male. We present a patient who underwent male to female reassignment and had a vaginal reconstruction. She presented almost a year later with acute kidney injury and bilateral ureteric obstruction, subsequently ending up with nephrectomy for a non-functioning kidney.

  14. Tubular Compressed Collagen Scaffolds for Ureteral Tissue Engineering in a Flow Bioreactor System.

    PubMed

    Vardar, Elif; Engelhardt, Eva-Maria; Larsson, Hans M; Mouloungui, Elodie; Pinnagoda, Kalitha; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Frey, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Ureteral replacement by tissue engineering might become necessary following tissue loss after excessive ureteral trauma, after retroperitoneal cancer, or even after failed reconstructive surgery. This need has driven innovation in the design of novel scaffolds and specific cell culture techniques for urinary tract reconstruction. In this study, compressed tubular collagen scaffolds were evaluated, addressing the physical and biological characterization of acellular and cellular collagen tubes in a new flow bioreactor system, imitating the physiological pressure, peristalsis, and flow conditions of the human ureter. Collagen tubes, containing primary human smooth muscle and urothelial cells, were evaluated regarding their change in gene and protein expression under dynamic culture conditions. A maximum intraluminal pressure of 22.43 ± 0.2 cm H2O was observed in acellular tubes, resulting in a mean wall shear stress of 4 dynes/cm(2) in the tubular constructs. Dynamic conditions directed the differentiation of both cell types into their mature forms. This was confirmed by their gene expression of smooth muscle alpha-actin, smoothelin, collagen type I and III, elastin, laminin type 1 and 5, cytokeratin 8, and uroplakin 2. In addition, smooth muscle cell alignment predominantly perpendicular to the flow direction was observed, comparable to the cell orientation in native ureteral tissue. These results revealed that coculturing human smooth muscle and urothelial cells in compressed collagen tubes under human ureteral flow-mimicking conditions could lead to cell-engineered biomaterials that might ultimately be translated into clinical applications.

  15. Voiding urosonography: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound cystography to diagnose vesico-ureteric reflux: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Ramesh; Gopinath, Vinu; Sai, Venkata

    2015-01-01

    We report two children with hydronephrosis, in whom we have utilized voiding urosonography (VUS) in the evaluation of vesico-ureteric reflux. With wider availability of ultrasound contrast agents and high-end ultrasound machines, VUS is likely to become a popular tool to diagnose or exclude VUR. PMID:25552831

  16. Validation of screening examinations of the ureteral orifices in dogs: Comparison of ultrasonography with dissection.

    PubMed

    Balogh, O; Degrandi, F; Hässig, M; Reichler, I M

    2015-08-01

    In dogs, ultrasonography is performed to locate the ureteral orifices in the urinary bladder, but reference values for their normal location using this technique are missing. In this study, the ureterovesical-vesicourethral and inter-ureterovesical distances were determined in 20 freshly euthanized medium size dogs by detecting artificially produced ureteral jets in color-flow Doppler ultrasonography at two different bladder volumes, and comparing them to manual measurements in the dissected bladder. All distances determined by ultrasonography were in agreement with values found by dissection (P ≥ 0.100). With increasing bladder volume only the left ureterovesical-vesicourethral distance changed (P = 0.041). The right ureteral opening was more cranial than the left in 16 dogs. The inter-ureterovesical distances differed by gender (P = 0.016), but spay/neuter status had no influence (P ≥ 0.847). In conclusion, ultrasonography is a reliable modality for screening ureteral orifices in medium size dogs and agrees with anatomical findings.

  17. A guidewire introducer as a ureteral foreign body: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sener, Tarik Emre; Cloutier, Jonathan; Audouin, Marie; Villa, Luca; Traxer, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    A 63-year-old male, previously treated for a ureteral tumour by a right-sided segmental ureterectomy and end-to-end anastomosis of ureteral segments, was referred to our clinic for endoscopic follow-up. During his follow-up, he was diagnosed with partial right-sided ureteral stricture which eventually progressed to complete obstruction. During the ureteroscopy, as the stenotic segment did not allow passage of an hydrophilic guidewire, an antegrade-retrograde approach was decided. On the antegrade endoscopic view, a near-complete stenosis was diagnosed and a nephrostomy catheter (12 Fr) was placed. A second intervention was planned and from the nephrostomy tract, the ureteroscope was placed into the right pyelocaliceal system. The diagnostic ureteroscopy revealed a foreign object proximal to the stenotic area. Right-sided segmental ureterectomy of the stenotic segment with ureteroneocystostomy and removal of the foreign object was performed. This is the only case in literature to reveal a guidewire introducer as a ureteral foreign body. This case also highlights the importance of the fragility of the ureter, the importance of the equipment, of always being watchful during a surgery, and the importance of checking the integrity of the equipment at the end of each procedure. PMID:26225183

  18. A guidewire introducer as a ureteral foreign body: A case report.

    PubMed

    Sener, Tarik Emre; Cloutier, Jonathan; Audouin, Marie; Villa, Luca; Traxer, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    A 63-year-old male, previously treated for a ureteral tumour by a right-sided segmental ureterectomy and end-to-end anastomosis of ureteral segments, was referred to our clinic for endoscopic follow-up. During his follow-up, he was diagnosed with partial right-sided ureteral stricture which eventually progressed to complete obstruction. During the ureteroscopy, as the stenotic segment did not allow passage of an hydrophilic guidewire, an antegrade-retrograde approach was decided. On the antegrade endoscopic view, a near-complete stenosis was diagnosed and a nephrostomy catheter (12 Fr) was placed. A second intervention was planned and from the nephrostomy tract, the ureteroscope was placed into the right pyelocaliceal system. The diagnostic ureteroscopy revealed a foreign object proximal to the stenotic area. Right-sided segmental ureterectomy of the stenotic segment with ureteroneocystostomy and removal of the foreign object was performed. This is the only case in literature to reveal a guidewire introducer as a ureteral foreign body. This case also highlights the importance of the fragility of the ureter, the importance of the equipment, of always being watchful during a surgery, and the importance of checking the integrity of the equipment at the end of each procedure.

  19. Massive Hematuria and Shock Caused by Ilio-Ureteral Fistula in a Patient with an Isolated Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yuhei; Setozaki, Shuji; Harada, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    An emergent operation was performed on a 73-year-old woman with massive hematuria and serious shock. A computed tomography (CT) revealed that the cause of the shock was hemorrhage from an aneurysm into the ureter, with resultant massive hematuria. During surgery, we observed that the ureter was encased into the wall of the aneurysm, with exposure of the pre-positioned ureteric stent inside the aneurysmal space. Reconstruction of the ureter was performed by wrapping the tissues with the ureteric stent inside. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, and CT angiography showed complete exclusion of the right internal iliac artery with the in situ ureteric stent. PMID:23641292

  20. A rare cause of ureteral injuries; simultaneous common iliac artery and ureter injury during posterior lumbar disc surgery

    PubMed Central

    Başer, Aykut; Alkış, Okan; Toktaş, Cihan; Zümrütbaş, Ali Ersin

    2016-01-01

    Major vascular injuries during lumbar disc surgery are rare but well-recognized complications. However, vascular injuries of the branches of the aorta and ureteral injuries are very rare. Although its incidence is not known definitely, it is estimated to be 1/1000. Ureteral injuries comprise less than 1% of all genitourinary traumas. In this article, we report clinical progress of a patient who had simultaneous internal iliac artery and ureteral injury during lumbar discectomy. The patient was managed with primary ureteroureterostomy. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported with simultaneous ureter and iliac artery trauma during lumbar disc surgery. PMID:27274898

  1. [Combined ultrasound and roentgen localization in ESWL. Initial clinical experiences].

    PubMed

    Gschwend, J; Miller, K; Hautmann, R

    1993-03-01

    Interdisciplinary use of extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy with sonographic or fluoroscopic guidance has become a routine procedure in clinical practice, for both urolithiasis and cholecystolithiasis. Therefore, newly developed systems with combined locating devices are gaining in importance. A primary sonographically guided lithotripter was extended by a mobile X-ray system. The results were compared with those obtained with a first-generation lithotripter. The results show that sufficient disintegration of stones throughout the urinary tract is possible with both systems. The retreatment rate with both lithotripters was 30% when stone size was comparable. No essential differences in treatment time, shockwave energy and pain were found. The easy localisation of radiolucent stones, convenient positioning of the patient and successful localisation of ureteral stones near to the spine are advantages of the MPL 9000 X. On the other hand, the technically simpler fluoroscopy system and greater ease of electrode changing are advantages of the HM3 Lithotripter. Altogether, differences in the application of the two systems are slight and insignificant except in special cases.

  2. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of primary intrahepatic stones.

    PubMed

    Kim, M H; Lee, S K; Min, Y I; Lee, M G; Sung, K B; Cho, K S; Lee, S G; Min, P C

    1992-01-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithothripsy (ESWL) was performed in intrahepatic stone patients (n = 18) by Dornier MPL 9,000 with ultrasound guidance. The patients had T-tube (n = 9) or percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage tube (n = 9). Average treatment session was four and shock-wave numbers were in the range of 3,064 to 12,000 (average 6,288 shocks). Intrahepatic stones were removed completely in 16 patients over a 3 month period by ESWL and combined stone extraction maneuver such as cholangioscopic or interventional radiologic method. Extracorporeal shockwave lithothripsy was very helpful in facilitating extraction of stones in unfavorable locations or located above the severe stricture. In summary, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, followed by percutaneous stone extraction, will provide an improvement in the success rate and duration of treatment required for complete removal of primary hepatolithiasis.

  3. [Asymptomatic kidney stones: active surveillance vs. treatment].

    PubMed

    Neisius, A; Thomas, C; Roos, F C; Hampel, C; Fritsche, H-M; Bach, T; Thüroff, J W; Knoll, T

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing worldwide. Asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones are increasingly detected as an incidental finding on radiologic imaging, which has been performed more frequently over the last decades. Beside the current interventional treatment modalities such as extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL), active surveillance of asymptomatic kidney stones has been a focus of discussion lately, not only for attending physicians, but even more so for patients. The current German and European guidelines recommend active surveillance for patients with asymptomatic kidney stones if no interventional therapy is mandatory because of pain or medical factors. Herein we review the current literature on risks and benefits of active surveillance of asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones.

  4. Kidney stone risk following modern bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ricardo D; Canales, Benjamin K

    2014-05-01

    Over the past 10 years, a variety of reports have linked bariatric surgery to metabolic changes that alter kidney stone risk. Most of these studies were retrospective, lacked appropriate controls, or involved bariatric patients with a variety of inclusion criteria. Despite these limitations, recent clinical and experimental research has contributed to our understanding of the pathophysiology of stone disease in this high-risk population. This review summarizes the urinary chemistry profiles that may be responsible for the increased kidney stone incidence seen in contemporary epidemiological bariatric studies, outlines the mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and potential therapies through a newly described experimental bariatric animal model, and provides a focused appraisal of recommendations for reducing stone risk in bariatric stone formers.

  5. [Asymptomatic kidney stones: active surveillance vs. treatment].

    PubMed

    Neisius, A; Thomas, C; Roos, F C; Hampel, C; Fritsche, H-M; Bach, T; Thüroff, J W; Knoll, T

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing worldwide. Asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones are increasingly detected as an incidental finding on radiologic imaging, which has been performed more frequently over the last decades. Beside the current interventional treatment modalities such as extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL), active surveillance of asymptomatic kidney stones has been a focus of discussion lately, not only for attending physicians, but even more so for patients. The current German and European guidelines recommend active surveillance for patients with asymptomatic kidney stones if no interventional therapy is mandatory because of pain or medical factors. Herein we review the current literature on risks and benefits of active surveillance of asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones. PMID:26378390

  6. Impact of stone content on soil moisture measurement with capacitive sensors 10HS (Decagon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deraedt, Deborah; Bernard, Julien; Bietlot, Louise; Clerbois, Laura; Rosière, Clément; Starren, Amandine; Colinet, Gilles; Mercatoris, Benoit; Degré, Aurore

    2015-04-01

    Lot of soil survey focused on agricultural soils. For practical reasons, those soils have a low stone content. So, most of the soil water content sensors are placed on low stone content soils and the calibration equations are developed for them. Yet some researches take an interest in forest soils that are often much different from the previous ones. The differences lie in their stone content and their slope. Lots of studies have proved the importance of making soil specific calibration of the soil water content sensor. As our lab use regularly the 10HS sensors (Decagon Devices, United States) in forested soil, we decided to evaluate the importance of the stone content in the soil moisture measurement. The soil used for this experimentation comes from Gembloux (50°33'54.9''N, 4°42'11.3''E). It is silt that has been sieved at 2 mm to remove the gravel. The stones used to form the samples come from an experimental site located in the Belgian Ardennes (50°1'52.6''N, 4°53'22.5''E). They are mainly composed of schist with some quartz and sandstone elements. Initially, only five samples were constructed with three replications each. The size and the proportion of stones were the variables. Stones were classified in two groups, the first contains gravels whose size is less than 1,5 cm and a the second contains gravels whose size is comprised between 2 and 3 cm. The proportions of stone selected for the experiment are 0, 20 and 40%. In order to generate validation data, two more samples were constructed with intermediate proportion of stone content (30%). The samples were built in PVC container which dimensions are slightly bigger than the sensor volume of influence (1.1-1.3l). The soil samples were saturated and then dried on a thermal chamber set at about 32°C. During at least 14 days, the samples soil water content was determined by the sensor measurement with the Procheck read-out system (Decagon Devices, United State) and by weighting the samples thrice a day

  7. Protecting Space Travelers from Kidney Stones: Renal Stone Risk During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Renal stones, popularly known as kidney or bladder stones, are small rock-like objects formed in the kidneys or urinary tract by deposits of calcium and other minerals. The problem arises when the stones block the drainage of the kidney, resulting in urinary obstruction and pain. Passing these stones can be one of the most painful experiences a person will endure so doctors often prescribe pain relievers to ease the experience. Drinking plenty of fluids, which help flush waste out of the body, and eating a well-balanced diet are the first steps to preventing stones. For individuals at risk, this may not be enough, and a doctor may recommend a special diet and medications. Unfortunately, approximately 60 percent of people who have had a renal stone will experience a recurrence. This is particularly true of men, who are four to five times more likely to develop stones than women. Renal stones do not discriminate based on age; even children are at risk. Astronauts are particularly at risk of developing renal stones because they lose bone and muscle mass; calcium, other minerals, and protein normally used for bone and muscle end up in the bloodstream and then in the kidneys. Without plenty of fluid to wash them away, crystals can form and then grow into stones. This factor compounds the risk for astronauts, since they also perceive that they are less thirsty in space and will drink less than normal during the mission. To minimize all of these factors, doctors must instead treat the stone-forming compounds with medication. This study will use potassium citrate to reduce the risk of stone formation. Renal stones are never convenient, but they are a particular concern for astronauts who have limited access to treatment during flight. Researchers are examining how earthbound preventions for renal stone formation work in flight, ensuring missions are not ended prematurely due to this medical condition. During STS-107, earthbound preventions and treatments become astronauts

  8. Complete Ureteral Duplication: Outcome of Different Surgical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Isabel; Estevão-Costa, José; Fragoso, Ana Catarina

    2016-04-01

    Introdução: O tratamento cirúrgico das duplicações ureterais completas não é consensual. Objetivos: Caraterizar a população pediátrica submetida a cirurgia para tratamento de duplicações ureterais completas e avaliar resultados de diferentes abordagens. Material e Métodos: Processos clínicos de doentes tratados entre janeiro de 2008 e junho de 2014 foram retrospetivamente revistos. Dados acerca de epidemiologia, diagnóstico, manifestações clínicas e procedimentos cirúrgicos foram recolhidos. As unidades ureterais foram divididas em dois grupos: A, com ureterocelo; e B, sem ureterocelo. Resultados: Quarenta e uma unidades ureterais de 32 doentes com duplicação completa foram intervencionados. No grupo A (n = 18), o procedimento primário selecionado foi: punção de ureterocelo (12); reimplantação de ureter (3); pielopielostomia (2) e heminefrectomia (1). Foi necessário reintervir em três dos 12 casos submetidos a punção: heminefrectomia (1), ureteroureterostomia (1) e reimplantação (1). No grupo B (n = 23), foi efetuado STING em 10 unidades, reimplantação ureteral em três, pielopielostomia em três, ureteroureterostomia em um, e heminefrectomia em seis; dois casos necessitaram de reintervenção. Discussão: Foi favorecida uma abordagem primária conservadora para tratamento de ureterocelo ou refluxo em hemissistemas a preservar (53,7%; n = 22/41), tendo sido eficaz per se em 75% (n = 9/12) unidades do grupo A e 80% (n = 8/10) do grupo B. Uma abordagem ablativa primária foi adotada em 17% (n = 7/14) casos, 5,6% do grupo A (n = 1/18) e 26,1% do grupo B (n = 6/23). Conclusão: Uma abordagem conservadora é eficaz como procedimento primário isolado na maioria dos casos com ureterocelo ou refluxo. Mais estudos são necessários para estabelecer as suas vantagens sobre abordagens primárias invasivas ou ablativas.

  9. Shockwave lithotripsy of salivary duct stones.

    PubMed

    Iro, H; Schneider, H T; Födra, C; Waitz, G; Nitsche, N; Heinritz, H H; Benninger, J; Ell, C

    1992-05-30

    Surgical extirpation of the affected gland has been necessary for cases of sialolithiasis in which the stone cannot be removed by dilatation or dissection of the salivary duct. The ability of the piezoelectric lithotripter to deliver shockwaves to a small focus makes extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of salivary gland stones potentially safe. Its safety and efficacy have been assessed in 51 patients with symptomatic solitary salivary stones that could not be removed by conservative measures. The stones had a median diameter of 8 (range 4-18) mm and were located in the submandibular gland in 69% of patients and in the parotid gland in 31%. A total of 72 shockwave treatment sessions (maximum 3 per patient) were given under continuous sonographic monitoring. In 45 patients (88%) complete fragmentation (fragments less than or equal to 3 mm) of the concrements was achieved. No patient needed anaesthesia, sedatives, or analgesics. The only untoward effects were localised petechial haemorrhages after 10 (13%) out of 72 treatments and transient swelling of the gland immediately after delivery of shockwave in 2/72 (3%) sessions. 20 weeks after the first session 90% (46/51) of patients were free of discomfort, and 53% (27/51) were stone free. Stone-clearance rate was higher among patients with stones in the parotid gland (81%) than among those with stones of the submandibular gland (40%). Auxiliary measures such as dilatation or dissection of the salivary duct were required only in patients with stones in the submandibular gland (20%). No long-term damage to the treated salivary gland or to adjacent tissue structures was noted during the median follow-up of 9 (1-24) months. Extracorporeal piezoelectric shockwave therapy seems likely to be safe, comfortable, and effective minimally-invasive, non-surgical treatment for salivary stones.

  10. Optimum nutrition for kidney stone disease.

    PubMed

    Heilberg, Ita P; Goldfarb, David S

    2013-03-01

    We summarize the data regarding the associations of individual dietary components with kidney stones and the effects on 24-hour urinary profiles. The therapeutic recommendations for stone prevention that result from these studies are applied where possible to stones of specific composition. Idiopathic calcium oxalate stone-formers are advised to reduce ingestion of animal protein, oxalate, and sodium while maintaining intake of 800 to 1200 mg of calcium and increasing consumption of citrate and potassium. There are few data regarding dietary therapy of calcium phosphate stones. Whether the inhibitory effect of citrate sufficiently counteracts increasing urine pH to justify more intake of potassium and citrate is not clear. Reduction of sodium intake to decrease urinary calcium excretion would also be expected to decrease calcium phosphate stone recurrence. Conversely, the most important urine variable in the causation of uric acid stones is low urine pH, linked to insulin resistance as a component of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. The mainstay of therapy is weight loss and urinary alkalinization provided by a more vegetarian diet. Reduction in animal protein intake will reduce purine ingestion and uric acid excretion. For cystine stones, restriction of animal protein is associated with reduction in intake of the cystine precursor methionine as well as cystine. Reduction of urine sodium results in less urine cystine. Ingestion of vegetables high in organic anion content, such as citrate and malate, should be associated with higher urine pH and fewer stones because the amino acid cystine is soluble in more alkaline urine. Because of their infectious origin, diet has no definitive role for struvite stones except for avoiding urinary alkalinization, which may worsen their development.

  11. Ureteral Stent Insertion in the Management of Renal Colic during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Il; Yu, Young Dong

    2016-01-01

    To determine an optimal invasive intervention for renal colic patients during pregnancy after conservative treatments have been found to be unhelpful. Among the available invasive interventions, we investigated the reliability of a ureteral stent insertion, which is considered the least invasive intervention during pregnancy. Between June 2006 and February 2015, a total of 826 pregnant patients came to the emergency room or urology outpatient department, and 39 of these patients had renal colic. The mean patient age was 30.49 years. In this retrospective cohort study, the charts of the patients were reviewed to collect data that included age, symptoms, the lateralities and locations of urolithiasis, trimester, pain following treatment and pregnancy complications. Based on ultrasonography diagnoses, 13 patients had urolithiasis, and 13 patients had hydronephrosis without definite echogenicity of the ureteral calculi. Conservative treatments were successful in 25 patients. Among these treatments, antibiotics were used in 15 patients, and the remaining patients received only hydration and analgesics without antibiotics. Several urological interventions were required in 14 patients. The most common intervention was ureteral stent insertion, which was performed in 13 patients to treat hydronephrosis or urolithiasis. The patients' pain was relieved following these interventions. Only one patient received percutaneous nephrostomy due to pyonephrosis. No pregnancy complications were noted. Ureteral stent insertion is regarded as a reliable and stable first-line urological intervention for pregnant patients with renal colic following conservative treatments. Ureteral stent insertion has been found to be equally effective and safe as percutaneous nephrostomy, which is associated with complications that include bleeding and dislocation, and the inconvenience of using external drainage system. PMID:27231677

  12. Ureteral Stent Insertion in the Management of Renal Colic during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Il; Yu, Young Dong; Park, Dong Soo

    2016-05-01

    To determine an optimal invasive intervention for renal colic patients during pregnancy after conservative treatments have been found to be unhelpful. Among the available invasive interventions, we investigated the reliability of a ureteral stent insertion, which is considered the least invasive intervention during pregnancy. Between June 2006 and February 2015, a total of 826 pregnant patients came to the emergency room or urology outpatient department, and 39 of these patients had renal colic. The mean patient age was 30.49 years. In this retrospective cohort study, the charts of the patients were reviewed to collect data that included age, symptoms, the lateralities and locations of urolithiasis, trimester, pain following treatment and pregnancy complications. Based on ultrasonography diagnoses, 13 patients had urolithiasis, and 13 patients had hydronephrosis without definite echogenicity of the ureteral calculi. Conservative treatments were successful in 25 patients. Among these treatments, antibiotics were used in 15 patients, and the remaining patients received only hydration and analgesics without antibiotics. Several urological interventions were required in 14 patients. The most common intervention was ureteral stent insertion, which was performed in 13 patients to treat hydronephrosis or urolithiasis. The patients' pain was relieved following these interventions. Only one patient received percutaneous nephrostomy due to pyonephrosis. No pregnancy complications were noted. Ureteral stent insertion is regarded as a reliable and stable first-line urological intervention for pregnant patients with renal colic following conservative treatments. Ureteral stent insertion has been found to be equally effective and safe as percutaneous nephrostomy, which is associated with complications that include bleeding and dislocation, and the inconvenience of using external drainage system. PMID:27231677

  13. Characteristics of hammer stones and anvils used by wild bearded capuchin monkeys (Cebus libidinosus) to crack open palm nuts.

    PubMed

    Visalberghi, E; Fragaszy, D; Ottoni, E; Izar, P; de Oliveira, M G; Andrade, F R D

    2007-03-01

    Capuchins living in Boa Vista (Piauì, Brazil) crack open hard palm nuts on hard, level surfaces (anvils) using stones (hammers) as percussive tools. This activity leaves diagnostic physical remains: distinctive shallow depressions (pits) on the surface of the anvil, cracked shells, and stone hammers on the anvil. To initiate comparison of percussive stone tool use and interpretation of the artifacts it produces across capuchins, chimpanzees, and hominins, we describe a sample of the anvils and hammer stones used by capuchin monkeys at our site. Anvils (boulders and logs) were located predominantly in the transition zone between the flat open woodland and ridges, in locations that offered some overhead coverage, and with a tree nearby, but not necessarily near palm trees. Anvils contained shallow, hemispherical pits with smooth interiors. Hammers represent a diverse assemblage of ancient rocks that are much harder than the prevailing sedimentary rock out of which they eroded. Hard stones large enough to serve as hammers were more abundant on the anvils than in the surrounding area, indicating that capuchins transport them to the anvils. Capuchins use hammers weighing on average more than 1 kg, a weight that is equivalent to 25-40% of the average body weight for adult males and females. Our findings indicate that capuchins select stones to use as hammers and transport stones and nuts to anvil sites. Wild capuchins provide a new reference point for interpreting early percussive stone tool use in hominins, and a point of comparison with chimpanzees cracking nuts.

  14. Apparatus for disintegrating kidney stones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, E. D. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    The useful life of the wire probe in an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument is enhanced and prolonged by attaching the wire of the wire probe to the tip of an ultrasonic transducer by means of a clamping arrangement. Additionally, damping material is applied to the wire probe in the form of a damper tube through which the wire probe passes in the region adjacent the transducer tip. The damper tube extends outwardly from the transducer tip a predetermined distance, terminating in a resilient soft rubber joint. Also, the damper tube is supported intermediate its length by a support member. The damper system thus acts to inhibit lateral vibrations of the wire in the region of the transducer tip while providing little or no damping to the linear vibrations imparted to the wire by the transducer.

  15. Cosmogenic radionuclides in stone meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cressy, P. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This document presents the techniques and compilation of results of cosmogenic Al-26 measurements at Goddard Space Flight Center on 91 samples of 76 stone meteorites. Short-lived radionuclides, including Na-22, Sc-46, Mn-54, and Co-60, were measured in 13 of these meteorites. About one-third of these data has not previously been published. The results are discussed briefly in terms of (1) depletion of Al-26 and natural potassium due to weathering, (2) possible exposure of several chondrites to an unusually high cosmic-ray flux, (3) comparison of Al-26, Na-22, Sc-46, and Mn5-54 in chondrites with the spallation Ne-22/Ne-21 ratio as a shielding indicator, and (4) comparison of (Al-26)-(Ne-22)/Ne-21 data for achondrite classes with the chondrite trend.

  16. Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-11

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms” to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

  17. Absorption of impinging water droplet in porous stones.

    PubMed

    Lee, J B; Radu, A I; Vontobel, P; Derome, D; Carmeliet, J

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation and numerical analysis of the absorption of water droplets impacting porous stones. The absorption process of an impinging droplet is here fully characterized from spreading to evaporation in terms of absorbed mass during droplet depletion and moisture content distribution in a time-resolved manner for three different natural stones. High-speed imaging and neutron radiography are used to quantify moisture absorption in porous stones of varying moisture properties from deposition until depletion. During impact and spreading, the droplet exhibits a dynamic non-wetting behavior. At maximum spreading, the droplet undergoes pinning, resulting into the contact radius remaining constant until droplet depletion. Absorption undergoes two phases: initially, absorption is hindered due a contact resistance attributed to entrapped air; afterwards, a more perfect capillary contact occurs and absorption goes on until depletion, concurrently with evaporation and further redistribution. A finite-element numerical model for isothermal unsaturated moisture transport in porous media captures the phases of mass absorption in good agreement with the experimental data. Droplet spreading and absorption are highly determined by the impact velocity of the droplet, while moisture content redistribution after depletion is much less dependent on impact conditions.

  18. [Calcium kidney stones. Diagnostic and preventive prospects].

    PubMed

    Arcidiacono, T; Terranegra, A; Biasion, R; Soldati, L; Vezzoli, G

    2007-01-01

    Kidney stone disease is one of the main causes of hospitalization in Italy. Its prevalence increased in the last century and is probably still increasing. The pathogenesis of the disease is not known, although two main theories have been elaborated. The first hypothesizes that hydroxyapatite deposition in the interstitium of the renal papillae (Randall's plaque) precedes urinary calcium oxalate precipitation on the ulcered surface of the papilla to form a stone. The second presumes the tubular lumen of Bellini's duct to be the site where calcium-oxalate salts precipitate to form the nucleus for stone formation within the urinary tract. These pathogenetic processes may be favored by different dietary and genetic factors. The genes involved are not known, although many studies have been performed. Polymorphisms of genes coding for the vitamin D receptor, calcium-sensing receptor, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, and urokinase were found to be associated with kidney stones, but these results have not been replicated. Different nutrients are suspected to predispose patients to calcium kidney stone disease. A high intake of animal proteins, sodium, vitamin C and oxalate has been implicated in stone formation, whereas calcium, alkalis and phytate may have a protective effect. The prevention of calcium stone formation is based on the recognition of risk factors like those already mentioned here. Furthermore, a family history of kidney stones may be useful in identifying subjects predisposed to become calcium stone formers. However, the expectations of the scientific community are turned to the advances in genetics and to the findings of genetic studies, which may provide diagnostic tools and criteria to define the risk profile of the single individual.

  19. Famous building stones of our Nation's capital

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2012-01-01

    The buildings of our Nation's Capital are constructed with rocks from quarries located throughout the United States and many distant lands. The earliest Government buildings, however, were constructed with stones from nearby sources because it was too difficult and expensive to move heavy materials such as stone any great distance without the aid of modern transportation methods, including large cargo ships, trains, and trucks. This fact sheet describes the source and appearance of three frequently used local stones employed in building Washington, D.C., and the geologic environment in which they were formed.

  20. Total ureteral avulsion leading to early nephrectomy as a rare complication of simple lumbar discectomy; a case report

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Mousavi, Seyed Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lumbar discectomy constitutes the most common and probably easiest spine surgery but it is not without complications. The aim of this work is to report a case with total ureteral avulsion during lumbar discectomy due to careless advancement of the pituitary rongeur. Methods: A 59-year-old male presented with refractory left L5-S1 lumbar disc herniation. During the surgery, left sided total ureteral avulsion occurred. Early postoperative progressive abdominal pain was the main clue for further investigation and diagnostic work-up. Results: Abdominal ultrasonography, intravenous pyelography, and abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) detected a left ureteral injury. Although the injury was detected early, ureteral repair or renal autotransplantation was not possible and nephrectomy was finally indicated, due to a significant ureteral loss. Discussion: Careful use of discectomy instruments, avoidance of excessive advancement of pituitary rongeurs (more than 3 cm), and thorough knowledge of the relevant anatomy are critical in preventing ureteral injury. PMID:27163085

  1. INACCURATE REPORTING OF MINERAL COMPOSITION BY COMMERCIAL STONE ANALYSIS LABORATORIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR INFECTION AND METABOLIC STONES

    PubMed Central

    Krambeck, Amy E.; Khan, Naseem F.; Jackson, Molly E.; Lingeman, James E.; McAteer, James A; Williams, James C.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The goal of this study was to determine the accuracy of stone composition analysis by commercial laboratories. METHODS 25 human renal stones with infrared spectroscopy (IR) determined compositions were fragmented into aliquots and studied with micro-computed tomography (CT) to ensure fragment similarity. Representative fragments of each stone were submitted to 5 commercial stone laboratories for blinded analysis. RESULTS All laboratories agreed on composition for 6 pure stones. Of 4 stones known to contain struvite, only 2(50%) were identified as struvite by all laboratories. Struvite was reported as a component by some laboratories for 4 stones previously determined not to contain struvite. Overall, there was disagreement regarding struvite in 6(24%) stones. For 9 calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones, all laboratories reported some mixture of CaOx, but the quantities of subtypes differed significantly among laboratories. In 6 apatite containing stones, apatite was missed by the laboratories in 20% of the samples. None of the laboratories identified atazanavir in a stone containing that antiviral drug. One laboratory reported protein in every sample, while all others reported it in only 1 sample. Nomenclature for apatite differed among laboratories, with one reporting apatite as carbonate apatite (CA) and never hydroxyapatite (HA), another never reporting CA and always reporting HA, and a third reporting CA as apatite with calcium carbonate. CONCLUSIONS Commercial laboratories reliably recognize pure calculi; however, variability in reporting of mixed calculi suggests a problem with accuracy of stone analysis results. Furthermore, there is a lack of standard nomenclature used by laboratories. PMID:20728108

  2. A Case of Recurrent Renal Aluminum Hydroxide Stone

    PubMed Central

    Cakıroglu, Basri; Dogan, Akif Nuri; Tas, Tuncay; Gozukucuk, Ramazan; Uyanik, Bekir Sami

    2014-01-01

    Renal stone disease is characterized by the differences depending on the age, gender, and the geographic location of the patients. Seventy-five percent of the renal stone components is the calcium (Ca). The most common type of the stones is the Ca oxalate stones, while Ca phosphate, uric acid, struvite, and sistine stones are more rarely reported. Other than these types, triamterene, adenosine, silica, indinavir, and ephedrine stones are also reported in the literature as case reports. However, to the best of our knowledge, aluminum hydroxide stones was not reported reported before. Herein we will report a 38-years-old woman with the history of recurrent renal colic disease whose renal stone was determined as aluminum hydroxide stone in type. Aluminum mineral may be considered in the formation of kidney stones as it is widely used in the field of healthcare and cosmetics. PMID:25013740

  3. Salivary stones: symptoms, aetiology, biochemical composition and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kraaij, S; Karagozoglu, K H; Forouzanfar, T; Veerman, E C I; Brand, H S

    2014-12-01

    Salivary stones, also known as sialoliths, are calcified concrements in the salivary glands. Sialoliths are more frequently located in the submandibular gland (84%), than in the parotid gland (13%). The majority of the submandibular stones are located in Wharton's duct (90%), whereas parotid stones are more often located in the gland itself. Salivary stones consist of an amorphous mineralised nucleus, surrounded by concentric laminated layers of organic and inorganic substances. The organic components of salivary stones include collagen, glycoproteins, amino acids and carbohydrates. The major inorganic components are hydroxyapatite, carbonate apatite, whitlockite and brushite. The management of salivary stones is focused on removing the salivary stones and preservation of salivary gland function which depends on the size and location of the stone. Conservative management of salivary stones consists of salivary gland massage and the use of sialogogues. Other therapeutic options include removal of the stone or in some cases surgical removal of the whole salivary gland.

  4. Portugues Marbles as Stone Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Luis; Martins, Ruben

    2013-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to present and justify the reasons for the worldwide recognition of Portuguese Marbles as Stone Heritage. These marbles are also known as "Estremoz Marble" since was the first county were exploited. In the Estremoz Anticline marbles occupy an intermediate stratigraphic position being part of a volcano-sedimentary sequence of Cambrian age. The anticlinal structure has a Precambrian core and the younger rocks aged Devonian Period. This sequence has deformed by the Variscan Orogeny, which performed twice with different intensities both in ductile and brittle tension fields. The early Alpine Cycle also acts in the region and cause more fracturing of the marble. Practically in all the quarries is possible to perceive the spatial-temporal continuity of the deformation where one can describe a complete Wilson Cycle. Together all these geological features imprint the marbles beautiful aesthetic patterns that can be highlighted when used as dimension stone. Nowadays most of the quarries are placed in the counties of Borba and mainly in Vila Viçosa. This last city claims for itself the "Capital of the Marble" title and named the marble as "White Gold". In fact, according to the historical record, the marbles were quarried in Portuguese Alentejo's Province since the fourth century BC. Locally these geological materials are available easily accessible. Exhibit physical properties that allow the fabrication of structural and decorative elements and so were used since humans settled in the region and developed a structured Society. In the Roman period, the pieces of art made with Estremoz Marbles were exported abroad and today are represented in Museums and Archaeological Sites throughout Europe and North Africa countries. The Portuguese Marbles and Limestones, transformed into altars, stairways, columns, statues and pieces of wall cladding, were carried as ballast in the holds of ships. At the destination the Portuguese People had built

  5. The nutrition consult for recurrent stone formers.

    PubMed

    Penniston, Kristina L

    2015-07-01

    Diet is implicated in stone formation and growth. Whether alone or in concert with pharmacologics, dietary changes may be useful in reducing recurrence but only when they correct dietary stone-forming risks. Patients benefit from recommendations individualized to their food preferences as well as to lifestyle, age, food knowledge and access, preparation skills, and cultural and ethnic identities. Urologists can provide general dietary recommendations but often lack the time to provide the full complement of individualized nutrition care offered by a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN). Urologists can partner with and refer patients to a RDN for any component of the nutrition care process: assessment of diet, diagnosis of dietary factors that contribute to stone risk factors, intervention formulation and implementation, and monitoring the effectiveness of the intervention and modifying it as needed to maintain suitably low dietary risk for stone recurrence.

  6. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of bile duct stones].

    PubMed

    Wenzel, H; Greiner, L; Jakobeit, C; Lazica, M; Thüroff, J

    1989-05-12

    Extracorporeal lithotripsy (EL) was undertaken in 50 patients (mean age 73.7 years; range 29-90 years) with extrahepatic and, in five, with intrahepatic gallstones, the usual endoscopic methods having been unsuccessful in removing the stones. Occasionally stone fragments were passed spontaneously, but in most they had to be removed endoscopically, in 48 (96%) with extrahepatic and in three (60%) with intrahepatic stones. Biliary tract or gallbladder infections occurred after the lithotripsy and associated local litholysis in seven of the 48 with extrahepatic (14%) and three of the five (60%) with intrahepatic stones. There was one hospital death. The results indicate that EL has definite advantages over surgical treatment in these patients, who are usually elderly and in whom surgical intervention is more risky.

  7. Adenoid Stones – “Adenoliths”

    PubMed Central

    Sakano, Hitomi; Thaker, Ameet I.; Davis, Greg E.

    2015-01-01

    Stones made of bacterial aggregates can be found in chronically inflamed lymphoid tissue such as hypertrophied tonsils. Although it is common to find tonsilloliths in cryptic tonsils, it is rare to find stones in adenoid tissue. Here we present an interesting case of a patient who underwent adenoidectomy for adenoid hypertrophy, recurrent malaise and upper respiratory infections. Intraoperatively we found numerous bright green stones in the crypts of the adenoid tissue, reminiscent of tonsilloliths in tonsillar crypts. Pathology revealed polymicrobial bacterial aggregates surrounded by neutrophils. Our findings suggest that the pathophysiology is similar to that of tonsillolith formation. Thus, we should at least consider the presence of adenoid stones and consider adenoidectomy for symptoms often attributed to tonsilloliths. We have coined the term “adenoliths” to describe this interesting finding and present it as a potential source of recurrent infection. PMID:26798664

  8. Stone Composition as a Function of Age and Sex

    PubMed Central

    Rule, Andrew D.; Krambeck, Amy E.; Williams, James C.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Mehta, Ramila A.; Moyer, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Kidney stones are heterogeneous but often grouped together. The potential effects of patient demographics and calendar month (season) on stone composition are not widely appreciated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The first stone submitted by patients for analysis to the Mayo Clinic Metals Laboratory during 2010 was studied (n=43,545). Stones were classified in the following order: any struvite, any cystine, any uric acid, any brushite, majority (≥50%) calcium oxalate, or majority (≥50%) hydroxyapatite. Results Calcium oxalate (67%) was the most common followed by hydroxyapatite (16%), uric acid (8%), struvite (3%), brushite (0.9%), and cystine (0.35%). Men accounted for more stone submissions (58%) than women. However, women submitted more stones than men between the ages of 10–19 (63%) and 20–29 (62%) years. Women submitted the majority of hydroxyapatite (65%) and struvite (65%) stones, whereas men submitted the majority of calcium oxalate (64%) and uric acid (72%) stones (P<0.001). Although calcium oxalate stones were the most common type of stone overall, hydroxyapatite stones were the second most common before age 55 years, whereas uric acid stones were the second most common after age 55 years. More calcium oxalate and uric acid stones were submitted in the summer months (July and August; P<0.001), whereas the season did not influence other stone types. Conclusions It is well known that calcium oxalate stones are the most common stone type. However, age and sex have a marked influence on the type of stone formed. The higher number of stones submitted by women compared with men between the ages of 10 and 29 years old and the change in composition among the elderly favoring uric acid have not been widely appreciated. These data also suggest increases in stone risk during the summer, although this is restricted to calcium oxalate and uric acid stones. PMID:25278549

  9. Investigation on laser induced salivary stone fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Pongratz, Thomas; Eder, Matthias; Domes, Mona; Vogeser, Michael; Johnson, Thorsten; Siedeck, Vanessa; Schroetzlmair, Florian; Zengel, Pamela

    2014-03-01

    Objective: It was the objective of this in-vitro study to investigate photon-based techniques for identifying the composition and fragmentation of salivary stones using a Ho:YAG laser. Materials and Method: Salivary stones (n=47) extracted from patients with clinical symptoms of sialolithiasis were examined in-vitro. After extraction, the stones were kept in Ringers solution until size and volume measurements could be performed. Thereafter, dual-energy CT scans (DECT) were performed to classify the composition of the stones. Subsequently, fluorescence measurements were performed by taking images under blue light excitation as well as by fluorescence spectroscopy, measuring excitation-emission-matrixes (EEM). Further investigation to identify the exact composition of the stone was performed by Raman spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy of stone fragments and debris. Fragmentation was performed in an aquarium set-up equipped with a mesh (hole: 1.5mm) using a Ho:YAG-laser to deliver laser pulses of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5J/pulse at a frequency of 3Hz through a 200μm-fibre to the stone surface. The collected data were analyzed and fragmentation rates were calculated. Finally, correlation between stone composition and fragmentation was performed. Results: Blue light fluorescence excitation resulted in either fluorescence in the green spectral region or in a combination of green and red fluorescence emission. EEM-measurement showed the corresponding spectra. Raman spectroscopy showed a mixture of carbonate apatite and keratin. DECT results in evidence of calcium containing components. FTIR-spectroscopy results showed that carbonate apatite is the main component. Fragmentation experiment showed a dependency on the energy per pulse applied if the evaluation implies the ratio of fragmented weight to pulse, while the ratio fragmented weight to energy remains about constant for the three laser parameter used. Conclusion: The composition of salivary stones could be determined using

  10. Experimental pyelonephritis. I. Effect of ureteral ligation on the course of bacterial infection in the kidney of the rat.

    PubMed

    BEESON, P B; GUZE, L B

    1956-12-01

    A study has been made of the effect of ureteral ligation on the susceptibility of the kidney to pyogenic infection. In most experiments a strain of E. coli was employed as the test organism, being injected intravenously in varying quantity either before or after ureteral ligation. A few experiments were also carried out with S. marcescens. Preliminary observations were made on the distribution and persistence of E. coli following its inoculation into the blood stream of normal rats. Rapid reduction in number of bacteria in the circulation occurred during the first 30 minutes, but bacteriemia persisted at a comparatively low level for at least 48 hours. Large proportions of the inoculated bacteria were arrested and apparently destroyed in the liver, spleen, and lungs. Comparatively small numbers were deposited in the kidneys; nevertheless, these continued to be demonstrable during the 1st week, without notable tendency to increase or decrease, then disappeared during the 2nd week. There was no acceleration in rate of disposal of the bacteria in the kidney when a second injection was made 1 week after the first. In rats with one ureter ligated the number of bacteria lodging in the kidneys after intravenous inoculation did not differ from that found in normal animals. It appears, therefore, that the increased susceptibility of the obstructed kidney to infection via the blood stream is not attributable to an increased trapping of circulating bacteria. 4 to 6 hours after the intravenous injection, however, an increased number of bacteria could be demonstrated in the obstructed kidney, apparently due to local multiplication, and by the end of 24 hours purulent infection was usually obvious. A comparatively large number of bacteria was required to cause infection, even in the kidney with obstruction. This appeared to be related to the small proportion of the intravenous inoculum which lodged in the kidney initially. Although bacteria could be demonstrated in the normal

  11. Vascular Calcification and Stone Disease: A New Look towards the Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yiu, Allen J.; Callaghan, Daniel; Sultana, Razia; Bandyopadhyay, Bidhan C.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) crystals are formed in pathological calcification as well as during stone formation. Although there are several theories as to how these crystals can develop through the combined interactions of biochemical and biophysical factors, the exact mechanism of such mineralization is largely unknown. Based on the published scientific literature, we found that common factors can link the initial stages of stone formation and calcification in anatomically distal tissues and organs. For example, changes to the spatiotemporal conditions of the fluid flow in tubular structures may provide initial condition(s) for CaP crystal generation needed for stone formation. Additionally, recent evidence has provided a meaningful association between the active participation of proteins and transcription factors found in the bone forming (ossification) mechanism that are also involved in the early stages of kidney stone formation and arterial calcification. Our review will focus on three topics of discussion (physiological influences—calcium and phosphate concentration—and similarities to ossification, or bone formation) that may elucidate some commonality in the mechanisms of stone formation and calcification, and pave the way towards opening new avenues for further research. PMID:26185749

  12. Famous Stone Patients and Their Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael E.

    2007-04-01

    The fact that stone patients have endured much throughout the ages and that prior to our current era, when the ultimate horror, "being cut for the stone" was the only alternative to the repeated episodes of colic, should be recalled from time to time. Urolithiasis has affected humanity throughout the ages and has been indiscriminate to those lives it touched. A full accounting of those who have suffered and recorded their agonies is beyond the scope of this investigation; however, even a partial accounting is valuable for present day physicians who care for those with stone disease. For the present work, the historical accounts of stone disease literature were scrutinized for individual sufferers who could be cross-referenced from other sources as legitimately afflicted by stones. Only those patients that could be documented and were (or are) well known were included, because the internet is now a verdant repository of thousands of "not so well knowns." Reliable historical data was found for a variety of persons from the pre-Christian era to the present, including those remembered as philosophers and scientists, physicians, clergy, leaders and rulers, entertainers, athletes and fictitious/Hollywood-type individuals. Verified accounts of famous stone formers were chosen for this paper, and are presented in chronological order. The list of urolithiasis sufferers presented here is undoubtedly incomplete, but it is not through lack of trying that they are missing. Most often, the suffering do so silently, and that is always allowed.

  13. The mechanisms of stone fragmentation in ESWL.

    PubMed

    Eisenmenger, W

    2001-05-01

    Currently, several mechanisms of kidney stone fragmentation in extracorporal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) are under discussion. As a new mechanism, the circumferential quasistatic compression or "squeezing" by evanescent waves in the stone has been introduced. In fragmentation experiments with self-focussing electromagnetic shock-wave generators with focal diameters comparable to or larger than the stone diameter, we observed first cleavage surfaces either parallel or perpendicular to the wave propagation direction. This is in agreement with the expectation of the "squeezing" mechanism. Because, for positive pulse pressures below 35 MPa and stones with radii of 15 mm or smaller, cleavage into only two fragments was observed, we developed a quantitative model of binary fragmentation by "quasistatic squeezing." This model predicts the ratio of the number of pulses for the fragmentation to 2-mm size and of the number of pulses required for the first cleavage into two parts. This "fragmentation-ratio" depends linearly alone on the stone radius and on the final size of the fragments. The experimental results for spherical artificial stones of 5 mm, 12 mm and 15 mm diameter at a pulse pressure of 11 MPa are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. Thus, binary fragmentation by quasistatic squeezing in ESWL as a new efficient fragmentation mechanism is also quantitatively verified.

  14. Sutureless end-to-end ureteral anastomosis using a new albumin stent and diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hua; Shaffer, Brian S.; Prahl, Scott A.; Gregory, Kenton W.

    1999-09-01

    Sutureless end to end ureteral anastomoses was successfully constructed in acute and chronic experiments. A photothermal sensitive hydrolyzable (PSH) albumin stent played roles as solder and intraluminal supporter to adhesion and position the anastomosed ureter by end to end fashion. The anastomosis seam was lased with 810 nm diode laser energy supplied through hand- held 600 micrometers noncontact optical fiber. A continuous 1 watt wave of power was applied for laser anastomosis. Integrity, welding strength, bursting pressures of anastomosis and histological reaction, and radiological phenomena were compared to those of anastomoses constructed using a liquidity soldering technique. The acute results of two methods were equivalent at welding strengths, but the liquid soldering showed more energy consumption. At chronic study, the radiological and histological studies were performed to evaluate the complications of the anastomosis. Excellent heating and varied degrees of complications were observed. We conclude that PSH stent showed great promise for ureteral anastomosis using laser welding.

  15. Laser welding with an albumin stent: experimental ureteral end-to-end anastomosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hua; Shaffer, Brian S.; Prahl, Scott A.; Gregory, Kenton W.

    2000-05-01

    Porcine ureters were anastomosed using an albumin stent and diode laser in vitro. The albumin stent provided precise apposition for an end to end anastomosis and enhanced welding strength. The anastomosis seam was lasered with an 810 nm diode laser using continuous wave and pulse light through a hand-held 600 micrometer noncontact optical fiber. Tensile strength, burst pressures, operative times, total energy and thermal damaged were measured in this study. The results demonstrated that using an albumin stent to laser weld ureteral anastomoses produces strong weld strengths. The liquid albumin solder also provided satisfactory welding strength. There were no significant differences of tissue thermal damage between the albumin stent alone, liquid solder alone and both combination groups. Thermal damage to tissue depended on laser setting and energy. This study determined the appropriate laser setting parameters to perform in vivo ureteral end to end anastomosis.

  16. Rapidly progressive kidney failure induced by fungal mycelia obstructing indwelling ureteral stents.

    PubMed

    Dubert, Marie; Loi, Valeria; Tligui, Mohamed; Hertig, Alexandre

    2012-12-14

    Antibiotics reduce the commensal flora in the gut, thereby facilitating the overgrowth of undesirable microorganisms such as Candida albicans. Here, we report the case of a 48-year-old woman with a history of obstructive uropathy consecutive to a radiation therapy, in whom both indwelling ureteral stents were rapidly occluded by fungal mycelia, resulting in a rapidly progressive kidney failure. Ascendant infection by C albicans had occurred after a 2- week course of antibiotics, prescribed for a perforative peritonitis also due to radiation-induced colitis. As shown by iterative CT scans made before (at the time of the diagnosis of peritonitis) and after the antibiotic course, kidney failure was explained by a sudden and bilateral pyelocaliceal dilation, due to the obstruction of the ureteral stents. Fungal mycelia were objectivised during the replacement procedure. Intravenous fluconazole was started, and renal function recovered ad integrum with the relief of the obstruction.

  17. Rapidly progressive kidney failure induced by fungal mycelia obstructing indwelling ureteral stents

    PubMed Central

    Dubert, Marie; Loi, Valeria; Tligui, Mohamed; Hertig, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics reduce the commensal flora in the gut, thereby facilitating the overgrowth of undesirable microorganisms such as Candida albicans. Here, we report the case of a 48-year-old woman with a history of obstructive uropathy consecutive to a radiation therapy, in whom both indwelling ureteral stents were rapidly occluded by fungal mycelia, resulting in a rapidly progressive kidney failure. Ascendant infection by C albicans had occurred after a 2- week course of antibiotics, prescribed for a perforative peritonitis also due to radiation-induced colitis. As shown by iterative CT scans made before (at the time of the diagnosis of peritonitis) and after the antibiotic course, kidney failure was explained by a sudden and bilateral pyelocaliceal dilation, due to the obstruction of the ureteral stents. Fungal mycelia were objectivised during the replacement procedure. Intravenous fluconazole was started, and renal function recovered ad integrum with the relief of the obstruction. PMID:23242091

  18. Nonleukemic Ureteral Granulocytic Sarcoma Presenting with Unilateral Urinary Obstruction and Hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Tarık; Tecimer, Tülay; Çetiner, Mustafa; Peker, Önder; Musaoğlu, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma is an extramedullary tumor which is composed of myeloblasts and immature myeloid cells. It usually occurs in association with acute myeloid leukemia and most commonly involves skin, soft tissue, lymph nodes, bone, and periosteum. We report a case of isolated ureteral granulocytic sarcoma without hematologic manifestations. Our patient presented with bloody urine and left-sided lumbar pain. Preoperative clinical and radiologic features raised the suspicion of an upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma, and he was scheduled for nephroureterectomy. However, perioperative pathologic feedback and the unusual endoscopic appearance of the tumor altered our surgical strategy towards segmental ureterectomy and ureteroneocystostomy. Eventual pathologic diagnosis was granulocytic sarcoma of the ureter. Postoperative workup failed to demonstrate any sign of an accompanying hematologic disorder. He started receiving the chemotherapy protocol of acute myeloblastic leukemia. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of nonleukemic ureteral granulocytic sarcoma which came to attention due to urologic complaints. PMID:24024067

  19. Long ureteric stricture replacement by buccal mucosa graft: an Armenian experience case series report

    PubMed Central

    Akopyan, Kristina; Levonyan, Arthur; Tsaturyan, Ashot

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to demonstrate the results of a case series concerning the replacement of long ureteric strictures using buccal mucosa grafts. Material and methods Five patients (3 men, 2 women), with a mean age of 35 years old, underwent reconstructive ureteral surgery using buccal mucosa graft with omental wrapping during the period of 2010–2013. In all cases, the location of strictures was in the proximal ureters with the length of strictures varying from 2.5 to 5.0 cm. Results We did not observe any major complications postoperatively. Two patients complained of constipation, which was resolved on the second day without any special treatment. Only one patient experienced fever (39°C) on the seventh day after the surgery due to inadequate drainage of the nephrostomic tube. Mean follow-up time was 39.6 months (range 26–52 months), mean hospital stay length was 10.6 days. Intravenous and antegrade urography were performed after removing JJ stents. Results were favorable without any signs of stricture. Repetitive ultrasound and radiologic imaging was performed at month 3, 6, 12 in the first year and every half-year thereafter. Intravenous urography showed no signs of strictures. Hydronephrosis was resolved in all patients by the sixth month following the surgery. Conclusions Postoperatively, we observed favorable results in all patients in terms of absence of short term-surgical complications. This technique could be considered for patients with long ureteric strictures in whom ureteral replacement with bowel interposition or kidney auto-transplantation is contraindicated. PMID:27551561

  20. Ureteritis Cystica: Important Consideration in the Differential Diagnosis of Acute Renal Colic

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Fernández, B.; Díaz-Alférez, FJ.; Herrero-Polo, M.; Martín-Izquierdo, M.; Silva-Abuín, JM.; Lorenzo-Gómez, MF.

    2012-01-01

    Ureteritis cystica is an uncommon cause of acute renal pain. The aetiology remains unclear and the diagnosis may be difficult to establish. We report the case of a 29 year old woman with a history of repeated urinary tract infections presenting with acute renal colic in the absence of lithiasis. We review the diagnostic tools available to make the diagnosis and the recent pertinent literature. PMID:22474406

  1. Ureteral lesion secondary to vaginal ultrasound follicular puncture for oocyte recovery in in-vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Coroleu, B; Lopez Mourelle, F; Hereter, L; Veiga, A; Calderón, G; Martinez, F; Carreras, O; Barri, P N

    1997-05-01

    Techniques of oocyte retrieval have progressed from laparoscopy to transvaginal follicular aspiration under ultrasonographic control. This highly efficient method, routinely used nowadays, is not free of complications. We present a case of a ureteral lesion secondary to vaginal ultrasound follicular puncture for oocyte recovery in in-vitro fertilization. Despite the surgical procedure to reimplant the ureter, the patient achieved a twin pregnancy which is ongoing uneventfully.

  2. Bleeding Ureter: Endometriosis Mascarading as a Ureteral Malignancy - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sandeep, Puvvada; Pathade, Amey; Nagaraj, H K

    2014-01-01

    Ureteral endometriosis is a serious localization of disease burden that can lead to urinary tract obstruction, with subsequent hydroureter, hydronephrosis, and potential kidney loss. As the diagnosis is elusive, a heavy clinical suspicion is necessary. Surgical technique to treatment varies, but the goal is to salvage renal function and decrease disease burden. Here, we are presenting a rare case of bleeding ureter in a young lady who had endometriosis of the ureter. PMID:25478397

  3. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy for isolated calyceal stones: How important is the stone location?

    PubMed Central

    Özgör, Faruk; Küçüktopcu, Onur; Şimşek, Abdulmuttalip; Sarılar, Ömer; Binbay, Murat; Gürbüz, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of percutaneous access site on the success and complication rates of isolated calyceal stones. Material and methods We retrospectively evaluated 2700 patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) in our clinic between October 2002 and August 2014. We selected only the patients with isolated lower, middle or upper calyceal stones and we grouped the patients according to the location of their stones. Successful operation was defined as complete stone clearence or retention of stone fragments smaller than 4 mm which do not lead to infection, obstruction or pain requiring treatment. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were also recorded. Results Totally 360 patients underwent PNL for their isolated upper, middle and lower calyceal stones. Access sites for those patients were selected based on stone location. The stones were localized in the lower (n=304), middle (n=14), and upper (n=42) calices. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups with respect to operation and scopy times. Hemoglobin drop was seen more frequently in the upper calyceal access group, without any significant intergroup difference. Thoracic complications including hemothorax, pneumothorax and pleural effusion were more common in the upper calyceal access group (11.9%; p<0.001). Complete stone clerance was accomplished in 81.9%, 92.9% and 78.6% of the patients with lower, middle and upper calyceal stones respectively without any significant intergroup difference (p=0.537). Conclusion PNL is an effective and safe treatment modality for isolated calyceal kidney stones and upper calyceal access causes thoracic complications more than other access sites. PMID:26623144

  4. When should one perform shockwave lithotripsy for lower caliceal stones?

    PubMed

    Ilker, Y; Tarcan, T; Akdas, A

    1995-12-01

    Extracorporal shockwave lithotripsy of lower caliceal stones is often unrewarding because of the difficulty of passing stone fragments. We report our results in SWL of lower pole stones in 219 patients and compare them with the results of SWL of middle (82 patients) and upper pole (85 patients) stones. The stone-free rate of SWL monotherapy was found to be 59%, 77%, and 64% in lower, middle, and upper caliceal stones, respectively. In lower pole stones, SWL was unsuccessful in 41% of the patients, of whom 9% had minimal residual asymptomatic stones (less than 4 mm in greatest diameter). In comparison with the results of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCN) of lower pole urolithiasis in the literature, SWL was unsuccessful in large stones, with stone-free rates of 13% and 0 when the stone size was 3 to 4.9 cm2 and > 5 cm2, respectively. A stone-free rate of 82% when the stone burden was < 1 cm2 is similar to the PCN results of other centers, suggesting that SWL may be the first choice of treatment in lower pole stones of this size. We achieved a stone-free rate of 59% when the stone size was between 1 and 3 cm2, which is lower than the stone-free rates of PCN in the literature. In spite of its lower stone-free rates, SWL, with its lower morbidity, may still be considered an acceptable treatment modality in this range of moderate stone burden, especially when there is a patient desire for conservative treatment.

  5. A Tissue-Specific Scaffold for Tissue Engineering-Based Ureteral Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongde; Fu, Weijun; Wang, Zhongxin; Li, Gang; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Terminally differentiated somatic cells can rapidly change phenotypes when they are isolated from their native tissue and cultured in vitro. This problem may become a barrier to tissue engineering-based organ reconstruction, which utilizes somatic cells. The present study was designed to validate the feasibility of maintaining the urothelial cell phenotype in a tissue-specific ureteral scaffold. The tissue-specific scaffold was fabricated by blending poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and ureteral extracellular matrix (UECM) using electrostatic spinning technology. PLLA was used to enhance the mechanical properties, and UECM was used to mimic the natural components of the ureter. Primary urothelial cells (UCs), derived from ureteral mucosa, were seeded onto the tissue-specific scaffold to assess cell adhesion, proliferation and phenotypes at designated time points. The results showed that UCs in the tissue-specific scaffold exhibited better proliferation compared to cells in pure PLLA or a PLLA-small intestinal submucosa (PLLA-SIS) scaffold (p<0.05). At different time points, the expression of a UC-specific marker (UroplakinⅢ) in the tissue-specific scaffold was significantly higher than its expression in pure PLLA or a PLLA-SIS scaffold (p<0.05). Therefore, the tissue-specific scaffold appears to be an ideal substrate for promoting UC survival and phenotype maintenance. PMID:25775033

  6. Clinical observation of different minimally invasive surgeries for the treatment of impacted upper ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanhua; Zhou, Zhangyan; Xia, An; Dai, Haitao; Guo, Linjie; Zheng, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical effects of three minimally invasive surgeries on the treatment of impacted upper ureteral calculi. Methods: 135 patients with impacted upper ureteral calculi were selected and randomly divided into three groups (Group A-C) (n=45), which were treated with transurethral ureteroscopic lithotripsy, minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy, and retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy respectively. Relevant results of the three groups were compared. Results: The surgery time of Group C was significantly longer than those of Group A and Group B (P < 0.05). The postoperative hospitalization time of Group B was significantly longer than those of Group A and Group C (P < 0.05). 37.78% (17/45) of Group A patients required extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, being significantly more than those in Group B (6.67%, 3/45) and Group C (0, 0/45) (P < 0.05). The postoperative calculus clearance rate of Group A (51.11%, 82.22%) was significantly lower than those of Group B (91.11%, 97.78%) and Group C (93.33%, 100%) (P < 0.05). The incidence rates of postoperative complications in Group A-C were 11.11% (5/45), 8.89% (4/45) and 6.67% (3/45) respectively without significant differences (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The three surgical methods for impacted upper ureteral calculi should be selected according to practical conditions to improve therapeutic effects and to ensure safe surgery. PMID:24550953

  7. Modulation of ureteric Ca signaling and contractility in humans and rats by uropathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Rachel V; Winstanley, Craig; Bakran, Ali; Wray, Susan; Burdyga, Theodor V

    2010-04-01

    Ascending urinary tract infections, a significant cause of kidney damage, are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). However, the role and mechanism of changes in ureteric function during infection are poorly understood. We therefore investigated the effects of UPEC on Ca signaling and contractions in rat (n = 17) and human (n = 6) ureters. Ca transients and force were measured and effects of UPEC on the urothelium were monitored in live tissues. In both species, luminal exposure of ureters to UPEC strains J96 and 536 caused significant time-dependent decreases in phasic and high K depolarization-induced contractility, associated with decreases in the amplitude and duration of the Ca transients. These changes were significant after 3-5 h and irreversible over the next 5 h. The infection causes increased activity of K channels, causing inhibition of voltage-gated Ca entry, and K channel blockers could reverse the effects of UPEC on ureteric function. A smaller direct effect on Ca entry also occurs. Nonpathogenic E. coli (TG2) or abluminal application of UPEC did not produce changes in Ca signaling or contractility. UPEC exposure also caused significant impairment of urothelial barrier function; luminal application of the Ca channel blocker nifedipine caused a reduction in contractions as it entered the tissue, an effect not observed in untreated ureters. Thus, UPEC impairs ureteric contractility in a Ca-dependent manner, largely caused by stimulation of potassium channels and this mechanism is dependent on host-urothelium interaction.

  8. Melatonin protects kidney against apoptosis induced by acute unilateral ureteral obstruction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Badem, Hüseyin; Cakmak, Muzaffer; Yilmaz, Hakki; Kosem, Bahadir; Karatas, Omer Faruk; Bayrak, Reyhan; Cimentepe, Ersin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To investigate whether there was a protective effect of melatonin on apoptotic mechanisms after an acute unilateral obstruction of the kidney. Material and methods A total of 25 rats consisting of five groups were used in the study, designated as follows: Group 1: control, Group 2: sham, Group 3: unilateral ureteral obstruction treated with only saline, Group 4: unilateral ureteral obstruction treated with melatonin immediately, and Group 5: unilateral obstruction treated with melatonin one day after obstruction. Melatonin was administered as a 10 mg/kg dose intraperitoneally. The kidneys were evaluated according to the apoptotic index and Ki-67 scores. Results Comparison of all obstruction groups (Group 3, 4, and 5), revealed that the apoptotic index was significantly higher in Groups 1 and 2. Despite melatonin reduced apoptotic mechanisms in Groups 4 and 5, there was no significant difference between Groups 4 and 5 in terms of the reduction of apoptosis. However, the reduction of apoptosis in the melatonin treated group did not decrease to the level of Groups 1 and 2. Conclusions Despite melatonin administration, which significantly reduces the apoptotic index occurring after acute unilateral ureteral obstruction, the present study did not observe a return to normal renal histology in the obstruction groups. PMID:27551563

  9. The Utility of Routine Ultrasound Imaging after Elective Transplant Ureteric Stent Removal

    PubMed Central

    Olsburgh, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ureteric stent insertion during kidney transplantation reduces the incidence of major urological complications (MUCs). We evaluated whether routine poststent removal graft ultrasonography (PSRGU) was useful in detecting MUCs before they became clinically or biochemically apparent. Methods. A retrospective analysis was undertaken of clinical outcomes following elective stent removals from adult single renal transplant recipients (sRTRs) at our centre between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013. Results. Elective stent removal was performed for 338 sRTRs. Of these patients, 222 had routine PSRGU (median (IQR) days after stent removal = 18 (11–31)), 79 had urgent PSRGU due to clinical or biochemical indications, 12 had CT imaging, and 25 had no further renal imaging. Of the 222 sRTRs who underwent routine PSRGU, 210 (94.6%) had no change of management, three (1.4%) required repeat imaging only, and eight patients (3.6%) had incidental (nonureteric) findings. One patient (0.5%) had nephrostomy insertion as a result of routine PSRGU findings, but no ureteric stenosis was identified. Of 79 patients having urgent PSRGU after elective stent removal, three patients required transplant ureteric reimplantation. Conclusions. This analysis found no evidence that routine PSRGU at two to three weeks after elective stent removal provides any added value beyond standard clinical and biochemical monitoring. PMID:27493793

  10. Urological complications of renal transplantation: the impact of double J ureteric stents.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, M. L.; Veitch, P. S.; Donnelly, P. K.; Bell, P. R.

    1991-01-01

    In a 10 year series of 350 consecutive renal transplant operations, the overall urological complication rate was 7.7%. During this period double J stents were introduced and were used either in the treatment of actual urological complications or as a prophylactic measure to protect ureters which had been damaged at retrieval. A total of 34 double J stents were used in 33 patients. The indications were: ureteric obstruction (n = 13), urinary leak (n = 5), short transplant ureter anastomosed using an extravesical ureteroneocystostomy (n = 10) and ureteric injury at the time of organ retrieval (n = 6). Thirty-two double J stents were inserted at open operation and two were inserted by an antegrade method after percutaneous nephrostomy. Improvement in renal function occurred in 16 out of the 18 cases of urological complications. No kidneys were lost and there were no deaths as a direct result of these complications. In a number of cases the insertion of a double J stent was the only treatment, thus eliminating the need for more complex surgery. All 16 patients who had a ureteric stent inserted as a prophylactic measure at the time of transplantation made uncomplicated postoperative recoveries. Urinary tract infection was relatively common (27%) after double J stent insertion, but other complications were rare. In conclusion, double J stents have proved to be a useful adjunct in the management of renal transplant related urological complications. PMID:1929136

  11. Introductory Overview of Stone Heritages in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hirokazu; Oikawa, Teruki; Fujita, Masayo; Yokoyama, Shunji

    2013-04-01

    As one contribution to 'Global Heritage Stone Resources' (GHSR), some stone heritages in Japan, which are nominated in the interim list, are briefly introduced. The geology of Japanese Islands where are the one of the most active areas in the history of the Earth, is very complicated. Therefore Japanese Islands consist of various kinds of minerals and rocks. Some of them were used to make stone implements and accessories. Japanese people also used to the best possible advantage to built tombstone, gate, pavement ,and the basement and wall of the large building such as temples, shrines, castles and modern buildings. 1. Stone Heritages of Pre-historical age: In the late Pleistocene and the early Holocene, ancient Japanese used obsidian cooled rapidly from rhyolitic magma.to make small implements and accessories. For example, Shirataki, Hokkaido (north island) is the largest place producing obsidian in Japan where Paleolithic people made arrowhead, knives and so on. Another example, Jade yielded in Itoigawa City, Japan Sea coast of central Japan, was made in the metamorphic rock about five hundred million years ago. Itoigawa area is only one place where jade is abundantly produced in Japan. Ancient people had been already collected and processed to ornaments although it is very hard and traded in wide area more than several thousand years ago. 2. Stone Heritages of Historical age: 2.1 Archaeological remains: In the Kofun (old mound) period (250 to 538 AD), stone burial chambers were used for old mounds to preserve against the putrefaction and to protect from the theft. For example, Ishibutai Kofun ("ishi" means "stone" and "butai" means "stage") in Nara old capital city, southwest Japan, is the largest known megalithic structure made of granite in Japan. 2.2 Stone walls of some typical castles Stones used is because of not only the rich reserves of rocks but also restriction of transportation. Osaka (second biggest city) castle, are composed of Cretaceous granite

  12. Comparison of flexible ureterorenoscopy and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy in treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Fatih; Kucuktopcu, Onur; Kandemir, Emre; Sonmezay, Erkan; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Ozgor, Faruk; Binbay, Murat; Muslumanoglu, Ahmet Yaser; Gurbuz, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    To compare the outcomes of flexible ureterorenoscopy (F-URS) and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (mini-PNL) in the treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm. Patients who underwent F-URS and mini-PNL for the treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm between March 2009 and December 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Ninety-four patients were divided into two groups by treatment modality: F-URS (Group 1: 63 patients) and mini-PNL (Group 2: 31 patients). All patients were preoperatively diagnosed with intravenous pyelography or computed tomography. Success rates for F-URS and mini-PNL at postoperative first month were 85.7% and 90.3%, respectively. Operation time, fluoroscopy time, and hospitalization time for F-URS and mini-PNL patients were 44.40 min, 2.9 min, 22.4 h, and 91.9 min, 6.4 min, and 63.8 h, respectively. All three parameters were significantly shorter among the F-URS group (p < 0.001). Postoperative hemoglobin drop was significantly lower in F-URS group compared to mini-PNL group (0.39 mg/dL vs. 1.15 mg/dL, p = 0.001). A comparison of complications according to the Clavien classification demonstrated significant differences between the groups (p = 0.001). More patients in the F-URS groups require antibiotics due to urinary tract infection, and more patients in the mini-PNL group required ureteral double J catheter insertion under general anesthesia. Although both F-URS and mini-PNL have similar success rates for the treatment of lower calyceal stones, F-URS appears to be more favorable due to shorter fluoroscopy and hospitalization times; and lower hemoglobin drops. Multicenter and studies using higher patient volumes are needed to confirm these findings.

  13. Comparison of flexible ureterorenoscopy and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy in treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Fatih; Kucuktopcu, Onur; Kandemir, Emre; Sonmezay, Erkan; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Ozgor, Faruk; Binbay, Murat; Muslumanoglu, Ahmet Yaser; Gurbuz, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    To compare the outcomes of flexible ureterorenoscopy (F-URS) and mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (mini-PNL) in the treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm. Patients who underwent F-URS and mini-PNL for the treatment of lower calyceal stones smaller than 2 cm between March 2009 and December 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Ninety-four patients were divided into two groups by treatment modality: F-URS (Group 1: 63 patients) and mini-PNL (Group 2: 31 patients). All patients were preoperatively diagnosed with intravenous pyelography or computed tomography. Success rates for F-URS and mini-PNL at postoperative first month were 85.7% and 90.3%, respectively. Operation time, fluoroscopy time, and hospitalization time for F-URS and mini-PNL patients were 44.40 min, 2.9 min, 22.4 h, and 91.9 min, 6.4 min, and 63.8 h, respectively. All three parameters were significantly shorter among the F-URS group (p < 0.001). Postoperative hemoglobin drop was significantly lower in F-URS group compared to mini-PNL group (0.39 mg/dL vs. 1.15 mg/dL, p = 0.001). A comparison of complications according to the Clavien classification demonstrated significant differences between the groups (p = 0.001). More patients in the F-URS groups require antibiotics due to urinary tract infection, and more patients in the mini-PNL group required ureteral double J catheter insertion under general anesthesia. Although both F-URS and mini-PNL have similar success rates for the treatment of lower calyceal stones, F-URS appears to be more favorable due to shorter fluoroscopy and hospitalization times; and lower hemoglobin drops. Multicenter and studies using higher patient volumes are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26727075

  14. Stones in 2015: Changes in stone management - suspending belief for evidence.

    PubMed

    Ambani, Sapan N; Ghani, Khurshid R

    2016-02-01

    In 2015, population-based studies in patients with urinary stones informed us of the changing trends in contemporary stone management and identified areas for improvement. Although meta-analyses aim to provide the highest level of evidence, a randomized controlled trial of medical expulsive therapy challenged current paradigms and was the defining publication of the year.

  15. Renal Stone Risk During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Pietrzyk, Robert A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Pak, Charles Y. C.; Jones, Jeffrey A.

    1999-01-01

    Space flight produces a number of metabolic and physiological changes in the crewmembers exposed to microgravity. Following launch, body fluid volumes, electrolyte levels, and bone and muscle undergo changes as the human body adapts to the weightless environment. Changes in the urinary chemical composition may lead to the potentially serious consequences of renal stone formation. Previous data collected immediately after space flight indicate changes in the urine chemistry favoring an increased risk of calcium oxalate and uric acid stone formation (n = 323). During short term Shuttle space flights, the changes observed include increased urinary calcium and decreased urine volume, pH and citrate resulting in a greater risk for calcium oxalate and brushite stone formation (n = 6). Results from long duration Shuttle/Mir missions (n = 9) followed a similar trend and demonstrated decreased fluid intake and urine volume and increased urinary calcium resulting in a urinary environment saturated with the calcium stone-forming salts. The increased risk occurs rapidly upon exposure to microgravity, continues throughout the space flight and following landing. Dietary factors, especially fluid intake, or pharmacologic intervention can significantly influence the urinary chemical composition. Increasing fluid intake to produce a daily urine output of 2 liters/day may allow the excess salts in the urine to remain in solution, crystals formation will not occur and a renal stone will not develop. Results from long duration crewmembers (n = 2) who had urine volumes greater than 2.5 L/day minimized their risk of renal stone formation. Also, comparisons of stone-forming risk in short duration crewmembers clearly identified greater risk in those who produced less than 2 liters of urine/day. However, hydration and increased urine output does not correct the underlying calcium excretion due to bone loss and only treats the symptoms and not the cause of the increased urinary salts

  16. Urinary stone composition in Oman: with high incidence of cystinuria.

    PubMed

    Al-Marhoon, Mohammed S; Bayoumi, Riad; Al-Farsi, Yahya; Al-Hinai, Abdullhakeem; Al-Maskary, Sultan; Venkiteswaran, Krishna; Al-Busaidi, Qassim; Mathew, Josephkunju; Rhman, Khalid; Sharif, Omar; Aquil, Shahid; Al-Hashmi, Intisar

    2015-06-01

    Urinary stones are a common problem in Oman and their composition is unknown. The aim of this study is to analyze the components of urinary stones of Omani patients and use the obtained data for future studies of etiology, treatment, and prevention. Urinary stones of 255 consecutive patients were collected at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital. Stones were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer. The biochemical, metabolic, and radiological data relating to the patients and stones were collected. The mean age was 41 years, with M:F ratio of 3.7:1. The common comorbidities associated with stone formation were hypertension; diabetes, benign prostate hyperplasia; urinary tract infection; obesity; and atrophic kidney. The common presentation was renal colic and flank pain (96%). Stones were surgically retrieved in 70% of patients. Mean stone size was 9 ± 0.5 mm (range 1.3-80). Stone formers had a BMI ≥ 25 in 56% (P = 0.006) and positive family history of stones in 3.8%. The most common stones in Oman were as follows: Calcium Oxalates 45% (114/255); Mixed calcium phosphates & calcium oxalates 22% (55/255); Uric Acid 16% (40/255); and Cystine 4% (10/255). The most common urinary stones in Oman are Calcium Oxalates. Overweight is an important risk factor associated with stone formation. The hereditary Cystine stones are three times more common in Oman than what is reported in the literature that needs further genetic studies. PMID:25805105

  17. Urinary stone composition in Oman: with high incidence of cystinuria.

    PubMed

    Al-Marhoon, Mohammed S; Bayoumi, Riad; Al-Farsi, Yahya; Al-Hinai, Abdullhakeem; Al-Maskary, Sultan; Venkiteswaran, Krishna; Al-Busaidi, Qassim; Mathew, Josephkunju; Rhman, Khalid; Sharif, Omar; Aquil, Shahid; Al-Hashmi, Intisar

    2015-06-01

    Urinary stones are a common problem in Oman and their composition is unknown. The aim of this study is to analyze the components of urinary stones of Omani patients and use the obtained data for future studies of etiology, treatment, and prevention. Urinary stones of 255 consecutive patients were collected at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital. Stones were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer. The biochemical, metabolic, and radiological data relating to the patients and stones were collected. The mean age was 41 years, with M:F ratio of 3.7:1. The common comorbidities associated with stone formation were hypertension; diabetes, benign prostate hyperplasia; urinary tract infection; obesity; and atrophic kidney. The common presentation was renal colic and flank pain (96%). Stones were surgically retrieved in 70% of patients. Mean stone size was 9 ± 0.5 mm (range 1.3-80). Stone formers had a BMI ≥ 25 in 56% (P = 0.006) and positive family history of stones in 3.8%. The most common stones in Oman were as follows: Calcium Oxalates 45% (114/255); Mixed calcium phosphates & calcium oxalates 22% (55/255); Uric Acid 16% (40/255); and Cystine 4% (10/255). The most common urinary stones in Oman are Calcium Oxalates. Overweight is an important risk factor associated with stone formation. The hereditary Cystine stones are three times more common in Oman than what is reported in the literature that needs further genetic studies.

  18. Distribution and functional effects of neuropeptide Y on equine ureteral smooth muscle and resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Prieto, D; Hernández, M; Rivera, L; García-Sacristán, A; Simonsen, U

    1997-04-30

    The distribution of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-immunoreactive (IR) nerves, as well as the functional effects of NPY and the Y1- and Y2-receptor agonists, [Leu31,Pro34]NPY and NPY(13-36), respectively, have been investigated in vitro in both visceral and arterial smooth muscle of the horse intravesical ureter. NPY-IR nerve fibres were widely distributed along the entire length of the ureter, although the intravesical part was the most richly innervated region, and the only one where NPY-IR ganglion cells were found. NPY (10(-7) M) did not affect either basal tone or spontaneous rhythmic contractions of the isolated intravesical ureter, but significantly enhanced the increases in both tone and frequency of phasic activity elicited by noradrenaline (10(-6) and 10(-5) M). The Y1-receptor agonist, [Leu31,Pro34]NPY (10(-7) and 10(-6) M) did not significantly alter either ureteral basal tone or the contractile activity induced by noradrenaline, whereas the Y2-receptor agonist, NPY(13-36) (10(-7) M), mimicked the potentiating effect of NPY on noradrenaline responses. In ureteral resistance arteries (effective lumen diameters of 130-300 microm), NPY (10(-10) to 10(-7) M) elicited concentration-dependent contractions, which were inversely correlated with the arterial lumen diameter. Submaximal concentrations of NPY (10(-8) M) significantly increased the sensitivity of ureteral arteries to noradrenaline. [Leu31,Pro34]NPY (10(-10) to 10(-7) M), but not NPY(13-36), induced a contractile effect of similar magnitude and potency as those of NPY, and also potentiated noradrenaline responses. The present results demonstrate a rich NPY-innervation in the intravesical ureter and reveal functional effects of the peptide enhancing motor activity in both ureteral and arterial smooth muscles, although the receptors mediating such effects seem to be different. Thus, NPY potentiates the phasic contractions and tone elicited by noradrenaline through Y2-receptors, whereas it both contracts and

  19. Mid-Infrared Study of Samples from Several Stones from the Sutter's Mill Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott; Nuevo, Michel; Flynn, George J.; Wirick, Sue

    2013-01-01

    On April 22, 2012, a fireball was observed over California and Nevada, and the falling fragments of the meteorite were detected by weather radar near small townships in the El Dorado County, California. Some of these stones were collected at Sutter s Mill, in the historic site where the California gold rush was initiated, giving the name to this meteorite. Thus far, 77 pieces of the meteorite have been collected, for a total mass of 943 g, with the biggest stone weighing 205 g [1].

  20. Search for fullerenes in stone meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oester, M. Y.; Kuechl, D.; Sipiera, P. P.; Welch, C. J.

    1994-07-01

    The possibility of identifying fullerenes in stony meteorites became apparent from a paper given by Radicati de Brozolo. In this paper it was reported that fullerenes were present in the debris resulting from a collision between a micrometeoroid and an orbiting satellite. This fact generated sufficient curiosity to initiate a search for the presence of fullerenes in various stone meteorites. In the present study seven ordinary chondrites (al-Ghanim L6 (find), Dimmitt H4 (find), Lazbuddie LL5 (find), New Concord H5 (fall), Silverton H4 (find), Springlake L6 (find), and Umbarger L3/6 (find)). Four carbonaceous chondrites (ALH 83100 C2 (find), ALH 83108 C30 (find), Allende CV3 (fall), and Murchison CM2 (fall), and one achondrite (Monticello How (find)) were analyzed for the presence of fullerenes. The analytical procedure employed was as follows: 100 mg of meteorite was ground up with a mortar and pestle; 10 mL of toluene was then added and the mixture was refluxed for 90 min; this mixture was then filtered through a short column of silica; a 50 microliter sample was then analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) using a Buckyclutcher I column with a mobile phase consisting of equal volumes of toluene and hexane at a flow rate of 1.00 mg per minute, with detection at 330 and 600 nm. Three of the meteorites, Allende, Murchison, and al-Ghanim, gave HPLC traces containing peaks with similar retention times to the HPLC trace of an authentic fullerene C60. However, further analysis using an HPLC instrument equipped with a diode-array detector failed to confirm any of the substances detected in the three meteorites as C60. Additional analyses will be conducted to identify what the HPLC traces actually represent.

  1. "Sydney sandstone": Heritage Stone from Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Barry; Kramar, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    Sydney is Australia's oldest city being founded in 1788. The city was fortunate to be established on an extensive and a relatively undeformed layer of lithified quartz sandstone of Triassic age that has proved to be an ideal building stone. The stone has been long identified by geologists as the Hawkesbury Sandstone. On the other hand the term "Sydney sandstone" has also been widely used over a long period, even to the extent of being utilised as the title of published books, so its formal designation as a heritage stone will immediately formalise this term. The oldest international usage is believed to be its use in the construction of the Stone Store at Kerikeri, New Zealand (1832-1836). In the late 19th century, public buildings such as hospitals, court houses as well as the prominent Sydney Town Hall, Sydney General Post Office, Art Gallery of New South Wales, State Library of New South Wales as well as numerous schools, churches, office building buildings, University, hotels, houses, retaining walls were all constructed using Sydney sandstone. Innumerable sculptures utilising the gold-coloured stone also embellished the city ranging from decorative friezes and capitals on building to significant monuments. Also in the late 19th and early 20th century, Sydney sandstone was used for major construction in most other major Australian cities especially Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane to the extent that complaints were expressed that suitable local stone materials were being neglected. Quarrying of Sydney sandstone continues today. In 2000 it was recorded noted that there were 33 significant operating Sydney sandstone quarries including aggregate and dimension stone operations. In addition sandstone continues to be sourced today from construction sites across the city area. Today major dimension stone producers (eg Gosford Quarries) sell Sydney sandstone not only into the Sydney market but also on national and international markets as cladding and paving products

  2. Analysis of stone-column reinforced foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. S.; Pande, G. N.

    1998-12-01

    A numerical model is proposed to analyse elastic as well as elastoplastic behaviour of stone-column reinforced foundations. The stone-columns are assumed to be dispersed within the in situ soil and a homogenization technique is invoked to establish equivalent material properties for in situ soil and stone-column composite. The difficulties encountered in carrying out elastoplastic analyses of composite materials are overcome by adopting a separate yield function for each of the constituent materials and a sub-iteration procedure within an implicit backward Euler stress integration scheme. In the proposed procedure, equilibrium as well as kinematic conditions implied in the homogenization procedure are satisfied for both elastic as well as elastoplastic stress states.The proposed model is implemented in an axi-symmetric finite element code and numerical prediction is made for the behaviour of model circular footings resting on stone-column reinforced foundations. This prediction indicates good agreement with experimental observation. Finally, a new scheme in which the length of stone-column is variable is proposed and its behaviour is examined through a numerical example.

  3. Cancer incidence among Danish stone workers.

    PubMed

    Guénel, P; Højberg, G; Lynge, E

    1989-08-01

    The lung cancer incidence of 2071 Danish stone workers was followed for a 42-year period. The expected numbers of cancer cases were based on the incidence rates for all Danish men after adjustment for region, and the data were analyzed separately for skilled and unskilled stone workers. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for lung cancer was 200 (44 observed, 22.0 expected) for all skilled stone workers, 808 (7 observed, 0.9 expected) for skilled sandstone cutters in Copenhagen, 119 (8 observed, 6.5 expected) for skilled granite cutters in Bornholm, 181 (24 observed, 13.2 expected) for all unskilled stone workers, 246 (17 observed, 6.9 expected) for unskilled workers in the road and building material industry, and 111 (7 observed, 6.3 expected) for unskilled workers in the stonecutting industry. Smoking was unlikely alone to explain the excess risk, and the available data on levels of exposure in the Danish stone industry point to a possible dose-response relationship between exposure to respirable silica dust and the incidence of lung cancer.

  4. Assessment of compatibility and durability of photocatalytic TiO2 for stone coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calia, Angela; Lettieri, Maria Teresa; Licciulli, Antonio; Masieri, Maurizio

    2014-05-01

    The use of Titanium dioxide nano-particles has received increasing attention in many fields as these particles can trap and decompose organic and inorganic soiling matter and air pollutants by a photocatalytic process, providing new functional properties in terms of self-cleaning and depolluting performances to the treated materials. Since recent years, the use of photocatalytic TiO2 as external coating for natural stones has been allowed thanks to the fine-tuning of nano-titania preparation, overcoming the initial limits of application related to a necessary thermal treatment. Notwithstanding nano-titania benefits, the potential of its application as stone coating needs to be assessed with respect to basic requirements involved for any surface stone treatment, especially in the field of the preservation of historical-architectural heritage. They concern the harmlessness with respect to the original characteristics of the stones, the effectiveness and durability of the treatments themselves. In this work we present the study for the assessment of compatibility of Titania coatings applied to calcareous stones paying attention to their effects on chromatic properties, water absorption by capillarity, permeability to water vapour, water wettability. The durability of the coatings under mechanical action in laboratory simulated conditions was also investigated.

  5. Unilateral versus bilateral ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane blocks during ureteric shock wave lithotripsy: A prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Elnabtity, Ali Mohamed Ali; Shabana, Waleed Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has been used for intra- and post-operative analgesia during abdominal operations and for ureteric shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) as well. Aim: This study aimed at comparing ultrasound-guided unilateral versus bilateral TAP blocks as analgesic techniques for unilateral ureteric SWL. Settings and Design: Prospective randomized comparative study. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients scheduled for unilateral ureteric SWL were randomly allocated into two groups: Group (U) received unilateral TAP block in the form of 25 ml of bupivacaine 0.25% (i.e., 62.5 mg), and Group (B) received bilateral TAP blocks in the form of 25 ml of bupivacaine 0.25% (i.e., 62.5 mg) on each side. Statistical Analysis: This was performed using SPSS program version 19 ((IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA) and EP 16 program. Results: The mean values of intra- and post-procedural visual analog scale at different time intervals were around (30), which was statistically insignificant between groups (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences between groups regarding cardiopulmonary stability, postanesthesia care unit time, the total amount of rescue fentanyl and patient satisfaction scores (P > 0.05). There were no significant side effects in both groups. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided unilateral TAP block is as safe and effective analgesic technique as bilateral TAP blocks during unilateral ureteric SWL. It can be used as the sole analgesic technique during ureteric SWL. PMID:27453645

  6. Prenatal diagnosis of a rare form of congenital mid-ureteral stricture: a case report and literature revisited

    PubMed Central

    Brugnara, Milena; Cecchetto, Mariangela; Manfredi, Riccardo; Zuffante, Michele; Fanos, Vassilios; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Zaffanello, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background Congenital mid-ureteral stricture is a rare malformation of the ureter leading to prenatal and neonatal hydronephrosis. Site characterization of the narrowing is important to optimize the surgical approach to the newborn affected by hydronephrosis. Case presentation We report a female EM with a rare form of hydronephrosis, (i.e. mid-ureteral stricture) which was detected early during pregnancy by imaging techniques. During fetal life both conventional fetal Ultrasound and maternal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) were used to diagnose the obstruction. Magnetic Resonance pyelography and retrograde Ureteropyelography were performed after delivery and before surgical correction and confirmed the finding. Furthermore, we revisited the literature using online MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The literature reported only a few cases of prenatal diagnosis of early onset mid-ureteral stricture. Conclusion Mid-ureteral stricture is a rare cause of prenatal hydronephrosis. The diagnosis should not be delayed in order to apply the appropriate surgical approach. As a result, we showed the usefulness of fetal MRI and postnatal Magnetic Resonance pyelography, in the event that radionuclide renography with Tc-MAG3 was less informative, to allow the detection of the site of ureteral narrowing. Intrasurgical retrograde ureteropyelography confirmed these findings. PMID:17559650

  7. Evaporative moisture loss from heterogeneous stone: Material-environment interactions during drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Daniel; Warke, Patricia; McCabe, Stephen; Gomez-Heras, M.

    2016-11-01

    The complexities of evaporation from structurally and mineralogically heterogeneous sandstone (Locharbriggs Sandstone) are investigated through a laboratory-based experiment in which a variety of environmental conditions are simulated. Data reported demonstrate the significance of material-environment interactions on the spatial and temporal variability of evaporative dynamics. Evaporation from porous stone is determined by the interplay between environmental, material and solution properties, which govern the rate and mode by which water is transmitted to, and subsequently removed from, an evaporating surface. Initially, when the stone is saturated, evaporation is characterized by high rates of moisture loss primarily controlled by external atmospheric conditions. However, as drying progresses, eventually the hydraulic continuity between the stone surface and subsurface is disrupted with recession of the drying front and a decrease in evaporation rates which become reliant on the ability of the material to transport water vapour to the block surface. Pore size distribution and connectivity, as well as other material properties, control the timing of each stage of evaporation and the nature of the transition. These experimental data highlight the complexity of evaporation, demonstrating that different regions of the same stone can exhibit varying moisture dynamics during drying and that the rate and nature of evaporative loss differs under different environmental conditions. The results identify the importance of material-environment interactions during drying and that stone micro-environmental conditions cannot be inferred from ambient data alone. These data have significance for understanding the spatial distribution of stone surface weathering-related morphologies in both the natural and built environments where mineralogical and/or structural heterogeneity creates differences in moisture flux and hence variable drying rates. Such differences may provide a

  8. Ureteroscopy for stone disease in the paediatric population: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Hiro; Griffin, Stephen; Somani, Bhaskar K

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present review was to look at the role of ureteroscopy (URS) for treatment of paediatric stone disease. We conducted a systematic review using studies identified by a literature search between January 1990 and May 2013. All English-language articles reporting on a minimum of 50 patients aged ≤ 18 years treated with URS for stone disease were included. Two reviewers independently extracted the data from each study. A total of 14 studies (1718 procedures) were reported in patients with a mean (range) age of 7.8 (0.25-18.0) years. The mean (range) stone burden was 9.8 (1-30) mm and the mean (range) stone-free rate (SFR) 87.5 (58-100)% with initial therapeutic URS. The majority of these stones were in the ureter (n = 1427, 83.4%). There were 180 (10.5%) Clavien I-III complications and 38 cases (2.2%) where there was a failure to complete the initial ureteroscopic procedure and an alternative procedure was performed. To assess the impact of age on failure rate and complications, studies were subcategorized into those that included children with either a mean age <6 years (four studies, 341 procedures) or a mean age >6 years. (10 studies, 1377 procedures). A higher failure rate (4.4 vs 1.7%) and a higher complication rate (24.0 vs 7.1%) were observed in children whose mean age was <6 years. URS for paediatric stone disease is a relatively safe procedure with a reasonably good SFR, but there seems to be a higher failure and complication rate in children aged <6 years.

  9. Terahertz lens made out of natural stone.

    PubMed

    Han, Daehoon; Lee, Kanghee; Lim, Jongseok; Hong, Sei Sun; Kim, Young Kie; Ahn, Jaewook

    2013-12-20

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy probes the optical properties of naturally occurring solid aggregates of minerals, or stones, in the THz frequency range. Refractive index and extinction coefficient measurement reveals that most natural stones, including mudstone, sandstone, granite, tuff, gneiss, diorite, slate, marble, and dolomite, are fairly transparent for THz frequency waves. Dolomite in particular exhibits a nearly uniform refractive index of 2.7 over the broad frequency range from 0.1 to 1 THz. The high index of refraction allows flexibility in lens designing with a shorter accessible focal length or a thinner lens with a given focal length. Good agreement between the experiment and calculation for the THz beam profile confirms that dolomite has high homogeneity as a lens material, suggesting the possibility of using natural stones for THz optical elements. PMID:24513932

  10. Trace element relations to renal stones phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluszkiewicz, C.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Gazilka, M.

    1990-04-01

    The renal stones formation is still not well known and seems to be a very complex phenomenon. Therefore, the renal stones were analyzed by the Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy as well as by the Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) method. Using FTIR the samples were grouped into 5 types: phosphates, mixture of phosphates and oxalates, oxalates, mixture of oxalates and uric acid, and uric acid. PIXE was used to determine Trace Element (TE) contents. The combination of the two analysis methods enables us to find some TE relations to different renal stones phases. In general it appeared that TE contents in mixed structures are always between values of the respective pure phases. It was also found that some of the toxic elements are related to the structures but not necessarily to environmental influences as in the case of lead. All data were statistically analyzed and the correalations of the elements are presented.

  11. Laser ablation of gall bladder stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafi, M.; Makdisi, Y.; Bhatia, K. S.; Abdulah, A. H.; Kokaj, Y.; Mathew, K.; Quinn, F.; Qabazard, A.

    1999-06-01

    Study of laser interaction with calculi is presented. A system of Nd-Yag and Ho-Yag pulsed lasers were used to produce fluorescence and plasma signals at the stone surface surrounded by saline and bile fluids. Fourth harmonic from Nd-Yag laser was transmitted to the samples by graded UV optical fibres. Gall bladder stones of various compositions were subjected to the high power Ho-Yag laser. Temporal transients and spectral evolution of plasma and fluorescence signals were monitored by a streak camera. A profile of acoustic pressures generated by shock waves was recorded with sensitive hydrophones placed in the surrounding fluids. Ablation threshold, cavitation process and fluorescence dependence on the laser parameters were studied in detail. Potential of stone identification by fluorescence and possible hydrodynamic model for ablation of biological samples is discussed.

  12. Terahertz lens made out of natural stone.

    PubMed

    Han, Daehoon; Lee, Kanghee; Lim, Jongseok; Hong, Sei Sun; Kim, Young Kie; Ahn, Jaewook

    2013-12-20

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy probes the optical properties of naturally occurring solid aggregates of minerals, or stones, in the THz frequency range. Refractive index and extinction coefficient measurement reveals that most natural stones, including mudstone, sandstone, granite, tuff, gneiss, diorite, slate, marble, and dolomite, are fairly transparent for THz frequency waves. Dolomite in particular exhibits a nearly uniform refractive index of 2.7 over the broad frequency range from 0.1 to 1 THz. The high index of refraction allows flexibility in lens designing with a shorter accessible focal length or a thinner lens with a given focal length. Good agreement between the experiment and calculation for the THz beam profile confirms that dolomite has high homogeneity as a lens material, suggesting the possibility of using natural stones for THz optical elements.

  13. Sequencing of proteins extracted from stones.

    PubMed

    Binette, J P; Binette, M B

    1994-01-01

    Proteins from urinary tract and gallbladder stones were extracted and characterized to determine the composition of the matrix and possibly unravel the role of the organic phase in stone formation. Proteins from crushed stones were extracted by electrodialysis and concentrated in the Amicon centricon cartridge or by lyophilization after dialysis against distilled water. Aliquots were first analyzed by isoelectric focusing in gel and if suitable subjected to two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis. The most promising spots were harvested and the N-terminal amino acids sequenced, thus providing maximum information with minimum expenditure of material. The 2D separations and amino acid sequences of several protein extracts demonstrated similarities and differences in composition and achieved the identification or demonstration of previously and recently detected polypeptides.

  14. Technetium Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Asmussen, Robert M.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2015-10-15

    The cementitious material known as Cast Stone has been selected as the preferred waste form for solidification of aqueous secondary liquid effluents from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process condensates and low-activity waste (LAW) melter off-gas caustic scrubber effluents. Cast Stone is also being evaluated as a supplemental immobilization technology to provide the necessary LAW treatment capacity to complete the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost effective manner. Two radionuclides of particular concern in these waste streams are technetium-99 (99Tc) and iodine-129 (129I). These radioactive tank waste components contribute the most to the environmental impacts associated with the cleanup of the Hanford site. A recent environmental assessment of Cast Stone performance, which assumes a diffusion controlled release of contaminants from the waste form, calculates groundwater in excess of the allowable maximum permissible concentrations for both contaminants. There is, therefore, a need and an opportunity to improve the retention of both 99Tc and 129I in Cast Stone. One method to improve the performance of Cast Stone is through the addition of “getters” that selectively sequester Tc and I, therefore reducing their diffusion out of Cast Stone. In this paper, we present results of Tc and I removal from solution with various getters with batch sorption experiments conducted in deionized water (DIW) and a highly caustic 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. In general, the data show that the selected getters are effective in DIW but their performance is comprised when experiments are performed with the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant. Reasons for the mitigated performance in the LAW simulant may be due to competition with Cr present in the 7.8 M Na Ave LAW simulant and to a pH effect.

  15. [Minimally-invasive therapy of urinary stones].

    PubMed

    Knoll, T; Trojan, L; Haecker, A; Michel, M S; Köhrmann, K U; Alken, P

    2003-09-01

    Open surgery was the standard therapy for urinary calculi up to about 30 years ago. This changed upon introduction of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) in 1980, a procedure that is now the primary therapy for 70 % of the patients in western countries. Simultaneously, endourological procedures like ureterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL) have been improved, and now, modern small diameter and highly efficient instruments offer an ideal alternative to shockwave lithotripsy. Today, minimally-invasive stone treatment has replaced open stone surgery almost completely. This article introduces ESWL, URS and PCNL and discusses indications, outcomes and limitations.

  16. Management of Asymptomatic Renal Stones in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes, David; Locke, James

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Management guidelines were created to screen and manage asymptomatic renal stones in U.S. astronauts. The risks for renal stone formation in astronauts due to bone loss and hypercalcuria are unknown. Astronauts have a stone risk which is about the same as commercial aviation pilots, which is about half that of the general population. However, proper management of this condition is still crucial to mitigate health and mission risks in the spaceflight environment. Methods: An extensive review of the literature and current aeromedical standards for the monitoring and management of renal stones was done. The NASA Flight Medicine Clinic's electronic medical record and Longitudinal Survey of Astronaut Health were also reviewed. Using this work, a screening and management algorithm was created that takes into consideration the unique operational environment of spaceflight. Results: Renal stone screening and management guidelines for astronauts were created based on accepted standards of care, with consideration to the environment of spaceflight. In the proposed algorithm, all astronauts will receive a yearly screening ultrasound for renal calcifications, or mineralized renal material (MRM). Any areas of MRM, 3 millimeters or larger, are considered a positive finding. Three millimeters approaches the detection limit of standard ultrasound, and several studies have shown that any stone that is 3 millimeters or less has an approximately 95 percent chance of spontaneous passage. For mission-assigned astronauts, any positive ultrasound study is followed by low-dose renal computed tomography (CT) scan, and flexible ureteroscopy if CT is positive. Other specific guidelines were also created. Discussion: The term "MRM" is used to account for small areas of calcification that may be outside the renal collecting system, and allows objectivity without otherwise constraining the diagnostic and treatment process for potentially very small calcifications of uncertain

  17. Building stones of our Nation's Capital

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Withington, Charles F.

    1975-01-01

    The buildings of our Nation's Capital serve as an unusual geologic display, for the city has been constructed with rocks from quarries throughout the United States and many distant lands. Each building is a unique museum that not only displays the important features of various stones and the geologic environment in which they were formed, but also serves as an historic witness to the city's growth and to the development of its architecture. This booklet describes the source and appearance of the stones used in Washington, D.C.; it includes a map and a walking guide to assist the visitor in examining them.

  18. Endotherapy for chronic pancreatitis with intracanalar stones.

    PubMed

    Maydeo, A; Soehendra, N; Reddy, N; Bhandari, S

    2007-07-01

    Endotherapy for pancreatic stone is an emerging specialty. The judicious application of extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in selected groups of patients has increased the success rates of endotherapy, with excellent long-term results. In this review the authors share their vast experience of treating patients with pancreatic stones. The article will focus on the basic principles of pancreatic endotherapy, the instrumentation required, details of the ESWL technique and its applications, as well as the limitations, success rate, and complications of endotherapy in selected patients.

  19. 2. STONE ARCH BRIDGE. TIMBERS ON THE UPSTREAM FACE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. STONE ARCH BRIDGE. TIMBERS ON THE UPSTREAM FACE OF THE PIER PROTECTED THE STONEWORK FROM DAMAGE FROM ICE FLOWS, BARGES, ETC. - Lockport Historic District, Stone Arch Bridge, Spanning Des Plaines River at Ninth Street, Lockport, Will County, IL

  20. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for kidney stone on surgical clip.

    PubMed

    Clark, J Y; Kearse, W S

    1997-04-01

    We report the successful use of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for the destruction of a renal stone that had formed around a surgical clip. The SWL led to passage of both the stone and the clip.