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Sample records for vaccines biological products

  1. 76 FR 13646 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. In...

  2. 76 FR 52668 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... Administration (FDA) is announcing an amendment to the notice of meeting of the Vaccines and Related Biological... announced that a meeting of the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee would be held...

  3. 77 FR 3780 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological..., Parasitic and Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics...

  4. 75 FR 47605 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological..., Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. FDA intends...

  5. 78 FR 20663 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... DNA Viruses, Division of Viral Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for...

  6. 76 FR 3639 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2011-2012 influenza season....

  7. 76 FR 44016 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological..., Division of Bacterial, Parasitic and Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review,...

  8. 78 FR 5465 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2013- 2014 influenza season. FDA intends...

  9. 75 FR 2876 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2010 - 2011 influenza season....

  10. 77 FR 42319 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... lines derived from human tumors for vaccine manufacture. FDA intends to make background...

  11. 76 FR 55397 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... the Laboratory of Method Development, Division of Viral Products, Office of Vaccines Research...

  12. 75 FR 17929 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... circovirus type 1 (PCV 1) in Rotarix, a U.S. licensed vaccine manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline and...

  13. 77 FR 63839 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... immunogenicity of an Influenza A (H5N1) Virus Monovalent Vaccine manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. On November...

  14. 75 FR 59729 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... for protective antigen-based anthrax vaccines for a post-exposure prophylaxis indication using...

  15. 78 FR 60884 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... portion of the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological... of Retroviruses and Laboratory of Immunoregulation, Division of Viral Products, Office of...

  16. 76 FR 79203 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Veterinary Biological Products for Swine Influenza Vaccines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... Biological Products for Swine Influenza Vaccines AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service... methods of use as Veterinary Influenza Vaccines. Sustained outbreaks of highly pathogenic influenza in animals increase the risk of reassortment and adaption to humans. This technology describes DNA...

  17. In situ pneumococcal vaccine production and delivery through a hybrid biological-biomaterial vector

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Beitelshees, Marie; Fang, Lei; Hill, Andrew; Ahmadi, Mahmoud Kamal; Chen, Mingfu; Davidson, Bruce A.; Knight, Paul; Smith, Randall J.; Andreadis, Stelios T.; Hakansson, Anders P.; Jones, Charles H.; Pfeifer, Blaine A.

    2016-01-01

    The type and potency of an immune response provoked during vaccination will determine ultimate success in disease prevention. The basis for this response will be the design and implementation of antigen presentation to the immune system. Whereas direct antigen administration will elicit some form of immunological response, a more sophisticated approach would couple the antigen of interest to a vector capable of broad delivery formats and designed for heightened response. New antigens associated with pneumococcal disease virulence were used to test the delivery and adjuvant capabilities of a hybrid biological-biomaterial vector consisting of a bacterial core electrostatically coated with a cationic polymer. The hybrid design provides (i) passive and active targeting of antigen-presenting cells, (ii) natural and multicomponent adjuvant properties, (iii) dual intracellular delivery mechanisms, and (iv) a simple formulation mechanism. In addition, the hybrid format enables device-specific, or in situ, antigen production and consolidation via localization within the bacterial component of the vector. This capability eliminates the need for dedicated antigen production and purification before vaccination efforts while leveraging the aforementioned features of the overall delivery device. We present the first disease-specific utilization of the vector toward pneumococcal disease highlighted by improved immune responses and protective capabilities when tested against traditional vaccine formulations and a range of clinically relevant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains. More broadly, the results point to similar levels of success with other diseases that would benefit from the production, delivery, and efficacy capabilities offered by the hybrid vector. PMID:27419235

  18. Vaccines and biologics.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Isabel; Isenberg, David

    2014-08-01

    Patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases are more susceptible to infectious complications during the course of their disease. The introduction of biologics has been a major achievement in treating these diseases, but an increased risk of infection associated with these therapies has become evident. Some infections can be prevented by vaccination and it is clearly worthwhile considering which immunisations would be sensible and practicable for these patients. To date no formal specific recommendations for patients on biologics have been published. A search was made of Medline (via PubMed) from 1970 to January 2014 to provide results. This review aims to provide a systematic analysis of the data about vaccines and biologics and considers recommendations for vaccination in adult patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases treated with biologics.

  19. Rabies vaccine. Developments employing molecular biology methods.

    PubMed

    Paolazzi, C C; Pérez, O; De Filippo, J

    1999-04-01

    Rabies vaccines produced by means of molecular biology are described. Recombinant vaccines employing either viruses as vectors (vaccinia, adenovirus, poxvirus, baculovirus, plant viruses) or a plasmid vector carrying the rabies virus glycoprotein gene are discussed. Synthetic peptide technology directed to rabies vaccine production is also presented.

  20. Evaluation of growth based rapid microbiological methods for sterility testing of vaccines and other biological products.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Seema; Kaur, Simleen; David, Selwyn A Wilson; Kenney, James L; McCormick, William M; Gupta, Rajesh K

    2011-10-19

    Most biological products, including vaccines, administered by the parenteral route are required to be tested for sterility at the final container and also at various stages during manufacture. The sterility testing method described in the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR 610.12) and the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP, Chapter <71>) is based on the observation of turbidity in liquid culture media due to growth of potential contaminants. We evaluated rapid microbiological methods (RMM) based on detection of growth 1) by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence technology (Rapid Milliflex(®) Detection System [RMDS]), and 2) by CO(2) monitoring technologies (BacT/Alert and the BACTEC systems), as alternate sterility methods. Microorganisms representing Gram negative, Gram positive, aerobic, anaerobic, spore forming, slow growing bacteria, yeast, and fungi were prepared in aliquots of Fluid A or a biological matrix (including inactivated influenza vaccines) to contain approximately 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 colony forming units (CFU) in an inoculum of 10 ml. These preparations were inoculated to the specific media required for the various methods: 1) fluid thioglycollate medium (FTM) and tryptic soy broth (TSB) of the compendial sterility method (both membrane filtration and direct inoculation); 2) tryptic soy agar (TSA), Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) and Schaedler blood agar (SBA) of the RMDS; 3) iAST and iNST media of the BacT/Alert system and 4) Standard 10 Aerobic/F and Standard Anaerobic/F media of the BACTEC system. RMDS was significantly more sensitive in detecting various microorganisms at 0.1CFU than the compendial methods (p<0.05), whereas the compendial membrane filtration method was significantly more sensitive than the BACTEC and BacT/Alert methods (p<0.05). RMDS detected all microorganisms significantly faster than the compendial method (p<0.05). BacT/Alert and BACTEC methods detected most microorganisms significantly faster than the compendial method

  1. A PCR detection method for testing Mycoplasma contamination of veterinary vaccines and biological products.

    PubMed

    Ingebritson, A L; Gibbs, C P; Tong, C; Srinivas, G B

    2015-02-01

    A rapid test method was developed for detecting mycoplasma contamination in veterinary biological products. The method reduces testing time by 2 weeks and shows comparable sensitivity to the current agar-based detection model. The primary goals for the development of the test were to reduce the testing time, incorporate a method that was easily adaptable across the veterinary biologics industry and reduce the subjective interpretation of results. We found that biological enrichment is necessary to maintain sensitivity of the detection method when compared to the standard culture-based test and that periodic sampling of enrichment cultures is essential to detect a wide variety of mycoplasma species that may be present as contaminants. The PCR detection method is comparable to the agar-based model and can reduce the overall testing time by up to 14 days.

  2. Production of viral vaccines for veterinary use.

    PubMed

    van Gelder, Pieter; Makoschey, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    This review provides inside information on the production of vaccines for veterinary use. The vaccines against rinderpest as well as foot and mouth disease are considered milestones in the history of veterinary vaccine production. Modern vaccines are based on the scientific progress in virology, cell biology and immunology. While naturally occurring attenuated viruses or viruses obtained after passage in different animal species or cell culture were used as vaccine strains in the early vaccines, nowadays targeted mutagenesis can be applied to generate vaccine virus strains. In principle, the antigen production process is the same for live and inactivated vaccines. The vaccine virus is usually grown in cell culture, either in roller bottles or bioreactors. Most live vaccines are freeze-dried in order to enable storage in the refridgerator for a longer period. To this end, a so-called stabilizer is added to the culture medium. The inactivation of the vaccine virus for the production of killed vaccines is done by physical or chemical treatments that lead to denaturation of the proteins or damage of the nucleic acids. The inactivated antigen may be further purified and mixed with an adjuvant. The quality standards for vaccines are layed down in international regulations and laws. Numerous tests are performed during the different production steps and on the final product in order to warrant the quality of each batch.

  3. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  4. Assessment of the impact of manufacturing changes on the physicochemical properties and biological activity of Her1-ECD vaccine during product development.

    PubMed

    Garcia Duardo, Katia; Prieto Curbelo, Yadira; Raymond Pous, Judith; Rabasa Legón, Estela Yamilet; Ramírez, Belinda Sánchez; Hernández, Kathya Rashida de la Luz; Castillo Vitoch, Adolfo

    2015-08-20

    Vaccine preparations based on the extracellular domain of Her1 (Her1-ECD) have demonstrated, in vitro and in vivo, a potent antimetastatic effect on EGFR(+) Lewis lung carcinoma model, while associated side effects were absent. The Her1-ECD is a glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 105 kDa and has 11 potential sites for N-glycosylation. Currently Her1-ECD based vaccine has been evaluated in patients with hormone refractory prostate cancer. Her1-ECD molecule used for in clinical trials was obtained from culture supernatant of HEK 293 transfectomes used the protein free culture media and is purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. In order to increase the cell growth and productivity, new defined culture media have been developed (alternative culture media) in Her1-ECD vaccine production process. In this work, a comparability study was performed to evaluate the impact of process changes in the characteristics physic-chemical and biologicals of the Her1-ECD protein and the degree of similitude between both variants. Techniques such as: SDS-PAGE, SEC-HPLC, isoelectric point, peptide mapping, mass spectrometric, SCX-HPLC, oligosaccharide map, ELISA and flow cytometric were used with this aim. Results indicated that this process change decreases the degree of sialylation of the protein but does not affect its biological activity (measured as titers of Abs and recognition for A431 cell line).

  5. Plant production systems for vaccines.

    PubMed

    Streatfield, Stephen J; Howard, John A

    2003-12-01

    Plants offer an attractive alternative for the production and delivery of subunit vaccines. Various antigens have been expressed at sufficiently high levels in plants to render vaccine development practical. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that these plant-produced antigens can induce immunogenic responses and confer protection when delivered orally. Plant-based vaccines are relatively inexpensive to produce and production can be rapidly scaled up. There is also the potential for oral delivery of these vaccines, which can dramatically reduce distribution and delivery costs. Here we describe the technology to develop plant-based vaccines, review their advantages and discuss potential roadblocks and concerns over their commercialization. We also speculate on likely future developments with these vaccines and on their potential impact in the realms of human and animal health.

  6. Vaccines against biologic agents: uses and developments.

    PubMed

    Ales, Noel C; Katial, Rohit K

    2004-03-01

    Although the Geneva protocol that prohibits the use of chemical and biologic weapons was ratified in 1925, many countries failed to accept this protocol: others stipulated retaliation, and some, like the United States, did not ratify the protocol for decades. This delay allowed the continued development of chemical and biologic agents. Members of the health care community are responsible for determining the best way to protect society from the potentially devastating effects of these biologic agents. Ideally,these diseases would be prevented from ever developing into systemic illnesses. In the past, vaccination has been a successful means of eradicating disease. Vaccines remain a hopeful therapy for the future, but time is short,and there are many obstacles.Information regarding bioterrorism agents and their treatments comes mainly from dated data or from in vitro or animal studies that may not apply to human treatment and disease. Additionally, the current threat of bioterrorism does not allow enough time for accurate, well-designed,controlled studies in humans before the release of investigational vaccines. Furthermore, some human studies would not be safe or ethical. Finally,many members of society suffer from illnesses that would put them at high risk to receive prophylactic vaccination. It is therefore naive to believe that vaccines would be the ultimate protection from these agents. In addition to vaccine development, there must be concurrent investigations into disease management and treatment. Even in instances in which vaccination is known to be an effective means of disease protection. biologic agents may be presented in a manner that renders vaccines ineffective. Virulent strains of organisms may be used, more than one organism may be used in tandem to increase virulence, and strains may be selected for antibiotic and vaccine resistance. Genetically engineered strains may use virulence factors other than those targeted in vaccines, and high

  7. Evaluation of some selected vaccines and other biological products irradiated by gamma rays, electron beams and X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J. C.; Rey, L.; Lee, Chi-Jen

    2002-03-01

    Molecular sizing potency results are presented for irradiated samples of one lot of Haemophilus b conjugate vaccine, pneumococcal polysaccharide type 6B and typhoid vi polysaccharide vaccine. The samples were irradiated (25 kGy) by gamma rays, electron beams and X-rays. IgG and IgM antibody response in mice test results (ELISA) are given for the Hib conjugate vaccine irradiated at 0°C or frozen in liquid nitrogen.

  8. Biological challenges to effective vaccines in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Grassly, Nicholas C; Kang, Gagandeep; Kampmann, Beate

    2015-06-19

    The reason for holding a meeting to discuss biological challenges to vaccines is simple: not all vaccines work equally well in all settings. This special issue reviews the performance of vaccines in challenging environments, summarizes current thinking on the reasons why vaccines underperform and considers what approaches are necessary to understand the heterogeneity in responses and to improve vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy.

  9. Immunogenomics and systems biology of vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Buonaguro, Luigi; Pulendran, Bali

    2011-01-01

    Summary Vaccines represent a potent tool to prevent or contain infectious diseases with high morbidity or mortality. However, despite their widespread use, we still have a limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying the effective elicitation of protective immune responses by vaccines. Recent research suggests that this represents the cooperative action of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Immunity is made of a multifaceted set of integrated responses involving a dynamic interaction of thousands of molecules, whose list is constantly updated to fill the several empty spaces of this puzzle. The recent development of new technologies and computational tools permits the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of the interactions between all of the components of immunity over time. Here, we review the role of the innate immunity in the host response to vaccine antigens and the potential of systems biology in providing relevant and novel insights in the mechanisms of action of vaccines to improve their design and effectiveness. PMID:21198673

  10. Chinese vaccine products go global: vaccine development and quality control.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miao; Liang, Zhenglun; Xu, Yinghua; Wang, Junzhi

    2015-05-01

    Through the continuous efforts of several generations, China has become one of the few countries in the world that is capable of independently addressing all the requirements by the Expanded Program on Immunization. Regulatory science is applied to continuously improve the vaccine regulatory system. Passing the prequalification by WHO has allowed Chinese vaccine products to go global. Chinese vaccine products not only secure disease prevention and control domestically but also serve the needs for international public health. This article describes the history of Chinese vaccine development, the current situation of Chinese vaccine industry and its contribution to the prevention and control of infectious diseases. We also share our experience of national quality control and vaccine regulation during the past decades. China's experience in vaccine development and quality control can benefit other countries and regions worldwide, including the developing countries.

  11. Vaccines Directed Against Microorganisms or Their Products Present During Biofilm Lifestyle: Can We Make a Translation as a Broad Biological Model to Tuberculosis?

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Valdez, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains as a global public health problem. In recent years, experimental evidence suggesting the relevance of in vitro pellicle (a type of biofilm formed at the air-liquid interface) production as a phenotype mimicking aspects found by Mycobacterium tuberculosis-complex bacteria during in vivo infection has started to accumulate. There are still opportunities for better diagnostic tools, therapeutic molecules as well as new vaccine candidates to assist in TB control programs worldwide and particularly in less developed nations. Regarding vaccines, despite the availability of a live, attenuated strain (Mycobacterium bovis BCG) since almost a century ago, its variable efficacy and lack of protection against pulmonary and latent disease has prompted basic and applied research leading to preclinical and clinical evaluation of up to 15 new candidates. In this work, I present examples of vaccines based on whole cells grown as biofilms, or specific proteins expressed under such condition, and the effect they have shown in relevant animal models or directly in the natural host. I also discuss why it might be worthwhile to explore these approaches, for constructing and developing new vaccine candidates for testing their efficacy against TB. PMID:26834732

  12. Vaccines Directed Against Microorganisms or Their Products Present During Biofilm Lifestyle: Can We Make a Translation as a Broad Biological Model to Tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Flores-Valdez, Mario A

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains as a global public health problem. In recent years, experimental evidence suggesting the relevance of in vitro pellicle (a type of biofilm formed at the air-liquid interface) production as a phenotype mimicking aspects found by Mycobacterium tuberculosis-complex bacteria during in vivo infection has started to accumulate. There are still opportunities for better diagnostic tools, therapeutic molecules as well as new vaccine candidates to assist in TB control programs worldwide and particularly in less developed nations. Regarding vaccines, despite the availability of a live, attenuated strain (Mycobacterium bovis BCG) since almost a century ago, its variable efficacy and lack of protection against pulmonary and latent disease has prompted basic and applied research leading to preclinical and clinical evaluation of up to 15 new candidates. In this work, I present examples of vaccines based on whole cells grown as biofilms, or specific proteins expressed under such condition, and the effect they have shown in relevant animal models or directly in the natural host. I also discuss why it might be worthwhile to explore these approaches, for constructing and developing new vaccine candidates for testing their efficacy against TB.

  13. Vaccine production, distribution, access, and uptake.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jon; Lipsitch, Marc; Almond, Jeffrey W

    2011-07-30

    For human vaccines to be available on a global scale, complex production methods, meticulous quality control, and reliable distribution channels are needed to ensure that the products are potent and effective at the point of use. The technologies used to manufacture different types of vaccines can strongly affect vaccine cost, ease of industrial scale-up, stability, and, ultimately, worldwide availability. The complexity of manufacturing is compounded by the need for different formulations in different countries and age-groups. Reliable vaccine production in appropriate quantities and at affordable prices is the cornerstone of developing global vaccination policies. However, to ensure optimum access and uptake, strong partnerships are needed between private manufacturers, regulatory authorities, and national and international public health services. For vaccines whose supply is insufficient to meet demand, prioritisation of target groups can increase the effect of these vaccines. In this report, we draw from our experience of vaccine development and focus on influenza vaccines as an example to consider production, distribution, access, and other factors that affect vaccine uptake and population-level effectiveness.

  14. Vaccine production, distribution, access and uptake

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jon; Lipsitch, Marc; Almond, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Making human vaccines available on a global scale requires the use of complex production methods, meticulous quality control and reliable distribution channels that ensure the products are potent and effective at their point of use. The technologies involved in manufacturing different types of vaccines may strongly influence vaccine cost, ease of industrial scale-up, stability and ultimately world-wide availability. Manufacturing complexity is compounded by the need for different formulations for different countries and age groups. Reliable vaccine production in appropriate quantities and at affordable prices is the cornerstone of developing global vaccination policies. However, ensuring optimal access and uptake also requires strong partnerships between private manufacturers, regulatory authorities and national and international public health services. For vaccines whose supplies are limited, either due to rapidly emerging diseases or longer-term mismatch of supply and demand, prioritizing target groups can increase vaccine impact. Focusing on influenza vaccines as an example that well illustrates many of the relevant points, this article considers current production, distribution, access and other factors that ultimately impact on vaccine uptake and population-level effectiveness. PMID:21664680

  15. Synthetic biology devices and circuits for RNA-based 'smart vaccines': a propositional review.

    PubMed

    Andries, Oliwia; Kitada, Tasuku; Bodner, Katie; Sanders, Niek N; Weiss, Ron

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acid vaccines have been gaining attention as an alternative to the standard attenuated pathogen or protein based vaccine. However, an unrealized advantage of using such DNA or RNA based vaccination modalities is the ability to program within these nucleic acids regulatory devices that would provide an immunologist with the power to control the production of antigens and adjuvants in a desirable manner by administering small molecule drugs as chemical triggers. Advances in synthetic biology have resulted in the creation of highly predictable and modular genetic parts and devices that can be composed into synthetic gene circuits with complex behaviors. With the recent advent of modified RNA gene delivery methods and developments in the RNA replicon platform, we foresee a future in which mammalian synthetic biologists will create genetic circuits encoded exclusively on RNA. Here, we review the current repertoire of devices used in RNA synthetic biology and propose how programmable 'smart vaccines' will revolutionize the field of RNA vaccination.

  16. Biological hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  17. Workshop report: Schistosomiasis vaccine clinical development and product characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mo, Annie X; Colley, Daniel G

    2016-02-17

    A schistosomiasis vaccine meeting was organized to evaluate the utility of a vaccine in public health programs, to discuss clinical development paths, and to define basic product characteristics for desirable vaccines to be used in the context of schistosomiasis control and elimination programs. It was concluded that clinical evaluation of a schistosomiasis vaccine is feasible with appropriate trial design and tools. Some basic Preferred Product Characteristics (PPC) for a human schistosomiasis vaccine and for a veterinary vaccine for bovine use were also proposed.

  18. Plastids: The Green Frontiers for Vaccine Production

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Mohammad T.; Ismail, Hammad; Gottschamel, Johanna; Mirza, Bushra; Lössl, Andreas G.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases pose an increasing risk to health, especially in developing countries. Vaccines are available to either cure or prevent many of these diseases. However, there are certain limitations related to these vaccines, mainly the costs, which make these vaccines mostly unaffordable for people in resource poor countries. These costs are mainly related to production and purification of the products manufactured from fermenter-based systems. Plastid biotechnology has become an attractive platform to produce biopharmaceuticals in large amounts and cost-effectively. This is mainly due to high copy number of plastids DNA in mature chloroplasts, a characteristic particularly important for vaccine production in large amounts. An additional advantage lies in the maternal inheritance of plastids in most plant species, which addresses the regulatory concerns related to transgenic plants. These and many other aspects of plastids will be discussed in the present review, especially those that particularly make these green biofactories an attractive platform for vaccine production. A summary of recent vaccine antigens against different human diseases expressed in plastids will also be presented. PMID:26635832

  19. Adventitious agents and live viral vectored vaccines: Considerations for archiving samples of biological materials for retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Klug, Bettina; Robertson, James S; Condit, Richard C; Seligman, Stephen J; Laderoute, Marian P; Sheets, Rebecca; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Gurwith, Marc; Kochhar, Sonali; Chapman, Louisa; Carbery, Baevin; Mac, Lisa M; Chen, Robert T

    2016-12-12

    Vaccines are one of the most effective public health medicinal products with an excellent safety record. As vaccines are produced using biological materials, there is a need to safeguard against potential contamination with adventitious agents. Adventitious agents could be inadvertently introduced into a vaccine through starting materials used for production. Therefore, extensive testing has been recommended at specific stages of vaccine manufacture to demonstrate the absence of adventitious agents. Additionally, the incorporation of viral clearance steps in the manufacturing process can aid in reducing the risk of adventitious agent contamination. However, for live viral vaccines, aside from possible purification of the virus or vector, extensive adventitious agent clearance may not be feasible. In the event that an adventitious agent is detected in a vaccine, it is important to determine its origin, evaluate its potential for human infection and pathology, and discern which batches of vaccine may have been affected in order to take risk mitigation action. To achieve this, it is necessary to have archived samples of the vaccine and ancillary components, ideally from developmental through to current batches, as well as samples of the biological materials used in the manufacture of the vaccine, since these are the most likely sources of an adventitious agent. The need for formal guidance on such vaccine sample archiving has been recognized but not fulfilled. We summarize in this paper several prior major cases of vaccine contamination with adventitious agents and provide points for consideration on sample archiving of live recombinant viral vector vaccines for use in humans.

  20. Systems Biology of Seasonal Influenza Vaccination in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Helder I; Wrammert, Jens; Lee, Eva K; Racioppi, Luigi; Marie-Kunze, Stephanie; Haining, W. Nicholas; Means, Anthony R; Kasturi, Sudhir P; Khan, Nooruddin; Li, Gui-Mei; McCausland, Megan; Kanchan, Vibhu; Kokko, Kenneth E; Li, Shuzhao; Elbein, Rivka; Mehta, Aneesh K; Aderem, Alan; Subbarao, Kanta; Ahmed, Rafi; Pulendran, Bali

    2011-01-01

    We used a systems biological approach to study innate and adaptive responses to influenza vaccination in humans, during 3 consecutive influenza seasons. Healthy adults were vaccinated with inactivated (TIV) or live attenuated (LAIV) influenza vaccines. TIV induced greater antibody titers and enhanced numbers of plasmablasts than LAIV. In TIV vaccinees, early molecular signatures correlated with, and accurately predicted, later antibody titers in two independent trials. Interestingly, the expression of Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CamkIV) at day 3 was inversely correlated with later antibody titers. Vaccination of CamkIV −/− mice with TIV induced enhanced antigen-specific antibody titers, demonstrating an unappreciated role for CaMKIV in the regulation of antibody responses. Thus systems approaches can predict immunogenicity, and reveal new mechanistic insights about vaccines. PMID:21743478

  1. Systems vaccinology: Enabling rational vaccine design with systems biological approaches.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Thomas; Nakaya, Helder I; Subramaniam, Shankar; Pulendran, Bali

    2015-09-29

    Vaccines have drastically reduced the mortality and morbidity of many diseases. However, vaccines have historically been developed empirically, and recent development of vaccines against current pandemics such as HIV and malaria has been met with difficulty. The advent of high-throughput technologies, coupled with systems biological methods of data analysis, has enabled researchers to interrogate the entire complement of a variety of molecular components within cells, and characterize the myriad interactions among them in order to model and understand the behavior of the system as a whole. In the context of vaccinology, these tools permit exploration of the molecular mechanisms by which vaccines induce protective immune responses. Here we review the recent advances, challenges, and potential of systems biological approaches in vaccinology. If the challenges facing this developing field can be overcome, systems vaccinology promises to empower the identification of early predictive signatures of vaccine response, as well as novel and robust correlates of protection from infection. Such discoveries, along with the improved understanding of immune responses to vaccination they impart, will play an instrumental role in development of the next generation of rationally designed vaccines.

  2. The search for a promising cell factory system for production of edible vaccine.

    PubMed

    Barzegari, Abolfazl; Saeedi, Nazli; Zarredar, Habib; Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2014-01-01

    Despite worldwide vaccination against devastating diseases for decades, millions of children in remote and impoverished regions of the globe die every year from vaccine-preventable infectious diseases. The reasons for incomplete coverage of vaccination programs are based in part on the relatively high costs of conventional vaccinations, including mass production, refrigeration, transportation, and training as well as funding personnel for their administration. Plant-based edible vaccines (PEVs) have been introduced as a revolutionary cost-effective vaccination modality. However, they suffer from major deficiencies that have restricted their application to bench-scale. This article discusses the deficiencies of PEVs and also provides concise overview on the health-promoting, biological and biotechnological features of spirulina (Arthrospira). In short, we envision that spirulina could be considered as a potential alternative biofactory system to the plants toward the production of edible vaccines in high-yield with low-costs that other hosts cannot yet offer.

  3. The search for a promising cell factory system for production of edible vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Barzegari, Abolfazl; Saeedi, Nazli; Zarredar, Habib; Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2014-01-01

    Despite worldwide vaccination against devastating diseases for decades, millions of children in remote and impoverished regions of the globe die every year from vaccine-preventable infectious diseases. The reasons for incomplete coverage of vaccination programs are based in part on the relatively high costs of conventional vaccinations, including mass production, refrigeration, transportation, and training as well as funding personnel for their administration. Plant-based edible vaccines (PEVs) have been introduced as a revolutionary cost-effective vaccination modality. However, they suffer from major deficiencies that have restricted their application to bench-scale. This article discusses the deficiencies of PEVs and also provides concise overview on the health-promoting, biological and biotechnological features of spirulina (Arthrospira). In short, we envision that spirulina could be considered as a potential alternative biofactory system to the plants toward the production of edible vaccines in high-yield with low-costs that other hosts cannot yet offer. PMID:25424962

  4. Now That You Want to Take Your HIV/AIDS Vaccine/Biological Product Research Concept into the Clinic: What are “cGMP”?

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Rebecca L.; Rangavajhula, Vijaya; Pullen, Jeffrey K.; Butler, Chris; Mehra, Vijay; Shapiro, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The Division of AIDS Vaccine Research Program funds the discovery and development of HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates. Basic researchers, having discovered a potential vaccine in the laboratory, next want to take that candidate into the clinic to test the concept in humans, to see if it translates. Many of them have heard of “cGMP” and know that they are supposed to make a “GMP product” to take into the clinic, but often they are not very familiar with what “cGMP” means and why these good practices are so important. As members of the Vaccine Translational Research Branch, we frequently get asked “can’t we use the material we made in the lab in the clinic?” or “aren’t Phase 1 studies exempt from cGMP?” Over the years, we have had many experiences where researchers or their selected contract manufacturing organizations have not applied an appropriate degree of compliance with cGMP suitable for the clinical phase of development. We share some of these experiences and the lessons learned, along with explaining the importance of cGMP, just what cGMP means, and what they can assure, in an effort to de-mystify this subject and facilitate the rapid and safe translational development of HIV vaccines. PMID:25698494

  5. Chemical biology approaches to designing defined carbohydrate vaccines.

    PubMed

    Anish, Chakkumkal; Schumann, Benjamin; Pereira, Claney Lebev; Seeberger, Peter H

    2014-01-16

    Carbohydrate antigens have shown promise as important targets for developing effective vaccines and pathogen detection strategies. Modifying purified microbial glycans through synthetic routes or completely synthesizing antigenic motifs are attractive options to advance carbohydrate vaccine development. However, limited knowledge on structure-property correlates hampers the discovery of immunoprotective carbohydrate epitopes. Recent advancements in tools for glycan modification, high-throughput screening of biological samples, and 3D structural analysis may facilitate antigen discovery process. This review focuses on advances that accelerate carbohydrate-based vaccine development and various technologies that are driving these efforts. Herein we provide a critical overview of approaches and resources available for rational design of better carbohydrate antigens. Structurally defined and fully synthetic oligosaccharides, designed based on molecular understanding of antigen-antibody interactions, offer a promising alternative for developing future carbohydrate vaccines.

  6. Biological Weapons and Bioterorism Threats: The Role of Vaccines in Protecting the Military and Civilian Sectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-16

    non- vaccinated individuals (n =754) • Zero cases of inhalation anthrax among vaccinated individuals (n = 379) 12 Concerns for Developing & Producing...Adverse Effects i Pot en ial • Hepatitis A virus • Meningococcal disease • Influenza vaccine • Measles • Mumps • Rubella Vaccine Use Risk...large population. 20 Concerns for Using Biological Defense VaccinesVaccine use: Routine use vs. stockpile – Limited shelf life for stockpile

  7. A clinical development paradigm for cancer vaccines and related biologics.

    PubMed

    Hoos, Axel; Parmiani, Giorgio; Hege, Kristen; Sznol, Mario; Loibner, Hans; Eggermont, Alexander; Urba, Walter; Blumenstein, Brent; Sacks, Natalie; Keilholz, Ulrich; Nichol, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines are a heterogeneous group of complex biologics with distinctly different clinical characteristics than cytotoxic agents. The current clinical development paradigm used for oncology drug development is based on criteria developed for cytotoxic agents. More flexible and focused developmental guidelines are needed to address the unique characteristics of therapeutic cancer vaccines. Over the course of 1 year, the Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group, representing academia and the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries with participation from the US Food and Drug Administration, defined in a consensus process the cornerstones of a new clinical development paradigm for cancer vaccines and related biologics. Four major topics were addressed: (1) end points for clinical trials, (2) trial designs and statistical methods, (3) technical and developmental challenges, and (4) combination therapy. The proposed paradigm suggests therapeutic cancer vaccines to be investigated in 2 general types of clinical studies: proof-of-principle trials and efficacy trials. Proof-of-principle trials, which introduce a novel cancer vaccine into humans, should include a minimum of 20 or more patients in a homogenous, well-defined population in an adjuvant setting or without rapidly progressive disease in a metastatic setting to allow vaccines adequate time to induce biologic activity and should incorporate immune and molecular markers. Objectives should include initiation of a safety database, determination of dose and schedule, and demonstration of biologic activity as proof-of-principle. Biologic activity is defined as any effect of the vaccine on the target disease or host immune system using biologic markers as study end points, for example, clinical, molecular, or immune response. Immune response is demonstrated if determined in 2 separate, established and reproducible assays at 2 consecutive follow-up time points after the baseline assessment. If

  8. 78 FR 65904 - Permanent Discontinuance or Interruption in Manufacturing of Certain Drug or Biological Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ...(D) Immune Globulin and Hepatitis B Immune Globulin; Coagulation Factor VIIa (Recombinant); and..., or mitigate shortages of these products. b. Vaccines. We are proposing to apply section 506C of the FD&C Act to all biological products, including vaccines. Under section 506C(i)(3)(B) of the FD&C...

  9. Considerations for sustainable influenza vaccine production in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Nannei, Claudia; Chadwick, Christopher; Fatima, Hiba; Goldin, Shoshanna; Grubo, Myriam; Ganim, Alexandra

    2016-10-26

    Through its Global Action Plan for Influenza Vaccines (GAP), the World Health Organization (WHO) in collaboration with the United States Department of Health and Human Services has produced a checklist to support policy-makers and influenza vaccine manufacturers in identifying key technological, political, financial, and logistical issues affecting the sustainability of influenza vaccine production. This checklist highlights actions in five key areas that are beneficial for establishing successful local vaccine manufacturing. These five areas comprise: (1) the policy environment and health-care systems; (2) surveillance systems and influenza evidence; (3) product development and manufacturing; (4) product approval and regulation; and (5) communication to support influenza vaccination. Incorporating the checklist into national vaccine production programmes has identified the policy gaps and next steps for countries involved in GAP's Technology Transfer Initiative. Lessons learnt from country experiences provide context and insight that complement the checklist's goal of simplifying the complexities of influenza prevention, preparedness, and vaccine manufacturing.

  10. Plankton Production Biology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    studied. The book by Sazhina provides illustrated keys for all stages of the nauplii ( copepod larvae) of 85 species common in the oceans and is the...has to take precedence. 6 3. Sazhina’s (1985) keys for copepod nauplii still are the only ones anywhere. They will permit the study of stage...specific population dynamics (growth rate, production, mortality) of copepod larvae in mixed populations. TRANSITIONS The world’s oceanographic

  11. [Optimization of the pertussis vaccine production process].

    PubMed

    Germán Santiago, J; Zamora, N; de la Rosa, E; Alba Carrión, C; Padrón, P; Hernández, M; Betancourt, M; Moretti, N

    1995-01-01

    The production of Pertussis Vaccine was reevaluated at the Instituto Nacional de Higiene "Rafael Rangel" in order to optimise it in terms of vaccine yield, potency, specific toxicity and efficiency (cost per doses). Four different processes, using two culture media (Cohen-Wheeler and Fermentación Glutamato Prolina-1) and two types of bioreactors (25 L Fermentador Caracas and a 450 L industrial fermentor) were compared. Runs were started from freeze-dried strains (134 or 509) and continued until the obtention of the maximal yield. It was found that the combination Fermentación Glutamato Prolina-1/industrial fermentor, shortened the process to 40 hours while consistently yielding a vaccine of higher potency (7.91 +/- 2.56 IU/human dose) and lower specific toxicity in a mice bioassay. In addition, the physical aspect of the preparation was rather homogeneous and free of dark aggregates. Most importantly, the biomass yield more than doubled those of the Fermentador Caracas using the two different media and that in the industrial fermentor with the Cohen-Wheeler medium. Therefore, the cost per doses was substantially decreased.

  12. Yellow fever vaccination centers: concurrent vaccinations and updates on mosquito biology.

    PubMed

    Arya, Subhash C; Agarwal, Nirmala

    2012-09-01

    Mandatory visits to immunization centers that offer pre-travel Yellow fever vaccine to prospective travelers would be useful for briefing the basics of the biology of the mosquito responsible for Yellow fever spread. Pre- travel knowledge on the day-time rather the nocturnal biting habit of the mosquitoes of Aedes species would prevent from bites of the mosquitoes responsible for the spread of viruses causing Yellow fever, dengue or Chikungunya infection.

  13. Avipoxviruses: infection biology and their use as vaccine vectors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Avipoxviruses (APVs) belong to the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of the Poxviridae family. APVs are distributed worldwide and cause disease in domestic, pet and wild birds of many species. APVs are transmitted by aerosols and biting insects, particularly mosquitoes and arthropods and are usually named after the bird species from which they were originally isolated. The virus species Fowlpox virus (FWPV) causes disease in poultry and associated mortality is usually low, but in flocks under stress (other diseases, high production) mortality can reach up to 50%. APVs are also major players in viral vaccine vector development for diseases in human and veterinary medicine. Abortive infection in mammalian cells (no production of progeny viruses) and their ability to accommodate multiple gene inserts are some of the characteristics that make APVs promising vaccine vectors. Although abortive infection in mammalian cells conceivably represents a major vaccine bio-safety advantage, molecular mechanisms restricting APVs to certain hosts are not yet fully understood. This review summarizes the current knowledge relating to APVs, including classification, morphogenesis, host-virus interactions, diagnostics and disease, and also highlights the use of APVs as recombinant vaccine vectors. PMID:21291547

  14. Model for product development of vaccines against neglected tropical diseases: a vaccine against human hookworm.

    PubMed

    Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Brown, Ami Shah

    2008-12-01

    This article provides an overview of the advances in product development and technology transfer of the vaccine against human hookworm, with particular emphasis on the lessons learned and the challenges of developing a vaccine in the nonprofit sector. The comprehensive approach to vaccine development established by the Human Hookworm Vaccine Initiative (HHVI) identifies key operational and technical aspects that are essential for a successful partnership with a developing country vaccine manufacturer. This article also highlights the importance of a global access roadmap to guide the vaccine development program. The advancement of new products for the control of neglected tropical diseases portends great challenges for global access, including aspects related to vaccine design, product development and manufacture, vaccine introduction and distribution, financing, knowledge dissemination and intellectual property management. With only three vaccines for neglected tropical diseases in clinical trials - hookworm, leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis - we are at the nascent stages of developing vaccines for neglected populations. Product development public-private partnerships, such as the HHVI, continue to show great promise on this front and will eventually provide significant control tools for achieving millennium development goals related to poverty reduction, as well as child and maternal health.

  15. Biological Processes for Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    van Niel, Ed W J

    Methane is produced usually from organic waste in a straightforward anaerobic digestion process. However, hydrogen production is technically more challenging as more stages are needed to convert all biomass to hydrogen because of thermodynamic constraints. Nevertheless, the benefit of hydrogen is that it can be produced, both biologically and thermochemically, in more than one way from either organic compounds or water. Research in biological hydrogen production is booming, as reflected by the myriad of recently published reviews on the topic. This overview is written from the perspective of how to transfer as much energy as possible from the feedstock into the gaseous products hydrogen, and to a lesser extent, methane. The status and remaining challenges of all the biological processes are concisely discussed.

  16. Cell substrates for the production of viral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Aubrit, Françoise; Perugi, Fabien; Léon, Arnaud; Guéhenneux, Fabienne; Champion-Arnaud, Patrick; Lahmar, Mehdi; Schwamborn, Klaus

    2015-11-04

    Vaccines have been used for centuries to protect people and animals against infectious diseases. For vaccine production, it has become evident that cell culture technology can be considered as a key milestone and has been the result of decades of progress. The development and implementation of cell substrates have permitted massive and safe production of viral vaccines. The demand in new vaccines against emerging viral diseases, the increasing vaccine production volumes, and the stringent safety rules for manufacturing have made cell substrates mandatory viral vaccine producer factories. In this review, we focus on cell substrates for the production of vaccines against human viral diseases. Depending on the nature of the vaccine, choice of the cell substrate is critical. Each manufacturer intending to develop a new vaccine candidate should assess several cell substrates during the early development phase in order to select the most convenient for the application. First, as vaccine safety is quite naturally a central concern of Regulatory Agencies, the cell substrate has to answer the regulatory rules stringency. In addition, the cell substrate has to be competitive in terms of viral-specific production yields and manufacturing costs. No cell substrate, even the so-called "designer" cell lines, is able to fulfil all the requested criteria for all viral vaccines. Therefore, the availability of a variety of cell substrates for vaccine production is essential because it improves the chance to successfully respond to the current and future needs of vaccines linked to new emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases (e.g. pandemic flu, Ebola, and Chikungunya outbreaks).

  17. Evolution of M. bovis BCG Vaccine: Is Niacin Production Still a Valid Biomarker?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarman; Singh, Pragati

    2015-01-01

    BCG vaccine is usually considered to be safe though rarely serious complications have also been reported, often incriminating contamination of the seed strain with pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In such circumstances, it becomes prudent to rule out the contamination of the vaccine seed. M. bovis BCG can be confirmed by the absence of nitrate reductase, negative niacin test, and resistance to pyrazinamide and cycloserine. Recently in India, some stocks were found to be niacin positive which led to a national controversy and closer of a vaccine production plant. This prompted us to write this review and the comparative biochemical and genotypic studies were carried out on the these contentious vaccine stocks at the Indian vaccine plant and other seeds and it was found that some BCG vaccine strains and even some strains of M. bovis with eugenic-growth characteristics mainly old laboratory strains may give a positive niacin reaction. Most probably, the repeated subcultures lead to undefined changes at the genetic level in these seed strains. These changing biological characteristics envisage reevaluation of biochemical characters of existing BCG vaccine seeds and framing of newer guidelines for manufacturing, production, safety, and effectiveness of BCG vaccine. PMID:25694828

  18. Evolution of M. bovis BCG Vaccine: Is Niacin Production Still a Valid Biomarker?

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarman; Kumar, Manoj; Singh, Pragati

    2015-01-01

    BCG vaccine is usually considered to be safe though rarely serious complications have also been reported, often incriminating contamination of the seed strain with pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In such circumstances, it becomes prudent to rule out the contamination of the vaccine seed. M. bovis BCG can be confirmed by the absence of nitrate reductase, negative niacin test, and resistance to pyrazinamide and cycloserine. Recently in India, some stocks were found to be niacin positive which led to a national controversy and closer of a vaccine production plant. This prompted us to write this review and the comparative biochemical and genotypic studies were carried out on the these contentious vaccine stocks at the Indian vaccine plant and other seeds and it was found that some BCG vaccine strains and even some strains of M. bovis with eugenic-growth characteristics mainly old laboratory strains may give a positive niacin reaction. Most probably, the repeated subcultures lead to undefined changes at the genetic level in these seed strains. These changing biological characteristics envisage reevaluation of biochemical characters of existing BCG vaccine seeds and framing of newer guidelines for manufacturing, production, safety, and effectiveness of BCG vaccine.

  19. Automated production of plant-based vaccines and pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Wirz, Holger; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F; Briggs, John; Sharpe, Aaron; Shu, Sudong; Sharon, Andre

    2012-12-01

    A fully automated "factory" was developed that uses tobacco plants to produce large quantities of vaccines and other therapeutic biologics within weeks. This first-of-a-kind factory takes advantage of a plant viral vector technology to produce specific proteins within the leaves of rapidly growing plant biomass. The factory's custom-designed robotic machines plant seeds, nurture the growing plants, introduce a viral vector that directs the plant to produce a target protein, and harvest the biomass once the target protein has accumulated in the plants-all in compliance with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines (e.g., current Good Manufacturing Practices). The factory was designed to be time, cost, and space efficient. The plants are grown in custom multiplant trays. Robots ride up and down a track, servicing the plants and delivering the trays from the lighted, irrigated growth modules to each processing station as needed. Using preprogrammed robots and processing equipment eliminates the need for human contact, preventing potential contamination of the process and economizing the operation. To quickly produce large quantities of protein-based medicines, we transformed a laboratory-based biological process and scaled it into an industrial process. This enables quick, safe, and cost-effective vaccine production that would be required in case of a pandemic.

  20. Production of a falcon herpesvirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wernery, U; Wernery, R; Kinne, J

    1999-09-01

    Ten common kestrels (Falco tinnunculus) were used for this falcon herpes vaccine experiment. Four kestrels were subcutaneously given 1 ml of an attenuated falcon herpesvirus that had originally been isolated from the liver of an American prairie falcon (Falco mexicanus). This virus was then passaged 100 times on chicken embryo fibroblast cells (CEF-cells). Another 4 kestrels were given subcutaneously an inactivated falcon herpesvirus vaccine derived from the same American field strain. This vaccine was concentrated, inactivated by heat and betapropiolactone and emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvans. Two further kestrels served as controls and were not vaccinated. Twenty-one days after vaccination, all 10 kestrels were challenged with passage 3 of the American falcon herpesvirus. The 2 control kestrels died 6 days after challenge and 3 of those given the inactivated herpes vaccine died 9 days after challenge, with typical lesions of herpesvirus inclusion body hepatitis. Before the vaccination experiment, all 10 kestrels were free of serum neutralising antibodies to the falcon herpesvirus. Twenty-one days after vaccination, all 4 kestrels vaccinated with the attenuated vaccine, and one vaccinated with the killed vaccine, had seroconverted, having shown no symptoms to the challenge with a low passage virulent American herpesvirus strain. Following the challenge their antibody titres to falcon herpesvirus increased. No herpesvirus was isolated from any of the cloacal swabs taken during this experiment, indicating that there is no danger for any other birds from the attenuated herpesvirus vaccine. This experiment clearly shows that an attenuated falcon herpesvirus vaccine can protect kestrels from fatal inclusion body hepatitis.

  1. Synthetic Biology Guides Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Michael R.; Atsumi, Shota

    2010-01-01

    The advancement of microbial processes for the production of renewable liquid fuels has increased with concerns about the current fuel economy. The development of advanced biofuels in particular has risen to address some of the shortcomings of ethanol. These advanced fuels have chemical properties similar to petroleum-based liquid fuels, thus removing the need for engine modification or infrastructure redesign. While the productivity and titers of each of these processes remains to be improved, progress in synthetic biology has provided tools to guide the engineering of these processes through present and future challenges. PMID:20827393

  2. Overview of measles and mumps vaccine: origin, present, and future of vaccine production.

    PubMed

    Betáková, T; Svetlíková, D; Gocník, M

    2013-01-01

    Measles and mumps are common viral childhood diseases that can cause serious complications. Vaccination remains the most efficient way to control the spread of these viruses. The manufacturing capability for viral vaccines produced in embryonated hen eggs and conventional/classical cell substrates, such as chicken embryo fibroblast or primary dog kidney cell substrates, is no longer sufficient. This limitation can be overcome by utilizing other recognized cell substrates such as Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK), Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO), Vero (monkey origin) cells, MRC-5 (human diploid) or as an alternative, introducing new cell substrates of human or avian origin. A very important factor in vaccine production is the safety and immunogenicity of the final vaccine, where the proper choice of cell substrate used for virus propagation is made. All substrates used in vaccine production must be fully characterized to avoid the contamination of hidden unknown pathogens which is difficult to achieve in primary cell substrates.

  3. Cancer vaccines inducing antibody production: more pros than cons.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Singer, Josef

    2011-09-01

    To date, passive immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies is a well-established option in clinical oncology. By contrast, anticancer vaccines are less advanced, with the exception of successfully applied prophylactic vaccines against oncogenic virus infections. The creation of therapeutic vaccines is still a great challenge mostly due to the self-nature of tumor antigens. Therapeutic vaccines may be based on patient-specific material including pulsed effector cells, or tumor-associated antigens and derivatives thereof, such as peptides, mimotopes and nucleic acids. The latter represents a more universal approach, which would set an ideal economic framework resulting in broad patient access. In this article we focus on cancer vaccines for antibody production, in particular mimotope vaccines. The collected evidence suggests that they will open up new treatment options in minimal residual disease and early stage disease.

  4. Vector Design for Improved DNA Vaccine Efficacy, Safety and Production

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a disruptive technology that offers the promise of a new rapidly deployed vaccination platform to treat human and animal disease with gene-based materials. Innovations such as electroporation, needle free jet delivery and lipid-based carriers increase transgene expression and immunogenicity through more effective gene delivery. This review summarizes complementary vector design innovations that, when combined with leading delivery platforms, further enhance DNA vaccine performance. These next generation vectors also address potential safety issues such as antibiotic selection, and increase plasmid manufacturing quality and yield in exemplary fermentation production processes. Application of optimized constructs in combination with improved delivery platforms tangibly improves the prospect of successful application of DNA vaccination as prophylactic vaccines for diverse human infectious disease targets or as therapeutic vaccines for cancer and allergy. PMID:26344110

  5. The Differential Impact of Coadministered Vaccines, Geographic Region, Vaccine Product and Other Covariates on Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antipneumococcal capsular polysaccharide antibody concentrations are used as predictors of vaccine efficacy against vaccine serotype (ST) pneumococcal disease among infants. While pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) are recommended globally, factors associated with optimal PCV immune response are not well described. We aimed to systematically assess local setting factors, beyond dosing schedule, which may affect PCV antibody levels. Methods: We conducted a literature review of PCV immunogenicity, abstracting data from published reports, unpublished sources, and conference abstracts from 1994 to 2010 (and ad hoc 2011 reports). Studies included in this analysis evaluated ≥ 2 primary doses of PCV before 6 months of age in non–high-risk populations, used 7-valent or higher PCV products (excluding Aventis-Pasteur and Merck products) and provided information on geometric mean concentration (GMC) for STs 1, 5, 6B, 14, 19F or 23F. Using random effects meta-regression, we assessed the impact of geographic region, coadministered vaccines and PCV product on postprimary GMC, adjusting for dosing schedule and ELISA laboratory method. Results: Of 12,980 citations reviewed, we identified 103 vaccine study arms for this analysis. Children in studies from Asia, Africa and Latin America had significantly higher GMC responses compared with those in studies from Europe and North America. Coadministration with acellular pertussis DTP compared with whole-cell DTP had no effect on PCV immunogenicity except for ST14, where GMCs were higher when coadministered with acellular pertussis DTP. Vaccine product, number of PCV doses, dosing interval, age at first dose and ELISA laboratory method also affected the GMC. Conclusions: PCV immunogenicity is associated with geographic region and vaccine product; however, the associations and magnitude varied by ST. Consideration of these factors is essential when comparing PCV immunogenicity results between groups and should be

  6. Hairy roots as a vaccine production and delivery system.

    PubMed

    Skarjinskaia, Marina; Ruby, Karen; Araujo, Adriana; Taylor, Karina; Gopalasamy-Raju, Vengadesan; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Chichester, Jessica A; Palmer, Gene A; de la Rosa, Patricia; Mett, Vadim; Ugulava, Natalia; Streatfield, Stephen J; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2013-01-01

    Prevention of infectious diseases by vaccination is often limited because of the lack of safe, effective, and accessible vaccines. Traditional vaccines are expensive and require special conditions for storage, distribution, and administration. Plants have potential for large-scale production of a variety of inexpensive and highly effective recombinant proteins for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, including subunit vaccines. There are several approaches for the production of vaccine antigens in plants, including transient expression systems based on Agrobacterium delivery of binary vectors or plant viral vectors, stable transgenic plants, and plant cell or tissue cultures. Axenic plant cultures maintained under defined physical and chemical conditions appear to be an attractive production platform when target proteins need to be synthesized in a fully controlled environment. Hairy root cultures meet the criteria for such a system. Hairy root cultures, generated from edible plants and producing target antigens, provide a potential approach for the development of vaccines for oral delivery. With this approach, there are no protein extraction and purification costs and the active biomolecule is protected by the plant cell wall during passage through the upper gastrointestinal tract. This allows for gradual release of antigen at mucosal surfaces in the gut. Lyophilized hairy root cultures expressing vaccine antigens can be stored at ambient temperature for extended periods of time, which should facilitate storage and distribution, ultimately allowing for large populations to be vaccinated.

  7. Vaccine stability study design and analysis to support product licensure.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Timothy L

    2009-11-01

    Stability evaluation supporting vaccine licensure includes studies of bulk intermediates as well as final container product. Long-term and accelerated studies are performed to support shelf life and to determine release limits for the vaccine. Vaccine shelf life is best determined utilizing a formal statistical evaluation outlined in the ICH guidelines, while minimum release is calculated to help assure adequate potency through handling and storage of the vaccine. In addition to supporting release potency determination, accelerated stability studies may be used to support a strategy to recalculate product expiry after an unintended temperature excursion such as a cold storage unit failure or mishandling during transport. Appropriate statistical evaluation of vaccine stability data promotes strategic stability study design, in order to reduce the uncertainty associated with the determination of the degradation rate, and the associated risk to the customer.

  8. Product review on the JE vaccine IXIARO

    PubMed Central

    Firbas, Christa; Jilma, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus, as the most important vaccine-preventable cause of viral encephalitis in Asia, is estimated to cause over 68,000 clinical cases yearly. In endemic areas, most Japanese encephalitis infections occur in children younger than 10 y and clinical manifestation of this disease is critical, because there is no effective treatment available. As JEV infections are regarded as one of the most serious viral causes of encephalitis and mass immunization programmes are generally recommended for residents in endemic areas, a safe and effective JEV vaccine was needed to protect them as well as others at risk. Due to the safety concerns with the mouse brain derived vaccine, second generation vaccines against JE produced in cell culture like Vero cells were developed. IXIARO® is a purified, inactivated aluminum-adjuvanted JE vaccine, based on the SA14–14–2 virus strain, and is available in North America, Europe, Canada, Switzerland, Singapore, Hong Kong and Israel as well as in Australia & New Zealand (as JESPECT®).The safety, tolerability and immunogenicity profile of IXIARO® is well established through a number of clinical studies comparing IXIARO® with placebo as well as mouse brain derived vaccine. Recent data show that the global incidence of JE remains substantial, especially young children in endemic areas are most susceptible. As vaccination is the most feasible, reliable and cost effective tool for JE control, IXIARO® with confirmed excellent safety profile is highly recommendable, in particular for vaccination of children at risk. The European Commission as well as the FDA approved the extension of indication of IXIARO® to the pediatric segment (2 months of age and older) based on these data. PMID:25621812

  9. Cell culture-derived influenza vaccines from Vero cells: a new horizon for vaccine production.

    PubMed

    Montomoli, Emanuele; Khadang, Baharak; Piccirella, Simona; Trombetta, Claudia; Mennitto, Elisa; Manini, Ilaria; Stanzani, Valerio; Lapini, Giulia

    2012-05-01

    In the 20th century, three influenza pandemics killed approximately 100 million people. The traditional method of influenza vaccine manufacturing is based on using chicken eggs. However, the necessity of the availability of millions of fertile eggs in the event of a pandemic has led research to focus on the development of cell culture-derived vaccines, which offer shorter lead-in times and greater flexibility of production. So far, the cell substrates being evaluated and in use include Vero, Madin-Darby canine kidney, PER.C6 and insect cells. However, Vero cells are the most widely accepted among others. This review introduces briefly the concepts of advanced cell culture-derived influenza vaccine production and highlights the advantages of these vaccines in terms of efficiency, speed and immunogenicity based on the clinical data obtained from different studies.

  10. A review on current downstream bio-processing technology of vaccine products.

    PubMed

    Li, Michael; Qiu, Ye Xian

    2013-02-18

    An effective downstream bio-processing of vaccine products requires complete chemical knowledge of the contaminants that may arise from a given vector expression system. Whether the vaccine is made from the traditional egg-based or the new cell-cultured process, it is the expression system that determines the types of impurities that need to be identified and removed from the vaccine product. There are mechanical and chemical factors that can either reduce the yield or render a vaccine product to be irreversibly inactive. The choice of equipment and solvents is therefore important in minimizing product loss, and for maintaining an efficient and optimized manufacturing process. The frequent out-of-specification, irreproducible data and inefficiency in the manufacturing of biologics were the basis for FDA to propose the "cGMP for the 21st Century" initiative in the year of 2000. Effective 2004, the concept of quality by design (QbD) has been imposed in the manufacturing of biologics. To facilitate the implementation of QbD FDA has encouraged the use of process analytical technology (PAT). Further, FDA believes that an optimized manufacturing scheme requires one to identify and to control the variables that can negatively affect the yield and quality of the desired product, and PAT can reveal wrongful data and alert the operator for immediate correction during processing.

  11. Mitigating the looming vaccine crisis: production and delivery of plasmid-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ongkudon, Clarence M; Ho, Jenny; Danquah, Michael K

    2011-03-01

    The exponentially growing human population and the emergence of new diseases are clear indications that the world can no longer depend solely on conventional vaccine technologies and production schemes. The race to find a new vaccine technology is crucial to help speed up and complement the World Health Organization (WHO) disease elimination program. The ultimate goal is to uncover fast and efficient production schemes in the event of a pandemic, and also to effectively fight deadly diseases such as malaria, bird flu, hepatitis, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Plasmid DNA vaccines, if properly formulated, offer specific priming of the immune system and similar or even better prophylactic effects than conventional vaccines. This article discusses many of the critical issues that need to be considered when developing fast, effective, and reliable plasmid DNA vaccine manufacturing processes. Different modes of plasmid production via bacterial fermentation are compared. Plasmid purification by chromatography is specifically discussed as it is the most commercially viable bioprocess engineering technique for continuous purification of supercoiled plasmid DNA. Current techniques and progress covering the area of plasmid DNA vaccine design, formulation, and delivery are also put forward.

  12. DNA Virus Vectors for Vaccine Production in Plants: Spotlight on Geminiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hefferon, Kathleen L.

    2014-01-01

    Plants represent a safe, efficacious and inexpensive production platform by which to provide vaccines and other therapeutic proteins to the world’s poor. Plant virus expression vector technology has rapidly become one of the most popular methods to express pharmaceutical proteins in plants. This review discusses several of the state-of-the-art plant expression systems based upon geminiviruses that have been engineered for vaccine production. An overview of the advantages of these small, single-stranded DNA viruses is provided and comparisons are made with other virus expression systems. Advances in the design of several different geminivirus vectors are presented in this review, and examples of vaccines and other biologics generated from each are described. PMID:26344750

  13. [Animal experimentation in the discovery and production of veterinary vaccines].

    PubMed

    Audonnet, J Ch; Lechenet, J; Verschuere, B

    2007-08-01

    Veterinary vaccine research, development and production facilities must aim to improve animal welfare, respond to public concerns and meet regulatory requirements, while at the same time fulfilling their objective of producing evermore effective and safer vaccines. The use of animal experimentation for the development of new veterinary vaccines is inevitable, as no in vitro model can predict a candidate vaccine's ability to induce protection in the target species. Against the backdrop of ethical and regulatory constraints, constant progress is being made in creating the best possible conditions for animal experimentation. Keeping up to date with the constant changes in the field of animal ethics requires a particular effort on the part of the pharmaceutical industry, which must make careful changes to product registration documentation in accordance with each new development.

  14. Biological and phylogenetic characterization of a genotype VII Newcastle disease virus from Venezuela: Efficacy of vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we describe the characterization a virulent genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from Venezuela and evaluate the efficacy of heterologous genotype commercial vaccination under field and controlled rearing conditions. Biological pathotyping and molecular analysis were applied. Results sh...

  15. Production of EV71 vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Chong, Pele; Hsieh, Shih-Yang; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chou, Ai-Hsiang; Chang, Jui-Yuan; Wu, Suh-Chin; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chow, Yen-Hung; Su, Ih-Jen; Klein, Michel

    2012-12-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is now recognized as an emerging neurotropic virus in Asia and with Coxsackie virus (CV) it is the other major causative agent of hand-foot-mouth diseases (HFMD). Effective medications and/or prophylactic vaccines against HFMD are urgently needed. From a scientific (the feasibility of bioprocess, immunological responses and potency in animal challenge model) and business development (cost of goods) points of view, we in this review address and discuss the pros and cons of different EV71 vaccine candidates that have been produced and evaluated in animal models. Epitope-based synthetic peptide vaccine candidates containing residues 211-225 of VP1 formulated with Freund's adjuvant (CFA/IFA) elicited low EV71 virus neutralizing antibody responses, but were protective in the suckling mouse challenge model. Among recombinant EV71 subunits (rVP1, rVP2 and rVP3) expressed in E. coli, purified and formulated with CFA/IFA, only VP1 elicited mouse antibody responses with measurable EV71-specific virus neutralization titers. Immunization of mice with either a DNA plasmid containing VP1 gene or VP1 expressed in Salmonella typhimurium also generated neutralizing antibody responses and protected animals against a live EV71 challenge. Recombinant EV71 virus-like particles (rVLP) produced from baculovirus formulated either with CFA/IFA or alum elicited good virus neutralization titers in both mice and non-human primates, and were found to be protective in the suckling mouse EV71 challenge model. Synthetic peptides or recombinant EV71 subunit vaccines (rVP1 and rVLP) formulated in alum were found to be poorly immunogenic in rabbits. Only formalin-inactivated (FI) EV71 virions formulated in alum elicited cross-neutralizing antibodies against different EV71 genotypes in mice, rabbits and non-human primates but induced weak neutralizing responses against CAV16. From a regulatory, economic and market acceptability standpoint, FI-EV71 virion vaccines are the most

  16. Production of EV71 vaccine candidates

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Pele; Hsieh, Shih-Yang; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chou, Ai-Hsiang; Chang, Jui-Yuan; Wu, Suh-Chin; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chow, Yen-Hung; Su, Ih-Jen; Klein, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is now recognized as an emerging neurotropic virus in Asia and with Coxsackie virus (CV) it is the other major causative agent of hand-foot-mouth diseases (HFMD). Effective medications and/or prophylactic vaccines against HFMD are urgently needed. From a scientific (the feasibility of bioprocess, immunological responses and potency in animal challenge model) and business development (cost of goods) points of view, we in this review address and discuss the pros and cons of different EV71 vaccine candidates that have been produced and evaluated in animal models. Epitope-based synthetic peptide vaccine candidates containing residues 211–225 of VP1 formulated with Freund’s adjuvant (CFA/IFA) elicited low EV71 virus neutralizing antibody responses, but were protective in the suckling mouse challenge model. Among recombinant EV71 subunits (rVP1, rVP2 and rVP3) expressed in E. coli, purified and formulated with CFA/IFA, only VP1 elicited mouse antibody responses with measurable EV71-specific virus neutralization titers. Immunization of mice with either a DNA plasmid containing VP1 gene or VP1 expressed in Salmonella typhimurium also generated neutralizing antibody responses and protected animals against a live EV71 challenge. Recombinant EV71 virus-like particles (rVLP) produced from baculovirus formulated either with CFA/IFA or alum elicited good virus neutralization titers in both mice and non-human primates, and were found to be protective in the suckling mouse EV71 challenge model. Synthetic peptides or recombinant EV71 subunit vaccines (rVP1 and rVLP) formulated in alum were found to be poorly immunogenic in rabbits. Only formalin-inactivated (FI) EV71 virions formulated in alum elicited cross-neutralizing antibodies against different EV71 genotypes in mice, rabbits and non-human primates but induced weak neutralizing responses against CAV16. From a regulatory, economic and market acceptability standpoint, FI-EV71 virion vaccines are the

  17. Challenges in vaccinating infants born to mothers taking immunoglobulin biologicals during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ling, Juejing; Koren, Gideon

    2016-01-01

    While immunoglobulin biologicals are increasingly used during pregnancy, there have been concerns on the immune function and vaccination of infants born to mothers taking immunoglobulin biologicals. In addition to the detection of biologicals in cord blood, cases of severe neonatal neutropenia and fatal dissemination of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) have been reported. With increasing number of infants exposed to immunoglobulin biologicals in utero, there is a need to address the challenges in vaccinating these infants. This review summarizes the available evidence to discuss the issues of immunoglobulin biological exposure in utero, neonatal immune function, long-term immune development, and the challenges and strategies of vaccinating newborns and infants who were born to mothers taking biologicals during pregnancy.

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies to Shigella Lipopolysaccharide Are Useful for Vaccine Production

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jisheng; Smith, Mark A.; Benjamin, William H.; Kaminski, Robert W.; Wenzel, Heather

    2016-01-01

    There is a significant need for an effective multivalent Shigella vaccine that targets the most prevalent serotypes. Most Shigella vaccines under development utilize serotype-specific lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) as a major component based on protection and epidemiological data. As vaccine formulations advance from monovalent to multivalent, assays and reagents need to be developed to accurately and reproducibly quantitate the amount of LPSs from multiple serotypes in the final product. To facilitate this effort, we produced 36 hybridomas that secrete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the O antigen on the LPS from Shigella flexneri 2a, Shigella flexneri 3a, and Shigella sonnei. We used six of these monoclonal antibodies for an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA), measuring LPSs with high sensitivity and specificity. It was also demonstrated that the Shigella serotype-specific MAbs were useful for bacterial surface staining detected by flow cytometry. These MAbs are also useful for standardizing the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) for Shigella. Functional assays, such as the in vitro bactericidal assay, are necessary for vaccine evaluation and may serve as immunological correlates of immunity. An S. flexneri 2a-specific monoclonal antibody killed S. flexneri 2b isolates, suggesting that S. flexneri 2a LPS may induce cross-protection against S. flexneri 2b. Overall, the Shigella LPS-specific MAbs described have potential utility to the vaccine development community for assessing multivalent vaccine composition and as a reliable control for multiple immunoassays used to assess vaccine potency. PMID:27280622

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies to Shigella Lipopolysaccharide Are Useful for Vaccine Production.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jisheng; Smith, Mark A; Benjamin, William H; Kaminski, Robert W; Wenzel, Heather; Nahm, Moon H

    2016-08-01

    There is a significant need for an effective multivalent Shigella vaccine that targets the most prevalent serotypes. Most Shigella vaccines under development utilize serotype-specific lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) as a major component based on protection and epidemiological data. As vaccine formulations advance from monovalent to multivalent, assays and reagents need to be developed to accurately and reproducibly quantitate the amount of LPSs from multiple serotypes in the final product. To facilitate this effort, we produced 36 hybridomas that secrete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the O antigen on the LPS from Shigella flexneri 2a, Shigella flexneri 3a, and Shigella sonnei We used six of these monoclonal antibodies for an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA), measuring LPSs with high sensitivity and specificity. It was also demonstrated that the Shigella serotype-specific MAbs were useful for bacterial surface staining detected by flow cytometry. These MAbs are also useful for standardizing the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) for Shigella Functional assays, such as the in vitro bactericidal assay, are necessary for vaccine evaluation and may serve as immunological correlates of immunity. An S. flexneri 2a-specific monoclonal antibody killed S. flexneri 2b isolates, suggesting that S. flexneri 2a LPS may induce cross-protection against S. flexneri 2b. Overall, the Shigella LPS-specific MAbs described have potential utility to the vaccine development community for assessing multivalent vaccine composition and as a reliable control for multiple immunoassays used to assess vaccine potency.

  20. Bioreactor concepts for cell culture-based viral vaccine production.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Ramírez, Lilí Esmeralda; Nikolay, Alexander; Genzel, Yvonne; Reichl, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine manufacturing processes are designed to meet present and upcoming challenges associated with a growing vaccine market and to include multi-use facilities offering a broad portfolio and faster reaction times in case of pandemics and emerging diseases. The final products, from whole viruses to recombinant viral proteins, are very diverse, making standard process strategies hardly universally applicable. Numerous factors such as cell substrate, virus strain or expression system, medium, cultivation system, cultivation method, and scale need consideration. Reviewing options for efficient and economical production of human vaccines, this paper discusses basic factors relevant for viral antigen production in mammalian cells, avian cells and insect cells. In addition, bioreactor concepts, including static systems, single-use systems, stirred tanks and packed-beds are addressed. On this basis, methods towards process intensification, in particular operational strategies, the use of perfusion systems for high product yields, and steps to establish continuous processes are introduced.

  1. Designing vaccines based on biology of human dendritic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Mellman, Ira

    2010-01-01

    The effective vaccines developed against a variety of infectious agents, including polio, measles and Hepatitis B, represent major achievements in medicine. These vaccines, usually composed of microbial antigens, are often associated with an adjuvant that activates dendritic cells (DCs). Many infectious diseases are still in need of an effective vaccine including HIV, malaria, hepatitis C and tuberculosis. In some cases, the induction of cellular rather than humoral responses may be more important as the goal is to control and eliminate the existing infection rather than to prevent it. Our increased understanding of the mechanisms of antigen presentation, particularly with the description of DC subsets with distinct functions, as well as their plasticity in responding to extrinsic signals, represent opportunities to develop novel vaccines. In addition, we foresee that this increased knowledge will permit us to design vaccines that will reprogram the immune system to intervene therapeutically in cancer, allergy and autoimmunity. PMID:21029958

  2. A probabilistic model for risk assessment of residual host cell DNA in biological products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Harry; Zhang, Lanju; Galinski, Mark

    2010-04-26

    Biological products such as viral vaccines manufactured in cells contain residual DNA derived from host cell substrates used in production. It is theoretically possible that the residual DNA could transmit activated oncogenes and/or latent infectious viral genomes to subjects receiving the product, and induce oncogenic or infective events. A probabilistic model to estimate the risks due to residual DNA is proposed. The model takes account of enzyme inactivation process. It allows for more accurate risk assessment when compared to methods currently in use. An application of the method to determine safety factor of a vaccine product is provided.

  3. Ontology-supported research on vaccine efficacy, safety and integrative biological networks.

    PubMed

    He, Yongqun

    2014-07-01

    While vaccine efficacy and safety research has dramatically progressed with the methods of in silico prediction and data mining, many challenges still exist. A formal ontology is a human- and computer-interpretable set of terms and relations that represent entities in a specific domain and how these terms relate to each other. Several community-based ontologies (including Vaccine Ontology, Ontology of Adverse Events and Ontology of Vaccine Adverse Events) have been developed to support vaccine and adverse event representation, classification, data integration, literature mining of host-vaccine interaction networks, and analysis of vaccine adverse events. The author further proposes minimal vaccine information standards and their ontology representations, ontology-based linked open vaccine data and meta-analysis, an integrative One Network ('OneNet') Theory of Life, and ontology-based approaches to study and apply the OneNet theory. In the Big Data era, these proposed strategies provide a novel framework for advanced data integration and analysis of fundamental biological networks including vaccine immune mechanisms.

  4. Ontology-supported Research on Vaccine Efficacy, Safety, and Integrative Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongqun

    2016-01-01

    Summary While vaccine efficacy and safety research has dramatically progressed with the methods of in silico prediction and data mining, many challenges still exist. A formal ontology is a human- and computer-interpretable set of terms and relations that represent entities in a specific domain and how these terms relate to each other. Several community-based ontologies (including the Vaccine Ontology, Ontology of Adverse Events, and Ontology of Vaccine Adverse Events) have been developed to support vaccine and adverse event representation, classification, data integration, literature mining of host-vaccine interaction networks, and analysis of vaccine adverse events. The author further proposes minimal vaccine information standards and their ontology representations, ontology-based linked open vaccine data and meta-analysis, an integrative One Network (“OneNet”) Theory of Life, and ontology-based approaches to study and apply the OneNet theory. In the Big Data era, these proposed strategies provide a novel framework for advanced data integration and analysis of fundamental biological networks including vaccine immune mechanisms. PMID:24909153

  5. Biological production of products from waste gases

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.

    2002-01-22

    A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

  6. Report from the World Health Organization's third Product Development for Vaccines Advisory Committee (PDVAC) meeting, Geneva, 8-10th June 2016.

    PubMed

    Giersing, Birgitte K; Vekemans, Johan; Nava, Samantha; Kaslow, David C; Moorthy, Vasee

    2017-03-02

    The third meeting of WHO's Product Development for Vaccines Advisory Committee (PDVAC) was held in June 2016, with a remit to revisit the pathogen areas for which significant progress has occurred since recommendations from the 2015 meeting, as well as to consider new advances in the development of vaccines against other pathogens. Since the previous meeting, significant progress has been made with regulatory approvals of the first malaria and dengue vaccines, and the first phase III trials of a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine candidate has started in the elderly and pregnant women. In addition, PDVAC has also supported vaccine development efforts against important emerging pathogens, including Middle Eastern Coronavirus (MERS CoV) and Zika virus. Trials of HIV and tuberculosis vaccine candidates are steadily progressing towards pivotal data points, and the leading norovirus vaccine candidate has entered a phase IIb efficacy study. WHO's Immunization, Vaccine and Biologicals (IVB) department is actively working in several pathogen areas on the recommendation of PDVAC, as well as continuing horizon scanning for advances in the development of vaccines that may benefit low and middle income countries (LMICs), such as the recent licensure of the enterovirus 71 (EV71) vaccine in China. Following on from discussions with WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on Immunization, PDVAC will also look beyond licensure and consider data needs for vaccine recommendation and implementation to reduce the delay between vaccine approval and vaccine impact.

  7. Antigenicity of Streptococcus agalactiae extracellular products and vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Pasnik, D J; Evans, J J; Panangala, V S; Klesius, P H; Shelby, R A; Shoemaker, C A

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major bacterial pathogen that is the cause of serious economic losses in many species of freshwater, marine and estuarine fish worldwide. A highly efficacious S. agalactiae vaccine was developed using extracellular products (ECP) and formalin-killed whole cells of S. agalactiae. The vaccine efficacy following storage of S. agalactiae ECP and formalin-killed S. agalactiae cells at 4 degrees C for 1 year was determined. The stored ECP containing S. agalactiae formalin-killed cells failed to prevent morbidity and mortality among the vaccinated fish, and the relative percentage survival was 29. Serum antibody responses of the stored ECP and freshly prepared ECP against soluble whole cell extract of S. agalactiae indicated that significantly less antibody was produced in fish immunized with stored ECP and S. agalactiae cells than in those fish immunized with freshly prepared ECP and S. agalactiae cells at day 31 post-vaccination. Silver staining of sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gels and immunostaining of Western blots with tilapia antiserum to S. agalactiae revealed that predominant 54 and 55 kDa bands were present in the freshly prepared ECP fraction. The 55 kDa band was absent from the stored ECP and new bands below 54 kDa appeared on the Western blot. The results of this study on S. agalactiae ECP provide evidence for a correlation between protection and antibody production to ECP and for the importance of the 55 kDa ECP antigen for vaccine efficacy.

  8. Enhancing the role of veterinary vaccines reducing zoonotic diseases of humans: linking systems biology with vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Adams, L Garry; Khare, Sangeeta; Lawhon, Sara D; Rossetti, Carlos A; Lewin, Harris A; Lipton, Mary S; Turse, Joshua E; Wylie, Dennis C; Bai, Yu; Drake, Kenneth L

    2011-09-22

    The aim of research on infectious diseases is their prevention, and brucellosis and salmonellosis as such are classic examples of worldwide zoonoses for application of a systems biology approach for enhanced rational vaccine development. When used optimally, vaccines prevent disease manifestations, reduce transmission of disease, decrease the need for pharmaceutical intervention, and improve the health and welfare of animals, as well as indirectly protecting against zoonotic diseases of people. Advances in the last decade or so using comprehensive systems biology approaches linking genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, and biotechnology with immunology, pathogenesis and vaccine formulation and delivery are expected to enable enhanced approaches to vaccine development. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the role of computational systems biology analysis of host:pathogen interactions (the interactome) as a tool for enhanced rational design of vaccines. Systems biology is bringing a new, more robust approach to veterinary vaccine design based upon a deeper understanding of the host-pathogen interactions and its impact on the host's molecular network of the immune system. A computational systems biology method was utilized to create interactome models of the host responses to Brucella melitensis (BMEL), Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (STM), and a Salmonella mutant (isogenic ΔsipA, sopABDE2) and linked to the basis for rational development of vaccines for brucellosis and salmonellosis as reviewed by Adams et al. and Ficht et al. [1,2]. A bovine ligated ileal loop biological model was established to capture the host gene expression response at multiple time points post infection. New methods based on Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) machine learning were employed to conduct a comparative pathogenicity analysis of 219 signaling and metabolic pathways and 1620 gene ontology (GO) categories that defined the host's biosignatures

  9. Enhancing the role of veterinary vaccines reducing zoonotic diseases of humans: Linking systems biology with vaccine development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Leslie G.; Khare, Sangeeta; Lawhon, Sara D.; Rossetti, Carlos A.; Lewin, Harris A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Turse, Joshua E.; Wylie, Dennis C.; Bai, Yu; Drake, Kenneth L.

    2011-09-22

    The aim of research on infectious diseases is their prevention, and brucellosis and salmonellosis as such are classic examples of worldwide zoonoses for application of a systems biology approach for enhanced rational vaccine development. When used optimally, vaccines prevent disease manifestations, reduce transmission of disease, decrease the need for pharmaceutical intervention, and improve the health and welfare of animals, as well as indirectly protecting against zoonotic diseases of people. Advances in the last decade or so using comprehensive systems biology approaches linking genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics, and biotechnology with immunology, pathogenesis and vaccine formulation and delivery are expected to enable enhanced approaches to vaccine development. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the role of computational systems biology analysis of host:pathogen interactions (the interactome) as a tool for enhanced rational design of vaccines. Systems biology is bringing a new, more robust approach to veterinary vaccine design based upon a deeper understanding of the host pathogen interactions and its impact on the host's molecular network of the immune system. A computational systems biology method was utilized to create interactome models of the host responses to Brucella melitensis (BMEL), Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (STM), and a Salmonella mutant (isogenic *sipA, sopABDE2) and linked to the basis for rational development of vaccines for brucellosis and salmonellosis as reviewed by Adams et al. and Ficht et al. [1,2]. A bovine ligated ileal loop biological model was established to capture the host gene expression response at multiple time points post infection. New methods based on Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) machine learning were employed to conduct a comparative pathogenicity analysis of 219 signaling and metabolic pathways and 1620 gene ontology (GO) categories that defined the host's biosignatures

  10. Transgenic plants for the production of veterinary vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dus Santos, María José; Wigdorovitz, Andrés

    2005-06-01

    The expression of antigens in transgenic plants has been increasingly used in the development of experimental vaccines, particularly oriented to the development of edible vaccines. Hence, this technology becomes highly suitable to express immunogenic proteins from pathogens. Foot and mouth disease virus, bovine rotavirus and bovine viral diarrhoea virus are considered to be the most important causative agents of economic loss of cattle production in Argentina, and they are thus optimal candidates for alternative means of immunization. Here, we present a review of our results corresponding to the expression of immunogenic proteins from these three viruses in alfalfa transgenic plants, and we discuss the possibility of using them for the development of plant-based vaccines.

  11. Hijacking bacterial glycosylation for the production of glycoconjugates, from vaccines to humanised glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Glycosylation or the modification of a cellular component with a carbohydrate moiety has been demonstrated in all three domains of life as a basic post-translational process important in a range of biological processes. This review will focus on the latest studies attempting to exploit bacterial N-linked protein glycosylation for glycobiotechnological applications including glycoconjugate vaccine and humanised glycoprotein production. The challenges that remain for these approaches to reach full biotechnological maturity will be discussed. Key findings Oligosaccharyltransferase-dependent N-linked glycosylation can be exploited to make glycoconjugate vaccines against bacterial pathogens. Few technical limitations remain, but it is likely that the technologies developed will soon be considered a cost-effective and flexible alternative to current chemical-based methods of vaccine production. Some highlights from current glycoconjugate vaccines developed using this in-vivo production system include a vaccine against Shigella dysenteriae O1 that has passed phase 1 clinical trials, a vaccine against the tier 1 pathogen Francisella tularensis that has shown efficacy in mice and a vaccine against Staphylococcus aureus serotypes 5 and 8. Generation of humanised glycoproteins within bacteria was considered impossible due to the distinct nature of glycan modification in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. We describe the method used to overcome this conundrum to allow engineering of a eukaryotic pentasaccharide core sugar modification within Escherichia coli. This core was assembled by combining the function of the initiating transferase WecA, several Alg genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the oligosaccharyltransferase function of the Campylobacter jejuni PglB. Further exploitation of a cytoplasmic N-linked glycosylation system found in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae where the central enzyme is known as N-linking glycosyltransferase has overcome some of the

  12. Scale-down of the inactivated polio vaccine production process.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Yvonne E; van 't Oever, Aart G; Vinke, Marian; Spiekstra, Arjen; Wijffels, René H; van der Pol, Leo A; Bakker, Wilfried A M

    2013-05-01

    The anticipated increase in the demand for inactivated polio vaccines resulting from the success in the polio eradication program requires an increase in production capacity and cost price reduction of the current inactivated polio vaccine production processes. Improvement of existing production processes is necessary as the initial process development has been done decades ago. An up-to-date lab-scale version encompassing the legacy inactivated polio vaccine production process was set-up. This lab-scale version should be representative of the large scale, meaning a scale-down model, to allow experiments for process optimization that can be readily applied. Initially the separate unit operations were scaled-down at setpoint. Subsequently, the unit operations were applied successively in a comparative manner to large-scale manufacturing. This allows the assessment of the effects of changes in one unit operation to the consecutive units at small-scale. Challenges in translating large-scale operations to lab-scale are discussed, and the concessions that needed to be made are described. The current scale-down model for cell and virus culture (2.3-L) presents a feasible model with its production scale counterpart (750-L) when operated at setpoint. Also, the current scale-down models for the DSP unit operations clarification, concentration, size exclusion chromatography, ion exchange chromatography, and inactivation are in agreement with the manufacturing scale. The small-scale units can be used separately, as well as sequentially, to study variations and critical product quality attributes in the production process. Finally, it is shown that the scale-down unit operations can be used consecutively to prepare trivalent vaccine at lab-scale with comparable characteristics to the product produced at manufacturing scale.

  13. Synthetic biology advances for pharmaceutical production

    PubMed Central

    Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology enables a new generation of microbial engineering for the biotechnological production of pharmaceuticals and other high-value chemicals. This review presents an overview of recent advances in the field, describing new computational and experimental tools for the discovery, optimization and production of bioactive molecules, and outlining progress towards the application of these tools to pharmaceutical production systems. PMID:25744872

  14. Synthetic biology advances for pharmaceutical production.

    PubMed

    Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic biology enables a new generation of microbial engineering for the biotechnological production of pharmaceuticals and other high-value chemicals. This review presents an overview of recent advances in the field, describing new computational and experimental tools for the discovery, optimization and production of bioactive molecules, and outlining progress towards the application of these tools to pharmaceutical production systems.

  15. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  16. Biologically active proteins from natural product extracts.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, B R

    2001-10-01

    The term "biologically active proteins" is almost redundant. All proteins produced by living creatures are, by their very nature, biologically active to some extent in their homologous species. In this review, a subset of these proteins will be discussed that are biologically active in heterologous systems. The isolation and characterization of novel proteins from natural product extracts including those derived from microorganisms, plants, insects, terrestrial vertebrates, and marine organisms will be reviewed and grouped into several distinct classes based on their biological activity and their structure.

  17. Structural and Computational Biology in the Design of Immunogenic Vaccine Antigens.

    PubMed

    Liljeroos, Lassi; Malito, Enrico; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Bottomley, Matthew James

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is historically one of the most important medical interventions for the prevention of infectious disease. Previously, vaccines were typically made of rather crude mixtures of inactivated or attenuated causative agents. However, over the last 10-20 years, several important technological and computational advances have enabled major progress in the discovery and design of potently immunogenic recombinant protein vaccine antigens. Here we discuss three key breakthrough approaches that have potentiated structural and computational vaccine design. Firstly, genomic sciences gave birth to the field of reverse vaccinology, which has enabled the rapid computational identification of potential vaccine antigens. Secondly, major advances in structural biology, experimental epitope mapping, and computational epitope prediction have yielded molecular insights into the immunogenic determinants defining protective antigens, enabling their rational optimization. Thirdly, and most recently, computational approaches have been used to convert this wealth of structural and immunological information into the design of improved vaccine antigens. This review aims to illustrate the growing power of combining sequencing, structural and computational approaches, and we discuss how this may drive the design of novel immunogens suitable for future vaccines urgently needed to increase the global prevention of infectious disease.

  18. Structural and Computational Biology in the Design of Immunogenic Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Liljeroos, Lassi; Malito, Enrico; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Bottomley, Matthew James

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is historically one of the most important medical interventions for the prevention of infectious disease. Previously, vaccines were typically made of rather crude mixtures of inactivated or attenuated causative agents. However, over the last 10–20 years, several important technological and computational advances have enabled major progress in the discovery and design of potently immunogenic recombinant protein vaccine antigens. Here we discuss three key breakthrough approaches that have potentiated structural and computational vaccine design. Firstly, genomic sciences gave birth to the field of reverse vaccinology, which has enabled the rapid computational identification of potential vaccine antigens. Secondly, major advances in structural biology, experimental epitope mapping, and computational epitope prediction have yielded molecular insights into the immunogenic determinants defining protective antigens, enabling their rational optimization. Thirdly, and most recently, computational approaches have been used to convert this wealth of structural and immunological information into the design of improved vaccine antigens. This review aims to illustrate the growing power of combining sequencing, structural and computational approaches, and we discuss how this may drive the design of novel immunogens suitable for future vaccines urgently needed to increase the global prevention of infectious disease. PMID:26526043

  19. Biological production of organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Jianping; Paddock, Troy; Carrieri, Damian; Maness, Pin-Ching; Seibert, Michael

    2016-04-12

    Strains of cyanobacteria that produce high levels of alpha ketoglutarate (AKG) and pyruvate are disclosed herein. Methods of culturing these cyanobacteria to produce AKG or pyruvate and recover AKG or pyruvate from the culture are also described herein. Nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides that function as ethylene-forming enzymes and their use in the production of ethylene are further disclosed herein. These nucleic acids may be expressed in hosts such as cyanobacteria, which in turn may be cultured to produce ethylene.

  20. Models of risk assessments for biologicals or related products in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Moos, M

    1995-12-01

    In the context of veterinary biologicals, environmental risk assessment means the evaluation of the risk to human health and the environment (which includes plants and animals) connected with the release of such products. The following categories or types of veterinary biologicals can be distinguished: non-genetically modified organisms (non-GMOs) (inactivated/live) GMOs (inactivated/live) carrier products related products (e.g. non-specific "inducers'). Suitable models used in risk assessment for these products should aim to identify all possible adverse effects. A good working model should lead, at least, to a qualitative judgement on the environmental risk of the biological product (e.g. negligible, low, medium, severe, unacceptable). Quantifiable outcomes are rare; therefore, the producer of a biological product and the European control authorities should accept only models which are based on testable points and which are relevant to the type of product and its instructions for use. In view of animal welfare aspects, models working without animals should be preferred. In recent years, some of these methods have been integrated into safety tests described in European Union Directives and in monographs of the European Pharmacopoeia. By reviewing vaccine/registration problems (e.g. Aujeszky's disease live vaccine for pigs, and vaccinia-vectored rabies vaccine), several models used in risk assessment are demonstrated and discussed.

  1. A Design of Experiment approach to predict product and process parameters for a spray dried influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, Gaurav; Willems, Geert-Jan; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kersten, Gideon F A; Soema, Peter C; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-25

    Spray dried vaccine formulations might be an alternative to traditional lyophilized vaccines. Compared to lyophilization, spray drying is a fast and cheap process extensively used for drying biologicals. The current study provides an approach that utilizes Design of Experiments for spray drying process to stabilize whole inactivated influenza virus (WIV) vaccine. The approach included systematically screening and optimizing the spray drying process variables, determining the desired process parameters and predicting product quality parameters. The process parameters inlet air temperature, nozzle gas flow rate and feed flow rate and their effect on WIV vaccine powder characteristics such as particle size, residual moisture content (RMC) and powder yield were investigated. Vaccine powders with a broad range of physical characteristics (RMC 1.2-4.9%, particle size 2.4-8.5μm and powder yield 42-82%) were obtained. WIV showed no significant loss in antigenicity as revealed by hemagglutination test. Furthermore, descriptive models generated by DoE software could be used to determine and select (set) spray drying process parameter. This was used to generate a dried WIV powder with predefined (predicted) characteristics. Moreover, the spray dried vaccine powders retained their antigenic stability even after storage for 3 months at 60°C. The approach used here enabled the generation of a thermostable, antigenic WIV vaccine powder with desired physical characteristics that could be potentially used for pulmonary administration.

  2. Modern Vaccines/Adjuvants Formulation Session 6: Vaccine &Adjuvant Formulation & Production 15-17 May 2013, Lausanne, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher B

    2013-09-01

    The Modern Vaccines/Adjuvants Formulation meeting aims to fill a critical gap in current vaccine development efforts by bringing together formulation scientists and immunologists to emphasize the importance of rational formulation design in order to optimize vaccine and adjuvant bioactivity, safety, and manufacturability. Session 6 on Vaccine and Adjuvant Formulation and Production provided three examples of this theme, with speakers emphasizing the need for extensive physicochemical characterization of adjuvant-antigen interactions, the rational formulation design of a CD8+ T cell-inducing adjuvant based on immunological principles, and the development and production of a rabies vaccine by a developing country manufacturer. Throughout the session, the practical importance of sound formulation and manufacturing design accompanied by analytical characterization was highlighted.

  3. Biological engineering for sustainable biomass production

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S.

    1986-09-01

    A new discipline has evolved in efforts to engineer photosynthetic production systems that produce biomass feedstocks efficiently, economically and with minimal adverse environmental impact. In this talk an overview is given of how biological engineering systems are designed to produce energy and novel material products within the framework of existing market infrastructure. Practical examples of biological engineering systems which employ components based on genetic engineering, species propagation, modern agricultural techniques, chemical engineering, and mechanical engineering are analyzed for worldwide materials application and environmental conservation. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Human adenovirus-vectored foot-and-mouth disease vaccines: establishment of a vaccine product profile through in vitro testing.

    PubMed

    Brake, D A; McIlhaney, M; Miller, T; Christianson, K; Keene, A; Lohnas, G; Purcell, C; Neilan, J; Schutta, C; Barrera, J; Burrage, T; Brough, D E; Butman, B T

    2012-01-01

    Next generation, foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) molecular vaccines based on replication deficient human adenovirus serotype 5 viral vectored delivery of FMD capsid genes (AdFMD) are being developed by the United States Dept. of Homeland Security and industry partners. The strategic goal of this program is to develop AdFMD licensed vaccines for the USA National Veterinary Stockpile for use, if needed, as emergency response tools during an FMD outbreak. This vaccine platform provides a unique opportunity to develop a set of in vitro analytical parameters to generate an AdFMD vaccine product profile to replace the current lot release test for traditional, inactivated FMD vaccines that requires FMDV challenge in livestock. The possibility of an indirect FMD vaccine potency test based on a serological alternative was initially investigated for a lead vaccine candidate, Adt.A24. Results show that serum virus neutralization (SVN) based serology testing for Adt.A24 vaccine lot release is not feasible, at least not in the context of vaccine potency assessment at one week post-vaccination. Thus, an in vitro infectious titer assay (tissue culture infectious dose 50, TCID50) which measures FMD infectious (protein expression) titer was established. Pre-validation results show acceptable assay variability and linearity and these data support further studies to validate the TCID50 assay as a potential potency release test. In addition, a quantitative physiochemical assay (HPLC) and three immunochemical assays (Fluorescent Focus-Forming Unit (FFU); tissue culture expression dose 50 (TCED50); Western blot) were developed for potential use as in vitro assays to monitor AdFMD vaccine lot-to-lot consistency and other potential applications. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using a traditional modified-live vaccine virus infectivity assay in combination with a set of physiochemical and immunochemical tests to build a vaccine product profile that will ensure the each Ad

  5. Do biological medicinal products pose a risk to the environment?: a current view on ecopharmacovigilance.

    PubMed

    Kühler, Thomas C; Andersson, Mikael; Carlin, Gunnar; Johnsson, Ann; Akerblom, Lennart

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of active pharmaceutical substances in the environment is of growing concern. The vast majority of the compounds in question are of low molecular weight, intended for oral use and designed to tolerate, for example, the digestive enzymes in the upper alimentary tract, the harsh milieus found in the acidic stomach, or the microbe rich intestine. Accordingly, these xenobiotic compounds may, due to their inherent biological activity, constitute a risk to the environment. Biological medicinal products, for example recombinant human insulin or monoclonal antibodies, however, are different. They are primarily made up of oligomers or polymers of amino acids, sugars or nucleotides and are thus readily metabolized. They are therefore generally not considered to pose any risk to the environment. Certain classes of biological medicinal products, however, are associated with specific safety issues. Genetically modified organisms as vectors in vaccines or in gene therapy products have attracted much attention in this regard. Issues include the degree of attenuation of the live recombinant vaccine, replication restrictions of the vaccine vector, alteration of the host and tissue tropism of the vector, the possibility of reversion to virulence, and risk to the ecosystem. In this review we discuss the fate and the potential environmental impact of biological medicinal products following clinical use from an ecopharmacovigilance point of view, and review relevant policy documents and regulatory statements.

  6. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  7. Recombinant and epitope-based vaccines on the road to the market and implications for vaccine design and production.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, Patricio; Kobe, Bostjan

    2016-03-03

    Novel vaccination approaches based on rational design of B- and T-cell epitopes - epitope-based vaccines - are making progress in the clinical trial pipeline. The epitope-focused recombinant protein-based malaria vaccine (termed RTS,S) is a next-generation approach that successfully reached phase-III trials, and will potentially become the first commercial vaccine against a human parasitic disease. Progress made on methods such as recombinant DNA technology, advanced cell-culture techniques, immunoinformatics and rational design of immunogens are driving the development of these novel concepts. Synthetic recombinant proteins comprising both B- and T-cell epitopes can be efficiently produced through modern biotechnology and bioprocessing methods, and can enable the induction of large repertoires of immune specificities. In particular, the inclusion of appropriate CD4+ T-cell epitopes is increasingly considered a key vaccine component to elicit robust immune responses, as suggested by results coming from HIV-1 clinical trials. In silico strategies for vaccine design are under active development to address genetic variation in pathogens and several broadly protective "universal" influenza and HIV-1 vaccines are currently at different stages of clinical trials. Other methods focus on improving population coverage in target populations by rationally considering specificity and prevalence of the HLA proteins, though a proof-of-concept in humans has not been demonstrated yet. Overall, we expect immunoinformatics and bioprocessing methods to become a central part of the next-generation epitope-based vaccine development and production process.

  8. Antiviral Biologic Produced in DNA Vaccine/Goose Platform Protects Hamsters Against Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome When Administered Post-exposure.

    PubMed

    Haese, Nicole; Brocato, Rebecca L; Henderson, Thomas; Nilles, Matthew L; Kwilas, Steve A; Josleyn, Matthew D; Hammerbeck, Christopher D; Schiltz, James; Royals, Michael; Ballantyne, John; Hooper, Jay W; Bradley, David S

    2015-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) and ANDV-like viruses are responsible for most hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in South America. Recent studies in Chile indicate that passive transfer of convalescent human plasma shows promise as a possible treatment for HPS. Unfortunately, availability of convalescent plasma from survivors of this lethal disease is very limited. We are interested in exploring the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce antiviral biologics, including polyclonal neutralizing antibodies for use in humans. Geese produce IgY and an alternatively spliced form, IgYΔFc, that can be purified at high concentrations from egg yolks. IgY lacks the properties of mammalian Fc that make antibodies produced in horses, sheep, and rabbits reactogenic in humans. Geese were vaccinated with an ANDV DNA vaccine encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins. All geese developed high-titer neutralizing antibodies after the second vaccination, and maintained high-levels of neutralizing antibodies as measured by a pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA) for over 1 year. A booster vaccination resulted in extraordinarily high levels of neutralizing antibodies (i.e., PsVNA80 titers >100,000). Analysis of IgY and IgYΔFc by epitope mapping show these antibodies to be highly reactive to specific amino acid sequences of ANDV envelope glycoproteins. We examined the protective efficacy of the goose-derived antibody in the hamster model of lethal HPS. α-ANDV immune sera, or IgY/IgYΔFc purified from eggs, were passively transferred to hamsters subcutaneously starting 5 days after an IM challenge with ANDV (25 LD50). Both immune sera, and egg-derived purified IgY/IgYΔFc, protected 8 of 8 and 7 of 8 hamsters, respectively. In contrast, all hamsters receiving IgY/IgYΔFc purified from normal geese (n=8), or no-treatment (n=8), developed lethal HPS. These findings demonstrate that the DNA vaccine/goose platform can be used to produce a candidate antiviral biological product

  9. Antiviral Biologic Produced in DNA Vaccine/Goose Platform Protects Hamsters Against Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome When Administered Post-exposure

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Thomas; Nilles, Matthew L.; Kwilas, Steve A.; Josleyn, Matthew D.; Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Schiltz, James; Royals, Michael; Ballantyne, John; Hooper, Jay W.; Bradley, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) and ANDV-like viruses are responsible for most hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in South America. Recent studies in Chile indicate that passive transfer of convalescent human plasma shows promise as a possible treatment for HPS. Unfortunately, availability of convalescent plasma from survivors of this lethal disease is very limited. We are interested in exploring the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce antiviral biologics, including polyclonal neutralizing antibodies for use in humans. Geese produce IgY and an alternatively spliced form, IgYΔFc, that can be purified at high concentrations from egg yolks. IgY lacks the properties of mammalian Fc that make antibodies produced in horses, sheep, and rabbits reactogenic in humans. Geese were vaccinated with an ANDV DNA vaccine encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins. All geese developed high-titer neutralizing antibodies after the second vaccination, and maintained high-levels of neutralizing antibodies as measured by a pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA) for over 1 year. A booster vaccination resulted in extraordinarily high levels of neutralizing antibodies (i.e., PsVNA80 titers >100,000). Analysis of IgY and IgYΔFc by epitope mapping show these antibodies to be highly reactive to specific amino acid sequences of ANDV envelope glycoproteins. We examined the protective efficacy of the goose-derived antibody in the hamster model of lethal HPS. α-ANDV immune sera, or IgY/IgYΔFc purified from eggs, were passively transferred to hamsters subcutaneously starting 5 days after an IM challenge with ANDV (25 LD50). Both immune sera, and egg-derived purified IgY/IgYΔFc, protected 8 of 8 and 7 of 8 hamsters, respectively. In contrast, all hamsters receiving IgY/IgYΔFc purified from normal geese (n=8), or no-treatment (n=8), developed lethal HPS. These findings demonstrate that the DNA vaccine/goose platform can be used to produce a candidate antiviral biological product

  10. Rational design of vaccine targets and strategies for HIV: a crossroad of statistical physics, biology, and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Arup K.; Barton, John P.

    2017-03-01

    Vaccination has saved more lives than any other medical procedure. Pathogens have now evolved that have not succumbed to vaccination using the empirical paradigms pioneered by Pasteur and Jenner. Vaccine design strategies that are based on a mechanistic understanding of the pertinent immunology and virology are required to confront and eliminate these scourges. In this perspective, we describe just a few examples of work aimed to achieve this goal by bringing together approaches from statistical physics with biology and clinical research.

  11. Rational design of vaccine targets and strategies for HIV: a crossroad of statistical physics, biology, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arup K; Barton, John P

    2017-03-01

    Vaccination has saved more lives than any other medical procedure. Pathogens have now evolved that have not succumbed to vaccination using the empirical paradigms pioneered by Pasteur and Jenner. Vaccine design strategies that are based on a mechanistic understanding of the pertinent immunology and virology are required to confront and eliminate these scourges. In this perspective, we describe just a few examples of work aimed to achieve this goal by bringing together approaches from statistical physics with biology and clinical research.

  12. [Book review] Developments in biological standardization (Vol. 49): Fish Biologics: Seriodiagnostics and Vaccines, edited by W. Hennessen and D. P. Andersen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.P.

    1981-01-01

    Review of: Developments in Biologicals, Vol. 49. Fish Biologics: Serodiagnostics and Vaccines. International Symposium, Leetown, W.Va., April 1981. Editor(s): Hennessen, W. (Bern); Andersen, D.P. (Leetown, W.Va.); Society/Societies: International Association of Biological Standardization, XII + 496 p., 90 fig., 110 tab., soft cover, 1981. ISBN: 978-3-8055-3471-0.

  13. Biological challenges and technological opportunities for respiratory syncytial virus vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Graham, Barney S

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important cause of respiratory disease causing high rates of hospitalizations in infants, significant morbidity in children and adults, and excess mortality in the elderly. Major barriers to vaccine development include early age of RSV infection, capacity of RSV to evade innate immunity, failure of RSV-induced adaptive immunity to prevent reinfection, history of RSV vaccine-enhanced disease, and lack of an animal model fully permissive to human RSV infection. These biological challenges, safety concerns, and practical issues have significantly prolonged the RSV vaccine development process. One great advantage compared to other difficult viral vaccine targets is that passively administered neutralizing monoclonal antibody is known to protect infants from severe RSV disease. Therefore, the immunological goals for vaccine development are to induce effective neutralizing antibody to prevent infection and to avoid inducing T-cell response patterns associated with enhanced disease. Live-attenuated RSV and replication-competent chimeric viruses are in advanced clinical trials. Gene-based strategies, which can control the specificity and phenotypic properties of RSV-specific T-cell responses utilizing replication-defective vectors and which may improve on immunity from natural infection, are progressing through preclinical testing. Atomic level structural information on RSV envelope glycoproteins in complex with neutralizing antibodies is guiding design of new vaccine antigens that may be able to elicit RSV-specific antibody responses without induction of RSV-specific T-cell responses. These new technologies may allow development of vaccines that can protect against RSV-mediated disease in infants and establish a new immunological paradigm in the host to achieve more durable protection against reinfection.

  14. Vaccine production training to develop the workforce of foreign institutions supported by the BARDA influenza vaccine capacity building program.

    PubMed

    Tarbet, E Bart; Dorward, James T; Day, Craig W; Rashid, Kamal A

    2013-03-15

    In the event of an influenza pandemic, vaccination will be the best method to limit virus spread. However, lack of vaccine biomanufacturing capacity means there will not be enough vaccine for the world's population. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) provides support to the World Health Organization to enhance global vaccine production capacity in developing countries. However, developing a trained workforce in some of those countries is necessary. Biomanufacturing is labor-intensive, requiring unique skills not found in traditional academic programs. Employees must understand the scientific basis of biotechnology, operate specialized equipment, and work in an environment regulated by good manufacturing practices (cGMP). Therefore, BARDA supported development of vaccine biomanufacturing training at Utah State University. The training consisted of a three-week industry-focused course for participants from institutions supported by the BARDA and WHO influenza vaccine production capacity building program. The curriculum was divided into six components: (1) biosafety, (2) cell culture and growth of cells in bioreactors, (3) virus assays and inactivation, (4) scale-up strategies, (5) downstream processing, and (6) egg- and cell-based vaccine production and cGMP. Lectures were combined with laboratory exercises to provide a balance of theory and hands-on training. The initial course included sixteen participants from seven countries including: Egypt, Romania, Russia, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam. The participant's job responsibilities included: Production, Quality Control, Quality Assurance, and Research; and their education ranged from bachelors to doctoral level. Internal course evaluations utilized descriptive methods including surveys, observation of laboratory activities, and interviews with participants. Generally, participants had appropriate academic backgrounds, but

  15. Development of a Salmonella cross-protective vaccine for food animal production systems.

    PubMed

    Heithoff, Douglas M; House, John K; Thomson, Peter C; Mahan, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Intensive livestock production is associated with increased Salmonella exposure, transmission, animal disease, and contamination of food and water supplies. Modified live Salmonella enterica vaccines that lack a functional DNA adenine methylase (Dam) confer cross-protection to a diversity of salmonellae in experimental models of murine, avian, ovine, and bovine models of salmonellosis. However, the commercial success of any vaccine is dependent upon the therapeutic index, the ratio of safety/efficacy. Herein, secondary virulence-attenuating mutations targeted to genes involved in intracellular and/or systemic survival were introduced into Salmonella dam vaccines to screen for vaccine candidates that were safe in the animal and the environment, while maintaining the capacity to confer cross-protective immunity to pathogenic salmonellae serotypes. Salmonella dam mgtC, dam sifA, and dam spvB vaccine strains exhibited significantly improved vaccine safety as evidenced by the failure to give rise to virulent revertants during the infective process, contrary to the parental Salmonella dam vaccine. Further, these vaccines exhibited a low grade persistence in host tissues that was associated with reduced vaccine shedding, reduced environmental persistence, and induction of cross-protective immunity to pathogenic serotypes derived from infected livestock. These data indicate that Salmonella dam double mutant vaccines are suitable for commercial applications against salmonellosis in livestock production systems. Reducing pre-harvest salmonellae load through vaccination will promote the health and productivity of livestock and reduce contamination of livestock-derived food products, while enhancing overall food safety.

  16. Systems biology solutions for biochemical production challenges.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anne Sofie Lærke; Lennen, Rebecca M; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Herrgård, Markus J

    2017-03-16

    There is an urgent need to significantly accelerate the development of microbial cell factories to produce fuels and chemicals from renewable feedstocks in order to facilitate the transition to a biobased society. Methods commonly used within the field of systems biology including omics characterization, genome-scale metabolic modeling, and adaptive laboratory evolution can be readily deployed in metabolic engineering projects. However, high performance strains usually carry tens of genetic modifications and need to operate in challenging environmental conditions. This additional complexity compared to basic science research requires pushing systems biology strategies to their limits and often spurs innovative developments that benefit fields outside metabolic engineering. Here we survey recent advanced applications of systems biology methods in engineering microbial production strains for biofuels and -chemicals.

  17. Utilizing population variation, vaccination, and systems biology to study human immunology.

    PubMed

    Tsang, John S

    2015-08-01

    The move toward precision medicine has highlighted the importance of understanding biological variability within and across individuals in the human population. In particular, given the prevalent involvement of the immune system in diverse pathologies, an important question is how much and what information about the state of the immune system is required to enable accurate prediction of future health and response to medical interventions. Towards addressing this question, recent studies using vaccination as a model perturbation and systems-biology approaches are beginning to provide a glimpse of how natural population variation together with multiplexed, high-throughput measurement and computational analysis can be used to uncover predictors of immune response quality in humans. Here I discuss recent developments in this emerging field, with emphasis on baseline correlates of vaccination responses, sources of immune-state variability, as well as relevant features of study design, data generation, and computational analysis.

  18. Utilizing population variation, vaccination, and systems biology to study human immunology

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The move toward precision medicine has highlighted the importance of understanding biological variability within and across individuals in the human population. In particular, given the prevalent involvement of the immune system in diverse pathologies, an important question is how much and what information about the state of the immune system is required to enable accurate prediction of future health and response to medical interventions. Towards addressing this question, recent studies using vaccination as a model perturbation and systems-biology approaches are beginning to provide a glimpse of how natural population variation together with multiplexed, high-throughput measurement and computational analysis can be used to uncover predictors of immune response quality in humans. Here I discuss recent developments in this emerging field, with emphasis on baseline correlates of vaccination responses, sources of immune-state variability, as well as relevant features of study design, data generation, and computational analysis. PMID:26187853

  19. Application of new vaccine technology to improve immunity and productivity: advantages and challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines play a critical role in the poultry industry’s efforts to protect animals against disease. However, providing safe, efficacious, and cost-effective vaccines remains a constant concern to the industry. Recent advances in avian immunology, genetics, molecular biology, and pathogenesis have ...

  20. Evolution of approaches to viral safety issues for biological products.

    PubMed

    Lubiniecki, Anthony S

    2011-01-01

    CONFERENCE PROCEEDING Proceedings of the PDA/FDA Adventitious Viruses in Biologics: Detection and Mitigation Strategies Workshop in Bethesda, MD, USA; December 1-3, 2010 Guest Editors: Arifa Khan (Bethesda, MD), Patricia Hughes (Bethesda, MD) and Michael Wiebe (San Francisco, CA) Approaches to viral safety issues for biological products have evolved during the past 50+ years. The first cell culture products (viral vaccines) relied largely on the use of in vitro and in vivo virus screening assays that were based upon infectivity of adventitious viral agents. The use of Cohn fractionation and pasteurization by manufacturers of plasma derivatives introduced the concepts that purification and treatment with physical and chemical agents could greatly reduce the risk of viral contamination of human albumin and immunoglobulin products. But the limitations of such approaches became clear for thermolabile products that were removed early in fractionation such as antihemophilic factors, which transmitted hepatitis viruses and HIV-1 to some product recipients. These successes and limitations were taken into account by the early developers of recombinant DNA (rDNA)-derived cell culture products and by regulatory agencies, leading to the utilization of cloning technology to reduce/eliminate contamination due to human viruses and purification technologies to physically remove and inactivate adventitious and endogenous viruses, along with cell banking and cell bank characterization for adventitious and endogenous viruses, viral screening of biological raw materials, and testing of cell culture harvests, to ensure virus safety. Later development and incorporation of nanofiltration technology in the manufacturing process provided additional assurance of viral clearance for safety of biotechnology products. These measures have proven very effective at preventing iatrogenic infection of recipients of biotechnology products; however, viral contamination of production cell cultures has

  1. The 2015 global production capacity of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    McLean, Kenneth A; Goldin, Shoshanna; Nannei, Claudia; Sparrow, Erin; Torelli, Guido

    2016-10-26

    A global shortage and inequitable access to influenza vaccines has been cause for concern for developing countries who face dire consequences in the event of a pandemic. The Global Action Plan for Influenza Vaccines (GAP) was launched in 2006 to increase global capacity for influenza vaccine production to address these concerns. It is widely recognized that well-developed infrastructure to produce seasonal influenza vaccines leads to increased capacity to produce pandemic influenza vaccines. This article summarizes the results of a survey administered to 44 manufacturers to assess their production capacity for seasonal influenza and pandemic influenza vaccine production. When the GAP was launched in 2006, global production capacity for seasonal and pandemic vaccines was estimated to be 500million and 1.5billion doses respectively. Since 2006 there has been a significant increase in capacity, with the 2013 survey estimating global capacity at 1.5billion seasonal and 6.2billion pandemic doses. Results of the current survey showed that global seasonal influenza vaccine production capacity has decreased since 2013 from 1.504billion doses to 1.467billion doses. However, notwithstanding the overall global decrease in seasonal vaccine capacity there were notable positive changes in the distribution of production capacity with increases noted in South East Asia (SEAR) and the Western Pacific (WPR) regions, albeit on a small scale. Despite a decrease in seasonal capacity, there has been a global increase of pandemic influenza vaccine production capacity from 6.2 billion doses in 2013 to 6.4 billion doses in 2015. This growth can be attributed to a shift towards more quadrivalent vaccine production and also to increased use of adjuvants. Pandemic influenza vaccine production capacity is at its highest recorded levels however challenges remain in maintaining this capacity and in ensuring access in the event of a pandemic to underserved regions.

  2. Human immune responses to vaccines in the first year of life: biological, socio-economic and ethical issues - a viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Ota, M O C; Idoko, O T; Ogundare, E O; Afolabi, M O

    2013-05-17

    Human newborns are vulnerable to infectious diseases that account for majority of the morbidity and mortality, particularly in first year of life. Vaccines have become the most effective public health intervention strategy to curtail the prevalence of these infectious diseases. Although vaccines against a number of diseases exist, there are no vaccines against many other diseases that commonly affect children. The adequate assessment of immune responses to vaccines is an important step in the development of vaccines. However, a number of biological and "non-medical" socio-economic and ethical factors could influence either the administration and/or evaluation of vaccines in infants. Recognition and understanding of these determinants are crucial in planning interventions and for logical interpretations of results.

  3. 75 FR 55776 - Request for Comments on Vaccine Production and Additional Planning for Future Possible Pandemic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... International Trade Administration Request for Comments on Vaccine Production and Additional Planning for Future... comments from the public and relevant industries on vaccine production and additional planning for future... such. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments by any of the following methods: E-mail:...

  4. Synthetic Biological Approaches to Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jaclyn M; Tang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules produced in Nature continue to be an inspiration for the development of new therapeutic agents. These natural products possess exquisite chemical diversity, which gives rise to their wide range of biological activities. In their host organism, natural products are assembled and modified by dedicated biosynthetic pathways that Nature has meticulously developed. Often times, the complex structures or chemical modifications instated by these pathways are difficult to replicate using traditional synthetic methods. An alternative approach for creating or enhancing the structural variation of natural products is through combinatorial biosynthesis. By rationally reprogramming and manipulating the biosynthetic machinery responsible for their production, unnatural metabolites that were otherwise inaccessible can be obtained. Additionally, new chemical structures can be synthesized or derivatized by developing the enzymes that carry out these complicated chemical reactions into biocatalysts. In this review, we will discuss a variety of combinatorial biosynthetic strategies, their technical challenges, and highlight some recent (since 2007) examples of rationally designed unnatural metabolites, as well as platforms that have been established for the production and modification of clinically important pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:22221832

  5. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXPERIMENTAL... products which are neither composed of nor prepared with organisms or antigens used in biologicals...

  6. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXPERIMENTAL... products which are neither composed of nor prepared with organisms or antigens used in biologicals...

  7. Alphavirus vectors: applications for DNA vaccine production and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, K

    2000-01-01

    Replication-deficient alphavirus vectors have been developed for efficient high-level transgene expression. The broad host range of alphaviruses has allowed infection of a wide variety of mammalian cell lines and primary cultures. Particularly, G protein-coupled receptors have been expressed at high levels and subjected to binding and functional studies. Expression in suspension cultures has greatly facilitated production of large quantities of recombinant proteins for structural studies. Injection of recombinant alphavirus vectors into rodent brain resulted in local reporter gene expression. Highly neuron-specific expression was obtained in hippocampal slice cultures in vivo. Additionally, preliminary studies in animal models suggest that alphavirus vectors can be attractive candidates for gene therapy applications. Traditionally alphavirus vectors, either attenuated strains or replication-deficient particles, have been used to elicit efficient immune responses in animals. Recently, the application of alphaviruses has been extended to naked nucleic acids. Injection of DNA as well as RNA vectors has demonstrated efficient antigen production. In many cases, protection against lethal challenges has been obtained after immunization with alphavirus particles or nucleic acid vectors. Alphavirus vectors can therefore be considered as potentially promising vectors for vaccine production.

  8. Vaccination of biological cellulose fibers with glucose: a gateway to novel nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Tamer Y A; Mobarak, Fardous

    2008-01-01

    This work introduces, for the first time worldwide, the means to preserve and protect the natural nanoporous structure of the never-dried plant cell wall, against the irreversible collapse, which occurs due to drying. Simultaneously, these means, used for the above-mentioned aim, provide a gateway to novel nanocomposite materials, which retain the super reactive and super absorbent properties of the never-dried biological cellulose fibers. The present work showed, for the first time worldwide, that glucose can be vaccinated into the cell wall micropores or nanostructure of the never-dried biological cellulose fibers, by simple new techniques, to create a reactive novel nanocomposite material possessing surprising super absorbent properties. Inoculation of the never dried biological cellulose fibers, with glucose, prevented the collapse of the cell wall nanostructure, which normally occurs due to drying. The nanocomposite, produced after drying of the glucose inoculated biological cellulose, retained the super absorbent properties of the never dried biological cellulose fibers. It was found that glucose under certain circumstances grafts to the never dried biological cellulose fibers to form a novel natural nanocomposite material. About 3-8% (w/w) glucose remained grafted in the novel nanocomposite.

  9. Principles of Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Zepp, Fred

    2016-01-01

    While many of the currently available vaccines have been developed empirically, with limited understanding on how they activate the immune system and elicit protective immunity, the recent progress in basic sciences like immunology, microbiology, genetics, and molecular biology has fostered our understanding on the interaction of microorganisms with the human immune system. In consequence, modern vaccine development strongly builds on the precise knowledge of the biology of microbial pathogens, their interaction with the human immune system, as well as their capacity to counteract and evade innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Strategies engaged by pathogens strongly determine how a vaccine should be formulated to evoke potent and efficient protective immune responses. The improved knowledge of immune response mechanisms has facilitated the development of new vaccines with the capacity to defend against challenging pathogens and can help to protect individuals particular at risk like immunocompromised and elderly populations. Modern vaccine development technologies include the production of highly purified antigens that provide a lower reactogenicity and higher safety profile than the traditional empirically developed vaccines. Attempts to improve vaccine antigen purity, however, may result in impaired vaccine immunogenicity. Some of such disadvantages related to highly purified and/or genetically engineered vaccines yet can be overcome by innovative technologies, such as live vector vaccines, and DNA or RNA vaccines. Moreover, recent years have witnessed the development of novel adjuvant formulations that specifically focus on the augmentation and/or control of the interplay between innate and adaptive immune systems as well as the function of antigen-presenting cells. Finally, vaccine design has become more tailored, and in turn has opened up the potential of extending its application to hitherto not accessible complex microbial pathogens plus providing new

  10. Green tea cultivar 'Benifuuki' potentiates split vaccine-induced immunoglobulin A production.

    PubMed

    Won, Yeong-Seon; Kumazoe, Motofumi; Takamatsu, Kanako; Shinoda, Yuki; Sonoda, Saki; Okada, Kenji; Okamoto, Takehisa; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2017-01-01

    Influenza is a widespread disease caused by infection with the influenza virus. Vaccination is considered to be the main countermeasure against influenza. A split vaccine is widely used to avoid severe adverse events, and it induces strong humoral immunity. However, the split vaccine alone cannot elicit mucosal immunity, including IgA production, and its preventative effects are limited. Here, we show that the green tea cultivar 'Benifuuki' extract enhanced the effect of a split vaccine on mucosal immunity. The frequency of IgA(+) cells was increased in lung and Peyer's patch that received Benifuuki diet. Secretion of hemagglutinin-specific mucosal IgA, which is closely linked to the prevention of viral infection, was significantly increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of split vaccine-immunized BALB/c mice that were administered green tea Benifuuki extract. Our findings suggest that Benifuuki intake enhanced the effects of the split vaccine on mucosal immunity.

  11. Systems Biology of Microbial Exopolysaccharides Production

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by diverse group of microbial systems are rapidly emerging as new and industrially important biomaterials. Due to their unique and complex chemical structures and many interesting physicochemical and rheological properties with novel functionality, the microbial EPSs find wide range of commercial applications in various fields of the economy such as food, feed, packaging, chemical, textile, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry, agriculture, and medicine. EPSs are mainly associated with high-value applications, and they have received considerable research attention over recent decades with their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and both environmental and human compatibility. However, only a few microbial EPSs have achieved to be used commercially due to their high production costs. The emerging need to overcome economic hurdles and the increasing significance of microbial EPSs in industrial and medical biotechnology call for the elucidation of the interrelations between metabolic pathways and EPS biosynthesis mechanism in order to control and hence enhance its microbial productivity. Moreover, a better understanding of biosynthesis mechanism is a significant issue for improvement of product quality and properties and also for the design of novel strains. Therefore, a systems-based approach constitutes an important step toward understanding the interplay between metabolism and EPS biosynthesis and further enhances its metabolic performance for industrial application. In this review, primarily the microbial EPSs, their biosynthesis mechanism, and important factors for their production will be discussed. After this brief introduction, recent literature on the application of omics technologies and systems biology tools for the improvement of production yields will be critically evaluated. Special focus will be given to EPSs with high market value such as xanthan, levan, pullulan, and dextran. PMID:26734603

  12. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], CH[sub 4] and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the wild strain'' produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

  13. Chemical and biological production of cyclotides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yilong; Bi, Tao; Camarero, Julio A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclotides are fascinating naturally occurring micro-proteins (≈30 residues long) present in several plant families, and display various biological properties such as protease inhibitory, anti-microbial, insecticidal, cytotoxic, anti-HIV and hormone-like activities. Cyclotides share a unique head-to-tail circular knotted topology of three disulfide bridges, with one disulfide penetrating through a macrocycle formed by the two other disulfides and interconnecting peptide backbones, forming what is called a cystine knot topology. This cyclic cystine knot (CCK) framework gives the cyclotides exceptional rigidity, resistance to thermal and chemical denaturation, and enzymatic stability against degradation. Interestingly, cyclotides have been shown to be orally bioavailable, and other cyclotides have been shown to cross the cell membranes. Moreover, recent reports have also shown that engineered cyclotides can be efficiently used to target extracellular and intracellular protein-protein interactions, therefore making cyclotides ideal tools for drug development to selectively target protein-protein interactions. In this work we will review all the available methods for production of these interesting proteins using chemical or biological methods. PMID:27064329

  14. Biological response modifiers: interferons, interleukins, recombinant products, liposomal products.

    PubMed

    Kruth, S A

    1998-03-01

    The concept of enhancing the normal immune response against infections and neoplasms has been considered for decades. The administration of various natural and synthetic products to simulate systemic infections has largely given over to the idea that specific cytokines can be used effectively when administered systemically. Interferons, interleukins, and hematopoietic growth factors may offer substantial clinical benefit in chronic viral infections, and cancers such as osteosarcoma, melanoma, and lymphosarcoma. Erythropoietin has been shown to have great utility in the management of chronic renal failure. At this point in time, only recombinant products derived from humans are commercially available, and they are expensive and not licensed for use in companion animals. Nevertheless, these products may have significant clinical impact on several highly fatal disorders of dogs and cats. When administered systemically, cytokines perturb complex regulatory pathways, and serious side effects may occur. Innovative delivery methods, such as liposomes, gene therapy, and even oral administration may increase the therapeutic index of these molecules. Biological response modification, cytokine biology, and associated delivery systems are rapidly changing fields, and the small animal veterinarian will need to watch for significant advances in these areas over the next several years.

  15. Regulatory considerations for raw materials used in biological products.

    PubMed

    Khan, A S

    2010-01-01

    Raw materials are critical components of product manufacture; these include source materials such as cell substrates, tissues, and biological fluids required for product manufacture, as well as biological materials required for cell growth, propagation, differentiation, and selection. Adventitious viruses are a major safety concern in biological raw materials. This paper discusses the specific concerns related to different types of biological materials and presents the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research's perspective on the qualification and management of raw materials for purposes of developing a safety program for the manufacture of biological products.

  16. Effects of biological and non-biological immunomodulatory therapies on the immunogenicity of vaccines in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    McMahan, Zsuzsanna H; Bingham, Clifton O

    2014-12-23

    Vaccinations are administered to patients to induce a protective immune response, resulting in immunological memory. Preventing infection through the use of vaccines is particularly important in immunocompromised and immunosuppressed individuals given their increased frequency and severity of infections relative to healthy individuals. Recent surveys show that the vaccination rate is still alarmingly low in patients with rheumatic disease. In this review we briefly discuss the different types of vaccines and then critically examine evidence related to vaccination efficacy in patients with autoimmune disease and the effects of immunomodulatory therapy, with an aim to provide guidance and optimize the administration of vaccines in such individuals.

  17. Monascus secondary metabolites: production and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Patakova, Petra

    2013-02-01

    The genus Monascus, comprising nine species, can reproduce either vegetatively with filaments and conidia or sexually by the formation of ascospores. The most well-known species of genus Monascus, namely, M. purpureus, M. ruber and M. pilosus, are often used for rice fermentation to produce red yeast rice, a special product used either for food coloring or as a food supplement with positive effects on human health. The colored appearance (red, orange or yellow) of Monascus-fermented substrates is produced by a mixture of oligoketide pigments that are synthesized by a combination of polyketide and fatty acid synthases. The major pigments consist of pairs of yellow (ankaflavin and monascin), orange (rubropunctatin and monascorubrin) and red (rubropunctamine and monascorubramine) compounds; however, more than 20 other colored products have recently been isolated from fermented rice or culture media. In addition to pigments, a group of monacolin substances and the mycotoxin citrinin can be produced by Monascus. Various non-specific biological activities (antimicrobial, antitumor, immunomodulative and others) of these pigmented compounds are, at least partly, ascribed to their reaction with amino group-containing compounds, i.e. amino acids, proteins or nucleic acids. Monacolins, in the form of β-hydroxy acids, inhibit hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis in animals and humans.

  18. Developing whole mycobacteria cell vaccines for tuberculosis: Workshop proceedings, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin, Germany, July 9, 2014.

    PubMed

    2015-06-12

    On July 9, 2014, Aeras and the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology convened a workshop entitled "Whole Mycobacteria Cell Vaccines for Tuberculosis" at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology on the grounds of the Charité Hospital in Berlin, Germany, close to the laboratory where, in 1882, Robert Koch first identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) as the pathogen responsible for tuberculosis (TB). The purpose of the meeting was to discuss progress in the development of TB vaccines based on whole mycobacteria cells. Live whole cell TB vaccines discussed at this meeting were derived from Mtb itself, from Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only licensed vaccine against TB, which was genetically modified to reduce pathogenicity and increase immunogenicity, or from commensal non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Inactivated whole cell TB and non-tuberculous mycobacterial vaccines, intended as immunotherapy or as safer immunization alternatives for HIV+ individuals, also were discussed. Workshop participants agreed that TB vaccine development is significantly hampered by imperfect animal models, unknown immune correlates of protection and the absence of a human challenge model. Although a more effective TB vaccine is needed to replace or enhance the limited effectiveness of BCG in all age groups, members of the workshop concurred that an effective vaccine would have the greatest impact on TB control when administered to adolescents and adults, and that use of whole mycobacteria cells as TB vaccine candidates merits greater support, particularly given the limited understanding of the specific Mtb antigens necessary to generate an immune response capable of preventing Mtb infection and/or disease.

  19. Recombinant biologic products versus nutraceuticals from plants - a regulatory choice?

    PubMed

    Drake, Pascal M W; Szeto, Tim H; Paul, Mathew J; Teh, Audrey Y-H; Ma, Julian K-C

    2017-01-01

    Biotechnology has transformed the potential for plants to be a manufacturing source of pharmaceutical compounds. Now, with transgenic and transient expression techniques, virtually any biologic, including vaccines and therapeutics, could be manufactured in plants. However, uncertainty over the regulatory path for such new pharmaceuticals has been a deterrent. Consideration has been given to using alternative regulatory paths, including those for nutraceuticals or cosmetic agents. This review will consider these possibilities, and discuss the difficulties in establishing regulatory guidelines for new pharmaceutical manufacturing technologies.

  20. Establishment of pandemic influenza vaccine production capacity at Bio Farma, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Suhardono, Mahendra; Ugiyadi, Dori; Nurnaeni, Ida; Emelia, Imelda

    2011-07-01

    In Indonesia, avian influenza A(H5N1) virus started to spread in humans in June 2005, with an alarming case-fatality rate of more than 80%. Considering that global influenza vaccine production capacity would barely have covered 10% of the world's pandemic vaccine needs, and that countries with no production facilities or prearranged contracts would be without access to a vaccine, the Government of Indonesia embarked on a programme to increase its readiness for a future influenza pandemic. This included the domestic production of influenza vaccine, which was entrusted to Bio Farma. This health security strategy consists of developing trivalent influenza vaccine production capacity in order to be able to convert immediately to monovalent production of up to 20 million pandemic doses for the Indonesian market upon receipt of the seed strain from the World Health Organization (WHO). For this purpose, a dedicated production facility is being constructed within the Bio Farma premises in Bandung. As an initial stage of influenza vaccine development, imported seasonal influenza bulk has been formulated and filled in the Bio Farma facility. Following three consecutive batches and successful clinical trials, the product was licensed by the Indonesian National Regulatory Authority and distributed commercially for the Hajj programme in 2009. With continued support from its technology transfer partners, Bio Farma is now advancing with the development of upstream processes to produce its own bulk for seasonal and pandemic use.

  1. Cattle tick vaccines: many candidate antigens, but will a commercially viable product emerge?

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Felix D; Miller, Robert J; Pérez de León, Adalberto A

    2012-05-01

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, is arguably the world's most economically important external parasite of cattle. Sustainable cattle tick control strategies are required to maximise the productivity of cattle in both large production operations and small family farms. Commercially available synthetic acaricides are commonly used in control and eradication programs, but indiscriminate practices in their application have resulted in the rapid evolution of resistance among populations in tropical and subtropical regions where the invasive R. microplus thrives. The need for novel technologies that could be used alone or in combination with commercially available synthetic acaricides is driving a resurgence of cattle tick vaccine discovery research efforts by various groups globally. The aim is to deliver a next-generation vaccine that has an improved efficacy profile over the existing Bm86-based cattle tick vaccine product. We present a short review of these projects and offer our opinion on what constitutes a good target antigen and vaccine, and what might influence the market success of candidate vaccines. The previous experience with Bm86-based vaccines offers perspective on marketing and producer acceptance aspects that a next-generation cattle tick vaccine product must meet for successful commercialisation.

  2. Edible vaccines.

    PubMed

    Artnzen, C J

    1997-01-01

    Vaccines were the result of trial and error research until molecular biology and genetic engineering made possible the creation of of many new and improved vaccines. New vaccines need to be inexpensive, easily administered, and capable of being stored and transported without refrigeration; without these characteristics, developing countries find it difficult to adopt vaccination as the central strategy for preventing their most devastating diseases. The authors describe a promising approach to inexpensive and effective vaccines: producing them in plants we commonly consume.

  3. Assessment of packed bed bioreactor systems in the production of viral vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is believed to be the most effective method for the prevention of infectious diseases. Thus it is imperative to develop cost effective and scalable process for the production of vaccines so as to make them affordable for mass use. In this study, performance of a novel disposable iCELLis fixed bed bioreactor system was investigated for the production of some viral vaccines like Rabies, Hepatitis-A and Chikungunya vaccines in comparison to conventional systems like the commercially available packed bed system and roller bottle system. Vero and MRC-5 cell substrates were evaluated for growth parameters in all the three systems maintaining similar seeding density, multiplicity of infection (MOI) and media components. It was observed that Vero cells showed similar growth in all the three bioreactors whereas MRC-5 cells showed better growth in iCELLis Nano system and roller bottle system. Subsequently, the virus infection and antigen production studies also revealed that for Hepatitis-A and Chikungunya iCELLis Nano bioreactor system was better to the commercial packed bed bioreactor and roller bottle systems. Although for rabies antigen production commercially available packed bed bioreactor system was found to be better. This study shows that different bioreactor platforms may be employed for viral vaccine production and iCELLis Nano is one of such new convenient and a stable platform for production of human viral vaccines. PMID:24949260

  4. Assessment of packed bed bioreactor systems in the production of viral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Ramya; Lingala, Rajendra; Vuppu, Siva Kumar; Bandi, Bala Obulapathi; Manickam, Elaiyaraja; Macherla, Sankar Rao; Dubois, Stéphanie; Havelange, Nicolas; Maithal, Kapil

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is believed to be the most effective method for the prevention of infectious diseases. Thus it is imperative to develop cost effective and scalable process for the production of vaccines so as to make them affordable for mass use. In this study, performance of a novel disposable iCELLis fixed bed bioreactor system was investigated for the production of some viral vaccines like Rabies, Hepatitis-A and Chikungunya vaccines in comparison to conventional systems like the commercially available packed bed system and roller bottle system. Vero and MRC-5 cell substrates were evaluated for growth parameters in all the three systems maintaining similar seeding density, multiplicity of infection (MOI) and media components. It was observed that Vero cells showed similar growth in all the three bioreactors whereas MRC-5 cells showed better growth in iCELLis Nano system and roller bottle system. Subsequently, the virus infection and antigen production studies also revealed that for Hepatitis-A and Chikungunya iCELLis Nano bioreactor system was better to the commercial packed bed bioreactor and roller bottle systems. Although for rabies antigen production commercially available packed bed bioreactor system was found to be better. This study shows that different bioreactor platforms may be employed for viral vaccine production and iCELLis Nano is one of such new convenient and a stable platform for production of human viral vaccines.

  5. Biological treatment of shrimp production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Boopathy, Raj

    2009-07-01

    Over the last few decades, there has been an increase in consumer demand for shrimp, which has resulted in its worldwide aquaculture production. In the United States, the stringent enforcement of environmental regulations encourages shrimp farmers to develop new technologies, such as recirculating raceway systems. This is a zero-water exchange system capable of producing high-density shrimp yields. The system also produces wastewater characterized by high levels of ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and organic carbon, which make waste management costs prohibitive. Shrimp farmers have a great need for a waste management method that is effective and economical. One such method is the sequencing batch reactor (SBR). A SBR is a variation of the activated sludge biological treatment process. This process uses multiple steps in the same reactor to take the place of multiple reactors in a conventional treatment system. The SBR accomplishes equalization, aeration, and clarification in a timed sequence in a single reactor system. This is achieved through reactor operation in sequences, which includes fill, react, settle, decant, and idle. A laboratory scale SBR was successfully operated using shrimp aquaculture wastewater. The wastewater contained high concentrations of carbon and nitrogen. By operating the reactors sequentially, namely, aerobic and anoxic modes, nitrification and denitrification were achieved as well as removal of carbon. Ammonia in the waste was nitrified within 4 days. The denitrification of nitrate was achieved by the anoxic process, and 100% removal of nitrate was observed within 15 days of reactor operation.

  6. A Cell-Based Systems Biology Assessment of Human Blood to Monitor Immune Responses after Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Hoek, Kristen L.; Samir, Parimal; Howard, Leigh M.; Niu, Xinnan; Prasad, Nripesh; Galassie, Allison; Liu, Qi; Allos, Tara M.; Floyd, Kyle A.; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Levy, Shawn E.; Joyce, Sebastian; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Link, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Systems biology is an approach to comprehensively study complex interactions within a biological system. Most published systems vaccinology studies have utilized whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to monitor the immune response after vaccination. Because human blood is comprised of multiple hematopoietic cell types, the potential for masking responses of under-represented cell populations is increased when analyzing whole blood or PBMC. To investigate the contribution of individual cell types to the immune response after vaccination, we established a rapid and efficient method to purify human T and B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), monocytes, and neutrophils from fresh venous blood. Purified cells were fractionated and processed in a single day. RNA-Seq and quantitative shotgun proteomics were performed to determine expression profiles for each cell type prior to and after inactivated seasonal influenza vaccination. Our results show that transcriptomic and proteomic profiles generated from purified immune cells differ significantly from PBMC. Differential expression analysis for each immune cell type also shows unique transcriptomic and proteomic expression profiles as well as changing biological networks at early time points after vaccination. This cell type-specific information provides a more comprehensive approach to monitor vaccine responses. PMID:25706537

  7. A cell-based systems biology assessment of human blood to monitor immune responses after influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hoek, Kristen L; Samir, Parimal; Howard, Leigh M; Niu, Xinnan; Prasad, Nripesh; Galassie, Allison; Liu, Qi; Allos, Tara M; Floyd, Kyle A; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Levy, Shawn E; Joyce, Sebastian; Edwards, Kathryn M; Link, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Systems biology is an approach to comprehensively study complex interactions within a biological system. Most published systems vaccinology studies have utilized whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to monitor the immune response after vaccination. Because human blood is comprised of multiple hematopoietic cell types, the potential for masking responses of under-represented cell populations is increased when analyzing whole blood or PBMC. To investigate the contribution of individual cell types to the immune response after vaccination, we established a rapid and efficient method to purify human T and B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), monocytes, and neutrophils from fresh venous blood. Purified cells were fractionated and processed in a single day. RNA-Seq and quantitative shotgun proteomics were performed to determine expression profiles for each cell type prior to and after inactivated seasonal influenza vaccination. Our results show that transcriptomic and proteomic profiles generated from purified immune cells differ significantly from PBMC. Differential expression analysis for each immune cell type also shows unique transcriptomic and proteomic expression profiles as well as changing biological networks at early time points after vaccination. This cell type-specific information provides a more comprehensive approach to monitor vaccine responses.

  8. Immunization against Genital Herpes with a Vaccine Virus That has Defects in Productive and Latent Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Xavier J.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Knipe, David M.

    1999-06-01

    An effective vaccine for genital herpes has been difficult to achieve because of the limited efficacy of subunit vaccines and the safety concerns about live viruses. As an alternative approach, mutant herpes simplex virus strains that are replication-defective can induce protective immunity. To increase the level of safety and to prove that replication was not needed for immunization, we constructed a mutant herpes simplex virus 2 strain containing two deletion mutations, each of which eliminated viral replication. The double-mutant virus induces protective immunity that can reduce acute viral shedding and latent infection in a mouse genital model, but importantly, the double-mutant virus shows a phenotypic defect in latent infection. This herpes vaccine strain, which is immunogenic but has defects in both productive and latent infection, provides a paradigm for the design of vaccines and vaccine vectors for other sexually transmitted diseases, such as AIDS.

  9. Analyses of Brucella Pathogenesis, Host Immunity, and Vaccine Targets using Systems Biology and Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongqun

    2011-01-01

    Brucella is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium that causes zoonotic brucellosis in humans and various animals. Out of 10 classified Brucella species, B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, and B. canis are pathogenic to humans. In the past decade, the mechanisms of Brucella pathogenesis and host immunity have been extensively investigated using the cutting edge systems biology and bioinformatics approaches. This article provides a comprehensive review of the applications of Omics (including genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics) and bioinformatics technologies for the analysis of Brucella pathogenesis, host immune responses, and vaccine targets. Based on more than 30 sequenced Brucella genomes, comparative genomics is able to identify gene variations among Brucella strains that help to explain host specificity and virulence differences among Brucella species. Diverse transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression studies have been conducted to analyze gene expression profiles of wild type Brucella strains and mutants under different laboratory conditions. High throughput Omics analyses of host responses to infections with virulent or attenuated Brucella strains have been focused on responses by mouse and cattle macrophages, bovine trophoblastic cells, mouse and boar splenocytes, and ram buffy coat. Differential serum responses in humans and rams to Brucella infections have been analyzed using high throughput serum antibody screening technology. The Vaxign reverse vaccinology has been used to predict many Brucella vaccine targets. More than 180 Brucella virulence factors and their gene interaction networks have been identified using advanced literature mining methods. The recent development of community-based Vaccine Ontology and Brucellosis Ontology provides an efficient way for Brucella data integration, exchange, and computer-assisted automated reasoning. PMID:22919594

  10. Analyses of Brucella pathogenesis, host immunity, and vaccine targets using systems biology and bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    He, Yongqun

    2012-01-01

    Brucella is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium that causes zoonotic brucellosis in humans and various animals. Out of 10 classified Brucella species, B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, and B. canis are pathogenic to humans. In the past decade, the mechanisms of Brucella pathogenesis and host immunity have been extensively investigated using the cutting edge systems biology and bioinformatics approaches. This article provides a comprehensive review of the applications of Omics (including genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics) and bioinformatics technologies for the analysis of Brucella pathogenesis, host immune responses, and vaccine targets. Based on more than 30 sequenced Brucella genomes, comparative genomics is able to identify gene variations among Brucella strains that help to explain host specificity and virulence differences among Brucella species. Diverse transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression studies have been conducted to analyze gene expression profiles of wild type Brucella strains and mutants under different laboratory conditions. High throughput Omics analyses of host responses to infections with virulent or attenuated Brucella strains have been focused on responses by mouse and cattle macrophages, bovine trophoblastic cells, mouse and boar splenocytes, and ram buffy coat. Differential serum responses in humans and rams to Brucella infections have been analyzed using high throughput serum antibody screening technology. The Vaxign reverse vaccinology has been used to predict many Brucella vaccine targets. More than 180 Brucella virulence factors and their gene interaction networks have been identified using advanced literature mining methods. The recent development of community-based Vaccine Ontology and Brucellosis Ontology provides an efficient way for Brucella data integration, exchange, and computer-assisted automated reasoning.

  11. Biosynthesis of therapeutic natural products using synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Awan, Ali R; Shaw, William M; Ellis, Tom

    2016-10-01

    Natural products are a group of bioactive structurally diverse chemicals produced by microorganisms and plants. These molecules and their derivatives have contributed to over a third of the therapeutic drugs produced in the last century. However, over the last few decades traditional drug discovery pipelines from natural products have become far less productive and far more expensive. One recent development with promise to combat this trend is the application of synthetic biology to therapeutic natural product biosynthesis. Synthetic biology is a young discipline with roots in systems biology, genetic engineering, and metabolic engineering. In this review, we discuss the use of synthetic biology to engineer improved yields of existing therapeutic natural products. We further describe the use of synthetic biology to combine and express natural product biosynthetic genes in unprecedented ways, and how this holds promise for opening up completely new avenues for drug discovery and production.

  12. [Application of systems biology and synthetic biology in strain improvement for biofuel production].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu; Li, Yin

    2010-07-01

    Biofuels are renewable and environmentally friendly, but high production cost makes them economically not competitive, and the development of robust strains is thus one of the prerequisites. In this article, strain improvement studies based on the information from systems biology studies are reviewed, with a focus on their applications on stress tolerance improvement. Furthermore, the contribution of systems biology, synthetic biology and metabolic engineering in strain development for biofuel production is discussed, with an expectation for developing more robust strains for biofuel production.

  13. A Systems Biology Approach for Diagnostic and Vaccine Antigen Discovery in Tropical Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Li; Felgner, Philip L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review: There is a need for improved diagnosis and for more rapidly assessing the presence, prevalence and spread of newly emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases. An approach to the pathogen-detection strategy is based on analyzing host immune response to the infection. This review focuses on a protein microarray approach for this purpose. Recent findings: Here we take a protein microarray approach to profile the humoral immune response to numerous infectious agents, and to identify the complete antibody repertoire associated with each disease. The results of these studies lead to the identification of diagnostic markers and potential subunit vaccine candidates. These results from over 30 different organisms can also provide information about common trends in the humoral immune response. Summary: Systems biology approach to identify the antibody repertoire associated with infectious diseases challenge using protein microarray has become a powerful method in identifying diagnostic markers and potential subunit vaccine candidates, and moreover, in providing information on proteomic feature (functional and physically properties) of seroreactive and serodiagnostic antigens. Combining the detection of the pathogen with a comprehensive assessment of the host immune response will provide a new understanding of the correlations between specific causative agents, the host response, and the clinical manifestations of the disease. PMID:26237545

  14. Influenza vaccine production for Brazil: a classic example of successful North-South bilateral technology transfer.

    PubMed

    Miyaki, Cosue; Meros, Mauricio; Precioso, Alexander R; Raw, Isaias

    2011-07-01

    Technology transfer is a promising approach to increase vaccine production at an affordable price in developing countries. In the case of influenza, it is imperative that developing countries acquire the technology to produce pandemic vaccines through the transfer of know-how, as this will be the only way for the majority of these countries to face the huge demand for vaccine created by influenza pandemics. Access to domestically produced influenza vaccine in such health crises is thus an important national defence strategy. However, technology transfer is not a simple undertaking. It requires a committed provider who is willing to transfer a complete production process, and not just the formulation and fill-finish parts of the process. It requires a recipient with established experience in vaccine production for human use and the ability to conduct research into new developments. In addition, the country of the recipient should preferably have sufficient financial resources to support the undertaking, and an internal market for the new vaccine. Technology transfer should create a solid partnership that results in the joint development of new competency, improvements to the product, and to further innovation. The Instituto Butantan-sanofi pasteur partnership can be seen as a model for successful technology transfer and has led to the technological independence of the Instituto Butantan in the use a strategic public health tool.

  15. Constructing target product profiles (TPPs) to help vaccines overcome post-approval obstacles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Burke, Donald S.

    2012-01-01

    As history has demonstrated, post-approval obstacles can impede a vaccine’s use and potentially lead to its withdrawal. Addressing these potential obstacles when changes in a vaccine’s technology can still be easily made may improve a vaccine’s chances of success. Augmented vaccine target product profiles (TPPs) can help vaccine scientists better understand and anticipate these obstacles and galvanize conversations among various vaccine stakeholders (e.g., scientists, marketers, business development managers, policy makers, public health officials, health care workers, third party payors, etc.) earlier in a vaccine’s development. PMID:19782109

  16. Vaccine antigen production in transgenic plants: strategies, gene constructs and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sala, Francesco; Manuela Rigano, M; Barbante, Alessandra; Basso, Barbara; Walmsley, Amanda M; Castiglione, Stefano

    2003-01-30

    Stable integration of a gene into the plant nuclear or chloroplast genome can transform higher plants (e.g. tobacco, potato, tomato, banana) into bioreactors for the production of subunit vaccines for oral or parental administration. This can also be achieved by using recombinant plant viruses as transient expression vectors in infected plants. The use of plant-derived vaccines may overcome some of the major problems encountered with traditional vaccination against infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases and tumours. They also offer a convenient tool against the threat of bio-terrorism. State of the art, experimental strategies, safety and perspectives are discussed in this article.

  17. Physicochemical and biological characterization of 1E10 Anti-Idiotype vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 1E10 monoclonal antibody is a murine anti-idiotypic antibody that mimics N-glycolyl-GM3 gangliosides. This antibody has been tested as an anti-idiotypic cancer vaccine, adjuvated in Al(OH)3, in several clinical trials for melanoma, breast, and lung cancer. During early clinical development this mAb was obtained in vivo from mice ascites fluid. Currently, the production process of 1E10 is being transferred from the in vivo to a bioreactor-based method. Results Here, we present a comprehensive molecular and immunological characterization of 1E10 produced by the two different production processes in order to determine the impact of the manufacturing process in vaccine performance. We observed differences in glycosylation pattern, charge heterogeneity and structural stability between in vivo-produced 1E10 and bioreactor-obtained 1E10. Interestingly, these modifications had no significant impact on the immune responses elicited in two different animal models. Conclusions Changes in 1E10 primary structure like glycosylation; asparagine deamidation and oxidation affected 1E10 structural stability but did not affect the immune response elicited in mice and chickens when compared to 1E10 produced in mice. PMID:22108317

  18. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  19. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  20. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  1. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  2. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be...

  3. Vaccine process technology.

    PubMed

    Josefsberg, Jessica O; Buckland, Barry

    2012-06-01

    The evolution of vaccines (e.g., live attenuated, recombinant) and vaccine production methods (e.g., in ovo, cell culture) are intimately tied to each other. As vaccine technology has advanced, the methods to produce the vaccine have advanced and new vaccine opportunities have been created. These technologies will continue to evolve as we strive for safer and more immunogenic vaccines and as our understanding of biology improves. The evolution of vaccine process technology has occurred in parallel to the remarkable growth in the development of therapeutic proteins as products; therefore, recent vaccine innovations can leverage the progress made in the broader biotechnology industry. Numerous important legacy vaccines are still in use today despite their traditional manufacturing processes, with further development focusing on improving stability (e.g., novel excipients) and updating formulation (e.g., combination vaccines) and delivery methods (e.g., skin patches). Modern vaccine development is currently exploiting a wide array of novel technologies to create safer and more efficacious vaccines including: viral vectors produced in animal cells, virus-like particles produced in yeast or insect cells, polysaccharide conjugation to carrier proteins, DNA plasmids produced in E. coli, and therapeutic cancer vaccines created by in vitro activation of patient leukocytes. Purification advances (e.g., membrane adsorption, precipitation) are increasing efficiency, while innovative analytical methods (e.g., microsphere-based multiplex assays, RNA microarrays) are improving process understanding. Novel adjuvants such as monophosphoryl lipid A, which acts on antigen presenting cell toll-like receptors, are expanding the previously conservative list of widely accepted vaccine adjuvants. As in other areas of biotechnology, process characterization by sophisticated analysis is critical not only to improve yields, but also to determine the final product quality. From a regulatory

  4. Production and purification of plasmid DNA vaccines: is there scope for further innovation?

    PubMed

    Xenopoulos, Alex; Pattnaik, Priyabrata

    2014-12-01

    The demand for plasmid DNA (pDNA) has vastly increased over the past decade in response to significant advances that have been made in its application for gene therapy and vaccine development. Plasmid DNA-based vaccines are experiencing a resurgence due to success with prime-boost immunization strategies. The challenge has always been poor productivity and delivery of pDNA. Plasmid DNA-based vaccines have traditionally required milligram scale of GMP-grade product for vaccination due to the relatively low efficacy and duration of gene expression. However, efforts to increase pDNA vaccine effectiveness are evolving in genetic manipulations of bacterial host, improvements in product recovery and innovative delivery methods. This review summarizes recent advances in large-scale pDNA vaccine manufacturing, ranging from upstream processing, downstream processing and formulation, as such information is usually not available to the scientific community. The article will highlight technology gaps and offer insight on further scope of innovation.

  5. Design control considerations for biologic-device combination products.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Dave; Liu, Roger; Anand Subramony, J; Cammack, Jon

    2017-01-11

    Combination products are therapeutic and diagnostic medical products that combine drugs, devices, and/or biological products with one another. Historically, biologics development involved identifying efficacious doses administered to patients intravenously or perhaps by a syringe. Until fairly recently, there has been limited focus on developing an accompanying medical device, such as a prefilled syringe or auto-injector, to enable easy and more efficient delivery. For the last several years, and looking forward, where there may be little to distinguish biologics medicines with relatively similar efficacy profiles, the biotechnology market is beginning to differentiate products by patient-focused, biologic-device based combination products. As innovative as biologic-device combination products are, they can pose considerable development, regulatory, and commercialization challenges due to unique physicochemical properties and special clinical considerations (e.g., dosing volumes, frequency, co-medications, etc.) of the biologic medicine. A biologic-device combination product is a marriage between two partners with "cultural differences," so to speak. There are clear differences in the development, review, and commercialization processes of the biologic and the device. When these two cultures come together in a combination product, developers and reviewers must find ways to address the design controls and risk management processes of both the biologic and device, and knit them into a single entity with supporting product approval documentation. Moreover, digital medicine and connected health trends are pushing the boundaries of combination product development and regulations even further. Despite an admirable cooperation between industry and FDA in recent years, unique product configurations and design features have resulted in review challenges. These challenges have prompted agency reviewers to modernize consultation processes, while at the same time, promoting

  6. Influenza Vaccine Manufacturing: Effect of Inactivation, Splitting and Site of Manufacturing. Comparison of Influenza Vaccine Production Processes

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Theone C.; Onu, Adrian; Berbecila, Laurentiu; Lupulescu, Emilia; Ghiorgisor, Alina; Kersten, Gideon F.; Cui, Yi-Qing; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Van der Pol, Leo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different inactivation and splitting procedures on influenza vaccine product composition, stability and recovery to support transfer of process technology. Four split and two whole inactivated virus (WIV) influenza vaccine bulks were produced and compared with respect to release criteria, stability of the bulk and haemagglutinin recovery. One clarified harvest of influenza H3N2 A/Uruguay virus prepared on 25.000 fertilized eggs was divided equally over six downstream processes. The main unit operation for purification was sucrose gradient zonal ultracentrifugation. The inactivation of the virus was performed with either formaldehyde in phosphate buffer or with beta-propiolactone in citrate buffer. For splitting of the viral products in presence of Tween®, either Triton™ X-100 or di-ethyl-ether was used. Removal of ether was established by centrifugation and evaporation, whereas removal of Triton-X100 was performed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. All products were sterile filtered and subjected to a 5 months real time stability study. In all processes, major product losses were measured after sterile filtration; with larger losses for split virus than for WIV. The beta-propiolactone inactivation on average resulted in higher recoveries compared to processes using formaldehyde inactivation. Especially ether split formaldehyde product showed low recovery and least stability over a period of five months. PMID:26959983

  7. Influenza Vaccine Manufacturing: Effect of Inactivation, Splitting and Site of Manufacturing. Comparison of Influenza Vaccine Production Processes.

    PubMed

    Kon, Theone C; Onu, Adrian; Berbecila, Laurentiu; Lupulescu, Emilia; Ghiorgisor, Alina; Kersten, Gideon F; Cui, Yi-Qing; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Van der Pol, Leo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different inactivation and splitting procedures on influenza vaccine product composition, stability and recovery to support transfer of process technology. Four split and two whole inactivated virus (WIV) influenza vaccine bulks were produced and compared with respect to release criteria, stability of the bulk and haemagglutinin recovery. One clarified harvest of influenza H3N2 A/Uruguay virus prepared on 25.000 fertilized eggs was divided equally over six downstream processes. The main unit operation for purification was sucrose gradient zonal ultracentrifugation. The inactivation of the virus was performed with either formaldehyde in phosphate buffer or with beta-propiolactone in citrate buffer. For splitting of the viral products in presence of Tween®, either Triton™ X-100 or di-ethyl-ether was used. Removal of ether was established by centrifugation and evaporation, whereas removal of Triton-X100 was performed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. All products were sterile filtered and subjected to a 5 months real time stability study. In all processes, major product losses were measured after sterile filtration; with larger losses for split virus than for WIV. The beta-propiolactone inactivation on average resulted in higher recoveries compared to processes using formaldehyde inactivation. Especially ether split formaldehyde product showed low recovery and least stability over a period of five months.

  8. Two initial vaccinations with the Bm86-based Gavacplus vaccine against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus induce similar reproductive suppression to three initial vaccinations under production conditions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, affects livestock production in many regions of the world. Up to now, the widespread use of chemical acaricides has led to the selection of acaricide-resistant ticks and to environmental contamination. Gavacplus is a subunit vaccine based on the recombinant Bm86 tick antigen expressed in yeast, capable to control infestations of R. microplus under controlled and production conditions. The vaccine constitutes the core element of broad control programs against this ectoparasite, in which acquired immunity in cattle to Bm86 is combined with a rational use of acaricides. At present, the conventional vaccine scheme consists of three doses that should be administered at weeks 0, 4 and 7, followed by a booster every six months. Results In this study we assayed a reduction in the number of the initial doses of Gavacplus, evaluated the time course and the level of bovine anti-Bm86 antibodies elicited, and analyzed the vaccine effect on ticks engorging on immunized cattle under production conditions. Following three different immunization schemes, the bovines developed a strong and specific immune response characterized by elevated anti-Bm86 IgG titers. A reduction in the weight of engorging female ticks, in the weight of the eggs laid and also in R. microplus viable eggs percentage was obtained by using only two doses of Gavacplus administered at weeks 0 and 4, followed by a booster six months later. This reduction did not differ from the results obtained on ticks engorging on cattle immunized at weeks 0, 4 and 7. It was also demonstrated that anti-Bm86 antibody titers over 1:640, measured in bovines immunized at weeks 0 and 4, were sufficient to affect weight and reproductive potential of female ticks as compared with ticks engorging on unvaccinated animals. In addition, no statistically significant differences were detected in the average weight of eggs laid by ticks engorged on immunized cattle that showed

  9. Biological control and sustainable food production.

    PubMed

    Bale, J S; van Lenteren, J C; Bigler, F

    2008-02-27

    The use of biological control for the management of pest insects pre-dates the modern pesticide era. The first major successes in biological control occurred with exotic pests controlled by natural enemy species collected from the country or area of origin of the pest (classical control). Augmentative control has been successfully applied against a range of open-field and greenhouse pests, and conservation biological control schemes have been developed with indigenous predators and parasitoids. The cost-benefit ratio for classical biological control is highly favourable (1:250) and for augmentative control is similar to that of insecticides (1:2-1:5), with much lower development costs. Over the past 120 years, more than 5000 introductions of approximately 2000 non-native control agents have been made against arthropod pests in 196 countries or islands with remarkably few environmental problems. Biological control is a key component of a 'systems approach' to integrated pest management, to counteract insecticide-resistant pests, withdrawal of chemicals and minimize the usage of pesticides. Current studies indicate that genetically modified insect-resistant Bt crops may have no adverse effects on the activity or function of predators or parasitoids used in biological control. The introduction of rational approaches for the environmental risk assessment of non-native control agents is an essential step in the wider application of biological control, but future success is strongly dependent on a greater level of investment in research and development by governments and related organizations that are committed to a reduced reliance on chemical control.

  10. 9 CFR 112.6 - Packaging biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Packaging biological products. 112.6 Section 112.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND...

  11. 9 CFR 112.6 - Packaging biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Packaging biological products. 112.6 Section 112.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND...

  12. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Preparation of experimental biological products. 103.1 Section 103.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  13. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Preparation of experimental biological products. 103.1 Section 103.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  14. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Biological products; exemption. 106.1 Section 106.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR...

  15. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Biological products; exemption. 106.1 Section 106.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR...

  16. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Biological products; exemption. 106.1 Section 106.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR...

  17. 9 CFR 101.3 - Biological products and related terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biological products and related terms. 101.3 Section 101.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  18. 9 CFR 112.6 - Packaging biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packaging biological products. 112.6 Section 112.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND...

  19. 9 CFR 115.2 - Inspections of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inspections of biological products. 115.2 Section 115.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  20. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Biological products; exemption. 106.1 Section 106.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR...

  1. 9 CFR 112.6 - Packaging biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Packaging biological products. 112.6 Section 112.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PACKAGING AND...

  2. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sampling of biological products. 113.3 Section 113.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD...

  3. Advances in host and vector development for the production of plasmid DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Juergen; Lara, Alvaro R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in DNA vaccine research provide a new momentum for this rather young and potentially disruptive technology. Gene-based vaccines are capable of eliciting protective immunity in humans to persistent intracellular pathogens, such as HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis, for which the conventional vaccine technologies have failed so far. The recent identification and characterization of genes coding for tumor antigens has stimulated the development of DNA-based antigen-specific cancer vaccines. Although most academic researchers consider the production of reasonable amounts of plasmid DNA (pDNA) for immunological studies relatively easy to solve, problems often arise during this first phase of production. In this chapter we review the current state of the art of pDNA production at small (shake flasks) and mid-scales (lab-scale bioreactor fermentations) and address new trends in vector design and strain engineering. We will guide the reader through the different stages of process design starting from choosing the most appropriate plasmid backbone, choosing the right Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain for production, and cultivation media and scale-up issues. In addition, we will address some points concerning the safety and potency of the produced plasmids, with special focus on producing antibiotic resistance-free plasmids. The main goal of this chapter is to make immunologists aware of the fact that production of the pDNA vaccine has to be performed with as much as attention and care as the rest of their research.

  4. Sweeten PAMPs: Role of Sugar Complexed PAMPs in Innate Immunity and Vaccine Biology

    PubMed Central

    Mahla, Ranjeet Singh; Reddy, Madhava C.; Prasad, D. Vijaya Raghava; Kumar, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    Innate sensors play a critical role in the early innate immune responses to invading pathogens through sensing of diverse biochemical signatures also known as pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). These biochemical signatures primarily consist of a major family of biomolecules such as proteins, lipids, nitrogen bases, and sugar and its complexes, which are distinct from host molecules and exclusively expressed in pathogens and essential to their survival. The family of sensors known as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are germ-line encoded, evolutionarily conserved molecules, and consist of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), NOD-like receptors (NLRs), C-type lectin-like receptors (CLRs), and DNA sensors. Sensing of PAMP by PRR initiates the cascade of signaling leading to the activation of transcription factors, such as NF-κB and interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), resulting in a variety of cellular responses, including the production of interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this review, we discuss sensing of different types of glycosylated PAMPs such as β-glucan (a polymeric sugar) or lipopolysaccharides, nucleic acid, and so on (sugar complex PAMPs) by different families of sensors, its role in pathogenesis, and its application in development of potential vaccine and vaccine adjuvants. PMID:24032031

  5. Tularemia vaccines - an overview.

    PubMed

    McMurry, Julie A; Moise, Leonard; Gregory, Stephen H; De Groot, Anne S

    2007-10-01

    F tularensis is among of the most virulent pathogens known, yet it remains poorly understood. Correlates of protection involve robust CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, and the production of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-12. Novel approaches may be required to develop a safe vaccine that achieves these correlates. In contrast to other types of vaccines, epitope-based vaccines combine targeted biologic activity with the practical advantages of platform independence, scalable synthesis and manufacturing. These advantages, coupled with the proof of principle achieved with an epitope-based tularemia vaccine, suggest that this approach might be applied more widely to develop vaccines against other pathogens, intracellular bacteria most notably.

  6. Development of a whole cell pneumococcal vaccine: BPL inactivation, cGMP production, and stability.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Viviane M; Dias, Waldely O; Campos, Ivana B; Liberman, Celia; Sbrogio-Almeida, Maria E; Silva, Eliane P; Cardoso, Celso P; Alderson, Mark; Robertson, George; Maisonneuve, Jean-François; Tate, Andrea; Anderson, Porter; Malley, Richard; Fratelli, Fernando; Leite, Luciana C C

    2014-02-19

    Pneumococcal infections impose a large burden of disease on the human population, mainly in developing countries, and the current pneumococcal vaccines offer serotype-specific protection, but do not cover all pathogenic strains, leaving populations vulnerable to disease caused by non-vaccine serotypes. The pneumococcal whole cell vaccine is a low-cost strategy based on non-capsular antigens common to all strains, inducing serotype-independent immunity. Therefore, we developed the process for the cGMP production of this cellular vaccine. Initially, three engineering runs and two cGMP runs were performed in 60-L bioreactors, demonstrating the consistency of the production process, as evaluated by the growth curves, glucose consumption and metabolite formation (lactate and acetate). Cell recovery by tangential filtration was 92 ± 13 %. We optimized the conditions for beta-propiolactone (BPL) inactivation of the bacterial suspensions, establishing a maximum cell density of OD600 between 27 and 30, with a BPL concentration of 1:4000 (v/v) at 150 rpm and 4 °C for 30 h. BPL was hydrolyzed by heating for 2h at 37 °C. The criteria and methods for quality control were defined using the engineering runs and the cGMP Lots passed all specifications. cGMP vaccine Lots displayed high potency, inducing between 80 and 90% survival in immunized mice when challenged with virulent pneumococci. Sera from mice immunized with the cGMP Lots recognized several pneumococcal proteins in the extract of encapsulated strains by Western blot. The cGMP whole cell antigen bulk and whole cell vaccine product lots were shown to be stable for up to 12 and 18 months, respectively, based upon survival assays following i.p. challenge. Our results show the consistency and stability of the cGMP whole cell pneumococcal vaccine lots and demonstrate the feasibility of production in a developing country setting.

  7. Department of Defense Acquisition of Vaccine Production. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    albino corn leaves. Can. J. Bot. 47:1051. 3. Abeles, F.B., R.P. Bosshart, L.E. Forrence, and W.H. Habig. 1970. Preparation of purification of glucanase...indefmdont otpinion Os 11he Vaceine St dv tea ho1Jd~i~ It con o tred "I I ptsitiott of the i)Do), DEPUTY SECRETARY OF DEFENSE VACCINE ACQUISITION AND

  8. Advances and challenges in the development and production of effective plant-based influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yusibov, Vidadi; Kushnir, Natasha; Streatfield, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Influenza infections continue to present a major threat to public health. Traditional modes of influenza vaccine manufacturing are failing to satisfy the global demand because of limited scalability and long production timelines. In contrast, subunit vaccines (SUVs) can be produced in heterologous expression systems in shorter times and at higher quantities. Plants are emerging as a promising platform for SUV production due to time efficiency, scalability, lack of harbored mammalian pathogens and possession of the machinery for eukaryotic post-translational protein modifications. So far, several organizations have utilized plant-based transient expression systems to produce SUVs against influenza, including vaccines based on virus-like particles. Plant-produced influenza SUV candidates have been extensively evaluated in animal models and some have shown safety and immunogenicity in clinical trials. Here, the authors review ongoing efforts and challenges to producing influenza SUV candidates in plants and discuss the likelihood of bringing these products to the market.

  9. 9 CFR 102.5 - U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false U.S. Veterinary Biological Product... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 102.5 U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License. (a) Authorization to produce each biological product shall be specified on a U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License, issued by...

  10. 9 CFR 103.3 - Shipment of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... animals, Provided, that, the Administrator determines that the conditions under which the experiment is to... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shipment of experimental biological products. 103.3 Section 103.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  11. 9 CFR 103.1 - Preparation of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Preparation of experimental biological products. 103.1 Section 103.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... submitted to the Administrator. Research facilities that are entirely separate and apart from...

  12. Lessons learned: role of influenza vaccine production, distribution, supply, and demand--what it means for the provider.

    PubMed

    Orenstein, Walter A; Schaffner, William

    2008-07-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been increasing the size of the population for whom influenza vaccine is recommended to reduce the substantial and persistent annual health burden of influenza. Realization of current and future public health influenza immunization goals requires assuring vaccine supply will be adequate to meet demand. This has posed distinct challenges for the many stakeholders in the influenza vaccine program--government agencies, federal, state, and local policymakers, vaccine manufacturers and distributors, and the medical community--each of whom must make critical decisions in a constantly shifting environment. Factors such as the yearly changes in influenza virus strains, the complicated vaccine production and distribution process, revisions in vaccination recommendations, and changing demographics can all affect the delicate balance between supply and demand. While vaccine shortages and delays have been well-publicized concerns in the recent past, there has been a marked increase in supply in the past several years, with substantial growth in supply expected in the future. The primary issue today is to strengthen the demand for the influenza vaccine, which would in turn help ensure the continued availability of the vaccine to reduce disease burden. A number of strategies are discussed, including increased efforts to publicize and fully implement current CDC recommendations and to offer influenza vaccine beyond the typical vaccination season of October and November, because in the great majority of years, vaccination into January and beyond will still provide health benefits.

  13. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    A batch kinetic study involving Clostridium lungdahlii in a mineral medium was carried out in order to provide baseline data for the effects of nutrients on product ratio and kinetics. The use of this minimal medium containing vitamins, minerals, select amino acids and salts showed both a lower maximum specific growth rate and a lower maximum specific uptake rate than found when using a complex medium supplemented with 0.01% yeast extract. At the same time, the product ratio was improved slightly in favor of ethanol over acetate. Future experiments will measure the effects of ammonia and phosphate limitation on product ratio and process kinetics.

  14. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Previous results have shown that the medium pH, the composition of the medium and concentration of medium constituents significantly affect the ratio of ethanol to acetate in the product stream when fermenting CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in synthesis gas to products by Clostridium ljungdahlii. An additional batch study was carried out varying the agitation rate at pH 4, 4.5 and 5.0. It was speculated that increased agitation rates in combination with low pH might result in increased ethanol production while, at the same time, yielding higher cell concentrations which could eventually result in higher ethanol concentrations.

  15. Optimization of a methamphetamine conjugate vaccine for antibody production in mice.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Misty W; Gunnell, Melinda G; Tawney, Rachel; Owens, S Michael

    2016-06-01

    There are still no approved medications for treating patients who abuse methamphetamine. Active vaccines for treating abuse of nicotine and cocaine are in clinical studies, but have not proven effective seemingly due to inadequate anti-drug antibody production. The current studies aimed to optimize the composition, adjuvant and route of administration of a methamphetamine conjugate vaccine, ICKLH-SMO9, in mice with the goal of generating significantly higher antibody levels. A range of hapten epitope densities were compared, as were the adjuvants Alhydrogel and a new Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist called GLA-SE. While methamphetamine hapten density did not strongly affect the antibody response, the adjuvant did. Glucopyranosyl lipid A in a stable oil-in-water emulsion (GLA-SE) produced much higher levels of antibody in response to immunization compared with Alhydrogel; immunization with GLA-SE also produced antibodies with higher affinities for methamphetamine. GLA-SE has been used in human studies of vaccines for influenza among others and like some other clinical TLR4 agonists, it is safe and elicits a strong immune response. GLA-SE adjuvanted vaccines are typically administered by intramuscular injection and this also proved effective in these mouse studies. Clinical studies of the ICKLH-SMO9 methamphetamine vaccine adjuvanted with GLA-SE have the potential for demonstrating efficacy by generating much higher levels of antibody than substance abuse vaccines that have unsuccessfully used aluminum-based adjuvants.

  16. Recombinant Alpha, Beta, and Epsilon Toxins of Clostridium perfringens: Production Strategies and Applications as Veterinary Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Marcos Roberto A.; Moreira, Gustavo Marçal S. G.; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P.; Mendonça, Marcelo; Salvarani, Felipe M.; Moreira, Ângela N.; Conceição, Fabricio R.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a spore-forming, commensal, ubiquitous bacterium that is present in the gastrointestinal tract of healthy humans and animals. This bacterium produces up to 18 toxins. The species is classified into five toxinotypes (A–E) according to the toxins that the bacterium produces: alpha, beta, epsilon, or iota. Each of these toxinotypes is associated with myriad different, frequently fatal, illnesses that affect a range of farm animals and humans. Alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins are the main causes of disease. Vaccinations that generate neutralizing antibodies are the most common prophylactic measures that are currently in use. These vaccines consist of toxoids that are obtained from C. perfringens cultures. Recombinant vaccines offer several advantages over conventional toxoids, especially in terms of the production process. As such, they are steadily gaining ground as a promising vaccination solution. This review discusses the main strategies that are currently used to produce recombinant vaccines containing alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins of C. perfringens, as well as the potential application of these molecules as vaccines for mammalian livestock animals. PMID:27879630

  17. Recombinant Alpha, Beta, and Epsilon Toxins of Clostridium perfringens: Production Strategies and Applications as Veterinary Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcos Roberto A; Moreira, Gustavo Marçal S G; Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P da; Mendonça, Marcelo; Salvarani, Felipe M; Moreira, Ângela N; Conceição, Fabricio R

    2016-11-21

    Clostridium perfringens is a spore-forming, commensal, ubiquitous bacterium that is present in the gastrointestinal tract of healthy humans and animals. This bacterium produces up to 18 toxins. The species is classified into five toxinotypes (A-E) according to the toxins that the bacterium produces: alpha, beta, epsilon, or iota. Each of these toxinotypes is associated with myriad different, frequently fatal, illnesses that affect a range of farm animals and humans. Alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins are the main causes of disease. Vaccinations that generate neutralizing antibodies are the most common prophylactic measures that are currently in use. These vaccines consist of toxoids that are obtained from C. perfringens cultures. Recombinant vaccines offer several advantages over conventional toxoids, especially in terms of the production process. As such, they are steadily gaining ground as a promising vaccination solution. This review discusses the main strategies that are currently used to produce recombinant vaccines containing alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins of C. perfringens, as well as the potential application of these molecules as vaccines for mammalian livestock animals.

  18. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Previously studies have shown the importance of both medium composition and concentration and medium pH on ethanol production of Clostridium ljungdahlii in fermenting CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in synthesis gas. Four additional batch experiments involving medium composition and concentration were carried out in modified basal medium without yeast extract at pH 4.0. These experiments indicate that basal medium with only small amounts of B-vitamins can yield significant cell growth while yielding ethanol as the major product. Product ratios as high as 11.0 g ethanol per g acetate were obtained with half strength B-vitamins. Further experiments indicates that Ca-pantothenate may be necessary for the growth of C. ljungdahlii and that growth and ethanol production can occur simultaneously.

  19. Biological Activity of Recently Discovered Halogenated Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents the biological activity—antibacterial, antifungal, anti-parasitic, antiviral, antitumor, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and enzymatic activity—of halogenated marine natural products discovered in the past five years. Newly discovered examples that do not report biological activity are not included. PMID:26133553

  20. 9 CFR 115.2 - Inspections of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... United States veterinary license number or a United States veterinary permit number or other mark...) When notified to stop distribution and sale of a serial or subserial of a veterinary biological product by the Secretary, veterinary biologics licensees or permittees shall: (1) Stop the...

  1. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Research is continuing in an attempt to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio using C. ljungdahlii. The purpose of this report is to present data utilizing a medium prepared especially for C. ljungdahlii. Medium development studies are presented, as well as reactor studies with the new medium in batch reactors. CSTRs and CSTRs with cell recycle. The use of this new medium has resulted in significant improvements in cell concentration, ethanol concentration and product ratio.

  2. Biological production of ethanol fom coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Research is continuing in an attempt to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio using C. ljungdahlii. The purpose of this report is to present data (acetate to ethanol) utilizing a medium prepared especially for C. ljungdahlii. Medium development studies are presented, as well as reactor studies with the new medium in batch reactors. Continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with cell recycle. The use of this new medium has resulted in significant improvements in cell concentration, ethanol concentration and product ratio.

  3. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... a combination product containing Haemophilus influenzae type b, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis, Hepatitis B, Polio Vaccine)

  4. Production of hydrogen using an anaerobic biological process

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Robert; Pelter, Libbie S.; Patterson, John A.

    2016-11-29

    Various embodiments of the present invention pertain to methods for biological production of hydrogen. More specifically, embodiments of the present invention pertain to a modular energy system and related methods for producing hydrogen using organic waste as a feed stock.

  5. Vaccine safety.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M

    2003-11-01

    Rates of reported adverse events are remarkably low. VAERS identifies an adverse event rate approximating 11.4 reports per 100,000 vaccine doses. Approximately 15% of these reports represent SAEs, but less than 2% involve death; in most cases, reviews have shown no causal relation between the events and the vaccine. Across the spectrum of vaccines in use (including those directed against influenza and hepatitis B virus), many claims of adverse events regarding vaccines represent typical reactions to vaccinations. These reactions can be thought of as foreign-body reactions and predominate among the inactivated vaccines. In controlled studies, the adverse event rates that occur with vaccination resemble those that occur with placebo injections. Typical reactions associated with live viral and bacterial vaccines, such as MMR and varicella vaccines, may resemble attenuated forms of the disease for which the vaccine is directed. Other claims against vaccines represent chance-coincidence or misunderstood data; further studies of claims have vindicated the overall safety of the vaccines in most cases. Two documented safety concerns with vaccines, however, have demonstrated that vaccines (like other biologics and pharmacologic) can result in harm (eg, rotavirus and OPV vaccines). The denouement with these vaccines indicates the broad postmarketing data collection and evaluation that extends efforts made with prelicensure study to balance the benefits from vaccination with the risk for harm. Overall, measures including prelicensure study and postlicensure surveillance, such as VAERS, the Vaccine Safety Datalink Project, and the Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment Centers, have resulted in an exceptional safety profile for the vaccines in use.

  6. Casting off vaccine supply charity -- the pace quickens. CVI goal: quality vaccines for all children.

    PubMed

    1995-10-01

    Several proposals are offered for production of high-quality vaccines within developing countries. The World Health Organization's Vaccine Supply and Quality (VSQ) team from the Global Program for Vaccines and Immunization (GPV) visited 10 countries (Bangladesh, Brazil, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Iran, Mexico, Pakistan, Philippines, and South Africa) out of 14 priority countries (China, Russia, Thailand, and Vietnam were not visited) producing vaccines and found only two with a quality control system that was acceptable. Vaccine-producing countries are urged to consider the full costs of production that include necessary infrastructure, an independent national control authority and laboratory, manufacturers with managerial autonomy, and manufacturers with good management, a qualified staff, and adequate technology. UNICEF has urged both private and public sectors to combine forces in bringing down the price of new vaccines for distribution to a very large market. Some imaginative proposals were made by some manufacturers for vaccine production and supply for a range of less traditional vaccines. The Director of the Massachusetts Public Health Biologic Laboratories proposed the formation of a consortium of vaccine manufacturers who would support public health priorities for market-affordable, simple vaccines against the major childhood diseases. The aim would be international validation of high-quality local vaccine production in developing countries, ease of research collaboration, improvement in information exchange between countries, and structured assistance. Lack of political commitment has been blamed for poor quality local production. A small cooperative effort among some Latin American countries, the Pan American Association's Regional Vaccine System for Latin America (SIREVA), is backed by the Children's Vaccine Initiative. SIREVA is a consortium of manufacturers in Brazil, Chile, and Mexico that plans joint development of some vaccines. Donor assistance is

  7. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Previous results have shown that the yeast extract concentration and the medium pH significantly affect the ratio of ethanol to acetate in the product stream when fermenting CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in synthesis gas to products by Clostridium ljungdahlii. Further experimentation has demonstrated the impact of eliminating yeast extract from the medium (except for the slight quantity transferred with the inoculm), especially when coupled with low pH. An ethanol to acetate product ratio of 4.0 was obtained at pH 4.5 without yeast extract present in the medium when using culture previously exposed to growth-limiting H{sub 2}S. The product ratio was 2.0 at pH 4.0 (nearly three times the value of pH 4.5 and nine times the value of pH 5.0) without yeast extract present in the media when using the standard (unexposed) culture.

  8. European Pharmacopoeia biological reference preparation for poliomyelitis vaccine (inactivated): collaborative study for the establishment of batch No. 3.

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Daas, A; Milne, C

    2016-01-01

    Inactivated poliomyelitis vaccines are an important part of the World Health Organization (WHO) control strategy to eradicate poliomyelitis. Requirements for the quality control of poliomyelitis vaccines (inactivated) include the use of an in vitro D antigen quantification assay for potency determination on the final lot as outlined in the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) monograph 0214. Performance of this assay requires a reference preparation calibrated in International Units (IU). A Ph. Eur. biological reference preparation (BRP) for poliomyelitis vaccine (inactivated) calibrated in IU has been established for this purpose. Due to the dwindling stocks of batch 2 of the BRP a collaborative study was run as part of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM) Biological Standardisation Programme to establish BRP batch 3 (BRP3). Twelve laboratories including Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) and manufacturers participated. The candidate BRP3 (cBRP3) was from the same source and had the same characteristics as BRP batch 2 (BRP2). During the study the candidate was calibrated against the 3(rd) International Standard for inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine using in-house D antigen ELISA assays in line with the Ph. Eur. monograph 0214. The candidate was also compared to BRP2 to evaluate the continuity. Based on the results of the study, values of 320 DU/mL, 78 DU/mL and 288 DU/mL (D antigen units/mL) (IU) for poliovirus type 1, 2 and 3 respectively were assigned to the candidate. In June 2016, the Ph. Eur. Commission adopted the material as Ph. Eur. BRP for poliomyelitis vaccine (inactivated) batch 3.

  9. Biological production of liquid fuels from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    A scheme for the production of liquid fuels from renewable resources such as poplar wood and lignocellulosic wastes from a refuse hydropulper was investigated. The particular scheme being studied involves the conversion of a cellulosic residue, resulting from a solvent delignified lignocellulosic feed, into either high concentration sugar syrups or into ethyl and/or butyl alcohol. The construction of a pilot apparatus for solvent delignifying 150 g samples of lignocellulosic feeds was completed. Also, an analysis method for characterizing the delignified product has been selected and tested. This is a method recommended in the Forage Fiber Handbook. Delignified samples are now being prepared and tested for their extent of delignification and susceptibility to enzyme hydrolysis. Work is continuing on characterizing the cellulase and cellobiase enzyme systems derived from the YX strain of Thermomonospora.

  10. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The fermentation pH has been observed to be the key parameter affecting the ratio of ethanol to acetate produced by Clostridium ljungdahlii. The effects of controlled pH on cell growth and product formation by C. ljungdahlii were measured. It was found that cell concentration and acetate concentration increased with pH, while the ethanol concentration was highest at the lower pH. The molar product ratio of ethanol to acetate was 0.74 at pH 4.0, 0.39 at pH 4.5 and 0.12 at pH 5.0. Future experiments will concentrate on studying other important parameters such as agitation rate and nutrients concentrations with controlled pH as a preclude to continuous reactor studies.

  11. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Research is continuing in attempting to increase both the ethanol concentration and product ratio from the C. ljungdahlii fermentation. Both batch and continuous reactors are being used for this purpose. The purpose of this report is four-fold. First, the data presented in PETC Report No. 2-4-91 (June--September 1991) are analyzed and interpreted using normalized specific growth and production rates. This technique eliminates experimental variation due to the differences in inoculum history. Secondly, the effects of the sulfur gases H{sub 2}S and COS on the performance of C. ljungdahlii are presented and discussed. Although these are preliminary results, they illustrate the tolerance of the bacterium to low levels of sulfur gases. Thirdly, the results of continuous stirred tank reactor studies are presented, where cell and product concentrations are shown as a function of agitation rate and gas flow rate. Finally, additional data are presented showing the performance of C. ljungdahlii in a CSTR with cell recycle.

  12. Production of avian influenza virus vaccine using primary cell cultures generated from host organs.

    PubMed

    Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Riaz, Muhammad Suleman; Zaidi, Najam-us-Sahar Sadaf; Afzal, Farhan; Farooq, Muhammad Sabir

    2013-06-01

    The global availability of a therapeutically effective influenza virus vaccine during a pandemic remains a major challenge for the biopharmaceutical industry. Long production time, coupled with decreased supply of embryonated chicken eggs (ECE), significantly affects the conventional vaccine production. Transformed cell lines have attained regulatory approvals for vaccine production. Based on the fact that the avian influenza virus would infect the cells derived from its natural host, the viral growth characteristics were studied on chicken embryo-derived primary cell cultures. The viral propagation was determined on avian origin primary cell cultures, transformed mammalian cell lines, and in ECE. A comparison was made between these systems by utilizing various cell culture-based assays. In-vitro substrate susceptibility and viral infection characteristics were evaluated by performing hemagglutination assay (HA), 50 % tissue culture infectious dose (TCID₅₀) and monitoring of cytopathic effects (CPE) caused by the virus. The primary cell culture developed from chicken embryos showed stable growth characteristics with no contamination. HA, TCID₅₀, and CPE exhibited that these cell systems were permissive to viral infection, yielding 2-10 times higher viral titer as compared to mammalian cell lines. Though the viral output from the ECE was equivalent to the chicken cell culture, the time period for achieving it was decreased to half. Some of the prerequisites of inactivated influenza virus vaccine production include generation of higher vial titer, independence from exogenous sources, and decrease in the production time lines. Based on the tests, it can be concluded that chicken embryo primary cell culture addresses these issues and can serve as a potential alternative for influenza virus vaccine production.

  13. Development of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Recombinant Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Marchioro, Silvana Beutinger; Simionatto, Simone; Dellagostin, Odir

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiological agent of swine enzootic pneumonia (EP), a disease that affects swine production worldwide. Vaccination is the most cost-effective strategy for the control and prevention of the disease. Research using genome-based approach has the potential to elucidate the biology and pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae and contribute to the development of more effective vaccines. Here, we describe the protocol for developing M. hyopneumoniae recombinant vaccines using reverse vaccinology approaches.

  14. Keynote symposium - avian influenza: Vectors, vaccines, public health, and product marketability introduction and welcome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper is the introduction to the Keynote Symposium titled “Avian Influenza: Vectors, Vaccines, Public Health, and Product Marketability” that the author organized for the Poultry Science Association (PSA) on July 20, 2008. The purpose of the symposium was to provide the members and guests of PS...

  15. Producing, controlling, and stabilizing Pasteur's anthrax vaccine: creating a new industry and a health market.

    PubMed

    Cassier, Maurice

    2008-06-01

    When Pasteur and Chamberland hastily set up their small biological industry to meet the agricultural demand for the anthrax vaccine, their methods for preparation and production had not yet been stabilized. The process of learning how to standardize biological products was accelerated in 1882 when vaccination accidents required the revision of production norms as the first hypotheses on fixity, inalterability, and transportability of vaccines were invalidated and replaced by procedures for continuous monitoring of the calibration of vaccines and the renewal of vaccine strains. Initially, the incompleteness and ongoing development of production standards justified Pasteur's monopoly on the production of the anthrax vaccine under his immediate supervision. Later on, the Pasteur Institute maintained control of these standards in the framework of a commercial monopoly that it established on the veterinary vaccines first sent and then cultivated abroad by the Société de Vulgarisation du Vaccin Charbonneux Pasteur, founded in 1886.

  16. The potential of plants as a system for the development and production of human biologics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang; Davis, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    The growing promise of plant-made biologics is highlighted by the success story of ZMapp™ as a potentially life-saving drug during the Ebola outbreak of 2014-2016. Current plant expression platforms offer features beyond the traditional advantages of low cost, high scalability, increased safety, and eukaryotic protein modification. Novel transient expression vectors have been developed that allow the production of vaccines and therapeutics at unprecedented speed to control potential pandemics or bioterrorism attacks. Plant-host engineering provides a method for producing proteins with unique and uniform mammalian post-translational modifications, providing opportunities to develop biologics with increased efficacy relative to their mammalian cell-produced counterparts. Recent demonstrations that plant-made proteins can function as biocontrol agents of foodborne pathogens further exemplify the potential utility of plant-based protein production. However, resolving the technical and regulatory challenges of commercial-scale production, garnering acceptance from large pharmaceutical companies, and obtaining U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for several major classes of biologics are essential steps to fulfilling the untapped potential of this technology. PMID:27274814

  17. Alphavirus vectors for vaccine production and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2003-06-01

    Alphavirus vectors demonstrate high expression of heterologous proteins in a broad range of host cells. Replication-deficient as well as replication-competent variants exist. Systemic delivery of many viral antigens has elicited strong antibody responses in immunized mice and primates, and protection against challenges with lethal viruses was obtained. Similarly, prophylactic vaccination was established against tumor challenges. Attention has been paid to the engineering of improved targeting to immunologically active cells, such as dendritic cells. In the area of gene therapy, intratumoral injections of alphavirus vectors have resulted in potentially promising tumor rejection. Moreover, encapsulation of alphavirus particles into liposomes demonstrated efficient tumor targeting in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency, which permitted the initiation of clinical trials for patients with advanced kidney carcinoma and melanoma.

  18. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Section 113.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... market by a Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service representative. (a) Either an employee of the... biological products shall be selected. (2) Comparable samples shall be used by Animal and Plant...

  19. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Section 113.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... market by a Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service representative. (a) Either an employee of the... biological products shall be selected. (2) Comparable samples shall be used by Animal and Plant...

  20. Role of natural product diversity in chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiyong

    2011-06-01

    Through the natural selection process, natural products possess a unique and vast chemical diversity and have been evolved for optimal interactions with biological macromolecules. Owing to their diversity, target affinity, and specificity, natural products have demonstrated enormous potential as modulators of biomolecular function, been an essential source for drug discovery, and provided design principles for combinatorial library development.

  1. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Section 113.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... market by a Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service representative. (a) Either an employee of the... biological products shall be selected. (2) Comparable samples shall be used by Animal and Plant...

  2. 9 CFR 113.3 - Sampling of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 113.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... market by a Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service representative. (a) Either an employee of the... biological products shall be selected. (2) Comparable samples shall be used by Animal and Plant...

  3. Neurotrophic Natural Products: Chemistry and Biology

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Lacoske, Michelle H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases and spinal cord injury affect approximately 50 million people worldwide, bringing the total healthcare cost to over 600 billion dollars per year. Nervous system growth factors, that is, neurotrophins, are a potential solution to these disorders, since they could promote nerve regeneration. An average of 500 publications per year attests to the significance of neurotrophins in biomedical sciences and underlines their potential for therapeutic applications. Nonetheless, the poor pharmacokinetic profile of neurotrophins severely restricts their clinical use. On the other hand, small molecules that modulate neurotrophic activity offer a promising therapeutic approach against neurological disorders. Nature has provided an impressive array of natural products that have potent neurotrophic activities. This Review highlights the current synthetic strategies toward these compounds and summarizes their ability to induce neuronal growth and rehabilitation. It is anticipated that neurotrophic natural products could be used not only as starting points in drug design but also as tools to study the next frontier in biomedical sciences: the brain activity map project. PMID:24353244

  4. Improvement of FK506 production by synthetic biology approaches.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li-Feng; Tao, Yang; Jin, Mei-Ying; Jiang, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic biology has been applied to direct improvement of valuable metabolite productions. Tacrolimus (FK506), a clinically used immunosuppressive agent isolated from many Streptomyces, is produced by fermentation in industry. Here we chose FK506 as an example to review recent progress in improving FK506 production, including enhancing transcription levels of biosynthetic genes, accelerating post-translational modification levels of biosynthetic enzymes, increasing activities of rate limiting enzymes, and rational supplement of limited precursors. FK506 production was increased from 25 % to sevenfold by these synthetic biology approaches.

  5. Antiradiation Vaccine: Technology Development Of Prophylaxis, Prevention And Treatment Of Biological Consequences And Complications After Neutron Irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava; Jones, Jeffrey

    Introduction: Neutrons irradiation produce a unique biological effectiveness compare to different types of radiation because their ability to create a denser trail of ionized atoms in biological living tissues[Straume 1982; Latif et al.2010; Katz 1978; Bogatyrev 1982]. The efficacy of an Anti-Radiation Vaccine for the prophylaxis, prevention and therapy of acute radiation pathology was studied in a neutron exposure facility. The biological effects of fast neutrons include damage of central nervous system and cardiovascular system with development of Acute Cerebrovascular and Cardiovascular forms of acute radiation pathology. After irradiation by high doses of fast neutron, formation of neurotoxins, hematotoxins,cytotoxins forming from cell's or tissue structures. High doses of Neutron Irradiation generate general and specific toxicity, inflammation reactions. Current Acute Medical Management and Methods of Radiation Protection are not effective against moderate and high doses of neutron irradiation. Our experiments demonstrate that Antiradiation Vaccine is the most effective radioprotectant against high doses of neutron-radiation. Radiation Toxins(biological substances with radio-mimetic properties) isolated from central lymph of gamma-irradiated animals could be working substance with specific antigenic properties for vaccination against neutron irradiation. Methods: Antiradiation Vaccine preparation standard - mixture of a toxoid form of Radiation Toxins - include Cerebrovascular RT Neurotoxin, Cardiovascular RT Neurotoxin, Gastrointestinal RT Neurotoxin, Hematopoietic RT Hematotoxin. Radiation Toxins were isolated from the central lymph of gamma-irradiated animals with different forms of Acute Radiation Syndromes - Cerebrovascular, Cardiovascular, Gastrointestinal, Hematopoietic forms. Devices for Y-radiation were "Panorama","Puma". Neutron exposure was accomplished at the Department of Research Institute of Nuclear Physics, Dubna, Russia. The neutrons

  6. Edible vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Artnzen, C J

    1997-01-01

    Vaccines were the result of trial and error research until molecular biology and genetic engineering made possible the creation of of many new and improved vaccines. New vaccines need to be inexpensive, easily administered, and capable of being stored and transported without refrigeration; without these characteristics, developing countries find it difficult to adopt vaccination as the central strategy for preventing their most devastating diseases. The authors describe a promising approach to inexpensive and effective vaccines: producing them in plants we commonly consume. Images p190-a p191-a p193-a p196-a PMID:9182305

  7. Safety of plant-made pharmaceuticals: product development and regulatory considerations based on case studies of two autologous human cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tusé, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Guidelines issued by regulatory agencies for the development of plant-made pharmaceutical (PMP) products provide criteria for product manufacturing and characterization, safety determination, containment and mitigation of environmental risks. Features of plant-made products do not always enable an easy fit within the criteria subscribed to by regulators. The unconventional nature of plant-based manufacturing processes and peculiarities of plant biology relative to that of traditional biological production systems have led to special considerations in the regulatory scrutiny of PMP. Presented in this review are case studies of two plant-made autologous (patient-specific) cancer vaccines, the nature of which introduced challenges to conventional and standardized development and preclinical evaluation routes. The rationale presented to FDA by the sponsors of each vaccine to build consensus and obtain variances to existing guidelines is discussed. While development of many plant-made biologics can be accomplished within the existing regulatory framework, the development of specialized products can be defended with rational arguments based on strong science.

  8. Rabies virus inactivation by binary ethylenimine: new method for inactivated vaccine production.

    PubMed Central

    Larghi, O P; Nebel, A E

    1980-01-01

    The inactivation dynamics of rabies virus (PV strain) by binary ethylenimine, and the immunogenic properites and the stability of the vaccines prepared using this agent, were studied. Binary ethylenimine at a final concentration of 0.01 M was prepared wtih 2-bromoethylamine hydrobromide in alkaline solutions, either separately from or in suspensions of rabies virus propagated in BHK cells. The infectivity of virus suspensions containing more than 108 plaque-forming units per 0.1 ml was inactivated in 2 h when the inactivating agent was prepared before its addition to the suspensions, and in3 h when prepared directly in the suspensions. Liquid vaccines prepared in this manner and stored at different temperatures maintained potency for 1 month at 37 degrees C and for 6 months at 4 degrees C and 22 to 25 degrees C. Lyophilized vaccine maintained its potency for 6 months at the three temperatures. The inactivated vaccine mixed with aluminum or oil adjuvant at high dilutions protected guinea pigs against challenge. This safer procedure for rabies virus inactivation offers promise for the production of effective vaccines for the immunization of dogs and cattle. PMID:7358836

  9. Biology of Francisella tularensis Subspecies holarctica Live Vaccine Strain in the Tick Vector Dermacentor variabilis

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Rinosh J.; Reichard, Mason V.; Morton, Rebecca J.; Kocan, Katherine M.; Clinkenbeard, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Background The γ-proteobacterium Francisella tularensis is the etiologic agent of seasonal tick-transmitted tularemia epizootics in rodents and rabbits and of incidental infections in humans. The biology of F. tularensis in its tick vectors has not been fully described, particularly with respect to its quanta and duration of colonization, tissue dissemination, and transovarial transmission. A systematic study of the colonization of Dermacentor variabilis by the F. tularensis subsp. holarctica live vaccine strain (LVS) was undertaken to better understand whether D. variabilis may serve as an inter-epizootic reservoir for F. tularensis. Methodology/Principal Findings Colony-reared larva, nymph, and adult D. variabilis were artificially fed LVS via glass capillary tubes fitted over the tick mouthparts, and the level of colonization determined by microbial culture. Larvae and nymphs were initially colonized with 8.8±0.8×101 and 1.1±0.03×103 CFU/tick, respectively. Post-molting, a significant increase in colonization of both molted nymphs and adults occurred, and LVS persisted in 42% of molted adult ticks at 126 days post-capillary tube feeding. In adult ticks, LVS initially colonized the gut, disseminated to hemolymph and salivary glands by 21 days, and persisted up to 165 days. LVS was detected in the salivary secretions of adult ticks after four days post intra-hemocoelic inoculation, and LVS recovered from salivary gland was infectious to mice with an infectious dose 50% of 3 CFU. LVS in gravid female ticks colonized via the intra-hemocoelic route disseminated to the ovaries and then to the oocytes, but the pathogen was not recovered from the subsequently-hatched larvae. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that D. variabilis can be efficiently colonized with F. tularensis using artificial methods. The persistence of F. tularensis in D. variabilis suggests that this tick species may be involved in the maintenance of enzootic foci of tularemia in the

  10. The Interstellar Production of Biologically Important Organics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Dworkin, Jason; Allamandola, Louis J.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary tasks of the Astrochemistry Laboratory at Ames Research Center is to use laboratory simulations to study the chemical processes that occur in dense interstellar clouds. Since new stars are formed in these clouds, their materials may be responsible for the delivery of organics to new habitable planets and may play important roles in the origin of life. These clouds are extremely cold (less than 50 kelvin), and most of the volatiles in these clouds are condensed onto dust grains as thin ice mantles. These ices are exposed to cosmic rays and ultraviolet (UV) photons that break chemical bonds and result in the production of complex molecules when the ices are warmed (as they would be when incorporated into a star-forming region). Using cryovacuum systems and UV lamps, this study simulates the conditions of these clouds and studies the resulting chemistry. Some of the areas of progress made in 1999 are described below. It shows some of the types of molecules that may be formed in the interstellar medium. Laboratory simulations have already confirmed that many of these compounds are made under these conditions.

  11. Systems Biology Approaches to Understand Natural Products Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Manteca, Angel; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Nielsen, Lars K; Marcellin, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycetes populate soils and aquatic sediments that impose biotic and abiotic challenges for their survival. As a result, actinomycetes metabolism and genomes have evolved to produce an overwhelming diversity of specialized molecules. Polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, post-translationally modified peptides, lactams, and terpenes are well-known bioactive natural products with enormous industrial potential. Accessing such biological diversity has proven difficult due to the complex regulation of cellular metabolism in actinomycetes and to the sparse knowledge of their physiology. The past decade, however, has seen the development of omics technologies that have significantly contributed to our better understanding of their biology. Key observations have contributed toward a shift in the exploitation of actinomycete's biology, such as using their full genomic potential, activating entire pathways through key metabolic elicitors and pathway engineering to improve biosynthesis. Here, we review recent efforts devoted to achieving enhanced discovery, activation, and manipulation of natural product biosynthetic pathways in model actinomycetes using genome-scale biological datasets.

  12. New advances in the production of edible plant vaccines: chloroplast expression of a tetanus vaccine antigen, TetC.

    PubMed

    Tregoning, John; Maliga, Pal; Dougan, Gordon; Nixon, Peter J

    2004-04-01

    Vaccines are a proven method of controlling disease. However there are issues with the delivery and administration of vaccines. A particular problem is that the majority of vaccines currently used are injected, which can be unsafe if needles are reused in areas where blood-borne diseases are prevalent. Vaccines targeting the mucosal immune system avoid many of the problems associated with injections. One potential form of mucosal vaccine is based on the expression of vaccine antigens in plants. Current research in this area has focused on the expression of immunogens from the plant's nuclear genome but low expression levels generally achieved using this system have limited progress. In recent work we have used the model antigen, TetC, which confers resistance to Tetanus infection, to demonstrate the feasibility of expressing vaccine antigens at high levels in the plant chloroplast.

  13. [Development of new vaccines].

    PubMed

    González-Romo, Fernando; Picazo, Juan J

    2015-10-01

    Recent and important advances in the fields of immunology, genomics, functional genomics, immunogenetics, immunogenomics, bioinformatics, microbiology, genetic engineering, systems biology, synthetic biochemistry, proteomics, metabolomics and nanotechnology, among others, have led to new approaches in the development of vaccines. The better identification of ideal epitopes, the strengthening of the immune response due to new adjuvants, and the search of new routes of vaccine administration, are good examples of advances that are already a reality and that will favour the development of more vaccines, their use in indicated population groups, or its production at a lower cost. There are currently more than 130 vaccines are under development against the more wished (malaria or HIV), difficult to get (CMV or RSV), severe re-emerging (Dengue or Ebola), increasing importance (Chagas disease or Leishmania), and nosocomial emerging (Clostridium difficile or Staphylococcus aureus) infectious diseases.

  14. Biologic Activity of Autologous, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor Secreting Alveolar Soft Parts Sarcoma and Clear Cell Sarcoma Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, John; Fisher, David E.; Demetri, George D.; Neuberg, Donna; Allsop, Stephen A.; Fonseca, Catia; Nakazaki, Yukoh; Nemer, David; Raut, Chandrajit P.; George, Suzanne; Morgan, Jeffrey A.; Wagner, Andrew J.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Ritz, Jerome; Lezcano, Cecilia; Mihm, Martin; Canning, Christine; Hodi, F. Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Alveolar soft parts sarcoma (ASPS) and clear cell sarcoma (CCS) are rare mesenchymal malignancies driven by chromosomal translocations that activate members of the microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF) family. However, in contrast to malignant melanoma, little is known about their immunogenicity. To learn more about the host response to ASPS and CCS, we conducted a phase I clinical trial of vaccination with irradiated, autologous sarcoma cells engineered by adenoviral mediated gene transfer to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Experimental Design Metastatic tumors from ASPS and CCS patients were resected, processed to single cell suspensions, transduced with a replication defective adenoviral vector encoding GM-CSF, and irradiated. Immunizations were administered subcutaneously and intradermally weekly times three and then every other week. Results Vaccines were successfully manufactured for 11 of the 12 enrolled patients. Eleven subjects received from 3 to 13 immunizations. Toxicities were restricted to grade 1–2 skin reactions at inoculation sites. Vaccination elicited local dendritic cell infiltrates and stimulated T cell mediated delayed type-hypersensitivity reactions to irradiated, autologous tumor cells. Antibody responses to tissue-type plasminogen activator (tTPA) and angiopoietins-1/2 were detected. Tumor biopsies showed programmed death-1 (PD-1) positive CD8+ T cells in association with PD ligand-1 (PD-L1) expressing sarcoma cells. No tumor regressions were observed. Conclusions Vaccination with irradiated, GM-CSF secreting autologous sarcoma cell vaccines is feasible, safe, and biologically active. Concurrent targeting of angiogenic cytokines and antagonism of the PD-1 negative regulatory pathway might intensify immune-mediated tumor destruction. PMID:25805798

  15. Milk kefir: composition, microbial cultures, biological activities, and related products

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Maria R.; Blandón, Lina Marcela; Vandenberghe, Luciana P. S.; Rodrigues, Cristine; Castro, Guillermo R.; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a strong focus on beneficial foods with probiotic microorganisms and functional organic substances. In this context, there is an increasing interest in the commercial use of kefir, since it can be marketed as a natural beverage that has health promoting bacteria. There are numerous commercially available kefir based-products. Kefir may act as a matrix in the effective delivery of probiotic microorganisms in different types of products. Also, the presence of kefir’s exopolysaccharides, known as kefiran, which has biological activity, certainly adds value to products. Kefiran can also be used separately in other food products and as a coating film for various food and pharmaceutical products. This article aims to update the information about kefir and its microbiological composition, biological activity of the kefir’s microflora and the importance of kefiran as a beneficial health substance. PMID:26579086

  16. Assessment of biological Hydrogen production processes: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafpour, G. D.; Shahavi, M. H.; Neshat, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Energy crisis created a special attention on renewable energy sources. Among these sources; hydrogen through biological processes is well-known as the most suitable and renewable energy sources. In terms of process yield, hydrogen production from various sources was evaluated. A summary of microorganisms as potential hydrogen producers discussed along with advantages and disadvantages of several bioprocesses. The pathway of photo-synthetic and dark fermentative organisms was discussed. In fact, the active enzymes involved in performance of biological processes for hydrogen generation were identified and their special functionalities were discussed. The influential factors affecting on hydrogen production were known as enzymes assisting liberation specific enzymes such as nitrogenase, hydrogenase and uptake hydrogenase. These enzymes were quite effective in reduction of proton and form active molecular hydrogen. Several types of photosynthetic systems were evaluated with intension of maximum hydrogen productivities. In addition dark fermentative and light intensities on hydrogen productions were evaluated. The hydrogen productivities of efficient hydrogen producing strains were evaluated.

  17. Pilot Scale Production of Highly Efficacious and Stable Enterovirus 71 Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng-Peng; Guo, Meng-Shin; Hsieh, Shih-Yang; Yang, Wen-Hsueh; Chao, Hsin-Ju; Wu, Chien-Long; Huang, Ju-Lan; Lee, Min-Shi; Hu, Alan Yung-Chi; Lin, Sue-Chen; Huang, Yu-Yun; Hu, Mei-Hua; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chiang, Jen-Ron; Chang, Jui-Yuan; Chong, Pele

    2012-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has caused several epidemics of hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD) in Asia and now is being recognized as an important neurotropic virus. Effective medications and prophylactic vaccine against EV71 infection are urgently needed. Based on the success of inactivated poliovirus vaccine, a prototype chemically inactivated EV71 vaccine candidate has been developed and currently in human phase 1 clinical trial. Principal Finding In this report, we present the development of a serum-free cell-based EV71 vaccine. The optimization at each step of the manufacturing process was investigated, characterized and quantified. In the up-stream process development, different commercially available cell culture media either containing serum or serum-free was screened for cell growth and virus yield using the roller-bottle technology. VP-SFM serum-free medium was selected based on the Vero cell growth profile and EV71 virus production. After the up-stream processes (virus harvest, diafiltration and concentration), a combination of gel-filtration liquid chromatography and/or sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation down-stream purification processes were investigated at a pilot scale of 40 liters each. Although the combination of chromatography and sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation produced extremely pure EV71 infectious virus particles, the overall yield of vaccine was 7–10% as determined by a VP2-based quantitative ELISA. Using chromatography as the downstream purification, the virus yield was 30–43%. To retain the integrity of virus neutralization epitopes and the stability of the vaccine product, the best virus inactivation was found to be 0.025% formalin-treatment at 37°C for 3 to 6 days. Furthermore, the formalin-inactivated virion vaccine candidate was found to be stable for >18 months at 4°C and a microgram of viral proteins formulated with alum adjuvant could induce strong virus-neutralizing antibody responses in mice, rats, rabbits, and

  18. Yeast synthetic biology toolbox and applications for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Sung; Kwak, Suryang; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2015-02-01

    Yeasts are efficient biofuel producers with numerous advantages outcompeting bacterial counterparts. While most synthetic biology tools have been developed and customized for bacteria especially for Escherichia coli, yeast synthetic biological tools have been exploited for improving yeast to produce fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass. Here we review the current status of synthetic biological tools and their applications for biofuel production, focusing on the model strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae We describe assembly techniques that have been developed for constructing genes, pathways, and genomes in yeast. Moreover, we discuss synthetic parts for allowing precise control of gene expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Applications of these synthetic biological approaches have led to identification of effective gene targets that are responsible for desirable traits, such as cellulosic sugar utilization, advanced biofuel production, and enhanced tolerance against toxic products for biofuel production from renewable biomass. Although an array of synthetic biology tools and devices are available, we observed some gaps existing in tool development to achieve industrial utilization. Looking forward, future tool development should focus on industrial cultivation conditions utilizing industrial strains.

  19. Natural product synthesis at the interface of chemistry and biology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nature has evolved to produce unique and diverse natural products that possess high target affinity and specificity. Natural products have been the richest sources for novel modulators of biomolecular function. Since the chemical synthesis of urea by Wöhler, organic chemists have been intrigued by natural products, leading to the evolution of the field of natural product synthesis over the past two centuries. Natural product synthesis has enabled natural products to play an essential role in drug discovery and chemical biology. With the introduction of novel, innovative concepts and strategies for synthetic efficiency, natural product synthesis in the 21st century is well poised to address the challenges and complexities faced by natural product chemistry and will remain essential to progress in biomedical sciences. PMID:25043880

  20. Natural product synthesis at the interface of chemistry and biology.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiyong

    2014-08-11

    Nature has evolved to produce unique and diverse natural products that possess high target affinity and specificity. Natural products have been the richest sources for novel modulators of biomolecular function. Since the chemical synthesis of urea by Wöhler, organic chemists have been intrigued by natural products, leading to the evolution of the field of natural product synthesis over the past two centuries. Natural product synthesis has enabled natural products to play an essential role in drug discovery and chemical biology. With the introduction of novel, innovative concepts and strategies for synthetic efficiency, natural product synthesis in the 21st century is well poised to address the challenges and complexities faced by natural product chemistry and will remain essential to progress in biomedical sciences.

  1. Veterinary Products Committee working group report on feline and canine vaccination.

    PubMed

    Gaskell, R M; Gettinby, G; Graham, S J; Skilton, D

    2002-02-02

    * The working group was set up by the Veterinary Products Committee in response to current concern in both the public domain and in the scientific community about possible health risks related to the routine vaccination of cats and dogs. The working group concluded that vaccination plays a very valuable role in the prevention and control of the major infectious diseases in cats and dogs. Although adverse reactions to vaccination, including lack of efficacy, occasionally occur, the working group concluded that the overall risk/benefit analysis strongly supports their continued use. * Although for some diseases there is evidence of a longer duration of immunity following vaccination than the one year which is typically recommended on the product literature, there is currently insufficient information to propose revaccination intervals other than those proposed by the manufacturer and approved by the regulatory process. * Notwithstanding this, in view of the occasional occurrence of adverse reactions, the working group recommends that the product literature indicates that the regime for booster vaccinations is based on a minimum duration of immunity rather than a maximum. The working group further recommends that the product literature should state that a risk/benefit assessment should be made for each individual animal by the veterinary surgeon in consultation with the owner with respect to the necessity for each vaccine and the frequency of its use. * The evidence suggests that cats appear to be susceptible to the occasional development of sarcomas at sites of injection and there is some further evidence to suggest that, although other products may be involved, this may be more associated with the use of vaccines containing aluminium-based adjuvants. The working group therefore recommends that a generic warning to this effect should appear on the product literature for all feline vaccines administered by injection. The working group also highlighted the need for

  2. Cell-Based Systems Biology Analysis of Human AS03-Adjuvanted H5N1 Avian Influenza Vaccine Responses: A Phase I Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Samir, Parimal; Galassie, Allison; Allos, Tara M.; Niu, Xinnan; Gordy, Laura E.; Creech, C. Buddy; Prasad, Nripesh; Jensen, Travis L.; Hill, Heather; Levy, Shawn E.; Joyce, Sebastian; Link, Andrew J.; Edwards, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Vaccine development for influenza A/H5N1 is an important public health priority, but H5N1 vaccines are less immunogenic than seasonal influenza vaccines. Adjuvant System 03 (AS03) markedly enhances immune responses to H5N1 vaccine antigens, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Objective and Methods We compared the safety (primary endpoint), immunogenicity (secondary), gene expression (tertiary) and cytokine responses (exploratory) between AS03-adjuvanted and unadjuvanted inactivated split-virus H5N1 influenza vaccines. In a double-blinded clinical trial, we randomized twenty adults aged 18–49 to receive two doses of either AS03-adjuvanted (n = 10) or unadjuvanted (n = 10) H5N1 vaccine 28 days apart. We used a systems biology approach to characterize and correlate changes in serum cytokines, antibody titers, and gene expression levels in six immune cell types at 1, 3, 7, and 28 days after the first vaccination. Results Both vaccines were well-tolerated. Nine of 10 subjects in the adjuvanted group and 0/10 in the unadjuvanted group exhibited seroprotection (hemagglutination inhibition antibody titer > 1:40) at day 56. Within 24 hours of AS03-adjuvanted vaccination, increased serum levels of IL-6 and IP-10 were noted. Interferon signaling and antigen processing and presentation-related gene responses were induced in dendritic cells, monocytes, and neutrophils. Upregulation of MHC class II antigen presentation-related genes was seen in neutrophils. Three days after AS03-adjuvanted vaccine, upregulation of genes involved in cell cycle and division was detected in NK cells and correlated with serum levels of IP-10. Early upregulation of interferon signaling-related genes was also found to predict seroprotection 56 days after first vaccination. Conclusions Using this cell-based systems approach, novel mechanisms of action for AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccination were observed. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  3. Growth conditions of clostridium perfringens type B for production of toxins used to obtain veterinary vaccines.

    PubMed

    Viana Brandi, Igor; Domenici Mozzer, Otto; Jorge, Edson Vander; Vieira Passos, Frederico Jose; Lopes Passos, Flavia Maria; Cangussu, Alex Sander Rodrigues; Macedo Sobrinho, Eliane

    2014-09-01

    The diseases caused for Clostridium perfringens are generically called enterotoxemias because toxins produced in the intestine may be absorbed into the general circulation. C. perfringens type B, grown in batch fermentation, produced toxins used to obtain veterinary vaccines. Glucose in concentrations of 1.4-111.1 mM was used to define the culture medium. The minimum concentration for a satisfactory production of vaccines against clostridial diseases was 55.6 mM. Best results were brought forth by meat and casein peptones, both in the concentration 5.0 g l(-1) in combination with glucose and a culture pH maintained at 6.5 throughout the fermentation process. The production of lactic, acetic and propionic organic acids was observed. Ethanol was the metabolite produced in the highest concentration when cultures maintained steady pH of 6.5 with exception of cultures with initial glucose concentration of 1.4 mM, where the highest production was of propionic acid. Maximal cell concentration and the highest toxin title concomitantly low yield coefficient to organic acids and ethanol were obtained using basal medium containing 111.1 mM glucose under a controlled pH culture (pH) 6.5 in batch fermentations of C. perfringens type B. These data contribute to improve process for industrial toxin production allowing better condition to produce a toxoid vaccine.

  4. Improved Production Process for Native Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Zomer, Gijsbert; Kaaijk, Patricia; Ruiterkamp, Nicole; Wijffels, René H.; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie P. J. M.; van der Pol, Leo A.

    2013-01-01

    An improved detergent-free process has been developed to produce vaccine based on native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV) against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. Performance was evaluated with the NonaMen vaccine concept, which provides broad coverage based on nine distinct PorA antigens. Scalable aseptic equipment was implemented, replacing undesirable steps like ultracentrifugation, inactivation with phenol, and the use of preservatives. The resulting process is more consistent and gives a higher yield than published reference processes, enabling NOMV production at commercial scale. Product quality met preliminary specifications for 9 consecutive batches, and an ongoing study confirmed real-time stability up to 12 months after production. As the NOMV had low endotoxic activity and induced high bactericidal titres in mice, they are expected to be safe and effective in humans. The production process is not limited to NonaMen and may be applicable for other N. meningitidis serogroups and other gram-negative pathogens. The current results therefore facilitate the late-stage development and clinical evaluation of NOMV vaccines. PMID:23741478

  5. Live SIV vaccine correlate of protection: local antibody production and concentration on the path of virus entry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingsheng; Zeng, Ming; Duan, Lijie; Voss, James E.; Smith, Anthony J.; Pambuccian, Stefan; Shang, Liang; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Southern, Peter J.; Reilly, Cavan S.; Skinner, Pamela J.; Zupancic, Mary L.; Carlis, John V.; Piatak, Michael; Waterman, Diane; Reeves, R. Keith; Masek-Hammerman, Katherine; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Alpert, Michael D.; Evans, David T.; Kohler, Heinz; Muller, Sybille; Robinson, James; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Burton, Dennis R.; Johnson, R. Paul; Haase, Ashley T.

    2014-01-01

    We sought design principles for a vaccine to prevent HIV transmission to women by identifying correlates of protection conferred by a highly effective live attenuated SIV vaccine in the rhesus macaque animal model. We show that SIVmac239Δnef vaccination recruits plasma cells and induces ectopic lymphoid follicle formation beneath the mucosal epithelium in the rhesus macaque female reproductive tract. The plasma cells and ectopic follicles produce IgG antibodies reactive with viral envelope glycoprotein gp41 trimers, and these antibodies are concentrated on the path of virus entry by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in cervical reserve epithelium and in vaginal epithelium. This local antibody production and delivery system correlated spatially and temporally with the maturation of local protection against high dose pathogenic SIV vaginal challenge. Thus, designing vaccines to elicit production and concentration of antibodies at mucosal frontlines could aid development of an effective vaccine to protect women against HIV-1. PMID:25135832

  6. Live simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine correlate of protection: local antibody production and concentration on the path of virus entry.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingsheng; Zeng, Ming; Duan, Lijie; Voss, James E; Smith, Anthony J; Pambuccian, Stefan; Shang, Liang; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Southern, Peter J; Reilly, Cavan S; Skinner, Pamela J; Zupancic, Mary L; Carlis, John V; Piatak, Michael; Waterman, Diane; Reeves, R Keith; Masek-Hammerman, Katherine; Derdeyn, Cynthia A; Alpert, Michael D; Evans, David T; Kohler, Heinz; Müller, Sybille; Robinson, James; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Burton, Dennis R; Johnson, R Paul; Haase, Ashley T

    2014-09-15

    We sought design principles for a vaccine to prevent HIV transmission to women by identifying correlates of protection conferred by a highly effective live attenuated SIV vaccine in the rhesus macaque animal model. We show that SIVmac239Δnef vaccination recruits plasma cells and induces ectopic lymphoid follicle formation beneath the mucosal epithelium in the rhesus macaque female reproductive tract. The plasma cells and ectopic follicles produce IgG Abs reactive with viral envelope glycoprotein gp41 trimers, and these Abs are concentrated on the path of virus entry by the neonatal FcR in cervical reserve epithelium and in vaginal epithelium. This local Ab production and delivery system correlated spatially and temporally with the maturation of local protection against high-dose pathogenic SIV vaginal challenge. Thus, designing vaccines to elicit production and concentration of Abs at mucosal frontlines could aid in the development of an effective vaccine to protect women against HIV-1.

  7. Continuous downstream processing for high value biological products: A Review.

    PubMed

    Zydney, Andrew L

    2016-03-01

    There is growing interest in the possibility of developing truly continuous processes for the large-scale production of high value biological products. Continuous processing has the potential to provide significant reductions in cost and facility size while improving product quality and facilitating the design of flexible multi-product manufacturing facilities. This paper reviews the current state-of-the-art in separations technology suitable for continuous downstream bioprocessing, focusing on unit operations that would be most appropriate for the production of secreted proteins like monoclonal antibodies. This includes cell separation/recycle from the perfusion bioreactor, initial product recovery (capture), product purification (polishing), and formulation. Of particular importance are the available options, and alternatives, for continuous chromatographic separations. Although there are still significant challenges in developing integrated continuous bioprocesses, recent technological advances have provided process developers with a number of attractive options for development of truly continuous bioprocessing operations.

  8. Irradiation of advanced health care products - Tissues and biologics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Martell

    2014-12-01

    Radiation sterilization of tissues and biologics has become more common in recent years. As a result it has become critical to understand how to adapt the typical test methods and validation approaches to a tissue or biological product scenario. Also data evaluation sometimes becomes more critical than with traditional medical devices because for many tissues and biologics a low radiation dose is required. It is the intent behind this paper to provide information on adapting bioburden tests used in radiation validations such that the data can be most effectively used on tissues and biologics. In addition challenges with data evaluation are discussed, particularly the use of less-than values for bioburden results in radiation validation studies.

  9. [Producing an immunizing agent: images from the production of a yellow fever vaccine].

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Aline L

    2003-01-01

    Through analysis of a set of photographs on the production of a yellow fever vaccine in Brazil, the article discusses the use of images as a research source in the history of medicine and public health. part of a historical archive belonging to the Fundação Rockefeller, stored at the Casa de Oswaldo Cruz/Fiocruz the photographs were produced between the 1930s and 1940s by the Fundação Rockefeller and Brazil's National Yellow Fever Service, institutions then responsible for research and control of the disease in Brazil. The article raises some questions generally posed by those who employ images as sources or objects of interpretation in the production of historical knowledge, and also points to the theoretical, conceptual, and methodological aspects involved in this process of analyzing images. It goes on to interpret these photographs from the beginning of the yellow fever vaccine.

  10. The potential of Physcomitrella patens as a platform for the production of plant-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Orellana-Escobedo, Lucía; Romero-Maldonado, Andrea; Decker, Eva L; Reski, Ralf

    2014-02-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens has a number of advantages for the production of biopharmaceuticals, including: i) availability of standardized conditions for cultivation in bioreactors; ii) not being part of the food chain; iii) high biosafety; iv) availability of highly efficient transformation methods; v) a haploid, fully sequenced genome providing genetic stability and uniform expression; vi) efficient gene targeting at the nuclear level allows for the generation of mutants with specific post-translational modifications (e.g., glycosylation patterns); and vii) oral formulations are a viable approach as no toxic effects are attributed to ingestion of this moss. In the light of this panorama, this opinion paper analyzes the possibilities of using P. patens for the production of oral vaccines and presents some specific cases where its use may represent significant progress in the field of plant-based vaccine development. The advantages represented by putative adjuvant effects of endogenous secondary metabolites and producing specific glycosylation patterns are highlighted.

  11. Optimizing Selection of Large Animals for Antibody Production by Screening Immune Response to Standard Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mary K.; Fridy, Peter C.; Keegan, Sarah; Chait, Brian T.; Fenyö, David; Rout, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies made in large animals are integral to many biomedical research endeavors. Domesticated herd animals like goats, sheep, donkeys, horses and camelids all offer distinct advantages in antibody production. However, their cost of use is often prohibitive, especially where poor antigen response is commonplace; choosing a non-responsive animal can set a research program back or even prevent experiments from moving forward entirely. Over the course of production of antibodies from llamas, we found that some animals consistently produced a higher humoral antibody response than others, even to highly divergent antigens, as well as to their standard vaccines. Based on our initial data, we propose that these “high level responders” could be pre-selected by checking antibody titers against common vaccines given to domestic farm animals. Thus, time and money can be saved by reducing the chances of getting poor responding animals and minimizing the use of superfluous animals. PMID:26775851

  12. Optimizing selection of large animals for antibody production by screening immune response to standard vaccines.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mary K; Fridy, Peter C; Keegan, Sarah; Chait, Brian T; Fenyö, David; Rout, Michael P

    2016-03-01

    Antibodies made in large animals are integral to many biomedical research endeavors. Domesticated herd animals like goats, sheep, donkeys, horses and camelids all offer distinct advantages in antibody production. However, their cost of use is often prohibitive, especially where poor antigen response is commonplace; choosing a non-responsive animal can set a research program back or even prevent experiments from moving forward entirely. Over the course of production of antibodies from llamas, we found that some animals consistently produced a higher humoral antibody response than others, even to highly divergent antigens, as well as to their standard vaccines. Based on our initial data, we propose that these "high level responders" could be pre-selected by checking antibody titers against common vaccines given to domestic farm animals. Thus, time and money can be saved by reducing the chances of getting poor responding animals and minimizing the use of superfluous animals.

  13. 9 CFR 106.1 - Biological products; exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTION FOR BIOLOGICAL... control of the Department in the prevention, control or eradication of animal diseases in connection with (a) an official USDA program; or (b) an emergency animal disease situation, or (c) a...

  14. Natural products with health benefits from marine biological resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ocean is the cradle of lives, which provides a diverse array of intriguing natural products that has captured scientists’ attention in the past few decades due to their significant and extremely potent biological activities. In addition to being rich sources for pharmaceutical drugs, marine nat...

  15. PRODUCTION AND BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF METHYLATED TRIVALENT ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PRODUCTION AND BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF METHYLATED TRIVALENT ARSENICALS

    Miroslav Styblo1,2,*, Zuzana Drobna1, Felecia S. Walton1, Ilona Jaspers1,2, Shan Lin3,
    Stephen B. Waters3, David J. Thomas4

    1Department of Pediatrics, 2Center for Environmental Medicine an...

  16. Research advances on transgenic plant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Han, Mei; Su, Tao; Zu, Yuan-Gang; An, Zhi-Gang

    2006-04-01

    In recent years, with the development of genetics molecular biology and plant biotechnology, the vaccination (e.g. genetic engineering subunit vaccine, living vector vaccine, nucleic acid vaccine) programs are taking on a prosperous evolvement. In particular, the technology of the use of transgenic plants to produce human or animal therapeutic vaccines receives increasing attention. Expressing vaccine candidates in vegetables and fruits open up a new avenue for producing oral/edible vaccines. Transgenic plant vaccine disquisitions exhibit a tempting latent exploiting foreground. There are a lot of advantages for transgenic plant vaccines, such as low cost, easiness of storage, and convenient immune-inoculation. Some productions converged in edible tissues, so they can be consumed directly without isolation and purification. Up to now, many transgenic plant vaccine productions have been investigated and developed. In this review, recent advances on plant-derived recombinant protein expression systems, infectious targets, and delivery systems are presented. Some issues of high concern such as biosafety and public health are also discussed. Special attention is given to the prospects and limitations on transgenic plant vaccines.

  17. [Salmonella typhi vaccination response study reveals defective antibody production selective IgA deficiency patient].

    PubMed

    Pleguezuelo, Daniel E; Gianelli, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD) is the most prevalent immunodeficiency worldwide, progressing to common variable immunodeficiency only in few reported cases. We report the case of a Spanish female aged 22 and diagnosed of selective IgA deficiency, a long history of bronchitis, several episodes of pneumonia, bilateral bronchiectasis, normal IgG, IgM, IgG subclasses, and detectable pre-vaccination IgG antibodies against tetanus toxoid and Streptococcus pneumoniae. She was evaluated in our clinic in order to rule out common variable immunodeficiency. We observed good antibody response to tetanus toxoid, absence of circulating switched memory B cells, decreased response to pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens and a lack of response to Salmonella typhi vaccine. Most SIgAD patients presents with upper respiratory tract infections or mild diarrhea. Those with lower tract infections, pneumonia or untreatable diarrhea should follow B-cell subpopulations' study and antibody response to vaccines. Absence of response to Salmonella typhi vaccine allowed us to expose the defective antibody production.

  18. Vaccines, Pharmaceutical Products, and Bioterrorism: Challenges for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    plague (Yersinia pestis), tularemia (Francisella tularensis), brucellosis ( Brucella abortus, B. melitensis , B. suis, B. canis), Q fever (Coxiella...Special Issue 20011029 090 Vaccines, Pharmaceutical Products, and Bioterrorism: Challenges for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Kathryn C...Zoon U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, Maryland, USA In regards to bioterrorism, the goal of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA

  19. Limited efficacy of inactivated influenza vaccine in elderly individuals is associated with decreased production of vaccine-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Sanae; Sullivan, Meghan; Narvaez, Carlos F.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Furman, David; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Nishtala, Madhuri; Wrammert, Jens; Smith, Kenneth; James, Judith A.; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Davis, Mark M.; Wilson, Patrick C.; Greenberg, Harry B.; He, Xiao-Song

    2011-01-01

    During seasonal influenza epidemics, disease burden is shouldered predominantly by the very young and the elderly. Elderly individuals are particularly affected, in part because vaccine efficacy wanes with age. This has been linked to a reduced ability to induce a robust serum antibody response. Here, we show that this is due to reduced quantities of vaccine-specific antibodies, rather than a lack of antibody avidity or affinity. We measured levels of vaccine-specific plasmablasts by ELISPOT 1 week after immunization of young and elderly adults with inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine. Plasmablast-derived polyclonal antibodies (PPAbs) were generated from bulk-cultured B cells, while recombinant monoclonal antibodies (re-mAbs) were produced from single plasmablasts. The frequency of vaccine-specific plasmablasts and the concentration of PPAbs were lower in the elderly than in young adults, whereas the yields of secreted IgG per plasmablast were not different. Differences were not detected in the overall vaccine-specific avidity or affinity of PPAbs and re-mAbs between the 2 age groups. In contrast, reactivity of the antibodies induced by the inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine toward the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, which was not present in the vaccine, was higher in the elderly than in the young. These results indicate that the inferior antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly is primarily due to reduced quantities of vaccine-specific antibodies. They also suggest that exposure history affects the cross-reactivity of vaccination-induced antibodies. PMID:21785218

  20. [Testing of vaccines. The challenge of testing complex combination vaccines].

    PubMed

    Merkle, A; Lechner, H; Oppling, V; Meyer, H

    2014-10-01

    Vaccines are biologicals. This group of medicinal products is produced with a predefined variability based on the biological starting materials used. Vaccines are subject to official control authority batch release performed by the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI). To release batches to the market, experimental testing has to be conducted by an official medicines control laboratory as the PEI. It is the aim of this independent testing to demonstrate the conformity of quality criteria with conditions set in the marketing authorization for each lot produced. The testing is performed on the basis of vaccine specific batch release guideline and due to the difficult and time consuming testing procedures often run in parallel with manufacturers testing. If test results comply with the predefined criteria, the lot in question is released. This article describes the challenge of official control authority batch release testing of two complex combination vaccines.

  1. 75 FR 75682 - Reclassification of Category IIIA Biological Products, Bacterial Vaccines and Related Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... design that permits a valid comparison with a control to provide a quantitative assessment of drug effect'' (Sec. 314.126(b)(2)). A control is necessary to ``distinguish the effect of a drug from other... provide ``an analysis of the results of the study adequate to assess the effects of the drug'' (Sec....

  2. Problems Digesting Dairy Products?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers ... Answers: Raw Milk More in Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food Medical ...

  3. Varicella (Chickenpox) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ProQuad® (as a combination product containing Measles Vaccine, Mumps Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine, Varicella Vaccine) ... up to about 1 person in 5) and measles-like rash (about 1 person in 20) than MMR and varicella vaccines given separately. Moderate Problems:Seizure (jerking or staring) ...

  4. Microbial Production of Isoprenoids Enabled by Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Immethun, Cheryl M.; Hoynes-O’Connor, Allison G.; Balassy, Andrea; Moon, Tae Seok

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms transform inexpensive carbon sources into highly functionalized compounds without toxic by-product generation or significant energy consumption. By redesigning the natural biosynthetic pathways in an industrially suited host, microbial cell factories can produce complex compounds for a variety of industries. Isoprenoids include many medically important compounds such as antioxidants and anticancer and antimalarial drugs, all of which have been produced microbially. While a biosynthetic pathway could be simply transferred to the production host, the titers would become economically feasible when it is rationally designed, built, and optimized through synthetic biology tools. These tools have been implemented by a number of research groups, with new tools pledging further improvements in yields and expansion to new medically relevant compounds. This review focuses on the microbial production of isoprenoids for the health industry and the advancements though synthetic biology. PMID:23577007

  5. Antiradiation UV Vaccine: UV Radiation, Biological effects, lesions and medical management - immune-therapy and immune-protection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    rabbits, 11-12 months old, live weight 3.5-3.7 (n=11), Balb mice, 2-3 months old, live weight 20-22 g (n=33), Wistar rats, 3-4 months old, live weight 180-220 g(n=33). The studies were approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee for ethical animal research equivalent, at each institution. Seven rabbits, ten mice, eleven Wistar rats were vaccinated with a UV antiradiation vaccine. A second group of animals was used as biological control which received vaccine but no UV Radiation and a third group of animals was used as control without any interventions. Before and after UV Radiation, Vaccination with the UV antiradiation vaccine were provided 17 days prior to UV exposure. The animals were irradiated by a DRT-1 UV generator lamp. The dose of irradiation for laboratory, experimental animals was 10-12 * Standard Erythema Dose (SED) at L=283,7 Laboratory animals were placed in to the box with ventilation. Results: Ultraviolet irradiation of the skin was performed with high doses and causes an inflammation or erythema in all experimental animals. However the grade of skin damage and inflammation was significantly different between animals protected by vaccination and non-protected, non-vaccinated animals. Animals UV-irradiated, but who did not receive the antiradiation vaccine suffered from extensive UV skin burns of second or third degree (grade 2-3). However, animals protected with the UV antiradiation vaccine demonstrated much mild forms of skin cellular injury - mainly erythema, first degree skin burns and a few small patches with second degree skin burns (grade 1-2). Discussion: The severity of skin damage depended on area of exposed skin, time and dose of UV irradiation. Skin injury could be divided into 4 major grades: 1. Faint erythema with dry desquamation. 2. Moderate to severe erythema. 3. Severe erythema with blistering, moist desquamation. 4. Toxic epidermal necrolysis. Mild doses of UV radiation and ionizing radiation can induce cell death by apoptosis and

  6. Use of Staby(®) technology for development and production of DNA vaccines free of antibiotic resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Reschner, Anca; Scohy, Sophie; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Daukandt, Marc; Jacques, Céline; Michel, Benjamin; Nauwynck, Hans; Xhonneux, Florence; Préat, Véronique; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Szpirer, Cédric

    2013-10-01

    The appearance of new viruses and the cost of developing certain vaccines require that new vaccination strategies now have to be developed. DNA vaccination seems to be a particularly promising method. For this application, plasmid DNA is injected into the subject (man or animal). This plasmid DNA encodes an antigen that will be expressed by the cells of the subject. In addition to the antigen, the plasmid also encodes a resistance to an antibiotic, which is used during the construction and production steps of the plasmid. However, regulatory agencies (FDA, USDA and EMA) recommend to avoid the use of antibiotics resistance genes. Delphi Genetics developed the Staby(®) technology to replace the antibiotic-resistance gene by a selection system that relies on two bacterial genes. These genes are small in size (approximately 200 to 300 bases each) and consequently encode two small proteins. They are naturally present in the genomes of bacteria and on plasmids. The technology is already used successfully for production of recombinant proteins to achieve higher yields and without the need of antibiotics. In the field of DNA vaccines, we have now the first data validating the innocuousness of this Staby(®) technology for eukaryotic cells and the feasibility of an industrial production of an antibiotic-free DNA vaccine. Moreover, as a proof of concept, mice have been successfully vaccinated with our antibiotic-free DNA vaccine against a deadly disease, pseudorabies (induced by Suid herpesvirus-1).

  7. History of vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before. PMID:25136134

  8. History of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-08-26

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before.

  9. Synthetic biology and microbioreactor platforms for programmable production of biologics at the point-of-care

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Han, Ningren; Cleto, Sara; Cao, Jicong; Purcell, Oliver; Shah, Kartik A.; Lee, Kevin; Ram, Rajeev; Lu, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Current biopharmaceutical manufacturing systems are not compatible with portable or distributed production of biologics, as they typically require the development of single biologic-producing cell lines followed by their cultivation at very large scales. Therefore, it remains challenging to treat patients in short time frames, especially in remote locations with limited infrastructure. To overcome these barriers, we developed a platform using genetically engineered Pichia pastoris strains designed to secrete multiple proteins on programmable cues in an integrated, benchtop, millilitre-scale microfluidic device. We use this platform for rapid and switchable production of two biologics from a single yeast strain as specified by the operator. Our results demonstrate selectable and near-single-dose production of these biologics in <24 h with limited infrastructure requirements. We envision that combining this system with analytical, purification and polishing technologies could lead to a small-scale, portable and fully integrated personal biomanufacturing platform that could advance disease treatment at point-of-care. PMID:27470089

  10. Capturing Biological Activity in Natural Product Fragments by Chemical Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Erika A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Natural products have had an immense influence on science and have directly led to the introduction of many drugs. Organic chemistry, and its unique ability to tailor natural products through synthesis, provides an extraordinary approach to unlock the full potential of natural products. In this Review, an approach based on natural product derived fragments is presented that can successfully address some of the current challenges in drug discovery. These fragments often display significantly reduced molecular weights, reduced structural complexity, a reduced number of synthetic steps, while retaining or even improving key biological parameters such as potency or selectivity. Examples from various stages of the drug development process up to the clinic are presented. In addition, this process can be leveraged by recent developments such as genome mining, antibody–drug conjugates, and computational approaches. All these concepts have the potential to identify the next generation of drug candidates inspired by natural products. PMID:26833854

  11. Systems Biology of Recombinant Protein Production in Bacillus megaterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedendieck, Rebekka; Bunk, Boyke; Fürch, Tobias; Franco-Lara, Ezequiel; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter

    Over the last two decades the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium was systematically developed to a useful alternative protein production host. Multiple vector systems for high yield intra- and extracellular protein production were constructed. Strong inducible promoters were combined with DNA sequences for optimised ribosome binding sites, various leader peptides for protein export and N- as well as C-terminal affinity tags for affinity chromatographic purification of the desired protein. High cell density cultivation and recombinant protein production were successfully tested. For further system biology based control and optimisation of the production process the genomes of two B. megaterium strains were completely elucidated, DNA arrays designed, proteome, fluxome and metabolome analyses performed and all data integrated using the bioinformatics platform MEGABAC. Now, solid theoretical and experimental bases for primary modeling attempts of the production process are available.

  12. Capturing Biological Activity in Natural Product Fragments by Chemical Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Crane, Erika A; Gademann, Karl

    2016-03-14

    Natural products have had an immense influence on science and have directly led to the introduction of many drugs. Organic chemistry, and its unique ability to tailor natural products through synthesis, provides an extraordinary approach to unlock the full potential of natural products. In this Review, an approach based on natural product derived fragments is presented that can successfully address some of the current challenges in drug discovery. These fragments often display significantly reduced molecular weights, reduced structural complexity, a reduced number of synthetic steps, while retaining or even improving key biological parameters such as potency or selectivity. Examples from various stages of the drug development process up to the clinic are presented. In addition, this process can be leveraged by recent developments such as genome mining, antibody-drug conjugates, and computational approaches. All these concepts have the potential to identify the next generation of drug candidates inspired by natural products.

  13. Systems Biology Approaches to Understand Natural Products Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Manteca, Angel; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Nielsen, Lars K.; Marcellin, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycetes populate soils and aquatic sediments that impose biotic and abiotic challenges for their survival. As a result, actinomycetes metabolism and genomes have evolved to produce an overwhelming diversity of specialized molecules. Polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, post-translationally modified peptides, lactams, and terpenes are well-known bioactive natural products with enormous industrial potential. Accessing such biological diversity has proven difficult due to the complex regulation of cellular metabolism in actinomycetes and to the sparse knowledge of their physiology. The past decade, however, has seen the development of omics technologies that have significantly contributed to our better understanding of their biology. Key observations have contributed toward a shift in the exploitation of actinomycete’s biology, such as using their full genomic potential, activating entire pathways through key metabolic elicitors and pathway engineering to improve biosynthesis. Here, we review recent efforts devoted to achieving enhanced discovery, activation, and manipulation of natural product biosynthetic pathways in model actinomycetes using genome-scale biological datasets. PMID:26697425

  14. Current advances in biological production of propionic acid.

    PubMed

    Eş, Ismail; Khaneghah, Amin Mousavi; Hashemi, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Koubaa, Mohamed

    2017-02-01

    Propionic acid and its derivatives are considered "Generally Recognized As Safe" food additives and are generally used as an anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory agent, herbicide, and artificial flavor in diverse industrial applications. It is produced via biological pathways using Propionibacterium and some anaerobic bacteria. However, its commercial chemical synthesis from the petroleum-based feedstock is the conventional production process bit results in some environmental issues. Novel biological approaches using microorganisms and renewable biomass have attracted considerable recent attention due to economic advantages as well as great adaptation with the green technology. This review provides a comprehensive overview of important biotechnological aspects of propionic acid production using recent technologies such as employment of co-culture, genetic and metabolic engineering, immobilization technique and efficient bioreactor systems.

  15. Impact of fowlpox-vectored Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine Vectormune® FP MG on layer hen egg production and egg quality parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to determine the impact of vaccination with Vectormune®FP MG on egg production and egg quality characteristics of white leghorn hens. Due to questions of the efficacy of this vaccine in preventing M. gallisepticum mediated pathology, the ability of this vaccine to protect a...

  16. Vaccination with cell immunoglobulin mucin-1 antibodies and inactivated influenza enhances vaccine-specific lymphocyte proliferation, interferon-γ production and cross-strain reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Soo Hoo, W; Jensen, E R; Saadat, A; Nieto, D; Moss, R B; Carlo, D J; Moll, T

    2006-01-01

    Influenza virus causes a contagious and potentially serious infection of the upper respiratory tract. While neutralizing antibodies are protective against infection, the problem of antigenic drift remains, requiring the constant monitoring and development of new vaccines. The magnitude of this situation is underscored by the emergence of new potentially human pathogenic influenza strains, avian H5N1 being the most recent example. We present evidence that antibodies against T cell immunoglobulin mucin-1 (TIM-1), a recently identified immunomodulatory molecule, stimulate cellular immunity against influenza viruses and cross-strain immune reactivity. To determine potential immunostimulatory properties of anti-TIM-1, mice were vaccinated with inactivated influenza virus in the presence or absence of TIM-1-specific monoclonal antibodies. Development of cellular immunity against both the influenza strain used for immunization and serotypically distinct virus strains was monitored 3 weeks after vaccination by determining antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production. Results show that TIM-1 antibodies enhance antigen-specific cellular proliferation (P < 0·05) and interferon (IFN)-γ production (P < 0·01). Using blocking anti-CD4 and CD8 antibodies, it was observed that antigen-specific cellular proliferation is CD4-dependent and that the majority of proliferating cells are CD4+. Finally, vaccination with inactivated influenza virus with TIM-1 antibody results in the significant (P < 0·001) induction of proliferation and IFN-γ production upon stimulation with one of three serologically distinct strains. TIM-1 antibodies demonstrate an adjuvant effect promoting antigen-specific cellular proliferation and IFN-γ production, which are important for the promotion of cell-mediated immunity. These results are the first to suggest that TIM-1 antibody may serve as a potent adjuvant in the development of new influenza virus vaccines. PMID:16792682

  17. Rapid production of a H₉ N₂ influenza vaccine from MDCK cells for protecting chicken against influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhenghua; Lu, Zhongzheng; Wang, Lei; Huo, Zeren; Cui, Jianhua; Zheng, Tingting; Dai, Qing; Chen, Cuiling; Qin, Mengying; Chen, Meihua; Yang, Rirong

    2015-04-01

    H9N2 subtype avian influenza viruses are widespread in domestic poultry, and vaccination remains the most effective way to protect the chicken population from avian influenza pandemics. Currently, egg-based H9N2 influenza vaccine production has several disadvantages and mammalian MDCK cells are being investigated as candidates for influenza vaccine production. However, little research has been conducted on low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) such as H9N2 replicating in mammalian cells using microcarrier beads in a bioreactor. In this study, we present a systematic analysis of a safe H9N2 influenza vaccine derived from MDCK cells for protecting chickens against influenza virus infection. In 2008, we isolated two novel H9N2 influenza viruses from chickens raised in southern China, and these H9N2 viruses were adapted to MDCK cells. The H9N2 virus was produced in MDCK cells in a scalable bioreactor, purified, inactivated, and investigated for use as a vaccine. The MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine was able to induce high titers of neutralizing antibodies in chickens of different ages. Histopathological examination, direct immunofluorescence, HI assay, CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio test, and cytokine evaluation indicated that the MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine evoked a rapid and effective immune response to protect chickens from influenza infection. High titers of H9N2-specific antibodies were maintained in chickens for 5 months, and the MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine had no effects on chicken growth. The use of MDCK cells in bioreactors for LPAIV vaccine production is an attractive option to prevent outbreaks of LPAIV in poultry.

  18. Development of influenza vaccine production capacity by the Government Pharmaceutical Organization of Thailand: addressing the threat of an influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Surichan, Somchaiya; Wirachwong, Ponthip; Supachaturas, Wutichai; Utid, Kanchala; Theerasurakarn, Sompone; Langsanam, Pimsuk; Lakornrach, Pattharachai; Nitisaporn, Ladda; Chansikkakorn, Chanpen; Vangkanonta, Wilak; Kaweepornpoj, Ruangchai; Poopipatpol, Kittisak; Thirapakpoomanunt, Sit; Srichainak, Somchai; Artavatkun, Witit; Chokevivat, Vichai; Wibulpolprasert, Suwit

    2011-07-01

    In 2005, a year after highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreaks in Thailand, the Thai Government issued a National Strategy Plan for Pandemic Influenza Preparedness, a major objective of which was the domestic production of seasonal influenza vaccine. It was considered that sustained influenza vaccine production was the best guarantee of a pandemic vaccine in the event of a future pandemic. The Government decided to provide funds to establish an industrial-scale influenza vaccine production plant, and gave responsibility for this challenging project to the Government Pharmaceutical Organization (GPO). In 2007, with support from the World Health Organization (WHO), the GPO started to develop egg-based, trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in a renovated pilot plant. In early 2009, during the second year of the project, the GPO turned its attention to develop a pandemic live attenuated influenza vaccine (PLAIV) against the influenza A (H1N1) virus. By December 2010, the H1N1 PLAIV had successfully completed Phase II clinical trials and was awaiting registration approval from the Thai Food and Drug Administration (TFDA). The GPO has also started to develop an H5N2 PLAIV, which is expected to enter clinical trials in January 2011. The next step in 2011 will be the development and clinical evaluation of seasonal LAIV. To meet the needs of the national seasonal influenza vaccination programme, the GPO aims to produce 2 million doses of trivalent IIV in 2012 and progressively increase production to the maximum annual capacity of 10 million doses. This article relates how influenza vaccine production capacity was developed and how major challenges are being met in an expeditious manner, with strong local and global commitment.

  19. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    PubMed Central

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production. PMID:21687599

  20. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  1. New Biological Insights in the Immunomodulatory Effects of Mucosal Polybacterial Vaccines in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Tejera-Alhambra, Marta; Palomares, Oscar; de Diego, Rebeca Perez; Diaz-Lezcano, Ignacio; Sanchez-Ramon, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    A main focus in healthcare is the active search for alternative strategies to antibiotics, both for prophylactic and therapeutical interventions, due to the accelerated and widespread increase in antibiotic resistance. This problem is more marked for patients with recurrent infections, in which the risk for antibiotic resistance and adverse effects is higher and can be life-threatening. Although antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment for infectious diseases, prophylactic vaccines via the mucosal route in defined populations of patients with recurrent infections has gained use in recent years. Concomitantly, relevant advances in the formulation and administration of these vaccines driven by an increased knowledge of mucosal immunity have expanded their use, although still in its infancy. These drugs target both the innate and adaptive immune systems, at the actual point of entry of most pathogens. A fascinating new application of the concepts of trained immunity may open novel studies in their potential uses, given the paradoxically simultaneous pro-tolerogenic and boosting effector effects on diverse immune cells for different antigens. Here we delineate an updated review on the immunomodulatory mechanisms of mucosal polybacterial vaccines.

  2. A Model to Explain How the Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) Vaccine Drives Interleukin-12 Production in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Kativhu, Chido Loveness; Libraty, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    The Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccine is the only routine vaccination at birth that effectively induces neonatal T-helper 1 (Th1)-polarized immune responses. The primary cytokine that drives CD4+ T-cell Th1 differentiation is interleukin (IL)-12 p70, a heterodimeric cytokine composed of the IL-12 p35 and IL-12 p40 subunits. We therefore examined the mechanisms involved in BCG vaccine stimulation of IL-12 p35 and p40 production from human umbilical cord (neonatal) cells. We found that BCG bacilli did not upregulate IL-12 p35 mRNA production, but upregulated IL-12 p40 mRNA production in a Toll-like receptor (TLR)2-dependent manner, in human neonatal monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDCs). The combination of TLR2 signaling, Type I interferon (IFN), and Type II IFN induced maximal levels of IL-12 p35 and p40 mRNA production in human neonatal mdDCs. The cell-free supernatants of reconstituted BCG vaccine vials contained extracellular mycobacterial (BCG) DNA which could induce IFN-α (Type I IFN) production in human neonatal plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). BCG bacilli also stimulated human neonatal CD16lo natural killer (NK) cells to produce IFN-γ (Type II IFN) in a TLR2-dependent manner. We have therefore proposed a model where BCG vaccine could stimulate the combination of neonatal conventional DCs (cDCs), pDCs, and CD16lo NK cells to produce optimal neonatal IL-12 p35 and p40 (IL-12 p70) production and subsequent CD4+ T-cell Th1 polarization. An adjuvant that emulates the mechanism by which the BCG vaccine stimulates neonatal IL-12 p35 and p40 production could improve vaccine strategies at birth for protection against intracellular pathogens and toxins.

  3. A Model to Explain How the Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) Vaccine Drives Interleukin-12 Production in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Kativhu, Chido Loveness; Libraty, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccine is the only routine vaccination at birth that effectively induces neonatal T-helper 1 (Th1)-polarized immune responses. The primary cytokine that drives CD4+ T-cell Th1 differentiation is interleukin (IL)-12 p70, a heterodimeric cytokine composed of the IL-12 p35 and IL-12 p40 subunits. We therefore examined the mechanisms involved in BCG vaccine stimulation of IL-12 p35 and p40 production from human umbilical cord (neonatal) cells. We found that BCG bacilli did not upregulate IL-12 p35 mRNA production, but upregulated IL-12 p40 mRNA production in a Toll-like receptor (TLR)2-dependent manner, in human neonatal monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDCs). The combination of TLR2 signaling, Type I interferon (IFN), and Type II IFN induced maximal levels of IL-12 p35 and p40 mRNA production in human neonatal mdDCs. The cell-free supernatants of reconstituted BCG vaccine vials contained extracellular mycobacterial (BCG) DNA which could induce IFN-α (Type I IFN) production in human neonatal plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). BCG bacilli also stimulated human neonatal CD16lo natural killer (NK) cells to produce IFN-γ (Type II IFN) in a TLR2-dependent manner. We have therefore proposed a model where BCG vaccine could stimulate the combination of neonatal conventional DCs (cDCs), pDCs, and CD16lo NK cells to produce optimal neonatal IL-12 p35 and p40 (IL-12 p70) production and subsequent CD4+ T-cell Th1 polarization. An adjuvant that emulates the mechanism by which the BCG vaccine stimulates neonatal IL-12 p35 and p40 production could improve vaccine strategies at birth for protection against intracellular pathogens and toxins. PMID:27571272

  4. Selenium and vitamin E effect on antibody production of sheep vaccinated against enzootic abortion (Chlamydia psittaci).

    PubMed

    Giadinis, N; Koptopoulos, G; Roubles, N; Siarkou, V; Papasteriades, A

    2000-03-01

    The effect of selenium (Se) and vitamin E (vit E) on antibody production of sheep vaccinated against Chlamydia psittaci (ovis) was investigated. Thirty-two sheep, one year old, seronegative to Chlamydia infection, vaccinated against enterotoxemia and dewormed were used. Injectable sodium selenite (0.1 mg/kg b.w.) was given twice to animals of the first group (gSe), with a three week interval. The sheep of the second group (gE) received 1 g vit E each orally, six times at weekly intervals. The animals of the third group (gSeE) were given Se and vit E in doses and routes of administration as in gSe and gE. The animals of the fourth group served as controls (gC) and injected normal saline. The first vaccination was made at the time that the second Se injection was given. Revaccination was made two weeks later. The experiment lasted 29 weeks. The results indicated that Se alone led to a significant increase of Chlamydia antibody response (P < 0.05), but not when it was given in combination with vit E. Animals that received vit E (gE) had much lower titres, just above of those of the controls.

  5. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) S protein production in plants: Development of recombinant vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Pogrebnyak, Natalia; Golovkin, Maxim; Andrianov, Vyacheslav; Spitsin, Sergei; Smirnov, Yuriy; Egolf, Richard; Koprowski, Hilary

    2005-01-01

    In view of a recent spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), there is a high demand for production of a vaccine to prevent this disease. Recent studies indicate that SARS-coronavirus (CoV) spike protein (S protein) and its truncated fragments are considered the best candidates for generation of the recombinant vaccine. Toward the development of a safe, effective, and inexpensive vaccine candidate, we have expressed the N-terminal fragment of SARS-CoV S protein (S1) in tomato and low-nicotine tobacco plants. Incorporation of the S1 fragment into plant genomes as well as its transcription was confirmed by PCR and RT-PCR analyses. High levels of expression of recombinant S1 protein were observed in several transgenic lines by Western blot analysis using specific antibodies. Plant-derived antigen was evaluated to induce the systemic and mucosal immune responses in mice. Mice showed significantly increased levels of SARS-CoV-specific IgA after oral ingestion of tomato fruits expressing S1 protein. Sera of mice parenterally primed with tobacco-derived S1 protein revealed the presence of SARS-CoV-specific IgG as detected by Western blot and ELISA analysis. PMID:15956182

  6. Biotechnological approaches to the production of idiotypic vaccines and antiidiotypic antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Salati, A; Arseni, S; Ravanetti, L; Frazzi, R; Polonelli, L

    2003-04-01

    The potential therapeutic activity of a killer toxin produced by the yeast Pichia anomala (PaKT) characterized by its wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity has been exploited through the simulation of its interaction with the specific cell wall receptor (KTR) of PaKT-sensitive microorganisms by the idiotypic network. Killer antiidiotypes (PaKTantiId) produced by idiotypic vaccination with a PaKT-neutralizing monoclonal antibody have proven to confer active and passive immunoprotection in experimental models of systemic and vaginal candidiasis. PaKTantiId-like human anti-KTR antibodies are naturally produced in infections caused by PaKT-sensitive microorganisms. PaKTantiId in its monoclonal and recombinant formats as well as expressed on human commensal bacteria have shown microbicidal activity in vitro and a therapeutic effect in experimental models of infection caused by PaKT-sensitive microorganisms. New perspectives of idiotypic vaccination and antiidiotypic antibiotic therapy and biotechnological approaches to the production of trandisease idiotypic vaccines and wide-spectrum antiidiotypic antibiotics (killer mimotopes) will be discussed as effective tools to fight epidemiologically important mucosal and systemic microbial infections.

  7. Influenza Vaccines: Challenges and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Katherine; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is the best method for the prevention and control of influenza. Vaccination can reduce illness and lessen severity of infection. This review focuses on how currently licensed influenza vaccines are generated in the U.S., why the biology of influenza poses vaccine challenges, and vaccine approaches on the horizon that address these challenges. PMID:25766291

  8. Intensification of tropical Pacific biological productivity due to volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikamoto, Megumi O.; Timmermann, Axel; Yoshimori, Masakazu; Lehner, Flavio; Laurian, Audine; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Mouchet, Anne; Joos, Fortunat; Raible, Christoph C.; Cobb, Kim M.

    2016-02-01

    Major volcanic eruptions generate widespread ocean cooling, which reduces upper ocean stratification. This effect has the potential to increase nutrient delivery into the euphotic zone and boost biological productivity. Using externally forced last millennium simulations of three climate/Earth System models (Model for Interdisciplinary Research On Climate (MIROC), Community Earth System Model (CESM), and LOch-Vecode-Ecbilt-CLio-agIsm Model (LOVECLIM)), we test the hypothesis that large volcanic eruptions intensify nutrient-driven export production. It is found that strong volcanic radiative forcing enhances the likelihood of eastern Pacific El Niño-like warming in CESM and LOVECLIM. This leads to an initial reduction of nutrients and export production in the eastern equatorial Pacific. However, this initial response reverses after about 3 years in association with La Niña cooling. The resulting delayed enhancement of biological production resembles the multiyear response in MIROC. The model simulations show that volcanic impacts on tropical Pacific dynamics and biogeochemistry persist for several years, thus providing a new source for potential multiyear ecosystem predictability.

  9. RNAi suppression of rice endogenous storage proteins enhances the production of rice-based Botulinum neutrotoxin type A vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Yoshikazu; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Hiroiwa, Tomoko; Kong, Il Gyu; Kuroda, Masaharu; Takahashi, Yoko; Nochi, Tomonori; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kohda, Tomoko; Kozaki, Shunji; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2012-06-13

    Mucosal vaccines based on rice (MucoRice) offer a highly practical and cost-effective strategy for vaccinating large populations against mucosal infections. However, the limitation of low expression and yield of vaccine antigens with high molecular weight remains to be overcome. Here, we introduced RNAi technology to advance the MucoRice system by co-introducing antisense sequences specific for genes encoding endogenous rice storage proteins to minimize storage protein production and allow more space for the accumulation of vaccine antigen in rice seed. When we used RNAi suppression of a combination of major rice endogenous storage proteins, 13 kDa prolamin and glutelin A in a T-DNA vector, we could highly express a vaccine comprising the 45 kDa C-terminal half of the heavy chain of botulinum type A neurotoxin (BoHc), at an average of 100 μg per seed (MucoRice-BoHc). The MucoRice-Hc was water soluble, and was expressed in the cytoplasm but not in protein body I or II of rice seeds. Thus, our adaptation of the RNAi system improved the yield of a vaccine antigen with a high molecular weight. When the mucosal immunogenicity of the purified MucoRice-BoHc was examined, the vaccine induced protective immunity against a challenge with botulinum type A neurotoxin in mice. These findings demonstrate the efficiency and utility of the advanced MucoRice system as an innovative vaccine production system for generating highly immunogenic mucosal vaccines of high-molecular-weight antigens.

  10. Technology transfer hub for pandemic influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Friede, M; Serdobova, I; Palkonyay, L; Kieny, M P

    2009-01-29

    Increase of influenza vaccine production capacity in developing countries has been identified as an important element of global pandemic preparedness. Nevertheless, technology transfer for influenza vaccine production to developing country vaccine manufacturers has proven difficult because of lack of interested technology providers. As an alternative to an individual provider-recipient relationship, a technology and training platform (a "hub") for a generic non-proprietary process was established at a public sector European manufacturer's site. The conditions for setting up such a platform and the potential applicability of this model to other biologicals are discussed.

  11. The March Toward Malaria Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Stephen L.; Vekemans, Johan; Richie, Thomas L.; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    In 2013 there were an estimated 584,000 deaths and 198 million clinical illnesses due to malaria, the majority in sub-Saharan Africa. Vaccines would be the ideal addition to the existing armamentarium of anti-malaria tools. However, malaria is caused by parasites, and parasites are much more complex in terms of their biology than the viruses and bacteria for which we have vaccines, passing through multiple stages of development in the human host, each stage expressing hundreds of unique antigens. This complexity makes it more difficult to develop a vaccine for parasites than for viruses and bacteria, since an immune response targeting one stage may not offer protection against a later stage, because different antigens are the targets of protective immunity at different stages. Furthermore, depending on the life cycle stage and whether the parasite is extra- or intra-cellular, antibody and/or cellular immune responses provide protection. It is thus not surprising that there is no vaccine on the market for prevention of malaria, or any human parasitic infection. In fact, no vaccine for any disease with this breadth of targets and immune responses exists. In this limited review, we focus on four approaches to malaria vaccines, (1) a recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccine aimed at Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) pre-erythrocytic stages of the parasite cycle (RTS,S/AS01), (2) whole sporozoite vaccines aimed at Pf pre-erythrocytic stages (PfSPZ Vaccine and PfSPZ-CVac), (3) prime boost vaccines that include recombinant DNA, viruses and bacteria, and protein with adjuvant aimed primarily at Pf pre-erythrocytic, but also asexual erythrocytic stages, and (4) recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccines aimed at Pf and Plasmodium vivax sexual erythrocytic and mosquito stages. We recognize that we are not covering all approaches to malaria vaccine development, or most of the critically important work on development of vaccines against P. vivax, the second most important cause of

  12. The March Toward Malaria Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Stephen L; Vekemans, Johan; Richie, Thomas L; Duffy, Patrick E

    2015-12-01

    In 2013 there were an estimated 584,000 deaths and 198 million clinical illnesses due to malaria, the majority in sub-Saharan Africa. Vaccines would be the ideal addition to the existing armamentarium of anti-malaria tools. However, malaria is caused by parasites, and parasites are much more complex in terms of their biology than the viruses and bacteria for which we have vaccines, passing through multiple stages of development in the human host, each stage expressing hundreds of unique antigens. This complexity makes it more difficult to develop a vaccine for parasites than for viruses and bacteria, since an immune response targeting one stage may not offer protection against a later stage, because different antigens are the targets of protective immunity at different stages. Furthermore, depending on the life cycle stage and whether the parasite is extra- or intra-cellular, antibody and/or cellular immune responses provide protection. It is thus not surprising that there is no vaccine on the market for prevention of malaria, or any human parasitic infection. In fact, no vaccine for any disease with this breadth of targets and immune responses exists. In this limited review, we focus on four approaches to malaria vaccines, (1) a recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccine aimed at Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) pre-erythrocytic stages of the parasite cycle (RTS,S/AS01), (2) whole sporozoite vaccines aimed at Pf pre-erythrocytic stages (PfSPZ Vaccine and PfSPZ-CVac), (3) prime boost vaccines that include recombinant DNA, viruses and bacteria, and protein with adjuvant aimed primarily at Pf pre-erythrocytic, but also asexual erythrocytic stages, and (4) recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccines aimed at Pf and Plasmodium vivax sexual erythrocytic and mosquito stages. We recognize that we are not covering all approaches to malaria vaccine development, or most of the critically important work on development of vaccines against P. vivax, the second most important cause of

  13. The march toward malaria vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Stephen L; Vekemans, Johan; Richie, Thomas L; Duffy, Patrick E

    2015-11-27

    In 2013 there were an estimated 584,000 deaths and 198 million clinical illnesses due to malaria, the majority in sub-Saharan Africa. Vaccines would be the ideal addition to the existing armamentarium of anti-malaria tools. However, malaria is caused by parasites, and parasites are much more complex in terms of their biology than the viruses and bacteria for which we have vaccines, passing through multiple stages of development in the human host, each stage expressing hundreds of unique antigens. This complexity makes it more difficult to develop a vaccine for parasites than for viruses and bacteria, since an immune response targeting one stage may not offer protection against a later stage, because different antigens are the targets of protective immunity at different stages. Furthermore, depending on the life cycle stage and whether the parasite is extra- or intra-cellular, antibody and/or cellular immune responses provide protection. It is thus not surprising that there is no vaccine on the market for prevention of malaria, or any human parasitic infection. In fact, no vaccine for any disease with this breadth of targets and immune responses exists. In this limited review, we focus on four approaches to malaria vaccines, (1) a recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccine aimed at Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) pre-erythrocytic stages of the parasite cycle (RTS,S/AS01), (2) whole sporozoite vaccines aimed at Pf pre-erythrocytic stages (PfSPZ Vaccine and PfSPZ-CVac), (3) prime boost vaccines that include recombinant DNA, viruses and bacteria, and protein with adjuvant aimed primarily at Pf pre-erythrocytic, but also asexual erythrocytic stages, and (4) recombinant protein with adjuvant vaccines aimed at Pf and Plasmodium vivax sexual erythrocytic and mosquito stages. We recognize that we are not covering all approaches to malaria vaccine development, or most of the critically important work on development of vaccines against P. vivax, the second most important cause of

  14. An interspecific Nicotiana hybrid as a useful and cost-effective platform for production of animal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ling, Huai-Yian; Edwards, Aaron M; Gantier, Michael P; Deboer, Kathleen D; Neale, Alan D; Hamill, John D; Walmsley, Amanda M

    2012-01-01

    The use of transgenic plants to produce novel products has great biotechnological potential as the relatively inexpensive inputs of light, water, and nutrients are utilised in return for potentially valuable bioactive metabolites, diagnostic proteins and vaccines. Extensive research is ongoing in this area internationally with the aim of producing plant-made vaccines of importance for both animals and humans. Vaccine purification is generally regarded as being integral to the preparation of safe and effective vaccines for use in humans. However, the use of crude plant extracts for animal immunisation may enable plant-made vaccines to become a cost-effective and efficacious approach to safely immunise large numbers of farm animals against diseases such as avian influenza. Since the technology associated with genetic transformation and large-scale propagation is very well established in Nicotiana, the genus has attributes well-suited for the production of plant-made vaccines. However the presence of potentially toxic alkaloids in Nicotiana extracts impedes their use as crude vaccine preparations. In the current study we describe a Nicotiana tabacum and N. glauca hybrid that expresses the HA glycoprotein of influenza A in its leaves but does not synthesize alkaloids. We demonstrate that injection with crude leaf extracts from these interspecific hybrid plants is a safe and effective approach for immunising mice. Moreover, this antigen-producing alkaloid-free, transgenic interspecific hybrid is vigorous, with a high capacity for vegetative shoot regeneration after harvesting. These plants are easily propagated by vegetative cuttings and have the added benefit of not producing viable pollen, thus reducing potential problems associated with bio-containment. Hence, these Nicotiana hybrids provide an advantageous production platform for partially purified, plant-made vaccines which may be particularly well suited for use in veterinary immunization programs.

  15. Beware of Products Promising Miracle Weight Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers ... Weight Loss Products More in Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food Medical ...

  16. Biologic properties and vaccine potential of the staphylococcal poly-N-acetyl glucosamine surface polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Maira-Litran, Tomas; Kropec, Andrea; Goldmann, Donald; Pier, Gerald B

    2004-02-17

    Staphylococci have become the most common causes of nosocomial bacterial infections, and this fact, along with increasing problems associated with antimicrobial resistance, spurs the need for finding immunotherapeutic alternatives to prevent and possibly treat these infections. Most virulent, clinical isolates of both coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) and Staphylococcus aureus carry the ica locus which encodes proteins that synthesize a polymer of beta-1-6 linked N-acetyl glucosamine residues (PNAG). Animal studies have shown purified PNAG can elicit protective immunity against both CoNS and S. aureus, suggesting its potential as a broadly protective vaccine for many clinically important strains of staphylococci.

  17. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    SciTech Connect

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G.; Geider, R.

    1992-07-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies.

  18. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    SciTech Connect

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G. ); Geider, R. . Coll. of Marine Studies)

    1992-01-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies.

  19. Current biodefense vaccine programs and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Daniel N; Florence, William; Bryant, Paula

    2013-07-01

    The Defense Threat Reduction Agency's Joint Science and Technology Office manages the Chemical and Biological Defense Program's Science and Technology portfolio. The Joint Science and Technology Office's mission is to invest in transformational ideas, innovative people and actionable technology development for Chemical and Biological Defense solutions, with the primary goal to deliver Science and Technology products and capabilities to the warfighter and civilian population that outpace the threat. This commentary focuses on one thrust area within this mission: the Vaccine program of the Joint Science and Technology Office's Translational Medical Division. Here, we will describe candidate vaccines currently in the S&T pipeline, enabling technologies that should facilitate advanced development of these candidates into FDA licensed vaccines, and how the ever-changing biological threat landscape impacts the future of biodefense vaccines.

  20. Isoleukotrienes are biologically active free radical products of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, K A; Murphy, R C

    1995-07-21

    The free radical oxidation of arachidonic acid esterified to glycerophospholipids is known to generate complex metabolites, termed isoprostanes, that share structural features of prostaglandins derived from prostaglandin H2 synthase. Furthermore, certain isoprostanes have been found to exert biological activity through endogenous receptors on cell surfaces. Using mass spectrometry and ancillary techniques, the free radical oxidation of 1-hexadecanoyl-2-arachidonoyl-glycerophosphocholine was studied in the search for products of arachidonic acid isomeric to the leukotrienes that are derived from 5-lipoxygenase-catalyzed metabolism of arachidonic acid. Several conjugated triene metabolites were chromatographically separated from known 5-lipoxygenase products and structures characterized as 5,12-dihydroxy-6,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid esterified to the glycerophosphocholine backbone. We have termed these products as B4-isoleukotrienes. Following saponification some, but not all, B4-isoleukotrienes were found to exert biological activity in elevating intracellular calcium in Indo-1-loaded human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. This activity could be blocked by a leukotriene B4 receptor antagonist. An EC50 of approximately 30 nM was determined for one unique B4-isoleukotriene with a relative retention index of 2.54. We have shown that free radical processes can lead to the formation of biologically active isoleukotrienes in glycerophosphocholine liposomes, and we propose that B4-isoleukotrienes may also be formed in membrane glycerophospholipids as a result of lipid peroxidation during tissue injury. Such B4-isoleukotrienes could then mediate events of tissue damage through activation of leukotriene B4 receptors on target cells.

  1. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  2. Efficacy of three candidate Rift Valley fever vaccines in sheep.

    PubMed

    Kortekaas, J; Antonis, A F G; Kant, J; Vloet, R P M; Vogel, A; Oreshkova, N; de Boer, S M; Bosch, B J; Moormann, R J M

    2012-05-14

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted Bunyavirus that causes high morbidity and mortality among ruminants and humans. The virus is endemic to the African continent and the Arabian Peninsula and continues to spread into new areas. The explosive nature of RVF outbreaks requires that vaccines provide swift protection after a single vaccination. We recently developed several candidate vaccines and here report their efficacy in lambs within three weeks after a single vaccination. The first vaccine comprises the purified ectodomain of the Gn structural glycoprotein formulated in a water-in-oil adjuvant. The second vaccine is based on a Newcastle disease virus-based vector that produces both RVFV structural glycoproteins Gn and Gc. The third vaccine comprises a recently developed nonspreading RVFV. The latter two vaccines were administered without adjuvant. The inactivated whole virus-based vaccine produced by Onderstepoort Biological Products was used as a positive control. Five out of six mock-vaccinated lambs developed high viremia and fever and one lamb succumbed to the challenge infection. A single vaccination with each vaccine resulted in a neutralizing antibody response within three weeks after vaccination and protected lambs from viremia, pyrexia and mortality.

  3. The androgen receptor: a biologically relevant vaccine target for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Olson, Brian M; Johnson, Laura E; McNeel, Douglas G

    2013-03-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays an essential role in the development and progression of prostate cancer. However, while it has long been the primary molecular target of metastatic prostate cancer therapies, it has not been explored as an immunotherapeutic target. In particular, the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is a potentially attractive target, as it has an identical sequence among humans as well as among multiple species, providing a logical candidate for preclinical evaluation. In this report, we evaluated the immune and anti-tumor efficacy of a DNA vaccine targeting the AR LBD (pTVG-AR) in relevant rodent preclinical models. We found immunization of HHDII-DR1 mice, which express human HLA-A2 and HLA-DR1, with pTVG-AR augmented AR LBD HLA-A2-restricted peptide-specific, cytotoxic immune responses in vivo that could lyse human prostate cancer cells. Using an HLA-A2-expressing autochthonous model of prostate cancer, immunization with pTVG-AR augmented HLA-A2-restricted immune responses that could lyse syngeneic prostate tumor cells and led to a decrease in tumor burden and an increase in overall survival of tumor-bearing animals. Finally, immunization decreased prostate tumor growth in Copenhagen rats that was associated with a Th1-type immune response. These data show that the AR is as a prostate cancer immunological target antigen and that a DNA vaccine targeting the AR LBD is an attractive candidate for clinical evaluation.

  4. 9 CFR 113.313 - Measles Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Measles Vaccine. 113.313 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.313 Measles Vaccine. Measles Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture... for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall...

  5. 9 CFR 113.313 - Measles Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Measles Vaccine. 113.313 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.313 Measles Vaccine. Measles Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture... for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall...

  6. 9 CFR 113.313 - Measles Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Measles Vaccine. 113.313 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.313 Measles Vaccine. Measles Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture... for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall...

  7. 9 CFR 113.313 - Measles Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Measles Vaccine. 113.313 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.313 Measles Vaccine. Measles Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture... for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall...

  8. 9 CFR 113.313 - Measles Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Measles Vaccine. 113.313 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.313 Measles Vaccine. Measles Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture... for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall...

  9. The EB66® cell line as a valuable cell substrate for MVA-based vaccines production.

    PubMed

    Léon, Arnaud; David, Anne-Laure; Madeline, Brice; Guianvarc'h, Laurence; Dureau, Elodie; Champion-Arnaud, Patrick; Hebben, Matthias; Huss, Thierry; Chatrenet, Benoît; Schwamborn, Klaus

    2016-11-21

    The selection of a cell substrate is a critical step for the development and manufacturing of a viral vaccine candidate. Several parameters such as cell susceptibility and permissiveness to the viral pathogens but also performance in terms of viral antigens quality and production yields are important considerations when identifying the ideal match between a viral vaccine and cell substrate. The modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is a replication-deficient viral vector that holds great promise as a vaccine platform, however only limited cell substrates have been tested or are available for industrialization. Here we evaluate the duck embryo-derived EB66® cell line as potential cell substrate for MVA production. To this end, we used two recombinant MVA constructs and demonstrated that EB66® cells are propagating the tested MVA viruses very efficiently, while preserving viral attenuation and transgene expression for up to 20 serial passages. Furthermore we developed upstream and downstream processes that enable industrialization of the virus production. In conclusion, we showed that EB66® cells can be used as potent cell substrate for MVA-based vaccines and represent therefore an attractive alternative for vaccine production.

  10. Development of Improved Vaccine Adjuvants Based on the Saponin Natural Product QS-21 through Chemical Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Tan, Derek S; Gin, David Y

    2016-09-20

    Vaccines based on molecular subunit antigens are increasingly being investigated due to their improved safety and more precise targeting compared to classical whole-pathogen vaccines. However, subunit vaccines are inherently less immunogenic; thus, coadministration of an adjuvant to increase the immunogenicity of the antigen is often necessary to elicit a potent immune response. QS-21, an immunostimulatory saponin natural product, has been used as an adjuvant in conjunction with various vaccines in numerous clinical trials, but suffers from several inherent liabilities, including scarcity, chemical instability, and dose-limiting toxicity. Moreover, little is known about its mechanism of action. Over a decade-long effort, beginning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and continuing at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), the group of Prof. David Y. Gin accomplished the total synthesis of QS-21 and developed a practical semisynthetic approach to novel variants that overcome the liabilities of the natural product. First, semisynthetic QS-21 variants were designed with stable amide linkages in the acyl chain domain that exhibited comparable in vivo adjuvant activity and lower toxicity than the natural product. Further modifications in the acyl chain domain and truncation of the linear tetrasaccharide domain led to identification of a trisaccharide variant with a simple carboxylic acid side chain that retained potent adjuvant activity, albeit with reemergence of toxicity. Conversely, an acyl chain analogue terminating in a free amine was inactive but enabled chemoselective functionalization with radiolabeled and fluorescent tags, yielding adjuvant-active saponin probes that, unlike inactive congeners, accumulated in the lymph nodes in vaccinated mice and internalized into dendritic cells. Subtle variations in length, stereochemistry, and conformational flexibility around the central glycosidic linkage provided QS-21 variants with adjuvant

  11. Development of Improved Vaccine Adjuvants Based on the Saponin Natural Product QS-21 through Chemical Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Vaccines based on molecular subunit antigens are increasingly being investigated due to their improved safety and more precise targeting compared to classical whole-pathogen vaccines. However, subunit vaccines are inherently less immunogenic; thus, coadministration of an adjuvant to increase the immunogenicity of the antigen is often necessary to elicit a potent immune response. QS-21, an immunostimulatory saponin natural product, has been used as an adjuvant in conjunction with various vaccines in numerous clinical trials, but suffers from several inherent liabilities, including scarcity, chemical instability, and dose-limiting toxicity. Moreover, little is known about its mechanism of action. Over a decade-long effort, beginning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and continuing at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), the group of Prof. David Y. Gin accomplished the total synthesis of QS-21 and developed a practical semisynthetic approach to novel variants that overcome the liabilities of the natural product. First, semisynthetic QS-21 variants were designed with stable amide linkages in the acyl chain domain that exhibited comparable in vivo adjuvant activity and lower toxicity than the natural product. Further modifications in the acyl chain domain and truncation of the linear tetrasaccharide domain led to identification of a trisaccharide variant with a simple carboxylic acid side chain that retained potent adjuvant activity, albeit with reemergence of toxicity. Conversely, an acyl chain analogue terminating in a free amine was inactive but enabled chemoselective functionalization with radiolabeled and fluorescent tags, yielding adjuvant-active saponin probes that, unlike inactive congeners, accumulated in the lymph nodes in vaccinated mice and internalized into dendritic cells. Subtle variations in length, stereochemistry, and conformational flexibility around the central glycosidic linkage provided QS-21 variants with

  12. Standardization and assessment of cell culture media quantities in roller poly ethylene terephthalate bottles employed in the industrial rabies viral vaccine production.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, S; Chaansha, S; Rajesh, K; Santhiya, T; Charles, C; Venkataramana, K N

    2009-09-15

    Vero cells are utilized for production of rabies vaccine. This study deals with the optimize quantity media require for the rabies vaccine production in the smooth roller surface. The rabies virus (Pasteur vaccine strain) is infected to monolayer of the various experimented bottles. To analyze the optimal quantity of media for the production of rabies viral harvest during the process of Vero cell derived rabies vaccine. The trials are started from 200 to 400 mL (PTARV-1, PTARV-2, PTARV-3, PTARV-4 and PTARV-5). The samples are taken in an appropriate time intervals for analysis of In Process Quality Control (IPQC) tests. The collected viral harvests are further processed to rabies vaccine in a pilot level and in addition to scale up an industrial level. Based on the evaluation the PTARV-2 (250 mL) show highly encouraging results for the Vero cell derived rabies vaccine production.

  13. Natural products as a resource for biologically active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate various sources of biologically active natural products in an effort to identify the active pesticidal compounds involved. The study is divided into several parts. Chapter 1 contains a discussion of several new compounds from plant and animal sources. Chapter 2 introduces a new NMR technique. In section 2.1 a new technique for better utilizing the lanthanide relaxation agent Gd(fod)/sub 3/ is presented which allows the predictable removal of resonances without line broadening. Section 2.2 discusses a variation of this technique for use in an aqueous solvent by applying this technique towards identifying the binding sites of metals of biological interest. Section 2.3 presents an unambiguous /sup 13/C NMR assignment of melibiose. Chapter 3 deals with work relating to the molting hormone of most arthropods, 20-hydroxyecdysone. Section 3.1 discusses the use of two-dimensional NMR (2D NMR) to assign the /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of this biologically important compound. Section 3.2 presents a new application for Droplet countercurrent chromatography (DCCC). Chapter 4 presents a basic improvement to the commercial DCCC instrument that is currently being applied to future commercial instruments. Chapter 5 discusses a curious observation of the effects that two previously known compounds, nagilactone C and (-)-epicatechin, have on lettuce and rice and suggest a possible new role for the ubiquitous flavanol (-)-epicatechin in plants.

  14. Systems biological approaches towards understanding cellulase production by Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Kubicek, Christian P

    2013-01-20

    Recent progress and improvement in "-omics" technologies has made it possible to study the physiology of organisms by integrated and genome-wide approaches. This bears the advantage that the global response, rather than isolated pathways and circuits within an organism, can be investigated ("systems biology"). The sequencing of the genome of Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina), a fungus that serves as a major producer of biomass-degrading enzymes for the use of renewable lignocellulosic material towards production of biofuels and biorefineries, has offered the possibility to study this organism and its enzyme production on a genome wide scale. In this review, I will highlight the use of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics towards an improved and novel understanding of the biochemical processes that involve in the massive overproduction of secreted proteins.

  15. Production of hantavirus Puumala nucleocapsid protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for vaccine and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Antoniukas, L; Grammel, H; Reichl, U

    2006-07-13

    The production of hantavirus Puumala nucleocapsid (N) protein for potential applications as a vaccine and for diagnostic purposes was investigated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a recombinant host. The N protein gene and the hexahistidine tagged N (h-N) protein gene were expressed intracellular from a 2-microm plasmid vectors under the control of a fused galactose inducible GAL10-PYK promoter. For monitoring the recombinant gene expression, a h-N and a GFP fusion protein was used. Different cultivation strategies and growth media compositions were tested in shake flasks and a 5 l bioreactor. When using defined YNB growth medium, we found the biomass yield to be unsatisfactorily low. Higher concentrated YNB medium, promoted cell growth but showed a pronounced inhibitory effect on heterologous gene expression. This phenomenon could not be attributed to plasmid losses, as we could demonstrate high stability of the vector under the applied cultivation conditions. Supplementation of YNB medium with extracts of plant origin resulted in increased biomass yields with concomitant high expression levels of the recombinant gene. The modified medium was used for fed-batch cultivations where basic metabolic features as well as growth parameters were determined in addition to recombinant gene expression. The maximal volumetric yield of N protein was 316 mg l(-1), the respective yield of h-N protein was 284 mg l(-1). Our study provides a basis for large-scale production of hantavirus vaccines, which satisfies economic efficiency as well as biosafety regulations for human applications.

  16. 37 CFR 1.779 - Calculation of patent term extension for a veterinary biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... extension for a veterinary biological product. 1.779 Section 1.779 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights... Calculation of patent term extension for a veterinary biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a veterinary biological product is eligible for extension, the...

  17. 21 CFR 601.26 - Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded under prescribed, recommended, or... Reclassification procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not misbranded... for the reclassification of all biological products that have been classified into Category IIIA....

  18. Biological standards: problems in large-scale production.

    PubMed

    Campbell, P J

    1976-10-01

    A biological standard usually consists of a batch of perhaps several thousand ampoules. In defining a batch of ampoules to be a standard, we are in essence making a number of fundamental claims: (1) That in terms of content, (mass and potency) each individual ampoule is identical to every other amoule in the batch. (2) That in the course of preparation of the standard, the contents of each ampoule have been treated in exactly the same way and held for the same length of time under the same conditions, (i.e. all the ampoules of the standard have been treated as one single batch, each stage of processing being carried out under constant conditions in one complete working session, however long). (3) That the stability or instability of the biological activity of the contents of each ampoule of the batch is identical to every other ampoule (i.e. that moisture, oxygen, light, raised temperature--all factors which cause deterioration of biological activity--have been exculuded to the same degree in each and every ampoule in the batch, so that each ampoule of the standard is equally stable or unstable). It is quite a difficult task to meet these criteria even in a small number of ampoules at the bench. It becomes a very demanding exercise to achieve the same results in 4,000 ampoules--the normal batch size at NIBSC. Details of the methods used at NIBSC for the production of large batches of ampoules of biological standards have already been published (Campbell, 1974). The author of the papers will take the opportunity to develop various aspects of the published detail.

  19. An overview of biological production of L-theanine.

    PubMed

    Mu, Wanmeng; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    L-Theanine (γ-glutamylethylamide) is a unique non-protein amino acid that is naturally found in tea plants. It contributes to the umami taste and unique flavor to green tea infusion, and thus its content in tea leaves highly impacts the tea quality and price. In addition to the graceful taste, it has been proved to have many beneficial physiological effects, especially promoting relaxation and improving concentration and learning ability. Based on these promising advantages, L-theanine has been commercially developed as a valuable ingredient for use in food and beverages to improve and/or maintain human health. L-Theanine can be obtained by chemical synthesis or isolation from tea, while chemical synthesis of L-theanine is hard to be accepted by consumers and is not allowed to use in food industry, and isolation of L-theanine in high purity generally involves time-consuming, cost-ineffective, and complicated operational processes. Accordingly, the biological production of L-theanine has recently attracted much attention. Four kinds of bacterial enzymes, including L-glutamine synthetase, γ-glutamylmethylamide synthetase, γ-glutamyltranspeptidase, and L-glutaminase, have been characterized to have L-theanine-producing ability. Herein, an overview of recent studies on the biological production of L-theanine was presented.

  20. Genes to vaccines for immunotherapy: how the molecular biology revolution has influenced cancer immunology.

    PubMed

    Laheru, Dan A; Pardoll, Drew M; Jaffee, Elizabeth M

    2005-11-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the complex signaling pathways involved in immune system regulation, along with analyses of genetic differences between tumors and their normal cellular counterparts, have accelerated development of immune-based strategies for cancer treatment and prevention. More clinically relevant animal models have shown that successful immune-based strategies will require the integration of interventions that target specific tumor antigens with regulators of the antitumor immune response. Immunotherapy for cancer is at a critical crossroad, as therapeutics designed to target cancer-associated antigens and regulatory signaling molecules enter clinical trials. We outline here a paradigm for early-stage clinical development of immunotherapy combinations that use vaccines to drive tumor antigen-specific responses while simultaneously targeting immune regulatory pathways.

  1. Biological evaluation of nanosilver incorporated cellulose pulp for hygiene products.

    PubMed

    Kavitha Sankar, P C; Ramakrishnan, Reshmi; Rosemary, M J

    2016-04-01

    Cellulose pulp has a visible market share in personal hygiene products such as sanitary napkins and baby diapers. However it offers good surface for growth of microorganisms. Huge amount of research is going on in developing hygiene products that do not initiate microbial growth. The objective of the present work is to produce antibacterial cellulose pulp by depositing silver nanopowder on the cellulose fiber. The silver nanoparticles used were of less than 100 nm in size and were characterised using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction studies. Antibacterial activity of the functionalized cellulose pulp was proved by JIS L 1902 method. The in-vitro cytotoxicity, in-vivo vaginal irritation and intracutaneous reactivity studies were done with silver nanopowder incorporated cellulose pulp for introducing a new value added product to the market. Cytotoxicity evaluation suggested that the silver nanoparticle incorporated cellulose pulp is non-cytotoxic. No irritation and skin sensitization were identified in animals tested with specific extracts prepared from the test material in the in-vivo experiments. The results indicated that the silver nanopowder incorporated cellulose pulp meets the requirements of the standard practices recommended for evaluating the biological reactivity and has good biocompatibility, hence can be classified as a safe hygiene product.

  2. Challenges and opportunities in developing and marketing vaccines for OIE List A and emerging animal diseases.

    PubMed

    Gay, C G; Salt, J; Balaski, C

    2003-01-01

    Veterinary pharmaceutical products generated 14.5 billion U.S. Dollars (USD) in worldwide sales in 2000, with biological products contributing 16.2 percent or 2.3 billion USD. The leading biological products were foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines, with 284 million USD in sales, representing 26.4 percent of the entire livestock biological business. Despite the potential opportunities for the biologicals industry, non-vaccination policies and undefined control and eradication strategies have deterred the private sector from significant investments in the research and development of vaccines against List A diseases. The primary research focus remains vaccines for infectious diseases that have an impact on current domestic herd health management systems. Changing the vaccine paradigm, investing in new technologies, and creating the future by integrating into key alliances with producers and regulatory authorities will be paramount in protecting our poultry and livestock industries against highly infectious diseases and potential acts of bioterrorism.

  3. From population to public institutions: what needs to be changed to benefit from the full value of vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Szucs, Thomas; Quilici, Sibilia; Panfilo, Marina

    2015-01-01

    The poor perception of the benefits of vaccines, and their subsequent underuse, can result in substantial economic, societal, and political burden. Adequate support and communication from health authorities and governments is essential to promote the benefits of vaccination and reduce the risk of infectious diseases outbreaks. Cost-containment policies in the vaccine procurement processes could also be a threat to the long-term sustainability of the vaccine industry and manufacturing sites in Europe. Biologicals, such as vaccines, are highly technical and complex products to manufacture and only a few industries are engaged in this activity. Developing incentives to encourage vaccine manufacturers and identifying means of taking into consideration the specificities of vaccines in economic evaluations could allow the full value of vaccination to be appreciated. In conclusion, governments, international agencies, and other stakeholders have an important role to play to help society regain confidence in vaccination and ensure that the benefits of vaccination programmes are fully recognised and valued. PMID:27123169

  4. A codon-shuffling method to prevent reversion during production of replication-defective herpesvirus stocks: Implications for herpesvirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Ward, Charles; Yeasmin, Rukhsana; Skiena, Steven; Krug, Laurie T; Forrest, J Craig

    2017-03-13

    Herpesviruses establish life-long chronic infections that place infected hosts at risk for severe disease. Herpesvirus genomes readily undergo homologous recombination (HR) during productive replication, often leading to wild-type (WT) reversion during complementation of replication-defective and attenuated viruses via HR with the helper gene provided in trans. To overcome this barrier, we developed a synthetic-biology approach based on a technique known as codon shuffling. Computer-assisted algorithms redistribute codons in a helper gene, thereby eliminating regions of homology, while enabling manipulation of factors such as codon-pair bias and CpG content to effectively titrate helper-gene protein levels. We apply this technique to rescue the replication of a murine gammaherpesvirus engineered with a mutation in the major immediate-early transactivator protein RTA. Complementation with codon-shuffled RTA constructs did not yield any WT revertant virus, a sharp contrast to WT virus contamination frequently observed during complementation with an unmodified helper gene. We further demonstrate the importance of eliminating WT virus contamination in an animal model of gammaherpesvirus lethality. We propose complementation by codon shuffling as a means to produce replication-defective or attenuated viruses. This method has immediate utility for investigating roles of essential genes in viral replication and will better enable future development of herpesvirus vaccines.

  5. A codon-shuffling method to prevent reversion during production of replication-defective herpesvirus stocks: Implications for herpesvirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Ward, Charles; Yeasmin, Rukhsana; Skiena, Steven; Krug, Laurie T.; Forrest, J. Craig

    2017-01-01

    Herpesviruses establish life-long chronic infections that place infected hosts at risk for severe disease. Herpesvirus genomes readily undergo homologous recombination (HR) during productive replication, often leading to wild-type (WT) reversion during complementation of replication-defective and attenuated viruses via HR with the helper gene provided in trans. To overcome this barrier, we developed a synthetic-biology approach based on a technique known as codon shuffling. Computer-assisted algorithms redistribute codons in a helper gene, thereby eliminating regions of homology, while enabling manipulation of factors such as codon-pair bias and CpG content to effectively titrate helper-gene protein levels. We apply this technique to rescue the replication of a murine gammaherpesvirus engineered with a mutation in the major immediate-early transactivator protein RTA. Complementation with codon-shuffled RTA constructs did not yield any WT revertant virus, a sharp contrast to WT virus contamination frequently observed during complementation with an unmodified helper gene. We further demonstrate the importance of eliminating WT virus contamination in an animal model of gammaherpesvirus lethality. We propose complementation by codon shuffling as a means to produce replication-defective or attenuated viruses. This method has immediate utility for investigating roles of essential genes in viral replication and will better enable future development of herpesvirus vaccines. PMID:28287622

  6. Suitability of Gray Water for Hydroponic Crop Production Following Biological and Physical Chemical and Biological Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Harper, Lynn D.; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Greene, Catherine

    1994-01-01

    The water present in waste streams from a human habitat must be recycled in Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) to limit resupply needs and attain self-sufficiency. Plants play an important role in providing food, regenerating air, and producing purified water via transpiration. However, we have shown that the surfactants present in hygiene waste water have acute toxic effects on plant growth (Bubenheim et al. 1994; Greene et al., 1994). These phytotoxic affects can be mitigated by allowing the microbial population on the root surface to degrade the surfactant, however, a significant suppression (several days) in crop performance is experienced prior to reaching sub-toxic surfactant levels and plant recovery. An effective alternative is to stabilize the microbial population responsible for degradation of the surfactant on an aerobic bioreactor and process the waste water prior to utilization in the hydroponic solution (Wisniewski and Bubenheim, 1993). A sensitive bioassay indicates that the surfactant phytotoxicity is suppressed by more than 90% within 5 hours of introduction of the gray water to the bioreactor; processing for more than 12 hours degrades more than 99% of the phytotoxin. Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) is a physical / chemical method for water purification which employees sequential distillation steps to separate water from solids and to volatilize contaminants. The solids from the waste water are concentrated in a brine and the pure product water (70 - 90% of the total waste water volume depending on operating conditions) retains non of the phytotoxic effects. Results of the bioassay were used to guide evaluations of the suitability of recovered gray water following biological and VCD processing for hydroponic lettuce production in controlled environments. Lettuce crops were grown for 28 days with 100% of the input water supplied with recovered water from the biological processor or VCD. When compared with the growth of plants

  7. Biological hydrogen production by dark fermentation: challenges and prospects towards scaled-up production.

    PubMed

    RenNanqi; GuoWanqian; LiuBingfeng; CaoGuangli; DingJie

    2011-06-01

    Among different technologies of hydrogen production, bio-hydrogen production exhibits perhaps the greatest potential to replace fossil fuels. Based on recent research on dark fermentative hydrogen production, this article reviews the following aspects towards scaled-up application of this technology: bioreactor development and parameter optimization, process modeling and simulation, exploitation of cheaper raw materials and combining dark-fermentation with photo-fermentation. Bioreactors are necessary for dark-fermentation hydrogen production, so the design of reactor type and optimization of parameters are essential. Process modeling and simulation can help engineers design and optimize large-scale systems and operations. Use of cheaper raw materials will surely accelerate the pace of scaled-up production of biological hydrogen. And finally, combining dark-fermentation with photo-fermentation holds considerable promise, and has successfully achieved maximum overall hydrogen yield from a single substrate. Future development of bio-hydrogen production will also be discussed.

  8. Ex vivo production of autologous whole inactivated HIV-1 for clinical use in therapeutic vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gil, Cristina; Climent, Núria; García, Felipe; Hurtado, Carmen; Nieto-Márquez, Sara; León, Agathe; García, M Teresa; Rovira, Cristina; Miralles, Laia; Dalmau, Judith; Pumarola, Tomás; Almela, Manel; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Zamora, Laura; Miró, José M; Brander, Christian; Clotet, Bonaventura; Gallart, Teresa; Gatell, José M

    2011-08-05

    This study provides a detailed description and characterization of the preparation of individualized lots of autologous heat inactivated HIV-1 virions used as immunogen in a clinical trial designed to test an autologous dendritic-cell-based therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine (Clinical Trial DCV-2, NCT00402142). For each participant, ex vivo isolation and expansion of primary virus were performed by co-culturing CD4-enriched PBMCs from the HIV-1-infected patient with PBMC from HIV-seronegative unrelated healthy volunteer donors. The viral supernatants were heat-inactivated and concentrated to obtain 1 mL of autologous immunogen, which was used to load autologous dendritic cells of each patient. High sequence homology was found between the inactivated virus immunogen and the HIV-1 circulating in plasma at the time of HIV-1 isolation. Immunogens contained up to 10⁹ HIV-1 RNA copies/mL showed considerably reduced infectivity after heat inactivation (median of 5.6 log₁₀), and were free of specified adventitious agents. The production of individualized lots of immunogen based on autologous inactivated HIV-1 virus fulfilling clinical-grade good manufacturing practice proved to be feasible, consistent with predetermined specifications, and safe for use in a clinical trial designed to test autologous dendritic cell-based therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine.

  9. Salmonid alphavirus replication in mosquito cells: towards a novel vaccine production system.

    PubMed

    Hikke, Mia C; Verest, Marjan; Vlak, Just M; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2014-09-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) causes pancreas disease and sleeping disease in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and confers a major burden to the aquaculture industry. A commercial inactivated whole virus vaccine propagated in a salmon cell line at low temperature provides effective protection against SAV infections. Alphaviruses (family Togaviridae) are generally transmitted between vertebrate hosts via blood-sucking arthropod vectors, typically mosquitoes. SAV is unique in this respect because it can be transmitted directly from fish to fish and has no known invertebrate vector. Here, we show for the first time that SAV is able to complete a full infectious cycle within arthropod cells derived from the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus. Progeny virus is produced in C6/36 and U4.4. cells in a temperature-dependent manner (at 15 °C but not at 18 °C), can be serially passaged and remains infectious to salmonid Chinook salmon embryo cells. This suggests that SAV is not a vertebrate-restricted alphavirus after all and may have the potential to replicate in invertebrates. The current study also shows the ability of SAV to be propagated in mosquito cells, thereby possibly providing an alternative SAV production system for vaccine applications.

  10. Is biological productivity enhanced at the New England shelfbreak front?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weifeng G.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J.; Gawarkiewicz, Glen G.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional (cross-shelf) numerical model of the mean seasonal circulation offshore of southern New England predicts upwelling at the shelfbreak front. Expected ramifications of this upwelling include enhancement of nutrient supply, phytoplankton biomass, and productivity. However, seasonal climatologies of chlorophyll based on both in situ data and satellite observations show no mean enhancement at the front. We investigate this apparent discrepancy with a four-component planktonic ecosystem model coupled to the two-dimensional physical model. Nutrient fields are restored to climatological values at depth, and upper ocean values evolve freely according to physical and biological forcing. Vertical diffusivity is based on seasonally averaged surface and bottom mixed layer depths compiled from in situ observations. The model reproduces the general pattern of the observed cross-shelf and seasonal variations of the chlorophyll distribution. It predicts a local enhancement of phytoplankton productivity at the shelfbreak in spring and summer as a result of the persistently upwelled nutrient-rich slope water. In the model, zooplankton grazing prevents accumulation of phytoplankton biomass at the site of the upwelling. The predicted enhancement of primary productivity (but not phytoplankton biomass) at the shelfbreak constitutes a hypothesis that could be tested in the future with suitable measurements from regional long-term observatories, such as the Ocean Observatories Initiative Pioneer Array.

  11. Systems biology of recombinant protein production using Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Biedendieck, Rebekka; Borgmeier, Claudia; Bunk, Boyke; Stammen, Simon; Scherling, Christian; Meinhardt, Friedhelm; Wittmann, Christoph; Jahn, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli is the most widely used production host for recombinant proteins in both academia and industry. The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium represents an increasingly used alternative for high yield intra- and extracellular protein synthesis. During the past two decades, multiple tools including gene expression plasmids and production strains have been developed. Introduction of free replicating and integrative plasmids into B. megaterium is possible via protoplasts transformation or transconjugation. Using His(6)- and StrepII affinity tags, the intra- or extracellular produced proteins can easily be purified in one-step procedures. Different gene expression systems based on the xylose controlled promoter P(xylA) and various phage RNA polymerase (T7, SP6, K1E) driven systems enable B. megaterium to produce up to 1.25g of recombinant protein per liter. Biomass concentrations of up to 80g/l can be achieved by high cell density cultivations in bioreactors. Gene knockouts and gene replacements in B. megaterium are possible via an optimized gene disruption system. For a safe application in industry, sporulation and protease-deficient as well as UV-sensitive mutants are available. With the help of the recently published B. megaterium genome sequence, it is possible to characterize bottle necks in the protein production process via systems biology approaches based on transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and fluxome data. The bioinformatical platform (Megabac, http://www.megabac.tu-bs.de) integrates obtained theoretical and experimental data.

  12. Biological production of ethanol from coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the ``wild strain`` produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

  13. Mechanism of Action for Anti-Radiation Vaccine in Reducing the Biological Impact of High-Dose Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then collected and circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naive animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. We partially analyzed the biochemical characteristics of the SRDs. The SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which the mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  14. Mechanism of Action for Anti-radiation Vaccine in Reducing the Biological Impact of High-dose Gamma Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then collected and circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naive animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. Initial analysis of the biochemical characteristics indicated that the SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which the mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  15. Mechanism of action for anti-radiation vaccine in reducing the biological impact of high-dose gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliev, Vladislav; Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Casey, Rachael C.

    Ionizing radiation is a major health risk of long-term space travel, the biological consequences of which include genetic and oxidative damage. In this study, we propose an original mechanism by which high doses of ionizing radiation induce acute toxicity. We identified biological components that appear in the lymphatic vessels shortly after high-dose gamma irradiation. These radiation-induced toxins, which we have named specific radiation determinants (SRD), were generated in the irradiated tissues and then circulated throughout the body via the lymph circulation and bloodstream. Depending on the type of SRD elicited, different syndromes of acute radiation sickness (ARS) were expressed. The SRDs were developed into a vaccine used to confer active immunity against acute radiation toxicity in immunologically naïve animals. Animals that were pretreated with SRDs exhibited resistance to lethal doses of gamma radiation, as measured by increased survival times and survival rates. In comparison, untreated animals that were exposed to similar large doses of gamma radiation developed acute radiation sickness and died within days. This phenomenon was observed in a number of mammalian species. Initial analysis of the biochemical characteristics indicated that the SRDs were large molecular weight (200-250 kDa) molecules that were comprised of a mixture of protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mineral. Further analysis is required to further identify the SRD molecules and the biological mechanism by which they mediate the toxicity associated with acute radiation sickness. By doing so, we may develop an effective specific immunoprophylaxis as a countermeasure against the acute effects of ionizing radiation.

  16. Experimental intramammary inoculation with Mycoplasma bovis in vaccinated and unvaccinated cows: effect on milk production and milk quality.

    PubMed Central

    Boothby, J T; Jasper, D E; Thomas, C B

    1986-01-01

    The effect of vaccination on milk production was evaluated in vaccinated and control cows experimentally challenged in two of four quarters with live Mycoplasma bovis. During the first three weeks after experimental challenge, six of eight unchallenged quarters on vaccinated cows and seven of eight unchallenged quarters on control cows became infected. Most of these quarters secreted normal milk, with negative California Mastitis Test scores and maintained normal milk production throughout most of the study (although some quarters on control cows remained infected). All challenged quarters became infected, had strong California Mastitis Test reactions, and had a drastic (greater than 85%) loss in milk production. Thereafter, four of eight challenged quarters on control cows remained infected, had mostly positive California Mastitis Test scores, produced mostly normal-appearing milk, and recovered some productive capabilities. By the end of the study no M. bovis could be recovered from challenged quarters on vaccinated cows and the milk appeared mostly normal. The California Mastitis Test scores on these quarters, however, remained elevated and milk production remained very low. PMID:3756674

  17. Production and biological activities of yellow pigments from Monascus fungi.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Wu, Zhenqiang

    2016-08-01

    Monascus yellow pigments (MYPs), are azaphilone compounds and one of the three main components of total Monascus pigments (MPs). Thirty-five hydrophilic or hydrophobic MYPs have been identified, with the majority being hydrophobic. Apart from screening special Monascus strains, some advanced approaches, such as extractive and high-cell-density fermentations, have been applied for developing or producing new MYPs, especially extracellular hydrophilic MYPs. The outstanding performance of MYPs in terms of resistance to photodegradation, as well as tolerance for temperature and pH, give natural MYPs reasonable prospects, compared with the orange and red MPs, for practical use in the present and future. Meanwhile, MYPs have shown promising potential for applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries based on their described bioactivities. This review briefly summarizes the reports to date on chemical structures, biological activities, biosynthetic pathways, production technologies, and physicochemical performances of MYPs. The existing problems for MYPs are discussed and research prospects proposed.

  18. 9 CFR 113.318 - Pseudorabies Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pseudorabies Vaccine. 113.318 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.318 Pseudorabies Vaccine. Pseudorabies Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be prepared from...

  19. 9 CFR 113.303 - Bluetongue Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bluetongue Vaccine. 113.303 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.303 Bluetongue Vaccine. Bluetongue Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... be used for preparing the seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be prepared...

  20. 9 CFR 113.318 - Pseudorabies Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pseudorabies Vaccine. 113.318 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.318 Pseudorabies Vaccine. Pseudorabies Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be prepared from...

  1. 9 CFR 113.318 - Pseudorabies Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pseudorabies Vaccine. 113.318 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.318 Pseudorabies Vaccine. Pseudorabies Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be prepared from...

  2. 9 CFR 113.318 - Pseudorabies Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pseudorabies Vaccine. 113.318 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.318 Pseudorabies Vaccine. Pseudorabies Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be prepared from...

  3. 9 CFR 113.303 - Bluetongue Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bluetongue Vaccine. 113.303 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.303 Bluetongue Vaccine. Bluetongue Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... be used for preparing the seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be prepared...

  4. 9 CFR 113.303 - Bluetongue Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bluetongue Vaccine. 113.303 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.303 Bluetongue Vaccine. Bluetongue Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... be used for preparing the seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be prepared...

  5. 9 CFR 113.303 - Bluetongue Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bluetongue Vaccine. 113.303 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.303 Bluetongue Vaccine. Bluetongue Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... be used for preparing the seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be prepared...

  6. 9 CFR 113.318 - Pseudorabies Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pseudorabies Vaccine. 113.318 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.318 Pseudorabies Vaccine. Pseudorabies Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be prepared from...

  7. 9 CFR 113.303 - Bluetongue Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bluetongue Vaccine. 113.303 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.303 Bluetongue Vaccine. Bluetongue Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... be used for preparing the seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be prepared...

  8. 9 CFR 103.2 - Disposition of animals administered experimental biological products or live organisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... experimental biological products or live organisms. 103.2 Section 103.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL... live organisms. Safeguards as herein provided shall be established by the research investigator...

  9. 9 CFR 103.2 - Disposition of animals administered experimental biological products or live organisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... experimental biological products or live organisms. 103.2 Section 103.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL... live organisms. Safeguards as herein provided shall be established by the research investigator...

  10. Large scale production of a mammalian cell derived quadrivalent hepatitis C virus like particle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Earnest-Silveira, L; Christiansen, D; Herrmann, S; Ralph, S A; Das, S; Gowans, E J; Torresi, J

    2016-10-01

    A method for the large-scale production of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived hepatitis C virus-like particles (HCV VLPs) is described. The HCV core E1 and E2 coding sequences of genotype 1a, 1b, 2a or 3a were co-expressed in Huh7 cell factories using a recombinant adenoviral expression system. The structural proteins self-assembled into VLPs that were purified from Huh7 cell lysates by iodixanol ultracentrifugation and Stirred cell ultrafiltration. Electron microscopy, revealed VLPs of the different genotypes that are morphologically similar. Our results show that it is possible to produce large quantities of individual HCV genotype VLPs with relative ease thus making this approach an alternative for the manufacture of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived HCV VLP vaccine.

  11. Cytokine production and dysregulation in HIV pathogenesis: lessons for development of therapeutics and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Morgan A; Pombo, Carolina; Betts, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have characterized the cytokine modulation observed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals, from initial infection through chronic disease. Progressive and non-progressive HIV infection models show the cytokine milieu differs in terms of production and responsiveness in these two groups, suggesting an understanding of the role cytokines play during infection is necessary for directing the immune response toward viral control. This review will cover cytokine induction and dysfunction during HIV pathogenesis, with a focus on the interplay between cytokines and transcription factors, T cell activation, and exhaustion. We highlight cytokines that have either vaccine adjuvant or therapeutic potential and discuss the need to identify key factors required for prevention of progression, clearance of infection, or protection from acquisition.

  12. Using IC-Tagging Methodology for Production and Purification of Epitope-Loaded Protein Microspheres for Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Barreiro-Piñeiro, Natalia; Menaya-Vargas, Rebeca; Brandariz-Núñez, Alberto; Otero-Romero, Iria; Lostalé-Seijo, Irene; Benavente, Javier; Martínez-Costas, José M

    2016-01-01

    Particulate material is more efficient in eliciting immune responses. Here we describe the production of microspheres formed by protein muNS-Mi from avian reoviruses, loaded with foreign epitopes by means of IC-Tagging, for their use as vaccines.

  13. 9 CFR 105.3 - Notices re: worthless, contaminated, dangerous, or harmful biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... serial or subserial of a veterinary biological product under the provisions of paragraph (a) or (b) of this section, veterinary biologics licensees or permittees shall: (1) Stop the preparation... veterinary biological product pending further instructions from APHIS. (2) Immediately, but no later than...

  14. Technology transfer of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant manufacturing for pandemic influenza vaccine production in Romania: Preclinical evaluation of split virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine with adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Stavaru, Crina; Onu, Adrian; Lupulescu, Emilia; Tucureanu, Catalin; Rasid, Orhan; Vlase, Ene; Coman, Cristin; Caras, Iuliana; Ghiorghisor, Alina; Berbecila, Laurentiu; Tofan, Vlad; Bowen, Richard A.; Marlenee, Nicole; Hartwig, Airn; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Baldwin, Susan L.; Van Hoeven, Neal; Vedvick, Thomas S.; Huynh, Chuong; O'Hara, Michael K.; Noah, Diana L.; Fox, Christopher B.

    2016-01-01

    abstract Millions of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine doses containing oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant have been administered in order to enhance and broaden immune responses and to facilitate antigen sparing. Despite the enactment of a Global Action Plan for Influenza Vaccines and a multi-fold increase in production capabilities over the past 10 years, worldwide capacity for pandemic influenza vaccine production is still limited. In developing countries, where routine influenza vaccination is not fully established, additional measures are needed to ensure adequate supply of pandemic influenza vaccines without dependence on the shipment of aid from other, potentially impacted first-world countries. Adaptation of influenza vaccine and adjuvant technologies by developing country influenza vaccine manufacturers may enable antigen sparing and corresponding increases in global influenza vaccine coverage capacity. Following on previously described work involving the technology transfer of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant manufacturing to a Romanian vaccine manufacturing institute, we herein describe the preclinical evaluation of inactivated split virion H5N1 influenza vaccine with emulsion adjuvant, including immunogenicity, protection from virus challenge, antigen sparing capacity, and safety. In parallel with the evaluation of the bioactivity of the tech-transferred adjuvant, we also describe the impact of concurrent antigen manufacturing optimization activities. Depending on the vaccine antigen source and manufacturing process, inclusion of adjuvant was shown to enhance and broaden functional antibody titers in mouse and rabbit models, promote protection from homologous virus challenge in ferrets, and facilitate antigen sparing. Besides scientific findings, the operational lessons learned are delineated in order to facilitate adaptation of adjuvant technologies by other developing country institutes to enhance global pandemic influenza preparedness. PMID:26618392

  15. Technology transfer of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant manufacturing for pandemic influenza vaccine production in Romania: Preclinical evaluation of split virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine with adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Stavaru, Crina; Onu, Adrian; Lupulescu, Emilia; Tucureanu, Catalin; Rasid, Orhan; Vlase, Ene; Coman, Cristin; Caras, Iuliana; Ghiorghisor, Alina; Berbecila, Laurentiu; Tofan, Vlad; Bowen, Richard A; Marlenee, Nicole; Hartwig, Airn; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Baldwin, Susan L; Van Hoeven, Neal; Vedvick, Thomas S; Huynh, Chuong; O'Hara, Michael K; Noah, Diana L; Fox, Christopher B

    2016-04-02

    Millions of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine doses containing oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant have been administered in order to enhance and broaden immune responses and to facilitate antigen sparing. Despite the enactment of a Global Action Plan for Influenza Vaccines and a multi-fold increase in production capabilities over the past 10 years, worldwide capacity for pandemic influenza vaccine production is still limited. In developing countries, where routine influenza vaccination is not fully established, additional measures are needed to ensure adequate supply of pandemic influenza vaccines without dependence on the shipment of aid from other, potentially impacted first-world countries. Adaptation of influenza vaccine and adjuvant technologies by developing country influenza vaccine manufacturers may enable antigen sparing and corresponding increases in global influenza vaccine coverage capacity. Following on previously described work involving the technology transfer of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant manufacturing to a Romanian vaccine manufacturing institute, we herein describe the preclinical evaluation of inactivated split virion H5N1 influenza vaccine with emulsion adjuvant, including immunogenicity, protection from virus challenge, antigen sparing capacity, and safety. In parallel with the evaluation of the bioactivity of the tech-transferred adjuvant, we also describe the impact of concurrent antigen manufacturing optimization activities. Depending on the vaccine antigen source and manufacturing process, inclusion of adjuvant was shown to enhance and broaden functional antibody titers in mouse and rabbit models, promote protection from homologous virus challenge in ferrets, and facilitate antigen sparing. Besides scientific findings, the operational lessons learned are delineated in order to facilitate adaptation of adjuvant technologies by other developing country institutes to enhance global pandemic influenza preparedness.

  16. Hormones in international meat production: biological, sociological and consumer issues.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, Hugh

    2002-12-01

    Beef and its products are an important source of nutrition in many human societies. Methods of production vary and include the use of hormonal compounds ('hormones') to increase growth and lean tissue with reduced fat deposition in cattle. The hormonal compounds are naturally occurring in animals or are synthetically produced xenobiotics and have oestrogenic (oestradiol-17beta and its esters; zeranol), androgenic (testosterone and esters; trenbolone acetate) or progestogenic (progesterone; melengestrol acetate) activity. The use of hormones as production aids is permitted in North American countries but is no longer allowed in the European Union (EU), which also prohibits the importation of beef and its products derived from hormone-treated cattle. These actions have resulted in a trade dispute between the two trading blocs. The major concern for EU authorities is the possibility of adverse effects on human consumers of residues of hormones and metabolites. Methods used to assess possible adverse effects are typical of those used by international agencies to assess acceptability of chemicals in human food. These include analysis of quantities present in the context of known biological activity and digestive, absorptive, post-absorptive and excretory processes. Particular considerations include the low quantities of hormonal compounds consumed in meat products and their relationships to endogenous production particularly in prepubertal children, enterohepatic inactivation, cellular receptor- and non-receptor-mediated effects and potential for interference with growth, development and physiological function in consumers. There is particular concern about the role of oestradiol-17beta as a carcinogen in certain tissues. Now subject to a 'permanent' EU ban, current evidence suggests that certain catechol metabolites may induce free-radical damage of DNA in cell and laboratory animal test systems. Classical oestrogen-receptor mediation is considered to stimulate

  17. WHO Expert Committee on biological standardization.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of a WHO Expert Committee commissioned to coordinate activities leading to the adoption of international recommendations for the production and control of vaccines and other biologicals and the establishment of international biological reference materials. The report starts with a discussion of general issues brought to the attention of the Committee and provides information on the status and development of reference materials for various antibodies, antigens, blood products and related substances, cytokines, growth factors, and endocrinological substances. The second part of the report, of particular relevance to manufacturers and national regulatory authorities, contains WHO recommendations and guidelines on human papillomavirus vaccines; meningococcal A conjugate vaccines; and stability evaluation of vaccines. Also included are a list of recommendations, guidelines and other documents for biological substances used in medicine, and of international standards and reference reagent for biological substances.

  18. WHO Expert Committee on biological standardization.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of a WHO Expert Committee commissioned to coordinate activities leading to the adoption of international recommendations for the production and control of vaccines and other biologicals and the establishment of international biological reference materials. The report starts with a discussion of general issues brought to the attention of the Committee and provides information on the status and development of reference materials for various antibodies, antigens, blood products and related substances, cytokines, growth factors, and endocrinological substances. The second part of the report, of particular relevance to manufacturers and national regulatory authorities, contains WHO recommendations and guidelines on Japanese encephalitis vaccine (inactivated), human; regulatory preparedness for human pandemic influenza vaccines; and clinical evaluation of meningococcal C conjugate vaccines. Also included are a list of recommendations, guidelines and other documents for biological substances used in medicine, and of international standards and reference reagent for biological substances.

  19. Review: production, characterization, and testing of banked mammalian cell substrates used to produce biological products.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Leonard J

    2005-01-01

    A critical component in controlling the production of biological products derived from human and animal cell lines is the characterization and testing of banked cell substrates. The objective is to confirm the identity, purity, and suitability of these cells for manufacturing use. Quality concerns for biological products derived from cell lines originate from the presence of cellular and adventitious contaminants. Well-characterized cell banks not only permit a consistent source of production cells throughout the life of a product but also decrease the likelihood of contamination by other cell lines and adventitious agents. An important part of qualifying a cell line is choosing the appropriate testing for the presence of adventitious contaminants. The qualification of cell banks includes tests for cell identity and endogenous and adventitious microbial contaminants (bacteria, fungi, mycoplasmas, and viruses). For cells producing recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid-derived products, analysis of the expression construct at the nucleic acid level (genetic stability) is also a primary concern. The strategy for designing a safety-testing program for banked cells should be based on sound scientific principles and current regulatory guidance.

  20. Competency development in antibody production in cancer cell biology

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M.S.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objective of this project was to develop a rapid recombinant antibody production technology. To achieve the objective, the authors employed (1) production of recombinant antigens that are important for cell cycle regulation and DNA repair, (2) immunization and specific selection of antibody-producing lymphocytes using the flow cytometry and magnetic bead capturing procedure, (3) construction of single chain antibody library, (4) development of recombinant vectors that target, express, and regulate the expression of intracellular antibodies, and (5) specific inhibition of tumor cell growth in tissue culture. The authors have accomplished (1) optimization of a selection procedure to isolate antigen-specific lymphocytes, (2) optimization of the construction of a single-chain antibody library, and (3) development of a new antibody expression vector for intracellular immunization. The future direction of this research is to continue to test the potential use of the intracellular immunization procedure as a tool to study functions of biological molecules and as an immuno-cancer therapy procedure to inhibit the growth of cancer cells.

  1. Biological removal of cationic fission products from nuclear wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, N; Chirwa, E M N

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear energy is becoming a preferred energy source amidst rising concerns over the impacts of fossil fuel based energy on global warming and climate change. However, the radioactive waste generated during nuclear power generation contains harmful long-lived fission products such as strontium (Sr). In this study, cationic strontium uptake from solution by microbial cultures obtained from mine wastewater is evaluated. A high strontium removal capacity (q(max)) with maximum loading of 444 mg/g biomass was achieved by a mixed sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) culture. Sr removal in SRB was facilitated by cell surface based electrostatic interactions with the formation of weak ionic bonds, as 68% of the adsorbed Sr(2+) was easily desorbed from the biomass in an ion exchange reaction with MgCl₂. To a lesser extent, precipitation reactions were also found to account for the removal of Sr from aqueous solution as about 3% of the sorbed Sr was precipitated due to the presence of chemical ligands while the remainder occurred as an immobile fraction. Further analysis of the Sr-loaded SRB biomass by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled to energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) confirmed extracellular Sr(2+) precipitation as a result of chemical interaction. In summary, the obtained results demonstrate the prospects of using biological technologies for the remediation of industrial wastewaters contaminated by fission products.

  2. Biological conversion of pyrolytic products to ethanol and lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jieni

    Pyrolysis is a promising technology that can convert up to 75 % of lignocellulosic biomass into crude bio-oil. However, due to the complex chemical compositions of bio-oil, its further refining into fuels and high value chemicals faces great challenges. This dissertation research proposed new technologies for biological conversion of pyrolytic products derived from cellulose and hemicellulose, such as anhydrosugars and carbolic acids to fuels and chemicals. First, the pyrolytic anhydrosugars (chiefly levoglucosan (LG)) were hydrolysed into glucose followed by neutralization, detoxification and fermentation to produce ethanol by ethanogenetic yeast and lipids by oleaginous yeasts. Second, a novel process for the conversion of C1-C4 pyrolytic products to lipid with oleaginous yeasts was investigated. Third, oleaginous yeasts that can directly convert LG to lipids were studied and a recombined yeast with LG kinase was constructed for the direct convertion of LG into lipids. This allowed a reduction of existing process for LG fermentation from four steps into two steps and eliminated the need for acids and bases as well as the disposal of chemicals. The development of genetic modified organisms with LG kinase opens a promising avenue for the direct LG fermentation to produce a wide range of fuels and chemicals. The simplification of LG utilization process would enhance the economic viability of this technology.

  3. Fundamental hair follicle biology and fine fibre production in animals.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, H

    2010-09-01

    Hair 'fine' fibre is an important commercial product of farmed and certain wild animal species. The fibre is produced in follicles embedded in skin. These have properties in common with other tissues of the integument and have importance in determining yield and quality of fibre. Means of understanding and improving these characteristics are informed by knowledge of integumental and follicle biology. This paper reviews contemporary information that identifies the major fibre-producing species and their production characteristic. It surveys knowledge describing fundamental biology of the integument and considers information derived for the hair follicle from studies on a number of species including genetically modified mice. It identifies the composition of the follicle and describes components and interrelationships between epidermal hair-fibre producing epidermis and fibroblast- and connective tissue-containing dermis. The structure of different primary and secondary follicle types, and associated structures, are described. Focus is given to the alterations in anatomy and in behaviour from active to inactive state, which occurs during the hair follicle cycle. Information is provided on the anatomical substructures (hair medulla, cortex, cuticles and supporting sheaths and dermal papilla), cellular and extracellular composition, and adhesion and chemical signalling systems, which regulate development from the early embryo to post-natal state and subsequent cycling. Such signalling involves the dermis and its specialist fibroblasts, which secrete signalling molecules, which along with those from local epidermis and systemic sources, largely determine structure and function of epidermal cells. Such chemical signalling typically includes endocrine-, paracrine-, autocrine- and juxtacrine-acting molecules and interactions with their receptors located on cell membranes or intracellularly with transduction of message mediated by transcription factors at gene level

  4. Biological risks associated with consumption of reptile products.

    PubMed

    Magnino, Simone; Colin, Pierre; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Madsen, Mogens; McLauchlin, Jim; Nöckler, Karsten; Maradona, Miguel Prieto; Tsigarida, Eirini; Vanopdenbosch, Emmanuel; Van Peteghem, Carlos

    2009-09-15

    The consumption of a wide variety of species of reptiles caught from the wild has been an important source of protein for humans world-wide for millennia. Terrapins, snakes, lizards, crocodiles and iguanas are now farmed and the consumption and trade of their meat and other edible products have recently increased in some areas of the world. Biological risks associated with the consumption of products from both farmed and wild reptile meat and eggs include infections caused by bacteria (Salmonella spp., Vibrio spp.), parasites (Spirometra, Trichinella, Gnathostoma, pentastomids), as well as intoxications by biotoxins. For crocodiles, Salmonella spp. constitute a significant public health risk due to the high intestinal carrier rate which is reflected in an equally high contamination rate in their fresh and frozen meat. There is a lack of information about the presence of Salmonella spp. in meat from other edible reptilians, though captive reptiles used as pets (lizards or turtles) are frequently carriers of these bacteria in Europe. Parasitic protozoa in reptiles represent a negligible risk for public health compared to parasitic metazoans, of which trichinellosis, pentastomiasis, gnathostomiasis and sparganosis can be acquired through consumption of contaminated crocodile, monitor lizard, turtle and snake meat, respectively. Other reptiles, although found to harbour the above parasites, have not been implicated with their transmission to humans. Freezing treatment inactivates Spirometra and Trichinella in crocodile meat, while the effectiveness of freezing of other reptilian meat is unknown. Biotoxins that accumulate in the flesh of sea turtles may cause chelonitoxism, a type of food poisoning with a high mortality rate in humans. Infections by fungi, including yeasts, and viruses widely occur in reptiles but have not been linked to a human health risk through the contamination of their meat. Currently there are no indications that natural transmissible spongiform

  5. Evaluation of the immunogenicity and biological activity of the Citrobacter freundii Vi-CRM197 conjugate as a vaccine for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Rondini, Simona; Micoli, Francesca; Lanzilao, Luisa; Hale, Christine; Saul, Allan J; Martin, Laura B

    2011-03-01

    Typhoid fever remains a major health problem in developing countries. Young children are at high risk, and a vaccine effective for this age group is urgently needed. Purified capsular polysaccharide from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Vi) is licensed as a vaccine, providing 50 to 70% protection in individuals older than 5 years. However, this vaccine is ineffective in infants. Vi conjugated to a carrier protein (i.e., an exoprotein A mutant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa [rEPA]) is highly immunogenic, provides long-term protection, and shows more than 90% protective efficacy in children 2 to 5 years old. Here, we describe an alternative glycoconjugate vaccine for S. Typhi, Vi-CRM(197), where Vi was obtained from Citrobacter freundii WR7011 and CRM(197), the mutant diphtheria toxin protein, was used as the carrier. We investigated the optimization of growth conditions for Vi production from C. freundii WR7011 and the immunogenicity of Vi-CRM(197) conjugates in mice. The optimal saccharide/protein ratio of the glycoconjugates was identified for the best antibody production. We also demonstrated the ability of this new vaccine to protect mice against challenge with Vi-positive Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

  6. Sustainable production of biologically active molecules of marine based origin.

    PubMed

    Murray, Patrick M; Moane, Siobhan; Collins, Catherine; Beletskaya, Tanya; Thomas, Olivier P; Duarte, Alysson W F; Nobre, Fernando S; Owoyemi, Ifeloju O; Pagnocca, Fernando C; Sette, L D; McHugh, Edward; Causse, Eric; Pérez-López, Paula; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, Ma T; Rubiolo, Juan; Leirós, Marta; Botana, Luis M; Pinteus, Susete; Alves, Celso; Horta, André; Pedrosa, Rui; Jeffryes, Clayton; Agathos, Spiros N; Allewaert, Celine; Verween, Annick; Vyverman, Wim; Laptev, Ivan; Sineoky, Sergei; Bisio, Angela; Manconi, Renata; Ledda, Fabio; Marchi, Mario; Pronzato, Roberto; Walsh, Daniel J

    2013-09-25

    The marine environment offers both economic and scientific potential which are relatively untapped from a biotechnological point of view. These environments whilst harsh are ironically fragile and dependent on a harmonious life form balance. Exploitation of natural resources by exhaustive wild harvesting has obvious negative environmental consequences. From a European industry perspective marine organisms are a largely underutilised resource. This is not due to lack of interest but due to a lack of choice the industry faces for cost competitive, sustainable and environmentally conscientious product alternatives. Knowledge of the biotechnological potential of marine organisms together with the development of sustainable systems for their cultivation, processing and utilisation are essential. In 2010, the European Commission recognised this need and funded a collaborative RTD/SME project under the Framework 7-Knowledge Based Bio-Economy (KBBE) Theme 2 Programme 'Sustainable culture of marine microorganisms, algae and/or invertebrates for high value added products'. The scope of that project entitled 'Sustainable Production of Biologically Active Molecules of Marine Based Origin' (BAMMBO) is outlined. Although the Union is a global leader in many technologies, it faces increasing competition from traditional rivals and emerging economies alike and must therefore improve its innovation performance. For this reason innovation is placed at the heart of a European Horizon 2020 Strategy wherein the challenge is to connect economic performance to eco performance. This article provides a synopsis of the research activities of the BAMMBO project as they fit within the wider scope of sustainable environmentally conscientious marine resource exploitation for high-value biomolecules.

  7. Mercury Poisoning Linked to Skin Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco ... Get Consumer Updates by E-mail Download PDF (250 K) On this page Dangers of Mercury Tracking Skin Products Containing Mercury How ...

  8. Plastid Molecular Pharming I. Production of Oral Vaccines via Plastid Transformation.

    PubMed

    Berecz, Bernadett Berecz; Zelenyánszki, Helga; Pólya, Sára; Tamás-Nyitrai, Cecília; Oszvald, Mária

    2016-10-04

    Vaccines produced in plants have opened up new opportunities in vaccination. Among the various categories of vaccines, the recombinant vaccine is generally regarded as the most economical and safest type because it cannot cause disease and does not require large-scale cultivation of pathogens. Due to the low cost of their cultivation, plants may represent viable alternative platforms for producing subunit vaccines. Genetic engineering of plastids is the innovation of the last three decades and has numerous benefits when compared to nuclear transformation. Due to the high level of expression, oral vaccines produced in transplastomic plants do not have to be purified as they can be consumed raw, which, therefore, reduces the cost of preparation, transportation and handling of the vaccines. Oral vaccination also excludes the risk of other infections or contaminations, while compartmentation of the plant cell provides an excellent encapsulation to the antigen within the plastid. Herein we review the main biotechnological and immunological aspects of the progress achieved in the field of plastid derived edible vaccines during the last decade. As there is a public debate against genetically modified crops, the advantages and limitations of oral vaccines are also discussed.

  9. Beyond phage display: non-traditional applications of the filamentous bacteriophage as a vaccine carrier, therapeutic biologic, and bioconjugation scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Kevin A.; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi; Scott, Jamie K.

    2015-01-01

    For the past 25 years, phage display technology has been an invaluable tool for studies of protein–protein interactions. However, the inherent biological, biochemical, and biophysical properties of filamentous bacteriophage, as well as the ease of its genetic manipulation, also make it an attractive platform outside the traditional phage display canon. This review will focus on the unique properties of the filamentous bacteriophage and highlight its diverse applications in current research. Particular emphases are placed on: (i) the advantages of the phage as a vaccine carrier, including its high immunogenicity, relative antigenic simplicity and ability to activate a range of immune responses, (ii) the phage’s potential as a prophylactic and therapeutic agent for infectious and chronic diseases, (iii) the regularity of the virion major coat protein lattice, which enables a variety of bioconjugation and surface chemistry applications, particularly in nanomaterials, and (iv) the phage’s large population sizes and fast generation times, which make it an excellent model system for directed protein evolution. Despite their ubiquity in the biosphere, metagenomics work is just beginning to explore the ecology of filamentous and non-filamentous phage, and their role in the evolution of bacterial populations. Thus, the filamentous phage represents a robust, inexpensive, and versatile microorganism whose bioengineering applications continue to expand in new directions, although its limitations in some spheres impose obstacles to its widespread adoption and use. PMID:26300850

  10. Presence and biological activity of antibiotics used in fuel ethanol and corn co-product production.

    PubMed

    Compart, D M Paulus; Carlson, A M; Crawford, G I; Fink, R C; Diez-Gonzalez, F; Dicostanzo, A; Shurson, G C

    2013-05-01

    Antibiotics are used in ethanol production to control bacteria from competing with yeast for nutrients during starch fermentation. However, there is no published scientific information on whether antibiotic residues are present in distillers grains (DG), co-products from ethanol production, or whether they retain their biological activity. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to quantify concentrations of various antibiotic residues in DG and determine whether residues were biologically active. Twenty distillers wet grains and 20 distillers dried grains samples were collected quarterly from 9 states and 43 ethanol plants in the United States. Samples were analyzed for DM, CP, NDF, crude fat, S, P, and pH to describe the nutritional characteristics of the samples evaluated. Samples were also analyzed for the presence of erythromycin, penicillin G, tetracycline, tylosin, and virginiamycin M1, using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Additionally, virginiamycin residues were determined, using a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved bioassay method. Samples were extracted and further analyzed for biological activity by exposing the sample extracts to 10(4) to 10(7) CFU/mL concentrations of sentinel bacterial strains Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115. Extracts that inhibited bacterial growth were considered to have biological activity. Physiochemical characteristics varied among samples but were consistent with previous findings. Thirteen percent of all samples contained low (≤1.12 mg/kg) antibiotic concentrations. Only 1 sample extract inhibited growth of Escherichia coli at 10(4) CFU/mL, but this sample contained no detectable concentrations of antibiotic residues. No extracts inhibited Listeria monocytogenes growth. These data indicate that the likelihood of detectable concentrations of antibiotic residues in DG is low; and if detected, they are found in very low concentrations. The inhibition in only 1 DG

  11. Integrated analysis of recombinant BPV-1 L1 protein for the production of a bovine papillomavirus VLP vaccine.

    PubMed

    Módolo, Diego Grando; Araldi, Rodrigo Pinheiro; Mazzuchelli-de-Souza, Jacqueline; Pereira, Alexandre; Pimenta, Daniel Carvalho; Zanphorlin, Letícia Maria; Beçak, Willy; Menossi, Marcelo; de Cassia Stocco, Rita; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Franco

    2017-03-14

    Bovine papillomatosis is an infectious disease that is caused by bovine papillomavirus (BPV), which results in important economic losses. However, no BPV vaccines or effective treatment methods are commercially available to date. Moreover, the absence of papillomavirus replication in vitro makes the use of recombinant protein a promising candidate for vaccine formulations. Hence, we developed an integrated study on the L1 capsid protein of BPV-1, obtained from a bacterial expression system, regarding its purification, biosafety, thermostability and immunogenicity. The results indicated an absence of genotoxicity of the purified recombinant L1 protein, β-sheet prevalence of secondary structure folding, protein stability under high temperatures as well as the presence of capsomeres and VLPs. In addition, preliminary experimental vaccination of calves showed the production of specific antibodies against BPV-1 L1.

  12. WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, B; Minor, P; Morgenthaler, J J; Burnouf, T; McIntosh, R; Padilla, A; Thorpe, R; van Aken, W G

    2004-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of a WHO Expert Committee commissioned to coordinate activities leading to the adoption of international requirements for the production and control of vaccines and other biologicals and the establishment of international biological reference materials. The report starts with a discussion of general issues brought to the Committee's attention and provides information on the status and development of reference materials for various antibodies, antigens, blood products and related substances, cytokines, growth factors, and endocrinological substances. The second part of the report, of particular relevance to manufacturers and national regulatory authorities, contains recommendations for the production and quality control of meningococcal group C conjugate vaccines, guidelines for regulatory expectations for clinical evaluation of vaccines, guidelines for the production and quality control of inactivated oral cholera vaccines and guidelines on viral inactivation and removal procedures intended to assure the viral safety of human blood plasma products.

  13. Who Expert Committee on Biological Standardization.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of a WHO Expert Committee commissioned to coordinate activities leading to the adoption of international requirements for the production and control of vaccines and other biologicals and the establishment of international biological reference materials. The report starts with a discussion of general issues brought to the Committee's attention and provides information on the status and development of reference materials for various antibodies, antigens, blood products and related substances, cytokines, growth factors, and endocrinological substances. The second part of the report, of particular relevance to manufacturers and national regulatory authorities, contains recommendations for the production and quality control of smallpox vaccine, an addendum to the recommendations for the production and quality control of meningococcal group C conjugate vaccines, guidelines on regulatory expectations related to the elimination, reduction or replacement of thiomersal in vaccines, and guidelines for the safe production and quality control of IPV manufactured from wild polioviruses.

  14. Comparative evaluation of conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), with loop-mediated isothermal amplification and SYBR green I-based real-time PCR for the quantitation of porcine circovirus-1 DNA in contaminated samples destined for vaccine production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo-Chao; Wang, Feng-Xue; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Song, Ni; Li, Jian-Xi; Yang, Zhi-Qiang; Wen, Yong-Jun; Wu, Hua

    2013-07-01

    Porcine circovirus type1 (PCV1), described initially as a contaminant of a porcine kidney cell line, is ubiquitous within the swine population The presence of PCV1 in porcine cell lines can lead to contamination during both human and porcine vaccine production. Therefore, a rapid, specific, sensitive and practical method is needed for the detection of PCV1 in bio-products. The aim of this study was to compare three assays in their ability to accurately quantify PCV1 virus in biological samples, namely loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), SYBR green I-based real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and conventional PCR. All assays yielded successful quantitation of PCV1 DNA and differentiated between PCV1-free and-contaminated cells. In addition, the results were specific for PCV1, since amplification of samples containing closely-related PCV2 or other pathogenic swine viruses yielded negative results. The lowest detection threshold of 10(2) copies was displayed by the SYBR green I-based real-time PCR assay. In addition, this assay was the most effective in detecting PCV1 contamination in a set of commercially available porcine vaccines. Therefore we conclude that SYBR green I-based real-time PCR is specific and sensitive for detecting PCV1 in biological samples and maybe used for quality control of vaccine and biomaterial production.

  15. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  16. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  17. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  18. 78 FR 78796 - Supplemental Applications Proposing Labeling Changes for Approved Drugs and Biological Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... Applications Proposing Labeling Changes for Approved Drugs and Biological Products; Correction and Extension of... holders of an approved drug or biological product to change the product labeling to reflect certain types of newly acquired information in advance of FDA's review of the change. The proposed rule...

  19. 9 CFR 112.9 - Biological products imported for research and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... research and evaluation. 112.9 Section 112.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PACKAGING AND LABELING § 112.9 Biological products imported for research and evaluation. A biological product imported for research and evaluation under a permit issued in accordance with § 104.4, with...

  20. 9 CFR 112.9 - Biological products imported for research and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... research and evaluation. 112.9 Section 112.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... PACKAGING AND LABELING § 112.9 Biological products imported for research and evaluation. A biological product imported for research and evaluation under a permit issued in accordance with § 104.4, with...

  1. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  2. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  3. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal ...

  4. 9 CFR 114.6 - Mixing biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS FOR... be mixed thoroughly in a single container. During bottling operations, the product shall...

  5. 9 CFR 113.327 - Bronchitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bronchitis Vaccine. 113.327 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.327 Bronchitis Vaccine. Bronchitis Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials shall...

  6. 9 CFR 113.327 - Bronchitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bronchitis Vaccine. 113.327 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.327 Bronchitis Vaccine. Bronchitis Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials shall...

  7. 9 CFR 113.327 - Bronchitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bronchitis Vaccine. 113.327 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.327 Bronchitis Vaccine. Bronchitis Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials shall...

  8. 9 CFR 113.327 - Bronchitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bronchitis Vaccine. 113.327 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.327 Bronchitis Vaccine. Bronchitis Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials shall...

  9. 9 CFR 113.327 - Bronchitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bronchitis Vaccine. 113.327 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.327 Bronchitis Vaccine. Bronchitis Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All serials shall...

  10. Antibiotic-free production of a herpes simplex virus 2 DNA vaccine in a high yield cGMP process

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jared; Rodriguez, Stephen; Finlayson, Neil; Williams, Jim; Carnes, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Two DNA vaccine plasmids encoding Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D, NTC8485-O2-gD2 and NTC8485-O2-UgD2tr, were produced at large scale under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) for use in a Phase I human clinical trial. These DNA vaccines incorporate the regulatory agency compliant, minimal, antibiotic-free (AF) NTC8485 mammalian expression vector. Plasmid yields of > 1 g/L were achieved using the HyperGRO™ fed-batch fermentation process, with successful scale up from 10 L process development scale to 320 L culture volume for cGMP production. The DNA vaccines were purified using a low residence time, high shear lysis process and AIRMIXTM technology, followed by chromatographic purification. This combination of optimized plasmid vector, high yield upstream production, and efficient downstream purification resulted in purified HSV-2 DNA vaccines with > 99% total supercoiled plasmid, ≤ 0.2% RNA, ≤ 0.1% host cell genomic DNA, and ≤ 0.1 endotoxin units per mg. PMID:23899469

  11. The potential of plants for the production and delivery of human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Govea-Alonso, Dania O

    2015-07-01

    The available vaccines against human papillomavirus have some limitations such as low coverage due to their high cost, reduced immune coverage and the lack of therapeutic effects. Recombinant vaccines produced in plants (genetically engineered using stable or transient expression systems) offer the possibility to obtain low cost, efficacious and easy to administer vaccines. The status on the development of plant-based vaccines against human papillomavirus is analyzed and placed in perspective in this review. Some candidates have been characterized at a preclinical level with interesting outcomes. However, there is a need to perform the immunological characterization of several vaccine prototypes, especially through the oral administration route, as well as develop new candidates based on new chimeric designs intended to provide broader immunoprotection and therapeutic activity.

  12. 9 CFR 105.3 - Notices re: worthless, contaminated, dangerous, or harmful biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...-Serum-Toxin Act, of any biological product by any person holding a license or permit may be dangerous...

  13. 9 CFR 105.3 - Notices re: worthless, contaminated, dangerous, or harmful biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...-Serum-Toxin Act, of any biological product by any person holding a license or permit may be dangerous...

  14. 9 CFR 105.3 - Notices re: worthless, contaminated, dangerous, or harmful biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS...-Serum-Toxin Act, of any biological product by any person holding a license or permit may be dangerous...

  15. Development of biological platform for the autotrophic production of biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Nymul

    The research described herein is aimed at developing an advanced biofuel platform that has the potential to surpass the natural rate of solar energy capture and CO2 fixation. The underlying concept is to use the electricity from a renewable source, such as wind or solar, to capture CO 2 via a biological agent, such as a microbe, into liquid fuels that can be used for the transportation sector. In addition to being renewable, the higher rate of energy capture by photovoltaic cells than natural photosynthesis is expected to facilitate higher rate of liquid fuel production than traditional biofuel processes. The envisioned platform is part of ARPA-E's (Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy) Electrofuels initiative which aims at supplementing the country's petroleum based fuel production with renewable liquid fuels that can integrate easily with the existing refining and distribution infrastructure (http://arpae. energy.gov/ProgramsProjects/Electrofuels.aspx). The Electrofuels initiative aimed to develop liquid biofuels that avoid the issues encountered in the current generation of biofuels: (1) the reliance of biomass-derived technologies on the inefficient process of photosynthesis, (2) the relatively energy- and resource-intensive nature of agronomic processes, and (3) the occupation of large areas of arable land for feedstock production. The process proceeds by the capture of solar energy into electrical energy via photovoltaic cells, using the generated electricity to split water into molecular hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2), and feeding these gases, along with carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from point sources such as a biomass or coal-fired power plant, to a microbial bioprocessing platform. The proposed microbial bioprocessing platform leverages a chemolithoautotrophic microorganism (Rhodobacter capsulatus or Ralstonia eutropha) naturally able to utilize these gases as growth substrates, and genetically modified to produce a triterpene hydrocarbon fuel

  16. 9 CFR 103.3 - Shipment of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXPERIMENTAL... case of products containing live organisms, when they are deemed necessary or advisable by...

  17. 9 CFR 103.3 - Shipment of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXPERIMENTAL... case of products containing live organisms, when they are deemed necessary or advisable by...

  18. Evaluation and redesign of manual material handling in a vaccine production centre's warehouse.

    PubMed

    Torres, Yaniel; Viña, Silvio

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted in a warehouse at a vaccine production centre where improvement to existing storage and working conditions were sought through the construction of a new refrigerated store section (2-8C°). Warehousing tasks were videotaped and ergonomics analysis tools were used to assess the risk of developing MSDs. Specifically, these tools were the Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA) and the NIOSH equation. The current plant layout was sketched and analyzed to find possible targets for improvement trough the application of general work space design and ergonomics principles. Seven of the eight postures evaluated with REBA had a total score between 8 and 10, meaning a high risk, and only one was at a medium risk level. Nine of the eleven manual material handling tasks analyzed with the NIOSH equation had a Lifting Index between 1.14 and 1.80 and two had a recommended weight limit of 0 kg, indicating a need for job redesign. Solutions included the redesign of shelves, the design of a two-step stair and a trolley with adjustable height; also, changes in work methods were proposed by introducing a two-workers lifting strategy and job rotation, and, finally, a restructuring of plant layout was completed.

  19. 21 CFR 310.4 - Biologics; products subject to license control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Biologics; products subject to license control. 310.4 Section 310.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... (b) To obtain marketing approval for radioactive biological products for human use, as defined...

  20. 21 CFR 310.4 - Biologics; products subject to license control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Biologics; products subject to license control. 310.4 Section 310.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... (b) To obtain marketing approval for radioactive biological products for human use, as defined...

  1. 21 CFR 310.4 - Biologics; products subject to license control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Biologics; products subject to license control. 310.4 Section 310.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... (b) To obtain marketing approval for radioactive biological products for human use, as defined...

  2. 21 CFR 310.4 - Biologics; products subject to license control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Biologics; products subject to license control. 310.4 Section 310.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... (b) To obtain marketing approval for radioactive biological products for human use, as defined...

  3. 77 FR 30887 - Amendments to Sterility Test Requirements for Biological Products; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is correcting a final rule that appeared in the Federal Register of May 3, 2012. (77 FR 26162). The final rule provides manufacturers of biological products greater flexibility, as appropriate, and encourages use of the most appropriate and state-of-the-art test methods for assuring the safety of biological products. The rule was published with an......

  4. Current concepts and future approaches to the development of autologous/autogenous vaccines for veterinary use.

    PubMed

    Tollis, M

    2004-01-01

    Current classification of autologous/autogenous (A/A) vaccines is commonly based on the concept of strain/antigen specificity associated with targeted treatment of a restricted number of animals. However, fulfilling these two conditions is not sufficient for immune-veterinary immunebiologicals to be excluded from the provisions of Directive 2001/82/EC. Indeed, non-inactivated A/A vaccines are not automatically considered out of the scope of the community code relating to veterinary medicinal products, in particular to immune-biologicals. As a major consequence of the "regulatory" exclusion from the requirements of EU rules, A/A vaccines can be usually manufactured and distributed without having obtained a marketing authorization by the competent authority of a Member State. Furthermore, strain specificity enables veterinarians to consider the use of these vaccines in quite a large variety of epidemiological circumstances where no "conventional" vaccines are yet available or are considered efficacious. In addition, in contrast to "conventional" vaccines, which are considered exclusively as a preventive tool against infectious diseases, A/A vaccines can also be used to treat "continuing" infections. Although the limited scientific value of these products and the poor investigations of the effector mechanisms involved are widely recognized, their use is still claimed in conditions where disorders in the immune system are suspected. Today, a more appropriate definition of A/A vaccines is one that takes into account their historical tradition and practical use, such as stable- or herd-specific vaccines, custom ("..ized") vaccines, therapeutic vaccines, pharmavaccines, vaccines used for biological therapy, etc. Although acknowledging the "regulatory autonomy" of A/A vaccines versus "conventional" vaccines, here it will be presented as an overview of the necessary points to consider, to guarantee an acceptable standard in the development and control of this particular

  5. High-yield production of a stable Vero cell-based vaccine candidate against the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Fangye; Zhou, Jian; Ma, Lei; Song, Shaohui; Zhang, Xinwen; Li, Weidong; Jiang, Shude; Wang, Yue; Liao, Guoyang

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vero cell-based HPAI H5N1 vaccine with stable high yield. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable high yield derived from the YNVa H3N2 backbone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H5N1/YNVa has a similar safety and immunogenicity to H5N1delta. -- Abstract: Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses pose a global pandemic threat, for which rapid large-scale vaccine production technology is critical for prevention and control. Because chickens are highly susceptible to HPAI viruses, the supply of chicken embryos for vaccine production might be depleted during a virus outbreak. Therefore, developing HPAI virus vaccines using other technologies is critical. Meeting vaccine demand using the Vero cell-based fermentation process has been hindered by low stability and yield. In this study, a Vero cell-based HPAI H5N1 vaccine candidate (H5N1/YNVa) with stable high yield was achieved by reassortment of the Vero-adapted (Va) high growth A/Yunnan/1/2005(H3N2) (YNVa) virus with the A/Anhui/1/2005(H5N1) attenuated influenza vaccine strain (H5N1delta) using the 6/2 method. The reassorted H5N1/YNVa vaccine maintained a high hemagglutination (HA) titer of 1024. Furthermore, H5N1/YNVa displayed low pathogenicity and uniform immunogenicity compared to that of the parent virus.

  6. [A kinetic study of gamma interferon production in herpes simplex virus-1 DNA prime-protein boost regimen comparing to DNA or subunit vaccination].

    PubMed

    Arefian, Ehsan; Bamdad, Taravat; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Akhood, Mohamad Reza; Parsania, Masaoud; Ghaemi, Amir

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of the world's population is infected with Herpes simplex virus (HSV). Although antiviral therapy can reduce the incidence of reactivation and asymptomatic viral shedding, and limit morbidity and mortality from active disease, it cannot cure infection. Therefore, the development of an effective vaccine is an important global health priority. In this study, the induction of IFN-gamma production was compared by different herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) vaccines. Glycoprotein D (gD1) as a major immunogenic HSV1 glycoprotein was chosen to our study. Balb/c mice were administered with DNA vaccine encoding gD1, subunit glycoprotein vaccine including insect cells infected by a gD1 recombinant Baculovirus, prime DNA vaccine boosted by subunit glycoprotein vaccine, inactivated KOS strain as a positive control, PcDNA3 plasmid and Sf9 cells as a negative control. Evaluation tests showed kinetics of IFN-gamma mRNA at 8, 16 and 32 hours after restimulation sharply decreased whereas, IFN-gamma protein is significantly increased. Our results revealed that at 14 days after immunization IFN-gamma secretion of stimulated cells in all of the vaccinate groups dramatically raised rather than secreted IFN-gamma levels in mice that were analyzed at 7 days after vaccination. In comparison to other groups; Prime-Boost immunization dramatically caused vigorous and prompt IFN-gamma production at 7 days after immunization and 8 hours after restimulation.

  7. Probiotics, immunostimulants, plant products and oral vaccines, and their role as feed supplements in the control of bacterial fish diseases.

    PubMed

    Newaj-Fyzul, A; Austin, B

    2015-11-01

    There is a rapidly increasing literature pointing to the success of probiotics, immunostimulants, plant products and oral vaccines in immunomodulation, namely stimulation of the innate, cellular and/or humoral immune response, and the control of bacterial fish diseases. Probiotics are regarded as live micro-organisms administered orally and leading to health benefits. However, in contrast with the use in terrestrial animals, a diverse range of micro-organisms have been evaluated in aquaculture with the mode of action often reflecting immunomodulation. Moreover, the need for living cells has been questioned. Also, key subcellular components, including lipopolysaccharides, have been attributed to the beneficial effect in fish. Here, there is a link with immunostimulants, which may also be administered orally. Furthermore, numerous plant products have been reported to have health benefits, namely protection against disease for which stimulation of some immune parameters has been reported. Oral vaccines confer protection against some diseases, although the mode of action is usually linked to humoral rather than the innate and cellular immune responses. This review explores the relationship between probiotics, immunostimulants, plant products and oral vaccines.

  8. Comparing the Primary and Recall Immune Response Induced by a New EV71 Vaccine Using Systems Biology Approaches.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jie; Zhang, Junnan; Wu, Xing; Mao, Qunying; Chen, Pan; Zhu, Fengcai; Xu, Miao; Kong, Wei; Liang, Zhenglun; Wang, Junzhi

    2015-01-01

    Three inactivated EV71 whole-virus vaccines have completed Phase III clinical trials in mainland China, with high efficacy, satisfactory safety, and sustained immunogenicity. However, the molecular mechanisms how this new vaccine elicit potent immune response remain poorly understood. To characterize the primary and recall responses to EV71 vaccines, PBMC from 19 recipients before and after vaccination with EV71 vaccine are collected and their gene expression signatures after stimulation with EV71 antigen were compared. The results showed that primary and recall response to EV71 antigen have both activated an IRF7 regulating type I interferon and antiviral immune response network. However, up-regulated genes involved in T cell activation regulated by IRF1, inflammatory response, B-cell activation and humoral immune response were only observed in recall response. The specific secretion of IL-10 in primary response and IL-2,IP-10,CCL14a, CCL21 in recall response was consistent with the activation of immune response process found in genes. Furthermore, the expression of MX1 and secretion of IP-10 in recall response were strongly correlated with NTAb level at 180d after vaccination (r = 0.81 and 0.99). In summary, inflammatory response, adaptive immune response and a stronger antiviral response were indentified in recall response.

  9. Polysaccharide-Based Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Violeta Fernández; Balbin, Yury Valdés; Calderón, Janoi Chang; Icart, Luis Peña; Verez-Bencomo, Vicente

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPS) and lipopolysaccharides from bacteria are employed for the production of vaccines against human diseases. Initial development of CPS as a vaccine was followed by the development and introduction of conjugate polysaccharide-protein vaccines. The principles leading to both developments are reviewed.

  10. 9 CFR 113.332 - Tenosynovitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tenosynovitis Vaccine. 113.332 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.332 Tenosynovitis Vaccine. Tenosynovitis Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials...

  11. 9 CFR 113.332 - Tenosynovitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tenosynovitis Vaccine. 113.332 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.332 Tenosynovitis Vaccine. Tenosynovitis Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials...

  12. 9 CFR 113.332 - Tenosynovitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tenosynovitis Vaccine. 113.332 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.332 Tenosynovitis Vaccine. Tenosynovitis Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials...

  13. 9 CFR 113.332 - Tenosynovitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tenosynovitis Vaccine. 113.332 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.332 Tenosynovitis Vaccine. Tenosynovitis Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials...

  14. 9 CFR 113.332 - Tenosynovitis Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tenosynovitis Vaccine. 113.332 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.332 Tenosynovitis Vaccine. Tenosynovitis Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials...

  15. Female contraceptive vaccine possible, but not for years.

    PubMed

    1989-10-01

    Researchers are presently testing 2 types of contraceptive vaccines in animal models. One of these is the sperm antigen vaccine which would cause immunity to sperm within the female reproductive tract. The other works against the zona pellucida (the extracellular membrane surrounding the ovum) which the sperm must bind to and penetrate for fertilization to take place. At this time, researchers do not yet know what vaccine is the best route. The sperm antigen vaccine would inhibit capacitation--that stage where they become capable of fertilizing the ovum. The researchers foresee certain problems with this vaccine, however. For example, it will be difficult to get a vaccine to work properly within just the reproductive tract since most antigen vaccines work within the entire immune system. Further, all the areas of the reproductive tract are biologically different. In addition, researchers must find a vaccine potent enough to affect the millions of sperm that enter the uterus. A potential problem with the zona pellucida vaccine is that it could create ovarian dysfunction permanently. Therefore, researchers realize the importance of finding a zona pellucida vaccine that will induce fertilization but not destroy the ovaries. WHO is in the early stages of working on a vaccine against human chorionic gonadotropin to prevent implantation, but this and any postfertilization vaccine will probably not be produced for the US market because of the present antiabortion sentiment. Additional barriers to production of a contraceptive vaccine is that pharmaceutical companies fear liability in marketing a new contraceptive and their profit margin will be low. Nevertheless, the earliest a contraceptive vaccine would become available in 1999.

  16. DNA vaccines: ready for prime time?

    PubMed Central

    Kutzler, Michele A.; Weiner, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery, over a decade and a half ago, that genetically engineered DNA can be delivered in vaccine form and elicit an immune response, there has been much progress in understanding the basic biology of this platform. A large amount of data has been generated in preclinical model systems, and more sustained cellular responses and more consistent antibody responses are being observed in the clinic. Four DNA vaccine products have recently been approved, all in the area of veterinary medicine. These results suggest a productive future for this technology as more optimized constructs, better trial designs and improved platforms are being brought into the clinic. PMID:18781156

  17. WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of a WHO Expert Committee commissioned to coordinate activities leading to the adoption of international requirements for the production and control of vaccines and other biologicals and the establishment of international biological reference materials. The report starts with a discussion of general issues brought to the Committee's attention and provides information on the status and development of reference materials for various antibodies, antibiotics, antigens, blood products and related substances, cytokines and growth factors and other substances for which the Committee has discerned a need for international reference materials. The second part of the report, of particular relevance of manufacturers and national control authorities, contains guidelines for the production and control of synthetic peptide vaccines, requirements for tick-borne encephalitis vaccine (inactivated), guidelines for thromboplastins and plasma used to control oral anticoagulant therapy, an amendment to the requirements for hepatitis B vaccine made by recombinant DNA techniques and a report on the standardization and calibration of cytokine immunoassays.

  18. 9 CFR 113.326 - Avian Pox Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Avian Pox Vaccine. 113.326 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.326 Avian Pox Vaccine. Fowl Pox Vaccine and Pigeon Pox Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... this section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All...

  19. 9 CFR 113.326 - Avian Pox Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Avian Pox Vaccine. 113.326 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.326 Avian Pox Vaccine. Fowl Pox Vaccine and Pigeon Pox Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... this section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All...

  20. 9 CFR 113.326 - Avian Pox Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Avian Pox Vaccine. 113.326 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.326 Avian Pox Vaccine. Fowl Pox Vaccine and Pigeon Pox Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... this section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All...

  1. 9 CFR 113.326 - Avian Pox Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Avian Pox Vaccine. 113.326 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.326 Avian Pox Vaccine. Fowl Pox Vaccine and Pigeon Pox Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... this section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All...

  2. 9 CFR 113.326 - Avian Pox Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Avian Pox Vaccine. 113.326 Section 113... Vaccines § 113.326 Avian Pox Vaccine. Fowl Pox Vaccine and Pigeon Pox Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... this section shall be used for preparing the production seed virus for vaccine production. All...

  3. 9 CFR 112.9 - Biological products imported for research and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Biological products imported for research and evaluation. 112.9 Section 112.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND...

  4. 9 CFR 102.5 - U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License. 102.5 Section 102.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS LICENSES...

  5. 9 CFR 102.5 - U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License. 102.5 Section 102.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS LICENSES...

  6. 9 CFR 102.5 - U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false U.S. Veterinary Biological Product License. 102.5 Section 102.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS LICENSES...

  7. 9 CFR 112.9 - Biological products imported for research and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biological products imported for research and evaluation. 112.9 Section 112.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND...

  8. 9 CFR 112.9 - Biological products imported for research and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Biological products imported for research and evaluation. 112.9 Section 112.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND...

  9. NEUTRALIZING AND COMPLEMENT-FIXING ANTIBODY PRODUCTION AND RESISTANCE FOLLOWING VACCINATION IN EXPERIMENTAL ENCEPHALITIS INFECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Casals, J.

    1943-01-01

    In mice vaccinated subcutaneously with different doses of virulent W.E.E. virus or with formolized vaccine, neutralizing and complement-fixing antibodies paralleled resistance to some extent yet appeared in groups in which resistance remained undetectable, persisted at a similar maximum level in spite of different titers of resistance, and after resistance had become negligible. In mice vaccinated subcutaneously with different doses of virulent St. Louis encephalitis virus or with formolized vaccine, neutralizing and complement-fixing antibodies bore little relation to resistance. Neutralizing antibodies appeared only in the group showing resistance but not until resistance was diminishing. Complement-fixing antibodies developed equally well in groups with or without resistance. PMID:19871341

  10. Advancement in bioprocess technology: parallels between microbial natural products and cell culture biologics.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Arpan A; Khetan, Anurag; Malmberg, Li-Hong; Zhou, Weichang; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2017-02-09

    The emergence of natural products and industrial microbiology nearly eight decades ago propelled an era of bioprocess innovation. Half a century later, recombinant protein technology spurred the tremendous growth of biologics and added mammalian cells to the forefront of industrial producing cells in terms of the value of products generated. This review highlights the process technology of natural products and protein biologics. Despite the separation in time, there is a remarkable similarity in their progression. As the new generation of therapeutics for gene and cell therapy emerges, its process technology development can take inspiration from that of natural products and biologics.

  11. Production of a subunit vaccine candidate against porcine post-weaning diarrhea in high-biomass transplastomic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Kolotilin, Igor; Kaldis, Angelo; Devriendt, Bert; Joensuu, Jussi; Cox, Eric; Menassa, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) in piglets is a major problem in piggeries worldwide and results in severe economic losses. Infection with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the key culprit for the PWD disease. F4 fimbriae of ETEC are highly stable proteinaceous polymers, mainly composed of the major structural subunit FaeG, with a capacity to evoke mucosal immune responses, thus demonstrating a potential to act as an oral vaccine against ETEC-induced porcine PWD. In this study we used a transplastomic approach in tobacco to produce a recombinant variant of the FaeG protein, rFaeG(ntd/dsc), engineered for expression as a stable monomer by N-terminal deletion and donor strand-complementation (ntd/dsc). The generated transplastomic tobacco plants accumulated up to 2.0 g rFaeG(ntd/dsc) per 1 kg fresh leaf tissue (more than 1% of dry leaf tissue) and showed normal phenotype indistinguishable from wild type untransformed plants. We determined that chloroplast-produced rFaeG(ntd/dsc) protein retained the key properties of an oral vaccine, i.e. binding to porcine intestinal F4 receptors (F4R), and inhibition of the F4-possessing (F4+) ETEC attachment to F4R. Additionally, the plant biomass matrix was shown to delay degradation of the chloroplast-produced rFaeG(ntd/dsc) in gastrointestinal conditions, demonstrating a potential to function as a shelter-vehicle for vaccine delivery. These results suggest that transplastomic plants expressing the rFaeG(ntd/dsc) protein could be used for production and, possibly, delivery of an oral vaccine against porcine F4+ ETEC infections. Our findings therefore present a feasible approach for developing an oral vaccination strategy against porcine PWD.

  12. 9 CFR 112.6 - Packaging biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... products for mass administration (including but not limited to administration through drinking water and... if seal is broken.” (d) Diluent for the following products need not be packaged with the...

  13. International reference preparations for standardization of biological medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Minor, P

    2014-10-01

    International standards are prepared as materials assigned an arbitrary unitage for a biological activity by the Expert Committee on Biological Standardization of the World Health Organization. Working reference materials are calibrated against international standards giving a common unit of measurement between laboratories. The references are assessed by a collaborative study including all relevant assays rather than by a single reference method as in the SI (Le Système international d'unités) system and the unitage assigned is an arbitrary value derived from a consensus of all valid methods. The process has proved valuable in assaying the activity of therapeutic biological medicines and in standardizing certain types of diagnostics. Issues arise with maintaining the unit when the primary reference must be replaced and to some extent in assessing the commutability of the reference with real life analytes.

  14. Plant-based rapid production of recombinant subunit hemagglutinin vaccines targeting H1N1 and H5N1 influenza.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Yoko; Chichester, Jessica A; Jones, Mark; Manceva, Slobodanka D; Damon, Emily; Mett, Vadim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Bi, Hong; Farrance, Christine; Shamloul, Moneim; Kushnir, Natasha; Sharma, Satish; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, a novel H1N1 swine influenza virus was isolated from infected humans in Mexico and the United States, and rapidly spread around the world. Another virus, a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus of the H5N1 subtype, identified by the World Health Organization as a potential pandemic threat in 1997, continues to be a significant risk. While vaccination is the preferred strategy for the prevention and control of influenza infections, the traditional egg-based approach to producing influenza vaccines does not provide sufficient capacity and adequate speed to satisfy global needs to combat newly emerging strains, seasonal or potentially pandemic. Significant efforts are underway to develop and implement new cell substrates with improved efficiency for influenza vaccine development and manufacturing. In recent years, plants have been used to produce recombinant proteins including subunit vaccines and antibodies. The main advantages of using plant systems for the production of vaccine antigens against influenza are their independence from pathogenic viruses, and cost and time efficiency. Here, we describe the large-scale production of recombinant hemagglutinin proteins from A/California/04/09 (H1N1) and A/Indonesia/05/05 (H5N1) strains of influenza virus in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and their immunogenicity (serum hemagglutination inhibition and virus neutralizing antibodies), and safety in animal models. These results support the testing of these candidate vaccines in human volunteers and also the utility of our plant expression system for large-scale recombinant influenza vaccine production.

  15. Rapid and Scalable Plant-based Production of a Cholera Toxin B Subunit Variant to Aid in Mass Vaccination against Cholera Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Lauren J.; Baldauf, Keegan J.; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is a component of an internationally licensed oral cholera vaccine. The protein induces neutralizing antibodies against the holotoxin, the virulence factor responsible for severe diarrhea. A field clinical trial has suggested that the addition of CTB to killed whole-cell bacteria provides superior short-term protection to whole-cell-only vaccines; however, challenges in CTB biomanufacturing (i.e., cost and scale) hamper its implementation to mass vaccination in developing countries. To provide a potential solution to this issue, we developed a rapid, robust, and scalable CTB production system in plants. Methodology/Principal Findings In a preliminary study of expressing original CTB in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana, the protein was N-glycosylated with plant-specific glycans. Thus, an aglycosylated CTB variant (pCTB) was created and overexpressed via a plant virus vector. Upon additional transgene engineering for retention in the endoplasmic reticulum and optimization of a secretory signal, the yield of pCTB was dramatically improved, reaching >1 g per kg of fresh leaf material. The protein was efficiently purified by simple two-step chromatography. The GM1-ganglioside binding capacity and conformational stability of pCTB were virtually identical to the bacteria-derived original B subunit, as demonstrated in competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, surface plasmon resonance, and fluorescence-based thermal shift assay. Mammalian cell surface-binding was corroborated by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. pCTB exhibited strong oral immunogenicity in mice, inducing significant levels of CTB-specific intestinal antibodies that persisted over 6 months. Moreover, these antibodies effectively neutralized the cholera holotoxin in vitro. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results demonstrated that pCTB has robust producibility in Nicotiana plants and retains most, if not all, of major biological activities of

  16. Biological production of ethanol from waste gases with Clostridium ljungdahlii

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products is disclosed. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various product, such as organic acids, alcohols H.sub.2, SCP, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

  17. 9 CFR 101.3 - Biological products and related terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., the harvest date shall be the date blood or tissues are collected for production or the date cultures..., representing a whole culture or a concentrate thereof, with or without the unevaluated growth products, which... toxin or toxic growth product, which has resulted from the growth of bacterial organisms in a...

  18. 9 CFR 101.3 - Biological products and related terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., the harvest date shall be the date blood or tissues are collected for production or the date cultures..., representing a whole culture or a concentrate thereof, with or without the unevaluated growth products, which... toxin or toxic growth product, which has resulted from the growth of bacterial organisms in a...

  19. 9 CFR 101.3 - Biological products and related terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Product Code Number. A number assigned by Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to each type of..., the harvest date shall be the date blood or tissues are collected for production or the date cultures... cellular antigens and shall stimulate the development of antitoxin; or (2) A combination product in...

  20. 9 CFR 101.3 - Biological products and related terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Product Code Number. A number assigned by Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to each type of..., the harvest date shall be the date blood or tissues are collected for production or the date cultures... cellular antigens and shall stimulate the development of antitoxin; or (2) A combination product in...

  1. Synthetic biology for microbial production of lipid-based biofuels.

    PubMed

    d'Espaux, Leo; Mendez-Perez, Daniel; Li, Rachel; Keasling, Jay D

    2015-12-01

    The risks of maintaining current CO2 emission trends have led to interest in producing biofuels using engineered microbes. Microbial biofuels reduce emissions because CO2 produced by fuel combustion is offset by CO2 captured by growing biomass, which is later used as feedstock for biofuel fermentation. Hydrocarbons found in petroleum fuels share striking similarity with biological lipids. Here we review synthetic metabolic pathways based on fatty acid and isoprenoid metabolism to produce alkanes and other molecules suitable as biofuels. We further discuss engineering strategies to optimize engineered biosynthetic routes, as well as the potential of synthetic biology for sustainable manufacturing.

  2. Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Redding, Alyssa M.; Rutherford, Becky J.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-12-02

    Microorganisms have been rich sources for natural products, some of which have found use as fuels, commodity chemicals, specialty chemicals, polymers, and drugs, to name a few. The recent interest in production of transportation fuels from renewable resources has catalyzed numerous research endeavors that focus on developing microbial systems for production of such natural products. Eliminating bottlenecks in microbial metabolic pathways and alleviating the stresses due to production of these chemicals are crucial in the generation of robust and efficient production hosts. The use of systems-level studies makes it possible to comprehensively understand the impact of pathway engineering within the context of the entire host metabolism, to diagnose stresses due to product synthesis, and provides the rationale to cost-effectively engineer optimal industrial microorganisms.

  3. Product-specific validation of a serological potency test for release of Leptospira vaccines in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Catrina; Novokova, Viera

    2013-09-01

    Historically in the European Union, all Leptospira vaccines were released using the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) hamster potency assay. Recently, there has been a shift toward alternatives that offer either refinement of testing or replacement of animals for product release. This is being driven by animal welfare concerns but also by a drive to have more consistent, cheaper, and faster batch release tests. This publication discusses one such example of a multicomponent canine vaccine that includes three Leptospira serovars and has recently been registered in the European Union. The potency release test is a refinement because it uses rabbit serology rather than hamster challenge. This publication covers the principles of the test method, challenges faced during its development and registration, and discussion about benefits and limitations of this method. It concludes with a view of how the use of serology testing could fit into an overall strategy to move to fully in vitro testing by adopting a consistency approach.

  4. Vaccines against poverty

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, Calman A.; Saul, Allan

    2014-01-01

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented. PMID:25136089

  5. Vaccines against poverty.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan

    2014-08-26

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented.

  6. Cattle, sheep and pigs vaccinated against foot and mouth disease: does trade in these animals and their products present a risk of transmitting the disease?

    PubMed

    Garland, A J M; de Clercq, K

    2011-04-01

    The foot and mouth disease (FMD) status of a country or region has a profound bearing on access to export markets for live animals and animal products. In countries without FMD-free status, and in accordance with the international standards of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), restrictions may be applied to trade in both vaccinated and unvaccinated animals and their products. Available information suggests that, provided there is compliance with essential criteria concerning vaccines, vaccination and other zoosanitary measures (especially quarantine and ante- and post-mortem inspection), the risk of spreading FMD through the importation of vaccinated cattle, sheep and pigs is extremely small. The risk from products derived from vaccinated animals is even smaller, provided that appropriate risk mitigation measures are applied. Knowledge of the zoosanitary status of the exporting country is critical for risk assessment, but can be difficult to verify. Although empirical evidence and practical experience strongly indicate low risk, it is not possible to assert that the risk is zero for vaccinated animals or their products. In the absence of key factual data, risk analysis is only practicable on a qualitative or semi-quantitative basis. However, a very low level of risk is both unavoidable and acceptable if such trade is to be conducted.

  7. 9 CFR 103.3 - Shipment of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... products. 103.3 Section 103.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... permit and encourage research, a person may be authorized by the Administrator to ship unlicensed..., recommendations for use, and results of preliminary research work; (d) Two copies of labels or label...

  8. 9 CFR 103.3 - Shipment of experimental biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... products. 103.3 Section 103.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... permit and encourage research, a person may be authorized by the Administrator to ship unlicensed..., recommendations for use, and results of preliminary research work; (d) Two copies of labels or label...

  9. Strategies for optimizing algal biology for enhanced biomass production

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, Amanda N.; Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Sayre, Richard T.

    2015-02-02

    One of the most environmentally sustainable ways to produce high-energy density (oils) feed stocks for the production of liquid transportation fuels is from biomass. Photosynthetic carbon capture combined with biomass combustion (point source) and subsequent carbon capture and sequestration has also been proposed in the intergovernmental panel on climate change report as one of the most effective and economical strategies to remediate atmospheric greenhouse gases. To maximize photosynthetic carbon capture efficiency and energy-return-on-investment, we must develop biomass production systems that achieve the greatest yields with the lowest inputs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that microalgae have among the greatest potentials for biomass production. This is in part due to the fact that all alga cells are photoautotrophic, they have active carbon concentrating mechanisms to increase photosynthetic productivity, and all the biomass is harvestable unlike plants. All photosynthetic organisms, however, convert only a fraction of the solar energy they capture into chemical energy (reduced carbon or biomass). To increase aerial carbon capture rates and biomass productivity, it will be necessary to identify the most robust algal strains and increase their biomass production efficiency often by genetic manipulation. We review recent large-scale efforts to identify the best biomass producing strains and metabolic engineering strategies to improve aerial productivity. In addition, these strategies include optimization of photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna size to increase energy capture and conversion efficiency and the potential development of advanced molecular breeding techniques. To date, these strategies have resulted in up to twofold increases in biomass productivity.

  10. Biology Needs a Modern Assessment System for Professional Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDade, Lucinda A.; Maddison, David R.; Guralnick, Robert; Piwowar, Heather A.; Jameson, Mary Liz; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Herendeen, Patrick S.; Hill, Andrew; Vis, Morgan L.

    2011-01-01

    Stimulated in large part by the advent of the Internet, research productivity in many academic disciplines has changed dramatically over the last two decades. However, the assessment system that governs professional success has not kept pace, creating a mismatch between modes of scholarly productivity and academic assessment criteria. In this…

  11. China's emerging vaccine industry.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Jan; Liang, Yan; Zeng, Bing

    2010-07-01

    The Chinese vaccine industry is developing rapidly due to an emerging and large market for current and new vaccines, a large potential for local vaccine manufacturing both in the public and private domain, and a governmental orientation towards national vaccine self-sufficiency. There are currently over 40 companies and institutions manufacturing a large variety of traditional (EPI) and some new vaccines. The innovative development capacity of state vaccine institutions is stimulated by significant government investments. Various Chinese influenza manufacturers were in 2009 among the first worldwide to obtain national license for their pandemic H1N1 flu vaccines. It is of interest to note that private but also governmental entities are committed to raise manufacturing quality standards to reach WHO prequalification. It is expected that WHO prequalification for at least one product from a Chinese manufacturer will have been obtained by 2011. This will open the door to the global market for Chinese vaccines.

  12. Vaccines against malaria.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Amed; Laurens, Matthew B

    2015-03-15

    Despite global efforts to control malaria, the illness remains a significant public health threat. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine against malaria, but an efficacious vaccine would represent an important public health tool for successful malaria elimination. Malaria vaccine development continues to be hindered by a poor understanding of antimalarial immunity, a lack of an immune correlate of protection, and the genetic diversity of malaria parasites. Current vaccine development efforts largely target Plasmodium falciparum parasites in the pre-erythrocytic and erythrocytic stages, with some research on transmission-blocking vaccines against asexual stages and vaccines against pregnancy-associated malaria. The leading pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidate is RTS,S, and early results of ongoing Phase 3 testing show overall efficacy of 46% against clinical malaria. The next steps for malaria vaccine development will focus on the design of a product that is efficacious against the highly diverse strains of malaria and the identification of a correlate of protection against disease.

  13. The Regulatory Evaluation of Vaccines for Human Use.

    PubMed

    Baylor, Norman W

    2016-01-01

    A vaccine is an immunogen, the administration of which is intended to stimulate the immune system to result in the prevention, amelioration, or therapy of any disease or infection (US Food and Drug Administration. Guidance for Industry: content and format of chemistry, manufacturing, and controls information and establishment description information for a vaccine or related product). A vaccine may be a live attenuated preparation of microorganisms, inactivated (killed) whole organisms, living irradiated cells, crude fractions, or purified immunogens, including those derived from recombinant DNA in a host cell, conjugates formed by covalent linkage of components, synthetic antigens, polynucleotides (such as the plasmid DNA vaccines), living vectored cells expressing specific heterologous immunogens, or cells pulsed with immunogen. Vaccines are highly complex products that differ from small molecule drugs because of the biological nature of the source materials such as those derived from microorganisms as well as the various cell substrates from which some are derived. Regardless of the technology used, because of their complexities, vaccines must undergo extensive characterization and testing. Special expertise and procedures are needed for their manufacture, control, and regulation. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is the National Regulatory Authority (NRA) in the United States responsible for assuring quality, safety, and effectiveness of all human medical products, including vaccines for human use.The Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) within the US FDA is responsible for overseeing the regulation of therapeutic and preventative vaccines against infectious diseases. Authority for the regulation of vaccines resides in Section 351 of the Public Health Service Act and specific sections of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C). Vaccines are regulated as biologics and licensed based on the demonstration of safety and effectiveness. The

  14. Comparison of Molecular and Biological Characteristics of a Modified Live Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) Vaccine (Ingelvac PRRS MLV), the Parent Strain of the Vaccine (ATCC VR2332), ATCC VR2385, and Two Recent Field Isolates of PRRSV

    PubMed Central

    Opriessnig, T.; Halbur, P. G.; Yoon, K.-J.; Pogranichniy, R. M.; Harmon, K. M.; Evans, R.; Key, K. F.; Pallares, F. J.; Thomas, P.; Meng, X. J.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the molecular and biological characteristics of recent porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) field isolates to those of a modified live virus (MLV) PRRS vaccine and its parent strain. One hundred seventeen, 4-week-old pigs were randomly assigned to six groups. Group 1 (n = 20) served as sham-inoculated negative controls, group 2 (n = 19) was inoculated with Ingelvac PRRS MLV vaccine, group 3 (n = 20) was inoculated with the parent strain of the vaccine (ATCC VR2332), group 4 (n = 19) was inoculated with vaccine-like PRRSV field isolate 98-38803, group 5 (n = 19) was inoculated with PRRSV field isolate 98-37120, and group 6 (n = 20) was inoculated with known high-virulence PRRSV isolate ATCC VR2385. The levels of severity of gross lung lesions (0 to 100%) among the groups were significantly different at both 10 (P < 0.0001) and 28 days postinoculation (p.i.) (P = 0.002). At 10 days p.i., VR2332 (26.5% ± 4.64%) and VR2385 (36.4% ± 6.51%) induced gross lesions of significantly greater severity than 98-38803 (0.0% ± 0.0%), 98-37120 (0.8% ± 0.42%), Ingelvac PRRS MLV (0.9% ± 0.46%), and negative controls (2.3% ± 1.26%). At 28 days p.i., 98-37120 (17.2% ± 6.51%) induced gross lesions of significantly greater severity than any of the other viruses. Analyses of the microscopic-interstitial-pneumonia-lesion scores (0 to 6) revealed that VR2332 (2.9 ± 0.23) and VR2385 (3.1 ± 0.35) induced significantly more severe lesions at 10 days p.i. At 28 days p.i., VR2385 (2.5 ± 0.27), VR2332 (2.3 ± 0.21), 98-38803 (2.6 ± 0.29), and 98-37120 (3.0 ± 0.41) induced significantly more severe lesions than Ingelvac PRRS MLV (0.7 ± 0.17) and controls (0.7 ± 0.15). The molecular analyses and biological characterizations suggest that the vaccine-like isolate 98-38803 (99.5% amino acid homology based on the ORF5 gene) induces microscopic pneumonia lesions similar in type to, but different in severity and time of

  15. Development of malaria transmission-blocking vaccines: from concept to product.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yimin; Sinden, Robert E; Churcher, Thomas S; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2015-06-01

    Despite decades of effort battling against malaria, the disease is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs) that target sexual stage parasite development could be an integral part of measures for malaria elimination. In the 1950s, Huff et al. first demonstrated the induction of transmission-blocking immunity in chickens by repeated immunizations with Plasmodium gallinaceum-infected red blood cells. Since then, significant progress has been made in identification of parasite antigens responsible for transmission-blocking activity. Recombinant technologies accelerated evaluation of these antigens as vaccine candidates, and it is possible to induce effective transmission-blocking immunity in humans both by natural infection and now by immunization with recombinant vaccines. This chapter reviews the efforts to produce TBVs, summarizes the current status and advances and discusses the remaining challenges and approaches.

  16. Development of Rabies Virus-Like Particles for Vaccine Applications: Production, Characterization, and Protection Studies.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Diego; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Kratje, Ricardo; Prieto, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a viral infection of the central nervous system for which vaccination is the only treatment possible. Besides preexposure, vaccination is highly recommended for people living in endemic areas, veterinarians, and laboratory workers. Our group has developed rabies virus-like particles (RV-VLPs) with immunogenic features expressed in mammalian cells for vaccine applications. In this chapter the methods to obtain and characterize a stable HEK293 cell line expressing RV-VLPs are detailed. Further, analytical ultracentrifugation steps to purify the obtained VLPs are developed, as well as western blot, dynamic light scattering, and immunogold electron microscopy to analyze the size, distribution, shape, and antigenic conformation of the purified particles. Finally, immunization protocols are described to study the immunogenicity of RV-VLPs.

  17. 9 CFR 113.52 - Requirements for cell lines used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for cell lines used for... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.52 Requirements for cell lines used for production of... cell line used to prepare a biological product shall be tested as prescribed in this section. A...

  18. 9 CFR 113.52 - Requirements for cell lines used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for cell lines used for... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.52 Requirements for cell lines used for production of... cell line used to prepare a biological product shall be tested as prescribed in this section. A...

  19. 9 CFR 113.52 - Requirements for cell lines used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for cell lines used for... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.52 Requirements for cell lines used for production of... cell line used to prepare a biological product shall be tested as prescribed in this section. A...

  20. 9 CFR 103.2 - Disposition of animals administered experimental biological products or live organisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Disposition of animals administered experimental biological products or live organisms. 103.2 Section 103.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND...

  1. 9 CFR 113.52 - Requirements for cell lines used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for cell lines used for... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.52 Requirements for cell lines used for production of... cell line used to prepare a biological product shall be tested as prescribed in this section. A...

  2. 9 CFR 113.52 - Requirements for cell lines used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for cell lines used for... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.52 Requirements for cell lines used for production of... cell line used to prepare a biological product shall be tested as prescribed in this section. A...

  3. Why are pharmaceutical companies gradually abandoning vaccines?

    PubMed

    Offit, Paul A

    2005-01-01

    During the past fifty years, the number of pharmaceutical companies making vaccines has decreased dramatically, and those that still make vaccines have reduced resources to make new ones. Pharmaceutical companies are gradually abandoning vaccines because the research, development, testing, and manufacture of vaccines are expensive and because the market to sell vaccines is much smaller than the market for other drug products. Congressional action could assure both a steady supply of existing vaccines and the promise of vaccines for the future.

  4. Synoptic events force biological productivity in Patagonian fjord ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneri, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The annual cycle of primary productivity of the Patagonian fjords has, to date, been described as a two phase system consisting of a short non productive winter phase (during June and July) and a productive phase extending from late winter (August) to autumn (May). Low levels of primary production, phytoplankton biomass and high concentrations of surface nutrients have been described as characterizing winter conditions while pulsed productivity events typifies the productivity pattern during the extended productive season. Pulsed productivity events characterize coastal waters where inorganic nutrients in surface layers are replenished following periods of intensive utilization by autotrophs. Freshwater input in Patagonian fjords in southern Chile (41-55°S) results in one of the largest estuarine regions worldwide. Here strong haline water column stratification prevents nutrient mixing to the surface layers thus potentially shutting off algal production. Our working hypothesis considered that in order to reconcile the observed pulsed productivity pattern, periodic breaking (associated to surface nutrient replenishment) and re-establishment of estuarine conditions (associated to water column stratification) would be required. Up to now however our understanding of the physical processes that control water column conditions in the Patagonian fjord area has been extremely limited. Here we present evidence linking the passage of synoptic low pressure fronts to pulsed productivity events in the Patagonian fjord area. These front controls and influence local processes of interaction between the fjord and the atmosphere generating a rapid water column response. In the specific case of the Puyuhuapi fjord we have been able to show that such synoptic fronts induce surface flow reversal and water column mixing. Phytoplankton blooming occurs after the passage of the synoptic front once calmer conditions prevail and estuarine conditions are re established. The occurrence of

  5. WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization. Forty-sixth Report.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the recommendations of a WHO Expert Committee commissioned to coordinate activities leading to the adoption of international requirements for the production and control of vaccines and other biologicals and the establishment of international biological reference materials. The report starts with a discussion of general issues brought to the Committee's attention and provides information on the status and development of reference materials for various antibiotics, antibodies, antigens, blood products, cytokines, endocrinological and related substances and toxins. The second part of the report, of particular relevance to manufacturers and national control authorities, contains the revised list of laboratories approved by WHO for the production of yellow fever vaccine, revised requirements for yellow fever vaccine, an amendment to the General Requirements for the Sterility of Biological Substances, and a summary protocol for the batch release of virus vaccines.

  6. The large-scale production of an artificial influenza virus-like particle vaccine in silkworm pupae.

    PubMed

    Nerome, Kuniaki; Sugita, Shigeo; Kuroda, Kazumichi; Hirose, Toshiharu; Matsuda, Sayaka; Majima, Kei; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shibata, Toshikatsu; Poetri, Okti Nadia; Soejoedono, Retno D; Mayasari, Ni L P Ika; Agungpriyono, Srihadi; Nerome, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    We successfully established a mass production system for an influenza virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine using a synthetic H5 hemagglutinin (HA) gene codon-optimized for the silkworm. A recombinant baculovirus containing the synthetic gene was inoculated into silkworm pupae. Four days after inoculation, the hemagglutination titer in homogenates from infected pupae reached a mean value of 0.8 million hemagglutination units (HAU), approximately 2,000 μg HA protein per pupa, more than 50-fold higher than that produced with an embryonated chicken egg. VLPs ranging from 30 nm to 300 nm in diameter and covered with a large number of spikes were detected in the homogenates. The spikes were approximately 14 nm long, similar to an authentic influenza HA spike. Detailed electron micrographs indicated that the VLP spike density was similar to that of authentic influenza virus particles. The results clearly show that the expression of a single HA gene can efficiently produce VLPs in silkworm pupae. When chickens were immunized with the pupae homogenate, the hemagglutination inhibition titer in their sera reached values of 2,048-8,192 after approximately 1 month. This is the first report demonstrating that a large amount of VLP vaccine could be produced by single synthetic HA gene in silkworm pupae. Our system might be useful for future vaccine development against other viral diseases.

  7. Changes in TNF and IL-6 production after diphtheria toxoid vaccination: drug modulation of the cytokine levels

    PubMed Central

    Bliacher, M. S.; Danilina, A. V.; Kalashnikova, E. A.; Lopatina, T. K.; Fedorova, I. M.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of vaccination with diphtheria toxoid (AD-M) on TNF and IL-6 production has been studied in humans. In the present study it was demonstrated that immunization with AD-M resulted in changes of in vitro TNF and IL-6 production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. TNF release was suppressed but IL-6 production was stimulated. On the other hand, serum levels of TNF were markedly increased over a period of 3 weeks. It was also demonstrated that the postvaccinal cytokine production disturbances may be corrected by pretreatment with a new synthetic hexapeptid (Imunofan®). It is possible that the imunofan treatment could prevent some postvaccinal complications. PMID:18475748

  8. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. 113.316... Virus Vaccines § 113.316 Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine shall be prepared... immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be...

  9. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. 113.316... Virus Vaccines § 113.316 Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine shall be prepared... immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be...

  10. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. 113.316... Virus Vaccines § 113.316 Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine shall be prepared... immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be...

  11. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. 113.316... Virus Vaccines § 113.316 Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine shall be prepared... immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be...

  12. 9 CFR 113.316 - Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. 113.316... Virus Vaccines § 113.316 Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine. Canine Parainfluenza Vaccine shall be prepared... immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be...

  13. 9 CFR 115.2 - Inspections of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS INSPECTIONS... excuse any person from compliance with the Virus-Serum-Toxin Act. (Approved by the Office of...

  14. 9 CFR 115.2 - Inspections of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS INSPECTIONS... excuse any person from compliance with the Virus-Serum-Toxin Act. (Approved by the Office of...

  15. 9 CFR 115.2 - Inspections of biological products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS INSPECTIONS... excuse any person from compliance with the Virus-Serum-Toxin Act. (Approved by the Office of...

  16. Intended use of reference products & WHO International Standards/Reference Reagents in the development of similar biological products (biosimilars).

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Robin; Wadhwa, Meenu

    2011-09-01

    Reference Products and WHO International Standards/Reference Reagents have roles to play in the development and characterization of similar biological products (SBPs). However, these roles are distinct and non-interchangeable. The uses of these materials and their limitations are considered in this paper.

  17. 77 FR 47397 - Request for Nominations of Specific Drug/Biologic Product(s) That Could Be Brought Before the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Request for Nominations of Specific Drug/Biologic Product(s) That Could Be Brought Before the Food and Drug Administration's Pediatric Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; request for...

  18. 21 CFR 601.25 - Review procedures to determine that licensed biological products are safe, effective, and not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... biological product. IV. Animal safety data. A. Individual active components. 1. Controlled studies. 2. Partially controlled or uncontrolled studies. B. Combinations of the individual active components. 1. Controlled studies. 2. Partially controlled or uncontrolled studies. C. Finished biological product....

  19. Strategies for optimizing algal biology for enhanced biomass production

    DOE PAGES

    Barry, Amanda N.; Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Sayre, Richard T.

    2015-02-02

    One of the most environmentally sustainable ways to produce high-energy density (oils) feed stocks for the production of liquid transportation fuels is from biomass. Photosynthetic carbon capture combined with biomass combustion (point source) and subsequent carbon capture and sequestration has also been proposed in the intergovernmental panel on climate change report as one of the most effective and economical strategies to remediate atmospheric greenhouse gases. To maximize photosynthetic carbon capture efficiency and energy-return-on-investment, we must develop biomass production systems that achieve the greatest yields with the lowest inputs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that microalgae have among the greatest potentials formore » biomass production. This is in part due to the fact that all alga cells are photoautotrophic, they have active carbon concentrating mechanisms to increase photosynthetic productivity, and all the biomass is harvestable unlike plants. All photosynthetic organisms, however, convert only a fraction of the solar energy they capture into chemical energy (reduced carbon or biomass). To increase aerial carbon capture rates and biomass productivity, it will be necessary to identify the most robust algal strains and increase their biomass production efficiency often by genetic manipulation. We review recent large-scale efforts to identify the best biomass producing strains and metabolic engineering strategies to improve aerial productivity. In addition, these strategies include optimization of photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna size to increase energy capture and conversion efficiency and the potential development of advanced molecular breeding techniques. To date, these strategies have resulted in up to twofold increases in biomass productivity.« less

  20. Public vaccine manufacturing capacity in the Latin American and Caribbean region: current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Maria de los Angeles; Cardoso, Daniel; Fitzgerald, James; DiFabio, Jose Luis

    2012-01-01

    The vaccine global market is currently growing at a rate of 16.52%. Nowadays the vaccine manufacturing industry is limited in the sense that not all vaccine manufacturers have the capacity to execute all the steps necessary to produce a successful product. The biological variation inherent to vaccine manufacturing and the initial investment required to bring a vaccine to the market are some of the factors that discourage vaccine manufacturing initiatives. Given the current global context in vaccine innovation and production, and the increasing participation of vaccine manufacturers from developing countries in global markets, this paper aims to review vaccine manufacturing capacity in Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries with specific focus on trends in national or public sector manufacturing, presenting current challenges and future opportunities for the sector in meeting national and regional (LAC) needs. Despite the overall low vaccine manufacturing capacity reported within the LAC region within this paper, it is considered that the relatively high and concentrated capacity that exists within a number of countries, combined with political commitment of all countries within the Region, can provide the necessary platform for the continued development of capacity in vaccine development and manufacture within LAC.

  1. 9 CFR 103.2 - Disposition of animals administered experimental biological products or live organisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS... live organisms. Safeguards as herein provided shall be established by the research investigator or research sponsor to control disposition of all animals administered experimental biological products...

  2. 9 CFR 103.2 - Disposition of animals administered experimental biological products or live organisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS... live organisms. Safeguards as herein provided shall be established by the research investigator or research sponsor to control disposition of all animals administered experimental biological products...

  3. 21 CFR 310.4 - Biologics; products subject to license control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Biologics; products subject to license control. 310.4 Section 310.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS General Provisions § 310.4 Biologics; products subject to license control. (a) If a drug has an...

  4. The Analysis of Cyanide and Its Breakdown Products in Biological Samples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Literature 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Analysis of Cyanide and Its Breakdown Products in Biological Samples 5a. CONTRACT... cyanide , thiocyanate, 2-amino-2-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid (ATCA), chemical warfare agent, exposure, toxicology, analytical methods 16. SECURITY...ISSN: 1040-8347 print / 1547-6510 online DOI: 10.1080/10408340903535315 The Analysis of Cyanide and its Breakdown Products in Biological Samples Brian A

  5. Biological Methanol Production by a Type II Methanotroph Methylocystis bryophila.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjay K S; Mardina, Primata; Kim, Sang-Yong; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kim, In-Won

    2016-04-28

    Methane (CH₄) is the most abundant component in natural gas. To reduce its harmful environmental effect as a greenhouse gas, CH₄ can be utilized as a low-cost feed for the synthesis of methanol by methanotrophs. In this study, several methanotrophs were examined for their ability to produce methanol from CH₄; including Methylocella silvestris, Methylocystis bryophila, Methyloferula stellata, and Methylomonas methanica. Among these methanotrophs, M. bryophila exhibited the highest methanol production. The optimum process parameters aided in significant enhancement of methanol production up to 4.63 mM. Maximum methanol production was observed at pH 6.8, 30°C, 175 rpm, 100 mM phosphate buffer, 50 mM MgCl₂ as a methanol dehydrogenase inhibitor, 50% CH₄ concentration, 24 h of incubation, and 9 mg of dry cell mass ml(-1) inoculum load, respectively. Optimization of the process parameters, screening of methanol dehydrogenase inhibitors, and supplementation with formate resulted in significant improvements in methanol production using M. bryophila. This report suggests, for the first time, the potential of using M. bryophila for industrial methanol production from CH₄.

  6. In planta production of flock house virus transencapsidated RNA and its potential use as a vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yiyang; Maharaj, Payal D; Mallajosyula, Jyothi K; McCormick, Alison A; Kearney, Christopher M

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a transencapsidated vaccine delivery system based on the insect virus, Flock House virus (FHV). FHV is attractive due to its small genome size, simple organization, and nonpathogenic characteristics. With the insertion of a Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) origin of assembly (Oa), the independently replicating FHV RNA1 can be transencapsidated by TMV coat protein. In this study, we demonstrated that the Oa-adapted FHV RNA1 transencapsidation process can take place in planta, by using a bipartite plant expression vector system, where TMV coat protein is expressed by another plant virus vector, Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV). Dual infection in the same cell by both FHV and FoMV was observed. Though an apparent classical coat protein-mediated resistance repressed FHV expression, this was overcome by delaying inoculation of the TMV coat protein vector by 3 days after FHV vector inoculation. Expression of the transgene marker in animals by these in vivo-generated transencapsidated nanoparticles was confirmed by mouse vaccination, which also showed an improved vaccine response compared to similar in vitro-produced vaccines.

  7. Anti-cattle tick vaccines: Many candidate antigens, but will a commercially viable product emerge?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is an invited paper from the editor-in-chief of International Journal for Parasitology who requested a Current Opinion manuscript to discuss the status of anti-cattle tick vaccine research. Arguably the world's most significant arthropod pest of cattle, control of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus...

  8. Synthetic biology tools for bioprospecting of natural products in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Unkles, Shiela E; Valiante, Vito; Mattern, Derek J; Brakhage, Axel A

    2014-04-24

    Filamentous fungi have the capacity to produce a battery of natural products of often unknown function, synthesized by complex metabolic pathways. Unfortunately, most of these pathways appear silent, many in intractable organisms, and their products consequently unidentified. One basic challenge is the difficulty of expressing a biosynthesis pathway for a complex natural product in a heterologous eukaryotic host. Here, we provide a proof-of concept solution to this challenge and describe how the entire penicillin biosynthesis pathway can be expressed in a heterologous host. The method takes advantage of a combination of improved yeast in vivo cloning technology, generation of polycistronic mRNA for the gene cluster under study, and an amenable and easily manipulated fungal host, i.e., Aspergillus nidulans. We achieve expression from a single promoter of the pathway genes to yield a large polycistronic mRNA by using viral 2A peptide sequences to direct successful cotranslational cleavage of pathway enzymes.

  9. Systems-Level Synthetic Biology for Advanced Biofuel Production

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffing, Anne; Jensen, Travis J.; Strickland, Lucas Marshall; Meserole, Stephen; Tallant, David

    2015-03-01

    Cyanobacteria have been shown to be capable of producing a variety of advanced biofuels; however, product yields remain well below those necessary for large scale production. New genetic tools and high throughput metabolic engineering techniques are needed to optimize cyanobacterial metabolisms for enhanced biofuel production. Towards this goal, this project advances the development of a multiple promoter replacement technique for systems-level optimization of gene expression in a model cyanobacterial host: Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. To realize this multiple-target approach, key capabilities were developed, including a high throughput detection method for advanced biofuels, enhanced transformation efficiency, and genetic tools for Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Moreover, several additional obstacles were identified for realization of this multiple promoter replacement technique. The techniques and tools developed in this project will help to enable future efforts in the advancement of cyanobacterial biofuels.

  10. Perspectives and advances of biological H2 production in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Jens; Hankamer, Ben; Mussgnug, Jan H; Ananyev, Gennady; Dismukes, Charles; Kruse, Olaf

    2006-09-01

    The rapid development of clean fuels for the future is a critically important global challenge for two main reasons. First, new fuels are needed to supplement and ultimately replace depleting oil reserves. Second, fuels capable of zero CO2 emissions are needed to slow the impact of global warming. This review summarizes the development of solar powered bio-H2 production processes based on the conversion of photosynthetic products by fermentative bacteria, as well as using photoheterotrophic and photoautrophic organisms. The use of advanced bioreactor systems and their potential and limitations in terms of process design, efficiency, and cost are also briefly reviewed.

  11. Combination biological and microwave treatments of used rubber products

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B.; Wicks, George G.

    2002-01-01

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a vulcanized solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has select chemical bonds altered by biotreatment with thermophillic microorganisms selected from natural isolates from hot sulfur springs. Following the biotreatment, microwave radiation is used to further treat the surface and to treat the bulk interior of the crumb rubber. The resulting combined treatments render the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels and sizes of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures and good properties obtained from the new recycled products.

  12. Will containment of wild poliovirus in laboratories and inactivated poliovirus vaccine production sites be effective for global certification?

    PubMed Central

    Dowdle, Walter R.; Wolff, Christopher; Sanders, Raymond; Lambert, Scott; Best, Maureen

    2004-01-01

    The absolute laboratory containment of any virus cannot be guaranteed, but a wealth of experience indicates that effective containment of wild poliovirus materials for global certification is technically and operationally feasible. Effective containment is based on the principles of minimal wild poliovirus infectious and potentially infectious materials in laboratories; minimal risks of operations in laboratories and inactivated poliovirus vaccine production facilities; minimal susceptibility of workers to wild poliovirus infection and shedding; and minimal susceptibility of populations to wild poliovirus spread. Each principle alone is imperfect, but collectively they greatly minimize the risks of transmitting wild poliovirus from the laboratory to the community. PMID:15106302

  13. Similar biological medicinal products containing recombinant human growth hormone: European regulation.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Mira; Girardin, Elizabeth; Kapetanovic, Liliana; Ho, Kowid; Trouvin, Jean-Hugues

    2008-01-01

    The concept of similar biological medicinal products ('biosimilar' medicinal products) allows pharmaceutical companies to develop products based on an abridged dossier once the marketing protection of the 'reference' biological medicinal product has expired. A biosimilar medicinal product can be granted a marketing authorization provided that its similarity to a reference product is established in terms of quality, safety and efficacy (step-wise comparability exercise). A decision to launch a biosimilar medicinal product on the market is taken if it has a similar efficacy and comparable or better (less) immunogenicity than the chosen reference biological medicinal product. However, this decision is based on limited data and the comparability program may detect substantial differences in immunogenicity profiles but is likely incapable of detecting rare events. This is why clinical experience, through clinical trials and extensive pharmacovigilance programs, remains the most reliable way to assess the immunogenicity and tolerance profile of recombinant therapeutic proteins. Substitution of one biological medicinal product by a biosimilar medicinal product is not currently recommended before long-term clinical efficacy and safety have been acquired in all relevant populations. Here we review recent regulatory guidelines provided by EMEA and comment on the marketing authorizations and risk management plans of two recently approved biosimilar somatropins.

  14. 75 FR 9905 - Guidance for Industry: Characterization and Qualification of Cell Substrates and Other Biological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ...: Characterization and Qualification of Cell Substrates and Other Biological Materials Used in the Production of... a document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Characterization and Qualification of Cell Substrates... vaccines for the characterization and qualification of cell substrates, viral seeds, and other...

  15. Production and evaluation of a recombinant chimeric vaccine against clostridium botulinum neurotoxin types C and D.

    PubMed

    Gil, Luciana A F; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P; Moreira, Gustavo M S G; Salvarani, Felipe M; Assis, Ronnie A; Lobato, Francisco Carlos F; Mendonça, Marcelo; Dellagostin, Odir A; Conceição, Fabricio R

    2013-01-01

    Bovine botulism is a fatal disease that is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D and that causes great economic losses, with nearly 100% lethality during outbreaks. It has also been considered a potential source of human food-borne illness in many countries. Vaccination has been reported to be the most effective way to control bovine botulism. However, the commercially available toxoid-based vaccines are difficult and hazardous to produce. Neutralizing antibodies targeted against the C-terminal fragment of the BoNT heavy chain (HC) are known to confer efficient protection against lethal doses of BoNTs. In this study, a novel recombinant chimera, consisting of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB), a strong adjuvant of the humoral immune response, fused to the HC of BoNT serotypes C and D, was produced in E. coli. Mice vaccinated with the chimera containing LTB and an equivalent molar ratio of the chimera without LTB plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) developed 2 IU/mL of antitoxins for both serotypes. Guinea pigs immunized with the recombinant chimera with LTB plus Al(OH)3 developed a protective immune response against both BoNT/C (5 IU/mL) and BoNT/D (10 IU/mL), as determined by a mouse neutralization bioassay with pooled sera. The results achieved with guinea pig sera fulfilled the requirements of commercial vaccines for prevention of botulism, as determined by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food, Supply. The presence of LTB was essential for the development of a strong humoral immune response, as it acted in synergism with Al(OH)3. Thus, the vaccine described in this study is a strong candidate for the control of botulism in cattle.

  16. Production and Evaluation of a Recombinant Chimeric Vaccine against Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Types C and D

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Luciana A. F.; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P.; Moreira, Gustavo M. S. G.; Salvarani, Felipe M.; Assis, Ronnie A.; Lobato, Francisco Carlos F.; Mendonça, Marcelo; Dellagostin, Odir A.; Conceição, Fabricio R.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine botulism is a fatal disease that is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D and that causes great economic losses, with nearly 100% lethality during outbreaks. It has also been considered a potential source of human food-borne illness in many countries. Vaccination has been reported to be the most effective way to control bovine botulism. However, the commercially available toxoid-based vaccines are difficult and hazardous to produce. Neutralizing antibodies targeted against the C-terminal fragment of the BoNT heavy chain (HC) are known to confer efficient protection against lethal doses of BoNTs. In this study, a novel recombinant chimera, consisting of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB), a strong adjuvant of the humoral immune response, fused to the HC of BoNT serotypes C and D, was produced in E. coli. Mice vaccinated with the chimera containing LTB and an equivalent molar ratio of the chimera without LTB plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) developed 2 IU/mL of antitoxins for both serotypes. Guinea pigs immunized with the recombinant chimera with LTB plus Al(OH)3 developed a protective immune response against both BoNT/C (5 IU/mL) and BoNT/D (10 IU/mL), as determined by a mouse neutralization bioassay with pooled sera. The results achieved with guinea pig sera fulfilled the requirements of commercial vaccines for prevention of botulism, as determined by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food, Supply. The presence of LTB was essential for the development of a strong humoral immune response, as it acted in synergism with Al(OH)3. Thus, the vaccine described in this study is a strong candidate for the control of botulism in cattle. PMID:23936080

  17. A quantitative analysis for the ADP-ribosylation activity of pertussis toxin: an enzymatic-HPLC coupled assay applicable to formulated whole cell and acellular pertussis vaccine products.

    PubMed

    Cyr, T; Menzies, A J; Calver, J; Whitehouse, L W

    2001-06-01

    The majority of the biological effects of pertussis toxin (PT) are the result of a toxin-catalyzed transfer of an adenosine diphosphate-ribose (ADP-ribose) moiety from NAD(+)to the alpha-subunits of a subset of signal-transducing guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins). This generally leads to an uncoupling of the modified G-protein from the corresponding receptor and the loss of effector regulation. This assay is based on the PT S1 subunit enzymatic transfer of ADP-ribose from NAD to the cysteine moiety of a fluorescent tagged synthetic peptide homologous to the 20 amino acid residue carboxyl-terminal sequence of the alpha-subunit of the G(i3)protein. The tagged peptide and the ADP-ribosylated product were characterized by HPLC/MS and MS/MS for structure confirmation. Quantitation of this characterized ADP-ribosylated fluorescently tagged peptide was by HPLC fluorescence using Standard Addition methodology. The assay was linear over a five hr incubation period at 20 degrees C at PT concentrations between 0.0625 and 4.0 microg/ml and the sensitivity of the assay could be increased several fold by increasing the incubation time to 24 h. Purified S1 subunit of PT exhibited 68.1+/-10.1% of the activity of the intact toxin on a molar basis, whereas the pertussis toxin B oligomer, the genetically engineered toxoid, (PT-9K/129G), and several of the other components of the Bordetella pertussis organism possessed little (<0.6%) or no detectable ribosylation activity. Commonly used pertussis vaccine reference materials, US PV Lot #11, BRP PV 66/303, and BRP PV 88/522, were assayed by this method against Bordetella pertussis Toxin Standard 90/518 and demonstrated to contain, respectively, 0.323+/-0.007, 0.682+/-0.045, and 0.757+/-0.006 microg PT/ml (Mean+/-SEM) or in terms of microg/vial: 3.63, 4.09 and 4.54, respectively. A survey of several multivalent pertussis vaccine products formulated with both whole cell as well as acellular components indicated that

  18. Persistence of T-cell immune response induced by two acellular pertussis vaccines in children five years after primary vaccination.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Raffaella; Carollo, Maria; Bianco, Manuela; Fedele, Giorgio; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Pandolfi, Elisabetta; Villani, Alberto; Tozzi, Alberto E; Mascart, Françoise; Ausiello, Clara M

    2016-01-01

    The resurgence of pertussis suggests the need for greater efforts to understand the long-lasting protective responses induced by vaccination. In this paper we dissect the persistence of T memory responses induced by primary vaccination with two different acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines, hexavalent Hexavac® vaccine (Hexavac) (Sanofi Pasteur MSD) and Infanrix hexa® (Infanrix) (Glaxo-SmithKline Biologicals). We evaluated magnitude and duration of T-cell responses to pertussis toxin (PT) by measuring T-cell proliferation, cytokines (IL-2 and IFNγ) production and memory subsets in two groups of children 5 years after primary vaccination. Some of the enrolled children received only primary vaccination, while others had the pre-school boost dose. Positive T-cell responses to PT were detected in 36% of children. Percentage of responsive children, T-cell proliferation and CD4IL-2+ cells were significantly higher in the children primed with Hexavac than in those who received Infanrix vaccine. No major effects of the boost on PT-specific proliferation were observed. Overall, our data documented a persistence of T-cell memory against PT in a minor fraction of children 5 years after primary vaccination. The different responses induced by Hexavac and Infanrix vaccine could rely on differences in PT inactivation process or excipients/adjuvants formulations.

  19. Challenges and Opportunities While Developing a Group A Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine Within a Product Development Partnership: A Manufacturer's Perspective From the Serum Institute of India

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Prasad S.; Socquet, Muriel; Jadhav, Suresh S.; Kapre, Subhash V.; LaForce, F. Marc; Poonawalla, Cyrus S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. In 2002, the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) chose the Serum Institute of India, Ltd (SIIL), as its manufacturing partner to establish a product development partnership (PDP) with the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP). MVP was a collaboration between PATH and the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop meningococcal conjugate vaccines for sub-Saharan Africa. Method. From the outset, SIIL recognized that a partnership with MVP carried some risk but also offered important opportunities for accessing new conjugate vaccine technology and know-how. Over 3 years, SIIL successfully accepted technology transfer for the group A meningococcal polysaccharide from SynCo Bio Partners and a conjugation method from the US Food and Drug Administration. Results. SIIL successfully scaled up production of a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine that used SIIL tetanus toxoid as the carrier protein. Phase 1 studies began in India in 2005, followed by phase 2/3 studies in Africa and India. A regulatory dossier was submitted to the Indian authorities in April 2009 and WHO in September 2009. Export license was granted in December 2009, and WHO prequalification was obtained in June 2010. Vaccine was introduced at public scale in Burkina Faso that December. The group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine was named MenAfriVac, and is the first internationally qualified vaccine developed outside of big pharma. Conclusions. The project proved to be a sound investment for SIIL and is a concrete example of the potential for PDPs to provide needed products for resource-poor countries. PMID:26553678

  20. Vaccine-induced protection from egg production losses in commercial turkey breeder hens following experimental challenge with a triple-reassortant H3N2 avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Kapczynski, Darrell R; Gonder, Eric; Liljebjelke, Karen; Lippert, Ron; Petkov, Daniel; Tilley, Becky

    2009-03-01

    Infections of avian influenza virus (AIV) in turkey breeder hens can cause a decrease in both egg production and quality, resulting in significant production losses. In North Carolina in 2003, a triple-reassortant H3N2 AIV containing human, swine, and avian gene segments was isolated from turkey breeder hens (A/turkey/NC/16108/03). This viral subtype was subsequently isolated from both turkeys and swine in Ohio in 2004, and in Minnesota in 2005, and was responsible for significant losses in turkey production. The objective of this study was to determine if currently available commercial, inactivated avian influenza H3 subtype oil-emulsion vaccines would protect laying turkey hens from egg production losses following challenge with the 2003 H3N2 field virus isolate from North Carolina. Laying turkey hens were vaccinated in the field with two injections of either a commercial monovalent (A/duck/Minnesota/79/79 [H3N4]) or autogenous bivalent (A/turkey/North Carolina/05 (H3N2)-A/turkey/North Carolina/88 [H1N1]) vaccine, at 26 and 30 wk of age, and subsequently challenged under BSL 3-Ag conditions at 32 wk of age. Vaccine-induced efficacy was determined as protection from a 50% decrease in egg production and from a decrease in egg quality within 21 days postchallenge. Results indicate that, following a natural route of challenge (eye drop and intranasal), birds vaccinated with the 2005 North Carolina H3N2 subtype were significantly protected from the drop in egg production observed in both the H3N4 vaccinated and sham-vaccinated hens. The results demonstrate that groups receiving vaccines containing either H3 subtype had a decreased number of unsettable eggs, increased hemagglutination inhibition titers following challenge, and decreased virus isolations from cloacal swabs as compared to the sham-vaccinated group. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the HA1 gene segment from the three H3 viruses used in these studies indicated that the two North Carolina