Science.gov

Sample records for vacuum diffusion bonding

  1. Interface science of controlled metal/metal and metal/ceramic interfaces prepared using ultrahigh vacuum diffusion bonding

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.E.; Campbell, G.H.; Coombs, A.W.; Johnson, G.W.; Kelly, B.E.; Reitz, T.C.; Stoner, S.L.; Wien, W.L.; Wilson, D.M.

    1993-04-01

    We have designed, constructed, and are operating a capability for production of controlled homophase and heterophase interfaces: an ultrahigh vacuum diffusion bonding machine. This machine is based on a previous design which is operating at the Max Planck Institut fuer Metallforschung, Institut fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft, Stuttgart, FRG. In this method, flat-polished single or polycrystals of materials with controlled surfaced topography can be heat treated up to 1500C in ultrahigh vacuum. Surfaces of annealed samples can be sputter cleaned and characterized prior to bonding. Samples can then be precisely aligned crystallographically to obtain desired grain boundary misorientations. Material couples can then be bonded at temperatures up to 1500C and pressures up to 10 MPa. Results are presented from initial work on Mo grain boundaries and Cu/Al{sub 2}A{sub 3} interfaces.

  2. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  3. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  4. Method for vacuum fusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2001-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  5. Influence of pore size of porous titanium fabricated by vacuum diffusion bonding of titanium meshes on cell penetration and bone ingrowth.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bei; Song, Wen; Han, Tianxiao; Yan, Jun; Li, Fuping; Zhao, Lingzhou; Kou, Hongchao; Zhang, Yumei

    2016-03-01

    The present work assesses the potential of three-dimensional (3D) porous titanium (pore size of 188-390 μm and porosity of 70%) fabricated by vacuum diffusion bonding of titanium meshes for applications in bone engineering. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were used to investigate the proliferation and differentiation of cells on titanium scaffolds with different pore sizes at day 7, day 14 and day 21 based on DNA contents, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, collagen (COL) secretion and osteogenic gene expressions including ALP, COL-1, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), osteopontin (OPN), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), using smooth solid titanium plate as reference material. The rabbit models with distal femoral condyles defect were used to investigate the bone ingrowth into the porous titanium. All samples were subjected to Micro-CT and histological analysis after 4 and 12 weeks of healing. A one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey post hoc tests was used to analyze the data. It was found that the differentiation stage of cells on the porous titanium delayed compared with the smooth solid titanium plate and Ti 188 was more inclined to promote cell differentiation at the initial stage (day 14) while cell proliferation (day 1, 4, 7, 10, 14 and 21) and bone ingrowth (4 and 12 weeks) were biased to Ti 313 and Ti 390. The study indicates that the hybrid porous implant design which combines the advantages of different pore sizes may be meaningful and promising for bone defect restoration. One of the significant challenges in bone defect restoration is the integration of biomaterials and surrounding bone tissue. Porous titanium may be a promising choice for bone ingrowth and mineralization with appropriate mechanical and biological properties. In this study, based on porous titanium fabricated by vacuum diffusion bonding of titanium meshes, we have evaluated the influence of various pore sizes on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (r

  6. Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.; Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2001-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  7. Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.; Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2000-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  8. Diffusion bonding of mismatch dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Honghua; Ni, Jiahua; Wu, Luhai; He, Guo

    2010-04-01

    The diffusion bonding of Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo dental alloys has been investigated in terms of the atoms diffusion, the microstructure evolution, and the bonding strength. The bonding performance reveals asymmetry diffusion profiles for both the Co and Cr in Ti-6Al-4V and the Ti in Co-Cr-Mo alloy. Their diffusion coefficients (Arrhenius relations) have been established based on the experiments. Co and Cr diffusion into Ti-6Al-4V leads to alpha --> beta transformation and the intermetallics-formation. Maximum bonding strength occurs at about 840 degrees C. The bonding joint fails under the shear stress in the Ti-6Al-4V side near the bonding interface in brittle manner. The intermetallics in the diffusion layer together with the unbonded areas and other flaws in the bonding interface are responsible for the shear brittle fracture, which also weaken the bonding strength.

  9. Diffusion bonding of Stratapax for drill bits

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, J.N.; Finger, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    A process has been developed for the diffusion bonding of General Electric's Stratapax drill blanks to support studs for cutter assemblies in drill bits. The diffusion bonding process is described and bond strength test data are provided for a variety of materials. The extensive process details, provided in the Appendices, should be sufficient to enable others to successfully build diffusion-bonded drill bit cutter assemblies.

  10. Diffusion bonding of copper to niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Adrian R.

    Processes used to join metal to ceramic at low temperatures have proven to be inefficient because multiple brazing cycles with different brazing temperatures and braze filler metals are required. Even though this is reproducible and robust, it is not ideal due to the manufacturing time and cost associated with multiple brazing cycles. A more efficient and cost effective process is to utilize the diffusion bonding technique to join different metallic layers prior to joining the entire ceramic assembly in one brazing cycle. In this study, the diffusion bonding of copper to niobium was examined. To the author's knowledge, the diffusion bonding of Cu to Nb has not been researched, and the diffusion of Cu into Nb or Nb into Cu has not been observed. A series of diffusion bonding experiments were conducted to determine the optimal bonding time, temperature, and pressure for the Cu-Nb system. The diffusion bonded samples were evaluated using mechanical testing and microscopy. Results from characterization indicate that diffusion of Nb into Cu occurs, and a robust bond with no interfacial voids is formed using different combinations of bonding parameters. The diffusion of Nb into Cu and with failure occurring outside the diffusion bonded region during all mechanical testing indicate that Cu can be bonded to Nb via the diffusion bonding technique.

  11. Diffusion bonding of titanium-titanium aluminide-alumina sandwich

    SciTech Connect

    Wickman, H.A.; Chin, E.S.C.; Biederman, R.R.

    1995-12-31

    Diffusion bonding of a metallic-intermetallic-ceramic sandwich is of interest for potential armor applications. Low cost titanium, titanium diboride reinforced titanium aluminide (Ti-48at.%Al), and aluminum oxide are diffusion bonded in a vacuum furnace between 1,000 C and 1,400 C. Metallographic examination of the prior bonding interface showed excellent metallurgical coupling between the Ti-48at.%Al composite and the low cost Ti. A series of microstructures representative of phases consistent with a hypothetical Ti-Al-B phase diagram is visible. The alumina-Ti-48at.%Al interfacial bond is achieved through penetration of titanium-aluminum phases into the existing alumina porosity. A detailed microstructural analysis identifying mechanisms of interfacial bonding will be presented for each interfacial zone.

  12. Interface nanochemistry effects on stainless steel diffusion bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, M. J.; Carpenter, R. W.; Kim, M. J.

    2002-02-01

    The diffusion-bonding behavior of single-phase austenitic stainless steel depends strongly on the chemistry of the surfaces to be bounded. We found that very smooth (0.5 nm root-mean-square (RMS) roughness), mechanically polished and lapped substrates would bond completely in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) in 1 hour at 1000 °C under 3.5 MPa uniaxial pressure, if the native oxide on the substrates was removed by ion-beam cleaning, as shown by in-situ Auger analysis. No voids were observed in these bonded interfaces by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the strength was equal to that of the unbounded bare material. No bond formed between the substrates if in-situ ion cleaning was not used. The rougher cleaned substrates partially bonded, indicating that roughness, as well as native oxides, reduced the bonding kinetics.

  13. Vacuum pull down method for an enhanced bonding process

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    1999-01-01

    A process for effectively bonding arbitrary size or shape substrates. The process incorporates vacuum pull down techniques to ensure uniform surface contact during the bonding process. The essence of the process for bonding substrates, such as glass, plastic, or alloys, etc., which have a moderate melting point with a gradual softening point curve, involves the application of an active vacuum source to evacuate interstices between the substrates while at the same time providing a positive force to hold the parts to be bonded in contact. This enables increasing the temperature of the bonding process to ensure that the softening point has been reached and small void areas are filled and come in contact with the opposing substrate. The process is most effective where at least one of the two plates or substrates contain channels or grooves that can be used to apply vacuum between the plates or substrates during the thermal bonding cycle. Also, it is beneficial to provide a vacuum groove or channel near the perimeter of the plates or substrates to ensure bonding of the perimeter of the plates or substrates and reduce the unbonded regions inside the interior region of the plates or substrates.

  14. Diffusion bonding of superplastic aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A.J.

    1993-12-01

    Ability to diffusion bond aluminum alloys, in particular superplastic aluminum alloys, will complete the technology-base that is strongly needed to enhance the use of superplastic forming (SPF) technology. Concurrent diffusion bonding (DB)-SPF is considered to be an energy-saving manufacturing process since it simplifies the production of complex components. Moreover, because of increased design flexibility, overall manufacturing cost and component weight are significantly reduced. Diffusion bonding is an attractive manufacturing option for applications where the preservation of the base metal microstructure and, in turn, mechanical properties is imperative in the bond area. The process utilizes either the solid state or transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding to produce a bond with microstructure continuity in the joint. In addition, there is no localized thermal gradient present to induce distortion or to create residual stresses in the component, thereby increasing structural integrity.

  15. Better vacuum by removal of diffusion-pump-oil contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buggele, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    The complex problem of why large space simulation chambers do not realize true ultimate vacuum was investigated. Some contaminating factors affecting diffusion pump performance were identified, and some advances in vacuum distillation-fractionation technology were achieved which resulted in a two-decade-or-more lower ultimate pressure. Data are presented to show the overall or individual contaminating effects of commonly used phthalate ester plasticizers of 390 to 530 molecular weight on diffusion pump performance. Methods for removing contaminants from diffusion pump silicone oil during operation and for reclaiming contaminated oil by high-vacuum molecular distillation are described. Conceptual self-cleansing designs and operating procedures are proposed for modifying large diffusion pumps into high-efficiency distillation devices. The potential exists for application of these technological advancements to other disciplines, such as medicine, biomedical materials, metallurgy, refining, and chemical (diffusion-enrichment) processing.

  16. Vacuum fusion bonded glass plates having microstructures thereon

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.; Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2001-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

  17. Vacuum bag bonding with a high temperature adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Progar, Donald J.; St. Clair, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    A novel controlled molecular weight form of LARC-TPI polymide that exhibits an exceptionally high degree of melt flow in the 340-360 C temperature range has been developed. This material has been evaluated as a high-temperature adhesive, and because of its flow, cost-effective vacuum bag/oven processing can be used. Comparison of adhesive performance with higher molecular weight forms bonded at higher pressures shows this novel material to be equal in mechanical strength.

  18. Roll diffusion bonding of titanium alloy panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J.; De Witt, T. E.; Jones, A. G.; Koeller, F.; Muser, C.

    1968-01-01

    Roll diffusion bonding technique is used for fabricating T-stiffened panel assemblies from titanium alloy. The single unit fabrication exhibits excellent strength characteristics under tensile and compressive loads. This program is applied to structures in which weight/strength ratio and integral construction are important considerations.

  19. Diffusion bonding of aluminium alloy, 8090

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A. )

    1994-08-15

    Ability to diffusion bond aluminum (Al) alloys, in particular superplastic aluminum alloys, will complete the technology-base that is strongly needed to enhance the use of superplastic forming (SPF) technology. Diffusion bonding (DB) is an attractive manufacturing option for applications where the preservation of the base metal microstructure and, in turn, mechanical properties is important in the bond area. As the technology moves from the laboratory to production, the DB process has to be production-feasible and cost-effective. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the DB study of SPF Al alloys has been initiated. This paper describes the effect of surface chemistry on the DB properties of the Al alloy, 8090 (2.4Li-1.18Cu-0.57Mg-0.14Zr-Al). The integrity of the diffusion bonds was evaluated for both interlayered and bare surfaces. Two interlayer elements, copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn), were compared. Although the eutectic temperature of Al-Cu is 548 C, a thin Cu layer in contact with 8090 has been shown to lower its eutectic temperature to [approximately]521 C. In 8090, Cu is one of the primary alloying elements but has a limited solubility in Al at the bonding temperature. Zinc, on the other hand, forms a considerably lower eutectic (380 C) with Al and is highly soluble in Al. The diffusivity of Zn in Al is much faster than that of Cu, but Zn forms a more thermodynamically stable oxide. These subtle metallurgical differences will affect the transient liquid phase (TLP) formation at the interface, which will subsequently influence the bond quality.

  20. Morphology, topography, and hardness of diffusion bonded sialon to AISI 420 at different bonding time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Nor Nurulhuda Md.; Hussain, Patthi; Awang, Mokhtar

    2015-07-01

    Sialon and AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel were diffusion bonded in order to study the effect of bonding time on reaction layer's growth. Joining of these materials was conducted at 1200°C under a uniaxial pressure of 17 MPa in a vacuum ranging from 5.0 to 8.0×10-6 Torr with bonding time varied for 0.5, 2, and 3 h. Thicker reaction layer was formed in longer bonded sample since the elements from sialon could diffuse further into the steel. Sialon retained its microstructure but it was affected at the initial contact with the steel to form the new interface layer. Diffusion layer grew toward the steel and it was segregated with the parent steel as a result of the difference in properties between these regions. The segregation formed a stream-like structure and its depth decreased when the bonding time was increased. The microstructure of the steel transformed into large grain size with precipitates. Prolonging the bonding time produced more precipitates in the steel and reduced the steel thickness as well. Interdiffusions of elements occurred between the joined materials and the concentrations were decreasing toward the steel and vice versa. Silicon easily diffused into the steel because it possessed lower ionization potential compared to nitrogen. Formation of silicide and other compounds such as carbides were detected in the interface layer and steel grain boundary, respectively. These compounds were harmful due to silicide brittleness and precipitation of carbides in the grain boundary might cause intergranular corrosion cracking. Sialon retained its hardness but it dropped very low at the interface layer. The absence of crack at the joint in all samples could be contributed from the ductility characteristic of the reaction layer which compensated the residual stress that was formed upon the cooling process.

  1. Strength, ultrasonic and metallurgical evaluation of diffusion bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Ojard, G.C.; Buck, O.; Rehbein, D.K.

    1993-10-01

    Diffusion bonding allows similar and dissimilar materials to be bonded together in near net shape. However, differentiation of almost perfect diffusion bonds, with little variation in their acoustic response, is of critical importance since relatively significant changes in bond strength may be a consequence. Challenge is to find ultrasonic techniques sensitive enough to detect small imperfections at interface. Diffusion bonds have been produced that show only a slight variation in a single frequency reflection measurement. The total energy, reflected from bond line, can differentiate these diffusion bonds. This evaluation is based on Parseval`s theorem which states that energy in time domain is proportional to energy in the frequency domain. This measurement takes advantage of presence of voids in the diffusion bonds as well as of the interdiffusion zone. Cu and Ni were chosen as the materials to be bonded due to the case of microstructural control. Diffusion bonds fabricated of Ti-6Al-4V are also discussed.

  2. HIP diffusion bonding for gear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ashworth, M.A.; Jacobs, M.H.; Armstrong, G.R.; Freeman, R.; Rickinson, B.A.; King, S.

    1996-12-31

    Mechanical actuators used on aircraft flight control systems contain highly stressed gears which are made from low alloy steels; either through or surface hardened. Corrosion protection has traditionally been provided by cadmium plating. Conventional stainless steels, even when given surface treatments do not provide the necessary strength, wear and corrosion properties for such gears. HIP processing has been used on cobalt based alloy powders as a new approach to produce gears for mechanical and corrosion testing. The technology has been used both to consolidate the powder and HIP diffusion bond the alloy to conventional stainless steels. The microstructure and properties of the consolidated alloy are presented together with preliminary results from component testing. The diffusion bonding route has produced gears which have much better wear and corrosion resistance than conventional steel gears whilst retaining equivalent fatigue properties. The economics of the process are discussed together with the concept of using the HIP process to shape as well as consolidate the material.

  3. Using Diffusion Bonding in Making Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, Frank E.

    2003-01-01

    A technique for the fabrication of piezoelectric actuators that generate acceptably large forces and deflections at relatively low applied voltages involves the stacking and diffusion bonding of multiple thin piezoelectric layers coated with film electrodes. The present technique stands in contrast to an older technique in which the layers are bonded chemically, by use of urethane or epoxy agents. The older chemical-bonding technique entails several disadvantages, including the following: It is difficult to apply the bonding agents to the piezoelectric layers. It is difficult to position the layers accurately and without making mistakes. There is a problem of disposal of hazardous urethane and epoxy wastes. The urethane and epoxy agents are nonpiezoelectric materials. As such, they contribute to the thickness of a piezoelectric laminate without contributing to its performance; conversely, for a given total thickness, the performance of the laminate is below that of a unitary piezoelectric plate of the same thickness. The figure depicts some aspects of the fabrication of a laminated piezoelectric actuator by the present diffusion- bonding technique. First, stock sheets of the piezoelectric material are inspected and tested. Next, the hole pattern shown in the figure is punched into the sheets. Alternatively, if the piezoelectric material is not a polymer, then the holes are punched in thermoplastic films. Then both faces of each punched piezoelectric sheet or thermoplastic film are coated with a silver-ink electrode material by use of a silkscreen printer. The electrode and hole patterns are designed for minimal complexity and minimal waste of material. After a final electrical test, all the coated piezoelectric layers (or piezoelectric layers and coated thermoplastic films) are stacked in an alignment jig, which, in turn, is placed in a curved press for the diffusion-bonding process. In this process, the stack is pressed and heated at a specified curing temperature

  4. Diffuse vacuum arc with cerium oxide hot cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirov, R. Kh; Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Liziakin, G. D.; Polistchook, V. P.; Samoylov, I. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Usmanov, R. A.; Yartsev, I. M.; Ivanov, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    Diffuse vacuum arc with hot cathode is one of the perspective plasma sources for the development of spent nuclear fuel plasma reprocessing technology. Experimental data is known for such type of discharges on metal cathodes. In this work discharge with cerium dioxide hot cathode was studied. Cerium dioxide properties are similar to uranium dioxide. Its feature as dielectric is that it becomes conductive in oxygen-free atmosphere. Vacuum arc was studied at following parameters: cathode temperatures were between 2.0 and 2.2 kK, discharge currents was between 30 and 65 A and voltages was in range from 15 to 25 V. Power flows from plasma to cathode were estimated in achieved regimes. Analysis of generated plasma component composition was made by radiation spectrum diagnostics. These results were compared with calculations of equilibrium gaseous phase above solid sample of cerium dioxide in close to experimental conditions. Cerium dioxide vacuum evaporation rate and evaporation rate in arc were measured.

  5. Diffusion bonding of IN 718 to VM 350 grade maraging steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosby, S. R.; Biederman, R. R.; Reynolds, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Diffusion bonding studies have been conducted on IN 718, VM 350 and the dissimilar alloy couple, IN 718 to maraging steel. The experimental processing parameters critical to obtaining consistently good diffusion bonds between IN 718 and VM 350 were determined. Interrelationships between temperature, pressure and surface preparation were explored for short bending intervals under vacuum conditions. Successful joining was achieved for a range of bonding cycle temperatures, pressures and surface preparations. The strength of the weaker parent material was used as a criterion for a successful tensile test of the heat treated bond. Studies of VM-350/VM-350 couples in the as-bonded condition showed a greater yielding and failure outside the bond region.

  6. Wafer bonding technology for new generation vacuum MEMS: challenges and promises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoi, V.; Pabo, E.

    2015-05-01

    Various MEMS devices are incorporated into consumer electronic devices. A particular category of MEMS require vacuum packaging by wafer bonding with the need to encapsulate vacuum levels of 10-2 mbar or higher with long time stability. The vacuum requirement is limiting the choice of the wafer bonding process and raises significant challenges to the existing investigation methods (metrology) used for results qualification. From the broad range of wafer bonding processes only few are compatible with vacuum applications: fusion bonding, anodic bonding, glass frit bonding and metal-based bonding. The outgassing from the enclosed surfaces after bonding will affect the vacuum level in the cavity: in some cases, a getter material is used inside the device cavity to compensate for this outgassing. Additionally the selected bonding process must be compatible with the devices on the wafers being bonded. This work reviews the principles of vacuum encapsulation using wafer bonding. Examples showing the suitability of each process for specific applications types will be presented. A significant challenge in vacuum MEMS fabrication is the lack of analytical methods needed for process characterization or reliability testing. A short overview of the most used methods and their limitations will be presented. Specific needs to be addressed will be introduced with examples.

  7. Diffusion doping in quantum dots: bond strength and diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Saha, Avijit; Makkar, Mahima; Shetty, Amitha; Gahlot, Kushagra; A R, Pavan; Viswanatha, Ranjani

    2017-02-23

    Semiconducting materials uniformly doped with optical or magnetic impurities have been useful in a number of potential applications. However, clustering or phase separation during synthesis has made this job challenging. Recently the "inside out" diffusion doping was proposed to be successful in obtaining large sized quantum dots (QDs) uniformly doped with a dilute percentage of dopant atoms. Herein, we demonstrate the use of basic physical chemistry of diffusion to control the size and concentration of the dopants within the QDs for a given transition metal ion. We have studied three parameters; the bond strength of the core molecules and the diffusion coefficient of the diffusing metal ion are found to be important while the ease of cation exchange was not highly influential in the control of size and concentration of the single domain dilute magnetic semiconductor quantum dots (DMSQDs) with diverse dopant ions M(2+) (Fe(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), Mn(2+)). Steady state optical emission spectra reveal that the dopants are incorporated inside the semiconducting CdS and the emission can be tuned during shell growth. We have shown that this method enables control over doping percentage and the QDs show a superior ferromagnetic response at room temperature as compared to previously reported systems.

  8. Diffusion bonding of silicon nitride to titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemus-Ruiz, Jose

    2001-07-01

    The use of ceramic has gradually increased over the past few years. Si3N4 is one of the most important ceramics used as structural material for high temperature applications. The practical use of advanced ceramics depends on the reliability of ceramic/metal joining techniques and the properties of the resulting interfaces. This work focuses on various aspects of diffusion bonding of Si3N4 to Ti as well as on the use of Ti-foil interlayer during the self-joining of Si3N4. Si3N4/Ti and Si3N 4/Ti-foil/Si3N4 combinations were diffusion joined by hot-uniaxial pressing and the microstructural characterization of the resulting interfaces was carried out by SEM, EPMA, and X-ray diffraction. Diffusion bonding was carried out at temperatures ranging from 1200 to 1500°C using different holding times, pressures, and surface roughness of the joining materials. The results showed that Si3N4 could not be bonded to Ti at temperatures lower than 1400°C, however successful joining at higher temperatures. Joining occurred by the formation of a reactive interface on the Ti side of the joint. At temperatures greater than 1330°C, liquid formation occurred by the interaction of Ti with Si promoting bonding, as well as the high affinity of Ti for Si resulted in rapid interface formation of silicides, initially Ti5Si3. EPMA and X-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of Ti5Si3, TiSi, and TiN at the interface. The surface roughness of the joining materials plays an important role since thicker interfaces were obtained for polished samples compared to as-ground samples. The interfaces grew in a parabolic fashion with the formation of various Ti-silicides (Ti5Si3 and TiSi) as well as Ti-nitride (TiN) at the interface. Evaluation of joint strengths as a function of the experimental parameters such as, joining temperature and time was obtained by four-point bending test performed on Si3N4/Ti/Si3N4 joints. Strong joints were produced at joining temperatures greater than 1450°C with average

  9. Diffusion bonding between ODS ferritic steel and F82H steel for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Byungjun; Kasada, Ryuta; Kimura, Akihiko

    2012-07-01

    Diffusion bonding techniques were employed to join high Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel (Fe-15Cr-2W-0.2Ti-0.35Y2O3) and F82H steel under uni-axial hydrostatic pressure using a high vacuum hot press, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were investigated. The dissimilar joints were bonded by solid-state diffusion bonding (SSDB) and liquid phase diffusion bonding (LPDB). After bonding process, heat treatments were conducted to utilize the phase transformation of F82H steel for recovering the martensitic structure. Tensile tests with miniaturized specimens were carried out to investigate and compare the bonding strengths of each joint. Microstructure was observed for the bonding interface, and fracture mode was investigated after the tensile tests. LPDB joint of interfacial F82H steel fully recovered to martensite phase by post-joining heat treatments, while SSDB joint had ferrite phases at the interface even after heat treatment, which is considered to be due to decarburization of F82H steel during the bonding process. Therefore it is considered that the insert material plays a role as diffusion barrier of carbon during LPDB process. Microstructure observations and tensile tests of the joints revealed that the LPDB joints possess suitable tensile properties which are comparable to that of F82H steel. This indicates that LPDB is more promising method to bond ODS-FS and F82H steel than SSDB.

  10. Diffuser-ejector system for a very high vacuum environment

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, K.E.

    1984-06-19

    A system for testing space engines at sea level under a very low pressure environment. The system includes a space simulation chamber connected to a diffuser, which has two variable area ratio ejectors connected to it in tandem. Each of the ejectors is driven by a jet engine, preferably a turbo jet. The system is capable of providing a low pressure environment of about three or four millimeters of mercury for testing of engines mounted in the space simulation chamber. The system also may be used for other purposes requiring very high vacuum, such as evaporation and dehydration of food products or drugs.

  11. Signal analysis approach to ultrasonic evaluation of diffusion bond quality

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, D; Thomas, G

    1999-06-08

    Solid state bonds like the diffusion bond are attractive techniques for joining dissimilar materials since they are not prone to the defects that occur with fusion welding. Ultrasonic methods can detect the presence of totally unbonded regions but have difficulty sensing poor bonded areas where the substrates are in intimate contact. Standard ultrasonic imaging is based on amplitude changes in the signal reflected from the bond interface. Unfortunately amplitude alone is not sensitive to bond quality. We demonstrated that there is additional information in the ultrasonic signal that correlates with bond quality. In our approach we interrogated a set of dissimilar diffusion bonded samples with broad band ultrasonic signals. The signals were digitally processed and the characteristics of the signals that corresponded to bond quality were determined. These characteristics or features were processed with pattern recognition algorithms to produce predictions of bond quality. The predicted bond quality was then compared with the destructive measurement to assess the classification capability of the ultrasonic technique

  12. AN INTERNAL CONVECTIVE HEATING TECHNIQUE FOR DIFFUSION BONDING ARRAYED MICROCHANNEL ARCHITECTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Brian; Bose, Sumantra; Palo, Daniel R.

    2010-01-08

    Diffusion bonding cycle times can be a large factor in the production cost of metal microchannel devices. The challenge is to significantly minimize bonding cycle times through rapid heating and cooling within the bonding process. A novel method is described which takes advantage of the internal flow passages within microchannel devices for convective heat transfer during the bonding process. The internal convective heating (ICH) technique makes use of heated inert gas to provide the microchannel assembly with rapid and uniform heat input. Results demonstrate that the ICH technique is feasible, capable of producing microchannels with higher dimensional integrity and shorter bonding cycle times than traditional vacuum hot press methods. Results suggest that this may be due to smaller thermal gradients within microchannel devices during the ICH bonding cycle.

  13. Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, J. W.; Klingmann, J.; van Bibber, K.

    2001-05-01

    is proposed for fabricating the NLC structures. The structure would be assembled with pure silver braze inserts using a self-aligning step joint design, then the assembly would be vacuum diffusion bonded at 700 °C and 3.45 MPa pressure to seal the critical inner portion of the assembly. Finally, during the same furnace cycle, the temperature would be increased to 800 °C in order to react the silver with the copper to form a liquid braze alloy that would join and seal the outer portion of the cells together.

  14. Ultrasonic NDT of titanium diffusion bonding with guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.L.; Zhu, W.; Zaidi, M.

    1998-04-01

    An ultrasonic guided wave technique is developed for the NDT of diffusion bonded titanium-to-titanium structures. A three-layer model based on the normal beam experimental results has been proposed. Dispersion curves and wave structure are analyzed to direct the experimental study. Two features related to Lamb waves propagating in diffusion bonded titanium plates, the spectral peak to peak ratios and the wave mode frequency shift, are extracted from the guided wave experimental results for both 2 mm (0.08 in.) and 4 mm (0.16 in.) diffusion bond panels. It is found for some specific modes and frequencies that these two features are sensitive to the diffusion bonding states and, therefore, could be used to distinguish good bond panels from poor bond ones.

  15. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide for MEMS-LDI Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    A robust joining approach is critically needed for a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems-Lean Direct Injector (MEMS-LDI) application which requires leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. Diffusion bonding is well suited for the MEMS-LDI application. Diffusion bonds were fabricated using titanium interlayers between silicon carbide substrates during hot pressing. The interlayers consisted of either alloyed titanium foil or physically vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings. Microscopy shows that well adhered, crack free diffusion bonds are formed under optimal conditions. Under less than optimal conditions, microcracks are present in the bond layer due to the formation of intermetallic phases. Electron microprobe analysis was used to identify the reaction formed phases in the diffusion bond. Various compatibility issues among the phases in the interlayer and substrate are discussed. Also, the effects of temperature, pressure, time, silicon carbide substrate type, and type of titanium interlayer and thickness on the microstructure and composition of joints are discussed.

  16. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide Ceramics using Titanium Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, James D.

    2006-01-01

    Robust joining approaches for silicon carbide ceramics are critically needed to fabricate leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. In this study, titanium foils and physical vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings were used to form diffusion bonds between SiC ceramics using hot pressing. Silicon carbide substrate materials used for bonding include sintered SiC and two types of CVD SiC. Microscopy results show the formation of well adhered diffusion bonds. The bond strengths as determined from pull tests are on the order of several ksi, which is much higher than required for a proposed application. Microprobe results show the distribution of silicon, carbon, titanium, and other minor elements across the diffusion bond. Compositions of several phases formed in the joint region were identified. Potential issues of material compatibility and optimal bond formation will also be discussed.

  17. Partial transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of Zircaloy-4 to stabilized austenitic stainless steel 321

    SciTech Connect

    Atabaki, M. Mazar; Hanzaei, A. Talebi

    2010-10-15

    An innovative method was applied for bonding Zircaloy-4 to stabilized austenitic stainless steel 321 using an active titanium interlayer. Specimens were joined by a partial transient liquid phase diffusion bonding method in a vacuum furnace at different temperatures under 1 MPa dynamic pressure of contact. The influence of different bonding temperatures on the microstructure, microindentation hardness, joint strength and interlayer thickness has been studied. The diffusion of Fe, Cr, Ni and Zr has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy elemental analyses. Results showed that control of the heating and cooling rate and 20 min soaking at 1223 K produces a perfect joint. However, solid-state diffusion of the melting point depressant elements into the joint metal causes the solid/liquid interface to advance until the joint is solidified. The tensile strength of all the bonded specimens was found around 480-670 MPa. Energy dispersive spectroscopy studies indicated that the melting occurred along the interface of the bonded specimens as a result of the transfer of atoms between the interlayer and the matrix during bonding. This technique provides a reliable method of bonding zirconium alloy to stainless steel.

  18. Application of diffusion bonding to electronic interconnection of flatpack leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, R. W.; Lardenoit, V. F.

    1973-01-01

    Diffusion-bonded joints between gold-plated Kovar leads and indium-plated copper circuit pads offer some advantages for electronic circuit packaging. Test results show that consistent high strength bonds stronger than the copper circuit foil are achieved by parallel-gap bonding at relatively low power settings. The bonds are basically formed by the alloying of the gold, indium and copper at the bond interface. Other low melting metals such as tin can also be used; however, tin does not offer the ease of bonding that results in consistent separation of the copper foil during pull testing. The investigation was conducted in three parts consisting of: (1) an evaluation of the physical strength of resulting bonds at ambient and elevated temperature, (2) a metallurgical analysis of bonds using scanning electron microscopy and nondispersive X-ray analysis, and (3) evaluation and development of various schemes for multiple lead flatpack bonding.

  19. Joining of Silicon Carbide: Diffusion Bond Optimization and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Joining and integration methods are critically needed as enabling technologies for the full utilization of advanced ceramic components in aerospace and aeronautics applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. In the application, several SiC substrates with different hole patterns to form fuel and combustion air channels are bonded to form the injector. Diffusion bonding is a joining approach that offers uniform bonds with high temperature capability, chemical stability, and high strength. Diffusion bonding was investigated with the aid of titanium foils and coatings as the interlayer between SiC substrates to aid bonding. The influence of such variables as interlayer type, interlayer thickness, substrate finish, and processing time were investigated. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis were used to characterize the bonds and to identify the reaction formed phases.

  20. Metal honeycomb to porous wireform substrate diffusion bond evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Moorhead, P. E.; Hull, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two nondestructive techniques were used to evaluate diffusion bond quality between a metal foil honeycomb and porous wireform substrate. The two techniques, cryographics and acousto-ultrasonics, are complementary in revealing variations of bond integrity and quality in shroud segments from an experimental aircraft turbine engine.

  1. Fabrication and Characterization of Diffusion Bonds for Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael; Singh, Mrityunjay; Martin, Richard E.; Cosgriff, Laura M.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion bonds of silicon carbide (SiC) were fabricated using several different types of titanium (Ti) based interlayers between the SiC substrates. The interlayers were an alloyed Ti foil, a pure Ti foil, and a physically vapor deposited (PVD) Ti coating. Microscopy was conducted to evaluate the cross-sections of the resulting bonds. Microprobe analysis identified reaction formed phases in the diffusion bonded region. Uniform and well adhered bonds were formed between the SiC substrates. In the case where the alloyed Ti foil or a thick Ti coating (i.e. 20 micron) was used as the interlayer, microcracks and several phases were present in the diffusion bonds. When a thinner interlayer was used (i.e. 10 micron PVD Ti), no microcracks were observed and only two reaction formed phases were present. The two phases were preferred and fully reacted phases that did not introduce thermal stresses or microcracks during the cool-down stage after processing. Diffusion bonded samples were evaluated with the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods of pulsed thermography and immersion ultrasonic testing. Joined SiC substrates that were fully bonded and that had simulated bond flaws in the interlayer were also evaluated using immersion ultrasound. Pull testing was conducted on the bonds to determine the tensile strength. To demonstrate the joining approach for a complex multilayered component for a low NOx injector application, the diffusion bonding approach was used to join three 4" diameter SiC discs that contained complex fuel and air flow channels.

  2. Ion diffusion at the bonding interface of undoped YAG/Yb:YAG composite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, Kana; Sugiyama, Akira; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Kawanaka, Junji; Miyanaga, Noriaki

    2015-08-01

    Cation diffusion across a boundary between ytterbium (Yb)-doped and undoped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramics was examined by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA). Polished Yb:YAG and undoped YAG ceramics were bonded by surface treatment with argon fast atom beam, and then heat-treated at 1400 or 1600 °C for 50 h or at 1400 °C for 10 h under vacuum. We obtained EPMA mapping images of the bonded samples that clearly showed the bulk and grain-boundary diffusion of Y and Yb ions. The number density profiles showed that the total diffusion distances of Yb and Y ions were almost equal and approximately 2 and 15 μm at 1400 and 1600 °C, respectively, and the dependence of diffusion distance on heating time was weak. The diffusion curves were well modeled by Harrison type B kinetics including bulk and grain-boundary diffusion. In addition, it was found that Si ions added to the samples as a sintering aid might be segregated at the grain boundary by heat treatment, and diffused only along grain boundaries.

  3. Torsion Testing of Diffusion Bonded LIGA Formed Nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, T.E.; Christenson, T.R.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-27

    A test technique has been devised which is suitable for the testing of the bond strength of batch diffusion bonded LIGA or DXRL defined structures. The method uses a torsion tester constructed with the aid of LIGA fabrication and distributed torsion specimens which also make use of the high aspect ratio nature of DXRL based processing. Measurements reveal achieved bond strengths of 130MPa between electroplated nickel with a bond temperature of 450 C at 7 ksi pressure which is a sufficiently low temperature to avoid mechanical strength degradation.

  4. Diffusion bonding a creep-resistant Fe-ODS alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucklow, I. A.

    A method is described for diffusion bonding iron-based alloys in which the grain structure is continuous along the interface. The method is based on oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloying for producing fine-grained materials with highly directional strain. Samples of the Fe-based MA956 alloy are rapidly diffusion bonded at about 1200 C and 200-300 MPa with either one or two induction heat treatments, and secondary recrystallization is seeded epitaxially. Sections are etched in glyceregia and studied by means of micrographs, and the diffusion rates of the ferritic alloys are found to be high enough to allow bonding at temperatures below the recrystallization level. Some mechanical damage to the specimens is noted that can lead to suboptimal grain directionality. The present results are of interest to the development of Fe-ODS alloys for turbine applications and for use in sulfurous atmospheres.

  5. Superplastically formed diffusion bonded metallic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A metallic sandwich structure particularly suited for use in aerospace industries comprising a base plate, a cover plate, and an orthogonally corrugated core is described. A pair of core plates formed of a superplastic alloy are interposed between the base plate and the cover plate and bonded. Each of the core plates is characterized by a plurality of protrusions comprising square-based, truncated pyramids uniformly aligned along orthogonally related axes perpendicularly bisecting the legs of the bases of the pyramids and alternately inverted along orthogonally related planes diagonally bisecting the pyramids, whereby an orthogonally corrugated core is provided.

  6. Evaluation of ultrasonic signals from diffusion and eutectic bond interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C. M.

    1980-12-10

    A research program is in progress at Rocky Flats to determine correlations between ultrasonic signal content and diffusion or eutectic bond joint condition, and to develop a computer-controlled scanning, data acquisition and analysis system which utilizes these correlations and waveform analysis techniques. The initial efforts to determine effective ultrasonic waveform parameters to characterize the strength of bond interfaces is complete. A development version of a computer-controlled, automated scanning and data acquisition system is in operation.

  7. Application of vacuum stability test to determine thermal decomposition kinetics of nitramines bonded by polyurethane matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbeih, Ahmed; Abd-Elghany, Mohamed; Elshenawy, Tamer

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum stability test (VST) is mainly used to study compatibility and stability of energetic materials. In this work, VST has been investigated to study thermal decomposition kinetics of four cyclic nitramines, 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX) and 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX), cis-1,3,4,6-tetranitrooctahydroimidazo-[4,5-d]imidazole (BCHMX), 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (ε-HNIW, CL-20), bonded by polyurethane matrix based on hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB). Model fitting and model free (isoconversional) methods have been applied to determine the decomposition kinetics from VST results. For comparison, the decomposition kinetics were determined isothermally by ignition delay technique and non-isothermally by Advanced Kinetics and Technology Solution (AKTS) software. The activation energies for thermolysis obtained by isoconversional method based on VST technique of RDX/HTPB, HMX/HTPB, BCHMX/HTPB and CL20/HTPB were 157.1, 203.1, 190.0 and 176.8 kJ mol-1 respectively. Model fitting method proved that the mechanism of thermal decomposition of BCHMX/HTPB is controlled by the nucleation model while all the other studied PBXs are controlled by the diffusion models. A linear relationship between the ignition temperatures and the activation energies was observed. BCHMX/HTPB is interesting new PBX in the research stage.

  8. Hydrogen Bonding Slows Down Surface Diffusion of Molecular Glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinshan; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Lian

    2016-08-18

    Surface-grating decay has been measured for three organic glasses with extensive hydrogen bonding: sorbitol, maltitol, and maltose. For 1000 nm wavelength gratings, the decay occurs by viscous flow in the entire range of temperature studied, covering the viscosity range 10(5)-10(11) Pa s, whereas under the same conditions, the decay mechanism transitions from viscous flow to surface diffusion for organic glasses of similar molecular sizes but with no or limited hydrogen bonding. These results indicate that extensive hydrogen bonding slows down surface diffusion in organic glasses. This effect arises because molecules can preserve hydrogen bonding even near the surface so that the loss of nearest neighbors does not translate into a proportional decrease of the kinetic barrier for diffusion. This explanation is consistent with a strong correlation between liquid fragility and the surface enhancement of diffusion, both reporting resistance of a liquid to dynamic excitation. Slow surface diffusion is expected to hinder any processes that rely on surface transport, for example, surface crystal growth and formation of stable glasses by vapor deposition.

  9. Forge-Diffusion Bond Titanium Rotor Hub Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    beta temperature • of 1750°F, diffusion treated at 1900°F, water —quenched, and then overaged at 1300°F for two hours. Separately forged upper and... FRACTU RE SURFACE , TRIAL PANCAKE ASSEMBLIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 x - .— ~~- - -• FIGU RE PAGE 33. MEAN S/N CURVE FOR VARIOUS...optimum process to be an alpha—beta forging, forge—diffusion bonded at 1750°F , diffusion treated at 1900°F, water -quenched, and then overaged at

  10. A local view of bonding and diffusion at metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, P.J.

    1996-09-01

    First-principles density functional calculations and corresponding experimental results underline the importance of basic chemical concepts, such as coordination, valence saturation and promotion-hybridization energetics, in understanding bonding and diffusion of atoms at and on metal surfaces. Several examples are reviewed, including outer-layer relaxations of clean hcp(0001) surfaces, liquid-metal-embrittlement energetics, separation energies of metal-adatom dimers, concerted substitutional self-diffusion on fcc(001) surfaces, and adsorption and diffusion barrier sites for adatoms near steps.

  11. Silver plating ensures reliable diffusion bonding of dissimilar metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Dissimilar metals are reliably joined by diffusion bonding when the surfaces are electroplated with silver. The process involves cleaning and etching, anodization, silver striking, and silver plating with a conventional plating bath. It minimizes the formation of detrimental intermetallic phases and provides greater tolerance of processing parameters.

  12. Air-coupled ultrasonic testing of diffusion bonds.

    PubMed

    Windels, Filip; Leroy, O

    2002-05-01

    The diffusion bond between two steel plates can be ultrasonically evaluated, at normal incidence in an immersion experiment, by analyzing the frequency dependence of the echo reflected from the imperfect bond. The interfacial stiffness, derived from the echo amplitude, correlates well with the bond-strength. However, a non-contact method is desirable for applications where immersion or contact is not wanted or even dangerous for damaging the material. This above mentioned bond-echo technique would not work in the situation of air-coupling as the reflected echo becomes then too weak due to the high impedance mismatch at the air-solid interface. Therefore we propose a theoretical method based on the study of two neighbouring resonance frequencies of the diffusion bonded plate-plate structure. In this way the physical signal sensitive to the adhesion status is not the (too weak) echo reflected from the bond, but the resonance frequency of the whole plate-plate system, and this frequency is detectable as working at resonance ensures high enough signal levels. It was shown that the odd resonance is as well sensitive to the plate thickness as to the interfacial bond parameter, whereas the even resonance feels only the plate thickness. On the basis of a theoretical formula, it is possible to extract, from a single point measurement, out of these two resonance frequencies both the plate thickness and the interfacial stiffness. In this way bond information is separated from geometrical information. Finally it is shown that thickness differences between the plates did not affect the reliability of the bonding-strength predictions.

  13. Dependence of scale thickness on the breaking behavior of the initial oxide on plasma spray bond coat surface during vacuum pre-treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bang-Yan; Meng, Guo-Hui; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-03-01

    The thermally grown oxide (TGO) on the thermal spray bond coat surface was one of the most important factors which would influence the lifetime of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Pre-diffusion treatment (high temperature vacuum treatment) plays an important role in the growth of the TGO. Results show that the initial thin oxide scale, formed during deposition process, on the as-sprayed bond coating surface has broken and shrunk to discontinuous oxide particles through the elements diffusion during the pre-diffusion. Two kinds of bond coats with different initial oxide scale thicknesses were subjected to the same pre-diffusion. The two pre-diffused bond coats show different results of the average distance between the individual oxide particles. In this study, a three dimensional model with thermal grooving theory was developed to explore the essential condition for the scale breaking and explain the differences of these results. This research can provide reference for the preparation optimization and pre-treatment optimization of bond coat towards high performance TBCs.

  14. Dynamics and mechanism of structural diffusion in linear hydrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongwattana, Sermsiri; Phonyiem, Mayuree; Vchirawongkwin, Viwat; Prueksaaroon, Supakit; Sagarik, Kritsana

    2012-01-15

    Dynamics and mechanism of proton transfer in a protonated hydrogen bond (H-bond) chain were studied, using the CH(3)OH(2)(+)(CH(3)OH)(n) complexes, n = 1-4, as model systems. The present investigations used B3LYP/TZVP calculations and Born-Oppenheimer MD (BOMD) simulations at 350 K to obtain characteristic H-bond structures, energetic and IR spectra of the transferring protons in the gas phase and continuum liquid. The static and dynamic results were compared with the H(3)O(+)(H(2)O)(n) and CH(3)OH(2)(+)(H(2)O)(n) complexes, n = 1-4. It was found that the H-bond chains with n = 1 and 3 represent the most active intermediate states and the CH(3)OH(2)(+)(CH(3)OH)(n) complexes possess the lowest threshold frequency of proton transfer. The IR spectra obtained from BOMD simulations revealed that the thermal energy fluctuation and dynamics help promote proton transfer in the shared-proton structure with n = 3 by lowering the vibrational energy for the interconversion between the oscillatory shuttling and structural diffusion motions, leading to a higher population of the structural diffusion motion than in the shared-proton structure with n = 1. Additional explanation on the previously proposed mechanisms was introduced, with the emphases on the energetic of the transferring proton, the fluctuation of the number of the CH(3)OH molecules in the H-bond chain, and the quasi-dynamic equilibriums between the shared-proton structure (n = 3) and the close-contact structures (n ≥ 4). The latter prohibits proton transfer reaction in the H-bond chain from being concerted, since the rate of the structural diffusion depends upon the lifetime of the shared-proton intermediate state. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Tunable infrared generation with diffusion-bonded-stacked gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dong

    Mid-infrared (MIR) radiation finds increasing applications in remote sensing, spectroscopy and military counter-measures. Nonlinear optical interactions provide one approach to tunable MIR sources generation. The development of MIR nonlinear optical crystals with excellent performance at a reasonable cost is essential for applications. Diffusion-bonded-stacked (DBS) GaAs periodic structures are a new family of quasi-phasematched (QPM) nonlinear optical crystals. The bonding process preserves the optical and mechanical properties of the bulk material, while the periodic modulation of the nonlinear coefficient permits QPM interactions. DBS GaAs bonding requirements, such as number of bonded layers and tolerable optical loss, are discussed. Nonlinear optical properties like mixing gain, wavelength, temperature and angular acceptance of the bonded structure, are predicted. DBS GaAs devices with up to 50 layers were bonded and characterized. Optical loss from interfacial voids and gaps at shorter wavelengths, from processing induced p- type free carrier absorption at longer wavelengths was characterized. 'Lithographic dicing' was invented and demonstrated as a replacement for mechanical dicing, resulting in the capability to handle thin wafers and cleaner interfaces for better bonding. Absorption due to semi-insulating-to-p-type conversion, a bulk crystal loss mechanism, was found to be induced by high bonding temperatures, and dependent on wafer sources and materials in contact with the stack. Optimized bonding parameters reduced the optical loss of 36-layer DBS GaAs to less than 0.2 cm-1 at long wavelengths. Tunable 15.6 to 17.6 μm coherent radiation at 90-ps pulse width was generated by difference frequency mixing in a 24-layer DBS GaAs device. The wavelength tuning curve agreed with theoretical predictions demonstrating that the bonding process maintained nonlinear optical phasematching over the 6 mm interaction length. Maximum mixing gain of 0.7%, or 5% internal

  16. Diffuser/ejector system for a very high vacuum environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, K. E.; Wojciechowski, C. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Turbo jet engines are used to furnish the necessary high temperature, high volume, medium pressure gas to provide a high vacuum test environment at comparatively low cost for space engines at sea level. Moreover, the invention provides a unique way by use of the variable area ratio ejectors with a pair of meshing cones are used. The outer cone is arranged to translate fore and aft, and the inner cone is interchangeable with other cones having varying angles of taper.

  17. Thermographic Inspection Of Superplastically Formed Diffusion Bonded Titanium Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haavig, David L.; King, Daniel C.

    1988-01-01

    Infrared thermographic nondestructive inspection of superplastically formed diffusion bonded (SPF/DB) titanium structures is discussed. Nondestructive testing (NDT) of the structures produced by this recently developed method is vital for construction of modern fighter aircraft. Forming and bonding parameters can be optimized by proper interpretation of NDT results. Currently, ultrasonic inspection is used for NDT on these parts. In an effort to reduce cost and inspection time required by ultrasonic testing, a thermographic investigation of panel response to rapid heating was undertaken. Panels were uniformly illuminated for a duration of up to four seconds by high intensity lamps. Infrared images of temperature variation due to panel thickness were observed. Correlation of thermograms with ultrasonic and destructive investigations indicate that lack of bonding and panel formations can easily be observed. We have demonstrated that thermographic inspection provides an equally sensitive and lower cost alternative to ultrasonic inspection. Finally, thermographic inspection facilities for large scale inspection are suggested.

  18. Joining of Silicon Carbide Through the Diffusion Bonding Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael .; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2009-01-01

    In order for ceramics to be fully utilized as components for high-temperature and structural applications, joining and integration methods are needed. Such methods will allow for the fabrication the complex shapes and also allow for insertion of the ceramic component into a system that may have different adjacent materials. Monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) is a ceramic material of focus due to its high temperature strength and stability. Titanium foils were used as an interlayer to form diffusion bonds between chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC ceramics with the aid of hot pressing. The influence of such variables as interlayer thickness and processing time were investigated to see which conditions contributed to bonds that were well adhered and crack free. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis were used to characterize the bonds and to identify the reaction formed phases.

  19. An investigation on microstructure evolution and mechanical properties during liquid state diffusion bonding of Al2024 to Ti–6Al–4V

    SciTech Connect

    Samavatian, Majid; Halvaee, Ayoub; Amadeh, Ahmad Ali; Khodabandeh, Alireza

    2014-12-15

    Joining mechanism of Ti/Al dissimilar alloys was studied during liquid state diffusion bonding process using Cu/Sn/Cu interlayer at 510 °C under vacuum of 7.5 × 10{sup −5} Torr for various bonding times. The microstructure and compositional changes in the joint zone were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Microhardness and shear strength tests were also applied to study the mechanical properties of the joints. It was found that with an increase in bonding time, the elements of interlayer diffused into the parent metals and formed various intermetallic compounds at the interface. Diffusion process led to the isothermal solidification and the bonding evolution in the joint zone. The results from mechanical tests showed that microhardness and shear strength values have a straight relation with bonding time so that the maximum shear strength of joint was obtained for a bond made with 60 min bonding time. - Highlights: • Liquid state diffusion bonding of Al2024 to Ti–6Al–4V was performed successfully. • Diffusion of the elements caused the formation of various intermetallics at the interface. • Microhardness and shear strength values have a straight relation with bonding time. • The maximum shear strength reached to 36 MPa in 60 min bonding time.

  20. Vacuum-compatible standard diffuse source, manufacture and calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, D.A.; Atkins, W.H.; Bender, S.C.; Christensen, R.W.; Michaud, F.D.

    1999-03-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratories has completed the design, manufacture and calibration of a vacuum-compatible, tungsten lamp, integrated sphere. The light source has been calibrated at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and is intended for use as a calibration standard for remote sensing instrumentation. Calibration 2{sigma} uncertainty varied with wavelength from 1.21% at 400 nm and 0.73% at 900 nm, to 3.95% at 2,400 nm. The inner radius of the Spectralon-coated sphere is 21.2 cm with a 7.4 cm square exit aperture. A small satellite sphere is attached to the main sphere and its output coupled through a stepper motor driven aperture. The variable aperture allows a constant radiance without effecting the color temperature output from the main sphere. The sphere`s output is transmitted into a vacuum test environment through a fused silica window that is an integral part of the outer housing of the vacuum shell assembly. The atmosphere within this outer housing is composed of 240 K nitrogen gas, provided by a custom LN{sub 2} vaporizer unit. Use of the nitrogen gas maintains the internal temperature of the sphere at a nominal 300 K {+-}10{degree}. The calibrated spectral range of the source is 0.4 {micro}m through 2.4 {micro}m. Three, color temperature matched, 20 W bulbs together with a 10 W bulb are within the main integrating sphere. Two 20 W bulbs, also color temperature matched, reside in the satellite integrating sphere. A Silicon and a Germanium broadband detector are situated within the inner surface of the main sphere. Their purpose is for the measurement of the internal broadband irradiance. A fiber-optic-coupled spectrometer measures the internal color temperature that is maintained by current control on the lamps. Each lamp is independently operated allowing for radiances with common color temperatures ranging from near 0.026 W/cm{sup 2}/sr to about 0.1 W/cm{sup 2}/sr at a wavelength of 0.9 {micro}m (the location of the peak spectral

  1. Solid state direct bonding of polymers by vacuum ultraviolet light below 160 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takatoki

    2017-10-01

    This work investigated the application of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation to the bonding of various substrates, including glass, polycarbonate (PC), cyclic olefin polymer (COP), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). This method has the advantage of being able to bond various substrates without the application of heat or adhesives, and therefore may be very useful in the fabrication of micro/nanoscale structures composed of polymers. In contrast to previous applications of this technique, the present study used VUV radiation at wavelengths at and below 160 nm so as to take advantage of the higher energy in this range. Bonding was assessed based on measuring the shear stress of various test specimens subjected to VUV irradiation and then pressed together, and a number of analytical methods were also employed to examine the irradiated surfaces in order to elucidate the morphological and chemical changes following VUV treatment. These analyses included water contact angle measurements, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Poor bonding was identified between combinations consisting of PMMA/PC, PMMA/COP, PMMA/PMMA, PMMA/glass, and PC/COP, whereas all other combinations resulted in successful bonding with the bonding stress values such as PC/PC = 2.0 MPa, PC/glass = 10.7 MPa and COP/COP = 1.7 MPa, respectively.

  2. Mo/Ti Diffusion Bonding for Making Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Kisor, Adam; Caillat, Thierry; Lara, Liana; Ravi, Vilupanur; Firdosy, Samad; Fleuiral, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    An all-solid-state diffusion bonding process that exploits the eutectoid reaction between molybdenum and titanium has been developed for use in fabricating thermoelectric devices based on skutterudite compounds. In essence, the process is one of heating a flat piece of pure titanium in contact with a flat piece of pure molybdenum to a temperature of about 700 C while pushing the pieces together with a slight pressure [a few psi (of the order of 10 kPa)]. The process exploits the energy of mixing of these two metals to form a strong bond between them. These two metals were selected partly because the bonds formed between them are free of brittle intermetallic phases and are mechanically and chemically stable at high temperatures. The process is a solution of the problem of bonding hot-side metallic interconnections (denoted hot shoes in thermoelectric jargon) to titanium-terminated skutterudite n and p legs during the course of fabrication of a unicouple, which is the basic unit cell of a thermoelectric device (see figure). The hot-side operating temperature required for a skutterudite thermoelectric device is 700 C. This temperature precludes the use of brazing to attach the hot shoe; because brazing compounds melt at lower temperatures, the hot shoe would become detached during operation. Moreover, the decomposition temperature of one of the skutterudite compounds is 762 C; this places an upper limit on the temperature used in bonding the hot shoe. Molybdenum was selected as the interconnection metal because the eutectoid reaction between it and the titanium at the ends of the p and n legs has characteristics that are well suited for this application. In addition to being suitable for use in the present bonding process, molybdenum has high electrical and thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability - characteristics that are desired for hot shoes of thermoelectric devices. The process takes advantage of the chemical potential energy of mixing between

  3. Delayed mechanical failure of silver-interlayer diffusion bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Kassner, M.E. ); Rosen, R.S.; Henshall, G.A. . Physical Metallurgy and Joining Section)

    1990-12-01

    Silver-interlayer diffusion bonds were fabricated using planar-magnetron sputtering (PMS). The bonds exhibit very high tensile strengths, despite the soft interlayer, because of the constraint by the base metal. However, these joints undergo delayed failure at relatively low tensile stresses at ambient temperatures, apparently by a ductile microvoid coalescence mechanism at the bond interfaces. Two classes of delayed tensile failure were investigated. In the first case, the applied stress does not produced any plastic deformation in the base metal, and failure appears to be controlled by time-dependent plasticity within the silver interlayer as a result of the effective stress in the interlayer. The plasticity causes cavity nucleation and, eventually, interlinkage and failure. In the second case, time-dependent plasticity is observed in base metals, and concomitant shear occurs within the softer silver under a high triaxial stress state. Here, the time-dependent plasticity of the base metal accelerates plasticity and failure in the interlayer. These models were substantiated by careful analysis of the stress and temperature dependence of the rupture times, finite element analysis of the stress state within the interlayer, and microscopy of the fracture surfaces and interfaces loaded to various fractions of the expected rupture times. These findings are applicable to bonds in which the interlayers are prepared by processes other than physical vapor deposition.

  4. Elastic constants for superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded sandwich structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    Formulae and the associated graphs are presented for contrasting the effective elastic constants for a superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded (SPF/DB) corrugated sandwich core and a honeycomb sandwich core. The results used in the comparison of the structural properties of the two types of sandwich cores are under conditions of equal sandwich density. It was found that the stiffness in the thickness direction of the optimum SPF/DB corrugated core (i.e., triangular truss core) was lower than that of the honeycomb core, and that the former had higher transverse shear stiffness than the latter.

  5. Vacuum ultraviolet photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons. III. Diffusion of photo-produced H2 as a function of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Doménech, R.; Dartois, E.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) has been proposed as one of the carbonaceous solids detected in the interstellar medium. Energetic processing of the a-C:H particles leads to the dissociation of the C-H bonds and the formation of hydrogen molecules and small hydrocarbons. Photo-produced H2 molecules in the bulk of the dust particles can diffuse out to the gas phase and contribute to the total H2 abundance. Aims: We have simulated this process in the laboratory with plasma-produced a-C:H and a-C:D analogs under astrophysically relevant conditions to investigate the dependence of the diffusion as a function of temperature. Methods: Experimental simulations were performed in a high-vacuum chamber, with complementary experiments carried out in an ultra-high-vacuum chamber. Plasma-produced a-C:H and a-C:D analogs were UV-irradiated using a microwave-discharged hydrogen flow lamp. Molecules diffusing to the gas-phase were detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer, providing a measurement of the outgoing H2 or D2 flux. By comparing the experimental measurements with the expected flux from a one-dimensional diffusion model, a diffusion coefficient D could be derived for experiments carried out at different temperatures. Results: Dependence on the diffusion coefficient D with the temperature followed an Arrhenius-type equation. The activation energy for the diffusion process was estimated (ED(H2) = 1660 ± 110 K, ED(D2) = 2090 ± 90 K), as well as the pre-exponential factor (D0(H2) = 0.0007 cm2 s-1, D0(D2) = 0.0045 cm2 s-1). Conclusions: The strong decrease of the diffusion coefficient at low dust particle temperatures exponentially increases the diffusion times in astrophysical environments. Therefore, transient dust heating by cosmic rays needs to be invoked for the release of the photo-produced H2 molecules in cold photon-dominated regions, where destruction of the aliphatic component in hydrogenated amorphous carbons most probably takes place.

  6. Diffusion Bonding and Characterization of a Dispersion Strengthened Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Kavian Omar

    Aluminum metal matrix composites (Al-MMC's) containing silicon carbide or alumina particle reinforcements are used extensively in automotive and aircraft industries. The addition of a reinforcing phase has led to significant improvements in the mechanical properties of these alloys. However, despite substantial improvements in the properties, the lack of a reliable joining method has restricted their full potential. The differences in physical and metallurgical properties between the ceramic phase and the Al-MMC, prevents the successful application of the fusion welding processes, conventionally used for joining monolithic aluminum alloys. Therefore, alternative techniques that prevent microstructural changes in the base metal need to be developed. In this study, the transient liquid phase diffusion bonding and eutectic bonding of a particle reinforced Al 6061-MMC was investigated to identify a method that could control particle segregation within the joint and increase the final joint strength. The results showed that TLP bonding using Ni-foil was possible at 600°C for 10 minutes using a pressure of 0.01 MPa. However, characterization of the bond interface showed a wide particle segregated zone due to the "pushing effect" of the solid/liquid interface during isothermal solidification stage of bonding. The presence of this particle segregated zone was shown to cause low joint strengths. In order to overcome these problems, TLP bonding was performed using electrodeposited coatings of Ni and Ni-Al 2O3 as a way of controlling the volume of eutectic liquid formed at the joint. Theoretical and experimental work showed that the use of thin coatings was successful in reducing the width of the segregated zone formed at the joint and this had the effect of increasing joint shear strength values. Furthermore, lower bonding temperature could also be used as a method of reducing particle segregation and therefore, a Cu-Sn interlayer was used to form a eutectic bond. The

  7. Diffusion of co-sputtered metals as bonding materials for 3D interconnects during thermal treatments.

    PubMed

    Hsu, S Y; Chen, H Y; Chen, K N

    2012-03-01

    Diffusion behaviors of co-sputtered metals during thermal treatments were investigated, where these co-sputtered metals can be used as bonding materials for 3D Interconnects. In this paper, we report the diffusion behaviors and discuss the diffusion mechanisms of co-sputtered metals before and after annealing. Atom and vacancy volume, vacancy formation energy, and activation energy are proposed to explain the diffusion direction and diffusion rate among different co-sputtered metals. Based on the excellent bonding performance of this method, Cu/metal co-sputtering bonding is considered as a potential candidate for advanced bonding technology.

  8. The diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide using refractory metals

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-10-01

    Joining is an enabling technology for the application of structural ceramics at high temperatures. Metal foil diffusion bonding is a simple process for joining silicon carbide or boron carbide by solid-state, diffusive conversion of the metal foil into carbide and silicide compounds that produce bonding. Metal diffusion bonding trials were performed using thin foils (5 {micro}m to 100 {micro}m) of refractory metals (niobium, titanium, tungsten, and molybdenum) with plates of silicon carbide (both {alpha}-SiC and {beta}-SiC) or boron carbide that were lapped flat prior to bonding. The influence of bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and foil thickness on bond quality was determined from metallographic inspection of the bonds. The microstructure and phases in the joint region of the diffusion bonds were evaluated using SEM, microprobe, and AES analysis. The use of molybdenum foil appeared to result in the highest quality bond of the metal foils evaluated for the diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide. Bonding pressure appeared to have little influence on bond quality. The use of a thinner metal foil improved the bond quality. The microstructure of the bond region produced with either the {alpha}-SiC and {beta}-SiC polytypes were similar.

  9. Diffusion welding. [heat treatment of nickel alloys following single step vacuum welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Dispersion-strengthened nickel alloys are sanded on one side and chemically polished. This is followed by a single-step welding process wherein the polished surfaces are forced into intimate contact at 1,400 F for one hour in a vacuum. Diffusion, recrystallization, and grain growth across the original weld interface are obtained during postheating at 2,150 F for two hours in hydrogen.

  10. The metallurgical integrity of the frit vent assembly diffusion bond

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.

    1994-06-01

    Iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVSs) are now being made by Energy Systems at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. These CVSs are being made for the US Department of Energy`s (NE-53) General Purpose Heat Source- Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) program, which is to supply electrical power for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s Cassini mission to Saturn. A GPHS-RTG has 72 CVSs. Each CVS encapsulates one {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet. The helium gas produced from the alpha decay of the {sup 238}Pu is vented through a nominal 0.45-mm-diam hole in the vent cup of each CVS. A frit vent assembly that is electron beam welded over the vent hole allows helium gas to escape but prevents plutonia fines from exiting. The metallurgical integrity of frit vent assemblies produced by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) were compared with those produced earlier by EG&G-Mound Applied Technology, Inc. (EG&G-MAT). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs were taken (at magnifications of from 126X to 1,000X) of the starting frit vent powder and the diffusion-bonded powder in finished frit vent assemblies produced by Energy Systems and EG&G-MAT. Frit vent assemblies also were metallographically prepared and visually examined/photographed at magnifications of from 50X to 1,000X. The SEM and metallographic examinations of the particle-to-particle and particle-to-foil component diffusion bonds indicated that the Energy Systems-produced and EG&G-MAT-produced frit vent assemblies have comparable metallurgical integrity. Statistical analysis of the Energy Systems production data shows that the frit vent manufacturing yield is 91%.

  11. The metallurgical integrity of the frit vent assembly diffusion bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, G. B.

    1994-06-01

    Iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS's) are now being made by Energy Systems at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. These CVS's are being made for the US Department of Energy's (NE-53) General Purpose Heat Source- Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) program, which is to supply electrical power for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn. A GPHS-RTG has 72 CVS'. Each CVS encapsulates one (238)PuO2 fuel pellet. The helium gas produced from the alpha decay of the (238)Pu is vented through a nominal 0.45-mm-diam hole in the vent cup of each CVS. A frit vent assembly that is electron beam welded over the vent hole allows helium gas to escape but prevents plutonia fines from exiting. The metallurgical integrity of frit vent assemblies produced by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) were compared with those produced earlier by EG&G-Mound Applied Technology, Inc. (EG&G-MAT). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs were taken (at magnifications of from 126x to 1,000x) of the starting frit vent powder and the diffusion-bonded powder in finished frit vent assemblies produced by Energy Systems and EG&G-MAT. Frit vent assemblies also were metallographically prepared and visually examined/photographed at magnifications of from 50x to 1,000x. The SEM and metallographic examinations of the particle-to-particle and particle-to-foil component diffusion bonds indicated that the Energy Systems-produced and EG&G-MAT-produced frit vent assemblies have comparable metallurgical integrity. Statistical analysis of the Energy Systems production data shows that the frit vent manufacturing yield is 91%.

  12. Effectiveness of bonded and vacuum-formed retainers: A prospective randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Niamh; Albeedh, Hussein; Sharma, Pratik; Johal, Ama

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this prospective trial was to compare the clinical effectiveness of bonded retainers with vacuum-formed retainers, in terms of maintaining the results of orthodontic treatment in the lower arch up to 18 months post debond. This was a hospital-based, prospective randomized controlled clinical trial in which a total of 82 subjects were randomly allocated using a computer-generated number sequence to 1 of 2 groups, receiving either a vacuum-formed retainer (Essix Ace plastic (120 mm; DENTSPLY Raintree Essix, Sarasota, Fla) or a bonded retainer (0.0175 coaxial archwire (Ortho-Care, UK, Shipley, United Kingdom) bonded in place with Transbond LR (3M United Kingdom, Brachnell, United Kingdom) for the mandibular arch. Each number was placed in an opaque, concealed envelope and chosen randomly by the study subject; this determined the allocation group. Eligibility criteria included patients nearing debond after treatment with 0.022 × 0.028-in slot size preadjusted edgewise fixed orthodontic appliances whose pretreatment records and study models were available to confirm pretreatment labial segment crowding or spacing and who had clinically acceptable alignment at the end of treatment. The main outcome was to investigate the clinical effectiveness of the 2 types of retainers in terms of changes in incisor irregularity at 6 months of retention. The following measurements were recorded at each time point (6, 12, and 18 months) with a digital caliper: Little's irregularity index, intercanine width, intermolar width, arch length, and extraction site opening. Blinding was applicable only at debond because of the permanence of 1 intervention. The 2 groups were well matched with respect to age, sex, clinical characteristics, and treatment plans. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups for changes in Little's irregularity index at 6 months, with the vacuum-formed retainer group showing greater changes than the bonded retainer

  13. Implementation of various vacuum conditions in sealed chambers for wafer-level bonding by using embedded cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.-W.; Liang, K.-C.; Chu, C.-H.; Fang, W.

    2017-01-01

    The existing foundry processes enable the fabrication and integration of various sensors on a single chip. However, various vacuum conditions of these sensors remain a critical concern after packaging. For example, accelerometers and gyroscopes are operated under two different vacuum conditions. This study extends the concept of using outgassing to realize sealed chambers under different vacuum conditions in one wafer-level bonding step. In other words, by etching various numbers and sizes of cavities on a substrate, the vacuum condition of a sealed chamber can be modulated. In applications, resonators and Pirani gauges were fabricated and characterized to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed process scheme. The vacuum condition of the sealed chambers was then monitored using the quality factor (detected by resonators) and the pressure (measured by Pirani gauges). The measurements indicate that the sealed chambers with vacuum conditions ranging from approximately 2 to 180 mbar were simultaneously fabricated and integrated on the same wafer. This approach could facilitate the monolithic integration of devices with different vacuum requirements, such as approximately 100 mbar chamber pressure for accelerometers, and single-digit millibars vacuum conditions for gyroscopes.

  14. Liquid phase diffusion bonding of A1070 by using metal formate coated Zn sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, K.; Koyama, S.; shohji, I.

    2017-05-01

    Aluminium alloy have high strength and easily recycle due to its low melting point. Therefore, aluminium is widely used in the manufacturing of cars and electronic devices. In recent years, the most common way for bonding aluminium alloy is brazing and friction stir welding. However, brazing requires positional accuracy and results in the formation of voids by the flax residue. Moreover, aluminium is an excellent heat radiating and electricity conducting material; therefore, it is difficult to bond together using other bonding methods. Because of these limitations, liquid phase diffusion bonding is considered to the suitable method for bonding aluminium at low temperature and low bonding pressure. In this study, the effect of metal formate coating processing of zinc surface on the bond strength of the liquid phase diffusion bonded interface of A1070 has been investigated by SEM observation of the interfacial microstructures and fractured surfaces after tensile test. Liquid phase diffusion bonding was carried out under a nitrogen gas atmosphere at a bonding temperature of 673 K and 713 K and a bonding load of 6 MPa (bonding time: 15 min). As a result of the metal formate coating processing, a joint having the ultimate tensile strength of the base aluminium was provided. It is hypothesized that this is because metallic zinc is generated as a result of thermal decomposition of formate in the bonded interface at lower bonding temperatures.

  15. Leakage rates and thermal requirements for the diffusion bonding of microchannel arrays via internal convective heating

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Sumantra; Palo, Daniel R.; Paul, Brian

    2007-07-24

    Diffusion bonding cycle times can be a large cost factor in the production of metal microchannel devices. The challenge is to significantly minimize this cost by reducing the bonding cycle time through rapid and uniform heating and cooling within the bonding process. Heating rates in diffusion bonding processes are typically limited by the need to minimize thermal gradients during bonding. A novel method is described which takes advantage of the internal flow passages within microchannel devices for convective heat transfer during the bonding process. The internal convective heating (ICH) technique makes use of heated inert gas to provide the microchannel assembly with rapid and uniform heat input. This paper will demonstrate the ability to effectively diffusion bond microchannel laminae using the ICH method by investigating the leakage rates.

  16. Effect of Sn Alloying on the Diffusion Bonding Behavior of Al-Mg-Si Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atabay, Sıla Ece; Esen, Ziya; Dericioglu, Arcan F.

    2017-07-01

    Effect of Sn as an alloying element on the diffusion-bonding behavior of Al-Mg-Si alloy has been studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mechanical testing of the diffusion-bonded joint. XRD results revealed the formation of Mg2Sn and (Sn) phases during solidification following induction casting. DSC results showed local liquid (Sn) formation during the bonding process for Sn-containing alloys, where its amount was found to be increasing with the increasing Sn content. Results revealed that Sn addition leads to an increase in the bond shear strength of the diffusion-bonded joints and elimination of the irregularities formed on the bonded interface. Fractured surfaces showed that formation of (Sn) layer at the bonded interface causes the fracture to transform from the ductile to the mixed fracture mode.

  17. Light-induced hydrogen evolution from hydrogenated amorphous silicon: Hydrogen diffusion by formation of bond centered hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, H.; Arai, H.; Mizubayashi, H.; Yamanaka, M.; Sakata, I.

    2014-02-01

    The light-induced hydrogen evolution (LIHE) from amorphous (a-) Si:H by the order of at. % is observed during white light soaking (WLS) of 100-400 mW/cm2 at 350-500 K or ultra violet light soaking (UVLS) of 30-120 mW/cm2 at 305-320 K in a vacuum. The thermal desorption spectroscopy indicates that LIHE originated from bonded hydrogen takes place through the diffusion of light-induced mobile hydrogen (LIMH) with the activation energy of 0.5 eV. LIMH is assigned to bond centered hydrogen and the hydrogen diffusion process becomes prominent when LIMH can leave from a-Si:H such under light soaking in a vacuum above room temperature. For H2 in microvoids, the hydrogen evolution rate is governed by the surface barrier and its activation energy of 1.0 eV in dark decreases to 0.4 eV under WLS or UVLS.

  18. Wafer level vacuum packaging of scanning micro-mirrors using glass-frit and anodic bonding methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langa, S.; Drabe, C.; Kunath, C.; Dreyhaupt, A.; Schenk, H.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper the authors report about the six inch wafer level vacuum packaging of electro-statically driven two dimensional micro-mirrors. The packaging was done by means of two types of wafer bonding methods: anodic and glass frit. The resulting chips after dicing are 4 mm wide, 6 mm long and 1.6 mm high and the residual pressure inside the package after dicing was estimated to be between 2 and 20 mbar. This allowed us to reduce the driving voltage of the micro-mirrors by more than 40% compared to the driving voltage without vacuum packaging. The vacuum stability after 5 months was verified by measurement using the so called "membrane method". Persistence of the vacuum was proven. No getter materials were used for packaging.

  19. Ultrasonically Activated Diffusion Bonding for Fluidic Control Assembly

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-02-01

    costs can be exceptionally low due to brief bonding time, low energy consumption, and freedom from special atmospheres or temperatures during bonding...bond energy 9 2. Ultrasonic bond energy density for aluminum foil 2.1 3. Load and reverse power ratios versus load impedance 15 4...ultrasonic energy input .... 46 11. Array of 5-mil etched laminates as assembled for active element tests 53 12. Top and bottom views of

  20. The application of diffusion bonding in the manufacture of aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, J. A.

    Rolls-Royce has developed and optimized diffusion bonding processes for the manufacture of advanced titanium alloy aeroengine structures and components. Both categories of the joining technique - 'liquid-phase' and 'solid-state' - are being applied in the production of both static fabrications and complex rotating parts. In order to utilize diffusion bonding processes in a production environment, the process parameters which contribute to consistent formation of joints of the required strength have been critically examined. Process variables include temperature, pressure, time, surface roughness and, in the case of liquid-phase diffusion bonding, interlayer composition, density and thickness. Mechanical testing (tensile, impact and fatigue) complemented by metallography has predominantly been used to identify the permitted variations in the processes for the realistic and economical production manufacture of high quality lightweight aeroengine fabrications. The development of a high integrity bond via optimized diffusion bonding processes has been fundamental to the development of Rolls-Royce's unique wide chord fan design concept.

  1. Developing A Laser Shockwave Model For Characterizing Diffusion Bonded Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Barry H. Rabin

    2014-07-01

    12. Other advances in QNDE and related topics: Preferred Session Laser-ultrasonics Developing A Laser Shockwave Model For Characterizing Diffusion Bonded Interfaces 41st Annual Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation Conference QNDE Conference July 20-25, 2014 Boise Centre 850 West Front Street Boise, Idaho 83702 James A. Smith, Jeffrey M. Lacy, Barry H. Rabin, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID ABSTRACT: The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) which is assigned with reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU. The new LEU fuel is based on a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to complete the fuel qualification process, the laser shock technique is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being investigated to characterize interface strength in fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on specimen’s surface is intractably complex. The shock wave energy is inferred from the velocity on the backside and the depth of the impression left on the surface from the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses and strengths at the interface, a finite element model is being developed and validated by comparing numerical and experimental results for back face velocities and front face depressions with experimental results. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop a finite element model for laser

  2. A three-mask process for fabricating vacuum-sealed capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers using anodic bonding.

    PubMed

    Yamaner, F Yalçın; Zhang, Xiao; Oralkan, Ömer

    2015-05-01

    This paper introduces a simplified fabrication method for vacuum-sealed capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays using anodic bonding. Anodic bonding provides the established advantages of wafer-bondingbased CMUT fabrication processes, including process simplicity, control over plate thickness and properties, high fill factor, and ability to implement large vibrating cells. In addition to these, compared with fusion bonding, anodic bonding can be performed at lower processing temperatures, i.e., 350°C as opposed to 1100°C; surface roughness requirement for anodic bonding is more than 10 times more relaxed, i.e., 5-nm rootmean- square (RMS) roughness as opposed to 0.5 nm for fusion bonding; anodic bonding can be performed on smaller contact area and hence improves the fill factor for CMUTs. Although anodic bonding has been previously used for CMUT fabrication, a CMUT with a vacuum cavity could not have been achieved, mainly because gas is trapped inside the cavities during anodic bonding. In the approach we present in this paper, the vacuum cavity is achieved by opening a channel in the plate structure to evacuate the trapped gas and subsequently sealing this channel by conformal silicon nitride deposition in the vacuum environment. The plate structure of the fabricated CMUT consists of the single-crystal silicon device layer of a silicon-on-insulator wafer and a thin silicon nitride insulation layer. The presented fabrication approach employs only three photolithographic steps and combines the advantages of anodic bonding with the advantages of a patterned metal bottom electrode on an insulating substrate, specifically low parasitic series resistance and low parasitic shunt capacitance. In this paper, the developed fabrication scheme is described in detail, including process recipes. The fabricated transducers are characterized using electrical input impedance measurements in air and hydrophone measurements in immersion. A representative

  3. A Batch Wafer Scale LIGA Assembly and Packaging Technique vai Diffusion Bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, T.R.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-27

    A technique using diffusion bonding (or solid-state welding) has been used to achieve batch fabrication of two- level nickel LIGA structures. Interlayer alignment accuracy of less than 1 micron is achieved using press-fit gauge pins. A mini-scale torsion tester was built to measure the diffusion bond strength of LIGA formed specimens that has shown successful bonding at temperatures of 450"C at 7 ksi pressure with bond strength greater than 100 Mpa. Extensions to this basic process to allow for additional layers and thereby more complex assemblies as well as commensurate packaging are discussed.

  4. Process optimization for diffusion bonding of tungsten with EUROFER97 using a vanadium interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basuki, Widodo Widjaja; Aktaa, Jarir

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state diffusion bonding is a selected joining technology to bond divertor components consisting of tungsten and EUROFER97 for application in fusion power plants. Due to the large mismatch in their coefficient of thermal expansions, which leads to serious thermally induced residual stresses after bonding, a thin vanadium plate is introduced as an interlayer. However, the diffusion of carbon originated from EUROFER97 in the vanadium interlayer during the bonding process can form a vanadium carbide layer, which has detrimental influences on the mechanical properties of the joint. For optimal bonding results, the thickness of this layer and the residual stresses has to be decreased sufficiently without a significant reduction of material transport especially at the vanadium/tungsten interface, which can be achieved by varying the diffusion bonding temperature and duration. The investigation results show that at a sufficiently low bonding temperature of 700 °C and a bonding duration of 4 h, the joint reaches a reasonable high ductility and toughness especially at elevated test temperature of 550 °C with elongation to fracture of 20% and mean absorbed Charpy impact energy of 2 J (using miniaturized Charpy impact specimens). The strength of the bonded materials is about 332 MPa at RT and 291 MPa at 550 °C. Furthermore, a low bonding temperature of 700 °C can also help to avoid the grain coarsening and the alteration of the grain structure especially of the EUROFER97 close to the bond interface.

  5. Diffusion Bonding of Microduplex Stainless Steel and Ti Alloy with and without Interlayer: Interface Microstructure and Strength Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, S.; Sam, S.; Mishra, B.; Chatterjee, S.

    2014-01-01

    The interface microstructure and strength properties of solid state diffusion bonding of microduplex stainless steel (MDSS) to Ti alloy (TiA) with and without a Ni alloy (NiA) intermediate material were investigated at 1173 K (900 °C) for 0.9 to 5.4 ks in steps of 0.9 ks in vacuum. The effects of bonding time on the microstructure of the bonded joint have been analyzed by light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy in the backscattered mode. In the direct bonded joints of MDSS and TiA, the layer-wise σ phase and the λ + FeTi phase mixture were observed at the bond interface when the joint was processed for 2.7 ks and above holding times. However, when NiA was used as an intermediate material, the results indicated that TiNi3, TiNi, and Ti2Ni are formed at the NiA-TiA interface, and the irregular shaped particles of Fe22Mo20Ni45Ti13 have been observed within the TiNi3 intermetallic layer. The stainless steel-NiA interface is free from intermetallics and the layer of austenitic phase was observed at the stainless steel side. A maximum tensile strength of ~520 MPa, shear strength of ~405 MPa, and impact toughness of ~18 J were obtained for the directly bonded joint when processed for 2.7 ks. However, when nickel base alloy was used as an intermediate material in the same materials, the bond tensile and shear strengths increase to ~640 and ~479 MPa, respectively, and the impact toughness to ~21 J when bonding was processed for 4.5 ks. Fracture surface observations in scanning electron microscopy using energy dispersive spectroscopy demonstrate that in MDSS-TiA joints, failure takes place through the FeTi + λ phase when bonding was processed for 2.7 ks; however, failure takes place through σ phase for the diffusion joints processed for 3.6 ks and above processing times. However, in MDSS-NiA-TiA joints, the fracture takes place through NiTi2 layer at the NiA-TiA interface for all bonding times.

  6. Effect of Dynamic Recrystallization on Diffusion Bonding of Ni3Al Intermetallic Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Yuichiro; Minamino, Yoritoshi; Inui, Yasuhiro

    Diffusion bonding of B-doped Ni3Al polycrystals with various grain sizes was performed under various conditions with bonding pressures of 29-147MPa, bonding temperatures of 1173-1323K and bonding times of 0.12-3.6ks. The influences of the bonding conditions on the bond strength and the configurations of the fracture surfaces were investigated focusing on the microstructure near the bonding interface. The bond strength increased with increasing bonding pressure and increasing bonding temperature. On the other hand, the bond strength was almost independent of the bonding time. Moreover, the bond strength was higher as the grain size was smaller. The fracture surfaces of the specimen broken at the bonding interface were composed of two kinds of areas with different configurations. One had rugged configuration with a height of tens micrometers, and another had flat and smooth configuration. The area fraction of the rugged area tended to be larger in the fracture surfaces of the specimens exhibiting higher bond strength. The formation of the rugged fracture surface was attributed to the migration of the bonding interface accompanying the dynamic recrystallization in the bonding process and the fracture along the migrated interface by the observation of microstructure near the interface. The relationship between the bond strength and the distribution of the rugged fracture surface indicated that the increase in the bond strength was mainly due to the relief of the stress concentration at the triple junctions on the bonding interface by the change in the configuration of bonding interface.

  7. In-process oxidation protection in fluxless brazing or diffusion bonding of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.; Featherston, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    Aluminum is cleaned of its oxide coating and is sealed immediately with polymeric material which makes it suitable for fluxless brazing or diffusion bonding. Time involved between cleaning and brazing is no longer critical factor.

  8. Diffusion bonding and its application to manufacturing. [for joining of metal parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurgeon, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    In its simplest form diffusion bonding is accomplished by placing clean metal surfaces together under a sufficient load and heating. The natural interatomic attractive force between atoms transforms the interface into a natural grain boundary. Therefore, in principle, the properties of the bond area are identical to those of the parent metal. Other advantages of diffusion bonding over conventional methods of bonding include freedom from residual stresses, excessive deformation, foreign metals, or changed crystal structures. Stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, and aluminum alloys have all been successfully joined. Complex hardware, including integrated flueric devices, jet engine servovalves, and porous woven structures have been fabricated. The processing involved is discussed, along with such theoretical considerations as the role of metal surfaces, the formation of metal contact junctions, and the mechanisms of material transport in diffusion bonding.

  9. Method of fluxless brazing and diffusion bonding of aluminum containing components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Featherston, A. B.; Okelly, K. P. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method of diffusion bonding and fluxless brazing of aluminum containing components is reported. The aluminum surfaces are freed of any aluminum oxide coating and are coated with a polymeric sealer which can be thermally removed leaving essentially no residue. The polymeric sealer is being removed in a substantially oxygen free environment, and the aluminum components are then being brazed or diffusion bonded without the use of a flux to remove oxide coating.

  10. MRI-guided breast vacuum biopsy: Localization of the lesion without contrast-agent application using diffusion-weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Berger, Nicole; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Boss, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    In magnetic resonance-guided breast vacuum biopsies, the contrast agent for targeting suspicious lesions can typically be applied only once during an intervention, due to the slow elimination of the gadolinium chelate from the extracellular fluid space. This study evaluated the feasibility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for lesion targeting in vacuum assisted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biopsies. DWI may be used as an alternative to dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with the advantage of reproducibility. However, the targeted lesion requires the characteristics of a mass-like lesion, substantial diffusion restriction, and a minimum size of approximately 1cm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The fabrication of all-silicon micro gas chromatography columns using gold diffusion eutectic bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radadia, A. D.; Salehi-Khojin, A.; Masel, R. I.; Shannon, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Temperature programming of gas chromatography (GC) separation columns accelerates the elution rate of chemical species through the column, increasing the speed of analysis, and hence making it a favorable technique to speedup separations in microfabricated GCs (micro-GC). Temperature-programmed separations would be preferred in an all-silicon micro-column compared to a silicon-Pyrex® micro-column given that the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of silicon is 2 orders of magnitude higher than Pyrex®. This paper demonstrates how to fabricate all-silicon micro-columns that can withstand the temperature cycling required for temperature-programmed separations. The columns were sealed using a novel bonding process where they were first bonded using a gold eutectic bond, then annealed at 1100 °C to allow gold diffusion into silicon and form what we call a gold diffusion eutectic bond. The gold diffusion eutectic-bonded micro-columns when examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) and blade insertion techniques showed bonding strength comparable to the previously reported anodic-bonded columns. Gas chromatography-based methane injections were also used as a novel way to investigate proper sealing between channels. A unique methane elution peak at various carrier gas inlet pressures demonstrated the suitability of gold diffusion eutectic-bonded channels as micro-GC columns. The application of gold diffusion eutectic-bonded all-silicon micro-columns to temperature-programmed separations (120 °C min-1) was demonstrated with the near-baseline separation of n-C6 to n-C12 alkanes in 35 s.

  12. Diffusion bonding of beryllium to CuCrZr for ITER applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Cadden, Charles H.; Puskar, Joseph David; Goods, Steven Howard

    2008-08-01

    Low temperature diffusion bonding of beryllium to CuCrZr was investigated for fusion reactor applications. Hot isostatic pressing was accomplished using various metallic interlayers. Diffusion profiles suggest that titanium is effective at preventing Be-Cu intermetallics. Shear strength measurements suggest that acceptable results were obtained at temperatures as low as 540C.

  13. TEM Analysis of Diffusion-Bonded Silicon Carbide Ceramics Joined Using Metallic Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozaki, T.; Tsuda, H.; Halbig, M. C.; Singh, M.; Hasegawa, Y; Mori, S.; Asthana, R.

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) is a promising material for thermostructural applications due to its excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, oxidation resistance, and thermal stability. However, joining and integration technologies are indispensable for this material in order to fabricate large size and complex shape components with desired functionalities. Although diffusion bonding techniques using metallic interlayers have been commonly utilized to bond various SiC ceramics, detailed microstructural observation by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of the bonded area has not been carried out due to difficulty in preparing TEM samples. In this study, we tried to prepare TEM samples from joints of diffusion bonded SiC ceramics by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) system and carefully investigated the interfacial microstructure by TEM analysis. The samples used in this study were SiC fiber bonded ceramics (SA-Tyrannohex: SA-THX) diffusion bonded with metallic interlayers such as Ti, TiMo, Mo-B and TiCu. In this presentation, we report the microstructure of diffusion bonded SA-THX mainly with TiCu interlayers obtained by TEM observations, and the influence of metallic interlayers on the joint microstructure and microhardness will be discussed.

  14. Foil Patches Seal Small Vacuum Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, Kirk W.; Reed, David W.

    1995-01-01

    Report discloses technique to patch holes in nickel-alloy rocket-engine nozzle parts prior to vacuum brazing. Technique involves lightly spot-welding nickel foil 0.002 in. thick over hole patched, then spot-welding corrosion-resistant steel foil of same thickness over nickel foil. Once patches subject to pressure and temperature of vacuum brazing, nickel foil diffuses to bond with nickel-alloy nozzle, making vacuum-tight seal.

  15. Foil Patches Seal Small Vacuum Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, Kirk W.; Reed, David W.

    1995-01-01

    Report discloses technique to patch holes in nickel-alloy rocket-engine nozzle parts prior to vacuum brazing. Technique involves lightly spot-welding nickel foil 0.002 in. thick over hole patched, then spot-welding corrosion-resistant steel foil of same thickness over nickel foil. Once patches subject to pressure and temperature of vacuum brazing, nickel foil diffuses to bond with nickel-alloy nozzle, making vacuum-tight seal.

  16. Diffusion bonding of a superplastic Inconel 718SPF superalloy by electroless nickel plating

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, M.S.; Chang, C.B.; Chuang, T.H.

    2000-02-01

    Although intimate contact can be obtained for diffusion bonding of a superplastic Inconel 718SPF superalloy under a low pressure of 7 MPa, the precipitates formed at the interface retarded achievement of a sound joint. The shear strength was only 41.5 MPa for an overlap length of 12 T (T = 1.3 mm, sheet thickness). The diffusion bondability of t his Inconel 718SPF superalloy was enhanced by electroless nickel plating. In this situation, the bonding shear strength increased to 70.4 MPa for the same overlap length of 12 T under the same bonding condition, regardless of the roughness of the surface to be bonded. Upon decreasing the overlap length from 12 to 6T, the bonding strength remained constant.

  17. Testing and modeling of diffusion bonded prototype optical windows under ITER conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, M.; Van Oost, G.; Degrieck, J.; De Baere, I.; Gusarov, A.; Gubbels, F.; Massaut, V.

    2011-07-01

    Glass-metal joints are a part of ITER optical diagnostics windows. These joints must be leak tight for the safety (presence of tritium in ITER) and to preserve the vacuum. They must also withstand the ITER environment: temperatures up to 220 deg.C and fast neutron fluxes of {approx}3.10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}.s. At the moment, little information is available about glass-metal joints suitable for ITER. Therefore, we performed mechanical and thermal tests on some prototypes of an aluminium diffusion bonded optical window. Finite element modeling with Abaqus code was used to understand the experimental results. The prototypes were helium leaking probably due to very tiny cracks in the interaction layer between the steel and the aluminium. However, they were all able to withstand a thermal cycling test up to 200 deg. C; no damage could be seen after the tests by visual inspection. The prototypes successfully passed push-out test with a 500 N load. During the destructive push-out tests the prototypes broke at a 6-12 kN load between the aluminium layer and the steel or the glass, depending on the surface quality of the glass. The microanalysis of the joints has also been performed. The finite element modeling of the push-out tests is in a reasonable agreement with the experiments. According to the model, the highest thermal stress is created in the aluminium layer. Thus, the aluminium joint seems to be the weakest part of the prototypes. If this layer is improved, it will probably make the prototype helium leak tight and as such, a good ITER window candidate. (authors)

  18. Vibrational spectral diffusion and hydrogen bond dynamics in heavy water from first principles.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Bhabani S; Semparithi, A; Chandra, Amalendu

    2008-06-12

    We present a first-principles theoretical study of vibrational spectral diffusion and hydrogen bond dynamics in heavy water without using any empirical model potentials. The calculations are based on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for trajectory generation and a time series analysis using the wavelet method for frequency calculations. It is found that, in deuterated water, although a one-to-one relation does not exist between the instantaneous frequency of an OD bond and the distance of its associated hydrogen bond, such a relation does hold on average. The dynamics of spectral diffusion is investigated by means of frequency-time correlation and spectral hole dynamics calculations. Both of these functions are found to have a short-time decay with a time scale of approximately 100 fs corresponding to dynamics of intact hydrogen bonds and a slower long-time decay with a time constant of approximately 2 ps corresponding to lifetimes of hydrogen bonds. The connection of the slower time scale to the dynamics of local structural relaxation is also discussed. The dynamics of hydrogen bond making is shown to have a rather fast time scale of approximately 100 fs; hence, it can also contribute to the short-time dynamics of spectral diffusion. A damped oscillation is also found at around 150-200 fs, which is shown to have come from underdamped intermolecular vibrations of a hydrogen-bonded water pair. Such assignments are confirmed by independent calculations of power spectra of intermolecular motion and hydrogen bond kinetics using the population correlation function formalism. The details of the time constants of frequency correlations and spectral shifts are found to depend on the frequencies of chosen OD bonds and are analyzed in terms of the dynamics of hydrogen bonds of varying strengths and also of free non-hydrogen-bonded OD groups.

  19. Enhanced nonlinear inspection of diffusion bonded interfaces using reflected non-collinear ultrasonic wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B.; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic wave mixing has shown promising potential for assessing otherwise hidden subtle imperfections in imperfect diffusion bonds between Ti-6Al-4V components. When interrogating a diffusion bonded specimen using non-collinear shear wave mixing, both bulk and interface nonlinearity will contribute to the transmitted nonlinear signal. Although a recent study has shown that changing the transducer alignment can suppress the intrinsic nonlinearity of the surrounding material to some extent so that the interface nonlinearity could be detected more selectively, it is still difficult to distinguish different levels of bond quality based on the detected transmitted signal only. Analytical and numerical studies showed that an imperfect interface generates the same amount of nonlinear displacement in the reflected and transmitted fields. In this study, we used the reflected nonlinear interface signature to characterize diffusion bonded interfaces. Our results indicate that it is better to use the reflected nonlinear interface signature to assess the bond quality, which is in agreement with our previous analytical and numerical predictions. However, the observed random phase of the reflected signature indicates that existing nonlinear interface models are insufficient for accurately describing the nonlinear interaction of shear incident waves with high-quality diffusion bonded interfaces.

  20. The effect of hydrogen bonds on diffusion mechanism of water inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qu; Wang, Qi; Liu, Ying-Chun; Wu, Tao

    2014-06-01

    Nanopores can serve as a molecule channel for transport of fluid, where water diffusion differs remarkably from that of simple particles. Hydrogen bonds play an essential role in the diffusion anomaly. Detailed investigations are carried out on the systems of rigid (6, 6), (7, 7), (8, 8), (9, 9), and (10, 10) armchair carbon nanotubes, solvated with Lennard-Jones water fluids. The role of hydrogen bonds is examined by diffusivity statistics and animation snapshots. It is found that in small (6,6) CNT, hydrogen bonds tend to aggregate water into a wire and lead to rapid collective drift. Confinement can stabilize the hydrogen bond of water molecules and enhance its lifetime. In relatively smaller CNTs, the diffusion mechanism could be altered by the temperature. Moreover, in larger nanotubes hydrogen bonding network allows the water to form regional concentrated clusters. This allows water fluid in extremely low density exhibit rather slow self-diffusion motion. This fundamental study attempts to provide insights in understanding nanoscale delivery system in aqueous solution.

  1. The effect of hydrogen bonds on diffusion mechanism of water inside single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qu; Wang, Qi; Liu, Ying-Chun; Wu, Tao

    2014-06-07

    Nanopores can serve as a molecule channel for transport of fluid, where water diffusion differs remarkably from that of simple particles. Hydrogen bonds play an essential role in the diffusion anomaly. Detailed investigations are carried out on the systems of rigid (6, 6), (7, 7), (8, 8), (9, 9), and (10, 10) armchair carbon nanotubes, solvated with Lennard-Jones water fluids. The role of hydrogen bonds is examined by diffusivity statistics and animation snapshots. It is found that in small (6,6) CNT, hydrogen bonds tend to aggregate water into a wire and lead to rapid collective drift. Confinement can stabilize the hydrogen bond of water molecules and enhance its lifetime. In relatively smaller CNTs, the diffusion mechanism could be altered by the temperature. Moreover, in larger nanotubes hydrogen bonding network allows the water to form regional concentrated clusters. This allows water fluid in extremely low density exhibit rather slow self-diffusion motion. This fundamental study attempts to provide insights in understanding nanoscale delivery system in aqueous solution.

  2. Fatigue and Impact Strength of Diffusion Bonded Titanium Alloy Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    specimen was machined to give either a Rolls-Royce rotating bend fatigue test piece or a Hounsfield impact test piece with the bond- line at the middle...specimens were machined to give Hounsfield impact test pieces. One of the metallographic specimens was also used for microhardness and electron probe...8217high’ void level condition was 3..:i lower than that of the controls. The Hounsfield impact values obtained for the 12.7 mm dia specimens (Fig 4

  3. Design and fabrication of high performance wafer-level vacuum packaging based on glass-silicon-glass bonding techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinwen; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Jilong; Yang, Huabing

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a high performance wafer-level vacuum packaging technology based on GSG triple-layer sealing structure for encapsulating large mass inertial MEMS devices fabricated by silicon-on-glass bulk micromachining technology is presented. Roughness controlling strategy of bonding surfaces was proposed and described in detail. Silicon substrate was thinned and polished by CMP after the first bonding with the glass substrate and was then bonded with the glass micro-cap. Zr thin film was embedded into the concave of the micro-cap by a shadow-mask technique. The glass substrate was thinned to about 100 µm, wet etched through and metalized for realizing vertical feedthrough. During the fabrication, all patterning processes were operated carefully so as to reduce extrusive fragments to as little as possible. In addition, a high-performance micro-Pirani vacuum gauge was integrated into the package for monitoring the pressure and the leak rate further. The result shows that the pressure in the package is about 120 Pa and has no obvious change for more than one year indicating 10-13 stdcc s-1 leak rate.

  4. Diffusion bonding titanium to stainless steel using Nb/Cu/Ni multi-interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Li Peng; Li Jinglong; Xiong Jiangtao; Zhang Fusheng; Raza, Syed Hamid

    2012-06-15

    By using Nb/Cu/Ni structure as multi-interlayer, diffusion bonding titanium to austenitic stainless steel has been conducted. The effects of bonding temperature and bonding time on the interfacial microstructure were analyzed by scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive spectroscope, and the joint strength was evaluated by tensile test. The results showed that Ni atoms aggregated at the Cu-Nb interface, which promoted Cu solution in Nb. This phenomenon forms a Cu-Nb solution strengthening effect. However, such effect would decay by using long bonding time that dilutes Ni atom aggregation, or be suppressed by using high bonding temperature that embrittles the Cu-Nb interface due to the formation of large grown intermetallic compounds. The sound joint was obtained by promoted parameters as 850 Degree-Sign C for 30-45 min, under which a bonding strength around 300 MPa could be obtained. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium was diffusion bonded to stainless steel using Nb/Cu/Ni multi-interlayer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of bonding parameters on microstructure and joint strength were studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nickel aggregation promotes Cu solution in Nb which can strengthen the joint. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sound joint with strength of around 300 MPa was obtained by promoted parameters.

  5. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide for a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Lean Direct Injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, James D.

    2006-01-01

    Robust approaches for joining silicon carbide (SiC) to silicon carbide sub-elements have been developed for a micro-electro-mechanical systems lean direct injector (MEMS LDI) application. The objective is to join SiC sub-elements to form a leak-free injector that has complex internal passages for the flow and mixing of fuel and air. Previous bonding technology relied upon silicate glass interlayers that were not uniform or leak free. In a newly developed joining approach, titanium foils and physically vapor deposited titanium coatings were used to form diffusion bonds between SiC materials during hot pressing. Microscopy results show the formation of well adhered diffusion bonds. Initial tests show that the bond strength is much higher than required for the component system. Benefits of the joining technology are fabrication of leak free joints with high temperature and mechanical capability.

  6. Joint design for improved fatigue life of diffusion-bonded box-stiffened panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. C.; Moses, P. L.; Kanenko, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Simple photoelastic models were used to identify a cross-section geometry that would eliminate the severe stress concentrations at the bond line between box stiffeners diffusion bonded to a panel skin. Experimental fatigue-test data from titanium test specimens quantified the allowable stress in terms of cycle life for various joint geometries. It is shown that the effect of stress concentration is reduced and an acceptable fatigue life is achieved.

  7. Reaction-diffusion analysis for one-step plasma etching and bonding of microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rosso, Michel; Steijn, Volkert van; Smet, Louis C. P. M. de; Sudhoelter, Ernst J. R.; Kreutzer, Michiel T.; Kleijn, Chris R.

    2011-04-25

    A self-similar reaction front develops in reactive ion etching when the ions penetrate channels of shallow height h. This relates to the patterning of microchannels using a single-step etching and bonding, as described by Rhee et al. [Lab Chip 5, 102 (2005)]. Experimentally, we report that the front location scales as x{sub f{approx}}ht{sup 1/2} and the width is time-invariant and scales as {delta}{approx}h. Mean-field reaction-diffusion theory and Knudsen diffusion give a semiquantitative understanding of these observations and allow optimization of etching times in relation to bonding requirements.

  8. Influence of Hydrogen Bonding on the Surface Diffusion of Molecular Glasses: Comparison of Three Triazines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinshan; Zhu, Men; Laventure, Audrey; Lebel, Olivier; Ediger, M D; Yu, Lian

    2017-07-27

    Surface grating decay measurements have been performed on three closely related molecular glasses to study the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonds on surface diffusion. The three molecules are derivatives of bis(3,5-dimethyl-phenylamino)-1,3,5-triazine and differ only in the functional group R at the 2-position, with R being C2H5, OCH3, and NHCH3, and referred to as "Et", "OMe", and "NHMe", respectively. Of the three molecules, NHMe forms more extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds than Et and OMe and was found to have slower surface diffusion. For Et and OMe, surface diffusion is so fast that it replaces viscous flow as the mechanism of surface grating decay as temperature is lowered. In contrast, no such transition was observed for NHMe under the same conditions, indicating significantly slower surface diffusion. This result is consistent with the previous finding that extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds slow down surface diffusion in molecular glasses and is attributed to the persistence of hydrogen bonds even in the surface environment. This result is also consistent with the lower stability of the vapor-deposited glass of NHMe relative to those of Et and OMe and supports the view that surface mobility controls the stability of vapor-deposited glasses.

  9. Hydrogen bonds and heat diffusion in α-helices: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Miño, German; Barriga, Raul; Gutierrez, Gonzalo

    2014-08-28

    Recent evidence has shown a correlation between the heat diffusion pathways and the known allosteric communication pathways in proteins. Allosteric communication in proteins is a central, yet unsolved, problem in biochemistry, and the study and characterization of the structural determinants that mediate energy transfer among different parts of proteins is of major importance. In this work, we characterized the role of hydrogen bonds in diffusivity of thermal energy for two sets of α-helices with different abilities to form hydrogen bonds. These hydrogen bonds can be a constitutive part of the α-helices or can arise from the lateral chains. In our in vacuo simulations, it was observed that α-helices with a higher possibility of forming hydrogen bonds also had higher rates of thermalization. Our simulations also revealed that heat readily flowed through atoms involved in hydrogen bonds. As a general conclusion, according to our simulations, hydrogen bonds fulfilled an important role in heat diffusion in structural patters of proteins.

  10. TEM Analysis of Interfaces in Diffusion-Bonded Silicon Carbide Ceramics Joined Using Metallic Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozaki, T.; Tsuda, H.; Halbig, M. C.; Singh, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Mori, S.; Asthana R.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) is a promising material for thermo-structural applications due to its excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, oxidation resistance, and thermal stability. However, joining and integration technologies are indispensable for this material in order to fabricate large size and complex shape components with desired functionalities. Although diffusion bonding techniques using metallic interlayers have been commonly utilized to bond various SiC ceramics, detailed microstructural observation by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of the bonded area has not been carried out due to difficulty in preparing TEM samples. In this study, we tried to prepare TEM samples from joints of diffusion bonded SiC ceramics by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) system and carefully investigated the interfacial microstructure by TEM analysis. The samples used in this study were SiC fiber bonded ceramics (SA-Tyrannohex: SA-THX) diffusion bonded with metallic interlayers such as Ti, TiMo, and Mo-B. In this presentation, the result of microstructural analysis obtained by TEM observations and the influence of metallic interlayers and fiber orientation of SA-THX on the joint microstructure will be discussed.

  11. Visible to vacuum-UV range optical absorption of oxygen dangling bonds in amorphous SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Skuja, Linards; Kajihara, Koichi; Hirano, Masahiro; Hosono, Hideo

    2011-11-15

    Synthetic silica glass with an optical absorption spectrum dominated by oxygen dangling bonds (nonbridging oxygen hole centers, or NBOHCs) and having negligible (<1%) contribution from the usually copresent Si dangling bonds (E'-centers), was prepared by room temperature ultraviolet photobleaching of high SiOH content (''wet'') silica, irradiated by F{sub 2} laser (7.9 eV) at T = 80 K. This allowed us to obtain the up-to-now controversial optical absorption spectrum of NBOHC in the ultraviolet and vacuum-ultraviolet (UV-VUV) region of the spectrum and to show that it is semicontinuous from 4 to 7.8 eV and cannot be represented by a pair of distinct Gaussian bands. Since NBOHC is one of the main UV-VUV range optical absorbers in silica, its spectral shape provides a tool to disentangle contributions of different color centers to optical losses in this spectral region.

  12. Effect of Bonding Temperature on Phase Transformation of Diffusion-Bonded Joints of Duplex Stainless Steel and Ti-6Al-4V Using Nickel and Copper as Composite Intermediate Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sukumar; Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Chatterjee, Subrata; Mishra, Brajendra

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, the effect of bonding temperature on phase transformation of diffusion-bonded joints of duplex stainless steel (DSS) and Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) using simultaneously both nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu) interlayers was investigated in the temperature range of 1148 K to 1223 K (875 °C to 950 °C) insteps of 25 K (25 °C) for 60 minutes under 4 MPa uniaxial pressure in vacuum. Interfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and interdiffusion of the chemical species across the diffusion interfaces were witnessed by electron probe microanalysis. At 1148 K (875 °C), layer-wise Cu4Ti, Cu2Ti, Cu4Ti3, CuTi, and CuTi2 phases were observed at the Cu-Ti64 interface; however, DSS-Ni and Ni-Cu interfaces were free from any intermetallic. At 1173 K and 1198 K (900 °C and 925 °C), Cu interlayer could not restrict the diffusion of atoms from Ti64 to Ni, and vice versa; and Ni-Ti-based intermetallics were formed at the Ni-Cu interface and throughout the Cu zone as well; however, at 1223 K (950 °C), both Ni and Cu interlayers could not inhibit the diffusion of atoms from Ti64 to DSS, and vice versa. The maximum shear strength of ~377 MPa was obtained for the diffusion couple processed at 1148 K (875 °C) and strength of the bonded joints gradually decreased with the increasing bonding temperature due to the widening of brittle intermetallics at the diffusion zone. Fracture path indicated that failure took place through the Cu4Ti intermetallic at the Cu-Ti64 interface when bonding was processed at 1148 K (875 °C). When bonding was processed at 1173 K and 1198 K (900 °C and 925 °C), fracture took place through the Ni3Ti intermetallic at the Ni-(Ni + Cu + Ti64 diffusion reaction) interface; however, at 1223 K (950 °C), fracture morphology indicated the brittle nature and the fracture took place apparently through the σ phase at the DSS-(DSS + Ni + Cu + Ti64 diffusion reaction) interface.

  13. Transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of Udimet 720 for Stirling power converter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittendorf, Donald L.; Baggenstoss, William G.

    1992-01-01

    Udimet 720 has been selected for use on Stirling power converters for space applications. Because Udimet 720 is generally considered susceptible to strain age cracking if traditional fusion welding is used, other joining methods are being considered. A process for transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of Udimet 720 has been theoretically developed in an effort to eliminate the strain age crack concern. This development has taken into account such variables as final grain size, joint homogenization, joint efficiency related to bonding aid material, bonding aid material application method, and thermal cycle.

  14. Directional diffusion and void formation at a Si (001) bonded wafer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esser, R. H.; Hobart, K. D.; Kub, F. J.

    2002-08-01

    Low-temperature hydrophobic bonding is an enabling technology allowing the fabrication of device structures. Current research into improvement of hydrophobic bonding has focused on the elimination of thermally generated voids. It has been observed that a regular grid etched into the bonding interface can eliminate the thermally generated voids. By manipulation of patterns etched into the bond interface, it was possible to ascertain that the diffusion of interfacial gasses that form the thermally generated voids is enhanced along the <110> directions. This is shown by an analysis of the void density at various locations in relation to the etched trenches at the bonded interface. Void density between trenches is shown to be 12% of the void density near trenches but nto along a <110> direction.

  15. Diffusion bonding of boron nitride on metal substrates by plasma activated sintering (PAS) process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, S.; Groza, J.R.; Yamazaki, K.; Sudarshan, T.S.

    1996-05-01

    Ceramic coatings have a considerable potential to be used as thermal barriers and improve corrosion and wear resistance of metallic materials at high temperatures. In particular, BN ceramics are excellent candidates for thermal barrier materials because they have superior corrosion and abrasion resistance, low thermal conductivity and high temperature stability. In general, above 1,273 K ceramics have better strength, creep oxidation resistance than metals or superalloys. It is well known that ceramic coatings are difficult to apply on metal substrates due to the different atomic bonding between ceramic and metals. To provide the expected protection, ceramic coating of metals must provide good interfacial bonding, suitable adherence and interface stability. These may be achieved by different processing approaches such as: diffusion bonding under pressure application, thermal spray or mechanical bonding. An alternative method may be sinter-bonding using P/M techniques such as hot isostatic pressing (HIP) when simultaneous sintering of ceramic powders and bonding onto the metal substrate can take place. The purpose of this present work is to verify the potential of the plasma assisted sintering (PAS) process to develop a good diffusion bonding between a BN ceramic layer and the metal substrate while sintering the ceramic layer. In contrast to HIP techniques, sintering and coating in PAS can be completed in a very short time (minutes as compared to hours) concurrent with an observed (not yet demonstrated) capability of particle surface cleaning by removing surface oxides or trapped gases.

  16. Maskless RGB color patterning of vacuum-deposited small molecule OLED displays by diffusion of luminescent dopant molecules.

    PubMed

    Kajiyama, Yoshitaka; Kajiyama, Koichi; Aziz, Hany

    2015-06-29

    A maskless RGB color patterning technique based on diffusion of luminescent dopant molecules is proposed here for vacuum-deposited small molecule OLED displays. The proposed maskless color patterning technique enables us to overcome challenging issues in OLED display manufacturing arising from shadow mask limitations. This approach utilizes selective diffusion of luminescent dopant molecules from a donor substrate to an acceptor substrate. Results show that sufficiently high doping levels can be achieved through this technique and that devices with performance similar to those produced by standard co-deposition can be easily produced. Red, green and blue OLEDs are successfully fabricated side by side on one substrate using this technique.

  17. The Breathing Orbital Valence Bond Method in Diffusion Monte Carlo: C-H Bond Dissociation ofAcetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Domin, D.; Braida, Benoit; Lester Jr., William A.

    2008-05-30

    This study explores the use of breathing orbital valence bond (BOVB) trial wave functions for diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC). The approach is applied to the computation of the carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond dissociation energy (BDE) of acetylene. DMC with BOVB trial wave functions yields a C-H BDE of 132.4 {+-} 0.9 kcal/mol, which is in excellent accord with the recommended experimental value of 132.8 {+-} 0.7 kcal/mol. These values are to be compared with DMC results obtained with single determinant trial wave functions, using Hartree-Fock orbitals (137.5 {+-} 0.5 kcal/mol) and local spin density (LDA) Kohn-Sham orbitals (135.6 {+-} 0.5 kcal/mol).

  18. Effect of Bonding Time on Interfacial Reaction and Mechanical Properties of Diffusion-Bonded Joint Between Ti-6Al-4V and 304 Stainless Steel Using Nickel as an Intermediate Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Kundu, Sukumar; Mishra, Brajendra; Chatterjee, Subrata

    2014-04-01

    In the current study, solid-state diffusion bonding between Ti-6Al-4V (TiA) and 304 stainless steel (SS) using pure nickel (Ni) of 200- μm thickness as an intermediate material was carried out in vacuum. Uniaxial compressive pressure and temperature were kept at 4 MPa and 1023 K (750 °C), respectively, and the bonding time was varied from 30 to 120 minutes in steps of 15 minutes. Scanning electron microscopy images, in backscattered electron mode, revealed the layerwise Ti-Ni-based intermetallics like either Ni3Ti or both Ni3Ti and NiTi at titanium alloy-nickel (TiA/Ni) interface, whereas nickel-stainless steel (Ni/SS) interface was free from intermetallic phases for all the joints. Chemical composition of the reaction layers was determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and confirmed by X-ray diffraction study. Maximum tensile strength of ~382 MPa along with ~3.7 pct ductility was observed for the joints processed for 60 minutes. It was found that the extent of diffusion zone at Ni/SS interface was greater than that of TiA/Ni interface. From the microhardness profile, fractured surfaces, and fracture path, it was demonstrated that the failure of the joints was initiated and propagated apparently at TiA/Ni interface near Ni3Ti intermetallic for bonding time less than 90 minutes, and through Ni for bonding time 90 minutes and greater.

  19. Role of Hydrogen-Bonding in Nonelectrolyte Diffusion through Dense Artificial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gary-Bobo, C. M.; DiPolo, R.; Solomon, A. K.

    1969-01-01

    The diffusion of two series of alcohols and amides through complex cellulose acetate membranes was studied. The thin dense part of these membranes behaves as a nonporous layer of low water content. In this layer, called the skin, the solute diffusion coefficients, ω, depend upon size, steric configuration, and the partition coefficient, K8, between membrane and bathing solution. From the experimental values of ω and K8, the over-all friction, f, experienced by the solutes in the membrane was computed. It was found that f depends upon the chemical nature of the solute and is related to hydrogen-bonding ability. In the coarse, porous layer of the cellulose acetate membrane, diffusion occurs mainly through aqueous channels. In this instance also the hydrogen-bonding ability of the solute seems to exercise a smaller but significant influence. PMID:5806595

  20. Influence of anatomical, physical, and mechanical properties of diffuse-porous hardwoods on moisture durability of bonded assemblies

    Treesearch

    Daniel J. Yelle; Ashley M. Stirgus

    2016-01-01

    Studying wood adhesive bond durability is challenging because wood is highly variable and heterogeneous at all length scales. In this study, three North American diffuse-porous hardwoods (hard maple, soft maple, and basswood) and their adhesively bonded as-semblies were exposed to wet and dry cyclic tests. Then, their den-sity differences were related to bond...

  1. Ambient-temperature creep failure of silver-aided diffusion bonds between steel

    SciTech Connect

    Henshall, G.A.; Kassner, M.E.; Rosen, R.S.

    1990-01-15

    It has long been known that thin (e.g., 1 {mu}m {minus} 1 mm) interlayer bonds between higher strength base materials may have high ultimate tensile or rupture strengths despite the relatively low strength of the filler metal. The high strength of the joint is due to the mechanical constraint provided by the stronger base metals which restricts transverse contraction of the interlayer. The constraint produces a triaxial state or stress and reduces the effective stress, thus reducing the tendency for the interlayer to plastically deform. Plasticity of the base metal reduces the constraint and decreases the strength of the bond. The purpose of this work was twofold. First, the validity of the base-metal- accelerated'' delayed-failure theory for bonds utilizing plastic base metals was checked. Creep-rupture tests were performed on diffusion-bonded specimens using silver interlayers deposited by planar-magnetron sputtering (PMS), a physical vapor-deposition process. The PMS process was preferred because of the superior quality and strength of the bond and because this modern low-temperature joining process is increasingly utilized for joining ceramic and composite materials. The role of plastic base metals in the fracture process was further investigated by conducting tensile-rupture tests of diffusion bonds made with stainless steel base metals of different yield strengths, and therefore different creep rates. The second purpose was to determine whether delayed failure occurs in interlayer bonds between elastic base metals, which do not creep over the range of applied stresses. This question is particularly relevant since many alloys, ceramics and composites fall within this category. Again, ambient and near-ambient temperature creep-rupture tests were performed at a variety of stresses below the UTS of the bond. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Effect of Bonding Temperature on Interfacial Reaction and Mechanical Properties of Diffusion-Bonded Joint Between Ti-6Al-4V and 304 Stainless Steel Using Nickel as an Intermediate Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Kundu, Sukumar; Mishra, Brajendra; Chatterjee, Subrata

    2014-04-01

    An investigation was carried out on the solid-state diffusion bonding between Ti-6Al-4V (TiA) and 304 stainless steel (SS) using pure nickel (Ni) of 200- μm thickness as an intermediate material prepared in vacuum in the temperature range from 973 K to 1073 K (700 °C to 800 °C) in steps of 298 K (25 °C) using uniaxial compressive pressure of 3 MPa and 60 minutes as bonding time. Scanning electron microscopy images, in backscattered electron mode, had revealed existence of layerwise Ti-Ni-based intermetallics such as either Ni3Ti or both Ni3Ti and NiTi at titanium alloy-nickel (TiA/Ni) interface, whereas nickel-stainless steel (Ni/SS) diffusion zone was free from intermetallic phases for all joints processed. Chemical composition of the reaction layers was determined in atomic percentage by energy dispersive spectroscopy and confirmed by X-ray diffraction study. Room-temperature properties of the bonded joints were characterized using microhardness evaluation and tensile testing. The maximum hardness value of ~800 HV was observed at TiA/Ni interface for the bond processed at 1073 K (800 °C). The hardness value at Ni/SS interface for all the bonds was found to be ~330 HV. Maximum tensile strength of ~206 MPa along with ~2.9 pct ductility was obtained for the joint processed at 1023 K (750 °C). It was observed from the activation study that the diffusion rate at TiA/Ni interface is lesser than that at the Ni/SS interface. From microhardness profile, fractured surfaces and fracture path, it was demonstrated that failure of the joints was initiated and propagated apparently at the TiA/Ni interface near Ni3Ti intermetallic phase.

  3. Development and analysis of diffusion bonding techniques for LBE-cooled spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, A. T.; Hosemann, P.; Maloy, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Spallation sources incorporating solid targets may be driven to utilize liquid metal coolants by neutronics or temperature concerns. If tungsten is chosen as the target material, it will require cladding given its poor performance under irradiation. One option to meet this need are ferritic/martensitic stainless steel alloys. This study investigates possible diffusion bonding techniques suitable to clad tungsten targets with HT9, a high chromium stainless steel familiar to the nuclear industry. A test bonding matrix was performed to identify bonding conditions and process parameters suitable for the three material systems of interest (HT9/Ta, HT9/W, and HT9/HT9). Temperatures of 900 and 1060 °C were investigated along with bonding pressures of 7 and 70 MPa. A nominal soak time of 3 h was used for all tests. Three interlayers were investigated: pure nickel, Ni-6P, and vanadium. Finally, different surface preparation techniques for the tungsten were explored in order to gage their effect on the bond quality. Following joining, the bonds were characterized using an array of microscopy and micromechanical techniques to determine the resulting interface character. The nickel and NiP coatings were found to stabilize austenite at the HT9 surface during bonding, while the vanadium remained generally inert given good solubility in each of the three systems. Intermetallic formation is also a significant concern at elevated bonding temperatures as FeTa, FeW, NiTa, and NiW each rapidly form during interdiffusion. Multiple failures were observed through crack propagation parallel to the interface along the intermetallic phases. Differing contraction rates among the base materials also resulted in brittle fracture within the tungsten during cooling from bonding temperatures. Bonding performed at 900 °C under 70 MPa for 3 h with the inclusion of a vanadium interlayer was found to be superior of the conditions explored in this work.

  4. Shrinkage-Stress Assisted Diffusion Bonds Between Titanium and Stainless Steel: A Novel Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, A. B.; Laik, A.; Kain, V.; Chakravartty, J. K.

    2016-10-01

    Diffusion bonding of high-strength titanium (Ti) to stainless steel (SS) (i.e., transition joint of lap configuration) is designed and assessed for the possible high-temperature, high-pressure applications for the nuclear power plant and chemical industries. The strength of annular joint is enhanced by providing grooves at the interface ensuring strength of the joint compatible to Ti. The optimized hot forming conditions are utilized to facilitate the flow of Ti to fill the grooves located at the interface on SS sleeve resulting in strong mechanical connection. The shrinkage stress developed due to differential contraction during cooling facilitates the diffusion bonding at the interfaces inside the grooves under relatively lower temperature. The present design concept results in the formation of low level of intermetallic compounds at the interface. The bond width containing the intermetallic compounds toward Ti side has been found to be less than that of the high-strength diffusion bonds as occasionally reported in the open published literatures.

  5. Bond lifetime and diffusion coefficient in colloids with short-range interactions.

    PubMed

    Ndong Mintsa, E; Germain, Ph; Amokrane, S

    2015-03-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the influence of short-range structures in the interaction potential between hard-sphere-like colloidal particles. Starting from model potentials and effective potentials in binary mixtures computed from the Ornstein-Zernike equations, we investigate the influence of the range and strength of a possible tail beyond the usual core repulsion or the presence of repulsive barriers. The diffusion coefficient and mean "bond" lifetimes are used as indicators of the effect of this structure on the dynamics. The existence of correlations between the variations of these quantities with the physical parameters is discussed to assess the interpretation of dynamics slowing down in terms of long-lived bonds. We also discuss the question of a universal behaviour determined by the second virial coefficient B ((2)) and the interplay of attraction and repulsion. While the diffusion coefficient follows the B ((2)) law for purely attractive tails, this is no longer true in the presence of repulsive barriers. Furthermore, the bond lifetime shows a dependence on the physical parameters that differs from that of the diffusion coefficient. This raises the question of the precise role of bonds on the dynamics slowing down in colloidal gels.

  6. Microstructural Characterization of Diffusion Bonds Assisted by Ni/Ti Nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, Sónia; Viana, Filomena; Sofia Ramos, A.; Teresa Vieira, M.; Vieira, Manuel F.

    2016-08-01

    The microstructure of similar and dissimilar diffusion bonds of metallic materials using reactive Ni/Ti interlayers was studied in this investigation. The base material surfaces were modified by sputter deposition of alternated Ni and Ti nanolayers. These nanolayers increase the diffusivity at the interface, enhancing the bonding process. Bonding experiments were performed at 800 °C under a pressure of 10 MPa with a bonding time of 60 min. The reaction zone was characterized by high-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Microstructural characterization reveals that similar (NiTi to NiTi and TiAl to TiAl) and dissimilar (NiTi to Ti6Al4V and TiAl to stainless steel) joints can be obtained successfully with Ni/Ti reactive nanolayers. The interfaces are thin (<10 µm) and their microstructure (thickness and number of zones, size and shape of the grains) depends on the elements diffusing from the base materials. For all joints, the interface is mainly composed of equiaxed grains of NiTi and NiTi2.

  7. Uniaxial diffusion bonding of CLAM/CLAM steels: Microstructure and mechanical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaosheng; Liu, Yongchang; Yu, Liming; Liu, Chenxi; Sui, Guofa; Yang, Jianguo

    2015-06-01

    By performing a two-step uniaxial diffusion bonding, the reliable joining between CLAM/CLAM steels has been attained. The microstructures at the vicinity of the joint region and in base material were respectively investigated through OM, SEM and TEM. The joint interface was integrated, and no microstructural defects were observed. In the base material, small amount of austenite is retained as thin films between martensite laths, which was suggested to be related to the compressive deformation in diffusion bonding. As a candidate structural material for the first wall in fusion energy systems, the radiation resistance of CLAM steel would be deteriorated by the retained austenite. Tensile and impact tests were carried out to assess the reliability of the joints subjected to post bond heat treatment. All the tensile specimens fractured in the base CLAM steel, meaning the good joining between CLAM steels. However, due to the low impact absorbed energy of the joints, efforts should still be made to optimize the bonding technology and the post bond heat treatment further.

  8. Effects of interface bonding and defects on boron diffusion at Si/SiO2 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geun-Myeong; Oh, Young Jun; Chang, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    We perform first-principles density functional calculations to find the migration pathway and barrier for B diffusion at the Si/SiO2 interface. For various interface models, in which crystalline α-quartz or amorphous silica (a-SiO2) is placed on Si, we examine stable and metastable configurations of B-related defects which play a role in B diffusion. While a substitutional B alone is immobile in Si, it tends to diffuse to the interface via an interstitialcy mechanism in the presence of a self-interstitial and then changes into an interstitial B in oxide via a kick-out mechanism, leaving the self-interstitial at the interface. At the defect-free interface, where bridging O atoms are inserted to remove interface dangling bonds, an interstitial B prefers to intervene between the interface Si and bridging O atoms and subsequently diffuses through the hollow space or along the network of the Si-O-Si bonds in oxide. The overall migration barriers are calculated to be 2.02-2.12 eV at the Si/α-quartz interface, while they lie in the range of 2.04 ± 0.44 eV at the Si/a-SiO2 interface, similar to that in α-quartz. The migration pathway and barrier are not significantly affected by interface defects such as suboxide bond and O protrusion, while dangling bonds in the suboxide region can increase the migration barrier by about 1.5 eV. The result that the interface generally does not hinder the B diffusion from Si to SiO2 assists in understanding the underlying mechanism for B segregation which commonly occurs at the Si/SiO2 interface.

  9. Diffusion Bonding Beryllium to Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel: Development of Processes and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ryan Matthew

    Only a few materials are suitable to act as armor layers against the thermal and particle loads produced by magnetically confined fusion. These candidates include beryllium, tungsten, and carbon fiber composites. The armor layers must be joined to the plasma facing components with high strength bonds that can withstand the thermal stresses resulting from differential thermal expansion. While specific joints have been developed for use in ITER (an experimental reactor in France), including beryllium to CuCrZr as well as tungsten to stainless steel interfaces, joints specific to commercially relevant fusion reactors are not as well established. Commercial first wall components will likely be constructed front Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, which will need to be coating with one of the three candidate materials. Of the candidates, beryllium is particularly difficult to bond, because it reacts during bonding with most elements to form brittle intermetallic compounds. This brittleness is unacceptable, as it can lead to interface crack propagation and delamination of the armor layer. I have attempted to overcome the brittle behavior of beryllium bonds by developing a diffusion bonding process of beryllium to RAFM steel that achieves a higher degree of ductility. This process utilized two bonding aids to achieve a robust bond: a. copper interlayer to add ductility to the joint, and a titanium interlayer to prevent beryllium from forming unwanted Be-Cu intermetallics. In addition, I conducted a series of numerical simulations to predict the effect of these bonding aids on the residual stress in the interface. Lastly, I fabricated and characterized beryllium to ferritic steel diffusion bonds using various bonding parameters and bonding aids. Through the above research, I developed a process to diffusion bond beryllium to ferritic steel with a 150 M Pa tensile strength and 168 M Pa shear strength. This strength was achieved using a Hot Isostatic

  10. Role of interfacial carbon layer in the thermal diffusivity/conductivity of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Hemanshu; Donaldson, Kimberly Y.; Hasselman, D. P. H.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on samples of reaction-bonded silicon nitride uniaxially reinforced by SiC monofilaments with and without a 3-micron-thick carbon-rich coating. It is found that a combination of a carbon coatings on the fibers and an interfacial gap due to the thermal expansion mismatch in the composite can significantly (by a factor of 2) lower the effective thermal diffusivity in the direction transverse to the fiber. At atmospheric pressure, gaseous conduction across the interfacial gap makes a significant contribution to the heat transfer across the interface, indicated by significantly lower values of the effective thermal diffusivity under vacuum than in nitrogen or helium at atmospheric pressure.

  11. [Casting faults and structural studies on bonded alloys comparing centrifugal castings and vacuum pressure castings].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, P; Küfmann, W

    1978-07-01

    The casting processes in use today such as centrifugal casting and vacuum pressure casting were compared with one another. An effort was made to answer the question whether the occurrence of shrink cavities and the mean diameter of the grain of the alloy is dependent on the method of casting. 80 crowns were made by both processes from the baked alloys Degudent Universal, Degudent N and the trial alloy 4437 of the firm Degusa. Slice sections were examined for macro and micro-porosity and the structural appearance was evaluated by linear analysis. Statistical analysis showed that casting faults and casting structure is independent of the method used and their causes must be found in the conditions of casting and the composition of the alloy.

  12. Fabrication and Design Aspects of High-Temperature Compact Diffusion Bonded Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Mylavarapu, Sai K.; Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard N.; Glosup, Richard E.; Unocic, Raymond R

    2012-01-01

    The very high temperature reactor (VHTR), using gas-cooled reactor technology, is one of the six reactor concepts selected by the Generation IV International Forum and is anticipated to be the reactor type for the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP). In this type of reactor with an indirect power cycle system, a high-temperature and high integrity intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) with high effectiveness is required to efficiently transfer the core thermal output to secondary fluid for electricity production, process heat, or hydrogen cogeneration. The current Technology Readiness Level status issued by NGNP to all components associated with the IHX for reactor core outlet temperatures of 750-800oC is 3 on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the most ready. At present, there is no proven high-temperature IHX concept for VHTRs. Amongst the various potential IHX concepts available, diffusion bonded heat exchangers (henceforth called printed circuit heat exchangers, or PCHEs) appear promising for NGNP applications. The design and fabrication of this key component of NGNP is the primary focus of this paper. In the current study, two PCHEs were fabricated using Alloy 617 plates and will be experimentally investigated for their thermal-hydraulic performance in a high-temperature helium test facility (HTHF). The HTHF was primarily designed and constructed to test the thermal-hydraulic performance of PCHEs The test facility is primarily of Alloy 800H construction and is designed to facilitate experiments at temperatures and pressures up to 800oC and 3 MPa, respectively. The PCHE fabrication related processes, i.e., photochemical machining and diffusion bonding are briefly discussed for Alloy 617 plates. Diffusion bonding of Alloy 617 plates with and without a Ni interlayer is discussed. Furthermore, preliminary microstructural and mechanical characterization studies of representative diffusion bonded Alloy 617 specimens are presented.

  13. Influence of silicon dangling bonds on germanium thermal diffusion within SiO{sub 2} glass

    SciTech Connect

    Barba, D.; Martin, F.; Ross, G. G.; Cai, R. S.; Wang, Y. Q.; Demarche, J.; Terwagne, G.; Rosei, F.

    2014-03-17

    We study the influence of silicon dangling bonds on germanium thermal diffusion within silicon oxide and fused silica substrates heated to high temperatures. By using scanning electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, we determine that the lower mobility of Ge found within SiO{sub 2}/Si films can be associated with the presence of unsaturated SiO{sub x} chemical bonds. Comparative measurements obtained by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that 10% of silicon dangling bonds can reduce Ge desorption by 80%. Thus, the decrease of the silicon oxidation state yields a greater thermal stability of Ge inside SiO{sub 2} glass, which could enable to considerably extend the performance of Ge-based devices above 1300 K.

  14. TEM Observation of the Ti Interlayer Between SiC Substrates During Diffusion Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuda, Hiroshi; Mori, Shigeo; Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mori

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion bonding was carried out to join SiC to SiC substrates using titanium interlayers. In this study, 10 m and 20 m thick physical vapor deposited (PVD) Ti surface coatings, and 10 and 20 m thick Ti foils were used. Diffusion bonding was performed at 1250 C for PVD Ti coatings and 1200 C for Ti foil. This study investigates the microstructures of the phases formed during diffusion bonding through TEM and selected-area diffraction analysis of a sample prepared with an FIB, which allows samples to be taken from the reacted area. In all samples, Ti3SiC2, Ti5Si3Cx and TiSi2 phases were identified. In addition, TiC and unknown phases also appeared in the samples in which Ti foils were used as interlayers. Furthermore, Ti3SiC2 phases show high concentration and Ti5Si3Cx formed less when samples were processed at a higher temperature and thinner interlayer samples were used. It appears that the formation of microcracks is caused by the presence of intermediate phase Ti5Si3Cx, which has anisotropic thermal expansion, and by the presence of an unidentified Ti-Si-C ternary phase with relatively low Si content.

  15. Measurement and Modeling of Water-Vapor Diffusion in Elastomers with Impact in Humidity and Vacuum Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šetina, Janez; Sefa, Makfir; Erjavec, Bojan; Hudoklin, Domen

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of water-vapor dissolution in Viton O-rings is measured with a gravimetric method using a precise mass comparator. A sample gasket was degassed in high vacuum for a sufficiently long period to remove more than 99 % of the dissolved water vapor. After that, it was exposed to the ambient atmosphere with a controlled temperature, and relative humidity and water-vapor uptake curves were measured gravimetrically with a precise balance. The dynamics of a water-vapor release into vacuum from another sample that was previously saturated with water vapor at room temperature was determined. The sample was placed in a vacuum outgassing rate measurement apparatus. The time dependence of the evolved water vapor was calculated by integrating the measured outgassing rate. The physical process of water absorption can be described by the diffusion equation. The geometry of the samples required solving the diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates. This was done numerically using a finite-difference method. As a result of the modeling, room temperature values of the diffusion constant D, the solubility s, and the permeability K = D× s of water vapor in the sample material (Viton A-401C) were obtained. For sample 1, we obtained D = 8.0 × 10 ^{-8} cm2 {\\cdot } s^{-1} and s = 6.5 × 10^{-7} g {\\cdot } cm^-3 Pa^{-1}, while for sample 2, D = 3.0 × 10^{-7} cm2 s^{-1} and s = 3.5 × 10^{-7} g {\\cdot } cm^{-3} {\\cdot } Pa^{-1}.

  16. Reflexion measurements for inverse characterization of steel diffusion bond mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bourdais, Florian; Cachon, Lionel; Rigal, Emmanuel

    2017-02-01

    The present work describes a non-destructive testing method aimed at securing high manufacturing quality of the innovative compact heat exchanger developed under the framework of the CEA R&D program dedicated to the Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration (ASTRID). The heat exchanger assembly procedure currently proposed involves high temperature and high pressure diffusion welding of stainless steel plates. The aim of the non-destructive method presented herein is to characterize the quality of the welds obtained through this assembly process. Based on a low-frequency model developed by Baik and Thompson [1], pulse-echo normal incidence measurements are calibrated according to a specific procedure and allow the determination of the welding interface stiffness using a nonlinear fitting procedure in the frequency domain. Performing the characterization of plates after diffusion welding using this method allows a useful assessment of the material state as a function of the diffusion bonding process.

  17. Diffusion bonding of commercially pure titanium to low carbon steel using a silver interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Atasoy, Evren; Kahraman, Nizamettin

    2008-10-15

    Titanium and low carbon steel plates were joined through diffusion bonding using a silver interlayer at various temperatures for various diffusion times. In order to determine the strength of the resulting joints, tensile-shear tests and hardness tests were applied. Additionally, optical, scanning electron microscopy examinations and energy dispersive spectrometry elemental analyses were carried out to determine the interface properties of the joint. The work showed that the highest interface strength was obtained for the specimens joined at 850 deg. C for 90 min. It was seen from the hardness results that the highest hardness value was obtained for the interlayer material and the hardness values on the both sides of the interlayer decreased gradually as the distance from the joint increased. In energy dispersive spectrometry analyses, it was seen that the amount of silver in the interlayer decreased markedly depending on the temperature rise. In addition, increasing diffusion time also caused some slight decrease in the amount of silver.

  18. Fabrication and Design Aspects of High-Temperature Compact Diffusion Bonded Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Sai K. Mylavarapu; Richard N. Christensen; Raymond R. Unocic; Richard E. Glosup; Mike W. Patterson

    2012-08-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) using gas-cooled reactor technology is anticipated to be the reactor type for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). In this reactor concept with an indirect power cycle system, a high-temperature and high integrity Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) with high effectiveness is required to efficiently transfer the core thermal output to a secondary fluid for electricity generation, hydrogen production, and/or industrial process heat applications. At present, there is no proven IHX concept for VHTRs. The current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) status issued by NGNP to all components associated with the IHX for reduced nominal reactor outlet temperatures of 750–800 degrees C is 3 on a 1–10 scale, with 10 indicating omplete technological maturity. Among the various potential IHX concepts available, diffusion bonded heat exchangers (henceforth called printed circuit heat exchangers, or PCHEs) appear promising for NGNP applications. The design and fabrication of this key component of NGNP with Alloy 617, a candidate high-temperature structural material for NGNP applications, are the primary focus of this paper. In the current study, diffusion bonding of Alloy 617 has been demonstrated, although the optimum diffusion bonding process parameters to engineer a quasi interface-free joint are yet to be determined. The PCHE fabrication related processes, i.e., photochemical etching and diffusion bonding are discussed for Alloy 617 plates. In addition, the authors’ experiences with these non-conventional machining and joining techniques are discussed. Two PCHEs are fabricated using Alloy 617 plates and are being experimentally investigated for their thermal-hydraulic performance in a High-Temperature Helium Facility (HTHF). The HTHF is primarily of Alloy 800H construction and is designed to facilitate experiments at temperatures and pressures up to 800 degrees C and 3 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, some preliminary

  19. Microstructural Characteristics of HIP-bonded Monolithic Nuclear Fuels with a Diffusion Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Jan-Fong Jue; Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Cynthia R. Breckenridge; Glenn A. Moore; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2014-05-01

    Due to the limitation of maximum uranium load achievable by dispersion fuel type, the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is developing an advanced monolithic fuel to convert US high performance research reactors to low-enriched uranium. Hot-isostatic-press bonding was the single process down-selected to bond monolithic U-Mo fuel meat to aluminum alloy cladding. A diffusion barrier was applied to the U–Mo fuel meat by roll-bonding process to prevent extensive interaction between fuel meat and aluminum-alloy cladding. Microstructural characterization was performed on fresh fuel plates fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. Interfaces between fuel meat, cladding, and diffusion barrier, as well as U–10Mo fuel meat and Al–6061 cladding were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Preliminary results indicate that the interfaces contain many different phases while decomposition, second phases, and chemical banding were also observed in the fuel meat. The important attributes of the HIP-bonded monolithic fuel are • A typical Zr diffusion barrier of thickness 25 µm • Transverse cross section that exhibits relatively equiaxed grains with an average grain diameter of 10 µm • Chemical banding, in some areas more than 100 µm in length, that is very pronounced in longitudinal (i.e., rolling) direction with Mo concentration varying from 7–13 wt% • Decomposed areas containing plate-shaped low-Mo phase • A typical Zr/cladding interaction layer of thickness 1-2 µm • A visible UZr2 bearing layer of thickness 1-2 µm • Mo-rich precipitates (mainly Mo2Zr, forming a layer in some areas) followed by a Mo-depleted sub-layer between the visible UZr2-bearing layer and the U–Mo matrix • No excessive interaction between cladding and the uncoated fuel edge • Cladding-to-cladding bonding that exhibits no cracks or porosity with second phases high in Mg, Si, and O decorating the bond line. • Some of these attributes might be critical to the

  20. Diffuse lymphatic leakage after continuous vacuum-assisted closure therapy for thoracic wound infection after rib stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Dackam, Sandrine; Furrer, Katarzyna; Haug, Martin; Lardinois, D.

    2015-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a useful tool in the management of a wide spectrum of complex wounds in cardiothoracic surgery. It promotes healing through the application of a controlled and localized negative pressure on porous polyurethane absorbent foams. Known advantages of the VAC therapy are the acceleration of wound healing, stimulation of granulation tissue and reduced tissue edema. Despite its excellent properties, some related complications after and during the therapy have been reported. We report the case of a 47-year-old female with a thoracic wound infection after rib stabilization, managed with open surgery and VAC therapy, which was complicated by a diffuse lymphatic leakage. This is the first case described of diffuse lymphatic leakage followed by partial necrosis of the breast after continuous VAC therapy. We recommend the application of a lower pressure level of this device for complex wounds of the chest wall near the breast. PMID:26675995

  1. Classical solution to 1D viscous polytropic perfect fluids with constant diffusion coefficients and vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhilei; Wu, Shanqiu

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with the initial boundary value problem for one-dimensional (1D) viscous, compressible and heat conducting fluids. We establish the global existence and uniqueness of classical solutions, with large data and possible vacuum at initial time. Our approach is based on the Calderón-Zygmund decomposition technique and allows that the viscosity and heat conductivity are both constant.

  2. Verification of the effect of surface preparation on Hot Isostatic Pressing diffusion bonding joints of CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanyun; Li, Chunjing; Huang, Bo; Liu, Shaojun; Huang, Qunying

    2014-12-01

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) diffusion bonding with CLAM steel is the primary candidate fabrication technique for the first wall (FW) of DFLL-TBM. Surface state is one of the key factors for the joints quality. The effect of surface state prepared with grinder and miller on HIP diffusion bonding joints of CLAM steel was investigated. HIP diffusion bonding was performed at 140 MPa and 1373 K within 3 h. The mechanical properties of the joints were investigated with instrumented Charpy V-notch impact tests and the microstructures of the joints were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the milled samples with fine surface roughness were more suitable for CLAM steel HIP diffusion bonding.

  3. Diffusion bonding of Al7075 alloy to titanium aluminum vanadate alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhazaa, Abdulaziz Nasser

    The aluminum alloy (Al7075) and titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) are used in a variety of applications in the aerospace industry. However, the high cost of Ti-6Al-4V alloy has been a major factor which has limited its use and therefore, the ability to join Al7075 alloy to Ti-6Al-4V alloy can provide a product that is less costly, but retains the high strength and light weight properties necessary for the transport industry. However, the large difference in the physical properties between these two alloys prevents the use of conventional joining techniques such as fusion welding to join these dissimilar alloys. Therefore, the diffusion bonding technique was used to join Al7075 alloy to Ti-6Al-4V alloy with the objective of minimizing microstructural changes of the two alloys during the bonding process. In this thesis, solid state and liquid phase bonding processes were undertaken. Solid state bonding was employed without interlayers and was successful at 510°C and 7 MPa. The bond interface showed an absence of the oxides due to the dissolution of oxygen into the titanium solution. Bonds made using copper interlayers at a temperature sufficient enough to form eutectic liquid formation between copper and aluminum were produced. The intermetallics theta(Al2Cu), S(Al2CuMg) and T(Al2Mg3Zn3) were identified at the aluminum interface while Cu3Ti2 intermetallic was identified at the titanium interface. Bonds made using tin based alloys interlayers and copper coatings were successful and gave the highest shear strength. The eutectic formation on the Al7075 alloy was responsible for joint formation at the aluminum interface while the formation of Sn3Ti5 intermetallic was responsible for the joint formation at titanium interface. The corrosion rate of the bonds decreased with increasing bonding time for joints made using the tin based interlayer in 3% NaCl solution. However, the presence of copper within the joint increased the corrosion rate of the bonds and this was attributed to

  4. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Disruption of H-BONDS by Water Molecules and its Diffusion Behavior in Amorphous Cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ruijin; Zhu, Mengzhao; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Fuzhou; Yan, Jiaming; Zhu, Wenbin; Gu, Chao

    2012-06-01

    Hydrolysis is an important component of the aging of cellulose, and it severely affects the insulating performance of cellulosic materials. The diffusion behavior of water molecules in amorphous cellulose and their destructive effect on the hydrogen bonding structure of cellulose were investigated by molecular dynamics. The change in the hydrogen bonding structure indicates that water molecules have a considerable effect on the hydrogen bonding structure within cellulose: both intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds decreased with an increase in ingressive water molecules. Moreover, the stabilities of the cellulose molecules were disrupted when the number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds declined to a certain degree. Both the free volumes of amorphous cells and water molecule-cellulose interaction affect the diffusion of water molecules. The latter, especially the hydrogen bonding interaction between water molecules and cellulose, plays a predominant role in the diffusion behavior of water molecules in the models of which the free volume rarely varies. The diffusion coefficient of water molecules has an excellent correlation with water molecule-cellulose interaction and the average hydrogen bonds between each water molecule and cellulose; however, this relationship was not apparent between the diffusion coefficient and free volume.

  5. Examination of superplastic forming combined with diffusion bonding for titanium: Perspective from experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Daniel G.; Ramulu, Mamidala

    2004-12-01

    Superplastic forming (SPF) combined with diffusion bonding (DB) has been used successfully for the fabrication of titanium aerospace hardware. Many of these applications have been for military aircraft, whereby a complex built-up structure has been replaced with monolithic parts. Several methods for applying the two- and four-sheet titanium SPF/DB processes have been devised, including the welding of sheets prior to forming and the use of silk-screened stop-off (yttria) to prevent bonding where it is undesirable. Very little progress has been made in the past few years toward understanding and modeling the SPF/DB process using constitutive equations and data by laboratory testing. Concerns that engineers face in designing for fatigue life, acceptable design loads, and damage tolerance are currently being studied, but the database is very limited. This is a summary of past work found in the literature and forms the foundation for additional research.

  6. Elastic stability of superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded orthogonally corrugated core sandwich plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper concerns the elastic buckling behavior of a newly developed superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded (SPF/DB) orthogonally corrugated core sandwich plate. Uniaxial buckling loads were calculated for this type of sandwich plate with simply supported edges by using orthotropic sandwich plate theory. The buckling behavior of this sandwich plate was then compared with that of an SPF/DB unidirectionally corrugated core sandwich plate under conditions of equal structural density. It was found that the buckling load for the former was considerably higher than that of the latter.

  7. Elastic constants for superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded corrugated sandwich core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formulas and associated graphs for evaluating the effective elastic constants for a superplastically formed/diffusion bonded (SPF/DB) corrugated sandwich core, are presented. A comparison of structural stiffnesses of the sandwich core and a honeycomb core under conditions of equal sandwich core density was made. The stiffness in the thickness direction of the optimum SPF/DB corrugated core (that is, triangular truss core) is lower than that of the honeycomb core, and that the former has higher transverse shear stiffness than the latter.

  8. Structural properties of superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded orthogonally corrugated core sandwich plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a new superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded (SPF/DB) orthogonally corrugated sandwich structure, and presents formulae and the associated plots for evaluating the effective elastic constants for the core of this new sandwich structure. Comparison of structural properties of this new sandwich structure with the conventional honeycomb core sandwich structure was made under the condition of equal sandwich density. It was found that the SPF/DB orthogonally corrugated sandwich core has higher transverse shear stiffness than the conventional honeycomb sandwich core. However, the former has lower stiffness in the sandwich core thickness direction than the latter.

  9. Superplastic Formed and Diffusion Bonded Titanium Landing Gear Component Feasibility Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    Gear Superplastic Forming Shock Strut SPF/DB Outer Cylinder Titanium Diffusion Bonding Cylindrical Sandwich Structure Z% ABSTRACT (Continue en ro,eree...lO0 Fighter Aircraft 6 5 F-lO0 Main Landing Gear 6 6 F-lO0 Landing Gear Strut Section Selected for this Program 7 7 SPF/DB Titanium Landing Gear... Assembly with a Diaphram Seal for DB Cycle. 18 15 MLG SPF/DB Titanium Outer Cylinder Segment DB Cycle Using a Diaphram Seal 19 16 Hot Sizing Tool 20 17

  10. Structural dynamics of hydrogen bonded methanol oligomers: Vibrational transient hole burning studies of spectral diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piletic, I. R.; Gaffney, K. J.; Fayer, M. D.

    2003-07-01

    Frequency resolved pump-probe experiments have been conducted on the deuterated hydroxyl stretch of methanol-d in a solution containing 0.8% methanol-d/23% methanol-h in carbon tetrachloride. Methanol-d molecules that both donate and receive hydrogen bonds have an inhomogeneously broadened hydroxyl stretch absorption line centered at 2487 cm-1. With a laser tuned to 2513 cm-1, the high-frequency side of the absorption spectrum is excited. The equilibration of the excited state peak and the ground-state hole results in the time-dependent shift in the frequency of the signal, which is used to monitor the dynamics of spectral diffusion. Model calculations were conducted to address the influence of spectral diffusion in the ground and excited states on the experimental observables when the vibrational lifetime is comparable to the spectral diffusion time. The model calculations illustrate the influence on the signal of absorbers in the ground state that have relaxed from the excited state. This aspect of the problem has not been addressed in previous descriptions of frequency resolved pump-probe spectroscopy. The calculations were used to fit the time-dependent peak maximum, resulting in a bi-exponential frequency-frequency correlation function, with a fast time constant of roughly 0.1 ps and a slower time constant of 1.6±0.3 ps. The observed dynamics have been compared with the predictions of dielectric continuum theory. The inability of a simple dielectric continuum theory to predict the observed spectral diffusion dynamics suggests that these dynamics do not result from the long-wavelength, collective orientational relaxation of the solvent. Instead the dynamics are attributed to fluctuations in the local hydrogen bond network, which is consistent with recent molecular-dynamics simulations of vibrational transient hole burning in water.

  11. Superplastic Forming/Diffusion Bonding Without Interlayer of 5A90 Al-Li Alloy Hollow Double-Layer Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shaosong; Jia, Yong; Lu, Zhen; Shi, Chengcheng; Zhang, Kaifeng

    2017-09-01

    The hollow double-layer structure of 5A90 Al-Li alloy was fabricated by SPF/DB process in this study. The characteristics and mechanism of 5A90 Al-Li alloy with respect to superplasticity and diffusion bonding were investigated. Tensile tests showed that the optimal elongation of tensile specimens was 243.97% at the temperature of 400 °C and the strain rate of 0.001 s-1. Effect of the surface roughness, bonding temperature and bonding time to determine the microstructure and mechanical properties of diffusion bonding joints was investigated, and the optimum bonding parameters were 540 °C/2.5 h/Ra18. Through the finite element simulation, it could be found that the SPF/DB process of hollow double-layer structure was feasible. The hollow double-layer structure of 5A90 Al-Li alloy was manufactured, showing that the thickness distribution of the bonding area was uniform and the thinnest part was the round corner. The SEM images of diffusion bonding joints showed that sound bonding interfaces were obtained in which no discontinuity existed.

  12. Diffusion Bonding of Ti-6Al-4V Sheet with Ti-6Al-4V Foam for Biomedical Implant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Brittany; Oppenheimer, Scott; Dunand, David C.; Lewis, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Advanced metallic bone implants are designed to have a porous surface to improve osseointegration and reduce risks of loosening. An alternative approach to existing surface treatments to create a porous surface is to bond separately produced metallic foams onto the implant. To assess the feasibility of this approach, a Ti-6Al-4V foam was diffusion bonded onto bulk Ti-6Al-4V in an argon atmosphere at temperatures between 1173 K and 1223 K (900 °C and 950 °C) for times between 45 and 75 minutes. These specimens were tested in tension to determine bond quality: failures occurred in the foam, indicating a strong diffusion-bonded interface. The quality of the bond was confirmed by metallographic studies, indicating that this approach, which can also be applied to creating of sandwich with porous cores, is successful.

  13. Microstructure and mechanical strength of diffusion bonded joints between silicon carbide and F82H steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhihong; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Kohyama, Akira

    2011-10-01

    The combination of SiC and reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels is attractive for fusion applications because it is expected to offer high thermal efficiency, high reliability and superior safety characteristic under a neutron irradiation environment. In this paper, diffusion bonding of SiC to F82H steel has been investigated. Direct joining of SiC to F82H was unsuccessful due to a large residual stress generated in the joint. A double W/Cu and a multiple W/Ni/Cu/Ni interlayer were used to reduce the residual stress, and encouraging results were obtained. The interfacial microstructure examination revealed that the various interfaces were bonded well. Diffusion products in the reaction zones were identified. The shear strength of the SiC/F82H joints measured by knife-edge tests at room temperature was found to increase with the increase in the joining temperature, and reached a maximum of 41.3 MPa. The fracture surfaces of the joints were also analyzed.

  14. Detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in diffusion bonding of steel hollow structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Li, H.; Li, M. Q.

    2016-05-01

    This study focused on the detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in similar diffusion bonding as well as on the fabrication of high quality martensitic stainless steel hollow structural components. A special surface with regular patterns was processed to be joined so as to observe the extent of surface asperity deformation under different bonding pressures. Results showed that an undamaged hollow structural component has been obtained with full interfacial contact and the same shear strength to that of base material. Fracture surface characteristic combined with surface roughness profiles distinctly revealed the enhanced surface asperity deformation as the applied pressure increases. The influence of surface asperity deformation mechanism on joint formation was analyzed: (a) surface asperity deformation not only directly expanded the interfacial contact areas, but also released deformation heat and caused defects, indirectly accelerating atomic diffusion, then benefits to void shrinkage; (b) surface asperity deformation readily introduced stored energy difference between two opposite sides of interface grain boundary, resulting in strain induced interface grain boundary migration. In addition, the influence of void on interface grain boundary migration was analyzed in detail.

  15. Effect of an axial magnetic field and arc current on the anode current density in diffuse vacuum arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Geng, Yingsan; Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhang, Zaiqin

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to measure the effect of an axial magnetic field (AMF) BAMF and arc current on the anode current density in diffuse vacuum arcs. The experimental geometry included a split anode and a butt-type cathode, both with a diameter of 60 mm. The anode surface was divided into a central area and three symmetrically disposed peripheral annular areas. The central area of the split anode had a diameter of 20 mm. The contact material was CuCr25 (25% Cr). The arc current IARC ranged from 4 to 14 kA (rms) at 50 Hz. The opening velocity was 2.4 m/s. The currents of the four areas on the anode contact were measured using four Rogowski coils situated outside the vacuum chamber. An external uniform AMF BAMF ranging from 0 to 110 mT was applied during the experiment. The observed arc modes were recorded by a high-speed charge-coupled device video camera. The experimental results quantitatively reveal that the current density distribution on the anode surface in the diffuse arc mode was not uniform but concentrated in the central area. The current density in the central anode area at the current peak JPeakArea I decreased with increasing BAMF following a power law. For BAMF of 0-110 mT and IARC of 4-14 kA, JPeakArea I = (2.2 IARC + 0.069 IARC2) BAMF-0.22, where JPeakArea I is in A/mm2, BAMF is in mT, and IARC is in kA. Moreover, the current distribution was uneven in the three peripheral areas.

  16. Diffuse lymphatic leakage after continuous vacuum-assisted closure therapy for thoracic wound infection after rib stabilization.

    PubMed

    Dackam, Sandrine; Furrer, Katarzyna; Haug, Martin; Lardinois, D

    2015-12-16

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a useful tool in the management of a wide spectrum of complex wounds in cardiothoracic surgery. It promotes healing through the application of a controlled and localized negative pressure on porous polyurethane absorbent foams. Known advantages of the VAC therapy are the acceleration of wound healing, stimulation of granulation tissue and reduced tissue edema. Despite its excellent properties, some related complications after and during the therapy have been reported. We report the case of a 47-year-old female with a thoracic wound infection after rib stabilization, managed with open surgery and VAC therapy, which was complicated by a diffuse lymphatic leakage. This is the first case described of diffuse lymphatic leakage followed by partial necrosis of the breast after continuous VAC therapy. We recommend the application of a lower pressure level of this device for complex wounds of the chest wall near the breast. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015.

  17. A Comparison Between Cold-Welded and Diffusion-Bonded Al/Cu Bimetallic Rods Produced by ECAE Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, P.; Karimi Taheri, A.; Zebardast, M.

    2013-10-01

    In this research, the application of equal channel angular extrusion process to produce both the cold-welded and diffusion-bonded Al/Cu bimetallic rods is assessed. The joints shear strength for both of the methods are measured and compared. The microstructure examinations were also carried out using scanning electron microscope equipped with EDX system and x-ray diffraction analysis. The results exhibit that the strength of the bond in cold-welded specimens is dependent on the amount of stretch and pressure at the materials interface. But in the diffusion-bonded specimens, it is depended on the struggle between the oxidation rate of the mating surfaces accompanied by inter-metallic compounds formation and the aluminum and copper atoms ability to diffuse in the joint interface.

  18. Application of superplastically formed and diffusion bonded aluminum to a laminar flow control leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyear, M. D.

    1987-01-01

    NASA sponsored the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program in 1976 to develop technologies to improve fuel efficiency. Laminar flow control was one such technology. Two approaches for achieving laminar flow were designed and manufactured under NASA sponsored programs: the perforated skin concept used at McDonnell Douglas and the slotted design used at Lockheed-Georgia. Both achieved laminar flow, with the slotted design to a lesser degree (JetStar flight test program). The latter design had several fabrication problems concerning springback and adhesive flow clogging the air flow passages. The Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplishments is documented in designing and fabricating a small section of a leading edge article addressing a simpler fabrication method to overcome the previous program's manufacturing problems, i.e., design and fabrication using advanced technologies such as diffusion bonding of aluminum, which has not been used on aerospace structures to date, and the superplastic forming of aluminum.

  19. Reactive diffusion bonding of Si3N4 to MA6000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaysser, W. A.; Frisch, A.; Zhang, W.; Petzow, G.

    The procedure for joining Si3N4 to the MA6000 superalloy by diffusion bonding during HIP is described. Due to the large thermal mismatch between both components, it was necessary to introduce multiphase interlayers to allow relaxation of thermal stresses. Calculations of the stress development and the results of experiments showed that stress relaxation by thin soft interlayers in Si3N4/MA6000 is very limited: during bonding of Si3N4 to metals suitable as interlayers, brittle reaction products often form at the metal/ceramic interfaces. Experiments were then performed with iron-based alloys with small thermal expansion coefficients at low temperatures, combined with V, Nb, and Hf-based layers, and the reactions at the layer interfaces and the fracture surfaces were investigated by SEM, EDX, and WDX. It was found that, in systems with low deformability of the stiff reaction layers, stress relaxation by controlled microcrack formation reduced the interfacial damage and improved the mechanical stability of the joints.

  20. Lasing and thermal characteristics of Yb:YAG/YAG composite with atomic diffusion bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar Nagisetty, Siva; Severova, Patricie; Miura, Taisuke; Smrž, Martin; Kon, Hitoe; Uomoto, Miyuki; Shimatsu, Takehito; Kawasaki, Masato; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrated the laser performance of an Yb:YAG/YAG composite ceramic laser medium mounted on an aluminium heatsink via atomic diffusion bonding (ADB) technique using nanocrystalline metal films at room temperature in air. The surface temperature rise of the ADB bonded laser medium was linear with 57 °C lower than that of the commercially available soldered Yb:YAG thin disk at the pump power of 280 W. Moreover, the ADB disk was pumped 1.5 times higher (7.3 kW cm-2) than the typical damage threshold of the soldered disk without any sign of damage. The undoped capping may be effective for the suppression of ASE heating; however, according to the in situ OPD measurement it induces strong thermal lensing. The CW laser output power of 177 W was obtained at the pump power of 450 W with the optical-to-optical efficiency of 40% using V-shape cavity.

  1. A rapid scan vacuum FTIR method for determining diffusion coefficients in viscous and glassy aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Cai, Chen; Pang, Shu-Feng; Reid, Jonathan P; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2017-09-25

    We report a new method to investigate water transport kinetics in aerosol particles by using rapid scan FTIR spectroscopy combined with a custom-built pulse relative humidity (RH) control system. From real time in situ measurements of RH and composition using high time resolution infrared spectroscopy (0.12 s for one spectrum), and through achieving a high rate of RH change (as fast as 60% per second), we are able to investigate the competition between the gas and condensed phase diffusive transport limits of water for particles with mean diameter ∼3 μm and varying phase and viscosity. The characteristic time (τ) for equilibration in particle composition following a step change in RH is measured to quantify dissolution timescales for crystalline particles and to probe the kinetics of water evaporation and condensation in amorphous particles. We show that the dissolution kinetics are prompt for crystalline inorganic salt particles following an increase in RH from below to above the deliquescence RH, occurring on a timescale comparable to the timescale of the RH change (<1 s). For aqueous sucrose particles, we show that the timescales for both the drying and condensation processes can be delayed by many orders of magnitude, depending on the viscosity of the particles in the range 10(1) to 10(9) Pa s considered here. For amorphous particles, these kinetics are shown to be consistent with previous measurements of mass transfer rates in larger single particles. More specifically, the consistency suggests that fully understanding and modelling the complex microphysical processes and heterogeneities that form in viscous particles may not be necessary for estimating timescales for particle equilibration. A comparison of the kinetics for crystalline and amorphous particles illustrates the interplay of the rates of gas and condensed phase diffusion in determining the mass transport rates of water in aerosols.

  2. Photodissociation of CS2 in the vacuum ultraviolet - Determination of bond dissociation energy from the lowest vibrational level of the ground state CS2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okabe, H.

    1972-01-01

    Photolysis in the vacuum ultraviolet results almost exclusively in the production of S(super-3)P atoms, which is in apparent violation of spin conservation. The threshold energy of incident photons required to produce fluorescence was used to calculate the bond dissociation energy (from the lowest vibrational level of the ground state), and the result agrees with the value previously derived from the photoionization of CS2. The fluorescence excitation spectrum shows peaks corresponding to Rydberg series I and II, indicating that the observed photodissociation of CS2 in the vacuum ultraviolet is mainly the result of predissociation from Rydberg states. The absorption coefficient of CS2 was measured in the region of 1200 to 1400 A.

  3. Low cycle fatigue strength of diffusion bonded joints of alumina dispersion-strengthened copper to stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, H.; Araki, T.

    2000-12-01

    It is proposed that the first wall and divertor components of ITER employ alumina dispersion-strengthened copper (DS Cu) joined to austenitic stainless steel. In this work, low cycle fatigue tests were performed on a direct diffusion bonded joint, a diffusion bonded joint with a Au interlayer, stainless steel and DS Cu in order to investigate their fatigue strength and fracture behavior. For the direct diffusion bonded joint, the fatigue strength in the small strain range was considerably lower than that of the DS Cu, while in the large strain range the fatigue strength was similar to that of the DS Cu. The low cycle fatigue strength of the Au interlayer joint increased compared with the direct diffusion bonded joint, and was the same as that of the DS Cu. The strain distribution in joint specimens was not uniform, because the deformation stress was different between the 316 stainless steel and the DS Cu. The fracture locations for the joint specimens varied depending on their strain distribution.

  4. First-Principles Simulation Study of Vibrational Spectral Diffusion and Hydrogen Bond Fluctuations in Aqueous Solution of N-Methylacetamide.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vivek Kumar; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-07-30

    We have presented a first-principles simulation study of the vibrational spectral diffusion and hydrogen bond dynamics in an aqueous solution of N-methylacetamide (NMA). We have studied the spectral diffusion of local OD stretch modes of deuterated water in the first hydration shells of the carbonyl (CO) and deuterated amide (ND) modes and their relations to the dynamics of hydrogen bonds formed by water with these groups. The frequency fluctuations of the amide I and amide A modes of the solute are also investigated. It is found that the vibrational spectral diffusion of water molecules in the first hydration shell of the carbonyl oxygen of NMA proceeds with three time scales: A short-time relaxation (∼100 fs) originating from the dynamics of NMA-water hydrogen bonds without breaking, a slower relaxation (∼3.3 ps) arising from the breaking dynamics of NMA(CO)-water hydrogen bonds, and another longer time constant (∼14 ps) coming from the escape dynamics of water from the first hydration shell of carbonyl oxygen. The current results show that the NMA(CO)-water hydrogen bonds have a longer lifetime than those between water molecules, although frequency calculations reveal a slightly higher stretch frequency of the water molecules in the first hydration shell of the carbonyl oxygen of NMA. An analysis of the vibrational spectral diffusion of solute modes is also presented in terms of the dynamics of solute-water hydrogen bonds. Effects of dispersion interactions on various calculated properties of the NMA-water system are also investigated in the present work.

  5. Heat and Mass Transfer of the Droplet Vacuum Freezing Process Based on the Diffusion-controlled Evaporation and Phase Transition Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhijun; Gao, Jingxin; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    A frozen phase transition model is developed to investigate the heat and mass transfer of a single water droplet during the vacuum freezing process. The model is based on the diffusion-controlled evaporation mechanism and phase transition characteristics. The droplet vacuum freezing process can be divided into three stages according to the droplet states and the time order. It includes the evaporation freezing stage, the isothermal freezing stage and the sublimation freezing stage. A numerical calculation is performed, and the result is analysed. The effects of the vacuum chamber pressure, initial droplet diameter and initial droplet temperature on the heat and mass transfer characteristics at each stage are studied. The droplet experiences supercooling breakdown at the end of the evaporation freezing stage before the isothermal freezing stage begins. The temperature is transiently raised as a result of the supercooling breakdown phenomenon, whose effects on the freezing process and freezing parameters are considered. PMID:27739466

  6. Heat and Mass Transfer of the Droplet Vacuum Freezing Process Based on the Diffusion-controlled Evaporation and Phase Transition Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Gao, Jingxin; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-10-01

    A frozen phase transition model is developed to investigate the heat and mass transfer of a single water droplet during the vacuum freezing process. The model is based on the diffusion-controlled evaporation mechanism and phase transition characteristics. The droplet vacuum freezing process can be divided into three stages according to the droplet states and the time order. It includes the evaporation freezing stage, the isothermal freezing stage and the sublimation freezing stage. A numerical calculation is performed, and the result is analysed. The effects of the vacuum chamber pressure, initial droplet diameter and initial droplet temperature on the heat and mass transfer characteristics at each stage are studied. The droplet experiences supercooling breakdown at the end of the evaporation freezing stage before the isothermal freezing stage begins. The temperature is transiently raised as a result of the supercooling breakdown phenomenon, whose effects on the freezing process and freezing parameters are considered.

  7. Heat and Mass Transfer of the Droplet Vacuum Freezing Process Based on the Diffusion-controlled Evaporation and Phase Transition Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhijun; Gao, Jingxin; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-10-14

    A frozen phase transition model is developed to investigate the heat and mass transfer of a single water droplet during the vacuum freezing process. The model is based on the diffusion-controlled evaporation mechanism and phase transition characteristics. The droplet vacuum freezing process can be divided into three stages according to the droplet states and the time order. It includes the evaporation freezing stage, the isothermal freezing stage and the sublimation freezing stage. A numerical calculation is performed, and the result is analysed. The effects of the vacuum chamber pressure, initial droplet diameter and initial droplet temperature on the heat and mass transfer characteristics at each stage are studied. The droplet experiences supercooling breakdown at the end of the evaporation freezing stage before the isothermal freezing stage begins. The temperature is transiently raised as a result of the supercooling breakdown phenomenon, whose effects on the freezing process and freezing parameters are considered.

  8. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopic Identification of Dispersant/Particle Bonding Mechanisms in Functional Inks

    PubMed Central

    Deiner, L. Jay; Farjami, Elaheh

    2015-01-01

    In additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, material is deposited drop by drop, to create micron to macroscale layers. A typical inkjet ink is a colloidal dispersion containing approximately ten components including solvent, the nano to micron scale particles which will comprise the printed layer, polymeric dispersants to stabilize the particles, and polymers to tune layer strength, surface tension and viscosity. To rationally and efficiently formulate such an ink, it is crucial to know how the components interact. Specifically, which polymers bond to the particle surfaces and how are they attached? Answering this question requires an experimental procedure that discriminates between polymer adsorbed on the particles and free polymer. Further, the method must provide details about how the functional groups of the polymer interact with the particle. In this protocol, we show how to employ centrifugation to separate particles with adsorbed polymer from the rest of the ink, prepare the separated samples for spectroscopic measurement, and use Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) for accurate determination of dispersant/particle bonding mechanisms. A significant advantage of this methodology is that it provides high level mechanistic detail using only simple, commonly available laboratory equipment. This makes crucial data available to almost any formulation laboratory. The method is most useful for inks composed of metal, ceramic, and metal oxide particles in the range of 100 nm or greater. Because of the density and particle size of these inks, they are readily separable with centrifugation. Further, the spectroscopic signatures of such particles are easy to distinguish from absorbed polymer. The primary limitation of this technique is that the spectroscopy is performed ex-situ on the separated and dried particles as opposed to the particles in dispersion. However, results from attenuated total reflectance spectra of the wet separated

  9. Diffusion bonding of CMSX-4 to UDIMET 720 using PVD-coated interfaces and HIP

    SciTech Connect

    Larker, R.; Ockborn, J.; Selling, B.

    1999-07-01

    There is an increasing interest in development of manufacturing methods for Dual Property BLISKs (BLaded dISKs), consisting of creep resistant airfoils and fatigue resistant disks bonded together by a durable joint. Optimum heat treatments are, however, very different for creep resistant single crystal CMSX-4 and fatigue resistant polycrystalline Udimet 720 selected in this study, but fortunately the first aging treatment for CMSX-4 (1140 C, 2-6h, AC) is similar to the partial solution treatment of U 720 HS2 (1115 C, 4h, OQ). Based on this, diffusion bonding was performed by HIP at 1120 C and 200 MPa argon pressure for 4 h, followed by cooling to 400 C. Subsequently, a shortened Udimet 720 HS2 two-step aging treatment was adopted by heating to 650 C for 6 h followed by cooling to 400 C, heating to 760 C for 2 h, and finally cooling to R.T. under remaining HIP pressure. Plasma etching followed by thin (80 nm) PVD coating with either nickel or titanium were used to clean and protect the polished surfaces before joining. The selection of coatings was governed by the possibility to reduce oxidized nickel by flushing with hydrogen at 330 C during evacuation of the HIP capsules, and by the large solubility of oxygen in titanium. Hot tensile testing was performed at 750 C on both joined and reference materials subjected to the modified heat treatment. Initially solution treated Udimet 720 and CMSX-4 comprised the reference materials. The testing showed that joints with Ni-PV coatings were almost as strong as Udimet 720 (although with very limited elongation), while the joints with Ti-PVD coatings were weaker.

  10. Method for producing components with internal architectures, such as micro-channel reactors, via diffusion bonding sheets

    DOEpatents

    Alman, David E.; Wilson, Rick D.; Davis, Daniel L.

    2011-03-08

    This invention relates to a method for producing components with internal architectures, and more particularly, this invention relates to a method for producing structures with microchannels via the use of diffusion bonding of stacked laminates. Specifically, the method involves weakly bonding a stack of laminates forming internal voids and channels with a first generally low uniaxial pressure and first temperature such that bonding at least between the asperites of opposing laminates occurs and pores are isolated in interfacial contact areas, followed by a second generally higher isostatic pressure and second temperature for final bonding. The method thereby allows fabrication of micro-channel devices such as heat exchangers, recuperators, heat-pumps, chemical separators, chemical reactors, fuel processing units, and combustors without limitation on the fin aspect ratio.

  11. Levitation effect: role of symmetry and dependence of diffusivity on the bond length of homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic species.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manju; Yashonath, S

    2011-04-07

    Molecular dynamics investigation of model diatomic species confined to the α-cages of zeolite NaY is reported. The dependence of self-diffusivity on the bond length of the diatomic species has been investigated. Three different sets of runs have been carried out. In the first set, the two atoms of the diatomic molecule interact with the zeolite atoms with equal strength (example, O(2), the symmetric case). In the second and third sets which correspond to asymmetric cases, the two atoms of the diatomic molecule interact with unequal strengths (example, CO). The result for the symmetric case exhibits a well-defined maximum in self-diffusivity for an intermediate bond length. In contrast to this, the intermediate asymmetry leads to a less pronounced maximum. For the large asymmetric case, the maximum is completely absent. These findings are analyzed by computing a number of related properties. These results provide a direct confirmation at the microscopic level of the suggestion by Derouane that the supermobility observed experimentally by Kemball has its origin in the mutual cancellation of forces. The maximum in diffusivity from molecular dynamics is seen at the value predicted by the levitation effect. Further, these findings suggest a role for symmetry in the existence of a diffusivity maximum as a function of diameter of the diffusant often referred to as the levitation effect. The nature of the required symmetry for the existence of anomalous diffusivity is interaction symmetry which is different from that normally encountered in crystallography.

  12. Effect of electron energy distribution functions on plasma generated vacuum ultraviolet in a diffusion plasma excited by a microwave surface wave

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. P.; Chen, L.; Funk, M.; Sundararajan, R.; Nozawa, T.; Samukawa, S.

    2013-07-15

    Plasma generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) in diffusion plasma excited by a microwave surface wave has been studied by using dielectric-based VUV sensors. Evolution of plasma VUV in the diffusion plasma as a function of the distance from the power coupling surface is investigated. Experimental results have indicated that the energy and spatial distributions of plasma VUV are mainly controlled by the energy distribution functions of the plasma electrons, i.e., electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs). The study implies that by designing EEDF of plasma, one could be able to tailor plasma VUV in different applications such as in dielectric etching or photo resist smoothing.

  13. Indirect Versus Direct Heating of Sheet Materials: Superplastic Forming and Diffusion Bonding Using Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jocelyn, Alan; Kar, Aravinda; Fanourakis, Alexander; Flower, Terence; Ackerman, Mike; Keevil, Allen; Way, Jerome

    2010-06-01

    Many from within manufacturing industry consider superplastic forming (SPF) to be ‘high tech’, but it is often criticized as too complicated, expensive, slow and, in general, an unstable process when compared to other methods of manipulating sheet materials. Perhaps, the fundamental cause of this negative perception of SPF, and also of diffusion bonding (DB), is the fact that the current process of SPF/DB relies on indirect sources of heating to produce the conditions necessary for the material to be formed. Thus, heat is usually derived from the electrically heated platens of hydraulic presses, to a lesser extent from within furnaces and, sometimes, from heaters imbedded in ceramic moulds. Recent evaluations of these isothermal methods suggest they are slow, thermally inefficient and inappropriate for the process. In contrast, direct heating of only the material to be formed by modern, electrically efficient, lasers could transform SPF/DB into the first choice of designers in aerospace, automotive, marine, medical, architecture and leisure industries. Furthermore, ‘variable temperature’ direct heating which, in theory, is possible with a laser beam(s) may provide a means to control material thickness distribution, a goal of enormous importance as fuel efficient, lightweight structures for transportation systems are universally sought. This paper compares, and contrasts, the two systems and suggests how a change to laser heating might be achieved.

  14. A link between structure, diffusion and rotations of hydrogen bonding tracers in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Araque, Juan C; Daly, Ryan P; Margulis, Claudio J

    2016-05-28

    When solutes are small compared to the size of the ions in an ionic liquid, energetic heterogeneities associated with charge enhanced (stiff) and charge depleted (soft) nanoenvironments are sampled. In a recent article [J. C. Araque et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119(23), 7015-7029 (2015)], we explored large deviations from Stokes-Einstein translational diffusion caused by such a heterogeneity. The current article is set to explore the effect of soft and stiff solvent environments (i.e., structure) on OH-bond rotations in the case of water and small alcohols in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Im1,2 (+)NTf2 (-)). Is solute rotational dynamics heterogeneous? If so, are solute rotations and translations coupled in the sense that stiff and soft solvent environments hinder or speed up both types of dynamics? For the systems studied here, there appears to be a clear connection between translations, rotations, and stiff/soft solvent environments. We also discuss interesting asymmetries of the correlation between solutes with anions and cations.

  15. A link between structure, diffusion and rotations of hydrogen bonding tracers in ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araque, Juan C.; Daly, Ryan P.; Margulis, Claudio J.

    2016-05-01

    When solutes are small compared to the size of the ions in an ionic liquid, energetic heterogeneities associated with charge enhanced (stiff) and charge depleted (soft) nanoenvironments are sampled. In a recent article [J. C. Araque et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119(23), 7015-7029 (2015)], we explored large deviations from Stokes-Einstein translational diffusion caused by such a heterogeneity. The current article is set to explore the effect of soft and stiff solvent environments (i.e., structure) on OH-bond rotations in the case of water and small alcohols in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([" separators="Im1,2 + ][" separators="NTf2- ]). Is solute rotational dynamics heterogeneous? If so, are solute rotations and translations coupled in the sense that stiff and soft solvent environments hinder or speed up both types of dynamics? For the systems studied here, there appears to be a clear connection between translations, rotations, and stiff/soft solvent environments. We also discuss interesting asymmetries of the correlation between solutes with anions and cations.

  16. Evaluation of Cu as an interlayer in Be/F82H diffusion bonds for ITER TBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, R. M.; Goods, S. H.; Ying, A.; Dorn, C. K.; Abdou, M.

    2011-10-01

    Copper has been investigated as a potential interlayer material for diffusion bonds between beryllium and Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel. Utilizing Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP), copper was directly bonded to a RAFM steel, F82H, at 650 °C, 700 °C, 750 °C, 800 °C and 850 °C, under 103 MPa for 2 h. Interdiffusion across the bonded interface was limited to 1 μm or less, even at the highest HIP'ing temperature. Through mechanical testing it was found that samples HIP'ed at 750 °C and above remain bonded up to 211 MPa under tensile loading, at which point ductile failure occurred in the bulk copper. As titanium will be used as a barrier layer to prevent the formation of brittle Be/Cu intermetallics, additional annealing studies were performed on copper samples coated with a titanium thin film to study Ti/Cu interdiffusion characteristics. Samples were heated to temperatures between 650 °C and 850 °C for 2 h in order to mimic the range of likely HIP temperatures. A correlation was drawn between HIP temperature and diffusion depth for use in determining the minimum Ti film thickness necessary to block diffusion in the Be/F82H joint.

  17. Effect of High Temperature Storage in Vacuum, Air, and Humid Conditions on Degradation of Gold/Aluminum Wire Bonds in PEMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Microcircuits encapsulated in three plastic package styles were stored in different environments at temperatures varying from 130 C to 225 C for up to 4,000 hours in some cases. To assess the effect of oxygen, the parts were aged at high temperatures in air and in vacuum chambers. The effect of humidity was evaluated during long-term highly accelerated temperature and humidity stress testing (HAST) at temperatures of 130 C and 150 C. High temperature storage testing of decapsulated microcircuits in air, vacuum, and HAST chambers was carried out to evaluate the role of molding compounds in the environmentally-induced degradation and failure of wire bonds (WB). This paper reports on accelerating factors of environment and molding compound on WB failures. It has been shown that all environments, including oxygen, moisture, and the presence of molding compounds reduce time-to-failures compared to unencapsulated devices in vacuum conditions. The mechanism of the environmental effect on KB degradation is discussed.

  18. Effects of interface bonding and defects on boron diffusion at Si/SiO{sub 2} interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Geun-Myeong; Oh, Young Jun; Chang, K. J.

    2013-12-14

    We perform first-principles density functional calculations to find the migration pathway and barrier for B diffusion at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. For various interface models, in which crystalline α-quartz or amorphous silica (a-SiO{sub 2}) is placed on Si, we examine stable and metastable configurations of B-related defects which play a role in B diffusion. While a substitutional B alone is immobile in Si, it tends to diffuse to the interface via an interstitialcy mechanism in the presence of a self-interstitial and then changes into an interstitial B in oxide via a kick-out mechanism, leaving the self-interstitial at the interface. At the defect-free interface, where bridging O atoms are inserted to remove interface dangling bonds, an interstitial B prefers to intervene between the interface Si and bridging O atoms and subsequently diffuses through the hollow space or along the network of the Si-O-Si bonds in oxide. The overall migration barriers are calculated to be 2.02–2.12 eV at the Si/α-quartz interface, while they lie in the range of 2.04 ± 0.44 eV at the Si/a-SiO{sub 2} interface, similar to that in α-quartz. The migration pathway and barrier are not significantly affected by interface defects such as suboxide bond and O protrusion, while dangling bonds in the suboxide region can increase the migration barrier by about 1.5 eV. The result that the interface generally does not hinder the B diffusion from Si to SiO{sub 2} assists in understanding the underlying mechanism for B segregation which commonly occurs at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  19. The Structure and Properties of Diffusion Assisted Bonded Joints in 17-4 PH, Type 347, 15-5 PH and Nitronic 40 Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Diffusion assisted bonds are formed in 17-4 PH, 15-5 PH, type 347 and Nitronic 40 stainless steels using electrodeposited copper as the bonding agent. The bonds are analyzed by conventional metallographic, electron microprobe analysis, and scanning electron microscopic techniques as well as Charpy V-notch impact tests at temperatures of 77 and 300 K. Results are discussed in terms of a postulated model for the bonding process.

  20. Diffusion Bonding Behavior and Characterization of Joints Made Between 316L Stainless Steel Alloy and AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elthalabawy, Waled Mohamed

    The 316L austenitic stainless steel and AZ31 magnesium alloy have physical and mechanical properties which makes these alloys suitable in a number of high technology based industries such as the aerospace and automotive sectors. However, for these alloys to be used in engineering applications, components must be fabricated and joined successfully. The differences in the physical and metallurgical properties between these two alloys prevents the use of conventional fusion welding processes commonly employed in aerospace and transport industry. Therefore, alternative techniques need to be developed and diffusion bonding technology is a process that has considerable potential to join these two dissimilar alloys. In this research work both solid-state and transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding processes were applied. The solid-state bonding of 316L steel to AZ31 magnesium alloy was possible at a bonding temperature of 550°C for 120 minutes using a pressure of 1.3 MPa. The interface characterization of the joint showed a thin intermetallic zone rich in Fe-Al was responsible for providing a metallurgical bond. However, low joint shear strengths were recorded and this was attributed to the poor surface to surface contact. The macro-deformation of the AZ31 alloy prevented the use of higher bonding pressures and longer bonding times. In order to overcome these problems, the TLP bonding process was implemented using pure Cu and Ni foils as interlayers which produced a eutectic phase at the bonding temperature. This research identified the bonding mechanism through microstructural and differential scanning calorimetry investigations. The microstructural characterization of the TLP joints identified intermetallics which became concentrated along the 316L steel/AZ31 bond interface due to the "pushing effect" of the solid/liquid interface during isothermal solidification stage of bonding. The size and concentration of the intermetallics had a noticeable effect on the final joint

  1. Furnace brazing under partial vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckown, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Brazing furnace utilizing partial-vacuum technique reduces tooling requirements and produces better bond. Benefit in that partial vacuum helps to dissociate metal oxides that inhibit metal flow and eliminates heavy tooling required to hold parts together during brazing.

  2. Furnace brazing under partial vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckown, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Brazing furnace utilizing partial-vacuum technique reduces tooling requirements and produces better bond. Benefit in that partial vacuum helps to dissociate metal oxides that inhibit metal flow and eliminates heavy tooling required to hold parts together during brazing.

  3. Thermal fatigue testing of a diffusion-bonded beryllium divertor mock-up under ITER relevant conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, D.L.; Guiniiatouline, R.; Watson, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    Thermal response and thermal fatigue tests of four 5 mm thick beryllium tiles on a Russian divertor mock-up were completed on the Electron Beam Test System at Sandia National Laboratories. The beryllium tiles were diffusion bonded onto an OFHC copper saddleblock and a DSCu (MAGT) tube containing a porous coating. Thermal response tests were performed on the tiles to an absorbed heat flux of 5 MW/m{sup 2} and surface temperatures near 300{degrees}C using 1.4 MPa water at 5.0 m/s flow velocity and an inlet temperature of 8-15{degrees}C. One tile was exposed to incrementally increasing heat fluxes up to 9.5 MW/m{sup 2} and surface temperatures up to 690{degrees}C before debonding at 10 MW/m{sup 2}. A third tile debonded after 9200 thermal fatigue cycles at 5 MW/m{sup 2}, while another debonded after 6800 cycles. In all cases, fatigue failure occurred in the intermetallic layers between the beryllium and copper. No fatigue cracking of the bulk beryllium was observed. During thermal cycling, a gradual loss of porous coating produced increasing sample temperatures. These experiments indicate that diffusion-bonded beryllium tiles can survive several thousand thermal cycles under ITER relevant conditions without failure. However, the reliability of the diffusion bonded Joint remains a serious issue.

  4. Thermal fatigue testing of a diffusion-bonded beryllium divertor mock-up under ITER-relevant conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, D.L.; Watson, R.D.; McDonald, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    Thermal response and thermal fatigue tests of four 5-mm-thick beryllium tiles on a Russian Federation International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)-relevant divertor mock-up were completed on the electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories. Thermal response tests were performed on the tiles to an absorbed heat flux of 5 MW/m{sup 2} and surface temperatures near 300{degree}C using 1.4 MPa water at 5 m/s flow velocity and an inlet temperature of 8 to 15{degree}C. One tile was exposed to incrementally increasing heat fluxes up to 9.5 MW/m{sup 2} and surface temperatures up to 690{degree}C before debonding at 10MW/m{sup 2}. A second tile debonded in 25 to 30 cycles at <0.5 MW/m{sup 2}. However, a third tile debonded after 9200 thermal fatigue cycles at 5 MW/m{sup 2}, while another debonded after 6800 cycles. Posttest surface analysis indicated that fatigue failure occurred in the intermetallic layers between the beryllium and copper. No fatigue cracking of the bulk beryllium was observed. It appears that microcracks growing at the diffusion bond produced the observed gradual temperature increases during thermal cycling. These experiments indicate that diffusion-bonded beryllium tiles can survive several thousand thermal cycles under ITER-relevant conditions. However, the reliability of the diffusion-bonded joint remains a serious issue. 17 refs., 25 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of rapidly solidified, dispersion strengthened aluminum alloys for elevated temperature structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, E. Y.; Kennedy, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Rapidly solidified alloys, based upon the Al-Fe-V-Si system and designed for elevated temperature applications, were evaluated for superplasticity and diffusion bonding behavior. Alloys with 8, 16, 27, and 36 volume percent silicide dispersoids were produced; dispersoid condition was varied by rolling at 300, 400, and 500 C (572, 752, and 932 F). Superplastic behavior was evaluated at strain rates from 1 x 10(exp -6)/s to 8.5/s at elevated temperatures. The results indicate that there was a significant increase in elongation at higher strain rates and at temperatures above 600 C (1112 F). However, the exposure of the alloys to temperatures greater than 600 C (1112 F) resulted in the coarsening of the strengthening dispersoid and the degradation of mechanical properties. Diffusion bonding was possible using low gas pressure at temperatures greater than 600 C (1112 F) which also resulted in degraded properties. The bonding of Al-Fe-V-Si alloys to 7475 aluminum alloy was performed at 516 C (960 F) without significant degradation in microstructure. Bond strengths equal to 90 percent that of the base metal shear strength were achieved. The mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of the alloys were investigated.

  6. Thermal analysis of a diffusion bonded Er3+,Yb3+:glass/Co2+: MgAl2O4 microchip lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghachem, Nabil; Mlynczak, Jaroslaw; Kopczynski, krzysztof; Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Gawron, Michal

    2016-10-01

    The analysis of thermal effects in a diffusion bonded Er3+,Yb3+:glass/Co2+:MgAl2O4 microchip laser is presented. The analysis is performed for both wavelengths at 940 nm and at 975 nm as well as for two different sides of pumping, glass side and saturable absorber side. The heat sink effect of Co2+:MgAl2O4, as well as the impact of the thermal expansion and induced stress on the diffusion bonding are emphasised. The best configurations for reducing the temperature peaks, the Von Mises stresses on the diffusion bonding, and the thermal lensing are determined.

  7. Ceramic-to-metal vacuum seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackerlotzky, O. H.

    1979-01-01

    Knife-edge sealing technique forms reliable, vacuum-tight bonds between materials having very different thermal-expansion characteristics. Seal is thin and flexible and absorb shear, hoop, and bonding stresses at joint so that seal remains vacuum tight.

  8. An investigation on diffusion bonding of aluminum to copper using equal channel angular extrusion process

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, P.; Taheri, A. Karimi

    2011-01-01

    A new method for production of bimetallic rods, utilizing the equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) process has been introduced before by previous researchers, but no attempt has been made to assess the effect of different temperatures and holding times in order to achieve a diffusional bond between the mating surfaces. In present research copper sheathed aluminum rods have been ECAEed at room temperature and subsequently held at a constant ECAE pressure, at different temperatures and holding times to produce a diffusional bond between the copper sheath and the aluminum core. The bonding quality of the joints was examined by shear strength test and a sound bonding interface was achieved. Based on the results, a bonding temperature of 200 °C and holding time of 60–80 min yielded the highest shear strength value. PMID:21760654

  9. Reactive force field simulation of proton diffusion in BaZrO3 using an empirical valence bond approach.

    PubMed

    Raiteri, Paolo; Gale, Julian D; Bussi, Giovanni

    2011-08-24

    A new reactive force field to describe proton diffusion within the solid oxide fuel cell material BaZrO(3) has been derived. Using a quantum mechanical potential energy surface, the parameters of an interatomic potential model to describe hydroxyl groups within both pure and yttrium-doped BaZrO(3) have been determined. Reactivity is then incorporated through the use of the empirical valence bond model. Molecular dynamics simulations (EVB-MD) have been performed to explore the diffusion of hydrogen using a stochastic thermostat and barostat whose equations are extended to the isostress-isothermal ensemble. In the low concentration limit, the presence of yttrium is found not to significantly influence the diffusivity of hydrogen, despite the proton having a longer residence time at oxygen adjacent to the dopant. This lack of influence is due to the fact that trapping occurs infrequently, even when the proton diffuses through octahedra adjacent to the dopant. The activation energy for diffusion is found to be 0.42 eV, in good agreement with experimental values, though the prefactor is slightly underestimated.

  10. Study of diffusion bond development in 6061 aluminum and its relationship to future high density fuels fabrication.

    SciTech Connect

    Prokofiev, I.; Wiencek, T.; McGann, D.

    1997-10-07

    Powder metallurgy dispersions of uranium alloys and silicides in an aluminum matrix have been developed by the RERTR program as a new generation of proliferation-resistant fuels. Testing is done with miniplate-type fuel plates to simulate standard fuel with cladding and matrix in plate-type configurations. In order to seal the dispersion fuel plates, a diffusion bond must exist between the aluminum coverplates surrounding the fuel meat. Four different variations in the standard method for roll-bonding 6061 aluminum were studied. They included mechanical cleaning, addition of a getter material, modifications to the standard chemical etching, and welding methods. Aluminum test pieces were subjected to a bend test after each rolling pass. Results, based on 400 samples, indicate that at least a 70% reduction in thickness is required to produce a diffusion bond using the standard rollbonding method versus a 60% reduction using the Type II method in which the assembly was welded 100% and contained open 9mm holes at frame corners.

  11. Tensile and creep properties of diffusion bonded titanium alloy IMI 834 to gamma titanium aluminide IHI alloy 01A

    SciTech Connect

    Holmquist, M.; Recina, V.; Pettersson, B.

    1999-04-23

    Diffusion bonding of the Ti-alloy Ti-5.8Al-4.0Sn-3.5Zr-0.7Nb-0.5Mo-0.35Se-0.06C (wt%) to the intermetallic {gamma}-based alloy Ti-33Al-2Fe-1.8V-0.1B (wt%) using hot isostatic pressing at 900 C, 200 MPa held for 1 h was studied. Sound joints without any pores or cracks with a width of approximately 5--7 {micro}m could be produced. Tensile testing showed that the strengths of the joints are similar to the strength of the {gamma}-TiAl base material at temperatures between room temperature and 600 C. The fracture occurs either at the joint or in the {gamma}-TiAl material. The fracture initiation process is a competition between initiation in the {gamma}-TiAl base material and initiation at the {gamma}-TiAl/diffusion bond interface. Creep testing showed that most of the creep elongation occurs in the Ti-alloy, but failure is initiated in the joint bond line. Creep causes degradation and pore formation in this line. Interlinkage of these pores creates a crack which grows slowly until the fracture toughness of the {gamma}-TiAl is exceeded and the crack starts to propagate in the {gamma}-TiAl material and terminates creep life.

  12. A comparative study of high velocity oxygen fuel, vacuum plasma spray, and axial plasma spray for the deposition of CoNiCrAlY bond coat alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrivani, A.; Bardi, U.; Carrafiello, L.; Lavacchi, A.; Niccolai, F.; Rizzi, G.

    2003-12-01

    In the aerospace field as well as in the stationary gas turbine field, thermally sprayed coatings are used to improve the surface properties of nickel-super-alloys materials. Coatings are commonly used as bond coat and antioxidation materials (mainly MCrAlY alloys) and as thermal barrier coatings (mainly yttria partially stabilized zirconia). The purpose of the current study was to assess the properties of thermally sprayed bond coat CoNiCrAlY alloys comparing the performance of three different techniques: vacuum plasma spray (VPS), high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF), and axial plasma spray (AxPS). The quality of the deposited films has been assessed and compared from the point of view of microstructural (porosity, oxide concentration, unmelted particles presence) and mechanical (hardness) characteristics. The surface composition and morphology of the coatings were also determined. Specific efficiency tests were performed for the three examined technologies. The highest quality coatings are obtained by VPS, but also high velocity oxygen fuel and AxPS sprayed films have interesting properties, which can make their use interesting for some applications.

  13. Brazing process using'al-Si filler alloy reliably bonds aluminum parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Johnson, W. R.

    1966-01-01

    Brazing process employs an aluminum-silicon filler alloy for diffusion bonding of aluminum parts in a vacuum or inert gas atmosphere. This process is carried out at temperatures substantially below those required in conventional process and produces bonds of greater strength and reliability.

  14. Comparison of structural behavior of superplastically formed/diffusion-bonded sandwich structures and honeycomb core sandwich structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A superplasticity formed/diffusion-bonded (SPF/DB) orthogonally corrugated core sandwich structure is discussed and its structural behavior is compared to that of a conventional honeycomb core sandwich structure. The stiffness and buckling characteristics of the two types of sandwich structures are compared under conditions of equal structural density. It is shown that under certain conditions, the SPF/DB orthogonally corrugated core sandwich structure is slightly more efficient than the optimum honeycomb core (square-cell core) sandwich structure. However, under different conditions, this effect can be reversed.

  15. Microstructure of arc brazed and diffusion bonded joints of stainless steel and SiC reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elßner, M.; Weis, S.; Grund, T.; Wagner, G.; Habisch, S.; Mayr, P.

    2016-03-01

    Joint interfaces of aluminum and stainless steel often exhibit intermetallics of Al-Fe, which limit the joint strength. In order to reduce these brittle phases in joints of aluminum matrix composites (AMC) and stainless steel, diffusion bonding and arc brazing are used. Due to the absence of a liquid phase, diffusion welding can reduce the formation of these critical in- termetallics. For this joining technique, the influence of surface treatments and adjusted time- temperature-surface-pressure-regimes is investigated. On the other hand, arc brazing offers the advantage to combine a localized heat input with the application of a low melting filler and was conducted using the system Al-Ag-Cu. Results of the joining tests using both approaches are described and discussed with regard to the microstructure of the joints and the interfaces.

  16. Transient Liquid Phase Diffusion Bonding of Magnesium Alloy (Mg-AZ31) to Titanium Alloy (Ti-6Al-4V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atieh, Anas Mahmoud

    The magnesium alloy Mg-AZ31 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V have physical characteristics and mechanical properties that makes it attractive for a wide range of engineering applications in the aerospace and automotive industries. However, the differences in melting temperature and coefficient of thermal expansion hinder the use of traditional fusion welding techniques. Transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding of magnesium alloy Mg-AZ31 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al- 4V was performed and different interlayer types and configurations were used to facilitate joint formation. The joining of these alloys using Ni foils was successful at a bonding temperature of 515°C, bonding pressure 0.2 MPa, for bonding time of 5 minutes. At the Ni/Mg-AZ31 bond interface, the formation of a eutectic liquid between Mg and Ni was observed. The formation of Mg2Ni and Mg3AlNi2 were identified along the bond interface resulting in an isothermally solidified joint. At the Ni/Ti-6Al-4V interface, the solid-state diffusion process results in joint formation. The use of double Ni-Cu sandwich joint resulted in further enhancement in joint formation and this produced joints with greater shear strength values. The configuration of Mg-AZ31/Cu- Ni/Ti-6Al-4V or Mg-AZ31/Ni-Cu/Ti-6Al-4V influence the mechanism of bonding and the type of intermetallics formed within the joint. The application of thin Ni electrodeposited coatings resulted in further enhancements of joint quality due to better surface-to-surface contact and a reduction in the formation of intermetallics at the joint. The effect of Cu nano-particles in the coatings was found to decrease the eutectic zone width and this resulted in an increase the shear strength of the joints. The highest shear strength of 69 MPa was possible with bonds made using coatings containing Cu nano-particle dispersion.

  17. The effect of hydrogen bonding on the diffusion of water in n-alkanes and n-alcohols measured with a novel single microdroplet method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jonathan T.; Duncan, P. Brent; Momaya, Amit; Jutila, Arimatti; Needham, David

    2010-01-01

    While the Stokes-Einstein (SE) equation predicts that the diffusion coefficient of a solute will be inversely proportional to the viscosity of the solvent, this relation is commonly known to fail for solutes, which are the same size or smaller than the solvent. Multiple researchers have reported that for small solutes, the diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the viscosity to a fractional power, and that solutes actually diffuse faster than SE predicts. For other solvent systems, attractive solute-solvent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, are known to retard the diffusion of a solute. Some researchers have interpreted the slower diffusion due to hydrogen bonding as resulting from the effective diffusion of a larger complex of a solute and solvent molecules. We have developed and used a novel micropipette technique, which can form and hold a single microdroplet of water while it dissolves in a diffusion controlled environment into the solvent. This method has been used to examine the diffusion of water in both n-alkanes and n-alcohols. It was found that the polar solute water, diffusing in a solvent with which it cannot hydrogen bond, closely resembles small nonpolar solutes such as xenon and krypton diffusing in n-alkanes, with diffusion coefficients ranging from 12.5×10-5 cm2/s for water in n-pentane to 1.15×10-5 cm2/s for water in hexadecane. Diffusion coefficients were found to be inversely proportional to viscosity to a fractional power, and diffusion coefficients were faster than SE predicts. For water diffusing in a solvent (n-alcohols) with which it can hydrogen bond, diffusion coefficient values ranged from 1.75×10-5 cm2/s in n-methanol to 0.364×10-5 cm2/s in n-octanol, and diffusion was slower than an alkane of corresponding viscosity. We find no evidence for solute-solvent complex diffusion. Rather, it is possible that the small solute water may be retarded by relatively longer residence times (compared to non-H-bonding solvents

  18. The effect of hydrogen bonding on the diffusion of water in n-alkanes and n-alcohols measured with a novel single microdroplet method.

    PubMed

    Su, Jonathan T; Duncan, P Brent; Momaya, Amit; Jutila, Arimatti; Needham, David

    2010-01-28

    While the Stokes-Einstein (SE) equation predicts that the diffusion coefficient of a solute will be inversely proportional to the viscosity of the solvent, this relation is commonly known to fail for solutes, which are the same size or smaller than the solvent. Multiple researchers have reported that for small solutes, the diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the viscosity to a fractional power, and that solutes actually diffuse faster than SE predicts. For other solvent systems, attractive solute-solvent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, are known to retard the diffusion of a solute. Some researchers have interpreted the slower diffusion due to hydrogen bonding as resulting from the effective diffusion of a larger complex of a solute and solvent molecules. We have developed and used a novel micropipette technique, which can form and hold a single microdroplet of water while it dissolves in a diffusion controlled environment into the solvent. This method has been used to examine the diffusion of water in both n-alkanes and n-alcohols. It was found that the polar solute water, diffusing in a solvent with which it cannot hydrogen bond, closely resembles small nonpolar solutes such as xenon and krypton diffusing in n-alkanes, with diffusion coefficients ranging from 12.5x10(-5) cm(2)/s for water in n-pentane to 1.15x10(-5) cm(2)/s for water in hexadecane. Diffusion coefficients were found to be inversely proportional to viscosity to a fractional power, and diffusion coefficients were faster than SE predicts. For water diffusing in a solvent (n-alcohols) with which it can hydrogen bond, diffusion coefficient values ranged from 1.75x10(-5) cm(2)/s in n-methanol to 0.364x10(-5) cm(2)/s in n-octanol, and diffusion was slower than an alkane of corresponding viscosity. We find no evidence for solute-solvent complex diffusion. Rather, it is possible that the small solute water may be retarded by relatively longer residence times (compared to non-H-bonding

  19. The effect of hydrogen bonding on the diffusion of water in n-alkanes and n-alcohols measured with a novel single microdroplet method

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jonathan T.; Duncan, P. Brent; Momaya, Amit; Jutila, Arimatti; Needham, David

    2010-01-01

    While the Stokes–Einstein (SE) equation predicts that the diffusion coefficient of a solute will be inversely proportional to the viscosity of the solvent, this relation is commonly known to fail for solutes, which are the same size or smaller than the solvent. Multiple researchers have reported that for small solutes, the diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the viscosity to a fractional power, and that solutes actually diffuse faster than SE predicts. For other solvent systems, attractive solute-solvent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, are known to retard the diffusion of a solute. Some researchers have interpreted the slower diffusion due to hydrogen bonding as resulting from the effective diffusion of a larger complex of a solute and solvent molecules. We have developed and used a novel micropipette technique, which can form and hold a single microdroplet of water while it dissolves in a diffusion controlled environment into the solvent. This method has been used to examine the diffusion of water in both n-alkanes and n-alcohols. It was found that the polar solute water, diffusing in a solvent with which it cannot hydrogen bond, closely resembles small nonpolar solutes such as xenon and krypton diffusing in n-alkanes, with diffusion coefficients ranging from 12.5×10−5 cm2∕s for water in n-pentane to 1.15×10−5 cm2∕s for water in hexadecane. Diffusion coefficients were found to be inversely proportional to viscosity to a fractional power, and diffusion coefficients were faster than SE predicts. For water diffusing in a solvent (n-alcohols) with which it can hydrogen bond, diffusion coefficient values ranged from 1.75×10−5 cm2∕s in n-methanol to 0.364×10−5 cm2∕s in n-octanol, and diffusion was slower than an alkane of corresponding viscosity. We find no evidence for solute-solvent complex diffusion. Rather, it is possible that the small solute water may be retarded by relatively longer residence times (compared to non-H-bonding

  20. Dynamics of supercritical methanol of varying density from first principles simulations: hydrogen bond fluctuations, vibrational spectral diffusion, and orientational relaxation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vivek Kumar; Chandra, Amalendu

    2013-06-14

    A first principles study of the dynamics of supercritical methanol is carried out by means of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, the fluctuation dynamics of hydroxyl stretch frequencies, hydrogen bonds, dangling hydroxyl groups, and orientation of methanol molecules are investigated for three different densities at 523 K. Apart from the dynamical properties, various equilibrium properties of supercritical methanol such as the local density distributions and structural correlations, hydrogen bonding aspects, frequency-structure correlations, and dipole distributions of methanol molecules are also investigated. In addition to the density dependence of various equilibrium and dynamical properties, their dependencies on dispersion interactions are also studied by carrying out additional simulations using a dispersion corrected density functional for all the systems. It is found that the hydrogen bonding between methanol molecules decreases significantly as we move to the supercritical state from the ambient one. The inclusion of dispersion interactions is found to increase the number of hydrogen bonds to some extent. Calculations of the frequency-structure correlation coefficient reveal that a statistical correlation between the hydroxyl stretch frequency and the nearest hydrogen-oxygen distance continues to exist even at supercritical states of methanol, although it is weakened with increase of temperature and decrease of density. In the supercritical state, the frequency time correlation function is found to decay with two time scales: One around or less than 100 fs and the other in the region of 250-700 fs. It is found that, for supercritical methanol, the times scales of vibrational spectral diffusion are determined by an interplay between the dynamics of hydrogen bonds, dangling OD groups, and inertial rotation of methanol molecules and the roles of these various components are found to vary with density of the supercritical solvent. Effects

  1. NMR spectra and translational diffusion of protons in crystals with hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timokhin, V. M.; Garmash, V. M.; Tarasov, V. P.

    2015-07-01

    Investigation of proton transport in hydrogen-bond crystals at low temperatures is currently one of important problems in the semiconductor physics. With the use of the NMR spectra of wide-band-gap hydrogen-bond crystals grown in H2O and D2O solutions, we have succeeded in finding a direct proof of the presence of protons in the mobile phase, determined their activation energy in good agreement with the spectra of thermally stimulated depolarization currents and with the infrared spectra, and, as a result, clarified the mechanism of proton transport and tunneling.

  2. Breather cloth for vacuum curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1979-01-01

    Finely-woven nylon cloth that has been treated with Teflon improves vacuum adhesive bonding of coatings to substrates. Cloth is placed over coating; entire assembly, including substrate, coating, and cloth, is placed in plastic vacuum bag for curing. Cloth allows coating to "breathe" when bag is evacuated. Applications include bonding film coatings to solar concentrators and collectors.

  3. Diffusion Bonding of TA15 and Ti2AlNb Alloys: Interfacial Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Ji, Xiaohu; Xue, Kemin

    2017-03-01

    TA15 and Ti2AlNb alloys were joined by diffusion welding. The influence of holding time on morphology and mechanical properties of the joint was studied under two conditions of different bonding pressure and temperature. The interface structure was analyzed by BSE and EDS. The mechanical properties of joints were tested. The results show that the typical interfacial microstructure consists of lath α-phase (TA15 alloy)/flake α phase + α-interfacial phase + α2 phase/B2-rich phase/Ti2AlNb alloy. When bonding at 920 °C and 15 MPa with increasing holding time, the interface microstructure evolves into flake α phase and distributes as a basket-weave and the interfacial coarse spherical α phase distributes as a line. α2 phase and O phase disappear gradually while the content of the B2 phase increases. The tensile strength of the joints is 870, 892 and 903 MPa, for 120, 150 and 210 min holding time, respectively, while the elongation rises as well. When bonding at 940 °C and 10 MPa with increasing holding time, the interfacial area includes more Widmanstatten structure and B2 phase. The tensile strength of joints decreases from 921 to 908 MPa, while the elongation increases from 12 to 15.5%, for holding 120 and 210 min, respectively. The tendency of plastic fracture also increases with holding time for both temperature-pressure combinations.

  4. Atomic force microscopy imaging of TiO{sub 2} surfaces active for C-C bond formation reactions in ultrahigh vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, B.A.; Barteau, M.A.

    1994-06-01

    TiO{sub 2}(001) single crystal surfaces active for a variety of different chemistries were examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). C-C bond forming reactions previously identified on these surfaces include carboxylic acid ketonization, aldol condensation, reductive carbonyl coupling, and alkyne cyclotrimerization. The surfaces were prepared in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) and examined by AFM in air. Surfaces examined included the (011)-faceted surface, (114)-faceted surface, and argon-ion-bombarded surfaces, as well as the mechanically polished single-crystal surface prior to treatment in UHV. The one unifying feature of all the images was their extreme flatness. Root-mean-square roughnesses were routinely less than 10 {Angstrom} in 500 x 500 nm scans. These same scans showed the surfaces to have surface areas exceeding that of an ideal flat surface by no more than 1.2%. Images of the polished surface revealed a variety of surface features, including polishing scratches and particle-like features. The argon-ion-bombarded surface and the faceted surfaces were composed of large flat plateaus ranging in size from 21 to 75 nm. The size of the plateaus was essentially the same for the ion bombarded surface and the (011)-faceted surface. The (114)-faceted surfaced exhibited slightly smaller plateau regions than the other surfaces. The images indicate that argon-ion bombardment, while disordering the surface and causing significant composition changes, does not lead to observable morphological changes on this scale. The relative uniformity of the surfaces examined is consistent with the selectivity of carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions that have been shown to take place on these surfaces. The images also reveal how the surface topography on the scale of the plateau structures observed is only slightly changed during the transformation of the surface unit cell structure from the (011)- to the (114)-faceted surface. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Nonideality in diffusion of ionic and neutral solutes and hydrogen bond dynamics in dimethyl sulfoxide-chloroform mixtures of varying composition.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rini; Chandra, Amalendu

    2011-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of charged and neutral solutes in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-chloroform mixtures reveal pronounced nonideality in the solute diffusion with changes of composition of the mixtures. The diffusion coefficient of the anionic solute first decreases, passes through a minimum at DMSO mole fraction of about 0.50, and then increases to reach its value for pure DMSO. The diffusion coefficients of the cationic and neutral solutes are found to decrease with increase in DMSO content of the solvent mixture. The extent of nonideality in the diffusion and orientational relaxation of solvent molecules is found to be somewhat stronger than that in diffusion of the anionic solute in these mixtures. We have also calculated the relaxation of hydrogen bonds formed between DMSO and chloroform molecules. The lifetimes of DMSO-chloroform hydrogen bonds are found to increase monotonically with increase in DMSO concentration. The average number of hydrogen bonds and their average energies are also computed. It is found that an increase in DMSO concentration causes a decrease in the number of DMSO-chloroform hydrogen bonds per DMSO or chloroform molecules but increases the strength of these hydrogen bonds. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. M3B2 and M5B3 Formation in Diffusion-Affected Zone During Transient Liquid Phase Bonding Single-Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Naicheng; Hu, Xiaobing; Liu, Jide; Jin, Tao; Sun, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhuangqi

    2015-04-01

    Precipitates in the diffusion-affected zone (DAZ) during transient liquid phase bonding (TLP) single-crystal superalloys were observed and investigated. Small size and dendritic-shaped precipitates were identified to be M3B2 borides and intergrowth of M3B2/M5B3 borides. The orientation relationships among M3B2, M5B3, and matrix were determined using transmission electron microscope (TEM). Composition characteristics of these borides were also analyzed by TEM energy-dispersive spectrometer. Because this precipitating phenomenon deviates from the traditional parabolic transient liquid phase bonding model which assumed a precipitates free DAZ during TLP bonding, some correlations between the deviation of the isothermal solidification kinetics and these newly observed precipitating behaviors were discussed and rationalized when bonding the interlayer containing the high diffusivity melting point depressant elements and substrates of low solubility.

  7. Evaluation of superplastic forming and co-diffusion bonding of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy expanded sandwich structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvin, G. H.; Israeli, L.; Stolpestad, J. H.; Stacher, G. W.

    1981-01-01

    The application of the superplastic forming/diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) process to supersonic cruise research is investigated. The capability of an SPF/DB titanium structure to meet the structural requirements of the inner wing area of the NASA arrow-wing advanced supersonic transport design is evaluated. Selection of structural concepts and their optimization for minimum weight, SPF/DB process optimization, fabrication of representative specimens, and specimen testing and evaluation are described. The structural area used includes both upper and lower wing panels, where the upper wing panel is used for static compression strength evaluation and the lower panel, in tension, is used for fracture mechanics evaluations. The individual test specimens, cut from six large panels, consist of 39 static specimens, 10 fracture mechanics specimens, and one each full size panel for compression stability and fracture mechanics testing. Tests are performed at temperatures of -54 C (-65 F), room temperature, and 260 C (500 F).

  8. Role of large-scale slip in mode II fracture of bimaterial interface produced by diffusion bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, M. R.; Ghosh, A. K.

    2001-08-01

    Bimaterial interfaces present in diffusion-bonded (and in-situ) composites are often not flat interfaces. The unevenness of the interface can result not only from interface reaction products but also from long-range waviness associated with the surfaces of the component phases bonded together. Experimental studies aimed at determining interface mechanical properties generally ignore the departure in the local stress due to waviness and assume a theoretically flat interface. Furthermore, the commonly used testing methods involving superimposed tension often renders the interface so extremely brittle that if microplastic effects were present it becomes impossible to perceive them. This article examines the role of waviness of the interface and microplastic effects on crack initiation. To do this, a test was selected that provides significant stability against crack growth by superimposing compressive stresses. Mode II interface fracture was studied for NiAl/Mo model laminates using a recently developed asymmetrically loaded shear (ALS) interface shear test. The ALS test may be viewed as opposite of the laminate bend test. In the bend test, shear at the interface is created via tension on one surface of the bend, while in the ALS test, shear is created by compression on one side of the interface relative to the other. Normal to the interface, near the crack tip, an initially compressive state is replaced by slight tension due to Poisson’s expansion of the unbonded part of the compressed beam.

  9. Liquid-phase diffusion bonding: Temperature effects and solute redistribution in high temperature lead-free composite solders

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver; Choquette, Stephanie

    2015-05-17

    Liquid-phase diffusion bonding (LPDB) is being studied as the primary phenomena occurring in the development of a high temperature lead-free composite solder paste composed of gas-atomized Cu-10Ni, wt.% (Cu-11Ni, at.%) powder blended with Sn-0.7Cu-0.05Ni-0.01Ge (Sn-1.3Cu-0.1Ni-0.02Ge, at.%) Nihon-Superior SN100C solder powder. Powder compacts were used as a model system. LPDB promotes enhanced interdiffusion of the low-melting alloy matrix with the solid Cu-10Ni reinforcement powder above the matrix liquidus temperature. The initial study involved the effective intermetallic compound (IMC) compositions and microstructures that occur at varying reflow temperatures and times between 250-300°C and 30-60s, respectively. Certain reflow temperatures encourage adequate interdiffusion to form a continuous highly-conductive network throughout the composite solder joints. The diffusion of nickel, in particular, has a disperse pattern that foreshadows the possibility of a highly-conductive low-melting solder that can be successfully utilized at high temperatures.

  10. Fabrication and evaluation of enhanced diffusion bonded titanium honeycomb core sandwich panels with titanium aluminide face sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, E. K.; Bird, R. K.; Bales, T. T.

    1989-01-01

    A joining process was developed for fabricating lightweight, high temperature sandwich panels for aerospace applications using Ti-14Al-21Nb face sheets and Ti-3Al-2.5V honeycomb core. The process, termed Enhanced Diffusion Bonding (EDB), relies on the formation of a eutectic liquid through solid-state diffusion at elevated temperatures and isothermal solidification to produce joints in thin-gage titanium and titanium aluminide structural components. A technique employing a maskant on the honeycomb core was developed which permitted electroplating a controlled amount of EDB material only on the edges of the honeycomb core in order to minimize the structural weight and metallurgical interaction effects. Metallurgical analyses were conducted to determine the interaction effects between the EDB materials and the constituents of the sandwich structure following EDB processing. The initial mechanical evaluation was conducted with butt joint specimens tested at temperatures from 1400 - 1700 F. Further mechanical evaluation was conducted with EDB sandwich specimens using flatwise tension tests at temperatures from 70 - 1100 F and edgewise compression tests at ambient temperature.

  11. Solvent-dependent spectral diffusion in a hydrogen bonded "vibrational aggregate".

    PubMed

    King, John T; Baiz, Carlos R; Kubarych, Kevin J

    2010-10-07

    Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2DIR) is used to measure the viscosity-dependent spectral diffusion of a model vibrational probe, Mn(2)(CO)(10) (dimanganese decacarbonyl, DMDC), in a series of alcohols with time scales ranging from 2.67 ps in methanol to 5.33 ps in 1-hexanol. Alcohol-alkane solvent mixtures were found to produce indistinguishable linear IR spectra, while still demonstrating viscosity-dependent spectral diffusion. Using a vibrational exciton model to characterize the inhomogeneous energy landscape, several analogies emerge with multichromophoric electronic systems, such as J-aggregates and light-harvesting protein complexes. An excitonic, local vibrational mode Hamiltonian parametrized to reproduce the vibrational structure of DMDC serves as a starting point from which site energies (i.e., local carbonyl frequencies) are given Gaussian distributed disorder. The model gives excellent agreement with both the linear IR spectrum and the inhomogeneous widths extracted from 2DIR, indicating the system can be considered to be a "vibrational aggregate." This model naturally leads to exchange narrowing due to disorder-induced exciton localization, producing line widths consistent with our 1D and 2D measurements. Further, the diagonal disorder alone effectively reduces the molecular symmetry, leading to the appearance of Raman bands in the IR spectrum in accord with the measurements. Here, we show that the static inhomogeneity of the excitonic model with disorder successfully captures the essential details of the 1D spectrum while predicting the degree of IR activity of forbidden modes as well as the inhomogeneous widths and relative magnitudes of the transition moments.

  12. Open abdomen with vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction in patients with complicated diffuse secondary peritonitis: A single-center 8-year experience.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Matti; Mentula, Panu; Sallinen, Ville; Rasilainen, Suvi; Bäcklund, Minna; Leppäniemi, Ari

    2017-06-01

    Open abdomen (OA) treatment in patients with peritonitis is increasing worldwide. Various temporary abdominal closure devices are being used. This study included patients with complicated diffuse secondary peritonitis, OA, and vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM). The aim of this study was to describe mortality and major morbidity in terms of delayed primary fascial closure and enteroatmospheric fistula rates. This was a single-academic-center retrospective study of consecutive patients with diffuse peritonitis, OA, and VAWCM between years 2008 and 2016. Descriptive and univariate analyses were performed. Forty-one patients were identified and analyzed. Median age was 59 years, preoperative septic shock was diagnosed in 54% (n = 22), and 59% (n = 24) had a postoperative peritonitis. Mortality was 29% (n = 12), and 76% (n = 31) of patients were admitted in the intensive care unit. The median duration of OA was 7 days with a median of two dressing changes. Delayed primary fascial closure rate among survivors was 92% (n = 33), and enteroatmospheric fistulas developed in 7% (n = 3). In a subgroup analysis, patients with OA in the primary laparotomy for peritonitis (n = 27) were compared with patients with OA in the subsequent laparotomies (n = 14). There were no significant differences between groups. The VAWCM technique in patients with complicated secondary diffuse peritonitis and OA yields excellent results in terms of delayed primary fascial closure rate and a low number of enteroatmospheric fistulas. It seems to be safe to close the abdomen at the index laparotomy, if possible, even if there is a risk of a need of OA later. Therapeutic/care management study, level IV.

  13. Investigation on W/Fe diffusion bonding using Ti foil and Ti powder interlayer by SPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-Yu; Luo, Lai-Ma; Zhang, Jun; Zan, Xiang; Zhu, Xiao-Yong; Luo, Guang-Nan; Wu, Yu-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    W/steel composites are being developed for potential application in He gas-cooled divertors and plasma-facing components in fusion reactors. In this study, the dissimilar metal joints between W and Fe were fabricated at 950 °C via spark plasma sintering method with Ti foil (Ti-F) and Ti powder (Ti-P) as the interlayer under Ar atmosphere for 5 min at 57 MPa. Microscopic structures of the W/Fe diffusion joints with Ti-F and Ti-P were investigated and compared via field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thermal cycling tests were employed to measure the thermal stability of different types of W/Ti/Fe samples. The hardness distribution across joining interfaces was also determined. After thermal cycling tests, a crack occurred along the W/Ti-P interface in the W/Ti-P/Fe samples, whereas the W/Ti-F/Fe samples were intact at the interfaces. Results revealed that Ti-F is more suitable as an interlayer than Ti-P, and the interfaces of the W/Ti-F/Fe samples have better thermal stability than those of the W/Ti-P/Fe ones.

  14. K-130 Cyclotron vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhole, R. B.; Roy, Anindya; Pal, Sarbajit; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    The vacuum system for K-130 cyclotron has been operational since 1977. It consists of two sub-systems, main vacuum system and beam line vacuum system. The main vacuum system is designed to achieve and maintain vacuum of about 1 × 10-6 mbar inside the 23 m3 volume of acceleration chamber comprising the Resonator tank and the Dee tank. The beam line vacuum system is required for transporting the extracted beam with minimum loss. These vacuum systems consist of diffusion pumps backed by mechanical pumps like roots and rotary pumps. The large vacuum pumps and valves of the cyclotron vacuum system were operational for more than twenty five years. In recent times, problems of frequent failures and maintenance were occurring due to aging and lack of appropriate spares. Hence, modernisation of the vacuum systems was taken up in order to ensure a stable high voltage for radio frequency system and the extraction system. This is required for efficient acceleration and transportation of high intensity ion beam. The vacuum systems have been upgraded by replacing several pumps, valves, gauges and freon units. The relay based control system for main vacuum system has also been replaced by PLC based state of the art control system. The upgraded control system enables inclusion of additional operational logics and safety interlocks into the system. The paper presents the details of the vacuum system and describes the modifications carried out for improving the performance and reliability of the vacuum system.

  15. Enhanced Cu-to-Cu direct bonding by controlling surface physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Po-Hao; Liang, Sin-Yong; Song, Jenn-Ming; Huang, Shang-Kun; Chiu, Ying-Ta; Hung, Chih-Pin

    2017-03-01

    Cu-to-Cu direct bonding is one of the key technologies for three-dimensional (3D) chip stacking. This research proposes a new concept to enhance Cu-to-Cu direct bonding through the control of surface physical properties. A linear relationship between bonding strength and the H/\\sqrt{R} value of the bonding face (H: subsurface hardness, R: surface roughness) was found. Low vacuum air plasma and thermal annealing were adopted to adjust the surface physical conditions. Instead of surface activation, an acceleration in copper atom diffusion due to plasma-induced compressive stress accounts for the improvement in bonding strength.

  16. A scintillator fabricated by solid-state diffusion bonding for high spatial resolution x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameshima, Takashi; Sato, Takahiro; Kudo, Togo; Ono, Shun; Ozaki, Kyosuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-07-01

    Lens-coupled two-dimensional indirect X-ray detectors with thin-film scintillators are important for high spatial resolution X-ray imaging. To achieve high quality high-resolution images, we propose a novel fabrication method for thin-film scintillators based on solid-state diffusion bonding. Scintillators were successfully produced with thicknesses of 5, 10, and 20 μm, with a surface flatness better than λ/10. X-ray imaging performance with a point spread function of 8 μm FWHM was demonstrated with a prototype X-ray detector equipped with a 20-μm-thick scintillator, at an effective spatial sampling of 4 μm/pixel and a field of view of 2.56 x 1.92 mm2. At the request of all authors of the paper and with the agreement of the proceedings editors an updated version of this article was published on 1 September 2016. An older version of the paper was inadvertently supplied to AIP Publishing and the final version is now available.

  17. Vacuum plasma coatings for turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Turbine blades, vacuum plasma spray coated with NiCrAlY, CoCrAlY or NiCrAlY/Cr2O3, were evaluated and rated superior to standard space shuttle main engine (SSME) coated blades. Ratings were based primarily on 25 thermal cycles in the MSFC Burner Rig Tester, cycling between 1700 F (gaseous H2) and -423 F (liquid H2). These tests showed no spalling on blades with improved vacuum plasma coatings, while standard blades spalled. Thermal barrier coatings of ZrO2, while superior to standard coatings, lacked the overall performance desired. Fatigue and tensile specimens, machined from MAR-M-246(Hf) test bars identical to the blades were vacuum plasma spray coated, diffusion bond treated, and tested to qualify the vacuum plasma spray process for flight hardware testing and application. While NiCrAlY/Cr2O3 offers significant improvement over standard coatings in durability and thermal protection, studies continue with an objective to develop coatings offering even greater improvements.

  18. Dual-central-wavelength passively mode-locked diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO4/Nd:GdVO4 laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, F. L.; Sung, C. L.; Huang, T. L.; Wu, T. W.; Cho, H. H.; Liang, H. C.; Chen, Y. F.

    2017-08-01

    A dual-central-wavelength passively mode-locked laser with full modulation in the 0.31 THz optical beating is achieved by using a diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO4/Nd:GdVO4 crystal and a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. The output power of the dual-band emission is well balanced by tuning the focal position of the pump waist. At a pump power of 13 W, the total output power is up to 2.7 W with a repetition rate of 297.9 MHz. The autocorrelation traces clearly reveal the synchronization of the dual-band emission. Moreover, an analytical model is developed to manifest the multi-pulse structure caused by the etalon effect of the gain medium. More important, we experimentally verify that the etalon effect can be completely eliminated by using the wedge-cut diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO4/Nd:GdVO4 crystal.

  19. Comparison of Diffusion Coefficients of Aryl Carbonyls and Aryl Alcohols in Hydroxylic Solvents. Evidence that the Diffusion of Ketyl Radicals in Hydrogen-Bonding Solvents is Not Anomalous?

    SciTech Connect

    Autrey, S Thomas ); Camaioni, Donald M. ); Kandanarachchi, Pramod H.; Franz, James A. )

    2000-12-01

    The diffusion coefficients of a benzyl-, sec-phenethyl-, and diphenylmethyl alcohol and the corresponding aryl carbonyls (benzaldehyde, acetophenone and benzophenone) were measured by Taylor's dispersion method in both ethyl and isopropyl alcohol. The experimental values are compared to published transient grating measurements of the corresponding aryl ketyl radicals (benzyl-, sec-phenethyl-, and diphenylmethyl-ketyl radical). In general, the diffusion coefficient of the aryl alcohols and the corresponding aryl ketyl radicals are equivalent within experimental error. This work shows that the diffusion of ketyl radicals is not anomalously slow and that aryl alcohols are significantly better models than the corresponding aryl ketones for analyzing the diffusion of aryl ketyl radicals in both ethyl and isopropyl alcohol. Empirical estimates of the diffusion coefficients of aryl alcohols using the Spernol-Wirtz and Wilke-Chang modifications to the Stokes-Einstein diffusion equation do not adequately account for the interactions between the aryl ketyl radicals or aryl alcohols with the hydroxylic solvents ethyl and isopropyl alcohol. The excellent agreement between the experimental diffusion coefficients of the aryl alcohols and the corresponding ketyl radicals show that the transient grating method can provide accurate estimates for the diffusion coefficients of transient species. This is especially important when a stable model is not available, for example the pyranyl radical.

  20. Water in Hydration Shell of an Iodide Ion: Structure and Dynamics of Solute-Water Hydrogen Bonds and Vibrational Spectral Diffusion from First-Principles Simulations.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Anwesa; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-07-09

    The dynamics of hydrogen bonds and vibrational spectral diffusion of water in the hydration shell of an iodide ion and in bulk have been investigated for aqueous iodide solutions of two different concentrations by using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of dispersion interactions on the dynamics have also been investigated by using a dispersion corrected density functional. For the dilute solution containing a single iodide ion, three time scales are found for the spectral diffusion of solvation shell water: A short time scale of ∼150 fs, a slower time scale of ∼2-3 ps and a yet longer time scale of ∼14-16 ps. The long time scale of ∼14-16 ps is not noticed when calculations are done for all OD modes for both the dilute and concentrated solutions. It is found that a clear separation between the solvation shell and bulk water does not exist in terms of OD stretching frequencies for the concentrated solution. The dynamics of vibrational spectral diffusion is explained in terms of hydrogen bond dynamics, other dynamical modes such as orientational relaxation and molecular diffusion, and also structural aspects of water molecules in the solvation shells. The current results are compared with those of available experimental and other theoretical studies.

  1. Plates for vacuum thermal fusion

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2002-01-01

    A process for effectively bonding arbitrary size or shape substrates. The process incorporates vacuum pull down techniques to ensure uniform surface contact during the bonding process. The essence of the process for bonding substrates, such as glass, plastic, or alloys, etc., which have a moderate melting point with a gradual softening point curve, involves the application of an active vacuum source to evacuate interstices between the substrates while at the same time providing a positive force to hold the parts to be bonded in contact. This enables increasing the temperature of the bonding process to ensure that the softening point has been reached and small void areas are filled and come in contact with the opposing substrate. The process is most effective where at least one of the two plates or substrates contain channels or grooves that can be used to apply vacuum between the plates or substrates during the thermal bonding cycle. Also, it is beneficial to provide a vacuum groove or channel near the perimeter of the plates or substrates to ensure bonding of the perimeter of the plates or substrates and reduce the unbonded regions inside the interior region of the plates or substrates.

  2. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Loading-Dependent Diffusion of CO2, SO2, CH4, and Their Binary Mixtures in ZIF-10: The Role of Hydrogen Bond.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yang, Deshuai; Fisher, Trevor R; Qiao, Qi; Yang, Zhen; Hu, Na; Chen, Xiangshu; Huang, Liangliang

    2017-08-07

    The loading-dependent diffusion behavior of CH4, CO2, SO2, and their binary mixtures in ZIF-10 has been investigated in detail by using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulation results demonstrate that the self-diffusion coefficient Di of CH4 molecules decreases sharply and monotonically with the loading while those of both CO2 and SO2 molecules initially display a slight increase at low uptakes and follow a slow decrease at high uptakes. Accordingly, the interaction energies between CH4 molecules and ZIF-10 remain nearly constant regardless of the loading due to the absence of hydrogen bonds (HBs), while the interaction energies between CO2 (or SO2) and ZIF-10 decease rapidly with the loading, especially at small amounts of gas molecules. Such different loading-dependent diffusion and interaction mechanisms can be attributed to the relevant HB behavior between gas molecules and ZIF-10. At low loadings, both the number and strength of HBs between CO2 (or SO2) molecules and ZIF-10 decrease obviously as the loading increases, which is responsible for the slight increase of their diffusion coefficients. However, at high loadings, their HB strength increases with the loading. Similar loading-dependent phenomena of diffusion, interaction, and HB behavior can be observed for CH4, CO2, and SO2 binary mixtures in ZIF-10, only associated with some HB competition between CO2 and SO2 molecules in the case of the CO2/SO2 mixture.

  4. Transient Liquid Phase Diffusion Bonding of 6061Al-15 wt.% SiC p Composite Using Mixed Cu-Ag Powder Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Pallab; Pal, Tapan Kumar; Maity, Joydeep

    2016-08-01

    Microstructure and shear strength of transient liquid phase diffusion bonded (560 °C, 0.2 MPa) 6061Al-15 wt.% SiCp extruded composite using a 50-µm-thick mixed Cu-Ag powder interlayer have been investigated. During isothermal solidification that took 2 h for completion, a ternary liquid phase formed due to diffusion of Cu and Ag in Al. Subsequent cooling formed a ternary phase mixture (α-Al + CuAl2 + Ag2Al) upon eutectic solidification. With mixed Cu-Ag powder interlayer, isothermal solidification was faster than for pure Al joints made using a 50-µm-thick Cu foil interlayer and for the composite joints made using a 50-µm-thick Cu foil/powder interlayer under similar conditions. The presence of brittle eutectic phase mixture (CuAl2 + Ag2Al) led to poor joint strength at short TLP bonding times. The mixture disappeared upon isothermal solidification with a 2-h hold yielding improved joint strength even with solidification shrinkage in the joint. Increased holding time (6 h) erased shrinkage via solid state diffusion and yielded the highest joint strength (87 MPa) and fair joint efficiency (83%).

  5. Vacuum Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  6. Vacuum Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

  7. Vacuum Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

  8. Vacuum mechatronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackwood, Susan; Belinski, Steven E.; Beni, Gerardo

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is defined as the design and development of vacuum-compatible computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. The importance of vacuum mechatronics is growing with an increased application of vacuum in space studies and in manufacturing for material processing, medicine, microelectronics, emission studies, lyophylisation, freeze drying and packaging. The quickly developing field of vacuum mechatronics will also be the driving force for the realization of an advanced era of totally enclosed clean manufacturing cells. High technology manufacturing has increasingly demanding requirements for precision manipulation, in situ process monitoring and contamination-free environments. To remove the contamination problems associated with human workers, the tendency in many manufacturing processes is to move towards total automation. This will become a requirement in the near future for e.g., microelectronics manufacturing. Automation in ultra-clean manufacturing environments is evolving into the concept of self-contained and fully enclosed manufacturing. A Self Contained Automated Robotic Factory (SCARF) is being developed as a flexible research facility for totally enclosed manufacturing. The construction and successful operation of a SCARF will provide a novel, flexible, self-contained, clean, vacuum manufacturing environment. SCARF also requires very high reliability and intelligent control. The trends in vacuum mechatronics and some of the key research issues are reviewed.

  9. Gravitational vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, L. S.; Saakyan, G. S.

    1984-09-01

    The existence of a special gravitational vacuum is considered in this paper. A phenomenological method differing from the traditional Einsteinian formalization is utilized. Vacuum, metric and matter form a complex determined by field equations and at great distances from gravitational masses vacuum effects are small but could be large in powerful fields. Singularities and black holes justify the approach as well as the Ambartsmyan theory concerning the existence of supermassive and superdense prestallar bodies that then disintegrate. A theory for these superdense bodies is developed involving gravitational field equations that describe the vacuum by an energy momentum tensor and define the field and mass distribution. Computations based on the theory for gravitational radii with incompressible liquid models adequately reflecting real conditions indicate that a gravitational vacuum could have considerable effects on superdense stars and could have radical effects for very large masses.

  10. Chemical insight from density functional modeling of molecular adsorption: Tracking the bonding and diffusion of anthracene derivatives on Cu(111) with molecular orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrick, Jonathan; Bartels, Ludwig; Einstein, T. L.

    2015-03-14

    We present a method of analyzing the results of density functional modeling of molecular adsorption in terms of an analogue of molecular orbitals. This approach permits intuitive chemical insight into the adsorption process. Applied to a set of anthracene derivates (anthracene, 9,10-anthraquinone, 9,10-dithioanthracene, and 9,10-diselenonanthracene), we follow the electronic states of the molecules that are involved in the bonding process and correlate them to both the molecular adsorption geometry and the species’ diffusive behavior. We additionally provide computational code to easily repeat this analysis on any system.

  11. Role of the interfacial thermal barrier in the effective thermal diffusivity/conductivity of SiC-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Hemanshu; Donaldson, Kimberly Y.; Hasselman, D. P. H.; Bhatt, R. T.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental thermal diffusivity data transverse to the fiber direction for composites composed of a reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix reinforced with uniaxially aligned carbon-coated silicon carbide fibers indicate the existence of a significant thermal barrier at the matrix-fiber interface. Calculations of the interfacial thermal conductances indicate that at 300 C and 1-atm N2, more than 90 percent of the heat conduction across the interface occurs by gaseous conduction. Good agreement is obtained between thermal conductance values for the oxidized composite at 1 atm calculated from the thermal conductivity of the N2 gas and those inferred from the data for the effective composite thermal conductivity.

  12. Method for vacuum pressing electrochemical cell components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Craig C. (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Assembling electrochemical cell components using a bonding agent comprising aligning components of the electrochemical cell, applying a bonding agent between the components to bond the components together, placing the components within a container that is essentially a pliable bag, and drawing a vacuum within the bag, wherein the bag conforms to the shape of the components from the pressure outside the bag, thereby holding the components securely in place. The vacuum is passively maintained until the adhesive has cured and the components are securely bonded. The bonding agent used to bond the components of the electrochemical cell may be distributed to the bonding surface from distribution channels in the components. To prevent contamination with bonding agent, some areas may be treated to produce regions of preferred adhesive distribution and protected regions. Treatments may include polishing, etching, coating and providing protective grooves between the bonding surfaces and the protected regions.

  13. Vacuum Plasma Spraying Replaces Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Power, Chris; Burns, David H.; Daniel, Ron; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spraying used to fabricate large parts with complicated contours and inner structures, without uninspectable welds. Reduces time, and expense of fabrication. Wall of combustion chamber built up inside of outer nickel-alloy jacket by plasma spraying. Particles of metal sprayed partially melted in plasma gun and thrown at supersonic speed toward deposition surface. Vacuum plasma-spray produces stronger bond between the grooves and covering layer completing channels and wall of combustion chamber. In tests, bond withstood pressure of 20 kpsi, three times allowable limit by old method.

  14. Vacuum applications of metal foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Several vacuum applications of copper foams in the density range 2-5% and pore sizes of 0.5-0.7 mm are discussed, such as a foreline hydrocarbon trap in a mechanical vacuum pump, a molecular-flow resistor, a diffuser, and a water injector. Other suggested applications include the use of foam copper in the form of an externally heated plug to remove traces of oxygen from inert gases bled into a vacuum system through a stainless steel line and the use of the porous surface for minimizing release of secondary electrons from electrodes in the path of charged particle beams.

  15. Vacuum die attach for integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, E.H.; Tuckerman, D.B.

    1991-09-10

    A thin film eutectic bond for attaching an integrated circuit die to a circuit substrate is formed by coating at least one bonding surface on the die and substrate with an alloying metal, assembling the die and substrate under compression loading, and heating the assembly to an alloying temperature in a vacuum. A very thin bond, 10 microns or less, which is substantially void free, is produced. These bonds have high reliability, good heat and electrical conduction, and high temperature tolerance. The bonds are formed in a vacuum chamber, using a positioning and loading fixture to compression load the die, and an IR lamp or other heat source. For bonding a silicon die to a silicon substrate, a gold silicon alloy bond is used. Multiple dies can be bonded simultaneously. No scrubbing is required. 1 figure.

  16. Vacuum die attach for integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, Edward H.; Tuckerman, David B.

    1991-01-01

    A thin film eutectic bond for attaching an integrated circuit die to a circuit substrate is formed by coating at least one bonding surface on the die and substrate with an alloying metal, assembling the die and substrate under compression loading, and heating the assembly to an alloying temperature in a vacuum. A very thin bond, 10 microns or less, which is substantially void free, is produced. These bonds have high reliability, good heat and electrical conduction, and high temperature tolerance. The bonds are formed in a vacuum chamber, using a positioning and loading fixture to compression load the die, and an IR lamp or other heat source. For bonding a silicon die to a silicon substrate, a gold silicon alloy bond is used. Multiple dies can be bonded simultaneously. No scrubbing is required.

  17. Vacuum mounting for piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiede, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Special housing couples piezoelectric transducers to nonporous surfaces for ultrasonic or acoustic-emission testing. Device, while providing sound isolation on flat or nonflat surfaces, can be attached and detached quickly. Vacuum sealing mechanism eliminates need for permanent or semipermanent bonds, viscous coupling liquids, weights, magnets, tape, or springs ordinarily used.

  18. Use of bond-valence sums in modelling the diffuse scattering from PZN (PbZn1/3Nb2/3O3)

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, R. E.; Welberry, T. R.; Paściak, M.; Goossens, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    This work extends previous efforts to model diffuse scattering from PZN (PbZn1/3Nb2/3O3). Earlier work [Welberry et al. (2005 ▶). J. Appl. Cryst. 38, 639–647; Welberry et al. (2006 ▶). Phys. Rev. B, 74, 224108] is highly prescriptive, using Monte Carlo simulation with very artificial potentials to induce short-range-order structures which were deduced as necessary from inspection of the data. While this gives valid results for the nature of the local structure, it does not strongly relate these structures to underlying crystal chemistry. In that work, the idea of the bond-valence sum was used as a guide to the expected behaviour of the atoms. This paper extends the use of the bond-valence sum from a qualitative guide to becoming a key aspect of the potential experienced by the atoms, through the idea of the global instability index, whose square has been shown to be proportional to the density functional theory energy of some systems when close to the minimum energy configuration.

  19. Strong bonding between sputtered bioglass-ceramic films and Ti-substrate implants induced by atomic inter-diffusion post-deposition heat-treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, G. E.; Popa, A. C.; Galca, A. C.; Aldica, G.; Ferreira, J. M. F.

    2013-09-01

    Bioglasses (BG) are the inorganic materials exhibiting the highest indices of bioactivity. Their appliance as films for bio-functionalization of metallic implant surfaces has been regarded as an optimal solution for surpassing their limited bulk mechanical properties. This study reports on magnetron sputtering of alkali-free BG thin films by varying the target-to-substrate working distance, which proved to play an important role in determining the films’ properties. Post deposition heat-treatments at temperatures slightly above the glass transformation temperature were then applied to induce inter-diffusion processes at the BG/titanium substrate interface and strengthening the bonding as determined by pull-out adherence measurements. The morphological and structural features assessed by SEM-EDS, XRD, and FTIR revealed a good correlation between the formations of inter-metallic titanium silicide phases and the films’ bonding strength. The highest mean value of pull-out adherence (60.3 ± 4.6 MPa), which is adequate even for load-bearing biomedical applications, was recorded for films deposited at a working distance of 35 mm followed by a heat-treatment at 750 °C for 2 h in air. The experimental findings are explained on the basis of structural, compositional and thermodynamic considerations.

  20. Degassing procedure for ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, B. C.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations based on diffusion coefficients and degassing rates for stainless-steel vacuum chambers indicate that baking at lower temperatures for longer periods give lower ultimate pressures than rapid baking at high temperatures. Process could reduce pressures in chambers for particle accelerators, fusion reactors, material research, and other applications.

  1. Degassing procedure for ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, B. C.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations based on diffusion coefficients and degassing rates for stainless-steel vacuum chambers indicate that baking at lower temperatures for longer periods give lower ultimate pressures than rapid baking at high temperatures. Process could reduce pressures in chambers for particle accelerators, fusion reactors, material research, and other applications.

  2. D-Zero Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Wintercorn, S.J.; /Fermilab

    1986-04-07

    The system pumping speed was calculated by taking the reciprocal of the sum of the reciprocal pump speed and the reciprocal line conductances. The conductances of the pipe were calculated from the following formulas taken from the Varian vacuum manual. This report updates the original to reflect the pumping curves and basic vacuum system characteristics for the purchased components and installed piping of the D-Zero vacuum system. The system consists of two Edward's E2M275 two stage mechanical pumps, a Leybold-Heraeus WSU2000 Blower and three Varian 4' diffusion pumps (one for each cryostat). Individual pump and system pumping speed curves and a diagram of the system is included.

  3. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wallow, Thomas I.; Hunter, Marion C.; Krafcik, Karen Lee; Morales, Alfredo M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Domeier, Linda A.

    2008-06-24

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  4. Stainless steel and silicon direct interface synthesis: Chemical bonding effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Michael J.

    Planar stainless steel/stainless steel interfaces, with and without a titanium interlayer and silicon/silicon interfaces have been produced in an ultra high vacuum (UHV) diffusion bonding/deposition instrument. Interface synthesis was accomplished by diffusion bonding two substrates after subjecting the substrate surfaces to a variety of pre-bonding treatments including heat treating, ion-beam sputter cleaning and thin film deposition. Chemical characterization was performed in situ by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) prior to deposition and/or bonding and ex situ by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Additionally, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to study interfaces before and after bonding. Diffusion bonding behavior of stainless steel depends strongly on the chemistry of the surfaces to be bonded. Very smooth, mechanically polished and lapped substrates would bond completely in UHV in 1 hour at 1000°C under 3.5 MPa uniaxial pressure, if the native oxide on the substrates was removed by ion beam cleaning. No voids were observed in these bonded interfaces as studied by TEM and the strength was equal to the unbonded bare material. When an electron beam deposited, 200 A titanium interlayer was added to the stainless steel interface, while bonding under the same conditions, mechanical tensile testing resulted in very low strength when compared with that of chemically clean stainless steel interfaces. Analytical inspection of the interfaces, performed with EELS, EDS, and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) coupled with images from TEM and SEM, showed the reason for the significantly reduced strength is a result of limited contact area and delamination between titanium carbide particles precipitated in the interface. Silicon wafers bicrystals were synthesized by bonding two single-crystal substrates. Silicon wafers were

  5. Vacuum phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Ohsaka, Hiromichi; Jitsuiki, Kei; Yoshizawa, Toshihiko; Takeuchi, Ikuto; Omori, Kazuhiko; Oode, Yasumasa; Ishikawa, Kouhei

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the theory of the formation of the vacuum phenomenon (VP), the detection of the VP, the different medical causes, the different locations of the presentation of the VP, and the differential diagnoses. In the human body, the cavitation effect is recognized on radiological studies; it is called the VP. The mechanism responsible for the formation of the VP is as follows: if an enclosed tissue space is allowed to expand as a rebound phenomenon after an external impact, the volume within the enclosed space will increase. In the setting of expanding volume, the pressure within the space will decrease. The solubility of the gas in the enclosed space will decrease as the pressure of the space decreases. Decreased solubility allows a gas to leave a solution. Clinically, the pathologies associated with the VP have been reported to mainly include the normal joint motion, degeneration of the intervertebral discs or joints, and trauma. The frequent use of CT for trauma patients and the high spatial resolution of CT images might produce the greatest number of chances to detect the VP in trauma patients. The VP is observed at locations that experience a traumatic impact; thus, an analysis of the VP may be useful for elucidating the mechanism of an injury. When the VP is located in the abdomen, it is important to include perforation of the digestive tract in the differential diagnosis. The presence of the VP in trauma patients does not itself influence the final outcome.

  6. Fusion bonding and alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2000-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all the components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  7. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  8. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  9. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.

    1993-11-09

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of standard polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  10. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.

    1995-03-07

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of ``standard`` polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  11. VACUUM TRAP AND VALVE COMBINATION

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.; Levenson, L.

    1963-02-19

    This patent relates to a vacuum trap and valve combination suitable for use in large ultra-high vacuum systems. The vacuum trap is a chamber having an inlet and outlet opening which may be made to communicate with a chamber to be evacuated and a diffusion pump, respectively. A valve is designed to hermeticaliy seal with inlet opening and, when opened, block the line-of- sight'' between the inlet and outlet openings, while allowing a large flow path between the opened vaive and the side walls of the trap. The interior of the trap and the side of the valve facing the inlet opening are covered with an impurity absorbent, such as Zeolite or activated aluminum. Besides the advantage of combining two components of a vacuum system into one, the present invention removes the need for a baffle between the pump and the chamber to be evacuated. In one use of a specific embodiment of this invention, the transmission probability was 45 and the partial pressure of the pump fluid vapor in the vacuum chamber was at least 100 times lower than its vapor pressure. (AEC)

  12. Microstructural evolution during transient liquid phase bonding of Inconel 738LC using AMS 4777 filler alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Jalilvand, V.; Omidvar, H.; Shakeri, H.R.; Rahimipour, M.R.

    2013-01-15

    IN-738LC nickel-based superalloy was joined by transient liquid phase diffusion bonding using AMS 4777 filler alloy. The bonding process was carried out at 1050 Degree-Sign C under vacuum atmosphere for various hold times. Microstructures of the joints were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Continuous centerline eutectic phases, characterized as nickel-rich boride, chromium-rich boride and nickel-rich silicide were observed at the bonds with incomplete isothermal solidification. In addition to the centerline eutectic products, precipitation of boron-rich particles was observed in the diffusion affected zone. The results showed that, as the bonding time was increased to 75 min, the width of the eutectic zone was completely removed and the joint was isothermally solidified. Homogenization of isothermally solidified joints at 1120 Degree-Sign C for 300 min resulted in the elimination of intermetallic phases formed at the diffusion affected zone and the formation of significant {gamma} Prime precipitates in the joint region. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TLP bonding of IN-738LC superalloy was performed using AMS 4777 filler alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insufficient diffusion time resulted in the formation of eutectic product. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation of B-rich particles was observed within the DAZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The extent of isothermal solidification increased with increasing holding time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homogenizing of joints resulted in the dissolution of DAZ intermetallics.

  13. Vacuum plasma spray coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1989-01-01

    Currently, protective plasma spray coatings are applied to space shuttle main engine turbine blades of high-performance nickel alloys by an air plasma spray process. Originally, a ceramic coating of yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2.12Y2O3) was applied for thermal protection, but was removed because of severe spalling. In vacuum plasma spray coating, plasma coatings of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) are applied in a reduced atmosphere of argon/helium. These enhanced coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles between 927 C (1700 F) and -253 C (-423 F), while current coatings spalled during 5 to 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2.8Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the enhanced NiCrAlY bond-coating process. NiCrAlY bond coating is applied first, with ZrO2.8Y2O3 added sequentially in increasing amounts until a thermal barrier coating is obtained. The enchanced thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles.

  14. Vacuum mechatronics. Proceedings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinski, S. E.; Shirazi, M.; Hackwood, S.; Beni, G.

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is the design and development of vacuum-compatible, computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. Vacuum mechantronics is relevant to research engineers in integrated circuit manufacturing, surface physics, food processing, biotechnology, materials handling, space sciences and manufacturing.

  15. Inorganic bonding of semiconductor strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, N. L.

    1970-01-01

    Inorganic bonding materials minimize outgassing and improve electrical and mechanical properties of semiconductor strain-gage transducers in high-vacuum and high-temperature operations. The two basic methods described are ceramic-glass-bonding and metallic bond formation between the strain gage and the substrate.

  16. Performance tests of large thin vacuum windows

    SciTech Connect

    Hall Crannell

    2011-02-01

    Tests of thin composition vacuum windows of the type used for the Tagger in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility are described. Three different tests have been performed. These include: (1) measurement of the deformation and durability of a window under long term (>8 years) almost continuous vacuum load, (2) measurement of the deformation as a function of flexing of the window as it is cycled between vacuum and atmosphere, and (3) measurement of the relative diffusion rate of gas through a variety of thin window membranes.

  17. Method of bonding silver to glass and mirrors produced according to this method

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, John R.; Thomas, Terence M.; Czanderna, Alvin W.

    1985-01-01

    A method for adhering silver to a glass substrate for producing mirrors includes attaining a silicon enriched substrate surface by reducing the oxygen therein in a vacuum and then vacuum depositing a silver layer onto the silicon enriched surface. The silicon enrichment can be attained by electron beam bombardment, ion beam bombardment, or neutral beam bombardment. It can also be attained by depositing a metal, such as aluminum, on the substrate surface, allowing the metal to oxidize by pulling oxygen from the substrate surface, thereby leaving a silicon enriched surface, and then etching or eroding the metal oxide layer away to expose the silicon enriched surface. Ultraviolet rays can be used to maintain dangling silicon bonds on the enriched surface until covalent bonding with the silver can occur. This disclosure also includes encapsulated mirrors with diffusion layers built therein. One of these mirrors is assembled on a polymer substrate.

  18. Method of bonding silver to glass and mirrors produced according to this method

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.; Thomas, T.M.; Czanderna, A.W.

    1984-07-31

    A method for adhering silver to a glass substrate for producing mirrors includes attaining a silicon enriched substrate surface by reducing the oxygen therein in a vacuum and then vacuum depositing a silver layer onto the silicon enriched surface. The silicon enrichment can be attained by electron beam bombardment, ion beam bombardment, or neutral beam bombardment. It can also be attained by depositing a metal, such as aluminum, on the substrate surface, allowing the metal to oxidize by pulling oxygen from the substrate surface, thereby leaving a silicon enriched surface, and then etching or eroding the metal oxide layer away to expose the silicon enriched surface. Ultraviolet rays can be used to maintain dangling silicon bonds on the enriched surface until covalent bonding with the silver can occur. This disclosure also includes encapsulated mirrors with diffusion layers built therein. One of these mirrors is assembled on a polymer substrate.

  19. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  20. Natural vacuum electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, Nickolaus

    1990-01-01

    The ambient natural vacuum of space is proposed as a basis for electron valves. Each valve is an electron controlling structure similiar to a vacuum tube that is operated without a vacuum sustaining envelope. The natural vacuum electron valves discussed offer a viable substitute for solid state devices. The natural vacuum valve is highly resistant to ionizing radiation, system generated electromagnetic pulse, current transients, and direct exposure to space conditions.

  1. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  2. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  3. Vacuum sources in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Wiper, D W; Duchon, M A; Muise, K L

    1996-06-01

    To characterize the performance of vacuum equipment used in operative vaginal deliveries. We measured wall suction in eight Cleveland area labor-and-delivery units. Additionally, we tested samples of hand-operated and electric vacuum pumps. For each apparatus we recorded vacuum in millimeters of mercury using a calibrated, diaphragm-type gauge. We calculated mean maximal vacuum. Work required to produce 500 mm Hg of vacuum was determined for the hand-operated pumps. At increments of vacuum, we compared the vacuum displayed by the gauge head included with the device to our standard. Mean wall suction was 494 mm Hg (range, 248-655). As compared to the Mity-vac, the CMI hand-operated pump needed significantly more work to generate 500 mm Hg of vacuum. Electric pumps produced a reliable and consistent vacuum. Gauges included with the pump had an average error of 4% over 400-600 mm Hg. Wall suction was an unreliable source of vacuum. The two hand-operated pumps tested required significantly different amounts of work to achieve an adequate vacuum. Addition of a fluid trap does not affect the vacuum, and head gauges supplied with vacuum pumps are accurate.

  4. Vacuum-assisted delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000514.htm Vacuum-assisted delivery To use the sharing features on ... the baby through the birth canal. When is Vacuum-assisted Delivery Needed? Even after your cervix is ...

  5. Heat-shrinkable film improves adhesive bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, J. M.; Reed, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure is applied during adhesive bonding by wrapping parts in heat-shrinkable plastic film. Film eliminates need to vacuum bag or heat parts in expensive autoclave. With procedure, operators are trained quickly, and no special skills are required.

  6. Heat-shrinkable film improves adhesive bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, J. M.; Reed, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure is applied during adhesive bonding by wrapping parts in heat-shrinkable plastic film. Film eliminates need to vacuum bag or heat parts in expensive autoclave. With procedure, operators are trained quickly, and no special skills are required.

  7. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  8. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  9. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  10. The Classical Vacuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    1985-01-01

    The classical vacuum of physics is not empty, but contains a distinctive pattern of electromagnetic fields. Discovery of the vacuum, thermal spectrum, classical electron theory, zero-point spectrum, and effects of acceleration are discussed. Connection between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum reveals unexpected unity in the laws of…

  11. The Classical Vacuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    1985-01-01

    The classical vacuum of physics is not empty, but contains a distinctive pattern of electromagnetic fields. Discovery of the vacuum, thermal spectrum, classical electron theory, zero-point spectrum, and effects of acceleration are discussed. Connection between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum reveals unexpected unity in the laws of…

  12. Recovery properties of vacuum spark gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E. ); Gurbaxani, S.H. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Buttram, M.T. . Pulsed Power Systems Dept.)

    1989-12-01

    Multi-kilohertz vacuum spark gap switching utilizing diffuse discharge and counter-pulse techniques has recently been demonstrated. In addition, commercial, high coulomb vacuum interrupter switches have shown free recovery rates greater than 10 kV / {mu}s. Thus, vacuum spark gap switches may provide an alternative method of high average power switching. The authors have investigated the recovery properties of a 90 kV, 15 kA multiple site, triggered vacuum spark gap. Triggering was accomplished with a multisite surface flashover plasma source with approximately 60 sites distributed over a 10 cm/sup 2/ area. Gap dimensions were 1-cm spacing by 7.5-cm diam. Recovery measurements are presented and discussed.

  13. Transient liquid phase bonding of titanium-, iron- and nickel-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A. H. M. Esfakur

    appropriate thermodynamic and kinetic database. In the third phase industrially important alloys such as SS 321, Inconel 718 and Ti-6Al-4V were diffusion bonded. Diffusion bonded SS 321 with Au-12Ge interlayer provided the best microstructure when bonded in either vacuum or argon at 1050°C for 20 h and cooled in air. The maximum strength obtained of the joint was 387+/-4 MPa bonded in vacuum at 1050°C for 20 h and cooled in air. The microstructure of joint centerline of diffusion bonded Inconel 718 using Au-12Ge interlayer at 1050°C for 15 h and cooled in air consisted of residual interlayer (1.3-2.5 microm). The residual interlayer was disappeared by increasing the bonding time by 5 h, however, pores appeared in the joint centerline. As a result, the strength obtained for bonded Inconel 718 was much lower than that of the base alloy. The joint centerline microstructure of bonded Ti-6Al-4V using Cu interlayer was free of intermetallics and solid solution of Cu and base alloy. The strength of the joint is yet to be determined.

  14. Nanoscale Vacuum Channel Transistor.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Woo; Moon, Dong-Il; Meyyappan, M

    2017-04-12

    Vacuum tubes that sparked the electronics era had given way to semiconductor transistors. Despite their faster operation and better immunity to noise and radiation compared to the transistors, the vacuum device technology became extinct due to the high power consumption, integration difficulties, and short lifetime of the vacuum tubes. We combine the best of vacuum tubes and modern silicon nanofabrication technology here. The surround gate nanoscale vacuum channel transistor consists of sharp source and drain electrodes separated by sub-50 nm vacuum channel with a source to gate distance of 10 nm. This transistor performs at a low voltage (<5 V) and provides a high drive current (>3 microamperes). The nanoscale vacuum channel transistor can be a possible alternative to semiconductor transistors beyond Moore's law.

  15. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  16. Vacuum pump aids ejectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.E.

    1982-12-01

    The steam ejector/vacuum pump hybrid system has been operating satisfactorily since the summer of 1981. This system has essentially been as troublefree as the all-ejector system and, of course, has provided a substantial cost savings. Construction is currently under way to convert the vacuum system of another crude still which is equipped with steam ejectors and barometric condensers to the hybrid system of steam ejectors, surface condensers, and vacuum pumps. This current project is even more financially attractive because it allows a dirty water cooling tower which serves the barometric condensers to be shut down. Providing a vacuum for crude distillation vacuum towers with this hybrid system is by no means the only application of this technique. Any vacuum system consisting of all steam ejectors would be a candidate for this hybrid system and the resulting savings in energy.

  17. Maintaining vacuum furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalewski, J.

    2000-04-01

    A preventive maintenance program is essential for safe and consistent vacuum furnace operation. The program should be developed in cooperation with safety, maintenance, and furnace operators, implemented as soon as the furnace is commissioned, and adhered to throughout the life of the furnace. This article serves as an introduction to the topic of vacuum furnace preventive maintenance. Basic information about installing a new vacuum furnace also is provided.

  18. High Temperature Adhesives for Bonding Kapton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, A. K.; Slemp, W. S.; Stclair, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental polyimide resins were developed and evaluated as potential high temperature adhesives for bonding Kapton polyimide film. Lap shear strengths of Kapton/Kapton bonds were obtained as a function of test temperature, adherend thickness, and long term aging at 575K (575 F) in vacuum. Glass transition temperatures of the polyimide/Kapton bondlines were monitored by thermomechanical analysis.

  19. Vacuum probe surface sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahlava, B. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A vacuum probe surface sampler is described for rapidly sampling relatively large surface areas which possess relatively light loading densities of micro-organism, drug particles or the like. A vacuum head with a hollow handle connected to a suitable vacuum source is frictionally attached to a cone assembly terminating in a flared tip adapted to be passed over the surface to be sampled. A fine mesh screen carried by the vacuum head provides support for a membrane filter which collects the microorganisms or other particles. The head assembly is easily removed from the cone assembly without contacting the cone assembly with human hands.

  20. Gravitation and vacuum field

    SciTech Connect

    Tevikyan, R.V.

    1986-03-01

    This paper presents equations that describe particles with spins s = 0, 1/2, 1 completely and which also describe 2s + 2 limiting fields as E ..-->.. infinity. It is shown that the ordinary Hilbert-Einstein action for the gravitation field must be augmented by the action for the Bose vacuum field. This means that one must introduce in the gravitational equations a cosmological term proportional to the square of the strength of the Bose vacuum field. It is shown that the theory of gravitation describes three realities: matter, field, and vacuum field. A new form of matter--the vacuum field--is introduced into field theory.

  1. Vacuum wafer-level packaging for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplet, Stephane; Sillon, Nicolas; Delaye, Marie-Therese; Berruyer, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    For several kinds of MEMS (gyrometers, accelerometers, RF MEMS, bolometers, vacuum allows a significant improvement of performances. Leti has developed a high performance sensor operating at a pressure lower than 10-3 mbar. In a first phase, a ceramic vacuum packaging has been developed: the device is encapsulated in a cavity containing a getter. However, this technique increases considerably the fabrication costs, because it is made at the chip level. For that reason, Leti has also developed wafer-level vacuum packaging process. The process to manufacture encapsulated devices is presented in this paper. The vacuum function is obtained thanks to an additional wafer (glass or silicon wafer), which supports getters. This wafer is bonded by an hermetic bonding. Characterisation of different kinds of bonding, in term of hermeticity, is presented. First chips manufactured with this process have been tested. The vacuum level in the cavities has been measured, and was lower than 10-3 mbar. Moreover, vacuum evolution during 6 months does not show pressure increase. This process can be easily adapted to several MEMS applications. With these experiments, Leti has so proved the possibility of manufacturing low cost vacuum packaged MEMS.

  2. Comparison of thermal lensing effects between single-end and double-end diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO4 crystals for 4F 3/2-->4I 11/2 and 4F 3/2-->4I 13/2 transitions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y T; Huang, Y P; Su, K W; Chen, Y F

    2008-12-08

    The effective focal lengths of thermal lens in diode-end-pumped continuous-wave Nd:YVO(4) lasers for the (4)F(3/2)-->(4)I(11/2) and (4)F(3/2)-->(4)I(13/2) transitions were determined. The experimental results revealed that the thermal lensing effect for the (4)F(3/2)-->(4)I(11/2) transition can be sufficiently improved by employing a single-end diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO(4) crystal replacing a conventional Nd:YVO(4) crystal. However, using a double-end diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO(4) crystal was a great improvement over a single-end diffusion-bonded Nd:YVO(4) crystal for the (4)F(3/2)-->(4)I(13/2) transition with stronger thermal lensing effect.

  3. Diffusion controlled hydrogen atom abstraction from tertiary amines by the benzyloxyl radical. The importance of C-H/N hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Anastasi, Gloria; Bietti, Massimo; DiLabio, Gino A

    2011-01-21

    The rate constants for H-atom abstraction (k(H)) from 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD), triethylamine (TEA), triisobutylamine (TIBA), and DABCO by the cumyloxyl (CumO(•)) and benzyloxyl (BnO(•)) radicals were measured. Comparable k(H) values for the two radicals were obtained in their reactions with CHD and TIBA whereas large increases in k(H) for TEA and DABCO were found on going from CumO(•) to BnO(•). These differences are attributed to the rate-determining formation of BnO(•) C-H/amine N lone-pair H-bonded complexes.

  4. Working in a Vacuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses several myths about vacuum cleaners and offers tips on evaluating and purchasing this essential maintenance tool. These myths are: (1) Amps mean performance; (2) Everyone needs high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA): (3) Picking up a "bowling ball" shows cleaning power; (4) All vacuum bags are the same; (5)…

  5. Working in a Vacuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses several myths about vacuum cleaners and offers tips on evaluating and purchasing this essential maintenance tool. These myths are: (1) Amps mean performance; (2) Everyone needs high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA): (3) Picking up a "bowling ball" shows cleaning power; (4) All vacuum bags are the same; (5)…

  6. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  7. ELETTRA vacuum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, M.

    1991-08-01

    A status report of the vacuum system of ELETTRA, the 2 GeV, 400 mA light source under construction in Trieste, will be described. The Vacuum project, presented at ``Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop'' at Riken (Japan 22-24 March 1990) and more recently at EVC-2, the European Vacuum Conference at Trieste (Italy 21-26 May 1990), is now in the phase of testing a prototype sector, which is 1/24 of the ring circumference. Details and some technological aspects of the fabrication will be reviewed together with the vacuum performances. Results of laboratory experiments on components, standard or not, allowed us to finalize the main choices in light of the general philosophy of the project and will be properly summarized.

  8. Cervical spine annulus vacuum.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, S P; Chen, Y M

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-eight annulus vacuums in 27 patients were analyzed with regard to location, configuration, and associated vertebral abnormalities such as degenerative changes, absent and compressed anterosuperior vertebral body corners, and annulus calcification. It is concluded that most annulus vacuums are a degenerative phenomenon at the attachment of the annulus to bone. These vacuums may be associated with other degenerative changes such as osteophytes and annulus calcification. Vacuums have a strong association with compressed anterosuperior corners. These deformed corners are thought to be early osteophytes and may be related to previous trauma, a vertebra with an absent corner, and/or normal motion. Small annulus vacuums adjacent to vertebral corners with a normal appearance are more likely to result from acute trauma.

  9. Vacuum tunneling in gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Pak, D. G.

    2011-08-01

    Topologically non-trivial vacuum structures in gravity models with Cartan variables (vielbein and contortion) are considered. We study the possibility of vacuum spacetime tunneling in Einstein gravity assuming that the vielbein may play a fundamental role in quantum gravitational phenomena. It has been shown that in the case of RP3 space topology, the tunneling between non-trivial topological vacuums can be realized by means of Eguchi-Hanson gravitational instanton. In the Riemann-Cartan geometric approach to quantum gravity, the vacuum tunneling can be provided by means of contortion quantum fluctuations. We define a double self-duality condition for the contortion and give explicit self-dual configurations which can contribute to vacuum tunneling amplitude.

  10. A Road Map to Extreme High Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2007-06-20

    Ultimate pressure of a well-designed vacuum system very much depends on pretreatments, processing and the procedures [1,2]. Until now much attention has been paid in minimizing hydrogen outgassing from the chamber material. However, procedures and processing deserves further scrutiny than hitherto given so far. For reducing the gas load, high sensitivity helium leak detection techniques with sensitivities better than 1× 10-12 Torr l/sec need to be used. Effects that are induced by vacuum instrumentation need to be reduced in order to obtain accurate pressure measurements. This presentation will discuss: clean assembly procedures, metal sponges for cryosorption pumping of hydrogen to extreme high vacuum, low cost surface diffusion barriers for reducing the hydrogen gas load, cascade pumping, sensitive helium leak detection techniques and the use of modified extractor and residual gas analyzers. Further, alternative back up pumping systems based on active NEG’s [3] for turbo molecular pumps will be presented.

  11. Housing protects laser in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canali, V. G.

    1978-01-01

    Airtight housing encloses laser for easy alinement and operation in high-vacuum chamber. Beam is transmitted through window into vacuum chamber. Flexible line runs through vacuum chamber to outside, maintaining laser enclosure at atmospheric pressure.

  12. Multinuclear diffusion NMR spectroscopy and DFT modeling: a powerful combination for unraveling the mechanism of phosphoester bond hydrolysis catalyzed by metal-substituted polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Luong, Thi Kim Nga; Shestakova, Pavletta; Mihaylov, Tzvetan T; Absillis, Gregory; Pierloot, Kristine; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2015-03-09

    A detailed reaction mechanism is proposed for the hydrolysis of the phosphoester bonds in the DNA model substrate bis(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) in the presence of the Zr(IV)-substituted Keggin type polyoxometalate (Et2NH2)8[{α-PW11O39Zr(μ-OH)(H2O)}2]⋅7 H2O (ZrK 2:2) at pD 6.4. Low-temperature (31)P DOSY spectra at pD 6.4 gave the first experimental evidence for the presence of ZrK 1:1 in fast equilibrium with ZrK 2:2 in purely aqueous solution. Moreover, theoretical calculations identified the ZrK 1:1 form as the potentially active species in solution. The reaction intermediates involved in the hydrolysis were identified by means of (1)H/(31)P NMR studies, including EXSY and DOSY NMR spectroscopy, which were supported by DFT calculations. This experimental/theoretical approach enabled the determination of the structures of four intermediate species in which the starting compound BNPP, nitrophenyl phosphate (NPP), or the end product phosphate (P) is coordinated to ZrK 1:1. In the proposed reaction mechanism, BNPP initially coordinates to ZrK 1:1 in a monodentate fashion, which results in hydrolysis of the first phosphoester bond in BNPP and formation of NPP. EXSY NMR studies showed that the bidentate complex between NPP and ZrK 1:1 is in equilibrium with monobound and free NPP. Subsequently, hydrolysis of NPP results in P, which is in equilibrium with its monobound form.

  13. Thermophoretic vacuum wand

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John

    2001-01-01

    A thermophoretic vacuum wand that is particularly suited for transporting articles in a cleanroom environment so that potential particle contaminants in the air do not become adhered to the surface of the article is described. The wand includes a housing having a platen with a front surface with suction port(s) through the platen; a vacuum source for applying a negative pressure to the suction port(s); and heating device for the object. Heating the article when it is held by the vacuum wand affords thermophoretic protection that effectively prevents particles in the air from depositing onto the article.

  14. Thermophoretic vacuum wand

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John

    2000-01-01

    A thermophoretic vacuum wand that is particularly suited for transporting articles in a cleanroom environment so that potential particle contaminants in the air do not become adhered to the surface of the article is described. The wand includes a housing having a platen with a front surface with suction port(s) through the platen; a vacuum source for applying a negative pressure to the suction port(s); and heating device for the object. Heating the article when it is held by the vacuum wand affords thermophoretic protection that effectively prevents particles in the air from depositing onto the article.

  15. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  16. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.

    1996-08-20

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of ``standard`` polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface. 3 figs.

  17. Sticker Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Laura Corbin

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science activity on the bonding of chemical compounds. Assigns students the role of either a cation or anion and asks them to write the ions they may bond with. Assesses students' understanding of charge, bonding, and other concepts. (YDS)

  18. Sticker Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Laura Corbin

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science activity on the bonding of chemical compounds. Assigns students the role of either a cation or anion and asks them to write the ions they may bond with. Assesses students' understanding of charge, bonding, and other concepts. (YDS)

  19. Car-Parrinello simulation of an O-H stretching envelope and potential of mean force of an intramolecular hydrogen bonded system: application to a Mannich base in solid state and in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Jezierska, Aneta; Panek, Jarosław J; Koll, Aleksander; Mavri, Janez

    2007-05-28

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) study was performed for an anharmonic system-an intramolecularly hydrogen bonded Mannich-base-type compound, 4,5-dimethyl-2(N,N-dimethylaminemethyl)phenol, to investigate the vibrational spectrum associated with the O-H stretching. Calculations were carried out for the solid state and for an isolated molecule. The classical CPMD simulation was performed and then the proton potential snapshots were extracted from the trajectory. The vibrational Schrodinger equation for the snapshots was solved numerically, and the (O-H) envelope was calculated as a superposition of the 0-->1 transitions. The potential of mean force for the proton stretching mode was calculated from the proton vibrational eigenfunctions and eigenvalues incorporating statistical sampling, nuclear quantum effects, and effects of the environment. Perspectives for application of the presented methodology in the computational support of biocatalysis are given in the study.

  20. Car-Parrinello simulation of an O-H stretching envelope and potential of mean force of an intramolecular hydrogen bonded system: Application to a Mannich base in solid state and in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezierska, Aneta; Panek, Jarosław J.; Koll, Aleksander; Mavri, Janez

    2007-05-01

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) study was performed for an anharmonic system—an intramolecularly hydrogen bonded Mannich-base-type compound, 4,5-dimethyl-2(N,N-dimethylaminemethyl)phenol, to investigate the vibrational spectrum associated with the O-H stretching. Calculations were carried out for the solid state and for an isolated molecule. The classical CPMD simulation was performed and then the proton potential snapshots were extracted from the trajectory. The vibrational Schrödinger equation for the snapshots was solved numerically, and the (O-H) envelope was calculated as a superposition of the 0→1 transitions. The potential of mean force for the proton stretching mode was calculated from the proton vibrational eigenfunctions and eigenvalues incorporating statistical sampling, nuclear quantum effects, and effects of the environment. Perspectives for application of the presented methodology in the computational support of biocatalysis are given in the study.

  1. Collapse of vacuum bubbles in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Wang, Shang-Yung

    2011-02-01

    We revisit the dynamics of a false vacuum bubble in a background de Sitter spacetime. We find that there exists a large parameter space that allows the bubble to collapse into a black hole or to form a wormhole. This may have interesting implications for the creation of a baby universe in the laboratory, the string landscape where the bubble nucleation takes place among a plenitude of metastable vacua, and the inflationary physics.

  2. Collapse of vacuum bubbles in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Wang, Shang-Yung

    2011-02-15

    We revisit the dynamics of a false vacuum bubble in a background de Sitter spacetime. We find that there exists a large parameter space that allows the bubble to collapse into a black hole or to form a wormhole. This may have interesting implications for the creation of a baby universe in the laboratory, the string landscape where the bubble nucleation takes place among a plenitude of metastable vacua, and the inflationary physics.

  3. Vacuum mechatronics first international workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Belinski, S.E.; Shirazi, M.; Hackwood, S.; Beni, G. )

    1989-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: proposed epitaxial thin film growth in the ultra-vacuum of space; particle monitoring and control in vacuum processing equipment; electrostatic dust collector for use in vacuum systems; materials evaluation of an electrically noisy vacuum slip ring assembly; an overview of lubrication and associated materials for vacuum service; the usage of lubricants in a vacuum environment; guidelines and practical applications for lubrication in vacuum; recent development in leak detector and calibrator designs; the durability of ballscrews for ultrahigh vacuum; vacuum-compatible robot for self-contained manufacturing systems; the design, fabrication, and assembly of an advanced vacuum robotics system for space payload calibration; design criteria for mechanisms used in space; and concepts and requirements for semiconductor multiprocess integration in vacuum. These papers are indexed separately elsewhere.

  4. The classical vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, T. H.

    1985-08-01

    The history of vacuum concepts is reviewed, noting that no way is known to physically produce a true void. Even at absolute zero, a pattern of electromagnetic wave fluctuations are still present. The fluctuations are called zero-point radiation (ZPR). To be invariant to Lorentz transformation, ZPR has a spectral intensity proportional to the cube of each frequency. ZPR does not change in response to compression and produces a force between objects that is inversely proportional to the 4th power of the separation distance. The ZPR scale value has been measured to be one-half of the Planck constant, and is the measure of the energy of a harmonic oscillator, such as the electron, in a vacuum. Finally, since gravitational accelerations always occur in the physical space, a minimum thermal radiation can also be found for the vacuum, implying that a fixed relationship exists between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum.

  5. Vacuum Camera Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laugen, Geoffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Acquiring cheap, moving video was impossible in a vacuum environment, due to camera overheating. This overheating is brought on by the lack of cooling media in vacuum. A water-jacketed camera cooler enclosure machined and assembled from copper plate and tube has been developed. The camera cooler (see figure) is cup-shaped and cooled by circulating water or nitrogen gas through copper tubing. The camera, a store-bought "spy type," is not designed to work in a vacuum. With some modifications the unit can be thermally connected when mounted in the cup portion of the camera cooler. The thermal conductivity is provided by copper tape between parts of the camera and the cooled enclosure. During initial testing of the demonstration unit, the camera cooler kept the CPU (central processing unit) of this video camera at operating temperature. This development allowed video recording of an in-progress test, within a vacuum environment.

  6. Welding space vacuum technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to assist the EH 42 Division in putting together a vacuum system that could attain the desired pressure and be large enough to accommodate the gas-metal arc (GMA) welding fixture apparatus. A major accomplishment was the design and fabrication of the controller/annunciator for the 4' by 8' system. It contains many safety features such as thermocouple set point relays that will only allow inlet and exit gas and vacuum valves to be operated at pre-selected system pressures, and a fail safe mode for power interruptions and operator mistakes. It is felt that significant progress was made in this research effort to weld in a vacuum environment. With continued efforts to increase the pump speeds for vacuum chambers and further studies on weld fixtures and gas inlet pressures, the NASA program will be successful.

  7. TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.; Persons, R.

    1981-01-01

    The TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller (DVC) provides in conjunction with the Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition System (CICADA), control and monitoring for the pumps, valves and gauges associated with each individual diagnostic vacuum system. There will be approximately 50 systems on TFTR. Two standard versions of the controller (A and B) wil be provided in order to meet the requirements of two diagnostic manifold arrangements. All pump and valve sequencing, as well as protection features, will be implemented by the controller.

  8. Vacuum self-magnetization?

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Rojas, H.; Rodriguez Querts, E.

    2006-06-19

    We study vacuum properties in a strong magnetic field as the zero temperature and zero density limit of quantum statistics. For charged vector bosons (W bosons) the vacuum energy density diverges for B > B{sub c} = m{sub w}{sup 2}/e, leading to vacuum instability. A logarithmic divergence of vacuum magnetization is found for B = Bc, which suggests that if the magnetic field is large enough, it is self-consistently maintained, and this mechanism actually prevents B from reaching the critical value Bc. For virtual neutral vector bosons bearing an anomalous magnetic moment, the instability of the ground state for B > B{sub c}{sup '} = m{sub n}{sup 2}/q also leads to the vacuum energy density divergence for fields B > B{sub c}{sup '} and to the magnetization divergence for B B{sub c}{sup '}. The possibility of virtual electron-positron pairs bosonization in strong magnetic field and the applicability of the neutral bosons model to describe the virtual positronium behavior in a magnetic field are discussed. We conjecture that this could lead to vacuum self-magnetization in QED.

  9. Vacuum chamber-free centrifuge with magnetic bearings.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheol Hoon; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2013-09-01

    Centrifuges are devices that separate particles of different densities and sizes through the application of a centrifugal force. If a centrifuge could be operated under atmospheric conditions, all vacuum-related components such as the vacuum chamber, vacuum pump, diffusion pump, and sealing could be removed from a conventional centrifuge system. The design and manufacturing procedure for centrifuges could then be greatly simplified to facilitate the production of lightweight centrifuge systems of smaller volume. Furthermore, the maintenance costs incurred owing to wear and tear due to conventional ball bearings would be eliminated. In this study, we describe a novel vacuum chamber-free centrifuge supported by magnetic bearings. We demonstrate the feasibility of the vacuum chamber-free centrifuge by presenting experimental results that verify its high-speed support capability and motoring power capacity.

  10. Texture of Al films for wafer-level thermocompression bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Nishant; Venkatachalapathy, Vishnukanthan; Dall, Wilhelm; Schjølberg-Henriksen, Kari; Poppe, Erik; Visser Taklo, Maaike M.; Finstad, Terje G.

    2017-06-01

    Properties of aluminum thin films for thermocompression bonding have been studied in terms of surface roughness, grain size, and grain orientation by AFM, SEM, XRD and EBSD for thermocompression bonding. Al films were sputter deposited directly on Si and thermally oxidized Si wafers, respectively. The resulting Si/Al and Si/SiO2/Al sample types were compared after annealing (300-550 °C) in vacuum. The Si/SiO2/Al film samples showed higher surface roughness than the Si/Al samples. The as-deposited films had (111) preferred orientation, while (100) and (110) oriented Al grains were also present in Si/SiO2/Al samples. The Si/SiO2/Al samples and Si/Al sample annealed at 550 °C had a conical <111> texture. The observed evolution of the grain structure with annealing temperature is discussed in terms of native oxide, surface roughness, diffusivity and grain orientation dependent mechanical properties in order to shine light on previously observed differences in Alsbnd Al thermocompression wafer-level bonding with Si/SiO2/Al and Si/Al wafers.

  11. Adhesives For Use In Vacuum, Radiation, And Cold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents results of literature searches and tests of eight adhesives for use in high-radiation, low-temperature, vacuum environment of Galileo spacecraft mission to Jupiter. Used as bonding agents for thermal blankets, instruments, structural members, and coatings. Adhesives tested for contamination, reflectance, bond integrity, color, transmittance, outgassing, dielectric constant, coefficient of thermal expansion, optical interference, peel strength, and shear strength. Some of tests conducted at temperature of liquid nitrogen (-150 degree C).

  12. ISABELLE vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H J

    1980-01-01

    The Intersecting Storage Accelerator (ISABELLE) consists of two rings having a circumference of 3.8 km each. In these rings superconducting magnets, held at 4 K, bend and focus the proton beam which is accelerated up to 400 GeV. Due to very different pressure requirements, ISABELLE has two completely independent vacuum systems. One, which operates at 1 x 10/sup -11/ Torr, provides a very clean environment for the circulating proton beam. Here only ion and titanium sublimation pumps are used to provide the vacuum. The other system maintains superconducting magnet vessels at a pressure below 1 x 10/sup -4/ Torr, since at this pressure the gas conduction becomes negligible. In this so-called insulating vacuum system, turbomolecular pumps pump the inadvertent small helium leaks. Other gases are cryocondensed on the cold surfaces of the cryogenic system. The basic element of ISABELLE known as Full Cell containing 45 meters of beam tube, 8 pumping stations, 8 superconducting magnets and complete instrumentation has been constructed, leak checked and tested. All design parameters have been achieved in both vacuum systems. The two vacuum systems are described with particular emphasis on the influence of superconducting magnets in the selection of materials and UHV components.

  13. Aluminum for bonding Si-Ge alloys to graphite

    DOEpatents

    Eggemann, Robert V.

    1976-01-13

    Improved thermoelectric device and process, comprising the high-temperature, vacuum bonding of a graphite contact and silicon-germanium thermoelectric element by the use of a low void, aluminum, metallurgical shim with low electrical resistance sandwiched therebetween.

  14. Rapid bonding of Pyrex glass microchips.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yoshitake; Morishima, Keisuke; Kogi, Atsuna; Kikutani, Yoshikuni; Tokeshi, Manabu; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2007-03-01

    A newly developed vacuum hot press system has been specially designed for the thermal bonding of glass substrates in the fabrication process of Pyrex glass microchemical chips. This system includes a vacuum chamber equipped with a high-pressure piston cylinder and carbon plate heaters. A temperature of up to 900 degrees C and a force of as much as 9800 N could be applied to the substrates in a vacuum atmosphere. The Pyrex substrates bonded with this system under different temperatures, pressures, and heating times were evaluated by tensile strength tests, by measurements of thickness, and by observations of the cross-sectional shapes of the microchannels. The optimal bonding conditions of the Pyrex glass substrates were 570 degrees C for 10 min under 4.7 N/mm(2) of applied pressure. Whereas more than 16 h is required for thermal bonding with a conventional furnace, the new system could complete the whole bonding processes within just 79 min, including heating and cooling periods. Such improvements should considerably enhance the production rate of Pyrex glass microchemical chips. Whereas flat and dust-free surfaces are required for conventional thermal bonding, especially without long and repeated heating periods, our hot press system could press a fine dust into glass substrates so that even the areas around the dust were bonded. Using this capability, we were able to successfully integrate Pt/Ti thin film electrodes into a Pyrex glass microchip.

  15. Improving Vacuum Cleaners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement between the Kirby company and Lewis Research Center, NASA technology was applied to a commercial vacuum cleaner product line. Kirby engineers were interested in advanced operational concepts, such as particle flow behavior and vibration, critical factors to improve vacuum cleaner performance. An evaluation of the company 1994 home care system, the Kirby G4, led to the refinement of the new G5 and future models. Under the cooperative agreement, Kirby had access to Lewis' holography equipment, which added insight into how long a vacuum cleaner fan would perform, as well as advanced computer software that can simulate the flow of air through fans. The collaboration resulted in several successes including fan blade redesign and continuing dialogue on how to improve air-flow traits in various nozzle designs.

  16. Vacuum Technology in the study of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, A. K.; Banerjee, S. N.; Chakraborty, D.

    2012-11-01

    Graphene, an allotrope of carbon is a two-dimensional sheet of covalently bonded carbon atoms that has been attracting great attention in the field of electronics. In a recent review graphene is defined as a flat monolayer of carbon atoms tightly packed into a 2-D honeycomb lattice. A survey has been made of the production processes and instrumentation for characterization of graphene. In the production of graphene, the methods mainly used are Epitaxial growth, oxide reduction, growth from metal-carbon melts, growth from sugar. In the characterization of graphene, the instruments that are mainly used to study the atomic properties, electronic properties, optical properties, spin properties are Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Raman Spectroscopy. In all these instruments high or ultra-high vacuum is required. This paper attempts to correlate vacuum technology in the production and characterization of graphene.

  17. Superoleophobicity under vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinjie; Wang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yongmin; Bell, Steven E. J.; Liu, Weimin; Zhou, Feng

    2011-05-01

    By using superoleophobic alumina and low vapor pressure oils we have been able to study wetting behavior at high vacuum. Here, we show that a superoleophobic state can exist for some probe liquids, even under high vacuum. However, with other liquids the surfaces are only superoloephobic because air is trapped beneath the droplet and the contact angle decreases dramatically (150°-120°) if this air is removed. These observations open up the possibility of designing materials which fully exploit the potential of physically trapped air to achieve extreme oleophobicity and/or hydrophobicity.

  18. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  19. Effect of titanium preoxidation on wrought pure titanium to ceramic bond strength.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-cui; Ye, Jian-tao; Zhang, Yi-ping; Liao, Juan-kun; Li, Bo-hua

    2013-02-01

    The creation of high bond strength between machined computer-manufactured pure titanium and porcelain remains a problem. However, machined titanium does not form the thick titanium oxide film found in cast titanium. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different preoxidation treatments on the bond strength of a machined pure titanium ceramic system. Specimens of commercially pure titanium (25 × 3 × 0.5 mm) were divided equally into 6 groups (n=8), which received different preoxidation treatments (3 hour natural oxidation; 600°C, 650°C, 700°C, 750°C, and 800°C for 3 minutes). Bond strengths were evaluated by using a 3-point bend test. The results were analyzed by using 1-way ANOVA and the least significant difference test. Twelve additional specimens of commercially pure titanium (15 × 3 × 0.5 mm) were cut for interface observation and divided equally into 6 groups that received the preoxidation treatments described previously. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrum were used to observe microscopic features of the interface between Ti and ceramic. The bond strength values of the 6 groups ranged from 23.72 ±2.53 MPa to 36.99 ±3.92 MPa, with significant differences (P<.05). The specimen that received 750°C preoxidation had the highest bond strength. The main interface elements of the 6 groups were O, Si, Ti, Sn, Al, Na, and K. Ti showed a sigmoidal diffusion curve in each group, and Si showed a sigmoidal diffusion curve in most groups. Sn was enriched in each group's interface. Preoxidation under vacuum before porcelain firing can effectively improve the bond strength of machined pure titanium-porcelain systems. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. VACUUM SEALING MEANS FOR LOW VACUUM PRESSURES

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1962-06-12

    S>A vacuum seal is designed in which the surface tension of a thin layer of liquid metal of low vapor pressure cooperates with adjacent surfaces to preclude passages of gases across pressure differentials as low as 10/sup -8/ mm Hg. Mating contiguous surfaces composed of copper, brass, stainless steel, nickel, molybdenum, tungsten, tantalum, glass, quartz, and/or synthetic mica are disposed to provide a maximum tolerance, D, expressed by 2 gamma /P/sub 1/, where gamma is the coefflcient of the surface tension of the metal sealant selected in dynes/cm/sub 2/. Means for heating the surfaces remotely is provided where temperatures drop below about 250 deg C. A sealant consisting of an alloy of gallium, indium, and tin, among other combinations tabulated, is disposed therebetween after treating the surfaces to improve wettability, as by ultrasonic vibrations, the surfaces and sealants being selected according to the anticipated experimental conditions of use. (AEC)

  1. Vacuum Kundt waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, David; Milson, Robert; Coley, Alan

    2013-03-01

    We discuss the invariant classification of vacuum Kundt waves using the Cartan-Karlhede algorithm and determine the upper bound on the number of iterations of the Karlhede algorithm to classify the vacuum Kundt waves (Collins (1991 Class. Quantum Grav. 8 1859-69), Machado Ramos (1996 Class. Quantum Grav. 13 1589)). By choosing a particular coordinate system we partially construct the canonical coframe used in the classification to study the functional dependence of the invariants arising at each iteration of the algorithm. We provide a new upper bound, q ⩽ 4, and show that this bound is sharp by analyzing the subclass of Kundt waves with invariant count beginning with (0, 1,…) to show that the class with invariant count (0, 1, 3, 4, 4) exists. This class of vacuum Kundt waves is shown to be unique as the only set of metrics requiring the fourth covariant derivatives of the curvature. We conclude with an invariant classification of the vacuum Kundt waves using a suite of invariants.

  2. Sorption vacuum trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrington, A. E.; Caruso, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    Modified sorption trap for use in high vacuum systems contains provisions for online regeneration of sorbent material. Trap is so constructed that it has a number of encapsulated resistance heaters and a valving and pumping device for removing gases from heated sorbing material. Excessive downtime is eliminated with this trap.

  3. Various unique vacuum holders

    SciTech Connect

    Gregar, J.S.

    1992-12-01

    Glassblowers use vacuum holding devices to support a flat plate in the glassflowing lathe to seal onto the end of, or inside of, a glass cylinder. Glassblowing blowhose swivels tend to leak; a rotating union from the hydraulics industry is better. Various graphite holder designs are described.

  4. Vacuum ultraviolet holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, G. C.; Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The authors report the first demonstration of holographic techniques in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region. Holograms were produced with coherent 1182 A radiation. The holograms were recorded in polymethyl methacrylate and read out with an electron microscope. A holographic grating with a fringe spacing of 836 A was produced and far-field Fraunhofer holograms of sub-micron particles were recorded.

  5. Gas injected vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Hardin, K. Dan

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a gas injected vacuum switch comprising a housing having an interior chamber, a conduit for evacuating the interior chamber, within the chamber an anode and a cathode spaced from the anode, and a detonator for injecting electrically conductive gas into the chamber between the anode and the cathode to provide a current path therebetween.

  6. Use of Vacuum Bagging for Fabricating Thermoplastic Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, Christopher L.; Simon, Andrew J.; Liu, Wei; Fredrickson, Carl; Fan, Z. Hugh

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a novel thermal bonding method for thermoplastic microfluidic devices. This simple method employs a modified vacuum bagging technique, a concept borrowed from the aerospace industry, to produce conventional thick substrate microfluidic devices, as well as multi-layer film devices. The bonds produced using this method are superior to those obtained using conventional thermal bonding methods, including thermal lamination, and are capable of sustaining burst pressures in excess of 550 kPa. To illustrate the utility of this method, thick substrate devices were produced, as well as a six-layer film device that incorporated several complex features. PMID:25329244

  7. Use of vacuum bagging for fabricating thermoplastic microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Cassano, Christopher L; Simon, Andrew J; Liu, Wei; Fredrickson, Carl; Fan, Z Hugh

    2015-01-07

    In this work we present a novel thermal bonding method for thermoplastic microfluidic devices. This simple method employs a modified vacuum bagging technique, a concept borrowed from the aerospace industry, to produce conventional thick substrate microfluidic devices, as well as multi-layer film devices. The bonds produced using this method are superior to those obtained using conventional thermal bonding methods, including thermal lamination, and are capable of sustaining burst pressures in excess of 550 kPa. To illustrate the utility of this method, thick substrate devices were produced, as well as a six-layer film device that incorporated several complex features.

  8. Demonstrations with a Vacuum: Old Demonstrations for New Vacuum Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Explains mechanisms of 19th-century vacuum pumps. Describes demonstrations using the pump including guinea and feather tube, aurora tube, electric egg, Gassiots cascade, air mill, bell in vacuum, density and buoyancy of air, fountain in vacuum, mercury shower, palm and bladder glasses, Bacchus demonstration, pneumatic man-lifter, and Magdeburg…

  9. Demonstrations with a Vacuum: Old Demonstrations for New Vacuum Pumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Explains mechanisms of 19th-century vacuum pumps. Describes demonstrations using the pump including guinea and feather tube, aurora tube, electric egg, Gassiots cascade, air mill, bell in vacuum, density and buoyancy of air, fountain in vacuum, mercury shower, palm and bladder glasses, Bacchus demonstration, pneumatic man-lifter, and Magdeburg…

  10. Evaluation of Several Bonding Parameters on the Random Bending Fatigue Life of Adhesively Bonded Aluminum Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    bag and cured in an autoclave according to the adhesive manufacturer’s recommended cure cycle. Detailed information on processes and fabrication...applied to the bond line during autoclave cure . The assembly was bagged in plastic and sealed. Vacuum was applied to the lay-up and it was placed in the... autoclave . After applying autoclave pressure, the vacuum was vented to the atmosphere, and the heat cure cycle commenced. (2) Autoclave Cure (a) FM73

  11. Gas bearing operates in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Bearing has restrictions to reduce air leaks and is connected to external pumpout facility which removes exhausted air. Token amount of air which is lost to vacuum is easily removed by conventional vacuum pump.

  12. Tritium handling in vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.T.; Coffin, D.O.

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a course in Tritium handling in vacuum systems. Topics presented are: Properties of Tritium; Tritium compatibility of materials; Tritium-compatible vacuum equipment; and Tritium waste treatment.

  13. A radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1988-07-19

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction. 3 figs.

  14. Compact waves in microscopic nonlinear diffusion.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, P I; Krapivsky, P L

    2012-06-01

    We analyze the spread of a localized peak of energy into vacuum for nonlinear diffusive processes. In contrast with standard diffusion, the nonlinearity results in a compact wave with a sharp front separating the perturbed region from vacuum. In d spatial dimensions, the front advances as t^{1/(2+da)} according to hydrodynamics, with a the nonlinearity exponent. We show that fluctuations in the front position grow as ∼t^{μ}η, where μ<1/2+da is an exponent that we measure and η is a random variable whose distribution we characterize. Fluctuating corrections to hydrodynamic profiles give rise to an excess penetration into vacuum, revealing scaling behaviors and robust features. We also examine the discharge of a nonlinear rarefaction wave into vacuum. Our results suggest the existence of universal scaling behaviors at the fluctuating level in nonlinear diffusion.

  15. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization of Complex Chemical Systems.

    PubMed

    Kostko, Oleg; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Ahmed, Musahid

    2016-05-27

    Tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation coupled to mass spectrometry is applied to the study of complex chemical systems. The identification of novel reactive intermediates and radicals is revealed in flame, pulsed photolysis, and pyrolysis reactors, leading to the elucidation of spectroscopy, reaction mechanisms, and kinetics. Mass-resolved threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence measurements provide unprecedented access to vibrationally resolved spectra of free radicals present in high-temperature reactors. Photoionization measurements in water clusters, nucleic acid base dimers, and their complexes with water provide signatures of proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded and π-stacked systems. Experimental and theoretical methods to track ion-molecule reactions and fragmentation pathways in intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems in sugars and alcohols are described. Photoionization of laser-ablated molecules, clusters, and their reaction products inform thermodynamics and spectroscopy that are relevant to astrochemistry and catalysis. New directions in coupling VUV radiation to interrogate complex chemical systems are discussed.

  16. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization of Complex Chemical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostko, Oleg; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Ahmed, Musahid

    2016-05-01

    Tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation coupled to mass spectrometry is applied to the study of complex chemical systems. The identification of novel reactive intermediates and radicals is revealed in flame, pulsed photolysis, and pyrolysis reactors, leading to the elucidation of spectroscopy, reaction mechanisms, and kinetics. Mass-resolved threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence measurements provide unprecedented access to vibrationally resolved spectra of free radicals present in high-temperature reactors. Photoionization measurements in water clusters, nucleic acid base dimers, and their complexes with water provide signatures of proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded and π-stacked systems. Experimental and theoretical methods to track ion-molecule reactions and fragmentation pathways in intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems in sugars and alcohols are described. Photoionization of laser-ablated molecules, clusters, and their reaction products inform thermodynamics and spectroscopy that are relevant to astrochemistry and catalysis. New directions in coupling VUV radiation to interrogate complex chemical systems are discussed.

  17. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  18. Surge-damping vacuum valve

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jack C.; Kelly, Benjamin E.

    1980-01-01

    A valve having a mechanism for damping out flow surges in a vacuum system which utilizes a slotted spring-loaded disk positioned adjacent the valve's vacuum port. Under flow surge conditions, the differential pressure forces the disk into sealing engagement with the vacuum port, thereby restricting the flow path to the slots in the disk damping out the flow surge.

  19. Portable vacuum object handling device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon H.

    1983-08-09

    The disclosure relates to a portable device adapted to handle objects which are not to be touched by hand. A piston and bore wall form a vacuum chamber communicating with an adaptor sealably engageable with an object to be lifted. The piston is manually moved and set to establish vacuum. A valve is manually actuatable to apply the vacuum to lift the object.

  20. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  1. A simple flow analysis of diffuser-getter-diffuser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Howard, D. W.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition. (authors)

  2. FLOW ANALYSIS OF DIFFUSER-GETTER-DIFFUSER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J; Dave W. Howard, D

    2007-07-24

    Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition.

  3. Determining the mode of high voltage breakdowns in vacuum devices

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.; Furno, E.J.; Sturtz, J.P.

    1980-08-11

    Devices were constructed which were essentially vacuum diodes equipped with windows allowing observation of high voltage breakdowns. The waveform of the applied voltage was photographed, and the x-ray output was monitored to investigate electrical breakdown in these vacuum diodes. Results indicate that breakdowns may be divided into two types: (1) vacuum (interelectrode) breakdown - characterized by a diffuse moderately bright discharge, a relative slow and smooth voltage collapse, and a large burst of x-rays, and (2) surface (insulator) flashover - characterized by a bright discharge with a very bright filamentary core, a relatively fast and noisy voltage collapse and no x-ray burst. Useful information concerning the type of breakdown in a vacuum device can be obtained by monitoring the voltage (current) waveform and the x-ray output.

  4. Parametric Study of Diffusion Bonded Butt Joints.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    the outside top of the base accommodate lateral pressure bars. Back-up Bar and Thermal Barriers - Back-up bar usage was created to serve two...fixture. 9 Consumable items are prepared using the following procedure: . Metallic thermal barriers , if used, are cut to length, vapor degreased...Ceramics, ceramic coatings or plastic-glass cloth laminates usually cannot be used. There are occasions when it is necessary to create thermal

  5. Accelerated aging of phenolic-bonded flakeboards

    Treesearch

    Andrew J. Baker; Robert H. Gillespie

    1978-01-01

    Specimens of phenolic-bonded flakeboard, vertical-grain southern pine and Douglas-fir, and marine-grade Douglas-fir plywood were exposed to four accelerated aging situations. These consisted of: 1) Multiple cycles of boiling and elevated-temperature drying, 2) multiple cycles of vacuum- pressure soaking and intermediate-temperature drying, 3) the six-cycle ASTM D-1037...

  6. Semipermanent sealing of leaks in high vacuum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, J. D.; Gilbreath, W. P.

    1974-01-01

    Silicone-rubber adhesive is applied externally to seal hair-line cracks in sections of high vacuum system while system is partially evacuated. No pretreatment of surface is required since adhesive will be drawn into crack while diffusion or ion pump is off.

  7. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm.

  8. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  9. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  10. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  11. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  12. Integrated structure vacuum tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Kerwin, W. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    High efficiency, multi-dimensional thin film vacuum tubes suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments are described. The tubes are fabricated by placing thin film electrode members in selected arrays on facing interior wall surfaces of an alumina substrate envelope. Cathode members are formed using thin films of triple carbonate. The photoresist used in photolithography aids in activation of the cathodes by carbonizing and reacting with the reduced carbonates when heated in vacuum during forming. The finely powdered triple carbonate is mixed with the photoresist used to delineate the cathode locations in the conventional solid state photolithographic manner. Anode and grid members are formed using thin films of refractory metal. Electron flow in the tubes is between grid elements from cathode to anode as in a conventional three-dimensional tube.

  13. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  14. Edison's vacuum technology patents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waits, Robert K.

    2003-07-01

    During 1879 Thomas Edison's Menlo Park, New Jersey laboratory developed the means to evacuate glass lamp globes to less than a mTorr in 20 min and in mid-1880 began production of carbon-filament incandescent lamps. Among Edison's nearly 1100 U.S. patents are five for vacuum pump improvements, and at least eight others that are vacuum-related; all applied for between 1880 and 1886. Inspired by an 1878 article by De La Rue and Müller [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 169, 155 (1878)] on studies of glow discharges, Edison devised a combination pump using the Geissler pump as a rough pump and the Sprengel pump for continuous exhaustion. Edison's patents described means to control the mercury flow and automate the delivery of the mercury to banks of up to a hundred pumps. Other patents described various means to remove residual gases during lamp processing.

  15. Vacuum tool manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprising a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm.

  16. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1993-11-23

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm. 6 figures.

  17. An automated vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, W.H. ); Vaughn, G.D. ); Bridgman, C. )

    1991-01-01

    Software tools available with the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) control system provide the capability to express a control problem as a finite state machine. System states and transitions are expressed in terms of accelerator parameters and actions are taken based on state transitions. This is particularly useful for sequencing operations which are modal in nature or are unwieldy when implemented with conventional programming. State diagrams are automatically translated into code which is executed by the control system. These tools have been applied to the vacuum system for the GTA accelerator to implement automatic sequencing of operations. With a single request, the operator may initiate a complete pump-down sequence. He can monitor the progress and is notified if an anomaly occurs requiring intervention. The operator is not required to have detailed knowledge of the vacuum system and is protected from taking inappropriate actions. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  18. Vacuum: From Art to Exact Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafferty, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the history of vacuum technology. Includes vacuum pump developments (mechanical, ion, and cyrogenic pumps), measurement techniques, the development of the American Vacuum Society, and electronics in vacuum technology. (JN)

  19. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1978-01-01

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangement to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 .times. 10.sup.-4 Pa m.sup.3 /s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum.

  20. Vacuum Gap Microstrip Microwave Resonators for 2.5-D Integration in Quantum Computing

    DOE PAGES

    Lewis, Rupert M.; Henry, Michael David; Schroeder, Katlin

    2017-02-22

    We demonstrate vacuum gap λ/2 microwave resonators as a route toward higher integration in superconducting qubit circuits. The resonators are fabricated from pieces on two silicon chips bonded together with an In-Sb bond. Measurements of the devices yield resonant frequencies in good agreement with simulations. Furthermore, we discuss creating low loss circuits in this geometry.

  1. Vacuum Packaging of MEMS With Multiple Internal Seal Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayworth, Ken; Yee, Karl; Shcheglov, Kirill; Bae, Youngsam; Wiberg, Dean; Peay, Chris; Challoner, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    A proposed method of design and fabrication of vacuum-packaged microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and of individual microelectromechanical devices involves the use of multiple internal seal rings (MISRs) in conjunction with vias (through holes plated with metal for electrical contacts). The proposed method is compatible with mass production in a wafer-level fabrication process, in which the dozens of MEMS or individual microelectromechanical devices on a typical wafer are simultaneously vacuum packaged by bonding a capping wafer before the devices are singulated (cut apart by use of a dicing saw). In addition to being compatible with mass production, the proposed method would eliminate the need for some complex and expensive production steps and would yield more reliable vacuum seals. Conventionally, each MEMS or individual microelectromechanical device is fabricated as one of many identical units on a device wafer. Vacuum packaging is accomplished by bonding the device wafer to a capping wafer with metal seal rings (one ring surrounding each unit) that have been formed on the capping wafer. The electrical leads of each unit are laid out on what would otherwise be a flat surface of the device wafer, against which the seal ring is to be pressed for sealing. The resulting pattern of metal lines and their insulating oxide coverings presents a very rough and uneven surface, upon which it is difficult to pattern the sealing metal. Consequently, the seal is prone to leakage unless additional costly and complex planarization steps are performed before patterning the seal ring and bonding the wafers.

  2. Vacuum application of thermal barrier plasma coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. R.; Mckechnie, T. N.

    1988-01-01

    Coatings are presently applied to Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbine blades for protection against the harsh environment realized in the engine during lift off-to-orbit. High performance nickel, chromium, aluminum, and yttrium (NiCrAlY) alloy coatings, which are applied by atmospheric plasma spraying, crack and spall off because of the severe thermal shock experienced during start-up and shut-down of the engine. Ceramic coatings of yttria stabilized zirconia (ZrO2-Y2O3) were applied initially as a thermal barrier over coating to the NiCrAlY but were removed because of even greater spalling. Utilizing a vacuum plasma spraying process, bond coatings of NiCrAlY were applied in a low pressure atmosphere of argon/helium, producing significantly improved coating-to-blade bonding. The improved coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles, cycling between 1700 and -423 F. The current atmospheric plasma NiCrAlY coatings spalled during 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2-Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the vacuum plasma process. The improved thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles without spalling. Hot firing in an SSME turbine engine is scheduled for the blades. Tooling was installed in preparation for vacuum plasma spray coating other SSME hardware, e.g., the titanium main fuel valve housing (MFVH) and the fuel turbopump nozzle/stator.

  3. Note: Ultra-low birefringence dodecagonal vacuum glass cell

    SciTech Connect

    Brakhane, Stefan Alt, Wolfgang; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Moon, Geol; Alberti, Andrea

    2015-12-15

    We report on an ultra-low birefringence dodecagonal glass cell for ultra-high vacuum applications. The epoxy-bonded trapezoidal windows of the cell are made of SF57 glass, which exhibits a very low stress-induced birefringence. We characterize the birefringence Δn of each window with the cell under vacuum conditions, obtaining values around 10{sup −8}. After baking the cell at 150 °C, we reach a pressure below 10{sup −10} mbar. In addition, each window is antireflection coated on both sides, which is highly desirable for quantum optics experiments and precision measurements.

  4. Note: Ultra-low birefringence dodecagonal vacuum glass cell.

    PubMed

    Brakhane, Stefan; Alt, Wolfgang; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Moon, Geol; Alberti, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    We report on an ultra-low birefringence dodecagonal glass cell for ultra-high vacuum applications. The epoxy-bonded trapezoidal windows of the cell are made of SF57 glass, which exhibits a very low stress-induced birefringence. We characterize the birefringence Δn of each window with the cell under vacuum conditions, obtaining values around 10(-8). After baking the cell at 150 °C, we reach a pressure below 10(-10) mbar. In addition, each window is antireflection coated on both sides, which is highly desirable for quantum optics experiments and precision measurements.

  5. Vacuum MOCVD fabrication of high efficience cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partain, L. D.; Fraas, L. M.; Mcleod, P. S.; Cape, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Vacuum metal-organic-chemical-vapor-deposition (MOCVD) is a new fabrication process with improved safety and easier scalability due to its metal rather than glass construction and its uniform multiport gas injection system. It uses source materials more efficiently than other methods because the vacuum molecular flow conditions allow the high sticking coefficient reactants to reach the substrates as undeflected molecular beams and the hot chamber walls cause the low sticking coefficient reactants to bounce off the walls and interact with the substrates many times. This high source utilization reduces the materials costs power device and substantially decreases the amounts of toxic materials that must be handled as process effluents. The molecular beams allow precise growth control. With improved source purifications, vacuum MOCVD has provided p GaAs layers with 10-micron minority carrier diffusion lengths and GaAs and GaAsSb solar cells with 20% AMO efficiencies at 59X and 99X sunlight concentration ratios. Mechanical stacking has been identified as the quickest, most direct and logical path to stacked multiple-junction solar cells that perform better than the best single-junction devices. The mechanical stack is configured for immediate use in solar arrays and allows interconnections that improve the system end-of-life performance in space.

  6. A vacuum-driven peristaltic micropump with valved actuation chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jianguo; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a simple peristaltic micropump design incorporated with valved actuation chambers and propelled by a pulsed vacuum source. The vacuum-driven peristaltic micropump offers high pumping rates, low backflow, appreciable tolerance to air bubbles, and minimal destruction to fluid contents. The pumping device, fabricated by laser micromachining and plasma bonding of three polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers, includes a pneumatic network, actuation membranes, and microfluidic channels. As the key to peristaltic motion, the sequential deflection of the elastic membranes is achieved by periodic pressure waveforms (negative) traveling through the pneumatic network, provided by a vacuum source regulated by an electromagnetic valve. This configuration eliminates the complicated control logic typically required in peristaltic motion. Importantly, the valved actuation chambers substantially reduce backflow and improve the pumping rates. In addition, the pneumatic network with negative pressure provides a means to effectively remove air bubbles present in the microflow through the gas-permeable PDMS membrane, which can be highly desired in handling complex fluidic samples. Experimental characterization of the micropump performance has been conducted by controlling the resistance of the pneumatic network, the number of normally closed valves, the vacuum pressure, and the frequency of pressure pulses. A maximal flow rate of 600 µL min-1 has been optimized at the pulsed vacuum frequency of 30 Hz with a vacuum pressure of 50 kPa, which is comparable to that of compressed air-actuated peristaltic micropumps.

  7. Vacuum bell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sesia, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background For specific therapy to correct pectus excavatum (PE), conservative treatment with the vacuum bell (VB) was introduced more than 10 years ago in addition to surgical repair. Preliminary results using the VB were encouraging. We report on our 13-year experience with the VB treatment including the intraoperative use during the Nuss procedure and present some technical innovations. Methods A VB with a patient-activated hand pump is used to create a vacuum at the anterior chest wall. Three different sizes of vacuum bells, as well as a model fitted for young women, exist. The appropriate size is selected according to the individual patient’s age and ventral surface. The device should be used at home for a minimum of 30 minutes (twice a day), and may be used up to a maximum of several hours daily. The intensity of the applied negative pressure can be evaluated with an integrated pressure gauge during follow-up visits. A prototype of an electronic model enables us to measure the correlation between the applied negative pressure and the elevation of the anterior chest wall. Results Since 2003, approx. 450 patients between 2 to 61 years of age started the VB therapy. Age and gender specific differences, depth of PE, symmetry or asymmetry, and concomitant malformations such as scoliosis and/or kyphosis influence the clinical course and success of VB therapy. According to our experience, we see three different groups of patients. Immediate elevation of the sternum was confirmed thoracoscopically during the Nuss procedure in every patient. Conclusions The VB therapy has been established as an alternative therapeutic option in selected patients suffering from PE. The initial results up to now are encouraging, but long-term results comprising more than 15 years are so far lacking, and further evaluation and follow-up studies are necessary. PMID:27747177

  8. Polymers in a Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, J. M.

    2007-12-07

    In a variety of situations, isolated polymer molecules are found in a vacuum, and here we examine their properties. Angular momentum conservation is shown to significantly alter the average size of a chain and its conservation is only broken slowly by thermal radiation. For an ideal chain, the time autocorrelation for monomer position oscillates with a period proportional to chain length. The oscillations and damping are analyzed in detail. Short-range repulsive interactions suppress oscillations and speed up relaxation, but stretched chains still show damped oscillatory correlations.

  9. Rolling through a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schaar, Jan Pieter; Yang, I.-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    We clarify under what conditions slow-roll inflation can continue almost undisturbed, while briefly evolving through a (semi-classically) metastable false vacuum. Furthermore, we look at potential signatures in the primordial power spectrum that could point towards the existence of traversed metastable false vacua. Interestingly, the theoretical constraints for the existence of traversable metastable vacua imply that Planck should be able to detect the resulting features in the primordial power spectrum. In other words, if Planck does not see features this immediately implies the non-existence of metastable false vacua rolled through during the inflationary epoch.

  10. Avoiding Death by Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso, A.; Ferreira, P. M.; Ivanov, I.; Santos, R.; Silva, João P.

    2013-07-01

    The two-Higgs doublet model (2HDM) can have two electroweak breaking, CP-conserving, minima. The possibility arises that the minimum which corresponds to the known elementary particle spectrum is metastable, a possibility we call the "panic vacuum". We present analytical bounds on the parameters of the softly broken Peccei-Quinn 2HDM which are necessary and sufficient conditions to avoid this possibility. We also show that, for this particular model, the current LHC data already tell us that we are necessarily in the global minimum of the theory, regardless of any cosmological considerations about the lifetime of the false vacua.

  11. Vacuum Beat Wave Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. I.; Hafizi, B.; Ting, A.; Burris, H. R.; Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Ganguly, A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1997-11-01

    The Vacuum Beat Wave Accelerator (VBWA) is a particle acceleration scheme which uses the non-linear ponderomotive beating of two different frequency laser beams to accelerate electrons. A proof-of-principle experiment to demonstrate the VBWA is underway at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). This experiment will use the beating of a 1054 nm and 527 nm laser pulse from the NRL T-cubed laser to generate the beat wave and a 4.5 MeV RF electron gun as the electron source. Simulation results and the experimental design will be presented. The suitability of using axicon or higher order Gaussian laser beams will also be discussed.

  12. Plasmons in QED vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, E. Yu.; Kudrin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The problem of longitudinal oscillations of an electric field and a charge polarization density in a quantum electrodynamics (QED) vacuum is considered. Within the framework of semiclassical analysis, we calculate time-periodic solutions of bosonized (1 +1 )-dimensional QED (massive Schwinger model). Applying the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition, we determine the mass spectrum of charge-zero bound states (plasmons) which correspond in quantum theory to the found classical solutions. We show that the existence of such plasmons does not contradict any fundamental physical laws and study qualitatively their excitation in a (3 +1 )-dimensional real world.

  13. Thermal Vacuum Test Facility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-31

    tne power has a rear terminal sensor input for this Probe, use it. Otherwiseq connect the probe to the front panel. The end of the sensor should be...outlet on the front panel of the vacuum chamber. BUS CONNECTtONS: Plug the 1/0 expander card into one of the three calculator slots. Cover the other two...mating cable. Soth connectors on the slave disk are identical, so either one can be used. This cable also locks into place at each end . Connect the other

  14. Yankee bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, P. )

    1993-10-01

    Yankee and Euromarket bonds may soon find their way into the financing of power projects in Latin America. For developers seeking long-term commitments under build, own, operate, and transfer (BOOT) power projects in Latin America, the benefits are substantial.

  15. R&D ERL: Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Weiss, D.; Steszyn, A.; Todd, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL Vacuum systems are depicted in a figure. ERL has eight vacuum volumes with various sets of requirements. A summary of vacuum related requirements is provided in a table. Five of the eight volumes comprise the electron beamline. They are the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity, Superconducting e-gun, injection, loop and beam dump. Two vacuum regions are the individual cryostats insulating the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity and the Superconducting e-gun structures. The last ERL vacuum volume not shown in the schematic is the laser transport line. The beamline vacuum regions are separated by electropneumatic gate valves. The beam dump is common with loop beamline but is considered a separate volume due to geometry and requirements. Vacuum in the 5-cell SRF cavity is maintained in the {approx}10{sup -9} torr range at room temperature by two 20 l/s ion pumps and in the e-gun SRF cavity by one 60 l/s ion pump. Vacuum in the SRF cavities operated at 2{sup o}K is reduced to low 10{sup -11} torr via cryopumping of the cavity walls. The cathode of the e-gun must be protected from poisoning, which can occur if vacuum adjacent to the e-gun in the injection line exceeds 10-11 torr range in the injection warm beamline near the e-gun exit. The vacuum requirements for beam operation in the loop and beam dump are 10-9 torr range. The beamlines are evacuated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum level with a particulate free, oil free turbomolecular pumping cart. 25 l/s shielded ion pumps distributed throughout the beamlines maintain the vacuum requirement. Due to the more demanding vacuum requirement of the injection beamline proximate to the e-gun, a vacuum bakeout of the injection beamline is required. In addition, two 200 l/s diode ion pumps and supplemental pumping provided by titanium sublimation pumps are installed in the injection line just beyond the exit of the e-gun. Due to expected gas load a similar pumping arrangement is planned for the beam dump. The

  16. Portable vacuum object handling device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, G.H.

    1983-08-09

    The disclosure relates to a portable device adapted to handle objects which are not to be touched by hand. A piston and bore wall form a vacuum chamber communicating with an adaptor sealably engageable with an object to be lifted. The piston is manually moved and set to establish vacuum. A valve is manually actuatable to apply the vacuum to lift the object. 1 fig.

  17. Vacuum vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, Richard M. (Inventor); Weeks, Jack L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for vapor deposition of a thin metallic film utilizing an ionized gas arc directed onto a source material spaced from a substrate to be coated in a substantial vacuum while providing a pressure differential between the source and the substrate so that, as a portion of the source is vaporized, the vapors are carried to the substrate. The apparatus includes a modified tungsten arc welding torch having a hollow electrode through which a gas, preferably inert, flows and an arc is struck between the electrode and the source. The torch, source, and substrate are confined within a chamber within which a vacuum is drawn. When the arc is struck, a portion of the source is vaporized and the vapors flow rapidly toward the substrate. A reflecting shield is positioned about the torch above the electrode and the source to ensure that the arc is struck between the electrode and the source at startup. The electrode and the source may be confined within a vapor guide housing having a duct opening toward the substrate for directing the vapors onto the substrate.

  18. MOLECULAR VACUUM PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Eckberg, E.E.

    1960-09-27

    A multiple molecular vacuum pump capable of producing a vacuum of the order of 10/sup -9/ mm Hg is described. The pump comprises a casing of an aggregate of paired and matched cylindrical plates, a recessed portion on one face of each plate concentrically positioned formed by a radially extending wall and matching the similarly recessed portion of its twin plate of that pair of plates and for all paired and matched plates; a plurality of grooves formed in the radially extending walls of each and all recesses progressing in a spiral manner from their respective starting points out at the periphery of the recess inwardly to the central area; a plurality of rotors rotatably mounted to closely occupy the spaces as presented by the paired and matched recesses between all paired plates; a hollowed drive-shaft perforated at points adjacent to the termini of all spiral grooves; inlet ports at the starting points of all grooves and through all plates at common points to each respectively; and a common outlet passage presented by the hollow portion of the perforated hollowed drive-shaft of the molecular pump. (AEC)

  19. Motor actuated vacuum door

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanagud, A. V.

    1986-10-01

    Doors that allow scientific instruments to record and retrieve the observed data are often required to be designed and installed as a part of sounding rocket hardware. The motor-actuated vacuum door was designed to maintain a medium vacuum of the order of 0.0001 torr or better while closed, and to provide an opening 15 inches long x 8.5 inches wide while open for cameras to image Halley's comet. When the electric motor receives the instruction to open the door through the payload battery, timer, and relay circuit, the first operation is to unlock the door. After unlatching, the torque transmitted by the motor to the main shaft through the links opens the door. A microswitch actuator, which rides on the linear motion conversion mechanism, is adjusted to trip the limit switch at the end of the travel. The process is repeated in the reverse order to close the door. 'O' rings are designed to maintain the seal. Door mechanisms similar to the one described have flown on Aerobee 17.018 and Black Brant 27.047 payloads.

  20. Accelerator Vacuum Protection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barua, Pradip; Kothari, Ashok; Archunan, M.; Joshi, Rajan

    2012-11-01

    A new and elaborate automatic vacuum protection system using fast acting valve has been installed to avoid accidental venting of accelerator from experimental chamber side. To cover all the beam lines and to reduce the system cost, it has been installed at a common point from where all the seven beam lines originate. The signals are obtained by placing fast response pressure sensing gauges (HV SENSOR) near all the experimental stations. The closing time of the fast valve is 10 milli-second. The fast closing system protects only one vacuum line at a time. At IUAC, we have seven beam lines so one sensor was placed in each of the beam lines near experimental chamber and a multiplexer was incorporated into the fast closing system. At the time of experiment, the sensor of the active beam line is selected through the multiplexer and the Fast closing valve is interlocked with the selected sensor. As soon as the pressure sensor senses the pressure rise beyond a selected pressure, the signal is transferred and the fast valve closes within 10 to 12 millisecond.

  1. Vacuum leak detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Jr., David

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting leakage in a vacuum system involves a moisture trap chamber connected to the vacuum system and to a pressure gauge. Moisture in the trap chamber is captured by freezing or by a moisture adsorbent to reduce the residual water vapor pressure therein to a negligible amount. The pressure gauge is then read to determine whether the vacuum system is leaky. By directing a stream of carbon dioxide or helium at potentially leaky parts of the vacuum system, the apparatus can be used with supplemental means to locate leaks.

  2. Vacuum metastability with black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burda, Philipp; Gregory, Ruth; Moss, Ian G.

    2015-08-01

    We consider the possibility that small black holes can act as nucleation seeds for the decay of a metastable vacuum, focussing particularly on the Higgs potential. Using a thin-wall bubble approximation for the nucleation process, which is possible when generic quantum gravity corrections are added to the Higgs potential, we show that primordial black holes can stimulate vacuum decay. We demonstrate that for suitable parameter ranges, the vacuum decay process dominates over the Hawking evaporation process. Finally, we comment on the application of these results to vacuum decay seeded by black holes produced in particle collisions.

  3. Vacuum system of the cyclotrons in VECC, Kolkata

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Anindya; Bhole, R.B.; Akhtar, J.; Yadav, R.C.; Pal, Sarbajit; Sarkar, D.; Bhandari, R.K. E-mail: rbb@vecc.gov.in E-mail: yadav@vecc.gov.in E-mail: dsarkar@vecc.gov.in

    2011-07-01

    The vacuum system of the K=130 Room Temperature Cyclotron (RTC) (operational since 1978) has been recently modernized and the same of the K{sub bend}=520 Superconducting Cyclotron (SCC), currently under commissioning, is being deployed for remote monitoring and control. The vacuum system of RTC is designed to achieve and maintain vacuum level of 2 X 10{sup -6} mbar inside 23 m{sup 3} volume of Resonator tank and DEE tank. This has been upgraded by replacing several valves, Freon units, gauges and pumps. The relay based manual control system has been replaced by PLC based automated system. The SCC vacuum system also has an elaborate arrangement comprising of turbo molecular pumping modules with associated isolation valves and characteristic gauges. This paper describes essential elements, typically used to obtain high (1X10{sup -7} mbar) vacuum using rotary pumps, diffusion pumps and cold traps/turbo-molecular pumps and other system components such as valves, gauges and baffles. The supervisory control methodology/scheme of both the vacuum systems, developed in-house using EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System), a standard open-source software tool for designing distributed control system, is also elaborated here. (author)

  4. Uncooled IRFPA with chip scale vacuum package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Hisatoshi; Nakaki, Yoshiyuki; Inoue, Hiromoto; Kosasayama, Yasuhiro; Ohta, Yasuaki; Fukumoto, Hiroshi; Seto, Toshiki; Kama, Keisuke; Takeda, Munehisa; Kimata, Masafumi

    2006-05-01

    We have developed an uncooled IRFPA with a chip scale vacuum package and succeeded in obtaining excellent IR images of less than 60 mK in NETD. This package consists of a device chip and a silicon lid. The chip in this study is a 160 x 120 SOI diode IRFPA with a 25 μm pixel pitch. The size of the package is 14.5(L) x 13.5(W) x 1.2(H) mm. The gap between the device chip and the lid is controlled by the thickness of the vacuum sealing material. The lid is prepared by a wafer process and diced just before vacuum sealing. We use DLC (diamond like carbon) as the AR coat because of its high IR transmittance and high endurance in the wafer process. DLC films are deposited on both sides of the silicon lid wafer, and then a ring-shaped metal pattern for solder bonding is formed on one side of the lid wafer. Solder is mounted on the metal pattern by a molten solder ejection method. The patterned thin-film getter is formed on the lid wafer. Because of the use of patterned thin-film getter, there is no need to form a cavity on the lid to allow installation of getter or to insert a spacer between the device chip and the lid. Then the lid wafer is diced into individual lids. The device wafer and the lids are set in a vacuum chamber, which has a heater to melt the solder, so as to pair each die and lid. After pumping the chamber, the patterned thin-film getters are activated and then the lids are bonded simultaneously to the device wafer. Finally the device wafer is diced into individual chips. The measured pressure of the package is less than 0.5 Pa which is sufficient for obtaining high thermal isolation. In this technique, only the good dies in a wafer are packaged in chip scale simultaneously. Thus, a reduction in the size and cost of the package has been achieved.

  5. Wear Testing of Moving Components in Ultra-High Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Arnelia; McAlister, T.; Ellis, R.; Mosleh, M.

    2010-11-01

    Wear and friction in moving parts in an Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) environment is a fundamental challenge in the design of mechanical assemblies in fusion experiments. In a reactor-scale experiment, constraints have been placed on the material choices and mechanical motions within the system due to their vacuum environment. Wear and friction only serve to complicate these constraints. Textured surfaces, bonded lubricants, and vacuum compatible greases have shown promise as possible means of reducing friction and wear. We have designed a machine for testing wear in a UHV environment, at room temperature, and elevated temperatures. This poster describes the design of the wear test machine and its operating parameters. We have presented an outline of the material test program along with a discussion of the pros and cons of anti-friction and anti-wear treatments.

  6. A vacuum ultraviolet laser pulsed field ionization-photoion study of methane (CH4): determination of the appearance energy of methylium from methane with unprecedented precision and the resulting impact on the bond dissociation energies of CH4 and CH4().

    PubMed

    Chang, Yih-Chung; Xiong, Bo; Bross, David H; Ruscic, Branko; Ng, C Y

    2017-04-05

    We report on the successful implementation of a high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser pulsed field ionization-photoion (PFI-PI) detection method for the study of unimolecular dissociation of quantum-state- or energy-selected molecular ions. As a test case, we have determined the 0 K appearance energy (AE0) for the formation of methylium, CH3(+), from methane, CH4, as AE0(CH3(+)/CH4) = 14.32271 ± 0.00013 eV. This value has a significantly smaller error limit, but is otherwise consistent with previous laboratory and/or synchrotron-based studies of this dissociative photoionization onset. Furthermore, the sum of the VUV laser PFI-PI spectra obtained for the parent CH4(+) ion and the fragment CH3(+) ions of methane is found to agree with the earlier VUV pulsed field ionization-photoelectron (VUV-PFI-PE) spectrum of methane, providing unambiguous validation of the previous interpretation that the sharp VUV-PFI-PE step observed at the AE0(CH3(+)/CH4) threshold ensues because of higher PFI detection efficiency for fragment CH3(+) than for parent CH4(+). This, in turn, is a consequence of the underlying high-n Rydberg dissociation mechanism for the dissociative photoionization of CH4, which was proposed in previous synchrotron-based VUV-PFI-PE and VUV-PFI-PEPICO studies of CH4. The present highly accurate 0 K dissociative ionization threshold for CH4 can be utilized to derive accurate values for the bond dissociation energies of methane and methane cation. For methane, the straightforward application of sequential thermochemistry via the positive ion cycle leads to some ambiguity because of two competing VUV-PFI-PE literature values for the ionization energy of methyl radical. The ambiguity is successfully resolved by applying the Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) approach, resulting in D0(H-CH3) = 432.463 ± 0.027 kJ mol(-1) and D0(H-CH3(+)) = 164.701 ± 0.038 kJ mol(-1).

  7. A vacuum ultraviolet laser pulsed field ionization-photoion study of methane (CH4): Determination of the appearance energy of methylium from methane with unprecedented precision and the resulting impact on the bond dissociation energies of CH4 and CH4+

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, Yih -Chung; Xiong, Bo; Bross, David H.; ...

    2017-03-27

    Here, we report on the successful implementation of a high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser pulsed field ionization-photoion (PFI-PI) detection method for the study of unimolecular dissociation of quantum-state- or energy-selected molecular ions. As a test case, we have determined the 0 K appearance energy (AE0) for the formation of methylium, CH3+, from methane, CH4, as AE0 (CH3+/CH4) = 14.32271 ± 0.00013 eV. This value has a significantly smaller error limit, but is otherwise consistent with previous laboratory and/or synchrotron-based studies of this dissociative photoionization onset. Furthermore, the sum of the VUV laser PFI-PI spectra obtained for the parent CH4+ ionmore » and the fragment CH3+ ions of methane is found to agree with the earlier VUV pulsed field ionization-photoelectron (VUV-PFI-PE) spectrum of methane, providing unambiguous validation of the previous interpretation that the sharp VUV-PFI-PE step observed at the AE0 (CH3+/CH4) threshold ensues because of higher PFI detection efficiency for fragment CH3+ than for parent CH4+. This, in turn, is a consequence of the underlying high-n Rydberg dissociation mechanism for the dissociative photoionization of CH4, which was proposed in previous synchrotron-based VUV-PFI-PE and VUV-PFI-PEPICO studies of CH4. The present highly accurate 0 K dissociative ionization threshold for CH4 can be utilized to derive accurate values for the bond dissociation energies of methane and methane cation. For methane, the straightforward application of sequential thermochemistry via the positive ion cycle leads to some ambiguity because of two competing VUV-PFI-PE literature values for the ionization energy of methyl radical. The ambiguity is successfully resolved by applying the Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) approach, resulting in D0 (H-CH3) = 432.463 ± 0.027 kJ/mol and D0(H-CH3+) = 164.701 ± 0.038 kJ/mol.« less

  8. Flash vacuum pyrolysis of lignin model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, M.J.; Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III

    1997-03-01

    Despite the extensive research into the pyrolysis of lignin, the underlying chemical reactions that lead to product formation are poorly understood. Detailed mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of biomass and lignin under conditions relevant to current process conditions could provide insight into utilizing this renewable resource for the production of chemicals and fuel. Currently, flash or fast pyrolysis is the most promising process to maximize the yields of liquid products (up to 80 wt %) from biomass by rapidly heating the substrate to moderate temperatures, typically 500{degrees}C, for short residence times, typically less than two seconds. To provide mechanistic insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds that contain a {beta}-ether. linkage and {alpha}- or {gamma}-alcohol, which are key structural elements in lignin. The dominant products from the FVP of PhCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OPh (PPE), PhC(OH)HCH{sub 2}OPh, and PhCH{sub 2}CH(CH{sub 2}OH)OPh at 500{degrees}C can be attributed to homolysis of the weakest bond in the molecule (C-O bond) or 1,2-elimination. Surprisingly, the hydroxy-substituent dramatically increases the decomposition of PPE. It is proposed that internal hydrogen bonding is accelerating the reaction.

  9. Interface Characteristics of Sapphire Direct Bonding for High-Temperature Applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Wangwang; Liang, Ting; Chen, Yulei; Jia, Pinggang; Xiong, Jijun; Hong, Yingping; Lei, Cheng; Yao, Zong; Qi, Lei; Liu, Wenyi

    2017-09-11

    In this letter, we present a sapphire direct bonding method using plasma surface activation, hydrophilic pre-bonding, and high temperature annealing. Through the combination of sapphire inductively coupled plasma etching and the direct bonding process, a vacuum-sealed cavity employable for high temperature applications is achieved. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) research of the bonding interface indicates that the two sapphire pieces are well bonded and the cavity structure stays intact. Moreover, the tensile testing shows that the bonding strength of the bonding interface is in excess of 7.2 MPa. The advantage of sapphire direct bonding is that it is free from the various problems caused by the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion between different materials. Therefore, the bonded vacuum-sealed cavity can be potentially further developed into an all-sapphire pressure sensor for high temperature applications.

  10. Fluxless flip chip bonding processes and aerial fluxless bonding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwook

    New fluxless flip chip processes of Sn-rich non-eutectic Au-Sn solder bumps were developed using vacuum deposition and electroplating technique. It is believed that this is the first report that non-eutectic Au-Sn flip chip solder bonding is achieved without the use of flux. In order to make 200mum diameter and 10mum thick Au-Sn solder bump 0.03mum of Cr, 10mum of Sn and 0.3mum of Au were vacuum deposited on the Si wafer through the high carbon steal stencil mask. Nearly void-free solder bumps with small grains of AuSn4 intermetallic compound were achieved. The re-melting temperature of solder bumps was measured to be 220°C. In the second part, first, the fluxless bonding process was performed in hydrogen environment with electroplated 4 mm x 4mm Au-Sn multi-layer chips if electroplating technique is compatible with our process. High quality and nearly void free solder joint was successfully achieved with this new process. After proving compatibility of the process, tall electroplated Sn/Au bumps (50 mum) were produced by photolithography method using Su-8 photoresist. The bumps in the chip were flip chip bonded to the borosilicate glass wafer coated with Cr (0.03 mum) and Au (0.05 mum) pads without using any flux. Fluxless and lead-free bonding technology in air ambient based on non eutectic 5 at. % Au-95 at. % Sn and eutectic 57 at. %Sn-43 at. % Bi with Au capping layer have been developed and studied. To understand the fluxless bonding principles in air ambient, phase formation mechanism of Au-Sn intermetallics embedded in Bi matrix has been postulated. The Au-Sn intermetallic-capping layer covers most outer surface of the samples and inhibits formation of oxide layer due to the minimizing exposure of (beta-Sn) phase to the air. In conclusion, new-lead free and fluxless bonding processes for flip chip packages were developed. In this work, Sn-rich Au-Sn flip chip solder bumps using vacuum deposition and electroplating process were successfully produced. It is

  11. A large high vacuum, high pumping speed space simulation chamber for electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisnik, Stanley P.; Parkes, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Testing high power electric propulsion devices poses unique requirements on space simulation facilities. Very high pumping speeds are required to maintain high vacuum levels while handling large volumes of exhaust products. These pumping speeds are significantly higher than those available in most existing vacuum facilities. There is also a requirement for relatively large vacuum chamber dimensions to minimize facility wall/thruster plume interactions and to accommodate far field plume diagnostic measurements. A 4.57 m (15 ft) diameter by 19.2 m (63 ft) long vacuum chamber at NASA Lewis Research Center is described. The chamber utilizes oil diffusion pumps in combination with cryopanels to achieve high vacuum pumping speeds at high vacuum levels. The facility is computer controlled for all phases of operation from start-up, through testing, to shutdown. The computer control system increases the utilization of the facility and reduces the manpower requirements needed for facility operations.

  12. LIGO vacuum system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey C.; Moore, Boude C.

    1988-01-01

    A laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (LIGO) is being developed with sensitivities which will have a high probability of detecting gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. A major component of LIGO is a total of 16 km of 1.2 m (48 inch) diameter tube at a pressure of less than 10 to the minus 8th power torr. It will be of 304L stainless steel procured directly from the steel mills with the initial hydrogen content specially reduced. Projections of the outgassing rates of hydrogen and of water vapor as a function of time are given and the uncertainties discussed. Based on these, a preliminary analysis of the vacuum system is presented.

  13. ULTRA HIGH VACUUM VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Fry, W.A.

    1962-05-29

    A valve for high vacuum applications such as the CStellarator where chamber pressures as low as 2 x 10/sup -10/ mm Hg are necessary is designed with a line-of-sight path through the valve for visual inspection of the contents of reactants in such chambers. The valve comprises a turnable resilient metal ball having an aperture therethrough, means for selectively turning the ball to rotate the axis of its line-of-sight path, and soft, deformable opposing orifices that are movable relatively toward said ball to seal with opposite ball surfaces upon said movement of said axis of said line-of-sight path. The valve also includes a bellows seal connected between said orifices and internal actuating means that eliminates the requirement for gasketed turnable valve closing stems. (AEC)

  14. THERMOCOUPLE VACUUM GAUGE

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.W.

    1954-08-01

    A protector device is described for use in controlling the pressure within a cyclotron. In particular, an electrical circuit functions to actuate a vacuum pump when a predetermined low pressure is reached and disconnect the pump when the pressure increases abcve a certain value. The principal feature of the control circuit lies in the use of a voltage divider network at the input to a relay control tube comprising two parallel, adjustable resistances wherein one resistor is switched into the circuit when the relay connects the pump to a power source. With this arrangement the relay is energized at one input level received from a sensing element within the cyclotron chamber and is de-energized when a second input level, representing the higher pressure limit, is reached.

  15. Effect of bonding parameters on microstructure development during TGTLP bonding of Al7075 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afghahi, S. Salman S.; Ekrami, Aliakbar; Farahany, Saeed; Jahangiri, Amirreza

    2014-04-01

    The effect of temperature, pressure and bonding time on microstructure of temperature gradient transient liquid phase (TGTLP) diffusion bonded Al7075 alloy using liquid gallium interlayer was investigated. The selected bonding method relies on using the minimum amount of liquid gallium on faying surfaces, using a very fast heating rate to reach the joining temperature and imposing a temperature gradient across the bond region. The microstructure of the diffusion bonded joints was evaluated by light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results show that by increasing the temperature, pressure and time of joining, a more uniform microstructure can be obtained at the joint area. The best joint microstructure was achieved at a temperature of 460 °C, pressure of 10 MPa and time of 10 min. EDS spot analysis indicates that brittle silicon-rich precipitates form at the joint line during TGTLP bonding.

  16. Vacuum Energy Sequestering and Graviton Loops.

    PubMed

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2017-02-10

    We recently formulated a local mechanism of vacuum energy sequester. This mechanism automatically removes all matter loop contributions to vacuum energy from the stress energy tensor which sources the curvature. Here we adapt the local vacuum energy sequestering mechanism to also cancel all the vacuum energy loops involving virtual gravitons, in addition to the vacuum energy generated by matter fields alone.

  17. Vacuum Energy Sequestering and Graviton Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    We recently formulated a local mechanism of vacuum energy sequester. This mechanism automatically removes all matter loop contributions to vacuum energy from the stress energy tensor which sources the curvature. Here we adapt the local vacuum energy sequestering mechanism to also cancel all the vacuum energy loops involving virtual gravitons, in addition to the vacuum energy generated by matter fields alone.

  18. Abdominal intrauterine vacuum aspiration.

    PubMed

    Tjalma, W A A

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating and "cleaning" of the uterine cavity is probably the most performed operation in women. It is done for several reasons: abortion, evaluation of irregular bleeding in premenopausal period, and postmenopausal bleeding. Abortion is undoubtedly the number one procedure with more than 44 million pregnancies terminated every year. This procedure should not be underestimated and a careful preoperative evaluation is needed. Ideally a sensitive pregnancy test should be done together with an ultrasound in order to confirm a uterine pregnancy, excluding extra-uterine pregnancy, and to detect genital and/or uterine malformations. Three out of four abortions are performed by surgical methods. Surgical methods include a sharp, blunt, and suction curettage. Suction curettage or vacuum aspiration is the preferred method. Despite the fact that it is a relative safe procedure with major complications in less than one percent of cases, it is still responsible for 13% of all maternal deaths. All the figures have not declined in the last decade. Trauma, perforation, and bleeding are a danger triage. When there is a perforation, a laparoscopy should be performed immediately, in order to detect intra-abdominal lacerations and bleeding. The bleeding should be stopped as soon as possible in order to not destabilize the patient. When there is a perforation in the uterus, this "entrance" can be used to perform the curettage. This is particularly useful if there is trauma of the isthmus and uterine wall, and it is difficult to identify the uterine canal. A curettage is a frequent performed procedure, which should not be underestimated. If there is a perforation in the uterus, then this opening can safely be used for vacuum aspiration.

  19. Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging of Smart Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Allan; Temple, Dorota S.

    2016-01-01

    The reach and impact of the Internet of Things will depend on the availability of low-cost, smart sensors—“low cost” for ubiquitous presence, and “smart” for connectivity and autonomy. By using wafer-level processes not only for the smart sensor fabrication and integration, but also for packaging, we can further greatly reduce the cost of sensor components and systems as well as further decrease their size and weight. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology of smart sensors. We describe the processes needed to create the wafer-scale vacuum microchambers, focusing on approaches that involve metal seals and that are compatible with the thermal budget of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits. We review choices of seal materials and structures that are available to a device designer, and present techniques used for the fabrication of metal seals on device and window wafers. We also analyze the deposition and activation of thin film getters needed to maintain vacuum in the ultra-small chambers, and the wafer-to-wafer bonding processes that form the hermetic seal. We discuss inherent trade-offs and challenges of each seal material set and the corresponding bonding processes. Finally, we identify areas for further research that could help broaden implementations of the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology. PMID:27809249

  20. Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging of Smart Sensors.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Allan; Temple, Dorota S

    2016-10-31

    The reach and impact of the Internet of Things will depend on the availability of low-cost, smart sensors-"low cost" for ubiquitous presence, and "smart" for connectivity and autonomy. By using wafer-level processes not only for the smart sensor fabrication and integration, but also for packaging, we can further greatly reduce the cost of sensor components and systems as well as further decrease their size and weight. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology of smart sensors. We describe the processes needed to create the wafer-scale vacuum microchambers, focusing on approaches that involve metal seals and that are compatible with the thermal budget of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits. We review choices of seal materials and structures that are available to a device designer, and present techniques used for the fabrication of metal seals on device and window wafers. We also analyze the deposition and activation of thin film getters needed to maintain vacuum in the ultra-small chambers, and the wafer-to-wafer bonding processes that form the hermetic seal. We discuss inherent trade-offs and challenges of each seal material set and the corresponding bonding processes. Finally, we identify areas for further research that could help broaden implementations of the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology.

  1. Wafer-level vacuum packaging technology based on selective electroplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topart, Patrice A.; Leclair, Sebastien; Alain, Christine; Jerominek, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    A novel concept for low-cost, wafer-level packaging of MEMS is proposed and applied to vacuum packaging of INO"s 160x120 pixel uncooled bolometric focal plane arrays, FPAs, based on vanadium oxide thermistor material. A wafer-scale metallic tray composed of several tens of micropackages is electroplated by using the thick resist SU-8 as a micromold. FPA dies and infrared windows are then soldered to the main tray by flip-chip bonding. Contrary to the conventional wafer to wafer bonding approach, assembly and vacuum sealing steps are dissociated. For this purpose, each micropackage is equipped with a pump-out hole for outgassing under vacuum and at elevated temperature prior to vacuum sealing. The process flow for fabrication of micropackages is described. The influence of DC and pulse plating conditions on the stress and properties of deposited nickel packages was investigated. Results on the selective electroplating of indium solder on antireflection-coated IR window wafers and the formation of a solderable layer around the chip are presented.

  2. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  3. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-07-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  4. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  5. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Gross, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  6. Vacuum Enhanced Cutaneous Biopsy Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Joseph

    1999-06-25

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  7. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  8. Multipurpose Vacuum Induction Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, M.; Kulkarni, Deepak; Balasubramanian, K.

    2012-11-01

    Multipurpose vacuum processing systems are cost effective; occupy less space, multiple functional under one roof and user friendly. A multipurpose vacuum induction system was designed, fabricated and installed in a record time of 6 months time at NFTDC Hyderabad. It was designed to function as a) vacuum induction melting/refining of oxygen free electronic copper/pure metals, b) vacuum induction melting furnace for ferrous materials c) vacuum induction melting for non ferrous materials d) large vacuum heat treatment chamber by resistance heating (by detachable coil and hot zone) e) bottom discharge vacuum induction melting system for non ferrous materials f) Induction heat treatment system and g) directional solidification /investment casting. It contains provision for future capacity addition. The attachments require to manufacture multiple shaped castings and continuous rod casting can be added whenever need arises. Present capacity is decided on the requirement for 10years of development path; presently it has 1.2 ton liquid copper handling capacity. It is equipped with provision for capacity addition up to 2 ton liquid copper handling capacity in future. Provision is made to carry out the capacity addition in easy steps quickly. For easy operational maintenance and troubleshooting, design was made in easily detachable sections. High vacuum system is also is detachable, independent and easily movable which is first of its kind in the country. Detailed design parameters, advantages and development history are presented in this paper.

  9. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  10. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  11. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  12. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  13. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  14. Cosmology with decaying vacuum energy

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, K.; Adams, F.; Frieman, J.; Mottola, E.

    1987-09-01

    Motivated by recent attempts to solve the cosmological constant problem, we examine the observational consequences of a vacuum energy density which decays in time. For all times later than t approx. 1 sec, the ratio of the vacuum to the total energy density of the universe must be small. Although the vacuum cannot provide the ''missing mass'' required to close the universe today, its presence earlier in the history of the universe could have important consequences. We discuss restrictions on the vacuum energy arising from primordial nucleosynthesis, the microwave and gamma ray background spectra, and galaxy formation. A small vacuum component at the era of nucleosynthesis, 0.01 < rho/sub vac//rho/sup rad/ < 0.1, increase the number of allowed neutino species to N/sup nu/ > 5, but in some cases would severely distort the microwave spectrum. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Hadron Contribution to Vacuum Polarisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davier, M.; Hoecker, A.; Malaescu, B.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-10-01

    Precision tests of the Standard Theory require theoretical predictions taking into account higher-order quantum corrections. Among these vacuum polarisation plays a predominant role. Vacuum polarisation originates from creation and annihilation of virtual particle-antiparticle states. Leptonic vacuum polarisation can be computed from quantum electrodynamics. Hadronic vacuum polarisation cannot because of the non-perturbative nature of QCD at low energy. The problem is remedied by establishing dispersion relations involving experimental data on the cross section for e+ e- annihilation into hadrons. This chapter sets the theoretical and experimental scene and reviews the progress achieved in the last decades thanks to more precise and complete data sets. Among the various applications of hadronic vacuum polarisation calculations, two are emphasised: the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the running of the fine structure constant α to the Z mass scale. They are fundamental ingredients to high precision tests of the Standard Theory.

  16. Bubbling the false vacuum away

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiser, M.; Rogers, B.; Thorarinson, J.

    2008-01-15

    We investigate the role of nonperturbative, bubblelike inhomogeneities on the decay rate of false-vacuum states in two- and three-dimensional scalar field theories. The inhomogeneities are induced by setting up large-amplitude oscillations of the field about the false vacuum, as, for example, after a rapid quench or in certain models of cosmological inflation. We show that, for a wide range of parameters, the presence of large-amplitude bubblelike inhomogeneities greatly accelerates the decay rate, changing it from the well-known exponential suppression of homogeneous nucleation to a power-law suppression. It is argued that this fast, power-law vacuum decay--known as resonant nucleation--is promoted by the presence of long-lived oscillons among the nonperturbative fluctuations about the false vacuum. A phase diagram is obtained distinguishing three possible mechanisms for vacuum decay: homogeneous nucleation, resonant nucleation, and crossover. Possible applications are briefly discussed.

  17. Vacuum Energy and Its Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, Lionel

    2009-10-01

    Intuitively one would think that a perfect vacuum should contain no energy. However, quantum mechanics asserts that virtual particles popping in and out of existence too fast to be observed directly should produce a non-zero average energy density for empty space. This presentation discusses how quantum mechanics predicts too large a value for this energy density, how the Casimir effect correctly predicts the measured value of the vacuum energy between closely spaced objects, how time-symmetric cosmology predicts the energy density of interstellar space, how vacuum energy produces negative pressure, how vacuum energy causes the current universe to accelerate its expansion, and why vacuum energy cannot be tapped so as to produce an inexhaustible source of energy for all mankind.

  18. The AGS Booster vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hseuh, H.C.

    1989-01-01

    The AGS Booster is a synchrotron for the acceleration of both protons and heavy ions. The design pressure of low 10{sup {minus}11} mbar is required to minimize beam loss of the partially stripped heavy ions. To remove contaminants and to reduce outgassing, the vacuum chambers and the components located in them will be chemically cleaned, vacuum fired, baked then treated with nitric oxide. The vacuum sector will be insitu baked to a minimum of 200{degree}C and pumped by the combination of sputter ion pumps and titanium sublimation pumps. This paper describes the design and the processing of this ultra high vacuum system, and the performance of some half-cell vacuum chambers. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Efficient baffle prevents oil backstreaming in diffusion pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghetti, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    High vacuum diffusion pump baffle, positioned immediately above pump stack, prevents vaporized pumping oil from entering and contaminating test chamber. Pumping vapors are collected and condensed on the baffle and flow back to pump base reservoir.

  20. Vacuum fiber-fiber coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrici, Axel; Bjelajac, Goran; Jonkers, Jeroen; Jakobs, Stefan; Olschok, Simon; Reisgen, Uwe

    2017-02-01

    Research and development carried out by the ISF Welding and Joining Institute of RWTH Aachen University has proven that combining high power laser and low vacuum atmosphere provides a welding performance and quality, which is comparable to electron beam welding. The developed welding machines are still using a beam forming which takes place outside the vacuum and the focusing laser beam has to be introduced to the vacuum via a suitable window. This inflexible design spoils much of the flexibility of modern laser welding. With the target to bring a compact, lightweight flying optics with flexible laser transport fibers into vacuum chambers, a high power fiber-fiber coupler has been adapted by II-VI HIGHYAG that includes a reliable vacuum interface. The vacuum-fiber-fiber coupler (V-FFC) is tested with up to 16 kW sustained laser power and the design is flexible in terms of a wide variety of laser fiber plug systems and vacuum flanges. All that is needed to implement the V-FFC towards an existing or planned vacuum chamber is an aperture of at least 100 mm (4 inch) diameter with any type of vacuum or pressure flange. The V-FFC has a state-of-the-art safety interface which allows for fast fiber breakage detection for both fibers (as supported by fibers) by electric wire breakage and short circuit detection. Moreover, the System also provides connectors for cooling and electric signals for the laser beam optics inside the vacuum. The V-FFC has all necessary adjustment options for coupling the laser radiation to the receiving fiber.

  1. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  2. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  3. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  4. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  5. 49 CFR 570.56 - Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system... Vehicles With GVWR of More Than 10,000 Pounds § 570.56 Vacuum brake assist unit and vacuum brake system. The following requirements apply to vehicles with vacuum brake assist units and vacuum brake...

  6. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  7. Development and evaluation of vacuum pressure gauge components from carbon and graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, D. K.; Beitel, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    A prototype all carbon triode ultrahigh vacuum gage was fabricated and tested. The gage exhibited a sensitivity of 3.7 per torr for nitrogen and an X-ray background approximately 0.1 as large as would be expected of a metal gage of the same design. The gage made from these materials, showed good sensitivity and durability. A practical technique was developed for bonding carbon components together without metal fasteners. The bond is made with a cross-linked phenolic resin which is converted to vitreous carbon by a careful pyrolysis procedure. The resulting bonds are strong, electrically conductive, and can withstand repeated excursions to 2500 K in vacuum. Measurements of adsorption and outgassing characteristics of four refractory carbons have confirmed that such materials are suitable for use in ultrahigh vacuum and that some are superior refractory metals in man respects.

  8. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

    2012-11-01

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  9. Thermal Vacuum Testing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Engineers guiding the GPM Core Observatory into the thermal vacuum chamber. Credit: NASA/Goddard The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international partnership co-led by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) that will provide next-generation global observations of precipitation from space. GPM will study global rain, snow and ice to better understand our climate, weather, and hydrometeorological processes. As of Novermber 2013 the GPM Core Observatory is in the final stages of testing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The satellite will be flown to Japan in the fall of 2013 and launched into orbit on an HII-A rocket in early 2014. For more on the GPM mission, visit gpm.gsfc.nasa.gov/. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  10. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  11. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  12. Vacuum phenomenon: Clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Ishan; Vilensky, Joel A; Weber, Edward C

    2014-04-01

    Vacuum phenomenon (VP) is an anatomical entity of potential confusion in the diagnosis and evaluation of joint pathology. Observation of this phenomenon has been demonstrated on basic radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Although VP is most often associated with degenerative joint disease, it is observed with other pathologies. Two problematic scenarios can occur: a false-positive diagnosis of serious pathology instead of benign VP and a false-negative diagnosis of benign VP with a more serious underlying process Despite this potential for confusion, criteria for distinguishing VP from other causes of joint pain and for evaluating a suspected case of VP have not been fully established. We reviewed the literature to determine underlying mechanism, symptomology, associated pathologies, and clinical importance of VP. The formation of VP can be explained by gas solubility, pressure-volume relationships, and human physiology. CT, GRE-MRI, and multipositional views are the best imaging studies to view VP. Although most cases of VP are benign, it can be associated with clinical signs and symptoms. VP outside the spine is an underreported finding on imaging studies. VP should be on the differential diagnosis for joint pain, especially in the elderly. We have proposed criteria for diagnosing VP and generated a basic algorithm for its workup. Underreporting of this phenomenon shows a lack of awareness of VP on the part of physicians. By identifying true anatomic VP, we can prevent harm from suboptimal treatment of patients.

  13. Vacuum still bottoms viscometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dinsmore, T.V.; Wilson, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    A viscometer system that is capable of measuring VSB viscosity on-line has been designed, constructed, and tested. The viscometer will not only provide continuous on-line measurements for process control purposes, but will also determine viscosity as functions of temperature and shear rate. The latter results may be used to verify design-base information for direct coal liquefaction demonstration plants. The viscosities of Wilsonville samples of VSB and LSRC were determined as functions of shear rate and, in the case of LSRC, temperature. The VSB viscosity was found to be shear-rate sensitive, while the LSRC viscosity was temperature sensitive. A 24-h test run was unsuccessful, apparently because the check valves in the pump plugged; however, all other mechanical, electrical, and electronic equipment operated satisfactorily. The source of the plugging was thought to be degradation products, which should not cause difficulties in the pilot plant where fresh vacuum bottoms feed is always available. In summary, the results obtained in this study indicate that the viscometer system is ready to be transported to a plant such as Wilsonville and operated on-line. 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Precooler Ring Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Moenich, J.

    1980-10-02

    The precooler vacuum system, as proposed by FNAL, is based on a suitable modification of the existing Electron Cooling Ring System. Because of the magnetic cycle of the bending magnets, distributed ion pumping, as exists in the Electron Cooling Ring, is not applicable. Instead, the proposed pumping will be done with commercial appendage ion pumps mounted approximately every two meters around the circumference of the ring. The loss of effective pumping speed and non-uniformity of system pressure with appendage pumps may not be major considerations but the large number required does effect experimental and analytical equipment placement considerations. There is a distributed pumping technique available which: (1) is not affected by the magnetic cycle of the bending magnets; (2) will provide a minimum of four times the hydrogen pumping speed of the proposed appendage ion pumps; (3) will require no power during pumping after the strip is activated; (4) will provide the heat source for bakeout; (5) is easily replaceable; and (6) can be purchased, installed, and operated at a generous economic advantage over the presently proposed ion pumped system. The pumping technique referred to is non-evaporable gettering with ST101 Zr/Al pumping strip. A technical description of this pumping strip is given on Data Sheet 1 and 2 attached to this report.

  15. Quantum Vacuum Pathway Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habegger, Eric John

    2005-02-01

    It is theorized that the quantum vacuum is a random electromagnetic field that permeates the universe. It will be shown that acceleration between a quark and a random electromagnetic energy field is an analog of the reaction between a charge moving at constant velocity with respect to an organized electromagnetic field. The difference is that with a quark any natural perpendicular deflection during that motion, as predicted by Lorentz, is contained by the strong force, which results in a change in the angular momentum of the spin of a quark. The first derivative of the equations of motion of charges in an organized electromagnetic field may be used when applied to a random electromagnetic field to invoke the same fields modeled by Maxwell's equations. Mass is intimately bound up with a quark's spin angular momentum and the energy for that increase comes directly from the local field. The underlying randomness of the local field normally remains intact through these energy exchanges but it is speculated that in a quantum entanglement, an absolute level of order is imposed on the field along a path between two particles. This causes the non local effects seen in quantum entanglement. The mechanism that may cause this effect is discussed and a simple experiment is proposed that can test the hypothesis. Also discussed are new theoretical constructs for electromagnetic radiation, mass, the skin effect, self-inductance, superposition, and gravity. The emphasis will be on an intuitive and logical approach more than a mathematical approach.

  16. Fume incinerator with vacuum baffle

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, R.

    1994-01-04

    A single unit, shell and tube fume incinerator utilizes a vacuum baffle structure proximate a combustion zone to control the flow of combustion exhaust gas. The vacuum baffle is located slightly above the hot ends of a plurality of heat exchange tubes to deflect the hot exhaust gases from the combustion zone away from the ends of the tubes, and back to the outside of the tubes, thereby controlling the time at temperature'' for contaminants in the impure gas feed. A vacuum effect is created just below the baffle to draw cleansed exhaust below the baffle back up into the combustion zone to prevent the escape of impure gas. 3 figs.

  17. (Higgs) vacuum decay during inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joti, Aris; Katsis, Aris; Loupas, Dimitris; Salvio, Alberto; Strumia, Alessandro; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Urbano, Alfredo

    2017-07-01

    We develop the formalism for computing gravitational corrections to vacuum decay from de Sitter space as a sub-Planckian perturbative expansion. Non-minimal coupling to gravity can be encoded in an effective potential. The Coleman bounce continuously deforms into the Hawking-Moss bounce, until they coincide for a critical value of the Hubble constant. As an application, we reconsider the decay of the electroweak Higgs vacuum during inflation. Our vacuum decay computation reproduces and improves bounds on the maximal inflationary Hubble scale previously computed through statistical techniques.

  18. Simulation modelling in vacuum engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, V. V.; Averyanov, G. P.; Ulin, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with the latest version of a computer part of Vacuum Engineering laboratory in which means of fragmentary pumping and receiving of fine vacuum are studied. The virtual laboratory allows to carry out a heatup and processing of preselected surface materials of the pumped-out objects in acceptable time limits by using any means of preselected pumping (from the built-in database). It is possible to retrace online dynamics of receiving fine vacuum in time by having started the procedure of pumping.

  19. Photoelectron backscattering in vacuum phototubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Vasiliev, R. V.; Vyatchin, Y. E.; Shaibonov, B. A. J.

    2006-11-01

    In this article we describe results of studies of a photoelectron backscattering effect in vacuum phototubes: classical photomultipliers (PMT) and hybrid phototubes (PH). Late pulses occurring in PMTs are attributed to the photoelectron backscattering and distinguished from pulses due to an anode glow effect. The late pulses are measured in a number of PMTs and HPs with various photocathode sizes covering 1 50 cm range and different types of the first dynode materials and construction designs. It is shown that the late pulses are a generic feature of all vacuum photodetectors—PMTs and PHs—and they do not deteriorate dramatically amplitude and timing responses of vacuum phototubes.

  20. Direct liquid phase bonding of ceramics to metals

    SciTech Connect

    Dockus, K.F.

    1986-07-29

    A method is described of bonding at least two material layers together, at least one layer being a ceramic, comprising the steps of cleaning the surfaces of the layers to be bonded, plating a brazing alloy sheet with nickel, nickel-lead or cobalt-lead, sandwiching the plated brazing alloy between the material layers to the bonded, heating the material layers and brazing alloy to a temperature in the range of 1100/sup 0/ to 1200/sup 0/F for a time period of three to five minutes in an inert atmosphere or vacuum, and cooling the bonded article.

  1. Cleaning of a thermal vacuum chamber with shrouds in place

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, William R.

    1992-01-01

    In February, 1991, a failure of a rotary booster pump caused the diffusion pumps to backstream into a 10 ft x 15 ft thermal vacuum chamber. Concerns existed about the difficulty of removing and reinstalling the shrouds without causing leaks. The time required for the shroud removal was also of concern. These concerns prompted us to attempt to clean the chamber without removing the shrouds.

  2. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  3. Microwave-vacuum drying of flax fiber for biocomposite production.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Satyanarayan; Rana, Anup; Meda, Venkatesh; Chang, Peter R

    2009-01-01

    Flax fiber is one of the important bast fiber available in North America which has low density and good mechanical properties for reinforcing various polymers to develop industrial biocomposite. But the hydrophilic nature of the fiber leads to poor adhesion between the fiber and the polymer matrices which, in turn, leads to poor dimensional stability. To enhance the adhesion between polymer matrix and fiber, chemical treatments of the fiber are necessary. After these treatments, the fiber needs to be uniformly dried to minimum moisture content for better compounding of flax in polymer matrices. Drying by conventional dryers at higher temperature usually results in overall quality loss due to surface drying, and it is also time consuming and energy intensive. In recent years, the microwave has been effectively used for enhancing bulk drying of biomaterials especially when coupled with vacuum. Such a volumetric heat transfer mechanism coupled with drying in vacuum provides an ideal low-temperature drying technique resulting in better organoleptic quality. In this study, the drying characteristics of flax fiber were studied under microwave-vacuum condition. The drying experiments were conducted in Enwave Microwave-vacuum dryer using three different process variables viz., microwave power (750 W and 375 W), vacuum level (25, 10, and 0 in Hg) and time of drying (0 to 14 mins). In order to select the appropriate drying curve equation, the drying data was fitted in three different models viz., Page model, single exponential model and approximation of diffusion model.

  4. Vacuum brazing of carbon nanotube strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) discovered at 1991 have attracted great interest for applications in Nano-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (NEMS). However, the search for methods to join CNTs with metallic parts has been a worldwide challenge. Many efforts have been devoted to manipulating individual CNTs and joining them to each other. Joining processes so far attempted are premature and fall short of efficiency for joint quality evaluation. Thus, it has been found necessary to work on macro CNTs strands which are easy to handle via macro joining techniques. In this study, vacuum brazing technology has been developed for joining macro CNTs strands with Ni using a Ti-Ag-Cu alloy. The brazing mechanism has been confirmed as due to TiC formation at the CNTs/Ti-Ag-Cu interface. To evaluate this novel vacuum brazing technique for CNTs joining, the temperature effect on the brazing mechanism, microstructure and stoichiometry at joint interface needed to be understood. Firstly, the influence of temperature (from room temperature to 1000°C) on mechanical behaviour of CNTs was well examined. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of CNTs was measured to be a maximum at 900°C. Then, the mechanical performance of the joints was investigated from 850°C to 1000°C, and the fracture modes of the joints were identified. The UTS of joint also achieves maximum at 900°C. Below 900°C, due to little TiC formation, the bonding is weak thus leading to interfacial fracture. Above 900°C, due to much TiC formation, the bonding is strong thus resulting in CNTs fracture. Furthermore, the vacuum brazing technique was applied to join CNTs to Ni contact wires used as a lamp filament. Compared to the filament joined by Ag paste or mechanical connection, the illumination of the brazed CNTs filament was stronger. The current density of the brazed filament was superior to the Ag paste connected filament. This may represent a promising way to produce energy saving lamps.

  5. The Tynode: A new vacuum electron multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Graaf, Harry; Akhtar, Hassan; Budko, Neil; Chan, Hong Wah; Hagen, Cornelis W.; Hansson, Conny C. T.; Nützel, Gert; Pinto, Serge D.; Prodanović, Violeta; Raftari, Behrouz; Sarro, Pasqualina M.; Sinsheimer, John; Smedley, John; Tao, Shuxia; Theulings, Anne M. M. G.; Vuik, Kees

    2017-03-01

    By placing, in vacuum, a stack of transmission dynodes (tynodes) on top of a CMOS pixel chip, a single free electron detector could be made with outstanding performance in terms of spatial and time resolution. The essential object is the tynode: an ultra thin membrane, which emits, at the impact of an energetic electron on one side, a multiple of electrons at the other side. The electron yields of tynodes have been calculated by means of GEANT-4 Monte Carlo simulations, applying special low-energy extensions. The results are in line with another simulation based on a continuous charge-diffusion model. By means of Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) technology, tynodes and test samples have been realized. The secondary electron yield of several samples has been measured in three different setups. Finally, several possibilities to improve the yield are presented.

  6. Vacuum-Assisted Vaginal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Unzila A; Norwitz, Errol R

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 5% (1 in 20) of all deliveries in the United States are operative vaginal deliveries. The past 20 years have seen a progressive shift away from the use of forceps in favor of the vacuum extractor as the instrument of choice. This article reviews in detail the indications, contraindications, patient selection criteria, choice of instrument, and technique for vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery. The use of vacuum extraction at the time of cesarean delivery will also be discussed. With vacuum extraction becoming increasingly popular, it is important that obstetric care providers are aware of the maternal and neonatal risks associated with such deliveries and of the options available to effect a safe and expedient delivery. PMID:19399290

  7. [Wound healing after vacuum drainage].

    PubMed

    Davydov, Iu A; Larichev, A B; Abramov, A Iu

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum therapy was applied in the management of 63 patients with postoperative ventral hernias, 101 patients with a similar pathological conditions were treated by the traditional method for wound healing. From analysis of the results of treatment and with due consideration for the results of additional methods of examination it was established that vacuum prevents accumulation of exudate and blood clots in the wound cavity and removes the risk medium for the development of pyo-inflammatory complications. Moreover, by promoting the coming together of the wound edges and liquidation of the wound cavity, vacuum therapy affects the metabolic reorganizations in the tissues and leads to stabilization of the regeneration mechanisms. The use of vacuum therapy in the postoperative period creates the possibility of regulating the reparative reactions through an active effect on the healing of the wound in the phase of inflammation, protecting in this manner the biology of the wound process and preventing infectious complications.

  8. Alumina barrier for vacuum brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    Heating platens of vacuum-brazing press will not stick to workpiece if aluminum oxide "paper" is interposed. Paper does not disintegrate in press, will not contaminate braze alloy, and helps form smoothly contoured, regular fillet at brazed edges.

  9. APS storage ring vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, R.C.; Benaroya, R.; Choi, M.; Dortwegt, R.J.; Goeppner, G.A.; Gonczy, J.; Krieger, C.; Howell, J.; Nielsen, R.W.; Roop, B.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source synchrotron radiation facility, under construction at the Argonne National Laboratory, incorporates a large ring for the storage of 7 GeV positrons for the generation of photon beams for the facility's experimental program. The Storage Ring's 1104 m circumference is divided into 40 functional sectors. The sectors include vacuum, beam transport, control, acceleration and insertion device components. The vacuum system, which is designed to operate at a pressure of 1 n Torr, consists of 240 connected sections, the majority of which are fabricated from an aluminum alloy extrusion. The sections are equipped with distributed NeG pumping, photon absorbers with lumped pumping, beam position monitors, vacuum diagnostics and valving. The details of the vacuum system design, selected results of the development program and general construction plans are presented. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. IRIS Leaves Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This video shows the transportation of the IRIS observatory from the thermal vacuum chamber back to the clean tent for final testing and preparations for delivery to the launch site at Vandenberg A...

  11. Alumina barrier for vacuum brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    Heating platens of vacuum-brazing press will not stick to workpiece if aluminum oxide "paper" is interposed. Paper does not disintegrate in press, will not contaminate braze alloy, and helps form smoothly contoured, regular fillet at brazed edges.

  12. Silicon source for vacuum deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, G. W.; Rutecki, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    Device using two independent silicon sources for ultra-high-vacuum deposition on large substrates can deposit P and N types of silicon simultaneously. Efficient water cooled copper shield supports and cools structure and isolates two filaments.

  13. Electric Propulsion Laboratory Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1964-06-21

    Engineer Paul Reader and his colleagues take environmental measurements during testing of a 20-inch diameter ion engine in a vacuum tank at the Electric Propulsion Laboratory (EPL). Researchers at the Lewis Research Center were investigating the use of a permanent-magnet circuit to create the magnetic field required power electron bombardment ion engines. Typical ion engines use a solenoid coil to create this magnetic field. It was thought that the substitution of a permanent magnet would create a comparable magnetic field with a lower weight. Testing of the magnet system in the EPL vacuum tanks revealed no significant operational problems. Reader found the weight of the two systems was similar, but that the thruster’s efficiency increased with the magnet. The EPL contained a series of large vacuum tanks that could be used to simulate conditions in space. Large vacuum pumps reduced the internal air pressure, and a refrigeration system created the cryogenic temperatures found in space.

  14. Vacuum lamination of photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Vacuum lamination of terrestrial photovoltaic modules is a new high volume process requiring new equipment and newly develop materials. Equipment development, materials research, and some research in related fields and testing methods are discussed.

  15. [Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure].

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer, J; Lankisch, T

    2013-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage in the upper and lower intestinal tract is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Within the last 10 years endoscopic treatment options have been accepted as sufficient treatment option of these surgical complications. Endoscopic vacuum assisted closure (E-VAC) is a new innovative endoscopic therapeutic option in this field. E-VAC transfers the positive effects of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) on infected cutaneous wounds to infected cavities that can only be reached endoscopically. A sponge connected to a drainage tube is endoscopically placed in the leakage and a continuous vacuum is applied. Sponge and vacuum allow removal of infected fluids and promote granulation of the leakage. This results in clean wound grounds and finally allows wound closure. Meanwhile the method was also successfully used in the treatment of necrotic pancreatitis.

  16. Effect of Ti, Nb, and Ti + Nb Coatings on the Bond Strength-Structure Relationship in Al/Al2O3 Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksiazek, Marzanna; Richert, Maria; Tchorz, Aam; Boron, Lukasz

    2012-05-01

    There is a growing interest in metal-ceramic bonding for wide range of applications in electronic devices and high technology industry for fabrication of metal matrix composites and bonding of ceramic components to metals. The object of the work was to study the effect of Ti, Nb, and Ti + Nb thin films deposited by PVD method on alumina substrates on structure and bond strength properties of Al/Al2O3 joints. The joints were fabricated using the results of a wetting experiment and the sessile drop method at a temperature of 1223 K in a vacuum of 0.2 MPa for 30 min of contact. The structure of the metal/ceramic interface was investigated using scanning electron microscopy. The elemental distribution at the metal-ceramic interface was analyzed using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy was also used to investigate some aspects of the metal/ceramic interface. The bond strength properties of joints were measured using shear test. The shear strength results demonstrated significant improvement of shear strength of Al/Al2O3 joints due to the application of Ti + Nb thin film on alumina substrate. Microstructural investigations of the interface indicated that Al/coating/Al2O3 couples have diffusion transition interface which influences the strengthening of these joints. A conclusion could be drawn that the presence of thin film layers changes the character of interaction and leads to the formation of new reaction products in the bonding layer.

  17. Plasmapause diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The Bohm diffusion coefficient and observed electrostatic wave scattering are used as the bases of estimates of the smoothing effect that diffusion may have on steep plasmapause density gradients. The estimate for diffusion resulting from scattering by observed electrostatic waves is found to be much lower than that of the perpendicular Bohm diffusion coefficient for characteristic plasma temperatures and magnetic fields. This diffusion rate estimate may be too small, however, if the wave amplitudes are significantly higher for steep plasmapauses. The effects are therefore negligible for most considerations of macroscopic plasmapause dynamics, but may be significant in limiting drift wave instabilities and similar phenomena driven by the steepness of the plasmapause density gradient.

  18. Low-temperature vacuum hermetic wafer-level package for uncooled microbolometer FPAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Blanco, S.; Topart, P.; Desroches, Y.; Caron, J. S.; Williamson, F.; Alain, C.; Jerominek, H.

    2008-02-01

    Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) packaging constitutes most of the cost of such devices. For the integration of MEMS with microelectronics systems to be widespread, a drastic reduction of the overall price is required. Wafer-level-packaging allows a fundamental reduction of the packaging cost by combining wafer-level microfabrication techniques with wafer-to-wafer bonding. To achieve the vacuum atmosphere required for the operation of many MEMS devices, bonding techniques such as anodic bonding, eutectic bonding, fusion bonding and gold to gold thermocompression bonding have been utilized, which require relatively high temperatures (>300°C) being in some cases incompatible with MEMS and microelectronics devices. Furthermore, to maintain vacuum integrity over long periods of time, getters requiring high activation temperatures are usually employed. INO has developed a hybrid wafer-level micropackaging technology based on low temperature fluxless solder joints in which the micropackaged MEMS device is not exposed to a temperature over 150°C. The micropackages have been designed for 160×120 microbolometer FPAs. Ceramic spacers are patterned by standard microfabrication techniques followed by laser micromachining. AR-coated floatzone silicon IR windows are patterned with a solderable layer. Both, microbolometer dies and windows are soldered to the ceramic tray by a combination of solder paste stencil printing, reflow and fluxless flip-chip bonding. A low temperature getter is also introduced to control outgassing of moisture and CO II during the lifetime of the package. Vacuum sealing is carried out by locally heating the vacuum port after bake out of the micropackages. In this paper, the vacuum integrity of micropackaged FPA dies will be reported. Base pressures as low as 5 mTorr and equivalent flow rates at room temperature of 4×10 -14 Torr.l/s without getter incorporation have been demonstrated using integrated micro-pressure gauges. A study of the

  19. VACUUM DEPOSITION OF THIN FILMS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The book deals with methods of obtaining and processing thin films , methods of measuring the deposition rate and thickness of thin-film layers, and...the main fields of application of thin films . Vacuum requirements and the requirements for the composition of the residual medium in thermal...evaporation and cathode sputtering are given, and modern methods of producing and measuring vacuums and the equipment used in obtaining thin films are described. (Author)

  20. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5{sup ′}-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  1. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5'-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  2. Technical specification for vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khaw, J.

    1987-01-01

    The vacuum systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) are primarily of all-metal construction and operate at pressures from 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -11/ Torr. The primary gas loads during operation result from thermal desorption and beam-induced desorption from the vacuum chamber walls. These desorption rates can be extremely high in the case of hydrocarbons and other contaminants. These specifications place a major emphasis on eliminating contamination sources. The specifications and procedures have been written to insure the cleanliness and vacuum integrity of all SLAC vacuum systems, and to assist personnel involved with SLAC vacuum systems in choosing and designing components that are compatible with existing systems and meet the quality and reliability of SLAC vacuum standards. The specification includes requirements on design, procurement, fabrication, chemical cleaning, clean room practices, welding and brazing, helium leak testing, residual gas analyzer testing, bakeout, venting, and pumpdown. Also appended are specifications regarding acceptable vendors, isopropyl alcohol, bakeable valve cleaning procedure, mechanical engineering safety inspection, notes on synchrotron radiation, and specifications of numerous individual components. (LEW)

  3. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  4. Modelling of nectarine drying under near infrared - Vacuum conditions.

    PubMed

    Alaei, Behnam; Chayjan, Reza Amiri

    2015-01-01

    Drying of nectarine slices was performed to determine the thermal and physical properties in order to reduce product deterioration due to chemical reactions, facilitate storage and lower transportation costs. Because nectarine slices are sensitive to heat with long drying period, the selection of a suitable drying approach is a challenging task. Infrared-vacuum drying can be used as an appropriate method for susceptible materials with high moisture content such as nectarine slices. Modelling of nectarine slices drying was carried out in a thin layer near infraredvacuum conditions. Drying of the samples was implemented at the absolute pressures of 20, 40 and 60 kPa and drying temperatures of 50, 60 and 70°C. Drying behaviour of nectarine slices, as well as the effect of drying conditions on moisture loss trend, drying rate, effective diffusion coefficient, activation energy, shrinkage, colour and energy consumption of nectarine slices, dried in near infrared-vacuum dryer are discussed in this study. Six mathematical models were used to predict the moisture ratio of the samples in thin layer drying. The Midilli model had supremacy in prediction of nectarine slices drying behaviour. The maximum drying rates of the samples were between 0.014-0.047 gwater/gdry material·min. Effective moisture diffusivity of the samples was estimated in the ranges of 2.46·10-10 to 6.48·10-10 m2/s. Activation energy were computed between 31.28 and 35.23 kJ/mol. Minimum shrinkage (48.4%) and total colour difference (15.1) were achieved at temperature of 50°C and absolute pressure of 20 kPa. Energy consumption of the tests was estimated in the ranges of 0.129 to 0.247 kWh. Effective moisture diffusivity was increased with decrease of vacuum pressure and increase of drying temperature but effect of drying temperature on effective moisture diffusivity of nectarine slices was more than vacuum pressure. Activation energy was decreased with decrease in absolute pressure. Total colour

  5. Cure Monitoring Techniques for Adhesive Bonding Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    Dissipation Factor 21 Derived From Audrey and Phasemeter Data for PH-73 Ad- hesive. Filled symbols represent positive values of tanq .; hollow symbols...bonded joint. Since the absorption of water is a slow diffusion controlled process, it was decided to test the idea by iomursing a siulated bondline in... water . A series of probed bonds (probe 1/4" x 2ŕ) were fabricated between aluminum adherends with a layer of FE? film adjacent to each adherend. This

  6. Vacuum-Gauge Connection For Shipping Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    External connector enables measurement of vacuum in stored part. Remote-readout connector added to shipping container and connected to thermo-couple vacuum gauge in vacuum-insulated cryogenic line packed in container. Enables monitoring of condition of vacuum without opening container.

  7. Vacuum-Gauge Connection For Shipping Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    External connector enables measurement of vacuum in stored part. Remote-readout connector added to shipping container and connected to thermo-couple vacuum gauge in vacuum-insulated cryogenic line packed in container. Enables monitoring of condition of vacuum without opening container.

  8. Pneumatically Actuated Miniature Peristaltic Vacuum Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Sabrina; Feldman, Jason; Svehla, Danielle

    2003-01-01

    Pneumatically actuated miniature peristaltic vacuum pumps have been proposed for incorporation into advanced miniature versions of scientific instruments that depend on vacuum for proper operation. These pumps are expected to be capable of reaching vacuum-side pressures in the torr to millitorr range (from .133 down to .0.13 Pa). Vacuum pumps that operate in this range are often denoted roughing pumps. In comparison with previously available roughing pumps, these pumps are expected to be an order of magnitude less massive and less power-hungry. In addition, they would be extremely robust, and would operate with little or no maintenance and without need for oil or other lubricants. Portable mass spectrometers are typical examples of instruments that could incorporate the proposed pumps. In addition, the proposed pumps could be used as roughing pumps in general laboratory applications in which low pumping rates could be tolerated. The proposed pumps could be designed and fabricated in conventionally machined and micromachined versions. A typical micromachined version (see figure) would include a rigid glass, metal, or plastic substrate and two layers of silicone rubber. The bottom silicone layer would contain shallow pump channels covered by silicone arches that could be pushed down pneumatically to block the channels. The bottom silicone layer would be covered with a thin layer of material with very low gas permeability, and would be bonded to the substrate everywhere except in the channel areas. The top silicone layer would be attached to the bottom silicone layer and would contain pneumatic- actuation channels that would lie crosswise to the pump channels. This version is said to be micromachined because the two silicone layers containing the channels would be fabricated by casting silicone rubber on micromachined silicon molds. The pneumatic-actuation channels would be alternately connected to a compressed gas and (depending on pump design) either to atmospheric

  9. Vacuum deposited polycrystalline silicon films for solar cell applications. Quarterly report, 1 April-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, C.; Arrington, III, C. H.; Blum, N. A.; Satkiewicz, F. G.

    1980-08-01

    Polycrystalline p-type films were vacuum deposited onto TiB/sub 2/ coated alumina and sapphire substrates. Epitaxial layers were also formed on single crystal silicon substrates. Junctions in the layers were created by both gaseous diffusion in a tube furnace and by vacuum deposition. The TiB/sub 2/ vacuum deposited bottom electrodes have resistivities between 30 and 40 ..mu.. ..cap omega..-cm. All-vacuum-deposited solar cells were fabricated for the first time. Efficiencies approaching those in the diffused junction devices were achieved. The n-layers were deposited on the previously deposited p-layer/TiB/sub 2//ceramic sandwiches by vacuum deposition of silicon in a phosphine (PH/sub 3/) atmosphere. Photovoltaic data in diffused junction samples, including efficiency and spectral response measurements, indicate that crystallite size may no longer be the limiting factor in achieving high efficiency; rather, performance is now being limited by the presence of impurities in the vacuum deposition silicon base region.

  10. The diffusion welding of 7075Al-3%SiC particles reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, M.; Gürler, R.; Türker, M.

    2009-02-01

    A group of 3% SiC particle reinforced Al-7075 alloys was diffusion joined at 560°C between 1 h and 2 h durations under 2 MPa applied pressure in a vacuum of 2 × 10-3 Pa. Optical microscopy and SEM-EDS studies were used to characterise the weldment and the fracture surfaces of all samples investigated. A non-planar interface formation was observed at the bond interface. The maximum shear strength of 137 MPa was obtained with the composite 7075-3% SiC joined for two hours, which is 92% of the shear strength of the parent material. The fracture surface of the 7075-3% SiC composites displayed a non-planar fracture surfaces with some plastic deformation.

  11. Vacuum Packaging for Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    The Vacuum Packaging for MEMS Program focused on the development of an integrated set of packaging technologies which in totality provide a low cost...high volume product-neutral vacuum packaging capability which addresses all MEMS vacuum packaging requirements. The program balanced the need for...near term component and wafer-level vacuum packaging with the development of advanced high density wafer-level packaging solutions. Three vacuum

  12. Probability distribution of the vacuum energy density

    SciTech Connect

    Duplancic, Goran; Stefancic, Hrvoje; Glavan, Drazen

    2010-12-15

    As the vacuum state of a quantum field is not an eigenstate of the Hamiltonian density, the vacuum energy density can be represented as a random variable. We present an analytical calculation of the probability distribution of the vacuum energy density for real and complex massless scalar fields in Minkowski space. The obtained probability distributions are broad and the vacuum expectation value of the Hamiltonian density is not fully representative of the vacuum energy density.

  13. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  14. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  15. Fluxless indium and silver-indium bonding processes for photonics and high-temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, William Wilson

    A fluxless oxidation-free bonding technology using multilayer composite solders based on indium, or low melting temperature indium. alloys such as Ag-In, In-Sn and Au-In has been developed and studied. This technology eliminates the need of flux and scrubbing motion that are used in conventional soldering processes, and still produces good quality joints. By depositing multilayer composite materials in high vacuum, we eliminate the formation of an oxide layer thus removing the origin of the problem---solder oxidation. To understand the oxidation kinetics in the bonding process, I have modeled the oxidation rate of tin, which follows a parabolic growth law. For completeness of the oxidation model, I incorporated the temperature dependency of Henry's coefficient in the oxidation model. To prevent the solder material from oxidation when exposing to atmosphere, I have developed a technique, which utilizes the in-situ formation of stable intermetallic compound on the outer surface, or a gold layer to protect the bonding materials. The bonding is achieved by means of solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) and in-situ compound formation. The first alloy system that I studied is indium-silver. GaAs and silicon dice have been successfully bonded on silicon or glass substrates. The bonding quality is examined by a Scanning Acoustic Microscope (SAM). The results confirm that void-free joints are achieved. Cross-sections of the joint are examined using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The results reveal that the joint is composed of AuIn2, AgIn2-intermetallic compound and pure indium. From the Ag-In phase diagram, as indium composition is reduced to 25 wt. %, the solidus temperature jumps from 144 to above 695°C. By modifying the design of the multilayer composite, we developed a 210°C process to produce 700°C joints. All the well-bonded devices, before or after annealing, exceed the shear test force requirement of 2

  16. Carbon Diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Boehnke, P.; Harrison, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    With the recent discovery of potentially biogenic carbon in 4.1 billion-year-old zircon (Bell et al., 2015), it is important to understand diffusion of C in zircon in order to assess the potential of these carbonaceous inclusions to preserve isotopic evidence of Earth's early history. In this study, we have characterized carbon diffusion in natural zircon at 1-atm and under high-pressure conditions in the presence of hydrous species. The 1-atm experiments were conducted by implanting 13C into polished, oriented slabs of zircon, with implanted samples heated in air or under buffered conditions in silica glass ampoules sealed under vacuum. High-pressure experiments (1 GPa) were conducted in a piston-cylinder apparatus, using 13C labeled glycine as the starting source (this breaks down at run conditions). In all cases, 13C distributions in zircon were measured by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using the reaction 13C(p,γ)14N. In addition to the NRA measurements, we have also conducted analyses of carbon in zircon by ion microprobe. For diffusion parallel to c we obtain a well-constrained Arrhenius relation over the temperature range 600-1100°C. Diffusion normal to c is similar. Data from the high-pressure experiments and those run under buffered conditions also yield similar diffusivities, suggesting that carbon diffusion is not significantly affected by these parameters over the range of conditions studied. Carbon diffuses more rapidly than most cations in zircon, with the exception of lithium, but several orders of magnitude more slowly than helium. Zircon will therefore be moderately retentive of carbon. For example, diffusion distances on Gyr timescales would be on order of nm at 200°C, μm at 350°C and mm at 650°C, suggesting that carbon isotopic signatures contained within carbonaceous inclusions in zircon may be retained over long timeframes if zircons experience only moderate heating. E.A. Bell, P. Boehnke, T. M. Harrison, W.L. Mao (2015) PNAS 47, 14518-14521

  17. Wafer-level vacuum/hermetic packaging technologies for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Mitchell, Jay; Welch, Warren; Lee, Sangwoo; Najafi, Khalil

    2010-02-01

    An overview of wafer-level packaging technologies developed at the University of Michigan is presented. Two sets of packaging technologies are discussed: (i) a low temperature wafer-level packaging processes for vacuum/hermeticity sealing, and (ii) an environmentally resistant packaging (ERP) technology for thermal and mechanical control as well as vacuum packaging. The low temperature wafer-level encapsulation processes are implemented using solder bond rings which are first patterned on a cap wafer and then mated with a device wafer in order to encircle and encapsulate the device at temperatures ranging from 200 to 390 °C. Vacuum levels below 10 mTorr were achieved with yields in an optimized process of better than 90%. Pressures were monitored for more than 4 years yielding important information on reliability and process control. The ERP adopts an environment isolation platform in the packaging substrate. The isolation platform is designed to provide low power oven-control, vibration isolation and shock protection. It involves batch flip-chip assembly of a MEMS device onto the isolation platform wafer. The MEMS device and isolation structure are encapsulated at the wafer-level by another substrate with vertical feedthroughs for vacuum/hermetic sealing and electrical signal connections. This technology was developed for high performance gyroscopes, but can be applied to any type of MEMS device.

  18. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  19. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  20. Measurement of partial pressures in vacuum technology and vacuum physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, W. K.

    1986-01-01

    It is pointed out that the measurement of gaseous pressures of less than 0.0001 torr is based on the ionization of gas atoms and molecules due to collisions with electrons. The particle density is determined in place of the pressure. The ionization cross sections for molecules of various gases are discussed. It is found that the true pressure in a vacuum system cannot be determined with certainty if it is unknown which gas is present. Effects of partial pressure determination on the condition of the vacuum system are discussed together with ion sources, systems of separation, and ion detection.

  1. Vacuum-assisted cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    McQuivey, Ross W; Block, Jon E

    2017-01-01

    There has been a dramatic rise in the frequency of cesarean sections, surpassing 30% of all deliveries in the US. This upsurge, coupled with a decreasing willingness to allow vaginal birth after cesarean section, has resulted in an expansion of the use of vacuum assistance to safely extract the fetal head. By avoiding the use of a delivering hand or forceps blade, the volume being delivered through the uterine incision can be decreased when the vacuum is used properly. Reducing uterine extensions with their associated complications (eg, excessive blood loss) in difficult cases is also a theoretical advantage of vacuum delivery. Maternal discomfort related to excessive fundal pressure may also be lessened. To minimize the risk of neonatal morbidity, proper cup placement over the “flexion point” remains essential to maintain vacuum integrity and reduce the chance of inadvertent detachment and uterine extensions. Based on the published literature and pragmatic clinical experience, utilization of the vacuum device is a safe and effective technique to assist delivery during cesarean section. PMID:28331371

  2. What Determines Bond Costs. Municipal Bonds Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Douglas; And Others

    Public officials in small towns who participate infrequently in the bond market need information about bond financing. This publication, one in a series of booklets published by the Western Rural Development Center using research gathered between 1967-77, discusses factors influencing the marketability and cost of bond financing for towns and…

  3. Evaporation in equilibrium, in vacuum, and in hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagahara, Hiroko

    1993-01-01

    Evaporation experiments were conducted for SiO2 in three different conditions: in equilibrium, in vacuum, and in hydrogen gas. Evaporation rate in vacuum is about two orders of magnitude smaller than that in equilibrium, which is consistent with previous works. The rate in hydrogen gas changes depending on hydrogen pressure. The rate at 10 exp -7 bar of hydrogen pressure is as small as that of free evaporation, but at 10 exp -5 bar of hydrogen pressure it is larger than that in equilibrium. In equilibrium and in vacuum, the evaporation rate is limited by decomposition of SiO2 on the crystal surface, but it is limited by a diffusion process for evaporation in hydrogen gas. Therefore, evaporation rate of minerals in the solar nebula can be shown neither by that in equilibrium nor by that in vacuum. The maximum temperature of the solar nebula at the midplane at 2-3 AU where chondrites are believed to have originated is calculated to be as low as 150 K, 1500 K, or in between them. The temperature is, in any case, not high enough for total evaporation of the interstellar materials. Therefore, evaporation of interstellar materials is one of the most important processes for the origin and fractionation of solid materials. The fundamental process of evaporation of minerals has been intensively studied for these several years. Those experiments were carried out either in equilibrium or in vacuum; however, evaporation in the solar nebula is in hydrogen (and much smaller amount of helium) gas. In order to investigate evaporation rate and compositional (including isotopic) fractionation during evaporation, vaporization experiments for various minerals in various conditions are conducted. At first, SiO2 was adopted for a starting material, because thermochemical data and its nature of congruent vaporization are well known. Experiments were carried out in a vacuum furnace system.

  4. Kinetics of scrap tyre pyrolysis under vacuum conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Gartzen; Aguado, Roberto; Olazar, Martin Arabiourrutia, Miriam; Bilbao, Javier

    2009-10-15

    Scrap tyre pyrolysis under vacuum is attractive because it allows easier product condensation and control of composition (gas, liquid and solid). With the aim of determining the effect of vacuum on the pyrolysis kinetics, a study has been carried out in thermobalance. Two data analysis methods have been used in the kinetic study: (i) the treatment of experimental data of weight loss and (ii) the deconvolution of DTG (differential thermogravimetry) curve. The former allows for distinguishing the pyrolysis of the three main components (volatile components, natural rubber and styrene-butadiene rubber) according to three successive steps. The latter method identifies the kinetics for the pyrolysis of individual components by means of DTG curve deconvolution. The effect of vacuum in the process is significant. The values of activation energy for the pyrolysis of individual components of easier devolatilization (volatiles and NR) are lower for pyrolysis under vacuum with a reduction of 12 K in the reaction starting temperature. The kinetic constant at 503 K for devolatilization of volatile additives at 0.25 atm is 1.7 times higher than that at 1 atm, and that corresponding to styrene-butadiene rubber at 723 K is 2.8 times higher. Vacuum enhances the volatilization and internal diffusion of products in the pyrolysis process, which contributes to attenuating the secondary reactions of the repolymerization and carbonization of these products on the surface of the char (carbon black). The higher quality of carbon black is interesting for process viability. The large-scale implementation of this process in continuous mode requires a comparison to be made between the economic advantages of using a vacuum and the energy costs, which will be lower when the technologies used for pyrolysis require a lower ratio between reactor volume and scrap tyre flow rate.

  5. Kinetics of scrap tyre pyrolysis under vacuum conditions.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Gartzen; Aguado, Roberto; Olazar, Martín; Arabiourrutia, Miriam; Bilbao, Javier

    2009-10-01

    Scrap tyre pyrolysis under vacuum is attractive because it allows easier product condensation and control of composition (gas, liquid and solid). With the aim of determining the effect of vacuum on the pyrolysis kinetics, a study has been carried out in thermobalance. Two data analysis methods have been used in the kinetic study: (i) the treatment of experimental data of weight loss and (ii) the deconvolution of DTG (differential thermogravimetry) curve. The former allows for distinguishing the pyrolysis of the three main components (volatile components, natural rubber and styrene-butadiene rubber) according to three successive steps. The latter method identifies the kinetics for the pyrolysis of individual components by means of DTG curve deconvolution. The effect of vacuum in the process is significant. The values of activation energy for the pyrolysis of individual components of easier devolatilization (volatiles and NR) are lower for pyrolysis under vacuum with a reduction of 12K in the reaction starting temperature. The kinetic constant at 503K for devolatilization of volatile additives at 0.25atm is 1.7 times higher than that at 1atm, and that corresponding to styrene-butadiene rubber at 723K is 2.8 times higher. Vacuum enhances the volatilization and internal diffusion of products in the pyrolysis process, which contributes to attenuating the secondary reactions of the repolymerization and carbonization of these products on the surface of the char (carbon black). The higher quality of carbon black is interesting for process viability. The large-scale implementation of this process in continuous mode requires a comparison to be made between the economic advantages of using a vacuum and the energy costs, which will be lower when the technologies used for pyrolysis require a lower ratio between reactor volume and scrap tyre flow rate.

  6. Evaporation in equilibrium, in vacuum, and in hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagahara, Hiroko

    1993-01-01

    Evaporation experiments were conducted for SiO2 in three different conditions: in equilibrium, in vacuum, and in hydrogen gas. Evaporation rate in vacuum is about two orders of magnitude smaller than that in equilibrium, which is consistent with previous works. The rate in hydrogen gas changes depending on hydrogen pressure. The rate at 10 exp -7 bar of hydrogen pressure is as small as that of free evaporation, but at 10 exp -5 bar of hydrogen pressure it is larger than that in equilibrium. In equilibrium and in vacuum, the evaporation rate is limited by decomposition of SiO2 on the crystal surface, but it is limited by a diffusion process for evaporation in hydrogen gas. Therefore, evaporation rate of minerals in the solar nebula can be shown neither by that in equilibrium nor by that in vacuum. The maximum temperature of the solar nebula at the midplane at 2-3 AU where chondrites are believed to have originated is calculated to be as low as 150 K, 1500 K, or in between them. The temperature is, in any case, not high enough for total evaporation of the interstellar materials. Therefore, evaporation of interstellar materials is one of the most important processes for the origin and fractionation of solid materials. The fundamental process of evaporation of minerals has been intensively studied for these several years. Those experiments were carried out either in equilibrium or in vacuum; however, evaporation in the solar nebula is in hydrogen (and much smaller amount of helium) gas. In order to investigate evaporation rate and compositional (including isotopic) fractionation during evaporation, vaporization experiments for various minerals in various conditions are conducted. At first, SiO2 was adopted for a starting material, because thermochemical data and its nature of congruent vaporization are well known. Experiments were carried out in a vacuum furnace system.

  7. Microscale Digital Vacuum Electronic Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Mojarradi, Mohammed M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement microscale digital vacuum electronic gates. In one embodiment, a microscale digital vacuum electronic gate includes: a microscale field emitter that can emit electrons and that is a microscale cathode; and a microscale anode; where the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode are disposed within at least a partial vacuum; where the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode are separated by a gap; and where the potential difference between the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode is controllable such that the flow of electrons between the microscale field emitter and the microscale anode is thereby controllable; where when the microscale anode receives a flow of electrons, a first logic state is defined; and where when the microscale anode does not receive a flow of electrons, a second logic state is defined.

  8. Gravity-Induced Vacuum Dominance

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, William C. C.; Vanzella, Daniel A. T.

    2010-04-23

    It has been widely believed that, except in very extreme situations, the influence of gravity on quantum fields should amount to just small, subdominant contributions. This view seemed to be endorsed by the seminal results obtained over the last decades in the context of renormalization of quantum fields in curved spacetimes. Here, however, we argue that this belief is false by showing that there exist well-behaved spacetime evolutions where the vacuum energy density of free quantum fields is forced, by the very same background spacetime, to become dominant over any classical energy-density component. By estimating the time scale for the vacuum energy density to become dominant, and therefore for backreaction on the background spacetime to become important, we argue that this (infrared) vacuum dominance may bear unexpected astrophysical and cosmological implications.

  9. Gravity-induced vacuum dominance.

    PubMed

    Lima, William C C; Vanzella, Daniel A T

    2010-04-23

    It has been widely believed that, except in very extreme situations, the influence of gravity on quantum fields should amount to just small, subdominant contributions. This view seemed to be endorsed by the seminal results obtained over the last decades in the context of renormalization of quantum fields in curved spacetimes. Here, however, we argue that this belief is false by showing that there exist well-behaved spacetime evolutions where the vacuum energy density of free quantum fields is forced, by the very same background spacetime, to become dominant over any classical energy-density component. By estimating the time scale for the vacuum energy density to become dominant, and therefore for backreaction on the background spacetime to become important, we argue that this (infrared) vacuum dominance may bear unexpected astrophysical and cosmological implications.

  10. Cryogenic evaluation of epoxy bond strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albritton, N.; Young, W.

    The purpose of the work presented here was to determine methods of optimizing the adhesion of a particular epoxy (CTD-101K, Composite Technology Development Inc.) to a particular nickel-based alloy substrate (Incoloy ® 908, Inco Alloys International) for cryogenic applications. Initial efforts were focused on surface preparation of the substrate material via various mechanical and chemical cleaning techniques. Test samples, fabricated to simulate the conduit-to-insulation interface, were put through a mock heat treat and vacuum/pressure impregnation process. Samples were compression/shear load tested to compare the bond strengths at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature. The resulting data indicate that acid etching creates a higher bond strength than the other tested techniques and that the bond formed is stronger at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperature. A description of the experiment along with the resulting data is presented here.

  11. Studies of Lubricating Materials in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Johnson, R. L.; Swikert, M. A.

    1964-01-01

    Lubricating materials for use in a vacuum environment have been the subject of a series of experimental investigations. Evaporation properties were evaluated for solid polymeric compositions. Friction and wear studies explored the behavior during sliding contact for series of polymeric compositions, binary alloys containing soft film-forming phases, complex alloys with film-forming materials, and a burnished MoS2 film. Friction and wear experiments were conducted at 10(exp-9)mm Hg with a 3/16-inch-radius-hemisphere rider specimen sliding on the flat surface of a rotating 2-1/2-inch-diameter disk specimen with materials that had low rates of evaporation. The influence of fillers in polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) on decomposition during vacuum friction studies was determined with a mass spectrometer. A real advantage in reducing decomposition and improving friction wear properties is gained by adding fillers (e.g., copper) that improve thermal conductivity through the composite materials. A polyimide and an epoxy-MoS2 composition material were found to have better friction and wear properties than PTFE compositions. A series of alloys (cast binary as well as more complex alloys) that contained microinclusions of potential film-forming material was studied. These materials replaced the normal surface oxides as they were worn away on sliding contact. Iron sulfide, nickel oxide, and tin are typical film-forming materials employed and were demonstrated to be effective in inhibiting surface welding and reducing friction. A burnished MoS2 film applied to type 440-C stainless steel in argon with a rotating soft wire brush had good endurance properties but somewhat higher friction than commercially available bonded films. An oil film applied to the burnished MoS2 markedly reduced its endurance life.

  12. Invisibility cloaking in the diffusive-light limit (presentation video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schittny, Robert; Kadic, Muamer; Wegener, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Albert Einstein's theory of relativity imposes stringent limitations to making macroscopic objects invisible with respect to electromagnetic light waves propagating in vacuum. These limitations are not relevant though for propagation of light in diffusive media like fog or milk because the effective energy speed is significantly lower than in vacuum due to multiple scattering events. Here, by exploiting the close mathematical analogy between the electrostatic or near-field limit of optics on the one hand and light diffusion on the other hand, we design, fabricate, and characterize simple core-shell cloaking structures for diffusive light propagation in cylindrical and spherical geometry.

  13. Vacuum design of storage ring and front ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Weilun

    1988-09-01

    The vacuum chambers of the 2.8 GeV BEPC storage ring consists of Al alloy 6061 extrusions as the bending magnet chambers, all stainless steel flanges and roll bond Al/SS clad metal as the transitions. The double-decker distributed ion pumps were designed to have pumping speeds of ≳0.16 m3.s-1.m-1, and are mounted inside the slotted Al extrusions. To improve the vacuum at the interaction region, additional radial ion pumps and NEGs would be connected with the beam pipe. There are three front ends joining the beam ports to the experimental beamlines. Each front end contains a fast closing valve, and all metal gate valve, masks and shutters, triode sputter ion pumps, Ti sublimation pumps, total and partial pressure gauges, etc.

  14. Metallic Thin-Film Bonding and Alloy Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, Jack Merrill (Inventor); Campbell, Geoff (Inventor); Peotter, Brian S. (Inventor); Droppers, Lloyd (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion bonding a stack of aluminum thin films is particularly challenging due to a stable aluminum oxide coating that rapidly forms on the aluminum thin films when they are exposed to atmosphere and the relatively low meting temperature of aluminum. By plating the individual aluminum thin films with a metal that does not rapidly form a stable oxide coating, the individual aluminum thin films may be readily diffusion bonded together using heat and pressure. The resulting diffusion bonded structure can be an alloy of choice through the use of a carefully selected base and plating metals. The aluminum thin films may also be etched with distinct patterns that form a microfluidic fluid flow path through the stack of aluminum thin films when diffusion bonded together.

  15. Microstructural characteristics of Au/Al bonded interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li Junhui . E-mail: lijunhui@mail.csu.edu.cn; Han Lei; Duan Jian; Zhong Jue

    2007-02-15

    Fracture characteristics at the interface of ultrasonic bonds between Au and Al were characterized by SEM following pull-testing to effect separation of the bonded joints. Vertical sections at the bonding point were produced by ion-sputter thinning, and were examined by TEM. Results show that the thickness of the Au/Al atomic diffusion interface was about 500 nm due to combined effects of ultrasonic and thermal energy. Ultrasonic vibration activates dislocations in the crystalline lattice and increases atomic diffusion. The fracture morphology on the lift-off interface was dimpled rupture. Tensile fracture occurred during the pull-test not at the bonded interface but in the base material; the bond strength at the interface was enhanced by the diffusion reactions that occurred across the interface due to the combined ultrasonic and thermal energy.

  16. Silicon crystal growth in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.

    1982-01-01

    The most developed process for silicon crystal growth is the Czochralski (CZ) method which was in production for over two decades. In an effort to reduce cost of single crystal silicon for photovoltaic applications, a directional solidification technique, Heat Exchanger Method (HEM), was adapted. Materials used in HEM and CZ furnaces are quite similar (heaters, crucibles, insulation, etc.). To eliminate the cost of high purity argon, it was intended to use vacuum operation in HEM. Two of the major problems encountered in vacuum processing of silicon are crucible decomposition and silicon carbide formation in the melt.

  17. Vacuum Cleaner Fan Being Improved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedt, Daniel L.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the technology utilization program at the NASA Lewis Research Center, efforts are underway to transfer aerospace technologies to new areas of practical application. One such effort involves using advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes for turbomachinery to analyze the internal fluid dynamics of low-speed fans and blowers. This year, the Kirby Company in Cleveland, Ohio, approached NASA with a request for technologies that could help them improve their vacuum cleaners. Of particular interest to Kirby is the high-frequency blade-passing noise generation of their vacuum cleaner fan at low airflow rates.

  18. Carbon atom adsorption on and diffusion into Fe(110) and Fe(100) from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, D. E.; Carter, Emily A.

    2005-01-01

    We employ spin-polarized periodic density functional theory (DFT) to examine carbon atom adsorption on, absorption in, and diffusion into Fe(110) and Fe(100). We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Fe surfaces and prefer high coordination sites. The carbon atom is predicted to adsorb on the long-bridge site on Fe(110) and the fourfold hollow site on Fe(100). Due to the very short distance between the carbon atom and the subsurface Fe atom of Fe(100), the carbon atom binds more strongly with Fe(100) than with Fe(110). In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site, as in bulk Fe. We find that the carbon atom is more stable in the subsurface octahedral site of Fe(110) than that of Fe(100), since the strain caused by the interstitial carbon atom is released by pushing one surface Fe atom towards vacuum by 0.5 Å in Fe(110), while the distortion in Fe(100) propagates far into the lattice. Diffusion of carbon atoms into Fe(110) and Fe(100) subsurfaces goes through transition states where the carbon atom is coordinated to four Fe atoms. The barriers to diffusion into Fe(110) and Fe(100) are 1.18 eV and 1.47 eV, respectively. The larger diffusion barrier into Fe(100) is mainly due to the stronger bonding between carbon and the Fe(100) surface. We predict that the rate-limiting step for C incorporation into bulk Fe is the initial diffusion to subsurface sites, while the rate-limiting step for absorbed carbon segregation to the surface is bulk diffusion, with no expected difference between rates to segregate to different surfaces. Lastly, we predict that graphite formation will be more favorable on C -covered Fe(110) than C -covered Fe(100).

  19. Amorphous Ternary Diffusion Barriers for Silicon Metallizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Jason Sven

    1995-01-01

    Reactively sputtered from transition-metal silicide or boride targets in Ar/N_2 discharges, thin amorphous films of TM-Si-N (TM = Mo, Ta, Ti, or W) and W-B-N are investigated. Resistivity, density, stress, and structure are given as functions of composition, and in some cases, temperature. Transmission electron microscopy shows that most of the films are marginally amorphous with the scale of local order ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 nm. Small -angle scattering measurements reveal chemically dissimilary regions in the films. When fully nitrided, Si appears to be preferentially bonded to nitrogen in the form of Si_3N_4 in the TM-Si-N films, according to extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) measurements. By tests on shallow-junction diodes, 100-nm thick TM-Si-N barriers are able to prevent aluminum overlayers from spiking the Si substrate at temperatures above aluminum's melting point, 660^circC. The exceptional stability is partly attributable to a 3 nm, self-sealing AlN layer which grows at the TM-Si-N/Al interface. The performance of the TM-Si-N and W-B-N barriers with copper overlayers is equally impressive. At the proper compositions, 100-nm barriers prevent copper from diffusing into the junction at 800^circC or higher for a 30-min vacuum annealing. Diode failure typically corresponds to the crystallization temperature of the barrier, which can be reduced by the presence of copper. Preliminary diffusion measurements of Cu in Ta _{36}Si_ {14}N_{50} films by SIMS yield an approximate diffusivity constant of D_{CU} = (0.014 cm ^2/s) times exp(-2.7 eV/kT). A 10-nm-thick TM-Si-N barrier with a Cu overlayer on MOS capacitors reveals no penetration of Cu into SiO_2 during an 80 h bias-thermal-stress at 300^circ C and 1 MV/cm applied field. Through a microscopic four-point probe lithographically defined on a Cu/barrier/Cu trilayer stack, the specific contact resistances of barrier/Cu interfaces are determined for TM-Si-N, TiN, and W barriers. In all instances, the

  20. Braze alloy holds bonding strength over wide temperature range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Copper-based quaternary alloys of the solid solution type is used for vacuum furnace brazing of large stainless steel components at a maximum temperature of 1975 deg F. The alloy has high bonding strength and good ductility over a temperature range extending from the cryogenic region to approximately 800 deg F.