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Sample records for vaginal microbiome studies

  1. Menopause and the vaginal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Muhleisen, Alicia L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2016-09-01

    For over a century it has been well documented that bacteria in the vagina maintain vaginal homeostasis, and that an imbalance or dysbiosis may be associated with poor reproductive and gynecologic health outcomes. Vaginal microbiota are of particular significance to postmenopausal women and may have a profound effect on vulvovaginal atrophy, vaginal dryness, sexual health and overall quality of life. As molecular-based techniques have evolved, our understanding of the diversity and complexity of this bacterial community has expanded. The objective of this review is to compare the changes that have been identified in the vaginal microbiota of menopausal women, outline alterations in the microbiome associated with specific menopausal symptoms, and define how hormone replacement therapy impacts the vaginal microbiome and menopausal symptoms; it concludes by considering the potential of probiotics to reinstate vaginal homeostasis following menopause. This review details the studies that support the role of Lactobacillus species in maintaining vaginal homeostasis and how the vaginal microbiome structure in postmenopausal women changes with decreasing levels of circulating estrogen. In addition, the associated transformations in the microanatomical features of the vaginal epithelium that can lead to vaginal symptoms associated with menopause are described. Furthermore, hormone replacement therapy directly influences the dominance of Lactobacillus in the microbiota and can resolve vaginal symptoms. Oral and vaginal probiotics hold great promise and initial studies complement the findings of previous research efforts concerning menopause and the vaginal microbiome; however, additional trials are required to determine the efficacy of bacterial therapeutics to modulate or restore vaginal homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Methodology for a vaginal and urinary microbiome study in women with mixed urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Komesu, Yuko M; Richter, Holly E; Dinwiddie, Darrell L; Siddiqui, Nazema Y; Sung, Vivian W; Lukacz, Emily S; Ridgeway, Beri; Arya, Lily A; Zyczynski, Halina M; Rogers, Rebecca G; Gantz, Marie

    2017-05-01

    We describe the rationale and methods of a study designed to compare vaginal and urinary microbiomes in women with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) and similarly aged, asymptomatic controls. This paper delineates the methodology of a supplementary microbiome study nested in an ongoing randomized controlled trial comparing a standardized perioperative behavioral/pelvic floor exercise intervention plus midurethral sling versus midurethral sling alone for MUI. Women in the parent study had at least "moderate bother" from urgency and stress urinary incontinence symptoms (SUI) on validated questionnaire and confirmed MUI on bladder diary. Controls had no incontinence symptoms. All participants underwent vaginal and urine collection for DNA analysis and conventional urine culture. Standardized protocols were designed, and a central lab received samples for subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of the bacterial16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. The composition of bacterial communities will be determined by dual amplicon sequencing of variable regions 1-3 and 4-6 from vaginal and urine specimens to compare the microbiome of patients with controls. Sample-size estimates determined that 126 MUI and 84 control participants were sufficient to detect a 20 % difference in predominant urinary genera, with 80 % power and 0.05 significance level. Specimen collection commenced January 2015 and finished April 2016. DNA was extracted and stored for subsequent evaluation. Methods papers sharing information regarding development of genitourinary microbiome studies, particularly with control populations, are few. We describe the rigorous methodology developed for a novel urogenital microbiome study in women with MUI.

  3. The Perinatal Microbiome and Pregnancy: Moving Beyond the Vaginal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Amanda L.; Chu, Derrick M.; Seferovic, Maxim D.; Antony, Kathleen M.; Ma, Jun; Aagaard, Kjersti M.

    2015-01-01

    The human microbiome, the collective genome of the microbial community that is on and within us, has recently been mapped. The initial characterization of healthy subjects has provided investigators with a reference population for interrogating the microbiome in metabolic, intestinal, and reproductive health and disease states. Although it is known that bacteria can colonize the vagina, recent metagenomic studies have shown that the vaginal microbiome varies among reproductive age women. Similarly, the richness and diversity of intestinal microbiota also naturally fluctuate among gravidae in both human and nonhuman primates, as well as mice. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that microbiome niches in pregnancy are not limited to maternal body sites, as the placenta appears to harbor a low biomass microbiome that is presumptively established in early pregnancy and varies in association with a remote history of maternal antenatal infection as well as preterm birth. In this article, we will provide a brief overview on metagenomics science as a means to investigate the microbiome, observations pertaining to both variation and the presumptive potential role of a varied microbiome during pregnancy, and how future studies of the microbiome in pregnancy may lend to a better understanding of human biology, reproductive health, and parturition. PMID:25775922

  4. High Diversity and Variability in the Vaginal Microbiome in Women following Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes (PPROM): A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Paramel Jayaprakash, Teenus; Wagner, Emily C.; van Schalkwyk, Julie; Albert, Arianne Y. K.; Hill, Janet E.; Money, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterize the vaginal microbiota of women following preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM), and determine if microbiome composition predicts latency duration and perinatal outcomes. Design A prospective cohort study Setting Canada Population Women with PPROM between 24+0 and 33+6 weeks gestational age (GA). Methods Microbiome profiles, based on pyrosequencing of the cpn60 universal target, were generated from vaginal samples at time of presentation with PPROM, weekly thereafter, and at delivery. Main Outcome Measures Vaginal microbiome composition, latency duration, gestational age at delivery, perinatal outcomes. Results Microbiome profiles were generated from 70 samples from 36 women. Mean GA at PPROM was 28.8 wk (mean latency 2.7 wk). Microbiome profiles were highly diverse but sequences representing Megasphaera type 1 and Prevotella spp. were detected in all vaginal samples. Only 13/70 samples were dominated by Lactobacillus spp. Microbiome profiles at the time of membrane rupture did not cluster by gestational age at PPROM, latency duration, presence of chorioamnionitis or by infant outcomes. Mycoplasma and/or Ureaplasma were detected by PCR in 81% (29/36) of women, and these women had significantly lower GA at delivery and correspondingly lower birth weight infants than Mycoplasma and/or Ureaplasma negative women. Conclusion Women with PPROM had mixed, abnormal vaginal microbiota but the microbiome profile at PPROM did not correlate with latency duration. Prevotella spp. and Megasphaera type I were ubiquitous. The presence of Mollicutes in the vaginal microbiome was associated with lower GA at delivery. The microbiome was remarkably unstable during the latency period. PMID:27861554

  5. Primate vaginal microbiomes exhibit species specificity without universal Lactobacillus dominance.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Suleyman; Yeoman, Carl J; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Thomas, Susan M; Ho, Mengfei; Leigh, Steven R; White, Bryan A; Wilson, Brenda A; Stumpf, Rebecca M

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial communities colonizing the reproductive tracts of primates (including humans) impact the health, survival and fitness of the host, and thereby the evolution of the host species. Despite their importance, we currently have a poor understanding of primate microbiomes. The composition and structure of microbial communities vary considerably depending on the host and environmental factors. We conducted comparative analyses of the primate vaginal microbiome using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of a phylogenetically broad range of primates to test for factors affecting the diversity of primate vaginal ecosystems. The nine primate species included: humans (Homo sapiens), yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus), olive baboons (Papio anubis), lemurs (Propithecus diadema), howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra), red colobus (Piliocolobus rufomitratus), vervets (Chlorocebus aethiops), mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Our results indicated that all primates exhibited host-specific vaginal microbiota and that humans were distinct from other primates in both microbiome composition and diversity. In contrast to the gut microbiome, the vaginal microbiome showed limited congruence with host phylogeny, and neither captivity nor diet elicited substantial effects on the vaginal microbiomes of primates. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance and Wilcoxon tests revealed correlations among vaginal microbiota and host species-specific socioecological factors, particularly related to sexuality, including: female promiscuity, baculum length, gestation time, mating group size and neonatal birth weight. The proportion of unclassified taxa observed in nonhuman primate samples increased with phylogenetic distance from humans, indicative of the existence of previously unrecognized microbial taxa. These findings contribute to our understanding of host-microbe variation and coevolution, microbial biogeography, and disease risk, and have important

  6. Vaginal microbiome and sexually transmitted infections: an epidemiologic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brotman, Rebecca M.

    2011-01-01

    Vaginal bacterial communities are thought to help prevent sexually transmitted infections. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common clinical syndrome in which the protective lactic acid–producing bacteria (mainly species of the Lactobacillus genus) are supplanted by a diverse array of anaerobic bacteria. Epidemiologically, BV has been shown to be an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes including preterm birth, development of pelvic inflammatory disease, and acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. Longitudinal studies of the vaginal microbiome using molecular techniques such as 16S ribosomal DNA analysis may lead to interventions that shift the vaginal microbiota toward more protective states. PMID:22133886

  7. The vaginal microbiome during pregnancy and the postpartum period in a European population

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, David A.; Chandiramani, Manju; Lee, Yun S.; Kindinger, Lindsay; Smith, Ann; Angelopoulos, Nicos; Lehne, Benjamin; Arulkumaran, Shankari; Brown, Richard; Teoh, Tiong Ghee; Holmes, Elaine; Nicoholson, Jeremy K.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Bennett, Phillip R.

    2015-01-01

    The composition and structure of the pregnancy vaginal microbiome may influence susceptibility to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Studies on the pregnant vaginal microbiome have largely been limited to Northern American populations. Using MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we characterised the vaginal microbiota of a mixed British cohort of women (n = 42) who experienced uncomplicated term delivery and who were sampled longitudinally throughout pregnancy (8–12, 20–22, 28–30 and 34–36 weeks gestation) and 6 weeks postpartum. We show that vaginal microbiome composition dramatically changes postpartum to become less Lactobacillus spp. dominant with increased alpha-diversity irrespective of the community structure during pregnancy and independent of ethnicity. While the pregnancy vaginal microbiome was characteristically dominated by Lactobacillus spp. and low alpha-diversity, unlike Northern American populations, a significant number of pregnant women this British population had a L. jensenii-dominated microbiome characterised by low alpha-diversity. L. jensenii was predominantly observed in women of Asian and Caucasian ethnicity whereas L. gasseri was absent in samples from Black women. This study reveals new insights into biogeographical and ethnic effects upon the pregnancy and postpartum vaginal microbiome and has important implications for future studies exploring relationships between the vaginal microbiome, host health and pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25758319

  8. Early pregnancy vaginal microbiome trends and preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Stout, Molly J; Zhou, Yanjiao; Wylie, Kristine M; Tarr, Phillip I; Macones, George A; Tuuli, Methodius G

    2017-09-01

    Despite decades of attempts to link infectious agents to preterm birth, an exact causative microbe or community of microbes remains elusive. Nonculture 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing suggests important racial differences and pregnancy specific changes in the vaginal microbial communities. A recent study examining the association of the vaginal microbiome and preterm birth documented important findings but was performed in a predominantly white cohort. Given the important racial differences in bacterial communities within the vagina as well as persistent racial disparities in preterm birth, it is important to examine cohorts with varied demographic compositions. To characterize vaginal microbial community characteristics in a large, predominantly African-American, longitudinal cohort of pregnant women and test whether particular vaginal microbial community characteristics are associated with the risk for subsequent preterm birth. This is a nested case-control study within a prospective cohort study of women with singleton pregnancies, not on supplemental progesterone, and without cervical cerclage in situ. Serial mid-vaginal swabs were obtained by speculum exam at their routine prenatal visits. Sequencing of the V1V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was performed on the Roche 454 platform. Alpha diversity community characteristics including richness, Shannon diversity, and evenness as well as beta diversity metrics including Bray Curtis Dissimilarity and specific taxon abundance were compared longitudinally in women who delivered preterm to those who delivered at term. A total of 77 subjects contributed 149 vaginal swabs longitudinally across pregnancy. Participants were predominantly African-American (69%) and had a preterm birth rate of 31%. In subjects with subsequent term delivery, the vaginal microbiome demonstrated stable community richness and Shannon diversity, whereas subjects with subsequent preterm delivery had significantly decreased vaginal richness

  9. Vaginal Microbiome Characterization of Nellore Cattle Using Metagenomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Laguardia-Nascimento, Mateus; Branco, Kelly Moreira Grillo Ribeiro; Gasparini, Marcela Ribeiro; Giannattasio-Ferraz, Silvia; Leite, Laura Rabelo; Araujo, Flávio Marcos Gomes; Salim, Anna Christina de Matos; Nicoli, Jacques Robert; de Oliveira, Guilherme Corrêa; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel Figueiredo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of microbial communities inhabiting cattle vaginal tract may lead to a better comprehension of bovine physiology and reproductive health being of great economic interest. Up to date, studies involving cattle microbiota are focused on the gastrointestinal tract, and little is known about the vaginal microbiota. This study aimed to investigate the vaginal microbiome in Nellore cattle, heifers and cows, pregnant and non-pregnant, using a culture independent approach. The main bacterial phyla found were Firmicutes (~40-50%), Bacteroidetes (~15-25%) and Proteobacteria (~5-25%), in addition to ~10-20% of non-classified bacteria. 45-55% of the samples were represented by only ten OTUs: Aeribacillus, Bacteroides, Clostridium, Ruminococcus, Rikenella, Alistipes, Bacillus, Eubacterium, Prevotella and non-classified bacteria. Interestingly, microbiota from all 20 animals could be grouped according to the respiratory metabolism of the main OTUs found, creating three groups of vaginal microbiota in cattle. Archaeal samples were dominated by the Methanobrevibacter genus (Euryarchaeota, ~55-70%). Ascomycota was the main fungal phylum (~80-95%) and Mycosphaerella the most abundant genus (~70-85%). Hormonal influence was not clear, but a tendency for the reduction of bacterial and increase of archaeal populations in pregnant animals was observed. Eukaryotes did not vary significantly between pregnant and non-pregnant animals, but tended to be more abundant on cows than on heifers. The present work describes a great microbial variability in the vaginal community among the evaluated animals and groups (heifers and cows, pregnant and non-pregnant), which is significantly different from the findings previously reported using culture dependent methods, pointing out the need for further studies on this issue. The microbiome found also indicates that the vaginal colonization appears to be influenced by the gastrointestinal community.

  10. A Study of the Vaginal Microbiome in Healthy Canadian Women Utilizing cpn60-Based Molecular Profiling Reveals Distinct Gardnerella Subgroup Community State Types

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Emily C.; Schellenberg, John J.; Links, Matthew G.; van Schalkwyk, Julie; Reid, Gregor; Hemmingsen, Sean M.; Hill, Janet E.; Money, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The vaginal microbiota is important in women’s reproductive and overall health. However, the relationships between the structure, function and dynamics of this complex microbial community and health outcomes remain elusive. The objective of this study was to determine the phylogenetic range and abundance of prokaryotes in the vaginal microbiota of healthy, non-pregnant, ethnically diverse, reproductive-aged Canadian women. Socio-demographic, behavioural and clinical data were collected and vaginal swabs were analyzed from 310 women. Detailed profiles of their vaginal microbiomes were generated by pyrosequencing of the chaperonin-60 universal target. Six community state types (CST) were delineated by hierarchical clustering, including three Lactobacillus-dominated CST (L. crispatus, L. iners, L. jensenii), two Gardnerella-dominated (subgroups A and C) and an “intermediate” CST which included a small number of women with microbiomes dominated by seven other species or with no dominant species but minority populations of Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Peptoniphilus, E. coli and various Proteobacteria in co-dominant communities. The striking correspondence between Nugent score and deep sequencing CST continues to reinforce the basic premise provided by the simpler Gram stain method, while additional analyses reveal detailed cpn60-based phylogeny and estimated abundance in microbial communities from vaginal samples. Ethnicity was the only demographic or clinical characteristic predicting CST, with differences in Asian and White women (p = 0.05). In conclusion, this study confirms previous work describing four cpn60-based subgroups of Gardnerella, revealing previously undescribed CST. The data describe the range of bacterial communities seen in Canadian women presenting with no specific vaginal health concerns, and provides an important baseline for future investigations of clinically important cohorts. PMID:26266808

  11. A Study of the Vaginal Microbiome in Healthy Canadian Women Utilizing cpn60-Based Molecular Profiling Reveals Distinct Gardnerella Subgroup Community State Types.

    PubMed

    Albert, Arianne Y K; Chaban, Bonnie; Wagner, Emily C; Schellenberg, John J; Links, Matthew G; van Schalkwyk, Julie; Reid, Gregor; Hemmingsen, Sean M; Hill, Janet E; Money, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The vaginal microbiota is important in women's reproductive and overall health. However, the relationships between the structure, function and dynamics of this complex microbial community and health outcomes remain elusive. The objective of this study was to determine the phylogenetic range and abundance of prokaryotes in the vaginal microbiota of healthy, non-pregnant, ethnically diverse, reproductive-aged Canadian women. Socio-demographic, behavioural and clinical data were collected and vaginal swabs were analyzed from 310 women. Detailed profiles of their vaginal microbiomes were generated by pyrosequencing of the chaperonin-60 universal target. Six community state types (CST) were delineated by hierarchical clustering, including three Lactobacillus-dominated CST (L. crispatus, L. iners, L. jensenii), two Gardnerella-dominated (subgroups A and C) and an "intermediate" CST which included a small number of women with microbiomes dominated by seven other species or with no dominant species but minority populations of Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Peptoniphilus, E. coli and various Proteobacteria in co-dominant communities. The striking correspondence between Nugent score and deep sequencing CST continues to reinforce the basic premise provided by the simpler Gram stain method, while additional analyses reveal detailed cpn60-based phylogeny and estimated abundance in microbial communities from vaginal samples. Ethnicity was the only demographic or clinical characteristic predicting CST, with differences in Asian and White women (p = 0.05). In conclusion, this study confirms previous work describing four cpn60-based subgroups of Gardnerella, revealing previously undescribed CST. The data describe the range of bacterial communities seen in Canadian women presenting with no specific vaginal health concerns, and provides an important baseline for future investigations of clinically important cohorts.

  12. Vaginal microbiome of reproductive-age women

    PubMed Central

    Ravel, Jacques; Gajer, Pawel; Abdo, Zaid; Schneider, G. Maria; Koenig, Sara S. K.; McCulle, Stacey L.; Karlebach, Shara; Gorle, Reshma; Russell, Jennifer; Tacket, Carol O.; Brotman, Rebecca M.; Davis, Catherine C.; Ault, Kevin; Peralta, Ligia; Forney, Larry J.

    2011-01-01

    The means by which vaginal microbiomes help prevent urogenital diseases in women and maintain health are poorly understood. To gain insight into this, the vaginal bacterial communities of 396 asymptomatic North American women who represented four ethnic groups (white, black, Hispanic, and Asian) were sampled and the species composition characterized by pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA genes. The communities clustered into five groups: four were dominated by Lactobacillus iners, L. crispatus, L. gasseri, or L. jensenii, whereas the fifth had lower proportions of lactic acid bacteria and higher proportions of strictly anaerobic organisms, indicating that a potential key ecological function, the production of lactic acid, seems to be conserved in all communities. The proportions of each community group varied among the four ethnic groups, and these differences were statistically significant [χ2(10) = 36.8, P < 0.0001]. Moreover, the vaginal pH of women in different ethnic groups also differed and was higher in Hispanic (pH 5.0 ± 0.59) and black (pH 4.7 ± 1.04) women as compared with Asian (pH 4.4 ± 0.59) and white (pH 4.2 ± 0.3) women. Phylotypes with correlated relative abundances were found in all communities, and these patterns were associated with either high or low Nugent scores, which are used as a factor for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. The inherent differences within and between women in different ethnic groups strongly argues for a more refined definition of the kinds of bacterial communities normally found in healthy women and the need to appreciate differences between individuals so they can be taken into account in risk assessment and disease diagnosis. PMID:20534435

  13. Lactobacilli Dominance and Vaginal pH: Why Is the Human Vaginal Microbiome Unique?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth A.; Beasley, DeAnna E.; Dunn, Robert R.; Archie, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiome is dominated by bacteria from the genus Lactobacillus, which create an acidic environment thought to protect women against sexually transmitted pathogens and opportunistic infections. Strikingly, lactobacilli dominance appears to be unique to humans; while the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the human vagina is typically >70%, in other mammals lactobacilli rarely comprise more than 1% of vaginal microbiota. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain humans' unique vaginal microbiota, including humans' distinct reproductive physiology, high risk of STDs, and high risk of microbial complications linked to pregnancy and birth. Here, we test these hypotheses using comparative data on vaginal pH and the relative abundance of lactobacilli in 26 mammalian species and 50 studies (N = 21 mammals for pH and 14 mammals for lactobacilli relative abundance). We found that non-human mammals, like humans, exhibit the lowest vaginal pH during the period of highest estrogen. However, the vaginal pH of non-human mammals is never as low as is typical for humans (median vaginal pH in humans = 4.5; range of pH across all 21 non-human mammals = 5.4–7.8). Contrary to disease and obstetric risk hypotheses, we found no significant relationship between vaginal pH or lactobacilli relative abundance and multiple metrics of STD or birth injury risk (P-values ranged from 0.13 to 0.99). Given the lack of evidence for these hypotheses, we discuss two alternative explanations: the common function hypothesis and a novel hypothesis related to the diet of agricultural humans. Specifically, with regard to diet we propose that high levels of starch in human diets have led to increased levels of glycogen in the vaginal tract, which, in turn, promotes the proliferation of lactobacilli. If true, human diet may have paved the way for a novel, protective microbiome in human vaginal tracts. Overall, our results highlight the need for continuing research on non

  14. Lactobacilli Dominance and Vaginal pH: Why Is the Human Vaginal Microbiome Unique?

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth A; Beasley, DeAnna E; Dunn, Robert R; Archie, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiome is dominated by bacteria from the genus Lactobacillus , which create an acidic environment thought to protect women against sexually transmitted pathogens and opportunistic infections. Strikingly, lactobacilli dominance appears to be unique to humans; while the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the human vagina is typically >70%, in other mammals lactobacilli rarely comprise more than 1% of vaginal microbiota. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain humans' unique vaginal microbiota, including humans' distinct reproductive physiology, high risk of STDs, and high risk of microbial complications linked to pregnancy and birth. Here, we test these hypotheses using comparative data on vaginal pH and the relative abundance of lactobacilli in 26 mammalian species and 50 studies ( N = 21 mammals for pH and 14 mammals for lactobacilli relative abundance). We found that non-human mammals, like humans, exhibit the lowest vaginal pH during the period of highest estrogen. However, the vaginal pH of non-human mammals is never as low as is typical for humans (median vaginal pH in humans = 4.5; range of pH across all 21 non-human mammals = 5.4-7.8). Contrary to disease and obstetric risk hypotheses, we found no significant relationship between vaginal pH or lactobacilli relative abundance and multiple metrics of STD or birth injury risk ( P -values ranged from 0.13 to 0.99). Given the lack of evidence for these hypotheses, we discuss two alternative explanations: the common function hypothesis and a novel hypothesis related to the diet of agricultural humans. Specifically, with regard to diet we propose that high levels of starch in human diets have led to increased levels of glycogen in the vaginal tract, which, in turn, promotes the proliferation of lactobacilli. If true, human diet may have paved the way for a novel, protective microbiome in human vaginal tracts. Overall, our results highlight the need for continuing research on non

  15. A New Era of the Vaginal Microbiome: Advances using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Girerd, Philippe H.; Jefferson, Kimberly K.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, bacterial species that inhabit the human vagina have been primarily studied using organism-centric approaches. Understanding how these bacterial species interact with each other and the host vaginal epithelium is essential for a more complete understanding of vaginal health. Molecular approaches have already led to the identification of uncultivated bacterial taxa associated with bacterial vaginosis. Here, we review recent studies of the vaginal microbiome and discuss how culture-independent approaches, such as applications of next-generation sequencing, are advancing the field and shifting our understanding of how vaginal health is defined. This work may to lead to improved diagnostic tools and treatments for women who suffer from, or are at risk for, vaginal imbalances, pregnancy complications, and sexually acquired infections. These approaches may also transform our understanding of how host genetic factors, physiological conditions (e.g. menopause) and environmental exposures (e.g. smoking, antibiotic usage) influence the vaginal microbiome. PMID:22589096

  16. Impact of a Hormone-Releasing Intrauterine System on the Vaginal Microbiome: A Prospective Baboon Model

    PubMed Central

    Hashway, Sara A.; Bergin, Ingrid L.; Bassis, Christine M.; Uchihashi, Mayu; Schmidt, Kelsey C.; Young, Vincent B.; Aronoff, David M.; Patton, Dorothy L.; Bell, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) in humans may alter vaginal microbial populations and susceptibility to pathogens. This study evaluated the time-dependent effects of an LNG-IUS on the vaginal microbiome of the baboon, a useful animal model for reproductive studies. Methods LNG-IUS were inserted into three reproductively mature, female baboons. The animals were evaluated for six months by physical examination and Gram-stained cytology. The vaginal microbiota was characterized at each timepoint by culture-independent analysis of the16S rRNA-encoding gene. Results Each baboon harbored a diverse vaginal microbiome. Inter-individual variation exceeded intra-individual variation. Diversity declined over time in one baboon and showed mild fluctuations in the other two. There were no significant community differences from early to late post LNG-IUS placement. Conclusions The baboon vaginal microbiome is unique to each individual and is polymicrobial. In this pilot study, the vaginal microbiome remained stable from early to late post LNG-IUS placement. PMID:24266633

  17. Association between statin use, the vaginal microbiome, and Gardnerella vaginalis vaginolysin-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Abdelmaksoud, Abdallah A; Girerd, Philippe H; Garcia, Erin M; Brooks, J Paul; Leftwich, Lauren M; Sheth, Nihar U; Bradley, Steven P; Serrano, Myrna G; Fettweis, Jennifer M; Huang, Bernice; Strauss, Jerome F; Buck, Gregory A; Jefferson, Kimberly K

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the leading dysbiosis of the vaginal microbiome. The pathways leading towards the development of BV are not well understood. Gardnerella vaginalis is frequently associated with BV. G. vaginalis produces the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC), vaginolysin, which can lyse a variety of human cells and is thought to play a role in pathogenesis. Because membrane cholesterol is required for vaginolysin to function, and because HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) affect not only serum levels of cholesterol but membrane levels as well, we hypothesized that statins might affect the vaginal microbiome. To investigate the relationship between use of the statins and the vaginal microbiome, we analyzed 16S rRNA gene taxonomic surveys performed on vaginal samples from 133 women who participated in the Vaginal Human Microbiome Project and who were taking statins at the time of sampling, 152 women who reported high cholesterol levels but were not taking statins, and 316 women who did not report high cholesterol. To examine the effect of statins on the cytolytic effect of vaginolysin, the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) produced by Gardnerella vaginalis, we assessed the effect of simvastatin pretreatment of VK2E6/E7 vaginal epithelial cells on vaginolysin-mediated cytotoxicity. The mean proportion of G. vaginalis among women taking statins was significantly lower relative to women not using statins. Women using statins had higher mean proportions of Lactobacillus crispatus relative to women with normal cholesterol levels, and higher levels of Lactobacillus jensenii relative to women with high cholesterol but not taking statins. In vitro, vaginal epithelial cells pretreated with simvastatin were relatively resistant to vaginolysin and this effect was inhibited by cholesterol. In this cross-sectional study, statin use was associated with reduced proportions of G. vaginalis and greater proportions of beneficial lactobacilli within the vaginal

  18. Vaginal Microbiomes Associated With Aerobic Vaginitis and Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Kaambo, Evelyn; Africa, Charlene; Chambuso, Ramadhani; Passmore, Jo-Ann Shelley

    2018-01-01

    A healthy vaginal microbiota is considered to be significant for maintaining vaginal health and preventing infections. However, certain vaginal bacterial commensal species serve an important first line of defense of the body. Any disruption of this microbial barrier might result in a number of urogenital conditions including aerobic vaginitis (AV) and bacterial vaginosis (BV). The health of the vagina is closely associated with inhabitant microbiota. Furthermore, these microbes maintain a low vaginal pH, prevent the acquisition of pathogens, stimulate or moderate the local innate immune system, and further protect against complications during pregnancies. Therefore, this review will focus on vaginal microbial "health" in the lower reproductive tract of women and on the physiological characteristics that determine the well-being of reproductive health. In addition, we explore the distinct versus shared characteristics of BV and AV, which are commonly associated with increased risk for preterm delivery.

  19. Vaginal Microbiomes Associated With Aerobic Vaginitis and Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaambo, Evelyn; Africa, Charlene; Chambuso, Ramadhani; Passmore, Jo-Ann Shelley

    2018-01-01

    A healthy vaginal microbiota is considered to be significant for maintaining vaginal health and preventing infections. However, certain vaginal bacterial commensal species serve an important first line of defense of the body. Any disruption of this microbial barrier might result in a number of urogenital conditions including aerobic vaginitis (AV) and bacterial vaginosis (BV). The health of the vagina is closely associated with inhabitant microbiota. Furthermore, these microbes maintain a low vaginal pH, prevent the acquisition of pathogens, stimulate or moderate the local innate immune system, and further protect against complications during pregnancies. Therefore, this review will focus on vaginal microbial “health” in the lower reproductive tract of women and on the physiological characteristics that determine the well-being of reproductive health. In addition, we explore the distinct versus shared characteristics of BV and AV, which are commonly associated with increased risk for preterm delivery. PMID:29632854

  20. Influence of Age, Reproductive Cycling Status, and Menstruation on the Vaginal Microbiome in Baboons (Papio anubis)

    PubMed Central

    UCHIHASHI, M.; BERGIN, I. L.; BASSIS, C. M.; HASHWAY, S. A.; CHAI, D.; BELL, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    The vaginal microbiome is believed to influence host health by providing protection from pathogens and influencing reproductive outcomes such as fertility and gestational length. In humans, age-associated declines in diversity of the vaginal microbiome occur in puberty and persist into adulthood. Additionally, menstruation has been associated with decreased microbial community stability. Adult female baboons, like other non-human primates (NHPs), have a different and highly diverse vaginal microbiome compared to that of humans, which is most commonly dominated by Lactobacillus spp. We evaluated the influence of age, reproductive cycling status (cycling vs. non-cycling) and menstruation on the vaginal microbiome of 38 wild-caught, captive female olive baboons (Papio anubis) by culture-independent sequencing of the V3–V5 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. All baboons had highly diverse vaginal microbial communities. Adult baboons had significantly lower microbial diversity in comparison to subadult baboons, which was attributable to decreased relative abundance of minor taxa. No significant differences were detected based on cycling state or menstruation. Predictive metagenomic analysis showed uniformity in relative abundance of metabolic pathways regardless of age, cycle stage, or menstruation, indicating conservation of microbial community functions. This study suggests that selection of an optimal vaginal microbial community occurs at puberty. Since decreased diversity occurs in both baboons and humans at puberty, this may reflect a general strategy for selection of adult vaginal microbial communities. Comparative evaluation of vaginal microbial community development and composition may elucidate mechanisms of community formation and function that are conserved across host species or across microbial community types. These findings have implications for host health, evolutionary biology, and microbe-host ecosystems. PMID:25676781

  1. Influence of age, reproductive cycling status, and menstruation on the vaginal microbiome in baboons (Papio anubis).

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, M; Bergin, I L; Bassis, C M; Hashway, S A; Chai, D; Bell, J D

    2015-05-01

    The vaginal microbiome is believed to influence host health by providing protection from pathogens and influencing reproductive outcomes such as fertility and gestational length. In humans, age-associated declines in diversity of the vaginal microbiome occur in puberty and persist into adulthood. Additionally, menstruation has been associated with decreased microbial community stability. Adult female baboons, like other non-human primates (NHPs), have a different and highly diverse vaginal microbiome compared to that of humans, which is most commonly dominated by Lactobacillus spp. We evaluated the influence of age, reproductive cycling status (cycling vs. non-cycling) and menstruation on the vaginal microbiome of 38 wild-caught, captive female olive baboons (Papio anubis) by culture-independent sequencing of the V3-V5 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. All baboons had highly diverse vaginal microbial communities. Adult baboons had significantly lower microbial diversity in comparison to subadult baboons, which was attributable to decreased relative abundance of minor taxa. No significant differences were detected based on cycling state or menstruation. Predictive metagenomic analysis showed uniformity in relative abundance of metabolic pathways regardless of age, cycle stage, or menstruation, indicating conservation of microbial community functions. This study suggests that selection of an optimal vaginal microbial community occurs at puberty. Since decreased diversity occurs in both baboons and humans at puberty, this may reflect a general strategy for selection of adult vaginal microbial communities. Comparative evaluation of vaginal microbial community development and composition may elucidate mechanisms of community formation and function that are conserved across host species or across microbial community types. These findings have implications for host health, evolutionary biology, and microbe-host ecosystems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The vaginal microbiome: rethinking health and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bing; Forney, Larry J.; Ravel, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Vaginal microbiota form a mutually beneficial relationship with their host and have major impact on health and disease. In recent years our understanding of vaginal bacterial community composition and structure has significantly broadened as a result of investigators using cultivation-independent methods based on the analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences. In asymptomatic, otherwise healthy women, several kinds of vaginal microbiota exist, the majority often dominated by species of Lactobacillus, while others comprise a diverse array of anaerobic microorganisms. Bacterial vaginosis is the most common vaginal conditions and is vaguely characterized as the disruption of the equilibrium of the ‘normal’ vaginal microbiots. A better understanding of ‘normal’ and ‘healthy’ vaginal ecosystems that is based on its ‘true’ function and not simply on its composition would help better define health and further improve disease diagnostics as well as the development of more personalized regimens to promote health and treat diseases. PMID:22746335

  3. Differences in vaginal microbiome in African American women versus women of European ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Brooks, J. Paul; Serrano, Myrna G.; Sheth, Nihar U.; Girerd, Philippe H.; Edwards, David J.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Jefferson, Kimberly K.

    2014-01-01

    Women of European ancestry are more likely to harbour a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiome, whereas African American women are more likely to exhibit a diverse microbial profile. African American women are also twice as likely to be diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis and are twice as likely to experience preterm birth. The objective of this study was to further characterize and contrast the vaginal microbial profiles in African American versus European ancestry women. Through the Vaginal Human Microbiome Project at Virginia Commonwealth University, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was used to compare the microbiomes of vaginal samples from 1268 African American women and 416 women of European ancestry. The results confirmed significant differences in the vaginal microbiomes of the two groups and identified several taxa relevant to these differences. Major community types were dominated by Gardnerella vaginalis and the uncultivated bacterial vaginosis-associated bacterium-1 (BVAB1) that were common among African Americans. Moreover, the prevalence of multiple bacterial taxa that are associated with microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity and preterm birth, including Mycoplasma, Gardnerella, Prevotella and Sneathia, differed between the two ethnic groups. We investigated the contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including pregnancy, body mass index, diet, smoking and alcohol use, number of sexual partners, and household income, to vaginal community composition. Ethnicity, pregnancy and alcohol use correlated significantly with the relative abundance of bacterial vaginosis-associated species. Trends between microbial profiles and smoking and number of sexual partners were observed; however, these associations were not statistically significant. These results support and extend previous findings that there are significant differences in the vaginal microbiome related to ethnicity and demonstrate that these differences are pronounced even in healthy women

  4. The vaginal microbiome: New information about genital tract flora using molecular based techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Ronald F.; Sobel, Jack D.; Akins, Robert A.; Hassan, Sonia S.; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Romero, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Vaginal microbiome studies provide information which may change the way we define vaginal flora. Normal flora appears dominated by one or two species of Lactobacillus. Significant numbers of healthy women lack appreciable numbers of vaginal lactobacilli. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is not a single entity, but different bacterial communities or profiles of greater microbial diversity than is evident from cultivation-dependent studies. BV should be considered a syndrome of variable composition which results in different symptoms, phenotypical outcomes, and responses to different antibiotic regimens. This information may help to elucidate the link between BV and infection-related adverse outcomes of pregnancy. PMID:21251190

  5. Associations between sexual habits, menstrual hygiene practices, demographics and the vaginal microbiome as revealed by Bayesian network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Noelle; Cho, Kyu-Chul; Ravel, Jacques; Forney, Larry J.

    2018-01-01

    The vaginal microbiome plays an influential role in several disease states in reproductive age women, including bacterial vaginosis (BV). While demographic characteristics are associated with differences in vaginal microbiome community structure, little is known about the influence of sexual and hygiene habits. Furthermore, associations between the vaginal microbiome and risk symptoms of bacterial vaginosis have not been fully elucidated. Using Bayesian network (BN) analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence results, demographic and extensive questionnaire data, we describe both novel and previously documented associations between habits of women and their vaginal microbiome. The BN analysis approach shows promise in uncovering complex associations between disparate data types. Our findings based on this approach support published associations between specific microbiome members (e.g., Eggerthella, Gardnerella, Dialister, Sneathia and Ruminococcaceae), the Nugent score (a BV diagnostic) and vaginal pH (a risk symptom of BV). Additionally, we found that several microbiome members were directly connected to other risk symptoms of BV (such as vaginal discharge, odor, itch, irritation, and yeast infection) including L. jensenii, Corynebacteria, and Proteobacteria. No direct connections were found between the Nugent Score and risk symptoms of BV other than pH, indicating that the Nugent Score may not be the most useful criteria for assessment of clinical BV. We also found that demographics (i.e., age, ethnicity, previous pregnancy) were associated with the presence/absence of specific vaginal microbes. The resulting BN revealed several as-yet undocumented associations between birth control usage, menstrual hygiene practices and specific microbiome members. Many of these complex relationships were not identified using common analytical methods, i.e., ordination and PERMANOVA. While these associations require confirmatory follow-up study, our findings strongly suggest that future

  6. Associations between sexual habits, menstrual hygiene practices, demographics and the vaginal microbiome as revealed by Bayesian network analysis.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Noelle; Cho, Kyu-Chul; Ravel, Jacques; Forney, Larry J; Abdo, Zaid

    2018-01-01

    The vaginal microbiome plays an influential role in several disease states in reproductive age women, including bacterial vaginosis (BV). While demographic characteristics are associated with differences in vaginal microbiome community structure, little is known about the influence of sexual and hygiene habits. Furthermore, associations between the vaginal microbiome and risk symptoms of bacterial vaginosis have not been fully elucidated. Using Bayesian network (BN) analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence results, demographic and extensive questionnaire data, we describe both novel and previously documented associations between habits of women and their vaginal microbiome. The BN analysis approach shows promise in uncovering complex associations between disparate data types. Our findings based on this approach support published associations between specific microbiome members (e.g., Eggerthella, Gardnerella, Dialister, Sneathia and Ruminococcaceae), the Nugent score (a BV diagnostic) and vaginal pH (a risk symptom of BV). Additionally, we found that several microbiome members were directly connected to other risk symptoms of BV (such as vaginal discharge, odor, itch, irritation, and yeast infection) including L. jensenii, Corynebacteria, and Proteobacteria. No direct connections were found between the Nugent Score and risk symptoms of BV other than pH, indicating that the Nugent Score may not be the most useful criteria for assessment of clinical BV. We also found that demographics (i.e., age, ethnicity, previous pregnancy) were associated with the presence/absence of specific vaginal microbes. The resulting BN revealed several as-yet undocumented associations between birth control usage, menstrual hygiene practices and specific microbiome members. Many of these complex relationships were not identified using common analytical methods, i.e., ordination and PERMANOVA. While these associations require confirmatory follow-up study, our findings strongly suggest that future

  7. Cultivated Vaginal Microbiomes Alter HIV-1 Infection and Antiretroviral Efficacy in Colonized Epithelial Multilayer Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pyles, Richard B.; Vincent, Kathleen L.; Baum, Marc M.; Elsom, Barry; Miller, Aaron L.; Maxwell, Carrie; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia D.; Li, Guangyu; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Ferguson, Monique R.

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for modeling of the symbiotic and at times dysbiotic relationship established between bacterial microbiomes and human mucosal surfaces. In particular clinical studies have indicated that the complex vaginal microbiome (VMB) contributes to the protection against sexually-transmitted pathogens including the life-threatening human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The human microbiome project has substantially increased our understanding of the complex bacterial communities in the vagina however, as is the case for most microbiomes, very few of the community member species have been successfully cultivated in the laboratory limiting the types of studies that can be completed. A genetically controlled ex vivo model system is critically needed to study the complex interactions and associated molecular dialog. We present the first vaginal mucosal culture model that supports colonization by both healthy and dysbiotic VMB from vaginal swabs collected from routine gynecological patients. The immortalized vaginal epithelial cells used in the model and VMB cryopreservation methods provide the opportunity to reproducibly create replicates for lab-based evaluations of this important mucosal/bacterial community interface. The culture system also contains HIV-1 susceptible cells allowing us to study the impact of representative microbiomes on replication. Our results show that our culture system supports stable and reproducible colonization by VMB representing distinct community state types and that the selected representatives have significantly different effects on the replication of HIV-1. Further, we show the utility of the system to predict unwanted alterations in efficacy or bacterial community profiles following topical application of a front line antiretroviral. PMID:24676219

  8. Cultivated vaginal microbiomes alter HIV-1 infection and antiretroviral efficacy in colonized epithelial multilayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Pyles, Richard B; Vincent, Kathleen L; Baum, Marc M; Elsom, Barry; Miller, Aaron L; Maxwell, Carrie; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia D; Li, Guangyu; Popov, Vsevolod L; Nusbaum, Rebecca J; Ferguson, Monique R

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for modeling of the symbiotic and at times dysbiotic relationship established between bacterial microbiomes and human mucosal surfaces. In particular clinical studies have indicated that the complex vaginal microbiome (VMB) contributes to the protection against sexually-transmitted pathogens including the life-threatening human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The human microbiome project has substantially increased our understanding of the complex bacterial communities in the vagina however, as is the case for most microbiomes, very few of the community member species have been successfully cultivated in the laboratory limiting the types of studies that can be completed. A genetically controlled ex vivo model system is critically needed to study the complex interactions and associated molecular dialog. We present the first vaginal mucosal culture model that supports colonization by both healthy and dysbiotic VMB from vaginal swabs collected from routine gynecological patients. The immortalized vaginal epithelial cells used in the model and VMB cryopreservation methods provide the opportunity to reproducibly create replicates for lab-based evaluations of this important mucosal/bacterial community interface. The culture system also contains HIV-1 susceptible cells allowing us to study the impact of representative microbiomes on replication. Our results show that our culture system supports stable and reproducible colonization by VMB representing distinct community state types and that the selected representatives have significantly different effects on the replication of HIV-1. Further, we show the utility of the system to predict unwanted alterations in efficacy or bacterial community profiles following topical application of a front line antiretroviral.

  9. Analysis of the Vaginal Microbiome by Next-Generation Sequencing and Evaluation of its Performance as a Clinical Diagnostic Tool in Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ki Ho; Hong, Sung Kuk; Cho, Sung Im; Ra, Eunkyung; Han, Kyung Hee; Kang, Soon Beom; Kim, Eui-Chong; Park, Sung Sup

    2016-01-01

    Background Next-generation sequencing (NGS) can detect many more microorganisms of a microbiome than traditional methods. This study aimed to analyze the vaginal microbiomes of Korean women by using NGS that included bacteria and other microorganisms. The NGS results were compared with the results of other assays, and NGS was evaluated for its feasibility for predicting vaginitis. Methods In total, 89 vaginal swab specimens were collected. Microscopic examinations of Gram staining and microbiological cultures were conducted on 67 specimens. NGS was performed with GS junior system on all of the vaginal specimens for the 16S rRNA, internal transcribed spacer (ITS), and Tvk genes to detect bacteria, fungi, and Trichomonas vaginalis. In addition, DNA probe assays of the Candida spp., Gardnerella vaginalis, and Trichomonas vaginalis were performed. Various predictors of diversity that were obtained from the NGS data were analyzed to predict vaginitis. Results ITS sequences were obtained in most of the specimens (56.2%). The compositions of the intermediate and vaginitis Nugent score groups were similar to each other but differed from the composition of the normal score group. The fraction of the Lactobacillus spp. showed the highest area under the curve value (0.8559) in ROC curve analysis. The NGS and DNA probe assay results showed good agreement (range, 86.2-89.7%). Conclusions Fungi as well as bacteria should be considered for the investigation of vaginal microbiome. The intermediate and vaginitis Nugent score groups were indistinguishable in NGS. NGS is a promising diagnostic tool of the vaginal microbiome and vaginitis, although some problems need to be resolved. PMID:27374709

  10. Changes in vaginal community state types reflect major shifts in the microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, J. Paul; Buck, Gregory A.; Chen, Guanhua; Diao, Liyang; Edwards, David J.; Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Huzurbazar, Snehalata; Rakitin, Alexander; Satten, Glen A.; Smirnova, Ekaterina; Waks, Zeev; Wright, Michelle L.; Yanover, Chen; Zhou, Yi-Hui

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Recent studies of various human microbiome habitats have revealed thousands of bacterial species and the existence of large variation in communities of microorganisms in the same habitats across individual human subjects. Previous efforts to summarize this diversity, notably in the human gut and vagina, have categorized microbiome profiles by clustering them into community state types (CSTs). The functional relevance of specific CSTs has not been established. Objective: We investigate whether CSTs can be used to assess dynamics in the microbiome. Design: We conduct a re-analysis of five sequencing-based microbiome surveys derived from vaginal samples with repeated measures. Results: We observe that detection of a CST transition is largely insensitive to choices in methods for normalization or clustering. We find that healthy subjects persist in a CST for two to three weeks or more on average, while those with evidence of dysbiosis tend to change more often. Changes in CST can be gradual or occur over less than one day. Upcoming CST changes and switches to high-risk CSTs can be predicted with high accuracy in certain scenarios. Finally, we observe that presence of Gardnerella vaginalis is a strong predictor of an upcoming CST change. Conclusion: Overall, our results show that the CST concept is useful for studying microbiome dynamics. PMID:28572753

  11. Unraveling the Dynamics of the Human Vaginal Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Kenetta L; Forney, Larry J

    2016-09-01

    Four Lactobacillus species, namely L. crispatus , L. iners , L. gasseri , and L. jensenii , commonly dominate the vaginal communities of most reproductive-age women. It is unclear why these particular species, and not others, are so prevalent. Historically, estrogen-induced glycogen production by the vaginal epithelium has been proffered as being key to supporting the proliferation of vaginal lactobacilli. However, the 'fly in the ointment' (that has been largely ignored) is that the species of Lactobacillus commonly found in the human vagina cannot directly metabolize glycogen. It would appear that this riddle has been solved as studies have demonstrated that vaginal lactobacilli can metabolize the products of glycogen depolymerization by α-amylase, and fortunately, amylase activity is found in vaginal secretions. These amylases are presumed to be host-derived, but we suggest that other bacterial populations in vaginal communities could also be sources of amylase in addition to (or instead of) the host. Here we briefly review what is known about human vaginal bacterial communities and discuss how glycogen-derived resources and resource competition might shape the composition and structure of these communities.

  12. Unraveling the Dynamics of the Human Vaginal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Kenetta L.; Forney, Larry J.

    2016-01-01

    Four Lactobacillus species, namely L. crispatus, L. iners, L. gasseri, and L. jensenii, commonly dominate the vaginal communities of most reproductive-age women. It is unclear why these particular species, and not others, are so prevalent. Historically, estrogen-induced glycogen production by the vaginal epithelium has been proffered as being key to supporting the proliferation of vaginal lactobacilli. However, the ‘fly in the ointment’ (that has been largely ignored) is that the species of Lactobacillus commonly found in the human vagina cannot directly metabolize glycogen. It would appear that this riddle has been solved as studies have demonstrated that vaginal lactobacilli can metabolize the products of glycogen depolymerization by α-amylase, and fortunately, amylase activity is found in vaginal secretions. These amylases are presumed to be host-derived, but we suggest that other bacterial populations in vaginal communities could also be sources of amylase in addition to (or instead of) the host. Here we briefly review what is known about human vaginal bacterial communities and discuss how glycogen-derived resources and resource competition might shape the composition and structure of these communities. PMID:27698617

  13. Diverse Vaginal Microbiomes in Reproductive-Age Women with Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mu-Biao; Xu, Su-Rong; He, Yan; Deng, Guan-Hua; Sheng, Hua-Fang; Huang, Xue-Mei; Ouyang, Cai-Yan; Zhou, Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is one of the most prevalent vaginal infectious diseases, and there are controversial reports regarding the diversity of the associated vaginal microbiota. We determined the vaginal microbial community in patients with VVC, bacterial vaginosis (BV), and mixed infection of VVC and BV using Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA tags. Our results revealed for the first time the highly variable patterns of the vaginal microbiome from VVC patients. In general, the alpha-diversity results of species richness and evenness showed the following order: normal control < VVC only < mixed BV and VVC infection < BV only. The beta-diversity comparison of community structures also showed an intermediate composition of VVC between the control and BV samples. A detailed comparison showed that, although the control and BV communities had typical patterns, the vaginal microbiota of VVC is complex. The mixed BV and VVC infection group showed a unique pattern, with a relatively higher abundance of Lactobacillus than the BV group and higher abundance of Prevotella, Gardnerella, and Atopobium than the normal control. In contrast, the VVC-only group could not be described by any single profile, ranging from a community structure similar to the normal control (predominated with Lactobacillus) to BV-like community structures (abundant with Gardnerella and Atopobium). Treatment of VVC resulted in inconsistent changes of the vaginal microbiota, with four BV/VVC samples recovering to a higher Lactobacillus level, whereas many VVC-only patients did not. These results will be useful for future studies on the role of vaginal microbiota in VVC and related infectious diseases. PMID:24265786

  14. Diverse vaginal microbiomes in reproductive-age women with vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mu-Biao; Xu, Su-Rong; He, Yan; Deng, Guan-Hua; Sheng, Hua-Fang; Huang, Xue-Mei; Ouyang, Cai-Yan; Zhou, Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is one of the most prevalent vaginal infectious diseases, and there are controversial reports regarding the diversity of the associated vaginal microbiota. We determined the vaginal microbial community in patients with VVC, bacterial vaginosis (BV), and mixed infection of VVC and BV using Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA tags. Our results revealed for the first time the highly variable patterns of the vaginal microbiome from VVC patients. In general, the alpha-diversity results of species richness and evenness showed the following order: normal control < VVC only < mixed BV and VVC infection < BV only. The beta-diversity comparison of community structures also showed an intermediate composition of VVC between the control and BV samples. A detailed comparison showed that, although the control and BV communities had typical patterns, the vaginal microbiota of VVC is complex. The mixed BV and VVC infection group showed a unique pattern, with a relatively higher abundance of Lactobacillus than the BV group and higher abundance of Prevotella, Gardnerella, and Atopobium than the normal control. In contrast, the VVC-only group could not be described by any single profile, ranging from a community structure similar to the normal control (predominated with Lactobacillus) to BV-like community structures (abundant with Gardnerella and Atopobium). Treatment of VVC resulted in inconsistent changes of the vaginal microbiota, with four BV/VVC samples recovering to a higher Lactobacillus level, whereas many VVC-only patients did not. These results will be useful for future studies on the role of vaginal microbiota in VVC and related infectious diseases.

  15. Understanding vaginal microbiome complexity from an ecological perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Roxana J.; Zhou, Xia; Pierson, Jacob D.; Ravel, Jacques; Forney, Larry J.

    2012-01-01

    The various microbiota normally associated with the human body have an important influence on human development, physiology, immunity, and nutrition. This is certainly true for the vagina wherein communities of mutualistic bacteria constitute the first line of defense for the host by excluding invasive, nonindigenous organisms that may cause disease. In recent years much has been learned about the bacterial species composition of these communities and how they differ between individuals of different ages and ethnicities. A deeper understanding of their origins and the interrelationships of constituent species is needed to understand how and why they change over time or in response to changes in the host environment. Moreover, there are few unifying theories to explain the ecological dynamics of vaginal ecosystems as they respond to disturbances caused by menses and human activities such as intercourse, douching, and other habits and practices. This fundamental knowledge is needed to diagnose and assess risk to disease. Here we summarize what is known about the species composition, structure, and function of bacterial communities in the human vagina and the applicability of ecological models of community structure and function to understanding the dynamics of this and other ecosystems that comprise the human microbiome. PMID:22683415

  16. Group B Streptococci Colonization in Pregnant Guatemalan Women: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Vaginal Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Rick, Anne-Marie; Aguilar, Angie; Cortes, Rosita; Gordillo, Remei; Melgar, Mario; Samayoa-Reyes, Gabriela; Frank, Daniel N; Asturias, Edwin J

    2017-01-01

    Infection causes 1 of every 5 neonatal deaths globally. Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the most significant pathogen, although little is known about its epidemiology and risk in low-income countries. A cross-sectional study in 2015 at a public hospital in Guatemala City enrolled women ≥35 weeks' gestation. Vaginal and rectal swabs were processed using Lim broth and GBS CHROMagar then agglutination testing. Risk factors were assessed using multivariate analysis. Vaginal microbiota were profiled by 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequencing in a subset of 94 women. Of 896 pregnant women, 155 (17.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 14.9-19.9) were GBS colonized. Colonization was associated with history of previous infant with poor outcome (odds ratio [OR], 1.94; 95% CI, 1.15-3.27) and increasing maternal age (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02-1.09). Multiparity was protective (OR, .39; 95% CI, .21-.72). Four (6%) GBS-exposed infants had early-onset neonatal sepsis. Vaginal microbiome composition was associated with previous antibiotic exposure ( P = .003) and previous low birth weight infant ( P = .03), but not GBS colonization ( P = .72). Several individual taxa differed in abundance between colonized and noncolonized women. Group B Streptococcus is prevalent in pregnant women from Guatemala with different risk factors than previously described. Although the vaginal microbiome was not altered significantly in GBS-colonized women, use of antibiotics had an effect on its composition. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  17. Lactobacillus crispatus Dominant Vaginal Microbiome Is Associated with Inhibitory Activity of Female Genital Tract Secretions against Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zigui; Buckley, Niall; Lo, Yungtai; Ratner, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Female genital tract secretions inhibit E. coli ex vivo and the activity may prevent colonization and provide a biomarker of a healthy microbiome. We hypothesized that high E. coli inhibitory activity would be associated with a Lactobacillus crispatus and/or jensenii dominant microbiome and differ from that of women with low inhibitory activity. Study Design Vaginal swab cell pellets from 20 samples previously obtained in a cross-sectional study of near-term pregnant and non-pregnant healthy women were selected based on having high (>90% inhibition) or low (<20% inhibition) anti-E. coli activity. The V6 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified and sequenced using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Filtered culture supernatants from Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus iners, and Gardnerella vaginalis were also assayed for E. coli inhibitory activity. Results Sixteen samples (10 with high and 6 with low activity) yielded evaluable microbiome data. There was no difference in the predominant microbiome species in pregnant compared to non-pregnant women (n = 8 each). However, there were significant differences between women with high compared to low E. coli inhibitory activity. High activity was associated with a predominance of L. crispatus (p<0.007) and culture supernatants from L. crispatus exhibited greater E. coli inhibitory activity compared to supernatants obtained from L. iners or G. vaginalis. Notably, the E. coli inhibitory activity varied among different strains of L. crispatus. Conclusion Microbiome communities with abundant L. crispatus likely contribute to the E. coli inhibitory activity of vaginal secretions and efforts to promote this environment may prevent E. coli colonization and related sequelae including preterm birth. PMID:24805362

  18. What fertility specialists should know about the vaginal microbiome: a review.

    PubMed

    García-Velasco, Juan Antonio; Menabrito, Marco; Catalán, Isidoro Bruna

    2017-07-01

    Our understanding of the composition of the microbial communities that inhabit the human body, known as the 'microbiome', is aided by the development of non-culture-dependent DNA sequencing. It is increasingly apparent that the balance of microbial species greatly affects the health of the host. Disturbances in the composition of bacterial communities have been shown to contribute to various disease states, and there is a growing body of evidence that the vaginal microbiota, which is unique to each woman, plays an important role in determining many facets of reproductive health. The purpose of this review is to investigate what is currently known about the composition of the vaginal microbiome, including what is considered 'normal' in terms of bacterial species and abundance. We will investigate the impact of vaginal microbiome composition on reproductive outcomes within the context of infertility treatments, and the implications this has been shown to have on assisted reproductive technology procedures. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of Lactobacillus crispatus isolates from Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiomes with isolates from microbiomes containing bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmaksoud, Abdallah A.; Koparde, Vishal N.; Sheth, Nihar U.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Glascock, Abigail L.; Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Buck, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal lactobacilli can inhibit colonization by and growth of other bacteria, thereby preventing development of bacterial vaginosis (BV). Amongst the lactobacilli, Lactobacillus crispatus appears to be particularly effective at inhibiting growth of BV-associated bacteria. Nonetheless, some women who are colonized with this species can still develop clinical BV. Therefore, we sought to determine whether strains of L. crispatus that colonize women with lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microbiomes are distinct from strains that colonize women who develop BV. The genomes of L. crispatus isolates from four women with lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microbiomes ( < 1 % 16S rRNA reads above threshold from genera other than Lactobacillus) and four women with microbiomes containing BV-associated bacteria (>12 % 16S rRNA reads from bacterial taxa associated with BV) were sequenced and compared. Lactic acid production by the different strains was quantified. Phage induction in the strains was also analysed. There was considerable genetic diversity between strains, and several genes were exclusive to either the strains from Lactobacillus-dominated microbiomes or those containing BV-associated bacteria. Overall, strains from microbiomes dominated by lactobacilli did not differ from strains from microbiomes containing BV-associated bacteria with respect to lactic acid production. All of the strains contained multiple phage, but there was no clear distinction between the presence or absence of BV-associated bacteria with respect to phage-induced lysis. Genes found to be exclusive to the Lactobacillus-dominated versus BV-associated bacteria-containing microbiomes could play a role in the maintenance of vaginal health and the development of BV, respectively. PMID:26747455

  20. Comparison of Lactobacillus crispatus isolates from Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiomes with isolates from microbiomes containing bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abdelmaksoud, Abdallah A; Koparde, Vishal N; Sheth, Nihar U; Serrano, Myrna G; Glascock, Abigail L; Fettweis, Jennifer M; Strauss, Jerome F; Buck, Gregory A; Jefferson, Kimberly K

    2016-03-01

    Vaginal lactobacilli can inhibit colonization by and growth of other bacteria, thereby preventing development of bacterial vaginosis (BV). Amongst the lactobacilli, Lactobacillus crispatus appears to be particularly effective at inhibiting growth of BV-associated bacteria. Nonetheless, some women who are colonized with this species can still develop clinical BV. Therefore, we sought to determine whether strains of L. crispatus that colonize women with lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microbiomes are distinct from strains that colonize women who develop BV. The genomes of L. crispatus isolates from four women with lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microbiomes ( <1% 16S rRNA reads above threshold from genera other than Lactobacillus) and four women with microbiomes containing BV-associated bacteria (>12% 16S rRNA reads from bacterial taxa associated with BV) were sequenced and compared. Lactic acid production by the different strains was quantified. Phage induction in the strains was also analysed. There was considerable genetic diversity between strains, and several genes were exclusive to either the strains from Lactobacillus-dominated microbiomes or those containing BV-associated bacteria. Overall, strains from microbiomes dominated by lactobacilli did not differ from strains from microbiomes containing BV-associated bacteria with respect to lactic acid production. All of the strains contained multiple phage, but there was no clear distinction between the presence or absence of BV-associated bacteria with respect to phage-induced lysis. Genes found to be exclusive to the Lactobacillus-dominated versus BV-associated bacteria-containing microbiomes could play a role in the maintenance of vaginal health and the development of BV, respectively.

  1. A metagenomic approach to characterization of the vaginal microbiome signature in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Kjersti; Riehle, Kevin; Ma, Jun; Segata, Nicola; Mistretta, Toni-Ann; Coarfa, Cristian; Raza, Sabeen; Rosenbaum, Sean; Van den Veyver, Ignatia; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Gevers, Dirk; Huttenhower, Curtis; Petrosino, Joseph; Versalovic, James

    2012-01-01

    While current major national research efforts (i.e., the NIH Human Microbiome Project) will enable comprehensive metagenomic characterization of the adult human microbiota, how and when these diverse microbial communities take up residence in the host and during reproductive life are unexplored at a population level. Because microbial abundance and diversity might differ in pregnancy, we sought to generate comparative metagenomic signatures across gestational age strata. DNA was isolated from the vagina (introitus, posterior fornix, midvagina) and the V5V3 region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes were sequenced (454FLX Titanium platform). Sixty-eight samples from 24 healthy gravidae (18 to 40 confirmed weeks) were compared with 301 non-pregnant controls (60 subjects). Generated sequence data were quality filtered, taxonomically binned, normalized, and organized by phylogeny and into operational taxonomic units (OTU); principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) of the resultant beta diversity measures were used for visualization and analysis in association with sample clinical metadata. Altogether, 1.4 gigabytes of data containing >2.5 million reads (averaging 6,837 sequences/sample of 493 nt in length) were generated for computational analyses. Although gravidae were not excluded by virtue of a posterior fornix pH >4.5 at the time of screening, unique vaginal microbiome signature encompassing several specific OTUs and higher-level clades was nevertheless observed and confirmed using a combination of phylogenetic, non-phylogenetic, supervised, and unsupervised approaches. Both overall diversity and richness were reduced in pregnancy, with dominance of Lactobacillus species (L. iners crispatus, jensenii and johnsonii, and the orders Lactobacillales (and Lactobacillaceae family), Clostridiales, Bacteroidales, and Actinomycetales. This intergroup comparison using rigorous standardized sampling protocols and analytical methodologies provides robust initial evidence that the vaginal

  2. The primate vaginal microbiome: comparative context and implications for human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Rebecca M; Wilson, Brenda A; Rivera, Angel; Yildirim, Suleyman; Yeoman, Carl J; Polk, John D; White, Bryan A; Leigh, Steven R

    2013-12-01

    The primate body hosts trillions of microbes. Interactions between primate hosts and these microbes profoundly affect primate physiology, reproduction, health, survival, and ultimately, evolution. It is increasingly clear that primate health cannot be understood fully without knowledge of host-microbial interactions. Our goals here are to review what is known about microbiomes of the female reproductive tract and to explore several factors that influence variation within individuals, as well as within and between primate species. Much of our knowledge of microbial variation derives from studies of humans, and from microbes located in nonreproductive regions (e.g., the gut). We review work suggesting that the vaginal microbiota affects female health, fecundity, and pregnancy outcomes, demonstrating the selective potential for these agents. We explore the factors that correlate with microbial variation within species. Initial colonization by microbes depends on the manner of birth; most microbial variation is structured by estrogen levels that change with age (i.e., at puberty and menopause) and through the menstrual cycle. Microbial communities vary by location within the vagina and can depend on the sampling methods used (e.g., swab, lavage, or pap smear). Interindividual differences also exist, and while this variation is not completely understood, evidence points more to differences in estrogen levels, rather than differences in external physical environment. When comparing across species, reproductive-age humans show distinct microbial communities, generally dominated by Lactobacillus, unlike other primates. We develop evolutionary hypotheses to explain the marked differences in microbial communities. While much remains to be done to test these hypotheses, we argue that the ample variation in primate mating and reproductive behavior offers excellent opportunities to evaluate host-microbe coevolution and adaptation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Vaginal eroticism: a replication study.

    PubMed

    Alzate, H

    1985-12-01

    Vaginal eroticism was investigated in a group of 27 coitally experienced volunteers by means of systematic digital stimulation of both vaginal walls. Erogenous zones were found in all subjects, mainly located on the upper anterior wall and the lower posterior one. An orgasmic response was elicited by stimulation of these zones in 89% of the subjects. This study supports previous findings regarding vaginal eroticism. It does not support the existence of the discrete anatomical structure called the Grafenberg spot. It supports the contention that there are two distinct types of female orgasm, vaginally evoked and clitorally evoked. It also supports the finding that some women expel a fluid through the urethra at the time of orgasm. In this particular case the fluid was chemically indistinguishable from urine.

  4. The composition of the vaginal microbiome in first trimester pregnant women influences the level of autophagy and stress in vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nasioudis, Dimitrios; Forney, Larry J; Schneider, G Maria; Gliniewicz, Karol; France, Michael T; Boester, Allison; Sawai, Mio; Scholl, Jessica; Witkin, Steven S

    2017-09-01

    Epithelial cells lining the vagina are major components of genital tract immunity. The influence of the vaginal microbiome on properties of host epithelial cells is largely unexplored. We evaluated whether differences in the most abundant lactobacilli species or bacterial genera in the vagina of first trimester pregnant women were associated with variations in the extent of stress and autophagy in vaginal epithelial cells. Vaginal swabs from 154 first trimester pregnant women were analyzed for bacterial composition by amplification and sequencing of the V1-V3 region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Vaginal epithelial cells were lysed and autophagy quantitated by measurement of p62. Intracellular levels of the inducible 70kDa heat shock protein (hsp70), an indicator of cell stress and an autophagy inhibitor, were determined. When Lactobacillus crispatus was the most abundant member of the vaginal microbiota, epithelial p62 and hsp70 levels were lowest as compared to when other bacterial taxa were most abundant. The highest concentrations of p62 and hsp70 were associated with Streptococcus and Bifidobacterium abundance. The p62 level associated with Gardnerella abundance was lower than that observed when lactobacilli other than L. crispatus were most abundant. In conclusion, in the first trimester of pregnancy the abundance of different bacterial taxa is associated with variations in autophagy and magnitude of the stress response in vaginal epithelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Alterations in the Vaginal Microbiome by Maternal Stress Are Associated With Metabolic Reprogramming of the Offspring Gut and Brain.

    PubMed

    Jašarević, Eldin; Howerton, Christopher L; Howard, Christopher D; Bale, Tracy L

    2015-09-01

    The neonate is exposed to the maternal vaginal microbiota during parturition, providing the primary source for normal gut colonization, host immune maturation, and metabolism. These early interactions between the host and microbiota occur during a critical window of neurodevelopment, suggesting early life as an important period of cross talk between the developing gut and brain. Because perturbations in the prenatal environment such as maternal stress increase neurodevelopmental disease risk, disruptions to the vaginal ecosystem could be a contributing factor in significant and long-term consequences for the offspring. Therefore, to examine the hypothesis that changes in the vaginal microbiome are associated with effects on the offspring gut microbiota and on the developing brain, we used genomic, proteomic and metabolomic technologies to examine outcomes in our mouse model of early prenatal stress. Multivariate modeling identified broad proteomic changes to the maternal vaginal environment that influence offspring microbiota composition and metabolic processes essential for normal neurodevelopment. Maternal stress altered proteins related to vaginal immunity and abundance of Lactobacillus, the prominent taxa in the maternal vagina. Loss of maternal vaginal Lactobacillus resulted in decreased transmission of this bacterium to offspring. Further, altered microbiota composition in the neonate gut corresponded with changes in metabolite profiles involved in energy balance, and with region- and sex-specific disruptions of amino acid profiles in the developing brain. Taken together, these results identify the vaginal microbiota as a novel factor by which maternal stress may contribute to reprogramming of the developing brain that may predispose individuals to neurodevelopmental disorders.

  6. The normal vaginal and uterine bacterial microbiome in giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Cheng, Guangyang; Li, Caiwu; Yang, Jiang; Li, Jianan; Chen, Danyu; Zou, Wencheng; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; He, Yongguo; Wang, Chengdong; Wang, Min; Wang, Hongning

    2017-06-01

    While the health effects of the colonization of the reproductive tracts of mammals by bacterial communities are widely known, there is a dearth of knowledge specifically in relation to giant panda microbiomes. In order to investigate the vaginal and uterine bacterial diversity of healthy giant pandas, we used high-throughput sequence analysis of portions of the 16S rRNA gene, based on samples taken from the vaginas (GPV group) and uteri (GPU group) of these animals. Results showed that the four most abundant phyla, which contained in excess of 98% of the total sequences, were Proteobacteria (59.2% for GPV and 51.4% for GPU), Firmicutes (34.4% for GPV and 23.3% for GPU), Actinobacteria (5.2% for GPV and 14.0% for GPU) and Bacteroidetes (0.3% for GPV and 10.3% for GPU). At the genus level, Escherichia was most abundant (11.0%) in the GPV, followed by Leuconostoc (8.7%), Pseudomonas (8.0%), Acinetobacter (7.3%), Streptococcus (6.3%) and Lactococcus (6.0%). In relation to the uterine samples, Janthinobacterium had the highest prevalence rate (20.2%), followed by Corynebacterium (13.2%), Streptococcus (19.6%), Psychrobacter (9.3%), Escherichia (7.5%) and Bacteroides (6.2%). Moreover, both Chao1 and abundance-based coverage estimator (ACE) species richness indices, which were operating at the same sequencing depth for each sample, demonstrated that GPV had more species richness than GPU, while Simpson and Shannon indices of diversity indicated that GPV had the higher bacterial diversity. These findings contribute to our understanding of the potential influence abnormal reproductive tract microbial communities have on negative pregnancy outcomes in giant pandas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. The vaginal microbiome, vaginal anti-microbial defence mechanisms and the clinical challenge of reducing infection-related preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Witkin, S S

    2015-01-01

    Ascending bacterial infection is implicated in about 40-50% of preterm births. The human vaginal microbiota in most women is dominated by lactobacilli. In women whose vaginal microbiota is not lactobacilli-dominated anti-bacterial defence mechanisms are reduced. The enhanced proliferation of pathogenic bacteria plus degradation of the cervical barrier increase bacterial passage into the endometrium and amniotic cavity and trigger preterm myometrial contractions. Evaluation of protocols to detect the absence of lactobaciili dominance in pregnant women by self-measuring vaginal pH, coupled with measures to promote growth of lactobacilli are novel prevention strategies that may reduce the occurrence of preterm birth in low-resource areas. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  8. The Cellient System for Paraffin Histology Can Be Combined with HPV Testing and Morphotyping the Vaginal Microbiome Thanks to BoonFixing

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Mathilde E.

    2013-01-01

    The Cellient Automated Cell Block System (Hologic) can be used to process cervical scrapes to paraffin sections. For the first study on this subject, cervical scrapes were fixed in the formalin-free fixative BoonFix. This pilot study was limited to cases classified as atypical squamous lesion of unknown significance (ASCUS) and high-grade squamous lesion (HSIL) as diagnosed in the ThinPrep slide. The Cellient paraffin sections were classified into negative, atypical, CIN 1, CIN 2, and CIN 3. Multiple HPV genotypes were encountered in 79% of the scrapes. This study showed that the Cellient system for paraffin sections can be combined with HPV testing thanks to the formalin-free BoonFix. In two additional studies it was shown that such samples can also be used for morphotyping the vaginal microbiome and preparing cytologic ThinPrep slides. PMID:23577033

  9. The Cellient System for Paraffin Histology Can Be Combined with HPV Testing and Morphotyping the Vaginal Microbiome Thanks to BoonFixing.

    PubMed

    Boon, Mathilde E

    2013-01-01

    The Cellient Automated Cell Block System (Hologic) can be used to process cervical scrapes to paraffin sections. For the first study on this subject, cervical scrapes were fixed in the formalin-free fixative BoonFix. This pilot study was limited to cases classified as atypical squamous lesion of unknown significance (ASCUS) and high-grade squamous lesion (HSIL) as diagnosed in the ThinPrep slide. The Cellient paraffin sections were classified into negative, atypical, CIN 1, CIN 2, and CIN 3. Multiple HPV genotypes were encountered in 79% of the scrapes. This study showed that the Cellient system for paraffin sections can be combined with HPV testing thanks to the formalin-free BoonFix. In two additional studies it was shown that such samples can also be used for morphotyping the vaginal microbiome and preparing cytologic ThinPrep slides.

  10. The vaginal microbiome is stable in prepubertal and sexually mature Ellegaard Göttingen Minipigs throughout an estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Emma; Kudirkiene, Egle; Gutman, Nicole; Grossi, Anette Blak; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Erneholm, Karin; Skytte, Christina; Dalgaard, Marlene Danner; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2015-10-28

    Although the pig has been introduced as an advanced animal model of genital tract infections in women, almost no knowledge exists on the porcine vaginal microbiota, especially in barrier-raised Göttingen Minipigs. In women, the vaginal microbiota plays a crucial role for a healthy vaginal environment and the fate of sexually transmitted infections such as Chlamydia trachomatis infections. Therefore, knowledge on the vaginal microbiota is urgently needed for the minipig model. The aim of this study was to characterize the microbiota of the anterior vagina by 16 s rRNA gene sequencing in prepubertal and sexually mature Göttingen Minipigs during an estrous cycle. The dominating phyla in the vaginal microbiota consisted of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteriodetes and Tenericutes. The most abundant bacterial families were Enterobacteriaceae, unclassified families from Gammaproteobacteria, Clostridiales Family XI Incertae Sedis, Paenibacillaceae, Lactobacillaceae, Ruminococcaceae and Syntrophaceae. We found a higher abundance of Lactobacillaceae in the prepubertal Göttingen Minipigs compared to sexually mature non-pregnant Göttingen Minipigs. However, correlation tests and diversity parameters revealed a very stable vaginal microbiota in the Göttingen Minipigs, both before and after sexual maturity and on different days throughout an estrous cycle. The vaginal microbiota in Göttingen Minipigs was not dominated by lactobacilli, as it is in women and according to our results the minipig vaginal microbiota is very stable, in opposite to women. These differences should be considered when using the minipig as a model of the genital tract in women.

  11. Rationale and Safety Assessment of a Novel Intravaginal Drug-Delivery System with Sustained DL-Lactic Acid Release, Intended for Long-Term Protection of the Vaginal Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Verstraelen, Hans; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a prevalent state of dysbiosis of the vaginal microbiota with wide-ranging impact on human reproductive health. Based on recent insights in community ecology of the vaginal microbiome, we hypothesize that sustained vaginal DL-lactic acid enrichment will enhance the recruitment of lactobacilli, while counteracting bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria. We therefore aimed to develop an intravaginal device that would be easy to insert and remove, while providing sustained DL-lactic acid release into the vaginal lumen. The final prototype selected is a vaginal ring matrix system consisting of a mixture of ethylene vinyl acetate and methacrylic acid-methyl methacrylate copolymer loaded with 150 mg DL-lactic acid with an L/D-lactic acid ratio of 1:1. Preclinical safety assessment was performed by use of the Slug Mucosal Irritation test, a non-vertebrate assay to evaluate vaginal mucosal irritation, which revealed no irritation. Clinical safety was evaluated in a phase I trial with six healthy nulliparous premenopausal volunteering women, with the investigational drug left in place for 7 days. Colposcopic monitoring according to the WHO/CONRAD guidelines for the evaluation of vaginal products, revealed no visible cervicovaginal mucosal changes. No adverse events related to the investigational product occurred. Total release from the intravaginal ring over 7 days was estimated through high performance liquid chromatography at 37.1 (standard deviation 0.9) mg DL-lactic acid. Semisolid lactic acid formulations have been studied to a limited extent in the past and typically consist of a large volume of excipients and very high doses of lactic acid, which is of major concern to mucosal safety. We have documented the feasability of enriching the vaginal environment with pure DL-lactic acid with a prototype intravaginal ring. Though the efficacy of this platform remains to be established possibly requiring further development, this approach may offer a

  12. The Vaginal Microbiome and its Potential to Impact Efficacy of HIV Pre-exposure Prophylaxis for Women.

    PubMed

    Velloza, Jennifer; Heffron, Renee

    2017-10-01

    This review describes existing evidence addressing the potential modulation of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) products, specifically 1% tenofovir (TFV) gel and oral tenofovir-based PrEP, by vaginal dysbiosis and discusses future considerations for delivering novel, long-acting PrEP products to women at high risk for vaginal dysbiosis and HIV. We describe results from analyses investigating the modification of PrEP efficacy by vaginal dysbiosis and studies of biological mechanisms that could render PrEP ineffective in the presence of specific microbiota. A secondary analysis from the CAPRISA-004 cohort demonstrated that there is no effect of the 1% TFV gel in the presence of non-Lactobacillus dominant microbiota. Another recent analysis comparing oral tenofovir-based PrEP efficacy among women with and without bacterial vaginosis in the Partners PrEP Study found that oral PrEP efficacy is not modified by bacterial vaginosis. Gardnerella vaginalis, commonly present in women with vaginal dysbiosis, can rapidly metabolize TFV particularly when it is locally applied and thereby prevent TFV integration into cells. Given that vaginal dysbiosis appears to modulate efficacy for 1% TFV gel but not for oral tenofovir-based PrEP, vaginal dysbiosis is potentially less consequential to HIV protection from TFV in the context of systemic drug delivery and high product adherence. Vaginal dysbiosis may undermine the efficacy of 1% TFV gel to protect women from HIV but not the efficacy of oral PrEP. Ongoing development of novel ring, injectable, and film-based PrEP products should investigate whether vaginal dysbiosis can reduce efficacy of these products, even in the presence of high adherence.

  13. Rifaximin Modulates the Vaginal Microbiome and Metabolome in Women Affected by Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Picone, Gianfranco; Cruciani, Federica; Brigidi, Patrizia; Calanni, Fiorella; Donders, Gilbert; Capozzi, Francesco; Vitali, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common vaginal disorder characterized by the decrease of lactobacilli and overgrowth of Gardnerella vaginalis and resident anaerobic vaginal bacteria. In the present work, the effects of rifaximin vaginal tablets on vaginal microbiota and metabolome of women affected by BV were investigated by combining quantitative PCR and a metabolomic approach based on 1H nuclear magnetic resonance. To highlight the general trends of the bacterial communities and metabolomic profiles in response to the antibiotic/placebo therapy, a multivariate statistical strategy was set up based on the trajectories traced by vaginal samples in a principal component analysis space. Our data demonstrated the efficacy of rifaximin in restoring a health-like condition in terms of both bacterial communities and metabolomic features. In particular, rifaximin treatment was significantly associated with an increase in the lactobacillus/BV-related bacteria ratio, as well as with an increase in lactic acid concentration and a decrease of a pool of metabolites typically produced by BV-related bacteria (acetic acid, succinate, short-chain fatty acids, and biogenic amines). Among the tested dosages of rifaximin (100 and 25 mg for 5 days and 100 mg for 2 days), 25 mg for 5 days was found to be the most effective. PMID:24709255

  14. Vaginitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge usually is thin and dark or dull gray, but may have a greenish color. Itching is ... trichomoniasis? Signs of trichomoniasis may include a yellow-gray or green vaginal discharge. The discharge may have ...

  15. Vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, E G

    1985-06-01

    Vaginitis is one of the most common complaints of women in the United States today. About 90% of patients with this problem suffer from infection of the vagina caused by Candida, Gardnerella, or Trichomonas. The diagnosis and effective treatment of these common infections depend on accurate identification of the entity, effective specific therapy, and restoration of the normal ecosystem of the vagina. At the same time women should be made aware that not all discharge means infection and that any attempts at self-treatment may only worsen their condition. Proper hygiene habits, dietary control, and management of stress are all helpful factors in the control of recurrent vaginal infections.

  16. Microbiome in parturition and preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Mysorekar, Indira U; Cao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Preterm parturition is a one of the most significant global maternal-child health problem. In recent years, there has been an explosion in reports on a role for microbiomes (i.e., a microbial biomass) on a plethora of physiologic and pathologic human conditions. This review aims to describe our current understanding of the microbiome and its impact on parturition, with particular emphasis on preterm birth. We will focus on the roles of vaginal and oral mucosal microbiomes in premature parturition and describe the state-of-the-art methodologies used in microbiome studies. Next, we will present new studies on a potential microbiome in the placenta and how it may affect pregnancy outcomes. Finally, we will propose that host genetic factors can perturb the normal "pregnancy microbiome" and trigger adverse pregnancy outcomes. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Rationale and Safety Assessment of a Novel Intravaginal Drug-Delivery System with Sustained DL-Lactic Acid Release, Intended for Long-Term Protection of the Vaginal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Verstraelen, Hans; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a prevalent state of dysbiosis of the vaginal microbiota with wide-ranging impact on human reproductive health. Based on recent insights in community ecology of the vaginal microbiome, we hypothesize that sustained vaginal DL-lactic acid enrichment will enhance the recruitment of lactobacilli, while counteracting bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria. We therefore aimed to develop an intravaginal device that would be easy to insert and remove, while providing sustained DL-lactic acid release into the vaginal lumen. The final prototype selected is a vaginal ring matrix system consisting of a mixture of ethylene vinyl acetate and methacrylic acid-methyl methacrylate copolymer loaded with 150 mg DL-lactic acid with an L/D-lactic acid ratio of 1:1. Preclinical safety assessment was performed by use of the Slug Mucosal Irritation test, a non-vertebrate assay to evaluate vaginal mucosal irritation, which revealed no irritation. Clinical safety was evaluated in a phase I trial with six healthy nulliparous premenopausal volunteering women, with the investigational drug left in place for 7 days. Colposcopic monitoring according to the WHO/CONRAD guidelines for the evaluation of vaginal products, revealed no visible cervicovaginal mucosal changes. No adverse events related to the investigational product occurred. Total release from the intravaginal ring over 7 days was estimated through high performance liquid chromatography at 37.1 (standard deviation 0.9) mg DL-lactic acid. Semisolid lactic acid formulations have been studied to a limited extent in the past and typically consist of a large volume of excipients and very high doses of lactic acid, which is of major concern to mucosal safety. We have documented the feasability of enriching the vaginal environment with pure DL-lactic acid with a prototype intravaginal ring. Though the efficacy of this platform remains to be established possibly requiring further development, this approach may offer a

  18. Endometrial microbiome.

    PubMed

    Franasiak, Jason M; Scott, Richard T

    2017-06-01

    There have been great improvements in assisted reproduction in the recent decade; however, there are still a significant number of chromosomally normal blastocysts that fail to produce live births. The human microbiome is the totality of the microbes and their genomes that exist in and on the host. The understanding of its impact on health and human disease, particularly in human reproduction, is evolving. New technologies have empowered metagenomic sample analysis that allows for more fully characterizing the reproductive tract microbiome. With these technologies, we have determined not only that sites previously thought to be sterile in fact have robust microbiomes, but also have better characterized the normal and abnormal vaginal and endometrial microbiome. The understanding of the microbiome in health and human disease, in particular in relation to human reproduction, is in its infancy. As the reproductive tract dysbiosis are better characterized and understood, we may be better equipped to manipulate it more expertly.

  19. Studies and methodologies on vaginal drug permeation.

    PubMed

    Machado, Rita Monteiro; Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Ana; Gaspar, Carlos; Martinez-de-Oliveira, José; Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Rita

    2015-09-15

    The vagina stands as an important alternative to the oral route for those systemic drugs that are poorly absorbed orally or are rapidly metabolized by the liver. Drug permeation through the vaginal tissue can be estimated by using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models. The latter ones, although more realistic, assume ethical and biological limitations due to animal handling. Therefore, in vitro and ex vivo models have been developed to predict drug absorption through the vagina while allowing for simultaneous toxicity and pathogenesis studies. This review focuses on available methodologies to study vaginal drug permeation discussing their advantages and drawbacks. The technical complexity, costs and the ethical issues of an available model, along with its accuracy and reproducibility will determine if it is valid and applicable. Therefore every model shall be evaluated, validated and standardized in order to allow for extrapolations and results presumption, and so improving vaginal drug research and stressing its benefits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Epidemiologic studies of the human microbiome and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vogtmann, Emily; Goedert, James J

    2016-02-02

    The human microbiome, which includes the collective genome of all bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists, and viruses found in and on the human body, is altered in many diseases and may substantially affect cancer risk. Previously detected associations of individual bacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori), periodontal disease, and inflammation with specific cancers have motivated studies considering the association between the human microbiome and cancer risk. This short review summarises microbiome research, focusing on published epidemiological associations with gastric, oesophageal, hepatobiliary, pancreatic, lung, colorectal, and other cancers. Large, prospective studies of the microbiome that employ multidisciplinary laboratory and analysis methods, as well as rigorous validation of case status, are likely to yield translational opportunities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by improving prevention, screening, and treatment.

  1. Epidemiologic studies of the human microbiome and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vogtmann, Emily; Goedert, James J

    2016-01-01

    The human microbiome, which includes the collective genome of all bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists, and viruses found in and on the human body, is altered in many diseases and may substantially affect cancer risk. Previously detected associations of individual bacteria (e.g., Helicobacter pylori), periodontal disease, and inflammation with specific cancers have motivated studies considering the association between the human microbiome and cancer risk. This short review summarises microbiome research, focusing on published epidemiological associations with gastric, oesophageal, hepatobiliary, pancreatic, lung, colorectal, and other cancers. Large, prospective studies of the microbiome that employ multidisciplinary laboratory and analysis methods, as well as rigorous validation of case status, are likely to yield translational opportunities to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by improving prevention, screening, and treatment. PMID:26730578

  2. Human Microbiome Acquisition and Bioinformatic Challenges in Metagenomic Studies

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    The study of the human microbiome has become a very popular topic. Our microbial counterpart, in fact, appears to play an important role in human physiology and health maintenance. Accordingly, microbiome alterations have been reported in an increasing number of human diseases. Despite the huge amount of data produced to date, less is known on how a microbial dysbiosis effectively contributes to a specific pathology. To fill in this gap, other approaches for microbiome study, more comprehensive than 16S rRNA gene sequencing, i.e., shotgun metagenomics and metatranscriptomics, are becoming more widely used. Methods standardization and the development of specific pipelines for data analysis are required to contribute to and increase our understanding of the human microbiome relationship with health and disease status. PMID:29382070

  3. A large, population-based study of age-related associations between vaginal pH and human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Megan A; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Gage, Julia C; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Wacholder, Sholom; Burk, Robert; Schiffman, Mark

    2012-02-08

    Vaginal pH is related to genital tract inflammation and changes in the bacterial flora, both suggested cofactors for persistence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. To evaluate the relationship between vaginal pH and HPV, we analyzed data from our large population-based study in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. We examined vaginal pH and the risk of HPV infection, cytological abnormalities, and C. trachomatis infection. Our study included 9,165 women aged 18-97 at enrollment with a total of 28,915 visits (mean length of follow-up = 3.4 years). Generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate the relationship between vaginal pH and HPV infection (both overall and single versus multiple types) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), the cytomorphic manifestation of HPV infection. The relationship between enrollment vaginal pH and C. trachomatis infection was assessed by logistic regression. Results were stratified by age at visit. Detection of HPV was positively associated with vaginal pH, mainly in women < 35 years (p-trend = 0.009 and 0.007 for women aged < 25 and 25-34 years, respectively). Elevated vaginal pH was associated with 30% greater risk of infection with multiple HPV types and with LSIL, predominantly in women younger than 35 and 65+ years of age. Detection of C. trachomatis DNA was associated with increased vaginal pH in women < 25 years (OR 2.2 95% CI 1.0-5.0). Our findings suggest a possible association of the cervical microenvironment as a modifier of HPV natural history in the development of cervical precancer and cancer. Future research should include studies of vaginal pH in a more complex assessment of hormonal changes and the cervicovaginal microbiome as they relate to the natural history of cervical neoplasia.

  4. Longitudinal Analysis of Vaginal Microbiome Dynamics in Women with Recurrent Bacterial Vaginosis: Recognition of the Conversion Process

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Janet A.; John, Susan; Sobel, Jack D.; Akins, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) affects ∼30% of women of reproductive age, has a high rate of recurrence, and is associated with miscarriage, preterm birth, and increased risk of acquiring other sexually transmitted infections, including HIV-1. Little is known of the daily changes in the vaginal bacterial composition as it progresses from treatment to recurrence, or whether any of these might be useful in its prediction or an understanding of its causes. We used phylogenetic branch-inclusive quantitative PCR (PB-qPCR) and Lactobacillus blocked/unblocked qPCR (Lb-qPCR) to characterize longitudinal changes in the vaginal microbiota in sequential vaginal self-swabs from five women with recurrent BV, from diagnosis through remission to recurrence. Both patients with acute BV samples dominated by G. vaginalis recurred during the study with similar profiles, whereas the three patients with acute BV samples dominated by other anaerobes did not recur or recurred to an intermediate Nugent score. L. iners dominated remission phases, with intermittent days of abnormal microbial profiles typically associated with menses. The exception was a newly discovered phenomenon, a sustained period of abnormal profiles, termed conversion, which preceded symptomatic acute BV. Species known to have antagonistic activity towards Lactobacillus were detected in pre-conversion samples, possibly contributing to the decline in Lactobacillus. Lb-qPCR scores define two categories of response in the initial post-treatment visit samples; scores <5 may correspond with poor response to treatment or rapid recurrence, whereas scores >8 may predict delayed or no recurrence. Amsel criteria or Nugent scores did not have this potential predictive capability. Larger studies are warranted to evaluate the prognostic potential of detecting conversion and poor Lb-qPCR scores at the post-treatment visit of recurrent BV patients. PMID:24376552

  5. Human Microbiome and HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yihong; Yang, Liying; Pei, Zhiheng; Poles, Michael; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of the human microbiome continues to grow rapidly; however, reports on changes in the microbiome after HIV infection are still limited. This review surveys the progress made in methodology associated with microbiome studies and highlights the remaining challenges to this field. Studies have shown that commensal oral, gut, vaginal, and penile bacteria are vital to the health of the human immune system. Our studies on crosstalk among oral and gastrointestinal soluble innate factors, HIV, and microbes indicated that the oral and gut microbiome was altered in the HIV-positive samples compared to the negative controls. The importance of understanding the bacterial component of HIV/AIDS, and likelihood of “crosstalk” between viral and bacterial pathogens, will help in understanding the role of the microbiome in HIV-infected individuals and facilitate identification of novel antiretroviral factors for use as novel diagnostics, microbicides, or therapeutics against HIV infection. PMID:22193889

  6. Bacteria in the vaginal microbiome alter the innate immune response and barrier properties of the human vaginal epithelia in a species-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Doerflinger, Sylvie Y; Throop, Andrea L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2014-06-15

    Bacterial vaginosis increases the susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections and negatively affects women's reproductive health. To investigate host-vaginal microbiota interactions and the impact on immune barrier function, we colonized 3-dimensional (3-D) human vaginal epithelial cells with 2 predominant species of vaginal microbiota (Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus crispatus) or 2 prevalent bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (Atopobium vaginae and Prevotella bivia). Colonization of 3-D vaginal epithelial cell aggregates with vaginal microbiota was observed with direct attachment to host cell surface with no cytotoxicity. A. vaginae infection yielded increased expression membrane-associated mucins and evoked a robust proinflammatory, immune response in 3-D vaginal epithelial cells (ie, expression of CCL20, hBD-2, interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, and tumor necrosis factor α) that can negatively affect barrier function. However, P. bivia and L. crispatus did not significantly upregulate pattern-recognition receptor-signaling, mucin expression, antimicrobial peptides/defensins, or proinflammatory cytokines in 3-D vaginal epithelial cell aggregates. Notably, L. iners induced pattern-recognition receptor-signaling activity, but no change was observed in mucin expression or secretion of interleukin 6 and interleukin 8. We identified unique species-specific immune signatures from vaginal epithelial cells elicited by colonization with commensal and bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria. A. vaginae elicited a signature that is consistent with significant disruption of immune barrier properties, potentially resulting in enhanced susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections during bacterial vaginosis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Impact of Periodic Presumptive Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis on the Vaginal Microbiome among Women Participating in the Preventing Vaginal Infections Trial.

    PubMed

    Balkus, Jennifer E; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Anzala, Omu; Kimani, Joshua; Andac, Chloe; Schwebke, Jane; Fredricks, David N; McClelland, R Scott

    2017-03-01

    Evidence suggests that specific vaginal bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV) may increase the risk of adverse health outcomes in women. Among women participating in a randomized, double-blinded trial, we assessed the effect of periodic presumptive treatment (PPT) on detection of select vaginal bacteria. High-risk women from the United States and Kenya with a recent vaginal infection received intravaginal metronidazole 750 mg plus miconazole 200 mg or placebo for 5 consecutive nights each month for 12 months. Vaginal fluid specimens were collected via polyester/polyethylene terephthalate swabs every other month and tested for bacteria, using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. The effect of PPT on bacterium detection was assessed among all participants and stratified by country. Of 234 women enrolled, 221 had specimens available for analysis. The proportion of follow-up visits with detectable quantities was lower in the PPT arm versus the placebo arm for the following bacteria: BVAB1, BVAB2, Atopobium vaginae, Leptotrichia/Sneathia, and Megasphaera. The magnitude of reductions was greater among Kenyan participants as compared to US participants. Use of monthly PPT for 1 year reduced colonization with several bacteria strongly associated with BV. The role of PPT to improve vaginal health should be considered, and efforts to improve the impact of PPT regimens are warranted. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Impact of Periodic Presumptive Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis on the Vaginal Microbiome among Women Participating in the Preventing Vaginal Infections Trial

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Anzala, Omu; Kimani, Joshua; Andac, Chloe; Schwebke, Jane; Fredricks, David N.; McClelland, R. Scott

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Evidence suggests that specific vaginal bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV) may increase the risk of adverse health outcomes in women. Among women participating in a randomized, double-blinded trial, we assessed the effect of periodic presumptive treatment (PPT) on detection of select vaginal bacteria. Methods. High-risk women from the United States and Kenya with a recent vaginal infection received intravaginal metronidazole 750 mg plus miconazole 200 mg or placebo for 5 consecutive nights each month for 12 months. Vaginal fluid specimens were collected via polyester/polyethylene terephthalate swabs every other month and tested for bacteria, using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. The effect of PPT on bacterium detection was assessed among all participants and stratified by country. Results. Of 234 women enrolled, 221 had specimens available for analysis. The proportion of follow-up visits with detectable quantities was lower in the PPT arm versus the placebo arm for the following bacteria: BVAB1, BVAB2, Atopobium vaginae, Leptotrichia/Sneathia, and Megasphaera. The magnitude of reductions was greater among Kenyan participants as compared to US participants. Conclusions. Use of monthly PPT for 1 year reduced colonization with several bacteria strongly associated with BV. The role of PPT to improve vaginal health should be considered, and efforts to improve the impact of PPT regimens are warranted. PMID:28007924

  9. Insights into human evolution from ancient and contemporary microbiome studies

    PubMed Central

    Schnorr, Stephanie L; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Lewis, Cecil M; Warinner, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, human microbiome research has energized the study of human evolution through a complete shift in our understanding of what it means to be human. The microbiome plays a pivotal role in human biology, performing key functions in digestion, mood and behavior, development and immunity, and a range of acute and chronic diseases. It is therefore critical to understand its evolution and changing ecology through time. Here we review recent findings on the microbiota of diverse human populations, non-human primates, and past human populations and discuss the implications of this research in formulating a deeper evolutionary understanding of the human holobiont. PMID:27507098

  10. Comparison between vaginal royal jelly and vaginal estrogen effects on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women: a clinical trial study.

    PubMed

    Seyyedi, Fatemeh; Kopaei, Mahmoud Rafiean; Miraj, Sepideh

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic effects of vaginal royal jelly and vaginal estrogen on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women. This double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out at gynecology and obstetrics clinics of Hajar Hospital of Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences (Iran) from January 2013 to January 2014. The study was conducted on married postmenopausal women between 50 and 65 years old. Of 120 patients, 30 individuals were excluded based on the exclusion criteria, and 90 women were randomly distributed into three groups of 30 royal jelly vaginal cream 15%, vaginal Premarin, and placebo (lubricant), for three months. At the beginning and the end of the study, quality of life and vaginal cytology assay were evaluated. Data were analyzed by SPSS Version 11. Vaginal cream of royal jelly is significantly more effective than vaginal cream of Premarin and lubricant in improvement of quality of life in postmenopausal women (p<0.05). Moreover, Pap smear results showed that vaginal atrophy in vaginal Premarin group was lower than the other groups (p<0.001), and there was no significant difference between lubricant and royal jelly groups (p=0.89). Administration of vaginal royal jelly was effective in quality-of-life improvement of postmenopausal women. Given to the various properties of royal jelly and its effectiveness on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women, further studies are recommended for using =royal jelly in improving menopausal symptoms. The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCT code: 2014112220043n1. Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences supported this research (project no. 1440).

  11. Comparison between vaginal royal jelly and vaginal estrogen effects on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women: a clinical trial study

    PubMed Central

    Seyyedi, Fatemeh; Kopaei, Mahmoud Rafiean; Miraj, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic effects of vaginal royal jelly and vaginal estrogen on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women. Methods This double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out at gynecology and obstetrics clinics of Hajar Hospital of Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences (Iran) from January 2013 to January 2014. The study was conducted on married postmenopausal women between 50 and 65 years old. Of 120 patients, 30 individuals were excluded based on the exclusion criteria, and 90 women were randomly distributed into three groups of 30 royal jelly vaginal cream 15%, vaginal Premarin, and placebo (lubricant), for three months. At the beginning and the end of the study, quality of life and vaginal cytology assay were evaluated. Data were analyzed by SPSS Version 11. Results Vaginal cream of royal jelly is significantly more effective than vaginal cream of Premarin and lubricant in improvement of quality of life in postmenopausal women (p<0.05). Moreover, Pap smear results showed that vaginal atrophy in vaginal Premarin group was lower than the other groups (p<0.001), and there was no significant difference between lubricant and royal jelly groups (p=0.89). Conclusion Administration of vaginal royal jelly was effective in quality-of-life improvement of postmenopausal women. Given to the various properties of royal jelly and its effectiveness on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women, further studies are recommended for using =royal jelly in improving menopausal symptoms. Clinical trial registration The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCT code: 2014112220043n1. Funding Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences supported this research (project no. 1440). PMID:28070251

  12. The Female Genital Tract Microbiome Is Associated With Vaginal Antiretroviral Drug Concentrations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Women on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Donahue Carlson, Renee; Sheth, Anandi N; Read, Timothy D; Frisch, Michael B; Mehta, C Christina; Martin, Amy; Haaland, Richard E; Patel, Anar S; Pau, Chou-Pong; Kraft, Colleen S; Ofotokun, Igho

    2017-11-15

    The female genital tract (FGT) microbiome may affect vaginal pH and other factors that influence drug movement into the vagina. We examined the relationship between the microbiome and antiretroviral concentrations in the FGT. Over one menstrual cycle, 20 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women virologically suppressed on tenofovir (TFV) disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine and ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV) underwent serial paired cervicovaginal and plasma sampling for antiretroviral concentrations using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of cervicovaginal lavage clustered each participant visit into a unique microbiome community type (mCT). Participants were predominantly African American (95%), with a median age of 38 years. Cervicovaginal lavage sequencing (n = 109) resulted in a low-diversity mCT dominated by Lactobacillus (n = 40), and intermediate-diversity (n = 28) and high-diversity (n = 41) mCTs with abundance of anaerobic taxa. In multivariable models, geometric mean FGT:plasma ratios varied significantly by mCT for all 3 drugs. For both ATV and TFV, FGT:plasma was significantly lower in participant visits with high- and low-diversity mCT groups (all P < .02). For emtricitabine, FGT:plasma was significantly lower in participant visits with low- vs intermediate-diversity mCT groups (P = .002). Certain FGT mCTs are associated with decreased FGT antiretroviral concentrations. These findings are relevant for optimizing antiretrovirals used for biomedical HIV prevention in women. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Vaginal breech delivery: results of a prospective registration study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most countries recommend planned cesarean section in breech deliveries, which is considered safer than vaginal delivery. As one of few countries in the western world Norway has continued to practice planned vaginal delivery in selected women. The aim of this study is to evaluate prospectively registered neonatal and maternal outcomes in term singleton breech deliveries in a Norwegian hospital during a ten years period. We aim to compare maternal and neonatal outcomes in term breech pregnancies subjected either to planned vaginal or elective cesarean section. Methods A prospective registration study including 568 women with term breech deliveries (>37 weeks) consecutively registered at Sorlandet Hospital Kristiansand between 2001 and 2011. Fetal and maternal outcomes were compared according to delivery method; planned vaginal delivery versus planned cesarean section. Results Of 568 women, elective cesarean section was planned in 279 (49%) cases and vaginal delivery was planned in 289 (51%) cases. Acute cesarean section was performed in 104 of the planned vaginal deliveries (36.3%). There were no neonatal deaths. Two cases of serious neonatal morbidity were reported in the planned vaginal group. One infant had seizures, brachial plexus injury, and cephalhematoma. The other infant had 5-minutes Apgar < 4. Twenty-nine in the planned vaginal group (10.0%) and eight in the planned cesarean section group (2.9%) (p < 0.001) were transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit. However, only one infant was admitted for ≥4 days. According to follow-up data (median six years) none of these infants had long-term sequelae. Regarding maternal morbidity, blood loss was the only variable that was significantly higher in the planned cesarean section group versus in the vaginal delivery group (p < 0.001). Conclusions Strict guidelines were followed in all cases. There were no neonatal deaths. Two infants had serious neonatal morbidity in the planned

  14. Clinical and microbiological correlates of vaginal trichomoniasis during pregnancy. The Vaginal Infections and Prematurity Study Group.

    PubMed

    Pastorek, J G; Cotch, M F; Martin, D H; Eschenbach, D A

    1996-11-01

    Colonization with Trichomonas vaginalis is a possible cause of poor pregnancy outcome. To facilitate the diagnosis of this condition during pregnancy, we conducted a prospective, multicenter study of 13,816 gravid women who were between 23rd and 26th week of gestation. Findings significantly associated with T. vaginalis colonization included a yellow, green, or bloody discharge from the vagina or cervix; abnormal odor after KOH was added to a vaginal specimen; a vaginal pH of > 5.0; and cervical friability. The amount of vaginal discharge and abnormal consistency of the discharge were also associated with T. vaginalis colonization. These findings (except for cervical bleeding and odor after the addition of KOH to a vaginal specimen, which may be influenced by the presence of other flora) are consistent with those reported elsewhere. The clinical usefulness of these features is minimal, and it is more significant that other microorganisms are makers for trichomoniasis; therefore, controlling for other flora is important in the investigation of T. vaginalis colonization.

  15. Testing in Microbiome-Profiling Studies with MiRKAT, the Microbiome Regression-Based Kernel Association Test

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ni; Chen, Jun; Carroll, Ian M.; Ringel-Kulka, Tamar; Epstein, Michael P.; Zhou, Hua; Zhou, Jin J.; Ringel, Yehuda; Li, Hongzhe; Wu, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology has enabled population-based studies of the role of the human microbiome in disease etiology and exposure response. Distance-based analysis is a popular strategy for evaluating the overall association between microbiome diversity and outcome, wherein the phylogenetic distance between individuals’ microbiome profiles is computed and tested for association via permutation. Despite their practical popularity, distance-based approaches suffer from important challenges, especially in selecting the best distance and extending the methods to alternative outcomes, such as survival outcomes. We propose the microbiome regression-based kernel association test (MiRKAT), which directly regresses the outcome on the microbiome profiles via the semi-parametric kernel machine regression framework. MiRKAT allows for easy covariate adjustment and extension to alternative outcomes while non-parametrically modeling the microbiome through a kernel that incorporates phylogenetic distance. It uses a variance-component score statistic to test for the association with analytical p value calculation. The model also allows simultaneous examination of multiple distances, alleviating the problem of choosing the best distance. Our simulations demonstrated that MiRKAT provides correctly controlled type I error and adequate power in detecting overall association. “Optimal” MiRKAT, which considers multiple candidate distances, is robust in that it suffers from little power loss in comparison to when the best distance is used and can achieve tremendous power gain in comparison to when a poor distance is chosen. Finally, we applied MiRKAT to real microbiome datasets to show that microbial communities are associated with smoking and with fecal protease levels after confounders are controlled for. PMID:25957468

  16. Formulation and in vitro study of antibacterial vaginal suppositories.

    PubMed

    Regdon, G; Gombkötö, S; Regdon, G; Selmeczi, B

    1994-12-01

    Vaginal suppositories frequently used in gynaecological therapy were studied. Several antibacterial pharmacons are used for the topical treatment of vaginitis of various origins. In view of the fact that the liberation of the given active substance and the subsequent therapeutic effect may be improved or inhibited by the vehicle, our aim was to find the optimal suppository base for vaginal suppositories containing sulfadimidine, chloramphenicol and gentamicin sulfate by means of in vitro experiments. On the basis of breaking hardness, disintegration time and spreading properties the French Suppocire NA product, and compositions of macrogols with lower molecular weight proved to be the best lipophilic and hydrophilic bases, respectively. Among the lipophilic bases the in vitro drug liberation of Suppocire NA was significantly better (P < 0.05) than the other lipophilic bases. This vehicle is recommended for the topical treatment of vaginitis, as these suppositories have the further advantage that they can easily be produced on a magistral, galenical or industrial scale as well.

  17. Microbial Eukaryotes: a Missing Link in Gut Microbiome Studies

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human-associated microbial communities include prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms across high-level clades of the tree of life. While advances in high-throughput sequencing technology allow for the study of diverse lineages, the vast majority of studies are limited to bacteria, and very little is known on how eukaryote microbes fit in the overall microbial ecology of the human gut. As recent studies consider eukaryotes in their surveys, it is becoming increasingly clear that eukaryotes play important ecological roles in the microbiome as well as in host health. In this perspective, we discuss new evidence on eukaryotes as fundamental species of the human gut and emphasize that future microbiome studies should characterize the multitrophic interactions between microeukaryotes, other microorganisms, and the host. PMID:29556538

  18. Microbial Eukaryotes: a Missing Link in Gut Microbiome Studies.

    PubMed

    Laforest-Lapointe, Isabelle; Arrieta, Marie-Claire

    2018-01-01

    Human-associated microbial communities include prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms across high-level clades of the tree of life. While advances in high-throughput sequencing technology allow for the study of diverse lineages, the vast majority of studies are limited to bacteria, and very little is known on how eukaryote microbes fit in the overall microbial ecology of the human gut. As recent studies consider eukaryotes in their surveys, it is becoming increasingly clear that eukaryotes play important ecological roles in the microbiome as well as in host health. In this perspective, we discuss new evidence on eukaryotes as fundamental species of the human gut and emphasize that future microbiome studies should characterize the multitrophic interactions between microeukaryotes, other microorganisms, and the host.

  19. The placenta harbors a unique microbiome.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Kjersti; Ma, Jun; Antony, Kathleen M; Ganu, Radhika; Petrosino, Joseph; Versalovic, James

    2014-05-21

    Humans and their microbiomes have coevolved as a physiologic community composed of distinct body site niches with metabolic and antigenic diversity. The placental microbiome has not been robustly interrogated, despite recent demonstrations of intracellular bacteria with diverse metabolic and immune regulatory functions. A population-based cohort of placental specimens collected under sterile conditions from 320 subjects with extensive clinical data was established for comparative 16S ribosomal DNA-based and whole-genome shotgun (WGS) metagenomic studies. Identified taxa and their gene carriage patterns were compared to other human body site niches, including the oral, skin, airway (nasal), vaginal, and gut microbiomes from nonpregnant controls. We characterized a unique placental microbiome niche, composed of nonpathogenic commensal microbiota from the Firmicutes, Tenericutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Fusobacteria phyla. In aggregate, the placental microbiome profiles were most akin (Bray-Curtis dissimilarity <0.3) to the human oral microbiome. 16S-based operational taxonomic unit analyses revealed associations of the placental microbiome with a remote history of antenatal infection (permutational multivariate analysis of variance, P = 0.006), such as urinary tract infection in the first trimester, as well as with preterm birth <37 weeks (P = 0.001). Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Study the Role of the Gut Microbiome in Relapsing and Progressive MS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0653 TITLE: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Study the Role of the Gut Microbiome in Relapsing and Progressive MS...Approach to Study the Role of the Gut Microbiome in Relapsing and Progressive MS 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...compare the gut microbiome of subjects with RMS and PPMS. Major Task 1: To seek and obtain HRPO approval Major Task 2: Identification and

  1. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Study the Role of the Gut Microbiome in Relapsing and Progressive MS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0654 TITLE: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Study the Role of the Gut Microbiome in Relapsing and Progressive MS...Multidisciplinary Approach to Study the Role of the Gut Microbiome in Relapsing and Progressive MS 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...Major Tasks and subtasks: Aim#1: To compare the gut microbiome of subjects with RMS and PPMS. Major Task 1: To seek and obtain HRPO approval Major

  2. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Study the Role of the Gut Microbiome in Relapsing and Progressive MS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0652 TITLE: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Study the Role of the Gut Microbiome in Relapsing and Progressive MS...0652 A Multidisciplinary Approach to Study the Role of the Gut Microbiome in Relapsing and Progressive MS 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...SOW, each Aim was subdivided into Major Tasks and subtasks: Aim#1: To compare the gut microbiome of subjects with RMS and PPMS. Major Task 1

  3. Beneficial effects of a Coriolus versicolor-based vaginal gel on cervical epithelization, vaginal microbiota and vaginal health: a pilot study in asymptomatic women.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Santiago; Losa, Fernando; Dexeus, Damián; Cortés, Javier

    2017-03-16

    To assess the effect of a 12-day treatment using a vaginal gel based on niosomes containing hyaluronic acid, ß-glucan, alpha-glucan oligosaccharide, Coriolus versicolor, Asian centella, Azadirachta indica and Aloe vera on vaginal microbiota, cervical epithelization and vaginal health. Open-label, prospective pilot study conducted in asymptomatic women in daily practice. Cervical epithelization was evaluated by colposcopy using an ectopy epithelization score (from 5: no ectopy to 1: severe ectopy and bleeding), vaginal microbiota using the VaginaStatus-Diagnostic test (Instiüt für Mikroökologie, Herborn, Germany) and further rated by the investigator using a 5-point Liker scale (from 5: normal to 1: very severe deterioration in which all evaluated species were altered), and vaginal health using the Vaginal Health Index. In 21 women, a positive effect to improve epithelization of the cervical mucosa, with a mean score of 4.42 at the final visit as compared to 3.09 at baseline (P < 0.0001) (43% improvement). In 10 women, there was a trend of improving of vaginal microbiota status, with a mean score of 4.0 at the final visit vs. 3.3 at baseline (P = NS) (21.2% improvement). In 11 women, the Vaginal Health Index increased from 19.0 at baseline to 22.3 at the final visit (P = 0.007). The concentration of Lactobacillus spp. increased 54.5% of women and pH decreased from 4.32 to 4.09. These encouraging preliminary results provide the basis for designing a randomized controlled study, and for potential use in human papilloma virus infection. ISRCTN77955077 . Registration date: February 15, 2017. Retrospectively registered.

  4. Vaginal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Mendling, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge about the normal and abnormal vaginal microbiome has changed over the last years. Culturing techniques are not suitable any more for determination of a normal or abnormal vaginal microbiota. Non culture-based modern technologies revealed a complex and dynamic system mainly dominated by lactobacilli.The normal and the abnormal vaginal microbiota are complex ecosystems of more than 200 bacterial species influenced by genes, ethnic background and environmental and behavioral factors. Several species of lactobacilli per individuum dominate the healthy vagina. They support a defense system together with antibacterial substances, cytokines, defensins and others against dysbiosis, infections and care for an normal pregnancy without preterm birth.The numbers of Lactobacillus (L.) iners increase in the case of dysbiosis.Bacterial vaginosis (BV) - associated bacteria (BVAB), Atopobium vaginae and Clostridiales and one or two of four Gardnerella vaginalis - strains develop in different mixtures and numbers polymicrobial biofilms on the vaginal epithelium, which are not dissolved by antibiotic therapies according to guidelines and, thus, provoke recurrences.Aerobic vaginitis seems to be an immunological disorder of the vagina with influence on the microbiota, which is here dominated by aerobic bacteria (Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli). Their role in AV is unknown.Vaginal or oral application of lactobacilli is obviously able to improve therapeutic results of BV and dysbiosis.

  5. Reoccurrence of retained placenta at vaginal delivery: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Nikolajsen, Sys; Løkkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth; Bergholt, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence and validate the diagnosis of retained placenta in nulliparous women and the risk of reoccurrence at subsequent vaginal delivery. Nested cohort study. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, university-affiliated teaching hospital. 10 334 nulliparous singleton pregnancies who delivered vaginally at the hospital during 2000-2009. Data from a computerized database information system were used to identify 287 women who had an ICD-10 diagnosis of retained placenta and 572 randomly selected controls matched by the date of first delivery. At chart review the diagnosis was confirmed by: (1) excessive bleeding <30 minutes after delivery without placental separation, (2) placenta not separated 30 minutes after delivery or (3) confirmation of retained placental tissue >2 hours postpartum. Confirmation of the diagnosis and prevalence of retained placenta. Risk of reoccurrence in a subsequent vaginal delivery. The prevalence of retained placenta increased from 2.8 to 7.0% after confirmation according to the set criteria. Of the selected women, 48.4% had a subsequent vaginal delivery. Of these women, 25.3% (23/91) with a previous retained placenta and 5.3% (11/206) without previously retained placenta, experienced retained placenta in subsequent delivery. This corresponds to an adjusted odds ratio of 5.5 (95% confidence interval 2.6-12.7) in the multivariate analysis for recurrence of retained placenta in a subsequent vaginal delivery. The use of the ICD-10 diagnosis of retained placenta underestimated the prevalence. The risk of reoccurrence of retained placenta is significantly increased in a subsequent vaginal delivery. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica © 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. [Salivary microbiome in people with obesity: a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Wu, Y J; Chi, X P; Chen, F; Deng, X L

    2018-02-18

    To investigate the characterization of the salivary microbiome in people with obesity and the differences in microbial composition, gene function and metabolic pathways of salivary microbiome between people with obesity and normal weight controls. The study was carried out in people with obesity and age- and sex-matched normal weight controls. None of these selected participants had the systemic disease, oral mucosal disease or periodontal disease. Unstimulated saliva samples were collected and oral examination was conducted. DNAs from saliva samples were extracted and sequenced in an Illumina NextSeq 500 platform. Community composition, linear discriminant analysis of taxonomic differences,gene prediction, gene set construction and annotation of gene function were performed. The classified bacterial reads of the samples were 2 630 428 for each sample. A total of 11 phyla, 19 classes, 26 orders, 41 families, 62 genera and 164 species were detected ultimately. All samples had the same predominant phyla (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria). There were statistical differences between the groups at the class, order, family, genus and species levels. At the class level, Negativicutes and Erysipelotrichia were more abundant in the obesity group, while Flavobacteriia and Bateroidetes dominated in normal weight group (P<0.05). At the species level, 16 showed significant differences in relative abundance among the groups, in which Prevotella melaninogenica,Prevotella salivae,Solobacterium moorei and Atopobium parvulum ware more abundant in the obesity group, whereas Streptococcus sanguinis dominated in normal weight group (P<0.05). The people with obesity had a higher number of salivary microbial genes (P<0.05). We produced statistics on gene prediction and found salivary microbiome of obesity group had a higher number of genes (P < 0.05). Genes associated with the pathways of metabolism and environmental information processing and

  7. Quantitative studies on the vaginal flora of asymptomatic women and patients with vaginitis and vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Hammann, R; Kronibus, A; Lang, N; Werner, H

    1987-07-01

    Vaginal washings of 22 patients with vaginitis, 11 with vaginosis, and 12 healthy subjects were investigated quantitatively and qualitatively for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and yeasts. Gardnerella vaginalis was recovered from 9 of the vaginitis patients, 7 of the vaginosis patients, and 4 of the asymptomatic subjects. Obligate anaerobes were found in 11 of the vaginitis patients, 4 of the vaginosis patients, and none of the control subjects. Bacteroides bivius was the anaerobe most frequently isolated from symptomatic subjects. Anaerobic vibrios were recovered twice from symptomatic subjects. The counts for Gardnerella vaginalis and anaerobes when present were generally very high. The most frequent aerobes were beta-hemolytic streptococci (group B) and staphylococci.

  8. Correcting for batch effects in case-control microbiome studies

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Sean M.; Duvallet, Claire

    2018-01-01

    High-throughput data generation platforms, like mass-spectrometry, microarrays, and second-generation sequencing are susceptible to batch effects due to run-to-run variation in reagents, equipment, protocols, or personnel. Currently, batch correction methods are not commonly applied to microbiome sequencing datasets. In this paper, we compare different batch-correction methods applied to microbiome case-control studies. We introduce a model-free normalization procedure where features (i.e. bacterial taxa) in case samples are converted to percentiles of the equivalent features in control samples within a study prior to pooling data across studies. We look at how this percentile-normalization method compares to traditional meta-analysis methods for combining independent p-values and to limma and ComBat, widely used batch-correction models developed for RNA microarray data. Overall, we show that percentile-normalization is a simple, non-parametric approach for correcting batch effects and improving sensitivity in case-control meta-analyses. PMID:29684016

  9. Intricacies of assessing the human microbiome in epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Courtney K.; Brotman, Rebecca M.; Ravel, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the past decade, remarkable relationships have been documented between dysbiosis of the human microbiota and adverse health outcomes. This review seeks to highlight some of the challenges and pitfalls that may be encountered during all stages of microbiota research, from study design and sample collection, to nucleic acid extraction and sequencing, and bioinformatic and statistical analysis. Methods Literature focused on human microbiota research was reviewed and summarized. Results While most studies have focused on surveying the composition of the microbiota, fewer have explored the causal roles of these bacteria, archaea, viruses, and fungi in affecting disease states. Microbiome research is in its relatively early years and many aspects remain challenging, including the complexity and personalized aspects of microbial communities, the influence of exogenous and often confounding factors, the need to apply fundamental principles of ecology and epidemiology, the necessity for new software tools, and the rapidly evolving genomic, technological, and analytical landscapes. Conclusions Incorporating human microbiome research in large epidemiological studies will soon help us unravel the intricate relationships that we have with our microbial partners and provide interventional opportunities to improve human health. PMID:27180112

  10. Overweight and the feline gut microbiome - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kieler, I N; Mølbak, L; Hansen, L L; Hermann-Bank, M L; Bjornvad, C R

    2016-06-01

    Compared with lean humans, the gut microbiota is altered in the obese. Whether these changes are due to an obesogenic diet, and whether the microbiota contributes to adiposity is currently discussed. In the cat population, where obesity is also prevalent, gut microbiome changes associated with obesity have not been studied. Consequently, the aim of this study was to compare the gut microbiota of lean cats, with that of overweight and obese cats. Seventy-seven rescue-shelter cats housed for ≥3 consecutive days were included in the study. Faecal samples were obtained by rectal swab and, when available, by a paired litter box sample. Body condition was assessed using a 9-point scoring system. DNA was extracted, and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified with a high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR chip. Overweight and obese cats had a significantly different gut microbiota compared to lean cats (p < 0.05), but this finding could not be linked to differences in specific bacterial groups. The rectal samples obtained higher DNA concentration than litter box samples (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, overweight and obese cats seem to have an altered gut microbiome as compared to lean cats. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Comparison of Collection Methods for Fecal Samples in Microbiome Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vogtmann, Emily; Chen, Jun; Amir, Amnon; Shi, Jianxin; Abnet, Christian C.; Nelson, Heidi; Knight, Rob; Chia, Nicholas; Sinha, Rashmi

    2017-01-01

    Prospective cohort studies are needed to assess the relationship between the fecal microbiome and human health and disease. To evaluate fecal collection methods, we determined technical reproducibility, stability at ambient temperature, and accuracy of 5 fecal collection methods (no additive, 95% ethanol, RNAlater Stabilization Solution, fecal occult blood test cards, and fecal immunochemical test tubes). Fifty-two healthy volunteers provided fecal samples at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, in 2014. One set from each sample collection method was frozen immediately, and a second set was incubated at room temperature for 96 hours and then frozen. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated for the relative abundance of 3 phyla, 2 alpha diversity metrics, and 4 beta diversity metrics. Technical reproducibility was high, with ICCs for duplicate fecal samples between 0.64 and 1.00. Stability for most methods was generally high, although the ICCs were below 0.60 for 95% ethanol in metrics that were more sensitive to relative abundance. When compared with fecal samples that were frozen immediately, the ICCs were below 0.60 for the metrics that were sensitive to relative abundance; however, the remaining 2 alpha diversity and 3 beta diversity metrics were all relatively accurate, with ICCs above 0.60. In conclusion, all fecal sample collection methods appear relatively reproducible, stable, and accurate. Future studies could use these collection methods for microbiome analyses. PMID:27986704

  12. Analysis of the influence of living environment and age on vaginal fungal microbiome in giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) by high throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Danyu; Li, Caiwu; Feng, Lan; Zhang, Zhizhong; Zhang, Heming; Cheng, Guangyang; Li, Desheng; Zhang, Guiquan; Wang, Hongning; Chen, Yanxi; Feng, Mingfu; Wang, Chengdong; Wu, Honglin; Deng, Linhua; Ming, He; Yang, Xin

    2018-02-01

    A recent study has described the normal vaginal bacterial community in giant pandas, but there is a lack of knowledge of the fungal community residing in the vagina of giant pandas. In order to comprehensively understand the vaginal fungal microbial diversity and abundance in giant pandas, high throughput sequencing was used to analyse the ITS1 region, based on thirteen samples taken from the pandas' vaginas, which were grouped by sampling points and age. The results showed that the most abundant phyla were Basidiomycota (73.37%), followed by Ascomycota (20.04%), Zygomycota (5.23%), Glomeromycota (0.014%) and Chytridiomycota (0.006%). At the genus level, Guehomyces (37.92%) was the most abundant, followed by Cladosporium (9.072%), Trichosporon (6.2%) and Mucor (4.97%). Furthermore, Candida only accounted for a low percentage of the vaginal fungal community. With the saturation of rarefaction curves and fungal diversity indices, the samples from Dujiangyan and Chungking Safari Park (DC group) showed a higher fungal species richness and diversity than other living environments. Shannon diversity indices showed significant difference between group WL (Wolong nature reserve) and DC (P < .05). Additionally, a higher diversity was found in ten to fifteen years old (Group 2) than other groups. Group 2 and Group 3 displayed significant differences in the diversities of their vaginal fungal communities (P < .05). These data that has been collected from this research will be helpful for further study to improve the reproductive status of giant pandas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vaginal and uterine bacterial communities in postpartum lactating cows

    The vaginal and uterine microbiome of cattle could provide important indicators of fertility pregnancy success; however, only recently has next-generation sequencing made it possible to deeply interrogate these microbial communities. The objective of this study was to determine the bacteriome of the...

  14. Mechanistic and Technical Challenges in Studying the Human Microbiome and Cancer Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mukesh

    2017-04-01

    This article reviews the significance of the microbiome in cancer epidemiology, mechanistic and technical challenges in the field, and characterization of the microbiome in different tumor types to identify biomarkers of risk, progression, and prognosis. Publications on the microbiome and cancer epidemiology were reviewed to analyze sample collection and processing, microbiome taxa characterization by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, and microbiome metabolite characterization (metabotyping) by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. The analysis identified methodology types, research design, sample types, and issues in integrating data from different platforms. Aerodigestive cancer epidemiology studies conducted by different groups demonstrated the significance of microbiome information in developing approaches to improve health. Challenges exist in sample preparation and processing (eg, standardization of methods for collection and analysis). These challenges relate to technology, data integration from "omics" studies, inherent bias in primer selection during 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, the need for large consortia with well-characterized biospecimens, cause and effect issues, resilience of microbiota to exposure events (requires longitudinal studies), and expanding studies for fungal and viral diversity (most studies used bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing for microbiota characterization). Despite these challenges, microbiome and cancer epidemiology studies are significant and may facilitate cancer risk assessment, diagnosis, and prognosis. In the future, clinical trials likely will use microbiota modifications to improve the efficacy of existing treatments.

  15. Mechanistic and Technical Challenges in Studying the Human Microbiome and Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the significance of the microbiome in cancer epidemiology, mechanistic and technical challenges in the field, and characterization of the microbiome in different tumor types to identify biomarkers of risk, progression, and prognosis. Publications on the microbiome and cancer epidemiology were reviewed to analyze sample collection and processing, microbiome taxa characterization by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, and microbiome metabolite characterization (metabotyping) by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. The analysis identified methodology types, research design, sample types, and issues in integrating data from different platforms. Aerodigestive cancer epidemiology studies conducted by different groups demonstrated the significance of microbiome information in developing approaches to improve health. Challenges exist in sample preparation and processing (eg, standardization of methods for collection and analysis). These challenges relate to technology, data integration from “omics” studies, inherent bias in primer selection during 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, the need for large consortia with well-characterized biospecimens, cause and effect issues, resilience of microbiota to exposure events (requires longitudinal studies), and expanding studies for fungal and viral diversity (most studies used bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing for microbiota characterization). Despite these challenges, microbiome and cancer epidemiology studies are significant and may facilitate cancer risk assessment, diagnosis, and prognosis. In the future, clinical trials likely will use microbiota modifications to improve the efficacy of existing treatments. PMID:27121074

  16. Exploring Relationships between Host Genome and Microbiome: New Insights from Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Aziz, Muslihudeen A.; Cooper, Alan; Weyrich, Laura S.

    2016-01-01

    As our understanding of the human microbiome expands, impacts on health and disease continue to be revealed. Alterations in the microbiome can result in dysbiosis, which has now been linked to subsequent autoimmune and metabolic diseases, highlighting the need to identify factors that shape the microbiome. Research has identified that the composition and functions of the human microbiome can be influenced by diet, age, sex, and environment. More recently, studies have explored how human genetic variation may also influence the microbiome. Here, we review several recent analytical advances in this new research area, including those that use genome-wide association studies to examine host genome–microbiome interactions, while controlling for the influence of other factors. We find that current research is limited by small sample sizes, lack of cohort replication, and insufficient confirmatory mechanistic studies. In addition, we discuss the importance of understanding long-term interactions between the host genome and microbiome, as well as the potential impacts of disrupting this relationship, and explore new research avenues that may provide information about the co-evolutionary history of humans and their microorganisms. PMID:27785127

  17. Effects of horizontal vs vertical vaginal cuff closure techniques on vagina length after vaginal hysterectomy: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Cavkaytar, Sabri; Kokanali, Mahmut Kuntay; Topcu, Hasan Onur; Aksakal, Orhan Seyfi; Doganay, Melike

    2014-01-01

    To compare the effects of horizontal and vertical vaginal cuff closure techniques on vagina length after vaginal hysterectomy. Prospective randomized study (Canadian Task Force classification I). Teaching and research hospital, a tertiary center. Fifty-two women with POP-Q stage 0 or 1 uterine prolapse were randomized into 2 groups using vertical (n = 26) or horizontal (n = 26) vaginal cuff closure. All patients underwent vaginal hysterectomy. Vagina length in the 2 groups was compared preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and at 6 weeks postoperatively. Mean (SD) preoperative vagina length in the horizontal and vertical groups was similar (7.87 [0.92] cm vs 7.99 [0.78] cm; p = .41). Immediately postoperatively, the vagina was significantly shorter in the horizontal group than in the vertical group (6.61 [0.89] cm vs 7.51 [0.74] cm; p < .001). At 6 weeks postoperatively, the vagina was still significantly shorter in the horizontal group (6.55 [0.89] cm vs 7.42 (0.73) cm; p < .001). The mean difference in vagina length before and after surgery was also significantly higher in the horizontal group than in the vertical group (-1.26 [0.12] cm vs 0.49 [0.11] cm; p < .001). Vertical cuff closure during vaginal hysterectomy seems to preserve vagina length better than does horizontal cuff closure. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Perspectives on Promoting Hospital Primary Vaginal Birth: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Holly P; Doig, Eleanor; Tillman, Stephanie; Strauss, Amanda; Williams, Beth; Pettker, Christian; Illuzzi, Jessica

    2016-12-01

    One in three women will deliver by cesarean, a procedure that can be life saving, but which also carries short- and long-term risks. There is growing interest in preventing primary cesarean deliveries, while optimizing the health of the mother and infant. The primary aim of this study was to use participatory action strategies and ethnographic interview data collected from diverse stakeholders in birth (caregivers, women, policymakers) about facilitators and barriers to the achievement of primary vaginal birth in first-time mothers in hospital settings. The secondary aim was to use the findings to identify strategies to promote primary vaginal birth and future areas of research. Individual and small group interviews were conducted with caregivers and policymakers (N = 79) and first-time mothers (N = 24) at a northeastern hospital. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using Atlas.ti. Four broad themes were identified: 1) preparation for childbirth, 2) early labor management, 3) caregiver knowledge and practice style, and 4) birth environment (physical, cultural/emotional). The first two were closely linked from caregivers' perspectives. If the woman was not prepared for childbirth, it was perceived she would be more likely to present to the hospital in early labor. Once there, it was hard to prevent admission and interventions. A woman's knowledge and confidence were perceived as powerful mediators for vaginal birth. Caregivers and first-time mothers identified early labor management and childbirth preparation as important factors to promote primary vaginal birth in hospital settings. Both deserve further inquiry as potential strategies to decrease rising cesarean delivery rates. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Douching with Water Works device for perceived vaginal odor with or without complaints of discharge in women with no infectious cause of vaginitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chatwani, Ashwin J; Hassan, Sarmina; Rahimi, Salma; Jeronis, Stacey; Dandolu, Vani

    2006-01-01

    To determine if douching with Water Works device for 1 month can (1) lower or eliminate perceived vaginal odor by subject; (2) have any effects on vaginal ecosystem. Ten women with perceived vaginal odor with or without discharge, douched every day for 4 weeks in an open-label, nonrandomized pilot study. Primary outcome measures included perceived vaginal odor by subject, lactobacilli score from Nugent slide, and acceptance of the Water Works douching system. Secondary outcome included the safety of using this douching device. At week 4, there was improvement in vaginal odor (P=.0006) and there was no significant change in lactobacilli score. Douching with Water Works device is associated with reduction or elimination of vaginal odor without adversely affecting the vaginal ecosystem.

  20. Douching With Water Works Device for Perceived Vaginal Odor With or Without Complaints of Discharge in Women With No Infectious Cause of Vaginitis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chatwani, Ashwin J.; Hassan, Sarmina; Rahimi, Salma; Jeronis, Stacey; Dandolu, Vani

    2006-01-01

    Objective. To determine if douching with Water Works device for 1 month can (1) lower or eliminate perceived vaginal odor by subject; (2) have any effects on vaginal ecosystem. Methods. Ten women with perceived vaginal odor with or without discharge, douched every day for 4 weeks in an open-label, nonrandomized pilot study. Primary outcome measures included perceived vaginal odor by subject, lactobacilli score from Nugent slide, and acceptance of the Water Works douching system. Secondary outcome included the safety of using this douching device. Results. At week 4, there was improvement in vaginal odor (P = .0006) and there was no significant change in lactobacilli score. Conclusion. Douching with Water Works device is associated with reduction or elimination of vaginal odor without adversely affecting the vaginal ecosystem. PMID:17485816

  1. Vaginal health and hygiene practices and product use in Canada: a national cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Crann, Sara E; Cunningham, Shannon; Albert, Arianne; Money, Deborah M; O'Doherty, Kieran C

    2018-03-23

    The vaginal microbiome influences quality of life and health. The composition of vaginal microbiota can be affected by various health behaviors, such as vaginal douching. The purpose of this study was to examine the types and prevalence of diverse vaginal/genital health and hygiene behaviors among participants living in Canada and to examine associations between behavioral practices and adverse gynecological health conditions. An anonymous online survey, available in English and French, was distributed across Canada. The sample consisted of 1435 respondents, 18 years or older, living in Canada. Respondents reported engaging in diverse vaginal/genital health and hygiene behavioral practices, including the use of commercially manufactured products and homemade and naturopathic products and practices. Over 95% of respondents reported using at least one product in or around the vaginal area. Common products and practices included vaginal/genital moisturizers, anti-itch creams, feminine wipes, washes, suppositories, sprays, powders, and waxing and shaving pubic hair. The majority of the sample (80%) reported experiencing one or more adverse vaginal/genital symptom in their lifetime. Participants who had used any vaginal/genital product(s) had approximately three times higher odds of reporting an adverse health condition. Several notable associations between specific vaginal/genital health and hygiene products and adverse health conditions were identified. This study is the first of its kind to identify the range and prevalence of vaginal/genital health and hygiene behaviors in Canada. Despite a lack of credible information about the impact of these behaviors on women's health, the use of commercially manufactured and homemade products for vaginal/genital health and hygiene is common. Future research can extend the current exploratory study by identifying causal relationships between vaginal/genital health and hygiene behaviors and changes to the vaginal microbiome.

  2. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Study the Role of the Gut Microbiome in Relapsing and Progressive MS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0654 TITLE: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Study the Role of the Gut Microbiome in Relapsing and Progressive MS...valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE Oct 2017 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30...Multidisciplinary Approach to Study the Role of the Gut Microbiome in Relapsing and Progressive MS 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  3. A Multi-Country Cross-Sectional Study of Vaginal Carriage of Group B Streptococci (GBS) and Escherichia coli in Resource-Poor Settings: Prevalences and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cools, Piet; Jespers, Vicky; Hardy, Liselotte; Crucitti, Tania; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Mwaura, Mary; Ndayisaba, Gilles F.; van de Wijgert, Janneke H. H. M.; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background One million neonates die each year in low- and middle-income countries because of neonatal sepsis; group B Streptococcus (GBS) and Escherichia coli are the leading causes. In sub-Saharan Africa, epidemiological data on vaginal GBS and E. coli carriage, a prerequisite for GBS and E. coli neonatal sepsis, respectively, are scarce but necessary to design and implement prevention strategies. Therefore, we assessed vaginal GBS and E. coli carriage rates and risk factors and the GBS serotype distribution in three sub-Saharan countries. Methods A total of 430 women from Kenya, Rwanda and South Africa were studied cross-sectionally. Vaginal carriage of GBS and E. coli, and GBS serotype were assessed using molecular techniques. Risk factors for carriage were identified using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results Vaginal carriage rates in reference groups from Kenya and South Africa were 20.2% (95% CI, 13.7–28.7%) and 23.1% (95% CI, 16.2–31.9%), respectively for GBS; and 25.0% (95% CI, 17.8–33.9%) and 27.1% (95% CI, 19.6–36.2%), respectively for E. coli. GBS serotypes Ia (36.8%), V (26.3%) and III (14.0%) were most prevalent. Factors independently associated with GBS and E. coli carriage were Candida albicans, an intermediate vaginal microbiome, bacterial vaginosis, recent vaginal intercourse, vaginal washing, cervical ectopy and working as a sex worker. GBS and E. coli carriage were positively associated. Conclusions Reduced vaginal GBS carriage rates might be accomplished by advocating behavioral changes such as abstinence from sexual intercourse and by avoidance of vaginal washing during late pregnancy. It might be advisable to explore the inclusion of vaginal carriage of C. albicans, GBS, E. coli and of the presence of cervical ectopy in a risk- and/or screening-based administration of antibiotic prophylaxis. Current phase II GBS vaccines (a trivalent vaccine targeting serotypes Ia, Ib, and III, and a conjugate vaccine targeting serotype

  4. Vaginal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer; Cancer - vagina; Tumor - vaginal ... Most vaginal cancers occur when another cancer, such as cervical or endometrial cancer , spreads. This is called secondary vaginal cancer. Cancer ...

  5. [Vaginal colonization of group B Streptococcus: a study in 267 cases of factory women].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y Z; Yang, Y H; Zhang, X L

    1996-02-01

    An epidemiologic study on vaginal colonization of group B streptococcus (GBS) from non-pregnancy women was carried out. Two hundred sixty seven female workers were studied. The carrier rate of GBS in vaginal specimens was 10.86%. Women aged 45 years old and above had more cases with genital tract GBS colonization. Women with vaginal colonization had more history of miscarriage and using IUD. We did not find the positive correlations between vaginal colonization and oral contraceptive, ovarian cyst, hysteromyoma in our study group. Women with gynecologic inflammation had more cases with vaginal GBS colonization. There is a significant increase for women with vaginitis and cervicitis. Serotyping study showed that types III and II were the most frequent GBS types isolated from the carriers. Antibiotic sensitivity test showed that more than half GBS strains were resistant to oxcillin and amikacin.

  6. A multi-omic future for microbiome studies

    SciT

    Jansson, Janet K.; Baker, Erin S.

    2016-04-26

    Microbes constitute about a third of the Earth’s biomass and play critical roles in sustaining life. While results from multiple sequence-based studies have illustrated the importance of microbial communities for human health and the environment, additional technological developments are still needed to gain more insight into their functions [1]. To date, the majority of sequencing studies have focused on the 16S rRNA gene as a phylogenetic marker. This approach has enabled exploration of microbial compositions in a range of sample types, while bypassing the need for cultivation. 16S rRNA gene sequencing has also enabled a vast majority of microorganisms nevermore » previously isolated in culture to be identified and placed into a phylogenetic context [2]. These technologies have been utilized to map the locations of microbes inhabiting various locations of the body [3]. Similarly, sequencing has been used to determine the identities and distributions of microorganisms inhabiting different ecosystems [4, 5], and efforts in single cell sequencing of the microbiome have helped fill in missing branches of the phylogenetic tree [6].« less

  7. Study comparing 3 hour and 24 hour post-operative removal of bladder catheter and vaginal pack following vaginal surgery: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Priya; Soundara Raghavan, S; Sharma, Deepak

    2017-09-11

    Traditional practice after vaginal hysterectomy was to keep the vaginal pack and urinary catheter for 24 hours post operatively. But there were studies that prolonged cathterisation was associated with urinary infection. So this study was conducted to compare the post operative outcome when the urinary catheter and vaginal pack were removed after 3 hours and after 24 hours after surgery. The study was done in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, in a tertiary teaching institute of South India from September 2008 to March 2010. It was a randomised controlled trial involving 200 women undergoing vaginal surgery, who were randomly assigned to 2 groups - catheter and vaginal pack were removed either in 3 h in study group or were removed in 24 h in control group. The outcome of the study were vaginal bleeding, urinary retention, febrile morbidity, and urinary infection. There was no significant difference between the study and control groups with respect to vaginal bleeding (0 and 1%, p = 1), urinary retention (9 and 4%, p = 0.15), febrile morbidity (7 and 4%, p = 0.35), and urinary infection (26% in each group, p = 1.0). Keeping the urinary catheter and vaginal pack for 24 h following vaginal surgery does not offer any additional benefit against removing them after 3 h.

  8. Women's experiences of using vaginal trainers (dilators) to treat vaginal penetration difficulties diagnosed as vaginismus: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Macey, Kat; Gregory, Angela; Nunns, David; das Nair, Roshan

    2015-06-20

    Recent research has highlighted controversies in the conceptualisation, diagnosis and treatment of vaginismus. Vaginal trainers are currently the most widely used treatment. Critiques have highlighted concerns that the evidence-base of its effectiveness is limited, with controlled trials reporting disappointing results, and its prescription promotes 'performance-based' sexuality which may be detrimental. Despite this, little has been done to seek women's views about their treatment. This study set out to explore women's experiences of vaginismus treatment with vaginal trainers, and to use their voices to propose guidelines for improving treatment. 13 women who had used vaginal trainers for vaginal penetration difficulties diagnosed as vaginismus were recruited through a specialist clinic, university campuses, and online forums. The women took part in semi-structured individual interviews (face-to-face/telephone/Skype), which were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using Thematic Analysis. Four superordinate themes were elicited and used to draft 'better treatment' guidelines. Themes were: (1) Lack of knowledge, (2) Invalidation of suffering by professionals, (3) Difficult journey, and (4) Making the journey easier. This paper describes themes (3) and (4). Difficult Journey describes the long and arduous 'Journey into treatment', including difficulties asking for help, undergoing physical investigations and negotiating 'the system' of medical referrals. It also describes the sometimes demoralising process of 'being in treatment', which includes emotional and practical demands of treatment. Making the journey easier highlights the importance of and limits to 'partner support'. 'Professional support' comprises personal qualities of professionals/therapeutic relationship, the value of specialist skills and knowledge and the need for facilitating couple communication about vaginismus. 'Peer support/helping each other' describes the importance of

  9. Comparative Study on the Vaginal Flora and Incidence of Asymptomatic Vaginosis among Healthy Women and in Women with Infertility Problems of Reproductive Age.

    PubMed

    Babu, Geethavani; Singaravelu, Balamuru Ganvelu; Srikumar, R; Reddy, Sreenivasalu V; Kokan, Afraa

    2017-08-01

    The normal vaginal flora is highly complex, dominated by lactobacilli of doderlein that plays a vital role in maintaining the women's health and inhibits other pathogenic microorganisms. Fluctuation in local environment or exposure to any exogenous and endogenous sources changes the vaginal flora over a period of time. Disruption of the vaginal ecosystem changes the microflora of the healthy vagina, altering the pH and predisposing to lower reproductive tract infections. The change in the microflora of the female genital tract by pathogenic organisms may ascend from vagina to upper genital tract and may cause infertility. Although several studies demonstrate a higher prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in infertile population. The role of vaginal microbiome in infertility is not clear and need to be explored further. To compare the vaginal flora and analyse the incidence of asymptomatic vaginosis among healthy women and in women with infertility problems. A cross-sectional study was conducted over a period of six months at Sri Lakshmi Narayana Medical College and Hospital Puducherry, India. A total of 200 high vaginal swabs were collected from Group 1 which included 84 healthy women with regular menstrual cycles without any gynaecological disorder and from Group 2, 116 women with infertility problems attending fertility clinic within the age group of 18 to 45 years. All swabs were subjected to routine aerobic, anaerobic and fungal culture. Saline wet mount was performed for the detection of clue cells and Trichomonas vaginalis , 10% KOH was performed for demonstration of budding yeast cells and pseudo hyphae, Gram's staining to determine the presence of yeast cells, leucocytes and bacterial morphotypes. The smear was also graded using Nugent scoring system. The vaginal flora of Group 1 was dominated by Lactobacillus (40, 27.8 %) followed by Micrococcus (22, 15.3 %), Enterococcus (16, 11.1%), Coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (12, 8.3%). Whereas in Group 2, the

  10. Sphingolipid metabolism potential in fecal microbiome and bronchiolitis in infants: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Stewart, Christopher J; Mansbach, Jonathan M; Linnemann, Rachel W; Ajami, Nadim J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Camargo, Carlos A

    2017-07-26

    Emerging evidence demonstrated that the structure of fecal microbiome is associated with the likelihood of bronchiolitis in infants. However, no study has examined functional profiles of fecal microbiome in infants with bronchiolitis. In this context, we conducted a case-control study. As a part of multicenter prospective study, we collected stool samples from 40 infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis (cases). We concurrently enrolled 115 age-matched healthy controls. First, by applying 16S rRNA gene sequencing to these 155 fecal samples, we identified the taxonomic profiles of fecal microbiome. Next, based on the taxonomy data, we inferred the functional capabilities of fecal microbiome and tested for differences in the functional capabilities between cases and controls. Overall, the median age was 3 months and 45% were female. Among 274 metabolic pathways surveyed, there were significant differences between bronchiolitis cases and healthy controls for 37 pathways, including lipid metabolic pathways (false discovery rate [FDR] <0.05). Particularly, the fecal microbiome of bronchiolitis cases had consistently higher abundances of gene function related to the sphingolipid metabolic pathways compared to that of controls (FDR <0.05). These pathways were more abundant in infants with Bacteroides-dominant microbiome profile compared to the others (FDR <0.001). On the basis of the predicted metagenome in this case-control study, we found significant differences in the functional potential of fecal microbiome between infants with bronchiolitis and healthy controls. Although causal inferences remain premature, our data suggest a potential link between the bacteria-derived metabolites, modulations of host immune response, and development of bronchiolitis.

  11. Clinical features and surgical procedures of congenital vaginal atresia-A retrospective study of 67 patients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Ningzhi; Xiao, Hong; Liu, Yongying; Liu, Jiandong; Chen, Lili; Li, Liang; Zhang, Linlin; Zhang, Youguo

    2017-10-01

    To explore the characteristics of congenital vaginal atresia, further improve its classification, and therefore help the clinical diagnosis and treatment of congenital vaginal atresia. This was a retrospective study of 67 patients with congenital vaginal atresia (from March 1984 to March 2015). Clinical and surgical characteristics were analyzed. For lower vaginal atresia, 25 patients successfully underwent vaginoplasty at the lower portion of the vagina. For complete vagina atresia, 25 patients with type i cervical atresia were treated with artificial vaginoplasty+tracheloplasty, and all showed no dysmenorrhea within six months after surgery. Four patients with type ii cervical atresia and two patients with type iii cervical atresia successfully underwent hysterectomy+artificialvaginoplasty. Two patients with type iv cervical atresia underwent combined abdominoperineal artificial vaginoplasty+tracheloplasty. One patient with upper vaginal atresia successfully underwent hysterectomy via the narrow segment of the cervix. Three patients with top vaginal atresia had no dysmenorrhea after transvaginaltracheloplasty. This study suggests two new categories of vaginal atresia (upper vaginal atresia and top vaginal atresia), which could be used as a reference for treatment of this condition. Appropriate treatments were performed using a personalized approach and satisfactory results were achieved. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Commensal Bacteria Modulate Innate Immune Responses of Vaginal Epithelial Cell Multilayer Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Rose, William A.; McGowin, Chris L.; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia D.; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Pyles, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiome plays a critical but poorly defined role in reproductive health. Vaginal microbiome alterations are associated with increased susceptibility to sexually-transmitted infections (STI) possibly due to related changes in innate defense responses from epithelial cells. Study of the impact of commensal bacteria on the vaginal mucosal surface has been hindered by current vaginal epithelial cell (VEC) culture systems that lack an appropriate interface between the apical surface of stratified squamous epithelium and the air-filled vaginal lumen. Therefore we developed a reproducible multilayer VEC culture system with an apical (luminal) air-interface that supported colonization with selected commensal bacteria. Multilayer VEC developed tight-junctions and other hallmarks of the vaginal mucosa including predictable proinflammatory cytokine secretion following TLR stimulation. Colonization of multilayers by common vaginal commensals including Lactobacillus crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. rhamnosus led to intimate associations with the VEC exclusively on the apical surface. Vaginal commensals did not trigger cytokine secretion but Staphylococcus epidermidis, a skin commensal, was inflammatory. Lactobacilli reduced cytokine secretion in an isolate-specific fashion following TLR stimulation. This tempering of inflammation offers a potential explanation for increased susceptibility to STI in the absence of common commensals and has implications for testing of potential STI preventatives. PMID:22412914

  13. Microbiome and Bile Acid Profiles in Duodenal Aspirates from Cirrhotics: The Microbiome, Microbial Markers and Liver Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jonathan P; Dong, Tien S; Agopian, Vatche; Lagishetty, Venu; Sundaram, Vinay; Noureddin, Mazen; Ayoub, Walid; Durazo, Francisco; Benhammou, Jihane; Enayati, Pedram; Elashoff, David; Goodman, Marc T; Pisegna, Joseph; Hussain, Shehnaz

    2018-06-20

    Cirrhosis is a leading cause of death in the world, yet there are no well-established risk stratifying tools for lethal complications including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients with liver cirrhosis undergo routine endoscopic surveillance, providing ready access to duodenal aspirate samples which may be a source for identifying novel biomarkers. The aim of this study was to characterize the microbiome and bile acid profiles in duodenal aspirates from patients with liver cirrhosis to demonstrate feasibility of developing biomarkers for HCC risk stratification. Thirty patients with liver cirrhosis were enrolled in the Microbiome, Microbial Markers, and Liver Disease (M 3 LD) study between May 2015 and March 2017. Detailed clinical and epidemiological data were collected at baseline and at 6-monthly follow-up visits. Duodenal aspirate fluid was collected at baseline for microbial characterization using 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing and bile acid quantification using mass spectroscopy. Alcohol-related cirrhosis was associated with reductions in the Bacteroidetes phylum, particularly Prevotella (13-fold reduction), and expansion of Staphylococcus (13-fold increase), compared to HCV-related cirrhosis. Participants with hepatic encephalopathy (HE) had less microbial diversity compared to patients without HE (p<0.05), and were characterized by expansion of Mycobacterium (45-fold increase) and Gram positive cocci including Granulicatella (3.1-fold increase), unclassified Planococcaceae (3.3-fold increase), and unclassified Streptococcaceae (4.5-fold increase). Non-Hispanic Whites had reduced microbial richness (p<0.01) and diversity (p<0.05), and increased levels of conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid (glycoursodeoxycholic acid and tauroursodeoxycholic acid, p<0.05) compared to Hispanics. Microbial profiles of duodenal aspirates differed by cirrhosis etiology, HE, and Hispanic ethnicity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Ovarian cycling and reproductive state shape the vaginal microbiota in wild baboons.

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth A; Livermore, Joshua A; Alberts, Susan C; Tung, Jenny; Archie, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-19

    The vaginal microbiome is an important site of bacterial-mammalian symbiosis. This symbiosis is currently best characterized for humans, where lactobacilli dominate the microbial community and may help defend women against infectious disease. However, lactobacilli do not dominate the vaginal microbiota of any other mammal studied to date, raising key questions about the forces that shape the vaginal microbiome in non-human mammals. We used Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to investigate variation in the taxonomic composition of the vaginal microbiota in 48 baboons (Papio cynocephalus), members of a well-studied wild population in Kenya. Similar to prior studies, we found that the baboon vaginal microbiota was not dominated by lactobacilli. Despite this difference, and similar to humans, reproductive state was the dominant predictor of baboon vaginal microbiota, with pregnancy, postpartum amenorrhea, and ovarian cycling explaining 18% of the variance in community composition. Furthermore, among cycling females, a striking 39% of variance in community composition was explained by ovarian cycle phase, with an especially distinctive microbial community around ovulation. Periovulatory females exhibited the highest relative abundance of lactic acid-producing bacteria compared to any other phase, with a mean relative abundance of 44%. To a lesser extent, sexual behavior, especially a history of shared sexual partners, also predicted vaginal microbial similarity between baboons. Despite striking differences in their dominant microbes, both human and baboon vaginal microbiota exhibit profound changes in composition in response to reproductive state, ovarian cycle phase, and sexual behavior. We found major shifts in composition during ovulation, which may have implications for disease risk and conception success. These findings highlight the need for future studies to account for fine-scale differences in reproductive state, particularly differences between

  15. Vaginal microbial flora analysis by next generation sequencing and microarrays; can microbes indicate vaginal origin in a forensic context?

    PubMed

    Benschop, Corina C G; Quaak, Frederike C A; Boon, Mathilde E; Sijen, Titia; Kuiper, Irene

    2012-03-01

    Forensic analysis of biological traces generally encompasses the investigation of both the person who contributed to the trace and the body site(s) from which the trace originates. For instance, for sexual assault cases, it can be beneficial to distinguish vaginal samples from skin or saliva samples. In this study, we explored the use of microbial flora to indicate vaginal origin. First, we explored the vaginal microbiome for a large set of clinical vaginal samples (n = 240) by next generation sequencing (n = 338,184 sequence reads) and found 1,619 different sequences. Next, we selected 389 candidate probes targeting genera or species and designed a microarray, with which we analysed a diverse set of samples; 43 DNA extracts from vaginal samples and 25 DNA extracts from samples from other body sites, including sites in close proximity of or in contact with the vagina. Finally, we used the microarray results and next generation sequencing dataset to assess the potential for a future approach that uses microbial markers to indicate vaginal origin. Since no candidate genera/species were found to positively identify all vaginal DNA extracts on their own, while excluding all non-vaginal DNA extracts, we deduce that a reliable statement about the cellular origin of a biological trace should be based on the detection of multiple species within various genera. Microarray analysis of a sample will then render a microbial flora pattern that is probably best analysed in a probabilistic approach.

  16. The Vaginal Eukaryotic DNA Virome and Preterm Birth.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Kristine M; Wylie, Todd N; Cahill, Alison G; Macones, George A; Tuuli, Methodius G; Stout, Molly J

    2018-05-05

    Despite decades of attempts to link infectious agents to preterm birth, an exact causative microbe or community of microbes remains elusive. Culture-independent sequencing of vaginal bacterial communities demonstrates community characteristics are associated with preterm birth, although none are specific enough to apply clinically. Viruses are important components of the vaginal microbiome and have dynamic relationships with vaginal bacterial communities. We hypothesized that vaginal eukaryotic DNA viral communities (the "vaginal virome") either alone or in the context of bacterial communities are associated with preterm birth. The objective of this study was to use high-throughput sequencing to examine the vaginal eukaryotic DNA virome in a cohort of pregnant women and examine associations between vaginal community characteristics and preterm birth. This is a nested case-control study within a prospective cohort study of women with singleton pregnancies, not on supplemental progesterone, and without cervical cerclage in situ. Serial mid-vaginal swabs were obtained at routine prenatal visits. DNA was extracted, bacterial communities were characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and eukaryotic viral communities were characterized by enrichment of viral nucleic acid with the ViroCap targeted sequence capture panel followed by nucleic acid sequencing. Viral communities were analyzed according to presence/absence of viruses, diversity, dynamics over time, and association with bacterial community data obtained from the same specimens. Sixty subjects contributed 128 vaginal swabs longitudinally across pregnancy. Twenty-four patients delivered preterm. Participants were predominantly African-American (65%). Six families of eukaryotic DNA viruses were detected in the vaginal samples. At least 1 virus was detected in 80% of women. No specific virus or group of viruses was associated with preterm delivery. Higher viral richness was significantly associated with preterm

  17. [Importance of studying the balance of vaginal content (BAVACO) in the preventive control of sex workers].

    PubMed

    Bologno, Romina; Díaz, Yanina M; Giraudo, María C; Fernández, Rosa; Menéndez, Viviana; Brizuela, Juan C; Gallardo, Adriana A; Alvarez, Laura A; Estevao Belchior, Silvia G

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the vaginal microenvironment in sex workers from Comodoro Rivadavia, Chubut. For that purpose, BAVACO procedures were applied. A total of 229 female sex workers attended public health centers. Vaginal secretions were analyzed by Gram and Giemsa stains. The following results were obtained: normal microbiota 35.37 %, intermediate microbiota 15.72 %, bacterial vaginosis 23.14 %, microbial non-specific vaginitis, Donders'"aerobic vaginitis" 10.48 %, yeast vulvovaginitis 8.30 %, and trichomoniasis 6.99 %. The intermediate microbiota was characterized by a decrease in the number of lactobacilli and the presence of diphtheroid bacilli cell types. The population studied shared increased values of vaginal dysfunctions. These results are considered risk factors for obstetric and gynecologic diseases.

  18. Progesterone for Luteal Phase Support in In Vitro Fertilization: Comparison of Vaginal and Rectal Pessaries to Vaginal Capsules: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Khrouf, Mohamed; Slimani, Soufiene; Khrouf, Myriam Razgallah; Braham, Marouen; Bouyahia, Maha; Berjeb, Khadija Kacem; Chaabane, Hanene Elloumi; Merdassi, Ghaya; Kaffel, Aida Zahaf; Zhioua, Amel; Zhioua, Fethi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In IVF, Luteal phase support is usually performed using vaginal progesterone. A part of patients using this route reports being uncomfortable with this route. We tried to study whether the rectal route could be an effective alternative and associated with less discomfort. PATIENTS AND METHODS A prospective randomized controlled study. All patient were eligible for IVF treatment for infertility. After oocyte pickup, 186 patients were allocated to one the following protocols for luteal phase support: (i) rectal pessaries group: natural progesterone pessaries administered rectally 200 mg three times a day, (ii) vaginal pessaries group: natural progesterone pessaries administered vaginally 200 mg three times a day), and (iii) vaginal capsules group: natural micronized progesterone capsules administered vaginally 200 mg three times a day. On the day of pregnancy test, patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire conducted by an investigator in order to assess the tolerability and side effects of the LPS treatment taken. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of perineal irritation. RESULTS Fifty eight patients were assigned to the rectal pessaries group, 68 patients to the vaginal pessaries group, and 60 patients to the vaginal capsules group. All patients adhered to their allocated treatment. Implantation and clinical pregnancy rates per transfer did not differ between the three groups. Perineal irritation, which was our primary endpoint, was the same for all the three groups (respectively 1.7 % versus 5.9 % versus 11.7%). Regarding the other side effects, more patients experienced constipation and flatulence with the rectal route, whereas more patients reported vaginal discharge in the vaginal capsules group. CONCLUSION Rectal administration for luteal phase support is effective and well accepted alternative to vaginal route. PMID:28096703

  19. Progesterone for Luteal Phase Support in In Vitro Fertilization: Comparison of Vaginal and Rectal Pessaries to Vaginal Capsules: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Khrouf, Mohamed; Slimani, Soufiene; Khrouf, Myriam Razgallah; Braham, Marouen; Bouyahia, Maha; Berjeb, Khadija Kacem; Chaabane, Hanene Elloumi; Merdassi, Ghaya; Kaffel, Aida Zahaf; Zhioua, Amel; Zhioua, Fethi

    2016-01-01

    In IVF, Luteal phase support is usually performed using vaginal progesterone. A part of patients using this route reports being uncomfortable with this route. We tried to study whether the rectal route could be an effective alternative and associated with less discomfort. A prospective randomized controlled study. All patient were eligible for IVF treatment for infertility. After oocyte pickup, 186 patients were allocated to one the following protocols for luteal phase support: (i) rectal pessaries group: natural progesterone pessaries administered rectally 200 mg three times a day, (ii) vaginal pessaries group: natural progesterone pessaries administered vaginally 200 mg three times a day), and (iii) vaginal capsules group: natural micronized progesterone capsules administered vaginally 200 mg three times a day. On the day of pregnancy test, patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire conducted by an investigator in order to assess the tolerability and side effects of the LPS treatment taken. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of perineal irritation. Fifty eight patients were assigned to the rectal pessaries group, 68 patients to the vaginal pessaries group, and 60 patients to the vaginal capsules group. All patients adhered to their allocated treatment. Implantation and clinical pregnancy rates per transfer did not differ between the three groups. Perineal irritation, which was our primary endpoint, was the same for all the three groups (respectively 1.7 % versus 5.9 % versus 11.7%). Regarding the other side effects, more patients experienced constipation and flatulence with the rectal route, whereas more patients reported vaginal discharge in the vaginal capsules group. Rectal administration for luteal phase support is effective and well accepted alternative to vaginal route.

  20. The Neonatal Microbiome and Its Partial Role in Mediating the Association between Birth by Cesarean Section and Adverse Pediatric Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Montoya-Williams, Diana; Lemas, Dominick J; Spiryda, Lisa; Patel, Keval; Carney, O'neshia Olivia; Neu, Josef; Carson, Tiffany L

    2018-05-22

    Cesarean sections (CS) are among the most commonly performed surgical procedures in the world. Epidemiologic data has associated delivery by CS with an increased risk of certain adverse health outcomes in children, such as asthma and obesity. To explore what is known about the effect of mode of delivery on the development of the infant microbiome and discuss the potentially mediating role of CS-related microbial dysbiosis in the development of adverse pediatric health outcomes. Recommendations for future inquiry are also provided. This study provides a narrative overview of the literature synthesizing the findings of literature retrieved from searches of PubMed and other computerized databases and authoritative texts. Emerging evidence suggests that mode of delivery is involved in the development of the neonatal microbiome and may partially explain pediatric health outcomes associated with birth by CS. Specifically, the gut microbiome of vaginally delivered infants more closely resembles their mothers' vaginal microbiome and thus more commonly consists of potentially beneficial microbiota such as Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Bacteroides. Conversely, the microbiome of infants born via CS shows an increased prevalence of either skin flora or potentially pathogenic microbial communities such as Klebsiella, Enterococcus, and Clostridium. Mode of delivery plays an important role in the development of the postnatal microbiome but likely tells only part of the story. More comprehensive investigations into all the pre- and perinatal factors that have the potential to contribute to the neonatal microbiome are warranted. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Association of HPV infection and clearance with cervicovaginal immunology and the vaginal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, B; Yi, TJ; Perusini, S; Gajer, P; Ma, B; Humphrys, MS; Thomas-Pavanel, J; Chieza, L; Janakiram, P; Saunders, M; Tharao, W; Huibner, S; Shahabi, K; Ravel, J; Rebbapragada, A; Kaul, R

    2016-01-01

    Cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection may increase HIV risk. Since other genital infections enhance HIV susceptibility by inducing inflammation, we assessed the impact of HPV infection and clearance on genital immunology and the cervico-vaginal microbiome. Genital samples were collected from 65 women for HPV testing, immune studies and microbiota assessment; repeat HPV testing was performed after 6 months. All participants were HIV-uninfected and free of bacterial STIs. Cytobrush-derived T cell and dendritic cell subsets were assessed by multiparameter flow cytometry. Undiluted cervico-vaginal secretions were used to determine cytokine levels by multiplex ELISA, and to assess bacterial community composition and structure by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Neither HPV infection nor clearance were associated with broad differences in cervical T cell subsets or cytokines, although HPV clearance was associated with increased Langerhans cells and HPV infection with elevated IP-10 and MIG. Individuals with HPV more frequently had a high diversity cervico-vaginal microbiome (community state type IV) and were less likely to have an L. gasseri predominant microbiome. In summary, HPV infection and/or subsequent clearance was not associated with inflammation or altered cervical T cell subsets, but associations with increased Langerhans cells and the composition of the vaginal microbiome warrant further exploration. PMID:28120845

  2. Do fecal and litter microbiomes vary within the major areas of a commercial poultry house, and does this effect sampling strategies for whole house microbiomic studies?

    The microbiota of the live production environment can directly shape the gastrointestinal microbiome of chickens and indirectly influence the health of birds. Therefore, numerous studies have attempted to characterize the microbial communities in litter and chicken feces from commercial poultry hous...

  3. Studying Vertical Microbiome Transmission from Mothers to Infants by Strain-Level Metagenomic Profiling.

    PubMed

    Asnicar, Francesco; Manara, Serena; Zolfo, Moreno; Truong, Duy Tin; Scholz, Matthias; Armanini, Federica; Ferretti, Pamela; Gorfer, Valentina; Pedrotti, Anna; Tett, Adrian; Segata, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiome becomes shaped in the first days of life and continues to increase its diversity during the first months. Links between the configuration of the infant gut microbiome and infant health are being shown, but a comprehensive strain-level assessment of microbes vertically transmitted from mother to infant is still missing. We collected fecal and breast milk samples from multiple mother-infant pairs during the first year of life and applied shotgun metagenomic sequencing followed by computational strain-level profiling. We observed that several specific strains, including those of Bifidobacterium bifidum , Coprococcus comes , and Ruminococcus bromii , were present in samples from the same mother-infant pair, while being clearly distinct from those carried by other pairs, which is indicative of vertical transmission. We further applied metatranscriptomics to study the in vivo gene expression of vertically transmitted microbes and found that transmitted strains of Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium species were transcriptionally active in the guts of both adult and infant. By combining longitudinal microbiome sampling and newly developed computational tools for strain-level microbiome analysis, we demonstrated that it is possible to track the vertical transmission of microbial strains from mother to infants and to characterize their transcriptional activity. Our work provides the foundation for larger-scale surveys to identify the routes of vertical microbial transmission and its influence on postinfancy microbiome development. IMPORTANCE Early infant exposure is important in the acquisition and ultimate development of a healthy infant microbiome. There is increasing support for the idea that the maternal microbial reservoir is a key route of microbial transmission, and yet much is inferred from the observation of shared species in mother and infant. The presence of common species, per se , does not necessarily equate to vertical transmission, as species

  4. Studying Vertical Microbiome Transmission from Mothers to Infants by Strain-Level Metagenomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Manara, Serena; Truong, Duy Tin; Armanini, Federica; Ferretti, Pamela; Gorfer, Valentina; Pedrotti, Anna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gut microbiome becomes shaped in the first days of life and continues to increase its diversity during the first months. Links between the configuration of the infant gut microbiome and infant health are being shown, but a comprehensive strain-level assessment of microbes vertically transmitted from mother to infant is still missing. We collected fecal and breast milk samples from multiple mother-infant pairs during the first year of life and applied shotgun metagenomic sequencing followed by computational strain-level profiling. We observed that several specific strains, including those of Bifidobacterium bifidum, Coprococcus comes, and Ruminococcus bromii, were present in samples from the same mother-infant pair, while being clearly distinct from those carried by other pairs, which is indicative of vertical transmission. We further applied metatranscriptomics to study the in vivo gene expression of vertically transmitted microbes and found that transmitted strains of Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium species were transcriptionally active in the guts of both adult and infant. By combining longitudinal microbiome sampling and newly developed computational tools for strain-level microbiome analysis, we demonstrated that it is possible to track the vertical transmission of microbial strains from mother to infants and to characterize their transcriptional activity. Our work provides the foundation for larger-scale surveys to identify the routes of vertical microbial transmission and its influence on postinfancy microbiome development. IMPORTANCE Early infant exposure is important in the acquisition and ultimate development of a healthy infant microbiome. There is increasing support for the idea that the maternal microbial reservoir is a key route of microbial transmission, and yet much is inferred from the observation of shared species in mother and infant. The presence of common species, per se, does not necessarily equate to vertical transmission, as

  5. The vaginal microbiota and susceptibility to HIV.

    PubMed

    Buve, Anne; Jespers, Vicky; Crucitti, Tania; Fichorova, Raina N

    2014-10-23

    There is some evidence that the risk of HIV infection per heterosexual act is higher in low-income countries than in high-income countries. We hypothesize that variations in per sex-act transmission probability of HIV may in part be attributed to differences in the composition and function of the vaginal microbiota between different populations. This paper presents data that are in support of this hypothesis. Experimental and clinical studies have provided evidence that the normal vaginal microbiota plays a protective role against acquisition of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Epidemiological studies have convincingly shown that disturbances of the vaginal microbiome, namely intermediate flora and bacterial vaginosis, increase the risk of acquisition of HIV infection. A review of the literature found large differences in prevalence of bacterial vaginosis between different populations, with the highest prevalence rates found in black populations. Possible explanations for these differences are presented including data suggesting that there are ethnic differences in the composition of the normal vaginal microbiota. Lastly, interventions are discussed to restore and maintain a healthy vaginal environment. 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  6. Ovine pedomics: the first study of the ovine foot 16S rRNA-based microbiome

    We report the first study of the bacterial microbiome of ovine interdigital skin based on 16S rRNA by pyrosequencing and conventional cloning with Sanger-sequencing. Ovine foot rot is an infectious, contagious disease of sheep that causes severe lameness and economic loss from decreased flock produc...

  7. Metagenome-Wide Association Study and Machine Learning Prediction of Bulk Soil Microbiome and Crop Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hao-Xun; Haudenshield, James S.; Bowen, Charles R.; Hartman, Glen L.

    2017-01-01

    Areas within an agricultural field in the same season often differ in crop productivity despite having the same cropping history, crop genotype, and management practices. One hypothesis is that abiotic or biotic factors in the soils differ between areas resulting in these productivity differences. In this study, bulk soil samples collected from a high and a low productivity area from within six agronomic fields in Illinois were quantified for abiotic and biotic characteristics. Extracted DNA from these bulk soil samples were shotgun sequenced. While logistic regression analyses resulted in no significant association between crop productivity and the 26 soil characteristics, principal coordinate analysis and constrained correspondence analysis showed crop productivity explained a major proportion of the taxa variance in the bulk soil microbiome. Metagenome-wide association studies (MWAS) identified more Bradyrhizodium and Gammaproteobacteria in higher productivity areas and more Actinobacteria, Ascomycota, Planctomycetales, and Streptophyta in lower productivity areas. Machine learning using a random forest method successfully predicted productivity based on the microbiome composition with the best accuracy of 0.79 at the order level. Our study showed that crop productivity differences were associated with bulk soil microbiome composition and highlighted several nitrogen utility-related taxa. We demonstrated the merit of MWAS and machine learning for the first time in a plant-microbiome study. PMID:28421041

  8. A robust ambient temperature collection and stabilization strategy: Enabling worldwide functional studies of the human microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ericka L.; Li, Weizhong; Klitgord, Niels; Highlander, Sarah K.; Dayrit, Mark; Seguritan, Victor; Yooseph, Shibu; Biggs, William; Venter, J. Craig; Nelson, Karen E.; Jones, Marcus B.

    2016-01-01

    As reports on possible associations between microbes and the host increase in number, more meaningful interpretations of this information require an ability to compare data sets across studies. This is dependent upon standardization of workflows to ensure comparability both within and between studies. Here we propose the standard use of an alternate collection and stabilization method that would facilitate such comparisons. The DNA Genotek OMNIgene∙Gut Stool Microbiome Kit was compared to the currently accepted community standard of freezing to store human stool samples prior to whole genome sequencing (WGS) for microbiome studies. This stabilization and collection device allows for ambient temperature storage, automation, and ease of shipping/transfer of samples. The device permitted the same data reproducibility as with frozen samples, and yielded higher recovery of nucleic acids. Collection and stabilization of stool microbiome samples with the DNA Genotek collection device, combined with our extraction and WGS, provides a robust, reproducible workflow that enables standardized global collection, storage, and analysis of stool for microbiome studies. PMID:27558918

  9. Vaginal Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... an Endocrinologist Search Featured Resource Menopause Map™ View Vaginal Atrophy October 2017 Download PDFs English Editors Christine ... during this time, including vaginal dryness. What is vaginal atrophy? Vaginal atrophy (also referred to as vulvovaginal ...

  10. Vaginal delivery among women who underwent labor induction with vaginal dinoprostone (PGE2) insert: a retrospective study of 1656 women in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Lin, Ying; Jiang, Ting-Ting; Wang, Ling; Li, Min; Wang, Ying; Sun, Guo-Qiang; Xiao, Mei

    2017-12-21

    This study aimed to qualify relevant factors for vaginal delivery among women who underwent labor induction with vaginal dinoprostone (PGE2) insert in a Chinese tertiary maternity hospital. A retrospective study was conducted in Hubei Maternal and Child Health Hospital. A total of 1656 pregnancies that underwent labor induction with vaginal dinoprostone insert between January and August 2016 were finally included in this study. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariable regression modeling. Of 1656 women with PGE2-induced labor at term, 396 (23.91%) gave birth by cesarean section, 1260 (76.09%) had a vaginal delivery among which 921 (55.61%) delivered vaginally within 24 h. Multivariable regression analysis showed that maternal age (p < .001, OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.85-0.93), parity (multiparous versus nulliparous, p < .001, OR = 8.74, 95%CI 4.36-17.50), baseline fetal heart rate (p = .009, OR = 0.98, 95%CI 0.96-0.99), and birth weight (p < .001, OR = 0.37, 95%CI 0.28-0.51) were significantly correlated with vaginal delivery. Moreover, body mass index (p < .001, OR = 1.11, 95%CI 1.05-1.19), parity (multiparous versus nulliparous, p < .001, OR = 6.57, 95%CI 2.37-18.23), baseline fetal heart rate (p = .004, OR = 0.96, 95%CI 0.94-0.99), and birth weight (p < .001, OR = 0.34, 95%CI 0.21-0.54) were independent predictors of vaginal delivery within 24-h. Our findings suggested a vaginal delivery rate of 76.09% when dinoprostone vaginal insert was used for labor induction, which was markedly higher than the overall annual vaginal delivery rate of 65.1% in China during 2014. Maternal age, parity, baseline fetal heart rate, and birth weight were significant factors for vaginal delivery. This study enables us to better understand the efficiency of dinoprostone and the potential predictors of vaginal delivery in dinoprostone-induced labor, which may be helpful to guide the clinical use of dinoprostone and therefore provide better

  11. Odorous vaginal discharge - a case study for thorough investigation.

    PubMed

    Cernat, Geta; Leung, Lawrence

    2011-08-01

    Odorous vaginal discharge is a common presentation to general practitioners, and a frequent presentation for bacterial infections and sexually transmissible diseases. Busy GPs may be tempted to make a diagnosis from the clinical history and symptoms, and prescribe antibiotics as a first line treatment. This case highlights an unusual cause of persistent odorous vaginal discharge. If a thorough examination had not been conducted, the cause would have been overlooked, first line antibiotics would most likely have been ineffective, and potentially life threatening consequences may have occurred.

  12. Structural zeros in high-dimensional data with applications to microbiome studies.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Abhishek; Davidov, Ori; Peddada, Shyamal D

    2017-07-01

    This paper is motivated by the recent interest in the analysis of high-dimensional microbiome data. A key feature of these data is the presence of "structural zeros" which are microbes missing from an observation vector due to an underlying biological process and not due to error in measurement. Typical notions of missingness are unable to model these structural zeros. We define a general framework which allows for structural zeros in the model and propose methods of estimating sparse high-dimensional covariance and precision matrices under this setup. We establish error bounds in the spectral and Frobenius norms for the proposed estimators and empirically verify them with a simulation study. The proposed methodology is illustrated by applying it to the global gut microbiome data of Yatsunenko and others (2012. Human gut microbiome viewed across age and geography. Nature 486, 222-227). Using our methodology we classify subjects according to the geographical location on the basis of their gut microbiome. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Cigarette smoking and the oral microbiome in a large study of American adults

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Peters, Brandilyn A; Dominianni, Christine; Zhang, Yilong; Pei, Zhiheng; Yang, Liying; Ma, Yingfei; Purdue, Mark P; Jacobs, Eric J; Gapstur, Susan M; Li, Huilin; Alekseyenko, Alexander V; Hayes, Richard B; Ahn, Jiyoung

    2016-01-01

    Oral microbiome dysbiosis is associated with oral disease and potentially with systemic diseases; however, the determinants of these microbial imbalances are largely unknown. In a study of 1204 US adults, we assessed the relationship of cigarette smoking with the oral microbiome. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed on DNA from oral wash samples, sequences were clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) using QIIME and metagenomic content was inferred using PICRUSt. Overall oral microbiome composition differed between current and non-current (former and never) smokers (P<0.001). Current smokers had lower relative abundance of the phylum Proteobacteria (4.6%) compared with never smokers (11.7%) (false discovery rate q=5.2 × 10−7), with no difference between former and never smokers; the depletion of Proteobacteria in current smokers was also observed at class, genus and OTU levels. Taxa not belonging to Proteobacteria were also associated with smoking: the genera Capnocytophaga, Peptostreptococcus and Leptotrichia were depleted, while Atopobium and Streptococcus were enriched, in current compared with never smokers. Functional analysis from inferred metagenomes showed that bacterial genera depleted by smoking were related to carbohydrate and energy metabolism, and to xenobiotic metabolism. Our findings demonstrate that smoking alters the oral microbiome, potentially leading to shifts in functional pathways with implications for smoking-related diseases. PMID:27015003

  14. Power and sample-size estimation for microbiome studies using pairwise distances and PERMANOVA.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brendan J; Gross, Robert; Bittinger, Kyle; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Lewis, James D; Collman, Ronald G; Bushman, Frederic D; Li, Hongzhe

    2015-08-01

    The variation in community composition between microbiome samples, termed beta diversity, can be measured by pairwise distance based on either presence-absence or quantitative species abundance data. PERMANOVA, a permutation-based extension of multivariate analysis of variance to a matrix of pairwise distances, partitions within-group and between-group distances to permit assessment of the effect of an exposure or intervention (grouping factor) upon the sampled microbiome. Within-group distance and exposure/intervention effect size must be accurately modeled to estimate statistical power for a microbiome study that will be analyzed with pairwise distances and PERMANOVA. We present a framework for PERMANOVA power estimation tailored to marker-gene microbiome studies that will be analyzed by pairwise distances, which includes: (i) a novel method for distance matrix simulation that permits modeling of within-group pairwise distances according to pre-specified population parameters; (ii) a method to incorporate effects of different sizes within the simulated distance matrix; (iii) a simulation-based method for estimating PERMANOVA power from simulated distance matrices; and (iv) an R statistical software package that implements the above. Matrices of pairwise distances can be efficiently simulated to satisfy the triangle inequality and incorporate group-level effects, which are quantified by the adjusted coefficient of determination, omega-squared (ω2). From simulated distance matrices, available PERMANOVA power or necessary sample size can be estimated for a planned microbiome study. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Power and sample-size estimation for microbiome studies using pairwise distances and PERMANOVA

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Brendan J.; Gross, Robert; Bittinger, Kyle; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Lewis, James D.; Collman, Ronald G.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Li, Hongzhe

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The variation in community composition between microbiome samples, termed beta diversity, can be measured by pairwise distance based on either presence–absence or quantitative species abundance data. PERMANOVA, a permutation-based extension of multivariate analysis of variance to a matrix of pairwise distances, partitions within-group and between-group distances to permit assessment of the effect of an exposure or intervention (grouping factor) upon the sampled microbiome. Within-group distance and exposure/intervention effect size must be accurately modeled to estimate statistical power for a microbiome study that will be analyzed with pairwise distances and PERMANOVA. Results: We present a framework for PERMANOVA power estimation tailored to marker-gene microbiome studies that will be analyzed by pairwise distances, which includes: (i) a novel method for distance matrix simulation that permits modeling of within-group pairwise distances according to pre-specified population parameters; (ii) a method to incorporate effects of different sizes within the simulated distance matrix; (iii) a simulation-based method for estimating PERMANOVA power from simulated distance matrices; and (iv) an R statistical software package that implements the above. Matrices of pairwise distances can be efficiently simulated to satisfy the triangle inequality and incorporate group-level effects, which are quantified by the adjusted coefficient of determination, omega-squared (ω2). From simulated distance matrices, available PERMANOVA power or necessary sample size can be estimated for a planned microbiome study. Availability and implementation: http://github.com/brendankelly/micropower. Contact: brendank@mail.med.upenn.edu or hongzhe@upenn.edu PMID:25819674

  16. Maternal–Child Microbiome: Specimen Collection, Storage and Implications for Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Sheila; Baker, Brenda; Dunn, Alexis; Edwards, Sara; Ferranti, Erin; Mutic, Abby D.; Yang, Irene; Rodriguez, Jeannie

    2017-01-01

    Background The maternal microbiome is a key contributor to the development and outcomes of pregnancy and the health status of both mother and infant. Significant advances are occurring in the science of the maternal and child microbiome and hold promise in improving outcomes related to pregnancy complications, child development, and chronic health conditions of mother and child. Objectives The purpose of the paper is to review site-specific considerations in the collection and storage of maternal and child microbiome samples and its implications for nursing research and practice. Approach Microbiome sampling protocols were reviewed and synthesized. Precautions across sampling protocols were also noted. Results Oral, vaginal, gut, placental, and breastmilk are viable sources for sampling the maternal and/or child microbiome. Prior to sampling special considerations need to be addressed related to various factors including current medications, health status, and hygiene practices. Proper storage of samples will avoid degradation of cellular and DNA structures vital for analysis. Discussion Changes in the microbiome throughout the perinatal, postpartum and childhood periods are dramatic and significant to outcomes of the pregnancy and the long-term health of mother and child. Proper sampling techniques are required to produce reliable results from which evidence-based practice recommendations will be built. Ethical and practical issues surrounding study design and protocol development must also be considered when researching vulnerable groups such as pregnant women and infants. Nurses hold the responsibility to both perform the research and to translate findings from microbiome investigations for clinical use. PMID:28252577

  17. Role of sex hormones and the vaginal microbiome in susceptibility and mucosal immunity to HIV-1 in the female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Danielle; Wessels, Jocelyn M; Kaushic, Charu

    2017-09-12

    While the prevalence of Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection has stabilized globally, it continues to be the leading cause of death among women of reproductive age. The majority of new infections are transmitted heterosexually, and women have consistently been found to be more susceptible to HIV-1 infection during heterosexual intercourse compared to men. This emphasizes the need for a deeper understanding of how the microenvironment in the female genital tract (FGT) could influence HIV-1 acquisition. This short review focuses on our current understanding of the interplay between estrogen, progesterone, and the cervicovaginal microbiome and their immunomodulatory effects on the FGT. The role of hormonal contraceptives and bacterial vaginosis on tissue inflammation, T cell immunity and HIV-1 susceptibility is discussed. Taken together, this review provides valuable information for the future development of multi-purpose interventions to prevent HIV-1 infection in women.

  18. Dying for love: Perimenopausal degeneration of vaginal microbiome drives the chronic inflammation-malignant transformation of benign prostatic hyperplasia to prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2017-04-01

    Prostatic carcinoma is the second commonest cancer in males and is so common as to become almost holoendemic with advancing age. The recent demonstration that far from being benign, "benign" prostatic hypertrophy is a likely a reaction of the prostate to chronic untreated lower genital tract infection, and that this chronic inflammation is likely the usual precursor to the frequent occurrence of prostatic carcinoma has far reaching implications. The obvious source for the chronic inflammatory stimulus in the prostate is the documented dramatically altered lower female genital microbiota associated with the menopause. Hence the major hypothesis is that prostatic cancer may arise due to chronic infection and inflammation in the prostate gland consequent upon the altered microbiome of the menopausal female genital tract. This has implications for testing and diagnosis, treatment, population health and personal hygiene practices. It suggests that male dyspareunia, although almost never encountered in clinical practice may in fact be relatively common in older males, and in particular if diagnosed, represents a critical opportunity for therapeutic intervention to interrupt the chronic inflammation - cancer transformation and progression which has been well documented in other tissues. It implies that the coordinated application of next generation sequencing to the microbiome of the lower genital tracts of male and female couples, including seminal fluid, will have both research applications to further explore this sequence, as well as finding application as a potential population level screening procedure as is presently done for the "Thin Prep" cervical screening for human papillomavirus in females. Moreover this insight opens up new opportunities for chemointervention and chemoprevention for this important clinicopathological progression. These considerations give rise to the exciting possibility that prostatic malignancy may be preventable by various methods of local

  19. Fractional CO2 laser treatment for vaginal laxity: A preclinical study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Rin; Kim, Jong Hwan; Seok, Joon; Kim, Jae Min; Bak, Dong-Ho; Choi, Mi-Ji; Mun, Seok Kyun; Kim, Chan Woong; Ahn, Seungwon; Kim, Beom Joon

    2018-05-07

    Various studies have investigated treatment for vaginal laxity with microablative fractional carbon dioxide CO 2 laser in humans; however, this treatment has not yet been studied in an animal model. Herein, we evaluate the therapeutic effects of fractional CO 2 laser for tissue remodeling of vaginal mucosa using a porcine model, with the aim of improving vaginal laxity. The fractional CO 2 laser enables minimally invasive and non-incisional procedures. By precisely controlling the laser energy pulses, energy is sent to the vaginal canal and the introitus area to induce thermal denaturation and contraction of collagen. We examined the effects of fractional CO 2 laser on a porcine model via clinical observation and ultrasound measurement. Also, thermal lesions were histologically examined via hematoxylin-eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining, and Elastica van Gieson staining and immunohistochemistry. The three treatment groups, which were determined according to the amount of laser-energy applied (60, 90, and 120 mJ), showed slight thermal denaturation in the vaginal mucosa, but no abnormal reactions, such as excessive hemorrhaging, vesicles, or erythema, were observed. Histologically, we also confirmed that the denatured lamina propria induced by fractional CO 2 laser was dose-dependently increased after laser treatment. The treatment groups also showed an increase in collagen and elastic fibers due to neocollagenesis and angiogenesis, and the vaginal walls became firmer and tighter because of increased capillary and vessel formation. Also, use of the fractional CO 2 laser increased HSP (heat shock protein) 70 and collagen type I synthesis. Our results show that microablative fractional CO 2 laser can produce remodeling of the vaginal connective tissue without causing damage to surrounding tissue, and the process of mucosa remodeling while under wound dressings enables collagen to increase and the vaginal wall to become thick and tightened. Lasers Surg. Med

  20. Estrogen Replacement Regulates Vaginal Innervations in Ovariectomized Adult Virgin Rats: A Histological Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Ma, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Hong; Yan, Ping; Huo, Lili; Hu, Yongyan; Chen, Xi; Li, Ting; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Zhaohui

    2017-01-01

    Background . Our previous Gräfenberg spot findings confirmed that the distal-third areas of the anterior vaginal wall bore a significantly greater number of nerves and sexual hormone may have certain degree of influence on these significant differences. However, the role of estrogen in vaginal innervations remains controversial. Methods . To investigate whether hormonal-neural interactions occur in the vagina, sixty rats were randomly divided into six groups: Sham-operated, ovariectomy, and 4 treatment groups. After 2 weeks of treatment, vaginal biopsies were prepared with hematoxylin and eosin and PGP9.5 using immunohistochemistry. Results . The density of small nerve fibers was significantly higher in the distal-half areas of intact vaginal walls than the proximal-half areas ( P = 0.001). In contrast, the overall PGP 9.5-ir fiber innervation density was significantly decreased in the OVX rats subjected to surgical menopause. Sustained estrogen administration for 2 weeks resulted in nerve fiber proliferation, with values reaching normal levels in the low-dose estradiol valerate group. Conclusion . Our findings indicate that systemic hormonal therapy with low-dose estradiol valerate is effective and safe for treating deficient vaginal innervation caused by low level of estrogen activity in menopausal women and may aid studies to identify an optimal estradiol dose to provide relief from vaginal discomfort.

  1. Strategy for an Association Study of the Intestinal Microbiome and Brain Metabolome Across the Lifespan of Rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianlu; You, Yijun; Xie, Guoxiang; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Zhao, Aihua; Liu, Jiajian; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Shouli; Huang, Fengjie; Rajani, Cynthia; Wang, Congcong; Chen, Shaoqiu; Ni, Yan; Yu, Herbert; Deng, Youping; Wang, Xiaoyan; Jia, Wei

    2018-02-20

    There is increased appreciation for the diverse roles of the microbiome-gut-brain axis on mammalian growth and health throughout the lifespan. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the gut microbiome and their metabolites are extensively involved in the communication between brain and gut. Association study of brain metabolome and gut microbiome is an active field offering large amounts of information on the interaction of microbiome, brain and gut but data size and complicated hierarchical relationships were found to be major obstacles to the formation of significant, reproducible conclusions. This study addressed a two-level strategy of brain metabolome and gut microbiome association analysis of male Wistar rats in the process of growth, employing several analytical platforms and various bioinformatics methods. Trajectory analysis showed that the age-related brain metabolome and gut microbiome had similarity in overall alteration patterns. Four high taxonomical level correlated pairs of "metabolite type-bacterial phylum", including "lipids-Spirochaetes", "free fatty acids (FFAs)-Firmicutes", "bile acids (BAs)-Firmicutes", and "Neurotransmitters-Bacteroidetes", were screened out based on unit- and multivariant correlation analysis and function analysis. Four groups of specific "metabolite-bacterium" association pairs from within the above high level key pairs were further identified. The key correlation pairs were validated by an independent animal study. This two-level strategy is effective in identifying principal correlations in big data sets obtained from the systematic multiomics study, furthering our understanding on the lifelong connection between brain and gut.

  2. Vaginal Changes Due to Varying Degrees of Rectocele Prolapse: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Arnab; Meyer, Isuzu; Richter, Holly E; Lockhart, Mark E; Moraes, Fabia R D; Unnikrishnan, Vinu

    2017-10-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP), downward descent of the pelvic organs resulting in a protrusion of the vagina, is a highly prevalent condition, responsible for 300,000 surgeries in the U.S. annually. Rectocele, a posterior vaginal wall (PVW) prolapse of the rectum, is the second most common type of POP after cystocele. A rectocele usually manifests itself along with other types of prolapse with multicompartment pelvic floor defects. To date, the specific mechanics of rectocele formation are poorly understood, which does not allow its early stage detection and progression prediction over time. Recently, with the advancement of imaging and computational modeling techniques, a plethora of finite element (FE) models have been developed to study vaginal prolapse from different perspectives and allow a better understanding of dynamic interactions of pelvic organs and their supporting structures. So far, most studies have focused on anterior vaginal prolapse (AVP) (or cystocele) and limited data exist on the role of pelvic muscles and ligaments on the development and progression of rectocele. In this work, a full-scale magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based three-dimensional (3D) computational model of the female pelvic anatomy, comprising the vaginal canal, uterus, and rectum, was developed to study the effect of varying degrees (or sizes) of rectocele prolapse on the vaginal canal for the first time. Vaginal wall displacements and stresses generated due to the varying rectocele size and average abdominal pressures were estimated. Considering the direction pointing from anterior to posterior side of the pelvic system as the positive Y-direction, it was found that rectocele leads to negative Y-direction displacements, causing the vaginal cross section to shrink significantly at the lower half of the vaginal canal. Besides the negative Y displacements, the rectocele bulging was observed to push the PVW downward toward the vaginal hiatus, exhibiting the well-known "kneeling

  3. Crossover Control Study of the Effect of Personal Care Products Containing Triclosan on the Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Angela C.; Pischel, Lauren; Ley, Catherine; Suh, Gina; Goodrich, Julia K.; Haggerty, Thomas D.; Ley, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Commonly prescribed antibiotics are known to alter human microbiota. We hypothesized that triclosan and triclocarban, components of many household and personal care products (HPCPs), may alter the oral and gut microbiota, with potential consequences for metabolic function and weight. In a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, participants were given triclosan- and triclocarban (TCS)-containing or non-triclosan/triclocarban (nTCS)-containing HPCPs for 4 months and then switched to the other products for an additional 4 months. Blood, stool, gingival plaque, and urine samples and weight data were obtained at baseline and at regular intervals throughout the study period. Blood samples were analyzed for metabolic and endocrine markers and urine samples for triclosan. The microbiome in stool and oral samples was then analyzed. Although there was a significant difference in the amount of triclosan in the urine between the TCS and nTCS phases, no differences were found in microbiome composition, metabolic or endocrine markers, or weight. Though this study was limited by the small sample size and imprecise administration of HPCPs, triclosan at physiologic levels from exposure to HPCPs does not appear to have a significant or important impact on human oral or gut microbiome structure or on a panel of metabolic markers. IMPORTANCE Triclosan and triclocarban are commonly used commercial microbicides found in toothpastes and soaps. It is unknown what effects these chemicals have on the human microbiome or on endocrine function. From this randomized crossover study, it appears that routine personal care use of triclosan and triclocarban neither exerts a major influence on microbial communities in the gut and mouth nor alters markers of endocrine function in humans. PMID:27303746

  4. The Salivary Microbiome in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) and Its Association with Disease-Related Parameters: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lindheim, Lisa; Bashir, Mina; Münzker, Julia; Trummer, Christian; Zachhuber, Verena; Pieber, Thomas R.; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common female endocrine condition of unclear etiology characterized by hyperandrogenism, oligo/amenorrhoea, and polycystic ovarian morphology. PCOS is often complicated by infertility, overweight/obesity, insulin resistance, and low-grade inflammation. The gut microbiome is known to contribute to several of these conditions. Recently, an association between stool and saliva microbiome community profiles was shown, making saliva a possible convenient, non-invasive sample type for detecting gut microbiome changes in systemic disease. In this study, we describe the saliva microbiome of PCOS patients and the association of microbiome features with PCOS-related parameters. Methods: 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was performed on saliva samples from 24 PCOS patients and 20 healthy controls. Data processing and microbiome analyses were conducted in mothur and QIIME. All study subjects were characterized regarding reproductive, metabolic, and inflammatory parameters. Results: PCOS patients showed a decrease in bacteria from the phylum Actinobacteria and a borderline significant shift in bacterial community composition in unweighted UniFrac analysis. No differences between patients and controls were found in alpha diversity, weighted UniFrac analysis, or on other taxonomic levels. We found no association of saliva alpha diversity, beta diversity, or taxonomic composition with serum testosterone, oligo/amenorrhoea, overweight, insulin resistance, inflammatory markers, age, or diet. Conclusions: In this pilot study, patients with PCOS showed a reduced salivary relative abundance of Actinobacteria. Reproductive and metabolic components of the syndrome were not associated with saliva microbiome parameters, indicating that the majority of between-subject variation in saliva microbiome profiles remains to be explained. PMID:27610099

  5. The Salivary Microbiome in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) and Its Association with Disease-Related Parameters: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Lindheim, Lisa; Bashir, Mina; Münzker, Julia; Trummer, Christian; Zachhuber, Verena; Pieber, Thomas R; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common female endocrine condition of unclear etiology characterized by hyperandrogenism, oligo/amenorrhoea, and polycystic ovarian morphology. PCOS is often complicated by infertility, overweight/obesity, insulin resistance, and low-grade inflammation. The gut microbiome is known to contribute to several of these conditions. Recently, an association between stool and saliva microbiome community profiles was shown, making saliva a possible convenient, non-invasive sample type for detecting gut microbiome changes in systemic disease. In this study, we describe the saliva microbiome of PCOS patients and the association of microbiome features with PCOS-related parameters. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was performed on saliva samples from 24 PCOS patients and 20 healthy controls. Data processing and microbiome analyses were conducted in mothur and QIIME. All study subjects were characterized regarding reproductive, metabolic, and inflammatory parameters. PCOS patients showed a decrease in bacteria from the phylum Actinobacteria and a borderline significant shift in bacterial community composition in unweighted UniFrac analysis. No differences between patients and controls were found in alpha diversity, weighted UniFrac analysis, or on other taxonomic levels. We found no association of saliva alpha diversity, beta diversity, or taxonomic composition with serum testosterone, oligo/amenorrhoea, overweight, insulin resistance, inflammatory markers, age, or diet. In this pilot study, patients with PCOS showed a reduced salivary relative abundance of Actinobacteria. Reproductive and metabolic components of the syndrome were not associated with saliva microbiome parameters, indicating that the majority of between-subject variation in saliva microbiome profiles remains to be explained.

  6. A Review on the Applications of Next Generation Sequencing Technologies as Applied to Food-Related Microbiome Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yu; Fanning, Séamus; Proos, Sinéad; Jordan, Kieran; Srikumar, Shabarinath

    2017-01-01

    The development of next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques has enabled researchers to study and understand the world of microorganisms from broader and deeper perspectives. The contemporary advances in DNA sequencing technologies have not only enabled finer characterization of bacterial genomes but also provided deeper taxonomic identification of complex microbiomes which in its genomic essence is the combined genetic material of the microorganisms inhabiting an environment, whether the environment be a particular body econiche (e.g., human intestinal contents) or a food manufacturing facility econiche (e.g., floor drain). To date, 16S rDNA sequencing, metagenomics and metatranscriptomics are the three basic sequencing strategies used in the taxonomic identification and characterization of food-related microbiomes. These sequencing strategies have used different NGS platforms for DNA and RNA sequence identification. Traditionally, 16S rDNA sequencing has played a key role in understanding the taxonomic composition of a food-related microbiome. Recently, metagenomic approaches have resulted in improved understanding of a microbiome by providing a species-level/strain-level characterization. Further, metatranscriptomic approaches have contributed to the functional characterization of the complex interactions between different microbial communities within a single microbiome. Many studies have highlighted the use of NGS techniques in investigating the microbiome of fermented foods. However, the utilization of NGS techniques in studying the microbiome of non-fermented foods are limited. This review provides a brief overview of the advances in DNA sequencing chemistries as the technology progressed from first, next and third generations and highlights how NGS provided a deeper understanding of food-related microbiomes with special focus on non-fermented foods. PMID:29033905

  7. Role of Lactobacillus Species in the Intermediate Vaginal Flora in Early Pregnancy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Machal, Susanne; Holzer, Iris; Kueronya, Verena; Husslein, Peter Wolf; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor obstetrical outcomes are associated with imbalances in the vaginal flora. The present study evaluated the role of vaginal Lactobacillus species in women with intermediate vaginal flora with regard to obstetrical outcomes. Methods We retrospectively analysed data from all women with singleton pregnancies who had undergone routine screening for asymptomatic vaginal infections at our tertiary referral centre between 2005 and 2014. Vaginal smears were Gram-stained and classified according to the Nugent scoring system as normal flora (score 0–3), intermediate vaginal flora (4–6), or bacterial vaginosis (7–10). Only women with intermediate vaginal flora were investigated. Women with a Nugent score of 4 were categorised into those with and without Lactobacilli. Follow-up smears were obtained 4–6 weeks after the initial smears. Descriptive data analysis, the Welch’s t-test, the Fisher’s exact test, and multiple regression analysis with adjustment for confounders were performed. Gestational age at delivery and birth weight were the outcome measures. Results At antenatal screening, 529/8421 women presented with intermediate vaginal flora. Amongst these, 349/529 (66%) had a Nugent score of 4, 94/529 (17.8%) a Nugent score of 5, and 86/529 (16.2%) a Nugent score of 6. Amongst those with a Nugent score of 4, 232/349 (66.5%) women were in the Lactobacilli group and 117/349 (33.5%) in the Non-Lactobacilli group. The preterm delivery rate was significantly lower in the Lactobacilli than in the Non-Lactobacilli group (OR 0.34, CI 0.21–0.55; p<0.001). Mean birth weight was 2979 ± 842 g and 2388 ± 1155 g in the study groups, respectively (MD 564.12, CI 346.23–781.92; p<0.001). On follow-up smears, bacterial vaginosis rates were 9% in the Lactobacilli and 7.8% in the Non-Lactobacilli group. Conclusions The absence of vaginal Lactobacillus species and any bacterial colonisation increases the risks of preterm delivery and low birth weight in women with

  8. Role of Lactobacillus Species in the Intermediate Vaginal Flora in Early Pregnancy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Machal, Susanne; Holzer, Iris; Kueronya, Verena; Husslein, Peter Wolf; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2015-01-01

    Poor obstetrical outcomes are associated with imbalances in the vaginal flora. The present study evaluated the role of vaginal Lactobacillus species in women with intermediate vaginal flora with regard to obstetrical outcomes. We retrospectively analysed data from all women with singleton pregnancies who had undergone routine screening for asymptomatic vaginal infections at our tertiary referral centre between 2005 and 2014. Vaginal smears were Gram-stained and classified according to the Nugent scoring system as normal flora (score 0-3), intermediate vaginal flora (4-6), or bacterial vaginosis (7-10). Only women with intermediate vaginal flora were investigated. Women with a Nugent score of 4 were categorised into those with and without Lactobacilli. Follow-up smears were obtained 4-6 weeks after the initial smears. Descriptive data analysis, the Welch's t-test, the Fisher's exact test, and multiple regression analysis with adjustment for confounders were performed. Gestational age at delivery and birth weight were the outcome measures. At antenatal screening, 529/8421 women presented with intermediate vaginal flora. Amongst these, 349/529 (66%) had a Nugent score of 4, 94/529 (17.8%) a Nugent score of 5, and 86/529 (16.2%) a Nugent score of 6. Amongst those with a Nugent score of 4, 232/349 (66.5%) women were in the Lactobacilli group and 117/349 (33.5%) in the Non-Lactobacilli group. The preterm delivery rate was significantly lower in the Lactobacilli than in the Non-Lactobacilli group (OR 0.34, CI 0.21-0.55; p<0.001). Mean birth weight was 2979 ± 842 g and 2388 ± 1155 g in the study groups, respectively (MD 564.12, CI 346.23-781.92; p<0.001). On follow-up smears, bacterial vaginosis rates were 9% in the Lactobacilli and 7.8% in the Non-Lactobacilli group. The absence of vaginal Lactobacillus species and any bacterial colonisation increases the risks of preterm delivery and low birth weight in women with intermediate vaginal flora in early pregnancy.

  9. Vaginal Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome of menopause (GSM) increases your risk of: Vaginal infections. Changes in the acid balance of your vagina makes vaginal infections (vaginitis) more likely. Urinary problems. Urinary changes associated ...

  10. Gut microbiome and bone.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Lidia; Rouleau, Matthieu; Wakkach, Abdelilah; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine

    2018-04-11

    The gut microbiome is now viewed as a tissue that interacts bidirectionally with the gastrointestinal, immune, endocrine and nervous systems, affecting the cellular responses in numerous organs. Evidence is accumulating of gut microbiome involvement in a growing number of pathophysiological processes, many of which are linked to inflammatory responses. More specifically, data acquired over the last decade point to effects of the gut microbiome on bone mass regulation and on the development of bone diseases (such as osteoporosis) and of inflammatory joint diseases characterized by bone loss. Mice lacking a gut microbiome have bone mass alteration that can be reversed by gut recolonization. Changes in the gut microbiome composition have been reported in mice with estrogen-deficiency osteoporosis and have also been found in a few studies in humans. Probiotic therapy decreases bone loss in estrogen-deficient animals. The effect of the gut microbiome on bone tissue involves complex mechanisms including modulation of CD4 + T cell activation, control of osteoclastogenic cytokine production and modifications in hormone levels. This complexity may contribute to explain the discrepancies observed betwwen some studies whose results vary depending on the age, gender, genetic background and treatment duration. Further elucidation of the mechanisms involved is needed. However, the available data hold promise that gut microbiome manipulation may prove of interest in the management of bone diseases. Copyright © 2018 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy and safety of vitamin C vaginal tablets in the treatment of non-specific vaginitis. A randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, E Eiko; Magnani, Paola

    2004-11-10

    This was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Vitamin C vaginal tablets (250 mg) given once a day in patients suffering from non-specific vaginitis. The total length of the study was 20 days, including a treatment phase of 6 days. The primary end-point was the presence in the two groups of non-specific vaginitis 1 and 2 weeks after the end of treatment, as assessed by at least 3 out of the 4 characteristic symptoms: discharge, fishy odour, vaginal pH >/= 4.7, and presence of clue cells. Secondary end-points were the individual symptoms and signs, above reported, and pruritus, fever, superinfections, microscopic findings on vaginal smear, and colposcopy. One hundred female patients aged 18 years or older and suffering from non-specific vaginitis were included in the study after giving their informed consent. Fifty were randomised to the active treatment and 50 to placebo. Seven patients, three in the Vitamin C group and four in the placebo group, were lost to follow-up and did not complete the treatment period. Two patients in the active group showed protocol deviations (age under 18 years and HIV-positive, respectively). The two groups resulted comparable for demographics, history and baseline clinical picture. A cluster analysis of the four main symptoms showed a statistically significant difference between the active group and the placebo group; significantly more patients were still affected by non-specific vaginitis after placebo (35.7%) compared to patients treated with Vitamin C tablets (14.0%). The meaningful secondary variable, referring to the microscopic examination of vaginal smear, supported the trend for efficacy in the Vitamin C treated group. The clue cells disappeared in 79% of patients treated with the drug and in 53% of patients on placebo. Similarly, bacteria disappeared in 77 and 54%, respectively, while lactobacilli reappeared in 79.1 and 53.3%, respectively. Vaginal pH values decreased

  12. Comparative study of titrated oral misoprostol solution and vaginal dinoprostone for labor induction at term pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu; Yang, Aijun; Ma, Qingyong; Li, Xuelan; Qin, Li; He, Tongqiang

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate effectiveness and safety of titrated oral misoprostol solution (OMS) in comparison with vaginal dinoprostone for cervix ripening and labor induction in term pregnant women. A multicenter randomized controlled trial of women with term singleton pregnancy with indications for labor induction; 481 participants were allocated to receive titrated OMS with different doses by hourly administration according to the procedure or insert vaginal dinoprostone for cervix ripening and labor induction to compare maternal outcomes including indication of labor induction, mode of outcome of delivery, maternal morbidity, and neonatal outcomes between two groups for evaluating the efficacy and safety of titrated oral misoprostol induction. Proportion of delivery within 12 h of titrated oral misoprostol is significantly less than vaginal dinoprostone (p = 0.03), but no difference of total vaginal delivery rate (p = 0.93); the mean time of first treatment to vaginal delivery was longer in OMS group (21.3 ± 14.5 h) compared with the vaginal dinoprostone group (15.7 ± 9.6 h). Although the proportion of cesarean section between the two groups showed no statistically significant difference, OMS group showed significantly lower frequency of uterine hyperstimulation, hypertonus, partus precipitatus and non-reassuring fetal heart rate than dinoprostone group. Neonatal outcomes were similar evaluating from Apgar score and NICU admission. Our study also showed that labor induction of women with cervix Bishop score ≤3 needed increased dosage of misoprostol solution. Titrated OMS is as effective as vaginal dinoprostone in labor induction for term pregnant women, with safer effect for its lower rate of adverse effect for women.

  13. Approaches to studying and manipulating the enteric microbiome to improve autism symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Richard E.; Slattery, John; MacFabe, Derrick F.; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Parker, William; Rodakis, John; Adams, James B.; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Bolte, Ellen; Kahler, Stephen; Jennings, Jana; James, Jill; Cerniglia, Carl E.; Midtvedt, Tore

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing body of scientific evidence that the health of the microbiome (the trillions of microbes that inhabit the human host) plays an important role in maintaining the health of the host and that disruptions in the microbiome may play a role in certain disease processes. An increasing number of research studies have provided evidence that the composition of the gut (enteric) microbiome (GM) in at least a subset of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) deviates from what is usually observed in typically developing individuals. There are several lines of research that suggest that specific changes in the GM could be causative or highly associated with driving core and associated ASD symptoms, pathology, and comorbidities which include gastrointestinal symptoms, although it is also a possibility that these changes, in whole or in part, could be a consequence of underlying pathophysiological features associated with ASD. However, if the GM truly plays a causative role in ASD, then the manipulation of the GM could potentially be leveraged as a therapeutic approach to improve ASD symptoms and/or comorbidities, including gastrointestinal symptoms. One approach to investigating this possibility in greater detail includes a highly controlled clinical trial in which the GM is systematically manipulated to determine its significance in individuals with ASD. To outline the important issues that would be required to design such a study, a group of clinicians, research scientists, and parents of children with ASD participated in an interdisciplinary daylong workshop as an extension of the 1st International Symposium on the Microbiome in Health and Disease with a Special Focus on Autism (www.microbiome-autism.com). The group considered several aspects of designing clinical studies, including clinical trial design, treatments that could potentially be used in a clinical trial, appropriate ASD participants for the clinical trial, behavioral and cognitive

  14. Vaginal microbial communities from synchronized heifers and cows with reproductive disorders.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Moreno, C; Fontana, C; Cocconcelli, P S; Callegari, M L; Otero, M C

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate changes in the resident microbial population in the cranial vaginal mucosa induced by a progesterone-releasing intravaginal device (PRID) compared to the vaginal microbiota of cows with reproductive disorders. Vaginal discharge was evaluated by clinical examination and a Vaginitis Diagnosis Score was performed by exfoliative cytology. All samples classified as positive and some classified as negative by clinical evaluation were later diagnosed as positive for vaginitis by cytological analysis. Bacterial diversity profiles were performed by PCR-DGGE and clustered according to the reproductive health status of the specimens, revealing a correspondence between the structures of the communities in the vagina and the clinical profile. Representative bands from each group were sequenced and identified as Ruminococcus sp., Dialister sp., Escherichia sp./Shigella sp., Virgibacillus sp., Campylobacter sp., Helcoccoccus sp., Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus sp., Actinopolymorpha sp., Exiguobacterium sp., Haemophilus sp./Histophilus sp., Aeribacillus sp., Porphyromonas sp., Lactobacillus sp. and Clostridium sp. Our results contribute to the knowledge of the vaginal microbiome in synchronized heifers showing positive or negative clinical vaginitis. This study contributes to the understanding of a dynamic vaginal colonization by bacterial consortiums during the synchronization with a widely used PRID protocol. Also, the results reveal the presence of well-known metritis-related pathogens as well as emerging uterine opportunistic pathogens. The provided information will allow to carry out further studies to elucidate functional roles of these native micro-organisms in the bovine reproductive tract. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Vaginal toxic shock reaction triggering desquamative inflammatory vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Nigel; Edlind, Thomas D; Schlievert, Patrick M; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to report 2 cases of desquamative inflammatory vaginitis associated with toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1)-producing Staphylococcus aureus strains. Case report of 2 patients, 1 with an acute and 1 with a chronic presentation, diagnosed with desquamative inflammatory vaginitis on the basis of clinical findings and wet mount microscopy. Pretreatment and posttreatment vaginal bacterial and yeast cultures were obtained. Pretreatment vaginal bacterial cultures from both patients grew TSST-1-producing S. aureus. Subsequent vaginal bacterial culture results after oral antibiotic therapy were negative. Desquamative inflammatory vaginitis may be triggered through TSST-1-mediated vaginal toxic shock reaction.

  16. The most bothersome symptom of vaginal atrophy: Evidence from the observational AGATA study.

    PubMed

    Palma, Federica; Xholli, Anjeza; Cagnacci, Angelo

    2018-02-01

    Vaginal atrophy (VA) is a chronic medical condition. It is managed unsatisfactorily, despite its high prevalence and negative impact on female quality of life. In order to meet their needs, it would be useful to know what women perceive to be the most bothersome symptom (MBS) of VA. Cross-sectional, multicenter study of 913 postmenopausal women consulting 22 gynecological outpatient services. Prevalence of the MBS perceived by postmenopausal women of different age and vaginal condition. Vaginal dryness was the most prevalent MBS (54.4%), followed by dyspareunia (17.6%), itching (7.8%), dysuria (5.9%) and burning (2.0%). The prevalence of vaginal dryness as the MBS increased with years since menopause, while that of itching, dysuria and burning remained approximately constant over time. The prevalence of dyspareunia as the MBS was 26.2% in the first 6 years after menopause and declined thereafter, to 8.8%. Among all postmenopausal women vaginal dryness per se, independent of dyspareunia, is the most commonly reported MBS. In each woman, the identification of the MBS may help to define more appropriate VA management. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Safety Study of an Antimicrobial Peptide Lactocin 160, Produced by the Vaginal Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    PubMed Central

    Dover, Sara E.; Aroutcheva, Alla A.; Faro, S.; Chikindas, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the safety of the antimicrobial peptide, lactocin 160. Methods. Lactocin 160, a product of vaginal probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus 160 was evaluated for toxicity and irritation. An in vitro human organotypic vaginal-ectocervical tissue model (EpiVaginal) was employed for the safety testing by determining the exposure time to reduce tissue viability to 50% (ET-50). Hemolytic activity of lactocin160 was tested using 8% of human erythrocyte suspension. Susceptibility of lactobacilli to lactocin160 was also studied. Rabbit vaginal irritation (RVI) model was used for an in vivo safety evaluation. Results. The ET-50 value was 17.5 hours for lactocin 160 (4.9 hours for nonoxynol 9, N9). Hemolytic activity of lactocin 160 was 8.2% (N9 caused total hemolysis). Lactobacilli resisted to high concentrations of peptide preparation. The RVI model revealed slight vaginal irritation. An average irritation index grade was evaluated as “none.” Conclusions. Lactocin 160 showed minimal irritation and has a good potential for intravaginal application. PMID:18273406

  18. The use of supersaturation for the vaginal application of microbicides: a case study with dapivirine.

    PubMed

    Grammen, Carolien; Plum, Jakob; Van Den Brande, Jeroen; Darville, Nicolas; Augustyns, Koen; Augustijns, Patrick; Brouwers, Joachim

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential of supersaturation for the formulation of the poorly water-soluble microbicide dapivirine (DPV) in an aqueous vaginal gel in order to enhance its vaginal tissue uptake. Different excipients such as hydroxypropylmethylcellulose, polyethylene glycol 1000, and cyclodextrins were evaluated for their ability to inhibit precipitation of supersaturated DPV in the formulation vehicle as such as well as in biorelevant media. In vitro permeation assessment across HEC-1A cell layers demonstrated an enhanced DPV flux from supersaturated gels compared with suspension gels. The best performing supersaturated gel containing 500 μM DPV (supersaturation degree of 4) in the presence of sulfobutyl ether-beta-cyclodextrin (2.5%) appeared to be stable for at least 3 months. In addition, the gel generated a significant increase in vaginal drug uptake in rabbits as compared with suspension gels. We conclude that supersaturation is a possible strategy to enhance the vaginal concentration of hydrophobic microbicides, thereby increasing permeation into the vaginal submucosa. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  19. A Systems Biology Approach Investigating the Effect of Probiotics on the Vaginal Microbiome and Host Responses in a Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of Post-Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Bisanz, Jordan E.; Seney, Shannon; McMillan, Amy; Vongsa, Rebecca; Koenig, David; Wong, LungFai; Dvoracek, Barbara; Gloor, Gregory B.; Sumarah, Mark; Ford, Brenda; Herman, Dorli; Burton, Jeremy P.; Reid, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    A lactobacilli dominated microbiota in most pre and post-menopausal women is an indicator of vaginal health. The objective of this double blinded, placebo-controlled crossover study was to evaluate in 14 post-menopausal women with an intermediate Nugent score, the effect of 3 days of vaginal administration of probiotic L. rhamnosus GR-1 and L. reuteri RC-14 (2.5×109 CFU each) on the microbiota and host response. The probiotic treatment did not result in an improved Nugent score when compared to when placebo. Analysis using 16S rRNA sequencing and metabolomics profiling revealed that the relative abundance of Lactobacillus was increased following probiotic administration as compared to placebo, which was weakly associated with an increase in lactate levels. A decrease in Atopobium was also observed. Analysis of host responses by microarray showed the probiotics had an immune-modulatory response including effects on pattern recognition receptors such as TLR2 while also affecting epithelial barrier function. This is the first study to use an interactomic approach for the study of vaginal probiotic administration in post-menopausal women. It shows that in some cases multifaceted approaches are required to detect the subtle molecular changes induced by the host to instillation of probiotic strains. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02139839 PMID:25127240

  20. A Longitudinal Study of the Feline Faecal Microbiome Identifies Changes into Early Adulthood Irrespective of Sexual Development

    PubMed Central

    Deusch, Oliver; O’Flynn, Ciaran; Colyer, Alison; Swanson, Kelly S.; Allaway, David; Morris, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    Companion animals provide an excellent model for studies of the gut microbiome because potential confounders such as diet and environment can be more readily controlled for than in humans. Additionally, domestic cats and dogs are typically neutered early in life, enabling an investigation into the potential effect of sex hormones on the microbiome. In a longitudinal study to investigate the potential effects of neutering, neutering age and gender on the gut microbiome during growth, the faeces of kittens (16 male, 14 female) were sampled at 18, 30 and 42 weeks of age. DNA was shotgun sequenced on the Illumina platform and sequence reads were annotated for taxonomy and function by comparison to a database of protein coding genes. In a statistical analysis of diversity, taxonomy and functional potential of the microbiomes, age was identified as the only factor with significant associations. No significant effects were detected for gender, neutering, or age when neutered (19 or 31 weeks). At 18 weeks of age the microbiome was dominated by the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium (35% and 20% average abundance). Structural and functional diversity was significantly increased by week 30 but there was no further significant increase. At 42 weeks of age the most abundant genera were Bacteroides (16%), Prevotella (14%) and Megasphaera (8%). Significant differences in functional potential included an enrichment for genes in energy metabolism (carbon metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation) and depletion in cell motility (flagella and chemotaxis). We conclude that the feline faecal microbiome is predominantly determined by age when diet and environment are controlled for. We suggest this finding may also be informative for studies of the human microbiome, where control over such factors is usually limited. PMID:26659594

  1. Microbiological/clinical characteristics and validation of topical therapy with kanamycin in aerobic vaginitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tempera, G; Bonfiglio, G; Cammarata, E; Corsello, S; Cianci, A

    2004-07-01

    The term 'aerobic vaginitis' defines a 'new' vaginal pathology that is neither classifiable as specific vaginitis nor as bacterial vaginosis. We studied a sample of 30 women with a clinical and microbiological diagnosis of aerobic vaginitis and compared the efficacy and tolerability of kanamycin and meclocycline, two products commercially available in Italy in the form of vaginal pessaries. In chronological order of enrollment, the patients were alternately treated with kanamycin or meclocycline; the dose of administration in both groups was of one pessary per day for 6 days. The evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy was carried out both at the first check-up (7th-8th day) and at a second check-up (13th-16th day). At the first follow-up carried out immediately at the end of therapy, the percentage of normalisation of clinical signs and symptoms was increased independently of the type of treatment in the case of moderate grade aerobic vaginitis, while kanamycin was produced a better effect in the group with severe aerobic vaginitis. Furthermore, at the second follow-up, a direct correlation with recovery of vaginal homeostasis was demonstrated by the normalisation of the vaginal pH and by the presence of lactobacilli, only in kanamycin treated group. In conclusion, our results showed the validity of the treatment with kanamycin intravaginally in this recently recognised disease.

  2. Vaginal disorders.

    PubMed

    Soderberg, S F

    1986-05-01

    Chronic vaginitis is the most common vaginal disorder. Dogs with vaginitis show no signs of systemic illness but often lick at the vulva and have purulent or hemorrhagic vaginal discharges. Vaginitis is most commonly secondary to a noninfectious inciting factor such as congenital vaginal anomalies, clitoral hypertrophy, foreign bodies, trauma to the vaginal mucosa, or vaginal tumors. Inspection of the caudal vagina and vestibule both visually and digitally will often reveal the source of vaginal irritation. Vaginal cytology is used to establish the stage of the estrous cycle as well as distinguish uterine from vaginal sources of discharge. Vaginal cultures are used to establish the predominant offending organism associated with vaginal discharges and may be used as a guide for selection of a therapeutic agent. Vaginitis is best managed by removing the inciting cause and treating the area locally with antiseptic douches. Congenital malformations at the vestibulovaginal or vestibulovulvar junction may prevent normal intromission. Affected bitches may be reluctant to breed naturally because of pain. Such defects are detected best by digital examination. Congenital vaginal defects may be corrected by digital or surgical means. Prolapse of tissue through the lips of the vulva may be caused by clitoral hypertrophy, vaginal hyperplasia, or vaginal tumors. Enlargement of clitoral tissue is the result of endogenous or exogenous sources of androgens. Treatment of this condition includes removal of the androgen source and/or surgical removal of clitoral tissue. Vaginal hyperplasia is detected during proestrus or estrus of young bitches. Hyperplastic tissue will regress during diestrus. Tissue that is excessively traumatized and/or prolapse of the entire vaginal circumference may be removed surgically. Ovariohysterectomy may be used to prevent recurrence. Vaginal tumors are detected most often in older intact bitches. Such tumors are generally of smooth muscle or fibrous

  3. Ultrasonography in Detection of Vaginal Foreign Bodies in Girls: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuzhen; Sun, Liying; Ye, Jingjing; Li, Xiaoying; Tao, Ran

    2017-12-01

    In this study we investigated the sonographic features of vaginal foreign bodies in girls and the diagnostic role of combined transperineal and transabdominal ultrasonography in the detection of vaginal foreign bodies in this population. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, INTERVENTIONS, AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A retrospective review of the records of 249 girls seen in the outpatient pediatric and adolescent gynecology clinic of our hospital and referred to our department for sonographic evaluation of suspected vaginal foreign bodies between 2013 and 2016 was performed. All patients were transperineally and transabdominally scanned using an ultrasound machine with 3-MHz and 7.5-MHz transducers. The sonographic features of the detected foreign bodies were recorded and reported. All patients also underwent pelvic radiography. The presence of foreign bodies was confirmed using vaginoscopy. Two hundred forty-nine patients were included in this study, and vaginal foreign bodies were detected in 181 patients. Vaginal foreign bodies often present in girls aged from 2 to 12 years old. The most common vaginal foreign bodies were toilet paper, beads, small parts of toys, cap of water color brush, and crayons. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of transperineal/transabdominal sonography in the diagnosis of vaginal foreign bodies were 81%, 53%, 82%, and 51%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of transabdominal sonography were 33%, 49%, 63%, and 21%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of transperineal sonography were 64%, 49%, 77%, and 33%, respectively. Abnormal findings were detected using x-ray in only 43 of the 181 cases (23.7%). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of x-ray were 24%, 91%, 88%, and 31%, respectively. The size of the foreign bodies ranged from 2 mm to 35 mm. For foreign

  4. [Study on vaginal production of human defensins and the correlated pathogenetic factors of vulvovaginal candidiasis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; DI, Wen; Liao, Qin-ping; Liu, Zhao-hui; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Hui-ying; Zhang, Dai; Geng, Li; Fan, Shang-rong; Hu, Li-na

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the correlated pathogenetic factors and vaginal local immunity in vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). A case control study was conducted to compare VVC group (60 cases) with normal group (60 cases). All of the women filled up the specific questionnaires. Routine examination, pH test and bacterial culture were done on the vaginal discharge. Cytokines of the vaginal lavage were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. (1) Outcomes of the questionnaires: there was no significant difference between the two groups in educational background, knowledge of gynecologic infection, history of gynecologic infection, hygienic habit, sex life, or use of medicine (P > 0.05). The incidence of chronic cervicitis in normal group (43%, 26/60) was higher than in VVC group (22%, 13/60; P < 0.05). (2) There was no difference in vaginal pH between the two groups (P > 0.05). (3) Detection rate of candida albicans by vaginal discharge routine examination was 72% (43/60). (4) The concentrations of interleukin (IL) 2, and IL-4 in vaginal lavage did not show significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05), but the concentrations of human defensin 5, human beta-defensin (HBD) 1, and HBD2 in VVC group [(0.94 +/- 0.44) mg/L, (3.1 +/- 0.4) microg/L, (10 +/- 6) microg/L] were higher than normal group (P < 0.05). VVC is a common vulvovaginitis. There is no significant correlation between the incidence of VVC and educational background, knowledge of gynecologic infection, history of gynecologic infection, hygienic habit, sex life, or use of medicine in the child-bearing period. Human defensin may be closely correlated with the pathogenesis of VVC.

  5. Can Plant Microbiome Studies Lead to Effective Biocontrol of Plant Diseases?

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jeffrey G

    2017-03-01

    In this review, the wisdom and efficacy of studies seeking disease attenuating microbes and microbiomes only in healthy plant communities is questioned and an alternative view is posited, namely that success in biocontrol of crop diseases may also come from studies of microbiota, or at least individual species isolates, associated with diseased plants. In support of this view, I summarize the current extensive knowledge of the biology behind what is probably the most successful biocontrol of a plant disease, namely the biocontrol of crown gall of stone fruit using non-pathogenic Rhizobium rhizogenes K84, in which the biocontrol agent itself came from a diseased plant.

  6. BMPOS: a Flexible and User-Friendly Tool Sets for Microbiome Studies.

    PubMed

    Pylro, Victor S; Morais, Daniel K; de Oliveira, Francislon S; Dos Santos, Fausto G; Lemos, Leandro N; Oliveira, Guilherme; Roesch, Luiz F W

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in science and technology are leading to a revision and re-orientation of methodologies, addressing old and current issues under a new perspective. Advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) are allowing comparative analysis of the abundance and diversity of whole microbial communities, generating a large amount of data and findings at a systems level. The current limitation for biologists has been the increasing demand for computational power and training required for processing of NGS data. Here, we describe the deployment of the Brazilian Microbiome Project Operating System (BMPOS), a flexible and user-friendly Linux distribution dedicated to microbiome studies. The Brazilian Microbiome Project (BMP) has developed data analyses pipelines for metagenomic studies (phylogenetic marker genes), conducted using the two main high-throughput sequencing platforms (Ion Torrent and Illumina MiSeq). The BMPOS is freely available and possesses the entire requirement of bioinformatics packages and databases to perform all the pipelines suggested by the BMP team. The BMPOS may be used as a bootable live USB stick or installed in any computer with at least 1 GHz CPU and 512 MB RAM, independent of the operating system previously installed. The BMPOS has proved to be effective for sequences processing, sequences clustering, alignment, taxonomic annotation, statistical analysis, and plotting of metagenomic data. The BMPOS has been used during several metagenomic analyses courses, being valuable as a tool for training, and an excellent starting point to anyone interested in performing metagenomic studies. The BMPOS and its documentation are available at http://www.brmicrobiome.org .

  7. Abnormal vaginal microbiota may be associated with poor reproductive outcomes: a prospective study in IVF patients.

    PubMed

    Haahr, T; Jensen, J S; Thomsen, L; Duus, L; Rygaard, K; Humaidan, P

    2016-04-01

    What is the diagnostic performance of qPCR assays compared with Nugent scoring for abnormal vaginal microbiota and for predicting the success rate of IVF treatment? The vaginal microbiota of IVF patients can be characterized with qPCR tests which may be promising tools for diagnosing abnormal vaginal microbiota and for prediction of clinical pregnancy in IVF treatment. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common genital disorder with a prevalence of approximately 19% in the infertile population. BV is often sub-clinical with a change of the vaginal microbiota from being Lactobacillus spp. dominated to a more heterogeneous environment with anaerobic bacteria, such as Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae. Few studies have been conducted in infertile women, and some have suggested a negative impact on fecundity in the presence of BV. A cohort of 130 infertile patients, 90% Caucasians, attending two Danish fertility clinics for in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment from April 2014-December 2014 were prospectively enrolled in the trial. Vaginal swabs from IVF patients were obtained from the posterior fornix. Gram stained slides were assessed according to Nugent's criteria. PCR primers were specific for four common Lactobacillus spp., G. vaginalis and A. vaginae. Threshold levels were established using ROC curve analysis. The prevalence of BV defined by Nugent score was 21% (27/130), whereas the prevalence of an abnormal vaginal microbiota was 28% (36/130) defined by qPCR with high concentrations of Gardnerella vaginalis and/or Atopobium vaginae. The qPCR diagnostic approach had a sensitivity and specificity of respectively 93% and 93% for Nugent-defined BV. Furthermore, qPCR enabled the stratification of Nugent intermediate flora. Eighty-four patients completed IVF treatment. The overall clinical pregnancy rate was 35% (29/84). Interestingly, only 9% (2/22) with qPCR defined abnormal vaginal microbiota obtained a clinical pregnancy (P = 0.004). Although a total of 130

  8. Association between cigarette smoking and the vaginal microbiota: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brotman, Rebecca M; He, Xin; Gajer, Pawel; Fadrosh, Doug; Sharma, Eva; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Ravel, Jacques; Glover, Elbert D; Rath, Jessica M

    2014-08-28

    Smoking has been identified in observational studies as a risk factor for bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined in part by decimation of Lactobacillus spp. The anti-estrogenic effect of smoking and trace amounts of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) may predispose women to BV. BPDE increases bacteriophage induction in Lactobacillus spp. and is found in the vaginal secretions of smokers. We compared the vaginal microbiota between smokers and non-smokers and followed microbiota changes in a smoking cessation pilot study. In 2010-2011, 20 smokers and 20 non-smokers were recruited to a cross-sectional study (Phase A) and 9 smokers were enrolled and followed for a 12-week smoking cessation program (Phase B). Phase B included weekly behavioral counseling and nicotine patches to encourage smoking cessation. In both phases, participants self-collected mid-vaginal swabs (daily, Phase B) and completed behavioral surveys. Vaginal bacterial composition was characterized by pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA genes (V1-V3 regions). Vaginal smears were assigned Nugent Gram stain scores. Smoking status was evaluated (weekly, Phase B) using the semi-quantitative NicAlert® saliva cotinine test and carbon monoxide (CO) exhalation. In phase A, there was a significant trend for increasing saliva cotinine and CO exhalation with elevated Nugent scores (P value <0.005). Vaginal microbiota clustered into three community state types (CSTs); two dominated by Lactobacillus (L. iners, L. crispatus), and one lacking significant numbers of Lactobacillus spp. and characterized by anaerobes (termed CST-IV). Women who were observed in the low-Lactobacillus CST-IV state were 25-fold more likely to be smokers than those dominated by L. crispatus (aOR: 25.61, 95 % CI: 1.03-636.61). Four women completed Phase B. One of three who entered smoking cessation with high Nugent scores demonstrated a switch from CST-IV to a L.iners-dominated profile with a concomitant drop in Nugent scores which

  9. An Adhesive Patch-Based Skin Biopsy Device for Molecular Diagnostics and Skin Microbiome Studies.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zuxu; Moy, Ronald; Allen, Talisha; Jansen, Burkhard

    2017-10-01

    A number of diagnoses in clinical dermatology are currently histopathologically confirmed and this image recognition-based confirmation generally requires surgical biopsies. The increasing ability of molecular pathology to corroborate or correct a clinical diagnosis based on objective gene expression, mutation analysis, or molecular microbiome data is on the horizon and would be further supported by a tool or procedure to collect samples non-invasively. This study characterizes such a tool in form of a 'bladeless' adhesive patch-based skin biopsy device. The performance of this device was evaluated through a variety of complementary technologies including assessment of sample biomass, electron microscopy demonstrating the harvesting of layers of epidermal tissue, and isolation of RNA and DNA from epidermal skin samples. Samples were obtained by application of adhesive patches to the anatomical area of interest. Biomass assessment demonstrated collection of approximately 0.3mg of skin tissue per adhesive patch and electron microscopy confirmed the nature of the harvested epidermal skin tissue. The obtained tissue samples are stored in a stable fashion on adhesive patches over a wide range of temperatures (-80oC to +60oC) and for extended periods of time (7 days or more). Total human RNA, human genomic DNA and microbiome DNA yields were 23.35 + 15.75ng, 27.72 + 20.71ng and 576.2 + 376.8pg, respectively, in skin samples obtained from combining 4 full patches collected non-invasively from the forehead of healthy volunteers. The adhesive patch skin sampling procedure is well tolerated and provides robust means to obtain skin tissue, RNA, DNA, and microbiome samples without involving surgical biopsies. The non-invasively obtained skin samples can be shipped cost effectively at ambient temperature by mail or standard courier service, and are suitable for a variety of molecular analyses of the skin microbiome as well as of keratinocytes, T cells, dendritic cells

  10. The fact and the fiction: A prospective study of internet forum discussions on vaginal breech birth.

    PubMed

    Petrovska, Karolina; Sheehan, Athena; Homer, Caroline S E

    2017-04-01

    Women with a breech baby late in pregnancy may use the internet to gather information to assist in decision-making for birth. The aim of this study was to examine how women use English language internet discussion forums to find out information about vaginal breech birth and to increase understanding of how vaginal breech birth is perceived among women. A descriptive qualitative study of internet discussion forums was undertaken. Google alerts were created with the search terms "breech birth" and "breech". Alerts were collected for a one-year period (January 2013-December 2013). The content of forum discussions was analysed using thematic analysis. A total of 50 forum discussions containing 382 comments were collected. Themes that arose from the data were: Testing the waters-which way should I go?; Losing hope for the chance of a normal birth; Seeking support for options-who will listen to me?; Considering vaginal breech birth-a risky choice?; Staying on the 'safe side'-caesarean section as a guarantee; Exploring the positive potential for vaginal breech birth. Women search online for information about vaginal breech birth in an attempt to come to a place in their decision-making where they feel comfortable with their birth plan. This study highlights the need for clinicians to provide comprehensive, unbiased information on the risks and benefits of all options for breech birth to facilitate informed decision-making for the woman. This will contribute to improving the woman's confidence in distinguishing between "the fact and the fiction" of breech birth discussions online. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A cross cultural study of vaginal practices and sexuality: implications for sexual health.

    PubMed

    Martin Hilber, Adriane; Hull, Terence H; Preston-Whyte, Eleanor; Bagnol, Brigitte; Smit, Jenni; Wacharasin, Chintana; Widyantoro, Ninuk

    2010-02-01

    Between 2005 and 2006, we investigated vaginal practices in Yogyakarta, Indonesia; Tete, Mozambique; KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; and Bangkok and Chonburi, Thailand. We sought to understand women's practices, their motivations for use and the role vaginal practices play in women's health, sexuality and sense of wellbeing. The study was carried out among adult women and men who were identified as using, having knowledge or being involved in trade in products. Further contacts were made using snowball sampling. Across the sites, individual interviews were conducted with 229 people and 265 others participated in focus group discussions. We found that women in all four countries have a variety of reasons for carrying out vaginal practices whose aim is to not simply 'dry' the vagina but rather decrease moisture that may have other associated meanings, and that they are exclusively "intravaginal" in operation. Practices, products and frequency vary. Motivations generally relate to personal hygiene, genital health or sexuality. Hygiene practices involve external washing and intravaginal cleansing or douching and ingestion of substances. Health practices include intravaginal cleansing, traditional cutting, insertion of herbal preparations, and application of substances to soothe irritated vaginal tissue. Practices related to sexuality can involve any of these practices with specific products that warm, dry, and/or tighten the vagina to increase pleasure for the man and sometimes for the woman. Hygiene and health are expressions of femininity connected to sexuality even if not always explicitly expressed as such. We found their effects may have unexpected and even undesired consequences. This study demonstrates that women in the four countries actively use a variety of practices to achieve a desired vaginal state. The results provide the basis for a classification framework that can be used for future study of this complex topic. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  12. Comparison of the vaginal microbiota diversity of women with and without human papillomavirus infection: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weijiao; Weng, Jinlong; Gao, Yunong; Chen, Xiaochi

    2013-06-10

    The female genital tract is an important bacterial habitat of the human body, and vaginal microbiota plays a crucial role in vaginal health. The alteration of vaginal microbiota affects millions of women annually, and is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes, including human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, previous studies have primarily focused on the association between bacterial vaginosis and HPV infection. Little is known about the composition of vaginal microbial communities involved in HPV acquisition. The present study was performed to investigate whether HPV infection was associated with the diversity and composition of vaginal microbiota. A total of 70 healthy women (32 HPV-negative and 38 HPV-positive) with normal cervical cytology were enrolled in this study. Culture-independent polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to measure the diversity and composition of vaginal microbiota of all subjects. We found significantly greater biological diversity in the vaginal microbiota of HPV-positive women (p < 0.001). Lactobacillus, including L. gallinarum, L. iners and L. gasseri, was the predominant genus and was detected in all women. No significant difference between HPV-positive and HPV-negative women was found for the frequency of detection of L. gallinarum (p = 0.775) or L. iners (p = 0.717), but L. gasseri was found at a significantly higher frequency in HPV-positive women (p = 0.005). Gardnerella vaginalis was also found at a significantly higher frequency in HPV-positive women (p = 0.031). Dendrograms revealed that vaginal microbiota from the two groups had different profiles. Our study is the first systematic evaluation of an association between vaginal microbiota and HPV infection, and we have demonstrated that compared with HPV-negative women, the bacterial diversity of HPV-positive women is more complex and the composition of vaginal microbiota is different.

  13. Vaginal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... bleeding is any vaginal bleeding unrelated to normal menstruation. This type of bleeding may include spotting of ... two or more hours. Normal vaginal bleeding, or menstruation, occurs every 21 to 35 days when the ...

  14. Vaginal Odor

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually don't cause vaginal odors. Neither do yeast infections. Generally, if you have vaginal odor without ... Avoid douching. All healthy vaginas contain bacteria and yeast. The normal acidity of your vagina keeps bacteria ...

  15. Clindamycin Vaginal

    MedlinePlus

    ... an infection caused by an overgrowth of harmful bacteria in the vagina). Clindamycin is in a class ... works by slowing or stopping the growth of bacteria. Vaginal clindamycin cannot be used to treat vaginal ...

  16. Vaginal Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have ... common problem is vaginitis, an inflammation of the vagina. Other problems that affect the vagina include sexually ...

  17. Vaginal cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... essential to determine what type of cyst or mass you may have. A mass or bulge of the vaginal wall may be ... to rule out vaginal cancer, especially if the mass appears to be solid. If the cyst is ...

  18. Oral Health and the Oral Microbiome in Pancreatic Cancer: An Overview of Epidemiological Studies.

    PubMed

    Bracci, Paige M

    The aim was to provide a cohesive overview of epidemiological studies of periodontal disease, oral microbiome profiles, and pancreatic cancer risk. A PubMed search of articles published in English through July 2017 with additional review of bibliographies of identified articles. Risk estimates for periodontal disease associated with pancreatic cancer consistently ranged from 1.5 to 2, aligning with a meta-analysis summary relative risk of 1.74. Analyses of antibodies to pathogenic and/or commensal oral bacteria in prediagnostic blood provided evidence that some oral bacteria and oral microbial diversity may be related to pancreatic cancer. Overall, the data present a plausible but complex relationship among pancreatic cancer, the oral microbiome, periodontal disease, and other risk factors that might be explained by systemic effects on immune and inflammatory processes. Larger comprehensive studies that examine serially collected epidemiological/clinical data and blood, tissue, and various microbial samples are needed to definitively determine how and whether oral health-related factors contribute to pancreatic cancer risk.

  19. Partial restoration of the microbiota of cesarean-born infants via vaginal microbial transfer.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Bello, Maria G; De Jesus-Laboy, Kassandra M; Shen, Nan; Cox, Laura M; Amir, Amnon; Gonzalez, Antonio; Bokulich, Nicholas A; Song, Se Jin; Hoashi, Marina; Rivera-Vinas, Juana I; Mendez, Keimari; Knight, Rob; Clemente, Jose C

    2016-03-01

    Exposure of newborns to the maternal vaginal microbiota is interrupted with cesarean birthing. Babies delivered by cesarean section (C-section) acquire a microbiota that differs from that of vaginally delivered infants, and C-section delivery has been associated with increased risk for immune and metabolic disorders. Here we conducted a pilot study in which infants delivered by C-section were exposed to maternal vaginal fluids at birth. Similarly to vaginally delivered babies, the gut, oral and skin bacterial communities of these newborns during the first 30 d of life was enriched in vaginal bacteria--which were underrepresented in unexposed C-section-delivered infants--and the microbiome similarity to those of vaginally delivered infants was greater in oral and skin samples than in anal samples. Although the long-term health consequences of restoring the microbiota of C-section-delivered infants remain unclear, our results demonstrate that vaginal microbes can be partially restored at birth in C-section-delivered babies.

  20. Clothing factors and vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, F E; Berg, A O; Bergman, J J

    1984-10-01

    Associations of clothing factors and vulvovaginal symptoms, signs, and microbiology were sought in 203 women seeking care at a university family medicine clinic. Clothing factors studied were use of panty hose, underwear for sleep, cotton lining panels, and pants vs skirts. Women wearing and not wearing panty hose had similar rates of vaginitis symptoms and signs, but yeast vaginitis was about three times more common among wearers. Relationships of other clothing factors to vaginitis were not found. Nonspecific vaginitis was not found to be related to clothing.

  1. Studying the Differences of Bacterial Metabolome and Microbiome in the Colon between Landrace and Meihua Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shijuan; Zhu, Cui; Yu, Ting; Huang, Wenjie; Huang, Jianfeng; Kong, Qian; Shi, Jingfang; Chen, Zhongjian; Liu, Qinjian; Wang, Shaolei; Jiang, Zongyong; Chen, Zhuang

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the microbiome and metabolome differences in the colon lumen from two pig breeds with different genetic backgrounds. Fourteen weaned piglets at 30 days of age, including seven Landrace piglets (a lean-type pig breed with a fast growth rate) and seven Meihua piglets (a fatty-type Chinese local pig breed with a slow growth rate), were fed the same diets for 35 days. Untargeted metabolomics analyses showed that a total of 401 metabolites differed between Landrace and Meihua. Seventy of these 401 metabolites were conclusively identified. Landrace accumulated more short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and secondary bile acids in the colon lumen. Moreover, expression of the SCFAs transporter (solute carrier family 5 member 8, SLC5A8) and receptor (G protein-coupled receptor 41, GPR41) in the colon mucosa was higher, while the bile acids receptor (farnesoid X receptor, FXR) had lower expression in Landrace compared to Meihua. The relative abundances of 8 genera and 16 species of bacteria differed significantly between Landrace and Meihua, and were closely related to the colonic concentrations of bile acids or SCFAs based on Pearson's correlation analysis. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that there were differences in the colonic microbiome and metabolome between Meihua and Landrace piglets, with the most profound disparity in production of SCFAs and secondary bile acids. PMID:28983290

  2. REPRODUCIBLE RESEARCH WORKFLOW IN R FOR THE ANALYSIS OF PERSONALIZED HUMAN MICROBIOME DATA.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Benjamin; Proctor, Diana; Relman, David; Fukuyama, Julia; Holmes, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a reproducible research workflow for amplicon-based microbiome studies in personalized medicine created using Bioconductor packages and the knitr markdown interface.We show that sometimes a multiplicity of choices and lack of consistent documentation at each stage of the sequential processing pipeline used for the analysis of microbiome data can lead to spurious results. We propose its replacement with reproducible and documented analysis using R packages dada2, knitr, and phyloseq. This workflow implements both key stages of amplicon analysis: the initial filtering and denoising steps needed to construct taxonomic feature tables from error-containing sequencing reads (dada2), and the exploratory and inferential analysis of those feature tables and associated sample metadata (phyloseq). This workow facilitates reproducible interrogation of the full set of choices required in microbiome studies. We present several examples in which we leverage existing packages for analysis in a way that allows easy sharing and modification by others, and give pointers to articles that depend on this reproducible workflow for the study of longitudinal and spatial series analyses of the vaginal microbiome in pregnancy and the oral microbiome in humans with healthy dentition and intra-oral tissues.

  3. Vaginal Microbiota in Pregnancy: Evaluation Based on Vaginal Flora, Birth Outcome, and Race.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Akila; Kumar, Ranjit; Cliver, Suzanne P; Zhi, Degui; Szychowski, Jeff M; Abramovici, Adi; Biggio, Joseph R; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Morrow, Casey; Edwards, Rodney K

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate vaginal microbiota differences by bacterial vaginosis (BV), birth timing, and race, and to estimate parameters to power future vaginal microbiome studies. Previously, vaginal swabs were collected at 21 to 25 weeks (stored at -80°C), and vaginal smears evaluated for BV (Nugent criteria). In a blinded fashion, 40 samples were selected, creating 8 equal-sized groups stratified by race (black/white), BV (present/absent), and birth timing (preterm/term). Samples were thawed, DNA extracted, and prepared. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers targeting the 16S rDNA V4 region was used to prepare an amplicon library. PCR products were sequenced and analyzed using quantitative insight into microbial ecology; taxonomy was assigned using ribosomal database program classifier (threshold 0.8) against the modified Greengenes database. After quality control, 97,720 sequences (mean) per sample, single-end 250 base-reads, were analyzed. BV samples had greater microbiota diversity (p < 0.05)-with BVAB1, Prevotella, and unclassified genus, Bifidobacteriaceae family (all p < 0.001) more abundant; there was minimal content of Gardnerella or Mobiluncus. Microbiota did not differ by race or birth timing, but there was an association between certain microbial clusters and preterm birth (p = 0.07). To evaluate this difference, 159 patients per group are needed. There are differences in the vaginal microbiota between patients with and without BV. Larger studies should assess the relationship between microbiota composition and preterm birth. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Vaginal Microbiota in Pregnancy: Evaluation Based on Vaginal Flora, Birth Outcome, and Race

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Akila; Kumar, Ranjit; Cliver, Suzanne P.; Zhi, Degui; Szychowski, Jeff M.; Abramovici, Adi; Biggio, Joseph R.; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Morrow, Casey; Edwards, Rodney K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to evaluate vaginal microbiota differences by bacterial vaginosis (BV), birth timing, and race, and to estimate parameters to power future vaginal microbiome studies. Methods Previously, vaginal swabs were collected at 21 to 25 weeks (stored at −80°C), and vaginal smears evaluated for BV (Nugent criteria). In a blinded fashion, 40 samples were selected, creating 8 equal-sized groups stratified by race (black/white), BV (present/absent), and birth timing (preterm/term). Samples were thawed, DNA extracted, and prepared. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers targeting the 16S rDNA V4 region was used to prepare an amplicon library. PCR products were sequenced and analyzed using quantitative insight into microbial ecology; taxonomy was assigned using ribosomal database program classifier (threshold 0.8) against the modified Greengenes database. Results After quality control, 97,720 sequences (mean) per sample, single-end 250 base-reads, were analyzed. BV samples had greater microbiota diversity (p < 0.05)—with BVAB1, Prevotella, and unclassified genus, Bifidobacteriaceae family (all p < 0.001) more abundant; there was minimal content of Gardnerella or Mobiluncus. Microbiota did not differ by race or birth timing, but there was an association between certain microbial clusters and preterm birth (p = 0.07). To evaluate this difference, 159 patients per group are needed. Conclusions There are differences in the vaginal microbiota between patients with and without BV. Larger studies should assess the relationship between microbiota composition and preterm birth. PMID:26479170

  5. The saliva microbiome of Pan and Homo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is increasingly recognized that the bacteria that live in and on the human body (the microbiome) can play an important role in health and disease. The composition of the microbiome is potentially influenced by both internal factors (such as phylogeny and host physiology) and external factors (such as diet and local environment), and interspecific comparisons can aid in understanding the importance of these factors. Results To gain insights into the relative importance of these factors on saliva microbiome diversity, we here analyze the saliva microbiomes of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) from two sanctuaries in Africa, and from human workers at each sanctuary. The saliva microbiomes of the two Pan species are more similar to one another, and the saliva microbiomes of the two human groups are more similar to one another, than are the saliva microbiomes of human workers and apes from the same sanctuary. We also looked for the existence of a core microbiome and find no evidence for a taxon-based core saliva microbiome for Homo or Pan. In addition, we studied the saliva microbiome from apes from the Leipzig Zoo, and found an extraordinary diversity in the zoo ape saliva microbiomes that is not found in the saliva microbiomes of the sanctuary animals. Conclusions The greater similarity of the saliva microbiomes of the two Pan species to one another, and of the two human groups to one another, are in accordance with both the phylogenetic relationships of the hosts as well as with host physiology. Moreover, the results from the zoo animals suggest that novel environments can have a large impact on the microbiome, and that microbiome analyses based on captive animals should be viewed with caution as they may not reflect the microbiome of animals in the wild. PMID:24025115

  6. [Evaluation of vaginal dysfunction in symptomatic and asymptomatic pregnant women by using the analysis of basic vaginal states (BVS) and its comparison with the conventional microbiological study].

    PubMed

    Touzon, María S; Losada, Mirta; Eliseht, Martha Cora; Menghi, Claudia; Gatta, Claudia; Santa Cruz, Gabriela; Malamud de Ruda Vega, Hilda; Vay, Carlos; Tatti, Silvio; Famiglietti, Angela; Perazzi, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Infections of the lower genital tract associated to maternal and perinatal complications frequently occur during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate vaginal dysfunction through the analysis of basic vaginal states (BVS) using the methodology of balance of the vaginal content (BAVACO) and to compare it with the microbiological study of candidiasis, trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis (BV). Pregnant patients (1238) were examined from 2010 to 2012. In asymptomatic (A) (n: 1046) and symptomatic pregnant women (S) (n: 192) BVS I was 59.5% and 26% of the patients, respectively. BVS II was observed in 19.7% of A and in 17.2% of S. BVS III was only detected in A in 0.4%. BVS IV was observed in 14.4% of A and in 38% of S. BVS V was detected in 6% of A and in 18.8% of S. Yeasts were associated to BVS I and II in 55.5% and 23.2% of A, respectively; and in 32.4% and 31% of S, respectively. Trichomonas were associated to BVS I in 50% of A, to IV in 44.4% of S and to V in 33.3% of S. BAVACO susceptibility to detect yeasts was 80.4% and 85.5% in A and S, respectively; 40% and 75% in A and S, respectively, to detect trichomonas and 100% in A and S to detect BV. BAVACO specificity was 100% for all pathogens in A and S. The study of BVS proved useful as a guide to evaluate vaginal dysfunction, regardless of symptomatology. Therefore, this study is recommended as prenatal control. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. General Information about Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Vaginal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Vaginal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  8. Preservation Methods Differ in Fecal Microbiome Stability, Affecting Suitability for Field Studies

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Amnon; Metcalf, Jessica L.; Amato, Katherine R.; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Humphrey, Greg

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immediate freezing at −20°C or below has been considered the gold standard for microbiome preservation, yet this approach is not feasible for many field studies, ranging from anthropology to wildlife conservation. Here we tested five methods for preserving human and dog fecal specimens for periods of up to 8 weeks, including such types of variation as freeze-thaw cycles and the high temperature fluctuations often encountered under field conditions. We found that three of the methods—95% ethanol, FTA cards, and the OMNIgene Gut kit—can preserve samples sufficiently well at ambient temperatures such that differences at 8 weeks are comparable to differences among technical replicates. However, even the worst methods, including those with no fixative, were able to reveal microbiome differences between species at 8 weeks and between individuals after a week, allowing meta-analyses of samples collected using various methods when the effect of interest is expected to be larger than interindividual variation (although use of a single method within a study is strongly recommended to reduce batch effects). Encouragingly for FTA cards, the differences caused by this method are systematic and can be detrended. As in other studies, we strongly caution against the use of 70% ethanol. The results, spanning 15 individuals and over 1,200 samples, provide our most comprehensive view to date of storage effects on stool and provide a paradigm for the future studies of other sample types that will be required to provide a global view of microbial diversity and its interaction among humans, animals, and the environment. IMPORTANCE Our study, spanning 15 individuals and over 1,200 samples, provides our most comprehensive view to date of storage and stabilization effects on stool. We tested five methods for preserving human and dog fecal specimens for periods of up to 8 weeks, including the types of variation often encountered under field conditions, such as freeze

  9. Preservation Methods Differ in Fecal Microbiome Stability, Affecting Suitability for Field Studies.

    PubMed

    Song, Se Jin; Amir, Amnon; Metcalf, Jessica L; Amato, Katherine R; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Humphrey, Greg; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Immediate freezing at -20°C or below has been considered the gold standard for microbiome preservation, yet this approach is not feasible for many field studies, ranging from anthropology to wildlife conservation. Here we tested five methods for preserving human and dog fecal specimens for periods of up to 8 weeks, including such types of variation as freeze-thaw cycles and the high temperature fluctuations often encountered under field conditions. We found that three of the methods-95% ethanol, FTA cards, and the OMNIgene Gut kit-can preserve samples sufficiently well at ambient temperatures such that differences at 8 weeks are comparable to differences among technical replicates. However, even the worst methods, including those with no fixative, were able to reveal microbiome differences between species at 8 weeks and between individuals after a week, allowing meta-analyses of samples collected using various methods when the effect of interest is expected to be larger than interindividual variation (although use of a single method within a study is strongly recommended to reduce batch effects). Encouragingly for FTA cards, the differences caused by this method are systematic and can be detrended. As in other studies, we strongly caution against the use of 70% ethanol. The results, spanning 15 individuals and over 1,200 samples, provide our most comprehensive view to date of storage effects on stool and provide a paradigm for the future studies of other sample types that will be required to provide a global view of microbial diversity and its interaction among humans, animals, and the environment. IMPORTANCE Our study, spanning 15 individuals and over 1,200 samples, provides our most comprehensive view to date of storage and stabilization effects on stool. We tested five methods for preserving human and dog fecal specimens for periods of up to 8 weeks, including the types of variation often encountered under field conditions, such as freeze-thaw cycles and

  10. The Airplane Cabin Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Howard; Hertzberg, Vicki Stover; Dupont, Chris; Espinoza, Josh L; Levy, Shawn; Nelson, Karen; Norris, Sharon

    2018-06-06

    Serving over three billion passengers annually, air travel serves as a conduit for infectious disease spread, including emerging infections and pandemics. Over two dozen cases of in-flight transmissions have been documented. To understand these risks, a characterization of the airplane cabin microbiome is necessary. Our study team collected 229 environmental samples on ten transcontinental US flights with subsequent 16S rRNA sequencing. We found that bacterial communities were largely derived from human skin and oral commensals, as well as environmental generalist bacteria. We identified clear signatures for air versus touch surface microbiome, but not for individual types of touch surfaces. We also found large flight-to-flight beta diversity variations with no distinguishing signatures of individual flights, rather a high between-flight diversity for all touch surfaces and particularly for air samples. There was no systematic pattern of microbial community change from pre- to post-flight. Our findings are similar to those of other recent studies of the microbiome of built environments. In summary, the airplane cabin microbiome has immense airplane to airplane variability. The vast majority of airplane-associated microbes are human commensals or non-pathogenic, and the results provide a baseline for non-crisis-level airplane microbiome conditions.

  11. Ultra-low-dose estriol and Lactobacillus acidophilus vaginal tablets (Gynoflor(®)) for vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal breast cancer patients on aromatase inhibitors: pharmacokinetic, safety, and efficacy phase I clinical study.

    PubMed

    Donders, Gilbert; Neven, Patrick; Moegele, Maximilian; Lintermans, Anneleen; Bellen, Gert; Prasauskas, Valdas; Grob, Philipp; Ortmann, Olaf; Buchholz, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    Phase I pharmacokinetic (PK) study assessed circulating estrogens in breast cancer (BC) patients on a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor (NSAI) with vaginal atrophy using vaginal ultra-low-dose 0.03 mg estriol (E3) and Lactobacillus combination vaginal tablets (Gynoflor(®)). 16 women on NSAI with severe vaginal atrophy applied a daily vaginal tablet of Gynoflor(®) for 28 days followed by a maintenance therapy of 3 tablets weekly for 8 weeks. Primary outcomes were serum concentrations and PK of E3, estradiol (E2), and estrone (E1) using highly sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Secondary outcomes were clinical measures for efficacy and side effects; microscopic changes in vaginal epithelium and microflora; and changes in serum FSH, LH, and sex hormone-binding globulin. Compared with baseline, serum E1 and E2 did not increase in any of the women at any time following vaginal application. Serum E3 transiently increased after the first application in 15 of 16 women, with a maximum of 168 pg/ml 2-3 h post-insertion. After 4 weeks, serum E3 was slightly increased in 8 women with a maximum of 44 pg/ml. The vaginal atrophy resolved or improved in all women. The product was well tolerated, and discontinuation of therapy was not observed. The low-dose 0.03 mg E3 and Lactobacillus acidophilus vaginal tablets application in postmenopausal BC patients during AI treatment suffering from vaginal atrophy lead to small and transient increases in serum E3, but not E1 or E2, and therefore can be considered as safe and efficacious for treatment of atrophic vaginitis in BC patients taking NSAIs.

  12. Vaginal douching and sexually transmitted infections among female sex workers: a cross-sectional study in three provinces in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Jiang, Ning; Yue, Xiaoli; Gong, Xiangdong

    2015-05-01

    Though vaginal douching is a common practice among female sex workers that could increase the risk of HIV and adverse reproductive health outcomes, it has drawn limited attention. From November 2010 to January 2011, a convenience sample of female sex workers was recruited in three cities in China. Face-to-face interviews were conducted to gather socio-demographic and behavioural information. Blood samples were collected for syphilis serological tests. Endo-cervical swabs were collected and tested for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis by polymerase chain reaction. A logistic regression model was used to determine factors associated with vaginal douching and the association between vaginal douching and sexually transmitted infection. A total of 1032 eligible female sex workers were enrolled. The overall prevalence of any sexually transmitted infection (syphilis, Chlamydia trachomatis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae) and vaginal douching with disinfectant were 23.4% and 23.1%, respectively. Factors independently associated with douching practice included study sites, venue types, ethnicity, having regular partner and sexually transmitted infection history. No significant association was found between vaginal douching and current sexually transmitted infection. Vaginal douching with disinfectant after sex with clients seemed to be a prevalent practice among female sex workers in China. Prevention programmes targeting female sex workers should incorporate components about the adverse health outcomes associated with vaginal douching. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. First trimester vaginal bleeding and adverse pregnancy outcomes among Chinese women: from a large cohort study in China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lu; Tao, Fangbiao; Hao, Jiahu; Su, Puyu; Liu, Fang; Xu, Rong

    2012-08-01

    To examine the effect of first trimester vaginal bleeding on adverse pregnancy outcomes including preterm delivery, low birth weight and small for gestational age. This is a prospective population-based cohort study. A questionnaire survey was conducted on 4342 singleton pregnancies by trained doctors. Binary logistic regression was used to estimate risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Vaginal bleeding occurred among 1050 pregnant women, the incidence of vaginal bleeding was 24.2%, 37.4% of whom didn't see a doctor, 62.6% of whom saw a doctor for vaginal bleeding. Binary logistic regression demonstrated that bleeding with seeing a doctor was significantly associated with preterm birth (RR 1.84, 95% CI 1.25-2.69) and bleeding without seeing a doctor was related to increased of low birth weight (RR 2.52, 95% CI 1.34-4.75) and was 1.97-fold increased of small for gestational age (RR 1.97, 95% CI 1.19-3.25). These results suggest that first trimester vaginal bleeding is an increased risk of low birth weight, preterm delivery and small for gestational age. Find ways to reduce the risk of vaginal bleeding and lower vaginal bleeding rate may be helpful to reduce the incidence of preterm birth, low birth weight and small for gestational age.

  14. Management of vaginal atrophy: a real mess. Results from the AGATA study.

    PubMed

    Palma, Federica; Xholli, Anjeza; Cagnacci, Angelo

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the management of vaginal atrophy (VA) in a population-based study. A sub-study of a cross-sectional multicenter study on 913 postmenopausal women. Management of VA was investigated on the 274 women referring having received a previous diagnosis of VA. Women had received, no therapy (9.8%), systemic hormones (9.2%), intra-vaginal estrogens (44.5%) or local non-hormonal (36.5%) therapy. There was heterogeneity of treatments. Local therapies were given in cycles, and used for a length of time ranging from 1 to 12 months. At the time of the investigation 59.5% of these women were not on treatment, either because following the physician's indication (31.1%) or because spontaneously withdrawing from treatment (68.9%). Reasons for withdrawing from therapy were insufficient symptom relief (46.6%), messiness (24.3%), difficulty in application (7.8%) and vaginal discharge (1.9%). At the time of investigation only 2.9% of treated women did not suffer from VA. This study underlines the presence of a great confusion about the therapy used for VA, along with patients' dissatisfaction with actual treatments. The emerging evidence is that in real world VA remains untreated.

  15. Common methods for fecal sample storage in field studies yield consistent signatures of individual identity in microbiome sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Blekhman, Ran; Tang, Karen; Archie, Elizabeth A; Barreiro, Luis B; Johnson, Zachary P; Wilson, Mark E; Kohn, Jordan; Yuan, Michael L; Gesquiere, Laurence; Grieneisen, Laura E; Tung, Jenny

    2016-08-16

    Field studies of wild vertebrates are frequently associated with extensive collections of banked fecal samples-unique resources for understanding ecological, behavioral, and phylogenetic effects on the gut microbiome. However, we do not understand whether sample storage methods confound the ability to investigate interindividual variation in gut microbiome profiles. Here, we extend previous work on storage methods for gut microbiome samples by comparing immediate freezing, the gold standard of preservation, to three methods commonly used in vertebrate field studies: lyophilization, storage in ethanol, and storage in RNAlater. We found that the signature of individual identity consistently outweighed storage effects: alpha diversity and beta diversity measures were significantly correlated across methods, and while samples often clustered by donor, they never clustered by storage method. Provided that all analyzed samples are stored the same way, banked fecal samples therefore appear highly suitable for investigating variation in gut microbiota. Our results open the door to a much-expanded perspective on variation in the gut microbiome across species and ecological contexts.

  16. Longitudinal profiling of the lung microbiome in the AERIS study demonstrates repeatability of bacterial and eosinophilic COPD exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Christophe; Clarke, Stuart C; Kim, Viktoriya L; Magid-Slav, Michal; Miller, Bruce E; Patel, Ruchi; Sathe, Ganesh; Simola, Daniel F; Sung, Ruby; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Tuck, Andrew C; Van Horn, Stephanie; Weynants, Vincent; Williams, Nicholas P; Devaster, Jeanne-Marie; Wilkinson, Tom M A

    2018-01-01

    Background Alterations in the composition of the lung microbiome associated with adverse clinical outcomes, known as dysbiosis, have been implicated with disease severity and exacerbations in COPD. Objective To characterise longitudinal changes in the lung microbiome in the AERIS study (Acute Exacerbation and Respiratory InfectionS in COPD) and their relationship with associated COPD outcomes. Methods We surveyed 584 sputum samples from 101 patients with COPD to analyse the lung microbiome at both stable and exacerbation time points over 1 year using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. We incorporated additional lung microbiology, blood markers and in-depth clinical assessments to classify COPD phenotypes. Results The stability of the lung microbiome over time was more likely to be decreased in exacerbations and within individuals with higher exacerbation frequencies. Analysis of exacerbation phenotypes using a Markov chain model revealed that bacterial and eosinophilic exacerbations were more likely to be repeated in subsequent exacerbations within a subject, whereas viral exacerbations were not more likely to be repeated. We also confirmed the association of bacterial genera, including Haemophilus and Moraxella, with disease severity, exacerbation events and bronchiectasis. Conclusions Subtypes of COPD have distinct bacterial compositions and stabilities over time. Some exacerbation subtypes have non-random probabilities of repeating those subtypes in the future. This study provides insights pertaining to the identification of bacterial targets in the lung and biomarkers to classify COPD subtypes and to determine appropriate treatments for the patient. Trial registration number Results, NCT01360398. PMID:29386298

  17. Newly developed vaginal atrophy symptoms II and vaginal pH: a better correlation in vaginal atrophy?

    PubMed

    Tuntiviriyapun, P; Panyakhamlerd, K; Triratanachat, S; Chatsuwan, T; Chaikittisilpa, S; Jaisamrarn, U; Taechakraichana, N

    2015-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation among symptoms, signs, and the number of lactobacilli in postmenopausal vaginal atrophy. The secondary objective was to develop a new parameter to improve the correlation. A cross-sectional descriptive study. Naturally postmenopausal women aged 45-70 years with at least one clinical symptom of vaginal atrophy of moderate to severe intensity were included in this study. All of the objective parameters (vaginal atrophy score, vaginal pH, the number of lactobacilli, vaginal maturation index, and vaginal maturation value) were evaluated and correlated with vaginal atrophy symptoms. A new parameter of vaginal atrophy, vaginal atrophy symptoms II, was developed and consists of the two most bothersome symptoms (vaginal dryness and dyspareunia). Vaginal atrophy symptoms II was analyzed for correlation with the objective parameters. A total of 132 naturally postmenopausal women were recruited for analysis. Vaginal pH was the only objective parameter found to have a weak correlation with vaginal atrophy symptoms (r = 0.273, p = 0.002). The newly developed vaginal atrophy symptoms II parameter showed moderate correlation with vaginal pH (r = 0.356, p < 0.001) and a weak correlation with the vaginal atrophy score (r = 0.230, p < 0.001). History of sexual intercourse within 3 months was associated with a better correlation between vaginal atrophy symptoms and the objective parameters. Vaginal pH was significantly correlated with vaginal atrophy symptoms. The newly developed vaginal atrophy symptoms II was associated with a better correlation. The vaginal atrophy symptoms II and vaginal pH may be better tools for clinical evaluation and future study of the vaginal ecosystem.

  18. Covert use, vaginal lubrication, and sexual pleasure: a qualitative study of urban U.S. Women in a vaginal microbicide clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Susie; Morrow, Kate M; Mantell, Joanne E; Rosen, Rochelle K; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Gai, Fang

    2010-06-01

    Using data from a U.S. clinical safety trial of tenofovir gel, a candidate microbicide, we explored the intersection of sexual pleasure and vaginal lubrication to understand whether and under what circumstances women would use a microbicide gel covertly with primary partners. This study question emerged from acceptability research in diverse settings showing that even though future microbicides are extolled as a disease prevention method that women could use without disclosing to their partners, many women assert they would inform their primary partner. Participants (N = 84), stratified by HIV-status and sexual activity (active vs. abstinent), applied the gel intra-vaginally for 14 days. At completion, quantitative acceptability data were obtained via questionnaire (N = 79) and qualitative data via small group discussions (N = 15 groups, 40 women). Quantitatively, 71% preferred a microbicide that could not be noticed by a sex partner and 86% experienced greater vaginal lubrication with daily use. Based on our analysis of the qualitative data, we suggest that women's perception that their primary partners would notice a microbicide gel is a more important reason for their caution regarding covert use than may previously have been recognized. Our findings also showed that women's assessment of the possibility of discreet, if not covert, use was strongly related to their perception of how a microbicide's added vaginal lubrication would influence their own and their partner's pleasure, as well as their partner's experience of his sexual performance. A microbicide that increases pleasure for both partners could potentially be used without engendering opposition from primary partners.

  19. Influences on vaginal birth after caesarean section: A qualitative study of Taiwanese women.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Man; McKellar, Lois; Pincombe, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Vaginal birth is a safe mode of birth for most women who have had a prior caesarean with a transverse incision. Despite the evidence, most Taiwanese women who have had a previous caesarean are rarely offered the opportunity to consider any possibility other than a repeat caesarean. This study explored factors affecting Taiwanese women's decisionmaking regarding vaginal birth after cesarean. Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behaviour provided the theoretical framework to underpin the study, which adopted an interpretive descriptive methodology. Sequential semi-structured interviews were conducted with 29 women who had a previous caesarean and were pregnant between 34 and 38 weeks gestation, ten women who attempted vaginal birth in the third to fifth day postpartum, and 25 women in the fourth week postpartum. Boyatzis' method of thematic analysis was used to identify themes and codes. This paper reports the findings of the prenatal interviews with 29 participants. The major factor influencing women's decision-making was to avoid negative outcomes for themselves and their babies. Three thematic codes describe influences on the women's decisions: 'past experience of childbirth', 'anticipating the next experience of normal birth' and 'contemplation on the process of childbirth'. Women who have had a previous caesarean section are prepared to have a vaginal birth but are not always supported to carry out this decision. Changing the models of antenatal care is recommended as a strategy to overcome this difficulty therefore empowering women to make a meaningful choice about VBAC after a CS. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence and predictors of urinary/anal incontinence after vaginal delivery: prospective study of Nigerian women.

    PubMed

    Obioha, Kingsley Chukwu; Ugwu, Emmanuel Onyebuchi; Obi, Samuel Nnamdi; Dim, Cyril Chukwudi; Oguanuo, Theophilus Chimezie

    2015-09-01

    Urinary and anal incontinence are major public health problems impacting on the quality of life of affected women, with resultant loss of self-esteem. Despite the anticipated magnitude of this public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa, there is paucity of data on the prevalence of urinary and/or anal incontinence after childbirth in the region. This study determined the prevalence and predictors of urinary and anal incontinence after vaginal delivery among women in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria. This was a longitudinal study of 230 consecutive parturients at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria. Eligible women were followed up immediately, 6 weeks, and 3 months postpartum to assess the development of urinary and/or anal incontinence using validated questionnaires. Overall, 28 women had urinary incontinence, giving a cumulative prevalence rate of 12.2 %. The cumulative prevalence rate was 13.5 % for anal incontinence and 3 % for combined urinary and anal incontinence. Age, social class, parity, prolonged second stage of labor, and neonatal birth weight were significantly associated with postpartum urinary incontinence (P < 0.05). On the other hand, age, parity, prolonged second stage of labor, episiotomy, and instrumental vaginal delivery were significantly associated with postpartum anal incontinence (P < 0.05). Urinary and anal incontinence are common after vaginal delivery in Enugu, Nigeria. Modification of obstetric care and discouraging preventable predisposing factors for incontinence, such as prolonged second stage of labor and vaginal delivery of macrosomic babies, are measures that may reduce the prevalence of postpartum incontinence in our population.

  1. Fecal Microbiome and Food Allergy in Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis: A Cross-Sectional Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Fieten, Karin B; Totté, Joan E E; Levin, Evgeni; Reyman, Marta; Meijer, Yolanda; Knulst, André; Schuren, Frank; Pasmans, Suzanne G M A

    2018-01-01

    Exposure to microbes may be important in the development of atopic disease. Atopic diseases have been associated with specific characteristics of the intestinal microbiome. The link between intestinal microbiota and food allergy has rarely been studied, and the gold standard for diagnosing food allergy (double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge [DBPCFC]) has seldom been used. We aimed to distinguish fecal microbial signatures for food allergy in children with atopic dermatitis (AD). Pediatric patients with AD, with and without food allergy, were included in this cross-sectional observational pilot study. AD was diagnosed according to the UK Working Party criteria. Food allergy was defined as a positive DBPCFC or a convincing clinical history, in combination with sensitization to the relevant food allergen. Fecal samples were analyzed using 16S rRNA microbial analysis. Microbial signature species, discriminating between the presence and absence food allergy, were selected by elastic net regression. Eighty-two children with AD (39 girls) with a median age of 2.5 years, and 20 of whom were diagnosed with food allergy, provided fecal samples. Food allergy to peanut and cow's milk was the most common. Six bacterial species from the fecal microbiome were identified, that, when combined, distinguished between children with and without food allergy: Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Escherichia coli, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, and Akkermansia muciniphila (AUC 0.83, sensitivity 0.77, specificity 0.80). In this pilot study, we identified a microbial signature in children with AD that discriminates between the absence and presence of food allergy. Future studies are needed to confirm our findings. © 2018 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Analysis of the Risk Factors for Aerobic Vaginitis: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Geng, Nv; Wu, Wenjuan; Fan, Aiping; Han, Cha; Wang, Chen; Wang, Yingmei; Xue, Fengxia

    2015-06-09

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is a newly defined clinical entity which may interfere with women's reproductive health and have negative effects on pregnancy. This study was to identify the risk factors for AV. Participants in this case-control study included healthy women and women with AV. All participants completed a standardized questionnaire covering sociodemographic factors, sexual behaviors, personal hygiene habits and health behaviors. Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used for statistical evaluation. A total of 290 women of reproductive age were enrolled. In the multivariate analysis, unmarried status (odds ratio [OR] 2.606, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.257-5.402), use of an intrauterine device (OR 4.989, 95% CI 1.922-12.952), long-term use of antibiotics (OR 11.176, 95% CI 1.363-91.666) and frequent vaginal douching (OR 4.689, 95% CI 1.363-16.135) were independent risk factors for AV. On the contrary, consistent condom use (OR 0.546, 95% CI 0.301-0.991) and college-level education or above (OR 0.255, 95% CI 0.131-0.497) were independent protective factors. Measures that may be considered to prevent AV include enhancing education to improve women's knowledge related to reproductive health, especially unmarried women, encouraging them to consistently use condoms as a contraceptive method, to avoid long-term use of antibiotics and to stop frequent vaginal douching. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Studies of the Human Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    Knight, Rob

    2018-04-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Rob Knight of the University of Colorado gives a presentation on "Spatially and Temporally Resolved Studies of the Human Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

  4. Dose Reduction Study in Vaginal Balloon Packing Filled With Contrast for HDR Brachytherapy Treatment;HDR; Uterine cervix cancer; Vaginal balloon packing; Contrast; Monte Carlo

    SciT

    Saini, Amarjit S.; Zhang, Geoffrey G., E-mail: geoffrey.zhang@moffitt.org; Finkelstein, Steven E.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Vaginal balloon packing is a means to displace organs at risk during high dose rate brachytherapy of the uterine cervix. We tested the hypothesis that contrast-filled vaginal balloon packing reduces radiation dose to organs at risk, such as the bladder and rectum, in comparison to water- or air-filled balloons. Methods and Materials: In a phantom study, semispherical vaginal packing balloons were filled with air, saline solution, and contrast agents. A high dose rate iridium-192 source was placed on the anterior surface of the balloon, and the diode detector was placed on the posterior surface. Dose ratios were taken withmore » each material in the balloon. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, by use of the MC computer program DOSXYZnrc, were performed to study dose reduction vs. balloon size and contrast material, including commercially available iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents. Results: Measured dose ratios on the phantom with the balloon radius of 3.4 cm were 0.922 {+-} 0.002 for contrast/saline solution and 0.808 {+-} 0.001 for contrast/air. The corresponding ratios by MC simulations were 0.895 {+-} 0.010 and 0.781 {+-} 0.010. The iodine concentration in the contrast was 23.3% by weight. The dose reduction of contrast-filled balloon ranges from 6% to 15% compared with water-filled balloon and 11% to 26% compared with air-filled balloon, with a balloon size range between 1.4 and 3.8 cm, and iodine concentration in contrast of 24.9%. The dose reduction was proportional to the contrast agent concentration. The gadolinium-based contrast agents showed less dose reduction because of much lower concentrations in their solutions. Conclusions: The dose to the posterior wall of the bladder and the anterior wall of the rectum can be reduced if the vaginal balloon is filled with contrast agent in comparison to vaginal balloons filled with saline solution or air.« less

  5. Ancient human microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Warinner, Christina; Speller, Camilla; Collins, Matthew J.; Lewis, Cecil M.

    2015-01-01

    Very recently, we discovered a vast new microbial self: the human microbiome. Our native microbiota interface with our biology and culture to influence our health, behavior, and quality of life, and yet we know very little about their origin, evolution, or ecology. With the advent of industrialization, globalization, and modern sanitation, it is intuitive that we have changed our relationship with microbes, but we have little information about the ancestral state of our microbiome, and therefore, we lack a foundation for characterizing this change. High-throughput sequencing has opened up new opportunities in the field of paleomicrobiology, allowing us to investigate the evolution of the complex microbial ecologies that inhabit our bodies. By focusing on recent coprolite and dental calculus research, we explore how emerging research on ancient human microbiomes is changing the way we think about ancient disease and how archaeological studies can contribute to a medical understanding of health and nutrition today. PMID:25559298

  6. Gut microbiome in gestational diabetes: a cross-sectional study of mothers and offspring 5 years postpartum.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Sayyid; Aho, Velma; Pereira, Pedro; Paulin, Lars; Koivusalo, Saila B; Auvinen, Petri; Eriksson, Johan G

    2018-01-01

    An altered gut microbiome composition is shown to be associated with various diseases and health outcomes. We compare the gut microbiota of women who developed gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) with that of those who did not, and the gut microbiota of their offspring, to determine any differences in the composition and diversity of their gut microbiota, which may be correlated with their GDM state. All women were at high risk for GDM and participated in the Finnish Gestational Diabetes Prevention Study (RADIEL). Stool samples were obtained, 5 years postpartum, from 60 GDM-positive women, 68 non-GDM control women, and their children (n = 109), 237 individuals in total. 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing was employed to determine the composition of bacterial communities present. Statistical correlations were inferred between clinical variables and microbiota, while taking into account potential confounders. In mothers, no significant differences were observed in microbiota composition between the two groups. Genus Anaerotruncus was increased in children of women with GDM (p < 0.001). Beta-diversity measures showed that a mother and her child have a more similar microbiome composition when compared with unrelated children, other mothers, or the children compared with each other (p < 0.001). These results suggest that there may be no discernible microbiome basis to GDM susceptibility in high-risk women, whereas microbiome differences between the offspring could be of greater biological significance. The heterogeneous nature of the disease could be obscuring potential differences between women. A longer time-series study, with carefully defined subject subgroups, may be an appropriate course of future investigation into GDM and the microbiome. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Heterogeneity of Vaginal Microbial Communities within Individuals▿ #

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Kyung; Thomas, Susan M.; Ho, Mengfei; Sharma, Shobha; Reich, Claudia I.; Frank, Jeremy A.; Yeater, Kathleen M.; Biggs, Diana R.; Nakamura, Noriko; Stumpf, Rebecca; Leigh, Steven R.; Tapping, Richard I.; Blanke, Steven R.; Slauch, James M.; Gaskins, H. Rex; Weisbaum, Jon S.; Olsen, Gary J.; Hoyer, Lois L.; Wilson, Brenda A.

    2009-01-01

    Recent culture-independent studies have revealed that a healthy vaginal ecosystem harbors a surprisingly complex assemblage of microorganisms. However, the spatial distribution and composition of vaginal microbial populations have not been investigated using molecular methods. Here, we evaluated site-specific microbial composition within the vaginal ecosystem and examined the influence of sampling technique in detection of the vaginal microbiota. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were prepared from samples obtained from different locations (cervix, fornix, outer vaginal canal) and by different methods (swabbing, scraping, lavaging) from the vaginal tracts of eight clinically healthy, asymptomatic women. The data reveal that the vaginal microbiota is not homogenous throughout the vaginal tract but differs significantly within an individual with regard to anatomical site and sampling method used. Thus, this study illuminates the complex structure of the vaginal ecosystem and calls for the consideration of microenvironments when sampling vaginal microbiota as a clinical predictor of vaginal health. PMID:19158255

  8. Sputum microbiome temporal variability and dysbiosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: an analysis of the COPDMAP study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhang; Singh, Richa; Miller, Bruce E; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Van Horn, Stephanie; Tomsho, Lynn; Mackay, Alexander; Allinson, James P; Webb, Adam J; Brookes, Anthony J; George, Leena M; Barker, Bethan; Kolsum, Umme; Donnelly, Louise E; Belchamber, Kylie; Barnes, Peter J; Singh, Dave; Brightling, Christopher E; Donaldson, Gavin C; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Brown, James R

    2018-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that lung microbiome dysbiosis, the disease associated disruption of the lung microbial community, might play a key role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations. However, characterising temporal variability of the microbiome from large longitudinal COPD cohorts is needed to better understand this phenomenon. We performed a 16S ribosomal RNA survey of microbiome on 716 sputum samples collected longitudinally at baseline and exacerbations from 281 subjects with COPD at three UK clinical centres as part of the COPDMAP consortium. The microbiome composition was similar among centres and between stable and exacerbations except for a small significant decrease of Veillonella at exacerbations. The abundance of Moraxella was negatively associated with bacterial alpha diversity. Microbiomes were distinct between exacerbations associated with bacteria versus eosinophilic airway inflammation. Dysbiosis at exacerbations, measured as significant within subject deviation of microbial composition relative to baseline, was present in 41% of exacerbations. Dysbiosis was associated with increased exacerbation severity indicated by a greater fall in forced expiratory volume in one second, forced vital capacity and a greater increase in CAT score, particularly in exacerbations with concurrent eosinophilic inflammation. There was a significant difference of temporal variability of microbial alpha and beta diversity among centres. The variation of beta diversity significantly decreased in those subjects with frequent historical exacerbations. Microbial dysbiosis is a feature of some exacerbations and its presence, especially in concert with eosinophilic inflammation, is associated with more severe exacerbations indicated by a greater fall in lung function. Results, NCT01620645. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless

  9. Saving seed microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Berg, Gabriele; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2018-05-01

    Plant seeds are home to diverse microbial communities whose composition is determined by plant genotype, environment, and management practices. Plant domestication is now recognized as an important driver of plant-associated microbial diversity. To what extent and how domestication affects seed microbiomes is less well studied. Here we propose a 'back-to-the-future' approach to harness seed microbiomes of wild relatives of crop cultivars to save and re-instate missing beneficial seed microbes for improved plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress.

  10. Colonic Absorption of Low-Molecular-Weight Metabolites Influenced by the Intestinal Microbiome: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Ooga, Takushi; Kibe, Ryoko; Aiba, Yuji; Koga, Yasuhiro; Benno, Yoshimi

    2017-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight metabolites produced by the intestinal microbiome play a direct role in health and disease. However, little is known about the ability of the colon to absorb these metabolites. It is also unclear whether these metabolites are bioavailable. Here, metabolomics techniques (capillary electrophoresis with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, CE-TOFMS), germ-free (GF) mice, and colonized (Ex-GF) mice were used to identify the colonic luminal metabolites transported to colonic tissue and/or blood. We focused on the differences in each metabolite between GF and Ex-GF mice to determine the identities of metabolites that are transported to the colon and/or blood. CE-TOFMS identified 170, 246, 166, and 193 metabolites in the colonic feces, colonic tissue, portal plasma, and cardiac plasma, respectively. We classified the metabolites according to the following influencing factors: (i) the membrane transport system of the colonocytes, (ii) metabolism during transcellular transport, and (iii) hepatic metabolism based on the similarity in the ratio of each metabolite between GF and Ex-GF mice and found 62 and 22 metabolites that appeared to be absorbed from the colonic lumen to colonocytes and blood, respectively. For example, 11 basic amino acids were transported to the systemic circulation from the colonic lumen. Furthermore, many low-molecular-weight metabolites influenced by the intestinal microbiome are bioavailable. The present study is the first to report the transportation of metabolites from the colonic lumen to colonocytes and somatic blood in vivo, and the present findings are critical for clarifying host-intestinal bacterial interactions.

  11. Correlates of the molecular vaginal microbiota composition of African women.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Raju; Borgdorff, Hanneke; Jespers, Vicky; Francis, Suzanna C; Verhelst, Rita; Mwaura, Mary; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Ndayisaba, Gilles; Kyongo, Jordan K; Hardy, Liselotte; Menten, Joris; Crucitti, Tania; Tsivtsivadze, Evgeni; Schuren, Frank; van de Wijgert, Janneke H H M

    2015-02-21

    Sociodemographic, behavioral and clinical correlates of the vaginal microbiome (VMB) as characterized by molecular methods have not been adequately studied. VMB dominated by bacteria other than lactobacilli may cause inflammation, which may facilitate HIV acquisition and other adverse reproductive health outcomes. We characterized the VMB of women in Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa and Tanzania (KRST) using a 16S rDNA phylogenetic microarray. Cytokines were quantified in cervicovaginal lavages. Potential sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical correlates were also evaluated. Three hundred thirteen samples from 230 women were available for analysis. Five VMB clusters were identified: one cluster each dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus (KRST-I) and L. iners (KRST-II), and three clusters not dominated by a single species but containing multiple (facultative) anaerobes (KRST-III/IV/V). Women in clusters KRST-I and II had lower mean concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1α (p < 0.001) and Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) (p = 0.01), but higher concentrations of interferon-γ-induced protein (IP-10) (p < 0.01) than women in clusters KRST-III/IV/V. A lower proportion of women in cluster KRST-I tested positive for bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs; ptrend = 0.07) and urinary tract infection (UTI; p = 0.06), and a higher proportion of women in clusters KRST-I and II had vaginal candidiasis (ptrend = 0.09), but these associations did not reach statistical significance. Women who reported unusual vaginal discharge were more likely to belong to clusters KRST-III/IV/V (p = 0.05). Vaginal dysbiosis in African women was significantly associated with vaginal inflammation; the associations with increased prevalence of STIs and UTI, and decreased prevalence of vaginal candidiasis, should be confirmed in larger studies.

  12. Histological study on the effects of microablative fractional CO2 laser on atrophic vaginal tissue: an ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Stefano; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Athanasiou, Stavros; Origoni, Massimo; Candiani, Massimo; Calligaro, Alberto; Zerbinati, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Microablative fractional CO2 laser has been proven to determine tissue remodeling with neoformation of collagen and elastic fibers on atrophic skin. The aim of our study is to evaluate the effects of microablative fractional CO2 laser on postmenopausal women with vulvovaginal atrophy using an ex vivo model. This is a prospective ex vivo cohort trial. Consecutive postmenopausal women with vulvovaginal atrophy managed with pelvic organ prolapse surgical operation were enrolled. After fascial plication, the redundant vaginal edge on one side was treated with CO2 laser (SmartXide2; DEKA Laser, Florence, Italy). Five different CO2 laser setup protocols were tested. The contralateral part of the vaginal wall was always used as control. Excessive vagina was trimmed and sent for histological evaluation to compare treated and nontreated tissues. Microscopic and ultrastructural aspects of the collagenic and elastic components of the matrix were studied, and a specific image analysis with computerized morphometry was performed. We also considered the fine cytological aspects of connective tissue proper cells, particularly fibroblasts. During the study period, five women were enrolled, and 10 vaginal specimens were finally retrieved. Four different settings of CO2 laser were compared. Protocols were tested twice each to confirm histological findings. Treatment protocols were compared according to histological findings, particularly in maximal depth and connective changes achieved. All procedures were uneventful for participants. This study shows that microablative fractional CO2 laser can produce a remodeling of vaginal connective tissue without causing damage to surrounding tissue.

  13. The dynamic changes of vaginal microecosystem in patients with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis: a retrospective study of 800 patients.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xin-Ai; Chen, Ping; Tang, Yuanting; Wu, Xiuli; Hu, Zhengqiang

    2015-12-01

    Vaginal microecological environment is an important factor of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). This study was undertaken to investigate dynamic changes of vaginal microecosystem in patients with RVVC. Four hundred patients with VVC and 400 healthy women of reproductive age who admitted to the hospital from January 2012 to December 2013 were evaluated retrospectively. Vaginal microecological factors were evaluated before and after treatment until no recurrence, including vaginal cleanliness, white blood cells, Lactobacillus, Lactobacillus classification, bacteria density, flora diversity, Nugent scores, etc. The grouping was done according to the recurrence of the disease. Every time after treatment, the relapsing patients were defined as case group and the cured patients without recurrence were defined as control group. The differences in the results between the case and the control groups were analyzed by t test. With the development of RVVC, the ages of all case groups were lower than the corresponding control groups. In different stages of the disease, the bacteria density of the case groups and their corresponding control groups had no significant difference (P > 0.05). Most of the microecological indicators of the first occurring group were significantly different (P < 0.05) from that of the control group. In the recurrence groups, only a few indicators were significantly different from the control groups. The values of all vaginal microecological indicators (except Lactobacillus) of all case groups were higher than that of the control groups. The values of Lactobacillus of all RVVC case groups were lower than that of the RVVC control groups. There were vaginal microecological imbalances in all developing stages of RVVC. As for vaginal flora, diverse sorts changed to normal Lactobacillus dominantly with the development of RVVC. In the first occurrence of RVVC, after antifungal treatment, Lactobacillus is suggested to be timely supplemented to restore

  14. Study results on the use of different therapies for the treatment of vaginitis in hospitalised pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Novakov Mikić, Aleksandra; Stojic, Sinisa

    2015-08-01

    During pregnancy, many women experience vaginal infections due to a weakened immune system and changes in hormonal status. Treating these infections is of crucial importance, because women are at high risk for serious complications such as preterm birth and late miscarriage. For this reason, the present study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of octenidine dihydrochloride/phenoxyethanol (OHP) in comparison to antimicrobial therapies in pregnant women in hospital suffering from different types of vaginitis. A total of 1,000 patients were divided into 4 different groups according to their type of vaginal infection after smear analyses. Each group was again divided into two subgroups receiving treatment with OHP or antimicrobial therapies with neomycin/polymyxin B/nystatin, metronidazole or miconazole vaginal tablets. The most frequent causes of vaginitis were unspecific bacterial infections (42.4 %) and vaginal candidiasis (44.8 %). The average time needed to obtain negative results from smear analyses was significantly shorter when treated with OHP, both in patients with bacterial vaginosis (BV) or vaginal candidiasis (VC) compared to antimicrobial therapy (1.7 ± 0.8 vs. 2.3 ± 1.1 days; 2.3 ± 1.4 vs. 3.4 ± 1.6 days; both p < 0.001). Equally, the maximum number of days until negative results were detected was significantly lower with OHP compared to antimicrobial therapy (BV: 3 vs. 5 days; VC: 5 vs. 7 days). OHP has a great effect in the treatment of vaginitis during pregnancy and thus should be an integral part of standard therapy regimens.

  15. Effect of lyophilized lactobacilli and 0.03 mg estriol (Gynoflor®) on vaginitis and vaginosis with disrupted vaginal microflora: a multicenter, randomized, single-blind, active-controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Donders, G G G; Van Bulck, B; Van de Walle, P; Kaiser, R R; Pohlig, G; Gonser, S; Graf, F

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of lyophilized lactobacilli in combination with 0.03 mg estriol when compared to metronidazole in the treatment of bacterial vaginal infections. Multicenter, randomized, single-blind, active-controlled pilot study in 3 independent gynecological practices in Belgium. Forty-six, 18- to 50-year-old premenopausal women with a disrupted vaginal flora due to a bacterial vaginal infection (bacterial vaginosis, aerobic vaginitis) were included, provided that fresh phase-contrast microscopy of the vaginal fluid showed lactobacillary flora grade 2B or 3. Patients were given a blinded box with either 12 vaginal tablets of Gynoflor® (study medication) or 6 vaginal suppositories containing 500 mg metronidazole (control medication). Eight efficacy variables were studied to assess the status of the vaginal flora at entry, 3-7 days (control 1), 4-6 (control 2) weeks and 4 months after the end of therapy. At control 1, the combined variables equally improved in the lactobacilli group as in the metronidazole group. At control 2, the lactobacillus preparation showed slightly inferior results when compared to metronidazole. At 4 months, this analysis could not be performed due to low numbers, but analysis of recurrence rate and extra medication needed was not different between both groups. Lyophilized lactobacilli in combination with low-dose estriol are equivalent to metronidazole in the short-term treatment of bacterial vaginal infections, but have less effect after 1 month. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term efficacy of lactobacilli when applied repeatedly. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. The hospital microbiome project: meeting report for the UK science and innovation network UK-USA workshop ‘beating the superbugs: hospital microbiome studies for tackling antimicrobial resistance’, October 14th 2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The UK Science and Innovation Network UK-USA workshop ‘Beating the Superbugs: Hospital Microbiome Studies for tackling Antimicrobial Resistance’ was held on October 14th 2013 at the UK Department of Health, London. The workshop was designed to promote US-UK collaboration on hospital microbiome studies to add a new facet to our collective understanding of antimicrobial resistance. The assembled researchers debated the importance of the hospital microbial community in transmission of disease and as a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes, and discussed methodologies, hypotheses, and priorities. A number of complementary approaches were explored, although the importance of the built environment microbiome in disease transmission was not universally accepted. Current whole genome epidemiological methods are being pioneered in the UK and the benefits of moving to community analysis are not necessarily obvious to the pioneers; however, rapid progress in other areas of microbiology suggest to some researchers that hospital microbiome studies will be exceptionally fruitful even in the short term. Collaborative studies will recombine different strengths to tackle the international problems of antimicrobial resistance and hospital and healthcare associated infections.

  17. Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human ... test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its ...

  18. Vaginal Fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal fistula Overview A vaginal fistula is an abnormal opening that connects your vagina to another organ, such as your bladder, colon or rectum. Your ... describe the condition as a hole in your vagina that allows stool or urine to pass through ...

  19. The Costs and Their Determinant of Cesarean Section and Vaginal Delivery: An Exploratory Study in Chongqing Municipality, China

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhifei; Cheng, Zhaohui; Wu, Tailai; Zhou, Yan; Chen, Junguo; Fu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aims to analyze the cesarean section (CS) rates and vaginal delivery rates in tertiary hospitals of China, explore the costs of two different deliveries, and examine the relative influencing factors of the costs in both CS and vaginal deliveries. Methods. 30,168 anonymized obstetric medical cases were selected from three sample tertiary hospitals in Chongqing Municipality from 2011 to 2013. Chi-square test was used to compare the distributions of CS and vaginal deliveries under different indicators. Mann–Whitney test and Kruskal-Wallis test were adopted to analyze the differences under different items. Multiple linear regression was used to determine the influencing factors of the costs of different delivery modes. Results. (1) The rates of CS were 69%, 65.5%, and 59.2% in the three sample tertiary hospitals in Chongqing from 2011 to 2013. (2) The costs and the length of stay of CS were greater than those of vaginal delivery, which had significant differences (P < 0.005). (3) The areas, length of stay, age, medical insurance, and modes of delivery were the influencing factors of both CS and vaginal delivery costs. Discussion. The high CS rates in China must be paid significant attention. The indicators of two modes of delivery should be regulated strictly. CS rate reduction and saving medical resources will be the benefits if vaginal delivery is chosen by pregnant women. PMID:27995142

  20. Analysis of Vaginal Cell Populations during Experimental Vaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Fidel, Paul L.; Luo, Wei; Steele, Chad; Chabain, Joseph; Baker, Marc; Wormley, Floyd

    1999-01-01

    Studies with an estrogen-dependent murine model of vaginal candidiasis suggest that local cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is more important than systemic CMI for protection against vaginitis. The present study, however, showed that, compared to uninfected mice, little to no change in the percentage or types of vaginal T cells occurred during a primary vaginal infection or during a secondary vaginal infection where partial protection was observed. Furthermore, depletion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) had no effect on infection in the presence or absence of pseudoestrus. These results indicate a lack of demonstrable effects by systemic CMI or PMN against vaginitis and suggest that if local T cells are important, they are functioning without showing significant increases in numbers within the vaginal mucosa during infection. PMID:10338532

  1. Captivity humanizes the primate microbiome.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Jonathan B; Vangay, Pajau; Huang, Hu; Ward, Tonya; Hillmann, Benjamin M; Al-Ghalith, Gabriel A; Travis, Dominic A; Long, Ha Thang; Tuan, Bui Van; Minh, Vo Van; Cabana, Francis; Nadler, Tilo; Toddes, Barbara; Murphy, Tami; Glander, Kenneth E; Johnson, Timothy J; Knights, Dan

    2016-09-13

    The primate gastrointestinal tract is home to trillions of bacteria, whose composition is associated with numerous metabolic, autoimmune, and infectious human diseases. Although there is increasing evidence that modern and Westernized societies are associated with dramatic loss of natural human gut microbiome diversity, the causes and consequences of such loss are challenging to study. Here we use nonhuman primates (NHPs) as a model system for studying the effects of emigration and lifestyle disruption on the human gut microbiome. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing in two model NHP species, we show that although different primate species have distinctive signature microbiota in the wild, in captivity they lose their native microbes and become colonized with Prevotella and Bacteroides, the dominant genera in the modern human gut microbiome. We confirm that captive individuals from eight other NHP species in a different zoo show the same pattern of convergence, and that semicaptive primates housed in a sanctuary represent an intermediate microbiome state between wild and captive. Using deep shotgun sequencing, chemical dietary analysis, and chloroplast relative abundance, we show that decreasing dietary fiber and plant content are associated with the captive primate microbiome. Finally, in a meta-analysis including published human data, we show that captivity has a parallel effect on the NHP gut microbiome to that of Westernization in humans. These results demonstrate that captivity and lifestyle disruption cause primates to lose native microbiota and converge along an axis toward the modern human microbiome.

  2. Captivity humanizes the primate microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Vangay, Pajau; Huang, Hu; Ward, Tonya; Hillmann, Benjamin M.; Al-Ghalith, Gabriel A.; Travis, Dominic A.; Long, Ha Thang; Tuan, Bui Van; Minh, Vo Van; Cabana, Francis; Nadler, Tilo; Toddes, Barbara; Murphy, Tami; Glander, Kenneth E.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Knights, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The primate gastrointestinal tract is home to trillions of bacteria, whose composition is associated with numerous metabolic, autoimmune, and infectious human diseases. Although there is increasing evidence that modern and Westernized societies are associated with dramatic loss of natural human gut microbiome diversity, the causes and consequences of such loss are challenging to study. Here we use nonhuman primates (NHPs) as a model system for studying the effects of emigration and lifestyle disruption on the human gut microbiome. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing in two model NHP species, we show that although different primate species have distinctive signature microbiota in the wild, in captivity they lose their native microbes and become colonized with Prevotella and Bacteroides, the dominant genera in the modern human gut microbiome. We confirm that captive individuals from eight other NHP species in a different zoo show the same pattern of convergence, and that semicaptive primates housed in a sanctuary represent an intermediate microbiome state between wild and captive. Using deep shotgun sequencing, chemical dietary analysis, and chloroplast relative abundance, we show that decreasing dietary fiber and plant content are associated with the captive primate microbiome. Finally, in a meta-analysis including published human data, we show that captivity has a parallel effect on the NHP gut microbiome to that of Westernization in humans. These results demonstrate that captivity and lifestyle disruption cause primates to lose native microbiota and converge along an axis toward the modern human microbiome. PMID:27573830

  3. Influence of the estrus cycle on the evaluation of a vaginal irritation study in intact and ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Aiko; Ogawa, Bunichiro; Koyama, Tomoko; Nakanishi, Yutaka; Sasaki, Minoru

    2017-01-01

    When conducting vaginal irritation studies, ovariectomized rats or rabbits are typically used according to practical reports. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of the estrus cycle in a vaginal irritation study using intact rats and ovariectomized rats, which exhibit a late diestrus-like condition, to determine whether intact rats can be useful for evaluating vaginal irritancy. Rats were divided into 4 groups: proestrus, estrus, and metestrus or diestrus in intact rats and ovariectomized rats. All the rats in each group were treated with a vehicle or sodium dodecyl sulfate, as the irritant, in single-dose and 4-day repeat-dose vaginal irritation studies. Each rat’s vagina was examined histopathologically, and the irritation score was calculated using a semiquantitative scoring system. In the single-dose study, the irritation scores for the proestrus or ovariectomized groups treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate were higher than those of the estrus group or metestrus or diestrus group. In the 4-day repeat-dose study, a significant histopathological difference was not found among the intact rats (proestrus, estrus, and metestrus or diestrus groups), and the irritation score range of the intact rats was similar to that of the ovariectomized rats, though the mean score of the intact rats was slightly lower than that of the ovariectomized rats. These results suggest that intact rats might be well suited for 4-day vaginal irritation studies and useful for evaluating vaginal irritancy using not only the mean score, but also individual irritation score ranges, whereas the estrus cycle would need to be identified in single-dose vaginal irritation studies. PMID:28458454

  4. Associations of the vaginal microbiota with HIV infection, bacterial vaginosis, and demographic factors.

    PubMed

    Chehoud, Christel; Stieh, Daniel J; Bailey, Aubrey G; Laughlin, Alice L; Allen, Shannon A; McCotter, Kerrie L; Sherrill-Mix, Scott A; Hope, Thomas J; Bushman, Frederic D

    2017-04-24

    We sought to investigate the effects of HIV infection on the vaginal microbiota and associations with treatment and demographic factors. We thus compared vaginal microbiome samples from HIV-infected (HIV+) and HIV-uninfected (HIV-) women collected at two Chicago area hospitals. We studied vaginal microbiome samples from 178 women analyzed longitudinally (n = 324 samples) and collected extensive data on clinical status and demographic factors. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to characterize the bacterial lineages present, then UniFrac, Shannon diversity, and other measures to compare community structure with sample metadata. Differences in microbiota measures were modest in the comparison of HIV+ and HIV- samples, in contrast to several previous studies, consistent with effective antiretroviral therapy. Proportions of healthy Lactobacillus species were not higher in HIV- patients overall, but were significantly higher when analyzed within each hospital in isolation. Rates of bacterial vaginosis were higher among African-American women and HIV+ women. Bacterial vaginosis was associated with higher frequency of HIV+. Unexpectedly, African-American women were more likely to switch bacterial vaginosis status between sampling times; switching was not associated with HIV+ status. The influence of HIV infection on the vaginal microbiome was modest for this cohort of well suppressed urban American women, consistent with effective antiretroviral therapy. HIV+ was found to be associated with bacterial vaginosis. Although bacterial vaginosis has previously been associated with HIV transmission, most of the women studied here became HIV+ many years before our test for bacterial vaginosis, thus implicating additional mechanisms linking HIV infection and bacterial vaginosis.

  5. Analyses of the Microbial Diversity across the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kelvin; Bihan, Monika; Yooseph, Shibu; Methé, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of human body microbial diversity is fundamental to understanding community structure, biology and ecology. The National Institutes of Health Human Microbiome Project (HMP) has provided an unprecedented opportunity to examine microbial diversity within and across body habitats and individuals through pyrosequencing-based profiling of 16 S rRNA gene sequences (16 S) from habits of the oral, skin, distal gut, and vaginal body regions from over 200 healthy individuals enabling the application of statistical techniques. In this study, two approaches were applied to elucidate the nature and extent of human microbiome diversity. First, bootstrap and parametric curve fitting techniques were evaluated to estimate the maximum number of unique taxa, Smax, and taxa discovery rate for habitats across individuals. Next, our results demonstrated that the variation of diversity within low abundant taxa across habitats and individuals was not sufficiently quantified with standard ecological diversity indices. This impact from low abundant taxa motivated us to introduce a novel rank-based diversity measure, the Tail statistic, (“τ”), based on the standard deviation of the rank abundance curve if made symmetric by reflection around the most abundant taxon. Due to τ’s greater sensitivity to low abundant taxa, its application to diversity estimation of taxonomic units using taxonomic dependent and independent methods revealed a greater range of values recovered between individuals versus body habitats, and different patterns of diversity within habitats. The greatest range of τ values within and across individuals was found in stool, which also exhibited the most undiscovered taxa. Oral and skin habitats revealed variable diversity patterns, while vaginal habitats were consistently the least diverse. Collectively, these results demonstrate the importance, and motivate the introduction, of several visualization and analysis methods tuned specifically for next

  6. External Pelvic and Vaginal Irradiation Versus Vaginal Irradiation Alone as Postoperative Therapy in Medium-Risk Endometrial Carcinoma-A Prospective Randomized Study

    SciT

    Sorbe, Bengt, E-mail: bengt.sorbe@orebroll.se; Horvath, Gyoergy; Andersson, Hakan

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of adjuvant external beam pelvic radiotherapy as adjunct to vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) in medium-risk endometrial carcinoma, with regard to locoregional tumor control, recurrences, survival, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Consecutive series of 527 evaluable patients were included in this randomized trial. Median follow-up for patients alive was 62 months. The primary study endpoints were locoregional recurrences and overall survival. Secondary endpoints were recurrence-free survival, recurrence-free interval, cancer-specific survival, and toxicity. Results: Five-year locoregional relapse rates were 1.5% after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus VBT and 5% after vaginal irradiation alone (p = 0.013), and 5-yearmore » overall survival rates were 89% and 90%, respectively (p = 0.548). Endometrial cancer-related death rates were 3.8% after EBRT plus VBT and 6.8% after VBT (p = 0.118). Pelvic recurrences (exclusively vaginal recurrence) were reduced by 93% by the addition of EBRT to VBT. Deep myometrial infiltration was a significant prognostic factor in this medium-risk group of endometrioid carcinomas but not International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade or DNA ploidy. Combined radiotherapy was well tolerated, with serious (Grade 3) late side effects of less than 2%. However, there was a significant difference in favor of VBT alone. Conclusions: Despite a significant locoregional control benefit with combined radiotherapy, no survival improvement was recorded, but increased late toxicity was noted in the intestine, bladder, and vagina. Combined RT should probably be reserved for high-risk cases with two or more high-risk factors. VBT alone should be the adjuvant treatment option for purely medium-risk cases.« less

  7. Non-specific vaginitis or vaginitis of undetermined aetiology.

    PubMed

    Faro, S; Phillips, L E

    1987-01-01

    Vaginitis is a complex syndrome that is probably the most common outpatient disease seen by the gynaecologist. The specific aetiologies of vaginitis are many. One of the most common entities, however, is "non-specific vaginitis" which can be subdivided into: Gardnerella vaginitis, anaerobic vaginosis, and vaginitis of undetermined aetiology. The role of Gardnerella as a causative agent for vaginitis has been studied in depth but its specific role remains controversial. Anaerobic vaginosis can be diagnosed by noting on microscopic examination the presence of clue cells, free-floating bacteria and numerous white blood cells (WBC's). Culturing an aliquot of the vaginal discharge reveals a high number of anaerobes. In addition, this condition responds to antibiotics effective against anaerobes, e.g., metronidazole. Vaginitis of undetermined aetiology is more complex and is characterized by a purulent vaginal discharge, a pH of 4.0-4.6, numerous WBC's, and a high concentration of bacteria. The microbiology of this vaginitis includes many facultative Gram-negative rods and Gram-positive cocci. Anaerobes may be present but do not make up a large component of the endogenous microflora. This condition does not respond to the usual antibiotic therapies employed in treating bacterial vaginitis. Since this condition appears to be primarily an inflammatory reaction, it may be responsive to topical antiinflammatory agents such as benzydamine.

  8. Management of vaginal penetration phobia in Arab women: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Muammar, Tarfah; McWalter, Patricia; Alkhenizan, Abdullah; Shoukri, Mohamed; Gabr, Alia; Bin, Abdulaziz AlDanah

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal penetration phobia is a common and distressing problem world.wide. It interferes with vaginal penetrative sexual relations, and leads to unconsummated marriage (UCM). This problem may be heightened in Arab women, due to cultural taboos about pain and bleeding, that may be associated with the first coital experience after marriage. Data about this problem is scarce in Arab societies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of these women and their husbands to an individualized, psychotherapeutic assessment and treatment to resolve this problem. Retrospective descriptive in a general gynecology community setting over a 6-year period. The study involved a retrospective sequential cohort of 100 Arab couples with UCM due to the woman's VPP. They were evaluated by a female gynecologist in out patient clinics. Data was collected through chart review, and telephone interviews. Final analysis was performed on 100 Arab couples, who satisfied the inclusion criteria. They were followed up to assess their response to an individualized, structured treatment protocol. The treatment combined sex education with systematic desensitization, targeting fear and anxiety as.sociated with vaginal penetration. A total of 96% of the studied group had a successful outcome after an average of 4 sessions. Penetrative intercourse was reported by the tolerance of these women; further pregnancy was achieved in 77.8 % of the infertile couples. Insufficient knowledge of sexual intercourse is a major contributor to the development of VPP in the sampled population. It appears that they respond well to an individualized, structured treatment protocol as described by Hawten 1985 (regardless of other risk factors associated with vaginismus).

  9. High-intensity focused ultrasound treatment of placenta accreta after vaginal delivery: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bai, Y; Luo, X; Li, Q; Yin, N; Fu, X; Zhang, H; Qi, H

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficiency of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of placenta accreta after vaginal delivery. Enrolled into this study between September 2011 and September 2013 were 12 patients who had been diagnosed with placenta accreta following vaginal delivery and who had stable vital signs. All patients were treated using an ultrasound-guided HIFU treatment system. As indication of the effectiveness of the treatment we considered decreased vascular index on color Doppler imaging, decrease in size of residual placenta compared with pretreatment size on assessment by three-dimensional ultrasound with Virtual Organ Computer-aided Analysis, reduced signal intensity and degree of enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging and avoidance of hysterectomy following treatment. To assess the safety of HIFU treatment, we recorded side effects, hemorrhage, infection, sex steroid levels, return of menses and subsequent pregnancy. Patients were followed up in this preliminary study until December 2013. The 12 patients receiving HIFU treatment had an average postpartum hospital stay of 6.8 days and an average period of residual placental involution of 36.9 days. HIFU treatment did not apparently increase the risk of infection or hemorrhage and no patient required hysterectomy. In all patients menstruation recommenced after an average of 80.2 days, and sex steroid levels during the middle luteal phase of the second menstrual cycle were normal. Two patients became pregnant again during the follow-up period. This preliminary study suggests that ultrasound-guided HIFU is a safe and effective non-invasive method to treat placenta accreta patients after vaginal delivery who have stable vital signs and desire to preserve fertility. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Emphysematous vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Lima-Silva, Joana; Vieira-Baptista, Pedro; Cavaco-Gomes, João; Maia, Tiago; Beires, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    Emphysematous vaginitis is a rare condition, characterized by the presence of multiple gas-filled cysts in the vaginal and/or exocervical mucosa. Although its etiology is not completely understood, it is self-limited, with a benign clinical course. Vaginal discharge, sometimes bloody, and pruritus are the most common symptoms. Chronic and acute inflammation can be found, and diseases that impair the immune system and pregnancy have been associated with this condition. A 48-year-old postmenopausal woman, with a history of hysterectomy with several comorbidities, presented with a 4-month history of bloody discharge and vulvar pruritus. Examination showed multiple cystic lesions, 1 to 5 mm, occupying the posterior and right lateral vaginal walls. Speculum examination produced crepitus. Vaginal wet mount was normal, except for diminished lactobacilli; results of Trichomonas vaginalis DNA test and vaginal cultures were negative. Lugol's iodine applied to the vagina was taken up by the intact lesions. Biopsy result showed typical features of emphysematous vaginitis. This is an unusual entity, presenting with common gynecological complaints, and both physicians and pathologists should be aware to prevent misdiagnosis and overtreatment.

  11. Definition of a type of abnormal vaginal flora that is distinct from bacterial vaginosis: aerobic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Donders, Gilbert G G; Vereecken, Annie; Bosmans, Eugene; Dekeersmaecker, Alfons; Salembier, Geert; Spitz, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    To define an entity of abnormal vaginal flora: aerobic vaginitis. Observational study. University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium. 631 women attending for routine prenatal care or attending vaginitis clinic. Samples were taken for fresh wet mount microscopy of vaginal fluid, vaginal cultures and measurement of lactate, succinate and cytokine levels in vaginal fluid. Smears deficient in lactobacilli and positive for clue cells were considered to indicate a diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. Aerobic vaginitis was diagnosed if smears were deficient in lactobacilli, positive for cocci or coarse bacilli, positive for parabasal epithelial cells, and/or positive for vaginal leucocytes (plus their granular aspect). Genital complaints include red inflammation, yellow discharge, vaginal dyspareunia. Group B streptococci, escherichia coli, staphylococcus aureus and trichomonas vaginalis are frequently cultured. Vaginal lactate concentration is severely depressed in women with aerobic vaginitis, as in bacterial vaginosis, but vaginal succinate is not produced. Also in contrast to bacterial vaginosis, aerobic vaginitis produces a host immune response that leads to high production of interleukin-6, interleukin-1-beta and leukaemia inhibitory factor in the vaginal fluid. Aerobic vaginitis is associated with aerobic micro-organisms, mainly group B streptococci and E. coli. Its characteristics are different from those of bacterial vaginosis and elicit an important host response. The most severe form of aerobic vaginitis equals desquamative inflammatory vaginitis. In theory, aerobic vaginitis may be a better candidate than bacterial vaginosis as the cause of pregnancy complications, such as ascending chorioamnionitis, preterm rupture of the membranes and preterm delivery.

  12. A study of the osmotic characteristics, water permeability, and cryoprotectant permeability of human vaginal immune cells.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zhiquan; Hughes, Sean M; Fang, Cifeng; Huang, Jinghua; Fu, Baiwen; Zhao, Gang; Fialkow, Michael; Lentz, Gretchen; Hladik, Florian; Gao, Dayong

    2016-04-01

    Cryopreservation of specimens taken from the genital tract of women is important for studying mucosal immunity during HIV prevention trials. However, it is unclear whether the current, empirically developed cryopreservation procedures for peripheral blood cells are also ideal for genital specimens. The optimal cryopreservation protocol depends on the cryobiological features of the cells. Thus, we obtained tissue specimens from vaginal repair surgeries, isolated and flow cytometry-purified immune cells, and determined fundamental cryobiological characteristics of vaginal CD3(+) T cells and CD14(+) macrophages using a microfluidic device. The osmotically inactive volumes of the two cell types (Vb) were determined relative to the initial cell volume (V0) by exposing the cells to hypotonic and hypertonic saline solutions, evaluating the equilibrium volume, and applying the Boyle van't Hoff relationship. The cell membrane permeability to water (Lp) and to four different cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions (Ps) at room temperature were also measured. Results indicated Vb values of 0.516 V0 and 0.457 V0 for mucosal T cells and macrophages, respectively. Lp values at room temperature were 0.196 and 0.295 μm/min/atm for T cells and macrophages, respectively. Both cell types had high Ps values for the three CPAs, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), propylene glycol (PG) and ethylene glycol (EG) (minimum of 0.418 × 10(-3) cm/min), but transport of the fourth CPA, glycerol, occurred 50-150 times more slowly. Thus, DMSO, PG, and EG are better options than glycerol in avoiding severe cell volume excursion and osmotic injury during CPA addition and removal for cryopreservation of human vaginal immune cells. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Vaginal birth after caesarean section: a cohort study investigating factors associated with its uptake and success.

    PubMed

    Knight, H E; Gurol-Urganci, I; van der Meulen, J H; Mahmood, T A; Richmond, D H; Dougall, A; Cromwell, D A

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the demographic and obstetric factors associated with the uptake and success rate of vaginal birth after caesarean section (VBAC). Cohort study using data from Hospital Episode Statistics. English National Health Service. Women whose first birth resulted in a live singleton delivery by caesarean section between 1 April 2004 and 31 March 2011, and who had a second birth before 31 March 2012. Logistic regression to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR). Attempted and successful VBAC. Among the 143,970 women in the cohort, 75,086 (52.2%) attempted a VBAC for their second birth. Younger women, those of non-white ethnicity and those living in a more deprived area had higher rates of attempted VBAC. Overall, 47,602 women (63.4%) who attempted a VBAC had a successful vaginal birth. Younger women and women of white ethnicity had higher success rates. Black women had a particularly low success rate (OR, 0.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.50-0.57). Women who had an emergency caesarean section in their first birth also had a lower VBAC success rate, particularly those with a history of failed induction of labour (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.53-0.67). In this national cohort, just over one-half of women with a primary caesarean section who were eligible for a trial of labour attempted a VBAC for their second birth. Of these, almost two-thirds successfully achieved a vaginal delivery. © 2013 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  14. Phase I Randomized Safety Study of Twice Daily Dosing of Acidform Vaginal Gel: Candidate Antimicrobial Contraceptive

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Marla J.; Carpenter, Colleen A.; Lo, Yungtai; Einstein, Mark H.; Liu, Congzhou; Fredricks, David N.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acidform gel, an acid-buffering product that inactivates spermatozoa, may be an effective topical non-hormonal contraceptive. This study was designed to evaluate the safety of vaginal dosing and effects of Acidform on mucosal immune mediators, antimicrobial properties of genital secretions, and vaginal microbiota. Methods Thirty-six sexually abstinent U.S. women were randomized to apply Acidform or hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) placebo gel twice daily for 14 consecutive days. Safety was assessed by symptoms and pelvic examination. The impact of gel on mucosal immunity was assessed by quantifying cytokines, chemokines, antimicrobial proteins and antimicrobial activity of genital secretions collected by cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) at screening, 2 hours after gel application, and on days 7, 14 and 21. Vaginal microbiota was characterized at enrollment and day 14 using species-specific quantitative PCR assays. Results The median vaginal and cervical pH was significantly lower 2 hours after application of Acidform and was associated with an increase in the bactericidal activity of CVL against E. coli. However, 65% of women who received Acidform had at least one local adverse event compared with 11% who received placebo (p = 0.002). While there was no increase in inflammatory cytokines or chemokines, CVL concentrations of lactoferrin and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), an anti-inflammatory protein, were significantly lower following Acidform compared to HEC placebo gel application. There were no significant changes in Lactobacillus crispatus or Lactobacillus jensenii in either group but there was a decrease in Gardnerella vaginalis in the Acidform group (p = 0.08). Conclusions Acidform gel may augment mucosal defense as evidenced by an increase in bactericidal activity of genital secretions against E. coli and a decrease in Gardnerella vaginalis colonization. However, Acidform was associated with more irritation than placebo and lower levels

  15. Comparative study of the gut microbiome potentially related to milk protein in Murrah buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) and Chinese Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiachao; Xu, Chuanbiao; Huo, Dongxue; Hu, Qisong; Peng, Qiannan

    2017-02-08

    Previous studies suggested a close relationship between ruminant gut microbes and the mammary gland. In this study, shotgun metagenomic sequencing was used to reveal the differences in the intestinal microbiome potentially related to milk components in Murrah buffaloes and Chinese Holstein cattle. A PCoA based on the weighted Unifrac distances showed an apparent clustering pattern in the structure of intestinal microbiota between buffalo and cattle. We could attribute the structural difference to the genera of Sutterella, Coprococcus and Dorea. A further analysis of microbial functional features revealed that the biosynthesis of amino acids (including lysine, valine, leucine and isoleucine), lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and cofactor/vitamin biosynthesis were enriched in the buffalo. In contrast, dairy cattle had higher levels of pyruvate metabolism and carbon fixation in photosynthetic organisms. A further correlation analysis based on different milk components and the typical microbiome uncovered a significant positive correlation between milk protein and the microbial biosynthesis of amino acids, which was also positively correlated in the genera of Parabacteroides, Dorea and Sutterella. This study will expand our understanding of the intestinal microbiome of buffalo and cattle as representative ruminants, as well as provide new views about how to improve the production and nutritional qualities of animal milk.

  16. Soy Formula and Epigenetic Modifications: Analysis of Vaginal Epithelial Cells from Infant Girls in the IFED Study.

    PubMed

    Harlid, Sophia; Adgent, Margaret; Jefferson, Wendy N; Panduri, Vijayalakshmi; Umbach, David M; Xu, Zongli; Stallings, Virginia A; Williams, Carmen J; Rogan, Walter J; Taylor, Jack A

    2017-03-01

    Early-life exposure to estrogenic compounds affects the development of the reproductive system in rodent models and humans. Soy products, which contain phytoestrogens such as genistein, are one source of exposure in infants fed soy formula, and they result in high serum concentrations. Our goal was to determine whether soy exposure is associated with differential DNA methylation in vaginal cells from soy-fed infant girls. Using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, we evaluated epigenome-wide DNA methylation in vaginal cells from four soy formula-fed and six cow formula-fed girls from the Infant Feeding and Early Development (IFED) study. Using pyrosequencing we followed up the two most differentially methylated sites in 214 vaginal cell samples serially collected between birth and 9 months of age from 50 girls (28 soy formula-fed and 22 cow formula-fed). With a mouse model, we examined the effect of neonatal exposure to genistein on gene specific mRNA levels in vaginal tissue. The epigenome-wide scan suggested differences in methylation between soy formula-fed and cow formula-fed infants at three CpGs in the gene proline rich 5 like ( PRR5L ) ( p < 10 4 ). Pyrosequencing of the two feeding groups found that methylation levels progressively diverged with age, with pointwise differences becoming statistically significant after 126 days. Genistein-exposed mice showed a 50% decrease in vaginal Prr5l mRNA levels compared to controls. Girls fed soy formula have altered DNA methylation in vaginal cell DNA which may be associated with decreased expression of an estrogen-responsive gene. Citation: Harlid S, Adgent M, Jefferson WN, Panduri V, Umbach DM, Xu Z, Stallings VA, Williams CJ, Rogan WJ, Taylor JA. 2017. Soy formula and epigenetic modifications: analysis of vaginal epithelial cells from infant girls in the IFED study. Environ Health Perspect 125:447-452; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP428.

  17. Questions and challenges associated with studying the microbiome of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yige; Al, Kait F; Chanyi, Ryan M; Whiteside, Samantha; Dewar, Malcom; Razvi, Hassan; Reid, Gregor; Burton, Jeremy P

    2017-01-01

    Urologists are typically faced with clinical situations for which the microbiome may have been a contributing factor. Clinicians have a good understanding regarding the role of bacteria related to issues such as antibiotic resistance; however, they generally have a limited grasp of how the microbiome may relate to urological issues. The largest part of the human microbiome is situated in the gastrointestinal tract, and though this is mostly separated from the urinary system, bacterial dissemination and metabolic output by this community is thought to have a significant influence on urological conditions. Sites within the urogenital system that were once considered "sterile" may regularly have bacterial populations present. The health implications potentially extend all the way to the kidneys. This could affect urinary tract infections, bladder cancer, urinary incontinence and related conditions including the formation of kidney stones. Given the sensitivity of the methodologies employed, and the large potential for contamination when working with low abundance microbiomes, meticulous care in the analyses of urological samples at various sites is required. This review highlights the opportunities for urinary microbiome investigations and our experience in working with these low abundance samples in the urinary tract.

  18. Questions and challenges associated with studying the microbiome of the urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yige; Al, Kait F.; Chanyi, Ryan M.; Whiteside, Samantha; Dewar, Malcom; Razvi, Hassan; Reid, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Urologists are typically faced with clinical situations for which the microbiome may have been a contributing factor. Clinicians have a good understanding regarding the role of bacteria related to issues such as antibiotic resistance; however, they generally have a limited grasp of how the microbiome may relate to urological issues. The largest part of the human microbiome is situated in the gastrointestinal tract, and though this is mostly separated from the urinary system, bacterial dissemination and metabolic output by this community is thought to have a significant influence on urological conditions. Sites within the urogenital system that were once considered “sterile” may regularly have bacterial populations present. The health implications potentially extend all the way to the kidneys. This could affect urinary tract infections, bladder cancer, urinary incontinence and related conditions including the formation of kidney stones. Given the sensitivity of the methodologies employed, and the large potential for contamination when working with low abundance microbiomes, meticulous care in the analyses of urological samples at various sites is required. This review highlights the opportunities for urinary microbiome investigations and our experience in working with these low abundance samples in the urinary tract. PMID:28217698

  19. Vaginal health in contraceptive vaginal ring users - A review.

    PubMed

    Lete, Iñaki; Cuesta, María C; Marín, Juan M; Guerra, Sandra

    2013-08-01

    To provide an overview of the available data from clinical studies of vaginal conditions in women who use a vaginal ring as a contraceptive. A systematic review of the literature. Millions of women have already used the ethylene vinyl acetate vaginal ring that releases ethinylestradiol and etonogestrel for contraception. Because of its small size, more than four out of five women using the ring report that they do not feel it, even during sexual intercourse. No colposcopic or cytological changes have been observed in users, although approximately 10% have increased vaginal discharge. While in vitro studies have shown adhesion of Candida yeasts to the vaginal ring surface, clinical studies have not demonstrated a greater incidence of Candida infections compared to users of equivalent oral contraceptives. Some clinical studies suggest a lower incidence of bacterial vaginosis. No interaction exists between concomitant use of the vaginal ring and other drugs or products for vaginal use. The use of a contraceptive vaginal ring does not alter the vaginal ecosystem and therefore does not substantially affect vaginal health.

  20. Measuring the microbiome of chronic wounds with use of a topical antimicrobial dressing – A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Labbie, Michele; Willing, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Background Polymicrobial communities colonize all wounds, and biofilms are hypothesized to be a key link to the chronic state and stalled healing. Molecular methods offer greater insight when studying microbial ecology in chronic wounds, as only a small fraction of wound bacteria are cultured by currently available methods and studies have shown little agreement between culture and molecular based approaches. Some interventions, like dressings with oxidized silver, are reported to help the stalled wounds move to a normal healing trajectory but the underlying mechanisms are difficult to measure. One hypothesis is that the use of topical antimicrobial dressings targets the wound microbiome and reduces bioburden. Objectives Our objective was to determine if culture-independent molecular methods could be used to identify the microbial composition in chronic wounds, and measure the microbiome over time when a topical antimicrobial dressing is used to reduce bioburden. Methods Patients with chronic wounds defined as >6 weeks in duration and not taking systemic antibiotics were recruited to participate. A wound contact layer containing silver oxynitrate was applied immediately after routine sharp debridement material was collected and swabs of the wound bed taken. Next-generation sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene in each specimen was used to measure the microbiome. Results Distinct bacterial communities were observed between swab and debridement samples, highlighting spatial differences and the importance of sampling consistency. The microbial communities appeared to be similar between different diabetes statuses, but different among the three wound categories included. Conclusions Culture-independent methods can be applied to measure the microbiome of chronic wounds even when a topical antimicrobial dressing is applied to the wound. PMID:29155834

  1. Abnormal vaginal flora in symptomatic non-pregnant and pregnant women in a Greek hospital: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Tansarli, G S; Skalidis, T; Legakis, N J; Falagas, M E

    2017-02-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), candidiasis, and trichomoniasis were the three established types of vaginal conditions until aerobic vaginitis (AV) was defined in the early 2000s. We sought to study the prevalence of abnormal vaginal flora (AVF) with inflammation in our hospital and to correlate it with AV. We prospectively collected vaginal smear specimens originated from symptomatic women who were examined at Iaso Obstetrics, Gynecology and Children's Hospital of Athens from April 2014 until September 2015. Amsel's criteria were used for the diagnosis of BV. The presence of leukocytes and lactobacillary grade were evaluated to classify a condition as AVF with inflammation; subsequently, bacterial cultures were performed. A total of 761 women were included. Five hundred and seventy-nine women were diagnosed with candidiasis, BV, trichomoniasis, or other types of vaginitis in which no pathogenic bacterial growth occurred in cultures. One hundred and eighty-two women (23.9 %) were diagnosed with AVF with inflammation (116 non-pregnant, 66 pregnant). Escherichia coli was the most common pathogen among these women (non-pregnant: 45.7 %, pregnant: 34.8 %). Other common pathogens were Group-B-Streptococcus (non-pregnant: 20.7 %, pregnant: 22.7 % respectively), Enterococcus faecalis (14.7 %, 18.2 %), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (6.9 %, 12.1 %). The prevalence of AVF with inflammation may be high. Since inflammation criteria were applied, most cases of BV were eliminated and the majority of cases of AVF are AV. Therefore, clinicians should include AV in the differential diagnosis of vaginitis, while microbiologists should take into account the growth of aerobic bacteria in vaginal cultures originating from women with microscopic findings of AV.

  2. Metronidazole Vaginal

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat vaginal infections such as bacterial vaginosis (an infection caused from too much of certain bacteria in the vagina). Metronidazole is in a class of medications called nitroimidazole antimicrobials. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria.

  3. Vaginal bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... who are approaching menopause. Women who take oral contraceptives may experience episodes of abnormal vaginal bleeding. Often ... Practice Bulletin No. 110: noncontraceptive uses of hormonal contraceptives. Obstet Gynecol . 2010;115(1):206-218. PMID: ...

  4. Vaginal Discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... also be on the lookout for symptoms of yeast infections, bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis, 3 infections that ... cause changes in your vaginal discharge. Signs of yeast infections White, cottage cheese-like discharge Swelling and ...

  5. Estrogen Vaginal

    MedlinePlus

    ... estradiol vaginal ring is also used to treat hot flushes ('hot flashes'; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... leave the ring in place when you have sex. If you choose to remove it or if ...

  6. Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; LAVH - discharge ... you were in the hospital, you had a vaginal hysterectomy. Your surgeon made a cut in your ...

  7. Vaginal foreign body mimicking cervical cancer in postmenopausal woman - case study.

    PubMed

    Ciebiera, Michał; Słabuszewska-Jóźwiak, Aneta; Ledowicz, Witold; Jakiel, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    We present a case report of a 73-year-old, postmenopausal woman with detailed history of breast cancer and oncology treatment including tamoxifen therapy. She presented at the clinic of gynecology and obstetrics with recurrent inflammation of the urinary and genital tract and suspicion of a cervical mass. She also presented occasional abdominal complaints and malodorous vaginal discharge. These symptoms were observed in the patient for several years. Before hospitalization she received many kinds of empirical, antimicrobial treatment such as chlorquinaldol, metronidazole, nifuratel, and nystatin. She did not receive further guidance from doctors about the causes of ailments and further diagnostic and treatment capabilities. In our clinic a detailed diagnostic process including ultrasound transvaginal examination and a minisurgical procedure revealed the presence of a vaginal foreign body (which turned out to be a plastic, shampoo bottle cap) surrounded by a mass of inflamed tissue mimicking a cervical tumor. All symptoms and complaints subsided after surgical removal of the foreign body and antibacterial therapy with metronidazole and cefuroxime. Our study draws attention to the need of thorough gynecological care including prophylaxis, especially in the case of complaints of an intimate nature. Even trivial, frequently occurring disorders can be dangerous and require proper and responsible doctor's supervision and management through the healing process.

  8. Vaginal foreign body mimicking cervical cancer in postmenopausal woman – case study

    PubMed Central

    Słabuszewska-Jóźwiak, Aneta; Ledowicz, Witold; Jakiel, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 73-year-old, postmenopausal woman with detailed history of breast cancer and oncology treatment including tamoxifen therapy. She presented at the clinic of gynecology and obstetrics with recurrent inflammation of the urinary and genital tract and suspicion of a cervical mass. She also presented occasional abdominal complaints and malodorous vaginal discharge. These symptoms were observed in the patient for several years. Before hospitalization she received many kinds of empirical, antimicrobial treatment such as chlorquinaldol, metronidazole, nifuratel, and nystatin. She did not receive further guidance from doctors about the causes of ailments and further diagnostic and treatment capabilities. In our clinic a detailed diagnostic process including ultrasound transvaginal examination and a minisurgical procedure revealed the presence of a vaginal foreign body (which turned out to be a plastic, shampoo bottle cap) surrounded by a mass of inflamed tissue mimicking a cervical tumor. All symptoms and complaints subsided after surgical removal of the foreign body and antibacterial therapy with metronidazole and cefuroxime. Our study draws attention to the need of thorough gynecological care including prophylaxis, especially in the case of complaints of an intimate nature. Even trivial, frequently occurring disorders can be dangerous and require proper and responsible doctor's supervision and management through the healing process. PMID:26528112

  9. The microbiome and HIV prevention strategies in women.

    PubMed

    Abdool Karim, Salim S; Passmore, Jo-Ann S; Baxter, Cheryl

    2018-01-01

    HIV prevention approaches that women can use and control are a priority. Results from topical and oral preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) HIV prevention trials have produced inconsistent results in women. One of the main behavioural factors impacting effectiveness of PrEP has been suboptimal adherence. In this review, we examine biological factors that modulate topical PrEP efficacy, with particular focus on the vaginal microbiome. Genital inflammation is an independent risk factor for HIV acquisition in women. Using 16S rRNA sequencing of the vaginal microbiota, anaerobic bacteria linked with bacterial vaginosis have been shown to be associated with both genital inflammation and HIV risk. Using proteomics, it was recently discovered that a dysbiotic vaginal microbiome, comprising less than 50% Lactobacillus spp., directly influenced topical PrEP efficacy. Gardnerella vaginalis, the dominant vaginal species in dysbiotic women, was able to directly degrade tenofovir, but not dapivirine, an antiretroviral also being developed for topical PrEP. The link between bacterial vaginosis-associated organisms with HIV risk and altered tenofovir gel effectiveness underscores the importance of good vaginal health and good adherence for women to benefit maximally from topical PrEP. Altering the vaginal microbiome is one of the new directions being pursued for HIV prevention.

  10. Evaluation of vaginal complaints.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew R; Klink, Kathleen; Cohrssen, Andreas

    2004-03-17

    Vaginal symptoms are one of the most common reasons for gynecological consultation. Clinicians have traditionally diagnosed vaginal candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and vaginal trichomoniasis using some combination of physical examination, pH, the wet mount, and the whiff test. To evaluate the role of the clinical examination and determine the positive and negative likelihood ratios (LRs) for the diagnosis of vaginal candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and vaginal trichomoniasis. Using a structured literature review, we abstracted information on sensitivity and specificity for symptoms, signs, and office laboratory procedures. We chose published (1966 to April 2003) articles that appeared in the MEDLINE database and were indexed under the combined search terms of diagnosis with vaginitis, vaginal discharge, candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and trichomoniasis. Included studies of symptomatic premenopausal women seen in primary care settings. Tests were evaluated only if they would provide diagnostic information during the office visit and were compared with an acceptable criterion standard. All 3 authors extracted the data and computed sensitivity and specificity from each article independently. The absence of standard definitions for symptoms and signs made it impossible to combine results across studies. Symptoms alone do not allow clinicians to distinguish confidently between the causes of vaginitis. However, a patient's lack of itching makes candidiasis less likely (range of LRs, 0.18 [95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-0.70] to 0.79 [95% CI, 0.72-0.87]) and lack of perceived odor makes bacterial vaginosis unlikely (LR, 0.07 [95% CI, 0.01-0.51]). Similarly, physical examination signs are limited in their diagnostic power. The presence of inflammatory signs is associated with candidiasis (range of LRs, 2.1 [95% CI, 1.5-2.8] to 8.4 [95% CI, 2.3-31]). Presence of a "high cheese" odor on examination is predictive of bacterial vaginosis (LR, 3.2 [95% CI, 2

  11. High frequency of human papillomavirus detection in the vagina before first vaginal intercourse among females enrolled in a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Shew, Marcia L; Weaver, Bree; Tu, Wanzhu; Tong, Yan; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Brown, Darron R

    2013-03-15

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is believed to be primarily sexually transmitted. Few studies have documented the detection of HPV in the vagina before first vaginal intercourse. We used a longitudinally followed cohort of adolescent females without prior vaginal intercourse to examine the frequency of detection of vaginal HPV and the association between first reported HPV detection and noncoital sexual behaviors. HPV was detected in 45.5% of subjects (10 of 22) before first vaginal sex. Seven of these 10 subjects reported noncoital behaviors that, in part, might have explained genital transmission. HPV can be detected in the vagina before first sexual intercourse, highlighting the need for early vaccination.

  12. Impact of targeted counseling on reported vaginal hygiene practices and bacterial vaginosis: the HIV Prevention Trials Network 035 study.

    PubMed

    Kasaro, Margaret P; Husnik, Marla J; Chi, Benjamin H; Reid, Cheri; Magure, Tsitsi; Makanani, Bonus; Tembo, Tchangani; Ramjee, Gita; Maslankowski, Lisa; Rabe, Lorna; Brad Guffey, M

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the impact of intense counseling to reduce vaginal hygiene practices and its effect on bacterial vaginosis. A secondary data analysis of the HIV Prevention Trials Network 035 study was undertaken, focusing on HIV-negative, nonpregnant women who were at least 18 years old, in seven African sites and one US site. At enrollment and during follow-up quarterly visits, vaginal hygiene practices were determined by face-to-face administration of a behavioral assessment questionnaire. Vaginal hygiene practices were categorized as insertion into the vagina of (1) nothing, (2) water only, and (3) other substances with or without water. Each practice was quantified by frequency and type/combination of inserted substances. At quarterly visits, diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis was made using the Nugent score. Trends for vaginal hygiene practices and bacterial vaginosis were evaluated using generalized estimating equation models. A total of 3087 participants from the HIV Prevention Trials Network 035 study were eligible for this analysis. At enrollment, 1859 (60%) reported recent vaginal hygiene practices. By one year, this figure had decreased to 1019 (33%) with counseling. However, bacterial vaginosis prevalence remained consistent across the study observation period, with 36%-38% of women testing positive for the condition ( p for trend = 0.27). Overall, those who reported douching with water only (AOR = 1.03, 95%CI: 0.94-1.13) and those who reported inserting other substances (AOR= 0.98, 95%CI: 0.88-1.09) in the past quarter were not more likely to have bacterial vaginosis compared to those who reported no insertions. However, in South Africa, an increase in bacterial vaginosis was seen among those who reported inserting other substances (AOR: 1.48, 95%CI: 1.17, 1.88). In conclusion, targeted counseling against vaginal hygiene practices resulted in change in self-reported behavior but did not have an impact on bacterial vaginosis

  13. Fast track vaginal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ottesen, Marianne; Sørensen, Mette; Rasmussen, Yvonne; Smidt-Jensen, Steen; Kehlet, Henrik; Ottesen, Bent

    2002-02-01

    Our aim was to describe the need for postoperative hospitalization after vaginal surgery for utero-vaginal prolapse with well-defined charts for postoperative care. A prospective, descriptive study. Consecutive women admitted for first-time vaginal surgery for utero-vaginal prolapse at a public university hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark, underwent surgery and postoperative care in a fast track setting from September 15, 1999 to June 15 2000. A multimodal rehabilitation model with emphasis on information, standardized general anesthesia, reduced surgical distress, optimized pain-relief, early oral nutrition and ambulation, minimal use of indwelling catheter and vaginal packing. Postoperative hospital stay, complications, re-admission, success rate, patients' satisfaction and acceptability. Forty-one women with a median age of 69 years (range, 44-88 years) were included. All underwent anterior and/or posterior vaginal repair. Nineteen (46.3%) underwent vaginal hysterectomy, and eight (19.5%) underwent the Manchester procedure. Postoperative hospital stay was median 24 hr. Only three (7.3%) were discharged later than 48 hr. No re-admissions occurred. The most frequent complications were urinary retention exceeding 450 ml, and urinary tract infection (12.2%, and 9.8%, respectively). Short-term success rate was 97.6%. Patients' satisfaction rates were 85.4-95.1%. The median score of acceptability was 10 on a 0-10 points scale. The need for postoperative hospitalization was median 24 hr after vaginal surgery in a fast track setting, independently of the complexity of the procedure performed. Short-term success rate, satisfaction rates, and acceptability were all excellent. Follow up has been established to evaluate long-term success rates and recurrence.

  14. The microbiome of uncontacted Amerindians.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Jose C; Pehrsson, Erica C; Blaser, Martin J; Sandhu, Kuldip; Gao, Zhan; Wang, Bin; Magris, Magda; Hidalgo, Glida; Contreras, Monica; Noya-Alarcón, Óscar; Lander, Orlana; McDonald, Jeremy; Cox, Mike; Walter, Jens; Oh, Phaik Lyn; Ruiz, Jean F; Rodriguez, Selena; Shen, Nan; Song, Se Jin; Metcalf, Jessica; Knight, Rob; Dantas, Gautam; Dominguez-Bello, M Gloria

    2015-04-03

    Most studies of the human microbiome have focused on westernized people with life-style practices that decrease microbial survival and transmission, or on traditional societies that are currently in transition to westernization. We characterize the fecal, oral, and skin bacterial microbiome and resistome of members of an isolated Yanomami Amerindian village with no documented previous contact with Western people. These Yanomami harbor a microbiome with the highest diversity of bacteria and genetic functions ever reported in a human group. Despite their isolation, presumably for >11,000 years since their ancestors arrived in South America, and no known exposure to antibiotics, they harbor bacteria that carry functional antibiotic resistance (AR) genes, including those that confer resistance to synthetic antibiotics and are syntenic with mobilization elements. These results suggest that westernization significantly affects human microbiome diversity and that functional AR genes appear to be a feature of the human microbiome even in the absence of exposure to commercial antibiotics. AR genes are likely poised for mobilization and enrichment upon exposure to pharmacological levels of antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the need for extensive characterization of the function of the microbiome and resistome in remote nonwesternized populations before globalization of modern practices affects potentially beneficial bacteria harbored in the human body.

  15. The microbiome of uncontacted Amerindians

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Jose C.; Pehrsson, Erica C.; Blaser, Martin J.; Sandhu, Kuldip; Gao, Zhan; Wang, Bin; Magris, Magda; Hidalgo, Glida; Contreras, Monica; Noya-Alarcón, Óscar; Lander, Orlana; McDonald, Jeremy; Cox, Mike; Walter, Jens; Oh, Phaik Lyn; Ruiz, Jean F.; Rodriguez, Selena; Shen, Nan; Song, Se Jin; Metcalf, Jessica; Knight, Rob; Dantas, Gautam; Dominguez-Bello, M. Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Most studies of the human microbiome have focused on westernized people with life-style practices that decrease microbial survival and transmission, or on traditional societies that are currently in transition to westernization. We characterize the fecal, oral, and skin bacterial microbiome and resistome of members of an isolated Yanomami Amerindian village with no documented previous contact with Western people. These Yanomami harbor a microbiome with the highest diversity of bacteria and genetic functions ever reported in a human group. Despite their isolation, presumably for >11,000 years since their ancestors arrived in South America, and no known exposure to antibiotics, they harbor bacteria that carry functional antibiotic resistance (AR) genes, including those that confer resistance to synthetic antibiotics and are syntenic with mobilization elements. These results suggest that westernization significantly affects human microbiome diversity and that functional AR genes appear to be a feature of the human microbiome even in the absence of exposure to commercial antibiotics. AR genes are likely poised for mobilization and enrichment upon exposure to pharmacological levels of antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the need for extensive characterization of the function of the microbiome and resistome in remote nonwesternized populations before globalization of modern practices affects potentially beneficial bacteria harbored in the human body. PMID:26229982

  16. Evaluation of a novel vaginal bromocriptine mesylate formulation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Atef M; Hafez, Ehsan; El-Gebali, Ibraheem; Hassan, Saher B

    2005-04-01

    Because of the frequent side effects found with oral bromocriptine, we created two formulas of vaginal bromocriptine suppositories to compare with vaginal application of bromocriptine tablets. The formula containing bromocriptine and a releasing agent (Pluronic F127) showed an increased dissolution rate, 39-fold greater than that of the pure drug alone, and subsequently was effective in lowering serum prolactin.

  17. Y Chromosome DNA in Women's Vaginal Samples as a Biomarker of Recent Vaginal Sex and Condom Use With Male Partners in the HPV Infection and Transmission Among Couples Through Heterosexual Activity Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Malagón, Talía; Burchell, Ann; El-Zein, Mariam; Guénoun, Julie; Tellier, Pierre-Paul; Coutlée, François; Franco, Eduardo L

    2018-01-01

    Y chromosome DNA from male epithelial and sperm cells was detected in vaginal samples after unprotected sex in experimental studies. We assessed the strength of this association in an observational setting to examine the utility of Y chromosome DNA as a biomarker of recent sexual behaviors in epidemiological studies. The HPV (human papillomavirus) Infection and Transmission Among Couples Through Heterosexual Activity cohort study enrolled 502 women attending a university or college in Montréal, Canada, and their male partners from 2005 to 2010. Participants completed self-administered questionnaires. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction to test women's baseline vaginal samples for Y chromosome DNA and assessed which sexual behaviors were independent predictors of Y chromosome DNA positivity and quantity with logistic and negative binomial regression. Y chromosome DNA positivity decreased from 77% in women in partnerships reporting vaginal sex 0 to 1 day ago to 13% in women in partnerships reporting last vaginal sex of 15 or more days ago (adjusted odds ratio, 0.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.36). The mean proportion of exfoliated vaginal sample cells with Y chromosome DNA was much lower for women who reported always using condoms (0.01%) than for women who reported never using condoms (2.07%) (adjusted ratio, 26.8; 95% confidence interval, 8.9-80.5). No association was found with reported oral/digital sex frequency or concurrency of partnerships. Y chromosome DNA quantity is strongly associated with days since last vaginal sex and lack of condom use in observational settings. Y chromosome DNA quantity may prove useful as a correlate of recent vaginal sex in observational studies lacking data on sexual behavior, such as surveillance studies of human papillomavirus infection prevalence.

  18. Analysis of variation in charges and prices paid for vaginal and caesarean section births: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Renee Y; Akosa Antwi, Yaa; Weber, Ellerie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the between-hospital variation of charges and discounted prices for uncomplicated vaginal and caesarean section deliveries, and to determine the institutional and market-level characteristics that influence adjusted charges. Design, setting and participants Using data from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD), we conducted a cross-sectional study of all privately insured patients admitted to California hospitals in 2011 for uncomplicated vaginal delivery (diagnosis-related group (DRG) 775) or uncomplicated caesarean section (DRG 766). Outcome measures Hospital charges and discounted prices adjusted for each patient's clinical and demographic characteristics. Results We analysed 76 766 vaginal deliveries and 32 660 caesarean sections in California in 2011. After adjusting for patient demographic and clinical characteristics, we found that the average California woman could be charged as little as US$3296 or as much as US$37 227 for a vaginal delivery, and US$8312–US$70 908 for a caesarean section depending on which hospital she was admitted to. The discounted prices were, on an average, 37% of the charges. We found that hospitals in markets with middling competition had significantly lower adjusted charges for vaginal deliveries, while hospitals with higher wage indices and casemixes, as well as for-profit hospitals, had higher adjusted charges. Hospitals in markets with higher uninsurance rates charged significantly less for caesarean sections, while for-profit hospitals and hospitals with higher wage indices charged more. However, the institutional and market-level factors included in our models explained only 35–36% of the between-hospital variation in charges. Conclusions These results indicate that charges and discounted prices for two common, relatively homogeneous diagnosis groups—uncomplicated vaginal delivery and caesarean section—vary widely between hospitals and are not well

  19. Evaluation of the vaginal flora in pregnant women receiving opioid maintenance therapy: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Holzer, Iris; Kueronya, Verena; Husslein, Peter W; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2016-08-05

    Vaginal infections are a risk factor for preterm delivery. In this study, we sought to evaluate the vaginal flora of pregnant women receiving opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) in comparison to non-dependent, non-maintained controls. A total of 3763 women with singleton pregnancies who underwent routine screening for asymptomatic vaginal infections between 10 + 0 and 16 + 0 gestational weeks were examined. Vaginal smears were Gram-stained, and microscopically evaluated for bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis, and trichomoniasis. In a retrospective manner, data of 132 women receiving OMT (cases) were matched for age, ethnicity, parity, education, previous preterm delivery, and smoking status to the data of 3631 controls. The vaginal flora at antenatal screening served as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures were gestational age and birth weight. In the OMT group, 62/132 (47 %) pregnant women received methadone, 39/132 (29.5 %) buprenorphine, and 31/132 (23.5 %) slow-release oral morphine. Normal or intermediate flora was found in 72/132 OMT women (54.5 %) and 2865/3631 controls [78.9 %; OR 0.49 (95 % CI, 0.33-0.71); p < 0.001]. Candidiasis occurred more frequently in OMT women than in controls [OR 2.11 (95 % CI, 1.26-3.27); p < 0.001]. Findings were inconclusive regarding bacterial vaginosis (± candidiasis) and trichomoniasis. Compared to infants of the control group, those of women with OMT had a lower mean birth weight [MD -165.3 g (95 % CI, -283.6 to -46.9); p = 0.006]. Pregnant women with OMT are at risk for asymptomatic vaginal infections. As recurrent candidiasis is associated with preterm delivery, the vulnerability of this patient population should lead to consequent antenatal infection screening at early gestation.

  20. Analysis of variation in charges and prices paid for vaginal and caesarean section births: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Renee Y; Akosa Antwi, Yaa; Weber, Ellerie

    2014-01-15

    To examine the between-hospital variation of charges and discounted prices for uncomplicated vaginal and caesarean section deliveries, and to determine the institutional and market-level characteristics that influence adjusted charges. Using data from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD), we conducted a cross-sectional study of all privately insured patients admitted to California hospitals in 2011 for uncomplicated vaginal delivery (diagnosis-related group (DRG) 775) or uncomplicated caesarean section (DRG 766). Hospital charges and discounted prices adjusted for each patient's clinical and demographic characteristics. We analysed 76 766 vaginal deliveries and 32 660 caesarean sections in California in 2011. After adjusting for patient demographic and clinical characteristics, we found that the average California woman could be charged as little as US$3296 or as much as US$37 227 for a vaginal delivery, and US$8312-US$70 908 for a caesarean section depending on which hospital she was admitted to. The discounted prices were, on an average, 37% of the charges. We found that hospitals in markets with middling competition had significantly lower adjusted charges for vaginal deliveries, while hospitals with higher wage indices and casemixes, as well as for-profit hospitals, had higher adjusted charges. Hospitals in markets with higher uninsurance rates charged significantly less for caesarean sections, while for-profit hospitals and hospitals with higher wage indices charged more. However, the institutional and market-level factors included in our models explained only 35-36% of the between-hospital variation in charges. These results indicate that charges and discounted prices for two common, relatively homogeneous diagnosis groups-uncomplicated vaginal delivery and caesarean section-vary widely between hospitals and are not well explained by observable patient or hospital characteristics.

  1. Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Peter E; Dai, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Humans live in constant and vital symbiosis with a closely linked bacterial ecosystem called the microbiome, which influences many aspects of human health. When this microbial ecosystem becomes disrupted, the health of the human host can suffer; a condition called dysbiosis. However, the community compositions of human microbiomes also vary dramatically from individual to individual, and over time, making it difficult to uncover the underlying mechanisms linking the microbiome to human health. We propose that a microbiome's interaction with its human host is not necessarily dependent upon the presence or absence of particular bacterial species, but instead is dependent on its community metabolome; an emergent property of the microbiome. Using data from a previously published, longitudinal study of microbiome populations of the human gut, we extrapolated information about microbiome community enzyme profiles and metabolome models. Using machine learning techniques, we demonstrated that the aggregate predicted community enzyme function profiles and modeled metabolomes of a microbiome are more predictive of dysbiosis than either observed microbiome community composition or predicted enzyme function profiles. Specific enzyme functions and metabolites predictive of dysbiosis provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of microbiome-host interactions. The ability to use machine learning to predict dysbiosis from microbiome community interaction data provides a potentially powerful tool for understanding the links between the human microbiome and human health, pointing to potential microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.

  2. Defining normal apical vaginal support: a relook at the POSST study.

    PubMed

    Patnam, Radhika; Edenfield, Autumn; Swift, Steven

    2018-06-16

    The purpose of this study is to reanalyze data from the original 2005 Pelvic Organ Support Study (POSST) data set to define normal values for apical Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) points C and D and total vaginal length (TVL) in an asymptomatic population of women. In this retrospective observational data-set review, patient were >18 years presenting for annual gynecologic exams to six centers in the United States. Data included demographics, questions about prolapse symptoms, and POP-Q points. Means and standard deviations were determined for each POP-Q point in the total population. The data set comprised 1011 women; 59 were excluded because they met criteria for having POP or were missing data. This left 948 for study. Mean age of our study population was 42 ± 14 years, and 45.6% were white, 25.1% black, and 25.2% Hispanic. One hundred fifty-six had a prior hysterectomy. Mean values with standard deviations (SD) for POP-Q values are as following: point C (vaginal cuff) -7.3 ± 1.5 cm, point C (cervix) -5.9 ± 1.5, point D -8.7 cm ± 1.5 cm, TVL (no hysterectomy) 9.8 cm ± 1.3 cm, and TVL (hysterectomy) 8.9 cm ± 1.5 cm. This data suggests normal values for POP-Q apical points in a population of patient with annual gynecological exams.

  3. The Microbiome in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Trauma-Exposed Controls: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Hemmings, Sian M J; Malan-Müller, Stefanie; van den Heuvel, Leigh L; Demmitt, Brittany A; Stanislawski, Maggie A; Smith, David G; Bohr, Adam D; Stamper, Christopher E; Hyde, Embriette R; Morton, James T; Marotz, Clarisse A; Siebler, Philip H; Braspenning, Maarten; Van Criekinge, Wim; Hoisington, Andrew J; Brenner, Lisa A; Postolache, Teodor T; McQueen, Matthew B; Krauter, Kenneth S; Knight, Rob; Seedat, Soraya; Lowry, Christopher A

    2017-10-01

    Inadequate immunoregulation and elevated inflammation may be risk factors for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and microbial inputs are important determinants of immunoregulation; however, the association between the gut microbiota and PTSD is unknown. This study investigated the gut microbiome in a South African sample of PTSD-affected individuals and trauma-exposed (TE) controls to identify potential differences in microbial diversity or microbial community structure. The Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5 was used to diagnose PTSD according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition criteria. Microbial DNA was extracted from stool samples obtained from 18 individuals with PTSD and 12 TE control participants. Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene V3/V4 amplicons were generated and sequenced. Microbial community structure, α-diversity, and β-diversity were analyzed; random forest analysis was used to identify associations between bacterial taxa and PTSD. There were no differences between PTSD and TE control groups in α- or β-diversity measures (e.g., α-diversity: Shannon index, t = 0.386, p = .70; β-diversity, on the basis of analysis of similarities: Bray-Curtis test statistic = -0.033, p = .70); however, random forest analysis highlighted three phyla as important to distinguish PTSD status: Actinobacteria, Lentisphaerae, and Verrucomicrobia. Decreased total abundance of these taxa was associated with higher Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale scores (r = -0.387, p = .035). In this exploratory study, measures of overall microbial diversity were similar among individuals with PTSD and TE controls; however, decreased total abundance of Actinobacteria, Lentisphaerae, and Verrucomicrobia was associated with PTSD status.

  4. Effects of sea buckthorn oil intake on vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Larmo, Petra S; Yang, Baoru; Hyssälä, Juha; Kallio, Heikki P; Erkkola, Risto

    2014-11-01

    Vaginal atrophy, the thinning and drying of vaginal mucosa, is associated with menopause. The standard estrogen treatment is not suitable for all women. To investigate the effects of oral sea buckthorn (SB) oil supplementation on vaginal atrophy. A total of 116 postmenopausal women experiencing symptoms of vaginal dryness, itching or burning were randomized to this placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Ninety-eight participants completed the intervention of three months, during which they consumed 3g of SB or placebo oil daily. At the beginning and end, factors of vaginal health were scored by a gynecologist, vaginal pH and moisture were measured and vaginal health index was calculated. Symptoms of atrophy and menopause were evaluated at study visits and by daily logbooks. Serum samples were collected for the analysis of circulating lipids, liver enzymes and C-reactive protein. Compared to placebo, there was a significantly better rate of improvement in the integrity of vaginal epithelium in the SB group when both compliant and noncompliant participants were included (odds ratio (OR)=3.1, 95% CI 1.11-8.95). A beneficial trend was observed when only the compliant participants were included (OR=2.9; 95% CI 0.99-8.35). There was a tendency (P=0.08) toward better improvement of vaginal health index from baseline to the end in the SB group [(0.8 (SD 2.8)] compared to placebo [-0.1 (SD 2.0)]. SB oil showed beneficial effects on vaginal health, indicating it is a potential alternative for mucosal integrity for those women not able to use estrogen treatment for vaginal atrophy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Odon device for instrumental vaginal deliveries: results of a medical device pilot clinical study.

    PubMed

    Schvartzman, Javier A; Krupitzki, Hugo; Merialdi, Mario; Betrán, Ana Pilar; Requejo, Jennifer; Nguyen, My Huong; Vayena, Effy; Fiorillo, Angel E; Gadow, Enrique C; Vizcaino, Francisco M; von Petery, Felicitas; Marroquin, Victoria; Cafferata, María Luisa; Mazzoni, Agustina; Vannevel, Valerie; Pattinson, Robert C; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Althabe, Fernando; Bonet, Mercedes

    2018-03-12

    A prolonged and complicated second stage of labour is associated with serious perinatal complications. The Odon device is an innovation intended to perform instrumental vaginal delivery presently under development. We present an evaluation of the feasibility and safety of delivery with early prototypes of this device from an early terminated clinical study. Hospital-based, multi-phased, open-label, pilot clinical study with no control group in tertiary hospitals in Argentina and South Africa. Multiparous and nulliparous women, with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies, were enrolled during the third trimester of pregnancy. Delivery with Odon device was attempted under non-emergency conditions during the second stage of labour. The feasibility outcome was delivery with the Odon device defined as successful expulsion of the fetal head after one-time application of the device. Of the 49 women enrolled, the Odon device was inserted successfully in 46 (93%), and successful Odon device delivery as defined above was achieved in 35 (71%) women. Vaginal, first and second degree perineal tears occurred in 29 (59%) women. Four women had cervical tears. No third or fourth degree perineal tears were observed. All neonates were born alive and vigorous. No adverse maternal or infant outcomes were observed at 6-weeks follow-up for all dyads, and at 1 year for the first 30 dyads. Delivery using the Odon device is feasible. Observed genital tears could be due to the device or the process of delivery and assessment bias. Evaluating the effectiveness and safety of the further developed prototype of the BD Odon Device™ will require a randomized-controlled trial. ANZCTR ACTRN12613000141741 Registered 06 February 2013. Retrospectively registered.

  6. Prospective study of vaginal bacterial flora and other risk factors for vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    McClelland, R Scott; Richardson, Barbra A; Hassan, Wisal M; Graham, Susan M; Kiarie, James; Baeten, Jared M; Mandaliya, Kishorchandra; Jaoko, Walter; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah O; Holmes, King K

    2009-06-15

    It has been suggested that vaginal colonization with lactobacilli may reduce the risk of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), but supporting data are limited. Our objective was to determine the relationship between vaginal bacterial flora and VVC. We conducted a prospective cohort analysis that involved 151 Kenyan sex workers. At monthly follow-up visits, VVC was defined as the presence of yeast buds, pseudohyphae, or both on a wet preparation (including potassium hydroxide preparation) of vaginal secretions. Generalized estimating equations were used to identify correlates of VVC. Participants returned for a median of 12 visits (interquartile range, 11-12 visits). VVC was identified at 162 visits, including 26 involving symptomatic VVC. Bacterial vaginosis was associated with fewer episodes of VVC (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.29 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.16-0.50]). After excluding women with concurrent bacterial vaginosis, another possible cause of vaginal symptoms, the likelihood of symptomatic VVC was higher among those who had had yeast identified on wet preparation of vaginal secretions during the past 60 days (aOR, 4.06 [95% CI, 1.12-14.74]) and those with concurrent vaginal Lactobacillus colonization (aOR, 3.75 [95% CI, 1.30-10.83]). Contrary to the commonly posited hypothesis that vaginal Lactobacillus colonization has a protective effect, we found that such colonization was associated with a nearly 4-fold increase in the likelihood of symptomatic VVC.

  7. A Prospective Study of Vaginal Bacterial Flora and Other Risk Factors for Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, R. Scott; Richardson, Barbra A.; Hassan, Wisal M.; Graham, Susan M.; Kiarie, James; Baeten, Jared M.; Mandaliya, Kishorchandra; Jaoko, Walter; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah O.; Holmes, King K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that vaginal lactobacilli may reduce the risk of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), but supporting data are limited. Our objective was to determine the relationship between vaginal bacterial flora and VVC. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort analysis among 151 Kenyan sex workers. At monthly follow-up, VVC was defined as the presence of yeast buds, pseudohyphae, or both on vaginal wet preparation or KOH preparation. Generalized estimating equations were used to identify correlates of VVC. Results: Participants returned for a median of 12 (interquartile range 11-12) visits. Vulvovaginal candidiasis was present at 162 visits, including 26 with symptomatic VVC. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) was associated with fewer episodes of VVC (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.16-0.50). After excluding women with concurrent BV, another possible cause of vaginal symptoms, the likelihood of symptomatic VVC was higher in those with yeast on vaginal wet preparation in the past 60 days (aOR 4.06, 95% CI 1.12-14.74) and those with concurrent vaginal Lactobacillus colonization (aOR 3.75, 95% CI 1.30-10.83). Conclusions: Contrary to a commonly posed hypothesis of a protective effect, we found that vaginal Lactobacillus colonization was associated with a >4-fold increase in the likelihood of symptomatic VVC. PMID:19456235

  8. The Bali STD/AIDS study: association between vaginal hygiene practices and STDs among sex workers.

    PubMed

    Reed, B D; Ford, K; Wirawan, D N

    2001-02-01

    To assess the association between genital cleansing practices and the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases and of sexual health knowledge among female sex workers in Bali, Indonesia. Low priced commercial sex workers (CSWs) participated in the Bali STD/AIDS Study, a 3 year educational project evaluating the effect of education on the subsequent use of condoms and the prevalence of STDs and AIDS. Structured interviews, genital evaluation, laboratory evaluation for STDs, and treatment were performed. Vaginal cleansing characteristics including frequency, type, and reasons for use, were evaluated. Associations between these characteristics and the presence of bacterial and viral genital infections were assessed. Of 625 female sex workers evaluated between May and July 1998, 99.1% used substances, such as soap and toothpaste, to clean the vagina at least daily, with 69.3% performing this after each intercourse. The women using such cleansers after each client did not differ from those using them once or less daily in education, AIDS and condom use knowledge, time working as a CSW, or number of clients in the previous day. However, they were younger than those using vaginal cleansers daily or less, and reported lower condom usage in the past week. Several genital symptoms, such as discoloured discharge and odour, were reported less by women with the highest frequency of vaginal cleanser use. Prevalence of genital infections in this population of women was substantial, with bacterial infections more prevalent than viral infections. Infections were not associated with the type of cleanser used, using a genital cleanser on the day of examination, or using a cleanser after each client versus daily or less, except for candida colonisation, which was more prevalent in women cleansing after each client (OR=1.87, 95% CI 1.21, 2.90). However, symptomatic candida vulvovaginitis (positive culture plus presence of symptoms) was not associated with the prevalence of genital

  9. Comparative Study of Oral and Vaginal Misoprostol for Induction of Labour, Maternal and Foetal Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Komala, Kambhampati; Reddy, Meherlatha; Quadri, Iqbal Jehan; B., Suneetha; V., Ramya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Misoprostol is a new promising agent for cervical ripening and induction of labour .The ideal dose, route and frequency of administration of misoprostol are still under investigation. Although, vaginal application of misoprostol has been validated as a reasonable mean of induction, there is a patient resistance to digital examination and there is a risk of ascending infection. For this reason, oral administration of misoprostol for cervical ripening and labour induction has been tried. Aims and Objectives: To compare 50μg of oral misoprostol versus 25μg of intravaginal misoprostol for induction of labour at term and maternal, foetal outcomes. Methods: Two hundred women who were at term, with indication for induction of labour and Bishop scores of ≤5 were randomly assigned to receive misoprostol 50μg or 25μg intravaginal, every 4-6 hours, for a maximum of 5 doses. In either group, pregnant females with inadequate uterine contractions despite being given maximum 5 doses of misoprostol, were augmented using oxytocin. The primary outcome measure was time-interval from induction to vaginal delivery and vaginal delivery rate within 24 hours. Results: The median induction to vaginal delivery time in oral group (12.92h) and vaginal group (14.04 h) was not significant. Oral misoprostol resulted in more number of vaginal deliveries as compared to vaginal misoprostol (94% as compared to 86%), which was not significant. There was a significantly higher incidence of uterine tachysystole in the vaginal group, as compared to oral group. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to oxytocin augmentation, caesarean section rate, analgesic requirement and neonatal outcome. Conclusion: Oral misoprostol is as efficacious as vaginal misoprostol because of shorter induction delivery interval, lower caesarean section rates, and lower incidence of failed induction rates. Lower incidence of foetal distress and easy intake are observed if the

  10. The alligator gut microbiome and implications for archosaur symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Sarah W.; Engel, Annette Summers; Elsey, Ruth M.

    2013-01-01

    Among vertebrate gastrointestinal microbiome studies, complete representation of taxa is limited, particularly among reptiles. Here, we provide evidence for previously unrecognized host-microbiome associations along the gastrointestinal tract from the American alligator, a crown archosaur with shared ancestry to extinct taxa, including dinosaurs. Microbiome compositional variations reveal that the digestive system consists of multiple, longitudinally heterogeneous microbiomes that strongly correlate to specific gastrointestinal tract organs, regardless of rearing histories or feeding status. A core alligator gut microbiome comprised of Fusobacteria, but depleted in Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria common to mammalians, is compositionally unique from other vertebrate gut microbiomes, including other reptiles, fish, and herbivorous and carnivorous mammals. As such, modern alligator gut microbiomes advance our understanding of archosaur gut microbiome evolution, particularly if conserved host ecology has retained archosaur-specific symbioses over geologic time. PMID:24096888

  11. Final Report: The Human Microbiome as a Multipurpose Biomarker

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-23

    Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 microbiome, biomarker, microbial forensics, microbial ecology , identifiability REPORT...temporal variation in the ecology of the human microbiome, this work demonstrated the feasibility of microbiome-based identifiability for the first time...a result with important ethical implications for microbiome study design. In order to construct metagenomic codes that are stable over time, we

  12. Bespoke microbiome therapy to manage plant diseases.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Murali; Gupta, Alka; Thomas, George V

    2013-01-01

    Information gathered with advanced nucleotide sequencing technologies, small molecule detection systems and computational biology is revealing that a community of microbes and their genes, now termed "the microbiome," located in gut and rhizosphere, is responsible for maintaining the health of human beings and plants, respectively. Within the complete microbiome a "core-microbiome" exists that plays the pivotal role in well being of humans and plants. Recent studies in medicine have shown that an artificial mixture of bacteria representing the core gut microbiome of healthy person when transferred into gut of diseased person results in re-establishment of normal microflora in the latter leading to alleviation from diseased condition. In agriculture, though not exactly in similar manner as in medicine, success in plant disease management has been achieved through transfer of microbiome by mixing disease suppressive soils with disease conducive soils. A study more similar to artificial gut microbiome transfer in medical field has been recently reported in agriculture, in which transfer of microbiome via soil solutions (filtered and unfiltered) has shown ability to alleviate drought stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the exact practice of transferring artificially cultivated core-microbiome as in medicine has not thus far been attempted in plant disease management. Nonetheless, as the gut and rhizosphere microbiome are known to share many common traits, there exists a good scope for accomplishing similar studies in agriculture. Based upon the information drawn from all recent works in microbiome studies of gut and rhizosphere, we propose that tailor-made core-microbiome transfer therapy can be a success in agriculture too and it could become a viable strategy for management of plant diseases in future.

  13. Weight gain, body image and sexual function in young patients treated with contraceptive vaginal ring. A prospective pilot study.

    PubMed

    Morotti, Elena; Casadio, Paolo; Guasina, Francesca; Battaglia, Bruno; Mattioli, Mara; Battaglia, Cesare

    2017-08-01

    Oral contraceptives could induce mood changes. As far as our knowledge, there are no studies in literature that have examined the role of vaginal contraception in self-perceived body image. To evaluate the effects of intravaginal contraception on weight gain and perceived body image in relation with the Beck's Depression Inventory questionnaire (BDI) and the McCoy Female Sexuality Questionnaire (MFSQ). Twenty-one adult (18-35 years old) eumenorrheic (menstrual cycle of 25-35 days), lean (body mass index - BMI - of 19-25 kg/m 2 ) women who were referred for hormonal contraception were administered the Stunkard Figure Rating Scale (FRS), BDI and MFSQ. Subjects were studied in basal condition and after 6 months of therapy with vaginal contraception (NuvaRing®; Organon-Schering-Plough Italia, Milan, Italy). BMI, FRS, MFSQ and BDI. After 6 months of therapy with NuvaRing®, both body weight (60.0 ± 8.3; p = 0.050) and BMI (22.1 ± 3.1; p = 0.028) slightly, but statistically, increased. FRS and BDI showed no differences after the vaginal contraception. Hormonal contraception was associated with a significant decrease in the two-factor Italian MFSQ score. Vaginal ring seems a good alternative to other hormonal contraceptive not significantly altering the female sexuality and not influencing the FRS and BDI.

  14. A microbiome case-control study of recurrent acute otitis media identified potentially protective bacterial genera.

    PubMed

    Lappan, Rachael; Imbrogno, Kara; Sikazwe, Chisha; Anderson, Denise; Mok, Danny; Coates, Harvey; Vijayasekaran, Shyan; Bumbak, Paul; Blyth, Christopher C; Jamieson, Sarra E; Peacock, Christopher S

    2018-02-20

    Recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM, recurrent ear infection) is a common childhood disease caused by bacteria termed otopathogens, for which current treatments have limited effectiveness. Generic probiotic therapies have shown promise, but seem to lack specificity. We hypothesised that healthy children with no history of AOM carry protective commensal bacteria that could be translated into a specific probiotic therapy to break the cycle of re-infection. We characterised the nasopharyngeal microbiome of these children (controls) in comparison to children with rAOM (cases) to identify potentially protective bacteria. As some children with rAOM do not appear to carry any of the known otopathogens, we also hypothesised that characterisation of the middle ear microbiome could identify novel otopathogens, which may also guide the development of more effective therapies. Middle ear fluids, middle ear rinses and ear canal swabs from the cases and nasopharyngeal swabs from both groups underwent 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The nasopharyngeal microbiomes of cases and controls were distinct. We observed a significantly higher abundance of Corynebacterium and Dolosigranulum in the nasopharynx of controls. Alloiococcus, Staphylococcus and Turicella were abundant in the middle ear and ear canal of cases, but were uncommon in the nasopharynx of both groups. Gemella and Neisseria were characteristic of the case nasopharynx, but were not prevalent in the middle ear. Corynebacterium and Dolosigranulum are characteristic of a healthy nasopharyngeal microbiome. Alloiococcus, Staphylococcus and Turicella are possible novel otopathogens, though their rarity in the nasopharynx and prevalence in the ear canal means that their role as normal aural flora cannot be ruled out. Gemella and Neisseria are unlikely to be novel otopathogens as they do not appear to colonise the middle ear in children with rAOM.

  15. A prospective microbiome-wide association study of food sensitization and food allergy in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jessica H; Lee-Sarwar, Kathleen A; Sordillo, Joanne; Bunyavanich, Supinda; Zhou, Yanjiao; O'Connor, George; Sandel, Megan; Bacharier, Leonard B; Zeiger, Robert; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M; Gold, Diane R; Weiss, Scott T; Litonjua, Augusto A

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the intestinal microbiome are prospectively associated with the development of asthma; less is known regarding the role of microbiome alterations in food allergy development. Intestinal microbiome samples were collected at age 3-6 months in children participating in the follow-up phase of an interventional trial of high-dose vitamin D given during pregnancy. At age 3, sensitization to foods (milk, egg, peanut, soy, wheat, walnut) was assessed. Food allergy was defined as caretaker report of healthcare provider-diagnosed allergy to the above foods prior to age 3 with evidence of IgE sensitization. Analysis was performed using Phyloseq and DESeq2; P-values were adjusted for multiple comparisons. Complete data were available for 225 children; there were 87 cases of food sensitization and 14 cases of food allergy. Microbial diversity measures did not differ between food sensitization and food allergy cases and controls. The genera Haemophilus (log 2 fold change -2.15, P=.003), Dialister (log 2 fold change -2.22, P=.009), Dorea (log 2 fold change -1.65, P=.02), and Clostridium (log 2 fold change -1.47, P=.002) were underrepresented among subjects with food sensitization. The genera Citrobacter (log 2 fold change -3.41, P=.03), Oscillospira (log 2 fold change -2.80, P=.03), Lactococcus (log 2 fold change -3.19, P=.05), and Dorea (log 2 fold change -3.00, P=.05) were underrepresented among subjects with food allergy. The temporal association between bacterial colonization and food sensitization and allergy suggests that the microbiome may have a causal role in the development of food allergy. Our findings have therapeutic implications for the prevention and treatment of food allergy. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  16. An in vitro study to assess the impact of tetracycline on the human intestinal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Young; Ahn, Youngbeom; Khare, Sangeeta; Gokulan, Kuppan; Piñeiro, Silvia A; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2018-02-01

    The human intestinal microbiome, a generally stable ecosystem, could be potentially altered by the ingestion of antimicrobial drug residues in foods derived from animals. Data and the scientific published literature on the effects of antimicrobial residues on the human intestinal microbiome are reviewed by national regulatory authorities as part of the human food safety evaluation of veterinary antimicrobial agents used in food-producing animals. In this study, we determined if tetracycline, at low residue concentrations, could impact the human intestinal microbiome structure and the resistance-gene profile, following acute and subchronic exposure. The effects of 0.15, 1.5, 15, and 150 μg/ml of tetracycline, after 24 h and 40 days of exposure, in 3% human fecal suspensions, collected from three individuals (A, B, and C) were investigated using in vitro batch cultures. Results were variable, with either no change or minor changes in total bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies after exposure of fecal samples to tetracycline, because of the inter-individual variation of human gastrointestinal tract microbiota. Bacterial community analysis using rRNA-based pyrosequencing revealed that Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the predominant phyla in the three fecal samples; the ratio of phylotypes varied among individuals. The evaluation of bacterial community changes at the genus level, from control to tetracycline-treated fecal samples, suggested that tetracycline under the conditions of this study could lead to slight differences in the composition of intestinal microbiota. The genus Bacteroides (of the Bacteroidetes) was consistently altered from 1.68 to 5.70% and 4.82-8.22% at tetracycline concentrations of 0.15 μg/ml or above at both time points for individual A, respectively, and increased 5.13-13.50% and 10.92-22.18% for individual B, respectively. Clostridium family XI increased 3.50-25.34% in the presence of tetracycline at 40 days for individual C. Principal

  17. [Influence of vaginal microflora on the presence of persistent atypical squamous cells and atypical glandular cells in pap smear--a 3-year study].

    PubMed

    Ludwin, Inga; Ludwin, Artur; Basta, Antoni

    2010-05-01

    the evaluation of influence of abnormal vaginal biocoenosis on presence and maintenance ASC and AGC in Pap smears. The study group consisted of 242 non-pregnant women (25-65 years of age): 207 women (4.96%) with atypical sqamous cells and 35 (0.7%) with atypical glandular cells. In all women the vaginal flora was assessed by Nugent scale. Vaginal flora was normal in 157 (75.8%) and pathological in 50 (24.1%) women with ASC. In the ASC subgroup, the highest proportion of physiological vaginal flora was observed in 151 patients (77.4%) with ASC-US, in comparison to 44 (22.6%) with ASC-H, in which the percentage of women with normal or abnormal flora was the same (50% vs 50%). This difference was statistically significant. In case of AGC, vaginal culture was physiological in 23 (65.7%) women, and in 12 (34.3%) abnormal vaginal flora with features of the inflammation. The statistically significant influence of abnormal vaginal flora on the presence of atypical endometrial and endocervical cells was not observed. We did not observed any influence of abnormal vaginal flora on the presence, regression and progression of ASC and AGC.

  18. Male hamster preference for odors of female hamster vaginal discharges: studies of experiential and hormonal determinants.

    PubMed

    Gregory, E; Engel, K; Pfaff, D

    1975-07-01

    Male hamsters approach sources of odors from female hamster vaginal discharges and spend significantly more time around these odor sources than around control locations in the test box. This preference for female hamster vaginal odors appears in sexually inexperienced as well as experienced males, even in individuals isolated from females since the time of weaning. Castration significantly reduces the sex odor preference, and treatment with testosterone propionate partially restores it.

  19. Embracing Community Ecology in Plant Microbiome Research.

    PubMed

    Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2018-06-01

    Community assembly is mediated by selection, dispersal, drift, and speciation. Environmental selection is mostly used to date to explain patterns in plant microbiome assembly, whereas the influence of the other processes remains largely elusive. Recent studies highlight that adopting community ecology concepts provides a mechanistic framework for plant microbiome research. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Soy Formula and Epigenetic Modifications: Analysis of Vaginal Epithelial Cells from Infant Girls in the IFED Study

    PubMed Central

    Harlid, Sophia; Adgent, Margaret; Jefferson, Wendy N.; Panduri, Vijayalakshmi; Umbach, David M.; Xu, Zongli; Stallings, Virginia A.; Williams, Carmen J.; Rogan, Walter J.; Taylor, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early-life exposure to estrogenic compounds affects the development of the reproductive system in rodent models and humans. Soy products, which contain phytoestrogens such as genistein, are one source of exposure in infants fed soy formula, and they result in high serum concentrations. Objectives: Our goal was to determine whether soy exposure is associated with differential DNA methylation in vaginal cells from soy-fed infant girls. Methods: Using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, we evaluated epigenome-wide DNA methylation in vaginal cells from four soy formula–fed and six cow formula–fed girls from the Infant Feeding and Early Development (IFED) study. Using pyrosequencing we followed up the two most differentially methylated sites in 214 vaginal cell samples serially collected between birth and 9 months of age from 50 girls (28 soy formula–fed and 22 cow formula–fed). With a mouse model, we examined the effect of neonatal exposure to genistein on gene specific mRNA levels in vaginal tissue. Results: The epigenome-wide scan suggested differences in methylation between soy formula–fed and cow formula–fed infants at three CpGs in the gene proline rich 5 like (PRR5L) (p < 104). Pyrosequencing of the two feeding groups found that methylation levels progressively diverged with age, with pointwise differences becoming statistically significant after 126 days. Genistein-exposed mice showed a 50% decrease in vaginal Prr5l mRNA levels compared to controls. Conclusions: Girls fed soy formula have altered DNA methylation in vaginal cell DNA which may be associated with decreased expression of an estrogen-responsive gene. Citation: Harlid S, Adgent M, Jefferson WN, Panduri V, Umbach DM, Xu Z, Stallings VA, Williams CJ, Rogan WJ, Taylor JA. 2017. Soy formula and epigenetic modifications: analysis of vaginal epithelial cells from infant girls in the IFED study. Environ Health Perspect 125:447–452; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP428 PMID

  1. Effects of Cesarean delivery and formula supplementation on the intestinal microbiome of six-week old infants

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Juliette C.; Hoen, Anne G.; Lundgren, Sara N.; Farzan, Shohreh F.; Cottingham, Kathryn L.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; Li, Hongzhe; Moore, Jason H.; Karagas, Margaret R.

    2016-01-01

    Importance The intestinal microbiome plays a critical role in infant development, and delivery mode and feeding method (breastmilk vs. formula) are determinants of its composition. However, the importance of delivery mode beyond the first days of life is unknown, and studies of associations between infant feeding and microbiome composition have been generally limited to comparisons between exclusively breastfed and formula fed infants, with little consideration given to combination feeding of both breastmilk and formula. Objectives To examine the relative effects of delivery mode and feeding method on infant intestinal microbiome composition at approximately six weeks of life. Design, Setting and Participants Prospective observational study of 102 infants followed as part of a US pregnancy cohort study. Exposures Delivery mode was abstracted from delivery medical records and feeding method prior to the time of stool collection was ascertained through detailed questionnaires. Main Outcomes and Measures Stool microbiome composition was characterized using next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Results We identified independent associations between microbial community composition and both delivery mode and feeding method. Differences in microbial community composition between vaginally and infants delivered by Cesarean section were equivalent to or significantly larger than those between feeding groups. Bacterial communities associated with combination feeding were more similar to those associated with exclusive formula feeding than exclusive breastfeeding. We identified individual bacterial genera that were differentially abundant between delivery mode and feeding groups. Conclusions and Relevance The infant intestinal microbiome at approximately six weeks of age is significantly associated with both delivery mode and feeding method, and the supplementation of breastmilk feeding with formula is associated with a microbiome composition that resembles that of

  2. [Study on the relationship between vaginal and intestinal candida in patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao-li; Li, Zhen; Zuo, Xu-lei

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the relationship between vaginal and intestinal candida in patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis by using microbiological and molecular methods. The samples of vaginal discharge and anal swabs were collected from 148 cases with vulvovaginal candidiasis, followed by fungal culture, identification, purification and genome DNA extraction. The genome sequences from respective locations were aligned and typed according to their homology analyzed by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) PCR and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR. Patients with vulvovaginal infection or those with infections in intestine and vulvovagina were pooled respectively, while the recurrent incidences after local anti-fungal treatments were analyzed. Candida albicans is the dominant pathogen in 148 cases with vulvovaginal candidiasis (91.9%, 136/148); 33.1% (49/148) of patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis were infected in both intestine and vulvovagina. While 92% (22/24) of patients with intestinal and vaginal candida infection showed high homology. The recurrent rate of patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis complicated with concurrent intestinal candida infection (7/14) was significantly higher than that of solo vaginal infected patients [21% (6/29)] after vaginal treatment (P<0.05). The infection of vulvovaginal candidiasis is highly associated with the concurrent infection of intestinal candida. The recurrent rate is high in patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis with concurrent infection of intestinal candida after vaginal treatment. The general management to those patients infected by both vulvovaginal and intestinal candida is necessary in reducing the recurrence of the disease.

  3. Anatomic distribution of nerves and microvascular density in the human anterior vaginal wall: prospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Liao, Qinping; Zhang, Hong; Gao, Xuelian; Li, Xueying; Zhang, Miao

    2014-01-01

    The presence of the G-spot (an assumed erotic sensitive area in the anterior wall of the vagina) remains controversial. We explored the histomorphological basis of the G-spot. Biopsies were drawn from a 12 o'clock direction in the distal- and proximal-third areas of the anterior vagina of 32 Chinese subjects. The total number of protein gene product 9.5-immunoreactive nerves and smooth muscle actin-immunoreactive blood vessels in each specimen was quantified using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase assay. Vaginal innervation was observed in the lamina propria and muscle layer of the anterior vaginal wall. The distal-third of the anterior vaginal wall had significantly richer small-nerve-fiber innervation in the lamina propria than the proximal-third (p = 0.000) and in the vaginal muscle layer (p = 0.006). There were abundant microvessels in the lamina propria and muscle layer, but no small vessels in the lamina propria and few in the muscle layer. Significant differences were noted in the number of microvessels when comparing the distal- with proximal-third parts in the lamina propria (p = 0.046) and muscle layer (p = 0.002). Significantly increased density of nerves and microvessels in the distal-third of the anterior vaginal wall could be the histomorphological basis of the G-spot. Distal anterior vaginal repair could disrupt the normal anatomy, neurovascular supply and function of the G-spot, and cause sexual dysfunction.

  4. Lung microbiome and disease progression in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: an analysis of the COMET study.

    PubMed

    Han, MeiLan K; Zhou, Yueren; Murray, Susan; Tayob, Nabihah; Noth, Imre; Lama, Vibha N; Moore, Bethany B; White, Eric S; Flaherty, Kevin R; Huffnagle, Gary B; Martinez, Fernando J

    2014-07-01

    The role of the lung microbiome in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is unknown. We investigated whether unique microbial signatures were associated with progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Patients (aged 35-80 years) with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis within 4 years of diagnosis from the Correlating Outcomes with biochemical Markers to Estimate Time-progression (COMET) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis study were followed up for a maximum of 80 weeks. Progression-free survival was defined as time to death, acute exacerbation, lung transplant, or decrease in forced vital capacity (FVC) of 10% or greater or decrease in diffusion capacity of the lung (DLCO) of 15% or greater. DNA was isolated from 55 samples of bronchoscopic alveolar lavage. 454 pyrosequencing was used to assign operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to bacteria based on a 3% sequence divergence. Adjusted Cox models were used to identify OTUs that were significantly associated with progression-free survival at a p<0.10. These OTUs were then used in the analysis of the principal components. The association between principal components and microbes with high factor loadings and progression-free survival were assessed with Cox regression analyses. The COMET study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01071707. Mean FVC was 70.1% (SD 17.0) and DLCO 42.3% (14.0) of predicted. Disease progression was significantly associated with increased relative abundance of two OTUs-Streptococcus OTU 1345 (relative risk 1.11, 95% CI 1.04-1.18; p=0.0009) and Staphylococcus OTU 1348 (1.16, 1.03-1.31, p=0.012). Thresholds for relative abundance of each OTU associated with progression-free survival were more than 3.9% for Streptococcus OTU 1345 (10.19, 2.94-35.35; p=0.0002) and more than 1.8% for Staphylococcus OTU 1348 (5.06, 1.71-14.93; p=0.003). These preliminary data suggest progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is associated with the presence of specific members within the

  5. Metabolic Model-Based Integration of Microbiome Taxonomic and Metabolomic Profiles Elucidates Mechanistic Links between Ecological and Metabolic Variation.

    PubMed

    Noecker, Cecilia; Eng, Alexander; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Theriot, Casey M; Young, Vincent B; Jansson, Janet K; Fredricks, David N; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2016-01-01

    Multiple molecular assays now enable high-throughput profiling of the ecology, metabolic capacity, and activity of the human microbiome. However, to date, analyses of such multi-omic data typically focus on statistical associations, often ignoring extensive prior knowledge of the mechanisms linking these various facets of the microbiome. Here, we introduce a comprehensive framework to systematically link variation in metabolomic data with community composition by utilizing taxonomic, genomic, and metabolic information. Specifically, we integrate available and inferred genomic data, metabolic network modeling, and a method for predicting community-wide metabolite turnover to estimate the biosynthetic and degradation potential of a given community. Our framework then compares variation in predicted metabolic potential with variation in measured metabolites' abundances to evaluate whether community composition can explain observed shifts in the community metabolome, and to identify key taxa and genes contributing to the shifts. Focusing on two independent vaginal microbiome data sets, each pairing 16S community profiling with large-scale metabolomics, we demonstrate that our framework successfully recapitulates observed variation in 37% of metabolites. Well-predicted metabolite variation tends to result from disease-associated metabolism. We further identify several disease-enriched species that contribute significantly to these predictions. Interestingly, our analysis also detects metabolites for which the predicted variation negatively correlates with the measured variation, suggesting environmental control points of community metabolism. Applying this framework to gut microbiome data sets reveals similar trends, including prediction of bile acid metabolite shifts. This framework is an important first step toward a system-level multi-omic integration and an improved mechanistic understanding of the microbiome activity and dynamics in health and disease. Studies

  6. Metabolic Model-Based Integration of Microbiome Taxonomic and Metabolomic Profiles Elucidates Mechanistic Links between Ecological and Metabolic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Noecker, Cecilia; Eng, Alexander; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Theriot, Casey M.; Young, Vincent B.; Jansson, Janet K.; Fredricks, David N.

    2016-01-01

    . IMPORTANCE Studies characterizing both the taxonomic composition and metabolic profile of various microbial communities are becoming increasingly common, yet new computational methods are needed to integrate and interpret these data in terms of known biological mechanisms. Here, we introduce an analytical framework to link species composition and metabolite measurements, using a simple model to predict the effects of community ecology on metabolite concentrations and evaluating whether these predictions agree with measured metabolomic profiles. We find that a surprisingly large proportion of metabolite variation in the vaginal microbiome can be predicted based on species composition (including dramatic shifts associated with disease), identify putative mechanisms underlying these predictions, and evaluate the roles of individual bacterial species and genes. Analysis of gut microbiome data using this framework recovers similar community metabolic trends. This framework lays the foundation for model-based multi-omic integrative studies, ultimately improving our understanding of microbial community metabolism. PMID:27239563

  7. Large contribution of human papillomavirus in vaginal neoplastic lesions: a worldwide study in 597 samples.

    PubMed

    Alemany, L; Saunier, M; Tinoco, L; Quirós, B; Alvarado-Cabrero, I; Alejo, M; Joura, E A; Maldonado, P; Klaustermeier, J; Salmerón, J; Bergeron, C; Petry, K U; Guimerà, N; Clavero, O; Murillo, R; Clavel, C; Wain, V; Geraets, D T; Jach, R; Cross, P; Carrilho, C; Molina, C; Shin, H R; Mandys, V; Nowakowski, A M; Vidal, A; Lombardi, L; Kitchener, H; Sica, A R; Magaña-León, C; Pawlita, M; Quint, W; Bravo, I G; Muñoz, N; de Sanjosé, S; Bosch, F X

    2014-11-01

    This work describes the human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and the HPV type distribution in a large series of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) grades 2/3 and vaginal cancer worldwide. We analysed 189 VAIN 2/3 and 408 invasive vaginal cancer cases collected from 31 countries from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of sectioned formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and typing was performed using the SPF-10/DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA)/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 146 vaginal cancers was tested for p16(INK4a) expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance. HPV DNA was detected in 74% (95% confidence interval (CI): 70-78%) of invasive cancers and in 96% (95% CI: 92-98%) of VAIN 2/3. Among cancers, the highest detection rates were observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, and in younger ages. Concerning the type-specific distribution, HPV16 was the most frequently type detected in both precancerous and cancerous lesions (59%). p16(INK4a) overexpression was found in 87% of HPV DNA positive vaginal cancer cases. HPV was identified in a large proportion of invasive vaginal cancers and in almost all VAIN 2/3. HPV16 was the most common type detected. A large impact in the reduction of the burden of vaginal neoplastic lesions is expected among vaccinated cohorts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cervical Microbiome and Cytokine Profile at Various Stages of Cervical Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bahena-Román, Margarita; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Cortina-Ceballos, Bernardo; López-Estrada, Guillermina; Delgado-Romero, Karina; Burguete-García, Ana I.; Cantú, David; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is caused by high-risk human papillomavirus persistence due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines. Vaginal microbiota determines the presence of certain cytokines locally. We assessed the association between cervical microbiota diversity and the histopathological diagnosis of each stage of CC, and we evaluated mRNA cervical expression levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, TNF-α and IFN-γ across the histopathological diagnosis and specific bacterial clusters. We determined the cervical microbiota by high throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons and classified it in community state types (CST). Mean difference analyses between alpha-diversity and histopathological diagnosis were carried out, as well as a β-diversity analysis within the histological diagnosis. Cervical cytokine mRNA expression was analyzed across the CSTs and the histopathological diagnoses. We found a significant difference in microbiota's diversity in NCL-HPV negative women vs those with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and CC(p = 0.006, p = 0.036).When β-diversity was evaluated, the CC samples showed the highest variation within groups (p<0.0006) and the largest distance compared to NCL-HPV negative ones (p<0.00001). The predominant bacteria in women with normal cytology were L. crispatus and L. iners, whereas for SIL, it was Sneathia spp. and for CC, Fusobacterium spp. We found higher median cervical levels of IL-4 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the CST dominated by Fusobacterium spp. These results suggest that the cervical microbiota may be implicated in cervical cancer pathology. Further cohort studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:27115350

  9. Aerobic vaginitis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Donders, Ggg; Bellen, G; Rezeberga, D

    2011-09-01

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is an alteration in vaginal bacterial flora that differs from bacterial vaginosis (BV). AV is characterised by an abnormal vaginal microflora accompanied by an increased localised inflammatory reaction and immune response, as opposed to the suppressed immune response that is characteristic of BV. Given the increased local production of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and IL-8 associated with AV during pregnancy, not surprisingly AV is associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery, chorioamnionitis and funisitis of the fetus. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment for AV in pregnant or non-pregnant women, but a broader spectrum drug such as clindamycin is preferred above metronidazole to prevent infection-related preterm birth. The exact role of AV in pregnancy, the potential benefit of screening, and the use of newer local antibiotics, disinfectants, probiotics and immune modulators need further study. © 2011 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2011 RCOG.

  10. Vaginal progesterone prophylaxis for preterm birth (the OPPTIMUM study): a multicentre, randomised, double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Norman, Jane Elizabeth; Marlow, Neil; Messow, Claudia-Martina; Shennan, Andrew; Bennett, Phillip R; Thornton, Steven; Robson, Stephen C; McConnachie, Alex; Petrou, Stavros; Sebire, Neil J; Lavender, Tina; Whyte, Sonia; Norrie, John

    2016-05-21

    Progesterone administration has been shown to reduce the risk of preterm birth and neonatal morbidity in women at high risk, but there is uncertainty about longer term effects on the child. We did a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial of vaginal progesterone, 200 mg daily taken from 22-24 to 34 weeks of gestation, on pregnancy and infant outcomes in women at risk of preterm birth (because of previous spontaneous birth at ≤34 weeks and 0 days of gestation, or a cervical length ≤25 mm, or because of a positive fetal fibronectin test combined with other clinical risk factors for preterm birth [any one of a history in a previous pregnancy of preterm birth, second trimester loss, preterm premature fetal membrane rupture, or a history of a cervical procedure to treat abnormal smears]). The objective of the study was to determine whether vaginal progesterone prophylaxis given to reduce the risk of preterm birth affects neonatal and childhood outcomes. We defined three primary outcomes: fetal death or birth before 34 weeks and 0 days gestation (obstetric), a composite of death, brain injury, or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (neonatal), and a standardised cognitive score at 2 years of age (childhood), imputing values for deaths. Randomisation was done through a web portal, with participants, investigators, and others involved in giving the intervention, assessing outcomes, or analysing data masked to treatment allocation until the end of the study. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered at ISRCTN.com, number ISRCTN14568373. Between Feb 2, 2009, and April 12, 2013, we randomly assigned 1228 women to the placebo group (n=610) and the progesterone group (n=618). In the placebo group, data from 597, 587, and 439 women or babies were available for analysis of obstetric, neonatal, and childhood outcomes, respectively; in the progesterone group the corresponding numbers were 600, 589, and 430. After correction for multiple outcomes

  11. Emerging Technologies for Gut Microbiome Research

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jason W.; Roach, Jeffrey; Azcarate-Peril, M. Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the importance of the gut microbiome on modulation of host health has become a subject of great interest for researchers across disciplines. As an intrinsically multidisciplinary field, microbiome research has been able to reap the benefits of technological advancements in systems and synthetic biology, biomaterials engineering, and traditional microbiology. Gut microbiome research has been revolutionized by high-throughput sequencing technology, permitting compositional and functional analyses that were previously an unrealistic undertaking. Emerging technologies including engineered organoids derived from human stem cells, high-throughput culturing, and microfluidics assays allowing for the introduction of novel approaches will improve the efficiency and quality of microbiome research. Here, we will discuss emerging technologies and their potential impact on gut microbiome studies. PMID:27426971

  12. Macroscopically detected female genital injury after consensual and non-consensual vaginal penetration: a prospective comparison study.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Catherine; Perera, Rafael; Jacobs, Ian; Ward, Alison

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence, type and pattern of macroscopically detected female genital injury after consensual and non-consensual vaginal penetration to further an understanding of the forensic significance of genital injury in women reporting sexual assault. A secondary aim was to identify any effect of a range of possible variables upon the likelihood of genital injury resulting from vaginal penetrative sexual intercourse. Two groups of reproductive age women (aged 18-45 years) were prospectively recruited within 72 h of a single episode of vaginal penetrative sex, and macroscopically examined for the presence of bruises, abrasions and lacerations at twelve external and internal genital sites. Forty one women who presented for forensic examination after reporting a sexual assault to police were recruited to the non-consensual group and 81 women who presented for routine cervical screening or with sexual health concerns to a primary health care service to the consensual group. Each group was examined by a different group of doctors, all of whom were experienced in both forensic genital examination and gynaecological examination of healthy and diseased sexually active women. Data collection and examination protocols were the same for both groups. The key finding was a statistically significant difference in genital injury prevalence between women who were vaginally penetrated non-consensually and consensually; 53.7% of the non-consensual group (22/41) and 9.9% of the consensual group (8/81) were found to have at least one genital injury [OR 10.57, CI (4.07, 27.42), p < 0.00001]. Penetration with finger/s and possible pre-existing genital 'infection' were found to be significantly associated with the presence of injury in the univariate analysis after adjusting for consent. Logistic regression demonstrated that women penetrated without consent were 19.5 times more likely to sustain at least one genital injury, than those penetrated

  13. Human genetic variation and the gut microbiome in disease.

    PubMed

    Hall, Andrew Brantley; Tolonen, Andrew C; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2017-11-01

    Taxonomic and functional changes to the composition of the gut microbiome have been implicated in multiple human diseases. Recent microbiome genome-wide association studies reveal that variants in many human genes involved in immunity and gut architecture are associated with an altered composition of the gut microbiome. Although many factors can affect the microbial organisms residing in the gut, a number of recent findings support the hypothesis that certain host genetic variants predispose an individual towards microbiome dysbiosis. This condition, in which the normal microbiome population structure is disturbed, is a key feature in disorders of metabolism and immunity.

  14. Antibiotic use and microbiome function.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Manuel; Méndez-García, Celia; Rojo, David; Barbas, Coral; Moya, Andrés

    2017-06-15

    Our microbiome should be understood as one of the most complex components of the human body. The use of β-lactam antibiotics is one of the microbiome covariates that influence its composition. The extent to which our microbiota changes after an antibiotic intervention depends not only on the chemical nature of the antibiotic or cocktail of antibiotics used to treat specific infections, but also on the type of administration, duration and dose, as well as the level of resistance that each microbiota develops. We have begun to appreciate that not all bacteria within our microbiota are vulnerable or reactive to different antibiotic interventions, and that their influence on both microbial composition and metabolism may differ. Antibiotics are being used worldwide on a huge scale and the prescription of antibiotics is continuing to rise; however, their effects on our microbiota have been reported for only a limited number of them. This article presents a critical review of the antibiotics or antibiotic cocktails whose use in humans has been linked to changes in the composition of our microbial communities, with a particular focus on the gut, oral, respiratory, skin and vaginal microbiota, and on their molecular agents (genes, proteins and metabolites). We review the state of the art as of June 2016, and cover a total of circa 68 different antibiotics. The data herein are the first to compile information about the bacteria, fungi, archaea and viruses most influenced by the main antibiotic treatments prescribed nowadays. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of the cutaneous microbiome in skin cancer: lessons learned from the gut.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Champer, Jackson; Beynet, David; Kim, Jenny; Friedman, Adam J

    2015-05-01

    The human microbiome has recently gained prominence as a major factor in health and disease. Here we review the literature regarding the microbiome and cancer and suggest how the microbiome may be manipulated for improved health outcomes. The gut microbiome has been relatively well studied, and the mechanisms of how it may increase or decrease the risk of certain cancers may apply to the skin microbiome. Additionally, the gut microbiome may directly impact the risk of cancer in the skin and other organs by promoting systemic inflammation. The skin microbiome itself is as diverse as the gut microbiome, but research has just begun to unravel its influence on the host. Like the gut microbiome, it affects the risk for several diseases, including cancer. By using healthpromoting strains from the microbiome in oral or topical probiotics, it may be possible to reduce the risk of skin cancer and perhaps even increase the likelihood of successful treatment.

  16. Prevalent high-risk HPV infection and vaginal microbiota in Nigerian women.

    PubMed

    Dareng, E O; Ma, B; Famooto, A O; Adebamowo, S N; Offiong, R A; Olaniyan, O; Dakum, P S; Wheeler, C M; Fadrosh, D; Yang, H; Gajer, P; Brotman, R M; Ravel, J; Adebamowo, C A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the association between high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) and the vaginal microbiome. Participants were recruited in Nigeria between April and August 2012. Vaginal bacterial composition was characterized by deep sequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA gene fragments (V4) on Illumina MiSeq and HPV was identified using the Roche Linear Array® HPV genotyping test. We used exact logistic regression models to evaluate the association between community state types (CSTs) of vaginal microbiota and hrHPV infection, weighted UniFrac distances to compare the vaginal microbiota of individuals with prevalent hrHPV to those without prevalent hrHPV infection, and the Linear Discriminant Analysis effect size (LEfSe) algorithm to characterize bacteria associated with prevalent hrHPV infection. We observed four CSTs: CST IV-B with a low relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. in 50% of participants; CST III (dominated by L. iners) in 39·2%; CST I (dominated by L. crispatus) in 7·9%; and CST VI (dominated by proteobacteria) in 2·9% of participants. LEfSe analysis suggested an association between prevalent hrHPV infection and a decreased abundance of Lactobacillus sp. with increased abundance of anaerobes particularly of the genera Prevotella and Leptotrichia in HIV-negative women (P < 0·05). These results are hypothesis generating and further studies are required.

  17. Prospective study of vaginal dilator use adherence and efficacy following radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ethel; Kelvin, Joanne F.; Thom, Bridgette; Riedel, Elyn; Tom, Ashlyn; Carter, Jeanne; Alektiar, Kaled; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Vaginal stenosis (VS) after pelvic radiotherapy can impair long-term quality of life. We prospectively assessed adherence and efficacy of VD use as the primary and secondary objectives, respectively. Material and methods Women with gastrointestinal (n=63) and gynecologic (n=46) cancers self-reported use and VD size in monthly diaries for 12 months after radiotherapy. Adherence was measured as actual VD use out of recommended times over 12 months (3×/week × 52 weeks = 156). Results Among 109 participants, aged 28–81 years (median, 58 years), mean percent adherence over 12 months was 42% (95% confidence interval [CI], 36%–48%). Adherence was highest in the first quarter (56%), but fell to 25% by the fourth. Disease type, treatment sequence, and chemotherapy were predictors of adherence (all P<.05). Eighty-two percent maintained pre-RT VD size at 12 months; of 49% with decrease in VD size at 1 month post-RT, 71% returned to pre-RT VD size at 12 months. Disease type, younger age, and increased adherence at 6 months were associated with maintaining or returning to pre-RT size at 12 months (all P≤.05). Conclusions VD use is effective in minimizing VS, but adherence at 12 months was poor. Studies evaluating methods of improving adherence and determining the optimal frequency and duration of use are needed. PMID:26164775

  18. Does the Vaginal Flora Modify When a Synthetic Mesh is Used for Genital Prolapse Repair in Postmenopausal Women? A Pilot, Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Edilson Benedito; Brito, Luiz Gustavo Oliveria; Giraldo, Paulo César; Teatin Juliato, Cássia Raquel

    2018-01-10

    The vaginal flora from postmenopausal women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is different from younger women. We hypothesized that the decision of a surgical route using a mesh would modify the vaginal flora. The purpose of this study was to analyze the vaginal flora from postmenopausal women that were submitted to abdominal sacrocervicopexy or vaginal sacrospinous fixation. A pilot, randomized controlled study with 50 women aged 55 to 75 years (n = 25; abdominal sacrocervicopexy + subtotal hysterectomy; n = 25 vaginal sacrospinous fixation + vaginal hysterectomy) was performed. A polyvinylidene mesh was used in both arms. The vaginal content analysis was collected before and 60 days after the surgery. The type of flora, the presence of lactobacilli/leukocytes, and the Nugent criteria were analyzed. Most of the women were white (80%), with at least 1 comorbidity (69.9%), did not present sexual activity (60%), and presented advanced stage 4 POP. Two thirds of women presented a type 3 flora, and half of them did not present lactobacilli (48.3%). About the Nugent criteria, 51.7% presented normal flora, 46.6% found altered flora, and 1.7% had bacterial vaginosis. There were no differences about the type of flora (P = 1), number of lactobacilli (P = 0.9187), Nugent criteria (P = 0.4235), inflammation (P = 0.1018), and bacterial vaginosis (P = 0.64) before and after surgery in both groups. In this pilot study, the use of synthetic mesh by vaginal or abdominal route did not affect the vaginal flora in postmenopausal women operated on by POP surgery.

  19. The Egyptian Red Sea coastal microbiome: A study revealing differential microbial responses to diverse anthropogenic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Ghada A; Abd-Elgawad, Amr; Ouf, Amged; Siam, Rania

    2016-07-01

    The Red Sea is considered one of the youngest oceanic systems, with unique physical, geochemical and biological characteristics. Tourism, industrialization, extensive fishing, oil processing and shipping are extensive sources of pollution in the Red Sea. We analyzed the geochemical characteristics and microbial community of sediments along the Egyptian coast of the Red Sea. Our sites mainly included 1) four ports used for shipping aluminum, ilmenite and phosphate; 2) a site previously reported to have suffered extensive oil spills; and 3) a site impacted by tourism. Two major datasets for the sediment of ten Red Sea coastal sites were generated; i) a chemical dataset included measurements of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur, metals and selected semi-volatile oil; and ii) a 16S rRNA Pyrotags bacterial metagenomic dataset. Based on the taxonomic assignments of the 16S rRNA Pyrotags to major bacterial groups, we report 30 taxa constituting an Egyptian Red Sea Coastal Microbiome. Bacteria that degrade hydrocarbons were predominant in the majority of the sites, particularly in two ports where they reached up to 76% of the total identified genera. In contrast, sulfate-reducing and sulfate-oxidizing bacteria dominated two lakes at the expense of other hydrocarbon metabolizers. Despite the reported "Egyptian Red Sea Coastal Microbiome," sites with similar anthropogenic pollutants showed unique microbial community abundances. This suggests that the abundance of a specific bacterial community is an evolutionary mechanism induced in response to selected anthropogenic pollutants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Natural history of the infant gut microbiome and impact of antibiotic treatment on bacterial strain diversity and stability.

    PubMed

    Yassour, Moran; Vatanen, Tommi; Siljander, Heli; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa J; Franzosa, Eric A; Vlamakis, Hera; Huttenhower, Curtis; Gevers, Dirk; Lander, Eric S; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-06-15

    The gut microbial community is dynamic during the first 3 years of life, before stabilizing to an adult-like state. However, little is known about the impact of environmental factors on the developing human gut microbiome. We report a longitudinal study of the gut microbiome based on DNA sequence analysis of monthly stool samples and clinical information from 39 children, about half of whom received multiple courses of antibiotics during the first 3 years of life. Whereas the gut microbiome of most children born by vaginal delivery was dominated by Bacteroides species, the four children born by cesarean section and about 20% of vaginally born children lacked Bacteroides in the first 6 to 18 months of life. Longitudinal sampling, coupled with whole-genome shotgun sequencing, allowed detection of strain-level variation as well as the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes. The microbiota of antibiotic-treated children was less diverse in terms of both bacterial species and strains, with some species often dominated by single strains. In addition, we observed short-term composition changes between consecutive samples from children treated with antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance genes carried on microbial chromosomes showed a peak in abundance after antibiotic treatment followed by a sharp decline, whereas some genes carried on mobile elements persisted longer after antibiotic therapy ended. Our results highlight the value of high-density longitudinal sampling studies with high-resolution strain profiling for studying the establishment and response to perturbation of the infant gut microbiome. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. An assessment of US microbiome research.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Elizabeth; Fravel, Deborah; Proctor, Lita M; Murray, David M; LoTempio, Jonathan; Chrisey, Linda; Garland, Jay; Goodwin, Kelly; Graber, Joseph; Harris, M Camille; Jackson, Scott; Mishkind, Michael; Porterfield, D Marshall; Records, Angela

    2016-01-11

    Genome-enabled technologies have supported a dramatic increase in our ability to study microbial communities in environments and hosts. Taking stock of previously funded microbiome research can help to identify common themes, under-represented areas and research priorities to consider moving forward. To assess the status of US microbiome research, a team of government scientists conducted an analysis of federally funded microbiome research. Microbiomes were defined as host-, ecosystem- or habitat-associated communities of microorganisms, and microbiome research was defined as those studies that emphasize community-level analyses using 'omics technologies. Single pathogen, single strain and culture-based studies were not included, except symbiosis studies that served as models for more complex communities. Fourteen governmental organizations participated in the data call. The analysis examined three broad research themes, eight environments and eight microbial categories. Human microbiome research was larger than any other environment studied, and the basic biology research theme accounted for half of the total research activities. Computational biology and bioinformatics, reference databases and biorepositories, standardized protocols and high-throughput tools were commonly identified needs. Longitudinal and functional studies and interdisciplinary research were also identified as needs. This study has implications for the funding of future microbiome research, not only in the United States but beyond.

  2. Experimental study and constitutive modeling of the viscoelastic mechanical properties of the human prolapsed vaginal tissue.

    PubMed

    Peña, Estefania; Calvo, B; Martínez, M A; Martins, P; Mascarenhas, T; Jorge, R M N; Ferreira, A; Doblaré, M

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, the viscoelastic mechanical properties of vaginal tissue are investigated. Using previous results of the authors on the mechanical properties of biological soft tissues and newly experimental data from uniaxial tension tests, a new model for the viscoelastic mechanical properties of the human vaginal tissue is proposed. The structural model seems to be sufficiently accurate to guarantee its application to prediction of reliable stress distributions, and is suitable for finite element computations. The obtained results may be helpful in the design of surgical procedures with autologous tissue or prostheses.

  3. Yeast Infection (Vaginal)

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection (vaginal) Overview A vaginal yeast infection is a fungal infection that causes irritation, discharge and intense itchiness ... symptoms Causes The fungus candida causes a vaginal yeast infection. Your vagina naturally contains a balanced mix of yeast, including ...

  4. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the ...

  5. Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy - vaginal bleeding; Maternal blood loss - vaginal ... Up to 1 in 4 women have vaginal bleeding at some time during their pregnancy. Bleeding is more common in the first 3 months (first trimester), especially with twins.

  6. Lactobacillus species isolated from vaginal secretions of healthy and bacterial vaginosis-intermediate Mexican women: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus jensenii, L. iners, L. crispatus and L. gasseri are the most frequently occurring lactobacilli in the vagina. However, the native species vary widely according to the studied population. The present study was performed to genetically determine the identity of Lactobacillus strains present in the vaginal discharge of healthy and bacterial vaginosis (BV) intermediate Mexican women. Methods In a prospective study, 31 strains preliminarily identified as Lactobacillus species were isolated from 21 samples collected from 105 non-pregnant Mexican women. The samples were classified into groups according to the Nugent score criteria proposed for detection of BV: normal (N), intermediate (I) and bacterial vaginosis (BV). We examined the isolates using culture-based methods as well as molecular analysis of the V1–V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequence analysis was performed to reject clones. Results Clinical isolates (25/31) were classified into four groups based on sequencing and analysis of the 16S rRNA gene: L. acidophilus (14/25), L. reuteri (6/25), L. casei (4/25) and L. buchneri (1/25). The remaining six isolates were presumptively identified as Enterococcus species. Within the L. acidophilus group, L. gasseri was the most frequently isolated species, followed by L. jensenii and L. crispatus. L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus and L. brevis were also isolated, and were placed in the L. reuteri, L. casei and L. buchneri groups, respectively. ERIC profile analysis showed intraspecific variability amongst the L. gasseri and L. fermentum species. Conclusions These findings agree with previous studies showing that L. crispatus, L. gasseri and L. jensenii are consistently present in the healthy vaginal ecosystem. Additional species or phylotypes were detected in the vaginal microbiota of the non-pregnant Mexican (Hispanic-mestizo) population, and thus, these results further our understanding of

  7. Does the vaginal microbiota play a role in the development of cervical cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Kyrgiou, Maria; Mitra, Anita; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary but not sufficient for the development of cervical cancer. The factors promoting persistence as well those triggering carcinogenetic pathways are incompletely understood. Rapidly evolving evidence indicates that the vaginal microbiome (VM) may play a functional role (both protective and harmful) in the acquisition and persistence of HPV, and subsequent development of cervical cancer. The first studies examining the vaginal microbiome and the presence of an HPV infection using next generation sequencing techniques (NGS) identified higher microbial diversity in HPV-positive as opposed to HPV-negative women. Furthermore, there appears to be a temporal relationship between the VM and HPV infection in that specific community state types (CSTs) may be correlated with a higher chance of progression or regression of the infection. Studies describing the VM in women with pre-invasive disease (squamous intra-epithelial neoplasia – SIL) consistently demonstrate a dysbiosis in women with the more severe disease. Although it is plausible that the composition of the VM may influence the host innate immune response, susceptibility to infection and the development of cervical disease, the studies to date do not prove causality. Future studies should explore the causal link between the VM and the clinical outcome in longitudinal samples from existing biobanks. PMID:27477083

  8. Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis

    DOE PAGES

    Larsen, Peter E.; Dai, Yang

    2015-09-14

    Background: Humans live in constant and vital symbiosis with a closely linked bacterial ecosystem called the microbiome, which influences many aspects of human health. When this microbial ecosystem becomes disrupted, the health of the human host can suffer; a condition called dysbiosis. The community compositions of human microbiomes also vary dramatically from individual to individual, and over time, making it difficult to uncover the underlying mechanisms linking the microbiome to human health. We propose that a microbiome’s interaction with its human host is not necessarily dependent upon the presence or absence of particular bacterial species, but instead is dependent onmore » its community metabolome; an emergent property of the microbiome. Results: Using data from a previously published, longitudinal study of microbiome populations of the human gut, we extrapolated information about microbiome community enzyme profiles and metabolome models. Using machine learning techniques, we demonstrated that the aggregate predicted community enzyme function profiles and modeled metabolomes of a microbiome are more predictive of dysbiosis than either observed microbiome community composition or predicted enzyme function profiles. Conclusions: Specific enzyme functions and metabolites predictive of dysbiosis provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of microbiome–host interactions. The ability to use machine learning to predict dysbiosis from microbiome community interaction data provides a potentially powerful tool for understanding the links between the human microbiome and human health, pointing to potential microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.« less

  9. Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis

    SciT

    Larsen, Peter E.; Dai, Yang

    Background: Humans live in constant and vital symbiosis with a closely linked bacterial ecosystem called the microbiome, which influences many aspects of human health. When this microbial ecosystem becomes disrupted, the health of the human host can suffer; a condition called dysbiosis. The community compositions of human microbiomes also vary dramatically from individual to individual, and over time, making it difficult to uncover the underlying mechanisms linking the microbiome to human health. We propose that a microbiome’s interaction with its human host is not necessarily dependent upon the presence or absence of particular bacterial species, but instead is dependent onmore » its community metabolome; an emergent property of the microbiome. Results: Using data from a previously published, longitudinal study of microbiome populations of the human gut, we extrapolated information about microbiome community enzyme profiles and metabolome models. Using machine learning techniques, we demonstrated that the aggregate predicted community enzyme function profiles and modeled metabolomes of a microbiome are more predictive of dysbiosis than either observed microbiome community composition or predicted enzyme function profiles. Conclusions: Specific enzyme functions and metabolites predictive of dysbiosis provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of microbiome–host interactions. The ability to use machine learning to predict dysbiosis from microbiome community interaction data provides a potentially powerful tool for understanding the links between the human microbiome and human health, pointing to potential microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.« less

  10. Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis

    SciT

    Larsen, Peter E.; Dai, Yang

    Background: Humans live in constant and vital symbiosis with a closely linked bacterial ecosystem called the microbiome, which influences many aspects of human health. When this microbial ecosystem becomes disrupted, the health of the human host can suffer; a condition called dysbiosis. However, the community compositions of human microbiomes also vary dramatically from individual to individual, and over time, making it difficult to uncover the underlying mechanisms linking the microbiome to human health. We propose that a microbiome’s interaction with its human host is not necessarily dependent upon the presence or absence of particular bacterial species, but instead is dependentmore » on its community metabolome; an emergent property of the microbiome. Results: Using data from a previously published, longitudinal study of microbiome populations of the human gut, we extrapolated information about microbiome community enzyme profiles and metabolome models. Using machine learning techniques, we demonstrated that the aggregate predicted community enzyme function profiles and modeled metabolomes of a microbiome are more predictive of dysbiosis than either observed microbiome community composition or predicted enzyme function profiles. Conclusions: Specific enzyme functions and metabolites predictive of dysbiosis provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of microbiome–host interactions. The ability to use machine learning to predict dysbiosis from microbiome community interaction data provides a potentially powerful tool for understanding the links between the human microbiome and human health, pointing to potential microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.« less

  11. Determination of nasal and oropharyngeal microbiomes in a multicenter population-based study - findings from Pretest 1 of the German National Cohort.

    PubMed

    Akmatov, Manas K; Koch, Nadine; Vital, Marius; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fricke, Julia; Gatzemeier, Anja; Greiser, Halina; Günther, Kathrin; Illig, Thomas; Kaaks, Rudolf; Krone, Bastian; Kühn, Andrea; Linseisen, Jakob; Meisinger, Christine; Michels, Karin; Moebus, Susanne; Nieters, Alexandra; Obi, Nadia; Schultze, Anja; Six-Merker, Julia; Pieper, Dietmar H; Pessler, Frank

    2017-05-12

    We examined acceptability, preference and feasibility of collecting nasal and oropharyngeal swabs, followed by microbiome analysis, in a population-based study with 524 participants. Anterior nasal and oropharyngeal swabs were collected by certified personnel. In addition, participants self-collected nasal swabs at home four weeks later. Four swab types were compared regarding (1) participants' satisfaction and acceptance and (2) detection of microbial community structures based on deep sequencing of the 16 S rRNA gene V1-V2 variable regions. All swabbing methods were highly accepted. Microbial community structure analysis revealed 846 phylotypes, 46 of which were unique to oropharynx and 164 unique to nares. The calcium alginate tipped swab was found unsuitable for microbiome determinations. Among the remaining three swab types, there were no differences in oropharyngeal microbiomes detected and only marginal differences in nasal microbiomes. Microbial community structures did not differ between staff-collected and self-collected nasal swabs. These results suggest (1) that nasal and oropharyngeal swabbing are highly feasible methods for human population-based studies that include the characterization of microbial community structures in these important ecological niches, and (2) that self-collection of nasal swabs at home can be used to reduce cost and resources needed, particularly when serial measurements are to be taken.

  12. Vaginal birth after caesarean section prediction models: a UK comparative observational study.

    PubMed

    Mone, Fionnuala; Harrity, Conor; Mackie, Adam; Segurado, Ricardo; Toner, Brenda; McCormick, Timothy R; Currie, Aoife; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2015-10-01

    Primarily, to assess the performance of three statistical models in predicting successful vaginal birth in patients attempting a trial of labour after one previous lower segment caesarean section (TOLAC). The statistically most reliable models were subsequently subjected to validation testing in a local antenatal population. A retrospective observational study was performed with study data collected from the Northern Ireland Maternity Service Database (NIMATs). The study population included all women that underwent a TOLAC (n=385) from 2010 to 2012 in a regional UK obstetric unit. Data was collected from the Northern Ireland Maternity Service Database (NIMATs). Area under the curve (AUC) and correlation analysis was performed. Of the three prediction models evaluated, AUC calculations for the Smith et al., Grobman et al. and Troyer and Parisi Models were 0.74, 0.72 and 0.65, respectively. Using the Smith et al. model, 52% of women had a low risk of caesarean section (CS) (predicted VBAC >72%) and 20% had a high risk of CS (predicted VBAC <60%), of whom 20% and 63% had delivery by CS. The fit between observed and predicted outcome in this study cohort using the Smith et al. and Grobman et al. models were greatest (Chi-square test, p=0.228 and 0.904), validating both within the population. The Smith et al. and Grobman et al. models could potentially be utilized within the UK to provide women with an informed choice when deciding on mode of delivery after a previous CS. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adherence and Acceptability of a Multidrug Vaginal Ring for HIV Prevention in a Phase I Study in the United States

    PubMed Central

    van der Straten, Ariane; Panther, Lori; Laborde, Nicole; Hoesley, Craig; Cheng, Helen; Husnik, Marla; Horn, Stephanie; Nel, Annalene; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Chen, Beatrice A.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the adherence and acceptability of a vaginal ring containing dapivirine, maraviroc, or both drugs for 28 days during a Phase I placebo-controlled trial in 48 HIV-negative sexually abstinent U.S. women aged 18 to 40. Adherence was assessed weekly by clinical interview and computer-assisted self-interviewing; acceptability assessment occurred at the last product-use visit. Study retention was 98% (47/48); 94% (45/48) reported being fully adherent with ring use during the 28-day period. Two participants experienced the ring partially coming out. Analysis was blinded and behavioral data were combined across study groups. Most women reported being very comfortable having the ring in their vagina; 44% preferred continuous use, whereas 51% had no preference compared to episodic use. Although a range of minor ring concerns were expressed, few were actually experienced. High adherence to and acceptability of this vaginal ring in this Phase I trial contributes to its promise as a sustained mechanism for multidrug vaginal microbicide delivery. PMID:26837628

  14. Adherence and Acceptability of a Multidrug Vaginal Ring for HIV Prevention in a Phase I Study in the United States.

    PubMed

    van der Straten, Ariane; Panther, Lori; Laborde, Nicole; Hoesley, Craig J; Cheng, Helen; Husnik, Marla J; Horn, Stephanie; Nel, Annalene; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Chen, Beatrice A

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated the adherence and acceptability of a vaginal ring containing dapivirine, maraviroc, or both drugs for 28 days during a Phase I placebo-controlled trial in 48 HIV-negative sexually abstinent U.S. women aged 18-40. Adherence was assessed weekly by clinical interview and computer-assisted self-interviewing; acceptability assessment occurred at the last product-use visit. Study retention was 98 % (47/48); 94 % (45/48) reported being fully adherent with ring use during the 28-day period. Two participants experienced the ring partially coming out. Analysis was blinded and behavioral data were combined across study groups. Most women reported being very comfortable having the ring in their vagina; 44 % preferred continuous use, whereas 51 % had no preference compared to episodic use. Although a range of minor ring concerns were expressed, few were actually experienced. High adherence to and acceptability of this vaginal ring in this Phase I trial contributes to its promise as a sustained mechanism for multidrug vaginal microbicide delivery.

  15. [Laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy after multiple abdominal surgeries--case study].

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Andrzej; Wiecka-Płusa, Monika; Mołas, Justyna

    2009-11-01

    At present the laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH) is the most widespread and most frequently executed variation of hysterectomy. It is an effective and safe operating alternative for the traditional way--abdominal hysterectomy. Good cosmetic effects, short post-operative stay at hospital and, first of all, a small risk of intra- and postoperative complications are the major driving factors justifying the choice of this method of surgery. In the following article we describe a case of a 43-year-old woman who underwent many interventions in the peritoneal cavity (abdominal surgery) and was shortlisted for the laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy. The cause of the operation was recurrent bilateral ovary cystis that could not be treated neither conservatively nor surgically, as well as the uterus myoma leading to abnormal uterus bleeding and hypermenorrhoea. Surgery in patients who have previously undergone abdominal operations is always difficult and the risk of complications is high indeed. In this case, while selecting the method of the next surgical procedure, surgeons must not exclude the vaginal and laparoscopic methods, or use them simultaneously. Experiences of other surgeons, as well as the unique case of a treated patient, show that previous abdominal surgical procedures are not a contraindication for either vaginal or laparoscopic procedures, and in some cases they might be safer than yet another laparotomy.

  16. [Study on the Chinese herbal formula for treatment of vaginitis and the antimicrobial activity in murine models].

    PubMed

    Fu, Ting-ting; Wu, Jian-yuan; Wang, Li; Ma, Yao; Wang, Ying; Liu, Ying; Ding, Hong

    2006-09-01

    To study on the various proportions of Radix Sophorae Flavescentis, Cortex Phellodendri, Fructus Cnidii and pericarp of Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim in the formulas, whose antimicrobial effects on E. coli, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa and C. albicans under different pH values were compared in vitro. According to Chinese ancient proved recipe, the K-B method and plate diluting method were adopted to measure antimicrobial activity, and orthogonal design to ascertain the herbal formula in vitro. Finally, murine models were established to test the antimicrobial activity in vivo through vaginal membrane irritancy experiment, negative rate of pathogeny and pathological grade of vaginal membrane. The results suggested that formulas with different proportions of the herbs had diverse antimicrobial activities, and the effect was shown to be most obvious when one milliliter drug contains 100 microl Fructus Cnidii-pericarp of Zanthoxylum bungeanum (2:1) co-extracted volatile oil and 50 microl Radix Sophorae Flavescentis and Cortex Phenodendri ethanol extraction respectively under pH6. The antimicrobial effect of the formula, which hardly had any membrane irritancy, was better than Jie Eryin in vitro and vivo. The fromula has few components and better effect, and adaptation to the pH value of vaginitis. It is a promising alternative for gynecological diseases.

  17. The lung microbiome in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William Ocm

    2017-12-01

    The Human Microbiome Project began 10 years ago, leading to a significant growth in understanding of the role the human microbiome plays in health and disease. In this article, we explain with an emphasis on the lung, the origins of microbiome research. We discuss how 16S rRNA gene sequencing became the first major molecular tool to examine the bacterial communities present within the human body. We highlight the pitfalls of molecular-based studies, such as false findings resulting from contamination, and the limitations of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Knowledge about the lung microbiome has evolved from initial scepticism to the realisation that it might have a significant influence on many illnesses. We also discuss the lung microbiome in the context of disease by giving examples of important respiratory conditions. In addition, we draw attention to the challenges for metagenomic studies of respiratory samples and the importance of systematic bacterial isolation to enable host-microbiome interactions to be understood. We conclude by discussing how knowledge of the lung microbiome impacts current clinical diagnostics. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  18. The Subgingival Microbiome of Periodontal Pockets With Different Probing Depths in Chronic and Aggressive Periodontitis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Meng; Wei, Yiping; Hu, Wenjie; Nie, Yong; Wu, Xiaolei; Lu, Ruifang

    2018-01-01

    Periodontitis is a kind of infectious disease initiated by colonization of subgingival periodontal pathogens, which cause destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, and is a predominant threat to oral health as the most common cause of loss of teeth. The aim of this pilot study was to characterize the subgingival bacterial biodiversity of periodontal pockets with different probing depths in patients with different forms of periodontitis. Twenty-one subgingival plaque samples were collected from three patients with chronic periodontitis (ChP), three patients with aggressive periodontitis (AgP) and three periodontally healthy subjects (PH). Each patient with periodontitis was sampled at three sites, at different probing depths (PDs, one each at 4 mm, 5-6 mm, and ≥ 7 mm). Using 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic analysis, we found that subgingival communities in health and periodontitis samples largely differed. Meanwhile, Acholeplasma, Fretibacterium, Porphyromonas, Peptococcus, Treponema_2, Defluviitaleaceae_UCG_011, Filifactor , and Mycoplasma increased with the deepening of the pockets in ChP, whilst only Corynebacterium was negatively associated with PD. In AgP, Corynebacterium and Klebsiella were positively associated with PD, while Serratia, Pseudoramibacter, Defluviitaleaceae_UCG_011 , and Desulfobulbus were negatively associated with PD. And among these two groups, Corynebacterium shifted differently. Moreover, in subgingival plaque, the unweighted UniFrac distances between samples from pockets with different PD in the same patients were significantly lower than those from pockets within the same PD category from different patients. This study demonstrated the shift of the subgingival microbiome in individual teeth sites during disease development. Within the limitation of the relative small sample size, this pilot study shed new light on the dynamic relationship between the extent of periodontal destruction and the subgingival

  19. An integrative study on biologically recovered polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and simultaneous assessment of gut microbiome in yellow mealworm.

    PubMed

    Ong, Su Yean; Kho, Hui-Pheng; Riedel, Sebastian L; Kim, Seok-Won; Gan, Chee-Yuen; Taylor, Todd D; Sudesh, Kumar

    2018-01-10

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are produced in microbes as a source of carbon and energy storage. They are biodegradable and have properties similar to synthetic plastics, which make them an interesting alternative to petroleum-based plastics. In this study, a refined method of recovering PHA from Cupriavidus necator biomass was proposed by incorporating the use of the yellow mealworm (the larval phase of the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor) as partial purification machinery, followed by washing of the fecal pellets with distilled water and sodium hydroxide. The PHA contents of the cells used in this study were 55wt% (produced from palm olein) and 60 wt% (produced from waste animal fats). The treatment of distilled water and NaOH further increased the purity of PHA to 94%. In parallel, analysis of the 16S rRNA metagenomic sequencing of the mealworm gut microbiome has revealed remarkable changes in the bacterial diversity, especially between the mealworms fed with cells produced from palm olein and waste animal fats. This biological recovery of PHA from cells is an attempt to move towards a green and sustainable process with the aim of reducing the use of harmful solvents and strong chemicals during polymer purification. The results obtained show that - purities of >90%, without a reduction in the molecular weight, can be obtained through this integrative biological recovery approach. In addition, this study has successfully shown that the cells, regardless of their origins, were readily consumed by the mealworms, and there is a correlation between the feed type and the mealworm gut microbiome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. HuMiChip: Development of a Functional Gene Array for the Study of Human Microbiomes

    SciT

    Tu, Q.; Deng, Ye; Lin, Lu

    Microbiomes play very important roles in terms of nutrition, health and disease by interacting with their hosts. Based on sequence data currently available in public domains, we have developed a functional gene array to monitor both organismal and functional gene profiles of normal microbiota in human and mouse hosts, and such an array is called human and mouse microbiota array, HMM-Chip. First, seed sequences were identified from KEGG databases, and used to construct a seed database (seedDB) containing 136 gene families in 19 metabolic pathways closely related to human and mouse microbiomes. Second, a mother database (motherDB) was constructed withmore » 81 genomes of bacterial strains with 54 from gut and 27 from oral environments, and 16 metagenomes, and used for selection of genes and probe design. Gene prediction was performed by Glimmer3 for bacterial genomes, and by the Metagene program for metagenomes. In total, 228,240 and 801,599 genes were identified for bacterial genomes and metagenomes, respectively. Then the motherDB was searched against the seedDB using the HMMer program, and gene sequences in the motherDB that were highly homologous with seed sequences in the seedDB were used for probe design by the CommOligo software. Different degrees of specific probes, including gene-specific, inclusive and exclusive group-specific probes were selected. All candidate probes were checked against the motherDB and NCBI databases for specificity. Finally, 7,763 probes covering 91.2percent (12,601 out of 13,814) HMMer confirmed sequences from 75 bacterial genomes and 16 metagenomes were selected. This developed HMM-Chip is able to detect the diversity and abundance of functional genes, the gene expression of microbial communities, and potentially, the interactions of microorganisms and their hosts.« less

  1. Association of Cesarean Delivery and Formula Supplementation With the Intestinal Microbiome of 6-Week-Old Infants.

    PubMed

    Madan, Juliette C; Hoen, Anne G; Lundgren, Sara N; Farzan, Shohreh F; Cottingham, Kathryn L; Morrison, Hilary G; Sogin, Mitchell L; Li, Hongzhe; Moore, Jason H; Karagas, Margaret R

    2016-03-01

    The intestinal microbiome plays a critical role in infant development, and delivery mode and feeding method (breast milk vs formula) are determinants of its composition. However, the importance of delivery mode beyond the first days of life is unknown, and studies of associations between infant feeding and microbiome composition have been generally limited to comparisons between exclusively breastfed and formula-fed infants, with little consideration given to combination feeding of both breast milk and formula. To examine the associations of delivery mode and feeding method with infant intestinal microbiome composition at approximately 6 weeks of life. Prospective observational study of 102 infants followed up as part of a US pregnancy cohort study. Delivery mode was abstracted from delivery medical records, and feeding method prior to the time of stool collection was ascertained through detailed questionnaires. Stool microbiome composition was characterized using next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. There were 102 infants (mean gestational age, 39.7 weeks; range, 37.1-41.9 weeks) included in this study, of whom 70 were delivered vaginally and 32 by cesarean delivery. In the first 6 weeks of life, 70 were exclusively breastfed, 26 received combination feeding, and 6 were exclusively formula fed. We identified independent associations between microbial community composition and both delivery mode (P< .001; Q < .001) and feeding method (P = .01; Q < .001). Differences in microbial community composition between vaginally delivered infants and infants delivered by cesarean birth were equivalent to or significantly larger than those between feeding groups (P = .003). Bacterial communities associated with combination feeding were more similar to those associated with exclusive formula feeding than exclusive breastfeeding (P = .002). We identified 6 individual bacterial genera that were differentially abundant between delivery mode and feeding groups

  2. Observational prospective study on Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630 in the prevention of vaginal infections, during and after systemic antibiotic therapy or in women with recurrent vaginal or genitourinary infections.

    PubMed

    Cianci, Antonio; Cicinelli, Ettore; De Leo, Vincenzo; Fruzzetti, Franca; Massaro, Maria Giulia; Bulfoni, Alessandro; Parazzini, Fabio; Perino, Antonio

    2018-07-01

    We performed a prospective cohort parallel observational study on the use of Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630 in the prevention of vaginal infections. Eligible were women with a diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (<15 days) and documented history of recurrent vaginal infections; and/or cystitis (<15 days); and/or treatment with antibiotics for bacterial respiratory tract infections during the week before the study entry. Study subjects were prescribed Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630 > 100.000.000 UFC one vaginal capsule per day for 6 days, then a capsule per week for 16 weeks. Eligible subjects were enrolled in two parallel cohorts: 85 women using (group A) and 39 not using (group B) Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630. The risk of recurrent infection within 4 months from the study entry, was higher among untreated women: multivariate OR 2.6 (95%CI 0.7-9.4). The modification of presence/intensity or symptoms was significant in both the study groups (p < .001). Impact statement What is already known on this subject? The Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630 has been shown to be active in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis and vaginal candidiasis. No data are available on its efficacy in the prevention of recurrent vaginal or urological infection or as a prevention strategy during systemic treatment with antibiotics. What do the results of this study add? This observational study suggests that Lactobacillus plantarum given for 4 months may lower the risk of recurrent infection in women with recurrent vaginal or genitourinary infection or after antibiotic systemic treatment for bacterial respiratory tract infection. The finding, however, is not statistically significant, possibly due to the lower than expected rate of infection observed in our population and consequently the limited power of the study. What are the implications of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research? New studies are needed in order to evaluate in different populations

  3. Longitudinal Analysis of the Premature Infant Intestinal Microbiome Prior to Necrotizing Enterocolitis: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanjiao; Shan, Gururaj; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George; Walker, W. Allan; Gregory, Katherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is an inflammatory disease of the newborn bowel, primarily affecting premature infants. Early intestinal colonization has been implicated in the pathogenesis of NEC. The objective of this prospective case-control study was to evaluate differences in the intestinal microbiota between infants who developed NEC and unaffected controls prior to disease onset. We conducted longitudinal analysis of the 16S rRNA genes of 312 samples obtained from 12 NEC cases and 26 age-matched controls with a median frequency of 7 samples per subject and median sampling interval of 3 days. We found that the microbiome undergoes dynamic development during the first two months of life with day of life being the major factor contributing to the colonization process. Depending on when the infant was diagnosed with NEC (i.e. early vs. late onset), the pattern of microbial progression was different for cases and controls. The difference in the microbiota was most overt in early onset NEC cases and controls. In proximity to NEC onset, the abundances of Clostridium sensu stricto from Clostridia class were significantly higher in early onset NEC subjects comparing to controls. In late onset NEC, Escherichia/Shigella among Gammaproteobacteria, showed an increasing pattern prior to disease onset, and was significantly higher in cases than controls six days before NEC onset. Cronobacter from Gammaproteobacteria was also significantly higher in late onset NEC cases than controls 1-3 days prior to NEC onset. Thus, the specific infectious agent associated with NEC may vary by the age of infant at disease onset. We found that intravenously administered antibiotics may have an impact on the microbial diversity present in fecal material. Longitudinal analysis at multiple time points was an important strategy utilized in this study, allowing us to appreciate the dynamics of the premature infant intestinal microbiome while approaching NEC at various points. PMID:25741698

  4. Association of coffee and tea intake with the oral microbiome: results from a large cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brandilyn A; McCullough, Marjorie L; Purdue, Mark P; Freedman, Neal D; Um, Caroline Y; Gapstur, Susan M; Hayes, Richard B; Ahn, Jiyoung

    2018-04-27

    The oral microbiota play a central role in oral health, and possibly in carcinogenesis. Research suggests coffee and tea consumption may have beneficial health effects. We examined the associations of these common beverages with the oral ecosystem in a large cross-sectional study. We assessed oral microbiota in mouthwash samples from 938 participants in two U.S. cohorts using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Coffee and tea intake were assessed from food frequency questionnaires. We examined associations of coffee and tea intake with overall oral microbiota diversity and composition using linear regression and permutational MANOVA, respectively, and with taxon abundance using negative binomial generalized linear models; all models adjusted for age, sex, cohort, BMI, smoking, ethanol intake, and energy intake. Higher tea intake was associated with greater oral microbiota richness (P=0.05) and diversity (P=0.006), and shifts in overall community composition (P=0.002); coffee was not associated with these microbiome parameters. Tea intake was associated with altered abundance of several oral taxa; these included Fusobacteriales, Clostridiales, and Shuttleworthia satelles (higher with increasing tea) and Bifidobacteriaceae, Bergeyella, Lactobacillales, and Kingella oralis (lower with increasing tea). Higher coffee intake was only associated with greater abundance of Granulicatella and Synergistetes. In the largest study to date of tea and coffee consumption in relation to the oral microbiota, the microbiota of tea drinkers differed in several ways from non-drinkers. Tea-driven changes to the oral microbiome may contribute to previously observed associations between tea and oral and systemic diseases, including cancers. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Meta-analysis of human genome-microbiome association studies: the MiBioGen consortium initiative.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Kurilshikov, Alexander; Radjabzadeh, Djawad; Turpin, Williams; Croitoru, Kenneth; Bonder, Marc Jan; Jackson, Matthew A; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Frost, Fabian; Homuth, Georg; Rühlemann, Malte; Hughes, David; Kim, Han-Na; Spector, Tim D; Bell, Jordana T; Steves, Claire J; Timpson, Nicolas; Franke, Andre; Wijmenga, Cisca; Meyer, Katie; Kacprowski, Tim; Franke, Lude; Paterson, Andrew D; Raes, Jeroen; Kraaij, Robert; Zhernakova, Alexandra

    2018-06-08

    In recent years, human microbiota, especially gut microbiota, have emerged as an important yet complex trait influencing human metabolism, immunology, and diseases. Many studies are investigating the forces underlying the observed variation, including the human genetic variants that shape human microbiota. Several preliminary genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been completed, but more are necessary to achieve a fuller picture. Here, we announce the MiBioGen consortium initiative, which has assembled 18 population-level cohorts and some 19,000 participants. Its aim is to generate new knowledge for the rapidly developing field of microbiota research. Each cohort has surveyed the gut microbiome via 16S rRNA sequencing and genotyped their participants with full-genome SNP arrays. We have standardized the analytical pipelines for both the microbiota phenotypes and genotypes, and all the data have been processed using identical approaches. Our analysis of microbiome composition shows that we can reduce the potential artifacts introduced by technical differences in generating microbiota data. We are now in the process of benchmarking the association tests and performing meta-analyses of genome-wide associations. All pipeline and summary statistics results will be shared using public data repositories. We present the largest consortium to date devoted to microbiota-GWAS. We have adapted our analytical pipelines to suit multi-cohort analyses and expect to gain insight into host-microbiota cross-talk at the genome-wide level. And, as an open consortium, we invite more cohorts to join us (by contacting one of the corresponding authors) and to follow the analytical pipeline we have developed.

  6. Effect of vaginal delivery on anal sphincter function in Asian primigravida: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Dakshitha Praneeth; Senaratne, Supun; Senanayake, Hemantha; Samarasekera, Dharmabandhu Nandadeva

    2016-09-01

    The true incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASI) among Asian primigravida is not known. This study aimed to evaluate OASI in Sri Lankan primigravida. One hundred and one consecutive primigravida in their last trimester were recruited from antenatal clinics at a tertiary care centre in Sri Lanka and followed up 6 weeks and 6 months after delivery. They were assessed using anorectal manometry (3D-ARM) and endoanal ultrasound (3D-EAUS) on both occasions. Seventy-three (75.3 %) had vaginal delivery without instrumentation, whereas 3 (3.1 %) each delivered using forceps or vacuum. Twelve (12.4 %) had emergency caesarean sections and 6 (6.2 %) had elective caesarean sections. None had clinically identified anal sphincter injuries. EAUS identified IAS defects in 3 (5.1 %) and EAS defects in 28 (47.5 %). Both resting (p = 0.3) and squeeze (p = 0.001) pressures had decreased following childbirth. Multivariate analysis identified antepartum RP and postpartum EAS defects to be associated with RP reduction (χ(2)(4)=17.825, p < 0.0005) and antepartum SP and postpartum EAS defects to be associated with SP reduction (χ(2)(5)=31.517, p < 0.0005). Episiotomy was protective, whereas delivering after 40 weeks' gestation and delivering a baby with a longer length increased the risk of SP reduction. EAS defects (χ(2) (6)=23.502, p = .001) were more common in mothers who had labour augmented by oxytocin and in those who delivered a baby with a larger head circumference. Labour induction and delivering a longer baby were protective for EAS defects. Several risk and protective factors for the structural and functional damage of sphincters were identified. These findings will help to formulate a policy to minimize future obstetric anal sphincter injuries.

  7. The Oral Microbiome Bank of China.

    PubMed

    Xian, Peng; Xuedong, Zhou; Xin, Xu; Yuqing, Li; Yan, Li; Jiyao, Li; Xiaoquan, Su; Shi, Huang; Jian, Xu; Ga, Liao

    2018-05-03

    The human microbiome project (HMP) promoted further understanding of human oral microbes. However, research on the human oral microbiota has not made as much progress as research on the gut microbiota. Currently, the causal relationship between the oral microbiota and oral diseases remains unclear, and little is known about the link between the oral microbiota and human systemic diseases. To further understand the contribution of the oral microbiota in oral diseases and systemic diseases, a Human Oral Microbiome Database (HOMD) was established in the US. The HOMD includes 619 taxa in 13 phyla, and most of the microorganisms are from American populations. Due to individual differences in the microbiome, the HOMD does not reflect the Chinese oral microbial status. Herein, we established a new oral microbiome database-the Oral Microbiome Bank of China (OMBC, http://www.sklod.org/ombc ). Currently, the OMBC includes information on 289 bacterial strains and 720 clinical samples from the Chinese population, along with lab and clinical information. The OMBC is the first curated description of a Chinese-associated microbiome; it provides tools for use in investigating the role of the oral microbiome in health and diseases, and will give the community abundant data and strain information for future oral microbial studies.

  8. Childhood Malnutrition and the Intestinal Microbiome Malnutrition and the microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Anne V.; Dinh, Duy M.; Ward, Honorine D.

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition contributes to almost half of all deaths in children under the age of 5 years, particularly those who live in resource-constrained areas. Those who survive frequently suffer from long-term sequelae including growth failure and neurodevelopmental impairment. Malnutrition is part of a vicious cycle of impaired immunity, recurrent infections and worsening malnutrition. Recently, alterations in the gut microbiome have also been strongly implicated in childhood malnutrition. It has been suggested that malnutrition may delay the normal development of the gut microbiota in early childhood or force it towards an altered composition that lacks the required functions for healthy growth and/or increases the risk for intestinal inflammation. This review addresses our current understanding of the beneficial contributions of gut microbiota to human nutrition (and conversely the potential role of changes in that community to malnutrition), the process of acquiring an intestinal microbiome, potential influences of malnutrition on the developing microbiota and the evidence directly linking alterations in the intestinal microbiome to childhood malnutrition. We review recent studies on the association between alterations in the intestinal microbiome and early childhood malnutrition and discuss them in the context of implications for intervention or prevention of the devastation caused by malnutrition. PMID:25356748

  9. Coital incontinence and vaginal symptoms and the relationship to pelvic floor muscle function in primiparous women at 12 months postpartum: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tennfjord, Merete Kolberg; Hilde, Gunvor; Stær-Jensen, Jette; Siafarikas, Franziska; Engh, Marie Ellström; Bø, Kari

    2015-04-01

    Symptoms related to sexual dysfunction postpartum are scarcely addressed in the literature, and the relationship to pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate primiparous women 12 months postpartum and study: (i) prevalence and bother of coital incontinence, vaginal symptoms, and sexual matters; and (ii) whether coital incontinence and vaginal symptoms were associated with vaginal resting pressure (VRP), PFM strength, and endurance. International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire (ICIQ) sexual matters module and ICIQ-Vaginal Symptoms Questionnaire were used for questions on coital incontinence, vaginal symptoms, and sexual matters, respectively. PFM function was assessed by manometer (Camtech AS, Sandvika, Norway). Coital incontinence, vaginal symptoms, and PFM function were the main outcome measures. One hundred seventy-seven primiparous women, mean age 28.7 (standard deviation [SD] 4.3) participated. Of the 94% of women having sexual intercourse, coital incontinence was found for 1.2% whereas 34.5% reported at least one vaginal symptom interfering with the sexual life of primiparous women. Of the symptoms investigated, "vagina feels dry," "vagina feels sore," and "vagina feels loose or lax" were most prevalent, but the overall impact on the woman's sexual life was minimally bothersome, mean 1.4 out of 10 (SD 2.5). Women reporting "vagina feels loose or lax" had lower VRP, PFM strength, and endurance when compared with women without the symptom. Twelve-month postpartum coital incontinence was rare, whereas the prevalence of vaginal symptoms interfering with sexual life was more common. The large majority of primiparous women in our study had sexual intercourse at 12 months postpartum and the reported overall bother on sexual life was low. Women reporting "vagina feels loose or lax" had lower VRP, PFM strength, and endurance when compared with women without the symptom. © 2015 International

  10. Failed Operative Vaginal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, James M.; Leveno, Kenneth J.; Hauth, John C.; Landon, Mark B.; Gilbert, Sharon; Spong, Catherine Y.; Varner, Michael W.; Caritis, Steve N.; Meis, Paul; Wapner, Ronald J.; Sorokin, Yoram; Miodovnik, Menachem; O'Sullivan, Mary J.; Sibai, Baha M.; Langer, Oded; Gabbe, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare maternal and neonatal outcomes in women undergoing a second stage cesarean after a trial of operative vaginal delivery with women undergoing a second stage cesarean without such an attempt. Methods This study is a secondary analysis of the women who underwent second stage cesarean. .The maternal outcomes examined included blood transfusion, endometritis, wound complication, anesthesia use, and maternal death. Infant outcomes examined included umbilical artery pH < 7.0, Apgar of 3 or less at 5 minutes, seizures within 24 hours of birth, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), stillbirth, skull fracture, and neonatal death. Results Of 3189 women who underwent second stage cesarean, operative vaginal delivery was attempted in 640. Labor characteristics were similar in the two groups with the exception of the admission to delivery time and cesarean indication. Those with an attempted operative vaginal delivery were more likely to undergo cesarean delivery for a non-reassuring fetal heart rate tracing (18.0% vs 13.9%, p=.01), have a wound complication (2.7% vs 1.0%; OR 2.65 95% CI 1.43–4.91), and require general anesthesia (8.0% vs 4.1%, OR 2.05 95% CI 1.44–2.91). Neonatal outcomes including umbilical artery pH less than 7.0, Apgar at or below 3 at 5 minutes, and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy were more common for those with an attempted operative vaginal delivery. This was not significant when cases with a non-reassuring fetal heart rate tracing were removed. Conclusion Cesarean delivery after an attempt at operative vaginal delivery was not associated with adverse neonatal outcomes in the absence of a non-reassuring fetal heart rate tracing. PMID:20168101

  11. Restoring vaginal microbiota: biological control of bacterial vaginosis. A prospective case-control study using Lactobacillus rhamnosus BMX 54 as adjuvant treatment against bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Recine, Nadia; Palma, Ettore; Domenici, Lavinia; Giorgini, Margherita; Imperiale, Ludovica; Sassu, Carolina; Musella, Angela; Marchetti, Claudia; Muzii, Ludovico; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most prevalent lower genital tract infection in reproductive-age women worldwide. BV is an ecological disorder of the vaginal microbiota characterized microbiologically by replacement of the lactobacilli, predominant vaginal microbiota. It is characterized by a high rate of relapse in sexual active women, and these patients show three or more relapses each year. A healthy vagina is characterized by hydrogen peroxide and acid-producing lactobacilli, which are crucial to maintain the physiological vaginal ecosystem and their depletion speeds up bacterial overgrowth with pH elevation, salidase and amine production, leading to the observed signs and symptoms of BV. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of long-term vaginal lactobacilli's implementation in restoring and maintaining vaginal microflora and pH and to collect data about prophylactic approach based on probiotics supplementation with lactobacilli. This is a prospective case-control study, performed between January 2013 and September 2014 at Department of Gynecological Obstetrics and Urologic Sciences of "Sapienza" University of Rome. 250 non-pregnant sexually active women with diagnoses of BV were collected. Patients selected were divided in Group A (125 patients assigned to standard treatment for BV-metronidazole 500 mg orally twice a day for 7 days) and Group B (125 women undergoing the same standard antibiotic regimen followed by vaginal tablets containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus BMX 54). Patients were evaluated after 2, 6, and 9 months (T0, T2, T6, and T9) in term of recurrences rates of BV, vaginal symptoms, re-establishment of healthy vaginal flora, vaginal pH, and treatment tolerability. Vaginal flora was significantly replaced in Group B patients after 2 months comparing with Group A (p = 0.014). These data were confirmed at 6 and 9 months follow-up: patients that underwent prophylactic therapy with NORMOGIN(®) experienced significantly low rate of

  12. Dinoprostone vaginal insert versus intravenous oxytocin to reduce postpartum blood loss following vaginal or cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Ozalp, E; Tanir, H M; Sener, T

    2010-01-01

    To compare the impact of a dinoprostone vaginal insert and intravenous oxytocin in reducing blood loss of women undergoing vaginal or cesarean delivery. This study was conducted among term singleton pregnancies delivered vaginally or by elective cesarean section. In the vaginally delivered cases, active management of the third stage of labor was conducted. During cesarean delivery, 20 IU of intravenous oxytocin was administered. Women, who either delivered via the vaginal or abdominal route, were then randomly allocated to receive 10 mg vaginal dinoprostone insert for 12 hours (group I, n: 100) or intravenous oxytocin (group II, n: 100), respectively. Mean blood loss and need for additional uterotonics and postpartum hemoglobin and hematocrit levels at 24 and 36 hours after delivery did not differ between the two groups. Women allocated to the dinoprostone vaginal insert arm experienced more nausea and vomiting. Dinoprostone vaginal insert was as effective as intravenous oxytocin in the prevention of postpartum blood loss.

  13. Vaginal Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Vaginal Cancer Vaginal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Vaginal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Vaginal Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and ...

  14. Parasite Microbiome Project: Systematic Investigation of Microbiome Dynamics within and across Parasite-Host Interactions.

    PubMed

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Bolnick, Daniel; Bordenstein, Seth; Brindley, Paul J; Figuères, Cédric; Holmes, Edward C; Martínez Martínez, Joaquín; Phillips, Anna J; Poulin, Robert; Rosario, Karyna

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how microbiomes affect host resistance, parasite virulence, and parasite-associated diseases requires a collaborative effort between parasitologists, microbial ecologists, virologists, and immunologists. We hereby propose the Parasite Microbiome Project to bring together researchers with complementary expertise and to study the role of microbes in host-parasite interactions. Data from the Parasite Microbiome Project will help identify the mechanisms driving microbiome variation in parasites and infected hosts and how that variation is associated with the ecology and evolution of parasites and their disease outcomes. This is a call to arms to prevent fragmented research endeavors, encourage best practices in experimental approaches, and allow reliable comparative analyses across model systems. It is also an invitation to foundations and national funding agencies to propel the field of parasitology into the microbiome/metagenomic era.

  15. Polymicrobial nature of vaginitis in young women: a microbiological and therapeutic study.

    PubMed

    Kippax, R A; Caradoc-Davies, G; Meech, R J

    1982-03-24

    Thirty-six young females attending the Student Health Service with vaginitis were investigated by serial semiquantitative aerobic, anaerobic, fungal, mycoplasma and viral cultures over a 10 day period and results were correlated with signs and symptoms. Antifungal therapy (econazole pessaries and cream) resulted in clearance of candida from 13 out of 16 patients where there was no increase in the anaerobic flora. In the four subjects where candida was isolated along with Gardnerella vaginalis plus abnormal anaerobic flora, only one cleared with econazole, the remaining three clearing during therapy with metronidazole. In the nine subjects with Gardnerella vaginalis and abnormal anaerobic flora, metronidazole relieved symptoms despite failure to eradicate G. vaginalis in seven indicating the pathogenic role of the anaerobic flora rather then G. vaginalis. Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum and gram negative enteric bacilli were not implicated as primary agents in causing vaginitis.

  16. The role of microbiome in central nervous system disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Kasper, Lloyd H.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals live in a co-evolutionary association with the plethora of microorganisms that reside at a variety of tissue microenvironments. The microbiome represents the collective genomes of these co-existing microorganisms, which is shaped by host factors such as genetics and nutrients but in turn is able to influence host biology in health and disease. Niche-specific microbiome, prominently the gut microbiome, has the capacity to effect both local and distal sites within the host. The gut microbiome has played a crucial role in the bidirectional gut-brain axis that integrates the gut and central nervous system (CNS) activities, and thus the concept of microbiome-gut-brain axis is emerging. Studies are revealing how diverse forms of neuro-immune and neuro-psychiatric disorders are correlated with or modulated by variations of microbiome, microbiota-derived products and exogenous antibiotics and probiotics. The microbiome poises the peripheral immune homeostasis and predisposes host susceptibility to CNS autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Neural, endocrine and metabolic mechanisms are also critical mediators of the microbiome-CNS signaling, which are more involved in neuro-psychiatric disorders such as autism, depression, anxiety, stress. Research on the role of microbiome in CNS disorders deepens our academic knowledge about host-microbiome commensalism in central regulation and in practicality, holds conceivable promise for developing novel prognostic and therapeutic avenues for CNS disorders. PMID:24370461

  17. Breaking down the gut microbiome composition in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Budhram, Adrian; Parvathy, Seema; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo; Silverman, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The gut microbiome, which consists of a highly diverse ecologic community of micro-organisms, has increasingly been studied regarding its role in multiple sclerosis (MS) immunopathogenesis. This review critically examines the literature investigating the gut microbiome in MS. A comprehensive search was performed of PubMed databases and ECTRIMS meeting abstracts for literature relating to the gut microbiome in MS. Controlled studies examining the gut microbiome in patients with MS were included for review. Identified studies were predominantly case-control in their design and consistently found differences in the gut microbiome of MS patients compared to controls. We examine plausible mechanistic links between these differences and MS immunopathogenesis, and discuss the therapeutic implications of these findings. Review of the available literature reveals potential immunopathogenic links between the gut microbiome and MS, identifies avenues for therapeutic advancement, and emphasizes the need for further systematic study in this emerging field.

  18. Elevated temperature drives kelp microbiome dysbiosis, while elevated carbon dioxide induces water microbiome disruption

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Megan M.; Brown, Matt; Doane, Michael; Edwards, Matthew S.; Michael, Todd P.; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.

    2018-01-01

    Global climate change includes rising temperatures and increased pCO2 concentrations in the ocean, with potential deleterious impacts on marine organisms. In this case study we conducted a four-week climate change incubation experiment, and tested the independent and combined effects of increased temperature and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), on the microbiomes of a foundation species, the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera, and the surrounding water column. The water and kelp microbiome responded differently to each of the climate stressors. In the water microbiome, each condition caused an increase in a distinct microbial order, whereas the kelp microbiome exhibited a reduction in the dominant kelp-associated order, Alteromondales. The water column microbiomes were most disrupted by elevated pCO2, with a 7.3 fold increase in Rhizobiales. The kelp microbiome was most influenced by elevated temperature and elevated temperature in combination with elevated pCO2. Kelp growth was negatively associated with elevated temperature, and the kelp microbiome showed a 5.3 fold increase Flavobacteriales and a 2.2 fold increase alginate degrading enzymes and sulfated polysaccharides. In contrast, kelp growth was positively associated with the combination of high temperature and high pCO2 ‘future conditions’, with a 12.5 fold increase in Planctomycetales and 4.8 fold increase in Rhodobacteriales. Therefore, the water and kelp microbiomes acted as distinct communities, where the kelp was stabilizing the microbiome under changing pCO2 conditions, but lost control at high temperature. Under future conditions, a new equilibrium between the kelp and the microbiome was potentially reached, where the kelp grew rapidly and the commensal microbes responded to an increase in mucus production. PMID:29474389

  19. The Human Microbiome: Our Second Genome*

    PubMed Central

    Grice, Elizabeth A.; Segre, Julia A.

    2012-01-01

    The human genome has been referred to as the blueprint of human biology. In this review we consider an essential but largely ignored overlay to that blueprint, the human microbiome, which is composed of those microbes that live in and on our bodies. The human microbiome is a source of genetic diversity, a modifier of disease, an essential component of immunity, and a functional entity that influences metabolism and modulates drug interactions. Characterization and analysis of the human microbiome have been greatly catalyzed by advances in genomic technologies. We discuss how these technologies have shaped this emerging field of study and advanced our understanding of the human microbiome. We also identify future challenges, many of which are common to human genetic studies, and predict that in the future, analyzing genetic variation and risk of human disease will sometimes necessitate the integration of human and microbial genomic data sets. PMID:22703178

  20. Metabolic Reconstruction for Metagenomic Data and Its Application to the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Abubucker, Sahar; Segata, Nicola; Goll, Johannes; Schubert, Alyxandria M.; Izard, Jacques; Cantarel, Brandi L.; Rodriguez-Mueller, Beltran; Zucker, Jeremy; Thiagarajan, Mathangi; Henrissat, Bernard; White, Owen; Kelley, Scott T.; Methé, Barbara; Schloss, Patrick D.; Gevers, Dirk; Mitreva, Makedonka; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    Microbial communities carry out the majority of the biochemical activity on the planet, and they play integral roles in processes including metabolism and immune homeostasis in the human microbiome. Shotgun sequencing of such communities' metagenomes provides information complementary to organismal abundances from taxonomic markers, but the resulting data typically comprise short reads from hundreds of different organisms and are at best challenging to assemble comparably to single-organism genomes. Here, we describe an alternative approach to infer the functional and metabolic potential of a microbial community metagenome. We determined the gene families and pathways present or absent within a community, as well as their relative abundances, directly from short sequence reads. We validated this methodology using a collection of synthetic metagenomes, recovering the presence and abundance both of large pathways and of small functional modules with high accuracy. We subsequently applied this method, HUMAnN, to the microbial communities of 649 metagenomes drawn from seven primary body sites on 102 individuals as part of the Human Microbiome Project (HMP). This provided a means to compare functional diversity and organismal ecology in the human microbiome, and we determined a core of 24 ubiquitously present modules. Core pathways were often implemented by different enzyme families within different body sites, and 168 functional modules and 196 metabolic pathways varied in metagenomic abundance specifically to one or more niches within the microbiome. These included glycosaminoglycan degradation in the gut, as well as phosphate and amino acid transport linked to host phenotype (vaginal pH) in the posterior fornix. An implementation of our methodology is available at http://huttenhower.sph.harvard.edu/humann. This provides a means to accurately and efficiently characterize microbial metabolic pathways and functional modules directly from high-throughput sequencing reads

  1. Tools for the Microbiome: Nano and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Biteen, Julie S; Blainey, Paul C; Cardon, Zoe G; Chun, Miyoung; Church, George M; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Fraser, Scott E; Gilbert, Jack A; Jansson, Janet K; Knight, Rob; Miller, Jeff F; Ozcan, Aydogan; Prather, Kimberly A; Quake, Stephen R; Ruby, Edward G; Silver, Pamela A; Taha, Sharif; van den Engh, Ger; Weiss, Paul S; Wong, Gerard C L; Wright, Aaron T; Young, Thomas D

    2016-01-26

    The microbiome presents great opportunities for understanding and improving the world around us and elucidating the interactions that compose it. The microbiome also poses tremendous challenges for mapping and manipulating the entangled networks of interactions among myriad diverse organisms. Here, we describe the opportunities, technical needs, and potential approaches to address these challenges, based on recent and upcoming advances in measurement and control at the nanoscale and beyond. These technical needs will provide the basis for advancing the largely descriptive studies of the microbiome to the theoretical and mechanistic understandings that will underpin the discipline of microbiome engineering. We anticipate that the new tools and methods developed will also be more broadly useful in environmental monitoring, medicine, forensics, and other areas.

  2. Tools for the microbiome. Nano and beyond

    SciT

    Biteen, Julie S.; Blainey, Paul C.; Cardon, Zoe G.

    Here, the microbiome presents great opportunities for understanding and improving the world around us and elucidating the interactions that compose it. The microbiome also poses tremendous challenges for mapping and manipulating the entangled networks of interactions among myriad diverse organisms. Here, we describe the opportunities, technical needs, and potential approaches to address these challenges, based on recent and upcoming advances in measurement and control at the nanoscale and beyond. Moreover, these technical needs will provide the basis for advancing the largely descriptive studies of the microbiome to the theoretical and mechanistic understandings that will underpin the discipline of microbiome engineering.more » We anticipate that the new tools and methods developed will also be more broadly useful in environmental monitoring, medicine, forensics, and other areas.« less

  3. Tools for the microbiome. Nano and beyond

    DOE PAGES

    Biteen, Julie S.; Blainey, Paul C.; Cardon, Zoe G.; ...

    2015-12-22

    Here, the microbiome presents great opportunities for understanding and improving the world around us and elucidating the interactions that compose it. The microbiome also poses tremendous challenges for mapping and manipulating the entangled networks of interactions among myriad diverse organisms. Here, we describe the opportunities, technical needs, and potential approaches to address these challenges, based on recent and upcoming advances in measurement and control at the nanoscale and beyond. Moreover, these technical needs will provide the basis for advancing the largely descriptive studies of the microbiome to the theoretical and mechanistic understandings that will underpin the discipline of microbiome engineering.more » We anticipate that the new tools and methods developed will also be more broadly useful in environmental monitoring, medicine, forensics, and other areas.« less

  4. The Lung Microbiome After Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Julia B.; Poroyko, Valeriy

    2014-01-01

    Summary Lung transplantation survival remains significantly impacted by infections and the development of chronic rejection manifesting as bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). Traditional microbiologic data has provided insight into the role of infections in BOS. Now, new non-culture-based techniques have been developed to characterize the entire population of microbes resident on the surfaces of the body, also known as the human microbiome. Early studies have identified that lung transplant patients have a different lung microbiome and have demonstrated the important finding that the transplant lung microbiome changes over time. Furthermore, both unique bacterial populations and longitudinal changes in the lung microbiome have now been suggested to play a role in the development of BOS. In the future, this technology will need to be combined with functional assays and assessment of the immune responses in the lung to help further explain the microbiome’s role in the failing lung allograft. PMID:24601662

  5. The influence of behaviors and relationships on the vaginal microbiota of women and their female partners: the WOW Health Study.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Catriona S; Walker, Sandra M; Vodstrcil, Lenka A; Bilardi, Jade E; Law, Matthew; Hocking, Jane S; Fethers, Katherine A; Fehler, Glenda; Petersen, Susan; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Chen, Marcus Y; Garland, Suzanne M; Fairley, Christopher K

    2014-05-15

    A community-based study of women who have sex with women (WSW) was performed to determine the burden of bacterial vaginosis (BV), and behavioral factors influencing the vaginal microbiota of women and their female sexual partners (FSPs), as measured by Nugent score (NS). In a cross-sectional study of 18-55-year-old WSW recruited nationally, participants completed questionnaires and self-collected vaginal swab samples weekly on 3 occasions. BV was defined as an NS of 7-10. Factors associated with BV, stability of NS category, and concordance of these categories in co-enrolled couples were examined with multivariable logistic regression analysis. A total of 458 participants were recruited; 192 were co-enrolled with their FSP (96 couples). BV was detected in 125 women (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 23%-32%). BV was associated with ≥4 lifetime FSPs (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-3.1), an FSP with BV symptoms (AOR, 2.9; 1.0-8.2) and smoking, with ≥30 cigarettes per week showing greatest odds (AOR, 2.7; 1.5-5.0). Of 428 women returning ≥2 swab samples, 375 (88%) had a stable NS category across all samples, predominantly reflecting normal flora. Co-enrolled WSW were less likely to have BV (31% vs 23%; P = .07), and the majority (70%) were concordant for NS category (κ = 0.47; P ≤ .01), with most concordant for normal flora. Concordant NS category was associated with a relationship of >6 months (AOR, 4.7; 95% CI, 1.4-16.4) and frequent sexual contact (more than once per month; AOR, 2.7; 1.0-7.1). BV is associated with key behaviors and smoking practices in WSW, but longer-duration, sexually active WSW partnerships support a stable favorable vaginal microbiota.

  6. Characterization of the bacterial and fungal microbiome in indoor dust and outdoor air samples: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Blake; Zhou, Yanjiao; Bautista, Eddy J; Urch, Bruce; Speck, Mary; Silverman, Frances; Muilenberg, Michael; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Weinstock, George; Sodergren, Erica; Gold, Diane R; Sordillo, Joanne E

    2016-06-15

    Environmental microbes have been associated with both protective and adverse health effects in children and adults. Epidemiological studies often rely on broad biomarkers of microbial exposure (i.e. endotoxin, 1 → 3-beta-d-glucan), but fail to identify the taxonomic composition of the microbial community. Our aim was to characterize the bacterial and fungal microbiome in different types of environmental samples collected in studies of human health effects. We determined the composition of microbial communities present in home, school and outdoor air samples by amplifying and sequencing regions of rRNA genes from bacteria (16S) and fungi (18S and ITS). Samples for this pilot study included indoor settled dust (from both a Boston area birth cohort study on Home Allergens and Asthma (HAA) (n = 12) and a study of school exposures and asthma symptoms (SICAS) (n = 1)), as well as fine and coarse concentrated outdoor ambient particulate (CAP) samples (n = 9). Sequencing of amplified 16S, 18S, and ITS regions was performed on the Roche-454 Life Sciences Titanium pyrosequencing platform. Indoor dust samples were dominated by Gram-positive bacteria (Firmicutes and Actinobacteria); the most abundant bacterial genera were those related to human flora (Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium and Lactobacillus). Outdoor CAPs were dominated by Gram-negative Proteobacteria from water and soil sources, in particular the genera Acidovorax, and Brevundimonas (which were present at very low levels or entirely absent in indoor dust). Phylum-level fungal distributions identified by 18S or ITS regions showed very similar findings: a predominance of Ascomycota in indoor dust and Basidiomycota in outdoor CAPs. ITS sequencing of fungal genera in indoor dust showed significant proportions of Aureobasidium and Leptosphaerulina along with some contribution from Cryptococcus, Epicoccum, Aspergillus and the human commensal Malassezia. ITS sequencing detected more than 70 fungal genera

  7. User's perception of the contraceptive vaginal ring: a field study in Brazil and the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Hardy, E E; Reyes, Q; Gomez, F; Portes-Carrasco, R; Faúndes, A

    1983-11-01

    The basis for this report is home interviews of users of the contraceptive vaginal ring and the pill from urban and rural clinics in 2 provinces in the Dominican Republic and clinics from 2 towns and a large city in Brazil. Dominican ring users were significantly more likely to be older than pill users, to have more schooling, and have partners with more education. 6% were illiterate and 75% had only elementary education. 1/10 of the ring users reported having had problems with insertion of the ring and 1/5 had problems removing it. It may be worthwhile to try a narrower, more flexible model that may be easier to insert and remove. 1 out of every 6 users reported vaginal odor, 1 out of 8 reported having felt the ring move in their vagina, and 1/3 were aware of the ring at some time. About 1/2 the women in each country said the ring had changed color during use, and about 1/2 of those who reported the change did not like it. It became light gray and looked dirty. Correction may improve acceptance. 10% reported having expelled the ring. Twice as many ring users reported having menstrual problems. Ring and pill users both reported headaches, vaginal discharge, menstrual pain, and increased libido. A large proportion of ring and pill users experienced decreased duration and amount of menstrual bleeding, which was seen more as a beneficial than a negative effect. The same can be said for weight gain, which was "linked" by 89% of the women in the Dominican Republic. 64% of ring users and 67% of pill users described thier respective method as good or very good. Detailed instructions should accompany the final model. They should say that it is alright for the ring to be any place within tha vagina for it to be effective.

  8. Vaginal microbicides and teenagers.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Richard E; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2003-10-01

    Sexually active teens are at significant risk from sexually transmitted infections and girls and women bear the greatest burden of these infections. New methods, such as vaginal microbicides, would provide female controlled options. Microbicides are currently in development and thus it is timely to discuss the progress made and factors that may influence acceptability for teens. Microbicide development presents many challenges, and several different potential mechanisms of action are being explored. There is interest in these products from women and men, and specific preferences are being investigated. Adolescents, due to reproductive system immaturity, developing cognitive abilities and the psychosocial context of their relationships, present a special set of challenges in efforts to foster microbicide use. Vaginal microbicides are on the horizon. Further study into teen issues is required to develop successful strategies for marketing and encouraging adolescent use of microbicides.

  9. Relationship of Specific Vaginal Bacteria and Bacterial Vaginosis Treatment Failure in Women Who Have Sex with Women: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Marrazzo, Jeanne M.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Ringwood, Kathleen; Fredricks, David N.

    2008-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis frequently persists after treatment. The role of newly defined bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria (BVAB), with specificity ≥97% for this condition, has not been assessed. Objective Define risks for bacterial vaginosis persistence, including pre-treatment detection of specific vaginal bacteria, among women reporting sex with other women. Design Observational cohort study. Setting University-based research clinic. Patients 335 women 16–29 years-old reporting sex with ≥1 woman in the prior year recruited through advertisements and provider referral. Intervention Bacterial vaginosis was treated with intravaginal metronidazole gel (0.75%), 37.5 mg nightly for five nights. Measurements Species-specific 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeting 17 bacteria were applied to vaginal fluid obtained at baseline. Test of cure by clinical criteria and Gram stain analysis and repeat PCR assays of vaginal fluid were performed one month post-treatment, and interim behaviors assessed using computer-assisted self-interview. Results Of 335 women, 24% of whom also reported sex with men within 3 months before enrollment, 131 (39%) had bacterial vaginosis. In 120 (92%) with follow-up, incidence of persistent bacterial vaginosis was 26%, and significantly higher in women with baseline detection of Clostridia-like bacteria designated BVAB1 (risk ratio (95% C.I.) 2.0 (1.1–4.0), BVAB2 (risk ratio (95% C.I.) 8.7 (2.5-∞), or BVAB3 (risk ratio (95% C.I.) 3.1 (1.7–5.8)), or of Peptoniphilus lacrimalis (risk ratio (95% C.I.) 3.5 (1.6–15.5)) or Megasphaera phylotype 2 (risk ratio (95% C.I.) 3.4 (1.4–5.5)), and lower with treatment adherence (risk ratio (95% C.I.) 0.4 (0.2–0.9)). Detection of these bacteria at test-of-cure was associated with persistence, while post-treatment sexual activity was not. Limitations Findings may not be generalizable to women who have sex only with men, or to women whose bacterial vaginosis is treated

  10. The Gut Microbiome: A New Frontier in Autism Research

    PubMed Central

    Mulle, Jennifer G.; Sharp, William G.; Cubells, Joseph F.

    2013-01-01

    The human gut harbors a complex community of microbes that profoundly influence many aspects of growth and development, including development of the nervous system. Advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing methods have led to rapidly expanding knowledge about this gut microbiome. Here, we review fundamental emerging data on the human gut microbiome, with a focus on potential interactions between the microbiome and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and consider research on atypical patterns of feeding and nutrition in ASD and how they might interact with the microbiome. Finally we selectively survey results from studies in rodents on the impact of the microbiome on neurobehavioral development. The evidence reviewed here suggests that a deeper understanding of the gut microbiome could open up new avenues of research on ASD, including potential novel treatment strategies. PMID:23307560

  11. The Ramazzini Institute 13-week pilot study on glyphosate and Roundup administered at human-equivalent dose to Sprague Dawley rats: effects on the microbiome.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qixing; Manservisi, Fabiana; Panzacchi, Simona; Mandrioli, Daniele; Menghetti, Ilaria; Vornoli, Andrea; Bua, Luciano; Falcioni, Laura; Lesseur, Corina; Chen, Jia; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Hu, Jianzhong

    2018-05-29

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are broad-spectrum herbicides that act on the shikimate pathway in bacteria, fungi, and plants. The possible effects of GBHs on human health are the subject of an intense public debate for both its potential carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects, including its effects on microbiome. The present pilot study examines whether exposure to GBHs at doses of glyphosate considered to be "safe" (the US Acceptable Daily Intake - ADI - of 1.75 mg/kg bw/day), starting from in utero, may modify the composition of gut microbiome in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Glyphosate alone and Roundup, a commercial brand of GBHs, were administered in drinking water at doses comparable to the US glyphosate ADI (1.75 mg/kg bw/day) to F0 dams starting from the gestational day (GD) 6 up to postnatal day (PND) 125. Animal feces were collected at multiple time points from both F0 dams and F1 pups. The gut microbiota of 433 fecal samples were profiled at V3-V4 region of 16S ribosomal RNA gene and further taxonomically assigned and assessed for diversity analysis. We tested the effect of exposure on overall microbiome diversity using PERMANOVA and on individual taxa by LEfSe analysis. Microbiome profiling revealed that low-dose exposure to Roundup and glyphosate resulted in significant and distinctive changes in overall bacterial composition in F1 pups only. Specifically, at PND31, corresponding to pre-pubertal age in humans, relative abundance for Bacteriodetes (Prevotella) was increased while the Firmicutes (Lactobacillus) was reduced in both Roundup and glyphosate exposed F1 pups compared to controls. This study provides initial evidence that exposures to commonly used GBHs, at doses considered safe, are capable of modifying the gut microbiota in early development, particularly before the onset of puberty. These findings warrant future studies on potential health effects of GBHs in early development such as childhood.

  12. More frequent vaginal orgasm is associated with experiencing greater excitement from deep vaginal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Brody, Stuart; Klapilova, Katerina; Krejčová, Lucie

    2013-07-01

    Research indicated that: (i) vaginal orgasm (induced by penile-vaginal intercourse [PVI] without concurrent clitoral masturbation) consistency (vaginal orgasm consistency [VOC]; percentage of PVI occasions resulting in vaginal orgasm) is associated with mental attention to vaginal sensations during PVI, preference for a longer penis, and indices of psychological and physiological functioning, and (ii) clitoral, distal vaginal, and deep vaginal/cervical stimulation project via different peripheral nerves to different brain regions. The aim of this study is to examine the association of VOC with: (i) sexual arousability perceived from deep vaginal stimulation (compared with middle and shallow vaginal stimulation and clitoral stimulation), and (ii) whether vaginal stimulation was present during the woman's first masturbation. A sample of 75 Czech women (aged 18-36), provided details of recent VOC, site of genital stimulation during first masturbation, and their recent sexual arousability from the four genital sites. The association of VOC with: (i) sexual arousability perceived from the four genital sites and (ii) involvement of vaginal stimulation in first-ever masturbation. VOC was associated with greater sexual arousability from deep vaginal stimulation but not with sexual arousability from other genital sites. VOC was also associated with women's first masturbation incorporating (or being exclusively) vaginal stimulation. The findings suggest (i) stimulating the vagina during early life masturbation might indicate individual readiness for developing greater vaginal responsiveness, leading to adult greater VOC, and (ii) current sensitivity of deep vaginal and cervical regions is associated with VOC, which might be due to some combination of different neurophysiological projections of the deep regions and their greater responsiveness to penile stimulation. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  13. Innovative Approach for Interstitial Cystitis: Vaginal Pessaries Loaded Diazepam—A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Capra, P.; Perugini, P.; Bleve, M.; Pavanetto, P.; Musitelli, G.; Rovereto, B.; Porru, D.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder pain is a characteristic disorder of interstitial cystitis. Diazepam is well known for its antispasmodic activity in the treatment of muscular hypertonus. The aim of this work was to develop and characterize vaginal pessaries as an intravaginal delivery system of diazepam for the treatment of interstitial cystitis. In particular, the performance of two types of formulations, with and without beta-glucan, was compared. In particular, the preparation of pessaries, according to the modified Pharmacopeia protocol, the setup of the analytical method to determine diazepam, pH evaluation, dissolution profile, and photostability assay were reported. Results showed that the modified protocol permitted obtaining optimal vaginal pessaries, without air bubbles, with good consistency and handling and with good pH profiles. In order to determine the diazepam amount, calibration curves with good correlation coefficients were obtained, by the spectrophotometric method, using placebo pessaries as matrix with the addition of diazepam standard solution. This method was demonstrated sensible and accurate to determine the amount of drug in batches. Dissolution profiles showed a complete diazepam release just after 15 minutes, even if beta-glucan pessaries released drug more gradually. Finally, a possible drug photodegradation after exacerbated UV-visible exposition was evaluated. PMID:26555976

  14. The adult nasopharyngeal microbiome as a determinant of pneumococcal acquisition.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Amelieke Jh; Zomer, Aldert L; Gritzfeld, Jenna F; Ferwerda, Gerben; van Hijum, Sacha Aft; Ferreira, Daniela M; Shak, Joshua R; Klugman, Keith P; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; de Jonge, Marien I; Gordon, Stephen B; Hermans, Peter Wm

    2014-01-01

    Several cohort studies have indicated associations between S. pneumoniae and other microbes in the nasopharynx. To study causal relationships between the nasopharyngeal microbiome and pneumococcal carriage, we employed an experimental human pneumococcal carriage model. Healthy adult volunteers were assessed for pneumococcal carriage by culture of nasal wash samples (NWS). Those without natural pneumococcal carriage received an intranasal pneumococcal inoculation with serotype 6B or 23F. The composition of the nasopharyngeal microbiome was longitudinally studied by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing on NWS collected before and after challenge. Among 40 selected volunteers, 10 were natural carriers and 30 were experimentally challenged. At baseline, five distinct nasopharyngeal microbiome profiles were identified. The phylogenetic distance between microbiomes of natural pneumococcal carriers was particularly large compared to non-carriers. A more diverse microbiome prior to inoculation was associated with the establishment of pneumococcal carriage. Perturbation of microbiome diversity upon pneumococcal challenge was strain specific. Shifts in microbiome profile occurred after pneumococcal exposure, and those volunteers who acquired carriage more often diverted from their original profile. S. pneumoniae was little prominent in the microbiome of pneumococcal carriers. Pneumococcal acquisition in healthy adults is more likely to occur in a diverse microbiome and appears to promote microbial heterogeneity.

  15. Identifying personal microbiomes using metagenomic codes

    PubMed Central

    Franzosa, Eric A.; Huang, Katherine; Meadow, James F.; Gevers, Dirk; Lemon, Katherine P.; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Community composition within the human microbiome varies across individuals, but it remains unknown if this variation is sufficient to uniquely identify individuals within large populations or stable enough to identify them over time. We investigated this by developing a hitting set-based coding algorithm and applying it to the Human Microbiome Project population. Our approach defined body site-specific metagenomic codes: sets of microbial taxa or genes prioritized to uniquely and stably identify individuals. Codes capturing strain variation in clade-specific marker genes were able to distinguish among 100s of individuals at an initial sampling time point. In comparisons with follow-up samples collected 30–300 d later, ∼30% of individuals could still be uniquely pinpointed using metagenomic codes from a typical body site; coincidental (false positive) matches were rare. Codes based on the gut microbiome were exceptionally stable and pinpointed >80% of individuals. The failure of a code to match its owner at a later time point was largely explained by the loss of specific microbial strains (at current limits of detection) and was only weakly associated with the length of the sampling interval. In addition to highlighting patterns of temporal variation in the ecology of the human microbiome, this work demonstrates the feasibility of microbiome-based identifiability—a result with important ethical implications for microbiome study design. The datasets and code used in this work are available for download from huttenhower.sph.harvard.edu/idability. PMID:25964341

  16. Risk of Vaginal Infections at Early Gestation in Patients with Diabetic Conditions during Pregnancy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Marschalek, Julian; Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Göbl, Christian S; Trofaier, Marie-Louise; Kueronya, Verena; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are reported to be at increased risk for infections of the genital tract. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis (BV) and Candida colonization at early gestation between pregnant women with and without diabetic conditions during pregnancy. We included data from 8, 486 singleton pregnancies that underwent an antenatal infection screen-and-treat programme at our department. All women with GDM or pre-existing diabetes were retrospectively assigned to the diabetic group (DIAB), whereas non-diabetic women served as controls (CON). Prevalence for BV and Candida colonization was 9% and 14% in the DIAB group, and 9% and 13% in the CON group, respectively (n.s.). No significant difference regarding stillbirth and preterm delivery (PTD), defined as a delivery earlier than 37 + 0 (37 weeks plus 0 days) weeks of gestation was found. We could not find an increased risk of colonization with vaginal pathogens at early gestation in pregnant women with diabetes, compared to non-diabetic women. Large prospective studies are needed to evaluate the long-term risk of colonization with vaginal pathogens during the course of pregnancy in these women.

  17. DNA Fingerprinting of Lactobacillus crispatus Strain CTV-05 by Repetitive Element Sequence-Based PCR Analysis in a Pilot Study of Vaginal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, May A. D.; Hillier, Sharon L.

    2003-01-01

    Lactobacillus crispatus is one of the predominant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-producing species found in the vagina and is under development as a probiotic for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. In this study, we assessed whether DNA fingerprinting by repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) can be used to distinguish the capsule strain of L. crispatus (CTV-05) from other endogenous strains as well as other species of vaginal lactobacilli. Vaginal and rectal lactobacilli were identified to the species level by using whole-chromosome probe DNA hybridization. The DNAs from L. crispatus, L. jensenii, L. gasseri, and an as-yet-unnamed H2O2-negative Lactobacillus species designated 1086V were subjected to rep-PCR. The results of gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining of the DNA fingerprints obtained were compared. L. crispatus CTV-05 had a unique DNA fingerprint compared to all other lactobacilli. DNA fingerprints for 27 production lots of L. crispatus sampled from 1994 through 2001 were identical to that of the original strain isolated in 1993, suggesting strain stability. In a pilot study of nine women, this DNA fingerprinting method distinguished CTV-05 from other endogenous vaginal lactobacilli prior to and after vaginal capsule use. rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting is useful for strain typing and for evaluating longitudinal loss or acquisition of vaginal lactobacilli used as probiotics. PMID:12734221

  18. Alterations in Gut Microbiome Composition and Barrier Function Are Associated with Reproductive and Metabolic Defects in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS): A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mina; Münzker, Julia; Trummer, Christian; Zachhuber, Verena; Leber, Bettina; Horvath, Angela; Pieber, Thomas R.; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common female endocrinopathy of unclear origin characterized by hyperandrogenism, oligo-/anovulation, and ovarian cysts. Women with PCOS frequently display overweight, insulin resistance, and systemic low-grade inflammation. We hypothesized that endotoxemia resulting from a leaky gut is associated with inflammation, insulin resistance, fat accumulation, and hyperandrogenemia in PCOS. In this pilot study, we compared the stool microbiome, gut permeability, and inflammatory status of women with PCOS and healthy controls. Methods 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was performed on stool samples from 24 PCOS patients and 19 healthy controls. Data processing and microbiome analysis were conducted in mothur and QIIME using different relative abundance cut-offs. Gut barrier integrity, endotoxemia, and inflammatory status were evaluated using serum and stool markers and associations with reproductive, metabolic, and anthropometric parameters were investigated. Results The stool microbiome of PCOS patients showed a lower diversity and an altered phylogenetic composition compared to controls. We did not observe significant differences in any taxa with a relative abundance>1%. When looking at rare taxa, the relative abundance of bacteria from the phylum Tenericutes, the order ML615J-28 (phylum Tenericutes) and the family S24-7 (phylum Bacteroidetes) was significantly lower and associated with reproductive parameters in PCOS patients. Patients showed alterations in some, but not all markers of gut barrier function and endotoxemia. Conclusion Patients with PCOS have a lower diversity and an altered phylogenetic profile in their stool microbiome, which is associated with clinical parameters. Gut barrier dysfunction and endotoxemia were not driving factors in this patient cohort, but may contribute to the clinical phenotype in certain PCOS patients. PMID:28045919

  19. Alterations in Gut Microbiome Composition and Barrier Function Are Associated with Reproductive and Metabolic Defects in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS): A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Lindheim, Lisa; Bashir, Mina; Münzker, Julia; Trummer, Christian; Zachhuber, Verena; Leber, Bettina; Horvath, Angela; Pieber, Thomas R; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common female endocrinopathy of unclear origin characterized by hyperandrogenism, oligo-/anovulation, and ovarian cysts. Women with PCOS frequently display overweight, insulin resistance, and systemic low-grade inflammation. We hypothesized that endotoxemia resulting from a leaky gut is associated with inflammation, insulin resistance, fat accumulation, and hyperandrogenemia in PCOS. In this pilot study, we compared the stool microbiome, gut permeability, and inflammatory status of women with PCOS and healthy controls. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was performed on stool samples from 24 PCOS patients and 19 healthy controls. Data processing and microbiome analysis were conducted in mothur and QIIME using different relative abundance cut-offs. Gut barrier integrity, endotoxemia, and inflammatory status were evaluated using serum and stool markers and associations with reproductive, metabolic, and anthropometric parameters were investigated. The stool microbiome of PCOS patients showed a lower diversity and an altered phylogenetic composition compared to controls. We did not observe significant differences in any taxa with a relative abundance>1%. When looking at rare taxa, the relative abundance of bacteria from the phylum Tenericutes, the order ML615J-28 (phylum Tenericutes) and the family S24-7 (phylum Bacteroidetes) was significantly lower and associated with reproductive parameters in PCOS patients. Patients showed alterations in some, but not all markers of gut barrier function and endotoxemia. Patients with PCOS have a lower diversity and an altered phylogenetic profile in their stool microbiome, which is associated with clinical parameters. Gut barrier dysfunction and endotoxemia were not driving factors in this patient cohort, but may contribute to the clinical phenotype in certain PCOS patients.

  20. The microbiome in prostate inflammation and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Porter, Corey M; Shrestha, Eva; Peiffer, Lauren B; Sfanos, Karen S

    2018-05-23

    The human microbiome may influence prostate cancer initiation and/or progression through both direct and indirect interactions. To date, the majority of studies have focused on direct interactions including the influence of prostate infections on prostate cancer risk and, more recently, on the composition of the urinary microbiome in relation to prostate cancer. Less well understood are indirect interactions of the microbiome with prostate cancer, such as the influence of the gastrointestinal or oral microbiota on pro- or anti-carcinogenic xenobiotic metabolism, and treatment response. We review the literature to date on direct and indirect interactions of the microbiome with prostate inflammation and prostate cancer. Emerging studies indicate that the microbiome can influence prostate inflammation in relation to benign prostate conditions such as prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and benign prostatic hyperplasia, as well as in prostate cancer. We provide evidence that the human microbiome present at multiple anatomic sites (urinary tract, gastrointestinal tract, oral cavity, etc.) may play an important role in prostate health and disease. In health, the microbiome encourages homeostasis and helps educate the immune system. In dysbiosis, a systemic inflammatory state may be induced, predisposing remote anatomical sites to disease, including cancer. The microbiome's ability to affect systemic hormone levels may also be important, particularly in a disease such as prostate cancer that is dually affected by estrogen and androgen levels. Due to the complexity of the potential interconnectedness between prostate cancer and the microbiome, it is vital to further explore and understand the relationships that are involved.

  1. Basic vaginal pH, bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis: prevalence in early pregnancy and risk of spontaneous preterm delivery, a prospective study in a low socioeconomic and multiethnic South American population.

    PubMed

    Krauss-Silva, Leticia; Almada-Horta, Antonio; Alves, Mariane B; Camacho, Karla G; Moreira, Maria Elizabeth L; Braga, Alcione

    2014-03-19

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) increases the risk of spontaneous preterm deliveries (PD) in developed countries. Its prevalence varies with ethnicity, socioeconomic conditions and gestational age. Aerobic vaginitis (AV) has also been implicated with spontaneous PD. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of asymptomatic BV, the accuracy of vaginal pH level to predict BV and to estimate the risk of spontaneous PD <34 and <37 weeks' gestation of BV and AV. Women attending prenatal public services in Rio de Janeiro were screened to select asymptomatic pregnant women, < 20 weeks' gestation, with no indication for elective PD and without risk factors of spontaneous PD. Vaginal smears of women with vaginal pH > = 4.5 were collected to determine the Nugent score; a sample of those smears was also classified according to a modified Donders' score. Primary outcomes were spontaneous PD < 34 and <37 weeks' gestation and abortion. Prevalence of asymptomatic BV was estimated in 28.1% (n = 1699); 42.4% of the smears were collected before 14 weeks' gestation. After an 8-week follow up, nearly 40% of the initially BV positive women became BV negative. The prevalence of BV among white and black women was 28.1% (95% CI: 24.6%-32.0%) and 32.5% (95% CI: 28.2%-37.2%), respectively. The sensitivity of vaginal pH= > 4.5 and = > 5.0 to predict BV status was 100% and 82%, correspondingly; the 5.0 cutoff value doubled the specificity, from 41% to 84%. The incidence of < 37 weeks' spontaneous PDs among BV pregnant women with a pH= > 4.5 was 3.8%. The RR of spontaneous PD < 34 and <37 weeks among BV women with pH > =4.5, as compared with those with intermediate state, were 1.24 and 1.86, respectively (Fisher's exact test, p value = 1; 0.52, respectively, both ns). No spontaneous case of PD or abortion was associated with severe or moderate AV. A high prevalence of asymptomatic BV was observed without statistically significant difference between black and white women. The RRs of

  2. Basic vaginal pH, bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis: prevalence in early pregnancy and risk of spontaneous preterm delivery, a prospective study in a low socioeconomic and multiethnic South American population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) increases the risk of spontaneous preterm deliveries (PD) in developed countries. Its prevalence varies with ethnicity, socioeconomic conditions and gestational age. Aerobic vaginitis (AV) has also been implicated with spontaneous PD. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of asymptomatic BV, the accuracy of vaginal pH level to predict BV and to estimate the risk of spontaneous PD <34 and <37 weeks’ gestation of BV and AV. Methods Women attending prenatal public services in Rio de Janeiro were screened to select asymptomatic pregnant women, < 20 weeks’ gestation, with no indication for elective PD and without risk factors of spontaneous PD. Vaginal smears of women with vaginal pH > = 4.5 were collected to determine the Nugent score; a sample of those smears was also classified according to a modified Donders’ score. Primary outcomes were spontaneous PD < 34 and <37 weeks’ gestation and abortion. Results Prevalence of asymptomatic BV was estimated in 28.1% (n = 1699); 42.4% of the smears were collected before 14 weeks’ gestation. After an 8-week follow up, nearly 40% of the initially BV positive women became BV negative. The prevalence of BV among white and black women was 28.1% (95% CI: 24.6%-32.0%) and 32.5% (95% CI: 28.2%-37.2%), respectively. The sensitivity of vaginal pH= > 4.5 and = > 5.0 to predict BV status was 100% and 82%, correspondingly; the 5.0 cutoff value doubled the specificity, from 41% to 84%. The incidence of < 37 weeks’ spontaneous PDs among BV pregnant women with a pH= > 4.5 was 3.8%. The RR of spontaneous PD < 34 and <37 weeks among BV women with pH > =4.5, as compared with those with intermediate state, were 1.24 and 1.86, respectively (Fisher’s exact test, p value = 1; 0.52, respectively, both ns). No spontaneous case of PD or abortion was associated with severe or moderate AV. Conclusions A high prevalence of asymptomatic BV was

  3. The sponge microbiome project.

    PubMed

    Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Nielsen, Shaun; Amir, Amnon; Gonzalez, Antonio; Ackermann, Gail L; Cerrano, Carlo; Astudillo-Garcia, Carmen; Easson, Cole; Sipkema, Detmer; Liu, Fang; Steinert, Georg; Kotoulas, Giorgos; McCormack, Grace P; Feng, Guofang; Bell, James J; Vicente, Jan; Björk, Johannes R; Montoya, Jose M; Olson, Julie B; Reveillaud, Julie; Steindler, Laura; Pineda, Mari-Carmen; Marra, Maria V; Ilan, Micha; Taylor, Michael W; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Erwin, Patrick M; Schupp, Peter J; Simister, Rachel L; Knight, Rob; Thacker, Robert W; Costa, Rodrigo; Hill, Russell T; Lopez-Legentil, Susanna; Dailianis, Thanos; Ravasi, Timothy; Hentschel, Ute; Li, Zhiyong; Webster, Nicole S; Thomas, Torsten

    2017-10-01

    Marine sponges (phylum Porifera) are a diverse, phylogenetically deep-branching clade known for forming intimate partnerships with complex communities of microorganisms. To date, 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies have largely utilised different extraction and amplification methodologies to target the microbial communities of a limited number of sponge species, severely limiting comparative analyses of sponge microbial diversity and structure. Here, we provide an extensive and standardised dataset that will facilitate sponge microbiome comparisons across large spatial, temporal, and environmental scales. Samples from marine sponges (n = 3569 specimens), seawater (n = 370), marine sediments (n = 65) and other environments (n = 29) were collected from different locations across the globe. This dataset incorporates at least 268 different sponge species, including several yet unidentified taxa. The V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced from extracted DNA using standardised procedures. Raw sequences (total of 1.1 billion sequences) were processed and clustered with (i) a standard protocol using QIIME closed-reference picking resulting in 39 543 operational taxonomic units (OTU) at 97% sequence identity, (ii) a de novo clustering using Mothur resulting in 518 246 OTUs, and (iii) a new high-resolution Deblur protocol resulting in 83 908 unique bacterial sequences. Abundance tables, representative sequences, taxonomic classifications, and metadata are provided. This dataset represents a comprehensive resource of sponge-associated microbial communities based on 16S rRNA gene sequences that can be used to address overarching hypotheses regarding host-associated prokaryotes, including host specificity, convergent evolution, environmental drivers of microbiome structure, and the sponge-associated rare biosphere. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Management of aerobic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Tempera, Gianna; Furneri, Pio Maria

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic vaginitis is a new nonclassifiable pathology that is neither specific vaginitis nor bacterial vaginosis. The diversity of this microbiological peculiarity could also explain several therapeutic failures when patients were treated for infections identified as bacterial vaginosis. The diagnosis 'aerobic vaginitis' is essentially based on microscopic examinations using a phase-contrast microscope (at ×400 magnification). The therapeutic choice for 'aerobic vaginitis' should take into consideration an antibiotic characterized by an intrinsic activity against the majority of bacteria of fecal origin, bactericidal effect and poor/absent interference with the vaginal microbiota. Regarding the therapy for aerobic vaginitis when antimicrobial agents are prescribed, not only the antimicrobial spectrum but also the presumed ecological disturbance on the anaerobic and aerobic vaginal and rectal microbiota should be taken into a consideration. Because of their very low impact on the vaginal microbiota, kanamycin or quinolones are to be considered a good choice for therapy. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Vaginal sponge and spermicides

    MedlinePlus

    Birth control - over the counter; Contraceptives - over the counter; Family planning - vaginal sponge; Contraception - vaginal sponge ... preventing pregnancy as some other forms of birth control. However, using a spermicide or sponge is much ...

  6. Assisted Vaginal Delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education FAQs Assisted Vaginal Delivery Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Assisted Vaginal Delivery FAQ192, February 2016 PDF ... on Patient Safety For Patients Patient FAQs Spanish Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & Governance ...

  7. Vaginitis test - wet mount

    MedlinePlus

    ... prep - vaginitis; Vaginosis - wet mount; Trichomoniasis - wet mount; Vaginal candida - wet mount ... provider gently inserts an instrument (speculum) into the vagina to hold it open and view inside. A ...

  8. Transfascial vaginal tape (TFT): a simple, safe and cost-effective procedure for stress urinary incontinence. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Foglia, Giovanni; Mistrangelo, Emanuela; Lijoi, Davide; Alessandri, Franco; Ragni, Nicola

    2007-07-01

    To analyse prospectively the effectiveness of a new simple, minimally invasive, and cost-effective technique for the treatment of female urinary stress incontinence: the transfascial vaginal tape (TFT). In a prospective study, we enrolled 45 women undergoing TFT with or without hysterectomy and/or another pelvic reconstructive procedure between 1st December 2003 and 31st December. TFT consists of a tension-free urethrosuspension using a sling located at the mid-urethral level and placed laterally in the endopelvic fascia previously perforated. Follow-up evaluations were established at 3 and 6 months and at 1 year after the operation. During each follow-up, women underwent cough stress test and they answered to the "Incontinence quality of life questionnaire" (I-QOL), to the Patient Global Impression of Severity (PGI-S) and of Improvement (PGI-I) questions. Thirty-nine patients (88.9%) had a follow-up examination 1 year after surgery. Of these, 30 (76.9%) were defined cured, 6 (15.4%) improved and 3 (7.7%) failed. TFT procedure can be considered a simple, safe and cost-effective procedure for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence and can be an alternative to tension-free vaginal tape or transobturator route for sub-urethral tape procedures.

  9. Force-length relationship in the pelvic floor muscles under transverse vaginal distension: a method study in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Verelst, M; Leivseth, G

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is a relationship between changes in the diameter of the urogenital hiatus and force developed in pelvic floor musculature. In addition, we wanted to examine the reliability of the method that measures force development in the pelvic floor in the transverse direction of the urogenital hiatus. Passive and total force in the pelvic floor was measured with an intra-vaginal device in 20 healthy parous volunteers. The measurements were done with a consecutively increasing diameter in the transverse plane of the urogenital hiatus. The procedure was repeated with a few days interval. The measurements show an increase in force with an increasing device-diameter. The results are reliable at all the diameters tested, estimated by the within-subject day-to-day variability which was non-significant. The 40 mm diameter device is most favourable, estimated by Bland Altman plots of the test-retest measurements. Force development in pelvic floor muscles increased as a function of vaginal diameter when measured in the frontal plane. The measurements were reliable at all the different diameters chosen. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Longitudinal comparison study of pelvic floor function between women with and without stress urinary incontinence after vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mikako; Murayama, Ryoko; Haruna, Megumi; Matsuzaki, Masayo; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Murashima, Sachiyo; Kozuma, Shiro

    2013-04-01

    To compare the pelvic floor function between women with and without stress urinary incontinence after vaginal delivery. Seventeen women (age 35.5 ± 3.5) were prospectively studied at about 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after vaginal delivery. Urinary incontinence was assessed by the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Short Form. Pelvic floor function was assessed by antero-posterior diameter of the levator hiatus using transperineal ultrasound. Five of 17 women experienced postpartum stress urinary incontinence. The antero-posterior diameter of the levator hiatus at rest was significantly longer in stress urinary incontinent women than in continent women until 3 months after delivery (p < 0.01), though shortening of the antero-posterior diameter of the levator hiatus was not significantly different between continent women and stress urinary incontinent women. Regardless of urinary incontinence, the antero-posterior diameter of the levator hiatus at rest shortened at 6 months postpartum, compared to 6 weeks postpartum (p < 0.001). The antero-posterior diameter of the levator hiatus during contraction had shortened only in continent women by 6 months postpartum (p = 0.02). The extended pelvic floor may be a cause of stress urinary incontinence in the postpartum period. Therefore, treatment to improve the extended pelvic floor should be developed for the prevention of stress urinary incontinence.

  11. Human Gut Microbiome: Function Matters.

    PubMed

    Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Wilmes, Paul

    2017-11-22

    The human gut microbiome represents a complex ecosystem contributing essential functions to its host. Recent large-scale metagenomic studies have provided insights into its structure and functional potential. However, the functional repertoire which is actually contributed to human physiology remains largely unexplored. Here, by leveraging recent omics datasets, we challenge current assumptions regarding key attributes of the functional gut microbiome, in particular with respect to its variability. We further argue that the closing of existing gaps in functional knowledge should be addressed by a most-wanted gene list, the development and application of molecular and cellular high-throughput measurements, the development and sensible use of experimental models, as well as the direct study of observable molecular effects in the human host. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Predictive value of the composition of the vaginal microbiota in bacterial vaginosis, a dynamic study to identify recurrence-related flora

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bingbing; Niu, Xiaoxi; Han, Na; Wang, Ben; Du, Pengcheng; Na, Risu; Chen, Chen; Liao, Qinping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a highly prevalent disease in women, and increases the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. It has been given wide attention because of the high recurrence rate. Traditional diagnostic methods based on microscope providing limited information on the vaginal microbiota increase the difficulty in tracing the development of the disease in bacteria resistance condition. In this study, we used deep-sequencing technology to observe dynamic variation of the vaginal microbiota at three major time points during treatment, at D0 (before treatment), D7 (stop using the antibiotics) and D30 (the 30-day follow-up visit). Sixty-five patients with BV were enrolled (48 were cured and 17 were not cured), and their bacterial composition of the vaginal microbiota was compared. Interestingly, we identified 9 patients might be recurrence. We also introduced a new measurement point of D7, although its microbiota were significantly inhabited by antibiotic and hard to be observed by traditional method. The vaginal microbiota in deep-sequencing-view present a strong correlation to the final outcome. Thus, coupled with detailed individual bioinformatics analysis and deep-sequencing technology, we may illustrate a more accurate map of vaginal microbial to BV patients, which provide a new opportunity to reduce the rate of recurrence of BV. PMID:27253522

  13. Predictive value of the composition of the vaginal microbiota in bacterial vaginosis, a dynamic study to identify recurrence-related flora.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bingbing; Niu, Xiaoxi; Han, Na; Wang, Ben; Du, Pengcheng; Na, Risu; Chen, Chen; Liao, Qinping

    2016-06-02

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a highly prevalent disease in women, and increases the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. It has been given wide attention because of the high recurrence rate. Traditional diagnostic methods based on microscope providing limited information on the vaginal microbiota increase the difficulty in tracing the development of the disease in bacteria resistance condition. In this study, we used deep-sequencing technology to observe dynamic variation of the vaginal microbiota at three major time points during treatment, at D0 (before treatment), D7 (stop using the antibiotics) and D30 (the 30-day follow-up visit). Sixty-five patients with BV were enrolled (48 were cured and 17 were not cured), and their bacterial composition of the vaginal microbiota was compared. Interestingly, we identified 9 patients might be recurrence. We also introduced a new measurement point of D7, although its microbiota were significantly inhabited by antibiotic and hard to be observed by traditional method. The vaginal microbiota in deep-sequencing-view present a strong correlation to the final outcome. Thus, coupled with detailed individual bioinformatics analysis and deep-sequencing technology, we may illustrate a more accurate map of vaginal microbial to BV patients, which provide a new opportunity to reduce the rate of recurrence of BV.

  14. The Infant Microbiome: Implications for Infant Health and Neurocognitive Development

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Irene; Corwin, Elizabeth J.; Brennan, Patricia A.; Jordan, Sheila; Murphy, Jordan R.; Dunlop, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background Beginning at birth, the microbes in the gut perform essential duties related to the digestion and metabolism of food, the development and activation of the immune system, and the production of neurotransmitters that affect behavior and cognitive function. Objectives The objectives of this review are to: (a) provide a brief overview of the microbiome and the “microbiome-gut-brain axis”; (b) discuss factors known to affect the composition of the infant microbiome: mode of delivery, antibiotic exposure, and infant feeding patterns; and (c) present research priorities for nursing science, and clinical implications for infant health and neurocognitive development. Discussion The gut microbiome influences immunological, endocrine, and neural pathways and plays an important role in infant development. Several factors influence colonization of the infant gut microbiome. Different microbial colonization patterns are associated with vaginal versus surgical birth, exposure to antibiotics, and infant feeding patterns. Because of extensive physiological influence, infant microbial colonization patterns have the potential to impact physical and neurocognitive development and life course disease risk. Understanding these influences will inform newborn care and parental education. PMID:26657483

  15. Community assembly of a euryhaline fish microbiome during salinity acclimation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Victor T; Smith, Katherine F; Melvin, Donald W; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A

    2015-05-01

    Microbiomes play a critical role in promoting a range of host functions. Microbiome function, in turn, is dependent on its community composition. Yet, how microbiome taxa are assembled from their regional species pool remains unclear. Many possible drivers have been hypothesized, including deterministic processes of competition, stochastic processes of colonization and migration, and physiological 'host-effect' habitat filters. The contribution of each to assembly in nascent or perturbed microbiomes is important for understanding host-microbe interactions and host health. In this study, we characterized the bacterial communities in a euryhaline fish and the surrounding tank water during salinity acclimation. To assess the relative influence of stochastic versus deterministic processes in fish microbiome assembly, we manipulated the bacterial species pool around each fish by changing the salinity of aquarium water. Our results show a complete and repeatable turnover of dominant bacterial taxa in the microbiomes from individuals of the same species after acclimation to the same salinity. We show that changes in fish microbiomes are not correlated with corresponding changes to abundant taxa in tank water communities and that the dominant taxa in fish microbiomes are rare in the aquatic surroundings, and vice versa. Our results suggest that bacterial taxa best able to compete within the unique host environment at a given salinity appropriate the most niche space, independent of their relative abundance in tank water communities. In this experiment, deterministic processes appear to drive fish microbiome assembly, with little evidence for stochastic colonization. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Value of bacterial culture of vaginal swabs in diagnosis of vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Nenadić, Dane; Pavlović, Miloš D

    2015-06-01

    Vaginal and cervical swab culture is still very common procedure in our country's everyday practice whereas simple and rapid diagnostic methods have been very rarely used. The aim of this study was to show that the employment of simple and rapid diagnostic tools [vaginal fluid wet mount microscopy (VFWMM), vaginal pH and potassium hydroxide (KOH) test] offers better assessment of vaginal environment than standard microbiologic culture commonly used in Serbia. This prospective study included 505 asymptomatic pregnant women undergoing VFWMM, test with 10% KOH, determination of vaginal pH and standard culture of cervicovaginal swabs. Combining findings from the procedures was used to make diagnoses of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vaginitis. In addition, the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) was determined in each sample and analyzed along with other findings. Infections with Candida albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis were confirmed or excluded by microscopic examination. In 36 (6%) patients cervicovaginal swab cultures retrieved several aerobes and facultative anaerobes, whereas in 52 (11%) women Candida albicans was isolated. Based on VFWMM findings and clinical criteria 96 (19%) women had BV, 19 (4%) vaginitis, and 72 (14%) candidiasis. Of 115 women with BV and vaginitis, pH 4.5 was found in 5, and of 390 with normal findings 83 (21%) had vaginal pH 4.5. Elevated numbers of PMN were found in 154 (30%) women--in 83 (54%) of them VFWMM was normal. Specificity and sensitivity of KOH test and vaginal pH determination in defining pathological vaginal flora were 95% and 81%, and 79% and 91%, respectively. Cervicovaginal swab culture is expensive but almost non-informative test in clinical practice. The use of simpler and rapid methods as vaginal fluid wet mount microscopy, KOH test and vaginal pH offers better results in diagnosis, and probably in the treatment and prevention of sequels of vaginal infections.

  17. USGS microbiome research

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Hopkins, M. Camille

    2017-09-26

    Microbiomes are the communities of microorganisms (for example, bacteria, viruses, and fungi) that live on, in, and around people, plants, animals, soil, water, and the atmosphere. Microbiomes are active in the functioning of diverse ecosystems, for instance, by influencing water quality, nutrient acquisition 
and stress tolerance in plants, and stability of soil and aquatic environments. Microbiome research conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey spans many of our mission areas. Key research areas include water quality, understanding climate effects on soil and permafrost, ecosystem and wildlife health, invasive species, contaminated environments to improve bioremediation, and enhancing energy production. Microbiome research will fundamentally strengthen the ability to address the global challenges of maintaining clean water, ensuring adequate food supply, meeting energy needs, and preserving human and ecosystem health.

  18. Xenobiotic Metabolism and Gut Microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anubhav; Srinivasan, Meenakshi; Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Mande, Sharmila S.

    2016-01-01

    Humans are exposed to numerous xenobiotics, a majority of which are in the form of pharmaceuticals. Apart from human enzymes, recent studies have indicated the role of the gut bacterial community (microbiome) in metabolizing xenobiotics. However, little is known about the contribution of the plethora of gut microbiome in xenobiotic metabolism. The present study reports the results of analyses on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in various human gut microbiomes. A total of 397 available gut metagenomes from individuals of varying age groups from 8 nationalities were analyzed. Based on the diversities and abundances of the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, various bacterial taxa were classified into three groups, namely, least versatile, intermediately versatile and highly versatile xenobiotic metabolizers. Most interestingly, specific relationships were observed between the overall drug consumption profile and the abundance and diversity of the xenobiotic metabolizing repertoire in various geographies. The obtained differential abundance patterns of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and bacterial genera harboring them, suggest their links to pharmacokinetic variations among individuals. Additional analyses of a few well studied classes of drug modifying enzymes (DMEs) also indicate geographic as well as age specific trends. PMID:27695034

  19. Common causes of vaginal infections and antibiotic susceptibility of aerobic bacterial isolates in women of reproductive age attending at Felegehiwot Referral Hospital, Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mulu, Wondemagegn; Yimer, Mulat; Zenebe, Yohannes; Abera, Bayeh

    2015-05-13

    Bacterial vaginosis, candidal, trichomonal and Gonococcal vaginal infections are a major health problems associated with gynecologic complications and increase in replication, shedding and transmission of HIV and other STIs in women of reproductive age. The study aimed at determining the prevalence of common vaginal infections and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of aerobic bacterial isolates in women of reproductive age, attending Felegehiwot referral Hospital. A hospital based cross sectional study was conducted from May to November, 2013. Simple random sampling technique was used. Demographic variables were collected using a structured questionnaire. Clinical data were collected by physicians. Two vaginal swab specimens were collected from each participant. Wet mount and Gram staining were carried out to identify motile T.vaginalis, budding yeast and clue cells. All vaginal specimens were cultured for aerobic bacterial isolates using standard microbiology methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed using disc diffusion technique as per the standard by Kirby-Bauer method. The results were analyzed using descriptive, chi-square and fisher's exact test as appropriate. A total of 409 women in reproductive age (15 - 49 years) participated in the study. The median age of the women was 28 years. Overall, 63 (15.4 %) of women had vaginal infections. The proportion of vaginal infection was higher in non-pregnant (17.3 %) than pregnant women (13.3 %) (P = 0.002). The most common identified vaginal infections were candidiasis (8.3 %) and bacterial vaginosis (2.8 %) followed by trichomoniasis (2.1 %). The isolation rate of N. gonorrhoeae and group B Streptococcus colonization was 4 (1 %) and 6 (1.2 %), respectively. Bacterial vaginosis was higher in non-pregnant (5.6 %) than pregnant women (0.5 %) (P = 0.002). Religion, age, living in rural area and having lower abdominal pain were significantly associated with bacterial vaginosis and

  20. Microbiome/microbiota and allergies.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuzaburo; Shimojo, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Allergies are characterized by a hypersensitive immune reaction to originally harmless antigens. In recent decades, the incidence of allergic diseases has markedly increased, especially in developed countries. The increase in the frequency of allergic diseases is thought to be primarily due to environmental changes related to a westernized lifestyle, which affects the commensal microbes in the human body. The human gut is the largest organ colonized by bacteria and contains more than 1000 bacterial species, called the "gut microbiota." The recent development of sequencing technology has enabled researchers to genetically investigate and clarify the diversity of all species of commensal microbes. The collective genomes of commensal microbes are together called the "microbiome." Although the detailed mechanisms remain unclear, it has been proposed that the microbiota/microbiome, especially that in the gut, impacts the systemic immunity and metabolism, thus affecting the development of various immunological diseases, including allergies. In this review, we summarize the recent findings regarding the importance of the microbiome/microbiota in the development of allergic diseases and also the results of interventional studies using probiotics or prebiotics to prevent allergies.

  1. From microbiome to infectome in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Sakkas, Lazaros I

    2017-07-01

    The current review discusses the pros and cons of the microbiome studies conducted in search of the association between microbiota and autoimmunity. We focus on the role of infectome and autoinfectome as a bridge to link the findings of microbiome studies with those emerging from investigations of the role of specific viruses and antiviral responses as triggers of autoimmunity (through various mechanisms such as molecular mimicry). The 'usual suspects', such as herpetoviruses and Escherichia coli, are thoroughly discussed in light of the data emerged by the microbiome studies, using as examples specific autoimmune rheumatic diseases and inflammatory bowel diseases. We conclude that the studies of the oral cavity, gastrointestinal, and urinary tract microbiome are informative but can only be useful if further explored from the infectome perspective. This means that the plethora of bacteria associated with autoimmune diseases from microbiome studies can be and must be tested experimentally. If certain bacteria are associated directly or indirectly with autoimmune diseases, specific immunological mechanisms must be identified.

  2. Metronidazole Vaginal Gel 1.3% in the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis: A Dose-Ranging Study

    PubMed Central

    Chavoustie, Steven E.; Jacobs, Mark; Reisman, Howard A.; Waldbaum, Arthur S.; Levy, Sharon F.; Hillier, Sharon L.; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metronidazole vaginal gel (MVG) 0.75% is a US Food and Drug Administration–approved, 5-day treatment for bacterial vaginosis (BV). This study tested the hypothesis that a shorter treatment course at a higher dose (MVG 1.3%) would yield similar efficacy to 5 days of MVG 0.75%. Materials and Methods This phase 2, multicenter, randomized, controlled, investigator-blinded, dose-ranging study enrolled women with a clinical diagnosis of BV. Patients were assigned to MVG 1.3% once daily for 1, 3, or 5 days or MVG 0.75% once daily for 5 days. The therapeutic cure rate, requiring clinical and bacteriological cure, at the end-of-study visit was determined for the per-protocol population. A Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate median time-to-symptom resolution. Results In total, 255 women (mean age = 35 y) were enrolled. The per-protocol population included 189 patients. The therapeutic cure rate was higher in the 1-day (13/43, 30.2%), 3-day (12/48, 25.0%), and 5-day (16/49, 32.7%) MVG 1.3% groups versus the MVG 0.75% group (10/49, 20.4%). Median time-to-resolution of fishy odor was shorter in the 3 MVG 1.3% groups versus the MVG 0.75% group. The 5-day MVG 1.3% group had the lowest rate of symptom return. No clinically important differences were observed in adverse events across treatment groups; most events were mild or moderate in intensity and considered unrelated to treatment. Similar results were found in the modified intent-to-treat population. Conclusions Metronidazole vaginal gel 1.3% applied once daily for 1, 3, or 5 days showed similar efficacy, safety, and tolerability as MVG 0.75% once daily for 5 days. PMID:24983350

  3. Metronidazole vaginal gel 1.3% in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis: a dose-ranging study.

    PubMed

    Chavoustie, Steven E; Jacobs, Mark; Reisman, Howard A; Waldbaum, Arthur S; Levy, Sharon F; Hillier, Sharon L; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Metronidazole vaginal gel (MVG) 0.75% is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved, 5-day treatment for bacterial vaginosis (BV). This study tested the hypothesis that a shorter treatment course at a higher dose (MVG 1.3%) would yield similar efficacy to 5 days of MVG 0.75%. This phase 2, multicenter, randomized, controlled, investigator-blinded, dose-ranging study enrolled women with a clinical diagnosis of BV. Patients were assigned to MVG 1.3% once daily for 1, 3, or 5 days or MVG 0.75% once daily for 5 days. The therapeutic cure rate, requiring clinical and bacteriological cure, at the end-of-study visit was determined for the per-protocol population. A Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate median time-to-symptom resolution. In total, 255 women (mean age = 35 y) were enrolled. The per-protocol population included 189 patients. The therapeutic cure rate was higher in the 1-day (13/43, 30.2%), 3-day (12/48, 25.0%), and 5-day (16/49, 32.7%) MVG 1.3% groups versus the MVG 0.75% group (10/49, 20.4%). Median time-to-resolution of fishy odor was shorter in the 3 MVG 1.3% groups versus the MVG 0.75% group. The 5-day MVG 1.3% group had the lowest rate of symptom return. No clinically important differences were observed in adverse events across treatment groups; most events were mild or moderate in intensity and considered unrelated to treatment. Similar results were found in the modified intent-to-treat population. Metronidazole vaginal gel 1.3% applied once daily for 1, 3, or 5 days showed similar efficacy, safety, and tolerability as MVG 0.75% once daily for 5 days.

  4. Effect of vaginal or systemic estrogen on dynamics of collagen assembly in the rat vaginal wall.

    PubMed

    Montoya, T Ignacio; Maldonado, P Antonio; Acevedo, Jesus F; Word, R Ann

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of systemic and local estrogen treatment on collagen assembly and biomechanical properties of the vaginal wall. Ovariectomized nulliparous rats were treated with estradiol or conjugated equine estrogens (CEEs) either systemically, vaginal CEE, or vaginal placebo cream for 4 wk. Low-dose local CEE treatment resulted in increased vaginal epithelial thickness and significant vaginal growth without uterine hyperplasia. Furthermore, vaginal wall distensibility increased without compromise of maximal force at failure. Systemic estradiol resulted in modest increases in collagen type I with no change in collagen type III mRNA. Low-dose vaginal treatment, however, resulted in dramatic increases in both collagen subtypes whereas moderate and high dose local therapies were less effective. Consistent with the mRNA results, low-dose vaginal estrogen resulted in increased total and cross-linked collagen content. The inverse relationship between vaginal dose and collagen expression may be explained in part by progressive downregulation of estrogen receptor-alpha mRNA with increasing estrogen dose. We conclude that, in this menopausal rat model, local estrogen treatment increased total and cross-linked collagen content and markedly stimulated collagen mRNA expression in an inverse dose-effect relationship. High-dose vaginal estrogen resulted in downregulation of estrogen receptor-alpha and loss of estrogen-induced increases in vaginal collagen. These results may have important clinical implications regarding the use of local vaginal estrogen therapy and its role as an adjunctive treatment in women with loss of vaginal support. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  5. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis of the microbiome of watermelon fruits

    The plant microbiome is a key determinant of plant health and productivity, and alteration of the plant microbiome can increase the quality of agricultural products. Little is known about the microbial population in fruit development of plants. In this study, we aimed to understand the function of m...

  6. Protection against rat vaginal candidiasis by adoptive transfer of vaginal B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Santoni, Giorgio; Boccanera, Maria; Lucciarini, Roberta; Arancia, Silvia; Sandini, Silvia; Amantini, Consuelo; Cassone, Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is a mucosal infection affecting many women, but the immune mechanisms operating against Candida albicans at the mucosal level remain unknown. A rat model was employed to further characterize the contribution of B and T cells to anti-Candida vaginal protection. Particularly, the protective role of vaginal B cells was studied by means of adoptive transfer of vaginal CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) cells from Candida-immunized rats to naïve animals. This passive transfer of B cells resulted into a number of vaginal C. albicans CFU approximately 50% lower than their controls. Sorted CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) vaginal B lymphocytes from Candida-infected rats proliferated in response to stimulation with an immunodominant mannoprotein (MP) antigen of the fungus. Importantly, anti-MP antibodies and antibody-secreting B cells were detected in the supernatant and cell cultures, respectively, of vaginal B lymphocytes from infected rats incubated in vitro with vaginal T cells and stimulated with MP. No such specific antibodies were found when using vaginal B cells from uninfected rats. Furthermore, inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6 and IL-10, were found in the supernatant of vaginal B cells from infected rats. These data are evidence of a partial anti-Candida protective role of CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) vaginal B lymphocytes in our experimental model.

  7. High-dose nifuratel for simple and mixed aerobic vaginitis: A single-center prospective open-label cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qian; Li, Nan; Song, Shurong; Zhang, Aihua; Li, Ni; Duan, Ying

    2016-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of two nifuratel dosages for the treatment of aerobic vaginitis (AV) were compared. This was a prospective open-label cohort study of patients diagnosed and treated at the Tianjin Third Central Hospital between January 2012 and December 2013. The co-presence of bacterial vaginosis (BV), vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), or/and trichomonal vaginitis (TV; mixed AV) was determined. Patients were randomized to nifuratel-500 (500 mg nifuratel, intravaginal, 10 days) or nifuratel-250 (250 mg nifuratel, intravaginal, 10 days), and followed-up for three to seven days after treatment completion. Primary and secondary outcomes were recovery rate and adverse events, respectively. The study included 142 patients with AV. Age was not significantly different between the groups (n = 71 each), and disease distribution was identical: 29 (40.85%) simple AV and 42 (59.15%) mixed AV (AV + BV, 42.86 %; AV + VVC, 30.95%; AV + TV, 26.19%). In patients with simple AV, the recovery rate did not differ significantly between the nifuratel-500 (26/29, 89.66%) and nifuratel-250 (22/29, 75.86%) groups. In patients with mixed AV, recovery rates were significantly higher in the nifuratel-500 than in the nifuratel-250 group (AV + BV, 88.89% vs 50.00 %; AV + VVC, 76.92 % vs 30.77 %; AV + TV, 90.91 % vs 36.36%; all P < 0.05). Only one patient (nifuratel-500) reported an adverse event (mild anaphylactic reaction). Nifuratel 500 mg showed good clinical efficacy for the treatment of AV, particularly mixed AV, and is superior to the 250 mg dosage in the treatment of mixed AV. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. [Clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis and its mixed infections].

    PubMed

    Fan, Ai-Ping; Xue, Feng-Xia

    2010-12-01

    To investigate clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis (AV) and its mixed infections for diagnosis efficiently. From April 2008 to December 2008, 516 patients with vaginitis treated in Tianjin Medical University General Hospital were enrolled in this study. AV, bacterial vaginosis (BV), vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), trichomonal vaginitis (TV), and cytolytic vaginosis (CV) were diagnosed based on symptoms, sign and vaginal discharge examination. Among 516 cases, AV cases were found in 14.7% (76/516), and AV was common vaginal infection. AV mixed infections was diagnosed in 58% (44/76), including mixed with BV (45%, 20/44), mixed with VVC (30%, 13/44), and mixed with TV (25%, 11/44). Those common symptom of AV were yellow vaginal discharge (63%, 20/32), more vaginal discharge (44%, 14/32). Vaginal pH value was usually more than 4.5 (84%, 27/32). Vaginal cleanliness mainly was grade III - IV (88%, 28/32). Six cases with enterococcus faecium and 4 cases with streptococci were frequently isolated. The symptom and sign of mixed AV infection was atypical. Aerobic vaginitis is a common lower vaginal infection and easily mixed with other pathogens, especially with BV, VVC or TV. When patients were diagnosed with AV or other vaginal infection, it should be mentioned whether those patients have mixed vaginal infection or AV.

  9. The effect of vaginal cream containing ginger in users of clotrimazole vaginal cream on vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Shabanian, Sheida; Khalili, Sima; Lorigooini, Zahra; Malekpour, Afsaneh; Heidari-Soureshjani, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is one of the most common infections of the genital tract in women that causes many complications. Therefore, we examined the clinical effect of ginger cream along with clotrimazole compared to vaginal clotrimazole alone in this study. This double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 67 women admitted to the Gynecology Clinic of Hajar Hospital with vaginal candidiasis. The patients were divided randomly into two groups of 33 and 34 people. The diagnosis was made according to clinical symptoms, wet smear, and culture. Ginger-clotrimazole vaginal cream 1% and clotrimazole vaginal cream 1% were administered to groups 1 and 2, respectively, once a day for 7 days and therapeutic effects and symptoms were evaluated in readmission. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 22, t -test and Chi-square. The mean value of variables itching ( P > 0.05), burning ( P > 0.05), and cheesy secretion ( P < 0.05) in users of ginger-clotrimazole was less than the other group after the treatment. Recurrence in clotrimazole group was 48.5% and in ginger-clotrimazole group 51.2% during the 1-month follow-up with no significant difference. Study results showed that cream containing ginger and clotrimazole 1% was more effective and may be more useful than the clotrimazole to treat vaginal candidiasis.

  10. Experimental metagenomics and ribosomal profiling of the human skin microbiome.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Pamela; Farina, Stefania; Cristofolini, Mario; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Tett, Adrian; Segata, Nicola

    2017-03-01

    The skin is the largest organ in the human body, and it is populated by a large diversity of microbes, most of which are co-evolved with the host and live in symbiotic harmony. There is increasing evidence that the skin microbiome plays a crucial role in the defense against pathogens, immune system training and homoeostasis, and microbiome perturbations have been associated with pathological skin conditions. Studying the skin resident microbial community is thus essential to better understand the microbiome-host crosstalk and to associate its specific configurations with cutaneous diseases. Several community profiling approaches have proved successful in unravelling the composition of the skin microbiome and overcome the limitations of cultivation-based assays, but these tools remain largely inaccessible to the clinical and medical dermatology communities. The study of the skin microbiome is also characterized by specific technical challenges, such as the low amount of microbial biomass and the extensive human DNA contamination. Here, we review the available community profiling approaches to study the skin microbiome, specifically focusing on the practical experimental and analytical tools necessary to generate and analyse skin microbiome data. We describe all the steps from the initial samples collection to the final data interpretation, with the goal of enabling clinicians and researchers who are not familiar with the microbiome field to perform skin profiling experiments. © 2016 The Authors. Experimental Dermatology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Protective activity of geranium oil and its component, geraniol, in combination with vaginal washing against vaginal candidiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Naho; Takizawa, Toshio; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Hisajima, Tatsuya; Inouye, Shigeharu; Yamaguchi, Hideyo; Abe, Shigeru

    2008-08-01

    In order to evaluate an effective administration method of essential oils for vaginal candidiasis, efficacy of vaginal application of essential oils against murine experimental candidiasis was investigated. The effect on vaginal inflammation and Candida growth form was also studied. Vaginal candidiasis was established by intravaginal infection of C. albicans to estradiol-treated mice. These mice intravaginally received essential oils such as geranium and tea tree singly or in combination with vaginal washing. Vaginal administration of clotrimazole significantly decreased the number of viable C. albicans cells in the vaginal cavity by itself. In contrast, these essential oils did not lower the cell number. When application of geranium oil or geraniol was combined with vaginal washing, the cell number was decreased significantly. The myeloperoxidase activity assay exhibited the possibility that essential oils worked not only to reduce the viable cell number of C. albicans, but also to improve vaginal inflammation. The smear of vaginal washing suspension suggested that more yeast-form cells appeared in vaginal smears of these oil-treated mice than in control mice. In vitro study showed that a very low concentration (25 microg/ml) of geranium oil and geraniol inhibited mycelial growth, but not yeast growth. Based on these findings, it is estimated that vaginal application of geranium oil or its main component, geraniol, suppressed Candida cell growth in the vagina and its local inflammation when combined with vaginal washing.

  12. Evaluation of the microbiome in children's appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Salö, Martin; Marungruang, Nittaya; Roth, Bodil; Sundberg, Tiia; Stenström, Pernilla; Arnbjörnsson, Einar; Fåk, Frida; Ohlsson, Bodil

    2017-01-01

    The role of the microbiome has been widely discussed in the etiology of appendicitis. The primary aim was to evaluate the microbiome in the normal appendix and in appendicitis specifically divided into the three clinically and histopathologically defined grades of inflammation. Secondary aims were to examine whether there were any microbiome differences between proximal and distal appendices, and relate the microbiome with histopathological findings. A prospective pilot study was conducted of children undergoing appendectomy for appendicitis. The diagnosis was based on histopathological analysis. Children with incidental appendectomy were used as controls. The proximal and distal mucosa from the appendices were analyzed with 16S rRNA gene sequencing. A total of 22 children, 3 controls and 19 appendicitis patients; 11 phlegmonous, 4 gangrenous, and 4 perforated appendices, were prospectively included. The amount of Fusobacterium increased and Bacteroides decreased in phlegmonous and perforated appendicitis compared to controls, but statistical significance was not reached, and this pattern was not seen in gangrenous appendicitis. No relation could be seen between different bacteria and the grade of inflammation, and there was a wide variation of abundances at phylum, genus, and species level within every specific group of patients. Further, no significant differences could be detected when comparing the microbiome in proximal and distal mucosa, which may be because the study was underpowered. A trend with more abundance of Fusobacteria in the distal mucosa was seen in appendicitis patients with obstruction (25 and 13 %, respectively, p = 0.06). The pattern of microbiome differed not only between groups, but also within groups. However, no statistically significant differences could be found in the microbiome between groups or clinical conditions. No correlation between a specific bacteria and grade of inflammation was found. In the vast majority of cases of

  13. A Pilot Study to Evaluate the Oral Microbiome and Dental Health in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Polla, Daniel; Astafurov, Konstantin; Hawy, Eman; Hyman, Leslie; Hou, Wei; Danias, John

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate possible associations between primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), dental health, and the oral microbiome. Case-control study was conducted at SUNY Downstate. Adult subjects (40 to 87 y) were recruited as POAG cases (n=119) and controls without glaucoma (n=78) based on visual field and optic nerve criteria. Overall 74.6% were African Americans (AA). Information on medical history and oral health was collected and ophthalmologic examinations were performed. Mouthwash specimens (28 AA cases and 17 controls) were analyzed for bacterial DNA amounts. Analyses were limited to AAs as the predominant racial group. Outcome measures included number of natural teeth, self-reported periodontal health parameters, and amounts and prevalence of oral bacterial species. Logistic regression was used to evaluate associated factors and potential interactions. Cases and controls had similar age (mean: 62.2 and 60.9 y, respectively, P>0.48), and frequency of hypertension, diabetes, but cases had a higher proportion of men (P<0.04). On average (±SD), cases had fewer natural teeth than controls [18.0 (±11.1) vs. 20.7 (±9.4)]. Having more natural teeth was inversely associated with POAG, in multivariable analyses, at older ages [eg, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) at age 55: 1.0 (0.95-1.06), P=0.98 vs. at age 85: 0.87 (0.79-0.96), P=0.007]. Amounts of Streptococci were higher in cases than controls (P<0.03) in samples from the subset of subjects analyzed. The number of teeth (an oral health indicator) and alterations in the amounts of oral bacteria may be associated with glaucoma pathology. Further investigation of the association between dental health and glaucoma is warranted.

  14. Functional variation in the gut microbiome of wild Drosophila populations.

    PubMed

    Bost, Alyssa; Martinson, Vincent G; Franzenburg, Soeren; Adair, Karen L; Albasi, Alice; Wells, Martin T; Douglas, Angela E

    2018-05-26

    Most of the evidence that the gut microbiome of animals is functionally variable, with consequences for the health and fitness of the animal host, is based on laboratory studies, often using inbred animals under tightly controlled conditions. It is largely unknown whether these microbiome effects would be evident in outbred animal populations under natural conditions. In this study, we quantified the functional traits of the gut microbiota (metagenome) and host (gut transcriptome) and the taxonomic composition of the gut microorganisms (16S rRNA gene sequence) in natural populations of three mycophagous Drosophila species. Variation in microbiome function and composition was driven principally by the period of sample collection, while host function varied mostly with Drosophila species, indicating that variation in microbiome traits is determined largely by environmental factors, and not host taxonomy. Despite this, significant correlations between microbiome and host functional traits were obtained. In particular, microbiome functions dominated by metabolism were positively associated with host functions relating to gut epithelial turnover. Much of the functional variation in the microbiome could be attributed to variation in abundance of Bacteroidetes, rather than the two other abundant groups, the γ-Proteobacteria or Lactobacillales. We conclude that functional variation in the interactions between animals and their gut microbiome can be detectable in natural populations and, in mycophagous Drosophila, this variation relates primarily to metabolism and homeostasis of the gut epithelium. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Microbiome and Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Blázquez, Ana B.; Berin, M. Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is a common disease affecting approximately 8% of children and 5% of adults. The prevalence has increased over the last two decades, suggesting an important environmental contribution to susceptibility. Studies have identified mode of birth, pet exposure, and having older siblings as being significant risk modifying factors in the development of food allergy. With the discovery that these factors significantly impact the composition of the intestinal microbiome, which is known to play a critical role in shaping the immune system, recent studies have begun to address the role of the intestinal microbiota in the development of food allergy. Studies in human cohorts support a dysbiosis in food allergy, and limited data suggest that this dysbiosis occurs early in life, preceding the onset of sensitization. Studies from animal models have clearly shown that the composition of the intestinal microbiota confers susceptibility to food allergy, and that there are organisms such as Clostridia species that are protective in the development of food allergy. Our understanding of microbial regulation of food allergy is in its nascency, but the state of the field supports an important contribution of intestinal microbes to susceptibility. Challenges going forward are to identify commensal-derived microorganisms that could be used therapeutically to prevent or perhaps treat food allergy. PMID:27686718

  16. Risk of vaginal bleeding and postpartum hemorrhage after use of antidepressants in pregnancy: a study from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lupattelli, Angela; Spigset, Olav; Koren, Gideon; Nordeng, Hedvig

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to examine obstetric bleeding outcomes after exposure during pregnancy to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), tricyclic (TCAs), and other antidepressants (OADs).The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway constituted the data source for the present study. We included 57,279 pregnant women, of which 1.02% reported use of antidepressants during pregnancy, mostly SSRIs/SNRIs (0.92%). We categorized exposure according to antidepressant use in pregnancy (SSRIs/SNRIs, n = 527; TCAs/OADs, n = 59; nonexposed, nondepressed, n = 55,411) with inclusion of a disease comparison group (nonexposed, depressed, n = 1282). We used logistic regression to estimate adjusted odds ratio (aOR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for vaginal bleeding outcomes in pregnancy and postpartum hemorrhage.Compared with nonexposed subjects, first trimester exposure to SSRIs/SNRIs or TCAs/OADs did not confer any increased risk of vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy (aOR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.72-1.16 and aOR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.36-1.92, respectively). No increased risk for vaginal bleeding in midpregnancy was observed among users of SSRIs/SNRIs (aOR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.50-1.31) or TCAs/OADs (aOR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.26-3.53) in second trimester. Exposure to SSRIs/SNRIs during gestational week 30 to childbirth did not confer any increased risk of postpartum hemorrhage after vaginal (aOR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.47-1.74) or cesarean (aOR, 1.47; 95% CI, 0.51-4.22) delivery. Women in the disease comparison group presented a significant moderate increased risk of vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy (aOR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06-1.39) and midpregnancy (aOR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.55) but not postpartum.Among this Norwegian cohort of pregnant women, use of antidepressants in pregnancy was not associated with any obstetrical bleeding outcome.

  17. The microbiome in early life: implications for health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tamburini, Sabrina; Shen, Nan; Wu, Han Chih; Clemente, Jose C

    2016-07-07

    Recent studies have characterized how host genetics, prenatal environment and delivery mode can shape the newborn microbiome at birth. Following this, postnatal factors, such as antibiotic treatment, diet or environmental exposure, further modulate the development of the infant's microbiome and immune system, and exposure to a variety of microbial organisms during early life has long been hypothesized to exert a protective effect in the newborn. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown that factors that alter bacterial communities in infants during childhood increase the risk for several diseases, highlighting the importance of understanding early-life microbiome composition. In this review, we describe how prenatal and postnatal factors shape the development of both the microbiome and the immune system. We also discuss the prospects of microbiome-mediated therapeutics and the need for more effective approaches that can reconfigure bacterial communities from pathogenic to homeostatic configurations.

  18. Formulation, stability study, and pre-clinical evaluation of a vaginal cream containing curcumin in a rat model of vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    de Souza Fernandes, Lígia; Amorim, Yuri Martins; Silva, Elton Libério da; Silva, Samuel Calixto; Santos, Alécia Junia Aparecida; Peixoto, Franciele Natália; Pires, Luara Moniele Neves; Sakamoto, Raquel Yumi; Pinto, Flávia do Carmo Horta; Scarpa, Maria Virgínia Costa; Gonzaga de Freitas Araújo, Marcelo

    2018-03-08

    Owing to the growing resistance among isolates of Candida species to usual antifungal agents and the well-known therapeutic potential of curcumin, the purpose of this study was to develop and validate a vaginal formulation containing this substance and to evaluating its effectiveness in the treatment of experimental vulvovaginal candidiasis METHODS: Curcumin was incorporated in a vaginal cream in three concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 1.0%). The different concentrations of the cream and its controls were intravaginally administered in an immunosuppressed rat model to evaluate the efficacy in the treatment of experimental vulvovaginal candidiasis. Samples of the cream were also subjected to centrifugation and physical stability tests and an analytical method for quantification of curcumin was validated based on HPLC RESULTS: The formulation was stable and the HPLC method could be considered suitable for the quantitative determination of curcumin in the cream. After six days of pre-clinical study, the number of infected animals was 1/6 in all groups treated with curcumin vaginal cream and the fungal burden showed a progressive reduction. Reduction of the inflammatory infiltrate was observed in the group treated with 1.0% cream CONCLUSION: Vaginal cream containing curcumin could be considered a promising effective antifungal medicine in the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Sexual Response in Women with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Controlled Laboratory Study Measuring Vaginal Blood Flow and Subjective Sexual Arousal.

    PubMed

    Both, Stephanie; Ter Kuile, Moniek; Enzlin, Paul; Dekkers, Olaf; van Dijk, Marieke; Weijenborg, Philomeen

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have indicated that women with diabetes mellitus are at higher risk to develop sexual dysfunctions. In the current study, we hypothesized that lower genital arousal response-as a consequence of diabetes-related damage to nerves and blood vessels-might play a part in these higher prevalence rates. Vaginal blood flow, subjective sexual response, and clitoral sensitivity were compared between women with diabetes and healthy controls, and associations with diabetes complications were investigated. In pre- and postmenopausal women with type 1 diabetes (n = 42) and healthy controls (n = 46), vaginal blood flow was measured as vaginal pulse amplitude (VPA). VPA was assessed at rest, during erotic film viewing, and during vibrotactile clitoral stimulation. Subjective sexual arousal was measured using a questionnaire. Clitoral sensitivity was assessed by a vibration perception test. Data on diabetes complications were obtained from medical records, and neuropathy was assessed by quantitative sensory testing. VPA, subjective sexual arousal, and clitoral sensitivity were not significantly different between women with diabetes and controls. Nevertheless, women with diabetes who had retinopathy showed significantly lower VPA than women without retinopathy, and women with diabetes who had neuropathy showed significantly higher sensation thresholds for vibrotactile clitoral stimulation. The results do not support the hypothesis of a disrupted genital arousal response in women with diabetes. However, the observed associations between retinopathy and vaginal blood flow, and between neuropathy and clitoral sensitivity, suggest that diabetes-related complications might adversely affect the physiological basis of female sexual response.

  20. Metagenomic investigation of gastrointestinal microbiome in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minseok; Park, Tansol; Yu, Zhongtang

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract, including the rumen and the other intestinal segments of cattle, harbors a diverse, complex, and dynamic microbiome that drives feed digestion and fermentation in cattle, determining feed efficiency and output of pollutants. This microbiome also plays an important role in affecting host health. Research has been conducted for more than a century to understand the microbiome and its relationship to feed efficiency and host health. The traditional cultivation-based research elucidated some of the major metabolism, but studies using molecular biology techniques conducted from late 1980’s to the late early 2000’s greatly expanded our view of the diversity of the rumen and intestinal microbiome of cattle. Recently, metagenomics has been the primary technology to characterize the GI microbiome and its relationship with host nutrition and health. This review addresses the main methods/techniques in current use, the knowledge gained, and some of the challenges that remain. Most of the primers used in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction quantification and diversity analysis using metagenomics of ruminal bacteria, archaea, fungi, and protozoa were also compiled. PMID:28830126

  1. Global diversity in the human salivary microbiome.

    PubMed

    Nasidze, Ivan; Li, Jing; Quinque, Dominique; Tang, Kun; Stoneking, Mark

    2009-04-01

    The human salivary microbiome may play a role in diseases of the oral cavity and interact with microbiomes from other parts of the human body (in particular, the intestinal tract), but little is known about normal variation in the salivary microbiome. We analyzed 14,115 partial ( approximately 500 bp) 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences from saliva samples from 120 healthy individuals (10 individuals from each of 12 worldwide locations). These sequences could be assigned to 101 known bacterial genera, of which 39 were not previously reported from the human oral cavity; phylogenetic analysis suggests that an additional 64 unknown genera are present. There is high diversity in the salivary microbiome within and between individuals, but little geographic structure. Overall, approximately 13.5% of the total variance in the composition of genera is due to differences among individuals, which is remarkably similar to the fraction of the total variance in neutral genetic markers that can be attributed to differences among human populations. Investigation of some environmental variables revealed a significant association between the genetic distances among locations and the distance of each location from the equator. Further characterization of the enormous diversity revealed here in the human salivary microbiome will aid in elucidating the role it plays in human health and disease, and in the identification of potentially informative species for studies of human population history.

  2. Gut Microbiome of the Canadian Arctic Inuit

    PubMed Central

    Tromas, Nicolas; Amyot, Marc

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Diet is a major determinant of community composition in the human gut microbiome, and “traditional” diets have been associated with distinct and highly diverse communities, compared to Western diets. However, most traditional diets studied have been those of agrarians and hunter-gatherers consuming fiber-rich diets. In contrast, the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic have been consuming a traditional diet low in carbohydrates and rich in animal fats and protein for thousands of years. We hypothesized that the Inuit diet and lifestyle would be associated with a distinct microbiome. We used deep sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to compare the gut microbiomes of Montrealers with a Western diet to those of the Inuit consuming a range of traditional and Western diets. At the overall microbial community level, the gut microbiomes of Montrealers and Inuit were indistinguishable and contained similar levels of microbial diversity. However, we observed significant differences in the relative abundances of certain microbial taxa down to the subgenus level using oligotyping. For example, Prevotella spp., which have been previously associated with high-fiber diets, were enriched in Montrealers and among the Inuit consuming a Western diet. The gut microbiomes of Inuit consuming a traditional diet also had significantly less genetic diversity within the Prevotella genus, suggesting that a low-fiber diet might not only select against Prevotella but also reduce its diversity. Other microbes, such as Akkermansia, were associated with geography as well as diet, suggesting limited dispersal to the Arctic. Our report provides a snapshot of the Inuit microbiome as Western-like in overall community structure but distinct in the relative abundances and diversity of certain genera and strains. IMPORTANCE Non-Western populations have been shown to have distinct gut microbial communities shaped by traditional diets. The hitherto-uncharacterized microbiome of the Inuit may help us to

  3. The genetic predisposition and the interplay of host genetics and gut microbiome in Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Jianzhong, Hu

    2014-12-01

    Extensive genetic studies have identified more than 140 loci predisposing to Crohn disease (CD). Several major CD susceptibility genes have been shown to impair biological function with regard to immune response to recognizing and clearance of bacterial infection. Recent human microbiome studies suggest that the gut microbiome composition is differentiated in carriers of many risk variants of major CD susceptibility genes. This interplay between host genetics and its associated gut microbiome may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of CD. The ongoing microbiome research is aimed to investigate the detailed host genetics-microbiome interacting mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Improvement of abnormal vaginal flora in Ugandan women by self-testing and short use of intravaginal antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Donders, G; Bellen, G; Donders, F; Pinget, J; Vandevelde, I; Michiels, T; Byamughisa, J

    2017-04-01

    , lasting improvements in the vaginal microbiome composition of women with disturbed vaginal microflora. As African women have high prevalences of BV, AV, and AVF, this approach could improve their odds to prevent health-compromising complications. Further studies assessing direct health outcomes are needed to substantiate this.

  5. The noncolonic microbiome: does it really matter?

    PubMed

    Lawson, R Daniel; Coyle, Walter J

    2010-08-01

    About 100 trillion microorganisms compose the microbiome of the gastrointestinal tract and are predominantly found within the colon. Until recently, few bacteria were thought to inhabit the normal healthy esophagus and stomach. However, contemporary studies using molecular techniques have contradicted these assumptions. In this review, we summarize the pertinent findings of these studies that demonstrate established, complex mixed-microbial communities within the foregut in both health and disease. These studies contribute to improved understanding of interactions between the host immunity and the microbiome that may ultimately allow for novel therapeutic targets.

  6. Assessment of microbiota:host interactions at the vaginal mucosa interface.

    PubMed

    Pruski, Pamela; Lewis, Holly V; Lee, Yun S; Marchesi, Julian R; Bennett, Phillip R; Takats, Zoltan; MacIntyre, David A

    2018-04-27

    There is increasing appreciation of the role that vaginal microbiota play in health and disease throughout a woman's lifespan. This has been driven partly by molecular techniques that enable detailed identification and characterisation of microbial community structures. However, these methods do not enable assessment of the biochemical and immunological interactions between host and vaginal microbiota involved in pathophysiology. This review examines our current knowledge of the relationships that exist between vaginal microbiota and the host at the level of the vaginal mucosal interface. We also consider methodological approaches to microbiomic, immunologic and metabolic profiling that permit assessment of these interactions. Integration of information derived from these platforms brings the potential for biomarker discovery, disease risk stratification and improved understanding of the mechanisms regulating vaginal microbial community dynamics in health and disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Analyses of the Stability and Core Taxonomic Memberships of the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kelvin; Bihan, Monika; Methé, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of the taxonomic diversity associated with the human microbiome continue to be an area of great importance. The study of the nature and extent of the commonly shared taxa (“core”), versus those less prevalent, establishes a baseline for comparing healthy and diseased groups by quantifying the variation among people, across body habitats and over time. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) sponsored Human Microbiome Project (HMP) has provided an unprecedented opportunity to examine and better define what constitutes the taxonomic core within and across body habitats and individuals through pyrosequencing-based profiling of 16S rRNA gene sequences from oral, skin, distal gut (stool), and vaginal body habitats from over 200 healthy individuals. A two-parameter model is introduced to quantitatively identify the core taxonomic members of each body habitat’s microbiota across the healthy cohort. Using only cutoffs for taxonomic ubiquity and abundance, core taxonomic members were identified for each of the 18 body habitats and also for the 4 higher-level body regions. Although many microbes were shared at low abundance, they exhibited a relatively continuous spread in both their abundance and ubiquity, as opposed to a more discretized separation. The numbers of core taxa members in the body regions are comparatively small and stable, reflecting the relatively high, but conserved, interpersonal variability within the cohort. Core sizes increased across the body regions in the order of: vagina, skin, stool, and oral cavity. A number of “minor” oral taxonomic core were also identified by their majority presence across the cohort, but with relatively low and stable abundances. A method for quantifying the difference between two cohorts was introduced and applied to samples collected on a second visit, revealing that over time, the oral, skin, and stool body regions tended to be more transient in their taxonomic structure than the vaginal body region. PMID

  8. The intestinal microbiome and skeletal fitness: connecting bugs and bones

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Julia F.; Ermann, Joerg; Aliprantis, Antonios O.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances have dramatically increased our understanding of how organ systems interact. This has been especially true for immunology and bone biology, where the term “osteoimmunology” was coined to capture this relationship. The importance of the microbiome to the immune system has also emerged as a driver of health and disease. It makes sense therefore to ask the question: how does the intestinal microbiome influence bone biology and does dysbiosis promote bone disease? Surprisingly, few studies have analyzed this connection. A broader interpretation of this question reveals many mechanisms whereby the microbiome may affect bone cells. These include effects of the microbiome on immune cells, including myeloid progenitors and Th17 cells, as well as steroid hormones, fatty acids, serotonin and vitamin D. As mechanistic interactions of the microbiome and skeletal system are revealed within and without the immune system, novel strategies to optimize skeletal fitness may emerge. PMID:25840106

  9. Biodiversity and Functional Genomics in the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Xochitl C.; Segata, Nicola; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    Over the course of our lives, humans are colonized by a tremendous diversity of commensal microbes, which comprise the human microbiome. The collective genetic potential (metagenome) of the human microbiome is orders of magnitude more than the human genome, and it profoundly affects human health and disease in ways we are only beginning to understand. Advances in computing and high-throughput sequencing have enabled population-level surveys such as MetaHIT and the recently-released Human Microbiome Project, detailed investigations of the microbiome in human disease, and mechanistic studies employing gnotobiotic model organisms. The resulting knowledge of human microbiome composition, function, and range of variation across multiple body sites has begun to assemble a rich picture of commensal host-microbe and microbe- microbe interactions as well as their roles in human health and disease and their potential as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. PMID:23140990

  10. A prospective study of genital infections in a family-planning clinic. 1. Microbiological findings and their association with vaginal symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, T.; Macaulay, M. E.; James, J. M.; Leventhall, P. A.; Morris, E. M.; Neal, B. R.; Rowland, J.; Evans, B. M.

    1990-01-01

    A prospective study of genital infection was conducted in four inner-city family-planning clinics. Fifteen per cent of routine attenders had symptoms and signs of vaginal infection and many more women attended primarily because of symptoms. Among the women with both signs and symptoms, 70% had positive laboratory findings, Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida albicans and bacterial vaginosis being equally prevalent. Measurement of vaginal pH in the clinic was the single most useful clinical finding for directing empirical therapy. Among patients with a discharge confirmed on examination and an abnormally high pH, 72% had either T. vaginalis or bacterial vaginosis. Neisseria gonorrhoeae was isolated from 4% of women with, and 1% of those without, symptoms. We believe that it is worthwhile to investigate patients presenting to family-planning clinics with vaginal symptoms. No single specimen was found ideal for all pathogens, a cervical swab is better for gonococci and also for T. vaginalis but a vaginal swab is needed for candida and bacterial vaginosis. PMID:2307184

  11. The impact of oral probiotics on vaginal Group B Streptococcal colonisation rates in pregnant women: A pilot randomised control study.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Paula; Williamson, Moira; Traynor, Victoria; Georgiou, Chris

    2018-02-01

    To perform a pilot project to determine if this research design was appropriate to explore potential causal relationships between oral probiotic use and vaginal Group B Streptococcal (GBS) colonisation rates in pregnant women. Thirty-four GBS-positive women at 36 weeks pregnant were recruited. The participants were randomly allocated to the control group, who received standard antenatal care, or to the intervention group, who received standard antenatal care and a daily oral dose of probiotics for three weeks or until they gave birth. A vaginal GBS swab was collected three weeks post consent or during labour. No significant difference was found in vaginal GBS rates between the control and intervention groups. Only seven of 21 women in the intervention group completed the entire 21days of probiotics. A subgroup analysis, including only those who had completed 14days or more of probiotics (n=16), also showed no significant difference in vaginal GBS when compared to the control. The findings did show significantly more vaginal commensals in the probiotics group (p=0.048). Five possible reasons for the lack of significant results are: the length of the intervention was too short; the dosage of the probiotics was too low; the wrong strains of probiotics were used; the sample size was inadequate; or oral probiotics are ineffective in impacting vaginal GBS. The finding of a significant increase of vaginal commensals in women who completed 14days or more of probiotics supports the potential of probiotics to impact vaginal GBS in pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of the infant intestinal microbiome: A bird's eye view of a complex process.

    PubMed

    Meropol, Sharon B; Edwards, Amy

    2015-12-01

    Infants undergo profound shifts in colonizing intestinal microorganisms during their first year, especially during and after birth and during weaning. Microbiota are passed to infants through the placenta, during the vaginal birth process, and from early diet and other environmental exposures. These microbiota play an active role in the development of healthy infant metabolic and immunologic systems; profound shifts in microbiotal populations can be persistent, are associated with immediate alterations in gene expression, metabolic, immunologic, and neurologic function, and with downstream metabolic and immunologic consequences such as obesity, allergies, asthma, autoimmune diseases, and potentially neurologic conditions. Many modern exposures, including Cesarean section, formula feeding, and antibiotics, have been associated with microbiome shifts, and also with downstream diseases; while many published studies considered exposures individually, a more comprehensive understanding of their interaction and impact will consider the entirety of the infant's environment. It is not possible, nor desirable, to return to a world without toilets, sewers, tap water, delivery room antisepsis, Cesarean sections, antibiotics, immunizations, and refrigerators; our other alternative is to better understand these complex changes in infant developmental and molecular physiology. Protecting and repairing the developmental processes of the healthy infant microbiome is the modern medical frontier. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Vaginitis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Faro, S

    1996-01-01

    The various conditions that give rise to vaginitis include specific and nonspecific entities, such as candidiasis, trichomoniasis, bacterial vaginosis, group B streptococcal vaginitis, purulent vaginitis, volvodynia, and vestibulitis. The patient with chronic vaginitis usually develops this condition because of a misdiagnosis. It is critical that patients who have chronic vaginitis be thoroughly evaluated to determine if there is a specific etiology and whether their condition is recurrent or persistent, or is a reinfection. This also must include obtaining a detailed history, beginning with the patient's best recollection of when she felt perfectly normal. The physician must have an understanding of a healthy vaginal ecosystem and what mechanisms are in place to maintain the equilibrium. The vaginal ecosystem is a complex system of micro-organisms interacting with host factors to maintain its equilibrium. The endogenous microflora consists of a variety of bacteria, which include aerobic, facultative and obligate anaerobic bacteria. These organisms exist in a commensal, synergistic or antagonistic relationship. Therefore, it is important to understand what factors control the delicate equilibrium of the vaginal ecosystem, and which factors, both endogenous and exogenous, can disrupt this system. It is also important for the physician to understand that when a patient has symptoms of vaginitis it is not always due to an infectious etiology. There are situations in which an inflammatory reaction occurs but the specific etiology may not be determined. Thus, it is important that the physician not rush through the history or the examination.

  14. Vaginal foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Stricker, T; Navratil, F; Sennhauser, F H

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical features and outcome in girls with a vaginal foreign body. Retrospective review of medical records of 35 girls with a vaginal foreign body seen in an outpatient clinic for paediatric and adolescent gynaecology between 1980 and 2000. The ages ranged from 2.6 to 9.2 years. The most common symptom was blood-stained vaginal discharge/vaginal bleeding (49%). Duration of symptoms varied from 1 day to 2 years. Fifty-four percent of the patients recalled insertion of the foreign object, usually by the girl herself. All but three patients (91%) either recalled insertion of the foreign object and/or had vaginal bleeding or blood-stained or foul-smelling vaginal discharge, and/or visualization or palpation of the foreign body in physical examination. Symptoms resolved after removal of the foreign body followed by a single irrigation with Providon-Iod (Betadine). In the majority of patients a carefully obtained history and physical examination suggest the diagnosis of a vaginal foreign object. The leading symptoms are vaginal bleeding and blood-stained or foul smelling vaginal discharge. Removal of the foreign object followed by a single irrigation with Providon-Iod is the definitive treatment and does not require additional measures.

  15. Prolapse repair by vaginal route using a new protected low-weight polypropylene mesh: 1-year functional and anatomical outcome in a prospective multicentre study.

    PubMed

    de Tayrac, Renaud; Devoldere, Guy; Renaudie, Joël; Villard, Pierre; Guilbaud, Olivier; Eglin, Georges

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anatomical and functional results of a low-weight polypropylene mesh coated with an absorbable film in prolapse surgery by vaginal route. We have conducted a prospective multicentre study in 13 gynaecological and urological units. There were 230 patients requiring repair for anterior or posterior vaginal prolapse included. The present report is based on the analysis of the first 143 patients evaluated after at least 10 months follow-up. All patients were operated by the vaginal route using a specially designed mesh (Ugytex, Sofradim, France). Prolapse severity were evaluated using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse staging system. Symptoms and quality of life were evaluated preoperatively and during follow-up using the validated Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI) and Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire (PFIQ) self-questionnaires. Mean age was 63 years (37-91). Anterior, posterior and anterior-posterior repair with the mesh were performed in 67 (46.9%), 11 (7.7%) and 65 (45.4%) patients, respectively. With a mean follow-up of 13 months (10-19), 132 patients were considered anatomically cured (92.3%) with a recurrence rate of 9 of 132 for cystocele (6.8%) and 2 of 76 for rectocele (2.6%). Nine vaginal erosions occurred (6.3%), six of them necessitated another procedure by simple excision. The rate of de novo dyspareunia was 12.8%. At follow-up, improvement of PFDI and PFIQ scores were highly significant (p<0.0001). The use of low-weight polypropylene mesh coated with a hydrophilic absorbable film for vaginal repair of genital prolapse seems to decrease local morbidity while maintaining low recurrence rates.

  16. Twin Birth Study: 2-year neurodevelopmental follow-up of the randomized trial of planned cesarean or planned vaginal delivery for twin pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Asztalos, Elizabeth V; Hannah, Mary E; Hutton, Eileen K; Willan, Andrew R; Allen, Alexander C; Armson, B Anthony; Gafni, Amiram; Joseph, K S; Ohlsson, Arne; Ross, Susan; Sanchez, J Johanna; Mangoff, Kathryn; Barrett, Jon F R

    2016-03-01

    The Twin Birth Study randomized women with uncomplicated pregnancies, between 32(0/7)-38(6/7) weeks' gestation where the first twin was in cephalic presentation, to a policy of either a planned cesarean or planned vaginal delivery. The primary analysis showed that planned cesarean delivery did not increase or decrease the risk of fetal/neonatal death or serious neonatal morbidity as compared with planned vaginal delivery. This study presents the secondary outcome of death or neurodevelopmental delay at 2 years of age. A total of 4603 children from the initial cohort of 5565 fetuses/infants (83%) contributed to the outcome of death or neurodevelopmental delay. Surviving children were screened using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire with abnormal scores validated by a clinical neurodevelopmental assessment. The effect of planned cesarean vs planned vaginal delivery on death or neurodevelopmental delay was quantified using a logistic model to control for stratification variables and using generalized estimating equations to account for the nonindependence of twin births. Baseline maternal, pregnancy, and infant characteristics were similar. Mean age at assessment was 26 months. There was no significant difference in the outcome of death or neurodevelopmental delay: 5.99% in the planned cesarean vs 5.83% in the planned vaginal delivery group (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-1.41; P = .79). A policy of planned cesarean delivery provides no benefit to children at 2 years of age compared with a policy of planned vaginal delivery in uncomplicated twin pregnancies between 32(0/7)-38(6/7)weeks' gestation where the first twin is in cephalic presentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of the Lung Microbiome in the Pathogenesis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Hao, Ke; Yang, Ting; Wang, Chen

    2017-09-05

    The development of culture-independent techniques for microbiological analysis shows that bronchial tree is not sterile in either healthy or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) individuals. With the advance of sequencing technologies, lung microbiome has become a new frontier for pulmonary disease research, and such advance has led to better understanding of the lung microbiome in COPD. This review aimed to summarize the recent advances in lung microbiome, its relationships with COPD, and the possible mechanisms that microbiome contributed to COPD pathogenesis. Literature search was conducted using PubMed to collect all available studies concerning lung microbiome in COPD. The search terms were "microbiome" and "chronic obstructive pulmonary disease", or "microbiome" and "lung/pulmonary". The papers in English about lung microbiome or lung microbiome in COPD were selected, and the type of articles was not limited. The lung is a complex microbial ecosystem; the microbiome in lung is a collection of viable and nonviable microbiota (bacteria, viruses, and fungi) residing in the bronchial tree and parenchymal tissues, which is important for health. The following types of respiratory samples are often used to detect the lung microbiome: sputum, bronchial aspirate, bronchoalveolar lavage, and bronchial mucosa. Disordered bacterial microbiome is participated in pathogenesis of COPD; there are also dynamic changes in microbiota during COPD exacerbations. Lung microbiome may contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD by manipulating inflammatory and/or immune process. Normal lung microbiome could be useful for prophylactic or therapeutic management in COPD, and the changes of lung microbiome could also serve as biomarkers for the evaluation of COPD.

  18. The gut microbiome of nonhuman primates: Lessons in ecology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Jonathan B; Gomez, Andres; Amato, Katherine; Knights, Dan; Travis, Dominic A; Blekhman, Ran; Knight, Rob; Leigh, Steven; Stumpf, Rebecca; Wolf, Tiffany; Glander, Kenneth E; Cabana, Francis; Johnson, Timothy J

    2018-06-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract is home to trillions of bacteria that play a substantial role in host metabolism and immunity. While progress has been made in understanding the role that microbial communities play in human health and disease, much less attention has been given to host-associated microbiomes in nonhuman primates (NHPs). Here we review past and current research exploring the gut microbiome of NHPs. First, we summarize methods for characterization of the NHP gut microbiome. Then we discuss variation in gut microbiome composition and function across different NHP taxa. Finally, we highlight how studying the gut microbiome offers new insights into primate nutrition, physiology, and immune system function, as well as enhances our understanding of primate ecology and evolution. Microbiome approaches are useful tools for studying relevant issues in primate ecology. Further study of the gut microbiome of NHPs will offer new insight into primate ecology and evolution as well as human health. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Retrospective Cohort Study to Assess Outcomes, Cost-Effectiveness, and Patient Satisfaction in Primary Vaginal Ovarian Cystectomy versus the Laparoscopic Approach.

    PubMed

    Yoong, Wai; Fadel, Michael G; Walker, Sophie; Williams, Sophie; Subba, Beena

    2016-02-01

    To compare surgical outcomes, cost-effectiveness, and patient satisfaction in women undergoing primary vaginal or laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy for benign ovarian cysts. Retrospective cohort control study (Canadian Task Force classification II-3). Gynecologic unit at a university-affiliated hospital. Fifty patients who underwent primary ovarian cystectomy either through the vaginal route via posterior colpotomy (n = 29) or laparoscopic route (n = 21). Nonmalignant ovarian cysts were initially determined by transvaginal ultrasonography and serum tumor markers. The index group of women (n = 29) underwent vaginal ovarian cystectomy via a posterior colpotomy incision, whereas the control group (n = 21) comprised women who had laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy using the traditional "grasp and peel" technique. The following outcomes were evaluated: duration of surgery, intraoperative complications, estimated blood loss, length of inpatient stay, and postoperative pain (visual analogue scale). The average cost of both surgical methods was calculated by factoring in theater time, equipment required, and the length of hospital stay. Patients were then surveyed to compare postoperative pain and satisfaction scores as well as the time taken to return to work (in days). The 2 groups had similar mean ages (35.79 vs 36.72 years) and cyst diameter (6.8 vs 6.6 cm) (p > .05 in both cases). Vaginal ovarian cystectomy took a mean of 13.7 minutes longer (91.7 vs 78.0 minutes, p < .001) to perform and resulted in a greater mean estimated blood loss (116.1 vs 95 mL, p < .001). The spillage rate in the index group was 6-fold less compared with control cases (6% ± 2.4% vs 35% ± 4.6, p < .01). Although patients from the index group spent a mean of 2 hours longer as inpatients (10.9 vs 8.9 hours, p < .001), they reported a lower mean visual analogue pain score (2.01/10 vs 3.95/10, p < .05) and higher patient satisfaction scores (8.2/10 vs 6.5/10, p < .001). Mean perioperative cost of

  20. Microbiome influences on insect host vector competence

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Insect symbioses lack the complexity and diversity of those associated with higher eukaryotic hosts. Symbiotic microbiomes are beneficial to their insect hosts in many ways, including dietary supplementation, tolerance to environmental perturbations and maintenance and/or enhancement of host immune system homeostasis. Recent studies have also highlighted the importance of the microbiome in the context of host pathogen transmission processes. Here we provide an overview of the relationship between insect disease vectors, such as tsetse flies and mosquitoes, and their associated microbiome. Several mechanisms are discussed through which symbiotic microbes may influence their host’s ability to transmit pathogens, as well as potential disease control strategies that harness symbiotic microbes to reduce pathogen transmission through an insect vector. PMID:21697014

  1. Human microbiome visualization using 3D technology.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jason H; Lari, Richard Cowper Sal; Hill, Douglas; Hibberd, Patricia L; Madan, Juliette C

    2011-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technology has opened the door to the study of the human microbiome and its relationship with health and disease. This is both an opportunity and a significant biocomputing challenge. We present here a 3D visualization methodology and freely-available software package for facilitating the exploration and analysis of high-dimensional human microbiome data. Our visualization approach harnesses the power of commercial video game development engines to provide an interactive medium in the form of a 3D heat map for exploration of microbial species and their relative abundance in different patients. The advantage of this approach is that the third dimension provides additional layers of information that cannot be visualized using a traditional 2D heat map. We demonstrate the usefulness of this visualization approach using microbiome data collected from a sample of premature babies with and without sepsis.

  2. Exploring the Cultivable Ectocarpus Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    KleinJan, Hetty; Jeanthon, Christian; Boyen, Catherine; Dittami, Simon M.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal areas form the major habitat of brown macroalgae, photosynthetic multicellular eukaryotes that have great ecological value and industrial potential. Macroalgal growth, development, and physiology are influenced by the microbial community they accommodate. Studying the algal microbiome should thus increase our fundamental understanding of algal biology and may help to improve culturing efforts. Currently, a freshwater strain of the brown macroalga Ectocarpus subulatus is being developed as a model organism for brown macroalgal physiology and algal microbiome studies. It can grow in high and low salinities depending on which microbes it hosts. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still unclear. Cultivation of Ectocarpus-associated bacteria is the first step toward the development of a model system for in vitro functional studies of brown macroalgal–bacterial interactions during abiotic stress. The main aim of the present study is thus to provide an extensive collection of cultivable E. subulatus-associated bacteria. To meet the variety of metabolic demands of Ectocarpus-associated bacteria, several isolation techniques were applied, i.e., direct plating and dilution-to-extinction cultivation techniques, each with chemically defined and undefined bacterial growth media. Algal tissue and algal growth media were directly used as inoculum, or they were pretreated with antibiotics, by filtration, or by digestion of algal cell walls. In total, 388 isolates were identified falling into 33 genera (46 distinct strains), of which Halomonas (Gammaproteobacteria), Bosea (Alphaproteobacteria), and Limnobacter (Betaproteobacteria) were the most abundant. Comparisons with 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding data showed that culturability in this study was remarkably high (∼50%), although several cultivable strains were not detected or only present in extremely low abundance in the libraries. These undetected bacteria could be considered as part of the

  3. Exploring the Cultivable Ectocarpus Microbiome.

    PubMed

    KleinJan, Hetty; Jeanthon, Christian; Boyen, Catherine; Dittami, Simon M

    2017-01-01

    Coastal areas form the major habitat of brown macroalgae, photosynthetic multicellular eukaryotes that have great ecological value and industrial potential. Macroalgal growth, development, and physiology are influenced by the microbial community they accommodate. Studying the algal microbiome should thus increase our fundamental understanding of algal biology and may help to improve culturing efforts. Currently, a freshwater strain of the brown macroalga Ectocarpus subulatus is being developed as a model organism for brown macroalgal physiology and algal microbiome studies. It can grow in high and low salinities depending on which microbes it hosts. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this process are still unclear. Cultivation of Ectocarpus -associated bacteria is the first step toward the development of a model system for in vitro functional studies of brown macroalgal-bacterial interactions during abiotic stress. The main aim of the present study is thus to provide an extensive collection of cultivable E . subulatus -associated bacteria. To meet the variety of metabolic demands of Ectocarpus -associated bacteria, several isolation techniques were applied, i.e., direct plating and dilution-to-extinction cultivation techniques, each with chemically defined and undefined bacterial growth media. Algal tissue and algal growth media were directly used as inoculum, or they were pretreated with antibiotics, by filtration, or by digestion of algal cell walls. In total, 388 isolates were identified falling into 33 genera (46 distinct strains), of which Halomonas ( Gammaproteobacteria ), Bosea ( Alphaproteobacteria ), and Limnobacter ( Betaproteobacteria ) were the most abundant. Comparisons with 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding data showed that culturability in this study was remarkably high (∼50%), although several cultivable strains were not detected or only present in extremely low abundance in the libraries. These undetected bacteria could be considered as part

  4. The interaction between vaginal microbiota, cervical length, and vaginal progesterone treatment for preterm birth risk.

    PubMed

    Kindinger, Lindsay M; Bennett, Phillip R; Lee, Yun S; Marchesi, Julian R; Smith, Ann; Cacciatore, Stefano; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Teoh, T G; MacIntyre, David A

    2017-01-19

    Preterm birth is the primary cause of infant death worldwide. A short cervix in the second trimester of pregnancy is a risk factor for preterm birth. In specific patient cohorts, vaginal progesterone reduces this risk. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we undertook a prospective study in women at risk of preterm birth (n = 161) to assess (1) the relationship between vaginal microbiota and cervical length in the second trimester and preterm birth risk and (2) the impact of vaginal progesterone on vaginal bacterial communities in women with a short cervix. Lactobacillus iners dominance at 16 weeks of gestation was significantly associated with both a short cervix <25 mm (n = 15, P < 0.05) and preterm birth <34 +0  weeks (n = 18; P < 0.01; 69% PPV). In contrast, Lactobacillus crispatus dominance was highly predictive of term birth (n = 127, 98% PPV). Cervical shortening and preterm birth were not associated with vaginal dysbiosis. A longitudinal characterization of vaginal microbiota (<18, 22, 28, and 34 weeks) was then undertaken in women receiving vaginal progesterone (400 mg/OD, n = 25) versus controls (n = 42). Progesterone did not alter vaginal bacterial community structure nor reduce L. iners-associated preterm birth (<34 weeks). L. iners dominance of the vaginal microbiota at 16 weeks of gestation is a risk factor for preterm birth, whereas L. crispatus dominance is protective against preterm birth. Vaginal progesterone does not appear to impact the pregnancy vaginal microbiota. Patients and clinicians who may be concerned about "infection risk" associated with the use of a vaginal pessary during high-risk pregnancy can be reassured.

  5. Towards microbiome transplant as a therapy for periodontitis: an exploratory study of periodontitis microbial signature contrasted by oral health, caries and edentulism.

    PubMed

    Pozhitkov, Alex E; Leroux, Brian G; Randolph, Timothy W; Beikler, Thomas; Flemmig, Thomas F; Noble, Peter A

    2015-10-14

    Conventional periodontal therapy aims at controlling supra- and subgingival biofilms. Although periodontal therapy was shown to improve periodontal health, it does not completely arrest the disease. Almost all subjects compliant with periodontal maintenance continue to experience progressive clinical attachment loss and a fraction of them loses teeth. An oral microbial transplant may be a new alternative for treating periodontitis (inspired by fecal transplant). First, it must be established that microbiomes of oral health and periodontitis are distinct. In that case, the health-associated microbiome could be introduced into the oral cavity of periodontitis patients. This relates to the goals of our study: (i) to assess if microbial communities of the entire oral cavity of subjects with periodontitis were different from or oral health contrasted by microbiotas of caries and edentulism patients; (ii) to test in vitro if safe concentration of sodium hypochlorite could be used for initial eradication of the original oral microbiota followed by a safe neutralization of the hypochlorite prior transplantation. Sixteen systemically healthy white adults with clinical signs of one of the following oral conditions were enrolled: periodontitis, established caries, edentulism, and oral health. Oral biofilm samples were collected from sub- and supra-gingival sites, and oral mucosae. DNA was extracted and 16S rRNA genes were amplified. Amplicons from the same patient were pooled, sequenced and quantified. Volunteer's oral plaque was treated with saline, 16 mM NaOCl and NaOCl neutralized by ascorbate buffer followed by plating on blood agar. Ordination plots of rRNA gene abundances revealed distinct groupings for the oral microbiomes of subjects with periodontitis, edentulism, or oral health. The oral microbiome in subjects with periodontitis showed the greatest diversity harboring 29 bacterial species at significantly higher abundance compared to subjects with the other

  6. The human gut microbiome of Latin America popul