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Sample records for vaginal infection study

  1. Yeast Infection (Vaginal)

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection (vaginal) Overview A vaginal yeast infection is a fungal infection that causes irritation, discharge and intense itchiness ... symptoms Causes The fungus candida causes a vaginal yeast infection. Your vagina naturally contains a balanced mix of yeast, including ...

  2. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the ...

  3. [Clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis and its mixed infections].

    PubMed

    Fan, Ai-Ping; Xue, Feng-Xia

    2010-12-01

    To investigate clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis (AV) and its mixed infections for diagnosis efficiently. From April 2008 to December 2008, 516 patients with vaginitis treated in Tianjin Medical University General Hospital were enrolled in this study. AV, bacterial vaginosis (BV), vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), trichomonal vaginitis (TV), and cytolytic vaginosis (CV) were diagnosed based on symptoms, sign and vaginal discharge examination. Among 516 cases, AV cases were found in 14.7% (76/516), and AV was common vaginal infection. AV mixed infections was diagnosed in 58% (44/76), including mixed with BV (45%, 20/44), mixed with VVC (30%, 13/44), and mixed with TV (25%, 11/44). Those common symptom of AV were yellow vaginal discharge (63%, 20/32), more vaginal discharge (44%, 14/32). Vaginal pH value was usually more than 4.5 (84%, 27/32). Vaginal cleanliness mainly was grade III - IV (88%, 28/32). Six cases with enterococcus faecium and 4 cases with streptococci were frequently isolated. The symptom and sign of mixed AV infection was atypical. Aerobic vaginitis is a common lower vaginal infection and easily mixed with other pathogens, especially with BV, VVC or TV. When patients were diagnosed with AV or other vaginal infection, it should be mentioned whether those patients have mixed vaginal infection or AV.

  4. Observational prospective study on Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630 in the prevention of vaginal infections, during and after systemic antibiotic therapy or in women with recurrent vaginal or genitourinary infections.

    PubMed

    Cianci, Antonio; Cicinelli, Ettore; De Leo, Vincenzo; Fruzzetti, Franca; Massaro, Maria Giulia; Bulfoni, Alessandro; Parazzini, Fabio; Perino, Antonio

    2018-07-01

    We performed a prospective cohort parallel observational study on the use of Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630 in the prevention of vaginal infections. Eligible were women with a diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (<15 days) and documented history of recurrent vaginal infections; and/or cystitis (<15 days); and/or treatment with antibiotics for bacterial respiratory tract infections during the week before the study entry. Study subjects were prescribed Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630 > 100.000.000 UFC one vaginal capsule per day for 6 days, then a capsule per week for 16 weeks. Eligible subjects were enrolled in two parallel cohorts: 85 women using (group A) and 39 not using (group B) Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630. The risk of recurrent infection within 4 months from the study entry, was higher among untreated women: multivariate OR 2.6 (95%CI 0.7-9.4). The modification of presence/intensity or symptoms was significant in both the study groups (p < .001). Impact statement What is already known on this subject? The Lactobacillus plantarum P 17630 has been shown to be active in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis and vaginal candidiasis. No data are available on its efficacy in the prevention of recurrent vaginal or urological infection or as a prevention strategy during systemic treatment with antibiotics. What do the results of this study add? This observational study suggests that Lactobacillus plantarum given for 4 months may lower the risk of recurrent infection in women with recurrent vaginal or genitourinary infection or after antibiotic systemic treatment for bacterial respiratory tract infection. The finding, however, is not statistically significant, possibly due to the lower than expected rate of infection observed in our population and consequently the limited power of the study. What are the implications of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research? New studies are needed in order to evaluate in different populations

  5. New strategies for local treatment of vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Rita; Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Ana; Martinez-de-Oliveira, José

    2015-09-15

    Vaginal infections are extremely prevalent, particularly among women of reproductive age. Although they do not result in high mortality rates, these infections are associated with high levels of anxiety and reduction of quality of life. In most cases, topical treatment of vaginal infections has been shown to be at least as effective as oral treatment, resulting in higher local drug concentrations, with fewer drug interactions and adverse effects. Furthermore, the emergence of microbial resistance to chemotherapeutics and the difficulties in managing infection recurrences sustain the need for more effective local treatments. However, conventional dosage forms have been associated with low retention in the vagina and discomfort. Formulation strategies such as the development of bioadhesive, thermogelling systems and microtechnological or nanotechnological approaches have been proposed to improve delivery of traditional drugs, and other treatment modalities such as new drugs, plant extracts, and probiotics are being studied. This article reviews the recent strategies studied to improve the treatment and prevention of the commonest vaginal infections-namely, vaginal bacteriosis, aerobic vaginitis, vulvovaginal candidosis, and trichomoniasis-through the intravaginal route. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Value of bacterial culture of vaginal swabs in diagnosis of vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Nenadić, Dane; Pavlović, Miloš D

    2015-06-01

    Vaginal and cervical swab culture is still very common procedure in our country's everyday practice whereas simple and rapid diagnostic methods have been very rarely used. The aim of this study was to show that the employment of simple and rapid diagnostic tools [vaginal fluid wet mount microscopy (VFWMM), vaginal pH and potassium hydroxide (KOH) test] offers better assessment of vaginal environment than standard microbiologic culture commonly used in Serbia. This prospective study included 505 asymptomatic pregnant women undergoing VFWMM, test with 10% KOH, determination of vaginal pH and standard culture of cervicovaginal swabs. Combining findings from the procedures was used to make diagnoses of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vaginitis. In addition, the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) was determined in each sample and analyzed along with other findings. Infections with Candida albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis were confirmed or excluded by microscopic examination. In 36 (6%) patients cervicovaginal swab cultures retrieved several aerobes and facultative anaerobes, whereas in 52 (11%) women Candida albicans was isolated. Based on VFWMM findings and clinical criteria 96 (19%) women had BV, 19 (4%) vaginitis, and 72 (14%) candidiasis. Of 115 women with BV and vaginitis, pH 4.5 was found in 5, and of 390 with normal findings 83 (21%) had vaginal pH 4.5. Elevated numbers of PMN were found in 154 (30%) women--in 83 (54%) of them VFWMM was normal. Specificity and sensitivity of KOH test and vaginal pH determination in defining pathological vaginal flora were 95% and 81%, and 79% and 91%, respectively. Cervicovaginal swab culture is expensive but almost non-informative test in clinical practice. The use of simpler and rapid methods as vaginal fluid wet mount microscopy, KOH test and vaginal pH offers better results in diagnosis, and probably in the treatment and prevention of sequels of vaginal infections.

  7. A large, population-based study of age-related associations between vaginal pH and human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Megan A; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Gage, Julia C; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Wacholder, Sholom; Burk, Robert; Schiffman, Mark

    2012-02-08

    Vaginal pH is related to genital tract inflammation and changes in the bacterial flora, both suggested cofactors for persistence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. To evaluate the relationship between vaginal pH and HPV, we analyzed data from our large population-based study in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. We examined vaginal pH and the risk of HPV infection, cytological abnormalities, and C. trachomatis infection. Our study included 9,165 women aged 18-97 at enrollment with a total of 28,915 visits (mean length of follow-up = 3.4 years). Generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate the relationship between vaginal pH and HPV infection (both overall and single versus multiple types) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), the cytomorphic manifestation of HPV infection. The relationship between enrollment vaginal pH and C. trachomatis infection was assessed by logistic regression. Results were stratified by age at visit. Detection of HPV was positively associated with vaginal pH, mainly in women < 35 years (p-trend = 0.009 and 0.007 for women aged < 25 and 25-34 years, respectively). Elevated vaginal pH was associated with 30% greater risk of infection with multiple HPV types and with LSIL, predominantly in women younger than 35 and 65+ years of age. Detection of C. trachomatis DNA was associated with increased vaginal pH in women < 25 years (OR 2.2 95% CI 1.0-5.0). Our findings suggest a possible association of the cervical microenvironment as a modifier of HPV natural history in the development of cervical precancer and cancer. Future research should include studies of vaginal pH in a more complex assessment of hormonal changes and the cervicovaginal microbiome as they relate to the natural history of cervical neoplasia.

  8. Vaginal Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... for sure if yogurt with Lactobacillus or other probiotics can prevent or treat vaginal yeast infections. If ... Chen, H., et al. (2013). Impact of eating probiotic yogurt on colonization by Candida species of the ...

  9. [Vaginal infections in a Family Health Clinic in the Metropolitan Region, Chile].

    PubMed

    Villaseca, Rodrigo; Ovalle, Alfredo; Amaya, Fernando; Labra, Bayron; Escalona, Natalia; Lizana, Paola; Montoya, M José; Lillo, Eduardo; Martínez, M Angélica

    2015-02-01

    Vaginal infections are a frequent cause for consultation, but their prevalence and etiology vary in different populations. To determine the prevalence and etiologies of vaginal infection in women attending a family health center in the Metropolitan Region of Chile. The microbiological diagnosis was made by wet mount and Gram stain. Diagnosis of trichomoniasis was performed by wet mount, culture and polymerase chain reaction. 101 women aged 15-54, not selected by signs or symptoms of vaginal infection, 46 of them pregnant were included. In 47 women (46.5%), vaginal infections were diagnosed. An association was observed between age and frequency of vaginal infection. The proportion of infections among pregnant and non-pregnant women was similar. The most frequent infections were bacterial vaginosis (16.8%), vulvovaginal candidiasis (11.9%) and co-infections (6.9%). We found 5.9% of intermediate microbiota cases, 3% of trichomoniasis and 2% of aerobic vaginitis. Symptoms of vaginal infection had poor agreement with microbiological findings. Otherwise physical signs had good agreement with the presence of infection, but low to moderate concordance with a specific etiology. We found a high prevalence of vaginal infections in the study population. It is necessary to improve the definitions and criteria of microbiological diagnosis of co-infections and intermediate microbiota, for them to be diagnosed in the clinical practice. More descriptive questionnaires are recommended to enhance the usefulness of clinical examination.

  10. Effects of a One Year Reusable Contraceptive Vaginal Ring on Vaginal Microflora and the Risk of Vaginal Infection: An Open-Label Prospective Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongmei; Merkatz, Ruth B; Hillier, Sharon L; Roberts, Kevin; Blithe, Diana L; Sitruk-Ware, Régine; Creinin, Mitchell D

    2015-01-01

    A contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR) containing Nestorone® (NES) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) that is reusable for 1- year (13 cycles) is under development. This study assessed effects of this investigational CVR on the incidence of vaginal infections and change in vaginal microflora. There were 120 women enrolled into a NES/EE CVR Phase III trial and a microbiology sub-study for up to 1- year of cyclic product use. Gynecological examinations were conducted at baseline, the first week of cycle 6 and last week of cycle 13 (or during early discontinuation visits). Vaginal swabs were obtained for wet mount microscopy, Gram stain and culture. The CVR was removed from the vagina at the last study visit and cultured. Semi-quantitative cultures for Lactobacillus, Gardnerella vaginalis, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, anaerobic gram negative rods (GNRs), Candida albicans and other yeasts were performed on vaginal and CVR samples. Vaginal infections were documented throughout the study. Over 1- year of use, 3.3% of subjects were clinically diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis, 15.0% with vulvovaginal candidiasis, and 0.8% with trichomoniasis. The detection rate of these three infections did not change significantly from baseline to either Cycle 6 or 13. Nugent scores remained stable. H2O2-positive Lactobacillus dominated vaginal flora with a non-significant prevalence increase from 76.7% at baseline to 82.7% at cycle 6 and 90.2% at cycle 13, and a median concentration of 107 colony forming units (cfu) per gram. Although anaerobic GNRs prevalence increased significantly, the median concentration decreased slightly (104 to 103cfu per gram). There were no significant changes in frequency or concentrations of other pathogens. High levels of agreement between vaginal and ring surface microbiota were observed. Sustained use of the NES/EE CVR did not increase the risk of vaginal infection and was not disruptive to the vaginal ecosystem. Clinical

  11. Effects of a One Year Reusable Contraceptive Vaginal Ring on Vaginal Microflora and the Risk of Vaginal Infection: An Open-Label Prospective Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongmei; Merkatz, Ruth B.; Hillier, Sharon L.; Roberts, Kevin; Blithe, Diana L.; Sitruk-Ware, Régine; Creinin, Mitchell D.

    2015-01-01

    Background A contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR) containing Nestorone® (NES) and ethinyl estradiol (EE) that is reusable for 1- year (13 cycles) is under development. This study assessed effects of this investigational CVR on the incidence of vaginal infections and change in vaginal microflora. Methods There were 120 women enrolled into a NES/EE CVR Phase III trial and a microbiology sub-study for up to 1- year of cyclic product use. Gynecological examinations were conducted at baseline, the first week of cycle 6 and last week of cycle 13 (or during early discontinuation visits). Vaginal swabs were obtained for wet mount microscopy, Gram stain and culture. The CVR was removed from the vagina at the last study visit and cultured. Semi-quantitative cultures for Lactobacillus, Gardnerella vaginalis, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, anaerobic gram negative rods (GNRs), Candida albicans and other yeasts were performed on vaginal and CVR samples. Vaginal infections were documented throughout the study. Results Over 1- year of use, 3.3% of subjects were clinically diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis, 15.0% with vulvovaginal candidiasis, and 0.8% with trichomoniasis. The detection rate of these three infections did not change significantly from baseline to either Cycle 6 or 13. Nugent scores remained stable. H2O2-positive Lactobacillus dominated vaginal flora with a non-significant prevalence increase from 76.7% at baseline to 82.7% at cycle 6 and 90.2% at cycle 13, and a median concentration of 107 colony forming units (cfu) per gram. Although anaerobic GNRs prevalence increased significantly, the median concentration decreased slightly (104 to 103cfu per gram). There were no significant changes in frequency or concentrations of other pathogens. High levels of agreement between vaginal and ring surface microbiota were observed. Conclusion Sustained use of the NES/EE CVR did not increase the risk of vaginal infection and was not disruptive to

  12. The Performance of the Vaginal Discharge Syndromic Management in Treating Vaginal and Cervical Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kiarie, James; Seuc, Armando; Mogasale, Vittal; Latif, Ahmed; Broutet, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Background This review aimed to synthesize and analyze the diagnostic accuracy and the likelihood of providing correct treatment of the syndromic approach Vaginal Discharge Flowchart in managing cervical infections caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), and vaginal infections caused by Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) and Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and Candida albicans. This review will inform updating the WHO 2003 guidelines on Vaginal Discharge syndromic case management. Methods A systematic review was conducted on published studies from 01-01-2000 to 30-03-2015 in multiple databases. Studies evaluating the diagnostic accuracy and validation of the WHO Vaginal Discharge Flowchart were included. Validation parameters including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) and the 95% confidence intervals for the different types of the flowchart were taken as outcomes, re-calculated, and analysed using a fixed model meta-analysis for data pooling. The level of agreement between the index and reference test were determined by the Cohen’s Kappa co-efficiency test. Each individual study was assessed on quality using the QUADAS-2 tool. Findings The search yielded 2,845 studies of which 16 met the eligibility criteria for final analysis. The diagnostic performance to identify cervical infections was low and resulted in a high proportion of over and missed treatment. The four flowcharts had a sensitivity between 27.37% in history and risk assessment and 90.13% with microscopy, with the inverse in specificity rates. The treatment performances between the flowcharts were inconsistent. The same applies to the use of vaginal discharge flowchart for treating vaginal infections. For vaginal infections the vaginal discharge flowchart had a good performance in flowchart 3 with 91.68% of sensitivity; 99.97% specificity; 99.93% PPV and 0.02% who missed their treatment and 8.32% of women who were over treated

  13. Chlamydia caviae infection alters abundance but not composition of the guinea pig vaginal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Neuendorf, Elizabeth; Gajer, Pawel; Bowlin, Anne K.; Marques, Patricia X.; Ma, Bing; Yang, Hongqiu; Fu, Li; Humphrys, Michael S.; Forney, Larry J.; Myers, Garry S.A.; Bavoil, Patrik M.; Rank, Roger G.; Ravel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    In humans, the vaginal microbiota is thought to be the first line of defense again pathogens including Chlamydia trachomatis. The guinea pig has been extensively used as a model to study chlamydial infection because it shares anatomical and physiological similarities with humans, such as a squamous vaginal epithelium as well as some of the long-term outcomes caused by chlamydial infection. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the guinea pig-C. caviae model of genital infection as a surrogate for studying the role of the vaginal microbiota in the early steps of C. trachomatis infection in humans. We used culture-independent molecular methods to characterize the relative and absolute abundance of bacterial phylotypes in the guinea pig vaginal microbiota in animals non-infected, mock-infected or infected by C. caviae. We showed that the guinea pig and human vaginal microbiotas are of different bacterial composition and abundance. Chlamydia caviae infection had a profound effect on the absolute abundance of bacterial phylotypes but not on the composition of the guinea pig vaginal microbiota. Our findings compromise the validity of the guinea pig-C. caviae model to study the role of the vaginal microbiota during the early steps of sexually transmitted infection. PMID:25761873

  14. Chlamydia caviae infection alters abundance but not composition of the guinea pig vaginal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Neuendorf, Elizabeth; Gajer, Pawel; Bowlin, Anne K; Marques, Patricia X; Ma, Bing; Yang, Hongqiu; Fu, Li; Humphrys, Michael S; Forney, Larry J; Myers, Garry S A; Bavoil, Patrik M; Rank, Roger G; Ravel, Jacques

    2015-06-01

    In humans, the vaginal microbiota is thought to be the first line of defense again pathogens including Chlamydia trachomatis. The guinea pig has been extensively used as a model to study chlamydial infection because it shares anatomical and physiological similarities with humans, such as a squamous vaginal epithelium as well as some of the long-term outcomes caused by chlamydial infection. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the guinea pig-C. caviae model of genital infection as a surrogate for studying the role of the vaginal microbiota in the early steps of C. trachomatis infection in humans. We used culture-independent molecular methods to characterize the relative and absolute abundance of bacterial phylotypes in the guinea pig vaginal microbiota in animals non-infected, mock-infected or infected by C. caviae. We showed that the guinea pig and human vaginal microbiotas are of different bacterial composition and abundance. Chlamydia caviae infection had a profound effect on the absolute abundance of bacterial phylotypes but not on the composition of the guinea pig vaginal microbiota. Our findings compromise the validity of the guinea pig-C. caviae model to study the role of the vaginal microbiota during the early steps of sexually transmitted infection. © FEMS 2015.

  15. Comparison of the vaginal microbiota diversity of women with and without human papillomavirus infection: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weijiao; Weng, Jinlong; Gao, Yunong; Chen, Xiaochi

    2013-06-10

    The female genital tract is an important bacterial habitat of the human body, and vaginal microbiota plays a crucial role in vaginal health. The alteration of vaginal microbiota affects millions of women annually, and is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes, including human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, previous studies have primarily focused on the association between bacterial vaginosis and HPV infection. Little is known about the composition of vaginal microbial communities involved in HPV acquisition. The present study was performed to investigate whether HPV infection was associated with the diversity and composition of vaginal microbiota. A total of 70 healthy women (32 HPV-negative and 38 HPV-positive) with normal cervical cytology were enrolled in this study. Culture-independent polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to measure the diversity and composition of vaginal microbiota of all subjects. We found significantly greater biological diversity in the vaginal microbiota of HPV-positive women (p < 0.001). Lactobacillus, including L. gallinarum, L. iners and L. gasseri, was the predominant genus and was detected in all women. No significant difference between HPV-positive and HPV-negative women was found for the frequency of detection of L. gallinarum (p = 0.775) or L. iners (p = 0.717), but L. gasseri was found at a significantly higher frequency in HPV-positive women (p = 0.005). Gardnerella vaginalis was also found at a significantly higher frequency in HPV-positive women (p = 0.031). Dendrograms revealed that vaginal microbiota from the two groups had different profiles. Our study is the first systematic evaluation of an association between vaginal microbiota and HPV infection, and we have demonstrated that compared with HPV-negative women, the bacterial diversity of HPV-positive women is more complex and the composition of vaginal microbiota is different.

  16. [Application of sumamed in treatment of bacterial vaginal infections during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Nikolov, A; Shopova, E; Nashar, S; Dimitrov, A

    2008-01-01

    To study the efficacy of Sumamed in cases of endogenous bacterial vaginal infections during third trimester of pregnancy. 34 women in last trimester of pregnancy with Streptococcus group B, Streptococcus group A, alpha hemolytic Streptococci, S. aureus infections and intermediate state of vaginal ecosystem (Nugent score 4-6) were treated with Sumamed (Azithromycin, 500 mg. p.o. for 3 days). Patients were separated in two groups. First group included 19 women with symptomatic and microbiologically proven recurrent vaginal infection during last 6 months. Second group included 15 symptom free pregnant women, in whom, pathogenic bacteria were found on vaginal swab and culture. Culture revealed 2 cases of Streptococcus group A infection in the second study group. Streptococcus group B was isolated in 19 patients--11 group 1 and 8--group 2. S. aureus was found in 6 patients from group 1 and 3 patients from group 2. Alpha hemolytic streptococci were cultured in 4 cases--2 from group 1 and 2 from group 2. Isolated microorganisms showed in vitro sensibility toward Sumamed. After treatment completion, control swab and culture was performed in 26 cases (14 group 1 and 12 group 2 patients). In group 1 in 12 (85,7%) patients no pathological microorganisms were cultured, Nugent scores were between 0-3 and no subjective symptoms were reported. 2 (14,3%) patients had Candida infection. In the second group 10 patients (83,5%) had normal vaginal microbiology, 2(16,5%) remained with intermediate vaginal microflora state. No newborn infections and cases of endometritis were found in both study groups. Sumamed is an efficacious treatment in cases of streptococcal and staphylococcal vaginal infections during pregnancy. Application of Sumamed results in alleviation of clinical symptoms and in sanitation of birth canal.

  17. Vaginal microbiome and sexually transmitted infections: an epidemiologic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brotman, Rebecca M.

    2011-01-01

    Vaginal bacterial communities are thought to help prevent sexually transmitted infections. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common clinical syndrome in which the protective lactic acid–producing bacteria (mainly species of the Lactobacillus genus) are supplanted by a diverse array of anaerobic bacteria. Epidemiologically, BV has been shown to be an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes including preterm birth, development of pelvic inflammatory disease, and acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. Longitudinal studies of the vaginal microbiome using molecular techniques such as 16S ribosomal DNA analysis may lead to interventions that shift the vaginal microbiota toward more protective states. PMID:22133886

  18. [The change of vaginal lactobacillus in patients with high-risk human papillomavirus infection].

    PubMed

    Zhou, D; Cui, Y; Wu, F L; Deng, W H

    2016-07-05

    To study the distribution characteristics of lactobacillus in the vaginal mucosa of patients with HPV infection. The planting density of lactobacillus in vaginal secretions of 95 cases with HPV16/18 infection and 90 cases of normal women of childbearing age were observed by oil microscope. And the strains of vaginal lactobacilli in two groups were analyzed using species-specific polymerase chain reaction (Species-specific PCR) and the distribution of vaginal lactobacilli in patients with HPV16/18 infection were investigated. In HPV16/18 infective groups, the planting density of lactobacillus in the vaginal mucosa was 104 (68-186)/HP. It was significantly lower than that of the normal group (234 (161-326)/HP, P<0.05). Compared with the normal group, the positive rates of lactobacillus iners, lactobacillus crispatus, and lactobacillus gasseri were significantly lower in HPV16/18 infection group (P<0.05). The HPV16/18 infection is associated with the decreased number of lactobacillus and the imbalance of vaginal flora; Lactobacillus iners, lactobacillus crispatus, and lactobacillus gasseri may play a key role in maintaining the vaginal micro ecological environment.

  19. Comparison of clinical diagnosis and microbiological test results in vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Karaca, M; Bayram, A; Kocoglu, M E; Gocmen, A; Eksi, F

    2005-01-01

    Lower genital tract infections continue to be a problem due to the fact that the clinical diagnosis is usually inadequate, and subsequent care is suboptimal. This study aimed at evaluating the accuracy of clinical diagnosis by comparing it with microbiologic test results, and to determine the causative agents of vaginal infections. Sixty-seven nonpregnant women (18-45 years of age) with the clinical diagnosis of lower genital tract infection were enrolled in the study. Patients were not included if they had a history of vaginal infection during the previous three-month period or intrauterine device. The clinical diagnosis was based on the combinations of symptoms, direct observation of wet mount, homogeneous discharge, vaginal pH > 4.5, and detection of the amine odor after exposure of vaginal secretions to 10% KOH. Vaginal samples were taken with two cotton swabs, one was used for pH determination, and the second was utilized for microbiological tests. Gram staining and cultures with Sabouraud agar and chocolate agar were performed for microbiological diagnosis, and the results were compared. The clinical diagnoses included 26 (38.8%) candidiasis, 18 (26.8%) bacterial vaginosis, three (4.5%) trichomoniasis, and 20 (29.9%) mixed vaginal infections. Of the 26 patients with clinical diagnoses of candidiasis, 12 (46.1%) revealed Candiada albicans, nine (34.6) patients revealed microorganisms other than candida species, and five (19.2%) patients had no growth. Five (27.8%) bacterial vaginosis patients revealed Gardnarella vaginalis and 12 patients (66.6%) did not grow any microorganism. The overall rate of accurate clinical diagnoses confirmed by microbiological test results was 43.2%. Seventeen (43.6) of the 39 microbiological test results correlated with clinical diagnosis, and no growth was observed in 28 (41.8%) cultures. We conclude that the clinical diagnosis of vaginal infection is inadequate and should be confirmed with microbiological testing if the resources

  20. The Vaginal Microbiota and Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Ann E

    2016-12-01

    The vagina is a key anatomical site in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) in women, serving as a potential reservoir for infecting bacteria and a site at which interventions may decrease the risk of UTI. The vaginal microbiota is a dynamic and often critical factor in this pathogenic interplay, because changes in the characteristics of the vaginal microbiota resulting in the loss of normally protective Lactobacillus spp. increase the risk of UTI. These alterations may result from the influence of estrogen deficiency, antimicrobial therapy, contraceptives, or other causes. Interventions to reduce adverse effects on the vaginal microbiota and/or to restore protective lactobacilli may reduce the risks of UTI.

  1. Probiotics in the Prevention and Treatment of Postmenopausal Vaginal Infections: Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoo Jin

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and complicated vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) are frequently occurring vaginal infections in postmenopausal women, caused by an imbalance in vaginal microflora. Postmenopausal women suffer from decreased ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone. A normal, healthy vaginal microflora mainly comprises Lactobacillus species (spp.), which act beneficially as a bacterial barrier in the vagina, interfering with uropathogens. During premenopausal period, estrogen promotes vaginal colonization by lactobacilli that metabolizing glycogen and producing lactic acid, and maintains intravaginal health by lowering the intravaginal pH level. A lower vaginal pH inhibits uropathogen growth, preventing vaginal infections. Decreased estrogen secretion in postmenopausal women depletes lactobacilli and increases intravaginal pH, resulting in increased vaginal colonization by harmful microorganisms (e.g., Enterobacter, Escherichia coli, Candida, and Gardnerella). Probiotics positively effects on vaginal microflora composition by promoting the proliferation of beneficial microorganisms, alters the intravaginal microbiota composition, prevents vaginal infections in postmenopausal. Probiotics also reduce the symptoms of vaginal infections (e.g., vaginal discharge, odor, etc.), and are thus helpful for the treatment and prevention of BV and VVC. In this review article, we provide information on the intravaginal mechanism of postmenopausal vaginal infections, and describes the effectiveness of probiotics in the treatment and prevention of BV and VVC. PMID:29354612

  2. Probiotics in the Prevention and Treatment of Postmenopausal Vaginal Infections: Review Article.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Mo; Park, Yoo Jin

    2017-12-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and complicated vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) are frequently occurring vaginal infections in postmenopausal women, caused by an imbalance in vaginal microflora. Postmenopausal women suffer from decreased ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone. A normal, healthy vaginal microflora mainly comprises Lactobacillus species (spp.), which act beneficially as a bacterial barrier in the vagina, interfering with uropathogens. During premenopausal period, estrogen promotes vaginal colonization by lactobacilli that metabolizing glycogen and producing lactic acid, and maintains intravaginal health by lowering the intravaginal pH level. A lower vaginal pH inhibits uropathogen growth, preventing vaginal infections. Decreased estrogen secretion in postmenopausal women depletes lactobacilli and increases intravaginal pH, resulting in increased vaginal colonization by harmful microorganisms (e.g., Enterobacter , Escherichia coli , Candida , and Gardnerella ). Probiotics positively effects on vaginal microflora composition by promoting the proliferation of beneficial microorganisms, alters the intravaginal microbiota composition, prevents vaginal infections in postmenopausal. Probiotics also reduce the symptoms of vaginal infections (e.g., vaginal discharge, odor, etc.), and are thus helpful for the treatment and prevention of BV and VVC. In this review article, we provide information on the intravaginal mechanism of postmenopausal vaginal infections, and describes the effectiveness of probiotics in the treatment and prevention of BV and VVC.

  3. The Vaginal Microbiota and Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    STAPLETON, ANN E.

    2017-01-01

    The vagina is a key anatomical site in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) in women, serving as a potential reservoir for infecting bacteria and a site at which interventions may decrease the risk of UTI. The vaginal microbiota is a dynamic and often critical factor in this pathogenic interplay, because changes in the characteristics of the vaginal microbiota resulting in the loss of normally protective Lactobacillus spp. increase the risk of UTI. These alterations may result from the influence of estrogen deficiency, antimicrobial therapy, contraceptives, or other causes. Interventions to reduce adverse effects on the vaginal microbiota and/or to restore protective lactobacilli may reduce the risks of UTI. PMID:28087949

  4. Effects of vaginal lactobacilli in Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

    PubMed

    Mastromarino, Paola; Di Pietro, Marisa; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Nardis, Chiara; Gentile, Massimo; Sessa, Rosa

    2014-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that abnormal vaginal flora lacking lactobacilli facilitates the acquisition of several sexually transmitted diseases including Chlamydia trachomatis. C. trachomatis, the most common bacterial agent of genital infections worldwide, can progress from the lower to upper reproductive tract and induce severe sequelae. The ability of C. trachomatis to develop into a persistent form has been suggested as key pathogenetic mechanism underlying chronic infections and sequelae. The aim of our study was to investigate the C. trachomatis interaction with vaginal microbiota analyzing the effects of Lactobacillus strains (L. brevis and L. salivarius) on the different phases of C. trachomatis developmental cycle. In addition, the effect of lactobacilli on persistent chlamydial forms induced by HSV-2 coinfection has also been evaluated. Our results demonstrated significant inhibition of C. trachomatis multiplication by vaginal lactobacilli. L. brevis was significantly more effective than L. salivarius (p<0.05) on all the steps of chlamydial infection cycle suggesting that the ability of lactobacilli to protect from infection is strain-dependent. Lactobacilli had an adverse effect on elementary chlamydial bodies (p<0.05), on chlamydial adsorption to epithelial cells (p<0.001) and on intracellular phases of chlamydial replication (p<0.0001). Our study also demonstrated a protective effect of lactobacilli toward persistent C. trachomatis forms induced by HSV-2 coinfection. A significant increase in the production of C. trachomatis infectious progeny was observed in C. trachomatis/HSV-2 coinfection in the presence of L. brevis (p=0.01) despite a significant inhibition of C. trachomatis multiplication (p=0.028). Our data suggest that a healthy vaginal microbiota can reduce the risk of acquiring C. trachomatis infection and counteract the development of persistent chlamydial forms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of Vaginal Cell Populations during Experimental Vaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Fidel, Paul L.; Luo, Wei; Steele, Chad; Chabain, Joseph; Baker, Marc; Wormley, Floyd

    1999-01-01

    Studies with an estrogen-dependent murine model of vaginal candidiasis suggest that local cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is more important than systemic CMI for protection against vaginitis. The present study, however, showed that, compared to uninfected mice, little to no change in the percentage or types of vaginal T cells occurred during a primary vaginal infection or during a secondary vaginal infection where partial protection was observed. Furthermore, depletion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) had no effect on infection in the presence or absence of pseudoestrus. These results indicate a lack of demonstrable effects by systemic CMI or PMN against vaginitis and suggest that if local T cells are important, they are functioning without showing significant increases in numbers within the vaginal mucosa during infection. PMID:10338532

  6. Elevated vaginal pH in the absence of current vaginal infection, still a challenging obstetrical problem.

    PubMed

    Hantoushzadeh, Sedigheh; Sheikh, Mahdi; Javadian, Pouya; Shariat, Mamak; Amini, Elaheh; Abdollahi, Alireza; Kashanian, Maryam

    2014-04-01

    To assess the association of vaginal pH ≥ 5 in the absence of vaginal infection with systemic inflammation and adverse pregnancy outcome. Four-hundred sixty pregnant women completed the study, upon enrollment Vaginal pH was measured for all women, maternal and umbilical sera were obtained for determining C-reactive protein (CRP) and uric acid levels. Umbilical blood was tested for gas parameters, 1 and 5 min Apgar scores, the need for neonatal resuscitation and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission were recorded. Elevated vaginal pH was significantly associated with preterm birth (odds ratio (OR), 2.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-4.76), emergency cesarean section (OR 2.57; 95% CI 1.32-5), neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room (OR 2.85; 95% CI 1.1-7.38), elevated cord base deficit (OR 8.01; 95% CI 1.61-39.81), low cord bicarbonate (OR 4.16, 95% CI 1.33-12.92) and NICU admission (OR 2.02; 95% CI 1.12-3.66). Increased vaginal pH was also significantly associated with maternal leukocytosis, hyperuricemia and elevated CRP levels in maternal and umbilical sera. Elevated vaginal pH in the absence of current vaginal infection still constitutes a risk for adverse pregnancy outcome which is mediated by systemic inflammatory response.

  7. Vaginal douching and sexually transmitted infections among female sex workers: a cross-sectional study in three provinces in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Jiang, Ning; Yue, Xiaoli; Gong, Xiangdong

    2015-05-01

    Though vaginal douching is a common practice among female sex workers that could increase the risk of HIV and adverse reproductive health outcomes, it has drawn limited attention. From November 2010 to January 2011, a convenience sample of female sex workers was recruited in three cities in China. Face-to-face interviews were conducted to gather socio-demographic and behavioural information. Blood samples were collected for syphilis serological tests. Endo-cervical swabs were collected and tested for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis by polymerase chain reaction. A logistic regression model was used to determine factors associated with vaginal douching and the association between vaginal douching and sexually transmitted infection. A total of 1032 eligible female sex workers were enrolled. The overall prevalence of any sexually transmitted infection (syphilis, Chlamydia trachomatis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae) and vaginal douching with disinfectant were 23.4% and 23.1%, respectively. Factors independently associated with douching practice included study sites, venue types, ethnicity, having regular partner and sexually transmitted infection history. No significant association was found between vaginal douching and current sexually transmitted infection. Vaginal douching with disinfectant after sex with clients seemed to be a prevalent practice among female sex workers in China. Prevention programmes targeting female sex workers should incorporate components about the adverse health outcomes associated with vaginal douching. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Noninvasive diagnosis of intraamniotic infection: proteomic biomarkers in vaginal fluid.

    PubMed

    Hitti, Jane; Lapidus, Jodi A; Lu, Xinfang; Reddy, Ashok P; Jacob, Thomas; Dasari, Surendra; Eschenbach, David A; Gravett, Michael G; Nagalla, Srinivasa R

    2010-07-01

    We analyzed the vaginal fluid proteome to identify biomarkers of intraamniotic infection among women in preterm labor. Proteome analysis was performed on vaginal fluid specimens from women with preterm labor, using multidimensional liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry, and label-free quantification. Enzyme immunoassays were used to quantify candidate proteins. Classification accuracy for intraamniotic infection (positive amniotic fluid bacterial culture and/or interleukin-6 >2 ng/mL) was evaluated using receiver-operator characteristic curves obtained by logistic regression. Of 170 subjects, 30 (18%) had intraamniotic infection. Vaginal fluid proteome analysis revealed 338 unique proteins. Label-free quantification identified 15 proteins differentially expressed in intraamniotic infection, including acute-phase reactants, immune modulators, high-abundance amniotic fluid proteins and extracellular matrix-signaling factors; these findings were confirmed by enzyme immunoassay. A multi-analyte algorithm showed accurate classification of intraamniotic infection. Vaginal fluid proteome analyses identified proteins capable of discriminating between patients with and without intraamniotic infection. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of locally delivered dequalinium chloride in the treatment of vaginal infections: a review.

    PubMed

    Mendling, Werner; Weissenbacher, Ernst Rainer; Gerber, Stefan; Prasauskas, Valdas; Grob, Philipp

    2016-03-01

    Vaginal infections are responsible for a large proportion of gynaecological outpatient visits. Those are bacterial vaginosis (BV), vulvovaginal candidosis (VVC), aerobic vaginitis (AV) associated with aerobic bacteria, and mixed infections. Usual treatments show similar acceptable short-term efficacy, but frequent recurrences and increasing microbial resistance are unsolved issues. Furthermore, vaginal infections are associated with a variety of serious adverse outcomes in pregnancy and generally have a major impact on quality of life. Identifying the correct therapy can be challenging for the clinician, particularly in mixed infections. Dequalinium chloride (DQC) is an anti-microbial antiseptic agent with a broad bactericidal and fungicidal activity. Systemic absorption after vaginal application of DQC is very low and systemic effects negligible. Vaginal DQC (Fluomizin vaginal tablets) has been shown to have equal clinical efficacy as clindamycin in the treatment of BV. Its broad antimicrobial activity makes it appropriate for the treatment of mixed vaginal infections and in case of uncertain diagnosis. Moreover, resistance of pathogens is unlikely due to its multiple mode of action, and vaginal DQC provides also a reduced risk for post-treatment vaginal infections. Vaginal DQC (10 mg) as 6-day therapy offers a safe and effective option for empiric therapy of different vaginal infections in daily practice. This review summarizes the available and relevant pharmacological and clinical data for the therapy of vaginal infections with vaginal DQC and provides the rationale for its use in daily gynaecologic practice.

  10. MIV-150-containing intravaginal rings protect macaque vaginal explants against SHIV-RT infection.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Louise A; Barnable, Patrick; Mawson, Paul; Seidor, Samantha; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Kizima, Larisa; Rodriguez, Aixa; Fernández-Romero, José A; Cooney, Michael L; Roberts, Kevin D; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Robbiani, Melissa; Teleshova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that intravaginal rings (IVRs) containing 100 mg of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 significantly protect macaques against a chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus that expresses the HIV-1 HxB2 reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) when present before and after vaginal challenge. The objectives of this study were to (i) evaluate the pharmacodynamics (PD) of MIV-150 in vaginal fluids (VF) and in ectocervical and vaginal tissues following 100-mg MIV-150 IVR exposure and to (ii) gain more insight whether pharmacokinetics (PK) of MIV-150 can predict PD. MIV-150 in VF collected at 1 day and 14 days post-MIV-150 IVR insertion inhibited ex vivo SHIV-RT infection in vaginal biopsy specimens from untreated animals (not carrying IVRs) in a dose-dependent manner. Previous PK studies demonstrated a significant increase of ectocervical and vaginal tissue MIV-150 concentrations 14 days versus 1 day post-IVR insertion, with the highest increase in vaginal tissue. Therefore, we tested PD of MIV-150 in tissues 14 days post-MIV-150 IVR insertion. Ex vivo SHIV-RT infection of vaginal, but not ectocervical, tissues collected 14 days post-MIV-150 IVR insertion was significantly inhibited compared to infection at the baseline (prior to MIV-150 IVR exposure). No changes in vaginal and ectocervical tissue infection were observed after placebo IVR exposure. Overall, these data underscore the use of the ex vivo macaque explant challenge models to evaluate tissue and VF PK/PD of candidate microbicides before in vivo animal efficacy studies. The data support further development of MIV-150-containing IVRs.

  11. Vaginal Exposure to Zika Virus during Pregnancy Leads to Fetal Brain Infection.

    PubMed

    Yockey, Laura J; Varela, Luis; Rakib, Tasfia; Khoury-Hanold, William; Fink, Susan L; Stutz, Bernardo; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Van den Pol, Anthony; Lindenbach, Brett D; Horvath, Tamas L; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-08-25

    Zika virus (ZIKV) can be transmitted sexually between humans. However, it is unknown whether ZIKV replicates in the vagina and impacts the unborn fetus. Here, we establish a mouse model of vaginal ZIKV infection and demonstrate that, unlike other routes, ZIKV replicates within the genital mucosa even in wild-type (WT) mice. Mice lacking RNA sensors or transcription factors IRF3 and IRF7 resulted in higher levels of local viral replication. Furthermore, mice lacking the type I interferon (IFN) receptor (IFNAR) became viremic and died of infection after a high-dose vaginal ZIKV challenge. Notably, vaginal infection of pregnant dams during early pregnancy led to fetal growth restriction and infection of the fetal brain in WT mice. This was exacerbated in mice deficient in IFN pathways, leading to abortion. Our study highlights the vaginal tract as a highly susceptible site of ZIKV replication and illustrates the dire disease consequences during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalent high-risk HPV infection and vaginal microbiota in Nigerian women.

    PubMed

    Dareng, E O; Ma, B; Famooto, A O; Adebamowo, S N; Offiong, R A; Olaniyan, O; Dakum, P S; Wheeler, C M; Fadrosh, D; Yang, H; Gajer, P; Brotman, R M; Ravel, J; Adebamowo, C A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the association between high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) and the vaginal microbiome. Participants were recruited in Nigeria between April and August 2012. Vaginal bacterial composition was characterized by deep sequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA gene fragments (V4) on Illumina MiSeq and HPV was identified using the Roche Linear Array® HPV genotyping test. We used exact logistic regression models to evaluate the association between community state types (CSTs) of vaginal microbiota and hrHPV infection, weighted UniFrac distances to compare the vaginal microbiota of individuals with prevalent hrHPV to those without prevalent hrHPV infection, and the Linear Discriminant Analysis effect size (LEfSe) algorithm to characterize bacteria associated with prevalent hrHPV infection. We observed four CSTs: CST IV-B with a low relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. in 50% of participants; CST III (dominated by L. iners) in 39·2%; CST I (dominated by L. crispatus) in 7·9%; and CST VI (dominated by proteobacteria) in 2·9% of participants. LEfSe analysis suggested an association between prevalent hrHPV infection and a decreased abundance of Lactobacillus sp. with increased abundance of anaerobes particularly of the genera Prevotella and Leptotrichia in HIV-negative women (P < 0·05). These results are hypothesis generating and further studies are required.

  13. Vaginal Candidiasis Infection Treated Using Apple Cider Vinegar: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Betul; Baser, Muruvvet

    2017-11-07

    A 32-y-old married woman was admitted with intense vaginal discharge with foul odor, itching, groin pain, and infertility for the past 5 y. Candida albicans was isolated from the culture of vaginal swab. The patient was diagnosed with chronic vaginal candida infection. She failed to respond to integrative medicine methods prescribed. Recovery was achieved with the application of apple cider vinegar. Alternative treatment methods can be employed in patients unresponsive to medical therapies. As being one of these methods, application of apple cider vinegar can cure vaginal candida infection.

  14. Trichomonas vaginalis infection induces vaginal CD4+ T-cell infiltration in a mouse model: a vaccine strategy to reduce vaginal infection and HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffrey D; Garber, Gary E

    2015-07-15

    Complications related to the diagnosis and treatment of Trichomonas vaginalis infection, as well as the association between T. vaginalis infection and increased transmission of and susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus, highlight the need for alternative interventions. We tested a human-safe, aluminum hydroxide-adjuvanted whole-cell T. vaginalis vaccine for efficacy in a BALB/c mouse model of vaginal infection. A whole-cell T. vaginalis vaccine was administered subcutaneously to BALB/c mice, using a prime-boost vaccination schedule. CD4(+) T-cell infiltration in the murine vaginal tissue and local and systemic levels of immunoglobulins were measured at time points up to 4 weeks following infection. Vaccination reduced the incidence and increased the clearance of T. vaginalis infection and induced both systemic and local humoral immune responses. CD4(+) T cells were detected in vaginal tissues following intravaginal infection with T. vaginalis but were not seen in uninfected mice. The presence of CD4(+) T cells following T. vaginalis infection can potentially increase susceptibility to and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. The vaccine induces local and systemic immune responses and confers significantly greater protection against vaginal infection than seen in unvaccinated mice (P < .005). These data support the potential for a human vaccine against T. vaginalis infection that could also influence the incidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Cervicovaginal secretions protect from human papillomavirus infection: effects of vaginal douching.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tang-Yuan; Chang, Ying-Cheng; Ding, Dah-Ching

    2013-06-01

    Cervicovaginal secretions (CVSs) are reported to protect against human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Although vaginal douching is known to clear both viral inoculants and CVSs, its effect on CVSs in women with HPV infection is unknown. The in vitro HPV pseudovirus infection system was used to test the protective activity of CVSs against HPV infection in samples collected before and after vaginal douching. To simulate different time points of vaginal douching in relation to viral exposure, the cell CVS reconstitute was washed after different viral exposure durations. In the CVSs of premenopausal and postmenopausal women who did not perform douching, the CVSs inhibited HPV infection by 56.7 ± 1.8% and 53.6 ± 2.5%, respectively; in women who had performed douching, the CVSs inhibited HPV infection by only 31.2 ± 7.1%, which was significantly lower (p < 0.01). Cell washing effectively cleared 60-90% of the infectious load with the greatest activity occurring within 30 minutes after inoculation. In the presence of CVSs, a sustained inhibition of HPV infection existed for up to 8 hours after HPV exposure, and cell washing increased the clearance to up to 82-93% of the infectious load. This study confirms the protective activity of CVSs against HPV infection regardless of age. In this in vitro study, the net effect of douching was found to be beneficial. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Higher vaginal pH in Trichomonas vaginalis infection with intermediate Nugent score in reproductive-age women-a hospital-based cross-sectional study in Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Padmalaya; Swain, Tapoja; Mohanty, Jyoti Ranjan; Sinha, Shalini; Padhi, Bijay; Torondel, Belen; Cumming, Oliver; Panda, Bijaya; Nayak, Arati; Panigrahi, Pinaki

    2018-06-23

    A close association between Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) infection and bacterial vaginosis (BV) has been reported. Some other studies have found association is stronger with intermediate Nugent score than BV. Most studies have used wet mount microscopy, a relatively insensitive method, to detect TV infection. We wanted to study the association of TV infection with BV and with intermediate Nugent score. We undertook a cross-sectional hospital-based study of 1110 non-pregnant women from Odisha state, India, aged between 18 and 45 years, collecting vaginal swabs for diagnosis of BV by Nugent score (NS) criteria and TV by PCR analysis. TV infection was found in 13.3% of women with intermediate Nugent score (NS 4-6) and 13.6% with BV (NS 7-10). Before adjustment, TV infection was associated with BV, intermediate Nugent, vaginal pH ≥ 4.5, and age group between 26 and 35 years. Multivariate analysis confirmed that TV infection was more likely to have raised vaginal pH, either BV or intermediate Nugent. Proportion of TV cases increased sequentially with the increase in Nugent score up to NS 6, after which a decline was observed. Vaginal pH was higher in the TV-infected group than the uninfected group in women with intermediate Nugent, but no difference was noticed in women with BV. TV infection was equally prevalent in women with intermediate Nugent as well as BV. In the intermediate Nugent group women, TV infection was found only when vaginal pH was raised, indicating a crucial role of vaginal pH in determining TV infection.

  17. Aerobic vaginitis and mixed infections: comparison of clinical and laboratory findings.

    PubMed

    Fan, Aiping; Yue, Yingli; Geng, Nv; Zhang, Huiying; Wang, Yingmei; Xue, Fengxia

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the clinical features of aerobic vaginitis (AV) and mixed infections with AV to achieve efficient diagnosis. From April 2008 to August 2009, 657 consecutive outpatients with vaginal symptoms in gynecology clinic in the General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University were investigated. Samples were taken for examination of vaginal discharge and fresh wet mount microscopy. AV, bacterial vaginosis (BV), vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), and trichomonal vaginitis (TV) were diagnosed according to standardized definitions. Sixty patients with single AV were randomly selected over the same period. Each patient accepted moxifloxacin therapy. Two kinds of treatment course (400 mg qd, 6 days or 400 mg qd, 12 days) were given. Clinical features and laboratory test results in the first visit and follow-ups were recorded and statistically analyzed. Among the 657 cases, AV was found in 23.74 % of the cases (156/657). AV mixed infections were diagnosed in 53.85 % (84/156): the mixed infections included VVC (32/84, 38.10 %), BV (31/84, 36.90 %), and TV (21/84, 25.00 %). Common symptoms of AV were a change in the characteristics of the discharge (44/72, 61.11 %) and increased discharge (30/72, 41.67 %). Vaginal pH was usually higher than 4.5 (63/72, 87.50 %). Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus viridans, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis were frequently isolated. There is no statistically significant difference between two moxifloxacin treatment groups (p > 0.05). Cure rate was 89.7 % in 6-day group, and 71.4 % in 12-day group. AV is a common vaginal infection, and it is often mixed with other infections, especially VVC, BV and TV. The symptoms and signs of AV mixed infections are atypical. If a patient has vaginal complaints, it is necessary to determine whether AV or mixed infections are present. Oral moxifloxacin is effective in treating AV, and an appropriate course should be selected taking the severity of AV into consideration.

  18. Chlamydial infection in a high risk population: association with vaginal flora patterns.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Camila; Donders, Gilbert G G; Martin, Laura F; Ramos, Bruna R A; Duarte, Marli T C; Parada, Cristina M G L; Tristão, Andréa R; Silva, Márcia G

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the frequency of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection among high risk Brazilian women and evaluate its association with vaginal flora patterns. This was a cross-sectional study, performed in an outpatient clinic of Bauru State Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil. A total of 142 women were included from 2006 to 2008. Inclusion criteria was dyspareunia, pain during bimanual exam, presence of excessive cervical mucus, cervical ectopy or with three or more episodes of abnormal vaginal flora (AVF) in the previous year before enrollment. Endocervical CT testing was performed by PCR. Vaginal swabs were collected for microscopic assessment of the microbial flora pattern. Gram-stained smears were classified in normal, intermediate or bacterial vaginosis (BV), and recognition of Candida sp. morphotypes. Wet mount smears were used for detection of Trichomonas vaginalis and aerobic vaginitis (AV). Thirty-four of 142 women (23.9%) tested positive for CT. AVF was found in 50 (35.2%) cases. The most frequent type of AVF was BV (17.6%). CT was strongly associated with the presence of AV (n = 7, 4.9%, P = 0.018), but not BV (n = 25, 17.6%, P = 0.80) or intermediate flora (n = 18, 12.7%, P = 0.28). A high rate of chlamydial infection was found in this population. Chlamydia infection is associated with aerobic vaginitis.

  19. Association of the Vaginal Microbiota with Human Papillomavirus Infection in a Korean Twin Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Sunghee; Lee, Heetae; Song, Yun-Mi; Lee, Kayoung; Han, Min Ji; Sung, Joohon; Ko, GwangPyo

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important causative agent of cervical cancers worldwide. However, our understanding of how the vaginal microbiota might be associated with HPV infection is limited. In addition, the influence of human genetic and physiological factors on the vaginal microbiota is unclear. Studies on twins and their families provide the ideal settings to investigate the complicated nature of human microbiota. This study investigated the vaginal microbiota of 68 HPV-infected or uninfected female twins and their families using 454-pyrosequencing analysis targeting the variable region (V2–V3) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Analysis of the vaginal microbiota from both premenopausal women and HPV-discordant twins indicated that HPV-positive women had significantly higher microbial diversity with a lower proportion of Lactobacillus spp. than HPV-negative women. Fusobacteria, including Sneathia spp., were identified as a possible microbiological marker associated with HPV infection. The vaginal microbiotas of twin pairs were significantly more similar to each other than to those from unrelated individuals. In addition, there were marked significant differences from those of their mother, possibly due to differences in menopausal status. Postmenopausal women had a lower proportion of Lactobacillus spp. and a significantly higher microbiota diversity. This study indicated that HPV infection was associated with the composition of the vaginal microbiota, which is influenced by multiple host factors such as genetics and menopause. The potential biological markers identified in this study could provide insight into HPV pathogenesis and may represent biological targets for diagnostics. PMID:23717441

  20. Association of the vaginal microbiota with human papillomavirus infection in a Korean twin cohort.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Sunghee; Lee, Heetae; Song, Yun-Mi; Lee, Kayoung; Han, Min Ji; Sung, Joohon; Ko, GwangPyo

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important causative agent of cervical cancers worldwide. However, our understanding of how the vaginal microbiota might be associated with HPV infection is limited. In addition, the influence of human genetic and physiological factors on the vaginal microbiota is unclear. Studies on twins and their families provide the ideal settings to investigate the complicated nature of human microbiota. This study investigated the vaginal microbiota of 68 HPV-infected or uninfected female twins and their families using 454-pyrosequencing analysis targeting the variable region (V2-V3) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Analysis of the vaginal microbiota from both premenopausal women and HPV-discordant twins indicated that HPV-positive women had significantly higher microbial diversity with a lower proportion of Lactobacillus spp. than HPV-negative women. Fusobacteria, including Sneathia spp., were identified as a possible microbiological marker associated with HPV infection. The vaginal microbiotas of twin pairs were significantly more similar to each other than to those from unrelated individuals. In addition, there were marked significant differences from those of their mother, possibly due to differences in menopausal status. Postmenopausal women had a lower proportion of Lactobacillus spp. and a significantly higher microbiota diversity. This study indicated that HPV infection was associated with the composition of the vaginal microbiota, which is influenced by multiple host factors such as genetics and menopause. The potential biological markers identified in this study could provide insight into HPV pathogenesis and may represent biological targets for diagnostics.

  1. Tracking vaginal, anal and oral infection in a mouse papillomavirus infection model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Budgeon, Lynn R; Cladel, Nancy M; Balogh, Karla; Myers, Roland; Cooper, Timothy K; Christensen, Neil D

    2015-12-01

    Noninvasive and practical techniques to longitudinally track viral infection are sought after in clinical practice. We report a proof-of-principle study to monitor the viral DNA copy number using a newly established mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV1) mucosal infection model. We hypothesized that viral presence could be identified and quantified by collecting lavage samples from cervicovaginal, anal and oral sites. Nude mice infected at these sites with infectious MmuPV1 were tracked for up to 23 weeks starting at 6 weeks post-infection. Viral DNA copy number was determined by SYBR Green Q-PCR analysis. In addition, we tracked viral DNA load through three complete oestrous cycles to pinpoint whether there was a correlation between the DNA load and the four stages of the oestrous cycle. Our results showed that high viral DNA copy number was reproducibly detected from both anal and cervicovaginal lavage samples. The infection and disease progression were further confirmed by histology, cytology, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Interestingly, the viral copy number fluctuated over the oestrous cycle, with the highest level at the oestrus stage, implying that multiple sampling might be necessary to provide a reliable diagnosis. Virus DNA was detected in oral lavage samples at a later time after infection. Lower viral DNA load was found in oral samples when compared with those in anal and vaginal tracts. To our knowledge, our study is the first in vivo study to sequentially monitor papillomavirus infection from mucosal anal, oral and vaginal tracts in a preclinical model.

  2. Management of patients with vaginal infections. An invitational symposium.

    PubMed

    1972-07-01

    A guest faculty discussed the management of patients with vaginal infections. It was agreed that correct diagnosis is necessary before therapy. Diagnosis can be accomplished by a microscopic examination in 90% of the cases. The cytologic smear is also very important. Specific culture media may be useful for troublesome cases, for instance, blood agar fo Haemophilus vaginalis, Trichocel medium for Trichiomonas vaginalis, Neckerson's medium for candidal species and Thayer-Martin for Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Patient history is important since some infections tend to occur in certain patients such as candidiasis in patients with diabetes mellitus, patients who are pregnant or are taking broad spectrum antibiotics, estrogen or contraceptive pills. The pH of vaginal secretions may also be helpful in making the diagnosis. It was suggested that the term "nonspecific" vaginitis is a misnomer and is used to conceal ignorance. Others felt that such agents as soap, vaginal deodorant spray, and clothing may be causatives. The term "psychogenic leukorrhea" was discussed with varying conclusions. Routine treatment for each form of vaginitis was outlines and treatment for recurrent, persistent trichomoniasis and moniliasis was given. It was agreed that douching will not cure vaginitis but may be useful in removing excessive secretion. It is not recommended for routine hygeine but is acceptable following menstruation or intercourse.

  3. Association of HPV infection and clearance with cervicovaginal immunology and the vaginal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, B; Yi, TJ; Perusini, S; Gajer, P; Ma, B; Humphrys, MS; Thomas-Pavanel, J; Chieza, L; Janakiram, P; Saunders, M; Tharao, W; Huibner, S; Shahabi, K; Ravel, J; Rebbapragada, A; Kaul, R

    2016-01-01

    Cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection may increase HIV risk. Since other genital infections enhance HIV susceptibility by inducing inflammation, we assessed the impact of HPV infection and clearance on genital immunology and the cervico-vaginal microbiome. Genital samples were collected from 65 women for HPV testing, immune studies and microbiota assessment; repeat HPV testing was performed after 6 months. All participants were HIV-uninfected and free of bacterial STIs. Cytobrush-derived T cell and dendritic cell subsets were assessed by multiparameter flow cytometry. Undiluted cervico-vaginal secretions were used to determine cytokine levels by multiplex ELISA, and to assess bacterial community composition and structure by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Neither HPV infection nor clearance were associated with broad differences in cervical T cell subsets or cytokines, although HPV clearance was associated with increased Langerhans cells and HPV infection with elevated IP-10 and MIG. Individuals with HPV more frequently had a high diversity cervico-vaginal microbiome (community state type IV) and were less likely to have an L. gasseri predominant microbiome. In summary, HPV infection and/or subsequent clearance was not associated with inflammation or altered cervical T cell subsets, but associations with increased Langerhans cells and the composition of the vaginal microbiome warrant further exploration. PMID:28120845

  4. [POLYGYNAX IN THE TREATMENT OF VAGINAL INFECTIONS IN PREGNANT AND NON-PREGNANT WOMEN--CLINICAL EXPERIENCE].

    PubMed

    Popovski, N; Popovski, K; Nedelkovski, V

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal infections /VI/ represent some of the most common diseases by infection of FGS. The aim of this study is to analyze clinical and bacteriological efficacy of Polygynax in the treatment of vaginal infections and to take into account the correlation between the results of microbiological controls and reduction of clinical symptoms. The study included 100 patients, including 50 pregnant and non-pregnant 50 for a period of 3 months. All of them was diagnosed with vaginitis clinical examination, taken material from vagina for microbiological testing. The studied women was conducted targeted therapy Polygynax 12 capsules, in the form of vaginal capsules for 12 days, after which the sample control microbiology. Behind the subjective complaints of the patient and to reduce them as a result of treatment. The effective implementation of Polygynax 12 capsules is equally good as in non-pregnant and pregnant women. In a summary of the survey data to make relevant analyzes and conclusions from the results.

  5. Differential profiles of immune mediators and in vitro HIV infectivity between endocervical and vaginal secretions from women with Chlamydia trachomatis infection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Rhoda; Kraus, Thomas A; Ding, Jian; Veretennikova, Alina; Lorde-Rollins, Elizabeth; Singh, Tricia; Lo, Yungtai; Quayle, Alison J; Chang, Theresa L

    2013-09-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection is one of the most prevalent bacterial STIs in the USA and worldwide, and women with C. trachomatis infection are at increased risk of acquiring HIV. Because immune activation at the genital mucosa facilitates HIV/SIV infection, C. trachomatis-mediated cytokine induction may contribute to increased HIV transmission in asymptomatic women. To begin to elucidate the mechanisms, we longitudinally analyzed profiles of innate immune factors and HIV infectivity in genital secretions from anatomically specific sites in asymptomatic women during C. trachomatis infection and post-antibiotic treatment. We found higher levels of cytokines and chemokines in endocervical secretions than vaginal secretions. Compared with the convalescent state, G-CSF, IL-1α, and RANTES were elevated in endocervical secretions, IFN-γ and TNF-α were elevated in vaginal secretions, and IFNγ, IL-1β, and MIP1-α were elevated in cervicolavage fluid (CVL), before adjustment of multiple comparisons. Elevated endocervical levels of IP-10 and MCP-1 were associated with the use of hormonal contraception in infected women after successful treatment, suggesting the role of hormonal contraception in inflammation independent of STIs. Importantly, soluble factors found in endocervical secretions during infection enhanced HIV infectivity while no difference in HIV infectivity was found with vaginal secretions or CVL during infection or at convalescence. Taken together, the profiles of immune mediators and in vitro HIV infectivity indicate that the endocervical and vaginal mucosa are immunologically distinct. Our results underscore the importance of considering anatomical site and local sampling methodology when measuring mucosal responses, particularly in the presence of C. trachomatis infection. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Postexposure protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV infection by topical integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Parikh, Urvi M; West, Rolieria; Taylor, Andrew; Martin, Amy; Pau, Chou-Pong; Hanson, Debra L; Lipscomb, Jonathan; Smith, James; Novembre, Francis; Hazuda, Daria; Garcia-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2014-03-12

    Coitally delivered microbicide gels containing antiretroviral drugs are important for HIV prevention. However, to date, microbicides have contained entry or reverse transcriptase inhibitors that block early steps in virus infection and thus need to be given as a preexposure dose that interferes with sexual practices and may limit compliance. Integrase inhibitors block late steps after virus infection and therefore are more suitable for post-coital dosing. We first determined the kinetics of strand transfer in vitro and confirmed that integration begins about 6 hours after infection. We then used a repeat-challenge macaque model to assess efficacy of vaginal gels containing integrase strand transfer inhibitors when applied before or after simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. We showed that gel containing the strand transfer inhibitor L-870812 protected two of three macaques when applied 30 min before SHIV challenge. We next evaluated the efficacy of 1% raltegravir gel and demonstrated its ability to protect macaques when applied 3 hours after SHIV exposure (five of six protected; P < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). Breakthrough infections showed no evidence of drug resistance in plasma or vaginal secretions despite continued gel dosing after infection. We documented rapid vaginal absorption reflecting a short pharmacological lag time and noted that vaginal, but not plasma, virus load was substantially reduced in the breakthrough infection after raltegravir gel treatment. We provide a proof of concept that topically applied integrase inhibitors protect against vaginal SHIV infection when administered shortly before or 3 hours after virus exposure.

  7. A prospective study of genital infections in a family-planning clinic. 1. Microbiological findings and their association with vaginal symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, T.; Macaulay, M. E.; James, J. M.; Leventhall, P. A.; Morris, E. M.; Neal, B. R.; Rowland, J.; Evans, B. M.

    1990-01-01

    A prospective study of genital infection was conducted in four inner-city family-planning clinics. Fifteen per cent of routine attenders had symptoms and signs of vaginal infection and many more women attended primarily because of symptoms. Among the women with both signs and symptoms, 70% had positive laboratory findings, Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida albicans and bacterial vaginosis being equally prevalent. Measurement of vaginal pH in the clinic was the single most useful clinical finding for directing empirical therapy. Among patients with a discharge confirmed on examination and an abnormally high pH, 72% had either T. vaginalis or bacterial vaginosis. Neisseria gonorrhoeae was isolated from 4% of women with, and 1% of those without, symptoms. We believe that it is worthwhile to investigate patients presenting to family-planning clinics with vaginal symptoms. No single specimen was found ideal for all pathogens, a cervical swab is better for gonococci and also for T. vaginalis but a vaginal swab is needed for candida and bacterial vaginosis. PMID:2307184

  8. Vaginal infections among pregnant women at Omdurman Maternity Hospital in Khartoum, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Zeinab A; Ibrahim, Mutasim E; Bilal, Naser E; Hamid, Mohamed E

    2014-04-15

    Microbial infections of the vagina in pregnant women are health problems that lead to serious medical complications and consequences. This study aimed to investigate and determine antimicrobial susceptibilities of the causative agents of vaginal infections in pregnant women. A cross-sectional study of pregnant women (n = 200) was conducted between August and December 2008 at Omdurman Maternity Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan. Vaginal and cervical swabs were obtained from each subject and processed for isolation and identification of pathogenic microorganisms using standard methods of wet mount preparation, direct Gram smear, Nugent scoring system, direct immunofluorescence, and cultural techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial isolates was performed using standard procedures. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS program version 12.0.1. A p value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Of the 200 pregnant women enrolled, BV was detected in 49.8%, followed by Chlamydia trachomatis (31.3%) and Candida albicans (16.6%), with low frequencies of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (1.8%) and Trichomonas vaginalis (0.5%). Higher infection rates were recorded among subjects in the third trimester (71.6%) than in the second trimester of gestation (28.4%). No significant association (p = 0.7) between history of abortions and C. trachomatis infections was found. Gentamicin was the most active agent against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Clarythromycin was the most active against Mycoplasma species. Pregnant women with vaginal complaints revealed various positive microbiology results. Such cases may require specific medication. Routine culture of vaginal and cervical samples should be performed on all pregnant women during prenatal visits.

  9. Vaginal Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome of menopause (GSM) increases your risk of: Vaginal infections. Changes in the acid balance of your vagina makes vaginal infections (vaginitis) more likely. Urinary problems. Urinary changes associated ...

  10. Associations of the vaginal microbiota with HIV infection, bacterial vaginosis, and demographic factors.

    PubMed

    Chehoud, Christel; Stieh, Daniel J; Bailey, Aubrey G; Laughlin, Alice L; Allen, Shannon A; McCotter, Kerrie L; Sherrill-Mix, Scott A; Hope, Thomas J; Bushman, Frederic D

    2017-04-24

    We sought to investigate the effects of HIV infection on the vaginal microbiota and associations with treatment and demographic factors. We thus compared vaginal microbiome samples from HIV-infected (HIV+) and HIV-uninfected (HIV-) women collected at two Chicago area hospitals. We studied vaginal microbiome samples from 178 women analyzed longitudinally (n = 324 samples) and collected extensive data on clinical status and demographic factors. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to characterize the bacterial lineages present, then UniFrac, Shannon diversity, and other measures to compare community structure with sample metadata. Differences in microbiota measures were modest in the comparison of HIV+ and HIV- samples, in contrast to several previous studies, consistent with effective antiretroviral therapy. Proportions of healthy Lactobacillus species were not higher in HIV- patients overall, but were significantly higher when analyzed within each hospital in isolation. Rates of bacterial vaginosis were higher among African-American women and HIV+ women. Bacterial vaginosis was associated with higher frequency of HIV+. Unexpectedly, African-American women were more likely to switch bacterial vaginosis status between sampling times; switching was not associated with HIV+ status. The influence of HIV infection on the vaginal microbiome was modest for this cohort of well suppressed urban American women, consistent with effective antiretroviral therapy. HIV+ was found to be associated with bacterial vaginosis. Although bacterial vaginosis has previously been associated with HIV transmission, most of the women studied here became HIV+ many years before our test for bacterial vaginosis, thus implicating additional mechanisms linking HIV infection and bacterial vaginosis.

  11. Study comparing 3 hour and 24 hour post-operative removal of bladder catheter and vaginal pack following vaginal surgery: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Priya; Soundara Raghavan, S; Sharma, Deepak

    2017-09-11

    Traditional practice after vaginal hysterectomy was to keep the vaginal pack and urinary catheter for 24 hours post operatively. But there were studies that prolonged cathterisation was associated with urinary infection. So this study was conducted to compare the post operative outcome when the urinary catheter and vaginal pack were removed after 3 hours and after 24 hours after surgery. The study was done in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, in a tertiary teaching institute of South India from September 2008 to March 2010. It was a randomised controlled trial involving 200 women undergoing vaginal surgery, who were randomly assigned to 2 groups - catheter and vaginal pack were removed either in 3 h in study group or were removed in 24 h in control group. The outcome of the study were vaginal bleeding, urinary retention, febrile morbidity, and urinary infection. There was no significant difference between the study and control groups with respect to vaginal bleeding (0 and 1%, p = 1), urinary retention (9 and 4%, p = 0.15), febrile morbidity (7 and 4%, p = 0.35), and urinary infection (26% in each group, p = 1.0). Keeping the urinary catheter and vaginal pack for 24 h following vaginal surgery does not offer any additional benefit against removing them after 3 h.

  12. Human vaginal epithelial cells augment autophagy marker genes in response to Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Ankit; Sequeira, Roicy; Reddy, Kudumula Venkata Rami

    2017-04-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in clearance of intracellular pathogens. However, no information is available on its involvement in vaginal infections such as vulvo-vaginal candidiasis (VVC). VVC is intimately associated with the immune status of the human vaginal epithelial cells (VECs). The objective of our study is to decipher if autophagy process is involved during Candida albicans infection of VECs. In this study, C. albicans infection system was established using human VEC line (VK2/E6E7). Infection-induced change in the expression of autophagy markers like LC3 and LAMP-1 were analyzed by RT-PCR, q-PCR, Western blot, immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies were carried out to ascertain the localization of autophagosomes. Multiplex ELISA was carried out to determine the cytokine profiles. Analysis of LC3 and LAMP-1 expression at mRNA and protein levels at different time points revealed up-regulation of these markers 6 hours post C. albicans infection. LC3 and LAMP-1 puncti were observed in infected VECs after 12 hours. TEM studies showed C. albicans entrapped in autophagosomes. Cytokines-TNF-α and IL-1β were up-regulated in culture supernatants of VECs at 12 hours post-infection. The results suggest that C. albicans invasion led to the activation of autophagy as a host defense mechanism of VECs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Prevalence of vaginal infections and associated lifestyles of students in the university of Cape Coast, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Aubyn, Gloria Baaba; Tagoe, Daniel Nii Aryee

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of vaginal infections and associated lifestyles of students visiting the University of Cape Coast Hospital. Methods Fifty female students presenting with clinical symptoms of vaginitis were sampled. One hundred samples made up of 50 urine and 50 higher vaginal swabs (HVS) were obtained from patients and questionnaire administered. Samples were wet prepared, examined microscopically, and cultured on blood and chocolate agars for 24 h at (35±2) °C. Colonial morphology, Gram reactions and biochemical tests were used for the identification of isolates. Results There were high percentages of pus cells (64%), epithelial cells (62%) and yeast cells (56%) in all urine samples. Bacterial isolates included Staphylococcus aureus (28%) and (22%), Klebsiella spp. (6%) and (4%) in urine and HVS samples respectively; Escherichia coli in urine (18%) and Candida in HVS (16%). The overall prevalence of vaginitis was 66%, including bacterial vaginosis 28%, Candida infection 22% and co-infection of bacterial and Candida 16%. Lifestyle data showed all sampled students were sexually active, 48% used contraceptives, 54% used antimicrobial agents, and 92% prefered wearing of trousers and shorts. Conclusions The present study indicates prevalence of vaginal infection among female students, which strongly correlates with student lifestyle. Education on lifestyle modifications will go a long way in reducing the prevalence of vaginitis.

  14. Protection against rat vaginal candidiasis by adoptive transfer of vaginal B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Santoni, Giorgio; Boccanera, Maria; Lucciarini, Roberta; Arancia, Silvia; Sandini, Silvia; Amantini, Consuelo; Cassone, Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is a mucosal infection affecting many women, but the immune mechanisms operating against Candida albicans at the mucosal level remain unknown. A rat model was employed to further characterize the contribution of B and T cells to anti-Candida vaginal protection. Particularly, the protective role of vaginal B cells was studied by means of adoptive transfer of vaginal CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) cells from Candida-immunized rats to naïve animals. This passive transfer of B cells resulted into a number of vaginal C. albicans CFU approximately 50% lower than their controls. Sorted CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) vaginal B lymphocytes from Candida-infected rats proliferated in response to stimulation with an immunodominant mannoprotein (MP) antigen of the fungus. Importantly, anti-MP antibodies and antibody-secreting B cells were detected in the supernatant and cell cultures, respectively, of vaginal B lymphocytes from infected rats incubated in vitro with vaginal T cells and stimulated with MP. No such specific antibodies were found when using vaginal B cells from uninfected rats. Furthermore, inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6 and IL-10, were found in the supernatant of vaginal B cells from infected rats. These data are evidence of a partial anti-Candida protective role of CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) vaginal B lymphocytes in our experimental model.

  15. Y Chromosome DNA in Women's Vaginal Samples as a Biomarker of Recent Vaginal Sex and Condom Use With Male Partners in the HPV Infection and Transmission Among Couples Through Heterosexual Activity Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Malagón, Talía; Burchell, Ann; El-Zein, Mariam; Guénoun, Julie; Tellier, Pierre-Paul; Coutlée, François; Franco, Eduardo L

    2018-01-01

    Y chromosome DNA from male epithelial and sperm cells was detected in vaginal samples after unprotected sex in experimental studies. We assessed the strength of this association in an observational setting to examine the utility of Y chromosome DNA as a biomarker of recent sexual behaviors in epidemiological studies. The HPV (human papillomavirus) Infection and Transmission Among Couples Through Heterosexual Activity cohort study enrolled 502 women attending a university or college in Montréal, Canada, and their male partners from 2005 to 2010. Participants completed self-administered questionnaires. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction to test women's baseline vaginal samples for Y chromosome DNA and assessed which sexual behaviors were independent predictors of Y chromosome DNA positivity and quantity with logistic and negative binomial regression. Y chromosome DNA positivity decreased from 77% in women in partnerships reporting vaginal sex 0 to 1 day ago to 13% in women in partnerships reporting last vaginal sex of 15 or more days ago (adjusted odds ratio, 0.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.36). The mean proportion of exfoliated vaginal sample cells with Y chromosome DNA was much lower for women who reported always using condoms (0.01%) than for women who reported never using condoms (2.07%) (adjusted ratio, 26.8; 95% confidence interval, 8.9-80.5). No association was found with reported oral/digital sex frequency or concurrency of partnerships. Y chromosome DNA quantity is strongly associated with days since last vaginal sex and lack of condom use in observational settings. Y chromosome DNA quantity may prove useful as a correlate of recent vaginal sex in observational studies lacking data on sexual behavior, such as surveillance studies of human papillomavirus infection prevalence.

  16. Comparison of the Effect of Vaginal Zataria multiflora Cream and Oral Metronidazole Pill on Results of Treatments for Vaginal Infections including Trichomoniasis and Bacterial Vaginosis in Women of Reproductive Age.

    PubMed

    Abdali, Khadijeh; Jahed, Leila; Amooee, Sedigheh; Zarshenas, Mahnaz; Tabatabaee, Hamidreza; Bekhradi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Effect of Zataria multiflora on bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis is shown in vivo and in vitro. We compare the effectiveness of Zataria multiflora cream and oral metronidazole pill on results of treatment for vaginal infections including Trichomonas and bacterial vaginosis; these infections occur simultaneously. The study included 420 women with bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis, or both infections together, who were randomly divided into six groups. Criteria for diagnosis were wet smear and Gram stain. Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream and placebo pill were administered to the experiment groups; the control group received oral metronidazole pill and vaginal placebo cream. Comparison of the clinical symptoms showed no significant difference in all three vaginitis groups receiving metronidazole pill and vaginal Zataria multiflora cream. However, comparison of the wet smear test results was significant in patients with trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis associated with trichomoniasis in the two treatment groups (p = 0.001 and p = 0.01). Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream had the same effect of oral metronidazole tablets in improving clinical symptoms of all three vaginitis groups, as well as the treatment for bacterial vaginosis. It can be used as a drug for treatment of bacterial vaginosis and elimination of clinical symptoms of Trichomonas vaginitis.

  17. Comparison of the Effect of Vaginal Zataria multiflora Cream and Oral Metronidazole Pill on Results of Treatments for Vaginal Infections including Trichomoniasis and Bacterial Vaginosis in Women of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Abdali, Khadijeh; Jahed, Leila; Amooee, Sedigheh; Zarshenas, Mahnaz; Tabatabaee, Hamidreza; Bekhradi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Effect of Zataria multiflora on bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis is shown in vivo and in vitro. We compare the effectiveness of Zataria multiflora cream and oral metronidazole pill on results of treatment for vaginal infections including Trichomonas and bacterial vaginosis; these infections occur simultaneously. The study included 420 women with bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis, or both infections together, who were randomly divided into six groups. Criteria for diagnosis were wet smear and Gram stain. Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream and placebo pill were administered to the experiment groups; the control group received oral metronidazole pill and vaginal placebo cream. Comparison of the clinical symptoms showed no significant difference in all three vaginitis groups receiving metronidazole pill and vaginal Zataria multiflora cream. However, comparison of the wet smear test results was significant in patients with trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis associated with trichomoniasis in the two treatment groups (p = 0.001 and p = 0.01). Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream had the same effect of oral metronidazole tablets in improving clinical symptoms of all three vaginitis groups, as well as the treatment for bacterial vaginosis. It can be used as a drug for treatment of bacterial vaginosis and elimination of clinical symptoms of Trichomonas vaginitis. PMID:26266260

  18. Does vaginal douching affect the type of candidal vulvovaginal infection?

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Omar M; Abbas, Ahmed M; Moharram, Ahmad M; Farhan, Mohammed M; Hassanen, Ibrahim H

    2015-11-01

    The normal vaginal microbiota is a dynamic system that continually fluctuates under the environmental changes and different physiological conditions. Yeast infections of the vagina are caused by one of the species of fungus called Candida (C.). The study aimed to evaluate the types of mycobiota in women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) who were performing vaginal douching (VD) or not. Furthermore, it studied the antifungal sensitivity toward different fungi isolated from the vagina. In a cross-sectional study conducted in Assiut University Hospital, Egypt, women with VVC were interviewed regarding relevant history including the habit of VD. Vaginal swabs were obtained and processed by direct microscope and by culture on CHROMagar Candida and other differential media. The types of Candida in women with the habit of VD were compared with those not having this habit. We found that VD habit was practiced by 67.4% of women with VVC, and Candida albicans was the commonest (78.3%) type observed. There was no significant difference in the percentage of non-albicans types between women performing VD (23.6%) and those not reporting this habit (18.9%). Harboring non-albicans types were significantly increased in regular performers of VD compared with those who had this procedure only after sexual intercourse or after the end of menstruation (36.8%,12.5%, and 16.7%, respectively) (P = .048). Thus, vaginal douching does not influence the type of Candida infection involved in VVC. Frequent performance of VD increases the likelihood of having non-albicans types and the resistance to the common antifungal agents. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Clinical and microbiological correlates of vaginal trichomoniasis during pregnancy. The Vaginal Infections and Prematurity Study Group.

    PubMed

    Pastorek, J G; Cotch, M F; Martin, D H; Eschenbach, D A

    1996-11-01

    Colonization with Trichomonas vaginalis is a possible cause of poor pregnancy outcome. To facilitate the diagnosis of this condition during pregnancy, we conducted a prospective, multicenter study of 13,816 gravid women who were between 23rd and 26th week of gestation. Findings significantly associated with T. vaginalis colonization included a yellow, green, or bloody discharge from the vagina or cervix; abnormal odor after KOH was added to a vaginal specimen; a vaginal pH of > 5.0; and cervical friability. The amount of vaginal discharge and abnormal consistency of the discharge were also associated with T. vaginalis colonization. These findings (except for cervical bleeding and odor after the addition of KOH to a vaginal specimen, which may be influenced by the presence of other flora) are consistent with those reported elsewhere. The clinical usefulness of these features is minimal, and it is more significant that other microorganisms are makers for trichomoniasis; therefore, controlling for other flora is important in the investigation of T. vaginalis colonization.

  20. Vaginal health in contraceptive vaginal ring users - A review.

    PubMed

    Lete, Iñaki; Cuesta, María C; Marín, Juan M; Guerra, Sandra

    2013-08-01

    To provide an overview of the available data from clinical studies of vaginal conditions in women who use a vaginal ring as a contraceptive. A systematic review of the literature. Millions of women have already used the ethylene vinyl acetate vaginal ring that releases ethinylestradiol and etonogestrel for contraception. Because of its small size, more than four out of five women using the ring report that they do not feel it, even during sexual intercourse. No colposcopic or cytological changes have been observed in users, although approximately 10% have increased vaginal discharge. While in vitro studies have shown adhesion of Candida yeasts to the vaginal ring surface, clinical studies have not demonstrated a greater incidence of Candida infections compared to users of equivalent oral contraceptives. Some clinical studies suggest a lower incidence of bacterial vaginosis. No interaction exists between concomitant use of the vaginal ring and other drugs or products for vaginal use. The use of a contraceptive vaginal ring does not alter the vaginal ecosystem and therefore does not substantially affect vaginal health.

  1. Vaginal and anal human papillomavirus infection and seropositivity among female sex workers in Amsterdam, the Netherlands: Prevalence, concordance and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Marra, E; Kroone, N; Freriks, E; van Dam, C L; Alberts, C J; Hogewoning, A A; Bruisten, S; van Dijk, A; Kroone, M M; Waterboer, T; Schim van der Loeff, M F

    2018-04-01

    We studied prevalence, risk factors and concordance of vaginal and anal HPV infection and L1 seropositivity among female sex workers (FSW) in Amsterdam. In 2016, FSW aged ≥18 years having a sexually transmitted infections (STI) consultation were invited to participate. Participation entailed taking vaginal and anal self-swabs. Demographics and sexual behaviour data were collected. HPV DNA was analysed using the SPF10-PCR-DEIA-LiPA25-system-v1. Serum was tested for HPV L1 antibodies using multiplex serology assays. Determinants of vaginal and anal high risk HPV (hrHPV) infection and L1 seropositivity were assessed with logistic regression analyses. We included 304 FSW; median age was 29 years (IQR 25-37). Vaginal and anal hrHPV prevalence were 46% and 55%, respectively. HrHPV L1 seropositivity was 37%. Vaginal-anal hrHPV concordance was strong, but no significant association between vaginal or anal hrHPV infection and seropositivity was found. Having had anal sexual contact was not associated with anal hrHPV infection (P = 0.119). Vaginal and anal hrHPV prevalence is high among FSW in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Promotion of HPV vaccination, preferably at the beginning of the sex (work) career, may be a useful prevention method against hrHPV infection and disease. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Vaginal versus Obstetric Infection Escherichia coli Isolates among Pregnant Women: Antimicrobial Resistance and Genetic Virulence Profile.

    PubMed

    Sáez-López, Emma; Guiral, Elisabet; Fernández-Orth, Dietmar; Villanueva, Sonia; Goncé, Anna; López, Marta; Teixidó, Irene; Pericot, Anna; Figueras, Francesc; Palacio, Montse; Cobo, Teresa; Bosch, Jordi; Soto, Sara M

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal Escherichia coli colonization is related to obstetric infections and the consequent development of infections in newborns. Ampicillin resistance among E. coli strains is increasing, which is the main choice for treating empirically many obstetric and neonatal infections. Vaginal E. coli strains are very similar to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli with regards to the virulence factors and the belonging to phylogroup B2. We studied the antimicrobial resistance and the genetic virulence profile of 82 E. coli isolates from 638 vaginal samples and 63 isolated from endometrial aspirate, placental and amniotic fluid samples from pregnant women with obstetric infections. The prevalence of E. coli in the vaginal samples was 13%, which was significant among women with associated risk factors during pregnancy, especially premature preterm rupture of membranes (p<0.0001). Sixty-five percent of the strains were ampicillin-resistant. The E. coli isolates causing obstetric infections showed higher resistance levels than vaginal isolates, particularly for gentamicin (p = 0.001). The most prevalent virulence factor genes were those related to the iron uptake systems revealing clear targets for interventions. More than 50% of the isolates belonged to the virulent B2 group possessing the highest number of virulence factor genes. The ampicillin-resistant isolates had high number of virulence factors primarily related to pathogenicity islands, and the remarkable gentamicin resistance in E. coli isolates from women presenting obstetric infections, the choice of the most appropriate empiric treatment and clinical management of pregnant women and neonates should be carefully made. Taking into account host-susceptibility, the heterogeneity of E. coli due to evolution over time and the geographical area, characterization of E. coli isolates colonizing the vagina and causing obstetric infections in different regions may help to develop interventions and avoid the aetiological link

  3. Frequency and determinants of vaginal infection in postpartum period: a cross-sectional survey from low socioeconomic settlements, Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Tazeen Saeed; Fikree, Fariyal F; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Mahmud, Sadia

    2006-03-01

    To determine the frequency and factors associated with perceived vaginal infections among married women in their postpartum period. A cross-sectional study was conducted from July 2000 to October 2000 in five squatter settlements of Karachi, Pakistan. These squatter settlements were selected on the basis of an existing surveillance system run by female community health workers for maternal and child healthcare which identified women who had delivered 42-56 days prior to the date of interview. Vaginal infection was considered present when a mother perceived foul smelling vaginal discharge during the postpartum period. Mothers were interviewed to gain insight into socioeconomic and demographic variables, materials used to staunch lochia, duration of labour, personal and perineal hygiene and past obstetric history. A total of 525 women were interviewed. The estimated prevalence of perceived vaginal infection was 5.1%. Factors associated with perceived vaginal infections included, delivery conducted by a non-medical personnel (AOR 3.5, CI 1.3-9.5) and use of unhygienic cloth or cotton for staunch of lochia (AOR 2.7, CI 1.1-6.2). Among women who reported perceived vaginal infection, a higher proportion were delivered by non-medical personnel, and used unhygienic material (cloth or cotton) for staunch of lochia as compared to women who did not perceive vaginal infection. We recommend deliveries to be conducted by trained personnel and provision of health education for persons who conduct delivery and women to use hygienic material for staunch of lochia during post partum period.

  4. The Role of Chronic Mesh Infection in Delayed-Onset Vaginal Mesh Complications or Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections: Results From Explanted Mesh Cultures.

    PubMed

    Mellano, Erin M; Nakamura, Leah Y; Choi, Judy M; Kang, Diana C; Grisales, Tamara; Raz, Shlomo; Rodriguez, Larissa V

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal mesh complications necessitating excision are increasingly prevalent. We aim to study whether subclinical chronically infected mesh contributes to the development of delayed-onset mesh complications or recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Women undergoing mesh removal from August 2013 through May 2014 were identified by surgical code for vaginal mesh removal. Only women undergoing removal of anti-incontinence mesh were included. Exclusion criteria included any women undergoing simultaneous prolapse mesh removal. We abstracted preoperative and postoperative information from the medical record and compared mesh culture results from patients with and without mesh extrusion, de novo recurrent UTIs, and delayed-onset pain. One hundred seven women with only anti-incontinence mesh removed were included in the analysis. Onset of complications after mesh placement was within the first 6 months in 70 (65%) of 107 and delayed (≥6 months) in 37 (35%) of 107. A positive culture from the explanted mesh was obtained from 82 (77%) of 107 patients, and 40 (37%) of 107 were positive with potential pathogens. There were no significant differences in culture results when comparing patients with delayed-onset versus immediate pain, extrusion with no extrusion, and de novo recurrent UTIs with no infections. In this large cohort of patients with mesh removed for a diverse array of complications, cultures of the explanted vaginal mesh demonstrate frequent low-density bacterial colonization. We found no differences in culture results from women with delayed-onset pain versus acute pain, vaginal mesh extrusions versus no extrusions, or recurrent UTIs using standard culture methods. Chronic prosthetic infections in other areas of medicine are associated with bacterial biofilms, which are resistant to typical culture techniques. Further studies using culture-independent methods are needed to investigate the potential role of chronic bacterial infections in delayed vaginal mesh

  5. Th17 Cells Are Preferentially Infected Very Early after Vaginal Transmission of SIV in Macaques.

    PubMed

    Stieh, Daniel J; Matias, Edgar; Xu, Huanbin; Fought, Angela J; Blanchard, James L; Marx, Preston A; Veazey, Ronald S; Hope, Thomas J

    2016-04-13

    The difficulty in detecting rare infected cells immediately after mucosal HIV transmission has hindered our understanding of the initial cells targeted by the virus. Working with the macaque simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaginal challenge model, we developed methodology to identify discrete foci of SIV (mac239) infection 48 hr after vaginal inoculation. We find infectious foci throughout the reproductive tract, from labia to ovary. Phenotyping infected cells reveals that SIV has a significant bias for infection of CCR6+ CD4+ T cells. SIV-infected cells expressed the transcriptional regulator RORγt, confirming that the initial target cells are specifically of the Th17 lineage. Furthermore, we detect host responses to infection, as evidenced by apoptosis, cell lysis, and phagocytosis of infected cells. Thus, our analysis identifies Th17-lineage CCR6+ CD4+ T cells as primary targets of SIV during vaginal transmission. This opens new opportunities for interventions to protect these cells and prevent HIV transmission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The stimulation of the vaginal immune system with short-term administration of a vaginal gel containing fraction of Propionibacterium acnes, hyaluronic acid and polycarbophil is efficacious in vaginal infections dependent on disorders in the vaginal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Melis, Gian Benedetto; Piras, Bruno; Marotto, Maria Francesca; Neri, Manuela; Corda, Valentina; Vallerino, Valerio; Saba, Alessandra; Lello, Stefano; Pilloni, Monica; Zedda, Pierina; Paoletti, Anna Maria; Mais, Valerio

    2018-04-12

    The vaginal immune system (VIS) is the first defense against antigens recognized as foreign. Substances capable of locally activating the VIS could be a valid strategy to treat vulvo-vaginal infections (VVI), caused by changes in the vaginal ecosystem, such as bacterial vaginosis (BV), vulvo-vaginal candidiasis (CA), and mixed vaginitis (MV). Bacterial lysates, obtained by crushing bacterial cultures, exert immuno-modulatory activities. The parietal fraction from Propionibacterium acnes is a patent of Depofarma (MoglianoVeneto, Italy). The preparation that associates such fraction to hyaluronic acid and polycarbophil is a registered trademark, commercially available in Italy as vaginal gel, Immunovag ® . The study aimed to evaluate whether a 5-day-treatment with Immunovag ® improves the symptoms and signs of VVI, in 60 women with Gardnerella vaginalis (GV), 154 with CA, 95 with MV, diagnosed with vulvar vaginal swab (VVS), and in 283 with BV, diagnosed with the Amsel criteria. At the end of the treatment (visit 2), the symptoms and signs of VVI disappeared in a significant number of subjects (χ 2 p < .02 vs pre-treatment) in all VVI groups, and their intensity was significantly (p < .0002) reduced in the subjects in which they were still present. Immunovag ® represents a valid treatment of VVI induced by changes in the vaginal ecosystem.

  7. Adherence of Lactobacillus crispatus to vaginal epithelial cells from women with or without a history of recurrent urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Louisa; Stapleton, Ann E; Stamm, Walter E; Hillier, Sharon L; Wobbe, Cheryl L; Gupta, Kalpana

    2006-11-01

    Lactobacillus crispatus strain CTV-05 is a vaginal probiotic proposed for use in women with recurrent urinary tract infection to reduce vaginal colonization with Escherichia coli and the risk of urinary tract infection. However, the ability of this probiotic strain to adhere to the target mucosa, vaginal epithelial cells, has not been assessed in women with recurrent urinary tract infection. We measured the adherence of L. crispatus strain CTV-05 to vaginal epithelial cells collected from more than 100 premenopausal women with (cases) and without (controls) a history of recurrent urinary tract infection. We also examined the effects of relevant host factors on bacterial adherence. Bacterial adherence assays were performed by combining L. crispatus CTV-05 with exfoliated vaginal epithelial cells collected from 51 case women and 51 controls. L. crispatus CTV-05 adhered in high numbers to vaginal epithelial cells from women with recurrent urinary tract infection (mean adherence of 50.5 lactobacilli per vaginal epithelial cell) and controls (mean adherence of 39.4 lactobacilli per vaginal epithelial cell). Adherence was significantly higher using vaginal epithelial cells from women with a maternal history of urinary tract infection (p = 0.036) and a nonsecretor phenotype (p < 0.001), but was not significantly affected by recent spermicide use, oral contraceptive use, menstrual cycle phase or sexual activity. L. crispatus strain CTV-05 is highly adherent to vaginal epithelial cells collected from a large sample of premenopausal women with or without a history of recent recurrent urinary tract infection. These data strongly support further evaluation of this probiotic in clinical trials of women with recurrent urinary tract infection.

  8. Robust vaginal colonization of macaques with a novel vaginally disintegrating tablet containing a live biotherapeutic product to prevent HIV infection in women.

    PubMed

    Lagenaur, Laurel A; Swedek, Iwona; Lee, Peter P; Parks, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    MucoCept is a biotherapeutic for prevention of HIV-1 infection in women and contains a human, vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii that has been genetically enhanced to express the HIV-1 entry inhibitor, modified cyanovirin-N (mCV-N). The objective of this study was to develop a solid vaginal dosage form that supports sustained vaginal colonization of the MucoCept Lactobacillus at levels previously shown, with freshly prepared cultures, to protect macaques from SHIV infection and to test this formulation in a macaque vaginal colonization model. Vaginally disintegrating tablets were prepared by lyophilizing the formulated bacteria in tablet-shaped molds, then packaging in foil pouches with desiccant. Disintegration time, potency and stability of the tablets were assessed. For colonization, non-synchronized macaques were dosed vaginally with either one tablet or five tablets delivered over five days. Vaginal samples were obtained at three, 14, and 21 days post-dosing and cultured to determine Lactobacillus colonization levels. To confirm identity of the MucoCept Lactobacillus strain, genomic DNA was extracted from samples on days 14 and 21 and a strain-specific PCR was performed. Supernatants from bacteria were tested for the presence of the mCV-N protein by Western blot. The tablets were easy to handle, disintegrated within two minutes, potent (5.7x1011 CFU/g), and stable at 4°C and 25°C. Vaginal administration of the tablets to macaques resulted in colonization of the MucoCept Lactobacillus in 66% of macaques at 14 days post-dosing and 83% after 21 days. There was no significant difference in colonization levels for the one or five tablet dosing regimens (p=0.88 Day 14, p=0.99 Day 21). Strain-specific PCR confirmed the presence of the bacteria even in culture-negative macaques. Finally, the presence of mCV-N protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis using a specific anti-mCV-N antibody.

  9. Robust Vaginal Colonization of Macaques with a Novel Vaginally Disintegrating Tablet Containing a Live Biotherapeutic Product to Prevent HIV Infection in Women

    PubMed Central

    Lagenaur, Laurel A.; Swedek, Iwona; Lee, Peter P.; Parks, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    MucoCept is a biotherapeutic for prevention of HIV-1 infection in women and contains a human, vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii that has been genetically enhanced to express the HIV-1 entry inhibitor, modified cyanovirin-N (mCV-N). The objective of this study was to develop a solid vaginal dosage form that supports sustained vaginal colonization of the MucoCept Lactobacillus at levels previously shown, with freshly prepared cultures, to protect macaques from SHIV infection and to test this formulation in a macaque vaginal colonization model. Vaginally disintegrating tablets were prepared by lyophilizing the formulated bacteria in tablet-shaped molds, then packaging in foil pouches with desiccant. Disintegration time, potency and stability of the tablets were assessed. For colonization, non-synchronized macaques were dosed vaginally with either one tablet or five tablets delivered over five days. Vaginal samples were obtained at three, 14, and 21 days post-dosing and cultured to determine Lactobacillus colonization levels. To confirm identity of the MucoCept Lactobacillus strain, genomic DNA was extracted from samples on days 14 and 21 and a strain-specific PCR was performed. Supernatants from bacteria were tested for the presence of the mCV-N protein by Western blot. The tablets were easy to handle, disintegrated within two minutes, potent (5.7x1011 CFU/g), and stable at 4°C and 25°C. Vaginal administration of the tablets to macaques resulted in colonization of the MucoCept Lactobacillus in 66% of macaques at 14 days post-dosing and 83% after 21 days. There was no significant difference in colonization levels for the one or five tablet dosing regimens (p=0.88 Day 14, p=0.99 Day 21). Strain-specific PCR confirmed the presence of the bacteria even in culture-negative macaques. Finally, the presence of mCV-N protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis using a specific anti-mCV-N antibody. PMID:25875100

  10. Common causes of vaginal infections and antibiotic susceptibility of aerobic bacterial isolates in women of reproductive age attending at Felegehiwot Referral Hospital, Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mulu, Wondemagegn; Yimer, Mulat; Zenebe, Yohannes; Abera, Bayeh

    2015-05-13

    Bacterial vaginosis, candidal, trichomonal and Gonococcal vaginal infections are a major health problems associated with gynecologic complications and increase in replication, shedding and transmission of HIV and other STIs in women of reproductive age. The study aimed at determining the prevalence of common vaginal infections and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of aerobic bacterial isolates in women of reproductive age, attending Felegehiwot referral Hospital. A hospital based cross sectional study was conducted from May to November, 2013. Simple random sampling technique was used. Demographic variables were collected using a structured questionnaire. Clinical data were collected by physicians. Two vaginal swab specimens were collected from each participant. Wet mount and Gram staining were carried out to identify motile T.vaginalis, budding yeast and clue cells. All vaginal specimens were cultured for aerobic bacterial isolates using standard microbiology methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed using disc diffusion technique as per the standard by Kirby-Bauer method. The results were analyzed using descriptive, chi-square and fisher's exact test as appropriate. A total of 409 women in reproductive age (15 - 49 years) participated in the study. The median age of the women was 28 years. Overall, 63 (15.4 %) of women had vaginal infections. The proportion of vaginal infection was higher in non-pregnant (17.3 %) than pregnant women (13.3 %) (P = 0.002). The most common identified vaginal infections were candidiasis (8.3 %) and bacterial vaginosis (2.8 %) followed by trichomoniasis (2.1 %). The isolation rate of N. gonorrhoeae and group B Streptococcus colonization was 4 (1 %) and 6 (1.2 %), respectively. Bacterial vaginosis was higher in non-pregnant (5.6 %) than pregnant women (0.5 %) (P = 0.002). Religion, age, living in rural area and having lower abdominal pain were significantly associated with bacterial vaginosis and

  11. Screening for abnormal vaginal microflora by self-assessed vaginal pH does not enable detection of sexually transmitted infections in Ugandan women.

    PubMed

    Donders, Gilbert G G; Donders, Francesca; Bellen, Gert; Depuydt, Christophe; Eggermont, Natalie; Michiels, Thirsa; Lule, John; Byamughisa, Jacobat

    2016-06-01

    Is self-assessed vaginal pH measurement to detect abnormal vaginal bacterial microflora (AVF) an adequate prescreening method for detection of genital sexually transmitted infections (STIs)? A total of 360 Ugandan women tested themselves with a gloved finger and a pH color strip. PCR for bacterial vaginosis (BV)-associated bacteria was tested by PCR for Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and/or Atopobium vaginae, while the STIs were diagnosed by positive PCR for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, and/or Trichomonas vaginalis. A strong correlation was found between self-assessed pH values and BV-associated bacteria (P<0.0001), but not with STIs, not as single infections, nor in general. Self-measured vaginal pH correlated well with markers of high-risk microflora types such as BV or aerobic vaginitis, but not with STIs. Hence, in a screening program addressing AVF in low-resource countries, extra specific tests are required to exclude STIs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The vaginal microbiome, vaginal anti-microbial defence mechanisms and the clinical challenge of reducing infection-related preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Witkin, S S

    2015-01-01

    Ascending bacterial infection is implicated in about 40-50% of preterm births. The human vaginal microbiota in most women is dominated by lactobacilli. In women whose vaginal microbiota is not lactobacilli-dominated anti-bacterial defence mechanisms are reduced. The enhanced proliferation of pathogenic bacteria plus degradation of the cervical barrier increase bacterial passage into the endometrium and amniotic cavity and trigger preterm myometrial contractions. Evaluation of protocols to detect the absence of lactobaciili dominance in pregnant women by self-measuring vaginal pH, coupled with measures to promote growth of lactobacilli are novel prevention strategies that may reduce the occurrence of preterm birth in low-resource areas. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  13. Vaginal Douching, Condom Use, and Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Chinese Female Sex Workers

    PubMed Central

    WANG, BO; LI, XIAOMING; STANTON, BONITA; YANG, HONGMEI; FANG, XIAOYI; ZHAO, RAN; DONG, BAIQING; ZHOU, YUEJIAO; LIU, WEI; LIANG, SHAOLING

    2007-01-01

    Background and Objective Vaginal douching has been hypothesized to increase a woman’s risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, data on the prevalence of this practice and its association with condom use and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are limited. Study A cross-sectional survey among 454 female sex workers (FSWs) in a Chinese county. Results Vaginal douching was reported by 64.7% of the women. The prevalence of self-reported history of STI and that of current STI was 19.4% and 41.5%, respectively. Fifteen percent of the women reported consistent use of condoms with their clients and 8.4% with their regular partners. Vaginal douching was significantly associated with decreased use of condoms (with clients: OR = 0.31; with regular partner(s): OR = 0.22) and increased rate of self-reported STI history (OR = 1.95). However, there was no direct relation between douching and current STI. Over one third of the women believed that douching can prevent STI/HIV. Conclusion Vaginal douching exposes FSWs to a high risk of STI/HIV. Medical professional and public health workers should correct women’s misconception about the effectiveness of douching and discourage women from douching through educational activities. PMID:16254545

  14. Unique Vaginal Microbiota That Includes an Unknown Mycoplasma-Like Organism Is Associated With Trichomonas vaginalis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martin, David H.; Zozaya, Marcela; Lillis, Rebecca A.; Myers, Leann; Nsuami, M. Jacques; Ferris, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis infection is highest in women with intermediate Nugent scores. We hypothesized that the vaginal microbiota in T. vaginalis–infected women differs from that in T. vaginalis–uninfected women. Methods. Vaginal samples from 30 T. vaginalis–infected women were matched by Nugent score to those from 30 T. vaginalis–uninfected women. Equal numbers of women with Nugent scores categorized as normal, intermediate, and bacterial vaginosis were included. The vaginal microbiota was assessed using 454 pyrosequencing analysis of polymerase chain reaction–amplified 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence of an unknown organism was obtained by universal bacterial polymerase chain reaction amplification, cloning, and sequencing. Results. Principal coordinates analysis of the pyrosequencing data showed divergence of the vaginal microbiota in T. vaginalis–infected and T. vaginalis–uninfected patients among women with normal and those with intermediate Nugent scores but not among women with bacterial vaginosis. Cluster analysis revealed 2 unique groups of T. vaginalis–infected women. One had high abundance of Mycoplasma hominis and other had high abundance of an unknown Mycoplasma species. Women in the former group had clinical evidence of enhanced vaginal inflammation. Conclusions. T. vaginalis may alter the vaginal microbiota in a manner that is favorable to its survival and/or transmissibility. An unknown Mycoplasma species plays a role in some of these transformations. In other cases, these changes may result in a heightened host inflammatory response. PMID:23482642

  15. Unique vaginal microbiota that includes an unknown Mycoplasma-like organism is associated with Trichomonas vaginalis infection.

    PubMed

    Martin, David H; Zozaya, Marcela; Lillis, Rebecca A; Myers, Leann; Nsuami, M Jacques; Ferris, Michael J

    2013-06-15

    The prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis infection is highest in women with intermediate Nugent scores. We hypothesized that the vaginal microbiota in T. vaginalis-infected women differs from that in T. vaginalis-uninfected women. Vaginal samples from 30 T. vaginalis-infected women were matched by Nugent score to those from 30 T. vaginalis-uninfected women. Equal numbers of women with Nugent scores categorized as normal, intermediate, and bacterial vaginosis were included. The vaginal microbiota was assessed using 454 pyrosequencing analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence of an unknown organism was obtained by universal bacterial polymerase chain reaction amplification, cloning, and sequencing. Principal coordinates analysis of the pyrosequencing data showed divergence of the vaginal microbiota in T. vaginalis-infected and T. vaginalis-uninfected patients among women with normal and those with intermediate Nugent scores but not among women with bacterial vaginosis. Cluster analysis revealed 2 unique groups of T. vaginalis-infected women. One had high abundance of Mycoplasma hominis and other had high abundance of an unknown Mycoplasma species. Women in the former group had clinical evidence of enhanced vaginal inflammation. T. vaginalis may alter the vaginal microbiota in a manner that is favorable to its survival and/or transmissibility. An unknown Mycoplasma species plays a role in some of these transformations. In other cases, these changes may result in a heightened host inflammatory response.

  16. The effect of treatment of vaginal infections on shedding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, C C; McClelland, R S; Reilly, M; Overbaugh, J; Emery, S R; Mandaliya, K; Chohan, B; Ndinya-Achola, J; Bwayo, J; Kreiss, J K

    2001-04-01

    To assess the effect of treatment of vaginal infections on vaginal shedding of cell-free human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-1-infected cells, HIV-1-seropositive women were examined before and after treatment of Candida vulvovaginitis, Trichomonas vaginitis, and bacterial vaginosis. For Candida (n=98), vaginal HIV-1 RNA decreased from 3.36 to 2.86 log(10) copies/swab (P<.001), as did the prevalence of HIV-1 DNA (36% to 17%; odds ratio [OR], 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-6.5). For Trichomonas vaginitis (n=55), HIV-1 RNA decreased from 3.67 to 3.05 log(10) copies/swab (P<.001), but the prevalence of HIV-1 DNA remained unchanged (22%-25%; OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.3-2.2). For bacterial vaginosis (n=73), neither the shedding of HIV-1 RNA (from 3.11 to 2.90 log(10) copies/swab; P=.14) nor the prevalence of DNA (from 21% to 23%; OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.3-2.0) changed. Vaginal HIV-1 decreased 3.2- and 4.2-fold after treating Candida and Trichomonas, respectively. These data suggest that HIV-1 transmission intervention strategies that incorporate diagnosis and treatment of these prevalent infections warrant evaluation.

  17. Vaginal microbiota and its role in HIV transmission and infection.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Mariya I; van den Broek, Marianne; Balzarini, Jan; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2013-09-01

    The urogenital tract appears to be the only niche of the human body that shows clear differences in microbiota between men and women. The female reproductive tract has special features in terms of immunological organization, an epithelial barrier, microbiota, and influence by sex hormones such as estrogen. While the upper genital tract is regarded as free of microorganisms, the vagina is colonized by bacteria dominated by Lactobacillus species, although their numbers vary considerably during life. Bacterial vaginosis is a common pathology characterized by dysbiosis, which increases the susceptibility for HIV infection and transmission. On the other hand, HIV infections are often characterized by a disturbed vaginal microbiota. The endogenous vaginal microbiota may protect against HIV by direct production of antiviral compounds, through blocking of adhesion and transmission by ligands such as lectins, and/or by stimulation of immune responses. The potential role of probiotics in the prevention of HIV infections and associated symptoms, by introducing them to the vaginal and gastrointestinal tract (GIT), is also discussed. Of note, the GIT is a site of considerable HIV replication and CD4(+) T-cell destruction, resulting in both local and systemic inflammation. Finally, genetically engineered lactobacilli show promise as new microbicidal agents against HIV. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antiviral and immunological effects of tenofovir microbicide in vaginal herpes simplex virus 2 infection.

    PubMed

    Vibholm, Line; Reinert, Line S; Søgaard, Ole S; Paludan, Søren R; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Melchjorsen, Jesper

    2012-11-01

    The anti-HIV microbicide, tenofovir (TFV) gel, has been shown to decrease HIV-1 acquisition by 39% and reduce herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) transmission by 51%. We evaluated the effect of a 1% TFV gel on genital HSV-2 infection in a mouse vaginal challenge model. In vitro plaque assays and luminex multiplex bead analysis were used, respectively, to measure postinfection vaginal viral shedding (day 1) and cytokine secretion (day 2). To further investigate the anti-HSV-2 properties, we evaluated the direct antiviral effect of TFV and the oral prodrug tenofovir disoproxil fumerate (TDF) in cell culture. Compared to placebo-treated mice, TFV-treated mice had significantly lower clinical scores, developed later genital lesions, and showed reduced vaginal viral shedding. Furthermore, the levels of IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, and other cytokines were altered in the vaginal fluid following topical tenofovir treatment and subsequent HSV-2 challenge. Finally, we found that both TFV and TDF inhibited HSV-2 infection in vitro; TDF showed a 50-fold greater potency than TFV. In conclusion, we confirmed that the microbicide TFV had direct anti-HSV-2 effects in a murine vaginal challenge model. Therefore, this model would be suitable for evaluating present and future microbicide candidates. Furthermore, the present study warrants further investigation of TDF in microbicides.

  19. Vaginal microbiota of spayed dogs with or without recurrent urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, R G; Vaden, S L; Jacob, M E; Harris, T L; Bowles, K D; Wood, M W; Bailey, C S

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding the vaginal microbiota of normal spayed dogs and spayed dogs with recurrent UTIs. Vaginal lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) have been associated with decreased frequency of recurrent urinary tract infection in women and may have a protective role within the urinary tract of female dogs. Spayed dogs with historical recurrent UTI will have decreased prevalence of LAB and increased prevalence of uropathogenic bacterial populations in the vaginal microbiota when compared with the vaginal microbiota of healthy, spayed dogs. Twenty-one client-owned adult spayed female dogs with historical recurrent UTI and 23 healthy, spayed female dogs without a history of recurrent UTI. Dogs were placed into a recurrent UTI group or control group in this prospective study. Bacterial populations were isolated and characterized from vaginal swabs obtained from each dog. The most common bacterial isolates obtained from the vaginal tract of all dogs were Escherichia coli (11/44) and S. pseudintermedius (13/44). E. coli was isolated from the vaginal tract of 8 of 21 (38%) dogs in the rUTI group and 3 of 23 (13%) dogs in the control group (P = .08). LAB were isolated from 7 of the 44 dogs. Two of these 7 dogs were in the rUTI group and 5 of the 7 dogs were in the control group. The vaginal microbiota of spayed female dogs with recurrent UTI was similar to the control population of normal, spayed female dogs. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  20. Effect of lyophilized lactobacilli and 0.03 mg estriol (Gynoflor®) on vaginitis and vaginosis with disrupted vaginal microflora: a multicenter, randomized, single-blind, active-controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Donders, G G G; Van Bulck, B; Van de Walle, P; Kaiser, R R; Pohlig, G; Gonser, S; Graf, F

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of lyophilized lactobacilli in combination with 0.03 mg estriol when compared to metronidazole in the treatment of bacterial vaginal infections. Multicenter, randomized, single-blind, active-controlled pilot study in 3 independent gynecological practices in Belgium. Forty-six, 18- to 50-year-old premenopausal women with a disrupted vaginal flora due to a bacterial vaginal infection (bacterial vaginosis, aerobic vaginitis) were included, provided that fresh phase-contrast microscopy of the vaginal fluid showed lactobacillary flora grade 2B or 3. Patients were given a blinded box with either 12 vaginal tablets of Gynoflor® (study medication) or 6 vaginal suppositories containing 500 mg metronidazole (control medication). Eight efficacy variables were studied to assess the status of the vaginal flora at entry, 3-7 days (control 1), 4-6 (control 2) weeks and 4 months after the end of therapy. At control 1, the combined variables equally improved in the lactobacilli group as in the metronidazole group. At control 2, the lactobacillus preparation showed slightly inferior results when compared to metronidazole. At 4 months, this analysis could not be performed due to low numbers, but analysis of recurrence rate and extra medication needed was not different between both groups. Lyophilized lactobacilli in combination with low-dose estriol are equivalent to metronidazole in the short-term treatment of bacterial vaginal infections, but have less effect after 1 month. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term efficacy of lactobacilli when applied repeatedly. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Ex vivo 2D and 3D HSV-2 infection model using human normal vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yaqi; Yang, Yan; Guo, Juanjuan; Dai, Ying; Ye, Lina; Qiu, Jianbin; Zeng, Zhihong; Wu, Xiaoting; Xing, Yanmei; Long, Xiang; Wu, Xufeng; Ye, Lin; Wang, Shubin; Li, Hui

    2017-02-28

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infects human genital mucosa and establishes life-long latent infection. It is unmet need to establish a human cell-based microphysiological system for virus biology and anti-viral drug discovery. One of barriers is lacking of culture system of normal epithelial cells in vitro over decades. In this study, we established human normal vaginal epithelial cell (HNVEC) culture using co-culture system. HNVEC cells were then propagated rapidly and stably in a defined culture condition. HNVEC cells exhibited a normal diploid karyotype and formed the well-defined and polarized spheres in matrigel three-dimension (3D) culture, while malignant cells (HeLa) formed disorganized and nonpolar solid spheres. HNVEC cells had a normal cellular response to DNA damage and had no transforming property using soft agar assays. HNVEC expressed epithelial marker cytokeratin 14 (CK14) and p63, but not cytokeratin 18 (CK18). Next, we reconstructed HNVEC-derived 3D vaginal epithelium using air-liquid interface (ALI) culture. This 3D vaginal epithelium has the basal and apical layers with expression of epithelial markers as its originated human vaginal tissue. Finally, we established an HSV-2 infection model based on the reconstructed 3D vaginal epithelium. After inoculation of HSV-2 (G strain) at apical layer of the reconstructed 3D vaginal epithelium, we observed obvious pathological effects gradually spreading from the apical layer to basal layer with expression of a viral protein. Thus, we established an ex vivo 2D and 3D HSV-2 infection model that can be used for HSV-2 virology and anti-viral drug discovery.

  2. Innovative non-surgical management of pelvic and anterior vaginal wall abscess following vaginal surgery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nisha; Negi, Neha; Kumar, Namrata

    2016-08-29

    Surgical site infections remain a common cause of morbidity following gynaecological surgery. The widespread implementation of antibiotic prophylaxis prior to surgery, as well as cognizance of modifiable risk factors for postoperative infection, has led to a significant reduction in postoperative infection rates. However, in low resource settings where sepsis and infections are common, surgical site infections following vaginal hysterectomy are sometimes encountered. It is a challenge to treat these infections with minimal intervention avoiding repeat surgery. We report here a unique situation following vaginal hysterectomy and then laparotomy; where a pelvic abscess communicated with the vesicovaginal space and drained through an opening into the anterior vaginal wall. An innovative technique was used to drain this anterior vaginal wall abscess connecting to pelvic cavity using a 40 cm long disposable urinary catheter (made of polyvinyl chloride), which was inserted into the vaginal opening under ultrasound guidance. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. [Management of vaginal infection following failure of a probabilistic treatment: is the vaginal swab really useful?].

    PubMed

    Bretelle, F; Chiarelli, P; Palmer, I; Glatt, N

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this observational national multi-centre study was to describe medical care of vaginal infections resisting a primary probabilistic treatment. Two hundred and seventy female patients were included during a 9-month period (from 2013, March 20th to 2013, December 7th) by 155 gynaecologists located throughout France. All patients were presenting a vulvo-vaginitis episode which started about three weeks ago and which was characterized by leucorrhea (93 % cases), itching (88 % cases) and/or vulvar and/or vaginal irritation (88 % cases). In most cases, this episode was previously treated by a short course of an azole antifungal medication. This treatment was initiated by the patient herself without any doctor's prescription in six out of 10 cases and had no influence on the evolution of the original clinical symptoms. Second line treatments included azole antifungal medications (56 % cases), local fixed combinations (antifungal agent and bactericidal antibiotic) (29 %), metronidazole (9 %), oral antibiotics (7.4 %). At the end of the treatment, 85 % patients recovered from vaginitis symptoms. The recovery rate was 82.6 % for patients who got a bacteriological examination and 87.6 % for patients who were treated without any bacteriological examination. The difference is not statistically significant. These results seem to show that a probabilistic medical care is as effective as (but probably more economical than) a therapeutic strategy guided by the results of further examinations in case of failure of a primary treatment. This conclusion should be confirmed by a medico-economic comparison after randomization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis and its association to vaginal candidiasis, trichomonas vaginitis and bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Jahic, Mahira; Mulavdic, Mirsada; Nurkic, Jasmina; Jahic, Elmir; Nurkic, Midhat

    2013-12-01

    Examine clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis and mixed infection for the purpose of better diagnostic accuracy and treatment efficiency. Prospective research has been conducted at Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department for Microbiology and Pathology at Polyclinic for laboratory diagnostic and Gynecology and Obstetrics Department at Health Center Sapna. Examination included 100 examinees with the signs of vaginitis. anamnesis, clinical, gynecological and microbiological examination of vaginal smear. The average age of the examinees was 32,62±2,6. Examining vaginal smears of the examinees with signs of vaginitis in 96% (N-96) different microorganisms have been isolated, while in 4% (N-4) findings were normal. AV has been found in 51% (N-51) of the examinees, Candida albicans in 17% (N-17), BV in 15% (N-15), Trichomonas vaginalis in 13% (N-13). In 21% (N-21) AV was diagnosed alone while associated with other agents in 30% (N-30). Most common causes of AV are E. coli (N-55) and E. faecalis (N-52). AV and Candida albicanis have been found in (13/30, 43%), Trichomonas vaginalis in (9/30, 30%) and BV (8/30, 26%). Vaginal secretion is in 70,05% (N-36) yellow coloured, red vagina wall is recorded in 31,13% (N-16) and pruritus in 72,54% (N-37). Increased pH value of vagina found in 94,10% (N-48). The average pH value of vaginal environment was 5,15±0,54 and in associated presence of AV and VVC, TV and BV was 5,29±0,56 which is higher value considering presence of AV alone but that is not statistically significant difference (p>0,05). Amino-odor test was positive in 29,94% (N-15) of associated infections. Lactobacilli are absent, while leukocytes are increased in 100% (N-51) of the examinees with AV. AV is vaginal infection similar to other vaginal infections. It is important to be careful while diagnosing because the treatment of AV differentiates from treatment of other vaginitis.

  5. Risk of Vaginal Infections at Early Gestation in Patients with Diabetic Conditions during Pregnancy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Marschalek, Julian; Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Göbl, Christian S; Trofaier, Marie-Louise; Kueronya, Verena; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are reported to be at increased risk for infections of the genital tract. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis (BV) and Candida colonization at early gestation between pregnant women with and without diabetic conditions during pregnancy. We included data from 8, 486 singleton pregnancies that underwent an antenatal infection screen-and-treat programme at our department. All women with GDM or pre-existing diabetes were retrospectively assigned to the diabetic group (DIAB), whereas non-diabetic women served as controls (CON). Prevalence for BV and Candida colonization was 9% and 14% in the DIAB group, and 9% and 13% in the CON group, respectively (n.s.). No significant difference regarding stillbirth and preterm delivery (PTD), defined as a delivery earlier than 37 + 0 (37 weeks plus 0 days) weeks of gestation was found. We could not find an increased risk of colonization with vaginal pathogens at early gestation in pregnant women with diabetes, compared to non-diabetic women. Large prospective studies are needed to evaluate the long-term risk of colonization with vaginal pathogens during the course of pregnancy in these women.

  6. Simple and inexpensive point-of-care tests improve diagnosis of vaginal infections in resource constrained settings.

    PubMed

    Madhivanan, Purnima; Krupp, Karl; Hardin, Jill; Karat, Chitra; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Reingold, Arthur L

    2009-06-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and Trichomonas vaginalis infection (TV) have been associated with adverse birth outcomes and increased risk for HIV. We compare the performance of simple inexpensive point-of-care (POC) tests to laboratory diagnosis and syndromic management of BV and TV in poor settings. Between November 2005 and March 2006, 898 sexually active women attending two reproductive health clinics in Mysore, India were recruited into a cohort study investigating the relationship between vaginal flora and HSV-2 infection. Participants were interviewed and screened for reproductive tract infections. Laboratory tests included serology for HSV-2; cultures for TV, Candida sp., and Neisseria gonorrhoeae; Gram stains; and two POC tests: vaginal pH; and Whiff test. Of the 898 participants, 411 [45.7%, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 42.4-49.0%] had any laboratory diagnosed vaginal infection. BV was detected in 165 women (19.1%, 95%CI: 16.5-21.9%) using Nugent score. TV was detected in 76 women (8.5%, 95%CI: 6.7-10.4%) using culture. Among the entire study population, POC correctly detected 82% of laboratory diagnosed BV cases, and 83% of laboratory diagnosed TV infections. Among women with complaints of vulval itching, burning, abnormal vaginal discharge, and/or sores (445/898), POC correctly detected 83% (60 of 72 cases) of laboratory diagnosed BV cases vs. 40% (29 of 72 cases) correctly managed using the syndromic approach (P < 0.001). Similarly, POC would have detected 82% (37 of 45 cases) of TV cases vs. 51% (23 of 45 cases) correctly managed using the syndromic approach (P = 0.001). In the absence of laboratory diagnostics, POC is not only inexpensive and practical, but also significantly more sensitive than the syndromic management approach, resulting in less overtreatment. .

  7. Cellular and Humoral Immunity Protect against Vaginal Zika Virus Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason M; Lebratti, Tania J; Richner, Justin M; Jiang, Xiaoping; Fernandez, Estefania; Zhao, Haiyan; Fremont, Daved H; Diamond, Michael S; Shin, Haina

    2018-01-17

    Zika virus (ZIKV), which can cause devastating disease in fetuses of infected pregnant women, can be transmitted by mosquito inoculation and sexual routes. Little is known about immune protection against sexually transmitted ZIKV. In this study, we show that previous infection through intravaginal or subcutaneous routes with a contemporary Brazilian strain of ZIKV can protect against subsequent intravaginal challenge with a homologous strain. Both routes of inoculation induced high titers of ZIKV-specific and neutralizing antibody in serum and the vaginal lumen. Virus-specific T cells were recruited to and retained in the female reproductive tract after intravaginal and subcutaneous ZIKV infection. Studies in mice with genetic or acquired deficiencies in B and/or T cells demonstrated that both lymphocyte populations redundantly protect against intravaginal challenge in ZIKV-immune animals. Passive transfer of ZIKV immune IgG or T cells significantly limited intravaginal infection of naïve mice, although antibody more effectively prevented dissemination throughout the reproductive tract. Collectively, our experiments begin to establish the immune correlates of protection against intravaginal ZIKV infection, which should inform vaccination strategies in non-pregnant and pregnant women. IMPORTANCE The recent ZIKV epidemic resulted in devastating outcomes in fetuses and may affect reproductive health. Unlike other flaviviruses, ZIKV can be spread by sexual contact as well as a mosquito vector. While previous studies have identified correlates of protection for mosquito-mediated infection, few have focused on immunity against sexual transmission. As exposure to ZIKV via mosquito bite has likely occurred to many living in endemic areas, our study addresses whether this route of infection can protect against subsequent sexual exposure. We demonstrate that subcutaneous ZIKV infection can protect against subsequent vaginal infection by generating both local antiviral T

  8. Vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, E G

    1985-06-01

    Vaginitis is one of the most common complaints of women in the United States today. About 90% of patients with this problem suffer from infection of the vagina caused by Candida, Gardnerella, or Trichomonas. The diagnosis and effective treatment of these common infections depend on accurate identification of the entity, effective specific therapy, and restoration of the normal ecosystem of the vagina. At the same time women should be made aware that not all discharge means infection and that any attempts at self-treatment may only worsen their condition. Proper hygiene habits, dietary control, and management of stress are all helpful factors in the control of recurrent vaginal infections.

  9. Beneficial effects of a Coriolus versicolor-based vaginal gel on cervical epithelization, vaginal microbiota and vaginal health: a pilot study in asymptomatic women.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Santiago; Losa, Fernando; Dexeus, Damián; Cortés, Javier

    2017-03-16

    To assess the effect of a 12-day treatment using a vaginal gel based on niosomes containing hyaluronic acid, ß-glucan, alpha-glucan oligosaccharide, Coriolus versicolor, Asian centella, Azadirachta indica and Aloe vera on vaginal microbiota, cervical epithelization and vaginal health. Open-label, prospective pilot study conducted in asymptomatic women in daily practice. Cervical epithelization was evaluated by colposcopy using an ectopy epithelization score (from 5: no ectopy to 1: severe ectopy and bleeding), vaginal microbiota using the VaginaStatus-Diagnostic test (Instiüt für Mikroökologie, Herborn, Germany) and further rated by the investigator using a 5-point Liker scale (from 5: normal to 1: very severe deterioration in which all evaluated species were altered), and vaginal health using the Vaginal Health Index. In 21 women, a positive effect to improve epithelization of the cervical mucosa, with a mean score of 4.42 at the final visit as compared to 3.09 at baseline (P < 0.0001) (43% improvement). In 10 women, there was a trend of improving of vaginal microbiota status, with a mean score of 4.0 at the final visit vs. 3.3 at baseline (P = NS) (21.2% improvement). In 11 women, the Vaginal Health Index increased from 19.0 at baseline to 22.3 at the final visit (P = 0.007). The concentration of Lactobacillus spp. increased 54.5% of women and pH decreased from 4.32 to 4.09. These encouraging preliminary results provide the basis for designing a randomized controlled study, and for potential use in human papilloma virus infection. ISRCTN77955077 . Registration date: February 15, 2017. Retrospectively registered.

  10. Influence of vaginal bacteria and D- and L-lactic acid isomers on vaginal extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer: implications for protection against upper genital tract infections.

    PubMed

    Witkin, Steven S; Mendes-Soares, Helena; Linhares, Iara M; Jayaram, Aswathi; Ledger, William J; Forney, Larry J

    2013-08-06

    We evaluated levels of vaginal extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-8) in vaginal secretions in relation to the composition of vaginal bacterial communities and D- and L-lactic acid levels. The composition of vaginal bacterial communities in 46 women was determined by pyrosequencing the V1 to V3 region of 16S rRNA genes. Lactobacilli were dominant in 71.3% of the women, followed by Gardnerella (17.4%), Streptococcus (8.7%), and Enterococcus (2.2%). Of the lactobacillus-dominated communities, 51.5% were dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus, 36.4% by Lactobacillus iners, and 6.1% each by Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus jensenii. Concentrations of L-lactic acid were slightly higher in lactobacillus-dominated vaginal samples, but most differences were not statistically significant. D-Lactic acid levels were higher in samples containing L. crispatus than in those with L. iners (P<0.0001) or Gardnerella (P=0.0002). The relative proportion of D-lactic acid in vaginal communities dominated by species of lactobacilli was in concordance with the proportions found in axenic cultures of the various species grown in vitro. Levels of L-lactic acid (P<0.0001) and the ratio of L-lactic acid to D-lactic acid (P=0.0060), but not concentrations of D-lactic acid, were also correlated with EMMPRIN concentrations. Moreover, vaginal concentrations of EMMPRIN and MMP-8 levels were highly correlated (P<0.0001). Taken together, the data suggest the relative proportion of L- to D-lactic acid isomers in the vagina may influence the extent of local EMMPRIN production and subsequent induction of MMP-8. The expression of these proteins may help determine the ability of bacteria to transverse the cervix and initiate upper genital tract infections. A large proportion of preterm births (>50%) result from infections caused by bacteria originating in the vagina, which requires that they traverse the cervix. Factors that influence

  11. [Study on the relationship between vaginal and intestinal candida in patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao-li; Li, Zhen; Zuo, Xu-lei

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the relationship between vaginal and intestinal candida in patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis by using microbiological and molecular methods. The samples of vaginal discharge and anal swabs were collected from 148 cases with vulvovaginal candidiasis, followed by fungal culture, identification, purification and genome DNA extraction. The genome sequences from respective locations were aligned and typed according to their homology analyzed by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) PCR and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR. Patients with vulvovaginal infection or those with infections in intestine and vulvovagina were pooled respectively, while the recurrent incidences after local anti-fungal treatments were analyzed. Candida albicans is the dominant pathogen in 148 cases with vulvovaginal candidiasis (91.9%, 136/148); 33.1% (49/148) of patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis were infected in both intestine and vulvovagina. While 92% (22/24) of patients with intestinal and vaginal candida infection showed high homology. The recurrent rate of patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis complicated with concurrent intestinal candida infection (7/14) was significantly higher than that of solo vaginal infected patients [21% (6/29)] after vaginal treatment (P<0.05). The infection of vulvovaginal candidiasis is highly associated with the concurrent infection of intestinal candida. The recurrent rate is high in patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis with concurrent infection of intestinal candida after vaginal treatment. The general management to those patients infected by both vulvovaginal and intestinal candida is necessary in reducing the recurrence of the disease.

  12. [Vaginal infections in pregnant women at the Regional Hospital of Sokode (Togo) in 2010 and 2011].

    PubMed

    Tchelougou, D; Karou, D S; Kpotsra, A; Balaka, A; Assih, M; Bamoke, M; Katawa, G; Anani, K; Simpore, J; de Souza, C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of the major microorganisms causing vaginal infections in pregnant women consulting at the Regional Hospital of Sokodé and to assess their sensitivity to antibiotics. This prospective study took place from June 2010 through August 2011 and included 302 pregnant women from whom a sample was taken by a vaginal swab. Samples were processed for parasitic, bacterial, and fungal agents, by microscopic examination and culture. We isolated 273 germs, alone or in association in 221 women. These germs were distributed as follows: Gardnerella vaginalis (55.31%), Candida spp (30.77%), Staphylococcus aureus (5.49%), Enterobacteriaceae (4.40%), Trichomonas vaginalis (3.66%) and Mobiluncus spp (0.37%). No Streptococcus strain was isolated during the study. Over 40% of women had bacterial vaginosis and 23.08% of them were coinfected. The occurrence of coinfection was statistically influenced by the stage of pregnancy (P = 0.05). The susceptibility tests revealed that S. aureus developed a strong resistance to aminopenicillins (66.67%) and cephalosporins (>44.44%), while Enterobacteriaceae was resistant to cephalosporins and quinolones. (16.67%). This study showed that pregnant women in Sokode are still exposed to vaginal infection, caused mostly by G. vaginalis and Candida species. These results underline the need for at least one vaginal swab culture for each woman during pregnancy.

  13. Effect of norfloxacin therapy for acute, uncomplicated lower urinary tract infection on vaginal Candida prevalence.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Rodrigo M; Zanni, Pâmela C M Delvas; de Souza Bonfim-Mendonça, Patrícia; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Alczuk, Silvia S Dantas; Svidzinski, Terezinha I Estivalet; Consolaro, Márcia E Lopes

    2016-05-01

    Acute uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections (UTI) and vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) both occur frequently in women. Although VVC is believed to commonly occur after antibiotic therapy, few studies have demonstrated this association. Thus, the aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of colonization by Candida spp. and VVC after norfloxacin (NOR) use for UTI and the effects on the vaginal microbiota and inflammatory process. This was a prospective cohort study of women with culture-proven UTI who were treated with NOR (antibiotic group). The control group consisted of women with noninfectious diseases or in preventive care. Candida vaginal infections were monitored both clinically and mycologically at baseline and at the follow-up evaluation. All women showed UTI remission after NOR treatment, and no woman in either group, antibiotic and control, showed symptoms of VVC. Both groups showed similar ratios of a positive Candida culture at baseline (6.7 % and 12.8 %, respectively) and at follow-up (3.3 % and 8.5 %, respectively) (p = 0.2768 and p = 0.5035, respectively). The antibiotic group showed no increased risk of Candida colonization or VVC after NOR treatment compared with the control group [odds ratio (OR) 0.556, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.2407-10.05]. NOR was effective for UTI treatment, did not increase the risk of vaginal colonization by Candida or VVC, and did not lead to major disturbances of the vaginal microbiota.

  14. Clinical Characteristics of Aerobic Vaginitis and Its Association to Vaginal Candidiasis, Trichomonas Vaginitis and Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Jahic, Mahira; Mulavdic, Mirsada; Nurkic, Jasmina; Jahic, Elmir; Nurkic, Midhat

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim of the work: Examine clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis and mixed infection for the purpose of better diagnostic accuracy and treatment efficiency. Materials and methods: Prospective research has been conducted at Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department for Microbiology and Pathology at Polyclinic for laboratory diagnostic and Gynecology and Obstetrics Department at Health Center Sapna. Examination included 100 examinees with the signs of vaginitis. Examination consisted of: anamnesis, clinical, gynecological and microbiological examination of vaginal smear. Results: The average age of the examinees was 32,62±2,6. Examining vaginal smears of the examinees with signs of vaginitis in 96% (N-96) different microorganisms have been isolated, while in 4% (N-4) findings were normal. AV has been found in 51% (N-51) of the examinees, Candida albicans in 17% (N-17), BV in 15% (N-15), Trichomonas vaginalis in 13% (N-13). In 21% (N-21) AV was diagnosed alone while associated with other agents in 30% (N-30). Most common causes of AV are E. coli (N-55) and E. faecalis (N-52). AV and Candida albicanis have been found in (13/30, 43%), Trichomonas vaginalis in (9/30, 30%) and BV (8/30, 26%). Vaginal secretion is in 70,05% (N-36) yellow coloured, red vagina wall is recorded in 31,13% (N-16) and pruritus in 72,54% (N-37). Increased pH value of vagina found in 94,10% (N-48). The average pH value of vaginal environment was 5,15±0,54 and in associated presence of AV and VVC, TV and BV was 5,29±0,56 which is higher value considering presence of AV alone but that is not statistically significant difference (p>0,05). Amino-odor test was positive in 29,94% (N-15) of associated infections. Lactobacilli are absent, while leukocytes are increased in 100% (N-51) of the examinees with AV. Conclusion: AV is vaginal infection similar to other vaginal infections. It is important to be careful while diagnosing because the treatment of AV differentiates from

  15. Vaginal preparation with antiseptic solution before cesarean section for preventing postoperative infections.

    PubMed

    Haas, David M; Morgan, Sarah; Contreras, Karenrose

    2014-09-09

    Cesarean delivery is one of the most common surgical procedures performed by obstetricians. Infectious morbidity after cesarean delivery can have a tremendous impact on the postpartum woman's return to normal function and her ability to care for her baby. Despite the widespread use of prophylactic antibiotics, postoperative infectious morbidity still complicates cesarean deliveries. To determine if cleansing the vagina with an antiseptic solution before a cesarean delivery decreases the risk of maternal infectious morbidities, including endometritis and wound complications. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (21 July 2014). We included randomized and quasi-randomized trials assessing the impact of vaginal cleansing immediately before cesarean delivery with any type of antiseptic solution versus a placebo solution/standard of care on post-cesarean infectious morbidity. We independently assessed eligibility and quality of the studies. Five trials randomizing 1946 women (1766 analyzed) evaluated the effects of vaginal cleansing (all with povidone-iodine) on post-cesarean infectious morbidity. The risk of bias was generally low, with the quality of most of the studies being high. Vaginal preparation immediately before cesarean delivery significantly reduced the incidence of post-cesarean endometritis from 7.2% in control groups to 3.6% in vaginal cleansing groups (average risk ratio (RR) 0.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16 to 0.97, five trials, 1766 women). The risk reduction was particularly strong for women with ruptured membranes (1.4% in the vaginal cleansing group versus 15.4% in the control group; RR 0.13, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.66, two trials, 148 women). No other outcomes realized statistically significant differences between the vaginal cleansing and control groups. No adverse effects were reported with the povidone-iodine vaginal cleansing.The quality of the evidence using GRADE was low for post-cesarean endometritis

  16. Vaginal Odor

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually don't cause vaginal odors. Neither do yeast infections. Generally, if you have vaginal odor without ... Avoid douching. All healthy vaginas contain bacteria and yeast. The normal acidity of your vagina keeps bacteria ...

  17. Clindamycin Vaginal

    MedlinePlus

    ... an infection caused by an overgrowth of harmful bacteria in the vagina). Clindamycin is in a class ... works by slowing or stopping the growth of bacteria. Vaginal clindamycin cannot be used to treat vaginal ...

  18. Treatment of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy with 10-μg estradiol vaginal tablets.

    PubMed

    Panay, Nick; Maamari, Ricardo

    2012-03-01

    Postmenopausal estrogen deficiency can lead to symptoms of urogenital atrophy. Individuals with urogenital atrophy have symptoms that include vaginal dryness, vaginal and vulval irritation, vaginal soreness, pain and burning during urination (dysuria), increased vaginal discharge, vaginal odour, vaginal infections, recurrent urinary tract infections, pain associated with sexual activity (dyspareunia) and vaginal bleeding associated with sexual activity. Despite the frequency and effects of vaginal atrophy symptoms, they are often under-reported and, consequently, under-treated. Therefore, care of a menopausal woman should include a physical assessment of vaginal atrophy and a dialogue between the physician and the patient that explores existing symptoms and their effect on vulvovaginal health, sexuality and quality-of-life issues. The development of the ultra-low-dose 10-µg estradiol vaginal tablets is in line with the requirements of regulatory agencies and women's health societies regarding the use of the lowest effective hormonal dose. Because of its effectiveness and safety profiles, in addition to its minimal systemic absorption, the 10-µg estradiol vaginal tablet can offer greater reassurance to health-care providers and postmenopausal women with an annual estradiol administration of only 1.14 mg.

  19. Vaginal preparation with antiseptic solution before cesarean section for preventing postoperative infections.

    PubMed

    Haas, David M; Morgan, Sarah; Contreras, Karenrose

    2014-12-21

    Cesarean delivery is one of the most common surgical procedures performed by obstetricians. Infectious morbidity after cesarean delivery can have a tremendous impact on the postpartum woman's return to normal function and her ability to care for her baby. Despite the widespread use of prophylactic antibiotics, postoperative infectious morbidity still complicates cesarean deliveries. To determine if cleansing the vagina with an antiseptic solution before a cesarean delivery decreases the risk of maternal infectious morbidities, including endometritis and wound complications. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (10 December 2014). We included randomized and quasi-randomized trials assessing the impact of vaginal cleansing immediately before cesarean delivery with any type of antiseptic solution versus a placebo solution/standard of care on post-cesarean infectious morbidity. We independently assessed eligibility and quality of the studies. Seven trials randomizing 2816 women (2635 analyzed) evaluated the effects of vaginal cleansing (all with povidone-iodine) on post-cesarean infectious morbidity. The risk of bias was generally low, with the quality of most of the studies being high. Vaginal preparation immediately before cesarean delivery significantly reduced the incidence of post-cesarean endometritis from 8.3% in control groups to 4.3% in vaginal cleansing groups (average risk ratio (RR) 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.25 to 0.81, seven trials, 2635 women). The risk reduction was particularly strong for women who were already in labor at the time of the cesarean delivery (7.4% in the vaginal cleansing group versus 13.0% in the control group; RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.95, three trials, 523 women) and for women with ruptured membranes (4.3% in the vaginal cleansing group versus 17.9% in the control group; RR 0.24, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.55, three trials, 272 women). No other outcomes realized statistically significant

  20. Vaginal Cancer—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Two-thirds of vaginal cancer cases are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Vaccines that protect against infection with HPV may reduce the risk of vaginal cancer. When found early, vaginal cancer can often be cured. Start here to find information on vaginal cancer treatment and research.

  1. Effects of Reproductive Hormones on Experimental Vaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Fidel, Paul L.; Cutright, Jessica; Steele, Chad

    2000-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is an opportunistic mucosal infection caused by Candida albicans that affects large numbers of otherwise healthy women of childbearing age. Acute episodes of VVC often occur during pregnancy and during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, when levels of progesterone and estrogen are elevated. Although estrogen-dependent experimental rodent models of C. albicans vaginal infection are used for many applications, the role of reproductive hormones and/or their limits in the acquisition of vaginal candidiasis remain unclear. This study examined the effects of estrogen and progesterone on several aspects of an experimental infection together with relative cell-mediated immune responses. Results showed that while decreasing estrogen concentrations eventually influenced infection-induced vaginal titers of C. albicans and rates of infection in inoculated animals, the experimental infection could not be achieved in mice treated with various concentrations of progesterone alone. Furthermore, progesterone had no effect on (i) the induction and persistence of the infection in the presence of estrogen, (ii) delayed-type hypersensitivity in primary-infected mice, or (iii) the partial protection from a secondary vaginal infection under pseudoestrus conditions. Other results with estrogen showed that a persistent infection could be established with a wide range of C. albicans inocula under supraphysiologic and near-physiologic (at estrus) concentrations of estrogen and that vaginal fungus titers or rates of infection were similar if pseudoestrus was initiated several days before or after inoculation. However, the pseudoestrus state had to be maintained for the infection to persist. Finally, estrogen was found to reduce the ability of vaginal epithelial cells to inhibit the growth of C. albicans. These results suggest that estrogen, but not progesterone, is an important factor in hormone-associated susceptibility to C. albicans vaginitis. PMID

  2. Combination of Estrogen and Immunosuppressive Agents to Establish a Mouse Model of Candidiasis with Concurrent Oral and Vaginal Mucosal Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Wang, Chong; Mei, Huan; Shen, Yongnian; Lv, Guixia; Zeng, Rong; Zhan, Ping; Li, Dongmei; Liu, Weida

    2016-02-01

    Mouse model is an appropriate tool for pathogenic determination and study of host defenses during the fungal infection. Here, we established a mouse model of candidiasis with concurrent oral and vaginal mucosal infection. Two C. albicans strains sourced from clinical candidemia (SC5314) and mucosal infection (ATCC62342) were tested in ICR mice. The different combinational panels covering estrogen and immunosuppressive agents, cortisone, prednisolone and cyclophosphamide were used for concurrent oral and vaginal candidiasis establishment. Prednisolone in combination with estrogen proved an optimal mode for concurrent mucosal infection establishment. The model maintained for 1 week with fungal burden reached at least 10(5) cfu/g of tissue. This mouse model was evaluated by in vivo pharmacodynamics of fluconazole and host mucosal immunity of IL-17 and IL-23. Mice infected by SC5314 were cured by fluconazole. An increase in IL-23 in both oral and vaginal homogenates was observed after infection, while IL-17 only had a prominent elevation in oral tissue. This model could properly mimic complicated clinical conditions and provides a valuable means for antifungal assay in vivo and may also provide a useful method for the evaluation of host-fungal interactions.

  3. The vaginal microbiota and susceptibility to HIV.

    PubMed

    Buve, Anne; Jespers, Vicky; Crucitti, Tania; Fichorova, Raina N

    2014-10-23

    There is some evidence that the risk of HIV infection per heterosexual act is higher in low-income countries than in high-income countries. We hypothesize that variations in per sex-act transmission probability of HIV may in part be attributed to differences in the composition and function of the vaginal microbiota between different populations. This paper presents data that are in support of this hypothesis. Experimental and clinical studies have provided evidence that the normal vaginal microbiota plays a protective role against acquisition of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Epidemiological studies have convincingly shown that disturbances of the vaginal microbiome, namely intermediate flora and bacterial vaginosis, increase the risk of acquisition of HIV infection. A review of the literature found large differences in prevalence of bacterial vaginosis between different populations, with the highest prevalence rates found in black populations. Possible explanations for these differences are presented including data suggesting that there are ethnic differences in the composition of the normal vaginal microbiota. Lastly, interventions are discussed to restore and maintain a healthy vaginal environment. 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  4. Chitosan Loaded into a Hydrogel Delivery System as a Strategy to Treat Vaginal Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Perinelli, Diego R.; Bonacucina, Giulia; Cespi, Marco; Mastrotto, Francesca; Baffone, Wally; Casettari, Luca

    2018-01-01

    Polymeric hydrogels are common dosage forms designed for the topical administration of antimicrobial drugs to treat vaginal infections. One of the major advantages of using chitosan in these formulations is related to the intrinsic and broad antimicrobial activity exerted on bacteria and fungi by this natural polymer. Most vaginal yeast infections are caused by the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. However, despite the anti-Candida activity towards and strains susceptibility to low molecular weight chitosan being documented, no information is available regarding the antimicrobial efficacy of mixed hydrogels in which chitosan is dispersed in a polymeric matrix. Therefore, the aim of the study is to evaluate the anti-Candida activity against eight different albicans and non-albicans strains of a mixed hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)/chitosan hydrogel. Importantly, chitosan was dispersed in HPMC matrix either assembled in nanoparticles or in a monomolecular state to eventually correlate any variation in terms of rheological and mucoadhesive properties, as well as anti-Candida activity, with the chitosan form. Hydrogels containing 1% w/w chitosan, either as free polymer chain or assembled in nanoparticles, showed an improved mucoadhesiveness and an anti-Candida effect against all tested albicans and non-albicans strains. Overall, the results demonstrate the feasibility of preparing HPMC/CS mixed hydrogels intended for the prevention and treatment of Candida infections after vaginal administration. PMID:29401648

  5. Vaginal Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Vaginal cancer is often squamous cell carcinoma. Other types of vaginal cancer are adenocarcinoma, melanoma, and sarcoma. Infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) causes most vaginal cancer. Find evidence-based information on vaginal cancer treatment and research.

  6. Vaginal Discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... also be on the lookout for symptoms of yeast infections, bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis, 3 infections that ... cause changes in your vaginal discharge. Signs of yeast infections White, cottage cheese-like discharge Swelling and ...

  7. Intrauterine inoculation of minipigs with Chlamydia trachomatis during diestrus establishes a longer lasting infection compared to vaginal inoculation during estrus.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Emma; Follmann, Frank; Secher, Jan O; Goericke-Pesch, Sandra; Hansen, Mette S; Zakariassen, Hannah; Olsen, Anja W; Andersen, Peter; Jungersen, Gregers; Agerholm, Jørgen S

    2017-06-01

    Advanced animal models, such as minipigs, are needed for the development of a globally requested human Chlamydia vaccine. Previous studies have shown that vaginal inoculation of sexually mature Göttingen minipigs with Chlamydia trachomatis resulted in an infection lasting only 3-5 days. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of targeting the upper porcine genital tract by transcervical and transabdominal intrauterine inoculation, compared to previously performed vaginal inoculation. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of the hormonal cycle, estrus vs. diestrus, on the establishment of a C. trachomatis infection in the minipig. Targeting the upper genital tract (transcervical inoculation) resulted in a longer lasting infection (at least 7 days) compared to vaginal inoculation (3-5 days). When comparing intrauterine inoculation during estrus and diestrus, inoculation during diestrus resulted in a longer lasting infection (at least 10 days) compared to estrus (3-5 days). Furthermore, we found a significant C. trachomatis specific IFN-γ response in pigs inoculated during estrus correlating with the accelerated clearance of infection in these pigs. These findings suggest that for implementation of an optimal model of C. trachomatis in minipigs, inoculation should bypass the cervix and preferable be performed during diestrus. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  8. Laboratory diagnosis of vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Metzger, G D

    1998-01-01

    Vaginal discomfort and/or odor are a common complaint in primary care visits by female patients. This is especially true among sexually active women of childbearing age. Because treatment varies depending upon which syndrome is present, effective treatment depends upon accurate diagnosis. The microscopic exams for diagnosing vaginal complaints are most frequently done in primary care sites. Because of this, few clinical laboratory scientists (CLSs) have the opportunity to become familiar with microscopy on this specimen type. In addition, literature on the subject is only gradually becoming available. This paper will attempt to briefly review the clinical and microscopic features of the common syndromes associated with vaginal discomfort.

  9. Vaginal Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... may feel more comfortable if you wear breathable cotton underwear and clothes and avoid vaginal sprays and ... help avoid them, follow your doctor's advice, wear cotton underwear, and try to wear loose-fitting clothes. ...

  10. [Cervugid ovules in cervico-vaginal infections and cervix uteri precancerous conditions treatment].

    PubMed

    Zanoschi, Ch; Anton, C; Anton, E; Costăchescu, Gh; Teleman, S; Costăchescu, G; Ciupilan, I; Cărăuleanu, M; Cărăuleanu, A; Leica, V; Pânzaru, C; Grigore, M; Merticaru, I; Huianu, O; Huianu, L; Chifan, M

    2004-01-01

    This medicine was authorized by the National Drug Agency (ANM, Bucureşti) in 2001. To evaluate the effectiveness and the tolerance to Cervugid-ovules, a preparation that combines the polyvalent local antiinflammatory action of chloramphenicol, metronidazole and nystatin with the effect of hydrocortisone acetate, an unspecific anti-inflammatory agent; they all are embedded in a Lipex-403, semisynthetic fat. The evaluation of 500 patients ages between 15 and 85 years with genital infections, registered in the files of "Cl. II Obst. and Gynecology" of the Cuza-Vodă Hospital from Iaşi has been studied. We studied the subjective manifestations (local discomfort and pelvic pains, local burning and dryness,vulvovaginal itching and dyspareunia) and objective manifestations (vaginal and cervical secretion, the cytotest performed and colored though the Papanicolaou method and reported in the Bethesda system). Healing of the subjective symptoms in 98%, healing of the leukorrhea--as a main objective symptom--in 95%; The Bethesda system cytotest was one of the inflammatory type in the most of the cases and there wew found in 85 cases: 6 ASCUS, 41 LSIL, and 37 HSIL. The use of Cervugid had a healing response in most of the cases when used in acute and chronic cervico-vaginal inflammatory processes. Cervugid may be considered as an important agent in the treatment of the precancerous affections af the cervix uteri on the following reasons: zhe cure of the infections caused by chlamydia, involved in the etiology of cervical neoplasms, the cure of the HPV infection under episome form, classified in the Bethesda system within the ASCUS, AGUS or LSIL classes. When the cytotest was in the HSIL class, a conization in the LLETZ method was performed. Cervugid is conceived for those three main categories of pathogenic factors related to the etiology of cervico-vaginitis: microbia germs, protozoa and mycosis. In addition, it is active on chlamydia and mycoplasms, always sensitive to

  11. Influence of the tryptophan-indole-IFNγ axis on human genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection: role of vaginal co-infections.

    PubMed

    Aiyar, Ashok; Quayle, Alison J; Buckner, Lyndsey R; Sherchand, Shardulendra P; Chang, Theresa L; Zea, Arnold H; Martin, David H; Belland, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    The natural history of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections can vary widely; infections can spontaneously resolve but can also last from months to years, potentially progressing to cause significant pathology. The host and bacterial factors underlying this wide variation are not completely understood, but emphasize the bacterium's capacity to evade/adapt to the genital immune response, and/or exploit local environmental conditions to survive this immune response. IFNγ is considered to be a primary host protective cytokine against endocervical C. trachomatis infections. IFNγ acts by inducing the host enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxgenase, which catabolizes tryptophan, thereby depriving the bacterium of this essential amino acid. In vitro studies have revealed that tryptophan deprivation causes Chlamydia to enter a viable but non-infectious growth pattern that is termed a persistent growth form, characterized by a unique morphology and gene expression pattern. Provision of tryptophan can reactivate the bacterium to the normal developmental cycle. There is a significant difference in the capacity of ocular and genital C. trachomatis serovars to counter tryptophan deprivation. The latter uniquely encode a functional tryptophan synthase to synthesize tryptophan via indole salvage, should indole be available in the infection microenvironment. In vitro studies have confirmed the capacity of indole to mitigate the effects of IFNγ; it has been suggested that a perturbed vaginal microbiome may provide a source of indole in vivo. Consistent with this hypothesis, the microbiome associated with bacterial vaginosis includes species that encode a tryptophanase to produce indole. In this review, we discuss the natural history of genital chlamydial infections, morphological and molecular changes imposed by IFNγ on Chlamydia, and finally, the microenvironmental conditions associated with vaginal co-infections that can ameliorate the effects of IFNγ on C. trachomatis.

  12. A MIV-150/zinc acetate gel inhibits SHIV-RT infection in macaque vaginal explants.

    PubMed

    Barnable, Patrick; Calenda, Giulia; Ouattara, Louise; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Jean-Pierre, Ninochka; Kizima, Larisa; Rodríguez, Aixa; Abraham, Ciby; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Cooney, Michael L; Roberts, Kevin D; Sperling, Rhoda; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Fernandez-Romero, Jose A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Robbiani, Melissa; Teleshova, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    To extend our observations that single or repeated application of a gel containing the NNRTI MIV-150 (M) and zinc acetate dihydrate (ZA) in carrageenan (CG) (MZC) inhibits vaginal transmission of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-RT in macaques, we evaluated safety and anti-SHIV-RT activity of MZC and related gel formulations ex vivo in macaque mucosal explants. In addition, safety was further evaluated in human ectocervical explants. The gels did not induce mucosal toxicity. A single ex vivo exposure to diluted MZC (1∶30, 1∶100) and MC (1∶30, the only dilution tested), but not to ZC gel, up to 4 days prior to viral challenge, significantly inhibited SHIV-RT infection in macaque vaginal mucosa. MZC's activity was not affected by seminal plasma. The antiviral activity of unformulated MIV-150 was not enhanced in the presence of ZA, suggesting that the antiviral activity of MZC was mediated predominantly by MIV-150. In vivo administration of MZC and CG significantly inhibited ex vivo SHIV-RT infection (51-62% inhibition relative to baselines) of vaginal (but not cervical) mucosa collected 24 h post last gel exposure, indicating barrier effect of CG. Although the inhibitory effect of MZC (65-74%) did not significantly differ from CG (32-45%), it was within the range of protection (∼75%) against vaginal SHIV-RT challenge 24 h after gel dosing. Overall, the data suggest that evaluation of candidate microbicides in macaque explants can inform macaque efficacy and clinical studies design. The data support advancing MZC gel for clinical evaluation.

  13. Study results on the use of different therapies for the treatment of vaginitis in hospitalised pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Novakov Mikić, Aleksandra; Stojic, Sinisa

    2015-08-01

    During pregnancy, many women experience vaginal infections due to a weakened immune system and changes in hormonal status. Treating these infections is of crucial importance, because women are at high risk for serious complications such as preterm birth and late miscarriage. For this reason, the present study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of octenidine dihydrochloride/phenoxyethanol (OHP) in comparison to antimicrobial therapies in pregnant women in hospital suffering from different types of vaginitis. A total of 1,000 patients were divided into 4 different groups according to their type of vaginal infection after smear analyses. Each group was again divided into two subgroups receiving treatment with OHP or antimicrobial therapies with neomycin/polymyxin B/nystatin, metronidazole or miconazole vaginal tablets. The most frequent causes of vaginitis were unspecific bacterial infections (42.4 %) and vaginal candidiasis (44.8 %). The average time needed to obtain negative results from smear analyses was significantly shorter when treated with OHP, both in patients with bacterial vaginosis (BV) or vaginal candidiasis (VC) compared to antimicrobial therapy (1.7 ± 0.8 vs. 2.3 ± 1.1 days; 2.3 ± 1.4 vs. 3.4 ± 1.6 days; both p < 0.001). Equally, the maximum number of days until negative results were detected was significantly lower with OHP compared to antimicrobial therapy (BV: 3 vs. 5 days; VC: 5 vs. 7 days). OHP has a great effect in the treatment of vaginitis during pregnancy and thus should be an integral part of standard therapy regimens.

  14. Protection of rhesus macaques from vaginal infection by vaginally delivered Maraviroc, an inhibitor of HIV-1 entry via the CCR5 co-receptor

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Ronald S.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Dufour, Jason; Moroney-Rasmussen, Terri; Green, Linda C.; Klasse, P.J.; Moore, John P.

    2010-01-01

    An effective vaginal microbicide could reduce human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission to women. Among microbicide candidates in clinical development is Maraviroc (MVC), a small molecule drug that binds the CCR5 co-receptor and impedes HIV-1 entry into cells. Delivered systemically, MVC reduces viral load in HIV-1-infected people, but its ability to prevent transmission is untested. We have now evaluated MVC as a vaginal microbicide, using a stringent model involving challenge of rhesus macaques with a high-dose of a CCR5-using virus, SHIV-162P3. Gel-formulated, prescription-grade MVC provided dose-dependent protection, half-maximally at 0.5 mM (0.25 mg/ml). The duration of protection was transient; the longer the delay between MVC application and virus challenge, the less protection (T1/2 ~ 4 h). As expected, MVC neither protected against challenge with a CXCR4-using virus, SHIV-KU1, nor exacerbated post-infection viremia. These findings validate MVC development as a vaginal microbicide for women, and should guide clinical programs. PMID:20629537

  15. The Comparison of vaginal cream of mixing yogurt, honey and clotrimazole on symptoms of vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Darvishi, Maryam; Jahdi, Fereshteh; Hamzegardeshi, Zeinab; Goodarzi, Saied; Vahedi, Mohsen

    2015-04-03

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is known as one of the most common fungal infection among women of reproductive age and considered as an important public health problem. In recent years, due to resistance to common antifungal medication, the use of traditional medicine of anti-fungal and herbal treatment increased. Therefore the objective of this study was to determine the effects of vaginal cream, mixture of yogurt and honey and comparing it with clotrimazole vaginal cream on symptoms of Vulvovaginal candidiasis in patients. In this randomized, triple blind clinical trial of 70 non-pregnant women infected with Candidal vulvovaginitis were placed in two groups of Vaginal cream mixed of yogurt and honey recipients (N=35) and clotrimazole vaginal cream (N=35). Both groups were treated for 7 days. At the beginning of study, Clinical and laboratory signs and symptoms were registered 7 and 14 days after treatment by questionnaire, observation form and secretions culture results. Data by chi-square test, t test, McNemar tests were analyzed by SPSS version 21. Significance level of 0.05 was considered. The result of present study reveals the significant differences in symptom improvement of ' yogurt and honey, than clotrimazole group (P<0.05) and also Positive results of the first cultures (one week after treatment) in "yogurt and honey" and clotrimazole (20% versus 8.6%) and second time cultivation (14 days after treatment) (17/1% versus 8.6%) were similar and there was no significant differences between the two groups. (P>0.05) CONCLUSION: This study indicated that he therapeutic effects of vaginal cream, yogurt and honey is not only similar with clotrimazole vaginal cream but more effective in relieving some symptoms of vaginal candidiasis. Therefore, the use of this product can be suggested as an herbal remedy for candida infection treatment.

  16. The Comparison of Vaginal Cream of Mixing Yogurt, Honey and Clotrimazole on Symptoms of Vaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Darvishi, Maryam; Jahdi, Fereshteh; Hamzegardeshi, Zeinab; Goodarzi, Saied; Vahedi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vulvovaginal candidiasis is known as one of the most common fungal infection among women of reproductive age and considered as an important public health problem. In recent years, due to resistance to common antifungal medication, the use of traditional medicine of anti-fungal and herbal treatmentis increased. Therefore the objective of this study was to determine the effects of vaginal cream, mixture of yogurt and honey and comparing it with clotrimazole vaginal cream on symptoms of Vulvovaginal candidiasis in patients. Methods: In this randomized, triple blind clinical trial of 70 non-pregnant women infected with Candidalvulvovaginitis were placed in two groups of Vaginal cream mixed of yogurt and honey recipients (N = 35) and clotrimazole vaginal cream (N = 35). Both groups were treated for 7 days.At the beginning of study, Clinical and laboratory signs and symptoms were registered 7 and 14 days after treatment by questionnaire, observation formand secretions medium culture results. Data were analyzed by chi-square test, t test, McNemar tests through SPSS version 21. Significance level of 0.05 was considered. Results: The result of present study reveals the significant differences in symptom improvement of yogurt and honey, toward clotrimazole group (P < 0.05) and also Positive results of the first cultures (one week after treatment) in “yogurt and honey” and clotrimazole (20% versus 8.6%) and second time cultivation (14 days after treatment) (17.1% versus 8.6%) were similar and there was no significant differences between the two groups. (P > 0.05). Conclusion: This study indicated that the therapeutic effects of vaginal cream, yogurt and honey is not only similar with clotrimazole vaginal cream but is more effective in relieving some symptoms of vaginal candidiasis. Therefore, the use of this product can be suggested as an herbal remedy for candida infection treatment. PMID:26153168

  17. Local Production of Chemokines during Experimental Vaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Michael; Taylor, Brad; Lukacs, Nicholas; Fidel, Paul L.

    1999-01-01

    Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis, caused by Candida albicans, is a significant problem in women of childbearing age. Although cell-mediated immunity (CMI) due to T cells and cytokines is the predominant host defense mechanism against C. albicans at mucosal tissue sites, host defense mechanisms against C. albicans at the vaginal mucosa are poorly understood. Based on an estrogen-dependent murine model of vaginal candidiasis, our data suggest that systemic CMI is ineffective against C. albicans vaginal infections. Thus, we have postulated that local immune mechanisms are critical for protection against infection. In the present study, the kinetic production of chemokines normally associated with the chemotaxis of T cells, macrophages (RANTES, MIP-1α, MCP-1), and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (MIP-2) was examined following intravaginal inoculation of C. albicans in estrogen-treated or untreated mice. Results showed significant increases in MCP-1 protein and mRNA in vaginal tissue of infected mice as early as 2 and 4 days postinoculation, respectively, that continued through a 21-day observation period, irrespective of estrogen status. No significant changes were observed with RANTES, MIP-1α, or MIP-2, although relatively high constitutive levels of RANTES mRNA and MIP-2 protein were observed. Furthermore, intravaginal immunoneutralization of MCP-1 with anti-MCP-1 antibodies resulted in a significant increase in vaginal fungal burden early during infection, suggesting that MCP-1 plays some role in reducing the fungal burden during vaginal infection. However, the lack of changes in leukocyte profiles in vaginal lavage fluids collected from infected versus uninfected mice suggests that MCP-1 functions to control vaginal C. albicans titers in a manner independent of cellular chemotactic activity. PMID:10531235

  18. Local IL-23 expression in murine vaginal candidiasis and its relationship with infection and immune status.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Tan, Zhijian; Liu, Zhixiang; Xia, Dechao; Li, Jiawen

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the expression of vaginal IL-23 and its role in experimental murine vaginal candidiasis and its relationship with infection and immune status, immuno-competent (group A) and immuno-suppressed (group B) murine models of vaginal candidiasis were established in estrogen-treated mice. Non-estrogen-treated mice were used as controls (group C). The level of IL-23 p19 mRNA in murine vaginal tissue was determined by RT-PCR. Significantly increased levels of IL-23p19mRNA were observed on the 4th, the 7th and 14th day after inoculation in immuno-competent group when compared with that in control group (P<0.01, P<0.05). However, significant increase of IL-23 p19mRNA were only observed on the 7th day and the 14th day after inoculatuon in immuno-suppressed groups (P<0.05). On the 4th and 7th day, the levels of IL-23 p19mRNA were significantly increased in immuno-competent group than those in immuno-suppressed group (P <0.05). Local IL-23 may play a role in the pathogenesis of murine vaginal candidiasis and has a protective function during infection. Low vaginal IL-23 level may correlate with the increased susceptibility to Candida albicans in immuno-suppressed group.

  19. Bacterial vaginosis and vaginal yeast, but not vaginal cleansing, increase HIV-1 acquisition in African women.

    PubMed

    van de Wijgert, Janneke H H M; Morrison, Charles S; Cornelisse, Peter G A; Munjoma, Marshall; Moncada, Jeanne; Awio, Peter; Wang, Jing; Van der Pol, Barbara; Chipato, Tsungai; Salata, Robert A; Padian, Nancy S

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate interrelationships between bacterial vaginosis (BV), vaginal yeast, vaginal practices (cleansing and drying/tightening), mucosal inflammation, and HIV acquisition. A multicenter, prospective, observational cohort study was conducted, enrolling 4531 HIV-negative women aged 18 to 35 years attending family planning clinics in Zimbabwe and Uganda. Participants were tested for HIV and reproductive tract infections and were interviewed about vaginal practices every 3 months for 15 to 24 months. BV was measured by Gram stain Nugent scoring, vaginal yeast by wet mount, and mucosal inflammation by white blood cells on Gram stain. HIV incidence was 4.12 and 1.53 per 100 woman-years of follow-up in Zimbabwe and Uganda, respectively (a total of 213 incident infections). Women with BV or vaginal yeast were more likely to acquire HIV, especially if the condition was present at the same visit as the new HIV infection and the visit preceding it (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.68 to 3.72 and HR = 2.97, 95% CI: 1.67 to 5.28 for BV and yeast, respectively). These relationships did not seem to be mediated by mucosal inflammation. Vaginal drying/tightening was associated with HIV acquisition in univariate (HR = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.03 to 2.15) but not multivariate models. Vaginal cleansing was not associated with HIV acquisition. BV and yeast may contribute more to the HIV epidemic than previously thought.

  20. Cell Adhesion Molecule and Lymphocyte Activation Marker Expression during Experimental Vaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Wormley, Floyd L.; Chaiban, Joseph; Fidel, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity by Th1-type CD4+ T cells is the predominant host defense mechanism against mucosal candidiasis. However, studies using an estrogen-dependent murine model of vaginal candidiasis have demonstrated little to no change in resident vaginal T cells during infection and no systemic T-cell infiltration despite the presence of Candida-specific systemic Th1-type responses in infected mice. The present study was designed to further investigate these observations by characterizing T-cell activation and cell adhesion molecule expression during primary and secondary C. albicans vaginal infections. While flow cytometry analysis of activation markers showed some evidence for activation of CD3+ draining lymph node and/or vaginal lymphocytes during both primary and secondary vaginal Candida infection, CD3+ cells expressing the homing receptors and integrins α4β7, αM290β7, and α4β1 in draining lymph nodes of mice with primary and secondary infections were reduced compared to results for uninfected mice. At the local level, few vaginal lymphocytes expressed integrins, with only minor changes observed during both primary and secondary infections. On the other hand, immunohistochemical analysis of vaginal cell adhesion molecule expression showed increases in mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression during both primary and secondary infections. Altogether, these data suggest that although the vaginal tissue is permissive to cellular infiltration during a vaginal Candida infection, the reduced numbers of systemic cells expressing the reciprocal cellular adhesion molecules may preempt cellular infiltration, thereby limiting Candida-specific T-cell responses against infection. PMID:11447188

  1. An Emerging Mycoplasma Associated with Trichomoniasis, Vaginal Infection and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Huang, Bernice; Brooks, J. Paul; Glascock, Abigail L.; Sheth, Nihar U.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Jefferson, Kimberly K.; Buck, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are colonized by thousands of bacterial species, but it is difficult to assess the metabolic and pathogenic potential of the majority of these because they have yet to be cultured. Here, we characterize an uncultivated vaginal mycoplasma tightly associated with trichomoniasis that was previously known by its 16S rRNA sequence as “Mnola.” In this study, the mycoplasma was found almost exclusively in women infected with the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, but rarely observed in women with no diagnosed disease. The genomes of four strains of this species were reconstructed using metagenome sequencing and assembly of DNA from four discrete mid-vaginal samples, one of which was obtained from a pregnant woman with trichomoniasis who delivered prematurely. These bacteria harbor several putative virulence factors and display unique metabolic strategies. Genes encoding proteins with high similarity to potential virulence factors include two collagenases, a hemolysin, an O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase and a feoB-type ferrous iron transport system. We propose the name “Candidatus Mycoplasma girerdii” for this potential new pathogen. PMID:25337710

  2. An emerging mycoplasma associated with trichomoniasis, vaginal infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Fettweis, Jennifer M; Serrano, Myrna G; Huang, Bernice; Brooks, J Paul; Glascock, Abigail L; Sheth, Nihar U; Strauss, Jerome F; Jefferson, Kimberly K; Buck, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Humans are colonized by thousands of bacterial species, but it is difficult to assess the metabolic and pathogenic potential of the majority of these because they have yet to be cultured. Here, we characterize an uncultivated vaginal mycoplasma tightly associated with trichomoniasis that was previously known by its 16S rRNA sequence as "Mnola." In this study, the mycoplasma was found almost exclusively in women infected with the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, but rarely observed in women with no diagnosed disease. The genomes of four strains of this species were reconstructed using metagenome sequencing and assembly of DNA from four discrete mid-vaginal samples, one of which was obtained from a pregnant woman with trichomoniasis who delivered prematurely. These bacteria harbor several putative virulence factors and display unique metabolic strategies. Genes encoding proteins with high similarity to potential virulence factors include two collagenases, a hemolysin, an O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase and a feoB-type ferrous iron transport system. We propose the name "Candidatus Mycoplasma girerdii" for this potential new pathogen.

  3. Inhibition of infection and transmission of HIV-1 and lack of significant impact on the vaginal commensal lactobacilli by carbohydrate-binding agents.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Mariya I; Mathys, Leen; Lebeer, Sarah; Noppen, Sam; Van Damme, Els J M; Tanaka, Haruo; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Vanderleyden, Jos; Balzarini, Jan

    2013-09-01

    A selection of carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) with different glycan specificities were evaluated for their inhibitory effect against HIV infection and transmission, and their interaction with vaginal commensal bacteria. Several assays were used for the antiviral evaluation: (i) cell-free virus infection of human CD4+ T lymphocyte C8166 cells; (ii) syncytium formation in co-cultures of persistently HIV-1-infected HUT-78/HIV-1 and non-infected CD4+ SupT1 cells; (iii) DC-SIGN-directed capture of HIV-1 particles; and (iv) transmission of DC-SIGN-captured HIV-1 particles to uninfected CD4+ C8166 cells. CBAs were also examined for their interaction with vaginal commensal lactobacilli using several viability, proliferation and adhesion assays. The CBAs showed efficient inhibitory activity in the nanomolar to low-micromolar range against four events that play a crucial role in HIV-1 infection and transmission: cell-free virus infection, fusion between HIV-1-infected and non-infected cells, HIV-1 capture by DC-SIGN and transmission of DC-SIGN-captured virus to T cells. As candidate microbicides should not interfere with the normal human microbiota, we examined the effect of CBAs against Lactobacillus strains, including a variety of vaginal strains, a gastrointestinal strain and several non-human isolates. None of the CBAs included in our studies inhibited the growth of these bacteria in several media, affected their viability or had any significant impact on their adhesion to HeLa cell monolayers. The CBAs in this study were inhibitory to HIV-1 in several in vitro infection and transmission models, and may therefore qualify as potential microbicide candidates. The lack of significant impact on commensal vaginal lactobacilli is an important property of these CBAs in view of their potential microbicidal use.

  4. HSV-2-Driven Increase in the Expression of α4β7 Correlates with Increased Susceptibility to Vaginal SHIVSF162P3 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Villegas, Guillermo; Calenda, Giulia; Guerra-Perez, Natalia; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Blanchard, James; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The availability of highly susceptible HIV target cells that can rapidly reach the mucosal lymphoid tissues may increase the chances of an otherwise rare transmission event to occur. Expression of α4β7 is required for trafficking of immune cells to gut inductive sites where HIV can expand and it is expressed at high level on cells particularly susceptible to HIV infection. We hypothesized that HSV-2 modulates the expression of α4β7 and other homing receptors in the vaginal tissue and that this correlates with the increased risk of HIV acquisition in HSV-2 positive individuals. To test this hypothesis we used an in vivo rhesus macaque (RM) model of HSV-2 vaginal infection and a new ex vivo model of macaque vaginal explants. In vivo we found that HSV-2 latently infected RMs appeared to be more susceptible to vaginal SHIVSF162P3 infection, had higher frequency of α4β7 high CD4+ T cells in the vaginal tissue and higher expression of α4β7 and CD11c on vaginal DCs. Similarly, ex vivo HSV-2 infection increased the susceptibility of the vaginal tissue to SHIVSF162P3. HSV-2 infection increased the frequencies of α4β7 high CD4+ T cells and this directly correlated with HSV-2 replication. A higher amount of inflammatory cytokines in vaginal fluids of the HSV-2 infected animals was similar to those found in the supernatants of the infected explants. Remarkably, the HSV-2-driven increase in the frequency of α4β7 high CD4+ T cells directly correlated with SHIV replication in the HSV-2 infected tissues. Our results suggest that the HSV-2-driven increase in availability of CD4+ T cells and DCs that express high levels of α4β7 is associated with the increase in susceptibility to SHIV due to HSV-2. This may persists in absence of HSV-2 shedding. Hence, higher availability of α4β7 positive HIV target cells in the vaginal tissue may constitute a risk factor for HIV transmission. PMID:25521298

  5. Randomized Trial of Periodic Presumptive Treatment With High-Dose Intravaginal Metronidazole and Miconazole to Prevent Vaginal Infections in HIV-negative Women

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, R. Scott; Balkus, Jennifer E.; Lee, Jeannette; Anzala, Omu; Kimani, Joshua; Schwebke, Jane; Bragg, Vivian; Lensing, Shelly; Kavak, Lale

    2015-01-01

    Background. Vaginal infections are common, frequently recur, and may increase women's risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We tested the efficacy of a novel regimen to prevent recurrent vaginal infections. Methods. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–negative women 18–45 years old with 1 or more vaginal infections, including bacterial vaginosis (BV), vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), or Trichomonas vaginalis (TV), were randomly assigned to receive vaginal suppositories containing metronidazole 750 mg plus miconazole 200 mg or matching placebo for 5 consecutive nights each month for 12 months. Primary endpoints, evaluated every 2 months, were BV (Gram stain) and VVC (positive wet mount and culture). Results. Participants (N = 234) were randomly assigned to the intervention (N = 118) or placebo (N = 116) arm. Two hundred seventeen (93%) women completed an end-of-study evaluation. The intervention reduced the proportion of visits with BV compared to placebo (21.2% vs 32.5%; relative risk [RR] 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] .48–.87). In contrast, the proportion of visits with VVC was similar in the intervention (10.4%) versus placebo (11.3%) arms (RR 0.92, 95% CI .62–1.37). Conclusions. Monthly treatment with intravaginal metronidazole plus miconazole reduced the proportion of visits with BV during 12 months of follow-up. Further study will be important to determine whether this intervention can reduce women's risk of STIs. PMID:25526757

  6. Vaginitis: current microbiologic and clinical concepts.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, L V; Embil, J A

    1986-01-01

    Infectious vaginitis occurs when the normal vaginal flora is disrupted; it may arise when saprophytes overwhelm the host immune response, when pathogenic organisms are introduced into the vagina or when changes in substrate allow an imbalance of microorganisms to develop. Examples of these types of vaginitis include the presence of chronic fungal infection in women with an inadequate cellular immune response to the yeast, the introduction of trichomonads into vaginal epithelium that has a sufficient supply of glycogen, and the alteration in bacterial flora, normally dominated by Lactobacillus spp., and its metabolites that is characteristic of "nonspecific vaginitis". The authors review microbiologic and clinical aspects of the fungal, protozoal and bacterial infections, including the interactions of bacteria thought to produce nonspecific vaginitis, that are now recognized as causing vaginitis. Other causes of vaginitis are also discussed. PMID:3510698

  7. Vaginitis: current microbiologic and clinical concepts.

    PubMed

    Hill, L V; Embil, J A

    1986-02-15

    Infectious vaginitis occurs when the normal vaginal flora is disrupted; it may arise when saprophytes overwhelm the host immune response, when pathogenic organisms are introduced into the vagina or when changes in substrate allow an imbalance of microorganisms to develop. Examples of these types of vaginitis include the presence of chronic fungal infection in women with an inadequate cellular immune response to the yeast, the introduction of trichomonads into vaginal epithelium that has a sufficient supply of glycogen, and the alteration in bacterial flora, normally dominated by Lactobacillus spp., and its metabolites that is characteristic of "nonspecific vaginitis". The authors review microbiologic and clinical aspects of the fungal, protozoal and bacterial infections, including the interactions of bacteria thought to produce nonspecific vaginitis, that are now recognized as causing vaginitis. Other causes of vaginitis are also discussed.

  8. Predictive value of vaginal IL-6 and TNFα bedside tests repeated until delivery for the prediction of maternal-fetal infection in cases of premature rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Kayem, Gilles; Batteux, Frederic; Girard, Noémie; Schmitz, Thomas; Willaime, Marion; Maillard, Francoise; Jarreau, Pierre Henri; Goffinet, Francois

    2017-04-01

    Examine the predictive value for maternal-fetal infection of routine bedside tests detecting the proinflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-6, in the vaginal secretions of women with premature rupture of the membranes (PROM). This prospective two-center cohort study included all women hospitalized for PROM over a 2-year period. A bedside test assessed IL-6 and TNFα in vaginal secretions. Both centers routinely tested CRP and leukocytes, assaying both in maternal serum, and analyzed vaginal bacterial flora; all samples were repeated twice weekly until delivery. The study included 689 women. In cases of preterm PROM (PPROM) before 37 weeks (n=184), a vaginal sample positive for one or more bacteria was the only marker associated with early neonatal infection (OR 5.6, 95%CI; 2.0-15.7). Its sensitivity was 82% (95%CI; 62-94) and its specificity 56% (95%CI; 47-65). All positive markers of infection were associated with the occurrence of chorioamnionitis. In cases of PROM from 37 weeks onward (n=505), only CRP >5mg/dL was associated with early neonatal infection (OR=8.3, 95%CI; 1.1-65.4) or clinical chorioamnionitis (OR=6.8, 95%CI; 1.5-30.0). The sensitivity of CRP >5mg/dL was 91% (95%CI; 59-100) and its specificity 45% (95%CI; 40-51) for predicting early neonatal infection, and 89% (95%CI; 65-99) and 46% (95%CI; 41-51), respectively, for predicting clinical chorioamnionitis. The association of vaginal cytokines with maternal-fetal infection is weak and thus prevents their use as a good predictor of maternal-fetal infection. CRP and vaginal samples may be useful for identifying a group of women at low risk of infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Streptococcus agalactiae: a vaginal pathogen?

    PubMed

    Maniatis, A N; Palermos, J; Kantzanou, M; Maniatis, N A; Christodoulou, C; Legakis, N J

    1996-03-01

    The significance of Streptococcus agalactiae as an aetiological agent in vaginitis was evaluated. A total of 6226 samples from women who presented with vaginal symptoms was examined. The presence of >10 leucocytes/high-power field (h.p.f.) was taken to be the criterion of active infection. S. agalactiae was isolated from 10.1% of these samples. The isolation rates of other common pathogens such as Candida spp., Gardnerella vaginalis and Trichomonas spp. were 54.1%, 27.2% and 4.2%, respectively, in the same group of patients. In contrast, the isolation rates of these micro-organisms in the group of patients who had no infection (<10 leucocytes/h.p.f.) were 4.2%, 38.3%, 33% and 0.5%, respectively. In the majority of samples from which S. agalactiae was isolated, it was the sole pathogen isolated (83%) and its presence was associated with an inflammatory response in 80% of patients. Furthermore, the relative risk of vaginal infection with S. agalactiae (2.38) in patients with purulent vaginal discharge was greater than that of Candida spp. infection (1.41) and lower than that of Trichomonas spp. infection (8.32). These data suggest that S. agalactiae in symptomatic women with microscopic evidence of inflammation should be considered a causative agent of vaginitis.

  10. [Study on vaginal production of human defensins and the correlated pathogenetic factors of vulvovaginal candidiasis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; DI, Wen; Liao, Qin-ping; Liu, Zhao-hui; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Hui-ying; Zhang, Dai; Geng, Li; Fan, Shang-rong; Hu, Li-na

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the correlated pathogenetic factors and vaginal local immunity in vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). A case control study was conducted to compare VVC group (60 cases) with normal group (60 cases). All of the women filled up the specific questionnaires. Routine examination, pH test and bacterial culture were done on the vaginal discharge. Cytokines of the vaginal lavage were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. (1) Outcomes of the questionnaires: there was no significant difference between the two groups in educational background, knowledge of gynecologic infection, history of gynecologic infection, hygienic habit, sex life, or use of medicine (P > 0.05). The incidence of chronic cervicitis in normal group (43%, 26/60) was higher than in VVC group (22%, 13/60; P < 0.05). (2) There was no difference in vaginal pH between the two groups (P > 0.05). (3) Detection rate of candida albicans by vaginal discharge routine examination was 72% (43/60). (4) The concentrations of interleukin (IL) 2, and IL-4 in vaginal lavage did not show significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05), but the concentrations of human defensin 5, human beta-defensin (HBD) 1, and HBD2 in VVC group [(0.94 +/- 0.44) mg/L, (3.1 +/- 0.4) microg/L, (10 +/- 6) microg/L] were higher than normal group (P < 0.05). VVC is a common vulvovaginitis. There is no significant correlation between the incidence of VVC and educational background, knowledge of gynecologic infection, history of gynecologic infection, hygienic habit, sex life, or use of medicine in the child-bearing period. Human defensin may be closely correlated with the pathogenesis of VVC.

  11. Decreased rates of nosocomial endometritis and urinary tract infection after vaginal delivery in a French surveillance network, 1997-2003.

    PubMed

    Ayzac, Louis; Caillat-Vallet, Emmanuelle; Girard, Raphaële; Chapuis, Catherine; Depaix, Florence; Dumas, Anne-Marie; Gignoux, Chantal; Haond, Catherine; Lafarge-Leboucher, Joëlle; Launay, Carine; Tissot-Guerraz, Françoise; Vincent, Agnès; Fabry, Jacques

    2008-06-01

    To identify independent risk factors for endometritis and urinary tract infection (UTI) after vaginal delivery, and to monitor changes in nosocomial infection rates and derive benchmarks for prevention. Prospective study. We analyzed routine surveillance data for all vaginal deliveries between January 1997 and December 2003 at 66 maternity units participating in the Mater Sud-Est surveillance network. Adjusted odds ratios for risk of endometritis or UTI were obtained using a logistic regression model. The overall incidence rates were 0.5% for endometritis and 0.3% for UTI. There was a significant decrease in the incidence and risk of endometritis but not of UTI during the 7-year period. Significant risk factors for endometritis were fever during labor, parity of 1, and instrumental delivery and/or manual removal of the placenta. Significant risk factors for UTI were urinary infection on admission, premature rupture of membranes (more than 12 hours before admission), blood loss of more than 800 mL, parity of 1, instrumental delivery, and receipt of more than 5 vaginal digital examinations. Each maternity unit received a poster showing graphs of the number of expected and observed cases of UTI and endometritis associated with vaginal deliveries, which enabled each maternity unit to determine their rank within the network and to initiate prevention programs. Although routine surveillance means additional work for maternity units, our results demonstrate the usefulness of regular targeted monitoring of risk factors and of the most common nosocomial infections in obstetrics. Most of the information needed for monitoring is already present in the patients' records.

  12. Durable protection from vaginal simian-human immunodeficiency virus infection in macaques by tenofovir gel and its relationship to drug levels in tissue.

    PubMed

    Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Martin, Amy; Pau, Chou-Pong; Holder, Angela; Kuklenyik, Zsuzsanna; Lipscomb, Jonathan; Hanson, Debra L; Smith, James; Novembre, Francis J; García-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2012-01-01

    A vaginal gel containing 1% tenofovir (TFV) was found to be safe and effective in reducing HIV infection in women when used pericoitally. Because of the long intracellular half-life of TFV and high drug exposure in vaginal tissues, we hypothesized that a vaginal gel containing TFV may provide long-lasting protection. Here, we performed delayed-challenge experiments and showed that vaginal 1% TFV gel protected 4/6 macaques against vaginal simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) exposures occurring 3 days after gel application, demonstrating long-lasting protection. Despite continued gel dosing postinfection, neither breakthrough infection had evidence of drug resistance by ultrasensitive testing of SHIV in plasma and vaginal lavage. Analysis of the active intracellular tenofovir diphosphate (TFV-DP) in vaginal lymphocytes collected 4 h to 3 days after gel dosing persistently showed high TFV-DP levels (median, 1,810 fmol/10(6) cells) between 4 and 24 h that exceed the 95% inhibitory concentration (IC(95)), reflecting rapid accumulation and long persistence. In contrast to those in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) following oral dosing, TFV-DP levels in vaginal lymphocytes decreased approximately 7-fold by 3 days, exhibiting a much higher rate of decay. We observed a strong correlation between intracellular TFV-DP in vaginal lymphocytes, in vitro antiviral activity, and in vivo protection, suggesting that TFV-DP above the in vitro IC(95) in vaginal lymphocytes is a good predictor of high efficacy. Data from this model reveal an extended window of protection by TFV gel that supports coitus-independent use. The identification of protective TFV-DP concentrations in vaginal lymphocytes may facilitate the evaluation of improved delivery methods of topical TFV and inform clinical studies.

  13. Evaluation and Management of Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Phyllis L; Felsenstein, Donna; Friedman, Robert H

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate recent advances in our understanding of the clinical relevance, diagnosis, and treatment of vaginal infections, and to determine an efficient and effective method of evaluating this clinical problem in the outpatient setting. DATA SOURCES Relevant papers on vaginitis limited to the English language obtained through a MEDLINE search for the years 1985 to 1997 were reviewed. DATA SYNTHESIS Techniques that enable the identification of the various strains of candida have helped lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of recurrent candida infection. From this information a rationale for the treatment of recurrent disease can be developed. Bacterial vaginosis has been associated with complications, including upper genital tract infection, preterm delivery, and wound infection. Women undergoing pelvic surgery, procedures in pregnancy, or pregnant women at risk of preterm delivery should be evaluated for bacterial vaginosis to decrease the rate of complications associated with this condition. New, more standardized criteria for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis may improve diagnostic consistency among clinicians and comparability of study results. Use of topical therapies in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis are effective and associated with fewer side effects than systemic medication. Trichomonas vaginalis, although decreasing in incidence, has been associated with upper genital tract infection. Therapy of T. vaginalis infection has been complicated by an increasing incidence of resistance to metronidazole. CONCLUSIONS Vaginitis is a common medical problem in women that is associated with significant morbidity and previously unrecognized complications. Research in recent years has improved diagnostic tools as well as treatment modalities for all forms of vaginitis. PMID:9613891

  14. Impact of Periodic Presumptive Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis on the Vaginal Microbiome among Women Participating in the Preventing Vaginal Infections Trial

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Anzala, Omu; Kimani, Joshua; Andac, Chloe; Schwebke, Jane; Fredricks, David N.; McClelland, R. Scott

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Evidence suggests that specific vaginal bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV) may increase the risk of adverse health outcomes in women. Among women participating in a randomized, double-blinded trial, we assessed the effect of periodic presumptive treatment (PPT) on detection of select vaginal bacteria. Methods. High-risk women from the United States and Kenya with a recent vaginal infection received intravaginal metronidazole 750 mg plus miconazole 200 mg or placebo for 5 consecutive nights each month for 12 months. Vaginal fluid specimens were collected via polyester/polyethylene terephthalate swabs every other month and tested for bacteria, using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. The effect of PPT on bacterium detection was assessed among all participants and stratified by country. Results. Of 234 women enrolled, 221 had specimens available for analysis. The proportion of follow-up visits with detectable quantities was lower in the PPT arm versus the placebo arm for the following bacteria: BVAB1, BVAB2, Atopobium vaginae, Leptotrichia/Sneathia, and Megasphaera. The magnitude of reductions was greater among Kenyan participants as compared to US participants. Conclusions. Use of monthly PPT for 1 year reduced colonization with several bacteria strongly associated with BV. The role of PPT to improve vaginal health should be considered, and efforts to improve the impact of PPT regimens are warranted. PMID:28007924

  15. HSV-2-driven increase in the expression of α4β7 correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV(SF162P3) infection.

    PubMed

    Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Villegas, Guillermo; Calenda, Giulia; Guerra-Perez, Natalia; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Blanchard, James; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2014-12-01

    The availability of highly susceptible HIV target cells that can rapidly reach the mucosal lymphoid tissues may increase the chances of an otherwise rare transmission event to occur. Expression of α4β7 is required for trafficking of immune cells to gut inductive sites where HIV can expand and it is expressed at high level on cells particularly susceptible to HIV infection. We hypothesized that HSV-2 modulates the expression of α4β7 and other homing receptors in the vaginal tissue and that this correlates with the increased risk of HIV acquisition in HSV-2 positive individuals. To test this hypothesis we used an in vivo rhesus macaque (RM) model of HSV-2 vaginal infection and a new ex vivo model of macaque vaginal explants. In vivo we found that HSV-2 latently infected RMs appeared to be more susceptible to vaginal SHIVSF162P3 infection, had higher frequency of α4β7high CD4+ T cells in the vaginal tissue and higher expression of α4β7 and CD11c on vaginal DCs. Similarly, ex vivo HSV-2 infection increased the susceptibility of the vaginal tissue to SHIVSF162P3. HSV-2 infection increased the frequencies of α4β7high CD4+ T cells and this directly correlated with HSV-2 replication. A higher amount of inflammatory cytokines in vaginal fluids of the HSV-2 infected animals was similar to those found in the supernatants of the infected explants. Remarkably, the HSV-2-driven increase in the frequency of α4β7high CD4+ T cells directly correlated with SHIV replication in the HSV-2 infected tissues. Our results suggest that the HSV-2-driven increase in availability of CD4+ T cells and DCs that express high levels of α4β7 is associated with the increase in susceptibility to SHIV due to HSV-2. This may persists in absence of HSV-2 shedding. Hence, higher availability of α4β7 positive HIV target cells in the vaginal tissue may constitute a risk factor for HIV transmission.

  16. The effect of vaginal cream containing ginger in users of clotrimazole vaginal cream on vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Shabanian, Sheida; Khalili, Sima; Lorigooini, Zahra; Malekpour, Afsaneh; Heidari-Soureshjani, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is one of the most common infections of the genital tract in women that causes many complications. Therefore, we examined the clinical effect of ginger cream along with clotrimazole compared to vaginal clotrimazole alone in this study. This double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 67 women admitted to the Gynecology Clinic of Hajar Hospital with vaginal candidiasis. The patients were divided randomly into two groups of 33 and 34 people. The diagnosis was made according to clinical symptoms, wet smear, and culture. Ginger-clotrimazole vaginal cream 1% and clotrimazole vaginal cream 1% were administered to groups 1 and 2, respectively, once a day for 7 days and therapeutic effects and symptoms were evaluated in readmission. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 22, t -test and Chi-square. The mean value of variables itching ( P > 0.05), burning ( P > 0.05), and cheesy secretion ( P < 0.05) in users of ginger-clotrimazole was less than the other group after the treatment. Recurrence in clotrimazole group was 48.5% and in ginger-clotrimazole group 51.2% during the 1-month follow-up with no significant difference. Study results showed that cream containing ginger and clotrimazole 1% was more effective and may be more useful than the clotrimazole to treat vaginal candidiasis.

  17. Vaginal Microbiomes Associated With Aerobic Vaginitis and Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Kaambo, Evelyn; Africa, Charlene; Chambuso, Ramadhani; Passmore, Jo-Ann Shelley

    2018-01-01

    A healthy vaginal microbiota is considered to be significant for maintaining vaginal health and preventing infections. However, certain vaginal bacterial commensal species serve an important first line of defense of the body. Any disruption of this microbial barrier might result in a number of urogenital conditions including aerobic vaginitis (AV) and bacterial vaginosis (BV). The health of the vagina is closely associated with inhabitant microbiota. Furthermore, these microbes maintain a low vaginal pH, prevent the acquisition of pathogens, stimulate or moderate the local innate immune system, and further protect against complications during pregnancies. Therefore, this review will focus on vaginal microbial "health" in the lower reproductive tract of women and on the physiological characteristics that determine the well-being of reproductive health. In addition, we explore the distinct versus shared characteristics of BV and AV, which are commonly associated with increased risk for preterm delivery.

  18. Vaginal Microbiomes Associated With Aerobic Vaginitis and Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaambo, Evelyn; Africa, Charlene; Chambuso, Ramadhani; Passmore, Jo-Ann Shelley

    2018-01-01

    A healthy vaginal microbiota is considered to be significant for maintaining vaginal health and preventing infections. However, certain vaginal bacterial commensal species serve an important first line of defense of the body. Any disruption of this microbial barrier might result in a number of urogenital conditions including aerobic vaginitis (AV) and bacterial vaginosis (BV). The health of the vagina is closely associated with inhabitant microbiota. Furthermore, these microbes maintain a low vaginal pH, prevent the acquisition of pathogens, stimulate or moderate the local innate immune system, and further protect against complications during pregnancies. Therefore, this review will focus on vaginal microbial “health” in the lower reproductive tract of women and on the physiological characteristics that determine the well-being of reproductive health. In addition, we explore the distinct versus shared characteristics of BV and AV, which are commonly associated with increased risk for preterm delivery. PMID:29632854

  19. Interactions between Trichomonas vaginalis and vaginal flora in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Meysick, K C; Garber, G E

    1992-02-01

    To study the role of vaginal flora and pH in the pathogenesis of Trichomonas vaginalis, an intravaginal mouse model of infection was established. By employing this model, the vaginal flora and pH of mice could be monitored for changes caused by the parasite. As a baseline, the endemic vaginal flora of BALB/c mice was examined first and found to consist mainly of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus species (32-76%). Lactobacilli and enteric bacilli were moderate (16-32%) in their frequency of isolation, and the prevalence of both anaerobic species and coagulase-negative staphylococci was low (4-16%). Vaginal pH was recorded at 6.5 +/- 0.3. Estrogenization, which was required for a sustained T. vaginalis infection, did not significantly alter vaginal flora; however, a slight rise in the number of bacterial species isolated per mouse and a drop in vaginal pH (6.2 +/- 0.5) were observed. Trichomonas vaginalis-infected mice did not appear to show significant changes in vaginal flora although vaginal pH was slightly increased. This mouse model could have applications in both immunologic and pathogenic studies of T. vaginalis and, with further modifications, aid in the study of protist-bacterial interactions.

  20. Prevalence of vaginitis in different age groups among females in Greece.

    PubMed

    Sianou, Argiri; Galyfos, George; Moragianni, Dimitra; Baka, Stavroula

    2017-08-01

    Patients with vaginitis were classified into four groups: Group A (prepubertal under-aged females); Group B (pubertal under-aged females); Group C (reproductive age adult females); Group D (postmenopausal adult females). All vaginal specimens underwent microscopy, amine testing, Gram staining and culturing. Overall, 163 patients were included (33, 14, 81 and 35 patients, respectively). The most common infection was bacterial vaginosis (BV), followed by Ureaplasma infection, aerobic vaginitis (AV) and candidiasis. The most common AV-associated organism was Escherichia coli and the most common BV-associated organism was Gardnerella vaginalis. AV was more frequent in Group A, BV in Group C and Ureaplasma infections in Groups C/D. Decreased lactobacilli concentrations were associated with BV in fertile patients (Groups B-C). Although presentation of vaginitis is similar among females of different age in Greece, type and prevalence of pathogens differ. Normal vaginal flora changes are associated with higher risk of vaginitis in specific age groups. Impact Statement The worldwide incidence of reproductive tract infections has been increasing, with specific pathogens being associated with significant risk of morbidity and complications. However, literature data on the distribution of such infections in different age groups is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide data on the prevalence and causes of vaginitis in adult and non-adult females of all ages. This study has shown that although presentation of vaginitis is similar among females of different age groups and menstrual status in Greece, type and prevalence of responsible pathogens are different among groups. Changes in normal vaginal flora seem to be associated with higher risk of vaginitis in specific age-groups as well. These findings could contribute in adjusting diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for each age group according to the prevailing pathogens. Further research on antibiotic

  1. Metronidazole Vaginal

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat vaginal infections such as bacterial vaginosis (an infection caused from too much of certain bacteria in the vagina). Metronidazole is in a class of medications called nitroimidazole antimicrobials. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria.

  2. Prevalence of vaginal candidiasis among pregnant women with abnormal vaginal discharge in Maiduguri.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, S M; Bukar, M; Mohammed, Y; Mohammed, B; Yahaya, M; Audu, B M; Ibrahim, H M; Ibrahim, H A

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy represents a risk factor in the occurrence of vaginal candidiasis. To determine the prevalence and clinical features associated with abnormal vaginal discharge and C. albicans infection in pregnant women. High vaginal swab samples and data on epidemiological characteristics were collected from 400 pregnant women with complaints of abnormal vaginal discharge at booking clinic of University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital. The data was analysed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software. The prevalence of abnormal vaginal discharge in pregnancy was 31.5%. The frequency of abnormal vaginal discharge was 183 (45.8%) among those aged 20-24 years, 291 (72.8%) in multipara, 223 (55.8%) in those with Primary education and 293 (73.2%) in unemployed. Vulval pruritus 300 (75.0%) was significantly related to abnormal vaginal discharge (P < 0.001). The prevalence of C. albicans was 41%. The frequencies of Vulval itching, Dyspareunia and vulval excoriation among those with candidiasis were 151 (50.3%), 14 (56.0%) and 75 (75.0%) respectively (P < 0.001). The prevalence of abnormal vaginal discharge in pregnancy was high in this study and C. albicans was the commonest cause. It is recommended that a pregnant woman complaining of abnormal vaginal discharge be assessed and Laboratory diagnosis done in order to give appropriate treatment.

  3. Postpartum urinary tract infection by mode of delivery: a Danish nationwide cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Lone; Loekkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth; Rasmussen, Steen Christian; Glavind, Julie; Clausen, Tine Dalsgaard

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between postpartum urinary tract infection and intended mode of delivery as well as actual mode of delivery. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting and participants All live births in Denmark between 2004 and 2010 (n=450 856). Births were classified by intended caesarean delivery (n=45 053) or intended vaginal delivery (n=405 803), and by actual mode of delivery: spontaneous vaginal delivery, operative vaginal delivery, emergency or planned caesarean delivery in labour or prelabour. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome measure was postpartum urinary tract infection (n=16 295) within 30 days post partum, defined as either a diagnosis of urinary tract infection in the National Patient Registry or redemption of urinary tract infection-specific antibiotics recorded in the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. Results We found that 4.6% of women with intended caesarean delivery and 3.5% of women with intended vaginal delivery were treated for postpartum urinary tract infection. Women with intended caesarean delivery had a significantly increased risk of postpartum urinary tract infection compared with women with intended vaginal delivery (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.27 to 1.40), after adjustment for age at delivery, smoking, body mass index, educational level, gestational diabetes mellitus, infection during pregnancy, birth weight, preterm delivery, preterm prelabour rupture of membranes, pre-eclampsia, parity and previous caesarean delivery (adjusted OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.46). Using actual mode of delivery as exposure, all types of operative delivery had an equally increased risk of postpartum urinary tract infection compared with spontaneous vaginal delivery. Conclusions Compared with intended vaginal delivery, intended caesarean delivery was significantly associated with a higher risk of postpartum urinary tract infection. Future studies should focus on reducing routine catheterisation prior to

  4. Characterization of an immortalized human vaginal epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Rajan, N; Pruden, D L; Kaznari, H; Cao, Q; Anderson, B E; Duncan, J L; Schaeffer, A J

    2000-02-01

    Adherence of type 1 piliated Escherichia coli to vaginal mucosa plays a major role in the pathogenesis of ascending urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women. Progress in understanding the mechanism of adherence to the vaginal surface could be enhanced by the utilization of well-characterized vaginal epithelial cells. The objective of this study was to immortalize vaginal epithelial cells and study their bacterial adherence properties. Primary vaginal cells were obtained from a normal post-menopausal woman, immortalized by infection with E6/E7 genes from human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) and cultured in serum free keratinocyte growth factor medium. Positive immunostaining with a pool of antibodies to cytokeratins 1, 5, 10 and 14 (K1, K5, K10 and K14) and to K13 confirmed the epithelial origin of these cells. The immortalized cells showed binding of type 1 piliated E. coli in a pili specific and mannose sensitive manner. This model system should facilitate studies on the interaction of pathogens with vaginal mucosal cells, an essential step in the progression of ascending UTIs in women.

  5. Vaginal Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) Is a Useful Biomarker of Semen Exposure Among HIV-Infected Ugandan Women.

    PubMed

    Woolf-King, Sarah E; Muyindike, Winnie; Hobbs, Marcia M; Kusasira, Adrine; Fatch, Robin; Emenyonu, Nneka; Johnson, Mallory O; Hahn, Judith A

    2017-07-01

    The practical feasibility of using prostate specific antigen (PSA) as a biomarker of semen exposure was examined among HIV-infected Ugandan women. Vaginal fluids were obtained with self-collected swabs and a qualitative rapid test (ABAcard ® p30) was used to detect PSA. Trained laboratory technicians processed samples on-site and positive PSA tests were compared to self-reported unprotected vaginal sex (UVS) in the last 48 h. A total of 77 women submitted 126 samples for PSA testing at up to three study visits. Of these samples, 31 % (n = 39/126) were PSA positive, and 64 % (n = 25/39) of the positive PSA samples were accompanied by self-report of no UVS at the study visit the PSA was collected. There were no reported difficulties with specimen collection, storage, or processing. These findings provide preliminary data on high levels of misreported UVS among HIV-infected Ugandan women using practically feasible methods for PSA collection and processing.

  6. Beneficial effect of Mentha suaveolens essential oil in the treatment of vaginal candidiasis assessed by real-time monitoring of infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Vaginal candidiasis is a frequent and common distressing disease affecting up to 75% of the women of fertile age; most of these women have recurrent episodes. Essential oils from aromatic plants have been shown to have antimicrobial and antifungal activities. This study was aimed at assessing the anti-fungal activity of essential oil from Mentha suaveolens (EOMS) in an experimental infection of vaginal candidiasis. Methods The in vitro and in vivo activity of EOMS was assessed. The in vitro activity was evaluated under standard CLSI methods, and the in vivo analysis was carried out by exploiting a novel, non-invasive model of vaginal candidiasis in mice based on an in vivo imaging technique. Differences between essential oil treated and saline treated mice were evaluated by the non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test. Viable count data from a time kill assay and yeast and hyphae survival test were compared using the Student's t-test (two-tailed). Results Our main findings were: i) EOMS shows potent candidastatic and candidacidal activity in an in vitro experimental system; ii) EOMS gives a degree of protection against vaginal candidiasis in an in vivo experimental system. Conclusions This study shows for the first time that the essential oil of a Moroccan plant Mentha suaveolens is candidastatic and candidacidal in vitro, and has a degree of anticandidal activity in a model of vaginal infection, as demonstrated in an in vivo monitoring imaging system. We conclude that our findings lay the ground for further, more extensive investigations to identify the active EOMS component(s), promising in the therapeutically problematic setting of chronic vaginal candidiasis in humans. PMID:21356078

  7. Urinary tract infection as a single presenting sign of multiple vaginal foreign bodies: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Neulander, Endre Z; Tiktinsky, Alex; Romanowsky, Igor; Kaneti, Jacob

    2010-02-01

    Vaginal foreign bodies in children usually present with foul-smelling discharge and/or vaginal bleeding. Rarely, these basic clinical diagnostic signs are not present. We report on a 5(1/2)-year-old girl with recurrent lower urinary tract infection as the sole presentation of multiple vaginal foreign bodies. Ultrasound of the lower urinary tract was inconclusive, and cystography indicated for recurrent urinary tract infections was declined by the patient in an outpatient setting. Cystography under general anesthesia raised the suspicion of foreign vaginal objects, and the definitive diagnosis was made by vaginoscopy. The relevant literature covering this subject is reviewed. High level of suspicion and strict basic diagnostic protocol are the most important steps for a timely diagnosis of this condition. Copyright 2010 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Odorous vaginal discharge - a case study for thorough investigation.

    PubMed

    Cernat, Geta; Leung, Lawrence

    2011-08-01

    Odorous vaginal discharge is a common presentation to general practitioners, and a frequent presentation for bacterial infections and sexually transmissible diseases. Busy GPs may be tempted to make a diagnosis from the clinical history and symptoms, and prescribe antibiotics as a first line treatment. This case highlights an unusual cause of persistent odorous vaginal discharge. If a thorough examination had not been conducted, the cause would have been overlooked, first line antibiotics would most likely have been ineffective, and potentially life threatening consequences may have occurred.

  9. Human papillomavirus infection is associated with decreased levels of GM-CSF in cervico-vaginal fluid of infected women.

    PubMed

    Comar, Manola; Monasta, Lorenzo; Zanotta, Nunzia; Vecchi Brumatti, Liza; Ricci, Giuseppe; Zauli, Giorgio

    2013-10-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection, there are very scant data about the influence of this virus on the in vitro fertilization outcome. To assess the presence of HPV in the cervico-vaginal fluid in relationship to the in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome and to the concentration of selected cytokines, known to affect embryo implantation and gestation: granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). Cervico-vaginal samples were collected on the day of oocyte pick-up from 82 women. Vaginas were flushed with 50 mL of sterile water and 3 mL of fluid was collected. Twelve women (15%) were positive for HPV. Interestingly, among HPV(+) women live birth rate was about half of the rate in HPV(-) women, although the differences were not statistically significant due to the low number of cases. Cervico-vaginal samples of a sub-group of 29 (8 HPV(+) and 21 HPV(-)) women were analyzed for GM-CSF and G-CSF by ELISA. GM-CSF but not G-CSF was significantly lower in the cervico-vaginal fluid of HPV(+) than in HPV(-) women. Since GM-CSF plays an important role during pregnancy, the reduced levels of GM-CSF in the cervico-vaginal fluid of HPV(+) women might contribute to explain the reduced live birth rate observed in HPV(+) women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of Periodic Presumptive Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis on the Vaginal Microbiome among Women Participating in the Preventing Vaginal Infections Trial.

    PubMed

    Balkus, Jennifer E; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Anzala, Omu; Kimani, Joshua; Andac, Chloe; Schwebke, Jane; Fredricks, David N; McClelland, R Scott

    2017-03-01

    Evidence suggests that specific vaginal bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV) may increase the risk of adverse health outcomes in women. Among women participating in a randomized, double-blinded trial, we assessed the effect of periodic presumptive treatment (PPT) on detection of select vaginal bacteria. High-risk women from the United States and Kenya with a recent vaginal infection received intravaginal metronidazole 750 mg plus miconazole 200 mg or placebo for 5 consecutive nights each month for 12 months. Vaginal fluid specimens were collected via polyester/polyethylene terephthalate swabs every other month and tested for bacteria, using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. The effect of PPT on bacterium detection was assessed among all participants and stratified by country. Of 234 women enrolled, 221 had specimens available for analysis. The proportion of follow-up visits with detectable quantities was lower in the PPT arm versus the placebo arm for the following bacteria: BVAB1, BVAB2, Atopobium vaginae, Leptotrichia/Sneathia, and Megasphaera. The magnitude of reductions was greater among Kenyan participants as compared to US participants. Use of monthly PPT for 1 year reduced colonization with several bacteria strongly associated with BV. The role of PPT to improve vaginal health should be considered, and efforts to improve the impact of PPT regimens are warranted. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Prevalence of asymptomatic infections in sexually transmitted diseases attendees diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis, vaginal candidiasis, and trichomoniasis.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, R; Kalaivani, S

    2016-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) are a major health problem affecting mostly young people in both developing and developed countries. STD in women causes both acute morbidity and complications such as infertility, ectopic pregnancy, low-birth weight, and prematurity. The aim of the study is to assess the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis, vaginal candidiasis, and trichomoniasis among asymptomatic females attending STD outpatient department in a tertiary care hospital in South India. A retrospective analysis of data collected from clinical records of 3000 female patients of age 18 to 49 over a period of 12 months (July 2014 to June 2015) was carried out at the Institute of Venereology, Madras Medical College. Complete epidemiological, clinical, and investigational data were recorded and analyzed for the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis, vaginal candidiasis, and trichomoniasis among asymptomatic patients. About 48.37% (228/470) of bacterial vaginosis patients were asymptomatic. Nearly 45.38% (116/235) of vaginal candidiasis patients were asymptomatic and 30.35% (26/87) of trichomoniasis patients were asymptomatic. The above infections were common in the age group 25-35. Holistic screening protocol was incorporated for all female patients attending STD clinic even if asymptomatic and should be treated accordingly to prevent the acquisition of other serious sexually transmitted infections.

  12. Postpartum urinary tract infection by mode of delivery: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gundersen, Tina Djernis; Krebs, Lone; Loekkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth; Rasmussen, Steen Christian; Glavind, Julie; Clausen, Tine Dalsgaard

    2018-03-14

    To examine the association between postpartum urinary tract infection and intended mode of delivery as well as actual mode of delivery. Retrospective cohort study. All live births in Denmark between 2004 and 2010 (n=450 856). Births were classified by intended caesarean delivery (n=45 053) or intended vaginal delivery (n=405 803), and by actual mode of delivery: spontaneous vaginal delivery, operative vaginal delivery, emergency or planned caesarean delivery in labour or prelabour. The primary outcome measure was postpartum urinary tract infection (n=16 295) within 30 days post partum, defined as either a diagnosis of urinary tract infection in the National Patient Registry or redemption of urinary tract infection-specific antibiotics recorded in the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. We found that 4.6% of women with intended caesarean delivery and 3.5% of women with intended vaginal delivery were treated for postpartum urinary tract infection.Women with intended caesarean delivery had a significantly increased risk of postpartum urinary tract infection compared with women with intended vaginal delivery (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.27 to 1.40), after adjustment for age at delivery, smoking, body mass index, educational level, gestational diabetes mellitus, infection during pregnancy, birth weight, preterm delivery, preterm prelabour rupture of membranes, pre-eclampsia, parity and previous caesarean delivery (adjusted OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.46).Using actual mode of delivery as exposure, all types of operative delivery had an equally increased risk of postpartum urinary tract infection compared with spontaneous vaginal delivery. Compared with intended vaginal delivery, intended caesarean delivery was significantly associated with a higher risk of postpartum urinary tract infection. Future studies should focus on reducing routine catheterisation prior to operative vaginal delivery as well as improving procedures related to catheterisation. © Article author

  13. The vaginal microbiota and its association with Human Papillomavirus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhea and Mycoplasma genitalium infections: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tamarelle, Jeanne; Thiébaut, Anne C M; de Barbeyrac, Bertille; Bébéar, Cécile; Ravel, Jacques; Delarocque-Astagneau, Elisabeth

    2018-05-02

    The vaginal microbiota may modulate susceptibility to Human papillomavirus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhea and Mycoplasma genitalium infections. The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the association between these infections and the vaginal microbiota. The search (2000-2016) yielded 1054 articles, of which 39 articles meeting the inclusion criteria were analyzed. The vaginal microbiota was dichotomized into high-Lactobacillus vaginal microbiota (HL-VMB) and low-Lactobacillus vaginal microbiota (LL-VMB), using either Nugent score, Amsel's criteria, presence of clue cells or gene sequencing. Measures of association with LL-VMB ranged from 0.6 (95% Confidence Interval 0.3, 1.2) to 2.8 (0.3, 28.0), 0.7 (0.4, 1.2) to 5.2 (1.9, 14.8), 0.8 (0.5, 1.4) to 3.8 (0.4, 36.2), and 0.4 (0.1, 1.5) to 6.1 (2.0, 18.5) for HPV, C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhea and M. genitalium infections respectively. While no clear trend for N. gonorrhea and M. genitalium infections could be detected, our results support a protective role of HL-VMB for HPV and C. trachomatis. Overall, these findings advocate for the use of high-resolution characterization methods for the vaginal microbiota to lay the foundation for its integration in prevention and treatment strategies. Copyright © 2018 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Management of aerobic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Tempera, Gianna; Furneri, Pio Maria

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic vaginitis is a new nonclassifiable pathology that is neither specific vaginitis nor bacterial vaginosis. The diversity of this microbiological peculiarity could also explain several therapeutic failures when patients were treated for infections identified as bacterial vaginosis. The diagnosis 'aerobic vaginitis' is essentially based on microscopic examinations using a phase-contrast microscope (at ×400 magnification). The therapeutic choice for 'aerobic vaginitis' should take into consideration an antibiotic characterized by an intrinsic activity against the majority of bacteria of fecal origin, bactericidal effect and poor/absent interference with the vaginal microbiota. Regarding the therapy for aerobic vaginitis when antimicrobial agents are prescribed, not only the antimicrobial spectrum but also the presumed ecological disturbance on the anaerobic and aerobic vaginal and rectal microbiota should be taken into a consideration. Because of their very low impact on the vaginal microbiota, kanamycin or quinolones are to be considered a good choice for therapy. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Vaginitis - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Vulvovaginitis - self-care; Yeast infections - vaginitis ... Creams or suppositories are used to treat yeast infections in the vagina. You can buy most of them without a prescription at drug stores, some grocery stores, and other stores. Treating yourself ...

  16. Neisseria gonorrhoeae co-infection exacerbates vaginal HIV shedding without affecting systemic viral loads in human CD34+ engrafted mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Stacey X; Leontyev, Danila; Kaul, Rupert; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2018-01-01

    HIV synergy with sexually transmitted co-infections is well-documented in the clinic. Co-infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae in particular, increases genital HIV shedding and mucosal transmission. However, no animal model of co-infection currently exists to directly explore this relationship or to bridge the gap in understanding between clinical and in vitro studies of this interaction. This study aims to test the feasibility of using a humanized mouse model to overcome this barrier. Combining recent in vivo modelling advancements in both HIV and gonococcal research, we developed a co-infection model by engrafting immunodeficient NSG mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells to generate humanized mice that permit both systemic HIV infection and genital N. gonorrhoeae infection. Systemic plasma and vaginal lavage titres of HIV were measured in order to assess the impact of gonococcal challenge on viral plasma titres and genital shedding. Engrafted mice showed human CD45+ leukocyte repopulation in blood and mucosal tissues. Systemic HIV challenge resulted in 104-105 copies/mL of viral RNA in blood by week 4 post-infection, as well as vaginal shedding of virus. Subsequent gonococcal challenge resulted in unchanged plasma HIV levels but higher viral shedding in the genital tract, which reflects published clinical observations. Thus, human CD34+ stem cell-transplanted NSG mice represent an experimentally tractable animal model in which to study HIV shedding during gonococcal co-infection, allowing dissection of molecular and immunological interactions between these pathogens, and providing a platform to assess future therapeutics aimed at reducing HIV transmission.

  17. The VI-SENSE-vaginal discharge self-test to facilitate management of vaginal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Geva, Adam; Bornstein, Jacob; Dan, Michael; Shoham, Hadar Kessary; Sobel, Jack D

    2006-11-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate a diagnostic panty liner (VI-SENSE) (Common Sense, Caesarea, Israel) developed to facilitate diagnosis of vaginal infections by detecting disordered acidity level. Five hundred sixteen women with vulvovaginal symptoms were enrolled. Final clinical diagnosis included Amsel criteria, Gram stain analysis, pH determination, and Trichomonas vaginalis and Candida culture. VI-SENSE strip color status estimated by patients was compared with clinical diagnosis and pH measurement by using nitrazine paper. Statistical analysis included sensitivity and specificity calculations. The VI-SENSE test was positive in 226 of 249 patients (90.8%) with bacterial vaginosis or trichomoniasis. Nitrazine pH paper revealed elevated pH in 165 (66.5%) and the amine test was positive in 160 (64.3%) patients. The VI-SENSE test was negative in 217 of 267 patients (81.3%) without trichomoniasis or bacterial vaginosis. The VI-SENSE was positive in 85 of 92 women (92%), with mixed vaginal infection including Candida and bacterial vaginosis or trichomoniasis. Amine test, nitrazine pH paper and physician diagnosis relying only on speculum examination were inferior and positive in only 65 (70%), 59 (64%), and 66 (72%) patients, respectively. The VI-SENSE test was found to be superior to traditional individual tests in facilitating preliminary diagnosis of vaginal infections.

  18. Association of in vitro Escherichia coli adherence to vaginal and buccal epithelial cells with susceptibility of women to recurrent urinary-tract infections.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, A J; Jones, J M; Dunn, J K

    1981-04-30

    To identify changes in epithelial cells that were associated with susceptibility to recurrent urinary-tract infections, we investigated the adherence of Escherichia coli to vaginal and buccal cells obtained from 11 healthy controls and 24 patients who had had at least three such infections in the preceding year. Adherence to vaginal cells was greater in patients than in controls (10.1 +/- 0.92 vs. 3.8 +/- 0.47 bacteria per cell [mean +/- S.E.], P less than 0.001), as was adherence to buccal cells (11.7 +/- 1.29 vs. 7.1 +/- 0.49, P = 0.002). This increased adherence in patients persisted despite temporary remission of the infection. Vaginal cells from patients not receiving antimicrobial prophylaxis had greater adherence than cells from patients given prophylactic therapy (11.7 +/- 1.34 vs. 8.3 +/- 1.0; P = 0.027). The range and rapidity of change in adherence as well as in vivo colonization of the vaginal mucosa were greater in patients than controls. Our data suggest that susceptibility to urinary-tract infections in women is associated with changes in the adhesive characteristics of epithelial cells.

  19. [Etiology of bacterial vaginosis (non-specific vaginitis)].

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, J C; Jean, M; Averous, S; Viraben, R; Blanc, C; Bauriaud, R; Lareng, M B

    1985-01-01

    56 women who were diagnosed bioclinically as having a bacterial vaginal infection were studied, as were 35 women as a control group. The study was a semi-quantitative analysis of the vaginal bacterial flora, both aerobic and anaerobic. It shows that Gardnerella vaginalis and anaerobic bacteria such as Peptococcus, Peptostreptococcus, Bacteroïdes, Veillonella and Mobiluncus were associated in a statistically significant way with bacterial vaginitis. On the other hand Lactobacilli were less frequently found (p less than 0.001) than in the control group of women. The way in which the microbial flora is changed has been observed during attacks of vaginitis and is discussed, as is the importance of making the diagnosis and of treating this syndrome.

  20. Evaluation of the vaginal flora in pregnant women receiving opioid maintenance therapy: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Holzer, Iris; Kueronya, Verena; Husslein, Peter W; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2016-08-05

    Vaginal infections are a risk factor for preterm delivery. In this study, we sought to evaluate the vaginal flora of pregnant women receiving opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) in comparison to non-dependent, non-maintained controls. A total of 3763 women with singleton pregnancies who underwent routine screening for asymptomatic vaginal infections between 10 + 0 and 16 + 0 gestational weeks were examined. Vaginal smears were Gram-stained, and microscopically evaluated for bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis, and trichomoniasis. In a retrospective manner, data of 132 women receiving OMT (cases) were matched for age, ethnicity, parity, education, previous preterm delivery, and smoking status to the data of 3631 controls. The vaginal flora at antenatal screening served as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures were gestational age and birth weight. In the OMT group, 62/132 (47 %) pregnant women received methadone, 39/132 (29.5 %) buprenorphine, and 31/132 (23.5 %) slow-release oral morphine. Normal or intermediate flora was found in 72/132 OMT women (54.5 %) and 2865/3631 controls [78.9 %; OR 0.49 (95 % CI, 0.33-0.71); p < 0.001]. Candidiasis occurred more frequently in OMT women than in controls [OR 2.11 (95 % CI, 1.26-3.27); p < 0.001]. Findings were inconclusive regarding bacterial vaginosis (± candidiasis) and trichomoniasis. Compared to infants of the control group, those of women with OMT had a lower mean birth weight [MD -165.3 g (95 % CI, -283.6 to -46.9); p = 0.006]. Pregnant women with OMT are at risk for asymptomatic vaginal infections. As recurrent candidiasis is associated with preterm delivery, the vulnerability of this patient population should lead to consequent antenatal infection screening at early gestation.

  1. A Case of Distal Vaginal Agenesis Presenting with Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection and Pyuria in a Prepubertal Girl.

    PubMed

    Dural, Ozlem; Ugurlucan, Funda Gungor; Yasa, Cenk; Bastu, Ercan; Eren, Hulya; Yuksel, Bahar; Celik, Serdal; Akhan, Suleyman Engin

    2017-02-01

    Isolated distal vaginal agenesis is a rare anomaly and mostly becomes symptomatic after menarche. We describe an unusual presentation of this anomaly in a prepubertal girl. An 11-year-old prepubertal girl presented with recurrent urinary tract infection, pyuria, and right-sided renal agenesis. The findings of perineal inspection, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging were consistent with a distal vaginal agenesis with pyometrocolpos. Discharging pyometrocolpos with dissection of the atretic portion and a pull-through vaginoplasty were performed. A cystoscopy showed no sign of a vesicovaginal or uterine fistula. This rare presentation of distal vaginal agenesis reminds us that congenital malformations of the female genital tract should be considered in patients with congenital anomalies of the urinary system and/or recurrent urinary tract infection, even during the prepubertal period. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Vaginal eroticism: a replication study.

    PubMed

    Alzate, H

    1985-12-01

    Vaginal eroticism was investigated in a group of 27 coitally experienced volunteers by means of systematic digital stimulation of both vaginal walls. Erogenous zones were found in all subjects, mainly located on the upper anterior wall and the lower posterior one. An orgasmic response was elicited by stimulation of these zones in 89% of the subjects. This study supports previous findings regarding vaginal eroticism. It does not support the existence of the discrete anatomical structure called the Grafenberg spot. It supports the contention that there are two distinct types of female orgasm, vaginally evoked and clitorally evoked. It also supports the finding that some women expel a fluid through the urethra at the time of orgasm. In this particular case the fluid was chemically indistinguishable from urine.

  3. Local expression of vaginal Th1 and Th2 cytokines in murine vaginal candidiasis under different immunity conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanjuan; Li, Shaohua; Wu, Yan; Liu, Zhixiang; Li, Jiawen

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the expression of vaginal Th1 and Th2 cytokines in rats with experimental vaginal candidiasis under different immune conditions, ICR murine vaginal candidiasis model was established and immno-suppressed murine models of vaginal cadidiasis were established in estrogen-treated mice. Non-estrogen-treated mice were used as controls. The mRNA level of Th1 (IL-2)/Th2 (IL-4, IL-10, TGF-beta1) cytokines in murine vaginal tissues was determined by RT-PCR. The cykotine in local tissues was increased to different extent under normal immune condition. IL-2 mRNA was increased during early stage of infection, while IL-10 was increased transiently during late stage of infection. TGF-beta1 production was found to be increased persistently. At same time, the expression of IL-2 mRNA was suppressed in immno-suppressed group, and the level of IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-beta1 were higher than the normal immunity group to different degree during infection. The high level of IL-2 mRNA during early stage of infection was associated with clearance of mucosal Candidia albicans (C. albicans), and its expression suppressed leading to decreased clearance of mucosal C. albican in immuno-suppression. The over-expression of IL-4 and IL-10 could significantly enhance the susceptibility to C. albicans infection in mice.

  4. Protective activity of geranium oil and its component, geraniol, in combination with vaginal washing against vaginal candidiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Naho; Takizawa, Toshio; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Hisajima, Tatsuya; Inouye, Shigeharu; Yamaguchi, Hideyo; Abe, Shigeru

    2008-08-01

    In order to evaluate an effective administration method of essential oils for vaginal candidiasis, efficacy of vaginal application of essential oils against murine experimental candidiasis was investigated. The effect on vaginal inflammation and Candida growth form was also studied. Vaginal candidiasis was established by intravaginal infection of C. albicans to estradiol-treated mice. These mice intravaginally received essential oils such as geranium and tea tree singly or in combination with vaginal washing. Vaginal administration of clotrimazole significantly decreased the number of viable C. albicans cells in the vaginal cavity by itself. In contrast, these essential oils did not lower the cell number. When application of geranium oil or geraniol was combined with vaginal washing, the cell number was decreased significantly. The myeloperoxidase activity assay exhibited the possibility that essential oils worked not only to reduce the viable cell number of C. albicans, but also to improve vaginal inflammation. The smear of vaginal washing suspension suggested that more yeast-form cells appeared in vaginal smears of these oil-treated mice than in control mice. In vitro study showed that a very low concentration (25 microg/ml) of geranium oil and geraniol inhibited mycelial growth, but not yeast growth. Based on these findings, it is estimated that vaginal application of geranium oil or its main component, geraniol, suppressed Candida cell growth in the vagina and its local inflammation when combined with vaginal washing.

  5. Vaginal microbial flora and outcome of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Donati, Laura; Di Vico, Augusto; Nucci, Marta; Quagliozzi, Lorena; Spagnuolo, Terryann; Labianca, Antonietta; Bracaglia, Marina; Ianniello, Francesca; Caruso, Alessandro; Paradisi, Giancarlo

    2010-04-01

    The vaginal microflora of a healthy asymptomatic woman consists of a wide variety of anaerobic and aerobic bacterial genera and species dominated by the facultative, microaerophilic, anaerobic genus Lactobacillus. The activity of Lactobacillus is essential to protect women from genital infections and to maintain the natural healthy balance of the vaginal flora. Increasing evidence associates abnormalities in vaginal flora during pregnancy with preterm labor and delivery with potential neonatal sequelae due to prematurity and poor perinatal outcome. Although this phenomenon is relatively common, even in populations of women at low risk for adverse events, the pathogenetic mechanism that leads to complications in pregnancy is still poorly understood. This review summarizes the current knowledge and uncertainties in defining alterations of vaginal flora in non-pregnant adult women and during pregnancy, and, in particular, investigates the issue of bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis. This could help specialists to identify women amenable to treatment during pregnancy leading to the possibility to reduce the preterm birth rate, preterm premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, neonatal, puerperal and maternal-fetal infectious diseases. Vaginal ecosystem study with the detection of pathogens is a key instrument in the prevention of preterm delivery, pPROM, chorioamnionitis, neonatal, puerperal and maternal-fetal infections.

  6. Aerobic vaginal pathogens and their sensitivity pattern.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Shamim; Ahmad, Mumtaz; Aftab, Irum; Akhtar, Naeem; ul Hassan, Masood; Hamid, Abdul

    2008-01-01

    The vaginal flora is a complicated environment, containing dozens of microbiological species in variable quantities and relative proportions. The frequent cause of vaginal discharge is an infection or colonization with different microorganisms. Some pathologic conditions causing vaginitis are well defined yet, 7-72% of women with vaginitis may remain undiagnosed and such forms of abnormal vaginal flora neither considered as normal, nor can be called bacterial vaginosis have been termed as 'intermediate flora' and its management probably differ from that of bacterial vaginosis. It is of crucial importance in pregnant females at risk of preterm delivery. The present study has been conducted especially to elucidate this type of aerobic vaginal isolates and their culture and sensitivity towards currently used antibiotics. This study was conducted at the Microbiology Department of Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi over a period of two years (April 2004-March 2006). One thousand, nine hundred and twenty three high vaginal swabs, both from indoor and outdoor patients were collected, cultured and their susceptibility to various antibiotics was determined. Significant growth was obtained in 731 samples. The highest frequency of infection (39.5%) was observed at 31-40 years followed by 41-50 years (35.8%). About 76% were from outdoor and 24% were from indoor patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent vaginal pathogen at 11-60 yrs & with highest prevalence at 31-40 years followed by 41-50 years. It was a predominant pathogen in both indoor (35%) as well as outdoor (41.6%) patients, followed by enteric gram-negative bacilli and other gram-positive cocci. There were very few antibiotics among the conventionally available aminoglycosides, third generation cephalosporins, penicillin, quinolones, sulfonamides and tetracyclines possessing good sensitivity (> 80%) against any one the common aerobic vaginal pathogens. The effective chemotherapeutics agents belong to

  7. Comparison between vaginal royal jelly and vaginal estrogen effects on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women: a clinical trial study.

    PubMed

    Seyyedi, Fatemeh; Kopaei, Mahmoud Rafiean; Miraj, Sepideh

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic effects of vaginal royal jelly and vaginal estrogen on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women. This double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out at gynecology and obstetrics clinics of Hajar Hospital of Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences (Iran) from January 2013 to January 2014. The study was conducted on married postmenopausal women between 50 and 65 years old. Of 120 patients, 30 individuals were excluded based on the exclusion criteria, and 90 women were randomly distributed into three groups of 30 royal jelly vaginal cream 15%, vaginal Premarin, and placebo (lubricant), for three months. At the beginning and the end of the study, quality of life and vaginal cytology assay were evaluated. Data were analyzed by SPSS Version 11. Vaginal cream of royal jelly is significantly more effective than vaginal cream of Premarin and lubricant in improvement of quality of life in postmenopausal women (p<0.05). Moreover, Pap smear results showed that vaginal atrophy in vaginal Premarin group was lower than the other groups (p<0.001), and there was no significant difference between lubricant and royal jelly groups (p=0.89). Administration of vaginal royal jelly was effective in quality-of-life improvement of postmenopausal women. Given to the various properties of royal jelly and its effectiveness on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women, further studies are recommended for using =royal jelly in improving menopausal symptoms. The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCT code: 2014112220043n1. Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences supported this research (project no. 1440).

  8. The vaginal microbiota, human papillomavirus infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: what do we know and where are we going next?

    PubMed

    Mitra, Anita; MacIntyre, David A; Marchesi, Julian R; Lee, Yun S; Bennett, Phillip R; Kyrgiou, Maria

    2016-11-01

    The vaginal microbiota plays a significant role in health and disease of the female reproductive tract. Next-generation sequencing techniques based upon the analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes permit in-depth study of vaginal microbial community structure to a level of detail not possible with standard culture-based microbiological techniques. The human papillomavirus (HPV) causes both cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer. Although the virus is highly prevalent, only a small number of women have a persistent HPV infection and subsequently develop clinically significant disease. There is emerging evidence which leads us to conclude that increased diversity of vaginal microbiota combined with reduced relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. is involved in HPV acquisition and persistence and the development of cervical precancer and cancer. In this review, we summarise the current literature and discuss potential mechanisms for the involvement of vaginal microbiota in the evolution of CIN and cervical cancer. The concept of manipulation of vaginal bacterial communities using pre- and probiotics is also discussed as an exciting prospect for the field of cervical pathology.

  9. Vaginal itching and discharge - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... vulvae; Itching - vaginal area; Vulvar itching; Yeast infection - child ... To prevent and treat vaginal irritation, your child should: Avoid colored or perfumed toilet tissue and bubble bath. Use plain, unscented soap. Limit bath time to 15 minutes or less. Ask ...

  10. Prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis infection and protozoan load in South African women: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    de Waaij, Dewi J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Trichomonas vaginalis is thought to be the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors and protozoan load of T. vaginalis infection in South African women. Methods A cross-sectional study of 604 women was conducted at 25 primary healthcare facilities in rural South Africa (Mopani district). T. vaginalis DNA was detected in vaginal and rectal swabs. In univariate and multivariate analyses, the T. vaginalis infection was investigated in relation to demographic characteristics, medical history and behavioural factors. The T. vaginalis load was determined as the logarithm of DNA copies per microlitre sample solution. Results Collected vaginal and rectal swabs were tested for T. vaginalis DNA. Prevalence of vaginal T. vaginalis was 20% (95% CI 17.0% to 23.4%) and rectal 1.2% (95% CI 0.6% to 2.4%). Most women (66%) with a vaginal infection were asymptomatic. Factors associated with T. vaginalis infection were a relationship status of single (OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.5 to 4.0; p<0.001) and HIV positive infection (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.6; p=0.041). Women with vaginal T. vaginalis infection were more likely to have concurrent Chlamydia trachomatis rectal infection than those without vaginal infection (12%vs3%; p<0.001; OR 4.1). A higher median T. vaginalis load was observed among women with observed vaginal discharge compared with those without vaginal discharge (p=0.025). Conclusions Vaginal trichomoniasis is highly prevalent in rural South Africa, especially among single women and those with HIV infection, and often presents without symptoms. PMID:28993385

  11. Acceptability of Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing Using Self-Collected Vaginal Swabs among College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielder, Robyn L.; Carey, Kate B.; Carey, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the acceptability of sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing using self-collected vaginal swabs (SCVS) among college women. Participants: First-year female students ("N" = 483). Methods: Participants were offered free testing for 3 STIs using SCVS in April 2010 and later completed a survey regarding their…

  12. Chlamydial Pre-Infection Protects from Subsequent Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Challenge in a Murine Vaginal Super-Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Jessica; Hall, Jennifer V.; Kintner, Jennifer; Schoborg, Robert V.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis and Herpes Simplex Virus-2 (HSV-2) genital tract co-infections have been reported in humans and studied in vitro but the clinical consequences are unknown. Limited epidemiologic evidence suggests that these co-infections could be more severe than single infections of either pathogen, but the host-pathogen interactions during co-infection remain uncharacterized. To determine whether disease progression and/or pathogen shedding differs between singly-infected and super-infected animals, we developed an in vivo super-infection model in which female BALB/c mice were vaginally infected with Chlamydia muridarum (Cm) followed later by HSV-2. Pre-infection with Chlamydia 3 or 9 days prior to HSV-2 super-infection conferred significant protection from HSV-2-induced neurologic disease and significantly reduced viral recovery compared to HSV-2 singly-infected controls. Neither protection from mortality nor reduced viral recovery were observed when mice were i) super-infected with HSV-2 on day 27 post Cm; ii) infected with UV-irradiated Cm and super-infected with HSV-2; or iii) azithromycin-treated prior to HSV-2 super-infection. Therefore, protection from HSV-2-induced disease requires active infection with viable chlamydiae and is not observed after chlamydial shedding ceases, either naturally or due to antibiotic treatment. Thus, Chlamydia-induced protection is transient and requires the continued presence of chlamydiae or their components. These data demonstrate that chlamydial pre-infection can alter progression of subsequent HSV-2 infection, with implications for HSV-2 transmission from co-infected humans. PMID:26726882

  13. Preoperative vaginal preparation with baby shampoo compared with povidone-iodine before gynecologic procedures.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Linda A; Lathi, Ruth B; Crochet, Patrice; Nezhat, Camran

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the postoperative infection rates between patients receiving either povidone-iodine (PI) or baby shampoo vaginal preparations before gynecologic surgery. Cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). University referral center for gynecologic endoscopy. All patients underwent minimally invasive gynecologic surgery including hysteroscopy or laparoscopy. The agents used for vaginal preparation were either baby shampoo in a 1:1 dilution with sterile normal saline solution or PI 7.5% scrub solution. Charts were reviewed for evidence of infection within 30 days of surgery (symptoms of urinary tract infection, abdominal or vaginal wound infections, temperature > 100.4 degrees F, and fungal or bacterial vaginitis). A total of 249 cases were collected; 96 subjects underwent surgery before the change to baby shampoo and 153 subjects after. Both groups were well matched for the types of surgery performed, age, risk factors for postoperative infections, and the postoperative diagnosis. The infection rates were 14/96 (14.6%) with PI preparation versus 18/153 (11.8%) with baby shampoo (p = .52). Baby shampoo should be studied as an alternative to PI because it is a nonirritating, inexpensive mild detergent. This preliminary study suggests that baby shampoo is as effective as PI in preventing postoperative infection.

  14. Effects of intrauterine contraception on the vaginal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Bassis, Christine M; Allsworth, Jenifer E; Wahl, Heather N; Sack, Daniel E; Young, Vincent B; Bell, Jason D

    2017-09-01

    There have been conflicting reports of altered vaginal microbiota and infection susceptibility associated with contraception use. The objectives of this study were to determine if intrauterine contraception altered the vaginal microbiota and to compare the effects of a copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) and a levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on the vaginal microbiota. DNA was isolated from the vaginal swab samples of 76 women using Cu-IUD (n=36) or LNG-IUS (n=40) collected prior to insertion of intrauterine contraception (baseline) and at 6 months. A third swab from approximately 12 months following insertion was available for 69 (Cu-IUD, n=33; LNG-IUS, n=36) of these women. The V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA-encoding gene was amplified from the vaginal swab DNA and sequenced. The 16S rRNA gene sequences were processed and analyzed using the software package mothur to compare the structure and dynamics of the vaginal bacterial communities. The vaginal microbiota from individuals in this study clustered into 3 major vaginal bacterial community types: one dominated by Lactobacillus iners, one dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus and one community type that was not dominated by a single Lactobacillus species. Changes in the vaginal bacterial community composition were not associated with the use of Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS. Additionally, we did not observe a clear difference in vaginal microbiota stability with Cu-IUD versus LNG-IUS use. Although the vaginal microbiota can be highly dynamic, alterations in the community associated with the use of intrauterine contraception (Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS) were not detected over 12 months. We found no evidence that intrauterine contraception (Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS) altered the vaginal microbiota composition. Therefore, the use of intrauterine contraception is unlikely to shift the composition of the vaginal microbiota such that infection susceptibility is altered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison between vaginal royal jelly and vaginal estrogen effects on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women: a clinical trial study

    PubMed Central

    Seyyedi, Fatemeh; Kopaei, Mahmoud Rafiean; Miraj, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic effects of vaginal royal jelly and vaginal estrogen on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women. Methods This double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out at gynecology and obstetrics clinics of Hajar Hospital of Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences (Iran) from January 2013 to January 2014. The study was conducted on married postmenopausal women between 50 and 65 years old. Of 120 patients, 30 individuals were excluded based on the exclusion criteria, and 90 women were randomly distributed into three groups of 30 royal jelly vaginal cream 15%, vaginal Premarin, and placebo (lubricant), for three months. At the beginning and the end of the study, quality of life and vaginal cytology assay were evaluated. Data were analyzed by SPSS Version 11. Results Vaginal cream of royal jelly is significantly more effective than vaginal cream of Premarin and lubricant in improvement of quality of life in postmenopausal women (p<0.05). Moreover, Pap smear results showed that vaginal atrophy in vaginal Premarin group was lower than the other groups (p<0.001), and there was no significant difference between lubricant and royal jelly groups (p=0.89). Conclusion Administration of vaginal royal jelly was effective in quality-of-life improvement of postmenopausal women. Given to the various properties of royal jelly and its effectiveness on quality of life and vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women, further studies are recommended for using =royal jelly in improving menopausal symptoms. Clinical trial registration The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCT code: 2014112220043n1. Funding Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences supported this research (project no. 1440). PMID:28070251

  16. Efficacy of rifaximin vaginal tablets in treatment of bacterial vaginosis: a molecular characterization of the vaginal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, Federica; Brigidi, Patrizia; Calanni, Fiorella; Lauro, Vittoria; Tacchi, Raffaella; Donders, Gilbert; Peters, Klaus; Guaschino, Secondo; Vitali, Beatrice

    2012-08-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common vaginal disorder characterized by an alteration of the vaginal bacterial morphotypes, associated with sexually transmitted infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the impact of different doses of rifaximin vaginal tablets (100 mg/day for 5 days, 25 mg/day for 5 days, and 100 mg/day for 2 days) on the vaginal microbiota of 102 European patients with BV enrolled in a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. An integrated molecular approach based on quantitative PCR (qPCR) and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was used to investigate the effects of vaginal tablets containing the antibiotic. An increase in members of the genus Lactobacillus and a decrease in the BV-related bacterial groups after the antibiotic treatment were demonstrated by qPCR. PCR-DGGE profiles confirmed the capability of rifaximin to modulate the composition of the vaginal microbial communities and to reduce their complexity. This molecular analysis supported the clinical observation that rifaximin at 25 mg/day for 5 days represents an effective treatment to be used in future pivotal studies for the treatment of BV.

  17. Efficacy of Rifaximin Vaginal Tablets in Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis: a Molecular Characterization of the Vaginal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cruciani, Federica; Brigidi, Patrizia; Calanni, Fiorella; Lauro, Vittoria; Tacchi, Raffaella; Donders, Gilbert; Peters, Klaus; Guaschino, Secondo

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common vaginal disorder characterized by an alteration of the vaginal bacterial morphotypes, associated with sexually transmitted infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the impact of different doses of rifaximin vaginal tablets (100 mg/day for 5 days, 25 mg/day for 5 days, and 100 mg/day for 2 days) on the vaginal microbiota of 102 European patients with BV enrolled in a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. An integrated molecular approach based on quantitative PCR (qPCR) and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was used to investigate the effects of vaginal tablets containing the antibiotic. An increase in members of the genus Lactobacillus and a decrease in the BV-related bacterial groups after the antibiotic treatment were demonstrated by qPCR. PCR-DGGE profiles confirmed the capability of rifaximin to modulate the composition of the vaginal microbial communities and to reduce their complexity. This molecular analysis supported the clinical observation that rifaximin at 25 mg/day for 5 days represents an effective treatment to be used in future pivotal studies for the treatment of BV. PMID:22585228

  18. Vaginal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Mendling, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge about the normal and abnormal vaginal microbiome has changed over the last years. Culturing techniques are not suitable any more for determination of a normal or abnormal vaginal microbiota. Non culture-based modern technologies revealed a complex and dynamic system mainly dominated by lactobacilli.The normal and the abnormal vaginal microbiota are complex ecosystems of more than 200 bacterial species influenced by genes, ethnic background and environmental and behavioral factors. Several species of lactobacilli per individuum dominate the healthy vagina. They support a defense system together with antibacterial substances, cytokines, defensins and others against dysbiosis, infections and care for an normal pregnancy without preterm birth.The numbers of Lactobacillus (L.) iners increase in the case of dysbiosis.Bacterial vaginosis (BV) - associated bacteria (BVAB), Atopobium vaginae and Clostridiales and one or two of four Gardnerella vaginalis - strains develop in different mixtures and numbers polymicrobial biofilms on the vaginal epithelium, which are not dissolved by antibiotic therapies according to guidelines and, thus, provoke recurrences.Aerobic vaginitis seems to be an immunological disorder of the vagina with influence on the microbiota, which is here dominated by aerobic bacteria (Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli). Their role in AV is unknown.Vaginal or oral application of lactobacilli is obviously able to improve therapeutic results of BV and dysbiosis.

  19. Prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis infection and protozoan load in South African women: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    de Waaij, Dewi J; Dubbink, Jan Henk; Ouburg, Sander; Peters, Remco P H; Morré, Servaas A

    2017-10-08

    Trichomonas vaginalis is thought to be the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors and protozoan load of T. vaginalis infection in South African women. A cross-sectional study of 604 women was conducted at 25 primary healthcare facilities in rural South Africa (Mopani district). T. vaginalis DNA was detected in vaginal and rectal swabs. In univariate and multivariate analyses, the T. vaginalis infection was investigated in relation to demographic characteristics, medical history and behavioural factors. The T. vaginalis load was determined as the logarithm of DNA copies per microlitre sample solution. Collected vaginal and rectal swabs were tested for T. vaginalis DNA. Prevalence of vaginal T. vaginalis was 20% (95% CI 17.0% to 23.4%) and rectal 1.2% (95% CI 0.6% to 2.4%). Most women (66%) with a vaginal infection were asymptomatic. Factors associated with T. vaginalis infection were a relationship status of single (OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.5 to 4.0; p<0.001) and HIV positive infection (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.6; p=0.041). Women with vaginal T. vaginalis infection were more likely to have concurrent Chlamydia trachomatis rectal infection than those without vaginal infection (12%vs3%; p<0.001; OR 4.1). A higher median T. vaginalis load was observed among women with observed vaginal discharge compared with those without vaginal discharge (p=0.025). Vaginal trichomoniasis is highly prevalent in rural South Africa, especially among single women and those with HIV infection, and often presents without symptoms. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Diagnosis and microecological characteristics of aerobic vaginitis in outpatients based on preformed enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Liang; Fu, Lan-Yong; Xiong, Zheng-Ai; Qin, Qin; Yu, Teng-Hua; Wu, Yu-Tong; Hua, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Yong-Hong

    2016-02-01

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is a recently proposed term for genital tract infection in women. The diagnosis of AV is mainly based on descriptive diagnostic criteria proposed by Donders and co-workers. The objective of this study is to report AV prevalence in southwest China using an objective assay kit based on preformed enzymes and also to determine its characteristics. A total of 1948 outpatients were enrolled and tested by a commercial diagnostic kit to investigate the AV prevalence and characteristics in southwestern China. The study mainly examined the vaginal ecosystem, age distribution, Lactobacillus amount, and changes in pH. Differences within groups were analyzed by Wilcoxon two-sample test. The AV detection rate is 15.40%. The AV patients were usually seen in the sexually active age group of 20-30 years, followed by those in the age group of 30-40 years. The vaginal ecosystems of all the patients studied were absolutely abnormal, and diagnosed to have a combined infection [aerobic vaginitis (AV) + bacterial vaginitis (BV) 61.33%; 184/300]. Aerobic bacteria, especially Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, were predominantly found in the vaginal samples of these women. AV is a common type of genital infection in southwestern China and is characterized by sexually active age and combined infection predominated by the AV and BV type. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Protection of rhesus macaques from vaginal infection by vaginally delivered maraviroc, an inhibitor of HIV-1 entry via the CCR5 co-receptor.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Ketas, Thomas J; Dufour, Jason; Moroney-Rasmussen, Terri; Green, Linda C; Klasse, P J; Moore, John P

    2010-09-01

    An effective vaginal microbicide could reduce human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission to women. Among microbicide candidates in clinical development is Maraviroc (MVC), a small-molecule drug that binds the CCR5 co-receptor and impedes HIV-1 entry into cells. Delivered systemically, MVC reduces viral load in HIV-1-infected individuals, but its ability to prevent transmission is untested. We have now evaluated MVC as a vaginal microbicide with use of a stringent model that involves challenge of rhesus macaques with a high-dose of a CCR5-using virus, SHIV-162P3. Gel-formulated, prescription-grade MVC provided dose-dependent protection, half-maximally at 0.5 mM (0.25 mg/mL). The duration of protection was transient; the longer the delay between MVC application and virus challenge, the less protection (half life of approximately 4 h). As expected, MVC neither protected against challenge with a CXCR4-using virus, SHIV-KU1, nor exacerbated postinfection viremia. These findings validate MVC development as a vaginal microbicide for women and should guide clinical programs.

  2. Genital tract lesions in sexually mature Göttingen minipigs during the initial stages of experimental vaginal infection with Chlamydia trachomatis serovar D.

    PubMed

    Erneholm, Karin; Lorenzen, Emma; Bøje, Sarah; Olsen, Anja Weinreich; Andersen, Peter; Cassidy, Joseph P; Follmann, Frank; Jensen, Henrik E; Agerholm, Jørgen S

    2016-09-10

    Chlamydia is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in humans worldwide, causing chronic lesions in the reproductive tract. Due to its often asymptomatic course, there is limited knowledge about the initial changes in the genital tract following infection. This study employs a novel sexually mature minipig model to investigate the initial histopathological changes following vaginal infection with Chlamydia trachomatis serovar D. A vaginal inoculation resulted in an infection primarily affecting the lower genital tract. The histopathological changes were characterized by a subepithelial inflammation consisting of neutrophils and mononuclear cells, followed by an increase in the number of plasma cells within the sub-epithelial stroma of the vagina. Detection of Chlamydia was associated with expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and interleukin-8 by superficial epithelial cells. The infection was self-limiting, with a duration of 7 days. Neutrophils, plasma cells and IL-8 have been linked with Chlamydia genital infection of unknown duration in human patients. In this study, we observe a similar pattern of local immune response/inflammation following experimental inoculation suggesting this porcine model shows promise as a model for translational chlamydia research.

  3. Vaginal microbicides and teenagers.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Richard E; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2003-10-01

    Sexually active teens are at significant risk from sexually transmitted infections and girls and women bear the greatest burden of these infections. New methods, such as vaginal microbicides, would provide female controlled options. Microbicides are currently in development and thus it is timely to discuss the progress made and factors that may influence acceptability for teens. Microbicide development presents many challenges, and several different potential mechanisms of action are being explored. There is interest in these products from women and men, and specific preferences are being investigated. Adolescents, due to reproductive system immaturity, developing cognitive abilities and the psychosocial context of their relationships, present a special set of challenges in efforts to foster microbicide use. Vaginal microbicides are on the horizon. Further study into teen issues is required to develop successful strategies for marketing and encouraging adolescent use of microbicides.

  4. The "RESEAU MATER": An efficient infection control for endometritis, but not for urinary tract infection after vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Ayzac, Louis; Caillat-Vallet, Emmanuelle; Girard, Raphaële; Berland, Michel

    "RESEAU MATER" is useful to monitor nosocomial infections in maternity and contributes to the decreasing trend of it, since its implementation. Specifically, this network demonstrates its efficiency in the control of endometritis following vaginal deliveries, but not in the control of urinary tract infections. The aim of this study is to determine whether the difference between the control of endometritis and of urinary tract infection could be explained by an unsuitable regression model or by an unsuitable care policy concerning urinary cares. This study includes (1) the analysis of historic data of the network and (2) the description of French guidelines for maternity cares and available evaluations, concerning endometritis and urinary tract infection prevention. Univariate and multivariate odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for the total study period of 1999-2013, for these infections and their risk factors. The endometritis frequency is decreasing, in association with no significant evolution of associated risk factors, but urinary tract infection frequency is constant, in association with a increasing trend of its risk factors such as intermittent catheterization and epidural analgesia. In French guidelines, all preventive measures against endometritis are clearly broadcasted by all field operators, and repeated audits have reinforced the control of their application. But preventive measures against urinary tract infection seem to be broadcasted exclusively in the circle of infection prevention agencies and not in the obstetrics societies or in the Health Ministry communication. Urinary tract infection prevention requires a clearer public and professional policy in favor of a more efficient urinary cares, with a specific target to maternity. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. History and update on host defense against vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Fidel, Paul L

    2007-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), caused by Candida albicans, remains a significant problem in women of childbearing age. While cell-mediated immunity is considered the predominant host defense mechanism against mucosal candidal infections, two decades of research from animal models and clinical studies have revealed a lack of a protective role for adaptive immunity against VVC caused by putative immunoregulatory mechanisms. Moreover, natural protective mechanisms and factors associated with susceptibility to infection have remained elusive. That is until recently, when through a live challenge model in humans, it was revealed that protection against vaginitis coincides with a non-inflammatory innate presence, whereas symptomatic infection correlates with a neutrophil infiltrate in the vaginal lumen and elevated fungal burden. Thus, instead of VVC being caused by a putative deficient adaptive immune response, it is now being considered that symptomatic vaginitis is caused by an aggressive innate response.

  6. Vaginal douching practice: Frequency, associated factors and relationship with vulvovaginal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Yanikkerem, Emre; Yasayan, Aysegul

    2016-04-01

    To determine the frequency, associated factors and relationship with vulvovaginal symptoms and vaginal douching among Turkish women. The cross-sectional, analytical study was conducted at Merkez Efendi Hospital, Manisa, Turkey, from January to June 2014 using a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 17. Of the total 343 women in the study, 91(26.5%) had reported vaginal douching in the preceding year. Statistically significant relationship was determined between the vaginal douching behaviour and couples who had low educationand low income levels, having unplanned pregnancy and had someone in their neighbourhood who douched (p< 0.05 each). The most common reason for using vaginal douching was reported to be cleanliness by 85(93.4%) women, prevention of genital infections 75(82.4%), cleaning after/before sexual intercourse 72(79%), during menstruation 49(54%), prevention of vaginal discharge 69(76%), decreasing of unpleasant odours 65(71.4%) and religious beliefs 46(50.5%). Self-reported history of vaginal infection was significantly more common for women who douched compared those who did not (p< 0.05). Healthcare providers should determine the reason and risky groups of women and educate the women to stop the vaginal douching behaviour and harmful effects of vaginal douching.

  7. Influence of Vaginal Bacteria and d- and l-Lactic Acid Isomers on Vaginal Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer: Implications for Protection against Upper Genital Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Witkin, Steven S.; Mendes-Soares, Helena; Linhares, Iara M.; Jayaram, Aswathi; Ledger, William J.; Forney, Larry J.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We evaluated levels of vaginal extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-8) in vaginal secretions in relation to the composition of vaginal bacterial communities and d- and l-lactic acid levels. The composition of vaginal bacterial communities in 46 women was determined by pyrosequencing the V1 to V3 region of 16S rRNA genes. Lactobacilli were dominant in 71.3% of the women, followed by Gardnerella (17.4%), Streptococcus (8.7%), and Enterococcus (2.2%). Of the lactobacillus-dominated communities, 51.5% were dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus, 36.4% by Lactobacillus iners, and 6.1% each by Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus jensenii. Concentrations of l-lactic acid were slightly higher in lactobacillus-dominated vaginal samples, but most differences were not statistically significant. d-Lactic acid levels were higher in samples containing L. crispatus than in those with L. iners (P < 0.0001) or Gardnerella (P = 0.0002). The relative proportion of d-lactic acid in vaginal communities dominated by species of lactobacilli was in concordance with the proportions found in axenic cultures of the various species grown in vitro. Levels of l-lactic acid (P < 0.0001) and the ratio of l-lactic acid to d-lactic acid (P = 0.0060), but not concentrations of d-lactic acid, were also correlated with EMMPRIN concentrations. Moreover, vaginal concentrations of EMMPRIN and MMP-8 levels were highly correlated (P < 0.0001). Taken together, the data suggest the relative proportion of l- to d-lactic acid isomers in the vagina may influence the extent of local EMMPRIN production and subsequent induction of MMP-8. The expression of these proteins may help determine the ability of bacteria to transverse the cervix and initiate upper genital tract infections. PMID:23919998

  8. The interaction between vaginal microbiota, cervical length, and vaginal progesterone treatment for preterm birth risk.

    PubMed

    Kindinger, Lindsay M; Bennett, Phillip R; Lee, Yun S; Marchesi, Julian R; Smith, Ann; Cacciatore, Stefano; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Teoh, T G; MacIntyre, David A

    2017-01-19

    Preterm birth is the primary cause of infant death worldwide. A short cervix in the second trimester of pregnancy is a risk factor for preterm birth. In specific patient cohorts, vaginal progesterone reduces this risk. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we undertook a prospective study in women at risk of preterm birth (n = 161) to assess (1) the relationship between vaginal microbiota and cervical length in the second trimester and preterm birth risk and (2) the impact of vaginal progesterone on vaginal bacterial communities in women with a short cervix. Lactobacillus iners dominance at 16 weeks of gestation was significantly associated with both a short cervix <25 mm (n = 15, P < 0.05) and preterm birth <34 +0  weeks (n = 18; P < 0.01; 69% PPV). In contrast, Lactobacillus crispatus dominance was highly predictive of term birth (n = 127, 98% PPV). Cervical shortening and preterm birth were not associated with vaginal dysbiosis. A longitudinal characterization of vaginal microbiota (<18, 22, 28, and 34 weeks) was then undertaken in women receiving vaginal progesterone (400 mg/OD, n = 25) versus controls (n = 42). Progesterone did not alter vaginal bacterial community structure nor reduce L. iners-associated preterm birth (<34 weeks). L. iners dominance of the vaginal microbiota at 16 weeks of gestation is a risk factor for preterm birth, whereas L. crispatus dominance is protective against preterm birth. Vaginal progesterone does not appear to impact the pregnancy vaginal microbiota. Patients and clinicians who may be concerned about "infection risk" associated with the use of a vaginal pessary during high-risk pregnancy can be reassured.

  9. Vaginal drug distribution modeling.

    PubMed

    Katz, David F; Yuan, Andrew; Gao, Yajing

    2015-09-15

    This review presents and applies fundamental mass transport theory describing the diffusion and convection driven mass transport of drugs to the vaginal environment. It considers sources of variability in the predictions of the models. It illustrates use of model predictions of microbicide drug concentration distribution (pharmacokinetics) to gain insights about drug effectiveness in preventing HIV infection (pharmacodynamics). The modeling compares vaginal drug distributions after different gel dosage regimens, and it evaluates consequences of changes in gel viscosity due to aging. It compares vaginal mucosal concentration distributions of drugs delivered by gels vs. intravaginal rings. Finally, the modeling approach is used to compare vaginal drug distributions across species with differing vaginal dimensions. Deterministic models of drug mass transport into and throughout the vaginal environment can provide critical insights about the mechanisms and determinants of such transport. This knowledge, and the methodology that obtains it, can be applied and translated to multiple applications, involving the scientific underpinnings of vaginal drug distribution and the performance evaluation and design of products, and their dosage regimens, that achieve it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Vaginal resection and anastomosis for treatment of vestibulovaginal stenosis in 4 dogs with recurrent urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Kieves, Nina R; Novo, Roberto E; Martin, Robert B

    2011-10-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION-4 dogs were evaluated because of recurrent urinary tract infections. CLINICAL FINDINGS-All dogs had recurrent urinary tract infections and similar clinical signs; 3 dogs had urinary incontinence. Digital vaginal examination revealed vestibulovaginal stenosis in all dogs, which was confirmed by results of contrast vaginourethrography. From image measurements, the vestibulovaginal ratio (ratio of the height of the vestibulovaginal junction to the maximum height of the vagina on a lateral vaginourethrogram) was calculated for each dog. Three dogs had severe stenosis (vestibulovaginal ratio, < 0.20; severe stenosis is defined as a vestibulovaginal ratio < 0.20), whereas the fourth dog had moderate stenosis (vestibulovaginal ratio, 0.24; ratio range for moderate stenosis is 0.20 to 0.25). TREATMENT AND OUTCOME-All dogs were anesthetized for surgical correction of the vestibulovaginal stenosis. Vaginal resection and anastomosis of the stenosis was performed in all 4 dogs, with 1 dog also undergoing episioplasty. Complete resolution of clinical signs was apparent in 3 dogs; 1 dog had postoperative complications including pollakiuria and stranguria, which resulted in rectal and vaginal prolapse. This dog underwent ovariohysterectomy, after which clinical signs resolved. All dogs had resolution of urinary tract infections at the time of follow-up (6 to 8 months after surgery). CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Resection and anastomosis may resolve recurrent urinary tract infections in dogs with severe or moderate vestibulovaginal stenosis. Episiotomy was not necessary for success of surgical treatment, and overall, that procedure increased morbidity, the severity of intraoperative hemorrhage, and duration of surgery.

  11. Th17 Cells and IL-17 in Protective Immunity to Vaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Pietrella, Donatella; Rachini, Anna; Pines, Mark; Pandey, Neelam; Mosci, Paolo; Bistoni, Francesco; d'Enfert, Cristophe; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Background Th17 cells play a major role in coordinating the host defence in oropharyngeal candidiasis. In this study we investigated the involvement of the Th17 response in an animal model of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). Methods To monitor the course of infection we exploited a new in vivo imaging technique. Results i) The progression of VVC leads to a strong influx of neutrophils in the vagina soon after the challenge which persisted despite the resolution of infection; ii) IL-17, produced by vaginal cells, particularly CD4 T cells, was detected in the vaginal wash during the infection, reaching a maximum 14 days after the challenge; iii) The amount and kinetics of IL-23 in vaginal fluids were comparable to those in vaginal cells; iv) The inhibition of Th17 differentiation led to significant inhibition of IL-17 production with consequent exacerbation of infection; v) An increased production of βdefensin 2 was manifested in cells of infected mice. This production was strongly reduced when Th17 differentiation was inhibited and was increased by rIL-17 treatment. Conclusions These results imply that IL-17 and Th17, along with innate antimicrobial factors, have a role in the immune response to vaginal candidiasis. PMID:21818387

  12. Th17 cells and IL-17 in protective immunity to vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Pietrella, Donatella; Rachini, Anna; Pines, Mark; Pandey, Neelam; Mosci, Paolo; Bistoni, Francesco; d'Enfert, Cristophe; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Th17 cells play a major role in coordinating the host defence in oropharyngeal candidiasis. In this study we investigated the involvement of the Th17 response in an animal model of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). To monitor the course of infection we exploited a new in vivo imaging technique. i) The progression of VVC leads to a strong influx of neutrophils in the vagina soon after the challenge which persisted despite the resolution of infection; ii) IL-17, produced by vaginal cells, particularly CD4 T cells, was detected in the vaginal wash during the infection, reaching a maximum 14 days after the challenge; iii) The amount and kinetics of IL-23 in vaginal fluids were comparable to those in vaginal cells; iv) The inhibition of Th17 differentiation led to significant inhibition of IL-17 production with consequent exacerbation of infection; v) An increased production of βdefensin 2 was manifested in cells of infected mice. This production was strongly reduced when Th17 differentiation was inhibited and was increased by rIL-17 treatment. These results imply that IL-17 and Th17, along with innate antimicrobial factors, have a role in the immune response to vaginal candidiasis.

  13. Topical tenofovir protects against vaginal simian HIV infection in macaques coinfected with Chlamydia trachomatis and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Natalia; Henning, Tara; Taylor, Andrew; Dinh, Chuong; Lipscomb, Jonathan; Aubert, Rachael; Hanson, Debra; Phillips, Christi; Papp, John; Mitchell, James; McNicholl, Janet; Garcia-Lerma, Gerardo J; Heneine, Walid; Kersh, Ellen; Dobard, Charles

    2017-03-27

    Chlamydia trachomatis and Trichomonas vaginalis, two prevalent sexually transmitted infections, are known to increase HIV risk in women and could potentially diminish preexposure prophylaxis efficacy, particularly for topical interventions that rely on local protection. We investigated in macaques whether coinfection with Chlamydia trachomatis/Trichomonas vaginalis reduces protection by vaginal tenofovir (TFV) gel. Vaginal TFV gel dosing previously shown to provide 100 or 74% protection when applied either 30 min or 3 days before simian HIV(SHIV) challenge was assessed in pigtailed macaques coinfected with Chlamydia trachomatis/Trichomonas vaginalis and challenged twice weekly with SHIV162p3 for up to 10 weeks (two menstrual cycles). Three groups of six macaques received either placebo or 1% TFV gel 30 min or 3 days before each SHIV challenge. We additionally assessed TFV and TFV diphosphate concentrations in plasma and vaginal tissues in Chlamydia trachomatis/Trichomonas vaginalis coinfected (n = 4) and uninfected (n = 4) macaques. Chlamydia trachomatis/Trichomonas vaginalis coinfections were maintained during the SHIV challenge period. All macaques that received placebo gel were SHIV infected after a median of seven challenges (one menstrual cycle). In contrast, no infections were observed in macaques treated with TFV gel 30 min before SHIV challenge (P < 0.001). Efficacy was reduced to 60% when TFV gel was applied 3 days before SHIV challenge (P = 0.07). Plasma TFV and TFV diphosphate concentrations in tissues and vaginal lymphocytes were significantly higher in Chlamydia trachomatis/Trichomonas vaginalis coinfected compared with Chlamydia trachomatis/Trichomonas vaginalis uninfected macaques. Our findings in this model suggest that Chlamydia trachomatis/Trichomonas vaginalis coinfection may have little or no impact on the efficacy of highly effective topical TFV modalities and highlight a significant modulation of TFV pharmacokinetics.

  14. Newly developed vaginal atrophy symptoms II and vaginal pH: a better correlation in vaginal atrophy?

    PubMed

    Tuntiviriyapun, P; Panyakhamlerd, K; Triratanachat, S; Chatsuwan, T; Chaikittisilpa, S; Jaisamrarn, U; Taechakraichana, N

    2015-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation among symptoms, signs, and the number of lactobacilli in postmenopausal vaginal atrophy. The secondary objective was to develop a new parameter to improve the correlation. A cross-sectional descriptive study. Naturally postmenopausal women aged 45-70 years with at least one clinical symptom of vaginal atrophy of moderate to severe intensity were included in this study. All of the objective parameters (vaginal atrophy score, vaginal pH, the number of lactobacilli, vaginal maturation index, and vaginal maturation value) were evaluated and correlated with vaginal atrophy symptoms. A new parameter of vaginal atrophy, vaginal atrophy symptoms II, was developed and consists of the two most bothersome symptoms (vaginal dryness and dyspareunia). Vaginal atrophy symptoms II was analyzed for correlation with the objective parameters. A total of 132 naturally postmenopausal women were recruited for analysis. Vaginal pH was the only objective parameter found to have a weak correlation with vaginal atrophy symptoms (r = 0.273, p = 0.002). The newly developed vaginal atrophy symptoms II parameter showed moderate correlation with vaginal pH (r = 0.356, p < 0.001) and a weak correlation with the vaginal atrophy score (r = 0.230, p < 0.001). History of sexual intercourse within 3 months was associated with a better correlation between vaginal atrophy symptoms and the objective parameters. Vaginal pH was significantly correlated with vaginal atrophy symptoms. The newly developed vaginal atrophy symptoms II was associated with a better correlation. The vaginal atrophy symptoms II and vaginal pH may be better tools for clinical evaluation and future study of the vaginal ecosystem.

  15. Impact of eating probiotic yogurt on colonization by Candida species of the oral and vaginal mucosa in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haihong; Merenstein, Daniel J; Wang, Cuiwei; Hamilton, Pilar R; Blackmon, Mandy L; Chen, Hui; Calderone, Richard A; Li, Dongmei

    2013-10-01

    Candidiasis in HIV/AIDS patients continues to be a public health problem. Antifungal therapies are not always effective and may result in complications, such as the development of drug-resistant strains of Candida species. This study evaluated the impact of probiotic consumption on Candida colonization of the oral and vaginal mucosa. A pilot study was conducted in 24 women (17 HIV-infected, 7 HIV-uninfected) from the Women's Interagency HIV Study. The women underwent a 60-day initiation period with no probiotic consumption, followed by two 15-day consumption periods, with a different probiotic yogurt (DanActive™ or YoPlus™ yogurt) during each interval. There was a 30-day washout period between the two yogurt consumption periods. Oral and vaginal culture swabs were collected on days 0, 60, 74, and 120. Candida was detected by inoculating each swab in both Sabouraud's dextrose agar with or without chloramphenicol and CHROMagar. Less fungal colonization among women was observed when the women consumed probiotic yogurts (54 % of the women had vaginal fungal colonization during the non-probiotic yogurt consumption period, 29 % during the DanActive™ period, and 38 % during YoPlus™ yogurt consumption period), and HIV-infected women had significantly lower vaginal fungal colonization after they consumed DanActive™ yogurt compared to the non-intervention periods (54 vs 29 %, p = 0.03). These data are promising, but as expected in a small pilot study, there were some significant changes but also some areas where colonization was not changed. This type of conflicting data is supportive of the need for a larger trial to further elucidate the role of probiotic yogurts in fungal growth in HIV-infected women.

  16. Impact of Eating Probiotic Yogurt on Colonization by Candida Species of the Oral and Vaginal Mucosa in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Women

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haihong; Wang, Cuiwei; Hamilton, Pilar R.; Blackmon, Mandy L.; Chen, Hui; Calderone, Richard A.; Li, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Background Candidiasis in HIV/AIDS patients continues to be a public health problem. Antifungal therapies are not always effective and may result in complications, such as the development of drug-resistant strains of Candida species. Objectives This study evaluated the impact of probiotic consumption on Candida colonization of the oral and vaginal mucosa. Patients/Methods A pilot study was conducted in 24 women (17 HIV-infected, 7 HIV-uninfected) from the Women's Interagency HIV Study. The women underwent a 60-day initiation period with no probiotic consumption, followed by two 15-day consumption periods, with a different probiotic yogurt (DanActive™ or YoPlus™ yogurt) during each interval. There was a 30-day washout period between the two yogurt consumption periods. Oral and vaginal culture swabs were collected on days 0, 60, 74, and 120. Candida was detected by inoculating each swab in both Sabouraud's dextrose agar with or without chloramphenicol and CHROMagar. Results Less fungal colonization among women was observed when the women consumed probiotic yogurts (54 % of the women had vaginal fungal colonization during the non-probiotic yogurt consumption period, 29 % during the DanActive™ period, and 38 % during YoPlus™ yogurt consumption period), and HIV-infected women had significantly lower vaginal fungal colonization after they consumed DanActive™ yogurt compared to the nonintervention periods (54 vs 29 %, p = 0.03). Conclusions These data are promising, but as expected in a small pilot study, there were some significant changes but also some areas where colonization was not changed. This type of conflicting data is supportive of the need for a larger trial to further elucidate the role of probiotic yogurts in fungal growth in HIV-infected women. PMID:23925786

  17. ["Mixed" and "miscellaneous" vulvovaginitis: diagnostics and therapy of vaginal administration of nystatin and nifuratel].

    PubMed

    Cepický, P; Malina, J; Líbalová, Z; Kuzelová, M

    2005-05-01

    The evaluation of combined and miscellaneous vulvovaginal infections incidence and their treatment with combined vaginal products containing nifuratel and nystatin. Prospective study. Gynecologic outpatient department LEVRET, Prague; Laboratories of Microbiology AescuLab, Prague. 70 consecutive patients were examined with complaint of vaginal fluor and/or pruritus. We established macroscopic features of fluor, pH, amine test and mounts stained with Giemsa and Gram. We qualified the cases with more diagnostic criteria (mycosis, lactobacillosis, anaerobic vaginosis, aerobic vaginitis) as combined infection, those with no diagnostic criteria as miscellaneous. We treated all patients with vaginal tablets nystatin + nifuratel (Macmiror complex). We prescribed clotrimazol cream, if pruritus was present. We evaluated withdrawals of symptoms and relapses during 3 months after treatment. Combined infection was found in 21 patients from 70 (30%). The most frequent combination was that of mycosis and aerobic vaginitis (13/70, 18.6%) or mycosis and anaerobic vaginosis (4/70, 5.7%); 11 patients fulfilled criteria of no diagnosis. We concluded them as "miscelaneous". The treatment was successful in all cases, 10 women relapsed in 3 months. Combined vaginal infection findings are present very often (30%), likewise miscellaneous ones (15%) occur. The treatment of these women in successful with vaginal tablets with nystatin + nifuratel.

  18. Surgical removal of a large vaginal calculus formed after a tension-free vaginal tape procedure.

    PubMed

    Zilberlicht, Ariel; Feiner, Benjamin; Haya, Nir; Auslender, Ron; Abramov, Yoram

    2016-11-01

    Vaginal calculus is a rare disorder which has been reported in association with urethral diverticulum, urogenital sinus anomaly, bladder exstrophy and the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure. We report a 42-year-old woman who presented with persistent, intractable urinary tract infection (UTI) following a TVT procedure. Cystoscopy demonstrated an eroded tape with the formation of a bladder calculus, and the patient underwent laser cystolithotripsy and cystoscopic resection of the tape. Following this procedure, her UTI completely resolved and she remained asymptomatic for several years. Seven years later she presented with a solid vaginal mass. Pelvic examination followed by transvaginal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large vaginal calculus located at the lower third of the anterior vaginal wall adjacent to the bladder neck. This video presents the transvaginal excision and removal of the vaginal calculus.

  19. Vaginal Discharge: What's Normal, What's Not

    MedlinePlus

    ... Discharge? Vaginal infections, such as bacterial vaginosis , candidiasis ( yeast infection ), and trichomoniasis are common causes of abnormal ... having sex, such as bacterial vaginosis or a yeast infection. If you notice any changes in your ...

  20. Fast track vaginal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ottesen, Marianne; Sørensen, Mette; Rasmussen, Yvonne; Smidt-Jensen, Steen; Kehlet, Henrik; Ottesen, Bent

    2002-02-01

    Our aim was to describe the need for postoperative hospitalization after vaginal surgery for utero-vaginal prolapse with well-defined charts for postoperative care. A prospective, descriptive study. Consecutive women admitted for first-time vaginal surgery for utero-vaginal prolapse at a public university hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark, underwent surgery and postoperative care in a fast track setting from September 15, 1999 to June 15 2000. A multimodal rehabilitation model with emphasis on information, standardized general anesthesia, reduced surgical distress, optimized pain-relief, early oral nutrition and ambulation, minimal use of indwelling catheter and vaginal packing. Postoperative hospital stay, complications, re-admission, success rate, patients' satisfaction and acceptability. Forty-one women with a median age of 69 years (range, 44-88 years) were included. All underwent anterior and/or posterior vaginal repair. Nineteen (46.3%) underwent vaginal hysterectomy, and eight (19.5%) underwent the Manchester procedure. Postoperative hospital stay was median 24 hr. Only three (7.3%) were discharged later than 48 hr. No re-admissions occurred. The most frequent complications were urinary retention exceeding 450 ml, and urinary tract infection (12.2%, and 9.8%, respectively). Short-term success rate was 97.6%. Patients' satisfaction rates were 85.4-95.1%. The median score of acceptability was 10 on a 0-10 points scale. The need for postoperative hospitalization was median 24 hr after vaginal surgery in a fast track setting, independently of the complexity of the procedure performed. Short-term success rate, satisfaction rates, and acceptability were all excellent. Follow up has been established to evaluate long-term success rates and recurrence.

  1. Douching for perceived vaginal odor with no infectious cause of vaginitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sarmina; Chatwani, Ashwin; Brovender, Herman; Zane, Richard; Valaoras, Thomas; Sobel, Jack D

    2011-04-01

    To demonstrate the effectiveness of medical-grade stainless steel Water Works Douching Device for treating abnormal vaginal odor in comparison with a commercially available over-the-counter plastic douching device. In a multicenter study, 140 women with perceived vaginal odor with no vaginal infection were randomized to either Water Works or control group in a 1:1 ratio and were douched daily for 4 weeks. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess the intensity of vaginal odor. Primary outcome included subject assessment of odor improvement and Nugent Gram stain score of vaginal secretions. Secondary outcome compared the efficacy and safety of Water Works with control douching device. Each patient underwent baseline, week 2, and week 4 visits. The final analytic sample consisted of 96 women. Success score at 4 weeks was 78% for the Water Works group and 38.5% for the control group. Mean VAS was significantly reduced, and Nugent and Lactobacillus scores were maintained in both groups. In the Water Works group, VAS was reduced from 7.3 ± 0.3 to 1.8 ± 0.6 (p < .001) after 4 weeks. In the control group, baseline versus 4 weeks VAS was 7.2 ± 0.3 and 3.4 ± 0.8 (p < .003). Women reported significant reduction of vaginal odor after douching with water for 4 weeks without any alteration of vaginal flora. The Water Works Douching Device was superior to over- the-counter device in reducing vaginal odor.

  2. Lactobacilli Dominance and Vaginal pH: Why Is the Human Vaginal Microbiome Unique?

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth A; Beasley, DeAnna E; Dunn, Robert R; Archie, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiome is dominated by bacteria from the genus Lactobacillus , which create an acidic environment thought to protect women against sexually transmitted pathogens and opportunistic infections. Strikingly, lactobacilli dominance appears to be unique to humans; while the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the human vagina is typically >70%, in other mammals lactobacilli rarely comprise more than 1% of vaginal microbiota. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain humans' unique vaginal microbiota, including humans' distinct reproductive physiology, high risk of STDs, and high risk of microbial complications linked to pregnancy and birth. Here, we test these hypotheses using comparative data on vaginal pH and the relative abundance of lactobacilli in 26 mammalian species and 50 studies ( N = 21 mammals for pH and 14 mammals for lactobacilli relative abundance). We found that non-human mammals, like humans, exhibit the lowest vaginal pH during the period of highest estrogen. However, the vaginal pH of non-human mammals is never as low as is typical for humans (median vaginal pH in humans = 4.5; range of pH across all 21 non-human mammals = 5.4-7.8). Contrary to disease and obstetric risk hypotheses, we found no significant relationship between vaginal pH or lactobacilli relative abundance and multiple metrics of STD or birth injury risk ( P -values ranged from 0.13 to 0.99). Given the lack of evidence for these hypotheses, we discuss two alternative explanations: the common function hypothesis and a novel hypothesis related to the diet of agricultural humans. Specifically, with regard to diet we propose that high levels of starch in human diets have led to increased levels of glycogen in the vaginal tract, which, in turn, promotes the proliferation of lactobacilli. If true, human diet may have paved the way for a novel, protective microbiome in human vaginal tracts. Overall, our results highlight the need for continuing research on non

  3. The aetiology of vaginal symptoms in rural Haiti.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Claire C; Desgrottes, Tania; Cutler, Lauren; Cutler, David; Devarajan, Karthika; Ocheretina, Oksana; Pape, Jean William; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2014-08-01

    Vaginal symptoms are a common chief complaint amongst women visiting outpatient clinics in rural Haiti. A systematic sample of 206 consecutive women over age 18 with gynaecological symptoms underwent gynaecologic examination and laboratory testing for chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis, HIV infection, trichomoniasis, candidiasis, and bacterial vaginosis. Among 206 women, 174 (84%) presented with vaginal discharge, 165 (80%) with vaginal itching, 123 (60%) with vaginal pain or dysuria, and 18 (9%) with non-traumatic vaginal sores or boils. Laboratory results were positive forChlamydia trachomatisin 5.4% (11/203), syphilis in 3.5% (7/202), HIV in 1.0% (2/200), andNeisseria gonorrhoeaein 1.0% (2/203). Among those that had microscopy, hyphae suggestive of candidiasis were visualized in 2.2% (1/45) and no cases of trichomoniasis were diagnosed 0% (0/45). Bacterial vaginosis was diagnosed in 28.3% (13/46). The prevalence of chlamydia was 4.9 (95% CI: 1.3-17.7) times greater among those 25 years of age and under (10.8%) than those older (2.3%). Chlamydia and bacterial vaginosis were the most common sexually transmitted infection and vaginal condition, respectively, in this study of rural Haitian adult women. The higher risk of chlamydia in younger women suggests education and screening programmes in young women should be considered. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Protective Effect of Vaginal Lactobacillus paracasei CRL 1289 against Urogenital Infection Produced by Staphylococcus aureus in a Mouse Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Zárate, Gabriela; Santos, Viviana; Nader-Macias, María Elena

    2007-01-01

    Urogenital infections of bacterial origin have a high incidence among the world female population at reproductive age. Lactobacilli, the predominant microorganisms of the healthy vaginal microbiota, have shown a protective effect against the colonization and overgrowth of urogenital pathogens that increased the interest for including them into probiotics products assigned to restore the urogenital balance. In the present work, we determined in a mouse animal model the capability of Lactobacillus paracasei CRL 1289, a human vaginal strain with probiotic properties, to prevent the vaginal colonization of a uropathogenic strain of Staphylococcus aureus. Six-week-old female BALB/c mice, synchronized in their estral cycle, were intravaginally inoculated with two doses of 109 lactobacilli before challenging them with a single dose of 105 or 107 CFU of S. aureus. The vaginal colonization of both microorganisms and the effect on the vaginal structure were determined at 2, 5, and 7 days after pathogen inoculation. Control mice and those challenged only with the pathogen showed an insignificant lactobacilli population, whereas 105 lactobacilli/mL of vaginal homogenate were recovered at 2 days after challenge from the L. paracasei CRL 1289 and the probiotic + pathogen groups, decreasing this number on the following days. The treatment with L. paracasei CRL 1289 decreased significantly the number of staphylococci recovered at 2 and 5 days when mice were challenged only with 105 CFU of pathogen. The inoculation of S. aureus produced a remarkable inflammatory response and structural alterations in the vaginal mucosa that decreases in a significant manner when the mice were protected with L. paracasei CRL 1289. The results obtained suggest that this particular Lactobacillus strain could prevent the onset of urogenital infections by interfering with the epithelial colonization by uropathogenic S. aureus. PMID:17485818

  5. Diverse Vaginal Microbiomes in Reproductive-Age Women with Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mu-Biao; Xu, Su-Rong; He, Yan; Deng, Guan-Hua; Sheng, Hua-Fang; Huang, Xue-Mei; Ouyang, Cai-Yan; Zhou, Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is one of the most prevalent vaginal infectious diseases, and there are controversial reports regarding the diversity of the associated vaginal microbiota. We determined the vaginal microbial community in patients with VVC, bacterial vaginosis (BV), and mixed infection of VVC and BV using Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA tags. Our results revealed for the first time the highly variable patterns of the vaginal microbiome from VVC patients. In general, the alpha-diversity results of species richness and evenness showed the following order: normal control < VVC only < mixed BV and VVC infection < BV only. The beta-diversity comparison of community structures also showed an intermediate composition of VVC between the control and BV samples. A detailed comparison showed that, although the control and BV communities had typical patterns, the vaginal microbiota of VVC is complex. The mixed BV and VVC infection group showed a unique pattern, with a relatively higher abundance of Lactobacillus than the BV group and higher abundance of Prevotella, Gardnerella, and Atopobium than the normal control. In contrast, the VVC-only group could not be described by any single profile, ranging from a community structure similar to the normal control (predominated with Lactobacillus) to BV-like community structures (abundant with Gardnerella and Atopobium). Treatment of VVC resulted in inconsistent changes of the vaginal microbiota, with four BV/VVC samples recovering to a higher Lactobacillus level, whereas many VVC-only patients did not. These results will be useful for future studies on the role of vaginal microbiota in VVC and related infectious diseases. PMID:24265786

  6. Diverse vaginal microbiomes in reproductive-age women with vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mu-Biao; Xu, Su-Rong; He, Yan; Deng, Guan-Hua; Sheng, Hua-Fang; Huang, Xue-Mei; Ouyang, Cai-Yan; Zhou, Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is one of the most prevalent vaginal infectious diseases, and there are controversial reports regarding the diversity of the associated vaginal microbiota. We determined the vaginal microbial community in patients with VVC, bacterial vaginosis (BV), and mixed infection of VVC and BV using Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA tags. Our results revealed for the first time the highly variable patterns of the vaginal microbiome from VVC patients. In general, the alpha-diversity results of species richness and evenness showed the following order: normal control < VVC only < mixed BV and VVC infection < BV only. The beta-diversity comparison of community structures also showed an intermediate composition of VVC between the control and BV samples. A detailed comparison showed that, although the control and BV communities had typical patterns, the vaginal microbiota of VVC is complex. The mixed BV and VVC infection group showed a unique pattern, with a relatively higher abundance of Lactobacillus than the BV group and higher abundance of Prevotella, Gardnerella, and Atopobium than the normal control. In contrast, the VVC-only group could not be described by any single profile, ranging from a community structure similar to the normal control (predominated with Lactobacillus) to BV-like community structures (abundant with Gardnerella and Atopobium). Treatment of VVC resulted in inconsistent changes of the vaginal microbiota, with four BV/VVC samples recovering to a higher Lactobacillus level, whereas many VVC-only patients did not. These results will be useful for future studies on the role of vaginal microbiota in VVC and related infectious diseases.

  7. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome secondary to group A Streptococcus vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Hikone, Mayu; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Washino, Takuya; Ota, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Naoya; Iwabuchi, Sentaro; Ohnishi, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a systemic illness usually caused in the setting of infection by group A Streptococcus (GAS). The primary infections are often invasive infections of the respiratory tract or necrotizing infections of the skin and soft tissue, but some infections occur without relevant focus. GAS vaginitis is a rare condition among adult women and is accordingly thought to be uncommon as a cause of streptococcal TSS. Here we report the cases of two postmenopausal women with streptococcal TSS secondary to GAS vaginitis, one aged 55 and one aged 60. Both came to our emergency department with complaints or symptoms of abdominal pain, fever, hypotension, and multi-organ failure. In both cases, the relevant factor associated with streptococcal infection was a recent episode of GAS vaginitis. Both underwent fluid management and 14 days of antibiotic treatment and fully recovered without complications. Vaginitis was likely to be the primary infectious trigger of TSS in these two cases. Intrauterine device insertion, endometrial biopsy, and post-partum state have all been previously reported in TSS patients, and the female genital tract has been described as a portal of entry. GAS vaginitis warrants appropriate treatment as it may progress to severe systemic infection as described. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Yin Care--a natural product for prophylactics and treatment of vaginal infections].

    PubMed

    Mikhova, M; Batashki, I; Ivanov, St

    2007-01-01

    A prospective study, including 60 patients with vaginal discharge has been made at Maternity hospital "Majchin dom"--Sofia for the period November 2006- February 2007. In 32 patients no causative agent has been revealed. They have been counseled to use Yin Care--vaginal lotion for 3 months in prophylactic concentration. 88.4% reported for diminished discharge. No adverse effects have been observed. In 11 patients suffering from bacterial vaginitis, caused by S. Epidermidis, S. Aureus, Enterococcus and E. Coli cure was achieved in 72.7% of cases. 17 women with Candida vaginitis have been included in the study. After standard antifungal treatment, 8 of them continued therapy with Yin Care. Recurrence of disease has been observed in only one case, while in the group treated with antifungal medication only recurrence has been observed in 2 cases.

  9. The role of lactobacilli and probiotics in maintaining vaginal health.

    PubMed

    Borges, Sandra; Silva, Joana; Teixeira, Paula

    2014-03-01

    The vaginal microbiota of healthy women consists typically of a diversity of anaerobic and aerobic microorganisms. Lactobacilli are the most prevalent and often numerically dominant microorganisms and are relevant as a barrier to infection. The capacity of lactobacilli to adhere and compete for adhesion sites in the vaginal epithelium and the capacity to produce antimicrobial compounds (hydrogen peroxide, lactic acid, bacteriocin-like substances), are important in the impairment of colonization by pathogens. This review summarizes the role of lactic acid bacteria in preventing illness of the host, including bacterial vaginosis, yeast vaginitis, urinary tract infection and sexually transmitted diseases. The administration of probiotics that colonize the vaginal tract can be important in maintaining a normal urogenital health and also to prevent or treat infections.

  10. Bacterial vaginosis, aerobic vaginitis, vaginal inflammation and major Pap smear abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Baptista, P; Lima-Silva, J; Pinto, C; Saldanha, C; Beires, J; Martinez-de-Oliveira, J; Donders, G

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the impact of the vaginal milieu on the presence of abnormal Pap smears and a positive human papilloma virus (HPV) test. A cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and May 2015, evaluating the vaginal discharge by fresh wet mount microscopy and comparing these data with Pap smear findings. Wet mount slides were scored for bacterial vaginosis (BV), aerobic vaginitis (AV), presence of Candida and Trichomonas vaginalis. Cytologic evaluation was done on all Pap smears according to the Bethesda criteria. The cobas© HPV Test (Roche) was performed for HPV detection. A total of 622 cases were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 41.6 ± 10.65 years (range 21-75). Eighty-three women (13.3 %) had a cytology result worse than low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). When comparing this group with the one with normal or minor [atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) or LSIL] Pap smear abnormalities, there were no differences in the presence of Candida (32.5 % vs. 33.2 %, p = 1.0), absence of lactobacilli (38.6 % vs. 32.5 %, p = 0.32) or BV (20.5 % vs. 13.2 %, p = 0.09). On the other hand, moderate or severe inflammation (msI) (41.0 % vs. 28.8 %, p = 0,04), moderate or severe AV (msAV) (16.9 % vs. 7.2 %, p = 0.009) and msAV/BV (37.3 % vs. 20.0 %, p = 0.001) were more common in women with such major cervical abnormalities. No significant association was found between deviations of the vaginal milieu and high-risk HPV infection. The presence of msI or msAV, but not BV, is independently associated with an increased risk of major cervical cytological abnormalities, but not with HPV infection.

  11. Vulvovaginitis and vaginal discharge in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, W.

    1975-01-01

    Ninety-four patients with vulvovaginitis and vaginal discharge were assessed clinically and had vaginal swabs taken in an effort to establish a definite diagnosis. A high incidence of fungous infection was found while there was a surprisingly low incidence of Trichomonal vaginitis. These findings vary markedly from recent surveys in other countries (Delaha et al. (1964); Gray and Barnes, 1965; Desai et al., 1966). PMID:1223281

  12. Aerobic vaginitis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Donders, Ggg; Bellen, G; Rezeberga, D

    2011-09-01

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is an alteration in vaginal bacterial flora that differs from bacterial vaginosis (BV). AV is characterised by an abnormal vaginal microflora accompanied by an increased localised inflammatory reaction and immune response, as opposed to the suppressed immune response that is characteristic of BV. Given the increased local production of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and IL-8 associated with AV during pregnancy, not surprisingly AV is associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery, chorioamnionitis and funisitis of the fetus. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment for AV in pregnant or non-pregnant women, but a broader spectrum drug such as clindamycin is preferred above metronidazole to prevent infection-related preterm birth. The exact role of AV in pregnancy, the potential benefit of screening, and the use of newer local antibiotics, disinfectants, probiotics and immune modulators need further study. © 2011 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2011 RCOG.

  13. Human neutrophil peptides in vaginitis/cervicitis of different etiology.

    PubMed

    Wiechuła, Barbara E; Friedek, Daniela A; Ekiel, Alicja M; Romanik, Małgorzata K; Martirosian, Gayane

    2007-01-01

    Development of female genito-urinary infections depends on many factors, such as immune system activity, virulence of microorganism and production of factors inhibiting the growth of microorganisms. Taking into account the possibility of relapses or severe complications, it is very important to appropriately diagnose and treat infections. Because of recently observed increase of microbial resistance to antibiotics, researchers are looking for alternatives. In our study we evaluated and compared the concentration of human neutrophil peptides (HNP 1-3) in cervico-vaginal lavages (CVL), obtained from women with vaginitis/cervicitis. Swabs from the posterior vaginal fornix and from the endocervical canal as well as CVL samples were obtained from 32 patients with vaginitis/cervicitis and 29 healthy women (control group). Supernatants of CVL were used for determination of concentration of HNP by ELISA. The difference between concentrations of HNP 1-3 in studied and control groups was statistically significant (p = 0.018). The maximal concentration was determined in patients with mixed infections (28.41 ng/ml), and Group B Streptococci, GBS, (28.06 ng/ml), the minimal concentrations in cases of C. trachomatis (mean concentrations did not differ from those in the control group: 16.93 ng/ml and 16.39 ng/ml, respectively). Maximal correlation was determined for control-studied group with isolation of GBS (r = 0.79), and very high negative correlation for group of GBS - C. trachomatis (r = -0.98).

  14. Accuracy of vaginal symptom self-diagnosis algorithms for deployed military women.

    PubMed

    Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A; Neal, Jeremy L; Jones, Ashley S; Lowe, Nancy K

    2010-01-01

    Deployed military women have an increased risk for development of vaginitis due to extreme temperatures, primitive sanitation, hygiene and laundry facilities, and unavailable or unacceptable healthcare resources. The Women in the Military Self-Diagnosis (WMSD) and treatment kit was developed as a field-expedient solution to this problem. The primary study aims were to evaluate the accuracy of women's self-diagnosis of vaginal symptoms and eight diagnostic algorithms and to predict potential self-medication omission and commission error rates. Participants included 546 active duty, deployable Army (43.3%) and Navy (53.6%) women with vaginal symptoms who sought healthcare at troop medical clinics on base.In the clinic lavatory, women conducted a self-diagnosis using a sterile cotton swab to obtain vaginal fluid, a FemExam card to measure positive or negative pH and amines, and the investigator-developed WMSD Decision-Making Guide. Potential self-diagnoses were "bacterial infection" (bacterial vaginosis [BV] and/or trichomonas vaginitis [TV]), "yeast infection" (candida vaginitis [CV]), "no infection/normal," or "unclear." The Affirm VPIII laboratory reference standard was used to detect clinically significant amounts of vaginal fluid DNA for organisms associated with BV, TV, and CV. Women's self-diagnostic accuracy was 56% for BV/TV and 69.2% for CV. False-positives would have led to a self-medication commission error rate of 20.3% for BV/TV and 8% for CV. Potential self-medication omission error rates due to false-negatives were 23.7% for BV/TV and 24.8% for CV. The positive predictive value of diagnostic algorithms ranged from 0% to 78.1% for BV/TV and 41.7% for CV. The algorithms were based on clinical diagnostic standards. The nonspecific nature of vaginal symptoms, mixed infections, and a faulty device intended to measure vaginal pH and amines explain why none of the algorithms reached the goal of 95% accuracy. The next prototype of the WMSD kit will not include

  15. High frequency of human papillomavirus detection in the vagina before first vaginal intercourse among females enrolled in a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Shew, Marcia L; Weaver, Bree; Tu, Wanzhu; Tong, Yan; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Brown, Darron R

    2013-03-15

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is believed to be primarily sexually transmitted. Few studies have documented the detection of HPV in the vagina before first vaginal intercourse. We used a longitudinally followed cohort of adolescent females without prior vaginal intercourse to examine the frequency of detection of vaginal HPV and the association between first reported HPV detection and noncoital sexual behaviors. HPV was detected in 45.5% of subjects (10 of 22) before first vaginal sex. Seven of these 10 subjects reported noncoital behaviors that, in part, might have explained genital transmission. HPV can be detected in the vagina before first sexual intercourse, highlighting the need for early vaccination.

  16. Vaginal microbiota and viral sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed

    Nardis, C; Mosca, L; Mastromarino, P

    2013-01-01

    Healthy vaginal microbiota is an important biological barrier to pathogenic microorganisms. When this predominantly Lactobacillus community is disrupted, decreased in abundance and replaced by different anaerobes, bacterial vaginosis (BV) may occur. BV is associated with prevalence and incidence of several sexually transmitted infections. This review provides background on BV, discusses the epidemiologic data to support a role of altered vaginal microbiota for acquisition of sexually transmitted diseases and analyzes mechanisms by which lactobacilli could counteract sexually transmitted viral infections.

  17. Vaginal Microbiota and Sexually Transmitted Infections That May Influence Transmission of Cell-Associated HIV

    PubMed Central

    Cone, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Vaginal microbiota and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are likely to influence the transmission of cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Lactic acid produced by Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota (Nugent score 0–3) will likely inhibit transmission, especially female-to-male transmission. In contrast, polymicrobial microbiota (Nugent score 4–10), community state types IV-A and IV-B, and STIs will likely increase transmission of cell-associated HIV. PMID:25414415

  18. Lactobacilli Dominance and Vaginal pH: Why Is the Human Vaginal Microbiome Unique?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth A.; Beasley, DeAnna E.; Dunn, Robert R.; Archie, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiome is dominated by bacteria from the genus Lactobacillus, which create an acidic environment thought to protect women against sexually transmitted pathogens and opportunistic infections. Strikingly, lactobacilli dominance appears to be unique to humans; while the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the human vagina is typically >70%, in other mammals lactobacilli rarely comprise more than 1% of vaginal microbiota. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain humans' unique vaginal microbiota, including humans' distinct reproductive physiology, high risk of STDs, and high risk of microbial complications linked to pregnancy and birth. Here, we test these hypotheses using comparative data on vaginal pH and the relative abundance of lactobacilli in 26 mammalian species and 50 studies (N = 21 mammals for pH and 14 mammals for lactobacilli relative abundance). We found that non-human mammals, like humans, exhibit the lowest vaginal pH during the period of highest estrogen. However, the vaginal pH of non-human mammals is never as low as is typical for humans (median vaginal pH in humans = 4.5; range of pH across all 21 non-human mammals = 5.4–7.8). Contrary to disease and obstetric risk hypotheses, we found no significant relationship between vaginal pH or lactobacilli relative abundance and multiple metrics of STD or birth injury risk (P-values ranged from 0.13 to 0.99). Given the lack of evidence for these hypotheses, we discuss two alternative explanations: the common function hypothesis and a novel hypothesis related to the diet of agricultural humans. Specifically, with regard to diet we propose that high levels of starch in human diets have led to increased levels of glycogen in the vaginal tract, which, in turn, promotes the proliferation of lactobacilli. If true, human diet may have paved the way for a novel, protective microbiome in human vaginal tracts. Overall, our results highlight the need for continuing research on non

  19. [Hemolytic group B streptococcus in cervico-vaginal secretions].

    PubMed

    Savarino, A; Mattei, R; Barsotti, A; Bechi, R; Saisi, F; Lenci, F

    1988-01-01

    The group B streptococcus can be an etiological agent of newborn's infections and vaginitis. Therefore, we evaluated the statistical incidence of this microorganism in vaginal swabs of 1403 non-selected subjects. We isolated this streptococcus in 12.3% samples and it was present in 26.3% of positive cultures. Our study confirms the elevate incidence of this microorganism and suggests the opportunity of this research in pregnancy monitoring and in gynaecological flogosis.

  20. Trichomonas vaginalis infection in women who submit self-obtained vaginal samples after internet recruitment.

    PubMed

    Gaydos, Charlotte A; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Barnes, Mathilda; Quinn, Nicole; Agreda, Patricia; Jett-Goheen, Mary; Whittle, Pamela; Hogan, Terry

    2011-09-01

    Submission of self-obtained vaginal samples (SOVs) collected at home could remove barriers that women face in getting tested for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Internet recruitment of SOVs is highly acceptable. Sexually active women ≥14 years were recruited by an educational Internet program, available at: www.iwantthekit.org (IWTK), which offered free testing for trichomonas as part of a panel, which also offered testing for chlamydia and gonorrhea. Kits were ordered online, SOVs were sent through US mail to the laboratory, and tested by nucleic acid amplification tests. Demographics and sexual risk factors were accessed by questionnaires. Women called or were contacted to receive their results. Of women requesting kits, 1525 (43%) returned swabs by mail. In all, 61% were <25 years, 52% were black, and 80% were single. Vaginal discharge was reported by 44%, prevalence for trichomonas was 10% (10% for chlamydia, 1% for gonorrhea), and 18% had at least one prevalent STI. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated several significantly associated risks factors as follows: adjusted odds ratio for black race was 2.69; for residence of Illinois, 3.85; for not having health insurance, 1.57; for lack of a bachelor's degree, 5.53; for having 2 to 15 partners, 1.60; for having ≥16 partners in previous year, 3.51; for being bisexual, 2.0; for not always using condoms, 3.04; and for having a partner who had a previous STI, 1.71. Age was not associated with trichomonas infection. All infected women were treated. A high prevalence of trichomonas and high sexual risk factors were demonstrated. Internet recruitment was a useful method of screening women for trichomonas infection.

  1. Vaginal toxic shock reaction triggering desquamative inflammatory vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Nigel; Edlind, Thomas D; Schlievert, Patrick M; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to report 2 cases of desquamative inflammatory vaginitis associated with toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1)-producing Staphylococcus aureus strains. Case report of 2 patients, 1 with an acute and 1 with a chronic presentation, diagnosed with desquamative inflammatory vaginitis on the basis of clinical findings and wet mount microscopy. Pretreatment and posttreatment vaginal bacterial and yeast cultures were obtained. Pretreatment vaginal bacterial cultures from both patients grew TSST-1-producing S. aureus. Subsequent vaginal bacterial culture results after oral antibiotic therapy were negative. Desquamative inflammatory vaginitis may be triggered through TSST-1-mediated vaginal toxic shock reaction.

  2. Minimizing the Risk of Infection and Bleeding at Trans-Vaginal Ultrasound-Guided Ovum Pick-up: Results of a Prospective Web-Based World-Wide Survey.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Harish; Agrawal, Rina; Weissman, Ariel; Shoham, Gon; Leong, Milton; Shoham, Zeev

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify clinical practices worldwide, which would help in recognizing women at risk of excessive bleeding or of developing pelvic infection following trans-vaginal ovum pick-up (TV-OPU), measures taken to minimize risks and their management. A prospective, web-based questionnaire with distinct questions related to the practice of TV-OPU. A total of 155 units from 55 countries performing 97,200 IVF cycles annually responded to this web-based survey. A majority (65 %) responded that they would routinely carry out full blood count, while 35 % performed coagulation profile. Less than a third agreed screening women for vaginal infections. About a third used both sterile water and antiseptic to minimize ascending infection, and 52 % used antibiotics for prophylaxis. Doppler ultrasound was routinely used by 20 % of clinicians. 73 % of the clinicians preferred conservative management as their first line management for patients diagnosed with intra-abdominal bleeding. The study has identified a wide variation in the practices of minimizing infection and bleeding complications. The dearth of good quality evidence may be responsible for the lack of published guidelines, and therefore a lack of consensus on the optimum practice for minimizing the risk of infection and bleeding during TV-OPU.

  3. Role for Dendritic Cells in Immunoregulation during Experimental Vaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Dana M.; Barousse, Melissa M.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2006-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) caused by the commensal organism Candida albicans remains a significant problem among women of childbearing age, with protection against and susceptibility to infection still poorly understood. While cell-mediated immunity by CD4+ Th1-type cells is protective against most forms of mucosal candidiasis, no protective role for adaptive immunity has been identified against VVC. This is postulated to be due to immunoregulation that prohibits a more profound Candida-specific CD4+ T-cell response against infection. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of dendritic cells (DCs) in the induction phase of the immune response as a means to understand the initiation of the immunoregulatory events. Immunostaining of DCs in sectioned murine lymph nodes draining the vagina revealed a profound cellular reorganization with DCs becoming concentrated in the T-cell zone throughout the course of experimental vaginal Candida infection consistent with cell-mediated immune responsiveness. However, analysis of draining lymph node DC subsets revealed a predominance of immunoregulation-associated CD11c+ B220+ plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) under both uninfected and infected conditions. Staining of vaginal DCs showed the presence of both DEC-205+ and pDCs, with extension of dendrites into the vaginal lumen of infected mice in close contact with Candida. Flow cytometric analysis of draining lymph node DC costimulatory molecules and activation markers from infected mice indicated a lack of upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class II, CD80, CD86, and CD40 during infection, consistent with a tolerizing condition. Together, the results suggest that DCs are involved in the immunoregulatory events manifested during a vaginal Candida infection and potentially through the action of pDCs. PMID:16714548

  4. Detection of Human Papillomavirus Infection in Patients with Vaginal Intraepithelial Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Lamos, Cristina; Mihaljevic, Charlotte; Aulmann, Sebastian; Bruckner, Thomas; Domschke, Christoph; Wallwiener, Markus; Paringer, Carmen; Fluhr, Herbert; Schott, Sarah; Dinkic, Christine; Brucker, Janina; Golatta, Michael; Gensthaler, Lisa; Eichbaum, Michael; Sohn, Christof; Rom, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) is a pre-malignant lesion, potentially leading to vaginal cancer. It is a rare disease, representing less than 1% of all intraepithelial neoplasia of the female genital tract. Similar to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), there are three different grades of VAIN. VAIN 1 is also known as a low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), whereas VAIN 2 and VAIN 3 both represent high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Risk factors for the development of VAIN are similar to those for cervical neoplasia, i.e. promiscuity, starting sexual activity at an early age, tobacco consumption and infection with human papillomavirus (HPV). However, compared to other intraepithelial neoplasia such as CIN or VIN (vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia), there still is little understanding about the natural course of VAIN and its capacity for pro- or regression. Furthermore, there is controversial data about the HPV detection rate in VAIN lesions. 67 patients with histologically confirmed VAIN, who were diagnosed between 2003 and 2011 at the University Women´s Hospital of Heidelberg Germany, were included in this study. The biopsies of all participating patients were subjected to HPV genotyping. GP-E6/E7 Nested Multiplex PCR (NMPCR) was used to identify and genotype HPV. Eighteen pairs of type-specific nested PCR primers were assessed to detect the following "high-risk" HPV genotypes: 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66 and 68, as well as the "low-risk" genotypes 6/11, 42, 43 and 44. The data was analyzed with the software SAS (Statistical Analysis System). All 67 cases were eligible for DNA analysis. The median age was 53 years. The largest group with 53% (n = 36) was formed by women, who were first diagnosed with VAIN between the age of 41 to 60 years. 50% (n = 37) of the patients presented a VAIN in the upper 1/3 of the vagina. 58 (87%) were diagnosed with HSIL (VAIN). The median age in patients with LSIL

  5. [Vaginitis and vaginosis. Comparison of two periods].

    PubMed

    Ceruti, M; Canestrelli, M; Piantelli, G; Amone, F; Condemi, V; De Paolis, P; Ludovici, G; Somenzi, P

    1993-10-01

    Vaginitis is the most frequent gynecological disease. It is characterized by objective and subjective signs of inflammation and differs from bacterial vaginosis (BV) which is an abnormal condition of the vaginal ecosystem caused by the excessive growth of aerobic and anaerobic flora normally present in the vagina with an increased risk of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). The authors report the results of a study carried out at the Centre for Gynecological Infections at the Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the University of Parma. 828 patients were enrolled in the study during the period 1985-86 and 1559 patients during the two-year period 1991-92. The aim of the study was to evaluate variations in epidemiological data for vaginitis and bacterial vaginosis in the two periods examined. No significant changes were observed (p > 0.05) with regard to the prevalence of Ca, Tv and BV forms. On the other hand, there was a significant reduction (p < 0.001) in the forms sustained by other microorganisms (above all, streptococcus and enterobacteria) between the first and second periods with a parallel increase in the number of negative cases. The analysis of the age distribution of vaginitis and BV showed a reduction of other microorganisms and an increase in negative vaginal swabs in adults (> 20 years old).

  6. A Combination Microbicide Gel Protects Macaques Against Vaginal Simian Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Reverse Transcriptase Infection, But Only Partially Reduces Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Infection After a Single High-Dose Cochallenge

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Mayla; Aravantinou, Meropi; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Goldman, Daniel; Kenney, Jessica; Derby, Nina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Fernández-Romero, Jose A.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection increases HIV susceptibility. We previously established a rhesus macaque model of vaginal HSV-2 preexposure followed by cochallenge with HSV-2 and simian/human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT). Using this model, we showed that a gel containing the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 in carrageenan (CG) reduced SHIV-RT infection. To evaluate the efficacy of new generation microbicides against both viruses, we first established dual infection after single vaginal cochallenge with SHIV-RT and HSV-2 in HSV-2-naive macaques. All animals (6/6) became HSV-2 infected, with 4/6 coinfected with SHIV-RT. In a control group cochallenged with SHIV-RT and UV-inactivated HSV-2, 2/4 became SHIV-RT infected, and none had detectable HSV-2. Low-level HSV-2-specific antibody and T cell responses were detected in some HSV-2-infected animals. To test a CG gel containing MIV-150 and zinc acetate (MZC), which provided naive animals full protection from SHIV-RT for at least 8 h, MZC (vs. CG) was applied daily for 14 days followed by cochallenge 8 h later. MZC prevented SHIV-RT infection (0/9 infected, p=0.04 vs. 3/6 in CG controls), but only reduced HSV-2 infection by 20% (6/9 infected vs. 5/6 in CG, p=0.6). In HSV-2-infected animals, none of the gel-treated animals seroconverted, and only the CG controls had measurable HSV-2-specific T cell responses. This study shows the promise of MZC to prevent immunodeficiency virus infection (even in the presence of HSV-2) and reduce HSV-2 infection after exposure to a high-dose inoculum. Additionally, it demonstrates the potential of a macaque coinfection model to evaluate broad-spectrum microbicides. PMID:24117013

  7. A combination microbicide gel protects macaques against vaginal simian human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase infection, but only partially reduces herpes simplex virus-2 infection after a single high-dose cochallenge.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Mayla; Aravantinou, Meropi; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Goldman, Daniel; Kenney, Jessica; Derby, Nina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Fernández-Romero, Jose A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Robbiani, Melissa

    2014-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection increases HIV susceptibility. We previously established a rhesus macaque model of vaginal HSV-2 preexposure followed by cochallenge with HSV-2 and simian/human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT). Using this model, we showed that a gel containing the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 in carrageenan (CG) reduced SHIV-RT infection. To evaluate the efficacy of new generation microbicides against both viruses, we first established dual infection after single vaginal cochallenge with SHIV-RT and HSV-2 in HSV-2-naive macaques. All animals (6/6) became HSV-2 infected, with 4/6 coinfected with SHIV-RT. In a control group cochallenged with SHIV-RT and UV-inactivated HSV-2, 2/4 became SHIV-RT infected, and none had detectable HSV-2. Low-level HSV-2-specific antibody and T cell responses were detected in some HSV-2-infected animals. To test a CG gel containing MIV-150 and zinc acetate (MZC), which provided naive animals full protection from SHIV-RT for at least 8 h, MZC (vs. CG) was applied daily for 14 days followed by cochallenge 8 h later. MZC prevented SHIV-RT infection (0/9 infected, p=0.04 vs. 3/6 in CG controls), but only reduced HSV-2 infection by 20% (6/9 infected vs. 5/6 in CG, p=0.6). In HSV-2-infected animals, none of the gel-treated animals seroconverted, and only the CG controls had measurable HSV-2-specific T cell responses. This study shows the promise of MZC to prevent immunodeficiency virus infection (even in the presence of HSV-2) and reduce HSV-2 infection after exposure to a high-dose inoculum. Additionally, it demonstrates the potential of a macaque coinfection model to evaluate broad-spectrum microbicides.

  8. Role of Lactobacillus Species in the Intermediate Vaginal Flora in Early Pregnancy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Machal, Susanne; Holzer, Iris; Kueronya, Verena; Husslein, Peter Wolf; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2015-01-01

    Poor obstetrical outcomes are associated with imbalances in the vaginal flora. The present study evaluated the role of vaginal Lactobacillus species in women with intermediate vaginal flora with regard to obstetrical outcomes. We retrospectively analysed data from all women with singleton pregnancies who had undergone routine screening for asymptomatic vaginal infections at our tertiary referral centre between 2005 and 2014. Vaginal smears were Gram-stained and classified according to the Nugent scoring system as normal flora (score 0-3), intermediate vaginal flora (4-6), or bacterial vaginosis (7-10). Only women with intermediate vaginal flora were investigated. Women with a Nugent score of 4 were categorised into those with and without Lactobacilli. Follow-up smears were obtained 4-6 weeks after the initial smears. Descriptive data analysis, the Welch's t-test, the Fisher's exact test, and multiple regression analysis with adjustment for confounders were performed. Gestational age at delivery and birth weight were the outcome measures. At antenatal screening, 529/8421 women presented with intermediate vaginal flora. Amongst these, 349/529 (66%) had a Nugent score of 4, 94/529 (17.8%) a Nugent score of 5, and 86/529 (16.2%) a Nugent score of 6. Amongst those with a Nugent score of 4, 232/349 (66.5%) women were in the Lactobacilli group and 117/349 (33.5%) in the Non-Lactobacilli group. The preterm delivery rate was significantly lower in the Lactobacilli than in the Non-Lactobacilli group (OR 0.34, CI 0.21-0.55; p<0.001). Mean birth weight was 2979 ± 842 g and 2388 ± 1155 g in the study groups, respectively (MD 564.12, CI 346.23-781.92; p<0.001). On follow-up smears, bacterial vaginosis rates were 9% in the Lactobacilli and 7.8% in the Non-Lactobacilli group. The absence of vaginal Lactobacillus species and any bacterial colonisation increases the risks of preterm delivery and low birth weight in women with intermediate vaginal flora in early pregnancy.

  9. The Bali STD/AIDS study: association between vaginal hygiene practices and STDs among sex workers.

    PubMed

    Reed, B D; Ford, K; Wirawan, D N

    2001-02-01

    To assess the association between genital cleansing practices and the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases and of sexual health knowledge among female sex workers in Bali, Indonesia. Low priced commercial sex workers (CSWs) participated in the Bali STD/AIDS Study, a 3 year educational project evaluating the effect of education on the subsequent use of condoms and the prevalence of STDs and AIDS. Structured interviews, genital evaluation, laboratory evaluation for STDs, and treatment were performed. Vaginal cleansing characteristics including frequency, type, and reasons for use, were evaluated. Associations between these characteristics and the presence of bacterial and viral genital infections were assessed. Of 625 female sex workers evaluated between May and July 1998, 99.1% used substances, such as soap and toothpaste, to clean the vagina at least daily, with 69.3% performing this after each intercourse. The women using such cleansers after each client did not differ from those using them once or less daily in education, AIDS and condom use knowledge, time working as a CSW, or number of clients in the previous day. However, they were younger than those using vaginal cleansers daily or less, and reported lower condom usage in the past week. Several genital symptoms, such as discoloured discharge and odour, were reported less by women with the highest frequency of vaginal cleanser use. Prevalence of genital infections in this population of women was substantial, with bacterial infections more prevalent than viral infections. Infections were not associated with the type of cleanser used, using a genital cleanser on the day of examination, or using a cleanser after each client versus daily or less, except for candida colonisation, which was more prevalent in women cleansing after each client (OR=1.87, 95% CI 1.21, 2.90). However, symptomatic candida vulvovaginitis (positive culture plus presence of symptoms) was not associated with the prevalence of genital

  10. Bacteria in the vaginal microbiome alter the innate immune response and barrier properties of the human vaginal epithelia in a species-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Doerflinger, Sylvie Y; Throop, Andrea L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2014-06-15

    Bacterial vaginosis increases the susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections and negatively affects women's reproductive health. To investigate host-vaginal microbiota interactions and the impact on immune barrier function, we colonized 3-dimensional (3-D) human vaginal epithelial cells with 2 predominant species of vaginal microbiota (Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus crispatus) or 2 prevalent bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (Atopobium vaginae and Prevotella bivia). Colonization of 3-D vaginal epithelial cell aggregates with vaginal microbiota was observed with direct attachment to host cell surface with no cytotoxicity. A. vaginae infection yielded increased expression membrane-associated mucins and evoked a robust proinflammatory, immune response in 3-D vaginal epithelial cells (ie, expression of CCL20, hBD-2, interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, and tumor necrosis factor α) that can negatively affect barrier function. However, P. bivia and L. crispatus did not significantly upregulate pattern-recognition receptor-signaling, mucin expression, antimicrobial peptides/defensins, or proinflammatory cytokines in 3-D vaginal epithelial cell aggregates. Notably, L. iners induced pattern-recognition receptor-signaling activity, but no change was observed in mucin expression or secretion of interleukin 6 and interleukin 8. We identified unique species-specific immune signatures from vaginal epithelial cells elicited by colonization with commensal and bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria. A. vaginae elicited a signature that is consistent with significant disruption of immune barrier properties, potentially resulting in enhanced susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections during bacterial vaginosis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The vaginal microbiota, host defence and reproductive physiology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven B; Ravel, Jacques

    2017-01-15

    The interaction between the human host and the vaginal microbiota is highly dynamic. Major changes in the vaginal physiology and microbiota over a woman's lifetime are largely shaped by transitional periods such as puberty, menopause and pregnancy, while daily fluctuations in microbial composition observed through culture-independent studies are more likely to be the results of daily life activities and behaviours. The vaginal microbiota of reproductive-aged women is largely made up of at least five different community state types. Four of these community state types are dominated by lactic-acid producing Lactobacillus spp. while the fifth is commonly composed of anaerobes and strict anaerobes and is sometimes associated with vaginal symptoms. The production of lactic acid has been associated with contributing to the overall health of the vagina due to its direct and indirect effects on pathogens and host defence. Some species associated with non-Lactobacillus vaginal microbiota may trigger immune responses as well as degrade the host mucosa, processes that ultimately increase susceptibility to infections and contribute to negative reproductive outcomes such as infertility and preterm birth. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional underpinnings of how the vaginal microbiota affect host physiology but also how host physiology affects the vaginal microbiota. Understanding this fine-tuned interaction is key to maintaining women's reproductive health. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  12. The vaginal microbiota, host defence and reproductive physiology

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The interaction between the human host and the vaginal microbiota is highly dynamic. Major changes in the vaginal physiology and microbiota over a woman's lifetime are largely shaped by transitional periods such as puberty, menopause and pregnancy, while daily fluctuations in microbial composition observed through culture‐independent studies are more likely to be the results of daily life activities and behaviours. The vaginal microbiota of reproductive‐aged women is largely made up of at least five different community state types. Four of these community state types are dominated by lactic‐acid producing Lactobacillus spp. while the fifth is commonly composed of anaerobes and strict anaerobes and is sometimes associated with vaginal symptoms. The production of lactic acid has been associated with contributing to the overall health of the vagina due to its direct and indirect effects on pathogens and host defence. Some species associated with non‐Lactobacillus vaginal microbiota may trigger immune responses as well as degrade the host mucosa, processes that ultimately increase susceptibility to infections and contribute to negative reproductive outcomes such as infertility and preterm birth. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional underpinnings of how the vaginal microbiota affect host physiology but also how host physiology affects the vaginal microbiota. Understanding this fine‐tuned interaction is key to maintaining women's reproductive health. PMID:27373840

  13. Relationship between lactobacilli and opportunistic bacterial pathogens associated with vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Razzak, Mohammad Sabri A; Al-Charrakh, Alaa H; Al-Greitty, Bara Hamid

    2011-04-01

    Vaginitis, is an infectious inflammation of the vaginal mucosa, which sometimes involves the vulva. The balance of the vaginal flora is maintained by the Lactobacilli and its protective and probiotic role in treating and preventing vaginal infection by producing antagonizing compounds which are regarded as safe for humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of Lactobacilli against common bacterial opportunistic pathogens in vaginitis and study the effects of some antibiotics on Lactobacilli isolates. In this study (110) vaginal swabs were obtained from women suffering from vaginitis who admitted to Babylon Hospital of Maternity and Paediatrics in Babylon province, Iraq. The study involved the role of intrauterine device among married women with vaginitis and also involved isolation of opportunistic bacterial isolates among pregnant and non pregnant women. This study also involved studying probiotic role of Lactobacilli by production of some defense factors like hydrogen peroxide, bacteriocin, and lactic acid. Results revealed that a total of 130 bacterial isolates were obtained. Intrauterine device was a predisposing factor for vaginitis. The most common opportunistic bacterial isolates were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. All Lactobacilli were hydrogen peroxide producers while some isolates were bacteriocin producers that inhibited some of opportunistic pathogens (S. aureus, E. coli). Lactobacilli were sensitive to erythromycin while 93.3% of them were resistant to ciprofloxacin and (40%, 53.3%) of them were resistant to amoxicillin and gentamycin respectively. Results revealed that there was an inverse relationship between Lactobacilli presence and organisms causing vaginitis. This may be attributed to the production of defense factors by Lactobacilli. The types of antibiotics used to treat vaginitis must be very selective in order not to kill the beneficial bacteria

  14. Relationship between lactobacilli and opportunistic bacterial pathogens associated with vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Razzak, Mohammad Sabri A.; Al-Charrakh, Alaa H.; AL-Greitty, Bara Hamid

    2011-01-01

    Background: Vaginitis, is an infectious inflammation of the vaginal mucosa, which sometimes involves the vulva. The balance of the vaginal flora is maintained by the Lactobacilli and its protective and probiotic role in treating and preventing vaginal infection by producing antagonizing compounds which are regarded as safe for humans. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of Lactobacilli against common bacterial opportunistic pathogens in vaginitis and study the effects of some antibiotics on Lactobacilli isolates. Materials and Methods: In this study (110) vaginal swabs were obtained from women suffering from vaginitis who admitted to Babylon Hospital of Maternity and Paediatrics in Babylon province, Iraq. The study involved the role of intrauterine device among married women with vaginitis and also involved isolation of opportunistic bacterial isolates among pregnant and non pregnant women. This study also involved studying probiotic role of Lactobacilli by production of some defense factors like hydrogen peroxide, bacteriocin, and lactic acid. Results: Results revealed that a total of 130 bacterial isolates were obtained. Intrauterine device was a predisposing factor for vaginitis. The most common opportunistic bacterial isolates were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. All Lactobacilli were hydrogen peroxide producers while some isolates were bacteriocin producers that inhibited some of opportunistic pathogens (S. aureus, E. coli). Lactobacilli were sensitive to erythromycin while 93.3% of them were resistant to ciprofloxacin and (40%, 53.3%) of them were resistant to amoxicillin and gentamycin respectively. Results revealed that there was an inverse relationship between Lactobacilli presence and organisms causing vaginitis. This may be attributed to the production of defense factors by Lactobacilli. Conclusion: The types of antibiotics used to treat vaginitis must be very

  15. A Murine Model of Candida glabrata Vaginitis Shows No Evidence of an Inflammatory Immunopathogenic Response.

    PubMed

    Nash, Evelyn E; Peters, Brian M; Lilly, Elizabeth A; Noverr, Mairi C; Fidel, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is the second most common organism isolated from women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), particularly in women with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. However, mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of C. glabrata-associated VVC are unknown and have not been studied at any depth in animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate host responses to infection following efforts to optimize a murine model of C. glabrata VVC. For this, various designs were evaluated for consistent experimental vaginal colonization (i.e., type 1 and type 2 diabetic mice, exogenous estrogen, varying inocula, and co-infection with C. albicans). Upon model optimization, vaginal fungal burden and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) recruitment were assessed longitudinally over 21 days post-inoculation, together with vaginal concentrations of IL-1β, S100A8 alarmin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and in vivo biofilm formation. Consistent and sustained vaginal colonization with C. glabrata was achieved in estrogenized streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Vaginal PMN infiltration was consistently low, with IL-1β, S100A8, and LDH concentrations similar to uninoculated mice. Biofilm formation was not detected in vivo, and co-infection with C. albicans did not induce synergistic immunopathogenic effects. This data suggests that experimental vaginal colonization of C. glabrata is not associated with an inflammatory immunopathogenic response or biofilm formation.

  16. A Murine Model of Candida glabrata Vaginitis Shows No Evidence of an Inflammatory Immunopathogenic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Evelyn E.; Peters, Brian M.; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is the second most common organism isolated from women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), particularly in women with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. However, mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of C. glabrata-associated VVC are unknown and have not been studied at any depth in animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate host responses to infection following efforts to optimize a murine model of C. glabrata VVC. For this, various designs were evaluated for consistent experimental vaginal colonization (i.e., type 1 and type 2 diabetic mice, exogenous estrogen, varying inocula, and co-infection with C. albicans). Upon model optimization, vaginal fungal burden and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) recruitment were assessed longitudinally over 21 days post-inoculation, together with vaginal concentrations of IL-1β, S100A8 alarmin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and in vivo biofilm formation. Consistent and sustained vaginal colonization with C. glabrata was achieved in estrogenized streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Vaginal PMN infiltration was consistently low, with IL-1β, S100A8, and LDH concentrations similar to uninoculated mice. Biofilm formation was not detected in vivo, and co-infection with C. albicans did not induce synergistic immunopathogenic effects. This data suggests that experimental vaginal colonization of C. glabrata is not associated with an inflammatory immunopathogenic response or biofilm formation. PMID:26807975

  17. Mouse strain-dependent differences in estrogen sensitivity during vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Mosci, Paolo; Pietrella, Donatella; Ricci, Giovanni; Pandey, Neelam; Monari, Claudia; Pericolini, Eva; Gabrielli, Elena; Perito, Stefano; Bistoni, Francesco; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2013-02-01

    The animal models available for studying the immune response to genital tract infection require induction of a pseudo estrous state, usually achieved by administration of 17-β-estradiol. In our experimental model of vaginal candidiasis, under pseudo estrus, different strains of mice were used. We observed major differences in the clearance of Candida albicans infection among the different strains, ascribable to differing susceptibility to estradiol treatment. In the early phase of infection CD1, BALB/c, C57BL/6 albino and C57BL/6 mice were colonized to similar levels, while in the late phase of infection, BALB/c mice, which are considered genetically resistant to C. albicans infection, exhibited greater susceptibility to vaginal candidiasis than CD1 and C57BL/6 albino strains of mice. This was because estradiol induced "per se" enlarged and fluid-filled uteri, more pronounced in infected mice and consistently more evident in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice than in CD1 mice. Unlike CD1, BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice showed a heavy fungal colonization of the uterus, even though C57BL/6 mice apparently cleared C. albicans from the vagina. The presence of C. albicans in the vagina and uterus was accompanied by a heavy bacterial load. Collectively these observations prompted us to carry out a careful analysis of estradiol effects in a mouse model of vaginal infection.

  18. Causes and Diagnosis of Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Elizabeth; Peddinti, Radhika

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal vaginal bleeding in a postmenarchal adolescent patient is most often related to dysfunctional uterine bleeding. However, there are other potential etiologies, including hematologic disorders, infections, and oncologic problems. We present a 12-year-old girl who presented with prolonged vaginal bleeding and was ultimately diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma. In this article, we discuss the approach to a patient with vaginal bleeding along with a more in-depth review of risk stratification in rhabdomyosarcoma, including treatment options such as chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation therapy. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Clinicoetiological Characterization of Infectious Vaginitis amongst Women of Reproductive Age Group from Navi Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Narayankhedkar, Anuradha; Hodiwala, Anahita; Mane, Arati

    2015-01-01

    Vaginitis is one of the commonest reproductive tract infections in sexually active women. In the present study clinicoetiological characterization of infectious vaginitis amongst 380 women of reproductive age group (18–45 years) was done. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) was detected by Nugent's scoring, Candida infection by culture, and trichomoniasis (TV) by wet mount. One hundred and ten (28.9%) women presented with symptoms of vaginitis. The presenting symptoms were vaginal discharge 106 (96.4%), vulval itching/irritation 19 (17.3%), malodor 5 (4.5%), pain in abdomen 3 (2.7%), and dysuria 1 (0.9%). The commonest etiology detected was Candida in 33 (30%) cases, of which 18 (54.5%) were C. albicans and 15 (45.5%) non-albicans Candida (NAC) infections. The NAC isolates were C. glabrata (n = 10), C. tropicalis (n = 3), and C. krusei (n = 2). BV and TV were observed in 19 (17.3%) and 2 (1.8%) cases, respectively. A statistically significant association between Candida infection and presence of curdy-white discharge (p = 0.001) and vulval itching/irritation (p = 0.007) was noted. To conclude, we observed the etiological predominance of Candida infection, with considerable prevalence of NAC, indicating the need for microbiological investigation up to species level in cases of Candida infections, to ensure appropriate management. PMID:26351613

  20. Clinicoetiological Characterization of Infectious Vaginitis amongst Women of Reproductive Age Group from Navi Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Narayankhedkar, Anuradha; Hodiwala, Anahita; Mane, Arati

    2015-01-01

    Vaginitis is one of the commonest reproductive tract infections in sexually active women. In the present study clinicoetiological characterization of infectious vaginitis amongst 380 women of reproductive age group (18-45 years) was done. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) was detected by Nugent's scoring, Candida infection by culture, and trichomoniasis (TV) by wet mount. One hundred and ten (28.9%) women presented with symptoms of vaginitis. The presenting symptoms were vaginal discharge 106 (96.4%), vulval itching/irritation 19 (17.3%), malodor 5 (4.5%), pain in abdomen 3 (2.7%), and dysuria 1 (0.9%). The commonest etiology detected was Candida in 33 (30%) cases, of which 18 (54.5%) were C. albicans and 15 (45.5%) non-albicans Candida (NAC) infections. The NAC isolates were C. glabrata (n = 10), C. tropicalis (n = 3), and C. krusei (n = 2). BV and TV were observed in 19 (17.3%) and 2 (1.8%) cases, respectively. A statistically significant association between Candida infection and presence of curdy-white discharge (p = 0.001) and vulval itching/irritation (p = 0.007) was noted. To conclude, we observed the etiological predominance of Candida infection, with considerable prevalence of NAC, indicating the need for microbiological investigation up to species level in cases of Candida infections, to ensure appropriate management.

  1. Postoperative Course and Complications after Pull-through Vaginoplasty for Distal Vaginal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Roshanak; Dietrich, Jennifer E

    2015-12-01

    To report the usual postoperative course and complications after pull-through vaginoplasty for isolated distal vaginal atresia. Retrospective chart review at Texas Children's Hospital of all patients who were diagnosed with isolated distal vaginal atresia and underwent pull-through vaginoplasty during the study time frame. None. Postoperative complications such as vaginal stenosis or infection and postoperative vaginal diameter. Sixteen patients were identified and charts were reviewed. Patients were initially evaluated by pelvic magnetic resonance imaging and found to have distended hematometrocolpos with distal vaginal atresia. All patients underwent pull-through vaginoplasty with similar operative techniques. The average distance from the perineum to the level of the obstruction was 1.84 ± 1.2 cm. Two patients, both with obstructions at greater than 3 cm, experienced stricture formation postoperatively. Four patients (25%) experienced postoperative vaginitis. One patient (6.25%) experienced a postoperative urinary tract infection. Two groups (3 cm or less versus greater than 3 cm) were compared, and the presence of stricture was statistically different based on mean centimeters from perineum prior to pull-through vaginoplasty (P = .038). Distal vaginal atresia is managed with pull-through vaginoplasty. Atresias that extend greater than 3 cm from the perineum are at increased risk for vaginal stricture formation and should be followed to monitor for their formation. Other complications are infrequent and minor. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Vaginal Film Drug Delivery of the Pyrimidinedione IQP-0528 for the Prevention of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Anthony S.; Rohan, Lisa Cencia; Boczar, Ashlee; Yang, Lu; Buckheit, Karen W; Buckheit, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Polymeric quick dissolving films were developed as a solid dosage topical microbicide formulation for the vaginal delivery of the highly potent and non-toxic, dual-acting HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) pyrimidinedione, IQP-0528. Methods Formulated from approved excipients, a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) based film was manufactured via solvent casting methods. The film formulations were evaluated based upon quantitative physicochemical evaluations defined by a Target Product Profile (TPP) Results Films dosed with 0.1 % (w/w) of IQP-0528 disintegrated within 10 minutes with over 50% of drug released and near 100% total drug released after 30 minutes. The IQP-0528 films were found to be non-toxic in in vitro CEM-SS and PBMC cell-based assays and biologically active with sub-nanomolar efficacy against HIV-1 infection. In a 12 month stability protocol, the IQP-0528 films demonstrated no significant degradation at International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) recommended standard (25°C / 65% relative humidity (R.H.)) and accelerated (40°C / 75% R.H.) environmental conditions. Conclusions Based on the above evaluations, a vaginal film formulation has been identified as a potential solid dosage form for the vaginal delivery of the topical microbicide candidate IQP-0528. PMID:22392331

  3. Infection of Hysterectomized Mice with Chlamydia muridarum and Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunfu; Whitmire, William M.; Sturdevant, Gail L.; Bock, Kevin; Moore, Ian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We studied infection and immunity of hysterectomized mice infected with Chlamydia muridarum and Chlamydia trachomatis to determine if there were differences between these species in their ability to infect vaginal squamous epithelial cells in vivo independently of proximal upper genital tract tissues. We found that C. muridarum readily colonized and infected vaginal squamous epithelial cells, whereas C. trachomatis did not. Primary infection of the vaginal epithelium with C. muridarum produced infections of a duration longer than that reported for normal mice. Infection resulted in an inflammatory response in the vagina characterized by neutrophils and infiltrating submucosal plasma cells consisting primarily of T cells. Despite the delayed clearance, rechallenged C. muridarum-infected mice were highly immune. Mice vaginally infected with C. muridarum produced serum and vaginal wash antibodies and an antigen-specific gamma interferon-dominated Th1-biased T cell response. By comparison, mice vaginally infected with C. trachomatis exhibited transient low-burden infections, produced no detectable tissue inflammatory response, and failed to seroconvert. We discuss how these marked differences in the biology of vaginal infection between these otherwise genetically similar species are possibly linked to pathogen-specific virulence genes and how they may influence pathology and immunity in the upper genital tract. PMID:28461392

  4. Non-specific vaginitis or vaginitis of undetermined aetiology.

    PubMed

    Faro, S; Phillips, L E

    1987-01-01

    Vaginitis is a complex syndrome that is probably the most common outpatient disease seen by the gynaecologist. The specific aetiologies of vaginitis are many. One of the most common entities, however, is "non-specific vaginitis" which can be subdivided into: Gardnerella vaginitis, anaerobic vaginosis, and vaginitis of undetermined aetiology. The role of Gardnerella as a causative agent for vaginitis has been studied in depth but its specific role remains controversial. Anaerobic vaginosis can be diagnosed by noting on microscopic examination the presence of clue cells, free-floating bacteria and numerous white blood cells (WBC's). Culturing an aliquot of the vaginal discharge reveals a high number of anaerobes. In addition, this condition responds to antibiotics effective against anaerobes, e.g., metronidazole. Vaginitis of undetermined aetiology is more complex and is characterized by a purulent vaginal discharge, a pH of 4.0-4.6, numerous WBC's, and a high concentration of bacteria. The microbiology of this vaginitis includes many facultative Gram-negative rods and Gram-positive cocci. Anaerobes may be present but do not make up a large component of the endogenous microflora. This condition does not respond to the usual antibiotic therapies employed in treating bacterial vaginitis. Since this condition appears to be primarily an inflammatory reaction, it may be responsive to topical antiinflammatory agents such as benzydamine.

  5. Vaginal breech delivery: results of a prospective registration study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most countries recommend planned cesarean section in breech deliveries, which is considered safer than vaginal delivery. As one of few countries in the western world Norway has continued to practice planned vaginal delivery in selected women. The aim of this study is to evaluate prospectively registered neonatal and maternal outcomes in term singleton breech deliveries in a Norwegian hospital during a ten years period. We aim to compare maternal and neonatal outcomes in term breech pregnancies subjected either to planned vaginal or elective cesarean section. Methods A prospective registration study including 568 women with term breech deliveries (>37 weeks) consecutively registered at Sorlandet Hospital Kristiansand between 2001 and 2011. Fetal and maternal outcomes were compared according to delivery method; planned vaginal delivery versus planned cesarean section. Results Of 568 women, elective cesarean section was planned in 279 (49%) cases and vaginal delivery was planned in 289 (51%) cases. Acute cesarean section was performed in 104 of the planned vaginal deliveries (36.3%). There were no neonatal deaths. Two cases of serious neonatal morbidity were reported in the planned vaginal group. One infant had seizures, brachial plexus injury, and cephalhematoma. The other infant had 5-minutes Apgar < 4. Twenty-nine in the planned vaginal group (10.0%) and eight in the planned cesarean section group (2.9%) (p < 0.001) were transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit. However, only one infant was admitted for ≥4 days. According to follow-up data (median six years) none of these infants had long-term sequelae. Regarding maternal morbidity, blood loss was the only variable that was significantly higher in the planned cesarean section group versus in the vaginal delivery group (p < 0.001). Conclusions Strict guidelines were followed in all cases. There were no neonatal deaths. Two infants had serious neonatal morbidity in the planned

  6. Role of Lactobacillus Species in the Intermediate Vaginal Flora in Early Pregnancy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Machal, Susanne; Holzer, Iris; Kueronya, Verena; Husslein, Peter Wolf; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor obstetrical outcomes are associated with imbalances in the vaginal flora. The present study evaluated the role of vaginal Lactobacillus species in women with intermediate vaginal flora with regard to obstetrical outcomes. Methods We retrospectively analysed data from all women with singleton pregnancies who had undergone routine screening for asymptomatic vaginal infections at our tertiary referral centre between 2005 and 2014. Vaginal smears were Gram-stained and classified according to the Nugent scoring system as normal flora (score 0–3), intermediate vaginal flora (4–6), or bacterial vaginosis (7–10). Only women with intermediate vaginal flora were investigated. Women with a Nugent score of 4 were categorised into those with and without Lactobacilli. Follow-up smears were obtained 4–6 weeks after the initial smears. Descriptive data analysis, the Welch’s t-test, the Fisher’s exact test, and multiple regression analysis with adjustment for confounders were performed. Gestational age at delivery and birth weight were the outcome measures. Results At antenatal screening, 529/8421 women presented with intermediate vaginal flora. Amongst these, 349/529 (66%) had a Nugent score of 4, 94/529 (17.8%) a Nugent score of 5, and 86/529 (16.2%) a Nugent score of 6. Amongst those with a Nugent score of 4, 232/349 (66.5%) women were in the Lactobacilli group and 117/349 (33.5%) in the Non-Lactobacilli group. The preterm delivery rate was significantly lower in the Lactobacilli than in the Non-Lactobacilli group (OR 0.34, CI 0.21–0.55; p<0.001). Mean birth weight was 2979 ± 842 g and 2388 ± 1155 g in the study groups, respectively (MD 564.12, CI 346.23–781.92; p<0.001). On follow-up smears, bacterial vaginosis rates were 9% in the Lactobacilli and 7.8% in the Non-Lactobacilli group. Conclusions The absence of vaginal Lactobacillus species and any bacterial colonisation increases the risks of preterm delivery and low birth weight in women with

  7. Yeast Infection and Diabetes Mellitus among Pregnant Mother in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Sopian, Iylia Liyana; Shahabudin, Sa’adiah; Ahmed, Mowaffaq Adam; Lung, Leslie Than Thian; Sandai, Doblin

    2016-01-01

    Background Vaginal yeast infection refers to irritation of the vagina due to the presence of opportunistic yeast of the genus Candida (mostly Candida albicans). About 75% of women will have at least one episode of vaginal yeast infection during their lifetime. Several studies have shown that pregnancy and uncontrolled diabetes increase the infection risk. Reproductive hormone fluctuations during pregnancy and elevated glucose levels characteristic of diabetes provide the carbon needed for Candida overgrowth and infection. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of vaginal yeast infection among pregnant women with and without diabetes. Methods This was a case-control study using cases reports from Kepala Batas Health Clinic, Penang State, Malaysia from 2006 to 2012. In total, 740 pregnant ladies were chosen as sample of which 370 were diabetic and 370 were non-diabetic cases. Results No relationship between diabetes and the occurrence of vaginal yeast infection in pregnant women was detected, and there was no significant association between infection and age group, race or education level. Conclusion In conclusion, within radius of this study, vaginal yeast infection can occur randomly in pregnant women. PMID:27540323

  8. A New Era of the Vaginal Microbiome: Advances using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Girerd, Philippe H.; Jefferson, Kimberly K.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, bacterial species that inhabit the human vagina have been primarily studied using organism-centric approaches. Understanding how these bacterial species interact with each other and the host vaginal epithelium is essential for a more complete understanding of vaginal health. Molecular approaches have already led to the identification of uncultivated bacterial taxa associated with bacterial vaginosis. Here, we review recent studies of the vaginal microbiome and discuss how culture-independent approaches, such as applications of next-generation sequencing, are advancing the field and shifting our understanding of how vaginal health is defined. This work may to lead to improved diagnostic tools and treatments for women who suffer from, or are at risk for, vaginal imbalances, pregnancy complications, and sexually acquired infections. These approaches may also transform our understanding of how host genetic factors, physiological conditions (e.g. menopause) and environmental exposures (e.g. smoking, antibiotic usage) influence the vaginal microbiome. PMID:22589096

  9. A single dose of a MIV-150/Zinc acetate gel provides 24 h of protection against vaginal simian human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase infection, with more limited protection rectally 8-24 h after gel use.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Jessica; Singer, Rachel; Derby, Nina; Aravantinou, Meropi; Abraham, Ciby J; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Zhang, Shimin; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Fernández-Romero, José A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Robbiani, Melissa

    2012-11-01

    Previously we showed that repeated vaginal application of a MIV-150/zinc acetate carrageenan (MIV-150/ZA/CG) gel and a zinc acetate carrageenan (ZA/CG) gel significantly protected macaques from vaginal simian human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) infection. Gels were applied either daily for 2 weeks or every other day for 4 weeks, and the animals were challenged 4-24 h later. Herein, we examined the effects of a single vaginal dose administered either before or after virus challenge. Encouraged by the vaginal protection seen with MIV-150/ZA/CG, we also tested it rectally. Vaginal applications of MIV-150/ZA/CG, ZA/CG, and CG gel were performed once 8-24 h before, 1 h after, or 24 h before and 1 h after vaginal challenge. Rectal applications of MIV-150/ZA/CG and CG gel were performed once 8 or 24 h before rectal challenge. While vaginal pre-challenge and pre/post-challenge application of MIV-150/ZA/CG gel offered significant protection (88%, p<0.002), post-challenge application alone did not significantly protect. ZA/CG gel reduced infection prechallenge, but not significantly, and the effect was completely lost post-challenge. Rectal application of MIV-150/ZA/CG gel afforded limited protection against rectal challenge when applied 8-24 h before challenge. Thus, MIV-150/ZA/CG gel is a highly effective vaginal microbicide that demonstrates 24 h of protection from vaginal infection and may demonstrate efficacy against rectal infection when given close to the time of HIV exposure.

  10. Quantitation of Secretory Immonoglobulin A in Vaginal Secretions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Tamara Dawn; Mace, Kenneth D.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to attempt to correlate vaginal levels of SIgA with variables including age, day of menstrual cycle, use of oral contraceptives, length of time oral contraceptives had been used, and presence of Candida albicans infection. (Author)

  11. Gluteo-vaginal fistula after posterior intravaginal slingplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grynberg, Michael; Teyssedre, Jacques; Staerman, Frederic

    2009-07-01

    In patients with posthysterectomy prolapse of the vaginal vault, the posterior intravaginal slingplasty (posterior IVS, Tyco Healthcare, USA) has been suggested as an alternative to traditional vaginal vault suspensions. The goal of this technique is to recreate the uterosacral ligaments and to reinforce the rectovaginal fascia with the use of prosthetic material. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with a history of 27 months of perineal suppurative discharge after she underwent a vaginal vault prolapse and rectocele repair using a posterior IVS (Tyco Healthcare, USA). The IVS tape was reinforced by interposing a rectovaginal monofilament polypropylene mesh (Parietex, Sofradim, France). Imaging studies and surgical exploration confirmed infection of the IVS mesh with the formation of a gluteo-vaginal fistula while the rectovaginal mesh was intact.

  12. Detection of interleukin 6 mRNA by RT-PCR in vaginal secretions: association with preterm delivery and neonatal infection in women with preterm labour and intact membranes.

    PubMed

    Goffinet, François; Kayem, Gilles; Maillard, Françoise; Trébéden, Hélène; Cabrol, Dominique; Weill, Bernard; Batteux, Frédéric

    2005-12-01

    To find a biological marker associated with preterm delivery or neonatal infection in pregnant women with preterm labour and intact membranes. Cervical secretions were collected from 286 women hospitalized for preterm labour with intact membranes at 24-34 weeks' gestation. The outcomes studied were delivery before 33 and 35 weeks' gestation, chorioamnionitis, and neonatal infection, and their association with the presence of IL-6 mRNA in cervical secretions as detected by RT-PCR. The other infectious markers tested were: bacterial vaginosis and fetal fibronectin in cervical secretions; serum CRP and white blood cell count. The vaginal secretions of 13 of 286 women (4.7%) contained IL-6 mRNA. The only other marker tested significantly associated with IL-6 mRNA+ was the presence of streptococcus in vaginal secretions (30.8% versus 9.4% in the IL-6+ and-groups, p = 0.03). Although the difference did not reach statistical significance (p<0.06 and 0.08, respectively), in women with IL-6 mRNA in cervical secretions we observed a tendency to give birth before 33 and 35 weeks more often than the population as a whole. This group was at higher risk of neonatal infection (38.5% versus 15.1%; p = 0.04). After adjustment for infectious risk factors, IL-6 remained significantly associated with neonatal infection (OR = 4.6, 95% CI [1.1-18.9]). The sensitivity of IL-6 mRNA for neonatal infection was 11.1%. The specificity was 96.7%. The detection of IL-6 mRNA by RT-PCR in vaginal secretions allows identification of a small group of women at high risk of neonatal infection, independently of other markers of infection.

  13. Clinical Trials with Agents Currently Used in the Management of Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, J. R.

    1964-01-01

    Results of treatment of 151 cases of vaginitis in patients attending a leukorrhea clinic were studied. The incidence of each type of vaginitis is recorded. Analysis of results of treatment with six compounds currently used in the therapy of vaginitis indicated that acetarsol or pimaricin compounds, with their broader spectra of activity, appeared to be most useful, prior to establishment of a definite diagnosis by means of cultures. Chlordantoin is an effective antifungal agent and is associated with a high percentage of “culture cures”. Resistant cases should be investigated for diabetes mellitus, and many are aided by a low carbohydrate diet. Metronidazole was used only for resistant cases of trichomoniasis, with a cure rate of over 80% when both partners were treated simultaneously. Triple-sulfa vaginal cream was effective in over 80% of patients with nonspecific vaginitis; no cases of resistant bacterial infections were encountered. Dienestrol cream was effective in relieving the symptoms of atrophic vaginitis. PMID:14144540

  14. Vaginal microbiota of women with frequent vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Westman, Rachel; Hickey, Roxana; Hansmann, Melanie A; Kennedy, Colleen; Osborn, Thomas W; Forney, Larry J

    2009-09-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is an insidious infection that afflicts a large proportion of women of all ages, and 5 to 8% of affected women experience recurrent VVC (RVVC). The aim of this study was to explore the possible importance of vaginal bacterial communities in reducing the risk of RVVC. The species composition and diversity of microbial communities were evaluated for 42 women with and without frequent VVC based on profiles of terminal restriction fragment polymorphisms of 16S rRNA genes and phylogenetic analysis of cloned 16S rRNA gene sequences from the numerically dominant microbial populations. The data showed that there were no significant differences between the vaginal microbial communities of women in the two groups (likelihood score, 5.948; bootstrap P value, 0.26). Moreover, no novel bacteria were found in the communities of women with frequent VVC. The vaginal communities of most women in both groups (38/42; 90%) were dominated by species of Lactobacillus. The results of this study failed to provide evidence for the existence of altered or unusual vaginal bacterial communities in women who have frequent VVC compared to women who do not have frequent VVC. The findings suggest that commensal vaginal bacterial species may not be able to prevent VVC.

  15. The importance of the vaginal delivery route for antiretrovirals in HIV prevention

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Lindsay M; Rohan, Lisa Cencia

    2012-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic continues to be a global health priority, with high rates of new HIV-1 infections persisting in young women. One HIV prevention strategy is topical pre-exposure prophylactics or microbicides, which are applied vaginally or rectally to protect the user from HIV and possibly other sexually transmitted infections. Vaginal microbicide delivery will be the focus of this review. Multiple nonspecific and specific antiretroviral microbicide products have been clinically evaluated, and many are in preclinical development. The events of HIV mucosal transmission and dynamics of the cervicovaginal environment should be considered for successful vaginal microbicide delivery. Beyond conventional vaginal formulations, intravaginal rings, tablets and films are employed as platforms in the hope to increase the likelihood of microbicide use. Furthermore, combining multiple antiretrovirals within a given formulation, combining a microbicide product with a vaginal device and integrating novel drug-delivery strategies within a microbicide product are approaches to successful vaginal-microbicide delivery. PMID:22468220

  16. High-intensity focused ultrasound treatment of placenta accreta after vaginal delivery: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bai, Y; Luo, X; Li, Q; Yin, N; Fu, X; Zhang, H; Qi, H

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficiency of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of placenta accreta after vaginal delivery. Enrolled into this study between September 2011 and September 2013 were 12 patients who had been diagnosed with placenta accreta following vaginal delivery and who had stable vital signs. All patients were treated using an ultrasound-guided HIFU treatment system. As indication of the effectiveness of the treatment we considered decreased vascular index on color Doppler imaging, decrease in size of residual placenta compared with pretreatment size on assessment by three-dimensional ultrasound with Virtual Organ Computer-aided Analysis, reduced signal intensity and degree of enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging and avoidance of hysterectomy following treatment. To assess the safety of HIFU treatment, we recorded side effects, hemorrhage, infection, sex steroid levels, return of menses and subsequent pregnancy. Patients were followed up in this preliminary study until December 2013. The 12 patients receiving HIFU treatment had an average postpartum hospital stay of 6.8 days and an average period of residual placental involution of 36.9 days. HIFU treatment did not apparently increase the risk of infection or hemorrhage and no patient required hysterectomy. In all patients menstruation recommenced after an average of 80.2 days, and sex steroid levels during the middle luteal phase of the second menstrual cycle were normal. Two patients became pregnant again during the follow-up period. This preliminary study suggests that ultrasound-guided HIFU is a safe and effective non-invasive method to treat placenta accreta patients after vaginal delivery who have stable vital signs and desire to preserve fertility. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Vaginal Douching Among Latinas: Practices and Meaning

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, María; Anderson, Matthew R.; Alvarez, Adelyn; Karasz, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Vaginal douching is widely practiced by American women, particularly among minority groups, and is associated with increased risk of pelvic and vaginal infections. This research sought to investigate vaginal hygiene practices and meaning associated with them among Latina women and adolescents. Study results would guide development of an intervention to decrease douching among Latinas. Methods In depth qualitative interviews conducted with English- and Spanish-speaking women aged 16–40, seeking care for any reason who reported douching within the last year (n = 34). Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed using qualitative methods. One-third of interviews were conducted in Spanish. Results Two explanatory models for douching motives emerged: one stressed cosmetic benefits; the other, infection prevention and control. Most women reported douching to eliminate menstrual residue; a small number reported douching in context of sexual intercourse or vaginal symptoms. Many were unaware of associated health risks. Respondents typically learned about douching from female family members and friends. Male partners were described as having little to no involvement in the decision to douche. Women varied in their willingness to stop douching. Two-thirds reported receiving harm reduction messages about “overdouching”. About half indicated previous discussion about douching with health care providers; some had reduced frequency in response to counseling. A number of previously unreported vaginal hygiene practices and products were described, including use of a range of traditional hygiene practices, and products imported from outside the US. Conclusions Respondents expressed a range of commitment to douching. Counseling messages acknowledging benefits women perceive as well as health risks should be developed and delivered tailored to individual beliefs. Further research is needed to assess prevalence and safety of previously unreported practices

  18. Antibiotic prophylaxis for operative vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; Choobun, Thanapan; Peeyananjarassri, Krantarat; Islam, Q Monir

    2017-08-05

    Vacuum and forceps assisted vaginal deliveries are reported to increase the incidence of postpartum infections and maternal readmission to hospital compared to spontaneous vaginal delivery. Prophylactic antibiotics may be prescribed to prevent these infections. However, the benefit of antibiotic prophylaxis for operative vaginal deliveries is still unclear. To assess the effectiveness and safety of antibiotic prophylaxis in reducing infectious puerperal morbidities in women undergoing operative vaginal deliveries including vacuum or forceps deliveries, or both. We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register (12 July 2017), ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (12 July 2017) and reference lists of retrieved studies. All randomised trials comparing any prophylactic antibiotic regimens with placebo or no treatment in women undergoing vacuum or forceps deliveries were eligible. Participants were all pregnant women without evidence of infections or other indications for antibiotics of any gestational age undergoing vacuum or forceps delivery for any indications. Interventions were any antibiotic prophylaxis (any dosage regimen, any route of administration or at any time during delivery or the puerperium) compared with either placebo or no treatment. Two review authors assessed trial eligibility and methodological quality. Two review authors extracted the data independently using prepared data extraction forms. Any discrepancies were resolved by discussion and a consensus reached through discussion with all review authors. We assessed methodological quality of the one included trial using the GRADE approach. One trial, involving 393 women undergoing either vacuum or forceps deliveries, was included. The trial compared the antibiotic intravenous cefotetan after cord clamping compared with no treatment. This trial reported only two out of the nine outcomes specified in this review. Seven women in the group

  19. Prophylactic antibiotics for manual removal of retained placenta during vaginal birth: a systematic review of observational studies and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chibueze, Ezinne C; Parsons, Alexander J Q; Ota, Erika; Swa, Toshiyuki; Oladapo, Olufemi T; Mori, Rintaro

    2015-11-26

    Manual removal of the placenta is an invasive obstetric procedure commonly used for the management of retained placenta. However, it is unclear whether antibiotic prophylaxis is beneficial in preventing infectious morbidity. We conducted a systematic review to determine the efficacy and safety of routine use of antibiotics for preventing adverse maternal outcomes related to manual placenta removal following vaginal birth. A detailed search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library and the CINAHL databases was conducted for non-randomized studies involving women undergoing manual placenta delivery after vaginal births and where antibiotic prophylaxis use was compared with no treatment or placebo to prevent maternal infection. Search terms including 'delivery, obstetric', 'placenta, retained', 'anti-infective agents', and 'chemoprevention' were used. Of the 407 citations that resulted after elimination of duplicates, 81 full texts were potentially eligible after independent assessment of the title and abstracts. Independent review of the full texts identified three eligible cohort studies which were retrospective in design. These studies contained data on two of the pre-specified outcomes, endometritis and puerperal fever. Other secondary outcomes such as perineal infection and/or any infection, hospital stay duration, sepsis, hemorrhage >1000 ml or hospital readmissions were not reported on excluding puerperal fever. A meta-analysis showed no significant reduction in the incidence of endometritis (odds ratio [OR] 0.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38 to 1.85, three studies, 567 women) and puerperal fever (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.38 to 2.27, one study, 302 women). There is currently no evidence to suggest beneficial effects for routine antibiotic use in women undergoing manual placental removal following vaginal birth. In appropriate settings, further research is required to determine whether a policy of routine antibiotic prophylaxis for the procedure should be maintained or

  20. Studies and methodologies on vaginal drug permeation.

    PubMed

    Machado, Rita Monteiro; Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Ana; Gaspar, Carlos; Martinez-de-Oliveira, José; Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Rita

    2015-09-15

    The vagina stands as an important alternative to the oral route for those systemic drugs that are poorly absorbed orally or are rapidly metabolized by the liver. Drug permeation through the vaginal tissue can be estimated by using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models. The latter ones, although more realistic, assume ethical and biological limitations due to animal handling. Therefore, in vitro and ex vivo models have been developed to predict drug absorption through the vagina while allowing for simultaneous toxicity and pathogenesis studies. This review focuses on available methodologies to study vaginal drug permeation discussing their advantages and drawbacks. The technical complexity, costs and the ethical issues of an available model, along with its accuracy and reproducibility will determine if it is valid and applicable. Therefore every model shall be evaluated, validated and standardized in order to allow for extrapolations and results presumption, and so improving vaginal drug research and stressing its benefits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Vaginal Acquisition and Dissemination of HIV-1 Infection in a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model Is Facilitated by Coinfection with Herpes Simplex Virus 2 and Is Inhibited by Microbicide Treatment.

    PubMed

    Seay, Kieran; Khajoueinejad, Nazanin; Zheng, Jian Hua; Kiser, Patrick; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Herold, Betsy; Goldstein, Harris

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) infection significantly increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition, thereby contributing to the expanding HIV-1 epidemic. To investigate whether HSV-2 infection directly facilitates mucosal HIV-1 acquisition, we used our transgenic hCD4/R5/cT1 mouse model which circumvents major entry and transcription blocks preventing murine HIV-1 infection by targeting transgenic expression of human CD4, CCR5, and cyclin T1 genes to CD4(+) T cells and myeloid-committed cells. Productive infection of mucosal leukocytes, predominantly CD4(+) T cells, was detected in all hCD4/R5/cT1 mice intravaginally challenged with an HIV-1 infectious molecular clone, HIV-Du151.2env-NLuc, which expresses an env gene (C.Du151.2) cloned from an acute heterosexually infected woman and a NanoLuc luciferase reporter gene. Lower genital tract HIV-1 infection after HIV-Du151.2env-NLuc intravaginal challenge was increased ~4-fold in hCD4/R5/cT1 mice coinfected with HSV-2. Furthermore, HIV-1 dissemination to draining lymph nodes was detected only in HSV-2-coinfected mice. HSV-2 infection stimulated local infiltration and activation of CD4(+) T cells and dendritic cells, likely contributing to the enhanced HIV-1 infection and dissemination in HSV-2-coinfected mice. We then used this model to demonstrate that a novel gel containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), the more potent prodrug of tenofovir (TFV), but not the TFV microbicide gel utilized in the recent CAPRISA 004, VOICE (Vaginal and Oral Interventions to Control the Epidemic), and FACTS 001 clinical trials, was effective as preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to completely prevent vaginal HIV-1 infection in almost half of HSV-2-coinfected mice. These results also support utilization of hCD4/R5/cT1 mice as a highly reproducible immunocompetent preclinical model to evaluate HIV-1 acquisition across the female genital tract. Multiple epidemiological studies have reported that

  2. Vaginal challenge with an SIV-based dual reporter system reveals that infection can occur throughout the upper and lower female reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Stieh, Daniel J; Maric, Danijela; Kelley, Z L; Anderson, Meegan R; Hattaway, Holly Z; Beilfuss, Beth A; Rothwangl, Katharina B; Veazey, Ronald S; Hope, Thomas J

    2014-10-01

    The majority of new HIV infections occur in women as a result of heterosexual intercourse, overcoming multiple innate barriers to infection within the mucosa. However, the avenues through which infection is established, and the nature of bottlenecks to transmission, have been the source of considerable investigation and contention. Using a high dose of a single round non-replicating SIV-based vector containing a novel dual reporter system, we determined the sites of infection by the inoculum using the rhesus macaque vaginal transmission model. Here we show that the entire female reproductive tract (FRT), including the vagina, ecto- and endocervix, along with ovaries and local draining lymph nodes can contain transduced cells only 48 hours after inoculation. The distribution of infection shows that virions quickly disseminate after exposure and can access target cells throughout the FRT, with an apparent preference for infection in squamous vaginal and ectocervical mucosa. JRFL enveloped virions infect diverse CD4 expressing cell types, with T cells resident throughout the FRT representing the primary target. These findings establish a new perspective that the entire FRT is susceptible and virus can reach as far as the ovary and local draining lymph nodes. Based on these findings, it is essential that protective mechanisms for prevention of HIV acquisition must be present at protective levels throughout the entire FRT to provide complete protection.

  3. Fungal Morphogenetic Pathways Are Required for the Hallmark Inflammatory Response during Candida albicans Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Glen E.; Nash, Andrea K.; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Fidel, Paul L.; Noverr, Mairi C.

    2014-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis, caused primarily by Candida albicans, presents significant health issues for women of childbearing age. As a polymorphic fungus, the ability of C. albicans to switch between yeast and hyphal morphologies is considered its central virulence attribute. Armed with new criteria for defining vaginitis immunopathology, the purpose of this study was to determine whether the yeast-to-hypha transition is required for the hallmark inflammatory responses previously characterized during murine vaginitis. Kinetic analyses of vaginal infection with C. albicans in C57BL/6 mice demonstrated that fungal burdens remained constant throughout the observation period, while polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN), S100A8, and interleukin-1β levels obtained from vaginal lavage fluid increased by day 3 onward. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was also positively correlated with increased effectors of innate immunity. Additionally, immunodepletion of neutrophils in infected mice confirmed a nonprotective role for PMNs during vaginitis. Determination of the importance of fungal morphogenesis during vaginitis was addressed with a two-pronged approach. Intravaginal inoculation of mice with C. albicans strains deleted for key transcriptional regulators (bcr1Δ/Δ, efg1Δ/Δ, cph1Δ/Δ, and efg1Δ/Δ cph1Δ/Δ) controlling the yeast-to-hypha switch revealed a crucial role for morphogenetic signaling through the Efg1 and, to a lesser extent, the Bcr1 pathways in contributing to vaginitis immunopathology. Furthermore, overexpression of transcription factors NRG1 and UME6, to maintain yeast and hyphal morphologies, respectively, confirmed the importance of morphogenesis in generating innate immune responses in vivo. These results highlight the yeast-to-hypha switch and the associated morphogenetic response as important virulence components for the immunopathogenesis of Candida vaginitis, with implications for transition from benign colonization to symptomatic infection. PMID

  4. The vaginal microbiome: New information about genital tract flora using molecular based techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Ronald F.; Sobel, Jack D.; Akins, Robert A.; Hassan, Sonia S.; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Romero, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Vaginal microbiome studies provide information which may change the way we define vaginal flora. Normal flora appears dominated by one or two species of Lactobacillus. Significant numbers of healthy women lack appreciable numbers of vaginal lactobacilli. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is not a single entity, but different bacterial communities or profiles of greater microbial diversity than is evident from cultivation-dependent studies. BV should be considered a syndrome of variable composition which results in different symptoms, phenotypical outcomes, and responses to different antibiotic regimens. This information may help to elucidate the link between BV and infection-related adverse outcomes of pregnancy. PMID:21251190

  5. Correlates of the molecular vaginal microbiota composition of African women.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Raju; Borgdorff, Hanneke; Jespers, Vicky; Francis, Suzanna C; Verhelst, Rita; Mwaura, Mary; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Ndayisaba, Gilles; Kyongo, Jordan K; Hardy, Liselotte; Menten, Joris; Crucitti, Tania; Tsivtsivadze, Evgeni; Schuren, Frank; van de Wijgert, Janneke H H M

    2015-02-21

    Sociodemographic, behavioral and clinical correlates of the vaginal microbiome (VMB) as characterized by molecular methods have not been adequately studied. VMB dominated by bacteria other than lactobacilli may cause inflammation, which may facilitate HIV acquisition and other adverse reproductive health outcomes. We characterized the VMB of women in Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa and Tanzania (KRST) using a 16S rDNA phylogenetic microarray. Cytokines were quantified in cervicovaginal lavages. Potential sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical correlates were also evaluated. Three hundred thirteen samples from 230 women were available for analysis. Five VMB clusters were identified: one cluster each dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus (KRST-I) and L. iners (KRST-II), and three clusters not dominated by a single species but containing multiple (facultative) anaerobes (KRST-III/IV/V). Women in clusters KRST-I and II had lower mean concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1α (p < 0.001) and Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) (p = 0.01), but higher concentrations of interferon-γ-induced protein (IP-10) (p < 0.01) than women in clusters KRST-III/IV/V. A lower proportion of women in cluster KRST-I tested positive for bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs; ptrend = 0.07) and urinary tract infection (UTI; p = 0.06), and a higher proportion of women in clusters KRST-I and II had vaginal candidiasis (ptrend = 0.09), but these associations did not reach statistical significance. Women who reported unusual vaginal discharge were more likely to belong to clusters KRST-III/IV/V (p = 0.05). Vaginal dysbiosis in African women was significantly associated with vaginal inflammation; the associations with increased prevalence of STIs and UTI, and decreased prevalence of vaginal candidiasis, should be confirmed in larger studies.

  6. Vaginal Infections of Albanian women Infected with HPV and their impact in intraepithelial cervical lesions evidenced by Pap test

    PubMed Central

    Kone, Elsa S; Balili, Avenir D; Paparisto, Piro D; Ceka, Xheladin R; Petrela, Elizana D

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cervical cytology is the best single method for large screening of the population in identifying precancerous lesions of the uterine cervix. Aim: To estimate the frequency of human papillomavirus (HPV) positivity in a group of Albanian women, the prevalence of vaginal coinfections, and the relationship of coinfections with HPV, as well as their role in metaplasia or cervical intraepithelial lesions (CIN). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, 2075 vaginal smears were examined. The Papanicolaou stain was used for all slides. The New Bethesda System 2001 was used for the interpretations of the smears. Data analysis was completed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 19.0. Results: Prevalence of HPV positivity was 43.9% with an average age of 35.48 ± 9.27 years. Candida coinfection resulted in 57.8% of HPV positive women with a significant relationship between them. Gardnerella coinfection resulted in 36 (23%), mixed flora in 34 (8%), and Trichomonas vaginalis in 50% of HPV positive woman. Among the women with positive HPV, 19% had CIN, 8% had metaplasia, and 1% had metaplasia and CIN; 9% of the women with HPV had CIN1 and one of the coinfections. Conclusions: There is a strong relationship between CIN1 and HPV positivity as well as between CIN1 and coinfections. HPV infection is a major factor contributing to metaplasia, and bacterial coinfections in HPV positive women have a statistically significant impact in the development of metaplasia. PMID:28182076

  7. Polyethylene glycol-functionalized poly (Lactic Acid-co-Glycolic Acid) and graphene oxide nanoparticles induce pro-inflammatory and apoptotic responses in Candida albicans-infected vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R Doug; Johnson, Shemedia J; Danielsen, Zhixia Yan; Lim, Jin-Hee; Mudalige, Thilak; Linder, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Mucous-penetrating nanoparticles consisting of poly lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) could improve targeting of microbicidal drugs for sexually transmitted diseases by intravaginal inoculation. Nanoparticles can induce inflammatory responses, which may exacerbate the inflammation that occurs in the vaginal tracts of women with yeast infections. This study evaluated the effects of these drug-delivery nanoparticles on VK2(E6/E7) vaginal epithelial cell proinflammatory responses to Candida albicans yeast infections. Vaginal epithelial cell monolayers were infected with C. albicans and exposed to 100 μg/ml 49.5 nm PLGA-PEG nanospheres or 20 μg/ml 1.1 x 500 nm PEG-functionalized graphene oxide (GO-PEG) sheets. The cells were assessed for changes in mRNA and protein expression of inflammation-related genes by RT-qPCR and physiological markers of cell stress using high content analysis and flow cytometry. C. albicans exposure suppressed apoptotic gene expression, but induced oxidative stress in the cells. The nanomaterials induced cytotoxicity and programmed cell death responses alone and with C. albicans. PLGA-PEG nanoparticles induced mRNA expression of apoptosis-related genes and induced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, increased BAX/BCL2 ratios, and chromatin condensation indicative of apoptosis. They also induced autophagy, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and DNA damage. They caused the cells to excrete inflammatory recruitment molecules chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), interleukin-1α (IL1A), interleukin-1β (IL1B), calprotectin (S100A8), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF). GO-PEG nanoparticles induced expression of necrosis-related genes and cytotoxicity. They reduced autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptotic gene expression responses. The results show that stealth nanoparticle drug-delivery vehicles may cause intracellular damage to vaginal epithelial cells by several mechanisms and that their use

  8. Polyethylene glycol-functionalized poly (Lactic Acid-co-Glycolic Acid) and graphene oxide nanoparticles induce pro-inflammatory and apoptotic responses in Candida albicans-infected vaginal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Shemedia J.; Danielsen, Zhixia Yan; Lim, Jin-Hee; Mudalige, Thilak; Linder, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Mucous-penetrating nanoparticles consisting of poly lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) could improve targeting of microbicidal drugs for sexually transmitted diseases by intravaginal inoculation. Nanoparticles can induce inflammatory responses, which may exacerbate the inflammation that occurs in the vaginal tracts of women with yeast infections. This study evaluated the effects of these drug-delivery nanoparticles on VK2(E6/E7) vaginal epithelial cell proinflammatory responses to Candida albicans yeast infections. Vaginal epithelial cell monolayers were infected with C. albicans and exposed to 100 μg/ml 49.5 nm PLGA-PEG nanospheres or 20 μg/ml 1.1 x 500 nm PEG-functionalized graphene oxide (GO-PEG) sheets. The cells were assessed for changes in mRNA and protein expression of inflammation-related genes by RT-qPCR and physiological markers of cell stress using high content analysis and flow cytometry. C. albicans exposure suppressed apoptotic gene expression, but induced oxidative stress in the cells. The nanomaterials induced cytotoxicity and programmed cell death responses alone and with C. albicans. PLGA-PEG nanoparticles induced mRNA expression of apoptosis-related genes and induced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, increased BAX/BCL2 ratios, and chromatin condensation indicative of apoptosis. They also induced autophagy, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and DNA damage. They caused the cells to excrete inflammatory recruitment molecules chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), interleukin-1α (IL1A), interleukin-1β (IL1B), calprotectin (S100A8), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF). GO-PEG nanoparticles induced expression of necrosis-related genes and cytotoxicity. They reduced autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptotic gene expression responses. The results show that stealth nanoparticle drug-delivery vehicles may cause intracellular damage to vaginal epithelial cells by several mechanisms and that their use

  9. Vaginal flora changes on Pap smears after insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device.

    PubMed

    Donders, Gilbert G G; Berger, Judith; Heuninckx, Hélène; Bellen, Gert; Cornelis, Ann

    2011-04-01

    The levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) combines a uterine foreign body and the continuous release of low-dose levonorgestrel for contraception. Its influence on the rate of vulvovaginal infections and flora disturbance is insufficiently known, but important for contraceptive advice in women, especially those who develop recurrent vaginosis or Candida vulvovaginitis. Slides of 286 women who had a Pap smear taken before and 1 to 2 years after placement of a LNG-IUS were blindly reviewed for the presence of abnormal vaginal flora (AVF), bacterial vaginosis (BV), aerobic vaginitis (AV) and Candida vaginitis (CV). Prior to insertion, there were no differences in vaginal flora abnormalities between women using different kinds of contraception. LNG-IUS users did not have different rates of AVF, BV, AV or CV, but the general risk to develop any infection was increased. Uterine bleeding after insertion did not seem to predict a different flora type. We found that Pap smears suggested more vaginal infections after 1 year of LNG-IUS use than prior to insertion of the device. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Throwing the dice for the diagnosis of vaginal complaints?

    PubMed

    Schwiertz, Andreas; Taras, David; Rusch, Kerstin; Rusch, Volker

    2006-02-17

    Vaginitis is among the most common conditions women are seeking medical care for. Although these infections can easily be treated, the relapse rate is high. This may be due to inadequate use of the diagnostic potential. We evaluated the misjudgement rate of the aetiology of vaginal complaints. A total of 220 vaginal samples from women with a vaginal complaint were obtained and analysed for numbers of total lactobacilli, H2O2-producing lactobacilli, total aerobic cell counts and total anaerobic cell counts including bifidobacteria, Bacteroides spp., Prevotella spp. Additionally, the presence of Atopobium vaginae, Gardnerella vaginalis, Candida spp. and Trichomonas vaginalis was evaluated by DNA-hybridisation using the PCR and Affirm VPIII Microbial Identification Test, respectively. The participating physicians diagnosed Bacterial vaginosis (BV) as origin of discomfort in 80 cases, candidiasis in 109 cases and mixed infections in 8 cases. However, a present BV, defined as lack of H2O2-lactobacilli, presence of marker organisms, such as G. vaginalis, Bacteroides spp. or Atopobium vaginae, and an elevated pH were identified in only 45 cases of the women examined. Candida spp. were detected in 46 cases. Interestingly, an elevated pH corresponded solely to the presence of Atopobium vaginae, which was detected in 11 cases. Errors in the diagnosis of BV and candida vulvovaginitis (CV) were high. Interestingly, the cases of misjudgement of CV (77%) were more numerous than that of BV (61%). The use of Amsel criteria or microscopy did not reduce the number of misinterpretations. The study reveals that the misdiagnosis of vaginal complaints is rather high.

  11. Vaginal delivery among women who underwent labor induction with vaginal dinoprostone (PGE2) insert: a retrospective study of 1656 women in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Lin, Ying; Jiang, Ting-Ting; Wang, Ling; Li, Min; Wang, Ying; Sun, Guo-Qiang; Xiao, Mei

    2017-12-21

    This study aimed to qualify relevant factors for vaginal delivery among women who underwent labor induction with vaginal dinoprostone (PGE2) insert in a Chinese tertiary maternity hospital. A retrospective study was conducted in Hubei Maternal and Child Health Hospital. A total of 1656 pregnancies that underwent labor induction with vaginal dinoprostone insert between January and August 2016 were finally included in this study. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariable regression modeling. Of 1656 women with PGE2-induced labor at term, 396 (23.91%) gave birth by cesarean section, 1260 (76.09%) had a vaginal delivery among which 921 (55.61%) delivered vaginally within 24 h. Multivariable regression analysis showed that maternal age (p < .001, OR = 0.89, 95%CI 0.85-0.93), parity (multiparous versus nulliparous, p < .001, OR = 8.74, 95%CI 4.36-17.50), baseline fetal heart rate (p = .009, OR = 0.98, 95%CI 0.96-0.99), and birth weight (p < .001, OR = 0.37, 95%CI 0.28-0.51) were significantly correlated with vaginal delivery. Moreover, body mass index (p < .001, OR = 1.11, 95%CI 1.05-1.19), parity (multiparous versus nulliparous, p < .001, OR = 6.57, 95%CI 2.37-18.23), baseline fetal heart rate (p = .004, OR = 0.96, 95%CI 0.94-0.99), and birth weight (p < .001, OR = 0.34, 95%CI 0.21-0.54) were independent predictors of vaginal delivery within 24-h. Our findings suggested a vaginal delivery rate of 76.09% when dinoprostone vaginal insert was used for labor induction, which was markedly higher than the overall annual vaginal delivery rate of 65.1% in China during 2014. Maternal age, parity, baseline fetal heart rate, and birth weight were significant factors for vaginal delivery. This study enables us to better understand the efficiency of dinoprostone and the potential predictors of vaginal delivery in dinoprostone-induced labor, which may be helpful to guide the clinical use of dinoprostone and therefore provide better

  12. The vaginal microbiome is stable in prepubertal and sexually mature Ellegaard Göttingen Minipigs throughout an estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Emma; Kudirkiene, Egle; Gutman, Nicole; Grossi, Anette Blak; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Erneholm, Karin; Skytte, Christina; Dalgaard, Marlene Danner; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2015-10-28

    Although the pig has been introduced as an advanced animal model of genital tract infections in women, almost no knowledge exists on the porcine vaginal microbiota, especially in barrier-raised Göttingen Minipigs. In women, the vaginal microbiota plays a crucial role for a healthy vaginal environment and the fate of sexually transmitted infections such as Chlamydia trachomatis infections. Therefore, knowledge on the vaginal microbiota is urgently needed for the minipig model. The aim of this study was to characterize the microbiota of the anterior vagina by 16 s rRNA gene sequencing in prepubertal and sexually mature Göttingen Minipigs during an estrous cycle. The dominating phyla in the vaginal microbiota consisted of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteriodetes and Tenericutes. The most abundant bacterial families were Enterobacteriaceae, unclassified families from Gammaproteobacteria, Clostridiales Family XI Incertae Sedis, Paenibacillaceae, Lactobacillaceae, Ruminococcaceae and Syntrophaceae. We found a higher abundance of Lactobacillaceae in the prepubertal Göttingen Minipigs compared to sexually mature non-pregnant Göttingen Minipigs. However, correlation tests and diversity parameters revealed a very stable vaginal microbiota in the Göttingen Minipigs, both before and after sexual maturity and on different days throughout an estrous cycle. The vaginal microbiota in Göttingen Minipigs was not dominated by lactobacilli, as it is in women and according to our results the minipig vaginal microbiota is very stable, in opposite to women. These differences should be considered when using the minipig as a model of the genital tract in women.

  13. A Mouse Model of Zika Virus Sexual Transmission and Vaginal Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Tang, William Weihao; Young, Matthew Perry; Mamidi, Anila; Regla-Nava, Jose Angel; Kim, Kenneth; Shresta, Sujan

    2016-12-20

    Case reports of Zika virus (ZIKV) sexual transmission and genital persistence are mounting. Venereal transmission and genital persistence threaten public health within and beyond the range of ZIKV's mosquito vectors. In this study, we administered ZIKV into the vaginas of AG129 mice and LysMCre + IFNAR fl/fl C57BL/6 mice after hormonal treatments. Mice infected during estrus-like phase were resistant to vaginal infection. In contrast, when infected during diestrus-like phase, AG129 mice succumbed to infection, whereas LysMCre + IFNAR fl/fl mice experienced transient illness. Patency of transgenital transmission (TGT) in diestrus-like mice was demonstrated by detection of viremia and ZIKV replication in spleen and brain, and viral RNA persisted in vaginal washes as late as 10 days post-infection. In these lethal and sublethal mouse models, this study indicates that intravaginal deposition of ZIKV can cause TGT, hormonal changes in the female reproductive tract (FRT) influence transmission, and ZIKV replication persists in the FRT for several days. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Vaginal microbiota and sexually transmitted infections that may influence transmission of cell-associated HIV.

    PubMed

    Cone, Richard A

    2014-12-15

    Vaginal microbiota and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are likely to influence the transmission of cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Lactic acid produced by Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota (Nugent score 0-3) will likely inhibit transmission, especially female-to-male transmission. In contrast, polymicrobial microbiota (Nugent score 4-10), community state types IV-A and IV-B, and STIs will likely increase transmission of cell-associated HIV. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Vaginal DNA vaccination against infectious diseases transmitted through the vagina.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Takanori; Takashima, Yuuki; Okada, Hiroaki

    2012-06-01

    There is an urgent need for the development of vaccines against genital virus infections that are transmitted through heterosexual intercourse, including the HIV and HPV. In general, the surface of female genital mucosa, including vaginal mucosa, is the most common site of initiation of these infections. Thus, it is becoming clear that successful vaccines must induce both cellular and humoral immune responses in both the local genital tract and systemically. We believe that a strong vaginal immune response could be obtained by inducing strong gene expression of antigen-coding DNA in the local targeted tissue. In order to improve transfection efficiency in the vagina, it is important that methods allowing breakthrough of the various barriers, such as the epithelial layer, cellular and nuclear membrane, are developed. Therefore, systems providing less invasive and more effective delivery into the subepithelial layer are required. In this review, we will introduce our studies into efficient vaginal DNA vaccination methods, focusing on the effects of the menstrual cycle, utilization of the combination of functional peptides, and use of a needle-free injector.

  16. A Single Dose of a MIV-150/Zinc Acetate Gel Provides 24 h of Protection Against Vaginal Simian Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reverse Transcriptase Infection, with More Limited Protection Rectally 8–24 h After Gel Use

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Jessica; Singer, Rachel; Derby, Nina; Aravantinou, Meropi; Abraham, Ciby J.; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Zhang, Shimin; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Fernández-Romero, José A.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Previously we showed that repeated vaginal application of a MIV-150/zinc acetate carrageenan (MIV-150/ZA/CG) gel and a zinc acetate carrageenan (ZA/CG) gel significantly protected macaques from vaginal simian human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) infection. Gels were applied either daily for 2 weeks or every other day for 4 weeks, and the animals were challenged 4–24 h later. Herein, we examined the effects of a single vaginal dose administered either before or after virus challenge. Encouraged by the vaginal protection seen with MIV-150/ZA/CG, we also tested it rectally. Vaginal applications of MIV-150/ZA/CG, ZA/CG, and CG gel were performed once 8–24 h before, 1 h after, or 24 h before and 1 h after vaginal challenge. Rectal applications of MIV-150/ZA/CG and CG gel were performed once 8 or 24 h before rectal challenge. While vaginal pre-challenge and pre/post-challenge application of MIV-150/ZA/CG gel offered significant protection (88%, p<0.002), post-challenge application alone did not significantly protect. ZA/CG gel reduced infection prechallenge, but not significantly, and the effect was completely lost post-challenge. Rectal application of MIV-150/ZA/CG gel afforded limited protection against rectal challenge when applied 8–24 h before challenge. Thus, MIV-150/ZA/CG gel is a highly effective vaginal microbicide that demonstrates 24 h of protection from vaginal infection and may demonstrate efficacy against rectal infection when given close to the time of HIV exposure. PMID:22737981

  17. Zika virus preferentially replicates in the female reproductive tract after vaginal inoculation of rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Timothy; Lo, Ming; Lanteri, Marion; Dutra, Joseph; Zarbock, Katie; Silveira, Paola; Rourke, Tracy; Ma, Zhong-Min; Fritts, Linda; O'Connor, Shelby; Busch, Michael; Miller, Christopher J

    2017-07-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus that can cause severe defects in an infected fetus. ZIKV is also transmitted by sexual contact, although the relative importance of sexual transmission is unclear. To better understand the role of sexual transmission in ZIKV pathogenesis, a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of vaginal transmission was developed. ZIKV was readily transmitted to mature cycling female rhesus macaque (RM) by vaginal inoculation with 104-106 plaque-forming units (PFU). However, there was variability in susceptibility between the individual RM with 1->8 vaginal inoculations required to establish infection. After treatment with Depoprovera, a widely used contraceptive progestin, two RM that initially resisted 8 vaginal ZIKV inoculations became infected after one ZIKV inoculation. Thus, Depoprovera seemed to enhance susceptibility to vaginal ZIKV transmission. Unexpectedly, the kinetics of virus replication and dissemination after intravaginal ZIKV inoculation were markedly different from RM infected with ZIKV by subcutaneous (SQ) virus inoculation. Several groups have reported that after SQ ZIKV inoculation vRNA is rapidly detected in blood plasma with vRNA less common in urine and saliva and only rarely detected in female reproductive tract (FRT) secretions. In contrast, in vaginally inoculated RM, plasma vRNA is delayed for several days and ZIKV replication in, and vRNA shedding from, the FRT was found in all 6 animals. Further, after intravaginal transmission ZIKV RNA shedding from FRT secretions was detected before or simultaneously with plasma vRNA, and persisted for at least as long. Thus, ZIKV replication in the FRT was independent of, and often preceded virus replication in the tissues contributing to plasma vRNA. These results support the conclusion that ZIKV preferentially replicates in the FRT after vaginal transmission, but not after SQ transmission, and raise the possibility that there is enhanced fetal infection and pathology

  18. Obstetric and gynecological diseases and complications resulting from vaginal dysbacteriosis.

    PubMed

    Kovachev, Stefan Miladinov

    2014-08-01

    Accurate knowledge of the composition and ecology of vaginal microbial environment of a healthy woman is necessary for the understanding of normal flora and how to reduce the risk for diseases. Vagina and its microflora form a balanced ecosystem in which dominated bacteria are vaginal lactobacilli. There are dynamic changes in this ecosystem having structure and composition depending on many factors. The term dysbacteriosis defines any movement outside the normal range for the given biotope of obligate and/or facultative microflora. Such a change in the quantity and quality of the respective microbial balance is fraught with danger and requires correction and recovery. The purpose of this overview is to examine obstetric and gynecological diseases that can cause vaginal impaired microbial balance. Vaginal dysbacteriosis is a cause, predecessor, and often also consequence of vaginal infections. In essence, any vaginal infection can be seen as dysbacteriosis, developed to the most severe extent. Here, there is a dominant microorganism other than lactic acid bacteria in the vagina (clinically manifested or not, respectively), depletion of defense mechanisms of the vagina associated with the shift of lactobacilli from their dominant role in the vaginal balance, decrease in their number and species diversity, and a resulting change in the healthy status of the vagina. Vaginal dysbacteriosis can be found in pathogenetic mechanism, whereby many obstetric and gynecological diseases develop. Most of these diseases lead directly to increased maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, so it is important to understand the reasons for them and the arrangements for their prevention.

  19. The missing "Bratz" doll: a case of vaginal foreign body.

    PubMed

    Someshwar, Jean; Lutfi, Riad; Nield, Linda S

    2007-12-01

    Young female patients with gynecologic complaints, including vaginal discharge, commonly seek care in the emergency department. Prepubertal vaginal discharges have various potential etiologies including nonspecific vulvovaginitis, infections, inflammatory or dermatologic processes, precocious puberty, malignancy, anatomical anomaly, trauma, sexual abuse, and foreign body. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl with vaginal odor and discharge secondary to a foreign body. The foreign body was part of a toy, the lower half of the patient's missing "Bratz" (MGA Entertainment) doll. Although it is well known that a vaginal foreign body can cause a vaginal discharge, the unusual nature of the foreign body in this case and the revealing radiograph made this a case of particular interest.

  20. 77 FR 70167 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Vaginal Microbicides: Development for the Prevention of Human...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... entitled ``Vaginal Microbicides: Development for the Prevention of HIV Infection.'' The purpose of this... human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The guidance outlines the types of nonclinical studies and...: Development for the Prevention of HIV Infection.'' This guidance addresses nonclinical development, early...

  1. Dynamics of Vaginal Bacterial Communities in Women Developing Bacterial Vaginosis, Candidiasis, or No Infection, Analyzed by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Real-Time PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Beatrice; Pugliese, Ciro; Biagi, Elena; Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Bellen, Gert; Donders, Gilbert G. G.; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2007-01-01

    The microbial flora of the vagina plays a major role in preventing genital infections, including bacterial vaginosis (BV) and candidiasis (CA). An integrated approach based on PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and real-time PCR was used to study the structure and dynamics of bacterial communities in vaginal fluids of healthy women and patients developing BV and CA. Universal eubacterial primers and Lactobacillus genus-specific primers, both targeted at 16S rRNA genes, were used in DGGE and real-time PCR analysis, respectively. The DGGE profiles revealed that the vaginal flora was dominated by Lactobacillus species under healthy conditions, whereas several potentially pathogenic bacteria were present in the flora of women with BV. Lactobacilli were the predominant bacterial population in the vagina for patients affected by CA, but changes in the composition of Lactobacillus species were observed. Real-time PCR analysis allowed the quantitative estimation of variations in lactobacilli associated with BV and CA diseases. A statistically significant decrease in the relative abundance of lactobacilli was found in vaginal fluids of patients with BV compared to the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the vaginal fluids of healthy women and patients with CA. PMID:17644631

  2. Dynamics of vaginal bacterial communities in women developing bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis, or no infection, analyzed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Beatrice; Pugliese, Ciro; Biagi, Elena; Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Bellen, Gert; Donders, Gilbert G G; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2007-09-01

    The microbial flora of the vagina plays a major role in preventing genital infections, including bacterial vaginosis (BV) and candidiasis (CA). An integrated approach based on PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and real-time PCR was used to study the structure and dynamics of bacterial communities in vaginal fluids of healthy women and patients developing BV and CA. Universal eubacterial primers and Lactobacillus genus-specific primers, both targeted at 16S rRNA genes, were used in DGGE and real-time PCR analysis, respectively. The DGGE profiles revealed that the vaginal flora was dominated by Lactobacillus species under healthy conditions, whereas several potentially pathogenic bacteria were present in the flora of women with BV. Lactobacilli were the predominant bacterial population in the vagina for patients affected by CA, but changes in the composition of Lactobacillus species were observed. Real-time PCR analysis allowed the quantitative estimation of variations in lactobacilli associated with BV and CA diseases. A statistically significant decrease in the relative abundance of lactobacilli was found in vaginal fluids of patients with BV compared to the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the vaginal fluids of healthy women and patients with CA.

  3. [Evaluation of vaginal dysfunction in symptomatic and asymptomatic pregnant women by using the analysis of basic vaginal states (BVS) and its comparison with the conventional microbiological study].

    PubMed

    Touzon, María S; Losada, Mirta; Eliseht, Martha Cora; Menghi, Claudia; Gatta, Claudia; Santa Cruz, Gabriela; Malamud de Ruda Vega, Hilda; Vay, Carlos; Tatti, Silvio; Famiglietti, Angela; Perazzi, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Infections of the lower genital tract associated to maternal and perinatal complications frequently occur during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate vaginal dysfunction through the analysis of basic vaginal states (BVS) using the methodology of balance of the vaginal content (BAVACO) and to compare it with the microbiological study of candidiasis, trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis (BV). Pregnant patients (1238) were examined from 2010 to 2012. In asymptomatic (A) (n: 1046) and symptomatic pregnant women (S) (n: 192) BVS I was 59.5% and 26% of the patients, respectively. BVS II was observed in 19.7% of A and in 17.2% of S. BVS III was only detected in A in 0.4%. BVS IV was observed in 14.4% of A and in 38% of S. BVS V was detected in 6% of A and in 18.8% of S. Yeasts were associated to BVS I and II in 55.5% and 23.2% of A, respectively; and in 32.4% and 31% of S, respectively. Trichomonas were associated to BVS I in 50% of A, to IV in 44.4% of S and to V in 33.3% of S. BAVACO susceptibility to detect yeasts was 80.4% and 85.5% in A and S, respectively; 40% and 75% in A and S, respectively, to detect trichomonas and 100% in A and S to detect BV. BAVACO specificity was 100% for all pathogens in A and S. The study of BVS proved useful as a guide to evaluate vaginal dysfunction, regardless of symptomatology. Therefore, this study is recommended as prenatal control. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Progesterone for Luteal Phase Support in In Vitro Fertilization: Comparison of Vaginal and Rectal Pessaries to Vaginal Capsules: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Khrouf, Mohamed; Slimani, Soufiene; Khrouf, Myriam Razgallah; Braham, Marouen; Bouyahia, Maha; Berjeb, Khadija Kacem; Chaabane, Hanene Elloumi; Merdassi, Ghaya; Kaffel, Aida Zahaf; Zhioua, Amel; Zhioua, Fethi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In IVF, Luteal phase support is usually performed using vaginal progesterone. A part of patients using this route reports being uncomfortable with this route. We tried to study whether the rectal route could be an effective alternative and associated with less discomfort. PATIENTS AND METHODS A prospective randomized controlled study. All patient were eligible for IVF treatment for infertility. After oocyte pickup, 186 patients were allocated to one the following protocols for luteal phase support: (i) rectal pessaries group: natural progesterone pessaries administered rectally 200 mg three times a day, (ii) vaginal pessaries group: natural progesterone pessaries administered vaginally 200 mg three times a day), and (iii) vaginal capsules group: natural micronized progesterone capsules administered vaginally 200 mg three times a day. On the day of pregnancy test, patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire conducted by an investigator in order to assess the tolerability and side effects of the LPS treatment taken. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of perineal irritation. RESULTS Fifty eight patients were assigned to the rectal pessaries group, 68 patients to the vaginal pessaries group, and 60 patients to the vaginal capsules group. All patients adhered to their allocated treatment. Implantation and clinical pregnancy rates per transfer did not differ between the three groups. Perineal irritation, which was our primary endpoint, was the same for all the three groups (respectively 1.7 % versus 5.9 % versus 11.7%). Regarding the other side effects, more patients experienced constipation and flatulence with the rectal route, whereas more patients reported vaginal discharge in the vaginal capsules group. CONCLUSION Rectal administration for luteal phase support is effective and well accepted alternative to vaginal route. PMID:28096703

  5. Progesterone for Luteal Phase Support in In Vitro Fertilization: Comparison of Vaginal and Rectal Pessaries to Vaginal Capsules: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Khrouf, Mohamed; Slimani, Soufiene; Khrouf, Myriam Razgallah; Braham, Marouen; Bouyahia, Maha; Berjeb, Khadija Kacem; Chaabane, Hanene Elloumi; Merdassi, Ghaya; Kaffel, Aida Zahaf; Zhioua, Amel; Zhioua, Fethi

    2016-01-01

    In IVF, Luteal phase support is usually performed using vaginal progesterone. A part of patients using this route reports being uncomfortable with this route. We tried to study whether the rectal route could be an effective alternative and associated with less discomfort. A prospective randomized controlled study. All patient were eligible for IVF treatment for infertility. After oocyte pickup, 186 patients were allocated to one the following protocols for luteal phase support: (i) rectal pessaries group: natural progesterone pessaries administered rectally 200 mg three times a day, (ii) vaginal pessaries group: natural progesterone pessaries administered vaginally 200 mg three times a day), and (iii) vaginal capsules group: natural micronized progesterone capsules administered vaginally 200 mg three times a day. On the day of pregnancy test, patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire conducted by an investigator in order to assess the tolerability and side effects of the LPS treatment taken. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of perineal irritation. Fifty eight patients were assigned to the rectal pessaries group, 68 patients to the vaginal pessaries group, and 60 patients to the vaginal capsules group. All patients adhered to their allocated treatment. Implantation and clinical pregnancy rates per transfer did not differ between the three groups. Perineal irritation, which was our primary endpoint, was the same for all the three groups (respectively 1.7 % versus 5.9 % versus 11.7%). Regarding the other side effects, more patients experienced constipation and flatulence with the rectal route, whereas more patients reported vaginal discharge in the vaginal capsules group. Rectal administration for luteal phase support is effective and well accepted alternative to vaginal route.

  6. Aphthous vaginal ulceration in two women with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schuman, P; Christensen, C; Sobel, J D

    1996-05-01

    Two women with advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection are described who were seen with painful aphthous vaginal ulceration and CD4+ lymphocyte counts < 50 cells/mm3. A chronic rectovaginal fistula developed in one patient. In spite of extensive investigation no underlying cause of the ulceration was discovered. Clinical therapeutic response suggests that corticosteroid therapy may be of value in healing or stabilizing the destructive process. Clinicians should be aware of this complication in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women with severe vaginal pain and unexplained discharge.

  7. Effects of antibiotic treatment on the lactobacillus composition of vaginal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Melkumyan, A R; Priputnevich, T V; Ankirskaya, A S; Murav'eva, V V; Lubasovskaya, L A

    2015-04-01

    We analyzed sensitivity of 123 vaginal lactobacillus strains to antibacterial substances. All lactobacillus strains were sensitive to ampicillin, cefazolin, cefotaxime, and vancomycin, and insensitive to metronidazole, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and levofloxacin. Lactobacillus strains demonstrated different sensitivity to gentamycin, clindamycin, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline. The phenomenon of preferential selective influence of antibacterial drugs on the composition of lactobacilli of the vaginal microbiota, in which some lactobacilli survive as part of the vaginal microbiota and have a selective advantage over other types of lactobacilli, should be taken into account during treatment of vaginal infections and dysbiosis.

  8. Throwing the dice for the diagnosis of vaginal complaints?

    PubMed Central

    Schwiertz, Andreas; Taras, David; Rusch, Kerstin; Rusch, Volker

    2006-01-01

    Backround Vaginitis is among the most common conditions women are seeking medical care for. Although these infections can easily be treated, the relapse rate is high. This may be due to inadequate use of the diagnostic potential. Methods We evaluated the misjudgement rate of the aetiology of vaginal complaints. A total of 220 vaginal samples from women with a vaginal complaint were obtained and analysed for numbers of total lactobacilli, H2O2-producing lactobacilli, total aerobic cell counts and total anaerobic cell counts including bifidobacteria, Bacteroides spp., Prevotella spp. Additionally, the presence of Atopobium vaginae, Gardnerella vaginalis, Candida spp. and Trichomonas vaginalis was evaluated by DNA-hybridisation using the PCR and Affirm VPIII Microbial Identification Test, respectively. Results The participating physicians diagnosed Bacterial vaginosis (BV) as origin of discomfort in 80 cases, candidiasis in 109 cases and mixed infections in 8 cases. However, a present BV, defined as lack of H2O2-lactobacilli, presence of marker organisms, such as G. vaginalis, Bacteroides spp. or Atopobium vaginae, and an elevated pH were identified in only 45 cases of the women examined. Candida spp. were detected in 46 cases. Interestingly, an elevated pH corresponded solely to the presence of Atopobium vaginae, which was detected in 11 cases. Conclusion Errors in the diagnosis of BV and candida vulvovaginitis (CV) were high. Interestingly, the cases of misjudgement of CV (77%) were more numerous than that of BV (61%). The use of Amsel criteria or microscopy did not reduce the number of misinterpretations. The study reveals that the misdiagnosis of vaginal complaints is rather high. PMID:16503990

  9. Accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of vaginitis compared with a DNA probe laboratory standard.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Nancy K; Neal, Jeremy L; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2009-01-01

    To estimate the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of the three most common causes of acute vulvovaginal symptoms (bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis vaginitis, and trichomoniasis vaginalis) using a traditional, standardized clinical diagnostic protocol compared with a DNA probe laboratory standard. This prospective clinical comparative study had a sample of 535 active-duty United States military women presenting with vulvovaginal symptoms. Clinical diagnoses were made by research staff using a standardized protocol of history, physical examination including pelvic examination, determination of vaginal pH, vaginal fluid amines test, and wet-prep microscopy. Vaginal fluid samples were obtained for DNA analysis. The research clinicians were blinded to the DNA results. The participants described a presenting symptom of abnormal discharge (50%), itching/irritation (33%), malodor (10%), burning (4%), or others such as vulvar pain and vaginal discomfort. According to laboratory standard, there were 225 cases (42%) of bacterial vaginosis, 76 cases (14%) of candidiasis vaginitis, 8 cases (1.5%) of trichomoniasis vaginalis, 87 cases of mixed infections (16%), and 139 negative cases (26%). For each single infection, the clinical diagnosis had a sensitivity and specificity of 80.8% and 70.0% for bacterial vaginosis, 83.8% and 84.8% for candidiasis vaginitis, and 84.6% and 99.6% for trichomoniasis vaginalis when compared with the DNA probe standard. Compared with a DNA probe standard, clinical diagnosis is 81-85% sensitive and 70-99% specific for bacterial vaginosis, Candida vaginitis, and trichomoniasis. Even under research conditions that provided clinicians with sufficient time and materials to conduct a thorough and standardized clinical evaluation, the diagnosis and, therefore, subsequent treatment of these common vaginal problems remains difficult. II.

  10. Longitudinal analysis reveals characteristically high proportions of bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria and temporal variability of vaginal microbiota in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Lei, Ai-Hua; Zheng, Hong-Yi; Lyu, Long-Bao; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-09-18

    The complex and dynamic vaginal microbial ecosystem is critical to both health and disease of the host. Studies focusing on how vaginal microbiota influences HIV-1 infection may face limitations in selecting proper animal models. Given that northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection, they may be an optimal animal model for elucidating the mechanisms by which vaginal microbiota contributes to resistance and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. However, little is known about the composition and temporal variability of vaginal microbiota of the northern pig-tailed macaque. Here, we present a comprehensive catalog of the composition and temporal dynamics of vaginal microbiota of two healthy northern pig-tailed macaques over 19 weeks using 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. We found remarkably high proportions of a diverse array of anaerobic bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis. Atopobium and Sneathia were dominant genera, and interestingly, we demonstrated the presence of Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota. Moreover, longitudinal analysis demonstrated that the temporal dynamics of the vaginal microbiota were considerably individualized. Finally, network analysis revealed that vaginal pH may influence the temporal dynamics of the vaginal microbiota, suggesting that inter-subject variability of vaginal bacterial communities could be mirrored in inter-subject variation in correlation profiles of species with each other and with vaginal pH over time. Our results suggest that the northern pig-tailed macaque could be an ideal animal model for prospective investigation of the mechanisms by which vaginal microbiota influence susceptibility and resistance to HIV-1 infection in the context of highly polymicrobial and Lactobacillus-dominated states.

  11. Vaginal disorders.

    PubMed

    Soderberg, S F

    1986-05-01

    Chronic vaginitis is the most common vaginal disorder. Dogs with vaginitis show no signs of systemic illness but often lick at the vulva and have purulent or hemorrhagic vaginal discharges. Vaginitis is most commonly secondary to a noninfectious inciting factor such as congenital vaginal anomalies, clitoral hypertrophy, foreign bodies, trauma to the vaginal mucosa, or vaginal tumors. Inspection of the caudal vagina and vestibule both visually and digitally will often reveal the source of vaginal irritation. Vaginal cytology is used to establish the stage of the estrous cycle as well as distinguish uterine from vaginal sources of discharge. Vaginal cultures are used to establish the predominant offending organism associated with vaginal discharges and may be used as a guide for selection of a therapeutic agent. Vaginitis is best managed by removing the inciting cause and treating the area locally with antiseptic douches. Congenital malformations at the vestibulovaginal or vestibulovulvar junction may prevent normal intromission. Affected bitches may be reluctant to breed naturally because of pain. Such defects are detected best by digital examination. Congenital vaginal defects may be corrected by digital or surgical means. Prolapse of tissue through the lips of the vulva may be caused by clitoral hypertrophy, vaginal hyperplasia, or vaginal tumors. Enlargement of clitoral tissue is the result of endogenous or exogenous sources of androgens. Treatment of this condition includes removal of the androgen source and/or surgical removal of clitoral tissue. Vaginal hyperplasia is detected during proestrus or estrus of young bitches. Hyperplastic tissue will regress during diestrus. Tissue that is excessively traumatized and/or prolapse of the entire vaginal circumference may be removed surgically. Ovariohysterectomy may be used to prevent recurrence. Vaginal tumors are detected most often in older intact bitches. Such tumors are generally of smooth muscle or fibrous

  12. In vitro effect of vaginal lactobacilli on the growth and adhesion abilities of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Leccese Terraf, María Cecilia; Juarez Tomás, María Silvina; Rault, Lucie; Le Loir, Yves; Even, Sergine; Nader-Macías, María Elena Fátima

    2017-07-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the main causes of uncomplicated urinary tract infections and responsible of vaginal infections. Lactobacilli can inhibit this pathogen by the production of antimicrobial substances as organic acids, hydrogen peroxide and/or bacteriocins. The aim of this work was to study the effects of beneficial vaginal lactobacilli on E. coli through in vitro experiments. The inhibitory activity of three vaginal Lactobacillus strains against E. coli was assessed using the agar plate diffusion. Moreover, the effect of Lactobacillus reuteri CRL (Centro de Referencia para Lactobacilos Culture Collection) 1324 on the adhesion and internalization capabilities of E. coli was studied on HeLa cells. Two Lactobacillus strains inhibited the growth of the pathogens by production of organic acids. L. reuteri CRL 1324 reduced the adhesion and internalization of E. coli 275 into HeLa cells. The results obtained suggest that L. reuteri CRL 1324 can be considered as a probiotic candidate for further in vivo studies for the prevention or treatment of urinary tract infections caused by E. coli.

  13. Seasonal variation of streptococcal vulvo-vaginitis in an urban community

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C. A.

    1971-01-01

    A study was made of patients investigated by general practitioners. Over a three-year period Streptococcus pyogenes (group A) was isolated most commonly from vaginal and vulval swabs collected in the winter. The serotypes of strains indicate that some had probably been derived from the skin and others from the respiratory tract. The two sources are thought to have masked a consistent, but not obvious, seasonal variation in streptococcal vulvo-vaginitis acquired usually from streptococcal infections of the respiratory tract in winter and from those of the skin in summer. PMID:4946417

  14. Vaginal pH and Microbicidal Lactic Acid When Lactobacilli Dominate the Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    O’Hanlon, Deirdre E.; Moench, Thomas R.; Cone, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Lactic acid at sufficiently acidic pH is a potent microbicide, and lactic acid produced by vaginal lactobacilli may help protect against reproductive tract infections. However, previous observations likely underestimated healthy vaginal acidity and total lactate concentration since they failed to exclude women without a lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota, and also did not account for the high carbon dioxide, low oxygen environment of the vagina. Fifty-six women with low (0-3) Nugent scores (indicating a lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota) and no symptoms of reproductive tract disease or infection, provided a total of 64 cervicovaginal fluid samples using a collection method that avoided the need for sample dilution and rigorously minimized aerobic exposure. The pH of samples was measured by microelectrode immediately after collection and under a physiological vaginal concentration of CO2. Commercial enzymatic assays of total lactate and total acetate concentrations were validated for use in CVF, and compared to the more usual HPLC method. The average pH of the CVF samples was 3.5 ± 0.3 (mean ± SD), range 2.8-4.2, and the average total lactate was 1.0% ± 0.2% w/v; this is a five-fold higher average hydrogen ion concentration (lower pH) and a fivefold higher total lactate concentration than in the prior literature. The microbicidal form of lactic acid (protonated lactic acid) was therefore eleven-fold more concentrated, and a markedly more potent microbicide, than indicated by prior research. This suggests that when lactobacilli dominate the vaginal microbiota, women have significantly more lactic acid-mediated protection against infections than currently believed. Our results invite further evaluations of the prophylactic and therapeutic actions of vaginal lactic acid, whether provided in situ by endogenous lactobacilli, by probiotic lactobacilli, or by products that reinforce vaginal lactic acid. PMID:24223212

  15. Vaginal pH and microbicidal lactic acid when lactobacilli dominate the microbiota.

    PubMed

    O'Hanlon, Deirdre E; Moench, Thomas R; Cone, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Lactic acid at sufficiently acidic pH is a potent microbicide, and lactic acid produced by vaginal lactobacilli may help protect against reproductive tract infections. However, previous observations likely underestimated healthy vaginal acidity and total lactate concentration since they failed to exclude women without a lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota, and also did not account for the high carbon dioxide, low oxygen environment of the vagina. Fifty-six women with low (0-3) Nugent scores (indicating a lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota) and no symptoms of reproductive tract disease or infection, provided a total of 64 cervicovaginal fluid samples using a collection method that avoided the need for sample dilution and rigorously minimized aerobic exposure. The pH of samples was measured by microelectrode immediately after collection and under a physiological vaginal concentration of CO2. Commercial enzymatic assays of total lactate and total acetate concentrations were validated for use in CVF, and compared to the more usual HPLC method. The average pH of the CVF samples was 3.5 ± 0.3 (mean ± SD), range 2.8-4.2, and the average total lactate was 1.0% ± 0.2% w/v; this is a five-fold higher average hydrogen ion concentration (lower pH) and a fivefold higher total lactate concentration than in the prior literature. The microbicidal form of lactic acid (protonated lactic acid) was therefore eleven-fold more concentrated, and a markedly more potent microbicide, than indicated by prior research. This suggests that when lactobacilli dominate the vaginal microbiota, women have significantly more lactic acid-mediated protection against infections than currently believed. Our results invite further evaluations of the prophylactic and therapeutic actions of vaginal lactic acid, whether provided in situ by endogenous lactobacilli, by probiotic lactobacilli, or by products that reinforce vaginal lactic acid.

  16. Partial protection against multiple RT-SHIV162P3 vaginal challenge of rhesus macaques by a silicone elastomer vaginal ring releasing the NNRTI MC1220.

    PubMed

    Fetherston, Susan M; Geer, Leslie; Veazey, Ronald S; Goldman, Laurie; Murphy, Diarmaid J; Ketas, Thomas J; Klasse, Per Johan; Blois, Sylvain; La Colla, Paolo; Moore, John P; Malcolm, R Karl

    2013-02-01

    The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor MC1220 has potent in vitro activity against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). A liposome gel formulation of MC1220 has previously been reported to partially protect rhesus macaques against vaginal challenge with a simian HIV (SHIV). Here, we describe the pre-clinical development of an MC1220-releasing silicone elastomer vaginal ring (SEVR), including pharmacokinetic (PK) and efficacy studies in macaques. In vitro release studies were conducted on SEVRs loaded with 400 mg of MC1220, using simulated vaginal fluid (SVF, n = 4) and 1 : 1 isopropanol/water (IPA/H(2)O, n = 4) as release media. For PK evaluation, SEVRs were inserted into adult female macaques (n = 6) for 30 days. Following a 1 week washout period, fresh rings were placed in the same animals, which were then challenged vaginally with RT-SHIV162P3 once weekly for 4 weeks. SEVRs released 1.66 and 101 mg of MC1220 into SVF and IPA/H(2)O, respectively, over 30 days, the differential reflecting the low aqueous solubility of the drug. In macaque PK studies, MC1220 was consistently detected in vaginal fluid (peak 845 ng/mL) and plasma (peak 0.91 ng/mL). Kaplan-Meier analysis over 9 weeks showed significantly lower infection rates for animals given MC1220-containing SEVRs than placebo rings (hazard ratio 0.20, P = 0.0037). An MC1220-releasing SEVR partially protected macaques from vaginal challenge. Such ring devices are a practical method for providing sustained, coitally independent protection against vaginal exposure to HIV-1.

  17. Quantitative studies on the vaginal flora of asymptomatic women and patients with vaginitis and vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Hammann, R; Kronibus, A; Lang, N; Werner, H

    1987-07-01

    Vaginal washings of 22 patients with vaginitis, 11 with vaginosis, and 12 healthy subjects were investigated quantitatively and qualitatively for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and yeasts. Gardnerella vaginalis was recovered from 9 of the vaginitis patients, 7 of the vaginosis patients, and 4 of the asymptomatic subjects. Obligate anaerobes were found in 11 of the vaginitis patients, 4 of the vaginosis patients, and none of the control subjects. Bacteroides bivius was the anaerobe most frequently isolated from symptomatic subjects. Anaerobic vibrios were recovered twice from symptomatic subjects. The counts for Gardnerella vaginalis and anaerobes when present were generally very high. The most frequent aerobes were beta-hemolytic streptococci (group B) and staphylococci.

  18. Systemic and mucosal immunization with Candida albicans hsp90 elicits hsp90-specific humoral response in vaginal mucosa which is further enhanced during experimental vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Raska, Milan; Belakova, Jana; Horynova, Milada; Krupka, Michal; Novotny, Jiri; Sebestova, Martina; Weigl, Evzen

    2008-08-01

    The Candida albicans heat shock protein 90 kDa (hsp90-CA) is an important target for protective antibodies in disseminated candidiasis of experimental mice and humans. Hsp90-CA is present in the cell wall of Candida pseudohyphae or hyphae--typical pathogenic morphotypes in both mucosal and systemic Candida infections. However, the potential protective effects of hsp90-CA-specific antibodies in vaginal candidiasis has not yet been reported. In the present study we used various vaccine formulations (recombinant hsp90-CA protein and hsp90-CA-encoding DNA vaccine) and routes of administration (intradermal, intranasal, and intravenous) to induce both hsp90-CA-specific systemic and vaginal mucosa immune responses in experimental BALB/c mice. The results showed that intradermal recombinant hsp90-CA protein priming, followed by intranasal or intradermal recombinant hsp90-CA protein boosting induced significant increases in both serum and vaginal hsp90-CA-specific IgG and IgA antibodies compared to the control group, as well as enhanced hsp90-CA-specific splenocyte responses in vitro. In the intradermally boosted group, subsequent experimental vaginal Candida infection induced additional increases in the hsp90-CA specific IgG isotype, suggesting that Candida has the ability to induce a local hsp90-specific antibody (IgG) response during vulvovaginal candidiasis. Further work is required to elucidate the importance of immunity to highly conserved antigens during infection of the human female reproductive tract where a balance between immunity to and tolerance for commonly antigens such as hsp90 is necessary for the maintenance of fertility.

  19. Accuracy of dry vaginal self-sampling for detecting high-risk human papillomavirus infection in cervical cancer screening: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Haguenoer, K; Giraudeau, B; Gaudy-Graffin, C; de Pinieux, I; Dubois, F; Trignol-Viguier, N; Viguier, J; Marret, H; Goudeau, A

    2014-08-01

    Cervical cancer screening coverage remains insufficient in most countries. Testing self-collected samples for high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) could be an alternative to the Pap smear, but costs, sampling methods and transport issues hamper its wide use. Our objective was to compare diagnostic accuracy of 2 vaginal self-collection methods, a dry swab (vsc-DRY) or swab in liquid medium (vsc-LIQ), for detecting HR-HPV cervical infection assessed by a cervical clinician-collected sample in liquid medium (ccc-LIQ). Women 20 to 65 years attending a Pap smear were recruited between September, 2009 and March, 2011. Each sample (3 per woman) underwent HPV DNA testing. Samples were classified as HR-HPV+ with detection of at least one HR-HPV or probable HR-HPV type. Of 734 women included, 722 had complete HPV data. HR-HPV was detected in 20.9% of ccc-LIQ samples. Estimated sensitivity and specificity to detect HR-HPV in vsc-DRY samples were 88.7% and 92.5%, respectively, and in vsc-LIQ samples, 87.4% and 90.9%. Cytology findings were abnormal for 79 women (10.9%): among 27 samples of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, 25 were HR-HPV+ in vsc-DRY, vsc-LIQ and ccc-LIQ samples. Among 6 samples of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, all were HR-HPV+ in vsc-DRY samples, 1 was HR-HPV- in vsc-LIQ samples and 1 was HR-HPV- in ccc-LIQ samples. Vaginal self-sampling with a dry swab is accurate to detect HR-HPV infection as compared with cervical clinician-collection and accurate as compared with cytology results. This cheap and easy-to-ship sampling method could be widely used in a cervical cancer screening program. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparing Serum Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Level with Vaginal PH in Women with Menopausal Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Vahidroodsari, Fatemeh; Ayati, Seddigheh; Yousefi, Zohreh; Saeed, Shohreh

    2010-01-01

    Despite the important implication for women's health and reproduction, very few studies have focused on vaginal PH for menopausal diagnosis. Recent studies have suggested vaginal PH as a simple, noninvasive and inexpensive method for this purpose. The aim of this study is to compare serum FSH level with vaginal PH in menopause. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive study, conducted on 103 women (aged 31-95 yrs) with menopausal symptoms who were referred to the Menopausal Clinic at Ghaem Hospital during 2006. Vaginal pH was measured using pH meter strips and serum FSH levels were measured using immunoassay methods. The data was analyzed using SPSS software (version 11.5) and results were evaluated statistically by the Chi-square and Kappa tests. p≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. According to this study, in the absence of vaginal infection, the average vaginal pH in these 103 menopausal women was 5.33±0.53. If the menopausal hallmark was considered as vaginal pH>4.5, and serum FSH as ≥20 mIU/ml, then the sensitivity of vaginal pH for menopausal diagnosis was 97%. The mean of FSH levels in this population was 80.79 mIU/ml. Vaginal pH is a simple, accurate, and cost effective tool that can be suggested as a suitable alternative to serum FSH measurement for the diagnosis of menopause.

  1. Vaginal flora alterations and clinical symptoms in low-risk pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Gondo, Fausto; da Silva, Márcia G; Polettini, Jossimara; Tristao, Andréa da R; Peracoli, José C; Witkin, Steven S; Rudge, Marilza V C

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate associations between alterations in vaginal flora and clinical symptoms in low-risk pregnant women. Vaginal specimens from 245 pregnant women were analyzed by microscopy for vaginal flora. Signs and symptoms of vaginal infection were determined by patient interviews and gynecologic examinations. Abnormal vaginal flora was identified in 45.7% of the subjects. The final clinical diagnoses were bacterial vaginosis (21.6%), vaginal candidosis (10.2%), intermediate vaginal flora (5.2%), aerobic vaginitis (2.9%), mixed flora (2.9%) and other abnormal findings (2.9%). The percentage of women with or without clinical signs or symptoms was not significantly different between these categories. The presence of vaginal odor or vaginal discharge characteristics was not diagnostic of any specific flora alteration; pruritus was highly associated with candidosis (p < 0.0001). Compared to women with normal flora, pruritus was more prevalent in women with candidosis (p < 0.0001), while vaginal odor was associated with bacterial vaginosis (p = 0.0026). The prevalence of atypical vaginal flora is common in our low-risk pregnant population and is not always associated with pathology. The occurrence of specific signs or symptoms does not always discriminate between women with different types of atypical vaginal flora or between those with abnormal and normal vaginal flora. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Epidemiological Investigation of Vaginal Saccharomyces cerevisiae Isolates by a Genotypic Method

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Michael J.; Clemons, Karl V.; Farina, Claudio; McCusker, John H.; Stevens, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a ubiquitous, ascomycetous yeast, and vaginitis caused by this organism has been reported only very rarely. The aim of the present investigation was to assess the epidemiological relatedness of a group of vaginal and commercial S. cerevisiae isolates by a previously reported genetic typing method, which divided the isolates into two broad groups with numerous subtypes. Nineteen S. cerevisiae isolates obtained from patients suffering from vaginitis and four isolates from commercial products in the same city were analyzed. The cellular DNA from each isolate was digested with the restriction endonuclease EcoRI, and restriction fragment length polymorphisms were generated by horizontal gel electrophoresis. The results showed that although vaginal isolates did not cluster in any particular genetic subtype, multiple patients were infected with indistinguishable strains (there were nine distinct strains among 23 isolates). For two of three patients, all three with two episodes of S. cerevisiae vaginitis, different strains were isolated during the recurrence of this disease. Three other patients with indistinguishable isolates were epidemiologically related in that two were practitioners in the same clinic and the third was a patient at this clinic. We also found that one commercial strain was indistinguishable from the strain isolated from three different women at the time that they were suffering from vaginitis. The findings of the present study suggest that some S. cerevisiae strains may possess properties permitting persistence in the human host. Furthermore, person-to-person contact and the proliferation of the use of S. cerevisiae as a health-food product, in home baking, and in home brewing may be a contributing factor in human colonization and infection with this organism. PMID:9466776

  3. Comparative Study of Oral and Vaginal Misoprostol for Induction of Labour, Maternal and Foetal Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Komala, Kambhampati; Reddy, Meherlatha; Quadri, Iqbal Jehan; B., Suneetha; V., Ramya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Misoprostol is a new promising agent for cervical ripening and induction of labour .The ideal dose, route and frequency of administration of misoprostol are still under investigation. Although, vaginal application of misoprostol has been validated as a reasonable mean of induction, there is a patient resistance to digital examination and there is a risk of ascending infection. For this reason, oral administration of misoprostol for cervical ripening and labour induction has been tried. Aims and Objectives: To compare 50μg of oral misoprostol versus 25μg of intravaginal misoprostol for induction of labour at term and maternal, foetal outcomes. Methods: Two hundred women who were at term, with indication for induction of labour and Bishop scores of ≤5 were randomly assigned to receive misoprostol 50μg or 25μg intravaginal, every 4-6 hours, for a maximum of 5 doses. In either group, pregnant females with inadequate uterine contractions despite being given maximum 5 doses of misoprostol, were augmented using oxytocin. The primary outcome measure was time-interval from induction to vaginal delivery and vaginal delivery rate within 24 hours. Results: The median induction to vaginal delivery time in oral group (12.92h) and vaginal group (14.04 h) was not significant. Oral misoprostol resulted in more number of vaginal deliveries as compared to vaginal misoprostol (94% as compared to 86%), which was not significant. There was a significantly higher incidence of uterine tachysystole in the vaginal group, as compared to oral group. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to oxytocin augmentation, caesarean section rate, analgesic requirement and neonatal outcome. Conclusion: Oral misoprostol is as efficacious as vaginal misoprostol because of shorter induction delivery interval, lower caesarean section rates, and lower incidence of failed induction rates. Lower incidence of foetal distress and easy intake are observed if the

  4. Controlled-release biodegradable nanoparticles: From preparation to vaginal applications.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Beatriz; Quintanar-Guerrero, David; Tapia-Tapia, Melina; Cisneros-Tamayo, Ricardo; Zambrano-Zaragoza, María L; Alcalá-Alcalá, Sergio; Mendoza-Muñoz, Néstor; Piñón-Segundo, Elizabeth

    2018-03-30

    This study aimed to prepare poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) with chitosan (CTS) surface modification to be used as a vaginal delivery system for antimycotic drugs. Clotrimazole was encapsulated with entrapment efficiencies of 86.1 and 68.9% into Clotrimazole-PLGA-NPs (CLT-PLGA-NPs) and PLGA-NPs with CTS-modified surface (CLT-PLGA-CTS-NPs), respectively. The later NPs exhibited a larger size and higher positive zeta potential (Z potential) in comparison to unmodified NPs. In vitro release kinetic studies indicated that Clotrimazole was released in percentages of >98% from both nanoparticulate systems after 18days. Antifungal activity and mucoadhesive properties of NPs were enhanced when CTS was added onto the surface. In summary, these results suggested that Clotrimazole loaded into PLGA-CTS-NPs has great potential for vaginal applications in treating vaginal infections generated by Candida albicans. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Commensal Bacteria Modulate Innate Immune Responses of Vaginal Epithelial Cell Multilayer Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Rose, William A.; McGowin, Chris L.; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia D.; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Pyles, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiome plays a critical but poorly defined role in reproductive health. Vaginal microbiome alterations are associated with increased susceptibility to sexually-transmitted infections (STI) possibly due to related changes in innate defense responses from epithelial cells. Study of the impact of commensal bacteria on the vaginal mucosal surface has been hindered by current vaginal epithelial cell (VEC) culture systems that lack an appropriate interface between the apical surface of stratified squamous epithelium and the air-filled vaginal lumen. Therefore we developed a reproducible multilayer VEC culture system with an apical (luminal) air-interface that supported colonization with selected commensal bacteria. Multilayer VEC developed tight-junctions and other hallmarks of the vaginal mucosa including predictable proinflammatory cytokine secretion following TLR stimulation. Colonization of multilayers by common vaginal commensals including Lactobacillus crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. rhamnosus led to intimate associations with the VEC exclusively on the apical surface. Vaginal commensals did not trigger cytokine secretion but Staphylococcus epidermidis, a skin commensal, was inflammatory. Lactobacilli reduced cytokine secretion in an isolate-specific fashion following TLR stimulation. This tempering of inflammation offers a potential explanation for increased susceptibility to STI in the absence of common commensals and has implications for testing of potential STI preventatives. PMID:22412914

  6. Living with Cat and Dog Increases Vaginal Colonization with E. coli in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Stokholm, Jakob; Schjørring, Susanne; Pedersen, Louise; Bischoff, Anne Louise; Følsgaard, Nilofar; Carson, Charlotte G.; Chawes, Bo; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Mølgaard, Anne; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Bisgaard, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Background Furred pets in the household are known reservoirs for pathogenic bacteria, but it is not known if transmission of bacteria between pet and owner leads to significantly increased rate of infections. We studied whether cats and dogs living in the household of pregnant women affect the commensal vaginal flora, and furthermore the need for oral antibiotics and rate of urinary tract infections during pregnancy. Methods The novel unselected Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC2010) pregnancy cohort of 709 women participated in this analysis. Detailed information on pet exposure, oral antibiotic prescriptions filled at pharmacy and urinary tract infection during pregnancy was obtained and verified prospectively during clinic visits. Vaginal cultures were obtained at pregnancy week 36. Results Women, who had cat or dog in the home during pregnancy, had a different vaginal flora, in particular with increased Escherichia coli (E. coli) colonization; odds ratio after adjustment for lifestyle confounders and antibiotics 2.20, 95% CI, [1.27–3.80], p = 0.005. 43% of women living with cat and/or dog in the home used oral antibiotics compared to 33% of women with no cat or dog; adjusted odds ratio 1.51, 95% CI, [1.08–2.12], p = 0.016. Women living with cat had increased frequency of self-reported urinary tract infection; adjusted odds ratio 1.57, 95% CI, [1.02–2.43], p = 0.042. Conclusions The increased vaginal E. coli colonization in women living with cat or dog suggests a clinically important transmission of pathogenic bacteria from pet to owner substantiated by increased rate of antibiotic use and urinary tract infections which, which is of particular concern during pregnancy. PMID:23049986

  7. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensign-Hodges, Laura

    A method that could provide more uniform and longer-lasting drug delivery to mucosal surfaces holds the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches for numerous diseases and conditions, including sexually transmitted infections and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the body's natural defenses, including adhesive, rapidly cleared mucus linings coating nearly all entry points to the body not covered by skin, has limited the effectiveness of drug and gene delivery by nanoscale delivery systems. Here, we investigate the use of muco-inert mucus-penetrating nanoparticles (MPP) for improving vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery. Conventional hydrophobic nanoparticles strongly adhere to mucus, facilitating rapid clearance from the body. Here, we demonstrate that mucoadhesive polystyrene nanoparticles (conventional nanoparticles, CP) become mucus-penetrating in human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) after pretreatment with sufficient concentrations of Pluronic F127. Importantly, the diffusion rate of large MPP did not change in F127 pretreated CVM, implying there is no affect on the native pore structure of CVM. Additionally, there was no increase in inflammatory cytokine release in the vaginal tract of mice after daily application of 1% F127 for one week. Importantly, HSV virus remains adherent in F127-pretreated CVM. Mucosal epithelia use osmotic gradients for fluid absorption and secretion. We hypothesized that hypotonically-induced fluid uptake could be advantageous for rapidly delivering drugs through mucus to the vaginal epithelium. We evaluated hypotonic formulations for delivering water-soluble drugs and for drug delivery with MPP. Hypotonic formulations markedly increased the rate at which drugs and MPP reached the epithelial surface. Additionally, hypotonic formulations greatly enhanced drug and MPP delivery to the entire epithelial surface, including deep into the vaginal folds (rugae) that isotonic formulations

  8. [Importance of microbiologic examination of vaginal secretions in the reproductive period].

    PubMed

    Arsić-Arsenijević, Valentina; Radonjić, Ivana; Mijac, Vera; Cirković, Ivana

    2004-01-01

    Vaginal infections, during reproductive period are frequent and although not life treating, they can affect their normal functions. They can also affect women's fertility as well as the course of pregnancy. The outcome of pregnancy can be endangered due to the possibility of infection of newborn while passing trough birth canal of the infected mother. As statistically shown, bacterial vaginosis is considerably more often found with the patients having precancerous changes on cervix, or diagnosed cancer of cervix, comparing with women with healthy cervix. It can also cause the appearance of postoperative pelvic cellulitis after hysterectomy. On the other side, the presence of S. agalactiae in vaginal secretion may cause very serious and lethal infections of the newborn such as meningitis, pneumonia and sepsis. As for protozoa T. vaginalis it has been shown that it could cause reduced fertility ability and that during pregnancy it could damage fetal membranes and bring to its premature rupture and premature birth. There is also increased risk of cervix cancer. During reproductive period of women especially if risk factors are existing such as hormone therapy, diabetes mellitus type 1 and applications of wide range antibiotics, vaginal fungal infections caused by Candida can frequently appear. These infection apart from the discomfort like itch and affluent secretion they can also mean diagnostic and therapeutical problem. Regular microbiological test of women are highly recommended during reproductive period as standard for bacterial vaginosis, fungal and trichomonas infections. If those results appear negative, further microbiological tests are necessary. Such tests which are more elaborate, more timely and more expensive are referring to tests on chlamydia, microplasma and some viruses that can also be the cause of vaginal secretion disbalance in women during reproductive period.

  9. Formulation and in vitro study of antibacterial vaginal suppositories.

    PubMed

    Regdon, G; Gombkötö, S; Regdon, G; Selmeczi, B

    1994-12-01

    Vaginal suppositories frequently used in gynaecological therapy were studied. Several antibacterial pharmacons are used for the topical treatment of vaginitis of various origins. In view of the fact that the liberation of the given active substance and the subsequent therapeutic effect may be improved or inhibited by the vehicle, our aim was to find the optimal suppository base for vaginal suppositories containing sulfadimidine, chloramphenicol and gentamicin sulfate by means of in vitro experiments. On the basis of breaking hardness, disintegration time and spreading properties the French Suppocire NA product, and compositions of macrogols with lower molecular weight proved to be the best lipophilic and hydrophilic bases, respectively. Among the lipophilic bases the in vitro drug liberation of Suppocire NA was significantly better (P < 0.05) than the other lipophilic bases. This vehicle is recommended for the topical treatment of vaginitis, as these suppositories have the further advantage that they can easily be produced on a magistral, galenical or industrial scale as well.

  10. Vaccination with a HSV-2 UL24 mutant induces a protective immune response in murine and guinea pig vaginal infection models.

    PubMed

    Visalli, Robert J; Natuk, Robert J; Kowalski, Jacek; Guo, Min; Blakeney, Susan; Gangolli, Seema; Cooper, David

    2014-03-10

    The rational design and development of genetically attenuated HSV-2 mutant viruses represent an attractive approach for developing both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for genital herpes. Previously, HSV-2 UL24 was shown to be a virulence determinant in both murine and guinea pig vaginal infection models. An UL24-βgluc insertion mutant produced syncytial plaques and replicated to nearly wild type levels in tissue culture, but induced little or no pathological effects in recipient mice or guinea pigs following vaginal infection. Here we report that immunization of mice or guinea pigs with high or low doses of UL24-βgluc elicited a highly protective immune response. UL24-βgluc immunization via the vaginal or intramuscular routes was demonstrated to protect mice from a lethal vaginal challenge with wild type HSV-2. Moreover, antigen re-stimulated splenic lymphocytes harvested from immunized mice exhibited both HSV-2 specific CTL activity and IFN-γ expression. Humoral anti-HSV-2 responses in serum were Th1-polarized (IgG2a>IgG1) and contained high-titer anti-HSV-2 neutralizing activity. Guinea pigs vaccinated subcutaneously with UL24-βgluc or the more virulent parental strain (186) were challenged with a heterologous HSV-2 strain (MS). Acute disease scores were nearly indistinguishable in guinea pigs immunized with either virus. Recurrent disease scores were reduced in UL24-βgluc immunized animals but not to the same extent as those immunized with strain 186. In addition, challenge virus was not detected in 75% of guinea pigs subcutaneously immunized with UL24-βgluc. In conclusion, disruption of the UL24 gene is a prime target for the development of a genetically attenuated live HSV-2 vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Qualitative Analysis of Sexually Experienced Adolescent Females: Attitudes about Vaginal Health

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Jenny K R; Fraiz, Lauren Dapena; Catallozzi, Marina; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract Study Objective To explore adolescent’s perceptions of vaginal health, practices, and vaginally-placed products. Design Semi-structured interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed until achieving theoretical saturation. Setting Adolescent medicine clinics in NYC. Participants Adolescent females (n = 22) who were sexually experienced, predominately Hispanic (73%) with a mean age of 17.7 years (range 15–20 years). Interventions None Main Outcome Measures Interviews assessed perspectives on vaginal health, specific vaginal hygiene practices and attitudes about vaginally-placed products (contraceptive rings, intrauterine devices (IUDs), and proposed multi-purpose technologies (MPTs) administered as ring or gel). The interviews were transcribed and coded for relevant themes. Results Overlapping themes included young women’s view of their vagina as a space that needed to be healthy for sexual partners and future fertility. The vagina could not be presumed to be healthy and conversations about vaginal health were limited to only include specific individuals. All reported a variety of practices to maintain their vaginal health, including showering 1 to 5 times a day and using soaps specifically for the vagina. Attitudes about vaginally-placed products revealed concerns about the sensory experience of having a product in the vagina, safety concerns and interest in the product’s objective (prevention of pregnancy or infection). Conclusions Adolescents have very specific views and practices about their vaginas. Clinicians should initiate conversations about vaginal health and hygiene with adolescents and focus on the normalcy of the vagina. Development of vaginally-placed products should focus on the sensory experience, safety and purpose of the product. PMID:27133374

  12. [Bacteriological aspects of trichomonal vaginitis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Brockmann, J; Höhne, C

    1979-01-01

    An analysis was made of the vaginal flora of 25 gynaecological patients with acute trichomomal vaginitis, with the view to elucidating the bacteriological situation. Eighty-four isolates, an average of 3.4 per patient, were taken and included a wide range of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. - Obligate anaerobic species, such as bacteriodes and peptostreptococci, with susceptibility to metronidazole were among the predominant pathogens. - The differentiated susceptibility of the most common bacteria to antibiotics may yield information useful to therapy in the case of aggravated infection.

  13. Ureterovaginal fistula: A complication of a vaginal foreign body.

    PubMed

    Lo, Tsia-Shu; Jaili, Sukanda Bin; Ibrahim, Rami; Kao, Chuan Chi; Uy-Patrimonio, Ma Clarissa

    2018-02-01

    To know the diagnostic tools and proper management of ureterovaginal fistula following neglected vaginal foreign body in order to achieve optimal outcome. A case of ureterovaginal fistula associated with a neglected vaginal foreign body. The patient was complaining of a foul-smelling vaginal discharge and lower abdominal pain. On vaginal examination, a hard and large foreign body was found. Examination under anesthesia was performed, and an aerosol cap was removed from her vagina. The patient developed urinary incontinence after removal of the foreign body. Subsequent work-up demonstrated the presence of a right ureterovaginal fistula. The patient underwent an abdominal ureteroneocystostomy. At one year follow up, the patient had fully recovered. Ureterovaginal fistula following neglected vaginal foreign body is a serious condition. Early diagnosis, treatment of infection and proper surgical management can improve the outcome and decrease complications. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Comparison of the vaginal environment in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques pre- and post-lactobacillus colonization.

    PubMed

    Daggett, Gregory J; Zhao, Chunxia; Connor-Stroud, Fawn; Oviedo-Moreno, Patricia; Moon, Hojin; Cho, Michael W; Moench, Thomas; Anderson, Deborah J; Villinger, Francois

    2017-10-01

    Rhesus and cynomologus macaques are valuable animal models for the study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention strategies. However, for such studies focused on the vaginal route of infection, differences in vaginal environment may have deterministic impact on the outcome of such prevention, providing the rationale for this study. We tested the vaginal environment of rhesus and cynomolgus macaques longitudinally to characterize the normal microflora based on Nugent scores and pH. This evaluation was extended after colonization of the vaginal space with Lactobacilli in an effort to recreate NHP models representing the healthy human vaginal environment. Nugent scores and pH differed significantly between species, although data from both species were suggestive of stable bacterial vaginosis. Colonization with Lactobacilli was successful in both species leading to lower Nugent score and pH, although rhesus macaques appeared better able to sustain Lactobacillus spp over time. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Partial protection against multiple RT-SHIV162P3 vaginal challenge of rhesus macaques by a silicone elastomer vaginal ring releasing the NNRTI MC1220

    PubMed Central

    Fetherston, Susan M.; Geer, Leslie; Veazey, Ronald S.; Goldman, Laurie; Murphy, Diarmaid J.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Klasse, Per Johan; Blois, Sylvain; La Colla, Paolo; Moore, John P.; Malcolm, R. Karl

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor MC1220 has potent in vitro activity against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). A liposome gel formulation of MC1220 has previously been reported to partially protect rhesus macaques against vaginal challenge with a simian HIV (SHIV). Here, we describe the pre-clinical development of an MC1220-releasing silicone elastomer vaginal ring (SEVR), including pharmacokinetic (PK) and efficacy studies in macaques. Methods In vitro release studies were conducted on SEVRs loaded with 400 mg of MC1220, using simulated vaginal fluid (SVF, n = 4) and 1 : 1 isopropanol/water (IPA/H2O, n = 4) as release media. For PK evaluation, SEVRs were inserted into adult female macaques (n = 6) for 30 days. Following a 1week washout period, fresh rings were placed in the same animals, which were then challenged vaginally with RT-SHIV162P3 once weekly for 4 weeks. Results SEVRs released 1.66 and 101 mg of MC1220 into SVF and IPA/H2O, respectively, over 30 days, the differential reflecting the low aqueous solubility of the drug. In macaque PK studies, MC1220 was consistently detected in vaginal fluid (peak 845 ng/mL) and plasma (peak 0.91 ng/mL). Kaplan–Meier analysis over 9weeks showed significantly lower infection rates for animals given MC1220-containing SEVRs than placebo rings (hazard ratio 0.20, P = 0.0037). Conclusions An MC1220-releasing SEVR partially protected macaques from vaginal challenge. Such ring devices are a practical method for providing sustained, coitally independent protection against vaginal exposure to HIV-1. PMID:23109186

  16. Vaginal high-risk human papillomavirus infection in a cross-sectional study among women of six different ethnicities in Amsterdam, the Netherlands: the HELIUS study.

    PubMed

    Alberts, C J; Vos, R A; Borgdorff, H; Vermeulen, W; van Bergen, J; Bruisten, S M; Geerlings, S E; Snijder, M B; van Houdt, R; Morré, S A; de Vries, H J C; van de Wijgert, J H H M; Prins, M; Schim van der Loeff, M F

    2016-12-01

    In the Netherlands the incidence of cervical cancer is higher among ethnic minority populations compared with the general Dutch population. We investigated the prevalence of, and risk factors associated with, vaginal high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection in women of six different ethnicities living in Amsterdam. For this cross-sectional study we selected women aged 18-34 years old of six ethnicities from the large-scale multiethnic HEalthy LIfe in an Urban Setting study. Self-collected vaginal swabs were tested for HPV DNA and genotyped using a highly sensitive PCR and reverse line blot assay (short PCR fragment (SPF)10-PCR DNA enzyme immunoassay/LiPA25-system version-1, delft diagnostic laboratory (DDL)). Participants completed a questionnaire regarding demographics and sexual behaviour. Logistic regression using generalised estimating equations was used to assess risk factors of hrHPV, and to investigate whether prevalence of hrHPV differed among ethnicities. The study population consisted of 592 women with a median age of 27 (IQR: 23-31) years. Dutch and African Surinamese women reported the highest sexual risk behaviour. HrHPV prevalence was highest in the Dutch (40%) followed by the African Surinamese (32%), Turkish (29%), Ghanaian (26%), Moroccan (26%) and South-Asian Surinamese (18%). When correcting for sexual risk behaviour, the odds to be hrHPV-positive were similar for all non-Dutch groups when compared with that of the Dutch group. We found an overall higher hrHPV prevalence and higher sexual risk behaviour in the native Dutch population. Further research is needed to unravel the complex problem concerning cervical cancer disparities, such as differences in participation in the cervical cancer screening programme, or differences in clearance and persistence of hrHPV. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Vaginal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer; Cancer - vagina; Tumor - vaginal ... Most vaginal cancers occur when another cancer, such as cervical or endometrial cancer , spreads. This is called secondary vaginal cancer. Cancer ...

  18. [Vaginal colonization of group B Streptococcus: a study in 267 cases of factory women].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y Z; Yang, Y H; Zhang, X L

    1996-02-01

    An epidemiologic study on vaginal colonization of group B streptococcus (GBS) from non-pregnancy women was carried out. Two hundred sixty seven female workers were studied. The carrier rate of GBS in vaginal specimens was 10.86%. Women aged 45 years old and above had more cases with genital tract GBS colonization. Women with vaginal colonization had more history of miscarriage and using IUD. We did not find the positive correlations between vaginal colonization and oral contraceptive, ovarian cyst, hysteromyoma in our study group. Women with gynecologic inflammation had more cases with vaginal GBS colonization. There is a significant increase for women with vaginitis and cervicitis. Serotyping study showed that types III and II were the most frequent GBS types isolated from the carriers. Antibiotic sensitivity test showed that more than half GBS strains were resistant to oxcillin and amikacin.

  19. Selecting anti-microbial treatment of aerobic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Donders, Gilbert G G; Ruban, Katerina; Bellen, Gert

    2015-05-01

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is a vaginal infectious condition which is often confused with bacterial vaginosis (BV) or with the intermediate microflora as diagnosed by Nugent's method to detect BV on Gram-stained specimens. However, although both conditions reflect a state of lactobacillary disruption in the vagina, leading to an increase in pH, BV and AV differ profoundly. While BV is a noninflammatory condition composed of a multiplex array of different anaerobic bacteria in high quantities, AV is rather sparely populated by one or two enteric commensal flora bacteria, like Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylocuccus aureus, or Escherichia coli. AV is typically marked by either an increased inflammatory response or by prominent signs of epithelial atrophy or both. The latter condition, if severe, is also called desquamative inflammatory vaginitis. As AV is per exclusionem diagnosed by wet mount microscopy, it is a mistake to treat just vaginal culture results. Vaginal cultures only serve as follow-up data in clinical research projects and are at most used in clinical practice to confirm the diagnosis or exclude Candida infection. AV requires treatment based on microscopy findings and a combined local treatment with any of the following which may yield the best results: antibiotic (infectious component), steroids (inflammatory component), and/or estrogen (atrophy component). In cases with Candida present on microscopy or culture, antifungals must be tried first in order to see if other treatment is still needed. Vaginal rinsing with povidone iodine can provide rapid relief of symptoms but does not provide long-term reduction of bacterial loads. Local antibiotics most suitable are preferably non-absorbed and broad spectrum, especially those covering enteric gram-positive and gram-negative aerobes, like kanamycin. To achieve rapid and short-term improvement of severe symptoms, oral therapy with amoxyclav or moxifloxacin can be used, especially in deep dermal vulvitis and

  20. Diagnostic and therapeutic advancements for aerobic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Han, Cha; Wu, Wenjuan; Fan, Aiping; Wang, Yingmei; Zhang, Huiying; Chu, Zanjun; Wang, Chen; Xue, Fengxia

    2015-02-01

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is a newly defined clinical entity that is distinct from candidiasis, trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis (BV). Because of the poor recognition of AV, this condition can lead to treatment failures and is associated with severe complications, such as pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, preterm birth and foetal infections. This review describes the diagnosis and treatment of AV and the relationship between AV and pregnancy. The characteristics of AV include severely depressed levels of lactobacilli, increased levels of aerobic bacteria and an inflamed vagina. The diagnosis is made by microscopy on wet mounts of fresh vaginal fluid, and some distinct clinical features are recognized. Vaginal suppositories that contain kanamycin or clindamycin have shown curative effects in nonpregnant women. Additionally, the application of topical probiotics can restore the vaginal flora and reduce the recurrence of AV. Clindamycin vaginal suppositories and probiotics may be a better choice for gravida with AV than metronidazole. AV requires prompt attention, and the early diagnosis and treatment of AV during pregnancy significantly improves perinatal outcomes. Further research is needed to define the pathogenesis, diagnostic criteria and standard treatment guidelines for AV.

  1. Non-volatile fatty acids in the diagnosis of non-specific vaginitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ison, C A; Easmon, C S; Dawson, S G; Southerton, G; Harris, J W

    1983-01-01

    In the vaginal washings of 100 women with symptomatic non-specific vaginitis a succinate/lactate ratio of greater than or equal to 0.4 had a diagnostic sensitivity of 80%, a specificity of 83% for this condition. The predictive value of a positive test was 94%, but that of a negative test was only 55%. A strong association between the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis, anaerobes, a vaginal pH of above 4.5, and amines was found not only in non-specific vaginitis, but also in trichomonal and gonococcal infection. A variety of primary changes may encourage the multiplication of both gardnerellae and anaerobes and their presence in non-specific vaginitis may be a secondary rather than a primary event. PMID:6606653

  2. Combination of microbiological culture and multiplex PCR increases the range of vaginal microorganisms identified in cervical cancer patients at high risk for bacterial vaginosis and vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Katarzyna; Cybulski, Zefiryn; Roszak, Andrzej; Grabiec, Alicja; Talaga, Zofia; Urbański, Bartosz; Odważna, Joanna; Wojciechowicz, Jacek

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vaginitis in cervical cancer patients might becaused by mixed aerobic, anaerobic, and atypical bacteria. Since genital tract infections can be complicated, early and accurate identification of causal pathogens is vital. The purpose of this study was i) to determinate if currently used aerobic culture methods are sufficiently sensitive to identify pathogens that can appear in the cervix of women after cancer treatment; ii) to investigate if molecular methods can improve the diagnostic process of BV and vaginitis, as well as broaden the range of detectable pathogens that would otherwise be difficult to cultivate. A one-year hospital-based study was conducted in 2011/2012. Cervical swabs from 130 patients were examined by microbiological culture and multiplex PCR. Swab samples were positive for 107 and 93 women by microbiological culture and multiplex PCR, respectively The most common bacteria isolated from culture were: Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Staphylococcus aureus, and using the molecular technique were: Gardnerella vaginalis, Bacteroides fragilis, Ureoplasma ureoliticum/parvum, Mobiluncus curtisii and Atopobium vaginae. Multiplex PCR might contribute to the diagnosis of genital tract infections and it broadens the number of detectable microorganisms responsible for BV. Combination of these two methods may become the basis for standardized diagnosis of BV and vaginitis.

  3. Difficulty in the management of pregnancy after vaginal radical trachelectomy.

    PubMed

    Takada, Sakura; Ishioka, Shin-Ichi; Endo, Toshiaki; Baba, Tsuyoshi; Morishita, Miyuki; Akashi, Yushi; Mizuuchi, Masahito; Adachi, Hidefumi; Kim, Miseon; Saito, Tsuyoshi

    2013-12-01

    We have performed 26 vaginal radical trachelectomies (RTs) for patients with early invasive uterine cervical cancer since 2003 and, to date, have experienced 8 deliveries. The procedure has a high risk for preterm labor and the subsequent occurrence of preterm premature rupture of membranes (pPROM). We report the present situation and the limits of follow-up of pregnancy after vaginal RT. Our operative procedure is based on that of Dargent et al. We usually amputate the cervix approximately 10 mm below the isthmus. To remove the parametrium, we cut at the level of type II hysterectomy. Pregnancy courses after vaginal RT were studied in 8 patients with respect to symptoms, cervical length, and several infectious signs. We recommended that patients enter hospital early in their second trimester, and prophylactic daily vaginal disinfection with povidone-iodine and an ulinastatin vaginal suppository were administered. Careful checking for vaginal infectious signs, as well as cervical length and abdominal tension of patients was also performed. Four patients followed up with this modality were able to continue their pregnancies until late in the third trimester. However, this follow-up modality was not effective for patients who showed cervical incompetence due to slack cervical cerclage. They suffered from pPROM at 26 and 19 weeks of gestation. We need a new approach for the management of pregnant patients after vaginal RT with cervical incompetence due to slack cervical cerclage to prevent cervical infection.

  4. Fractional CO2 laser treatment for vaginal laxity: A preclinical study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Rin; Kim, Jong Hwan; Seok, Joon; Kim, Jae Min; Bak, Dong-Ho; Choi, Mi-Ji; Mun, Seok Kyun; Kim, Chan Woong; Ahn, Seungwon; Kim, Beom Joon

    2018-05-07

    Various studies have investigated treatment for vaginal laxity with microablative fractional carbon dioxide CO 2 laser in humans; however, this treatment has not yet been studied in an animal model. Herein, we evaluate the therapeutic effects of fractional CO 2 laser for tissue remodeling of vaginal mucosa using a porcine model, with the aim of improving vaginal laxity. The fractional CO 2 laser enables minimally invasive and non-incisional procedures. By precisely controlling the laser energy pulses, energy is sent to the vaginal canal and the introitus area to induce thermal denaturation and contraction of collagen. We examined the effects of fractional CO 2 laser on a porcine model via clinical observation and ultrasound measurement. Also, thermal lesions were histologically examined via hematoxylin-eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining, and Elastica van Gieson staining and immunohistochemistry. The three treatment groups, which were determined according to the amount of laser-energy applied (60, 90, and 120 mJ), showed slight thermal denaturation in the vaginal mucosa, but no abnormal reactions, such as excessive hemorrhaging, vesicles, or erythema, were observed. Histologically, we also confirmed that the denatured lamina propria induced by fractional CO 2 laser was dose-dependently increased after laser treatment. The treatment groups also showed an increase in collagen and elastic fibers due to neocollagenesis and angiogenesis, and the vaginal walls became firmer and tighter because of increased capillary and vessel formation. Also, use of the fractional CO 2 laser increased HSP (heat shock protein) 70 and collagen type I synthesis. Our results show that microablative fractional CO 2 laser can produce remodeling of the vaginal connective tissue without causing damage to surrounding tissue, and the process of mucosa remodeling while under wound dressings enables collagen to increase and the vaginal wall to become thick and tightened. Lasers Surg. Med

  5. Vaginal Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... an Endocrinologist Search Featured Resource Menopause Map™ View Vaginal Atrophy October 2017 Download PDFs English Editors Christine ... during this time, including vaginal dryness. What is vaginal atrophy? Vaginal atrophy (also referred to as vulvovaginal ...

  6. Does the vaginal microbiota play a role in the development of cervical cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Kyrgiou, Maria; Mitra, Anita; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary but not sufficient for the development of cervical cancer. The factors promoting persistence as well those triggering carcinogenetic pathways are incompletely understood. Rapidly evolving evidence indicates that the vaginal microbiome (VM) may play a functional role (both protective and harmful) in the acquisition and persistence of HPV, and subsequent development of cervical cancer. The first studies examining the vaginal microbiome and the presence of an HPV infection using next generation sequencing techniques (NGS) identified higher microbial diversity in HPV-positive as opposed to HPV-negative women. Furthermore, there appears to be a temporal relationship between the VM and HPV infection in that specific community state types (CSTs) may be correlated with a higher chance of progression or regression of the infection. Studies describing the VM in women with pre-invasive disease (squamous intra-epithelial neoplasia – SIL) consistently demonstrate a dysbiosis in women with the more severe disease. Although it is plausible that the composition of the VM may influence the host innate immune response, susceptibility to infection and the development of cervical disease, the studies to date do not prove causality. Future studies should explore the causal link between the VM and the clinical outcome in longitudinal samples from existing biobanks. PMID:27477083

  7. Menopause and the vaginal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Muhleisen, Alicia L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2016-09-01

    For over a century it has been well documented that bacteria in the vagina maintain vaginal homeostasis, and that an imbalance or dysbiosis may be associated with poor reproductive and gynecologic health outcomes. Vaginal microbiota are of particular significance to postmenopausal women and may have a profound effect on vulvovaginal atrophy, vaginal dryness, sexual health and overall quality of life. As molecular-based techniques have evolved, our understanding of the diversity and complexity of this bacterial community has expanded. The objective of this review is to compare the changes that have been identified in the vaginal microbiota of menopausal women, outline alterations in the microbiome associated with specific menopausal symptoms, and define how hormone replacement therapy impacts the vaginal microbiome and menopausal symptoms; it concludes by considering the potential of probiotics to reinstate vaginal homeostasis following menopause. This review details the studies that support the role of Lactobacillus species in maintaining vaginal homeostasis and how the vaginal microbiome structure in postmenopausal women changes with decreasing levels of circulating estrogen. In addition, the associated transformations in the microanatomical features of the vaginal epithelium that can lead to vaginal symptoms associated with menopause are described. Furthermore, hormone replacement therapy directly influences the dominance of Lactobacillus in the microbiota and can resolve vaginal symptoms. Oral and vaginal probiotics hold great promise and initial studies complement the findings of previous research efforts concerning menopause and the vaginal microbiome; however, additional trials are required to determine the efficacy of bacterial therapeutics to modulate or restore vaginal homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Aetiological agents of vaginitis in Nigerian women.

    PubMed

    Otuonye, N M; Odunukwe, N N; Idigbe, E O; Imosemi, O D; Smith, S I; Chigbo, R C; Bamidele, M; Oparaugo, C T; Mafe, A G; Musa, A Z

    2004-01-01

    This study focuses on the identification of aetiological agents of vaginitis in Nigerian women. Study subjects are drawn from patients presenting with lower abdominal pain, vaginal discharge and itching at the gynaecology clinic of Lagos University Teaching Hospital and at the Clinical Centre of the Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Yaba, Lagos, between January 2001 and July 2002. A total of 250 patients gave informed consent to participate in the study. The patients also had pre- and post-test human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) counselling. Each patient completed a questionnaire in order to provide biographical data, past clinical history and socio-economic background information. A cervical swab (CS) and a high-vaginal swab (HVS) were obtained from each patient. Swab samples were examined for pH and under light microscopy by Gram's stain and as wet preparations in 10% potassium hydroxide. Subsequently, samples were cultured on appropriate media at optimal conditions and a drug sensitivity profile for all isolates was determined by standard methods. Blood samples were screened and confirmed for HIV antibodies. Bacterial, fungal and parasitic pathogens were identified or isolated in samples from 241 (96.4%) of the women. Bacterial agents (Neisseria, Streptococcus and Staphylococcus species) were predominant in 128 (51.2%) patients, followed by fungi in 108 (43.2%) and parasites (Trichomonas vaginalis) in five (2.0%). Sensitivity to ciprofloxacin was seen in 40% of Staphylococcus species and in 90% of Neisseria species. Positive HIV serology was seen in 25 (10%) of the 250 women studied, 20 (80%) of which had concurrent microbial infections. Overall, a broad spectrum of microbial agents were shown to be responsible for vaginitis in the group of patients studied.

  9. Do female patients with nonpathological vaginal discharge need the same evaluation as for Dhat syndrome in males?

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Avasthi, Ajit; Gupta, Sunil; Hazari, Nandita; Malhotra, Nidhi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the concept of female Dhat syndrome characterized by the complaint of nonpathological vaginal discharge in association with somatic, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Materials and Methods: A total of 26 female subjects with nonpathological vaginal discharge along with depressive and somatic complaints were assessed on a self-rated questionnaire modified from Comprehensive Questionnaire for Assessment of Dhat Syndrome designed for males. They were also assessed for psychiatric comorbidity as per ICD-10. Results: All female subjects received an ICD-10 psychiatric diagnosis, with somatoform/dissociative disorder (57.7%) being the most common. The mean age of onset of vaginal discharge was 24.6 (standard deviation - 7.0) years, noted every day or for 2–3 times per week by more than two-third of the participants. Two-fifth (61.5%) of the women described it as a milky discharge. The most common reason reported for passage of vaginal discharge was that of urinary infection or problems of urinary tract infections (42.3%) followed by vaginal infection/disease (34.6%). More than half (53.8%) of the subjects considered vaginal discharge to be responsible for weakness in the body, weakness in stamina and thinness of physique, while slightly more than two-third (69.2%) of them reported bodily weakness and sleep disturbances. Overall the clinical picture in females was similar to male patients with Dhat syndrome on most of the account. Conclusions: Subgroup of patients with vaginal discharge attribute their somatic and mental symptoms to the passage of whitish vaginal discharge and are distressed due to the same. The clinical picture is similar to Dhat syndrome in males. There is a need to recognize female variant of Dhat syndrome as a culture-bound syndrome. Identification of the same may help in managing this subgroup of patients seeking help from the gynecologists for their nonpathological vaginal discharge or from mental health

  10. Antibiotic prophylaxis for operative vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; Choobun, Thanapan; Peeyananjarassri, Krantarat; Islam, Q Monir

    2014-10-13

    Vacuum and forceps assisted vaginal deliveries are reported to increase the incidence of postpartum infections and maternal readmission to hospital compared to spontaneous vaginal delivery. Prophylactic antibiotics may be prescribed to prevent these infections. However, the benefit of antibiotic prophylaxis for operative vaginal deliveries is still unclear. To assess the effectiveness and safety of antibiotic prophylaxis in reducing infectious puerperal morbidities in women undergoing operative vaginal deliveries including vacuum or forceps deliveries, or both. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 August 2014). All randomised trials comparing any prophylactic antibiotic regimens with placebo or no treatment in women undergoing vacuum or forceps deliveries were eligible. Participants were all pregnant women without evidence of infections or other indications for antibiotics of any gestational age undergoing vacuum or forceps delivery for any indications. Interventions were any antibiotic prophylaxis (any dosage regimen, any route of administration or at any time during delivery or the puerperium) compared with either placebo or no treatment. Two review authors assessed trial eligibility and methodological quality. Two review authors extracted the data independently using prepared data extraction forms. Any discrepancies were resolved by discussion and a consensus reached through discussion with all review authors. For this update, we assessed methodological quality of the one included trial using the standard Cochrane criteria and the GRADE approach. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and mean difference (MD) using a fixed-effect model and all the review authors interpreted and discussed the results. One trial, involving 393 women undergoing either vacuum or forceps deliveries, was included. This trial identified only two out of the nine outcomes specified in this review. It reported seven women with endomyometritis in the

  11. Antibiotic prophylaxis for operative vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Liabsuetrakul, T; Choobun, T; Peeyananjarassri, K; Islam, M

    2004-01-01

    Vacuum and forceps assisted vaginal deliveries are reported to increase the incidence of postpartum infections and maternal readmission to hospital compared to spontaneous vaginal delivery. Prophylactic antibiotics are prescribed to prevent these infections. However, the benefit of antibiotic prophylaxis for operative vaginal deliveries is still unclear. To assess the effectiveness and safety of antibiotic prophylaxis in reducing infectious puerperal morbidities in women undergoing operative vaginal deliveries including vacuum and/or forceps deliveries. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register (November 2003), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2003) and MEDLINE (1966 to November 2003). All randomised trials comparing any prophylactic antibiotic regimens with placebo or no treatment in women undergoing vacuum or forceps deliveries were eligible. Participants were all pregnant women without evidence of infections or other indications for antibiotics of any gestational age undergoing vacuum or forceps delivery for any indications. Interventions were any antibiotic prophylaxis (any dosage regimen, any route of administration or at any time during delivery or the puerperium) compared with either placebo or no treatment. Four reviewers assessed trial eligibility and methodological quality. Two reviewers extracted the data independently using prepared data extraction forms. Any discrepancies were resolved by discussion and a consensus reached through discussion with all reviewers. We assessed methodological quality of the included trial using the standard Cochrane criteria and the CONSORT statement of randomised controlled trials. We calculated the relative risks using a fixed effect model and all the reviewers interpreted and discussed the results. One trial, involving 393 women undergoing either vacuum or forceps deliveries, was included. This trial identified only two out of the nine

  12. Human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence and HPV 31 predict the risk of recurrence in high-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Bogani, Giorgio; Martinelli, Fabio; Ditto, Antonino; Taverna, Francesca; Lombardo, Claudia; Signorelli, Mauro; Chiappa, Valentina; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Fontanella, Caterina; Sabatucci, Ilaria; Borghi, Chiara; Recalcati, Dario; Indini, Alice; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    High-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (vaginal HSIL) represents an uncommon entity. Here, we sought to identify predictors for recurrence and risk factor for developing genital cancers after primary treatment for vaginal HSIL. Data of consecutive 5104 women who had human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test were searched for identify women with histological confirmed vaginal HSIL. Disease-free interval and the risk of developing HPV-related gynecological cancers were assessed using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard models. Overall, 77 patients were included. After a mean (SD) follow-up of 69.3 (33.0) months, 11 (14%) and 4 (5%) patients experienced vaginal HSIL recurrence and the occurrence of HPV-related gynecological cancers, respectively. Via multivariate analysis factors predicting for vaginal HSIL recurrence were infection from HPV31 at diagnosis (HR: 5.0 (95%CI:1.17, 21.3); p=0.03) and persistence of HPV infection after treatment (HR: 7.0 (95%CI:1.54, 31.6); p=0.01). Additionally, patients who had LASER ablation experienced a trend toward a lower risk of recurrence in comparison to medical treatment (HR: 0.20 (95%CI:0.03, 1.09); p=0.06). Considering the occurrence of HPV-related gynecological cancers, we observed that no factors independently correlated with this risk; while, a trend towards higher risk was observed for women with HIV infection (HR:16.4 (95%CI:0.90, 300.1); p=0.06) and persistence of HPV infection (HR: 13.3 (95%CI:0.76, 230.2); p=0.07). Patients affected by vaginal HSIL experienced a relatively high risk of recurrence. Persistence of HPV after treatment and pretreatment HPV-31 infection predicts for high-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia recurrence. Further investigations are warranted in order to corroborate our data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Douching with Water Works device for perceived vaginal odor with or without complaints of discharge in women with no infectious cause of vaginitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chatwani, Ashwin J; Hassan, Sarmina; Rahimi, Salma; Jeronis, Stacey; Dandolu, Vani

    2006-01-01

    To determine if douching with Water Works device for 1 month can (1) lower or eliminate perceived vaginal odor by subject; (2) have any effects on vaginal ecosystem. Ten women with perceived vaginal odor with or without discharge, douched every day for 4 weeks in an open-label, nonrandomized pilot study. Primary outcome measures included perceived vaginal odor by subject, lactobacilli score from Nugent slide, and acceptance of the Water Works douching system. Secondary outcome included the safety of using this douching device. At week 4, there was improvement in vaginal odor (P=.0006) and there was no significant change in lactobacilli score. Douching with Water Works device is associated with reduction or elimination of vaginal odor without adversely affecting the vaginal ecosystem.

  14. [Investigation of the situation of vaginal microflora in healthy women population].

    PubMed

    Ji, Fang; Zhang, Ning; Di, Wen; Liao, Qin-ping; Wang, Wen; Zhao, Xiao-ming; Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhao-hui

    2009-01-01

    To assess the distribution of vaginal microflora in healthy women and investigate their cognition of lower reproductive tract infection-related knowledge as well as personal hygiene habits and character of behavior in seeking medical treatment. Total of 1660 healthy women who had physical check-ups at the Medical Center of Renji Hospital were selected and received gynecologic examination, as well as routine examination, pH examination and bacterial culture of the vaginal discharge. In addition, 860 of them were randomly selected for questionnaire survey, in which reproductive tract infection -related knowledge and personal hygiene habits as well as behavior in seeking medical treatment were involved. Among the 1660 censused women, vaginal average pH was 4. 16 +/- 0.21. The positive rate of Candida in vaginal discharge routine examination was 3.86% (64/1660), which was lower than that in aerobes culture 7.71% (128/1660). Candida albicans was the most populous species 78.9% (101/128), followed by 7.8% (10/128) and 7.0% (9/128) for the Candida glabrata and Candida krusei respectively. The most populous species of vaginal microflora were hemolytic streptococcus A (63.80%, 1059/1660), Staphylococcus epidermidis (14.28%, 237/1660), and Enterococcus faecalis (D) group (11.44%, 190/1660). The questionnaire survey showed that 88.4% (760/860) of 860 women took active treatment when feeling unwell, 92.1% (792/860) of them had good hygiene practices, and only 21.2% (182/860) had the habit of vaginal douching. In addition, 50.0% (430/860) of them had the desire to obtain reproductive health knowledge through out-patient consultation. Vulvovaginal Candida disease ranks the first in all types of vaginitis, among which, Candida albicans is the most populous species followed by the Candida glabrata and Candida krusei. Hemolytic streptococcus A and Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most common species of vaginal microflora in healthy women. The censused women have high awareness of

  15. Vaginal lactobacilli profile in pregnant women with normal & abnormal vaginal flora.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Thirupathaiah; Rajkumar, Hemalatha; Donugama, Vasundhara

    2017-10-01

    Lactobacilli species that are better adapted to vaginal environment of women may colonize better and offer protection against vaginal pathogenic bacteria. In this study, the distribution of common Lactobacillus species was investigated in pregnant women. Sixty seven pregnant women were included in the study and vaginal samples were collected for Gram staining. Women were classified as normal vaginal flora, intermediate flora and bacterial vaginosis (BV) based on Nugent's score. Vaginal samples were also collected for the identification of Lactobacillus spp. by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) profiling of 16S rDNA amplification method. Lactobacillus crispatus (100%) was the most predominant Lactobacillus spp. present in pregnant women with normal flora, followed by L. iners (77%), L. jensenii (74%) and L. helveticus (60%). While, L. iners was commonly present across groups in women with normal, intermediate or BV flora, L. crispatus, L. jensenii and L. helveticus decreased significantly as the vaginal flora changed to intermediate and BV. In women with BV, except L. iners other species of lactobacilli was less frequently prevalent. Species such as L. rhamnosus, L. fermentum, L. paracasei and L. casei were not detected in any vaginal sample. L. crispatus, L. jensinii and L. helveticus were predominant species in women with normal flora. L. crispatus alone or in combination with L. jensinii and L. helveticus may be evaluated for probiotic properties for the prevention and treatment of BV.

  16. Vaginal Changes Due to Varying Degrees of Rectocele Prolapse: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Arnab; Meyer, Isuzu; Richter, Holly E; Lockhart, Mark E; Moraes, Fabia R D; Unnikrishnan, Vinu

    2017-10-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP), downward descent of the pelvic organs resulting in a protrusion of the vagina, is a highly prevalent condition, responsible for 300,000 surgeries in the U.S. annually. Rectocele, a posterior vaginal wall (PVW) prolapse of the rectum, is the second most common type of POP after cystocele. A rectocele usually manifests itself along with other types of prolapse with multicompartment pelvic floor defects. To date, the specific mechanics of rectocele formation are poorly understood, which does not allow its early stage detection and progression prediction over time. Recently, with the advancement of imaging and computational modeling techniques, a plethora of finite element (FE) models have been developed to study vaginal prolapse from different perspectives and allow a better understanding of dynamic interactions of pelvic organs and their supporting structures. So far, most studies have focused on anterior vaginal prolapse (AVP) (or cystocele) and limited data exist on the role of pelvic muscles and ligaments on the development and progression of rectocele. In this work, a full-scale magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based three-dimensional (3D) computational model of the female pelvic anatomy, comprising the vaginal canal, uterus, and rectum, was developed to study the effect of varying degrees (or sizes) of rectocele prolapse on the vaginal canal for the first time. Vaginal wall displacements and stresses generated due to the varying rectocele size and average abdominal pressures were estimated. Considering the direction pointing from anterior to posterior side of the pelvic system as the positive Y-direction, it was found that rectocele leads to negative Y-direction displacements, causing the vaginal cross section to shrink significantly at the lower half of the vaginal canal. Besides the negative Y displacements, the rectocele bulging was observed to push the PVW downward toward the vaginal hiatus, exhibiting the well-known "kneeling

  17. The vaginal microbiota over an 8- to 10-year period in a cohort of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Supriya D; Donovan, Brock; Weber, Kathleen M; Cohen, Mardge; Ravel, Jacques; Gajer, Pawel; Gilbert, Douglas; Burgad, Derick; Spear, Greg T

    2015-01-01

    We identified predominant vaginal microbiota communities, changes over time, and how this varied by HIV status and other factors in a cohort of 64 women. Bacterial DNA was extracted from reposited cervicovaginal lavage samples collected annually over an 8-10 year period from Chicago Women's Interagency HIV Study participants: 22 HIV-negative, 22 HIV-positive with stable infection, 20 HIV-positive with progressive infection. The vaginal microbiota was defined by pyrosequencing of the V1/V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Scheduled visits included Bacterial vaginsosis (BV) screening; clinically detected cases were referred for treatment. Hierarchical clustering identified bacterial community state types (CST). Multinomial mixed effects modeling determined trends over time in CST, by HIV status and other factors. The median follow-up time was 8.1 years (range 5.5-15.3). Six CSTs were identified. The mean relative abundance (RA) of Lactobacillus spp. by CST (with median number of bacterial taxa) was: CST-1-25.7% (10), CST-2-27.1% (11), CST-3-34.6% (9), CST-4-46.8% (9), CST-5-57.9% (4), CST-6-69.4% (2). The two CSTs representing the highest RA of Lactobacillus and lowest diversity increased with each additional year of follow-up (CST-5, adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.62 [95% CI: 1.34-1.94]; CST-6, aOR = 1.57 [95 CI: 1.31-1.89]), while the two CSTs representing lowest RA of Lactobacillus and higher diversity decreased with each additional year (CST-1, aOR = 0.89 [95% CI: 0.80-1.00]; CST-2, aOR = 0.86 [95% CI: 0.75-0.99]). There was no association between HIV status and CST at baseline or over time. CSTs representing lower RA of Lactobacillus were associated with current cigarette smoking. The vaginal microbial community significantly improved over time in this cohort of women with HIV and at high risk for HIV who had regular detection and treatment referral for BV.

  18. MZC Gel Inhibits SHIV-RT and HSV-2 in Macaque Vaginal Mucosa and SHIV-RT in Rectal Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Calenda, Giulia; Villegas, Guillermo; Barnable, Patrick; Litterst, Claudia; Levendosky, Keith; Gettie, Agegnehu; Cooney, Michael L; Blanchard, James; Fernández-Romero, José A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Teleshova, Natalia

    2017-03-01

    The Population Council's microbicide gel MZC (also known as PC-1005) containing MIV-150 and zinc acetate dihydrate (ZA) in carrageenan (CG) has shown promise as a broad-spectrum microbicide against HIV, herpes simplex virus (HSV), and human papillomavirus. Previous data show antiviral activity against these viruses in cell-based assays, prevention of vaginal and rectal simian-human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) infection, and reduction of vaginal HSV shedding in rhesus macaques and also excellent antiviral activity against HSV and human papillomavirus in murine models. Recently, we demonstrated that MZC is safe and effective against SHIV-RT in macaque vaginal explants. Here we established models of ex vivo SHIV-RT/HSV-2 coinfection of vaginal mucosa and SHIV-RT infection of rectal mucosa in macaques (challenge of rectal mucosa with HSV-2 did not result in reproducible tissue infection), evaluated antiviral activity of MZC, and compared quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay readouts for monitoring SHIV-RT infection. MZC (at nontoxic dilutions) significantly inhibited SHIV-RT in vaginal and rectal mucosas and HSV-2 in vaginal mucosa when present during viral challenge. Analysis of SHIV-RT infection and MZC activity by 1-step simian immunodeficiency virus gag quantitative RT-PCR and p27 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated similar virus growth dynamics and MZC activity by both methods and higher sensitivity of quantitative RT-PCR. Our data provide more evidence that MZC is a promising dual compartment multipurpose prevention technology candidate.

  19. Douching With Water Works Device for Perceived Vaginal Odor With or Without Complaints of Discharge in Women With No Infectious Cause of Vaginitis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chatwani, Ashwin J.; Hassan, Sarmina; Rahimi, Salma; Jeronis, Stacey; Dandolu, Vani

    2006-01-01

    Objective. To determine if douching with Water Works device for 1 month can (1) lower or eliminate perceived vaginal odor by subject; (2) have any effects on vaginal ecosystem. Methods. Ten women with perceived vaginal odor with or without discharge, douched every day for 4 weeks in an open-label, nonrandomized pilot study. Primary outcome measures included perceived vaginal odor by subject, lactobacilli score from Nugent slide, and acceptance of the Water Works douching system. Secondary outcome included the safety of using this douching device. Results. At week 4, there was improvement in vaginal odor (P = .0006) and there was no significant change in lactobacilli score. Conclusion. Douching with Water Works device is associated with reduction or elimination of vaginal odor without adversely affecting the vaginal ecosystem. PMID:17485816

  20. Clinical evaluation of postpartum vaginal mucus reflects uterine bacterial infection and the immune response in cattle.

    PubMed

    Williams, Erin J; Fischer, Deborah P; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; England, Gary C W; Noakes, David E; Dobson, Hilary; Sheldon, I Martin

    2005-01-01

    Bacteria contaminate the uterus of most dairy cattle after parturition and endometritis causes infertility. An endometritis score can be ascribed based on the vaginal mucus character and odour but it is not clear if the clinical score reflects the number of uterine bacteria or the inflammatory response. The present study tested the hypothesis that clinical evaluation of endometritis reflects the number of bacteria present in the uterus, and the acute phase protein response. Swabs (n = 328) were collected from the uterine lumen of dairy cattle, 21 and 28 days postpartum, vaginal mucus was scored for character and odour, and blood samples collected for acute phase protein measurement. Bacteria were identified following aerobic and anaerobic culture, and the bacterial growth density was scored semi-quantitatively. When bacteria were categorised by their expected pathogenic potential in the uterus, purulent or fetid odour vaginal mucus was associated with the growth density of pathogenic bacteria but not opportunist contaminants. When bacteria were analysed independently, Arcanobacterium pyogenes, Proteus and Fusobacterium necrophorum growth densities were associated with mucopurulent or purulent vaginal mucus. The bacterial growth densities for A. pyogenes, Escherichia coli, non-hemolytic Streptococci, and Mannheimia haemolytica were associated with a fetid mucus odour. Peripheral plasma concentrations of alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein were higher if there was a fetid compared with a normal vaginal mucus odour (1.50 +/- 0.09 mg/mL versus 1.05 +/- 0.02 mg/mL, P < 0.001), but did not differ significantly between vaginal mucus character scores. The evaluation of the character and odour of vaginal mucus reflects the number of bacteria in the uterus, and the acute phase protein response.

  1. Lactobacillus acidophilus contributes to a healthy environment for vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pi, Woojin; Ryu, Jae-Sook; Roh, Jaesook

    2011-09-01

    Lactobacillus species in the female genital tract are thought to act as a barrier to infection. Several studies have demonstrated that lactobacilli can adhere to vaginal epithelial cells. However, little is known about how the adherence of lactobacilli to vaginal epithelial cells affects the acidity, cell viability, or proliferation of the lactobacilli themselves or those of vaginal epithelial cells. Lactobacillus acidophilus was co-cultured with immortalized human vaginal epithelial cells (MS74 cell line), and the growth of L. acidophilus and the acidity of the culture medium were measured. MS74 cell density and viability were also assessed by counting cell numbers and observing the cell attachment state. L. acidophilus showed exponential growth for the first 6 hr until 9 hr, and the pH was maintained close to 4.0-5.0 at 24 hr after culture, consistent with previous studies. The growth curve of L. acidophilus or the pH values were relatively unaffected by co-culture with MS74 cells, confirming that L. acidophilus maintains a low pH in the presence of MS74 cells. This co-culture model could therefore potentially be used to mimic vaginal conditions for future in vitro studies. On the other hand, MS74 cells co-cultured with L. acidophilus more firmly attached to the culture plate, and a higher number of cells were present compared to cells cultured in the absence of L. acidophilus. These results indicate that L. acidophilus increases MS74 cell proliferation and viability, suggesting that lactobacilli may contribute to the healthy environment for vaginal epithelial cells.

  2. Vaginal Toxic Shock Reaction Triggering Desquamative Inflammatory Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Nigel; Edlind, Thomas D.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report two cases of desquamative inflammatory vaginitis (DIV) associated with toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1)-producing Staphylococcus aureus strains. Materials and Methods Case report of two patients, one with an acute and one with a chronic presentation, diagnosed with DIV on the basis of clinical findings and wet mount microscopy. Pre- and posttreatment vaginal bacterial and yeast cultures were obtained. Results Pretreatment vaginal bacterial cultures from both patients grew TSST-1-producing S. aureus. Subsequent vaginal bacterial cultures following oral antibiotic therapy were negative. Conclusions DIV may be triggered through TSST-1-mediated vaginal toxic shock reaction. PMID:23222054

  3. Mucus-Penetrating Nanoparticles for Vaginal Drug Delivery Protect Against Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ensign, Laura M.; Tang, Benjamin C.; Wang, Ying-Ying; Tse, Terence A.; Hoen, Timothy; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Incomplete coverage and short duration of action limit the effectiveness of vaginally administered drugs, including microbicides for preventing sexually transmitted infections. We investigated vaginal distribution, retention, and safety of nanoparticles with surfaces modified to enhance transport through mucus. We show that mucus-penetrating particles (MPPs) provide uniform distribution over the vaginal epithelium, whereas conventional nanoparticles (CPs) that are mucoadhesive are aggregated by mouse vaginal mucus, leading to poor distribution. Moreover, when delivered hypotonically, MPPs were transported advectively (versus diffusively) through mucus deep into vaginal folds (rugae) within minutes. By penetrating into the deepest mucus layers, more MPPs were retained in the vaginal tract after 6 h compared to CPs. After 24 h, when delivered in a conventional vaginal gel, patches of a model drug remained on the vaginal epithelium, whereas the epithelium was coated with drug delivered by MPP. We then developed MPPs composed of acyclovir monophosphate (ACVp). When administered prior to vaginal herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) challenge, ACVp-MPPs protected 53% of mice, compared to only 16% protected by soluble drug. Overall, MPPs improved vaginal drug distribution and retention, provided more effective protection against vaginal viral challenge than soluble drug, and were non-toxic when administered daily for one week. PMID:22700955

  4. More frequent vaginal orgasm is associated with experiencing greater excitement from deep vaginal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Brody, Stuart; Klapilova, Katerina; Krejčová, Lucie

    2013-07-01

    Research indicated that: (i) vaginal orgasm (induced by penile-vaginal intercourse [PVI] without concurrent clitoral masturbation) consistency (vaginal orgasm consistency [VOC]; percentage of PVI occasions resulting in vaginal orgasm) is associated with mental attention to vaginal sensations during PVI, preference for a longer penis, and indices of psychological and physiological functioning, and (ii) clitoral, distal vaginal, and deep vaginal/cervical stimulation project via different peripheral nerves to different brain regions. The aim of this study is to examine the association of VOC with: (i) sexual arousability perceived from deep vaginal stimulation (compared with middle and shallow vaginal stimulation and clitoral stimulation), and (ii) whether vaginal stimulation was present during the woman's first masturbation. A sample of 75 Czech women (aged 18-36), provided details of recent VOC, site of genital stimulation during first masturbation, and their recent sexual arousability from the four genital sites. The association of VOC with: (i) sexual arousability perceived from the four genital sites and (ii) involvement of vaginal stimulation in first-ever masturbation. VOC was associated with greater sexual arousability from deep vaginal stimulation but not with sexual arousability from other genital sites. VOC was also associated with women's first masturbation incorporating (or being exclusively) vaginal stimulation. The findings suggest (i) stimulating the vagina during early life masturbation might indicate individual readiness for developing greater vaginal responsiveness, leading to adult greater VOC, and (ii) current sensitivity of deep vaginal and cervical regions is associated with VOC, which might be due to some combination of different neurophysiological projections of the deep regions and their greater responsiveness to penile stimulation. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  5. Effects of horizontal vs vertical vaginal cuff closure techniques on vagina length after vaginal hysterectomy: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Cavkaytar, Sabri; Kokanali, Mahmut Kuntay; Topcu, Hasan Onur; Aksakal, Orhan Seyfi; Doganay, Melike

    2014-01-01

    To compare the effects of horizontal and vertical vaginal cuff closure techniques on vagina length after vaginal hysterectomy. Prospective randomized study (Canadian Task Force classification I). Teaching and research hospital, a tertiary center. Fifty-two women with POP-Q stage 0 or 1 uterine prolapse were randomized into 2 groups using vertical (n = 26) or horizontal (n = 26) vaginal cuff closure. All patients underwent vaginal hysterectomy. Vagina length in the 2 groups was compared preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and at 6 weeks postoperatively. Mean (SD) preoperative vagina length in the horizontal and vertical groups was similar (7.87 [0.92] cm vs 7.99 [0.78] cm; p = .41). Immediately postoperatively, the vagina was significantly shorter in the horizontal group than in the vertical group (6.61 [0.89] cm vs 7.51 [0.74] cm; p < .001). At 6 weeks postoperatively, the vagina was still significantly shorter in the horizontal group (6.55 [0.89] cm vs 7.42 (0.73) cm; p < .001). The mean difference in vagina length before and after surgery was also significantly higher in the horizontal group than in the vertical group (-1.26 [0.12] cm vs 0.49 [0.11] cm; p < .001). Vertical cuff closure during vaginal hysterectomy seems to preserve vagina length better than does horizontal cuff closure. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Definition of a type of abnormal vaginal flora that is distinct from bacterial vaginosis: aerobic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Donders, Gilbert G G; Vereecken, Annie; Bosmans, Eugene; Dekeersmaecker, Alfons; Salembier, Geert; Spitz, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    To define an entity of abnormal vaginal flora: aerobic vaginitis. Observational study. University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium. 631 women attending for routine prenatal care or attending vaginitis clinic. Samples were taken for fresh wet mount microscopy of vaginal fluid, vaginal cultures and measurement of lactate, succinate and cytokine levels in vaginal fluid. Smears deficient in lactobacilli and positive for clue cells were considered to indicate a diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. Aerobic vaginitis was diagnosed if smears were deficient in lactobacilli, positive for cocci or coarse bacilli, positive for parabasal epithelial cells, and/or positive for vaginal leucocytes (plus their granular aspect). Genital complaints include red inflammation, yellow discharge, vaginal dyspareunia. Group B streptococci, escherichia coli, staphylococcus aureus and trichomonas vaginalis are frequently cultured. Vaginal lactate concentration is severely depressed in women with aerobic vaginitis, as in bacterial vaginosis, but vaginal succinate is not produced. Also in contrast to bacterial vaginosis, aerobic vaginitis produces a host immune response that leads to high production of interleukin-6, interleukin-1-beta and leukaemia inhibitory factor in the vaginal fluid. Aerobic vaginitis is associated with aerobic micro-organisms, mainly group B streptococci and E. coli. Its characteristics are different from those of bacterial vaginosis and elicit an important host response. The most severe form of aerobic vaginitis equals desquamative inflammatory vaginitis. In theory, aerobic vaginitis may be a better candidate than bacterial vaginosis as the cause of pregnancy complications, such as ascending chorioamnionitis, preterm rupture of the membranes and preterm delivery.

  7. Efficacy and safety of vitamin C vaginal tablets in the treatment of non-specific vaginitis. A randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, E Eiko; Magnani, Paola

    2004-11-10

    This was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Vitamin C vaginal tablets (250 mg) given once a day in patients suffering from non-specific vaginitis. The total length of the study was 20 days, including a treatment phase of 6 days. The primary end-point was the presence in the two groups of non-specific vaginitis 1 and 2 weeks after the end of treatment, as assessed by at least 3 out of the 4 characteristic symptoms: discharge, fishy odour, vaginal pH >/= 4.7, and presence of clue cells. Secondary end-points were the individual symptoms and signs, above reported, and pruritus, fever, superinfections, microscopic findings on vaginal smear, and colposcopy. One hundred female patients aged 18 years or older and suffering from non-specific vaginitis were included in the study after giving their informed consent. Fifty were randomised to the active treatment and 50 to placebo. Seven patients, three in the Vitamin C group and four in the placebo group, were lost to follow-up and did not complete the treatment period. Two patients in the active group showed protocol deviations (age under 18 years and HIV-positive, respectively). The two groups resulted comparable for demographics, history and baseline clinical picture. A cluster analysis of the four main symptoms showed a statistically significant difference between the active group and the placebo group; significantly more patients were still affected by non-specific vaginitis after placebo (35.7%) compared to patients treated with Vitamin C tablets (14.0%). The meaningful secondary variable, referring to the microscopic examination of vaginal smear, supported the trend for efficacy in the Vitamin C treated group. The clue cells disappeared in 79% of patients treated with the drug and in 53% of patients on placebo. Similarly, bacteria disappeared in 77 and 54%, respectively, while lactobacilli reappeared in 79.1 and 53.3%, respectively. Vaginal pH values decreased

  8. Formulation, stability study, and pre-clinical evaluation of a vaginal cream containing curcumin in a rat model of vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    de Souza Fernandes, Lígia; Amorim, Yuri Martins; Silva, Elton Libério da; Silva, Samuel Calixto; Santos, Alécia Junia Aparecida; Peixoto, Franciele Natália; Pires, Luara Moniele Neves; Sakamoto, Raquel Yumi; Pinto, Flávia do Carmo Horta; Scarpa, Maria Virgínia Costa; Gonzaga de Freitas Araújo, Marcelo

    2018-03-08

    Owing to the growing resistance among isolates of Candida species to usual antifungal agents and the well-known therapeutic potential of curcumin, the purpose of this study was to develop and validate a vaginal formulation containing this substance and to evaluating its effectiveness in the treatment of experimental vulvovaginal candidiasis METHODS: Curcumin was incorporated in a vaginal cream in three concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 1.0%). The different concentrations of the cream and its controls were intravaginally administered in an immunosuppressed rat model to evaluate the efficacy in the treatment of experimental vulvovaginal candidiasis. Samples of the cream were also subjected to centrifugation and physical stability tests and an analytical method for quantification of curcumin was validated based on HPLC RESULTS: The formulation was stable and the HPLC method could be considered suitable for the quantitative determination of curcumin in the cream. After six days of pre-clinical study, the number of infected animals was 1/6 in all groups treated with curcumin vaginal cream and the fungal burden showed a progressive reduction. Reduction of the inflammatory infiltrate was observed in the group treated with 1.0% cream CONCLUSION: Vaginal cream containing curcumin could be considered a promising effective antifungal medicine in the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Clothing factors and vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Heidrich, F E; Berg, A O; Bergman, J J

    1984-10-01

    Associations of clothing factors and vulvovaginal symptoms, signs, and microbiology were sought in 203 women seeking care at a university family medicine clinic. Clothing factors studied were use of panty hose, underwear for sleep, cotton lining panels, and pants vs skirts. Women wearing and not wearing panty hose had similar rates of vaginitis symptoms and signs, but yeast vaginitis was about three times more common among wearers. Relationships of other clothing factors to vaginitis were not found. Nonspecific vaginitis was not found to be related to clothing.

  10. Clinical features and surgical procedures of congenital vaginal atresia-A retrospective study of 67 patients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Ningzhi; Xiao, Hong; Liu, Yongying; Liu, Jiandong; Chen, Lili; Li, Liang; Zhang, Linlin; Zhang, Youguo

    2017-10-01

    To explore the characteristics of congenital vaginal atresia, further improve its classification, and therefore help the clinical diagnosis and treatment of congenital vaginal atresia. This was a retrospective study of 67 patients with congenital vaginal atresia (from March 1984 to March 2015). Clinical and surgical characteristics were analyzed. For lower vaginal atresia, 25 patients successfully underwent vaginoplasty at the lower portion of the vagina. For complete vagina atresia, 25 patients with type i cervical atresia were treated with artificial vaginoplasty+tracheloplasty, and all showed no dysmenorrhea within six months after surgery. Four patients with type ii cervical atresia and two patients with type iii cervical atresia successfully underwent hysterectomy+artificialvaginoplasty. Two patients with type iv cervical atresia underwent combined abdominoperineal artificial vaginoplasty+tracheloplasty. One patient with upper vaginal atresia successfully underwent hysterectomy via the narrow segment of the cervix. Three patients with top vaginal atresia had no dysmenorrhea after transvaginaltracheloplasty. This study suggests two new categories of vaginal atresia (upper vaginal atresia and top vaginal atresia), which could be used as a reference for treatment of this condition. Appropriate treatments were performed using a personalized approach and satisfactory results were achieved. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Intermediate vaginal flora is associated with HIV prevalence as strongly as bacterial vaginosis in a cross-sectional study of participants screened for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Guédou, Fernand Aimé; Van Damme, Lut; Mirembe, Florence; Solomon, Suniti; Becker, Marissa; Deese, Jennifer; Crucitti, Tania; Alary, Michel

    2012-11-01

    The authors analysed data from female sex workers screened prior to participation in a microbicide trial to examine the association between prevalent vaginal flora abnormalities and HIV infection, with special emphasis on the role of the intermediate vaginal flora (IVF) in this association. Data from the Kampala, Cotonou, Chennai and Mudhol/Jamkhandi sites were analysed. Participants were interviewed and provided blood for HIV and syphilis antibody testing, genital samples for the diagnosis of vaginal flora abnormalities (using Nugent score) and other reproductive tract infections. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate the HIV prevalence ratio (PR) in relation to IVF and bacterial vaginosis (BV). Among 1367 women, BV, IVF and HIV prevalences were 47.6% (95% CI=45.0% to 50.3%), 19.2% (95% CI=17.1% to 21.2%) and 27.0% (95% CI=24.6% to 29.3%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, adjusting for study site, age, years of education, occupation, female sterilisation, oral sex, past history of sexually transmitted infection, gonorrhoea and candidiasis, IVF was significantly associated with HIV infection with a PR similar to that of BV (adjusted PR=1.56 (95% CI=1.22 to 1.98) and 1.48 (95% CI=1.20 to 1.84), respectively). Though the cross-sectional design of the study precludes directional interpretation of the findings, the data do suggest that IVF may be as important as BV in HIV acquisition. The authors recommend prospective research to better understand the association between IVF and HIV acquisition.

  12. [EPIDEMIOLOGICAL, CLINICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL FINDINGS IN WOMEN WITH AEROBIC VAGINITIS].

    PubMed

    Dermendjiev, T; Pehlivanov, B; Hadjieva, K; Stanev, S

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is an alterarion of the normal lactobacillic flora accompanied by signs of inflammation, presence of mainly aerobic microorganisms from intestinal commensals or other aerobic pathogens. Clinical symptoms may vary by type and intensity and are marked by a high tendency for recurrence and chronification. Inflammation and ulcerations in AV could increase the risk of contracting HIV or other sexually transmitted infections. The aim is to study some epidemiological, clinical and microbiological features of the aerobic vaginitis in patients of the specialized Obstetric and Gynecological Clinic in Plovdiv, Bulgaria. In a retrospective research 4687 vaginal smears have been gathered in Microbiological laboratory at "St. George" Hospital - Plovdiv. We used clinical, microbiological and statistical methods. Information processing is performed by variation, alternative, correlation and graphical analysis using specialized package SPSS v13.0. The overall prevalence rate of AV in the studied population is 11.77%. The levels of prevalence of AV in pregnant and non-pregnant women are respectively 13.08% and 4.34%. The highest frequency of AV is in the age group 21-30 years (32.3%). The results show a marked association between Escherichia coli and the cases of AV (p < 0.001). AV is a common cause of vaginal symptoms in patients of specialized ambulatory outpatient. One in ten women with vaginal complaints suffers from AV Streptococcus agalactiae and Escherichia coli are most often isolated aerobic microorganisms.

  13. New suturing technique for robotic-assisted vaginal cuff closure during single-site hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Shin, So-Jin; Chung, Hyewon; Kwon, Sang-Hoon; Cha, Soon-Do; Cho, Chi-Heum

    2017-06-01

    To describe a simple and efficient technique for suturing the vaginal cuff in robotic-assisted single-site hysterectomy using barbed suture and a straight needle. Consecutive patients undergoing robotic-assisted single-site hysterectomy from February 2014 to August 2015 at Dong San Hospital, Keimyung University were included. Surgeons used two barbed sutures in a running fashion to close the vaginal cuff. A barbed suture was exclusively used with a straightened needle in upward direction from posterior vaginal cuff to anterior vaginal cuff which played a pivotal role for closure. A total of 100 patients underwent robotic-assisted single-site hysterectomy. The total operation time was 132.5 min and vaginal cuff closure time was 12.0 min. There were no postoperative complications; vaginal cuff dehiscence, vaginal cuff infection, and vaginal bleeding that require surgical intervention or admission. The use of barbed suture with straightened needle to close the vaginal cuff in robotic-assisted single-site hysterectomy is easy to perform and demonstrates safety and efficacy. This technique offers secure, fast, and effective incision closure.

  14. Cultivated vaginal microbiomes alter HIV-1 infection and antiretroviral efficacy in colonized epithelial multilayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Pyles, Richard B; Vincent, Kathleen L; Baum, Marc M; Elsom, Barry; Miller, Aaron L; Maxwell, Carrie; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia D; Li, Guangyu; Popov, Vsevolod L; Nusbaum, Rebecca J; Ferguson, Monique R

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for modeling of the symbiotic and at times dysbiotic relationship established between bacterial microbiomes and human mucosal surfaces. In particular clinical studies have indicated that the complex vaginal microbiome (VMB) contributes to the protection against sexually-transmitted pathogens including the life-threatening human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The human microbiome project has substantially increased our understanding of the complex bacterial communities in the vagina however, as is the case for most microbiomes, very few of the community member species have been successfully cultivated in the laboratory limiting the types of studies that can be completed. A genetically controlled ex vivo model system is critically needed to study the complex interactions and associated molecular dialog. We present the first vaginal mucosal culture model that supports colonization by both healthy and dysbiotic VMB from vaginal swabs collected from routine gynecological patients. The immortalized vaginal epithelial cells used in the model and VMB cryopreservation methods provide the opportunity to reproducibly create replicates for lab-based evaluations of this important mucosal/bacterial community interface. The culture system also contains HIV-1 susceptible cells allowing us to study the impact of representative microbiomes on replication. Our results show that our culture system supports stable and reproducible colonization by VMB representing distinct community state types and that the selected representatives have significantly different effects on the replication of HIV-1. Further, we show the utility of the system to predict unwanted alterations in efficacy or bacterial community profiles following topical application of a front line antiretroviral.

  15. Cultivated Vaginal Microbiomes Alter HIV-1 Infection and Antiretroviral Efficacy in Colonized Epithelial Multilayer Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pyles, Richard B.; Vincent, Kathleen L.; Baum, Marc M.; Elsom, Barry; Miller, Aaron L.; Maxwell, Carrie; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia D.; Li, Guangyu; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Ferguson, Monique R.

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for modeling of the symbiotic and at times dysbiotic relationship established between bacterial microbiomes and human mucosal surfaces. In particular clinical studies have indicated that the complex vaginal microbiome (VMB) contributes to the protection against sexually-transmitted pathogens including the life-threatening human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The human microbiome project has substantially increased our understanding of the complex bacterial communities in the vagina however, as is the case for most microbiomes, very few of the community member species have been successfully cultivated in the laboratory limiting the types of studies that can be completed. A genetically controlled ex vivo model system is critically needed to study the complex interactions and associated molecular dialog. We present the first vaginal mucosal culture model that supports colonization by both healthy and dysbiotic VMB from vaginal swabs collected from routine gynecological patients. The immortalized vaginal epithelial cells used in the model and VMB cryopreservation methods provide the opportunity to reproducibly create replicates for lab-based evaluations of this important mucosal/bacterial community interface. The culture system also contains HIV-1 susceptible cells allowing us to study the impact of representative microbiomes on replication. Our results show that our culture system supports stable and reproducible colonization by VMB representing distinct community state types and that the selected representatives have significantly different effects on the replication of HIV-1. Further, we show the utility of the system to predict unwanted alterations in efficacy or bacterial community profiles following topical application of a front line antiretroviral. PMID:24676219

  16. Use of lactobacilli and estriol combination in the treatment of disturbed vaginal ecosystem: a review

    PubMed Central

    Ünlü, Cihat; Donders, Gilbert

    2011-01-01

    To maintain a healthy vaginal ecosystem or to restore any disturbance, sufficient estrogen levels, an intact mature vaginal epithelium, and physiological lactobacillary microflora are essential. Thus, a combination of beneficial lactobacilli and estrogen is an appealing treatment option. This article reviews the published data on the use of viable Lactobacillus acidophilus KS400 and a low dose of estriol (0.03 mg E3) in the form of vaginal tablets (Gynoflor®). In vitro studies demonstrated that L. acidophilus KS400 produces lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), inhibits the growth of relevant vaginal pathogens, and inhibits adherence of pathogens to epithelial cells. Topical administration of E3 for treatment of vaginal diseases is generally preferred, as this route of application of hormones produces a more significant local proliferative response and has no stimulating effect on the endometrium. Overall, 16 clinical studies have been published with the combination of L. acidophilus KS400 and 0.03 mg E3. The results of these trials have demonstrated that the combination improves the vaginal epithelium and the restoration of the lactobacillary microflora with an excellent safety profile, even during pregnancy. The combination can be used in pre- and postmenopausal women for the restoration of the vaginal flora after anti-infective therapy, for treatment of symptomatic vaginal atrophy, and for abnormal vaginal flora therapy. It can be also considered in repetitive therapy courses for the long-term prevention of recurrences of bacterial vaginosis, even though further clinical studies are needed to substantiate the benefit of this application. PMID:24592002

  17. Phase I trial of a Lactobacillus crispatus vaginal suppository for prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection in women.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Christopher A; Stapleton, Ann E; Yarova-Yarovaya, Yuliya; Stamm, Walter E

    2007-01-01

    We performed a phase I trial to assess the safety and tolerance of a Lactobacillus vaginal suppository for prevention of recurrent UTI. Premenopausal women with a history of recurrent UTI were randomized to use L. crispatus CTV-05 or placebo vaginal suppositories daily for five days. 30 women were randomized (15 to L. crispatus CTV-05). No severe adverse events occurred. Mild to moderate vaginal discharge and genital irritation were reported by women in both study arms. Seven women randomized to L. crispatus CTV-05 developed pyuria without associated symptoms. Most women had high concentrations of vaginal H202-producing lactobacilli before randomization. L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. gasseri were the most common Lactobacillus species identified, with stable prevalence over time. L. crispatus CTV-05 can be given as a vaginal suppository with minimal sideeffects to healthy women with a history of recurrent UTI. Mild inflammation of the urinary tract was noted in some women.

  18. Phase I Trial of a Lactobacillus crispatus Vaginal Suppository for Prevention of Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection in Women

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Christopher A.; Stapleton, Ann E.; Yarova-Yarovaya, Yuliya; Stamm, Walter E.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: We performed a phase I trial to assess the safety and tolerance of a Lactobacillus vaginal suppository for prevention of recurrent UTI. Methods: Premenopausal women with a history of recurrent UTI were randomized to use L. crispatus CTV-05 or placebo vaginal suppositories daily for five days. Results: 30 women were randomized (15 to L. crispatus CTV-05). No severe adverse events occurred. Mild to moderate vaginal discharge and genital irritation were reported by women in both study arms. Seven women randomized to L. crispatus CTV-05 developed pyuria without associated symptoms. Most women had high concentrations of vaginal H202-producing lactobacilli before randomization. L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. gasseri were the most common Lactobacillus species identified, with stable prevalence over time. Conclusions: L. crispatus CTV-05 can be given as a vaginal suppository with minimal sideeffects to healthy women with a history of recurrent UTI. Mild inflammation of the urinary tract was noted in some women. PMID:18288237

  19. Effect of vaginal or systemic estrogen on dynamics of collagen assembly in the rat vaginal wall.

    PubMed

    Montoya, T Ignacio; Maldonado, P Antonio; Acevedo, Jesus F; Word, R Ann

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of systemic and local estrogen treatment on collagen assembly and biomechanical properties of the vaginal wall. Ovariectomized nulliparous rats were treated with estradiol or conjugated equine estrogens (CEEs) either systemically, vaginal CEE, or vaginal placebo cream for 4 wk. Low-dose local CEE treatment resulted in increased vaginal epithelial thickness and significant vaginal growth without uterine hyperplasia. Furthermore, vaginal wall distensibility increased without compromise of maximal force at failure. Systemic estradiol resulted in modest increases in collagen type I with no change in collagen type III mRNA. Low-dose vaginal treatment, however, resulted in dramatic increases in both collagen subtypes whereas moderate and high dose local therapies were less effective. Consistent with the mRNA results, low-dose vaginal estrogen resulted in increased total and cross-linked collagen content. The inverse relationship between vaginal dose and collagen expression may be explained in part by progressive downregulation of estrogen receptor-alpha mRNA with increasing estrogen dose. We conclude that, in this menopausal rat model, local estrogen treatment increased total and cross-linked collagen content and markedly stimulated collagen mRNA expression in an inverse dose-effect relationship. High-dose vaginal estrogen resulted in downregulation of estrogen receptor-alpha and loss of estrogen-induced increases in vaginal collagen. These results may have important clinical implications regarding the use of local vaginal estrogen therapy and its role as an adjunctive treatment in women with loss of vaginal support. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  20. W/O/W multiple emulsions containing nitroimidazole derivates for vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ozgen; Ozyazici, Mine; Tedajo, Muriel; Taner, Memduh S; Köseoglu, Kamil

    2007-03-01

    The aim of our study was to formulate a stable multiple emulsions containing two nitroimidazole derivates, metronidazole (MT) and ornidazole (OR), for vaginal therapy. MT and OR were located internal and external phases of multiple emulsion, respectively, and the in vitro release studies were realized in phosphate (pH 7) and lactate buffer (pH 4.5) solutions to investigate better the effect of pH and location of active substance on the release. The imaging studies were realized in rabbits following labeling MT and OR with Technethium-99m ((99m)Tc) to evaluate the in vivo absorption characteristics. The percentage of MT and OR released from the multiple emulsions in alkaline media were 3.2- and 2.8-fold greater than that observed in acidic media, respectively, when they were introduced in the internal phase of the multiple emulsions. The absorption rate of MT from vaginal epithelium was faster than OR. We observed that especially in alkaline medium a high release was found that was convenient for the vaginal infections seen in the alkaline pH. We concluded that W/O/W multiple emulsions were locally effective in vagina and they could be introduced as a new drug carrier system for vaginal delivery.

  1. Vaginal biogenic amines: biomarkers of bacterial vaginosis or precursors to vaginal dysbiosis?

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Tiffanie M.; Borgogna, Joanna-Lynn C.; Brotman, Rebecca M.; Ravel, Jacques; Walk, Seth T.; Yeoman, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal disorder among reproductive age women. One clinical indicator of BV is a “fishy” odor. This odor has been associated with increases in several biogenic amines (BAs) that may serve as important biomarkers. Within the vagina, BA production has been linked to various vaginal taxa, yet their genetic capability to synthesize BAs is unknown. Using a bioinformatics approach, we show that relatively few vaginal taxa are predicted to be capable of producing BAs. Many of these taxa (Dialister, Prevotella, Parvimonas, Megasphaera, Peptostreptococcus, and Veillonella spp.) are more abundant in the vaginal microbial community state type (CST) IV, which is depleted in lactobacilli. Several of the major Lactobacillus species (L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. gasseri) were identified as possessing gene sequences for proteins predicted to be capable of putrescine production. Finally, we show in a small cross sectional study of 37 women that the BAs putrescine, cadaverine and tyramine are significantly higher in CST IV over CSTs I and III. These data support the hypothesis that BA production is conducted by few vaginal taxa and may be important to the outgrowth of BV-associated (vaginal dysbiosis) vaginal bacteria. PMID:26483694

  2. Vaginal biogenic amines: biomarkers of bacterial vaginosis or precursors to vaginal dysbiosis?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Tiffanie M; Borgogna, Joanna-Lynn C; Brotman, Rebecca M; Ravel, Jacques; Walk, Seth T; Yeoman, Carl J

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal disorder among reproductive age women. One clinical indicator of BV is a "fishy" odor. This odor has been associated with increases in several biogenic amines (BAs) that may serve as important biomarkers. Within the vagina, BA production has been linked to various vaginal taxa, yet their genetic capability to synthesize BAs is unknown. Using a bioinformatics approach, we show that relatively few vaginal taxa are predicted to be capable of producing BAs. Many of these taxa (Dialister, Prevotella, Parvimonas, Megasphaera, Peptostreptococcus, and Veillonella spp.) are more abundant in the vaginal microbial community state type (CST) IV, which is depleted in lactobacilli. Several of the major Lactobacillus species (L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. gasseri) were identified as possessing gene sequences for proteins predicted to be capable of putrescine production. Finally, we show in a small cross sectional study of 37 women that the BAs putrescine, cadaverine and tyramine are significantly higher in CST IV over CSTs I and III. These data support the hypothesis that BA production is conducted by few vaginal taxa and may be important to the outgrowth of BV-associated (vaginal dysbiosis) vaginal bacteria.

  3. Vaginal yeast infections while deployed in Southwest/Central Asia, active component females, U.S. Armed Forces, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    In field settings, female service members may not have adequate access to bathrooms, showers, laundry, or sanitary products necessary to maintain adequate feminine hygiene; therefore, service women may be at risk for vaginal yeast infections while deployed. During the 6-year surveillance period, nearly 3,000 U.S. military service women were diagnosed with at least one clinically significant yeast infection while supporting combat operations in Southwest/Central Asia. The crude overall incidence rate was 35.1 per 1,000 person-years (p-yrs). Overall incidence rates were higher among black, non-Hispanic service women, and among those in the Army and Air Force, in enlisted grades, and in communications/intelligence and motor transport occupations. The yearly rate of yeast infections was relatively stable from 2008 through 2010, then decreased in 2011 through 2013. Prior to deploying to austere operational settings, female service members should be provided practical and useful information, realistic training, and material support to decrease the risk of acquiring and increase the effectiveness of treating clinically and military operationally significant yeast infections.

  4. Permeability of tritiated water through human cervical and vaginal tissue.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Alexandra B; McCullough, Kristy D; Cost, Marilyn R; Hillier, Sharon L; Rohan, Lisa Cencia

    2004-08-01

    The increased incidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection in women has identified an urgent need to develop a female-controlled method to prevent acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus and other sexually transmitted diseases. Women would apply the product intravaginally before intercourse. Development of such a product requires a better understanding of the permeability characteristics of the tissues with which such products would come into contact. However, limited studies have been performed in this area. In the present study, water permeability of fresh human cervical and vaginal tissue was evaluated. The average apparent permeability coefficient was found to be 8 x 10(-5) cm/s for fresh human cervical tissue and 7 x 10(-5) cm/s for fresh human vaginal tissue. Considering the lack of regularity in obtaining cervical and vaginal tissue from surgical specimens, additional tests were performed to evaluate the effect of freezing on tritiated water permeability. No statistically significant differences were observed in the permeability values obtained when comparing fresh versus frozen tissues. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 93:2009-2016, 2004

  5. Military women's risk factors for and symptoms of genitourinary infections during deployment.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Nancy K; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2003-07-01

    Symptoms of vaginitis and urinary tract infections are miserable, distracting, and significantly affect women's quality of life. Among civilian women, these symptoms account for 10.5 million office visits per year. To examine the scope of the problem for military women during deployment situations, surveys were sent to randomly selected Army and Navy units. Of 841 women who completed the anonymous survey and had been deployed, vaginal infections were experienced by 30.1% and urinary tract infections by 18.4% of them during deployment. Vaginal symptoms were consistent with symptoms associated with the three most common vaginal infections (candida, bacterial, and trichomonas vaginitis). A variety of risk factors, both behavioral and situational, significantly differentiated women with and without infections. Urinary tract infections and vaginal infections are common during deployment situations where resources for self-care and appropriate primary health care for women are scarce or unavailable. One solution is a self-diagnosis and treatment kit for deployed military women.

  6. IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-8 levels in gyneco-obstetric infections.

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Beatriz; Giménez, Francisco; López, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: During pregnancy cytokines and inflammatory mediators stimulate the expression of prostaglandin, the levels of which determine the onset of labor. The aim of this work was to study interleukin IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-8 levels in the vaginal discharge, serum and urine of pregnant women with genitourinary infection before and after specific treatment. One hundred and fifty-one patients were studied during the second or third trimester of their pregnancy. METHODS: The selected patients were: healthy or control group (n = 52), those with bacterial vaginosis (n = 47), those with vaginitis (n = 37), those with asymptomatic urinary infection (n = 15) and post-treatment. The level of cytokines was assayed by ELISA test. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: The IL-1beta levels in vaginal discharge were: control 103.5 +/- 24.2 pg/ml, bacterial vaginosis 1030 +/- 59.5, vaginitis 749.14 +/- 66.7l ( p < 0.0001), post-treatment 101.4 +/- 28.7. IL-6 values were similar in both control and infected groups, and there were no patients with chorioamnionitis. In vaginal discharge IL-6: control 14.2 +/- 3.9 pg/ml, bacterial vaginosis 13.2 +/- 3.8, vaginitis 13 +/- 4.2. IL-8 levels were: control 1643 +/- 130.3 pg/ml, bacterial vaginosis 2612.7 +/- 257.7, vaginitis 3437 +/- 460 (p < 0.0001), post-treatment 1693 +/- 126.6. In urine the results were: control 40.2 +/- 17 pg/ml, asymptomatic urinary infection 1200.7 +/- 375 (p < 0.0001). In patients with therapeutic success both IL-1beta and IL-8 returned to normal levels. CONCLUSIONS: Genitourinary infections induce a significant increase in IL-1beta and IL-8 levels in vaginal secretions, and IL-8 in urine as well. Both cytokines could be useful as evolutive markers of infection. PMID:16338780

  7. Vaginal Lactobacillus Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Tissues Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ñahui Palomino, Rogers A.; Zicari, Sonia; Vanpouille, Christophe; Vitali, Beatrice; Margolis, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus species, which dominate vaginal microbiota of healthy reproductive-age women, lower the risks of sexually transmitted infections, including the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. The exact mechanisms of this protection remain to be understood. Here, we investigated these mechanisms in the context of human cervico-vaginal and lymphoid tissues ex vivo. We found that all six Lactobacillus strains tested in these systems significantly suppressed HIV type-1 (HIV-1) infection. We identified at least three factors that mediated this suppression: (i) Acidification of the medium. The pH of the undiluted medium conditioned by lactobacilli was between 3.8 and 4.6. Acidification of the culture medium with hydrochloric acid (HCl) to this pH in control experiments was sufficient to abrogate HIV-1 replication. However, the pH of the Lactobacillus-conditioned medium (CM) diluted fivefold, which reached ∼6.9, was also suppressive for HIV-1 infection, while in control experiments HIV-1 infection was not abrogated when the pH of the medium was brought to 6.9 through the use of HCl. This suggested the existence of other factors responsible for HIV-1 inhibition by lactobacilli. (ii) Lactic acid. There was a correlation between the concentration of lactic acid in the Lactobacillus-CM and its ability to suppress HIV-1 infection in human tissues ex vivo. Addition of lactic acid isomers D and L to tissue culture medium at the concentration that corresponded to their amount released by lactobacilli resulted in HIV-1 inhibition. Isomer L was produced in higher quantities than isomer D and was mostly responsible for HIV-1 inhibition. These results indicate that lactic acid, in particular its L-isomer, inhibits HIV-1 independently of lowering of the pH. (iii) Virucidal effect. Incubation of HIV-1 in Lactobacillus-CM significantly suppressed viral infectivity for human tissues ex vivo. Finally, lactobacilli adsorb HIV-1, serving as a sink decreasing the

  8. Vaginal candidiasis and its risk factors among women attending a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Nwadioha, S I; Nwokedi, E O P; Egesie, J; Enejuo, H

    2013-03-01

    The study was set to detect Candida species in female genital discharge and validate the associated risk factors. A prospective study of female genital swabs collected from women with abnormal vaginal discharge (test group) and a control group who were attending gynaecology, family planning, antenatal care or HIV/STI clinics of Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano Nigeria and analysed for microscopy and culture in microbiology laboratory from December 2008 to December 2009. Data on epidemiologic indices were collected from the patients, using structured interviewer- administered questionnaires. Candida species were detected in the test group in 60% (n=600/1000) cases of infective vaginal discharge while 12% (120/1000) in the control group. The isolation rate of Candida albicans was 69% more than the non- albicans. Distribution of vaginal candidiasis in the test group, was prevalent in young adults age group of 21 to 30 years with 50% (n=300/600), in patients with pregnancy 38% (n=225/600) and patients with chronically debilitating illnesses 26% (n=157/600). The result shows that vaginal candidiasis is quite common and Candida albicans is the most prevalent species. We therefore recommend early diagnosis and prompt treatment of vaginal candidiasis in all women clinics especially among the patients with chronic debilitating illness, pregnancy and young adults in order to avert the complications of vaginal candidiasis and reduce HIV transmission.

  9. Heterogeneity of Vaginal Microbial Communities within Individuals▿ #

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Kyung; Thomas, Susan M.; Ho, Mengfei; Sharma, Shobha; Reich, Claudia I.; Frank, Jeremy A.; Yeater, Kathleen M.; Biggs, Diana R.; Nakamura, Noriko; Stumpf, Rebecca; Leigh, Steven R.; Tapping, Richard I.; Blanke, Steven R.; Slauch, James M.; Gaskins, H. Rex; Weisbaum, Jon S.; Olsen, Gary J.; Hoyer, Lois L.; Wilson, Brenda A.

    2009-01-01

    Recent culture-independent studies have revealed that a healthy vaginal ecosystem harbors a surprisingly complex assemblage of microorganisms. However, the spatial distribution and composition of vaginal microbial populations have not been investigated using molecular methods. Here, we evaluated site-specific microbial composition within the vaginal ecosystem and examined the influence of sampling technique in detection of the vaginal microbiota. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were prepared from samples obtained from different locations (cervix, fornix, outer vaginal canal) and by different methods (swabbing, scraping, lavaging) from the vaginal tracts of eight clinically healthy, asymptomatic women. The data reveal that the vaginal microbiota is not homogenous throughout the vaginal tract but differs significantly within an individual with regard to anatomical site and sampling method used. Thus, this study illuminates the complex structure of the vaginal ecosystem and calls for the consideration of microenvironments when sampling vaginal microbiota as a clinical predictor of vaginal health. PMID:19158255

  10. Evaluating Safer Conception Options for HIV-Serodiscordant Couples (HIV-Infected Female/HIV-Uninfected Male): A Closer Look at Vaginal Insemination

    PubMed Central

    Mmeje, Okeoma; Cohen, Craig R.; Cohan, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    HIV serodiscordant couples represent at least half of all HIV-affected couples worldwide. Many of these couples have childbearing desires. Safer methods of conception may allow for pregnancy while minimizing the risk of sexual transmission of HIV. In serodiscordant partnerships with an HIV-infected female and HIV-uninfected male, vaginal insemination of a partner's semen during the fertile period coupled with 100% condom use may be the safest method of conception. PMID:22927714

  11. Human Papillomavirus Infection in Women Who Submit Self-collected Vaginal Swabs After Internet Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erik J; Hughes, John; Oakes, J Michael; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Pankow, James S; Kulasingam, Shalini L

    2015-06-01

    Submission of vaginal samples collected at home could remove barriers that women face in getting screened for cervical cancer. From December 2013 to January 2014, women aged 21-30 years were recruited online to participate in either (1) self-collected testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and an online survey, or (2) an online survey regarding their perceptions of self-collected testing for HPV infection. Demographics, risk factors, testing perceptions, and satisfaction with self-collected testing were assessed with online questionnaires. Women who performed self-collection were sent a home sampling kit by US mail, which was returned via US mail for HPV testing. A total of 197 women were enrolled, with 130 completing the online survey and 67 participating in both the survey and self-collection. Of the 67 women who were sent kits, 62 (92.5%) were returned for testing. Sixty kits contained a sample sufficient for testing. The overall prevalence of HPV infection was 17.8%, however 6 women (9.7%) were infected with >1 type of HPV. Women who self-collected a sample reported more favorable attributes of self-collection compared to women who only participated in the online survey, including ease of sampling (87.1 vs. 18.9%), no pain during sampling (72.6 vs. 5.6%), and lack of embarrassment (67.7 vs. 12.9%). A high prevalence of HPV infection was demonstrated among women recruited via the internet. Online recruitment and at home screening methods have the potential to engage women in screening by offering an approach that might be more acceptable to women of different backgrounds.

  12. Reoccurrence of retained placenta at vaginal delivery: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Nikolajsen, Sys; Løkkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth; Bergholt, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence and validate the diagnosis of retained placenta in nulliparous women and the risk of reoccurrence at subsequent vaginal delivery. Nested cohort study. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, university-affiliated teaching hospital. 10 334 nulliparous singleton pregnancies who delivered vaginally at the hospital during 2000-2009. Data from a computerized database information system were used to identify 287 women who had an ICD-10 diagnosis of retained placenta and 572 randomly selected controls matched by the date of first delivery. At chart review the diagnosis was confirmed by: (1) excessive bleeding <30 minutes after delivery without placental separation, (2) placenta not separated 30 minutes after delivery or (3) confirmation of retained placental tissue >2 hours postpartum. Confirmation of the diagnosis and prevalence of retained placenta. Risk of reoccurrence in a subsequent vaginal delivery. The prevalence of retained placenta increased from 2.8 to 7.0% after confirmation according to the set criteria. Of the selected women, 48.4% had a subsequent vaginal delivery. Of these women, 25.3% (23/91) with a previous retained placenta and 5.3% (11/206) without previously retained placenta, experienced retained placenta in subsequent delivery. This corresponds to an adjusted odds ratio of 5.5 (95% confidence interval 2.6-12.7) in the multivariate analysis for recurrence of retained placenta in a subsequent vaginal delivery. The use of the ICD-10 diagnosis of retained placenta underestimated the prevalence. The risk of reoccurrence of retained placenta is significantly increased in a subsequent vaginal delivery. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica © 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  13. Emphysematous vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Lima-Silva, Joana; Vieira-Baptista, Pedro; Cavaco-Gomes, João; Maia, Tiago; Beires, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    Emphysematous vaginitis is a rare condition, characterized by the presence of multiple gas-filled cysts in the vaginal and/or exocervical mucosa. Although its etiology is not completely understood, it is self-limited, with a benign clinical course. Vaginal discharge, sometimes bloody, and pruritus are the most common symptoms. Chronic and acute inflammation can be found, and diseases that impair the immune system and pregnancy have been associated with this condition. A 48-year-old postmenopausal woman, with a history of hysterectomy with several comorbidities, presented with a 4-month history of bloody discharge and vulvar pruritus. Examination showed multiple cystic lesions, 1 to 5 mm, occupying the posterior and right lateral vaginal walls. Speculum examination produced crepitus. Vaginal wet mount was normal, except for diminished lactobacilli; results of Trichomonas vaginalis DNA test and vaginal cultures were negative. Lugol's iodine applied to the vagina was taken up by the intact lesions. Biopsy result showed typical features of emphysematous vaginitis. This is an unusual entity, presenting with common gynecological complaints, and both physicians and pathologists should be aware to prevent misdiagnosis and overtreatment.

  14. [Saforelle - a new approach to treat vaginitis].

    PubMed

    Karamisheva, V; Nachev, A

    2015-01-01

    Infections of the vulva and vagina are one of the most common gynecological diseases. They can be determined by a variety of physical, chemical and biological factors. The main risk factors contributing to vaginitis are aerobic and anaerobic bacterias, fungal and viral infections, and irritants. Subjective complaints are pruritus, vulvar and/or perivulvar erytema and different in volume and characterization discharge. Excepting etiological treatment in most cases it is necessary to use additional agents, for example Saforelle.

  15. [The first case of persistent vaginitis due to Aspergillus protuberus in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Borsa, Barış Ata; Özgün, Gonca; Houbraken, Jos; Ökmen, Fırat

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of vaginal fungal infections are caused by Candida species. However, vaginitis cases caused by molds are extremely rare. Aspergillus protuberus is previously known as a member of Aspergillus section Versicolores which can cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients, however it has recently been described as a seperate species. Although the members of Aspergillus section Versicolores have been isolated rarely in cases of pulmonary infections, eye infections, otomycosis, osteomyelitis and onycomycoses, to the best of our knowledge, there is no published case of human infection caused by A.protuberus. In this report, the first case of persistent vaginitis due to A.protuberus in an immunocompetent patient was presented. A 42-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of pelvic pain, vaginal itching and discharge during one month. Her symptoms had been persistant despite of the miconazole nitrate and clotrimazole therapies for probable candidal vaginitis. Fungal structures such as branched, septate hyphae together with the conidial forms were seen in microscopic examination as in the cervical smear. Thereafter, a vaginal discharge sample was taken for microbiological evaluation and similar characteristics of fungal structures were observed in the microscopic examination as of cervical smear. Then, preliminary result was reported as Aspergillus spp. At the same time, the sample was plated on Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) in duplicate and incubated at room temperature and at 37°C. After 5 days, white, powdery and pure-looking fungal colonies were observed in SDA which was incubated at room temperature, while the other medium remained sterile. The culture was submitted to the CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Center for further characterization. Phenotypic identification showed that the isolated strain belonged to the Aspergillus section Versicolores. The strain was grown for 7 days on malt extract agar and then

  16. Multidisciplinary Overview of Vaginal Atrophy and Associated Genitourinary Symptoms in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Irwin; Dicks, Brian; Kim, Noel N; Hartzell, Rose

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Vaginal atrophy, which may affect up to 45% of postmenopausal women, is often associated with one or more urinary symptoms, including urgency, increased frequency, nocturia, dysuria, incontinence, and recurrent urinary tract infection. Aims To provide an overview of the current literature regarding cellular and clinical aspects of vaginal atrophy and response to treatment with local vaginal estrogen therapy. Methods PubMed searches through February 2012 were conducted using the terms “vaginal atrophy,” “atrophic vaginitis,” and “vulvovaginal atrophy.” Expert opinion was based on review of the relevant scientific and medical literature. Main Outcome Measure Genitourinary symptoms and treatment of vaginal atrophy from peer-reviewed published literature. Results Typically, a diagnosis of vaginal atrophy is made based on patient-reported symptoms, including genitourinary symptoms, and an examination that reveals signs of the disorder; however, many women are hesitant to report vaginal-related symptoms, primarily because of embarrassment. Conclusions Physicians in various disciplines are encouraged to initiate open discussions about vulvovaginal health with postmenopausal women, including recommended treatment options. Goldstein I, Dicks B, Kim NN, and Hartzell R. Multidisciplinary overview of vaginal atrophy and associated genitourinary symptoms in postmenopausal women. Sex Med 2013;1:44–53. PMID:25356287

  17. Vaginal douching by women with vulvovaginitis and relation to reproductive health hazards.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Omar M; Youssef, Alaa Eldin A; Khodry, Mostafa M; Mostafa, Sayed A

    2013-05-14

    Vaginal douching (VD) is a common practice among married women all over the world specially those in the Middle East. It is used for personal hygiene or for other aesthetic reasons in many countries. The current study investigates the prevalence of VD among patients with vulvovaginitis in Egypt. It also compares the reproductive health hazards among women performing routine VD with those using external hygiene. It also investigates why, and how women practice this douching. A cross sectional observational study was conducted in a tertiary university affiliated hospital in Assiut, Egypt. An interview administered questionnaire was administered to 620 women by two trained clinic nurses. Women presented to the outpatient clinic and diagnosed to have any type of vaginal infections were approached for participation. The principle outcome was the history of preterm labor in women who routinely performed VD versus those who did not (upon which sample size was estimated). Other outcome measures were the types of vaginal infections, and reproductive implications comprising, ectopic pregnancy, abortion and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). The participants were predominantly multiparas from semi-urban background and middle socioeconomic level. Considering VD as a religious duty and a kind of personal cleanliness were the most common reasons for performing VD in 88.9% and 80.6% of the studied population, respectively. History of preterm labor was reported in 19.2% versus 11.9% (p=0.048), while history of PID in 13.2% versus 6.0% (p=0.008) in women performing VD compared to those not performing this habit, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups as regard the history of ectopic pregnancy or the number of previous abortions. Vaginal douching is a prevalent practice in Egypt and has traditional and religious roots within the community. There are many misbeliefs around this habit in Egypt. Vaginal douching increases certain reproductive health

  18. Postpartum surveillance of bacteriuria in term vaginal deliveries.

    PubMed Central

    Orrett, F. A.; Premanand, N.

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of bacteriuria in early postpartum period after term vaginal delivery in Trinidad, West Indies. Asymptomatic bacteriuria occurred in 58 (34.5%) of 168 patients tested. The prevalence of bacteriuria was significantly higher in non-catheterized patients than in catheterized patients and occurred more commonly in patients who were 20 to 29 years old and who were primigravida rather than multigravida. Forty-four patients had a history of urinary tract infection; 18 (40.9%) of these patients had positive urine cultures. Although 10 patients had a vaginal discharge in the late third trimester, none presented with postpartum bacteriuria. Because of the high prevalence of postpartum bacteriuria and the potential to progress to pyelonephritis and chronic renal disease, quantitative urine cultures for all postnatal patients and curative treatment for all positive cultures are recommend. PMID:9549982

  19. Cytokines in the host response to Candida vaginitis: Identifying a role for non-classical immune mediators, S100 alarmins

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Junko; Noverr, Mairi C.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), caused by Candida albicans, affects a significant number of women during their reproductive years. More than two decades of research have been focused on the mechanisms associated with susceptibility or resistance to symptomatic infection. Adaptive immunity by Th1-type CD4+ T cells and downstream cytokine responses are considered the predominant host defense mechanisms against mucosal Candida infections. However, numerous clinical and animal studies have indicated no or limited protective role of cells and cytokines of the Th1 or Th2 lineage against vaginal infection. The role for Th17 is only now begun to be investigated in-depth for VVC with results already showing significant controversy. On the other hand, a clinical live-challenge study and an established animal model have shown that a symptomatic condition is intimately associated with the vaginal infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) but with no effect on vaginal fungal burden. Subsequent studies identified S100A8 and S100A9 Alarmins as key chemotactic mediators of the acute PMN response. These chemotactic danger signals appear to be secreted by vaginal epithelial cells upon interaction and early adherence of Candida. Thus, instead of a putative immunodeficiency against Candida involving classical immune cells and cytokines of the adaptive response, the pathological inflammation in VVC is now considered a consequence of a non-productive innate response initiated by non-classical immune mediators. PMID:22182685

  20. Women's experiences of using vaginal trainers (dilators) to treat vaginal penetration difficulties diagnosed as vaginismus: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Macey, Kat; Gregory, Angela; Nunns, David; das Nair, Roshan

    2015-06-20

    Recent research has highlighted controversies in the conceptualisation, diagnosis and treatment of vaginismus. Vaginal trainers are currently the most widely used treatment. Critiques have highlighted concerns that the evidence-base of its effectiveness is limited, with controlled trials reporting disappointing results, and its prescription promotes 'performance-based' sexuality which may be detrimental. Despite this, little has been done to seek women's views about their treatment. This study set out to explore women's experiences of vaginismus treatment with vaginal trainers, and to use their voices to propose guidelines for improving treatment. 13 women who had used vaginal trainers for vaginal penetration difficulties diagnosed as vaginismus were recruited through a specialist clinic, university campuses, and online forums. The women took part in semi-structured individual interviews (face-to-face/telephone/Skype), which were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using Thematic Analysis. Four superordinate themes were elicited and used to draft 'better treatment' guidelines. Themes were: (1) Lack of knowledge, (2) Invalidation of suffering by professionals, (3) Difficult journey, and (4) Making the journey easier. This paper describes themes (3) and (4). Difficult Journey describes the long and arduous 'Journey into treatment', including difficulties asking for help, undergoing physical investigations and negotiating 'the system' of medical referrals. It also describes the sometimes demoralising process of 'being in treatment', which includes emotional and practical demands of treatment. Making the journey easier highlights the importance of and limits to 'partner support'. 'Professional support' comprises personal qualities of professionals/therapeutic relationship, the value of specialist skills and knowledge and the need for facilitating couple communication about vaginismus. 'Peer support/helping each other' describes the importance of

  1. The Vaginal Microbiota over an 8- to 10-Year Period in a Cohort of HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Women

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Supriya D.; Donovan, Brock; Weber, Kathleen M.; Cohen, Mardge; Ravel, Jacques; Gajer, Pawel; Gilbert, Douglas; Burgad, Derick; Spear, Greg T.

    2015-01-01

    Background We identified predominant vaginal microbiota communities, changes over time, and how this varied by HIV status and other factors in a cohort of 64 women. Methods Bacterial DNA was extracted from reposited cervicovaginal lavage samples collected annually over an 8–10 year period from Chicago Women’s Interagency HIV Study participants: 22 HIV-negative, 22 HIV-positive with stable infection, 20 HIV-positive with progressive infection. The vaginal microbiota was defined by pyrosequencing of the V1/V2 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Scheduled visits included Bacterial vaginsosis (BV) screening; clinically detected cases were referred for treatment. Hierarchical clustering identified bacterial community state types (CST). Multinomial mixed effects modeling determined trends over time in CST, by HIV status and other factors. Results The median follow-up time was 8.1 years (range 5.5–15.3). Six CSTs were identified. The mean relative abundance (RA) of Lactobacillus spp. by CST (with median number of bacterial taxa) was: CST-1–25.7% (10), CST-2–27.1% (11), CST-3–34.6% (9), CST-4–46.8% (9), CST-5–57.9% (4), CST-6–69.4% (2). The two CSTs representing the highest RA of Lactobacillus and lowest diversity increased with each additional year of follow-up (CST-5, adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.62 [95% CI: 1.34–1.94]; CST-6, aOR = 1.57 [95 CI: 1.31–1.89]), while the two CSTs representing lowest RA of Lactobacillus and higher diversity decreased with each additional year (CST-1, aOR = 0.89 [95% CI: 0.80–1.00]; CST-2, aOR = 0.86 [95% CI: 0.75–0.99]). There was no association between HIV status and CST at baseline or over time. CSTs representing lower RA of Lactobacillus were associated with current cigarette smoking. Conclusions The vaginal microbial community significantly improved over time in this cohort of women with HIV and at high risk for HIV who had regular detection and treatment referral for BV. PMID:25675346

  2. Vaginal Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Vaginal Cancer Vaginal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Vaginal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Vaginal Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and ...

  3. Persistent Low-Level Replication of SIVΔnef Drives Maturation of Antibody and CD8 T Cell Responses to Induce Protective Immunity against Vaginal SIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Adnan, Sama; Reeves, R Keith; Gillis, Jacqueline; Wong, Fay E; Yu, Yi; Camp, Jeremy V; Li, Qingsheng; Connole, Michelle; Li, Yuan; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Li, Wenjun; Keele, Brandon F; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Haase, Ashley T; Johnson, R Paul

    2016-12-01

    Defining the correlates of immune protection conferred by SIVΔnef, the most effective vaccine against SIV challenge, could enable the design of a protective vaccine against HIV infection. Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of immune responses that protect against SIV infection through detailed analyses of cellular and humoral immune responses in the blood and tissues of rhesus macaques vaccinated with SIVΔnef and then vaginally challenged with wild-type SIV. Despite the presence of robust cellular immune responses, animals at 5 weeks after vaccination displayed only transient viral suppression of challenge virus, whereas all macaques challenged at weeks 20 and 40 post-SIVΔnef vaccination were protected, as defined by either apparent sterile protection or significant suppression of viremia in infected animals. Multiple parameters of CD8 T cell function temporally correlated with maturation of protection, including polyfunctionality, phenotypic differentiation, and redistribution to gut and lymphoid tissues. Importantly, we also demonstrate the induction of a tissue-resident memory population of SIV-specific CD8 T cells in the vaginal mucosa, which was dependent on ongoing low-level antigenic stimulation. Moreover, we show that vaginal and serum antibody titers inversely correlated with post-challenge peak viral load, and we correlate the accumulation and affinity maturation of the antibody response to the duration of the vaccination period as well as to the SIVΔnef antigenic load. In conclusion, maturation of SIVΔnef-induced CD8 T cell and antibody responses, both propelled by viral persistence in the gut mucosa and secondary lymphoid tissues, results in protective immune responses that are able to interrupt viral transmission at mucosal portals of entry as well as potential sites of viral dissemination.

  4. Association between cigarette smoking and the vaginal microbiota: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brotman, Rebecca M; He, Xin; Gajer, Pawel; Fadrosh, Doug; Sharma, Eva; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Ravel, Jacques; Glover, Elbert D; Rath, Jessica M

    2014-08-28

    Smoking has been identified in observational studies as a risk factor for bacterial vaginosis (BV), a condition defined in part by decimation of Lactobacillus spp. The anti-estrogenic effect of smoking and trace amounts of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) may predispose women to BV. BPDE increases bacteriophage induction in Lactobacillus spp. and is found in the vaginal secretions of smokers. We compared the vaginal microbiota between smokers and non-smokers and followed microbiota changes in a smoking cessation pilot study. In 2010-2011, 20 smokers and 20 non-smokers were recruited to a cross-sectional study (Phase A) and 9 smokers were enrolled and followed for a 12-week smoking cessation program (Phase B). Phase B included weekly behavioral counseling and nicotine patches to encourage smoking cessation. In both phases, participants self-collected mid-vaginal swabs (daily, Phase B) and completed behavioral surveys. Vaginal bacterial composition was characterized by pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA genes (V1-V3 regions). Vaginal smears were assigned Nugent Gram stain scores. Smoking status was evaluated (weekly, Phase B) using the semi-quantitative NicAlert® saliva cotinine test and carbon monoxide (CO) exhalation. In phase A, there was a significant trend for increasing saliva cotinine and CO exhalation with elevated Nugent scores (P value <0.005). Vaginal microbiota clustered into three community state types (CSTs); two dominated by Lactobacillus (L. iners, L. crispatus), and one lacking significant numbers of Lactobacillus spp. and characterized by anaerobes (termed CST-IV). Women who were observed in the low-Lactobacillus CST-IV state were 25-fold more likely to be smokers than those dominated by L. crispatus (aOR: 25.61, 95 % CI: 1.03-636.61). Four women completed Phase B. One of three who entered smoking cessation with high Nugent scores demonstrated a switch from CST-IV to a L.iners-dominated profile with a concomitant drop in Nugent scores which

  5. Detection and Type-Distribution of Human Papillomavirus in Vulva and Vaginal Abnormal Cytology Lesions and Cancer Tissues from Thai Women.

    PubMed

    Ngamkham, Jarunya; Boonmark, Krittika; Phansri, Thainsang

    2016-01-01

    Vulva and Vaginal cancers are rare among all gynecological cancers worldwide, including Thailand, and typically affect women in later life. Persistent high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection is one of several important causes of cancer development. In this study, we focused on HPV investigation and specific type distribution from Thai women with abnormality lesions and cancers of the vulva and Vaginal. A total of ninety paraffin-embedded samples of vulva and Vaginal abnormalities and cancer cells with histologically confirmed were collected from Thai women, who were diagnosed in 2003-2012 at the National Cancer Institute, Thailand. HPV DNA was detected and genotyped using polymerase chain reaction and enzyme immunoassay with GP5+/ bio 6+ consensus specific primers and digoxigenin-labeled specific oligoprobes, respectively. The human β-globin gene was used as an internal control. Overall results represented that HPV frequency was 16/34 (47.1%) and 8/20 (40.0%) samples of vulva with cancer and abnormal cytology lesions, respectively, while, 3/5 (60%) and 16/33 (51.61%) samples of Vaginal cancer and abnormal cytology lesions, respectively, were HPV DNA positive. Single HPV type and multiple HPV type infection could be observed in both type of cancers and abnormal lesion samples in the different histological categorizes. HPV16 was the most frequent type in all cancers and abnormal cytology lesions, whereas HPV 18 was less frequent and could be detected as co-infection with other high risk HPV types. In addition, low risk types such as HPV 6, 11 and 70 could be detected in Vulva cancer and abnormal cytology lesion samples, whereas, all Vaginal cancer samples exhibited only high risk HPV types; HPV 16 and 31. In conclusion, from our results in this study we suggest that women with persistent high risk HPV type infection are at risk of developing vulva and Vaginal cancers and HPV 16 was observed at the highest frequent both of these, similar to the cervical

  6. Evaluation of Cytokines in Endocervical Secretion and Vaginal pH from Women with Bacterial Vaginosis or Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Ana Claudia Camargo; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido; Michelin, Márcia Antoniazi; Reis, Cleomenes

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To verify the relationship between vaginal pH and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and to measure cytokine levels in endocervical secretions of women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) or HPV. Methods. 173 women (16–48 years old) were enrolled and divided into groups: BV, HPV, and controls. Microbiological culture and vaginal pH were measured. HPV detect by PCR, and cytokines by ELISA (IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α, and IFN-γ cytokines). Results. Of 173 women, 60 were control group (34.7%) and 113 were distributed in HPV (n=36, 20.8%), BV (n=36, 20.8%), vaginitis (n=30, 17.3%) and, BV and HPV-associated groups (n=11, 6.4%). Vaginal pH > 4.5 was related with HPV infection. IL-2 and IL-12 were increased in BV and HPV groups, and IL-6 (only BV group), compared to control group. IL-12 and IFN-γ were higher in HPV than BV group. Conclusion. The increase of vaginal pH was associated with HPV infection; BV and HPV groups had a Th1 cytokines immune response. PMID:22550593

  7. Diagnostic Value of Vaginal Discharge, Wet Mount and Vaginal pH – An Update on the Basics of Gynecologic Infectiology

    PubMed Central

    Frobenius, W.; Bogdan, C.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of uncomplicated vulvovaginal complaints (e.g. bacterial vaginosis, vulvovaginal candidiasis, trichomoniasis) can be detected with uncomplicated basic infectiological tests and can usually be treated effectively without requiring further diagnostic procedures. Tests include measurement of vaginal pH, preparation and assessment of wet mount slides prepared from vaginal or cervical discharge, and the correct clinical and microbiological classification of findings. In Germany, at least in recent years, this has not been sufficiently taught or practiced. As new regulations on specialist gynecologic training in Germany are currently being drawn up, this overview provides basic information on gynecologic infectiology and summarizes clinically relevant aspects of recent microbiological findings on the physiology and pathology of vaginal flora. The clinical signs and symptoms of aerobic vaginitis, the pathogenesis of which is still not completely understood, are also reviewed. Finally, the symptoms, indications and risk factors for pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) are presented. In contrast to the above-listed infections, PID requires immediate culture of the pathogen from samples (e.g. obtained by laparoscopy) with microbiological diagnostic procedures carried out by specialist laboratories. A schematic summary of all pathologies discussed here is presented. PMID:26028693

  8. Relationship of Estimated SHIV Acquisition Time Points During the Menstrual Cycle and Thinning of Vaginal Epithelial Layers in Pigtail Macaques.

    PubMed

    Kersh, Ellen N; Ritter, Jana; Butler, Katherine; Ostergaard, Sharon Dietz; Hanson, Debra; Ellis, Shanon; Zaki, Sherif; McNicholl, Janet M

    2015-12-01

    HIV acquisition in the female genital tract remains incompletely understood. Quantitative data on biological HIV risk factors, the influence of reproductive hormones, and infection risk are lacking. We evaluated vaginal epithelial thickness during the menstrual cycle in pigtail macaques (Macaca nemestrina). This model previously revealed increased susceptibility to vaginal infection during and after progesterone-dominated periods in the menstrual cycle. Nucleated and nonnucleated (superficial) epithelial layers were quantitated throughout the menstrual cycle of 16 macaques. We examined the relationship with previously estimated vaginal SHIVSF162P3 acquisition time points in the cycle of 43 different animals repeatedly exposed to low virus doses. In the luteal phase (days 17 to cycle end), the mean vaginal epithelium thinned to 66% of mean follicular thickness (days 1-16; P = 0.007, Mann-Whitney test). Analyzing 4-day segments, the epithelium was thickest on days 9 to 12 and thinned to 31% thereof on days 29 to 32, with reductions of nucleated and nonnucleated layers to 36% and 15% of their previous thickness, respectively. The proportion of animals with estimated SHIV acquisition in each cycle segment correlated with nonnucleated layer thinning (Pearson r = 0.7, P < 0.05, linear regression analysis), but not nucleated layer thinning (Pearson r = 0.6, P = 0.15). These data provide a detailed picture of dynamic cycle-related changes in the vaginal epithelium of pigtail macaques. Substantial thinning occurred in the superficial, nonnucleated layer, which maintains the vaginal microbiome. The findings support vaginal tissue architecture as susceptibility factor for infection and contribute to our understanding of innate resistance to SHIV infection.

  9. Recombinant polymorphic membrane protein D in combination with a novel, second-generation lipid adjuvant protects against intra-vaginal Chlamydia trachomatis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Paes, Wayne; Brown, Naj; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Coler, Rhea; Reed, Steve; Carter, Darrick; Bland, Martin; Kaye, Paul M; Lacey, Charles J N

    2016-07-29

    The development of a chlamydial vaccine that elicits protective mucosal immunity is of paramount importance in combatting the global spread of sexually transmitted Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) infections. While the identification and prioritization of chlamydial antigens is a crucial prerequisite for efficacious vaccine design, it is likely that novel adjuvant development and selection will also play a pivotal role in the translational potential of preclinical Ct vaccines. Although the molecular nature of the immuno-modulatory component is of primary importance, adjuvant formulation and delivery systems may also govern vaccine efficacy and potency. Our study provides the first preclinical evaluation of recombinant Ct polymorphic membrane protein D (rPmpD) in combination with three different formulations of a novel second-generation lipid adjuvant (SLA). SLA was rationally designed in silico by modification of glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant (GLA), a TLR4 agonistic precursor molecule currently in Phase II clinical development. We demonstrate robust protection against intra-vaginal Ct challenge in mice, evidenced by significantly enhanced resistance to infection and reduction in mean bacterial load. Strikingly, protection was found to correlate with the presence of robust anti-rPmpD serum and cervico-vaginal IgG titres, even in the absence of adjuvant-induced Th1-type cellular immune responses elicited by each SLA formulation, and we further show that anti-rPmpD antibodies recognize Ct EBs. These findings highlight the utility of SLA and rational molecular design of adjuvants in preclinical Ct vaccine development, but also suggest an important role for anti-rPmpD antibodies in protection against urogenital Ct infection. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasonography in Detection of Vaginal Foreign Bodies in Girls: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuzhen; Sun, Liying; Ye, Jingjing; Li, Xiaoying; Tao, Ran

    2017-12-01

    In this study we investigated the sonographic features of vaginal foreign bodies in girls and the diagnostic role of combined transperineal and transabdominal ultrasonography in the detection of vaginal foreign bodies in this population. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, INTERVENTIONS, AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A retrospective review of the records of 249 girls seen in the outpatient pediatric and adolescent gynecology clinic of our hospital and referred to our department for sonographic evaluation of suspected vaginal foreign bodies between 2013 and 2016 was performed. All patients were transperineally and transabdominally scanned using an ultrasound machine with 3-MHz and 7.5-MHz transducers. The sonographic features of the detected foreign bodies were recorded and reported. All patients also underwent pelvic radiography. The presence of foreign bodies was confirmed using vaginoscopy. Two hundred forty-nine patients were included in this study, and vaginal foreign bodies were detected in 181 patients. Vaginal foreign bodies often present in girls aged from 2 to 12 years old. The most common vaginal foreign bodies were toilet paper, beads, small parts of toys, cap of water color brush, and crayons. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of transperineal/transabdominal sonography in the diagnosis of vaginal foreign bodies were 81%, 53%, 82%, and 51%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of transabdominal sonography were 33%, 49%, 63%, and 21%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of transperineal sonography were 64%, 49%, 77%, and 33%, respectively. Abnormal findings were detected using x-ray in only 43 of the 181 cases (23.7%). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of x-ray were 24%, 91%, 88%, and 31%, respectively. The size of the foreign bodies ranged from 2 mm to 35 mm. For foreign

  11. Over-the-counter vaginal contraceptive and spermicide drug products containing nonoxynol 9; required labeling. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2007-12-19

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule establishing new warning statements and other labeling information for all over-the-counter (OTC) vaginal contraceptive drug products (also known as spermicides, hereinafter referred to as vaginal contraceptives or vaginal contraceptives/spermicides) containing nonoxynol 9 (N9). These warning statements will advise consumers that vaginal contraceptives/spermicides containing N9 do not protect against infection from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), or against getting other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The warnings and labeling information will also advise consumers that use of vaginal contraceptives and spermicides containing N9 can irritate the vagina and rectum and may increase the risk of getting the AIDS virus (HIV) from an infected partner. This final rule is part of FDA's ongoing review of OTC drug products. FDA is issuing this final rule after considering public comments on its proposed regulation, and all relevant data and information on N9 that have come to our attention.

  12. Cervical cytopathological changes among women with vaginal discharge attending teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Salih, Magdi M; AlHag, Fatma Tage El Sir; Khalifa, Mohammed Ahmed; El Nabi, Abdulla H

    2017-01-01

    To find cytology changes among women attending obstetrics and gynaecology clinic with complaints of vaginal discharges. This descriptive hospital-based cytological study was conducted at the outpatient clinic of the obstetrics and gynaecology department. Two hundred women with complaints of vaginal discharge were selected. Their detailed histories were documented on a special request form. Pap smears were then obtained and sent for cytological examination to the cytopathology department. All low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) cases were advised to follow-up with Pap smears in the next 6-12 months. Those with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) were further investigated by a cervical biopsy and managed accordingly. The statistical analysis was performed using, the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS). Chi-square and cross-tabulation were used in this study. The cytological examination of Pap smears showed no changes (i.e. negative findings) in 88 (44%) cases, while Candida species infection was the most prevalent, which was found in 67 (33.5%) of the cases. Bacterial vaginosis was found in 39 women (19.5%); 6 women (3%) were reported with dyskaryotic changes. Two cases were found to have LSIL and 4 women had HSIL. Infection is common among the illiterate group of women. Women with vaginal discharges should undergo screening tests for evaluation by cervical smear for the early detection of cervical precancer conditions. There is an urgent need to establish a screening program for cervical cancer in Sudan.

  13. Comparison of two types of dipsticks to measure vaginal pH in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Donders, Gilbert G G; Caeyers, Tinne; Tydhof, Priska; Riphagen, Ine; van den Bosch, Thierry; Bellen, Gert

    2007-10-01

    To assess the practical use of two dispsticks for measuring vaginal pH with a range 4-7 (Merck and Macherey Nagel in the diagnosis of vaginal infections. Routine gynaecological clinic in the General Hospital H Hart in Tienen and vulvo-vaginitis clinic in the University Hospital Gasthuisberg in Leuven, Belgium. After oral consent was obtained, 101 unselected consecutive women presenting for gynaecologic examination between 15 January 2004 and 15 February 2004 were included in an observational study. Vaginal smears were taken from the upper vaginal wall for pH measurement and for fresh wet mount examination by phase contrast microscopy for diagnosing lactobacillary grades and presence of pathogens. The observed color change of two different pH strips were compared with the color scale provided by the company by a junior investigator who was not familiar with the technique, nor with the pathology of the patient. The difficulty of the measurement was scored semi-quantitatively by assessing the time and effort necessary to decide on the correct pH. Using the Macherey-Nagel method, the mean pH score was lower in women with normal flora and in women with vaginal infections than when the Merck method was used, but the difference was not significant. The pH became progressively more abnormal with increasing lactobacillary grades, a correlation that was similar for both tests. The reading of the pH sticks was significantly simpler and quicker with Macherey-Nagel than with Merck. Although difficult readings with Merck strips were four times more frequent in the group of women with abnormal flora than in women with normal flora, this difference was not significant. (1) In both tests (Macherey-Nagel and Merck) the pH was more abnormal (higher) with increasing lactobacillary grades (declining number of lactobacillary morphotypes). (2) The Macherey-Nagel sticks are more user-friendly than Merck's.

  14. [Prevalence of vaginal candidiasis in pregnant women. Identification of yeasts and susceptibility to antifungal agents].

    PubMed

    García Heredia, M; García, S D; Copolillo, E F; Cora Eliseth, M; Barata, A D; Vay, C A; de Torres, R A; Tiraboschi, N; Famiglietti, A M R

    2006-01-01

    Pregnant women are more susceptible to both vaginal colonization and infection by yeast. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence in pregnant women of yeasts isolated from vaginal exudates and their susceptibility to current antifungal drugs. A total of 493 patients was studied between December 1998 and February 2000. The prevalence of Candida spp. was 28% (Candida albicans 90.4%; Candida glabrata 6.3%; Candida parapsilosis 1.1%, Candida kefyr 1.1 %; unidentified species 1.1 %). The diffusion test in Shadomy agar was employed to determine the susceptibility to fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole and nistatine. All C. albicans, C. kefyr and C. parapsilosis isolates were susceptible in vitro to the antifungal agents tested, while 1 in 6 C. glabrata isolates showed resistance to azole drugs; all strains were susceptible to nistatine. In pregnant women, C. albicans was the yeast most frequently isolated from vaginal exudates; it continues to be highly susceptible to antifungal drugs. Azole resistance was detected only among C. glabrata isolates. Identification to the species level is recommended, specially in cases of treatment failure and recurrent or chronic infection.

  15. Evaluation of Vaginal Drug Levels and Safety of a Locally Administered Glycerol Monolaurate Cream in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Kirtane, Ameya R; Rothenberger, Meghan K; Frieberg, Abby; Nephew, Karla; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Schmidt, Thomas; Reimann, Thomas; Haase, Ashley T; Panyam, Jayanth

    2017-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus epidemic affects millions of people worldwide. As women are more vulnerable to infection, female-controlled interventions can help control the spread of the disease significantly. Glycerol monolaurate (GML), an inexpensive and safe compound, has been shown to protect against simian immunodeficiency virus infection when applied vaginally. However, on account of its low aqueous solubility, fabrication of high-dose formulations of GML has proven difficult. We describe the development of a vaginal cream that could be loaded with up to 35% GML. Vaginal drug levels and safety of 3 formulations containing increasing concentrations of GML (5%w/w, 15%w/w, and 35%w/w) were tested in rhesus macaques after vaginal administration. GML concentration in the vaginal tissue increased as the drug concentration in the cream increased, with 35% GML cream resulting in tissue concentration of ∼0.5 mg/g, albeit with high interindividual variability. Compared with the vehicle control, none of the GML creams had any significant effect on the vaginal flora and cytokine (macrophage inflammatory protein 3α and interleukin 8) levels, suggesting that high-dose GML formulations do not induce local adverse effects. In summary, we describe the development of a highly loaded vaginal cream of GML, and vaginal drug levels and safety after local administration in macaques. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dinoprostone vaginal insert versus intravenous oxytocin to reduce postpartum blood loss following vaginal or cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Ozalp, E; Tanir, H M; Sener, T

    2010-01-01

    To compare the impact of a dinoprostone vaginal insert and intravenous oxytocin in reducing blood loss of women undergoing vaginal or cesarean delivery. This study was conducted among term singleton pregnancies delivered vaginally or by elective cesarean section. In the vaginally delivered cases, active management of the third stage of labor was conducted. During cesarean delivery, 20 IU of intravenous oxytocin was administered. Women, who either delivered via the vaginal or abdominal route, were then randomly allocated to receive 10 mg vaginal dinoprostone insert for 12 hours (group I, n: 100) or intravenous oxytocin (group II, n: 100), respectively. Mean blood loss and need for additional uterotonics and postpartum hemoglobin and hematocrit levels at 24 and 36 hours after delivery did not differ between the two groups. Women allocated to the dinoprostone vaginal insert arm experienced more nausea and vomiting. Dinoprostone vaginal insert was as effective as intravenous oxytocin in the prevention of postpartum blood loss.

  17. Human vaginal fluid contains exosomes that have an inhibitory effect on an early step of the HIV-1 life cycle.

    PubMed

    Smith, Johanna A; Daniel, Rene

    2016-11-13

    Vaginal transmission is crucial to the spread of HIV-1 around the world. It is not yet clear what type (s) of innate defenses against HIV-1 infection are present in the vagina. Here, we aimed to determine whether human vaginal fluid contains exosomes that may possess anti-HIV-1 activity. The exosomal fraction was isolated from samples of vaginal fluids. The presence of exosomes was confirmed by flow cytometry and western blotting. The newly discovered exosomes were tested for their ability to block early steps of HIV-1 infection in vitro using established cell culture systems and real time PCR-based methods. Vaginal fluid contains exosomes expressing CD9, CD63, and CD81 exosomal markers. The exosomal fraction of the fluid-reduced transmission of HIV-1 vectors by 60%, the efficiency of reverse transcription step by 58.4%, and the efficiency of integration by 47%. Exosomes had no effect on the entry of HIV-1 vectors. Human vaginal fluid exosomes are newly discovered female innate defenses that may protect women against HIV-1 infection.

  18. Evaluation of vaginal complaints.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew R; Klink, Kathleen; Cohrssen, Andreas

    2004-03-17

    Vaginal symptoms are one of the most common reasons for gynecological consultation. Clinicians have traditionally diagnosed vaginal candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and vaginal trichomoniasis using some combination of physical examination, pH, the wet mount, and the whiff test. To evaluate the role of the clinical examination and determine the positive and negative likelihood ratios (LRs) for the diagnosis of vaginal candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and vaginal trichomoniasis. Using a structured literature review, we abstracted information on sensitivity and specificity for symptoms, signs, and office laboratory procedures. We chose published (1966 to April 2003) articles that appeared in the MEDLINE database and were indexed under the combined search terms of diagnosis with vaginitis, vaginal discharge, candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, and trichomoniasis. Included studies of symptomatic premenopausal women seen in primary care settings. Tests were evaluated only if they would provide diagnostic information during the office visit and were compared with an acceptable criterion standard. All 3 authors extracted the data and computed sensitivity and specificity from each article independently. The absence of standard definitions for symptoms and signs made it impossible to combine results across studies. Symptoms alone do not allow clinicians to distinguish confidently between the causes of vaginitis. However, a patient's lack of itching makes candidiasis less likely (range of LRs, 0.18 [95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-0.70] to 0.79 [95% CI, 0.72-0.87]) and lack of perceived odor makes bacterial vaginosis unlikely (LR, 0.07 [95% CI, 0.01-0.51]). Similarly, physical examination signs are limited in their diagnostic power. The presence of inflammatory signs is associated with candidiasis (range of LRs, 2.1 [95% CI, 1.5-2.8] to 8.4 [95% CI, 2.3-31]). Presence of a "high cheese" odor on examination is predictive of bacterial vaginosis (LR, 3.2 [95% CI, 2

  19. Protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV challenge by vaginally delivered inhibitors of virus-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Klasse, Per Johan; Schader, Susan M; Hu, Qinxue; Ketas, Thomas J; Lu, Min; Marx, Preston A; Dufour, Jason; Colonno, Richard J; Shattock, Robin J; Springer, Martin S; Moore, John P

    2005-11-03

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) continues to spread, principally by heterosexual sex, but no vaccine is available. Hence, alternative prevention methods are needed to supplement educational and behavioural-modification programmes. One such approach is a vaginal microbicide: the application of inhibitory compounds before intercourse. Here, we have evaluated the microbicide concept using the rhesus macaque 'high dose' vaginal transmission model with a CCR5-receptor-using simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-162P3) and three compounds that inhibit different stages of the virus-cell attachment and entry process. These compounds are BMS-378806, a small molecule that binds the viral gp120 glycoprotein and prevents its attachment to the CD4 and CCR5 receptors, CMPD167, a small molecule that binds to CCR5 to inhibit gp120 association, and C52L, a bacterially expressed peptide inhibitor of gp41-mediated fusion. In vitro, all three compounds inhibit infection of T cells and cervical tissue explants, and C52L acts synergistically with CMPD167 or BMS-378806 to inhibit infection of cell lines. In vivo, significant protection was achieved using each compound alone and in combinations. CMPD167 and BMS-378806 were protective even when applied 6 h before challenge.

  20. A randomised trial of a contraceptive vaginal ring in women at risk of HIV infection in Rwanda: Safety of intermittent and continuous use

    PubMed Central

    Van Nuil, Jennifer Ilo; Uwineza, Mireille; Umulisa, Marie Michelle; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Ndagijimana, Jean Claude; De Baetselier, Irith; Buyze, Jozefien; Delvaux, Thérèse; Crucitti, Tania; Jespers, Vicky

    2018-01-01

    Background Contraceptive vaginal rings could play a role in expanding the contraceptive method mix and in preparing communities for the introduction of HIV prevention and multipurpose rings. Methods We conducted an open label single-centre randomised clinical trial of intermittent versus continuous use of NuvaRing® in Kigali, Rwanda, in 2013–2014. We randomised 120 HIV-negative women 1:1 to intermittent use (three rings with a ring-free week in between rings) or continuous use (four rings without ring-free weeks). Women underwent an interview, counselling, and a speculum examination, and were tested for pregnancy, bacterial vaginosis (BV) by Nugent scoring, yeasts and trichomonads on wet mount, and sexually transmitted infections. Findings Only one woman withdrew early. Deliberate ring removals were rare, but spontaneous ring expulsions occurred during 14% of ring use periods. There were no incident pregnancies, serious adverse events, serious social harms, or early discontinuations for safety reasons. Systemic side effects were uncommon, and local side effects were not significantly differently distributed between groups except for lower abdominal pain (P = 0.013). The incidence of vaginal yeasts during ring use was high: 22% of intermittent users and 27% of continuous users had incident vaginal yeasts at one or multiple ring removal visits (P = 0.666), and symptomatic vaginal yeast cases were more common in the continuous than intermittent users (P = 0.031). In contrast, mean Nugent scores improved over time in both groups. Conclusions Intermittent and continuous NuvaRing® use were safe in Rwandan women and improved Nugent scores over time. However, attention should be paid to ring expulsions and to a potential increased risk of vaginal candidiasis. PMID:29856848

  1. Premenarchal, recurrent vaginal discharge associated with an incomplete obstructing longitudinal vaginal septum.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Keith A; DeWitt, Jason

    2005-12-01

    To describe an unusual, premenarchal presentation of an obstructive vaginal anomaly. Case Report. University Medical Center. Premenarchal subject Vaginogram, vaginal septum resection. Vaginal septum resection with resolution of vaginal discharge. This case demonstrates some of the typical features of uterus didelphys bicollis with incomplete obstructing hemivagina, but had a unique presentation with premenarchal, recurrent vaginal discharge. Typically, patients with an obstructing mullerian anomaly present after menarche with pelvic pain and a mass. The vaginogram assists in the preoperative definition of abnormal anatomy which allows the surgeon to develop the most appropriate surgical approach. Resection of this incompletely obstructing vaginal septum resulted in resolution of the recurrent vaginal discharge.

  2. Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; LAVH - discharge ... you were in the hospital, you had a vaginal hysterectomy. Your surgeon made a cut in your ...

  3. Vaginal foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Stricker, T; Navratil, F; Sennhauser, F H

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical features and outcome in girls with a vaginal foreign body. Retrospective review of medical records of 35 girls with a vaginal foreign body seen in an outpatient clinic for paediatric and adolescent gynaecology between 1980 and 2000. The ages ranged from 2.6 to 9.2 years. The most common symptom was blood-stained vaginal discharge/vaginal bleeding (49%). Duration of symptoms varied from 1 day to 2 years. Fifty-four percent of the patients recalled insertion of the foreign object, usually by the girl herself. All but three patients (91%) either recalled insertion of the foreign object and/or had vaginal bleeding or blood-stained or foul-smelling vaginal discharge, and/or visualization or palpation of the foreign body in physical examination. Symptoms resolved after removal of the foreign body followed by a single irrigation with Providon-Iod (Betadine). In the majority of patients a carefully obtained history and physical examination suggest the diagnosis of a vaginal foreign object. The leading symptoms are vaginal bleeding and blood-stained or foul smelling vaginal discharge. Removal of the foreign object followed by a single irrigation with Providon-Iod is the definitive treatment and does not require additional measures.

  4. The ring plus project: safety and acceptability of vaginal rings that protect women from unintended pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schurmans, Céline; De Baetselier, Irith; Kestelyn, Evelyne; Jespers, Vicky; Delvaux, Thérèse; Agaba, Stephen K; van Loen, Harry; Menten, Joris; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-04-10

    Research is ongoing to develop multipurpose vaginal rings to be used continuously for contraception and to prevent Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Contraceptive vaginal rings (CVRs) are available in a number of countries and are most of the time used intermittently i.e. three weeks out of a 4-week cycle. Efficacy trials with a dapivirine-containing vaginal ring for HIV prevention are ongoing and plans to develop multi-purpose vaginal rings for prevention of both HIV and pregnancy have been elaborated. In contrast with the CVRs, multi-purpose vaginal rings will have to be used continuously. Women who continuously use a CVR will no longer have menses. Furthermore, some safety aspects of CVR use have never been studied in-depth in the past, such as the impact of the vaginal ring on the vaginal microbiota, biofilm formation and induction of inflammation. We studied acceptability and these novel aspects of safety in Rwandan women. Although significant progress has been made over the past decade, Rwanda still has a high unmet need for contraception (with 47% unplanned births) and a generalized HIV epidemic, and CVRs are not yet available. We will conduct an open label, single centre, randomized controlled trial. A total of 120 HIV-negative women will be randomized to intermittent CVR use (to allow menstruation) or continuous CVR use. Women will be followed for a maximum of 14 weeks. In parallel, we will conduct a qualitative study using in-depth interview and focus group discussion methodology. In addition to evaluating the safety and acceptability of intermittent and continuous CVR use in Rwandan women, we hope that our findings will inform the development of future multipurpose vaginal rings, will prepare Rwandan study populations for future clinical trials of multipurpose vaginal rings, and will pave the way for introduction of CVRs on African markets. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01796613 . Registered 14 February 2013.

  5. Study of the prevalence and association of ocular chlamydial conjunctivitis in women with genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium and Candida albicans attending outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Rania Abdelmonem; Abdelfattah, Maha Mohssen

    2016-01-01

    To determine the association between chlamydial conjunctivitis and genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium and Candida albicans, in addition to the possible relationship between cultured bacterial pathogens and oculogenital chlamydial infection. This study was performed on 100 (50 symptomatic and 50 asymptomatic) women attending the Gynecological and Obstetric outpatient clinic of Alzahra hospital, Alazhar University. Simultaneously a conjunctival swab was taken from these patients. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was done on DNA extracted from both vaginal and conjunctival swab samples. Culture for both vaginal and conjunctival swabs was also done. Candida albicans was the predominant organism isolated by culture in 20% and 40% of conjunctival and vaginal swabs respectively. By the PCR method, ocular Chlamydia trachomatis was present in 60% of symptomatic women, while genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection was present in 30% of symptomatic women. The results of this method also indicated that 25/50 (50%) vaginal swabs were positive with PCR for Candida albicans versus 15/50 (30%) were PCR positive in conjunctival swab. Mycoplasma genitalium was present in only 10% of vaginal swabs. Concomitant oculogenital PCR positive results for Chlamydia trachomatis and Candida albicans were 30% and 28% respectively. Ocular Chlamydia trachomatis was associated with genital Chlamydia trachomatis in a high percentage of women followed by Candida albicans. Cultured bacterial organisms do not play a role in enhancement of Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

  6. Pitfalls in diagnosis and management of distal vaginal agenesis: 10-year experience at a single centre.

    PubMed

    Ugur, M G; Balat, O; Ozturk, E; Bekerecioglu, M; Dikensoy, E

    2012-07-01

    To discuss common pitfalls in diagnosis and management of distal vaginal agenesis, and summarize 10 years of experience among 11 patients using an interposition full-thickness graft and fibrin glue. Eleven patients with distal vaginal agenesis were evaluated and managed with an interposition full-thickness graft to bridge the gap between the upper vagina and the introitus. Associated renal abnormalities and complications including infection, total lack of skin graft take, stress urinary incontinence, partial graft loss, vaginal stricture and graft uptake were all investigated. The mean age of the patients was 12.91 (standard deviation 1.22) years. All patients had primary amenorrhoea, cryptomenorrhea, and cyclical or constant pelvic pain. None of the patients had associated urological abnormalities, and there were no cases of infection, total lack of skin graft take, stress urinary incontinence, partial graft loss or vaginal stricture. Graft uptake was 100% in 10 of the 11 patients. Four patients have subsequently married and report a satisfactory sex life. Accurate diagnosis of distal vaginal agenesis and careful pre-operative set-up, including evaluation of associated anomalies, bowel preparation, available vaginal stents and a multidisciplinary approach for the potential need for grafts, may be key to success. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Potential Use of Antimicrobial Peptides as Vaginal Spermicides/Microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Tanphaichitr, Nongnuj; Srakaew, Nopparat; Alonzi, Rhea; Kiattiburut, Wongsakorn; Kongmanas, Kessiri; Zhi, Ruina; Li, Weihua; Baker, Mark; Wang, Guanshun; Hickling, Duane

    2016-01-01

    The concurrent increases in global population and sexually transmitted infection (STI) demand a search for agents with dual spermicidal and microbicidal properties for topical vaginal application. Previous attempts to develop the surfactant spermicide, nonoxynol-9 (N-9), into a vaginal microbicide were unsuccessful largely due to its inefficiency to kill microbes. Furthermore, N-9 causes damage to the vaginal epithelium, thus accelerating microbes to enter the women’s body. For this reason, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), naturally secreted by all forms of life as part of innate immunity, deserve evaluation for their potential spermicidal effects. To date, twelve spermicidal AMPs have been described including LL-37, magainin 2 and nisin A. Human cathelicidin LL-37 is the most promising spermicidal AMP to be further developed for vaginal use for the following reasons. First, it is a human AMP naturally produced in the vagina after intercourse. Second, LL-37 exerts microbicidal effects to numerous microbes including those that cause STI. Third, its cytotoxicity is selective to sperm and not to the female reproductive tract. Furthermore, the spermicidal effects of LL-37 have been demonstrated in vivo in mice. Therefore, the availability of LL-37 as a vaginal spermicide/microbicide will empower women for self-protection against unwanted pregnancies and STI. PMID:26978373

  8. Phenotypic characterization and adhesive properties of vaginal Candida spp. strains provided by the CHU Farhat Hached (Sousse, Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Noumi, Emira; Snoussi, Mejdi; Noumi, Inès; Saghrouni, Fatma; Aouni, Mahjoub; Valentin, Eulogio

    2015-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is a common infection among women worldwide, being Candida albicans the most commonly isolated species. Therefore, controlling this opportunistic yeast is one of the key factors for reducing nosocomial infection. We investigated several virulence properties of 28 vaginal strains of Candida isolated from Tunisian women suffering from vulvovaginitis. We also analyzed the virulence properties of a clinical Candida krusei strain and five Candida reference strains. Candida strains were subjected to microscopic analysis and culture in Candida ID2 chromogenic medium. The adhesive properties of these strains were estimated by the microtiter plate - the safranin-staining - and the Congo red agar (CRA) methods, for determining yeast ability to form biofilms on biomaterials used in urinary catheter manufacturing. Their potency to produce hydrolytic enzymes was also studied. Our results showed that nine out of the total studied strains produced phospholipase. In addition, very high protease activity was detected in 23 Candida strains. All Candida strains were beta-hemolytic and adhered to polystyrene microtiter plates in varying degrees. Two vaginal C. albicans strains were strongly adhesive to polystyrene and glass slides. Also, our results showed that vaginal Candida strains were more adhesive to the three tested materials than the reference strains. This study shows the presence of a range of virulence and adhesion factors in clinical isolates of vaginal Candida. Consequently, control and treatment of vaginal candidiasis as a means to prevent biofilm formation on urinary catheters is of crucial importance. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. The acute neutrophil response mediated by S100 alarmins during vaginal Candida infections is independent of the Th17-pathway.

    PubMed

    Yano, Junko; Kolls, Jay K; Happel, Kyle I; Wormley, Floyd; Wozniak, Karen L; Fidel, Paul L

    2012-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) caused by Candida albicans affects a significant number of women during their reproductive ages. Clinical observations revealed that a robust vaginal polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) migration occurs in susceptible women, promoting pathological inflammation without affecting fungal burden. Evidence to date in the mouse model suggests that a similar acute PMN migration into the vagina is mediated by chemotactic S100A8 and S100A9 alarmins produced by vaginal epithelial cells in response to Candida. Based on the putative role for the Th17 response in mucosal candidiasis as well as S100 alarmin induction, this study aimed to determine whether the Th17 pathway plays a role in the S100 alarmin-mediated acute inflammation during VVC using the experimental mouse model. For this, IL-23p19(-/-), IL-17RA(-/-) and IL-22(-/-) mice were intravaginally inoculated with Candida, and vaginal lavage fluids were evaluated for fungal burden, PMN infiltration, the presence of S100 alarmins and inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Compared to wild-type mice, the cytokine-deficient mice showed comparative levels of vaginal fungal burden and PMN infiltration following inoculation. Likewise, inoculated mice of all strains with substantial PMN infiltration exhibited elevated levels of vaginal S100 alarmins in both vaginal epithelia and secretions in the vaginal lumen. Finally, cytokine analyses of vaginal lavage fluid from inoculated mice revealed equivalent expression profiles irrespective of the Th17 cytokine status or PMN response. These data suggest that the vaginal S100 alarmin response to Candida does not require the cells or cytokines of the Th17 lineage, and therefore, the immunopathogenic inflammatory response during VVC occurs independently of the Th17-pathway.

  10. Therapeutic activity of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based probiotic and inactivated whole yeast on vaginal candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Pericolini, Eva; Gabrielli, Elena; Ballet, Nathalie; Sabbatini, Samuele; Roselletti, Elena; Cayzeele Decherf, Amélie; Pélerin, Fanny; Luciano, Eugenio; Perito, Stefano; Jüsten, Peter; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vulvovaginal candidiasis is the most prevalent vaginal infection worldwide and Candida albicans is its major agent. Vulvovaginal candidiasis is characterized by disruption of the vaginal microbiota composition, as happens following large spectrum antibiotic usage. Recent studies support the effectiveness of oral and local probiotic treatment for prevention of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a safe yeast used as, or for, the production of ingredients for human nutrition and health. Here, we demonstrate that vaginal administration of probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae live yeast (GI) and, in part, inactivated whole yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (IY), used as post-challenge therapeutics, was able to positively influence the course of vaginal candidiasis by accelerating the clearance of the fungus. This effect was likely due to multiple interactions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with Candida albicans. Both live and inactivated yeasts induced coaggregation of Candida and consequently inhibited its adherence to epithelial cells. However, only the probiotic yeast was able to suppress some major virulence factors of Candida albicans such as the ability to switch from yeast to mycelial form and the capacity to express several aspartyl proteases. The effectiveness of live yeast was higher than that of inactivated whole yeast suggesting that the synergy between mechanical effects and biological effects were dominant over purely mechanical effects. The protection of epithelial cells to Candida-induced damage was also observed. Overall, our data show for the first time that Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based ingredients, particularly the living cells, can exert beneficial therapeutic effects on a widespread vaginal mucosal infection. PMID:27435998

  11. Therapeutic activity of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based probiotic and inactivated whole yeast on vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Pericolini, Eva; Gabrielli, Elena; Ballet, Nathalie; Sabbatini, Samuele; Roselletti, Elena; Cayzeele Decherf, Amélie; Pélerin, Fanny; Luciano, Eugenio; Perito, Stefano; Jüsten, Peter; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2017-01-02

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is the most prevalent vaginal infection worldwide and Candida albicans is its major agent. Vulvovaginal candidiasis is characterized by disruption of the vaginal microbiota composition, as happens following large spectrum antibiotic usage. Recent studies support the effectiveness of oral and local probiotic treatment for prevention of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a safe yeast used as, or for, the production of ingredients for human nutrition and health. Here, we demonstrate that vaginal administration of probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae live yeast (GI) and, in part, inactivated whole yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (IY), used as post-challenge therapeutics, was able to positively influence the course of vaginal candidiasis by accelerating the clearance of the fungus. This effect was likely due to multiple interactions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with Candida albicans. Both live and inactivated yeasts induced coaggregation of Candida and consequently inhibited its adherence to epithelial cells. However, only the probiotic yeast was able to suppress some major virulence factors of Candida albicans such as the ability to switch from yeast to mycelial form and the capacity to express several aspartyl proteases. The effectiveness of live yeast was higher than that of inactivated whole yeast suggesting that the synergy between mechanical effects and biological effects were dominant over purely mechanical effects. The protection of epithelial cells to Candida-induced damage was also observed. Overall, our data show for the first time that Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based ingredients, particularly the living cells, can exert beneficial therapeutic effects on a widespread vaginal mucosal infection.

  12. Characteristics of Women Enrolled into a Randomized Clinical Trial of Dapivirine Vaginal Ring for HIV-1 Prevention.

    PubMed

    Palanee-Phillips, Thesla; Schwartz, Katie; Brown, Elizabeth R; Govender, Vaneshree; Mgodi, Nyaradzo; Kiweewa, Flavia Matovu; Nair, Gonasagrie; Mhlanga, Felix; Siva, Samantha; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Jeenarain, Nitesha; Gaffoor, Zakir; Martinson, Francis; Makanani, Bonus; Naidoo, Sarita; Pather, Arendevi; Phillip, Jessica; Husnik, Marla J; van der Straten, Ariane; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Baeten, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Women in sub-Saharan Africa are a priority population for evaluation of new biomedical HIV-1 prevention strategies. Antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis is a promising prevention approach; however, clinical trials among young women using daily or coitally-dependent products have found low adherence. Antiretroviral-containing vaginal microbicide rings, which release medication over a month or longer, may reduce these adherence challenges. ASPIRE (A Study to Prevent Infection with a Ring for Extended Use) is a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial testing the safety and effectiveness of a vaginal ring containing the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor dapivirine for prevention of HIV-1 infection. We describe the baseline characteristics of African women enrolled in the ASPIRE trial. Between August 2012 and June 2014, 5516 women were screened and 2629 HIV-1 seronegative women between 18-45 years of age were enrolled from 15 research sites in Malawi, South Africa, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. The median age was 26 years (IQR 22-31) and the majority (59%) were unmarried. Nearly 100% of participants reported having a primary sex partner in the prior three months but 43% did not know the HIV-1 status of their primary partner; 17% reported additional concurrent partners. Nearly two-thirds (64%) reported having disclosed to primary partners about planned vaginal ring use in the trial. Sexually transmitted infections were prevalent: 12% had Chlamydia trachomatis, 7% Trichomonas vaginalis, 4% Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and 1% syphilis. African HIV-1 seronegative women at risk of HIV -1 infection were successfully enrolled into a phase III trial of dapivirine vaginal ring for HIV-1 prevention.

  13. Characteristics of Women Enrolled into a Randomized Clinical Trial of Dapivirine Vaginal Ring for HIV-1 Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Palanee-Phillips, Thesla; Schwartz, Katie; Brown, Elizabeth R.; Govender, Vaneshree; Mgodi, Nyaradzo; Kiweewa, Flavia Matovu; Nair, Gonasagrie; Mhlanga, Felix; Siva, Samantha; Bekker, L