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Sample records for validation studies conducted

  1. Practical Aspects of Designing and Conducting Validation Studies Involving Multi-study Trials.

    PubMed

    Coecke, Sandra; Bernasconi, Camilla; Bowe, Gerard; Bostroem, Ann-Charlotte; Burton, Julien; Cole, Thomas; Fortaner, Salvador; Gouliarmou, Varvara; Gray, Andrew; Griesinger, Claudius; Louhimies, Susanna; Gyves, Emilio Mendoza-de; Joossens, Elisabeth; Prinz, Maurits-Jan; Milcamps, Anne; Parissis, Nicholaos; Wilk-Zasadna, Iwona; Barroso, João; Desprez, Bertrand; Langezaal, Ingrid; Liska, Roman; Morath, Siegfried; Reina, Vittorio; Zorzoli, Chiara; Zuang, Valérie

    This chapter focuses on practical aspects of conducting prospective in vitro validation studies, and in particular, by laboratories that are members of the European Union Network of Laboratories for the Validation of Alternative Methods (EU-NETVAL) that is coordinated by the EU Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL ECVAM). Prospective validation studies involving EU-NETVAL, comprising a multi-study trial involving several laboratories or "test facilities", typically consist of two main steps: (1) the design of the validation study by EURL ECVAM and (2) the execution of the multi-study trial by a number of qualified laboratories within EU-NETVAL, coordinated and supported by EURL ECVAM. The approach adopted in the conduct of these validation studies adheres to the principles described in the OECD Guidance Document on the Validation and International Acceptance of new or updated test methods for Hazard Assessment No. 34 (OECD 2005). The context and scope of conducting prospective in vitro validation studies is dealt with in Chap. 4 . Here we focus mainly on the processes followed to carry out a prospective validation of in vitro methods involving different laboratories with the ultimate aim of generating a dataset that can support a decision in relation to the possible development of an international test guideline (e.g. by the OECD) or the establishment of performance standards.

  2. The Validity of Graduate Management Admission Test Scores: A Summary of Studies Conducted from 1997 to 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talento-Miller, Eileen; Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2008-01-01

    The validity of Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) scores is examined by summarizing 273 studies conducted between 1997 and 2004. Each of the studies was conducted through the Validity Study Service of the test sponsor and contained identical variables and statistical methods. Validity coefficients from each of the studies were corrected…

  3. The Validity of Graduate Management Admission Test Scores: A Summary of Studies Conducted from 1997 to 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talento-Miller, Eileen; Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2008-01-01

    The validity of Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) scores is examined by summarizing 273 studies conducted between 1997 and 2004. Each of the studies was conducted through the Validity Study Service of the test sponsor and contained identical variables and statistical methods. Validity coefficients from each of the studies were corrected…

  4. Introductory Guide for Conducting ASVAB Validation/Standards Studies in the U.S. Navy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-16

    Standards program. This Introductory Manual provides the background information and context that both policy makers and researchers should know about the...program’s objectives and processes. The companion manual , “Technical Guidance for Conducting ASVAB Validation/Standards Studies in the U.S. Navy” is...report is considered the Introductory Manual ; the second report, the Technical Manual . This work was sponsored and funded by the Navy’s Selection and

  5. Technical Guidance for Conducting ASVAB Validation/Standards Studies in the U.S. Navy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    evaluate the validity contribution of existing or candidate tests that serve as a second stage classification screen (multiple hurdle). Hierarchical...by the U.S. military services for enlistment qualification and occupational classification . All of the military services validate the ASVAB from time...measurement within the selection and classification context can have a comprehensive set of guidelines when they are assigned to conduct ASVAB

  6. Validation of a one-stop carpal tunnel clinic including nerve conduction studies and hand therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ball, C; Pearse, M; Kennedy, D; Hall, A; Nanchahal, J

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common hand disorder. We describe a pathway that includes clinical assessment, neurophysiological testing, surgery and physical therapy all at the same visit. METHODS All referrals for carpal tunnel syndrome were screened for inclusion in a ‘one-stop’ surgeon-led clinic. Prospective clinical data collected included patient reported outcome measures and satisfaction scores, touch threshold, pinch and grip strength. Patients were assessed clinically, underwent nerve conduction studies and surgery as indicated, all on the same day. Baseline and one-year follow-up data were analysed for 57 patients (62 hands). RESULTS There was significant improvement in all domains of the Boston Carpal Tunnel and Michigan Hand Outcomes questionnaires, grip strength and touch threshold. There were no adverse events. The total mean operating time was 12.8 minutes (range: 5–15 minutes) and the mean tourniquet time was 2.5 minutes (range: 1–11 minutes). Using a dual theatre model produced a short mean turnaround time of 14.8 minutes (range: 2–37 minutes). Patient satisfaction as judged using a Picker questionnaire was very high. CONCLUSIONS A highly efficient clinical service involving both diagnostics and treatment can be delivered at a single hospital visit while maintaining optimal outcomes and high patient satisfaction. PMID:22041242

  7. Quantum Mechanics Studies of Fuel Cell Catalysts and Proton Conducting Ceramics with Validation by Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ho-Cheng

    We carried out quantum mechanics (QM) studies aimed at improving the performance of hydrogen fuel cells. In part I, The challenge was to find a replacement for the Pt cathode that would lead to improved performance for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) while remaining stable under operational conditions and decreasing cost. Our design strategy was to find an alloy with composition Pt3M that would lead to surface segregation such that the top layer would be pure Pt, with the second and subsequent layers richer in M. Under operating conditions we expect the surface to have significant O and/or OH chemisorbed on the surface; we searched for M that would remain segregated under these conditions. Using QM we examined surface segregation for 28 Pt3M alloys, where M is a transition metal. We found that only Pt3Os and Pt3Ir showed significant surface segregation when O and OH are chemisorbed on the catalyst surfaces. This result indicates that Pt3Os and Pt 3Ir favor formation of a Pt-skin surface layer structure that would resist the acidic electrolyte corrosion during fuel cell operation environments. We chose to focus on Os because the phase diagram for Pt-Ir indicated that Pt-Ir could not form a homogeneous alloy at lower temperature. To determine the performance for ORR, we used QM to examine intermediates, reaction pathways, and reaction barriers involved in the processes for which protons from the anode reactions react with O2 to form H2O. These QM calculations used our Poisson-Boltzmann implicit solvation model include the effects of the solvent (water with dielectric constant 78 with pH 7 at 298K). We also carried out similar QM studies followed by experimental validation for the Os/Pt core-shell catalyst fabricated by the underpotential deposition (UPD) method. The QM results indicated that the RDS for ORR is a compromise between the OOH formation step (0.37 eV for Pt, 0.23 eV for Pt2ML/Os core-shell) and H2O formation steps (0.32 eV for Pt, 0.22 eV for Pt2ML

  8. Conducting and permeable states of cell membrane submitted to high voltage pulses: mathematical and numerical studies validated by the experiments.

    PubMed

    Leguèbe, M; Silve, A; Mir, L M; Poignard, C

    2014-11-07

    The aim of this paper is to present a new model of in vitro cell electropermeabilization, which describes separately the conducting state and the permeable state of the membrane submitted to high voltage pulses. We first derive the model based on the experimental observations and we present the numerical methods to solve the non-linear partial differential equations. We then present numerical simulations that corroborate qualitatively the experimental data dealing with the uptake of propidium iodide (PI) after millipulses. This tends to justify the validity of our modeling. Forthcoming work will be to calibrate the parameters of the model for quantitative description of the uptake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Validities and abilities in criminal profiling: a critique of the studies conducted by Richard Kocsis and his colleagues.

    PubMed

    Bennell, Craig; Jones, Natalie J; Taylor, Paul J; Snook, Brent

    2006-06-01

    In a recent issue of this journal, Kocsis reviewed the criminal profiling research that he and his colleagues have conducted during the past 4 years. Their research examines the correlates of profile accuracy with respect to the skills of the individual constructing the profile, and it has led Kocsis to draw conclusions that are important to the profiling field. In this article, the authors review the contributions of the Kocsis studies and critique their methodological and conceptual foundations. The authors raise a number of concerns and argue that data from the Kocsis studies fail to support many of the conclusions presented in his recent review. The authors present evidence in support of their assertions and provide recommendations that will allow future research in the area to generate data that are more meaningful and generalizable.

  10. Clinical Utility of Atrial Electromechanical Conduction Time Measured with Speckle Tracking Echocardiography after Catheter Ablation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: A Validation Study with Electroanatomical Mapping.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Akira; Inoue, Katsuji; Nagai, Takayuki; Nishimura, Kazuhisa; Uetani, Teruyoshi; Suzuki, Jun; Funada, Jun-Ichi; Okura, Takafumi; Higaki, Jitsuo; Ogimoto, Akiyoshi

    2016-09-01

    Our recent report demonstrated that atrial electromechanical conduction time (EMT-ε) measured with speckle tracking echocardiography could predict cardiac events in patients with pathological left ventricular hypertrophy. This study aimed to validate EMT-ε by comparison with electroanatomical mapping and to investigate the clinical utility of EMT-ε in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing catheter ablation. Forty-six patients with preserved LV ejection fraction (LVEF ≥ 50%) undergoing pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) for AF were studied. Atrial electrical conduction delay was determined by measuring atrial electrical activation time (EAT) using three-dimensional electroanatomical mapping just after PVI. Echocardiographic parameters were acquired within 24 hours and at 6 months after PVI. The study also included 10 control subjects. AF patients had a larger left atrial (LA) volume index (LAVI) and more prolonged EMT-ε compared with control subjects. According to the validation study, EAT was closely related to EMT-ε and a', and this association was independent of LAVI and the presence of persistent AF (EMT-ε: R(2) = 0.342, P < 0.0001, a': R(2) = 0.337, P < 0.0001). At 6 months after PVI, LAVI and EMT-ε were significantly improved. During continued follow-up beyond 6 months (total follow-up, 26 ± 12 months), the EMT-ε shortening at 6 months after PVI was significantly greater in AF-free patients than patients with AF recurrence. This study suggested that the EMT-ε could be a useful echocardiographic marker of LA electromechanical abnormalities in patients with AF. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Threats to Validity in the Design and Conduct of Preclinical Efficacy Studies: A Systematic Review of Guidelines for In Vivo Animal Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Valerie C.; Kimmelman, Jonathan; Fergusson, Dean; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.; Hackam, Dan G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The vast majority of medical interventions introduced into clinical development prove unsafe or ineffective. One prominent explanation for the dismal success rate is flawed preclinical research. We conducted a systematic review of preclinical research guidelines and organized recommendations according to the type of validity threat (internal, construct, or external) or programmatic research activity they primarily address. Methods and Findings We searched MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Google, and the EQUATOR Network website for all preclinical guideline documents published up to April 9, 2013 that addressed the design and conduct of in vivo animal experiments aimed at supporting clinical translation. To be eligible, documents had to provide guidance on the design or execution of preclinical animal experiments and represent the aggregated consensus of four or more investigators. Data from included guidelines were independently extracted by two individuals for discrete recommendations on the design and implementation of preclinical efficacy studies. These recommendations were then organized according to the type of validity threat they addressed. A total of 2,029 citations were identified through our search strategy. From these, we identified 26 guidelines that met our eligibility criteria—most of which were directed at neurological or cerebrovascular drug development. Together, these guidelines offered 55 different recommendations. Some of the most common recommendations included performance of a power calculation to determine sample size, randomized treatment allocation, and characterization of disease phenotype in the animal model prior to experimentation. Conclusions By identifying the most recurrent recommendations among preclinical guidelines, we provide a starting point for developing preclinical guidelines in other disease domains. We also provide a basis for the study and evaluation of preclinical research practice. Please see later in the article

  12. Threats to validity in the design and conduct of preclinical efficacy studies: a systematic review of guidelines for in vivo animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Valerie C; Kimmelman, Jonathan; Fergusson, Dean; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Hackam, Dan G

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of medical interventions introduced into clinical development prove unsafe or ineffective. One prominent explanation for the dismal success rate is flawed preclinical research. We conducted a systematic review of preclinical research guidelines and organized recommendations according to the type of validity threat (internal, construct, or external) or programmatic research activity they primarily address. We searched MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Google, and the EQUATOR Network website for all preclinical guideline documents published up to April 9, 2013 that addressed the design and conduct of in vivo animal experiments aimed at supporting clinical translation. To be eligible, documents had to provide guidance on the design or execution of preclinical animal experiments and represent the aggregated consensus of four or more investigators. Data from included guidelines were independently extracted by two individuals for discrete recommendations on the design and implementation of preclinical efficacy studies. These recommendations were then organized according to the type of validity threat they addressed. A total of 2,029 citations were identified through our search strategy. From these, we identified 26 guidelines that met our eligibility criteria--most of which were directed at neurological or cerebrovascular drug development. Together, these guidelines offered 55 different recommendations. Some of the most common recommendations included performance of a power calculation to determine sample size, randomized treatment allocation, and characterization of disease phenotype in the animal model prior to experimentation. By identifying the most recurrent recommendations among preclinical guidelines, we provide a starting point for developing preclinical guidelines in other disease domains. We also provide a basis for the study and evaluation of preclinical research practice. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  13. Validation of a two-step quality control approach for a large-scale human urine metabolomic study conducted in seven experimental batches with LC/QTOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Demetrowitsch, Tobias J; Petersen, Beate; Keppler, Julia K; Koch, Andreas; Schreiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Schwarz, Karin

    2015-01-01

    After his study of food science at the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms University of Bonn, Tobias J Demetrowitsch obtained his doctoral degree in the research field of metabolomics at the Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel. The present paper is part of his doctoral thesis and describes an extended strategy to evaluate and verify complex or large-scale experiments and data sets. Large-scale studies result in high sample numbers, requiring the analysis of samples in different batches. So far, the verification of such LC-MS-based metabolomics studies is difficult. Common approaches have not provided a reliable validation procedure to date. This article shows a novel verification process for a large-scale human urine study (analyzed by a LC/QToF-MS system) using a two-step validation procedure. The first step comprises a targeted approach that aims to examine and exclude statistical outliers. The second step consists of a principle component analysis, with the aim of a tight cluster of all quality controls and a second for all volunteer samples. The applied study design provides a reliable two-step validation procedure for large-scale studies and additionally contains an inhouse verification procedure.

  14. Carbon Fibers Conductivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. Y.; Butkus, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the process of electrical conduction in polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers, calculations were carried out on cluster models of the fiber consisting of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen atoms using the modified intermediate neglect of differential overlap (MINDO) molecular orbital (MO) method. The models were developed based on the assumption that PAN carbon fibers obtained with heat treatment temperatures (HTT) below 1000 C retain nitrogen in a graphite-like lattice. For clusters modeling an edge nitrogen site, analysis of the occupied MO's indicated an electron distribution similar to that of graphite. A similar analysis for the somewhat less stable interior nitrogen site revealed a partially localized II electron distribution around the nitrogen atom. The differences in bonding trends and structural stability between edge and interior nitrogen clusters led to a two-step process proposed for nitrogen evolution with increasing HTT.

  15. Validation of conducting wall models using magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, J. M.; Bialek, J.; Turco, F.; Navratil, G. A.; King, J.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2016-10-01

    Comparisons between magnetic measurements of the DIII D wall eddy current response to applied ac, non-axisymmetric fields and MHD stability code predictions favor a fully 3D treatment of the conducting elements in the system. We describe validation studies of the wall models in the MARS-F and VALEN stability codes, using coil-sensor vacuum coupling measurements. The measurements are sensitive to induced wall currents, owing to the close proximities of the sensors and coils to the wall. VALEN treats conducting structures with arbitrary 3D geometries, while MARS-F uses an axisymmetric wall model and spectral decomposition of the problem geometry. Straightforward improvements to the VALEN model, such as refining the wall mesh and sensor geometry, lead to good agreement with single-channel measurements. Comparisons of couplings to multi-coil toroidal mode perturbations to both codes favor the 3D simulation approach, likely because it naturally treats sidebands generated by the coils and wall currents. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FG02- 04ER54761, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and DE-FG02-95ER54309.

  16. Validity Studies of the Filial Anxiety Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Paul D.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Factor analytic and construct validity studies were conducted to explore the validity of Cicirelli's 13-item Filial Anxiety Scale (FAS). The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale were a part of the investigation. Results offer support for the validity of the FAS subscales and the FAS' usefulness as an…

  17. Validation of conducting wall models using magnetic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Jeremy M.; Bialek, James M.; Turco, Francesca; King, J.; Navratil, Gerald A.; Strait, Edward J.; Turnbull, Alan

    2016-08-16

    The impact of conducting wall eddy currents on perturbed magnetic field measurements is a key issue for understanding the measurement and control of long-wavelength MHD stability in tokamak devices. As plasma response models have growth in sophistication, the need to understand and resolve small changes in these measurements has become more important, motivating increased fidelity in simulations of externally applied fields and the wall eddy current response. In this manuscript, we describe thorough validation studies of the wall models in the MARS-F and VALEN stability codes, using coil–sensor vacuum coupling measurements from the DIII-D tokamak. The valen formulation treats conducting structures with arbitrary threedimensional geometries, while mars-f uses an axisymmetric wall model and a spectral decomposition of the problem geometry with a fixed toroidal harmonic n. The vacuum coupling measurements have a strong sensitivity to wall eddy currents induced by timechanging coil currents, owing to the close proximities of both the sensors and coils to the wall. Measurements from individual coil and sensor channels are directly compared with valen predictions. It is found that straightforward improvements to the valen model, such as refining the wall mesh and simulating the vertical extent of the DIII-D poloidal field sensors, lead to good agreement with the experimental measurements. In addition, couplings to multi-coil, n = 1 toroidal mode perturbations are calculated from the measurements and compared with predictions from both codes. Lastly, the toroidal mode comparisons favor the fully three-dimensional simulation approach, likely because this approach naturally treats n > 1 sidebands generated by the coils and wall eddy currents, as well as the n = 1 fundamental.

  18. Validation of conducting wall models using magnetic measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Hanson, Jeremy M.; Bialek, James M.; Turco, Francesca; ...

    2016-08-16

    The impact of conducting wall eddy currents on perturbed magnetic field measurements is a key issue for understanding the measurement and control of long-wavelength MHD stability in tokamak devices. As plasma response models have growth in sophistication, the need to understand and resolve small changes in these measurements has become more important, motivating increased fidelity in simulations of externally applied fields and the wall eddy current response. In this manuscript, we describe thorough validation studies of the wall models in the MARS-F and VALEN stability codes, using coil–sensor vacuum coupling measurements from the DIII-D tokamak. The valen formulation treats conductingmore » structures with arbitrary threedimensional geometries, while mars-f uses an axisymmetric wall model and a spectral decomposition of the problem geometry with a fixed toroidal harmonic n. The vacuum coupling measurements have a strong sensitivity to wall eddy currents induced by timechanging coil currents, owing to the close proximities of both the sensors and coils to the wall. Measurements from individual coil and sensor channels are directly compared with valen predictions. It is found that straightforward improvements to the valen model, such as refining the wall mesh and simulating the vertical extent of the DIII-D poloidal field sensors, lead to good agreement with the experimental measurements. In addition, couplings to multi-coil, n = 1 toroidal mode perturbations are calculated from the measurements and compared with predictions from both codes. Lastly, the toroidal mode comparisons favor the fully three-dimensional simulation approach, likely because this approach naturally treats n > 1 sidebands generated by the coils and wall eddy currents, as well as the n = 1 fundamental.« less

  19. Verbal autopsy as a tool for identifying children dying of sickle cell disease: a validation study conducted in Kilifi district, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) is common in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where it is associated with high early mortality. In the absence of newborn screening, most deaths among children with SCD go unrecognized and unrecorded. As a result, SCD does not receive the attention it deserves as a leading cause of death among children in SSA. In the current study, we explored the potential utility of verbal autopsy (VA) as a tool for attributing underlying cause of death (COD) in children to SCD. Methods We used the 2007 WHO Sample Vital Registration with Verbal Autopsy (SAVVY) VA tool to determine COD among child residents of the Kilifi Health and Demographic Surveillance System (KHDSS), Kenya, who died between January 2008 and April 2011. VAs were coded both by physician review (physician coded verbal autopsy, PCVA) using COD categories based on the WHO International Classification of Diseases 10th Edition (ICD-10) and by using the InterVA-4 probabilistic model after extracting data according to the 2012 WHO VA standard. Both of these methods were validated against one of two gold standards: hospital ICD-10 physician-assigned COD for children who died in Kilifi District Hospital (KDH) and, where available, laboratory confirmed SCD status for those who died in the community. Results Overall, 6% and 5% of deaths were attributed to SCD on the basis of PCVA and the InterVA-4 model, respectively. Of the total deaths, 22% occurred in hospital, where the agreement coefficient (AC1) for SCD between PCVA and hospital physician diagnosis was 95.5%, and agreement between InterVA-4 and hospital physician diagnosis was 96.9%. Confirmatory laboratory evidence of SCD status was available for 15% of deaths, in which the AC1 against PCVA was 87.5%. Conclusions Other recent studies and provisional data from this study, outlining the importance of SCD as a cause of death in children in many parts of the developing world, contributed to the inclusion of specific SCD

  20. Simulators' validation study: Problem solution logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoultz, M. B.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to validate the ground based simulators used for aircraft environment in ride-quality research. The logic to the approach for solving this problem is developed. The overall problem solution flow chart is presented. The factors which could influence the human response to the environment on board the aircraft are analyzed. The mathematical models used in the study are explained. The steps which were followed in conducting the validation tests are outlined.

  1. Developing and validating the Youth Conduct Problems Scale-Rwanda: a mixed methods approach.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lauren C; Kanyanganzi, Frederick; Munyanah, Morris; Mushashi, Christine; Betancourt, Theresa S

    2014-01-01

    This study developed and validated the Youth Conduct Problems Scale-Rwanda (YCPS-R). Qualitative free listing (n = 74) and key informant interviews (n = 47) identified local conduct problems, which were compared to existing standardized conduct problem scales and used to develop the YCPS-R. The YCPS-R was cognitive tested by 12 youth and caregiver participants, and assessed for test-retest and inter-rater reliability in a sample of 64 youth. Finally, a purposive sample of 389 youth and their caregivers were enrolled in a validity study. Validity was assessed by comparing YCPS-R scores to conduct disorder, which was diagnosed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children, and functional impairment scores on the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule Child Version. ROC analyses assessed the YCPS-R's ability to discriminate between youth with and without conduct disorder. Qualitative data identified a local presentation of youth conduct problems that did not match previously standardized measures. Therefore, the YCPS-R was developed solely from local conduct problems. Cognitive testing indicated that the YCPS-R was understandable and required little modification. The YCPS-R demonstrated good reliability, construct, criterion, and discriminant validity, and fair classification accuracy. The YCPS-R is a locally-derived measure of Rwandan youth conduct problems that demonstrated good psychometric properties and could be used for further research.

  2. How to Conduct Multimethod Field Studies in the Operating Room: The iPad Combined With a Survey App as a Valid and Reliable Data Collection Tool.

    PubMed

    Tscholl, David W; Weiss, Mona; Spahn, Donat R; Noethiger, Christoph B

    2016-01-05

    Tablet computers such as the Apple iPad are progressively replacing traditional paper-and-pencil-based data collection. We combined the iPad with the ready-to-use survey software, iSurvey (from Harvestyourdata), to create a straightforward tool for data collection during the Anesthesia Pre-Induction Checklist (APIC) study, a hospital-wide multimethod intervention study involving observation of team performance and team member surveys in the operating room (OR). We aimed to provide an analysis of the factors that led to the use of the iPad- and iSurvey-based tool for data collection, illustrate our experiences with the use of this data collection tool, and report the results of an expert survey about user experience with this tool. We used an iPad- and iSurvey-based tool to observe anesthesia inductions conducted by 205 teams (N=557 team members) in the OR. In Phase 1, expert raters used the iPad- and iSurvey-based tool to rate team performance during anesthesia inductions, and anesthesia team members were asked to indicate their perceptions after the inductions. In Phase 2, we surveyed the expert raters about their perceptions regarding the use of the iPad- and iSurvey-based tool to observe, rate, and survey teams in the ORs. The results of Phase 1 showed that training data collectors on the iPad- and iSurvey-based data collection tool was effortless and there were no serious problems during data collection, upload, download, and export. Interrater agreement of the combined data collection tool was found to be very high for the team observations (median Fleiss' kappa=0.88, 95% CI 0.78-1.00). The results of the follow-up expert rater survey (Phase 2) showed that the raters did not prefer a paper-and-pencil-based data collection method they had used during other earlier studies over the iPad- and iSurvey-based tool (median response 1, IQR 1-1; 1=do not agree, 2=somewhat disagree, 3=neutral, 4=somewhat agree, 5=fully agree). They found the iPad (median 5, IQR 4

  3. How to Conduct Multimethod Field Studies in the Operating Room: The iPad Combined With a Survey App as a Valid and Reliable Data Collection Tool

    PubMed Central

    Tscholl, David W; Weiss, Mona; Spahn, Donat R

    2016-01-01

    Background Tablet computers such as the Apple iPad are progressively replacing traditional paper-and-pencil-based data collection. We combined the iPad with the ready-to-use survey software, iSurvey (from Harvestyourdata), to create a straightforward tool for data collection during the Anesthesia Pre-Induction Checklist (APIC) study, a hospital-wide multimethod intervention study involving observation of team performance and team member surveys in the operating room (OR). Objective We aimed to provide an analysis of the factors that led to the use of the iPad- and iSurvey-based tool for data collection, illustrate our experiences with the use of this data collection tool, and report the results of an expert survey about user experience with this tool. Methods We used an iPad- and iSurvey-based tool to observe anesthesia inductions conducted by 205 teams (N=557 team members) in the OR. In Phase 1, expert raters used the iPad- and iSurvey-based tool to rate team performance during anesthesia inductions, and anesthesia team members were asked to indicate their perceptions after the inductions. In Phase 2, we surveyed the expert raters about their perceptions regarding the use of the iPad- and iSurvey-based tool to observe, rate, and survey teams in the ORs. Results The results of Phase 1 showed that training data collectors on the iPad- and iSurvey-based data collection tool was effortless and there were no serious problems during data collection, upload, download, and export. Interrater agreement of the combined data collection tool was found to be very high for the team observations (median Fleiss’ kappa=0.88, 95% CI 0.78-1.00). The results of the follow-up expert rater survey (Phase 2) showed that the raters did not prefer a paper-and-pencil-based data collection method they had used during other earlier studies over the iPad- and iSurvey-based tool (median response 1, IQR 1-1; 1=do not agree, 2=somewhat disagree, 3=neutral, 4=somewhat agree, 5=fully agree). They

  4. Conducting pilot and feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-03-01

    Planning a well-designed research study can be tedious and laborious work. However, this process is critical and ultimately can produce valid, reliable study findings. Designing a large-scale randomized, controlled trial (RCT)-the gold standard in quantitative research-can be even more challenging. Even the most well-planned study potentially can result in issues with research procedures and design, such as recruitment, retention, or methodology. One strategy that may facilitate sound study design is the completion of a pilot or feasibility study prior to the initiation of a larger-scale trial. This article will discuss pilot and feasibility studies, their advantages and disadvantages, and implications for oncology nursing research. 
.

  5. Conducting Simulation Studies in Psychometrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Richard A.; Rubright, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Simulation studies are fundamental to psychometric discourse and play a crucial role in operational and academic research. Yet, resources for psychometricians interested in conducting simulations are scarce. This Instructional Topics in Educational Measurement Series (ITEMS) module is meant to address this deficiency by providing a comprehensive…

  6. Conducting Simulation Studies in Psychometrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Richard A.; Rubright, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Simulation studies are fundamental to psychometric discourse and play a crucial role in operational and academic research. Yet, resources for psychometricians interested in conducting simulations are scarce. This Instructional Topics in Educational Measurement Series (ITEMS) module is meant to address this deficiency by providing a comprehensive…

  7. Noninvasive electrical conductivity measurement by MRI: a test of its validity and the electrical conductivity characteristics of glioma.

    PubMed

    Tha, Khin Khin; Katscher, Ulrich; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Stehning, Christian; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Fujima, Noriyuki; Kudo, Kohsuke; Kazumata, Ken; Yamamoto, Toru; Van Cauteren, Marc; Shirato, Hiroki

    2017-07-11

    This study noninvasively examined the electrical conductivity (σ) characteristics of diffuse gliomas using MRI and tested its validity. MRI including a 3D steady-state free precession (3D SSFP) sequence was performed on 30 glioma patients. The σ maps were reconstructed from the phase images of the 3D SSFP sequence. The σ histogram metrics were extracted and compared among the contrast-enhanced (CET) and noncontrast-enhanced tumour components (NCET) and normal brain parenchyma (NP). Difference in tumour σ histogram metrics among tumour grades and correlation of σ metrics with tumour grades were tested. Validity of σ measurement using this technique was tested by correlating the mean tumour σ values measured using MRI with those measured ex vivo using a dielectric probe. Several σ histogram metrics of CET and NCET of diffuse gliomas were significantly higher than NP (Bonferroni-corrected p ≤ .045). The maximum σ of NCET showed a moderate positive correlation with tumour grade (r = .571, Bonferroni-corrected p = .018). The mean tumour σ measured using MRI showed a moderate positive correlation with the σ measured ex vivo (r = .518, p = .040). Tissue σ can be evaluated using MRI, incorporation of which may better characterise diffuse gliomas. • This study tested the validity of noninvasive electrical conductivity measurements by MRI. • This study also evaluated the electrical conductivity characteristics of diffuse glioma. • Gliomas have higher electrical conductivity values than the normal brain parenchyma. • Noninvasive electrical conductivity measurement can be helpful for better characterisation of glioma.

  8. Bioconversion study conducted by JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J.

    1978-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of Caltech conducted a study of bioconversion as a means of identifying the role of biomass for meeting the national energy fuel and chemical requirements and the role and means for JPL-Caltech involvement in bioconversion. The bioconversion study included the following categories; biomass sources, chemicals from biomass, thermochemical conversion of biomass to fuels, biological conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals, and basic bioconversion sciences. A detailed review is included of the bioconversion fields cited with specific conclusions and recommendations given for future research and development and overall biomass system engineering and economic studies.

  9. Validation Studies for the Diet History Questionnaire II

    Cancer.gov

    Data show that the DHQ I instrument provides reasonable nutrient estimates, and three studies were conducted to assess its validity/calibration. There have been no such validation studies with the DHQ II.

  10. Nerve conduction and electromyography studies.

    PubMed

    Kane, N M; Oware, A

    2012-07-01

    Nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyography (EMG), often shortened to 'EMGs', are a useful adjunct to clinical examination of the peripheral nervous system and striated skeletal muscle. NCS provide an efficient and rapid method of quantifying nerve conduction velocity (CV) and the amplitude of both sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) and compound motor action potentials (cMAPs). The CV reflects speed of propagation of action potentials, by saltatory conduction, along large myelinated axons in a peripheral nerve. The amplitude of SNAPs is in part determined by the number of axons in a sensory nerve, whilst amplitude of cMAPs reflects integrated function of the motor axons, neuromuscular junction and striated muscle. Repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) can identify defects of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) transmission, pre- or post-synaptic. Needle EMG examination can detect myopathic changes in muscle and signs of denervation. Combinations of these procedures can establish if motor and/or sensory nerve cell bodies or peripheral nerves are damaged (e.g. motor neuronopathy, sensory ganglionopathy or neuropathy), and also indicate if the primary target is the axon or the myelin sheath (i.e. axonal or demyelinating neuropathies). The distribution of nerve damage can be determined as either generalised, multifocal (mononeuropathy multiplex) or focal. The latter often due to compression at the common entrapment sites (such as the carpal tunnel, Guyon's canal, cubital tunnel, radial groove, fibular head and tarsal tunnel, to name but a few of the reported hundred or so 'entrapment neuropathies').

  11. NOAA's hydrolab conducts reef studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This summer, scuba-diving scientists operating from Hydrolab, NOAA's undersea laboratory, are carrying out four experiments aimed at producing better management of coral reefs and their fishery resources. Hydrolab is located at a depth of 50 feet, near the mouth of the Salt River, off St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. The lab houses four scientists for up to 2 weeks at a time, permitting them to swim out into the water to conduct research. The projects make use of both the natural coral reef near Hydrolab and the nearby artificial reef constructed for comparison studies.

  12. Identification of conductive hearing loss using air conduction tests alone: reliability and validity of an automatic test battery.

    PubMed

    Convery, Elizabeth; Keidser, Gitte; Seeto, Mark; Freeston, Katrina; Zhou, Dan; Dillon, Harvey

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether a combination of automatically administered pure-tone audiometry and a tone-in-noise detection task, both delivered via an air conduction (AC) pathway, could reliably and validly predict the presence of a conductive component to the hearing loss. The authors hypothesized that performance on the battery of tests would vary according to hearing loss type. A secondary objective was to evaluate the reliability and validity of a novel automatic audiometry algorithm to assess its suitability for inclusion in the test battery. Participants underwent a series of hearing assessments that were conducted in a randomized order: manual pure-tone air conduction audiometry and bone conduction audiometry; automatic pure-tone air conduction audiometry; and an automatic tone-in-noise detection task. The automatic tests were each administered twice. The ability of the automatic test battery to: (a) predict the presence of an air-bone gap (ABG); and (b) accurately measure AC hearing thresholds was assessed against the results of manual audiometry. Test-retest conditions were compared to determine the reliability of each component of the automatic test battery. Data were collected on 120 ears from normal-hearing and conductive, sensorineural, and mixed hearing-loss subgroups. Performance differences between different types of hearing loss were observed. Ears with a conductive component (conductive and mixed ears) tended to have normal signal to noise ratios (SNR) despite impaired thresholds in quiet, while ears without a conductive component (normal and sensorineural ears) demonstrated, on average, an increasing relationship between their thresholds in quiet and their achieved SNR. Using the relationship between these two measures among ears with no conductive component as a benchmark, the likelihood that an ear has a conductive component can be estimated based on the deviation from this benchmark. The sensitivity and

  13. Validation of a heat conduction model for finite domain, non-uniformly heated, laminate bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desgrosseilliers, Louis; Kabbara, Moe; Groulx, Dominic; White, Mary Anne

    2016-07-01

    Infrared thermographic validation is shown for a closed-form analytical heat conduction model for non-uniformly heated, laminate bodies with an insulated domain boundary. Experiments were conducted by applying power to rectangular electric heaters and cooled by natural convection in air, but also apply to constant-temperature heat sources and forced convection. The model accurately represents two-dimensional laminate heat conduction behaviour giving rise to heat spreading using one-dimensional equations for the temperature distributions and heat transfer rates under steady-state and pseudo-steady-state conditions. Validation of the model with an insulated boundary (complementing previous studies with an infinite boundary) provides useful predictions of heat spreading performance and simplified temperature uniformity calculations (useful in log-mean temperature difference style heat exchanger calculations) for real laminate systems such as found in electronics heat sinks, multi-ply stovetop cookware and interface materials for supercooled salt hydrates. Computational determinations of implicit insulated boundary condition locations in measured data, required to assess model equation validation, were also demonstrated. Excellent goodness of fit was observed (both root-mean-square error and R 2 values), in all cases except when the uncertainty of low temperatures measured via infrared thermography hindered the statistical significance of the model fit. The experimental validation in all other cases supports use of the model equations in design calculations and heat exchange simulations.

  14. Validation studies and proficiency testing.

    PubMed

    Ankilam, Elke; Heinze, Petra; Kay, Simon; Van den Eede, Guy; Popping, Bert

    2002-01-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) entered the European food market in 1996. Current legislation demands the labeling of food products if they contain <1% GMO, as assessed for each ingredient of the product. To create confidence in the testing methods and to complement enforcement requirements, there is an urgent need for internationally validated methods, which could serve as reference methods. To date, several methods have been submitted to validation trials at an international level; approaches now exist that can be used in different circumstances and for different food matrixes. Moreover, the requirement for the formal validation of methods is clearly accepted; several national and international bodies are active in organizing studies. Further validation studies, especially on the quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods, need to be performed to cover the rising demand for new extraction methods and other background matrixes, as well as for novel GMO constructs.

  15. VALIDATION OF A THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR FUEL COMPACTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Phillips; Colby Jensen; Changhu Xing; Heng Ban

    2011-03-01

    A high temperature guarded-comparative-longitudinal heat flow measurement system has been built to measure the thermal conductivity of a composite nuclear fuel compact. It is a steady-state measurement device designed to operate over a temperature range of 300 K to 1200 K. No existing apparatus is currently available for obtaining the thermal conductivity of the composite fuel in a non-destructive manner due to the compact’s unique geometry and composite nature. The current system design has been adapted from ASTM E 1225. As a way to simplify the design and operation of the system, it uses a unique radiative heat sink to conduct heat away from the sample column. A finite element analysis was performed on the measurement system to analyze the associated error for various operating conditions. Optimal operational conditions have been discovered through this analysis and results are presented. Several materials have been measured by the system and results are presented for stainless steel 304, inconel 625, and 99.95% pure iron covering a range of thermal conductivities of 10 W/m*K to 70 W/m*K. A comparison of the results has been made to data from existing literature.

  16. External validation of multivariable prediction models: a systematic review of methodological conduct and reporting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Before considering whether to use a multivariable (diagnostic or prognostic) prediction model, it is essential that its performance be evaluated in data that were not used to develop the model (referred to as external validation). We critically appraised the methodological conduct and reporting of external validation studies of multivariable prediction models. Methods We conducted a systematic review of articles describing some form of external validation of one or more multivariable prediction models indexed in PubMed core clinical journals published in 2010. Study data were extracted in duplicate on design, sample size, handling of missing data, reference to the original study developing the prediction models and predictive performance measures. Results 11,826 articles were identified and 78 were included for full review, which described the evaluation of 120 prediction models. in participant data that were not used to develop the model. Thirty-three articles described both the development of a prediction model and an evaluation of its performance on a separate dataset, and 45 articles described only the evaluation of an existing published prediction model on another dataset. Fifty-seven percent of the prediction models were presented and evaluated as simplified scoring systems. Sixteen percent of articles failed to report the number of outcome events in the validation datasets. Fifty-four percent of studies made no explicit mention of missing data. Sixty-seven percent did not report evaluating model calibration whilst most studies evaluated model discrimination. It was often unclear whether the reported performance measures were for the full regression model or for the simplified models. Conclusions The vast majority of studies describing some form of external validation of a multivariable prediction model were poorly reported with key details frequently not presented. The validation studies were characterised by poor design, inappropriate handling

  17. 29 CFR 1607.7 - Use of other validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of other validity studies. 1607.7 Section 1607.7 Labor... EMPLOYEE SELECTION PROCEDURES (1978) General Principles § 1607.7 Use of other validity studies. A. Validity studies not conducted by the user. Users may, under certain circumstances, support the use of selection...

  18. PSI-Center Validation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. A.; Akcay, C.; Glasser, A. H.; Hansen, C. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Marklin, G. J.; Milroy, R. D.; Morgan, K. D.; Norgaard, P. C.; Shumlak, U.; Sutherland, D. A.; Victor, B. S.; Sovinec, C. R.; O'Bryan, J. B.; Held, E. D.; Ji, J.-Y.; Lukin, V. S.

    2014-10-01

    The Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center - http://www.psicenter.org) supports collaborating validation platform experiments with 3D extended MHD simulations using the NIMROD, HiFi, and PSI-TET codes. Collaborators include the Bellan Plasma Group (Caltech), CTH (Auburn U), HBT-EP (Columbia), HIT-SI (U Wash-UW), LTX (PPPL), MAST (Culham), Pegasus (U Wisc-Madison), SSX (Swarthmore College), TCSU (UW), and ZaP/ZaP-HD (UW). The PSI-Center is exploring application of validation metrics between experimental data and simulations results. Biorthogonal decomposition (BOD) is used to compare experiments with simulations. BOD separates data sets into spatial and temporal structures, giving greater weight to dominant structures. Several BOD metrics are being formulated with the goal of quantitive validation. Results from these simulation and validation studies, as well as an overview of the PSI-Center status will be presented.

  19. 49 CFR 40.89 - What is validity testing, and are laboratories required to conduct it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Drug Testing Laboratories § 40.89 What is validity testing, and are laboratories required to conduct it? (a) Specimen validity testing is... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What is validity testing, and are laboratories...

  20. Predictive Validity of DSM-IV Oppositional Defiant and Conduct Disorders in Clinically Referred Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Kate; Boeldt, Debra; Chen, Diane; Coyne, Claire; Donald, Radiah; Duax, Jeanne; Hart, Katherine; Perrott, Jennifer; Strickland, Jennifer; Danis, Barbara; Hill, Carri; Davis, Shante; Kampani, Smita; Humphries, Marisha

    2011-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic validity of oppositional defiant and conduct disorders (ODD and CD) for preschoolers has been questioned based on concerns regarding the ability to differentiate normative, transient disruptive behavior from clinical symptoms. Data on concurrent validity have accumulated, but predictive validity is limited. Predictive…

  1. Critical validation studies of neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Gruzelier, John; Egner, Tobias

    2005-01-01

    The field of neurofeedback training has proceeded largely without validation. In this article the authors review studies directed at validating sensory motor rhythm, beta and alpha-theta protocols for improving attention, memory, and music performance in healthy participants. Importantly, benefits were demonstrable with cognitive and neurophysiologic measures that were predicted on the basis of regression models of learning to enhance sensory motor rhythm and beta activity. The first evidence of operant control over the alpha-theta ratio is provided, together with remarkable improvements in artistic aspects of music performance equivalent to two class grades in conservatory students. These are initial steps in providing a much needed scientific basis to neurofeedback.

  2. Conducting and Reporting Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Merilyn; Taylor, Satomi Izumi

    Issues and elements of case study research are explored and illustrated with the example of a case study of a kindergarten in a suburb of Tokyo (Japan). Case study research is a type of qualitative research that concentrates on a single unit or entity, with boundaries established by the researcher. The case is an example drawn from a larger class,…

  3. DROPOUT STUDIES, DESIGN AND CONDUCT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SCHRIEBER, DANIEL; AND OTHERS

    ALTHOUGH THE DROPOUT PROBLEM IS ONE OF GREAT CONCERN AT BOTH LOCAL AND NATIONAL LEVELS, IT IS READILY APPARENT THAT THE PROBLEM IS NOT THE SAME EVERYWHERE IN THE COUNTRY. DROPOUT RATES VARY CONSIDERABLY FROM ONE COMMUNITY TO ANOTHER, AND EVEN DIFFER BETWEEN HIGH SCHOOLS IN THE SAME SCHOOL SYSTEM. LIMITATIONS IN PREVIOUS STUDIES OF THE PROBLEM HAVE…

  4. Conducting a wind sensing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Signal-to-noise requirements, and how signal-to-noise determines wind velocity measurement accuracy were studied. A Nd:YAG-based system was found to be competitive with a CO2-based system. Hardware was developed for a coherent Nd:YAG LIDAR system, and is being integrated into a functioning system. A diode-pumped monolithic rod laser to be used as a reference oscillator, a high-power, single-mode ring laser, for use as a master oscillator, and a high-gain, multipass amplifier were constructed.

  5. CTF Void Drift Validation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Salko, Robert K.; Gosdin, Chris; Avramova, Maria N.; Gergar, Marcus

    2015-10-26

    This milestone report is a summary of work performed in support of expansion of the validation and verification (V&V) matrix for the thermal-hydraulic subchannel code, CTF. The focus of this study is on validating the void drift modeling capabilities of CTF and verifying the supporting models that impact the void drift phenomenon. CTF uses a simple turbulent-diffusion approximation to model lateral cross-flow due to turbulent mixing and void drift. The void drift component of the model is based on the Lahey and Moody model. The models are a function of two-phase mass, momentum, and energy distribution in the system; therefore, it is necessary to correctly model the ow distribution in rod bundle geometry as a first step to correctly calculating the void distribution due to void drift.

  6. Image-based multi-scale simulation and experimental validation of thermal conductivity of lanthanum zirconate

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xingye; Hu, Bin; Wei, Changdong; Sun, Jiangang; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Li, Li; Knapp, James; Zhang, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) is a promising candidate material for thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications due to its low thermal conductivity and high-temperature phase stability. In this work, a novel image-based multi-scale simulation framework combining molecular dynamics (MD) and finite element (FE) calculations is proposed to study the thermal conductivity of La2Zr2O7 coatings. Since there is no experimental data of single crystal La2Zr2O7 thermal conductivity, a reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (reverse NEMD) approach is first employed to compute the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of single crystal La2Zr2O7. The single crystal data is then passed to a FE model which takes into account of realistic thermal barrier coating microstructures. The predicted thermal conductivities from the FE model are in good agreement with experimental validations using both flash laser technique and pulsed thermal imaging-multilayer analysis. The framework proposed in this work provides a powerful tool for future design of advanced coating systems. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nuts and bolts of conducting feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Tickle-Degnen, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Many factors can affect the successful implementation and validity of intervention studies. A primary purpose of feasibility and pilot studies is to assess the potential for successful implementation of the proposed main intervention studies and to reduce threats to the validity of these studies. This article describes a typology to guide the aims of feasibility and pilot studies designed to support the development of randomized controlled trials and provides an example of the studies underlying the development of one rehabilitation trial. The purpose of most feasibility and pilot studies should be to describe information and evidence related to the successful implementation and validity of a planned main trial. Null hypothesis significance testing is not appropriate for these studies unless the sample size is properly powered. The primary tests of the intervention effectiveness hypotheses should occur in the main study, not in the studies that are serving as feasibility or pilot studies.

  8. CANFOR Portuguese version: validation study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The increase in prisoner population is a troublesome reality in several regions of the world. Along with this growth there is increasing evidence that prisoners have a higher proportion of mental illnesses and suicide than the general population. In order to implement strategies that address criminal recidivism and the health and social status of prisoners, particularly in mental disordered offenders, it is necessary to assess their care needs in a comprehensive, but individual perspective. This assessment must include potential harmful areas like comorbid personality disorder, substance misuse and offending behaviours. The Camberwell Assessment of Need – Forensic Version (CANFOR) has proved to be a reliable tool designed to accomplish such aims. The present study aimed to validate the CANFOR Portuguese version. Methods The translation, adaptation to the Portuguese context, back-translation and revision followed the usual procedures. The sample comprised all detainees receiving psychiatric care in four forensic facilities, over a one year period. A total of 143 subjects, and respective case manager, were selected. The forensic facilities were chosen by convenience: one prison hospital psychiatric ward (n=68; 47.6%), one male (n=24; 16.8%) and one female (n=22; 15.4%) psychiatric clinic and one civil security ward (n=29; 20.3%), all located nearby Lisbon. Basic descriptive statistics and Kappa weighted coefficients were calculated for the inter-rater and the test-retest reliability studies. The convergent validity was evaluated using the Global Assessment of Functioning and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale scores. Results The majority of the participants were male and single, with short school attendance, and accused of a crime involving violence against persons. The most frequent diagnosis was major depression (56.1%) and almost half presented positive suicide risk. The reliability study showed average Kappa weighted coefficients of 0.884 and 0

  9. FDDS: A Cross Validation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Judy Parsons

    The Family Drawing Depression Scale (FDDS) was created by Wright and McIntyre to provide a clear and reliable scoring method for the Kinetic Family Drawing as a procedure for detecting depression. A study was conducted to confirm the value of the FDDS as a systematic tool for interpreting family drawings with populations of depressed individuals.…

  10. FDDS: A Cross Validation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Judy Parsons

    The Family Drawing Depression Scale (FDDS) was created by Wright and McIntyre to provide a clear and reliable scoring method for the Kinetic Family Drawing as a procedure for detecting depression. A study was conducted to confirm the value of the FDDS as a systematic tool for interpreting family drawings with populations of depressed individuals.…

  11. Vitamin D Dietary Intake Questionnaire Validation Conducted among Young Polish Women

    PubMed Central

    Głąbska, Dominika; Guzek, Dominika; Sidor, Patrycja; Włodarek, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Due to inadequate intake of Vitamin D, identification of individuals characterised by the highest risk of deficiencies is one of the more crucial tasks for public health. The aim of the presented study was to assess the validity and reproducibility of the designed Vitamin D dietary intake questionnaire based on food frequency assessment—VIDEO-FFQ (VItamin D Estimation Only—Food Frequency Questionnaire) in a group of Polish women aged 20–30 years. Seventy-five participants kept a three-day dietary record and filled out the VIDEO-FFQ twice (immediately after the three-day dietary record and after six weeks). The assessment of validity and reproducibility was conducted by verifying standard errors of estimation, median differences, and percentages of individuals classified into tertiles, correlations and Bland-Altman plots. The Vitamin D intake for the majority of the surveyed women was inadequate as over 85% of them were characterised by values of intake lower than 5.0 μg per day. The results allowed concluding that a high accuracy of the VIDEO-FFQ was achieved. The required Bland-Altman index values lower than 5.0% were obtained, confirming satisfactory validity and reproducibility. The VIDEO-FFQ may be deemed a convenient practical tool for the estimation of Vitamin D intake in young women. PMID:26742070

  12. GUIDE FOR CONDUCTING TREATABILITY STUDIES UNDER CERCLA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systematically conducted, well-documented treatability studies are an important component of the removal process, remedial investigation/ feasibility study (RI/FS) process and the remedial design/remedial action (RD/RA) process under the Comprehensive Environmental Response...

  13. GUIDE FOR CONDUCTING TREATABILITY STUDIES UNDER CERCLA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systematically conducted, well-documented treatability studies are an important component of the removal process, remedial investigation/ feasibility study (RI/FS) process and the remedial design/remedial action (RD/RA) process under the Comprehensive Environmental Response...

  14. 29 CFR 1607.7 - Use of other validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... selection procedure is valid; (2) Job similarity. The incumbents in the user's job and the incumbents in the job or group of jobs on which the validity study was conducted perform substantially the same major work behaviors, as shown by appropriate job analyses both on the job or group of jobs on which...

  15. 29 CFR 1607.7 - Use of other validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... selection procedure is valid; (2) Job similarity. The incumbents in the user's job and the incumbents in the job or group of jobs on which the validity study was conducted perform substantially the same major work behaviors, as shown by appropriate job analyses both on the job or group of jobs on which...

  16. Predictive validity of childhood oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder: implications for the DSM-V.

    PubMed

    Burke, Jeffrey D; Waldman, Irwin; Lahey, Benjamin B

    2010-11-01

    Data are presented from 3 studies of children and adolescents to evaluate the predictive validity of childhood oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD) as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) and the International Classification of Diseases, Version 10 (ICD-10; World Health Organization, 1992). The present analyses strongly support the predictive validity of these diagnoses by showing that they predict both future psychopathology and enduring functional impairment. Furthermore, the present findings generally support the hierarchical developmental hypothesis in DSM-IV that some children with ODD progress to childhood-onset CD, and some youth with CD progress to antisocial personality disorder (APD). Nonetheless, they reveal that CD does not always co-occur with ODD, particularly during adolescence. Importantly, the present findings suggest that ICD-10 diagnostic criteria for ODD, which treat CD symptoms as ODD symptoms when diagnostic criteria for CD are not met, identify more functionally impaired children than the more restrictive DSM-IV definition of ODD. Filling this "hole" in the DSM-IV criteria for ODD should be a priority for the DSM-V. In addition, the present findings suggest that although the psychopathic trait of interpersonal callousness in childhood independently predicts future APD, these findings do not confirm the hypothesis that callousness distinguishes a subset of children with CD with an elevated risk for APD.

  17. Thermographic validation of a novel, laminate body, analytical heat conduction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desgrosseilliers, Louis; Groulx, Dominic; White, Mary Anne

    2014-07-01

    The two-region fin model captures the heat spreading behaviour in multilayered composite bodies (i.e., laminates), heated only over a small part of their domains (finite heat source), where there is an inner layer that has a substantial capacity for heat conduction parallel to the heat exchange surface (convection cooling). This resulting heat conduction behaviour improves the overall heat transfer process when compared to heat conduction in homogeneous bodies. Long-term heat storage using supercooling salt hydrate phase change materials, stovetop cookware, and electronics cooling applications could all benefit from this kind of heat-spreading in laminates. Experiments using laminate films reclaimed from post-consumer Tetra Brik cartons were conducted with thin rectangular and circular heaters to confirm the laminate body, steady-state, heat conduction behaviour predicted by the two-region fin model. Medium to high accuracy experimental validation of the two-region fin model was achieved in Cartesian and cylindrical coordinates for forced external convection and natural convection, the latter for Cartesian only. These were conducted using constant heat flux finite heat source temperature profiles that were measured by infrared thermography. This validation is also deemed valid for constant temperature heat sources.

  18. DC electrical conductivity study of cerium doped conducting glass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barde, R. V.; Waghuley, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    The glass samples of composition 60V2O5-5P2O5-(35-x)B2O3-xCeO2, (1 ≤ x ≤ 5) were prepared by the conventional melt quench method. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction and thermo gravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The glass transition temperature and crystallization temperature determined from TG-DTA analysis. The DC electrical conductivity has been carried out in the temperature range 303-473 K. The maximum conductivity and minimum activation energy were found to be 0.039 Scm-1 and 0.15 eV at 473 K for x=1, respectively.

  19. Guide for Conducting Energy Efficiency Potential Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Guide for Conducting Energy Efficiency Potential Studies is provided to assist state officials, regulators, legislators, and others in implementing the recommendations of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency.

  20. Gas release and conductivity modification studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linson, L. M.; Baxter, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of gas clouds produced by releases from orbital velocity in either a point release or venting mode is described by the modification of snowplow equations valid in an intermediate altitude regime. Quantitative estimates are produced for the time dependence of the radius of the cloud, the average internal energy, the translational velocity, and the distance traveled. The dependence of these quantities on the assumed density profile, the internal energy of the gas, and the ratio of specific heats is examined. The new feature is the inclusion of the effect of the large orbital velocity. The resulting gas cloud models are used to calculate the characteristics of the field line integrated Pedersen conductivity enhancements that would be produced by the release of barium thermite at orbital velocity in either the point release or venting modes as a function of release altitude and chemical payload weight.

  1. Assessing the Validity and Reproducibility of an Iron Dietary Intake Questionnaire Conducted in a Group of Young Polish Women

    PubMed Central

    Głąbska, Dominika; Guzek, Dominika; Ślązak, Joanna; Włodarek, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse a designed brief iron dietary intake questionnaire based on a food frequency assessment (IRONIC-FFQ—IRON Intake Calculation-Food Frequency Questionnaire), including the assessment of validity and reproducibility in a group of 75 Polish women aged 20–30 years. Participants conducted 3-day dietary records and filled in the IRONIC-FFQ twice (FFQ1—directly after the dietary record and FFQ2—6 weeks later). The analysis included an assessment of validity (comparison with the results of the 3-day dietary record) and of reproducibility (comparison of the results obtained twice—FFQ1 and FFQ2). In the analysis of validity, the share of individuals correctly classified into tertiles was over 50% (weighted κ of 0.36), while analysis of correlation revealed correlation coefficients of almost 0.5. In the assessment of reproducibility, almost 80% of individuals were correctly classified and less than 3% were misclassified (weighted κ of 0.73), while a correlation coefficient higher than 0.85 was obtained. Both in the assessment of validity and of reproducibility, a Bland–Altman index of 6.7% was recorded (93.3% of compared pairs of results were in the acceptable range, attributed to differences within ± 2SD limit). Validation of the IRONIC-FFQ revealed a satisfactory level of validity and positively validated reproducibility. PMID:28264423

  2. Assessing the Validity and Reproducibility of an Iron Dietary Intake Questionnaire Conducted in a Group of Young Polish Women.

    PubMed

    Głąbska, Dominika; Guzek, Dominika; Ślązak, Joanna; Włodarek, Dariusz

    2017-02-27

    The aim of the study was to analyse a designed brief iron dietary intake questionnaire based on a food frequency assessment (IRONIC-FFQ-IRON Intake Calculation-Food Frequency Questionnaire), including the assessment of validity and reproducibility in a group of 75 Polish women aged 20-30 years. Participants conducted 3-day dietary records and filled in the IRONIC-FFQ twice (FFQ1-directly after the dietary record and FFQ2-6 weeks later). The analysis included an assessment of validity (comparison with the results of the 3-day dietary record) and of reproducibility (comparison of the results obtained twice-FFQ1 and FFQ2). In the analysis of validity, the share of individuals correctly classified into tertiles was over 50% (weighted κ of 0.36), while analysis of correlation revealed correlation coefficients of almost 0.5. In the assessment of reproducibility, almost 80% of individuals were correctly classified and less than 3% were misclassified (weighted κ of 0.73), while a correlation coefficient higher than 0.85 was obtained. Both in the assessment of validity and of reproducibility, a Bland-Altman index of 6.7% was recorded (93.3% of compared pairs of results were in the acceptable range, attributed to differences within ± 2SD limit). Validation of the IRONIC-FFQ revealed a satisfactory level of validity and positively validated reproducibility.

  3. Proton Conductivity Studies on Biopolymer Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harun, N. I.; Sabri, N. S.; Rosli, N. H. A.; Taib, M. F. M.; Saaid, S. I. Y.; Kudin, T. I. T.; Ali, A. M. M.; Yahya, M. Z. A.

    2010-07-07

    Proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolyte membranes consisting of methyl cellulose (MC) and different wt.% of ammonium nitrate (NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}) were prepared by solution cast technique. Impedance spectroscopy was carried out to study electrical characteristics of bulk materials. The ionic conductivity of the prepared samples was calculated using the bulk resistance (R{sub b}) obtained from impedance spectroscopy plot. The highest ionic conductivity obtained was 1.17x10{sup -4} Scm{sup -1} for the sample with composition ratio of MC(50): NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}(50). To enhance the ionic conductivity, propylene carbonate (PC) and ethylene carbonate (EC) plasticizers were introduced. It was found that the ionic conductivity of polymer electrolyte membranes increased with the increase in plasticizers concentration. The ionic conductivities of solid polymer electrolytes based on MC-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-PC was enhanced up to 4.91x10{sup -3} Scm{sup -1} while for the MC-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-EC system, the highest conductivity was 1.74x10{sup -2} Scm{sup -1}. The addition of more plasticizer however decreases in mechanical stability of the membranes.

  4. Validation and Use of a Predictive Modeling Tool: Employing Scientific Findings to Improve Responsible Conduct of Research Education.

    PubMed

    Mulhearn, Tyler J; Watts, Logan L; Todd, E Michelle; Medeiros, Kelsey E; Connelly, Shane; Mumford, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Although recent evidence suggests ethics education can be effective, the nature of specific training programs, and their effectiveness, varies considerably. Building on a recent path modeling effort, the present study developed and validated a predictive modeling tool for responsible conduct of research education. The predictive modeling tool allows users to enter ratings in relation to a given ethics training program and receive instantaneous evaluative information for course refinement. Validation work suggests the tool's predicted outcomes correlate strongly (r = 0.46) with objective course outcomes. Implications for training program development and refinement are discussed.

  5. Design and Validation of a High-Temperature Comparative Thermal-Conductivity Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Phillips; Colby Jensen; C Xing; H. Ban

    2012-02-01

    A measurement system has been designed and built for the specific application of measuring the effective thermal conductivity of a composite, nuclear-fuel compact (small cylinder) over a temperature range of 100 C to 800 C. Because of the composite nature of the sample as well as the need to measure samples pre- and postirradiation, measurement must be performed on the whole compact non-destructively. No existing measurement system is capable of obtaining its thermal conductivity in a non-destructive manner. The designed apparatus is an adaptation of the guardedcomparative-longitudinal heat flow technique. The system uniquely demonstrates the use of a radiative heat sink to provide cooling which greatly simplifies the design and setup of such high-temperature systems. The design was aimed to measure thermalconductivity values covering the expected range of effective thermal conductivity of the composite nuclear fuel from 10W {center_dot} m{sup -1} {center_dot} K{sup -1} to 70W {center_dot} m{sup -1} {center_dot} K{sup -1}. Several materials having thermal conductivities covering this expected range have been measured for system validation, and results are presented. A comparison of the results has been made to data from existing literature.Additionally, an uncertainty analysis is presented finding an overall uncertainty in sample thermal conductivity to be 6%, matching well with the results of the validation samples.

  6. Test of Creative Imagination: Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gundogan, Aysun; Ari, Meziyet; Gonen, Mubeccel

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate validity and reliability of the test of creative imagination. This study was conducted with the participation of 1000 children, aged between 9-14 and were studying in six primary schools in the city center of Denizli Province, chosen by cluster ratio sampling. In the study, it was revealed that the…

  7. Thinking and Creative Styles: A Validity Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Solange Muglia; Vendramini, Claudette Maria Medeiros; Oakland, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The validity evidences of thinking and creative styles were analyzed. Two studies are reported, one analyzing the dimensionality of creative styles and the other verifying their external validity. Participants were Brazilians, 1,752 in the first study (55% women) and 128 in the second study (53% women), among whom 45% had demonstrated creative…

  8. Thinking and Creative Styles: A Validity Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Solange Muglia; Vendramini, Claudette Maria Medeiros; Oakland, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The validity evidences of thinking and creative styles were analyzed. Two studies are reported, one analyzing the dimensionality of creative styles and the other verifying their external validity. Participants were Brazilians, 1,752 in the first study (55% women) and 128 in the second study (53% women), among whom 45% had demonstrated creative…

  9. Framework for planning and conducting pilot studies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lisa Janette; Harrison, Margaret B

    2009-12-01

    Researchers working with partners in home care to plan a pragmatic multicenter community-based, randomized, controlled trial for leg ulcer compression treatment realized a smaller pilot study would be necessary. Because no framework for conducting pilot studies could be found, the authors developed a framework for pilot study methodology to inform the planning of such research. To this end, an integrative literature review was conducted, guided by an explicit search strategy, retrieval procedures, and appraisal process, to identify recognized pilot study aims, processes, and methodologies used in previously reported community pilot studies. Factors influencing study inclusion were recognized pilot study aims and purposes and a concise working definition of pilot study. Methodologies used in previously conducted community pilot studies were reviewed. Although relevant published research was limited, 11 pilot studies met the inclusion criteria for this review and contained suggestions to further develop or improve plans for larger definitive trials to enable a better fit of protocols within the delivery systems and scopes of practice. Pilot research processes could be divided into two stages: early planning and pilot trial. Direction for procedures and methods was gained relative to planning for an effective pilot study regarding eligibility, recruitment and data collection, management, and analysis. The results were used to develop an organizing framework for the authors' pilot study and named the Pilot Research Process (PReP) Framework. The process was instrumental in working with the authors' research team and clinical partners in the planning of their leg ulcer treatment pilot study. This framework may provide a foundation for others to analyze or develop a pilot study methodology in planning a large-scale study.

  10. Ethical issues in conducting migrant farmworker studies.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Sharon P; Heitman, Elizabeth; Fox, Erin E; Quill, Beth; Knudson, Paula; Zahm, Sheila H; MacNaughton, Nancy; Ryder, Roberta

    2004-01-01

    Migrant farmworkers should be considered a vulnerable population because they work in a hazardous industry, are often members of an ethnic minority, have known difficulty in accessing health care, and are often of lower socioeconomic status. For these reasons, too, it is extremely important to conduct health-related research with this often-underserved group. However, because migrant farmworkers are vulnerable, investigators must be especially vigilant in protecting them from the potential harms of research and in ensuring that the special ethical issues that arise in research with this population are identified and addressed for every project. In response to the National Cancer Institute's concerns about the feasibility of conducting epidemiologic studies among migrant farmworkers, researchers undertook four feasibility studies near the Texas-Mexico border. Each study raised different, complex ethical questions that challenged the investigators, but whose resolution turned out to be crucial to the success of the studies.

  11. Cable SGEMP Code Validation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, William Parker

    2013-05-01

    This report compared data taken on the Modular Bremsstrahlung Simulator using copper jacketed (cujac) cables with calculations using the RHSD-RA Cable SGEMP analysis tool. The tool relies on CEPXS/ONBFP to perform radiation transport in a series of 1D slices through the cable, and then uses a Green function technique to evaluate the expected current drive on the center conductor. The data were obtained in 2003 as part of a Cabana verification and validation experiment using 1-D geometries, but were not evaluated until now. The agreement between data and model is not adequate unless gaps between the dielectric and outer conductor (ground) are assumed, and these gaps are large compared with what is believed to be in the actual cable.

  12. Dipole excitation of surface plasmon on a conducting sheet: Finite element approximation and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Matthias; Margetis, Dionisios; Luskin, Mitchell

    2017-06-01

    We formulate and validate a finite element approach to the propagation of a slowly decaying electromagnetic wave, called surface plasmon-polariton, excited along a conducting sheet, e.g., a single-layer graphene sheet, by an electric Hertzian dipole. By using a suitably rescaled form of time-harmonic Maxwell's equations, we derive a variational formulation that enables a direct numerical treatment of the associated class of boundary value problems by appropriate curl-conforming finite elements. The conducting sheet is modeled as an idealized hypersurface with an effective electric conductivity. The requisite weak discontinuity for the tangential magnetic field across the hypersurface can be incorporated naturally into the variational formulation. We carry out numerical simulations for an infinite sheet with constant isotropic conductivity embedded in two spatial dimensions; and validate our numerics against the closed-form exact solution obtained by the Fourier transform in the tangential coordinate. Numerical aspects of our treatment such as an absorbing perfectly matched layer, as well as local refinement and a posteriori error control are discussed.

  13. An Investigation of Pre-Service Middle School Mathematics Teachers' Ability to Conduct Valid Proofs, Methods Used, and Reasons for Invalid Arguments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demiray, Esra; Isiksal Bostan, Mine

    2017-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to investigate Turkish pre-service middle school mathematics teachers' ability in conducting valid proofs for statements regarding numbers and algebra in terms of their year of enrollment in a teacher education program, to determine the proof methods used in their valid proofs, and to examine the reasons for their…

  14. Validation data for the determination of perchlorate in water using ion chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Maike A; Jensen, Detlef; Neist, Udo; Deister, Ursula K; Schmitz, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Perchlorate salts are relatively stable, soluble in water, and migrate into groundwater sources. Groundwater is an essential source for drinking water suppliers. Perchlorate bears health risks as it is identified to impair normal thyroid function by interfering with iodine uptake by the thyroid gland. The development of a sensitive analytical method for the determination of perchlorate is therefore of the highest interest or public health. Ion chromatography is a sensitive method suitable for perchlorate determinations. This manuscript describes the validation of an ion chromatographic method. Perchlorate is determined by ion chromatography (IC) with conductivity detection after suppression (CD) applying isocratic elution. In this study, the suitability of IC-CD was tested for synthetic samples, selected environmental water, drinking water, and swimming pool water in order to evaluate potential matrix effects on the perchlorate signal even after sample preparation. A sample injection volume of 750 μL was applied to the selected 2-mm-IC column. In untreated samples, the perchlorate peak can be interfered by neighbouring signals from matrix ions like chloride, nitrate, carbonate, and sulphate. Depending on the concentration of the matrix ions, the perchlorate peak can show asymmetric shape in particular when the perchlorate concentration is low. Recovery is reduced with increasing matrix ion concentrations. Dedicated matrix elimination was applied to minimize such effects. A reporting limit of 1.5 μg/L perchlorate and an expanded measurement uncertainty of 13.2 % were achieved. The extended method validation proves the applicability of IC based on the EPA 314.0 method for the determination of trace amounts of perchlorate in water samples of different origin. The results support the development of a respective international standard pursued by ISO. The approach evidenced its working robustness and ease of use in terms of eluent preparation, chromatographic

  15. Effective electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube-polymer composites: a simplified model and its validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Sung-Hwan; Yin, Huiming

    2015-04-01

    A simplified model is presented to predict the effective electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube(CNT)-polymer composite with different material proportions, which is validated by the experiments of multi-walled CNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composites. CNTs are well dispersed in a PDMS matrix, and the mixture is then cured and cast into thin films for electrical characterization. The CNTs are assumed to be statistically uniformly distributed in the PDMS matrix with the three-dimensional (3D) waviness. As the proportion of CNTs increases to a certain level, namely the percolation threshold, the discrete CNTs start to connect with each other, forming a 3D network which exhibits a significant increase of effective electrical conductivity. The eight-chain model has been used to predict the effective electrical conductivity of the composite, in which the contact resistance between CNTs has been considered through the Simmons’ equation. The eight-chain network features can be significantly changed with the modification to mixing process, CNT length and diameter, and CNT clustering and curling. A Gaussian statistics-based formulation is used to calculate the effective length of a single CNT well dispersed in the matrix. The modeling results of effective electrical conductivity agree with the experiments very well, which are highly dependent on a contact resistance between CNTs and the waviness of the CNTs. The effect of inner-nanotube distance and diameter of CNTs on the effective electrical conductivity of the CNT/PDMS composite is also discussed.

  16. Supraorbital nerve conduction study in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Therimadasamy, Aravindakannan; Wilder-Smith, Einar P; Lim, Aymeric Y T; Yap, Yan Lin; Yeo, Matthew; Naidu, Shenthilkumar; Lee, Shu Jin

    2012-04-01

    There is currently no examination technique that allows direct measurement of supraorbital nerve conduction velocity and amplitude. Therefore, in this study we describe a novel nerve conduction technique that allows measurement of the supraorbital sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) distal to the supraorbital foramen. Supraorbital SNAPs were recorded bilaterally from 17 healthy volunteers using an antidromic technique. The SNAPs were consistently recordable over the site 6 cm lateral to the midline point that was marked 10 cm above the nasion. Measured parameters included peak latency (mean 2.3 ms, SD 0.3), amplitude (mean 14.6 μV; SD 10.5), and velocity (mean 51.3 m/s, SD 6.8). The mean percentage of interside difference in amplitude was 25.6% (SD 17.3). Cut-off values (97th percentile) were 2.7 ms (peak latency), 3.3 μV (amplitude), 41.9 m/s (conduction velocity), and 54.9% (interside difference in amplitude). Supraorbital SNAPs can be recorded in all normal subjects and used as a quantitative measure of the functioning large fibers in the nerve. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Two phase detonation studies conducted in 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A report is presented describing the research conducted on five phases: (1) ignition of fuel drops by a shock wave and passage of a shock wave over a burning drop, (2) the energy release pattern of a two-phase detonation with controlled drop sizes, (3) the attenuation of shock and detonation waves passing over an acoustic liner, (4) experimental and theoretical studies of film detonations, and (5) a simplified analytical model of a rotating two-phase detonation wave in a rocket motor.

  18. Validity of conducting clinical dysphagia assessments for patients with normal to mild cognitive impairment via telerehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ward, Elizabeth C; Sharma, Shobha; Burns, Clare; Theodoros, Deborah; Russell, Trevor

    2012-12-01

    To assess the validity of conducting clinical dysphagia assessments via telerehabilitation, 40 individuals with dysphagia from various etiologies were assessed simultaneously by a face-to-face speech-language pathologist (FTF-SLP) and a telerehabilitation SLP (T-SLP) via an Internet-based videoconferencing telerehabilitation system. Dysphagia status was assessed using a Clinical Swallowing Examination (CSE) protocol, delivered via a specialized telerehabilitation videoconferencing system and involving the use of an assistant at the patient's end of the consultation to facilitate the assessment. Levels of agreement between the FTF-SLP and T-SLP revealed that the majority of parameters reached set levels of clinically acceptable levels of agreement. Specifically, agreement between the T-SLP and FTF-SLP ratings for the oral, oromotor, and laryngeal function tasks revealed levels of exact agreement ranging from 75 to 100% (kappa = 0.36-1.0), while the parameters relating to food and fluid trials ranged in exact agreement from 79 to 100% (kappa = 0.61-1.0). Across the parameters related to aspiration risk and clinical management, exact agreement ranged between 79 and 100% (kappa = 0.49-1.0). The data show that a CSE conducted via telerehabilitation can provide valid and reliable outcomes comparable to clinical decisions made in the FTF environment.

  19. FETAX interlaboratory validation study: Phase 2 testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bantle, J.A. . Dept. of Zoology); Burton, D.T. ); Dawson, D.A. . Dept. of Biology and Toxicology)

    1994-10-01

    The Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX) is a 96-h whole embryo developmental toxicity screening assay that can be used in ecotoxicology and in detecting mammalian developmental toxicants when an in vitro metabolic activation system is employed. A standardized American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) guide for the conduct of FETAX has been published along with a companion atlas that helps in embryo staging and identifying malformations. As part of the ASTM process, an interlaboratory validation study was undertaken to evaluate the repeatability and reliability of FETAX. Six different laboratories participated in the study. Each laboratory utilized one technician with the exception of one laboratory, which utilized two independent technicians. In Phase 1, FETAX proved to be more repeatable and reliable than many other bioassays. However, some excessive variation was observed in a few laboratories. Some of this variation may have been due to an initial lack of experience with the assay by some technicians. Phase 2, which is reported here, showed far less intralaboratory and interlaboratory variability than did Phase 1. Nonteratogens such as saccharin and sodium cyclamate showed the most consistent results, whereas more variability was observed for the teratogens caffeine and 5-fluorouracil. Interlaboratory coefficient of variation values for all FETAX end points ranged from 7.3 to 54.7%. The minimum concentration to inhibit growth proved to be the most variable end point for three of the four test chemicals, whereas the LC50 and EC50 (malformation) proved to be less variable.

  20. Validity of 24-hour dietary recall interviews conducted among volunteers in an adult working community.

    PubMed

    Kahn, H A; Whelton, P K; Appel, L J; Kumanyika, S K; Meneses, J L; Hebert, P R; Woods, M

    1995-11-01

    There is considerable uncertainty regarding the validity of dietary data collected from free-living populations. Nevertheless, few attempts have been made to validate dietary assessment instruments. To address this issue, we compared average daily protein intake estimated from 24-hour dietary recall interviews to protein intake estimated from urinary nitrogen excretion in 24-hour samples. Among 244 community-dwelling adults who volunteered for a hypertension study, men (n = 139) overreported dietary protein intake by 12 to 19%. In contrast, women (n = 105) reported a dietary protein intake almost exactly in agreement with estimates based on urinary nitrogen levels. Thin men reported about one-third more protein intake than was reflected in their urinary nitrogen measurements. Our results suggest that the accuracy of dietary recall estimates may vary across subgroups of the population. Additional information from sufficiently large validation studies would be helpful in determining the role of dietary assessment instruments which are already in wide use in epidemiologic research. Until such information is obtained, doubts will remain regarding the validity of inferences drawn from nutritional epidemiologic studies.

  1. A Validation Study of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Rex J.

    A study was conducted to expand the body of research that tests the validity of Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory in a work context where it often serves as a guide for the supervisor's relationships with his subordinates. Data was gathered by questionnaire which tested for a hierarchy of needs among instructors at four community colleges…

  2. A Validation Study of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Rex J.

    A study was conducted to expand the body of research that tests the validity of Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory in a work context where it often serves as a guide for the supervisor's relationships with his subordinates. Data was gathered by questionnaire which tested for a hierarchy of needs among instructors at four community colleges…

  3. Assessing validity of observational intervention studies - the Benchmarking Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Malmivaara, Antti

    2016-09-01

    Benchmarking Controlled Trial (BCT) is a concept which covers all observational studies aiming to assess impact of interventions or health care system features to patients and populations. To create and pilot test a checklist for appraising methodological validity of a BCT. The checklist was created by extracting the most essential elements from the comprehensive set of criteria in the previous paper on BCTs. Also checklists and scientific papers on observational studies and respective systematic reviews were utilized. Ten BCTs published in the Lancet and in the New England Journal of Medicine were used to assess feasibility of the created checklist. The appraised studies seem to have several methodological limitations, some of which could be avoided in planning, conducting and reporting phases of the studies. The checklist can be used for planning, conducting, reporting, reviewing, and critical reading of observational intervention studies. However, the piloted checklist should be validated in further studies. Key messages Benchmarking Controlled Trial (BCT) is a concept which covers all observational studies aiming to assess impact of interventions or health care system features to patients and populations. This paper presents a checklist for appraising methodological validity of BCTs and pilot-tests the checklist with ten BCTs published in leading medical journals. The appraised studies seem to have several methodological limitations, some of which could be avoided in planning, conducting and reporting phases of the studies. The checklist can be used for planning, conducting, reporting, reviewing, and critical reading of observational intervention studies.

  4. Conductive keratoplasty: histological study of human corneas.

    PubMed

    Naoumidi, Tatiana L; Pallikaris, Ioannis G; Naoumidi, Irini I; Astyrakakis, Nikolaos I

    2005-12-01

    To determine the morphologic changes in human corneas over time following radiofrequency-based conductive keratoplasty (CK) treatment. Prospective, observational case series. In a single-center study six human corneas of six patients with localized peripheral keratoconus underwent CK treatment followed by penetrating keratoplasty. Three spots were applied in the periphery of each cornea (6 mm optical zone). Corneal buttons were examined with light and electron microscopy at different postoperative intervals up to 6 months post-CK. In samples assessed on day one post-CK, small areas of detachment between the basal layer of epithelial cells and Bowman's layer were observed. At 1 week after the CK procedure, the epithelium appeared almost normal. Endothelium and Descemet's membrane had no alterations. In all samples, thermally induced misconfiguration of collagen fibers, described as "crumpled" changes of collagen layers, was observed reaching 75% to 80% of the stromal depth. The area of alterations had a cylindrical shape with a diameter of 120 mum. The conductive keratoplasty procedure produced collagen "crumpling and splitting" changes in human corneas, which were observed during the follow-up of 6 months. Areas adjacent to treatment site were minimally damaged.

  5. Conducting a multi family member interview study.

    PubMed

    Reczek, Corinne

    2014-06-01

    Family researchers have long recognized the utility of incorporating interview data from multiple family members. Yet, relatively few contemporary scholars utilize such an approach due to methodological underdevelopment. This article contributes to family scholarship by providing a roadmap for developing and executing in-depth interview studies that include more than one family member. Specifically, it outlines the epistemological frames that most commonly underlie this approach, illustrates thematic research questions that it best addresses, and critically reviews the best methodological practices of conducting research with this approach. The three most common approaches are addressed in depth: separate interviews with each family member, dyadic or group interviews with multiple family members, and a combined approach that uses separate and dyadic or group interviews. This article speaks to family scholars who are at the beginning stages of their research project but are unsure of the best qualitative approach to answer a given research question. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  6. Validity and Reproducibility of the Iodine Dietary Intake Questionnaire Assessment Conducted for Young Polish Women

    PubMed Central

    Malowaniec, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse a designed brief iodine dietary intake questionnaire based on a food frequency assessment (IOdine Dietary INtake Evaluation-Food Frequency Questionnaire—IODINE-FFQ), including the assessment of validity and reproducibility in a group of 90 Polish women aged 20–35 years. Participants collected 3-day dietary records and filled in the IODINE-FFQ twice (FFQ1—directly after the dietary record and FFQ2—6 weeks later). The analysis included an assessment of validity (comparison with the results of the 3-day dietary record) and of reproducibility (comparison of the results obtained twice—FFQ1 and FFQ2). In the analysis of validity, a Bland-Altman index of 5.5% and 4.4% was recorded, respectively for FFQ1 and FFQ2. In the analysis of reproducibility it was 6.7%, but the share of individuals correctly classified into tertiles was over 70% (weighted κ of 0.675). It was stated, that assessment of IODINE-FFQ revealed a satisfactory level of validity and reproducibility in the analysis of Bland-Alman plot. The IODINE-FFQ may be indicated as a tool for the assessment of iodine intake in the young women in Poland, however further studies should be considered in order to obtain the practical tool for public health specialists. Due to the lack of validated iodine-specific food frequency questionnaires for countries of Eastern Europe, the IODINE-FFQ may be adjusted for courtiers other than Poland including iodine-fortified products. PMID:28661461

  7. Copper Conductivity Model Development and Validation Using Flyer Plate Experiments on the Z-machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riford, L.; Lemke, R. W.; Cochrane, K.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetically accelerated flyer plate experiments done on Sandia's Z-machine provide insight into a multitude of materials problems at high energies and densities including conductivity model development and validation. In an experiment with ten Cu flyer plates of thicknesses 500-1000 μm, VISAR measurements exhibit a characteristic jump in the velocity correlated with magnetic field burn-through and the expansion of melted material at the free surface. The experiment is modeled using Sandia's shock and multiphysics MHD code ALEGRA. Simulated free surface velocities are within 1% of the measured data early in time, but divergence occurs at the feature, where the simulation indicates a slower burn through time. The cause was found to be in the Cu conductivity model's compressed regime. The model was improved by lowering the conductivity in the region 12.5-16 g/cc and 350-16000 K with a novel parameter based optimization method using the velocity feature as a figure of merit. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U. S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Code Validation Study for Base Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ascoli, Edward P.; Heiba, Adel H.; Lagnado, Ronald R.; Ungewitter, Ronald J.; Williams, Morgan

    1993-01-01

    New and old rocket launch concepts recommend the clustering of motors for improved lift capability. The flowfield of the base region of the rocket is very complex and can contain high temperature plume gases. These hot gases can cause catastrophic problems if not adequately designed for. To assess the base region characteristics, advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used. As a precursor to these calculations the CFD code requires validation on base flows. The primary objective of this code validation study was to establish a high level of confidence in predicting base flows with the USA CFD code. USA has been extensively validated for fundamental flows and other applications. However, base heating flows have a number of unique characteristics so it was necessary to extend the existing validation for this class of problems. In preparation for the planned NLS 1.5 Stage base heating analysis, six case sets were studied to extend the USA code validation data base. This presentation gives a cursive review of three of these cases. The cases presented include a 2D axi-symmetric study, a 3D real nozzle study, and a 3D multi-species study. The results of all the studies show good general agreement with data with no adjustments to the base numerical algorithms or physical models in the code. The study proved the capability of the USA code for modeling base flows within the accuracy of available data.

  9. Code validation study for base flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascoli, Edward P.; Heiba, Adel H.; Lagnado, Ronald R.; Ungewitter, Ronald J.; Williams, Morgan

    1993-07-01

    New and old rocket launch concepts recommend the clustering of motors for improved lift capability. The flowfield of the base region of the rocket is very complex and can contain high temperature plume gases. These hot gases can cause catastrophic problems if not adequately designed for. To assess the base region characteristics, advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used. As a precursor to these calculations the CFD code requires validation on base flows. The primary objective of this code validation study was to establish a high level of confidence in predicting base flows with the USA CFD code. USA has been extensively validated for fundamental flows and other applications. However, base heating flows have a number of unique characteristics so it was necessary to extend the existing validation for this class of problems. In preparation for the planned NLS 1.5 Stage base heating analysis, six case sets were studied to extend the USA code validation data base. This presentation gives a cursive review of three of these cases. The cases presented include a 2D axi-symmetric study, a 3D real nozzle study, and a 3D multi-species study. The results of all the studies show good general agreement with data with no adjustments to the base numerical algorithms or physical models in the code. The study proved the capability of the USA code for modeling base flows within the accuracy of available data.

  10. Development and validation of an unsupervised scoring system (Autonomate) for skin conductance response analysis.

    PubMed

    Green, Steven R; Kragel, Philip A; Fecteau, Matthew E; LaBar, Kevin S

    2014-03-01

    The skin conductance response (SCR) is increasingly being used as a measure of sympathetic activation concurrent with neuroscience measurements. We present a method of automated analysis of SCR data in the contexts of event-related cognitive tasks and nonspecific responding to complex stimuli. The primary goal of the method is to accurately measure the classical trough-to-peak amplitude of SCR in a fashion closely matching manual scoring. To validate the effectiveness of the method in event-related paradigms, three archived datasets were analyzed by two manual raters, the fully-automated method (Autonomate), and three alternative software packages. Further, the ability of the method to score non-specific responses to complex stimuli was validated against manual scoring. Results indicate high concordance between fully-automated and computer-assisted manual scoring methods. Given that manual scoring is error prone, subject to bias, and time consuming, the automated method may increase the efficiency and accuracy of SCR data analysis. © 2013.

  11. Development and validation of an unsupervised scoring system (Autonomate) for skin conductance response analysis

    PubMed Central

    Green, Steven R.; Kragel, Philip A.; Fecteau, Matthew E.; LaBar, Kevin S.

    2014-01-01

    The skin conductance response (SCR) is increasingly being used as a measure of sympathetic activation concurrent with neuroscience measurements. We present a method of automated analysis of SCR data in the contexts of event-related cognitive tasks and nonspecific responding to complex stimuli. The primary goal of the method is to accurately measure the classical trough-to-peak amplitude of SCR in a fashion closely matching manual scoring. To validate the effectiveness of the method in event-related paradigms, three archived datasets were analyzed by two manual raters, the fully-automated method (Autonomate), and three alternative software packages. Further, the ability of the method to score non-specific responses to complex stimuli was validated against manual scoring. Results indicate high concordance between fully-automated and computer-assisted manual scoring methods. Given that manual scoring is error prone, subject to bias, and time consuming, the automated method may increase efficiency and accuracy of SCR data analysis. PMID:24184342

  12. Electrochemical Corrosion Studies in Low Conductivity Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    E.o (2) and the Tafel slopes: B - bbc/2.3(b + b,). (3) A Qomputer program has been devloped and tested earlier which allows simultaneous determinacion ...conductance of a solution made up of ions of high equivalent conductance, which is the case here. A Bode plot (log IZI vs log f) representation of

  13. NASA's Rodent Research Project: Validation of Capabilities for Conducting Long Duration Experiments in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sungshin Y.; Cole, Nicolas; Reyes, America; Lai, San-Huei; Klotz, Rebecca; Beegle, Janet E.; Wigley, Cecilia L.; Pletcher, David; Globus, Ruth K.

    2015-01-01

    Research using rodents is an essential tool for advancing biomedical research on Earth and in space. Prior rodent experiments on the Shuttle were limited by the short flight duration. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a new platform for conducting rodent experiments under long duration conditions. Rodent Research (RR)-1 was conducted to validate flight hardware, operations, and science capabilities that were developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. Twenty C57BL6J adult female mice were launched on Sept 21, 2014 in a Dragon Capsule (SpaceX-4), then transferred to the ISS for a total time of 21-22 days (10 commercial mice) or 37 days (10 validation mice). Tissues collected on-orbit were either rapidly frozen or preserved in RNAlater at -80C (n2group) until their return to Earth. Remaining carcasses on-orbit were rapidly frozen for dissection post-flight. The three controls groups at Kennedy Space Center consisted of: Basal mice euthanized at the time of launch, Vivarium controls housed in standard cages, and Ground Controls (GC) housed in flight hardware within an environmental chamber. Upon return to Earth, there were no differences in body weights between Flight (FLT) and GC at the end of the 37 days in space. Liver enzyme activity levels of FLT mice and all control mice were similar in magnitude to those of the samples that were processed under optimal conditions in the laboratory. Liver samples dissected on-orbit yielded high quality RNA (RIN8.99+-0.59, n7). Liver samples dissected post-flight from the intact, frozen FLT carcasses yielded RIN of 7.27 +- 0.52 (n6). Additionally, wet weights of various tissues were measured. Adrenal glands and spleen showed no significant differences in FLT compared to GC although thymus and livers weights were significantly greater in FLT compared to GC. Over 3,000 tissue aliquots collected post-flight from the four groups of mice were deposited into the Ames Life Science Data Archives for future Biospecimen

  14. 29 CFR 1607.14 - Technical standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... validity studies. Users choosing to validate a selection procedure by a content validity strategy should... by this strategy should therefore take particular care to assure that the validity study meets the... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Technical standards for validity studies. 1607.14 Section...

  15. 29 CFR 1607.14 - Technical standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... validity studies. Users choosing to validate a selection procedure by a content validity strategy should... by this strategy should therefore take particular care to assure that the validity study meets the... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Technical standards for validity studies. 1607.14 Section...

  16. 29 CFR 1607.14 - Technical standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... validity studies. Users choosing to validate a selection procedure by a content validity strategy should... by this strategy should therefore take particular care to assure that the validity study meets the... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Technical standards for validity studies. 1607.14 Section...

  17. 29 CFR 1607.14 - Technical standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... validity studies. Users choosing to validate a selection procedure by a content validity strategy should... by this strategy should therefore take particular care to assure that the validity study meets the... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Technical standards for validity studies. 1607.14 Section...

  18. Neuroscience Investigations: An Overview of Studies Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.

    1999-01-01

    The neural processes that mediate human spatial orientation and adaptive changes occurring in response to the sensory rearrangement encountered during orbital flight are primarily studied through second and third order responses. In the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) neuroscience investigations, the following were measured: (1) eye movements during acquisition of either static or moving visual targets, (2) postural and locomotor responses provoked by unexpected movement of the support surface, changes in the interaction of visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular information, changes in the major postural muscles via descending pathways, or changes in locomotor pathways, and (3) verbal reports of perceived self-orientation and self-motion which enhance and complement conclusions drawn from the analysis of oculomotor, postural, and locomotor responses. In spaceflight operations, spatial orientation can be defined as situational awareness, where crew member perception of attitude, position, or motion of the spacecraft or other objects in three-dimensional space, including orientation of one's own body, is congruent with actual physical events. Perception of spatial orientation is determined by integrating information from several sensory modalities. This involves higher levels of processing within the central nervous system that control eye movements, locomotion, and stable posture. Spaceflight operational problems occur when responses to the incorrectly perceived spatial orientation are compensatory in nature. Neuroscience investigations were conducted in conjunction with U. S. Space Shuttle flights to evaluate possible changes in the ability of an astronaut to land the Shuttle or effectively perform an emergency post-landing egress following microgravity adaptation during space flights of variable length. While the results of various sensory motor and spatial orientation tests could have an impact on future space flights, our knowledge of

  19. Thermal and electrical contact conductance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansciver, S. W.; Nilles, M.

    1985-01-01

    Prediction of electrical and thermal contact resistance for pressed, nominally flat contacts is complicated by the large number of variables which influence contact formation. This is reflected in experimental results as a wide variation in contact resistances, spanning up to six orders of magnitude. A series of experiments were performed to observe the effects of oxidation and surface roughness on contact resistance. Electrical contact resistance and thermal contact conductance from 4 to 290 K on OFHC Cu contacts are reported. Electrical contact resistance was measured with a 4-wire DC technique. Thermal contact conductance was determined by steady-state longitudinal heat flow. Corrections for the bulk contribution ot the overall measured resistance were made, with the remaining resistance due solely to the presence of the contact.

  20. 40 CFR 792.130 - Conduct of a study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conduct of a study. 792.130 Section... ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Protocol for and Conduct of A Study § 792.130 Conduct of a study. (a) The study shall be conducted in accordance with the protocol. (b) The test...

  1. 40 CFR 792.130 - Conduct of a study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conduct of a study. 792.130 Section... ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Protocol for and Conduct of A Study § 792.130 Conduct of a study. (a) The study shall be conducted in accordance with the protocol. (b) The test...

  2. 40 CFR 792.130 - Conduct of a study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conduct of a study. 792.130 Section... ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Protocol for and Conduct of A Study § 792.130 Conduct of a study. (a) The study shall be conducted in accordance with the protocol. (b) The test...

  3. 40 CFR 792.130 - Conduct of a study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Conduct of a study. 792.130 Section 792... (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Protocol for and Conduct of A Study § 792.130 Conduct of a study. (a) The study shall be conducted in accordance with the protocol. (b) The test systems shall...

  4. 40 CFR 792.130 - Conduct of a study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conduct of a study. 792.130 Section... ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Protocol for and Conduct of A Study § 792.130 Conduct of a study. (a) The study shall be conducted in accordance with the protocol. (b) The test...

  5. CFD Validation Studies for Hypersonic Flow Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of experiments to measure pressure and heating for code validation involving hypersonic, laminar, separated flows was conducted at the Calspan-University at Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) in the Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel. The experimental data serves as a focus for a code validation session but are not available to the authors until the conclusion of this session. The first set of experiments considered here involve Mach 9.5 and Mach 11.3 N2 flow over a hollow cylinder-flare with 30 degree flare angle at several Reynolds numbers sustaining laminar, separated flow. Truncated and extended flare configurations are considered. The second set of experiments, at similar conditions, involves flow over a sharp, double cone with fore-cone angle of 25 degrees and aft-cone angle of 55 degrees. Both sets of experiments involve 30 degree compressions. Location of the separation point in the numerical simulation is extremely sensitive to the level of grid refinement in the numerical predictions. The numerical simulations also show a significant influence of Reynolds number on extent of separation. Flow unsteadiness was easily introduced into the double cone simulations using aggressive relaxation parameters that normally promote convergence.

  6. Conduction Velocity of the Uterine Contraction in Serial Magnetomyogram (MMG) Data: Event Based Simulation and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Preissl, Hubert; Lowery, Curtis L.; Eswaran, Hari; Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to calculate the conduction velocity (CV) of the uterine contraction bursts in magnetomyogram (MMG) signals measured using a multichannel SQUID array. For this purpose, we partition the sensor coordinates into four different quadrants and identify the contractile bursts using a previously proposed Hilbert-wavelet transform approach. If contractile burst is identified in more than one quadrant, we calculate the center of gravity (CoG) in each quadrant for each time point as the sum of the product of the sensor coordinates with the Hilbert amplitude of the MMG signals normalized by the sum of the Hilbert amplitude of the signals over all sensors. Following this we compute the delay between the CoGs of all (six) possible quadrant pairs combinations. As a first step, we validate this approach by simulating a stochastic model based on independent second-order autoregressive processes (AR2) and we divide them into 30 second disjoint windows and insert burst activity at specific time instances in preselected sensors. Also we introduce a lag of 5 ± 1 seconds between different quadrants. Using our approach we calculate the CoG of the signals in a quadrant. To this end, we compute the delay between CoGs obtained from different quadrants and show that our approach is able to reliably capture the delay incorporated in the model. We apply the proposed approach to 19 serial MMG data obtained from two subjects and show an increase in the CV as the subjects approached labor. PMID:22255713

  7. 40 CFR 160.130 - Conduct of a study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conduct of a study. 160.130 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Protocol for and Conduct of a Study § 160.130 Conduct of a study. (a) The study... conformity with the protocol. (c) Specimens shall be identified by test system, study, nature, and date...

  8. 40 CFR 160.130 - Conduct of a study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conduct of a study. 160.130 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Protocol for and Conduct of a Study § 160.130 Conduct of a study. (a) The study... conformity with the protocol. (c) Specimens shall be identified by test system, study, nature, and date...

  9. 40 CFR 160.130 - Conduct of a study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conduct of a study. 160.130 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Protocol for and Conduct of a Study § 160.130 Conduct of a study. (a) The study... conformity with the protocol. (c) Specimens shall be identified by test system, study, nature, and date...

  10. 40 CFR 160.130 - Conduct of a study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conduct of a study. 160.130 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Protocol for and Conduct of a Study § 160.130 Conduct of a study. (a) The study... conformity with the protocol. (c) Specimens shall be identified by test system, study, nature, and date...

  11. 40 CFR 160.130 - Conduct of a study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conduct of a study. 160.130 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Protocol for and Conduct of a Study § 160.130 Conduct of a study. (a) The study... conformity with the protocol. (c) Specimens shall be identified by test system, study, nature, and date...

  12. 40 CFR 761.392 - Preparing validation study samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Preparing validation study samples..., AND USE PROHIBITIONS Comparison Study for Validating a New Performance-Based Decontamination Solvent Under § 761.79(d)(4) § 761.392 Preparing validation study samples. (a)(1) To validate a procedure...

  13. 40 CFR 761.392 - Preparing validation study samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Preparing validation study samples..., AND USE PROHIBITIONS Comparison Study for Validating a New Performance-Based Decontamination Solvent Under § 761.79(d)(4) § 761.392 Preparing validation study samples. (a)(1) To validate a procedure...

  14. 40 CFR 761.392 - Preparing validation study samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Preparing validation study samples..., AND USE PROHIBITIONS Comparison Study for Validating a New Performance-Based Decontamination Solvent Under § 761.79(d)(4) § 761.392 Preparing validation study samples. (a)(1) To validate a procedure...

  15. 18 CFR 5.15 - Conduct of studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Conduct of studies. 5... Conduct of studies. (a) Implementation. The potential applicant must gather information and conduct studies as provided for in the approved study plan and schedule. (b) Progress reports. The...

  16. 18 CFR 5.15 - Conduct of studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Conduct of studies. 5... Conduct of studies. (a) Implementation. The potential applicant must gather information and conduct studies as provided for in the approved study plan and schedule. (b) Progress reports. The...

  17. 18 CFR 5.15 - Conduct of studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conduct of studies. 5... Conduct of studies. (a) Implementation. The potential applicant must gather information and conduct studies as provided for in the approved study plan and schedule. (b) Progress reports. The...

  18. Developing the Irrational Beliefs in Mathematics Scale (IBIMS): A Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Deniz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is developing a valid and reliable scale intended to determine the irrational beliefs of students in mathematics. The study was conducted with a study group consisting of 700 students in 2015-2016 academic year. Expert opinions were received for the content and face validity of the scale, and the Exploratory Factor…

  19. 18 CFR 5.15 - Conduct of studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to the facts of the case, a demonstration that: (1) Approved studies were not conducted as provided... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Conduct of studies. 5... Conduct of studies. (a) Implementation. The potential applicant must gather information and...

  20. 18 CFR 5.15 - Conduct of studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to the facts of the case, a demonstration that: (1) Approved studies were not conducted as provided... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Conduct of studies. 5... Conduct of studies. (a) Implementation. The potential applicant must gather information and...

  1. Conductivity and electrical studies of plasticized carboxymethyl cellulose based proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa, M. I. N.; Noor, N. A. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolytes (SBE) comprises of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as polymer host, ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN) as doping salt and ethylene carbonate (EC) as plasticizer has been prepared via solution casting technique. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was carried out to study the conductivity and electrical properties of plasticized CMC-NH4SCN SBE system over a wide range of frequency between 50 Hz and 1 MHz at temperature range of 303 to 353 K. Upon addition of plasticizer into CMC-NH4SCN SBE system, the conductivity increased from 10-5 to 10-2 Scm-1. The highest conductivity was obtained by the electrolyte containing 10 wt.% of EC. The conductivity of plasticized CMC-NH4SCN SBE system by various temperatures obeyed Arrhenius law where the ionic conductivity increased as the temperature increased. The activation energy, Ea was found to decrease with enhancement of EC concentration. Dielectric studies for the highest conductivity electrolyte obeyed non-Debye behavior. The conduction mechanism for the highest conductivity electrolyte was determined by employing Jonsher's universal power law and thus, can be represented by the quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT) model.

  2. Discriminant validity study of Achilles enthesis ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Expósito Molinero, María Rosa; de Miguel Mendieta, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    We want to know if the ultrasound examination of the Achilles tendon in spondyloarthritis is different compared to other rheumatic diseases. We studied 97 patients divided into five groups: rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, gout, chondrocalcinosis and osteoarthritis, exploring six elementary lesions in 194 Achilles entheses examined. In our study the total index ultrasonographic Achilles is higher in spondyloarthritis with significant differences. The worst elementary spondyloarthritis lesions for discriminations against other pathologies were calcification. This study aims to demonstrate the discriminant validity of Achilles enthesitis observed by ultrasound in spondyloarthritis compared with other rheumatic diseases that may also have ultrasound abnormalities such enthesis level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  3. Turkish Adaptation of the Mentorship Effectiveness Scale: A Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yirci, Ramazan; Karakose, Turgut; Uygun, Harun; Ozdemir, Tuncay Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to adapt the Mentoring Relationship Effectiveness Scale to Turkish, and to conduct validity and reliability tests regarding the scale. The study group consisted of 156 university science students receiving graduate education. Construct validity and factor structure of the scale was analyzed first through exploratory…

  4. Reliable Digit Span: A Systematic Review and Cross-Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Ryan W.; Twumasi-Ankrah, Philip; Baade, Lyle E.; Marshall, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Reliable Digit Span (RDS) is a heavily researched symptom validity test with a recent literature review yielding more than 20 studies ranging in dates from 1994 to 2011. Unfortunately, limitations within some of the research minimize clinical generalizability. This systematic review and cross-validation study was conducted to address these…

  5. Reliable Digit Span: A Systematic Review and Cross-Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Ryan W.; Twumasi-Ankrah, Philip; Baade, Lyle E.; Marshall, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Reliable Digit Span (RDS) is a heavily researched symptom validity test with a recent literature review yielding more than 20 studies ranging in dates from 1994 to 2011. Unfortunately, limitations within some of the research minimize clinical generalizability. This systematic review and cross-validation study was conducted to address these…

  6. Turkish Adaptation of the Mentorship Effectiveness Scale: A Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yirci, Ramazan; Karakose, Turgut; Uygun, Harun; Ozdemir, Tuncay Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to adapt the Mentoring Relationship Effectiveness Scale to Turkish, and to conduct validity and reliability tests regarding the scale. The study group consisted of 156 university science students receiving graduate education. Construct validity and factor structure of the scale was analyzed first through exploratory…

  7. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center Summary of Activities Conducted in FY16

    SciTech Connect

    Gougar, Hans David

    2016-09-01

    The Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center (NEKVaC) is a new initiative by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to coordinate and focus the resources and expertise that exist with the DOE toward solving issues in modern nuclear code validation and knowledge management. In time, code owners, users, and developers will view the NEKVaC as a partner and essential resource for acquiring the best practices and latest techniques for validating codes, providing guidance in planning and executing experiments, facilitating access to and maximizing the usefulness of existing data, and preserving knowledge for continual use by nuclear professionals and organizations for their own validation needs. The scope of the NEKVaC covers many interrelated activities that will need to be cultivated carefully in the near term and managed properly once the NEKVaC is fully functional. Three areas comprise the principal mission: (1) identify and prioritize projects that extend the field of validation science and its application to modern codes, (2) develop and disseminate best practices and guidelines for high-fidelity multiphysics/multiscale analysis code development and associated experiment design, and (3) define protocols for data acquisition and knowledge preservation and provide a portal for access to databases currently scattered among numerous organizations. These mission areas, while each having a unique focus, are interdependent and complementary. Likewise, all activities supported by the NEKVaC, both near term and long term, must possess elements supporting all three areas. This cross cutting nature is essential to ensuring that activities and supporting personnel do not become “stove piped” (i.e., focused a specific function that the activity itself becomes the objective rather than achieving the larger vision). This report begins with a description of the mission areas; specifically, the role played by each major committee and the types

  8. The Global Mental Health Assessment Tool-validation in Hindi: A validity and feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vimal K.; Jagawat, Savita; Midha, Aarti; Jain, Anil; Tambi, Anil; Mangwani, Leena Kumari; Sharma, Bhawna; Dubey, Parul; Satija, Vipin; Copeland, John R. M.; Lepping, Peter; Lane, Steven; Krishna, Murali; Pangaria, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    Background: A computer-assisted interview, the Global Mental Health Assessment Tool-validation (GMHAT/PC) has been developed to assist general practitioners and other health professionals to make a quick, convenient, yet reasonably comprehensive standardized mental health assessment. GMHAT/PC has been translated into various languages including Hindi. This is the first study conducted in India, using the Hindi version GMHAT/PC of the series of studies assessing its validity in different cultures. Aim: The study aims to assess the feasibility of using a computer assisted diagnostic interview by health professionals and to examine the level of agreement between the Hindi version GMHAT/PC diagnosis and psychiatrists’ ICD-10 based clinical diagnosis. Design: Cross-sectional validation study. Setting: Psychiatric clinic of a General Hospital and an out patient (Neurology) clinic in the Teaching General Hospital in Jaipur, India. Materials and Methods: All consecutive patients attending the psychiatric out patient clinic were interviewed using GMHAT/PC and psychiatrists made a diagnosis applying ICD-10 criteria for a period of six weeks. A small sample of subjects was interviewed in a similar way in a Neurology clinic for four weeks. Results: The mean duration of interview was under 17 minutes. Most patients were pleased that they were asked about every aspect of their mental health. The agreement between psychologists’ GMHAT/PC interview diagnoses and psychiatrists’ clinical diagnoses was excellent (Kappa 0.96, sensitivity 1.00, and specificity 0.94). Conclusion: GMHAT/PC Hindi version detected mental disorders accurately and it was feasible to use GMHAT/PC in Indian settings. PMID:21267364

  9. The Global Mental Health Assessment Tool-validation in Hindi: A validity and feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vimal K; Jagawat, Savita; Midha, Aarti; Jain, Anil; Tambi, Anil; Mangwani, Leena Kumari; Sharma, Bhawna; Dubey, Parul; Satija, Vipin; Copeland, John R M; Lepping, Peter; Lane, Steven; Krishna, Murali; Pangaria, Ashok

    2010-10-01

    A computer-assisted interview, the Global Mental Health Assessment Tool-validation (GMHAT/PC) has been developed to assist general practitioners and other health professionals to make a quick, convenient, yet reasonably comprehensive standardized mental health assessment. GMHAT/PC has been translated into various languages including Hindi. This is the first study conducted in India, using the Hindi version GMHAT/PC of the series of studies assessing its validity in different cultures. The study aims to assess the feasibility of using a computer assisted diagnostic interview by health professionals and to examine the level of agreement between the Hindi version GMHAT/PC diagnosis and psychiatrists' ICD-10 based clinical diagnosis. Cross-sectional validation study. Psychiatric clinic of a General Hospital and an out patient (Neurology) clinic in the Teaching General Hospital in Jaipur, India. All consecutive patients attending the psychiatric out patient clinic were interviewed using GMHAT/PC and psychiatrists made a diagnosis applying ICD-10 criteria for a period of six weeks. A small sample of subjects was interviewed in a similar way in a Neurology clinic for four weeks. The mean duration of interview was under 17 minutes. Most patients were pleased that they were asked about every aspect of their mental health. The agreement between psychologists' GMHAT/PC interview diagnoses and psychiatrists' clinical diagnoses was excellent (Kappa 0.96, sensitivity 1.00, and specificity 0.94). GMHAT/PC Hindi version detected mental disorders accurately and it was feasible to use GMHAT/PC in Indian settings.

  10. 29 CFR 1607.5 - General standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... circumstances concerning the study, including the validation strategy used, and changes in the relevant labor... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General standards for validity studies. 1607.5 Section 1607... studies. A. Acceptable types of validity studies. For the purposes of satisfying these guidelines, users...

  11. 29 CFR 1607.5 - General standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... circumstances concerning the study, including the validation strategy used, and changes in the relevant labor... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General standards for validity studies. 1607.5 Section 1607... studies. A. Acceptable types of validity studies. For the purposes of satisfying these guidelines, users...

  12. 29 CFR 1607.5 - General standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... circumstances concerning the study, including the validation strategy used, and changes in the relevant labor... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false General standards for validity studies. 1607.5 Section 1607... studies. A. Acceptable types of validity studies. For the purposes of satisfying these guidelines, users...

  13. 29 CFR 1607.5 - General standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... circumstances concerning the study, including the validation strategy used, and changes in the relevant labor... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General standards for validity studies. 1607.5 Section 1607... studies. A. Acceptable types of validity studies. For the purposes of satisfying these guidelines, users...

  14. Validation study of Polar V800 accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Vicente, Adrián; De Cocker, Katrien; Garatachea, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Background The correct quantification of physical activity (PA) and energy expenditure (EE) in daily life is an important target for researchers and professionals. The objective of this paper is to study the validity of the Polar V800 for the quantification of PA and the estimation of EE against the ActiGraph (ActiTrainer) in healthy young adults. Methods Eighteen Caucasian active people (50% women) aged between 19–23 years wore an ActiTrainer on the right hip and a Polar V800 on the preferred wrist during 7 days. Paired samples t-tests were used to analyze differences in outcomes between devices, and Pearson’s correlation coefficients to examine the correlation between outcomes. The agreement was studied using the Bland-Altman method. Also, the association between the difference and the magnitude of the measurement (heteroscedasticity) was examined. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC value) were calculated to evaluate the ability of the devices to accurately define a person who fulfills the recommendation of 10,000 daily steps. Results The devices significantly differed from each other on all outcomes (P<0.05), except for Polar V800’s alerts vs. ActiTrainer’s 1 hour sedentary bouts (P=0.595) and Polar V800’s walking time vs. ActiTrainer’s lifestyle time (P=0.484). Heteroscedasticity analyses were significant for all outcomes, except for Kcal and sitting time. The ROC-AUC value was fair (0.781±0.048) and the sensitivity and specificity was 98% and 58%, respectively. Conclusions The Polar V800 accelerometer has a comparable validity to the accelerometer in free-living conditions, regarding “1 hour sedentary bouts” and “V800’s walking time vs. ActiTrainer’s lifestyle time” in young adults. PMID:27570772

  15. Validation study of Polar V800 accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vicente, Adrián; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; De Cocker, Katrien; Garatachea, Nuria

    2016-08-01

    The correct quantification of physical activity (PA) and energy expenditure (EE) in daily life is an important target for researchers and professionals. The objective of this paper is to study the validity of the Polar V800 for the quantification of PA and the estimation of EE against the ActiGraph (ActiTrainer) in healthy young adults. Eighteen Caucasian active people (50% women) aged between 19-23 years wore an ActiTrainer on the right hip and a Polar V800 on the preferred wrist during 7 days. Paired samples t-tests were used to analyze differences in outcomes between devices, and Pearson's correlation coefficients to examine the correlation between outcomes. The agreement was studied using the Bland-Altman method. Also, the association between the difference and the magnitude of the measurement (heteroscedasticity) was examined. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC value) were calculated to evaluate the ability of the devices to accurately define a person who fulfills the recommendation of 10,000 daily steps. The devices significantly differed from each other on all outcomes (P<0.05), except for Polar V800's alerts vs. ActiTrainer's 1 hour sedentary bouts (P=0.595) and Polar V800's walking time vs. ActiTrainer's lifestyle time (P=0.484). Heteroscedasticity analyses were significant for all outcomes, except for Kcal and sitting time. The ROC-AUC value was fair (0.781±0.048) and the sensitivity and specificity was 98% and 58%, respectively. The Polar V800 accelerometer has a comparable validity to the accelerometer in free-living conditions, regarding "1 hour sedentary bouts" and "V800's walking time vs. ActiTrainer's lifestyle time" in young adults.

  16. The validity of blood pressure kiosk validation studies: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Al Hamarneh, Yazid N; Houle, Sherilyn K D; Chatterley, Patricia; Tsuyuki, Ross T

    2013-06-01

    Public-use blood pressure (BP) kiosks are commonly used, and yet their accuracy has been questioned on the basis of the results of the published validation studies. However, the adherence of these studies to established validation standards has not been studied. We carried out a systematic review of the published peer-reviewed literature on the validity of public-use BP kiosks to assess their adherence to validation standards. With medical librarian assistance, the literature was searched systematically for studies claiming to validate kiosks up to June 2012. Studies were limited to English articles that studied adult patients and were excluded if they were carried out solely on pregnant women. Two authors independently compared the study methods with those recommended in the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation, British Hypertension Society and the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol validation standards. Nine studies were identified, of which only one came close to adhering to selected validation standard criteria, and found the device to be accurate. One study found device accuracy with poor adherence to standards, whereas the remaining seven found device inaccuracy with poor adherence to standards, therefore potentially reporting false conclusions. The majority of the reviewed studies validating public-use BP kiosks did not adhere to existing validation standards and therefore may have reported false conclusions. The one study that came close to following the validation standards found the device tested to be accurate. Readers must critically appraise the quality of validation studies published on these devices before interpreting their accuracy, and future studies should better adhere to existing validation standards to reduce the risk of reporting potentially false conclusions.

  17. Charge transport studies of proton and ion conducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versek, Craig Wm

    The development of a high-throughput impedance spectroscopy instrumentation platform for conductivity characterization of ion transport materials is outlined. Collaborative studies using this system are summarized. Charge conduction mechanisms and conductivity data for small molecule proton conducting liquids, pyrazole, imidazole, 1,2,3-triazole, 1,2,4-triazole, and select mixtures of these compounds are documented. Furthermore, proton diffusivity measurements using a Pulse Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (PFG NMR) technique for imidazole and 1,2,3-triazole binary mixtures are compared. Studies of azole functionalized discotic and linear mesogens with conductivity, structural, and thermal characterizations are detailed.

  18. 40 CFR 761.395 - A validation study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false A validation study. 761.395 Section... PROHIBITIONS Comparison Study for Validating a New Performance-Based Decontamination Solvent Under § 761.79(d)(4) § 761.395 A validation study. (a) Decontaminate the following prepared sample surfaces using...

  19. 40 CFR 761.395 - A validation study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false A validation study. 761.395 Section... PROHIBITIONS Comparison Study for Validating a New Performance-Based Decontamination Solvent Under § 761.79(d)(4) § 761.395 A validation study. (a) Decontaminate the following prepared sample surfaces using...

  20. 40 CFR 761.395 - A validation study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false A validation study. 761.395 Section... PROHIBITIONS Comparison Study for Validating a New Performance-Based Decontamination Solvent Under § 761.79(d)(4) § 761.395 A validation study. (a) Decontaminate the following prepared sample surfaces using...

  1. The birth satisfaction scale: Turkish adaptation, validation and reliability study

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Fatma Cosar; Sezer, Ayse; Merih, Yeliz Dogan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to investigate the validity and the reliability of Birth Satisfaction Scale (BSS) and to adapt it into the Turkish language. This scale is used for measuring maternal satisfaction with birth in order to evaluate women’s birth perceptions. METHODS: In this study there were 150 women who attended to inpatient postpartum clinic. The participants filled in an information form and the BSS questionnaire forms. The properties of the scale were tested by conducting reliability and validation analyses. RESULTS: BSS entails 30 Likert-type questions. It was developed by Hollins Martin and Fleming. Total scale scores ranged between 30–150 points. Higher scores from the scale mean increases in birth satisfaction. Three overarching themes were identified in Scale: service provision (home assessment, birth environment, support, relationships with health care professionals); personal attributes (ability to cope during labour, feeling in control, childbirth preparation, relationship with baby); and stress experienced during labour (distress, obstetric injuries, receiving sufficient medical care, obstetric intervention, pain, prolonged labour and baby’s health). Cronbach’s alfa coefficient was 0.62. CONCLUSION: According to the present study, BSS entails 30 Likert-type questions and evaluates women’s birth perceptions. The Turkish version of BSS has been proven to be a valid and a reliable scale. PMID:28058355

  2. The birth satisfaction scale: Turkish adaptation, validation and reliability study.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Fatma Cosar; Sezer, Ayse; Merih, Yeliz Dogan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the validity and the reliability of Birth Satisfaction Scale (BSS) and to adapt it into the Turkish language. This scale is used for measuring maternal satisfaction with birth in order to evaluate women's birth perceptions. In this study there were 150 women who attended to inpatient postpartum clinic. The participants filled in an information form and the BSS questionnaire forms. The properties of the scale were tested by conducting reliability and validation analyses. BSS entails 30 Likert-type questions. It was developed by Hollins Martin and Fleming. Total scale scores ranged between 30-150 points. Higher scores from the scale mean increases in birth satisfaction. Three overarching themes were identified in Scale: service provision (home assessment, birth environment, support, relationships with health care professionals); personal attributes (ability to cope during labour, feeling in control, childbirth preparation, relationship with baby); and stress experienced during labour (distress, obstetric injuries, receiving sufficient medical care, obstetric intervention, pain, prolonged labour and baby's health). Cronbach's alfa coefficient was 0.62. According to the present study, BSS entails 30 Likert-type questions and evaluates women's birth perceptions. The Turkish version of BSS has been proven to be a valid and a reliable scale.

  3. Sampling theory methodology applicable to data validation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chernick, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    In data validation studies, surveys are conducted to obtain information about the data collection process and the uses of the data. In many cases standard sampling techniques can be used. Two methods, stratified random sampling and cluster sampling, were used for surveys in the Form 4 data validation study. Form 4 is a data collection system on monthly generation and consumption of fuels by electric power plants. A description of those applications is given. Sometimes time and cost constraints make more sophisticated controlled sampling approaches necessary. One such approach using balanced incomplete block designs is described; an appendix surveys the existence results for these designs. Sequential methods which may prove to be more cost effective are discussed, as are sequential approaches to the problem of determining the size of a population. Problems requiring further research are also discussed. Some preliminary results on the problem of stratification with respect to more than one variable are included. The results were obtained for the Form 4 respondent population. The Form 4 study indicated that standard statistical sampling methods could be useful in data validation surveys. For example, at least 30 percent of the respondents do not report net generation as the instructions define it, and only 25 percent of the state regulatory agencies use the Form 4 data. Such inferences were possible only because statistical sampling procedures were used. 3 tables.

  4. COMPARISON OF CONDUCT DISORDER AND HYPERKINETIC CONDUCT DISORDER : A RETROSPECTIVE CLINIAL STUDY FROM NORTH INDIA

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Savita; Aga, Vimal M.; Balraj; Gupta, Nitin

    1999-01-01

    In a retrospective descriptive study of hyperkinetic conduct disorders (HCD) and conduct disorders (CD), as per ICD-10 diagnostic criteria, their clinical and phenomenological correlates were compared; with an aim of describing their distinctive clinical profiles. 20 cases of HCD and 25 cases of CD were compared on socio-demographic variables, temperament and specified clinical variables. The two groups differed in terms of the HCD group having younger age of onset, a more gradual development of and longer duration of conduct symptoms as compared to CD children. HCD children also had temperamental deviance (in the form of inattention, distractibility), lower IQ, more perinatal complications and delayed milestones as compared to the CD group; which made significant contribution to discriminant functions between the two groups. Results point towards different pathways of development of conduct symptomatology in HCD group as compared to the CD group PMID:21455373

  5. Experimental validation of an eddy current probe for defect detection in thick conducting specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesh Raja, P.; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents numerical modeling and experimental measurements of eddy current (EC) probe for detecting subsurface defects in 10 mm to 15 mm thick conducting specimen. Measurements are presented for a pancake air core coil to detect subsurface defect in 10 mm thick aluminum slab. EC coil parameters namely inner radius(r1), and outer radius(r2), and operating frequency (f) are optimized for deeper penetration in the conducting plate (35 MS/m) for a given coil height(h), and lift off distance (d). Preliminary simulation results are presented for a subsurface defect in 15 mm thick aluminium plate for the optimized EC coil parameters.

  6. 40 CFR 761.326 - Conducting the comparison study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conducting the comparison study. 761...-liquid PCB Remediation Waste Samples § 761.326 Conducting the comparison study. Extract or analyze the comparison study samples using the alternative method. For an alternative extraction method or alternative...

  7. 40 CFR 761.326 - Conducting the comparison study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conducting the comparison study. 761...-liquid PCB Remediation Waste Samples § 761.326 Conducting the comparison study. Extract or analyze the comparison study samples using the alternative method. For an alternative extraction method or alternative...

  8. 40 CFR 761.326 - Conducting the comparison study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conducting the comparison study. 761...-liquid PCB Remediation Waste Samples § 761.326 Conducting the comparison study. Extract or analyze the comparison study samples using the alternative method. For an alternative extraction method or alternative...

  9. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center – Summary of Activities Conducted in FY15

    SciTech Connect

    Gougar, Hans David; Hong, Bonnie Colleen

    2016-05-01

    The Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center (NEKVaC) is a new initiative by the Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory to coordinate and focus the resources and expertise that exist with the DOE Complex toward solving issues in modern nuclear code validation. In time, code owners, users, and developers will view the Center as a partner and essential resource for acquiring the best practices and latest techniques for validating codes, for guidance in planning and executing experiments, for facilitating access to, and maximizing the usefulness of, existing data, and for preserving knowledge for continual use by nuclear professionals and organizations for their own validation needs. The scope of the center covers many inter-related activities which will need to be cultivated carefully in the near-term and managed properly once the Center is fully functional. Three areas comprise the principal mission: 1) identification and prioritization of projects that extend the field of validation science and its application to modern codes, 2) adapt or develop best practices and guidelines for high fidelity multiphysics/multiscale analysis code development and associated experiment design, and 3) define protocols for data acquisition and knowledge preservation and provide a portal for access to databases currently scattered among numerous organizations. These mission areas, while each having a unique focus, are inter-dependent and complementary. Likewise, all activities supported by the NEKVaC, both near-term and long-term), must possess elements supporting all three. This cross-cutting nature is essential to ensuring that activities and supporting personnel do not become ‘stove-piped’, i.e. focused so much on a specific function that the activity itself becomes the objective rather than the achieving the larger vision. Achieving the broader vision will require a healthy and accountable level of activity in each of the areas. This will take time and

  10. 49 CFR 40.91 - What validity tests must laboratories conduct on primary specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Drug Testing Laboratories § 40.91 What... testing under § 40.89, you must conduct it in accordance with the requirements of this section. (a) You... responses characteristic of an adulterant obtained during initial or confirmatory drug tests (e.g., non...

  11. 49 CFR 40.91 - What validity tests must laboratories conduct on primary specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Drug Testing Laboratories § 40.91 What... testing under § 40.89, you must conduct it in accordance with the requirements of this section. (a) You... responses characteristic of an adulterant obtained during initial or confirmatory drug tests (e.g., non...

  12. 49 CFR 40.91 - What validity tests must laboratories conduct on primary specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Drug Testing Laboratories § 40.91 What... testing under § 40.89, you must conduct it in accordance with the requirements of this section. (a) You... responses characteristic of an adulterant obtained during initial or confirmatory drug tests (e.g., non...

  13. 49 CFR 40.91 - What validity tests must laboratories conduct on primary specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Drug Testing Laboratories § 40.91 What... testing under § 40.89, you must conduct it in accordance with the requirements of this section. (a) You... responses characteristic of an adulterant obtained during initial or confirmatory drug tests (e.g., non...

  14. 49 CFR 40.91 - What validity tests must laboratories conduct on primary specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Drug Testing Laboratories § 40.91 What... testing under § 40.89, you must conduct it in accordance with the requirements of this section. (a) You... responses characteristic of an adulterant obtained during initial or confirmatory drug tests (e.g., non...

  15. [Validation study of the Depressive Experience Questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Atger, F; Frasson, G; Loas, G; Guibourgé, S; Corcos, M; Perez Diaz, F; Speranza, M; Venisse, J-L; Lang, F; Stephan, Ph; Bizouard, P; Flament, M; Jeammet, Ph

    2003-01-01

    -reliant and as sociotropic and autonomous . Our work presents the results of a validation study of both forms of Blatt's questionnaire (for adults--DEQ--and for adolescents--DEQA) translated in French in a large population of normal subjects, aged 15 to 45 years. DEQ and DEQ-A were compared by inspection of items loading strongly on each factor and by correlation of the three factors of adults and adolescents. The exploratory factor analysis of DEQ and DEQA revealed three orthogonal factors, corresponding with Blatt's original dimensions. Consistency and external validity were adequate for all 3 factors of DEQ and DEQ-A. Anaclitism and self-criticism dimensions of DEQ and DEQ-A correlate positively with measures of depression (DSM-IV, Beck Depression Inventory), consistently with the results obtained by Blatt. Differently from this author, anaclitism appears to be less differentiated in males than in females, suggesting that the concept of dependence could assume different relevance for men and women.

  16. MEPROCS framework for Craniofacial Superimposition: Validation study.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, O; Vicente, R; Navega, D; Campomanes-Álvarez, C; Cattaneo, C; Jankauskas, R; Huete, M I; Navarro, F; Hardiman, R; Ruiz, E; Imaizumi, K; Cavalli, F; Veselovskaya, E; Humpire, D; Cardoso, J; Collini, F; Mazzarelli, D; Gibelli, D; Damas, S

    2016-11-01

    Craniofacial Superimposition (CFS) involves the process of overlaying a skull with a number of ante-mortem images of an individual and the analysis of their morphological correspondence. The lack of unified working protocols and the absence of commonly accepted standards, led to contradictory consensus regarding its reliability. One of the more important aims of 'New Methodologies and Protocols of Forensic Identification by Craniofacial Superimposition (MEPROCS)' project was to propose a common framework for CFS, what can be considered the first international standard in the field. The framework aimed to serve as a roadmap for avoiding particular assumptions that could bias the process. At the same time, it provides some empirical support to certain practices, technological means, and morphological criteria expected to facilitate the application of the CFS task and to improve its reliability. In order to confirm the utility and potential benefits of the framework use, there is a need to empirically evaluate it in CFS identification scenarios as close as possible to the reality. Thus, the purpose of this study is to validate the CFS framework developed. For that aim 12 participants were asked to report about a variable number of CFS following all the recommendations of the framework. The results are analysed and discussed according to the framework understanding and fulfilment, the participants' performance, and the correlation between expected decisions and those given by the participants. In view of the quantitative results and qualitative examination criteria we can conclude that those who follow the MEPROCS recommendations improve their performance.

  17. Maternal Attributions and Young Children's Conduct Problems: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charlotte; Gardner, Frances; Burton, Jennifer; Leung, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    The association between negative maternal attributions and child conduct problems is well established in correlational studies. However, little is known about how these variables influence each other over time. The present study examined patterns of prediction over time between maternal attributions and pre-school conduct problems. Sixty mothers…

  18. Maternal Attributions and Young Children's Conduct Problems: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charlotte; Gardner, Frances; Burton, Jennifer; Leung, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    The association between negative maternal attributions and child conduct problems is well established in correlational studies. However, little is known about how these variables influence each other over time. The present study examined patterns of prediction over time between maternal attributions and pre-school conduct problems. Sixty mothers…

  19. Conceptualizing and Validating Marital Quality in Beijing: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiping; Xu, Xiaohe; Tsang, Sandra K M

    2013-08-01

    Since the inception of the economic reform, marital relationship in urban China has undergone dramatic transformations. Though the burgeoning body of scholarly research has demonstrated that marital quality has increasingly become an important aspect of family life among married persons in urban China, both the conceptualization and measurement of marital quality remain underdeveloped. The purpose of this pilot study is to develop and validate a comprehensive and culturally appropriate marital quality scale, namely the Chinese Marital Quality Scale (CMQS). Results from the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) conducted on a sample of 387 married persons from Beijing indicate that the CMQS can be conceptualized as a two-factorial and multidimensional construct, encompassing marital happiness, marital interaction, marital disagreement, marital problem, and marital instability. Additional statistical analyses also indicate that the CMQS has exhibited satisfactory reliability and concurrent validity. It is thus concluded that the CMQS is a reliable and valid instrument to measure marital quality in contemporary Beijing and possibly in other Chinese cities.

  20. Conducting the Salary-Equity Study: A Consultant's View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Gerald W.; McLaughlin, Josetta S.

    2003-01-01

    A case study approach illustrates the various statistical and political issues that analysts encounter when conducting a salary-equity study for a single institution. Highlights the importance of integrating various stakeholders in the process of assessing salary equity. (EV)

  1. Design and Performance Validation of a Conductively Heated Sealed-Vessel Reactor for Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Obermayer, David; Znidar, Desiree; Glotz, Gabriel; Stadler, Alexander; Dallinger, Doris; Kappe, C Oliver

    2016-12-02

    A newly designed robust and safe laboratory scale reactor for syntheses under sealed-vessel conditions at 250 °C maximum temperature and 20 bar maximum pressure is presented. The reactor employs conductive heating of a sealed glass vessel via a stainless steel heating jacket and implements both online temperature and pressure monitoring in addition to magnetic stirring. Reactions are performed in 10 mL borosilicate vials that are sealed with a silicone cap and Teflon septum and allow syntheses to be performed on a 2-6 mL scale. This conductively heated reactor is compared to a standard single-mode sealed-vessel microwave instrument with respect to heating and cooling performance, stirring efficiency, and temperature and pressure control. Importantly, comparison of the reaction outcome for a number of different synthetic transformations performed side by side in the new device and a standard microwave reactor suggest that results obtained using microwave conditions can be readily mimicked in the operationally much simpler and smaller conventionally heated device.

  2. Identification of Learning Disabilities in Ontario: A Validity Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacIntyre, Robert B.; And Others

    The study examined the process by which diagnostic data on children thought to have learning disabilities (LD) are generated and used. Emphasis was placed on the validity of test instruments in common use in the field. Since part of the practical validity of any instrument used to identify an LD child rests on the validity of the LD construct…

  3. Identification of Learning Disabilities in Ontario: A Validity Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacIntyre, Robert B.; And Others

    The study examined the process by which diagnostic data on children thought to have learning disabilities (LD) are generated and used. Emphasis was placed on the validity of test instruments in common use in the field. Since part of the practical validity of any instrument used to identify an LD child rests on the validity of the LD construct…

  4. Expert system verification and validation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Scott W.; Hamilton, David

    1992-01-01

    Five workshops on verification and validation (V&V) of expert systems (ES) where taught during this recent period of performance. Two key activities, previously performed under this contract, supported these recent workshops (1) Survey of state-of-the-practice of V&V of ES and (2) Development of workshop material and first class. The first activity involved performing an extensive survey of ES developers in order to answer several questions regarding the state-of-the-practice in V&V of ES. These questions related to the amount and type of V&V done and the successfulness of this V&V. The next key activity involved developing an intensive hands-on workshop in V&V of ES. This activity involved surveying a large number of V&V techniques, conventional as well as ES specific ones. In addition to explaining the techniques, we showed how each technique could be applied on a sample problem. References were included in the workshop material, and cross referenced to techniques, so that students would know where to go to find additional information about each technique. In addition to teaching specific techniques, we included an extensive amount of material on V&V concepts and how to develop a V&V plan for an ES project. We felt this material was necessary so that developers would be prepared to develop an orderly and structured approach to V&V. That is, they would have a process that supported the use of the specific techniques. Finally, to provide hands-on experience, we developed a set of case study exercises. These exercises were to provide an opportunity for the students to apply all the material (concepts, techniques, and planning material) to a realistic problem.

  5. Dynamics of canopy stomatal conductance, transpiration, and evaporation in a temperate deciduous forest, validated by carbonyl sulfide uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehr, Richard; Commane, Róisín; Munger, J. William; McManus, J. Barry; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Saleska, Scott R.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2017-01-01

    Stomatal conductance influences both photosynthesis and transpiration, thereby coupling the carbon and water cycles and affecting surface-atmosphere energy exchange. The environmental response of stomatal conductance has been measured mainly on the leaf scale, and theoretical canopy models are relied on to upscale stomatal conductance for application in terrestrial ecosystem models and climate prediction. Here we estimate stomatal conductance and associated transpiration in a temperate deciduous forest directly on the canopy scale via two independent approaches: (i) from heat and water vapor exchange and (ii) from carbonyl sulfide (OCS) uptake. We use the eddy covariance method to measure the net ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of OCS, and we use a flux-gradient approach to separate canopy OCS uptake from soil OCS uptake. We find that the seasonal and diurnal patterns of canopy stomatal conductance obtained by the two approaches agree (to within ±6 % diurnally), validating both methods. Canopy stomatal conductance increases linearly with above-canopy light intensity (in contrast to the leaf scale, where stomatal conductance shows declining marginal increases) and otherwise depends only on the diffuse light fraction, the canopy-average leaf-to-air water vapor gradient, and the total leaf area. Based on stomatal conductance, we partition evapotranspiration (ET) and find that evaporation increases from 0 to 40 % of ET as the growing season progresses, driven primarily by rising soil temperature and secondarily by rainfall. Counterintuitively, evaporation peaks at the time of year when the soil is dry and the air is moist. Our method of ET partitioning avoids concerns about mismatched scales or measurement types because both ET and transpiration are derived from eddy covariance data. Neither of the two ecosystem models tested predicts the observed dynamics of evaporation or transpiration, indicating that ET partitioning such as that provided here is needed to further

  6. Dynamics of canopy stomatal conductance, transpiration, and evaporation in a temperate deciduous forest, validated by carbonyl sulfide uptake

    DOE PAGES

    Wehr, Richard; Commane, Roisin; Munger, J. William; ...

    2017-01-26

    Stomatal conductance influences both photosynthesis and transpiration, thereby coupling the carbon and water cycles and affecting surface–atmosphere energy exchange. The environmental response of stomatal conductance has been measured mainly on the leaf scale, and theoretical canopy models are relied on to upscale stomatal conductance for application in terrestrial ecosystem models and climate prediction. Here we estimate stomatal conductance and associated transpiration in a temperate deciduous forest directly on the canopy scale via two independent approaches: (i) from heat and water vapor exchange and (ii) from carbonyl sulfide (OCS) uptake. We use the eddy covariance method to measure the net ecosystem–atmosphere exchange ofmore » OCS, and we use a flux-gradient approach to separate canopy OCS uptake from soil OCS uptake. We find that the seasonal and diurnal patterns of canopy stomatal conductance obtained by the two approaches agree (to within ±6 % diurnally), validating both methods. Canopy stomatal conductance increases linearly with above-canopy light intensity (in contrast to the leaf scale, where stomatal conductance shows declining marginal increases) and otherwise depends only on the diffuse light fraction, the canopy-average leaf-to-air water vapor gradient, and the total leaf area. Based on stomatal conductance, we partition evapotranspiration (ET) and find that evaporation increases from 0 to 40 % of ET as the growing season progresses, driven primarily by rising soil temperature and secondarily by rainfall. Counterintuitively, evaporation peaks at the time of year when the soil is dry and the air is moist. Our method of ET partitioning avoids concerns about mismatched scales or measurement types because both ET and transpiration are derived from eddy covariance data. Neither of the two ecosystem models tested predicts the observed dynamics of evaporation or transpiration, indicating that ET partitioning such as that provided here is needed

  7. A Simulation Study of Electrical Fiber Composite Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezdour, D.; Sahli, S.

    2008-11-01

    Percolation concept has been used in this study to estimate the amount of conductive fibers embedded in polymeric matrix, necessary to establish conduction in this kind of composites. The resistance of composite materials is calculated by simulating composite samples with different size, containing conductive fibers with various lengths Calculation is based on detecting conductive pathways through the insulating matrix, these pathways are assumed to be resistances in parallel. Electrical resistance curves showed a percolative behavior of the samples versus volume fraction of filler. Lower conduction thresholds are obtained for fiber aspect ratio of 20 and sample size of 100. The electrical resistivity and the conduction thresholds of the carbon fiber reinforced polycarbonate composites have been characterized. Simulation results are in good agreement with an experimental result found in the literature.

  8. Validity Studies of the Kindergarten Screening Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Herbert L.; Doughtie, Eugene B.

    Research is reviewed on the validity of the Kindergarten Screening Inventory (KSI), an instrument developed by the Houston, Texas Independent School District to screen kindergarten students for possible difficulties that could lead to learning problems. The KSI includes eye-hand coordination, language learning, gross-motor subtests, as well as…

  9. College of the Canyons Predictive Validity Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA. Office of Institutional Development.

    Matriculation regulations in California require that community colleges which adopt standardized placement tests demonstrate that the tests are valid predictors of future course success. A positive correlation of at least .35 between test score and subsequent student performance in a particular course is needed to demonstrate the predictive…

  10. SAMICS Validation. SAMICS Support Study, Phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    SAMICS provides a consistent basis for estimating array costs and compares production technology costs. A review and a validation of the SAMICS model are reported. The review had the following purposes: (1) to test the computational validity of the computer model by comparison with preliminary hand calculations based on conventional cost estimating techniques; (2) to review and improve the accuracy of the cost relationships being used by the model: and (3) to provide an independent verification to users of the model's value in decision making for allocation of research and developement funds and for investment in manufacturing capacity. It is concluded that the SAMICS model is a flexible, accurate, and useful tool for managerial decision making.

  11. Validation of new psychosocial factors questionnaires: a Colombian national study.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Gloria H; Vargas, Angélica M; Rondón, Martin A; Felknor, Sarah A

    2013-01-01

    The study of workers' health problems possibly associated with stressful conditions requires valid and reliable tools for monitoring risk factors. The present study validates two questionnaires to assess psychosocial risk factors for stress-related illnesses within a sample of Colombian workers. The validation process was based on a representative sample survey of 2,360 Colombian employees, aged 18-70 years. Worker response rate was 90%; 46% of the responders were women. Internal consistency was calculated, construct validity was tested with factor analysis and concurrent validity was tested with Spearman correlations. The questionnaires demonstrated adequate reliability (0.88-0.95). Factor analysis confirmed the dimensions proposed in the measurement model. Concurrent validity resulted in significant correlations with stress and health symptoms. "Work and Non-work Psychosocial Factors Questionnaires" were found to be valid and reliable for the assessment of workers' psychosocial factors, and they provide information for research and intervention. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Construct Validation Theory Applied to the Study of Personality Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zapolski, Tamika C. B.; Guller, Leila; Smith, Gregory T.

    2013-01-01

    The authors review theory validation and construct validation principles as related to the study of personality dysfunction. Historically, personality disorders have been understood to be syndromes of heterogeneous symptoms. The authors argue that the syndrome approach to description results in diagnoses of unclear meaning and constrained validity. The alternative approach of describing personality dysfunction in terms of homogeneous dimensions of functioning avoids the problems of the syndromal approach and has been shown to provide more valid description and diagnosis. The authors further argue that description based on homogeneous dimensions of personality function/dysfunction is more useful, because it provides direct connections to validated treatments. PMID:22321263

  13. AC Conductivity Studies of Lithium Based Phospho Vanadate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagendra, K.; Babu, G. Satish; Reddy, C. Narayana; Gowda, Veeranna

    2011-07-01

    Glasses in the system xLi2SO4-20Li2O-(80-x) [80P2O5-20V2O5] (5⩾x⩾20 mol%) has been prepared by melt quenching method. Dc and ac conductivity has been studied over a wide range of frequency (10 Hz to 10 MHz) and temperature (298 K-523 K). The dc conductivity found to increase with increase of Li2SO4 concentration. The ac conductivities have been fitted to the Almond-West type single power law equation σ(ω) = σ(0)+Aωs where `s' is the power law exponent. The ac conductivity found to increase with increase of Li2SO4 concentration. An attempt is made to elucidate the enhancement of lithium ion conduction in phosphor-vanadate glasses by considering the expansion of network structure.

  14. Experimental validation of the nerve conduction velocity selective recording technique using a multi-contact cuff electrode.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Kurstjens, G A M; Hennings, K

    2009-12-01

    The earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) is presented as an in vitro model of a peripheral nerve containing only two fibers each with distinctly different conduction velocities, the median and lateral giant fibers (MGF and LGF). The worm model is used with a multi-contact cuff electrode to validate the spatial-temporal filtering effect of different electrode contact configurations and the effect of applying a delay adder and matched filter tuned to either the MGF or LGF action potential (AP) to extract conduction direction and velocity from the recording. The results confirmed the known effect of inter-electrode spacing and bipolar and tripolar recording configuration on the AP amplitude. It also demonstrates a crossover point where the amplitude of the tripolar recording is larger than the monopolar recording, an effect of the slower action potential conduction velocities in the worm. The delay adder was found to be an effective velocity sensitive filter, able to discriminate units based on conduction velocity. The matched filter to be an effective means to eliminate artifact and increase signal to noise ratios, however was not found to improve selectivity.

  15. Conducting Internet Research With the Transgender Population: Reaching Broad Samples and Collecting Valid Data

    PubMed Central

    Miner, Michael H.; Bockting, Walter O.; Romine, Rebecca Swinburne; Raman, Sivakumaran

    2013-01-01

    Health research on transgender people has been hampered by the challenges inherent in studying a hard-to-reach, relatively small, and geographically dispersed population. The Internet has the potential to facilitate access to transgender samples large enough to permit examination of the diversity and syndemic health disparities found among this population. In this article, we describe the experiences of a team of investigators using the Internet to study HIV risk behaviors of transgender people in the United States. We developed an online instrument, recruited participants exclusively via websites frequented by members of the target population, and collected data using online quantitative survey and qualitative synchronous and asynchronous interview methods. Our experiences indicate that the Internet environment presents the investigator with some unique challenges and that commonly expressed criticisms about Internet research (e.g., lack of generalizable samples, invalid study participants, and multiple participation by the same subject) can be overcome with careful method design, usability testing, and pilot testing. The importance of both usability and pilot testing are described with respect to participant engagement and retention and the quality of data obtained online. PMID:24031157

  16. The ADVANCE Code of Conduct for collaborative vaccine studies.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Xavier; Bauchau, Vincent; Mahy, Patrick; Glismann, Steffen; van der Aa, Lieke Maria; Simondon, François

    2017-04-04

    Lessons learnt from the 2009 (H1N1) flu pandemic highlighted factors limiting the capacity to collect European data on vaccine exposure, safety and effectiveness, including lack of rapid access to available data sources or expertise, difficulties to establish efficient interactions between multiple parties, lack of confidence between private and public sectors, concerns about possible or actual conflicts of interest (or perceptions thereof) and inadequate funding mechanisms. The Innovative Medicines Initiative's Accelerated Development of VAccine benefit-risk Collaboration in Europe (ADVANCE) consortium was established to create an efficient and sustainable infrastructure for rapid and integrated monitoring of post-approval benefit-risk of vaccines, including a code of conduct and governance principles for collaborative studies. The development of the code of conduct was guided by three core and common values (best science, strengthening public health, transparency) and a review of existing guidance and relevant published articles. The ADVANCE Code of Conduct includes 45 recommendations in 10 topics (Scientific integrity, Scientific independence, Transparency, Conflicts of interest, Study protocol, Study report, Publication, Subject privacy, Sharing of study data, Research contract). Each topic includes a definition, a set of recommendations and a list of additional reading. The concept of the study team is introduced as a key component of the ADVANCE Code of Conduct with a core set of roles and responsibilities. It is hoped that adoption of the ADVANCE Code of Conduct by all partners involved in a study will facilitate and speed-up its initiation, design, conduct and reporting. Adoption of the ADVANCE Code of Conduct should be stated in the study protocol, study report and publications and journal editors are encouraged to use it as an indication that good principles of public health, science and transparency were followed throughout the study. Copyright © 2017

  17. Illness Among Persian Gulf War Veterans: Case Validation Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    case-validation and case - control studies nested within our population-based study, should provide an estimate of the true magnitude of the problem...and occupational and environmental exposures for validated illness in a series of nested case - control studies . Year 2 of 4 the grant has just been

  18. Study of AC electrical conduction mechanisms in an epoxy polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilani, Wissal; Mzabi, Nissaf; Gallot-Lavallée, Olivier; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Zerrouki, Rachida; Guermazi, Hajer

    2015-11-01

    The AC conductivity of an epoxy resin was investigated in the frequency range 10^{-1} - 106 Hz at temperatures ranging from -100 to 120 °C. The frequency dependence of σ_{ac} was described by the law: σ_{ac}=ω \\varepsilon0\\varepsilon^''_{HN}+Aωs. The study of temperature variation of the exponent (s) reveals two conduction models: the AC conduction dependence upon temperature is governed by the small polaron tunneling mechanism (SPTM) at low temperature (-100 -60 °C) and the correlated barrier hopping (CHB) model at high temperature (80-120 °C).

  19. Thermal conductivity of penta-graphene from molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-10-21

    Using classical equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and applying the original Tersoff interatomic potential, we study the thermal transport property of the latest two dimensional carbon allotrope, penta-graphene. It is predicted that its room-temperature thermal conductivity is about 167 W/mK, which is much lower than that of graphene. With normal mode decomposition, the accumulated thermal conductivity with respect to phonon frequency and mean free path is analyzed. It is found that the acoustic phonons make a contribution of about 90% to the thermal conductivity, and phonons with mean free paths larger than 100 nm make a contribution over 50%. We demonstrate that the remarkably lower thermal conductivity of penta-graphene compared with graphene results from the lower phonon group velocities and fewer collective phonon excitations. Our study highlights the importance of structure-property relationship and provides better understanding of thermal transport property and valuable insight into thermal management of penta-graphene.

  20. [MISSCARE Survey - Italian Version: findings from an Italian validation study].

    PubMed

    Sist, Luisa; Contini, Carla; Bandini, Anna; Bandini, Stefania; Massa, Licia; Zanin, Roberta; Maricchio, Rita; Gianesini, Gloria; Bassi, Erika; Tartaglini, Daniela; Palese, Alvisa; Ferraresi, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    The Missed Nursing Care (MNC) refers to nursing interventions that are not completed, partially completed, or postponed. Despite the relevance of MNC, no assessment tools are available in the Italian context, and no data regarding the occurrence of this phenomenon has been documented on a large scale to date. The study aims were: (1) to validate the Italian version of the MISSCARE Survey tool; (2) to measure the prevalence of missed interventions and reasons for missed care as perceived by clinical nurses working in Italian health care settings. After having conducted the forward and backward translation, pre-pilot and pilot phases were developed to ensure face and content validity as well as semantic and conceptual equivalence of the Italian version with the original version. The MISSCARE survey questionnaire was then distributed to 1,233 clinical nurses of whom 1,003 completed the questionnaire. Overall, 979 questionnaires were analysed. The questionnaires were completed from January to March 2012, by nurses working in medical and surgical hospital departments in the Emilia Romagna region of Italy. Construct validity and internal consistency of the instrument were assessed. The face and content validity were ascertained by a group of experts. The instrument acceptability was good given that 79.4% of respondents replied to all items. Construct validity was investigated by an Exploratory Factor Analysis. Four factors explaining 64.18% of variance emerged: communication, lack of facilities/supplies, lack of staff, and unexpected events. Internal consistency, evaluated with Cronbach a, was 0.94. The nursing interventions omitted with greater frequency were, in order: ambulation (74.8%), passive mobilization (69.6%) and oral care (51.3%). The three main reasons for missed interventions were: an unexpected increase in the number of patients (90.5%), increased instability of the clinical condition (86.1%) and insufficient human resources (85.5%). The Italian version of

  1. Study on the validity region of Energy Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangjie; Chen, Hualing; Zhu, Danhui; Zhang, Wenbo

    2014-04-01

    The validity domain of Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) is studied in this paper. The validity region and criterion of EFEA are studied theoretically from the formation of reverberant plane wave field, one of the main assumptions of EFEA. The studies are acquired by virtue of the equation of radiative energy transfer method, a similar wave method that can express the direct field and its conversion relationship with reverberant field exactly. The result shows that the SEA criterion of diffuse field derived by Le Bot can be used as a good indicator for the EFEA validity. Numerical simulations on a rectangular plate with different physical parameters are applied to validate the criterion. The validity region and the diagrams of validity of EFEA are assessed and discussed. Some noteworthy conclusions about EFEA are drawn.

  2. Experimental validations of in vivo human musculoskeletal tissue conductivity images using MR-based electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Meng, Zi Jun; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-based electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a widely used imaging technique that provides high-resolution conductivity images at DC or below the 1 kHz frequency range. Using an MR scanner, this technique injects imaging currents into the human body and measures induced internal magnetic flux density data. By applying the recent progress of MREIT techniques, such as chemical shift artifact correction, multi-echo pulse sequence, and improved reconstruction algorithm, we can successfully reconstruct conductivity images of the human body. Meanwhile, numerous studies reported that the electrical conductivity of human tissues could be inferred from in vitro or ex vivo measurements of different species. However, in vivo tissues may differ from in vitro and/or ex vivo state due to the complicated tissue responses in living organs. In this study, we performed in vivo MREIT imaging of a human lower extremity and compared the resulting conductivity images with ex vivo biological tissue phantom images. The human conductivity images showed unique contrast between two different types of bones, muscles, subcutaneous adipose tissues, and conductive body fluids. Except for muscles and adipose tissues, the human conductivity images showed a similar pattern when compared with phantom results due to the anisotropic characteristic of muscle and the high conductive fluids in the adipose tissue. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Conducting spoken word recognition research online: Validation and a new timing method.

    PubMed

    Slote, Joseph; Strand, Julia F

    2016-06-01

    Models of spoken word recognition typically make predictions that are then tested in the laboratory against the word recognition scores of human subjects (e.g., Luce & Pisoni Ear and Hearing, 19, 1-36, 1998). Unfortunately, laboratory collection of large sets of word recognition data can be costly and time-consuming. Due to the numerous advantages of online research in speed, cost, and participant diversity, some labs have begun to explore the use of online platforms such as Amazon's Mechanical Turk (AMT) to source participation and collect data (Buhrmester, Kwang, & Gosling Perspectives on Psychological Science, 6, 3-5, 2011). Many classic findings in cognitive psychology have been successfully replicated online, including the Stroop effect, task-switching costs, and Simon and flanker interference (Crump, McDonnell, & Gureckis PLoS ONE, 8, e57410, 2013). However, tasks requiring auditory stimulus delivery have not typically made use of AMT. In the present study, we evaluated the use of AMT for collecting spoken word identification and auditory lexical decision data. Although online users were faster and less accurate than participants in the lab, the results revealed strong correlations between the online and laboratory measures for both word identification accuracy and lexical decision speed. In addition, the scores obtained in the lab and online were equivalently correlated with factors that have been well established to predict word recognition, including word frequency and phonological neighborhood density. We also present and analyze a method for precise auditory reaction timing that is novel to behavioral research. Taken together, these findings suggest that AMT can be a viable alternative to the traditional laboratory setting as a source of participation for some spoken word recognition research.

  4. Electrical studies on silver based fast ion conducting glassy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, B. Appa Kumar, E. Ramesh Kumari, K. Rajani Bhikshamaiah, G.

    2014-04-24

    Among all the available fast ion conductors, silver based glasses exhibit high conductivity. Further, glasses containing silver iodide enhances fast ion conducting behavior at room temperature. Glasses of various compositions of silver based fast ion conductors in the AgI−Ag{sub 2}O−[(1−x)B{sub 2}O{sub 3}−xTeO{sub 2}] (x=0 to1 mol% in steps of 0.2) glassy system have been prepared by melt quenching method. The glassy nature of the compounds has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The electrical conductivity (AC) measurements have been carried out in the frequency range of 1 KHz–3MHz by Impedance Analyzer in the temperature range 303–423K. The DC conductivity measurements were also carried out in the temperature range 300–523K. From both AC and DC conductivity studies, it is found that the conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with increasing the concentration of TeO{sub 2} as well as with temperature. The conductivity of the present glass system is found to be of the order of 10{sup −2} S/cm at room temperature. The ionic transport number of these glasses is found to be 0.999 indicating that these glasses can be used as electrolyte in batteries.

  5. Study of the improvement in bone conduction threshold after stapedectomy.

    PubMed

    García-Iza, Leire; Navarro, Juan José; Goiburu, Miren; Pérez, Nuria; Altuna, Xabier

    2016-01-01

    Bone conduction threshold depression is not always a result of inner ear and cochlear nerve pathology. In fact, middle ear pathologies may be responsible for such threshold depression, as occurs in otosclerosis. The aims of this study were to evaluate the improvement of bone conduction threshold in patients with otosclerosis that underwent stapedectomy and to study the postoperative audiological results. This was a retrospective study on 95 patients (116 ears) diagnosed with otosclerosis having conductive or mixed hearing loss that received surgery (stapedectomy and complete removal of the footplate) consecutively. Audiometry was performed on all patients pre- and postoperatively (one month and one year after surgery). Bone and air conduction thresholds were measured at 4 frequencies (500, 1000, 2000 and 4000Hz). The air-bone gap was closed, with a residual air-bone gap below 10dB in 92.2% of the patients and below 5dB in 79.3% of the cases. The air conduction threshold improved an average of 25dB. The patients that had an affected bone conduction threshold preoperatively improved bone conduction postoperatively at the frequencies of 1000 and 2000Hz (6 and 12dB, respectively). Consequently, the Carhart notch disappeared on the audiogram. These results were maintained at one year of follow up. We found a significant improvement in the bone conduction threshold at the frequencies of 1000 and 2000Hz and a disappearance of the Carhart notch in the audiogram after stapedectomy and total footplate removal in patients diagnosed with otosclerosis having mixed hearing loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  6. [The Well-Being Measure - dementia: A validation study].

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Gerben J; Richters, Kristel; Ten Klooster, Peter M

    2017-02-01

    The Well-Being Measure - dementia is a digital observation instrument that assesses the well-being of persons with dementia on four domains of quality of life: Mental well-being, Physical well-being, Participation, and Living arrangements. Its goal is to assess the well-being of persons with dementia in an easy and positive way. Besides illness-related symptoms and problems, the instrument also assesses positive aspects of functioning. It visualizes the results and provides specific behavioural advice to the caregivers. The goal of the present article is to conduct a first psychometric analysis: factor structure, reliability (Cronbach's alpha), concurrent, and convergent validity.Observations were carried out among 168 persons with dementia in eleven different small-scale psychogeriatric wards. Five existing instruments were used among 63 persons to validate the Well-Being Measure-dementia: quality of life, neuropsychiatric symptoms, care dependency, depression, and agitation.The expected factor structure was found in each of the four domains. Coefficients were high on the expected factor and low on the other factor(s). The scale means were on the positive side, but showed an adequate range and variability. Reliability was satisfactory to good. The relation with existing scales was moderate to strong. The pattern of relations was consistent with the measurement intentions of the different existing instruments.The Well-Being Measure - dementia appears to be a valid and reliable scale. Further studies should assess its test-retest reliability, sensitivity to change and relation with the course of dementia. Current experience shows that the instrument is also useful in everyday practice.

  7. Instrumentation for low frequency EIT studies of the human head and its validation in phantom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esler, Brian; Lyons, Thomas; Turovets, Sergei; Tucker, Don

    2010-04-01

    We describe instrumentation for low frequency (< 500 Hz) EIT studies of the human head and its calibration, testing and validation in the phantom experiments. Our EIT system prototype is based on a 256 channel commercial EEG system complimented by the current injection module and lock-in detection software. We have designed and built two types of head phantoms: i) a resistor network and ii) a cylinder tank filled with saline and gel insertions with chemically targeted conductivity values. We have developed a technology for fabricating, handling and storage of agar TX151 gel insertions. Independent and direct conductivity measurements of gel samples have been performed using a HP LCR meter in a four electrode conductivity cell specifically designed and built for this purpose. Measurements of saline conductivity were done with commercially available salinity / conductivity meters. Our inverse conductivity estimates in the phantom experiments with EIDORS and in-house software cross-validate the viability of the EIT-EEG system.

  8. Influence of the flow profile to Lorentz force velocimetry for weakly conducting fluids—an experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederhold, A.; Ebert, R.; Weidner, M.; Halbedel, B.; Fröhlich, T.; Resagk, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV) is a highly feasible contactless method for measuring flow rate in a pipe or in a channel. This method has been established for liquid metal flows but also for weakly conducting electrolytes where the Lorentz force amplitudes are typically six orders smaller than the ones from liquid metal flows. Due to an increased resolution of the Lorentz force measurements which was the main focus of research in the last years, now it is possible to investigate the influence of the flow profile on the amplitude of the Lorentz force. Even if there is a semi-theoretical approach an experimental validation is still outstanding. Therefore we have tested symmetric and asymmetric flow profiles to test the LFV for weakly conducting fluids for typical industrial flows. Salt water has been used as a test electrolyte with constant values of the electrical conductivity from 0.035 to 20 S m-1 and of the flow velocity in a range of 0.5-3 m s-1. We confirmed by extensive measurements that LFV is a suitable method for flow measurements even for different flow profiles within 5% measurement uncertainty. For a wide range of applications in research and industry the LFV should be not sensitive to various flow profiles.

  9. Establishing improved normal values for nerve conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Buschbacher, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    Nerve conduction studies are commonly performed to diagnose injuries of the peripheral nerves. In the past, normal ranges have been derived on relatively small samples of normal subjects. These ranges were often suboptimal for clinical use. Therefore, this series of articles was created to establish an improved database of normative values. It highlights the key contributions of a number of authors. In this foreword, the contributions of the various authors to the special issue on the development of an improved database for nerve conduction studies are described. The authors are introduced, including their training, gifts, and which articles they were involved in writing. In addition, there is a brief review of each of the articles in this special supplement. The fundamentals of ulnar motor nerve conduction to the first dorsal interosseous muscle are described, as is the contribution of Nate Prahlow, MD. In addition, the median motor nerve conduction to the pronator teres muscle and flexor carpi radialis muscle is highlighted including the contributions of Brian Foley, MD. The radial sensory nerve and dorsal ulnar cutaneous sensory nerve studies are described, as well as the contributions of Van Evanoff, Jr., MD, in creating this research. Median motor conduction to the lumbrical muscles and ulnar motor conduction to the palmar interosseous muscles are described, again highlighting the contributions of Dr. Foley. In addition, medial and lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve studies are described, along with the contributions of Dr. Nathan Prahlow. Median and ulnar sensory conduction studies recording from the fourth digit, as well as median and radial sensory conduction to the first digit, are described, as are the contributions of James Lohman, MD, and Andrew Berkson, DO. The side-to-side differences in median and ulnar sensory conduction studies and the importance of performing such studies are described, as are the contributions in this research of Dr. Nathan

  10. PLCO Ovarian Phase III Validation Study — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Our preliminary data indicate that the performance of CA 125 as a screening test for ovarian cancer can be improved upon by additional biomarkers. With completion of one additional validation step, we will be ready to test the performance of a consensus marker panel in a phase III validation study. Given the original aims of the PLCO trial, we believe that the PLCO represents an ideal longitudinal cohort offering specimens for phase III validation of ovarian cancer biomarkers.

  11. Methodology for the Conduct of a Seismic Risk Mitigation Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    33 3. The Base..................34 4. The Study Group ................34 III. DETERMINATION OF MISSION ESSENTIAL FACILITIES .. 36 A...97 APPENDIX C: NAVY EARTHQUAKE ADVISORY GROUP MODELS . 115 A. SEISMIC RISK MITIGATION MODEL...........115 B. ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLE OF THE BASIC MODEL...study group formed to conduct the Seismic Risk Mitigation Study. The first phase of the study is determining the missions of the base and determining

  12. Assessing Attachment in Young Adulthood: A Validational Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Lizbeth A.; And Others

    A sample of college students (N=170) was used to replicate and extend recent investigations that had conceptualized adults' close relationships within an early attachment framework. Analyses were conducted to support the validity of Hazan and Shaver's (1987) attachment measures, which were designed to assess the three major styles of attachment:…

  13. Considerations when conducting e-Delphi research: a case study.

    PubMed

    Toronto, Coleen

    2017-06-22

    Background E-Delphi is a way to access a geographically dispersed group of experts. It is similar to other Delphi methods but conducted online. E-research methodologies, such as the e-Delphi method, have yet to undergo significant critical discussion. Aim To highlight some of the challenges nurse researchers may wish to consider when using e-Delphi in their research. Discussion This paper provides details about the author's approach to conducting an e-Delphi study in which a group of health literacy nurse experts (n=41) used an online survey platform to identify and prioritise essential health literacy competencies for registered nurses. Conclusion This paper advances methodological discourse about e-Delphi by critically assessing an e-Delphi case study. The online survey platform used in this study was advantageous for the researcher and the experts: the experts could participate at any time and place where the internet was available; the researcher could efficiently access a national group of experts, track responses and analyse data in each round. Implications for practice E-Delphi studies create opportunities for nurse researchers to conduct research nationally and internationally. Before conducting an e-Delphi study, researchers should carefully consider the design and methods for collecting data, to avoid challenges that could potentially compromise the quality of the findings. Researchers are encouraged to publish details about their approaches to e-Delphi studies, to advance the state of the science.

  14. Validity study of the Moral Judgment Test in Physical Education: development and preliminary validation.

    PubMed

    Chatzopoulos, Dimitrios; Mouratidou, Katerina; Karamavrou, Sofia

    2008-02-01

    Teaching ethical behavior is an aspect of physical education. The purpose of the study was to present the construction and to estimate validity of a test which assesses physical education students' moral judgment, the Moral Judgment Test in Physical Education. The sample comprised 281 male and female participants (95 in Grades 7 to 9, 92 in Grades 10 to 12, and 94 university students), who completed Lind's Moral Judgment Test and the Moral Judgment Test-PE version. The validity of the latter was assessed using four criteria of Lind's moral theory. Analysis indicated that the Moral Judgment Test-PE had adequate construct validity and correlated positively, although relatively weakly, with the original test, so the new version has sufficient construct validity to be used in physical education.

  15. Can We Study Autonomous Driving Comfort in Moving-Base Driving Simulators? A Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Bellem, Hanna; Klüver, Malte; Schrauf, Michael; Schöner, Hans-Peter; Hecht, Heiko; Krems, Josef F

    2017-05-01

    To lay the basis of studying autonomous driving comfort using driving simulators, we assessed the behavioral validity of two moving-base simulator configurations by contrasting them with a test-track setting. With increasing level of automation, driving comfort becomes increasingly important. Simulators provide a safe environment to study perceived comfort in autonomous driving. To date, however, no studies were conducted in relation to comfort in autonomous driving to determine the extent to which results from simulator studies can be transferred to on-road driving conditions. Participants ( N = 72) experienced six differently parameterized lane-change and deceleration maneuvers and subsequently rated the comfort of each scenario. One group of participants experienced the maneuvers on a test-track setting, whereas two other groups experienced them in one of two moving-base simulator configurations. We could demonstrate relative and absolute validity for one of the two simulator configurations. Subsequent analyses revealed that the validity of the simulator highly depends on the parameterization of the motion system. Moving-base simulation can be a useful research tool to study driving comfort in autonomous vehicles. However, our results point at a preference for subunity scaling factors for both lateral and longitudinal motion cues, which might be explained by an underestimation of speed in virtual environments. In line with previous studies, we recommend lateral- and longitudinal-motion scaling factors of approximately 50% to 60% in order to obtain valid results for both active and passive driving tasks.

  16. Severity prediction rules in community acquired pneumonia: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, W; Lewis, S; Macfarlane, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The British Thoracic Society (BTS) developed a rule (BTSr) based on severity criteria to predict short term mortality in adults admitted to hospital with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, neither the BTSr nor a recent modification of it (mBTSr) have been validated in the UK. A case-control study was conducted in a typical UK population to determine the clinical factors predictive of mortality and to assess the performance of these rules.
METHODS—Cases were drawn from all patients with CAP who died in 1997 in five large hospitals in the Mid Trent area. Controls were randomly selected from survivors. Factors associated with mortality were identified following review of medical case notes and performance of the severity prediction rules assessed.
RESULTS—Age >65 years, temperature <37°C, respiratory rate >24 breaths/min, mental confusion, urea concentration of >7 mmol/l, sodium concentration of <135 mmol/l, and the presence of a pleural effusion, all determined on admission, were independently associated with in-hospital mortality on multivariate analysis. The BTSr was 52% sensitive and 79% specific in predicting death while the mBTSr displayed 66% sensitivity and 73% specificity.
CONCLUSIONS—The value of three of the four factors (presence of mental confusion, raised respiratory rate, raised urea) used in the mBTSr as predictors of mortality is confirmed. However, the BTSr and mBTSr did not perform as well in this validation study which included a high proportion (48%) of elderly patients (⩾75 years) compared with the derivation studies.

 PMID:10679541

  17. Measuring Long-Distance Romantic Relationships: A Validity Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole; Roberts, Amber

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated aspects of construct validity for the scores of a new long-distance romantic relationship measure. A single-factor structure of the long-distance romantic relationship index emerged, with convergent and discriminant evidence of external validity, high internal consistency reliability, and applied utility of the scores.…

  18. Measuring Long-Distance Romantic Relationships: A Validity Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole; Roberts, Amber

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated aspects of construct validity for the scores of a new long-distance romantic relationship measure. A single-factor structure of the long-distance romantic relationship index emerged, with convergent and discriminant evidence of external validity, high internal consistency reliability, and applied utility of the scores.…

  19. 29 CFR 1607.7 - Use of other validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... necessary information to support validity has been determined and will be made available to the user. B. Use... from the available studies meeting the standards of section 14B below clearly demonstrates that the selection procedure is valid; (2) Job similarity. The incumbents in the user's job and the incumbents in the...

  20. An Empirical Study of Reporting Practices Concerning Measurement Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Thomas P.; Agnello, Jessica

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the current research practice concerning reporting measurement validity evidence based on a sample of 696 research reports listed in the American Psychological Association's Directory of Unpublished Experimental Mental Measures. Only 55% of the reports included any type of validity evidence. This was a substantially lower…

  1. Paraphasias in Multilingual Conduction Aphasia: A Single Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegde, Medha; Bhat, Sapna

    2007-01-01

    Conduction aphasia is a type of fluent aphasia, which is caused due to the damage to the supramarginal gyrus and arcuate fasciculus resulting in repetition disturbance. It has been speculated that linguistic system in bilingual aphasics can breakdown in different ways across languages. There is a lack of detailed linguistic studies in specific…

  2. Impedance and Voltammetric Studies of Electrogenerated Polyaniline Conducting Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-14

    discovered, such as polypyrrole, polythiophene and polyaniline ( PANI ) [3] which will be an object of this paper. All important conducting polymers, with...December 191 Technical _____________ 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Impedance and voltammetric studies of electrogenerated C polyaniline ...unlimited nl 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) Polyaniline films were electrochemically synthesized from three acidic media; sulfuric, hydrochloric and

  3. Paraphasias in Multilingual Conduction Aphasia: A Single Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegde, Medha; Bhat, Sapna

    2007-01-01

    Conduction aphasia is a type of fluent aphasia, which is caused due to the damage to the supramarginal gyrus and arcuate fasciculus resulting in repetition disturbance. It has been speculated that linguistic system in bilingual aphasics can breakdown in different ways across languages. There is a lack of detailed linguistic studies in specific…

  4. The medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve: antidromic and orthodromic conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Seror, Paul

    2002-09-01

    Medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve (MABCN) conduction studies were performed antidromically and orthodromically in 70 control subjects to determine normal values and define the lower limits of normality. The mean sensory action potential (SAP) amplitudes were 17.7 and 17.5 microV and the sensory conduction velocities were 60 and 61 m/s, respectively, with the antidromic and orthodromic techniques. With both techniques, no SAP amplitude was lower than 6 microV. The lower limits of normal of the interside amplitude ratio were 1.66 when both techniques were used and 2.0 when only one was used.

  5. Ab-initio study of napthelene based conducting polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhela, Ankur; Kanchan, Reena; Srivastava, Anurag; Sinha, O. P.

    2014-04-24

    In this paper, we have identified structural and electronic properties of conducting polymers by using DFT based ATK-VNL ab-initio tool. Naphthalene derivative structures were stabilized by varying the bond length between two atoms of the molecule C-N and C-C. We have also studied the molecular energy spectrum of naphthalene derivatives and found the HOMOLUMO for the same. A comparison of structural and electronic properties of naphthalene derivatives by attaching the functional group of amine, have been performed and found that they show good semi conducting properties.

  6. Heat conduction in multifunctional nanotrusses studied using Boltzmann transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Nicholas G.; Minnich, Austin J.

    2016-01-01

    Materials that possess low density, low thermal conductivity, and high stiffness are desirable for engineering applications, but most materials cannot realize these properties simultaneously due to the coupling between them. Nanotrusses, which consist of hollow nanoscale beams architected into a periodic truss structure, can potentially break these couplings due to their lattice architecture and nanoscale features. In this work, we study heat conduction in the exact nanotruss geometry by solving the frequency-dependent Boltzmann transport equation using a variance-reduced Monte Carlo algorithm. We show that their thermal conductivity can be described with only two parameters, solid fraction and wall thickness. Our simulations predict that nanotrusses can realize unique combinations of mechanical and thermal properties that are challenging to achieve in typical materials.

  7. Relation of wrist angles to median nerve conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Trisan, Ramon L; Ojeda-Rodriguez, Aileen G

    2006-01-01

    To measure the changes in median nerve conduction parameters at various angles of wrist flexion and extension. We studied 8 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and 4 subjects (5 hands) without the condition (controls). Conduction parameters were measured with the wrist in neutral position and at different wrist angles. Onset motor latency increased in both groups with wrist extension and decreased with wrist flexion. Sensory onset latency decreased in both groups with wrist flexion. Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP) amplitude increased with wrist flexion for both groups. Wrist extension resulted in reduction of the CMAP amplitude in controls; however, for the CTS group it increased for the first 30 degrees and then decreased. Sensory Nerve Action Potential (SNAP) amplitude increased with wrist flexion and decreased with wrist extension in both groups. Median nerve conduction parameters improve with wrist flexion and generally worsen with extension.

  8. Heat conduction in multifunctional nanotrusses studied using Boltzmann transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, Nicholas G.; Minnich, Austin J.

    2016-01-04

    Materials that possess low density, low thermal conductivity, and high stiffness are desirable for engineering applications, but most materials cannot realize these properties simultaneously due to the coupling between them. Nanotrusses, which consist of hollow nanoscale beams architected into a periodic truss structure, can potentially break these couplings due to their lattice architecture and nanoscale features. In this work, we study heat conduction in the exact nanotruss geometry by solving the frequency-dependent Boltzmann transport equation using a variance-reduced Monte Carlo algorithm. We show that their thermal conductivity can be described with only two parameters, solid fraction and wall thickness. Our simulations predict that nanotrusses can realize unique combinations of mechanical and thermal properties that are challenging to achieve in typical materials.

  9. Vision Test Validation Study for the Health Examination Survey Among Youths 12-17 years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jean

    A validation study of the vision test battery used in the Health Examination Survey of 1966-1970 was conducted among 210 youths 12-17 years-old who had been part of the larger survey. The study was designed to discover the degree of correspondence between survey test results and clinical examination by an opthalmologist in determining the…

  10. The International Study of Wheezing in Infants: questionnaire validation.

    PubMed

    Mallol, Javier; García-Marcos, Luis; Aguirre, Viviana; Martinez-Torres, Antonela; Perez-Fernández, Virginia; Gallardo, Alejandro; Calvo, Mario; Rosario Filho, Nelson; Rocha, Wilson; Fischer, Gilberto; Baeza-Bacab, Manuel; Chiarella, Pascual; Pinto, Rosario; Barria, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    There are no internationally validated questionnaires to investigate the prevalence of infant wheezing. This study was undertaken to validate a questionnaire for the International Study on the Prevalence of Wheezing in Infants (Estudio Internacional de Sibilancias en Lactantes, EISL). Construct and criterion validity were tested for the question 'Has your baby had wheezing or whistling in the chest during his/her first 12 months of life?'. Construct validity (i.e. the ability of parents and doctors to refer to the same symptoms with the same words) was tested in a sample of 50 wheezing and 50 non-wheezy infants 12-15 months of age in each of 10 centres from 6 different Spanish- or Portuguese-speaking countries. Criterion validity (i.e. the ability of parents to correctly detect the symptom in the general population) was evaluated in 2 samples (Santiago, Chile and Cartagena, Spain) of 50 wheezing and 50 non-wheezing infants (according to parents) of the same age, randomly selected from the general population, who were later blindly diagnosed by a paediatric pulmonologist. Construct validity was very high (kappa test: 0.98-1) in all centres. According to Youden's index, criterion validity was good both in Cartagena (75.5%) and in Santiago (67.0%). Adding questions about asthma medication did not improve diagnosis accuracy. The EISL questionnaire significantly distinguished wheezy infants from healthy ones. This questionnaire has a strong validity and can be employed in large international multicentre studies on wheezing during infancy.

  11. AC Conductivity Studies of Lithium Based Phospho Vanadate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Nagendra, K.; Babu, G. Satish; Gowda, Veeranna; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2011-07-15

    Glasses in the system xLi{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-20Li{sub 2}O-(80-x) [80P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-20V{sub 2}O{sub 5}](5{>=}x{>=}20 mol%) has been prepared by melt quenching method. Dc and ac conductivity has been studied over a wide range of frequency (10 Hz to 10 MHz) and temperature (298 K-523 K). The dc conductivity found to increase with increase of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration. The ac conductivities have been fitted to the Almond-West type single power law equation {sigma}({omega}) = {sigma}(0)+A{omega}{sup s} where 's' is the power law exponent. The ac conductivity found to increase with increase of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration. An attempt is made to elucidate the enhancement of lithium ion conduction in phosphor-vanadate glasses by considering the expansion of network structure.

  12. Time resolved strain dependent morphological study of electrically conducting nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Imran; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Mateus, Artur; Kamma-Lorger, Christina S.

    2015-10-01

    An efficient and reliable method is introduced to understand the network behaviour of nano-fillers in a polymeric matrix under uniaxial strain coupled with small angle x-ray scattering measurements. The nanoparticles (carbon nanotubes) are conductive and the particles form a percolating network that becomes apparent source of electrical conduction and consequently the samples behave as a bulk conductor. Polyurethane based nanocomposites containing 2% w/w multiwall carbon nanotubes are studied. The electrical conductivity of the nanocomposite was (3.28×10-5s/m).The sample was able to be extended to an extension ratio of 1.7 before fracture. A slight variation in the electrical conductivity is observed under uniaxial strain which we attribute to the disturbance of conductive pathways. Further, this work is coupled with in- situ time resolved small angle x-ray scattering measurements using a synchrotron beam line to enable its measurements to be made during the deformation cycle. We use a multiscale structure to model the small angle x-ray data. The results of the analysis are interpreted as the presence of aggregates which would also go some way towards understanding why there is no alignment of the carbon nanotubes.

  13. Rocky Flats 1990--91 winter validation tracer study: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.J.

    1991-10-01

    During the winter of 1990--91, North American Weather Consultants (NAWC) and its subcontractor, ABB Environmental Services (ABBES), conducted a Winter Validation Study (WVS) for EG&G Rocky Flats involving 12 separate tracer experiments conducted between February 3 and February 19, 1991. Six experiments were conducted during nighttime hours and four experiments were conducted during daytime hours. In addition, there was one day/night and one night/day transitional experiment conducted. The primary purpose of the WVS was to gather data to further the approval process for the Terrain Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC). TRAC is an atmospheric dispersion model developed and operated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) north of Denver, Colorado. A secondary objective was to gather data that will serve to validate the TRAC model physics.

  14. Optical Studies of the Metallic State in Conducting Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlman, Randolph Scott

    A systematic charge transport study was performed at direct current, optical (10-55,000 cm^ {-1}, and microwave (6.5 GHz) frequencies to probe the insulator-metal (IM) transition which occurs as a function of sample processing in conducting polymers, notably Polyaniline (PAN) and Polypyrrole (PPy). These measurements demonstrate the universality of the inhomogeneous metallic state in conducting polymers. Optical and microwave measurements of the dielectric function (varepsilon( omega)] demonstrate a crossover from positive to large negative values for samples processed to lie near the IM transition. The negative dielectric response is attributed to a small fraction of the conduction electron gas which demonstrates Drude dispersion. The majority of the conduction electrons remain localized. In contrast, samples far from the IM transition on the insulating side demonstrate localized hopping behavior with positive varepsilon(omega) at low frequency. Detailed studies of the transport properties of PAN samples approaching the IM transition reveal that, though the localization is controlled by structural disorder, the transition is not a conventional Anderson transition such as has been applied to doped semiconductors. This is asserted because (1) samples with conductivity ( sigma_{DC}) higher than the minimum metallic conductivity (sigma_{min}) become insulating at low temperature; (2) millikelvin sigma _{DC} for selected insulating samples is not consistent with hopping transport; (3) the density of free electrons present in a sample scales with sigma_{DC}(T) so that a sample which demonstrates metallic behavior at low temperature may have a smaller density of free electrons at room temperature than a sample which demonstrates insulating behavior at low temperature; (4) varepsilon( omega) and the optical conductivity ( sigma(omega)] for metallic samples are consistent with macroscopically inhomogeneous models but not Anderson localization models; and (5) the polymers

  15. Calculation and Study of Graphene Conductivity Based on Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaodong; Hu, Min; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Shenggang

    2017-07-01

    Based on terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system and two-dimensional scanning control system, terahertz transmission and reflection intensity mapping images on a graphene film are obtained, respectively. Then, graphene conductivity mapping images in the frequency range 0.5 to 2.5 THz are acquired according to the calculation formula. The conductivity of graphene at some typical regions is fitted by Drude-Smith formula to quantitatively compare the transmission and reflection measurements. The results show that terahertz reflection spectroscopy has a higher signal-to-noise ratio with less interference of impurities on the back of substrates. The effect of a red laser excitation on the graphene conductivity by terahertz time-domain transmission spectroscopy is also studied. The results show that the graphene conductivity in the excitation region is enhanced while that in the adjacent area is weakened which indicates carriers transport in graphene under laser excitation. This paper can make great contribution to the study on graphene electrical and optical properties in the terahertz regime and help design graphene terahertz devices.

  16. Nerve conduction studies in chronic arsenic poisoning patients.

    PubMed

    Supapong, Soontorn; Phanthumchinda, Kammant; Srirattanaban, Jiruth

    2004-09-01

    To assess the nerve conduction functions among female patients with arsenical dermatoses compared with the controls. Cross-sectional analytic study Thirty females with skin lesions consistent with arsenical dermatoses and 27 controls who met the inclusion criteria were investigated by nerve conduction functions. Case findings resulted from a house-to-house survey in village 12, Ronphibun subdistrict and village 5, Saothong subdistrict, Nakhon Si Thammarat Province, southern Thailand in 1995. Differences between the arsenic-exposed population and the reference group regarding nerve conduction velocities (NCVs), proximal and distal latencies and amplitudes of sensory and motor nerve action potentials were not found except for the absent response to the sural nerve stimulation in three subjects of the exposed group. The effects of arsenic toxicity on the peripheral nerves in the form of slow nerve conduction velocities were not found among female patients with arsenical dermatoses in Ronphibun. Some patients might have experienced arsenic neuropathy to some degree in the past (before 1987) but they had recovered to some degree at the time of the present investigation (1996) as most of the patients with chronic arsenic poisoning in the present study changed their sources of drinking water from arsenic-contaminated shallow-well water to other sources such as rainwater, tap water or commercial bottled water.

  17. Assessing community readiness online: a concurrent validation study.

    PubMed

    Kostadinov, Iordan; Daniel, Mark; Stanley, Linda; Cargo, Margaret

    2015-07-02

    Community readiness for facilitation and uptake of interventions can impact the success of community-based prevention efforts. As currently practiced, measuring community readiness can be a resource intensive process, compromising its use in evaluating multisite community-based prevention efforts. The purpose of this study was to develop, test and validate a more efficient online version of an existing community readiness tool and identify potential problems in completing assessments. This study was conducted in the context of a complex community-based childhood obesity prevention program in South Australia. Following pre-testing, an online version of the community readiness tool was created, wherein respondents, with detailed knowledge of their community and prevention efforts, rated their communities on five anchored rating scales (Knowledge of Efforts, Leadership, Knowledge of the Issue, Community Climate, and Resources). Respondents completed the standard, over-the-phone community readiness interview ("gold standard") and the new online survey. Paired t-test, St. Laurent's correlation coefficient and intra-class correlation (ICC) were used to determine the validity of the online tool. Contact summary forms were completed after each interview to capture interview quality. Twenty-five respondents completed both assessments. There was a statistically significant difference in the overall community readiness scores between the two methods (paired t-test p = 0.03); online scores were consistently higher than interview scores. St. Laurent's correlation of 0.58 (95% CI 0.42-0.73) was moderate; the ICC of 0.65 (95% CI 0.35-0.83) was good. Only for the leadership and resources dimensions was there no statistically significant difference between the scores from the two methods (p = 0.61, p = 0.08 respectively). St Laurent's correlation (r = 0.83, 95% CI 0.71-0.92) and the ICC (0.78, 95% CI 0.57-0.90) were excellent for leadership. Qualitative results from the standard

  18. Sensor data validation and reconstruction. Phase 1: System architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The sensor validation and data reconstruction task reviewed relevant literature and selected applicable validation and reconstruction techniques for further study; analyzed the selected techniques and emphasized those which could be used for both validation and reconstruction; analyzed Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) hot fire test data to determine statistical and physical relationships between various parameters; developed statistical and empirical correlations between parameters to perform validation and reconstruction tasks, using a computer aided engineering (CAE) package; and conceptually designed an expert system based knowledge fusion tool, which allows the user to relate diverse types of information when validating sensor data. The host hardware for the system is intended to be a Sun SPARCstation, but could be any RISC workstation with a UNIX operating system and a windowing/graphics system such as Motif or Dataviews. The information fusion tool is intended to be developed using the NEXPERT Object expert system shell, and the C programming language.

  19. NASA's Rodent Research Project: Validation of Flight Hardware, Operations and Science Capabilities for Conducting Long Duration Experiments in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. Y.; Beegle, J. E.; Wigley, C. L.; Pletcher, D.; Globus, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Research using rodents is an essential tool for advancing biomedical research on Earth and in space. Rodent Research (RR)-1 was conducted to validate flight hardware, operations, and science capabilities that were developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. Twenty C57BL/6J adult female mice were launched on Sept 21, 2014 in a Dragon Capsule (SpaceX-4), then transferred to the ISS for a total time of 21-22 days (10 commercial mice) or 37 (10 validation mice). Tissues collected on-orbit were either rapidly frozen or preserved in RNA later at less than or equal to -80 C (n=2/group) until their return to Earth. Remaining carcasses were rapidly frozen for dissection post-flight. The three controls groups at Kennedy Space Center consisted of: Basal mice euthanized at the time of launch, Vivarium controls, housed in standard cages, and Ground Controls (GC), housed in flight hardware within an environmental chamber. FLT mice appeared more physically active on-orbit than GC, and behavior analysis are in progress. Upon return to Earth, there were no differences in body weights between FLT and GC at the end of the 37 days in space. RNA was of high quality (RIN greater than 8.5). Liver enzyme activity levels of FLT mice and all control mice were similar in magnitude to those of the samples that were optimally processed in the laboratory. Liver samples collected from the intact frozen FLT carcasses had RNA RIN of 7.27 +/- 0.52, which was lower than that of the samples processed on-orbit, but similar to those obtained from the control group intact carcasses. Nonetheless, the RNA samples from the intact carcasses were acceptable for the most demanding transcriptomic analyses. Adrenal glands, thymus and spleen (organs associated with stress response) showed no significant difference in weights between FLT and GC. Enzymatic activity was also not significantly different. Over 3,000 tissues collected from the four groups of mice have become available for the Biospecimen Sharing

  20. Studies on conducting polymer and conducting polymerinorganic composite electrodes prepared via a new cathodic polymerization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nikhilendra

    A novel approach for the electrodeposition of conducting polymers and conducting polymer-inorganic composite materials is presented. The approach shows that conducting polymers, such as polypyrrole (PPy) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) can be electrodeposited by the application of a cathodic bias that generates an oxidizing agent, NO+, via the in-situ reduction of nitrate anions. This new cathodic polymerization method allows for the deposition of PPy and PEDOT as three dimensional, porous films composed of spherical polymer particles. The method is also suitable for the co-deposition of inorganic species producing conducting polymer-inorganic composite electrodes. Such composites are used as high surface area electrodes in Li-ion batteries, electrochemical hydrogen evolution and in the development of various other conducting polymer-inorganic composite electrodes. New Sn-PPy and Sb-PPy composite electrodes where Sn and Sb nanoparticles are well dispersed among the PPy framework are reported. These structures allow for decreased stress during expansion and contraction of the active material (Sn, Sb) during the alloying and de-alloying processes of a Li-ion battery anode, significantly alleviating the loss of active material due to pulverization processes. The new electrochemical synthesis mechanism allows for the fabrication of Sn-PPy and Sb-PPy composite electrodes directly from a conducting substrate and eliminates the use of binding materials and conducting carbon used in modern battery anodes, which significantly simplifies their fabrication procedures. Platinum (Pt) has long been identified as the most efficient catalyst for electrochemical water splitting, while nickel (Ni) is a cheaper, though less efficient alternative to Pt. A new morphology of PPy attained via the aforementioned cathodic deposition method allows for the use of minimal quantities of Pt and Ni dispersed over a very high surface area PPy substrate. These composite electrodes

  1. Designing SoTL Studies--Part I: Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartsch, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses how to improve validity in SoTL studies through generating appropriate measures and using designs that examine causality between an activity and students' performance. [Part II available at EJ1029365.

  2. Temporal study of wake formation behind a conducting body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meassick, S.; Chan, C.; Qian, Y.; Sroda, T.; Azar, T.

    1991-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the wake of a conducting body is studied experimentally in a pulsed plasma device. Three-dimensional measurements of the plasma potential, density, particle energy distribution, and ion currents are measured throughout the near- and mid-wake regions during the wake formation. It is found that the potential behind the conducting body is initially negative. This negative potential is caused by the higher mobility of the electrons, allowing them to flow into the ion free wake region. The negative potential in the wake region induces an electric field that pulls ions into the region behind the conducting body. However, the dominant factor in determining the length of the near wake is the thermal energy spread of the ions. At later times, as the sheath forms around the conducting body, ions are deflected by the potential gradient in the sheath region. This deflection, in addition to the thermal energy spread of the ions, determines the length of the near wake.

  3. Hyper-X Stage Separation Trajectory Validation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tartabini, Paul V.; Bose, David M.; McMinn, John D.; Martin, John G.; Strovers, Brian K.

    2003-01-01

    An independent twelve degree-of-freedom simulation of the X-43A separation trajectory was created with the Program to Optimize Simulated trajectories (POST II). This simulation modeled the multi-body dynamics of the X-43A and its booster and included the effect of two pyrotechnically actuated pistons used to push the vehicles apart as well as aerodynamic interaction forces and moments between the two vehicles. The simulation was developed to validate trajectory studies conducted with a 14 degree-of-freedom simulation created early in the program using the Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanics Systems (ADAMS) simulation software. The POST simulation was less detailed than the official ADAMS-based simulation used by the Project, but was simpler, more concise and ran faster, while providing similar results. The increase in speed provided by the POST simulation provided the Project with an alternate analysis tool. This tool was ideal for performing separation control logic trade studies that required the running of numerous Monte Carlo trajectories.

  4. A validation study on CO2 chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelman, Peter; Heijkers, Stijn; Tadayon Musavi, Samaneh; Graef, Wouter; Bogaerts, Annemie; Dijk, Van, Jan; Elementary Processes in Gas Discharges Team; Plasmant Team

    2016-09-01

    The demand for renewable energy has increased the popularity of various energy sources, such as solar and wind energy. These sources are intermittent by nature, which typically does not match the demand of energy. Therefore, storage of energy is needed. Current tools for this are, however, costly, slow, and inefficient. Storing energy by the formation of valuable fuels from CO2 is potentially an improvement. By plasma assisted CO2 dissociation CO is produced. In subsequent steps the CO is transformed in valuable fuels. An extensive CO2 microwave plasma chemistry is studied, with special attention to the vibrational modes, which provide a pathway for the dissociation. To that end we developed a global model, which is only time resolved and needs less computational time than spatially resolved models. We present the results from a verification study of the CO2 chemistry. This is done by verification of input data, and by comparison of results obtained by two independent models: ZDPlaskin and PLASIMO's Global Model. We also present results from a sensitivity study of the input data.

  5. Reader studies for validation of CAD systems.

    PubMed

    Gallas, Brandon D; Brown, David G

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of computational intelligence (CI) systems designed to improve the performance of a human operator is complicated by the need to include the effect of human variability. In this paper we consider human (reader) variability in the context of medical imaging computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) systems, and we outline how to compare the detection performance of readers with and without the CAD. An effective and statistically powerful comparison can be accomplished with a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) experiment, summarized by the reader-averaged area under the ROC curve (AUC). The comparison requires sophisticated yet well-developed methods for multi-reader multi-case (MRMC) variance analysis. MRMC variance analysis accounts for random readers, random cases, and correlations in the experiment. In this paper, we extend the methods available for estimating this variability. Specifically, we present a method that can treat arbitrary study designs. Most methods treat only the fully-crossed study design, where every reader reads every case in two experimental conditions. We demonstrate our method with a computer simulation, and we assess the statistical power of a variety of study designs.

  6. 40 CFR 761.386 - Required experimental conditions for the validation study and subsequent use during decontamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... experimental conditions apply for any solvent: (a) Temperature and pressure. Conduct the validation study and perform decontamination at room temperature (from ≥15 °C to ≤30 °C) and at atmospheric pressure....

  7. 40 CFR 761.386 - Required experimental conditions for the validation study and subsequent use during decontamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... experimental conditions apply for any solvent: (a) Temperature and pressure. Conduct the validation study and perform decontamination at room temperature (from ≥15 °C to ≤30 °C) and at atmospheric pressure....

  8. 40 CFR 761.386 - Required experimental conditions for the validation study and subsequent use during decontamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... experimental conditions apply for any solvent: (a) Temperature and pressure. Conduct the validation study and perform decontamination at room temperature (from ≥15 °C to ≤30 °C) and at atmospheric pressure....

  9. 40 CFR 761.386 - Required experimental conditions for the validation study and subsequent use during decontamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... experimental conditions apply for any solvent: (a) Temperature and pressure. Conduct the validation study and perform decontamination at room temperature (from ≥15 °C to ≤30 °C) and at atmospheric pressure....

  10. 40 CFR 761.386 - Required experimental conditions for the validation study and subsequent use during decontamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... experimental conditions apply for any solvent: (a) Temperature and pressure. Conduct the validation study and perform decontamination at room temperature (from ≥15 °C to ≤30 °C) and at atmospheric pressure....

  11. Hypersonic code efficiency and validation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Bradford C.

    1992-01-01

    Renewed interest in hypersonic and supersonic flows spurred the development of the Compressible Navier-Stokes (CNS) code. Originally developed for external flows, CNS was modified to enable it to also be applied to internal high speed flows. In the initial phase of this study CNS was applied to both internal flow applications and fellow researchers were taught to run CNS. The second phase of this research was the development of surface grids over various aircraft configurations for the High Speed Research Program (HSRP). The complex nature of these configurations required the development of improved surface grid generation techniques. A significant portion of the grid generation effort was devoted to testing and recommending modifications to early versions of the S3D surface grid generation code.

  12. Simple models for stomatal conductance derived from a process model: cross-validation against sap flux data.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Thomas N; Turnbull, Tarryn L; Adams, Mark A

    2012-09-01

    Representation of stomatal physiology in models of plant-atmosphere gas exchange is minimal, and direct application of process-based models is limited by difficulty of parameter estimation. We derived simple models of stomatal conductance from a recent process-based model, and cross-validated them against measurements of sap flux (176-365 d in length) in 36 individual trees of two age classes for two Eucalyptus species across seven sites in the mountains of southeastern Australia. The derived models - which are driven by irradiance and evaporative demand and have two to four parameters that represent sums and products of biophysical parameters in the process model - reproduced a median 83-89% of observed variance in half-hourly and diurnally averaged sap flux, and performed similarly whether fitted using a random sample of all data or using 1 month of data from spring or autumn. Our simple models are an advance in predicting plant water use because their parameters are transparently related to reduced processes and properties, enabling easy accommodation of improved knowledge about how those parameters respond to environmental change and differ among species. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Environmental Affective Dispositions Scale (EADS): The Study of Validity and Reliability and Adaptation to Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fettahlioglu, Pinar; Timur, Serkan; Timur, Betül

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to conduct a research under circumstances of Turkey about the validity and reliability of the Affective Tendencies towards Environmental Scale prepared by Yavetz, Goldman and Pe'er (2009). The translation of this scale to Turkish was done by the researchers and language specialists. And then, the scale was evaluated by the…

  14. Adaptation of General Belongingness Scale into Turkish for Adolescents: Validity and Reliability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildiz, Mehmet Ali

    2017-01-01

    The current research aims to adapt the General Belongingness Scale (GBS), developed by Malone, Pillow, and Osman (2012), into Turkish for adolescents and to conduct the validity and reliability studies for it. Ages of the participants, a total of 567 adolescents including 274 males (48.3%) and 293 females (51.7%) ranged between 14 and 18 (average…

  15. Validation study of the USDA’s data quality evaluation system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL) of USDA conducted a validation study of the USDA Data Quality Evaluation System (DQES). The system evaluates the quality of analytical data by rating important documentation concerning the analytical method, analytical quality control, number of samples, sampling ...

  16. The National SAT Validity Study: Sharing Results from Recent College Success Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Emily J.; McKenzie, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    [Slides] presented at the annual conference of the Southern Association for College Admission Counseling, April 2010. This presentation summarizes recent research from the national SAT Validity Study and includes information on the Admitted Class Evaluation Service (ACES) system and how ACES can help institutions conduct their own validity…

  17. Value-Eroding Teacher Behaviors Scale: A Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arseven, Zeynep; Kiliç, Abdurrahman; Sahin, Seyma

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, it is aimed to develop a valid and reliable scale for determining value-eroding behaviors of teachers, hence their values of judgment. The items of the "Value-eroding Teacher Behaviors Scale" were designed in the form of 5-point likert type rating scale. The exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted to…

  18. Animal model validation studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    The project objectives were the development of a system to be used for exposing small laboratory animals to the respirable fraction of cotton dust found in a cotton mill, and testing an animal model of byssinosis which could be used to study the development of the disease in humans. This final report contains 10 published papers of the research at various stages of completion. A description of the cotton dust exposure system optimization techniques and measurements of the resulting improvements are noted in these articles. The final system developed used a large, modified, Pitt-3 cotton generator to expose up to 10 animals simultaneously to cotton dust in a Wahman stainless steel chamber. The acoustical powered generator, which was developed for the project to resuspend cotton dust has been very useful in resuspending other agricultural dusts. The development of an animal model for byssinosis involved verifying results of other investigators, developing and testing several new methods to evaluate pulmonary function in guinea pigs following acute cotton dust exposures, and modification of the cotton dust response using drug mediators.

  19. JaCVAM-organized international validation study of the in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay for detection of genotoxic carcinogens: II. Summary of definitive validation study results.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yoshifumi; Kojima, Hajime; Omori, Takashi; Corvi, Raffaella; Honma, Masamistu; Schechtman, Leonard M; Tice, Raymond R; Beevers, Carol; De Boeck, Marlies; Burlinson, Brian; Hobbs, Cheryl A; Kitamoto, Sachiko; Kraynak, Andrew R; McNamee, James; Nakagawa, Yuzuki; Pant, Kamala; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Priestley, Catherine; Takasawa, Hironao; Wada, Kunio; Wirnitzer, Uta; Asano, Norihide; Escobar, Patricia A; Lovell, David; Morita, Takeshi; Nakajima, Madoka; Ohno, Yasuo; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    The in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay (comet assay) is used internationally to investigate the in vivo genotoxic potential of test chemicals. This assay, however, has not previously been formally validated. The Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM), with the cooperation of the U.S. NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM)/the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM), the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM), and the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society/Mammalian Mutagenesis Study Group (JEMS/MMS), organized an international validation study to evaluate the reliability and relevance of the assay for identifying genotoxic carcinogens, using liver and stomach as target organs. The ultimate goal of this exercise was to establish an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline. The study protocol was optimized in the pre-validation studies, and then the definitive (4th phase) validation study was conducted in two steps. In the 1st step, assay reproducibility was confirmed among laboratories using four coded reference chemicals and the positive control ethyl methanesulfonate. In the 2nd step, the predictive capability was investigated using 40 coded chemicals with known genotoxic and carcinogenic activity (i.e., genotoxic carcinogens, genotoxic non-carcinogens, non-genotoxic carcinogens, and non-genotoxic non-carcinogens). Based on the results obtained, the in vivo comet assay is concluded to be highly capable of identifying genotoxic chemicals and therefore can serve as a reliable predictor of rodent carcinogenicity.

  20. Characteristics of nerve conduction studies in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moon, Parag P; Maheshwari, Dilip; Sardana, Vijay; Bhushan, Bharat; Mohan, Sankalp

    2017-01-01

    Numerous nerve conduction tests are used for the electrodiagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), with a wide range of sensitivity and specificity reported for each test in clinical studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various nerve conduction tests and determine the properties of the most accurate test. A prospective observational case control study. Eighty patients with clinically confirmed CTS and 80 asymptomatic healthy controls were included in the study. All patients underwent the routine hematological investigations as per the protocol. All cases and controls were subjected to various nerve conduction study protocols for CTS. Results were analyzed statistically. The two-tailed Student's t-test was used for the comparative statistical analysis. The sensitivity of each test was calculated as (the number of hands with an abnormal study result/the number of CTS hands) × 100. Comparison between percentages was performed by the McNemar test. The mean age was 38.19 ± 10.13 years and the female:male ratio was 1.5:1. The mean duration of disease was 0.89 ± 0.61 years. Hypothyroidism was present in 21 (26.25%) patients, whereas 13 (16.25%) and 4 (5%) patients had diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. The median nerve motor latency was 4.73 ± 0.83 ms while the sensory latency was 3.44 ± 0.56 ms. The median nerve orthodomic sensory latency was found to be 2.57 ± 0.31 ms. The conduction velocity across the palm and wrist was 41.37 ± 0.67 ms. The sensitivity was the highest in the inching method (86.25%) and lowest for the conventional median motor and sensory latencies (56.25% and 45%, respectively). Addition of a single test of median and ulnar sensory latency, the median and radial sensory latency or the inching method, in routine protocol will improve the sensitivity for the diagnosis of CTS in all patients.

  1. Human Rights Attitude Scale: A Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ercan, Recep; Yaman, Tugba; Demir, Selcuk Besir

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a valid and reliable attitude scale having quality psychometric features that can measure secondary school students' attitudes towards human rights. The study group of the research is comprised by 710 6th, 7th and 8th grade students who study at 4 secondary schools in the centre of Sivas. The study group…

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Lateral Femoral Cutaneous Nerve Conduction Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bum Jun; Joeng, Eui Soo; Choi, Jun Kyu; Kang, Seok; Yoon, Joon Shik

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify the utility of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) ultrasound-guided conduction technique compared to that of the conventional nerve conduction technique. Methods Fifty-eight legs of 29 healthy participants (18 males and 11 females; mean age, 42.7±14.9 years) were recruited. The conventional technique was performed bilaterally. The LFCN was localized by ultrasound. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the LFCN and the distance between the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) and the LFCN was measured. The nerve conduction study was repeated with the corrected cathode location. Sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitudes of the LFCN were recorded and compared between the ultrasound-guided and conventional techniques. Results Mean body mass index of the participants was 23.7±3.5 kg/m2, CSA was 4.2±1.9 mm2, and the distance between the ASIS and LFCN was 5.6±1.7 mm. The mean amplitude values were 6.07±0.52 µV and 6.66±0.54 µV using the conventional and ultrasound-guided techniques, respectively. The SNAP amplitude of the LFCN using the ultrasound-guided technique was significantly larger than that recorded using the conventional technique. Conclusion Correcting the stimulation position using the ultrasound-guided technique helped obtain increased SNAP amplitude. PMID:25750871

  3. Sample size considerations for the external validation of a multivariable prognostic model: a resampling study.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gary S; Ogundimu, Emmanuel O; Altman, Douglas G

    2016-01-30

    After developing a prognostic model, it is essential to evaluate the performance of the model in samples independent from those used to develop the model, which is often referred to as external validation. However, despite its importance, very little is known about the sample size requirements for conducting an external validation. Using a large real data set and resampling methods, we investigate the impact of sample size on the performance of six published prognostic models. Focussing on unbiased and precise estimation of performance measures (e.g. the c-index, D statistic and calibration), we provide guidance on sample size for investigators designing an external validation study. Our study suggests that externally validating a prognostic model requires a minimum of 100 events and ideally 200 (or more) events. © 2015 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Electronic conductivity studies on oxyhalide glasses containing TMO

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayatha, D.; Viswanatha, R.; Sujatha, B.; Narayana Reddy, C.

    2016-05-06

    Microwave-assisted synthesis is cleaner, more economical and much faster than conventional methods. The development of new routes for the synthesis of solid materials is an integral part of material science and technology. The electronic conductivity studies on xPbCl{sub 2} – 60 PbO – (40-x) V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (1 ≥ x ≤ 10) glass system has been carried out over a wide range of composition and temperature (300 K to 423 K). X-ray diffraction study confirms the amorphous nature of the samples. The Scanning electron microscopic studies reveal the formation of cluster like morphology in PbCl{sub 2} containing glasses. The d.c conductivity exhibits Arrhenius behaviour and increases with V{sub 2}O{sub 5} concentration. Analysis of the results is interpreted in view Austin-Mott’s small polaron model of electron transport. Activation energies calculated using regression analysis exhibit composition dependent trend and the variation is explained in view of the structure of lead-vanadate glass.

  5. Electronic conductivity studies on oxyhalide glasses containing TMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayatha, D.; Viswanatha, R.; Sujatha, B.; Narayana Reddy, C.

    2016-05-01

    Microwave-assisted synthesis is cleaner, more economical and much faster than conventional methods. The development of new routes for the synthesis of solid materials is an integral part of material science and technology. The electronic conductivity studies on xPbCl2 - 60 PbO - (40-x) V2O5 (1 ≥ x ≤ 10) glass system has been carried out over a wide range of composition and temperature (300 K to 423 K). X-ray diffraction study confirms the amorphous nature of the samples. The Scanning electron microscopic studies reveal the formation of cluster like morphology in PbCl2 containing glasses. The d.c conductivity exhibits Arrhenius behaviour and increases with V2O5 concentration. Analysis of the results is interpreted in view Austin-Mott's small polaron model of electron transport. Activation energies calculated using regression analysis exhibit composition dependent trend and the variation is explained in view of the structure of lead-vanadate glass.

  6. The Validity and Precision of the Comparative Interrupted Time-Series Design: Three Within-Study Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Clair, Travis; Hallberg, Kelly; Cook, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the conditions under which short, comparative interrupted time-series (CITS) designs represent valid alternatives to randomized experiments in educational evaluations. To do so, we conduct three within-study comparisons, each of which uses a unique data set to test the validity of the CITS design by comparing its causal estimates to…

  7. The Validity and Precision of the Comparative Interrupted Time-Series Design: Three Within-Study Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Clair, Travis; Hallberg, Kelly; Cook, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the conditions under which short, comparative interrupted time-series (CITS) designs represent valid alternatives to randomized experiments in educational evaluations. To do so, we conduct three within-study comparisons, each of which uses a unique data set to test the validity of the CITS design by comparing its causal estimates to…

  8. The Relationship between Nerve Conduction Study and Clinical Grading of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cheluvaiah, Janardhan D.; Agadi, Jagadish B.; Nagaraj, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common nerve entrapment. Subjective sensory symptoms are common place in patients with CTS, but sometimes they are not supported by objective findings in the neurological examination. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) studies are a valid and reliable means of confirming the diagnosis. The amplitudes along with the conduction velocities of the sensory nerve action potential and motor nerve action potential reflect the functional state of axons, and are useful parameters and complement the clinical grading in the assessment of severity of CTS. Aim To conduct median nerve sensory and motor conduction studies on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and correlate the relationship between nerve conduction study parameters and the clinical severity grading. Materials and Methods Based on clinical assessment, the study patients were divided into 03 groups with mild CTS, moderate CTS and severe CTS respectively as per Mackinnson’s classification. Median and ulnar nerve conduction studies were performed on bilateral upper limbs of 50 patients with symptoms of CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. The relationship between the clinical severity grade and various nerve conduction study parameters were correlated. Results In this prospective case control study, 50 patients with symptoms consistent with CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects were examined over a 10 month period. A total of 30 patients had unilateral CTS (right upper limb in 19 and left upper limb in 11) and 20 patients had bilateral CTS. Female to male ratio was 3.54 to 1. Age ranged from 25 to 81 years. The mean age at presentation was 49.68±11.7 years. Tingling paresthesias of hand and first three fingers were the most frequent symptoms 48 (98%). Tinel’s and Phalen’s sign were positive in 36 (72%) and 44 (88%) patients respectively. The mean duration of symptoms at presentation was 52.68±99.81 weeks. 16 patients (32%) had

  9. The Relationship between Nerve Conduction Study and Clinical Grading of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Srikanteswara, Praveen Kumar; Cheluvaiah, Janardhan D; Agadi, Jagadish B; Nagaraj, Karthik

    2016-07-01

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common nerve entrapment. Subjective sensory symptoms are common place in patients with CTS, but sometimes they are not supported by objective findings in the neurological examination. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) studies are a valid and reliable means of confirming the diagnosis. The amplitudes along with the conduction velocities of the sensory nerve action potential and motor nerve action potential reflect the functional state of axons, and are useful parameters and complement the clinical grading in the assessment of severity of CTS. To conduct median nerve sensory and motor conduction studies on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and correlate the relationship between nerve conduction study parameters and the clinical severity grading. Based on clinical assessment, the study patients were divided into 03 groups with mild CTS, moderate CTS and severe CTS respectively as per Mackinnson's classification. Median and ulnar nerve conduction studies were performed on bilateral upper limbs of 50 patients with symptoms of CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. The relationship between the clinical severity grade and various nerve conduction study parameters were correlated. In this prospective case control study, 50 patients with symptoms consistent with CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects were examined over a 10 month period. A total of 30 patients had unilateral CTS (right upper limb in 19 and left upper limb in 11) and 20 patients had bilateral CTS. Female to male ratio was 3.54 to 1. Age ranged from 25 to 81 years. The mean age at presentation was 49.68±11.7 years. Tingling paresthesias of hand and first three fingers were the most frequent symptoms 48 (98%). Tinel's and Phalen's sign were positive in 36 (72%) and 44 (88%) patients respectively. The mean duration of symptoms at presentation was 52.68±99.81 weeks. 16 patients (32%) had mild CTS, 25 (50%) had moderate CTS and 9 (18%) had

  10. Emphatic Tendency Scale for Student Teachers: Validity and Reliability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocak, Canan; Onen, Aysem Seda

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the validity and reliability of the Empathic Tendency Scale, which was developed in order to identify student teachers' empathic tendencies. The sampling of the study consisted of 730 student teachers studying at Hacettepe University Faculty of Education. To determine the factor pattern of Empathic Tendency…

  11. Illness Among Persian Gulf War Veterans: Case Validation Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    series of case-validation and case - control studies nested within our population-based study, should provide an estimate of the true magnitude of the...series of nested case - control studies . Year 4 has just been completed. Through September 2001, 578 subjects have been assessed, with a participation

  12. Illness Among Persian Gulf War Veterans: Case Validation Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    series of case-validation and case - control studies nested within our population-based study, should provide an estimate of the true magnitude of the...series of nested case - control studies . Year 3 of 4 has just been completed. Through September 2000, 456 subjects have been assessed, with a participation

  13. Conductive Education: Feasibility Study on Developing a National Curriculum Plan for Those Working in Conductive Education in New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Graham A.

    This study sought to determine whether there are national training needs among staff of conductive education programs in New Zealand. Conductive education is a unified system of education for children and adults with a motor disorder whose disability has been caused by damage to the central nervous system. The study, which focuses primarily on…

  14. Developing a reliable and valid patient measure of safety in hospitals (PMOS): a validation study.

    PubMed

    McEachan, Rosemary R C; Lawton, Rebecca J; O'Hara, Jane K; Armitage, Gerry; Giles, Sally; Parveen, Sahdia; Watt, Ian S; Wright, John

    2014-07-01

    Patients represent an important and as yet untapped source of information about the factors that contribute to the safety of their care. The aim of the current study is to test the reliability and validity of the Patient Measure of Safety (PMOS), a brief patient-completed questionnaire that allows hospitals to proactively identify areas of safety concern and vulnerability, and to intervene before incidents occur. 297 patients from 11 hospital wards completed the PMOS questionnaire during their stay; 25 completed a second 1 week later. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) safety culture survey was completed by 190 staff on 10 of these wards. Factor structure, internal reliability, test-retest reliability, discriminant validity and convergent validity were assessed. Factor analyses revealed 8 key domains of safety (eg, communication and team work, access to resources, staff roles and responsibilities) explaining 58% variance of the original questionnaire. Cronbach's α (range 0.66-0.89) and test-retest reliability (r=0.75) were good. The PMOS positive index significantly correlated with staff reported 'perceptions of patient safety' (r=0.79) and 'patient safety grade' (r=-0.81) outcomes from the AHRQ (demonstrating convergent validity). A multivariate analysis of variance (MAMOVA) revealed that three PMOS factors and one retained single item discriminated significantly across the 11 wards. The PMOS is the first patient questionnaire used to assess factors contributing to safety in hospital settings from a patient perspective. It has demonstrated acceptable reliability and validity. Such information is useful to help hospitals/units proactively improve the safety of their care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Conducting Simulation Studies in the R Programming Environment.

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Kevin A

    2013-10-12

    Simulation studies allow researchers to answer specific questions about data analysis, statistical power, and best-practices for obtaining accurate results in empirical research. Despite the benefits that simulation research can provide, many researchers are unfamiliar with available tools for conducting their own simulation studies. The use of simulation studies need not be restricted to researchers with advanced skills in statistics and computer programming, and such methods can be implemented by researchers with a variety of abilities and interests. The present paper provides an introduction to methods used for running simulation studies using the R statistical programming environment and is written for individuals with minimal experience running simulation studies or using R. The paper describes the rationale and benefits of using simulations and introduces R functions relevant for many simulation studies. Three examples illustrate different applications for simulation studies, including (a) the use of simulations to answer a novel question about statistical analysis, (b) the use of simulations to estimate statistical power, and (c) the use of simulations to obtain confidence intervals of parameter estimates through bootstrapping. Results and fully annotated syntax from these examples are provided.

  16. Radionuclide migration laboratory studies for validation of batch sorption data

    SciTech Connect

    Triay, I.R.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.

    1991-12-31

    Advective and diffusive migration experiments (within the Dynamic Transport Column Experiments and Diffusion Studies of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project) involve utilizing crushed material, intact, and fractured tuff in order to test and improve (if necessary) transport models by experimentally observing the migration of sorbing and non-sorbing radionuclides on a laboratory scale. Performing a validation of the sorption data obtained with batch techniques (within the Batch Sorption Study) is an integral part of the mission of the Dynamic Transport Column Experiments and Diffusion Studies. In this paper the work scope of the radionuclide migration laboratory experiments (as they apply to validation of batch sorption data) is reviewed.

  17. Preparation, piloting and validation for a longitudinal birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Golding, Jean

    2009-07-01

    No longitudinal study should go into the field prior to detailed piloting and validation studies of the measures and techniques to be used. Preparation should also involve the training of staff, the acquisition of space and appropriate equipment, and liaison with the community and ethical committees as well as with scientific collaborators. Because different measures will continually be introduced as the participants age, the preparation, piloting and validation studies have to be ongoing. Here we describe some of the different strategies that should be used.

  18. Math Placement Validation Study: A Summary of the Criterion-Related Validity Evidence and Multiple Measures Data for the San Diego Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, William B.

    In Fall 1994, the San Diego Community College District (SDCCD), in California, conducted a study to determine the validity of the Mathematics Diagnostic Testing Project (MDTP) placement test. The MDTP provides tests at four levels (i.e., algebra readiness, elementary algebra, intermediate algebra, and pre-calculus) and is used in the District for…

  19. Conducting a multicentre and multinational qualitative study on patient transitions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Julie K; Barach, Paul; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra

    2012-12-01

    A multicentre, multinational research study requires careful planning and coordination to accomplish the aims of the study and to ensure systematic and rigorous examination of all project methods and data collected. The aim of this paper is to describe the approach we used during the HANDOVER Project to develop a multicentre, multinational research project for studying transitions of patient care while creating a community of practice for the researchers. We highlight the process used to assure the quality of a multicentre qualitative study and to create a codebook for data analysis as examples of attending to the community of practice while conducting rigorous qualitative research. Essential elements for the success of this multinational, multilanguage research project included recruiting a strong research team, explicit planning for decision-making processes to be used throughout the project, acknowledging the differences among the study settings and planning the protocols to capitalise upon those differences. Although not commonly discussed in reports of large research projects, there is an underlying, concurrent stream of activities to develop a cohesive team that trusts and respects one another's skills and that engage independent researchers in a group process that contributes to achieving study goals. We discuss other lessons learned and offer recommendations for other teams planning multicentre research.

  20. 41 CFR 60-3.5 - General standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... validity study. All circumstances concerning the study, including the validation strategy used, and changes... validity studies. 60-3.5 Section 60-3.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating... General standards for validity studies. A. Acceptable types of validity studies. For the purposes of...

  1. 41 CFR 60-3.5 - General standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... validity study. All circumstances concerning the study, including the validation strategy used, and changes... validity studies. 60-3.5 Section 60-3.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating... General standards for validity studies. A. Acceptable types of validity studies. For the purposes of...

  2. 41 CFR 60-3.5 - General standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... validity study. All circumstances concerning the study, including the validation strategy used, and changes... validity studies. 60-3.5 Section 60-3.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating... General standards for validity studies. A. Acceptable types of validity studies. For the purposes of...

  3. 41 CFR 60-3.5 - General standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... validity study. All circumstances concerning the study, including the validation strategy used, and changes... validity studies. 60-3.5 Section 60-3.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating... General standards for validity studies. A. Acceptable types of validity studies. For the purposes of...

  4. Verification, Validation and Sensitivity Studies in Computational Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Andrew E.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Computational techniques and software for the analysis of problems in mechanics have naturally moved from their origins in the traditional engineering disciplines to the study of cell, tissue and organ biomechanics. Increasingly complex models have been developed to describe and predict the mechanical behavior of such biological systems. While the availability of advanced computational tools has led to exciting research advances in the field, the utility of these models is often the subject of criticism due to inadequate model verification and validation. The objective of this review is to present the concepts of verification, validation and sensitivity studies with regard to the construction, analysis and interpretation of models in computational biomechanics. Specific examples from the field are discussed. It is hoped that this review will serve as a guide to the use of verification and validation principles in the field of computational biomechanics, thereby improving the peer acceptance of studies that use computational modeling techniques. PMID:17558646

  5. Thermal conductivity and rectification study of restructured Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Anuj

    Electronics' miniaturization, has led to search for better thermal management techniques and discovery of important transport phenomenon. Thermal rectification, directionally preferential heat transport analogous to electrical diode, is one such technique, garnering tremendous interest. Its possibility has been explored through structural asymmetry, introducing a differential phonon density of states in hot and cold regions. As of now, mass and shape asymmetries have been studied, both experimentally and theoretically. However, strict requirements of material length being shorter than phonon mean free path and phonon coherence preservation at surface, makes connecting two materials with different temperature-dependent thermal conductivities, a more natural approach. To avoid resultant thermal boundary resistance and integration complexities, we achieve the affect in single material, by restructuring a region of Graphene by introducing defects. The asymmetry impedes ballistic phonon transport, modulating temperature dependence of thermal conductivity in the two regions. We perform deviational Monte Carlo simulations based on Energy-based formulation to microscopically investigate phonon transport, possibility and optimal conditions for thermal rectification. The proposed method uses phonon properties obtained from first principle, treat phonon-boundary scattering explicitly with properties drawn from Bose-Einstein Distribution.

  6. A Validation Study of the Adolescent Dissociative Experiences Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keck Seeley, Susan. M.; Perosa, Sandra, L.; Perosa, Linda, M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to further the validation process of the Adolescent Dissociative Experiences Scale (A-DES). In this study, a 6-item Likert response format with descriptors was used when responding to the A-DES rather than the 11-item response format used in the original A-DES. Method: The internal reliability and construct…

  7. Imagery Measures of Ego, Id, Superego, and Identity: Validity Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, D.; DeBruin, J.

    1988-01-01

    Five validity studies of the id, ego, superego, and identity scales of the Study of Imagery are reported, using undergraduate students. Multistage Bonferroni procedures are used to evaluate the significance of results. The scales are related to each other and to toughmindedness, self-control, and behavioral conflict. (TJH)

  8. A Validation Study of the Adolescent Dissociative Experiences Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keck Seeley, Susan. M.; Perosa, Sandra, L.; Perosa, Linda, M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to further the validation process of the Adolescent Dissociative Experiences Scale (A-DES). In this study, a 6-item Likert response format with descriptors was used when responding to the A-DES rather than the 11-item response format used in the original A-DES. Method: The internal reliability and construct…

  9. Basic School Skills Inventory-3: Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildiz, F. Ülkü; Çagdas, Aysel; Kayili, Gökhan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform the validity-reliability analysis of the three subtests of Basic School Skills Inventory 3--Mathematics, Classroom Behavior and Daily Life skills--and do its adaptation for four to six year-old Turkish children. The sample of the study included 595 four to six year-old Turkish children attending public and…

  10. California Diploma Project Technical Report III: Validity Study--Validity Study of the Health Sciences and Medical Technology Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGaughy, Charis; Bryck, Rick; de Gonzalez, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    This study is a validity study of the recently revised version of the Health Science Standards. The purpose of this study is to understand how the Health Science Standards relate to college and career readiness, as represented by survey ratings submitted by entry-level college instructors of health science courses and industry representatives. For…

  11. External validity of post-stroke interventional gait rehabilitation studies.

    PubMed

    Kafri, Michal; Dickstein, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Gait rehabilitation is a major component of stroke rehabilitation, and is supported by extensive research. The objective of this review was to examine the external validity of intervention studies aimed at improving gait in individuals post-stroke. To that end, two aspects of these studies were assessed: subjects' exclusion criteria and the ecological validity of the intervention, as manifested by the intervention's technological complexity and delivery setting. Additionally, we examined whether the target population as inferred from the titles/abstracts is broader than the population actually represented by the reported samples.

  12. Skin conductance fear conditioning impairments and aggression: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Tuvblad, Catherine; Schell, Anne; Baker, Laura; Raine, Adrian

    2015-02-01

    Autonomic fear conditioning deficits have been linked to child aggression and adult criminal behavior. However, it is unknown if fear conditioning deficits are specific to certain subtypes of aggression, and longitudinal research is rare. In the current study, reactive and proactive aggression were assessed in a sample of males and females when aged 10, 12, 15, and 18 years old. Skin conductance fear conditioning data were collected when they were 18 years old. Individuals who were persistently high on proactive aggression measures had significantly poorer conditioned responses at 18 years old when compared to others. This association was not found for reactive aggression. Consistent with prior literature, findings suggest that persistent antisocial individuals have unique neurobiological characteristics and that poor autonomic fear conditioning is associated with the presence of increased instrumental aggressive behavior.

  13. Skin Conductance Fear Conditioning Impairments and Aggression: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Tuvblad, Catherine; Schell, Anne; Baker, Laura; Raine, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic fear conditioning deficits have been linked to child aggression and adult criminal behavior. However, it is unknown if fear conditioning deficits are specific to certain subtypes of aggression, and longitudinal research is rare. In the current study, reactive and proactive aggression were assessed in a sample of males and females when aged 10, 12, 15, and 18 years old. Skin conductance fear conditioning data were collected when they were 18 years old. Individuals who were persistently high on proactive aggression measures had significantly poorer conditioned responses at 18 years old when compared to others. This association was not found for reactive aggression. Consistent with prior literature, findings suggest that persistent antisocial individuals have unique neurobiological characteristics and that poor autonomic fear conditioning is associated with the presence of increased instrumental aggressive behavior. PMID:25174802

  14. Recommended guidelines for the conduct and evaluation of prognostic studies in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Webster, J D; Dennis, M M; Dervisis, N; Heller, J; Bacon, N J; Bergman, P J; Bienzle, D; Cassali, G; Castagnaro, M; Cullen, J; Esplin, D G; Peña, L; Goldschmidt, M H; Hahn, K A; Henry, C J; Hellmén, E; Kamstock, D; Kirpensteijn, J; Kitchell, B E; Amorim, R L; Lenz, S D; Lipscomb, T P; McEntee, M; McGill, L D; McKnight, C A; McManus, P M; Moore, A S; Moore, P F; Moroff, S D; Nakayama, H; Northrup, N C; Sarli, G; Scase, T; Sorenmo, K; Schulman, F Y; Shoieb, A M; Smedley, R C; Spangler, W L; Teske, E; Thamm, D H; Valli, V E; Vernau, W; von Euler, H; Withrow, S J; Weisbrode, S E; Yager, J; Kiupel, M

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing need for more accurate prognostic and predictive markers in veterinary oncology because of an increasing number of treatment options, the increased financial costs associated with treatment, and the emotional stress experienced by owners in association with the disease and its treatment. Numerous studies have evaluated potential prognostic and predictive markers for veterinary neoplastic diseases, but there are no established guidelines or standards for the conduct and reporting of prognostic studies in veterinary medicine. This lack of standardization has made the evaluation and comparison of studies difficult. Most important, translating these results to clinical applications is problematic. To address this issue, the American College of Veterinary Pathologists' Oncology Committee organized an initiative to establish guidelines for the conduct and reporting of prognostic studies in veterinary oncology. The goal of this initiative is to increase the quality and standardization of veterinary prognostic studies to facilitate independent evaluation, validation, comparison, and implementation of study results. This article represents a consensus statement on the conduct and reporting of prognostic studies in veterinary oncology from veterinary pathologists and oncologists from around the world. These guidelines should be considered a recommendation based on the current state of knowledge in the field, and they will need to be continually reevaluated and revised as the field of veterinary oncology continues to progress. As mentioned, these guidelines were developed through an initiative of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists' Oncology Committee, and they have been reviewed and endorsed by the World Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  15. Validation study for secretarial/administrative classifications using computer-based testing

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a content and concurrent criterion-related validity study conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory for clerical, secretarial and administrative classifications using computer-based testing. The advantages and disadvantages of different types of testing software incorporated in the study are explored. Job analysis methodology, adverse impact analysis, procedure for establishing cut-off score and problems associated with criterion development and restriction of range are discussed. 6 tabs.

  16. Greek version of the Internet Addiction Test: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Tsimtsiou, Zoi; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Kokkali, Stamatia; Dardavesis, Theodoros; Young, Kimberly S; Arvanitidou, Malamatenia

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this project was to translate, culturally adapt and validate the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) in Greek adults. Twenty-one post-graduate medical students participated in the cultural adaptation procedure and 151 both post- and under-graduate medical students in the validation process. The internal consistency shown by a Cronbach's alpha was 0.91. Two-week test-retest reliability was rtt = 0.84, p < 0.001. Face validity was affirmed by 83.6 % of the students. In terms of convergent validity, the hours of daily internet use were positively correlated with IAT score (rho = 0.48, p < 0.001). Moreover, IAT scores were higher in students that reported use of online gambling (40.5 vs 29.2, p = 0.004), pornographic sites (36.5 vs 28.0, p = 0.003) and online games (35.6 vs 28.2, p = 0.009). Exploratory factor analysis revealed three interpretable factors for the IAT, "Psychological/Emotional Conflict", "Time Management" and "Neglect Work", that showed good internal consistency and concurrent validity, explaining 55.3 % of the variance. The Greek version of IAT has shown good psychometric properties, comparable with the original IAT and the previously published translated versions, and can be a useful tool in future studies on internet addiction.

  17. Validation of airway resistance models for predicting pressure loss through anatomically realistic conducting airway replicas of adults and children.

    PubMed

    Borojeni, Azadeh A T; Noga, Michelle L; Martin, Andrew R; Finlay, Warren H

    2015-07-16

    This work describes in vitro measurement of the total pressure loss at varying flow rate through anatomically realistic conducting airway replicas of 10 children, 4 to 8 years old, and 5 adults. Experimental results were compared with analytical predictions made using published airway resistance models. For the adult replicas, the model proposed by van Ertbruggen et al. (2005. J. Appl. Physiol. 98, 970-980) most accurately predicted central conducting airway resistance for inspiratory flow rates ranging from 15 to 90 L/min. Models proposed by Pedley et al. (1970. J. Respir. Physiol. 9, 371-386) and by Katz et al. (2011. J. Biomech. 44, 1137-1143) also provided reasonable estimates, but with a tendency to over predict measured pressure loss for both models. For child replicas, the Pedley and Katz models both provided good estimation of measured pressure loss at flow rates representative of resting tidal breathing, but under predicted measured values at high inspiratory flow rate (60 L/min). The van Ertbruggen model, developed based on flow simulations performed in an adult airway model, tended to under predict measured pressure loss through the child replicas across the range of flow rates studied (2 to 60 L/min). These results are intended to provide guidance for selection of analytical pressure loss models for use in predicting airway resistance and ventilation distribution in adults and children.

  18. Phase behaviour and conductivity study of electrolytes in supercritical hydrofluorocarbons.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Philip N; Cook, David C; George, Michael W; Ke, Jie; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; Su, Wenta; Zhang, Wenjian

    2011-01-07

    The purpose of this work was to characterise supercritical hydrofluorocarbons (HFC) that can be used as solvents for electrodeposition. The phase behaviour of CHF(3), CH(2)F(2), and CH(2)FCF(3) containing [NBu(n)(4)][BF(4)], [NBu(n)(4)][B{3,5-C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2)}(4)] and Na[B{3,5-C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2)}(4)] was studied and the conditions for forming a single supercritical phase established. Although all three HFCs are good solvents for [NBu(n)(4)][BF(4)] the results show that the CH(2)F(2) system has the lowest p(r) for dissolving a given amount of [NBu(n)(4)][BF(4)]. The solubility of Na[B{3,5-C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2)}(4)] in CH(2)F(2) was found to be unexpectedly high. Studies of the phase behaviour of CH(2)F(2) containing [NBu(n)(4)][BF(4)] and [Cu(CH(3)CN)(4)][BF(4)] showed that the copper complex was unstable in the absence of CH(3)CN. For CHF(3), [Cu(hfac)(2)] was more soluble and more stable than [Cu(CH(3)CN)(4)][BF(4)] and only increased the phase-separation pressure by a moderate amount. Studies of the conductivity of [NBu(n)(4)][B(C(6)F(5))(4)], [NBu(n)(4)][B{3,5-C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2)}(4)], [NR(f)Bu(n)(3)][B{3,5-C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2)}(4)] (R(f) = (CH(2))(3)C(7)F(15)), and Na[B{3,5-C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2)}(4)] were carried out in scCH(2)F(2). The results show that these salts are more conducting than [NBu(n)(4)][BF(4)] under the same conditions although the increase is much less significant than that reported in previous work in supercritical CO(2) + CH(3)CN. Consequently, either [NBu(n)(4)][BF(4)] or the corresponding BARF salts would be suitable background electrolytes for electrodeposition from scCH(2)F(2).

  19. Instruments for the assessment of social anxiety disorder: Validation studies.

    PubMed

    Osório, Flávia de Lima; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Loureiro, Sonia Regina

    2012-10-22

    Great progress has been observed in the literature over the last decade regarding the validation of instruments for the assessment of Social Anxiety Disorder in the Brazilian context. Particularly outstanding in this respect is the production of a group of Brazilian investigators regarding the psychometric study of the following instruments: Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, Social Phobia Inventory, Brief Social Phobia Scale, Disability Profile, Liebowitz Self-Rated Disability Scale, Social Phobia Safety Behaviors Scale and Self-Statements During Public Speaking Scale, which have proved to be appropriate and valid for use in the adult Brazilian population, representing resources for the assessment of social anxiety in clinical and experimental situations.

  20. Instruments for the assessment of social anxiety disorder: Validation studies

    PubMed Central

    Osório, Flávia de Lima; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Loureiro, Sonia Regina

    2012-01-01

    Great progress has been observed in the literature over the last decade regarding the validation of instruments for the assessment of Social Anxiety Disorder in the Brazilian context. Particularly outstanding in this respect is the production of a group of Brazilian investigators regarding the psychometric study of the following instruments: Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, Social Phobia Inventory, Brief Social Phobia Scale, Disability Profile, Liebowitz Self-Rated Disability Scale, Social Phobia Safety Behaviors Scale and Self-Statements During Public Speaking Scale, which have proved to be appropriate and valid for use in the adult Brazilian population, representing resources for the assessment of social anxiety in clinical and experimental situations. PMID:24175172

  1. Rap-Music Attitude and Perception Scale: A Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Edgar H.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study tests the validity of the Rap-music Attitude and Perception (RAP) Scale, a 1-page, 24-item measure of a person's thoughts and feelings surrounding the effects and content of rap music. The RAP was designed as a rapid assessment instrument for youth programs and practitioners using rap music and hip hop culture in their work…

  2. Dimensions of Intuition: First-Round Validation Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vrugtman, Rosanne

    2009-01-01

    This study utilized confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), canonical correlation analysis (CCA), regression analysis (RA), and correlation analysis (CA) for first-round validation of the researcher's Dimensions of Intuition (DOI) instrument. The DOI examined 25 personal characteristics and situations purportedly predictive of intuition. Data was…

  3. A Cross-Validation Study of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheikh, Alia I.; Marotta, Sylvia A.

    2005-01-01

    This article is a cross-validation of R. G. Tedeschi and L. G. Calhoun's (1996) original study of the development of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI). It describes several psychometric properties of scores on the PTGI in a sample of middle- to old-aged adults with a history of cardiovascular disease. The results did not support the…

  4. Understanding Foreign Language Learning Strategies: A Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tragant, Elsa; Thompson, Marilyn S.; Victori, Mia

    2013-01-01

    The present work aims to contribute to our understanding of the underlying dimensions of language learning strategies in foreign language contexts. The study analyzes alternative factor structures underlying a recently developed instrument (Tragant and Victori, 2012) and it includes the age factor in the examination of its construct validity. The…

  5. A Validity Study of the Self-Esteem Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, H. John

    Results of this validation study of a slightly modified version of the Coppersmith Self-Esteem Inventory substantiate its use with seventh graders to assess Goal I (concerning self-understanding and appreciation of self-worth) of the Educational Quality Assessment Program in Pennsylvania. Appendixes include the definition and rationale for Goal I,…

  6. A Cross-Validation Study of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheikh, Alia I.; Marotta, Sylvia A.

    2005-01-01

    This article is a cross-validation of R. G. Tedeschi and L. G. Calhoun's (1996) original study of the development of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI). It describes several psychometric properties of scores on the PTGI in a sample of middle- to old-aged adults with a history of cardiovascular disease. The results did not support the…

  7. Reflective Thinking Scale: A Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basol, Gulsah; Evin Gencel, Ilke

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt Reflective Thinking Scale to Turkish and investigate its validity and reliability over a Turkish university students' sample. Reflective Thinking Scale (RTS) is a 5 point Likert scale (ranging from 1 corresponding Agree Completely, 3 to Neutral, and 5 to Not Agree Completely), purposed to measure reflective…

  8. Teachers' Engagement at Work: An International Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klassen, Robert M.; Aldhafri, Said; Mansfield, Caroline F.; Purwanto, Edy; Siu, Angela F. Y.; Wong, Marina W.; Woods-McConney, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the validity of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale in a sample of 853 practicing teachers from Australia, Canada, China (Hong Kong), Indonesia, and Oman. The authors used multigroup confirmatory factor analysis to test the factor structure and measurement invariance across settings, after which they examined the relationships…

  9. Teachers' Engagement at Work: An International Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klassen, Robert M.; Aldhafri, Said; Mansfield, Caroline F.; Purwanto, Edy; Siu, Angela F. Y.; Wong, Marina W.; Woods-McConney, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the validity of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale in a sample of 853 practicing teachers from Australia, Canada, China (Hong Kong), Indonesia, and Oman. The authors used multigroup confirmatory factor analysis to test the factor structure and measurement invariance across settings, after which they examined the relationships…

  10. 40 CFR 761.392 - Preparing validation study samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE... surface to be used in the validation study as follows: (i) Use a spiking solution made of PCBs mixed with... to verify that there are measurable surface levels of PCBs resulting from the contamination...

  11. 40 CFR 761.392 - Preparing validation study samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE... surface to be used in the validation study as follows: (i) Use a spiking solution made of PCBs mixed with... to verify that there are measurable surface levels of PCBs resulting from the contamination...

  12. Homework Purpose Scale for Middle School Students: A Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Jianzhong

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to test the validity of scores on the Homework Purpose Scale (HPS) for middle school students. The participants were 1,181 eighth graders in the southeastern United States, including (a) 699 students in urban school districts and (b) 482 students in rural school districts. First, confirmatory factor analysis was…

  13. A Validation Study of the Revised Personal Safety Decision Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, HaeJung; Hopkins, Karen M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to examine the reliability and validity of an 11-item Personal Safety Decision Scale (PSDS) in a sample of child welfare workers. Methods: Data were derived from a larger cross-sectional online survey to a random stratified sample of 477 public child welfare workers in a mid-Atlantic State. An exploratory…

  14. Rap-Music Attitude and Perception Scale: A Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Edgar H.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study tests the validity of the Rap-music Attitude and Perception (RAP) Scale, a 1-page, 24-item measure of a person's thoughts and feelings surrounding the effects and content of rap music. The RAP was designed as a rapid assessment instrument for youth programs and practitioners using rap music and hip hop culture in their work…

  15. Assessing Meritorious Teacher Performance: A Differential Validity Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellett, Chad D; Capie, William

    The Teacher Assessment and Development System (TADS) - Meritorious Teacher Program (MTP) FORM instrument is used in the Dade County Public Schools, Miami, Florida, to evaluate teachers. Its validity for decisions concerning merit pay for master teachers was examined in this study. Specifically, its ability to discriminate between high performing…

  16. A Validation Study of Cognitively Experienced Communication Apprehension Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Michael Joseph

    This study develops a self-report inventory of public speaking apprehension that establishes measures of content, construct, and predictive validity. An item pool was generated by students that were anxious about giving speeches, and the resulting instrument was then administered to the general student population and factor analyzed. Each factor…

  17. A Validation Study of the Student Oral Proficiency Assessment (SOPA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Lynn E.; Kenyon, Dorry M.; Rhodes, Nancy C.

    This study validated the Student Oral Proficiency Assessment (SOPA), an oral proficiency instrument designed for students in elementary foreign language programs. Elementary students who were tested with the SOPA were also administered other instruments designed to measure proficiency. These instruments included the Stanford Foreign Language Oral…

  18. A Validation Study of the Existential Anxiety Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hullett, Michael A.

    Logotherapy is a meaning-centered psychotherapy which focuses on both the meaning of human existence and the personal search for meaning. If the will to search for meaning is frustrated, "existential frustration" may result. This study validates the Existential Anxiety Scale (EAS) developed by Good and Good (1974). Basic principles of…

  19. Understanding Foreign Language Learning Strategies: A Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tragant, Elsa; Thompson, Marilyn S.; Victori, Mia

    2013-01-01

    The present work aims to contribute to our understanding of the underlying dimensions of language learning strategies in foreign language contexts. The study analyzes alternative factor structures underlying a recently developed instrument (Tragant and Victori, 2012) and it includes the age factor in the examination of its construct validity. The…

  20. A Validation Study of Early Adolescents' Pubertal Self-Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Katharine E.; Hovell, Melbourne F.; Nichols, Jeanne F.; Irvin, Veronica L.; Keating, Kristen; Simon, Gayle M.; Gehrman, Christine; Jones, Kenneth Lee

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether self-assessed puberty is sufficiently reliable and valid to substitute for physician examination when feasibility of physician examination is low (e.g., behavioral research). Adolescents (convenience sample N = 178 endocrinology patients and N = 125 from educational trial; mean age 12.7 and 11.3 years,…

  1. Research Measures for Dyscalculia: A Validity and Reliability Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geiman, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate a measure of dyscalculia to determine its validity and reliability. It also tested use of the instrument with seventh graders and ascertained where errors attributed to dyscalculia were also present in an average sample of seventh graders. Results varied. (MNS)

  2. Ride qualities criteria validation/pilot performance study: Flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nardi, L. U.; Kawana, H. Y.; Greek, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    Pilot performance during a terrain following flight was studied for ride quality criteria validation. Data from manual and automatic terrain following operations conducted during low level penetrations were analyzed to determine the effect of ride qualities on crew performance. The conditions analyzed included varying levels of turbulence, terrain roughness, and mission duration with a ride smoothing system on and off. Limited validation of the B-1 ride quality criteria and some of the first order interactions between ride qualities and pilot/vehicle performance are highlighted. An earlier B-1 flight simulation program correlated well with the flight test results.

  3. A Protocol for Conducting Rainfall Simulation to Study Soil Runoff

    PubMed Central

    Kibet, Leonard C.; Saporito, Louis S.; Allen, Arthur L.; May, Eric B.; Kleinman, Peter J. A.; Hashem, Fawzy M.; Bryant, Ray B.

    2014-01-01

    Rainfall is a driving force for the transport of environmental contaminants from agricultural soils to surficial water bodies via surface runoff. The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of antecedent soil moisture content on the fate and transport of surface applied commercial urea, a common form of nitrogen (N) fertilizer, following a rainfall event that occurs within 24 hr after fertilizer application. Although urea is assumed to be readily hydrolyzed to ammonium and therefore not often available for transport, recent studies suggest that urea can be transported from agricultural soils to coastal waters where it is implicated in harmful algal blooms. A rainfall simulator was used to apply a consistent rate of uniform rainfall across packed soil boxes that had been prewetted to different soil moisture contents. By controlling rainfall and soil physical characteristics, the effects of antecedent soil moisture on urea loss were isolated. Wetter soils exhibited shorter time from rainfall initiation to runoff initiation, greater total volume of runoff, higher urea concentrations in runoff, and greater mass loadings of urea in runoff. These results also demonstrate the importance of controlling for antecedent soil moisture content in studies designed to isolate other variables, such as soil physical or chemical characteristics, slope, soil cover, management, or rainfall characteristics. Because rainfall simulators are designed to deliver raindrops of similar size and velocity as natural rainfall, studies conducted under a standardized protocol can yield valuable data that, in turn, can be used to develop models for predicting the fate and transport of pollutants in runoff. PMID:24748061

  4. A protocol for conducting rainfall simulation to study soil runoff.

    PubMed

    Kibet, Leonard C; Saporito, Louis S; Allen, Arthur L; May, Eric B; Kleinman, Peter J A; Hashem, Fawzy M; Bryant, Ray B

    2014-04-03

    Rainfall is a driving force for the transport of environmental contaminants from agricultural soils to surficial water bodies via surface runoff. The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of antecedent soil moisture content on the fate and transport of surface applied commercial urea, a common form of nitrogen (N) fertilizer, following a rainfall event that occurs within 24 hr after fertilizer application. Although urea is assumed to be readily hydrolyzed to ammonium and therefore not often available for transport, recent studies suggest that urea can be transported from agricultural soils to coastal waters where it is implicated in harmful algal blooms. A rainfall simulator was used to apply a consistent rate of uniform rainfall across packed soil boxes that had been prewetted to different soil moisture contents. By controlling rainfall and soil physical characteristics, the effects of antecedent soil moisture on urea loss were isolated. Wetter soils exhibited shorter time from rainfall initiation to runoff initiation, greater total volume of runoff, higher urea concentrations in runoff, and greater mass loadings of urea in runoff. These results also demonstrate the importance of controlling for antecedent soil moisture content in studies designed to isolate other variables, such as soil physical or chemical characteristics, slope, soil cover, management, or rainfall characteristics. Because rainfall simulators are designed to deliver raindrops of similar size and velocity as natural rainfall, studies conducted under a standardized protocol can yield valuable data that, in turn, can be used to develop models for predicting the fate and transport of pollutants in runoff.

  5. [FOTOTRANS study: multicentre study on the validity of Fototest under clinical practice conditions].

    PubMed

    Carnero-Pardo, C; Sáez-Zea, C; De la Vega Cotarelo, R; Gurpegui, M

    2012-03-01

    Fototest is a short simple test, applicable to illiterate subjects and not influenced by educational level. The purpose of this study is to assess its validity for cognitive impairment (CI) and dementia (DEM) under routine clinical practice conditions. A cross-sectional, multicentre and naturalistic study conducted in General Neurology clinics. The subjects were, over 60 years old, with a previously established diagnosis of no cognitive impairment (NoCI), cognitive impairment without dementia (CInoDEM), or dementia (DEM). The discriminant validity was assessed using the area under the ROC curve (AUC), sensitivity (Sn), specificity (Sp), and probability coefficients. Partial correlations were calculated, adjusted for age, sex and education level with Eurotest, verbal fluency test (VFT) and Global Deterioration Scale (GDS) score to evaluate the concurrent and construct validity. Nineteen neurologists included a total of 589 subjects: 361 NoCI, 106 CINoDEM and 122 DEM. The discriminant value was better for DEM (AUC 0.94 ± 0.02) than for CI (0.86 ± 0.02). For DEM the best cut-off point was 26/27 (Sn=0.88 [95% CI, 0.93-0.97], Sp=0.87 [95% CI, 0.84-0.90]); and for CI, 28/29 (Sn=0.71 [95% CI, 0.65-0.77], Sp=0.84 [95% CI, 0.80-0.88]). Fototest showed a high and significant correlation with Eurotest (r=0.70 ± 0.02), VFT (r=0.68 ± 0.02) and the GDS score (r=-0.77 ± 0.02). The Fototest showed adequate validity for CI and DEM in general Neurology clinics in an extensive and wide geographical area. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. First principles study of thermal conductivity cross-over in nanostructured zinc-chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Katre, Ankita; Madsen, Georg K. H.; Togo, Atsushi; Tanaka, Isao

    2015-01-28

    Systematic first principles studies of zinc-chalcogenides have been performed to understand their thermal transport behaviour. We have applied the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation to calculate the thermal conductivity of ZnS, ZnSe, and ZnTe. We find a thermal conductivity cross-over between ZnS and ZnSe at nanostructure sizes around 0.1–0.2 μm and explain this in terms of the different contributions of phonon modes in these materials. We study the effect of nanostructuring using both the diffusive boundary scattering and confined mean free path limit and discuss the variations in the results. Furthermore, we show the strong influence of isotope scattering on the thermal conductivity. The calculated thermal conductivity is found to be strongly dependent on the volume and we explain the observed differences between local density and generalized gradient approximation calculations. We compare further calculated thermal properties, such as the thermal expansion coefficient, to experiment to validate our approach.

  7. Ionic conductivity and battery characteristic studies of a new PAN-based Na+ ion conducting gel polymer electrolyte system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Jyothi, N.; Vijaya Kumar, K.; Sunita Sundari, G.; Narayana Murthy, P.

    2016-03-01

    Sodium ion conducting gel polymer electrolytes based on polyacrylonitrile (PAN) with ethylene carbonate and dimethyl formamide as plasticizing solvents are prepared by the solution cast technique. These electrolyte films are free standing, transparent and dimensionally stable. Na+ ions are derived from NaI. The structural properties of pure and complex formations have been examined by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies and differential scanning calorimetric studies. The variation of the conductivity with salt concentration ranging from 10 to 40 wt% is studied. The sample containing 30 wt% of NaI exhibits the highest conductivity of 2.35 × 10-4 S cm-1 at room temperature (303 K) and 1 × 10-3 S cm-1 at 373 K. The conductivity-temperature dependence of polymer electrolyte films obeys Arrhenius behavior with activation energy in the range of 0.25-0.46 eV. The transport numbers both electronic ( t e) and ionic ( t i) are evaluated using Wagner's polarization technique. It is revealed that the conducting species are predominantly due to ions. The ionic transport number of highest conducting film is found to be 0.991. Solid-state battery with configuration Na/(PAN + NaI)/(I2 + C + electrolyte) is developed using the highest conducting gel polymer electrolyte system and the discharge characteristics of the cell are evaluated over the load of 100 KΩ.

  8. Development and validation study of the Smartphone Overuse Screening Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Kyeong; Kim, Ji-Hae; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David; Park, Jae-Hyun; Shim, Eun-Jung; Lee, Eun-Ho; Lee, Ji Hyeon; Jeon, Hong Jin

    2017-08-02

    The aim of this study was to develop a screening questionnaire that could distinguish individuals at high risk of smartphone overuse from casual users. The reliability, validity, and diagnostic ability of the Smartphone Overuse Screening Questionnaire (SOS-Q) were evaluated. Preliminary items were assessed by 50 addiction experts on-line, and 28 questions were selected. A total of 158 subjects recruited from six community centers for internet addiction participated in this study. The SOS-Q, Young's internet addiction scale, Korean scale for internet addiction, and Smartphone Scale for Smartphone Addiction (S-Scale) were used to assess the concurrent validity. Construct validity was supported by a six-factor model using an exploratory factor analysis. The internal consistency and the item-total correlations were favorable (α = 0.95, r = 0.35-0.81). The test-retest reliability was moderate (r = 0.70). The SOS-Q showed superior concurrent validity with the highest correlation between the S-Scale (r = 0.76). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.877. A cut-off point of 49 effectively categorized addiction high-risk group with a sensitivity of 0.81 and specificity of 0.86. Overall, the current study supports the use of SOS-Q as both a primary and supplementary measurement tool in a variety of settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Genome-wide association study of conduct disorder symptomatology

    PubMed Central

    Dick, DM; Aliev, F; Krueger, RF; Edwards, A; Agrawal, A; Lynskey, M; Lin, P; Schuckit, M; Hesselbrock, V; Nurnberger, J; Almasy, L; Porjesz, B; Edenberg, HJ; Bucholz, K; Kramer, J; Kuperman, S; Bierut, L

    2013-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is one of the most prevalent childhood psychiatric conditions, and is associated with a number of serious concomitant and future problems. CD symptomatology is known to have a considerable genetic component, with heritability estimates in the range of 50%. Despite this, there is a relative paucity of studies aimed at identifying genes involved in the susceptibility to CD. In this study, we report results from a genome-wide association study of CD symptoms. CD symptoms were retrospectively reported by a psychiatric interview among a sample of cases and controls, in which cases met the criteria for alcohol dependence. Our primary phenotype was the natural log transformation of the number of CD symptoms that were endorsed, with data available for 3963 individuals who were genotyped on the Illumina Human 1M beadchip array. Secondary analyses are presented for case versus control status, in which caseness was established as endorsing three or more CD symptoms (N= 872 with CD and N= 3091 without CD). We find four markers that meet the criteria for genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) with the CD symptom count, two of which are located in the gene C1QTNF7 (C1q and tumor necrosis factor-related protein 7). There were six additional SNPs in the gene that yielded converging evidence of association. These data provide the first evidence of a specific gene that is associated with CD symptomatology. None of the top signals resided in traditional candidate genes, underscoring the importance of a genome-wide approach for identifying novel variants involved in this serious childhood disorder. PMID:20585324

  10. Environmental education curriculum evaluation questionnaire: A reliability and validity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minner, Daphne Diane

    The intention of this research project was to bridge the gap between social science research and application to the environmental domain through the development of a theoretically derived instrument designed to give educators a template by which to evaluate environmental education curricula. The theoretical base for instrument development was provided by several developmental theories such as Piaget's theory of cognitive development, Developmental Systems Theory, Life-span Perspective, as well as curriculum research within the area of environmental education. This theoretical base fueled the generation of a list of components which were then translated into a questionnaire with specific questions relevant to the environmental education domain. The specific research question for this project is: Can a valid assessment instrument based largely on human development and education theory be developed that reliably discriminates high, moderate, and low quality in environmental education curricula? The types of analyses conducted to answer this question were interrater reliability (percent agreement, Cohen's Kappa coefficient, Pearson's Product-Moment correlation coefficient), test-retest reliability (percent agreement, correlation), and criterion-related validity (correlation). Face validity and content validity were also assessed through thorough reviews. Overall results indicate that 29% of the questions on the questionnaire demonstrated a high level of interrater reliability and 43% of the questions demonstrated a moderate level of interrater reliability. Seventy-one percent of the questions demonstrated a high test-retest reliability and 5% a moderate level. Fifty-five percent of the questions on the questionnaire were reliable (high or moderate) both across time and raters. Only eight questions (8%) did not show either interrater or test-retest reliability. The global overall rating of high, medium, or low quality was reliable across both coders and time, indicating

  11. River Seepage Conductance in Large-Scale Regional Studies.

    PubMed

    Morel-Seytoux, Hubert J; Miller, Calvin D; Miracapillo, Cinzia; Mehl, Steffen

    2016-12-20

    Flow exchange between surface and groundwater is of great importance be it for beneficial allocation and use of water resources or for the proper exercise of water rights. In large-scale regional studies, most numerical models use coarse grid sizes, which make it difficult to provide an accurate depiction of the phenomenon. In particular, a somewhat arbitrary leakance coefficient in a third type (i.e., Cauchy, General Head) boundary condition is used to calculate the seepage discharge as a function of the difference of head in the river and in the aquifer, whose value is often found by calibration. A different approach is presented to analytically estimate that leakance coefficient. It is shown that a simple equivalence can be deduced from the analytical solution for the empirical coefficient, so that it provides the accuracy of the analytical solution while the model maintains a very coarse grid, treating the water-table aquifer as a single calculation layer. Relating the empirical leakance coefficient to the exact conductance, derived from physical principles, provides a physical basis for the leakance coefficient. Factors such as normalized wetted perimeter, degree of penetration of the river, presence of a clogging layer, and anisotropy can be included with little computational demand. In addition the river coefficient in models such as MODFLOW, for example, can be easily modified when grid size is changed without need for recalibration.

  12. Perovskite transparent conducting oxides: an ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Dabaghmanesh, S; Saniz, R; Amini, M N; Lamoen, D; Partoens, B

    2013-10-16

    We present an ab initio study of the electronic structure and of the formation energies of various point defects in BaSnO3 and SrGeO3. We show that La and Y impurities substituting Ba or Sr are shallow donors with a preferred 1 + charge state. These defects have a low formation energy within all the suitable equilibrium growth conditions considered. Oxygen vacancies behave as shallow donors as well, preferring the 2 + charge state. Their formation energies, however, are higher in most growth conditions, indicating a limited contribution to conductivity. The calculated electron effective mass in BaSnO3, with a value of 0.21 m(e), and the very high mobility reported recently in La-doped BaSnO3 single-crystals, suggest that remarkably low scattering rates can be achieved in the latter. In the case of SrGeO3, our results point to carrier density and mobility values in the low range for typical polycrystalline TCOs, in line with experiment.

  13. A numerical study of transient, thermally-conductive solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, S. M.; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical analysis of transient solar wind starting at the solar surface and arriving at 1 AU is performed by an implicit numerical method. The model hydrodynamic equations include thermal conduction terms for both steady and unsteady simulations. Simulation results show significant influence of thermal conduction on both steady and time-dependent solar wind. Higher thermal conduction results in higher solar wind speed, higher temperature, but lower plasma density at 1 AU. Higher base temperature at the solar surface gives lower plasma speed, lower temperature, but higher density at 1 AU. Higher base density, on the other hand, gives lower velocity, lower temperature, but higher density at 1 AU.

  14. A procedure for the measurement of infant skin conductance and its initial validation using clap induced startle

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Jacob; Tronick, Ed

    2008-01-01

    Studies examining psychophysiologic markers of infant emotional development abound. However, few studies have used skin conductance (SC), though it measures sympathetic activity, and none have measured SC on infants sitting up and actively engaged with another person, a significant challenge given the measures sensitivity to movement artifact. In this pilot/feasibility study, we present a procedure for measuring infant SC during active engagement with another person who executes a series of startling claps to elicit an SC response. We measured SC on the plantar surface of the foot of 17 five-month old infants. We found unconditioned SC responses that were related to the intensity of physical startle reactions for each clap trial. We also found anticipatory, conditioned SC responses that occurred within 5s before each clap that occurred when the researcher raised his clasped hands. These conditioned SC responses grew linearly in intensity over trials. We conclude that SC may be a useful addition to the infant researcher’s armamentarium and may indeed be used to measure physiologic reactivity in infants even when actively engaged with another person. Addition of SC measurement to research on infant emotion and emotional communication is likely to advance our understanding of the psychophysiologic foundations of infant emotional development. PMID:18683186

  15. Molecular Dynamics study of the mixed oxide fuel thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichenko, S.; Staicu, D.

    2013-08-01

    There is still no clear understanding of the plutonium content influence on the thermal conductivity behaviour of the (U,Pu) O2 MOX fuels. In this work Classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) was used to investigate the (U,Pu) O2 thermal conductivity in the whole concentration range and in the temperature range from 400 K to 1600 K. The Green-Kubo approach was used for the thermal conductivity calculation and an algorithm was proposed to improve the accuracy of the calculation. The obtained results are in good agreement with the literature experimental data and results of modelling of other authors. On the basis of the obtained results we give recommendations for the MOX thermal conductivity evaluation in the concentration range from pure UO2 up to pure PuO2.

  16. Comparative Study of the Thermal Conductivity of Solid Biomass Fuels

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of solid biomass fuels is useful information in the investigation of biomass combustion behavior and the development of modeling especially in the context of large scale power generation. There are little published data on the thermal conductivity of certain types of biomass such as wheat straw, miscanthus, and torrefied woods. Much published data on wood is in the context of bulk materials. A method for determining the thermal conductivities of small particles of biomass fuels has been developed using a custom built test apparatus. Fourteen different samples of various solid biomass fuel were processed to form a homogenized pellet for analysis. The thermal conductivities of the pelletized materials were determined and compared against each other and to existing data. PMID:27041819

  17. Carbonyl mediated conductance through metal bound peptides: a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Trilisa M.; Dunietz, Barry D.

    2007-10-01

    Large increases in the conductance of peptides upon binding to metal ions have recently been reported experimentally. The mechanism of the conductance switching is examined computationally. It is suggested that oxidation of the metal ion occurs after binding to the peptide. This is caused by the bias potential placed across the metal-peptide complex. A combination of configurational changes, metal ion involvement and interactions between carbonyl group oxygen atoms and the gold leads are all shown to be necessary for the large improvement in the conductance seen experimentally. Differences in the molecular orbitals of the nickel and copper complexes are noted and serve to explain the variation of the improvement in conductance upon binding to either a nickel or copper ion.

  18. Novel Conductive Coatings of Carbon Nanotubes: A Fundamental Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-29

    naphthalate ) transparent composite film: it gave conductivity of 130/sq with 80% transmittance at 400-700nm wavelength range. In contrast,, current...with metallic SWNT (m-SWNT) coated on PEN (poly-ethylene- naphthalate ) transparent composite film: it gave conductivity of 130fVsq with 80...adhere well to PEN (poly-ethylene- naphthalate ) film surface and it passes tape adhesion test. The m-SWNT, the best one we have scouted, was separated

  19. Sources of Self-Efficacy in Mathematics: A Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, Ellen L.; Pajares, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate items with which to assess A. Bandura's (1997) theorized sources of self-efficacy among middle school mathematics students. Results from Phase 1 (N=1111) were used to develop and refine items for subsequent use. In Phase 2 of the study (N=824), a 39-item, four-factor exploratory model fit best.…

  20. 41 CFR 60-3.14 - Technical standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... specific validation strategy used. B. Technical standards for criterion-related validity studies—(1...) Appropriateness of construct validity studies. Construct validity is a more complex strategy than either criterion... validity studies. 60-3.14 Section 60-3.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions...

  1. 41 CFR 60-3.14 - Technical standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... specific validation strategy used. B. Technical standards for criterion-related validity studies—(1...) Appropriateness of construct validity studies. Construct validity is a more complex strategy than either criterion... validity studies. 60-3.14 Section 60-3.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions...

  2. 41 CFR 60-3.14 - Technical standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... specific validation strategy used. B. Technical standards for criterion-related validity studies—(1...) Appropriateness of construct validity studies. Construct validity is a more complex strategy than either criterion... validity studies. 60-3.14 Section 60-3.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions...

  3. 41 CFR 60-3.14 - Technical standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specific validation strategy used. B. Technical standards for criterion-related validity studies—(1...) Appropriateness of construct validity studies. Construct validity is a more complex strategy than either criterion... validity studies. 60-3.14 Section 60-3.14 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions...

  4. 29 CFR 1607.7 - Use of other validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Fairness evidence. The studies include a study of test fairness for each race, sex, and ethnic group which... do not contain an investigation of test fairness, and it is not technically feasible for the borrowing user to conduct an internal study of test fairness, the borrowing user may utilize the study until...

  5. Open-Source MFIX-DEM Software for Gas-Solids Flows: Part II - Validation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen

    2012-04-01

    With rapid advancements in computer hardware and numerical algorithms, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been increasingly employed as a useful tool for investigating the complex hydrodynamics inherent in multiphase flows. An important step during the development of a CFD model and prior to its application is conducting careful and comprehensive verification and validation studies. Accordingly, efforts to verify and validate the open-source MFIX-DEM software, which can be used for simulating the gas–solids flow using an Eulerian reference frame for the continuum fluid and a Lagrangian discrete framework (Discrete Element Method) for the particles, have been made at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). In part I of this paper, extensive verification studies were presented and in this part, detailed validation studies of MFIX-DEM are presented. A series of test cases covering a range of gas–solids flow applications were conducted. In particular the numerical results for the random packing of a binary particle mixture, the repose angle of a sandpile formed during a side charge process, velocity, granular temperature, and voidage profiles from a bounded granular shear flow, lateral voidage and velocity profiles from a monodisperse bubbling fluidized bed, lateral velocity profiles from a spouted bed, and the dynamics of segregation of a binary mixture in a bubbling bed were compared with available experimental data, and in some instances with empirical correlations. In addition, sensitivity studies were conducted for various parameters to quantify the error in the numerical simulation.

  6. Open-source MFIX-DEM software for gas-solids flows: Part II Validation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Garg, Rahul; Galvin, Janine; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2012-01-01

    With rapid advancements in computer hardware and numerical algorithms, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been increasingly employed as a useful tool for investigating the complex hydrodynamics inherent in multiphase flows. An important step during the development of a CFD model and prior to its application is conducting careful and comprehensive verification and validation studies. Accordingly, efforts to verify and validate the open-source MFIX-DEM software, which can be used for simulating the gas solids flow using an Eulerian reference frame for the continuum fluid and a Lagrangian discrete framework (Discrete Element Method) for the particles, have been made at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). In part I of this paper, extensive verification studies were presented and in this part, detailed validation studies of MFIX-DEM are presented. A series of test cases covering a range of gas solids flow applications were conducted. In particular the numerical results for the random packing of a binary particle mixture, the repose angle of a sandpile formed during a side charge process, velocity, granular temperature, and voidage profiles from a bounded granular shear flow, lateral voidage and velocity profiles from a monodisperse bubbling fluidized bed, lateral velocity profiles from a spouted bed, and the dynamics of segregation of a binary mixture in a bubbling bed were compared with available experimental data, and in some instances with empirical correlations. In addition, sensitivity studies were conducted for various parameters to quantify the error in the numerical simulation.

  7. Verification, validation and sensitivity studies in computational biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Andrew E; Ellis, Benjamin J; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2007-06-01

    Computational techniques and software for the analysis of problems in mechanics have naturally moved from their origins in the traditional engineering disciplines to the study of cell, tissue and organ biomechanics. Increasingly complex models have been developed to describe and predict the mechanical behavior of such biological systems. While the availability of advanced computational tools has led to exciting research advances in the field, the utility of these models is often the subject of criticism due to inadequate model verification and validation (V&V). The objective of this review is to present the concepts of verification, validation and sensitivity studies with regard to the construction, analysis and interpretation of models in computational biomechanics. Specific examples from the field are discussed. It is hoped that this review will serve as a guide to the use of V&V principles in the field of computational biomechanics, thereby improving the peer acceptance of studies that use computational modeling techniques.

  8. Nerve conduction studies in upper extremities: skin temperature corrections.

    PubMed

    Halar, E M; DeLisa, J A; Soine, T L

    1983-09-01

    The relationship of skin to near nerve (NN) temperature and to nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and distal latency (DL) was studied in 34 normal adult subjects before and after cooling both upper extremities. Median and ulnar motor and sensory NCV, DL, and NN temperature were determined at ambient temperature (mean X skin temp = 33 C) and after cooling, at approximately 26, 28, and 30 C of forearm skin temperature. Skin temperatures on the volar side of the forearm, wrist, palm, and fingers and NN temperature at the forearm, midpalm, and thenar or hypothenar eminence were compared with respective NCV and DL. Results showed a significant linear correlation between skin temperature and NN temperature at corresponding sites (r2 range, 0.4-0.84; p less than 0.005). Furthermore, both skin and NN temperatures correlated significantly with respective NCV and DL. Midline wrist skin temperature showed the best correlation to NCV and DL. Median motor and sensory NCV were altered 1.5 and 1.4m/sec/C degree and their DL 0.2 msec/C degree of wrist skin temperature change, respectively. Ulnar motor and sensory NCV were changed 2.1 and 1.6m/sec/C degree respectively, and 0.2 msec/C degree wrist temperature for motor and sensory DL. Average ambient skin temperature at the wrist (33 C) was used as a standard skin temperature in the temperature correction formula: NCV or DL(temp corrected) = CF(Tst degree - Tm degree) + obtained NCV or DL, where Tst = 33 C for wrist, Tm = the measured skin temperature, and CF = correction factor of tested nerve. Use of temperature correction formula for NCV and DL is suggested in patients with changed wrist skin temperature outside 29.6-36.4C temperature range.

  9. Validity of the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey: A Confirmatory Study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of the present study were to evaluate whether investigator bias influenced the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS) scores of children with normal binocular vision (NBV) in our original validation study, reevaluate the usefulness of the cut-off score of 16, and reexamine the validity of the CISS. Methods Six clinical sites participating in the Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT) enrolled 46 children 9 - <18 years with NBV. Examiners masked to the child’s binocular vision status administered the CISS. The mean CISS score was compared to that from the children with NBV in the original, unmasked CISS study and also to that of the 221 symptomatic CI children enrolled in the CITT. Results The mean (±SD) CISS score for 46 subjects with NBV was 10.4 (±8.1). This was comparable to that from our prior unmasked NBV study (mean = 8.1(± 6.2); p = 0.11), but was significantly different from that of the CITT CI group (mean = 29.8 ± 9.0; p < 0.001). Eighty-three percent of these NBV subjects scored less than 16 on the CISS, which is not statistically different from the 87.5% found in the original unmasked study (p = 0.49). Conclusions Examiner bias did not affect the CISS scores for subjects with NBV in our prior study. The CISS continues to be a valid instrument for quantifying symptoms in 9 to <18 year-old children and these results confirm the validity of a cut-point of ≥ 16 in distinguishing children with symptomatic CI from those with NBV. PMID:19289977

  10. A study on electrode gels for skin conductance measurements.

    PubMed

    Tronstad, Christian; Johnsen, Gorm Krogh; Grimnes, Sverre; Martinsen, Ørjan G

    2010-10-01

    Low-frequency skin conductance is used within several clinical applications and is mainly sensitive to sweating and the moisture content of the stratum corneum, but also how electrodes introduce changes in the electrical properties. Four electrode gels were investigated with regard to sorption characteristics and electrical properties. Skin conductance time series were collected from 18 test subjects during relaxation, exercise and recovery, wearing different pairs of electrodes contralaterally on the hypothenar and the T9 dermatome. Pressure test was applied on the T9 electrodes. Impedance frequency sweeps were taken on the T9 electrodes the same day and the next, parameterized to the Cole model. ANOVA on the initial skin conductance level change, exercise response amplitude, recovery offset and pressure-induced changes revealed significant differences among gel types. The wetter gels caused a higher positive level change, a greater response amplitude, larger recovery offset and greater pressure-induced artifacts compared to the solid gels. Sweating on the T9 site led to negative skin conductance responses for the wetter gels. Correlations were found between the desorption measurements and the initial skin conductance level change (hypothenar: R = 0.988 T9: R = 0.901) RM-ANOVA on the Cole parameters revealed a significant decrease in R(s) of the most resistive gel. Clinical implications are discussed.

  11. Electrical Characterization and Morphological Studies of Conducting Polymer Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, N. J.; Zhou, Y. X.; Freitag, M.; Johnson, A. T.; MacDiarmid, A. G.; Mueller, C. H.; Theofylaktos, N.; Robinson, D. C.; Miranda, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    Doped polyaniline blended with poly(ethylene oxide) has been electrospun in air to give fibers with diameters in the range 3 nm 200 nm. These fibers were captured on wafers of degenerately doped Si/SiO2 by placing the wafer in the path of the fiber jet formed during the electrospinning process. Individual fibers were contacted using shadow mask evaporation and were also captured on prepatterned wafers. Fibers having diameters greater than 100 nm show a slight increase in the conductivity as compared to the bulk film, while fibers with diameters less than 30 nm had lower conductivity than the bulk. Data on Scanning Conductance Microscopy along the length of individual fibers will be presented. For fibers where the diameter was not uniform, we found that below a certain diameter ( approx.15 nm) the fiber was less conducting as compared to thicker diameter fibers. Dependence of the fiber conductivity on a gate bias is underway and these results will also be presented.

  12. Assessing validity of observational intervention studies – the Benchmarking Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Malmivaara, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Benchmarking Controlled Trial (BCT) is a concept which covers all observational studies aiming to assess impact of interventions or health care system features to patients and populations. Aims: To create and pilot test a checklist for appraising methodological validity of a BCT. Methods: The checklist was created by extracting the most essential elements from the comprehensive set of criteria in the previous paper on BCTs. Also checklists and scientific papers on observational studies and respective systematic reviews were utilized. Ten BCTs published in the Lancet and in the New England Journal of Medicine were used to assess feasibility of the created checklist. Results: The appraised studies seem to have several methodological limitations, some of which could be avoided in planning, conducting and reporting phases of the studies. Conclusions: The checklist can be used for planning, conducting, reporting, reviewing, and critical reading of observational intervention studies. However, the piloted checklist should be validated in further studies.Key messagesBenchmarking Controlled Trial (BCT) is a concept which covers all observational studies aiming to assess impact of interventions or health care system features to patients and populations.This paper presents a checklist for appraising methodological validity of BCTs and pilot-tests the checklist with ten BCTs published in leading medical journals. The appraised studies seem to have several methodological limitations, some of which could be avoided in planning, conducting and reporting phases of the studies.The checklist can be used for planning, conducting, reporting, reviewing, and critical reading of observational intervention studies. PMID:27238631

  13. Materials characterization study of conductive flexible second surface mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levadou, F.; Bosma, S. J.; Paillous, A.

    1981-01-01

    The status of prequalification and qualification work on conductive flexible second surface mirrors is described. The basic material is FEP Teflon witn either aluminium or silver vacuum deposited reflectors. The top layer has been made conductive by deposition of layer of a indium oxide. The results of a prequalification program comprised of decontamination, humidity, thermal cycling, thermal shock and vibration tests are presented. Thermo-optical and electrical properties. The results of a prequalification program comprised of decontamination, humidity, thermal cycling, thermal shock and vibration tests are presented. Thermo-optical and electrical properties, the electrostatic behavior of the materials under simulated substorm environment and electrical conductivity at low temperatures are characterized. The effects of simulated ultra violet and particles irradiation on electrical and thermo-optical properties of the materials are also presented.

  14. Theoretical Study of Electrical Conduction Through Alkanethiol Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomfohr, John; Sankey, Otto; Lindsay, Stuart; Cui, Xiaodong

    2000-03-01

    We have investigated theoretically the conduction of electrons through alkanethiol chains CH_3(CH_2)_nSH of various lengths and other simple organic molecules. We use, in part, a common method derived from scattering theory. Structural, energetic and dynamical information is obtained from an approach based on density-functional theory which utilizes a basis of slightly excited pseudo-atomic-orbitals. Alkanethiol monolayers have been used as supporting and insulating material in which molecules such as carotenoids are embedded so that their conductive properties may be measured with an STM probe. A comparison with experiments is made. In addition to ``tunneling" and resonant conduction we discuss progress in including vibrations in a time-dependent solution of the problem.

  15. Development, characterization and conductivity studies of chlorinated EPDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nihmath, A.; Ramesan, M. T.

    2014-10-01

    Halogenation of EPDM has been carried out by passing chlorine gas by a simple and inexpensive chemical method. Chlorinated EPDM was characterized by FTIR and UV spectroscopy, SEM, TGA, DSC and AC conductivity measurements. FTIR and UV spectra revealed the attachment of chlorine to double bond of EPDM. SEM images showed the coarsen morphology arising from polar nature of the resulting polymer. TGA and DSC analysis indicated that the chlorination on EPDM affected the basic decomposition pattern and glass transition temperature of synthesized polymer. Conductivity of halogenated polymer was significantly increased with increase in chlorine content and also with increase in frequency.

  16. Design, development, testing and validation of a Photonics Virtual Laboratory for the study of LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, Francisco L.; Martínez, Guadalupe; Pérez, Ángel L.; Pardo, Pedro J.

    2014-07-01

    This work presents the design, development, testing and validation of a Photonic Virtual Laboratory, highlighting the study of LEDs. The study was conducted from a conceptual, experimental and didactic standpoint, using e-learning and m-learning platforms. Specifically, teaching tools that help ensure that our students perform significant learning have been developed. It has been brought together the scientific aspect, such as the study of LEDs, with techniques of generation and transfer of knowledge through the selection, hierarchization and structuring of information using concept maps. For the validation of the didactic materials developed, it has been used procedures with various assessment tools for the collection and processing of data, applied in the context of an experimental design. Additionally, it was performed a statistical analysis to determine the validity of the materials developed. The assessment has been designed to validate the contributions of the new materials developed over the traditional method of teaching, and to quantify the learning achieved by students, in order to draw conclusions that serve as a reference for its application in the teaching and learning processes, and comprehensively validate the work carried out.

  17. A content validity study of signs, symptoms and diseases/health problems expressed in LIBRAS1

    PubMed Central

    Aragão, Jamilly da Silva; de França, Inacia Sátiro Xavier; Coura, Alexsandro Silva; de Sousa, Francisco Stélio; Batista, Joana D'arc Lyra; Magalhães, Isabella Medeiros de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to validate the content of signs, symptoms and diseases/health problems expressed in LIBRAS for people with deafness Method: methodological development study, which involved 36 people with deafness and three LIBRAS specialists. The study was conducted in three stages: investigation of the signs, symptoms and diseases/health problems, referred to by people with deafness, reported in a questionnaire; video recordings of how people with deafness express, through LIBRA, the signs, symptoms and diseases/health problems; and validation of the contents of the recordings of the expressions by LIBRAS specialists. Data were processed in a spreadsheet and analyzed using univariate tables, with absolute frequencies and percentages. The validation results were analyzed using the Content Validity Index (CVI). Results: 33 expressions in LIBRAS, of signs, symptoms and diseases/health problems were evaluated, and 28 expressions obtained a satisfactory CVI (1.00). Conclusions: the signs, symptoms and diseases/health problems expressed in LIBRAS presented validity, in the study region, for health professionals, especially nurses, for use in the clinical anamnesis of the nursing consultation for people with deafness. PMID:26625991

  18. [Assistive technology for visually impaired women for use of the female condom: a validation study].

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Luana Duarte Wanderley; Oliveira, Giselly Oseni Barbosa; Almeida, Paulo César de; Rebouças, Cristiana Brasil de Almeida; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag

    2015-02-01

    To validate assistive technology for visually impaired women to learn how to use the female condom. a methodological development study conducted on a web page, with data collection between May and October 2012. Participants were 14 judges; seven judges in sexual and reproductive health (1st stage) and seven in special education (2nd stage). All items have reached the adopted parameter of 70% agreement. In Stage 1 new materials were added to represent the cervix, and instructions that must be heard twice were included in the 2nd stage. The technology has been validated and is appropriate for its objectives, structure / presentation and relevance. It is an innovative, low cost and valid instrument for promoting health and one which may help women with visual disabilities to use the female condom.

  19. Study on Thermal Conductivities of Aromatic Polyimide Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Feng, Junzong; Wang, Xin; Jiang, Yonggang; Du, Dongxuan; Feng, Jian

    2016-05-25

    Polyimide aerogels for low density thermal insulation materials were produced by 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether and 3,3',4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride, cross-linked with 1,3,5-triaminophenoxybenzene. The densities of obtained polyimide aerogels are between 0.081 and 0.141 g cm(-3), and the specific surface areas are between 288 and 322 m(2) g(-1). The thermal conductivities were measured by a Hot Disk thermal constant analyzer. The value of the measured thermal conductivity under carbon dioxide atmosphere is lower than that under nitrogen atmosphere. Under pressure of 5 Pa at -130 °C, the thermal conductivity is the lowest, which is 8.42 mW (m K)(-1). The polyimide aerogels have lower conductivity [30.80 mW (m K)(-1)], compared to the value for other organic foams (polyurethane foam, phenolic foam, and polystyrene foam) with similar apparent densities under ambient pressure at 25 °C. The results indicate that polyimide aerogel is an ideal insulation material for aerospace and other applications.

  20. Mössbauer study of conductive oxide glass

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Koken; Kubuki, Shiro; Nishida, Tetsuaki

    2014-10-27

    Heat treatment of barium iron vanadate glass, BaO‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}‐V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, at temperatures higher than crystallization temperature causes a marked decrease in resistivity (ρ) from several MΩcm to several Ωcm. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectrum of heat-treated vanadate glass shows a marked decrease in quadrupole splitting (Δ) of Fe{sup III}, reflecting a structural relaxation, i.e., an increased symmetry of 'distorted' FeO{sub 4} and VO{sub 4} tetrahedra which are connected to each other by sharing corner oxygen atoms. Structural relaxation of 3D-network of vanadate glass accompanies a decrease in the activation energy for the conduction, reflecting a decreased energy gap between the donor level and conduction band. A marked increase in the conductivity was observed in CuO- or Cu{sub 2}O-containing barium iron vanadate glass after heat treatment at 450 °C for 30 min or more. 'n-type semiconductor model combined with small polaron hopping theory' was proposed in order to explain the high conductivity.

  1. Comparative study of thermal conductivity in crystalline and amorphous nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juangsa, Firman Bagja; Muroya, Yoshiki; Ryu, Meguya; Morikawa, Junko; Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2017-06-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs)/polystyrene (PS) nanocomposite has been observed to have a significant decrease in thermal conductivity in terms of the SiNC fraction with unspecified factors remained unclear. In this paper, amorphous silicon nanoparticles (a-SiNPs) with a mean diameter of 6 nm and PS nanocomposites were synthesized, and their thermal conductivity, including the density and specific heat, was compared with our previous work which investigated well-crystalized SiNPs (6 nm) and PS nanocomposite. The difference between amorphous and crystalline structure is insignificant, but phonon scattering at SiNPs and PS boundary is the key influencing factor of thermal conductivity reduction. The effective thermal conductivity models for nanocomposite revealed that the thermal boundary resistance, explained by Kapitza principle, is estimated to be 4 × 10-7 m2K/W, showing the significant effect of nanostructured heterogenic surface resistance on overall heat transfer behavior. Preservation of unique properties nanoscale materials and low-cost fabrication by silicon inks process at room temperature give the promising potential of SiNPs based heat transfer management.

  2. Dietary Assessment in the California Teachers Study: Reproducibility and Validity

    PubMed Central

    Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; Lee, Valerie S.; Collins, Christine N.; Stewart, Susan L.; Canchola, Alison J.; Lee, Marion M.; Reynolds, Peggy; Clarke, Christina A.; Bernstein, Leslie; Stram, Daniel O.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the reproducibility and validity of the food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) used in the California Teachers Study (CTS) cohort and to use this data to quantify the effects of correcting nutrient-breast cancer relative risks for measurement error. Methods 195 CTS cohort members participated in a 10-month dietary validation study that included four 24-hour dietary recalls and pre- and post-study FFQs. Shrout-Fleiss intraclass correlations for reproducibility were computed. Under several standard assumptions concerning the correlations of errors in the FFQs and 24-hour recalls, we calculated energy-adjusted deattenuated Pearson correlations for validity and tested for differences in validity according to a number of demographic and other risk factors. For each nutrient, we compared ot performance of the FFQ versus the 24-hour recalls, estimating the number of days of recalls that give equivalent information about true intake as does a single FFQ.. Finally, the effects of adjustment for measurement error on risk estimates were evaluated in 44,423 postmenopausal cohort members, 1,544 of whom developed breast cancer during seven years of follow-up. Relative risks (RR) and confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards with and without correction for measurement error. Results Reproducibility correlations for the nutrients ranged from 0.60 to 0.87. With a few exceptions, validity correlations were reasonably high (range: 0.55–0.85), including r=0.74 for alcohol. Performance of the FFQ differed by age for percent of calories from fat and by body mass index and hormone therapy use for alcohol consumption. For most nutrients examined, our FFQ is comparable to two to six recalls for each subject in capturing true intake. In the measurement error-adjusted risk analyses, corrected RRs were within 13% of uncorrected values for all nutrients examined except for linoleic acid. For alcohol consumption the corrected RR (per 20g/1000

  3. Two-year predictive validity of conduct disorder subtypes in early adolescence: a latent class analysis of a Canadian longitudinal sample.

    PubMed

    Lacourse, Eric; Baillargeon, Raymond; Dupéré, Véronique; Vitaro, Frank; Romano, Elisa; Tremblay, Richard

    2010-12-01

    Investigating the latent structure of conduct disorder (CD) can help clarify how symptoms related to aggression, property destruction, theft, and serious violations of rules cluster in individuals with this disorder. Discovering homogeneous subtypes can be useful for etiologic, treatment, and prevention purposes depending on the qualitative or quantitative nature of the symptomatology. The aim of the present study is twofold: identify subtypes of CD in young adolescents based on latent class analysis (LCA) and investigate the two-year predictive validity of CD subtypes on deviant and criminal lifestyles. Adolescent-reported CD symptoms were collected using the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. Three cohorts of 12-13-year-olds were assessed during 1994-1995, 1996-1997, and 1998-1999 (N = 4,125). Latent class analyses yielded 4 distinct subtypes: No CD (82.4%); Non-Aggressive CD ('NACD', 13.9%); Physically Aggressive CD ('PACD', 2.3%); and Severe-Mixed CD ('SMCD', 1.4%). Predictive validity at age 14-15 was non-specific, although the SMCD type had, by far, the highest odds of deviant and criminal lifestyle outcomes in comparison to youth with PACD or NACD. NACD and PACD had similar odds of deviant outcomes, even if most NACD youth were subthreshold CD (fewer than three symptoms). In early adolescence, CD is qualitatively and quantitatively heterogeneous, suggesting multiple developmental pathways. However, they appear to predict similarly violent and non-violent outcomes. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. © 2010 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  4. Comparative study of ion conducting pathways in borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Andreas; Swenson, Jan; Adams, Stefan

    2006-11-01

    The conduction pathways in metal-halide doped silver, lithium, and sodium diborate glasses have been examined by bond valence analysis of reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) produced structural models of the glasses. Although all glass compositions have basically the same short-range structure of the boron-oxygen network, it is evident that the intermediate-range structure is strongly dependent on the type of mobile ion. The topography of the pathways and the coordination of the pathway sites differ distinctly between the three glass systems. The mobile silver ions in the AgI-doped glass tend to be mainly iodine-coordinated and travel in homogeneously distributed pathways located in salt-rich channels of the borate network. In the NaCl-doped glass, there is an inhomogeneous spatial distribution of pathways that reflects the inhomogeneous introduction of salt ions into the glass. However, since the salt clusters are not connected, no long-range conduction pathways are formed without including also oxygen-rich regions. The pathways in the LiCl-doped glass are slightly more evenly distributed compared to the NaCl-doped glass (but not as ordered as in the AgI-doped glass), and the regions of mainly oxygen-coordinated pathway sites are of higher importance for the long-range migration. In order to more accurately investigate how these differences in the intermediate-range order of the glasses affect the ionic conductivity, we have compared the realistic structure models to more or less randomized structures. An important conclusion from this comparison is that we find no evidence that a pronounced intermediate-range order in the atomic structure or in the network of conduction pathways, as in the AgI-doped glass, is beneficial for the dc conductivity.

  5. The Aggression Questionnaire: a validation study in student samples.

    PubMed

    García-León, Ana; Reyes, Gustavo A; Vila, Jaime; Pérez, Nieves; Robles, Humbelina; Ramos, Manuel M

    2002-05-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) in Spain. The AQ is a 29-item instrument designed to measure the different dimensions of the hostility/anger/aggression construct. It consists of 4 subscales that assess: (a) anger, (b) hostility, (c) verbal aggression, and (d) physical aggression. In Study 1, reliability, construct validity, and convergent validity were evaluated in a group of 384 male and female university students. Test-retest reliability was evaluated using a group of 154 male and female university students. The results of the factor analysis were similar to the scale structure claimed for this instrument. The subscales also showed internal consistency and stability over time. The AQ and its subscales were also compared with the scales and subscales of the Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI), the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale (Ho), the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI), and the Jenkins Activity Survey-Form H (JASE-H). The results show that the AQ evaluates some aspects of anger, such as Anger-Trait and Anger-Out, rather than other elements, such as Anger-In or Anger-State. In Study 2, two new male groups were used to evaluate the criterion validity of the AQ: 57 prison inmates and 93 university students, finding that this instrument discriminated between the scores obtained by common offenders and university students.

  6. Use and validity of principles of extremum of entropy production in the study of complex systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heitor Reis, A.

    2014-07-15

    It is shown how both the principles of extremum of entropy production, which are often used in the study of complex systems, follow from the maximization of overall system conductivities, under appropriate constraints. In this way, the maximum rate of entropy production (MEP) occurs when all the forces in the system are kept constant. On the other hand, the minimum rate of entropy production (mEP) occurs when all the currents that cross the system are kept constant. A brief discussion on the validity of the application of the mEP and MEP principles in several cases, and in particular to the Earth’s climate is also presented. -- Highlights: •The principles of extremum of entropy production are not first principles. •They result from the maximization of conductivities under appropriate constraints. •The conditions of their validity are set explicitly. •Some long-standing controversies are discussed and clarified.

  7. Absorption in Sport: A Cross-Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Koehn, Stefan; Stavrou, Nektarios A. M.; Cogley, Jeremy; Morris, Tony; Mosek, Erez; Watt, Anthony P.

    2017-01-01

    Absorption has been identified as readiness for experiences of deep involvement in the task. Conceptually, absorption is a key psychological construct, incorporating experiential, cognitive, and motivational components. Although, no operationalization of the construct has been provided to facilitate research in this area, the purpose of this research was the development and examination of the psychometric properties of a sport-specific measure of absorption that evolved from the use of the modified Tellegen Absorption Scale (MODTAS; Jamieson, 2005) in mainstream psychology. The study aimed to provide evidence of the psychometric properties, reliability, and validity of the Measure of Absorption in Sport Contexts (MASCs). The psychometric examination included a calibration sample from Scotland and a cross-validation sample from Australia using a cross-sectional design. The item pool was developed based on existing items from the modified Tellegen Absorption Scale (Jamieson, 2005). The MODTAS items were reworded and translated into a sport context. The Scottish sample consisted of 292 participants and the Australian sample of 314 participants. Congeneric model testing and confirmatory factor analysis for both samples and multi-group invariance testing across samples was used. In the cross-validation sample the MASC subscales showed acceptable internal consistency and construct reliability (≥0.70). Excellent fit indices were found for the final 18-item, six-factor measure in the cross-validation sample, χ(120)2 = 197.486, p < 0.001; CFI = 0.957; TLI = 0.945; RMSEA = 0.045; SRMR = 0.044. Multi-group invariance testing revealed no differences in item meaning, except for two items. The MASC and the Dispositional Flow Scale-2 showed moderate-to-strong positive correlations in both samples, r = 0.38, p < 0.001 and r = 0.42, p < 0.001, supporting the external validity of the MASC. This article provides initial evidence in support of the psychometric properties

  8. A Validation Study of Administrative Claims Data to Measure Ovarian Cancer Recurrence and Secondary Debulking Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Livaudais-Toman, Jennifer; Egorova, Natalia; Franco, Rebeca; Prasad-Hayes, Monica; Howell, Elizabeth A.; Wisnivesky, Juan; Bickell, Nina A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Administrative claims data offer an alternative to chart abstraction to assess ovarian cancer recurrence, treatment and outcomes. Such analyses have been hindered by lack of valid recurrence and treatment algorithms. In this study, we sought to develop claims-based algorithms to identify ovarian cancer recurrence and secondary debulking surgery, and to validate them against the gold-standard of chart abstraction. Methods: We conducted chart validation studies; 2 recurrence algorithms and 1 secondary surgery among 94 ovarian cancer patients treated at one hospital between 2003–2009. A new recurrence algorithm was based on treatment timing (≥6 months after primary treatment) and a previously validated algorithm was based on secondary malignancy codes. A secondary debulking surgery algorithm was based on surgical billing codes. Results: The new recurrence algorithm had: sensitivity=100% (95% confidence interval [CI]=87%-=100%), specificity=89% (95%CI=78%–95%), kappa=84% (SE=10%) while the secondary-malignancy-=code recurrence algorithm had: sensitivity=84% (95%CI=66%–94%), specificity=44% (95%CI=31%-=57%), kappa=23% (SE=8%). The secondary surgery algorithm had: sensitivity=77% (95%CI=50%–92%), = specificity= 92% (95%CI=83%–97%), kappa=66% (SE=10%).= Conclusions: A recurrence algorithm based on treatment timing accurately identified ovarian cancer =recurrence. If validated in other populations, such an algorithm can provide a tool to compare effectiveness of recurrent ovarian cancer treatments. PMID:27891525

  9. Issues of Validity in Self-Study Research: Studying the Development of a Research Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munby, Hugh

    A previous paper argued that issues of validity in self-study research are first and foremost moral arguments about educational practice. It also asserted that if a self-study is to be valid, then the educational merit of the practice studied must be appropriate. Considering the responses of symposium participants to these assertions has resulted…

  10. Can large surveys conducted on highly selected populations provide valid information on the epidemiology of common health conditions? An analysis of UK Biobank data on musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Gary J; Beasley, Marcus; Smith, Blair H; Jones, Gareth T; Macfarlane, Tatiana V

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Biobank-type studies are typically large but have very low participation rates. It has been suggested that these studies may provide biased estimates of prevalence but are likely to provide valid estimates of association. We test these hypotheses using data collected on pain in a large Biobank study in the United Kingdom. Methods: UK Biobank recruited 503,325 persons aged 40–69 years (participation rate 5.5%). Participants completed questionnaires, including pain, lifestyle and environment factors. As a comparison, we used both a large population study of pain (MUSICIAN: n = 8847, aged: 40–69 years) conducted 2008–2009 and the National Child Development study (NCDS) which recruited all persons in Great Britain born during one week of 1958 and followed them up at age 44 years (n = 9377). Results: ‘Any pain’ (UK Biobank 61.0%; MUSICIAN 63.9%), chronic pain (42.9%, 52.2%) and site-specific musculoskeletal pain (back 26.2%, 29.7%; shoulder/neck 23.3%, 25.3%) were generally similar in UK Biobank and MUSICIAN. The prevalence of chronic pain and most regional musculoskeletal pains in UK Biobank were all within 2% of that in NCDS. Conclusion: UK Biobank has provided estimates of the prevalence of pain which are similar to those from previous large-scale studies, although a formal comparison of the estimates cannot be made. It has also confirmed known associations with the reporting of pain. Despite its very low participation rate, such a study provides the opportunity to investigate novel exposure–pain relationships and investigate rarer exposures and characteristics to further our knowledge of the epidemiology of pain. PMID:26526341

  11. Supplemental Milestones for Emergency Medicine Residency Programs: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Ketterer, Andrew R.; Salzman, David H.; Branzetti, Jeremy B.; Gisondi, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Emergency medicine (EM) residency programs may be 36 or 48 months in length. The Residency Review Committee for EM requires that 48-month programs provide educational justification for the additional 12 months. We developed additional milestones that EM training programs might use to assess outcomes in domains that meet this accreditation requirement. This study aims to assess for content validity of these supplemental milestones using a similar methodology to that of the original EM Milestones validation study. Methods A panel of EM program directors (PD) and content experts at two institutions identified domains of additional training not covered by the existing EM Milestones. This led to the development of six novel subcompetencies: “Operations and Administration,” “Critical Care,” “Leadership and Management,” “Research,” “Teaching and Learning,” and “Career Development.” Subject-matter experts at other 48-month EM residency programs refined the milestones for these subcompetencies. PDs of all 48-month EM programs were then asked to order the proposed milestones using the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition for each subcompetency. Data analysis mirrored that used in the original EM Milestones validation study, leading to the final version of our supplemental milestones. Results Twenty of 33 subjects (58.8%) completed the study. No subcompetency or individual milestone met deletion criteria. Of the 97 proposed milestones, 67 (69.1%) required no further editing and remained at the same level as proposed by the study authors. Thirty milestones underwent level changes: 15 (15.5%) were moved one level up and 13 (13.4%) were moved one level down. One milestone (1.0%) in “Leadership and Management” was moved two levels up, and one milestone in “Operations and Administration” was moved two levels down. One milestone in “Research” was ranked by the survey respondents at one level higher than that proposed by the authors

  12. Intent inferencing by an intelligent operator's associate - A validation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.

    1988-01-01

    In the supervisory control of a complex, dynamic system, one potential form of aiding for the human operator is a computer-based operator's associate. The design philosophy of the operator's associate is that of 'amplifying' rather than automating human skills. In particular, the associate possesses understanding and control properties. Understanding allows it to infer operator intentions and thus form the basis for context-dependent advice and reminders; control properties allow the human operator to dynamically delegate individual tasks or subfunctions to the associate. This paper focuses on the design, implementation, and validation of the intent inferencing function. Two validation studies are described which empirically demonstrate the viability of the proposed approach to intent inferencing.

  13. Conducting online expert panels: a feasibility and experimental replicability study.

    PubMed

    Khodyakov, Dmitry; Hempel, Susanne; Rubenstein, Lisa; Shekelle, Paul; Foy, Robbie; Salem-Schatz, Susanne; O'Neill, Sean; Danz, Margie; Dalal, Siddhartha

    2011-12-23

    This paper has two goals. First, we explore the feasibility of conducting online expert panels to facilitate consensus finding among a large number of geographically distributed stakeholders. Second, we test the replicability of panel findings across four panels of different size. We engaged 119 panelists in an iterative process to identify definitional features of Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI). We conducted four parallel online panels of different size through three one-week phases by using the RAND's ExpertLens process. In Phase I, participants rated potentially definitional CQI features. In Phase II, they discussed rating results online, using asynchronous, anonymous discussion boards. In Phase III, panelists re-rated Phase I features and reported on their experiences as participants. 66% of invited experts participated in all three phases. 62% of Phase I participants contributed to Phase II discussions and 87% of them completed Phase III. Panel disagreement, measured by the mean absolute deviation from the median (MAD-M), decreased after group feedback and discussion in 36 out of 43 judgments about CQI features. Agreement between the four panels after Phase III was fair (four-way kappa=0.36); they agreed on the status of five out of eleven CQI features. Results of the post-completion survey suggest that participants were generally satisfied with the online process. Compared to participants in smaller panels, those in larger panels were more likely to agree that they had debated each others' view points. It is feasible to conduct online expert panels intended to facilitate consensus finding among geographically distributed participants. The online approach may be practical for engaging large and diverse groups of stakeholders around a range of health services research topics and can help conduct multiple parallel panels to test for the reproducibility of panel conclusions.

  14. Nuclear Spin Lattice Relaxation and Conductivity Studies of the Non-Arrhenius Conductivity Behavior in Lithium Fast Ion Conducting Sulfide Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Benjamin Michael

    2003-01-01

    As time progresses, the world is using up more of the planet's natural resources. Without technological advances, the day will eventually arrive when these natural resources will no longer be sufficient to supply all of the energy needs. As a result, society is seeing a push for the development of alternative fuel sources such as wind power, solar power, fuel cells, and etc. These pursuits are even occurring in the state of Iowa with increasing social pressure to incorporate larger percentages of ethanol in gasoline. Consumers are increasingly demanding that energy sources be more powerful, more durable, and, ultimately, more cost efficient. Fast Ionic Conducting (FIC) glasses are a material that offers great potential for the development of new batteries and/or fuel cells to help inspire the energy density of battery power supplies. This dissertation probes the mechanisms by which ions conduct in these glasses. A variety of different experimental techniques give a better understanding of the interesting materials science taking place within these systems. This dissertation discusses Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques performed on FIC glasses over the past few years. These NMR results have been complimented with other measurement techniques, primarily impedance spectroscopy, to develop models that describe the mechanisms by which ionic conduction takes place and the dependence of the ion dynamics on the local structure of the glass. The aim of these measurements was to probe the cause of a non-Arrhenius behavior of the conductivity which has been seen at high temperatures in the silver thio-borosilicate glasses. One aspect that will be addressed is if this behavior is unique to silver containing fast ion conducting glasses. more specifically, this study will determine if a non-Arrhenius correlation time, τ, can be observed in the Nuclear Spin Lattice Relaxation (NSLR) measurements. If so, then can this behavior be modeled with a new single distribution of

  15. Online crowdsourcing for efficient rating of speech: A validation study

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Tara McAllister; Halpin, Peter F.; Szeredi, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Blinded listener ratings are essential for valid assessment of interventions for speech disorders, but collecting these ratings can be time-intensive and costly. This study evaluated the validity of speech ratings obtained through online crowdsourcing, a potentially more efficient approach. 100 words from children with /r/ misarticulation were electronically presented for binary rating by 35 phonetically trained listeners and 205 naïve listeners recruited through the Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT) crowdsourcing platform. Bootstrapping was used to compare different-sized samples of AMT listeners against a “gold standard” (mode across all trained listeners) and an “industry standard” (mode across bootstrapped samples of 3 trained listeners). There was strong overall agreement between trained and AMT listeners. The “industry standard” level of performance was matched by bootstrapped samples with n = 9 AMT listeners. These results support the hypothesis that valid ratings of speech data can be obtained in an efficient manner through AMT. Researchers in communication disorders could benefit from increased awareness of this method. PMID:25578293

  16. Ionic Conductivity And Structural Relaxation Studies on Lithium Niobophosphate Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Dabas, Prashant; Hariharan, K.

    2011-07-15

    Niobium pentoxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) increases the chemical and thermal stability of otherwise hygroscopic alkali phosphate glasses and also enhances the conduction characteristics. Ion dynamics and structural relaxation have been investigated for mol%50Li{sub 2}0-45P{sub 2}0{sub 5}-5Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The non-linearity parameter 'x' in the Tool-Narayanaswamy model is evaluated using the dependence of fictive and glass transition temperatures on the cooling and heating rates.

  17. Molecular modelling approaches for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator studies.

    PubMed

    Odolczyk, Norbert; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common genetic disorders, caused by loss of function mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. CFTR is a member of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters superfamily and functions as an ATP-gated anion channel. This review summarises the vast majority of the efforts which utilised molecular modelling approaches to gain insight into the various aspects of CFTR protein, related to its structure, dynamic properties, function and interactions with other protein partners, or drug-like compounds, with emphasis to its relation to CF disease.

  18. The pediatric stroke outcome measure: a validation and reliability study.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Lisa; Westmacott, Robyn; Friefeld, Sharon; MacGregor, Daune; Curtis, Rosalind; Allen, Anita; Yau, Ivanna; Askalan, Rand; Moharir, Mahendranath; Domi, Trish; deVeber, Gabrielle

    2012-06-01

    The Pediatric Stroke Outcome Measure (PSOM) is an objective, disease-specific outcome measure containing 115 test items suitable for newborn to adult ages. The PSOM measures neurological deficit and function across 5 subscales: right sensorimotor, left sensorimotor, language production, language comprehension, and cognitive/behavior yielding a final 10-point deficit score. The goal of this study was to examine PSOM construct validity in measuring neurological outcome in pediatric stroke survivors and interrater reliability (IRR) for both prospective and retrospective scoring. For construct validity, PSOM subscale scores were correlated with scores on standardized neuropsychological measures matched by functional domain. We assessed IRR by comparing same-day "live" PSOM scores from 2 independent raters in 10 children (prospective IRR) and by comparing PSOM scores estimated from medical dictations across 5 raters in another 10 children (retrospective IRR). We analyzed PSOM scores from 203 children with ischemic stroke. PSOM subscales show good construct validity (ρ=0.2-0.4; P<0.05). PSOM subscale scores of normal/abnormal demonstrate strong agreement for domain-matched neuropsychology scores (alternative chance-corrected statistic=0.4-0.8). IRR was excellent with the 2 prospective raters' scores in almost perfect agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.76-0.98). Retrospective IRR demonstrated strong agreement with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.77 (95% CI, 0.56-0.92). The PSOM is a valid and reliable outcome measure for pediatric stroke. It is useful for retrospective scoring from health records and prospective serial longitudinal outcome assessments and is ideally suited for prospective clinical trials in pediatric stroke.

  19. Distance-Dependent Measurements of the Conductance of Porphyrin Nanorods Studied with Conductive Probe Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xianglin; Alexander, Denzel; Derosa, Pedro; Garno, Jayne C

    2017-02-07

    Protocols for nanopatterning porphyrins on Au(111) were developed based on immersion particle lithography. Porphyrins with and without a central metal ion, 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrin (TPP) and 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrin cobalt(II) (CoTPP), were selected for study, which spontaneously formed nanorod geometries depending on concentration parameters. The elongated shapes of the nanorods offers an opportunity for successive distance-dependent conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) measurements along the length of the nanorods. To prepare patterns of TPP and CoTPP nanorods, a mask of silica mesospheres was placed on gold substrates to generate nanoholes within an alkanethiol matrix film. The nanoholes prepared by particle lithography with an immersion step were backfilled with porphyrins by a second immersion step. By controlling the concentration and immersion interval, nanorods of porphyrins were generated with one end of the nanostructure attached to gold within a nanohole. The porphyrin nanorods exhibited slight differences in dimensions at the nanoscale to enable size-dependent measurements of conductive properties. The conductivity along the horizontal direction of the nanorods was evaluated with CP-AFM studies. Changes in conductivity were measured along the long axis of TPP and CoTPP nanorods. The TPP nanorods exhibited conductive profiles of an insulating material, and the CoTPP nanorods exhibited profiles of a semiconductor. The experiments demonstrate the applicability of particle lithography for preparing unique and functional surface platforms of porphyrins to measure distance-dependent conductive properties on gold.

  20. Estimating the Prevalence of Treated Epilepsy Using Administrative Health Data and Its Validity: ESSENCE Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seo-Young; Chung, Soo-Eun; Kim, Dong Wook; Eun, So-Hee; Kang, Hoon Chul; Cho, Yong Won; Yi, Sang Do; Kim, Heung Dong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Few of the epidemiologic studies of epilepsy have utilized well-validated nationwide databases. We estimated the nationwide prevalence of treated epilepsy based on a comprehensive medical payment database along with diagnostic validation. Methods We collected data on patients prescribed of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment service, which covers the entire population of Korea. To assess the diagnostic validity, a medical records survey was conducted involving 6,774 patients prescribed AEDs from 43 institutions based on regional clusters and referral levels across the country. The prevalence of treated epilepsy was estimated by projecting the diagnostic validity on the number of patients prescribed AEDs. Results The mean positive predictive value (PPV) for epilepsy was 0.810 for those prescribed AEDs with diagnostic codes that indicate epilepsy or seizure (Diagnosis-E), while it was 0.066 for those without Diagnosis-E. The PPV tended to decrease with age in both groups, with lower values seen in females. The prevalence was 3.84 per 1,000, and it was higher among males, children, and the elderly. Conclusions The prevalence of epilepsy in Korea was comparable to that in other East Asian countries. The diagnostic validity of administrative health data varies depending on the method of case ascertainment, age, and sex. The prescriptions of AEDs even without relevant diagnostic codes should be considered as a tracer for epilepsy. PMID:27273925

  1. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy for Studying Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Happel, Patrick; Thatenhorst, Denis; Dietzel, Irmgard D.

    2012-01-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a scanning probe technique that utilizes the increase in access resistance that occurs if an electrolyte filled glass micro-pipette is approached towards a poorly conducting surface. Since an increase in resistance can be monitored before the physical contact between scanning probe tip and sample, this technique is particularly useful to investigate the topography of delicate samples such as living cells. SICM has shown its potential in various applications such as high resolution and long-time imaging of living cells or the determination of local changes in cellular volume. Furthermore, SICM has been combined with various techniques such as fluorescence microscopy or patch clamping to reveal localized information about proteins or protein functions. This review details the various advantages and pitfalls of SICM and provides an overview of the recent developments and applications of SICM in biological imaging. Furthermore, we show that in principle, a combination of SICM and ion selective micro-electrodes enables one to monitor the local ion activity surrounding a living cell. PMID:23202197

  2. Study of Conductivity and EOS Variations in Exploding Wire Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjarlais, M. P.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Douglas, M. R.; Cochrane, K.; Spielman, R. B.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2000-10-01

    Present day Z pinches have achieved particularly impressive peak powers and total energies when initiated with a cylindrical array of many wires. The heating and the expansion of the wires in response to the high current densities is believed to play an important role in the subsequent Z pinch dynamics, especially in the seeding of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. These wires pass through complex conductivity and EOS regimes in their evolution from cold solid to liquid, vapor, and plasma, and thus represent a challenging test case for simulation codes and the accompanying physics packages. We present simulation results from the Mach II code illustrating the sensitivity of the modeled behavior to variations in the electrical conductivity and the equation of state, with special attention given to variations in the vicinity of the metal-insulator and metal-liquid-vapor transitions. For reference exploding-wire experiments, we use primarily those of Cornell University with aluminum wires in the 12 to 25 μm range.

  3. Validation studies of the DOE-2 Building Energy Simulation Program. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.; Winkelmann, F.

    1998-06-01

    This report documents many of the validation studies (Table 1) of the DOE-2 building energy analysis simulation program that have taken place since 1981. Results for several versions of the program are presented with the most recent study conducted in 1996 on version DOE-2.1E and the most distant study conducted in 1981 on version DOE-1.3. This work is part of an effort related to continued development of DOE-2, particularly in its use as a simulation engine for new specialized versions of the program such as the recently released RESFEN 3.1. RESFEN 3.1 is a program specifically dealing with analyzing the energy performance of windows in residential buildings. The intent in providing the results of these validation studies is to give potential users of the program a high degree of confidence in the calculated results. Validation studies in which calculated simulation data is compared to measured data have been conducted throughout the development of the DOE-2 program. Discrepancies discovered during the course of such work has resulted in improvements in the simulation algorithms. Table 2 provides a listing of additions and modifications that have been made to various versions of the program since version DOE-2.1A. One of the most significant recent changes in the program occurred with version DOE-2.1E. An improved algorithm for calculating the outside surface film coefficient was implemented. In addition, integration of the WINDOW 4 program was accomplished resulting in improved ability in analyzing window energy performance. Validation and verification of a program as sophisticated as DOE-2 must necessarily be limited because of the approximations inherent in the program. For example, the most accurate model of the heat transfer processes in a building would include a three-dimensional analysis. To justify such detailed algorithmic procedures would correspondingly require detailed information describing the building and/or HVAC system and energy plant parameters

  4. Metaanalysis of Validity Studies Published Between 1964 and 1982 and the Investigation of Study Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Neal; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviewed published validation studies for the years 1964-1982 of the Journal of Applied Psychology and Personnel Psychology. Results indicated minimal differences across study designs in the average validity coefficient and found selection ratios, standard deviations, reliabilities, predictor and criterion intercorrelations to be rarely and…

  5. NAFTA Guidance Document for Conducting Terrestrial Field Dissipation Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Harmonized guidance for TFD studies that demonstrate transformation, transport and fate of pesticides under representative actual use conditions. Field studies substantiate physicochemical, mobility and biotransformation data from laboratory studies.

  6. A cross-sectional validation study of EQ-5D among the Malaysian adult population.

    PubMed

    Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Liau, Siow Yen

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the construct validity of the EQ-5D instrument among the Malaysian population. This was a cross-sectional study conducted among Malaysian adults in three northern states of Malaysia. A pre-developed questionnaire consisting of both the EQ-5D and SF-12 items was used for data collection. Concurrent, convergent, and known group validity of EQ-5D were assessed against SF-12 and several known relationships with participants' demographic and illness characteristics. A total of 596 Malaysians participated in the study. The mean EQ-5D score was 0.93 (SD = 0.13), while the mean physical component score (PCS-12) and mental component score (MCS-12) scores were 48.9 (SD = 7.4) and 49.1 (SD = 8.0), respectively. Participants with a current medical problem had lower PCS-12 and MCS-12 scores and reported more problems with all of the EQ-5D dimensions; they also had lower EQ-5D and EQ-VAS scores (P < 0.05). Convergent validity was supported by a moderately positive correlation between EQ-5D and EQ-VAS with MCS-12 and PCS-12 scores; moreover, the stronger effect sizes between PCS-12 and the physical dimensions of EQ-5D as well as between MCS-12 with anxiety/depression scores further supported the convergent validity of EQ-5D. Responses to the EQ-5D dimensions only supported two of the four known group validity hypotheses of higher quality of life among individuals who are better educated and no medical problem. No association was found between income and gender with EQ-5D score. This study has demonstrated acceptable construct validity of the EQ-5D among the Malaysian population.

  7. Factorial validity of an abbreviated neighborhood environment walkability scale for seniors in the Nurses' Health Study.

    PubMed

    Starnes, Heather A; McDonough, Meghan H; Tamura, Kosuke; James, Peter; Laden, Francine; Troped, Philip J

    2014-10-10

    Using validated measures of individuals' perceptions of their neighborhood built environment is important for accurately estimating effects on physical activity. However, no studies to date have examined the factorial validity of a measure of perceived neighborhood environment among older adults in the United States. The purpose of this measurement study was to test the factorial validity of a version of the Abbreviated Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS-A) modified for seniors in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS). A random sample of 2,920 female nurses (mean age = 73 ± 7 years) in the NHS cohort from California, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania completed a 36-item modified NEWS-A for seniors. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to test measurement models for both the modified NEWS-A for seniors and the original NEWS-A. Internal consistency within factors was examined using Cronbach's alpha. The hypothesized 7-factor measurement model was a poor fit for the modified NEWS-A for seniors. Overall, the best-fitting measurement model was the original 6-factor solution to the NEWS-A. Factors were correlated and internally consistent. This study provided support for the construct validity of the original NEWS-A for assessing perceptions of neighborhood environments in older women in the United States.

  8. In pursuit of a valid Information Assessment Method for continuing education: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Bindiganavile Sridhar, Soumya; Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland

    2013-10-07

    The Information Assessment Method (IAM) is a popular tool for continuing education and knowledge translation. After a search for information, the IAM allows the health professional to report what was the search objective, its cognitive impact, as well as any use and patient health benefit associated with the retrieved health information. In continuing education programs, professionals read health information, rate it using the IAM, and earn continuing education credit for this brief individual reflective learning activity. IAM items have been iteratively developed using literature reviews and qualitative studies. Thus, our research question was: what is the content validity of IAM items from the users' perspective? A two-step content validation study was conducted. In Step 1, we followed a mixed methods research design, and assessed the relevance and representativeness of IAM items. In this step, data from a longitudinal quantitative study and a qualitative multiple case study involving 40 family physicians were analyzed. In Step 2, IAM items were analyzed and modified based on a set of guiding principles by a multi-disciplinary expert panel. The content validity of 16 IAM items was supported, and these items were not changed. Nine other items were modified. Three new items were added, including two that were extensions of an existing item. A content validated version of the IAM (IAM 2011) is available for the continuing education of health professionals.

  9. Conducting systematic reviews of diagnostic studies: didactic guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Devillé, Walter L; Buntinx, Frank; Bouter, Lex M; Montori, Victor M; de Vet, Henrica CW; van der Windt, Danielle AWM; Bezemer, P Dick

    2002-01-01

    Background Although guidelines for critical appraisal of diagnostic research and meta-analyses have already been published, these may be difficult to understand for clinical researchers or do not provide enough detailed information. Methods Development of guidelines based on a systematic review of the evidence in reports of systematic searches of the literature for diagnostic research, of methodological criteria to evaluate diagnostic research, of methods for statistical pooling of data on diagnostic accuracy, and of methods for exploring heterogeneity. Results Guidelines for conducting diagnostic systematic reviews are presented in a stepwise fashion and are followed by comments providing further information. Examples are given using the results of two systematic reviews on the accuracy of the urine dipstick in the diagnosis of urinary tract infections, and on the accuracy of the straight-leg-raising test in the diagnosis of intervertebral disc hernia. PMID:12097142

  10. Scanning ion conductance microscopy studies of amyloid fibrils at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Cho, Sang-Joon; Busuttil, Katerina; Wang, Chen; Besenbacher, Flemming; Dong, Mingdong

    2012-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has developed to become a very versatile nano-scale technique to reveal the three-dimensional (3D) morphology of amyloid aggregates under physiological conditions. However, the imaging principle of AFM is based on measuring the `force' between a sharp tip and a given nanostructure, which may cause mechanical deformation of relatively soft objects. To avoid the deformation, scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is an alternative scanning probe microscopy technique, operating with alternating current mode. Here we can indeed reveal the 3D morphology of amyloid fibrils and it is capable of exploring proteins with nanoscale resolution. Compared with conventional AFM, we show that SICM can provide precise height measurements of amyloid protein aggregates, a feature that enables us to obtain unique insight into the detailed nucleation and growth mechanisms behind amyloid self-assembly.

  11. [Molecular genetic study of a family featuring cardiac conduction block].

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaojun; Huang, He; Zhu, Li; Lu, Yongjuan; Jiang, Yunshan; Li, Hui; Huang, Xianghong; Sun, Zhishan; Li, Zhihong

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the genetic mechanism for a family affected with cardiac conduction block. METHODS Affected family members were screened for potential mutations of known candidate genes. As no pathogenic mutation was found, two patients and one healthy member from the family were further analyzed by exomic sequencing followed by Sanger sequencing. The pathogenicity of suspected mutation was analyzed using bioinformatics software. RESULTS Sequencing of the full exome has identified a c.G1725T mutation in the CLCA2 gene. Sanger sequencing has detected the same mutation in all five patients, but not in the normal member from the family. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the mutation has resulted in substitution of the 575th amino acid cysteine (C) by tryptophan (W). The site is highly conserved and becomes pathogenic with the mutation. CONCLUSION The heterozygous c.G1725T mutation in exon 11 of the CLCA2 gene probably underlies the disease and fit the autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.

  12. Nuclear spin lattice relaxation and conductivity studies of the non-Arrhenius conductivity behavior in lithium fast ion conducting sulfide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Benjamin Michael

    Homogeneous xB2O3 + (1-x)B 2S3 glasses were prepared between 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.80. Raman, IR, and 11B NMR spectroscopies show that the boron oxide structures of B2O3, especially the six-membered rings, quickly diminish with increasing sulfide content, whereas the corresponding sulfide structures in B2S3 remain relatively intense as oxide content is increased. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and density measurements show that physical properties of these boron oxysulfide glasses heavily favor the B2S3 properties regardless of the amount of B2O3 added to the system. It is hypothesized that the stability of the thioboroxol ring group relative to that of the BS 3/2 trigonal group is a possible source of this behavior. The formation of mixed boron oxysulfide structures of composition BSzO3-z where 0 < z < 3 is proposed. Structural studies of the ternary xLi2S + (1-x)[0.5 B2S3 + 0.5 GeS2] glasses using IR, Raman, and 11B NMR show that these glasses do not have equal sharing of the lithium atoms between GeS2 and B2S3. The IR spectra indicates that the B2S3 glass network are under-doped in comparison to corresponding compositions in the xLi 2S + (1-x)B2S3 binary system. Additionally, the Raman spectra show that the GeS2 glass network is over-modified. 11Boron static NMR gives evidence that ˜80% of the boron atoms are in tetrahedral coordinated. A super macro tetrahedron is proposed as one of the structures in these glasses in which some of them may contain boron sites substituted by germanium atoms at lower Li2S content. Nuclear Spin Lattice Relaxation and ionic conductivity measurements of Li doped Li2S + GeS2 + B2S3 glasses were performed to investigate the ion hopping dynamics and the non-Arrhenius conductivity behavior that has been observed in some fast ion conducting glasses. A distribution of activation energies model was used to fit the NSLR results and conductivity results. Comparisons are made to previously studied binary lithium thio-germanate and binary

  13. The Bronchiectasis Severity Index. An International Derivation and Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Goeminne, Pieter; Aliberti, Stefano; McDonnell, Melissa J.; Lonni, Sara; Davidson, John; Poppelwell, Lucy; Salih, Waleed; Pesci, Alberto; Dupont, Lieven J.; Fardon, Thomas C.; De Soyza, Anthony; Hill, Adam T.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: There are no risk stratification tools for morbidity and mortality in bronchiectasis. Identifying patients at risk of exacerbations, hospital admissions, and mortality is vital for future research. Objectives: This study describes the derivation and validation of the Bronchiectasis Severity Index (BSI). Methods: Derivation of the BSI used data from a prospective cohort study (Edinburgh, UK, 2008–2012) enrolling 608 patients. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify independent predictors of mortality and hospitalization over 4-year follow-up. The score was validated in independent cohorts from Dundee, UK (n = 218); Leuven, Belgium (n = 253); Monza, Italy (n = 105); and Newcastle, UK (n = 126). Measurements and Main Results: Independent predictors of future hospitalization were prior hospital admissions, Medical Research Council dyspnea score greater than or equal to 4, FEV1 < 30% predicted, Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, colonization with other pathogenic organisms, and three or more lobes involved on high-resolution computed tomography. Independent predictors of mortality were older age, low FEV1, lower body mass index, prior hospitalization, and three or more exacerbations in the year before the study. The derived BSI predicted mortality and hospitalization: area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.74–0.86) for mortality and AUC 0.88 (95% confidence interval, 0.84–0.91) for hospitalization, respectively. There was a clear difference in exacerbation frequency and quality of life using the St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire between patients classified as low, intermediate, and high risk by the score (P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). In the validation cohorts, the AUC for mortality ranged from 0.81 to 0.84 and for hospitalization from 0.80 to 0.88. Conclusions: The BSI is a useful clinical predictive tool that identifies patients at risk of future mortality

  14. JaCVAM-organized international validation study of the in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay for the detection of genotoxic carcinogens: I. Summary of pre-validation study results.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yoshifumi; Kojima, Hajime; Omori, Takashi; Corvi, Raffaella; Honma, Masamistu; Schechtman, Leonard M; Tice, Raymond R; Burlinson, Brian; Escobar, Patricia A; Kraynak, Andrew R; Nakagawa, Yuzuki; Nakajima, Madoka; Pant, Kamala; Asano, Norihide; Lovell, David; Morita, Takeshi; Ohno, Yasuo; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    The in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay (comet assay) is used internationally to investigate the in vivo genotoxic potential of test chemicals. This assay, however, has not previously been formally validated. The Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM), with the cooperation of the U.S. NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM)/the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM), the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM), and the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society/Mammalian Mutagenesis Study Group (JEMS/MMS), organized an international validation study to evaluate the reliability and relevance of the assay for identifying genotoxic carcinogens, using liver and stomach as target organs. The ultimate goal of this validation effort was to establish an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline. The purpose of the pre-validation studies (i.e., Phase 1 through 3), conducted in four or five laboratories with extensive comet assay experience, was to optimize the protocol to be used during the definitive validation study.

  15. Annotations on Mexico's WISC-IV: a validity study.

    PubMed

    Fina, Anthony D; Sánchez-Escobedo, Pedro; Hollingworth, Liz

    2012-01-01

    This project seeks to provide evidence on the internal structure of the Escala Wechsler de Inteligencia para Niños-IV (EWIN-IV; Wechsler, 2007a ) through a confirmatory factor analysis and intercorrelational study. Also provided is information on the adaptation process and other sources of validity evidence in support of the EWIN-IV norms. The standardization data for the EWIN-IV were used for all analyses. The factor loadings and correlational patterns found on the EWIN-IV are comparable to those seen in the American versions of the test. The proposed factor and scoring structure of the EWIN-IV was supported.

  16. A Study of Equating in NAEP. NAEP Validity Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.; Vevea, Jack L.

    This study investigates the amount of uncertainty added to National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) estimates by equating error under both ideal and less than ideal circumstances. Data from past administrations are used to guide simulations of various equating designs and error due to equating is estimated empirically. The design…

  17. Pooled results from 5 validation studies of dietary self-report instruments using recovery biomarkers for energy and protein intake

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We pooled data from 5 large validation studies of dietary self-report instruments that used recovery biomarkers as references to clarify the measurement properties of food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) and 24-hour recalls. The studies were conducted in widely differing U.S. adult populations from...

  18. Psychosocial Factors Associated with Bulimia Nervosa during Pregnancy: An Internal Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Hunna J.; Von Holle, Ann; Knoph, Cecilie; Hamer, Robert M.; Torgersen, Leila; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Magnus, Per; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this paper was to internally validate previously reported relations (1) between psychosocial factors and bulimia nervosa (BN) outcomes during pregnancy. Method This study is based on the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Participants were women enrolled during pregnancy (N = 69,030). Internal validity was evaluated by way of bootstrapped parameter estimates using the overall sample and a split sample calibration approach. Results Bootstrap bias estimates were below the problematic threshold, and extend earlier findings(1) by providing support for the validity of the models at the population level of all pregnant women in Norway. Bootstrap risk ratios indicated that prevalence, incidence, and remission of BN during pregnancy were significantly associated with psychosocial factors. The split sample procedure showed that the models developed on the training sample did not predict risks in the validation sample. Discussion This study characterizes associations between psychosocial exposures and BN outcomes among pregnant women in Norway. Women with lifetime and current self-reported psychosocial adversities were at a much higher risk for BN during pregnancy. Psychosocial factors were associated with BN remission during pregnancy, inviting the prospect of enhancing therapeutic interventions. We consider the findings in the context of reproducibility in science. PMID:25346291

  19. Interface proximity effects on ionic conductivity in nanoscale oxide-ion conducting yttria stabilized zirconia: an atomistic simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2011-02-14

    We present an atomistic simulation study on the size dependence of dopant distribution and the influence of nanoscale film thickness on carrier transport properties of the model oxide-ion conductor yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ). Simulated amorphization and recrystallization approach was utilized to generate YSZ films with varying thicknesses (3-9 nm) on insulating MgO substrates. The atomic trajectories generated in the molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the structural evolution of the YSZ thin films and correlate the resulting microstructure with ionic transport properties at the nanoscale. The interfacial conductivity increases by 2 orders of magnitude as the YSZ film size decreases from 9 to 3 nm owing to a decrease in activation energy barrier from 0.54 to 0.35 eV in the 1200-2000 K temperature range. Analysis of dopant distribution indicates surface enrichment, the extent of which depends on the film thickness. The mechanisms of oxygen conductivity for the various film thicknesses at the nanoscale are discussed in detail and comparisons with experimental and other modeling studies are presented where possible. The study offers insights into mesoscopic ion conduction mechanisms in low-dimensional solid oxide electrolytes.

  20. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andy; Boraud, Thomas; Gonon, François

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers. Methods We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking) and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk). Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses. Results Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies) and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8%) and subsequent (58/600 9.7%) lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1%) than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%). Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48) than subsequent ones (29/45) and than lifestyle studies (31/63). Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38) than the neurological (26/41) or somatic (40/77) ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim. Conclusion Journalists

  1. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers.

    PubMed

    Dumas-Mallet, Estelle; Smith, Andy; Boraud, Thomas; Gonon, François

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers. We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking) and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk). Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses. Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies) and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8%) and subsequent (58/600 9.7%) lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1%) than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%). Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48) than subsequent ones (29/45) and than lifestyle studies (31/63). Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38) than the neurological (26/41) or somatic (40/77) ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim. Journalists preferentially cover initial findings

  2. Conducting influenza virus pathogenesis studies in avian species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Avian infection studies with influenza A are an important means of assessing host susceptibility, viral pathogenesis, host responses to infection, mechanisms of transmission and viral pathotype. Complex systems and natural settings may also be explored with carefully designed infection studies. In ...

  3. 29 CFR 1607.5 - General standards for validity studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., such as those described in the Standards for Educational and Psychological Tests prepared by a joint... they become accepted by the psychological profession. B. Criterion-related, content, and construct validity. Evidence of the validity of a test or other selection procedure by a criterion-related validity...

  4. Disentangling the Underlying Dimensions of Psychopathy and Conduct Problems in Childhood: A Community Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadds, Mark R.; Fraser, Jenny; Frost, Aaron; Hawes, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The psychometric and predictive validity of callous-unemotional (CU) traits as an early precursor of conduct disorder and antisocial behavior were assessed. A community sample of children (4-9 years of age) were tested 12 months apart with the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD; P. J. Frick & R. D. Hare, 2002), a measure of early signs of…

  5. Disentangling the Underlying Dimensions of Psychopathy and Conduct Problems in Childhood: A Community Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadds, Mark R.; Fraser, Jenny; Frost, Aaron; Hawes, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The psychometric and predictive validity of callous-unemotional (CU) traits as an early precursor of conduct disorder and antisocial behavior were assessed. A community sample of children (4-9 years of age) were tested 12 months apart with the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD; P. J. Frick & R. D. Hare, 2002), a measure of early signs of…

  6. [Study of the validity and reproducibility of passive ozone monitors].

    PubMed

    Cortez-Lugo, M; Romieu, I; Palazuelos-Rendón, E; Hernández-Avila, M

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reproducibility between ozone measurements obtained with passive ozone monitors and those registered with a continuous ozone monitor, to determine the applicability of passive monitors in epidemiological research. The study was carried out during November and December 1992. Indoor and outdoor classroom air ozone concentrations were analyzed using 28 passive monitors and using a continuous monitor. The correlation between both measurements was highly significant (r = 0.089, p < 0.001), indicating a very good validity. Also, the correlation between the measurements obtained with two different passive monitors exposed concurrently was very high (r = 0.97, p < 0.001), indicating a good reproducibility in the measurements of the passive monitors. The relative error between the concentrations measured by the passive monitors and those from the continuous monitor tended to decrease with increasing ozone concentrations. The results suggest that passive monitors should be used to determine cumulative exposure of ozone exceeding 100 ppb, corresponding to an exposure period greater than five days, if used to analyze indoor air.

  7. Use of wearable technology for performance assessment: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Papi, Enrica; Osei-Kuffour, Denise; Chen, Yen-Ming A; McGregor, Alison H

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of osteoarthritis is increasing globally but current compliance with rehabilitation remains poor. This study explores whether wearable sensors can be used to provide objective measures of performance with a view to using them as motivators to aid compliance to osteoarthritis rehabilitation. More specifically, the use of a novel attachable wearable sensor integrated into clothing and inertial measurement units located in two different positions, at the waist and thigh pocket, was investigated. Fourteen healthy volunteers were asked to complete exercises adapted from a knee osteoarthritis rehabilitation programme whilst wearing the three sensors including five times sit-to-stand test, treadmill walking at slow, preferred and fast speeds. The performances of the three sensors were validated against a motion capture system and an instrumented treadmill. The systems showed a high correlation (r(2) > 0.7) and agreement (mean difference range: -0.02-0.03 m, 0.005-0.68 s) with gold standards. The novel attachable wearable sensor was able to monitor exercise tasks as well as the inertial measurement units (ICC > 0.95). Results also suggested that a functional placement (e.g., situated in a pocket) is a valid position for performance monitoring. This study shows the potential use of wearable technologies for assessing subject performance during exercise and suggests functional solutions to enhance acceptance. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Use of wearable technology for performance assessment: A validation study

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Enrica; Osei-Kuffour, Denise; Chen, Yen-Ming A; McGregor, Alison H

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of osteoarthritis is increasing globally but current compliance with rehabilitation remains poor. This study explores whether wearable sensors can be used to provide objective measures of performance with a view to using them as motivators to aid compliance to osteoarthritis rehabilitation. More specifically, the use of a novel attachable wearable sensor integrated into clothing and inertial measurement units located in two different positions, at the waist and thigh pocket, was investigated. Fourteen healthy volunteers were asked to complete exercises adapted from a knee osteoarthritis rehabilitation programme whilst wearing the three sensors including five times sit-to-stand test, treadmill walking at slow, preferred and fast speeds. The performances of the three sensors were validated against a motion capture system and an instrumented treadmill. The systems showed a high correlation (r2 > 0.7) and agreement (mean difference range: −0.02–0.03 m, 0.005–0.68 s) with gold standards. The novel attachable wearable sensor was able to monitor exercise tasks as well as the inertial measurement units (ICC > 0.95). Results also suggested that a functional placement (e.g., situated in a pocket) is a valid position for performance monitoring. This study shows the potential use of wearable technologies for assessing subject performance during exercise and suggests functional solutions to enhance acceptance. PMID:25937613

  9. Assessing interpersonal aspects of schizoid personality disorder: preliminary validation studies.

    PubMed

    Kosson, David S; Blackburn, Ronald; Byrnes, Katherine A; Park, Sohee; Logan, Caroline; Donnelly, John P

    2008-03-01

    In 2 studies, we examined the reliability and validity of an interpersonal measure of schizoid personality disorder (SZPD) based on nonverbal behaviors and interpersonal interactions occurring during interviews. A total of 556 male jail inmates in the United States participated in Study 1; 175 mentally disordered offenders in maximum security hospitals in the United Kingdom participated in Study 2. Across both samples, scores on the Interpersonal Measure of Schizoid Personality Disorder (IM-SZ) exhibited adequate reliability and patterns of correlations with other measures consistent with expectations. The scale displayed patterns of relatively specific correlations with interview and self-report measures of SZPD. In addition, the IM-SZ correlated in an expected manner with features of psychopathy and antisocial personality and with independent ratings of interpersonal behavior. We address implications for assessment of personality disorder.

  10. Preliminary validation study of the Russian Birmingham Cognitive Screen.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, E; Humphreys, G W; Riddoch, M J; Skvortsov, A A; Weekes, B S

    2017-03-14

    The Birmingham Cognitive Screen (BCoS) is designed for use with individuals who have acquired language impairment following stroke. Our goal was to develop a Russian version of the BCoS (Rus-BCoS) by translating the battery following cultural and linguistic adaptations and establishing preliminary data on its psychometric properties. Fifty patients with left-hemisphere stroke were recruited, of whom 98% were diagnosed with mild to moderate aphasia. To check whether the Rus-BCoS provides stable and consistent scores, internal consistency, test-retest, and interrater types of reliability were determined. Eight participants with stroke and 20 neurologically intact participants were assessed twice. To inspect the discriminative power of the battery, 63 participants without brain impairment were tested with the Rus-BCoS. Additionally, the Russian version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Quantitative Assessment of Speech in Aphasia, and Luria's Neuropsychological Assessment Battery were used to examine convergent validity, sensitivity, and specificity of the Rus-BCoS. The internal consistency as well as test-retest and interrater reliability of the Rus-BCoS satisfied criteria for the research use. Performance on a majority of tasks in the battery correlated significantly with independently validated tests that putatively measure similar cognitive processes. Critically, all patients with aphasia returned nonzero scores in at least one task in all the Rus-BCoS sections, with the exception of the Controlled Attention section where two patients with severe executive control deficits could not perform. The Rus-BCoS shows promise as a comprehensive cognitive screening tool that can be used by clinicians working with Russian-speaking persons experiencing poststroke aphasia after much further validation and development of reliable normative standards. Given a lack of quantitative neuropsychological assessment tools in Russia, however, we contend the Rus-BCoS offers

  11. Case study for model validation : assessing a model for thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Dowding, Kevin J.; Leslie, Ian H.; Hobbs, Michael L.; Rutherford, Brian Milne; Hills, Richard Guy; Pilch, Martin M.

    2004-10-01

    A case study is reported to document the details of a validation process to assess the accuracy of a mathematical model to represent experiments involving thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam. The focus of the report is to work through a validation process. The process addresses the following activities. The intended application of mathematical model is discussed to better understand the pertinent parameter space. The parameter space of the validation experiments is mapped to the application parameter space. The mathematical models, computer code to solve the models and its (code) verification are presented. Experimental data from two activities are used to validate mathematical models. The first experiment assesses the chemistry model alone and the second experiment assesses the model of coupled chemistry, conduction, and enclosure radiation. The model results of both experimental activities are summarized and uncertainty of the model to represent each experimental activity is estimated. The comparison between the experiment data and model results is quantified with various metrics. After addressing these activities, an assessment of the process for the case study is given. Weaknesses in the process are discussed and lessons learned are summarized.

  12. Renal studies in safety pharmacology and toxicology: A survey conducted in the top 15 pharmaceutical companies.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Amanda; Gallacher, David J; Greiter-Wilke, Andrea; Guillon, Jean-Michel; Kasai, Cheiko; Ledieu, David; Levesque, Paul; Prelle, Katja; Ratcliffe, Sian; Sannajust, Frederick; Valentin, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    With the recent development of more sensitive biomarkers to assess kidney injury preclinically, a survey was designed i) to investigate what strategies are used to investigate renal toxicity in both ICH S7A compliant Safety Pharmacology (SP) studies after a single dose of a compound and within repeat-dose toxicity studies by large pharmaceutical companies today; ii) to understand whether renal SP studies have impact or utility in drug development and/or if it may be more appropriate to assess renal effects after multiple doses of compounds; iii) to ascertain how much mechanistic work is performed by the top 15 largest pharmaceutical companies (as determined by R&D revenue size); iv) to gain an insight into the impact of the validation of DIKI biomarkers and their introduction in the safety evaluation paradigm; and v) to understand the impact of renal/urinary safety study data on progression of projects. Two short anonymous surveys were submitted to SP leaders of the top 15 pharmaceutical companies, as defined by 2012 R&D portfolio size. Fourteen multiple choice questions were designed to explore the strategies used to investigate renal effects in both ICH S7A compliant SP studies and within toxicology studies. A 67% and 60% response rate was obtained in the first and second surveys, respectively. Nine out of ten respondent companies conduct renal excretory measurements (eg. urine analysis) in toxicology studies whereas only five out of ten conduct specific renal SP studies; and all of those 5 also conduct the renal excretory measurements in toxicology studies. These companies measure and/or calculate a variety of parameters as part of these studies, and also on a case by case basis include regulatory qualified and non-qualified DIKI biomarkers. Finally, only one company has used renal/urinary functional data alone to stop a project, whereas the majority of respondents combine renal data with other target organ assessments to form an integrated decision-making set

  13. Pilot In-Trail Procedure Validation Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussink, Frank J. L.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Chamberlain, James P.; Chartrand, Ryan; Jones, Kenneth M.

    2008-01-01

    A Human-In-The-Loop experiment was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) to investigate the viability of the In-Trail Procedure (ITP) concept from a flight crew perspective, by placing participating airline pilots in a simulated oceanic flight environment. The test subject pilots used new onboard avionics equipment that provided improved information about nearby traffic and enabled them, when specific criteria were met, to request an ITP flight level change referencing one or two nearby aircraft that might otherwise block the flight level change. The subject pilots subjective assessments of ITP validity and acceptability were measured via questionnaires and discussions, and their objective performance in appropriately selecting, requesting, and performing ITP flight level changes was evaluated for each simulated flight scenario. Objective performance and subjective workload assessment data from the experiment s test conditions were analyzed for statistical and operational significance and are reported in the paper. Based on these results, suggestions are made to further improve the ITP.

  14. Guide to good practices for developing and conducting case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    Learning from experience is often very costly to a facility: in terms of injured personnel, damaged equipment, and wasted manhours. Learning from the experience gained at the facility and from industry can prevent repeating costly mistakes. This guide contains a method for teaming from experience to prevent mistakes from occurring. That method is the case study. This guide describes how to develop and present case studies. This guide should give the instructional developer some ideas on the best kind of case study to use as well as providing examples of the various types of case studies. Training on industry and inhouse operating experiences should occur throughout the training program to help prevent recurring unsafe events and to curb dangerous trends. Experiences from the facility or from other industries should be incorporated in a manner that is systematic and timely in conveying useful information. Case studies provide a means to organize this information and present it to the trainees in a systematic way. By having trainees analyze and discuss case studies, the Teaming experience is accelerated because the trainees are actively involved in the learning process.

  15. The Study of Diagnostic Efficacy of Nerve Conduction Study Parameters in Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Sachin; Kashikar, Aditi; Shende, Vinod; Waghmare, Satish

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cervical Radiculopathy (CR) is a neurologic condition characterised by dysfunction of a cervical spinal nerve, the roots of the nerve, or both. Diagnostic criteria for CR are not well defined, and no universally accepted criteria for its diagnosis have been established. Clinical examination, radiological imaging and electrophysiologic evaluation are the different modalities to diagnose CR. The incidence of Cervical Spondylosis and related conditions is increasing in the present scenario and the use of radiologic examination is time consuming and uneconomical for the common Indian setup. Thus, there is a definite need to establish a cost effective, reliable, and accurate means for establishing the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy. Electrodiagnostic tests are the closest to fulfill these criteria. Aim: To evaluate diagnostic utility of various motor and sensory nerve conduction study parameters in cervical radiculopathy. Setting and Design: It was a cross-sectional study conducted on 100 subjects of age > 40 years. Material and Methods: The consecutive patients clinically diagnosed to have cervical radiculopathy, referred from department of Orthopaedics were prospectively recruited for the motor and sensory nerve conduction study using RMS EMG EP Mark-II. Parameters studied were Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP), Distal Motor Latency (DML) and Conduction Velocity (CV) for motor nerves and Sensory Nerve Action Potential (SNAP) and CV for sensory nerves. Statistical Analysis: Study observations and results were analysed to find the Specificity, Sensitivity, Positive Predictive Value and Negative Predictive Value using SPSS 16.0. Results: Among various motor nerve conduction parameters CMAP was found to be more sensitive with high positive predicative value. CV was found to have greater specificity and DML had least negative predictive value. Sensory nerve conduction parameters were found to have less sensitivity but higher specificity as compared

  16. [French validation study of the levels of emotional awareness scale].

    PubMed

    Bydlowski, S; Corcos, M; Paterniti, S; Guilbaud, O; Jeammet, P; Consoli, S M

    2002-01-01

    According to a thesis based on the idea of an influence of cognitions in the structuring of internal reality, emotional awareness, ie the capacity of representing your own emotional experience and that of others, is a cognitive process that goes into maturation. Defining this concept, Lane and Schwartz present a cognitivo-developmental model in five stages of the processes of symbolization, accounting for the differences in levels of emotional awareness observed in individuals. The organization of these cognitive processes would thus be structured in well differentiated stages, in which the development of the emotions would be inseparable from the development of ego and of the relation to others. These authors focus on the capacity of representing in a conscious way the emotional experience and consider that verbal representations used to describe the contents of what is experience constitute a good reflection of the organization structural of the emotional awareness. Therefore, they worked out an instrument of evaluation: the Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale (LEAS), which measures the capacity to describe your own emotional experience and the one you allow to others, in an emotional situation. The system of quotation of this scale is based on the analysis of the verbal contents of the provided answers, in direct reference to the authors' theory of the levels of differentiation and integration of the emotional experience. It is therefore an empirical measurement which is centered specifically on the structural organization of the emotional experience. The various studies of validation of this instrument show that it presents solid metrological properties. This work presents the validation of the French version of Lane and Schwartz's LEAS. Validity and fidelity were studied in a group of 121 healthy subjects. This setting is part of a larger clinical evaluation, also including a collection of socio-demographic and clinical data, and other instruments of self

  17. Challenges in conducting post-authorisation safety studies (PASS): A vaccine manufacturer's view.

    PubMed

    Cohet, Catherine; Rosillon, Dominique; Willame, Corinne; Haguinet, Francois; Marenne, Marie-Noëlle; Fontaine, Sandrine; Buyse, Hubert; Bauchau, Vincent; Baril, Laurence

    2017-05-25

    Post-authorisation safety studies (PASS) of vaccines assess or quantify the risk of adverse events following immunisation that were not identified or could not be estimated pre-licensure. The aim of this perspective paper is to describe the authors' experience in the design and conduct of twelve PASS that contributed to the evaluation of the benefit-risk of vaccines in real-world settings. We describe challenges and learnings from selected PASS of rotavirus, malaria, influenza, human papillomavirus and measles-mumps-rubella-varicella vaccines that assessed or identified potential or theoretical risks, which may lead to changes to risk management plans and/or to label updates. Study settings include the use of large healthcare databases and de novo data collection. PASS methodology is influenced by the background incidence of the outcome of interest, vaccine uptake, availability and quality of data sources, identification of the at-risk population and of suitable comparators, availability of validated case definitions, and the frequent need for case ascertainment in large databases. Challenges include the requirement for valid exposure and outcome data, identification of, and access to, adequate data sources, and mitigating limitations including bias and confounding. Assessing feasibility is becoming a key step to confirm that study objectives can be met in a timely manner. PASS provide critical information for regulators, public health agencies, vaccine manufacturers and ultimately, individuals. Collaborative approaches and synergistic efforts between vaccine manufacturers and key stakeholders, such as regulatory and public health agencies, are needed to facilitate access to data, and to drive optimal study design and implementation, with the aim of generating robust evidence. Copyright © 2017 GSK Biologicals SA. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Guidelines for conducting Smolt survival studies in the Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giorgi,; Skalski,; Pevin,; Smith,; Langeslay,; Counihan, Timothy D.; Perry, Russell W.; Bickford, Shane

    2010-01-01

    For more than a decade, investigators from different research groups in the Pacific Northwest have been using electronic tags to estimate survival of salmonid smolts as they migrate seaward past hydroelectric dams and through impoundments on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Over the years, they have refined both analytical and field methods associated with such studies. In this collaborative paper, they synthesize years of experience to formulate a set of guidelines that may assist others with the design and execution of survival studies involving smolts during their migratory phase.

  19. When Educational Material Is Delivered: A Mixed Methods Content Validation Study of the Information Assessment Method.

    PubMed

    Badran, Hani; Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland

    2017-03-14

    The Information Assessment Method (IAM) allows clinicians to report the cognitive impact, clinical relevance, intention to use, and expected patient health benefits associated with clinical information received by email. More than 15,000 Canadian physicians and pharmacists use the IAM in continuing education programs. In addition, information providers can use IAM ratings and feedback comments from clinicians to improve their products. Our general objective was to validate the IAM questionnaire for the delivery of educational material (ecological and logical content validity). Our specific objectives were to measure the relevance and evaluate the representativeness of IAM items for assessing information received by email. A 3-part mixed methods study was conducted (convergent design). In part 1 (quantitative longitudinal study), the relevance of IAM items was measured. Participants were 5596 physician members of the Canadian Medical Association who used the IAM. A total of 234,196 ratings were collected in 2012. The relevance of IAM items with respect to their main construct was calculated using descriptive statistics (relevance ratio R). In part 2 (qualitative descriptive study), the representativeness of IAM items was evaluated. A total of 15 family physicians completed semistructured face-to-face interviews. For each construct, we evaluated the representativeness of IAM items using a deductive-inductive thematic qualitative data analysis. In part 3 (mixing quantitative and qualitative parts), results from quantitative and qualitative analyses were reviewed, juxtaposed in a table, discussed with experts, and integrated. Thus, our final results are derived from the views of users (ecological content validation) and experts (logical content validation). Of the 23 IAM items, 21 were validated for content, while 2 were removed. In part 1 (quantitative results), 21 items were deemed relevant, while 2 items were deemed not relevant (R=4.86% [N=234,196] and R=3.04% [n

  20. When Educational Material Is Delivered: A Mixed Methods Content Validation Study of the Information Assessment Method

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background The Information Assessment Method (IAM) allows clinicians to report the cognitive impact, clinical relevance, intention to use, and expected patient health benefits associated with clinical information received by email. More than 15,000 Canadian physicians and pharmacists use the IAM in continuing education programs. In addition, information providers can use IAM ratings and feedback comments from clinicians to improve their products. Objective Our general objective was to validate the IAM questionnaire for the delivery of educational material (ecological and logical content validity). Our specific objectives were to measure the relevance and evaluate the representativeness of IAM items for assessing information received by email. Methods A 3-part mixed methods study was conducted (convergent design). In part 1 (quantitative longitudinal study), the relevance of IAM items was measured. Participants were 5596 physician members of the Canadian Medical Association who used the IAM. A total of 234,196 ratings were collected in 2012. The relevance of IAM items with respect to their main construct was calculated using descriptive statistics (relevance ratio R). In part 2 (qualitative descriptive study), the representativeness of IAM items was evaluated. A total of 15 family physicians completed semistructured face-to-face interviews. For each construct, we evaluated the representativeness of IAM items using a deductive-inductive thematic qualitative data analysis. In part 3 (mixing quantitative and qualitative parts), results from quantitative and qualitative analyses were reviewed, juxtaposed in a table, discussed with experts, and integrated. Thus, our final results are derived from the views of users (ecological content validation) and experts (logical content validation). Results Of the 23 IAM items, 21 were validated for content, while 2 were removed. In part 1 (quantitative results), 21 items were deemed relevant, while 2 items were deemed not relevant

  1. Mission Specialist (MS) Allen conducts Vestibular Study Experiment on middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Mission Specialist (MS) Allen, wearing headset and with electrodes placed on his face, relaxes on middeck floor while Vestibular Study Experiment hardware records eye movement data as it relates to motion sickness. The electrodes monitor his responses in zero gravity. Allen is wearing the multi-pieced constant wear garment.

  2. A protocol for conducting rainfall simulation to study soil runoff

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rainfall is a driving force for the transport of environmental contaminants from agricultural soils to surficial water bodies via surface runoff. The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of antecedent soil moisture content on the fate and transport of surface applied commercial ur...

  3. Studies on Enhancing Transverse Thermal Conductivity Carbon/Carbon Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-06

    control of matrix microstructure and to study influence of nanocarbon reinforcement addition to the carbonaceous precursors on the microstructure of the...of nanocarbon reinforcement addition to the carbonaceous precursors on the microstructure of the matrix as well as on the thermal properties of the

  4. Conducting Studies of Transfer of Learning: A Practical Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    neasures. A number of critical aspects of these issues are discussed. including the composition of the sample of learners, their assignment to study...prediction.- concerning transfer wottld he vatiimproved. But that is sigeer fanta -%. and isa the. pnActical world rescarchinr. ususally have to make d~o with

  5. Issues in Conducting an Institutional Salary-Equity Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferber, Marianne A.; Loeb, Jane W.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how the selection of variables used in the salary model, and the functional form of the salary model, can influence the findings from an institutional salary-equity study. Also demonstrates how an institution's salary model can be used to identify pay disparities for individual faculty members. (EV)

  6. Experimental Study on Thermal Conductivity of Self-Compacting Concrete with Recycled Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Fenollera, María; Míguez, José Luis; Goicoechea, Itziar; Lorenzo, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The research focuses on the use of recycled aggregate (RA), from waste pieces generated during production in precast plants for self-compacting concrete (SCC) manufactured with a double sustainable goal: recycle manufacturing waste (consumption) and improvement of the thermal properties of the manufactured product (energy efficiency). For this purpose, a mechanical study to ensure technical feasibility of the concrete obtained has been conducted, as well as a thermal analysis of recycled SCC specimens of 50 N/mm2 resistance, with different RA doses (0%, 20%, 50% and 100%). The main parameters that characterize a SCC in both states, fresh (slump-flow) and hard (compressive strength), have been tested; also, a qualitative analysis of the thermal conductivity using infrared thermography (IRT) and quantitative analysis with heat flow meter at three temperatures 20 °C, 25 °C and 30 °C have been performed. The results suggest the existence of two different thermal behaviors: concretes with 0% and 20% of RA, and on the other hand concretes with 50% and 100% of RA. It has also demonstrated the validity of the IRT as sampling technique in estimating the thermal behavior of materials having reduced range of variation in parameters. PMID:28793449

  7. Some limitations on the external validity of psychotherapy efficacy studies and suggestions for future research.

    PubMed

    Shean, Glenn D

    2012-01-01

    Increased emphasis on identifying empirically supported treatments (ESTs) has enhanced the scientific basis for psychotherapy practice, but uncritical acceptance of ESTs as the basis for credentialing and policy decisions risks stifling innovation and creativity in the field. There are limitations inherent in efficacy studies of psychotherapy that can constrain external validity. This article discusses several limitations on the external validity of efficacy studies, as well as other issues related to evaluating psychotherapy outcome research. These limitations and concerns include: 1) the practice of maximizing homogeneity by selecting participants diagnosed with a single Axis I disorder; 2) the practice of requiring manualized therapies for efficacy research; 3) the assumption that lasting and meaningful changes occur and can be assessed within a relatively short time frame; 4) the assumption that valid assessments of outcome can be conducted in randomized control trials studies without concern for researcher allegiance; and 5) the view that evidence of effectiveness from non-RCT design studies can be ignored. Finally, alternative research approaches for studying psychotherapy that can potentially supplement knowledge gained from efficacy studies and foster continued innovation and creativity in the field are discussed.

  8. Development, validation and stability study of pediatric atenolol syrup.

    PubMed

    Foppa, T; Murakami, F S; Silva, M A S

    2007-07-01

    Atenolol [4-(2-hydroxy-isopropylaminopropoxy)-phenylacetamide], is a cardioselective beta1-adrenergic receptor blocking agent prescribed for treatment of hypertension, angina pectoris and cardiac arrhythmias. However, most of these medicines are not formulated for easy or accurate administration to children. Atenolol is unstable in solutions and therefore the development of a liquid dosage form is a significant challenge. Studies showed that the degradation rate of atenolol is dependent on the temperature, indicating higher stability at 4 degrees C. Atenolol syrup is stable for 9 days, with acceptable apearance. A second order model adequately described atenolol decomposition when stored as syrup. A stability-indicating method was developed and validated in order to evaluate these studies.

  9. The Fast Scattering Code (FSC): Validation Studies and Program Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Dunn, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    The Fast Scattering Code (FSC) is a frequency domain noise prediction program developed at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to simulate the acoustic field produced by the interaction of known, time harmonic incident sound with bodies of arbitrary shape and surface impedance immersed in a potential flow. The code uses the equivalent source method (ESM) to solve an exterior 3-D Helmholtz boundary value problem (BVP) by expanding the scattered acoustic pressure field into a series of point sources distributed on a fictitious surface placed inside the actual scatterer. This work provides additional code validation studies and illustrates the range of code parameters that produce accurate results with minimal computational costs. Systematic noise prediction studies are presented in which monopole generated incident sound is scattered by simple geometric shapes - spheres (acoustically hard and soft surfaces), oblate spheroids, flat disk, and flat plates with various edge topologies. Comparisons between FSC simulations and analytical results and experimental data are presented.

  10. Determination of body composition from skinfold thickness: a validation study.

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, J J; Wilson, J; Durnin, J V

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of body composition is proving increasingly important in clinical nutrition and research. Skinfold thickness is a simple means of estimating body composition which is widely used in children, but there is little information on its validity. There has been a proliferation of equations for estimation of body composition from skinfolds, but some doubt as to their general applicability. The aim of the present study was to validate five currently used equations for this purpose in a sample of 98 healthy prepubertal children (64 boys, 34 girls), mean (SD) age 9.1 (1.7) years by comparison of estimates from each equation with measurements of fatness derived from hydrodensitometry. Differences between methods were determined by calculation of biases and limits of agreement. Limits of agreement between predicted and measured fatness were wide, particularly in the girls, and some distinct biases were apparent. Choice of prediction equation therefore has a substantial influence on the estimate of fatness obtained when using skinfolds in children. The existing published equations are associated with large random errors or significant systematic errors. For the time being skinfolds might best be regarded as indices (rather than measures) of body fatness in individuals, or means of estimating body fatness of groups. Estimating the total body fatness of individual prepubertal children using skinfolds, on the basis of this evidence, is not advisable at present. PMID:7492193

  11. Bioelectrical impedance validation studies: alternative approaches to their interpretation.

    PubMed

    Ward, L C

    2013-01-01

    Cross-validation of methods of body composition assessment necessitates statistical evaluation of the degree to which the two methods are in agreement. Typically, impedance-based methods for predicting body composition are assessed against other methods using limits of agreement and correlation analysis. Alternative approaches are presented with reference to example body composition data obtained using bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). A randomly selected data set, drawn from a body composition database, was analysed by limits of agreement analysis and error grid analysis. The precision of BIS-derived predictions of percentage body fat relative to that of DXA can be determined from limits of agreement analysis. The importance of knowing the precision of the reference method in such analyses was highlighted. Error grid analysis has the potential to aid interpretation of method comparison data in an intuitively understandable way. Alternative ways of comparing analytical methods that are in use in other branches of biomedical research may prove useful when evaluating the utility of impedance-based methods and other methods for the assessment of body composition in cross-validation studies.

  12. Evidence for the predictive validity of DSM-IV oppositional defiant and conduct disorders diagnosed in a clinically referred sample of preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Kate; Boeldt, Debra; Chen, Diane; Coyne, Claire; Donald, Radiah; Duax, Jeanne; Hart, Katherine; Perrott, Jennifer; Strickland, Jennifer; Danis, Barbara; Hill, Carri; Davis, Shante; Kampani, Smita; Humphries, Marisha

    2010-01-01

    Background Diagnostic validity of oppositional defiant and conduct disorders (ODD and CD) for preschoolers has been questioned based on concerns regarding the ability to differentiate normative, transient disruptive behavior from clinical symptoms. Data on concurrent validity has accumulated, but predictive validity is limited. Predictive validity is critical to refuting the hypothesis that diagnosing ODD and CD in young children leads to pathologizing normal behavior. ODD and CD have emerged as gateway disorders to many forms of adult psychopathology. Establishing how early we can identify symptoms and disorders that herald poor prognosis is one of the most important goals for research on etiology and prevention. Methods Subjects were 3–5 year old consecutive referrals to a child psychiatry clinic (n=123) and demographically matched children from a pediatric clinic (n=100). A diagnostic interview was used to assess DSM-IV ODD and CD in a prospective follow-up design from preschool to school age. Stability of ODD and CD diagnoses and level of impairment were tested as a function of preschool diagnosis. Results Over 80% of preschoolers diagnosed with ODD and approximately 60% of preschoolers diagnosed with CD met criteria for the same disorder during follow-up. Impairment over time varied significantly as a function of stability of diagnosis across three years. Conclusions These results provide the first evidence of the predictive validity of DSM-IV ODD and CD in clinically referred preschool children. The findings challenge the assumption that symptoms of disruptive behavior disorders that occur during the preschool period tend to be transient. PMID:20738448

  13. 43 CFR 404.18 - How can I request assistance to conduct a feasibility study?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... feasibility study? 404.18 Section 404.18 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... request assistance to conduct a feasibility study? To request assistance to conduct a feasibility study... submit a full proposal to conduct a feasibility study in response to the program announcement,...

  14. 43 CFR 404.18 - How can I request assistance to conduct a feasibility study?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... feasibility study? 404.18 Section 404.18 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... request assistance to conduct a feasibility study? To request assistance to conduct a feasibility study... submit a full proposal to conduct a feasibility study in response to the program announcement,...

  15. Improving medical record retrieval for validation studies in Medicare data.

    PubMed

    Wright, Nicole C; Delzell, Elizabeth S; Smith, Wilson K; Xue, Fei; Auroa, Tarun; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the study is to describe medical record retrieval for a study validating claims-based algorithms used to identify seven adverse events of special interest (AESI) in a Medicare population. We analyzed 2010-2011 Medicare claims of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis and men ≥65 years of age in the Medicare 5% national sample. The final cohorts included beneficiaries covered continuously for 12+ months by Medicare parts A, B, and D and not enrolled in Medicare Advantage before starting follow-up. We identified beneficiaries using each AESI algorithm and randomly selected 400 women and 100 men with each AESI for medical record retrieval. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services provided beneficiary contact information, and we requested medical records directly from providers, without patient contact. We selected 3331 beneficiaries (women: 2272; men: 559) for whom we requested 3625 medical records. Overall, we received 1738 [47.9% (95%CI 46.3%, 49.6%)] of the requested medical records. We observed small differences in the characteristics of the total population with AESIs compared with those randomly selected for retrieval; however, no differences were seen between those selected and those retrieved. We retrieved 54.7% of records requested from hospitals compared with 26.3% of records requested from physician offices (p < 0.001). Retrieval did not differ by sex or vital status of the beneficiaries. Our national medical record validation study of claims-based algorithms produced a modest retrieval rate. The medical record procedures outlined in this paper could have led to the improved retrieval from our previous medical record retrieval study. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. A NASA DC-8 conducts high-altitude hurricane studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This NASA Dryden Flight Research Center DC-8 takes off from Patrick Air Force Base to pursue its goal of collecting high- altitude information about Atlantic hurricanes and tropical storms. Flying at 35,000 to 40,000 feet, the plane is equipped with instruments to measure the storm's structure, environment and changes in intensity and tracking. The DC-8 is part of the NASA-led Atmospheric Dynamics and Remote Sensing program that includes other government weather researchers and the university community in a study of Atlantic hurricanes and tropical storms. The hurricane study, which lasts through September, is part of NASA's Earth Science enterprise to better understand the total Earth system and the effects of natural and human-induced changes on the global environment.

  17. [Reliability and validity studies of Turkish translation of Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised-Abbreviated].

    PubMed

    Karanci, A Nuray; Dirik, Gülay; Yorulmaz, Orçun

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the reliability and the validity of the Turkish translation of the Eysneck Personality Questionnaire Revised-abbreviated Form (EPQR-A) (Francis et al., 1992), which consists of 24 items that assess neuroticism, extraversion, psychoticism, and lying. The questionnaire was first translated into Turkish and then back translated. Subsequently, it was administered to 756 students from 4 different universities. The Fear Survey Inventory-III (FSI-III), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scales (RSES), and Egna Minnen Betraffande Uppfostran (EMBU-C) were also administered in order to assess the questionnaire's validity. The internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and validity were subsequently evaluated. Factor analysis, similar to the original scale, yielded 4 factors; the neuroticism, extraversion, psychoticism, and lie scales. Kuder-Richardson alpha coefficients for the extraversion, neuroticism, psychoticism, and lie scales were 0.78, 0.65, 0.42, and 0.64, respectively, and the test-retest reliability of the scales was 0.84, 0.82, 0.69, and 0.69, respectively. The relationships between EPQR-A-48, FSI-III, EMBU-C, and RSES were examined in order to evaluate the construct validity of the scale. Our findings support the construct validity of the questionnaire. To investigate gender differences in scores on the subscales, MANOVA was conducted. The results indicated that there was a gender difference only in the lie scale scores. Our findings largely supported the reliability and validity of the questionnaire in a Turkish student sample. The psychometric characteristics of the Turkish version of the EPQR-A were discussed in light of the relevant literature.

  18. Expert validation of a teamwork assessment rubric: A modified Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Parratt, Jenny A; Fahy, Kathleen M; Hutchinson, Marie; Lohmann, Gui; Hastie, Carolyn R; Chaseling, Marilyn; O'Brien, Kylie

    2016-01-01

    Teamwork is a 'soft skill' employability competence desired by employers. Poor teamwork skills in healthcare have an impact on adverse outcomes. Teamwork skills are rarely the focus of teaching and assessment in undergraduate courses. The TeamUP Rubric is a tool used to teach and evaluate undergraduate students' teamwork skills. Students also use the rubric to give anonymised peer feedback during team-based academic assignments. The rubric's five domains focus on planning, environment, facilitation, conflict management and individual contribution; each domain is grounded in relevant theory. Students earn marks for their teamwork skills; validity of the assessment rubric is critical. To what extent do experts agree that the TeamUP Rubric is a valid assessment of 'teamwork skills'? Modified Delphi technique incorporating Feminist Collaborative Conversations. A heterogeneous panel of 35 professionals with recognised expertise in communications and/or teamwork. Three Delphi rounds using a survey that included the rubric were conducted either face-to-face, by telephone or online. Quantitative analysis yielded item content validity indices (I-CVI); minimum consensus was pre-set at 70%. An average of the I-CVI also yielded sub-scale (domain) (D-CVI/Ave) and scale content validity indices (S-CVI/Ave). After each Delphi round, qualitative data were analysed and interpreted; Feminist Collaborative Conversations by the research team aimed to clarify and confirm consensus about the wording of items on the rubric. Consensus (at 70%) was obtained for all but one behavioural descriptor of the rubric. We modified that descriptor to address expert concerns. The TeamUP Rubric (Version 4) can be considered to be well validated at that level of consensus. The final rubric reflects underpinning theory, with no areas of conceptual overlap between rubric domains. The final TeamUP Rubric arising from this study validly measures individual student teamwork skills and can be used with

  19. Guidance for Reviewing OCSPP 850.2100 Avian Oral Toxicity Studies Conducted with Passerine Birds

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Guidance based on comparison of results from the TG223 validation studies to results from avian acute oral studies previously submitted to EPA for two test chemicals following EPA's 850.2100 (public draft) guidelines.

  20. Identification and Prediction of Diabetic Sensorimotor Polyneuropathy Using Individual and Simple Combinations of Nerve Conduction Study Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Weisman, Alanna; Bril, Vera; Ngo, Mylan; Lovblom, Leif E.; Halpern, Elise M.; Orszag, Andrej; Perkins, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSP) is hindered by the need for complex nerve conduction study (NCS) protocols and lack of predictive biomarkers. We aimed to determine the performance of single and simple combinations of NCS parameters for identification and future prediction of DSP. Materials and Methods 406 participants (61 with type 1 diabetes and 345 with type 2 diabetes) with a broad spectrum of neuropathy, from none to severe, underwent NCS to determine presence or absence of DSP for cross-sectional (concurrent validity) analysis. The 109 participants without baseline DSP were re-evaluated for its future onset (predictive validity). Performance of NCS parameters was compared by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC). Results At baseline there were 246 (60%) Prevalent Cases. After 3.9 years mean follow-up, 25 (23%) of the 109 Prevalent Controls that were followed became Incident DSP Cases. Threshold values for peroneal conduction velocity and sural amplitude potential best identified Prevalent Cases (AROC 0.90 and 0.83, sensitivity 80 and 83%, specificity 89 and 72%, respectively). Baseline tibial F-wave latency, peroneal conduction velocity and the sum of three lower limb nerve conduction velocities (sural, peroneal, and tibial) best predicted 4-year incidence (AROC 0.79, 0.79, and 0.85; sensitivity 79, 70, and 81%; specificity 63, 74 and 77%, respectively). Discussion Individual NCS parameters or their simple combinations are valid measures for identification and future prediction of DSP. Further research into the predictive roles of tibial F-wave latencies, peroneal conduction velocity, and sum of conduction velocities as markers of incipient nerve injury is needed to risk-stratify individuals for clinical and research protocols. PMID:23533591

  1. Recent propeller development and studies conducted at ONERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouaillec, F.

    Based on recent research, the common interests that exist between aeronautical and naval propeller design is presented. A review of aeronautical propeller evolution up to the introduction of unducted fan technology is offered, along with a history of the marine propeller. Specific areas covered include airflow calculation through Euler three-dimensional methodology, acoustic calculations for discrete-frequency noise of helicopter rotors, and vibration studies of aircraft and ship propellers. Similarity of test results and possible commonality applications for the two propeller types are discussed.

  2. Experience Tables, Predictive Validity Studies, and Validation of Placement Tables for the MDTP Placement Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA. Office of Institutional Development.

    California's College of the Canyons has used the four Mathematics Diagnostic Testing Project (MDTP) tests to assess students' abilities in basic and college math since spring 1989. These four reports dated June 1993, July 1993, May 1994, and June 1994 examine the predictive validity of the MDTP tests and the cut scores used to place students. The…

  3. A validation study of a stochastic model of human interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchfield, Mitchel Talmadge

    The purpose of this dissertation is to validate a stochastic model of human interactions which is part of a developmentalism paradigm. Incorporating elements of ancient and contemporary philosophy and science, developmentalism defines human development as a progression of increasing competence and utilizes compatible theories of developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, educational psychology, social psychology, curriculum development, neurology, psychophysics, and physics. To validate a stochastic model of human interactions, the study addressed four research questions: (a) Does attitude vary over time? (b) What are the distributional assumptions underlying attitudes? (c) Does the stochastic model, {-}N{intlimitssbsp{-infty}{infty}}varphi(chi,tau)\\ Psi(tau)dtau, have utility for the study of attitudinal distributions and dynamics? (d) Are the Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, and Bose-Einstein theories applicable to human groups? Approximately 25,000 attitude observations were made using the Semantic Differential Scale. Positions of individuals varied over time and the logistic model predicted observed distributions with correlations between 0.98 and 1.0, with estimated standard errors significantly less than the magnitudes of the parameters. The results bring into question the applicability of Fisherian research designs (Fisher, 1922, 1928, 1938) for behavioral research based on the apparent failure of two fundamental assumptions-the noninteractive nature of the objects being studied and normal distribution of attributes. The findings indicate that individual belief structures are representable in terms of a psychological space which has the same or similar properties as physical space. The psychological space not only has dimension, but individuals interact by force equations similar to those described in theoretical physics models. Nonlinear regression techniques were used to estimate Fermi-Dirac parameters from the data. The model explained a high degree

  4. [Validity of schintigraphy in the study of neurogenic dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Galli, J; Valenza, V; D'Alatri, L; Gajate Samanes, A M; Reale, F; La Mura, F

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to verify the validity and potential application of oropharyngealesophageal scintigraphy in the analysis of neurogenic dysphagia. Scintigraphy was used on 36 patients divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (control) comprised 17 healthy volunteers; Group 2 included 19 patients suffering from various neurological and neuromuscular pathologies (myasthenia gravis, Parkinson's disease, polymyositis, stroke, paralysis of the last cranial nerves). In group 1 scintigraphy provided normal results both for mode of swallowing and transit, and for the values of the various parameters studied. On the other hand, scintigraphy showed that in group 2 all oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing were altered vs the controls with a statistically significant increase in the average values for the oral transit time (OTT) (1.45 sec., p = 0.0005), pharyngeal transit time (OTT) (3.23 sec., p = 0.044), esophageal transit time (ETT) e19.87 sec., p = 0.005) as well as in the corresponding bolus retention indexes ORU (12.95%, p = 0.0003), FIR (15.05%, p = 0.0003) and ERI (28.63%, p = 0.002). Moreover, the quality and means of swallowing also proved altered while tracheobronchial aspiration was only seen in 6 of the 19 patients (maximum value: 90%, average value; 7.66%) with a marked prevalence in the stroke subgroup (4/8). In light of these results and considering the low dose of radiation (0.00043 Gy), the lack of invasiveness and excellent tolerability, scintigraphy has confirmed its clinical validity in the functional, objective and quali-quantitative study of deglutition, even in patients suffering from neurogenic dysphagia.

  5. A Known Group Analysis Validity Study of the Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education in US Elementary and Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covay Minor, Elizabeth; Porter, Andrew C.; Murphy, Joseph; Goldring, Ellen B.; Cravens, Xiu; Elloitt, Stephen N.

    2014-01-01

    The Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education (VAL-ED) provides educators with a tool for principal evaluation based on principal, teacher, and supervisor reports of principals' learning-centered leadership. In this study, we conduct a known group analysis as part of a larger argument for the validity of the VAL-ED in US elementary and…

  6. A Study on the Validity of Admissions Policy as Applied to the School of Engineering at an Urban University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Francis J.

    Entrance requirements and a weeding process conducted by way of a pre-engineering mathematics program act as a restriction on the number of students graduating with engineering degrees. This study examined the relationship between entrance requirements and the degree of student success upon graduation, as well as the validity of the weeding effect…

  7. A laboratory study of the correlation between the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Xiaopei; Du, Lizhi

    2017-10-01

    Thermal conductivity k (Wm- 1 K- 1) and electrical resistivity ρ (Ω·m) depend on common parameters such as grain size, dry density and saturation, allowing the finding of a relationship between both parameters. In this paper, we found a linear quantitative formula between thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of soil. To accomplish this, we measured the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of 57 soil samples in the laboratory; samples included 8 reconstructed soils from the Changchun area (clay, silt, and sand) with approximately 7 different saturation levels. A linear relationship between thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity was found excluding the parameter of soil saturation, and the linear model was validated with undisturbed soils in Changchun area. To fully use this relationship (e.g., by imaging the thermal conductivity of soils with electrical resistivity tomography), further measurements with different soils are needed.

  8. The conduct of drug metabolism studies considered good practice (II): in vitro experiments.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lee; Liu, Xiaodong

    2007-12-01

    In vitro drug metabolism studies, which are inexpensive and readily carried out, serve as an adequate screening mechanism to characterize drug metabolites, elucidate their pathways, and make suggestions for further in vivo testing. This publication is a sequel to part I in a series and aims at providing a general framework to guide designs and protocols of the in vitro drug metabolism studies considered good practice in an efficient manner such that it would help researchers avoid common pitfalls and misleading results. The in vitro models include hepatic and non-hepatic microsomes, cDNA-expressed recombinant human CYPs expressed in insect cells or human B lymphoblastoid, chemical P450 inhibitors, S9 fraction, hepatocytes and liver slices. Important conditions for conducting the in vitro drug metabolism studies using these models are stated, including relevant concentrations of enzymes, co-factors, inhibitors and test drugs; time of incubation and sampling in order to establish kinetics of reactions; appropriate control settings, buffer selection and method validation. Separate in vitro data should be logically integrated to explain results from animal and human studies and to provide insights into the nature and consequences of in vivo drug metabolism. This article offers technical information and data and addresses scientific rationales and practical skills related to in vitro evaluation of drug metabolism to meet regulatory requirements for drug development.

  9. New York State TrueAllele® Casework Validation Study*

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, Mark W; Belrose, Jamie L; Duceman, Barry W

    2013-01-01

    DNA evidence can pose interpretation challenges, particularly with low-level or mixed samples. It would be desirable to make full use of the quantitative data, consider every genotype possibility, and objectively produce accurate and reproducible DNA match results. Probabilistic genotype computing is designed to achieve these goals. This validation study assessed TrueAllele® probabilistic computer interpretation on 368 evidence items in 41 test cases and compared the results with human review of the same data. Whenever there was a human result, the computer's genotype was concordant. Further, the computer produced a match statistic on 81 mixture items (for 87 inferred matching genotypes) in the test cases, while human review reported a statistic on 25 of these items (30.9%). Using match statistics to quantify information, probabilistic genotyping was shown to be sensitive, specific, and reproducible. These results demonstrate that objective probabilistic genotyping of biological evidence can reliably preserve DNA identification information. PMID:23865896

  10. Goals of care among hospitalized patients: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Haberle, Tyler H; Shinkunas, Laura A; Erekson, Zachary D; Kaldjian, Lauris C

    2011-08-01

    Our objective was to validate 6 literature-derived goals of care by analyzing open-ended and closed-ended responses about goals of care from a previous study of hospitalized patients. Eight clinicians categorized patients' open-ended articulations of their goals of care using a literature-derived framework and then compared those categorizations to patients' own closed-ended selections of their most important goal of care. Clinicians successfully categorized patients' open-ended responses using the literature-derived framework 83.5% of the time, and their categorizations matched patients' closed-ended most important goal of care 87.8% of the time. Goals that did not fit within the literature-derived framework all pertained to the goal of understanding a patient's diagnosis or prognosis; this seventh potential goal can be added to the literature-derived framework of 6 goals of care.

  11. External Validation of the HERNIAscore: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Cherla, Deepa V; Moses, Maya L; Mueck, Krislynn M; Hannon, Craig; Ko, Tien C; Kao, Lillian S; Liang, Mike K

    2017-09-01

    The HERNIAscore is a ventral incisional hernia (VIH) risk assessment tool that uses only preoperative variables and predictable intraoperative variables. The aim of this study was to validate and modify, if needed, the HERNIAscore in an external dataset. This was a retrospective observational study of all patients undergoing resection for gastrointestinal malignancy from 2011 through 2015 at a safety-net hospital. The primary end point was clinical postoperative VIH. Patients were stratified into low-risk, medium-risk, and high-risk groups based on HERNIAscore. A revised HERNIAscore was calculated with the addition of earlier abdominal operation as a categorical variable. Cox regression of incisional hernia with stratification by risk class was performed. Incidence rates of clinical VIH formation within each risk class were also calculated. Two hundred and forty-seven patents were enrolled. On Cox regression, in addition to the 3 variables of the HERNIAscore (BMI, COPD, and incision length), earlier abdominal operation was also predictive of VIH. The revised HERNIAscore demonstrated improved predictive accuracy for clinical VIH. Although the original HERNIAscore effectively stratified the risk of an incisional radiographic VIH developing, the revised HERNIAscore provided a statistically significant stratification for both clinical and radiographic VIHs in this patient cohort. We have externally validated and improved the HERNIAscore. The revised HERNIAscore uses BMI, incision length, COPD, and earlier abdominal operation to predict risk of postoperative incisional hernia. Future research should assess methods to prevent incisional hernias in moderate-to-high risk patients. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Water balance at an arid site: a model validation study of bare soil evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.L.; Campbell, G.S.; Gee, G.W.

    1984-03-01

    This report contains results of model validation studies conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Low Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP). The model validation tests consisted of using unsaturated water flow models to simulate water balance experiments conducted at the Buried Waste Test Facility (BWTF) located at the Department of Energy's Hanford site, near Richland, Washington. The BWTF is a lysimeter facility designed to collect field data on long-term water balance and radionuclide tracer movement. It has been operated by PNL for the NLLWMP since 1978. An experimental test case, developed from data collected at the BWTF, was used to evaluate predictions from different water flow models. The major focus of the validation study was to evaluate how the use of different evaporation models affected the accuracy of predictions of evaporation, storage, and drainage made by the whole model. Four evaporation models were tested including two empirical models and two mechanistic models. The empirical models estimate actual evaporation from potential evaporation; the mechanistic models describe water vapor diffusion within the soil profile and between the soil and the atmosphere in terms of fundamental soil properties, and transport processes. The water flow models that included the diffusion-type evaporation submodels performed best overall. The empirical models performed poorly in their description of evaporation and profile water storage during summer months. The predictions of drainage were supported quite well by the experimental data. This indicates that the method used to estimate hydraulic conductivity needed for the Darcian submodel was adequate. This important result supports recommendations for these procedures that were made previously based on laboratory results.

  13. A validation study of elementary science ISTEP+ scores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonelli, Glenn

    The Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress-Plus (ISTEP+) was designed to assess student mastery of key educational goals. The 5th grade ISTEP+ Science Test (5-GIST) is part of the ISTEP+ testing regime. The Indiana Academic Standards were developed to guide instruction in the state, and questions on the ISTEP+ were aligned with these standards. Since its inception, the use of the ISTEP+ exam has been changed to comply with the dictates of both Indiana Public Law 221 and the national No Child Left Behind act. With these modifications, the purpose of the tests has shifted from assessment of individual student academic progress to evaluation of the quality of the educational institution administering the tests. The validity of this use has never been established. The purpose of this study is to assess the validity of the 5-GIST as an instrument for assessing and forming judgments about the quality of science instruction in a particular school. ISTEP+ scores of 2 cohorts of students in a Midwestern school district were converted into Z-scores and tracked from 3rd to 5th grade. A regression line was established to account for the general aptitude and the socio-economic status (SES) of the students. Examining the residuals of the 5-GIST scores revealed that between 57% and 60% of the variance in the scores can be attributed to the general aptitude and SES of the students, leaving between 40% and 43% that can be interpreted as reflecting the effect of the school on student learning.

  14. The Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory: A Construct Validation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brian W.

    1983-01-01

    Regression analyses indicated that the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory has convergent validity with regard to the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale and the Coopersmith Behavioral Academic Assessment Scale, has discriminant validity with regard to the Children's Social Desirability Scale, is sensitive to differences in achievement level,…

  15. The Anomalous Sentences Repetition Test: Replication and Validation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, David J.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a brief clinical test, derived from earlier neuropsychological instruments, with evidence for its reliability, interscorer agreement, and validity. The latter is based upon correlations with both CAT scan measures of cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement, as well as correlations with seven other previously validated cognitive…

  16. A Delphi Study and Initial Validation of Counselor Supervision Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuer Colburn, Anita A.; Grothaus, Tim; Hays, Danica G.; Milliken, Tammi

    2016-01-01

    The authors addressed the lack of supervision training standards for doctoral counseling graduates by developing and validating an initial list of supervision competencies. They used content analysis, Delphi polling, and content validity methods to generate a list, vetted by 2 different panels of supervision experts, of 33 competencies grouped…

  17. A Delphi Study and Initial Validation of Counselor Supervision Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuer Colburn, Anita A.; Grothaus, Tim; Hays, Danica G.; Milliken, Tammi

    2016-01-01

    The authors addressed the lack of supervision training standards for doctoral counseling graduates by developing and validating an initial list of supervision competencies. They used content analysis, Delphi polling, and content validity methods to generate a list, vetted by 2 different panels of supervision experts, of 33 competencies grouped…

  18. 40 CFR 152.92 - Submission of a new valid study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submission of a new valid study. 152... Submitters' Rights § 152.92 Submission of a new valid study. An applicant may demonstrate compliance for a data requirement by submitting a valid study that has not previously been submitted to the Agency....

  19. 40 CFR 152.93 - Citation of a previously submitted valid study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... valid study. 152.93 Section 152.93 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Data Submitters' Rights § 152.93 Citation of a previously submitted valid study. An applicant may demonstrate compliance for a data requirement by citing a valid study previously submitted to the Agency....

  20. Development and Validation of the Motivations for Selection of Medical Study (MSMS) Questionnaire in India.

    PubMed

    Goel, Sonu; Angeli, Federica; Singla, Neetu; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Understanding medical students' motivation to select medical studies is particularly salient to inform practice and policymaking in countries-such as India-where shortage of medical personnel poses crucial and chronical challenges to healthcare systems. This study aims to develop and validate a questionnaire to assess the motivation of medical students to select medical studies. A Motivation for Selection of Medical Study (MSMS) questionnaire was developed using extensive literature review followed by Delphi technique. The scale consisted of 12 items, 5 measuring intrinsic dimensions of motivations and 7 measuring extrinsic dimensions. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), validity, reliability and data quality checks were conducted on a sample of 636 medical students from six medical colleges of three North Indian states. The MSMS questionnaire consisted of 3 factors (subscales) and 8 items. The three principal factors that emerged after EFA were the scientific factor (e.g. research opportunities and the ability to use new cutting edge technologies), the societal factor (e.g. job security) and the humanitarian factor (e.g. desire to help others). The CFA conducted showed goodness-of-fit indices supporting the 3-factor model. The three extracted factors cut across the traditional dichotomy between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and uncover a novel three-faceted motivation construct based on scientific factors, societal expectations and humanitarian needs. This validated instrument can be used to evaluate the motivational factors of medical students to choose medical study in India and similar settings and constitutes a powerful tool for policymakers to design measures able to increase selection of medical curricula.

  1. Development and Validation of the Motivations for Selection of Medical Study (MSMS) Questionnaire in India

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Sonu; Angeli, Federica; Singla, Neetu; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Understanding medical students’ motivation to select medical studies is particularly salient to inform practice and policymaking in countries—such as India—where shortage of medical personnel poses crucial and chronical challenges to healthcare systems. This study aims to develop and validate a questionnaire to assess the motivation of medical students to select medical studies. Methods A Motivation for Selection of Medical Study (MSMS) questionnaire was developed using extensive literature review followed by Delphi technique. The scale consisted of 12 items, 5 measuring intrinsic dimensions of motivations and 7 measuring extrinsic dimensions. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), validity, reliability and data quality checks were conducted on a sample of 636 medical students from six medical colleges of three North Indian states. Results The MSMS questionnaire consisted of 3 factors (subscales) and 8 items. The three principal factors that emerged after EFA were the scientific factor (e.g. research opportunities and the ability to use new cutting edge technologies), the societal factor (e.g. job security) and the humanitarian factor (e.g. desire to help others). The CFA conducted showed goodness-of-fit indices supporting the 3-factor model. Conclusion The three extracted factors cut across the traditional dichotomy between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and uncover a novel three-faceted motivation construct based on scientific factors, societal expectations and humanitarian needs. This validated instrument can be used to evaluate the motivational factors of medical students to choose medical study in India and similar settings and constitutes a powerful tool for policymakers to design measures able to increase selection of medical curricula. PMID:27997928

  2. Verification and Validation Studies for the LAVA CFD Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Barad, Michael F; Sozer, Emre; Brehm, Christoph; Housman, Jeffrey A.; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2013-01-01

    The verification and validation of the Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver is presented. A modern strategy for verification and validation is described incorporating verification tests, validation benchmarks, continuous integration and version control methods for automated testing in a collaborative development environment. The purpose of the approach is to integrate the verification and validation process into the development of the solver and improve productivity. This paper uses the Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) for the verification of 2D Euler equations, 3D Navier-Stokes equations as well as turbulence models. A method for systematic refinement of unstructured grids is also presented. Verification using inviscid vortex propagation and flow over a flat plate is highlighted. Simulation results using laminar and turbulent flow past a NACA 0012 airfoil and ONERA M6 wing are validated against experimental and numerical data.

  3. Skin conductance as a pain assessment tool during chest tube removal: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J O; Storm, H; Boglino-Hörlin, A; Le Guen, M; Gayat, E; Fischler, M

    2017-07-01

    Skin conductance variability to assess pain has shown varying results. Skin conductance responses per second (SCR) during a standardized painful stimulus in awake adults may give further understanding of the method's validity. The purpose of this study was to validate the SCR with the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain (P-VAS) and anxiety (A-VAS) during chest tube removal (CTR). Ninety-five patients receiving epidural or non-epidural treatment, scheduled for CTR, were studied. Pain or anxiety was considered when VAS > 30 mm; the SCR cut-off value reflecting pain was ≥0.2 SCR. SCR values could not be recorded in eight cases before CTR, six cases during CTR and seven cases after CTR. CTR induced increases in SCR, P-VAS and A-VAS (p < 0.001). Seventy-seven percent of all pairs of P-VAS and SCR values were well-classified; P-VAS ≤ 30 mm and SCR < 0.2 or P-VAS > 30 mm and SCR ≥ 0.2. SCR obtained before CTR differentiates between patients with and without pain during CTR in all patients (p = 0.04) and in the subgroup of non-anxious patients (p = 0.02), but not in the subgroup of anxious patients. SCR obtained during CTR had similar values in patients with and without pain in all patients and in the subgroup of anxious patients, but in the subgroup of non-anxious patients SCR during CTR differentiates patients with and without pain (p = 0.009). SCR increases during painful procedures. Preprocedural SCR may help predict reported pain in patients exposed to painful procedures. SCR during CTR differentiates between patients with and without pain only in non-anxious patients. Preprocedural SCR may help predict reported pain in patients exposed to painful procedures. Procedural SCR accuracy improves in a subgroup of non-anxious patients. P-VAS is influenced by anxiety different from SCR. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  4. Portuguese validation of the Internet Addiction Test: An empirical study

    PubMed Central

    PONTES, HALLEY M.; PATRÃO, IVONE M.; GRIFFITHS, MARK D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Research into Internet addiction (IA) has increased greatly over the last decade. Despite its various definitions and general lack of consensus regarding its conceptualisation amongst researchers, instruments for measuring this phenomenon have proliferated in a number of countries. There has been little research on IA in Portugal and this may be partly due to the absence of standardised measurement tools for assessing IA. Methods: This study attempted to address this issue by adapting a Portuguese version of the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) via a translation-back translation process and Confirmatory Factor Analysis in a sample of 593 Portuguese students that completed a Portuguese version of the IAT along with questions related to socio-demographic variables. Results: The findings suggested that the IAT appears to be a valid and reliable instrument for measuring IA among Portuguese young adults as demonstrated by its satisfactory psychometric properties. However, the present findings also suggest the need to reword and update some of the IAT’s items. Prevalence of IA found in the sample was 1.2% and is discussed alongside findings relating to socio-demographic correlates. Limitations and implications of the present study are also discussed. Conclusions: The present study calls for a reflection of the IAT while also contributing to a better understanding of the basic aspects of IA in the Portuguese community since many health practitioners are starting to realise that Internet use may pose a risk for some individuals. PMID:25215221

  5. Validation of the new intubation detector device: a manikin study.

    PubMed

    Umesh, Goneppanavar; Jasvinder, Kaur; Tim, Thomas Joseph

    2012-12-01

    This study was done to validate the utility of Umesh's intubation detector in detection of tracheal or oesophageal intubation in manikin using volunteers with different levels of experience in tracheal intubation (including novices). The Sim Man II, (Laerdal Medical AS, Norway) manikin was used. Two cuffed tracheal tubes of size 6.5 mm ID were used. One was passed into the trachea and the other into oesophagus. The device was connected to one of the two tubes as per randomisation table and three high quality chest compressions were performed. Each volunteer participated in the study twice. Their opinion regarding the tube position (in trachea or oesophagus or could not determine) was noted. A total of 50 volunteers participated in the study. Eleven of them had not observed intubation (novice), 29 had either only observed or had experience of <10 tracheal intubations (less experienced) and 10 had experience of >10 intubations or >1 year experience in tracheal intubation (experienced). Out of a total 100 performances, 99 were correctly identified. On one instance, a tube placed in trachea was incorrectly interpreted to be in the oesophagus by a novice. Umesh's intubation detector helps in rapid and reliable confirmation of tracheal intubation in manikin irrespective of the experience level of the assessor in tracheal intubation.

  6. Portuguese validation of the Internet Addiction Test: An empirical study.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Halley M; Patrão, Ivone M; Griffiths, Mark D

    2014-06-01

    Research into Internet addiction (IA) has increased greatly over the last decade. Despite its various definitions and general lack of consensus regarding its conceptualisation amongst researchers, instruments for measuring this phenomenon have proliferated in a number of countries. There has been little research on IA in Portugal and this may be partly due to the absence of standardised measurement tools for assessing IA. This study attempted to address this issue by adapting a Portuguese version of the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) via a translation-back translation process and Confirmatory Factor Analysis in a sample of 593 Portuguese students that completed a Portuguese version of the IAT along with questions related to socio-demographic variables. The findings suggested that the IAT appears to be a valid and reliable instrument for measuring IA among Portuguese young adults as demonstrated by its satisfactory psychometric properties. However, the present findings also suggest the need to reword and update some of the IAT's items. Prevalence of IA found in the sample was 1.2% and is discussed alongside findings relating to socio-demographic correlates. Limitations and implications of the present study are also discussed. The present study calls for a reflection of the IAT while also contributing to a better understanding of the basic aspects of IA in the Portuguese community since many health practitioners are starting to realise that Internet use may pose a risk for some individuals.

  7. 21 CFR 312.120 - Foreign clinical studies not conducted under an IND.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... subjects; and (ii) FDA is able to validate the data from the study through an onsite inspection if the...) A description of how investigators were trained to comply with GCP (as described in paragraph (a)(1...

  8. Measuring Small-Group Environments: A Validity Study of Scores from the Salter Environmental Type Assessment and the Group Environment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Daniel W.; Junco, Reynol

    2007-01-01

    This concurrent validity study of Salter Environmental Type Assessment scores was conducted with the Group Environment Scale. A principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation of 191 college students' responses suggested two factors that accounted for 51% of the variance. The factor-analytic results and concurrent validity coefficients…

  9. Measuring Small-Group Environments: A Validity Study of Scores from the Salter Environmental Type Assessment and the Group Environment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Daniel W.; Junco, Reynol

    2007-01-01

    This concurrent validity study of Salter Environmental Type Assessment scores was conducted with the Group Environment Scale. A principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation of 191 college students' responses suggested two factors that accounted for 51% of the variance. The factor-analytic results and concurrent validity coefficients…

  10. Oxygen flux and dielectric response study of Mixed Ionic-Electronic Conducting (MIEC) heterogeneous functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbi, Fazle

    Dense mixed ionic-electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes consisting of ionic conductive perovskite-type and/or fluorite-type oxides and high electronic conductive spinel type oxides, at elevated temperature can play a useful role in a number of energy conversion related systems including the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), oxygen separation and permeation membranes, partial oxidization membrane reactors for natural gas processing, high temperature electrolysis cells, and others. This study will investigate the impact of different heterogeneous characteristics of dual phase ionic and electronic conductive oxygen separation membranes on their transport mechanisms, in an attempt to develop a foundation for the rational design of such membranes. The dielectric behavior of a material can be an indicator for MIEC performance and can be incorporated into computational models of MIEC membranes in order to optimize the composition, microstructure, and ultimately predict long term membrane performance. The dielectric behavior of the MIECs can also be an indicator of the transport mechanisms and the parameters they are dependent upon. For this study we chose a dual phase MIEC oxygen separation membrane consisting of an ionic conducting phase: gadolinium doped ceria-Ce0.8 Gd0.2O2 (GDC) and an electronic conductive phase: cobalt ferrite-CoFe2O4 (CFO). The membranes were fabricated from mixtures of Nano-powder of each of the phases for different volume percentages, sintered with various temperatures and sintering time to form systematic micro-structural variations, and characterized by structural analysis (XRD), and micro-structural analysis (SEM-EDS). Performance of the membranes was tested for variable partial pressures of oxygen across the membrane at temperatures from 850°C-1060°C using a Gas Chromatography (GC) system. Permeated oxygen did not directly correlate with change in percent mixture. An intermediate mixture 60%GDC-40%CFO had the highest flux compared to the 50%GDC

  11. 41 CFR 101-5.104-6 - Conduct of feasibility studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FEDERAL BUILDINGS AND COMPLEXES 5.1-General § 101-5.104-6 Conduct of feasibility studies. An initial... and detailed procedures to be followed in the conduct of each feasibility study. Arrangements will be... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Conduct of...

  12. A Construct Validation Study of Test Anxiety: A Discriminant Validation of Fear of Failure, Worry, and Emotionality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagtvet, Knut A.

    The study tested a hypothesized three-dimensional structure of test anxiety involving the constructs of fear of failure, emotionality, and worry. The discriminant validity of these three constructs was studied. Uninformed students were told about a mathematics test in a lesson just prior to administration. They were compared to informed students…

  13. Algorithms for verbal autopsies: a validation study in Kenyan children.

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, M. A.; Armstrong Schellenberg, J. R.; Snow, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    The verbal autopsy (VA) questionnaire is a widely used method for collecting information on cause-specific mortality where the medical certification of deaths in childhood is incomplete. This paper discusses review by physicians and expert algorithms as approaches to ascribing cause of deaths from the VA questionnaire and proposes an alternative, data-derived approach. In this validation study, the relatives of 295 children who had died in hospital were interviewed using a VA questionnaire. The children were assigned causes of death using data-derived algorithms obtained under logistic regression and using expert algorithms. For most causes of death, the data-derived algorithms and expert algorithms yielded similar levels of diagnostic accuracy. However, a data-derived algorithm for malaria gave a sensitivity of 71% (95% Cl: 58-84%), which was significantly higher than the sensitivity of 47% obtained under an expert algorithm. The need for exploring this and other ways in which the VA technique can be improved are discussed. The implications of less-than-perfect sensitivity and specificity are explored using numerical examples. Misclassification bias should be taken into consideration when planning and evaluating epidemiological studies. PMID:8706229

  14. Moral judgment reloaded: a moral dilemma validation study.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Julia F; Flexas, Albert; Calabrese, Margareta; Gut, Nadine K; Gomila, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    We propose a revised set of moral dilemmas for studies on moral judgment. We selected a total of 46 moral dilemmas available in the literature and fine-tuned them in terms of four conceptual factors (Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, Evitability, and Intention) and methodological aspects of the dilemma formulation (word count, expression style, question formats) that have been shown to influence moral judgment. Second, we obtained normative codings of arousal and valence for each dilemma showing that emotional arousal in response to moral dilemmas depends crucially on the factors Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, and Intentionality. Third, we validated the dilemma set confirming that people's moral judgment is sensitive to all four conceptual factors, and to their interactions. Results are discussed in the context of this field of research, outlining also the relevance of our RT effects for the Dual Process account of moral judgment. Finally, we suggest tentative theoretical avenues for future testing, particularly stressing the importance of the factor Intentionality in moral judgment. Additionally, due to the importance of cross-cultural studies in the quest for universals in human moral cognition, we provide the new set dilemmas in six languages (English, French, German, Spanish, Catalan, and Danish). The norming values provided here refer to the Spanish dilemma set.

  15. Moral judgment reloaded: a moral dilemma validation study

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Julia F.; Flexas, Albert; Calabrese, Margareta; Gut, Nadine K.; Gomila, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    We propose a revised set of moral dilemmas for studies on moral judgment. We selected a total of 46 moral dilemmas available in the literature and fine-tuned them in terms of four conceptual factors (Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, Evitability, and Intention) and methodological aspects of the dilemma formulation (word count, expression style, question formats) that have been shown to influence moral judgment. Second, we obtained normative codings of arousal and valence for each dilemma showing that emotional arousal in response to moral dilemmas depends crucially on the factors Personal Force, Benefit Recipient, and Intentionality. Third, we validated the dilemma set confirming that people's moral judgment is sensitive to all four conceptual factors, and to their interactions. Results are discussed in the context of this field of research, outlining also the relevance of our RT effects for the Dual Process account of moral judgment. Finally, we suggest tentative theoretical avenues for future testing, particularly stressing the importance of the factor Intentionality in moral judgment. Additionally, due to the importance of cross-cultural studies in the quest for universals in human moral cognition, we provide the new set dilemmas in six languages (English, French, German, Spanish, Catalan, and Danish). The norming values provided here refer to the Spanish dilemma set. PMID:25071621

  16. Methodological difficulties in the conduct of neuroepidemiological studies in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Nadir; Odermatt, Peter; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The majority of people with epilepsy (PWE) live in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, they remain largely untreated and the bulk of resources are used to treat patients in the developed world. This disparity constitutes a challenge for neuroepidemiological studies on a global scale. In the past, several studies have focused on diverse populations in disparate countries at various periods of time and for particular purposes. The specificity of different contexts and circumstances makes it difficult to analyse PWE as a group either qualitatively or quantitatively. Such methodological limitations are further complicated by a lack of logistical support. There is a lack of interest in conducting studies, which results in inadequate funding and, in addition, there is the considerable challenge of publishing research reports from LMICs in peer-reviewed international journals. This paper focuses on methodological problems related to studies in LMICs and attempts to give the reasons for their limitations using epilepsy as an example. Regional conditions and environmental factors must be given careful consideration in the research design because of the importance of understanding the challenges of living in these environments. There are further limitations to the successful implementation of studies. Existing information on epilepsy is often not readily accessible; there is a lack of census data, and migratory patterns into cities make enumeration and sampling even more challenging. As there is usually no well-developed healthcare system a door-to-door screening process is often the only way to identify those with convulsive epilepsy. The questionnaire and study design should preferably be adapted from standardized protocols, and pre-tested and validated in local conditions. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of studies in LMICs can provide data on the burden, risk factors, treatment and outcome of epilepsy only if the primary studies used are properly

  17. Estimating Anesthesia Time Using the Medicare Claim: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Silber, Jeffrey H.; Rosenbaum, Paul R.; Even-Shoshan, Orit; Mi, Lanyu; Kyle, Fabienne; Teng, Yun; Bratzler, Dale W.; Fleisher, Lee A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Procedure length is a fundamental variable associated with quality of care, though seldom studied on a large scale. We sought to estimate procedure length through information obtained in the anesthesia claim submitted to Medicare to validate this method for future studies. Methods The Obesity and Surgical Outcomes Study enlisted 47 hospitals located across New York, Texas and Illinois to study patients undergoing hip, knee, colon and thoracotomy procedures. 15,914 charts were abstracted to determine body mass index and initial patient physiology. Included in this abstraction were induction, cut, close and recovery room times. This chart information was merged to Medicare claims which included anesthesia Part B billing information. Correlations between chart times and claim times were analyzed, models developed, and median absolute differences in minutes calculated. Results Of the 15,914 eligible patients, there were 14,369 where both chart and claim times were available for analysis. In these 14,369, the Spearman correlation between chart and claim time was 0.94 (95% CI 0.94, 0.95) and the median absolute difference between chart and claim time was only 5 minutes (95% CI: 5.0, 5.5). The anesthesia claim can also be used to estimate surgical procedure length, with only a modest increase in error. Conclusion The anesthesia bill found in Medicare claims provides an excellent source of information for studying operative time on a vast scale throughout the United States. However, errors in both chart abstraction and anesthesia claims can occur. Care must be taken in the handling of outliers in this data. PMID:21720242

  18. An international validation study of two achievement goal measures in a pharmacy education context

    PubMed Central

    Alrakaf, Saleh; Abdelmageed, Ahmed; Kiersma, Mary; Coulman, Sion A; John, Dai N; Tordoff, June; Anderson, Claire; Noreddin, Ayman; Sainsbury, Erica; Rose, Grenville; Smith, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Background Achievement goal theory helps us understand what motivates students to participate in educational activities. However, measuring achievement goals in a precise manner is problematic. Elliot and McGregor’s Achievement Goal Questionnaire (AGQ) and Elliot and Murayama’s revised Achievement Goal Questionnaire (AGQ-R) are widely used to assess students’ achievement goals. Both instruments were developed and validated using undergraduate psychology students in the USA. Methods In this study, our aims were to first of all, assess the construct validity of both questionnaires using a cohort of Australian pharmacy students and, subsequently, to test the generalizability and replicability of these tools more widely in schools of pharmacy in other English-speaking countries. The AGQ and the AGQ-R were administered during tutorial class time. Confirmatory factor analysis procedures, using AMOS 19 software, were performed to determine model fit. Results In contrast to the scale developers’ findings, confirmatory factor analysis supported a superior model fit for the AGQ compared with the AGQ-R, in all countries under study. Conclusion Validating measures of achievement goal motivation for use in pharmacy education is necessary and has implications for future research. Based on these results, the AGQ will be used to conduct future cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of the achievement goals of undergraduate pharmacy students from these countries. PMID:25298743

  19. An international validation study of two achievement goal measures in a pharmacy education context.

    PubMed

    Alrakaf, Saleh; Abdelmageed, Ahmed; Kiersma, Mary; Coulman, Sion A; John, Dai N; Tordoff, June; Anderson, Claire; Noreddin, Ayman; Sainsbury, Erica; Rose, Grenville; Smith, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Achievement goal theory helps us understand what motivates students to participate in educational activities. However, measuring achievement goals in a precise manner is problematic. Elliot and McGregor's Achievement Goal Questionnaire (AGQ) and Elliot and Murayama's revised Achievement Goal Questionnaire (AGQ-R) are widely used to assess students' achievement goals. Both instruments were developed and validated using undergraduate psychology students in the USA. In this study, our aims were to first of all, assess the construct validity of both questionnaires using a cohort of Australian pharmacy students and, subsequently, to test the generalizability and replicability of these tools more widely in schools of pharmacy in other English-speaking countries. The AGQ and the AGQ-R were administered during tutorial class time. Confirmatory factor analysis procedures, using AMOS 19 software, were performed to determine model fit. In contrast to the scale developers' findings, confirmatory factor analysis supported a superior model fit for the AGQ compared with the AGQ-R, in all countries under study. Validating measures of achievement goal motivation for use in pharmacy education is necessary and has implications for future research. Based on these results, the AGQ will be used to conduct future cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of the achievement goals of undergraduate pharmacy students from these countries.

  20. Soil moisture estimation through Active and Passive sensors : An intercomparison and validation study in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, E.; Choi, M.

    2013-12-01

    Soil moisture is an important role for hydrological cycle as well as exchanges of energy and water between the land surface and the atmosphere. Although intercomparison and validation are a weighty task and particularly challenging work for analyzing remote sensing of soil moisture, such tasks are indispensable for understanding soil moisture spatio-temporal variability at different scales. A key point in the validation of soil moisture products is the gap in spatial and temporal scales between satellite and in situ observations. In this study, we estimate the Active (ASCAT) and Passive (AMSR-E) sensors soil moisture dynamics for assessing the accuracy of satellite-based soil moisture products and comparing what sensor is more good agreement with the ground soil moisture pattern over a growing season period in 2010 on Northeast Asia. Satellite soil moisture products were systematically compared with in situ observations from 4 different sites (Suwon, Seosan, Jeonju, Cheorwon) located in the Korea peninsula. Furthermore, we conducted with renormalisation methods for removing the systematic differences (bias, RMSE). As a result, ASCAT product gave the highest correlation coefficient (r = 0.788) with the in situ data. Our study will contribute not only to understand satellite validation of remotely sensed soil moisture products, but also to utilize these products as application areas including flood forecasting, drought monitoring and asian dust research.

  1. Trials and tribulations of conducting interventional studies in urban slums of a developing country: Experiences from Kolkata, India.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Tanmay; Mahapatra, Sanchita; Pal, Debottam; Saha, Jayanta; Lopez, AnnaLena; Ali, Mohammad; Bannerjee, Barnali; Manna, Byomkesh; Sur, Dipika; Bhattacharya, Sujit; Kanungo, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Experimental studies involving human subjects provide most internally valid evidences in epidemiological research due to their robust methodology. While conducting population-based interventional studies, to achieve external validity, inclusion of information from vulnerable groups like urban slum-dwellers of the developing world, in the epidemiological estimates is of paramount importance. The challenges faced while conducting 2 consecutive large-scale, community-based vaccine trials in urban slums of Kolkata, India are presented in this article. Interventions in these communities often get constrained by issues pertaining to human rights and benefits, socio-cultural factors, political environment, methodological shortcomings in addition to the challenges in ensuring community participation. While conducting these trials although we intermittently faced obstacles, by virtue of having a long term and robust surveillance system and developing a trusted relationship between the researchers, community leaders and residents we were able to come up with a commendable community participation which culminated into the success of the interventions. Bridging the gap between research and field operations by incorporating knowledge gathered from interventional studies and making strategies to improve health conditions of these informal settlers is a major unfulfilled agenda. We believe the lessons learnt during our research will help researchers while developing efficient interventions in similar setting.

  2. An Examination of University Conducting Faculty Members' Score Study Attitudes and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvey, Brian A.; Springer, D. Gregory; Eubanks, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine university conducting teachers' attitudes about score study, the source materials they used to teach score study, their personal score study practices, and the score study approaches they taught their undergraduate conducting students. Respondents (N = 236) were members of the College Band Directors…

  3. 43 CFR 404.47 - How will a feasibility study be conducted under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will a feasibility study be conducted... Studies § 404.47 How will a feasibility study be conducted under this program? Feasibility studies will be... feasibility study, including the Principles and Guidelines (incorporated by reference at § 404.4). You...

  4. 43 CFR 404.47 - How will a feasibility study be conducted under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How will a feasibility study be conducted... Studies § 404.47 How will a feasibility study be conducted under this program? Feasibility studies will be... feasibility study, including the Principles and Guidelines (incorporated by reference at § 404.4). You...

  5. An Examination of University Conducting Faculty Members' Score Study Attitudes and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvey, Brian A.; Springer, D. Gregory; Eubanks, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine university conducting teachers' attitudes about score study, the source materials they used to teach score study, their personal score study practices, and the score study approaches they taught their undergraduate conducting students. Respondents (N = 236) were members of the College Band Directors…

  6. Cyber Victim and Bullying Scale: A Study of Validity and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Bayram; Yaman, Erkan; Peker, Adem

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a reliable and valid scale, which determines cyber victimization and bullying behaviors of high school students. Research group consisted of 404 students (250 male, 154 male) in Sakarya, in 2009-2010 academic years. In the study sample, mean age is 16.68. Content validity and face validity of the scale was…

  7. Cyber Victim and Bullying Scale: A Study of Validity and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Bayram; Yaman, Erkan; Peker, Adem

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a reliable and valid scale, which determines cyber victimization and bullying behaviors of high school students. Research group consisted of 404 students (250 male, 154 male) in Sakarya, in 2009-2010 academic years. In the study sample, mean age is 16.68. Content validity and face validity of the scale was…

  8. Defining community acquired pneumonia severity on presentation to hospital: an international derivation and validation study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, W; van der Eerden, M M; Laing, R; Boersma, W; Karalus, N; Town, G; Lewis, S; Macfarlane, J

    2003-01-01

    Background: In the assessment of severity in community acquired pneumonia (CAP), the modified British Thoracic Society (mBTS) rule identifies patients with severe pneumonia but not patients who might be suitable for home management. A multicentre study was conducted to derive and validate a practical severity assessment model for stratifying adults hospitalised with CAP into different management groups. Methods: Data from three prospective studies of CAP conducted in the UK, New Zealand, and the Netherlands were combined. A derivation cohort comprising 80% of the data was used to develop the model. Prognostic variables were identified using multiple logistic regression with 30 day mortality as the outcome measure. The final model was tested against the validation cohort. Results: 1068 patients were studied (mean age 64 years, 51.5% male, 30 day mortality 9%). Age ⩾65 years (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.6 to 8.0) and albumin <30 g/dl (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.5 to 8.7) were independently associated with mortality over and above the mBTS rule (OR 5.2, 95% CI 2.7 to 10). A six point score, one point for each of Confusion, Urea >7 mmol/l, Respiratory rate ⩾30/min, low systolic(<90 mm Hg) or diastolic (⩽60 mm Hg) Blood pressure), age ⩾65 years (CURB-65 score) based on information available at initial hospital assessment, enabled patients to be stratified according to increasing risk of mortality: score 0, 0.7%; score 1, 3.2%; score 2, 3%; score 3, 17%; score 4, 41.5% and score 5, 57%. The validation cohort confirmed a similar pattern. Conclusions: A simple six point score based on confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and age can be used to stratify patients with CAP into different management groups. PMID:12728155

  9. A Validity Study of the Kinetic School Drawing Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prout, H. Thompson; Celmer, David S.

    1984-01-01

    Examined the relationship between Kinetic School Drawing responses and academic achievement in 100 normal fifth-grade students. Significant correlations were found for a number of measures, generally supporting the validity of the technique. (JAC)

  10. [Educational game of medication administration: a validation study].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Amanda Portugal de Andrade; Sabóia, Vera Maria; Camacho, Alessandra Conceição Leite Funchal; Daher, Donizete Vago; Teixeira, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This is a methodological research, which aimed to determine the validity of an educational technology (ET) in the form of educational game of medicine administration, according to the judges and audience, using the theoretical stage of Pasquali model. Data were collected between September 2011 and May 2012 in two stages: 1) application and validation of TE by forty students of the 4th period of Nursing, at the Fluminense Federal University (target audience); 2) observation and validation of TE by 8 teachers (judges). The questionnaires were organized in Likert scale, with items distributed in blocks and analyzed quantitatively. The game was validated, since it has over 80% approval by the two groups, and may therefore be used as a TE in the discipline of Fundamentals of Nursing. The results were positive, demonstrating that students and teachers are more interested in content taught when most dynamic technologies are used in the classroom.

  11. Validation of the Australian Nursing Standards Assessment Tool (ANSAT): A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ossenberg, Christine; Dalton, Megan; Henderson, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Workplace-based learning and assessment are essential elements of all nursing education programs. There is, however, limited evidence of validity and reliability available regarding assessment instruments, based on the professional competency standards for nursing in Australia. The aims of this project were to advance the assessment properties of a new instrument, the Australian Nursing Standards Assessment Tool (ANSAT) and investigate the acceptability of this instrument when applied to the evaluation of the professional competence of nursing students in authentic practice settings. A validation study of ANSAT was conducted by 23 clinical assessors from two universities, completing 220 instruments for second and third year undergraduate nursing students undertaking clinical placement in an authentic practice setting. 'Think Aloud' interviews and a post-test survey provided additional data to determine the validity and acceptability of the ANSAT. The pilot study occurred in parallel with completion of existing university assessment instruments. Principal components analysis extracted one factor: professional practice competence. Comparison of total instrument scores between year levels demonstrated a significant difference in each of the clinical domains (p=0.000), suggesting that the instrument is sensitive to differing levels of performance across different year levels. The ANSAT demonstrated high internal consistency with a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.976. Post-test evaluation completed by assessors demonstrated high usability and acceptability for use in common practice settings. Results of the pilot study provided preliminary support for the ANSAT instrument. It is recommended that testing of the instrument be undertaken on a larger cohort to ensure the generalisability of the findings to other nursing populations. There is a need for valid and reliable instruments that assess the performance of nursing in the authentic practice setting. With the

  12. Measurement of Pancreatic Volume by Abdominal MRI: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Szczepaniak, Edward W.; Malliaras, Konstantinos; Nelson, Michael D.; Szczepaniak, Lidia S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol to measure pancreatic volume in humans and to validate it in large animals. Materials and Methods We performed abdominal MRI in eight mini-pigs using a clinical 3T MRI system. We used consecutive parallel abdominal slices, covering the entire pancreas to calculate pancreatic volume. Following MRI, animals were sacrificed, the pancreas was removed, and the volume of the pancreas was measured by water displacement. We used the same MRI protocol to measure pancreatic volume in 21 humans. To assess reproducibility of in vivo measurement we repeated MRI pancreas volume evaluation within 24 hours in additional five humans. Results In mini-pigs the measurements of pancreatic volume by MRI and by water displacement were almost identical (R2 = 0.9867; p<0.0001). In humans the average pancreas volume was 72.7+/−4.5 ml, range from 35.0 to 105.5 ml. This result is in strong agreement with results of previous large postmortem and computed tomography (CT) studies. Repeated measurements of pancreatic volume in humans were highly reproducible. Pancreatic volume measured in vivo was negatively correlated with age, body fat mass, pancreatic TG levels, and visceral fat mass. Conclusions These initial results are highly encouraging and our protocol for pancreatic volume estimation in vivo may prove useful in obesity research to follow in vivo changes of pancreatic volume and structure during time course of obesity and type 2 diabetes development. PMID:23418491

  13. The Hong Kong Early Child Development Scale: A Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Nirmala; Sun, Jin; Ng, Sharon Sui Ngan; Ma, Kitty; Becher, Yvonne; Lee, Diana; Lau, Carrie; Zhang, Li; Chow, Chun Bong; Ip, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on the development and validation of the Hong Kong Early Child Development Scale (HKECDS), a holistic measure of child development designed specifically for preschool children in Hong Kong. Scale development was an iterative process and the first version of the scale contained 190 items whereas the final version includes only 95. Children ranging in age from three to six years were administered trial versions of the HKECDS in Studies 1 (n = 60) and 2 (n = 240). Item analyses indicated that it is a developmental scale and that it has an appropriate level of difficulty for preschool children. It also discriminates between three- to six-year-olds from different social backgrounds in Hong Kong. The final version of the HKECDS includes items from the following eight subscales: Personal, Social and Self-Care (7 items), Language Development (13 items), Pre-academic Learning (27 items), Cognitive Development (10 items), Gross Motor (12 items), Fine Motor (9 items), Physical Fitness, Health and Safety (7 items), and Self and Society (10 items). The HKECDS is the first early child development scale which considers both the holistic development of preschool children and incorporates current expectations of early child development in Hong Kong. In this era of evidence-based decision making, it can be used to evaluate both the efficacy of targeted interventions and broader child-related public policies on early child development in Hong Kong.

  14. Sound Transmission Validation and Sensitivity Studies in Numerical Models.

    PubMed

    Oberrecht, Steve P; Krysl, Petr; Cranford, Ted W

    2016-01-01

    In 1974, Norris and Harvey published an experimental study of sound transmission into the head of the bottlenose dolphin. We used this rare source of data to validate our Vibroacoustic Toolkit, an array of numerical modeling simulation tools. Norris and Harvey provided measurements of received sound pressure in various locations within the dolphin's head from a sound source that was moved around the outside of the head. Our toolkit was used to predict the curves of pressure with the best-guess input data (material properties, transducer and hydrophone locations, and geometry of the animal's head). In addition, we performed a series of sensitivity analyses (SAs). SA is concerned with understanding how input changes to the model influence the outputs. SA can enhance understanding of a complex model by finding and analyzing unexpected model behavior, discriminating which inputs have a dominant effect on particular outputs, exploring how inputs combine to affect outputs, and gaining insight as to what additional information improves the model's ability to predict. Even when a computational model does not adequately reproduce the behavior of a physical system, its sensitivities may be useful for developing inferences about key features of the physical system. Our findings may become a valuable source of information for modeling the interactions between sound and anatomy.

  15. Validation study of the Questionnaire on School Maladjustment Problems (QSMP).

    PubMed

    de la Fuente Arias, Jesús; Peralta Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Sánchez Roda, María Dolores; Trianes Torres, María Victoria

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the exploratory and confirmatory structure, as well as other psychometric properties, of the Cuestionario de Problemas de Convivencia Escolar (CPCE; in Spanish, the Questionnaire on School Maladjustment Problems [QSMP]), using a sample of Spanish adolescents. The instrument was administered to 60 secondary education teachers (53.4% females and 46.6% males) between the ages of 28 and 54 years (M= 41.2, SD= 11.5), who evaluated a total of 857 adolescent students. The first-order exploratory factor analysis identified 7 factors, explaining a total variance of 62%. A second-order factor analysis yielded three dimensions that explain 84% of the variance. A confirmatory factor analysis was subsequently performed in order to reduce the number of factors obtained in the exploratory analysis as well as the number of items. Lastly, we present the results of reliability, internal consistency, and validity indices. These results and their implications for future research and for the practice of educational guidance and intervention are discussed in the conclusions.

  16. AOAC Official MethodSM Matrix Extension Validation Study of Assurance GDSTM for the Detection of Salmonella in Selected Spices.

    PubMed

    Feldsine, Philip; Kaur, Mandeep; Shah, Khyati; Immerman, Amy; Jucker, Markus; Lienau, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Assurance GDSTM for Salmonella Tq has been validated according to the AOAC INTERNATIONAL Methods Committee Guidelines for Validation of Microbiological Methods for Food and Environmental Surfaces for the detection of selected foods and environmental surfaces (Official Method of AnalysisSM 2009.03, Performance Tested MethodSM No. 050602). The method also completed AFNOR validation (following the ISO 16140 standard) compared to the reference method EN ISO 6579. For AFNOR, GDS was given a scope covering all human food, animal feed stuff, and environmental surfaces (Certificate No. TRA02/12-01/09). Results showed that Assurance GDS for Salmonella (GDS) has high sensitivity and is equivalent to the reference culture methods for the detection of motile and non-motile Salmonella. As part of the aforementioned validations, inclusivity and exclusivity studies, stability, and ruggedness studies were also conducted. Assurance GDS has 100% inclusivity and exclusivity among the 100 Salmonella serovars and 35 non-Salmonella organisms analyzed. To add to the scope of the Assurance GDS for Salmonella method, a matrix extension study was conducted, following the AOAC guidelines, to validate the application of the method for selected spices, specifically curry powder, cumin powder, and chili powder, for the detection of Salmonella.

  17. Experimental and modeling study of forest fire effect on soil thermal conductivity

    Treesearch

    Kathleen M. Smits; Elizabeth Kirby; William J. Massman; Scott Baggett

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of soil thermal conductivity after a wildfire or controlled burn is important to land management and post-fire recovery efforts. Although soil thermal conductivity has been well studied for non-fire heated soils, comprehensive data that evaluate the long-term effect of extreme heating from a fire on the soil thermal conductivity are limited....

  18. The Predictive Validity of Preadmission Measures in Graduate Management Education: Three Years of the GMAC Validity Study Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Lawrence W.; Powers, Donald E.

    The Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) Validity Study Service was created to enable graduate schools of management to investigate the adequacy of the devices and procedures they use for selection purposes and to facilitate the accumulation and summary of data from many individual graduate management schools. Participating schools are…

  19. A Validation Study of the Dutch Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form: Factor Structure, Reliability, and Known-Groups Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thombs, Brett D.; Bernstein, David P.; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The 28-item Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form (CTQ-SF) has been translated into at least 10 different languages. The validity of translated versions of the CTQ-SF, however, has generally not been examined. The objective of this study was to investigate the factor structure, internal consistency reliability, and known-groups…

  20. Guidance for Classifying Studies Conducted Using the OECD Test Guideline 223 (TG223) (Acute Avian Oral Sequential Dose Study)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Guidance based on comparison of results from the TG223 validation studies to results from avian acute oral studies previously submitted to EPA for two test chemicals following EPA's 850.2100 (public draft) guidelines.

  1. Validation of the prognostic burn index: a nationwide retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Takashi; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2015-09-01

    The burn index (BI=full thickness total burn surface area [TBSA]+1/2 partial thickness TBSA) and prognostic burn index (PBI=BI+age) are clinically used particularly in Japan. However, few studies evaluated the validation of PBI with large sample size. We retrospectively investigated the relationships between PBI and mortality among burn patients using data from a nationwide database. Data of all burn patients with burn index ≥1 were extracted from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) inpatient database from 1 July 2010 to 31 March 2013 (17,185 patients in 1044 hospitals). The primary endpoint was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Overall in-hospital mortality was 5.9% (1011/17,185). Mortality increased significantly as the PBI increased (Mantel-Haenszel trend test, P<0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for PBI was 0.90 (95%CI, 0.90-0.91), and a PBI above a threshold of 85 showed the highest association with in-hospital mortality. Logistic regression analysis showed that PBI≥85 (odds ratio (OR), 14.6; 95%CI, 12.1-17.6), inhalation injury with mechanical ventilation (OR, 13.0; 95%CI, 10.8-15.7), Charlson Comorbidity Index≥2 (OR, 1.8; 95%CI, 1.5-2.3), and male gender (OR, 1.5; 95%CI, 1.3-1.8) were significant independent risk factors for death. Our study suggested that a PBI above a threshold of 85 was significantly associated with mortality. The PBI and mechanical ventilation were the most significant factors predicting in-hospital mortality, after adjustment for inhalation injury, comorbidity, and gender. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Measuring humeral head translation using fluoroscopy: a validation study.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Jun G; Karduna, Andrew R

    2010-03-03

    Numerous techniques have been employed to monitor humeral head translation due to its involvement with several shoulder pathologies. However, most of the techniques were not validated. The objective of this study is to compare the accuracy of manual digitization and contour registration in measuring superior translation of the humeral head. Eight pairs of cadaver scapulae and humerii bones were harvested for this study. Each scapula and humerus was secured in a customized jig that allowed for control of humeral head translations and a vise that permitted rotations of the scapula about three axes. Fluoroscopy was used to take images of the shoulder bones. Scapular orientation was manipulated in different positions while the humerus was at 90 degrees of humeral elevation in the scapular plane. Humeral head translation was measured using the two methods and was compared to the known translation. Additionally, accuracy of the contour registration method to measure 2-D scapular rotations was assessed. The range for the root mean square (RMS) error for manual digitization method was 0.27 mm-0.43 mm and the contour registration method had a RMS error ranging from 0.18 mm-0.40 mm. In addition, the RMS error for the scapular angle rotation using the contour registration method was 2.4 degrees . Both methods showed acceptable errors. However, on average, the contour registration method showed lesser measurement error compared to the manual digitization method. In addition, the contour registration method was able to show good accuracy in measuring rotation that is useful in 2-D image analysis.

  3. Validation study of the Medication Adherence Rating Scale. Results from the FACE-SZ national dataset.

    PubMed

    Fond, Guillaume; Boyer, Laurent; Boucekine, Mohamed; Aden, Latif A; Schürhoff, Franck; Tessier, Arnaud; Andrianarisoa, Meja; Berna, Fabrice; Brunel, Lore; Capdevielle, Delphine; Chereau, Isabelle; Mallet, Jasmina; Denizot, Hélène; Dorey, Jean Michel; Dubertret, Caroline; Dubreucq, Julien; Faget, Catherine; Gabayet, Franck; Rey, Romain; Richieri, Raphaelle; Passerieux, Christine; Schandrin, Aurélie; Urbach, Mathieu; Vidailhet, Pierre; Llorca, Pierre Michel; Misdrahi, David

    2017-04-01

    The Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) is one of the most widely used measurements of adherence in schizophrenia (SZ). However, the data available regarding its psychometric properties are scarce. The aim of this study was to provide new data regarding the psychometric properties of the MARS in a multicenter community-dwelling sample of SZ patients. This study was conducted in the French National network of the 10 FondaMental Expert Centers for SZ. The MARS was tested for construct validity, reliability, external validity and acceptability. In addition, data pertaining to sociodemographic information, clinical characteristics using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Scale to Assess Unawareness in Mental Disorder (SUMD), the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDRS) and therapeutic adherence using the Brief Adherence Rating Scale (BARS) were collected. Three hundred and nineteen patients were included. The 3-factor structure of the MARS was confirmed using confirmatory factor analysis: RMSEA=0.05, CFI=0.95, and WRMR=0.88. The unidimensionality of each factor was supported by the satisfactory INFIT statistics. Item internal consistencies were all higher than 0.15 and the Kuder-Richardson were close to 0.6, except for factor 2, which was close to 0.5. Significant associations with BARS, PANSS, CDRS showed satisfactory external validity. The acceptability was excellent as all patients complete the MARS, without missing values. The MARS is a short self-administered instrument with acceptable psychometric properties that yields important information about adherence to pharmacological treatment. Some improvements might be considered to enhance its validity and reliability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Psychometric instrumentation: reliability and validity of instruments used for clinical practice, evidence-based practice projects and research studies.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Ann M

    2015-01-01

    It is important for CNSs and other APNs to consider the reliability and validity of instruments chosen for clinical practice, evidence-based practice projects, or research studies. Psychometric testing uses specific research methods to evaluate the amount of error associated with any particular instrument. Reliability estimates explain more about how well the instrument is designed, whereas validity estimates explain more about scores that are produced by the instrument. An instrument may be architecturally sound overall (reliable), but the same instrument may not be valid. For example, if a specific group does not understand certain well-constructed items, then the instrument does not produce valid scores when used with that group. Many instrument developers may conduct reliability testing only once, yet continue validity testing in different populations over many years. All CNSs should be advocating for the use of reliable instruments that produce valid results. Clinical nurse specialists may find themselves in situations where reliability and validity estimates for some instruments that are being utilized are unknown. In such cases, CNSs should engage key stakeholders to sponsor nursing researchers to pursue this most important work.

  5. Development and validation of algorithms for heart failure patient care: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Cynthia Priyadarshini; Ranga, Asri; Joseph, Kevin Louis; Tangiisuran, Balamurugan

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Although heart failure (HF) management is available at primary and secondary care facilities in Malaysia, the optimisation of drug therapy is still suboptimal. Although pharmacists can help bridge the gap in optimising HF therapy, pharmacists in Malaysia currently do not manage and titrate HF pharmacotherapy. The aim of this study was to develop treatment algorithms and monitoring protocols for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta-blockers and spironolactone based on extensive literature review for validation and utilisation by pharmacists involved in HF management. METHODS A Delphi survey involving 32 panellists from private and government hospitals that provide cardiac services in Malaysia was conducted to obtain a consensus of opinion on the treatment protocols. The panellists completed two rounds of self-administered questionnaires to determine their level of agreement with all the components in the protocols. RESULTS Consensus was achieved for most of the sections of the protocols for the four classes of drugs. The panellists’ opinions were taken into consideration when amending the components of the protocols that did not achieve consensus of opinion. Full consensus was achieved with the second survey conducted, enabling the finalisation of the drug titration protocols. CONCLUSION The resulting validated HF titration protocols can be used as a guide for pharmacists when recommending the initiation and titration of HF drug therapy in daily clinical practice. Recommendations should be made in collaboration with the patient’s treating physician, with concomitant monitoring of the patient’s response to the drugs. PMID:25532514

  6. Alaska North Slope Tundra Travel Model and Validation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Harry R. Bader; Jacynthe Guimond

    2006-03-01

    of variability in snow depth cover throughout the period of field experimentation. The amount of change in disturbance indicators was greater in the tundra communities of the Foothills than in those of the Coastal Plain. However the overall level of change in both community types was less than expected. In Coastal Plain communities, ground hardness and snow slab thickness were found to play an important role in change in active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. In the Foothills communities, snow cover had the most influence on active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. Once certain minimum thresholds for ground hardness, snow slab thickness, and snow depth were attained, it appeared that little or no additive effect was realized regarding increased resistance to disturbance in the tundra communities studied. DNR used the results of this modeling project to set a standard for maximum permissible disturbance of cross-country tundra travel, with the threshold set below the widely accepted standard of Low Disturbance levels (as determined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service). DNR followed the modeling project with a validation study, which seemed to support the field trial conclusions and indicated that the standard set for maximum permissible disturbance exhibits a conservative bias in favor of environmental protection. Finally DNR established a quick and efficient tool for visual estimations of disturbance to determine when investment in field measurements is warranted. This Visual Assessment System (VAS) seemed to support the plot disturbance measurements taking during the modeling and validation phases of this project.

  7. Construct Validity of the GRE Aptitude Test across Populations--An Empirical Confirmatory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, D. A.; And Others

    The study evaluated the invariance of the construct validity and thus the interpretation of Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) Aptitude Test scores. A systematic procedure for investigation of test bias from a construct validity frame of reference was developed and applied. Invariant construct validity was defined as similar patterns of loadings…

  8. Study on the Validity and Reliability of Melbourne Decision Making Scale in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çolakkadioglu, Oguzhan; Deniz, M. Engin

    2015-01-01

    This study is to analyze the validity and reliability of Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire (MDMQ). The sample consisted of 650 university students. The structural validity of the MDMQ, as well as correlations among its sub-scales, measure-bound validity, internal consistency, item total correlations and test-retest reliability coefficients…

  9. Novel Automated Morphometric and Kinematic Handwriting Assessment: A Validity Study in Children with ASD and ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirlikov, Benjamin; Younes, Laurent; Nebel, Mary Beth; Martinelli, Mary Katherine; Tiedemann, Alyssa Nicole; Koch, Carolyn A.; Fiorilli, Diana; Bastian, Amy J.; Denckla, Martha Bridge; Miller, Michael I.; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2017-01-01

    This study presents construct validity for a novel automated morphometric and kinematic handwriting assessment, including (1) convergent validity, establishing reliability of automated measures with traditional manual-derived Minnesota Handwriting Assessment (MHA), and (2) discriminant validity, establishing that the automated methods distinguish…

  10. A Validation Study of the Thinking Styles Inventory: Implications for Gifted Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dai, David Yun; Feldhusen, John F.

    1999-01-01

    A study involving 96 gifted adolescents examined internal and external validity of the Thinking Styles Inventory (TSI) within the framework of Sternberg's (1988) theory of mental self-government. Results provided evidence of the external discriminant validity but lent only partial support to the internal validity of the instrument. (Author/CR)

  11. Propeller aircraft interior noise model utilization study and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    Utilization and validation of a computer program designed for aircraft interior noise prediction is considered. The program, entitled PAIN (an acronym for Propeller Aircraft Interior Noise), permits (in theory) predictions of sound levels inside propeller driven aircraft arising from sidewall transmission. The objective of the work reported was to determine the practicality of making predictions for various airplanes and the extent of the program's capabilities. The ultimate purpose was to discern the quality of predictions for tonal levels inside an aircraft occurring at the propeller blade passage frequency and its harmonics. The effort involved three tasks: (1) program validation through comparisons of predictions with scale-model test results; (2) development of utilization schemes for large (full scale) fuselages; and (3) validation through comparisons of predictions with measurements taken in flight tests on a turboprop aircraft. Findings should enable future users of the program to efficiently undertake and correctly interpret predictions.

  12. The Conduct of Drug Metabolism Studies Considered Good Practice (I): Analytical Systems and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaodong; Jia, Lee

    2009-01-01

    This review serial outlines practical and scientifically-based approaches to conducting contemporary drug metabolism studies considered good practice for drug development and regulatory filing. The present part addresses analytical methods used in the drug metabolism studies and evaluates advantages and disadvantages of these methods as well as the related sample preparations. The methods described here cover from conventional radioactive labeling of drugs, which includes selection of a proper radioisotope, its labeling position, and modern radio-pharmacokinetics employed in microdosing by using a radionuclide to visualize drug distribution in vivo, to currently widely-used liquid chromatography (LC) in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for quantitative detection of metabolites and characterization of their structures. Although the analytical tools have progressed sufficiently to allow determination of metabolites, proper in vitro models and in vivo studies have to be carefully designed in order to understand drug metabolism. Points for consideration when conducting in vivo drug metabolism studies include interspecies differences in systemic exposure and metabolism pathways, identification of the major metabolites and unique human metabolites that become the regulatory focus, local metabolism in addition to liver metabolism, time points for sampling, and synthesis of the authentic metabolites to confirm their formation. The next part of this serial article will focus on in vitro drug metabolism studies. PMID:18220562

  13. Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-07-01

    Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron

  14. Data handling and validation from Wisconsin's remote vehicle emissions sensing studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendahl, Craig S.

    1995-05-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and Department of Transportation (WDOT) are conducting a joint study to determine the effectiveness of applying optical sensing techniques to vehicular emission monitoring. Two field studies using Remote Sensing Technologies, Inc. remote sensing equipment was conducted in 1993 and 1994. This paper describes the data handling and data validation activities of these studies, including identification of data elements. Data handling was performed by the same people who conducted the 180,000 vehicle emissions tests. A contemporary commercial spreadsheet from Borland International, Inc. was used to import the raw data from the remote sensor. The data was reviewed with the spreadsheet then moved into a Borland relational database product. The relational database permitted structured queries against databases of vehicle inspection/maintenance (I/M) data from WDOT, National Insurance Crime Bureau, and EnviroTest. We determined effective cut points for vehicles of different ages which delineated high-polluting vehicles (gross emitters) from vehicles in compliance. The I/M data was also used to intercompare the remote sensing results with traditional testing results. Remote sensing test results were then compared for errors of commission and omission with respect to I/M test. Ultimately, this remote sensing database technique could serve as a means for identifying gross emitters who would be required to visit an I/M facility for an out-of-cycle emissions test.

  15. Lessons Learned from CFD Validation Study of Protuberance Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Brandon; Blaisdell, Greogory

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this presentation are: (1) Share lessons learned from a recent exercise in CFD validation of protuberance heating (2) Impact of experimental data reduction assumptions and techniques on validation activity (3) Advanced data reduction techniques may provide useful data from non-typical test methods (4) Significance of the recovery factor for high-speed flows (5) Show typical results of the Lag turbulence model on protuberances (6) Introduce and inform the listener of a protuberance heating dataset which will soon be available for comparison

  16. Simulation verification techniques study. Subsystem simulation validation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, L. M.; Reddell, J. P.; Schoonmaker, P. B.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques for validation of software modules which simulate spacecraft onboard systems are discussed. An overview of the simulation software hierarchy for a shuttle mission simulator is provided. A set of guidelines for the identification of subsystem/module performance parameters and critical performance parameters are presented. Various sources of reference data to serve as standards of performance for simulation validation are identified. Environment, crew station, vehicle configuration, and vehicle dynamics simulation software are briefly discussed from the point of view of their interfaces with subsystem simulation modules. A detailed presentation of results in the area of vehicle subsystems simulation modules is included. A list of references, conclusions and recommendations are also given.

  17. A Collection of Studies Conducted in Education about "Global Warming" Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozdogan, Aykut Emre

    2011-01-01

    The studies global warming problem conducted in education discipline in the world and in Turkey were analysed for this study. The literature was reviewed extensively especially through the articles in the indexed journals of Ebsco Host, Science Direct, Taylor and Francis and Web of Science databases and this study was conducted according to the…

  18. 41 CFR 101-5.104-6 - Conduct of feasibility studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... studies. 101-5.104-6 Section 101-5.104-6 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... FEDERAL BUILDINGS AND COMPLEXES 5.1-General § 101-5.104-6 Conduct of feasibility studies. An initial... and detailed procedures to be followed in the conduct of each feasibility study. Arrangements will...

  19. 41 CFR 101-5.104-6 - Conduct of feasibility studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... studies. 101-5.104-6 Section 101-5.104-6 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... FEDERAL BUILDINGS AND COMPLEXES 5.1-General § 101-5.104-6 Conduct of feasibility studies. An initial... and detailed procedures to be followed in the conduct of each feasibility study. Arrangements will...

  20. 41 CFR 101-5.104-6 - Conduct of feasibility studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... studies. 101-5.104-6 Section 101-5.104-6 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... FEDERAL BUILDINGS AND COMPLEXES 5.1-General § 101-5.104-6 Conduct of feasibility studies. An initial... and detailed procedures to be followed in the conduct of each feasibility study. Arrangements will...