Science.gov

Sample records for variable mass systems

  1. Dynamics of Variable Mass Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eke, Fidelis O.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the effects of mass loss on the attitude behavior of spinning bodies in flight. The principal goal is to determine whether there are circumstances under which the motion of variable mass systems can become unstable in the sense that their transverse angular velocities become unbounded. Obviously, results from a study of this kind would find immediate application in the aerospace field. The first part of this study features a complete and mathematically rigorous derivation of a set of equations that govern both the translational and rotational motions of general variable mass systems. The remainder of the study is then devoted to the application of the equations obtained to a systematic investigation of the effect of various mass loss scenarios on the dynamics of increasingly complex models of variable mass systems. It is found that mass loss can have a major impact on the dynamics of mechanical systems, including a possible change in the systems stability picture. Factors such as nozzle geometry, combustion chamber geometry, propellant's initial shape, size and relative mass, and propellant location can all have important influences on the system's dynamic behavior. The relative importance of these parameters on-system motion are quantified in a way that is useful for design purposes.

  2. Atwood's Machine as a Tool to Introduce Variable Mass Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Sousa, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses an instructional strategy which explores eventual similarities and/or analogies between familiar problems and more sophisticated systems. In this context, the Atwood's machine problem is used to introduce students to more complex problems involving ropes and chains. The methodology proposed helps students to develop the…

  3. Atwood's machine as a tool to introduce variable mass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, Célia A.

    2012-03-01

    This article discusses an instructional strategy which explores eventual similarities and/or analogies between familiar problems and more sophisticated systems. In this context, the Atwood's machine problem is used to introduce students to more complex problems involving ropes and chains. The methodology proposed helps students to develop the ability needed to apply relevant concepts in situations not previously encountered. The pedagogical advantages are relevant for both secondary and high school students, showing that, through adequate examples, the question of the validity of Newton's second law may even be introduced to introductory level students.

  4. Mass extinction in a dynamical system of evolution with variable dimension.

    PubMed

    Tokita, K; Yasutomi, A

    1999-07-01

    Introducing the effect of extinction into the so-called replicator equations in mathematical biology, we construct a general model where the diversity of species, i.e., the dimension of the equation, is a time-dependent variable. The system shows very different behavior from the original replicator equation, and leads to mass extinction when the system initially has high diversity. The present theory can serve as a mathematical foundation for the paleontologic theory for mass extinction. This extinction dynamics is a prototype of dynamical systems where the variable dimension is inevitable.

  5. Falling Chains as Variable-Mass Systems: Theoretical Model and Experimental Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Sousa, Celia A.; Gordo, Paulo M.; Costa, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit, theoretically and experimentally, the fall of a folded U-chain and of a pile-chain. The model calculation implies the division of the whole system into two subsystems of variable mass, allowing us to explore the role of tensional contact forces at the boundary of the subsystems. This justifies, for instance, that the…

  6. A three-mass tethered system for micro-g/variable-g applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a Space-Station attached tethered system for micro-g/variable-g applications. The system consists of three platforms: the Space Station, an end mass anchored at the end of a 10 km long kevlar tether and a micro-g/variable-g laboratory with the capability of crawling along the tether. Control strategies are devised for performing both the deployment and the station-keeping maneuvers of the system. Effective algorithms are identified for damping out the major vibrational modes.

  7. The dynamical mass of a classical Cepheid variable star in an eclipsing binary system.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyński, G; Thompson, I B; Gieren, W; Graczyk, D; Bono, G; Udalski, A; Soszyński, I; Minniti, D; Pilecki, B

    2010-11-25

    Stellar pulsation theory provides a means of determining the masses of pulsating classical Cepheid supergiants-it is the pulsation that causes their luminosity to vary. Such pulsational masses are found to be smaller than the masses derived from stellar evolution theory: this is the Cepheid mass discrepancy problem, for which a solution is missing. An independent, accurate dynamical mass determination for a classical Cepheid variable star (as opposed to type-II Cepheids, low-mass stars with a very different evolutionary history) in a binary system is needed in order to determine which is correct. The accuracy of previous efforts to establish a dynamical Cepheid mass from Galactic single-lined non-eclipsing binaries was typically about 15-30% (refs 6, 7), which is not good enough to resolve the mass discrepancy problem. In spite of many observational efforts, no firm detection of a classical Cepheid in an eclipsing double-lined binary has hitherto been reported. Here we report the discovery of a classical Cepheid in a well detached, double-lined eclipsing binary in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We determine the mass to a precision of 1% and show that it agrees with its pulsation mass, providing strong evidence that pulsation theory correctly and precisely predicts the masses of classical Cepheids.

  8. Earth System Data Records of Mass Transport from Time-Variable Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnicki, V.; Talpe, M.; Nerem, R. S.; Landerer, F. W.; Watkins, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite measurements of time variable gravity have revolutionized the study of Earth, by measuring the ice losses of Greenland, Antarctica and land glaciers, changes in groundwater including unsustainable losses due to extraction of groundwater, the mass and currents of the oceans and their redistribution during El Niño events, among other findings. Satellite measurements of gravity have been made primarily by four techniques: satellite tracking from land stations using either lasers or Doppler radio systems, satellite positioning by GNSS/GPS, satellite to satellite tracking over distances of a few hundred km using microwaves, and through a gravity gradiometer (radar altimeters also measure the gravity field, but over the oceans only). We discuss the challenges in the measurement of gravity by different instruments, especially time-variable gravity. A special concern is how to bridge a possible gap in time between the end of life of the current GRACE satellite pair, launched in 2002, and a future GRACE Follow-On pair to be launched in 2017. One challenge in combining data from different measurement systems consists of their different spatial and temporal resolutions and the different ways in which they alias short time scale signals. Typically satellite measurements of gravity are expressed in spherical harmonic coefficients (although expansions in terms of 'mascons', the masses of small spherical caps, has certain advantages). Taking advantage of correlations among spherical harmonic coefficients described by empirical orthogonal functions and derived from GRACE data it is possible to localize the otherwise coarse spatial resolution of the laser and Doppler derived gravity models. This presentation discusses the issues facing a climate data record of time variable mass flux using these different data sources, including its validation.

  9. Variability of mass-size relationships in tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Emmanuel; Leroy, Delphine; Delanoë, Julien; Dupuy, Régis; Lilie, Lyle; Strapp, Walter; Protat, Alain; Schwarzenböeck, Alfons

    2015-04-01

    The mass of individual ice hydrometeors in Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) has been investigated in the past using different methods in order to retrieve power law type mass-size relationships m(D) with m = α D^β. This study focuses on the variability of mass-size relationships in different types of MCS. Three types of tropical MCS were sampled during different airborne campaigns: (i) continental MCS during the West African monsoon (Megha-Tropique 2010), (ii) oceanic MCS over the Indian Ocean (Megha-Tropique 2011), and (iii) coastal MCS during the North-Australian monsoon (HAIC-HIWC). Mass-size relationships of ice hydrometeors are derived from a combined analysis of particle images from 2D-array probes and associated reflectivity factors measured with a Doppler cloud radar (94GHz) on the same research aircraft. A theoretical study of numerous hydrometeor shapes simulated in 3D and arbitrarily projected on a 2D plan allowed to constrain the exponent β of the m(D) relationship as a function of the derived surface-diameter relationship S(D), which is likewise written as a power law. Since S(D) always can be determined for real data from 2D optical array probes or other particle imagers, the evolution of the m(D) exponent β can be calculated along the flight trajectory. Then the pre-factor α of m(D) is constrained from theoretical simulations of the radar reflectivity factor matching the measured reflectivity factor along the aircraft trajectory. Finally, the Condensed Water Content (CWC) is deduced from measured particle size distributions (PSD) and retrieved m(D) relationships along the flight trajectory. Solely for the HAIC-HIWC campaign (North Australian Monsoon) a bulk reference measurement (IKP instrument) of high CWC could be performed in order to compare with the above described CWC deduced from ice hydrometeor images and reflectivity factors. Both CWC are coherent. Mean profiles of m(D) coefficients, PSD, and CWC are calculated as a function of the

  10. Video analysis of sliding chains: A dynamic model based on variable-mass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, R.; Page, A.; Riera, J.; Hueso, J. L.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the dynamics of a chain sliding off of a table, using video analysis to test a theoretical model. The model consists of two variable-mass subsystems, with friction between the chain and the table and assumes that all links move at the same speed. In order to check the model, the chain position x(t) is obtained using video analysis. The smoothed function x(t) and its derivatives v(t) and a(t) are numerically computed using a local regression algorithm. In this way, the differential equation governing the motion can be directly tested, instead of comparing the position with the solution of the differential equation. Our procedure is very sensitive to deviations between the model and reality, so we can detect the point at which the chain ceases to be in tension and the model is no longer valid. This experiment shows students the limitations of simplified models and offers an opportunity to assess a model's range of validity.

  11. The initial mass function of stars: evidence for uniformity in variable systems.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Pavel

    2002-01-04

    The distribution of stellar masses that form in one star formation event in a given volume of space is called the initial mass function (IMF). The IMF has been estimated from low-mass brown dwarfs to very massive stars. Combining IMF estimates for different populations in which the stars can be observed individually unveils an extraordinary uniformity of the IMF. This general insight appears to hold for populations including present-day star formation in small molecular clouds, rich and dense massive star-clusters forming in giant clouds, through to ancient and metal-poor exotic stellar populations that may be dominated by dark matter. This apparent universality of the IMF is a challenge for star formation theory, because elementary considerations suggest that the IMF ought to systematically vary with star-forming conditions.

  12. DEEP, LOW MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. XIII. DZ PISCIUM WITH INTRINSIC LIGHT VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.-G.; Dai, H.-F.; Qian, S.-B.; Soonthornthum, B. E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn

    2013-08-01

    New multi-color photometry for the eclipsing binary DZ Psc was performed in 2011 and 2012 using the 85 cm telescope at the Xinglong Station of the National Astronomical Observatories of China. Using the updated Wilson-Devinney (W-D) code, we deduced two sets of photometric solutions. The overcontact degree is f = 89.7({+-} 1.0)%, identifying DZ Psc as a deep, low mass ratio overcontact binary. The asymmetric light curves (i.e., LC{sub 2} in 2012) were modeled by a hot spot on the primary star. Based on all of the available light minimum times, we discovered that the orbital period of DZ Psc may be undergoing a secular period increase with a cyclic variation. The modulated period and semi-amplitude of this oscillation are P{sub mod} = 11.89({+-} 0.19) yr and A = 0.0064({+-} 0.0006) days, which may be possibly attributed to either cyclic magnetic activity or light-time effect due to the third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt=+7.43({+-}0.17) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}, which may be interpreted as conserved mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With mass transferring, DZ Psc will finally merge into a rapid-rotation single star when J{sub spin}/J{sub orb} > 1/3.

  13. Mass transfer cycles in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, A. R.; Frank, J.; Kolb, U.; Ritter, H.

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that in cataclysmic variables the mass transfer rate must fluctuate about the evolutionary mean on timescales too long to be directly observable. We show that limit-cycle behavior can occur if the radius change of the secondary star is sensitive to the instantaneous mass transfer rate. The only reasonable way in which such a dependence can arise is through irradiation of this star by the accreting component. The system oscillates between high states, in which irradiation causes slow expansion of the secondary and drives an elevated transfer rate, and low states, in which this star contracts.

  14. Comprehensive theory of the Deans' switch as a variable flow splitter: fluid mechanics, mass balance, and system behavior.

    PubMed

    Boeker, Peter; Leppert, Jan; Mysliwietz, Bodo; Lammers, Peter Schulze

    2013-10-01

    The Deans' switch is an effluent switching device based on controlling flows of carrier gas instead of mechanical valves in the analytical flow path. This technique offers high inertness and a wear-free operation. Recently new monolithic microfluidic devices have become available. In these devices the whole flow system is integrated into a small metal device with low thermal mass and leak-tight connections. In contrast to a mechanical valve-based system, a flow-controlled system is more difficult to calculate. Usually the Deans' switch is used to switch one inlet to one of two outlets, by means of two auxiliary flows. However, the Deans' switch can also be used to deliver the GC effluent with a specific split ratio to both outlets. The calculation of the split ratio of the inlet flow to the two outlets is challenging because of the asymmetries of the flow resistances. This is especially the case, if one of the outlets is a vacuum device, such as a mass spectrometer, and the other an atmospheric detector, e.g. a flame ionization detector (FID) or an olfactory (sniffing) port. The capillary flows in gas chromatography are calculated with the Hagen-Poiseuille equation of the laminar, isothermal and compressible flow in circular tubes. The flow resistances in the new microfluidic devices have to be calculated with the corresponding equation for rectangular cross-section microchannels. The Hagen-Poiseuille equation underestimates the flow to a vacuum outlet. A corrected equation originating from the theory of rarefied flows is presented. The calculation of pressures and flows of a Deans' switch based chromatographic system is done by the solution of mass balances. A specific challenge is the consideration of the antidiffusion resistor between the two auxiliary gas lines of the Deans' switch. A full solution for the calculation of the Deans' switch including this restrictor is presented. Results from validation measurements are in good accordance with the developed

  15. Variable contour securing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebus, P. P.; Packer, P. N.; Haynie, C. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A variable contour securing system has a retaining structure for a member whose surface contains a variable contour. The retaining mechanism includes a spaced array of adjustable spindles mounted on a housing. Each spindle has a base member support cup at one end. A vacuum source is applied to the cups for seating the member adjacent to the cups. A locking mechanism sets the spindles in a predetermined position once the member has been secured to the spindle support cups.

  16. Flow of sand and a variable mass Atwood machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, José; Solovey, Guillermo; Gil, Salvador

    2003-07-01

    We discuss a simple and inexpensive apparatus that lets us measure the instantaneous flow rate of granular media, such as sand, in real time. The measurements allow us to elucidate the phenomenological laws that govern the flow of granular media through an aperture. We use this apparatus to construct a variable mass system and study the motion of an Atwood machine with one weight changing in time in a controlled manner. The study illustrates Newton's second law for variable mass systems and lets us investigate the dependence of the flow rate on acceleration.

  17. Variable reluctance drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Lipo, T.A.; Liang, F.

    1995-10-17

    A variable reluctance drive system including a motor and corresponding converter for improved current commutation is described. The motor incorporates a salient pole rotor and a salient pole stator having one or more full pitch windings which operate by mutual inductance to transfer the current from the active short pitch winding following phase alignment. This increases output torque and/or speed and permits a number of simple and economical converter circuits. 17 figs.

  18. A control strategy for adaptive absorber based on variable mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qiang; Han, Ning; Zhao, Yanqing; Duan, Chendong; Wang, Wanqin

    2015-07-01

    The tuned vibration absorber (TVA) has been an effective tool for vibration control. However, the application of TVA can cause resonance of the primary system and increase its vibration when the absorber is mistuned. In this paper, a novel control strategy based on adaptive tuned vibration absorber (ATVA) of variable mass is proposed to reduce the resonance of the primary system. Unlike most ATVAs suggested by other researchers which adjust the absorber natural frequency by changing the stiffness, the variable mass ATVA varies its natural frequency by changing absorber mass to match the excitation frequency. Some simulations and experiments were conducted to test the performance of the control strategy. The results show that the proposed control plan can widen the frequency bandwidth of the absorber, as well as suppress the resonance of the primary system significantly. This implies that the work is useful for practical applications of ATVA.

  19. Variable camshaft timing system

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, R.P.; Smith, F.R.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes an improvement in a variable camshaft timing system for an internal combustion engine having intake and exhaust valves and a camshaft for each of the intake and exhaust valves, an intake sprocket and an exhaust sprocket keyed to their respective camshaft, only one of the camshafts being directly driven by an engine crankshaft, and a timing chain engaging both sprockets. The improvement comprising a single bracket carrying at least one idler sprocket engaging the timing chain, the bracket being mounted for movement to alter the timing relationship between the intake and exhaust sprockets.

  20. Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2005-12-06

    Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

  1. Variable camshaft timing system

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza, S.J.

    1988-05-17

    A variable camshaft timing system in combination with an internal combustion engine having at least one cylinder, a rotatable member such as a crankshaft, and an intake and exhaust valve coupled to an intake camshaft and an exhaust camshaft respectively, the system is described comprising: a pulley wheel fixedly attached at one end of each of the intake and exhaust camshafts and the crankshaft; belt means interconnecting each of the pulley wheels for transferring rotational motion from the crankshaft to the intake and exhaust camshafts; first and second idler arm means pivotally attached to the engine, each of the idler arm means having a pivoting arm, a cam follower arm and an idler wheel in operative contact with the belt means; positioning cam means operatively coupled to each of the cam follower arms of the idler arm means; a control means responsive to various engine operating parameters for generating motor control signals; and electric motor means responsive to the motor control signals and operatively coupled to rotate the positioning cams means for positioning each of the idler arm means for changing the relative rotational position between the input camshaft and the exhaust camshaft.

  2. Mode Selection Techniques in Variable Mass Flexible Body Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiocho, Leslie J.; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Frenkel, David; Huynh, An

    2010-01-01

    In developing a flexible body spacecraft simulation for the Launch Abort System of the Orion vehicle, when a rapid mass depletion takes place, the dynamics problem with time varying eigenmodes had to be addressed. Three different techniques were implemented, with different trade-offs made between performance and fidelity. A number of technical issues had to be solved in the process. This paper covers the background of the variable mass flexibility problem, the three approaches to simulating it, and the technical issues that were solved in formulating and implementing them.

  3. Variability in properties of Salado Mass Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Harrington, P.T.; Hansen, F.D.

    1995-08-01

    Salado Mass Concrete (SMC) has been developed for use as a seal component in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This concrete is intended to be mixed from pre-bagged materials, have an initial slump of 10 in., and remain pumpable and placeable for two hours after mixing. It is a mass concrete because it will be placed in monoliths large enough that the heat generated during cement hydration has the potential to cause thermal expansion and subsequent cracking, a phenomenon to avoid in the seal system. This report describes effects on concrete properties of changes in ratio of water to cement, batch size, and variations in characteristics of different lots of individual components of the concrete. The research demonstrates that the concrete can be prepared from laboratory-batched or pre-bagged dry materials in batches from 1.5 ft{sup 3} to 5.0 yd{sup 3}, with no chemical admixtures other than the sodium chloride added to improve bonding with the host rock, at a water-to-cement ratio ranging from 0.36 to 0.42. All batches prepared according to established procedures had adequate workability for at least 1.5 hours, and achieved or exceeded the target compressive strength of 4500 psi at 180 days after casting. Portland cement and fly ash from different lots or sources did not have a measurable effect on concrete properties, but variations in a shrinkage-compensating cement used as a component of the concrete did appear to affect workability. A low initial temperature and the water-reducing and set-retarding functions of the salt are critical to meeting target properties.

  4. Finescale Water-Mass Variability from ARGO Profiling Floats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Finescale Water -Mass Variability from ARGO Profiling...assessment of water -mass (aka thermohaline or spice) variability as a measure of stirring along isopycnals, as well as density ratio Rρ statistics, from the...global ARGO profiling float data set. APPROACH For the water -mass analysis, the profile data is transformed onto σθ density coordinates

  5. Modeling and Simulation of Variable Mass, Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobbe, Patrick A.; Matras, Alex L.; Wilson, Heath E.

    2009-01-01

    The advent of the new Ares I launch vehicle has highlighted the need for advanced dynamic analysis tools for variable mass, flexible structures. This system is composed of interconnected flexible stages or components undergoing rapid mass depletion through the consumption of solid or liquid propellant. In addition to large rigid body configuration changes, the system simultaneously experiences elastic deformations. In most applications, the elastic deformations are compatible with linear strain-displacement relationships and are typically modeled using the assumed modes technique. The deformation of the system is approximated through the linear combination of the products of spatial shape functions and generalized time coordinates. Spatial shape functions are traditionally composed of normal mode shapes of the system or even constraint modes and static deformations derived from finite element models of the system. Equations of motion for systems undergoing coupled large rigid body motion and elastic deformation have previously been derived through a number of techniques [1]. However, in these derivations, the mode shapes or spatial shape functions of the system components were considered constant. But with the Ares I vehicle, the structural characteristics of the system are changing with the mass of the system. Previous approaches to solving this problem involve periodic updates to the spatial shape functions or interpolation between shape functions based on system mass or elapsed mission time. These solutions often introduce misleading or even unstable numerical transients into the system. Plus, interpolation on a shape function is not intuitive. This paper presents an approach in which the shape functions are held constant and operate on the changing mass and stiffness matrices of the vehicle components. Each vehicle stage or component finite element model is broken into dry structure and propellant models. A library of propellant models is used to describe the

  6. Doubling down on peptide phosphorylation as a variable mass modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some mass spectrometrists believe that searching for variable post-translational modifications like phosphorylation of serine or threonine when using database-search algorithms to interpret peptide tandem mass spectra will increase false positive rates. The basis for this is the premise that the al...

  7. A variable acceleration calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas H.

    2011-12-01

    A variable acceleration calibration system that applies loads using gravitational and centripetal acceleration serves as an alternative, efficient and cost effective method for calibrating internal wind tunnel force balances. Two proof-of-concept variable acceleration calibration systems are designed, fabricated and tested. The NASA UT-36 force balance served as the test balance for the calibration experiments. The variable acceleration calibration systems are shown to be capable of performing three component calibration experiments with an approximate applied load error on the order of 1% of the full scale calibration loads. Sources of error are indentified using experimental design methods and a propagation of uncertainty analysis. Three types of uncertainty are indentified for the systems and are attributed to prediction error, calibration error and pure error. Angular velocity uncertainty is shown to be the largest indentified source of prediction error. The calibration uncertainties using a production variable acceleration based system are shown to be potentially equivalent to current methods. The production quality system can be realized using lighter materials and a more precise instrumentation. Further research is needed to account for balance deflection, forcing effects due to vibration, and large tare loads. A gyroscope measurement technique is shown to be capable of resolving the balance deflection angle calculation. Long term research objectives include a demonstration of a six degree of freedom calibration, and a large capacity balance calibration.

  8. On the White Dwarf Mass Problem of Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei-Min; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Recent observations show that white dwarfs (WDs) in cataclysmic variables (CVs) have an average mass significantly higher than isolated WDs and WDs in post-common envelope binaries (PCEBs), which are thought to be the progenitors of CVs. This suggests that either the WDs have grown in mass during the PCEB/CV evolution or the binaries with low-mass WDs are unable to evolve to be CVs. In this paper, we calculate the evolution of accreting WD binaries with updated hydrogen accumulation efficiency and angular momentum loss (AML) prescriptions. We show that thermal-timescale mass transfer is not effective in changing the average WD mass distribution. The WD mass discrepancy is most likely related to unstable mass transfer in WD binaries, in which an efficient mechanism of AML is required.

  9. Survey of Mass Storage Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    software that Pre- cision Instruments can provide. System Name: IBM 3850 Mass Storage System Manufacturer and Location: International Business Machines...34 Datamation, pp. 52-58, October 1973. 15 17. International Business Machines, IBM 3850 Mass Storage System Facts Folder, White Plains, NY, n.d. 18... International Business Machines, Introduction to the IBM 3850 Mass Storage System (MSS), White Plains, NY, n.d. 19. International Business Machines

  10. Finescale Water-Mass Variability from ARGO Profiling Floats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    characterize lateral stirring on O(100 km) lengthscales. This variability represents the low-wavenumber source for the submesoscale being studied under...produce a spectrum for water-mass variability on isopycnals over horizontal wavelengths of 0.03-30 km (Kunze et al. 2014). The submesoscale band...other. 4 REFERENCES D’Asaro, E.A., 1988: Geneation of submesoscale vortices – A new mechanism. J. Geophys. Res., 93, 6685-6693. Ferrari, R

  11. Mass properties measurement system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    The MPMS mechanism possess two revolute degrees-of-freedom and allows the user to measure the mass, center of gravity, and the inertia tensor of an unknown mass. The dynamics of the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS) from the Lagrangian approach to illustrate the dependency of the motion on the unknown parameters.

  12. Identifying Dynamically Induced Variability in Glacier Mass-Balance Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, J. E.; Siler, N.; Koutnik, M. R.; Roe, G.

    2015-12-01

    Glacier mass-balance (i.e., accumulation vs. ablation) provides a direct indicator of a glacier's relationship with climate. However, mass-balance records contain noise due to internal climate variability (i.e., from stochastic fluctuations in large-scale atmospheric circulation), which can obscure or bias trends in these relatively short timeseries. This presents a challenge in correctly identifying the signature of anthropogenic change. "Dynamical adjustment" is a technique that identifies patterns of variance shared between a climate timeseries of interest (e.g., mass-balance) and independent "predictor" variables associated with large-scale circulation (e.g., Sea Level Pressure, SLP, or Sea Surface Temperature, SST). Extracting the component of variance due to internal variability leaves a residual timeseries for which trends can more confidently be attributed to external forcing. We apply dynamical adjustments based on Partial Least Squares Regression to mass-balance records from South Cascade Glacier in Washington State and Wolverine and Gulkana Glaciers in Alaska, independently analyzing seasonal balance records to assess the dynamical influences on winter accumulation and summer ablation. Seasonally averaged North Pacific SLP and SST fields perform comparably as predictor variables, explaining 50-60% of the variance in winter balance and 30-40% of variance in summer balance for South Cascade and Wolverine Glaciers. Gulkana glacier, located further inland than the other two glaciers, is less closely linked to North Pacific climate variability, with the predictors explaining roughly one-third of variance in its winter and summer balance. We analyze the significance of linear trends in the raw and adjusted mass-balance records, and find that for all three glaciers, a) summer balance shows a statistically significant downward trend that is not substantially altered when dynamically induced variability is removed, and b) winter balance shows no statistically

  13. Modeling of Fluctuating Mass Flux in Variable Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Mongia, H. C.; Nikjooy, M.

    1983-01-01

    The approach solves for both Reynolds and Favre averaged quantities and calculates the scalar pdf. Turbulent models used to close the governing equations are formulated to account for complex mixing and variable density effects. In addition, turbulent mass diffusivities are not assumed to be in constant proportion to turbulent momentum diffusivities. The governing equations are solved by a combination of finite-difference technique and Monte-Carlo simulation. Some preliminary results on simple variable density shear flows are presented. The differences between these results and those obtained using conventional models are discussed.

  14. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOEpatents

    Bible, Don W.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14) for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier (18) may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator (12) or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator (14). A second amplifier (20) is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier (18). The second amplifier (20) outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity (34). In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier (20) is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the second amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  15. Variable frequency microwave furnace system

    DOEpatents

    Bible, D.W.; Lauf, R.J.

    1994-06-14

    A variable frequency microwave furnace system designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a furnace cavity for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave furnace system includes a microwave signal generator or microwave voltage-controlled oscillator for generating a low-power microwave signal for input to the microwave furnace. A first amplifier may be provided to amplify the magnitude of the signal output from the microwave signal generator or the microwave voltage-controlled oscillator. A second amplifier is provided for processing the signal output by the first amplifier. The second amplifier outputs the microwave signal input to the furnace cavity. In the preferred embodiment, the second amplifier is a traveling-wave tube (TWT). A power supply is provided for operation of the second amplifier. A directional coupler is provided for detecting the direction of a signal and further directing the signal depending on the detected direction. A first power meter is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace. A second power meter detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load. 5 figs.

  16. Gravitational lensing by a smoothly variable surface mass density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paczynski, Bohdan; Wambsganss, Joachim

    1989-01-01

    The statistical properties of gravitational lensing due to smooth but nonuniform distributions of matter are considered. It is found that a majority of triple images had a parity characteristic for 'shear-induced' lensing. Almost all cases of triple or multiple imaging were associated with large surface density enhancements, and lensing objects were present between the images. Thus, the observed gravitational lens candidates for which no lensing object has been detected between the images are unlikely to be a result of asymmetric distribution of mass external to the image circle. In a model with smoothly variable surface mass density, moderately and highly amplified images tended to be single rather than multiple. An opposite trend was found in models which had singularities in the surface mass distribution.

  17. Movement simulation of the variable masses in the Gylden-Meshcherskii problem

    SciTech Connect

    Starinova, Olga L.; Salmin, Vadim V.

    2014-12-10

    The Gylden-Meshcherskii problem is used for various cases of dynamics of two points of the variable mass. For example, it describes of double star evolution due to mass loss at the photon expense and the corpuscular activity. Except, it is mathematical model for the movement of spacecraft with propulsion system. In the present work the mass variation laws, allowing a stationary form of the movement differential equations are considered. Movement simulation for all cases was conducted. The relative movement trajectories was constructed as for known Eddington-Jeans laws and for other mass variation laws.

  18. Near-infrared Variability in the 2MASS Calibration Fields: A Search for Planetary Transit Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Jura, M.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cutri, Roc M.; Gallagher, S. C.

    2008-01-01

    The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometric calibration observations cover approximately 6 square degrees on the sky in 35 'calibration fields,' each sampled in nominal photometric conditions between 562 and 3692 times during the 4 years of the 2MASS mission. We compile a catalog of variables from the calibration observations to search for M dwarfs transited by extrasolar planets. We present our methods for measuring periodic and nonperiodic flux variability. From 7554 sources with apparent K(sub s) magnitudes between 5.6 and 16.1, we identify 247 variables, including extragalactic variables and 23 periodic variables. We have discovered three M dwarf eclipsing systems, including two candidates for transiting extrasolar planets.

  19. Effects of selected design variables on three ramp, external compression inlet performance. [boundary layer control bypasses, and mass flow rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamman, J. H.; Hall, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    Two inlet performance tests and one inlet/airframe drag test were conducted in 1969 at the NASA-Ames Research Center. The basic inlet system was two-dimensional, three ramp (overhead), external compression, with variable capture area. The data from these tests were analyzed to show the effects of selected design variables on the performance of this type of inlet system. The inlet design variables investigated include inlet bleed, bypass, operating mass flow ratio, inlet geometry, and variable capture area.

  20. Variable mass pendulum behaviour processed by wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccamo, M. T.; Magazù, S.

    2017-01-01

    The present work highlights how, in order to characterize the motion of a variable mass pendulum, wavelet analysis can be an effective tool in furnishing information on the time evolution of the oscillation spectral content. In particular, the wavelet transform is applied to process the motion of a hung funnel that loses fine sand at an exponential rate; it is shown how, in contrast to the Fourier transform which furnishes only an average frequency value for the motion, the wavelet approach makes it possible to perform a joint time-frequency analysis. The work is addressed at undergraduate and graduate students.

  1. Disambiguating seesaw models using invariant mass variables at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Kim, Doojin; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2016-01-01

    We propose ways to distinguish between different mechanisms behind the collider signals of TeV-scale seesaw models for neutrino masses using kinematic endpoints of invariant mass variables. We particularly focus on two classes of such models widely discussed in literature: (i) Standard Model extended by the addition of singlet neutrinos and (ii) Left-Right Symmetric Models. Relevant scenarios involving the same "smoking-gun" collider signature of dilepton plus dijet with no missing transverse energy differ from one another by their event topology, resulting in distinctive relationships among the kinematic endpoints to be used for discerning them at hadron colliders. These kinematic endpoints are readily translated to the mass parameters of the on-shell particles through simple analytic expressions which can be used for measuring the masses of the new particles. A Monte Carlo simulation with detector effects is conducted to test the viability of the proposed strategy in a realistic environment. Finally, we discuss the future prospects of testing these scenarios at the √{s}=14 and 100 TeV hadron colliders.

  2. Disambiguating seesaw models using invariant mass variables at hadron colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Kim, Doojin; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2016-01-19

    Here, we propose ways to distinguish between different mechanisms behind the collider signals of TeV-scale seesaw models for neutrino masses using kinematic endpoints of invariant mass variables. We particularly focus on two classes of such models widely discussed in literature: (i) Standard Model extended by the addition of singlet neutrinos and (ii) Left-Right Symmetric Models. Relevant scenarios involving the same "smoking-gun" collider signature of dilepton plus dijet with no missing transverse energy differ from one another by their event topology, resulting in distinctive relationships among the kinematic endpoints to be used for discerning them at hadron colliders. Furthermore, these kinematic endpoints are readily translated to the mass parameters of the on-shell particles through simple analytic expressions which can be used for measuring the masses of the new particles. We also conducted a Monte Carlo simulation with detector effects in order to test the viability of the proposed strategy in a realistic environment. Finally, we discuss the future prospects of testing these scenarios at themore » $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 14 and 100TeV hadron colliders.« less

  3. Disambiguating seesaw models using invariant mass variables at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Kim, Doojin; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2016-01-19

    Here, we propose ways to distinguish between different mechanisms behind the collider signals of TeV-scale seesaw models for neutrino masses using kinematic endpoints of invariant mass variables. We particularly focus on two classes of such models widely discussed in literature: (i) Standard Model extended by the addition of singlet neutrinos and (ii) Left-Right Symmetric Models. Relevant scenarios involving the same "smoking-gun" collider signature of dilepton plus dijet with no missing transverse energy differ from one another by their event topology, resulting in distinctive relationships among the kinematic endpoints to be used for discerning them at hadron colliders. Furthermore, these kinematic endpoints are readily translated to the mass parameters of the on-shell particles through simple analytic expressions which can be used for measuring the masses of the new particles. We also conducted a Monte Carlo simulation with detector effects in order to test the viability of the proposed strategy in a realistic environment. Finally, we discuss the future prospects of testing these scenarios at the $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14 and 100TeV hadron colliders.

  4. Development and Evaluation of a Variable-Temperature Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkits, David; Wiseman, Alex; Snead, Russell F.; Dows, Martina; Harge, Jasmine; Lamp, Jared A.; Gronert, Scott

    2016-02-01

    A new, variable-temperature mass spectrometer system is described. By applying polyimide heating tape to the end-cap electrodes of a Bruker (Bremen, Germany) Esquire ion trap, it is possible to vary the effective temperature of the system between 40 and 100°C. The modification does not impact the operation of the ion trap and the heater can be used for extended periods without degradation of the system. The accuracy of the ion trap temperatures was assessed by examining two gas-phase equilibrium processes with known thermochemistry. In each case, the variable-temperature ion trap provided data that were in good accord with literature data, indicating the effective temperature in the ion trap environment was being successfully modulated by the changes in the set-point temperatures on the end-cap electrodes. The new design offers a convenient and effective way to convert commercial ion trap mass spectrometers into variable-temperature instruments.

  5. Newtonian Version of the Variable Mass Theory of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, J. C.; Lima, J. A. S.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se presenta una versi6n Newtoniana de los modelos cosmol6gicos espacialmente e isotr6picos con masa variable. La influencia de la variaci6n de masa en la evoluci6n de la funci6n de escala est establecida para el caso de un Universo lieno de polvo bajo Ia suposici6n de que esta variaci6n es un efecto estrictamente cosmol6jico. Se muestra que el hiperb6lico, parab6lico 0 el#ptico dcl movimiento de puede ser modificado a lo larjo de la expansi6n. ABSTRACT. This paper presents a Newtonian version of the spatially homojeneous and isotropic cosmolojical models with variable mass. The influence of the mass variation on the evolution of the scale function is established for the case of a dust-filled Universe under the assumption that this variation is a strict cosmolojical effect. It is shown that the hyperbolic, parabolic or elliptic character of the fluid motion can be modified alonj the expansion. Keq : COSMOLOGY

  6. Masses and radii for thirteen chromospherically active ellipsoidal variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Douglas S.

    1990-01-01

    The amplitude of the ellipticity effect, the mass function, and the V sin i in ten long-period RS CVn SB1 binaries are used to compute limits on the masses of the two stars and the radius of the primary: zeta And, UV CrB, V1764 Cyg, V826 Her, V350 Lac, GX Lib, V1197 Ori, AP Psc, 33 Psc, and EE UMa. Explicit masses and radii are computed for three SB2 systems: BL CVn, V1817 Cyg, and TZ Tri. The primary in several is found to fill 95 percent or more of its Roche lobe. The two minima produced by the ellipticity effect are unequal in depth, with the effect largest when i is near 90 deg and the primary nearly fills its Roche lobe. The greatest inequality found, in UV CrB, was 0.08 mag.

  7. On exchangeable continuous variable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Robert; Wolf, Michael M.

    2009-01-15

    We investigate permutation-invariant continuous variable quantum states and their covariance matrices. We provide a complete characterization of the latter with respect to permutation invariance and exchangeability and representing convex combinations of tensor power states. On the level of the respective density operators this leads to necessary criteria for all these properties which become necessary and sufficient for Gaussian states. For these we use the derived results to provide de Finetti-type theorems for various distance measures.

  8. Spinor Slow-Light and Dirac Particles with Variable Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Unanyan, R. G.; Otterbach, J.; Fleischhauer, M.; Ruseckas, J.; Kudriasov, V.; Juzeliunas, G.

    2010-10-22

    We consider the interaction of two weak probe fields of light with an atomic ensemble coherently driven by two pairs of standing wave laser fields in a tripod-type linkage scheme. The system is shown to exhibit a Dirac-like spectrum for light-matter quasiparticles with multiple dark states, termed spinor slow-light polaritons. They posses an 'effective speed of light' given by the group velocity of slow light, and can be made massive by inducing a small two-photon detuning. Control of the two-photon detuning can be used to locally vary the mass including a sign flip. Particularly, this allows the implementation of the random-mass Dirac model for which localized zero-energy (midgap) states exist with unusual long-range correlations.

  9. Short time-scale AGN X-ray variability with EXOSAT: black hole mass and normalized variability amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHardy, I. M.

    2013-03-01

    The old EXOSAT medium energy measurements of high-frequency (HF) active galactic nuclei (AGN) power spectral normalization are re-examined in the light of accurate black hole mass determinations which were not available when these data were first published by Green et al. It is found that the normalized variability amplitude (NVA), measured directly from the power spectrum, is proportional to Mβ, where β ˜ -0.54 ± 0.08. As NVA is the square root of the power, these observations show that the normalization of the HF power spectrum for this sample of AGN varies very close to inversely with black hole mass. Almost the same value of β is obtained whether the quasar 3C 273 is included in the sample or not, suggesting that the same process that drives X-ray variability in Seyfert galaxies applies also to 3C 273. These observations support the work of Gierliński et al. who show that an almost exactly linear anticorrelation is required if the normalizations of the HF power spectra of AGN and X-ray binary systems are to scale similarly. These observations are also consistent with a number of studies showing that the short time-scale variance of AGN X-ray light curves varies approximately inversely with mass.

  10. Binary system parameters and the hibernation model of cataclysmic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Livio, M.; Shara, M.M.

    1987-08-01

    The hibernation model, in which nova systems spend most of the time between eruptions in a state of low mass transfer rate, is examined. The binary systems more likely to undergo hibernation are determined. The predictions of the hibernation scenario are shown to be consistent with available observational data. It is shown how the hibernation scenario provides links between classical novae, dwarf novae, and novalike variables, all of which represent different stages in the cyclic evolution of the same systems. 72 references.

  11. Model atmospheres with periodic shocks. [pulsations and mass loss in variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, G. H.

    1989-01-01

    The pulsation of a long-period variable star generates shock waves which dramatically affect the structure of the star's atmosphere and produce conditions that lead to rapid mass loss. Numerical modeling of atmospheres with periodic shocks is being pursued to study the processes involved and the evolutionary consequences for the stars. It is characteristic of these complex dynamical systems that most effects result from the interaction of various time-dependent processes.

  12. The mass ratio of the cataclysmic variable AM Herculis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southwell, K. A.; Still, M. D.; Connon Smith, R.; Martin, J. S.

    1995-10-01

    We present far red time-resolved spectroscopy of the cataclysmic variable AM Herculis. We measure the radial velocity semi-amplitude of the secondary component to be 198+/-3km/s and the projected rotational velocity of this star to be 92+/-9km/s. Thus we are able to estimate the ratio of component masses to be 0.47+/-0.08. We show, however, that these measurements are likely to be biased by ionization of the inner secondary surface by radiation originating close to the shock region above the surface of the primary. Using models of the Na surface distribution on the secondary star, we attempt to produce a less biased orbital parameter solution. These results indicate that the uncertainties in the measured, irradiation-affected parameters are too large to produce a well-constrained, corrected orbital solution with our limited spectral information. However, the method employed to make the irradiation correction has potential to produce accurate binary parameters given improved data.

  13. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-09-10

    This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

  14. Evaluation of Small Mass Spectrometer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Griffin, Timothy P.; Ottens, Andrew K.; Diaz, Jorge A.; Follistein, Duke W.; Adams, Fredrick W.; Helms, William R.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Various mass analyzer systems were evaluated. Several systems show promise, including the Stanford Research Systems RGA-100, Inficon XPR-2, the University of Florida's Ion Trap, and the Compact Double Focus Mass Spectrometer. Areas that need improvement are the response time, recovery time, system volume, and system weight. Future work will investigate techniques to improve systems and will evaluate engineering challenges.

  15. Error analysis of system mass properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brayshaw, J.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt is made to verify the margin of system mass properties over values that are sufficient for the support of such other critical system requirements as those of dynamic control. System nominal mass properties are designed on the basis of an imperfect understanding of the mass and location of constituent elements; the effect of such element errors is to introduce net errors into calculated system mass properties. The direct measurement of system mass properties is, however, impractical. Attention is given to these issues in the case of the Galileo spacecraft.

  16. Some Problems of Movement of Bodies with Variable Masses and Cases of Their Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammadli, A. H.

    2009-12-01

    Problems of movement of bodies with variable masses within the framework of the two-body problem are considered. It is shown, that under certain conditions by the method of spatial-time transformation the differential equations of movement with variable coefficients suppose autonomization, i.e. are transformed to the differential equations with constant coefficients, integrated in quadrature. The analogue of the Jacobi integral is found, surfaces of zero velocity and possible regions of motion are determined. As an example the problem of the motion of a star with a variable mass inside a globular cluster with a variable mass is considered. It has turned out, that the solution of differential equations in new variables represents elliptical epicycloids, and in initial variables it is a very complex trajectory. At the research of motion in the gravitating and resisting medium it is shown, that in the law change of Jeans mass the change of a body mass sign is admissible.

  17. Mass transfer in cataclysmic variables - Clues from the dwarf nova period distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafter, A. W.; Wheeler, J. C.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence is presented in support of the hypothesis that the mean mass-transfer rate at a given orbital period is not continuous across the 2-3 hr gap in the orbital period distribution for cataclysmic variables. It is pointed out that although dwarf novae comprise nearly half (48 percent) of all disk systems with orbital periods less than 10 hr, only three systems out of the 22 with periods between 3 and 4 hr appear to be dwarf novae. The overall orbital period distribution for dwarf novae in conjunction with the predictions from current theories of dwarf nova eruptions are used to argue that mass-transfer rates must be generally higher for systems with orbital periods greater than 3 hr relative to systems with periods less than 2 hr. It is further argued that the mean mass-transfer rate at a given orbital period cannot increase more steeply than P exp 1.7 unless the white dwarf mass is positively correlated with orbital period.

  18. Assessment of reservoir system variable forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistenmacher, Martin; Georgakakos, Aris P.

    2015-05-01

    Forecast ensembles are a convenient means to model water resources uncertainties and to inform planning and management processes. For multipurpose reservoir systems, forecast types include (i) forecasts of upcoming inflows and (ii) forecasts of system variables and outputs such as reservoir levels, releases, flood damage risks, hydropower production, water supply withdrawals, water quality conditions, navigation opportunities, and environmental flows, among others. Forecasts of system variables and outputs are conditional on forecasted inflows as well as on specific management policies and can provide useful information for decision-making processes. Unlike inflow forecasts (in ensemble or other forms), which have been the subject of many previous studies, reservoir system variable and output forecasts are not formally assessed in water resources management theory or practice. This article addresses this gap and develops methods to rectify potential reservoir system forecast inconsistencies and improve the quality of management-relevant information provided to stakeholders and managers. The overarching conclusion is that system variable and output forecast consistency is critical for robust reservoir management and needs to be routinely assessed for any management model used to inform planning and management processes. The above are demonstrated through an application from the Sacramento-American-San Joaquin reservoir system in northern California.

  19. Temporal variability of mass transport across Canary Islands Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero-Díaz, Ángeles; Rodríguez-Santana, Ángel; José Machín, Francisco; García-Weil, Luis; Sangrà, Pablo; Vélez-Belchí, Pedro; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio

    2014-05-01

    The equatorward flowing Canary Current (CC) is the main feature of the circulation in the Canary Islands region. The CC flow perturbation by the Canary Islands originate the Canary Eddy Corridor which is the major pathway for long lived eddies in the subtropical North Atlantic (Sangrà et al., 2009, DSR). Therefore the variability of the CC passing through the Canary Archipelago will have both local and regional importance. Past studies on the CC variability trough the Canary Islands point out a clearly seasonal variability (Fraile-Nuez et al, 2010 (JGR); Hernández-Guerra et al, 2002 (DSR)). However those studies where focused on the eastern islands channels missing the variability through the western island channels which are the main source of long lived eddies. In order to fill this gap from November 2012 until September 2013 we conducted trimonthly surveys crossing the whole islands channels using opportunity ships (Naviera Armas Ferries). XBT and XCTD where launched along the cross channels transects. Additionally a closed box circling the Archipelago was performed on October 2013 as part of the cruise RAPROCAN-2013 (IEO) using also XBT and XCTD. Dynamical variables where derived inferring salinity from S(T,p) analytical relationships for the region updated with new XCTD data. High resolution, vertical sections of temperature, potential density, geostrophic velocity and transport where obtained. Our preliminary results suggest that the CC suffer a noticeable acceleration in those islands channels where eddy shedding is more frequent. They also indicate a clearly seasonal variability of the flows passing the islands channels. With this regard we observed significant differences on the obtained seasonal variability with respect the cited past studies on the eastern islands channel (Lanzarote / Fuerteventura - Africa coast). This work was co-funded by Canary Government (TRAMIC project: PROID20100092) and the European Union (FEDER).

  20. LOW-MASS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH RAPID X-RAY VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Luis C.; Kim, Minjin

    2016-04-10

    We present a detailed study of the optical spectroscopic properties of 12 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with candidate low-mass black holes (BHs) selected by Kamizasa et al. through rapid X-ray variability. The high-quality, echellette Magellan spectra reveal broad Hα emission in all the sources, allowing us to estimate robust virial BH masses and Eddington ratios for this unique sample. We confirm that the sample contains low-mass BHs accreting at high rates: the median M{sub BH} = 1.2 × 10{sup 6} M{sub ⊙} and median L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} = 0.44. The sample follows the M{sub BH}–σ{sub *} relation, within the considerable scatter typical of pseudobulges, the probable hosts of these low-mass AGNs. Various lines of evidence suggest that ongoing star formation is prevalent in these systems. We propose a new strategy to estimate star formation rates in AGNs hosted by low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies, based on modification of an existing method using the strength of [O ii] λ3727, [O iii] λ5007, and X-rays.

  1. The security of mass transport ticketing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sel, Marc; Seys, Stefaan; Verheul, Eric

    Mass transport ticketing systems in most developed countries are making a rapid transition from ‘traditional’ paper or carton-based ticketing systems towards a contactless ‘smart card‘ based approach. This article discusses the main IT security aspects of mass transport ticketing systems (metro, bus, etc).

  2. Preliminary experimental results on studying possibility of variable mass liner (VML) formation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The main objective of the present experiment was to study the formation process and initial stage of acceleration of a variable-mass plasma liner (VML). The method is based on magnetic acceleration of a liner with the mass reduced during such acceleration. The experiment was carried out on February 16 at VNIIEF. This report describes the results of measurements obtained in the experiment and preliminary analysis of the results characterizing operation of the test facility main units: helical EMG; 5-module disk EMG 400 mm in diameter (DEMG); ponderomotive unit (PU) with a cylindric condensed liner and a special tooth-cutoff. The first part of the report presents measurement results obtained on the VNIIEF`s diagnostic equipment that are compared with those obtained by American specialists on their diagnostic equipment. Information submitted by American specialists is included in part 2 of this report. The second part of the report presents preliminary computational-theoretic analysis of the main measured results describing operation of DEMG TL system in the experiment; experimental data are compared with theoretical ones obtained before and after the experiment. But more emphasis is placed on the data preliminary analysis indicating that in the experiment a variable mass liner is formed (VML or plasma bubble).

  3. Variable pressure power cycle and control system

    DOEpatents

    Goldsberry, Fred L.

    1984-11-27

    A variable pressure power cycle and control system that is adjustable to a variable heat source is disclosed. The power cycle adjusts itself to the heat source so that a minimal temperature difference is maintained between the heat source fluid and the power cycle working fluid, thereby substantially matching the thermodynamic envelope of the power cycle to the thermodynamic envelope of the heat source. Adjustments are made by sensing the inlet temperature of the heat source fluid and then setting a superheated vapor temperature and pressure to achieve a minimum temperature difference between the heat source fluid and the working fluid.

  4. HAPSITE(Trademark) Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer Variability Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-27

    in an uncharacterized chemical environment that involves chemical warfare agents (CWA) or toxic industrial chemicals ( TIC ). Gas Chromatography/Mass...Research Institute (MRI) in Kansas City, Missouri conducted a study to optimize the use of a tri-bed concentrator with TIC . The tni-bed concentrator...The remaining 81 TIC were added based on a Navy threat assessment of chemicals that could be used in a terrorist attack or potentially hazardous

  5. Variability in winter mass balance of Northern Hemisphere glaciers and relations with atmospheric circulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Fountain, A.G.; Dyurgerov, M.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of variability in the winter mass balance (WMB) of 22 glaciers in the Northern Hemisphere indicates two primary modes of variability that explain 46% of the variability among all glaciers. The first mode of variability characterizes WMB variability in Northern and Central Europe and the second mode primarily represents WMB variability in northwestern North America, but also is related to variability in WMB of one glacier in Europe and one in Central Asia. These two modes of WMB variability are explained by variations in mesoscale atmospheric circulation which are driving forces of variations in surface temperature and precipitation. The first mode is highly correlated with the Arctic Oscillation Index, whereas the second mode is highly correlated with the Southern Oscillation Index. In addition, the second mode of WMB variability is highly correlated with variability in global winter temperatures. This result suggests some connection between global temperature trends and WMB for some glaciers.

  6. Variable Acceleration Force Calibration System (VACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.; Parker, Peter A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Landman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally, force balances have been calibrated manually, using a complex system of free hanging precision weights, bell cranks, and/or other mechanical components. Conventional methods may provide sufficient accuracy in some instances, but are often quite complex and labor-intensive, requiring three to four man-weeks to complete each full calibration. To ensure accuracy, gravity-based loading is typically utilized. However, this often causes difficulty when applying loads in three simultaneous, orthogonal axes. A complex system of levers, cranks, and cables must be used, introducing increased sources of systematic error, and significantly increasing the time and labor intensity required to complete the calibration. One aspect of the VACS is a method wherein the mass utilized for calibration is held constant, and the acceleration is changed to thereby generate relatively large forces with relatively small test masses. Multiple forces can be applied to a force balance without changing the test mass, and dynamic forces can be applied by rotation or oscillating acceleration. If rotational motion is utilized, a mass is rigidly attached to a force balance, and the mass is exposed to a rotational field. A large force can be applied by utilizing a large rotational velocity. A centrifuge or rotating table can be used to create the rotational field, and fixtures can be utilized to position the force balance. The acceleration may also be linear. For example, a table that moves linearly and accelerates in a sinusoidal manner may also be utilized. The test mass does not have to move in a path that is parallel to the ground, and no re-leveling is therefore required. Balance deflection corrections may be applied passively by monitoring the orientation of the force balance with a three-axis accelerometer package. Deflections are measured during each test run, and adjustments with respect to the true applied load can be made during the post-processing stage. This paper will

  7. Orbital Stability of High Mass Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Sarah J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2016-05-01

    In light of the observation of systems like HR 8799 that contain several planets with planet-star mass ratios larger than Jupiter's, we explore the relationships between planet separation, mass, and stability timescale for high mass multi-planet systems detectable via direct imaging. We discuss the role of overlap between 1st and sometimes 2nd order mean motion resonances, and show how trends in stability time vary from previous studies of lower mass multi-planet systems. We show that extrapolating empirically derived relationships between planet mass, separation, and stability timescale derived from lower mass planetary systems misestimate the stability timescales for higher mass planetary systems by more than an order of magnitude at separations near the Hill stability limit. We also address what metrics of planet separation are most useful for estimating a system's dynamical stability. We apply these results to young, gapped, debris disk systems of the ScoCen association in order to place limits on the maximum mass and number of planets that could persist for the lifetimes of the disks. These efforts will provide useful constraints for on-going direct imaging surveys. By setting upper limits on the most easily detectable systems, we can better interpret both new discoveries and non-dectections.

  8. Moving mass trim control system design

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, R.H.; Robinett, R.D.; Sturgis, B.R.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the design of a moving mass trim control system for maneuvering axisymmetric reentry vehicles. The moving mass trim controller is composed of three equal masses that are independently positioned in order to deliver a desired center of mass position. For a slowly spinning reentry vehicle, the mass offset creates a trim angle-of-attack to generate modest flight path corrections. The control system must maintain the desired position of each mass in the face of large disturbances. A novel algorithm for determining the desired mass positions is developed in conjunction with a preliminary controller design. The controller design is based on classical frequency domain techniques where a bound on the disturbance magnitude is used to formulate the disturbance rejection problem. Simulation results for the controller are presented for a typical reentry vehicle.

  9. [Complex systems variability analysis using approximate entropy].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Biological systems are highly complex systems, both spatially and temporally. They are rooted in an interdependent, redundant and pleiotropic interconnected dynamic network. The properties of a system are different from those of their parts, and they depend on the integrity of the whole. The systemic properties vanish when the system breaks down, while the properties of its components are maintained. The disease can be understood as a systemic functional alteration of the human body, which present with a varying severity, stability and durability. Biological systems are characterized by measurable complex rhythms, abnormal rhythms are associated with disease and may be involved in its pathogenesis, they are been termed "dynamic disease." Physicians have long time recognized that alterations of physiological rhythms are associated with disease. Measuring absolute values of clinical parameters yields highly significant, clinically useful information, however evaluating clinical parameters the variability provides additionally useful clinical information. The aim of this review was to study one of the most recent advances in the measurement and characterization of biological variability made possible by the development of mathematical models based on chaos theory and nonlinear dynamics, as approximate entropy, has provided us with greater ability to discern meaningful distinctions between biological signals from clinically distinct groups of patients.

  10. The water mass variability on the Romanian Black Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buga, Luminita; Mihailov, Maria-Emanuela; Malciu, Viorel; Stefan, Sabina

    2013-04-01

    The long-term trends in the water mass thermohaline structure and the effect of Danube River freshwater discharge into the western Black Sea during the last four decades (1971 - 2010) are analyzed using the data collected on the Romanian shelf (NIMRD data base). The variations of the temperature and salinity over the studied period are relatively small. The temperature data reveal a slightly warming trend for the upper mixed layer (UML) while for the shelf cold water (SCW) - identified by the 8˚C upper isotherm depth - thermohaline structure remains practically constant. At the same time the salinity exhibits a decreasing trend in the entire water column.

  11. Disentanglement in bipartite continuous-variable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, F. A. S.; Coelho, A. S.; Nussenzveig, P.; Martinelli, M.; Faria, A. J. de; Cassemiro, K. N.; Villar, A. S.

    2011-11-15

    Entanglement in bipartite continuous-variable systems is investigated in the presence of partial losses such as those introduced by a realistic quantum communication channel, e.g., by propagation in an optical fiber. We find that entanglement can vanish completely for partial losses, in a situation reminiscent of so-called entanglement sudden death. Even states with extreme squeezing may become separable after propagation in lossy channels. Having in mind the potential applications of such entangled light beams to optical communications, we investigate the conditions under which entanglement can survive for all partial losses. Different loss scenarios are examined, and we derive criteria to test the robustness of entangled states. These criteria are necessary and sufficient for Gaussian states. Our study provides a framework to investigate the robustness of continuous-variable entanglement in more complex multipartite systems.

  12. Dynamically variable spot size laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R. (Inventor); Hurst, John F. (Inventor); Middleton, James R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A Dynamically Variable Spot Size (DVSS) laser system for bonding metal components includes an elongated housing containing a light entry aperture coupled to a laser beam transmission cable and a light exit aperture. A plurality of lenses contained within the housing focus a laser beam from the light entry aperture through the light exit aperture. The lenses may be dynamically adjusted to vary the spot size of the laser. A plurality of interoperable safety devices, including a manually depressible interlock switch, an internal proximity sensor, a remotely operated potentiometer, a remotely activated toggle and a power supply interlock, prevent activation of the laser and DVSS laser system if each safety device does not provide a closed circuit. The remotely operated potentiometer also provides continuous variability in laser energy output.

  13. Variable protostellar mass accretion rates in cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Lou, Yu-Qing

    2017-03-01

    Spherical hydrodynamic models with a polytropic equation of state (EoS) for forming protostars are revisited in order to investigate the so-called luminosity conundrum highlighted by observations. For a molecular cloud (MC) core with such an EoS with polytropic index γ > 1, the central mass accretion rate (MAR) decreases with increasing time as a protostar emerges, offering a sensible solution to this luminosity problem. As the MAR decreases, the protostellar luminosity also decreases, meaning that it is invalid to infer the star formation time from the currently observed luminosity using an isothermal model. Furthermore, observations of radial density profiles and the radio continua of numerous MC cores evolving towards protostars also suggest that polytropic dynamic spheres of γ > 1 should be used in physical models.

  14. Variable/Multispeed Rotorcraft Drive System Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Mark A.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Several recent studies for advanced rotorcraft have identified the need for variable, or multispeed-capable rotors. A speed change of up to 50 percent has been proposed for future rotorcraft to improve vehicle performance. Varying rotor speed during flight not only requires a rotor capable of performing effectively over the extended operation speed and load range, but also requires an advanced propulsion system to provide the required speed changes. A study has been completed, which investigated possible drive system arrangements to accommodate up to the 50 percent speed change. These concepts are presented. The most promising configurations are identified and will be developed for future validation testing.

  15. Efficient State Tomography for Continuous Variable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chao; Jiang, Luyao; Krastanov, Stefan; Albert, Victor V.; Heeres, Reinier; Vlastakis, Brian; Schoelkopf, Rob; Jiang, Liang

    2015-03-01

    We propose an efficient and error robust scheme for state tomography of a continuous variable system, which is dispersively coupled to a two-level system. Our adaptive tomography protocol offers a significant speed up compared to the conventional Wigner tomography for a practically interesting class of states, such as Schrodinger cat states. In the presence of typical experimental errors, the number of measurements required is still close to the information theoretic limit. Our proposals can be readily implemented in platforms such as superconducting transmon qubit inside a microwave cavity.

  16. MASS: An automated accountability system

    SciTech Connect

    Erkkila, B.H.; Kelso, F.

    1994-08-01

    All Department of Energy contractors who manage accountable quantities of nuclear materials are required to implement an accountability system that tracks, and records the activities associated with those materials. At Los Alamos, the automated accountability system allows data entry on computer terminals and data base updating as soon as the entry is made. It is also able to generate all required reports in a timely Fashion. Over the last several years, the hardware and software have been upgraded to provide the users with all the capability needed to manage a large variety of operations with a wide variety of nuclear materials. Enhancements to the system are implemented as the needs of the users are identified. The system has grown with the expanded needs of the user; and has survived several years of changing operations and activity. The user community served by this system includes processing, materials control and accountability, and nuclear material management personnel. In addition to serving the local users, the accountability system supports the national data base (NMMSS). This paper contains a discussion of several details of the system design and operation. After several years of successful operation, this system provides an operating example of how computer systems can be used to manage a very dynamic data management problem.

  17. Infiltration History and Spatial Variability Derived from Chloride Mass Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, J. C.; Jaimes, A.; Woocay, A.

    2007-12-01

    Chloride mass balance was applied to drill cuttings collected from the unsaturated zone surrounding the Yucca Mountain Project. Samples correspond to four Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program boreholes where air was used as the drilling fluid to preserve sample integrity. Infiltration dates before present and pore velocities were calculated using a range of annual chloride deposition rates obtained from the literature. The lower chloride loading corresponds to contemporary values, and the upper loading corresponds to an attempt to correct for either past greater chloride deposition or a past higher precipitation with chloride concentration remaining constant. In each borehole, pore velocities present two distinct slopes corresponding to different infiltration regimes. The first one, near the surface, presents the slowest infiltration rate. The second pore velocity corresponds to a past wetter period (late Pleistocene to early Holocene) with much faster pore velocities. Results indicate that pore velocities among the boreholes differ at most by a factor of approximately 3.5. Boreholes located in areas of little or gradual slope present faster infiltration rates than those in areas of greater slope. Borehole NC-EWDP-22S, near Fortymile Wash east of Yucca Mountain, exhibits the most rapid pore velocities where as boreholes further from the wash demonstrate lower velocities. These results denote the effects climate change, and runoff and run-on at the surface have over infiltration rates in arid regions.

  18. Equations of motion for the variable mass flow-variable exhaust velocity rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempelman, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    An equation of motion for a one dimensional rocket is derived as a function of the mass flow rate into the acceleration chamber and the velocity distribution along the chamber, thereby including the transient flow changes in the chamber. The derivation of the mass density requires the introduction of the special time coordinate. The equation of motion is derived from both classical force and momentum approaches and is shown to be consistent with the standard equation expressed in terms of flow parameters at the exit to the acceleration chamber.

  19. Variable stars in the VVV globular clusters. I. 2MASS-GC 02 and Terzan 10

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-García, Javier; Dékány, István; Catelan, Márcio; Ramos, Rodrigo Contreras; Gran, Felipe; Leyton, Paul; Minniti, Dante; Amigo, Pía E-mail: idekany@astro.puc.cl E-mail: rcontrer@astro.puc.cl E-mail: pia.amigo@uv.cl E-mail: dante@astrofisica.cl

    2015-03-01

    The VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) ESO Public Survey is opening a new window to study inner Galactic globular clusters (GCs) using their variable stars. These GCs have been neglected in the past due to the difficulties caused by the presence of elevated extinction and high field stellar densities in their lines of sight. However, the discovery and study of any present variables in these clusters, especially RR Lyrae stars, can help to greatly improve the accuracy of their physical parameters. It can also help to shed some light on the questions raised by the intriguing Oosterhoff dichotomy in the Galactic GC system. In a series of papers we plan to explore variable stars in the GCs falling inside the field of the VVV survey. In this first paper, we search for and study the variables present in two highly reddened, moderately metal-poor, faint, inner Galactic GCs: 2MASS-GC 02 and Terzan 10. We report the discovery of sizable populations of RR Lyrae stars in both GCs. We use near-infrared period–luminosity relations to determine the color excess of each RR Lyrae star, from which we obtain both accurate distances to the GCs and the ratios of the selective-to-total extinction in their directions. We find the extinction toward both clusters to be elevated, non-standard, and highly differential. We also find both clusters to be closer to the Galactic center than previously thought, with Terzan 10 being on the far side of the Galactic bulge. Finally, we discuss their Oosterhoff properties, and conclude that both clusters stand out from the dichotomy followed by most Galactic GCs.

  20. Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E; Ladner, Edward P

    2003-12-30

    The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

  1. Trends and variability in the global dataset of glacier mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medwedeff, William G.; Roe, Gerard H.

    2016-06-01

    Glacier mass balance (i.e., accumulation and ablation) is the most direct connection between climate and glaciers. We perform a comprehensive evaluation of the available global network of mass-balance measurements. Each mass-balance time series is decomposed into a trend and the variability about that trend. Observed variability ranges by an order of magnitude, depending on climate setting (i.e., maritime vs continental). For the great majority of glaciers, variability is well characterized by normally distributed, random fluctuations that are uncorrelated between seasons, or in subsequent years. The magnitude of variability for both summer and winter is well correlated with mean wintertime balance, which reflects the climatic setting. Collectively, summertime variability exceeds wintertime variability, except for maritime glaciers. Trends in annual mass balance are generally negative, driven primarily by summertime changes. Approximately 25 % of annual-mean records show statistically significant negative trends when judged in isolation. In aggregate, the global trend is negative and significant. We further evaluate the magnitude of trends relative to the variability. We find that, on average, trends are approximately -0.2 standard deviations per decade, although there is a broad spread among individual glaciers. Finally, for two long records we also compare mass-balance trends and variability with nearby meteorological stations. We find significant differences among stations meaning caution is warranted in interpreting any point measurement (such as mass balance) as representative of region-wide behavior. By placing observed trends in the context of natural variability, the results are useful for interpreting past glacial history, and for placing constraints on future predictability.

  2. Mass Storage Performance Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop a data warehouse to enable system administrators and their managers to gather information by querying the data logs of the MDSDS. Currently detailed logs capture the activity of the MDSDS internal to the different systems. The elements to be included in the data warehouse are requirements analysis, data cleansing, database design, database population, hardware/software acquisition, data transformation, query and report generation, and data mining.

  3. Spatial and temporal variability in distribution of water masses in Hornsund, Spitsbergen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promińska, Agnieszka; Falck, Eva; Walczowski, Waldemar; Sundfjord, Arild

    2016-04-01

    Arctic fjords constitute an important part of many recent investigations because this is the place where different water masses meet, mix, and transform, influencing the stability of glaciers. Hornsund, the southernmost fjord of West Spitsbergen, has been studied during the past 15 years. Observations were based primarily on high resolution measurements of water temperature and salinity along fixed sections, that have been performed every July between 2001-2015. Research carried out in years 2010 - 2015 under Polish - Norwegian projects AWAKE and AWAKE-2 allowed for expansion of the database with data covering the period from spring to autumn. During this time measurements were also conducted from a small boat in the vicinity of glaciers with a time resolution of 1-2 weeks in addition to a mooring system deployed in the fjord and on the shelf just outside Hornsund. Synthesis of our measurements give an overview of water masses observed in the fjord. From summer to summer observations reveal high variability in water temperature and salinity giving a distinct division into an area influenced by oceanic factors (Main Basin) and an area which is more influenced by local factors (Brepollen). The chronology of water mass transformation has been obtained indicating a time of transition between winter (Arctic type), additionally interrupted by temporary inflow of waters of Atlantic origin, and summer (Atlantic type) conditions.

  4. Dual output variable pitch turbofan actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griswold, R. H., Jr.; Broman, C. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An improved actuating mechanism was provided for a gas turbine engine incorporating fan blades of the variable pitch variety, the actuator adapted to rotate the individual fan blades within apertures in an associated fan disc. The actuator included means such as a pair of synchronizing ring gears, one on each side of the blade shanks, and adapted to engage pinions disposed thereon. Means were provided to impart rotation to the ring gears in opposite directions to effect rotation of the blade shanks in response to a predetermined input signal. In the event of system failure, a run-away actuator was prevented by an improved braking device which arrests the mechanism.

  5. Long-term optical variability of high-mass X-ray binaries. II. Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.; Nersesian, A.; Zezas, A.; Gkouvelis, L.; Coe, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High-mass X-ray binaries are bright X-ray sources. The high-energy emission is caused by the accretion of matter from the massive companion onto a neutron star. The accreting material comes from either the strong stellar wind in binaries with supergiant companions or the cirscumstellar disk in Be/X-ray binaries. In either case, the Hα line stands out as the main source of information about the state of the accreting material. Aims: We present the results of our monitoring program to study the long-term variability of the Hα line in high-mass X-ray binaries. Our aim is to characterise the optical variability timescales and study the interaction between the neutron star and the accreting material. Methods: We fitted the Hα line with Gaussian profiles and obtained the line parameters and equivalent width. The peak separation in split profiles was used to determine the disk velocity law and estimate the disk radius. The relative intensity of the two peaks (V/R ratio) allowed us to investigate the distribution of gas particles in the disk. The equivalent width was used to characterise the degree of variability of the systems. We also studied the variability of the Hα line in correlation with the X-ray activity. Results: Our results can be summarised as follows: i) we find that Be/X-ray binaries with narrow orbits are more variable than systems with long orbital periods; ii) we show that a Keplerian distribution of gas particles provides a good description of the disks in Be/X-ray binaries, as it does in classical Be stars; iii) a decrease in the Hα equivalent width is generally observed after major X-ray outbursts; iv) we confirm that the Hα equivalent width correlates with disk radius; v) while systems with supergiant companions display multi-structured profiles, most of the Be/X-ray binaries show, at some epoch, double-peak asymmetric profiles, which indicates that density inhomogeneities is a common property in the disk of Be/X-ray binaries; vi) the

  6. Variability in a Young, L/T Transition Planetary-mass Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biller, Beth A.; Vos, Johanna; Bonavita, Mariangela; Buenzli, Esther; Baxter, Claire; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Allers, Katelyn; Liu, Michael C.; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Deacon, Niall; Brandner, Wolfgang; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Dupuy, Trent; Kopytova, Taisiya; Manjavacas, Elena; Allard, France; Homeier, Derek; Henning, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    As part of our ongoing NTT SoFI survey for variability in young free-floating planets and low-mass brown dwarfs, we detect significant variability in the young, free-floating planetary-mass object PSO J318.5-22, likely due to rotational modulation of inhomogeneous cloud cover. A member of the 23 ± 3 Myr β Pic moving group, PSO J318.5-22 has Teff = {1160}-40+30 K and a mass estimate of 8.3 ± 0.5 MJup for a 23 ± 3 Myr age. PSO J318.5-22 is intermediate in mass between 51 Eri b and β Pic b, the two known exoplanet companions in the β Pic moving group. With variability amplitudes from 7% to 10% in JS at two separate epochs over 3-5 hr observations, we constrain the rotational period of this object to >5 hr. In KS, we marginally detect a variability trend of up to 3% over a 3 hr observation. This is the first detection of weather on an extrasolar planetary-mass object. Among L dwarfs surveyed at high photometric precision (<3%), this is the highest amplitude variability detection. Given the low surface gravity of this object, the high amplitude preliminarily suggests that such objects may be more variable than their high-mass counterparts, although observations of a larger sample are necessary to confirm this. Measuring similar variability for directly imaged planetary companions is possible with instruments such as SPHERE and GPI and will provide important constraints on formation. Measuring variability at multiple wavelengths can help constrain cloud structure. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 095.C-0590.

  7. Variable temperature seat climate control system

    DOEpatents

    Karunasiri, Tissa R.; Gallup, David F.; Noles, David R.; Gregory, Christian T.

    1997-05-06

    A temperature climate control system comprises a variable temperature seat, at least one heat pump, at least one heat pump temperature sensor, and a controller. Each heat pump comprises a number of Peltier thermoelectric modules for temperature conditioning the air in a main heat exchanger and a main exchanger fan for passing the conditioned air from the main exchanger to the variable temperature seat. The Peltier modules and each main fan may be manually adjusted via a control switch or a control signal. Additionally, the temperature climate control system may comprise a number of additional temperature sensors to monitor the temperature of the ambient air surrounding the occupant as well as the temperature of the conditioned air directed to the occupant. The controller is configured to automatically regulate the operation of the Peltier modules and/or each main fan according to a temperature climate control logic designed both to maximize occupant comfort during normal operation, and minimize possible equipment damage, occupant discomfort, or occupant injury in the event of a heat pump malfunction.

  8. Variable acuity remote viewing system flight demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Variable Acuity Remote Viewing System (VARVS), originally developed under contract to the Navy (ONR) as a laboratory brassboard, was modified for flight demonstration. The VARVS system was originally conceived as a technique which could circumvent the acuity/field of view/bandwidth tradeoffs that exists in remote viewing to provide a nearly eye limited display in both field of view (160 deg) and resolution (2 min arc) while utilizing conventional TV sensing, transmission, and display equipment. The modifications for flight demonstration consisted of modifying the sensor so it could be installed and flow in a Piper PA20 aircraft, equipped for remote control and modifying the display equipment so it could be integrated with the NASA Research RPB (RPRV) remote control cockpit.

  9. MID-INFRARED VARIABILITY OF THE BINARY SYSTEM CS Cha

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, Erick; Espaillat, Catherine; D'Alessio, Paola; Calvet, Nuria

    2012-03-10

    CS Cha is a binary system surrounded by a circumbinary disk. We construct a model for the inner disk regions and compare the resulting synthetic spectral energy distribution (SED) with Infrared Spectrograph spectra of CS Cha taken at two different epochs. For our model, we adopt a non-axisymmetric mass distribution from results of published numerical simulations of the interaction between a circumbinary disk and a binary system, where each star is surrounded by a disk. In particular, we approximate the streams of mass from which the inner circumstellar disks accrete from the circumbinary disk. This structure is due to the gravitational interaction of the stars with the disk, in which an array of disks and streams is formed in an inner hole. We calculate the temperature distribution of the optically thin dust in these inner regions considering the variable impinging radiation from both stars and use the observations to estimate the mass variations in the streams. We find that the SEDs for both epochs can be explained with emission from an optically thick inner edge of the circumbinary disk and from the optically thin streams that connect the circumbinary disk with the two smaller circumstellar disks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the emission from the optically thin material in the hole, suggested by the theory, is tested against observations of a binary system.

  10. An analysis of space power system masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Cull, Ronald C.; Kankam, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Various space electrical power system masses are analyzed with particular emphasis on the power management and distribution (PMAD) portion. The electrical power system (EPS) is divided into functional blocks: source, interconnection, storage, transmission, distribution, system control and load. The PMAD subsystem is defined as all the blocks between the source, storage and load, plus the power conditioning equipment required for the source, storage and load. The EPS mass of a wide range of spacecraft is then classified as source, storage or PMAD and tabulated in a database. The intent of the database is to serve as a reference source for PMAD masses of existing and in-design spacecraft. The PMAD masses in the database range from 40 kg/kW to 183 kg/kW across the spacecraft systems studied. Factors influencing the power system mass are identified. These include the total spacecraft power requirements, total amount of load capacity and physical size of the spacecraft. It is found that a new utility class of power systems, represented by Space Station Freedom, is evolving.

  11. Online mass storage system detailed requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The requirements for an online high density magnetic tape data storage system that can be implemented in a multipurpose, multihost environment is set forth. The objective of the mass storage system is to provide a facility for the compact storage of large quantities of data and to make this data accessible to computer systems with minimum operator handling. The results of a market survey and analysis of candidate vendor who presently market high density tape data storage systems are included.

  12. Comparative glacio-climatological analysis of mass balance variability along the geographical margin of Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehoczky, Annamária; Kern, Zoltán; Pongrácz, Rita

    2014-05-01

    Glacio-climatological studies recognise glacier mass balance changes as high-confident climate indicators. The climatic sensitivity of a glacier does not simply depend on regional climate variability but also influenced via large- and mesoscale atmospheric circulation patterns. This study focuses on recent changes in the mass balance using records from three border regions of Europe, and investigates the relationships between the seasonal mass balance components, regional climatic conditions, and distant atmospheric forcing. Since glaciers in different macro-climatological conditions (i.e., mid-latitudes or high-latitudes, dry-continental or maritime regions) may present strongly diverse mass balance characteristics, the three analysed regions were selected from different glacierised macroregions (using the database of the World Glacier Monitoring Service). These regions belong to the Caucasus Mountains (Central Europe macroregion), the Polar Ural (Northern Asia macroregion), and Svalbard (Arctic Islands macroregion). The analysis focuses on winter, summer, and annual mass balance series of eight glaciers. The climatic variables (atmospheric pressure, air temperature, precipitation) and indices of teleconnection patterns (e.g., North Atlantic Oscillation, Pacific Decadal Oscillation) are used from the gridded databases of the University of East Anglia, Climatic Research Unit and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Center for Environmental Prediction. However, the period and length of available mass balance data in the selected regions vary greatly (the first full record is in 1958, Polar Ural; the last is in 2010, Caucasus Mountains), a comparative analysis can be carried out for the period of 1968-1981. Since glaciers from different regions respond to large- and mesoscale climatic forcings differently, and because the mass balance of glaciers within a region often co-vary, our specific objectives are (i) to examine the variability and the

  13. Stability of libration points in the restricted four-body problem with variable mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Amit; Aggarwal, Rajiv; Suraj, Md. Sanam; Bisht, Virender Singh

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated the stability of the Lagrangian solutions for the restricted four-body problem with variable mass. It has been assumed that the three primaries with masses m1, m2 and m3 form an equilateral triangle, wherein m2=m3. According to Jeans' law (Astronomy and Cosmogony, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1928), the infinitesimal body varies its mass m with time. The space-time transformations of Meshcherskii (Studies on the Mechanics of Bodies of Variable Mass, GITTL, Moscow, 1949) are used by taking the values of the parameters q=1/2, k=0, n=1. The equations of motion of the infinitesimal body with variable mass have been determined. The equations of motion of the current problem differ from the ones of the restricted four-body problem with constant mass. There exist eight libration points, out of which two are collinear with the primary m1 and the rest are non-collinear for a fixed value of parameters γ (m {at time} t/m {at initial time}, 0<γ≤1 ), α (the proportionality constant in Jeans' law (Astronomy and Cosmogony, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1928), 0≤α≤2.2) and μ=0.019 (the mass parameter). All the libration points are found to be unstable. The zero velocity surfaces (ZVS) are also drawn and regions of motion are discussed.

  14. System-Level Integration of Mass Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian; Mellstrom, Jeffrey; Wysocky, Terry

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses integrating multiple memory modules on the high-speed serial interconnect (IEEE 1393) that is used by a spacecraft?s inter-module communications in order to ease data congestion and provide for a scalable, strong, flexible system that can meet new system-level mass memory requirements.

  15. Seasonal to interannual variability of water mass characteristics and currents on the Namibian shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, Tim; Mohrholz, Volker; Siegfried, Lydia; van der Plas, Anja

    2017-01-01

    We present long-term current meter records from the Benguela system together with salinity and temperature observations gathered by a mooring on the Namibian shelf across 13 years (2002-2015). From this unique data set a climatological mean state is estimated enabling us to investigate seasonal to interannual variations of these variables on the Namibian shelf. The present study highlights the importance of the alongshore advection for the water mass characteristics in the Benguela system on a seasonal time scale. The annual cycle of the alongshore transport is characterized by a biannual flow reversal. Poleward directed currents dominate from October to April, and from May to September equatorward currents prevail. In addition, we present observational evidence for a biannual intrusion of tropical waters into the Benguela system with maxima in October and February. Based on the in situ temperature data, several anomalous events are described that affect the whole water column. During the outstanding warm event in austral fall 2011 the monthly temperature anomaly exceeds one Kelvin for five consecutive months peaking in March (2.4 K) in the upper layer of the water column. Our study suggests, that the occurrence of such extreme temperature events in the Benguela upwelling system is closely related to the strength of the alongshore advection in austral summer.

  16. Alaska SAR Facility mass storage, current system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddy, David; Chu, Eugene; Bicknell, Tom

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the mass storage systems that are currently in place at the Alaska SAR Facility (SAF). The architecture of the facility will be presented including specifications of the mass storage media that are currently used and the performances that we have realized from the various media. The distribution formats and media are also discussed. Because the facility is expected to service future sensors, the new requirements and possible solutions to these requirements are also discussed.

  17. [The analysis of the causes of variability of the relationship between leaf dry mass and area in plants].

    PubMed

    Vasfilov, S P

    2011-01-01

    The lamina dry mass: area ratio (LMA - Leaf Mass per Area) is a quite variable trait. Leaf dry mass consists of symplast mass (a set of all leaf protoplasts) and apoplast mass (a set of all cell walls in a leaf). The ratio between symplast and apoplast masses is positively related to any functional trait of leaf calculated per unit of dry mass. The value of this ratio is defined by cells size and their number per unit of leaf area, number of mesophyll cells layers and their differentiation between palisade and spongy ones, and also by density of cells packing. The LMA value is defined by leaf thickness and density. The extent and direction of variability in both leaf traits define the extent and direction of variability in LMA. Negative correlation between leaf thickness and density reduces the level of LMA variability. As a consequence of this correlation the following pattern emerges: the thinner a leaf, the denser it is. Changes in the traits that define the LMA value take place both within a species under the influence of environmental factors and between species that differ in leaf structure and functions. Light is the most powerful environmental factor that influences the LMA, increase in illumination leading to increase in LMA. This effect occurs during leaf growth at the expense of structural changes associated with the reduction of symplast/apoplast mass ratio. Under conditions of intense illumination, LMA may increase due to accumulation of starch. With regard to the majority of leaf functions, the mass of starch may be ascribed to apoplast. Starch accumulation in leaves is observed also under conditions of elevated CO2 concentration in the air. Under high illumination, however, LMA increases also due to increased apoplast contribution to leaf dry mass. Scarce mineral nutrition leads to LMA increase due to lowering of growth zones demands for phothosyntates and, therefore, to increase in starch content of leaves. High level of mineral nutrition during

  18. Mass flow in close binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    The manner of mass flow in close binary systems is examined with a special view to the role of the so-called critical Roche (or Jacobian) lobe, taking into consideration relevant physical conditions such as radiation pressure that may affect the restricted three-body problem treatment. The mass does not necessarily flow from component one to component two through the L1 point to form a gaseous ring surrounding the latter. These considerations are applied to X-ray binaries with early-type optical components, such as Cyg X-1 (HDE 226868) and 3U 1700 - 37 (HD 153919). In the two bright close binary systems Beta Lyr and UW CMa, which are believed to be undergoing dynamic mass transfer, recent Copernicus observations show that the gas giving rise to the prominent ultraviolet emission lines surrounds the entire binary system rather than merely component two. Implications of these observations are also discussed.

  19. INFRARED VARIABILITY OF THE GLIESE 569B SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Scuderi, Louis J.

    2012-06-20

    Gliese 569B is a multiple brown dwarf system whose exact nature has been the subject of several investigations over the past few years. Interpretation has partially relied on infrared photometry and spectroscopy of the resolved components of the system. We present seeing-limited K{sub s} photometry over four nights, searching for variability in this young low-mass substellar system. Our photometry is consistent with other reported photometry, and we report the tentative detection of several periodic signals consistent with rotational modulation due to spots on their surfaces. The five significant periods range from 2.90 hr to 12.8 hr, with peak-to-peak variabilities from 28 mmag to 62 mmag in the K{sub s} band. If both components are rotating with the shortest periods, then their rotation axes are not parallel with each other, and the rotation axis of the Bb component is not perpendicular to the Ba-Bb orbital plane. If Bb has one of the longer rotational periods, then the Bb rotation axis is consistent with being parallel to the orbital axis of the Ba-Bb system.

  20. Dynamical limits on dark mass in the outer solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Hogg, D.W.; Quinlan, G.D.; Tremaine, S. MIT, Cambridge, MA )

    1991-06-01

    Simplified model solar systems with known observational errors are considered in conducting a dynamical search for dark mass and its minimum detectable amount, and in determining the significance of observed anomalies. The numerical analysis of the dynamical influence of dark mass on the orbits of outer planets and comets is presented in detail. Most conclusions presented are based on observations of the four giant planets where the observational errors in latitude and longitude are independent Gaussian variables with a standard deviation. Neptune's long orbital period cannot be predicted by modern ephemerides, and no evidence of dark mass is found in considering this planet. Studying the improvement in fit when observations are fitted to models that consider dark mass is found to be an efficient way to detect dark mass. Planet X must have a mass of more than about 10 times the minimum detectable mass to locate the hypothetical planet. It is suggested that the IRAS survey would have already located the Planet X if it is so massive and close that it dynamically influences the outer planets. Orbital residuals from comets are found to be more effective than those from planets in detecting the Kuiper belt. 35 refs.

  1. Future satellite missions for time-variable geopotential recovery - results from the ESA Mass Transport Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reubelt, T.; Sneeuw, N.; Visser, P. N. A. M.; van Dam, T.; Losch, M.

    2009-04-01

    With the successful GRACE mission (data collection since Spring 2002), global time-variable gravity fields can be recovered beyond the lower degrees for the first time. Although GRACE is able to detect significant features of the time-variable geopotential, e.g. the continental hydrological cycle, trends in ice-mass change in Antarctica or Greenland or sea level rise, its mission concept suffers from inherent deficiencies. The main limitations of GRACE are (i) the range-rate measurements (insufficient accuracy, anisotropy of the leader-follower-formation), (ii) aliasing due to spatial and temporal undersampling and (iii) inaccurate de-aliasing products. This leads to an erroneous North-South striping pattern and a limited accuracy and resolution for many scientific studies. Within the ESA project „Monitoring and Modeling Individual Sources of Mass Distribution and Transport in the Earth System by Means of Satellites" potential future satellite mission concepts, which could improve time-variable geopotential-recovery, have been studied. An improved accuracy of a future laser instrument as well as an enhanced temporal sampling have been regarded in the simulations, which were based on repeat orbits. An enhanced sampling can be achieved by means of multi-satellite-missions, where the spatial and/or temporal resolutions are improved by: 1) additional satellites on interleaved groundtracks and/or 2) time shifted satellites on the same groundtrack. Another possibility is the so-called Pete-Bender-design, where the satellites fly on different repeat-orbits with different inclinations, which also allows for more homogeneous groundtrack coverage. Sophisticated satellite-formations such as cartwheels or gravity wheels have not been regarded so far due to the unsolved technical problems (e.g. control of the laser instrument) related to these designs. The primary objective of the simulation studies was the precise recovery of the input hydrological signal and the trends of

  2. Apparent mass of the human body in the vertical direction: Inter-subject variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toward, Martin G. R.; Griffin, Michael J.

    2011-02-01

    The biodynamic responses of the seated human body to whole-body vibration vary considerably between people, but the reasons for the variability are not well understood. This study was designed to determine how the physical characteristics of people affect their apparent mass and whether inter-subject variability is influenced by the magnitude of vibration and the support of a seat backrest. The vertical apparent masses of 80 seated adults (41 males and 39 females aged 18-65) were measured at frequencies between 0.6 and 20 Hz with four backrest conditions (no backrest, upright rigid backrest, reclined rigid backrest, reclined foam backrest) and with three magnitudes of random vibration (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m s -2 rms). Relationships between subject physical characteristics (age, gender, weight, and anthropometry) and subject apparent mass were investigated with multiple regression models. The strongest predictor of the modulus of the vertical apparent mass at 0.6 Hz, at resonance, and at 12 Hz was body weight, with other factors having only a marginal effect. After correction for other variables, the principal resonance frequency was most consistently associated with age and body mass index. As age increased from 18 to 65 years, the resonance frequency increased by up to 1.7 Hz, and when the body mass index was increased from 18 to 34 kg m -2 the resonance frequency decreased by up to 1.7 Hz. These changes were greater than the 0.9-Hz increase in resonance frequency between sitting without a backrest and sitting with a reclined rigid backrest, and greater than the 1.0-Hz reduction in resonance frequency when the magnitude of vibration increased from 0.5 to 1.5 m s -2 rms. It is concluded that the effects of age, body mass index, posture, vibration magnitude, and weight should be taken into account when defining the vertical apparent mass of the seated human body.

  3. High Temperature Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Walker, Kara L.; Anderson, William G.

    2009-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) is under development to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. The status of the ongoing effort in developing this technology is presented in this paper. An earlier, preliminary design had a radiator outside the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) casing, used NaK as the working fluid, and had the reservoir located on the cold side adapter flange. The revised design has an internal radiator inside the casing, with the reservoir embedded inside the insulation. A large set of advantages are offered by this new design. In addition to reducing the overall size and mass of the VCHP, simplicity, compactness and easiness in assembling the VCHP with the ASRG are significantly enhanced. Also, the permanently elevated temperatures of the entire VCHP allows the change of the working fluid from a binary compound (NaK) to single compound (Na). The latter, by its properties, allows higher performance and further mass reduction of the system. Preliminary design and analysis shows an acceptable peak temperature of the ASRG case of 140 C while the heat losses caused by the addition of the VCHP are 1.8 W.

  4. The influence of mass-transfer variability on the growth of white dwarfs, and the implications for Type Ia supernova rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toonen, S.; Voss, R.; Knigge, C.

    2014-06-01

    White dwarfs (WDs) can increase their mass by accretion from companion stars, provided the mass-accretion rate is high enough to avoid nova eruptions. The accretion regimes that allow growth of the WDs are usually calculated assuming constant mass-transfer rates. However, it is possible that these systems are influenced by effects that cause the rate to fluctuate on various time-scales. We investigate how long-term mass-transfer variability affects accreting WDs systems. We show that, if such variability is present, it expands the parameter space of binaries where the WD can effectively increase its mass. Furthermore, we find that the Type Ia supernova (SNIa) rate is enhanced by a factor 2-2.5 to a rate that is comparable with the lower limit of the observed rates. The changes in the delay-time distribution allow for more SNIae in stellar populations with ages of a few Gyr. Thus, mass-transfer variability gives rise to a new formation channel of SNIa events that can significantly contribute to the SNIa rate. Mass-transfer variability is also likely to affect other binary populations through enhanced WD growth. For example, it may explain why WDs in cataclysmic variables are observed to be more massive than single WDs, on average.

  5. Superpartner mass measurement technique using 1D orthogonal decompositions of the Cambridge transverse mass variable M(T2).

    PubMed

    Konar, Partha; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T; Park, Myeonghun

    2010-07-30

    We propose a new model-independent technique for mass measurements in missing energy events at hadron colliders. We illustrate our method with the most challenging case of a single-step decay chain. We consider inclusive same-sign chargino pair production in supersymmetry, followed by leptonic decays to sneutrinos χ+ χ+ → ℓ+ ℓ'+ ν(ℓ)ν(ℓ') and invisible decays ν(ℓ) → ν(ℓ) χ(1)(0). We introduce two one-dimensional decompositions of the Cambridge MT2 variable: M(T2∥) and M(T2⊥), on the direction of the upstream transverse momentum P→T and the direction orthogonal to it, respectively. We show that the sneutrino mass Mc can be measured directly by minimizing the number of events N(Mc) in which MT2 exceeds a certain threshold, conveniently measured from the end point M(T2⊥)(max) (Mc).

  6. Thrust distribution for attitude control in a variable thrust propulsion system with four ACS nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yeerang; Lee, Wonsuk; Bang, Hyochoong; Lee, Hosung

    2017-04-01

    A thrust distribution approach is proposed in this paper for a variable thrust solid propulsion system with an attitude control system (ACS) that uses a reduced number of nozzles for a three-axis attitude maneuver. Although a conventional variable thrust solid propulsion system needs six ACS nozzles, this paper proposes a thrust system with four ACS nozzles to reduce the complexity and mass of the system. The performance of the new system was analyzed with numerical simulations, and the results show that the performance of the system with four ACS nozzles was similar to the original system while the mass of the whole system was simultaneously reduced. Moreover, a feasibility analysis was performed to determine whether a thrust system with three ACS nozzles is possible.

  7. Effect of body mass and midsole hardness on kinetic and perceptual variables during basketball landing manoeuvres.

    PubMed

    Nin, Darren Z; Lam, Wing K; Kong, Pui W

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of body mass and shoe midsole hardness on kinetic and perceptual variables during the performance of three basketball movements: (1) the first and landing steps of layup, (2) shot-blocking landing and (3) drop landing. Thirty male basketball players, assigned into "heavy" (n = 15, mass 82.7 ± 4.3 kg) or "light" (n = 15, mass 63.1 ± 2.8 kg) groups, performed five trials of each movement in three identical shoes of varying midsole hardness (soft, medium, hard). Vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) during landing was sampled using multiple wooden-top force plates. Perceptual responses on five variables (forefoot cushioning, rearfoot cushioning, forefoot stability, rearfoot stability and overall comfort) were rated after each movement condition using a 150-mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). A mixed factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) (Body Mass × Shoe) was applied to all kinetic and perceptual variables. During the first step of the layup, the loading rate associated with rearfoot contact was 40.7% higher in the "heavy" than "light" groups (P = .014) and 12.4% higher in hard compared with soft shoes (P = .011). Forefoot peak VGRF in a soft shoe was higher (P = .011) than in a hard shoe during shot-block landing. Both "heavy" and "light" groups preferred softer to harder shoes. Overall, body mass had little effect on kinetic or perceptual variables.

  8. Using System Mass (SM), Equivalent Mass (EM), Equivalent System Mass (ESM) or Life Cycle Mass (LCM) in Advanced Life Support (ALS) Reporting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Life Support (ALS) has used a single number, Equivalent System Mass (ESM), for both reporting progress and technology selection. ESM is the launch mass required to provide a space system. ESM indicates launch cost. ESM alone is inadequate for technology selection, which should include other metrics such as Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Life Cycle Cost (LCC) and also consider perfom.arxe 2nd risk. ESM has proven difficult to implement as a reporting metric, partly because it includes non-mass technology selection factors. Since it will not be used exclusively for technology selection, a new reporting metric can be made easier to compute and explain. Systems design trades-off performance, cost, and risk, but a risk weighted cost/benefit metric would be too complex to report. Since life support has fixed requirements, different systems usually have roughly equal performance. Risk is important since failure can harm the crew, but it is difficult to treat simply. Cost is not easy to estimate, but preliminary space system cost estimates are usually based on mass, which is better estimated than cost. Amass-based cost estimate, similar to ESM, would be a good single reporting metric. The paper defines and compares four mass-based cost estimates, Equivalent Mass (EM), Equivalent System Mass (ESM), Life Cycle Mass (LCM), and System Mass (SM). EM is traditional in life support and includes mass, volume, power, cooling and logistics. ESM is the specifically defined ALS metric, which adds crew time and possibly other cost factors to EM. LCM is a new metric, a mass-based estimate of LCC measured in mass units. SM includes only the factors of EM that are originally measured in mass, the hardware and logistics mass. All four mass-based metrics usually give similar comparisons. SM is by far the simplest to compute and easiest to explain.

  9. Linking the spatial variability of glacier mass loss to fjord geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. F.; Tinto, K. J.; Boghosian, A.; Cochran, J. R.; Csatho, B. M.; Bell, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    There is compelling evidence of increasing mass loss of the ice sheets using a diverse set of observations, including increased thinning rates measured from both airborne and satellite altimeters, elevated mass fluxes resulting from the acceleration of outlet glaciers, and mass changes measured directly from satellite gravimetry. A dominant characteristic of observed change in Greenland outlet glaciers is that it is locally random. Numerous studies have revealed a high degree of spatial and temporal variability of outlet glacier mass change. Modeling studies suggest that increased ocean temperatures may be responsible for the observed glacial retreat in Greenland through increased basal melting, leading to increased calving rates, terminus retreat, glacier speedup, and eventually thinning of inland ice. Knowledge of fjord geometry is crucial for ice-ocean interaction because the availability of ocean heat to the ice will be restricted by narrow sills and shallow grounding lines. We investigate whether the variability in observed changes among Greenland glaciers can be partially explained by variation in fjord geometry. Using statistical techniques commonly employed to detect patterns in complex spatial data, we objectively show that mass change in Greenland tidewater glaciers between 2003 and 2009 is indeed mostly spatially incoherent. Except for a few clusters of similar change in the NW and Scoresby Sund regions, there is significant glacier-scale variability in mass loss rates. To understand the drivers of this local variability, we compare fjord bathymetries from all regions of Greenland, modeled using airborne gravimetry measurements from NASA Operation IceBridge flights, to estimates of glaciological change. Specifically, we investigate the correlation between water depths at the grounding line and the dynamic mass loss of tidewater glaciers. In theory, a deep grounding line will allow greater interaction with the warm Atlantic Water observed in most fjords

  10. Expert overseer for mass spectrometer system

    DOEpatents

    Filby, Evan E.; Rankin, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    An expert overseer for the operation and real-time management of a mass spectrometer and associated laboratory equipment. The overseer is a computer-based expert diagnostic system implemented on a computer separate from the dedicated computer used to control the mass spectrometer and produce the analysis results. An interface links the overseer to components of the mass spectrometer, components of the laboratory support system, and the dedicated control computer. Periodically, the overseer polls these devices and as well as itself. These data are fed into an expert portion of the system for real-time evaluation. A knowledge base used for the evaluation includes both heuristic rules and precise operation parameters. The overseer also compares current readings to a long-term database to detect any developing trends using a combination of statistical and heuristic rules to evaluate the results. The overseer has the capability to alert lab personnel whenever questionable readings or trends are observed and provide a background review of the problem and suggest root causes and potential solutions, or appropriate additional tests that could be performed. The overseer can change the sequence or frequency of the polling to respond to an observation in the current data.

  11. Effective mass discontinuity and current oscillations in stratified systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halilov, S.; Mil'shtein, S.

    2015-11-01

    Tunnelling transport in modulated film, which occurs either stoichiometrically or due to a stress field, is analysed in terms of the variable carrier effective mass tensor. It is shown that the mass tensor discontinuity alone, i.e. with no actual potential barrier present, may lead to current oscillations versus the size of the modulated region. While both effects of mass discontinuity and the band offset upon the carrier flow are formally described in terms of wave mechanics, their mechanisms are quite distinct: the magnitude of the current oscillations due to mass disruption is determined by the differential mass across the interface, i.e. by change in the covalency due to structural modulation, whereas the band offset is generally an effect of the affinity change across the interface. Both effects are superimposed by the 3D kinematic coupling of the orthogonal transport, either constructively or destructively, leading to an oscillatory dependence of the current magnitude on the film dimension. As an illustration, the analysis is applied to a Si1-x Ge x /Si stratified structure to demonstrate the effect of quasi-bound states on the transport. The modelling is corroborated by a device simulation of a SiGe system in a heterojunction bipolar transistor setting. The findings can be used as a general method to control anisotropic tunnelling transport in stratified structures.

  12. Interannual variability of water masses transports across A25-OVIDE section (subpolar atlantic gyre)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carracedo, L. I.; García, M.; Mercier, H.; Conde, P.; Lherminier, P.; Pérez, F. F.; Gilcoto, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Ovide (Observatoire de la Variabilité Interannuelle à DEcennale) project has consisted on repeated trans-oceanic hydrographic section from Greenland to Portugal every other year (from 2002 to 2010). This project is part of the CLIVAR (Climate Variability and Predictability) and CARBOOCEAN international programs, both focused on ocean climate variability. The section crosses the main currents implicated in the North Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC), and is very close to the previous A25 section ("Fourex") of the WOCE (World Ocean Circulation Experiment) performed in 1997. The North Atlantic Ocean plays a crucial role in the global thermohaline circulation as can be considered the departure point of the MOC, where the warm salty waters are transformed by deep winter convection into deep waters. The water mass distribution in the section is derived by means of OMP method for every cruise, and then combined with absolute velocity fields to provide the relative contribution from each water mass to the final transport values. The water mass circulation pattern across the section is then discussed within the context of interannual variability of the main MOC components, in terms of the different water mass components. The mean transport for each of these water masses results in 11.7 ± 2.6 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1) for central waters, 2.0 ± 0.69 Sv for SubArtic Intermediate Water, 0.58 ± 0.51 Sv for Antartic Intermediate water and MW 0.15 ± 1.3 Sv, all of them flowing northward and contributing to the upper branch of the MOC. On other hand, the lower MOC branch transports southward -8.5 ± 2.0 Sv of LSW, -3.3 ± 0.33 Sv of Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water and -1.3 ± 0.92 Sv of Denmark Strait Overflow Water, with an almost zero net transport of North East Atlantic Deep Water of 0.17 ± 1.0 Sv. The knowledge of the variability and contribution of each water mass itself will allow a better understanding of the global circulation mechanisms in the

  13. Mass spectrometer vacuum housing and pumping system

    DOEpatents

    Coutts, Gerald W.; Bushman, John F.; Alger, Terry W.

    1996-01-01

    A vacuum housing and pumping system for a portable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The vacuum housing section of the system has minimum weight for portability while designed and constructed to utilize metal gasket sealed stainless steel to be compatible with high vacuum operation. The vacuum pumping section of the system consists of a sorption (getter) pump to remove atmospheric leakage and outgassing contaminants as well as the gas chromatograph carrier gas (hydrogen) and an ion pump to remove the argon from atmospheric leaks. The overall GC/MS system has broad application to contaminants, hazardous materials, illegal drugs, pollution monitoring, etc., as well as for use by chemical weapon treaty verification teams, due to the light weight and portability thereof.

  14. Mass spectrometer vacuum housing and pumping system

    DOEpatents

    Coutts, G.W.; Bushman, J.F.; Alger, T.W.

    1996-07-23

    A vacuum housing and pumping system is described for a portable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The vacuum housing section of the system has minimum weight for portability while designed and constructed to utilize metal gasket sealed stainless steel to be compatible with high vacuum operation. The vacuum pumping section of the system consists of a sorption (getter) pump to remove atmospheric leakage and outgassing contaminants as well as the gas chromatograph carrier gas (hydrogen) and an ion pump to remove the argon from atmospheric leaks. The overall GC/MS system has broad application to contaminants, hazardous materials, illegal drugs, pollution monitoring, etc., as well as for use by chemical weapon treaty verification teams, due to the light weight and portability thereof. 7 figs.

  15. Mass Properties for Space Systems Standards Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beech, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Current Verbiage in S-120 Applies to Dry Mass. Mass Margin is difference between Required Mass and Predicted Mass. Performance Margin is difference between Predicted Performance and Required Performance. Performance estimates and corresponding margin should be based on Predicted Mass (and other inputs). Contractor Mass Margin reserved from Performance Margin. Remaining performance margin allocated according to mass partials. Compliance can be evaluated effectively by comparison of three areas (preferably on a single sheet). Basic and Predicted Mass (including historical trend). Aggregate potential changes (threats and opportunities) which gives Mass Forecast. Mass Maturity by category (Estimated/Calculated/Actual).

  16. Mass and Reliability System (MaRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) Directorate is responsible for mitigating risk, providing system safety, and lowering risk for space programs from ground to space. The S&MA is divided into 4 divisions: The Space Exploration Division (NC), the International Space Station Division (NE), the Safety & Test Operations Division (NS), and the Quality and Flight Equipment Division (NT). The interns, myself and Arun Aruljothi, will be working with the Risk & Reliability Analysis Branch under the NC Division's. The mission of this division is to identify, characterize, diminish, and communicate risk by implementing an efficient and effective assurance model. The team utilizes Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) to ensure decisions concerning risks are informed, vehicles are safe and reliable, and program/project requirements are realistic and realized. This project pertains to the Orion mission, so it is geared toward a long duration Human Space Flight Program(s). For space missions, payload is a critical concept; balancing what hardware can be replaced by components verse by Orbital Replacement Units (ORU) or subassemblies is key. For this effort a database was created that combines mass and reliability data, called Mass and Reliability System or MaRS. The U.S. International Space Station (ISS) components are used as reference parts in the MaRS database. Using ISS components as a platform is beneficial because of the historical context and the environment similarities to a space flight mission. MaRS uses a combination of systems: International Space Station PART for failure data, Vehicle Master Database (VMDB) for ORU & components, Maintenance & Analysis Data Set (MADS) for operation hours and other pertinent data, & Hardware History Retrieval System (HHRS) for unit weights. MaRS is populated using a Visual Basic Application. Once populated, the excel spreadsheet is comprised of information on ISS components including

  17. Greenland mass variation from time-variable gravity in the absence of GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, O.

    2013-08-01

    In a recent paper, the authors succeeded in the inference of time-variable gravity from orbit analysis of the CHAMP satellite. The authors demonstrated the potential of the adopted methods by validation against GRACE data and surface height changes from GPS ground stations. This paper presents the capability of orbit analysis for the spatiotemporal quantification of Greenland mass change trends. Based on CHAMP time-variable gravity fields from January 2003 to December 2009, we estimated the ice mass loss over the entire of Greenland to 246±10 Gt/yr. This result is in line with the findings from GRACE data analysis (223±10 Gt/yr) over the same period; the trend estimates differ by only 10%. Moreover, for some areas, the spatial mass variation patterns are in good agreement, pinpointing dominant deglaciation along the Greenland coastline. We conclude that orbit analysis of low-Earth orbiting spacecraft is suitable to assess Greenland mass balance in the absence of the GRACE satellites.

  18. A NEW SAMPLE OF CANDIDATE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLES SELECTED BY X-RAY VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kamizasa, Naoya; Terashima, Yuichi; Awaki, Hisamitsu

    2012-05-20

    We present the results of X-ray variability and spectral analysis of a sample of 15 new candidates for active galactic nuclei with relatively low-mass black holes (BHs). They are selected from the Second XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue based on strong variability quantified by normalized excess variances. Their BH masses are estimated to be (1.1-6.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} by using a correlation between excess variance and BH mass. Seven sources have estimated BH masses smaller than 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }, which are in the range for intermediate-mass black holes. Eddington ratios of sources with known redshifts range from 0.07 to 0.46 and the mean Eddington ratio is 0.24. These results imply that some of our sources are growing supermassive black holes, which are expected to have relatively low masses with high Eddington ratios. X-ray photon indices of the 15 sources are in the range of Almost-Equal-To 0.57-2.57 and 5 among them have steep (>2) photon indices, which are the range for narrow-line Seyfert 1s. Soft X-ray excess is seen in 12 sources and is expressed by a blackbody model with kT Almost-Equal-To 83-294 eV. We derive a correlation between X-ray photon indices and Eddington ratios, and find that the X-ray photon indices of about a half of our sources are flatter than the positive correlation suggested previously.

  19. High Temperature Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tarau, Calin; Walker, Kara L.; Anderson, William G.

    2009-03-16

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling converter provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) is under development to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling engine. The status of the ongoing effort in developing this technology is presented in this paper. An earlier, preliminary design had a radiator outside the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) casing, used NaK as the working fluid, and had the reservoir located on the cold side adapter flange. The revised design has an internal radiator inside the casing, with the reservoir embedded inside the insulation. A large set of advantages are offered by this new design. In addition to reducing the overall size and mass of the VCHP, simplicity, compactness and easiness in assembling the VCHP with the ASRG are significantly enhanced. Also, the permanently elevated temperatures of the entire VCHP allows the change of the working fluid from a binary compound (NaK) to single compound (Na). The latter, by its properties, allows higher performance and further mass reduction of the system. Preliminary design and analysis shows an acceptable peak temperature of the ASRG case of 140 deg. C while the heat losses caused by the addition of the VCHP are 1.8 W.

  20. Variability in young very low mass stars: two surprises from spectrophotometric monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhinova, I.; Scholz, A.; Eislöffel, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present simultaneous photometric and spectroscopic observations of seven young and highly variable M dwarfs in star-forming regions in Orion, conducted in four observing nights with FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph2 at European Southern Observatory/VLT. All seven targets show significant photometric variability in the I band, with amplitudes between 0.1-0.8 mag, The spectra, however, remain remarkably constant, with spectral type changes less than 0.5 subtypes. Thus, the brightness changes are not caused by veiling that `fills in' absorption features. Three objects in the σ Ori cluster (age ˜3 Myr) exhibit strong Hα emission and Hα variability, in addition to the continuum variations. Their behaviour is mostly consistent with the presence of spots with temperature of ˜300 K above the photosphere and filling factors between 0.2-0.4, in contrast to typical hotspots observed in more massive stars. The remaining targets near ɛ Ori, likely to be older, show eclipse-like light curves, no significant Hα activity and are better represented by variable extinction due to circumstellar material. Interestingly, two of them show no evidence of infrared excess emission. Our study shows that high-amplitude variability in young very low mass stars can be caused by different phenomena than in more massive T Tauri stars and can persist when the disc has disappeared and accretion has ceased.

  1. Measuring mixed cellulose ester (MCE) filter mass under variable humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Kenneth T; Brorby, Greg; Berman, D Wayne; Sheehan, Pat; Floyd, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Mixed cellulose ester (MCE) filters, used routinely to collect dust samples from air for fiber analysis, are the only filter type that can be prepared for both phased contrast microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses. However, whenever fiber counts require collecting dust masses <100 μg on a single filter under variable relative humidity (RH) conditions, historically noted effects of humidity on MCE filter mass can hinder accurate estimates of dust mass, measured as loaded minus unloaded filter mass (M). In this study, a baseline set of hundreds of paired measures of change in RH versus M over different time intervals were obtained over a 5-day period for replicate series of 40 unloaded 37-mm MCE filters under varying RH conditions at a nearly constant temperature. Similar baseline data were obtained for 25-mm MCE filters. Linear regressions fit to these data allow improved estimates of dust mass loaded onto MCE filters from measures of M and RH made before and after loading occurs. Using established theory, these relationships were generalized to address temperature variation as well, and examples of numerical applications are provided.

  2. Greenland Ice Sheet seasonal and spatial mass variability from model simulations and GRACE (2003-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Patrick M.; Tedesco, Marco; Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne; Luthcke, Scott B.; Fettweis, Xavier; Larour, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Improving the ability of regional climate models (RCMs) and ice sheet models (ISMs) to simulate spatiotemporal variations in the mass of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is crucial for prediction of future sea level rise. While several studies have examined recent trends in GrIS mass loss, studies focusing on mass variations at sub-annual and sub-basin-wide scales are still lacking. At these scales, processes responsible for mass change are less well understood and modeled, and could potentially play an important role in future GrIS mass change. Here, we examine spatiotemporal variations in mass over the GrIS derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites for the January 2003-December 2012 period using a "mascon" approach, with a nominal spatial resolution of 100 km, and a temporal resolution of 10 days. We compare GRACE-estimated mass variations against those simulated by the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) RCM and the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). In order to properly compare spatial and temporal variations in GrIS mass from GRACE with model outputs, we find it necessary to spatially and temporally filter model results to reproduce leakage of mass inherent in the GRACE solution. Both modeled and satellite-derived results point to a decline (of -178.9 ± 4.4 and -239.4 ± 7.7 Gt yr-1 respectively) in GrIS mass over the period examined, but the models appear to underestimate the rate of mass loss, especially in areas below 2000 m in elevation, where the majority of recent GrIS mass loss is occurring. On an ice-sheet-wide scale, the timing of the modeled seasonal cycle of cumulative mass (driven by summer mass loss) agrees with the GRACE-derived seasonal cycle, within limits of uncertainty from the GRACE solution. However, on sub-ice-sheet-wide scales, some areas exhibit significant differences in the timing of peaks in the annual cycle of mass change. At these scales, model biases, or processes not accounted for by models related

  3. Surface Time-Variable Gravity Signals and Possible Sources Including Core Mass Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Over two decades of geodetic satellite-laser-ranging (SLR) data show that the variation of the Earth's oblateness parameter J2 has a clear seasonal signal of amplitude of about 3e-10 and a secular decrease of about -2.8e-11/year, superimposed on some interesting interannual fluctuations. Physically, any change in mass distribution or/inside the Earth will be reflected in the time-variable gravity signal obtained outside the Earth, according to Newton s gravitational law. Therefore, such signal contains contributions from all geophysical sources that redistribute mass, on all temporal and spatial scales, including those from the core. Besides Earth rotation and geomagnetic field variations, the time-variable gravity also contains information linking Earth surface observations with internal core dynamical processes. The time scales of the gravity signal are critical in helping differentiate different contributions. The atmosphere and hydrosphere are responsible for the seasonal and much of the interannual and intraseasoanl fluctuations, while the secular trend is due mainly to the post-glacial rebound but possibly core mass flow. To estimate the latter effect, we use our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent, Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to forward simulate the core flow, and density variation due to the core convection. Our results suggest that, when upward continued to the surface, the J2 component of the core mass redistribution can reach an overall amplitude of e-11/year, approaching the SLR detectability and significant in geophysical terms. We also find a general westward drift of the mass flow, with a speed comparable to that of the geomagnetic westward drift.

  4. Detection of volatile compounds with mass-sensitive sensor arrays in the presence of variable ambient humidity.

    PubMed

    Dickert, F L; Hayden, O; Zenkel, M E

    1999-04-01

    Mass-sensitive sensor arrays were established for the detection of isomeric or highly analogue analyte mixtures, which show similar physical and morphological properties. Supramolecular host-guest chemistry and arrays of four mass-sensitive quartz crystal microbalances have been successfully combined with multivariate calibration techniques in the presence of variable air moisture. This system enabled even the separation of xylene isomers [Formula: see text] a task that might be crucial even by gas chromatography. The data of the sensor arrays were analyzed with partial least squares and artificial neural networks. The xylene isomers could be detected with an accuracy of ∼1% in the range of 0-200 ppm, nearly eliminating the residual water cross-sensitivity of the sensor coatings, which allows effective work place or environmental monitoring of toxic compounds with fast response levels.

  5. Has Natural Variability Masked the Expected Increase in Antarctic Surface Mass Balance with Global Warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previdi, M. J.; Polvani, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the expected and rather paradoxical consequences of anthropogenic global warming is an increase in Antarctic surface mass balance (or net snow accumulation), as robustly simulated by both global and regional climate models. This surface mass balance (SMB) increase occurs because the higher moisture content of a warmer atmosphere leads to increases in precipitation, with this precipitation falling in the form of snow over Antarctica. Despite these robust model projections, however, observations indicate that there has been no significant change in Antarctic SMB during the past several decades. Here, we show that this apparent discrepancy between models and observations can be explained by the fact that the anthropogenic climate change signal is still relatively small compared to the noise associated with natural climate variability. Using an ensemble of 35 global coupled climate models to separate signal and noise, we find that the forced SMB increase due to global warming in recent decades is unlikely to be detectable in a statistical sense as a result of large natural SMB variability on interannual-to-multidecadal timescales. However, our analysis reveals that if the world continues to follow the present trajectory of greenhouse gas emissions, the anthropogenic impact on Antarctic SMB will emerge from natural variability by the middle of the current century. With this, SMB increases over Antarctica will begin to mitigate global sea-level rise, partially offsetting the effects of dynamic ice loss.

  6. Has Natural Variability Masked the Expected Increase in Antarctic Surface Mass Balance with Global Warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previdi, Michael; Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    2016-04-01

    One of the expected and rather paradoxical consequences of anthropogenic global warming is an increase in Antarctic surface mass balance (or net snow accumulation), as robustly simulated by both global and regional climate models. This surface mass balance (SMB) increase occurs because the higher moisture content of a warmer atmosphere leads to increases in precipitation, with this precipitation falling in the form of snow over Antarctica. Despite these robust model projections, however, observations indicate that there has been no significant change in Antarctic SMB during the past several decades. Here, we show that this apparent discrepancy between models and observations can be explained by the fact that the anthropogenic climate change signal is still relatively small compared to the noise associated with natural climate variability. Using an ensemble of 35 global coupled climate models to separate signal and noise, we find that the forced SMB increase due to global warming in recent decades is unlikely to be detectable in a statistical sense as a result of large natural SMB variability on interannual-to-multidecadal timescales. However, our analysis reveals that if the world continues to follow the present trajectory of greenhouse gas emissions, the anthropogenic impact on Antarctic SMB will emerge from natural variability by the middle of the current century. With this, SMB increases over Antarctica will begin to mitigate global sea-level rise, partially offsetting the effects of dynamic ice loss.

  7. Re-interpreting the Oxbridge stransverse mass variable M T2 in general cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahbubani, Rakhi; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun

    2013-03-01

    We extend the range of possible applications of M T2 type analyses to decay chains with multiple invisible particles, as well as to asymmetric event topologies with different parent and/or different children particles. We advocate two possible approaches. In the first, we introduce suitably defined 3 + 1-dimensional analogues of the M T2 variable, which take into account all relevant on-shell kinematic constraints in a given event topology. The second approach utilizes the conventional M T2 variable, but its kinematic endpoint is suitably reinterpreted on a case by case basis, depending on the specific event topology at hand. We provide the general prescription for this reinterpretation, including the formulas relating the measured M T2 endpoint (as a function of the test masses of all the invisible particles) to the underlying physical mass spectrum. We also provide analytical formulas for the shape of the differential distribution of the doubly projected {M_{{T{2_{bot }}}}} variable for the ten possible event topologies with one visible particle and up to two invisible particles per decay chain. We illustrate our results with the example of leptonic chargino decays {{widetilde{χ}}+}to {ell+}ν {{widetilde{χ}}^0} in supersymmetry.

  8. Evaluation of Small Mass Spectrometer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Griffin, Timothy P.; Ottens, Andrew K.; Diaz, Jorge A.; Follistein, Duke W.; Adams, Fredrick W.; Helms, William R.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This work is aimed at understanding the aspects of designing a miniature mass spectrometer (MS) system. A multitude of commercial and government sectors, such as the military, environmental agencies and industrial manufacturers of semiconductors, refrigerants, and petroleum products, would find a small, portable, rugged and reliable MS system beneficial. Several types of small MS systems are evaluated and discussed, including linear quadrupole, quadrupole ion trap, time of flight and sector. The performance of each system in terms of accuracy, precision, limits of detection, response time, recovery time, scan rate, volume and weight is assessed. A performance scale is setup to rank each systems and an overall performance score is given to each system. All experiments involved the analysis of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and argon in a nitrogen background with the concentrations of the components of interest ranging from 0-5000 part-per-million (ppm). The relative accuracies of the systems vary from < 1% to approx. 40% with an average below 10%. Relative precisions varied from 1% to 20%, with an average below 5%. The detection limits had a large distribution, ranging from 0.2 to 170 ppm. The systems had a diverse response time ranging from 4 s to 210 s as did the recovery time with a 6 s to 210 s distribution. Most instruments had scan times near, 1 s, however one instrument exceeded 13 s. System weights varied from 9 to 52 kg and sizes from 15 x 10(exp 3)cu cm to 110 x 10(exp 3) cu cm.

  9. Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William G.; Tarau, Calin

    2008-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) was designed to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling engine. A VCHP turns on with a delta T of 30 C, which is high enough to not risk standard ASRG operation but low enough to save most heater head life. This VCHP has a low mass, and low thermal losses for normal operation. In addition to the design, a proof-of-concept NaK VCHP was fabricated and tested. While NaK is normally not used in heat pipes, it has an advantage in that it is liquid at the reservoir operating temperature, while Na or K alone would freeze. The VCHP had two condensers, one simulating the heater head, and the other simulating the radiator. The experiments successfully demonstrated operation with the simulated heater head condenser off and on, while allowing the reservoir temperature to vary over 40 to 120 C, the maximum range expected. In agreement with previous NaK heat pipe tests, the evaporator delta T was roughly 70 C, due to distillation of the NaK in the evaporator.

  10. Role Variables VS. Contextual Variables in the Theory of Didactic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Monica; Cirina, Lucia; Paoli, Francesco

    Partisans of the constructivist approach to mathematics education, such as Brousseau or Chevallard, developed an accurate theoretical framework in which didactical systems are viewed in a systemic perspective. What they somewhat fail to draw, however, is a sharp distinction between role variables - concerning the roles played in the didactical interaction by the individual elements of the system (Student-Teacher-Knowledge) - and contextual variables - concerning the action on the learning process of the system as a whole. Our research in progress on 2nd graders' word problem solving strategies applies the previous dichotomy to class management strategies adopted by teachers. Partial evidence collected so far points to the tentative conclusion according to which, contextual variables being equal, differences in teaching styles and methods may deeply reshape the role component of didactical systems. If we take into careful account this distinction, we can shed additional light into some hitherto unexplained phenomena observed in the literature.

  11. RR Lyrae Variables in Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Horace A.; Catelan, Márcio; Clementini, Gisella

    2009-09-01

    The pioneering studies of RR Lyrae stars in globular clusters by Oosterhoff and by Sawyer Hogg in the 1930s and 1940s called attention to interesting systematic differences among RR Lyrae populations in different systems. When such studies were extended to the dwarf spheroidal companions of the Milky Way in the 1960s, it was found that the average properties of their RR Lyrae stars were often different from those that had previously been observed in globular clusters. Observations of RR Lyrae stars have now extended to the Andromeda Galaxy and other Local Group systems, with still greater variety being apparent. Our understanding of the reasons for these differences among the RR Lyrae populations in different systems is by no means complete, but properties of RR Lyrae stars within these different systems are tied to differing horizontal branch morphologies and also shed light upon scenarios for the formation of the Galaxy.

  12. FTO genotype is associated with phenotypic variability of body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Powell, Joseph E.; Medland, Sarah E.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Rose, Lynda M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Mägi, Reedik; Waite, Lindsay; Smith, Albert Vernon; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Monda, Keri L.; Hadley, David; Mahajan, Anubha; Li, Guo; Kapur, Karen; Vitart, Veronique; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Wang, Sophie R.; Palmer, Cameron; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Zhao, Jing Hua; Demirkan, Ayşe; Isaacs, Aaron; Feitosa, Mary F.; Luan, Jian’an; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; White, Charles; Jackson, Anne U.; Preuss, Michael; Ziegler, Andreas; Eriksson, Joel; Kutalik, Zoltán; Frau, Francesca; Nolte, Ilja M.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Verweij, Niek; Goel, Anuj; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Estrada, Karol; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer Lynn; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Tyrer, Jonathan; Teumer, Alexander; Prokopenko, Inga; Mangino, Massimo; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John P.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hall, Per; Haritunians, Talin; Zgaga, Lina; Kolcic, Ivana; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Oostra, Ben A.; Junttila, M. Juhani; Grönberg, Henrik; Schreiber, Stefan; Peters, Annette; Hicks, Andrew A.; Stephens, Jonathan; Foad, Nicola S.; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Kaakinen, Marika; Willemsen, Gonneke; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Wild, Sarah H.; Navis, Gerjan; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Homuth, Georg; John, Ulrich; Iribarren, Carlos; Harris, Tamara; Launer, Lenore; Gudnason, Vilmundur; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Cadby, Gemma; Palmer, Lyle J.; James, Alan L.; Musk, Arthur W.; Ingelsson, Erik; Psaty, Bruce M.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Waeber, Gerard; Vollenweider, Peter; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Rudan, Igor; Groop, Leif C.; Metspalu, Andres; Khaw, Kay Tee; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Province, Michael A.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Atwood, Larry D.; Fox, Caroline S.; Boehnke, Michael; Collins, Francis S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Hengstenberg, Christian; Stark, Klaus; Lorentzon, Mattias; Ohlsson, Claes; Cusi, Daniele; Staessen, Jan A.; Van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Jolley, Jennifer D.; Ripatti, Samuli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Penninx, Brenda; Wilson, James F.; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J.; van der Harst, Pim; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Uitterlinden, André G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Zillikens, M. Carola; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Schlessinger, David; Schipf, Sabine; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Spector, Tim D.; North, Kari E.; Lettre, Guillaume; McCarthy, Mark I.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McKnight, Barbara; Strachan, David P.; Hill, William G.; Snieder, Harold; Ridker, Paul M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Goddard, Michael E.; Visscher, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence across several species for genetic control of phenotypic variation of complex traits1–4, such that the variance among phenotypes is genotype dependent. Understanding genetic control of variability is important in evolutionary biology, agricultural selection programmes and human medicine, yet for complex traits, no individual genetic variants associated with variance, as opposed to the mean, have been identified. Here we perform a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of phenotypic variation using 170,000 samples on height and body mass index (BMI) in human populations. We report evidence that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7202116 at the FTO gene locus, which is known to be associated with obesity (as measured by mean BMI for each rs7202116 genotype)5–7, is also associated with phenotypic variability. We show that the results are not due to scale effects or other artefacts, and find no other experiment-wise significant evidence for effects on variability, either at loci other than FTO for BMI or at any locus for height. The difference in variance for BMI among individuals with opposite homozygous genotypes at the FTO locus is approximately 7%, corresponding to a difference of 0.5 kilograms in the standard deviation of weight. Our results indicate that genetic variants can be discovered that are associated with variability, and that between-person variability in obesity can partly be explained by the genotype at the FTO locus. The results are consistent with reported FTO by environment interactions for BMI8, possibly mediated by DNA methylation9,10. Our BMI results for other SNPs and our height results for all SNPs suggest that most genetic variants, including those that influence mean height or mean BMI, are not associated with phenotypic variance, or that their effects on variability are too small to detect even with samples sizes greater than 100,000. PMID:22982992

  13. Improving the sensitivity of stop searches with on-shell constrained invariant mass variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Won Sang; Gainer, James S.; Kim, Doojin; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Moortgat, Filip; Pape, Luc; Park, Myeonghun

    2015-05-01

    The search for light stops is of paramount importance, both in general as a promising path to the discovery of beyond the standard model physics and more specifically as a way of evaluating the success of the naturalness paradigm. While the LHC experiments have ruled out much of the relevant parameter space, there are "stop gaps", i.e., values of sparticle masses for which existing LHC analyses have relatively little sensitivity to light stops. We point out that techniques involving on-shell constrained M 2 variables can do much to enhance sensitivity in this region and hence help close the stop gaps. We demonstrate the use of these variables for several benchmark points and describe the effect of realistic complications, such as detector effects and combinatorial backgrounds, in order to provide a useful toolkit for light stop searches in particular, and new physics searches at the LHC in general.

  14. Variability and mass loss in IA O-B-A supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R. E.; Garrison, R. F.; Hiltner, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    Recently completed catalogs of MK spectral types and UBV photometry of 1227 OB stars in the southern Milky Way have been analyzed to investigate brightness and color variability among the Ia supergiants. It is found that brightness variability is common among the O9-B1 supergiants with typical amplitudes about 0.1 and time scales longer than a week and shorter than 1000 days. Among the A supergiants fluctuations in U-B color are found on similar time scales and with amplitude about 0.1. For many early Ia supergiants there is a poor correlation between Balmer jump and spectral type, as had been known previously. An attempt to correlate the Balmer jump deficiency with mass loss rate yielded uncertain results.

  15. Bubble mass center and fluid feedback force fluctuations activated by constant lateral impulse with variable thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Long, Y. T.

    1995-01-01

    Sloshing dynamics within a partially filled rotating dewar of superfluid helium 2 are investigated in response to constant lateral impulse with variable thrust. The study, including how the rotating bubble of superfluid helium 2 reacts to the constant impulse with variable time period of thrust action in microgravity, how amplitudes of bubble mass center fluctuates with growth and decay of disturbances, and how fluid feedback forces fluctuates in activating on the rotating dewar through the dynamics of sloshing waves are investigated. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertial frame spacecraft bound coordinate with lateral impulses actuating on the rotating dewar in both inertial and non-inertial frames of thrust. Results of the simulations are illustrated.

  16. Control system for a continuously variable transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Vahabzadeh, H.

    1986-08-26

    A hydraulic control is described for a continuously variable transmission having hydraulically adjustable axially movable pulley members and a gearing arrangement for the transmitting of torque between an input shaft and a output shaft. The control consists of: a source of fluid pressure; first valve means connected with the source and being operable to supply control fluid to one of the first valve means to impose a force thereon; feedback means for imposing a force proportional to the axial position of the one adjustable pulley member on the first valve means in addition to the control fluid imposed force; torque sensing means operatively connected with the gearing arrangement for transmitting a force proportional to the torque transmitted by the gearing arrangement; servo motor means operatively connected with the torque sensing means; second valve means connected with the torque sensing means and being operable on a change of torque transmission to distribute a pressure signal from the source to the servo motor means and the servo motor means being responsive to the pressure fluid to balance the force on the torque to balance the force on the torque sensing means and discontinue fluid distribution thereto; and means for directing the pressure signal from the second valve means to the first valve means.

  17. A variable-collimation display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchko, Robert; Robinson, Sam; Schmidt, Jack; Graniela, Benito

    2014-03-01

    Two important human depth cues are accommodation and vergence. Normally, the eyes accommodate and converge or diverge in tandem; changes in viewing distance cause the eyes to simultaneously adjust both focus and orientation. However, ambiguity between accommodation and vergence cues is a well-known limitation in many stereoscopic display technologies. This limitation also arises in state-of-the-art full-flight simulator displays. In current full-flight simulators, the out-the-window (OTW) display (i.e., the front cockpit window display) employs a fixed collimated display technology which allows the pilot and copilot to perceive the OTW training scene without angular errors or distortions; however, accommodation and vergence cues are limited to fixed ranges (e.g., ~ 20 m). While this approach works well for long-range, the ambiguity of depth cues at shorter range hinders the pilot's ability to gauge distances in critical maneuvers such as vertical take-off and landing (VTOL). This is the first in a series of papers on a novel, variable-collimation display (VCD) technology that is being developed under NAVY SBIR Topic N121-041 funding. The proposed VCD will integrate with rotary-wing and vertical take-off and landing simulators and provide accurate accommodation and vergence cues for distances ranging from approximately 3 m outside the chin window to ~ 20 m. A display that offers dynamic accommodation and vergence could improve pilot safety and training, and impact other applications presently limited by lack of these depth cues.

  18. Southern Hemisphere water mass conversion linked with North Atlantic climate variability.

    PubMed

    Pahnke, Katharina; Zahn, Rainer

    2005-03-18

    Intermediate water variability at multicentennial scales is documented by 340,000-year-long isotope time series from bottom-dwelling foraminifers at a mid-depth core site in the southwest Pacific. Periods of sudden increases in intermediate water production are linked with transient Southern Hemisphere warm episodes, which implies direct control of climate warming on intermediate water conversion at high southern latitudes. Coincidence with episodes of climate cooling and minimum or halted deepwater convection in the North Atlantic provides striking evidence for interdependence of water mass conversion in both hemispheres, with implications for interhemispheric forcing of ocean thermohaline circulation and climate instability.

  19. On mass and momentum conservation in the variable-parameter Muskingum method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, Paolo; Todini, Ezio; Meißner, Dennis

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we investigate mass and momentum conservation in one-dimensional routing models. To this end we formulate the conservation equations for a finite-dimensional reach and compute individual terms using three standard Saint-Venant (SV) solvers: SOBEK, HEC-RAS and MIKE11. We also employ two different variable-parameter Muskingum (VPM) formulations: the classical Muskingum-Cunge (MC) and the revised, mass-conservative Muskingum-Cunge-Todini (MCT) approach, whereby geometrical cross sections are treated analytically in both cases. We initially compare the three SV solvers for a straight mild-sloping prismatic channel with geometric cross sections and a synthetic hydrograph as boundary conditions against the analytical MC and MCT solutions. The comparison is substantiated by the fact that in this flow regime the conditions for the parabolic equation model solved by MC and MCT are met. Through this intercomparison we show that all approaches have comparable mass and momentum conservation properties, except the MC. Then we extend the MCT to use natural cross sections for a real irregular river channel forced by an observed triple-peak event and compare the results with SOBEK. The model intercomparison demonstrates that the VPM in the form of MCT can be a computationally efficient, fully mass and momentum conservative approach and therefore constitutes a valid alternative to Saint-Venant based flood wave routing for a wide variety of rivers and channels in the world when downstream boundary conditions or hydraulic structures are non-influential.

  20. The Barents Sea frontal zones and water masses variability (1980-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oziel, L.; Sirven, J.; Gascard, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    The polar front separates the warm and saline Atlantic Water entering the southern Barents Sea from the cold and fresh Arctic Water located in the north. These water masses can mix together (mainly in the center of the Barents Sea), be cooled by the atmosphere and receive salt because of brine release; these processes generate dense water in winter, which then cascades into the Arctic Ocean to form the Arctic Intermediate Water. To study the interannual variability and evolution of the frontal zones and the corresponding variations of the water masses, we have merged data from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea and the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute and have built a new database, which covers the 1980-2011 period. The summer data were interpolated on a regular grid. A probability density function is used to show that the polar front splits into two branches east of 32° E where the topographic constraint weakens. Two fronts can then be identified: the Northern Front is associated with strong salinity gradients and the Southern Front with temperature gradients. Both fronts enclose the denser Barents Sea Water. The interannual variability of the water masses is apparent in the observed data and is linked to that of the ice cover. The frontal zones variability is found by using data from a general circulation model. The link with the atmospheric variability, represented here by the Arctic Oscillation, is not clear. However, model results suggest that such a link could be validated if winter data were taken into account. A strong trend appears: the Atlantic Water (Arctic Water) occupies a larger (smaller) volume of the Barents Sea. This trend amplifies during the last decade and the model study suggests that this could be accompanied by a northwards displacement of the Southern Front in the eastern part of the Barents Sea. The results are less clear for the Northern Front. The observations show that the volume of the Barents Sea Water

  1. Spatial variability of hailfalls in France: an analysis of air mass retro-trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermida, Lucía; Merino, Andrés; Sánchez, José Luis; Berthet, Claude; Dessens, Jean; López, Laura; Fernández-González, Sergio; Gascón, Estíbaliz; García-Ortega, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Hail is the main meteorological risk in south-west France, with the strongest hailfalls being concentrated in just a few days. Specifically, this phenomenon occurs most often and with the greatest severity in the Midi-Pyrénées area. Previous studies have revealed the high spatial variability of hailfall in this part of France, even leading to different characteristics being recorded on hailpads that were relatively close together. For this reason, an analysis of the air mass trajectories was carried out at ground level and at altitude, which subsequently led to the formation of the hail recorded by these hailpads. It is already known that in the study zone, the trajectories of the storms usually stretch for long distances and are oriented towards the east, leading to hailstones with diameters in excess of 3 cm, and without any change in direction above 3 km. We analysed different days with hail precipitation where there was at least one stone with a diameter of 3 cm or larger. Using the simulations from these days, an analysis of the backward trajectories of the air masses was carried out. We used the HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model) to determine the origin of the air masses, and tracked them toward each of the hailpads that were hit during the day studied. The height of the final points was the height of the impacted hailpads. Similarly, the backward trajectories for different heights were also established. Finally, the results show how storms that affect neighbouring hailpads come from very different air masses; and provide a deeper understanding of the high variability that affects the characteristics of hailfalls. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the Regional Government of Castile-León for its financial support through the project LE220A11-2. This study was supported by the following grants: GRANIMETRO (CGL2010-15930); MICROMETEO (IPT-310000-2010-22).

  2. Modeling the Motion of an Increasing Mass System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunkel, William; Harrington, Randal

    2010-01-01

    Problems on the dynamics of changing mass systems often call for the more general form of Newton's second law Fnet = dp/dt. These problems usually involve situations where the mass of the system decreases, such as in rocket propulsion. In contrast, this experiment examines a system where the mass "increases" at a constant rate and the net force…

  3. Error response test system and method using test mask variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gender, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An error response test system and method with increased functionality and improved performance is provided. The error response test system provides the ability to inject errors into the application under test to test the error response of the application under test in an automated and efficient manner. The error response system injects errors into the application through a test mask variable. The test mask variable is added to the application under test. During normal operation, the test mask variable is set to allow the application under test to operate normally. During testing, the error response test system can change the test mask variable to introduce an error into the application under test. The error response system can then monitor the application under test to determine whether the application has the correct response to the error.

  4. Holonomic Quantum Control with Continuous Variable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Victor V.; Shu, Chi; Krastanov, Stefan; Shen, Chao; Liu, Ren-Bao; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Jiang, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Universal computation of a quantum system consisting of superpositions of well-separated coherent states of multiple harmonic oscillators can be achieved by three families of adiabatic holonomic gates. The first gate consists of moving a coherent state around a closed path in phase space, resulting in a relative Berry phase between that state and the other states. The second gate consists of "colliding" two coherent states of the same oscillator, resulting in coherent population transfer between them. The third gate is an effective controlled-phase gate on coherent states of two different oscillators. Such gates should be realizable via reservoir engineering of systems that support tunable nonlinearities, such as trapped ions and circuit QED.

  5. Variable Neural Adaptive Robust Control: A Switched System Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Jianming; Hu, Jianghai; Zak, Stanislaw H.

    2015-05-01

    Variable neural adaptive robust control strategies are proposed for the output tracking control of a class of multi-input multi-output uncertain systems. The controllers incorporate a variable-structure radial basis function (RBF) network as the self-organizing approximator for unknown system dynamics. The variable-structure RBF network solves the problem of structure determination associated with fixed-structure RBF networks. It can determine the network structure on-line dynamically by adding or removing radial basis functions according to the tracking performance. The structure variation is taken into account in the stability analysis of the closed-loop system using a switched system approach with the aid of the piecewise quadratic Lyapunov function. The performance of the proposed variable neural adaptive robust controllers is illustrated with simulations.

  6. Effects of Mass and Volume Fraction Skewness in Variable Density Mixing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachtor, Adam J.; Bakosi, Jozsef; Ristorcelli, Raymond

    2015-11-01

    Among the parameters characterizing mixing by variable density turbulence of fluids involving density variations of a factor of 5 to 10 are the Atwood, Froude, Schmidt, and Reynolds numbers. There is evidence that the amount of each fluid present when the two pure fluids mix, as described by the probability density function of the mass or molar (volume) fraction, also strongly affects the mixing process. To investigate this phenomena, implicit large-eddy simulations (ILES) are performed for binary fluid mixtures in statistically homogenous environments under constant acceleration. These coarse grained simulations are used as data for theory validation and mix model development. ILES has been demonstrated to accurately capture the mixing behavior of a passive scalar field through stirring and advection by a turbulent velocity field. The present work advances that research and studies the extent to which an under-resolved active scalar drives the subsequent fluid motion and determines the nature of the mixing process. Effects of initial distributions of the mass and molar (volume) fraction probability density function on the resulting variable density turbulence and mixing are investigated and compared to direct numerical simulations from the Johns Hopkins Turbulence Database. Funded by the LANL LDRD-ER on ``Inserting Nonlinear N-Material Coupling PDF Information into Turbulent Mixing Models'' through exploratory research project number 20150498ER.

  7. The pulsation modes and masses of carbon-rich long period variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeat, J.; Knapik, A.; Rutily, B.

    2002-08-01

    Following our study of the carbon-rich giants in the HR diagram and of their luminosity function (Paper III), we investigate the pulsation data of the long period variables (LPVs) included in our sample. Pulsation modes (fundamental, overtone(s)) for carbon LPVs are identified in the period-radius diagram, making use of observed bi-periodicity in a small subsample of those stars, and of comparison to models. Mean pulsation masses are then deduced from theoretical PMR-relations, with due attention paid to a possible bias while averaging. Mean (present) pulsation masses (0.6 - 4.0 Msun) are found to increase along the group sequence HC5 to CV6, with still larger masses possibly associated with cool extreme CV7-objects with strong mass loss and thick circumstellar shells. This is consistent with the 0.8-4 Msun range of initial masses found in Paper III for the majority of carbon-rich giants affected by mass loss during their evolution. The pulsation masses found for a few HC-stars (Mle0 .8 Msun) are consistent with their low initial masses (Mi<~ 1.1 Msun), as inferred from their thick disk membership (age =~ 11 Gyr?) and locus in the HR diagram. A mean pulsation mass of =~ 0.6 Msun is found for the three population II Cepheids in the sample. A mass-luminosity diagram is proposed for the Galactic carbon giants. The data from observations is found consistent with theoretical predictions from AGB modeling, specially the third dredge-up (TDU) through thermal pulses (TP) with a carbon star formation line (CSFL) for TP-AGB stars. It appears that the CV-giants are close to the tip and end of their evolutionary tracks in the TP-AGB of the HR diagram. It is confirmed that this end shifts toward lower effective temperatures and higher luminosities, with increasing masses. It is shown that the C/O abundance ratios do correlate with effective temperatures, according to three distinct distributions (halo CH stars, thick disk HC-stars, and thin disk CV-stars). The mean stellar

  8. Variable-Speed Wind System Design : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lauw, Hinan K.; Weigand, Claus H.; Marckx, Dallas A.; Electronic Power Conditioning, Inc.

    1993-10-01

    Almost from the onset of the development of wind energy conversion systems (WECS), it was known that variable-speed operation of the turbine would maximize energy capture. This study was commissioned to assess the cost, efficiency gain, reduction of the cost of energy (COE), and other operating implications of converting the existing hardware of a modern fixed-speed wind energy conversion system to variable-speed operation. The purpose of this study was to develop a preliminary design for the hardware required to allow variable-speed operation using a doubly-fed generator with an existing fixed-speed wind turbine design. The turbine selected for this study is the AWT-26 designed and built by Advanced Wind Turbines Inc. of Redmond, Washington. The lowest projected COE using this variable-speed generation system is projected to be $0.0499/kWh, compared to the lowest possible COE with fixed-speed generation which is projected to be $0.0546/kWh. This translates into a 8.6% reduction of the COE using this variable-speed generation option. The preliminary system design has advanced to where the printed circuit boards can be physically laid out based on the schematics and the system software can be written based on the control flow-charts. The core of hardware and software has been proven to be successful in earlier versions of VSG systems. The body of this report presents the results of the VSWG system development. Operation under normal and fault conditions is described in detail, the system performance for variable-speed operation is estimated and compared to the original fixed-speed system performance, and specifications for all system components (generator, power electronic converter, and system controller) are given. Costs for all components are estimated, and incremental system cost is compared to incremental energy production. Finally, operational features of the VSWG which are not available in the existing FSWG system are outlined.

  9. Mass Uncertainty and Application For Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beech, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Expected development maturity under contract (spec) should correlate with Project/Program Approved MGA Depletion Schedule in Mass Properties Control Plan. If specification NTE, MGA is inclusive of Actual MGA (A5 & A6). If specification is not an NTE Actual MGA (e.g. nominal), then MGA values are reduced by A5 values and A5 is representative of remaining uncertainty. Basic Mass = Engineering Estimate based on design and construction principles with NO embedded margin MGA Mass = Basic Mass * assessed % from approved MGA schedule. Predicted Mass = Basic + MGA. Aggregate MGA % = (Aggregate Predicted - Aggregate Basic) /Aggregate Basic.

  10. Impact of photometric variability on age and mass determination in young stellar objects: the case of the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Sergio; Parihar, Padmakar; Distefano, Elisa

    2017-03-01

    Very young stars, like the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) members analysed in the present study, exhibit photometric variability with a wide range of amplitudes. Such a prominent variability reflects in the inferred values of stellar colours and luminosities and, in turn, in the inferred stellar ages and masses. In this study, we measure the amplitudes of the photometric variability in V, R and I optical bands of a sample of 346 ONC members. We use these measurements to investigate how this variability affects the inferred masses and ages and whether it alone can account for the age spread among ONC members reported by earlier studies. We make use of colour-magnitude and Hertzprung-Russell (HR) diagrams. We find that members that show periodic and smooth photometric rotational modulation have masses and ages that are unaffected by variability when theoretical isochrones and evolutionary mass tracks are used in either colour-magnitude or HR diagrams. On the other hand, members with periodic but very scattered photometric rotational modulation and non-periodic members have masses and ages that are significantly affected. Moreover, using HR diagrams, we find that the observed I-band photometric variability can take account of only a fraction (˜50 per cent) of the inferred age spread, whereas the V-band photometric variability is large enough to mask any age spread.

  11. Secular dynamics in hierarchical three-body systems with mass loss and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michaely, Erez; Perets, Hagai B.

    2014-10-20

    Recent studies have shown that secular evolution of triple systems can play a major role in the evolution and interaction of their inner binaries. Very few studies explored the stellar evolution of triple systems, and in particular the mass-loss phase of the evolving stellar components. Here we study the dynamical secular evolution of hierarchical triple systems undergoing mass loss. We use the secular evolution equations and include the effects of mass loss and mass transfer, as well as general relativistic effects. We present various evolutionary channels taking place in such evolving triples, and discuss both the effects of mass loss and mass transfer in the inner binary system, as well as the effects of mass loss/transfer from an outer third companion. We discuss several distinct types/regimes of triple secular evolution, where the specific behavior of a triple system can sensitively depend on its hierarchy and the relative importance of classical and general relativistic effects. We show that the orbital changes due to mass-loss and/or mass-transfer processes can effectively transfer a triple system from one dynamical regime to another. In particular, mass loss/transfer can both induce and quench high-amplitude (Lidov-Kozai) variations in the eccentricity and inclination of the inner binaries of evolving triples. They can also change the system dynamics from an orderly periodic behavior to a chaotic one, and vice versa.

  12. Observations of the variability of shallow trade wind cumulus cloudiness and mass flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamer, K.; Kollias, P.; Nuijens, L.

    2015-06-01

    Two years of ground-based remote sensing observations are used to study the vertical structure of marine cumulus near the island of Barbados, including their cloud fraction and mass flux profile. Daily radar derived cloud fraction profiles peak at different height levels depending on the depth of the cumuli and thus the extent to which they precipitate. Nonprecipitating cumuli have a peak cloud fraction of about 5% near mean cloud base (700 m), whereas precipitating cumuli tend to have a peak of only 2% near cloud base. Nineteen percent of the precipitating cumuli are accompanied by large cloud fractions near the detrainment level of cumulus tops (~1700 m). Day-to-day variations in cloud fraction near cloud base are modest (~3%). Nonprecipitating cumuli have their largest reflectivities near cloud top and an ascending core surrounded by a subsiding shell. Precipitating cumuli with enhanced elevated cloudiness (stratiform outflow) are deeper and contain larger vertical gradients in reflectivity and Doppler velocity than precipitating cumuli without such outflow. Bulk (3 h) statistics reveal that nonprecipitating shallow cumuli are active and organized. They contain on average 79% in-cloud updrafts with 86% of them being organized in large coherent structures contributing to a maximum updraft mass flux of 8-36 gm-2 s-1 just above cloud base. Alternatively, downdrafts contribute insignificantly to the mass flux and show little vertical and temporal variability (0-7 gm-2 s-1). Complementary Raman lidar information suggests that updraft mass flux profile slope is inversely related to environmental relative humidity.

  13. X-ray variability in Galactic high-mass black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Magnus

    The stars of the night sky can to the naked eye appear to be steady and unchanging, apart from the twinkling created by air moving in the atmosphere. However, when viewed in X-rays, the sky is far from constant, with detectable changes occurring on very short timescales. Black hole X-ray binaries are strong sources of X-rays. These systems contain a star and a black hole in orbit around each other. As matter from the companion star is accreted by the black hole, large amounts of gravitational energy are released, giving rise to strong X-ray emission. The accretion flow close to a black hole is characterized by strong gravity, high-energy radiation and variability on timescales down to milliseconds. These systems allow us to probe physics under conditions we cannot recreate in a laboratory, and provide some of the strongest observational indications of the existence of black holes. Temporal analysis is a powerful diagnostic of the geometry and physical processes of this environment. The bulk of this thesis concerns studies of the rapid variability of perhaps the most well-known of all black hole binaries: Cygnus X-1. By tapping into the large amount of archival data available, a systematic study of the variability, in the form of the power spectrum, is conducted. The results show that timing studies can indeed give valuable information on the emission mechanisms and accretion geometry. Tying characteristic frequencies to effects predicted by general relativity directly gives information about the parameters of the compact object. Using these results, the past evolution of the binary system is studied. In addition, results from temporal analysis of the possible black hole binary Cygnus X-3 are presented. The study of X-ray variability covers timescales from years to seconds, and shows that while temporal analysis provides clues to this complex system, it does not provide immediate insight into the accretion geometry, or the nature of the compact object

  14. Fractal variability: An emergent property of complex dissipative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, Andrew J. E.; Macklem, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The patterns of variation of physiologic parameters, such as heart and respiratory rate, and their alteration with age and illness have long been under investigation; however, the origin and significance of scale-invariant fractal temporal structures that characterize healthy biologic variability remain unknown. Quite independently, atmospheric and planetary scientists have led breakthroughs in the science of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In this paper, we aim to provide two novel hypotheses regarding the origin and etiology of both the degree of variability and its fractal properties. In a complex dissipative system, we hypothesize that the degree of variability reflects the adaptability of the system and is proportional to maximum work output possible divided by resting work output. Reductions in maximal work output (and oxygen consumption) or elevation in resting work output (or oxygen consumption) will thus reduce overall degree of variability. Second, we hypothesize that the fractal nature of variability is a self-organizing emergent property of complex dissipative systems, precisely because it enables the system's ability to optimally dissipate energy gradients and maximize entropy production. In physiologic terms, fractal patterns in space (e.g., fractal vasculature) or time (e.g., cardiopulmonary variability) optimize the ability to deliver oxygen and clear carbon dioxide and waste. Examples of falsifiability are discussed, along with the need to further define necessary boundary conditions. Last, as our focus is bedside utility, potential clinical applications of this understanding are briefly discussed. The hypotheses are clinically relevant and have potential widespread scientific relevance.

  15. Recent variability in the Atlantic water intrusion and water masses in Kongsfjorden, an Arctic fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya, David T.; Krishnan, K. P.

    2017-03-01

    The present study reports high inter-annual variability in the water masses and in the intrusion of Atlantic origin waters in Kongsfjorden from 2000 to 2013 using both the historical (2000-2010 summers) and recent CTD measurements (2011-2013 summer/fall). An earlier intrusion of Atlantic Water (AW) into Kongsfjorden was observed in the contemporary years. An overall summertime subsurface warming is evident from the maximum September AW temperature in 2011 (4.8 °C), 2012 (5.8 °C) and 2013 (7 °C). The combination of a compensating surface flow to the subsurface intrusion of AW and the strong southeasterly surface winds during the peak summer, resulted in a corresponding net outflow of the surface fresh water layer from Kongsfjorden. This led to the decreased freshwater volume inside the fjord during 2013 (1 km3) compared to 2011 (3.1 km3) and 2012 (2.3 km3).

  16. Untangling complex dynamical systems via derivative-variable correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levnaji, Zoran; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2014-05-01

    Inferring the internal interaction patterns of a complex dynamical system is a challenging problem. Traditional methods often rely on examining the correlations among the dynamical units. However, in systems such as transcription networks, one unit's variable is also correlated with the rate of change of another unit's variable. Inspired by this, we introduce the concept of derivative-variable correlation, and use it to design a new method of reconstructing complex systems (networks) from dynamical time series. Using a tunable observable as a parameter, the reconstruction of any system with known interaction functions is formulated via a simple matrix equation. We suggest a procedure aimed at optimizing the reconstruction from the time series of length comparable to the characteristic dynamical time scale. Our method also provides a reliable precision estimate. We illustrate the method's implementation via elementary dynamical models, and demonstrate its robustness to both model error and observation error.

  17. Modeling and Simulation For A Variable Sprayerrate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yan; Liang, Anbo; Yuan, Haibo; Zhang, Chunmei; Li, Junlong

    Variable spraying technology is an important content and developing direction in current plant protection machinery, which can effectively save pesticide and lighten burden of ecological environment in agriculture according to characteristic of spraying targets and speed of aircraft crew. Paper established mathematic model and delivery function of variable spraying system based on designed hardware of variable spraying machine, making use of PID controlling algorithm to simulate in MATLAB. Simulating result explained that the model can conveniently control gushing amounts and can arrive at satisfied controlling.

  18. Modeling and Simulation For A Variable Sprayerrate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yan; Liang, Anbo; Yuan, Haibo; Zhang, Chunmei; Li, Junlong

    Variable spraying technology is an important content and developing direction in current plant protection machinery, which can effectively save pesticide and lighten burden of ecological environment in agriculture according to characteristic of spraying targets and speed of aircraft crew. Paper established mathematic model and delivery function of variable spraying system based on designed hardware of variable spraying machine, making use of PID controlling algorithm to simulate in matlab. Simulating result explained that the model can conveniently control gushing amounts and can arrive at satisfied controlling.

  19. A new approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transfer rates with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Rosner, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A rational approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transport rates, applicable to many commonly encountered laminar flow conditions with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties, is outlined. The correlation scheme builds upon already available constant property blowing/suction solutions by introducing appropriate correction factors to account for the additional ('pseudo' blowing and source) effects identified with variable properties and thermal diffusion. Applications of the scheme to the particular laminar boundary layer mass transfer problems considered herein (alkali and transition metal compound vapor transport) indicates satisfactory accuracy up to effective blowing factors equivalent to about one third of the 'blow off' value. As a useful by-product of the variable property correlation, we extend the heat-mass transfer analogy, for a wide range of Lewis numbers, to include variable property effects.

  20. Water mass variability in the Atlantic Subtropical Gyre reveals the mechanisms of recent Meridional Overturning changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwyn Evans, Dafydd; Toole, John; Forget, Gael; Zika, Jan; Nurser, A. George; Naveira Garabato, Alberto; Yu, Lisan

    2015-04-01

    Interannual variability in the volumetric water-mass distribution within the North Atlantic subtropical gyre (STG) is described in relation to the recent reported changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Using an Argo based gridded climatology and a high-resolution ocean state estimate (ECCO), we project the ocean into thermohaline coordinates as volumes of water defined by their temperature and salinity. We compare monthly time-series of the volumetric distribution to the volume changes implied by the water mass transformations due to air/sea fluxes of heat and freshwater over the STG, and the divergence of advective transports across the latitudinal boundaries of the STG. Coinciding with the reported AMOC changes during the winters of 2009/10 and 2010/11, in both the observations and the state estimate, the total STG volume above the thermocline decreases while the volume below increases in compensation. During the winter of 2009/10, this redistribution is equivalent to a transport of 25 Sv (1 Sv==106 m3s-1) over 3 months. A comparison to two air-sea flux re-analyses products shows that this variability cannot be explained by anomalous cooling over the STG, which suggests the volumetric redistribution is caused by changes in the transport divergence between 26 and 45°N. In ECCO, we see a reduction in the zonal circulation of the STG and divergence of transport above the thermocline. Below the thermocline we see an increase in the southward transport at 45°N and a decrease at 26°N. Using two wind-stress products, we present evidence that the observed changes are a barotropic response to anomalous wind-stress curl over the STG.

  1. Evaluation of a center pivot variable rate irrigation system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uniformity of water distribution of a variable rate center pivot irrigation system was evaluated. This 4-span center-pivot system was configured with 10 water application zones along its 766 ft-long lateral. Two experiments were conducted for the uniformity tests. In one test, a constant water appli...

  2. Fabric variability associated with periglacial mass-wasting at Eagle Summit, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, Susan W. S.

    2005-12-01

    Fabric analysis is a frequently applied technique and, when used in concert with other tools, aids the interpretation of glacigenic and colluvial depositional environments. The research presented here focuses on its application to periglacial colluvium, using a stratified systematic unaligned sampling framework in order to assess the variation of fabrics generated. The range of possible variation in fabric is necessary information for its application to periglacial paleoenvironmental interpretation. Fabric strength and shape from 68 samples, of 50 stones each on a range of microgeomorphic settings across terrain influenced by periglacial mass-wasting in central Alaska, were analyzed in relation to local slope orientation, clast characteristics, organic mat thickness, stone density, distance downslope from the divide, soil texture and soil moisture. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to reduce stone characteristics to three factors. Multiple regression analyses of the three factors and environmental variables, with the fabric strength parameters as dependent variables, indicate that stone characteristics, particularly size and platyness, are the most significant factors determining fabric strength. No distinct fabric strength or shape was associated with specific landforms. These results raise serious doubts as to the time-cost effectiveness of the application of fabric analysis as a paleoenvironmental tool to identify periglacial landforms from their deposits.

  3. Direct measurement of sub-surface mass change using the variable-baseline gravity gradient method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Jeffrey; Ferré, Ty P. A.; Güntner, Andreas; Abe, Maiko; Creutzfeldt, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Time-lapse gravity data provide a direct, non-destructive method to monitor mass changes at scales from cm to km. But, the effectively infinite spatial sensitivity of gravity measurements can make it difficult to isolate the signal of interest. The variable-baseline gravity gradient method, based on the difference of measurements between two gravimeters, is an alternative to the conventional approach of individually modeling all sources of mass and elevation change. This approach can improve the signal-to-noise ratio for many applications by removing the contributions of Earth tides, loading, and other signals that have the same effect on both gravimeters. At the same time, this approach can focus the support volume within a relatively small user-defined region of the subsurface. The method is demonstrated using paired superconducting gravimeters to make for the first time a large-scale, non-invasive measurement of infiltration wetting front velocity and change in water content above the wetting front.

  4. Nutrient characteristics of the water masses and their seasonal variability in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Sardessai, S; Shetye, Suhas; Maya, M V; Mangala, K R; Prasanna Kumar, S

    2010-01-01

    Nutrient characteristics of four water masses in the light of their thermohaline properties are examined in the eastern Equatorial Indian Ocean during winter, spring and summer monsoon. The presence of low salinity water mass with "Surface enrichments" of inorganic nutrients was observed relative to 20 m in the mixed layer. Lowest oxygen levels of 19 microM at 3 degrees N in the euphotic zone indicate mixing of low oxygen high salinity Arabian Sea waters with the equatorial Indian Ocean. The seasonal variability of nutrients was regulated by seasonally varying physical processes like thermocline elevation, meridional and zonal transport, the equatorial undercurrent and biological processes of uptake and remineralization. Circulation of Arabian Sea high salinity waters with nitrate deficit could also be seen from low N/P ratio with a minimum of 8.9 in spring and a maximum of 13.6 in winter. This large deviation from Redfield N/P ratio indicates the presence of denitrified high salinity waters with a seasonal nitrate deficit ranging from -4.85 to 1.52 in the Eastern Equatorial Indian Ocean.

  5. Time-Variable Gravity Signal Due to Extratropic Pacific Water Mass Redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.; Au, A. Y.; Cox, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    Cox and Chao [2002] reported the detection of a large anomaly in the form of a positive "jump" in the time series of Earth's lowest-degree gravity harmonic J2, or the dynamic oblateness, during 1998. This prompted us to examine the mass redistribution in the global oceans. We report here a seesaw of the sea-surface height (SSH) in the extratropic north + south Pacific basins -- the leading (nonseasonal) EOF/PC mode in SSH derived from the 10-year TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry data in the extratropic Pacific region. The mode underwent a step-like jump with time evolution that match remarkably well with the observed J2 anomaly. However, the magnitude is several times too small to explain the observed J2, even if assuming the SSH jump was all mass-induced (as opposed to any steric effect which causes no time-variable gravity signal). If one accepts the notion that this extratropic Pacific seesaw is part of the geophysical process that produced the observed 1998 J2 anomaly, then this finding suggests strong geophysical connection of the interannual-to-decadal variation of J2 with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), as the time series of the above EOF/PC mode is actually a formally defined PDO Index series.

  6. Constraining aerosol optical models using ground-based, collocated particle size and mass measurements in variable air mass regimes during the 7-SEAS/Dongsha experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Shaun W.; Hansell, Richard A.; Chow, Judith C.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Hsu, N. Christina; Lin, Neng-Huei; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Ji, Qiang; Li, Can; Watson, John G.; Khlystov, Andrey

    2013-10-01

    During the spring of 2010, NASA Goddard's COMMIT ground-based mobile laboratory was stationed on Dongsha Island off the southwest coast of Taiwan, in preparation for the upcoming 2012 7-SEAS field campaign. The measurement period offered a unique opportunity for conducting detailed investigations of the optical properties of aerosols associated with different air mass regimes including background maritime and those contaminated by anthropogenic air pollution and mineral dust. What appears to be the first time for this region, a shortwave optical closure experiment (λ = 550 nm) for both scattering and absorption was attempted over a 12-day period during which aerosols exhibited the most change. Constraints to the optical model included combined SMPS and APS number concentration data for a continuum of fine and coarse-mode particle sizes up to PM2.5. We also take advantage of an IMPROVE chemical sampler to help constrain aerosol composition and mass partitioning of key elemental species including sea-salt, particulate organic matter, soil, non sea-salt sulfate, nitrate, and elemental carbon. Achieving full optical closure is hampered by limitations in accounting for the role of water vapor in the system, uncertainties in the instruments and the need for further knowledge in the source apportionment of the model's major chemical components. Nonetheless, our results demonstrate that the observed aerosol scattering and absorption for these diverse air masses are reasonably captured by the model, where peak aerosol events and transitions between key aerosols types are evident. Signatures of heavy polluted aerosol composed mostly of ammonium and non sea-salt sulfate mixed with some dust with transitions to background sea-salt conditions are apparent in the absorption data, which is particularly reassuring owing to the large variability in the imaginary component of the refractive indices. Consistency between the measured and modeled optical parameters serves as an

  7. Probing Cloud-Driven Variability on Two of the Youngest, Lowest-Mass Brown Dwarfs in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Adam; Cushing, Michael; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy

    2016-08-01

    Young, late-type brown dwarfs share many properties with directly imaged giant extrasolar planets. They therefore provide unique testbeds for investigating the physical conditions present in this critical temperature and mass regime. WISEA 1147-2040 and 2MASS 1119-1137, two recently discovered late-type (~L7) brown dwarfs, have both been determined to be members of the ~10 Myr old TW Hya Association (Kellogg et al. 2016, Schneider et al. 2016). Each has an estimated mass of 5-6 MJup, making them two of the youngest and lowest-mass free floating objects yet found in the solar neighborhood. As such, these two planetary mass objects provide unparalleled laboratories for investigating giant planet-like atmospheres far from the contaminating starlight of a host sun. Condensate clouds play a critical role in shaping the emergent spectra of both brown dwarfs and gas giant planets, and can cause photometric variability via their non-uniform spatial distribution. We propose to photometrically monitor WISEA 1147-2040 and 2MASS 1119-1137 in order to search for the presence of cloud-driven variability to 1) investigate the potential trend of low surface gravity with high-amplitude variability in a previously unexplored mass regime and 2) explore the angular momentum evolution of isolated planetary mass objects.

  8. Quantifying the increasing sensitivity of power systems to climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, H. C.; Brayshaw, D. J.; Shaffrey, L. C.; Coker, P. J.; Thornton, H. E.

    2016-12-01

    Large quantities of weather-dependent renewable energy generation are expected in power systems under climate change mitigation policies, yet little attention has been given to the impact of long term climate variability. By combining state-of-the-art multi-decadal meteorological records with a parsimonious representation of a power system, this study characterises the impact of year-to-year climate variability on multiple aspects of the power system of Great Britain (including coal, gas and nuclear generation), demonstrating why multi-decadal approaches are necessary. All aspects of the example system are impacted by inter-annual climate variability, with the impacts being most pronounced for baseload generation. The impacts of inter-annual climate variability increase in a 2025 wind-power scenario, with a 4-fold increase in the inter-annual range of operating hours for baseload such as nuclear. The impacts on peak load and peaking-plant are comparably small. Less than 10 years of power supply and demand data are shown to be insufficient for providing robust power system planning guidance. This suggests renewable integration studies—widely used in policy, investment and system design—should adopt a more robust approach to climate characterisation.

  9. A method for linearizing a nonlinear system with six state variables and three control variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsia, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    A nonlinear system governed by x = f(x,u) with six state variables and three control variables is considered in this project. A set of transformations from (x,u) - space to (z,v) - space is defined such that the linear tangent model is independent of the operating point in the z-space. Therefore, it is possible to design a control law satisfying all operating points in the transformed space. An algorithm to construct the above transformations and to obtain the associated linearized system is described in this report. This method is applied to a rigid body using pole placement for the control law. Results are verified by numerical simulation. Closed loop poles in x-space using traditional local linearization are compared with those pole placements in the z-space.

  10. Confirmation of mass-independent Ni isotopic variability in iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Robert C. J.; Elliott, Tim; Coath, Christopher D.; Regelous, Marcel

    2011-12-01

    We report high-precision analyses of internally-normalised Ni isotope ratios in 12 bulk iron meteorites. Our measurements of 60Ni/ 61Ni, 62Ni/ 61Ni and 64Ni/ 61Ni normalised to 58Ni/ 61Ni and expressed in parts per ten thousand (‱) relative to NIST SRM 986 as ɛ60Ni,ɛ62Ni and ɛ64Ni, vary by 0.146, 0.228 and 0.687, respectively. The precision on a typical analysis is 0.03‱, 0.05‱ and 0.08‱ for ɛ60Ni, ɛ62Ni and ɛ64Ni, respectively, which is comparable to our sample reproducibility. We show that this 'mass-independent' Ni isotope variability cannot be ascribed to interferences, inaccurate correction of instrumental or natural mass-dependent fractionation, fractionation controlled by nuclear field shift effects, nor the influence of cosmic ray spallation. These results thus document the presence of mass-independent Ni isotopic heterogeneity in bulk meteoritic samples, as previously proposed by Regelous et al. (2008) (EPSL 272, 330-338), but our new analyses are more precise and include determination of 64Ni. Intriguingly, we find that terrestrial materials do not yield homogenous internally-normalised Ni isotope compositions, which, as pointed out by Young et al. (2002) (GCA 66, 1095-1104), may be the expected result of using the exponential (kinetic) law and atomic masses to normalise all fractionation processes. The certified Ni isotope reference material NIST SRM 986 defines zero in this study, while appropriate ratios for the bulk silicate Earth are given by the peridotites JP-1 and DTS-2 and, relative to NIST SRM 986, yield deviations in ɛ60Ni, ɛ62Ni and ɛ64Ni of -0.006‱, 0.036‱ and 0.119‱, respectively. There is a strong positive correlation between ɛ64Ni and ɛ62Ni in iron meteorites analyses, with a slope of 3.03 ± 0.71. The variations of Ni isotope anomalies in iron meteorites are consistent with heterogeneous distribution of a nucleosynthetic component from a type Ia supernova into the proto-solar nebula.

  11. Parsing with logical variables (logic-based programming systems)

    SciTech Connect

    Finin, T.W.; Stone Palmer, M.

    1983-01-01

    Logic based programming systems have enjoyed an increasing popularity in applied AI work in the last few years. One of the contributions to computational linguistics made by the logic programming paradigm has been the definite clause grammar. In comparing DCGS with previous parsing mechanisms such as ATNS, certain clear advantages are seen. The authors feel that the most important of these advantages are due to the use of logical variables with unification as the fundamental operation on them. To illustrate the power of the logical variable, they have implemented an experimental atn system which treats atn registers as logical variables and provides a unification operation over them. They aim to simultaneously encourage the use of the powerful mechanisms available in DCGS and demonstrate that some of these techniques can be captured without reference to a resolution theorem prover. 14 references.

  12. Analysis of X-ray spectral variability and black hole mass determination of the NLS1 galaxy Mrk 766

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacchè, S.; Gilli, R.; Titarchuk, L.

    2014-02-01

    We present an XMM-Newton time-resolved spectral analysis of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 766. We analysed eight available observations taken between May 2000 and June 2005 with the EPIC-pn camera in order to investigate the X-ray spectral variability produced by changes in the mass accretion rate. The 0.2 - 10 keV spectra are extracted in time bins longer than 3 ks to have at least 3 × 104 net counts in each bin and then accurately trace the variations of the best-fit parameters of our adopted Comptonization spectral model. We tested a bulk-motion Comptonization (BMC) model which is in general applicable to any physical system powered by accretion onto a compact object, and assumes that soft seed photons are efficiently up-scattered via inverse Compton scattering in a hot and dense electron corona. The Comptonized spectrum has a characteristic power law shape, whose slope was found to increase for large values of the normalization of the seed component, which is proportional to the mass accretion rate ṁ (in Eddington units). Our baseline spectral model also includes a warm absorber lying on the line of sight and radiation reprocessing from the accretion disc or from outflowing matter in proximity to the central compact object. Our study reveals that the normalization-slope correlation, observed in Galactic black hole sources (GBHs), also holds for Mrk 766: variations of the photon index in the range Γ ~ 1.9-2.4 are indeed likely to be related to the variations of ṁ, as observed in X-ray binary systems. We finally applied a scaling technique based on the observed correlation to estimate the BH mass in Mrk 766. This technique is commonly and successfully applied to measure masses of GBHs, and this is the first time it has been applied in detail to estimate the BH mass in an AGN. We obtained a value of MBH = 1.26-0.77+1.00×106 M⊙, which is in very good agreement with that estimated by the reverberation mapping. Appendix A is available in electronic

  13. Effect of environmental variables on body size evolution of crinoids between periods of mass extinctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jani, T.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2013-12-01

    Body size plays a major role in determining whether or not an organism can sustain in its local environment. The ecosystem of an animal has a major effect on the fitness of organisms, and it would be interesting to note the degree to which various environmental factors alter body size. In my project, I identify three environmental factors that seem to affect body size of crinoids, marine invertebrates from phylum Echinodermata, and explore how these variables play out in the intervals between the five mass extinctions. The particular factors I study include atmospheric CO2 concentration (proxy for temperature), O2 concentration, and sea level. Although the r and p values for all of these factors were statistically insignificant to definitively make any correlation, there was a visual correlation. For O2, I noted a generally positive correlation with body size over time. CO2 trends suggested a negative correlation until the K-T boundary, but a positive correlation afterwards. Correlation with sea level was a little more complicated: correlation was positive from the start of the Phanerozoic to the Permian extinction; it turned negative until the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary; afterwards, it again became positive. However, for all three variables, statistical values are too low to say definitively mark any correlation. Out of all three factors, CO2 levels had the highest correlation and lowest p-values in the most time intervals: from the start of the Phanerozoic to Ordovician-Silurian Extinction, from the Late Devonian to the Permian Extinction, and from the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary to the present. When considering first differences, CO2 levels also had the highest correlation from the Permian Extinction to Triassic-Jurassic Extinction and from the Triassic-Jurassic Extinction to Cretaceous-Tertiary Extinction. Using PaleoTS, I found that body size evolution patterns either seemed to follow either an unbiased random walk (URW) or stasis in the intervals between

  14. Pruning The ELM Survey: Characterizing Candidate Low-mass White Dwarfs through Photometric Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Keaton J.; Gianninas, A.; Hermes, J. J.; Winget, D. E.; Kilic, Mukremin; Montgomery, M. H.; Castanheira, B. G.; Vanderbosch, Z.; Winget, K. I.; Brown, Warren R.

    2017-02-01

    We assess the photometric variability of nine stars with spectroscopic Teff and log g values from the ELM Survey that locates them near the empirical extremely low-mass (ELM) white dwarf instability strip. We discover three new pulsating stars: SDSS J135512.34+195645.4, SDSS J173521.69+213440.6, and SDSS J213907.42+222708.9. However, these are among the few ELM Survey objects that do not show radial velocity (RV) variations that confirm the binary nature expected of helium-core white dwarfs. The dominant 4.31 hr pulsation in SDSS J135512.34+195645.4 far exceeds the theoretical cut-off for surface reflection in a white dwarf, and this target is likely a high-amplitude δ Scuti pulsator with an overestimated surface gravity. We estimate the probability to be less than 0.0008 that the lack of measured RV variations in four of eight other pulsating candidate ELM white dwarfs could be due to low orbital inclination. Two other targets exhibit variability as photometric binaries. Partial coverage of the 19.342 hr orbit of WD J030818.19+514011.5 reveals deep eclipses that imply a primary radius >0.4 R⊙—too large to be consistent with an ELM white dwarf. The only object for which our time series photometry adds support to ELM white dwarf classification is SDSS J105435.78‑212155.9, which has consistent signatures of Doppler beaming and ellipsoidal variations. We conclude that the ELM Survey contains multiple false positives from another stellar population at Teff ≲ 9000 K, possibly related to the sdA stars recently reported from SDSS spectra.

  15. Performance evaluation of a center pivot variable rate irrigation system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable Rate Irrigation (VRI) for center pivots offers potential to match specific application rates to non-uniform soil conditions along the length of the lateral. The benefit of such systems is influenced by the areal extent of these variations and the smallest scale to which the irrigation syste...

  16. Robust nonlinear variable selective control for networked systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Behrooz

    2016-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the networked control of a class of uncertain nonlinear systems. In this way, Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy modelling is used to extend the previously proposed variable selective control (VSC) methodology to nonlinear systems. This extension is based upon the decomposition of the nonlinear system to a set of fuzzy-blended locally linearised subsystems and further application of the VSC methodology to each subsystem. To increase the applicability of the T-S approach for uncertain nonlinear networked control systems, this study considers the asynchronous premise variables in the plant and the controller, and then introduces a robust stability analysis and control synthesis. The resulting optimal switching-fuzzy controller provides a minimum guaranteed cost on an H2 performance index. Simulation studies on three nonlinear benchmark problems demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Variable volume combustor with an air bypass system

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Ostebee, Heath Michael; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-02-07

    The present application provides a combustor for use with flow of fuel and a flow of air in a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within a liner and an air bypass system position about the liner. The air bypass system variably allows a bypass portion of the flow of air to bypass the micro-mixer fuel nozzles.

  18. Mass balance and exergy analysis of a fast pyrolysis system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass balance closure and exergetic efficiency is evaluated for a bench scale fast pyrolysis system. The USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) has developed this system for processing energy crops and agricultural residues for bio-oil (pyrolysis oil or pyrolysis liquids) production. Mass balance c...

  19. Equilibria and vibration of a buckled beam with attached masses or spring-mass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, Raymond H.; Virgin, Lawrence N.

    2016-09-01

    A buckled beam with immovable pinned ends is considered. Attached to the beam are either one concentrated mass, two concentrated masses, a spring-mass system (that could model a human, robot, or passive vibration absorber), or a horizontal rigid bar with two vertical end springs (a "bounce-pitch" system that could model an animal or a vehicle). In the theoretical analysis, the beam is modeled as an inextensible elastica. Equilibrium configurations are determined first. Then small free vibrations about equilibrium are examined, and the lowest frequencies and corresponding modes are computed. The effects of various parameters are investigated, such as the ratio of the span to the total arc length of the beam, the locations and weights of the attached masses and systems, and the stiffnesses of the springs. For the case of a single attached mass, experiments are conducted and the results are compared to the theoretical ones.

  20. Performance of Thermal Mass Flow Meters in a Variable Gravitational Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, John E.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    The performance of five thermal mass flow meters, MKS Instruments 179A and 258C, Unit Instruments UFM-8100, Sierra Instruments 830L, and Hastings Instruments HFM-200, were tested on the KC-135 Reduced Gravity Aircraft in orthogonal, coparallel, and counterparallel orientations relative to gravity. Data was taken throughout the parabolic trajectory where the g-level varied from 0.01 to 1.8 times normal gravity. Each meter was calibrated in normal gravity in the orthogonal position prior to flight followed by ground testing at seven different flow conditions to establish a baseline operation. During the tests, the actual flow rate was measured independently using choked-flow orifices. Gravitational acceleration and attitude had a unique effect on the performance of each meter. All meters operated within acceptable limits at all gravity levels in the calibrated orthogonal position. However, when operated in other orientations, the deviations from the reference flow became substantial for several of the flow meters. Data analysis indicated that the greatest source of error was the effect of orientation, followed by the gravity level. This work emphasized that when operating thermal flow meters in a variable gravity environment, it is critical to orient the meter in the same direction relative to gravity in which it was calibrated. Unfortunately, there was no test in normal gravity that could predict the performance of a meter in reduced gravity. When operating in reduced gravity, all meters indicated within 5 percent of the full scale reading at all flow conditions and orientations.

  1. Northern East Asian Monsoon Precipitation Revealed by Air Mass Variability and Its Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, J. H.; Seo, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    This work provides a new perspective on the major factors controlling the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) in July, and a promising physical-statistical forecasting of the EASM ahead of summer. Dominant modes of the EASM are revealed from the variability of large-scale air masses discerned by equivalent potential temperature, and are found to be dynamically connected with the anomalous sea surface temperatures (SSTs) over the three major oceans of the world and their counterparts of prevailing atmospheric oscillation or teleconnection patterns. Precipitation over Northeast Asia (NEA) during July is enhanced by the tropical central Indian Ocean warming and central Pacific El Niño-related SST warming, the northwestern Pacific cooling off the coast of NEA, and the North Atlantic Ocean warming. Using these factors and data from the preceding spring seasons, the authors build a multiple linear regression model for seasonal forecasting. The cross-validated correlation skill predicted for the period 1994 to 2012 is up to 0.84, which far exceeds the skill level of contemporary climate models.

  2. Search for Low-mass Objects in the Globular Cluster M4. I. Detection of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonova, M.; Mkrtichian, D.; Hasan, P.; Sutaria, F.; Brosch, N.; Gorbikov, E.; Joseph, P.

    2016-02-01

    With every new discovery of an extrasolar planet, the absence of planets in globular clusters (GCs) becomes more and more conspicuous. Null detection of transiting hot Jupiters in GCs 47 Tuc, ω Cen, and NGC 6397 presents an important puzzle, raising questions about the role played by cluster metallicity and environment on formation and survival of planetary systems in densely populated stellar clusters. GCs were postulated to have many free-floating planets, for which microlensing (ML) is an established tool for detection. Dense environments, well-constrained distances and kinematics of lenses and sources, and photometry of thousands of stars simultaneously make GCs the ideal targets to search for ML. We present first results of a multisite, 69-night-long campaign to search for ML signatures of low-mass objects in the GC M4, which was chosen because of its proximity, location, and the actual existence of a planet. M4 was observed in R and I bands by two telescopes, 1 m T40 and 18-inch C18, of the Wise Observatory, Tel Aviv, Israel, from 2011 April to July. Observations on the 1 m telescope were carried out in service mode, gathering 12 to 48 20 s exposures per night for a total of 69 nights. C18 observations were done for about 4 hr a night for six nights in 2011 May. We employ a semiautomated pipeline to calibrate and reduce the images to the light curves that our group is developing for this purpose, which includes the differential photometry package DIAPL, written by Wozniak and modified by W. Pych. Several different diagnostics are employed for search of variability/transients. While no high-significance ML event was found in this observational run, we have detected more than 20 new variables and variable candidates in the M4 field, which we present here.

  3. 2MASS J17112318-2724315: A DEEPLY EMBEDDED LOW-MASS PROTOSTELLAR SYSTEM IN THE B59 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Riaz, B.; Martin, E. L.; Bouy, H.; Tata, R.

    2009-08-01

    We present near-infrared observations of the low-mass deeply embedded Class 0/I system 2MASS J17112318-2724315 (2M171123) in the B59 molecular cloud. Bright scattered light nebulosity is observed toward this source in the K{sub s} images, that seems to trace the edges of an outflow cavity. We report the detection of a low-luminosity protostar 2M17112255-27243448 (2M17112255) that lies {approx}8'' ({approx}1000 AU) from 2M171123. This is a Class I system, as indicated by its 2-8 {mu}m slope and Infrared Array Camera colors, with an estimated internal luminosity of {approx}0.3 L{sub sun}. We estimate a mass of {approx}0.12-0.25 M{sub sun} for this source, at an age of 0.1-1 Myr. Also presented is detailed modeling of the 2M171123 system. The best-fit parameters indicate a large envelope density of the order of {approx}10{sup -13} g cm{sup -3}, and an intermediate inclination between 53 deg. and 59 deg. The observed K{sub s} -band variability for this system could be explained by slight variability in the mass infall rate between 2.5E-5 and 1.8E-5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The protostar 2M171123 exhibits a rarely observed absorption feature near 11.3 {mu}m within its 10 {mu}m silicate band. We find a strong correlation between the strength in this 11.3 {mu}m 'edge' and the H{sub 2}O-ice column density, indicating the origin of this feature in the thickness of the ice mantle over the silicate grains.

  4. Nitrate, Nitrite, and Ammonium Variability in Drinking Water Distribution Systems.

    PubMed

    Schullehner, Jörg; Stayner, Leslie; Hansen, Birgitte

    2017-03-09

    Accurate assessments of exposure to nitrate in drinking water is a crucial part of epidemiological studies investigating long-term adverse human health effects. However, since drinking water nitrate measurements are usually collected for regulatory purposes, assumptions on (1) the intra-distribution system variability and (2) short-term (seasonal) concentration variability have to be made. We assess concentration variability in the distribution system of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, and seasonal variability in all Danish public waterworks from 2007 to 2016. Nitrate concentrations at the exit of the waterworks are highly correlated with nitrate concentrations within the distribution net or at the consumers' taps, while nitrite and ammonium concentrations are generally lower within the net compared with the exit of the waterworks due to nitrification. However, nitrification of nitrite and ammonium in the distribution systems only results in a relatively small increase in nitrate concentrations. No seasonal variation for nitrate, nitrite, or ammonium was observed. We conclude that nitrate measurements taken at the exit of the waterworks are suitable to calculate exposures for all consumers connected to that waterworks and that sampling frequencies in the national monitoring programme are sufficient to describe temporal variations in longitudinal studies.

  5. Nitrate, Nitrite, and Ammonium Variability in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schullehner, Jörg; Stayner, Leslie; Hansen, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    Accurate assessments of exposure to nitrate in drinking water is a crucial part of epidemiological studies investigating long-term adverse human health effects. However, since drinking water nitrate measurements are usually collected for regulatory purposes, assumptions on (1) the intra-distribution system variability and (2) short-term (seasonal) concentration variability have to be made. We assess concentration variability in the distribution system of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, and seasonal variability in all Danish public waterworks from 2007 to 2016. Nitrate concentrations at the exit of the waterworks are highly correlated with nitrate concentrations within the distribution net or at the consumers’ taps, while nitrite and ammonium concentrations are generally lower within the net compared with the exit of the waterworks due to nitrification. However, nitrification of nitrite and ammonium in the distribution systems only results in a relatively small increase in nitrate concentrations. No seasonal variation for nitrate, nitrite, or ammonium was observed. We conclude that nitrate measurements taken at the exit of the waterworks are suitable to calculate exposures for all consumers connected to that waterworks and that sampling frequencies in the national monitoring programme are sufficient to describe temporal variations in longitudinal studies. PMID:28282914

  6. Development and characterization of a variable turbulence generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, A.; Venkateswaran, P.; Noble, D.; Seitzman, J.; Lieuwen, T.

    2011-09-01

    Experimental turbulent combustion studies require systems that can simulate the turbulence intensities [ u'/ U 0 ~ 20-30% (Koutmos and McGuirk in Exp Fluids 7(5):344-354, 1989)] and operating conditions of real systems. Furthermore, it is important to have systems where turbulence intensity can be varied independently of mean flow velocity, as quantities such as turbulent flame speed and turbulent flame brush thickness exhibit complex and not yet fully understood dependencies upon both U 0 and u'. Finally, high pressure operation in a highly pre-heated environment requires systems that can be sealed, withstand high gas temperatures, and have remotely variable turbulence intensity that does not require system shut down and disassembly. This paper describes the development and characterization of a variable turbulence generation system for turbulent combustion studies. The system is capable of a wide range of turbulence intensities (10-30%) and turbulent Reynolds numbers (140-2,200) over a range of flow velocities. An important aspect of this system is the ability to vary the turbulence intensity remotely, without changing the mean flow velocity. This system is similar to the turbulence generators described by Videto and Santavicca (Combust Sci Technol 76(1):159-164, 1991) and Coppola and Gomez (Exp Therm Fluid Sci 33(7):1037-1048, 2009), where variable blockage ratio slots are located upstream of a contoured nozzle. Vortical structures from the slots impinge on the walls of the contoured nozzle to produce fine-scale turbulence. The flow field was characterized for two nozzle diameters using three-component Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and hotwire anemometry for mean flow velocities from 4 to 50 m/s. This paper describes the key design features of the system, as well as the variation of mean and RMS velocity, integral length scales, and spectra with nozzle diameter, flow velocity, and turbulence generator blockage ratio.

  7. Complex systems and the technology of variability analysis

    PubMed Central

    Seely, Andrew JE; Macklem, Peter T

    2004-01-01

    Characteristic patterns of variation over time, namely rhythms, represent a defining feature of complex systems, one that is synonymous with life. Despite the intrinsic dynamic, interdependent and nonlinear relationships of their parts, complex biological systems exhibit robust systemic stability. Applied to critical care, it is the systemic properties of the host response to a physiological insult that manifest as health or illness and determine outcome in our patients. Variability analysis provides a novel technology with which to evaluate the overall properties of a complex system. This review highlights the means by which we scientifically measure variation, including analyses of overall variation (time domain analysis, frequency distribution, spectral power), frequency contribution (spectral analysis), scale invariant (fractal) behaviour (detrended fluctuation and power law analysis) and regularity (approximate and multiscale entropy). Each technique is presented with a definition, interpretation, clinical application, advantages, limitations and summary of its calculation. The ubiquitous association between altered variability and illness is highlighted, followed by an analysis of how variability analysis may significantly improve prognostication of severity of illness and guide therapeutic intervention in critically ill patients. PMID:15566580

  8. MEASURING THE MASS OF SOLAR SYSTEM PLANETS USING PULSAR TIMING

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, D. J.; Hobbs, G. B.; Manchester, R. N.; Edwards, R. T.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Sarkissian, J. M.; Backer, D. C.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Van Straten, W.; Coles, W.; Demorest, P. B.; Ferdman, R. D.; Purver, M. B.; Folkner, W. M.; Hotan, A. W.; Kramer, M.; Lommen, A. N.; Nice, D. J.; Stairs, I. H.

    2010-09-10

    High-precision pulsar timing relies on a solar system ephemeris in order to convert times of arrival (TOAs) of pulses measured at an observatory to the solar system barycenter. Any error in the conversion to the barycentric TOAs leads to a systematic variation in the observed timing residuals; specifically, an incorrect planetary mass leads to a predominantly sinusoidal variation having a period and phase associated with the planet's orbital motion about the Sun. By using an array of pulsars (PSRs J0437-4715, J1744-1134, J1857+0943, J1909-3744), the masses of the planetary systems from Mercury to Saturn have been determined. These masses are consistent with the best-known masses determined by spacecraft observations, with the mass of the Jovian system, 9.547921(2) x10{sup -4} M {sub sun}, being significantly more accurate than the mass determined from the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft, and consistent with but less accurate than the value from the Galileo spacecraft. While spacecraft are likely to produce the most accurate measurements for individual solar system bodies, the pulsar technique is sensitive to planetary system masses and has the potential to provide the most accurate values of these masses for some planets.

  9. Neutral losses: a type of important variables in prediction of branching degree for acyclic alkenes from mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangxiao; Fan, Wei; Cao, Dongsheng; Zeng, Maomao; Xiao, Hongbin; Liang, Yizeng

    2012-03-30

    Neutral losses are a type of important variables in mass spectral interpretation. Since it is hard to calculate or extract neutral losses from mass spectra, they are usually discarded. In this study, dissimilarity analysis was employed to extract mass spectral characteristics for predicting branching degree of acyclic alkenes. The relationships between branching degree and neutral loss were constructed under direction of experimental observation and mass spectral fragmentations. A branching degree predictor of acyclic alkenes was subsequently built based on the above relationships. After tested by the experimental data in previous studies, the predictor could correctly provide the branching degree from abundant ions of mass spectra. More importantly, this predictor was able to point out which acyclic alkenes could be predicted correctly or not.

  10. Equations of motion and two-equation turbulence model for plane or axisymmetric turbulent flows in body-oriented orthogonal curvilinear coordinates and mass-averaged dependent variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The full Navier-Stokes time-dependent, compressible, turbulent, mean-flow equations in mass-averaged variables for plane or axisymmetric flow are presented. The equations are derived in a body-oriented, orthogonal, curvilinear coordinate system. Turbulence is modelled by a system of two equations for mass-averaged turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate proposed. These equations are rederived and some new features are discussed. A system of second order boundary layer equations is then derived which includes the effects of longitudinal curvature and the normal pressure gradient. The Wilcox and Chambers approach is used in considering effects of streamline curvature on turbulence phenomena in turbulent boundary layer type flows. Their two-equation turbulence model with curvature terms are rederived for the cases considered in the present report. The derived system equations serves as a basis for an investigation of problems where streamline curvature is of the order of the characteristic length in the longitudinal direction.

  11. Managing variability in the IO performance of petascale storage systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Matthew; Zheng, Fang; Klasky, Scott; Schwan, Karsten; Oldfield, Ron A.; Lofstead, Gerald Fredrick, II; Liu, Qing; Kordenbrock, Todd

    2010-11-01

    Significant challenges exist for achieving peak or even consistent levels of performance when using IO systems at scale. They stem from sharing IO system resources across the processes of single large-scale applications and/or multiple simultaneous programs causing internal and external interference, which in turn, causes substantial reductions in IO performance. This paper presents interference effects measurements for two different file systems at multiple supercomputing sites. These measurements motivate developing a 'managed' IO approach using adaptive algorithms varying the IO system workload based on current levels and use areas. An implementation of these methods deployed for the shared, general scratch storage system on Oak Ridge National Laboratory machines achieves higher overall performance and less variability in both a typical usage environment and with artificially introduced levels of 'noise'. The latter serving to clearly delineate and illustrate potential problems arising from shared system usage and the advantages derived from actively managing it.

  12. Analysis of a Linear System for Variable-Thrust Control in the Terminal Phase of Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, Richard A.; Durling, Barbara J.

    1961-01-01

    A linear system for applying thrust to a ferry vehicle in the 3 terminal phase of rendezvous with a satellite is analyzed. This system requires that the ferry thrust vector per unit mass be variable and equal to a suitable linear combination of the measured position and velocity vectors of the ferry relative to the satellite. The variations of the ferry position, speed, acceleration, and mass ratio are examined for several combinations of the initial conditions and two basic control parameters analogous to the undamped natural frequency and the fraction of critical damping. Upon making a desirable selection of one control parameter and requiring minimum fuel expenditure for given terminal-phase initial conditions, a simplified analysis in one dimension practically fixes the choice of the remaining control parameter. The system can be implemented by an automatic controller or by a pilot.

  13. Balloon borne optical disk mass storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanek, M. D.; Jennings, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    An on-board data recording system for balloon-borne interferometer using a vacuum operable, ruggedized WORM optical drive is presented. This system, as presently under development, provides 320 Mbytes of data storage (or approximately 11 hrs at the 64 kbits/sec telemetry rate of the experiment). It has the capability of recording the unmodified telemetry bit system as transmitted or doing some preprocessing of the data onboard. The system is compact and requires less than 28 watts of battery power to operate.

  14. Dynamic Analysis of Coupled Vehicle-Bridge System with Uniformly Variable Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei-zhen, Li; Chang-ping, Chen; Yi-qi, Mao; Chang-zhao, Qian

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a planar biaxial vehicle model with four degrees of freedom is presented based on spring-damping-mass system theory. By using Runge-Kutta method, the dynamic characteristics of a simply support bridge acting by moving vehicle with uniform variable speed are analyzed, and the effects of inertia force, relative acceleration and initial velocity are taken into consideration in the present research. The time-deflection response curves of the bridge under the variation of initial speed and acceleration are analyzed. Some valuable results are found which can provide a theoretical direction for the consideration of dynamical characteristics in design of bridge system.

  15. Global variability in angina pectoris and its association with body mass index and poverty.

    PubMed

    Liu, Longjian; Ma, Jixiang; Yin, Xiaoyan; Kelepouris, Ellie; Eisen, Howard J

    2011-03-01

    In the absence of a previous global comparison, we examined the variability in the prevalence of angina across 52 countries and its association with body weight and the poverty index using data from the World Health Organization-World Health Survey. The participants with angina were defined as those who had positive results using a Rose angina questionnaire and/or self-report of a physician diagnosis of angina. The body mass index (BMI) was determined as the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters. The poverty index (a standard score of socioeconomic status for a given country) was extracted from the United Nations' statistics. The associations of angina with the BMI and poverty index were analyzed cross-sectionally using univariate and multivariate analyses. The results showed that the total participants (n = 210,787) had an average age of 40.64 years. The prevalence of angina ranged from 2.44% in Tunisia to 23.89% in Chad. Those participants with a BMI of <18.5 kg/m(2) (underweight), 25 to 29 kg/m(2) (overweight), or BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) (obese) had a significantly greater risk of having angina compared to those with a normal BMI (≥ 18.5 but <25 k/m(2)). The odds ratios of overweight and obese for angina remained significant in the multilevel models, in which the influence of the country-level poverty status was considered. A tendency was seen for underweight status and a poverty index >14.65% to be associated with the risk of having angina, although these associations were not statistically significant in the multilevel models. In conclusion, significant variations were found in the anginal rates across 52 countries worldwide. An increased BMI was significantly associated with the odds of having angina.

  16. Time-Variable Gravity Signal due to Extratropic Pacific Water Mass Redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.; Boy, J. -P.; Cox, C. M.; Au, A. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Using the satellite-laser-ranging (SLR) data, Cox and Chao [2002] reported the detection of a large post-1998 anomaly (in the form of a positive jump) in the time series of Earth s lowest-degree gravity harmonic 52, or the dynamic oblateness. Among several groups now examining the mass redistribution in the global geophysical fluids in search of the cause(s), we report here a temporally coinciding anomalies found in the extratropic north + south Pacific basins. Clearly seen in the leading EOFPC mode for extratropic Pacific, these anomalies occurred in sea-surface height, sea-surface temperature, and temperature- and salinity-depth profiles. We based our analysis on two different data sources: TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry, and the ECCO ocean general circulation model output assimilating T/P data. The magnitude of these changes, when converted to equivalent J2 change, appears to be a few times too small to explain the observed J2 directly. These findings, and the fact that the anomalies occurred following the strong 1997-98 El Nino, suggest strong geophysical connection of the interannual-to-decadal variation of 52 with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the ultimate global-change processes that cause PDO. More work is underway, and additional independent data sources are examined, paying close attention to the fact that the J2 anomaly has been reversing back to normal since 2001. These include: (1) cryospheric contributions (melting of glaciers and ice sheets); (2) land hydrological contributions; (3) polar sea influences ( e g , via deep flow); (4) fluid flow in Earth's core; (5) time-variable gravity signals from SLR in higher harmonic degree/order, including J3,J4, (2,1), and (2,2) coefficients, considering their lower signal-to-noise ratios; (6) Earth rotation data in terms of length-of-day and polar motion.

  17. Bipartite entanglement in continuous-variable tripartite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, M. K.; Corney, J. F.

    2016-11-01

    In the field of continuous-variable tripartite entanglement, the systems utilised can be either asymmetric or symmetric. It is therefore of interest to examine the differences in the entanglement properties of these two types of system, using two examples that are known to produce tripartite entanglement. We examine one asymmetric and one fully symmetric Gaussian continuous-variable system in terms of their tripartite and bipartite entanglement properties. We first treat pure states and are able to find analytic solutions using the undepleted pump approximation for the Hamiltonian models. Our symmetric system exhibits perfect tripartite correlations, but only in the unphysical limit of infinite squeezing. For more realistic squeezing parameters, the two systems exhibit both tripartite and bipartite entanglement. Secondly we treat the more experimentally reasonable situation where the interactions take place inside optical cavities and we are dealing with mixed states. In these cases, where the criteria for genuine tripartite entanglement are more stringent, we find that tripartite entanglement is still available, although over smaller bandwidths than three-mode inseparability. In general, the spectral results are consistent with the analytical solutions. We conclude that none of the outputs are completely analogous to either GHZ or W states, but there are parameter regions of the Hamiltonian dynamics where they produce T states as introduced by Adesso et al. [1,2]. In the intracavity cases, both bipartite entanglement and tripartite inseparability are always present, with genuine tripartite entanglement appearing as the pumping rate is increased. The qualitative differences in the output states for different interaction parameters indicate that continuous-variable tripartite quantum information systems offer a versatility not found in two-mode bipartite systems.

  18. Quantification and scaling of multipartite entanglement in continuous variable systems.

    PubMed

    Adesso, Gerardo; Serafini, Alessio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-11-26

    We present a theoretical method to determine the multipartite entanglement between different partitions of multimode, fully or partially symmetric Gaussian states of continuous variable systems. For such states, we determine the exact expression of the logarithmic negativity and show that it coincides with that of equivalent two-mode Gaussian states. Exploiting this reduction, we demonstrate the scaling of the multipartite entanglement with the number of modes and its reliable experimental estimate by direct measurements of the global and local purities.

  19. Features of an electricity supply system based on variable input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we analyse and present the major features of electricity production being based predominantly on variable wind onshore and offshore and on photovoltaic generation. Actual data are taken from the German demand and supply situation in 2010. On this basis, the generation capacities are scaled to higher installed powers. The main purpose of the paper is to show characteristic trends and the mostly system oriented consequences of large-scale wind and solar use with fluctuating input.

  20. Low-Mass Inflation Systems for Inflatable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thunnissen, Daniel P.; Webster, Mark S.; Engelbrecht, Carl S.

    1995-01-01

    The use of inflatable space structures has often been proposed for aerospace and planetary applications. Communication, power generation, and very-long-baseline interferometry are just three potential applications of inflatable technology. The success of inflatable structures depends on the development of an applications of inflatable technology. This paper describes two design studies performed to develop a low mass inflation system. The first study takes advantage of existing onboard propulsion gases to reduce the overall system mass. The second study assumes that there is no onboard propulsion system. Both studies employ advanced components developed for the Pluto fast flyby spacecraft to further reduce mass. The study examined four different types of systems: hydrazine, nitrogen and water, nitrogen, and xenon. This study shows that all of these systems can be built for a small space structure with masses lower than 0.5 kilograms.

  1. Separation of variables in an asymmetric cyclidic coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohl, H. S.; Volkmer, H.

    2013-06-01

    A global analysis is presented of solutions for Laplace's equation on three-dimensional Euclidean space in one of the most general orthogonal asymmetric confocal cyclidic coordinate systems which admit solutions through separation of variables. We refer to this coordinate system as five-cyclide coordinates since the coordinate surfaces are given by two cyclides of genus zero which represent inversions of each other with respect to the unit sphere, a cyclide of genus one, and two disconnected cyclides of genus zero. This coordinate system is obtained by stereographic projection of sphero-conal coordinates on four-dimensional Euclidean space. The harmonics in this coordinate system are given by products of solutions of second-order Fuchsian ordinary differential equations with five elementary singularities. The Dirichlet problem for the global harmonics in this coordinate system is solved using multiparameter spectral theory in the regions bounded by the asymmetric confocal cyclidic coordinate surfaces.

  2. Mass properties measurement system: Dynamics and statics measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents and interprets experimental data obtained from the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS). Statics measurements yield the center-of-gravity of an unknown mass and dynamics measurements yield its inertia matrix. Observations of the MPMS performance has lead us to specific design criteria and an understanding of MPMS limitations.

  3. Mass storage system reference model, Version 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Sam (Editor); Miller, Steve (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The high-level abstractions that underlie modern storage systems are identified. The information to generate the model was collected from major practitioners who have built and operated large storage facilities, and represents a distillation of the wisdom they have acquired over the years. The model provides a common terminology and set of concepts to allow existing systems to be examined and new systems to be discussed and built. It is intended that the model and the interfaces identified from it will allow and encourage vendors to develop mutually-compatible storage components that can be combined to form integrated storage systems and services. The reference model presents an abstract view of the concepts and organization of storage systems. From this abstraction will come the identification of the interfaces and modules that will be used in IEEE storage system standards. The model is not yet suitable as a standard; it does not contain implementation decisions, such as how abstract objects should be broken up into software modules or how software modules should be mapped to hosts; it does not give policy specifications, such as when files should be migrated; does not describe how the abstract objects should be used or connected; and does not refer to specific hardware components. In particular, it does not fully specify the interfaces.

  4. Quantifying Interannual Variability for Photovoltaic Systems in PVWatts

    SciTech Connect

    Ryberg, David Severin; Freeman, Janine; Blair, Nate

    2015-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) PVWatts is a relatively simple tool used by industry and individuals alike to easily estimate the amount of energy a photovoltaic (PV) system will produce throughout the course of a typical year. PVWatts Version 5 has previously been shown to be able to reasonably represent an operating system's output when provided with concurrent weather data, however this type of data is not available when estimating system output during future time frames. For this purpose PVWatts uses weather data from typical meteorological year (TMY) datasets which are available on the NREL website. The TMY files represent a statistically 'typical' year which by definition excludes anomalous weather patterns and as a result may not provide sufficient quantification of project risk to the financial community. It was therefore desired to quantify the interannual variability associated with TMY files in order to improve the understanding of risk associated with these projects. To begin to understand the interannual variability of a PV project, we simulated two archetypal PV system designs, which are common in the PV industry, in PVWatts using the NSRDB's 1961-1990 historical dataset. This dataset contains measured hourly weather data and spans the thirty years from 1961-1990 for 239 locations in the United States. To note, this historical dataset was used to compose the TMY2 dataset. Using the results of these simulations we computed several statistical metrics which may be of interest to the financial community and normalized the results with respect to the TMY energy prediction at each location, so that these results could be easily translated to similar systems. This report briefly describes the simulation process used and the statistical methodology employed for this project, but otherwise focuses mainly on a sample of our results. A short discussion of these results is also provided. It is our hope that this quantification of the

  5. Dynamical Masses In The Young Triple System TWA 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Rainer; Ratzka, Thorsten; Petr-Gotzens, Monika G.

    2016-11-01

    We report on new observations and orbit fits of TWA5, a triple system consisting of a close pair of low-mass stars and a brown dwarf. The period of the close pair is only 6 years, allowing thedetermination of its orbit in a relatively short time. The third component can be used as astrometric reference to measurethe motion of the binary components around their center of mass. This yields their mass ratio and hence individual masses of thestars. With the help of new observations collected in January andFebruary 2016, we improved our orbit fits published in 2013.

  6. NASA Langley Research Center's distributed mass storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, Juliet Z.; Humes, D. Creig

    1993-01-01

    There is a trend in institutions with high performance computing and data management requirements to explore mass storage systems with peripherals directly attached to a high speed network. The Distributed Mass Storage System (DMSS) Project at NASA LaRC is building such a system and expects to put it into production use by the end of 1993. This paper presents the design of the DMSS, some experiences in its development and use, and a performance analysis of its capabilities. The special features of this system are: (1) workstation class file servers running UniTree software; (2) third party I/O; (3) HIPPI network; (4) HIPPI/IPI3 disk array systems; (5) Storage Technology Corporation (STK) ACS 4400 automatic cartridge system; (6) CRAY Research Incorporated (CRI) CRAY Y-MP and CRAY-2 clients; (7) file server redundancy provision; and (8) a transition mechanism from the existent mass storage system to the DMSS.

  7. Dark Energy and Dark Matter Phenomena and the Universe with Variable Gravitational Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2005-12-01

    Generation of high-frequency gravitational waves near the singularity is a crucial factor for understanding the origin and dynamics of the Universe. Emission of gravitational waves increases with a decreasing radius of collapsed object much faster than a gravitational force itself. Gravitationally unstable matter of the Universe will be completely converted into gravitational radiation during the Big Crunch. According to Misner, Thorne & Wheeler (Gravitation, 1977, p.959) plane gravitational waves have not gravitational mass or spacetime is flat everywhere outside the pulse. We can propose that the gravitational mass of the Universe is vanished after converting matter into gravitational waves. This hypothesis in the framework of Einstein's theory of gravitation can solve the problem of singularity without contradiction with theorems by Penrose-Hawking; explain the acceleration of our Universe as the effect of a retarded gravitational potential (Gorkavyi, BAAS, 2003, 35, #3) and the low quadrupole in fluctuations in CMB as result of blue-shift effect in a gravitational field. Proposed solution of dark energy problem free from coincidence problems. The hypothesis keeps best parts of Big Bang theory and inflation model without any unknown physical fields or new dimensions. According to this hypothesis a relic sea of high-frequency gravitational radiation in our Universe can be very dense. Interaction of relic gravitational waves with gravitational fields of galaxies and stars can create an additional dynamical effects like pressure of relic radiation that proportional to gravitational potential GM/(Rc2). This effect can be responsible for dark matter phenomena in galaxies and the Pioneer acceleration in the solar system (Gorkavyi, BAAS, 2005, 37, #2).

  8. Search for systemic mass loss in Algols with bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Deschamps, R.; Jorissen, A.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: Various studies indicate that interacting binary stars of Algol type evolve non-conservatively. However, direct detections of systemic mass loss in Algols have been scarce so far. We study the systemic mass loss in Algols by looking for the presence of infrared excesses originating from the thermal emission of dust grains, which is linked to the presence of a stellar wind. Methods: In contrast to previous studies, we make use of the fact that stellar and interstellar material is piled up at the edge of the astrosphere where the stellar wind interacts with the interstellar medium. We analyse WISE W3 12 μm and WISE W4 22 μm data of Algol-type binary Be and B[e] stars and the properties of their bow shocks. From the stand-off distance of the bow shock we are able to determine the mass-loss rate of the binary system. Results: Although the velocities of the stars with respect to the interstellar medium are quite low, we find bow shocks present in two systems, namely π Aqr, and ϕ Per; a third system, CX Dra, shows a more irregular circumstellar environment morphology which might somehow be related to systemic mass loss. The properties of the two bow shocks point to mass-loss rates and wind velocities typical of single B stars, which do not support an enhanced systemic mass loss.

  9. Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Mark L.; Davis, Jay C.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and .sup.3 He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

  10. Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

    1993-02-23

    Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and [sup 3]He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

  11. MASSIS: a mass spectrum simulation system 1. Principle and method.

    PubMed

    Chen, HaiFeng; Fan, BoTao; Xia, HaiRong; Petitjean, Michael; Yuan, ShenGang; Panaye, Annick; Doucet, Jean-Pierre

    2003-01-01

    A mass spectrum simulation system was developed. The simulated spectrum for a given target structure is computed based on the cleavage knowledge and statistical rules established and stocked in pivot databases: cleavage rule knowledge, function groups, small fragments and fragment-intensity relationships. These databases were constructed from correlation charts and statistical analysis of large population of organic mass spectra using data mining techniques. Since 1980, several systems were proposed for mass spectrum simulation, but in present there is no any commercial software available. This shows the complexity and difficulties in the development of a such system. The reported mass spectral simulation system in this paper could be the first general software for organic chemistry use

  12. Model-Based Systems Engineering Approach to Managing Mass Margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Seung H.; Bayer, Todd J.; Cole, Bjorn; Cooke, Brian; Dekens, Frank; Delp, Christopher; Lam, Doris

    2012-01-01

    When designing a flight system from concept through implementation, one of the fundamental systems engineering tasks ismanaging the mass margin and a mass equipment list (MEL) of the flight system. While generating a MEL and computing a mass margin is conceptually a trivial task, maintaining consistent and correct MELs and mass margins can be challenging due to the current practices of maintaining duplicate information in various forms, such as diagrams and tables, and in various media, such as files and emails. We have overcome this challenge through a model-based systems engineering (MBSE) approach within which we allow only a single-source-of-truth. In this paper we describe the modeling patternsused to capture the single-source-of-truth and the views that have been developed for the Europa Habitability Mission (EHM) project, a mission concept study, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  13. Extremal entanglement and mixedness in continuous variable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Adesso, Gerardo; Serafini, Alessio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-08-01

    We investigate the relationship between mixedness and entanglement for Gaussian states of continuous variable systems. We introduce generalized entropies based on Schatten p norms to quantify the mixedness of a state and derive their explicit expressions in terms of symplectic spectra. We compare the hierarchies of mixedness provided by such measures with the one provided by the purity (defined as tr {rho}{sup 2} for the state {rho}) for generic n-mode states. We then review the analysis proving the existence of both maximally and minimally entangled states at given global and marginal purities, with the entanglement quantified by the logarithmic negativity. Based on these results, we extend such an analysis to generalized entropies, introducing and fully characterizing maximally and minimally entangled states for given global and local generalized entropies. We compare the different roles played by the purity and by the generalized p entropies in quantifying the entanglement and the mixedness of continuous variable systems. We introduce the concept of average logarithmic negativity, showing that it allows a reliable quantitative estimate of continuous variable entanglement by direct measurements of global and marginal generalized p entropies.

  14. Variable buoyancy system for unmanned multi-domain vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Marc; Bryant, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the system design, construction, and testing of an active variable buoyancy system (VBS) actuator with applications to unmanned multi-domain vehicles. Unmanned multi-domain vehicles require nontraditional VBS designs because of their unique operation requirements. We present a VBS actuator design that targets multi-domain vehicle design objectives of high endurance, stealth, and underwater loitering. The design features a rigid ballast tank with an inner elastic bladder connected to a hydraulic pump and a proportionally controlled vent valve. The system working fluid is obtained from the ambient surrounding water and the elastic bladder separates the water from pressurized gas, thus preventing any gas from escaping during a venting operation. An analytic model of the VBS characterizing the system dynamics is derived. Ballast tank prototype design and construction is discussed. A VBS test platform vehicle is presented, featuring two ballast tanks, motor, pump, and RF receiver for control.

  15. Two-Stage Variable Sample-Rate Conversion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkacenko, Andre

    2009-01-01

    A two-stage variable sample-rate conversion (SRC) system has been pro posed as part of a digital signal-processing system in a digital com munication radio receiver that utilizes a variety of data rates. The proposed system would be used as an interface between (1) an analog- todigital converter used in the front end of the receiver to sample an intermediatefrequency signal at a fixed input rate and (2) digita lly implemented tracking loops in subsequent stages that operate at v arious sample rates that are generally lower than the input sample r ate. This Two-Stage System would be capable of converting from an input sample rate to a desired lower output sample rate that could be var iable and not necessarily a rational fraction of the input rate.

  16. Variable structure control of nonlinear systems through simplified uncertain models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sira-Ramirez, Hebertt

    1986-01-01

    A variable structure control approach is presented for the robust stabilization of feedback equivalent nonlinear systems whose proposed model lies in the same structural orbit of a linear system in Brunovsky's canonical form. An attempt to linearize exactly the nonlinear plant on the basis of the feedback control law derived for the available model results in a nonlinearly perturbed canonical system for the expanded class of possible equivalent control functions. Conservatism tends to grow as modeling errors become larger. In order to preserve the internal controllability structure of the plant, it is proposed that model simplification be carried out on the open-loop-transformed system. As an example, a controller is developed for a single link manipulator with an elastic joint.

  17. Mathematical modelling of unsteady MHD natural convection flow past a vertical plate with variable surface temperature and mass flux in the presence of radiation and chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, S. Suresh Kumar; Narahari, Marneni; Pendyala, Rajashekhar

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, a numerical analysis is made for unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) natural convective boundary-layer flow past an impulsively started semi-infinite vertical plate with variable surface temperature and mass flux in the presence of thermal radiation and chemical reaction. The Crank-Nicolson implicit finite difference technique is implemented to solve the system of governing equations. Numerical results are obtained for different values of system parameters and analyzed through graphs. The velocity profiles of the present study have been compared with the available results for the limiting case and a good agreement is found between the results.

  18. Upper air relaxation in regional climate model improves resolved interannual variability of the surface mass balance of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Berg, Willem Jan; Medley, Brooke; van Meijgaard, Erik

    2015-04-01

    The surface mass balance (SMB) determines the variability of the mass balance of the Antarctic Ice sheet on sub-decadal timescales. Since continent-wide SMB cannot be measured, it must be modeled and regional climate models (RCMs) generally outperform global reanalyses in the representation of total mass flux and the spatial distribution of SMB. However, if RCMs are only forced with reanalysis on their lateral boundaries, the representation of the interannual variability of SMB deteriorates significantly. In this study we show how to improve the resolved interannual variability in RCM modeled SMB. For this purpose we use annual SMB observations in the Thwaites drainage basin in Antarctica derived from airborne radar reflections and the RCM RACMO2. RACMO2, driven by ERA-Interim, better represents the mean spatial SMB pattern in this basin than ERA-Interim. However, without relaxation in the interior, RACMO2 poorly resolves the observed interannual SMB variability. If we gently relax the temperature and wind field in the upper atmosphere in RACMO2 to ERA-Interim, RACMO2 gets the best of both. Upper air relaxation little changes the mean SMB and spatial pattern compared to the original RACMO2 output, but allows RACMO2 to resolve the observed interannual SMB as good as ERA-Interim.

  19. Paper spray mass spectrometry and PLS-DA improved by variable selection for the forensic discrimination of beers.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Hebert Vinicius; Amador, Victória Silva; Sena, Marcelo Martins; Augusti, Rodinei; Piccin, Evandro

    2016-10-12

    Paper spray mass spectrometry (PS-MS) combined with partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was applied for the first time in a forensic context to a fast and effective differentiation of beers. Eight different brands of American standard lager beers produced by four different breweries (141 samples from 55 batches) were studied with the aim at performing a differentiation according to their market prices. The three leader brands in the Brazilian beer market, which have been subject to fraud, were modeled as the higher-price class, while the five brands most used for counterfeiting were modeled as the lower-price class. Parameters affecting the paper spray ionization were examined and optimized. The best MS signal stability and intensity was obtained while using the positive ion mode, with PS(+) mass spectra characterized by intense pairs of signals corresponding to sodium and potassium adducts of malto-oligosaccharides. Discrimination was not apparent neither by using visual inspection nor principal component analysis (PCA). However, supervised classification models provided high rates of sensitivity and specificity. A PLS-DA model using full scan mass spectra were improved by variable selection with ordered predictors selection (OPS), providing 100% of reliability rate and reducing the number of variables from 1701 to 60. This model was interpreted by detecting fifteen variables as the most significant VIP (variable importance in projection) scores, which were therefore considered diagnostic ions for this type of beer counterfeit.

  20. Effects of correlated variability on information entropies in nonextensive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hideo

    2008-08-01

    We have calculated the Tsallis entropy and Fisher information matrix (entropy) of spatially correlated nonextensive systems, by using an analytic non-Gaussian distribution obtained by the maximum entropy method. The effects of the correlated variability on the Fisher information matrix are shown to be different from those on the Tsallis entropy. The Fisher information is increased (decreased) by a positive (negative) correlation, whereas the Tsallis entropy is decreased with increasing absolute magnitude of the correlation, independently of its sign. This fact arises from the difference in their characteristics. It implies from the Cramér-Rao inequality that the accuracy of an unbiased estimate of fluctuation is improved by a negative correlation. A critical comparison is made between the present study and previous ones employing the Gaussian approximation for the correlated variability due to multiplicative noise.

  1. Realtime Multichannel System for Beat to Beat QT Interval Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starc, Vito; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The measurement of beat-to-beat QT interval variability (QTV) shows clinical promise for identifying several types of cardiac pathology. However, until now, there has been no device capable of displaying, in real time on a beattobeat basis, changes in QTV in all 12 conventional leads in a continuously monitored patient. While several software programs have been designed to analyze QTV, heretofore, such programs have all involved only a few channels (at most) and/or have required laborious user interaction or offline calculations and postprocessing, limiting their clinical utility. This paper describes a PC-based ECG software program that in real time, acquires, analyzes and displays QTV and also PQ interval variability (PQV) in each of the eight independent channels that constitute the 12lead conventional ECG. The system also processes certain related signals that are derived from singular value decomposition and that help to reduce the overall effects of noise on the realtime QTV and PQV results.

  2. Singular Hopf Bifurcation in Systems with Fast and Slow Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaksma, B.

    1998-10-01

    We study a general nonlinear ODE system with fast and slow variables, i.e., some of the derivatives are multiplied by a small parameter. The system depends on an additional bifurcation parameter. We derive a normal form for this system, valid close to equilibria where certain conditions on the derivatives hold. The most important condition concerns the presence of eigenvalues with singular imaginary parts, by which we mean that their imaginary part grows without bound as the small parameter tends to zero. We give a simple criterion to test for the possible presence of equilibria satisfying this condition. Using a center manifold reduction, we show the existence of Hopf bifurcation points, originating from the interaction of fast and slow variables, and we determine their nature. We apply the theory, developed here, to two examples: an extended Bonhoeffer—van der Pol system and a predator-prey model. Our theory is in good agreement with the numerical continuation experiments we carried out for the examples.

  3. Aerosol mass spectrometry systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Fergenson, David P.; Gard, Eric E.

    2013-08-20

    A system according to one embodiment includes a particle accelerator that directs a succession of polydisperse aerosol particles along a predetermined particle path; multiple tracking lasers for generating beams of light across the particle path; an optical detector positioned adjacent the particle path for detecting impingement of the beams of light on individual particles; a desorption laser for generating a beam of desorbing light across the particle path about coaxial with a beam of light produced by one of the tracking lasers; and a controller, responsive to detection of a signal produced by the optical detector, that controls the desorption laser to generate the beam of desorbing light. Additional systems and methods are also disclosed.

  4. Parsing interindividual drug variability: an emerging role for systems pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Richard M; Park, B Kevin; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2015-01-01

    There is notable interindividual heterogeneity in drug response, affecting both drug efficacy and toxicity, resulting in patient harm and the inefficient utilization of limited healthcare resources. Pharmacogenomics is at the forefront of research to understand interindividual drug response variability, but although many genotype-drug response associations have been identified, translation of pharmacogenomic associations into clinical practice has been hampered by inconsistent findings and inadequate predictive values. These limitations are in part due to the complex interplay between drug-specific, human body and environmental factors influencing drug response and therefore pharmacogenomics, whilst intrinsically necessary, is by itself unlikely to adequately parse drug variability. The emergent, interdisciplinary and rapidly developing field of systems pharmacology, which incorporates but goes beyond pharmacogenomics, holds significant potential to further parse interindividual drug variability. Systems pharmacology broadly encompasses two distinct research efforts, pharmacologically-orientated systems biology and pharmacometrics. Pharmacologically-orientated systems biology utilizes high throughput omics technologies, including next-generation sequencing, transcriptomics and proteomics, to identify factors associated with differential drug response within the different levels of biological organization in the hierarchical human body. Increasingly complex pharmacometric models are being developed that quantitatively integrate factors associated with drug response. Although distinct, these research areas complement one another and continual development can be facilitated by iterating between dynamic experimental and computational findings. Ultimately, quantitative data-derived models of sufficient detail will be required to help realize the goal of precision medicine. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2015, 7:221–241. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1302 PMID:25950758

  5. Satellite-based global-ocean mass balance estimates of interannual variability and emerging trends in continental freshwater discharge

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Tajdarul H.; Famiglietti, James S.; Chambers, Don P.; Willis, Josh K.; Hilburn, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater discharge from the continents is a key component of Earth’s water cycle that sustains human life and ecosystem health. Surprisingly, owing to a number of socioeconomic and political obstacles, a comprehensive global river discharge observing system does not yet exist. Here we use 13 years (1994–2006) of satellite precipitation, evaporation, and sea level data in an ocean mass balance to estimate freshwater discharge into the global ocean. Results indicate that global freshwater discharge averaged 36,055 km3/y for the study period while exhibiting significant interannual variability driven primarily by El Niño Southern Oscillation cycles. The method described here can ultimately be used to estimate long-term global discharge trends as the records of sea level rise and ocean temperature lengthen. For the relatively short 13-year period studied here, global discharge increased by 540 km3/y2, which was largely attributed to an increase of global-ocean evaporation (768 km3/y2). Sustained growth of these flux rates into long-term trends would provide evidence for increasing intensity of the hydrologic cycle. PMID:20921364

  6. Satellite-based global-ocean mass balance estimates of interannual variability and emerging trends in continental freshwater discharge.

    PubMed

    Syed, Tajdarul H; Famiglietti, James S; Chambers, Don P; Willis, Josh K; Hilburn, Kyle

    2010-10-19

    Freshwater discharge from the continents is a key component of Earth's water cycle that sustains human life and ecosystem health. Surprisingly, owing to a number of socioeconomic and political obstacles, a comprehensive global river discharge observing system does not yet exist. Here we use 13 years (1994-2006) of satellite precipitation, evaporation, and sea level data in an ocean mass balance to estimate freshwater discharge into the global ocean. Results indicate that global freshwater discharge averaged 36,055 km(3)/y for the study period while exhibiting significant interannual variability driven primarily by El Niño Southern Oscillation cycles. The method described here can ultimately be used to estimate long-term global discharge trends as the records of sea level rise and ocean temperature lengthen. For the relatively short 13-year period studied here, global discharge increased by 540 km(3)/y(2), which was largely attributed to an increase of global-ocean evaporation (768 km(3)/y(2)). Sustained growth of these flux rates into long-term trends would provide evidence for increasing intensity of the hydrologic cycle.

  7. Spatial variability in mass loss of glaciers in the Everest region, central Himalayas, between 2000 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Owen; Quincey, Duncan J.; Carrivick, Jonathan L.; Rowan, Ann V.

    2017-02-01

    Region-wide averaging of Himalayan glacier mass change has masked any catchment or glacier-scale variability in glacier recession; thus the role of a number of glaciological processes in glacier wastage remains poorly understood. In this study, we quantify mass loss rates over the period 2000-2015 for 32 glaciers across the Everest region and assess how future ice loss is likely to differ depending on glacier hypsometry. The mean mass balance of all 32 glaciers in our sample was -0.52 ± 0.22 m water equivalent (w.e.) a-1. The mean mass balance of nine lacustrine-terminating glaciers (-0.70 ± 0.26 m w.e. a-1) was 32 % more negative than land-terminating, debris-covered glaciers (-0.53 ± 0.21 m w.e. a-1). The mass balance of lacustrine-terminating glaciers is highly variable (-0.45 ± 0.13 to -0.91 ± 0.22 m w.e. a-1), perhaps reflecting glacial lakes at different stages of development. To assess the importance of hypsometry on glacier response to future temperature increases, we calculated current (Dudh Koshi - 0.41, Tama Koshi - 0.43, Pumqu - 0.37) and prospective future glacier accumulation area Ratios (AARs). IPCC AR5 RCP 4.5 warming (0.9-2.3 °C by 2100) could reduce AARs to 0.29 or 0.08 in the Tama Koshi catchment, 0.27 or 0.17 in the Dudh Koshi catchment and 0.29 or 0.18 in the Pumqu catchment. Our results suggest that glacial lake expansion across the Himalayas could expedite ice mass loss and the prediction of future contributions of glacial meltwater to river flow will be complicated by spatially variable glacier responses to climate change.

  8. NCDC mass storage systems and technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dick

    1993-01-01

    National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) data management issues are discussed, such as nature of holdings, history of the site, popularity of data sets, media/technology used for storage, volume distributed per month, mode of distribution, most frequently encountered problems, type of media requested/used, and evolution of media. Current holdings at NCDC are 107.8 terabytes of digital data and about 0.3 terabytes of manuscript data. The nexrad radar system is expected to generate approximately 88 terabytes per year by 1996.

  9. Adaptive mass expulsion attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodden, John J. (Inventor); Stevens, Homer D. (Inventor); Carrou, Stephane (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An attitude control system and method operative with a thruster controls the attitude of a vehicle carrying the thruster, wherein the thruster has a valve enabling the formation of pulses of expelled gas from a source of compressed gas. Data of the attitude of the vehicle is gathered, wherein the vehicle is located within a force field tending to orient the vehicle in a first attitude different from a desired attitude. The attitude data is evaluated to determine a pattern of values of attitude of the vehicle in response to the gas pulses of the thruster and in response to the force field. The system and the method maintain the attitude within a predetermined band of values of attitude which includes the desired attitude. Computation circuitry establishes an optimal duration of each of the gas pulses based on the pattern of values of attitude, the optimal duration providing for a minimal number of opening and closure operations of the valve. The thruster is operated to provide gas pulses having the optimal duration.

  10. Design of a variable-focal-length optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, D.; Shannon, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Requirements to place an entire optical system with a variable focal length ranging from 20 to 200 cm within a overall length somewhat less than 100 cm placed severe restrictions on the design of a zoom lens suitable for use on a comet explorer. The requirements of a wavelength range of 0.4 to 1.0 microns produced even greater limitations on the possibilities for a design that included a catadioptric (using mirrors and glass) front and followed by a zooming refractive portion. Capabilities available commercial zoom lenses as well as patents of optical systems are reviewed. Preliminary designs of the refractive optics zoom lens and the catadioptric system are presented and evaluated. Of the two, the latter probably has the best chance of success, so long as the shortest focal lengths are not really needed.

  11. Variable Stars and The Asymptotic Giant Branch: Stellar Pulsations, Dust Production, and Mass Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, A. K.

    2014-09-01

    Low- and intermediate-mass stars (1-8 M⊙; LIMS) are very important contributors of material to the interstellar medium (ISM), and yet the mechanisms by which this matter is expelled remain a mystery. In this paper we discuss how interferometry plays a role in studying the interplay between pulsation, mass loss, dust formation, and evolution of these LIMS.

  12. Variable Stars and the Asymptotic Giant Branch: Stellar Pulsations, Dust Production, and Mass Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, A. K.

    2012-06-01

    Low- and intermediate-mass stars (1-8 M⊙; LIMS) are very important contributors of material to the interstellar medium (ISM), and yet the mechanisms by which this matter is expelled remain a mystery. In this paper we discuss how interferometry plays a role in studying the interplay between pulsation, mass loss, dust formation and evolution of these LIMS.

  13. VX Her: Eclipsing Binary System or Single Variable Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Kathleen; Castelaz, Michael; Henson, Gary; Boghozian, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    VX Her is a pulsating variable star with a period of .4556504 days. It is believed to be part of an eclipsing binary system (Fitch et al. 1966). This hypothesis originated from Fitch seeing VX Her's minimum point on its light curve reaching a 0.7 magnitude fainter than normal and remaining that way for nearly two hours. If VX Her were indeed a binary system, I would expect to see similar results with a fainter minimum and a broader, more horizontal dip. Having reduced and analyzed images from the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy Observatory in Chile and Kitt Peak, as well as images from a 0.15m reflector at East Tennessee State University, I found that VX Her has the standard light curve of the prototype variable star, RR Lyrae. Using photometry, I found no differing features in its light curve to suggest that it is indeed a binary system. However, more observations are needed in case VX Her is a wide binary.

  14. Searching for Variability of NV Intrinsic Narrow Absorption Line Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodruck, Michael; Charlton, Jane C.; Ganguly, Rajib

    2017-01-01

    The majority of quasar absorption line systems with NV detected are found within the associated region (within 5000km/s of the quasar redshift) and many/most are believed to be related to the quasar accretion disk wind or outflows. The most definite evidence that these NV absorbers are "intrinsic" is partial covering of the quasar continuum source and/or broad line region. Over 50 quasars containing NV narrow absorption lines have observations obtained at different times with the Keck/HIRES and the VLT/UVES spectrographs at high resolution. The interval between these observations range from months to a decade in the quasar rest frame. While variability is common for intrinsic broad and mini-broad absorption lines, intrinsic narrow absorption lines have been found to be less likely to vary, though systematic studies with large, high quality datasets have been limited. The variability timescales are useful for deriving gas densities and thus the distances from the central engines. This is important in mapping the quasar surroundings, understanding the accretion disk wind mechanism, and assessing the effect the wind has on the galaxy surroundings. We report on the results of a systematic study of variability of NV NALs, exploiting the overlap of targets for observations in the archives of Keck and VLT, and discuss the consequences for interpretation of the origin of intrinsic narrow absorption lines.

  15. Mass change, environmental variability and female fertility in wild Propithecus verreauxi.

    PubMed

    Richard, A F; Dewar, R E; Schwartz, M; Ratsirarson, J

    2000-10-01

    Accurate estimates of mass and size are important in a wide range of research questions in population and evolutionary biology, and yet such data are still rare for wild primates. This study presents detailed longitudinal data from a large population of wild indriids, and demonstrates links between fluctuations in body mass, environmental cycles, and reproduction. Understanding these links is a necessary step toward explaining the function and evolution of distinctive features of lemur biology and behavior. During the first 12 years of an ongoing study of the sifaka, Propithecus verreauxi verreauxi, at Beza Mahafaly in southwest Madagascar, 320 animals were captured and weighed throughout the year. Adult males and females exhibit seasonal cycles of mass loss, with females losing significantly more mass than males. In 2 drought years this pattern was especially pronounced. Compared to lighter females, females who were heavier at the time of the mating season were more likely to give birth in the following birth season. By showing (1) seasonally greater mass loss in reproductive females compared to males, particularly in drought years, (2) a close link between female mass and fertility, and (3) an uncoupling of the periods of highest body mass and of gestation and lactation, these results suggest that energy acquisition and storage are critically important in the life history strategies of female sifaka, and that "capital breeding" may be a feature of sifaka reproductive strategies.

  16. Stability of control systems with variable time-delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracht, Rudolf; Thorausch, Marc

    2003-09-01

    In modern automated systems decentralized concepts are used. Information is communicated via networks as for instance fieldbus systems or industrial ethernet. Since often many users access to the bus, communication time is varying. In most cases this is not critical but for some aplications stability problems are introduced by the varying time-delay. Such applications can be modeled by control loops with a time varying delay block. Different methods were proposed in the last two years for analyzing control systems of this type. Usually state space models are investigated and linear matrix inequalities (LMI) must be solved. The stability region depends not only on the value of the delay time but also on the time-derivative of the variable delay-time. In the paper a new approach for analyzing stability is presented: The control system with delay is considered in the frequency domain. A stability criterion for systems with periodic varying time-delay is derived. By using a suitable transformation more general delay systems can be investigated. The method is illustrated by an example and simulation studies.

  17. Novel models on fluid's variable thermo-physical properties for extensive study on convection heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, De-Yi; Zhong, Liang-Cai

    2017-01-01

    Our novel models for fluid's variable physical properties are improved and reported systematically in this work for enhancement of theoretical and practical value on study of convection heat and mass transfer. It consists of three models, namely (1) temperature parameter model, (2) polynomial model, and (3) weighted-sum model, respectively for treatment of temperature-dependent physical properties of gases, temperature-dependent physical properties of liquids, and concentration- and temperature-dependent physical properties of vapour-gas mixture. Two related components are proposed, and involved in each model for fluid's variable physical properties. They are basic physic property equations and theoretical similarity equations on physical property factors. The former, as the foundation of the latter, is based on the typical experimental data and physical analysis. The latter is built up by similarity analysis and mathematical derivation based on the former basic physical properties equations. These models are available for smooth simulation and treatment of fluid's variable physical properties for assurance of theoretical and practical value of study on convection of heat and mass transfer. Especially, so far, there has been lack of available study on heat and mass transfer of film condensation convection of vapour-gas mixture, and the wrong heat transfer results existed in widespread studies on the related research topics, due to ignorance of proper consideration of the concentration- and temperature-dependent physical properties of vapour-gas mixture. For resolving such difficult issues, the present novel physical property models have their special advantages.

  18. Building and managing high performance, scalable, commodity mass storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekashman, John

    1998-01-01

    The NAS Systems Division has recently embarked on a significant new way of handling the mass storage problem. One of the basic goals of this new development are to build systems at very large capacity and high performance, yet have the advantages of commodity products. The central design philosophy is to build storage systems the way the Internet was built. Competitive, survivable, expandable, and wide open. The thrust of this paper is to describe the motivation for this effort, what we mean by commodity mass storage, what the implications are for a facility that performs such an action, and where we think it will lead.

  19. Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Ben (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Papers and viewgraphs from the conference are presented. Discussion topics include the IEEE Mass Storage System Reference Model, data archiving standards, high-performance storage devices, magnetic and magneto-optic storage systems, magnetic and optical recording technologies, high-performance helical scan recording systems, and low end helical scan tape drives. Additional discussion topics addressed the evolution of the identifiable unit for processing (file, granule, data set, or some similar object) as data ingestion rates increase dramatically, and the present state of the art in mass storage technology.

  20. Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Ben (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Copies of nearly all of the technical papers and viewgraphs presented at the Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies held in Sep. 1992 are included. The conference served as an informational exchange forum for topics primarily relating to the ingestion and management of massive amounts of data and the attendant problems (data ingestion rates now approach the order of terabytes per day). Discussion topics include the IEEE Mass Storage System Reference Model, data archiving standards, high-performance storage devices, magnetic and magneto-optic storage systems, magnetic and optical recording technologies, high-performance helical scan recording systems, and low end helical scan tape drives. Additional topics addressed the evolution of the identifiable unit for processing purposes as data ingestion rates increase dramatically, and the present state of the art in mass storage technology.

  1. Variability in the cardiac venous system of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Krešáková, Lenka; Purzyc, Halina; Schusterová, Ingrid; Fulton, Benjamin; Maloveská, Marcela; Vdoviaková, Katarina; Kravcová, Zuzanna; Boldižár, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Rats are often used as animal models in experimental cardiology for studying myocardial infarctions and various cardiologic procedures. Currently the cardiac venous system is a target for the delivery of drugs, gene vectors, angiogenetic growth factors, stem cells, and cardioprotective reagents. The purpose of this study was to describe the anatomic configuration and variability of the cardiac venous system in Wistar rats, by using the corrosion cast method and perfusion of colored latex. The distribution of veins in the rat heart disagrees with prior descriptions for other mammals, except mice, which have a similar pattern. Coronary venous drainage in the 36 rats examined consistently involved the left cardiac, left conal, major caudal, right cardiac, and right conal veins. Other veins involved inconsistently included the cranial cardiac vein (58.3% of cases), minor caudal veins (16.7%), conoanastomotic vein (66.7%), and left atrial vein (75%). In 4 cases (11.1%), the collateral veins were located between the left conal and left cardiac veins. In this study, high morphologic variability between cases was manifested by differences in the arrangement, size, mode of opening, and formation of the common root and affected all regions of the heart but primarily the right ventricle.

  2. Variability in the Cardiac Venous System of Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Krešáková, Lenka; Purzyc, Halina; Schusterová, Ingrid; Fulton, Benjamin; Maloveská, Marcela; Vdoviaková, Katarina; Kravcová, Zuzanna; Boldižár, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Rats are often used as animal models in experimental cardiology for studying myocardial infarctions and various cardiologic procedures. Currently the cardiac venous system is a target for the delivery of drugs, gene vectors, angiogenetic growth factors, stem cells, and cardioprotective reagents. The purpose of this study was to describe the anatomic configuration and variability of the cardiac venous system in Wistar rats, by using the corrosion cast method and perfusion of colored latex. The distribution of veins in the rat heart disagrees with prior descriptions for other mammals, except mice, which have a similar pattern. Coronary venous drainage in the 36 rats examined consistently involved the left cardiac, left conal, major caudal, right cardiac, and right conal veins. Other veins involved inconsistently included the cranial cardiac vein (58.3% of cases), minor caudal veins (16.7%), conoanastomotic vein (66.7%), and left atrial vein (75%). In 4 cases (11.1%), the collateral veins were located between the left conal and left cardiac veins. In this study, high morphologic variability between cases was manifested by differences in the arrangement, size, mode of opening, and formation of the common root and affected all regions of the heart but primarily the right ventricle. PMID:25651085

  3. Specialized Gas Chromatography--Mass Spectrometry Systems for Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gochman, Nathan; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the basic design and characteristics of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems used in clinical chemistry. A comparison of three specific systems: the Vitek Olfax IIA, Hewlett-Packard HP5992, and Du Pont DP-102 are included. (BB)

  4. The 1958-2008 Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance variability simulated by the regional climate model MAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fettweis, X.; Franco, B.

    2009-04-01

    Results made with the regional climate model MAR over 1958-2008 show a very high interannual variability of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) surface mass balance (SMB) modelled in average to be 330 ± 130 km3/yr. To a first approximation, the SMB variability is driven by the annual precipitation anomaly minus the meltwater run-off rate variability. Sensitivity experiments carried out by the MAR model evaluate the impacts on the surface melt of (i) the summer SST around the Greenland, (ii) the snow pack temperature at the beginning of the spring, (iii) the winter snow accumulation, (iv) the solid and liquid summer precipitations and (v) the summer atmospheric circulation. This last one, by forcing the summer air temperature above the ice sheet, explains mainly the surface melt anomalies.

  5. Satellite masses in the Uranus and Neptune systems

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.

    1984-10-01

    Satellite masses are derivation with emphasis on implications for bulk densities and albedos is reviewed. In the Uranian system the inner satellites have lower densities and/or higher albedos than the outer ones. However, uncertainties are great enough that all five satellites may have nearly equal densities. In such a case the albedo would decrease with semimajor axis. A more severe constraint is placed on Miranda's mass, and hence on its density and albedo. The recent radiometric value for Triton's diameter, combined with mass determinations, yields a density greater than 4 gm/cm3.

  6. Microscale mass spectrometry systems, devices and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, John Michael

    2016-06-21

    Mass spectrometry systems or assemblies therefore include an ionizer that includes at least one planar conductor, a mass analyzer with a planar electrode assembly, and a detector comprising at least one planar conductor. The ionizer, the mass analyzer and the detector are attached together in a compact stack assembly. The stack assembly has a perimeter that bounds an area that is between about 0.01 mm.sup.2 to about 25 cm.sup.2 and the stack assembly has a thickness that is between about 0.1 mm to about 25 mm.

  7. Concepts for Variable/Multi-Speed Rotorcraft Drive System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Mark A.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2008-01-01

    In several recent studies and on-going developments for advanced rotorcraft, the need for variable or multi-speed capable rotors has been raised. A speed change of up to 50 percent has been proposed for future rotorcraft to improve overall vehicle performance. Accomplishing rotor speed changes during operation requires both a rotor that can perform effectively over the operation speed/load range, and a propulsion system that can enable these speed changes. A study has been completed to investigate possible drive system arrangements that can accommodate up to the 50 percent speed change. Several concepts will be presented and evaluated. The most promising configurations will be identified and developed for future testing in a sub-scaled test facility to validate operational capability.

  8. Gravitational lensing by a smoothly variable three-dimensional mass distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Man Hoi; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1990-01-01

    A smooth three-dimensional mass distribution is approximated by a model with multiple thin screens, with surface mass density varying smoothly on each screen. It is found that 16 screens are sufficient for a good approximation of the three-dimensional distribution of matter. It is also found that in this multiscreen model the distribution of amplifications of single images is dominated by the convergence due to matter within the beam. The shear caused by matter outside the beam has no significant effect. This finding considerably simplifies the modeling of lensing by a smooth three-dimensional mass distribution by effectively reducing the problem to one dimension, as it is sufficient to know the mass distribution along a straight light ray.

  9. Design and Manufacturing of Extremely Low Mass Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Extremely small flight systems pose some unusual design and manufacturing challenges. The small size of the components that make up the system generally must be built with extremely tight tolerances to maintain the functionality of the assembled item. Additionally, the total mass of the system is extremely sensitive to what would be considered small perturbations in a larger flight system. The MUSES C mission, designed, built, and operated by Japan, has a small rover provided by NASA that falls into this small flight system category. This NASA-provided rover is used as a case study of an extremely small flight system design. The issues that were encountered with the rover portion of the MUSES C program are discussed and conclusions about the recommended mass margins at different stages of a small flight system project are presented.

  10. Arctic mass, freshwater and heat fluxes: methods and modelled seasonal variability.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Sheldon; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Fawcett, Stephen; Madec, Gurvan

    2015-10-13

    Considering the Arctic Ocean (including sea ice) as a defined volume, we develop equations describing the time-varying fluxes of mass, heat and freshwater (FW) into, and storage of those quantities within, that volume. The seasonal cycles of fluxes and storage of mass, heat and FW are quantified and illustrated using output from a numerical model. The meanings of 'reference values' and FW fluxes are discussed, and the potential for error through the use of arbitrary reference values is examined.

  11. On the nature of the variability of the Martian thermospheric mass density: Results from electron reflectometry with Mars Global Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Scott L.; Lillis, Robert J.

    2012-02-01

    Knowledge of Mars' thermospheric mass density is important for understanding the current state and evolution of the Martian atmosphere, and for spacecraft such as the upcoming MAVEN mission that will fly through this region on every orbit. Global-scale atmospheric models have been shown thus far to do an inconsistent job of matching the mass density observations at these altitudes, especially on the nightside. Thus, there is a clear need for a data-driven estimate of the mass density in this region. Given the wide range of conditions and locations over which this must be defined, the data set of thermospheric mass densities derived from energy and angular distributions of super-thermal electrons measured by the MAG/ER experiment on Mars Global Surveyor, spanning 4 full Martian years, is an extremely valuable resource. Here we present an empirical model of the thermospheric density structure of this data set. Using this new model, we assess the global-scale response of the thermosphere to dust storms in the lower atmosphere and show that this varies with both latitude and dust opacity. Further, we examine the short-term variability of the thermospheric density and show that it exhibits a repeatable behavior with latitude and season that is indicative of atmospheric wave activity seen in the lower thermosphere. This short-term variability is consistently highest in the southern hemisphere, peaking around perihelion, which may have significant implications for studies of atmospheric escape.

  12. Coupled effect of flow variability and mass transfer on contaminant transport and attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Fiori, Aldo; Dagan, Gedeon

    2016-04-01

    The driving mechanism of contaminant transport in aquifers is groundwater flow, which is controlled by boundary conditions and heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. In this work we show how hydrodynamics and mass transfer can be combined in a general analytical manner to derive a physically-based (or process-based) residence time distribution for a given integral scale of the hydraulic conductivity; the result can be applied for a broad class of linear mass transfer processes. The derived tracer residence time distribution is a transfer function with parameters to be inferred from combined field and laboratory measurements. It is scalable relative to the correlation length and applicable for an arbitrary statistical distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. Based on the derived residence time distribution, the coefficient of variation and skewness of contaminant residence time are illustrated assuming a log-normal hydraulic conductivity distribution and first-order mass transfer. We show that for a low Damkohler number the coefficient of variation is more strongly influenced by mass transfer than by heterogeneity, whereas skewness is more strongly influenced by heterogeneity. The derived physically-based residence time distribution for solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers is particularly useful for studying natural attenuation of contaminants. We illustrate the relative impacts of high heterogeneity and a generalised (non-Fickian) multi-rate mass transfer on natural attenuation defined as contaminant mass loss from injection to a downstream compliance boundary.

  13. Using sorted invariant mass variables to evade combinatorial ambiguities in cascade decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doojin; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun

    2016-02-01

    The classic method for mass determination in a SUSY-like cascade decay chain relies on measurements of the kinematic endpoints in the invariant mass distributions of suitable collections of visible decay products. However, the procedure is complicated by combinatorial ambiguities: e.g., the visible final state particles may be indistinguishable (as in the case of QCD jets), or one may not know the exact order in which they are emitted along the decay chain. In order to avoid such combinatorial ambiguities, we propose to treat the final state particles fully democratically and consider the sorted set of the invariant masses of all possible partitions of the visible particles in the decay chain. In particular, for a decay to N visible particles, one considers the sorted sets of all possible n-body invariant mass combinations (2 ≤ n ≤ N) and determines the kinematic endpoint m ( n, r) max of the distribution of the r-th largest n-body invariant mass m ( n, r) for each possible value of n and r. For the classic example of a squark decay in supersymmetry, we provide analytical formulas for the interpretation of these endpoints in terms of the underlying physical masses. We point out that these measurements can be used to determine the structure of the decay topology, e.g., the number and position of intermediate on-shell resonances.

  14. Using sorted invariant mass variables to evade combinatorial ambiguities in cascade decays

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Doojin; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun

    2016-02-19

    The classic method for mass determination in a SUSY-like cascade decay chain relies on measurements of the kinematic endpoints in the invariant mass distributions of suitable collections of visible decay products. However, the procedure is complicated by combinatorial ambiguities: e.g., the visible final state particles may be indistinguishable (as in the case of QCD jets), or one may not know the exact order in which they are emitted along the decay chain. In order to avoid such combinatorial ambiguities, we propose to treat the nal state particles fully democratically and consider the sorted set of the invariant masses of allmore » possible partitions of the visible particles in the decay chain. In particular, for a decay to N visible particles, one considers the sorted sets of all possible n-body invariant mass combinations (2≤ n≤ N) and determines the kinematic endpoint m(n,r)max of the distribution of the r-th largest n-body invariant mass m(n,r) for each possible value of n and r. For the classic example of a squark decay in supersymmetry, we provide analytical formulas for the interpretation of these endpoints in terms of the underlying physical masses. We point out that these measurements can be used to determine the structure of the decay topology, e.g., the number and position of intermediate on-shell resonances.« less

  15. Using sorted invariant mass variables to evade combinatorial ambiguities in cascade decays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Doojin; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun

    2016-02-19

    The classic method for mass determination in a SUSY-like cascade decay chain relies on measurements of the kinematic endpoints in the invariant mass distributions of suitable collections of visible decay products. However, the procedure is complicated by combinatorial ambiguities: e.g., the visible final state particles may be indistinguishable (as in the case of QCD jets), or one may not know the exact order in which they are emitted along the decay chain. In order to avoid such combinatorial ambiguities, we propose to treat the nal state particles fully democratically and consider the sorted set of the invariant masses of all possible partitions of the visible particles in the decay chain. In particular, for a decay to N visible particles, one considers the sorted sets of all possible n-body invariant mass combinations (2≤ n≤ N) and determines the kinematic endpoint m(n,r)max of the distribution of the r-th largest n-body invariant mass m(n,r) for each possible value of n and r. For the classic example of a squark decay in supersymmetry, we provide analytical formulas for the interpretation of these endpoints in terms of the underlying physical masses. We point out that these measurements can be used to determine the structure of the decay topology, e.g., the number and position of intermediate on-shell resonances.

  16. 6-year periodicity and variable synchronicity in a mass-flowering plant.

    PubMed

    Kakishima, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Jin; Murata, Hiroko; Murata, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Periodical organisms, such as bamboos and periodical cicadas, are very famous for their synchronous reproduction. In bamboos and other periodical plants, the synchronicity of mass-flowering and withering has been often reported indicating these species are monocarpic (semelparous) species. Therefore, synchronicity and periodicity are often suspected to be fairly tightly coupled traits in these periodical plants. We investigate the periodicity and synchronicity of Strobilanthes flexicaulis, and a closely related species S. tashiroi on Okinawa Island, Japan. The genus Strobilanthes is known for several periodical species. Based on 32-year observational data, we confirmed that S. flexicaulis is 6-year periodical mass-flowering monocarpic plant. All the flowering plants had died after flowering. In contrast, we found that S. tashiroi is a polycarpic perennial with no mass-flowering from three-year individual tracking. We also surveyed six local populations of S. flexicaulis and found variation in the synchronicity from four highly synchronized populations (>98% of plants flowering in the mass year) to two less synchronized one with 11-47% of plants flowering before and after the mass year. This result might imply that synchrony may be selected for when periodicity is established in monocarpic species. We found the selective advantages for mass-flowering in pollinator activities and predator satiation. The current results suggest that the periodical S. flexicaulis might have evolved periodicity from a non-periodical close relative. The current report should become a key finding for understanding the evolution of periodical plants.

  17. 6-Year Periodicity and Variable Synchronicity in a Mass-Flowering Plant

    PubMed Central

    Kakishima, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Jin; Murata, Hiroko; Murata, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Periodical organisms, such as bamboos and periodical cicadas, are very famous for their synchronous reproduction. In bamboos and other periodical plants, the synchronicity of mass-flowering and withering has been often reported indicating these species are monocarpic (semelparous) species. Therefore, synchronicity and periodicity are often suspected to be fairly tightly coupled traits in these periodical plants. We investigate the periodicity and synchronicity of Strobilanthes flexicaulis, and a closely related species S. tashiroi on Okinawa Island, Japan. The genus Strobilanthes is known for several periodical species. Based on 32-year observational data, we confirmed that S. flexicaulis is 6-year periodical mass-flowering monocarpic plant. All the flowering plants had died after flowering. In contrast, we found that S. tashiroi is a polycarpic perennial with no mass-flowering from three-year individual tracking. We also surveyed six local populations of S. flexicaulis and found variation in the synchronicity from four highly synchronized populations (>98% of plants flowering in the mass year) to two less synchronized one with 11–47% of plants flowering before and after the mass year. This result might imply that synchrony may be selected for when periodicity is established in monocarpic species. We found the selective advantages for mass-flowering in pollinator activities and predator satiation. The current results suggest that the periodical S. flexicaulis might have evolved periodicity from a non-periodical close relative. The current report should become a key finding for understanding the evolution of periodical plants. PMID:22163279

  18. Performance evaluation of mass storage systems for scientific databases

    SciTech Connect

    Segev, A. |; Seshadri, S.; Rotem, D.

    1994-09-01

    Mass storage systems for computers are the solution to economic storage of vast volumes of data. These systems evolved from the traditional tape libraries manned by operating personnel and the automation of the storage and retrieval function has led to significant improvement in performance. But in contrast to traditional computer systems, little work has been done to characterize performance in terms of the design parameters. The design and performance analysis of mass storage systems is complicated due to several reasons. A major reason for the complexity is the time lags that may occur in retrieving parts of the information meant for the same query. The usual queuing models used for analyzing disk performance are not directly applicable, because there is greater scope for working in parallel in mass storage systems such as robotic libraries, which help mitigate these shortcomings. In this note, robotic libraries are modeled as queueing systems and explicit results related to performance are obtained. The physical model corresponds to a mass storage system, where the information is stored in cassettes, which are retrieved by robots to be read using one or two read heads. The results pertain to the effect of file splitting on cassettes, and optimal configuration and control of robots that perform the retrieval and storage functions.

  19. Fold and thrust systems in Mass Transport Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Marco, S.; Levi, T.; Weinberger, R.

    2017-01-01

    Improvements in seismic reflection data from gravity-driven fold and thrust systems developed in offshore Mass Transport Deposits (MTDs) reveal a number of significant features relating to displacement along thrusts. However, the data are still limited by the resolution of the seismic method, and are unable to provide detail of local fold and thrust processes. Investigation of exceptional gravity-driven contractional structures forming part of MTDs in lacustrine deposits of the Dead Sea Basin, enables us to present the first detailed outcrop analysis of fold and thrust systems cutting unlithified 'soft' sediments. We employ a range of established geometric techniques to our case study, including dip isogons, fault-propagation fold charts and displacement-distance diagrams previously developed for investigation of thrusts and folds in lithified rocks. Fault-propagation folds in unlithified sediments display tighter interlimb angles compared to models developed for lithified sequences. Values of stretch, which compares the relative thickness of equivalent hangingwall and footwall sequences measured along the fault plane, may be as low as only 0.3, which is significantly less than the minimum 0.5 values reported from thrusts cutting lithified rocks, and reflects the extreme variation in stratigraphic thickness around thrust-related folds. We suggest that the simple shear component of deformation in unlithified sediments may modify the forelimb thickness and interlimb angles to a greater extent than in lithified rocks. The average spacing of thrust ramps and the thickness of the thrust sequence display an approximate 5:1 ratio across a range of scales in MTDs. In general, thicker hangingwall and footwall sequences occur with larger thrust displacements, although displacement patterns on thrusts cutting unlithified (yet cohesive) sediments are more variable than those in lithified rocks. Line-length restoration of thrust systems in MTDs reveals 42% shortening, which

  20. Strongly Interacting One-dimensional Systems with Small Mass Imbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volosniev, Artem G.

    2017-03-01

    We study a strongly interacting system of N identical bosons and one impurity in a one-dimensional trap. First, we assume that the particles have identical masses and analyze the corresponding set-up. After that, we study the influence of a small mass asymmetry on our analysis. In particular, we discuss how the structure of the wave function and the degeneracy in the impenetrable regime depend on the mass ratio and the shape of the trapping potential. To illustrate our findings, we consider a four-body system in a box and in an oscillator. We show that in the former case the system has the smallest energy when a heavy (light) impurity is close to the edge (center) of the trap. And we demonstrate that the opposite is true in the latter case.

  1. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  2. Low-Mass, Low-Power Hall Thruster System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pote, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing an electric propulsion system capable of producing 20 mN thrust with input power up to 1,000 W and specific impulse ranging from 1,600 to 3,500 seconds. The key technical challenge is the target mass of 1 kg for the thruster and 2 kg for the power processing unit (PPU). In Phase I, Busek Company, Inc., developed an overall subsystem design for the thruster/cathode, PPU, and xenon feed system. This project demonstrated the feasibility of a low-mass power processing architecture that replaces four of the DC-DC converters of a typical PPU with a single multifunctional converter and a low-mass Hall thruster design employing permanent magnets. In Phase II, the team developed an engineering prototype model of its low-mass BHT-600 Hall thruster system, with the primary focus on the low-mass PPU and thruster. The goal was to develop an electric propulsion thruster with the appropriate specific impulse and propellant throughput to enable radioisotope electric propulsion (REP). This is important because REP offers the benefits of nuclear electric propulsion without the need for an excessively large spacecraft and power system.

  3. Black hole mass estimation from X-ray variability measurements in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolajuk, M.; Papadakis, I. E.; Czerny, B.

    2004-05-01

    We propose a new method of estimation of the black hole masses in active galactic nuclei (AGN) based on the normalized excess variance, σ2nxs. We derive a relation between σ2nxs, the length of the observation, T, the light-curve bin size, Δt, and the black hole mass, assuming that (i) the power spectrum above the high-frequency break, νbf, has a slope of -2, (ii) the high-frequency break scales with black hole mass, (iii) the power-spectrum amplitude (in frequency-power space) is universal and (iv) σ2nxs is calculated from observations of length T < 1/νbf. Values of black hole masses in AGN obtained with this method are consistent with estimates based on other techniques such as reverberation mapping or the MBH-stellar velocity dispersion relation. The method is formally equivalent to methods based on power spectrum scaling with mass, but the use of σ2nxs has the big advantage of being applicable to relatively low-quality data.

  4. 454-Pyrosequencing Reveals Variable Fungal Diversity Across Farming Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kazeeroni, Elham A.; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M.

    2016-01-01

    Oasis farming system is common in some parts of the world, especially in the Arabian Peninsula and several African countries. In Oman, the farming system in the majority of farms follows a semi-oasis farming (SOF) system, which is characterized by growing multiple crops mainly for home consumption, but also for local market. This study was conducted to investigate fungal diversity using pyrosequencing approach in soils from a farm utilizing a SOF system which is cultivated with date palms, acid limes and cucumbers. Fungal diversity from this farm was compared to that from an organic farm (OR) growing cucumbers and tomatoes. Fungal diversity was found to be variable among different crops in the same farm. The observed OTUs, Chao1 richness estimates and Shannon diversity values indicated that soils from date palms and acid limes have higher fungal diversity compared to soil from cucumbers (SOF). In addition, they also indicated that the level of fungal diversity is higher in the rhizosphere of cucumbers grown in OR compared to SOF. Ascomycota was the most dominant phylum in most of the samples from the OR and SOF farms. Other dominant phyla are Microsporidia, Chytridiomycota, and Basidiomycota. The differential level of fungal diversity within the SOF could be related to the variation in the cultural practices employed for each crop. PMID:27014331

  5. Targeted Multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry with Single Chain Fragment Variable (scfv) Recombinant Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery, Gwendoline; Mernaugh, Ray L.; Yan, Heping; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Junhai; Parl, Fritz F.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-10-01

    Recombinant scfv antibodies specific for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 P450 enzymes were combined with targeted imaging mass spectrometry to simultaneously detect the P450 enzymes present in archived, paraffin-embedded, human breast cancer tissue sections. By using CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 specific scfv, each coupled to a unique reporter molecule (i.e., a mass tag) it was possible to simultaneously detect multiple antigens within a single tissue sample with high sensitivity and specificity using mass spectrometry. The capability of imaging multiple antigens at the same time is a significant advance that overcomes technical barriers encountered when using present day approaches to develop assays that can simultaneously detect more than a single antigen in the same tissue sample.

  6. Targeted Multiplex Imaging Mass Spectrometry with Single Chain Fragment Variable (scfv) Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Thiery, Gwendoline; Mernaugh, Ray L.; Yan, Heping; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Junhai; Parl, Fritz F.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant scfv antibodies specific for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 P450 enzymes were combined with targeted imaging mass spectrometry to simultaneously detect the P450 enzymes present in archived, paraffin-embedded, human breast cancer tissue sections. By using CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 specific scfv, each coupled to a unique reporter molecule (i.e., a mass tag) it was possible to simultaneously detect multiple antigens within a single tissue sample with high sensitivity and specificity using mass spectrometry. The capability of imaging multiple antigens at the same time is a significant advance that overcomes technical barriers encountered when using present day approaches to develop assays that can simultaneously detect more than a single antigen in the same tissue sample. PMID:22869296

  7. Mass spectrometric thermodynamic studies of oxide systems and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolyarova, V. L.

    2016-01-01

    Progress in methods of synthesis of advanced materials as well as utilization of such materials at high temperatures requires information on the vaporization processes and thermodynamic properties of oxide systems. The optimal experimental method for these purposes is high-temperature mass spectrometry. This review summarizes and classifies experimental results obtained in mass spectrometric studies of the high-temperature thermodynamic properties of oxide systems and materials carried out in the last two decades. Published data on the vaporization processes and thermodynamic properties of oxide materials for high-temperature technologies are discussed from the standpoint of acid-base concept and model approaches including statistical thermodynamic methods. The bibliography includes 248 references.

  8. Ion optics system incorporating radio frequency mass separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John R.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Results of an experimental study are presented. They show that an RF mass discriminator, based on a Bennett mass spectrometer concept, can be used to discriminate between two species of ions with about a 2-to-1 charge-to-mass ratio. Such a device would be useful for separating monatomic and diatomic oxygen ions in a system designed to simulate the environment that spacecraft encounter in low earth orbit. The influence of changing mass discriminator parameters - such as the spacing of its grids, the amplitude and frequency of RF voltage signals applied to it and the current density of ions incident upon it - on its species discrimination capabilities is discussed. Experimental results are also compared to the results of a simple theoretical model to gain insight into the processes occurring in the discriminator. These results are shown to be in good agreement.

  9. Ultrasensitive nanomechanical mass sensor using hybrid opto-electromechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cheng; Cui, Yuanshun; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2014-06-02

    Nanomechanical resonators provide an unparalleled mass sensitivity sufficient to detect single biomolecules, viruses and nanoparticles. In this work we propose a scheme for mass sensing based on the hybrid opto-electromechanical system, where a mechanical resonator is coupled to an optical cavity and a microwave cavity simultaneously. When the two cavities are driven by two pump fields with proper frequencies and powers, a weak probe field is used to scan across the optical cavity resonance frequency. The mass of a single baculovirus landing onto the surface of the mechanical resonator can be measured by tracking the resonance frequency shift in the probe transmission spectrum before and after the deposition. We also propose a nonlinear mass sensor based on the measurement of the four-wave mixing (FWM) spectrum, which can be used to weigh a single 20-nm-diameter gold nanoparticle with sub-femtogram resolution.

  10. Mass sensing based on a circuit cavity electromechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Cheng; Chen, Bin; Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2011-10-01

    We present a scheme for mass sensing based on a circuit cavity electromechanical system where a free-standing, flexible aluminium membrane is capacitively coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity. Integration with the microwave cavity enables capacitive readout of the mechanical resonance directly on the chip. A microwave pump field and a second probe field are simultaneously applied to the cavity. The accreted mass landing on the membrane can be measured conveniently by tracking the mechanical resonance frequency shifts due to mass changes in the probe transmission spectrum. The mass responsivity for the membrane is 0.72 Hz/ag and we demonstrate that frequency shifts induced by adsorption of one hundred 1587 bp DNA molecules can be well resolved in the probe transmission spectrum.

  11. Coupled heat and mass transfer in mixed convection over a wedge with variable wall temperature and concentration in porous media: The entire regime

    SciTech Connect

    Yih, K.A.

    1998-11-01

    Convective heat transfer in a porous medium has a number of thermal engineering applications such as moisture transport in thermal insulations, ceramic processing, the extraction of geothermal energy, nuclear reactor cooling system, underground nuclear waste disposal, ground water pollution and filtration processes. Here, a boundary layer analysis is used to investigate both heat and mass transfer characteristics of mixed convection about a wedge in saturated porous media under the coupled effects of thermal and mass diffusion. The surface of the wedge is maintained at a variable wall temperature (VWT) and variable wall concentration (VWC). The nonsimilar governing equations are obtained by using a suitable transformation and solved by Keller box method. Numerical results are presented for the local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number. Increasing the buoyancy ratio N, the exponent of wall temperature/concentration n and the wedge angle parameter {lambda} increases the local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number. As mixed convection parameter {chi} varies from 0 to 1, the local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number decrease initially, reach a minimum in the intermediate value of {chi} and then increase gradually. It is apparent that the Lewis number has a pronounced effect on the local Sherwood number than it does on the local Nusselt number. Furthermore, increasing the Lewis number decreases (increases) the local heat (mass) transfer rate.

  12. Implications of variable mass loading in the Io torus: The Jovian flywheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontius, D. H.

    1995-10-01

    The Io plasma torus exhibits a persistent lag from corotation with Jupiter, a phenomenon associated with mass loading due to local ionization of neutrals ejected from Io. The observed lag is the sum of two effects: slippage of the high-altitude neutral atmosphere relative to the planet and slippage of the torus relative to the neutrals. However, the relative weights of the two effects have not been well constrained. Recent observations show that the lag is very steady and insensitive to the position of Io. Models of torus chemistry suggest that mass loading should be concentrated in the vicinity of Io. If the lag is indeed a consequence of mass loading, then this inhomogeneity should presumably lead to more pronounced spatial and temporal variations than are observed. I show that because the neutral atmosphere has a much larger moment of inertia than the torus, it acts as a massive flywheel that requires several hundred hours to adjust to a changing source. By further implication, the effects of local time variations in the mass loading are also smoothed out, and the observed lag reflects the longitude-averaged source rate. This also confirms earlier predictions that most of the observed lag is accountable to slippage of the neutral atmosphere. Implications for radial transport are also discussed. .

  13. VARIABLE BOUND-SITE CHARGING CONTRIBUTIONS TO SURFACE COMPLEXATION MASS ACTION EXPRESSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One and two pK models of surface complexation reactions between reactive surface sites (>SOH) and the proton (H+) use mass action expressions of the form: Ka={[>SOHn-1z-1]g>SOH(0-1)aH+EXP(-xeY/kT)}/{[>SOHnz]g>SOH(n)} where Ka=the acidity constant, [ ]=reactive species concentrati...

  14. CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AS A MECHANISM FOR PRODUCING IR VARIABILITY IN DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Osten, Rachel; Livio, Mario; Lubow, Steve; Pringle, J. E.; Soderblom, David; Valenti, Jeff

    2013-03-10

    Motivated by recent observations of short-timescale variations in the infrared emission of circumstellar disks, we propose that coronal mass ejections can remove dust grains on timescales as short as a few days. Continuous monitoring of stellar activity, coupled with infrared observations, can place meaningful constraints on the proposed mechanism.

  15. Impact of Climatic Variability on Atmospheric Mass Distribution and GRACE-Derived Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salstein, David A.; Rosen, Richard D.; Ponte, Rui M.; Frey, Herbert (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    During the period we calculated the atmospheric data sets related to its mass and angular momentum distribution. For mass, we determined the various harmonics from the NCEP-NCAR reanalysis, especially the low-order harmonics that are useful in studying the gravitation distribution as will be determined from the GRACE mission. Atmospheric mass is also related to the atmospheric loading on the solid Earth; we cooperated with scientists who needed the atmospheric mass information for understanding its contributions to the overall loading, necessary for vertical and horizontal coordinate estimation. We calculated atmospheric angular momentum from the NCEP-NCAR reanalyses and 4 operational meteorological centers, based on the motion (wind) terms and the mass (surface pressure) terms. These are associated with motions of the planet, including its axial component causing changes in the length of day, more related to the winds, and the equatorial component related to motions of the pole, more related to the mass. Tasks related to the ocean mass and angular momentum were added to the project as well. For these we have noted the ocean impact on motions of the pole as well as the torque mechanisms that relate the transfer of angular momentum between oceans and solid earth. The activities of the project may be summarized in the following first manuscript written in December 2002, for a symposium that Dr. Salstein attended on Geodynamics. We have continued to assess ocean angular momentum (OAM) quantities derived from bottom pressure and velocity fields estimated with our finite-difference barotropic (single layer) model. Three years of output (1993-95) from a run without any data constraints was compared to output from a corresponding run that was constrained by altimeter data using a Kalman filter and smoother scheme. Respective OAM time series were combined with corresponding atmospheric series and compared to observed polar motion. The constrained OAM series provided

  16. Short-term variability and mass loss in Be stars. I. BRITE satellite photometry of η and μ Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baade, D.; Rivinius, Th.; Pigulski, A.; Carciofi, A. C.; Martayan, Ch.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Wade, G. A.; Weiss, W. W.; Grunhut, J.; Handler, G.; Kuschnig, R.; Mehner, A.; Pablo, H.; Popowicz, A.; Rucinski, S.; Whittaker, G.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Empirical evidence for the involvement of nonradial pulsations (NRPs) in the mass loss from Be stars ranges from (i) a singular case (μ Cen) of repetitive mass ejections triggered by multi-mode beating to (ii) several photometric reports about enormous numbers of pulsation modes that suddenly appear during outbursts and on to (iii) effective single-mode pulsators. Aims: The purpose of this study is to develop a more detailed empirical description of the star-to-disk mass transfer and to check the hypothesis that spates of transient nonradial pulsation modes accompany and even drive mass-loss episodes. Methods: The BRITE Constellation of nanosatellites was used to obtain mmag photometry of the Be stars η and μ Cen. Results: In the low-inclination star μ Cen, light pollution by variable amounts of near-stellar matter prevented any new insights into the variability and other properties of the central star. In the equator-on star η Cen, BRITE photometry and Heros echelle spectroscopy from the 1990s reveal an intricate clockwork of star-disk interactions. The mass transfer is modulated with the frequency difference of two NRP modes and an amplitude three times as large as the amplitude sum of the two NRP modes. This process feeds a high-amplitude circumstellar activity running with the incoherent and slightly lower so-called Štefl frequency. The mass-loss-modulation cycles are tightly coupled to variations in the value of the Štefl frequency and in its amplitude, albeit with strongly drifting phase differences. Conclusions: The observations are well described by the decomposition of the mass loss into a pulsation-related engine in the star and a viscosity-dominated engine in the circumstellar disk. Arguments are developed that large-scale gas-circulation flows occur at the interface. The propagation rates of these eddies manifest themselves as Štefl frequencies. Bursts in power spectra during mass-loss events can be understood as the noise inherent to

  17. Electromagnetic variable degrees of freedom actuator systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Montesanti, Richard C.; Trumper, David L.; Kirtley, Jr., James L.

    2009-02-17

    The present invention provides a variable reluctance actuator system and method that can be adapted for simultaneous rotation and translation of a moving element by applying a normal-direction magnetic flux on the moving element. In a beneficial example arrangement, the moving element includes a swing arm that carries a cutting tool at a set radius from an axis of rotation so as to produce a rotary fast tool servo that provides a tool motion in a direction substantially parallel to the surface-normal of a workpiece at the point of contact between the cutting tool and workpiece. An actuator rotates a swing arm such that a cutting tool moves toward and away from a mounted rotating workpiece in a controlled manner in order to machine the workpiece. Position sensors provide rotation and displacement information for a swing arm to a control system. A control system commands and coordinates motion of the fast tool servo with the motion of a spindle, rotating table, cross-feed slide, and in feed slide of a precision lathe.

  18. Prediction of segmental lean mass using anthropometric variables in young adults.

    PubMed

    Scafoglieri, Aldo; Tresignie, Jonathan; Provyn, Steven; Marfell-Jones, Mike; Reilly, Thomas; Bautmans, Ivan; Clarys, Jan Pieter

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop and cross-validate anthropometrical prediction equations for segmental lean tissue mass (SLM). One hundred and seventeen young healthy Caucasians (67 men and 50 women; mean age: 31.9 ± 10.0 years; Body Mass Index: 24.3 ± 3.2 kg · m(-2)) were included. Body mass (BM), stretch stature (SS), 14 circumferences (CC), 13 skinfolds (SF) and 4 bone breadths (BB) were used as anthropometric measurements. Segmental lean mass of both arms, trunk and both legs were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry as the criterion method. Three prediction equations for SLM were developed as follows: arms = 40.394(BM) + 169.836(CCarm-tensed) + 399.162(CCwrist) - 85.414(SFtriceps) - 39.790(SFbiceps) - 7289.190, where Adj.R (2) = 0.97, P < 0.001, and standard error of estimate (SEE) = 355 g;trunk = 181.530(BM) + 155.037(SS) + 534.818(CCneck) + 175.638(CCchest) - 88.359(SFchest) - 147.232(SFsupraspinale) - 46522.165, where Adj.R(2) = 0.97, P < 0.001, and SEE = 1077g; and legs = 55.838(BM) + 88.356(SS) + 235.579(CCmid-thigh) + 278.595(CCcalf) + 288.984(CCankle) - 84.954(SFfront-thigh) - 53.009(SFmedial calf) - 28522.241, where Adj.R (2) = 0.96, P < 0.001, and SEE = 724 g. Cross-validation statistics showed no significant differences (P < 0.05) between observed and predicted SLM. Root mean squared errors were smallest for arms (362 g), followed by legs (820 g) and trunk (1477 g). These new prediction equations allow an accurate estimation of segmental lean mass in groups of young adults, but estimation errors of 8 to 14% can occur in certain individuals.

  19. High Performance Variable Speed Drive System and Generating System with Doubly Fed Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yifan

    Doubly fed machines are another alternative for variable speed drive systems. The doubly fed machines, including doubly fed induction machine, self-cascaded induction machine and doubly excited brushless reluctance machine, have several attractive advantages for variable speed drive applications, the most important one being the significant cost reduction with a reduced power converter rating. With a better understanding, improved machine design, flexible power converters and innovated controllers, the doubly fed machines could favorably compete for many applications, which may also include variable speed power generations. The goal of this research is to enhance the attractiveness of the doubly fed machines for both variable speed drive and variable speed generator applications. Recognizing that wind power is one of the favorable clean, renewable energy sources that can contribute to the solution to the energy and environment dilemma, a novel variable-speed constant-frequency wind power generating system is proposed. By variable speed operation, energy capturing capability of the wind turbine is improved. The improvement can be further enhanced by effectively utilizing the doubly excited brushless reluctance machine in slip power recovery configuration. For the doubly fed machines, a stator flux two -axis dynamic model is established, based on which a flexible active and reactive power control strategy can be developed. High performance operation of the drive and generating systems is obtained through advanced control methods, including stator field orientation control, fuzzy logic control and adaptive fuzzy control. System studies are pursued through unified modeling, computer simulation, stability analysis and power flow analysis of the complete drive system or generating system with the machine, the converter and the control. Laboratory implementations and tested results with a digital signal processor system are also presented.

  20. On the relationship between climatic variables and pressure systems over Saudi Arabia in the winter season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanean, H. M.; Basset, H. Abdel; Hussein, M. A. A.

    2015-05-01

    The synoptic circulation over Saudi Arabia is complicated and frequently governed by the effect of large-scale pressure systems. In this work, we used NCEP-NCAR global data to illustrate the relationship between climatic variables and the main pressure systems that affect the weather and climate of Saudi Arabia, and also to investigate the influence of these pressure systems on surface air temperature (SAT) and rainfall over the region in the winter season. It was found that there are two primary patterns of pressure that influence the weather and climate of Saudi Arabia. The first occurs in cases of a strengthening Subtropical High (SubH), a weakening Siberian High (SibH), a deepening of the Icelandic Low (IceL), or a weakening of the Sudanese Low (SudL). During this pattern, the SubH combines with the SibH and an obvious increase of sea level pressure (SLP) occurs over southern European, the Mediterranean, North Africa, and the Middle East. This belt of high pressure prevents interaction between midlatitude and extratropical systems, which leads to a decrease in the SAT, relative humidity (RH) and rainfall over Saudi Arabia. The second pattern occurs in association with a weakening of the SubH, a strengthening of the SibH, a weakening of the IceL, or a deepening of the SudL. The pattern arising in this case leads to an interaction between two different air masses: the first (cold moist) air mass is associated with the Mediterranean depression travelling from west to east, while the second (warm moist) air mass is associated with the northward oscillation of the SudL and its inverted V-shape trough. The interaction between these two air masses increases the SAT, RH and the probability of rainfall over Saudi Arabia, especially over the northwest and northeast regions.

  1. DETECTION OF LOW-MASS-RATIO STELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gullikson, Kevin; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    O- and B-type stars are often found in binary systems, but the low binary mass-ratio regime is relatively unexplored due to observational difficulties. Binary systems with low mass ratios may have formed through fragmentation of the circumstellar disk rather than molecular cloud core fragmentation. We describe a new technique sensitive to G- and K-type companions to early B stars, a mass ratio of roughly 0.1, using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra. We apply this technique to a sample of archived VLT/CRIRES observations of nearby B stars in the CO bandhead near 2300 nm. While there are no unambiguous binary detections in our sample, we identify HIP 92855 and HIP 26713 as binary candidates warranting follow-up observations. We use our non-detections to determine upper limits to the frequency of FGK stars orbiting early B-type primaries.

  2. Viewing Events in the Center-of-Mass System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruby, Lawrence

    2010-02-01

    In elementary physics, collisions are usually studied by employing the conservation of momentum, and sometimes also the conservation of kinetic energy. However, in nuclear reactions, changes of mass that complicate the situation often occur. To illustrate the latter, we shall cite two examples of endoergic nuclear reactions, i.e., those for which energy must be supplied to make the reaction proceed. A typical situation is given by the equation A + B → C + D + Q, (1) where particles A, B, C, and D are expressed in terms of the energy-equivalent of the particle masses, according to the Einstein relation E = mc2, and where Q is a negative energy quantity, corresponding to the excess of mass of (C + D) over that of (A + B). Equation (1) is just an alternate statement of the conservation of total energy. Typically, in the lab system (L), energy is supplied as kinetic energy "T" of particle A, and particle B is at rest. Thus, to conserve momentum, particles C and D must compensate for the momentum corresponding to T. Often, it is desirable to know the minimum value of T that will conserve both energy and momentum, i.e., the threshold value of T, known as Tth, that will just allow the reaction to proceed. At threshold, the particles C and D will have their minimum possible kinetic energies. In the center-of-mass system of coordinates (Z) in which the input momentum is zero, at threshold, the products C and D are each stationary, and this requirement will allow us to calculate the corresponding Tth in the lab system (L). The Z system is often termed the "center-of-mass" system, but it is more properly termed the "zero-momentum" system.

  3. A common mass scaling for satellite systems of gaseous planets.

    PubMed

    Canup, Robin M; Ward, William R

    2006-06-15

    The Solar System's outer planets that contain hydrogen gas all host systems of multiple moons, which notably each contain a similar fraction of their respective planet's mass (approximately 10(-4)). This mass fraction is two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that of the largest satellites of the solid planets (such as the Earth's Moon), and its common value for gas planets has been puzzling. Here we model satellite growth and loss as a forming giant planet accumulates gas and rock-ice solids from solar orbit. We find that the mass fraction of its satellite system is regulated to approximately 10(-4) by a balance of two competing processes: the supply of inflowing material to the satellites, and satellite loss through orbital decay driven by the gas. We show that the overall properties of the satellite systems of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus arise naturally, and suggest that similar processes could limit the largest moons of extrasolar Jupiter-mass planets to Moon-to-Mars size.

  4. Advanced Life Support Equivalent System Mass Guidelines Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levri, Julie; Fisher, John W.; Jones, Harry W.; Drysdale, Alan E.; Ewert, Michael K.; Hanford, Anthony J.; Hogan, John A.; Joshi, Jitendri, A.; Vaccari, David A.

    2003-01-01

    This document is a viewgraph presentation which provides guidelines for performing an Equivalent System Mass (ESM) evaluation for trade study purposes. The document: 1) Defines ESM; 2) Explains how to calculate ESM; 3) Discusses interpretation of ESM results. The document is designed to provide detailed instructive material for researchers who are performing ESM evaluations for the first time.

  5. The Role of Intra-Island Temperature Variability at Palmyra Atoll in Mass Coral Bleaching Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urmy, S.; McNally, J.; Bartz, J.; Dunbar, R.

    2008-12-01

    Mass coral bleaching events have been reported in Palmyra Atoll during severe El Niños in the last 30 years, and are thought to be increasing both in frequency and magnitude. During these events, bleaching is highly localized, with some parts of the reef showing a much greater effect than others. NOAA's Coral Reef Watch monitors thermal stress on corals by calculating degree heating weeks (DHW) from satellite sea surface temperature in a 50 km pixel around each reef group or atoll of interest. While this technique allows some predictive capacity, especially for mass bleaching events, it does not consider the effects of reef geometry on bleaching susceptibility at different reef groups (Hoeke et al., 2006). Furthermore, because of its large scale, it cannot differentiate between open ocean, backreef, or lagoon temperatures. This project compiles high resolution temperature time series recorded in situ at a number of locations on the reef at Palmyra from 2002-2008, with surprising results. At any one given time, corals at different locations around the atoll may be experiencing temperature stresses that are significantly different both between locations and from the satellite DHW product. Shallow reef flats appear to be a source of heated water that, if advected elsewhere on the reef, may stress corals in normally cooler locations. A more thorough understanding of these mechanisms could improve our predictive capability as to which areas of the reef are at greatest risk if mass bleaching events continue to increase in severity and frequency.

  6. Effect of operator variability on microleakage with different adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Emel; Yazici, A. Ruya; Aksoy, Burak; Karabulut, Erdem; Ozgunaltay, Gul; Dayangac, Berrin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of operator variability on microleakage with different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 180 standardized Class V cavities were prepared on facial and lingual of 90 extracted human premolar teeth and randomly assigned to five groups according to the adhesive systems used (n = 36): Prime and Bond NT (PB), Single Bond (SB), Futura Bond NR, Xeno III (XE) and Adper Prompt-L-Pop (LP). The adhesive groups were then further subdivided into three operator groups according to level of clinical experience (n = 12): An undergraduate student, a research assistant and a faculty member. All cavities were restored with same composite resin. The restored teeth were thermocycled (500 cycles, 5-55°C) then immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin and measured for leakage under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analyses were performed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: Significant inter-operator variation was found in the enamel margins in the XE group with significantly higher microleakage when used by the undergraduate student (P < 0.05). Although no significant differences in microleakage were found between adhesive systems for the research assistant and faculty member (P > 0.05), significant differences were observed between PB and LP, PB and XE, SB and LP and SB and XE in the enamel margins for the undergraduate student (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Microleakage of adhesive systems is more dependent on interactions between the operator and adhesive material than on the choice of adhesive material. PMID:24966730

  7. Variable-Tension-Cord Suspension/Vibration-Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villemarette, Mark L.; Boston, Joshua; RInks, Judith; Felice, Pat; Stein, Tim; Payne, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    A system for mechanical suspension and vibration isolation of a machine or instrument is based on the use of Kevlar (or equivalent aromatic polyamide) cord held in variable tension between the machine or instrument and a surrounding frame. The basic concept of such a tensioned-cord suspension system (including one in which the cords are made of aromatic polyamide fibers) is not new by itself; what is new here is the additional provision for adjusting the tension during operation to optimize vibration- isolation properties. In the original application for which this system was conceived, the objective is to suspend a reciprocating cryocooler aboard a space shuttle and to prevent both (1) transmission of launch vibrations to the cryocooler and (2) transmission of vibrations from the cryocooler to samples in a chamber cooled by the cryocooler. The basic mechanical principle of this system can also be expected to be applicable to a variety of other systems in which there are requirements for cord suspension and vibration isolation. The reciprocating cryocooler of the original application is a generally axisymmetric object, and the surrounding frame is a generally axisymmetric object with windows (see figure). Two cords are threaded into a spoke-like pattern between attachment rings on the cryocooler, holes in the cage, and cord-tension- adjusting assemblies. Initially, the cord tensions are adjusted to at least the level necessary to suspend the cryocooler against gravitation. Accelerometers for measuring vibrations are mounted (1) on the cold tip of the cryocooler and (2) adjacent to the cage, on a structure that supports the cage. During operation, a technician observes the accelerometer outputs on an oscilloscope while manually adjusting the cord tensions in an effort to minimize the amount of vibration transmitted to and/or from the cryocooler. A contemplated future version of the system would include a microprocessor-based control subsystem that would include cord

  8. Sodium Variable Conductance Heat Pipe for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Walker, Kara

    2009-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the converter stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, and also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) has been designed to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor in an Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). When the Stirling convertor is turned off, the VCHP will activate when the temperatures rises 30 C above the setpoint temperature. A prototype VCHP with sodium as the working fluid was fabricated and tested in both gravity aided and against gravity conditions for a nominal heater head temperature of 790 C. The results show very good agreement with the predictions and validate the model. The gas front was located at the exit of the reservoir when heater head temperature was 790 C while cooling was ON, simulating an operating Advanced Stirling Converter (ASC). When cooling stopped, the temperature increased by 30 C, allowing the gas front to move past the radiator, which transferred the heat to the case. After resuming the cooling flow, the front returned at the initial location turning OFF the VCHP. The against gravity working conditions showed a colder reservoir and faster transients.

  9. Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, Lance G

    2014-07-07

    A variable phase turbine assembly will be designed and manufactured having a turbine, operable with transcritical, two-phase or vapor flow, and a generator – on the same shaft supported by process lubricated bearings. The assembly will be hermetically sealed and the generator cooled by the refrigerant. A compact plate-fin heat exchanger or tube and shell heat exchanger will be used to transfer heat from the geothermal fluid to the refrigerant. The demonstration turbine will be operated separately with two-phase flow and with vapor flow to demonstrate performance and applicability to the entire range of low temperature geothermal resources. The vapor leaving the turbine is condensed in a plate-fin refrigerant condenser. The heat exchanger, variable phase turbine assembly and condenser are all mounted on single skids to enable factory assembly and checkout and minimize installation costs. The system will be demonstrated using low temperature (237F) well flow from an existing large geothermal field. The net power generated, 1 megawatt, will be fed into the existing power system at the demonstration site. The system will demonstrate reliable generation of inexpensive power from low temperature resources. The system will be designed for mass manufacturing and factory assembly and should cost less than $1,200/kWe installed, when manufactured in large quantities. The estimated cost of power for 300F resources is predicted to be less than 5 cents/kWh. This should enable a substantial increase in power generated from low temperature geothermal resources.

  10. On the nature of the variability in the Martian thermospheric mass density: Results from the Mars Global Surveyor Electron Reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, S.; Lillis, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of Mars' thermospheric mass density (~120--200 km altitude) is important for understanding the current state and evolution of the Martian atmosphere and for spacecraft such as the upcoming MAVEN mission that will fly through this region every orbit. Global-scale atmospheric models have been shown thus far to do an inconsistent job of matching mass density observations at these altitudes, especially on the nightside. Thus there is a clear need for a data-driven estimate of the mass density in this region. Given the wide range of conditions and locations over which these must be defined, the dataset of thermospheric mass densities derived from energy and angular distributions of super-thermal electrons measured by the MAG/ER experiment on Mars Global Surveyor, spanning 4 full Martian years, is an extremely valuable resource that can be used to enhance our prediction of these densities beyond what is given by such global-scale models. Here we present an empirical model of the thermospheric density structure based on the MAG/ER dataset. Using this new model, we assess the global-scale response of the thermosphere to dust storms in the lower atmosphere and show that this varies with latitude. Further, we examine the short- and longer-term variability of the thermospheric density and show that it exhibits a complex behavior with latitude and season that is indicative of both atmospheric conditions at lower altitudes and possible lower atmosphere wave sources.

  11. Time-variable gravity observations of ice sheet mass balance: Precision and limitations of the GRACE satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velicogna, I.; Wahr, J.

    2013-06-01

    Time-variable gravity data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission have been available since 2002 to estimate the mass balance of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets. We analyze current progress and uncertainties in GRACE estimates of ice sheet mass balance. We discuss the impacts of errors associated with spherical harmonic truncation, spatial averaging, temporal sampling, and leakage from other time-dependent signals (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA)). The largest sources of error for Antarctica are the GIA correction, the omission of l=1 terms, nontidal changes in ocean mass, and measurement errors. For Greenland, the errors come mostly from the uncertainty in the scaling factor. Using Release 5.0 (RL05) GRACE fields for January 2003 through November 2012, we find a mass change of -258 ± 41 Gt/yr for Greenland, with an acceleration of -31 ± 6 Gt/yr2, and a loss that migrated clockwise around the ice sheet margin to progressively affect the entire periphery. For Antarctica, we report changes of -83 ± 49 and -147 ± 80 Gt/yr for two GIA models, with an acceleration of -12 ± 9 Gt/yr2 and a dominance from the southeast pacific sector of West Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula.

  12. High-performance mass storage system for workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, T.; Tang, Y.; Gupta, L.; Cooperman, S.

    1993-01-01

    Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) workstations and Personnel Computers (PC) are very popular tools for office automation, command and control, scientific analysis, database management, and many other applications. However, when using Input/Output (I/O) intensive applications, the RISC workstations and PC's are often overburdened with the tasks of collecting, staging, storing, and distributing data. Also, by using standard high-performance peripherals and storage devices, the I/O function can still be a common bottleneck process. Therefore, the high-performance mass storage system, developed by Loral AeroSys' Independent Research and Development (IR&D) engineers, can offload a RISC workstation of I/O related functions and provide high-performance I/O functions and external interfaces. The high-performance mass storage system has the capabilities to ingest high-speed real-time data, perform signal or image processing, and stage, archive, and distribute the data. This mass storage system uses a hierarchical storage structure, thus reducing the total data storage cost, while maintaining high-I/O performance. The high-performance mass storage system is a network of low-cost parallel processors and storage devices. The nodes in the network have special I/O functions such as: SCSI controller, Ethernet controller, gateway controller, RS232 controller, IEEE488 controller, and digital/analog converter. The nodes are interconnected through high-speed direct memory access links to form a network. The topology of the network is easily reconfigurable to maximize system throughput for various applications. This high-performance mass storage system takes advantage of a 'busless' architecture for maximum expandability. The mass storage system consists of magnetic disks, a WORM optical disk jukebox, and an 8mm helical scan tape to form a hierarchical storage structure. Commonly used files are kept in the magnetic disk for fast retrieval. The optical disks are used as archive

  13. Orbital parameters and variability of the emission spectrum for the massive binary system 103 Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, A. E.

    2016-09-01

    Based on high-resolution spectra taken near the He I 6678 Å line for the massive binary system 103 Tau, we have detected a weak absorption component belonging to the binary's secondary component. We have measured the radial velocities of both components, improved the previously known orbital parameters, and determined the new ones. The binary has an orbital period P orb = 58.305d, an orbital eccentricity e = 0.277, a radial velocity semi-amplitude of the bright component K A = 44.8 km s-1, and a component mass ratio M A / M B = 1.77. The absence of photometric variability and the estimates of physical parameters for the primary component suggest that the binary most likely has a considerable inclination of the orbital plane to the observer, i ≈ 50°-60°. In this case, the secondary component is probably a normal dwarf of spectral type B5-B8. Based on the spectra taken near the H α line, we have studied the variability of the emission profile. It is shown to be formed in the Roche lobe of the secondary component, but no traces of active mass exchange in the binary have been detected.

  14. Correlation of the Rock Mass Rating (RMR) System with the Unified Soil Classification System (USCS): Introduction of the Weak Rock Mass Rating System (W-RMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Sean N.; Kallu, Raj R.; Barnard, Chase K.

    2016-11-01

    Underground gold mines in Nevada are exploiting increasingly deeper ore bodies comprised of weak to very weak rock masses. The Rock Mass Rating (RMR) classification system is widely used at underground gold mines in Nevada and is applicable in fair to good-quality rock masses, but is difficult to apply and loses reliability in very weak rock mass to soil-like material. Because very weak rock masses are transition materials that border engineering rock mass and soil classification systems, soil classification may sometimes be easier and more appropriate to provide insight into material behavior and properties. The Unified Soil Classification System (USCS) is the most likely choice for the classification of very weak rock mass to soil-like material because of its accepted use in tunnel engineering projects and its ability to predict soil-like material behavior underground. A correlation between the RMR and USCS systems was developed by comparing underground geotechnical RMR mapping to laboratory testing of bulk samples from the same locations, thereby assigning a numeric RMR value to the USCS classification that can be used in spreadsheet calculations and geostatistical analyses. The geotechnical classification system presented in this paper including a USCS-RMR correlation, RMR rating equations, and the Geo-Pick Strike Index is collectively introduced as the Weak Rock Mass Rating System (W-RMR). It is the authors' hope that this system will aid in the classification of weak rock masses and more usable design tools based on the RMR system. More broadly, the RMR-USCS correlation and the W-RMR system help define the transition between engineering soil and rock mass classification systems and may provide insight for geotechnical design in very weak rock masses.

  15. Multiple-Point Mass Flux Measurement System Using Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Clem, Michelle M.

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-point Rayleigh scattering diagnostic is being developed to provide mass flux measurements in gas flows. Spectroscopic Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic that has the ability to provide simultaneous density, temperature, and velocity measurements. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 18 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is directly imaged through a solid Fabry-Perot etalon onto a CCD detector which permits spectral analysis of the light. The spatial resolution of the measurements is governed by the locations of interference fringes, which can be changed by altering the etalon characteristics. A prototype system has been used to acquire data in a Mach 0.56 flow to demonstrate feasibility of using this system to provide mass flux measurements. Estimates of measurement uncertainty and recommendations for system improvements are presented

  16. Laser Adaptive System for Measurement of Molecule Mass and Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romashko, R. V.; Kulchin, Y. N.; Efimov, T. A.; Sergeev, A. A.; Nepomnyashiy, A. V.

    A Laser adaptive microweighting system for measurement of molecules mass based on the principles of adaptive holog aphic interferometry is proposed and experimentally tested in task of gas concentration measurement. A sensitive element of the system is a microcantilever coated by a layer of chitosan, which can adsorb different molecules. Changes in gas concentration re ult in change in mass of molecules adsorbed in chitosan, and, as sequence, result in change in natural frequency of cantilever oscillations, which are measured by an adaptive holographic interferometer. The operation of the system has been experimentally demonstrated in measurement of water vapor concentration. The detected change in concentration of H2O molecules amounted to 125 ppm.

  17. Morphologic Variability of two Adjacent Mass-Transport Deposits: Twin Slides, Gela Basin (Sicily Channel).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minisini, D.; Trincardi, F.; Asioli, A.; Canu, M.; Foglini, F.

    2006-12-01

    Integrating geophysical, sedimentological, structural and paleontological data, we reconstruct the age, size and internal geometry of two adjacent and recent mass-transport deposits (Twin Slides) exposed on the seafloor of Gela Basin (Sicily Channel). Twin Slides are coeval (late-Holocene), and were likely triggered by an earthquake. Twin Slides originated from the mobilization of Pleistocene slope units, are only 6 km apart from each other, have their headscarps in similar water depth (230 m), and have a comparable run out distance (ca. 10 km). Both slides suggest a multistage evolution, but differ in internal organization and morphological expression. The northern slide shows a deposit characterised by pressure ridges in the toe region suggesting a component of plastic deformation, while the southern slide is characterised by large blocks and a reduced thickness of displaced masses. We ascribe the difference in deformation style and resulting morphology to the stratigraphic architecture of the Pleistocene progradational units involved in failure. In the case of the blocky southern slide the units affected by failure are slightly older (Eemian or pre-Emian) and more consolidated; furthermore, in the area where the headscarp is located these units appear affected by shallow faulting likely resulting in the definition of large blocks. The northern slide, instead, affects progradational units of the Last Glacial Maximum in an area where these units are more than 100 m thick and, possibly, underconsolidated.

  18. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-14

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  19. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2014-05-13

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  20. Mass independent kinetic energy reducing inlet system for vacuum environment

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2013-12-03

    A particle inlet system comprises a first chamber having a limiting orifice for an incoming gas stream and a micrometer controlled expansion slit. Lateral components of the momentum of the particles are substantially cancelled due to symmetry of the configuration once the laminar flow converges at the expansion slit. The particles and flow into a second chamber, which is maintained at a lower pressure than the first chamber, and then moves into a third chamber including multipole guides for electromagnetically confining the particle. The vertical momentum of the particles descending through the center of the third chamber is minimized as an upward stream of gases reduces the downward momentum of the particles. The translational kinetic energy of the particles is near-zero irrespective of the mass of the particles at an exit opening of the third chamber, which may be advantageously employed to provide enhanced mass resolution in mass spectrometry.

  1. Five New Low-Mass Eclipsing Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; López-Morales, M.; Shaw, J. S.

    2006-12-01

    We present the discovery of five new low-mass eclipsing binaries with masses between 0.54 and 0.95 M⊙, their photometric light curves, and preliminary models. This is part of a continuing campaign to increase the available data on these interesting systems. Once radial-velocity curves are completed, physical parameters will be determined with an error of less than 2-3%, thus allowing for a rigorous examination of stellar models in the lower-main sequence. Our initial analysis seems to support the current findings that low-mass stars have greater radii than models predict, most likely due to the presence of strong magnetic fields. This work is funded by a partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF AST-0552798) Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) and the Department of Defense (DoD) ASSURE (Awards to Stimulate and Support Undergraduate Research Experiences) programs.

  2. Torsion effects on a relativistic position-dependent mass system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitória, R. L. L.; Bakke, K.

    2016-12-01

    We analyse a relativistic scalar particle with a position-dependent mass in a spacetime with a space-like dislocation by showing that relativistic bound states solutions can be achieved. Further, we consider the presence of the Coulomb potential and analyse the relativistic position-dependent mass system subject to the Coulomb potential in the spacetime with a space-like dislocation. We also show that a new set of relativistic bound states solutions can be obtained, where there also exists the influence of torsion of the relativistic energy levels. Finally, we investigate an analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect for bound states in this position-dependent mass in a spacetime with a space-like dislocation.

  3. Mass transfer effects on the unsteady mhd radiative- convective flow of a micropolar fluid past a vertical porous plate with variable heat and mass fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. Gnaneswara

    2013-03-01

    The problem of unsteady two-dimensional laminar flow of a viscous incompressible micropolar fluid past a vertical porous plate in the presence of a transverse magnetic field and thermal radiation with variable heat and mass fluxes is considered. The free stream velocity is subjected to exponentially increasing or decreasing small perturbations. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicularly to a porous surface where a micropolar fluid is absorbed with a suction velocity varying with time. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe radiative heat transfer in the limit of optically thick fluids. The effects of the flow parameters and thermophysical properties on the velocity and temperature fields across the boundary layer are investigated. The effects of various parameters on the velocity, microrotation velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are given graphically, and the values of the skin friction and couple stress coefficients are presented.

  4. Noise Levels Associated With New York City's Mass Transit Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Robyn R. M.; Zeltser, Marina; Canton, Allison; Akram, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We measured noise levels associated with various forms of mass transit and compared them to exposure guidelines designed to protect against noise-induced hearing loss. Methods. We used noise dosimetry to measure time-integrated noise levels in a representative sample of New York City mass transit systems (subways, buses, ferries, tramway, and commuter railways) aboard transit vehicles and at vehicle boarding platforms or terminals during June and July 2007. Results. Of the transit types evaluated, subway cars and platforms had the highest associated equivalent continuous average (Leq) and maximum noise levels. All transit types had Leq levels appreciably above 70 A-weighted decibels, the threshold at which noise-induced hearing loss is considered possible. Conclusions. Mass transit noise exposure has the potential to exceed limits recommended by the World Health Organization and the US Environmental Protection Agency and thus cause noise-induced hearing loss among riders of all forms of mass transit given sufficient exposure durations. Environmental noise–control efforts in mass transit and, in cases in which controls are infeasible, the use of personal hearing protection would benefit the ridership's hearing health. PMID:19542046

  5. Annual variation of coastal uplift in Greenland as an indicator of variable and accelerating ice mass loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qian; Wdowinski, Shimon; Dixon, Timothy H.

    2013-05-01

    Seasonal melting of the coastal part of the Greenland ice sheet is investigated using GPS vertical displacement data from coastal stations, combined with data on atmospheric and ocean temperatures. Using a high pass filter and cubic spline models, we estimate five variables describing seasonal uplift, a proxy for proximal mass loss, including duration of the melt season and the amount of summer uplift. Our analysis shows both temporal and spatial variations of uplift. Southern coastal Greenland experienced anomalously large uplift in summer 2010, implying significant melting that year. However, the northwest coast did not experience significant change in uplift at that time. Our data suggest that a combination of warm summer air temperature and warm sub-surface ocean water temperature drove the large mass losses in 2010. Using the uplift pattern of 2008-2010, and comparing to atmospheric data and ocean water temperature data, we show that warm Irminger Water (IW) exerted significant influence on coastal melting in southeastern, southern and southwestern Greenland, reaching about 69°N in 2010. North of this, IW did not exert significant influence, in effect defining the northward limit of the sub-polar gyre for that year. Thus, short-term variability in the coastal GPS uplift signal can be used to infer an oceanographic parameter that has a critical influence on Greenland ice sheet health.

  6. An Infinite Order Discrete Variable Representation of an Effective Mass Hamiltonian: Application to Exciton Wave Functions in Quantum Confined Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kaledin, Alexey L; Lian, Tianquan; Hill, Craig L; Musaev, Djamaladdin G

    2014-08-12

    We describe an extension of the conventional Fourier grid discrete variable representation (DVR) to the bound state problem of a particle with a position-dependent mass. An infinite order DVR, derived for a variable mass kinetic energy operator, coupled with an efficient grid contraction scheme yields essentially exact eigenvalues for a chosen grid spacing. Implementation of the method is shown to be very practical due to the fact that in a DVR no integral evaluation is necessary and that the resultant kinetic energy matrix is sparse. Numerical calculations are presented for exciton states of spherical, cylindrical, and toric Type I (CdSe/ZnS) core-shell quantum dots. In these examples, electron-hole interaction is treated explicitly by solving a self-consistent Schrödinger-Poisson equation on a contracted DVR grid. Prospective applications of the developed approach to calculating electron transfer rates between adsorbed molecular acceptors and quantum confined nanocrystals of generic shape, dimensionality, and composition are also discussed.

  7. Screening of Electric field in a Variable Range Hopping System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigodin, Vladimir; Epstein, Arthur

    2003-03-01

    Recent report of a field effect in conducting polymers [1] initiated a large interest. The "field effect" can not be explained only by electrochemical dedoping of polymers. Also the field effect is impossible to understand within a model of homogeneous conductor because of the atomic scale of Debye radius. We discuss the penetration of electric field in a system in which charge transport is provided by variable range hopping (VRH). The majority of carriers are localized and contribute to the dielectric constant. An exponentially small fraction of carriers are mobile and screens the external field. Our estimate shows that the screening length for conducting polymers can be essentially larger than in metals but is still not enough to explain the experimental data. A combination of different factors including the inhomogeneous (granular) structure of conducting polymers may control the observable phenomena. J. Lu et al., J. Appl. Phys. XX, in press (2002); A.J. Epstein et al., Current Appl. Lett. 2, 339 (2002); M. Ishihara and H. Okuzaki, Synth. Met. XX, in press (2003).

  8. THE HD 192263 SYSTEM: PLANETARY ORBITAL PERIOD AND STELLAR VARIABILITY DISENTANGLED

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Diana; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Kane, Stephen R.; Ciardi, David R.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Henry, Gregory W.; Fischer, Debra A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Laughlin, Gregory

    2012-07-20

    As part of the Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey, we present new radial velocities and photometry of the HD 192263 system. Our analysis of the already available Keck-HIRES and CORALIE radial velocity measurements together with the five new Keck measurements we report in this paper results in improved orbital parameters for the system. We derive constraints on the size and phase location of the transit window for HD 192263b, a Jupiter-mass planet with a period of 24.3587 {+-} 0.0022 days. We use 10 years of Automated Photoelectric Telescope photometry to analyze the stellar variability and search for planetary transits. We find continuing evidence of spot activity with periods near 23.4 days. The shape of the corresponding photometric variations changes over time, giving rise to not one but several Fourier peaks near this value. However, none of these frequencies coincides with the planet's orbital period and thus we find no evidence of star-planet interactions in the system. We attribute the {approx}23 day variability to stellar rotation. There are also indications of spot variations on longer (8 years) timescales. Finally, we use the photometric data to exclude transits for a planet with the predicted radius of 1.09 R{sub J} , and as small as 0.79 R{sub J} .

  9. Student understanding of control of variables: Deciding whether or not a variable influences the behavior of a system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreaux, Andrew; Shaffer, Peter S.; Heron, Paula R. L.; McDermott, Lillian C.

    2008-02-01

    The ability of adult students to reason on the basis of the control of variables was the subject of an extended investigation. This paper describes the part of the study that focused on the reasoning required to decide whether or not a given variable influences the behavior of a system. The participants were undergraduates taking introductory Physics and K-8 teachers studying physics and physical science in inservice institutes and workshops. Although most of the students recognized the need to control variables, many had significant difficulty with the underlying reasoning. The results indicate serious shortcomings in the preparation of future scientists and in the education of a scientifically literate citizenry. There are also strong implications for the professional development of teachers, many of whom are expected to teach control of variables to young students.

  10. Miniature mass spectrometer systems based on a microengineered quadrupole filter.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Andrew; Wright, Steven; Syms, Richard R A; Dash, Neil; Schwab, Marc-André; Finlay, Alan

    2010-03-01

    Two miniature mass spectrometer systems based on a microengineered quadrupole mass filter have been developed. One of the instruments has a footprint of 27 cm x 20 cm and is intended for laboratory use when space is at a premium. The other is portable and intended for use in the field. It is battery powered, weighs 14.9 kg, and is housed in a rugged case. This is the first example of a portable mass spectrometer incorporating an analyzer fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques. The starting material for construction of the filters is a bonded silicon on insulator substrate, which is selectively etched using batch processing techniques to form coupling optics and springs that accurately hold 0.5 mm diameter stainless steel rods in the required geometry. Assembled filters measure 35 mm x 6 mm x 1.5 mm and are mounted, together with an ion source and channeltron detector, in small, interchangeable cartridges, which plug into a 220 cm(3) vacuum chamber. Recovery from accidental contamination or when servicing is required can be achieved within 5-10 min, as the cartridge is easily exchanged with a spare. A potential application to environmental monitoring has been investigated. The headspace above water spiked with dibutyl mercaptan was sampled with a solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber, which was then injected directly into the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer. Using this method, the limit of detection was found to be approximately 5 ppm for a 15 s sampling period.

  11. Saponification reaction system: a detailed mass transfer coefficient determination.

    PubMed

    Pečar, Darja; Goršek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The saponification of an aromatic ester with an aqueous sodium hydroxide was studied within a heterogeneous reaction medium in order to determine the overall kinetics of the selected system. The extended thermo-kinetic model was developed compared to the previously used simple one. The reaction rate within a heterogeneous liquid-liquid system incorporates a chemical kinetics term as well as mass transfer between both phases. Chemical rate constant was obtained from experiments within a homogeneous medium, whilst the mass-transfer coefficient was determined separately. The measured thermal profiles were then the bases for determining the overall reaction-rate. This study presents the development of an extended kinetic model for considering mass transfer regarding the saponification of ethyl benzoate with sodium hydroxide within a heterogeneous reaction medium. The time-dependences are presented for the mass transfer coefficient and the interfacial areas at different heterogeneous stages and temperatures. The results indicated an important role of reliable kinetic model, as significant difference in k(L)a product was obtained with extended and simple approach.

  12. Comparison of energy efficiency between variable refrigerant flow systems and ground source heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tainzhen; Liu, Xaiobing

    2009-11-01

    With the current movement toward net zero energy buildings, many technologies are promoted with emphasis on their superior energy efficiency. The variable refrigerant flow (VRF) and ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are probably the most competitive technologies among these. However, there are few studies reporting the energy efficiency of VRF systems compared with GSHP systems. In this article, a preliminary comparison of energy efficiency between the air-source VRF and GSHP systems is presented. The computer simulation results show that GSHP system is more energy efficient than the air-source VRF system for conditioning a small office building in two selected US climates. In general, GSHP system is more energy efficient than the air-source VRV system, especially when the building has significant heating loads. For buildings with less heating loads, the GSHP system could still perform better than the air-source VRF system in terms of energy efficiency, but the resulting energy savings may be marginal.

  13. Stability of uncertain impulsive complex-variable chaotic systems with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Song

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the robust exponential stabilization of uncertain impulsive complex-variable chaotic delayed systems is considered with parameters perturbation and delayed impulses. It is assumed that the considered complex-variable chaotic systems have bounded parametric uncertainties together with the state variables on the impulses related to the time-varying delays. Based on the theories of adaptive control and impulsive control, some less conservative and easily verified stability criteria are established for a class of complex-variable chaotic delayed systems with delayed impulses. Some numerical simulations are given to validate the effectiveness of the proposed criteria of impulsive stabilization for uncertain complex-variable chaotic delayed systems.

  14. Constraining Aerosol Optical Models Using Ground-Based, Collocated Particle Size and Mass Measurements in Variable Air Mass Regimes During the 7-SEAS/Dongsha Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Shaun W.; Hansell, Richard A.; Chow, Judith C.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Ji, Qiang; Li, Can; Watson, John G.; Khlystov, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    During the spring of 2010, NASA Goddard's COMMIT ground-based mobile laboratory was stationed on Dongsha Island off the southwest coast of Taiwan, in preparation for the upcoming 2012 7-SEAS field campaign. The measurement period offered a unique opportunity for conducting detailed investigations of the optical properties of aerosols associated with different air mass regimes including background maritime and those contaminated by anthropogenic air pollution and mineral dust. What appears to be the first time for this region, a shortwave optical closure experiment for both scattering and absorption was attempted over a 12-day period during which aerosols exhibited the most change. Constraints to the optical model included combined SMPS and APS number concentration data for a continuum of fine and coarse-mode particle sizes up to PM2.5. We also take advantage of an IMPROVE chemical sampler to help constrain aerosol composition and mass partitioning of key elemental species including sea-salt, particulate organic matter, soil, non sea-salt sulphate, nitrate, and elemental carbon. Our results demonstrate that the observed aerosol scattering and absorption for these diverse air masses are reasonably captured by the model, where peak aerosol events and transitions between key aerosols types are evident. Signatures of heavy polluted aerosol composed mostly of ammonium and non sea-salt sulphate mixed with some dust with transitions to background sea-salt conditions are apparent in the absorption data, which is particularly reassuring owing to the large variability in the imaginary component of the refractive indices. Extinctive features at significantly smaller time scales than the one-day sample period of IMPROVE are more difficult to reproduce, as this requires further knowledge concerning the source apportionment of major chemical components in the model. Consistency between the measured and modeled optical parameters serves as an important link for advancing remote

  15. The young low-mass star ISO-Oph-50: extreme variability induced by a clumpy, evolving circumstellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Alexander; Mužić, Koraljka; Geers, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    ISO-Oph-50 is a young low-mass object in the ˜1 Myr old Ophiuchus star-forming region undergoing dramatic changes in its optical/near/mid-infrared brightness by 2-4 mag. We present new multi-band photometry and near-infrared spectra, combined with a synopsis of the existing literature data. Based on the spectroscopy, the source is confirmed as a mid-M dwarf, with evidence for ongoing accretion. The near-infrared light curves show large-scale variations, with 2-4 mag amplitude in the bands IJHK, with the object generally being bluer when faint. Near its brightest state, the object shows colour changes consistent with variable extinction of ΔAV ˜ 7 mag. High-cadence monitoring at 3.6 μm reveals quasi-periodic variations with a typical time-scale of 1-2 weeks. The best explanation for these characteristics is a low-mass star seen through circumstellar matter, whose complex variability is caused by changing inhomogeneities in the inner parts of the disc. When faint, the direct stellar emission is blocked; the near-infrared radiation is dominated by scattered light. When bright, the emission is consistent with a photosphere strongly reddened by circumstellar dust. Based on the available constraints, the inhomogeneities have to be located at or beyond ˜0.1 au distance from the star. If this scenario turns out to be correct, a major portion of the inner disc has to be clumpy, structured, and/or in turmoil. In its observational characteristics, this object resembles other types of young stellar objects with variability caused in the inner disc. Compared to other objects, however, ISO-Oph-50 is clearly an extreme case, given the large amplitude of the brightness and colour changes combined with the erratic behaviour. ISO-Oph-50 has been near its brightest state since 2013; further monitoring is highly encouraged.

  16. Anthropogenic impact on Antarctic surface mass balance, currently masked by natural variability, to emerge by mid-century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previdi, Michael; Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    2016-09-01

    Global and regional climate models robustly simulate increases in Antarctic surface mass balance (SMB) during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in response to anthropogenic global warming. Despite these robust model projections, however, observations indicate that there has been no significant change in Antarctic SMB in recent decades. We show that this apparent discrepancy between models and observations can be explained by the fact that the anthropogenic climate change signal during the second half of the twentieth century is small compared to the noise associated with natural climate variability. Using an ensemble of 35 global coupled climate models to separate signal and noise, we find that the forced SMB increase due to global warming in recent decades is unlikely to be detectable as a result of large natural SMB variability. However, our analysis reveals that the anthropogenic impact on Antarctic SMB is very likely to emerge from natural variability by the middle of the current century, thus mitigating future increases in global sea level.

  17. Fourth NASA Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains copies of all those technical papers received in time for publication just prior to the Fourth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage and Technologies, held March 28-30, 1995, at the University of Maryland, University College Conference Center, in College Park, Maryland. This series of conferences continues to serve as a unique medium for the exchange of information on topics relating to the ingestion and management of substantial amounts of data and the attendant problems involved. This year's discussion topics include new storage technology, stability of recorded media, performance studies, storage system solutions, the National Information infrastructure (Infobahn), the future for storage technology, and lessons learned from various projects. There also will be an update on the IEEE Mass Storage System Reference Model Version 5, on which the final vote was taken in July 1994.

  18. Mass spectrometer. [On Space Transportation System 2 Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.; Carignan, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The quadrupole Mass Spectrometer of the Induced Environment Contamination Monitor (IECM) operates in the range from 2 to 150 amu. It is pointed out that the Mass Spectrometer on STS-2 performed very well. It was found that the column density of H2O effluent from the Shuttle reached a maximum of 1 x 10 to the 13th per sq cm at 7 hr, 30 min and decreased by a factor of 7.5 during the subsequent 40 hrs. The count rate response of H2O could be correlated with mission-related events, taking into account the dumping of supply water, the operation of the Flash Evaporator System, and the firing of a primary reaction control system engine.

  19. Turbulent mass flux closure modeling for variable density turbulence in the wake of an air-entraining transom stern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Kelli; Yue, Dick

    2016-11-01

    This work presents the development and a priori testing of closure models for the incompressible highly-variable density turbulent (IHVDT) flow in the near wake region of a transom stern. This complex, three-dimensional flow includes three regions with distinctly different flow behavior: (i) the convergent corner waves that originate from the body and collide on the ship center plane; (ii) the "rooster tail" that forms from the collision; and (iii) the diverging wave train. The characteristics of these regions involve violent free-surface flows and breaking waves with significant turbulent mass flux (TMF) at Atwood number At = (ρ2 -ρ1) / (ρ2 +ρ1) 1 for which there is little guidance in turbulence closure modeling for the momentum and scalar transport along the wake. Utilizing datasets from high-resolution simulations of the near wake of a canonical three-dimensional transom stern using conservative Volume-of-Fluid (cVOF), implicit Large Eddy Simulation (iLES), and Boundary Data Immersion Method (BDIM), we develop explicit algebraic turbulent mass flux closure models that incorporate the most relevant physical processes. Performance of these models in predicting the turbulent mass flux in all three regions of the wake will be presented. Office of Naval Research.

  20. Grand challenges in mass storage: A system integrator's perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Dan; Lee, Richard

    1993-01-01

    The grand challenges are the following: to develop more innovation in approach; to expand the I/O barrier; to achieve increased volumetric efficiency and incremental cost improvements; to reinforce the 'weakest link' software; to implement improved architectures; and to minimize the impact of self-destructing technologies. Mass storage is defined as any type of storage system exceeding 100 GBytes in total size, under the control of a centralized file management scheme. The topics covered are presented in viewgraph form.

  1. On the Inversion for Mass (Re)Distribution from Global (Time-Variable) Gravity Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    The well-known non-uniqueness of the gravitational inverse problem states the following: The external gravity field, even if completely and exactly known, cannot Uniquely determine the density distribution of the body that produces the gravity field. This is an intrinsic property of a field that obeys the Laplace equation, as already treated in mathematical as well as geophysical literature. In this paper we provide conceptual insight by examining the problem in terms of spherical harmonic expansion of the global gravity field. By comparing the multipoles and the moments of the density function, we show that in 3-S the degree of knowledge deficiency in trying to inversely recover the density distribution from external gravity field is (n+l)(n+2)/2 - (2n+l) = n(n-1)/2 for each harmonic degree n. On the other hand, on a 2-D spherical shell we show via a simple relationship that the inverse solution of the surface density distribution is unique. The latter applies quite readily in the inversion of time-variable gravity signals (such as those observed by the GRACE space mission) where the sources over a wide range of the scales largely come from the Earth's Surface.

  2. X-RAY DETERMINATION OF THE VARIABLE RATE OF MASS ACCRETION ONTO TW HYDRAE

    SciTech Connect

    Brickhouse, N. S.; Cranmer, S. R.; Dupree, A. K.; Guenther, H. M.; Wolk, S. J.; Luna, G. J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Diagnostics of electron temperature (T{sub e} ), electron density (n{sub e} ), and hydrogen column density (N{sub H}) from the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating spectrum of He-like Ne IX in TW Hydrae (TW Hya), in conjunction with a classical accretion model, allow us to infer the accretion rate onto the star directly from measurements of the accreting material. The new method introduces the use of the absorption of Ne IX lines as a measure of the column density of the intervening, accreting material. On average, the derived mass accretion rate for TW Hya is 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, for a stellar magnetic field strength of 600 G and a filling factor of 3.5%. Three individual Chandra exposures show statistically significant differences in the Ne IX line ratios, indicating changes in N{sub H}, T{sub e} , and n{sub e} by factors of 0.28, 1.6, and 1.3, respectively. In exposures separated by 2.7 days, the observations reported here suggest a five-fold reduction in the accretion rate. This powerful new technique promises to substantially improve our understanding of the accretion process in young stars.

  3. A system of three-dimensional complex variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. Dale

    1986-01-01

    Some results of a new theory of multidimensional complex variables are reported, including analytic functions of a three-dimensional (3-D) complex variable. Three-dimensional complex numbers are defined, including vector properties and rules of multiplication. The necessary conditions for a function of a 3-D variable to be analytic are given and shown to be analogous to the 2-D Cauchy-Riemann equations. A simple example also demonstrates the analogy between the newly defined 3-D complex velocity and 3-D complex potential and the corresponding ordinary complex velocity and complex potential in two dimensions.

  4. Mass transfer in binary X-ray systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, R.; Hatchett, S.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of X-ray heating on gas flows in binary X-ray systems is examined. A simple estimate is obtained for the evaporative wind flux from a stellar atmosphere due to X-ray heating which agrees with numerical calculations by Alme and Wilson (1974) but disagrees with calculations by Arons (1973) and by Basko and Sunyaev (1974) for the Her X-1/HZ Her system. The wind flux is sensitive to the soft X-ray spectrum. The self-excited wind mechanism does not work. Mass transfer in the Hercules system probably occurs by flow of the atmosphere of HZ Her through the gravitational saddle point of the system. The accretion gas stream is probably opaque with atomic density of not less than 10 to the 15th power per cu cm and is confined to a small fraction of 4(pi) steradians. Other binary X-ray systems are briefly discussed.

  5. Recent Variability Observations of Solar System Giant Planets: Fresh Context for Understanding Exoplanet and Brown Dwarf Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark Scott

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years a number of high cadence photometric observations of solar system giant planets have been acquired by various platforms. Such observations are of interest as they provide points of comparison to the already expansive set of brown dwarf variability observations and the small, but growing, set of exoplanet variability observations. By measuring how rapidly the integrated light from solar system giant planets can evolve, variability observations of substellar objects that are unlikely to ever be resolved can be placed in a fuller context. Examples of brown dwarf variability observations include extensive work from the ground (e.g., Radigen et al. 2014), Spitzer (e.g., Metchev et al. 2015), Kepler (Gizis et al. 2015), and HST (Yang et al. 2015).Variability has been measured on the planetary mass companion to the brown dwarf 2MASS 1207b (Zhou et al. 2016) and further searches are planned in thermal emission for the known directly imaged planets with ground based telescopes (Apai et al. 2016) and in reflected light with future space based telescopes. Recent solar system variability observations include Kepler monitoring of Neptune (Simon et al. 2016) and Uranus, Spitzer observations of Neptune (Stauffer et al. 2016), and Cassini observations of Jupiter (West et al. in prep). The Cassini observations are of particular interest as they measured the variability of Jupiter at a phase angle of approximately 60 deg, comparable to the viewing geometry expected for space based direct imaging of cool extrasolar Jupiters in reflected light. These solar system analog observations capture many of the characteristics seen in brown dwarf variability, including large amplitudes and rapid light curve evolution on timescales as short as a few rotation periods. Simon et al. (2016) attribute such variations at Neptune to a combination of large scale, stable cloud structures along with smaller, more rapidly varying, cloud patches. The observed brown dwarf and

  6. Recent Variability Observations of Solar System Giant Planets: Fresh Context for Understanding Exoplanet and Brown Dwarf Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, Mark S.; Kepler Giant Planet Variability Team, Spitzer Ice Giant Variability Team

    2016-10-01

    Over the past several years a number of of high cadence photometric observations of solar system giant planets have been acquired by various platforms. Such observations are of interest as they provide points of comparison to the already expansive set of brown dwarf variability observations and the small, but growing, set of exoplanet variability observations. By measuring how rapidly the integrated light from solar system giant planets can evolve, variability observations of substellar objects that are unlikely to ever be resolved can be placed in a fuller context. Examples of brown dwarf variability observations include extensive work from the ground (e.g., Radigan et al. 2014), Spitzer (e.g., Metchev et al. 2015), Kepler (Gizis et al. 2015), and HST (Yang et al. 2015). Variability has been measured on the planetary mass companion to the brown dwarf 2MASS 1207b (Zhou et al. 2016) and further searches are planned in thermal emission for the known directly imaged planets with ground based telescopes (Apai et al. 2016) and in reflected light with future space based telescopes. Recent solar system variability observations include Kepler monitoring of Neptune (Simon et al. 2016) and Uranus, Spitzer observations of Neptune (Stauffer et al. 2016), and Cassini observations of Jupiter (West et al. in prep). The Cassini observations are of particular interest as they measured the variability of Jupiter at a phase angle of ˜60○, comparable to the viewing geometry expected for space based direct imaging of cool extrasolar Jupiters in reflected light. These solar system analog observations capture many of the characteristics seen in brown dwarf variability, including large amplitudes and rapid light curve evolution on timescales as short as a few rotation periods. Simon et al. (2016) attribute such variations at Neptune to a combination of large scale, stable cloud structures along with smaller, more rapidly varying, cloud patches. The observed brown dwarf and exoplanet

  7. Eighth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies in Cooperation with the Seventeenth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This document contains copies of those technical papers received in time for publication prior to the Eighth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies which is being held in cooperation with the Seventeenth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems at the University of Maryland University College Inn and Conference Center March 27-30, 2000. As one of an ongoing series, this Conference continues to provide a forum for discussion of issues relevant to the management of large volumes of data. The Conference encourages all interested organizations to discuss long term mass storage requirements and experiences in fielding solutions. Emphasis is on current and future practical solutions addressing issues in data management, storage systems and media, data acquisition, long term retention of data, and data distribution. This year's discussion topics include architecture, future of current technology, new technology with a special emphasis on holographic storage, performance, standards, site reports, vendor solutions. Tutorials will be available on stability of optical media, disk subsystem performance evaluation, I/O and storage tuning, functionality and performance evaluation of file systems for storage area networks.

  8. Avoiding transthoracic echocardiography and transesophageal echocardiography for patients with variable body mass indexes in infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sogomonian, Robert; Alkhawam, Hassan; Vyas, Neil; Jolly, JoshPaul; Nguyen, James; Haftevani, Emma A. Moradoghli; Al-khazraji, Ahmed; Ashraf, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Background Echocardiography has been a popular modality used to aid in the diagnosis of infective endocarditis (IE) with the modified Duke criteria. We evaluated the necessity between the uses of either a transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) or transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in patients with a body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 25 kg/m2 and less than 25 kg/m2. Methods A single-centered, retrospective study of 198 patients between 2005 and 2012 diagnosed with IE based on modified Duke criteria. Patients, required to be above age 18, had undergone an echocardiogram study and had blood cultures to be included in the study. Results Among 198 patients, two echocardiographic groups were evaluated as 158 patients obtained a TTE, 143 obtained a TEE, and 103 overlapped with TEE and TTE. Out of these patients, 167 patients were included in the study as 109 (65%) were discovered to have native valve vegetations on TEE and 58 (35%) with TTE. TTE findings were compared with TEE results for true negatives and positives to isolate valvular vegetations. Overall sensitivity of TTE was calculated to be 67% with a specificity of 93%. Patients were further divided into two groups with the first group having a BMI ≥25 kg/m2 and the subsequent group with a BMI <25 kg/m2. Patients with a BMI ≥25 kg/m2 who underwent a TTE study had a sensitivity and specificity of 54 and 92%, respectively. On the contrary, patients with a BMI < 25 kg/m2 had a TTE sensitivity and specificity of 78 and 95%, respectively. Conclusions Patients with a BMI <25 kg/m2 and a negative TTE should refrain from further diagnostic studies, with TEE strong clinical judgment is warranted. Patients with a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 may proceed directly to TEE as the initial study, possibly avoiding an additional study with a TTE. PMID:27124167

  9. Power Conditioner with Variable Switching Control for Thermoelectric Generator Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayoshi, Hiroshi; Maiwa, Hiroshi; Kajikawa, Takenobu

    2013-07-01

    A thermoelectric (TE) power conditioner maintaining high efficiency over a wide input power range has been developed. Variable switching frequency operation is shown to give an improvement in efficient operating range. The input range showing more than 90% conversion efficiency is expanded to more than 25% by introducing a low-power controller circuit and variable switching frequency control. The TE power conditioner showed excellent response against a change in thermoelectric generator (TEG) output and load, making it suitable for automotive applications.

  10. Workshop 3 (synthesis): climate variability, water systems and management options.

    PubMed

    Connor, R; Kuylenstierna, J

    2004-01-01

    Addressing climate variability now will better prepare us for future impacts of climate change. Sustained, multi-stakeholder dialogue at local through national levels is an approach that will reach the widest audience, helped by tools that illustrate vulnerability such as the Climate Vulnerability Index. Integrated water resources management deals with managing for variability and change and is therefore highly appropriate for dealing with climate impacts.

  11. Heat and mass transfer in volcano-hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal systems re-distribute heat and mass derived from subsurface magma bodies over large temporal and spatial scales. Numerical models of fluid flow and heat transfer provide a quantitative basis for understanding the thermo-hydrological structure and transient behavior of volcano-hydrothermal systems. At the brittle-ductile transition around a magma body, the rate of conductive heat transfer from the impermeable intrusion is balanced by the rate of advective heat transfer by the fluid. Using the Complex Systems Modeling Platform (CSMP++) to model fluid flow up to near-magmatic conditions, we examine the effect of geologic factors such as host rock permeability, magma emplacement depth, the temperature conditions of the brittle-ductile transition, and rock/magma thermal conductivity on the rates of heat and mass transfer around magma bodies. Additionally, we investigate the role of these factors on the thermo-hydrological structure of the hydrothermal system, including patterns of phase separation, gravity-driven phase segregation, and fluid mixing. Passive tracers are included in the fluid flow models to simulate the input of magmatic volatiles into hydrothermal fluids and their fractionation between the liquid and vapor phases. Ultimately, we compare our model results against measured heat and gas fluxes from volcano-hydrothermal systems to help inform the interpreation of these measurements.

  12. 23 CFR 810.308 - Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Federal-Aid Urban System Nonhighway Public Mass Transit Projects § 810.308 Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit...

  13. 23 CFR 810.308 - Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Federal-Aid Urban System Nonhighway Public Mass Transit Projects § 810.308 Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit...

  14. 23 CFR 810.308 - Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Federal-Aid Urban System Nonhighway Public Mass Transit Projects § 810.308 Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit...

  15. 23 CFR 810.308 - Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Federal-Aid Urban System Nonhighway Public Mass Transit Projects § 810.308 Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit...

  16. 23 CFR 810.308 - Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Federal-Aid Urban System Nonhighway Public Mass Transit Projects § 810.308 Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit...

  17. Flow of variably fluidized granular masses across three-dimensional terrain I. Coulomb mixture theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; Denlinger, R.P.

    2001-01-01

    Rock avalanches, debris flows, and related phenomena consist of grain-fluid mixtures that move across three-dimensional terrain. In all these phenomena the same basic forces, govern motion, but differing mixture compositions, initial conditions, and boundary conditions yield varied dynamics and deposits. To predict motion of diverse grain-fluid masses from initiation to deposition, we develop a depth-averaged, threedimensional mathematical model that accounts explicitly for solid- and fluid-phase forces and interactions. Model input consists of initial conditions, path topography, basal and internal friction angles of solid grains, viscosity of pore fluid, mixture density, and a mixture diffusivity that controls pore pressure dissipation. Because these properties are constrained by independent measurements, the model requires little or no calibration and yields readily testable predictions. In the limit of vanishing Coulomb friction due to persistent high fluid pressure the model equations describe motion of viscous floods, and in the limit of vanishing fluid stress they describe one-phase granular avalanches. Analysis of intermediate phenomena such as debris flows and pyroclastic flows requires use of the full mixture equations, which can simulate interaction of high-friction surge fronts with more-fluid debris that follows. Special numerical methods (described in the companion paper) are necessary to solve the full equations, but exact analytical solutions of simplified equations provide critical insight. An analytical solution for translational motion of a Coulomb mixture accelerating from rest and descending a uniform slope demonstrates that steady flow can occur only asymptotically. A solution for the asymptotic limit of steady flow in a rectangular channel explains why shear may be concentrated in narrow marginal bands that border a plug of translating debris. Solutions for static equilibrium of source areas describe conditions of incipient slope instability

  18. Variability in the Heritability of Body Mass Index: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression

    PubMed Central

    Elks, Cathy E.; den Hoed, Marcel; Zhao, Jing Hua; Sharp, Stephen J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Ong, Ken K.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence for a major role of genetic factors in the determination of body mass index (BMI) comes from studies of related individuals. Despite consistent evidence for a heritable component of BMI, estimates of BMI heritability vary widely between studies and the reasons for this remain unclear. While some variation is natural due to differences between populations and settings, study design factors may also explain some of the heterogeneity. We performed a systematic review that identified 88 independent estimates of BMI heritability from twin studies (total 140,525 twins) and 27 estimates from family studies (42,968 family members). BMI heritability estimates from twin studies ranged from 0.47 to 0.90 (5th/50th/95th centiles: 0.58/0.75/0.87) and were generally higher than those from family studies (range: 0.24–0.81; 5th/50th/95th centiles: 0.25/0.46/0.68). Meta-regression of the results from twin studies showed that BMI heritability estimates were 0.07 (P = 0.001) higher in children than in adults; estimates increased with mean age among childhood studies (+0.012/year, P = 0.002), but decreased with mean age in adult studies (−0.002/year, P = 0.002). Heritability estimates derived from AE twin models (which assume no contribution of shared environment) were 0.12 higher than those from ACE models (P < 0.001), whilst lower estimates were associated with self reported versus DNA-based determination of zygosity (−0.04, P = 0.02), and with self reported versus measured BMI (−0.05, P = 0.03). Although the observed differences in heritability according to aspects of study design are relatively small, together, the above factors explained 47% of the heterogeneity in estimates of BMI heritability from twin studies. In summary, while some variation in BMI heritability is expected due to population-level differences, study design factors explained nearly half the heterogeneity reported in twin studies. The genetic contribution to BMI appears to

  19. Flow of variably fluidized granular masses across three-dimensional terrain: 1. Coulomb mixture theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, Richard M.; Denlinger, Roger P.

    2001-01-01

    Rock avalanches, debris flows, and related phenomena consist of grain-fluid mixtures that move across three-dimensional terrain. In all these phenomena the same basic forces govern motion, but differing mixture compositions, initial conditions, and boundary conditions yield varied dynamics and deposits. To predict motion of diverse grain-fluid masses from initiation to deposition, we develop a depth-averaged, three-dimensional mathematical model that accounts explicitly for solid- and fluid-phase forces and interactions. Model input consists of initial conditions, path topography, basal and internal friction angles of solid grains, viscosity of pore fluid, mixture density, and a mixture diffusivity that controls pore pressure dissipation. Because these properties are constrained by independent measurements, the model requires little or no calibration and yields readily testable predictions. In the limit of vanishing Coulomb friction due to persistent high fluid pressure the model equations describe motion of viscous floods, and in the limit of vanishing fluid stress they describe one-phase granular avalanches. Analysis of intermediate phenomena such as debris flows and pyroclastic flows requires use of the full mixture equations, which can simulate interaction of high-friction surge fronts with more-fluid debris that follows. Special numerical methods (described in the companion paper) are necessary to solve the full equations, but exact analytical solutions of simplified equations provide critical insight. An analytical solution for translational motion of a Coulomb mixture accelerating from rest and descending a uniform slope demonstrates that steady flow can occur only asymptotically. A solution for the asymptotic limit of steady flow in a rectangular channel explains why shear may be concentrated in narrow marginal bands that border a plug of translating debris. Solutions for static equilibrium of source areas describe conditions of incipient slope instability

  20. The linear system theory's account of behavior maintained by variable-ratio schedules.

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, J J; Wixted, J T

    1988-01-01

    The mathematical theory of linear systems, which has been used successfully to describe behavior maintained by variable-interval schedules, is extended to describe behavior maintained by variable-ratio schedules. The result of the analysis is a pair of equations, one of which expresses response rate on a variable-ratio schedule as a function of the mean ratio requirement (n) that the schedule arranges. The other equation expresses response rate on a variable-ratio schedule as a function of reinforcement rate. Both equations accurately describe existing data from variable-ratio schedules. The theory accounts for two additional characteristics of behavior maintained by variable-ratio schedules; namely, the appearance of strained, two-valued (i.e., zero or very rapid) responding at large ns, and the abrupt cessation of responding at a boundary n. The theory also accounts for differences between behavior on variable-interval and variable-ratio schedules, including (a) the occurrence of strained responding on variable-ratio but not on variable-interval schedules, (b) the abrupt cessation of responding on occurrence of higher response rates on variable-ratio than on variable-interval schedules. Furthermore, given data from a series of variable-interval schedules and from a series of concurrent variable-ratio variable-interval schedules, the theory permits quantitative prediction of many properties of behavior on single-alternative variable-ratio schedules. The linear system theory's combined account of behavior on variable-interval and variable-ratio schedules is superior to existing versions of six other mathematical theories of variable-interval and variable-ratio responding. PMID:3279150

  1. System Modeling of Lunar Oxygen Production: Mass and Power Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Christopher J.; Freeh, Joshua E.; Linne, Diane L.; Faykus, Eric W.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Green, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    A systems analysis tool for estimating the mass and power requirements for a lunar oxygen production facility is introduced. The individual modeling components involve the chemical processing and cryogenic storage subsystems needed to process a beneficiated regolith stream into liquid oxygen via ilmenite reduction. The power can be supplied from one of six different fission reactor-converter systems. A baseline system analysis, capable of producing 15 metric tons of oxygen per annum, is presented. The influence of reactor-converter choice was seen to have a small but measurable impact on the system configuration and performance. Finally, the mission concept of operations can have a substantial impact upon individual component size and power requirements.

  2. An extrasolar planetary system with three Neptune-mass planets.

    PubMed

    Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Pepe, Francesco; Alibert, Yann; Benz, Willy; Bouchy, François; Correia, Alexandre C M; Laskar, Jacques; Mordasini, Christoph; Queloz, Didier; Santos, Nuno C; Udry, Stéphane; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Sivan, Jean-Pierre

    2006-05-18

    Over the past two years, the search for low-mass extrasolar planets has led to the detection of seven so-called 'hot Neptunes' or 'super-Earths' around Sun-like stars. These planets have masses 5-20 times larger than the Earth and are mainly found on close-in orbits with periods of 2-15 days. Here we report a system of three Neptune-mass planets with periods of 8.67, 31.6 and 197 days, orbiting the nearby star HD 69830. This star was already known to show an infrared excess possibly caused by an asteroid belt within 1 au (the Sun-Earth distance). Simulations show that the system is in a dynamically stable configuration. Theoretical calculations favour a mainly rocky composition for both inner planets, while the outer planet probably has a significant gaseous envelope surrounding its rocky/icy core; the outer planet orbits within the habitable zone of this star.

  3. Tenth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies in Cooperation with the Nineteenth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This document contains copies of those technical papers received in time for publication prior to the Tenth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies which is being held in cooperation with the Nineteenth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems at the University of Maryland University College Inn and Conference Center April 15-18, 2002. As one of an ongoing series, this Conference continues to provide a forum for discussion of issues relevant to the ingest, storage, and management of large volumes of data. The Conference encourages all interested organizations to discuss long-term mass storage requirements and experiences in fielding solutions. Emphasis is on current and future practical solutions addressing issues in data management, storage systems and media, data acquisition, long-term retention of data, and data distribution. This year's discussion topics include architecture, future of current technology, storage networking with emphasis on IP storage, performance, standards, site reports, and vendor solutions. Tutorials will be available on perpendicular magnetic recording, object based storage, storage virtualization and IP storage.

  4. Design and research on a variable ballast system for deep-sea manned submersibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhong-Liang

    2008-12-01

    Variable ballast systems are necessary for manned submersibles to adjust their buoyancy. In this paper, the design of a variable ballast system for a manned submersible is described. The variable ballast system uses a super high pressure hydraulic seawater system. A super high pressure seawater pump and a deep-sea brushless DC motor are used to pump seawater into or from the variable ballast tank, increasing or decreasing the weight of the manned submersible. A magnetostrictive linear displacement transducer can detect the seawater level in the variable ballast tank. Some seawater valves are used to control pumping direction and control on-off states. The design and testing procedure for the valves is described. Finally, the future development of variable ballast systems and seawater hydraulic systems is projected.

  5. Detecting Nova Shells around known Cataclysmic Variable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xhakaj, Enia; Kupfer, Thomas; Prince, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    Nova shells are hydrogen-rich nebulae around Cataclysmic Variables that are created when a Nova outburst takes place. Learning more about Nova shells can help us get a better understanding of the long-term evolution of white dwarfs in active Cataclysmic Variables. In this project, we present the search for Nova shells around 1700 Cataclysmic Variables, using Hα images from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) survey. The PTF Hα survey started in 2009 using the 48’’ Oschin telescope at Palomar Observatory and is the first of its type covering the whole northern hemisphere while reaching 18 mags in 60 seconds of exposure. We concentrated our search on the IAU catalogue of Historical Novae, as well as on the SDSS and the Ritter-Kolb catalogue of Cataclysmic Variables. We numerically analyzed radial profiles centered on the target sources to search for excess emission potentially associated with the shells. Out of 1700 Cataclysmic Variables present in these catalogues, we detected 25 Nova shells, out of which 20 are not observed before.

  6. A Cautionary Tale on the Inclusion of Variable Posttranslational Modifications in Database-Dependent Searches of Mass Spectrometry Data.

    PubMed

    Svozil, J; Baerenfaller, K

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics allows in principle the identification of unknown target proteins of posttranslational modifications and the sites of attachment. Including a variety of posttranslational modifications in database-dependent searches of high-throughput mass spectrometry data holds the promise to gain spectrum assignments to modified peptides, thereby increasing the number of assigned spectra, and to identify potentially interesting modification events. However, these potential benefits come for the price of an increased search space, which can lead to reduced scores, increased score thresholds, and erroneous peptide spectrum matches. We have assessed here the advantages and disadvantages of including the variable posttranslational modifications methionine oxidation, protein N-terminal acetylation, cysteine carbamidomethylation, transformation of N-terminal glutamine to pyroglutamic acid (Gln→pyro-Glu), and deamidation of asparagine and glutamine. Based on calculations of local false discovery rates and comparisons to known features of the respective modifications, we recommend for searches of samples that were not enriched for specific posttranslational modifications to only include methionine oxidation, protein N-terminal acetylation, and peptide N-terminal Gln→pyro-Glu as variable modifications. The principle of the validation strategy adopted here can also be applied for assessing the inclusion of posttranslational modifications for differently prepared samples, or for additional modifications. In addition, we have reassessed the special properties of the ubiquitin footprint, which is the remainder of ubiquitin moieties attached to lysines after tryptic digest. We show here that the ubiquitin footprint often breaks off as neutral loss and that it can be distinguished from dicarbamidomethylation events.

  7. Design of a ram accelerator mass launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aarnio, Michael; Armerding, Calvin; Berschauer, Andrew; Christofferson, Erik; Clement, Paul; Gohd, Robin; Neely, Bret; Reed, David; Rodriguez, Carlos; Swanstrom, Fredrick

    1988-01-01

    The ram accelerator mass launch system has been proposed to greatly reduce the costs of placing acceleration-insensitive payloads into low earth orbit. The ram accelerator is a chemically propelled, impulsive mass launch system capable of efficiently accelerating relatively large masses from velocities of 0.7 km/sec to 10 km/sec. The principles of propulsion are based on those of a conventional supersonic air-breathing ramjet; however the device operates in a somewhat different manner. The payload carrying vehicle resembles the center-body of the ramjet and accelerates through a stationary tube which acts as the outer cowling. The tube is filled with premixed gaseous fuel and oxidizer mixtures that burn in the vicinity of the vehicle's base, producing a thrust which accelerates the vehicle through the tube. This study examines the requirement for placing a 2000 kg vehicle into a 500 km circular orbit with a minimum amount of on-board rocket propellant for orbital maneuvers. The goal is to achieve a 50 pct payload mass fraction. The proposed design requirements have several self-imposed constraints that define the vehicle and tube configurations. Structural considerations on the vehicle and tube wall dictate an upper acceleration limit of 1000 g's and a tube inside diameter of 1.0 m. In-tube propulsive requirements and vehicle structural constraints result in a vehicle diameter of 0.76 m, a total length of 7.5 m and a nose-cone half angle of 7 degrees. An ablating nose-cone constructed from carbon-carbon composite serves as the thermal protection mechanism for atmospheric transit.

  8. Singularly perturbed control systems with noncompact fast variable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thuong; Siconolfi, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    We deal with a singularly perturbed optimal control problem with slow and fast variable depending on a parameter ε. We study the asymptotics, as ε goes to 0, of the corresponding value functions, and show convergence, in the sense of weak semilimits, to sub and supersolution of a suitable limit equation containing the effective Hamiltonian. The novelty of our contribution is that no compactness condition is assumed on the fast variable. This generalization requires, in order to perform the asymptotic procedure, an accurate qualitative analysis of some auxiliary equations posed on the space of fast variable. The task is accomplished using some tools of Weak KAM theory, and in particular the notion of Aubry set.

  9. Decadal variability in coupled sea-ice-thermohaline circulation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Neelin, J.D.

    1997-12-01

    An interdecadal oscillation in a coupled ocean-ice system was identified in a previous study. This paper extends that study to further examine the stability of the oscillation and the sensitivity of its frequency to various parameters and forcing fields. Three models are used: (i) an analytical box model; (ii) a two-dimensional model for the ocean thermohaline circulation (THC) coupled to a thermodynamic ice model, as in the authors` previous study; and (iii) a three-dimensional ocean general circulation model (OGCM) coupled to a similar ice model. The box model is used to elucidate the essential feedbacks that give rise to this oscillation and to identify the most important parameters and processes that determine the period. The counted model becomes more stable toward low coupling, greater diffusion, and weaker THC feedback. Nonlinear effects in the sea-ice model become important in the higher ocean-ice coupling regime where the effective sea-ice damping associated with this nonlinearity stabilizes the model. The 3D OGCM is used to test this coupled ocean-ice mechanism in a more realistic model setting. This model generates an interdecadal oscillation whose characteristics and phase relations among the model variables are similar to the oscillation obtained in the 2D models. The major difference is that the oscillation frequency is considerably lower. The difference can be explained in terms of the analytical box model solution in which the period of oscillation depends on the rate of anomalous density production by melting/cooling of sea ice per SST anomaly, times the rate of warming/cooling by anomalous THC heat advection per change in density anomaly. The 3D model has a smaller THC response to high-latitude density perturbations than the 2D model, and anomalous velocities in the 3D case tend to follow the mean isotherms so anomalous heat advection is reduced. This slows the ocean-ice feedback process, leading to the longer oscillation period. 36 refs., 27 figs.

  10. Characteristics, processes, and causes of the spatio-temporal variabilities of the East Asian monsoon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ronghui; Chen, Jilong; Wang, Lin; Lin, Zhongda

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in the study of the characteristics, processes, and causes of spatio-temporal variabilities of the East Asian monsoon (EAM) system are reviewed in this paper. The understanding of the EAM system has improved in many aspects: the basic characteristics of horizontal and vertical structures, the annual cycle of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) system and the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) system, the characteristics of the spatio-temporal variabilities of the EASM system and the EAWM system, and especially the multiple modes of the EAM system and their spatio-temporal variabilities. Some new results have also been achieved in understanding the atmosphere-ocean interaction and atmosphere-land interaction processes that affect the variability of the EAM system. Based on recent studies, the EAM system can be seen as more than a circulation system, it can be viewed as an atmosphere-ocean-land coupled system, namely, the EAM climate system. In addition, further progress has been made in diagnosing the internal physical mechanisms of EAM climate system variability, especially regarding the characteristics and properties of the East Asia-Pacific (EAP) teleconnection over East Asia and the North Pacific, the "Silk Road" teleconnection along the westerly jet stream in the upper troposphere over the Asian continent, and the dynamical effects of quasi-stationary planetary wave activity on EAM system variability. At the end of the paper, some scientific problems regarding understanding the EAM system variability are proposed for further study.

  11. Variable gearing during locomotion in the human musculoskeletal system.

    PubMed

    Carrier, D R; Heglund, N C; Earls, K D

    1994-07-29

    Human feet and toes provide a mechanism for changing the gear ratio of the ankle extensor muscles during a running step. A variable gear ratio could enhance muscle performance during constant-speed running by applying a more effective prestretch during landing, while maintaining the muscles near the high-efficiency or high-power portion of the force-velocity curve during takeoff. Furthermore, during acceleration, variable gearing may allow muscle contractile properties to remain optimized despite rapid changes in running speed. Forceplate and kinematic analyses of running steps show low gear ratios at touchdown that increase throughout the contact phase.

  12. Seasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope in the southeastern Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Jennifer A.; Heywood, Karen J.; Chavanne, Cédric P.; Holland, Paul R.

    2013-04-01

    An array of five moorings was deployed from February 2009 to February 2010 across the Antarctic shelf and slope in the southeastern Weddell Sea (~18°W). Observations demonstrate the key processes responsible for variability in water masses and transport in the region. Rapid fluctuations in temperature and salinity throughout the year are linked with variability in wind stress over the array. This causes the deepening or shoaling of the pycnocline, past the depth of the moorings. In the upper 500 m, the seasonal cycle in salinity shows freshening in autumn, with the strongest freshening at the shallowest mooring (~250 m), furthest on-shelf. The sea ice concentration over the array exceeds 90% during this period and contributes a positive salt flux into the ocean during autumn. Freshening begins during strong along-shore (easterly) winds in late April 2009. This demonstrates that variations in Ekman transport and wind-driven mixing play a key role in determining the salinity of shelf waters around Antarctica. Transport of the Antarctic Slope Current also shows a seasonal cycle with a maximum during late April. Model simulations show the importance of along-shore advection, as the arrival of a fresh anomaly from upstream determines the timing of the salinity minimum at the array. These processes are likely to be important for other regions around the Antarctic continent.

  13. Mass spectrometric identification, sequence evolution, and intraspecific variability of dimeric peptides encoded by cockroach akh genes.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Sebastian; Predel, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    Neuropeptides are structurally the most diverse group of messenger molecules of the nervous system. Regarding neuropeptide identification, distribution, function, and evolution, insects are among the best studied invertebrates. Indeed, more than 100 neuropeptides are known from single species. Most of these peptides can easily be identified by direct tissue or cell profiling using MALDI-TOF MS. In these experiments, protein hormones with extensive post-translational modifications such as inter- and intramolecular disulfides are usually missed. It is evident that an exclusion of these bioactive molecules hinders the utilization of direct profiling methods in comprehensive peptidomic analyses. In the current study, we focus on the detection and structural elucidation of homo- and heterodimeric adipokinetic hormone precursor-related peptides (APRPs) of cockroaches. The physiological relevance of these molecules with highly conserved sequences in insects is still uncertain. Sequence similarities with vertebrate growth hormone-releasing factors have been reported, but remarkably, few data regarding APRP processing exist and these data are restricted to locusts. Here, we elucidated sequences of carbamidomethylated APRP monomers of different cockroaches by means of MALDI-TOF MS(2), and we were able to identify a surprisingly large number of APRP sequences, resulting either from intraspecific amino acid substitutions within the APRP sequences or C-terminal truncated APRPs.

  14. Research and design of high speed mass image storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-feng; Xue, Rong-kun; Liang, Fei

    2009-07-01

    The design of the high mass image storage system is introduced using DSP, FPGA and Flash structure. Texas Instruments Corporation DSP chip (TMS320VC5509APEG) is used as the main controller, Samsung's Flash chips (K9F2G08U0M) used as the main storage medium, and the Xilinx Corporation FPGA chip (XCV600E) used as logic control modules. In this system, Storage module consists of 32 Flash memory chips, which are divided into 8 groups that correspond to 8-level pipeline. The 4-Flash memory chip forms a basic 32-bit memory module. The entire system storage space is 64 G bit. Through simulation and verification, the storage speed is up to 352Mbps and readout speed is up to 290Mbps, it can meet the demand to the high-speed access, and which has strong environmental adaptability.

  15. Effects of chemical reaction and variable viscosity on hydromagnetic mixed convection heat and mass transfer for Hiemenz flow through porous media with radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddeek, M. A.; Darwish, A. A.; Abdelmeguid, M. S.

    2007-03-01

    The effect of chemical reaction and variable viscosity on hydromagnetic mixed convection heat and mass transfer for Hiemenz flow through porous media has been studied in the presence of radiation and magnetic field. The plate surface is embedded in a uniform Darcian porous medium in order to allow for possible fluid wall suction or blowing and has a power-law variation of both the wall temperature and concentration. The similarity solution is used to transform the system of partial differential equations, describing the problem under consideration, into a boundary value problem of coupled ordinary differential equations, and an efficient numerical technique is implemented to solve the reduced system. Numerical calculations are carried out, for various values of the dimensionless parameters of the problem, which include a variable viscosity, chemical reactions, radiation, magnetic field, porous medium and power index of the wall temperature parameters. Comparisons with previously published works are performed and excellent agreement between the results is obtained. The results are presented graphically and the conclusion is drawn that the flow field and other quantities of physical interest are significantly influenced by these parameters.

  16. Enhancing adoption of site-specific variable rate sprinkler systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than twenty years of private and public research on site-specific variable-rate sprinkler irrigation (SS-VRI) has resulted in very limited commercial adoption of the technology. Documented and proven water conservation strategies using site-specific irrigation are quite limited, and its cost-ef...

  17. Grand challenges in mass storage: A systems integrators perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard R.; Mintz, Daniel G.

    1993-01-01

    Within today's much ballyhooed supercomputing environment, with its CFLOPS of CPU power, and Gigabit networks, there exists a major roadblock to computing success; that of Mass Storage. The solution to this mass storage problem is considered to be one of the 'Grand Challenges' facing the computer industry today, as well as long into the future. It has become obvious to us, as well as many others in the industry, that there is no clear single solution in sight. The Systems Integrator today is faced with a myriad of quandaries in approaching this challenge. He must first be innovative in approach, second choose hardware solutions that are volumetric efficient; high in signal bandwidth; available from multiple sources; competitively priced, and have forward growth extendibility. In addition he must also comply with a variety of mandated, and often conflicting software standards (GOSIP, POSIX, IEEE, MSRM 4.0, and others), and finally he must deliver a systems solution with the 'most bang for the buck' in terms of cost vs. performance factors. These quandaries challenge the Systems Integrator to 'push the envelope' in terms of his or her ingenuity and innovation on an almost daily basis. This dynamic is explored further, and an attempt to acquaint the audience with rational approaches to this 'Grand Challenge' is made.

  18. A high pressure modulated molecular beam mass spectrometric sampling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.; Miller, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The current state of understanding of free-jet high pressure sampling is critically reviewed and modifications of certain theoretical and empirical considerations are presented. A high pressure, free-jet expansion, modulated molecular beam, mass spectrometric sampling apparatus was constructed and this apparatus is described in detail. Experimental studies have demonstrated that the apparatus can be used to sample high temperature systems at pressures up to one atmosphere. Condensible high temperature gaseous species have been routinely sampled and the mass spectrometric detector has provided direct identification of sampled species. System sensitivity is better than one tenth of a part per million. Experimental results obtained with argon and nitrogen beams are presented and compared to theoretical predictions. These results and the respective comparison are taken to indicate acceptable performance of the sampling apparatus. Results are also given for two groups of experiments related to hot corrosion studies. The formation of gaseous sodium sulfate in doped methane-oxygen flames was characterized and the oxidative vaporization of metals was studied in an atmospheric pressure flowing gas system to which gaseous salt partial pressures were added.

  19. System and method of modulating electrical signals using photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductors as variable resistors

    DOEpatents

    Harris, John Richardson; Caporaso, George J; Sampayan, Stephen E

    2013-10-22

    A system and method for producing modulated electrical signals. The system uses a variable resistor having a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material construction whose conduction response to changes in amplitude of incident radiation is substantially linear throughout a non-saturation region to enable operation in non-avalanche mode. The system also includes a modulated radiation source, such as a modulated laser, for producing amplitude-modulated radiation with which to direct upon the variable resistor and modulate its conduction response. A voltage source and an output port, are both operably connected to the variable resistor so that an electrical signal may be produced at the output port by way of the variable resistor, either generated by activation of the variable resistor or propagating through the variable resistor. In this manner, the electrical signal is modulated by the variable resistor so as to have a waveform substantially similar to the amplitude-modulated radiation.

  20. Low-mass materials and vertex detector systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Physics requirements set the material budget and the precision and stability necessary in low-mass vertex detector systems. Operational considerations, along with physics requirements, set the operating environment to be provided and determine the heat to be removed. Representative materials for fulfilling those requirements are described and properties of the materials are tabulated. A figure of merit is proposed to aid in material selection. Multi-layer structures are examined as a method to allow material to be used effectively, thereby reducing material contributions. Lastly, comments are made on future directions to be considered in using present materials effectively and in developing new materials.

  1. Low-mass materials and vertex detector systems

    DOE PAGES

    Cooper, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Physics requirements set the material budget and the precision and stability necessary in low-mass vertex detector systems. Operational considerations, along with physics requirements, set the operating environment to be provided and determine the heat to be removed. Representative materials for fulfilling those requirements are described and properties of the materials are tabulated. A figure of merit is proposed to aid in material selection. Multi-layer structures are examined as a method to allow material to be used effectively, thereby reducing material contributions. Lastly, comments are made on future directions to be considered in using present materials effectively and in developing newmore » materials.« less

  2. Neutron-proton pairing correlations in odd mass systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fellah, M. Allal, N. H.; Oudih, M. R.

    2015-03-30

    An expression of the ground-state which describes odd mass systems within the BCS approach in the isovector neutron-proton pairing case is proposed using the blocked level technique. The gap equations as well as the energy expression are then derived. It is shown that they exactly generalize the expressions obtained in the pairing between like-particles case. The various gap parameters and the energy are then numerically studied as a function of the pairing-strength within the schematic one-level model.

  3. Control System Upgrade for a Mass Property Measurement Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, William; Hinkle, R. Kenneth (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Mass Property Measurement Facility (MPMF) at the Goddard Space Flight Center has undergone modifications to ensure the safety of Flight Payloads and the measurement facility. The MPMF has been technically updated to improve reliability and increase the accuracy of the measurements. Modifications include the replacement of outdated electronics with a computer based software control system, the addition of a secondary gas supply in case of a catastrophic failure to the gas supply and a motor controlled emergency stopping feature instead of a hard stop.

  4. Acton mass flow system applied to PFBC feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homburg, E.

    1977-01-01

    Dense phase pneumatic conveying and the Acton Mass Flow concept are defined with emphasis on the specific advantages to the coal and dolomite feed to the Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor. The transport and feed functions are explored with a comparison of designing the process for a combined function or for individual functions. The equipment required to accomplish these functions is described together with a typical example of sizing and air or gas requirements. A general outline of the control system required to obtain a uniform feed rate is provided. The condition of the coal and dolomite and conveying gas as required to obtain reliable transport and feed will be discussed.

  5. Instrumental-Variables Simultaneous Equations Model of Physical Activity and Body Mass Index: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Katie A; Guilkey, David K; Tien, Hsiao-Chuen; Kiefe, Catarina I; Popkin, Barry M; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2016-09-15

    We used full-system-estimation instrumental-variables simultaneous equations modeling (IV-SEM) to examine physical activity relative to body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) using 25 years of data (1985/1986 to 2010/2011) from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study (n = 5,115; ages 18-30 years at enrollment). Neighborhood environment and sociodemographic instruments were used to characterize physical activity, fast-food consumption, smoking, alcohol consumption, marriage, and childbearing (women) and to predict BMI using semiparametric full-information maximum likelihood estimation to control for unobserved time-invariant and time-varying residual confounding and differential measurement error through model-derived discrete random effects. Comparing robust-variance ordinary least squares, random-effects regression, fixed-effects regression, single-equation-estimation IV-SEM, and full-system-estimation IV-SEM, estimates from random- and fixed-effects models and the full-system-estimation IV-SEM were unexpectedly similar, despite the lack of control for residual confounding with the random-effects estimator. Ordinary least squares tended to overstate the significance of health behaviors in BMI, while results from single-equation-estimation IV-SEM were notably different, revealing the impact of weak instruments in standard instrumental-variable methods. Our robust findings for fixed effects (which does not require instruments but has a high cost in lost degrees of freedom) and full-system-estimation IV-SEM (vs. standard IV-SEM) demonstrate potential for a full-system-estimation IV-SEM method even with weak instruments.

  6. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  7. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  8. 21 CFR 866.6050 - Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system... immunological Test Systems § 866.6050 Ovarian adnexal mass assessment score test system. (a) Identification. An ovarian/adnexal mass assessment test system is a device that measures one or more proteins in serum...

  9. Structural and Trajectory Control of Variable Geometry Planetary Entry Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco; Kwok, Kawai; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The results presented in this paper apply to a generic vehicle entering a planetary atmosphere which makes use of a variable geometry change to modulate the heat, drag, and acceleration loads. Two structural concepts for implementing the cone angle variation, namely a segmented shell and a corrugated shell, are presented. A structural analysis of these proposed structural configuration shows that the stress levels are tolerable during entry. The analytic expressions of the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients are also derived, and guidance laws that track reference heat flux, drag, and aerodynamic acceleration loads are also proposed. These guidance laws have been tested in an integrated simulation environment, and the results indicate that use of variable geometry is feasible to track specific profiles of dynamic load conditions during reentry.

  10. Structural and Control Concepts for Variable Geometry Planetary Entry Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco; Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Davis, Gregory; Kwok, Kawai; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The results presented in this paper apply to a generic vehicle entering a planetary atmosphere which makes use of a variable geometry change to modulate the heat, drag, and acceleration loads. Two structural concepts for implementing the cone angle variation, namely a segmented shell and a corrugated shell, are presented. A structural analysis of these proposed structural configuration shows that the stress levels are tolerable during entry. The analytic expressions of the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients are also derived, and guidance laws that track reference heat flux, drag, and aerodynamic acceleration loads are also proposed. These guidance laws have been tested in an integrated simulation environment, and the results indicate that use of variable geometry is feasible to track specific profiles of dynamic load conditions during reentry.

  11. Breaking Gaussian incompatibility on continuous variable quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Kiukas, Jukka; Schultz, Jussi

    2015-08-15

    We characterise Gaussian quantum channels that are Gaussian incompatibility breaking, that is, transform every set of Gaussian measurements into a set obtainable from a joint Gaussian observable via Gaussian postprocessing. Such channels represent local noise which renders measurements useless for Gaussian EPR-steering, providing the appropriate generalisation of entanglement breaking channels for this scenario. Understanding the structure of Gaussian incompatibility breaking channels contributes to the resource theory of noisy continuous variable quantum information protocols.

  12. Design of a Ram Accelerator mass launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Ram Accelerator, a chemically propelled, impulsive mass launch system, is presented as a viable concept for directly launching acceleration-insensitive payloads into low Earth orbit. The principles of propulsion are based on those of an airbreathing supersonic ramjet. The payload vehicle acts as the ramjet centerbody and travels through a fixed launch tube that acts as the ramjet outer cowling. The launch tube is filled with premixed gaseous fuel and oxidizer mixtures that combust at the base of the vehicle and produce thrust. Two modes of in-tube propulsion involving ramjet cycles are used in sequence to accelerate the vehicle from 0.7 km/sec to 9 km/sec. Requirements for placing a 2000 kg vehicle into a 500-km circular orbit, with a minimum amount of onboard rocket propellant for orbital maneuvers, are examined. It is shown that in-tube propulsion requirements dictate a launch tube length of 5.1 km to achieve an exit velocity of 9 km/sec, with peak accelerations not to exceed 1000 g's. Aerodynamic heating due to atmospheric transit requires minimal ablative protection and the vehicle retains a large percentage of its exit velocity. An indirect orbital insertion maneuver with aerobraking and two apogee burns is examined to minimize the required onboard propellant mass. An appropriate onboard propulsion system design to perform the required orbital maneuvers with minimum mass requirements is also determined. The structural designs of both the launch tube and the payload vehicle are examined using simple structural and finite element analysis for various materials.

  13. Systems for 42 V mass-market automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keim, Thomas A.

    With the introduction of the Toyota Crown Royal Saloon in August, 2001, 42 V automotive electrical systems made the transition from a technology for the future to present-day production. Nevertheless, there is widespread malaise in the 42 V technical community, stemming from a slower than expected introduction to the marketplace. This paper discusses some of the reasons for the slow adoption of this technology, and indicates a possible way forward. This paper looks beyond the initial uses of 42 V in limited-volume, high-end cars and light trucks, and discusses the prospects for 42 V in mass-market vehicles, given what is presently known about the technology. It is concluded that a case can be made for 42 V, even at some increment in cost. The motivation is improved fuel economy. The cost targets necessary for this benefit to be achieved are discussed, and new components being widely discussed as part of future electrical systems are evaluated for mass-market applications. New developments with higher potential are suggested.

  14. Control system and method for a power delivery system having a continuously variable ratio transmission

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Andrew A.

    1984-01-01

    A control system and method for a power delivery system, such as in an automotive vehicle, having an engine coupled to a continuously variable ratio transmission (CVT). Totally independent control of engine and transmission enable the engine to precisely follow a desired operating characteristic, such as the ideal operating line for minimum fuel consumption. CVT ratio is controlled as a function of commanded power or torque and measured load, while engine fuel requirements (e.g., throttle position) are strictly a function of measured engine speed. Fuel requirements are therefore precisely adjusted in accordance with the ideal characteristic for any load placed on the engine.

  15. Control system and method for a power delivery system having a continuously variable ratio transmission

    DOEpatents

    Frank, A.A.

    1984-07-10

    A control system and method for a power delivery system, such as in an automotive vehicle, having an engine coupled to a continuously variable ratio transmission (CVT). Totally independent control of engine and transmission enable the engine to precisely follow a desired operating characteristic, such as the ideal operating line for minimum fuel consumption. CVT ratio is controlled as a function of commanded power or torque and measured load, while engine fuel requirements (e.g., throttle position) are strictly a function of measured engine speed. Fuel requirements are therefore precisely adjusted in accordance with the ideal characteristic for any load placed on the engine. 4 figs.

  16. Estimation of the accuracy of methods for determining component masses for low-mass X-ray binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antokhina, E. A.; Petrov, V. S.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Modern modeling of the population of low-mass X-ray binary systems containing black holes applying standard assumptions leads to a lack of agreement between the modeled and observed mass distributions for the optical components, with the observed masses being lower. This makes the task of estimating the systematic errors in the derived component masses due to imperfect models relevant. To estimate the influence of systematic errors in the derived masses of stars in X-ray binary systems, we considered two approximations for the tidally deformed star in a Roche model. Approximating the star as a sphere with a volume equal to that of the Roche lobe leads to slight overestimation of the equatorial rotational velocity V rot sin i, and hence to slight underestimation of the mass ratio q = M x / M v . Approximating the star as a flat, circular disk with constant local line profiles and a linear limb-darkening law (a classical rotational broadeningmodel) is an appreciably cruder approach, and leads to overestimation of V rot sin i by about 20%. In the case of high values of q = M x / M v , this approximation leads to substantial underestimation of the mass ratio q, which can reach several tens of percent. The mass of the optical star is overestimated by a factor of 1.5 in this case, while the mass of the black hole is changed only slightly. Since most estimates of component mass ratios for X-ray binary systems are carried out using a classical rotational broadening model for the lines, this leads to the need for appreciable corrections to (reductions of) previously published masses for the optical stars, which enhances the contradiction with the standard evolutionary scenario for low-mass X-ray binaries containing black holes.

  17. The Evolution of Power System Planning with High Levels of Variable Renewable Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Jessica; Milligan, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Greening the Grid provides technical assistance to energy system planners, regulators, and grid operators to overcome challenges associated with integrating variable renewable energy into the grid. This document, part of the Greening the Grid introduces the evolution of power system planning with high levels of variable renewable generation.

  18. Variable Rate Irrigation Management for Humid Climates Using a Conventional Center Pivot System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigates suitability of a standard commercial center pivot system for variable-rate water application under Mid-South conditions. The objective was to determine if field variability data can be applied to conventional moving sprinkler systems to optimize irrigation management on non-u...

  19. Experimental investigation of a variable speed constant frequency electric generating system from a utility perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, J. I.; Reddoch, T. W.; Lawler, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    As efforts are accelerated to improve the overall capability and performance of wind electric systems, increased attention to variable speed configurations has developed. A number of potentially viable configurations have emerged. Various attributes of variable speed systems need to be carefully tested to evaluate their performance from the utility points of view. With this purpose, the NASA experimental variable speed constant frequency (VSCF) system has been tested. In order to determine the usefulness of these systems in utility applications, tests are required to resolve issues fundamental to electric utility systems. Legitimate questions exist regarding how variable speed generators will influence the performance of electric utility systems; therefore, tests from a utility perspective, have been performed on the VSCF system and an induction generator at an operating power level of 30 kW on a system rated at 200 kVA and 0.8 power factor.

  20. Descriptor Variable and Generalized Singularly Perturbed Systems: A Geometric Approach.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    variable theory depends heavily on the theory of regular matrix pencils which was first explored by Weierstrass in the nineteenth century [1]. A standard...modern reference to the theory is Gantmacher [2]. A regular matrix pencil is a matrix polynomial Es-A where E and A are square matrices of the same...dimensions and det(Es-A) * 0. (1.1) In (1.1) the determinant is formed in the obvious way by taking the deter- minant of the corresponding matrix of

  1. Prediction and analysis of variable reluctance stepmotor drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulle, D. W. J.

    1982-01-01

    A relationship between the electric terminal parameters and output/input power is derived for conventional doubly-salient synchronous machines and extended to include the variable reluctance motor. The advantages and limitations of the drive-schemes are shown in Blondel diagrams and torque speed curves. A general method for obtaining a quantitative assessment of drive-schemes is developed by the introduction of so-called performance figures, related to the output power and efficiency. From this method applied to four drive schemes, it is concluded that severe performance degradation is the result of using a forging resistance in a drive-scheme. A forced decay unipolar chopper drive is presented.

  2. Spatial distribution and intra-annual variability of water masses on the Eastern Gulf of Cadiz seabed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellanco, M. J.; Sánchez-Leal, R. F.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the spatial distribution and intra-annual variability of seabed hydrography in the Eastern Gulf of Cadiz based on more than 10 years of near-bottom CTD observations. Well-defined water masses and a variety of mixing products are persistently sorted along three bathymetric areas occupying particular depth intervals: (i) inner shelf waters (<60 m depth), with strong coastal and atmospheric influence; (ii) low-salinity Eastern North Atlantic Central Waters (ENACW), related to the Gulf of Cadiz Current (GCC) along the central and outer shelf (between 100 and 250 m depth); and (iii) a range of salinity and temperature flavors associated with the dense Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) occupying the deeper grounds. All three are characterized by significant March-November hydrographic differences suggesting an intra-annual variability pattern. After summer heating and stratification of the water column, warm (17.8 °C) and saline (36.26) waters occupy the inner-shelf in November whereas cooler (14.6 °C) and less saline (36.17) waters occur in March as the combined result of the erosion of the seasonal thermocline and intensified continental runoff. Offshore, colder, more saline and hence denser MOW invades the upper slope in March diluting the easternmost tip of a saltier ENACW wedge and nudging its outer rim up onto the shelf. This narrows and constricts the GCC band in winter, while its bottom trace appears to broaden and stretch eastwards in November. More effective MOW-ENACW mixing west of the Strait of Gibraltar driven both by an elevated MOW and a less stratified ENACW could explain the winter salinification of most of the grounds deeper than 250 m.

  3. Structure and variability of the abyssal water masses in the Ionian Sea in the period 2003-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensi, Manuel; Rubino, Angelo; Cardin, Vanessa; Hainbucher, Dagmar; Mancero-Mosquera, Isaac

    2013-02-01

    This study presents aspects of the spatial and temporal variability of abyssal water masses in the Ionian Sea, as derived from recent temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and velocity observations and from comparisons between these and former observations. Previous studies showed how in the Southern Adriatic Sea the Adriatic Deep Water (AdDW) became fresher (ΔS ≈ -0.08) and colder (ΔT ≈ -0.1°C) after experiencing warming and salinification between 2003 and 2007. Our data, collected from October 2009 to July 2010 from two bottom moorings, one within the Strait of Otranto and the other in the northern Ionian, confirm this tendency: a bottom vein of southward-flowing AdDW, whose temperature and salinity continuously decreased during the observation time, was detected there. Typically, the vein travel time between the two stations ranged between 45 and 50 days. This gave us a temporal estimate for AdDW anomaly propagation towards the Ionian abyss from their Adriatic generation region. The density excess of the observed vein was always enough to enable its existence as a bottom-arrested current. This evidence confirms that, at that time (2009 and 2010), the Adriatic Sea was greatly contributing to the formation of Eastern Mediterranean Deep Water (EMDW), the bottom water of the Eastern Mediterranean. Hence, based on these results and on the evidence that, from 2003 to 2009, abyssal Ionian waters became saltier and warmer under the time-lagged influence of AdDW, possible future changes in the EMDW characteristics, as a response to Adriatic variability, are discussed.

  4. Using random proportional pulse feedback of system variables to control chaos and hyperchaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiao-shu; Wang, Bing-hong; Jiang, Feng; Gao, Yuan

    2001-01-01

    A method that allows one to control chaotic and hyperchaotic systems by a random proportional pulse feedback of system variables is proposed. This method is illustrated with the Rossler chaotic and the complex Lorenz-Harken hyperchaotic systems and a better control result is obtained. The advantage of this method is that just one perturbed system variable is enough to obtain a stabilized periodic orbit.

  5. CoRoT 223992193: Investigating the variability in a low-mass, pre-main sequence eclipsing binary with evidence of a circumbinary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, E.; Aigrain, S.; Terquem, C.; Bouvier, J.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Gandolfi, D.; Stauffer, J.; Cody, A.; Venuti, L.; Almeida, P. Viana; Micela, G.; Favata, F.; Deeg, H. J.

    2017-02-01

    CoRoT 223992193 is the only known low-mass, pre-main sequence eclipsing binary that shows evidence of a circumbinary disk. The system displays complex photometric and spectroscopic variability over a range of timescales and wavelengths. Using two optical CoRoT runs from 2008 and 2011/2012 (spanning 23 and 39 days), along with infrared Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 μm observations (spanning 21 and 29 days, and simultaneous with the second CoRoT run), we model the out-of-eclipse light curves, finding that the large scale structure in both CoRoT light curves is consistent with the constructive and destructive interference of starspot signals at two slightly different periods. Using the vsini of both stars, we interpret this as the two stars having slightly different rotation periods: the primary is consistent with synchronisation and the secondary rotates slightly supersynchronously. Comparison of the raw 2011/2012 light curve data to the residuals of our spot model in colour-magnitude space indicates additional contributions consistent with a combination of variable dust emission and obscuration. There appears to be a tentative correlation between this additional variability and the binary orbital phase, with the system displaying increases in its infrared flux around primary and secondary eclipse. We also identify short-duration flux dips preceding secondary eclipse in all three CoRoT and Spitzer bands. We construct a model of the inner regions of the binary and propose that these dips could be caused by partial occultation of the central binary by the accretion stream onto the primary star. Analysis of 15 Hα profiles obtained with the FLAMES instrument on the Very Large Telescope reveal an emission profile associated with each star. The majority of this is consistent with chromospheric emission but additional higher velocity emission is also seen, which could be due to prominences. However, half of the secondary star's emission profiles display full widths at 10% intensity

  6. Volcanic Gas Emissions Mapping Using a Mass Spectrometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Timothy P.; Diaz, J. Andres

    2008-01-01

    The visualization of hazardous gaseous emissions at volcanoes using in-situ mass spectrometry (MS) is a key step towards a better comprehension of the geophysical phenomena surrounding eruptive activity. In-Situ gas data consisting of helium, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and other gas species, were acquired with an MS system. MS and global position system (GPS) data were plotted on ground imagery, topography, and remote sensing data collected by a host of instruments during the second Costa Rica Airborne Research and Technology Applications (CARTA) mission This combination of gas and imaging data allowed 3-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the volcanic plume end the mapping of gas concentration at several volcanic structures and urban areas This combined set of data has demonstrated a better tool to assess hazardous conditions by visualizing and modeling of possible scenarios of volcanic activity. The MS system is used for in-situ measurement of three-dimensional gas concentrations at different volcanic locations with three different transportation platforms, aircraft, auto, and hand carried. The demonstration for urban contamination mapping is also presented as another possible use for the MS system.

  7. Simulation of mass storage systems operating in a large data processing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R.

    1972-01-01

    A mass storage simulation program was written to aid system designers in the design of a data processing facility. It acts as a tool for measuring the overall effect on the facility of on-line mass storage systems, and it provides the means of measuring and comparing the performance of competing mass storage systems. The performance of the simulation program is demonstrated.

  8. Variability of pigment biomass in the California Current system as determined by satellite imagery. I - Spatial variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Raymond C.; Zhang, Xueyun; Michaelsen, Joel

    1988-01-01

    Spatial variability of chlorophyll in the California Current system was analyzed using Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) imagery. A total of 48 images were analyzed to produce seasonal averages and variances, gradients, and power spectra. Roughly one third to one half of the variance in pigment biomass can be explained by consistent, large-scale gradients. In general, biomass is higher in the north and in nearshore areas. Nearshore areas also have proportionally more small-scale variability than the areas offshore. Slopes of the power spectra for nearshore areas are about -2.2 (for spatial scales of 10-100 km), while slopes for offshore areas are about -3. In addition, the power spectra show evidence of a change in slope at about 10 km, with slopes of about -1 for shorter-length scales. This may indicate that biological processes dominate the smaller scales, while mesoscale eddies and geostrophic currents dominate the larger scales.

  9. Effect of Heart Rate and Body Mass Index on the Interscan and Interobserver Variability of Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring at Prospective ECG-Triggered 64-Slice CT

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Hideya; Kiguchi, Masao; Fujioka, Chikako; Kitagawa, Toshiro; Ito, Katsuhide

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test the effects of heart rate, body mass index (BMI) and noise level on interscan and interobserver variability of coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring on a prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered 64-slice CT. Materials and Methods One hundred and ten patients (76 patients with CAC) were scanned twice on prospective ECG-triggered scans. The scan parameters included 120 kV, 82 mAs, a 2.5 mm thickness, and an acquisition center at 45% of the RR interval. The interscan and interobserver variability on the CAC scores (Agatston, volume, and mass) was calculated. The factors affecting the variability were determined by plotting it against heart rate, BMI, and noise level (defined as the standard deviation: SD). Results The estimated effective dose was 1.5 ± 0.2 mSv. The mean heart rate was 63 ± 12 bpm (range, 44-101 bpm). The patient BMIs were 24.5 ± 4.5 kg/m2 (range, 15.5-42.3 kg/m2). The mean and median interscan variabilities were 11% and 6%, respectively by volume, and 11% and 6%, respectively, by mass. Moreover, the mean and median of the algorithms were lower than the Agatston algorithm (16% and 9%, respectively). The mean and median interobserver variability was 10% and 4%, respectively (average of algorithms). The mean noise levels were 15 ± 4 Hounsfield unit (HU) (range, 8-25 HU). The interscan and interobserver variability was not correlated with heart rate, BMI, or noise level. Conclusion The interscan and interobserver variability of CAC on a prospective ECG-triggered 64-slice CT with high image quality and 45% of RR acquisition is not significantly affected by heart rate, BMI, or noise level. The volume or mass algorithms show reduced interscan variability compared to the Agatston scoring (p < 0.05). PMID:19568461

  10. Analysis of two-element zoom systems based on variable power lenses.

    PubMed

    Miks, Antonin; Novak, Jiri

    2010-03-29

    Traditional optical systems with variable optical characteristics are composed of several optical elements that can be shifted with respect to each other mechanically. A motorized change of position of individual elements (or group of elements) then makes possible to achieve desired optical properties of such zoom lens systems. A disadvantage of such systems is the fact that individual elements of these optical systems have to move very precisely, which results in high requirements on mechanical construction of such optical systems. Our work is focused on a paraxial and third order aberration analysis of possible optical designs of two-element zoom lens systems based on variable power lenses with a variable focal length. First order chromatic aberrations of the variable power lenses are also described. Computer simulation examples are presented to show that such zoom lens systems without motorized movements of lenses appear to be promising for the next-generation of zoom lens design.

  11. Variable Resolution Direction Finding Using the Robust Symmetrical Number System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    EDO Corporation, for taking the time to come to NPS to have a look at the demonstration DF system . They provided great suggestions and insights that...relatively prime (PRP) moduli set. c. Determine the system dynamic range based on the chosen moduli. Using the MATLAB search program, the dynamic...the average phase data from each element was not converted to radians as required in MATLAB . However, the DF system still did not produce correct AOA

  12. Hot Thermal Storage in a Variable Power, Renewable Energy System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    characteristics and may not necessarily be available in all cases. Types of direct heat energy systems include solar thermal, waste heat , and geothermal ...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) This thesis outlines the design of a renewable energy heat generation system with thermal...LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT This thesis outlines the design of a renewable energy heat generation system with thermal storage for DOD facilities. The

  13. Zero and root loci of disturbed spring–mass systems

    PubMed Central

    Lecomte, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Models consisting of chains of particles that are coupled to their neighbours appear in many applications in physics or engineering, such as in the study of dynamics of mono-atomic and multi-atomic lattices, the resonances of crystals with impurities and the response of damaged bladed discs. Analytical properties of the dynamic responses of such disturbed chains of identical springs and masses are presented, including when damping is present. Several remarkable properties in the location of the resonances (poles) and anti-resonances (zeros) of the displacements in the frequency domain are presented and proved. In particular, it is shown that there exists an elliptical region in the frequency–disturbance magnitude plane from which zeros are excluded and the discrete values of the frequency and disturbance at which double poles occur are identified. A particular focus is on a local disturbance, such as when a spring or damper is modified at or between the first and last masses. It is demonstrated how, notably through normalization, the techniques and results of the paper apply to a broad category of more complex systems in physics, chemistry and engineering. PMID:24711724

  14. Influence of climate variability on water partitioning and effective energy and mass transfer in a semi-arid critical zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata-Rios, Xavier; Brooks, Paul D.; Troch, Peter A.; McIntosh, Jennifer; Rasmussen, Craig

    2016-03-01

    The critical zone (CZ) is the heterogeneous, near-surface layer of the planet that regulates life-sustaining resources. Previous research has demonstrated that a quantification of the influxes of effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT) to the CZ can predict its structure and function. In this study, we quantify how climate variability in the last 3 decades (1984-2012) has affected water availability and the temporal trends in EEMT. This study takes place in the 1200 km2 upper Jemez River basin in northern New Mexico. The analysis of climate, water availability, and EEMT was based on records from two high-elevation SNOTEL stations, PRISM data, catchment-scale discharge, and satellite-derived net primary productivity (MODIS). Results from this study indicated a decreasing trend in water availability, a reduction in forest productivity (4 g C m-2 per 10 mm of reduction in precipitation), and decreasing EEMT (1.2-1.3 MJ m2 decade-1). Although we do not know the timescales of CZ change, these results suggest an upward migration of CZ/ecosystem structure on the order of 100 m decade-1, and that decadal-scale differences in EEMT are similar to the differences between convergent/hydrologically subsidized and planar/divergent landscapes, which have been shown to be very different in vegetation and CZ structure.

  15. Variable volume combustor with nested fuel manifold system

    SciTech Connect

    McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Keener, Christopher Paul; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2016-09-13

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles, a fuel manifold system in communication with the micro-mixer fuel nozzles to deliver a flow of fuel thereto, and a linear actuator to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles and the fuel manifold system.

  16. Variable volume combustor with pre-nozzle fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Keener, Christopher Paul; Johnson, Thomas Edward; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2016-09-06

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of fuel nozzles, a pre-nozzle fuel injection system supporting the fuel nozzles, and a linear actuator to maneuver the fuel nozzles and the pre-nozzle fuel injection system.

  17. Evaluating preferred direction tropical cyclone track variability in an operational global ensemble prediction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elless, Travis J.

    Ensemble forecasts of Tropical Storm Debby and Hurricane Sandy (2012) highlight instances where variability in tropical cyclone (TC) position forecasts are stretched along a preferred direction. The goal of this thesis is to analyze this stretching of variability in a global ensemble prediction system, particularly the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), to determine how often and under what conditions does variability stretching occur, and ultimately what feature(s) are responsible for generating this variability. This study defines and evaluates preferred direction variability through a 2008--2012 global climatology of ECMWF TC position variability. A basin by basin comparison found stretching of the variability tends to occur most frequently in the West Pacific and least frequently in the Atlantic. Other forecast characteristics such as location, motion, and intensity are examined in each basin, and highlight midlatitude effects being associated with preferred direction variability. However, other features unique to each basin could also be playing a role in generating preferred direction variability. Possible sources of preferred direction variability are examined through a case study of ECMWF ensemble forecast initialized at 0000 UTC 24 June 2012 for Tropical Storm Debby. Zonal magnitude differences in Debby's steering layer wind are identified as the source for generating the associated variability stretching. Further evaluation however, cannot relate these differences to one feature, suggesting multiple processes are in play in generating preferred direction variability.

  18. Perturbation of eigenvalues for systems with concentrated mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Hubert, Jacqueline

    1989-07-01

    Theoretical results are presented for the vibrations of a system which is formed by the domain of R exp N (for N of 2 and 3) and which converges to a uniform density and a point mass at the origin as the density-dependent parameter epsilon approaches 0. The present study extends previous two-dimensional results for the coupling between local vibrations near the origin and the global vibrations of the domain (Leal and Sanchez-Hubert, 1989) to the case of a simple eigenvalue which is common to both the N = 2 and N = 3 problems. For epsilon of greater than 0, the common eigenvalue for these problems is shown to be split into two branches of simple eigenvalues.

  19. Next generation of food allergen quantification using mass spectrometric systems.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Martina; Clarke, Dean; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-08-01

    Food allergies are increasing worldwide and becoming a public health concern. Food legislation requires detailed declarations of potential allergens in food products and therefore an increased capability to analyze for the presence of food allergens. Currently, antibody-based methods are mainly utilized to quantify allergens; however, these methods have several disadvantages. Recently, mass spectrometry (MS) techniques have been developed and applied to food allergen analysis. At present, 46 allergens from 11 different food sources have been characterized using different MS approaches and some specific signature peptides have been published. However, quantification of allergens using MS is not routinely employed. This review compares the different aspects of food allergen quantification using advanced MS techniques including multiple reaction monitoring. The latter provides low limits of quantification for multiple allergens in simple or complex food matrices, while being robust and reproducible. This review provides an overview of current approaches to analyze food allergens, with specific focus on MS systems and applications.

  20. Lumped mass formulations for modeling flexible body systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampalli, Rajiv

    1989-01-01

    The efforts of Mechanical Dynamics, Inc. in obtaining a general formulation for flexible bodies in a multibody setting are discussed. The efforts being supported by MDI, both in house and externally are summarized. The feasibility of using lumped mass approaches to modeling flexibility in a multibody dynamics context is examined. The kinematics and kinetics for a simple system consisting of two rigid bodies connected together by an elastic beam are developed in detail. Accuracy, efficiency and ease of use using this approach are some of the issues that are then looked at. The formulation is then generalized to a superelement containing several nodes and connecting several bodies. Superelement kinematics and kinetics equations are developed. The feasibility and effectiveness of the method is illustrated by the use of some examples illustrating phenomena common in the context of spacecraft motions.

  1. Temporal and sex-specific variability in Rhinoceros Auklet diet in the central California Current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carle, Ryan D.; Beck, Jessie N.; Calleri, David M.; Hester, Michelle M.

    2015-06-01

    We used stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C) and compared prey provided to chicks by each sex to evaluate seasonal and sex-specific diets in Rhinoceros Auklets (Cerorhinca monocerata) in the central California Current system during 2012-2013. Mixing models indicated northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax) were important prey for adults during fall/winter and juvenile rockfishes (Sebastes spp.) were important prey during incubation both years. Adult trophic level increased between incubation and chick-rearing periods in both years. During 2012, δ15N and δ13C of chick-rearing males and females differed significantly; mixing models indicated that females ate more Pacific saury (Cololabis saira) and less market squid (Doryteuthis opalescens) than males. Likewise, females delivered significantly more Pacific saury and less market squid to chicks than males during 2012. Chick growth (g d- 1) and chick survival to fledging were significantly lower during 2012 than 2013, likely because chicks were fed lesser quality prey or fed less frequently in 2012. Lesser body mass of females during incubation in 2012 indicated sex-specific diet differences may have been related to female energetic constraints. The observed variability in Rhinoceros Auklet diet underscores the importance of managing multiple prey populations in this system so that generalist predators have sufficient resources through changing conditions.

  2. The model adaptive space shrinkage (MASS) approach: a new method for simultaneous variable selection and outlier detection based on model population analysis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming; Deng, Bai-Chuan; Cao, Dong-Sheng; Yun, Yong-Huan; Yang, Rui-Han; Lu, Hong-Mei; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2016-10-07

    Variable selection and outlier detection are important processes in chemical modeling. Usually, they affect each other. Their performing orders also strongly affect the modeling results. Currently, many studies perform these processes separately and in different orders. In this study, we examined the interaction between outliers and variables and compared the modeling procedures performed with different orders of variable selection and outlier detection. Because the order of outlier detection and variable selection can affect the interpretation of the model, it is difficult to decide which order is preferable when the predictabilities (prediction error) of the different orders are relatively close. To address this problem, a simultaneous variable selection and outlier detection approach called Model Adaptive Space Shrinkage (MASS) was developed. This proposed approach is based on model population analysis (MPA). Through weighted binary matrix sampling (WBMS) from model space, a large number of partial least square (PLS) regression models were built, and the elite parts of the models were selected to statistically reassign the weight of each variable and sample. Then, the whole process was repeated until the weights of the variables and samples converged. Finally, MASS adaptively found a high performance model which consisted of the optimized variable subset and sample subset. The combination of these two subsets could be considered as the cleaned dataset used for chemical modeling. In the proposed approach, the problem of the order of variable selection and outlier detection is avoided. One near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) dataset and one quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) dataset were used to test this approach. The result demonstrated that MASS is a useful method for data cleaning before building a predictive model.

  3. An Increase in the Mass of Planetary Systems around Lower-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, Gijs D.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Dániel

    2015-12-01

    Trends in the planet population with host star mass provide an avenue to constrain planet formation theories. We derive the planet radius distribution function for Kepler stars of different spectral types, sampling a range in host star masses. We find that M dwarf stars have 3.5 times more small planets (1.0-2.8 R⨁) than main-sequence FGK stars, but two times fewer Neptune-sized and larger (>2.8 R⨁) planets. We find no systematic trend in the planet size distribution between spectral types F, G, and K to explain the increasing occurrence rates. Taking into account the mass-radius relationship and heavy-element mass of observed exoplanets, and assuming those are independent of spectral type, we derive the inventory of the heavy-element mass locked up in exoplanets at short orbits. The overall higher planet occurrence rates around M stars are not consistent with the redistribution of the same mass into more, smaller planets. At the orbital periods and planet radii where Kepler observations are complete for all spectral types, the average heavy-element mass locked up in exoplanets increases roughly inversely with stellar mass from 4 M⨁ in F stars to 5 M⨁ in G and K stars to 7 M⨁ in M stars. This trend stands in stark contrast with observed protoplanetary disk masses that decrease toward lower mass stars, and provides a challenge for current planet formation models. Neither models of in situ formation nor migration of fully formed planets are consistent with these results. Instead, these results are indicative of large-scale inward migration of planetary building blocks—either through type-I migration or radial drift of dust grains—that is more efficient for lower mass stars, but does not result in significantly larger or smaller planets.

  4. Diffusive limits of nonlinear hyperbolic systems with variable coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Masayoshi

    2016-09-01

    We consider the initial-boundary value problem for a 2-speed system of first-order nonhomogeneous semilinear hyperbolic equations whose leading terms have a small positive parameter. Using energy estimates and a compactness lemma, we show that the diffusion limit of the sum of the solutions of the hyperbolic system, as the parameter tends to zero, verifies the nonlinear parabolic equation of the p-Laplacian type.

  5. Transient Finite Element Computations on a Variable Transputer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolinski, Patrick J.; Lapczyk, Ireneusz

    1993-01-01

    A parallel program to analyze transient finite element problems was written and implemented on a system of transputer processors. The program uses the explicit time integration algorithm which eliminates the need for equation solving, making it more suitable for parallel computations. An interprocessor communication scheme was developed for arbitrary two dimensional grid processor configurations. Several 3-D problems were analyzed on a system with a small number of processors.

  6. Variability of pigment biomass in the California Current system as determined by satellite imagery. II - Temporal variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaelsen, Joel; Zhang, Xueyun; Smith, Raymond C.

    1988-01-01

    Characteristics of temporal variability in the California Current system are analyzed using a 30-month time series of CZCS imagery. About 20-25 percent of the variance is produced by a periodic annual cycle with peak values in winter. Analysis of ship-based chlorophyll measurements indicates that the winter peak is only characteristic of the upper portion of the euphotic zone and that total water column chlorophyll peaks during the spring upwelling season. Satellite studies of intraannual variability are modulated by strong 5- to 6-day oscillation in the availability of usable imagery, resulting from a combination of satellite orbital dynamics, which produces images of the study area roughly 4 out of every 6 days, and an oscillation in cloud cover, which controls the availability of clear imagery. The cloud cover oscillation, which is also present in coastal winds, undoubtedly affects the ocean surface and biases the data obtained by satellites. Analysis of data using a 5-day time step indicates that the predominant mode of nonseasonal variability is characterized by in-phase fluctuations throughout the southern and central California coastal region.

  7. Large-scale variability of wind erosion mass flux rates at Owens Lake 1. Vertical profiles of horizontal mass fluxes of wind-eroded particles with diameter greater than 50 μm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillette, Dale A.; Fryrear, D.W.; Xiao, Jing Bing; Stockton, Paul; Ono, Duane; Helm, Paula J.; Gill, Thomas E; Ley, Trevor

    1997-01-01

    A field experiment at Owens (dry) Lake, California, tested whether and how the relative profiles of airborne horizontal mass fluxes for >50-μm wind-eroded particles changed with friction velocity. The horizontal mass flux at almost all measured heights increased proportionally to the cube of friction velocity above an apparent threshold friction velocity for all sediment tested and increased with height except at one coarse-sand site where the relative horizontal mass flux profile did not change with friction velocity. Size distributions for long-time-averaged horizontal mass flux samples showed a saltation layer from the surface to a height between 30 and 50 cm, above which suspended particles dominate. Measurements from a large dust source area on a line parallel to the wind showed that even though the saltation flux reached equilibrium ∼650 m downwind of the starting point of erosion, weakly suspended particles were still input into the atmosphere 1567 m downwind of the starting point; thus the saltating fraction of the total mass flux decreased after 650 m. The scale length difference and ratio of 70/30 suspended mass flux to saltation mass flux at the farthest down wind sampling site confirm that suspended particles are very important for mass budgets in large source areas and that saltation mass flux can be a variable fraction of total horizontal mass flux for soils with a substantial fraction of <100-μm particles.

  8. [Design of hand-held heart rate variability acquisition and analysis system].

    PubMed

    Li, Kaiyuan; Wang, Buqing; Wang, Weidong

    2012-07-01

    A design of handheld heart rate variability acquisition and analysis system is proposed. The system collects and stores the patient's ECG every five minutes through both hands touching on the electrodes, and then -uploads data to a PC through USB port. The system uses software written in LabVIEW to analyze heart rate variability parameters, The parameters calculated function is programmed and generated to components in Matlab.

  9. AN INCREASE IN THE MASS OF PLANETARY SYSTEMS AROUND LOWER-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mulders, Gijs D.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Dániel

    2015-12-01

    Trends in the planet population with host star mass provide an avenue to constrain planet formation theories. We derive the planet radius distribution function for Kepler stars of different spectral types, sampling a range in host star masses. We find that M dwarf stars have 3.5 times more small planets (1.0–2.8 R{sub ⨁}) than main-sequence FGK stars, but two times fewer Neptune-sized and larger (>2.8 R{sub ⨁}) planets. We find no systematic trend in the planet size distribution between spectral types F, G, and K to explain the increasing occurrence rates. Taking into account the mass–radius relationship and heavy-element mass of observed exoplanets, and assuming those are independent of spectral type, we derive the inventory of the heavy-element mass locked up in exoplanets at short orbits. The overall higher planet occurrence rates around M stars are not consistent with the redistribution of the same mass into more, smaller planets. At the orbital periods and planet radii where Kepler observations are complete for all spectral types, the average heavy-element mass locked up in exoplanets increases roughly inversely with stellar mass from 4 M{sub ⨁} in F stars to 5 M{sub ⨁} in G and K stars to 7 M{sub ⨁} in M stars. This trend stands in stark contrast with observed protoplanetary disk masses that decrease toward lower mass stars, and provides a challenge for current planet formation models. Neither models of in situ formation nor migration of fully formed planets are consistent with these results. Instead, these results are indicative of large-scale inward migration of planetary building blocks—either through type-I migration or radial drift of dust grains—that is more efficient for lower mass stars, but does not result in significantly larger or smaller planets.

  10. Multiple and variable speed electrical generator systems for large wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, T. S.; Hughes, P. S.; Kirschbaum, H. S.; Mutone, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A cost effective method to achieve increased wind turbine generator energy conversion and other operational benefits through variable speed operation is presented. Earlier studies of multiple and variable speed generators in wind turbines were extended for evaluation in the context of a specific large sized conceptual design. System design and simulation have defined the costs and performance benefits which can be expected from both two speed and variable speed configurations.

  11. Entropy of hydrological systems under small samples: Uncertainty and variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dengfeng; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuankun; Wu, Jichun; Singh, Vijay P.; Zeng, Xiankui; Wang, Lachun; Chen, Yuanfang; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Liyuan; Gu, Shenghua

    2016-01-01

    Entropy theory has been increasingly applied in hydrology in both descriptive and inferential ways. However, little attention has been given to the small-sample condition widespread in hydrological practice, where either hydrological measurements are limited or are even nonexistent. Accordingly, entropy estimated under this condition may incur considerable bias. In this study, small-sample condition is considered and two innovative entropy estimators, the Chao-Shen (CS) estimator and the James-Stein-type shrinkage (JSS) estimator, are introduced. Simulation tests are conducted with common distributions in hydrology, that lead to the best-performing JSS estimator. Then, multi-scale moving entropy-based hydrological analyses (MM-EHA) are applied to indicate the changing patterns of uncertainty of streamflow data collected from the Yangtze River and the Yellow River, China. For further investigation into the intrinsic property of entropy applied in hydrological uncertainty analyses, correlations of entropy and other statistics at different time-scales are also calculated, which show connections between the concept of uncertainty and variability.

  12. Controlling Chaos of Hybrid Systems by Variable Threshold Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Daisuke; Ueta, Tetsushi; Kousaka, Takuji; Imura, Jun'ichi; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    We try to stabilize unstable periodic orbits embedded in a given chaotic hybrid dynamical system by a perturbation of a threshold value. In conventional chaos control methods, a control input is designed by state-feedback, which is proportional to the difference between the target orbit and the current state, and it is applied to a specific system parameter or the state as a small perturbation. During a transition state, the control system consumes a certain control energy given by the integration of such perturbations. In our method, we change the threshold value dynamically to control the chaotic orbit. Unlike the OGY method and the delayed feedback control, no actual control input is added into the system. The state-feedback is utilized only to determine the dynamic threshold value, thus the orbit starting from the current threshold value reaches the next controlled threshold value without any control energy. We obtain the variation of the threshold value from the composite Poincaré map, and the controller is designed by the linear feedback theory with this variation. We demonstrate this method in simple hybrid chaotic systems and show its control performances by evaluating basins of attraction.

  13. The development of variably compliant haptic systems using magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadkhanlou, Farzad; Washington, Gregory N.; Wang, Yingru; Bechtel, Stephen E.

    2005-05-01

    In this study the authors develop haptic systems for telerobotic surgery. In order to model the full range of tactile force exhibited from an MR damper a microstructural, kinetic theory-based model of Magnetorheological (MR) fluids has been developed. Microscale constitutive equations relating flow, stress, and particle orientation are produced. The model developed is fully vectorial and relationships between the stress tensor and the applied magnetic field vector are fully exploited. The higher accuracy of the model in this regard gives better force representations of highly compliant objects. This model is then applied in force feedback control of single degree of freedom (SDOF) and two degrees of freedom (2DOF) systems. Carbonyl iron powders with different particle sizes mixed with silicone oils with different viscosities are used to make several sample MR fluids. These MR fluid samples are then used in three different designed MR dampers. A State feedback control algorithm is employed to control a SDOF system and tracking a 2-D profile path using a special innovative MR force feedback joystick. The results indicate that the MR based force feedback dampers can be used as effective haptic devices. The systems designed and constructed in this paper can be extended to a three degree of freedom force feedback system appropriate for telerobotic surgery.

  14. Design of variable frequency endoscope ultrasonic digital imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya-nan; Bai, Bao-ping; Chen, Xiao-dong; Zhao, Qiang; Deng, Hao-ran; Wang, Yi; Yu, Dao-yin

    2013-12-01

    This paper presented a real-time endoscope ultrasonic digital imaging system, which was based on FPGA and applied for gastrointestinal examination. Four modules, scan-line data processing module, coordinate transformation and interpolation algorithm module, cache reading and writing control module and transmitting and receiving control module were included in this FPGA based system. Through adopting different frequency ultrasound probes in a single insertion of endoscope, the system showed a high speed data processing mechanism capable of achieving images with various display effects. A high-precision modified coordinate calibration CORDIC (HMCC-CORDIC) algorithm was employed to realize coordinate transformation and interpolation simultaneously, while the precision and reliability of the algorithm could be greatly improved through utilizing the pipeline structure based on temporal logic. Also, system real-time control by computer could be achieved through operating under the condition of USB2.0 interface. The corresponding experimental validations proved the feasibility and the correctness of the proper data processing mechanism, the HMCC-CORDIC algorithm and the USB real-time control. Finally, the specific experimental sample, a tissue mimicking phantom, was imaged in real-time (25 frames per second) by an endoscope ultrasonic imaging system with image size 1024×1024. The requirements for clinical examination could be well satisfied with the imaging parameters discussed above.

  15. Tuned mass damping system for a pendulum in gravity and microgravity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atour, Farah

    2016-07-01

    An electrodynamic tether is a simple idea, but one with an amazing number of uses. Electrodynamic tether is a long conductor wire that is attached to the satellite, which can act as a generator or motor, from its motion through the earth's magnetic field. And it has the potential to make space travel significantly cheaper. The lack of electrodynamic tether's widespread in common applications can be attributed to the variable Lorentz forces occuring on the tethers, which will cause them to oscillate and may go out of control, de-orbit the satellite and fall to Earth. A tuned mass damper system, for short refered as tilger, is suggested as damper of oscillations of tethers. A system composed of a tuned mass damper and a simple pendulum simulating the tether was therefore constructed. 350 sets of experimental trials were done on the system, while it was installed inside a drop tower capsule resting on the ground, in order to pick four optimum setup experiments that will undergo a series of microgravity experiments at the Bremen Drop Tower in Bremen, Germany. The GJU Bachelor Research students found that the oscillations of the simple pendulum will not be affected by the tilger during the free fall experiment, except if a feedback mechanism is installed between the simple pendulum and the tilger. In this case, the tilger will dampen the simple pendulum oscillations during free fall.

  16. Gerotor and bearing system for whirling mass orbital vibrator

    DOEpatents

    Brett, James Ford; Westermark, Robert Victor; Turner, Jr., Joey Earl; Lovin, Samuel Scott; Cole, Jack Howard; Myers, Will

    2007-02-27

    A gerotor and bearing apparatus for a whirling mass orbital vibrator which generates vibration in a borehole. The apparatus includes a gerotor with an inner gear rotated by a shaft having one less lobe than an outer gear. A whirling mass is attached to the shaft. At least one bearing is attached to the shaft so that the bearing engages at least one sleeve. A mechanism is provided to rotate the inner gear, the mass and the bearing in a selected rotational direction in order to cause the mass, the inner gear, and the bearing to backwards whirl in an opposite rotational direction. The backwards whirling mass creates seismic vibrations.

  17. Universal Dichotomy for Dynamical Systems with Variable Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Andreas; Müller, David; Radons, Günter

    2017-01-01

    We show that the dynamics of systems with a time-dependent delay is fundamentally affected by the functional form of the retarded argument. Associating with the latter an iterated map, the access map, and a corresponding Koopman operator, we identify two universality classes. Members in the first are equivalent to systems with a constant delay. The new, second class is characterized by the mode-locking behavior of their access maps and by an asymptotically linear, instead of a logarithmic, scaling of the Lyapunov spectrum. The membership depends in a fractal manner only on the parameters of the delay.

  18. Instability of mass transfer in a planet-star system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shi; Spruit, H. C.

    2017-02-01

    We show that the angular momentum exchange mechanism governing the evolution of mass-transferring binary stars does not apply to Roche lobe filling planets, because most of the angular momentum of the mass-transferring stream is absorbed by the host star. Apart from a correction for the difference in specific angular momentum of the stream and the centre of mass of the planet, the orbit does not expand much on Roche lobe overflow. We explore the conditions for dynamically unstable Roche lobe overflow as a function of planetary mass and mass and radius (age) of host star and equation of state of planet. For a Sun-like host, gas giant planets in a range of mass and entropy can undergo dynamical mass transfer. Examples of the evolution of the mass transfer process are given. Dynamic mass transfer of rocky planets depends somewhat sensitively on equation of state used. Silicate planets in the range 1 < Mp < 10 M⊕ typically go through a phase of dynamical mass transfer before settling to slow overflow when their mass drops to less than 1 M⊕.

  19. A method of variable spacing for controlled plant growth systems in spaceflight and terrestrial agriculture applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, J.

    1986-01-01

    A higher plant growth system for Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) applications is described. The system permits independent movement of individual plants during growth. Enclosed within variable geometry growth chambers, the system allocates only the volume required by the growing plants. This variable spacing system maintains isolation between root and shoot environments, providing individual control for optimal growth. The advantages of the system for hydroponic and aeroponic growth chambers are discussed. Two applications are presented: (1) the growth of soybeans in a space station common module, and (2) in a terrestrial city greenhouse.

  20. Variable configuration fiber optic laser doppler vibrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada-Roman, Julio E.; Jackson, David A.; Garcia-Souto, Jose A.

    2016-06-01

    A multichannel heterodyne fiber optic vibrometer is demonstrated which can be operated at ranges in excess of 50 m. The system is designed to measure periodic signals, impacts, rotation, 3D strain, and vibration mapping. The displacement resolution of each channel exceeds 1 nm. The outputs from all channels are simultaneous, and the number of channels can be increased by using optical switches.

  1. Cold Mass Support System for he D0 Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, B.; /Fermilab

    1993-08-09

    The support system is designed to support the gravitational, magnetic, and thermal contraction loads associated with the cold mass weighing 1.46 metric tons (3210 Ibm). The loading constraints are listed in Table 1. The support system consists of axial members (axial supports) to provide longitudinal stiffness and nearly tangential members (radial supports) to provide radial stiffness. The members connect the outer support cylinder to the flat annular bulkheads of the vacuum vessel. See Figures 1 through 3 for additional details on the supports. Six axial compression-tension supports are located on the chimney end of the cryostat only. Six radial tension supports are located on each end. Both types of members are fabricated of Inconel 718 and have a design safety factor of 4 on the ultimate strength at 300 K. The axial supports are also designed for a buckling safety factor of 4 for the operating loads. Shipping stops will be installed to prevent the axial supports from going into compression during transportation. Axial and radial contraction of the coil support cylinder is accommodated by spherical bearings on both ends ofeach support member.

  2. Healthy Life Style Behaviors of University Students of School of Physical Education and Sports in Terms of Body Mass Index and Other Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozlar, Volkan; Arslanoglu, Cansel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors of students in the Schools of Physical Education and Sport (SPES) utilizing Body Mass Index (BMI) and other various variables. The study is composed of 1,695 students studying in SPES, in 14 different universities across Turkey. It is made up of 1,067 male and 624 female students.…

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF VARIABLE ELIMINATION RATE AND BODY FAT MASS IN A PBPK MODEL FOR TCDD IN PREDICTING THE SERUM TCDD CONCENTRATIONS FROM VETERANS OF OPERATION RANCH HAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Influence of Variable Elimination Rate and Body Fat Mass in a PBPK Model for TCDD in Predicting the Serum TCDD Concentrations from Veterans of Operation Ranch Hand.
    C Emond1,2, LS Birnbaum2, JE Michalek3, MJ DeVito2
    1 National Research Council, National Academy of Scien...

  4. Climate variability and Dinophysis acuta blooms in an upwelling system.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Patricio A; Ruiz-Villarreal, Manuel; Pazos, Yolanda; Moita, Teresa; Reguera, Beatriz

    2016-03-01

    Dinophysis acuta is a frequent seasonal lipophilic toxin producer in European Atlantic coastal waters associated with thermal stratification. In the Galician Rías, populations of D. acuta with their epicentre located off Aveiro (northern Portugal), typically co-occur with and follow those of Dinophysis acuminata during the upwelling transition (early autumn) as a result of longshore transport. During hotter than average summers, D. acuta blooms also occur in August in the Rías, when they replace D. acuminata. Here we examined a 30-year (1985-2014) time series of D. acuta from samples collected by the same method in the Galician Rías. Our main objective was to identify patterns of distribution and their relation with climate variability, and to explain the exceptional summer blooms of D. acuta in 1989-1990. A dome-shaped relationship was found between summer upwelling intensity and D. acuta blooms; cell maxima were associated with conditions where the balance between upwelling intensity and heating, leading to deepened thermoclines, combined with tidal phase (3 days after neap tides) created windows of opportunity for this species. The application of a generalized additive model based on biological (D. acuta inoculum) and environmental predictors (Cumulative June-August upwelling CUIJJA, average June-August SSTJJA and tidal range) explained more than 70% of the deviance for the exceptional summer blooms of D. acuta, through a combination of moderate (35,000-50,000m(3)s(-1)km(-1)) summer upwelling (CUIJJA), thermal stratification (SSTJJA>17°C) and moderate tidal range (∼2.5m), provided D. acuta cells (inoculum) were present in July. There was no evidence of increasing trends in D. acuta bloom frequency/intensity nor a clear relationship with NAO or other long-term climatic cycles. Instead, the exceptional summer blooms of 1989-1990 appeared linked to extreme hydroclimatic anomalies (high positive anomalies in SST and NAO index), which affected most of the

  5. Deep ocean mass fluxes in the coastal upwelling off Mauritania from 1988 to 2012: variability on seasonal to decadal timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, G.; Romero, O.; Merkel, U.; Donner, B.; Iversen, M.; Nowald, N.; Ratmeyer, V.; Ruhland, G.; Klann, M.; Wefer, G.

    2015-11-01

    A more than two-decadal sediment trap record from the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Ecosystem (EBUE) off Cape Blanc, Mauritania, is analyzed with respect to deep ocean mass fluxes, flux components and their variability on seasonal to decadal timescales. The total mass flux revealed interannual fluctuations which were superimposed by fluctuations on decadal timescales possibly linked to the Atlantic Multidedadal Oscillation (AMO). High winter fluxes of biogenic silica (BSi), used as a measure of marine production mostly by diatoms largely correspond to a positive North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index during boreal winter (December-March). However, this relationship is weak. The highest positive BSi anomaly was in winter 2004-2005 when the NAO was in a neutral state. More episodic BSi sedimentation events occurred in several summer seasons between 2001 and 2005, when the previous winter NAO was neutral or even negative. We suggest that distinct dust outbreaks and deposition in the surface ocean in winter but also in summer/fall enhanced particle sedimentation and carbon export on rather short timescales via the ballasting effect, thus leading to these episodic sedimentation events. Episodic perturbations of the marine carbon cycle by dust outbreaks (e.g. in 2005) weakened the relationships between fluxes and larger scale climatic oscillations. As phytoplankton biomass is high throughout the year in our study area, any dry (in winter) or wet (in summer) deposition of fine-grained dust particles is assumed to enhance the efficiency of the biological pump by being incorporated into dense and fast settling organic-rich aggregates. A good correspondence between BSi and dust fluxes was observed for the dusty year 2005, following a period of rather dry conditions in the Sahara/Sahel region. Large changes of all fluxes occurred during the strongest El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in 1997-1999 where low fluxes were obtained for almost one year during the warm El Niño and

  6. Deep ocean mass fluxes in the coastal upwelling off Mauritania from 1988 to 2012: variability on seasonal to decadal timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Gerhard; Romero, Oscar; Merkel, Ute; Donner, Barbara; Iversen, Morten; Nowald, Nico; Ratmeyer, Volker; Ruhland, Götz; Klann, Marco; Wefer, Gerold

    2016-05-01

    A more than two-decadal sediment trap record from the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Ecosystem (EBUE) off Cape Blanc, Mauritania, is analysed with respect to deep ocean mass fluxes, flux components and their variability on seasonal to decadal timescales. The total mass flux revealed interannual fluctuations which were superimposed by fluctuations on decadal timescales. High winter fluxes of biogenic silica (BSi), used as a measure of marine production (mostly by diatoms) largely correspond to a positive North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index (December-March). However, this relationship is weak. The highest positive BSi anomaly was in winter 2004-2005 when the NAO was in a neutral state. More episodic BSi sedimentation events occurred in several summer seasons between 2001 and 2005, when the previous winter NAO was neutral or even negative. We suggest that distinct dust outbreaks and deposition in the surface ocean in winter and occasionally in summer/autumn enhanced particle sedimentation and carbon export on short timescales via the ballasting effect. Episodic perturbations of the marine carbon cycle by dust outbreaks (e.g. in 2005) might have weakened the relationships between fluxes and large-scale climatic oscillations. As phytoplankton biomass is high throughout the year, any dry (in winter) or wet (in summer) deposition of fine-grained dust particles is assumed to enhance the efficiency of the biological pump by incorporating dust into dense and fast settling organic-rich aggregates. A good correspondence between BSi and dust fluxes was observed for the dusty year 2005, following a period of rather dry conditions in the Sahara/Sahel region. Large changes of all bulk fluxes occurred during the strongest El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in 1997-1999 where low fluxes were obtained for almost 1 year during the warm El Niño and high fluxes in the following cold La Niña phase. For decadal timescales, Bakun (1990) suggested an intensification of coastal upwelling

  7. Use of sunlight for plant lighting in a bioregenerative life support system Equivalent system mass calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drysdale, Alan; Nakamura, Takashi; Yorio, Neil; Sager, John; Wheeler, Ray

    2008-12-01

    Plant lighting is a critical issue for cost effectiveness of bioregenerative systems. A plant lighting system using sunlight has been investigated and compared to systems using electrical lighting. Co-generation of electricity and use of in situ resource utilization (ISRU) were also considered. The fixed part of equivalent system mass was found to be reduced by factors of from 3.1 to 3.9, according to the mission assumptions. The time-dependent part of equivalent system mass was reduced by a smaller value, of about 1.05. Cost effectiveness of bioregeneration has been compared to the cost of shipping food. Break-even times for different Lunar and Mars missions were generally in the order of 2-10 years, and were quite sensitive to the assumptions. There is significant scope for future refinement of these values, and work is ongoing.

  8. The Validity of Individual Rorschach Variables: Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses of the Comprehensive System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihura, Joni L.; Meyer, Gregory J.; Dumitrascu, Nicolae; Bombel, George

    2013-01-01

    We systematically evaluated the peer-reviewed Rorschach validity literature for the 65 main variables in the popular Comprehensive System (CS). Across 53 meta-analyses examining variables against externally assessed criteria (e.g., observer ratings, psychiatric diagnosis), the mean validity was r = 0.27 (k = 770) as compared to r = 0.08 (k = 386)…

  9. Synchronicity of Kuroshio Current and climate system variability since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xufeng; Li, Anchun; Kao, ShuhJi; Gong, Xun; Frank, Martin; Kuhn, Gerhard; Cai, Wenju; Yan, Hong; Wan, Shiming; Zhang, Honghai; Jiang, Fuqing; Hathorne, Edmund; Chen, Zhong; Hu, Bangqi

    2016-10-01

    The Kuroshio Current (KC) is the northward branch of the North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPG) and exerts influence on the exchange of physical, chemical, and biological properties of downstream regions in the Pacific Ocean. Resolving long-term changes in the flow of the KC water masses is, therefore, crucial for advancing our understanding of the Pacific's role in global ocean and climate variability. Here, we reconstruct changes in KC dynamics over the past 20 ka based on grain-size spectra, clay mineral, and Sr-Nd isotope constraints of sediments from the northern Okinawa Trough. Combined with published sediment records surrounding the NPG, we suggest that the KC remained in the Okinawa Trough throughout the Last Glacial Maximum. Together with Earth-System-Model simulations, our results additionally indicate that KC intensified considerably during the early Holocene (EH). The synchronous establishment of the KC ;water barrier; and the modern circulation pattern during the EH highstand shaped the sediment transport patterns. This is ascribed to the precession-induced increase in the occurrence of La Niña-like state and the strength of the East Asian summer monsoon. The synchronicity of the shifts in the intensity of the KC, Kuroshio extension, and El Niño/La Niña-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability may further indicate that the western branch of the NPG has been subject to basin-scale changes in wind stress curl over the North Pacific in response to low-latitude insolation. Superimposed on this long-term trend are high-amplitude, large century, and millennial-scale variations during last 5 ka, which are ascribed to the advent of modern ENSO when the equatorial oceans experienced stronger insolation during the boreal winter.

  10. The distribution of mass and angular momentum in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Marochnik, L.S.; Mukhin, L.M.; Sagdeev, R.Z. )

    1989-01-01

    This book describes the contribution of the comets in the Oort cloud to the angular momentum of the solar system. Topics covered include: Nuclear mass of the new comets observed, Mass of the Oort cloud, Mass distribution in the solar system, Zone of comet formation, Angular momentum of the Oort cloud, and Angular momentum of the Hills cloud.

  11. System albedo as sensed by satellites - Its definition and variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, N. A.; Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1982-01-01

    System albedo, an important climatological and environmental parameter, is considered. Some of the problems and assumptions involved in evaluating albedo from satellite data are discussed. Clear-sky and cloud albedos over the United Kingdom and parts of northwest Europe are treated. Consideration is given to the spectral, temporal, and spatial variations and the effect of averaging. The implications of these results for those using and archiving albedo values and for future monitoring of system albedo are discussed. Normalization is of especial importance since this correction alters many albedo values. The pronounced difference in spectral albedo of the two visible channels reemphasizes the problem of attempting to calculate integrated albedo values from meteorological satellite data. The assumption of isotropic reflection is seen to be invalid, hindering the computation of accurate albedo values.

  12. High Temperature VSCF (Variable Speed Constant Frequency) Generator System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    be’ing developed to reduce size and weight on all production programs. Monsanto OS-124 oil properties were used for heat transfer and fluid flow...is an important design consideration for higher temperature operation. Use of a lower expansion and stronger composite material such as cast AZ91 mg...systems were investigated. Figures 5 through 7 give a comparison of the tensile properties of composites with the properties of an unreinforced alloy. It

  13. Self-Calibrating, Variable-Flow Pumping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, Joe T.

    1994-01-01

    Pumping system provides accurate, controlled flows of two chemical liquids mixed in spray head and react to form rigid or flexible polyurethane or polyisocyanurate foam. Compatible with currently used polyurethane-based coating materials and gas-bubble-forming agents (called "blowing agents" in industry) and expected to be compatible with materials that used in near future. Handles environmentally acceptable substitutes for chlorofluorocarbon foaming agents.

  14. Fan Electricity Consumption for Variable-Air-Volume Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Be Reduced in Air Handling Systems," .- Specifying Engineer (March 1981); R. Haines, "Fan Energy - P vs. PI Control ," Heating - Piping - Air...much higher humidity. Minneapolis has the highest heating requirements of all sites studied. 1.0 i. - P CONTROL OF ACINV PI CONTROL OF ACINV...load performance data. 15115 :. .- ’-- .... . .. .... .. .. ....---.- .-.-. -. .’"o , 1.0 I I I I - P CONTROL OF ACINV,- PI CONTROL OF ACINV 0.8

  15. Application of Lattice Boltzmann Methods in Complex Mass Transfer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ning

    Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is a novel computational fluid dynamics method that can easily handle complex and dynamic boundaries, couple local or interfacial interactions/reactions, and be easily parallelized allowing for simulation of large systems. While most of the current studies in LBM mainly focus on fluid dynamics, however, the inherent power of this method makes it an ideal candidate for the study of mass transfer systems involving complex/dynamic microstructures and local reactions. In this thesis, LBM is introduced to be an alternative computational method for the study of electrochemical energy storage systems (Li-ion batteries (LIBs) and electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs)) and transdermal drug design on mesoscopic scale. Based on traditional LBM, the following in-depth studies have been carried out: (1) For EDLCs, the simulation of diffuse charge dynamics is carried out for both the charge and the discharge processes on 2D systems of complex random electrode geometries (pure random, random spheres and random fibers). Steric effect of concentrated solutions is considered by using modified Poisson-Nernst-Plank (MPNP) equations and compared with regular Poisson-Nernst-Plank (PNP) systems. The effects of electrode microstructures (electrode density, electrode filler morphology, filler size, etc.) on the net charge distribution and charge/discharge time are studied in detail. The influence of applied potential during discharging process is also discussed. (2) For the study of dendrite formation on the anode of LIBs, it is shown that the Lattice Boltzmann model can capture all the experimentally observed features of microstructure evolution at the anode, from smooth to mossy to dendritic. The mechanism of dendrite formation process in mesoscopic scale is discussed in detail and compared with the traditional Sand's time theories. It shows that dendrite formation is closely related to the inhomogeneous reactively at the electrode-electrolyte interface

  16. Automatically Finding the Control Variables for Complex System Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gay, Gregory; Menzies, Tim; Davies, Misty; Gundy-Burlet, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Testing large-scale systems is expensive in terms of both time and money. Running simulations early in the process is a proven method of finding the design faults likely to lead to critical system failures, but determining the exact cause of those errors is still time-consuming and requires access to a limited number of domain experts. It is desirable to find an automated method that explores the large number of combinations and is able to isolate likely fault points. Treatment learning is a subset of minimal contrast-set learning that, rather than classifying data into distinct categories, focuses on finding the unique factors that lead to a particular classification. That is, they find the smallest change to the data that causes the largest change in the class distribution. These treatments, when imposed, are able to identify the factors most likely to cause a mission-critical failure. The goal of this research is to comparatively assess treatment learning against state-of-the-art numerical optimization techniques. To achieve this, this paper benchmarks the TAR3 and TAR4.1 treatment learners against optimization techniques across three complex systems, including two projects from the Robust Software Engineering (RSE) group within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center. The results clearly show that treatment learning is both faster and more accurate than traditional optimization methods.

  17. Holocene Sea Surface and Subsurface Water Mass Variability Reconstructed from Temperature and Sea-ice Proxies in Fram Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Kirstin; Spielhagen, Robert F.; Müller, Juliane; Husum, Katrine; Kandiano, Evgenia S.; Polyak, Leonid

    2016-04-01

    In two high-resolution sediment cores from the West Spitsbergen continental margin we investigated planktic foraminiferal, biomarker and dinocyst proxy data in order to reconstruct surface and subsurface water mass variability during the Holocene. The two study sites are today influenced by northward flowing warm and saline Atlantic Water. Both foraminiferal and dinocyst (de Vernal et al., 2013) temperature reconstructions indicate a less-stratified, ice-free, nutrient-rich summer surface ocean with strong Atlantic Water advection between 10.6 and 8.5 cal ka BP, likely related to maximum July insolation during the early Holocene. Sea surface to subsurface water temperatures of up to 6°C prevailed until ca 5 cal ka BP. A weakened contribution of Atlantic Water is found when subsurface temperatures strongly decreased with minimum values between ca 4 and 3 cal ka BP. High planktic foraminifer shell fragmentation and increased oxygen isotope values of the subpolar planktic foraminifer species Turborotalita quinqueloba as well as increasing concentrations of the sea ice biomarker IP25 further indicate cool conditions. Indices associated with IP25 as well as dinocyst data suggest a sustained cooling and consequently sea-ice increase during the late Holocene. However, planktic foraminiferal data indicate a slight return of stronger subsurface influx of Atlantic Water since ca 3 cal ka BP. The observed decoupling of cooling surface and warming subsurface waters during the later Holocene might be attributed to a strong pycnocline layer separating cold sea-ice fed surface waters from enhanced subsurface Atlantic Water advection. Reference: de Vernal, A., Hillaire-Marcel, C., Rochon, A., Fréchette, B., Henry, M., Solignac, S., Bonnet, S., 2013. Dinocyst-based reconstructions of sea ice cover concentration during the Holocene in the Arctic Ocean, the northern North Atlantic Ocean and its adjacent seas. Quaternary Science Reviews 79, 111-121.

  18. A new method for observing the running states of a single-variable nonlinear system.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu; Chen, Hong; Chen, Cheng

    2015-03-01

    In order to timely grasp a single variable nonlinear system running states, a new method called Scatter Point method is put forward in this paper. It can be used to observe or monitor the running states of a single variable nonlinear system in real-time. In this paper, the definition of the method is given at first, and then its working principle is expounded theoretically, after this, some physical experiments based on Chua's nonlinear system are conducted. At the same time, many scatter point graphs are measured by a general analog oscilloscope. The motion, number, and distribution of these scatter points shown on the oscilloscope screen can directly reflect the current states of the tested system. The experimental results further confirm that the method is effective and practical, in which the system running states are not easily lost. In addition, this method is not only suitable for single variable systems but also for multivariable systems.

  19. Statistical measures of complexity for quantum systems with continuous variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzano, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Fisher-Shannon statistical measure of complexity is analyzed for a continuous manifold of quantum observables. It is shown that evaluating this measure only in the configuration or in the momentum spaces does not provide an adequate characterization of the complexity of some quantum systems. In order to obtain a more complete description of complexity two new measures, respectively based on the minimization and the integration of the usual Fisher-Shannon measure over all the parameter space, are proposed and compared. Finally, these measures are applied to the concrete case of a free particle in a box.

  20. Time-Variable Phenomena in the Jovian System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belton, Michael J. S. (Editor); West, Robert A. (Editor); Rahe, Jurgen (Editor); Pereyda, Margarita

    1989-01-01

    The current state of knowledge of dynamic processes in the Jovian system is assessed and summaries are provided of both theoretical and observational foundations upon which future research might be based. There are three sections: satellite phenomena and rings; magnetospheric phenomena, Io's torus, and aurorae; and atmospheric phenomena. Each chapter discusses time dependent theoretical framework for understanding and interpreting what is observed; others describe the evidence and nature of observed changes or their absence. A few chapters provide historical perspective and attempt to present a comprehensive synthesis of the current state of knowledge.

  1. Embedded computer controlled premixing inline injection system for air-assisted variable-rate sprayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvements to reduce chemical waste and environmental pollution for variable-rate sprayers used in orchards and ornamental nurseries require inline injection techniques. A microprocessor controlled premixing inline injection system implementing a ceramic piston chemical metering pump and two small...

  2. Multi-interferometric displacement measurement system with variable measurement mirrors.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Ping; Tung, Pi-Cheng; Shyu, Lih-Horng; Wang, Yung-Cheng; Manske, Eberhard

    2013-06-10

    Laser interferometers have been widely implemented for the displacement sensing and positioning calibration of the precision mechanical industry, due to their excellent measuring features and direct traceability to the dimensional definition. Currently some kinds of modified Fabry-Perot interferometers with a planar mirror or a corner cube prism as the measurement mirror have been proposed. Each optical structure of both models has the individual particularity and performance for measuring applications. In this investigation, a multi-interferometric displacement system has been proposed whose measurement mirror can be quickly and conveniently altered with a planar mirror or a corner cube reflector depending on the measuring demand. Some experimental results and analyses about the interpolation error and displacement measurements with both reflectors have been demonstrated. According to the results, suggestions about the choice of a measuring reflector and interpolation model have been presented. With the measuring verifications, the developed system with a maximum standard deviation less than 0.2081 μm in measuring range of 300 mm would be a compact and robust tool for sensing or calibrating the linear displacement of mechanical equipment.

  3. Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

    2013-09-17

    System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

  4. Drive system for the retraction/extension of variable diameter rotor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gmirya, Yuriy (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A drive system for a variable diameter rotor (VDR) system includes a plurality of rotor blade assemblies with inner and outer rotor blade segments. The outer blade segment being telescopically mounted to the inner blade segment. The VDR retraction/extension system includes a drive housing mounted at the root of each blade. The housing supports a spool assembly, a harmonic gear set and an electric motor. The spool assembly includes a pair of counter rotating spools each of which drive a respective cable which extends through the interior of the inboard rotor blade section and around a pulley mounted to the outboard rotor blade section. In operation, the electric motor drives the harmonic gear set which rotates the counter rotating spools. Rotation of the spools causes the cables to be wound onto or off their respective spool consequently effecting retraction/extension of the pulley and the attached outboard rotor blade section relative the inboard rotor blade section. As each blade drive system is independently driven by a separate electrical motor, each independent VDR blade assembly is independently positionable.

  5. Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Randy Peden; Sanjiv Shah

    2005-07-26

    This report describes complete results of the project entitled ''Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System''. This demonstration project was initiated in July 2003 and completed in March 2005. The objective of the project was to develop an integrated power production/variable frequency drive system that could easily be deployed in the oil field that would increase production and decrease operating costs. This report describes all the activities occurred and documents results of the demonstration.

  6. Mass, Density, and Formation Constraints in the Compact, Sub-Earth Kepler-444 System including Two Mars-mass Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Sean M.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2017-03-01

    Kepler-444 is a five-planet system around a host star approximately 11 billion years old. The five transiting planets all have sub-Earth radii and are in a compact configuration with orbital periods between 3 and 10 days. Here, we present a transit-timing analysis of the system using the full Kepler data set in order to determine the masses of the planets. Two planets, Kepler-444 d ({M}{{d}}={0.036}-0.020+0.065 {M}\\oplus ) and Kepler-444 e ({M}{{e}}={0.034}-0.019+0.059 {M}\\oplus ), have confidently detected masses due to their proximity to resonance that creates transit-timing variations. The mass ratio of these planets combined with the magnitude of possible star–planet tidal effects suggests that smooth disk migration over a significant distance is unlikely to have brought the system to its currently observed orbital architecture without significant post-formation perturbations.

  7. Variable stroke, electronically controlled fuel injection control system

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, C.G.

    1987-02-17

    A fuel injection control system is described comprising an internal combustion engine having a crankshaft, a fuel supply, a spill valve in fluid communication with the fuel supply, a fuel injection nozzle, a fuel pump comprising a piston and cylinder, the cylinder in fluid communication with the fuel injection nozzle and the spill valve, means for actuating the fuel pump piston comprises means for actuating the fuel pump piston to achieve a constant velocity relative to angular rotation of the crankshaft for the piston during the delivery portion of the pumpstroke during the travel of the piston in the cylinder, means for closing the spill valve when the piston, during the delivery portion of the pumpstroke, reaches a first predetermined position in the fuel pump cylinder and opening the spill valve when the piston, during the delivery portion, reaches a second predetermined position in the fuel pump cylinder.

  8. System for throttling and compensation for variable feedstock properties

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, J. W.

    1981-05-05

    Apparatus is shown for adjusting the feed rate of pulverized feed material into a pressurized container. The apparatus also has utility for compensating for variations in the permeability of the feed material. A rotor that includes sprues with provision for controlling the pressure distribution along the sprues is located within the pressurized container. The rotor hub is connected to a drive means and a material supply means which extend through the wall of the container. A line for controlling pressure along the sprues by gas injection is connected to a chamber between sections of the sprue for controlling gas pressure at that point. The gas pressure control line is connected to a pressurized gas source and a control system external to the rotor. 10 figs.

  9. System for throttling and compensation for variable feedstock properties

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, John W.

    1981-01-01

    Apparatus is shown for adjusting the feed rate of pulverized feed material into a pressurized container. The apparatus also has utility for compensating for variations in the permeability of the feed material. A rotor that includes sprues with provision for controlling the pressure distribution along the sprues is located within the pressurized container. The rotor hub is connected to a drive means and a material supply means which extend through the wall of the container. A line for controlling pressure along the sprues by gas injection is connected to a chamber between sections of the sprue for controlling gas pressure at that point. The gas pressure control line is connected to a pressurized gas source and a control system external to the rotor.

  10. Short-term variability and mass loss in Be stars. II. Physical taxonomy of photometric variability observed by the Kepler spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivinius, Th.; Baade, D.; Carciofi, A. C.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Classical Be stars have been established as pulsating stars. Space-based photometric monitoring missions contributed significantly to that result. However, whether Be stars are just rapidly rotating SPB or β Cep stars, or whether they have to be understood differently, remains debated in the view of their highly complex power spectra. Aims: Kepler data of three known Be stars are re-visited to establish their pulsational nature and assess the properties of additional, non-pulsational variations. The three program stars turned out to be one inactive Be star, one active, continuously outbursting Be star, and one Be star transiting from a non-outbursting into an outbursting phase, thus forming an excellent sample to distill properties of Be stars in the various phases of their life-cycle. Methods: The Kepler data was first cleaned from any long-term variability with Lomb-Scargle based pre-whitening. Then a Lomb-Scargle analysis of the remaining short-term variations was compared to a wavelet analysis of the cleaned data. This offers a new view on the variability, as it enables us to see the temporal evolution of the variability and phase relations between supposed beating phenomena, which are typically not visualized in a Lomb-Scargle analysis. Results: The short-term photometric variability of Be stars must be disentangled into a stellar and a circumstellar part. The stellar part is on the whole not different from what is seen in non-Be stars. However, some of the observed phenomena might be to be due to resonant mode coupling, a mechanism not typically considered for B-type stars. Short-term circumstellar variability comes in the form of either a group of relatively well-defined, short-lived frequencies during outbursts, which are called Štefl frequencies, and broad bumps in the power spectra, indicating aperiodic variability on a time scale similar to typical low-order g-mode pulsation frequencies, rather than true periodicity. Conclusions: From a

  11. Variability of African Farming Systems from Phenological Analysis of NDVI Time Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrieling, Anton; deBeurs, K. M.; Brown, Molly E.

    2011-01-01

    Food security exists when people have access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food at all times to meet their dietary needs. The natural resource base is one of the many factors affecting food security. Its variability and decline creates problems for local food production. In this study we characterize for sub-Saharan Africa vegetation phenology and assess variability and trends of phenological indicators based on NDVI time series from 1982 to 2006. We focus on cumulated NDVI over the season (cumNDVI) which is a proxy for net primary productivity. Results are aggregated at the level of major farming systems, while determining also spatial variability within farming systems. High temporal variability of cumNDVI occurs in semiarid and subhumid regions. The results show a large area of positive cumNDVI trends between Senegal and South Sudan. These correspond to positive CRU rainfall trends found and relate to recovery after the 1980's droughts. We find significant negative cumNDVI trends near the south-coast of West Africa (Guinea coast) and in Tanzania. For each farming system, causes of change and variability are discussed based on available literature (Appendix A). Although food security comprises more than the local natural resource base, our results can perform an input for food security analysis by identifying zones of high variability or downward trends. Farming systems are found to be a useful level of analysis. Diversity and trends found within farming system boundaries underline that farming systems are dynamic.

  12. Variable cycle stirling engine and gas leakage control system therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Otters, J.

    1984-12-25

    An improved thermal engine of the type having a displacer body movable between the hot end and the cold end of a chamber for subjecting a fluid within that chamber to a thermodynamic cycle and having a work piston driven by the fluid for deriving a useful work output. The work piston pumps a hydraulic fluid and a hydraulic control valve is connected in line with the hydraulic output conduit such that the flow of hydraulic fluid may be restricted to any desired degree or stopped altogether. The work piston can therefore be controlled by means of a controller device independently from the movement of the displacer such that a variety of engine cycles can be obtained for optimum engine efficiency under varying load conditions. While a Stirling engine cycle is particularly contemplated, other engine cycles may be obtained by controlling the movement of the displacer and work pistons. Also disclosed are a working gas recovery system for controlling leakage of working gas from the displacer chamber, and a compound work piston arrangement for preventing leakage of hydraulic fluid around the work piston into the displacer chamber.

  13. Mass Deacidification Systems: Planning and Managerial Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turko, Karen

    Library administrators, faced with the problems of acid-paper deterioration, are examining mass deacidification procedures. Mass deacidification of acidic books while they are still physically sound and not yet brittle is the most cost-effective corrective action to extend the life of the paper. There are currently at least five mass…

  14. First-order analysis of zoom system based on variable focal power lens.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hongtao; Liu, Hang; Li, Hengyu

    2015-05-04

    We present our analysis of a zoom system based on the variable focal power lens, and we demonstrate how our analysis can be used in zoom system design. The transverse magnification is considered as an independent first-order optics control parameter in the zoom system. The zoom system equations are established through the use of matrix optics. Formulas related to the zoom principles and performance of such optical systems are derived, and numerical and theoretical values are compared using examples.

  15. Implementing RFID technology in a novel triage system during a simulated mass casualty situation.

    PubMed

    Jokela, Jorma; Simons, Tomi; Kuronen, Pentti; Tammela, Juha; Jalasvirta, Pertti; Nurmi, Jouni; Harkke, Ville; Castrén, Maaret

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the applicability of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology and commercial cellular networks to provide an online triage system for handling mass casualty situations. This was tested by a using a pilot system for a simulated mass casualty situation during a military field exercise. The system proved to be usable. Compared to the currently used system, it also dramatically improves the general view of mass casualty situations and enhances medical emergency readiness in a military medical setting. The system can also be adapted without any difficulties by the civilian sector for the management of mass casualty disasters.

  16. Assessing the relative effects of emissions, climate means, and variability on large water supply systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whateley, Sarah; Brown, Casey

    2016-11-01

    Some of the greatest societal risks of climate change rise from the potential impacts to water supply. Yet prescribing adaptation policies in the near term is made difficult by the uncertainty in climate projections at relevant spatial scales and the conflating effects of uncertainties in emissions, model error, and internal variability. In this work, a new framework is implemented to explore the vulnerability of reservoir systems in the northeastern U.S. to climate change and attribute vulnerabilities to changes in mean climate, natural variability, or emission scenarios. Analysis of variance is used to explore the contributions of uncertainties to system performance. Diagnosing the relative risks to water supply will help water resource engineers better adapt to uncertain future conditions. The results indicate that uncertainty in water supply system performance can be attributed mostly to uncertainty in internal variability over policy-relevant planning horizons, and thus, adaptation efforts should focus on managing variability.

  17. Algebraic approach for the reconstruction of Rossler system from the x(3)- variable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanez, C. A.

    2006-02-01

    In this paper we propose a simple method to identify the unknown parameters and to estimate the underlying variables from a given chaotic time series {x(3)(t(k)) (k=n)(0) of the three-dimensional Rossler system (RS). The reconstruction of the RS from its x(3-) variable is known to be considerably more difficult than reconstruction from its two other variables. We show that the system is observable and algebraically identifiable with respect to the auxiliary output In(x(3)), hence, a differential parameterization of the output and its time derivatives can be obtained. Based on these facts, we proceed to form an extended re-parameterized system (linear-in-the -parameters), which turns out to be invertible, allowing us to estimate the variables and missing parameters.

  18. Reco level Smin and subsystem Smin: improved global inclusive variables for measuring the new physics mass scale in MET events at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Konar, Partha; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun; /Florida U.

    2011-08-11

    The variable {radical}s{sub min} was originally proposed in [1] as a model-independent, global and fully inclusive measure of the new physics mass scale in missing energy events at hadron colliders. In the original incarnation of {radical}s{sub min}, however, the connection to the new physics mass scale was blurred by the effects of the underlying event, most notably initial state radiation and multiple parton interactions. In this paper we advertize two improved variants of the {radical}s{sub min} variable, which overcome this problem. First we show that by evaluating the {radical}s{sub min} variable at the RECO level, in terms of the reconstructed objects in the event, the effects from the underlying event are significantly diminished and the nice correlation between the peak in the {radical}s{sub min}{sup (reco)} distribution and the new physics mass scale is restored. Secondly, the underlying event problem can be avoided altogether when the {radical}s{sub min} concept is applied to a subsystem of the event which does not involve any QCD jets. We supply an analytic formula for the resulting subsystem {radical}s{sub min}{sup (sub)} variable and show that its peak exhibits the usual correlation with the mass scale of the particles produced in the subsystem. Finally, we contrast {radical}s{sub min} to other popular inclusive variables such as H{sub T}, M{sub Tgen} and M{sub TTgen}. We illustrate our discussion with several examples from supersymmetry, and with dilepton events from top quark pair production.

  19. Mass Measurement Using the Fixed Point of a Spring-Mass System with a Dynamic Vibration Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Ishino, Yuji; Takasaki, Masaya; Mizuno, Takeshi

    A vibration-type measurement system characterized by the use of an undamped dynamic vibration absorber has been developed. However, inevitable damping in the absorber may cause measurement error. A new method of measuring mass is proposed to overcome this problem. The measurement system utilizes the fixed point of a mass-spring system with a dynamic vibration absorber so that the mass is estimated regardless of damping in the absorber. A phase-looked loop (PLL) is used to achieve tuning. The principle of measurement is described on the basis of a mathematical model. A measuring apparatus was designed and fabricated, and several of its basic characteristics were studied experimentally. Damping of the primary system was found to affect fixed point formation. By reducing the damping of the primary system by a voice coil motor, the measurement conditions were achieved. The efficacy of the apparatus was studied both analytically and experimentally. The measurement conditions were realized automatically by the PLL. Mass measurement was performed while the PLL was operated; the average measurement error was within 0.21 [%].

  20. An expert system/ion trap mass spectrometry approach for life support systems monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Wong, Carla M.; Yost, Richard A.; Johnson, Jodie V.; Yates, Nathan A.; Story, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Efforts to develop sensor and control system technology to monitor air quality for life support have resulted in the development and preliminary testing of a concept based on expert systems and ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS). An ITMS instrument provides the capability to identify and quantitate a large number of suspected contaminants at trace levels through the use of a variety of multidimensional experiments. An expert system provides specialized knowledge for control, analysis, and decision making. The system is intended for real-time, on-line, autonomous monitoring of air quality. The key characteristics of the system, performance data and analytical capabilities of the ITMS instrument, the design and operation of the expert system, and results from preliminary testing of the system for trace contaminant monitoring are described.

  1. Improved determination of dynamic balance using the centre of mass and centre of pressure inclination variables in a complete golf swing cycle.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Golf requires proper dynamic balance to accurately control the club head through a harmonious coordination of each human segment and joint. In this study, we evaluated the ability for dynamic balance during a golf swing by using the centre of mass (COM)-centre of pressure (COP) inclination variables. Twelve professional, 13 amateur and 10 novice golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras, two force platforms and SB-Clinic software were used to measure the net COM and COP trajectories. In order to evaluate dynamic balance ability, the COM-COP inclination angle, COM-COP inclination angular velocity and normalised COM-COP inclination angular jerk were used. Professional golfer group revealed a smaller COM-COP inclination angle and angular velocity than novice golfer group in the lead/trail direction (P < 0.01). In the normalised COM-COP inclination angular jerk, the professional golfer group showed a lower value than the other two groups in all directions. Professional golfers tend to exhibit improved dynamic balance, and this can be attributed to the neuromusculoskeletal system that maintains balance with proper postural control. This study has the potential to allow for an evaluation of the dynamic balance mechanism and will provide useful basic information for swing training and prevention of golf injuries.

  2. Optimization of NTP System Truss to Reduce Radiation Shield Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharber, Luke L.; Kharofa, Adam; Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of nuclear thermal propulsion are numerous and relevant to the current NASA mission goals involving but not limited to the crewed missions to mars and the moon. They do however also present new and unique challenges to the design and logistics of launching/operating spacecraft. One of these challenges, relevant to this discussion, is the significant mass of the shielding which is required to ensure an acceptable radiation environment for the spacecraft and crew. Efforts to reduce shielding mass are difficult to accomplish from material and geometric design points of the shield itself, however by increasing the distance between the nuclear engines and the main body of the spacecraft the required mass of the shielding is lessened considerably. The mass can be reduced significantly per unit length, though any additional mass added by the structure to create this distance serves to offset those savings, thus the design of a lightweight structure is ideal. The challenges of designing the truss are bounded by several limiting factors including; the loading conditions, the capabilities of the launch vehicle, and achieving the ideal truss length when factoring for the overall mass reduced. Determining the overall set of mass values for a truss of varying length is difficult since to maintain an optimally designed truss the geometry of the truss or its members must change. Thus the relation between truss mass and length for these loading scenarios is not linear, and instead has relation determined by the truss design. In order to establish a mass versus length trend for various truss designs to compare with the mass saved from the shield versus length, optimization software was used to find optimal geometric properties that still met the design requirements at established lengths. By solving for optimal designs at various lengths, mass trends could be determined. The initial design findings show a clear benefit to extending the engines as far from the main

  3. Melatonin in Plants and Plant Culture Systems: Variability, Stability and Efficient Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Erland, Lauren A. E.; Chattopadhyay, Abhishek; Jones, Andrew Maxwell P.; Saxena, Praveen K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing evidence of the importance of melatonin and serotonin in the plant life, there is still much debate over the stability of melatonin, with extraction and analysis methods varying greatly from lab to lab with respect to time, temperature, light levels, extraction solvents, and mechanical disruption. The variability in methodology has created conflicting results that confound the comparison of studies to determine the role of melatonin in plant physiology. We here describe a fully validated method for the quantification of melatonin, serotonin and their biosynthetic precursors: tryptophan, tryptamine and N-acetylserotonin by liquid chromatography single quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in diverse plant species and tissues. This method can be performed on a simple and inexpensive platform, and is both rapid and simple to implement. The method has excellent reproducibility and acceptable sensitivity with percent relative standard deviation (%RSD) in all matrices between 1 and 10% and recovery values of 82–113% for all analytes. Instrument detection limits were 24.4 ng/mL, 6.10 ng/mL, 1.52 ng/mL, 6.10 ng/mL, and 95.3 pg/mL, for serotonin, tryptophan, tryptamine, N-acetylserotonin and melatonin respectively. Method detection limits were 1.62 μg/g, 0.407 μg/g, 0.101 μg/g, 0.407 μg/g, and 6.17 ng/g respectively. The optimized method was then utilized to examine the issue of variable stability of melatonin in plant tissue culture systems. Media composition (Murashige and Skoog, Driver and Kuniyuki walnut or Lloyd and McCown's woody plant medium) and light (16 h photoperiod or dark) were found to have no effect on melatonin or serotonin content. A Youden trial suggested temperature as a major factor leading to degradation of melatonin. Both melatonin and serotonin appeared to be stable across the first 10 days in media, melatonin losses reached a mean minimum degradation at 28 days of approximately 90%; serotonin reached a mean minimum value of

  4. Melatonin in Plants and Plant Culture Systems: Variability, Stability and Efficient Quantification.

    PubMed

    Erland, Lauren A E; Chattopadhyay, Abhishek; Jones, Andrew Maxwell P; Saxena, Praveen K

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing evidence of the importance of melatonin and serotonin in the plant life, there is still much debate over the stability of melatonin, with extraction and analysis methods varying greatly from lab to lab with respect to time, temperature, light levels, extraction solvents, and mechanical disruption. The variability in methodology has created conflicting results that confound the comparison of studies to determine the role of melatonin in plant physiology. We here describe a fully validated method for the quantification of melatonin, serotonin and their biosynthetic precursors: tryptophan, tryptamine and N-acetylserotonin by liquid chromatography single quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in diverse plant species and tissues. This method can be performed on a simple and inexpensive platform, and is both rapid and simple to implement. The method has excellent reproducibility and acceptable sensitivity with percent relative standard deviation (%RSD) in all matrices between 1 and 10% and recovery values of 82-113% for all analytes. Instrument detection limits were 24.4 ng/mL, 6.10 ng/mL, 1.52 ng/mL, 6.10 ng/mL, and 95.3 pg/mL, for serotonin, tryptophan, tryptamine, N-acetylserotonin and melatonin respectively. Method detection limits were 1.62 μg/g, 0.407 μg/g, 0.101 μg/g, 0.407 μg/g, and 6.17 ng/g respectively. The optimized method was then utilized to examine the issue of variable stability of melatonin in plant tissue culture systems. Media composition (Murashige and Skoog, Driver and Kuniyuki walnut or Lloyd and McCown's woody plant medium) and light (16 h photoperiod or dark) were found to have no effect on melatonin or serotonin content. A Youden trial suggested temperature as a major factor leading to degradation of melatonin. Both melatonin and serotonin appeared to be stable across the first 10 days in media, melatonin losses reached a mean minimum degradation at 28 days of approximately 90%; serotonin reached a mean minimum value of

  5. Inclusive photoproduction of bottom quarks for low and medium pT in the general-mass variable-flavour-number scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G.; Spiesberger, H.

    2016-02-01

    We present predictions for b-quark production in photoproduction and compare with experimental data from HERA. Our theoretical predictions are obtained at next-to-leading-order in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme, an approach which takes into account the finite mass of the b quarks. We use realistic evolved nonperturbative fragmentation functions obtained from fits to e+e- data. We find in general good agreement of data with both the GM-VFNS and the FFNS calculations, while the more precise ZEUS data seem to prefer the GM-VFNS predictions.

  6. On Diffusion of Chemically Reactive Species in a Convective Flow Past an Inclined Plate with Variable Surface Temperature and Variable Mass Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirubavathi, J. D.; Palani, G.

    2016-12-01

    A numerical solution of a transient natural convection flow past a semi-infinite inclined plate under the combined buoyancy effects of heat and mass transfer along with chemical reaction is presented herewith. The governing boundary layer equations for the above flow problem for a first order homogeneous chemical reaction are set up and non-dimensionalised. An implicit finite difference method is employed to solve the unsteady, nonlinear, integro and coupled partial differential equation. Numerical results are presented for various parameters occurring in the problem. The unsteady velocity, temperature and concentration profiles, local and average skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are studied for both a generative and destructive reaction.

  7. Electronic drive and acquisition system for mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Rembrandt Thomas (Inventor); Mojarradi, Mohammad (Inventor); Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Darrach, Murray R. (Inventor); MacAskill, John (Inventor); Tran, Tuan (Inventor); Burke, Gary R. (Inventor); Madzunkov, Stojan M. (Inventor); Blaes, Brent R. (Inventor); Thomas, John L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention discloses a mixed signal RF drive electronics board that offers small, low power, reliable, and customizable method for driving and generating mass spectra from a mass spectrometer, and for control of other functions such as electron ionizer, ion focusing, single-ion detection, multi-channel data accumulation and, if desired, front-end interfaces such as pumps, valves, heaters, and columns.

  8. The Universal “Heartbeat” Oscillations in Black Hole Systems Across the Mass-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qingwen; Czerny, Bozena; Grzedzielski, Mikolaj; Janiuk, Agnieszka; Gu, Wei-Min; Dong, Ai-jun; Cao, Xiao-Feng; You, Bei; Yan, Zhen; Sun, Mou-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    The hyperluminous X-ray source (HLX-1, peak X-ray luminosity ˜ {10}42 {erg} {{{s}}}-1) near the spiral galaxy ESO 243-49, which underwent recurrent outbursts within a period of ˜400 days, is possibly the best candidate for an intermediate mass black hole (IMBH). The physical reason for this quasiperiodic variability is still unclear. We explore the possibility of radiation-pressure instability in the accretion disk by modeling the light curve of HLX-1, and find that it can roughly reproduce the duration, period, and amplitude of the recurrent outbursts in HLX-1 with an IMBH of ˜ {10}5 {M}⊙ . Our result provides a possible mechanism to explain the recurrent outbursts in HLX-1. We further find a universal correlation between the outburst duration and the bolometric luminosity for the black hole (BH) sources with a very broad mass range (e.g., X-ray binaries, HLX-1, and active galactic nuclei), which is roughly consistent with the prediction of radiation-pressure instability of the accretion disk. These results imply that “heartbeat” oscillations triggered by radiation-pressure instability may appear in different-scale BH systems.

  9. Lipidomics: a mass spectrometry based, systems level analysis of cellular lipids

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Milne, Stephen B.; Myers, David S.; Brown, H. Alex

    2009-01-01

    Lipidomics is a logical outcome of the history and traditions of lipid biochemistry and advances in mass spectrometry are at the heart of a renaissance in understanding the roles of lipids in cellular functions. Our desire to understand the complexity of lipids in biology has led to new techniques that allow us to identify over 1000 phospholipids in mammalian cell types and tissues. Improvements in chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry have positioned us to determine not only the lipid composition (i.e., parts list) of cells and tissues, but also address questions regarding lipid substrates and products that previously overwhelmed traditional analytical technologies. In the decade since lipidomics was conceived much of the efforts have been on new methodologies, development of computer programs to decipher the gigabytes of raw data, and struggling with the highly variable nature of biological systems where absolute quantities of a given metabolite may be less important than its relative change in concentration. It is clear that the technology is now sufficiently developed to address fundamental questions about the roles of lipids in cellular signaling and metabolic pathways. PMID:19744877

  10. Body mass, fat percentage, and fat free mass as reference variables for lung function: effects on terms for age and sex

    PubMed Central

    Cotes, J; Chinn, D; Reed, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Sex specific cross sectional reference values for lung function indices usually employ a linear model with terms for age and stature. The effects of also matching for body mass index (BMI= mass/stature2) or its components, fat percentage of body mass (fat%) and fat free mass index (FFMI = fat free mass/stature2) were studied.
METHODS—The subjects were 458 asymptomatic male and female non-smokers (383 men) and 22 female ex-smokers. Measurements were made of ventilatory capacity, lung volumes, transfer factor (diffusing capacity, single breath CO method), and body composition (skinfold method). Linear and proportional regression models were used.
RESULTS—Terms for fat% and FFMI significantly improved the accuracy of reference values for all the primary lung function indices. The improvements in subjects with atypical physiques (fat% and FFMI at the ends of the distributions for the subjects) were in the range 0.3-2.3 SD compared with conventional regression equations. The new partial regression coefficients on age were independent of age related changes in body fat. The coefficient for total lung capacity (TLC) on age in men was now positive. Most differences between the sexes were eliminated. A term for BMI improved the descriptions of subdivisions of TLC but lacked the other advantages.
CONCLUSION—Allowance for fat% and FFMI increases the accuracy of reference equations for lung function, particularly for subjects with a lot of fat and little muscle or vice versa. Allowance for BMI is less informative.

 PMID:11641507

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF A WIDE, LOW-MASS MULTIPLE SYSTEM CONTAINING THE BROWN DWARF 2MASS J0850359+105716

    SciTech Connect

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Bochanski, John J.; Looper, Dagny L.; West, Andrew A.; Van der Bliek, Nicole S.

    2011-03-15

    We report our discovery of NLTT 20346 as an M5+M6 companion system to the tight binary (or triple) L dwarf 2MASS J0850359+105716. This nearby ({approx}31 pc), widely separated ({approx}7700 AU) quadruple system was identified through a cross-match of proper motion catalogs. Follow-up imaging and spectroscopy of NLTT 20346 revealed it to be a magnetically active M5+M6 binary with components separated by {approx}2'' (50-80 AU). Optical spectroscopy of the components shows only moderate H{alpha} emission corresponding to a statistical age of {approx}5-7 Gyr for both M dwarfs. However, NLTT 20346 is associated with the XMM-Newton source J085018.9+105644, and based on X-ray activity the age of NLTT 20346 is between 250 and 450 Myr. Strong Li absorption in the optical spectrum of 2MASS J0850+1057 indicates an upper age limit of 0.8-1.5 Gyr, favoring the younger age for the primary. Using evolutionary models in combination with an adopted system age of 0.25-1.5 Gyr indicates a total mass for 2MASS J0850+1057 of 0.07 {+-} 0.02 M{sub sun}, if it is a binary. NLTT 20346/2MASS J0850+1057 joins a growing list of hierarchical systems containing brown dwarf binaries and is among the lowest binding energy associations found in the field. Formation simulations via gravitational fragmentation of massive extended disks have successfully produced a specific analog to this system.

  12. Observation of Fe(V)=O using variable-temperature mass spectrometry and its enzyme-like C-H and C=C oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, Irene; Mathieson, Jennifer S.; Güell, Mireia; Ribas, Xavi; Luis, Josep M.; Cronin, Leroy; Costas, Miquel

    2011-10-01

    Oxo-transfer chemistry mediated by iron underpins many biological processes and today is emerging as synthetically very important for the catalytic oxidation of C-H and C=C moieties that are hard to activate conventionally. Despite the vast amount of research in this area, experimental characterization of the reactive species under catalytic conditions is very limited, although a Fe(V)=O moiety was postulated. Here we show, using variable-temperature mass spectrometry, the generation of a Fe(V)=O species within a synthetic non-haem complex at -40 °C and its reaction with an olefin. Also, with isotopic labelling we were able both to follow oxygen-atom transfer from H2O2/H2O through Fe(V)=O to the products and to probe the reactivity as a function of temperature. This study pioneers the implementation of variable-temperature mass spectrometry to investigate reactive intermediates.

  13. Diagnostic variability for schizophrenia and major depression in a large public mental health care system dataset.

    PubMed

    Folsom, David P; Lindamer, Laurie; Montross, Lori P; Hawthorne, William; Golshan, Shahrokh; Hough, Richard; Shale, John; Jeste, Dilip V

    2006-11-15

    Administrative datasets can provide information about mental health treatment in real world settings; however, an important limitation in using these datasets is the uncertainty regarding psychiatric diagnosis. To better understand the psychiatric diagnoses, we investigated the diagnostic variability of schizophrenia and major depression in a large public mental health system. Using schizophrenia and major depression as the two comparison diagnoses, we compared the variability of diagnoses assigned to patients with one recorded diagnosis of schizophrenia or major depression. In addition, for both of these diagnoses, the diagnostic variability was compared across seven types of treatment settings. Statistical analyses were conducted using t tests for continuous data and chi-square tests for categorical data. We found that schizophrenia had greater diagnostic variability than major depression (31% vs. 43%). For both schizophrenia and major depression, variability was significantly higher in jail and the emergency psychiatric unit than in inpatient or outpatient settings. These findings demonstrate that the variability of psychiatric diagnoses recorded in the administrative dataset of a large public mental health system varies by diagnosis and by treatment setting. Further research is needed to clarify the relationship between psychiatric diagnosis, diagnostic variability and treatment setting.

  14. Minimum fuel control of a vehicle with a continuously variable transmission. [control system simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burghart, J. H.; Donoghue, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    The design and evaluation of a control system for a sedan with a heat engine and a continuously variable transmission, is considered in a effort to minimize fuel consumption and achieve satisfactory dynamic response of vehicle variables as the vehicle is driven over a standard driving cycle. Even though the vehicle system was highly nonlinear, attention was restricted to linear control algorithms which could be easily understood and implemented demonstrated by simulation. Simulation results also revealed that the vehicle could exhibit unexpected dynamic behavior which must be taken into account in any control system design.

  15. Description and test results of a variable speed, constant frequency generating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, F. J.

    1985-12-01

    The variable-speed, constant frequency generating system developed for the Mod-0 wind turbine is presented. This report describes the system as it existed at the conclusion of the project. The cycloconverter control circuit is described including the addition of field-oriented control. The laboratory test and actual wind turbine test results are included.

  16. Factors Affecting Relationships between the Contextual Variables and the Information Characteristics of Accounting Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choe, Jong-Min; Lee, Jinjoo

    1993-01-01

    Reports on a study of accounting information systems that explored the interactions among influence factors (e.g., user participation in the development process, top management support, capability of information systems personnel, and existence of steering committees), contextual variables (e.g., organizational structure and task characteristics),…

  17. Variability in Chinese as a Foreign Language Learners' Development of the Chinese Numeral Classifier System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jie; Lu, Xiaofei

    2013-01-01

    This study examined variability in Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL) learners' development of the Chinese numeral classifier system from a dynamic systems approach. Our data consisted of a longitudinal corpus of 657 essays written by CFL learners at lower and higher intermediate levels and a corpus of 100 essays written by native speakers (NSs)…

  18. FUZZY LOGIC BASED INTELLIGENT CONTROL OF A VARIABLE SPEED CAGE MACHINE WIND GENERATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a variable-speed wind generation system where fuzzy logic principles are used to optimize efficiency and enhance performance control. A squirrel cage induction generator feeds the power to a double-sided pulse width modulated converter system which either pump...

  19. Assessing application uniformity of a variable rate irrigation system in a windy location

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable rate irrigation (VRI) systems are commercially available and can easily be retrofitted onto moving sprinkler systems. However, there are few reports on the application performance of such equipment. In this study, application uniformity of two center pivots equipped with a commercial VRI sy...

  20. Description and test results of a variable speed, constant frequency generating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    The variable-speed, constant frequency generating system developed for the Mod-0 wind turbine is presented. This report describes the system as it existed at the conclusion of the project. The cycloconverter control circuit is described including the addition of field-oriented control. The laboratory test and actual wind turbine test results are included.

  1. Controlling chaos in some laser systems via variable coupling and feedback time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahverdiev, E. M.

    2016-09-01

    We study numerically a system of two lasers cross-coupled optoelectronically with a time delay where the output intensity of each laser modulates the pump current of the other laser. We demonstrate control of chaos via variable coupling time delay by converting the laser intensity chaos to the steady-state. We also show that wavelength chaos in an electrically tunable distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diode with a feedback loop that can be controlled via variable feedback time delay.

  2. Development of a multicomponent film diffusion controlled mixed bed ion exchange column model applicable to variable influent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussey, Dennis Frank

    2000-10-01

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was to develop a generalized rate model to handle multicomponent mixed-bed ion exchange (MBIE) with multivalent dissociative species and variable influent conditions. To achieve this goal, mass transfer mechanisms of weak electrolytes in ion exchange column have been studied; and based on which, rate expressions for weak electrolyte transfer have been proposed. In addition, the column material balance has been derived in terms of the constituent species concentrations only. Finally, generalized dissociation equilibrium equations for several types of weak electrolyte constituents were implemented, and the effluent concentrations were determined by solving column material balance equations along with the rate expressions. Findings and conclusions. The mixed bed ion exchange column model has been successfully programmed into a computer program and is capable of predicting the effluent concentration histories, dynamic resin loading, solution, and rate profiles. The column material balance has been satisfied to within 1% for all chemistries studied. The model is capable of simulating variable influent contaminant concentrations and flow rates by sequentially using the loading profiles of previous simulations. The model maintains electroneutrality at all times. Dissociative species transfer is adequate for many systems, but additional work is required to incorporate molecular constituent mass transfer.

  3. Variability of aerosol, gaseous pollutants and meteorological characteristics associated with changes in air mass origin at the SW Atlantic coast of Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diesch, J.-M.; Drewnick, F.; Zorn, S. R.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Martinez, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2012-04-01

    . In all air masses passing the continent the organic aerosol fraction dominated the total NR-PM1. For this reason, using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) four organic aerosol (OA) classes that can be associated with various aerosol sources and components were identified: a highly-oxygenated OA is the major component (43% OA) while semi-volatile OA accounts for 23%. A hydrocarbon-like OA mainly resulting from industries, traffic and shipping emissions as well as particles from wood burning emissions also contribute to total OA and depend on the air mass origin. A significant variability of ozone was observed that depends on the impact of different air mass types and solar radiation.

  4. Sixth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies Held in Cooperation with the Fifteenth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This document contains copies of those technical papers received in time for publication prior to the Sixth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies which is being held in cooperation with the Fifteenth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems at the University of Maryland-University College Inn and Conference Center March 23-26, 1998. As one of an ongoing series, this Conference continues to provide a forum for discussion of issues relevant to the management of large volumes of data. The Conference encourages all interested organizations to discuss long term mass storage requirements and experiences in fielding solutions. Emphasis is on current and future practical solutions addressing issues in data management, storage systems and media, data acquisition, long term retention of data, and data distribution. This year's discussion topics include architecture, tape optimization, new technology, performance, standards, site reports, vendor solutions. Tutorials will be available on shared file systems, file system backups, data mining, and the dynamics of obsolescence.

  5. The effect of pose variability and repeated reliability of segmental centres of mass acquisition when using 3D photonic scanning.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chuang-Yuan; Pease, David L; Sanders, Ross H

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic scanning is an emerging technique to acquire accurate body segment parameter data. This study established the repeated reliability of segmental centres of mass when using 3D photonic scanning (3DPS). Seventeen male participants were scanned twice by a 3D whole-body laser scanner. The same operators conducted the reconstruction and segmentation processes to obtain segmental meshes for calculating the segmental centres of mass. The segmental centres of mass obtained from repeated 3DPS were compared by relative technical error of measurement (TEM). Hypothesis tests were conducted to determine the size of change required for each segment to be determined a true variation. The relative TEMs for all segments were less than 5%. The relative changes in centres of mass at ±1.5% for most segments can be detected (p < 0.05). The arm segments which are difficult to keep in the same scanning pose generated more error than other segments. Practitioner Summary: Three-dimensional photonic scanning is an emerging technique to acquire body segment parameter data. This study established the repeated reliability of segmental centres of mass when using 3D photonic scanning and emphasised that the error for arm segments need to be considered while using this technique to acquire centres of mass.

  6. Two-body coordinate system generation using body-fitted coordinate system and complex variable transformation. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    Attempts are made to generate acceptable coordinate systems for two-body configurations. The first method to be tried was to use the body-fitted coordinate system technique to obtain the best system. This technique alone did not produce very good results, so another approach was investigated. This new approach involved using a combination of the body fitted coordinate system procedure and a complex variable transformation method that was used successfully in conformal mapping.

  7. Backstepping synchronization of uncertain chaotic systems by a single driving variable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ling; Zhang, Qing-Ling; Guo, Zhi-An

    2008-02-01

    In this paper a parameter observer and a synchronization controller are designed to synchronize unknown chaotic systems with diverse structures. Based on stability theory the structures of the observer and the controller are presented. The unknown Coullet system and Rossler system are taken for examples to demonstrate that the method is effective and feasible. The artificial simulation results show that global synchronization between the unknown Coullet system and the Rossler system can be achieved by a single driving variable with co-operation of the observer and the controller, and all parameters of the Coullet system can be identified at the same time.

  8. Model-Driven Development of Decision Support Systems: Tackling the Variability Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabello, María Eugenia; Ramos, Isidro

    In this chapter, we present software variability management using conceptual models for diagnostic decision support information systems (DSS) development. We use a software product line (SPL) approach. In the construction of the SPL, two orthogonal variabilities are used to capture domain (i.e., diagnosis) and application domain (i.e., medical diagnosis) particularities. In this context, we describe how variability is managed by using our BOM (baseline-oriented modeling) approach. BOM is a framework that automatically generates applications as PRISMA software architectural models using model transformations and SPL techniques. We use model-driven architecture (MDA) to build domain models (i.e., computational-independent models, CIMs), which are automatically transformed into platform-independent models, PIMs, and then compiled to a executable application (i.e., platform-specific model, PSM). In order to illustrate BOM, we focus on a type of information system, the decision support system, specifically in the diagnostic domain.

  9. Optimal control of singularly perturbed nonlinear systems with state-variable inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Corban, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    The established necessary conditions for optimality in nonlinear control problems that involve state-variable inequality constraints are applied to a class of singularly perturbed systems. The distinguishing feature of this class of two-time-scale systems is a transformation of the state-variable inequality constraint, present in the full order problem, to a constraint involving states and controls in the reduced problem. It is shown that, when a state constraint is active in the reduced problem, the boundary layer problem can be of finite time in the stretched time variable. Thus, the usual requirement for asymptotic stability of the boundary layer system is not applicable, and cannot be used to construct approximate boundary layer solutions. Several alternative solution methods are explored and illustrated with simple examples.

  10. Coping with Variability in Model-Based Systems Engineering: An Experience in Green Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Salvador; Garate, Jose Miguel; Lopez-Herrejon, Roberto Erick; Mendialdua, Xabier; Rosado, Albert; Egyed, Alexander; Krueger, Charles W.; de Sosa, Josune

    Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is an emerging engineering discipline whose driving motivation is to provide support throughout the entire system life cycle. MBSE not only addresses the engineering of software systems but also their interplay with physical systems. Quite frequently, successful systems need to be customized to cater for the concrete and specific needs of customers, end-users, and other stakeholders. To effectively meet this demand, it is vital to have in place mechanisms to cope with the variability, the capacity to change, that such customization requires. In this paper we describe our experience in modeling variability using SysML, a leading MBSE language, for developing a product line of wind turbine systems used for the generation of electricity.

  11. Viewing Events in the Center-of-Mass System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruby, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    In elementary physics, collisions are usually studied by employing the conservation of momentum, and sometimes also the conservation of kinetic energy. However, in nuclear reactions, changes of mass that complicate the situation often occur. To illustrate the latter, we shall cite two examples of endoergic nuclear reactions, i.e., those for which…

  12. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Joseph R.; Amlôt, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS). The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing) of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit. PMID:23202768

  13. Modelling mass casualty decontamination systems informed by field exercise data.

    PubMed

    Egan, Joseph R; Amlôt, Richard

    2012-10-16

    In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS). The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing) of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit.

  14. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  15. AeroPropulsoServoElasticity: Dynamic Modeling of the Variable Cycle Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2012-01-01

    This presentation was made at the 2012 Fundamental Aeronautics Program Technical Conference and it covers research work for the Dynamic Modeling of the Variable cycle Propulsion System that was done under the Supersonics Project, in the area of AeroPropulsoServoElasticity. The presentation covers the objective for the propulsion system dynamic modeling work, followed by the work that has been done so far to model the variable Cycle Engine, modeling of the inlet, the nozzle, the modeling that has been done to model the affects of flow distortion, and finally presenting some concluding remarks and future plans.

  16. The RenewElec Project: Variable Renewable Energy and the Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Apt, Jay

    2014-02-14

    Variable energy resources, such as wind power, now produce about 4% of U.S. electricity. They can play a significantly expanded role if the U.S. adopts a systems approach that considers affordability, security and reliability. Reaching a 20-30% renewable portfolio standard goal is possible, but not without changes in the management and regulation of the power system, including accurately assessing and preparing for the operational effects of renewable generation. The RenewElec project will help the nation make the transition to the use of significant amounts of electric generation from variable and intermittent sources of renewable power.

  17. Using expert systems to implement a semantic data model of a large mass storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelofs, Larry H.; Campbell, William J.

    1990-01-01

    The successful development of large volume data storage systems will depend not only on the ability of the designers to store data, but on the ability to manage such data once it is in the system. The hypothesis is that mass storage data management can only be implemented successfully based on highly intelligent meta data management services. There now exists a proposed mass store system standard proposed by the IEEE that addresses many of the issues related to the storage of large volumes of data, however, the model does not consider a major technical issue, namely the high level management of stored data. However, if the model were expanded to include the semantics and pragmatics of the data domain using a Semantic Data Model (SDM) concept, the result would be data that is expressive of the Intelligent Information Fusion (IIF) concept and also organized and classified in context to its use and purpose. The results are presented of a demonstration prototype SDM implemented using the expert system development tool NEXPERT OBJECT. In the prototype, a simple instance of a SDM was created to support a hypothetical application for the Earth Observing System, Data Information System (EOSDIS). The massive amounts of data that EOSDIS will manage requires the definition and design of a powerful information management system in order to support even the most basic needs of the project. The application domain is characterized by a semantic like network that represents the data content and the relationships between the data based on user views and the more generalized domain architectural view of the information world. The data in the domain are represented by objects that define classes, types and instances of the data. In addition, data properties are selectively inherited between parent and daughter relationships in the domain. Based on the SDM a simple information system design is developed from the low level data storage media, through record management and meta data

  18. The Attributes of a Variable-Diameter Rotor System Applied to Civil Tiltrotor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brender, Scott; Mark, Hans; Aguilera, Frank

    1996-01-01

    The attributes of a variable diameter rotor concept applied to civil tiltrotor aircraft are investigated using the V/STOL aircraft sizing and performance computer program (VASCOMP). To begin, civil tiltrotor viability issues that motivate advanced rotor designs are discussed. Current work on the variable diameter rotor and a theoretical basis for the advantages of the rotor system are presented. The size and performance of variable diameter and conventional tiltrotor designs for the same baseline mission are then calculated using a modified NASA Ames version of VASCOMP. The aircraft are compared based on gross weight, fuel required, engine size, and autorotative performance for various hover disk loading values. Conclusions about the viability of the resulting designs are presented and a program for further variable diameter rotor research is recommended.

  19. Control design variable linking for optimization of structural/control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Ik Min; Schmit, Lucien A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented to integrate the design space of structural/control system optimization problems in the case of linear state feedback control. Conventional structural sizing variables and elements of the feedback gain matrix are both treated as strictly independent design variables in optimization by extending design variable linking concepts to the control gains. Several approximation concepts including new control design variable linking schemes are used to formulate the integrated structural/control optimization problem as a sequence of explicit nonlinear mathematical programming problems. Examples which involve a variety of behavior constraints, including constraints on dynamic stability, damped frequencies, control effort, peak transient displacement, acceleration, and control force limits, are effectively solved by using the method presented.

  20. A study of engine variable geometry systems for an advanced high subsonic long range commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compagnon, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Several variable geometry high Mach inlet concepts, aimed at meeting a system noise objective of 15 EPNdB below FAR part 36, for a long range, Mach 0.9 advanced commercial transport are assessed and compared to a fixed geometry inlet with multiple splitters. The effects of a variable exhaust nozzle (mixed exhaust engine) on noise, inlet geometry requirements, and economics are also presented. The best variable geometry inlet configuration identified is a variable cowl design which relies on a high throat Mach number for additional inlet noise suppression only at takeoff, and depends entirely on inlet wall treatment for noise suppression at approach power. Relative economic penalties as a function of noise level are also presented.